Sample records for samples marine recreational

  1. Sports, Recreation, & Leisure Sample Occupations

    E-print Network

    Ronquist, Fredrik

    Sports, Recreation, & Leisure Sample Occupations Academic Advisor/Athletes Agent, Business/Aerobics Instructor Gaming/Sports Book Writer Golf Course Superintendent Guide Gymnastics/Tumbling Director Health Recreation Leader Recreation Manager Scout Soccer Player Special Education Teacher Sports Agent Sports

  2. 75 FR 67948 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Marine Recreational Information Program (Marine...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-04

    ...Marine Recreational Fisheries Statistics Survey) AGENCY: National...Marine Recreational Fisheries Statistics Survey. MRIP is testing alternative...timeliness of recreational fishing statistics. II. Method of Collection...Individuals or households, business or other for- profit...

  3. The Management of Inshore Marine Recreational Fishing in Japan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kenneth Ruddle; Shio Segi

    2006-01-01

    Despite a long history and great popularity, marine recreational fishing in Japan is unmanaged above the local level. Although basic rules govern usage, there is neither exclusive authority nor a recreational fishing right, little monitoring, and weak sanctions. The institutional structure of recreational fishing management and its legal framework are examined, and the current status of management analyzed in terms

  4. 78 FR 77431 - Appointments to a Recreational Fisheries Working Group by the Marine Fisheries Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-23

    ...Appointments to a Recreational Fisheries Working Group by the Marine Fisheries Advisory...appointment to a Recreational Fisheries Working Group of the Marine Fisheries Advisory...MAFAC established a Recreational Fisheries Working Group (RFWG) in 2010, to assist...

  5. 77 FR 73433 - Appointments to a Recreational Fisheries Working Group by the Marine Fisheries Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-10

    ...Appointments to a Recreational Fisheries Working Group by the Marine Fisheries Advisory...appointment to a Recreational Fisheries Working Group of the Marine Fisheries Advisory...MAFAC established a Recreational Fisheries Working Group (RFWG) in 2010, to assist...

  6. Recreational impacts on the fauna of Australian coastal marine ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Hardiman, Nigel; Burgin, Shelley

    2010-11-01

    This paper reviews recent research into the ecological impacts of recreation and tourism on coastal marine fauna in Australia. Despite the high and growing importance of water-based recreation to the Australian economy, and the known fragility of many Australian ecosystems, there has been relatively limited research into the effects of marine tourism and recreation, infrastructure and activities, on aquatic resources. In this paper we have reviewed the ecological impacts on fauna that are caused by outdoor recreation (including tourism) in Australian coastal marine ecosystems. We predict that the single most potentially severe impact of recreation may be the introduction and/or dispersal of non-indigenous species of marine organisms by recreational vessels. Such introductions, together with other impacts due to human activities have the potential to increasingly degrade recreation destinations. In response, governments have introduced a wide range of legislative tools (e.g., impact assessment, protected area reservation) to manage the recreational industry. It would appear, however, that these instruments are not always appropriately applied. PMID:20615603

  7. Marine Habitat Enhancement and Urban Recreational Fishing in Washington

    E-print Network

    Otms of fishery technology for improving ur ban recreational fishing in the Puget Sound region (Fig. J). Both fishing in Puget Sound. Fhl? enhanced areas were designed and sited to del'elnp hinlogi· calli proc"ss was b£lI'ed (In 28 west marine waters has been synony- mous with fishing for Pacific salmon

  8. SCHROEDER AND LOVE.: RECREATIONAL FISHING AND MARINE FISH POPULATIONS CalCOFI Rep., Vol. 43, 2002

    E-print Network

    Love, Milton

    SCHROEDER AND LOVE.: RECREATIONAL FISHING AND MARINE FISH POPULATIONS CalCOFI Rep., Vol. 43, 2002 RECREATIONAL FISHING AND MARINE FISH POPULATIONS IN CALIFORNIA DONNA M. SCHROEDER AND MILTON S. LOVE Marine@lifesci.ucsb.edu ABSTRACT We present and review information regarding recre- ational angling and exploited marine fish

  9. Recreational scuba-diving and carrying capacity in marine protected areas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Derrin Davis; Clem Tisdell

    1995-01-01

    Marine protected areas (MPAs) are declared principally to protect biological and environmental values in areas where such values are special. The declaration of MPAs is well accepted and widely used in a number of countries. Many recreation pursuits rely heavily upon marine resources, and marine-based tourism is growing at a significant rate. Scuba-diving is one recreational pursuit which is experiencing

  10. SAMPLING DESIGN FOR ASSESSING RECREATIONAL WATER QUALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current U.S. EPA guidelines for monitoring recreatoinal water quality refer to the geometric mean density of indicator organisms, enterococci and E. coli in marine and fresh water, respectively, from at least five samples collected over a four-week period. In order to expand thi...

  11. Authorized Course of Instruction for the Quinmester Program. Science: Introduction to Marine Science; Recreation and the Sea; Oceanography; Marine Ecology of South Florida, and Invertebrate Marine Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    All five units, developed for the Dade County Florida Quinmester Program, included in this collection concern some aspect of marine studies. Except for "Recreation and the Sea," intended to give students basic seamanship skills and experience of other marine recreation, all units are designed for students with a background in biology or chemistry.…

  12. POLICY PERSPECTIVE Coral reef quality and recreation fees in marine protected areas

    E-print Network

    Gerber, Leah R.

    , La Jolla, CA 92037, USA Keywords Coral reefs; diving; economics; financing; management; marine for diving in MPAs, but an excessive reliance on tourism for funding MPA management could expose coral reefsPOLICY PERSPECTIVE Coral reef quality and recreation fees in marine protected areas Jeffrey Wielgus

  13. THE EMPACT BEACHES: A CASE STUDY IN RECREATIONAL WATER SAMPLING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Various chapters describe sample and experimental design, use of a geometric mean or an arithmetic mean, modeling and forecasting, and risk assessment in relation to monitoring recreational waters for fecal indicators. All of these aspects of monitoring are dependent on the spat...

  14. Incorporating Recreational Users into Marine Protected Area Planning: A Study of Recreational Boating in British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Darcy L.; Canessa, Rosaline; Rollins, Rick; Keller, C. Peter; Dearden, Philip

    2010-08-01

    Marine protected areas (MPAs) and zoning plans require an understanding of stakeholders if they are to be successful at achieving social and biological objectives. This study examines recreational boaters in a proposed MPA in British Columbia, Canada, using the recreation opportunity spectrum (ROS) and models of recreation conflict as a basis for investigation. Boaters ( n = 543) visiting the region during the summer completed face-to-face surveys. Results show variability in boater setting preferences, supporting an ROS-based approach to MPA planning and zoning. While boaters as a whole placed the greatest importance on natural settings, sailboat operators expressed stronger preferences for natural and quiet settings relative to motorboats, and motorboat operators expressed stronger preferences for settings characterized by built facilities and extractive activities relative to sailboats. Several marine activities emerged as sources of perceived conflict for boaters, including personal watercraft, commercial whale watching vessels, and shellfish aquaculture. Our analysis indicates that while some of these may be addressed through zoning, others are better addressed through education and communication. Recommendations for both MPA management and future research are made.

  15. 78 FR 20296 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Marine Recreational Information Program Fishing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-04

    ...National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Fisheries has designed and tested new approaches for sampling and surveying recreational anglers. Revision: A mail survey that samples from residential address frames and collects information on...

  16. Marine recreation and public health microbiology: quest for the ideal indicator

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffin, Dale W.; Lipp, Erin K.; McLaughlin, Molly R.; Rose, Joan B.

    2001-01-01

    Four-fifths of the population of the United States live in close proximity to the oceans or Great Lakes, and approximately 100 million Americans use the marine environment for recreation each year (Thurman 1994). Consequently, contamination of lakes, rivers, and coastal waters raises significant public health issues. Among the leading sources of chemical and biological contamination of these waters and associated beaches are sewer systems, septic tanks, stormwater runoff, industrial wastes, wastewater injection wells, cesspits, animal wastes, commercial and private boat wastes, and human recreation. In 1997, 649 beach closings or advisories were caused by sewage spills and overflows (NRDC 1998). In Florida alone, approximately 500 million gallons of sewage were released along the coast each year during the late 1980s (Neshyba 1987). Thus one of the primary concerns in public health is the risk that humans using the marine environment for recreational activities will encounter microbial pathogens.

  17. Tourist perception of recreational environment and management in a marine protected area

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. Petrosillo; G. Zurlini; M. E. Corlianò; N. Zaccarelli; M. Dadamo

    2007-01-01

    A person's socio-economic status, cultural ties, and past experiences influence how people perceive environmental quality. In the case of tourism, people using protected areas can differ in many ways, including their personal characteristics and perception about the recreation environment. This research addresses the general problem of tourist perception in a marine protected area (MPA), focusing on tourists’ awareness of being

  18. A MARINE RECREATIONAL WATER QUALITY CRITERION CONSISTENT WITH INDICATOR CONCEPTS AND RISK ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An overivew is provided of water quality criteria developed for marine recreational waters by EPA in 1979. The crierion used is the strength of the association with the rates of the important symptoms, such as those that correlate best with swimming in wastewater-polluted waters....

  19. DMSWG-1 Project Report MRIP Data Management Standard (MDMS) Database MARINE RECREATIONAL INFORMATION

    E-print Network

    DMSWG-1 Project Report MRIP Data Management Standard (MDMS) Database MARINE RECREATIONAL INFORMATION PROGRAM MRIP Data Management Standard (MDMS) Database PROJECT REPORT DMSWG-1 Identify, 2008 Page i of 14 #12;DMSWG-1 Project Report MRIP Data Management Standard (MDMS) Database Page ii

  20. Consistent size-independent harvest selection on fish body shape in two recreationally exploited marine species.

    PubMed

    Alós, Josep; Palmer, Miquel; Linde-Medina, Marta; Arlinghaus, Robert

    2014-06-01

    Harvesting wild animals may exert size-independent selection pressures on a range of morphological, life history, and behavioral traits. Most work so far has focused on selection pressures on life history traits and body size as morphological trait. We studied here how recreational fishing selects for morphological traits related to body shape, which may correlate with underlying swimming behavior. Using landmark-based geometric morphometrics, we found consistent recreational fishing-induced selection pressures on body shape in two recreationally exploited marine fish species. We show that individuals with larger-sized mouths and more streamlined and elongated bodies were more vulnerable to passively operated hook-and-line fishing independent of the individual's body size or condition. While the greater vulnerability of individuals with larger mouth gapes can be explained by the direct physical interaction with hooks, selection against streamlined and elongated individuals could either involve a specific foraging mode or relate to underlying elevated swimming behavior. Harvesting using passive gear is common around the globe, and thus, size-independent selection on body shape is expected to be widespread potentially leaving behind individuals with smaller oral gapes and more compact bodies. This might have repercussions for food webs by altering foraging and predation. PMID:25360257

  1. Consistent size-independent harvest selection on fish body shape in two recreationally exploited marine species

    PubMed Central

    Alós, Josep; Palmer, Miquel; Linde-Medina, Marta; Arlinghaus, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Harvesting wild animals may exert size-independent selection pressures on a range of morphological, life history, and behavioral traits. Most work so far has focused on selection pressures on life history traits and body size as morphological trait. We studied here how recreational fishing selects for morphological traits related to body shape, which may correlate with underlying swimming behavior. Using landmark-based geometric morphometrics, we found consistent recreational fishing-induced selection pressures on body shape in two recreationally exploited marine fish species. We show that individuals with larger-sized mouths and more streamlined and elongated bodies were more vulnerable to passively operated hook-and-line fishing independent of the individual's body size or condition. While the greater vulnerability of individuals with larger mouth gapes can be explained by the direct physical interaction with hooks, selection against streamlined and elongated individuals could either involve a specific foraging mode or relate to underlying elevated swimming behavior. Harvesting using passive gear is common around the globe, and thus, size-independent selection on body shape is expected to be widespread potentially leaving behind individuals with smaller oral gapes and more compact bodies. This might have repercussions for food webs by altering foraging and predation. PMID:25360257

  2. Water quality, weather and environmental factors associated with fecal indicator organism density in beach sand at two recreational marine beaches.

    PubMed

    Heaney, Christopher D; Exum, Natalie G; Dufour, Alfred P; Brenner, Kristen P; Haugland, Richard A; Chern, Eunice; Schwab, Kellogg J; Love, David C; Serre, Marc L; Noble, Rachel; Wade, Timothy J

    2014-11-01

    Recent studies showing an association between fecal indicator organisms (FIOs) in sand and gastrointestinal (GI) illness among beachgoers with sand contact have important public health implications because of the large numbers of people who recreate at beaches and engage in sand contact activities. Yet, factors that influence fecal pollution in beach sand remain unclear. During the 2007 National Epidemiological and Environmental Assessment of Recreational (NEEAR) Water Study, sand samples were collected at three locations (60 m apart) on weekend days (Sat, Sun) and holidays between June and September at two marine beaches - Fairhope Beach, AL and Goddard Beach, RI - with nearby publicly-owned treatment works (POTWs) outfalls. F(+) coliphage, enterococci, Bacteroidales, fecal Bacteroides spp., and Clostridium spp. were measured in sand using culture and qPCR-based calibrator-cell equivalent methods. Water samples were also collected on the same days, times and transects as the 144 sand samples and were assayed using the same FIO measurements. Weather and environmental data were collected at the time of sample collection. Mean FIO concentrations in sand varied over time, but not space. Enterococci CFU and CCE densities in sand were not correlated, although other FIOs in sand were. The strongest correlation between FIO density in sand and water was fecal Bacteroides CCE, followed by enterococci CFU, Clostridium spp. CCE, and Bacteroidales CCE. Overall, the factors associated with FIO concentrations in sand were related to the sand-water interface (i.e., sand-wetting) and included daily average densities of FIOs in water, rainfall, and wave height. Targeted monitoring that focuses on daily trends of sand FIO variability, combined with information about specific water quality, weather, and environmental factors may inform beach monitoring and management decisions to reduce microbial burdens in beach sand. The views expressed in this paper are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. PMID:25150738

  3. A global estimate of benefits from ecosystem-based marine recreation: potential impacts and implications for management

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrés M. Cisneros-Montemayor; U. Rashid Sumaila

    2010-01-01

    Participation in ecosystem-based marine recreational activities (MRAs) has increased around the world, adding a new dimension\\u000a to human use of the marine ecosystem and another good reason to strengthen effective management measures. A first step in\\u000a studying the effects of MRAs at a global scale is to estimate their socioeconomic benefits, which are captured here by three\\u000a indicators: the amount

  4. Kelp Gulls (Larus dominicanus) killed and injured by discarded monofilament lines at a marine recreational fishery in northern Patagonia.

    PubMed

    Yorio, Pablo; Marinao, Cristian; Suárez, Nicolás

    2014-08-15

    Among marine debris, monofilament fishing lines often result in negative impacts on marine organisms. We characterized marine debris and incidence of lost and discarded monofilament lines along beaches used by recreational fishers, and report the impact of lines on Kelp Gulls (Larus dominicanus) at the Bahía San Blas protected area, site of one of the main shore-based recreational fisheries of the southwestern Atlantic. Over 55% of the marine debris recorded originated from recreational fishing activities. Balls of tangled monofilament lines were found at a rate of 40.5 items per km. A total of 27 adult Kelp Gulls were found entangled with monofilament. All individuals were tangled to vegetation within colony boundaries. Four of the gulls had a monofilament line protruding from the bill, showing that they may be also killed when trying to obtain bait. Our results indicate that lost or discarded monofilament lines in the Bahía San Blas recreational fishing area result in undesired impacts on coastal wildlife. PMID:24951250

  5. Rapidly measured indicators of recreational water quality and swimming-associated illness at marine beaches: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction In the United States and elsewhere, recreational water quality is monitored for fecal indicator bacteria to help prevent swimming-associated illnesses. Standard methods to measure these bacteria take at least 24 hours to obtain results. Molecular approaches such as quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) can estimate these bacteria faster, in under 3 hours. Previously, we demonstrated that measurements of the fecal indicator bacteria Enterococcus using qPCR were associated with gastrointestinal (GI) illness among swimmers at freshwater beaches. In this paper, we report on results from three marine beach sites. Methods We interviewed beach-goers and collected water samples at marine beaches affected by treated sewage discharges in Mississippi in 2005, and Rhode Island and Alabama in 2007. Ten to twelve days later, we obtained information about gastrointestinal, respiratory, eye, ear and skin symptoms by telephone. We tested water samples for fecal indicator organisms using qPCR and other methods. Results We enrolled 6,350 beach-goers. The occurrence of GI illness among swimmers was associated with a log10-increase in exposure to qPCR-determined estimates of fecal indicator organisms in the genus Enterococcus (AOR = 2.6, 95% CI 1.3-5.1) and order Bacteroidales (AOR = 1.9, 95% CI 1.3-2.9). Estimates of organisms related to Clostridium perfringens and a subgroup of organisms in the genus Bacteroides were also determined by qPCR in 2007, as was F+ coliphage, but relationships between these indicators and illness were not statistically significant. Conclusions This study provides the first evidence of a relationship between gastrointestinal illness and estimates of fecal indicator organisms determined by qPCR at marine beaches. PMID:21040526

  6. Recreational SCUBA divers' willingness to pay for marine biodiversity in Barbados.

    PubMed

    Schuhmann, Peter W; Casey, James F; Horrocks, Julia A; Oxenford, Hazel A

    2013-05-30

    The use of natural resources and the services they provide often do not have an explicit price and are therefore undervalued in decision-making, leading to environmental degradation. To 'monetize' the benefits from these services requires the use of non-market valuation techniques. Using a stated preference survey of recreational divers in Barbados conducted between 2007 and 2009, the economic value of marine biodiversity to recreational SCUBA divers in Barbados was estimated. In addition to a variety of demographic variables, divers were asked about their level of experience, expenditures related to travel and diving, and encounters with fish and sea turtles. Divers then completed a choice experiment, selecting between alternative dives with varying characteristics including price, crowding, fish diversity, encounters with sea turtles, and coral cover. Results indicate that divers in Barbados have a clear appreciation of reef quality variables. Willingness to pay for good coral cover, fish diversity and presence of sea turtles is significantly higher than prices paid for dives. In general, divers valued reef attributes similarly, although their appreciation of low density of divers at a site and high coral cover varied with prior diving experience. The results of this study demonstrate the economic value generated in Barbados by the recreational SCUBA diving industry and highlight the potential for substantial additional economic contributions with improvements to the quality of a variety of reef attributes. These results could inform management decisions regarding reef use and sea turtle conservation, and could aid in the development of informed 'win-win' policies aimed at maximizing returns from diving while reducing negative impacts often associated with tourism activities. PMID:23523829

  7. The Social and Economic Significance of Recreation Activities in the Marine Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ditton, Robert B.

    Although the data obtained by an Outdoor Recreation Resources Review Commission in 1960 indicated that 44 percent of participants in outdoor recreation prefer water-based activities, the potential demand for recreation within the coastal zone is much greater than that study indicates, because the unfulfilled recreational demands of the urban…

  8. Cryptosporidium and Giardia in tropical recreational marine waters contaminated with domestic sewage: estimation of bathing-associated disease risks.

    PubMed

    Betancourt, Walter Q; Duarte, Diana C; Vásquez, Rosa C; Gurian, Patrick L

    2014-08-15

    Sewage is a major contributor to pollution problems involving human pathogens in tropical coastal areas. This study investigated the occurrence of intestinal protozoan parasites (Giardia and Cryptosporidium) in tropical recreational marine waters contaminated with sewage. The potential risks of Cryptosporidium and Giardia infection from recreational water exposure were estimated from the levels of viable (oo) cysts (DIC+, DAPI+, PI-) found in near-shore swimming areas using an exponential dose response model. A Monte Carlo uncertainty analysis was performed in order to determine the probability distribution of risks. Microbial indicators of recreational water quality (enterococci, Clostridium perfringens) and genetic markers of sewage pollution (human-specific Bacteroidales marker [HF183] and Clostridium coccoides) were simultaneously evaluated in order to estimate the extent of water quality deterioration associated with human wastes. The study revealed the potential risk of parasite infections via primary contact with tropical marine waters contaminated with sewage; higher risk estimates for Giardia than for Cryptosporidium were found. Mean risks estimated by Monte Carlo were below the U.S. EPA upper bound on recreational risk of 0.036 for cryptosporidiosis and giardiasis for both children and adults. However, 95th percentile estimates for giardiasis for children exceeded the 0.036 level. Environmental surveillance of microbial pathogens is crucial in order to control and eradicate the effects that increasing anthropogenic impacts have on marine ecosystems and human health. PMID:24975093

  9. Valuing Recreational Benefits of Coral Reefs: The Case of Mombasa Marine National Park and Reserve, Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ransom, Kevin P.; Mangi, Stephen C.

    2010-01-01

    A contingent valuation study was conducted with adult Kenyan citizens and foreign tourists to estimate the value of recreational benefits arising from coral reefs at Mombasa Marine National Park and Reserve (MMNPR), and to assess the implications for local reef management. Citizen and foreign visitors to MMNPR were willing to pay an extra 2.2 (median = 1.6) and 8 (median = 6.7) per visit respectively, in addition to current park entrance fees, to support reef quality improvements. By aggregating visitors’ willingness to pay bids over the number of visitors to MMNPR in 2006-2007 the value of benefits was estimated at 346,733, which was more than twice the total annual operational expenditure of 152,383 for MMNPR. The findings indicate that annual revenues from citizen and foreign visitors may be increased by 60% to 261,932 through the implementation of proposed higher park fees of 3.10 for citizens and 15 for foreign visitors. However, any fee increase would serve to intensify concerns among citizens that only relatively affluent Kenyans can afford to visit MMNPR. Park managers need to demonstrate that the extra revenue would be used to fund the proposed conservation activities. This valuation study demonstrates that visitors are prepared to pay higher user fees for access to the marine protected area revealing considerable untapped resource to finance reef quality improvements.

  10. Marine Science: Sample Pathway Semester I Semester II

    E-print Network

    Goldberg, Bennett

    Marine Science: Sample Pathway Semester I Semester II Freshman Year CGS Core CGS Core CAS ES144 (MP** CAS ES331 (Marine Breadth) CAS BI260 (or other Marine Breadth Course) CAS Foreign Language (if needed) Senior Year Marine Semester CAS Marine Breadth Course (4 Marine Courses) CAS PY211 CAS Foreign Language

  11. Sample Nomination Relationship: Kait is a student in the Recreation Management & Policy

    E-print Network

    New Hampshire, University of

    they may have ever had to play a team sport, and Kait is guiding them, and their parents, throughSAM PLE Sample Nomination Relationship: Kait is a student in the Recreation Management & Policy of being "told." #12;SAM PLE Sample Nomination Relationship: I first met Brooke when I was a guest lecturer

  12. A water quality modeling study of non-point sources at recreational marine beaches.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaofang; Wang, John D; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M; Fleming, Lora E

    2011-04-01

    A model study was conducted to understand the influence of non-point sources including bather shedding, animal fecal sources, and near shore sand, as well as the impact of the environmental conditions, on the fate and transport of the indicator microbe, enterococci, at a subtropical recreational marine beach in South Florida. The model was based on an existing finite element hydrodynamic and transport model, with the addition of a first order microbe deactivation function due to solar radiation. Results showed that dog fecal events had a major transient impact (hundreds of Colony Forming Units/100 ml [CFU/100 ml]) on the enterococci concentration in a limited area within several hours, and could partially explain the high concentrations observed at the study beach. Enterococci released from beach sand during high tide caused mildly elevated concentration for a short period of time (ten to twenty of CFU/100 ml initially, reduced to 2 CFU/100 ml within 4 h during sunny weather) similar to the average baseline numbers observed at the beach. Bather shedding resulted in minimal impacts (less than 1 CFU/100 ml), even during crowded holiday weekends. In addition, weak current velocity near the beach shoreline was found to cause longer dwelling times for the elevated concentrations of enterococci, while solar deactivation was found to be a strong factor in reducing these microbial concentrations. PMID:21477839

  13. Enteric pathogens in stool samples of Chicago-area water recreators with new-onset gastrointestinal symptoms5

    E-print Network

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    Enteric pathogens in stool samples of Chicago-area water recreators with new-onset gastrointestinal June 2012 Available online 6 July 2012 Keywords: Water recreation Wastewater Enteric pathogens Gastrointestinal illness Environmental epidemiology a b s t r a c t Background: Characterizing pathogens

  14. 77 FR 42189 - Marine Recreational Fisheries of the United States; National Saltwater Angler Registry and State...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-18

    ...improvements will address the recommendations of the National Research Council's 2006 Review of Recreational Fisheries Survey Methods and the requirements of Section 401(g) of the MSA. As new and improved survey and estimation methods are...

  15. Including risk in stated-preference economic valuations: Experiments on choices for marine recreation

    E-print Network

    Gerber, Leah R.

    xxx Keywords: Choice experiments Diving Economic valuation Fishing Hypothetical bias Recreation Risk to estimate welfare impacts of changes to the environment. Hypothetical policies to achieve an environmental of benefits derived from the environment (Arrow and Fisher, 1974; Henry, 1974 and the potential impact

  16. Spatial dynamics and substrate impacts of recreational snorkelers and SCUBA divers in Hawaiian Marine Protected Areas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Carl G. Meyer; Kim N. Holland

    2008-01-01

    We quantified spatial dynamics and substrate impacts of snorkelers and SCUBA divers within four Hawaiian MPAs to determine: (1) whether coral reefs in these areas are being damaged by recreational activities, and (2) how damage might be mitigated. Observers secretly followed snorkelers and SCUBA divers, and used handheld Global Positioning System (GPS) units to record their geographic tracks and substrate

  17. The Evaluation of a Public Document: The Case of FCC's Marine Radio Rules for Recreational Boaters. Document Design Project, Technical Report No. 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felker, Daniel B.; Rose, Andrew M.

    In a collaborative effort, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and the Document Design Project conducted an evaluation of marine radio rules for recreational boaters that had been rewritten in plain English by FCC personnel. The revised rules were evaluated by 53 experienced boaters and 52 inexperienced boaters, who were given either the…

  18. TECHNIQUES FOR SAMPLING AND ANALYZING THE MARINE MACROBENTHOS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents guidelines for the quantitative assessment of the effects of marine pollution on benthic community structure and population dynamics. The sampling design addresses the number and location of stations, survey frequency, sampling gear, replication of samples, s...

  19. Recreational Therapists

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 2,700 What Recreational Therapists Do Recreational therapists plan, direct, and coordinate recreation-based treatment programs for ... help managing a disability or illness. Recreational therapists plan, direct, and coordinate recreation-based treatment programs for ...

  20. Recreational Scuba Diving In Caribbean Marine Protected Areas: Do The Users Pay?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Edmund Green; Rachel Donnelly

    2003-01-01

    There are more than 200 marine protected areas (MPAs) in the Caribbean and Central America that contain coral reefs and are therefore theoretically attractive to scuba divers. One fifth of dive operators in 30 countries were surveyed for their use of MPAs: the majority are located within 20 km of at least one MPA and 46% conduct at least 80%

  1. Associations between marine phytoplankton and symptoms of illness among recreational beachgoers in Puerto Rico, 2009

    EPA Science Inventory

    While phytoplankton generally have crucial roles in marine ecosystems, a small subset can release toxins and produce harmful algal blooms (HABs). HABs can be a threat to human health as symptoms from exposure range from neurological impairment to gastrointestinal (GI), dermal, a...

  2. Monitoring the marine environment using marine mammal tissue samples

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, P.D.; Hannah, D.J.; Day, P.J. [ESR:Environmental, Lower Hutt (New Zealand)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Marine environments, both inshore and open ocean, receive numerous inputs of anthropogenic chemicals. Cetaceans provide a valuable resource for monitoring the low level contamination of marine environments with persistent organic contaminants. Comparative studies using inshore and offshore southern ocean cetaceans have revealed significant differences in the types of contamination in these two environments. The polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) deposited in the southern oceans are characterized by an abundance of lower chlorinated congeners. Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/F) are not present at significant concentrations in cetaceans from the open southern ocean. In contrast significant concentrations of PCDD/F congeners are detected in the blubber of the inshore living Hector`s dolphin. This species lives close to the shore and has a very small home range (approximately 30 km) for a cetacean. Analysis of tissue PCDD/F and PCB profiles from different populations and their food sources will be presented. The data are being used to determine if there are local variations in the contamination of the New Zealand inshore marine environment.

  3. The investment made in serving at-risk children and youth by a national sample of recreation and park agencies

    E-print Network

    Espericueta, Lorina

    1995-01-01

    This study was intended to contribute to a better understanding of the problems, needs, and efforts that are underway in the area of at-risk children and youth programming in a large sample of recreation and park agencies across the nation...

  4. Performance of barbed and barbless hooks in a marine recreational fishery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaeffer, Jeffrey S.; Hoffman, Elizabeth M.

    2002-01-01

    We used an angling study to examine catch per unit effort (CPUE), bait loss, and total landings by anglers fishing with natural bait on barbed and barbless hooks in a nearshore marine sport fishery located in the Gulf of Mexico near St. Petersburg, Florida. Anglers fished half the day with a barbed hook and half the day with a barbless hook. We also recorded anatomical hook placement, severity of injury or bleeding, and hook extraction times for each landed fish. Bait loss, CPUE, and mean length of catch did not differ between gears, but anglers landed 22% more fish with barbed hooks. Loss of hooked fish was significantly higher with barbless hooks, and efficiency appeared to vary among species. Mean unhooking times were significantly shorter with barbless hooks. Anatomical hook placement did not differ between gears and most fish were hooked in the jaws. Bleeding did not differ between gears because bleeding was influenced strongly by hook placement, but barbless hooks reduced unhooking injuries. In this fishery, barbless hooks probably did not reduce hooking mortality and conferred only slight benefits at the expense of reduced catches.

  5. U.S. Marine Recreational Fisheries DATA COLLECTION. Detailed information on

    E-print Network

    vessel operators (FHS), and a field intercept survey of completed angler fishing trips. Information and charter boat fishing modes is estimated through For-Hire Surveys (FHS). These surveys differ from the CHTS with directories of charter and party boats as sampling frames. The FHS estimates the number of angler

  6. Physicochemical parameters aid microbial community? A case study from marine recreational beaches, Southern India.

    PubMed

    Vignesh, Sivanandham; Dahms, Hans-Uwe; Emmanuel, Kunnampuram Varghese; Gokul, Murugaiah Santhosh; Muthukumar, Krishnan; Kim, Bong-Rae; James, Rathinam Arthur

    2014-03-01

    A total of 176 (water and sediment) samples from 22 stations belonging to four different (urban, semi-urban, rural, and holy places) human habitations of Tamil Nadu beaches were collected and analyzed for physiochemical and microbial parameters during 2008-2009. Bacterial counts were two- to tenfold higher in sediments than in water due to strong bacterial aggregations by dynamic flocculation and rich organic content. The elevated bacterial communities during the monsoon explain rainfalls and several other wastes from inlands. Coliform counts drastically increased at holy and urban places due to pilgrimage and other ritual activities. Higher values of the pollution index (PI) ratio (>1) reveals, human fecal pollutions affect the water quality. The averaged PI ratio shows a substantial higher microbial contamination in holy places than in urban areas and the order of decreasing PI ratios observed were: holy places?>?urban areas?>?semi-urban areas?>?rural areas. Correlation and factor analysis proves microbial communities were not related to physicochemical parameters. Principal component analysis indicates 55.32 % of the total variance resulted from human/animal fecal matters and sewage contaminants whereas 19.95 % were related to organic contents and waste materials from the rivers. More than 80 % of the samples showed a higher fecal coliform and Streptococci by crossing the World Health Organization's permissible limits. PMID:24292984

  7. Rapidly measured indicators of recreational water quality andswimming-associated illness at marine beaches: a prospective cohort study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: In the United States and elsewhere, recreational water is monitored for fecal indicator bacteria to prevent illness. Standard methods to measure fecal indicator bacteria take at least 24 hours to obtain results. Molecular approaches such as quantitative polymerase cha...

  8. Quantifying Marine Microbes: A Simulation to Introduce Random Sampling

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Barbara Bruno

    2012-01-01

    This lesson introduces random sampling, one of the key concepts employed by scientists to study the natural environment, including microbial communities. Students first learn about the abundance and diversity of marine microbes. Colored beads in a bag are then used to represent different types of microbes, with the bag itself representing the ocean. Working in groups, each student randomly samples ten "microbes" from the "ocean", and records the data. To learn about the inherent variability of random sampling, the students then compare the composition of their individual samples, their group'?s pooled sample data, and that of the entire population.

  9. Optimizing voluntary compliance in marine protected areas: a comparison of recreational fisher and enforcement officer perspectives using multi-criteria analysis.

    PubMed

    Read, Andrew D; West, Ronald J; Haste, Max; Jordan, Alan

    2011-10-01

    A comprehensive list of planning criteria for optimizing compliance in Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) was compiled and used to compare the views of recreational fishers and compliance officers for facilitating voluntary compliance in the Port Stephens - Great Lakes Marine Park (PSGLMP). Expert working groups were tasked separately with: 1) criteria identification and weighting; 2) scoring of no-take zones; 3) prioritizing and determining uncertainty; and 4) analysis of results and sensitivity testing. Multi-Criteria Analysis (MCA) revealed that both groups had similar perspectives and recommendations, despite weighting the individual planning criteria differently. Significantly, "manageability" scores for no-take zones from MCA appeared to correlate well with past numbers of enforcement actions recorded for each zone. This provides empirical evidence that adopting manageability criteria during the planning of MPAs could lead to a marked increase in voluntary compliance. As a result, greater consideration to compliance planning during MPA design and zoning is recommended in order to optimize voluntary compliance. Whilst the majority of no-take zones in the PSGLMP case study were evaluated as being relatively effective in terms of optimizing voluntary compliance, there remains considerable potential to improve design, management and use of the poorer performing zones. Finally, the study highlighted the value of recreational fisher engagement in MPA planning processes to maximize voluntary compliance and manageability. PMID:21669486

  10. Re-creating Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Andrew

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the importance of the Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board guidelines for recreational and sports areas and their ancillary spaces. Examples of how the guidelines affect specific areas are highlighted, such as team seating areas, fitness centers, tennis courts, swimming pools, and locker rooms. (GR)

  11. Water quality prediction of marine recreational beaches receiving watershed baseflow and stormwater runoff in southern California, USA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhen-Li He

    2008-01-01

    Beach advisories are issued to the public in California when the concentration of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB), including total coliform, fecal coliform (or Escherichia coli), and Enterococcus, exceed their recreational water health standards, or when the amount of a rainfall event is above the pre-determined threshold. However, it is not fully understood about how and to what degree stormwater runoff

  12. Water Quality, Weather and Environmental Factors Associated with Fecal Indicator Organism Density in Beach Sand at Two Recreational Marine Beaches

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent studies showing an association between fecal indicator organisms (FIOs and gastrointestinal (GI) illness among beachgoers wit sand contact have important public health implicatons because of the large numbers of people who recreate at beaches and engage in sand contact act...

  13. COMPARISON OF ENTEROCCOCUS DENSITIES DETERMINED BY CULTURE AND QPCR ANALYSES IN WATER SAMPLES FROM TWO RECREATION BEACHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous studies conducted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) have demonstrated that cell densities of the bacterial genus Enterococcus in water samples are directly correlated with gastroenteritis illness rates in swimmers at both marine and fresh water beaches....

  14. RECREATIONAL INFORMATION

    E-print Network

    ..............................................................................................................................7 National Research Council Review of Recreational Fisheries Survey Methods.......................................................................18 Phased implementation of new survey methods ..............................................................................18 Benchmarking new survey methods against old survey methods

  15. Children's Recreational Physical Activity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Astrid D. A. M. Kemperman; Harry J. P. Timmermans

    2011-01-01

    This study explored children's participation in recreational (physical) activities and the extent to which this participation was influenced by individual and household socio-demographics and characteristics of the social and physical environment. Travel and activity diaries were used to collect data on out-of-home recreational activities for a random sample of 4,293 children in primary schools in the Netherlands. These data were

  16. Isolation of microplastics in biota-rich seawater samples and marine organisms

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Matthew; Webb, Hannah; Lindeque, Pennie K.; Fileman, Elaine S.; Halsband, Claudia; Galloway, Tamara S.

    2014-01-01

    Microplastic litter is a pervasive pollutant present in aquatic systems across the globe. A range of marine organisms have the capacity to ingest microplastics, resulting in adverse health effects. Developing methods to accurately quantify microplastics in productive marine waters, and those internalized by marine organisms, is of growing importance. Here we investigate the efficacy of using acid, alkaline and enzymatic digestion techniques in mineralizing biological material from marine surface trawls to reveal any microplastics present. Our optimized enzymatic protocol can digest >97% (by weight) of the material present in plankton-rich seawater samples without destroying any microplastic debris present. In applying the method to replicate marine samples from the western English Channel, we identified 0.27 microplastics m?3. The protocol was further used to extract microplastics ingested by marine zooplankton under laboratory conditions. Our findings illustrate that enzymatic digestion can aid the detection of microplastic debris within seawater samples and marine biota. PMID:24681661

  17. Isolation of microplastics in biota-rich seawater samples and marine organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Matthew; Webb, Hannah; Lindeque, Pennie K.; Fileman, Elaine S.; Halsband, Claudia; Galloway, Tamara S.

    2014-03-01

    Microplastic litter is a pervasive pollutant present in aquatic systems across the globe. A range of marine organisms have the capacity to ingest microplastics, resulting in adverse health effects. Developing methods to accurately quantify microplastics in productive marine waters, and those internalized by marine organisms, is of growing importance. Here we investigate the efficacy of using acid, alkaline and enzymatic digestion techniques in mineralizing biological material from marine surface trawls to reveal any microplastics present. Our optimized enzymatic protocol can digest >97% (by weight) of the material present in plankton-rich seawater samples without destroying any microplastic debris present. In applying the method to replicate marine samples from the western English Channel, we identified 0.27 microplastics m-3. The protocol was further used to extract microplastics ingested by marine zooplankton under laboratory conditions. Our findings illustrate that enzymatic digestion can aid the detection of microplastic debris within seawater samples and marine biota.

