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Sample records for samples marine recreational

  1. Luminex detection of fecal indicators in river samples, marine recreational water, and beach sand.

    PubMed

    Baums, Iliana B; Goodwin, Kelly D; Kiesling, Traci; Wanless, David; Diaz, Mara R; Fell, Jack W

    2007-05-01

    Research to understand and remediate coastal pollution is moving toward a multitiered approach in which traditional enumeration of fecal indicators is accompanied by molecular analysis of a variety of targets. Technology that rapidly detects multiple microbial contaminants would benefit from such an approach. The Luminex 100 system is a suspension array that assays multiple analytes rapidly in a single well of a microtiter plate. The ability of the system to simultaneously detect multiple fecal indicating bacteria in environmental samples was tested. Primer/probe sets were designed to simultaneously detect the following fecal indicators: the Bacteroides fragilis group, Enterococcus spp., Escherichia coli and Shigella spp., Bacteroides distasonis, and Ent. faecalis. Specificity and sensitivity of the Luminex probes was tested against laboratory cultures. In addition, sequencing, culture plate testing, and specificity testing with environmental isolates were steps taken to validate the function of the assay with environmental samples. Luminex response to cultures and to environmental samples was consistent with sequencing results, suggesting that the technology has the potential to simultaneously detect multiple targets for coastal water quality applications, particularly as progress is made to efficiently extract DNA from water and sediment matrices. PMID:17350051

  2. LUMINEX DETECTION OF FECAL INDICATORS IN RIVER SAMPLES, MARINE RECREATIONAL WATER, AND BEACH SAND

    PubMed Central

    Baums, Iliana B.; Goodwin, Kelly D.; Kiesling, Traci; Wanless, David; Fell, Jack W.

    2007-01-01

    Research to understand and remediate coastal pollution is moving toward a multitiered approach in which traditional enumeration of fecal indicators is accompanied by molecular analysis of a variety of targets. Technology that rapidly detects multiple microbial contaminants would benefit from such an approach. The Luminex 100 system is a suspension array that assays multiple analytes rapidly in a single well of a microtiter plate. The ability of the system to simultaneously detect multiple fecal indicating bacteria in environmental samples was tested. Primer/probe sets were designed to simultaneously detect the following fecal indicators: the Bacteroides fragilis group, Enterococcus spp., Escherichia coli & Shigella spp., B. distasonis, and Ent. faecalis. Specificity and sensitivity of the Luminex probes was tested against laboratory cultures. In addition, sequencing, culture plate testing, and specificity testing with environmental isolates were steps taken to validate the function of the assay with environmental samples. Luminex response to cultures and to environmental samples was consistent with sequencing results, suggesting that the technology has the potential to simultaneously detect multiple targets for coastal water quality applications, particularly as progress is made to efficiently extract DNA from water and sediment matrices. PMID:17350051

  3. 75 FR 67948 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Marine Recreational Information Program (Marine...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-04

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Marine Recreational Information Program (Marine Recreational Fisheries Statistics Survey) AGENCY: National Oceanic and... is a renewal of an existing information collection. Marine recreational anglers are surveyed...

  4. 77 FR 14348 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Marine Recreational Information Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-09

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Marine... information collection. Marine recreational anglers are surveyed to collect catch and effort data, fish biology data, and angler socioeconomic characteristics. These data are required to carry out provisions...

  5. 78 FR 6070 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Marine Recreational Information Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-29

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Marine.... Abstract This request is for a new information collection. Marine recreational anglers are surveyed to collect catch and effort data, fish biology data, and angler socioeconomic characteristics. These data...

  6. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from Northwest Marine and Fresh Water Recreational Beaches

    PubMed Central

    Levin-Edens, Emily; Soge, Olusegun O.; No, David; Stiffarm, Amy; Meschke, J. Scott; Roberts, Marilyn C.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the spatial distribution of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus [MRSA] at two marine and one fresh water recreational beaches in the Seattle area. Fifty-six marine water, 144 fresh water, and 96 sand samples were collected from June through August 2010. Isolates were biochemically verified as MRSA. Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) typing, multilocus sequence typing [MLST], pulse field gel electrophoresis [PFGE] and the presence of other antibiotic resistance genes were determined. Twenty-two fresh water [15.3%; n = 144], one dry sand [1.9%; n = 53], six wet sand [14%; n = 43], and 2 marine water samples [3.6%; n = 56] were MRSA positive. Of the 27 fresh water stream sites sampled multiple times, 37% of the sites were positive for MRSA and/or S. aureus ? 2 times. Twenty-one (67.7%) of 31 MRSA were SCCmec type IV, fifteen (48.4%) of the isolates had MLST types not previously associated with humans, and 29 (93.5%) of the isolates carried other antibiotic resistance genes. This study is the first to report and characterize repeated MRSA positive samples from fresh water drainages and creeks surrounding popular recreational beaches. PMID:22092827

  7. Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment of Pathogenic Vibrios in Marine Recreational Waters of Southern California

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, Gregory; Lim, Keah-ying

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the occurrence of three types of vibrios in Southern California recreational beach waters during the peak marine bathing season in 2007. Over 160 water samples were concentrated and enriched for the detection of vibrios. Four sets of PCR primers, specific for Vibrio cholerae, V. parahaemolyticus, and V. vulnificus species and the V. parahaemolyticus toxin gene, respectively, were used for the amplification of bacterial genomic DNA. Of 66 samples from Doheny State Beach, CA, 40.1% were positive for V. cholerae and 27.3% were positive for V. parahaemolyticus, and 1 sample (1.5%) was positive for the V. parahaemolyticus toxin gene. Of the 96 samples from Avalon Harbor, CA, 18.7% were positive for V. cholerae, 69.8% were positive for V. parahaemolyticus, and 5.2% were positive for the V. parahaemolyticus toxin gene. The detection of the V. cholerae genetic marker was significantly more frequent at Doheny State Beach, while the detection of the V. parahaemolyticus genetic marker was significantly more frequent at Avalon Harbor. A probability-of-illness model for V. parahaemolyticus was applied to the data. The risk for bathers exposed to recreational waters at two beaches was evaluated through Monte Carlo simulation techniques. The results suggest that the microbial risk from vibrios during beach recreation was below the illness benchmark set by the U.S. EPA. However, the risk varied with location and the type of water recreation activities. Surfers and children were exposed to a higher risk of vibrio diseases. Microbial risk assessment can serve as a useful tool for the management of risk related to opportunistic marine pathogens. PMID:23104412

  8. Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online-Offline, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This theme issue on recreation includes annotated listings of Web sites, CD-ROMs, computer software, videos, books, magazines, and professional resources that deal with recreation for K-8 language arts, art/architecture, music/dance, science, math, social studies, and health/physical education. Sidebars discuss fun and games, recess recreation,

  9. THE EMPACT BEACHES: A CASE STUDY IN RECREATIONAL WATER SAMPLING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Various chapters describe sample and experimental design, use of a geometric mean or an arithmetic mean, modeling and forecasting, and risk assessment in relation to monitoring recreational waters for fecal indicators. All of these aspects of monitoring are dependent on the spat...

  10. Authorized Course of Instruction for the Quinmester Program. Science: Introduction to Marine Science; Recreation and the Sea; Oceanography; Marine Ecology of South Florida, and Invertebrate Marine Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    All five units, developed for the Dade County Florida Quinmester Program, included in this collection concern some aspect of marine studies. Except for "Recreation and the Sea," intended to give students basic seamanship skills and experience of other marine recreation, all units are designed for students with a background in biology or chemistry.…

  11. Presence of pathogens and indicator microbes at a non-point source subtropical recreational marine beach.

    PubMed

    Abdelzaher, Amir M; Wright, Mary E; Ortega, Cristina; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M; Miller, Gary; Elmir, Samir; Newman, Xihui; Shih, Peter; Bonilla, J Alfredo; Bonilla, Tonya D; Palmer, Carol J; Scott, Troy; Lukasik, Jerzy; Harwood, Valerie J; McQuaig, Shannon; Sinigalliano, Chris; Gidley, Maribeth; Plano, Lisa R W; Zhu, Xiaofang; Wang, John D; Fleming, Lora E

    2010-02-01

    Swimming in ocean water, including ocean water at beaches not impacted by known point sources of pollution, is an increasing health concern. This study was an initial evaluation of the presence of indicator microbes and pathogens and the association among the indicator microbes, pathogens, and environmental conditions at a subtropical, recreational marine beach in south Florida impacted by non-point sources of pollution. Twelve water and eight sand samples were collected during four sampling events at high or low tide under elevated or reduced solar insolation conditions. The analyses performed included analyses of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) (fecal coliforms, Escherichia coli, enterococci, and Clostridium perfringens), human-associated microbial source tracking (MST) markers (human polyomaviruses [HPyVs] and Enterococcus faecium esp gene), and pathogens (Vibrio vulnificus, Staphylococcus aureus, enterovirus, norovirus, hepatitis A virus, Cryptosporidium spp., and Giardia spp.). The enterococcus concentrations in water and sand determined by quantitative PCR were greater than the concentrations determined by membrane filtration measurement. The FIB concentrations in water were below the recreational water quality standards for three of the four sampling events, when pathogens and MST markers were also generally undetectable. The FIB levels exceeded regulatory guidelines during one event, and this was accompanied by detection of HPyVs and pathogens, including detection of the autochthonous bacterium V. vulnificus in sand and water, detection of the allochthonous protozoans Giardia spp. in water, and detection of Cryptosporidium spp. in sand samples. The elevated microbial levels were detected at high tide and under low-solar-insolation conditions. Additional sampling should be conducted to further explore the relationships between tidal and solar insolation conditions and between indicator microbes and pathogens in subtropical recreational marine waters impacted by non-point source pollution. PMID:19966020

  12. 77 FR 14506 - Marine Recreational Fisheries of the United States; Southeast Data, Assessment, and Review (SEDAR...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-12

    ... for the MRFSS and MRIP estimates of marine recreational fisheries harvest. DATES: The workshop will be... estimated recreational catch resulting from the revised estimation process developed through MRIP may have..., develop possible calibration methods, and develop guidance for incorporating revised estimates into...

  13. Human-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from a subtropical recreational marine beach

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reports of Staphylococcus aureus detected in marine environments have occurred since the early 1990’s. This investigation sought to isolate and characterize S. aureus from marine waters and sand at a subtropical recreational beach, with and without bathers present, in order to investigate possible s...

  14. Unite research with what citizens do for fun: "recreational monitoring" of marine biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Goffredo, Stefano; Pensa, Francesco; Neri, Patrizia; Orlandi, Antonio; Gagliardi, Maria Scola; Velardi, Angela; Piccinetti, Corrado; Zaccanti, Francesco

    2010-12-01

    Institutes often lack funds and manpower to perform large-scale biodiversity monitoring. Citizens can be involved, contributing to the collection of data, thus decreasing costs. Underwater research requires specialist skills and SCUBA certification, and it can be difficult to involve volunteers. The aim of this study was to involve large numbers of recreational divers in marine biodiversity monitoring for increasing the environmental education of the public and collecting data on the status of marine biodiversity. Here we show that thousands of recreational divers can be enrolled in a short time. Using specially formulated questionnaires, nonspecialist volunteers reported the presence of 61 marine taxa encountered during recreational dives, performed as regular sport dives. Validation trials were carried out to assess the accuracy and consistency of volunteer-recorded data, and these were compared to reference data collected by an experienced researcher. In the majority of trials (76%) volunteers performed with an accuracy and consistency of 50-80%, comparable to the performance of conservation volunteer divers on precise transects in other projects. The recruitment of recreational divers involved the main diving and tour operators in Italy, a popular scientific magazine, and mass media. During the four-year study, 3825 divers completed 18757 questionnaires, corresponding to 13539 diving hours. The volunteer-sightings-based index showed that in the monitored area the biodiversity status did not change significantly within the project time scale, but there was a significant negative correlation with latitude, suggesting improved quality in the southernmost areas. This trend could be related to the presence of stressors in the northern areas and has been supported by investigations performed by the Italian Ministry of the Environment. The greatest limitation with using volunteers to collect data was the uneven spatial distribution of samples. The benefits were the considerable amounts of data collected over short time periods and at low costs. The successful development of citizen-based monitoring programs requires open-mindedness in the academic community; advantages of citizen involvement in research are not only adding large data sets to the ecological knowledge base but also aiding in the environmental education of the public. PMID:21265450

  15. Incorporating recreational users into marine protected area planning: a study of recreational boating in British Columbia, Canada.

    PubMed

    Gray, Darcy L; Canessa, Rosaline; Rollins, Rick; Keller, C Peter; Dearden, Philip

    2010-08-01

    Marine protected areas (MPAs) and zoning plans require an understanding of stakeholders if they are to be successful at achieving social and biological objectives. This study examines recreational boaters in a proposed MPA in British Columbia, Canada, using the recreation opportunity spectrum (ROS) and models of recreation conflict as a basis for investigation. Boaters (n = 543) visiting the region during the summer completed face-to-face surveys. Results show variability in boater setting preferences, supporting an ROS-based approach to MPA planning and zoning. While boaters as a whole placed the greatest importance on natural settings, sailboat operators expressed stronger preferences for natural and quiet settings relative to motorboats, and motorboat operators expressed stronger preferences for settings characterized by built facilities and extractive activities relative to sailboats. Several marine activities emerged as sources of perceived conflict for boaters, including personal watercraft, commercial whale watching vessels, and shellfish aquaculture. Our analysis indicates that while some of these may be addressed through zoning, others are better addressed through education and communication. Recommendations for both MPA management and future research are made. PMID:20549208

  16. Incorporating Recreational Users into Marine Protected Area Planning: A Study of Recreational Boating in British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Darcy L.; Canessa, Rosaline; Rollins, Rick; Keller, C. Peter; Dearden, Philip

    2010-08-01

    Marine protected areas (MPAs) and zoning plans require an understanding of stakeholders if they are to be successful at achieving social and biological objectives. This study examines recreational boaters in a proposed MPA in British Columbia, Canada, using the recreation opportunity spectrum (ROS) and models of recreation conflict as a basis for investigation. Boaters ( n = 543) visiting the region during the summer completed face-to-face surveys. Results show variability in boater setting preferences, supporting an ROS-based approach to MPA planning and zoning. While boaters as a whole placed the greatest importance on natural settings, sailboat operators expressed stronger preferences for natural and quiet settings relative to motorboats, and motorboat operators expressed stronger preferences for settings characterized by built facilities and extractive activities relative to sailboats. Several marine activities emerged as sources of perceived conflict for boaters, including personal watercraft, commercial whale watching vessels, and shellfish aquaculture. Our analysis indicates that while some of these may be addressed through zoning, others are better addressed through education and communication. Recommendations for both MPA management and future research are made.

  17. The BEACHES Study: health effects and exposures from non-point source microbial contaminants in subtropical recreational marine waters

    PubMed Central

    Fleisher, Jay M; Fleming, Lora E; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M; Kish, Jonathan K; Sinigalliano, Christopher D; Plano, Lisa; Elmir, Samir M; Wang, John D; Withum, Kelly; Shibata, Tomoyuki; Gidley, Maribeth L; Abdelzaher, Amir; He, Guoqing; Ortega, Cristina; Zhu, Xiaofang; Wright, Mary; Hollenbeck, Julie; Backer, Lorraine C

    2010-01-01

    Background Microbial water-quality indicators, in high concentrations in sewage, are used to determine whether water is safe for recreational purposes. Recently, the use of these indicators to regulate recreational water bodies, particularly in sub/tropical recreational marine waters without known sources of sewage, has been questioned. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the risk to humans from exposure to subtropical recreational marine waters with no known point source, and the possible relationship between microbe densities and reported symptoms in human subjects with random-exposure assignment and intensive individual microbial monitoring in this environment. Methods A total of 1303 adult regular bathers were randomly assigned to bather and non-bather groups, with subsequent follow-up for reported illness, in conjunction with extensive environmental sampling of indicator organisms (enterococci). Results Bathers were 1.76 times more likely to report gastrointestinal illness [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.943.30; P = 0.07]; 4.46 times more likely to report acute febrile respiratory illness (95% CI 0.9920.90; P = 0.051) and 5.91 times more likely to report a skin illness (95% CI 2.7612.63; P < 0.0001) relative to non-bathers. Evidence of a doseresponse relationship was found between skin illnesses and increasing enterococci exposure among bathers [1.46 times (95% CI 0.972.21; P = 0.07) per increasing log10 unit of enterococci exposure], but not for gastrointestinal or respiratory illnesses. Conclusions This study indicated that bathers may be at increased risk of several illnesses relative to non-bathers, even in the absence of any known source of domestic sewage impacting the recreational marine waters. There was no doseresponse relationship between gastroenteritis and increasing exposure to enterococci, even though many current water-monitoring standards use gastroenteritis as the major outcome illness. PMID:20522483

  18. Marine recreation and public health microbiology: quest for the ideal indicator

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffin, Dale W.; Lipp, Erin K.; McLaughlin, Molly R.; Rose, Joan B.

    2001-01-01

    Four-fifths of the population of the United States live in close proximity to the oceans or Great Lakes, and approximately 100 million Americans use the marine environment for recreation each year (Thurman 1994). Consequently, contamination of lakes, rivers, and coastal waters raises significant public health issues. Among the leading sources of chemical and biological contamination of these waters and associated beaches are sewer systems, septic tanks, stormwater runoff, industrial wastes, wastewater injection wells, cesspits, animal wastes, commercial and private boat wastes, and human recreation. In 1997, 649 beach closings or advisories were caused by sewage spills and overflows (NRDC 1998). In Florida alone, approximately 500 million gallons of sewage were released along the coast each year during the late 1980s (Neshyba 1987). Thus one of the primary concerns in public health is the risk that humans using the marine environment for recreational activities will encounter microbial pathogens.

  19. A MARINE RECREATIONAL WATER QUALITY CRITERION CONSISTENT WITH INDICATOR CONCEPTS AND RISK ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An overivew is provided of water quality criteria developed for marine recreational waters by EPA in 1979. The crierion used is the strength of the association with the rates of the important symptoms, such as those that correlate best with swimming in wastewater-polluted waters....

  20. Detection and phylogenetic analysis of hepatitis A virus and norovirus in marine recreational waters of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Flix, Josefina Len; Fernandez, Yuridia Chidez; Velarde-Flix, Jess Salvador; Torres, Benigno Valdez; Chidez, Cristobal

    2010-06-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine hepatitis A virus (HAV) and norovirus (NV) presence in marine recreational waters (MRWs) from two Mexican tourists beaches (Altata and Mazatlan), located at the northwestern state of Sinaloa, Mexico. Also, Binary Logistic Regression (BLR) analyses were conducted between physicochemical parameters (temperature, turbidity and salinity) and viral organisms (HAV and NV). A total of 32 MRWs samples were collected from April to July of 2006. Samples were processed according to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) adsorption-elution method. Overall, 18 MRWs samples (56.3%) were positive for HAV and NV; 4 (22.2%) were obtained from Altata and 14 (77.8%) from Mazatlan. HAV was detected in 3 MRWs samples (9.4%) and NV in 15 samples (46.8%). Phylogenetic analysis showed the presence of genotype I sub genotype B for HAV and NV genogroup II. BLR analysis showed significant correlations between NV and physicochemical parameters (temperature, turbidity and salinity) (p=0.017, p=0.08, p=0.048, respectively). No significant correlation between physicochemical parameters and HAV was observed. The results indicated that MRW quality of Sinaloa beaches is affected by human faecal pollution. Viral surveillance programs should be implemented to minimize health risks to bathers. PMID:20154390

  1. Recreational Boating in Ligurian Marine Protected Areas (Italy): A Quantitative Evaluation for a Sustainable Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venturini, S.; Massa, F.; Castellano, M.; Costa, S.; Lavarello, I.; Olivari, E.; Povero, P.

    2016-01-01

    Recreational boating is an important economic activity that can also represent a powerful source of interference for biological communities. The monitoring of the recreational boating in all Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) within the Liguria region was conducted in the 2010 summer season and it allowed to obtain information not provided by any official institution. The collaboration of geographically different MPAs in Liguria has led to the implementation of a monitoring framework of recreational boating, and this has made it possible to develop uniform management strategies for all the Ligurian marine parks. This study identifies the optimal number of boats for each MPAs, the number of boats that can anchor in the various parks without creating any impact on the biocenosis of merit, providing a first characterization of recreational boating in Liguria during the high touristic season and providing management recommendation to each MPAs. Generally, the Ligurian MPAs do not present critical situations, the number of boats in each MPA being below the optimal number, with the exception of Portofino MPA, where in the 12.5 % of monitored days more than 220 boats were counted and the mean density for weekend is 1.19 no boats/ha (4 times higher than weekday). The results confirm the dependence of the boats peaking from the holidays and the months of the summer, but also it highlights other factors that can contribute in the choice of the boaters.

  2. Recreational Boating in Ligurian Marine Protected Areas (Italy): A Quantitative Evaluation for a Sustainable Management.

    PubMed

    Venturini, S; Massa, F; Castellano, M; Costa, S; Lavarello, I; Olivari, E; Povero, P

    2016-01-01

    Recreational boating is an important economic activity that can also represent a powerful source of interference for biological communities. The monitoring of the recreational boating in all Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) within the Liguria region was conducted in the 2010 summer season and it allowed to obtain information not provided by any official institution. The collaboration of geographically different MPAs in Liguria has led to the implementation of a monitoring framework of recreational boating, and this has made it possible to develop uniform management strategies for all the Ligurian marine parks. This study identifies the optimal number of boats for each MPAs, the number of boats that can anchor in the various parks without creating any impact on the biocenosis of merit, providing a first characterization of recreational boating in Liguria during the high touristic season and providing management recommendation to each MPAs. Generally, the Ligurian MPAs do not present critical situations, the number of boats in each MPA being below the optimal number, with the exception of Portofino MPA, where in the 12.5% of monitored days more than 220 boats were counted and the mean density for weekend is 1.19 no boats/ha (4 times higher than weekday). The results confirm the dependence of the boats peaking from the holidays and the months of the summer, but also it highlights other factors that can contribute in the choice of the boaters. PMID:26289349

  3. The occurrence of Salmonella serotypes in marine recreational waters of Valencia, Spain.

    PubMed

    Alonso, J L; Alonso, M A; Usera, M A; Echeita, A

    1992-04-01

    Salmonellae serotypes were studied in order to know their prevalence in marine recreational areas of Valencia. Two hundred eight strains were isolated. The strains belonging to serogroups B, C, D, E and G. The serotyping yielded twenty one different serotypes. The most frequent salmonellae serotypes were S. anatum and S. bredeney. Our results were compared with those reported by other authors in Spain. PMID:1605921

  4. Consistent size-independent harvest selection on fish body shape in two recreationally exploited marine species

    PubMed Central

    Alós, Josep; Palmer, Miquel; Linde-Medina, Marta; Arlinghaus, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Harvesting wild animals may exert size-independent selection pressures on a range of morphological, life history, and behavioral traits. Most work so far has focused on selection pressures on life history traits and body size as morphological trait. We studied here how recreational fishing selects for morphological traits related to body shape, which may correlate with underlying swimming behavior. Using landmark-based geometric morphometrics, we found consistent recreational fishing-induced selection pressures on body shape in two recreationally exploited marine fish species. We show that individuals with larger-sized mouths and more streamlined and elongated bodies were more vulnerable to passively operated hook-and-line fishing independent of the individual's body size or condition. While the greater vulnerability of individuals with larger mouth gapes can be explained by the direct physical interaction with hooks, selection against streamlined and elongated individuals could either involve a specific foraging mode or relate to underlying elevated swimming behavior. Harvesting using passive gear is common around the globe, and thus, size-independent selection on body shape is expected to be widespread potentially leaving behind individuals with smaller oral gapes and more compact bodies. This might have repercussions for food webs by altering foraging and predation. PMID:25360257

  5. Consistent size-independent harvest selection on fish body shape in two recreationally exploited marine species.

    PubMed

    Als, Josep; Palmer, Miquel; Linde-Medina, Marta; Arlinghaus, Robert

    2014-06-01

    Harvesting wild animals may exert size-independent selection pressures on a range of morphological, life history, and behavioral traits. Most work so far has focused on selection pressures on life history traits and body size as morphological trait. We studied here how recreational fishing selects for morphological traits related to body shape, which may correlate with underlying swimming behavior. Using landmark-based geometric morphometrics, we found consistent recreational fishing-induced selection pressures on body shape in two recreationally exploited marine fish species. We show that individuals with larger-sized mouths and more streamlined and elongated bodies were more vulnerable to passively operated hook-and-line fishing independent of the individual's body size or condition. While the greater vulnerability of individuals with larger mouth gapes can be explained by the direct physical interaction with hooks, selection against streamlined and elongated individuals could either involve a specific foraging mode or relate to underlying elevated swimming behavior. Harvesting using passive gear is common around the globe, and thus, size-independent selection on body shape is expected to be widespread potentially leaving behind individuals with smaller oral gapes and more compact bodies. This might have repercussions for food webs by altering foraging and predation. PMID:25360257

  6. Water quality, weather and environmental factors associated with fecal indicator organism density in beach sand at two recreational marine beaches

    PubMed Central

    Heaney, Christopher D.; Exum, Natalie G.; Dufour, Alfred P.; Brenner, Kristen P.; Haugland, Richard A.; Chern, Eunice; Schwab, Kellogg J.; Love, David C.; Serre, Marc L.; Noble, Rachel; Wade, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies showing an association between fecal indicator organisms (FIOs) in sand and gastrointestinal (GI) illness among beachgoers with sand contact have important public health implications because of the large numbers of people who recreate at beaches and engage in sand contact activities. Yet, factors that influence fecal pollution in beach sand remain unclear. During the 2007 National Epidemiological and Environmental Assessment of Recreational (NEEAR) Water Study, sand samples were collected at three locations (60 m apart) on weekend days (Sat, Sun) and holidays between June and September at two marine beaches — Fairhope Beach, AL and Goddard Beach, RI — with nearby publicly-owned treatment works (POTWs) outfalls. F+ coliphage, enterococci, Bacteroidales, fecal Bacteroides spp., and Clostridium spp. were measured in sand using culture and qPCR-based calibrator-cell equivalent methods. Water samples were also collected on the same days, times and transects as the 144 sand samples and were assayed using the same FIO measurements. Weather and environmental data were collected at the time of sample collection. Mean FIO concentrations in sand varied over time, but not space. Enterococci CFU and CCE densities in sand were not correlated, although other FIOs in sand were. The strongest correlation between FIO density in sand and water was fecal Bacteroides CCE, followed by enterococci CFU, Clostridium spp. CCE, and Bacteroidales CCE. Overall, the factors associated with FIO concentrations in sand were related to the sand–water interface (i.e., sand-wetting) and included daily average densities of FIOs in water, rainfall, and wave height. Targeted monitoring that focuses on daily trends of sand FIO variability, combined with information about specific water quality, weather, and environmental factors may inform beach monitoring and management decisions to reduce microbial burdens in beach sand. The views expressed in this paper are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. PMID:25150738

  7. Water quality, weather and environmental factors associated with fecal indicator organism density in beach sand at two recreational marine beaches.

    PubMed

    Heaney, Christopher D; Exum, Natalie G; Dufour, Alfred P; Brenner, Kristen P; Haugland, Richard A; Chern, Eunice; Schwab, Kellogg J; Love, David C; Serre, Marc L; Noble, Rachel; Wade, Timothy J

    2014-11-01

    Recent studies showing an association between fecal indicator organisms (FIOs) in sand and gastrointestinal (GI) illness among beachgoers with sand contact have important public health implications because of the large numbers of people who recreate at beaches and engage in sand contact activities. Yet, factors that influence fecal pollution in beach sand remain unclear. During the 2007 National Epidemiological and Environmental Assessment of Recreational (NEEAR) Water Study, sand samples were collected at three locations (60 m apart) on weekend days (Sat, Sun) and holidays between June and September at two marine beaches - Fairhope Beach, AL and Goddard Beach, RI - with nearby publicly-owned treatment works (POTWs) outfalls. F(+) coliphage, enterococci, Bacteroidales, fecal Bacteroides spp., and Clostridium spp. were measured in sand using culture and qPCR-based calibrator-cell equivalent methods. Water samples were also collected on the same days, times and transects as the 144 sand samples and were assayed using the same FIO measurements. Weather and environmental data were collected at the time of sample collection. Mean FIO concentrations in sand varied over time, but not space. Enterococci CFU and CCE densities in sand were not correlated, although other FIOs in sand were. The strongest correlation between FIO density in sand and water was fecal Bacteroides CCE, followed by enterococci CFU, Clostridium spp. CCE, and Bacteroidales CCE. Overall, the factors associated with FIO concentrations in sand were related to the sand-water interface (i.e., sand-wetting) and included daily average densities of FIOs in water, rainfall, and wave height. Targeted monitoring that focuses on daily trends of sand FIO variability, combined with information about specific water quality, weather, and environmental factors may inform beach monitoring and management decisions to reduce microbial burdens in beach sand. The views expressed in this paper are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. PMID:25150738

  8. Human viruses and viral indicators in marine water at two recreational beaches in Southern California, USA.

    PubMed

    Love, David C; Rodriguez, Roberto A; Gibbons, Christopher D; Griffith, John F; Yu, Qilu; Stewart, Jill R; Sobsey, Mark D

    2014-03-01

    Waterborne enteric viruses may pose disease risks to bather health but occurrence of these viruses has been difficult to characterize at recreational beaches. The aim of this study was to evaluate water for human virus occurrence at two Southern California recreational beaches with a history of beach closures. Human enteric viruses (adenovirus and norovirus) and viral indicators (F+ and somatic coliphages) were measured in water samples over a 4-month period from Avalon Beach, Catalina Island (n = 324) and Doheny Beach, Orange County (n = 112). Human viruses were concentrated from 40 L samples and detected by nested reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Detection frequencies at Doheny Beach were 25.5% (adenovirus) and 22.3% (norovirus), and at Avalon Beach were 9.3% (adenovirus) and 0.7% (norovirus). Positive associations between adenoviruses and fecal coliforms were observed at Doheny (p = 0.02) and Avalon (p = 0.01) Beaches. Human viruses were present at both beaches at higher frequencies than previously detected in the region, suggesting that the virus detection methods presented here may better measure potential health risks to bathers. These virus recovery, concentration, and molecular detection methods are advancing practices so that analysis of enteric viruses can become more effective and routine for recreational water quality monitoring. PMID:24642440

  9. Recreational SCUBA divers' willingness to pay for marine biodiversity in Barbados.

    PubMed

    Schuhmann, Peter W; Casey, James F; Horrocks, Julia A; Oxenford, Hazel A

    2013-05-30

    The use of natural resources and the services they provide often do not have an explicit price and are therefore undervalued in decision-making, leading to environmental degradation. To 'monetize' the benefits from these services requires the use of non-market valuation techniques. Using a stated preference survey of recreational divers in Barbados conducted between 2007 and 2009, the economic value of marine biodiversity to recreational SCUBA divers in Barbados was estimated. In addition to a variety of demographic variables, divers were asked about their level of experience, expenditures related to travel and diving, and encounters with fish and sea turtles. Divers then completed a choice experiment, selecting between alternative dives with varying characteristics including price, crowding, fish diversity, encounters with sea turtles, and coral cover. Results indicate that divers in Barbados have a clear appreciation of reef quality variables. Willingness to pay for good coral cover, fish diversity and presence of sea turtles is significantly higher than prices paid for dives. In general, divers valued reef attributes similarly, although their appreciation of low density of divers at a site and high coral cover varied with prior diving experience. The results of this study demonstrate the economic value generated in Barbados by the recreational SCUBA diving industry and highlight the potential for substantial additional economic contributions with improvements to the quality of a variety of reef attributes. These results could inform management decisions regarding reef use and sea turtle conservation, and could aid in the development of informed 'win-win' policies aimed at maximizing returns from diving while reducing negative impacts often associated with tourism activities. PMID:23523829

  10. Kelp Gulls (Larus dominicanus) killed and injured by discarded monofilament lines at a marine recreational fishery in northern Patagonia.