  18. Isolation of microplastics in biota-rich seawater samples and marine organisms.

    PubMed

    Cole, Matthew; Webb, Hannah; Lindeque, Pennie K; Fileman, Elaine S; Halsband, Claudia; Galloway, Tamara S

    2014-01-01

    Microplastic litter is a pervasive pollutant present in aquatic systems across the globe. A range of marine organisms have the capacity to ingest microplastics, resulting in adverse health effects. Developing methods to accurately quantify microplastics in productive marine waters, and those internalized by marine organisms, is of growing importance. Here we investigate the efficacy of using acid, alkaline and enzymatic digestion techniques in mineralizing biological material from marine surface trawls to reveal any microplastics present. Our optimized enzymatic protocol can digest >97% (by weight) of the material present in plankton-rich seawater samples without destroying any microplastic debris present. In applying the method to replicate marine samples from the western English Channel, we identified 0.27 microplastics m(-3). The protocol was further used to extract microplastics ingested by marine zooplankton under laboratory conditions. Our findings illustrate that enzymatic digestion can aid the detection of microplastic debris within seawater samples and marine biota. PMID:24681661

  19. Effects of Sodium Azide on the Abundance of Prokaryotes and Viruses in Marine Samples

    E-print Network

    Winter, Christian

    Effects of Sodium Azide on the Abundance of Prokaryotes and Viruses in Marine Samples Christian-sur-Mer, France Abstract Flow cytometry is set to become the standard method for enumerating prokaryotes azide as a preservative for prokaryotes and viruses in marine samples as a possible alternative

  20. Recreation for All.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winston, Alan G., Ed.; Seekins, Nancy, Ed.

    The manual is intended to provide guidelines for the planning and development of parks and recreation facilities which are accessbile to everyone. Separate chapters present guidelines for the following topics (sample subtopics in parentheses): general information (space relationships and wheelchair functions); general site conditions (soil…

  1. Deinococcus enclensis sp. nov., isolated from a marine sediment sample.

    PubMed

    Thorat, Meghana N; Mawlankar, Rahul; Sonalkar, Vidya V; Venkata Ramana, V; Joseph, Neetha; Shouche, Yogesh S; Dastager, Syed G

    2015-01-01

    A novel pale-pink coloured strain, designated NIO-1023(T), was isolated from a marine sediment sample from Chorao Island, Goa, India. The taxonomic position of strain NIO-1023(T) was investigated by using a polyphasic approach. The cells were observed to be Gram-stain positive, coccal shaped and non-spore forming. Phylogenetic analyses using the 16S rRNA gene sequence of the isolate indicated that the organism belongs to the genus Deinococcus. The strain NIO-1023(T) showed highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities with Deinococcus ficus (97.8 %), whereas other Deinococcus species showed less than 95 % sequence similarity. The DNA-DNA relatedness with respect to D. ficus CC-FR2-10(T) was 23.9 %. Chemotaxonomic data revealed that strain NIO-1023(T) contains only menaquinone MK-8 as the respiratory quinone and a complex polar lipid profile consisting of different unidentified glycolipids and polar lipids, two unknown phospholipids and three unknown phosphoglycolipids. As in other deinococci, one of these phosphoglycolipids was predominant in the profile. The predominant fatty acids were identified as C17:1 w8c, C16:1 w6c/w7c, C15:1 w6c and C17:1 w9c. The genomic DNA G + C content of strain NIO-1023(T) was determined to be 67.2 mol%. The biochemical and chemotaxonomic properties demonstrate that strain NIO-1023(T) represents a novel species, for which the name Deinococcus enclensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is NIO-1023(T) (=DSM 25127(T) = NCIM 5456(T)). PMID:25344421

  2. Bacillus tianshenii sp. nov., isolated from a marine sediment sample.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhao; Zhang, Dao-Feng; Khieu, Thi-Nhan; Son, Chu Ky; Zhang, Xiao-Mei; Cheng, Juan; Tian, Xin-Peng; Zhang, Si; Li, Wen-Jun

    2014-06-01

    A novel Gram-stain-positive, motile, catalase- and oxidase-positive, aerobic, endospore-forming, peritrichous, rod-shaped bacterium, designated YIM M13235(T), was isolated from a marine sediment sample collected from the South China Sea. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain YIM M13235(T) belonged to the genus Bacillus. The strain grew optimally at 30 °C, pH 7.0 and in the presence of 2-4% (w/v) NaCl. meso-Diaminopimelic acid was present in the cell-wall peptidoglycan. Strain YIM M13235(T) exhibited a menaquinone system with MK-7, and the major polar lipids consisted of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, four unknown phospholipids and one unknown glycolipid. The major fatty acids (>5%) were iso-C(15?:?0), anteiso-C(15?:?0), anteiso-C(17?:?0), iso-C(17?:?1)?10c and summed feature 4 (anteiso-C(17?:?1) and/or iso-C(17?:?1)). The genomic DNA G+C content was 42.1 mol%. The DNA-DNA relatedness values between strain YIM M13235(T) and its close relatives (16S rRNA gene sequence similarities >97%) including Bacillus halmapalus DSM 8723(T), Bacillus horikoshii DSM 8719(T) and Bacillus zhanjiangensis JSM 099021(T) were 41%, 44% and 44%, respectively. On the basis of genotypic, phenotypic and DNA-DNA relatedness data, it is apparent that strain YIM M13235(T) represents a novel species of the genus Bacillus, for which the name Bacillus tianshenii sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is YIM M13235(T) (?=?DSM 25879(T)?=?KCTC 33044(T)). PMID:24614848

  3. EFFECTS OF SAMPLE PREPARATION ON THE MEASUREMENT OF ORGANIC CARBON, HYDROGEN, SULFUR, AND OXYGEN CONCENTRATIONS IN MARINE SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The elemental composition of marine sediment provides useful information for the study of environmental processes including biogeochemical cycling and contaminant partitioning. It is common practice to acidify marine sediment samples to remove carbonate before measuring the conce...

  4. Isolation and partial characterization of phosphate solubilizing bacteria isolated from soil and marine samples.

    PubMed

    Mujahid, Talat Yasmeen; Siddiqui, Khaizran; Ahmed, Rifat; Kazmi, Shahana U; Ahmed, Nuzhat

    2014-09-01

    In the present study the potential of indigenous bacterial isolates from soil rhizosphere and marine environment to promote plant growth was determined. Eight bacterial strains isolated from soil and marine samples were characterized for the phosphate solubilizing activity. Qualitative and quantitative estimation of phosphate solubilization is done. MIC of antibiotic and heavy metals were checked for these strains. Strains show a diverse pattern of antibiotic and heavy metals resistance. PMID:25176242

  5. ICES Journal of Marine Science, 53: 359361. 1996 Temporal sampling of backscattered sonar signals

    E-print Network

    Jaffe, Jules

    ICES Journal of Marine Science, 53: 359­361. 1996 Temporal sampling of backscattered sonar signals Jules S. Jaffe Jaffe, J. S. 1996. Temporal sampling of backscattered sonar signals. ­ ICES Journal sound from an active sonar system. Here, it is demonstrated how the beam patterns of the sonar, when

  6. Marine reservoir effect on the Southeastern coast of Brazil: results from the Tarioba shellmound paired samples.

    PubMed

    Macario, K D; Souza, R C C L; Aguilera, O A; Carvalho, C; Oliveira, F M; Alves, E Q; Chanca, I S; Silva, E P; Douka, K; Decco, J; Trindade, D C; Marques, A N; Anjos, R M; Pamplona, F C

    2015-05-01

    On the Southeastern coast of Brazil the presence of many archaeological shellmounds offers a great potential for studying the radiocarbon marine reservoir effect (MRE). However, very few such studies are available for this region. These archaeological settlements, mostly dating from 5 to 2 kyr cal BP, include both terrestrial and marine remains in good stratigraphic context and secure association, enabling the comparison of different carbon reservoirs. In a previous study the chronology of the Sambaqui da Tarioba, located in Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil, was established based on marine mollusc shells and charcoal samples from hearths, from several layers in two excavated sectors. We now compare the different materials with the aim of studying the MRE in this region. Calibration was performed with Oxford software OxCal v4.2.3 using the marine curve Marine13 with an undetermined offset to account for local corrections for shell samples, and the atmospheric curve SHCal13 for charcoal samples. The distribution of results considering a phase model indicates a ?R value of -127 ± 67 (14)C yr in the 1 sigma range and the multi-paired approach leads to a mean value of -110 ± 94 (14)C yr. PMID:25703433

  7. Applied Marine Sciences Plan for Sediment Sampling Cruise #19

    E-print Network

    Monitoring Program for Trace Substances in the San Francisco Estuary (RMP). Sediment sampling is one component of this program that is designed to provide long- term data on concentrations of trace metals Monitoring Program Summer 2000 Sediment Sampling Cruise July 11, 20-21, 24-26 2000 1. INTRODUCTION

  8. HEXACHLOROBENZENE IN SELECTED MARINE SAMPLES: AN ENVIRONMENTAL PERSPECTIVE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hexachlorobenzene (HCB) was designated as a chemical of interest. A new sample of mussel homogenate was spiked with an authentic HCB standard. Recovery of the spike was 56%. Re-examination of previously analyzed GC chromatograms and archived samples revealed peaks that co-eluted ...

  9. Detection of a Diverse Marine Fish Fauna Using Environmental DNA from Seawater Samples

    PubMed Central

    Iversen, Lars Lønsmann; Møller, Peter Rask; Rasmussen, Morten; Willerslev, Eske

    2012-01-01

    Marine ecosystems worldwide are under threat with many fish species and populations suffering from human over-exploitation. This is greatly impacting global biodiversity, economy and human health. Intriguingly, marine fish are largely surveyed using selective and invasive methods, which are mostly limited to commercial species, and restricted to particular areas with favourable conditions. Furthermore, misidentification of species represents a major problem. Here, we investigate the potential of using metabarcoding of environmental DNA (eDNA) obtained directly from seawater samples to account for marine fish biodiversity. This eDNA approach has recently been used successfully in freshwater environments, but never in marine settings. We isolate eDNA from ½-litre seawater samples collected in a temperate marine ecosystem in Denmark. Using next-generation DNA sequencing of PCR amplicons, we obtain eDNA from 15 different fish species, including both important consumption species, as well as species rarely or never recorded by conventional monitoring. We also detect eDNA from a rare vagrant species in the area; European pilchard (Sardina pilchardus). Additionally, we detect four bird species. Records in national databases confirmed the occurrence of all detected species. To investigate the efficiency of the eDNA approach, we compared its performance with 9 methods conventionally used in marine fish surveys. Promisingly, eDNA covered the fish diversity better than or equal to any of the applied conventional methods. Our study demonstrates that even small samples of seawater contain eDNA from a wide range of local fish species. Finally, in order to examine the potential dispersal of eDNA in oceans, we performed an experiment addressing eDNA degradation in seawater, which shows that even small (100-bp) eDNA fragments degrades beyond detectability within days. Although further studies are needed to validate the eDNA approach in varying environmental conditions, our findings provide a strong proof-of-concept with great perspectives for future monitoring of marine biodiversity and resources. PMID:22952584

  10. RECREATIONAL FISHERIES GUIDELINES FOR

    E-print Network

    Cooke, Steven J.

    RECREATIONAL FISHERIES FAO TECHNICAL GUIDELINES FOR RESPONSIBLE FISHERIES 13 ISSN 1020-5292 RECREATIONAL FISHERIES #12;Cover illustration: Emanuela D'Antoni #12;RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 13 RECREATIONAL FISHERIES FOOD AND AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION OF THE UNITED NATIONS Rome, 2012 FAO TECHNICAL GUIDELINES

  11. Applied Marine Sciences Winter 2000 Sediment Sampling Report

    E-print Network

    . The cleaning process began with a two-day soaking of all sampling equipment in an Alconox® detergent bath. Following the detergent soak, all equipment was washed with Alconox® detergent, rinsed with tap water

  12. Applied Marine Sciences Winter 2001 Sediment Sampling Report

    E-print Network

    . The cleaning process began with a two-day soaking of all sampling equipment in an Alconox® detergent bath. Following the detergent soak, all equipment was washed with Alconox® detergent, rinsed with tap water

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF THE MARINE INCINERATION BIOASSAY SAMPLING SYSTEM (MIBAS) FOR AT-SEA INCINERATION TESTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the development of the Marine Incineration Bioassay Sampling System (MIBAS) for at-sea incineration testing, as part of EPA's overall evaluation of the potential benefits and risks associated with the incineration of hazardous wastes at sea. The related strate...

  14. Variation sources of marine periphyton 1 Submersion time, depth, substrate type and sampling method

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . Studies on fertilization and use of biodegraded substrates (i.e. long-time submerged wood) are recommended marine and brackish ponds. Whole substrate unit sampling using a tube and stopper is recommended to avoid was very low compared to periphyton developed on biodegradable substrates in fertilized tropical ponds

  15. Determination of adenosine triphosphate on marine particulates: synthesis of methods for use on OTEC samples

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, A.T.; Hartwig, E.O.

    1982-08-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is an indicator of living biomass in marine particulates. This report details the method used by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to analyze particulate ATP in samples taken from oligotrophic, tropical ocean waters. It represents a synthesis of previously published methods.

  16. Determination of Adenosine Triphosphate on Marine Particulates:Synthesis of Methods for Use on OTEC Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Anthony T.; Hartwig, Eric O.

    1982-08-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is an indicator of living biomass in marine particulates. This report details the method used by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to analyze particulate ATP in samples taken from oligotrophic, tropical ocean waters. It represents a synthesis of previously published methods.

  17. Determination of methylmercury in marine biota samples: method validation.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Luis; Vassileva, Emilia

    2014-05-01

    Regulatory authorities are expected to measure concentration of contaminants in foodstuffs, but the simple determination of total amount cannot be sufficient for fully judging its impact on the human health. In particular, the methylation of metals generally increases their toxicity; therefore validated analytical methods producing reliable results for the assessment of methylated species are highly needed. Nowadays, there is no legal limit for methylmercury (MeHg) in food matrices. Hence, no standardized method for the determination of MeHg exists within the international jurisdiction. Contemplating the possibility of a future legislative limit, a method for low level determination of MeHg in marine biota matrixes, based on aqueous-phase ethylation followed by purge and trap and gas chromatography (GC) coupled to pyrolysis-atomic fluorescence spectrometry (Py-AFS) detection, has been developed and validated. Five different extraction procedures, namely acid and alkaline leaching assisted by microwave and conventional oven heating, as well as enzymatic digestion, were evaluated in terms of their efficiency to extract MeHg from Scallop soft tissue IAEA-452 Certified Reference Material. Alkaline extraction with 25% (w/w) KOH in methanol, microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) with 5M HCl and enzymatic digestion with protease XIV yielded the highest extraction recoveries. Standard addition or the introduction of a dilution step were successfully applied to overcome the matrix effects observed when microwave-assisted extraction using 25% (w/w) KOH in methanol or 25% (w/v) aqueous TMAH were used. ISO 17025 and Eurachem guidelines were followed to perform the validation of the methodology. Accordingly, blanks, selectivity, calibration curve, linearity (0.9995), working range (1-800pg), recovery (97%), precision, traceability, limit of detection (0.45pg), limit of quantification (0.85pg) and expanded uncertainty (15.86%, k=2) were assessed with Fish protein Dorm-3 Certified Reference Material. The major contributions to the expanded uncertainty, i.e. 86.1%, arose from the uncertainty associated with recovery, followed by the contribution from fluorescence signal. Additional validation of the methodology developed was effectuated by the comparison with the values reported for MeHg in the IAEA-452 inter-laboratory comparison exercise. PMID:24720970

  18. 50 CFR 648.107 - Conservation equivalent measures for the summer flounder party/charter and recreational fishery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...NORTHEASTERN UNITED STATES Management...recreational fishing measures...the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission. (1) Federally...recreational fishing measures of this...flounder in a state whose...

  19. The distribution of uranium and thorium in samples taken from different polluted marine environment.

    PubMed

    Akyil, S; Yusof, A M

    2007-06-01

    Concentrations of uranium and thorium in seawater, sediment and some marine species taken from along the coastal areas of Malaysia were determined spectrophotometrically. The uranium and thorium concentrations in seawater were found to vary ranging from 1.80 to 4.1 and 0.14 to 0.88 microg/L, respectively. The concentration of uranium in sediment samples was reported to range from 3.00 to 6.60 microg/g while those of thorium were slightly lower ranging from 0.01 to 0.68 microg/g. The uptake of uranium and thorium in marine species was found to be rather low. Similar variations in total alpha activities in samples were also observed with the total alpha activities relatively lower than the beta activities in most samples. PMID:17141412

  20. Publications Texas Reports Eye Seafood Consumers, Recreational

    E-print Network

    Publications Texas Reports Eye Seafood Consumers, Recreational Facilities, Sport Shrimping, and Marina Management charge from the Center for Marine Re- sources, Texas A&M University, Col- lege Station- terns and Product Perceptions in Texas" (TAMU-SG-75-216) by Samuel M. Gillespie and Michael J. Houston

  1. Estimates of Marine Debris Accumulation on Beaches Are Strongly Affected by the Temporal Scale of Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Stephen D. A.; Markic, Ana

    2013-01-01

    Marine debris is a global issue with impacts on marine organisms, ecological processes, aesthetics and economies. Consequently, there is increasing interest in quantifying the scale of the problem. Accumulation rates of debris on beaches have been advocated as a useful proxy for at-sea debris loads. However, here we show that past studies may have vastly underestimated the quantity of available debris because sampling was too infrequent. Our study of debris on a small beach in eastern Australia indicates that estimated daily accumulation rates decrease rapidly with increasing intervals between surveys, and the quantity of available debris is underestimated by 50% after only 3 days and by an order of magnitude after 1 month. As few past studies report sampling frequencies of less than a month, estimates of the scale of the marine debris problem need to be critically re-examined and scaled-up accordingly. These results reinforce similar, recent work advocating daily sampling as a standard approach for accurate quantification of available debris in coastal habitats. We outline an alternative approach whereby site-specific accumulation models are generated to correct bias when daily sampling is impractical. PMID:24367607

  2. Results of sediment and water sampling and inorganic, organic, and radionuclide analysis at recreation areas and water intakes - Norris, Melton Hill, and Watts Bar Lakes - Data report

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1991-10-01

    Suspected water quality contamination in Watts Bar Reservoir as a result of activities in past decades at the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Oak Ridge facility is of public concern. DOE, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), the State of Tennessee, and other agencies and officials have received many inquiries from the public in recent years concerning this suspected pollution, especially how this potential contamination may affect the health and safety of those persons who use beaches in the area for swimming or other water-body-contact sports. As a result of these concerns, TVA conducted a study in May and June 1991 to obtain data on potential contaminants of concern in the water and sediment of Watts Bar Reservoir. TVA collected water and sediment samples at a total of 29 sites, including 18 recreation areas and 11 water intake locations, located throughout Norris, Melton Hill, and Watts Bar Reservoirs. The samples were analyzed for radionuclides, metals, and organic compounds which could pose a threat to human health.

  3. Results of sediment and water sampling for inorganic, organic, and radionuclide analysis at recreation areas and water intakes -- Norris, Melton Hill, and Watts Bar Lakes. Data report

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1991-10-01

    Suspected water quality contamination in Watts Bar Reservoir as a result of activities in past decades at the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Oak Ridge facility is of public concern. DOE, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), the State of Tennessee, and other agencies and officials have received many inquiries from the public in recent years concerning this suspected pollution, especially how this potential contamination may affect the health and safety of those persons who use beaches in the area for swimming or other water-body-contact sports. As a result of these concerns, TVA conducted a study in May and June 1991 to obtain data on potential contaminants of concern in the water and sediment of Watts Bar Reservoir. TVA collected water and sediment samples at a total of 29 sites, including 18 recreation areas and 11 water intake locations, located throughout Norris, Melton Hill, and Watts Bar Reservoirs. The samples were analyzed for radionuclides, metals, and organic compounds which could pose a threat to human health.

  4. Lockheed's Employee Recreation Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffey, Steve

    1984-01-01

    The Lockheed Employee Recreation Association uses company and community facilities to offer a variety of programs to Lockheed employees and their families. Several of the recreation programs and how they were implemented are described. (DF)

  5. American Therapeutic Recreation Association

    MedlinePLUS

    American Therapeutic Recreation Association Promoting Health & Wellness Services New Feature for Members Only ~ Network with Members Become a part ... Proposals for 2015 Annual Conference Join thousands of Therapeutic Recreation specialists today Join Now Renew your membership ...

  6. Stereochemistry of amino acids in surface samples of a marine sediment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollock, G.E.; Kvenvolden, K.A.

    1978-01-01

    In two surface samples of marine sediment, the percentages of d-alanine and d-aspartic acid are significantly higher than the other d-amino acids and are similar to the range found in soils. The percentage of d-glutamic acid is also higher than the other amino acids but less than d-alanine and d-aspartic acid. These d-amino acids may come mainly from bacteria. ?? 1978.

  7. A sampling-based Bayesian model for gas saturation estimationusing seismic AVA and marine CSEM data

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jinsong Chen; Michael Hoversten; Don Vasco; Yoram Rubin; Zhangshuan Hou

    2006-01-01

    We develop a sampling-based Bayesian model to jointly invertseismic amplitude versus angles (AVA) and marine controlled-sourceelectromagnetic (CSEM) data for layered reservoir models. The porosityand fluid saturation in each layer of the reservoir, the seismic P- andS-wave velocity and density in the layers below and above the reservoir,and the electrical conductivity of the overburden are considered asrandom variables. Pre-stack seismic AVA

  8. APRIL 3 10:3011:30am Rm 102 Status and Future of Recreational Fisheries in

    E-print Network

    Anderson, Richard

    and Present Larry Carpenter, Washington State Fish and Wildlife Commission and Master Marine Services 5 State Fish and Wildlife Commission JUNE 3 10:30­11:30am Rm 102 Translating Science for Recreational of Saltwater Recreational Fisheries in Washington State Tony Floor, Director, Fishing Affairs, NW Marine Trade

  9. Economics of Outdoor Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clawson, Marion; Knetsch, Jack L.

    Written for the purposes of presenting an overview of outdoor recreation in the United States and defining the significant outdoor recreation policy issues of the next 10 to 20 years, this document also includes major sections on recreation resources and economic considerations. Projections to the year 2000 are made for a national time budget,…

  10. Department of Recreational Sports

    E-print Network

    Behmer, Spencer T.

    Department of Recreational Sports Student Staff Scholarship Spring 2011 This packet contains: ________________ 2 Texas A&M University Department of Recreational Sports Student Staff Scholarship Mission: The Department of Recreational Sports Student Staff Scholarship program was created to recognize and reward

  11. Recreation Resource Manual

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Human Development Institute, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Recreation is any voluntary activity that is enjoyable and fun. Recreation refreshes, revitalizes and improves a person's quality of life. Consider some recreation activity you may have an interest in. Suppose you are interested in gardening but have never tried it. Let's take a look at how you can learn about it, do it, and in the process get…

  12. Determination of arsenic species in marine samples by HPLC-ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Shizuko; Toshimitsu, Hideki; Aihara, Masato

    2006-01-01

    Arsenic speciation analysis in marine samples was performed using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with ICP-MS detection. The separation of eight arsenic species viz. arsenite (As(III)), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), arsenate (As(V)), arsenobetaine, trimethylarsine oxide (TMAO), arsenocholine and tetramethylarsonium ion (TeMAs) was achieved on a Shiseido Capcell Pak C18 column by using an isocratic eluent (pH 3.0), in which condition As(III) and MMA were co-eluted. The entire separation was accomplished in 15 min. The detection limits for 8 arsenic species by HPLC/ICP-MS were in the range of 0.02 - 0.10 microg L(-1) based on 3sigma of blank response (n=9). The precision was calculated to be 3.1-7.3% (RSD) for all eight species. The method then successfully applied to several marine samples e.g., oyster, scallop, fish, and shrimps. For the extraction of arsenic species from seafood products, the low power microwave digestion was employed. The extraction efficiency was in the range of 52.9 - 112.3%. Total arsenic concentrations were analyzed by using the microwave acid digestion. The total arsenics in the certified reference materials (DORM-2 and TORT-2) were analyzed and agreed with the certified values. The concentrations of arsenics in marine samples were in the range 6.6 - 35.1 microg g(-1). PMID:16429770

  13. Determination of Iodine-129 in fish samples as new tracer of marine biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusuno, Haruka; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki; Nagata, Toshi; Miyairi, Yosuke; Yokoyama, Yusuke; Ohkouchi, Naohiko

    2014-05-01

    Most of Iodine-129 in the surface environment is the anthropogenic origin, i.e., the result of the human nuclear activities. In the marine environment, like Pacific ocean, I-129 is transferred from atmosphere and slowly diffuses into deeper layer so that there is steep gradient of I-129 concentration, i.e., the surface layer has high I-129 concentration and it suddenly decreases going deeper. This peculiar depth profile is thus reflected by the isotopic ratio (I-129/I-127) profile because stable iodine (I-127) concentration is almost uniform in the seawater (ca. 60 ppb). Iodine isotopic ratio (I-129/I-127) of marine lives like fish should be determined by their habitats and the ways exchanging iodine with seawater. This means that the iodine isotopic ratio is potential indicator of marine biology. However there have been only few studies using I-129 for marine biology. This is because I-129 is so rare in the marine lives that ordinary analytical techniques cannot detect. Recently, the technique of accelerator mass spectrometry has been developed and demonstrates excellent sensitivity to detect I-129/I-127 ratio as low as 1E-14. However it requires typically 1 mg AgI sample. To obtain such amount of iodine several hundreds gram should be treated in the case of typical fish. In this study "carrier method" was adopted to overcome this difficulty. Our procedure is following: A fish sample was first dried completely then homogenized well. Iodine was extracted into an alkaline solution by the thermal hydrolysis from 0.1 to 0.5g of dried sample. An aliquot of this solution was taken for ICP-MS analysis to determine the stable iodine concentration. The remaining was, added with carrier iodine (about 1 mg), purified by solvent extraction and collected as AgI precipitation. I-129/I-127 ratio of obtained AgI was determined by AMS. From the AMS result and the stable iodine concentration, the isotopic ratio of the fish samples themselves can be calculated. The result of fish samples, collected from Suruga-bay (located on Pacific coast in the middle of Honshu, Japan) showed 1E-10 to 7E-10, which was consistent with that of surface seawater.

  14. Molecular investigation of the distribution, abundance and diversity of the genus Pseudoalteromonas in marine samples.

    PubMed

    Skovhus, Torben L; Holmström, Carola; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Dahllöf, Ingela

    2007-08-01

    The genus Pseudoalteromonas has attracted interest because it has frequently been found in association with eukaryotic hosts, and because many Pseudoalteromonas species produce biologically active compounds. One distinct group of Pseudoalteromonas species is the antifouling subgroup containing Pseudoalteromonas tunicata and Ps. ulvae, which both produce extracellular compounds that inhibit growth and colonization by different marine organisms. PCR primers targeting the 16S rRNA gene of the genus Pseudoalteromonas and the antifouling subgroup were developed and applied in this study. Real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) was applied to determine the relative bacterial abundance of the genus and the antifouling subgroup, and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) was applied to study the diversity of the genus in 11 different types of marine samples from Danish coastal waters. The detection of Ps. tunicata that contain the antifouling subgroup was achieved through specific PCR amplification of the antibacterial protein gene (alpP). The Pseudoalteromonas species accounted for 1.6% of the total bacterial abundance across all samples. The Pseudoalteromonas diversity on the three unfouled marine organisms Ciona intestinalis, Ulva lactuca and Ulvaria fusca was found to be low, and Ps. tunicata was only detected on these three hosts, which all contain accessible cellulose polymers in their cell walls. PMID:17573938

  15. Taxonomic assessment and enzymes production by yeasts isolated from marine and terrestrial Antarctic samples.

    PubMed

    Duarte, A W F; Dayo-Owoyemi, I; Nobre, F S; Pagnocca, F C; Chaud, L C S; Pessoa, A; Felipe, M G A; Sette, L D

    2013-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the taxonomic identity of yeasts isolated from the Antarctic continent and to evaluate their ability to produce enzymes (lipase, protease and xylanase) at low and moderate temperatures. A total of 97 yeast strains were recovered from marine and terrestrial samples collected in the Antarctica. The highest amount of yeast strains was obtained from marine sediments, followed by lichens, ornithogenic soils, sea stars, Salpa sp., algae, sea urchin, sea squirt, stone with lichens, Nacella concinna, sea sponge, sea isopod and sea snail. Data from polyphasic taxonomy revealed the presence of 21 yeast species, distributed in the phylum Ascomycota (n = 8) and Basidiomycota (n = 13). Representatives of encapsulated yeasts, belonging to genera Rhodotorula and Cryptococcus were recovered from 7 different Antarctic samples. Moreover, Candida glaebosa, Cryptococcus victoriae, Meyerozyma (Pichia) guilliermondii, Rhodotorula mucilaginosa and R. laryngis were the most abundant yeast species recovered. This is the first report of the occurrence of some species of yeasts recovered from Antarctic marine invertebrates. Additionally, results from enzymes production at low/moderate temperatures revealed that the Antarctic environment contains metabolically diverse cultivable yeasts, which could be considered as a target for biotechnological applications. Among the evaluated yeasts in the present study 46.39, 37.11 and 14.43 % were able to produce lipase (at 15 °C), xylanase (at 15 °C) and protease (at 25 °C), respectively. The majority of lipolytic, proteolytic and xylanolytic strains were distributed in the phylum Basidiomycota and were mainly recovered from sea stars, lichens, sea urchin and marine sediments. PMID:24114281

  16. Titan Recreation-Open Recreation Student Engagement Report

    E-print Network

    de Lijser, Peter

    Titan Recreation-Open Recreation Student Engagement Report FY 2011-2012 Purpose Statement Titan and overall wellness. Titan Recreation also provides opportunities for cooperative and competitive play, team building and interpersonal skills. Leadership and participation opportunities within Titan

  17. Titan Recreation-Open Recreation Student Engagement Report

    E-print Network

    de Lijser, Peter

    Titan Recreation-Open Recreation Student Engagement Report FY 2010-2011 Purpose Statement Titan and overall wellness. Titan Recreation also provides opportunities for cooperative and competitive play, team building and interpersonal skills. Leadership and participation opportunities within Titan

  18. Titan Recreation-Open Recreation Student Engagement Report

    E-print Network

    de Lijser, Peter

    Titan Recreation-Open Recreation Student Engagement Report FY 2012-2013 Purpose Statement Titan and overall wellness. Titan Recreation also provides opportunities for cooperative and competitive play, team building and interpersonal skills. Leadership and participation opportunities within Titan

  19. The Index to Marine and Lacustrine Geological Samples: Improving Sample Accessibility and Enabling Current and Future Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, C.

    2011-12-01

    The Index to Marine and Lacustrine Geological Samples is a community designed and maintained resource enabling researchers to locate and request sea floor and lakebed geologic samples archived by partner institutions. Conceived in the dawn of the digital age by representatives from U.S. academic and government marine core repositories and the NOAA National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) at a 1977 meeting convened by the National Science Foundation (NSF), the Index is based on core concepts of community oversight, common vocabularies, consistent metadata and a shared interface. Form and content of underlying vocabularies and metadata continue to evolve according to the needs of the community, as do supporting technologies and access methodologies. The Curators Consortium, now international in scope, meets at partner institutions biennially to share ideas and discuss best practices. NGDC serves the group by providing database access and maintenance, a list server, digitizing support and long-term archival of sample metadata, data and imagery. Over three decades, participating curators have performed the herculean task of creating and contributing metadata for over 195,000 sea floor and lakebed cores, grabs, and dredges archived in their collections. Some partners use the Index for primary web access to their collections while others use it to increase exposure of more in-depth institutional systems. The Index is currently a geospatially-enabled relational database, publicly accessible via Web Feature and Web Map Services, and text- and ArcGIS map-based web interfaces. To provide as much knowledge as possible about each sample, the Index includes curatorial contact information and links to related data, information and images; 1) at participating institutions, 2) in the NGDC archive, and 3) at sites such as the Rolling Deck to Repository (R2R) and the System for Earth Sample Registration (SESAR). Over 34,000 International GeoSample Numbers (IGSNs) linking to SESAR are included in anticipation of opportunities for interconnectivity with Integrated Earth Data Applications (IEDA) systems. To promote interoperability and broaden exposure via the semantic web, NGDC is publishing lithologic classification schemes and terminology used in the Index as Simple Knowledge Organization System (SKOS) vocabularies, coordinating with R2R and the Consortium for Ocean Leadership for consistency. Availability in SKOS form will also facilitate use of the vocabularies in International Standards Organization (ISO) 19115-2 compliant metadata records. NGDC provides stewardship for the Index on behalf of U.S. repositories as the NSF designated "appropriate National Data Center" for data and metadata pertaining to sea floor samples as specified in the 2011 Division of Ocean Sciences Sample and Data Policy, and on behalf of international partners via a collocated World Data Center. NGDC operates on the Open Archival Information System (OAIS) reference model. Active Partners: Antarctic Marine Geology Research Facility, Florida State University; British Ocean Sediment Core Research Facility; Geological Survey of Canada; Integrated Ocean Drilling Program; Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory; National Lacustrine Core Repository, University of Minnesota; Oregon State University; Scripps Institution of Oceanography; University of Rhode Island; U.S. Geological Survey; Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

  20. Uncovering the diversification history of marine tetrapods: ecology influences the effect of geological sampling biases

    E-print Network

    Cambridge, University of

    , and multiple regression models. These indicate that shallow marine diversity was driven by changes to `escape' from periodic extinctions driven by major marine regressions, which affected shallow marine taxaUncovering the diversification history of marine tetrapods: ecology influences the effect

  1. Coincident plasmids and antimicrobial resistance in marine bacteria isolated from polluted and unpolluted Atlantic Ocean samples.

    PubMed Central

    Baya, A M; Brayton, P R; Brown, V L; Grimes, D J; Russek-Cohen, E; Colwell, R R

    1986-01-01

    Sewage effluent and outfall confluence samples were collected at the Barceloneta Regional Treatment Plant in Barceloneta, Puerto Rico; outfall confluence samples at Ocean City, Md., were also collected. Samples from uncontaminated open ocean areas served as clean-water controls. Bacteria were enriched in marine broth 2216 amended with 1 microgram of one of a set of chemicals selected for study per ml: nitrobenzene, dibutyl phthalate, m-cresol, o-cresol, 4-nitroaniline, bis(tributyltin) oxide, and quinone. MICs of the chemicals were determined individually for all isolates. Bacterial isolates were evaluated for resistance to nine different antibiotics and for the presence of plasmid DNA. Treated sewage was found to contain large numbers of bacteria simultaneously possessing antibiotic resistance, chemical resistance, and multiple bands of plasmid DNA. Bacteria resistant to penicillin, erythromycin, nalidixic acid, ampicillin, m-cresol, quinone, and bis(tributyltin) oxide were detected in nearly all samples, but only sewage outfall confluence samples yielded bacterial isolates that were resistant to streptomycin. Bacteria resistant to a combination of antibiotics, including kanamycin, chloramphenicol, gentamicin, and tetracycline, were isolated only from sewage effluent samples. It is concluded that bacterial isolates derived from toxic chemical wastes more frequently contain plasmid DNA and demonstrate antimicrobial resistance than do bacterial isolates from domestic sewage-impacted waters or from uncontaminated open ocean sites. PMID:3755317

  2. Coincident plasmids and antimicrobial resistance in marine bacteria isolated from polluted and unpolluted Atlantic Ocean Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Baya, A.M.; Brayton, P.R.; Brown, V.L.; Grimes, D.J.; Russek-Cohen, E.; Colwell, R.R.

    1986-06-01

    Sewage effluent and outfall confluence samples were collected at the Barceloneta Regional Treatment Plant in Barceloneta, Puerto Rico; outfall confluence samples at Ocean City, Md., were also collected. Samples from uncontaminated open ocean areas served as clean-water controls. Bacteria were enriched in marine broth 2216 amended with 1 ..mu..g of one of a set of chemical selected for study per ml: nitrobenzene, dibutyl phthalate, m-cresol, o-cresol, 4-nitroaniline, bis(tributyltin) oxide, and quinone. MICs of the chemicals were determined individually for all isolates. Bacterial isolates were evaluated for resistance to nine different antibiotics and for the presence of plasmid DNA. Treated sewage was found to contain large numbers of bacteria simultaneously possessing antibiotic resistance, chemical resistance, and multiple bands of plasmic DNA. Bacteria resistant to penicillin, erythromycin, nalidixic acid, ampicillin, m-cresol, quinone, and bis(tributyltin) oxide were detected in nearly all samples, but only sewage outfall confluence samples yielded bacterial isolates that were resistant to streptomycin. Bacteria resistant to a combination of antibiotics, including kanamycin, chloramphenicol, gentamicin, and tetracycline, were isolated only from sewage effluent samples. It is concluded that bacterial isolates derived from toxic chemical wastes more frequently contain plasmid DNA and demonstrate antimicrobial resistance than do bacterial isolates from domestic sewage-impacted waters or from uncontaminated open ocean sites.

  3. Recreational Water Illness (RWI): MRSA

    MedlinePLUS

    ... MRSA website. Can MRSA be spread at recreational water facilities? MRSA does not survive long in recreational ... myself, my family, and others when visiting recreational water facilities? Take action! There are steps you can ...

  4. Optimizing sample pretreatment for compound-specific stable carbon isotopic analysis of amino sugars in marine sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, R.; Lin, Y.-S.; Lipp, J. S.; Meador, T. B.; Hinrichs, K.-U.

    2014-01-01

    Amino sugars are quantitatively significant constituents of soil and marine sediment, but their sources and turnover in environmental samples remain poorly understood. The stable carbon isotopic composition of amino sugars can provide information on the lifestyles of their source organisms and can be monitored during incubations with labeled substrates to estimate the turnover rates of microbial populations. However, until now, such investigation has been carried out only with soil samples, partly because of the much lower abundance of amino sugars in marine environments. We therefore optimized a procedure for compound-specific isotopic analysis of amino sugars in marine sediment employing gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The whole procedure consisted of hydrolysis, neutralization, enrichment, and derivatization of amino sugars. Except for the derivatization step, the protocol introduced negligible isotopic fractionation, and the minimum requirement of amino sugar for isotopic analysis was 20 ng, i.e. equivalent to ~ 8 ng of amino sugar carbon. Our results obtained from ?13C analysis of amino sugars in selected marine sediment samples showed that muramic acid had isotopic imprints from indigenous bacterial activities, whereas glucosamine and galactosamine were mainly derived from organic detritus. The analysis of stable carbon isotopic compositions of amino sugars opens a promising window for the investigation of microbial metabolisms in marine sediments and the deep marine biosphere.

  5. Recreational boating in North Central Texas

    E-print Network

    Cowart, Michael Ray

    1971-01-01

    . Number of Lakes Used by Boaters Storing Boats at Marines or Vacation Cabins 61 18. Storage Location Compared to the Boaters Most Used Lake 19. Per Cent of Boaters Storing Boats at Marina or Vacation Cabin . ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ . ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 63 LIST... through surveys and interviews, recreationists supply information for planning in an 10 indirect manner. Through the monitoring of recreation movement, planners are provided with a picture of present use and existing pressure against the resource...

  6. Partners: Promoting Accessible Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sable, Janet; Gravink, Jill

    1995-01-01

    The Promoting Accessible Recreation through Networking, Education, Resources and Services (PARTNERS) Project, a partnership between Northeast Passage, the University of New Hampshire, and Granite State Independent Living Foundation, helps create barrier-free recreation for individuals with physical disabilities. The paper describes PARTNERS and…

  7. Sports Union Recreational Sport

    E-print Network

    Howie, Jim

    Sports Union Recreational Sport Programme Futsal(5 a-side Football) Play football on a weekly basis and Semester 2 Entry form You must fill in a Recreational Sport Entry Form. This can be collected from the Sports Centre reception and hand it in along with your entry fee. Find us on Facebook at Heriot

  8. Recreation Service Handicapped Inc.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa Univ., Iowa City. Recreation Education Program.

    Presented are duplications of the responses given by Recreation Service Handicapped (Memphis, Tennessee) as part of a project to collect, share, and compile information about, and techniques in the operation of 18 community action models for recreation services to the disabled. Model programs are categorized as consumer, client competency,…

  9. Integrated Leisure and Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schleien, Stuart, Ed.; Rynders, John, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    This "feature issue" focuses on integrated leisure and recreation for developmentally disabled persons and includes descriptions of innovative leisure/recreation programs which allow the realization of the concepts of normalization and least restrictive environment. Brief articles include the following titles and authors: "Challenging the…

  10. Sampling design for long-term regional trends in marine rocky intertidal communities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Irvine, Gail V.; Shelley, Alice

    2013-01-01

    Probability-based designs reduce bias and allow inference of results to the pool of sites from which they were chosen. We developed and tested probability-based designs for monitoring marine rocky intertidal assemblages at Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve (GLBA), Alaska. A multilevel design was used that varied in scale and inference. The levels included aerial surveys, extensive sampling of 25 sites, and more intensive sampling of 6 sites. Aerial surveys of a subset of intertidal habitat indicated that the original target habitat of bedrock-dominated sites with slope ?30° was rare. This unexpected finding illustrated one value of probability-based surveys and led to a shift in the target habitat type to include steeper, more mixed rocky habitat. Subsequently, we evaluated the statistical power of different sampling methods and sampling strategies to detect changes in the abundances of the predominant sessile intertidal taxa: barnacles Balanomorpha, the mussel Mytilus trossulus, and the rockweed Fucus distichus subsp. evanescens. There was greatest power to detect trends in Mytilus and lesser power for barnacles and Fucus. Because of its greater power, the extensive, coarse-grained sampling scheme was adopted in subsequent years over the intensive, fine-grained scheme. The sampling attributes that had the largest effects on power included sampling of “vertical” line transects (vs. horizontal line transects or quadrats) and increasing the number of sites. We also evaluated the power of several management-set parameters. Given equal sampling effort, sampling more sites fewer times had greater power. The information gained through intertidal monitoring is likely to be useful in assessing changes due to climate, including ocean acidification; invasive species; trampling effects; and oil spills.