    PubMed

    Yorio, Pablo; Marinao, Cristian; Surez, Nicols

    2014-08-15

    Among marine debris, monofilament fishing lines often result in negative impacts on marine organisms. We characterized marine debris and incidence of lost and discarded monofilament lines along beaches used by recreational fishers, and report the impact of lines on Kelp Gulls (Larus dominicanus) at the Baha San Blas protected area, site of one of the main shore-based recreational fisheries of the southwestern Atlantic. Over 55% of the marine debris recorded originated from recreational fishing activities. Balls of tangled monofilament lines were found at a rate of 40.5 items per km. A total of 27 adult Kelp Gulls were found entangled with monofilament. All individuals were tangled to vegetation within colony boundaries. Four of the gulls had a monofilament line protruding from the bill, showing that they may be also killed when trying to obtain bait. Our results indicate that lost or discarded monofilament lines in the Baha San Blas recreational fishing area result in undesired impacts on coastal wildlife. PMID:24951250

  11. [Land and marine fauna constituting a threat for recreational divers in the tropics].

    PubMed

    Korzeniewski, Krzysztof

    2008-09-01

    Due to intensively growing international tourism, increasing numbers of people leave for countries with hot climates, where various threats for human health and life exist. Besides climatic and sanitary conditions, a rich fauna, represented by predators and venomous animals, can be included. Based on available world literature and their own observations, the authors present the threats that a tourist can possibly encounter whilst relaxing on the beach or during recreational diving in tropical waters. When staying in water, a large threat is posed by marine fish of prey (sharks, barracuda, muraena), Cnidaria (jellyfish, corals, anemones) and venomous animals (fish, sea snakes). On land, on the other hand, a threat can be posed by venomous arthropods (scorpions, spiders) and Hymenoptera insects. The study presents the most important representatives of fauna present in coastal areas frequently visited by diving enthusiasts. Also, clinical image and conduct in the case of body injures are discussed. PMID:19112854

  12. The Social and Economic Significance of Recreation Activities in the Marine Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ditton, Robert B.

    Although the data obtained by an Outdoor Recreation Resources Review Commission in 1960 indicated that 44 percent of participants in outdoor recreation prefer water-based activities, the potential demand for recreation within the coastal zone is much greater than that study indicates, because the unfulfilled recreational demands of the urban

  13. Rapidly measured indicators of recreational water quality and swimming-associated illness at marine beaches: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction In the United States and elsewhere, recreational water quality is monitored for fecal indicator bacteria to help prevent swimming-associated illnesses. Standard methods to measure these bacteria take at least 24 hours to obtain results. Molecular approaches such as quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) can estimate these bacteria faster, in under 3 hours. Previously, we demonstrated that measurements of the fecal indicator bacteria Enterococcus using qPCR were associated with gastrointestinal (GI) illness among swimmers at freshwater beaches. In this paper, we report on results from three marine beach sites. Methods We interviewed beach-goers and collected water samples at marine beaches affected by treated sewage discharges in Mississippi in 2005, and Rhode Island and Alabama in 2007. Ten to twelve days later, we obtained information about gastrointestinal, respiratory, eye, ear and skin symptoms by telephone. We tested water samples for fecal indicator organisms using qPCR and other methods. Results We enrolled 6,350 beach-goers. The occurrence of GI illness among swimmers was associated with a log10-increase in exposure to qPCR-determined estimates of fecal indicator organisms in the genus Enterococcus (AOR = 2.6, 95% CI 1.3-5.1) and order Bacteroidales (AOR = 1.9, 95% CI 1.3-2.9). Estimates of organisms related to Clostridium perfringens and a subgroup of organisms in the genus Bacteroides were also determined by qPCR in 2007, as was F+ coliphage, but relationships between these indicators and illness were not statistically significant. Conclusions This study provides the first evidence of a relationship between gastrointestinal illness and estimates of fecal indicator organisms determined by qPCR at marine beaches. PMID:21040526

  14. The Novel Application of Non-Lethal Citizen Science Tissue Sampling in Recreational Fisheries.

    PubMed

    Williams, Samuel M; Holmes, Bonnie J; Pepperell, Julian G

    2015-01-01

    Increasing fishing pressure and uncertainty surrounding recreational fishing catch and effort data promoted the development of alternative methods for conducting fisheries research. A pilot investigation was undertaken to engage the Australian game fishing community and promote the non-lethal collection of tissue samples from the black marlin Istiompax indica, a valuable recreational-only species in Australian waters, for the purpose of future genetic research. Recruitment of recreational anglers was achieved by publicizing the project in magazines, local newspapers, social media, blogs, websites and direct communication workshops at game fishing tournaments. The Game Fishing Association of Australia and the Queensland Game Fishing Association were also engaged to advertise the project and recruit participants with a focus on those anglers already involved in the tag-and-release of marlin. Participants of the program took small tissue samples using non-lethal methods which were stored for future genetic analysis. The program resulted in 165 samples from 49 participants across the known distribution of I. indica within Australian waters which was a sufficient number to facilitate a downstream population genetic analysis. The project demonstrated the potential for the development of citizen science sampling programs to collect tissue samples using non-lethal methods in order to achieve targeted research objects in recreationally caught species. PMID:26376487

  15. The Novel Application of Non-Lethal Citizen Science Tissue Sampling in Recreational Fisheries

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Samuel M.; Holmes, Bonnie J.; Pepperell, Julian G.

    2015-01-01

    Increasing fishing pressure and uncertainty surrounding recreational fishing catch and effort data promoted the development of alternative methods for conducting fisheries research. A pilot investigation was undertaken to engage the Australian game fishing community and promote the non-lethal collection of tissue samples from the black marlin Istiompax indica, a valuable recreational-only species in Australian waters, for the purpose of future genetic research. Recruitment of recreational anglers was achieved by publicizing the project in magazines, local newspapers, social media, blogs, websites and direct communication workshops at game fishing tournaments. The Game Fishing Association of Australia and the Queensland Game Fishing Association were also engaged to advertise the project and recruit participants with a focus on those anglers already involved in the tag-and-release of marlin. Participants of the program took small tissue samples using non-lethal methods which were stored for future genetic analysis. The program resulted in 165 samples from 49 participants across the known distribution of I. indica within Australian waters which was a sufficient number to facilitate a downstream population genetic analysis. The project demonstrated the potential for the development of citizen science sampling programs to collect tissue samples using non-lethal methods in order to achieve targeted research objects in recreationally caught species. PMID:26376487

  16. MICROBIAL SAMPLING VARIABLES AND RECREATIONAL WATER QUALITY STANDARDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was conducted at two beaches on Lake Erie to evaluate the water sampling design for the collection of several microbiological indicator organisms in relation to day, time, and location of collection. The concentrations of these organisms were generally found to vary signi...

  17. Recreational Diver Behavior and Contacts with Benthic Organisms in the Abrolhos National Marine Park, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Giglio, Vinicius J; Luiz, Osmar J; Schiavetti, Alexandre

    2016-03-01

    In the last two decades, coral reefs have become popular among recreational divers, especially inside marine protected areas. However, the impact caused by divers on benthic organisms may be contributing to the degradation of coral reefs. We analyzed the behavior of 142 scuba divers in the Abrolhos National Marine Park, Brazil. We tested the effect of diver profile, reef type, use of additional equipment, timing, and group size on diver behavior and their contacts with benthic organisms. Eighty-eight percent of divers contacted benthic organism at least once, with an average of eight touches and one damage per dive. No significant differences in contacts were verified among gender, group size, or experience level. Artificial reef received a higher rate of contact than pinnacle and fringe reefs. Specialist photographers and sidemount users had the highest rates, while non-users of additional equipment and mini camera users had the lowest contact rates. The majority of contacts were incidental and the highest rates occurred in the beginning of a dive. Our findings highlight the need of management actions, such as the provision of pre-dive briefing including ecological aspects of corals and beginning dives over sand bottoms or places with low coral abundance. Gathering data on diver behavior provides managers with information that can be used for tourism management. PMID:26614350

  18. Valuing Recreational Benefits of Coral Reefs: The Case of Mombasa Marine National Park and Reserve, Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ransom, Kevin P.; Mangi, Stephen C.

    2010-01-01

    A contingent valuation study was conducted with adult Kenyan citizens and foreign tourists to estimate the value of recreational benefits arising from coral reefs at Mombasa Marine National Park and Reserve (MMNPR), and to assess the implications for local reef management. Citizen and foreign visitors to MMNPR were willing to pay an extra 2.2 (median = 1.6) and 8 (median = 6.7) per visit respectively, in addition to current park entrance fees, to support reef quality improvements. By aggregating visitors’ willingness to pay bids over the number of visitors to MMNPR in 2006-2007 the value of benefits was estimated at 346,733, which was more than twice the total annual operational expenditure of 152,383 for MMNPR. The findings indicate that annual revenues from citizen and foreign visitors may be increased by 60% to 261,932 through the implementation of proposed higher park fees of 3.10 for citizens and 15 for foreign visitors. However, any fee increase would serve to intensify concerns among citizens that only relatively affluent Kenyans can afford to visit MMNPR. Park managers need to demonstrate that the extra revenue would be used to fund the proposed conservation activities. This valuation study demonstrates that visitors are prepared to pay higher user fees for access to the marine protected area revealing considerable untapped resource to finance reef quality improvements.

  19. Recreational Diver Behavior and Contacts with Benthic Organisms in the Abrolhos National Marine Park, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giglio, Vinicius J.; Luiz, Osmar J.; Schiavetti, Alexandre

    2016-03-01

    In the last two decades, coral reefs have become popular among recreational divers, especially inside marine protected areas. However, the impact caused by divers on benthic organisms may be contributing to the degradation of coral reefs. We analyzed the behavior of 142 scuba divers in the Abrolhos National Marine Park, Brazil. We tested the effect of diver profile, reef type, use of additional equipment, timing, and group size on diver behavior and their contacts with benthic organisms. Eighty-eight percent of divers contacted benthic organism at least once, with an average of eight touches and one damage per dive. No significant differences in contacts were verified among gender, group size, or experience level. Artificial reef received a higher rate of contact than pinnacle and fringe reefs. Specialist photographers and sidemount users had the highest rates, while non-users of additional equipment and mini camera users had the lowest contact rates. The majority of contacts were incidental and the highest rates occurred in the beginning of a dive. Our findings highlight the need of management actions, such as the provision of pre-dive briefing including ecological aspects of corals and beginning dives over sand bottoms or places with low coral abundance. Gathering data on diver behavior provides managers with information that can be used for tourism management.

  20. Cryptosporidium and Giardia in tropical recreational marine waters contaminated with domestic sewage: estimation of bathing-associated disease risks.

    PubMed

    Betancourt, Walter Q; Duarte, Diana C; Vásquez, Rosa C; Gurian, Patrick L

    2014-08-15

    Sewage is a major contributor to pollution problems involving human pathogens in tropical coastal areas. This study investigated the occurrence of intestinal protozoan parasites (Giardia and Cryptosporidium) in tropical recreational marine waters contaminated with sewage. The potential risks of Cryptosporidium and Giardia infection from recreational water exposure were estimated from the levels of viable (oo) cysts (DIC+, DAPI+, PI-) found in near-shore swimming areas using an exponential dose response model. A Monte Carlo uncertainty analysis was performed in order to determine the probability distribution of risks. Microbial indicators of recreational water quality (enterococci, Clostridium perfringens) and genetic markers of sewage pollution (human-specific Bacteroidales marker [HF183] and Clostridium coccoides) were simultaneously evaluated in order to estimate the extent of water quality deterioration associated with human wastes. The study revealed the potential risk of parasite infections via primary contact with tropical marine waters contaminated with sewage; higher risk estimates for Giardia than for Cryptosporidium were found. Mean risks estimated by Monte Carlo were below the U.S. EPA upper bound on recreational risk of 0.036 for cryptosporidiosis and giardiasis for both children and adults. However, 95th percentile estimates for giardiasis for children exceeded the 0.036 level. Environmental surveillance of microbial pathogens is crucial in order to control and eradicate the effects that increasing anthropogenic impacts have on marine ecosystems and human health. PMID:24975093

  1. Reducing plastic contamination of the marine environment under MARPOL Annex V: A model for recreational harbors and ports

    SciTech Connect

    Mudar, M.J.

    1991-01-01

    A case study was conducted during Summer, 1990, at the Nantucket Boat Basin, Massachusetts. The purpose of the study was to (1) determine the types and quantities of wastes generated by recreational boaters, particularly plastics and garbage regulated by MARPOL Annex V, (2) develop a model to assist recreational boating facilities to comply with the law and (3) reduce the impact of plastic contamination on the marine environment. An international law which came to force in December, 1988, MARPOL Annex V prohibits the disposal of plastics into the sea and stipulates ocean zones where garbage and other wastes may be disposed. A per capita rate of waste generation by recreational boaters was determined, which will enable recreational harbors and ports to estimate the waste management capacity necessary to meet the requirements of Annex V. In addition to determining the wastestream from the recreational boaters, boaters were surveyed to collect data about pertinent topics including awareness of MARPOL, waste types generated aboard vessels, waste management methods, and how marinas could assist boaters in meeting their waste management needs. As a result of the Boat Basin study, a planning model was developed to assist other recreational harbors and ports to meet the requirements of MARPOL Annex V. Major elements of the model include (1) information Transfer, (2) Waste Management Methods, and (3) the Role of Related Factors such as marina type, and waste characterization and quantification.

  2. 77 FR 73433 - Appointments to a Recreational Fisheries Working Group by the Marine Fisheries Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-10

    ... management or business of recreational fishing and/or fisheries science; a well-informed background in... MAFAC on issues of importance to the recreational fishing community, including, but not limited to: (1... fisheries science; 2. Informed background in recreational fisheries issues; and ] 3. Operational...

  3. 78 FR 77431 - Appointments to a Recreational Fisheries Working Group by the Marine Fisheries Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-23

    ... of the following: The management or business of recreational fishing and/or fisheries science; a well.... MAFAC established the RFWG to advise MAFAC on issues of importance to the recreational fishing community... management or business of recreational fishing, and/or fisheries science; 2. Informed background...

  4. A water quality modeling study of non-point sources at recreational marine beaches.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaofang; Wang, John D; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M; Fleming, Lora E

    2011-04-01

    A model study was conducted to understand the influence of non-point sources including bather shedding, animal fecal sources, and near shore sand, as well as the impact of the environmental conditions, on the fate and transport of the indicator microbe, enterococci, at a subtropical recreational marine beach in South Florida. The model was based on an existing finite element hydrodynamic and transport model, with the addition of a first order microbe deactivation function due to solar radiation. Results showed that dog fecal events had a major transient impact (hundreds of Colony Forming Units/100 ml [CFU/100 ml]) on the enterococci concentration in a limited area within several hours, and could partially explain the high concentrations observed at the study beach. Enterococci released from beach sand during high tide caused mildly elevated concentration for a short period of time (ten to twenty of CFU/100 ml initially, reduced to 2 CFU/100 ml within 4 h during sunny weather) similar to the average baseline numbers observed at the beach. Bather shedding resulted in minimal impacts (less than 1 CFU/100 ml), even during crowded holiday weekends. In addition, weak current velocity near the beach shoreline was found to cause longer dwelling times for the elevated concentrations of enterococci, while solar deactivation was found to be a strong factor in reducing these microbial concentrations. PMID:21477839

  5. Hydrogen peroxide measurements in recreational marine bathing waters in Southern California, USA.

    PubMed

    Clark, Catherine D; De Bruyn, Warren J; Hirsch, Charlotte M; Jakubowski, Scott D

    2010-04-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) was measured in the surf zone at 13 bathing beaches in Southern California, USA. Summer dry season concentrations averaged 122 +/- 38 nM with beaches with tide pools having lower levels (50-90 nM). No significant differences were observed for ebb waters at a salt marsh outlet vs. a beach (179 +/- 20 vs. 163 +/- 26 nM), and between ebb and flood tides at one site (171 +/- 24 vs. 146 +/- 42 nM). H(2)O(2) levels showed little annual variation. Diel cycling was followed over short (30 min; 24 h study) and long (d) time scales, with maximum afternoon concentration = 370 nM and estimated photochemical production rate of 44 nM h(-1). There was no correlation between the absorbance coefficient at 300 nm (used as a measure of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) levels) and H(2)O(2). H(2)O(2) concentrations measured in this study are likely sufficient to inhibit fecal indicator bacteria in marine recreational waters through indirect photoinactivation. PMID:20110100

  6. Marine Recreational Uses of Green Bay: A Survey of Human Behavior and Attitude Patterns of High School Juniors and Seniors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ditton, Robert B.; Johnsen, Per K.

    From a random sample of high school juniors and seniors in northeastern Wisconsin, this study obtained information concerning the subjects' participation in water recreation activities, their perceptions of water quality, and attitudinal data in related areas. The data obtained from the questionnaire were analyzed by chi-square methods to check

  7. A Comparison of Sampling Designs for Monitoring Recreational Trail Impacts in Rocky Mountain National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettebone, David; Newman, Peter; Theobald, David

    2009-03-01

    The dual goals of the Organic Act of 1916 and Wilderness Act of 1964 are to protect natural resources and provide quality visitor experiences. Park managers need metrics of trail conditions to protect park resources and quality of visitor experiences. A few methods of sampling design for trails have been developed. Here, we describe a relatively new method, spatially balanced sampling, and compare it to systematic sampling. We evaluated the efficiency of sampling designs to measure recreation-related impacts in Rocky Mountain National Park. This study addressed two objectives: first, it compared estimates of trail conditions from data collected from systematic versus spatially balanced sampling data; second, it examined the relationship between sampling precision and sampling efficiency. No statistically significant differences in trail condition were found between the 100-m interval and the spatially balanced datasets. The spatially balanced probability-based dataset was found to be a good estimate of trail conditions when analyses were conducted with fewer sample points. Moreover, spatially balanced probability-based sampling is flexible and allows additional sample points to be added to a sample.

  8. TECHNIQUES FOR SAMPLING AND ANALYZING THE MARINE MACROBENTHOS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents guidelines for the quantitative assessment of the effects of marine pollution on benthic community structure and population dynamics. The sampling design addresses the number and location of stations, survey frequency, sampling gear, replication of samples, s...

  9. Traditional and Molecular Analyses for Fecal Indicator Bacteria in Non-point Source Subtropical Recreational Marine Waters

    PubMed Central

    Sinigalliano, Christopher D.; Fleisher, Jay M.; Gidley, Maribeth L.; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M.; Shibata, Tomoyuki; Plano, Lisa R.W.; Elmir, Samir M.; Wanless, David; Bartkowiak, Jakub; Boiteau, Rene; Withum, Kelly; Abdelzaher, Amir M.; He, Guoqing; Ortega, Cristina; Zhu, Xiaofang; Wright, Mary E.; Kish, Jonathan; Hollenbeck, Julie; Scott, Troy; Backer, Lorraine C.; Fleming, Lora E.

    2010-01-01

    The use of enterococci as the primary fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) for the determination of recreational water safety has been questioned, particularly in sub/tropical marine waters without known point sources of sewage. Alternative FIB (such as the Bacteroidales group) and alternative measurement methods (such as rapid molecular testing) have been proposed to supplement or replace current marine water quality testing methods which require culturing enterococci. Moreover, environmental parameters have also been proposed to supplement current monitoring programs. The objective of this study was to evaluate the health risks to humans from exposure to subtropical recreational marine waters with no known point source. The study reported symptoms between one set of human subjects randomly assigned to marine water exposure with intensive environmental monitoring compared with other subjects who did not have exposure. In addition, illness outcomes among the exposed bathers were compared to levels of traditional and alternative FIB (as measured by culture-based and molecular-based methods), and compared to easily measured environmental parameters. Results demonstrated an increase in self-reported gastrointestinal, respiratory and skin illnesses among bathers vs. non-bathers. Among the bathers, a dose-response relationship by logistic regression modeling was observed for skin illness, where illness was positively related to enterococci enumeration by membrane filtration (odds ratio =1.46 [95% confidence interval=0.97-2.21] per increasing log10 unit of enterococci exposure) and positively related to 24 hour antecedent rain fall (1.04 [1.01 – 1.07] per increasing millimeters of rain). Acute febrile respiratory illness was inversely related to water temperature (0.74 [0.56-0.98] per increasing degree of water temperature). There were no significant dose response relationships between report of human illness and any of the other FIB or environmental measures. Therefore, for non-point source subtropical recreational marine waters, this study suggests that humans may be at increased risk of reported illness, and that the currently recommended and investigational FIB may not track gastrointestinal illness under these conditions; the relationship between other human illness and environmental measures is less clear. PMID:20605185

  10. Measurement of curium in marine samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, D. L.; Livingston, H. D.

    1984-06-01

    Measurement of environmentally small but detectable amounts of curium requires reliable, accureate, and sensitive analytical methods. The radiochemical separation developed at Woods Hole is briefly reviewed with specific reference to radiochemical interferences in the alpha spectrometric measurement of curium nuclides and to the relative amounts of interferences expected in different oceanic regimes and sample types. Detection limits for 242 Cm and 244 Cm are ultimately limited by their presence in the 243Am used as curium yield monitor. Environmental standard reference materials are evaluated with regard to curium. The marine literature is reviewed and curium measurements are discussed in relation to their source of introduction to the environment. Sources include ocean dumping of low-level radioactive wastes and discharges from nuclear fuel reporcessing activities, In particular, the question of a detectable presence of 244Cm in global fallout from nuclear weapons testing is addressed and shown to be essentially negligible. Analyses of Scottish coastal sedimantes show traces of 242Cm and 244Cm activity which are believed to originate from transport from sources in the Irish Sea.

  11. QPCR Determined Fecal Indicator Bacterial Densities in Marine Waters from Two Recreational Beaches

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of real-time qPCR to determine fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) densities is currently being investigated by the U.S. EPA. The present recreational water quality guidelines, based on culturable FIB, prevent same day determinations of water quality whereas results from the ...

  12. 78 FR 65971 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Marine Recreational Fishing Expenditure Survey

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-04

    ... nationwide. II. Method of Collection The survey will be conducted using two modes: in-person interviews and... Recreational Fishing Expenditure Survey AGENCY: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA... information. The objective of the survey is to collect information on both trip expenditures and...

  13. Monitoring the marine environment using marine mammal tissue samples

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, P.D.; Hannah, D.J.; Day, P.J.

    1995-12-31

    Marine environments, both inshore and open ocean, receive numerous inputs of anthropogenic chemicals. Cetaceans provide a valuable resource for monitoring the low level contamination of marine environments with persistent organic contaminants. Comparative studies using inshore and offshore southern ocean cetaceans have revealed significant differences in the types of contamination in these two environments. The polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) deposited in the southern oceans are characterized by an abundance of lower chlorinated congeners. Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/F) are not present at significant concentrations in cetaceans from the open southern ocean. In contrast significant concentrations of PCDD/F congeners are detected in the blubber of the inshore living Hector`s dolphin. This species lives close to the shore and has a very small home range (approximately 30 km) for a cetacean. Analysis of tissue PCDD/F and PCB profiles from different populations and their food sources will be presented. The data are being used to determine if there are local variations in the contamination of the New Zealand inshore marine environment.

  14. 76 FR 28421 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Marine Recreational Fisheries Statistics Survey

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-17

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Marine... collection instrument(s) and instructions should be directed to Rob Andrews, NOAA, National Marine Fisheries... INFORMATION: I. Abstract This request is for a revision of a current information collection....

  15. Sediment Contaminants and Infauna Associated with Recreational Boating Structures in a Multi-Use Marine Park.

    PubMed

    Sim, Vivian X Y; Dafforn, Katherine A; Simpson, Stuart L; Kelaher, Brendan P; Johnston, Emma L

    2015-01-01

    Multi-use marine parks achieve conservation through spatial management of activities. Zoning of marine parks in New South Wales, Australia, includes high conservation areas and special purpose zones (SPZ) where maritime activities are concentrated. Although such measures geographically constrain anthropogenic impacts, we have limited understanding of potential ecological effects. We assessed sediment communities and contaminants adjacent to boating infrastructure (boat ramps, jetties and a marina) in a SPZ from the Clyde Estuary in Batemans Marine Park. Metal concentrations and fines content were elevated at boating structures compared to reference sites. Species richness was higher at sites with boating structures, where capitellid polychaetes and nematodes dominated the communities. Changes associated with boating structures were localised and did not extend beyond breakwalls or to reference sites outside the SPZ. The study highlights the benefits of appropriate zoning in a multi-use marine park and the potential to minimise stress on pristine areas through the application of spatial management. PMID:26086427

  16. Sediment Contaminants and Infauna Associated with Recreational Boating Structures in a Multi-Use Marine Park

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Vivian X. Y.; Dafforn, Katherine A.; Simpson, Stuart L.; Kelaher, Brendan P.; Johnston, Emma L.

    2015-01-01

    Multi-use marine parks achieve conservation through spatial management of activities. Zoning of marine parks in New South Wales, Australia, includes high conservation areas and special purpose zones (SPZ) where maritime activities are concentrated. Although such measures geographically constrain anthropogenic impacts, we have limited understanding of potential ecological effects. We assessed sediment communities and contaminants adjacent to boating infrastructure (boat ramps, jetties and a marina) in a SPZ from the Clyde Estuary in Batemans Marine Park. Metal concentrations and fines content were elevated at boating structures compared to reference sites. Species richness was higher at sites with boating structures, where capitellid polychaetes and nematodes dominated the communities. Changes associated with boating structures were localised and did not extend beyond breakwalls or to reference sites outside the SPZ. The study highlights the benefits of appropriate zoning in a multi-use marine park and the potential to minimise stress on pristine areas through the application of spatial management. PMID:26086427

  17. Associations between marine phytoplankton and symptoms of illness among recreational beachgoers in Puerto Rico, 2009

    EPA Science Inventory

    While phytoplankton generally have crucial roles in marine ecosystems, a small subset can release toxins and produce harmful algal blooms (HABs). HABs can be a threat to human health as symptoms from exposure range from neurological impairment to gastrointestinal (GI), dermal, a...

  18. Recreation of Marine Atmospheric Corrosion Condition on Weathering Steel in Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guchhait, S. K.; Dewan, S.; Saha, J. K.; Mitra, P. K.

    2014-04-01

    Salt spray test, autoclave corrosion test, SO2 salt spray test, and Relative humidity test are generally used to assess atmospheric corrosion in laboratories at accelerated rates. However, no test can absolutely simulate the service condition. One can get only approximate corrosion rates using the aforesaid tests which serve as an indicative of corrosion behavior of the material in a service condition. The present work is aimed at creating specific environmental condition in laboratory to get the corrosion test done in short duration to compare with on field exposure test which would otherwise take years to complete. In this work recreation of atmospheric environment of Digha was tried and it was simulated in such a manner that the results of laboratory test could be compared with long time field exposure at Digha. Weathering steel (WS) was taken for experimentations. Potentiostatic electrochemical tests route was adopted to simulate atmospheric condition of Digha. Laboratory test results compared well with 18 month field exposure data in terms of corrosion rate, SEM and Ramon Spectroscopy matching.