  11. National Marine Sanctuary Program

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The National Marine Sanctuary Program identifies, designates and manages areas of the marine environment of special national significance due to their conservation, recreational, ecological, historical, research, educational, or aesthetic qualities. Access information and pictures of marine sanctuaries all over the U.S. and its territories. Discover ways to get involved with the sanctuary program, no matter where you live. Scientific publications are available for download.

  12. Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Fort Pierce Marine Station's "Marine Ecosystems Exhibit" recreates six different Florida marine habitats; visitors can learn about the complexity and importance of regional marine ecosystems. Site offers a virtual tour of each habitat, as well as classroom registration and group admission information, educational program and tour options, and down-loadable tour worksheets.

  13. 28 CFR 551.115 - Recreation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Inmates § 551.115 Recreation. (a) When...inmates in recreational activities. Staff shall ensure...participate in recreational activities with convicted inmates...other recreational activities. (b) At a minimum...hour daily of outside recreation, weather...

  14. 36 CFR 2.23 - Recreation fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...PROTECTION, PUBLIC USE AND RECREATION § 2.23 Recreation fees. (a) Recreation fees shall be established as provided for...equipment or services, or participating in group activities, recreation events, or other specialized recreation...

  15. 36 CFR 2.23 - Recreation fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...PROTECTION, PUBLIC USE AND RECREATION § 2.23 Recreation fees. (a) Recreation fees shall be established as provided for...equipment or services, or participating in group activities, recreation events, or other specialized recreation...

  16. 28 CFR 551.115 - Recreation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Inmates § 551.115 Recreation. (a) When...inmates in recreational activities. Staff shall ensure...participate in recreational activities with convicted inmates...other recreational activities. (b) At a minimum...hour daily of outside recreation, weather...

  17. ATHLETICS AND RECREATION Health, Wellness and Recreation

    E-print Network

    Handy, Todd C.

    and recreation for UBC. Anticipating this `work in progress' outcome from our initial discussion, the approach outcome ­ overall vision for health and wellbeing "UBC to become the healthiest campus/community on earth." Responsibility should be taken for health and wellbeing in the community - UBC should step up and become

  18. Passive sampling reversed: Coupling passive field sampling with passive lab dosing to assess the ecotoxicity of mixtures present in the marine environment.

    PubMed

    Claessens, Michiel; Monteyne, Els; Wille, Klaas; Vanhaecke, Lynn; Roose, Patrick; Janssen, Colin R

    2015-04-15

    This study presents a new approach in aquatic toxicity testing combining passive sampling and passive dosing. Polydimethylsiloxane sheets were used to sample contaminant mixtures in the marine environment. These sheets were subsequently transferred to ecotoxicological test medium in which the sampled contaminant mixtures were released through passive dosing. 4 out of 17 of these mixtures caused severe effects in a growth inhibition assay with a marine diatom. These effects could not be explained by the presence of compounds detected in the sampling area and were most likely attributable to unmeasured compounds absorbed to the passive samplers during field deployment. The findings of this study indicate that linking passive sampling in the field to passive dosing in laboratory ecotoxicity tests provides a practical and complimentary approach for assessing the toxicity of hydrophobic contaminant mixtures that mimics realistic environmental exposures. Limitations and opportunities for future improvements are presented. PMID:25752535

  19. Determination of methylmercury in marine biota samples with advanced mercury analyzer: Method validation.

    PubMed

    Azemard, Sabine; Vassileva, Emilia

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we present a simple, fast and cost-effective method for determination of methyl mercury (MeHg) in marine samples. All important parameters influencing the sample preparation process were investigated and optimized. Full validation of the method was performed in accordance to the ISO-17025 (ISO/IEC, 2005) and Eurachem guidelines. Blanks, selectivity, working range (0.09-3.0ng), recovery (92-108%), intermediate precision (1.7-4.5%), traceability, limit of detection (0.009ng), limit of quantification (0.045ng) and expanded uncertainty (15%, k=2) were assessed. Estimation of the uncertainty contribution of each parameter and the demonstration of traceability of measurement results was provided as well. Furthermore, the selectivity of the method was studied by analyzing the same sample extracts by advanced mercury analyzer (AMA) and gas chromatography-atomic fluorescence spectrometry (GC-AFS). Additional validation of the proposed procedure was effectuated by participation in the IAEA-461 worldwide inter-laboratory comparison exercises. PMID:25624245

  20. A sampling-based Bayesian model for gas saturation estimationusing seismic AVA and marine CSEM data

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jinsong; Hoversten, Michael; Vasco, Don; Rubin, Yoram; Hou,Zhangshuan

    2006-04-04

    We develop a sampling-based Bayesian model to jointly invertseismic amplitude versus angles (AVA) and marine controlled-sourceelectromagnetic (CSEM) data for layered reservoir models. The porosityand fluid saturation in each layer of the reservoir, the seismic P- andS-wave velocity and density in the layers below and above the reservoir,and the electrical conductivity of the overburden are considered asrandom variables. Pre-stack seismic AVA data in a selected time windowand real and quadrature components of the recorded electrical field areconsidered as data. We use Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) samplingmethods to obtain a large number of samples from the joint posteriordistribution function. Using those samples, we obtain not only estimatesof each unknown variable, but also its uncertainty information. Thedeveloped method is applied to both synthetic and field data to explorethe combined use of seismic AVA and EM data for gas saturationestimation. Results show that the developed method is effective for jointinversion, and the incorporation of CSEM data reduces uncertainty influid saturation estimation, when compared to results from inversion ofAVA data only.

  1. NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY Campus Recreation

    E-print Network

    Sridhar, Srinivas

    evaluation of cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength, body composition, flexibility, and a functionalNORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY Campus Recreation 140 Marino Center Boston, MA 02115 Fitness: Northeastern University's policy regarding registration for the Group Fitness, NUOPPS, and Personal Training

  2. Recreational Noise Level Facts

    MedlinePLUS

    ... noise to end it. Occupational Noise Facts Noise + Music Facts Recreational Noise Facts Airport Noise Facts Noise ... distance of 10 feet. Sound levels at live music concerts can be measured at 120 dBA and ...

  3. Predicting recreation priorities

    E-print Network

    Hunt, Kindal Alayne

    2003-01-01

    priorities. Assessment of residents' recreation priorities has been undertaken to guide provision decision-making. Kibler and Smith (2000) prioritized the recreation priorities of 60 HIV-positive and AIDS patients using importance-perfonnance measures... are "Factors that limit people's participation in leisure activities, people's use of leisure services, or people's enjoyment of current activities" (Scott, 2000). Categories of constraints will be determined using exploratory factor analysis. Different...

  4. Optimizing sample pretreatment for compound-specific stable carbon isotopic analysis of amino sugars in marine sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, R.; Lin, Y.-S.; Lipp, J. S.; Meador, T. B.; Hinrichs, K.-U.

    2014-09-01

    Amino sugars are quantitatively significant constituents of soil and marine sediment, but their sources and turnover in environmental samples remain poorly understood. The stable carbon isotopic composition of amino sugars can provide information on the lifestyles of their source organisms and can be monitored during incubations with labeled substrates to estimate the turnover rates of microbial populations. However, until now, such investigation has been carried out only with soil samples, partly because of the much lower abundance of amino sugars in marine environments. We therefore optimized a procedure for compound-specific isotopic analysis of amino sugars in marine sediment, employing gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The whole procedure consisted of hydrolysis, neutralization, enrichment, and derivatization of amino sugars. Except for the derivatization step, the protocol introduced negligible isotopic fractionation, and the minimum requirement of amino sugar for isotopic analysis was 20 ng, i.e., equivalent to ~8 ng of amino sugar carbon. Compound-specific stable carbon isotopic analysis of amino sugars obtained from marine sediment extracts indicated that glucosamine and galactosamine were mainly derived from organic detritus, whereas muramic acid showed isotopic imprints from indigenous bacterial activities. The ?13C analysis of amino sugars provides a valuable addition to the biomarker-based characterization of microbial metabolism in the deep marine biosphere, which so far has been lipid oriented and biased towards the detection of archaeal signals.

  5. IMPACTS OF RECREATIONAL SCUBA DIVING ON SHIP WRECKS IN AUSTRALIA AND THE PACIFIC A Review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joanne Edney

    This paper reviews the impacts of recreational scuba diving on the cultural heritage and recreational dive values of ship- wrecks in marine environments in Australia and the western Pacific Ocean, excluding South East Asia. Shipwrecks are unique, fragile, non-renewable cultural resources that are an important element of underwater heritage, and are of great interest to society. Shipwrecks also offer unique,

  6. NOAA HABITAT BLUEPRINT Healthy habitats that sustain resilient and thriving marine

    E-print Network

    NOAA HABITAT BLUEPRINT VISION Healthy habitats that sustain resilient and thriving marine · Recovered threatened and endangered species · Protected coastal and marine areas and habitats at risk · Resilient coastal communities · Increased coastal/marine tourism, access, and recreation PURPOSE The Habitat

  7. The Value of a Master's Degree to Recreation Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodge, Camilla J.; Hill, Brian J.; Brinton, Christian

    2012-01-01

    This study assessed the nature of the relationship between earning advanced degrees and career outcomes such as salary, job satisfaction, social capital, and human capital among professionals in the parks and recreation field. The sample (n = 196) was drawn from parks and recreation agencies located in the United States. Agencies, excluding…

  8. Nutritional Properties of Recreationally Caught Marine Fishes

    E-print Network

    percent. The protein content of fish usually ranges from 18 to 20 percent, but may be as low as 13 percent. Fish have been classified into five cat egories based on the relative percentages of protein and oil With Other Flesh Foods Protein The amount of protein in fish flesh (usually about 18-20 percent for most

  9. Economic Management of Recreational Scuba Diving and the Environment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Derrin Davis; Clem Tisdell

    1996-01-01

    Increasing use of marine protected areas for pursuits such as recreational scuba diving may lead to biological damage and reduced amenity values in popular locations. The relationships between biological and amenity values are discussed and the work of Dixonet al. (1993, Meeting ecological and economic goals: marine parks in the Caribbean.Ambio22, 117–125) on allocating divers between sites is extended. It

  10. 75 FR 5284 - Marine Fisheries Advisory Committee; Public Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-02

    ...of a meeting of the Marine Fisheries Advisory Committee (MAFAC...commercial and recreational fisheries, and environmental, State...include: an update on NOAA aquaculture program activities; an update...Programs, National Marine Fisheries Service. [FR Doc....

  11. Extended evaluation of polymeric and lipophilic sorbents for passive sampling of marine toxins.

    PubMed

    Zendong, Zita; Herrenknecht, Christine; Abadie, Eric; Brissard, Charline; Tixier, Céline; Mondeguer, Florence; Séchet, Véronique; Amzil, Zouher; Hess, Philipp

    2014-12-01

    Marine biotoxins are algal metabolites that can accumulate in fish or shellfish and render these foodstuffs unfit for human consumption. These toxins, released into seawater during algal occurrences, can be monitored through passive sampling. Acetone, methanol and isopropanol were evaluated for their efficiency in extracting toxins from algal biomass. Isopropanol was chosen for further experiments thanks to a slightly higher recovery and no artifact formation. Comparison of Oasis HLB, Strata-X, BondElut C18 and HP-20 sorbent materials in SPE-mode led to the choice of Oasis HLB, HP-20 and Strata-X. These three sorbents were separately exposed as passive samplers for 24 h to seawater spiked with algal extracts containing known amounts of okadaic acid (OA), azaspiracids (AZAs), pinnatoxin-G (PnTX-G), 13-desmethyl spirolide-C (SPX1) and palytoxins (PlTXs). Low density polyethylene (LDPE) and silicone rubber (PDMS) strips were tested in parallel on similar mixtures of spiked natural seawater for 24 h. These strips gave significantly lower recoveries than the polymeric sorbents. Irrespective of the toxin group, the adsorption rate of toxins on HP-20 was slower than on Oasis HLB and Strata-X. However, HP-20 and Strata-X gave somewhat higher recoveries after 24 h exposure. Irrespective of the sorbent tested, recoveries were generally highest for cyclic imines and OA group toxins, slightly lower for AZAs, and the lowest for palytoxins. Trials in re-circulated closed tanks with mussels exposed to Vulcanodinium rugosum or Prorocentrum lima allowed for further evaluation of passive samplers. In these experiments with different sorbent materials competing for toxins in the same container, Strata-X accumulated toxins faster than Oasis HLB, and HP-20, and to higher levels. The deployment of these three sorbents at Ingril French Mediterranean lagoon to detect PnTX-G in the water column showed accumulation of higher levels on HP-20 and Oasis HLB compared to Strata-X. This study has significantly extended the range of sorbents for passive sampling of marine toxins. In particular, sorbents were included that had previously been evaluated for polyhalogenated contaminants, pharmaceuticals, phytochemicals or veterinary residues. Moreover, this study has for the first time demonstrated the usefulness of the polymeric Oasis HLB and Strata-X sorbents in laboratory and field studies for various microalgal toxins. PMID:24709758

  12. DNA barcoding and metabarcoding of standardized samples reveal patterns of marine benthic diversity

    PubMed Central

    Leray, Matthieu; Knowlton, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Documenting the diversity of marine life is challenging because many species are cryptic, small, and rare, and belong to poorly known groups. New sequencing technologies, especially when combined with standardized sampling, promise to make comprehensive biodiversity assessments and monitoring feasible on a large scale. We used this approach to characterize patterns of diversity on oyster reefs across a range of geographic scales comprising a temperate location [Virginia (VA)] and a subtropical location [Florida (FL)]. Eukaryotic organisms that colonized multilayered settlement surfaces (autonomous reef monitoring structures) over a 6-mo period were identified by cytochrome c oxidase subunit I barcoding (>2-mm mobile organisms) and metabarcoding (sessile and smaller mobile organisms). In a total area of ?15.64 m2 and volume of ?0.09 m3, 2,179 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were recorded from 983,056 sequences. However, only 10.9% could be matched to reference barcodes in public databases, with only 8.2% matching barcodes with both genus and species names. Taxonomic coverage was broad, particularly for animals (22 phyla recorded), but 35.6% of OTUs detected via metabarcoding could not be confidently assigned to a taxonomic group. The smallest size fraction (500 to 106 ?m) was the most diverse (more than two-thirds of OTUs). There was little taxonomic overlap between VA and FL, and samples separated by ?2 m were significantly more similar than samples separated by ?100 m. Ground-truthing with independent assessments of taxonomic composition indicated that both presence–absence information and relative abundance information are captured by metabarcoding data, suggesting considerable potential for ecological studies and environmental monitoring. PMID:25646458

  13. DNA barcoding and metabarcoding of standardized samples reveal patterns of marine benthic diversity.

    PubMed

    Leray, Matthieu; Knowlton, Nancy

    2015-02-17

    Documenting the diversity of marine life is challenging because many species are cryptic, small, and rare, and belong to poorly known groups. New sequencing technologies, especially when combined with standardized sampling, promise to make comprehensive biodiversity assessments and monitoring feasible on a large scale. We used this approach to characterize patterns of diversity on oyster reefs across a range of geographic scales comprising a temperate location [Virginia (VA)] and a subtropical location [Florida (FL)]. Eukaryotic organisms that colonized multilayered settlement surfaces (autonomous reef monitoring structures) over a 6-mo period were identified by cytochrome c oxidase subunit I barcoding (>2-mm mobile organisms) and metabarcoding (sessile and smaller mobile organisms). In a total area of ?15.64 m(2) and volume of ?0.09 m(3), 2,179 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were recorded from 983,056 sequences. However, only 10.9% could be matched to reference barcodes in public databases, with only 8.2% matching barcodes with both genus and species names. Taxonomic coverage was broad, particularly for animals (22 phyla recorded), but 35.6% of OTUs detected via metabarcoding could not be confidently assigned to a taxonomic group. The smallest size fraction (500 to 106 ?m) was the most diverse (more than two-thirds of OTUs). There was little taxonomic overlap between VA and FL, and samples separated by ?2 m were significantly more similar than samples separated by ?100 m. Ground-truthing with independent assessments of taxonomic composition indicated that both presence-absence information and relative abundance information are captured by metabarcoding data, suggesting considerable potential for ecological studies and environmental monitoring. PMID:25646458

  14. Determination of total mercury for marine environmental monitoring studies by solid sampling continuum source high resolution atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandjukov, Petko; Orani, Anna Maria; Han, Eunmi; Vassileva, Emilia

    2015-01-01

    The most critical step in almost all commonly used analytical procedures for Hg determination is the sample preparation due to its extreme volatility. One of the possible solutions of this problem is the application of methods for direct analysis of solid samples. The possibilities for solid sampling high resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry (HR CS AAS) determination of total mercury in various marine environmental samples e.g. sediments and biota are object of the present study. The instrumental parameters were optimized in order to obtain reproducible and interference free analytical signal. A calibration technique based on the use of solid standard certified reference materials similar to the nature of the analyzed sample was developed and applied to various CRMs and real samples. This technique allows simple and reliable evaluation of the uncertainty of the result and the metrological characteristics of the method. A validation approach in line with the requirements of ISO 17025 standard and Eurachem guidelines was followed. With this in mind, selectivity, working range (0.06 to 25 ng for biota and 0.025 to 4 ng for sediment samples, expressed as total Hg) linearity (confirmed by Student's t-test), bias (1.6-4.3%), repeatability (4-9%), reproducibility (9-11%), and absolute limit of detection (0.025 ng for sediment, 0.096 ng for marine biota) were systematically assessed using solid CRMs. The relative expanded uncertainty was estimated at 15% for sediment sample and 8.5% for marine biota sample (k = 2). Demonstration of traceability of measurement results is also presented. The potential of the proposed analytical procedure, based on solid sampling HR CS AAS technique was demonstrated by direct analysis of sea sediments form the Caribbean region and various CRMs. Overall, the use of solid sampling HR CS AAS permits obtaining significant advantages for the determination of this complex analyte in marine samples, such as straightforward calibration, a high sample throughput (15 min per sample), sufficient precision, a suitable limit of detection, and reduced risk of analyte loss and contamination.

  15. Student Recreation and Wellness Center Campus Recreational Services -Aquatics

    E-print Network

    Hemmers, Oliver

    1 UNLV Student Recreation and Wellness Center Campus Recreational Services - Aquatics Assumption and Wellness Center (hereinafter "SRWC") is offering swimming lessons, which involves certain risks SRWC's employees' instructions or failure to ask for information or assistance; 6. Injuries resulting

  16. Partitioning of alcohol ethoxylates and polyethylene glycols in the marine environment: field samplings vs laboratory experiments.

    PubMed

    Traverso-Soto, Juan M; Brownawell, Bruce J; González-Mazo, Eduardo; Lara-Martín, Pablo A

    2014-08-15

    Nowadays, alcohol ethoxylates (AEOs) constitute the most important group of non-ionic surfactants, used in a wide range of applications such as household cleaners and detergents. Significant amounts of these compounds and their degradation products (polyethylene glycols, PEGs, which are also used for many other applications) reach aquatic environments, and are eliminated from the water column by degradation and sorption processes. This work deals with the environmental distribution of AEOs and PEGs in the Long Island Sound Estuary, a setting impacted by sewage discharges from New York City (NYC). The distribution of target compounds in seawater was influenced by tides, consistent with salinity differences, and concentrations in suspended solid samples ranged from 1.5 to 20.5 ?g/g. The more hydrophobic AEOs were mostly attached to the particulate matter whereas the more polar PEGs were predominant in the dissolved form. Later, the sorption of these chemicals was characterized in the laboratory. Experimental and environmental sorption coefficients for AEOs and PEGs showed average values from 3607 to 164,994 L/kg and from 74 to 32,862 L/kg, respectively. The sorption data were fitted to a Freundlich isotherm model with parameters n and log KF between 0.8-1.2 and 1.46-4.39 L/kg, respectively. AEO and PEG sorptions on marine sediment were also found to be mostly not affected by changes in salinity. PMID:24887194

  17. Recreation Handbook for State and Local Unit Recreation Committees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association for Retarded Citizens, Arlington, TX.

    The recreation handbook provides broad guidelines and lists sources of information for state and local units of the National Association for Retarded Citizens (NARC) to develop recreational programs throughout the nation. Described are the importance of recreation for reasons such as developing good habits of physical fitness, survey results…

  18. Wider sampling reveals a non-sister relationship for geographically contiguous lineages of a marine mussel

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, Regina L; Nicastro, Katy R; Costa, Joana; McQuaid, Christopher D; Serrão, Ester A; Zardi, Gerardo I

    2014-01-01

    The accuracy of phylogenetic inference can be significantly improved by the addition of more taxa and by increasing the spatial coverage of sampling. In previous studies, the brown mussel Perna perna showed a sister–lineage relationship between eastern and western individuals contiguously distributed along the South African coastline. We used mitochondrial (COI) and nuclear (ITS) sequence data to further analyze phylogeographic patterns within P. perna. Significant expansion of the geographical coverage revealed an unexpected pattern. The western South African lineage shared the most recent common ancestor (MRCA) with specimens from Angola, Venezuela, and Namibia, whereas eastern South African specimens and Mozambique grouped together, indicating a non-sister relationship for the two South African lineages. Two plausible biogeographic scenarios to explain their origin were both supported by the hypotheses-testing analysis. One includes an Indo-Pacific origin for P. perna, dispersal into the Mediterranean and Atlantic through the Tethys seaway, followed by recent secondary contact after southward expansion of the western and eastern South African lineages. The other scenario (Out of South Africa) suggests an ancient vicariant divergence of the two lineages followed by their northward expansion. Nevertheless, the “Out of South Africa” hypothesis would require a more ancient divergence between the two lineages. Instead, our estimates indicated that they diverged very recently (310 kyr), providing a better support for an Indo-Pacific origin of the two South African lineages. The arrival of the MRCA of P. perna in Brazil was estimated at 10 [0–40] kyr. Thus, the hypothesis of a recent introduction in Brazil through hull fouling in wooden vessels involved in the transatlantic itineraries of the slave trade did not receive strong support, but given the range for this estimate, it could not be discarded. Wider geographic sampling of marine organisms shows that lineages with contiguous distributions need not share a common ancestry. PMID:25360249

  19. Man and the marine environment

    SciTech Connect

    Ragotzkie, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    Written by marine scientists, this series of essays offers insight to man's interactions with the sea on both technological and human terms. It examines the inherent limits of man's relationship to the complex marine environment. It includes accounts of the ways people encounter the sea: in recreation; in fishing; in diving and work; in managing its coasts and beaches; and in its use for transportation. CONTENTS: Marine Recreation. Fishing Peoples. Shipping in the Great Lakes. Man Undersea. Work in the Sea. Man versus the Sea at the Shore. Coastal Management: an Unfinished Undertaking. Coastal Law. Great Lakes: a Microcosm of the World Ocean. Index.

  20. Marine Mammal Center

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    A non-profit hospital located in the Golden Gate National Recreation Area near Sausalito, California that rescues and rehabilitates marine mammals. Site contains information on education, research, and adopt-a-seal; features a photo gallery and FAQs. Volunteer, membership, and donation opportunities available. Information on what to do when finding a stranded marine mammal and stay current with the Center's patients. Education programs available at the Center or at your location (fees associated).

  1. Bacteria and Nutrients in the Obhur Recreational Sharm, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turki, Adnan; Mudarris, Mohammed

    2013-04-01

    Environmental pollution that render waters along the recreational shore unsatisfactory for use by the general public has become a global health problem. This study was carried out to examine the marine waters in sampling stations located at Sharm Obhur (North of Jeddah). These parameters included: total coliform (TC), l fecal coliform (FC) and nutrients (NO2-N, NO3-N, NH4-N and PO4-P). A comparison of the mean values of nutrients in Sharm Obhur with those of other locations in the Red Sea suggests that the mean levels of nutrients were similar to those of unpolluted areas. TC and FC counts were higher at the north sampling stations than the south ones, and with little variations between their numbers. FC was not recovered at stations to the south. The study shows that TC and FC counts at all sampling stations similar to the levels reported for normal unpolluted sea water. Keywords: Pollution, Nutrients, Coliforms, Sharm Obhur, Red Sea.

  2. Recreation of scanned documents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tim Gielissen; Maarten Marx

    Scanned and OCRed data leads to large file sizes if facsimile images are included. This makes storage of, and providing online access to large data sets costly. Manually analyzing such data is cumbersome because of long download and pro- cessing times. It may thus be advantageous to recreate the scanned documents as documents without scanned images which nevertheless closely resemble

  3. Computer Perspectives in Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haderlie, Brian M., Ed.

    This publication describes applications and/or research involved with computer use for professionals in leisure, parks, and recreation. Papers presented are: (1) "Software in the Eighties: Information Exchange and Clearinghouse Applications" (Jeff A. Stuyt); (2) "Microcomputer Applications for the Manager of the Future" (Christine Z. Howe); (3)…

  4. NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY Campus Recreation

    E-print Network

    Sridhar, Srinivas

    are designed to improve fitness levels and focus on cardiovascular, muscular, and flexibility training an individualized fitness plan based on an initial evaluation of cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength, bodyNORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY Campus Recreation 140 Marino Center Boston, MA 02115 Fitness

  5. The Computer and Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Paul

    The paper examines the applications of microcomputers to recreation programing for blind persons. The accessibility of microcomputers to this population is discussed, and the advantages as well as disadvantages of speech synthesis equipment are noted. Information is presented on the modification of hardware for Radio Shack and Apple computers.…

  6. Therapeutic Recreation Directory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Dixon, Charles C.

    The Therapeutic Recreation Directory has an abundance of information for the therapeutic recreation specialist, or those who study and teach in the field. There is an extensive collection of activity ideas, ranging from sports and cookery, for educators to experiment with in the classroom or for professionals to use on the job. This site also hosts inTeRlink, a long-running and constantly updated newsletter about developments in recreational therapy, found by clicking on the �News� link on the left hand side of the home page. All articles from the last ten years are available in the archive. A bulletin board, chat room, and forum keep professionals and students informed about current TR issues, and surveys help to gather and disseminate information and ideas about new developments in TR services. Visitors will also find the �Forms� link very helpful in nearly every aspect of providing recreational therapy to clients, including forms to help assess and treat patients, and guidelines on planning and implementing new therapeutic programs.

  7. Recreative Arts Outdoor Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Ray

    Emphasizing an interdisciplinary, experiential learning approach, this curriculum guide is designed for a one year recreative arts-outdoor education course for high school students in the Dallas (Texas) Independent School District. The course objective is to develop the skills and knowledge necessary for fostering responsible behavior in an…

  8. Recreational Vehicle Trades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felice, Michael

    This curriculum guide provides materials for a competency-based course in recreational vehicle trades at the secondary level. The curriculum design uses the curriculum infused model for the teaching of basic skills as part of vocational education and demonstrates the relationship of vocationally related skills to communication, mathematics, and…

  9. A Social and Economic Characterization of the U.S. Gulf of Mexico Recreational Shark Fishery

    E-print Network

    A Social and Economic Characterization of the U.S. Gulf of Mexico Recreational Shark Fishery MARK R. FISHER and ROBERT B. DITTON Introduction To protect sharks from overfishing, the National Marine tions of the National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA. ABSTRACT-A mail survey of tourna ment shark

  10. Adaptive Sampling for Marine Microorganism Bin Zhang, Gaurav S. Sukhatme and Aristides A. G. Requicha

    E-print Network

    Sukhatme, Gaurav S.

    a thermocline by using a mobile sensor network. Simulations and experiments using a mote test bed demonstrate provide raw data but also draw inferences and provide high level information. Wireless sensor networks on a particular application: Marine Microorganism Monitoring, which we introduce next. Microorganisms

  11. 36 CFR 71.10 - Special recreation permits and special recreation permit fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...recreation permit fees. (a) Special recreation permits may be required in accordance...administering bureaus for specialized recreation uses, such as, but not limited to, group activities, recreation events, and the use of...

  12. 36 CFR 71.10 - Special recreation permits and special recreation permit fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...recreation permit fees. (a) Special recreation permits may be required in accordance...administering bureaus for specialized recreation uses, such as, but not limited to, group activities, recreation events, and the use of...

  13. Assessing the Value of Recreational Divers for Censusing Elasmobranchs

    PubMed Central

    Ward-Paige, Christine A.; Lotze, Heike K.

    2011-01-01

    Background Around the world, researchers are using the observations and experiences of citizens to describe patterns in animal populations. This data is often collected via ongoing sampling or by synthesizing past experiences. Since elasmobranchs are relatively rare, obtaining data for broad-scale trend analysis requires high sampling effort. Elasmobranchs are also relatively large and conspicuous and therefore it may be possible to enlist recreational divers to collect data on their occurrence and relative abundance from daily dive activities. For this, however, a good understanding of the value of data collected by recreational divers is essential. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we explore the value of recreational divers for censusing elasmobranchs using a diverse set of data sources. First, we use a simulation experiment to explore detection rates of the roving diver technique, used by recreational divers, across a range of fish densities and speeds. Next, using a field survey, we show that inexperienced recreational divers detect and count elasmobranchs as well as experienced recreational divers. Finally, we use semi-structured interviews of recreational dive instructors to demonstrate the value of their recollections in terms of effort and their descriptions of spatial and temporal distributions of sharks in Thailand. Conclusions/Significance Overall, this study provides initial ground-work for using recreational divers for monitoring elasmobranch populations. If used appropriately, citizen-collected data may provide additional information that can be used to complement more standardized surveys and to describe population trends across a range of spatial and temporal scales. Due to the non-extractive nature of this data, recreational divers may also provide important insight into the success of conservation initiatives, such as shark sanctuaries and no-take zones. PMID:22016771

  14. Introduction to Therapeutic Recreation Services

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Health Professionals Teachers Submit Home About Goals Articles Directories Videos Resources Contact Home About Goals Articles Directories Videos Resources Contact Therapeutic Recreation Services Home » Article ...

  15. From Recreational Mathematics to Recreational Programming, and Back

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz Jimenez, B. C.; Ruiz Munoz, M.

    2011-01-01

    Recreational Programming (RecPro) is the discipline that encourages the study of computer programming through ludic problems. Problems that are typically studied within this discipline are similar to those of Recreational Mathematics (RecMat), which sometimes leads to the confusion of these two disciplines. The objective for RecPro is to write…

  16. 78 FR 73820 - Publicly Managed Recreation Opportunities, Recreation Fees

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-09

    ...Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act (REA) (16 U.S.C. 6801-6814), which...Service's interim implementation guidelines on REA and obsolete direction on recreation fees...Background and Need for the Final Directive REA authorizes the Federal land management...

  17. Arsenic species extraction of biological marine samples (Periwinkles, Littorina littorea) from a highly contaminated site.

    PubMed

    Whaley-Martin, K J; Koch, I; Reimer, K J

    2012-01-15

    Arsenic is ubiquitous in the tissues of marine organisms and in uncontaminated environments it is dominantly present as the highly soluble and easily extractable non-toxic arsenical, arsenobetaine. However in contaminated environments, higher proportions of inorganic arsenic, which is much less soluble, are accumulated into the tissues of marine organisms, resulting in lower extraction efficiencies (defined as the percent extracted arsenic of the total arsenic). This study carried out a comparative analysis between three different two-step arsenic extraction methods based on Foster et al. [27] from highly contaminated tissue of the marine periwinkle, Littorina littorea. The first extraction step used 100% water, 1:1 methanol-water, or a 9:1 methanol-water as the extraction solvent and the second step consisted of a gently heated dilute nitric acid extraction. The optimized two step extraction method was 1:1 methanol-water extraction followed by a 2% HNO(3) extraction, based on maximum amounts of extracted species, including organoarsenic species. PMID:22265486

  18. 78 FR 4120 - Recreation Resource Advisory Committees

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-18

    ...INFORMATION: Background The Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act (REA), signed in December 2004, directs the Secretary of Agriculture...limiting the recreation fee program; and fee- level changes. The REA grants flexibility to Recreation RACs by stating that the...

  19. 36 CFR 1002.23 - Recreation fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Presidio Trust to the same extent that recreation fees have been established for the Golden Gate National Recreation Area in accordance with 36 CFR part...services, or participating in group activities, recreation events, or other specialized...

  20. 43 CFR 17.270 - Recreation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...for the operation of programs or activities involving recreation. (a) Accessibility in existing recreation facilities. In the case of existing recreation facilities, accessibility of programs or activities shall mean accessibility of...

  1. 43 CFR 17.270 - Recreation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...for the operation of programs or activities involving recreation. (a) Accessibility in existing recreation facilities. In the case of existing recreation facilities, accessibility of programs or activities shall mean accessibility of...

  2. 36 CFR 1002.23 - Recreation fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Presidio Trust to the same extent that recreation fees have been established for the Golden Gate National Recreation Area in accordance with 36 CFR part...services, or participating in group activities, recreation events, or other specialized...

  3. 75 FR 57441 - Availability of Seats for the Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary Advisory...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-21

    ...Seats for the Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council...seats on the Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council: Commercial Shipping, Whale Watching, Ocean Recreation,...

  4. 75 FR 77615 - Availability of Seats for the Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary Advisory...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-13

    ...Seats for the Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council...seats on the Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council...alternate only), Commercial Shipping, Whale Watching, Ocean Recreation,...

  5. Health, Physical Education, and Recreation

    E-print Network

    Polly, David

    , and Recreation 1 Mission of the School 1 A History of Leadership 1 Organization of the School 1 HPER on the World Wide Web 1 Curriculum and Degrees 2 HPER Library 2 HPER Alumni Association 2 Assessment of Student, and Recreation 5 Department of Applied Health Science 5 Faculty 5 Applied Health Science Web Page 5 Description

  6. Seattle University Recreation Position Description

    E-print Network

    Carter, John

    skills · Crisis management skills · Written and verbal skills · Money management skills · Experience event supervision to money management. He/she must also have the ability to effectively dealSeattle University Recreation Position Description Title: University Recreation Office Manager Date

  7. Wipe sampling of amphetamine-type stimulants and recreational drugs on selected household surfaces with analysis by ultra-performance liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Madireddy, Sri Bharat; Bodeddula, Vanaja Reddy; Mansani, Sravan Kumar; Wells, Martha J M; Boles, Jeffrey O

    2013-06-15

    Sorption characteristics of eight drugs related to recreational and clandestine activity-amphetamine, cocaine, heroin, N-formyl amphetamine, N-formyl methamphetamine, methamphetamine, 3, 4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), and pseudoephedrine-were evaluated on selected kitchen countertop surfaces. Methanol-dampened Whatman 40 filter paper wipes were used to collect samples from eleven surfaces including alkyd resin, ceramic tiles, glass, granite, laminate, limestone, marble, quartz compac, quartz real, soap stone, and stainless steel. The filter paper wipes were analyzed by a rapid three-minute UPLC-QTOF method, following ammonium acetate buffer (pH 5.8-6.2) extraction. The average percentage recoveries after 15 h of exposure to the surface materials tested, was found to be highest for cocaine and MDMA and lowest for amphetamine and methamphetamine. Among the eleven countertop surfaces, overall recoveries for marble were observed to be the least, whereas soapstone, quartz compac and stainless steel were among the highest. Scanning electron microscopic images of the surfaces provided a unique view of surface irregularities that potentially influenced drug recovery. Aging, migration, solvent composition, and volatility were examined. The variation in recovery of drugs was attributed to four key factors: compound volatility, surface composition, surface-compound interaction, and solvent composition. PMID:23583948

  8. Impaired Inhibitory Control in Recreational Cocaine Users

    PubMed Central

    Colzato, Lorenza S.; van den Wildenberg, Wery P. M.; Hommel, Bernhard

    2007-01-01

    Chronic use of cocaine is associated with impairment in response inhibition but it is an open question whether and to which degree findings from chronic users generalize to the upcoming type of recreational users. This study compared the ability to inhibit and execute behavioral responses in adult recreational users and in a cocaine-free-matched sample controlled for age, race, gender distribution, level of intelligence, and alcohol consumption. Response inhibition and response execution were measured by a stop-signal paradigm. Results show that users and non users are comparable in terms of response execution but users need significantly more time to inhibit responses to stop-signals than non users. Interestingly, the magnitude of the inhibitory deficit was positively correlated with the individuals lifetime cocaine exposure suggesting that the magnitude of the impairment is proportional to the degree of cocaine consumed. PMID:17989775

  9. Recreation.gov: Recreational Opportunities on Federal Lands

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    If you are searching for an American summer vacation destination, this site is an excellent starting point. Recreation.gov, provided by several US government agencies, is a searchable database that allows users to select the type of outdoor recreation they are interested in, any of six federal agencies, and geographic location; search results include Bureau of Land Management, Fish and Wildlife Service, Forest Service, Bureau of Reclamation, Corps of Engineers, and National Park Service sites that support the activity or information entered. The database contains 1,956 recreational areas at this time. Contact information and a Weather Service forecast are provided; hyperlinks to the site are also provided, when available.

  10. Deep Water, Shallow Water: Marine Animal Homes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soltow, Willow

    1984-01-01

    Examines the diversity of life in the oceans and ways in which teachers can explore ocean habitats with their students without leaving the classroom. Topic areas considered include: restricted habitats, people and marine habitats, pollution, incidental kills, and the commercial and recreational uses of marine waters. (JN)

  11. Economics and Hawaii's Marine Fisheries Introduction

    E-print Network

    fishery is limited. Economic Values Determining the economic value of Hawaii's marine fisheries is not sim and recreational re sources and cultural practices, nor even a recitation of the kind of economic processes whichEconomics and Hawaii's Marine Fisheries Introduction Fishing and seafood consumption permeate

  12. Marine Debris

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-01-01

    Marine debris is an environmental problem of global importance, enlisting the concern and action of scientists, policy makers, as well as the general public. This three-lesson kit focuses primarily on plastic marine debris. Students critically examine data and samples and take part in activities that explore the causes, geographical distribution, and biological impacts of marine debris. Each lesson can be completed in about 50-60 minutes, but many of the activities are discrete and can be easily rearranged to fit various curricular objectives and time constraints.

  13. Validation of Ocean Color Satellite Data Products in Under Sampled Marine Areas. Chapter 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subramaniam, Ajit; Hood, Raleigh R.; Brown, Christopher W.; Carpenter, Edward J.; Capone, Douglas G.

    2001-01-01

    The planktonic marine cyanobacterium, Trichodesmium sp., is broadly distributed throughout the oligotrophic marine tropical and sub-tropical oceans. Trichodesmium, which typically occurs in macroscopic bundles or colonies, is noteworthy for its ability to form large surface aggregations and to fix dinitrogen gas. The latter is important because primary production supported by N2 fixation can result in a net export of carbon from the surface waters to deep ocean and may therefore play a significant role in the global carbon cycle. However, information on the distribution and density of Trichodesmium from shipboard measurements through the oligotrophic oceans is very sparse. Such estimates are required to quantitatively estimate total global rates of N2 fixation. As a result current global rate estimates are highly uncertain. Thus in order to understand the broader biogeochemical importance of Trichodesmium and N2 fixation in the oceans, we need better methods to estimate the global temporal and spatial variability of this organism. One approach that holds great promise is satellite remote sensing. Satellite ocean color sensors are ideal instruments for estimating global phytoplankton biomass, especially that due to episodic blooms, because they provide relatively high frequency synoptic information over large areas. Trichodesmium has a combination of specific ultrastructural and biochemical features that lend themselves to identification of this organism by remote sensing. Specifically, these features are high backscatter due to the presence of gas vesicles, and absorption and fluorescence of phycoerythrin. The resulting optical signature is relatively unique and should be detectable with satellite ocean color sensors such as the Sea-Viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS).

  14. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart G of... - Sampling Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing of Marine Engines

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Selective Enforcement Auditing of Marine Engines A Appendix A to Subpart G of Part 91 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES...

  15. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart G of... - Sampling Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing of Marine Engines

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Selective Enforcement Auditing of Marine Engines A Appendix A to Subpart G of Part 91 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES...

  16. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart G of... - Sampling Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing of Marine Engines

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Selective Enforcement Auditing of Marine Engines A Appendix A to Subpart G of Part 91 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES...

  17. Sample Limited Characterization of a Novel Disulfide-Rich Venom Peptide Toxin from Terebrid Marine Snail Terebra variegata

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Prachi; Grigoryan, Alexandre; Bhuiyan, Mohammed H.; Ueberheide, Beatrix; Russell, Victoria; Quinoñez, Jose; Moy, Patrick; Chait, Brian T.; Poget, Sébastien F.; Holford, Mandë

    2014-01-01

    Disulfide-rich peptide toxins found in the secretions of venomous organisms such as snakes, spiders, scorpions, leeches, and marine snails are highly efficient and effective tools for novel therapeutic drug development. Venom peptide toxins have been used extensively to characterize ion channels in the nervous system and platelet aggregation in haemostatic systems. A significant hurdle in characterizing disulfide-rich peptide toxins from venomous animals is obtaining significant quantities needed for sequence and structural analyses. Presented here is a strategy for the structural characterization of venom peptide toxins from sample limited (4 ng) specimens via direct mass spectrometry sequencing, chemical synthesis and NMR structure elucidation. Using this integrated approach, venom peptide Tv1 from Terebra variegata was discovered. Tv1 displays a unique fold not witnessed in prior snail neuropeptides. The novel structural features found for Tv1 suggest that the terebrid pool of peptide toxins may target different neuronal agents with varying specificities compared to previously characterized snail neuropeptides. PMID:24713808

  18. Environmental Impacts of Marine Exotics

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    James Carlton (Williams College, Williamstown, Massachusetts; )

    2004-05-01

    The issue-focused interview exposes marine exotic, or invasive, species as a global problem. These uninvited plants and animals: compete with native species for space, food, and other resources, put a strain on the economy, such as commercial fisheries, can contribute to public health problems, and impact recreational enjoyment by fouling the environment.

  19. Iron mineralogy and bioaccessibility of dust generated from soils as determined by reflectance spectroscopy and magnetic and chemical properties--Nellis Dunes recreational area, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldstein, Harland L.; Reynolds, Richard L.; Morman, Suzette A.; Moskowitz, Bruce; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Goossens, Dirk; Buck, Brenda J.; Flagg, Cody; Till, Jessica; Yauk, Kimberly; Berquó, Thelma S.

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric mineral dust exerts many important effects on the Earth system, such as atmospheric temperatures, marine productivity, and melting of snow and ice. Mineral dust also can have detrimental effects on human health through respiration of very small particles and the leaching of metals in various organs. These effects can be better understood through characterization of the physical and chemical properties of dust, including certain iron oxide minerals, for their extraordinary radiative properties and possible effects on lung inflammation. Studies of dust from the Nellis Dunes recreation area near Las Vegas, Nevada, focus on characteristics of radiative properties (capacity of dust to absorb solar radiation), iron oxide mineral type and size, chemistry, and bioaccessibility of metals in fluids that simulate human gastric, lung, and phagolysosomal fluids. In samples of dust from the Nellis Dunes recreation area with median grain sizes of 2.4, 3.1, and 4.3 micrometers, the ferric oxide minerals goethite and hematite, at least some of it nanosized, were identified. In one sample, in vitro bioaccessibility experiments revealed high bioaccessibility of arsenic in all three biofluids and higher leachate concentration and bioaccessibility for copper, uranium, and vanadium in the simulated lung fluid than in the phagolysosomal fluid. The combination of methods used here to characterize mineral dust at the Nellis Dunes recreation area can be applied to global dust and broad issues of public health.

  20. Organic UV filter concentrations in marine mussels from French coastal regions.

    PubMed

    Bachelot, Morgane; Li, Zhi; Munaron, Dominique; Le Gall, Patrik; Casellas, Claude; Fenet, Hélène; Gomez, Elena

    2012-03-15

    The accumulation of EHMC, OCT and OD-PABA, three common UV filter compounds, was investigated in marine mussels. Wild Mytilus edulis and Mytilus galloprovincialis were sampled in ten sites along the French Atlantic and Mediterranean coasts from June to November. In mussel tissues, 100% of the samples had quantifiable EHMC concentrations ranging from 3 to 256ngg(-1) dry weight, while 55% of the samples had detectable OCT concentrations ranging from under 2 to 7 112ngg(-1) dry weight. These concentrations significantly increased with the rising air temperature in summer, the recreational pressure and the geomorphological structure of the sampling sites (its lack of openness to the wide). This is the first study to report bioaccumulation of UV filters in marine mussels, thus highlighting the need for further monitoring and assessment. PMID:22330425

  1. 76 FR 10915 - Notice of Use Authorizations; Special Recreation Permits, Other Than on Developed Recreation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-28

    ...BLM) is adjusting certain special recreation permit fees for various recreation activities on BLM administered Public Lands and...competitive, organized group and activity special recreation permit fees and minimum assigned...

  2. Non-lethal method to obtain stomach samples from a large marine predator and the use of DNA analysis to improve dietary information

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Adam Barnett; Kevin S. Redd; Stewart D. Frusher; John D. Stevens; Jayson M. Semmens

    2010-01-01

    Dietary information of apex predators is crucial to understanding community dynamics and ecosystem processes. However, as dietary studies traditionally involve lethal sampling, obtaining this essential information can have repercussions on predator populations and the structure and functioning of marine ecosystems. With stronger emphasis being placed on conservation of species that are vulnerable to overexploitation, the need for non-destructive methods of

  3. A method for trace element determination of marine periphyton communities on discs of float glass (without sample preparation) using total-reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. P. Pettersson

    1998-01-01

    A quick method for trace element determination of marine periphyton communities on soda float glass discs is presented. After addition of an internal standard, the community is measured by total-reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) spectrometry. No sample preparation is required except a gentle wash with distilled water. The soda glass disc on which the periphyton community grows is used directly as

  4. Solubilities of Al, Pb, Cu, and Zn in rain sampled in the marine environment over the North Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Lim; T. D. Jickells; J. L. Colin; R. Losno

    1994-01-01

    Chemical processes controlling the dissolved and particulate phase distribution of crustal (Al) and noncrustal metals (Pb, Cu, and Zn) appear to differ in marine precipitation sampled over the North Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea. Dissolved Al appears to be in equilibrium with a trivalent Al salt at rainwater pH < 5.1, whereas dissolved Pb, Cu, and Zn concentrations are probably

  5. New procedure for recovering extra- and intracellular DNA from marine sediment samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alawi, M.; Kallmeyer, J.

    2012-12-01

    Extracellular DNA (eDNA) is a ubiquitous biological compound in aquatic sediment and soil. Despite major methodological advances, analysis of DNA from sediment is still technically challenging, not just because of the co-elution of inhibitory substances, but also due to co-elution of extracellular DNA, which potentially leads to an overestimate of the actual diversity. Previous studies suggested that eDNA might play an important role in biogeochemical element cycling, horizontal gene transfer and stabilization of biofilm structures. Several protocols based on the precipitation of eDNA e.g. with CTAB and ethanol have already been published. However, using these methods we did not succeed in quantifying very low amounts of eDNA (e.g. <1?g eDNA/g dry wt) in marine sediment even when using DNA carriers like glycogen. Since the recovery of eDNA by precipitation strongly depends on its concentration, these previously published procedures are not adequate for deep biosphere sediment due to the low eDNA content. We have focused on the question whether eDNA could be a source of nitrogen and phosphorus for microbes in the subseafloor biosphere. Therefore we developed a new method for the (semi)-quantitative extraction of eDNA from sediment. The new extraction procedure is based on sequential washing of the sediment to remove simultaneously eDNA and microbial cells without lysing them. After separation of the cells by centrifugation, the eDNA was extracted from the supernatant and purified by adsorption onto a solid phase, followed by removal of the solids and subsequent elution of the pure eDNA. Intracellular DNA (iDNA) was extracted and purified from the cell pellet using a commercial DNA extraction kit. Additional to a very low detection limit and reproducible quantification, this new method allows separation and purification of both extracellular and intracellular DNA to an extent that inhibitors are removed and downstream applications like PCR can be performed. To evaluate the new extraction method two sediments with rather opposing composition were analyzed. Sediment from the South Pacific Gyre, the most oligotrophic oceanic region on earth and organic-rich Baltic Sea sediment (Northern Germany) were processed. Using this new procedure high purity genomic iDNA and eDNA with a molecular size range between 20 bp and 50k bp can be simultaneously recovered even from very oligotrophic sediment with very low cell abundances. The main fraction of recovered eDNA was suitable for downstream applications like PCR and had a molecular size that indicates minimal shearing. Despite about two decades of research many questions about deep subsurface life remain unanswered. The fact that microbes can be found even in deep oligotrophic marine sediment raises the fundamental questions of the types and availability of substrates and their biogeochemical cycling. This is the first study that provides evidence that eDNA is an important potential substrate for microorganisms in the deep biosphere. Also, our results show a link between cell counts and eDNA content, indicating that the eDNA pool in the investigated sediment consist mainly of microbial DNA. Comparative sequence analysis of extracted iDNA and eDNA will provide deeper insights into the origin and turnover of eDNA and the apparent microbial community composition in the deep biosphere.

  6. Z .Marine Chemistry 67 1999 233247 Techniques for determination of trace metals in small samples of

    E-print Network

    Cullen, Jay T.

    Brunswick, NJ 08901-8521, USA Received 5 May 1999; accepted 2 July 1999 Abstract The oceanic biogeochemical of three size-classes of phytoplankton. At the Pacific station, measured phytoplankton Zn content as Znr fractionation technique, and allows determination of natural and pollutant elements in small samples

  7. Undergraduate Marine Science Program Student Advising Guide

    E-print Network

    Miami, University of

    . Introduction 2. Degree Programs and Sample Curricula MARINE AFFAIRS ­ B.A.M.A MARINE SCIENCE / BIOLOGY ­ B areas, coastal and ocean law, and marine cultural resources Marine Biology Marine biologists studyUndergraduate Marine Science Program Student Advising Guide 2012-2013 #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS 1

  8. Undergraduate Marine Science Program Student Advising Guide

    E-print Network

    Miami, University of

    . Introduction 2. Degree Programs and Sample Curricula MARINE AFFAIRS ­ BAMA MARINE SCIENCE / BIOLOGY ­ BSMAS areas, coastal and ocean law, and marine cultural resources Marine Science/Biology Marine biologistsUndergraduate Marine Science Program Student Advising Guide 2013-2014 #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS 1

  9. Development of a subcritical fluid extraction and GC-MS validation method for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in marine samples.

    PubMed

    Jia, Kai; Feng, Xiaomei; Liu, Kun; Han, Yuqian; Xue, Yong; Xue, Changhu

    2013-04-01

    This paper describes a new procedure for extracting polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from marine samples using subcritical 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (R134a). The extraction procedure was optimized at temperatures varying from 20 to 70°C and pressures ranging from 3 to 15 MPa. The volume of the co-solvent was then optimized using 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (R134a) as the subcritical phase. PCBs were characterized by GC-MS using the optimized conditions of 3 MPa, 30°C, and a co-solvent volume of 6 mL. The average yields of PCBs from subcritical fluid extraction of spiked oyster samples were measured and found to be greater than 90%, with relative standard deviations (RSD) of less than 10%. Detection limits of this method were in the range of 0.045-0.108 ng/g of dry mass. The method was compared to Soxhlet extraction and then applied for monitoring PCBs in oysters from Qingdao, Shandong, China. PMID:23455072

  10. Does getting a dog increase recreational walking?

    PubMed Central

    Cutt, Hayley E; Knuiman, Matthew W; Giles-Corti, Billie

    2008-01-01

    Background This study examines changes in socio-demographic, environmental and intrapersonal factors associated with dog acquisition in non-dog owners at baseline to 12-months follow-up and the effect of dog acquisition on minutes per week of recreational walking. Methods RESIDE study participants completed self-administered questionnaires (baseline and 12-months follow-up) measuring physical activity, dog ownership, dog walking behavior as well as environmental, intrapersonal and socio-demographic factors. Analysis was restricted to 'Continuing non-owners' (i.e., non-owners at both baseline and follow-up; n = 681) and 'New dog owners' (i.e., non-owners who acquired a dog by follow-up; n = 92). Results Overall, 12% of baseline non-owners had acquired a dog at follow-up. Dog acquisition was associated with working and having children at home. Those who changed from single to couple marital status were also more likely to acquire a dog. The increase in minutes of walking for recreation within the neighborhood from baseline to follow-up was 48 minutes/week for new dog owners compared with 12 minutes/week for continuing non-owners (p < 0.05). After adjusting for baseline variables the effect of dog acquisition on the increase in minutes of recreational walking within the neighborhood was 31 minutes (95% CI: 7.39, 54.22; p < 0.01). However, this reduced to 22 minutes (95% CI: -1.53, 45.42; p > 0.05) after further adjustment for change in baseline to follow-up variables. Increase in intention to walk was the main factor contributing to attenuation of the effect of dog acquisition on recreational walking. Conclusion This study used a large representative sample of non-owners to examine the relationship between dog acquisition and recreational walking and provides evidence to suggest that dog acquisition leads to an increase in walking. The most likely mechanism through which dog acquisition facilitates increased physical activity is through behavioral intention via the dog's positive effect on owner's cognitive beliefs about walking, and through the provision of motivation and social support for walking. The results suggest that behavioral intention mediates the relationship between dog acquisition and walking and that dogs may have a significant role in the maintenance of owner walking behavior. PMID:18366804

  11. Recreational water–related illness

    PubMed Central

    Sanborn, Margaret; Takaro, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To review the risk factors, management, and prevention of recreational water–related illness in family practice. Sources of information Original and review articles from January 1998 to February 2012 were identified using PubMed and the search terms water-related illness, recreational water illness, and swimmer illness. Main message There is a 3% to 8% risk of acute gastrointestinal illness (AGI) after swimming. The high-risk groups for AGI are children younger than 5 years, especially if they have not been vaccinated for rotavirus, and elderly and immunocompromised patients. Children are at higher risk because they swallow more water when swimming, stay in the water longer, and play in the shallow water and sand, which are more contaminated. Participants in sports with a lot of water contact like triathlon and kite surfing are also at high risk, and even activities involving partial water contact like boating and fishing carry a 40% to 50% increase in risk of AGI compared with nonwater recreational activities. Stool cultures should be done when a recreational water illness is suspected, and the clinical dehydration scale is a useful clinical tool for assessing the treatment needs of affected children. Conclusion Recreational water illness is the main attributable cause of AGI during swimming season. Recognition that swimming is a substantial source of illness can help prevent recurrent and secondary cases. Rotavirus vaccine is highly recommended for children who will swim frequently. PMID:23673583

  12. Addressing Public Health Risks for Cyanobacteria in Recreational Freshwaters: The Oregon and Vermont Framework

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Stone; William Bress

    2007-01-01

    Toxigenic cyanobacteria, commonly known as blue green algae, are an emerging public health issue. The toxins produced by cyanobacteria have been detected across the United States in marine, freshwater and estuarine systems and associated with adverse health outcomes. The intent of this paper is to focus on how to address risk in a recreational freshwater scenario when toxigenic cyanobacteria are

  13. Health effects of recreational exposure to Moreton Bay, Australia waters during a Lyngbya majuscula bloom.

    PubMed

    Osborne, N J; Shaw, G R; Webb, P M

    2007-04-01

    A survey of residents in an area subject to annual toxic cyanobacterial blooms was undertaken to examine potential health effects of cyanobacteria toxins. The survey assessed the health of marine recreational water users in Deception Bay/Bribie Island area in northern Moreton Bay, Queensland, which is exposed to blooms of the nuisance and potentially harmful cyanobacterium Lyngbya majuscula. A postal survey was mailed to 5000 residents with a response rate of 27%. High numbers of people (78%) responding to the survey reported recreational water activity in Moreton Bay. Of those having marine recreational water activity, 34% reported at least one symptom after exposure to marine waters, with skin itching the most reported (23%). Younger participants had greater water exposure and symptoms than older participants. Participants with greater exposures were more likely to have skin and eye symptoms than less exposed groups, suggesting agents in the marine environment may have contributed to these symptoms. Of those entering Moreton Bay waters 29 (2.7%) reported severe skin symptoms, 12 of whom attended a health professional. Six (0.6%) reported the classic symptoms of recreational water exposure to L. majuscula, severe skin symptoms in the inguinal region. Participants with knowledge of L. majuscula were less likely to report less skin, gastrointestinal and fever and headache symptoms. In conclusion, high numbers of participants reported symptoms after exposure to waters subject to L. majuscula blooms but only a small number appeared to be serious in nature suggesting limited exposure to toxins. PMID:17169427

  14. Estimating the Economic Damage of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita on Commercial and Recreational Fishing Industries

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rex H. Caffey; Richard F. Kazmierczak Jr.; Hamady Diop; Walter R. Keithly Jr.

    2007-01-01

    A USGS analysis of land change data from satellite imagery and field observation indicated that 217 square miles of Louisiana's coastal wetlands were converted to open water because of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. Because of their physical location and marine-dependence, commercial and recreational fishing sectors in Louisiana received a disproportional economic impact from the hurricanes of 2005. Storm surge modeling

  15. Impacts of recreational SCUBA diving at sites with different reef topographies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anthony B. Rouphael; Graeme J. Inglis

    1997-01-01

    Increased participation in marine recreation and tourism has been accompanied by concern for the impacts that these activities have on coral reef environments. We investigated how the topography of coral reef dive sites influences the type and amount of damage done by SCUBA divers to living corals. Independent observations were made on 150 qualified SCUBA divers at six dive sites

  16. Assessing the effectiveness of marine reserves on unsustainably harvested long-lived sessile invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Linares, Cristina; Garrabou, Joaquim; Hereu, Bernat; Diaz, David; Marschal, Christian; Sala, Enric; Zabala, Mikel

    2012-02-01

    Although the rapid recovery of fishes after establishment of a marine reserve is well known, much less is known about the response of long-lived, sessile, benthic organisms to establishment of such reserves. Since antiquity, Mediterranean red coral (Corallium rubrum) has been harvested intensively for use in jewelry, and its distribution is currently smaller than its historical size throughout the Mediterranean Sea. To assess whether establishment of marine reserves is associated with a change in the size and number of red coral colonies that historically were not harvested sustainably, we analyzed temporal changes in mean colony diameter and density from 1992 to 2005 within red coral populations at different study sites in the Medes Islands Marine Reserve (established in 1992) and in adjacent unprotected areas. Moreover, we compared colony size in the Medes Islands Marine Reserve, where recreational diving is allowed and poaching has been observed after reserve establishment, with colony size in three other marine protected areas (Banyuls, Carry-le-Rouet, and Scandola) with the enforced prohibition of fishing and diving. At the end of the study, the size of red coral colonies at all sampling sites in the Medes Islands was significantly smaller than predicted by growth models and smaller than those in marine protected areas without fishing and diving. The annual number of recreational dives and the percent change in the basal diameter of red coral colonies were negatively correlated, which suggests that abrasion by divers may increase the mortality rates of the largest red coral colonies within this reserve . Our study is the first quantitative assessment of a poaching event, which was detected during our monitoring in 2002, inside the marine reserve. Poaching was associated with a loss of approximately 60% of the biomass of red coral colonies. PMID:22098377

  17. CAMPUS RECREATION CLEMSON UNIVERSITY

    E-print Network

    Stuart, Steven J.

    -SITE RECOGNITION Market directly to target audiences with creative on-site sampling. All sampling events provide the ideal marketing platform for effectively reaching the student and campus markets. Our Corporate Sponsorship program provides a prime opportunity to directly market goods and services to our

  18. WILDLIFE RESPONSES TO MOTORIZED WINTER RECREATION IN YELLOWSTONE

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. J. White; Troy Davis

    2005-01-01

    Abstract: We monitored the behavioral responses of bison (Bison bison), elk (Cervus elaphus), and trumpeter swans (Olor buccinator) to motorized winter recreation by repeatedly surveying seven groomed,or plowed road segments in Yellowstone National Park during December 2004 through March 2005. We sampled >2,100 interactions between vehicles and wildlife groups and used multinomial logits models to identify conditions leading to behavioral

  19. Perception and use of a metropolitan greenway system for recreation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul H. Gobster

    1995-01-01

    Greenway development efforts often give priority to corridor length and linkages as top selection criteria, but other factors are also critical in ensuring a successful network of greenways for recreation. On-site surveys of recreationists (n = 2873) who used a diverse sample of 13 greenway trails in metropolitan Chicago showed that trail location relative to home strongly influenced how a

  20. 36 CFR 71.2 - Types of Federal recreation fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...or services furnished at Federal expense; and (c) Special recreation permit fees for specialized recreation uses, such as, but not limited to, group activities, recreation events, and the use of motorized recreation...

  1. 76 FR 27002 - Information Collection; National Recreation Program Administration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-10

    ...and charge fees for recreation uses of Federal recreational...waters, such as group activities, recreation events and motorized...FS-2300-48, National Recreation Permit, is a form...authorize specific activities at particular...

  2. 36 CFR 71.2 - Types of Federal recreation fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...or services furnished at Federal expense; and (c) Special recreation permit fees for specialized recreation uses, such as, but not limited to, group activities, recreation events, and the use of motorized recreation...

  3. Youth's recreation and drug sensations: is there a relationship?

    PubMed

    Cato, B M

    1992-01-01

    Adolescents' social behaviors remain a mystery to parks and recreation providers. Adolescence is a "high-risk" time for all youth in terms of experimenting with potentially health-compromising behavior, whether alcohol, drugs, or sex. Most of these antisocial behaviors occur during adolescents' leisure time. These inferences gave impetus to this research effort. The study was designed to ascertain information on adolescents' preferences for pleasure: drugs or recreation. Data were collected from a sample of 100 high school students from a medium-sized college town, and 100 students from a rural town in Florida. Findings revealed four statistically significant associations in the motives or pleasures sought in recreation and in drug behaviors: "enhancement of popularity," "provision of a means for self-discovery," "achievement of personal goal," and means to rebel against parents. In reference to the latter motive, findings revealed that neither drugs nor recreation were used to rebel against parents. Findings also provide documentation of the value of recreation in insulating adolescents against many of the stressors of contemporary life. PMID:1484327

  4. Pilot Inventory of mammals, reptiles, and amphibians, Golden Gate National Recreation Area, California, 1990-1997

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Semenoff-Irving, M.; Howell, J.A.

    2005-01-01

    The United States Geological Survey Golden Gate Field Station conducted a baseline inventory of terrestrial vertebrates within the Golden Gate National Recreation Area (GGNRA), Marin, San Francisco, and San Mateo Counties, California between 1990 and 1997. We established 456 permanent study plots in 6 major park habitats, including grassland, coastal scrub, riparian woodland, coastal wetland, broad-leaved evergreen forest, and needle-leaved evergreen forest. We tested multiple inventory methods, including live traps, track plate stations, and artificial cover boards, across all years and habitats. In most years, sampling occurred in 3?4 primary sampling sessions between July and September. In 1994, additional sampling occurred in February and May in conjunction with an assessment of Hantavirus exposure in deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus). Overall, we detected 32 mammal, 14 reptile, and 6 amphibian species during 25,222 trap-nights of effort. The deer mouse?the most abundant species detected--accounted for 67% of total captures. We detected the Federal Endangered salt marsh harvest mouse (Reithrodontomys raviventris) at one coastal wetland plot in 1992. This project represents the first phase in the development of a comprehensive terrestrial vertebrate inventory and monitoring program for GGNRA. This report summarizes data on relative abundance, frequency of occurrence, distribution across habitat types, and trap success for terrestrial vertebrates detected during this 7-year effort. It includes comprehensive descriptions of the inventory methods and sampling strategies employed during this survey and is intended to help guide the park in the implementation of future longterm ecological monitoring programs.

  5. Pilot Inventory of Mammals, Reptiles, and Amphibians, Golden Gate National Recreation Area, California, 1990-1997

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Semenoff-Irving, Marcia; Howell, Judd A.

    2005-01-01

    The United States Geological Survey Golden Gate Field Station conducted a baseline inventory of terrestrial vertebrates within the Golden Gate National Recreation Area (GGNRA), Marin, San Francisco, and San Mateo Counties, California between 1990 and 1997. We established 456 permanent study plots in 6 major park habitats, including grassland, coastal scrub, riparian woodland, coastal wetland, broad-leaved evergreen forest, and needle-leaved evergreen forest. We tested multiple inventory methods, including live traps, track plate stations, and artificial cover boards, across all years and habitats. In most years, sampling occurred in 3-4 primary sampling sessions between July and September. In 1994, additional sampling occurred in February and May in conjunction with an assessment of Hantavirus exposure in deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus). Overall, we detected 32 mammal, 14 reptile, and 6 amphibian species during 25,222 trap-nights of effort. The deer mouse-the most abundant species detected--accounted for 67% of total captures. We detected the Federal Endangered salt marsh harvest mouse (Reithrodontomys raviventris) at one coastal wetland plot in 1992. This project represents the first phase in the development of a comprehensive terrestrial vertebrate inventory and monitoring program for GGNRA. This report summarizes data on relative abundance, frequency of occurrence, distribution across habitat types, and trap success for terrestrial vertebrates detected during this 7-year effort. It includes comprehensive descriptions of the inventory methods and sampling strategies employed during this survey and is intended to help guide the park in the implementation of future longterm ecological monitoring programs.

  6. Campus Recreation Center Sports and Recreation Management Internship/Practicum

    E-print Network

    Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

    , Campus Recreation experiences are flexible. Positions are available year-round and for credit hours with practical experience that will round out your education. While we encourage students from all programs core classes have you completed in school that would assist you in your experience at the CRC? 4. What

  7. 75 FR 19608 - Recreation Resource Advisory Committees

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-15

    ...to section 4 of the Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act (REA) that was passed into law as part of the 2005 Consolidated Appropriations...regional contact. Additional information about recreation fees and REA is available at...

  8. 77 FR 36250 - Recreation Resource Advisory Committees

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-18

    ...to Section 4 of the Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act (REA) that was passed into law as part of the 2005 Consolidated Appropriations...regional contact. Additional information about recreation fees and REA is available at...

  9. 50 CFR 600.513 - Recreational fishing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Recreational fishing. 600.513 Section 600.513 Wildlife... MAGNUSON-STEVENS ACT PROVISIONS Foreign Fishing § 600.513 Recreational fishing. (a) Foreign vessels conducting...

  10. 50 CFR 600.513 - Recreational fishing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Recreational fishing. 600.513 Section 600.513 Wildlife... MAGNUSON-STEVENS ACT PROVISIONS Foreign Fishing § 600.513 Recreational fishing. (a) Foreign vessels conducting...

  11. 50 CFR 600.513 - Recreational fishing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Recreational fishing. 600.513 Section 600.513 Wildlife... MAGNUSON-STEVENS ACT PROVISIONS Foreign Fishing § 600.513 Recreational fishing. (a) Foreign vessels conducting...

  12. 50 CFR 600.513 - Recreational fishing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Recreational fishing. 600.513 Section 600.513 Wildlife... MAGNUSON-STEVENS ACT PROVISIONS Foreign Fishing § 600.513 Recreational fishing. (a) Foreign vessels conducting...

  13. 50 CFR 600.513 - Recreational fishing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Recreational fishing. 600.513 Section 600.513 Wildlife... MAGNUSON-STEVENS ACT PROVISIONS Foreign Fishing § 600.513 Recreational fishing. (a) Foreign vessels conducting...

  14. 50 CFR 36.31 - Recreational activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...established. Such recreational activities include, but are not limited...picnicking and other related activities. Any existing special regulations...dredges, are prohibited. The recreation activities specified in paragraphs...

  15. The Many Faces of Military Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaefer, George C.

    1980-01-01

    Military recreation offers many diverse programs similar to those found in commercial, school, industrial, and public recreational facilities. These programs include not only sports events and athletic competitions but also cultural activities and live entertainment. (JN)

  16. Determination of methylmercury in marine sediment samples: method validation and occurrence data.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Luis; Vassileva, Emilia

    2015-01-01

    The determination of methylmercury (MeHg) in sediment samples is a difficult task due to the extremely low MeHg/THg (total mercury) ratio and species interconversion. Here, we present the method validation of a cost-effective fit-for-purpose analytical procedure for the measurement of MeHg in sediments, which is based on aqueous phase ethylation, followed by purge and trap and hyphenated gas chromatography-pyrolysis-atomic fluorescence spectrometry (GC-Py-AFS) separation and detection. Four different extraction techniques, namely acid and alkaline leaching followed by solvent extraction and evaporation, microwave-assisted extraction with 2-mercaptoethanol, and acid leaching, solvent extraction and back extraction into sodium thiosulfate, were examined regarding their potential to selectively extract MeHg from estuarine sediment IAEA-405 certified reference material (CRM). The procedure based on acid leaching with HNO3/CuSO4, solvent extraction and back extraction into Na2S2O3 yielded the highest extraction recovery, i.e., 94±3% and offered the possibility to perform the extraction of a large number of samples in a short time, by eliminating the evaporation step. The artifact formation of MeHg was evaluated by high performance liquid chromatography coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS), using isotopically enriched Me(201)Hg and (202)Hg and it was found to be nonexistent. A full validation approach in line with ISO 17025 and Eurachem guidelines was followed. With this in mind, blanks, selectivity, working range (1-800 pg), linearity (0.9995), recovery (94-96%), repeatability (3%), intermediate precision (4%), limit of detection (0.45 pg) and limit of quantification (0.85 pg) were systematically assessed with CRM IAEA-405. The uncertainty budget was calculated and the major contribution to the combined uncertainty (16.24%, k=2) was found to arise from the uncertainty associated with recovery (74.1%). Demonstration of traceability of measurement results is also presented. The validated measurement procedure was applied to the determination of MeHg incurred in sediments from a highly polluted and scarcely studied area in the Caribbean region. PMID:25467456

  17. Quantifying Marine Emissions of Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds Using Laboratory Measurements of Plankton Monocultures and Field Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabolis, A. W.; Meskhidze, N.; Kamykowski, D.; Reed, R. E.

    2010-12-01

    Marine biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) have been suggested to contribute significant portion of the organic carbon present in ocean atmosphere. In this study emission rates of 40 different hydrocarbons are quantified for lab-grown non-axenic phytoplankton monocultures and ambient samples from the Pamlico-Neuse Estuary, NC. The outcome of environmental conditions on production of BVOCs was examined for different light and temperature conditions. These different regimes are considered proxies for physiological stress-induced effects observed in natural ecosystems. The samples were incubated in a climate controlled room; they were then transferred to smaller volumes (200 ml) for analysis. BVOCs accumulated in the water and headspace above the water were measured by bubbling hydrocarbon-free gas mixture through the sample and passing the gas stream through a gas chromatography/mass spectrometry system equipped with a sample pre-concentrator. Inside the pre-concentrator, the compounds were trapped on a sorbent material, heated, and flushed into the GC-MS column. The pre-concentrator/GC-MS system gave at least 1000 times magnification of the sample concentrations, allowing detection of low ppt levels of hydrocarbons. Here we report results for lab-grown diatoms Thalassiosira weissflogii and Thalassiosira pseudonana, prymnesiophyte Pleurochrysis carterae, and dinoflagellates Karina brevis and Procentrum minimum, as well as field samples. To make results widely usable, all the emissions are normalized to Chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) concentration and cell counts. Our results show that diatoms had the highest isoprene production rate of 2.8 ?mol (g Chl-a)-1 h-1 with ranges between 1.4 and 3.6 ?mol (g Chl-a)-1 h-1 at light levels between 90 and 900 ?E m-2 s-1, respectively. The prymnesiophyte and dinoflagellate species had isoprene production rates of 1.3±0.4 ?mol (g Chl-a)-1 h-1 with a similar light dependency as diatoms. Field samples had comparable isoprene production rate of 3.5 ?mol (g Chl-a)-1 h-1 with ranges between 0.6 and 4.1 ?mol (g Chl-a)-1 h-1 for similar light levels and temperatures between 18 to 30°C. Three monoterpenes detected were ?-pinene, camphene, and d-limonene. Diatoms had the highest ?-pinene and d-limonene production rates of 0.045 ?mol (g Chl-a)-1 h-1 and 0.015 ?mol (g Chl-a)-1 h-1, respectively. The prymnesiophyte species had the highest camphene production of 0.021 ?mol (g Chl-a)-1 h-1. Production rates of d-limonene and camphene did not show a well-defined light dependency, but both isoprene and ?-pinene showed an increase in terpene production with increasing light intensities. Field samples show ?-pinene, d-limonene, and camphene production rates of 0.05 ?mol (g Chl-a)-1 h-1, 0.02 ?mol (g Chl-a)-1 h-1 and 0.018 ?mol (g Chl-a)-1 h-1, respectively. Field samples acclimated at 26°C had the highest terpene production rates. This study tabulates a large number of BVOC emission rates for various phytoplankton species under diverse environmental conditions.

  18. [Recreation for Youth with Deaf Blindness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Theresa, Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This newsletter special issue focuses on recreational programming for people with deaf blindness. The following individual articles are presented: "Strategies To Promote Community Integrated Recreation: Guidelines for Leisure Coaches" by Joann Enos (which lists seven such strategies); "Assessing Recreation and Leisure Preferences" by Laura Rocchio…

  19. REGIONAL RECREATION DEMAND AND BENEFITS MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes a regional recreation demand and benefits model that is used to estimate recreation demand and value (consumers' surplus) of four activities at each of 195 sites in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and western Montana. The recreation activities considered are camp...

  20. Recreation/Tourism/Interpretation Graduate Schools

    E-print Network

    846021001 Program: Youth and Family Recreation http://rmyl.byu.edu/graduate.html California State University, Chico Chico, California 959290150 Program: Recreation Administration and Parks Management http 908400118 Program: Recreation Administration http://www.csulb.edu/~rls/Academic%20Program.htm California

  1. Keep Mental Health by Art Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Gongbin

    A distinct characteristic of the technology age is that people have more leisure time while the ways of recreation are getting more material and unified. Each step-up of technology has been fully used to produce more sensory attractive and lower unit-cost recreation products. In contrast, art recreation always means being highly devoted, creative,…

  2. Recreation Vehicle Mechanic. Occupational Analyses Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Ann; Embree, Rick

    This analysis covers tasks performed by a recreation vehicle mechanic, an occupational title some provinces and territories of Canada have also identified as recreation vehicle technician and recreation vehicle service technician. A guide to analysis discusses development, structure, and validation method; scope of the occupation; trends; and…

  3. Your Recreation Dollar. [Revised.] Money Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baran, Nancy H., Ed.; Tarrant, Sharon M., Ed.

    This booklet on recreation, 1 in a series of 12, covers all the basic aspects of personal- and family-money management. Suitable for use by high school and college students as well as adults, this handbook suggests ways to plan recreation expenses for special activities, equipment, and vacation travel. Section 1 looks at the need for recreation

  4. ECU CAMPUS RECREATION & WELLNESS SUMMER YOUTH CAMPS

    E-print Network

    ECU CAMPUS RECREATION & WELLNESS SUMMER YOUTH CAMPS SUMMER 2013 EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES Campus Recreation & Wellness is selecting/hiring individuals to serve as ECU Summer Youth Camp Counselors in the summer including Rec Junior Camp (ages 5-8) and Recreation Nation (ages 8-12). Campers will have

  5. IN-SITU SAMPLING AND CHARACTERIZATION OF NATURALLY OCCURRING MARINE METHANE HYDRATE USING THE D/V JOIDES RESOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Frank R. Rack; Tim Francis; Peter Schultheiss; Philip E. Long; Barry M. Freifeld

    2005-04-01

    The primary activities accomplished during this quarter were continued efforts to develop plans for Phase 2 of this cooperative agreement based on the evolving operational planning for IODP Expedition 311, which will use the JOIDES Resolution to study marine methane hydrates along the Cascadia margin, offshore Vancouver Island. IODP Expedition 311 has been designed to further constrain the models for the formation of marine gas hydrate in subduction zone accretionary prisms. The objectives include characterizing the deep origin of the methane, its upward transport, its incorporation in gas hydrate, and its subsequent loss to the seafloor. The main attention of this expedition is on the widespread seafloor-parallel layer of dispersed gas hydrate located just above the base of the predicted stability field. In a gas hydrate formation model, methane is carried upward through regional sediment or small-scale fracture permeability, driven by the tectonic consolidation of the accretionary prism. The upward moving methane is incorporated into the gas hydrate clathrate as it enters the methane hydrate stability zone. Also important is the focusing of a portion of the upward methane flux into localized plumes or channels to form concentrations of near-seafloor gas hydrate. The amount of gas hydrate in local concentrations near the seafloor is especially important for understanding the response of marine gas hydrate to climate change. The expedition includes coring and downhole measurements at five sites across the Northern Cascadia accretionary prism. The sites will track the history of methane in an accretionary prism from (1) its production by mainly microbiological processes over a thick sediment vertical extent, (2) its upward transport through regional or locally focused fluid flow, (3) its incorporation in the regional hydrate layer above the BSR or in local concentrations at or near the seafloor, (4) methane loss from the hydrate by upward diffusion, and (5) methane oxidation and incorporation in seafloor carbonate, or expulsion to the ocean. This expedition builds on the previous Cascadia gas hydrate drilling of ODP Leg 146 and on more recent ODP Leg 204 off Oregon. Important experiments being considered for DOE/NETL funding as part of the JOI cooperative agreement include, (1) Logging-While-Drilling/Measurements-While-Drilling (LWD/MWD), (2) Pressure Core Sampling (PCS/HYACINTH) of gas hydrate, and fluid recovery under in situ conditions, (3) X-ray CT logging of whole cores under in situ conditions, and (4) Infrared thermal imaging of whole round cores to map temperature variations resulting from the presence of hydrate. Preliminary budget estimates have been made for each of these tasks and discussions are ongoing with DOE/NETL program managers to develop a final plan that can be implemented within the constraints of the available funding and logistical considerations.

  6. Proceedings of the Third Annual Student Symposium on Marine Affairs (University of Hawaii, Manoa Campus, January 13, 1978).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1978

    This volume of the proceedings of the Third Annual Student Symposium on Marine Affairs contains 32 papers in eight categories: (1) coastal zone management; (2) marine resources; (3) aquaculture; (4) alternative marine energy sources; (5) ocean engineering; (6) recreational facilities; (7) marine biology; and (8) options. The papers are the…

  7. Recreational Games for Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hume, Donald

    2005-01-01

    Recreational games can be incorporated into physical education programs to encourage play and activity among students during their leisure time. Students can play their own games during recess, before or after school, during intramural programs, or in their neighborhood with family and friends. This article describes five such games namely:…

  8. Recreational Reading: 20 Years Later.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Block, Cathy Collins; Mangieri, John N.