  19. Recreational scuba diving in Caribbean marine protected areas: do the users pay?

    PubMed

    Green, Edmund; Donnelly, Rachel

    2003-03-01

    There are more than 200 marine protected areas (MPAs) in the Caribbean and Central America that contain coral reefs and are therefore theoretically attractive to scuba divers. One fifth of dive operators in 30 countries were surveyed for their use of MPAs: the majority are located within 20 km of at least one MPA and 46% conduct at least 80% of their diving within a MPA. An estimated 15 million dives take place outside of Florida each year, half of these occurring inside MPAs. Only 25% of MPAs containing coral reefs charge divers an entry or user fee, which is most usually USD 2-3 levied per dive or per diver. The revenue generated by these fees is estimated at USD 1-2 million annually, but the potential for generating income has not been fully realized. A significant contribution to the cost of regional conservation could be achieved if higher fees were applied more widely than at present. PMID:12733800

  20. Water quality prediction of marine recreational beaches receiving watershed baseflow and stormwater runoff in southern California, USA.

    PubMed

    He, Li-Ming Lee; He, Zhen-Li

    2008-05-01

    Beach advisories are issued to the public in California when the concentration of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB), including total coliform, fecal coliform (or Escherichia coli), and Enterococcus, exceed their recreational water health standards, or when the amount of a rainfall event is above the pre-determined threshold. However, it is not fully understood about how and to what degree stormwater runoff or baseflow exerts impacts on beach water quality. Furthermore, current laboratory methods used to determine the FIB levels take 18-96 h, which is too slow to keep pace with changes in FIB levels in water. Thus, a beach may not be posted when it is contaminated, and may be posted under advisory when bacterial levels have already decreased to within water quality standards. The study was designed to address the above critical issues. There were large temporal and spatial variations in FIB concentrations along two popular State Beaches in San Diego, CA, USA. The rainstorm-induced runoff from the watersheds exerts significant impacts on the marine recreational water quality of the beaches adjacent to lagoons during the first 24-48 h after a rain event. The large volume of stormwater runoff discharging to beaches caused high FIB concentrations in beach water not only at the lagoon outlet channel and the mixing zone, but also at the locations 90 m away from the channel northward or southward along the shoreline. The geomorphology of beach shoreline, distance from the outlet channel, wind strength, wind direction, tide height, wave height, rainfall, time lapse after a rainstorm, or channel flow rate played a role in affecting the distribution of FIB concentrations in beach water. Despite the great temporal and spatial variability of FIB concentrations along a shoreline, the artificial neural network-based models developed in this study are capable of successfully predicting FIB concentrations at different beaches, different locations, and different times under baseflow or rainstorm conditions. The models are based on readily measurable variables including temperature, conductivity, pH, turbidity, channel water flow, rainfall, and/or time lapse after a rainstorm. The established models will help fill the current gap between beach posting and actual water quality and make more meaningful and effective decisions on beach closures and advisories. PMID:18242661

  1. Performance of barbed and barbless hooks in a marine recreational fishery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaeffer, Jeffrey S.; Hoffman, Elizabeth M.

    2002-01-01

    We used an angling study to examine catch per unit effort (CPUE), bait loss, and total landings by anglers fishing with natural bait on barbed and barbless hooks in a nearshore marine sport fishery located in the Gulf of Mexico near St. Petersburg, Florida. Anglers fished half the day with a barbed hook and half the day with a barbless hook. We also recorded anatomical hook placement, severity of injury or bleeding, and hook extraction times for each landed fish. Bait loss, CPUE, and mean length of catch did not differ between gears, but anglers landed 22% more fish with barbed hooks. Loss of hooked fish was significantly higher with barbless hooks, and efficiency appeared to vary among species. Mean unhooking times were significantly shorter with barbless hooks. Anatomical hook placement did not differ between gears and most fish were hooked in the jaws. Bleeding did not differ between gears because bleeding was influenced strongly by hook placement, but barbless hooks reduced unhooking injuries. In this fishery, barbless hooks probably did not reduce hooking mortality and conferred only slight benefits at the expense of reduced catches.

  2. Monitoring marine recreational water quality using multiple microbial indicators in an urban tropical environment

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Tomoyuki; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M.; Fleming, Lora E.; Elmir, Samir

    2008-01-01

    The microbial water quality at two beaches, Hobie Beach and Crandon Beach, in Miami-Dade County, Florida, USA was measured using multiple microbial indicators for the purpose of evaluating correlations between microbes and for identifying possible sources of contamination. The indicator microbes chosen for this study (enterococci, Escherichia coli, fecal coliform, total coliform and C. perfringens) were evaluated through three different sampling efforts. These efforts included daily measurements at four locations during a wet season month and a dry season month, spatially intensive water sampling during low- and high-tide periods, and a sand sampling effort. Results indicated that concentrations did not vary in a consistent fashion between one indicator microbe and another. Daily water quality frequently exceeded guideline levels at Hobie Beach for all indicator microbes except for fecal coliform, which never exceeded the guideline. Except for total coliform, the concentrations of microbes did not change significantly between seasons in spite of the fact that the physicalchemical parameters (rainfall, temperature, pH, and salinity) changed significantly between the two monitoring periods. Spatially intense water sampling showed that the concentrations of microbes were significantly different with distance from the shoreline. The highest concentrations were observed at shoreline points and decreased at offshore points. Furthermore, the highest concentrations of indicator microbe concentrations were observed at high tide, when the wash zone area of the beach was submerged. Beach sands within the wash zone tested positive for all indicator microbes, thereby suggesting that this zone may serve as the source of indicator microbes. Ultimate sources of indicator microbes to this zone may include humans, animals, and possibly the survival and regrowth of indicator microbes due to the unique environmental conditions found within this zone. Overall, the results of this study indicated that the concentrations of indicator microbes do not necessarily correlate with one another. Exceedence of water quality guidelines, and thus the frequency of beach advisories, depends upon which indicator microbe is chosen. PMID:15261551

  3. Physicochemical parameters aid microbial community? A case study from marine recreational beaches, Southern India.

    PubMed

    Vignesh, Sivanandham; Dahms, Hans-Uwe; Emmanuel, Kunnampuram Varghese; Gokul, Murugaiah Santhosh; Muthukumar, Krishnan; Kim, Bong-Rae; James, Rathinam Arthur

    2014-03-01

    A total of 176 (water and sediment) samples from 22 stations belonging to four different (urban, semi-urban, rural, and holy places) human habitations of Tamil Nadu beaches were collected and analyzed for physiochemical and microbial parameters during 2008-2009. Bacterial counts were two- to tenfold higher in sediments than in water due to strong bacterial aggregations by dynamic flocculation and rich organic content. The elevated bacterial communities during the monsoon explain rainfalls and several other wastes from inlands. Coliform counts drastically increased at holy and urban places due to pilgrimage and other ritual activities. Higher values of the pollution index (PI) ratio (>1) reveals, human fecal pollutions affect the water quality. The averaged PI ratio shows a substantial higher microbial contamination in holy places than in urban areas and the order of decreasing PI ratios observed were: holy places?>?urban areas?>?semi-urban areas?>?rural areas. Correlation and factor analysis proves microbial communities were not related to physicochemical parameters. Principal component analysis indicates 55.32% of the total variance resulted from human/animal fecal matters and sewage contaminants whereas 19.95% were related to organic contents and waste materials from the rivers. More than 80% of the samples showed a higher fecal coliform and Streptococci by crossing the World Health Organization's permissible limits. PMID:24292984

  4. Rapidly measured indicators of recreational water quality andswimming-associated illness at marine beaches: a prospective cohort study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: In the United States and elsewhere, recreational water is monitored for fecal indicator bacteria to prevent illness. Standard methods to measure fecal indicator bacteria take at least 24 hours to obtain results. Molecular approaches such as quantitative polymerase cha...

  5. COMPARISON OF ENTEROCCOCUS DENSITIES DETERMINED BY CULTURE AND QPCR ANALYSES IN WATER SAMPLES FROM TWO RECREATION BEACHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous studies conducted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) have demonstrated that cell densities of the bacterial genus Enterococcus in water samples are directly correlated with gastroenteritis illness rates in swimmers at both marine and fresh water beaches....

  6. Directory of National Recreation Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Exceptional Parent, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Thirty national recreation organizations serving individuals with disabilities are listed, along with addresses and telephone numbers. Sample recreational activities covered include Boy Scouts and Girls Scouts, various wheelchair sports, skiing, golfing, and horticultural therapy. (JDD)

  7. Water Quality, Weather and Environmental Factors Associated with Fecal Indicator Organism Density in Beach Sand at Two Recreational Marine Beaches

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent studies showing an association between fecal indicator organisms (FIOs and gastrointestinal (GI) illness among beachgoers wit sand contact have important public health implicatons because of the large numbers of people who recreate at beaches and engage in sand contact act...

  8. Effects of sampling standardization on estimates of Phanerozoic marine diversification

    PubMed Central

    Alroy, J.; Marshall, C. R.; Bambach, R. K.; Bezusko, K.; Foote, M.; Frsich, F. T.; Hansen, T. A.; Holland, S. M.; Ivany, L. C.; Jablonski, D.; Jacobs, D. K.; Jones, D. C.; Kosnik, M. A.; Lidgard, S.; Low, S.; Miller, A. I.; Novack-Gottshall, P. M.; Olszewski, T. D.; Patzkowsky, M. E.; Raup, D. M.; Roy, K.; Sepkoski, J. J.; Sommers, M. G.; Wagner, P. J.; Webber, A.

    2001-01-01

    Global diversity curves reflect more than just the number of taxa that have existed through time: they also mirror variation in the nature of the fossil record and the way the record is reported. These sampling effects are best quantified by assembling and analyzing large numbers of locality-specific biotic inventories. Here, we introduce a new database of this kind for the Phanerozoic fossil record of marine invertebrates. We apply four substantially distinct analytical methods that estimate taxonomic diversity by quantifying and correcting for variation through time in the number and nature of inventories. Variation introduced by the use of two dramatically different counting protocols also is explored. We present sampling-standardized diversity estimates for two long intervals that sum to 300 Myr (Middle Ordovician-Carboniferous; Late Jurassic-Paleogene). Our new curves differ considerably from traditional, synoptic curves. For example, some of them imply unexpectedly low late Cretaceous and early Tertiary diversity levels. However, such factors as the current emphasis in the database on North America and Europe still obscure our view of the global history of marine biodiversity. These limitations will be addressed as the database and methods are refined. PMID:11353852

  9. Recreation monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    DiGennaro, B.; Merklein, G.H.

    1995-12-31

    Recreational use and recreational facilities are common features at hydropower projects. In fact, the hydropower industry is a major supplier of recreational opportunities contributing to tourism and rural economic growth in many communities across the country, As demands for public recreation have grown, pressure on the hydropower industry to provide more public access and more facilities has increased. This paper looks at recent developments in the FERC licensing and compliance arenas with regard to planning for and monitoring recreation at hydropower facilities. The paper highlights the increased occurrence of recreation monitoring requirements in license articles and discusses methods for complying with such requirements. The paper also looks at how monitoring data can be used to avoid unnecessary developments and to better plan for future recreation use.

  10. Isolation of microplastics in biota-rich seawater samples and marine organisms

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Matthew; Webb, Hannah; Lindeque, Pennie K.; Fileman, Elaine S.; Halsband, Claudia; Galloway, Tamara S.

    2014-01-01

    Microplastic litter is a pervasive pollutant present in aquatic systems across the globe. A range of marine organisms have the capacity to ingest microplastics, resulting in adverse health effects. Developing methods to accurately quantify microplastics in productive marine waters, and those internalized by marine organisms, is of growing importance. Here we investigate the efficacy of using acid, alkaline and enzymatic digestion techniques in mineralizing biological material from marine surface trawls to reveal any microplastics present. Our optimized enzymatic protocol can digest >97% (by weight) of the material present in plankton-rich seawater samples without destroying any microplastic debris present. In applying the method to replicate marine samples from the western English Channel, we identified 0.27 microplastics m−3. The protocol was further used to extract microplastics ingested by marine zooplankton under laboratory conditions. Our findings illustrate that enzymatic digestion can aid the detection of microplastic debris within seawater samples and marine biota. PMID:24681661

  11. Isolation of microplastics in biota-rich seawater samples and marine organisms.

    PubMed

    Cole, Matthew; Webb, Hannah; Lindeque, Pennie K; Fileman, Elaine S; Halsband, Claudia; Galloway, Tamara S

    2014-01-01

    Microplastic litter is a pervasive pollutant present in aquatic systems across the globe. A range of marine organisms have the capacity to ingest microplastics, resulting in adverse health effects. Developing methods to accurately quantify microplastics in productive marine waters, and those internalized by marine organisms, is of growing importance. Here we investigate the efficacy of using acid, alkaline and enzymatic digestion techniques in mineralizing biological material from marine surface trawls to reveal any microplastics present. Our optimized enzymatic protocol can digest >97% (by weight) of the material present in plankton-rich seawater samples without destroying any microplastic debris present. In applying the method to replicate marine samples from the western English Channel, we identified 0.27 microplastics m(-3). The protocol was further used to extract microplastics ingested by marine zooplankton under laboratory conditions. Our findings illustrate that enzymatic digestion can aid the detection of microplastic debris within seawater samples and marine biota. PMID:24681661

  12. Isolation of microplastics in biota-rich seawater samples and marine organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Matthew; Webb, Hannah; Lindeque, Pennie K.; Fileman, Elaine S.; Halsband, Claudia; Galloway, Tamara S.

    2014-03-01

    Microplastic litter is a pervasive pollutant present in aquatic systems across the globe. A range of marine organisms have the capacity to ingest microplastics, resulting in adverse health effects. Developing methods to accurately quantify microplastics in productive marine waters, and those internalized by marine organisms, is of growing importance. Here we investigate the efficacy of using acid, alkaline and enzymatic digestion techniques in mineralizing biological material from marine surface trawls to reveal any microplastics present. Our optimized enzymatic protocol can digest >97% (by weight) of the material present in plankton-rich seawater samples without destroying any microplastic debris present. In applying the method to replicate marine samples from the western English Channel, we identified 0.27 microplastics m-3. The protocol was further used to extract microplastics ingested by marine zooplankton under laboratory conditions. Our findings illustrate that enzymatic digestion can aid the detection of microplastic debris within seawater samples and marine biota.

  13. Operation Recreation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schutz, Jeff; Schutz, Laurie

    2010-01-01

    Parents who have a child with a disability often find that recreational activities can be anything but accessible. Time for recreation is drowned by the priorities of caring for a child's needs, and the "umph" to get out can feel like an insurmountable obstacle. The activities parents love and aspire to share with their child may seem like one

  14. Deinococcus enclensis sp. nov., isolated from a marine sediment sample.

    PubMed

    Thorat, Meghana N; Mawlankar, Rahul; Sonalkar, Vidya V; Venkata Ramana, V; Joseph, Neetha; Shouche, Yogesh S; Dastager, Syed G

    2015-01-01

    A novel pale-pink coloured strain, designated NIO-1023(T), was isolated from a marine sediment sample from Chorao Island, Goa, India. The taxonomic position of strain NIO-1023(T) was investigated by using a polyphasic approach. The cells were observed to be Gram-stain positive, coccal shaped and non-spore forming. Phylogenetic analyses using the 16S rRNA gene sequence of the isolate indicated that the organism belongs to the genus Deinococcus. The strain NIO-1023(T) showed highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities with Deinococcus ficus (97.8%), whereas other Deinococcus species showed less than 95% sequence similarity. The DNA-DNA relatedness with respect to D. ficus CC-FR2-10(T) was 23.9%. Chemotaxonomic data revealed that strain NIO-1023(T) contains only menaquinone MK-8 as the respiratory quinone and a complex polar lipid profile consisting of different unidentified glycolipids and polar lipids, two unknown phospholipids and three unknown phosphoglycolipids. As in other deinococci, one of these phosphoglycolipids was predominant in the profile. The predominant fatty acids were identified as C17:1 w8c, C16:1 w6c/w7c, C15:1 w6c and C17:1 w9c. The genomic DNA G+C content of strain NIO-1023(T) was determined to be 67.2mol%. The biochemical and chemotaxonomic properties demonstrate that strain NIO-1023(T) represents a novel species, for which the name Deinococcus enclensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is NIO-1023(T) (=DSM 25127(T)=NCIM 5456(T)). PMID:25344421

  15. Recreational Fish-Finders-An Inexpensive Alternative to Scientific Echo-Sounders for Unravelling the Links between Marine Top Predators and Their Prey.

    PubMed

    McInnes, Alistair M; Khoosal, Arjun; Murrell, Ben; Merkle, Dagmar; Lacerda, Miguel; Nyengera, Reason; Coetzee, Janet C; Edwards, Loyd C; Ryan, Peter G; Rademan, Johan; van der Westhuizen, Jan J; Pichegru, Lorien

    2015-01-01

    Studies investigating how mobile marine predators respond to their prey are limited due to the challenging nature of the environment. While marine top predators are increasingly easy to study thanks to developments in bio-logging technology, typically there is scant information on the distribution and abundance of their prey, largely due to the specialised nature of acquiring this information. We explore the potential of using single-beam recreational fish-finders (RFF) to quantify relative forage fish abundance and draw inferences of the prey distribution at a fine spatial scale. We compared fish school characteristics as inferred from the RFF with that of a calibrated scientific split-beam echo-sounder (SES) by simultaneously operating both systems from the same vessel in Algoa Bay, South Africa. Customized open-source software was developed to extract fish school information from the echo returns of the RFF. For schools insonified by both systems, there was close correspondence between estimates of mean school depth (R2 = 0.98) and school area (R2 = 0.70). Estimates of relative school density (mean volume backscattering strength; Sv) measured by the RFF were negatively biased through saturation of this system given its smaller dynamic range. A correction factor applied to the RFF-derived density estimates improved the comparability between the two systems. Relative abundance estimates using all schools from both systems were congruent at scales from 0.5 km to 18 km with a strong positive linear trend in model fit estimates with increasing scale. Although absolute estimates of fish abundance cannot be derived from these systems, they are effective at describing prey school characteristics and have good potential for mapping forage fish distribution and relative abundance. Using such relatively inexpensive systems could greatly enhance our understanding of predator-prey interactions. PMID:26600300

  16. Recreational Fish-Finders—An Inexpensive Alternative to Scientific Echo-Sounders for Unravelling the Links between Marine Top Predators and Their Prey

    PubMed Central

    McInnes, Alistair M.; Khoosal, Arjun; Murrell, Ben; Merkle, Dagmar; Lacerda, Miguel; Nyengera, Reason; Coetzee, Janet C.; Edwards, Loyd C.; Ryan, Peter G.; Rademan, Johan; van der Westhuizen, Jan J; Pichegru, Lorien

    2015-01-01

    Studies investigating how mobile marine predators respond to their prey are limited due to the challenging nature of the environment. While marine top predators are increasingly easy to study thanks to developments in bio-logging technology, typically there is scant information on the distribution and abundance of their prey, largely due to the specialised nature of acquiring this information. We explore the potential of using single-beam recreational fish-finders (RFF) to quantify relative forage fish abundance and draw inferences of the prey distribution at a fine spatial scale. We compared fish school characteristics as inferred from the RFF with that of a calibrated scientific split-beam echo-sounder (SES) by simultaneously operating both systems from the same vessel in Algoa Bay, South Africa. Customized open-source software was developed to extract fish school information from the echo returns of the RFF. For schools insonified by both systems, there was close correspondence between estimates of mean school depth (R2 = 0.98) and school area (R2 = 0.70). Estimates of relative school density (mean volume backscattering strength; Sv) measured by the RFF were negatively biased through saturation of this system given its smaller dynamic range. A correction factor applied to the RFF-derived density estimates improved the comparability between the two systems. Relative abundance estimates using all schools from both systems were congruent at scales from 0.5 km to 18 km with a strong positive linear trend in model fit estimates with increasing scale. Although absolute estimates of fish abundance cannot be derived from these systems, they are effective at describing prey school characteristics and have good potential for mapping forage fish distribution and relative abundance. Using such relatively inexpensive systems could greatly enhance our understanding of predator-prey interactions. PMID:26600300

  17. Evaluation of conventional and alternative monitoring methods for a recreational marine beach with non-point source of fecal contamination

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Tomoyuki; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M.; Sinigalliano, Christopher D.; Gidley, Maribeth L.; Plano, Lisa R.W.; Fleisher, Jay M.; Wang, John D.; Elmir, Samir M.; He, Guoqing; Wright, Mary E.; Abdelzaher, Amir M.; Ortega, Cristina; Wanless, David; Garza, Anna C.; Kish, Jonathan; Scott, Troy; Hollenbeck, Julie; Backer, Lorraine C.; Fleming, Lora E.

    2010-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to compare enterococci (ENT) measurements based on the membrane filter, ENT(MF) with alternatives that can provide faster results including alternative enterococci methods (e.g. chromogenic substrate (CS), and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR)), and results from regression models based upon environmental parameters that can be measured in real-time. ENT(MF) were also compared to source tracking markers (Staphylococcus aureus, Bacteroidales human and dog markers, and Catellicoccus gull marker) in an effort to interpret the variability of the signal. Results showed that concentrations of enterococci based upon MF (< 2 to 3,320 CFU/100mL) were significantly different from the CS and qPCR methods (p < 0.01). The correlations between MF and CS (r=0.58, p<0.01) were stronger than between MF and qPCR (r?0.36, p<0.01). Enterococci levels by MF, CS, and qPCR methods were positively correlated with turbidity and tidal height. Enterococci by MF and CS were also inversely correlated with solar radiation but enterococci by qPCR was not. The regression model based on environmental variables provided fair qualitative predictions of enterococci by MF in real-time, for daily geometric mean levels, but not for individual samples. Overall, ENT(MF) was not significantly correlated with source tracking markers with the exception of samples collected during one storm event. The inability of the regression model to predict ENT(MF) levels for individual samples is likely due to the different sources of ENT impacting the beach at any given time, making it particularly difficult to for environmental parameters to predict short-term variability of ENT(MF). PMID:20925349

  18. Evaluation of conventional and alternative monitoring methods for a recreational marine beach with nonpoint source of fecal contamination.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Tomoyuki; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M; Sinigalliano, Christopher D; Gidley, Maribeth L; Plano, Lisa R W; Fleisher, Jay M; Wang, John D; Elmir, Samir M; He, Guoqing; Wright, Mary E; Abdelzaher, Amir M; Ortega, Cristina; Wanless, David; Garza, Anna C; Kish, Jonathan; Scott, Troy; Hollenbeck, Julie; Backer, Lorraine C; Fleming, Lora E

    2010-11-01

    The objectives of this work were to compare enterococci (ENT) measurements based on the membrane filter, ENT(MF) with alternatives that can provide faster results including alternative enterococci methods (e.g., chromogenic substrate (CS), and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR)), and results from regression models based upon environmental parameters that can be measured in real-time. ENT(MF) were also compared to source tracking markers (Staphylococcus aureus, Bacteroidales human and dog markers, and Catellicoccus gull marker) in an effort to interpret the variability of the signal. Results showed that concentrations of enterococci based upon MF (<2 to 3320 CFU/100 mL) were significantly different from the CS and qPCR methods (p < 0.01). The correlations between MF and CS (r = 0.58, p < 0.01) were stronger than between MF and qPCR (r ? 0.36, p < 0.01). Enterococci levels by MF, CS, and qPCR methods were positively correlated with turbidity and tidal height. Enterococci by MF and CS were also inversely correlated with solar radiation but enterococci by qPCR was not. The regression model based on environmental variables provided fair qualitative predictions of enterococci by MF in real-time, for daily geometric mean levels, but not for individual samples. Overall, ENT(MF) was not significantly correlated with source tracking markers with the exception of samples collected during one storm event. The inability of the regression model to predict ENT(MF) levels for individual samples is likely due to the different sources of ENT impacting the beach at any given time, making it particularly difficult to to predict short-term variability of ENT(MF) for environmental parameters. PMID:20925349

  19. EFFECTS OF SAMPLE PREPARATION ON THE MEASUREMENT OF ORGANIC CARBON, HYDROGEN, SULFUR, AND OXYGEN CONCENTRATIONS IN MARINE SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The elemental composition of marine sediment provides useful information for the study of environmental processes including biogeochemical cycling and contaminant partitioning. It is common practice to acidify marine sediment samples to remove carbonate before measuring the conce...

  20. Recreation for All.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winston, Alan G., Ed.; Seekins, Nancy, Ed.

    The manual is intended to provide guidelines for the planning and development of parks and recreation facilities which are accessbile to everyone. Separate chapters present guidelines for the following topics (sample subtopics in parentheses): general information (space relationships and wheelchair functions); general site conditions (soil

  1. 46 CFR 4.03-50 - Recreational vessel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Recreational vessel. 4.03-50 Section 4.03-50 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Definitions 4.03-50 Recreational vessel. Recreational vessel means a vessel meeting...

  2. 46 CFR 4.03-50 - Recreational vessel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Recreational vessel. 4.03-50 Section 4.03-50 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Definitions 4.03-50 Recreational vessel. Recreational vessel means a vessel meeting...

  3. 46 CFR 4.03-50 - Recreational vessel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Recreational vessel. 4.03-50 Section 4.03-50 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Definitions 4.03-50 Recreational vessel. Recreational vessel means a vessel meeting...

  4. 46 CFR 4.03-50 - Recreational vessel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Recreational vessel. 4.03-50 Section 4.03-50 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Definitions 4.03-50 Recreational vessel. Recreational vessel means a vessel meeting...

  5. 46 CFR 4.03-50 - Recreational vessel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Recreational vessel. 4.03-50 Section 4.03-50 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Definitions 4.03-50 Recreational vessel. Recreational vessel means a vessel meeting...

  6. Multiplex biotoxin surface plasmon resonance method for marine biotoxins in algal and seawater samples.

    PubMed

    McNamee, Sara E; Elliott, Christopher T; Delahaut, Philippe; Campbell, Katrina

    2013-10-01

    A multiplex surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor method for the detection of paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) toxins, okadaic acid (and analogues) and domoic acid was developed. This method was compared to enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methods. Seawater samples (n=256) from around Europe were collected by the consortia of an EU project MIcroarrays for the Detection of Toxic Algae (MIDTAL) and evaluated using each method. A simple sample preparation procedure was developed which involved lysing and releasing the toxins from the algal cells with glass beads followed by centrifugation and filtering the extract before testing for marine biotoxins by both multi-SPR and ELISA. Method detection limits based on IC20 values for PSP, okadaic acid and domoic acid toxins were 0.82, 0.36 and 1.66 ng/ml, respectively, for the prototype multiplex SPR biosensor. Evaluation by SPR for seawater samples has shown that 47, 59 and 61 % of total seawater samples tested positive (result greater than the IC20) for PSP, okadaic acid (and analogues) and domoic acid toxins, respectively. Toxic samples were received mainly from Spain and Ireland. This work has demonstrated the potential of multiplex analysis for marine biotoxins in algal and seawater samples with results available for 24 samples within a 7 h period for three groups of key marine biotoxins. Multiplex immunological methods could therefore be used as early warning monitoring tools for a variety of marine biotoxins in seawater samples. PMID:23250726

  7. Determination of methylmercury in marine biota samples: method validation.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Luis; Vassileva, Emilia

    2014-05-01

    Regulatory authorities are expected to measure concentration of contaminants in foodstuffs, but the simple determination of total amount cannot be sufficient for fully judging its impact on the human health. In particular, the methylation of metals generally increases their toxicity; therefore validated analytical methods producing reliable results for the assessment of methylated species are highly needed. Nowadays, there is no legal limit for methylmercury (MeHg) in food matrices. Hence, no standardized method for the determination of MeHg exists within the international jurisdiction. Contemplating the possibility of a future legislative limit, a method for low level determination of MeHg in marine biota matrixes, based on aqueous-phase ethylation followed by purge and trap and gas chromatography (GC) coupled to pyrolysis-atomic fluorescence spectrometry (Py-AFS) detection, has been developed and validated. Five different extraction procedures, namely acid and alkaline leaching assisted by microwave and conventional oven heating, as well as enzymatic digestion, were evaluated in terms of their efficiency to extract MeHg from Scallop soft tissue IAEA-452 Certified Reference Material. Alkaline extraction with 25% (w/w) KOH in methanol, microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) with 5M HCl and enzymatic digestion with protease XIV yielded the highest extraction recoveries. Standard addition or the introduction of a dilution step were successfully applied to overcome the matrix effects observed when microwave-assisted extraction using 25% (w/w) KOH in methanol or 25% (w/v) aqueous TMAH were used. ISO 17025 and Eurachem guidelines were followed to perform the validation of the methodology. Accordingly, blanks, selectivity, calibration curve, linearity (0.9995), working range (1-800pg), recovery (97%), precision, traceability, limit of detection (0.45pg), limit of quantification (0.85pg) and expanded uncertainty (15.86%, k=2) were assessed with Fish protein Dorm-3 Certified Reference Material. The major contributions to the expanded uncertainty, i.e. 86.1%, arose from the uncertainty associated with recovery, followed by the contribution from fluorescence signal. Additional validation of the methodology developed was effectuated by the comparison with the values reported for MeHg in the IAEA-452 inter-laboratory comparison exercise. PMID:24720970

  8. Marine reservoir effect on the Southeastern coast of Brazil: results from the Tarioba shellmound paired samples.

    PubMed

    Macario, K D; Souza, R C C L; Aguilera, O A; Carvalho, C; Oliveira, F M; Alves, E Q; Chanca, I S; Silva, E P; Douka, K; Decco, J; Trindade, D C; Marques, A N; Anjos, R M; Pamplona, F C

    2015-05-01

    On the Southeastern coast of Brazil the presence of many archaeological shellmounds offers a great potential for studying the radiocarbon marine reservoir effect (MRE). However, very few such studies are available for this region. These archaeological settlements, mostly dating from 5 to 2 kyr cal BP, include both terrestrial and marine remains in good stratigraphic context and secure association, enabling the comparison of different carbon reservoirs. In a previous study the chronology of the Sambaqui da Tarioba, located in Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil, was established based on marine mollusc shells and charcoal samples from hearths, from several layers in two excavated sectors. We now compare the different materials with the aim of studying the MRE in this region. Calibration was performed with Oxford software OxCal v4.2.3 using the marine curve Marine13 with an undetermined offset to account for local corrections for shell samples, and the atmospheric curve SHCal13 for charcoal samples. The distribution of results considering a phase model indicates a ?R value of -127 67 (14)C yr in the 1 sigma range and the multi-paired approach leads to a mean value of -110 94 (14)C yr. PMID:25703433

  9. Detection of a Diverse Marine Fish Fauna Using Environmental DNA from Seawater Samples

    PubMed Central

    Iversen, Lars Lnsmann; Mller, Peter Rask; Rasmussen, Morten; Willerslev, Eske

    2012-01-01

    Marine ecosystems worldwide are under threat with many fish species and populations suffering from human over-exploitation. This is greatly impacting global biodiversity, economy and human health. Intriguingly, marine fish are largely surveyed using selective and invasive methods, which are mostly limited to commercial species, and restricted to particular areas with favourable conditions. Furthermore, misidentification of species represents a major problem. Here, we investigate the potential of using metabarcoding of environmental DNA (eDNA) obtained directly from seawater samples to account for marine fish biodiversity. This eDNA approach has recently been used successfully in freshwater environments, but never in marine settings. We isolate eDNA from -litre seawater samples collected in a temperate marine ecosystem in Denmark. Using next-generation DNA sequencing of PCR amplicons, we obtain eDNA from 15 different fish species, including both important consumption species, as well as species rarely or never recorded by conventional monitoring. We also detect eDNA from a rare vagrant species in the area; European pilchard (Sardina pilchardus). Additionally, we detect four bird species. Records in national databases confirmed the occurrence of all detected species. To investigate the efficiency of the eDNA approach, we compared its performance with 9 methods conventionally used in marine fish surveys. Promisingly, eDNA covered the fish diversity better than or equal to any of the applied conventional methods. Our study demonstrates that even small samples of seawater contain eDNA from a wide range of local fish species. Finally, in order to examine the potential dispersal of eDNA in oceans, we performed an experiment addressing eDNA degradation in seawater, which shows that even small (100-bp) eDNA fragments degrades beyond detectability within days. Although further studies are needed to validate the eDNA approach in varying environmental conditions, our findings provide a strong proof-of-concept with great perspectives for future monitoring of marine biodiversity and resources. PMID:22952584

  10. Sampling frequency of ciliated protozoan microfauna for seasonal distribution research in marine ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Xu, Henglong; Yong, Jiang; Xu, Guangjian

    2015-12-30

    Sampling frequency is important to obtain sufficient information for temporal research of microfauna. To determine an optimal strategy for exploring the seasonal variation in ciliated protozoa, a dataset from the Yellow Sea, northern China was studied. Samples were collected with 24 (biweekly), 12 (monthly), 8 (bimonthly per season) and 4 (seasonally) sampling events. Compared to the 24 samplings (100%), the 12-, 8- and 4-samplings recovered 94%, 94%, and 78% of the total species, respectively. To reveal the seasonal distribution, the 8-sampling regime may result in >75% information of the seasonal variance, while the traditional 4-sampling may only explain <65% of the total variance. With the increase of the sampling frequency, the biotic data showed stronger correlations with seasonal variables (e.g., temperature, salinity) in combination with nutrients. It is suggested that the 8-sampling events per year may be an optimal sampling strategy for ciliated protozoan seasonal research in marine ecosystems. PMID:26497257

  11. Determination of adenosine triphosphate on marine particulates: synthesis of methods for use on OTEC samples

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, A.T.; Hartwig, E.O.