    2002-01-01

    Determines elementary teachers' knowledge of: current children's literature; children's books in six literary genres; and activities to promote students' recreational reading. Replicates a 1981 study to determine the level of knowledge possessed by today's teachers concerning children's literature and methods of increasing students' reading for…

  9. Haptic Recreation of Elbow Spasticity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jonghyun; Damiano, Diane L.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to develop a haptic device capable of presenting standardized recreation of elbow spasticity. Using the haptic device, clinicians will be able to repeatedly practice the assessment of spasticity without requiring patient involvement, and these practice opportunities will help improve accuracy and reliability of the assessment itself. Haptic elbow spasticity simulator (HESS) was designed and prototyped according to mechanical requirements to recreate the feel of elbow spasticity. Based on the data collected from subjects with elbow spasticity, a mathematical model representing elbow spasticity is proposed. As an attempt to differentiate the feel of each score in Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS), parameters of the model were obtained respectively for three different MAS scores 1, 1+, and 2. The implemented haptic recreation was evaluated by experienced clinicians who were asked to give MAS scores by manipulating the haptic device. The clinicians who participated in the study were blinded to each other’s scores and to the given models. They distinguished the three models and the MAS scores given to the recreated models matched 100% with the original MAS scores from the patients. PMID:22275660

  10. Teratogenic Effects of `Recreational' Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Polifka, Janine E.; Friedman, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    Published data from clinical studies for commonly abused substances were identified through a TOXLINE bibliographic search. References in teratology monographs and review articles were also used. Emphasis was placed on controlled epidemiological studies. Available evidence suggests that maternal alcohol or cocaine abuse substantially increases the risk of congenital anomalies among infants. Many recreational drugs cause neurobehavioral dysfunction in neonates exposed before birth. PMID:21229112

  11. RAPID MEASUREMENT OF BACTERIAL FECAL POLLUTION INDICATORS AT RECREATIONAL BEACHES BY QUANTITATIVE POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous studies have demonstrated that measurements by the membrane filtration (MF) method of the bacterial indicators Enterococcus and E. coli in recreational beach water samples are correlated with swimming-associated gastroenteritis. These relationships currently serve as the...

  12. Solubilities of Al, Pb, Cu, and Zn in rain sampled in the marine environment over the North Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Lim; T. D. Jickells; J. L. Colin; R. Losno

    1994-01-01

    Chemical processes controlling the dissolved and particulate phase distribution of crustal (Al) and noncrustal metals (Pb, Cu, and Zn) appear to differ in marine precipitation sampled over the North Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea. Dissolved Al appears to be in equilibrium with a trivalent Al salt at rainwater pH<5.1, whereas dissolved Pb, Cu, and Zn concentrations are probably controlled by

  13. Current status of marine finfish larviculture in the United States

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C.-S Lee; A. C Ostrowski

    2001-01-01

    Twenty or more species of marine finfish have been reared experimentally for stock enhancement or aquaculture purposes in United States (US) hatcheries. The development of larviculture techniques for marine finfish in the US historically has focused on the restoration of recreational and commercial fisheries rather than on development of new agribusiness opportunities to produce food for domestic consumption or export.

  14. Competing Interests, Economics, and Marine Fisheries Management: An Educational Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorson, James T.; Berkson, Jim; Murphy, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Managing fish resources in the ocean, known as marine fisheries management, often involves disagreement among many groups of people: commercial fishers, recreational anglers, national and local conservationists, and several branches of government. While managing marine fisheries in federal waters, the federal government must rebuild marine fish…

  15. Guidance For The Bioremediation Of Oil-Contaminated Wetlands, Marshes, And Marine Shorelines

    EPA Science Inventory

    Marine shorelines are important public and ecological resources that serve as a home to a variety of wildlife and provide public recreation. Marine oil spills, particularly large scale spill accidents, have posed great threats and cause extensive damage to the marine coastal env...

  16. Automated microextraction sample preparation coupled on-line to FT-ICR-MS: application to desalting and concentration of river and marine dissolved organic matter.

    PubMed

    Morales-Cid, Gabriel; Gebefugi, Istvan; Kanawati, Basem; Harir, Mourad; Hertkorn, Norbert; Rosselló-Mora, Ramón; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe

    2009-10-01

    Sample preparation procedures are in most cases sample- and time-consuming and commonly require the use of a large amount of solvents. Automation in this regard can optimize the minimal-needed injection volume and the solvent consumption will be efficiently reduced. A new fully automated sample desalting and pre-concentration technique employing microextraction by packed sorbents (MEPS) cartridges is implemented and coupled to an ion cyclotron resonance Fourier-transform mass spectrometer (ICR-FT/MS). The performance of non-target mass spectrometric analysis is compared for the automated versus off-line sample preparation for several samples of aqueous natural organic matter. This approach can be generalized for any metabolite profiling or metabolome analysis of biological materials but was optimized herein using a well characterized but highly complex organic mixture: a surface water and its well-characterized natural organic matter and a marine sample having a highly salt charge and enabling to validate the presented automatic system for salty samples. The analysis of Suwannee River water showed selective C18-MEPS enrichment of chemical signatures with average H/C and O/C elemental ratios and loss of both highly polar and highly aromatic structures from the original sample. Automated on-line application to marine samples showed desalting and different chemical signatures from surface to bottom water. Relative comparison of structural footprints with the C18-concentration/desalting procedure however enabled to demonstrate that the surface water film was more concentrated in surface-active components of natural (fatty acids) and anthropogenic origin (sulfur-containing surfactants). Overall, the relative standard deviation distribution in terms of peak intensity was improved by automating the proposed on-line method. PMID:19685041

  17. PHYSIOLOGICAL RESPONSES TO RECREATIONAL SNOWSHOEING

    Microsoft Academic Search

    PATRICK L. SCHNEIDER; JOHN P. PORCARI; JEFF D. A. ERICKSON; CARL FOSTER; GLENN BRICE; ALAN FREEMAN

    PATRICK L. SCHNEIDER, JOHN P. PORCARI, JEFF D.A. ERICKSON, CARL FOSTER, GLENN BRICE, ALAN Freeman Physiological Responses To Recreational Snowshoeing. JEPonline. 2001;4(3):45-52. In recent years, the popularity of snowshoeing has increased due to innovations in snowshoe design; they are smaller, lighter, have maintenance-free aluminum frames, and a more versatile binding system. The purpose of this study was to provide descriptive

  18. Marine Biology

    E-print Network

    Zaffino, Kyle

    2013-01-01

    this  door. ”   Marine  Biology   I  joined  the  military  RIVERSIDE   Marine  Biology   A Thesis submitted in partialBiology                                                                                                                        

  19. Massachusetts Division of Marine Fisheries

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This Massachusetts Division of Marine Fisheries website provides health advisories and closures related to seafood consumption and recreational fishing. Links are provided to the Division's programs and projects, including shellfish sanitation and management, and shellfish closures. Maps and notices regarding closures related to paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) are posted with each health notice, as well as a link to general information regarding PSP and the state's PSP monitoring program.

  20. National Marine Fisheries Service's Statistics & Economics

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Fisheries Statistics Division collects data and coordinates information and research programs to support the science-based stewardship of the nation's living marine resources. Site features national fisheries data from as far back as 1950. You can search commercial or recreational fisheries data or find economic and world fisheries information. Site is very easy to use and data is readily accessible.

  1. Industrial recreation in Texas: an exploratory study

    E-print Network

    Kershaw, Deborah Louise

    1982-01-01

    INDUSTRIAL RECREATION IN TEXAS: AN EXPLORATORY STUDY A Thesis By DEBORAH LOUISE KERS?IAW Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University In partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1982... Major Subject: Recreation and Resources Development INDUSTRIAL RECREATION IN TEXAS: AN EXPLORATORY STUDY A Thesis By DEBORAH LOUISE KERSHAW Approved as to style and content by: (C airman Committee Mem er Mem e ead o Department August 1982...

  2. In-Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Marine Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Frank Rack; Peter Schultheiss; IODP Expedition 311 Scientific Party

    2005-12-31

    The primary accomplishments of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter were the implementation of a scientific ocean drilling expedition to study marine methane hydrates along the Cascadia margin, in the NE Pacific as part of Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 311 using the R/V JOIDES Resolution and the deployment of all required equipment and personnel to provide the required services during this expedition. IODP Expedition 311 shipboard activities on the JOIDES Resolution began on August 28 and were concluded on October 28, 2005. New ODP Pressure Coring System (PCS) aluminum autoclave chambers were fabricated prior to the expedition. During the expedition, 16 PCS autoclaves containing pressure cores were X-rayed before and after depressurization using a modified Geotek MSCL-P (multi-sensor core logger-pressure) system. These PCS cores were density scanned using the MSCL-V (multi-sensor core logger-vertical) during depressurization to monitor gas evolution. The MSCL-V was set up in a 20-foot-long refrigerated container provided by Texas A&M University through the JOI contract with TAMRF. IODP Expedition 311 was the first time that PCS cores were examined before (using X-ray), during (using MSCL-V gamma density) and after (using X-ray) degassing to determine the actual volume and distribution of sediment and gas hydrate in the pressurized core, which will be important for more accurate determination of mass balances between sediment, gas, gas hydrate, and fluids in the samples collected. Geotek, Ltd was awarded a contract by JOI to provide equipment and personnel to perform pressure coring and related work on IODP Expedition 311 (Cascadia Margin Gas Hydrates). Geotek, Ltd. provided an automated track for use with JOI's infrared camera systems. Four auxiliary monitors showed infrared core images in real time to aid hydrate identification and sampling. Images were collected from 185 cores during the expedition and processed to provide continuous core temperature data. The HYACINTH pressure coring tools, subsystems, and core logging systems were mobilized to Astoria, Oregon. Both HYACINTH pressure coring tools, the HRC (HYACE Rotary Corer) and the FPC (Fugro Pressure Corer) were mobilized and used during the expedition. Two HYACINTH engineers supervised the use of the tools and five good pressure cores were obtained. Velocity, density and X-ray linear scanning data were collected from these cores at near in situ pressure using the MSCL-P system. Dr. Barry Freifeld from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory provided an X-ray source and detector for X-ray imaging of pressure cores and helped Geotek with the design and mobilization of the MSCL-P system. Pressure core handling, transfer, and logging was performed in a refrigerated 20-foot container supplied by Geotek, Ltd. After scanning, the pressure cores were stored for on-shore analysis in aluminum barrels. Additional studies were conducted at the Pacific Geoscience Center (PGC), where a shore based laboratory was established after Expedition 311.

  3. Concentration of Beryllium (Be) and Depleted Uranium (DU) in Marine Fauna and Sediment Samples from Illeginni and Boggerik Islands at Kwajalein Atoll

    SciTech Connect

    Robison, W L; Hamilton, T F; Martinelli, R E; Kehl, S R; Lindman, T R

    2005-02-24

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) personnel have supported US Air Force (USAF) ballistic missile flight tests for about 15 years for Peacekeeper and Minuteman missiles launched at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB). Associated re-entry vehicles (RV's) re-enter at Regan Test Site (RTS) at the US Army base at Kwajalein Atoll (USAKA) where LLNL has supported scoring, recovery operations for RV materials, and environmental assessments. As part of ongoing USAF ballistic missile flight test programs, LLNL is participating in an updated EA being written for flights originating at VFAB. Marine fauna and sediments (beach-sand samples) were collected by US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), and LLNL at Illeginni Island and Boggerik Island (serving as a control site) at Kwajalein Atoll. Data on the concentration of DU (hereafter, U) and Be in collected samples was requested by USFWS and NMFS to determine whether or not U and Be in RV's entering the Illeginni area are increasing U and Be concentrations in marine fauna and sediments. LLNL agreed to do the analyses for U and Be in support of the EA process and provide a report of the results. There is no statistically significant difference in the concentration of U and Be in six species of marine fauna from Illeginni and Boggerik Islands (p - 0.14 for U and p = 0.34 for Be). Thus, there is no evidence that there has been any increase in U and Be concentrations in marine fauna as a result of the missile flight test program. Concentration of U in beach sand at Illeginni is the same as soil and beach sand in the rest of the Marshall Islands and again reflects an insignificant impact from the flight test program. Beach sand from Illeginni has a mean concentration of Be higher than that from the control site, Boggeik Island. Seven of 21 samples from Ileginni had detectable Be. Four samples had a concentration of Be ranging from 4 to 7 ng g {sup -1} (4 to 7 parts per billion (ppb)), one was 17 ppb, one was 0.14 parts per million (ppm), and one was 0.48 ppm. These extremely low concentrations of an insoluble form of Be again indicate no impact on marine life or human health at Illeginni as a result of the missile flight test program. Concentration of Fe in marine fauna muscle tissue is much higher at Illeginni Island than at Boggerik Island (control site) as a result of legacy iron piers, dump sites for iron metal along the island, and scrap iron randomly distributed along extensive portions of the reef line as part of programs conducted in the 1960's through 1980's that were not part of the recent flight test program.

  4. Recreation for the Aged: The Physician's Role

    PubMed Central

    Schonfield, David

    1970-01-01

    Family physicians could well spend some time intervening on behalf of geriatrics who need a higher income and better recreation facilities. Aside from money, the other needs for geriatric recreation are a proper concept of recreation (one person's work is another person's play) and recognition of age-related changes in performance. Recreation programs should be as varied as possible and should not discount useful tasks. Activities should provide for social interchange and long-term goals. Monetary reward is a good way to stimulate motivation. Imagesp43-a PMID:20468594

  5. 75 FR 12726 - Availability of Seats for the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-17

    ...Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council: Tourism alternate, Recreational Fishing member and alternate, Education...increase the public knowledge and stewardship of the Sanctuary environment; and (4) assisting to develop an informed...

  6. A Gender-based Examination of Past-year Recreational Gamblers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marc N. Potenza; Paul K. Maciejewski; Carolyn M. Mazure

    2006-01-01

    Background  Most adults gamble recreationally yet few studies have systematically investigated for gender-related differences in recreational gamblers.Methods  Logistic regression analyses were performed on data from a nationally representative sample of respondents from the 1998 Gambling Impact and Behavior Study. Results  Female gamblers versus non-gamblers were more likely to report use of alcohol and drugs. Male gamblers versus non-gamblers were more likely to report

  7. The effects of freeze/thaw periods and drying methods on isotopic and elemental carbon and nitrogen in marine organisms, raising questions on sample preparation.

    PubMed

    de Lecea, A M; Smit, A J; Fennessy, S T

    2011-12-15

    Stable isotopes are an increasingly important tool in trophic linkage ecological studies. In studies of large marine animals, isotopic sampling is often given secondary priority to sampling for diversity and biomass aspects. Consequently, isotopic samples are frequently collected subsequent to repeated freezing and thawing of animals, and the results of these studies are often based on the assumption that this pre-treatment does not affect the isotopic values. Our study tested this assumption and examined the difference between oven- and freeze-drying on isotopic values and elemental carbon-to-nitrogen (C:N) ratios. The values for ?(15)N and ?(13)C, percentage nitrogen and carbon, and the C:N ratios were determined from the tissues of six marine species, including invertebrates and fish, as (1) fresh samples, (2) samples thawed once, and (3) samples thawed twice. The drying method, thawing treatment and their interaction did significantly affect the ?(15)N and ?(13)C isotope values for all species. Oven-dried samples had slightly higher ?(13)C and ?(15)N values than freeze-dried samples, although not significant in most instances. For most species, oven-drying produced lower carbon and nitrogen percentage than freeze-drying for samples that had been thawed once, but the C:N ratio was unaffected by the drying method. Repeated freezing and thawing did not affect the isotope values, but it did decrease the percentage carbon and nitrogen for both desiccation methods. We recommend drying samples from fresh wherever possible, and careful choice of desiccation method in light of the fact that most lipid models are based on oven-dried samples and oven-drying could cause enrichment of (15)N or (13)C through evaporation of volatile compounds richer in lighter isotopes such as some lipids. Finally, we recommend that further studies on the specific effects of freezing and desiccation on elasmobranchs is needed. Overall we recommend the use of freeze-drying when possible and to use the samples from freshly caught organisms. PMID:22095513

  8. 76 FR 4281 - Recreation Resource Advisory Committees Charter Reestablishment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-25

    ...Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act (REA), signed in December 2004, directs the...program; and fee- level changes. The REA grants flexibility to Recreation RACs by...Recreation RACs for the purposes stated in REA. Dated: December 13, 2010. Pearlie...

  9. Risking It on Wildlands: The Evolution of Adventure Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewert, Alan; Hollenhorst, Steve

    1990-01-01

    Explored are the societal influences that have led to contemporary views surrounding the adventure experience. Adventure recreation and outdoor recreation are contrasted. The growth of the adventure recreation phenomenon is discussed. (CW)

  10. 50 CFR 660.721 - Recreational fishing bag limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 2010-10-01 false Recreational fishing bag limits. 660.721 Section 660...Fisheries § 660.721 Recreational fishing bag limits. This section applies to recreational fishing for HMS management unit...

  11. 50 CFR 660.721 - Recreational fishing bag limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 2014-10-01 false Recreational fishing bag limits. 660.721 Section 660...Fisheries § 660.721 Recreational fishing bag limits. This section applies to recreational fishing for HMS management unit...

  12. 50 CFR 660.721 - Recreational fishing bag limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 2012-10-01 false Recreational fishing bag limits. 660.721 Section 660...Fisheries § 660.721 Recreational fishing bag limits. This section applies to recreational fishing for HMS management unit...

  13. 50 CFR 660.721 - Recreational fishing bag limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 2013-10-01 false Recreational fishing bag limits. 660.721 Section 660...Fisheries § 660.721 Recreational fishing bag limits. This section applies to recreational fishing for HMS management unit...

  14. 50 CFR 660.721 - Recreational fishing bag limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 2011-10-01 false Recreational fishing bag limits. 660.721 Section 660...Fisheries § 660.721 Recreational fishing bag limits. This section applies to recreational fishing for HMS management unit...

  15. Titan Recreation-Intramural Sports Student Engagement Report

    E-print Network

    de Lijser, Peter

    Titan Recreation-Intramural Sports Student Engagement Report FY 2012-2013 Purpose Statement Titan fitness and overall wellness. Titan Recreation also provides opportunities for cooperative and competitive within Titan Recreation are designed to enhance social, psychological and physiological development

  16. Titan Recreation-Intramural Sports Student Engagement Report

    E-print Network

    de Lijser, Peter

    Titan Recreation-Intramural Sports Student Engagement Report FY 2011-2012 Purpose Statement Titan fitness and overall wellness. Titan Recreation also provides opportunities for cooperative and competitive within Titan Recreation are designed to enhance social, psychological and physiological development

  17. Titan Recreation-Titan Bowl and Billiards Student Engagement Report

    E-print Network

    de Lijser, Peter

    Titan Recreation-Titan Bowl and Billiards Student Engagement Report FY 2012-2013 Purpose Statement Titan Recreation strives to enhance participant experiences at CSUF through providing quality physical fitness and overall wellness. Titan Recreation also provides opportunities for cooperative

  18. 76 FR 58403 - Prohibitions-Developed Recreation Sites

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-21

    ...Prohibitions--Developed Recreation Sites AGENCY: Forest Service...Section 261.16 Developed Recreation Sites. Paragraph (j) currently...regulations governing certain activities on National Forest System...Sec. 261.16 Developed recreation sites. * * * * * (j)...

  19. 36 CFR 7.55 - Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area. 7.55 Section... Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area. (a) Hunting...within Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area except in the following...protection, and other management activities and objectives. [49...

  20. 36 CFR 7.55 - Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area. 7.55 Section... Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area. (a) Hunting...within Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area except in the following...protection, and other management activities and objectives. [49...

  1. 36 CFR 7.92 - Bighorn Canyon National Recreation Area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Bighorn Canyon National Recreation Area. 7.92 Section... Bighorn Canyon National Recreation Area. (a) Aircraft-designated...in Bighorn Canyon National Recreation Area, except in the following...protection, and other management activities and objectives. [36...

  2. Molecular detection of native and invasive marine invertebrate larvae present in ballast and open water environmental samples collected in Puget Sound

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harvey, J.B.J.; Hoy, M.S.; Rodriguez, R.J.

    2009-01-01

    Non-native marine species have been and continue to be introduced into Puget Sound via several vectors including ship's ballast water. Some non-native species become invasive and negatively impact native species or near shore habitats. We present a new methodology for the development and testing of taxon specific PCR primers designed to assess environmental samples of ocean water for the presence of native and non-native bivalves, crustaceans and algae. The intergenic spacer regions (IGS; ITS1, ITS2 and 5.8S) of the ribosomal DNA were sequenced for adult samples of each taxon studied. We used these data along with those available in Genbank to design taxon and group specific primers and tested their stringency against artificial populations of plasmid constructs containing the entire IGS region for each of the 25 taxa in our study, respectively. Taxon and group specific primer sets were then used to detect the presence or absence of native and non-native planktonic life-history stages (propagules) from environmental samples of ballast water and plankton tow net samples collected in Puget Sound. This methodology provides an inexpensive and efficient way to test the discriminatory ability of taxon specific oligonucleotides (PCR primers) before creating molecular probes or beacons for use in molecular ecological applications such as probe hybridizations or microarray analyses. This work addresses the current need to develop molecular tools capable of diagnosing the presence of planktonic life-history stages from non-native marine species (potential invaders) in ballast water and other environmental samples. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V.

  3. Value orientations toward coral reefs in recreation and tourism settings: a conceptual and measurement approach

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark D. Needham

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines recreationist and tourist value orientations toward coral reefs (e.g. protection–use, biocentric-anthropocentric), tests a scale for measuring these orientations in recreation and tourism settings, groups individuals based on their orientations and examines demographic and activity differences among groups. Data were obtained from surveys of 2821 users at three coastal and marine sites in Hawai'i. Belief statements about reefs

  4. Solid Waste Management in Recreational Forest Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spooner, Charles S.

    The Forest Service, U. S. Department of Agriculture, requested the Bureau of Solid Waste Management to conduct a study of National Forest recreation areas to establish waste generation rates for major recreation activities and to determine the cost of solid waste handling for selected Forest Service Districts. This report describes the 1968 solid…

  5. Intelligence and Past Use of Recreational Drugs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilmoth, Daniel R.

    2012-01-01

    One motivation for trying recreational drugs is the desire for novel experiences. More intelligent people tend to value novelty more highly and may therefore be more likely to have tried recreational drugs. Using data from a national survey, it is shown that intelligence tends to be positively related to the probabilities of having tried alcohol,…

  6. Physical Education and Recreation in Europe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, M. L.; Van Vliet, M. L.

    Physical education and research programs, and recreational and athletic facilities, in Yugoslavia, Sweden, Denmark, Germany, England, and the U.S.S.R. are examined by two faculty members from the University of Alberta. This publication is an abridgement of their report on European approaches to physical education and recreation, giving their…

  7. Recreation & Wellness Facility Operations Graduate Assistant

    E-print Network

    and repair. Suitable Academic Majors Sports Management, Recreation Tourism Management, Exercise Science management issues for facilities and events. Develop and manage policies and procedures for facilities in facilities management, informal recreation or related field. Possess good written and verbal skills CPR

  8. Department of Recreational Sports Intramural Sports

    E-print Network

    Escher, Christine

    Department of Recreational Sports Intramural Sports Par 3 Golf Rules Sports and Special Programs where a special Oregon State University Intramural Sports rule applies. II. ELIGIBILITY All Participants/Staff/Affiliate with a Recreational Sports Membership. For more information on eligibility, consult the Intramural Sports Handbook

  9. Virginia Tech Department of Recreational Sports

    E-print Network

    Buehrer, R. Michael

    Virginia Tech Department of Recreational Sports INTRAMURAL SPORTS POINTS SYSTEM "Battle Sports Program is to provide exercise, recreation, competition, and fun to all participants in a relaxed university organizations to join in the fun, the Intramural Sports Program has adopted a point system

  10. PHYSICAL FITNESS OF RECREATIONAL ADOLESCENT TAEKWONDO ATHLETES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. R. Noorul; Willy Pieter; Z. Z. Erie

    2008-01-01

    NOORUL, H. R. ; PIETER, W.; ERIE, Z. Z. Physical Fitness of Recreational Adolescent Taekwondo Athletes. Brazilian Journal of Biomotricity, v. 2, n. 4, p. 230-240, 2008. The purpose of this study was to describe the physical fitness of adolescent recreational taekwondo athletes. Subjects were members of the Kelantan State taekwondo team from Malaysia (8 males, 18.63 ± 1.92 years,

  11. INDEX OF SELECTED OUTDOOR RECREATION LITERATURE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of the Interior, Washington, DC.

    INDEXED ARE 991 PERIODICALS, REPORTS, BOOKS, AND OTHER PUBLICATIONS CONTAINING INFORMATION PERTINENT TO OUTDOOR RECREATION WHICH WERE RECEIVED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LIBRARY DURING 1966. THIS SHOULD NOT BE MISTAKEN FOR A COMPREHENSIVE BIBLIOGRAPHY OF OUTDOOR RECREATION LITERATURE BECAUSE NOT ALL PUBLICATIONS RECEIVED BY THE DEPARTMENT…

  12. Ethics Audit of a Therapeutic Recreation Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nisbett, Nancy; Hinton, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to enhance awareness of the presence of ethics education within the allied health discipline of therapeutic recreation. To achieve this end, a curriculum audit was conducted in a therapeutic recreation course to determine the existence of ethics education within the course. Included topics, methods of delivery, and…

  13. Adventure Recreation: Coming Soon to Your Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moorman, Marta; Schlatter, Barbara E.; Hurd, Amy R.

    2007-01-01

    Adventure recreation activities like mountain biking, bouldering, and kayaking used to require considerable travel to unique locations. This is changing, however, as the new trend emerges in the United State of providing adventure recreation experiences in cities and towns, such as New York City and Golden, Colorado. This article highlights…

  14. EXETRA Perspectives: Concepts in Therapeutic Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neal, Larry L.; Edginton, Christopher R.

    Fifteen papers address issues in therapeutic recreation for disabled persons from the perspectives of practitioners, educators, and students. The following papers are presented. "Therapeutic Recreation Service: The Past and Challenging Present" (H. Sessoms); "Therapeutic Recreatiion in an Era of Limits: A Crisis...A Challenge... An Opportunity"…

  15. College of Charleston Campus Recreation Services

    E-print Network

    Kasman, Alex

    College of Charleston Campus Recreation Services Admission to Recreation Facilities College of Charleston Personnel Students, faculty, and staff who possess a valid Cougar Card, the College of Charleston at the time of entry and when requested by a CRS facility supervisor. Alumni Memberships College of Charleston

  16. Rugged Practices: Embodying Authenticity in Outdoor Recreation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senda-Cook, Samantha

    2012-01-01

    When people recreate outdoors, they value the quality of the experience. This study examines rhetorical practices that sustain or undermine perceived authentic outdoor recreation experiences. I conducted a rhetorical analysis of my fieldnotes gathered through participant observation and interview transcripts of online and in-person interviews. I…

  17. Adapting Activities for Therapeutic Recreation Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Exceptional Parent, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Recreational activities can be adapted for disabled persons by using a functional device (such as a handle or extension), using an alternative stimulus (such as using tactile cues for blind persons), changing the participation technique (such as wheelchair basketball), or creating transitional recreation experiences (teaching prerequisite skills…

  18. UNBC: Outdoor Recreation and Tourism Management Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maher, Pat

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the University of Northern British Columbia's (UNBC's) Outdoor Recreation and Tourism Management (ORTM) Program, which focuses squarely on the management of outdoor recreation as it relates to conservation (i.e., in and around parks and protected areas), tourism that is both based in and concerned with the natural/cultural…

  19. Assessment of ultrasound-assisted extraction as sample pre-treatment for the measurement of lead isotope ratios in marine biological tissues by multicollector inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Costas-Rodríguez; Isela Lavilla; Carlos Bendicho

    2011-01-01

    In this work, ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) was evaluated as a sample preparation procedure for lead isotope ratio measurements in marine biological tissues by multicollector inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. 20mg of marine biological tissue and 1mL of acid extractant were sonicated for 3min at 60% ultrasound amplitude. Matrix separation was performed in the supernatant using a chromatographic exchange resin (Sr-Spec™). Total

  20. 2. EAGLE CREEK RECREATION AREA, VIEW OF COMMUNITY KITCHEN. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. EAGLE CREEK RECREATION AREA, VIEW OF COMMUNITY KITCHEN. - Historic Columbia River Highway, Eagle Creek Recreation Area, Historic Columbia River Highway at Eagle Creek, Troutdale, Multnomah County, OR

  1. Effects of Changed Aircraft Noise Exposure on the Use of Outdoor Recreational Areas

    PubMed Central

    Krog, Norun Hjertager; Engdahl, Bo; Tambs, Kristian

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines behavioural responses to changes in aircraft noise exposure in local outdoor recreational areas near airports. Results from a panel study conducted in conjunction with the relocation of Norway’s main airport in 1998 are presented. One recreational area was studied at each airport site. The samples (n = 1,264/1,370) were telephone interviewed about their use of the area before and after the change. Results indicate that changed aircraft noise exposure may influence individual choices to use local outdoor recreational areas, suggesting that careful considerations are needed in the planning of air routes over local outdoor recreational areas. However, considerable stability in use, and also fluctuations in use unrelated to the changes in noise conditions were found. Future studies of noise impacts should examine a broader set of coping mechanisms, like intra- and temporal displacement. Also, the role of place attachment, and the substitutability of local areas should be studied. PMID:21139867

  2. Prevalence of microplastics in Singapore's coastal marine environment.

    PubMed

    Ng, K L; Obbard, J P

    2006-07-01

    Microplastics have been recently identified as marine pollutants of significant concern due to their persistence, ubiquity and potential to act as vectors for the transfer and exposure of persistent organic pollutants to marine organisms. This study documents, for the first time, the presence and abundance of microplastics (>1.6 microm) in Singapore's coastal environment. An optimized sampling protocol for the collection and analysis of microplastics was developed, and beach sediments and seawater (surface microlayer and subsurface layer) samples were collected from nine different locations around the coastline. Low density microplastics were separated from sediments by flotation and polymer types were identified using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometry. Synthetic polymer microplastics identified in beach sediments included polyethylene, polypropylene, polystyrene, nylon, polyvinyl alcohol and acrylonitrile butadiene styrene. Microplastics were detected in samples from four out of seven beach environments, with the greatest quantity found in sediments from two popular beaches in the eastern part of Singapore. Polyethylene, polypropylene and polystyrene microplastics were also found in the surface microlayer (50-60 microm) and subsurface layer (1m) of coastal waters. The presence of microplastics in sediments and seawater is likely due to on-going waste disposal practices from industries and recreational activities, and discharge from shipping. PMID:16388828

  3. Effect of recreational diving on Patagonian rocky reefs.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Gonzalo; Márquez, Federico; Marzinelli, Ezequiel M; Mendez, María M; Bigatti, Gregorio

    2015-03-01

    Tourism has grown considerably in the last decades, promoting activities such as recreational SCUBA diving that may affect marine benthic communities. In Puerto Madryn, Patagonia Argentina, sub-aquatic tourism areas (STA) receive about 7,000 divers per year. Diving is concentrated on a few small rocky reefs and 50% of the dives occur in summer. In this work, we evaluated the effect of recreational diving activities on benthic communities and determined whether diving causes a press (long-term) or a pulse (short-term) response. We quantified the percentage cover of benthic organisms and compared benthic assemblage structure and composition between two sites with contrasting usage by divers, 'highly disturbed' and 'moderately disturbed' sites, and two 'control' sites with similar physical characteristics but no diving activity, twice before and after the diving peak in summer. We found differences in benthic assemblage structure (identity and relative abundance of taxa) and composition (identity only) among diving sites and controls. These differences were consistent before and after the peak of diving in summer, suggesting that recreational diving may produce a press impact on overall benthic assemblage structure and composition in these STA. At the moderately disturbed site, however, covers of specific taxa, such as some key habitat-forming or highly abundant species, usually differed from those in controls only immediately after summer, after which they begun to resemble controls, suggesting a pulse impact. Thus, STA in Golfo Nuevo seem to respond differently to disturbances of diving depending on the usage of the sites. This information is necessary to develop sound management strategies in order to preserve local biodiversity. PMID:25577688

  4. Impacts of marine debris on wild animals in the coastal area of Korea.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sunwook; Lee, Jongmyoung; Jang, Yong Chang; Kim, Young Jun; Kim, Hee Jong; Han, Donguk; Hong, Sang Hee; Kang, Daeseok; Shim, Won Joon

    2013-01-15

    Over the last decade, marine debris has become a major factor affecting the coastal ecosystem of Korea. This study compiled information regarding how marine debris impacts wildlife in Korea. Cases of marine debris impacting wildlife were collected from experts of various fields and from local participants through an open access website from February 2010 to March 2012. A total of 21 species were affected by marine debris: 18 species of birds, 2 species of mammals, and 1 species of crustacean. Five threatened or protected species were identified: black-faced spoonbill, finless porpoise, water deer, whooper swan, and greater painted snipe. Recreational fishing gears were the types of debris that most frequently impacted wildlife, especially birds. Black tailed gulls were the most vulnerable species to recreational fishing hooks and lines. Although it was preliminary, this study revealed that recreational fishing activities should be prioritized when managing marine debris in Korea. PMID:23199729

  5. SPME-GC-pyrolysis-AFS determination of methylmercury in marine fish products by alkaline sample preparation and aqueous phase phenylation derivatization.

    PubMed

    Jókai, Zsuzsa; Abrankó, László; Fodor, Péter

    2005-07-13

    Characterization of a cost-efficient analytical method based on alkaline sample digestion with KOH and NaOH, followed by aqueous phase phenylation derivatization with NaBPh4 and solid phase microextraction (SPME) for the determination of methylmercury in typical fish-containing food samples commercially available in Hungary, is reported. The sample preparation procedure along with the applied SPME-GC-pyrolysis-AFS system was validated by measuring certified reference materials (CRM) BCR-464, TORT-2, and a candidate CRM BCR 710. To carry out an estimation of average Hungarian methylmercury exposures via marine fish and/or fish-containing food consumption, 16 commercially available products and 3 pooled representative seafood samples of-according to a previous European survey--the three most consumed fish species in Hungary, herring, sardines, and hake, were analyzed. Methylmercury concentrations of the analyzed samples were in the range 0.016-0.137 microg of MeHg g(-1) dry weight as Hg. PMID:15998105

  6. Oregon State Parks and Recreation

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    What can you do in the great Oregon outdoors? From the world of Cannon Beach to the wild and rugged Snake River, the experiences are diverse, to say the least. The homepage features dramatic vistas, isolated lighthouses, and a whole range of wonderful images to entice visitors. In the Visit area, there is an interactive map of the state that will help plan any trip. Here visitors can select Activities and Facilities to look for specific amenities. Moving along, the Event Calendar area allows visitors to look for upcoming events at a specific park or by category. Policy folks will appreciate the About Us area, as it includes detailed information on the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department's budget, their annual report, information about upcoming initiatives, and construction projects.

  7. Lake Mead National Recreation Area

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This Lake Mead National Recreation Area site contains a section to plan a visit to the Boulder Basin, Lake Mohave, Overton Arm, and East Lake Mead areas; a park newspaper; park maps; and a photo archive. There is information on the natural history of plant and animal life in the park, including a species list of birds, mammals, plants, and reptiles; sections on bats, spring flowers, and algae bloom on Lake Mead; and a link about the geology of Lake Mead. Environmental lesson plans involving the Mojave Desert for grades 1-5 include: Animals Among Us, Cactus Clues, Going Buggy, Tortoise Tracks, Keyed Into Plants, Puzzle Pieces of the Past, Nocturnal Detective, Landforms in Motion, Weather Wise, and Do Not Be Trashy! There are also field trip guides to explore the Mojave Desert.

  8. *THE LOGNORMAL DISTRIBUTION AND USE OF THE GEOMETRIC MEAN AND THE ARITHMETIC MEAN IN RECREATIONAL WATER QUALITY MEASUREMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Statistical Framework for Recreational Water Quality Criteria and Monitoring offers a practical guide to the statistical methods used for assessing health effects and monitoring and modelling water quality Both traditional and novel sampling designs are discussed. Written by a te...

  9. The role of recreation and park amenities in influencing footloose businesses to (Re)locate in Colorado

    E-print Network

    Love, Lisa L.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relative importance of quality of life and recreation/parks/open space in business location decisions. The study sampled economic development agency officials and business representatives. Following...

  10. Observer rating of recreational use in wadeable streams of New York State, USA: implications for nutrient criteria development.

    PubMed

    Smith, Alexander J; Duffy, Brian T; Novak, Margaret A

    2015-02-01

    Like most other States and Tribes in the United States, New York State has been working with the United States Environmental Protection Agency to develop numeric nutrient criteria. These criteria are to protect water use such as drinking water supply, aquatic life, and recreation. Although extensive research exists related to the effects of eutrophication on human health and aquatic life, limited information is available on perceived impairment of recreational opportunities in rivers and streams. We present an approach to assess impacts to recreation using information collected by New York State's (NYS) monitoring program. This approach involved a questionnaire adapted from lake management surveys in which field crews rated their perceptions of recreational ability at each site. The ratings were then used to assess the relationship between perceived impact to recreational use and water quality. We include in our analyses the primary nutrient criteria variables total phosphorus (TP), total nitrogen (TN), suspended chlorophyll-a (SChl-a), and turbidity (Tb), as well as biological condition (benthic macroinvertebrate community assessment). We sampled 203 wadeable stream locations throughout NYS between July and September 2008-2012. Field crews ranked most locations as having "Minor aesthetic problems," but still considered them excellent for both primary (34%) and secondary (37%) contact recreation. Field crew rankings of recreational ability coincided with a gradient of nutrients (TP and TN), SChl-a, and Tb concentration. Logistic regression models were developed that identified significant predictors affecting field crew decisions about recreation. These included water clarity, periphyton cover, and odor. Analysis of variance using NYS's multimetric assessment of biological condition and a nutrient specific community metric suggest significant differences in metric scores among recreational use categories. These results indicate correlation of impairment of recreational use with impairment of aquatic life use from nutrient enrichment. The results of this investigation will be used to help establish nutrient endpoints for the protection of recreation in NYS streams and rivers. PMID:25482912

  11. Recreational injuries among older Americans, 2001

    PubMed Central

    Gerson, L; Stevens, J

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To describe the epidemiology of non-fatal recreational injuries among older adults treated in United States emergency departments including national estimates of the number of injuries, types of recreational activities, and diagnoses. Methods: Injury data were provided by the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System-All Injury Program (NEISS-AIP), a nationally representative subsample of 66 out of 100 NEISS hospitals. Potential cases were identified using the NEISS-AIP definition of a sport and recreation injury. The authors then reviewed the two line narrative to identify injuries related to participation in a sport or recreational activity among men and women more than 64 years old. Results: In 2001, an estimated 62 164 (95% confidence interval 35 570 to 88 758) persons ?65 years old were treated in emergency departments for injuries sustained while participating in sport or recreational activities. The overall injury rate was 177.3/100 000 population with higher rates for men (242.5/100 000) than for women (151.3/100 000). Exercising caused 30% of injuries among women and bicycling caused 17% of injuries among men. Twenty seven percent of all treated injuries were fractures and women (34%) were more likely than men (21%) to suffer fractures. Conclusions: Recreational activities were a frequent cause of injuries among older adults. Fractures were common. Many of these injuries are potentially preventable. As more persons engage in recreational activities, applying known injury prevention strategies will help to reduce the incidence of these injuries. PMID:15178667

  12. Influence of DNA extraction method, 16S rRNA targeted hypervariable regions, and sample origin on microbial diversity detected by 454 pyrosequencing in marine chemosynthetic ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Cruaud, Perrine; Vigneron, Adrien; Lucchetti-Miganeh, Céline; Ciron, Pierre Emmanuel; Godfroy, Anne; Cambon-Bonavita, Marie-Anne

    2014-08-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) opens up exciting possibilities for improving our knowledge of environmental microbial diversity, allowing rapid and cost-effective identification of both cultivated and uncultivated microorganisms. However, library preparation, sequencing, and analysis of the results can provide inaccurate representations of the studied community compositions. Therefore, all these steps need to be taken into account carefully. Here we evaluated the effects of DNA extraction methods, targeted 16S rRNA hypervariable regions, and sample origins on the diverse microbes detected by 454 pyrosequencing in marine cold seep and hydrothermal vent sediments. To assign the reads with enough taxonomic precision, we built a database with about 2,500 sequences from Archaea and Bacteria from deep-sea marine sediments, affiliated according to reference publications in the field. Thanks to statistical and diversity analyses as well as inference of operational taxonomic unit (OTU) networks, we show that (i) while DNA extraction methods do not seem to affect the results for some samples, they can lead to dramatic changes for others; and (ii) the choice of amplification and sequencing primers also considerably affects the microbial community detected in the samples. Thereby, very different proportions of pyrosequencing reads were obtained for some microbial lineages, such as the archaeal ANME-1, ANME-2c, and MBG-D and deltaproteobacterial subgroups. This work clearly indicates that the results from sequencing-based analyses, such as pyrosequencing, should be interpreted very carefully. Therefore, the combination of NGS with complementary approaches, such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)/catalyzed reporter deposition (CARD)-FISH or quantitative PCR (Q-PCR), would be desirable to gain a more comprehensive picture of environmental microbial communities. PMID:24837380

  13. Influence of DNA Extraction Method, 16S rRNA Targeted Hypervariable Regions, and Sample Origin on Microbial Diversity Detected by 454 Pyrosequencing in Marine Chemosynthetic Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Cruaud, Perrine; Vigneron, Adrien; Lucchetti-Miganeh, Céline; Ciron, Pierre Emmanuel; Godfroy, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) opens up exciting possibilities for improving our knowledge of environmental microbial diversity, allowing rapid and cost-effective identification of both cultivated and uncultivated microorganisms. However, library preparation, sequencing, and analysis of the results can provide inaccurate representations of the studied community compositions. Therefore, all these steps need to be taken into account carefully. Here we evaluated the effects of DNA extraction methods, targeted 16S rRNA hypervariable regions, and sample origins on the diverse microbes detected by 454 pyrosequencing in marine cold seep and hydrothermal vent sediments. To assign the reads with enough taxonomic precision, we built a database with about 2,500 sequences from Archaea and Bacteria from deep-sea marine sediments, affiliated according to reference publications in the field. Thanks to statistical and diversity analyses as well as inference of operational taxonomic unit (OTU) networks, we show that (i) while DNA extraction methods do not seem to affect the results for some samples, they can lead to dramatic changes for others; and (ii) the choice of amplification and sequencing primers also considerably affects the microbial community detected in the samples. Thereby, very different proportions of pyrosequencing reads were obtained for some microbial lineages, such as the archaeal ANME-1, ANME-2c, and MBG-D and deltaproteobacterial subgroups. This work clearly indicates that the results from sequencing-based analyses, such as pyrosequencing, should be interpreted very carefully. Therefore, the combination of NGS with complementary approaches, such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)/catalyzed reporter deposition (CARD)-FISH or quantitative PCR (Q-PCR), would be desirable to gain a more comprehensive picture of environmental microbial communities. PMID:24837380

  14. Sampling

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    William Trochim (Cornell University)

    2006-10-20

    This tutorial covers some of the key terms in sampling like "population" and "sampling frame," some of the statistical terms used in sampling, and the major distinction between probability and Nonprobability sampling methods.

  15. Supporting Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder in Recreation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coyne, Phyllis; Fullerton, Ann

    2004-01-01

    This book was developed to assist recreation service providers, as well as families, to understand strategies for supporting individuals with ASD in community and school recreation programs. The ideas have many practical uses in generic and specialized recreation programs. A variety of audiences, including teachers, recreation service providers,…

  16. Recreation and Sport Planning and Design. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daly, Jim

    This book offers guidelines for planning and designing cost-effective community recreation and sports facilities and open spaces in Australia. Seven chapters include: (1) "Benefits of Recreation and Sport" (e.g., quality of life, and diversity of recreation and sport); (2) "Provision of Recreation and Sport Open Spaces" (e.g., overview of…

  17. IN-SITU SAMPLING AND CHARACTERIZATION OF NATURALLY OCCURRING MARINE METHANE HYDRATE USING THE D/V JOIDES RESOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Frank R. Rack; Peter Schultheiss; Melanie Holland

    2005-01-01

    The primary accomplishments of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter were that: (1) follow-up logging of pressure cores containing hydrate-bearing sediment; and (2) opening of some of these cores to establish ground-truth understanding. The follow-up measurements made on pressure cores in storage are part of a hydrate geriatric study related to ODP Leg 204. These activities are described in detail in Appendices A and B of this report. Work also continued on developing plans for Phase 2 of this cooperative agreement based on evolving plans to schedule a scientific ocean drilling expedition to study marine methane hydrates along the Cascadia margin, in the NE Pacific as part of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) using the R/V JOIDES Resolution.

  18. 75 FR 2852 - Availability of Seats for the Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-19

    ...Community-at-Large Marin/ Sonoma Primary; Research Primary and Alternate; Maritime Activities Commercial Primary and Alternate; ad Maritime Activities Recreation Primary and Alternate. Applicants are chosen based upon their particular...

  19. Effects of sample handling and cultivation bias on the specificity of bacterial communities in keratose marine sponges

    PubMed Central

    Hardoim, Cristiane C. P.; Cardinale, Massimiliano; Cúcio, Ana C. B.; Esteves, Ana I. S.; Berg, Gabriele; Xavier, Joana R.; Cox, Cymon J.; Costa, Rodrigo

    2014-01-01

    Complex and distinct bacterial communities inhabit marine sponges and are believed to be essential to host survival, but our present-day inability to domesticate sponge symbionts in the laboratory hinders our access to the full metabolic breadth of these microbial consortia. We address bacterial cultivation bias in marine sponges using a procedure that enables direct comparison between cultivated and uncultivated symbiont community structures. Bacterial community profiling of the sympatric keratose species Sarcotragus spinosulus and Ircinia variabilis (Dictyoceratida, Irciniidae) was performed by polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and 454-pyrosequecing of 16S rRNA gene fragments. Whereas cultivation-independent methods revealed species-specific bacterial community structures in these hosts, cultivation-dependent methods resulted in equivalent community assemblages from both species. Between 15 and 18 bacterial phyla were found in S. spinosulus and I. variabilis using cultivation-independent methods. However, Alphaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria dominated the cultivation-dependent bacterial community. While cultivation-independent methods revealed about 200 and 220 operational taxonomic units (OTUs, 97% gene similarity) in S. spinosulus and I. variabilis, respectively, only 33 and 39 OTUs were found in these species via culturing. Nevertheless, around 50% of all cultured OTUs escaped detection by cultivation-independent methods, indicating that standard cultivation makes otherwise host-specific bacterial communities similar by selectively enriching for rarer and generalist symbionts. This study sheds new light on the diversity spectrum encompassed by cultivated and uncultivated sponge-associated bacteria. Moreover, it highlights the need to develop alternative culturing technologies to capture the dominant sponge symbiont fraction that currently remains recalcitrant to laboratory manipulation. PMID:25477868

  20. Epidemiological study of foot and ankle injuries in recreational sports

    PubMed Central

    Luciano, Alexandre de Paiva; Lara, Luiz Carlos Ribeiro

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This is a retrospective study showing the incidence, type and extent of injuries occurring in the foot and/or ankle as a result of recreational sports practice. METHODS: We treated 131 patients, of which 123 were male and 8 female, with a history of trauma and pain in the foot and/or ankle after the practicing recreational sports. The average age of the male patients was 24.53 years. The evaluation was done through a research protocol, which contained the variables age, sex, diagnosis, and type of recreational sport. RESULTS: The sports were classified according to the American Medical Association, which divides them into contact and non-contact sports. 82.4% of the sample practiced contact sports, while 17.6% practiced sports classified as non-contact. CONCLUSIONS: The sprained ankle was the most frequent type of injury, especially those of grade I and II. Soccer was the sport responsible for the highest incidence of injuries and among its various forms the indoor soccer presented the highest frequency of injuries (35%). In the non-contact sports, the highest incidence was found in running. Level of Evidence IV, Case Series. PMID:24453628

  1. The influence of family’s participation in recreational sports on its resilience and communication facilitation

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Min-soo

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to define the influence of the motive and degree of family’s participation in recreational sports on its resilience and communication facilitation. Of members of sports centers in Seoul and Gyeonggi areas, 202 people who participated in recreational sports together with their family members were sampled as the population. Input data were computerized for analysis, using PASW 22.0 and AMOS 18.0 programs. Data statistical processing methods of reliability analysis and structural equation modeling were used, and the results are outlined as follows. Motive for family’s participation in recreational sports did not influence family resilience and communication facilitation. However, the degree of family’s participation in recreational sports influenced family resilience and communication facilitation. Degree of family’s participation in recreational sports did not directly influence communication facilitation, but boosted family resilience, further facilitating family communication. In other words, family resilience is an important parameter between recreational sports and communication facilitation. PMID:25426470

  2. GCOOS Web Applications for Recreational Boaters and Fishermen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobara, S.; Howard, M. K.; Simoniello, C.; Jochens, A. E.; Gulf Of Mexico Coastal Ocean Observing System Regional Association (Gcoos-Ra)

    2010-12-01

    Spatial and temporal information on the ecology of marine species and encompassing oceanographic environment is vital to the development of effective strategies for marine resource management and biodiversity conservation. Assembling data and generating products is a time-consuming and often laborious part of the workflow required of fisheries specialists, resource managers, marine scientists and other stakeholder groups for effective fishery management and marine spatial planning. Workflow costs for all groups can be significantly reduced through the use of interoperable networked data systems. The Gulf of Mexico Coastal Ocean Observing System Regional Association (GCOOS-RA) is one of 11 RAs comprising the non-Federal part of the U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS). The RAs serve the region’s needs for data and information: by working with data providers to offer their data in standardized ways following IOOS guidance, by gathering stakeholders’ needs and requirements, and by producing basic products or facilitating product-generation by others to meet those needs. The GCOOS Data Portal aggregates regional near real-time data and serves these data through standardized service interfaces suitable for automated machine access or in formats suitable for human consumption. The related Products Portal generates products in graphical displays for humans and in standard formats for importing into common software packages. Web map applications are created using ArcGIS server RESTful service, publicly available Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web Map Service (WMS) layers, and Web Coverage Service (WCS). Use of standardize interfaces allows us to construct seamless workflows that carry data from sensors through to products in an automated fashion. As a demonstration of the power of interoperable standards-based systems we have developed tailored product web pages for recreational boaters and fishermen. This is a part of an ongoing project to provide an interactive tool for decision support in the Gulf of Mexico.

  3. Outdoor Recreation -- Potential in East Texas.

    E-print Network

    Schmedemann, Ivan W. (Ivan Wayne); Wooten, Alvin B.; Franklin, W. D. (William D.)

    1964-01-01

    Potential in tion . . . East Texas Ivan W. Schmedemann, A. B. Wooten and W. D. Franklins* 0 UTDOOR RECREATION ACTIVITIES of various types have experienced a steady in- crease in demand in the United States during the past decade. Such factors...

  4. Eye Health in Sports and Recreation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Eye Health News Consumer Alerts Eye Health in Sports and Recreation Tweet Tens of thousands of sports ... Eye Injuries in American Sports History High-Risk Sports For all age groups, sports-related eye injuries ...

  5. 18 CFR 801.10 - Recreation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...wildlife programs and projects within the basin...and future public water areas. (2) Promote...recreational use of public water supply reservoirs and lakes...adequate treatment of water is provided, and...compatible with primary project purposes....

  6. 18 CFR 801.10 - Recreation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...wildlife programs and projects within the basin...and future public water areas. (2) Promote...recreational use of public water supply reservoirs and lakes...adequate treatment of water is provided, and...compatible with primary project purposes....

  7. 18 CFR 801.10 - Recreation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...wildlife programs and projects within the basin...and future public water areas. (2) Promote...recreational use of public water supply reservoirs and lakes...adequate treatment of water is provided, and...compatible with primary project purposes....

  8. 18 CFR 801.10 - Recreation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...wildlife programs and projects within the basin...and future public water areas. (2) Promote...recreational use of public water supply reservoirs and lakes...adequate treatment of water is provided, and...compatible with primary project purposes....

  9. 18 CFR 801.10 - Recreation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...wildlife programs and projects within the basin...and future public water areas. (2) Promote...recreational use of public water supply reservoirs and lakes...adequate treatment of water is provided, and...compatible with primary project purposes....

  10. BACTERIAL INDICATORS OF RECREATIONAL WATER QUALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The selection of bacterial indicators of recreational water quality are considered with respect to suggested ideal characteristics, such as association with pathogens, growth in aquatic environments, resistance to disinfection and ease of enumeration, and through the use of epide...

  11. Physical-Education Facilities/Recreation Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School & University, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Describes the design of notable school physical education/recreation facilities, including the educational context and design goals. Includes information on architects, suppliers, and cost, as well as photographs. (EV)

  12. 50 CFR 36.31 - Recreational activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM ALASKA NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGES Other Refuge Uses § 36.31 ...recreational activities within the Alaska National Wildlife Refuges are authorized as long as...

  13. Parents Creating Recreational Experiences: Kamp for Kids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Exceptional Parent, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Kamp for Kids, an innovative summer recreation program for disabled and nondisabled children, was begun and maintained largely by parents efforts. Families periodically spend a weekend at the camp learning to play together and to function as a unit. (CL)

  14. ATHLETICS & RECREATION Volunteer Student Leadership Job Posting

    E-print Network

    Boonstra, Rudy

    speaking & interpersonal skills · Creative thinking, event planning skills & works well with teamsATHLETICS & RECREATION Volunteer Student Leadership Job Posting Position: PACE (Physical Activity Coach & Educator) & MOVE U Peer Educator Available Positions: 10 Type: Student Volunteer Position Work

  15. COMMUNITY RECREATIONAL WATER RISK ASSESSMENT AND PUBLICOUTREACH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The City of Milwaukee Health Department and the City of Racine Health Department have formed a consortium with several scientific and community organizations for the purpose of more effectively collecting and disseminating recreational water quality data from several bea...

  16. Simultaneous analysis of organochlorinated pesticides (OCPs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from marine samples using automated pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) and Power Prep™ clean-up.

    PubMed

    Helaleh, Murad I H; Al-Rashdan, Amal; Ibtisam, A

    2012-05-30

    An automated pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) method followed by Power Prep™ clean-up was developed for organochlorinated pesticide (OCP) and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) analysis in environmental marine samples of fish, squid, bivalves, shells, octopus and shrimp. OCPs and PCBs were simultaneously determined in a single chromatographic run using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-negative chemical ionization (GC-MS-NCI). About 5 g of each biological marine sample was mixed with anhydrous sodium sulphate and placed in the extraction cell of the PLE system. PLE is controlled by means of a PC using DMS 6000 software. Purification of the extract was accomplished using automated Power Prep™ clean-up with a pre-packed disposable silica column (6 g) supplied by Fluid Management Systems (FMS). All OCPs and PCBs were eluted from the silica column using two types of solvent: 80 mL of hexane and a 50 mL mixture of hexane and dichloromethane (1:1). A wide variety of fish and shellfish were collected from the fish market and analyzed using this method. The total PCB concentrations were 2.53, 0.25, 0.24, 0.24, 0.17 and 1.38 ng g(-1) (w/w) for fish, squid, bivalves, shells, octopus and shrimp, respectively, and the corresponding total OCP concentrations were 30.47, 2.86, 0.92, 10.72, 5.13 and 18.39 ng g(-1) (w/w). Lipids were removed using an SX-3 Bio-Beads gel permeation chromatography (GPC) column. Analytical criteria such as recovery, reproducibility and repeatability were evaluated through a range of biological matrices. PMID:22608412

  17. Recreation planning for Tallulah Gorge

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, J. [Georgia Power Co., Atlanta, GA (United States); Vogler, E.; Merklein, G. [EDAW, Inc., Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Georgia Power Company`s North Georgia Project, a member of the Class of `93, offers an example of successful recreation planning and conflict resolution. Following filing of the relicense application in 1991, the American Whitewater Affiliation (AWA) filed a motion to intervene, requesting a study of the feasibility of whitewater boating in Tallulah Gorge, located within the project. Following extensive consultation Georgia Power conducted the test in May 1993. The test garnered a great deal of publicity in Atlanta and North Georgia. At about this time, public support for aesthetics flows arose, and Georgia Power eventually tested several flows to compare aesthetics benefits. Georgia Power negotiated at length with agencies and interest groups to arrive at a proposal for whitewater, aesthetic and fishery enhancement flows and in December 1993, GPC made a proposal to FERC for flows in Tallulah Gorge. During this same time period, Georgia Power and the State of Georgia entered into a partnership agreement to develop a new state park encompassing lands within the North Georgia Project.

  18. Seeking Consensus on Designing Marine Protected Areas: Keeping the Fishing Community Engaged

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MARK HELVEY

    2004-01-01

    A community group was formed to consider establishing marine reserves within the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary in southern California. Membership included representatives from resource agencies, environmental organizations, commercial and recreational fishing interests, and the general public. While the group agreed on several areas for fishing closures, members could not reach consensus on a specific network design. Several factors interfered

  19. Today's Youth in Tomorrow's Sea. Another Title in the Series "Marine Careers."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Harold L.

    A discussion of many career possibilities related to the sea is presented. The false impressions many people have about the sea and about marine careers are dispelled. Among the career areas examined are offshore industry careers such as oil and gas drilling, careers in fishing, in seafaring, marine recreation, oceanography, aquaculture,…

  20. Cumulative effects, creeping enclosure, and the marine commons of New Jersey

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Grant Murray; Bonnie J. McCay; Satsuki Takahashi

    In response to declining fish stocks and increased societal concern, the marine 'commons' of New Jersey is no longer freely available to commercial and recreational fisheries. We discuss the concept of 'creeping' enclosure in relation to New Jersey's marine commons and suggest that enclosure can be a process and function of multiple events and processes and need not be the

  1. Recreational Use and Value of Water at Elephant Butte and Navajo Reservoirs. New Mexico State University Agricultural Experiment Station Bulletin 535.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coppedge, Robert O.; Gray, James R.

    This document is a descriptive study of the recreational use and the value of water at Elephant Butte and Navajo Reservoirs. Previous research studies, as well as the study areas and recreational characteristics and procedures of investigation used in this study (sampling and data collection, data organization, analysis) are described. Discussions…

  2. Adventure Recreation: What's New for Resource Managers, Public Policy Analysts, and Recreation Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewert, Alan; Galloway, Shayne

    2001-01-01

    Describes the phenomenon of risk taking in and through recreational activities, reviewing the use of adventure in recreation; summarizing salient research findings on adventure education within the past decade (perceived risk and individual involvement); and offering remarks related to what researchers know and do not know about the deliberate use…

  3. Community Recreation and Community Recreation/Education: Bibliographies on Educational Topics No. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Teacher Education, Washington, DC.

    This publication, the fourth in the series of Bibliographies on Educational Topics, focuses on community recreation and community recreation/education. Citations were selected from the two files contained in the ERIC data base: RESOURCES IN EDUCATION (RIE) and CURRENT INDEX TO JOURNALS IN EDUCATION (CIJE). Each topic is presented separately with a…

  4. Department of Recreational Sports The Sport Clubs staff and the Department of Recreational Sports would

    E-print Network

    Behmer, Spencer T.

    Department of Recreational Sports #12;The Sport Clubs staff and the Department of Recreational Sports would like to welcome your team to Texas A&M University. We hope you find the following information useful and helpful during your stay at College Station. Good Luck. INTRODUCTION #12;1 Sports Club

  5. Department of Recreational Sports The Sport Clubs staff and the Department of Recreational Sports would

    E-print Network

    Behmer, Spencer T.

    Department of Recreational Sports 2013 clubs visiting team guide sport #12;The Sport Clubs staff and the Department of Recreational Sports would like to welcome your team to Texas A&M University. We hope you find;1 Sport Clubs Staff 02 Facility Policies 03 Facilities 04-07 List of Sport Clubs 08 Local Hospitals 09

  6. 18 CFR 8.11 - Information respecting use and development of public recreational opportunities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Information respecting use and development of public recreational opportunities... RECREATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES AND DEVELOPMENT AT LICENSED PROJECTS § 8.11 Information respecting use and development of public recreational...

  7. Identification and quantification of polybrominated hexahydroxanthene derivatives and other halogenated natural products in commercial fish and other marine samples.

    PubMed

    Hiebl, Josef; Melcher, Joachim; Gundersen, Hans; Schlabach, Martin; Vetter, Walter

    2006-04-01

    During routine analysis of commercial fish on halogenated pollutants, an unknown tribromo component (TriBHD) was initially detected as an abundant peak in sample extracts from the Mediterranean Sea. The molecular formula was established to be C16H19Br3O by gas chromatography with electron ionization high-resolution mass spectrometry (GC/EI-HRMS). GC/EI-MS data were virtually identical with a polybrominated hexahydroxanthene derivative (PBHD) previously isolated from an Australian sponge species known to occur in the Mediterranean Sea as well. A tetrabromo isomer (TetraBHD) was also found in the fish samples. The concentrations of TriBHD and other halogenated compounds in commercial fish (sea bass, gilt head bream, anchovy, sardine, and salmon) were estimated with GC/electron capture detection (ECD). Using the ECD response of trans-nonachlor, the concentration of TriBHD reached up to 90 ng/g lipid weight and accounted for up to >90% of the concentration of p,p'-DDE, which was the most abundant peak in the most samples investigated. On the basis of the GC/ECD response, TetraBHD amounted for approximately 1/7 of TriBHD in all fish samples investigated. The sample with the highest content was a green-lipped mussel from New Zealand (236 ng/g lipid weight). The halogenated natural products TBA, Q1, and MHC-1 were also present in most of the samples. We assume that the bulk of the residues in fish from aquaculture may originate from algae and sponges living in proximity of the fish farms. Detection of TriBHD and TetraBHD in blubber of a monk seal (Monachus monachus) suggests that both HNPs may reach the top predators of food webs and thus also humans. PMID:16569057

  8. Marine Lubricants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, B. H.; Green, D.

    Marine diesel engines are classified by speed, either large (medium speed) or very large (slow speed) with high efficiencies and burning low-quality fuel. Slow-speed engines, up to 200 rpm, are two-stroke with separate combustion chamber and sump connected by a crosshead, with trunk and system oil lubricants for each. Medium-speed diesels, 300-1500 rpm, are of conventional automotive design with one lubricant. Slow-speed engines use heavy fuel oil of much lower quality than conventional diesel with problems of deposit cleanliness, acidity production and oxidation. Lubricants are mainly SAE 30/40/50 monogrades using paraffinic basestocks. The main types of additives are detergents/dispersants, antioxidants, corrosion inhibitors, anti-wear/load-carrying/ep, pour-point depressants and anti-foam compounds. There are no simple systems for classifying marine lubricants, as for automotive, because of the wide range of engine design, ratings and service applications they serve. There are no standard tests; lubricant suppliers use their own tests or the Bolnes 3DNL, with final proof from field tests. Frequent lubricant analyses safeguard engines and require standard sampling procedures before determination of density, viscosity, flash point, insolubles, base number, water and wear metal content.

  9. Comparison of Enterococcus qPCR analysis results from fresh and marine water samples on two real-time instruments - poster

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will be recommending a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) method targeting Enterococcus spp. as an option for monitoring recreational beach water quality. A practical consideration for widespread implementation of this or ...

  10. Unveiling of the Diversity of Prasinoviruses (Phycodnaviridae) in Marine Samples by Using High-Throughput Sequencing Analyses of PCR-Amplified DNA Polymerase and Major Capsid Protein Genes

    PubMed Central

    Clerissi, Camille; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Hingamp, Pascal; Poulain, Julie; Desdevises, Yves

    2014-01-01

    Viruses strongly influence the ecology and evolution of their eukaryotic hosts in the marine environment, but little is known about their diversity and distribution. Prasinoviruses infect an abundant and widespread class of phytoplankton, the Mamiellophyceae, and thereby exert a specific and important role in microbial ecosystems. However, molecular tools to specifically identify this viral genus in environmental samples are still lacking. We developed two primer sets, designed for use with polymerase chain reactions and 454 pyrosequencing technologies, to target two conserved genes, encoding the DNA polymerase (PolB gene) and the major capsid protein (MCP gene). While only one copy of the PolB gene is present in Prasinovirus genomes, there are at least seven paralogs for MCP, the copy we named number 6 being shared with other eukaryotic alga-infecting viruses. Primer sets for PolB and MCP6 were thus designed and tested on 6 samples from the Tara Oceans project. The results suggest that the MCP6 amplicons show greater richness but that PolB gave a wider coverage of Prasinovirus diversity. As a consequence, we recommend use of the PolB primer set, which will certainly reveal exciting new insights about the diversity and distribution of prasinoviruses at the community scale. PMID:24632251

  11. Do partial marine reserves protect reef fish assemblages?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. M. Denny; R. C. Babcock

    2004-01-01

    Fish assemblages in the Mimiwhangata Marine Park, an area closed to commercial fishing but open to most forms of recreational fishing, were compared with adjacent fished areas. Two survey methodologies were used; baited underwater video and underwater visual census. Snapper (Pagrus auratus), the most heavily targeted fish species in the region, showed no difference in abundance or size between the

  12. Mathematical analysis of marine pipeline leakage monitoring system based on coherent OTDR with improved sensor length and sampling frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pnev, A. B.; Zhirnov, A. A.; Stepanov, K. V.; Nesterov, E. T.; Shelestov, D. A.; Karasik, V. E.

    2015-01-01

    A system based on coherent optical time domain reflectometry (OTDR) for subsea pipeline monitoring is described. The fiber sensor length is increased using erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) cascades. The sampling frequency is increased by dividing the fiber sensor into separate sensitive areas, with parallel scanning. The calculation of the erbium amplifier cascade spontaneous noise influence on the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is carried out.

  13. Marine Reserves

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Science Update

    2001-03-30

    Ever declining numbers of marine plants and fish are sending ecologists scrambling for better ways to protect the oceans. Some have suggested that marine reserves are the answer. This Science Update looks at the unexpected impact marine reserves have on their surroundings.

  14. Motivations for Recreating on Farmlands, Private Forests, and State or National Parks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotomayor, Sandra; Barbieri, Carla; Wilhelm Stanis, Sonja; Aguilar, Francisco X.; Smith, Jordan W.

    2014-07-01

    This study explores the importance of different motivations to visit three types of recreational settings—farms, private forests, and state or national parks. Data were collected via a mail-back questionnaire administered to a stratified random sample of households in Missouri (USA). Descriptive and inferential statistics reveal both similarities and discontinuities in motivations for visiting farms, private forests, and state or national parks for recreation. Being with family, viewing natural scenery, and enjoying the smells and sounds of nature were all highly important motivations for visiting the three types of settings. However, all 15 motivations examined were perceived to be significantly more important for visits to state or national parks than to farms or private forests. Findings suggest that individuals are more strongly motivated to recreate at state and national parks relative to farmlands or forests. Post hoc paired t tests comparing motivations between both agricultural settings (farms and private forests) revealed significant differences in eight different recreational motivations. Individuals tended to place more importance on the ability to use equipment and test their skills when considering recreating on private forests. Conversely, social motivations (e.g., doing something with the family) were more important when individuals were considering recreating on farmland. Collectively, the findings suggest individuals expect distinctly different outcomes from their visits to farmlands, private forests, or state or national parks. Consequently, all three types of recreational settings have competitive advantages that their managers could capitalize on when making decisions about how to attract new visitors or produce the most desirable experiences for current recreationists.

  15. Application of passive sampling devices for screening of micro-pollutants in marine aquaculture using LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Martínez Bueno, María Jesús; Hernando, María Dolores; Agüera, Ana; Fernández-Alba, Amadeo R

    2009-02-15

    Knowledge on the presence of micro-pollutants, in particular emerging contaminants, such as pharmaceuticals, biocides or some pesticides, in semi-enclosed coastal areas, where fish farms are installed, is very limited. This article shows data on the presence of micro-pollutants over 1 year monitoring campaign carried out in a fish farm placed on the Mediterranean Sea. With this work, the results of the development of an analytical procedure which, makes use of passive sampling techniques (with polar organic chemical integrative samplers, POCIS, pharmaceutical configuration) and of the LC-QLIT-MS system, are presented. The development of the analytical procedure entail laboratory-based calibration with the samplers POCIS, for calculating uptake rates and sampling rates of compounds representative of a wide range of polarity (4.56>or=logK(ow)>or=-0.12). The uptake of the target compounds in the sampler POCIS, follows a linear pattern for most compounds, and sampling rates varied from 0.001 to 0.319l/d. The calibration experiments have shown that POCIS pharmaceutical configuration could be used for sampling other non-target compounds, such as pesticides and biocides with a logK(ow)sampling rates for each selected compound were obtained using spiked seawater for further estimation of time-weighted average (TWA) concentration of micro-pollutants in the water column, during the field study. An analytical method was developed with the LC-QLIT-MS system and validated to ensure a satisfactory performance for the detection of the target micro-pollutants in water. The limits of detection (LODs) achieved were between 0.01 and 1.50 microg/l. During the monitoring campaign, among the selected compounds, metronidazole, erythromycin, simazine, atrazine, diuron, terbutryn, irgarol, trimethoprim, carbaryl, flumequine, TCMTB and diphenyl sulphone (DPS) were detected. Most of target compounds found were at average concentrations which ranged from 0.01 to 75 ng/l. Irgarol, simazine, diuron, atrazine and DPS were the micro-pollutants most frequently detected over the period of the monitoring programme carried out. PMID:19084673

  16. Marine04 Marine radiocarbon age calibration, 26 ? 0 ka BP

    SciTech Connect

    Hughen, K; Baille, M; Bard, E; Beck, J; Bertrand, C; Blackwell, P; Buck, C; Burr, G; Cutler, K; Damon, P; Edwards, R; Fairbanks, R; Friedrich, M; Guilderson, T; Kromer, B; McCormac, F; Manning, S; Bronk-Ramsey, C; Reimer, P; Reimer, R; Remmele, S; Southon, J; Stuiver, M; Talamo, S; Taylor, F; der Plicht, J v; Weyhenmeyer, C

    2004-11-01

    New radiocarbon calibration curves, IntCal04 and Marine04, have been constructed and internationally ratified to replace the terrestrial and marine components of IntCal98. The new calibration datasets extend an additional 2000 years, from 0-26 ka cal BP (Before Present, 0 cal BP = AD 1950), and provide much higher resolution, greater precision and more detailed structure than IntCal98. For the Marine04 curve, dendrochronologically dated tree-ring samples, converted with a box-diffusion model to marine mixed-layer ages, cover the period from 0-10.5 ka cal BP. Beyond 10.5 ka cal BP, high-resolution marine data become available from foraminifera in varved sediments and U/Th-dated corals. The marine records are corrected with site-specific {sup 14}C reservoir age information to provide a single global marine mixed-layer calibration from 10.5-26.0 ka cal BP. A substantial enhancement relative to IntCal98 is the introduction of a random walk model, which takes into account the uncertainty in both the calendar age and the radiocarbon age to calculate the underlying calibration curve. The marine datasets and calibration curve for marine samples from the surface mixed layer (Marine04) are discussed here. The tree-ring datasets, sources of uncertainty, and regional offsets are presented in detail in a companion paper by Reimer et al.

  17. Diversity and population structure of uncultured marine viral communities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Breitbart; B. Felts; S. Kelley; J. M. Mahaffy; J. Nulton; P. Salamon; F. Rohwer

    2003-01-01

    Summary form only given. Viruses, most of which are phage, are extremely abundant in the marine environment. However, very little is known about the identity or diversity of these viruses. Here we present the first metagenomic analyses of uncultured viral communities from two nearshore marine water samples and one marine sediment sample. In all three marine libraries, over 65% of

  18. In-Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Marine Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Frank Rack; Michael Storms; Derryl Schroeder; Brandon Dugan; Peter Schultheiss; ODP Leg 204 Shipboard Scientific Party

    2002-12-31

    The primary accomplishments of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter were (1) the preliminary postcruise evaluation of the tools and measurement systems that were used during ODP Leg 204 to study hydrate deposits on Hydrate Ridge, offshore Oregon from July through September 2002; and (2) the preliminary study of the hydrate-bearing core samples preserved in pressure vessels and in liquid nitrogen cryofreezers, which are now stored at the ODP Gulf Coast Repository in College Station, TX. During ODP Leg 204, several newly modified downhole tools were deployed to better characterize the subsurface lithologies and environments hosting microbial populations and gas hydrates. A preliminary review of the use of these tools is provided herein. The DVTP, DVTP-P, APC-methane, and APC-Temperature tools (ODP memory tools) were used extensively and successfully during ODP Leg 204 aboard the D/V JOIDES Resolution. These systems provided a strong operational capability for characterizing the in situ properties of methane hydrates in subsurface environments on Hydrate Ridge during ODP Leg 204. Pressure was also measured during a trial run of the Fugro piezoprobe, which operates on similar principles as the DVTP-P. The final report describing the deployments of the Fugro Piezoprobe is provided in Appendix A of this report. A preliminary analysis and comparison between the piezoprobe and DVTP-P tools is provided in Appendix B of this report. Finally, a series of additional holes were cored at the crest of Hydrate Ridge (Site 1249) specifically geared toward the rapid recovery and preservation of hydrate samples as part of a hydrate geriatric study partially funded by the Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, the preliminary results from gamma density non-invasive imaging of the cores preserved in pressure vessels are provided in Appendix C of this report. An initial visual inspection of the samples stored in liquid nitrogen is provided in Appendix D of this report.

  19. Snorkelers impact on fish communities and algae in a temperate marine protected area

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joachim Claudet; Philippe Lenfant; Muriel Schrimm

    2010-01-01

    Multiple-use marine protected areas (MPAs) are used to manage marine resources, allocate space to different users and reduce\\u000a conflicts while protecting marine biodiversity. In the Mediterranean, MPA managers are increasingly interested in containing\\u000a the effects of coastal recreation within underwater trails, but snorkelers impacts on the surrounding ecosystem remain largely\\u000a unknown. In a Mediterranean MPA, an underwater snorkeling trail was

  20. Speciation and Vertical Distribution of Lead and Lead Shot in Soil at a Recreational Firing Range

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jack Duggan; Ankit Dhawan

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the speciation, vertical distribution and soil particle size fractions of lead in soil samples at a recreational firing range was determined. This study was performed to gain a better understanding of how lead shot breaks down at ranges. Both the chemical form of lead and the types of soil particles with which lead is associated are important

  1. Fear Perceptions in Public Parks: Interactions of Environmental Concealment, the Presence of People Recreating, and Gender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jorgensen, Lisa J.; Ellis, Gary D.; Ruddell, Edward

    2013-01-01

    This research examined the effect of concealment (environmental cues), presence or absence of people recreating (social cues), and gender on individuals' fear of crime in a community park setting. Using a 7-point single-item indicator, 732 participants from two samples (540 park visitors and 192 college students) rated their estimates of fear…

  2. Views of Students in the Department of Recreation and Sport Management on Distance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herguner, Gulten

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to investigate viewpoints of students in recreation and sport management department on distance education, and the effects of sex, having computers and internet access at home, family's monthly income, district of the family, and students' level of class on these viewpoints. Survey method was used to carry out the study. The sample

  3. Fishing, fish consumption and advisory awareness among Louisiana’s recreational fishers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Adrienne Katner; Ebenezer Ogunyinka; Mei-Hung Sun; Shannon Soileau; David Lavergne; Dianne Dugas; Mel Suffet

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents results from the first known population-based survey of recreational fishers in Louisiana (n=1774). The ultimate goal of this study was to obtain data in support of the development of regional advisories for a high exposure population with unique seafood consumption patterns. Between July and August of 2008, a survey was mailed to a random sample of licensed

  4. Impacts of recreational SCUBA diving on coral communities of the Caribbean island of Grand Cayman

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jamie A. Tratalos; Timothy J. Austin

    2001-01-01

    The impact of recreational SCUBA diving on coral reefs of the Cayman Islands, British West Indies, was assessed from 63 10-m video transects, filmed on reefs in the West Bay area of Grand Cayman. Three high use and three low use dive sites were sampled at distances of c. 15, 55 and 200 m from mooring buoys, in addition to

  5. RAPID DETECTION METHOD FOR E.COLI, ENTEROCOCCI AND BACTEROIDES IN RECREATIONAL WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current methodology for determining fecal contamination of drinking water sources and recreational waters rely on the time-consuming process of bacterial multiplication and require at least 24 hours from the time of sampling to the possible determination that the water is unsafe ...

  6. 77 FR 39984 - Information Collection; Recreation Administration Permit and Fee Envelope

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-06

    ...and charge fees for recreation uses of Federal recreational...waters, such as group activities, recreation events and motorized...FS-2300-48, National Recreation Permit, is a form...authorize specific activities at particular...

  7. Supplemental Figures and Tables for Groundfish EFH Review Phase 1 Report "Federal and State Marine Protected Areas Type of Fishing Restriction"

    E-print Network

    Goldfinger, Chris

    "Federal and State Marine Protected Areas ­ Type of Fishing Restriction" Author and state MPAs depicted in map figures, categorized by level of fishing restriction Fishing Restriction BEFORE AFTER Commercial and Recreational Fishing Prohibited

  8. 78 FR 78810 - Pacific Southwest Recreation Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-27

    ...will meet in San Bernardino, California. The Recreation RAC is authorized under the Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act (REA) (Pub. L. 108-447) and operates in compliance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act (FACA) (Pub. L....

  9. 18 CFR 2.7 - Recreational development at licensed projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...purposes. (2) To provide either by itself or through arrangement with others for facilities to process adequately sewage, litter, and other wastes from recreation facilities including wastes from watercraft, at recreation facilities maintained and...

  10. PARKS, RECREATION AND TOURISM MANAGEMENT ON-CAMPUS TRANSFER APPLICATION

    E-print Network

    Parker, Matthew D. Brown

    Recreation ____ Program Management _____ BS Professional Golf Management _____ BS Sport Management #12;NC STATE PARKS, RECREATION AND TOURISM MANAGEMENT ON-CAMPUS TRANSFER APPLICATION Box 8004, Raleigh First Student ID # ________________________ Current Major____________________________ Local Address

  11. In Search of Pleasure: An Exploration of Teenage Recreational Sex

    E-print Network

    Reichstein, Lauren

    2012-02-14

    This thesis utilizes a qualitative method to investigate recreational sex among teenagers as recounted by current college-aged students. As defined for the purposes of this thesis, recreational sex is any consensual sexual activity undertaken...

  12. Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University Department of Recreational Sports

    E-print Network

    Buehrer, R. Michael

    Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University Department of Recreational Sports Assumption Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University Department of Recreational Sports facilities, equipment and programs, sporting activities, running, weight lifting, use of equipment and swimming pools and/or mere

  13. Campers' facility preferences, recreation area selection consistency, and satisfactions

    E-print Network

    Marnell, John Andrew

    1983-01-01

    better service and facilities for its tax dollars. Therefore, outdoor recreation planners cannot afford to follow conventional wisdom or make blind assumptions as to what types of facilities users desire in recreation areas. "Planning decisions must...

  14. 50 CFR 648.105 - Summer flounder recreational fishing season.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Summer flounder recreational fishing season. 648.105 Section 648.105 Wildlife and Fisheries...Fisheries § 648.105 Summer flounder recreational fishing season. Unless otherwise specified pursuant to §...

  15. 50 CFR 648.105 - Summer flounder recreational fishing season.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Summer flounder recreational fishing season. 648.105 Section 648.105 Wildlife and Fisheries...Fisheries § 648.105 Summer flounder recreational fishing season. Unless otherwise specified pursuant to §...

  16. 50 CFR 648.105 - Summer flounder recreational fishing season.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Summer flounder recreational fishing season. 648.105 Section 648.105 Wildlife and Fisheries...Fisheries § 648.105 Summer flounder recreational fishing season. Unless otherwise specified pursuant to §...