    1982-08-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is an indicator of living biomass in marine particulates. This report details the method used by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to analyze particulate ATP in samples taken from oligotrophic, tropical ocean waters. It represents a synthesis of previously published methods.

  12. Determination of Adenosine Triphosphate on Marine Particulates:Synthesis of Methods for Use on OTEC Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Anthony T.; Hartwig, Eric O.

    1982-08-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is an indicator of living biomass in marine particulates. This report details the method used by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to analyze particulate ATP in samples taken from oligotrophic, tropical ocean waters. It represents a synthesis of previously published methods.

  13. Isolation strategies of marine-derived actinomycetes from sponge and sediment samples.

    PubMed

    Hame?-Kocaba?, E Esin; Uzel, Ata

    2012-03-01

    During the last two decades, discoveries of new members of actinomycetes and novel metabolites from marine environments have drawn attention to such environments, such as sediment and sponge. For the successful isolation of actinomycetes from marine environments, many factors including the use of enrichment and pre-treatment techniques, and the selection of growth media and antibiotic supplements should be taken into account. High-throughput cultivation is an innovative technique that mimics nature, eliminates undesired, fast-growing bacteria and creates suitable conditions for rare, slow-growing actinomycetes. This review comprehensively evaluates the traditional and innovative techniques and strategies used for the isolation of actinomycetes from marine sponge and sediment samples. PMID:22285852

  14. FAQ about Recreational Therapy/Therapeutic Recreation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... biological, and behavioral sciences and recreation and leisure theory. How can I get RT/TR services? Many ... ATRA) is the national membership organization representing the interests and needs of recreational therapists. The association is ...

  15. Molecular diversity and distribution of marine fungi across 130 European environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Richards, Thomas A; Leonard, Guy; Mahé, Frédéric; Del Campo, Javier; Romac, Sarah; Jones, Meredith D M; Maguire, Finlay; Dunthorn, Micah; De Vargas, Colomban; Massana, Ramon; Chambouvet, Aurélie

    2015-11-22

    Environmental DNA and culture-based analyses have suggested that fungi are present in low diversity and in low abundance in many marine environments, especially in the upper water column. Here, we use a dual approach involving high-throughput diversity tag sequencing from both DNA and RNA templates and fluorescent cell counts to evaluate the diversity and relative abundance of fungi across marine samples taken from six European near-shore sites. We removed very rare fungal operational taxonomic units (OTUs) selecting only OTUs recovered from multiple samples for a detailed analysis. This approach identified a set of 71 fungal 'OTU clusters' that account for 66% of all the sequences assigned to the Fungi. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that this diversity includes a significant number of chytrid-like lineages that had not been previously described, indicating that the marine environment encompasses a number of zoosporic fungi that are new to taxonomic inventories. Using the sequence datasets, we identified cases where fungal OTUs were sampled across multiple geographical sites and between different sampling depths. This was especially clear in one relatively abundant and diverse phylogroup tentatively named Novel Chytrid-Like-Clade 1 (NCLC1). For comparison, a subset of the water column samples was also investigated using fluorescent microscopy to examine the abundance of eukaryotes with chitin cell walls. Comparisons of relative abundance of RNA-derived fungal tag sequences and chitin cell-wall counts demonstrate that fungi constitute a low fraction of the eukaryotic community in these water column samples. Taken together, these results demonstrate the phylogenetic position and environmental distribution of 71 lineages, improving our understanding of the diversity and abundance of fungi in marine environments. PMID:26582030

  16. Molecular diversity and distribution of marine fungi across 130 European environmental samples

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Thomas A.; Leonard, Guy; Mahé, Frédéric; del Campo, Javier; Romac, Sarah; Jones, Meredith D. M.; Maguire, Finlay; Dunthorn, Micah; De Vargas, Colomban; Massana, Ramon; Chambouvet, Aurélie

    2015-01-01

    Environmental DNA and culture-based analyses have suggested that fungi are present in low diversity and in low abundance in many marine environments, especially in the upper water column. Here, we use a dual approach involving high-throughput diversity tag sequencing from both DNA and RNA templates and fluorescent cell counts to evaluate the diversity and relative abundance of fungi across marine samples taken from six European near-shore sites. We removed very rare fungal operational taxonomic units (OTUs) selecting only OTUs recovered from multiple samples for a detailed analysis. This approach identified a set of 71 fungal ‘OTU clusters' that account for 66% of all the sequences assigned to the Fungi. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that this diversity includes a significant number of chytrid-like lineages that had not been previously described, indicating that the marine environment encompasses a number of zoosporic fungi that are new to taxonomic inventories. Using the sequence datasets, we identified cases where fungal OTUs were sampled across multiple geographical sites and between different sampling depths. This was especially clear in one relatively abundant and diverse phylogroup tentatively named Novel Chytrid-Like-Clade 1 (NCLC1). For comparison, a subset of the water column samples was also investigated using fluorescent microscopy to examine the abundance of eukaryotes with chitin cell walls. Comparisons of relative abundance of RNA-derived fungal tag sequences and chitin cell-wall counts demonstrate that fungi constitute a low fraction of the eukaryotic community in these water column samples. Taken together, these results demonstrate the phylogenetic position and environmental distribution of 71 lineages, improving our understanding of the diversity and abundance of fungi in marine environments. PMID:26582030

  17. Estimates of Marine Debris Accumulation on Beaches Are Strongly Affected by the Temporal Scale of Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Stephen D. A.; Markic, Ana

    2013-01-01

    Marine debris is a global issue with impacts on marine organisms, ecological processes, aesthetics and economies. Consequently, there is increasing interest in quantifying the scale of the problem. Accumulation rates of debris on beaches have been advocated as a useful proxy for at-sea debris loads. However, here we show that past studies may have vastly underestimated the quantity of available debris because sampling was too infrequent. Our study of debris on a small beach in eastern Australia indicates that estimated daily accumulation rates decrease rapidly with increasing intervals between surveys, and the quantity of available debris is underestimated by 50% after only 3 days and by an order of magnitude after 1 month. As few past studies report sampling frequencies of less than a month, estimates of the scale of the marine debris problem need to be critically re-examined and scaled-up accordingly. These results reinforce similar, recent work advocating daily sampling as a standard approach for accurate quantification of available debris in coastal habitats. We outline an alternative approach whereby site-specific accumulation models are generated to correct bias when daily sampling is impractical. PMID:24367607

  18. Multi-Scale Sampling to Evaluate Assemblage Dynamics in an Oceanic Marine Reserve

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Andrew R.; Watson, William; McClatchie, Sam; Weber, Edward D.

    2012-01-01

    To resolve the capacity of Marine Protected Areas (MPA) to enhance fish productivity it is first necessary to understand how environmental conditions affect the distribution and abundance of fishes independent of potential reserve effects. Baseline fish production was examined from 20022004 through ichthyoplankton sampling in a large (10,878 km2) Southern Californian oceanic marine reserve, the Cowcod Conservation Area (CCA) that was established in 2001, and the Southern California Bight as a whole (238,000 km2 CalCOFI sampling domain). The CCA assemblage changed through time as the importance of oceanic-pelagic species decreased between 2002 (La Nia) and 2003 (El Nio) and then increased in 2004 (El Nio), while oceanic species and rockfishes displayed the opposite pattern. By contrast, the CalCOFI assemblage was relatively stable through time. Depth, temperature, and zooplankton explained more of the variability in assemblage structure at the CalCOFI scale than they did at the CCA scale. CalCOFI sampling revealed that oceanic species impinged upon the CCA between 2002 and 2003 in association with warmer offshore waters, thus explaining the increased influence of these species in the CCA during the El Nino years. Multi-scale, spatially explicit sampling and analysis was necessary to interpret assemblage dynamics in the CCA and likely will be needed to evaluate other focal oceanic marine reserves throughout the world. PMID:22448236

  19. Results of sediment and water sampling and inorganic, organic, and radionuclide analysis at recreation areas and water intakes - Norris, Melton Hill, and Watts Bar Lakes - Data report

    SciTech Connect

    1991-10-01

    Suspected water quality contamination in Watts Bar Reservoir as a result of activities in past decades at the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Oak Ridge facility is of public concern. DOE, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), the State of Tennessee, and other agencies and officials have received many inquiries from the public in recent years concerning this suspected pollution, especially how this potential contamination may affect the health and safety of those persons who use beaches in the area for swimming or other water-body-contact sports. As a result of these concerns, TVA conducted a study in May and June 1991 to obtain data on potential contaminants of concern in the water and sediment of Watts Bar Reservoir. TVA collected water and sediment samples at a total of 29 sites, including 18 recreation areas and 11 water intake locations, located throughout Norris, Melton Hill, and Watts Bar Reservoirs. The samples were analyzed for radionuclides, metals, and organic compounds which could pose a threat to human health.

  20. Results of sediment and water sampling for inorganic, organic, and radionuclide analysis at recreation areas and water intakes -- Norris, Melton Hill, and Watts Bar Lakes. Data report

    SciTech Connect

    1991-10-01

    Suspected water quality contamination in Watts Bar Reservoir as a result of activities in past decades at the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Oak Ridge facility is of public concern. DOE, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), the State of Tennessee, and other agencies and officials have received many inquiries from the public in recent years concerning this suspected pollution, especially how this potential contamination may affect the health and safety of those persons who use beaches in the area for swimming or other water-body-contact sports. As a result of these concerns, TVA conducted a study in May and June 1991 to obtain data on potential contaminants of concern in the water and sediment of Watts Bar Reservoir. TVA collected water and sediment samples at a total of 29 sites, including 18 recreation areas and 11 water intake locations, located throughout Norris, Melton Hill, and Watts Bar Reservoirs. The samples were analyzed for radionuclides, metals, and organic compounds which could pose a threat to human health.

  1. Stereochemistry of amino acids in surface samples of a marine sediment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollock, G.E.; Kvenvolden, K.A.

    1978-01-01

    In two surface samples of marine sediment, the percentages of d-alanine and d-aspartic acid are significantly higher than the other d-amino acids and are similar to the range found in soils. The percentage of d-glutamic acid is also higher than the other amino acids but less than d-alanine and d-aspartic acid. These d-amino acids may come mainly from bacteria. ?? 1978.

  2. Real-time quantitative PCR for assessment of abundance of Pseudoalteromonas species in marine samples.

    PubMed

    Skovhus, Torben L; Ramsing, Niels B; Holmstrm, Carola; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Dahllf, Ingela

    2004-04-01

    A real-time quantitative PCR (RTQ-PCR) method for measuring the abundance of Pseudoalteromonas species in marine samples is presented. PCR primers targeting a Pseudoalteromonas-specific region of the 16S rRNA gene were tested at three different levels using database searches (in silico), a selection of pure cultures (in vitro), and a combined denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and cloning approach on environmental DNA (in situ). The RTQ-PCR method allowed for the detection of SYBR Green fluorescence from double-stranded DNA over a linear range spanning six orders of magnitude. The detection limit was determined as 1.4 fg of target DNA (1,000 gene copies) measured in the presence of 20 ng of nontarget DNA from salmon testes. In this study, we discuss the importance of robust post-PCR analyses to overcome pitfalls in RTQ-PCR when samples from different complex marine habitats are analyzed and compared on a nonroutine basis. Representatives of the genus Pseudoalteromonas were detected in samples from all investigated habitats, suggesting a widespread distribution of this genus across many marine habitats (e.g., seawater, rocks, macroalgae, and marine animals). Three sample types were analyzed by RTQ-PCR to determine the relative abundance of Pseudoalteromonas ribosomal DNA (rDNA) compared to the total abundance of eubacterial rDNA. The rDNA fractions of Pseudoalteromonas compared to all Eubacteria were 1.55% on the green alga Ulva lactuca, 0.10% on the tunicate Ciona intestinalis, and 0.06% on the green alga Ulvaria fusca. PMID:15066834

  3. Real-Time Quantitative PCR for Assessment of Abundance of Pseudoalteromonas Species in Marine Samples

    PubMed Central

    Skovhus, Torben L.; Ramsing, Niels B.; Holmstrm, Carola; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Dahllf, Ingela

    2004-01-01

    A real-time quantitative PCR (RTQ-PCR) method for measuring the abundance of Pseudoalteromonas species in marine samples is presented. PCR primers targeting a Pseudoalteromonas-specific region of the 16S rRNA gene were tested at three different levels using database searches (in silico), a selection of pure cultures (in vitro), and a combined denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and cloning approach on environmental DNA (in situ). The RTQ-PCR method allowed for the detection of SYBR Green fluorescence from double-stranded DNA over a linear range spanning six orders of magnitude. The detection limit was determined as 1.4 fg of target DNA (1,000 gene copies) measured in the presence of 20 ng of nontarget DNA from salmon testes. In this study, we discuss the importance of robust post-PCR analyses to overcome pitfalls in RTQ-PCR when samples from different complex marine habitats are analyzed and compared on a nonroutine basis. Representatives of the genus Pseudoalteromonas were detected in samples from all investigated habitats, suggesting a widespread distribution of this genus across many marine habitats (e.g., seawater, rocks, macroalgae, and marine animals). Three sample types were analyzed by RTQ-PCR to determine the relative abundance of Pseudoalteromonas ribosomal DNA (rDNA) compared to the total abundance of eubacterial rDNA. The rDNA fractions of Pseudoalteromonas compared to all Eubacteria were 1.55% on the green alga Ulva lactuca, 0.10% on the tunicate Ciona intestinalis, and 0.06% on the green alga Ulvaria fusca. PMID:15066834

  4. Stereochemistry of amino acids in surface samples of a marine sediment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollock, G. E.; Kvenvolden, K. A.

    1978-01-01

    In two surface samples of marine sediment, the percentages of D-alanine and D-aspartic acid are significantly higher than the other D-amino acids and are similar to the range found in soils. The percentage of D-glutamic acid is also higher than the other amino acids but less than D-alanine and D-aspartic acid. These D-amino acids may come mainly from bacteria.

  5. Toxicity testing of marine, terrestrial, solid, liquid, clear, and turbid samples

    SciTech Connect

    Sabate, R.W.; Stiffey, A.V.; Dewailly, E.L.

    1994-12-31

    A novel, patented toxicity testing procedure that compares the light generated by the naturally bioluminescent marine dinoflagellate alga, Pyrocystis lunula, in the presence of toxins, to light from a non-toxic control, is sensitive in parts per billion to all substances considered toxic to which it has been subjected: chemical warfare agents, metals, detergents, pesticides, herbicides, anticancer drugs, oil-well drilling fluids and produced waters, marine antifouling paints, and others. Preparation and testing time is less than eight hours. Variability is 10% or less. Solids and turbid or darkly colored samples can be tested without correction. Small sample substrates (10 to 50{mu}l) in the buffered 3ml test medium do not significantly affect pH or salinity, which permits testing of marine or terrestrial samples without special preparation. Also, the organism is insensitive to selected solvents for lipophyllic test substances. EC{sub 50} of sodium lauryl (dodecyl) sulphate is 3.7 ppm, and correlation with the Mysid LC{sub 50} EPA 30,000 ppm toxicity limit is 63% light inhibition.

  6. Determination of Iodine-129 in fish samples as new tracer of marine biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusuno, Haruka; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki; Nagata, Toshi; Miyairi, Yosuke; Yokoyama, Yusuke; Ohkouchi, Naohiko

    2014-05-01

    Most of Iodine-129 in the surface environment is the anthropogenic origin, i.e., the result of the human nuclear activities. In the marine environment, like Pacific ocean, I-129 is transferred from atmosphere and slowly diffuses into deeper layer so that there is steep gradient of I-129 concentration, i.e., the surface layer has high I-129 concentration and it suddenly decreases going deeper. This peculiar depth profile is thus reflected by the isotopic ratio (I-129/I-127) profile because stable iodine (I-127) concentration is almost uniform in the seawater (ca. 60 ppb). Iodine isotopic ratio (I-129/I-127) of marine lives like fish should be determined by their habitats and the ways exchanging iodine with seawater. This means that the iodine isotopic ratio is potential indicator of marine biology. However there have been only few studies using I-129 for marine biology. This is because I-129 is so rare in the marine lives that ordinary analytical techniques cannot detect. Recently, the technique of accelerator mass spectrometry has been developed and demonstrates excellent sensitivity to detect I-129/I-127 ratio as low as 1E-14. However it requires typically 1 mg AgI sample. To obtain such amount of iodine several hundreds gram should be treated in the case of typical fish. In this study "carrier method" was adopted to overcome this difficulty. Our procedure is following: A fish sample was first dried completely then homogenized well. Iodine was extracted into an alkaline solution by the thermal hydrolysis from 0.1 to 0.5g of dried sample. An aliquot of this solution was taken for ICP-MS analysis to determine the stable iodine concentration. The remaining was, added with carrier iodine (about 1 mg), purified by solvent extraction and collected as AgI precipitation. I-129/I-127 ratio of obtained AgI was determined by AMS. From the AMS result and the stable iodine concentration, the isotopic ratio of the fish samples themselves can be calculated. The result of fish samples, collected from Suruga-bay (located on Pacific coast in the middle of Honshu, Japan) showed 1E-10 to 7E-10, which was consistent with that of surface seawater.

  7. Molecular investigation of the distribution, abundance and diversity of the genus Pseudoalteromonas in marine samples.

    PubMed

    Skovhus, Torben L; Holmstrm, Carola; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Dahllf, Ingela

    2007-08-01

    The genus Pseudoalteromonas has attracted interest because it has frequently been found in association with eukaryotic hosts, and because many Pseudoalteromonas species produce biologically active compounds. One distinct group of Pseudoalteromonas species is the antifouling subgroup containing Pseudoalteromonas tunicata and Ps. ulvae, which both produce extracellular compounds that inhibit growth and colonization by different marine organisms. PCR primers targeting the 16S rRNA gene of the genus Pseudoalteromonas and the antifouling subgroup were developed and applied in this study. Real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) was applied to determine the relative bacterial abundance of the genus and the antifouling subgroup, and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) was applied to study the diversity of the genus in 11 different types of marine samples from Danish coastal waters. The detection of Ps. tunicata that contain the antifouling subgroup was achieved through specific PCR amplification of the antibacterial protein gene (alpP). The Pseudoalteromonas species accounted for 1.6% of the total bacterial abundance across all samples. The Pseudoalteromonas diversity on the three unfouled marine organisms Ciona intestinalis, Ulva lactuca and Ulvaria fusca was found to be low, and Ps. tunicata was only detected on these three hosts, which all contain accessible cellulose polymers in their cell walls. PMID:17573938

  8. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart G of... - Sampling Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing of Marine Engines

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Enforcement Auditing of Marine Engines A Appendix A to Subpart G of Part 91 Protection of Environment...-IGNITION ENGINES Selective Enforcement Auditing Regulations Pt. 91, Subpt. G, App. A Appendix A to Subpart G of Part 91Sampling Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing of Marine Engines Table...

  9. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart G of... - Sampling Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing of Marine Engines

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Enforcement Auditing of Marine Engines A Appendix A to Subpart G of Part 91 Protection of Environment...-IGNITION ENGINES Selective Enforcement Auditing Regulations Pt. 91, Subpt. G, App. A Appendix A to Subpart G of Part 91—Sampling Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing of Marine Engines Table...

  10. Time series sampling and data assimilation in a simple marine ecosystem model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, Linda M.; Hofmann, Eileen E.; Spitz, Yvette H.

    Simulated distributions of nutrients, phytoplankton and zooplankton were obtained from a simple marine ecosystem model that included nutrient inputs from episodic events. These distributions were then used in numerical identical twin experiments to test the ability of an adjoint data assimilation method to recover rate parameters, such as population growth and death rates, component initial conditions, and the amplitude of episodic events. Data were assimilated into the marine ecosystem model at monthly, bi-weekly and weekly intervals over a period of about 2 months. The ability to recover rate parameters and component initial conditions was determined primarily by the frequency and type of data that were assimilated. Assimilation of data at monthly intervals proved to be adequate for recovery of most of the rate parameters and some of the initial conditions. Bi-weekly data yielded better recoveries; however, increasing the data availability to weekly intervals did not significantly improve the results relative to the bi-weekly cases. The ability to recover biological rates with only monthly data suggests that these are fundamental aspects of marine ecosystems and can be resolved with only a few measurements. The availability of zooplankton information, even at a reduced frequency relative to phytoplankton or nutrient information, improved the ability to recover rate parameters with data more widely spaced in time. Recovery of component initial conditions was related to the timescales of the biological processes; faster processes required more frequent data. The recovery of the amplitude of the episodic events was related to the timing of the sampling relative to the event, rather than to the frequency at which data were available. The number of iterations needed for convergence when using data assimilation with the marine ecosystem model was dependent not only on the frequency and type of the input data series, but also on the structure of the marine ecosystem model. These results have implications for designing sampling strategies for measurement programs, such as the U.S. Joint Global Ocean Flux Study Hawaii Ocean Time-series and Bermuda Atlantic Time-series sites, so that these multidisciplinary data sets can be used with data-assimilative marine ecosystem models.

  11. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart G of... - Sampling Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing of Marine Engines

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sampling Plans for Selective... G of Part 91Sampling Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing of Marine Engines Table 1Sampling... greater D 1 A manufacturer may optionally use either the sampling plan for code letter AA or...

  12. The Index to Marine and Lacustrine Geological Samples: Improving Sample Accessibility and Enabling Current and Future Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, C.

    2011-12-01

    The Index to Marine and Lacustrine Geological Samples is a community designed and maintained resource enabling researchers to locate and request sea floor and lakebed geologic samples archived by partner institutions. Conceived in the dawn of the digital age by representatives from U.S. academic and government marine core repositories and the NOAA National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) at a 1977 meeting convened by the National Science Foundation (NSF), the Index is based on core concepts of community oversight, common vocabularies, consistent metadata and a shared interface. Form and content of underlying vocabularies and metadata continue to evolve according to the needs of the community, as do supporting technologies and access methodologies. The Curators Consortium, now international in scope, meets at partner institutions biennially to share ideas and discuss best practices. NGDC serves the group by providing database access and maintenance, a list server, digitizing support and long-term archival of sample metadata, data and imagery. Over three decades, participating curators have performed the herculean task of creating and contributing metadata for over 195,000 sea floor and lakebed cores, grabs, and dredges archived in their collections. Some partners use the Index for primary web access to their collections while others use it to increase exposure of more in-depth institutional systems. The Index is currently a geospatially-enabled relational database, publicly accessible via Web Feature and Web Map Services, and text- and ArcGIS map-based web interfaces. To provide as much knowledge as possible about each sample, the Index includes curatorial contact information and links to related data, information and images; 1) at participating institutions, 2) in the NGDC archive, and 3) at sites such as the Rolling Deck to Repository (R2R) and the System for Earth Sample Registration (SESAR). Over 34,000 International GeoSample Numbers (IGSNs) linking to SESAR are included in anticipation of opportunities for interconnectivity with Integrated Earth Data Applications (IEDA) systems. To promote interoperability and broaden exposure via the semantic web, NGDC is publishing lithologic classification schemes and terminology used in the Index as Simple Knowledge Organization System (SKOS) vocabularies, coordinating with R2R and the Consortium for Ocean Leadership for consistency. Availability in SKOS form will also facilitate use of the vocabularies in International Standards Organization (ISO) 19115-2 compliant metadata records. NGDC provides stewardship for the Index on behalf of U.S. repositories as the NSF designated "appropriate National Data Center" for data and metadata pertaining to sea floor samples as specified in the 2011 Division of Ocean Sciences Sample and Data Policy, and on behalf of international partners via a collocated World Data Center. NGDC operates on the Open Archival Information System (OAIS) reference model. Active Partners: Antarctic Marine Geology Research Facility, Florida State University; British Ocean Sediment Core Research Facility; Geological Survey of Canada; Integrated Ocean Drilling Program; Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory; National Lacustrine Core Repository, University of Minnesota; Oregon State University; Scripps Institution of Oceanography; University of Rhode Island; U.S. Geological Survey; Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

  13. Economics of Outdoor Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clawson, Marion; Knetsch, Jack L.

    Written for the purposes of presenting an overview of outdoor recreation in the United States and defining the significant outdoor recreation policy issues of the next 10 to 20 years, this document also includes major sections on recreation resources and economic considerations. Projections to the year 2000 are made for a national time budget,

  14. Adaptive Recreational Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schilling, Mary Lou, Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Designed for teachers interested in therapeutic recreation, the document lists sources of adaptive recreational equipment and their homemade counterparts. Brief descriptions for ordering or constructing recreational equipment for the visually impaired, poorly coordinated, physically impaired, and mentally retarded are given. Specific adaptations

  15. Recreation Resource Manual

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Human Development Institute, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Recreation is any voluntary activity that is enjoyable and fun. Recreation refreshes, revitalizes and improves a person's quality of life. Consider some recreation activity you may have an interest in. Suppose you are interested in gardening but have never tried it. Let's take a look at how you can learn about it, do it, and in the process get…

  16. Educating the Military Recreator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bumgardner, Walter; Sharpless, Dan

    1984-01-01

    The Morale, Welfare, and Recreation program is responsible for the training of personnel who administer, manage, and operate the military recreation system. These personnel must be familiar with both military and public recreation approaches. Army, Navy, and Air Force training programs are discussed. (DF)

  17. Coincident plasmids and antimicrobial resistance in marine bacteria isolated from polluted and unpolluted Atlantic Ocean samples.

    PubMed Central

    Baya, A M; Brayton, P R; Brown, V L; Grimes, D J; Russek-Cohen, E; Colwell, R R

    1986-01-01

    Sewage effluent and outfall confluence samples were collected at the Barceloneta Regional Treatment Plant in Barceloneta, Puerto Rico; outfall confluence samples at Ocean City, Md., were also collected. Samples from uncontaminated open ocean areas served as clean-water controls. Bacteria were enriched in marine broth 2216 amended with 1 microgram of one of a set of chemicals selected for study per ml: nitrobenzene, dibutyl phthalate, m-cresol, o-cresol, 4-nitroaniline, bis(tributyltin) oxide, and quinone. MICs of the chemicals were determined individually for all isolates. Bacterial isolates were evaluated for resistance to nine different antibiotics and for the presence of plasmid DNA. Treated sewage was found to contain large numbers of bacteria simultaneously possessing antibiotic resistance, chemical resistance, and multiple bands of plasmid DNA. Bacteria resistant to penicillin, erythromycin, nalidixic acid, ampicillin, m-cresol, quinone, and bis(tributyltin) oxide were detected in nearly all samples, but only sewage outfall confluence samples yielded bacterial isolates that were resistant to streptomycin. Bacteria resistant to a combination of antibiotics, including kanamycin, chloramphenicol, gentamicin, and tetracycline, were isolated only from sewage effluent samples. It is concluded that bacterial isolates derived from toxic chemical wastes more frequently contain plasmid DNA and demonstrate antimicrobial resistance than do bacterial isolates from domestic sewage-impacted waters or from uncontaminated open ocean sites. PMID:3755317

  18. Coincident plasmids and antimicrobial resistance in marine bacteria isolated from polluted and unpolluted Atlantic Ocean Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Baya, A.M.; Brayton, P.R.; Brown, V.L.; Grimes, D.J.; Russek-Cohen, E.; Colwell, R.R.

    1986-06-01

    Sewage effluent and outfall confluence samples were collected at the Barceloneta Regional Treatment Plant in Barceloneta, Puerto Rico; outfall confluence samples at Ocean City, Md., were also collected. Samples from uncontaminated open ocean areas served as clean-water controls. Bacteria were enriched in marine broth 2216 amended with 1 ..mu..g of one of a set of chemical selected for study per ml: nitrobenzene, dibutyl phthalate, m-cresol, o-cresol, 4-nitroaniline, bis(tributyltin) oxide, and quinone. MICs of the chemicals were determined individually for all isolates. Bacterial isolates were evaluated for resistance to nine different antibiotics and for the presence of plasmid DNA. Treated sewage was found to contain large numbers of bacteria simultaneously possessing antibiotic resistance, chemical resistance, and multiple bands of plasmic DNA. Bacteria resistant to penicillin, erythromycin, nalidixic acid, ampicillin, m-cresol, quinone, and bis(tributyltin) oxide were detected in nearly all samples, but only sewage outfall confluence samples yielded bacterial isolates that were resistant to streptomycin. Bacteria resistant to a combination of antibiotics, including kanamycin, chloramphenicol, gentamicin, and tetracycline, were isolated only from sewage effluent samples. It is concluded that bacterial isolates derived from toxic chemical wastes more frequently contain plasmid DNA and demonstrate antimicrobial resistance than do bacterial isolates from domestic sewage-impacted waters or from uncontaminated open ocean sites.

  19. Coincident plasmids and antimicrobial resistance in marine bacteria isolated from polluted and unpolluted Atlantic Ocean samples.

    PubMed

    Baya, A M; Brayton, P R; Brown, V L; Grimes, D J; Russek-Cohen, E; Colwell, R R

    1986-06-01

    Sewage effluent and outfall confluence samples were collected at the Barceloneta Regional Treatment Plant in Barceloneta, Puerto Rico; outfall confluence samples at Ocean City, Md., were also collected. Samples from uncontaminated open ocean areas served as clean-water controls. Bacteria were enriched in marine broth 2216 amended with 1 microgram of one of a set of chemicals selected for study per ml: nitrobenzene, dibutyl phthalate, m-cresol, o-cresol, 4-nitroaniline, bis(tributyltin) oxide, and quinone. MICs of the chemicals were determined individually for all isolates. Bacterial isolates were evaluated for resistance to nine different antibiotics and for the presence of plasmid DNA. Treated sewage was found to contain large numbers of bacteria simultaneously possessing antibiotic resistance, chemical resistance, and multiple bands of plasmid DNA. Bacteria resistant to penicillin, erythromycin, nalidixic acid, ampicillin, m-cresol, quinone, and bis(tributyltin) oxide were detected in nearly all samples, but only sewage outfall confluence samples yielded bacterial isolates that were resistant to streptomycin. Bacteria resistant to a combination of antibiotics, including kanamycin, chloramphenicol, gentamicin, and tetracycline, were isolated only from sewage effluent samples. It is concluded that bacterial isolates derived from toxic chemical wastes more frequently contain plasmid DNA and demonstrate antimicrobial resistance than do bacterial isolates from domestic sewage-impacted waters or from uncontaminated open ocean sites. PMID:3755317

  20. [Infections related to recreational waters].

    PubMed

    Domnech-Snchez, Antonio; Olea, Francisco; Berrocal, Clara I

    2008-11-01

    Recreational waters are a source of infection by several microorganisms causing acute gastrointestinal, cutaneous and respiratory illnesses. Cryptosporidium, noroviruses and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli strains are the most important causes of diarrhea, while Pseudomonas and Staphylococcus aureus are the main causes of cutaneous infections, and Legionella is the major cause of acute lower respiratory disease. Approximately 90% of outbreaks occur in treated recreational waters (swimming pools, spas and recreational parks), while the remaining 10% arise from natural waters used for leisure (bathing in rivers, beaches, etc). In spas, most infections are caused by thermophilic bacteria, such as Pseudomonas and Legionella, since overgrowth of these bacteria is facilitated by the direct effect of temperature and, indirectly, by the evaporation of the disinfectant. Outbreaks related to recreational waters usually reflect deficient control of the system: a low level of disinfectant, or the use of an inappropriate disinfectant, insufficient maintenance and cleaning of the installation, higher than recommended usage, and failure of the disinfectant dosage system. The correct design, maintenance and use of these facilities drastically lower the risk of infections from recreational waters. Thus, other key actions to minimize this risk are the existence of, and compliance with, regulatory rules, as well as educational campaigns on good hygiene practices directed at users. Rapid etiologic diagnosis of affected patients, together with an epidemiological survey and detection of the pathogen implicated in water samples are the keys to outbreak control. PMID:19100165

  1. Marine anthropogenic radiotracers in the Southern Hemisphere: New sampling and analytical strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, I.; Povinec, P. P.; Aoyama, M.; Hirose, K.; Sanchez-Cabeza, J. A.; Comanducci, J.-F.; Gastaud, J.; Eriksson, M.; Hamajima, Y.; Kim, C. S.; Komura, K.; Osvath, I.; Roos, P.; Yim, S. A.

    2011-04-01

    The Japan Agency for Marine Earth Science and Technology conducted in 2003-2004 the Blue Earth Global Expedition (BEAGLE2003) around the Southern Hemisphere Oceans, which was a rare opportunity to collect many seawater samples for anthropogenic radionuclide studies. We describe here sampling and analytical methodologies based on radiochemical separations of Cs and Pu from seawater, as well as radiometric and mass spectrometry measurements. Several laboratories took part in radionuclide analyses using different techniques. The intercomparison exercises and analyses of certified reference materials showed a reasonable agreement between the participating laboratories. The obtained data on the distribution of 137Cs and plutonium isotopes in seawater represent the most comprehensive results available for the Southern Hemisphere Oceans.

  2. Sampling design for long-term regional trends in marine rocky intertidal communities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Irvine, Gail V.; Shelley, Alice

    2013-01-01

    Probability-based designs reduce bias and allow inference of results to the pool of sites from which they were chosen. We developed and tested probability-based designs for monitoring marine rocky intertidal assemblages at Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve (GLBA), Alaska. A multilevel design was used that varied in scale and inference. The levels included aerial surveys, extensive sampling of 25 sites, and more intensive sampling of 6 sites. Aerial surveys of a subset of intertidal habitat indicated that the original target habitat of bedrock-dominated sites with slope ≤30° was rare. This unexpected finding illustrated one value of probability-based surveys and led to a shift in the target habitat type to include steeper, more mixed rocky habitat. Subsequently, we evaluated the statistical power of different sampling methods and sampling strategies to detect changes in the abundances of the predominant sessile intertidal taxa: barnacles Balanomorpha, the mussel Mytilus trossulus, and the rockweed Fucus distichus subsp. evanescens. There was greatest power to detect trends in Mytilus and lesser power for barnacles and Fucus. Because of its greater power, the extensive, coarse-grained sampling scheme was adopted in subsequent years over the intensive, fine-grained scheme. The sampling attributes that had the largest effects on power included sampling of “vertical” line transects (vs. horizontal line transects or quadrats) and increasing the number of sites. We also evaluated the power of several management-set parameters. Given equal sampling effort, sampling more sites fewer times had greater power. The information gained through intertidal monitoring is likely to be useful in assessing changes due to climate, including ocean acidification; invasive species; trampling effects; and oil spills.

  3. Sampling design for long-term regional trends in marine rocky intertidal communities.

    PubMed

    Irvine, Gail V; Shelly, Alice

    2013-08-01

    Probability-based designs reduce bias and allow inference of results to the pool of sites from which they were chosen. We developed and tested probability-based designs for monitoring marine rocky intertidal assemblages at Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve (GLBA), Alaska. A multilevel design was used that varied in scale and inference. The levels included aerial surveys, extensive sampling of 25 sites, and more intensive sampling of 6 sites. Aerial surveys of a subset of intertidal habitat indicated that the original target habitat of bedrock-dominated sites with slope ?30 was rare. This unexpected finding illustrated one value of probability-based surveys and led to a shift in the target habitat type to include steeper, more mixed rocky habitat. Subsequently, we evaluated the statistical power of different sampling methods and sampling strategies to detect changes in the abundances of the predominant sessile intertidal taxa: barnacles Balanomorpha, the mussel Mytilus trossulus, and the rockweed Fucus distichus subsp. evanescens. There was greatest power to detect trends in Mytilus and lesser power for barnacles and Fucus. Because of its greater power, the extensive, coarse-grained sampling scheme was adopted in subsequent years over the intensive, fine-grained scheme. The sampling attributes that had the largest effects on power included sampling of "vertical" line transects (vs. horizontal line transects or quadrats) and increasing the number of sites. We also evaluated the power of several management-set parameters. Given equal sampling effort, sampling more sites fewer times had greater power. The information gained through intertidal monitoring is likely to be useful in assessing changes due to climate, including ocean acidification; invasive species; trampling effects; and oil spills. PMID:23420521

  4. 75 FR 81224 - Availability of Recreational Diving, Oil and Gas Operations and Commercial Fishing Seats for the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Availability of Recreational Diving, Oil and Gas Operations... National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council: Recreational Diving, Oil and Gas Operations and...

  5. Early detection of eukaryotic communities from marine biofilm using high-throughput sequencing: an assessment of different sampling devices.

    PubMed

    Pochon, Xavier; Zaiko, Anastasija; Hopkins, Grant A; Banks, Jonathan C; Wood, Susanna A

    2015-01-01

    Marine biofilms are precursors for colonization by larger fouling organisms, including non-indigenous species (NIS). In this study, high-throughput sequencing (HTS) of 18S rRNA metabarcodes was used to investigate four sampling methods (modified syringe, sterilized sponge, underwater tape and sterilized swab) for characterizing eukaryotic communities in marine biofilms. Perspex plates were sampled in and out of water. DNA collected with tape did not amplify. Otherwise, there were no statistical differences in communities among the remaining three sampling devices or between the two environments. Sterilized sponges are recommended for ease of use underwater. In-depth HTS analysis identified diverse eukaryotic communities, dominated by Metazoa and Chromoalveolata. Among the latter, diatoms (Bacillariophyceae) were particularly abundant (33% of reads assigned to Chromalveolata). The NIS Ciona savignyi was detected in all samples. The application of HTS in marine biofilm surveillance could facilitate early detection of NIS, improving the probability of successful eradication. PMID:25877857

  6. 75 FR 30775 - Availability of Seats for the Monitor National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-02

    ... for the following vacant seats: Heritage Tourism seat, Citizen-at-Large seat, Recreational Diving seat..., Maritime Museums, The Mariners' Museum, Recreational/Commercial Fishing, Recreational Diving, the US...

  7. Optimizing sample pretreatment for compound-specific stable carbon isotopic analysis of amino sugars in marine sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, R.; Lin, Y.-S.; Lipp, J. S.; Meador, T. B.; Hinrichs, K.-U.

    2014-01-01

    Amino sugars are quantitatively significant constituents of soil and marine sediment, but their sources and turnover in environmental samples remain poorly understood. The stable carbon isotopic composition of amino sugars can provide information on the lifestyles of their source organisms and can be monitored during incubations with labeled substrates to estimate the turnover rates of microbial populations. However, until now, such investigation has been carried out only with soil samples, partly because of the much lower abundance of amino sugars in marine environments. We therefore optimized a procedure for compound-specific isotopic analysis of amino sugars in marine sediment employing gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The whole procedure consisted of hydrolysis, neutralization, enrichment, and derivatization of amino sugars. Except for the derivatization step, the protocol introduced negligible isotopic fractionation, and the minimum requirement of amino sugar for isotopic analysis was 20 ng, i.e. equivalent to ~ 8 ng of amino sugar carbon. Our results obtained from ?13C analysis of amino sugars in selected marine sediment samples showed that muramic acid had isotopic imprints from indigenous bacterial activities, whereas glucosamine and galactosamine were mainly derived from organic detritus. The analysis of stable carbon isotopic compositions of amino sugars opens a promising window for the investigation of microbial metabolisms in marine sediments and the deep marine biosphere.

  8. Alaska Marine Mammal Tissue Archival Project: Sample inventory and results of analyses of selected samples for organic compounds and trace elements

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, P.R.; Wise, S.A.; Schantz, M.M.; Koster, B.J.; Zeisler, R.

    1992-02-01

    In 1987, the Alaska Marine Mammal Tissue Archival Project (AMMTAP) was established as part of the National Biomonitoring Specimen Bank (NBSB) program at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).The purpose of the AMMTAP was to establish a representative collection of Alaska marine mammal tissues for future contaminant analyses and documentation of long-term trends in environmental quality. Since 1987, specimens have been collected from 65 animals (seven species) from six different sites. The report contains the current sample inventory and the results of the analysis of selected samples for the measurement of inorganic and organic compounds.

  9. Non-polar halogenated natural products bioaccumulated in marine samples. II. Brominated and mixed halogenated compounds.

    PubMed

    Vetter, Walter; Jun, Wu

    2003-07-01

    Several identified and potential natural brominated bioaccumulative compounds were studied in this work. 4,6-dibromo-2-(2('),4(')-dibromo)phenoxyanisole (BC-2) previously detected in Australian marine mammals and isolated from sponges, was synthesized. Two byproducts (a tetrabromo isomer and a tribromo congener) were investigated as well. The byproducts of the synthesis were not identified in the environmental samples investigated. Previously described natural brominated compounds (BC-1, BC-2, BC-3, BC-10, BC-11, MHC-1) and anthropogenic brominated diphenyl ethers (BDE-47, BDE-99, BDE-100, BDE-154) were detected in a sample of human milk. The sample was from a woman from the Faeroe Islands who frequently consumed fish as well as whale blubber and meat. The most abundant compound originated from the natural tetrabromo phenoxyanisole BC-3 which may have a 3:1 distribution of bromine on the two phenyl units. This sample also accumulated a dibromochloroanisole, as well as a previously unknown mixed halogenated compound (MHC-X) and an unknown, most likely aromatic brominated compound. Co-elutions on a DB-5 column were found for BDE-99 and BC-11 as well as BDE-154 and the unknown brominated compound. This suggests that quantification of these two compounds has to be carried out carefully.Two samples of lower trophic level, namely Baltic cod liver and Mexican mussel tissue, were investigated as well. The cod liver samples contained BDE congeners but also abundant signals for the natural 2,3,3('),4,4('),5,5(')-heptachloro-1(')-methyl-1,2(')-bipyrrole Q1 and tribromoanisole (TBA). The mussel sample contained Q1, TBA, another halogenated anisole, BC-1, BC-2, and BC-3, as well as additional, potential natural brominated compounds in the elution range of tribromophenoxyanisoles. PMID:12738265

  10. A sampling-based Bayesian model for gas saturation estimationusing seismic AVA and marine CSEM data

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jinsong; Hoversten, Michael; Vasco, Don; Rubin, Yoram; Hou,Zhangshuan

    2006-04-04

    We develop a sampling-based Bayesian model to jointly invertseismic amplitude versus angles (AVA) and marine controlled-sourceelectromagnetic (CSEM) data for layered reservoir models. The porosityand fluid saturation in each layer of the reservoir, the seismic P- andS-wave velocity and density in the layers below and above the reservoir,and the electrical conductivity of the overburden are considered asrandom variables. Pre-stack seismic AVA data in a selected time windowand real and quadrature components of the recorded electrical field areconsidered as data. We use Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) samplingmethods to obtain a large number of samples from the joint posteriordistribution function. Using those samples, we obtain not only estimatesof each unknown variable, but also its uncertainty information. Thedeveloped method is applied to both synthetic and field data to explorethe combined use of seismic AVA and EM data for gas saturationestimation. Results show that the developed method is effective for jointinversion, and the incorporation of CSEM data reduces uncertainty influid saturation estimation, when compared to results from inversion ofAVA data only.

  11. Determination of methylmercury in marine biota samples with advanced mercury analyzer: method validation.

    PubMed

    Azemard, Sabine; Vassileva, Emilia

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we present a simple, fast and cost-effective method for determination of methyl mercury (MeHg) in marine samples. All important parameters influencing the sample preparation process were investigated and optimized. Full validation of the method was performed in accordance to the ISO-17025 (ISO/IEC, 2005) and Eurachem guidelines. Blanks, selectivity, working range (0.09-3.0ng), recovery (92-108%), intermediate precision (1.7-4.5%), traceability, limit of detection (0.009ng), limit of quantification (0.045ng) and expanded uncertainty (15%, k=2) were assessed. Estimation of the uncertainty contribution of each parameter and the demonstration of traceability of measurement results was provided as well. Furthermore, the selectivity of the method was studied by analyzing the same sample extracts by advanced mercury analyzer (AMA) and gas chromatography-atomic fluorescence spectrometry (GC-AFS). Additional validation of the proposed procedure was effectuated by participation in the IAEA-461 worldwide inter-laboratory comparison exercises. PMID:25624245

  12. Marine biodegradation of crude oil in temperate and Arctic water samples.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Mette; Johnsen, Anders R; Christensen, Jan H

    2015-12-30

    Despite increased interest in marine oil exploration in the Arctic, little is known about the fate of Arctic offshore oil pollution. Therefore, in the present study, we examine the oil degradation potential for an Arctic site (Disko Bay, Greenland) and discuss this in relation to a temperate site (North Sea, Denmark). Biodegradation was assessed following exposure to Oseberg Blend crude oil (100 mg L(-1)) in microcosms. Changes in oil hydrocarbon fingerprints of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), alkyl-substituted PAHs, dibenzothiophenes, n-alkanes and alkyltoluenes were measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). In the Disko Bay sample, the degradation order was n-alkanes>alkyltoluenes (para->meta->ortho-isomers)>PAHs and dibenzothiophenes, whereas, the degradation order in the North Sea samples was PAHs and dibenzothiophenes>alkyltoluenes>n-alkanes. These differences in degradation patterns significantly affect the environmental risk of oil spills and emphasise the need to consider the specific environmental conditions when conducting risk assessments of Arctic oil pollution. PMID:26159801

  13. Past-year recreational gambling in a nationally representative sample: Correlates of casino, non-casino, and both casino/non-casino gambling

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Christine A.; Maciejewski, Paul K.; Potenza, Marc N.

    2013-01-01

    Data from the Gambling Impact and Behavior Study (GIBS), a national survey of 2,417 U.S. adults, were examined by multivariate analysis to investigate characteristics of past-year recreational gamblers who participated in casino-only, non-casino-only, and both casino and non-casino gambling. Compared to non-casino-only gamblers, individuals who gambled in both locations had higher rates of alcohol use and abuse/dependence, lower rates of drug use, more frequent gambling, and larger wins and losses. Compared to casino-only gamblers, individuals who gambled in both locations reported less drug use, poorer subjective health, earlier age of gambling onset, greater frequency of gambling, and larger wins and losses. Compared to casino-only or non-casino-only gambling, gambling in both locations was associated with more frequent and heavier gambling. Findings suggest aspects of recreational gambling, such as gambling venue, may have important public health implications and should be considered in guidelines for responsible gambling. PMID:21550124

  14. DNA barcoding and metabarcoding of standardized samples reveal patterns of marine benthic diversity

    PubMed Central

    Leray, Matthieu; Knowlton, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Documenting the diversity of marine life is challenging because many species are cryptic, small, and rare, and belong to poorly known groups. New sequencing technologies, especially when combined with standardized sampling, promise to make comprehensive biodiversity assessments and monitoring feasible on a large scale. We used this approach to characterize patterns of diversity on oyster reefs across a range of geographic scales comprising a temperate location [Virginia (VA)] and a subtropical location [Florida (FL)]. Eukaryotic organisms that colonized multilayered settlement surfaces (autonomous reef monitoring structures) over a 6-mo period were identified by cytochrome c oxidase subunit I barcoding (>2-mm mobile organisms) and metabarcoding (sessile and smaller mobile organisms). In a total area of ∼15.64 m2 and volume of ∼0.09 m3, 2,179 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were recorded from 983,056 sequences. However, only 10.9% could be matched to reference barcodes in public databases, with only 8.2% matching barcodes with both genus and species names. Taxonomic coverage was broad, particularly for animals (22 phyla recorded), but 35.6% of OTUs detected via metabarcoding could not be confidently assigned to a taxonomic group. The smallest size fraction (500 to 106 μm) was the most diverse (more than two-thirds of OTUs). There was little taxonomic overlap between VA and FL, and samples separated by ∼2 m were significantly more similar than samples separated by ∼100 m. Ground-truthing with independent assessments of taxonomic composition indicated that both presence–absence information and relative abundance information are captured by metabarcoding data, suggesting considerable potential for ecological studies and environmental monitoring. PMID:25646458

  15. Optimizing sample pretreatment for compound-specific stable carbon isotopic analysis of amino sugars in marine sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, R.; Lin, Y.-S.; Lipp, J. S.; Meador, T. B.; Hinrichs, K.-U.

    2014-09-01

    Amino sugars are quantitatively significant constituents of soil and marine sediment, but their sources and turnover in environmental samples remain poorly understood. The stable carbon isotopic composition of amino sugars can provide information on the lifestyles of their source organisms and can be monitored during incubations with labeled substrates to estimate the turnover rates of microbial populations. However, until now, such investigation has been carried out only with soil samples, partly because of the much lower abundance of amino sugars in marine environments. We therefore optimized a procedure for compound-specific isotopic analysis of amino sugars in marine sediment, employing gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The whole procedure consisted of hydrolysis, neutralization, enrichment, and derivatization of amino sugars. Except for the derivatization step, the protocol introduced negligible isotopic fractionation, and the minimum requirement of amino sugar for isotopic analysis was 20 ng, i.e., equivalent to ~8 ng of amino sugar carbon. Compound-specific stable carbon isotopic analysis of amino sugars obtained from marine sediment extracts indicated that glucosamine and galactosamine were mainly derived from organic detritus, whereas muramic acid showed isotopic imprints from indigenous bacterial activities. The δ13C analysis of amino sugars provides a valuable addition to the biomarker-based characterization of microbial metabolism in the deep marine biosphere, which so far has been lipid oriented and biased towards the detection of archaeal signals.

  16. Integrated Leisure and Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schleien, Stuart, Ed.; Rynders, John, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    This "feature issue" focuses on integrated leisure and recreation for developmentally disabled persons and includes descriptions of innovative leisure/recreation programs which allow the realization of the concepts of normalization and least restrictive environment. Brief articles include the following titles and authors: "Challenging the

  17. Financing recreational mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Hennagir, T.

    1995-07-01

    Recreational resource area mitigation remains an important operational requirement for hydropower project owners, especially in the western United States. Increasingly, producers of electric capacity must accommodate a rapidly growing demand for public recreation, providing opportunities in accordance with Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) relicensing requirements.

  18. Recreation Leadership. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vannier, Maryhelen

    This text is intended for use in college recreation courses. It presents leadership techniques and teaching methods for conducting successful recreation programs in community centers, schools, churches, industry, hospitals, prisons, and on playgrounds. Over 1,000 program ideas and ways to teach are suggested that cover a wide range of activities…

  19. Therapeutic Recreation Practicum Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneegas, Kay

    This manual provides information on the practicum program offered by Moraine Valley Community College (MVCC) for students in its therapeutic recreation program. Sections I and II outline the rationale and goals for providing practical, on-the-job work experiences for therapeutic recreation students. Section III specifies MVCC's responsibilities…

  20. Partners: Promoting Accessible Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sable, Janet; Gravink, Jill

    1995-01-01

    The Promoting Accessible Recreation through Networking, Education, Resources and Services (PARTNERS) Project, a partnership between Northeast Passage, the University of New Hampshire, and Granite State Independent Living Foundation, helps create barrier-free recreation for individuals with physical disabilities. The paper describes PARTNERS and

  1. Berkeley Outreach Recreation Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa Univ., Iowa City. Recreation Education Program.

    Presented are duplications of the responses given by the Berkeley Outreach Recreation Program (California) as part of a project to collect, share, and compile information about, and techniques in the operation of 18 community action models for recreation services to the disabled. Model programs are categorized as consumer, client competency,

  2. Recreational Water Illness (RWI): MRSA

    MedlinePLUS

    ... MRSA website. Can MRSA be spread at recreational water facilities? MRSA does not survive long in recreational ... myself, my family, and others when visiting recreational water facilities? Take action! There are steps you can ...

  3. Partitioning of alcohol ethoxylates and polyethylene glycols in the marine environment: field samplings vs laboratory experiments.

    PubMed

    Traverso-Soto, Juan M; Brownawell, Bruce J; González-Mazo, Eduardo; Lara-Martín, Pablo A

    2014-08-15

    Nowadays, alcohol ethoxylates (AEOs) constitute the most important group of non-ionic surfactants, used in a wide range of applications such as household cleaners and detergents. Significant amounts of these compounds and their degradation products (polyethylene glycols, PEGs, which are also used for many other applications) reach aquatic environments, and are eliminated from the water column by degradation and sorption processes. This work deals with the environmental distribution of AEOs and PEGs in the Long Island Sound Estuary, a setting impacted by sewage discharges from New York City (NYC). The distribution of target compounds in seawater was influenced by tides, consistent with salinity differences, and concentrations in suspended solid samples ranged from 1.5 to 20.5 μg/g. The more hydrophobic AEOs were mostly attached to the particulate matter whereas the more polar PEGs were predominant in the dissolved form. Later, the sorption of these chemicals was characterized in the laboratory. Experimental and environmental sorption coefficients for AEOs and PEGs showed average values from 3607 to 164,994 L/kg and from 74 to 32,862 L/kg, respectively. The sorption data were fitted to a Freundlich isotherm model with parameters n and log KF between 0.8-1.2 and 1.46-4.39 L/kg, respectively. AEO and PEG sorptions on marine sediment were also found to be mostly not affected by changes in salinity. PMID:24887194

  4. Determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in marine samples by high-performance liquid chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Obana, H.; Hori, S.; Kashimoto, T.

    1981-05-01

    It has been reported that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are widely distributed in the environment, although their concentrations are quite low. Some PAHs, benzo(a)pyrene, dibenz(a,h)anthracene and 3-methycholanthrene, are carcinogenic to mammals after in vivo hydroxylation by mixed function oxidases. PAHs originate largely from smoke, soot, and exhaust gas produced by combustion and from petroleum oil spilled into the sea, so that the quantity of PAHs in the environment is broadly related to the level of contamination in a given region. Although PAHs have been determined by a TLC-fluorescence method, these methods suffer from complex pretreatment. On the other hand, the development of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) has made it possible to analyze PAHs with good separation and high sensitivity and to simplify the pretreatment processes. In this study, ten PAHs in sediments, oyster, and wakame seaweed were determined by HPLC with a fluorescence detector (HPLC-FD). The contents and the patterns of PAHs found in sediments and marine samples may be used as an indicator of petroleum contamination in the sea.

  5. Neutron activation analysis of stoney spherules from a marine sediment sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millar, H. T., Jr.; Englert, P.

    1984-01-01

    The identification of extraterrestrial material in samples collected at the surface of the Earth is discussed. Criteria were established for black magnetic spherules which involve the presence of: Fe, Ni, and Co in iron meteoritic ratios, wustite, and Fe-Ni metal while reliable criteria for stoney spherules are not well established. Neutron activation analysis was performed on eight stony spherules separated from the same marine sediment used by Millard and Finkelman. The 22 elements were determined by Compton suppression and triple coincidence gamma counting. It is found that Fe, Mg, Al, Ni, Cr, Co, Ir, and Sc are the best discriminators between chondritic and terrestrial compositions. Three of the spherules have compositions very close to chondrites and of these, two contain 0.5 and 0.25 ppm Ir. The other five spherules contain much less than chondritic concentrations of Ni but this element may be segregated and lost during ablation of the parent meteorite. One of these five low Ni spherules contains 2.9 ppm Ir while the other four contain less than 0.05 ppm Ir.