  17. Undergraduate and graduate degrees from the School of Recreation,

    E-print Network

    Leadership* licensure Virginia teaching licensure in Health and Physical Education (PK-12) *Interdisciplinary · hospitality management · kinesiology · physical education · recreation management · sport management Recreation BSEd | Physical Education BS | Tourism and Events Management Concentrations ­ Events Management

  18. Titan Recreation-Intramural Sports Student Engagement Report

    E-print Network

    de Lijser, Peter

    Titan Recreation-Intramural Sports Student Engagement Report FY 2010-2011 Purpose Statement Titan and overall wellness. Titan Recreation also provides opportunities for cooperative and competitive play, team building and interpersonal skills. Leadership and participation opportunities within Titan

  19. THE CONTRIBUTION OF OUTDOOR-BASED RECREATION OPPORTUNITIES TO LOCAL

    E-print Network

    strategy for outdoor-recreation based tourism development. Despite its reputation as a leading rock development are provided. Keywords: economic impact analysis; tourism development; recreation-based tourism; rock climbing; visitor monitoring Subject Terms: Leisure -- Economic aspects; Tourism -- Economic

  20. 36 CFR 7.51 - Curecanti Recreation Area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Curecanti Recreation Area. 7.51 Section 7.51 Parks, Forests...THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.51 Curecanti Recreation Area. (a) Hunting. Hunting is...

  1. 36 CFR 7.51 - Curecanti Recreation Area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Curecanti Recreation Area. 7.51 Section 7.51 Parks, Forests...THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.51 Curecanti Recreation Area. (a) Hunting. Hunting is...

  2. 36 CFR 7.51 - Curecanti Recreation Area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Curecanti Recreation Area. 7.51 Section 7.51 Parks, Forests...THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.51 Curecanti Recreation Area. (a) Hunting. Hunting is...

  3. 36 CFR 7.51 - Curecanti Recreation Area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Curecanti Recreation Area. 7.51 Section 7.51 Parks, Forests...THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.51 Curecanti Recreation Area. (a) Hunting. Hunting is...

  4. 36 CFR 7.51 - Curecanti National Recreation Area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...false Curecanti National Recreation Area. 7.51 Section 7.51 Parks, Forests...THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.51 Curecanti National Recreation Area. (a) Hunting. Hunting...

  5. 3. EAGLE CREEK RECREATION AREA, VIEW OF PICNIC AREA WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. EAGLE CREEK RECREATION AREA, VIEW OF PICNIC AREA WITH COMMUNITY KITCHEN IN BACKGROUND. - Historic Columbia River Highway, Eagle Creek Recreation Area, Historic Columbia River Highway at Eagle Creek, Troutdale, Multnomah County, OR

  6. 36 CFR 7.50 - Chickasaw Recreation Area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 2010-07-01 false Chickasaw Recreation Area. 7.50 Section 7.50 ...NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.50 Chickasaw Recreation Area. (a) Fishing. Unless...resource protection, and other management activities and objectives. [49 FR...

  7. 36 CFR 7.48 - Lake Mead National Recreation Area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...false Lake Mead National Recreation Area. 7.48 Section...48 Lake Mead National Recreation Area. (a) Aircraft...designated as closed to this activity. (c) Parking...protection, and other management activities and objectives. [32...

  8. 36 CFR 7.50 - Chickasaw Recreation Area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 2011-07-01 false Chickasaw Recreation Area. 7.50 Section 7.50 ...NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.50 Chickasaw Recreation Area. (a) Fishing. Unless...resource protection, and other management activities and objectives. [49 FR...

  9. 36 CFR 7.48 - Lake Mead National Recreation Area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...false Lake Mead National Recreation Area. 7.48 Section...48 Lake Mead National Recreation Area. (a) Aircraft...designated as closed to this activity. (c) Parking...protection, and other management activities and objectives. [32...

  10. 40 CFR 230.52 - Water-related recreation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...recreation activities. The disposal of dredged or fill material may adversely modify or destroy water use for recreation by changing turbidity, suspended particulates, temperature, dissolved oxygen, dissolved materials, toxic materials, pathogenic organisms,...

  11. 40 CFR 230.52 - Water-related recreation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...recreation activities. The disposal of dredged or fill material may adversely modify or destroy water use for recreation by changing turbidity, suspended particulates, temperature, dissolved oxygen, dissolved materials, toxic materials, pathogenic organisms,...

  12. 40 CFR 230.52 - Water-related recreation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...recreation activities. The disposal of dredged or fill material may adversely modify or destroy water use for recreation by changing turbidity, suspended particulates, temperature, dissolved oxygen, dissolved materials, toxic materials, pathogenic organisms,...

  13. 40 CFR 230.52 - Water-related recreation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...recreation activities. The disposal of dredged or fill material may adversely modify or destroy water use for recreation by changing turbidity, suspended particulates, temperature, dissolved oxygen, dissolved materials, toxic materials, pathogenic organisms,...

  14. Gambling motivation and passion: a comparison study of recreational and pathological gamblers.

    PubMed

    Back, Ki-Joon; Lee, Choong-Ki; Stinchfield, Randy

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the structural relationship among gambling motivation, gambling passion, and behavioral intentions to gamble between recreational and pathological gamblers. Specifically, this study aimed to shed light on the different ways in which gambling motivation and affective attitude are associated with recreational and pathological gamblers. Using a purposive sampling method, 400 subjects were selected for and participated in this study during their visits to a casino. Study results echoed the notion of distinctive and separate gambling motivations and passions between recreational and pathological gamblers. Also, results identified specific areas to which casino operators or policy makers should pay special attention in developing effective marketing strategies to promote responsible gambling. PMID:20680417

  15. Sampling

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. R. Brown; JOHN T. SCANLAN; WALDO C. AULT

    1955-01-01

    Conclusion  It is hoped that the foregoing general remarks on sampling procedures will point up the necessity for more care in this very\\u000a important operation. In too many instances sampling has been delegated to persons not too well aware of the purpose and importance\\u000a of the samples which they are taking, and possibly not too well qualified to handle the job.

  16. In-Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Marine Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Frank Rack; Gerhard Bohrmann; Anne Trehu; Michael Storms; Derryl Schroeder; ODP Leg 204 Shipboard Scientific Party

    2002-09-30

    The primary accomplishment of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter was the deployment of tools and measurement systems on ODP Leg 204 to study hydrate deposits on Hydrate Ridge, offshore Oregon from July through September, 2002. During Leg 204, we cored and logged 9 sites on the Oregon continental margin to determine the distribution and concentration of gas hydrates in an accretionary ridge and adjacent slope basin, investigate the mechanisms that transport methane and other gases into the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ), and obtain constraints on physical properties of hydrates in situ. A 3D seismic survey conducted in 2000 provided images of potential subsurface fluid conduits and indicated the position of the GHSZ throughout the survey region. After coring the first site, we acquired Logging-While-Drilling (LWD) data at all but one site to provide an overview of downhole physical properties. The LWD data confirmed the general position of key seismic stratigraphic horizons and yielded an initial estimate of hydrate concentration through the proxy of in situ electrical resistivity. These records proved to be of great value in planning subsequent coring. The second new hydrate proxy to be tested was infrared thermal imaging of cores on the catwalk as rapidly as possible after retrieval. The thermal images were used to identify hydrate samples and to map estimate the distribution and texture of hydrate within the cores. Geochemical analyses of interstitial waters and of headspace and void gases provide additional information on the distribution and concentration of hydrate within the stability zone, the origin and pathway of fluids into and through the GHSZ, and the rates at which the process of gas hydrate formation is occurring. Bio- and lithostratigraphic description of cores, measurement of physical properties, and in situ pressure core sampling and thermal measurements complement the data set, providing ground-truth tests of inferred physical and sedimentological properties. Among the most interesting preliminary results are: (1) the discovery that gas hydrates are distributed through a broad depth range within the GHSZ and that different physical and chemical proxies for hydrate distribution and concentration give generally consistent results; (2) evidence for the importance of sediment properties for controlling the migration of fluids in the accretionary complex; (3) geochemical indications that the gas hydrate system at Hydrate Ridge contains significant concentrations of higher order hydrocarbons and that fractionation and mixing signals will provide important constraints on gas hydrate dynamics; and (4) the discovery of very high chlorinity values that extend for at least 10 mbsf near the summit, indicating that hydrate formation here must be very rapid.

  17. In-Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Marine Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Frank R. Rack

    2006-09-20

    Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41329 between Joint Oceanographic Institutions and DOE-NETL was divided into two phases based on successive proposals and negotiated statements of work pertaining to activities to sample and characterize methane hydrates on ODP Leg 204 (Phase 1) and on IODP Expedition 311 (Phase 2). The Phase 1 Final Report was submitted to DOE-NETL in April 2004. This report is the Phase 2 Final Report to DOE-NETL. The primary objectives of Phase 2 were to sample and characterize methane hydrates using the systems and capabilities of the D/V JOIDES Resolution during IODP Expedition 311, to enable scientists the opportunity to establish the mass and distribution of naturally occurring gas and gas hydrate at all relevant spatial and temporal scales, and to contribute to the DOE methane hydrate research and development effort. The goal of the work was to provide expanded measurement capabilities on the JOIDES Resolution for a dedicated hydrate cruise to the Cascadia continental margin off Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada (IODP Expedition 311) so that hydrate deposits in this region would be well characterized and technology development continued for hydrate research. IODP Expedition 311 shipboard activities on the JOIDES Resolution began on August 28 and were concluded on October 28, 2005. The statement of work for this project included three primary tasks: (1) research management oversight, provided by JOI; (2) mobilization, deployment and demobilization of pressure coring and core logging systems, through a subcontract with Geotek Ltd.; and, (3) mobilization, deployment and demobilization of a refrigerated container van that will be used for degassing of the Pressure Core Sampler and density logging of these pressure cores, through a subcontract with the Texas A&M Research Foundation (TAMRF). Additional small tasks that arose during the course of the research were included under these three primary tasks in consultation with the DOE-NETL Program Manager. All tasks outlined in the original statement of work were accomplished except for the deployment and use of the X-ray CT system under Subtask 2-2. This reduction in scope provided resources that were applied to other activities to support the overall project. Post-expedition analysis of results and report writing will continue beyond this reporting period, however, all field deployments associated with this project have been successfully concluded as of this writing.

  18. Water Quality Conditions Associated with Cattle Grazing and Recreation on National Forest Lands

    PubMed Central

    Roche, Leslie M.; Kromschroeder, Lea; Atwill, Edward R.; Dahlgren, Randy A.; Tate, Kenneth W.

    2013-01-01

    There is substantial concern that microbial and nutrient pollution by cattle on public lands degrades water quality, threatening human and ecological health. Given the importance of clean water on multiple-use landscapes, additional research is required to document and examine potential water quality issues across common resource use activities. During the 2011 grazing-recreation season, we conducted a cross sectional survey of water quality conditions associated with cattle grazing and/or recreation on 12 public lands grazing allotments in California. Our specific study objectives were to 1) quantify fecal indicator bacteria (FIB; fecal coliform and E. coli), total nitrogen, nitrate, ammonium, total phosphorus, and soluble-reactive phosphorus concentrations in surface waters; 2) compare results to a) water quality regulatory benchmarks, b) recommended maximum nutrient concentrations, and c) estimates of nutrient background concentrations; and 3) examine relationships between water quality, environmental conditions, cattle grazing, and recreation. Nutrient concentrations observed throughout the grazing-recreation season were at least one order of magnitude below levels of ecological concern, and were similar to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) estimates for background water quality conditions in the region. The relative percentage of FIB regulatory benchmark exceedances widely varied under individual regional and national water quality standards. Relative to USEPA’s national E. coli FIB benchmarks–the most contemporary and relevant standards for this study–over 90% of the 743 samples collected were below recommended criteria values. FIB concentrations were significantly greater when stream flow was low or stagnant, water was turbid, and when cattle were actively observed at sampling. Recreation sites had the lowest mean FIB, total nitrogen, and soluble-reactive phosphorus concentrations, and there were no significant differences in FIB and nutrient concentrations between key grazing areas and non-concentrated use areas. Our results suggest cattle grazing, recreation, and provisioning of clean water can be compatible goals across these national forest lands. PMID:23826370

  19. America's Outdoor Recreation Areas--Playgrounds for the Affluent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, John D.

    The purpose of this paper is to assess the societal benefits of outdoor recreation and to determine the relationship of social stratification to utilization of outdoor recreation facilities. Conclusions are that many of America's outdoor recreation sites are located at considerable distances from population concentrations and require substantial…

  20. Leisure Today. Recreation Development in the American Countryside.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Patrick R., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    This special feature, an introduction and nine articles, highlights the continued impact of rural America on recreational lifestyles of both rural and urban residents. Topics include change, the role of leisure, local park and recreation departments, corporate cooperation, recreation development, health/wellness, festivals/special events, and…

  1. And Our State's Economic Vitality Colorado's Recreation Economy

    E-print Network

    And Our State's Economic Vitality Colorado's Recreation Economy Bryan Martin, The Colorado Mountain Club #12;Colorado's Recreation Economy The Colorado Mountain Club · 8,000 Members · 14 Chapters's Recreation Economy By the Numbers · $10 Billion Annually · 107,000 Jobs · $500 Million in State Tax Revenue

  2. Modeling Recreational Demand for Land in a CGE Framework

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Blandine Antoine; Angelo Gurgel; John M. Reilly

    We represent recreational demand for land in a CGE framework and apply it to investigate the potential of second generation biofuels production under possibilities of land use conversion from natural areas to agricultural land in the U.S, considering the recreational value of forests. We introduce recreational benefits of natural forests through \\

  3. 50 CFR 648.127 - Scup recreational fishing season.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Scup recreational fishing season. 648.127 Section 648.127...Fishery § 648.127 Scup recreational fishing season. Fishermen and vessels that...in § 648.128(a). The recreational fishing season may be adjusted pursuant to...

  4. 50 CFR 648.127 - Scup recreational fishing season.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Scup recreational fishing season. 648.127 Section 648.127...Fishery § 648.127 Scup recreational fishing season. Fishermen and vessels that...in § 648.128(a). The recreational fishing season may be adjusted pursuant to...

  5. 50 CFR 648.127 - Scup recreational fishing season.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Scup recreational fishing season. 648.127 Section 648.127...Fishery § 648.127 Scup recreational fishing season. Fishermen and vessels that...in § 648.128(a). The recreational fishing season may be adjusted pursuant to...

  6. Department of Recreation, Park and Tourism Sciences Academic Program Review

    E-print Network

    majors (Community Development and Recreation, Park and Tourism Sciences) and an undergraduate certificateDepartment of Recreation, Park and Tourism Sciences Academic Program Review Academic Year 2013 Department of Recreation, Park and Tourism Sciences 2261 TAMU College Station, TX 77843-2261 979

  7. Titan Recreation-Group Fitness Student Engagement Report

    E-print Network

    de Lijser, Peter

    Titan Recreation-Group Fitness Student Engagement Report FY 2012-2013 Purpose Statement Titan fitness and overall wellness. Titan Recreation also provides opportunities for cooperative and competitive in an environment committed to play and celebration. Program Overview The Titan Recreation Group Fitness Program

  8. Diffusion of Innovation: A Roadmap for Inclusive Community Recreation Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schleien, Stuart J.; Miller, Kimberly D.

    2010-01-01

    Inclusive community recreation is an optimal environment for the development of recreation and sports skills and social relationships between people with and without disabilities. Although we know much about best practices for inclusion, little systemic change in recreation agencies has transpired. Diffusion of Innovation Theory is proposed as a…

  9. 36 CFR 7.79 - Amistad Recreation Area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Amistad Recreation Area. 7.79 Section...SYSTEM § 7.79 Amistad Recreation Area. (a) Hunting...allowed within Amistad National Recreation Area with the following exceptions...protection, and other management activities and objectives. [34...

  10. 36 CFR 7.79 - Amistad Recreation Area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Amistad Recreation Area. 7.79 Section...SYSTEM § 7.79 Amistad Recreation Area. (a) Hunting...allowed within Amistad National Recreation Area with the following exceptions...protection, and other management activities and objectives. [34...

  11. Recreational Participation of Children with High Functioning Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potvin, Marie-Christine; Snider, Laurie; Prelock, Patricia; Kehayia, Eva; Wood-Dauphinee, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    The recreation of children with High Functioning Autism (HFA) is not well understood. The objective of this cross-sectional study was to compare the recreational engagement of children with HFA and their typically developing peers. Children with HFA (n = 30) and peers (n = 31) were similar on key characteristics that may impact recreation except…

  12. Identifying the Computer Competency Levels of Recreation Department Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zorba, Erdal

    2011-01-01

    Computer-based and web-based applications are as major instructional tools to increase undergraduates' motivation at school. In the recreation field usage of, computer and the internet based recreational applications has become more prevalent in order to present visual and interactive entertainment activities. Recreation department undergraduates…

  13. RECREATION PROBLEMS OF RURAL YOUTH IN A CHANGING ENVIRONMENT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PRENDERGAST, JOSEPH

    RURAL YOUTH WHO ARE MOVING TO URBAN AREAS ARE NOT PREPARED TO PARTICIPATE IN URBAN TYPES OF RECREATION PROGRAMS. THE RECREATION SKILLS OF THOSE WHO HAVE LEFT THE FARM BUT ARE STILL IN RURAL SETTINGS DO NOT MATCH THE URBAN OPPORTUNITIES REACHING OUT TO THEM. THOSE STILL ON THE FARMS ARE GETTING RECREATION IDEAS THROUGH MASS MEDIA WITHOUT FINDING…

  14. RECREATION AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY FOR THE MENTALLY RETARDED.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association for Health, Physical Education, and Recreation, Washington, DC.

    SPECIAL EDUCATORS, PHYSICAL EDUCATORS, PARENTS, AND VOLUNTEERS CAN PROVIDE RECREATION FOR THE MENTALLY HANDICAPPED. BACKGROUND INFORMATION ABOUT THE MENTALLY HANDICAPPED AND THEIR SPECIAL NEEDS IN A RECREATIONAL PROGRAM ARE CONSIDERED. OBJECTIVES OF PLAY AND OF RECREATIONAL PROGRAMS AND SUGGESTIONS FOR PROGRAM IMPLEMENTATION AND INSTRUCTION ARE…

  15. Dopaminergic system dysfunction in recreational dexamphetamine users.

    PubMed

    Schrantee, Anouk; Václav?, Lena; Heijtel, Dennis F R; Caan, Matthan W A; Gsell, Willy; Lucassen, Paul J; Nederveen, Aart J; Booij, Jan; Reneman, Liesbeth

    2015-01-01

    Dexamphetamine (dAMPH) is a stimulant drug that is widely used recreationally as well as for the treatment of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Although animal studies have shown neurotoxic effects of dAMPH on the dopaminergic system, little is known about such effects on the human brain. Here, we studied the dopaminergic system at multiple physiological levels in recreational dAMPH users and age, gender, and IQ-matched dAMPH-naïve healthy controls. We assessed baseline D2/3 receptor availability, in addition to changes in dopamine (DA) release using single-photon emission computed tomography and DA functionality using pharmacological magnetic resonance imaging, following a dAMPH challenge. Also, the subjective responses to the challenge were determined. dAMPH users displayed significantly lower striatal DA D2/3 receptor binding compared with healthy controls. In dAMPH users, we further observed a blunted DA release and DA functionality to an acute dAMPH challenge, as well as a blunted subjective response. Finally, the lower D2/3 availability, the more pleasant the dAMPH administration was experienced by control subjects, but not by dAMPH users. Thus, in agreement with preclinical studies, we show that the recreational use of dAMPH in human subjects is associated with dopaminergic system dysfunction. These findings warrant further (longitudinal) investigations and call for caution when using this drug recreationally and for ADHD. PMID:25394786

  16. Geography, tourism and recreation in the antipodes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Douglas G. Pearce; Robert C. Mings

    1984-01-01

    This review, albeit of necessity selective, has outlined a diversity of interests, not only in subject matter but also in approach; a concern with methodological and conceptual issues as well as with the practical application of such research. Thus in spite of the small number of Antipodean geographers actively engaged in the field, the indications are that tourism and recreation

  17. Star Trek as Recreational Reading for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espeland, Mecedes

    A study investigated the appropriateness of the "Star Trek" book series for use as recreational reading material for elementary school children. The 12 books were adapted from the television series by James Blish. Appropriateness was determined by evaluating the quality and the readability levels of the books. Quality was ascertained by examining…

  18. Recreational Gun Use by California Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vittes, Katherine A.; Sorenson, Susan B.

    2005-01-01

    Most research on adolescents and firearms focuses on urban populations, handguns, and homicide. This study examines the prevalence and correlates of recreational gun use (RGU)--for hunting or target shooting--among 5,801 community-residing 12- to 17-year-old Californians. Data are from the first statewide California Health Interview Survey (CHIS),…

  19. Recreation Research Publications. Bibliography 1961-1982.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Echelberger, Herbert E., Comp.; And Others

    This bibliography identifies, by author and subject matter, recreational research publications, by Forest Service scientists, that have been published from 1961 through 1982. Publications are classified under six major topic areas: (1) management of areas and facilities (including such topics as wilderness/backcountry resources and use of…

  20. FACULTY OF KINESIOLOGY AND RECREATION MANAGEMENT

    E-print Network

    Major, Arkady

    -2015 APPLICATION DEADLINES EARLY BIRD FEE DEADLINE: MARCH 17, 2014 REGULAR DEADLINE: APRIL 14, 2014 I. GENERAL, Athletic Therapy Program - BKin (AT) Bachelor of Physical Education - BPE Bachelor of Recreation of at least one year of university level study (any 24-30 credit hours). (Work completed at the college level

  1. Rice University Recreation Center Membership Manual

    E-print Network

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    group swim lessons. Fitness - offers group fitness classes, fitness incentive and specialty programs ­ 9000+ square feet devoted to weight and cardiovascular equipment Aquatic Center - one Olympic-size competitive pool, one recreational pool Multi-Purpose Rooms (4) - wood sprung flooring; used for group fitness

  2. Department of Recreational Sports Intramural Sports

    E-print Network

    Escher, Christine

    of the first and third periods. A halftime of five minutes will occur at the end of the second period. GDepartment of Recreational Sports Intramural Sports Water Polo Rules I. GOVERNING RULES The rules Oregon State University Intramural Sports rule applies. II. ELIGIBILITY All participants must be either

  3. Annual in Therapeutic Recreation. Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Michael E., Ed.; Card, Jaclyn A., Ed.

    This volume focuses on therapeutic recreation, as a subject of inquiry and as a treatment tool. The 11 articles include original field based research, program development initiatives, issue and theory of practice papers, and original tutorials in assessment and research. The article titles are: "The Role of Leisure Education with Family Caregivers…

  4. Purdue University Division of Recreational Sports

    E-print Network

    Jiang, Wen

    Purdue University Division of Recreational Sports http://www.purdue.edu/recsports/ Intramural Sports Participant Handbook (2012-2013) #12;2 Table of Contents Page Introduction .......................................................................................16 #12;3 Introduction The Intramural Sports Program is designed to provide an opportunity

  5. Physical-Education Facilities/Recreation Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School & University, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Presents K-12 and college physical education/recreation facilities considered outstanding in a competition, which judged the most outstanding learning environments at educational institutions nationwide. Jurors spent two days reviewing projects, highlighting unique concepts and ideas. For each citation, the article offers information on the firm,…

  6. DESIGN FOR SAFETY OF RECREATIONAL WATER SLIDES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sung-Hwan Joo; Kuang-Hua Chang

    2001-01-01

    This article presents an integrated modeling, analysis, and design method for the safety of recreational water slides. Safety and excitement levels of riding on the water slide are the two common criteria for water slide design. Between the two, safety is far more critical than excitement. The safety aspect of the water slide design is ensured by restricting the riding

  7. Berea College Campus Life, Wellness, and Recreation

    E-print Network

    Baltisberger, Jay H.

    Berea College Campus Life, Wellness, and Recreation CPO 2199 8599853290 Active Club/Sponsor: Advisor/Sponsor Email: Extension: CPO: Type of Group Academic/Educational/Labor Athletic College in connection with its own name, provided that such use is not otherwise precluded

  8. An Environmental Ethic for Parks and Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAvoy, Leo

    1990-01-01

    Suggests an environmental ethic for parks and recreation professionals who are often on the wrong side of the environmental controversy because they lack a professional ethic. This article provides a guide for implementing an environmental ethic, noting that philosophy of service must be grounded in ecological principles, not merchant values. (SM)

  9. Outdoor Recreation. Curriculum Materials for Agricultural Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McElwee, Robert; And Others

    This curriculum guide for agricultural education contains nine chapters on outdoor recreation. Each is written by a different author (professors at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University) and follows a similar format: Objectives, list of references, list of teaching materials, notes on teacher preparation, content for presentation,…

  10. Campus Recreation Sport Club Liability Release Form

    E-print Network

    Thomas, Andrew

    Campus Recreation Sport Club Liability Release Form I, ____________________________ , entirely upon my own initiative risk, and responsibility am about to participate in a sport club which is funded parent/legal guardian permission to participate in the UMaine Sport Clubs Program as indicated

  11. Geology Fieldnotes: Chickasaw National Recreation Area, Oklahoma

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This site provides information about the Chickasaw National Recreation Area including geology, park maps, visitor information, photographs, and links for more details. The human attraction to the water found there(streams, lakes, and springs), human history, the old mountains (300 million years old - Carboniferous) formed by the Arbuckle uplift, and sedimentary rock deposits are highlighted.

  12. Rescuing Reality: Viewer interpretation of Television Recreations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, David B.; Dobkin, Bethami A.

    While contemporary communication perspectives often make a distinction between reality and the televised presentation of reality, viewers may find this distinction difficult to maintain. Television is imbued with perceived objectivity. The use of recreations in popular television programming requires a reconceptualization of how viewers perceive…

  13. Guidelines for Recreation and Athletic Field Lighting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crookham, Joe P.

    1982-01-01

    Guidelines for planning the lighting facilities for recreational and other athletic fields are presented (a softball field is used for an example). Guidelines are given for determining (1) lighting needs and levels of uniformity; (2) lamp choice; (3) structural requirements; (4) operating and maintenance costs; and (5) financing options. (PP)

  14. Public Administration of Recreational Services. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hjelte, George; Shivers, Jay S.

    Oriented toward a consideration of administration from the standpoint of departmental problems, this textbook deals with administrative techniques and practices pertaining to public administration of recreational services. It covers organization, operation, planning, development, and managerial procedures, and also describes the basic elements of…

  15. Wednesday, January 04, 2012 7:00 AM 12:00 PM Recreational Sports Open Recreation Connolly South Court

    E-print Network

    Carter, John

    - Volleyball Connolly South Court A - West 8:30 PM 10:30 PM Recreational Sports Informal Rec - Table Tennis, January 10, 2012 8:30 PM 10:30 PM Recreational Sports Informal Rec - Table Tennis Connolly South Court B - Volleyball Connolly South Court A - West 8:30 PM 10:30 PM Recreational Sports Informal Rec - Table Tennis

  16. Marine Debris

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Bishop Museum

    In this activity students will perform experiments to examine if debris will float, or blow in the wind. They will discover which characteristics of trash affect the likelihood that it will become marine debris. Trash that floats or is easily blown around is more likely to become marine debris. As a result of this activity students will be able to define marine debris and categorize different types of debris.

  17. Assessment of ultrasound-assisted extraction as sample pre-treatment for the measurement of lead isotope ratios in marine biological tissues by multicollector inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costas-Rodríguez, M.; Lavilla, Isela; Bendicho, Carlos

    2011-06-01

    In this work, ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) was evaluated as a sample preparation procedure for lead isotope ratio measurements in marine biological tissues by multicollector inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. 20 mg of marine biological tissue and 1 mL of acid extractant were sonicated for 3 min at 60% ultrasound amplitude. Matrix separation was performed in the supernatant using a chromatographic exchange resin (Sr-Spec™). Total elimination of organic matter was achieved during the separation step. Microwave-assisted digestion and dry-ashing were used for comparative purposes. No significant differences were found in lead isotope ratios at 95% of confidence level. UAE emerges as an advantageous alternative to classical methods for sample preparation owing to its simplicity and rapidity ( i.e. operation steps were reduced), low reagent consumption and low contamination risks.

  18. Marine biology

    SciTech Connect

    Thurman, H.V.; Webber, H.H.

    1984-01-01

    This book discusses both taxonomic and ecological topics on marine biology. Full coverage of marine organisms of all five kingdoms is provided, along with interesting and thorough discussion of all major marine habitats. Organization into six major parts allows flexibility. It also provides insight into important topics such as disposal of nuclear waste at sea, the idea that life began on the ocean floor, and how whales, krill, and people interact. A full-color photo chapter reviews questions, and exercises. The contents are: an overview marine biology: fundamental concepts/investigating life in the ocean; the physical ocean, the ocean floor, the nature of water, the nature and motion of ocean water; general ecology, conditions for life in the sea, biological productivity and energy transfer; marine organisms; monera, protista, mycota and metaphyta; the smaller marine animals, the large animals marine habitats, the intertidal zone/benthos of the continental shelf, the photic zone, the deep ocean, the ocean under stress, marine pollution, appendix a: the metric system and conversion factors/ appendix b: prefixes and suffixes/ appendix c: taxonomic classification of common marine organisms, and glossary, and index.

  19. Marine cosmeceuticals.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se-Kwon

    2014-03-01

    Recently, a great deal of interest has been expressed in the cosmetic industry regarding marine-derived cosmetic active ingredients due to their numerous beneficial effects on human skin health. Bioactive substances derived from marine resources have diverse functional roles as natural skin care agents, and these properties can be applied to the development of novel cosmetics as well as nutricosmetics (from edible seaweeds and edible marine animals). This contribution focuses on marine-derived cosmeceutical active ingredients and presents an overview of their health beneficial effects on human skin. PMID:24641607

  20. Fishing, fish consumption and advisory awareness among Louisiana's recreational fishers.

    PubMed

    Katner, Adrienne; Ogunyinka, Ebenezer; Sun, Mei-Hung; Soileau, Shannon; Lavergne, David; Dugas, Dianne; Suffet, Mel

    2011-11-01

    This paper presents results from the first known population-based survey of recreational fishers in Louisiana (n=1774). The ultimate goal of this study was to obtain data in support of the development of regional advisories for a high exposure population with unique seafood consumption patterns. Between July and August of 2008, a survey was mailed to a random sample of licensed recreational fishers to characterize local fishing habits, sportfish consumption, and advisory awareness. Eighty-eight percent of respondents reported eating sportfish. Respondents ate an estimated mean of four fish meals per month, of which, approximately half were sportfish. Over half of all sportfish meals (54%) were caught in the Gulf of Mexico or bordering brackish areas. Sportfish consumption varied by license and gender; and was highest among Sportsman's Paradise license holders (2.8±0.2 meals per month), and males (2.2±0.1 meals per month). The most frequently consumed sportfish species were red drum, speckled trout, catfish, bass, crappie and bream. Advisory awareness rates varied by gender, ethnicity, geographic area, license type, age and education; and were lowest among women (53%), African-Americans (43%), fishers from the southeast of Louisiana (50%), holders of Senior Hunting and Fishing licenses (51%), individuals between 15 and 19 years of age (41%), and individuals with less than a high school education (43%). Results were used to identify ways to optimize monitoring, advisory development and outreach activities. PMID:21851935

  1. MDMA, cortisol, and heightened stress in recreational ecstasy users.

    PubMed

    Parrott, Andrew C; Montgomery, Cathy; Wetherell, Mark A; Downey, Luke A; Stough, Con; Scholey, Andrew B

    2014-09-01

    Stress develops when an organism requires additional metabolic resources to cope with demanding situations. This review will debate how recreational 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, 'ecstasy') can increase some aspects of acute and chronic stress in humans. Laboratory studies on the acute effects of MDMA on cortisol release and neurohormone levels in drug-free regular ecstasy/MDMA users have been reviewed, and the role of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in chronic changes in anxiety, stress, and cognitive coping is debated. In the laboratory, acute ecstasy/MDMA use can increase cortisol levels by 100-200%, whereas ecstasy/MDMA-using dance clubbers experience an 800% increase in cortisol levels, because of the combined effects of the stimulant drug and dancing. Three-month hair samples of abstinent users revealed cortisol levels 400% higher than those in controls. Chronic users show heightened cortisol release in stressful environments and deficits in complex neurocognitive tasks. Event-related evoked response potential studies show altered patterns of brain activation, suggestive of increased mental effort, during basic information processing. Chronic mood deficits include more daily stress and higher depression in susceptible individuals. We conclude that ecstasy/MDMA increases cortisol levels acutely and subchronically and that changes in the HPA axis may explain why recreational ecstasy/MDMA users show various aspects of neuropsychobiological stress. PMID:25014666

  2. Copper and sewage inputs from recreational vessels at popular anchor sites in a semi-enclosed Bay (Qld, Australia): estimates of potential annual loads.

    PubMed

    Leon, L Matthew; Warnken, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Environmental impacts of vessels are well documented; Cu pollution as result of Cu based antifouling paints and nutrient pollution (such as N) from marine sewage are two examples of such disturbances. Understanding environmental impacts as well as the use of coastal waterways by recreational vessels is of concern to regulatory authorities, waterway users and local residents. In this study more than 55 aerial surveys were conducted of selected popular anchorages in eastern Moreton Bay, Queensland, Australia. Numbers of recreational vessels at certain times during the year were used in multiple linear regression analyses to develop predictive models for recreational vessel numbers. Over one year approximately 10,000 locally registered recreational craft (>6m length overall) generated an estimated 59,000 vessel nights. With Cu leaching rates from the literature, and estimates of sewage inputs (assuming little or no use of pump-out facilities), load estimates associated with overnight use of 20 popular anchor sites were calculated as 141+/-46 kg of Cu and 1.17+/-0.38 t of nitrogen (N) annually. More importantly, the models showed vessel activity to be highly variable, and focused at peak holiday times, with 14% of vessel activity and associated pollutant loads entering the environment during Christmas and Easter. This study highlighted the inherent difficulties in managing a popular maritime amenity and Marine Parks such as the Moreton Bay Marine Protected Area, Queensland, Australia with its variety of stakeholders and types and intensities of uses. PMID:18514743

  3. Marine Microbial Ecology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Australian Antarctic Division

    This image-rich website from the Australian Antarctic Division's Biology program describes its research in marine microbial ecology. It includes an introduction of microbial ecology and microbial processes, followed by information about the research project. Field sampling, microscopy, flow cytometry, pigment analysis, flourometry, HPLC, culturing, feeding experiments, and the research staff are each discussed using vivid imagery. Links are provided to related websites.

  4. The effects of winter recreation on alpine and subalpine fauna: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Sato, Chloe F; Wood, Jeff T; Lindenmayer, David B

    2013-01-01

    The ski industry is often perceived as having a negative impact on sensitive alpine and subalpine communities. However, empirical evidence of such impacts is lacking. We reviewed the available literature from the last 35 years to quantify the reported effects of winter recreation on faunal communities. Overall, using one-sample binomial tests ('sign tests') we found that the effects of all types of winter recreation-related disturbances (i.e. ski runs, resort infrastructure and winter tourism) were more likely to be negative or have no effect, than be positive for wildlife. More specifically, in Europe, where the majority of the available research was conducted, the impacts of winter recreation were most often negative for fauna. In terms of specific taxa, birds and to a lesser extent mammals and arthropods, responded negatively to disturbance. Results from our meta-analysis confirmed the results from our binomial tests. Richness, abundance and diversity of fauna were lower in areas affected by winter recreation when compared with undisturbed areas. For most regions and taxa, however, empirical evidence remains too limited to identify clear impacts of winter recreation. We therefore conclude that the majority of ski resorts are operating in the absence of knowledge needed to inform effective strategies for biodiversity conservation and ecologically-sound management. Thus, there is an urgent need for more empirical research to be conducted throughout this increasingly threatened ecological community, especially given the indication from the available literature that fauna often respond negatively to winter recreation. PMID:23691190

  5. The Effects of Winter Recreation on Alpine and Subalpine Fauna: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Chloe F.; Wood, Jeff T.; Lindenmayer, David B.

    2013-01-01

    The ski industry is often perceived as having a negative impact on sensitive alpine and subalpine communities. However, empirical evidence of such impacts is lacking. We reviewed the available literature from the last 35 years to quantify the reported effects of winter recreation on faunal communities. Overall, using one-sample binomial tests (‘sign tests’) we found that the effects of all types of winter recreation-related disturbances (i.e. ski runs, resort infrastructure and winter tourism) were more likely to be negative or have no effect, than be positive for wildlife. More specifically, in Europe, where the majority of the available research was conducted, the impacts of winter recreation were most often negative for fauna. In terms of specific taxa, birds and to a lesser extent mammals and arthropods, responded negatively to disturbance. Results from our meta-analysis confirmed the results from our binomial tests. Richness, abundance and diversity of fauna were lower in areas affected by winter recreation when compared with undisturbed areas. For most regions and taxa, however, empirical evidence remains too limited to identify clear impacts of winter recreation. We therefore conclude that the majority of ski resorts are operating in the absence of knowledge needed to inform effective strategies for biodiversity conservation and ecologically-sound management. Thus, there is an urgent need for more empirical research to be conducted throughout this increasingly threatened ecological community, especially given the indication from the available literature that fauna often respond negatively to winter recreation. PMID:23691190

  6. Factors affecting the presence of human-associated and fecal indicator real-time quantitative PCR genetic markers in urban-impacted recreational beaches.

    PubMed

    Molina, Marirosa; Hunter, Shayla; Cyterski, Mike; Peed, Lindsay A; Kelty, Catherine A; Sivaganesan, Mano; Mooney, Thomas; Prieto, Lourdes; Shanks, Orin C

    2014-11-01

    Urban runoff can carry a variety of pollutants into recreational beaches, often including bacterial pathogens and indicators of fecal contamination. To develop complete recreational criteria and risk assessments, it is necessary to understand conditions under which human contamination could be present at beaches solely impacted by urban runoff. Accurately estimating risk requires understanding sources, concentrations, and transport mechanisms of microbial contaminants in these environments. By applying microbial source tracking methods and empirical modeling, we assessed the presence and level of human contamination at urban runoff impacted recreational beaches. We also identified environmental parameters and pollution sources that can influence the concentration and transport of culturable and molecular fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) in systems impacted solely by urban runoff. Water samples and physico-chemical parameters were collected from shoreline locations from three South Carolina (SC) beaches (five locations per beach) and two Florida (FL) beaches (three locations per beach). Each SC beach was directly impacted by swashes or tidal creeks receiving stormwater runoff from the urbanized area and therefore were designated as swash drain associated (SDA) beaches, while FL beaches were designated as non-swash drain associated (NSDA). Sampling in swash drains (SD; three sites per SD) directly impacting each SC beach was also conducted. Results indicate that although culturable (enterococci) and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) (EC23S857, Entero1, and GenBac3) FIB concentrations were, on average, higher at SD locations, SDA beaches did not have consistently higher molecular FIB signals compared to NSDA beaches. Both human-associated markers (HF183 and HumM2) were concomitantly found only at SDA beaches. Bacteroidales species-specific qPCR markers (BsteriF1 and BuniF2) identified differences in the Bacteroidales community, depending on beach type. The marker for general Bacteroidales was most abundant at SD locations and exhibited a high correlation with both culturable and other molecular markers. Combining molecular information with predictive modeling allowed us to identify both alongshore movement of currents and SD outflow as significant influences on the concentration of molecular and culturable indicators in the bathing zone. Data also suggests that combining methodologies is a useful and cost effective approach to help understand transport dynamics of fecal contamination and identify potential sources of contamination at marine beaches. PMID:25061692

  7. Marine Biomedicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bang, Frederik B.

    1977-01-01

    Describes early scientific research involving marine invertebrate pathologic processes that may have led to new insights into human disease. Discussed are inquiries of Metchnikoff, Loeb, and Cantacuzene (immunolgic responses in sea stars, horseshoe crabs, and marine worms, respectively). Describes current research stemming from these early…

  8. Marine Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewees, Christopher M.; Hooper, Jon K.

    1976-01-01

    A variety of informational material for a course in marine biology or oceanology at the secondary level is presented. Among the topics discussed are: food webs and pyramids, planktonic blooms, marine life, plankton nets, food chains, phytoplankton, zooplankton, larval plankton and filter feeders. (BT)

  9. City of New York Parks & Recreation

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    New York City's Department of Parks & Recreation oversees 29,000 acres of land, and more than 1,700 parks, playgrounds, and recreation facilities located throughout the five boroughs. Their website provides a great starting point for a virtual visit undaunted by weather. Take a virtual tour along the Bronx River, watch video clips from "It's My Park" (also aired every weekday at 11:00 a.m. on NYC life (channel 25)), and browse the photo gallery, which includes selections from the Parks Photo Archive, dating back to 1856, and the Parks' Flickr Group, with visitor-contributed photos. There are also seasonal features: for February, Black History Month, there's an events listing, an inventory of permanent sculptures honoring African-Americans in the Parks, African American Namesake Parks, and a photo gallery entitled The African American Experience. And of course, there's a Groundhog Day page, presenting the history of weather prediction by the rodent in the NYC Parks.

  10. Rapid determination of scopolamine in evidence of recreational and predatory use.

    PubMed

    Sáiz, Jorge; Mai, Thanh Duc; López, María López; Bartolomé, Carmen; Hauser, Peter C; García-Ruiz, Carmen

    2013-12-01

    In recent years, scopolamine has become a drug of common use for recreational and predatory purposes and several ways of administration have been devised. A method for the rapid analysis of suspicious samples was developed, using a portable capillary electrophoresis with contactless conductivity detection. The method allows the separation of scopolamine from atropine which has a similar structure and is present along with scopolamine in some samples. The method was demonstrated to be useful for the fast analysis of several types of evidential items which have recently been reported to have been abused with fatal consequences or employed for criminal purposes. An infusion of Datura stramonium L., in which scopolamine and atropine naturally coexist, was analyzed for being frequently consumed for recreational purposes. A spiked moisturizing cream and six spiked alcoholic beverages were also analyzed. In spite of the complexity of the specimens, the sample pre-treatment methods developed were simple and fast. PMID:24188342

  11. Speed and Exercise Intensity of Recreational Walkers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elaine M. Murtagh; Colin A. G. Boreham; Marie H. Murphy

    2002-01-01

    Background. Brisk walking has been identified as an activity suited to meet American College of Sport Medicine\\/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommendations for moderate intensity exercise (55–69% HRmax, 40–59% VO2R). However, little is known about whether recreational walkers self-select a pace which elicits this intensity and how they interpret the term “brisk walking.”Methods. The walking speed of 82 adults

  12. Feasibility study: a proposed recreational fishing enterprise

    E-print Network

    Booth, James D

    1991-01-01

    drinks), tanning oil and first aid products, ice and ice chests. Most enterprises also charged some kind of access fee. Most sold materials for catching and keeping fish including various kinds of live and prepared bait, fishing tackle, rods, reels... go fishing in Florida fishouts. Cichra & Carpenter, 1989. 12 that may not be present in natural settings (rest rooms, picnic tables, soft drinks, food, etc. ) . Product-related variables include outdoor types who enjoy recreational fishing...

  13. An experiment in recreation management training

    E-print Network

    Butts, Kenneth Mitchell

    1968-01-01

    Corpoxation, Flint, Michigan, pro- vided traIning date. dune 8, 1967. 12 W. F. . Bryan, Director of Nanagement Develonment, The Goodyear Tire and Nubber Company, Akron, Ohio, provided data May 23, 1967. 13 A. A. Daly, Dixector of' Management Development..., Michigan Park and Forestry Association, Midwest Institute of' Park Executives, National Cznzference on State Parks, Ohio Department, of' Natural Resources, and Ohio Parks and Recreation Association. It, is conducted by Indiana University, Bloomington...

  14. Hooking mortality: A review for recreational fisheries

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maurice I. Muoneke; W. Michael Childress

    1994-01-01

    Length?limit regulations and promotion of catch?and?release fishing have become increasingly important management approaches for recreational fisheries. We review?studies on catch?and?release (hooking) mortality gathered from the existing fisheries literature and from a survey of fisheries management agencies in all 50 states, the U.S. government, all Canadian provinces, and selected academic and research institutions. We identified hooking mortality estimates for 32 taxa.

  15. Mariner 9 star photography.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorpe, T. E.

    1973-01-01

    Mariner 9 achieved successful photography of the stars, the purpose of the experiment being to measure camera parameters associated with point source photometry, and to examine the feasibility of using stars as invariant calibration sources and a reference for optical navigation. The Mariner 9 camera-B photography demonstrated photometric response consistency over a limited sample of data to better than 15%. Camera performance verified the ability to model vidicon response characteristics as well as demonstrated an imaging capability sufficient to permit the use of stars for photometric calibration.

  16. Work Experience: Marine Biology A group of 4 to 6 potential marine biology students will spend one week in the

    E-print Network

    Harman, Neal.A.

    Work Experience: Marine Biology (ID:209) Outline A group of 4 to 6 potential marine biology of studying Marine Biology at Swansea University and develop a general understanding of the different subject will experience marine sampling techniques, both on board the university research vessel and from the shore

  17. The influence of use-related, environmental, and managerial factors on soil loss from recreational trails

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olive, N.D.; Marion, J.L.

    2009-01-01

    Recreational uses of unsurfaced trails inevitably result in their degradation, with the type and extent of resource impact influenced by factors such as soil texture, topography, climate, trail design and maintenance, and type and amount of use. Of particular concern, the loss of soil through erosion is generally considered a significant and irreversible form of trail impact. This research investigated the influence of several use-related, environmental, and managerial factors on soil loss on recreational trails and roads at Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area, a unit of the U.S. National Park Service. Regression modeling revealed that trail position, trail slope alignment angle, grade, water drainage, and type of use are significant determinants of soil loss. The introduction of individual and groups of variables into a series of regression models provides improved understanding and insights regarding the relative influence of these variables, informing the selection of more effective trail management actions. Study results suggest that trail erosion can be minimized by avoiding ?fall-line? alignments, steep grades, and valley-bottom alignments near streams, installing and maintaining adequate densities of tread drainage features, applying gravel to harden treads, and reducing horse and all-terrain vehicle use or restricting them to more resistant routes. This research also sought to develop a more efficient Variable Cross-Sectional Area method for assessing soil loss on trails. This method permitted incorporation of CSA measures in a representative sampling scheme applied to a large (24%) sample of the park's 526 km trail system. The variety of soil loss measures derived from the Variable CSA method, including extrapolated trail-wide soil loss estimates, permit an objective quantification of soil erosion on recreational trails and roads. Such data support relational analyses to increase understanding of trail degradation, and long-term monitoring of the natural and recreational integrity of the trail system infrastructure.

  18. Remote sensing in the coastal and marine environment. Proceedings of the US North Atlantic Regional Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaitzeff, J. B. (editor); Cornillon, P. (editor); Aubrey, D. A. (editor)

    1980-01-01

    Presentations were grouped in the following categories: (1) a technical orientation of Earth resources remote sensing including data sources and processing; (2) a review of the present status of remote sensing technology applicable to the coastal and marine environment; (3) a description of data and information needs of selected coastal and marine activities; and (4) an outline of plans for marine monitoring systems for the east coast and a concept for an east coast remote sensing facility. Also discussed were user needs and remote sensing potentials in the areas of coastal processes and management, commercial and recreational fisheries, and marine physical processes.

  19. Transcriptome of the dead: characterisation of immune genes and marker development from necropsy samples in a free-ranging marine mammal

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Transcriptomes are powerful resources, providing a window on the expressed portion of the genome that can be generated rapidly and at low cost for virtually any organism. However, because many genes have tissue-specific expression patterns, developing a complete transcriptome usually requires a 'discovery pool' of individuals to be sacrificed in order to harvest mRNA from as many different types of tissue as possible. This hinders transcriptome development in large, charismatic and endangered species, many of which stand the most to gain from such approaches. To circumvent this problem in a model pinniped species, we 454 sequenced cDNA from testis, heart, spleen, intestine, kidney and lung tissues obtained from nine adult male Antarctic fur seals (Arctocephalus gazella) that died of natural causes at Bird Island, South Georgia. Results After applying stringent quality control criteria based on length and annotation, we obtained 12,397 contigs which, in combination with 454 data previously obtained from skin, gave a total of 23,096 unique contigs. Homology was found to 77.0% of dog (Canis lupus familiaris) transcripts, suggesting that the combined assembly represents a substantial proportion of this species' transcriptome. Moreover, only 0.5% of transcripts revealed sequence similarity to bacteria, implying minimal contamination, and the percentage of transcripts involved in cell death was low at 2.6%. Transcripts with immune-related annotations were almost five-fold enriched relative to skin and represented 13.2% of all spleen-specific contigs. By reference to the dog, we also identified transcripts revealing homology to five class I, ten class II and three class III genes of the Major Histocompatibility Complex and derived the putative genomic distribution of 17,121 contigs, 2,119 in silico mined microsatellites and 9,382 single nucleotide polymorphisms. Conclusions Our findings suggest that transcriptome development based on samples collected post mortem may greatly facilitate genomic studies, not only of marine mammals but also more generally of species that are of conservation concern. PMID:23347513

  20. Contributions of the US state park system to nature recreation

    PubMed Central

    Siikamäki, Juha

    2011-01-01

    Nature recreation in the United States concentrates in publicly provided natural areas. They are costly to establish and maintain, but their societal contributions are difficult to measure. Here, a unique approach is developed to quantifying nature recreation services generated by the US state park system. The assessment first uses data from five national surveys conducted between 1975 and 2007 to consistently measure the amount of time used for nature recreation. The surveys comprise two official federal surveys and their predecessors. Each survey was designed to elicit nationally representative, detailed data on how people divide their time into different activities. State-level data on time use for nature recreation were then matched with information on the availability of state parks and other potentially important drivers of recreation, so that statistical estimation methods for nonexperimental panel data (difference-in-differences) could be used to examine the net contribution of state parks to nature recreation. The results show that state parks have a robust positive effect on nature recreation. For example, the approximately 2 million acres of state parks established between 1975 and 2007 are estimated to contribute annually 600 million hours of nature recreation (2.7 h per capita, approximately 9% of all nature recreation). All state parks generate annually an estimated 2.2 billion hours of nature recreation (9.7 h per capita; approximately 33% of all nature recreation). Using conventional approaches to valuing time, the estimated time value of nature recreation services generated by the US state park system is approximately $14 billion annually. PMID:21831838

  1. Land acquisition practices by Texas municipal park and recreation agencies

    E-print Network

    Reuwsaat, Michael Arthur

    1984-01-01

    LAND ACIlUISITION PRACTICES BY TEXAS MUNICIPAL PARK AND RECREATION AGENCIES A Thesis by MICHAEL ARTHUR REUWSAAT Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1984 Major Subject: Recreation and Resources Development LAND ACDU IS ITION PRACTICES BY TEXAS MUNICIPAL PARK AND RECREATION AGENCIES A Thesis by MICHAEL ARTHUR REUWSAAT Approved as to style and content by: Rona d A. Kaiser...

  2. Recreation land policies of Texas river authorities operating reservoirs

    E-print Network

    Ruesink, Lou Ellen

    1979-01-01

    RECREATION LAND POLICIES OF TEXAS RIVER AUTHORITIES OPERATING RESERVOIRS A Thesis by LOU ELLEN RUESINK Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A1IM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... December 1979 Major Subject: Recreation and Resources Developmenr. RECREATION LAND POLICIES OF TEXAS RIVER AUTHORITIES OPERATING RESERVOIRS A Thesis by LOU ELLEN RUESINK Approved as to sty1e and content by: (Chairman of o ittee) (Member...

  3. Medical and recreational marijuana: commentary and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Samuel T

    2013-01-01

    Recent years have seen substantial shifts in cultural attitudes towards marijuana for medical and recreational use. Potential problems with the approval, production, dispensation, route of administration, and negative health effects of medical and recreational marijuana are reviewed. Medical marijuana should be subject to the same rigorous approval process as other medications prescribed by physicians. Legalizing recreational marijuana may have negative public health effects. PMID:24564006

  4. Health Correlates of Recreational Gambling in Older Adults

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rani A. Desai; Paul K. Maciejewski; David J. Dausey; Barbara J. Caldarone; Marc N. Potenza

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Prior studies have found high rates of alcohol use and abuse\\/depen- dence, depression, bankruptcy, and incar- ceration associated with recreational gam- bling. Despite growing rates of recreational gambling in older adults, little is known re- garding its health correlates in this age group. The objective of this study was to identify health and well-being correlates of past-year recreational gambling

  5. Social psychological determinants of recreation: An exploratory analysis

    E-print Network

    Anson, Richard H.

    1974-10-01

    individuals perceive their parents to be active will exert an independent influence on their recreational activities. 5. The degree to which individuals perceive their parents to expect participation in recreational activities will exert an independent... psychological and are hypothesized to independently influence student recreational activity. They are as 174 Kansas Journal of Sociology follows: opinion leadership (actual responses to others - X3), perceived peer activity (X4), self description (X5...

  6. Marine Ecosystems

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Marine ecosystem introduction to shorelines, temperate oceans, and tropical oceans. Shoreline topics cover sandy and rocky shores, barrier islands, tide pools, estuaries, salt marshes, mud flats, mangrove forests, tides, waves, currents, and shoreline animals. Students can learn about temperate ocean zonation, light, forests, patterns, and animals. The tropical oceans chapter features coral reefs and tropical ocean animals. This site would provide a comprehensive introduction for a marine ecosystems or an ocean science unit.

  7. The national recreational fishing benefits of water pollution control

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Clifford S. Russell; William J. Vaughan

    1982-01-01

    Results are presented of an effort to estimate the fresh water recreational fishing benefit derived from water pollution control efforts. Methodology is potentially applicable to other subcategories. (PSB)

  8. roof truss detail, historic strap hinge detail Chopawamsic Recreational ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    roof truss detail, historic strap hinge detail - Chopawamsic Recreational Demonstration Area - Cabin Camp 1, Main Arts and Crafts Lodge, Prince William Forest Park, Triangle, Prince William County, VA

  9. U.S. Department of Commerce National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration National Marine Fisheries Service The Northeast region has a small but

    E-print Network

    ­ to support important commercial and recreational fisheries in the region or for habitat and endangered responsibility for the protection and recovery of anadromous and marine species listed under the Endangered of entanglement of marine mammals or sea turtles from the aquaculture structures themselves. 2. Both before

  10. ALASKA MARINE Alaska Marine Mammal Observer Program

    E-print Network

    ALASKA MARINE MAMMAL PROGRAM 2012 #12;2012 Alaska Marine Mammal Observer Program Observer Manual Contents Section 1: The Alaska Marine Mammal Observer Program 1.0 Introduction 1.1 Marine Mammal Stock Program 1.5 Alaska Marine Mammal Observer Program Section 2: The Southeast Alaska Environment 2

  11. The effect of recreational homes on willow ptarmigan ( Lagopus lagopus ) in a mountain area of Norway

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ole-Gunnar Støen; Per Wegge; Stian Heid; Olav Hjeljord; Christian Nellemann

    2010-01-01

    The increasing development of recreational resorts and second homes in mountain regions worldwide require substantial infrastructure,\\u000a and have large impact on habitats and ecosystems. We hypothesized that developed areas would attract predators and lead to\\u000a higher predation on willow ptarmigan and lower their abundance. In a 500-km2 study area in south-central Norway, we sampled the density of territorial cocks in

  12. The Effects of Livestock Grazing and Recreation on Irish Machair Grassland Vegetation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Cooper; T. McCann; E. Ballard

    2005-01-01

    Machair grassland uniquely occurs over sandy, calcareous soils of coastal sand-plains in dune systems of north-western Scotland and Ireland. This study assesses the plant species composition of Irish machair grassland at a landscape-scale. Machair sites were sampled with quadrats and multivariate analysis was used to assess relationships between species abundance, soil physical variables, livestock grazing and recreation activity. Grazing by

  13. Marine chemistry: Marine mercury breakdown

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joel D. Blum

    2011-01-01

    The neurotoxin methylmercury accumulates in marine biota and their predators. An analysis of seabird egg shells suggests that sea-ice cover reduces the breakdown of this highly toxic compound in sea water.

  14. Marine chemistry: Marine mercury breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, Joel D.

    2011-03-01

    The neurotoxin methylmercury accumulates in marine biota and their predators. An analysis of seabird egg shells suggests that sea-ice cover reduces the breakdown of this highly toxic compound in sea water.

  15. 78 FR 42486 - Notice of New Recreation Fee; Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-16

    ...Coronado National Forest is proposing to add the Portal CCC House and Portal Bunkhouse into the recreation rental program. The proposal is to charge $125.00 per night at the Portal CCC House and $100.00 per night at the...

  16. Recreation and Juvenile Delinquency Prevention: How Recreation Professionals Can Design Programs That Really Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munson, Wayne W.

    2002-01-01

    Parks and recreation professionals can help prevent juvenile delinquency by learning more about why young people feel disconnected with society and developing programs to help them develop strong ties and relationships with their communities. Social bonds can be developed through attachment, commitment, involvement, and positive beliefs. A sidebar…

  17. Geology of Lake Mead National Recreation Area

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This website of the United States Geological Survey (USGS) and National Park Service (NPS) highlights the geologic history of Lake Mead National Recreation Area in Nevada and Arizona. From the Precambrian (1.8 billion years ago) until the present, the Lake Mead region has been shaped by collisions, uplift, erosion, volcanic activity, submergence, extension, and sedimentation. This site covers these major events and when they occurred in the Lake Mead area. There are links to information about geologic maps, geologic time, rocks and minerals, plate tectonics, and other Lake Mead information sources.

  18. The role of marinas and recreational boating in the occurrence and distribution of exotic caprellids (Crustacea: Amphipoda) in the Western Mediterranean: Mallorca Island as a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ros, Macarena; Vázquez-Luis, Maite; Guerra-García, José M.

    2013-10-01

    In the Mediterranean Sea, the number of alien marine crustacean species has increased over the past two decades. However, knowledge about small alien marine crustaceans, like caprellid amphipods, is still very scarce. To understand the role of marinas and recreational boating in the early step of the invasion process by non-indigenous caprellids, we studied the recreational boating pressure and the spatial distribution of caprellid species in Mallorca Island. We collected caprellids from 14 marinas and 9 exposed intertidal rocky shores between November 2011 and April 2012 and we analyzed the differences in habitat use of native and exotic caprellids. Eight caprellid species, six native and two exotic, were found. Alien caprellids were only present in marinas, reaching high densities of population. The analysis of recreational boating pressure reveals that Palma-Migjorn is the area that is subject to the highest potential risk of introduction of exotic species via ship fouling. In the secondary dispersal of alien caprellids, the study reflects that recreational boating seems effective as a secondary vector in the transport of exotic species from marinas to marinas but not from marinas to natural and exposed areas. An illustrated key of caprellids from Balearic Island is provided to differentiate native and non-indigenous species.

  19. Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus Recovered from Recreational and Commercial Areas of Chesapeake Bay and Maryland Coastal Bays

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Kristi S.; Rosenberg Goldstein, Rachel E.; He, Xin; Jacobs, John M.; Crump, Byron C.; Sapkota, Amy R.

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus in the estuarine-marine environment are of human health significance and may be increasing in pathogenicity and abundance. Vibrio illness originating from dermal contact with Vibrio laden waters or through ingestion of seafood originating from such waters can cause deleterious health effects, particularly if the strains involved are resistant to clinically important antibiotics. The purpose of this study was to evaluate antimicrobial susceptibility among these pathogens. Surface-water samples were collected from three sites of recreational and commercial importance from July to September 2009. Samples were plated onto species-specific media and resulting V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus strains were confirmed using polymerase chain reaction assays and tested for antimicrobial susceptibility using the Sensititre® microbroth dilution system. Descriptive statistics, Friedman two-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and Kruskal-Wallis one-way ANOVA were used to analyze the data. Vibrio vulnificus (n?=?120) and V. parahaemolyticus (n?=?77) were isolated from all sampling sites. Most isolates were susceptible to antibiotics recommended for treating Vibrio infections, although the majority of isolates expressed intermediate resistance to chloramphenicol (78% of V. vulnificus, 96% of V. parahaemolyticus). Vibrio parahaemolyticus also demonstrated resistance to penicillin (68%). Sampling location or month did not significantly impact V. parahaemolyticus resistance patterns, but V. vulnificus isolates from St. Martin's River had lower overall intermediate resistance than that of the other two sampling sites during the month of July (p?=?0.0166). Antibiotics recommended to treat adult Vibrio infections were effective in suppressing bacterial growth, while some antibiotics recommended for pediatric treatment were not effective against some of the recovered isolates. To our knowledge, these are the first antimicrobial susceptibility data of V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus recovered from the Chesapeake Bay. These data can serve as a baseline against which future studies can be compared to evaluate whether susceptibilities change over time. PMID:24586914

  20. Gulf of Maine Marine Habitat Primer

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This book provides an overview of the Gulf of Maine's coastal and offshore habitats for resource managers and other coastal decision-makers in government, Non-Government Organizations (NGOs), and the private sector. Illustrated with color photographs and drawings, the primer describes habitat characteristics, ecological functions, economic and recreational values, human impacts, and management considerations. It is intended as a tool for resource managers, planners, legislators, conservation commissioners, NGO staff members, and other people seeking a better understanding of marine habitats from Massachusetts to Nova Scotia. The book is available in six downloadable sections, or it can be ordered as a hard copy.

  1. 78 FR 14447 - Special Regulations; Areas of the National Park System, Chattahoochee River National Recreation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-06

    ...the National Park System, Chattahoochee River National Recreation Area, Bicycle Routes...certain multi-use pathways in Chattahoochee River National Recreation Area as routes for...of multi-use pathways at Chattahoochee River National Recreation Area have been,...

  2. 78 FR 37417 - Small Business Size Standards: Arts, Entertainment, and Recreation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-20

    ...NAICS Sector 71, Arts, Entertainment, and Recreation, reflect...income after Federal income taxes (excluding any carry-over...NAICS Sector 71, Arts, Entertainment, and Recreation, are consistent...NAICS Sector 71, Arts, Entertainment, and Recreation, is...

  3. 43 CFR 2932.51 - When can I renew my Special Recreation Permit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...can I renew my Special Recreation Permit? 2932.51 Section 2932.51 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating...Organized Groups, and Recreation Use in Special Areas § 2932.51 When can I renew my Special Recreation...

  4. 43 CFR 2932.51 - When can I renew my Special Recreation Permit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...can I renew my Special Recreation Permit? 2932.51 Section 2932.51 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating...Organized Groups, and Recreation Use in Special Areas § 2932.51 When can I renew my Special Recreation...

  5. 78 FR 72028 - Special Regulations, Areas of the National Park System, Curecanti National Recreation Area...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-02

    ...heading for Sec. 7.51 from ``Curecanti Recreation Area'' to ``Curecanti...throughout the recreation area. Snowmobiles This rule amends section 7.51(c) to modify the...follows: Sec. 7.51 Curecanti National Recreation Area. * * * * *...

  6. 43 CFR 2932.51 - When can I renew my Special Recreation Permit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...can I renew my Special Recreation Permit? 2932.51 Section 2932.51 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating...Organized Groups, and Recreation Use in Special Areas § 2932.51 When can I renew my Special Recreation...

  7. 43 CFR 2932.51 - When can I renew my Special Recreation Permit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...can I renew my Special Recreation Permit? 2932.51 Section 2932.51 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating...Organized Groups, and Recreation Use in Special Areas § 2932.51 When can I renew my Special Recreation...

  8. 33 CFR 181.704 - Contents of information pamphlet: Recreational hybrid PFD.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Contents of information pamphlet: Recreational hybrid PFD. 181.704 Section 181.704...Contents of information pamphlet: Recreational hybrid PFD. Each information pamphlet for a recreational hybrid PFD approved under 46 CFR 160.077...

  9. 33 CFR 181.704 - Contents of information pamphlet: Recreational hybrid PFD.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Contents of information pamphlet: Recreational hybrid PFD. 181.704 Section 181.704...Contents of information pamphlet: Recreational hybrid PFD. Each information pamphlet for a recreational hybrid PFD approved under 46 CFR 160.077...

  10. 33 CFR 181.704 - Contents of information pamphlet: Recreational hybrid PFD.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Contents of information pamphlet: Recreational hybrid PFD. 181.704 Section 181.704...Contents of information pamphlet: Recreational hybrid PFD. Each information pamphlet for a recreational hybrid PFD approved under 46 CFR 160.077...

  11. 33 CFR 181.704 - Contents of information pamphlet: Recreational hybrid PFD.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Contents of information pamphlet: Recreational hybrid PFD. 181.704 Section 181.704...Contents of information pamphlet: Recreational hybrid PFD. Each information pamphlet for a recreational hybrid PFD approved under 46 CFR 160.077...

  12. 33 CFR 181.704 - Contents of information pamphlet: Recreational hybrid PFD.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Contents of information pamphlet: Recreational hybrid PFD. 181.704 Section 181.704...Contents of information pamphlet: Recreational hybrid PFD. Each information pamphlet for a recreational hybrid PFD approved under 46 CFR 160.077...

  13. 43 CFR 2932.11 - When do I need a Special Recreation Permit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...require you to obtain a Special Recreation Permit for— (1) Recreational...noncompetitive, organized group activities or events; or (3) Academic...activities normally associated with recreation; (ii) Use of areas where...

  14. 43 CFR 2932.31 - How does BLM establish fees for Special Recreation Permits?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...Organized Groups, and Recreation Use in Special Areas ...establish fees for Special Recreation Permits? (a) The BLM...annual fees, for Special Recreation Permits for commercial activities, organized group...

  15. 78 FR 25760 - Proposed Information Collection; Urban Park and Recreation Recovery Program Grants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-02

    ...close-to- home recreation facilities. Innovation--specific activities that either increase recreation programs or improve...Urban Park and Recreation Recovery Program...of Completion time Activity Number of...

  16. 77 FR 40547 - Special Regulations; Areas of the National Park System, Chattahoochee River National Recreation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-10

    ...Chattahoochee River National Recreation Area, and Jay P. Calhoun...Chattahoochee River National Recreation Area. (a) Bicycling...Chattahoochee River National Recreation Area? The following routes...capacity and other management activities and objectives. (ii)...

  17. 75 FR 51283 - Information Collection; Permits for Recreation on Public Lands

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-19

    ...Information Collection; Permits for Recreation on Public Lands AGENCY: Bureau of Land...2930, which pertains to permits for recreation and public lands. DATES: The OMB is...information collection: Title: Permits for Recreation on Public Lands (43 CFR part...

  18. 75 FR 48988 - Urban Park and Recreation Recovery Program Project Performance Reports, Conversion of Use...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-12

    ...National Park Service Urban Park and Recreation Recovery Program Project Performance...INFORMATION CONTACT: Laurie Heupel, Outdoor Recreation Planner, State and Local Assistance...Congress passed the Urban Park and Recreation Recovery (UPARR) Act (16...

  19. 43 CFR 2932.43 - What insurance requirements pertain to Special Recreation Permits?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...Events, Organized Groups, and Recreation Use in Special Areas § 2932...requirements pertain to Special Recreation Permits? (a) All commercial...competitive applicants for Special Recreation Permits, except vendors...that the vending or group activity will not cause...

  20. 78 FR 19523 - General Management Plan, Draft Environmental Impact Statement, Lake Meredith National Recreation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-01

    ...analyzed. Lake Meredith National Recreation Area: Alternative 1, the...Alternative 2 would provide quality recreation, enhance traditional activities, and improve resource protection...conditions and visitor uses. The recreation area would become a...

  1. 77 FR 73974 - Information Collection: Arapaho-Roosevelt National Forest Visitor Surveys for Recreation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-12

    ...National Forest Visitor Surveys for Recreation Transportation System Alternatives Study...National Forest Visitor Surveys for Recreation Transportation System Alternatives Study...Abstract: With over 5.4 million recreation visits annually, the...

  2. 43 CFR 2932.44 - What bonds does BLM require for a Special Recreation Permit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...ON PUBLIC LANDS Special Recreation Permits for Commercial Use...Events, Organized Groups, and Recreation Use in Special Areas § 2932...BLM require for a Special Recreation Permit? BLM may...requirement if we find that your activity will not cause...

  3. 75 FR 6699 - Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area Advisory Council; Notice of Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-10

    ...Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area Advisory Council; Notice...Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area. ACTION: Notice of...Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area Advisory Council will...presentation on citizen science activities on the islands, an...

  4. 43 CFR 2932.22 - When do I apply for a Special Recreation Permit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...I apply for a Special Recreation Permit? (a) For all uses requiring a Special Recreation Permit, except...application times for activities or events that do not...will establish Special Recreation Permit application...

  5. An Analysis of the Demand for and Value of Outdoor Recreation in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergstrom, John C.; Cordell, H. Ken

    1991-01-01

    Results of a study of demand equations for 37 outdoor recreational activities using a multicommunity, multisite travel cost model suggest that determinants of the demand for outdoor recreation include population, residence, income, age, price, quality, and recreational opportunity substitutes. (JD)

  6. Marine Biodiversity & Biotechnology

    E-print Network

    Howie, Jim

    this biodiversity needs expertise from classical marine biology to the latest molecular genetics techniques Information System (GIS) analysis expertise Marine taxonomy, biodiversity & modelling Marine ecotoxicology & pollution assessment Invertebrate biology & immunology Understanding nanomaterials in the marine environment

  7. Geochemistry of Upper Cretaceous non-marine - marine cycles (Gosau Group, Austria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofer, G.; Wagreich, M.; Draganits, E.; Neuhuber, S.; Grundtner, M. L.; Bottig, M.

    2012-04-01

    Early Campanian non-marine - marine cycles of the Grünbach Formation (Gosau Group, Northern Calcareous Alps, Austria) within the Grünbach Syncline have been investigated geochemically. The succession of the Grünbach Formation comprises clay, marl, siltstone, sandstone as well as rare conglomerate and coal deposited in a marginal marine to terrestrial environment. We sampled a 45 m section of an artificial trench at Maiersdorf, Lower Austria. Additionally, cored sections of equivalent boreholes of the Glinzendorf and Gießhübl Syncline and Slovakia have been investigated for their stable isotopic composition. Based on geochemical proxies (whole rock geochemistry and bulk carbon and oxygen isotopy) as well as microfossil data, five marine to non-marine cycles are reconstructed for the profile of the Grünbach Formation. Marine intervals were identified basically by the presence of nannofossils and by higher mean ?13C ratios (-4.5 ‰ VPDB), boron contents (165.8 ppm) and B/Al* ratios (167.2) compared to non-marine interpreted sections (mean ?13C: -6.3 ‰, B: 139.0 ppm, B/Al*: 149.4). A statistically significant differentiation between marine and non-marine samples is possible using the aluminium-normalized boron ratio and, to a lower degree, the absolute boron values. Generally non-marine samples of the various Gosau synclines have significantly lower mean ?13C values (-5.3 ‰ ) compared to the mean (-1.4 ‰ ) of marine samples. The discrimination between a marine and non-marine group using ?18O is also statistically highly significant. A duration of a few 100 kyrs is estimated for single non-marine - marine cycle of the Grünbach Formation. Both eustatic sea-level changes due to climate cycles and tectonically induced subsidence may have controlled the depositional cyclicity. Low subsidence rates and uniform provenance data argue against a purely tectonic origin of the cycles and are in favor for a mainly climatic control of these transgressive-regressive cycles in the Early Campanian.

  8. THE LOGNORMAL DISTRIBUTION AND USE OF THE GEOMETRIC MEAN AND THE ARITHMETIC MEAN IN RECREATIONAL WATER QUALITY MEASUREMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Since 1968 United States recreational water quality criteria have set a limit on the geometric mean for fecal indicator bacteria from a number water samples taken over a period of time (National Technical Advisory Committee, 1968; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1976 and 19...

  9. COMPARISON OF ENTEROCOCCUS MEASUREMENTS IN FRESHWATER AT TWO RECREATIONAL BEACHES BY QUANTITATIVE POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION AND MEMBRANE FILER CULTURE ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cell densities of the fecal pollution indicator genus, Enterococcus, were determined by a rapid (2-3 hr) quantitative PCR (QPCR) analysis based method in 100 ml water samples collected from recreational beaches on Lake Michigan and Lake Erie during the summer of 2003. Enumeration...

  10. SCIRehab Project Series: The Therapeutic Recreation Taxonomy

    PubMed Central

    Cahow, Claire; Skolnick, Susan; Joyce, Joan; Jug, Julie; Dragon, Charlotte; Gassaway, Julie

    2009-01-01

    Background/Objective: Outcomes research of therapeutic recreation (TR) activities and interventions for spinal cord injury (SCI) rehabilitation is made more difficult by a lack of uniform descriptions and the absence of a formal treatments classification system (taxonomy). The objective of this study was to describe a taxonomy developed by Certified Therapeutic Recreation Specialists. Methods: TR lead clinicians and researchers from 6 SCI rehabilitation centers developed a TR documentation system to describe the details of each TR session involving patients with SCI enrolled in the SCIRehab study. The SCIRehab study uses the practice-based evidence methodology, a rigorous observational methodology that examines current practice without introducing additional treatments, to capture details of each TR session for 1,500 SCI rehabilitation patients at 6 US inpatient SCI rehabilitation facilities. This may be the first attempt to document the many details of the TR rehabilitation process for patients with SCI. Results: The TR taxonomy consists of 6 activities (eg, leisure education and counseling, outings, and leisure skill work in center) and activity-specific interventions, as well as time spent on each activity. Activity descriptions are enhanced with additional details that focus on assistance needs for each activity, patient ability to direct care, and patient/family involvement, which may help to determine TR activity selection. Conclusion: Development and application of a TR taxonomy, which is comprehensive for patients with SCI and efficient to use, are feasible despite significantly different TR programs at the 6 SCIRehab centers. PMID:19810631

  11. North Carolina Division of Marine Fisheries: Cool Kids Fishin'

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Find information on NC's various marine resources such as blue crabs and red drum, commercial and recreational fishing statistics, a fish identification guide, and fun pages for kids. Information is broken up into three categories: Crustaceans, Fish, and Shellfish. Each section in full of great information for both the beginner and the expert. Check out the food chain information to learn why all creatures, big and small, are important to the ecosystem.

  12. Marine biodiversity in South Africa: an evaluation of current states of knowledge.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Charles L; Robinson, Tamara B; Lange, Louise; Mead, Angela

    2010-01-01

    Continental South Africa has a coastline of some 3,650 km and an Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) of just over 1 million km(2). Waters in the EEZ extend to a depth of 5,700 m, with more than 65% deeper than 2,000 m. Despite its status as a developing nation, South Africa has a relatively strong history of marine taxonomic research and maintains comprehensive and well-curated museum collections totaling over 291,000 records. Over 3 million locality records from more than 23,000 species have been lodged in the regional AfrOBIS (African Ocean Biogeographic Information System) data center (which stores data from a wider African region). A large number of regional guides to the marine fauna and flora are also available and are listed. The currently recorded marine biota of South Africa numbers at least 12,914 species, although many taxa, particularly those of small body size, remain poorly documented. The coastal zone is relatively well sampled with some 2,500 samples of benthic invertebrate communities have been taken by grab, dredge, or trawl. Almost none of these samples, however, were collected after 1980, and over 99% of existing samples are from depths shallower than 1,000 m--indeed 83% are from less than 100 m. The abyssal zone thus remains almost completely unexplored. South Africa has a fairly large industrial fishing industry, of which the largest fisheries are the pelagic (pilchard and anchovy) and demersal (hake) sectors, both focused on the west and south coasts. The east coast has fewer, smaller commercial fisheries, but a high coastal population density, resulting in intense exploitation of inshore resources by recreational and subsistence fishers, and this has resulted in the overexploitation of many coastal fish and invertebrate stocks. South Africa has a small aquaculture industry rearing mussels, oysters, prawns, and abalone-the latter two in land-based facilities. Compared with many other developing countries, South Africa has a well-conserved coastline, 23% of which is under formal protection, however deeper waters are almost entirely excluded from conservation areas. Marine pollution is confined mainly to the densely populated KwaZulu-Natal coast and the urban centers of Cape Town and Port Elizabeth. Over 120 introduced or cryptogenic marine species have been recorded, but most of these are confined to the few harbors and sheltered sites along the coast. PMID:20689849

  13. Survey of Alaskan subsistence fish, marine mammal, and invertebrate samples collected 1989-91 for exposure to oil spilled from the Exxon Valdez. Volume 1. Technical memo

    SciTech Connect

    Varanasi, U.; Brown, D.W.; Hom, T.; Burrows, D.G.; Sloan, C.A.

    1993-10-01

    The Exxon Valdez ran aground on Bligh Reef, Prince William Sound, Alaska on March 24, 1989, spilling millions of gallons of Prudhoe Bay crude oil (PBCO). During the weeks following the spill, large amounts of oil flowed towards southwestern Prince William Sound, and as a result, many shorelines were oiled. In the study, edible flesh of fish, marine mammals, and shellfish from 22 native subsistence food collection areas and from two reference areas (Angoon and Yakutat) were analyzed for aromatic compounds (ACs). Vertebrates can readily biotransform ACs to metabolites that are concentrated in bile for excretion. This process greatly limits the accumulation of ACs in tissues such as edible flesh. Thus, for fish and marine mammals, bile was first analyzed for the presence of fluorescent aromatic compounds (FACs) as an indication of exposure to petroleum.

  14. 97. Cumberland knob recreation area. The visitor contact center originally ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    97. Cumberland knob recreation area. The visitor contact center originally opened in 1941 as a combined sandwich shop, picnic area, and comfort station, the central building of the first recreation area to open looking north. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  15. Recreation Activity Programming for the Institutionalized Older Adult

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1995-01-01

    Demographers continually alert us to the increasing numbers of elderly and how a proportion of this growing cohort will be residing in nursing homes where out of necessity their lives are often controlled by professionals. Recreation activity programming is an integral part in the lives of institutionalized adults and their involvement is a key concern of recreation therapists. This qualitative

  16. The Commuting Student Study, Report VI: Recreation Space.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, W. J.

    This report presents a detailed analysis of the recreational space at the University of Alberta. The recreational facilities were assessed according to the use and satisfaction of facilities as stated by the students surveyed in a space facilities questionnaire, perceived needs as stated by the students, and discrepancies between existing…

  17. Children of a Lesser God. "Core Values in Therapeutic Recreation"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barney, Keith W.

    2013-01-01

    Students in recreation programs are often introduced to laws that apply to therapeutic or community recreation services. Several of these laws have to do with policy regarding people who experience a disability. One important law is the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). In order for students to better understand the law and its…

  18. Women Faculty, Higher Education, and the Recreation/Leisure Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Karla A.; Harrolle, Michelle; Rich, Samantha; Moretz, Janell

    2012-01-01

    Women represent growing numbers of faculty members in higher education as well as in recreation/leisure departments. The purpose of this study is to describe the career development of women faculty in recreation-related areas and to offer implications for faculty development and the preparation of future faculty. Data were collected from women who…

  19. A Guide to Books on Recreation, Fourteenth Annual Edition-1971.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Recreation and Park Association, Arlington, VA.

    Brief descriptions of 869 books and magazines are presented in this booklist which represents the best books available in the park, recreation, and conservation field. It is noted that textbooks and professional aids are available for recreation professionals, while laymen can find books to satisfy any number of leisure-time interests. Also listed…

  20. Leisure Services: The Organized Recreation and Park System. Fifth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sessoms, H. Douglas; And Others

    Following an introductory historical review, this book describes the functions, services, and resources of park and recreation systems. This survey emphasizes the social aspects of the park and recreation system and how the government meets these needs. Attention is given to minority groups and to the nature of financing services for the…