  6. Wider sampling reveals a non-sister relationship for geographically contiguous lineages of a marine mussel

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, Regina L; Nicastro, Katy R; Costa, Joana; McQuaid, Christopher D; Serro, Ester A; Zardi, Gerardo I

    2014-01-01

    The accuracy of phylogenetic inference can be significantly improved by the addition of more taxa and by increasing the spatial coverage of sampling. In previous studies, the brown mussel Perna perna showed a sisterlineage relationship between eastern and western individuals contiguously distributed along the South African coastline. We used mitochondrial (COI) and nuclear (ITS) sequence data to further analyze phylogeographic patterns within P. perna. Significant expansion of the geographical coverage revealed an unexpected pattern. The western South African lineage shared the most recent common ancestor (MRCA) with specimens from Angola, Venezuela, and Namibia, whereas eastern South African specimens and Mozambique grouped together, indicating a non-sister relationship for the two South African lineages. Two plausible biogeographic scenarios to explain their origin were both supported by the hypotheses-testing analysis. One includes an Indo-Pacific origin for P. perna, dispersal into the Mediterranean and Atlantic through the Tethys seaway, followed by recent secondary contact after southward expansion of the western and eastern South African lineages. The other scenario (Out of South Africa) suggests an ancient vicariant divergence of the two lineages followed by their northward expansion. Nevertheless, the Out of South Africa hypothesis would require a more ancient divergence between the two lineages. Instead, our estimates indicated that they diverged very recently (310 kyr), providing a better support for an Indo-Pacific origin of the two South African lineages. The arrival of the MRCA of P. perna in Brazil was estimated at 10 [040] kyr. Thus, the hypothesis of a recent introduction in Brazil through hull fouling in wooden vessels involved in the transatlantic itineraries of the slave trade did not receive strong support, but given the range for this estimate, it could not be discarded. Wider geographic sampling of marine organisms shows that lineages with contiguous distributions need not share a common ancestry. PMID:25360249

  7. Wider sampling reveals a non-sister relationship for geographically contiguous lineages of a marine mussel.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Regina L; Nicastro, Katy R; Costa, Joana; McQuaid, Christopher D; Serro, Ester A; Zardi, Gerardo I

    2014-06-01

    The accuracy of phylogenetic inference can be significantly improved by the addition of more taxa and by increasing the spatial coverage of sampling. In previous studies, the brown mussel Perna perna showed a sister-lineage relationship between eastern and western individuals contiguously distributed along the South African coastline. We used mitochondrial (COI) and nuclear (ITS) sequence data to further analyze phylogeographic patterns within P. perna. Significant expansion of the geographical coverage revealed an unexpected pattern. The western South African lineage shared the most recent common ancestor (MRCA) with specimens from Angola, Venezuela, and Namibia, whereas eastern South African specimens and Mozambique grouped together, indicating a non-sister relationship for the two South African lineages. Two plausible biogeographic scenarios to explain their origin were both supported by the hypotheses-testing analysis. One includes an Indo-Pacific origin for P. perna, dispersal into the Mediterranean and Atlantic through the Tethys seaway, followed by recent secondary contact after southward expansion of the western and eastern South African lineages. The other scenario (Out of South Africa) suggests an ancient vicariant divergence of the two lineages followed by their northward expansion. Nevertheless, the "Out of South Africa" hypothesis would require a more ancient divergence between the two lineages. Instead, our estimates indicated that they diverged very recently (310 kyr), providing a better support for an Indo-Pacific origin of the two South African lineages. The arrival of the MRCA of P. perna in Brazil was estimated at 10 [0-40] kyr. Thus, the hypothesis of a recent introduction in Brazil through hull fouling in wooden vessels involved in the transatlantic itineraries of the slave trade did not receive strong support, but given the range for this estimate, it could not be discarded. Wider geographic sampling of marine organisms shows that lineages with contiguous distributions need not share a common ancestry. PMID:25360249

  8. Enteroviruses in recreational waters of Northern Ireland.

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, M. S.; Coyle, P. V.; Connolly, J. H.

    1992-01-01

    Virus surveillance of Northern Ireland recreational waters, between April 1986 and May 1989 demonstrated widespread enteroviral contamination of coastal and inland waters. In 1986, enteroviruses were detected in 4 of 46 (8.7%) water samples, collected from 6 coastal bathing waters. In 1987, 49 of 107 (45.8%) samples, from 16 coastal bathing waters, yielded enteroviruses; 33 of the enterovirus positive samples passed one or both of the coliform standards outlined by the European Economic Community (EEC) bathing water directive (76/160/EEC). Enteroviruses were also detected in 33 of 39 (84.6%) samples tested from 3 inland recreational waters. PMID:1318220

  9. Determination of total mercury for marine environmental monitoring studies by solid sampling continuum source high resolution atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandjukov, Petko; Orani, Anna Maria; Han, Eunmi; Vassileva, Emilia

    2015-01-01

    The most critical step in almost all commonly used analytical procedures for Hg determination is the sample preparation due to its extreme volatility. One of the possible solutions of this problem is the application of methods for direct analysis of solid samples. The possibilities for solid sampling high resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry (HR CS AAS) determination of total mercury in various marine environmental samples e.g. sediments and biota are object of the present study. The instrumental parameters were optimized in order to obtain reproducible and interference free analytical signal. A calibration technique based on the use of solid standard certified reference materials similar to the nature of the analyzed sample was developed and applied to various CRMs and real samples. This technique allows simple and reliable evaluation of the uncertainty of the result and the metrological characteristics of the method. A validation approach in line with the requirements of ISO 17025 standard and Eurachem guidelines was followed. With this in mind, selectivity, working range (0.06 to 25 ng for biota and 0.025 to 4 ng for sediment samples, expressed as total Hg) linearity (confirmed by Student's t-test), bias (1.6-4.3%), repeatability (4-9%), reproducibility (9-11%), and absolute limit of detection (0.025 ng for sediment, 0.096 ng for marine biota) were systematically assessed using solid CRMs. The relative expanded uncertainty was estimated at 15% for sediment sample and 8.5% for marine biota sample (k = 2). Demonstration of traceability of measurement results is also presented. The potential of the proposed analytical procedure, based on solid sampling HR CS AAS technique was demonstrated by direct analysis of sea sediments form the Caribbean region and various CRMs. Overall, the use of solid sampling HR CS AAS permits obtaining significant advantages for the determination of this complex analyte in marine samples, such as straightforward calibration, a high sample throughput (15 min per sample), sufficient precision, a suitable limit of detection, and reduced risk of analyte loss and contamination.

  10. 78 FR 73820 - Publicly Managed Recreation Opportunities, Recreation Fees

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-09

    ... Forest Service RIN 0596-AD09 Publicly Managed Recreation Opportunities, Recreation Fees AGENCY: Forest... final directive providing direction on recreation fees in chapter 30 of new Forest Service Handbook (FSH) 2309.13. This chapter enumerates the requirements for recreation fees charged by the Forest...

  11. Antibacterial activity of marine culturable bacteria collected from a global sampling of ocean surface waters and surface swabs of marine organisms.

    PubMed

    Gram, Lone; Melchiorsen, Jette; Bruhn, Jesper Bartholin

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of the present study was to isolate marine culturable bacteria with antibacterial activity and hence a potential biotechnological use. Seawater samples (244) and 309 swab samples from biotic or abiotic surfaces were collected on a global Danish marine research expedition (Galathea 3). Total cell counts at the seawater surface were 5 x 10(5) to 10(6) cells/ml, of which 0.1-0.2% were culturable on dilute marine agar (20 degrees C). Three percent of the colonies cultured from seawater inhibited Vibrio anguillarum, whereas a significantly higher proportion (13%) of colonies from inert or biotic surfaces was inhibitory. It was not possible to relate a specific kind of eukaryotic surface or a specific geographic location to a general high occurrence of antagonistic bacteria. Five hundred and nineteen strains representing all samples and geographic locations were identified on the basis of partial 16S rRNA gene sequence homology and belonged to three major groups: Vibrionaceae (309 strains), Pseudoalteromonas spp. (128 strains), and the Roseobacter clade (29 strains). Of the latter, 25 strains were identified as Ruegeria mobilis or pelagia. When re-testing against V. anguillarum, only 409 (79%) retained some level of inhibitory activity. Many strains, especially Pseudoalteromonas spp. and Ruegeria spp., also inhibited Staphylococcus aureus. The most pronounced antibacterial strains were pigmented Pseudoalteromonas strains and Ruegeria spp. The inhibitory, pigmented Pseudoalteromonas were predominantly isolated in warmer waters from swabs of live or inert surfaces. Ruegeria strains were isolated from all ocean areas except for Arctic and Antarctic waters and inhibitory activity caused by production of tropodithietic acid. PMID:19823914

  12. Nocardioides nanhaiensis sp. nov., an actinobacterium isolated from a marine sediment sample.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dao-Feng; Zhong, Jing-Mei; Zhang, Xiao-Mei; Jiang, Zhao; Zhou, En-Min; Tian, Xin-Peng; Zhang, Si; Li, Wen-Jun

    2014-08-01

    A rod- to coccus-shaped, non-spore-forming actinobacterium, strain YIM M13091(T), was isolated from a marine sediment sample collected from the South China Sea and examined by a polyphasic approach to clarify its taxonomic position. This Gram-staining-positive, aerobic actinobacterium did not produce substrate mycelium and aerial hyphae, and no diffusible pigments were produced on the media tested. The optimum growth occurred at 30 °C, 1% (w/v) NaCl and pH 8.0. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the isolate belongs to the genus Nocardioides, with low levels (≤96.2%) of sequence similarity with respect to Nocardioides kribbensis KSL-2(T) and other members of the genus Nocardioides. Whole-organism hydrolysates of the strain contained ll-2,6-diaminopimelic acid as the diagnostic diamino acid. The predominant menaquinone was MK-8(H4), with MK-8 in a minor amount. Diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylinositol, hydroxyphosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylcholine, were the main polar lipids detected, while iso-C(16 : 0) and C(18 : 1)ω9c were the major fatty acids. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 68.5 mol%. Based on phylogenetic analysis, phenotypic and genotypic data, it is concluded that the isolate represents a member of the genus Nocardioides, and the name Nocardioides nanhaiensis sp. nov. (Type strain YIM M13091(T) = JCM 18127(T) = CCTCC AA 2011020(T)) is proposed for the novel species. PMID:24844261

  13. Forms of Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Progressive Architecture, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Two Oregon recreational facilities, the Tualatin Hills Sports Complex and the Corvallis Aquatic Center, designed by architects Broome, Oringdulph, O'Toole, Rudolf and Associates, share the bold application of color and clarity of design. (Author/MLF)

  14. Ultradeep 16S rRNA Sequencing Analysis of Geographically Similar but Diverse Unexplored Marine Samples Reveal Varied Bacterial Community Composition

    PubMed Central

    Karutha Pandian, Shunmugiah

    2013-01-01

    Background Bacterial community composition in the marine environment differs from one geographical location to another. Reports that delineate the bacterial diversity of different marine samples from geographically similar location are limited. The present study aims to understand whether the bacterial community compositions from different marine samples harbour similar bacterial diversity since these are geographically related to each other. Methods and Principal Findings In the present study, 16S rRNA deep sequencing analysis targeting V3 region was performed using Illumina bar coded sequencing. A total of 22.44 million paired end reads were obtained from the metagenomic DNA of Marine sediment, Rhizosphere sediment, Seawater and the epibacterial DNA of Seaweed and Seagrass. Diversity index analysis revealed that Marine sediment has the highest bacterial diversity and the least bacterial diversity was observed in Rhizosphere sediment. Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes were the dominant taxa present in all the marine samples. Nearly 6271% of rare species were identified in all the samples and most of these rare species were unique to a particular sample. Further taxonomic assignment at the phylum and genus level revealed that the bacterial community compositions differ among the samples. Conclusion This is the first report that supports the fact that, bacterial community composition is specific for specific samples irrespective of its similar geographical location. Existence of specific bacterial community for each sample may drive overall difference in bacterial structural composition of each sample. Further studies like whole metagenomic sequencing will throw more insights to the key stone players and its interconnecting metabolic pathways. In addition, this is one of the very few reports that depicts the unexplored bacterial diversity of marine samples (Marine sediment, Rhizosphere sediment, Seawater) and the host associated marine samples (Seaweed and Seagrass) at higher depths from uncharacterised coastal region of Palk Bay, India using next generation sequencing technology. PMID:24167548

  15. Changes of the elemental distributions in marine diatoms as a reporter of sample preparation artefacts. A nuclear microscopy application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godinho, R. M.; Cabrita, M. T.; Alves, L. C.; Pinheiro, T.

    2015-04-01

    Studies of the elemental composition of whole marine diatoms cells have high interest as they constitute a direct measurement of environmental changes, and allow anticipating consequences of anthropogenic alterations to organisms, ecosystems and global marine geochemical cycles. Nuclear microscopy is a powerful tool allowing direct measurement of whole cells giving qualitative imaging of distribution, and quantitative determination of intracellular concentration. Major obstacles to the analysis of marine microalgae are high medium salinity and the recurrent presence of extracellular exudates produced by algae to maintain colonies in natural media and in vitro. The objective of this paper was to optimize the methodology of sample preparation of marine unicellular algae for elemental analysis with nuclear microscopy, allowing further studies on cellular response to metals. Primary cultures of Coscinodiscus wailesii maintained in vitro were used to optimize protocols for elemental analysis with nuclear microscopy techniques. Adequate cell preparation procedures to isolate the cells from media components and exudates were established. The use of chemical agents proved to be inappropriate for elemental determination and for intracellular morphological analysis. The assessment of morphology and elemental partitioning in cell compartments obtained with nuclear microscopy techniques enabled to infer their function in natural environment and imbalances in exposure condition. Exposure to metal affected C. wailesii morphology and internal elemental distribution.

  16. Recreational stream assessment using Malaysia water quality index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Hanisah; Kutty, Ahmad Abas

    2013-11-01

    River water quality assessment is crucial in order to quantify and monitor spatial and temporally. Malaysia is producing WQI and NWQS indices to evaluate river water quality. However, the study on recreational river water quality is still scarce. A study was conducted to determine selected recreational river water quality area and to determine impact of recreation on recreational stream. Three recreational streams namely Sungai Benus, Sungai Cemperuh and Sungai Luruh in Janda Baik, Pahang were selected. Five sampling stations were chosen from each river with a 200-400 m interval. Six water quality parameters which are BOD5, COD, TSS, pH, ammoniacal-nitrogen and dissolved oxygen were measured. Sampling and analysis was conducted following standard method prepared by USEPA. These parameters were used to calculate the water quality subindex and finally an indicative WQI value using Malaysia water quality index formula. Results indicate that all recreational streams have excellent water quality with WQI values ranging from 89 to 94. Most of water quality parameter was homogenous between sampling sites and between streams. An one-way ANOVA test indicates that no significant difference was observed between each sub index values (p> 0.05, ?=0.05). Only BOD and COD exhibit slightly variation between stations that would be due to organic domestic wastes done by visitors. The study demonstrated that visitors impact on recreational is minimum and recreation streams are applicable for direct contact recreational.

  17. A simplified coulometric method for multi-sample measurements of total dissolved inorganic carbon concentration in marine waters.

    PubMed

    Amornthammarong, Natchanon; Ortner, Peter B; Hendee, James; Woosley, Ryan

    2014-10-21

    A new system requiring greatly reduced operator intervention has been developed for the determination of dissolved inorganic carbon concentration in marine waters. Based on a coulometric method, the system has an accuracy and precision comparable to more complex and expensive methods currently employed. A syringe pump equipped with a 12-port distribution valve is used to precisely dispense an acid solution and sample into a gas stripper. The system can autonomously measure eight discrete samples in duplicate or triplicate with no operator input. The best precision (%RSD) obtained was 0.022% (n = 14) or less than 1.0 ?mol kg(-1). The system is calibrated against a certified reference material (CRM). Average offset from the CRM was 1.2 ?mol kg(-1). Sample throughput was 4 samples per h. Carryover effects are negligible but field sample analyses suggest that prefiltering may be necessary in highly turbid waters. PMID:25136787

  18. SAMPLING THE OCEANS FOR POLLUTION: EPA (ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY) RESEARCH STRATEGY FOR MARINE WASTE DISPOSAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This article describes EPA's current approach to the management of ocean disposal. The physical and biological characterization of a proposed site is used to gauge the likelihood of exposure of a marine resource to a waste of given characteristics. After determination of the effe...

  19. Low molecular weight dicarboxylic acids and related polar compounds in the remote marine rain samples collected from Western Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sempr, Richard; Kawamura, Kimitaka

    During the western Pacific Ocean cruise of R/V Hakuho-Maru (20N-40S), fourteen rainwater samples were collected. They were studied by a capillary gas chromatography (GC) and GC-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) for the molecular distributions of C 2?C 10 ?, ?-dicarboxylic acids and related polar compounds, i.e. ketoacids (C 2?C 9) and ?-dicarbonyls (C 2?C 3). Samples were also analysed for dissolved (DOC) and total organic carbon (TOC). Total diacid concentration range was 36-959 ?g l-1 and accounted for 3% (av.) of TOC (1.2-2.5 mgC l-1), which is much higher than the previous numbers found in Tokyo rain samples (av. 1 %). This indicates that low molecular weight dicarboxylic acids are an important class of organic compounds in the marine rains. All the samples showed that the smallest diacid (oxalic acid) which comprised 50% of the total diacids was the most abundant followed by malonic (C 3) or succinic acid (C 4). The shorter chain diacids (C 2?C 4) accounted for 63-90% (av. 80%) of total diacids and their relative abundances increase from the Northern to the Southern Hemisphere. These results suggest that shorter chain diacids are in part produced in the marine atmosphere by photochemical oxidation of organic matter through the intermediates such as ketoacids and dicarbonyls. The major portion of diacids and their precursors is probably derived from the Asian and Australian continents by a long-range transport.

  20. The Value of a Master's Degree to Recreation Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodge, Camilla J.; Hill, Brian J.; Brinton, Christian

    2012-01-01

    This study assessed the nature of the relationship between earning advanced degrees and career outcomes such as salary, job satisfaction, social capital, and human capital among professionals in the parks and recreation field. The sample (n = 196) was drawn from parks and recreation agencies located in the United States. Agencies, excluding

  1. 77 FR 65136 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Black Sea Bass Fishery; Recreational Quota Harvested

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-25

    ... the 2012 fishing year is 1.86 million lb (844 mt) (76 FR 82189, December 30, 2011). The 2012 RHL was... Northeastern United States; Black Sea Bass Fishery; Recreational Quota Harvested AGENCY: National Marine...: Temporary rule; closure. SUMMARY: NMFS announces that the 2012 black sea bass recreational harvest limit...

  2. Relationships Between Sand and Water Quality at Recreational Beaches

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Matthew C.; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M.; Piggot, Alan M.; Klaus, James S.; Zhang, Yifan

    2011-01-01

    Enterococci are used to assess the risk of negative human health impacts from recreational waters. Studies have shown sustained populations of enterococci within sediments of beaches but comprehensive surveys of multiple tidal zones on beaches in a regional area and their relationship to beach management decisions are limited. We sampled three tidal zones on eight South Florida beaches in Miami-Dade and Broward counties and found that enterococci were ubiquitous within South Florida beach sands although their levels varied greatly both among the beaches and between the supratidal, intertidal and subtidal zones. The supratidal sands consistently had significantly higher (p<0.003) levels of enterococci (average 40 CFU/g dry sand) than the other two zones. Levels of enterococci within the subtidal sand correlated with the average level of enterococci in the water (CFU/100mL) for the season during which samples were collected (rs= 0.73). The average sand enterococci content over all the zones on each beach correlated with the average water enterococci levels of the year prior to sand samplings (rs=0.64) as well as the average water enterococci levels for the month after sand samplings (rs=0.54). Results indicate a connection between levels of enterococci in beach water and sands throughout South Floridas beaches and suggest that the sands are one of the predominant reservoirs of enterococci impacting beach water quality. As a result, beaches with lower levels of enterococci in the sand had fewer exceedences relative to beaches with higher levels of sand enterococci. More research should focus on evaluating beach sand quality as a means to predict and regulate marine recreational water quality. PMID:22071324

  3. Relationships between sand and water quality at recreational beaches.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Matthew C; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M; Piggot, Alan M; Klaus, James S; Zhang, Yifan

    2011-12-15

    Enterococci are used to assess the risk of negative human health impacts from recreational waters. Studies have shown sustained populations of enterococci within sediments of beaches but comprehensive surveys of multiple tidal zones on beaches in a regional area and their relationship to beach management decisions are limited. We sampled three tidal zones on eight South Florida beaches in Miami-Dade and Broward counties and found that enterococci were ubiquitous within South Florida beach sands although their levels varied greatly both among the beaches and between the supratidal, intertidal and subtidal zones. The supratidal sands consistently had significantly higher (p < 0.003) levels of enterococci (average 40 CFU/g dry sand) than the other two zones. Levels of enterococci within the subtidal sand correlated with the average level of enterococci in the water (CFU/100mL) for the season during which samples were collected (r(s) = 0.73). The average sand enterococci content over all the zones on each beach correlated with the average water enterococci levels of the year prior to sand samplings (r(s) = 0.64) as well as the average water enterococci levels for the month after sand samplings (r(s) = 0.54). Results indicate a connection between levels of enterococci in beach water and sands throughout South Florida's beaches and suggest that the sands are one of the predominant reservoirs of enterococci impacting beach water quality. As a result, beaches with lower levels of enterococci in the sand had fewer exceedences relative to beaches with higher levels of sand enterococci. More research should focus on evaluating beach sand quality as a means to predict and regulate marine recreational water quality. PMID:22071324

  4. Recreation Handbook for State and Local Unit Recreation Committees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association for Retarded Citizens, Arlington, TX.

    The recreation handbook provides broad guidelines and lists sources of information for state and local units of the National Association for Retarded Citizens (NARC) to develop recreational programs throughout the nation. Described are the importance of recreation for reasons such as developing good habits of physical fitness, survey results

  5. Financial Issues in Campus Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Howard; Canning, William F.; Brailsford, Paul; Rokosz, Frank

    2003-01-01

    Campus recreation centers, originally quasi-academic facilities, have evolved since the early 1980s: first into campus amenities and then into auxiliary business enterprises. Financial issues affecting campus recreation have changed accordingly and are discussed in this chapter. (Author)

  6. Friends of Recreation and Parks...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caverly, Joseph

    1973-01-01

    To acquire additional funding, San Francisco's Department of Recreation and Parks has organized the Friends of Recreation and Parks'' to obtain wide backing from individuals, organizations and businesses, and to coordinate the community's interests. (JA)

  7. Recreative Arts Outdoor Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Ray

    Emphasizing an interdisciplinary, experiential learning approach, this curriculum guide is designed for a one year recreative arts-outdoor education course for high school students in the Dallas (Texas) Independent School District. The course objective is to develop the skills and knowledge necessary for fostering responsible behavior in an…

  8. Recreational Vehicle Trades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felice, Michael

    This curriculum guide provides materials for a competency-based course in recreational vehicle trades at the secondary level. The curriculum design uses the curriculum infused model for the teaching of basic skills as part of vocational education and demonstrates the relationship of vocationally related skills to communication, mathematics, and…

  9. Recreational Vehicle Trades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felice, Michael

    This curriculum guide provides materials for a competency-based course in recreational vehicle trades at the secondary level. The curriculum design uses the curriculum infused model for the teaching of basic skills as part of vocational education and demonstrates the relationship of vocationally related skills to communication, mathematics, and

  10. The Computer and Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Paul

    The paper examines the applications of microcomputers to recreation programing for blind persons. The accessibility of microcomputers to this population is discussed, and the advantages as well as disadvantages of speech synthesis equipment are noted. Information is presented on the modification of hardware for Radio Shack and Apple computers.

  11. Recreative Arts Outdoor Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Ray

    Emphasizing an interdisciplinary, experiential learning approach, this curriculum guide is designed for a one year recreative arts-outdoor education course for high school students in the Dallas (Texas) Independent School District. The course objective is to develop the skills and knowledge necessary for fostering responsible behavior in an

  12. The Consumer and Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Secondary Curriculum Development.

    This publication deals with recreation and leisure in American society. It is stated that the greater mobility of Americans, the increased time and money available for leisure time pursuits, the higher degree of educational level with accompanying wider interests, and the changing attitudes toward the balance between work and play are having…

  13. 77 FR 36250 - Recreation Resource Advisory Committees

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-18

    ... Forest Service Recreation Resource Advisory Committees AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Call for nominations for the Pacific Northwest Recreation Resource Advisory Committee. SUMMARY: The Secretary of Agriculture has established the Pacific Northwest Recreation Resource Advisory Committee (Recreation...

  14. The Commercialization of Public Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crossley, John

    Commercialized approaches to public recreation may solve the financial and budgetary problems that many public recreation programs currently face. Case studies document the success of some commercialized approaches, including: (1) borrowing techniques from business and commercial recreation programs; (2) creating revenue producing facilities and

  15. Colorado Rural Recreation Director's Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Patrick T.; Kraus, Barbara

    1983-01-01

    The Colorado Rural Recreation Director's Project, based on a 1981 national survey identifying recreation/leisure needs of rural Americans, provided summer recreation for 11 western Colorado rural communities. Clinics in New Games, frisbee, hackisac, and tennis were given. Successful networking of resources by all involved parties produced positive

  16. Recreation and the Returning Female Student.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bialeschki, M. Deborah; Henderson, Karla A.

    This study evaluated the leisure attitudes and recreation participation patterns of a sample of returning female college students. Interviews were conducted with 36 full-time women students who had returned to graduate school after a five-year lapse in their formal training. The women placed a high value on the cognitive and affective aspects of

  17. Recreational Prescription Drug Use among College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolek, Ethan A.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore recreational prescription drug use among undergraduate students. Although anecdotal accounts on this subject abound, empirical research is extremely limited. Data from a survey of a random sample of 734 students at a large public research university in the Northeast were examined. Results indicate that a…

  18. Recreational Prescription Drug Use among College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolek, Ethan A.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore recreational prescription drug use among undergraduate students. Although anecdotal accounts on this subject abound, empirical research is extremely limited. Data from a survey of a random sample of 734 students at a large public research university in the Northeast were examined. Results indicate that a

  19. Recreational Prescription Drug Use among College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolek, Ethan A.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore recreational prescription drug use among undergraduate students. Although anecdotal accounts on this subject abound, empirical research is extremely limited. Data from a survey of a random sample of 734 students at a large public research university in the Northeast were examined. Results indicate that a

  20. Recreational Prescription Drug Use among College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolek, Ethan A.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore recreational prescription drug use among undergraduate students. Although anecdotal accounts on this subject abound, empirical research is extremely limited. Data from a survey of a random sample of 734 students at a large public research university in the Northeast were examined. Results indicate that a…

  1. Monitoring toxic Ostreopsis cf. ovata in recreational waters using a qPCR based assay.

    PubMed

    Casabianca, Silvia; Perini, Federico; Casabianca, Anna; Battocchi, Cecilia; Giussani, Valentina; Chiantore, Mariachiara; Penna, Antonella

    2014-11-15

    Ostreopsis sp. is a toxic marine benthic dinoflagellate that causes high biomass blooms, posing a threat to human health, marine biota and aquaculture activities, and negatively impacting coastal seawater quality. Species-specific identification and enumeration is fundamental because it can allow the implementation of all the necessary preventive measures to properly manage Ostreopsis spp. bloom events in recreational waters and aquaculture farms. The aim of this study was to apply a rapid and sensitive qPCR method to quantify Ostreopsis cf. ovata abundance in environmental samples collected from Mediterranean coastal sites and to develop site-specific environmental standard curves. Similar PCR efficiencies of plasmid and environmental standard curves allowed us to estimate the LSU rDNA copy number per cell. Moreover, we assessed the effectiveness of mitochondrial COI and cob genes as alternative molecular markers to ribosomal genes in qPCR assays for Ostreopsis spp. quantification. PMID:25282181

  2. Leptospirosis: risks during recreational activities.

    PubMed

    Monahan, A M; Miller, I S; Nally, J E

    2009-09-01

    Summary Rats, dogs, cattle, bats and sea lions, exemplify the diversity of mammalian species that can facilitate transmission of the zoonotic disease leptospirosis. The causative agent, pathogenic species of Leptospira, is shed in urine of chronically infected hosts. Direct contact with infected urine, or indirectly with water sources contaminated with infected urine, poses a risk of infection for humans exposed during water-related recreational and occupational activities. New serovars of Leptospira and maintenance hosts continue to be identified. In the western world, incidences of recreational exposure are increasing, while incidences of occupational exposure are decreasing. Adventure travellers returning from tropical regions, are presenting at clinics with symptoms of leptospirosis following participation in high risk activities including white water rafting, triathlons, endurance races and caving. Risks of infection can be reduced with increased awareness of how the disease is contracted, by avoiding contact with high risk water sources and the use of prophylaxis during high risk activities. Molecular techniques can be used to provide risk assessments prior to competition, to supplement epidemiology, and to assess shedding of Leptospira in urine samples. PMID:19302325

  3. Validation of Ocean Color Satellite Data Products in Under Sampled Marine Areas. Chapter 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subramaniam, Ajit; Hood, Raleigh R.; Brown, Christopher W.; Carpenter, Edward J.; Capone, Douglas G.

    2001-01-01

    The planktonic marine cyanobacterium, Trichodesmium sp., is broadly distributed throughout the oligotrophic marine tropical and sub-tropical oceans. Trichodesmium, which typically occurs in macroscopic bundles or colonies, is noteworthy for its ability to form large surface aggregations and to fix dinitrogen gas. The latter is important because primary production supported by N2 fixation can result in a net export of carbon from the surface waters to deep ocean and may therefore play a significant role in the global carbon cycle. However, information on the distribution and density of Trichodesmium from shipboard measurements through the oligotrophic oceans is very sparse. Such estimates are required to quantitatively estimate total global rates of N2 fixation. As a result current global rate estimates are highly uncertain. Thus in order to understand the broader biogeochemical importance of Trichodesmium and N2 fixation in the oceans, we need better methods to estimate the global temporal and spatial variability of this organism. One approach that holds great promise is satellite remote sensing. Satellite ocean color sensors are ideal instruments for estimating global phytoplankton biomass, especially that due to episodic blooms, because they provide relatively high frequency synoptic information over large areas. Trichodesmium has a combination of specific ultrastructural and biochemical features that lend themselves to identification of this organism by remote sensing. Specifically, these features are high backscatter due to the presence of gas vesicles, and absorption and fluorescence of phycoerythrin. The resulting optical signature is relatively unique and should be detectable with satellite ocean color sensors such as the Sea-Viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS).

  4. Marine Technician's Handbook, Instructions for Taking Air Samples on Board Ship: Carbon Dioxide Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeling, Charles D.

    This booklet is one of a series intended to provide explicit instructions for the collection of oceanographic data and samples at sea. The methods and procedures described have been used by the Scripps Institution of Oceanography and found reliable and up-to-date. Instructions are given for taking air samples on board ship to determine the

  5. Trends in Selenium Utilization in Marine Microbial World Revealed through the Analysis of the Global Ocean Sampling (GOS) Project

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2008-01-01

    Selenium is an important trace element that occurs in proteins in the form of selenocysteine (Sec) and in tRNAs in the form of selenouridine. Recent large-scale metagenomics projects provide an opportunity for understanding global trends in trace element utilization. Herein, we characterized the selenoproteome of the microbial marine community derived from the Global Ocean Sampling (GOS) expedition. More than 3,600 selenoprotein gene sequences belonging to 58 protein families were detected, including sequences representing 7 newly identified selenoprotein families, such as homologs of ferredoxinthioredoxin reductase and serine protease. In addition, a new eukaryotic selenoprotein family, thiol reductase GILT, was identified. Most GOS selenoprotein families originated from Cys-containing thiol oxidoreductases. In both Pacific and Atlantic microbial communities, SelW-like and SelD were the most widespread selenoproteins. Geographic location had little influence on Sec utilization as measured by selenoprotein variety and the number of selenoprotein genes detected; however, both higher temperature and marine (as opposed to freshwater and other aquatic) environment were associated with increased use of this amino acid. Selenoproteins were also detected with preference for either environment. We identified novel fusion forms of several selenoproteins that highlight redox activities of these proteins. Almost half of Cys-containing SelDs were fused with NADH dehydrogenase, whereas such SelD forms were rare in terrestrial organisms. The selenouridine utilization trait was also analyzed and showed an independent evolutionary relationship with Sec utilization. Overall, our study provides insights into global trends in microbial selenium utilization in marine environments. PMID:18551170

  6. The Spatial Dimension: A New Reservoir and Recreational Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hecock, Richard D.

    1974-01-01

    An initial effort to estimate the nature and extent of a new reservoir's impact upon the recreational behavior of a sample population living in the surrounding area (Keystone Reservoir, Oklahoma) is described. (NQ)

  7. Wipe sampling of amphetamine-type stimulants and recreational drugs on selected household surfaces with analysis by ultra-performance liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Madireddy, Sri Bharat; Bodeddula, Vanaja Reddy; Mansani, Sravan Kumar; Wells, Martha J M; Boles, Jeffrey O

    2013-06-15

    Sorption characteristics of eight drugs related to recreational and clandestine activity-amphetamine, cocaine, heroin, N-formyl amphetamine, N-formyl methamphetamine, methamphetamine, 3, 4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), and pseudoephedrine-were evaluated on selected kitchen countertop surfaces. Methanol-dampened Whatman 40 filter paper wipes were used to collect samples from eleven surfaces including alkyd resin, ceramic tiles, glass, granite, laminate, limestone, marble, quartz compac, quartz real, soap stone, and stainless steel. The filter paper wipes were analyzed by a rapid three-minute UPLC-QTOF method, following ammonium acetate buffer (pH 5.8-6.2) extraction. The average percentage recoveries after 15 h of exposure to the surface materials tested, was found to be highest for cocaine and MDMA and lowest for amphetamine and methamphetamine. Among the eleven countertop surfaces, overall recoveries for marble were observed to be the least, whereas soapstone, quartz compac and stainless steel were among the highest. Scanning electron microscopic images of the surfaces provided a unique view of surface irregularities that potentially influenced drug recovery. Aging, migration, solvent composition, and volatility were examined. The variation in recovery of drugs was attributed to four key factors: compound volatility, surface composition, surface-compound interaction, and solvent composition. PMID:23583948

  8. Archival policies and collections database for the Woods Hole Science Center's marine sediment samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buczkowski, Brian J.; Kelsey, Sarah A.

    2007-01-01

    The Woods Hole Science Center of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been an active member of the Woods Hole research community, Woods Hole, Massachusetts, for over 40 years. In that time there have been many projects that involved the collection of sediment samples conducted by USGS scientists and technicians for the research and study of seabed environments and processes. These samples were collected at sea or near shore and then brought back to the Woods Hole Science Center (WHSC) for analysis. While at the center, samples are stored in ambient temperature, refrigerated and freezing conditions ranging from +2º Celsius to -18º Celsius, depending on the best mode of preparation for the study being conducted or the duration of storage planned for the samples. Recently, storage methods and available storage space have become a major concern at the WHSC. The core and sediment archive program described herein has been initiated to set standards for the management, methods, and duration of sample storage. A need has arisen to maintain organizational consistency and define storage protocol. This handbook serves as a reference and guide to all parties interested in using and accessing the WHSC's sample archive and also defines all the steps necessary to construct and maintain an organized collection of geological samples. It answers many questions as to the way in which the archive functions.

  9. A new device for sampling small volumes of water from marine micro-environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Meo, Carol A.; Wakefield, Jeffrey R.; Cary, S. Craig

    1999-07-01

    Recent developments in microelectrode technology provide more sensitive measurement of biologically relevant redox species and require less water than traditional wet chemical techniques. To fully exploit the power of this new technology, water samplers capable of collecting small volumes (1-10 ml) from discrete micro-environments were developed. We have designed a new, low-cost water sampler (SIPPER) to draw small volume water samples from discrete locations at deep-sea hydrothermal vents. The sampler successfully operated with the deep submergence vehicle (DSV) ALVIN at 2600 m depth to extract water samples from the fragile tube dwellings of a small polychaete. These samples were electrochemically analyzed on board ship for the presence of biologically important redox species inside the worm tube. Although designed specifically for this study, the sampler can be readily modified for application in a variety of disciplines requiring discrete samples within aquatic micro-environments.

  10. Bacteria and Nutrients in the Obhur Recreational Sharm, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turki, Adnan; Mudarris, Mohammed

    2013-04-01

    Environmental pollution that render waters along the recreational shore unsatisfactory for use by the general public has become a global health problem. This study was carried out to examine the marine waters in sampling stations located at Sharm Obhur (North of Jeddah). These parameters included: total coliform (TC), l fecal coliform (FC) and nutrients (NO2-N, NO3-N, NH4-N and PO4-P). A comparison of the mean values of nutrients in Sharm Obhur with those of other locations in the Red Sea suggests that the mean levels of nutrients were similar to those of unpolluted areas. TC and FC counts were higher at the north sampling stations than the south ones, and with little variations between their numbers. FC was not recovered at stations to the south. The study shows that TC and FC counts at all sampling stations similar to the levels reported for normal unpolluted sea water. Keywords: Pollution, Nutrients, Coliforms, Sharm Obhur, Red Sea.

  11. Selected analytical challenges in the determination of pharmaceuticals in drinking/marine waters and soil/sediment samples.

    PubMed

    Białk-Bielińska, Anna; Kumirska, Jolanta; Borecka, Marta; Caban, Magda; Paszkiewicz, Monika; Pazdro, Ksenia; Stepnowski, Piotr

    2016-03-20

    Recent developments and improvements in advanced instruments and analytical methodologies have made the detection of pharmaceuticals at low concentration levels in different environmental matrices possible. As a result of these advances, over the last 15 years residues of these compounds and their metabolites have been detected in different environmental compartments and pharmaceuticals have now become recognized as so-called 'emerging' contaminants. To date, a lot of papers have been published presenting the development of analytical methodologies for the determination of pharmaceuticals in aqueous and solid environmental samples. Many papers have also been published on the application of the new methodologies, mainly to the assessment of the environmental fate of pharmaceuticals. Although impressive improvements have undoubtedly been made, in order to fully understand the behavior of these chemicals in the environment, there are still numerous methodological challenges to be overcome. The aim of this paper therefore, is to present a review of selected recent improvements and challenges in the determination of pharmaceuticals in environmental samples. Special attention has been paid to the strategies used and the current challenges (also in terms of Green Analytical Chemistry) that exist in the analysis of these chemicals in soils, marine environments and drinking waters. There is a particular focus on the applicability of modern sorbents such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in sample preparation techniques, to overcome some of the problems that exist in the analysis of pharmaceuticals in different environmental samples. PMID:26818066

  12. New procedure for recovering extra- and intracellular DNA from marine sediment samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alawi, M.; Kallmeyer, J.

    2012-12-01

    Extracellular DNA (eDNA) is a ubiquitous biological compound in aquatic sediment and soil. Despite major methodological advances, analysis of DNA from sediment is still technically challenging, not just because of the co-elution of inhibitory substances, but also due to co-elution of extracellular DNA, which potentially leads to an overestimate of the actual diversity. Previous studies suggested that eDNA might play an important role in biogeochemical element cycling, horizontal gene transfer and stabilization of biofilm structures. Several protocols based on the precipitation of eDNA e.g. with CTAB and ethanol have already been published. However, using these methods we did not succeed in quantifying very low amounts of eDNA (e.g. <1?g eDNA/g dry wt) in marine sediment even when using DNA carriers like glycogen. Since the recovery of eDNA by precipitation strongly depends on its concentration, these previously published procedures are not adequate for deep biosphere sediment due to the low eDNA content. We have focused on the question whether eDNA could be a source of nitrogen and phosphorus for microbes in the subseafloor biosphere. Therefore we developed a new method for the (semi)-quantitative extraction of eDNA from sediment. The new extraction procedure is based on sequential washing of the sediment to remove simultaneously eDNA and microbial cells without lysing them. After separation of the cells by centrifugation, the eDNA was extracted from the supernatant and purified by adsorption onto a solid phase, followed by removal of the solids and subsequent elution of the pure eDNA. Intracellular DNA (iDNA) was extracted and purified from the cell pellet using a commercial DNA extraction kit. Additional to a very low detection limit and reproducible quantification, this new method allows separation and purification of both extracellular and intracellular DNA to an extent that inhibitors are removed and downstream applications like PCR can be performed. To evaluate the new extraction method two sediments with rather opposing composition were analyzed. Sediment from the South Pacific Gyre, the most oligotrophic oceanic region on earth and organic-rich Baltic Sea sediment (Northern Germany) were processed. Using this new procedure high purity genomic iDNA and eDNA with a molecular size range between 20 bp and 50k bp can be simultaneously recovered even from very oligotrophic sediment with very low cell abundances. The main fraction of recovered eDNA was suitable for downstream applications like PCR and had a molecular size that indicates minimal shearing. Despite about two decades of research many questions about deep subsurface life remain unanswered. The fact that microbes can be found even in deep oligotrophic marine sediment raises the fundamental questions of the types and availability of substrates and their biogeochemical cycling. This is the first study that provides evidence that eDNA is an important potential substrate for microorganisms in the deep biosphere. Also, our results show a link between cell counts and eDNA content, indicating that the eDNA pool in the investigated sediment consist mainly of microbial DNA. Comparative sequence analysis of extracted iDNA and eDNA will provide deeper insights into the origin and turnover of eDNA and the apparent microbial community composition in the deep biosphere.

  13. Applicability of passive sampling to bioanalytical screening of bioaccumulative chemicals in marine wildlife.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ling; Gaus, Caroline; van Mourik, Louise; Escher, Beate I

    2013-07-16

    Quantification of bioaccumulative contaminants in biota is time and cost-intensive and the required extensive cleanup steps make it selective toward targeted chemical groups. Therefore tissue extracts prepared for chemical analysis are not amenable to assess the combined effects of unresolved complex mixtures. Passive equilibrium sampling with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) has the potential for unbiased sampling of mixtures, and the PDMS extracts can be directly dosed into cell-based bioassays. The passive sampling approach was tested by exposing PDMS to lipid-rich tissue (dugong blubber; 85% lipid) spiked with a known mixture of hydrophobic contaminants (five congeners of tetra- to octachloro-dibenzo-p-dioxins). The equilibrium was attained within 24 h. Lipid-PDMS partition coefficients (Klip-PDMS) ranged from 20 to 38, were independent of hydrophobicity, and within the range of those previously measured for organochlorine compounds. To test if passive sampling can be combined with bioanalysis without the need for chemical cleanup, spiked blubber-PDMS extracts were dosed into the CAFLUX bioassay, which specifically targets dioxin-like chemicals. Small quantities of lipids coextracted by the PDMS were found to affect the kinetics in the regularly applied 24-h bioassay; however, this effect was eliminated by a longer exposure period (72 h). The validated method was applied to 11 unspiked dugong blubber samples with known (native) dioxin concentrations. These results provide the first proof of concept for linking passive sampling of lipid-rich tissue with cell-based bioassays, and could be further extended to other lipid rich species and a wider range of bioanalytical end points. PMID:23758596

  14. Sample limited characterization of a novel disulfide-rich venom peptide toxin from terebrid marine snail Terebra variegata.

    PubMed

    Anand, Prachi; Grigoryan, Alexandre; Bhuiyan, Mohammed H; Ueberheide, Beatrix; Russell, Victoria; Quinoñez, Jose; Moy, Patrick; Chait, Brian T; Poget, Sébastien F; Holford, Mandë

    2014-01-01

    Disulfide-rich peptide toxins found in the secretions of venomous organisms such as snakes, spiders, scorpions, leeches, and marine snails are highly efficient and effective tools for novel therapeutic drug development. Venom peptide toxins have been used extensively to characterize ion channels in the nervous system and platelet aggregation in haemostatic systems. A significant hurdle in characterizing disulfide-rich peptide toxins from venomous animals is obtaining significant quantities needed for sequence and structural analyses. Presented here is a strategy for the structural characterization of venom peptide toxins from sample limited (4 ng) specimens via direct mass spectrometry sequencing, chemical synthesis and NMR structure elucidation. Using this integrated approach, venom peptide Tv1 from Terebra variegata was discovered. Tv1 displays a unique fold not witnessed in prior snail neuropeptides. The novel structural features found for Tv1 suggest that the terebrid pool of peptide toxins may target different neuronal agents with varying specificities compared to previously characterized snail neuropeptides. PMID:24713808

  15. Sample Limited Characterization of a Novel Disulfide-Rich Venom Peptide Toxin from Terebrid Marine Snail Terebra variegata

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Prachi; Grigoryan, Alexandre; Bhuiyan, Mohammed H.; Ueberheide, Beatrix; Russell, Victoria; Quinoez, Jose; Moy, Patrick; Chait, Brian T.; Poget, Sbastien F.; Holford, Mand

    2014-01-01

    Disulfide-rich peptide toxins found in the secretions of venomous organisms such as snakes, spiders, scorpions, leeches, and marine snails are highly efficient and effective tools for novel therapeutic drug development. Venom peptide toxins have been used extensively to characterize ion channels in the nervous system and platelet aggregation in haemostatic systems. A significant hurdle in characterizing disulfide-rich peptide toxins from venomous animals is obtaining significant quantities needed for sequence and structural analyses. Presented here is a strategy for the structural characterization of venom peptide toxins from sample limited (4 ng) specimens via direct mass spectrometry sequencing, chemical synthesis and NMR structure elucidation. Using this integrated approach, venom peptide Tv1 from Terebra variegata was discovered. Tv1 displays a unique fold not witnessed in prior snail neuropeptides. The novel structural features found for Tv1 suggest that the terebrid pool of peptide toxins may target different neuronal agents with varying specificities compared to previously characterized snail neuropeptides. PMID:24713808

  16. Comparison of marine sampling methods for organic contaminants: Passive samplers, water extractions, and live oyster deployment.

    PubMed

    Raub, Kristin B; Vlahos, Penny; Whitney, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Laboratory and field trials evaluated the efficacy of three methods of detecting aquatic pesticide concentrations. Currently used pesticides: atrazine, metolachlor, and diazinon and legacy pesticide dieldrin were targeted. Pesticides were extracted using solid-phase extraction (SPE) of water samples, titanium plate passive samplers coated in ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) and eastern oysters (Crassostrea viginica) as biosamplers. A laboratory study assessed the extraction efficiencies and precision of each method. Passive samplers yielded the highest precision of the three methods (RSD: 3-14%EVA plates; 19-60% oysters; and 25-56% water samples). Equilibrium partition coefficients were derived. A significant relationship was found between the concentration in oyster tissue and the ambient aquatic concentration. In the field (Housatonic River, CT (U.S.)) water sampling (n=5) detected atrazine at 1.61-7.31?gL(-1), oyster sampling (n=215) detected dieldrin at n.d.-0.096?gL(-1)SW and the passive samplers (n=53) detected atrazine at 0.97-3.78?gL(-1)SW and dieldrin at n.d.-0.68?gL(-1)SW. PMID:26210405

  17. Flow cytometric applicability to evaluate UV inactivation of phytoplankton in marine water samples.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Ranveig Ottoey; Hess-Erga, Ole-Kristian; Larsen, Aud; Thuestad, Gunnar; Tobiesen, August; Hoell, Ingunn Alne

    2015-07-15

    Disinfection of microbes is of importance to prevent the spread of pathogens and non-indigenous species in the environment. Here we test the applicability of using flow cytometry (FCM) to evaluate inactivation of the phytoplankter Tetraselmis suecica after UV irradiation and labeling with the esterase substrate 5-carboxyfluorescein diacetate acetoxymethyl ester (CFDA-AM). Non-irradiated and UV irradiated samples were analyzed with the plate count technique and FCM for 24 days. The numbers of colony forming units were used as a standard to develop a FCM protocol. Our protocol readily distinguishes live and dead cells, but challenges were encountered when determining whether UV damaged cells are dying or repairable. As damaged cells can represent a risk to aquatic organisms and/or humans, this was taken into account when developing the FCM protocol. In spite of the above mentioned challenges we argue that FCM represents an accurate and rapid method to analyze T. suecica samples. PMID:25960276

  18. 36 CFR 1002.23 - Recreation fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Recreation Area in accordance with 36 CFR part 71. (b) Entering designated entrance fee areas or using... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Recreation fees. 1002.23... RECREATION 1002.23 Recreation fees. (a) Recreation fees shall be charged in the area administered by...

  19. From Recreational Mathematics to Recreational Programming, and Back

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz Jimenez, B. C.; Ruiz Munoz, M.

    2011-01-01

    Recreational Programming (RecPro) is the discipline that encourages the study of computer programming through ludic problems. Problems that are typically studied within this discipline are similar to those of Recreational Mathematics (RecMat), which sometimes leads to the confusion of these two disciplines. The objective for RecPro is to write

  20. From Recreational Mathematics to Recreational Programming, and Back

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz Jimenez, B. C.; Ruiz Munoz, M.

    2011-01-01

    Recreational Programming (RecPro) is the discipline that encourages the study of computer programming through ludic problems. Problems that are typically studied within this discipline are similar to those of Recreational Mathematics (RecMat), which sometimes leads to the confusion of these two disciplines. The objective for RecPro is to write…

  1. Comparison of Multi-Drug Resistant Environmental Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from Recreational Beaches and High Touch Surfaces in Built Environments.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Marilyn C; Soge, Olusegun O; No, David

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has emerged as a major cause of disease in the general population with no health care exposure or known classical risk factors for MRSA infections. The potential community reservoirs have not been well defined though certain strains such as ST398 and USA300 have been well studied in some settings. MRSA has been isolated from recreational beaches, high-touch surfaces in homes, universities, and other community environmental surfaces. However, in most cases the strains were not characterized to determine if they are related to community-acquired or hospital-acquired clinical strains. We compared 55 environmental MRSA from 805 samples including sand, fresh, and marine water samples from local marine and fresh water recreational beaches (n?=?296), high touch surfaces on the University of Washington campus (n?=?294), surfaces in UW undergraduate housing (n?=?85), and the local community (n?=?130). Eleven USA300, representing 20% of the isolates, were found on the UW campus surfaces, student housing surfaces, and on the community surfaces but not in the recreational beach samples from the Northwest USA. Similarly, the predominant animal ST133 was found in the recreational beach samples but not in the high touch surface samples. All USA300 isolates were multi-drug resistant carrying two to six different antibiotic resistance genes coding for kanamycin, macrolides and/or macrolides-lincosamides-streptogramin B, and tetracycline, with the majority (72%) carrying four to six different antibiotic resistance genes. A surprising 98% of the 55 MRSA isolates were resistant to other classes of antibiotics and most likely represent reservoirs for these genes in the environment. PMID:23577006

  2. Toxicological evaluation of sediment samples spiked with human pharmaceutical products: Energy status and neuroendocrine effects in marine polychaetes Hediste diversicolor.

    PubMed

    Maranho, L A; Andr, C; DelValls, T A; Gagn, F; Martn-Daz, M L

    2015-08-01

    There is a lack of studies about the ecotoxicology of pharmaceutical products on marine environment. To predict possible adverse effects of pharmaceutical products on benthic biota, polychaetes Hediste diversicolor were exposed for 14-days to pharmaceutical-spiked sediments under laboratory conditions. Carbamazepine (CBZ), ibuprofen (IBP) and propranolol (PRO) at concentrations of 500ngg(-1), 50ngg(-1), 5ngg(-1), 0.5ngg(-1) and 0.05ngg(-1), fluoxetine (FX) and 17?-ethynylestradiol (EE2) at concentrations of 100ngg(-1), 10ngg(-1), 1ngg(-1), 0.1ngg(-1) and 0.01ngg(-1), including environmental concentrations (underlined), were spiked in marine sediment samples. After the exposure, cellular energy status (total lipids content - TLP; and mitochondrial electron transport activity - MET), metabolism of monoamines (monoamine oxidase activity - MAO) and inflammation properties (cyclooxygenase activity - COX) were observed in polychaetes. CBZ increased TLP content and MET activity, and decreased MAO activity in polychaetes. IBP did not interfere on the TLP level, but on the MET and MAO activities (environmental concentrations). FX did not cause changes in the energy status. Therefore, environmental concentration diminished MAO activity. EE2 did not affect the energy status, however, MAO activity was significantly lower in polychaetes exposed to environmental concentration. PRO increased TLP level in polychaetes, but not MET activity. MAO activity was significantly lower for polychaetes exposed to environmental concentration. Except FX, all pharmaceuticals showed anti-inflammatory properties confirmed by the decrease of COX activity. Pharmaceutical products affected H. diversicolor physiology and health. As a benthic top predator, adverse effects on sea-worms can potentially culminate in ecosystem perturbations. PMID:25899671

  3. Assessing the Value of Recreational Divers for Censusing Elasmobranchs

    PubMed Central

    Ward-Paige, Christine A.; Lotze, Heike K.

    2011-01-01

    Background Around the world, researchers are using the observations and experiences of citizens to describe patterns in animal populations. This data is often collected via ongoing sampling or by synthesizing past experiences. Since elasmobranchs are relatively rare, obtaining data for broad-scale trend analysis requires high sampling effort. Elasmobranchs are also relatively large and conspicuous and therefore it may be possible to enlist recreational divers to collect data on their occurrence and relative abundance from daily dive activities. For this, however, a good understanding of the value of data collected by recreational divers is essential. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we explore the value of recreational divers for censusing elasmobranchs using a diverse set of data sources. First, we use a simulation experiment to explore detection rates of the roving diver technique, used by recreational divers, across a range of fish densities and speeds. Next, using a field survey, we show that inexperienced recreational divers detect and count elasmobranchs as well as experienced recreational divers. Finally, we use semi-structured interviews of recreational dive instructors to demonstrate the value of their recollections in terms of effort and their descriptions of spatial and temporal distributions of sharks in Thailand. Conclusions/Significance Overall, this study provides initial ground-work for using recreational divers for monitoring elasmobranch populations. If used appropriately, citizen-collected data may provide additional information that can be used to complement more standardized surveys and to describe population trends across a range of spatial and temporal scales. Due to the non-extractive nature of this data, recreational divers may also provide important insight into the success of conservation initiatives, such as shark sanctuaries and no-take zones. PMID:22016771

  4. Professional Preparation in Recreation & Parks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bialeschki, M. Deborah; McAllister, Megan

    1990-01-01

    Presents data from the Society of Park and Recreation Educators' 1988 curriculum study monitoring the status of U.S. and Canadian higher education programs in park, recreation, and leisure studies. Data from 79 schools indicate declining enrollment of such students at the bachelor's level and increasing enrollment at the associate level. (SM)

  5. Financing of Private Outdoor Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Outdoor Recreation (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    A survey of financial institutions was undertaken by the Bureau of Outdoor Recreation to evaluate the demand and availability of private credit for enterprises that provide outdoor recreation. The survey provided basic information for (1) evaluating legislative proposals for loan guarantee programs, (2) nationwide planning, and (3) assessing the…

  6. Perceived Dangerousness of Recreational Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luce, Terrence S.; Merrel, Judy C.

    1995-01-01

    In this study both college students and degreed nurses were asked to estimate the abuse potential and lethality of recreational drugs, both licit and illicit. Findings indicate that the illicit drugs under consideration were perceived as presenting the greatest danger to the user. Dangers attributed to the use of licit recreational drugs were…

  7. 75 FR 19608 - Recreation Resource Advisory Committees

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-15

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Recreation Resource Advisory Committees AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Call for nominations for the Pacific Northwest Recreation Resource Advisory Committees. SUMMARY: The Secretary of Agriculture has established the Pacific Northwest Recreation Resource...

  8. Recreation and Leisure. The Right to Fun.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schleifer, Maxwell J., Ed.

    1979-01-01

    The special section on recreation and leisure for the disabled child covers rights to recreation and physical education, summer programs for children with disabilities, and adapted recreation and equipment. (SBH)

  9. Development of a subcritical fluid extraction and GC-MS validation method for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in marine samples.

    PubMed

    Jia, Kai; Feng, Xiaomei; Liu, Kun; Han, Yuqian; Xue, Yong; Xue, Changhu

    2013-04-01

    This paper describes a new procedure for extracting polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from marine samples using subcritical 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (R134a). The extraction procedure was optimized at temperatures varying from 20 to 70C and pressures ranging from 3 to 15 MPa. The volume of the co-solvent was then optimized using 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (R134a) as the subcritical phase. PCBs were characterized by GC-MS using the optimized conditions of 3 MPa, 30C, and a co-solvent volume of 6 mL. The average yields of PCBs from subcritical fluid extraction of spiked oyster samples were measured and found to be greater than 90%, with relative standard deviations (RSD) of less than 10%. Detection limits of this method were in the range of 0.045-0.108 ng/g of dry mass. The method was compared to Soxhlet extraction and then applied for monitoring PCBs in oysters from Qingdao, Shandong, China. PMID:23455072

  10. Determination of methylmercury in marine sediment samples: method validation and occurrence data.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Luis; Vassileva, Emilia

    2015-01-01

    The determination of methylmercury (MeHg) in sediment samples is a difficult task due to the extremely low MeHg/THg (total mercury) ratio and species interconversion. Here, we present the method validation of a cost-effective fit-for-purpose analytical procedure for the measurement of MeHg in sediments, which is based on aqueous phase ethylation, followed by purge and trap and hyphenated gas chromatography-pyrolysis-atomic fluorescence spectrometry (GC-Py-AFS) separation and detection. Four different extraction techniques, namely acid and alkaline leaching followed by solvent extraction and evaporation, microwave-assisted extraction with 2-mercaptoethanol, and acid leaching, solvent extraction and back extraction into sodium thiosulfate, were examined regarding their potential to selectively extract MeHg from estuarine sediment IAEA-405 certified reference material (CRM). The procedure based on acid leaching with HNO3/CuSO4, solvent extraction and back extraction into Na2S2O3 yielded the highest extraction recovery, i.e., 94±3% and offered the possibility to perform the extraction of a large number of samples in a short time, by eliminating the evaporation step. The artifact formation of MeHg was evaluated by high performance liquid chromatography coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS), using isotopically enriched Me(201)Hg and (202)Hg and it was found to be nonexistent. A full validation approach in line with ISO 17025 and Eurachem guidelines was followed. With this in mind, blanks, selectivity, working range (1-800 pg), linearity (0.9995), recovery (94-96%), repeatability (3%), intermediate precision (4%), limit of detection (0.45 pg) and limit of quantification (0.85 pg) were systematically assessed with CRM IAEA-405. The uncertainty budget was calculated and the major contribution to the combined uncertainty (16.24%, k=2) was found to arise from the uncertainty associated with recovery (74.1%). Demonstration of traceability of measurement results is also presented. The validated measurement procedure was applied to the determination of MeHg incurred in sediments from a highly polluted and scarcely studied area in the Caribbean region. PMID:25467456

  11. Recreational mountain biking injuries.

    PubMed

    Aitken, S A; Biant, L C; Court-Brown, Charles M

    2011-04-01

    Mountain biking is increasing in popularity worldwide. The injury patterns associated with elite level and competitive mountain biking are known. This study analysed the incidence, spectrum and risk factors for injuries sustained during recreational mountain biking. The injury rate was 1.54 injuries per 1000 biker exposures. Men were more commonly injured than women, with those aged 30-39 years at highest risk. The commonest types of injury were wounding, skeletal fracture and musculoskeletal soft tissue injury. Joint dislocations occurred more commonly in older mountain bikers. The limbs were more commonly injured than the axial skeleton. The highest hospital admission rates were observed with head, neck and torso injuries. Protective body armour, clip-in pedals and the use of a full-suspension bicycle may confer a protective effect. PMID:20659880

  12. Marine Sample Exploitation Project: estimates regarding the sensitivity and technology for the detection of nuclear explosion debris in the marine environment

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, K.V.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    1985-06-04

    The report discusses the possibility of detecting a small nuclear explosion in which most of the fission products are released to the ocean. The use of marine plankton as bioaccumulators is proposed to deal with the problem of dilution. 7 refs. (ACR)

  13. Bacillus toyonensis strain AEMREG6, a bacterium isolated from South African marine environment sediment samples produces a glycoprotein bioflocculant.

    PubMed

    Okaiyeto, Kunle; Nwodo, Uchechukwu U; Mabinya, Leonard V; Okoh, Anthony I

    2015-01-01

    A bioflocculant-producing bacteria, isolated from sediment samples of a marine environment in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa demonstrated a flocculating activity above 60% for kaolin clay suspension. Analysis of the 16S ribosomal deoxyribonucleic acid (rDNA) nucleotide sequence of the isolate in the GenBank database showed 99% similarity to Bacillus toyonensis strain BCT-7112 and it was deposited in the GenBank as Bacillus toyonensis strain AEMREG6 with accession number KP406731. The bacteria produced a bioflocculant (REG-6) optimally in the presence of glucose and NH4NO3 as the sole carbon and nitrogen source, respectively, initial medium pH of 5 and Ca2+ as the cation of choice. Chemical analysis showed that purified REG-6 was a glycoprotein mainly composed of polysaccharide (77.8%) and protein (11.5%). It was thermally stable and had strong flocculating activity against kaolin suspension over a wide range of pH values (3-11) with a relatively low dosage requirement of 0.1 mg/mL in the presence of Mn2+. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) revealed the presence of hydroxyl, carboxyl and amide groups preferred for flocculation. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that bridging was the main flocculation mechanism of REG-6. The outstanding flocculating performance of REG-6 holds great potential to replace the hazardous chemical flocculants currently used in water treatment. PMID:25806549

  14. Beyond Screen Time: Assessing Recreational Sedentary Behavior among Adolescent Girls

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Katherine W.; Friend, Sarah; Graham, Daniel J.; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2012-01-01

    Most studies of sedentary behavior have focused on television use or screen time. This study aims to examine adolescent girls' participation in a variety of recreational sedentary behaviors (e.g., talking on the phone and hanging around), and their association with physical activity (PA), dietary behaviors, and body mass index. Data were from a sample of 283 adolescent girls. Recreational sedentary behavior, PA, and dietary behaviors were self-reported, and girls' height and weight were measured. Over 95% of girls engaged in at least one recreational sedentary behavior during the recall period. Watching television and hanging around were the most common behaviors. Watching television, using the Internet, and hanging around were associated with less PA; watching television, hanging around, and talking on the phone were associated with less healthful dietary behaviors. No associations were found with body mass index. Interventions may benefit from capitalizing on and intervening upon girls' common recreational sedentary behaviors. PMID:22013514

  15. IN-SITU SAMPLING AND CHARACTERIZATION OF NATURALLY OCCURRING MARINE METHANE HYDRATE USING THE D/V JOIDES RESOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Frank R. Rack; Tim Francis; Peter Schultheiss; Philip E. Long; Barry M. Freifeld

    2005-04-01

    The primary activities accomplished during this quarter were continued efforts to develop plans for Phase 2 of this cooperative agreement based on the evolving operational planning for IODP Expedition 311, which will use the JOIDES Resolution to study marine methane hydrates along the Cascadia margin, offshore Vancouver Island. IODP Expedition 311 has been designed to further constrain the models for the formation of marine gas hydrate in subduction zone accretionary prisms. The objectives include characterizing the deep origin of the methane, its upward transport, its incorporation in gas hydrate, and its subsequent loss to the seafloor. The main attention of this expedition is on the widespread seafloor-parallel layer of dispersed gas hydrate located just above the base of the predicted stability field. In a gas hydrate formation model, methane is carried upward through regional sediment or small-scale fracture permeability, driven by the tectonic consolidation of the accretionary prism. The upward moving methane is incorporated into the gas hydrate clathrate as it enters the methane hydrate stability zone. Also important is the focusing of a portion of the upward methane flux into localized plumes or channels to form concentrations of near-seafloor gas hydrate. The amount of gas hydrate in local concentrations near the seafloor is especially important for understanding the response of marine gas hydrate to climate change. The expedition includes coring and downhole measurements at five sites across the Northern Cascadia accretionary prism. The sites will track the history of methane in an accretionary prism from (1) its production by mainly microbiological processes over a thick sediment vertical extent, (2) its upward transport through regional or locally focused fluid flow, (3) its incorporation in the regional hydrate layer above the BSR or in local concentrations at or near the seafloor, (4) methane loss from the hydrate by upward diffusion, and (5) methane oxidation and incorporation in seafloor carbonate, or expulsion to the ocean. This expedition builds on the previous Cascadia gas hydrate drilling of ODP Leg 146 and on more recent ODP Leg 204 off Oregon. Important experiments being considered for DOE/NETL funding as part of the JOI cooperative agreement include, (1) Logging-While-Drilling/Measurements-While-Drilling (LWD/MWD), (2) Pressure Core Sampling (PCS/HYACINTH) of gas hydrate, and fluid recovery under in situ conditions, (3) X-ray CT logging of whole cores under in situ conditions, and (4) Infrared thermal imaging of whole round cores to map temperature variations resulting from the presence of hydrate. Preliminary budget estimates have been made for each of these tasks and discussions are ongoing with DOE/NETL program managers to develop a final plan that can be implemented within the constraints of the available funding and logistical considerations.

  16. Healthy Swimming/Recreational Water

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Facts Index of Healthy Water-related Topics Healthy Water Sites Healthy Water Home Drinking Water Healthy Swimming/ ... minimizing the risk of illness and injury. Recreational Water Illness (noun): Illness caused by germs and chemicals ...

  17. 36 CFR 2.23 - Recreation fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Recreation fees. 2.23 Section 2.23 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RESOURCE PROTECTION, PUBLIC USE AND RECREATION 2.23 Recreation fees. (a) Recreation fees shall be established...

  18. Mississippi Statewide Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatum, W. Hugh; And Others

    Objectives of the official comprehensive outdoor recreation plan for the State of Mississippi are (1) to guide recreational development in Mississippi in an orderly fashion on a statewide level; (2) to survey public, semipublic, commercial, and private outdoor recreational opportunities; (3) to determine recreational needs for meeting present and

  19. 50 CFR 26.32 - Recreational uses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Recreational uses. 26.32 Section 26.32 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM PUBLIC ENTRY AND USE Public Use and Recreation § 26.32 Recreational uses. Recreational uses such as, but...

  20. Looking at Recreation through Forest Service Eyes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, R. Max

    1981-01-01

    Recreation has been an important part of the Forest Service since its beginning. A solid technical base for recreation management as a natural resource must be developed. The demand for outdoor recreation is increasing, and the supply of some types of outdoor recreation is virtually limitless. (JN)

  1. Relationships between the occurrence of Giardia and Cryptosporidium and physicochemical properties of marine waters of the Pacific Coast of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Magana-Ordorica, Dalia; Mena, Kristina; Valdez-Torres, Jose B; Soto-Beltran, Marcela; Leon-Felix, Josefina; Chaidez, Cristobal

    2010-12-01

    Untreated sewage has adversely affected the quality of marine recreational waters worldwide. Exposure to marine recreational water with poor microbial quality may pose a threat to bathers. The objectives of this study were to assess the effect of physicochemical parameters on Cryptosporidium and Giardia presence in marine recreational water of Sinaloa, Mexico, by Logistic Regression Analyses. Thirty-two 10-litre water samples were collected from two tourist beaches, Altata and Mazatlan, between November 2006 and May 2007. Water samples were processed by the EPA 1623 method and pH, temperature, salinity and turbidity were also determined. Cryptosporidium and Giardia were present in 71 and 57% of the samples collected from Altata, respectively. In Mazatlan, Cryptosporidium and Giardia were found in 83 and 72% of the samples, respectively. The overall concentration of Cryptosporidium ranged from 150 to 2,050 oocysts/10 L with an average of 581 oocysts/10 L and Giardia ranged from 10 to 300 cysts/10 L with an average of 73 cysts/10 L. The occurrence of both parasites increased in water with decreasing temperatures and increasing turbidity of the water. PMID:20705989

  2. Predicting recreational fishing use of offshore petroleum platforms in the Central Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, W.R. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    This study is based on the premise that properly sited artificial reefs for optimal human recreational use, a predictive model based upon the marine travel patterns and behavior of marine recreational fishermen, is needed. This research used data gathered from a previous study that addressed the recreational fishing use of offshore oil and gas structures (Ditton and Auyong 1984); on-site data were also collected. The primary research objective was to generate a predictive model that can be applied to artificial-reef development efforts elsewhere. This study investigated the recreational-user patterns of selected petroleum platforms structures in the Central Gulf of Mexico. The petroleum structures offshore from the Louisiana coastline provide a unique research tool. Although intended to facilitate the exploration and recovery of hydrocarbons, petroleum platforms also serve as defacto artificial reefs, providing habitat for numerous species of fish and other marine life. Petroleum platforms were found to be the principal fishing destinations within the study area. On-site findings reveal that marine recreational fishermen were as mobile on water, as they are on land. On-site findings were used to assist in the development of a predictive model.

  3. Deep Water, Shallow Water: Marine Animal Homes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soltow, Willow

    1984-01-01

    Examines the diversity of life in the oceans and ways in which teachers can explore ocean habitats with their students without leaving the classroom. Topic areas considered include: restricted habitats, people and marine habitats, pollution, incidental kills, and the commercial and recreational uses of marine waters. (JN)

  4. A Pilot Study of Microbial Contamination of Subtropical Recreational Waters

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Lora E; Solo, Gabriele H.; Elmir, Samir; Shibata, Tomoyuki; Squicciarini, Dominick; Quirino, Wendy; Arguello, Margia; Van de Bogart, Gayl

    2009-01-01

    Microbial water quality indicators are used to determine whether a water body is safe for recreational purposes. There have been concerns raised about the appropriate use of microbial indicators to regulate recreational uses of water bodies, in particular those located in tropical and sub-tropical environments. This prospective cohort pilot study evaluated the relationship between microbial water quality indicators and public health within two public beaches without known sewage discharge, but with historically high microbial levels for one beach, in subtropical Miami-Dade County (Florida). Monitoring was conducted in three phases: daily water monitoring, beach sand sampling, and spatially intense water sampling. An epidemiological questionnaire from a Los Angeles recreational beach-goer study was used to assess the self-reported swimming-related symptoms and exposures. There was no significant association between the number nor the type of reported symptoms and the different sampling months or beach sites, although persons who returned repeatedly to the beach were more likely to report symptoms. The number of indicator organisms correlated negatively with the frequency of symptoms reported by recreational beach goers. Results of the daily monitoring indicated that different indicators provided conflicting results concerning beach water quality. Larger epidemiologic studies with individual exposure monitoring are recommended to further evaluate these potentially important associations in subtropical recreational waters. PMID:20151031

  5. Biscayne bay: A bibliography of the marine environment

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, K.K.

    1993-04-01

    The history of Miami and Biscayne Bay are intimately related. In addition to food, industry, transportation and recreation, the Bay provides a constant source of aesthetic satisfaction for those who live and work along its shores. Information on the marine environment of Biscayne Bay includes pollution, monitoring, conservation and protection, coastal and resource management, artificial reefs, fishery assessments, park and marina construction, estuarine dynamics, and sampling. This bibliographic database containing over 1,700 entries was compiled using PROCITE software, produced by Personal Bibliographic Software, Inc.

  6. Recreational water–related illness

    PubMed Central

    Sanborn, Margaret; Takaro, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To review the risk factors, management, and prevention of recreational water–related illness in family practice. Sources of information Original and review articles from January 1998 to February 2012 were identified using PubMed and the search terms water-related illness, recreational water illness, and swimmer illness. Main message There is a 3% to 8% risk of acute gastrointestinal illness (AGI) after swimming. The high-risk groups for AGI are children younger than 5 years, especially if they have not been vaccinated for rotavirus, and elderly and immunocompromised patients. Children are at higher risk because they swallow more water when swimming, stay in the water longer, and play in the shallow water and sand, which are more contaminated. Participants in sports with a lot of water contact like triathlon and kite surfing are also at high risk, and even activities involving partial water contact like boating and fishing carry a 40% to 50% increase in risk of AGI compared with nonwater recreational activities. Stool cultures should be done when a recreational water illness is suspected, and the clinical dehydration scale is a useful clinical tool for assessing the treatment needs of affected children. Conclusion Recreational water illness is the main attributable cause of AGI during swimming season. Recognition that swimming is a substantial source of illness can help prevent recurrent and secondary cases. Rotavirus vaccine is highly recommended for children who will swim frequently. PMID:23673583

  7. Does getting a dog increase recreational walking?

    PubMed Central

    Cutt, Hayley E; Knuiman, Matthew W; Giles-Corti, Billie

    2008-01-01

    Background This study examines changes in socio-demographic, environmental and intrapersonal factors associated with dog acquisition in non-dog owners at baseline to 12-months follow-up and the effect of dog acquisition on minutes per week of recreational walking. Methods RESIDE study participants completed self-administered questionnaires (baseline and 12-months follow-up) measuring physical activity, dog ownership, dog walking behavior as well as environmental, intrapersonal and socio-demographic factors. Analysis was restricted to 'Continuing non-owners' (i.e., non-owners at both baseline and follow-up; n = 681) and 'New dog owners' (i.e., non-owners who acquired a dog by follow-up; n = 92). Results Overall, 12% of baseline non-owners had acquired a dog at follow-up. Dog acquisition was associated with working and having children at home. Those who changed from single to couple marital status were also more likely to acquire a dog. The increase in minutes of walking for recreation within the neighborhood from baseline to follow-up was 48 minutes/week for new dog owners compared with 12 minutes/week for continuing non-owners (p < 0.05). After adjusting for baseline variables the effect of dog acquisition on the increase in minutes of recreational walking within the neighborhood was 31 minutes (95% CI: 7.39, 54.22; p < 0.01). However, this reduced to 22 minutes (95% CI: -1.53, 45.42; p > 0.05) after further adjustment for change in baseline to follow-up variables. Increase in intention to walk was the main factor contributing to attenuation of the effect of dog acquisition on recreational walking. Conclusion This study used a large representative sample of non-owners to examine the relationship between dog acquisition and recreational walking and provides evidence to suggest that dog acquisition leads to an increase in walking. The most likely mechanism through which dog acquisition facilitates increased physical activity is through behavioral intention via the dog's positive effect on owner's cognitive beliefs about walking, and through the provision of motivation and social support for walking. The results suggest that behavioral intention mediates the relationship between dog acquisition and walking and that dogs may have a significant role in the maintenance of owner walking behavior. PMID:18366804

  8. Marine sediments monitoring studies for trace elements with the application of fast temperature programs and solid sampling high resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orani, Anna Maria; Han, Eunmi; Mandjukov, Petko; Vassileva, Emilia

    2015-01-01

    Analytical procedure for the determination of As, Cd, Cu, Ni, Co and Cr in marine sediment samples using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HR CS AAS) and direct solid sample analysis has been developed. The application of fast programs in combination with direct solid sampling allows to eliminate the drying and pretreatment steps, however makes impossible the use of liquid standards for calibration. Iridium treated platforms were applied throughout the present study. Calibration technique based on the use of solid certified reference materials (marine sediments) similar to the nature of the analyzed sample and statistics of regression analysis were applied to the real sediment samples. The instrumental parameters were optimized in order to obtain reproducible and interference free analytical signals. The ISO-17025 requirements and Eurachem guidelines were followed in the validation of the proposed analytical procedure. Accordingly, blanks, selectivity, calibration, linearity, working range, trueness, repeatability reproducibility, limits of detection and quantification and expanded uncertainty (k = 2) for all investigated elements were assessed. Two different approaches for the estimation of measurement uncertainty were applied and obtained results compared. The major contributors to the combined uncertainty of the analyte mass fraction were found to be the homogeneity of the samples and the microbalance precision. The influence of sample particle sizes on the total combined uncertainty was also evaluated. Traceability to SI system of units of the obtained by the proposed analytical procedure results was demonstrated. Additionally, validation of the methodology developed was effectuated by the comparison of the obtained results with independent method e.g. ICP-MS with external calibration. The use of solid sampling HR CS AAS for the determination of trace elements in marine sediment matrix gives significant advantages, such as straightforward calibration, a high sample throughput, sufficient precision, suitable limits of detection, appropriate for monitoring studies concentration range and reduced risk of analyte loss and contamination. This approach allows comparatively simple and reliable evaluation of uncertainty of the results and the basic validation parameters and in a natural way provides traceability of the obtained results. A comparison between the proposed fast programs with solid standard calibration and the conventional ones with liquid standard calibration demonstrates advantages of the new methodology. It provides faster, accurate and unbiased results typically with significantly lower uncertainties. The potential of the HR CS AAS technique is demonstrated by direct analysis of marine sediments form the Caribbean region and various sediment CRMs within the frame of monitoring program for this region.

  9. 40 CFR 1042.601 - General compliance provisions for marine engines and vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the provisions of this part, the requirements and prohibitions in 40 CFR part 1068, and the provisions of the Clean Air Act. The provisions of 40 CFR part 1068 apply for compression-ignition marine... recreational marine engine in a vessel that is not a recreational vessel is a violation of 40 CFR...

  10. 40 CFR 1042.601 - General compliance provisions for marine engines and vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the provisions of this part, the requirements and prohibitions in 40 CFR part 1068, and the provisions of the Clean Air Act. The provisions of 40 CFR part 1068 apply for compression-ignition marine... recreational marine engine in a vessel that is not a recreational vessel is a violation of 40 CFR...

  11. 40 CFR 1042.601 - General compliance provisions for marine engines and vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the provisions of this part, the requirements and prohibitions in 40 CFR part 1068, and the provisions of the Clean Air Act. The provisions of 40 CFR part 1068 apply for compression-ignition marine... recreational marine engine in a vessel that is not a recreational vessel is a violation of 40 CFR...

  12. 40 CFR 1042.601 - General compliance provisions for marine engines and vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the provisions of this part, the requirements and prohibitions in 40 CFR part 1068, and the provisions of the Clean Air Act. The provisions of 40 CFR part 1068 apply for compression-ignition marine... recreational marine engine in a vessel that is not a recreational vessel is a violation of 40 CFR...

  13. Toward routine, DNA-based detection methods for marine pests.

    PubMed

    Bott, Nathan J; Ophel-Keller, Kathy M; Sierp, Michael T; Herdina; Rowling, Keith P; McKay, Alan C; Loo, Maylene G K; Tanner, Jason E; Deveney, Marty R

    2010-01-01

    Marine pest incursions can cause significant ongoing damage to aquaculture, biodiversity, fisheries habitat, infrastructure and social amenity. They represent a significant and ongoing economic burden. Marine pests can be introduced by several vectors including aquaculture, aquarium trading, commercial shipping, fishing, floating debris, mining activities and recreational boating. Despite the inherent risks, there is currently relatively little routine surveillance of marine pest species conducted in the majority of countries worldwide. Accurate and rapid identification of marine pest species is central to early detection and management. Traditional techniques (e.g. physical sampling and sorting), have limitations, which has motivated some progress towards the development of molecular diagnostic tools. This review provides a brief account of the techniques traditionally used for detection and describes developments in molecular-based methods for the detection and surveillance of marine pest species. Recent advances provide a platform for the development of practical, specific, sensitive and rapid diagnosis and surveillance tools for marine pests for use in effective prevention and control strategies. PMID:20488239

  14. Water ingestion during water recreation.

    PubMed

    Dorevitch, Samuel; Panthi, Suraj; Huang, Yue; Li, Hong; Michalek, Angela M; Pratap, Preethi; Wroblewski, Meredith; Liu, Li; Scheff, Peter A; Li, An

    2011-02-01

    Quantitative risk assessments have estimated health risks of water recreation. One input to risk assessment models is the rate of water ingestion. One published study estimated rates of water ingestion during swimming, but estimates of water ingestion are not available for common limited contact water recreation activities such as canoeing, fishing, kayaking, motor boating, and rowing. In the summer of 2009 two related studies were conducted to estimate water ingestion during these activities. First, at Chicago area surface waters, survey research methods were utilized to characterize self-reported estimates of water ingestion during canoeing, kayaking, and fishing among 2705 people. Second, at outdoor swimming pools, survey research methods and the analysis of cyanuric acid, a tracer of swimming pool water, were used to characterize water ingestion among 662 people who engaged in a variety of full-contact and limited-contact recreational activities. Data from the swimming study was used to derive translation factors that quantify the volume of self-reported estimates. At surface waters, less than 2% of canoers and kayakers reported swallowing a teaspoon or more and 0.5% reported swallowing a mouthful or more. Swimmers in a pool were about 25-50 times more likely to report swallowing a teaspoon of water compared to those who participate in limited-contact recreational activities on surface waters. Mean and upper confidence estimates of water ingestion during limited-contact recreation on surface waters are about 3-4 mL and 10-15 mL, respectively. These estimates of water ingestion rates may be useful in modeling the health risks of water recreation. PMID:21227479

  15. In-Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Marine Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Rack, Frank; Schultheiss, Peter

    2005-12-31

    The primary accomplishments of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter were the implementation of a scientific ocean drilling expedition to study marine methane hydrates along the Cascadia margin, in the NE Pacific as part of Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 311 using the R/V JOIDES Resolution and the deployment of all required equipment and personnel to provide the required services during this expedition. IODP Expedition 311 shipboard activities on the JOIDES Resolution began on August 28 and were concluded on October 28, 2005. New ODP Pressure Coring System (PCS) aluminum autoclave chambers were fabricated prior to the expedition. During the expedition, 16 PCS autoclaves containing pressure cores were X-rayed before and after depressurization using a modified Geotek MSCL-P (multi-sensor core logger-pressure) system. These PCS cores were density scanned using the MSCL-V (multi-sensor core logger-vertical) during depressurization to monitor gas evolution. The MSCL-V was set up in a 20-foot-long refrigerated container provided by Texas A&M University through the JOI contract with TAMRF. IODP Expedition 311 was the first time that PCS cores were examined before (using X-ray), during (using MSCL-V gamma density) and after (using X-ray) degassing to determine the actual volume and distribution of sediment and gas hydrate in the pressurized core, which will be important for more accurate determination of mass balances between sediment, gas, gas hydrate, and fluids in the samples collected. Geotek, Ltd was awarded a contract by JOI to provide equipment and personnel to perform pressure coring and related work on IODP Expedition 311 (Cascadia Margin Gas Hydrates). Geotek, Ltd. provided an automated track for use with JOI's infrared camera systems. Four auxiliary monitors showed infrared core images in real time to aid hydrate identification and sampling. Images were collected from 185 cores during the expedition and processed to provide continuous core temperature data. The HYACINTH pressure coring tools, subsystems, and core logging systems were mobilized to Astoria, Oregon. Both HYACINTH pressure coring tools, the HRC (HYACE Rotary Corer) and the FPC (Fugro Pressure Corer) were mobilized and used during the expedition. Two HYACINTH engineers supervised the use of the tools and five good pressure cores were obtained. Velocity, density and X-ray linear scanning data were collected from these cores at near in situ pressure using the MSCL-P system. Dr. Barry Freifeld from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory provided an X-ray source and detector for X-ray imaging of pressure cores and helped Geotek with the design and mobilization of the MSCL-P system. Pressure core handling, transfer, and logging was performed in a refrigerated 20-foot container supplied by Geotek, Ltd. After scanning, the pressure cores were stored for on-shore analysis in aluminum barrels. Additional studies were conducted at the Pacific Geoscience Center (PGC), where a shore based laboratory was established after Expedition 311.

  16. Therapeutic Recreation: Recreation with Purpose for Exceptional Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fine, Aubrey H.

    The paper examines the role of therapeutic recreation with disabled children. The underlying philosophy of the field is interpreted and its development from beginnings in World War II is reviewed. Three specific levels of services within a comprehensive model are delineated: therapy (to improve functional behavior through assessment, planning,

  17. Are fecal indicator bacteria appropriate measures of recreational water risks in the tropics: A cohort study of beach goers in Brazil?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Regulating recreational water exposure to pathogens within the tropics is a major public health and economic concern. Although numerous epidemiological studies estimating the risk to recreational marine water exposure have been oonducted since the 1950s, few studies have been don...

  18. Recreational swimmers' exposure to Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus in the Chesapeake Bay, Maryland, USA.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Kristi S; Sapkota, Amy R; Jacobs, John M; He, Xin; Crump, Byron C

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus are ubiquitous in the marine-estuarine environment, but the magnitude of human non-ingestion exposure to these waterborne pathogens is largely unknown. We evaluated the magnitude of dermal exposure to V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus among swimmers recreating in Vibrio-populated waters by conducting swim studies at four swimming locations in the Chesapeake Bay in 2009 and 2011. Volunteers (n=31) swam for set time periods, and surface water (n=25) and handwash (n=250) samples were collected. Samples were analyzed for Vibrio concentrations using quantitative PCR. Linear and logistic regressions were used to evaluate factors associated with recreational exposures. Mean surface water V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus concentrations were 1128CFUmL(-1) (95% confidence interval (CI): 665.6, 1591.4) and 18CFUmL(-1) (95% CI: 9.8, 26.1), respectively, across all sampling locations. Mean Vibrio concentrations in handwash samples (V. vulnificus, 180CFUcm(-2) (95% CI: 136.6, 222.5); V. parahaemolyticus, 3CFUcm(-2) (95% CI: 2.4, 3.7)) were significantly associated with Vibrio concentrations in surface water (V. vulnificus, p<0.01; V. parahaemolyticus, p<0.01), but not with salinity or temperature (V. vulnificus, p=0.52, p=0.17; V. parahaemolyticus, p=0.82, p=0.06). Handwashing reduced V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus on subjects' hands by approximately one log (93.9%, 89.4%, respectively). It can be concluded that when Chesapeake Bay surface waters are characterized by elevated concentrations of Vibrio, swimmers and individuals working in those waters could experience significant dermal exposures to V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus, increasing their risk of infection. PMID:25454225

  19. Iron mineralogy and bioaccessibility of dust generated from soils as determined by reflectance spectroscopy and magnetic and chemical properties--Nellis Dunes recreational area, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldstein, Harland L.; Reynolds, Richard L.; Morman, Suzette A.; Moskowitz, Bruce; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Goossens, Dirk; Buck, Brenda J.; Flagg, Cody; Till, Jessica; Yauk, Kimberly; Berquó, Thelma S.

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric mineral dust exerts many important effects on the Earth system, such as atmospheric temperatures, marine productivity, and melting of snow and ice. Mineral dust also can have detrimental effects on human health through respiration of very small particles and the leaching of metals in various organs. These effects can be better understood through characterization of the physical and chemical properties of dust, including certain iron oxide minerals, for their extraordinary radiative properties and possible effects on lung inflammation. Studies of dust from the Nellis Dunes recreation area near Las Vegas, Nevada, focus on characteristics of radiative properties (capacity of dust to absorb solar radiation), iron oxide mineral type and size, chemistry, and bioaccessibility of metals in fluids that simulate human gastric, lung, and phagolysosomal fluids. In samples of dust from the Nellis Dunes recreation area with median grain sizes of 2.4, 3.1, and 4.3 micrometers, the ferric oxide minerals goethite and hematite, at least some of it nanosized, were identified. In one sample, in vitro bioaccessibility experiments revealed high bioaccessibility of arsenic in all three biofluids and higher leachate concentration and bioaccessibility for copper, uranium, and vanadium in the simulated lung fluid than in the phagolysosomal fluid. The combination of methods used here to characterize mineral dust at the Nellis Dunes recreation area can be applied to global dust and broad issues of public health.

  20. Collective Bargaining & Recreation and Park Operations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culkin, David; Howard, Dennis R.

    1982-01-01

    This study explored labor relations practices in United States parks and recreation agencies. Responses from 200 public parks and recreation organizations are discussed and displayed in tabular form. (CJ)

  1. The Many Faces of Military Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaefer, George C.

    1980-01-01

    Military recreation offers many diverse programs similar to those found in commercial, school, industrial, and public recreational facilities. These programs include not only sports events and athletic competitions but also cultural activities and live entertainment. (JN)

  2. Campus Recreation Facilities: Planning for Better Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammitt, Sally; Hammitt, William E.

    1985-01-01

    The use of user categories to explain campus recreation participation patterns and preferences is explored. User type variables were found to be helpful in campus recreation planning and administrative decision-making. (DF)

  3. Parks, Recreation and Public Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Ching-Hua; Payne, Laura; Orsega-Smith, Elizabeth; Godbey, Geoffrey

    2003-01-01

    Reviews what current research says about the holistic health benefits of park and recreation services, focusing on: health benefits according to park users; physical activities in parks; stress reduction benefits of park use; social support, self-determination, and stress reduction; observing nature in parks and associated benefits; and the

  4. Effective Parks & Recreation Boards & Commissions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibrahim, Hilmi; And Others

    This text explains the role of boards, commissions, and councils for parks and recreational programs in generating funds and involving volunteers in local service. The text covers functional differences and structural differences between administrative bodies, policy-making bodies, and advisory bodies. Special attention is given to small group

  5. Aquatic Recreation for the Blind.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordellos, Harry C.

    The sixth in a series of booklets on physical education and recreation for the handicapped describes aquatic activities for blind persons. Written by a partially sighted athlete, the document discusses swimming pool characteristics and special pools for the visually impaired. Qualities of swimming instructors are reviewed, and suggestions for…

  6. Heel Pain in Recreational Runners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bazzoli, Allan S.; Pollina, Frank S.

    1989-01-01

    Provides physicians with the signs, symptoms, and management of heel/sole pain in recreational runners (usually due to plantar fasciitis, Achilles tendinitis, and calcaneal stress fractures). Remedies involve palliative treatment of symptoms, correction of underlying biomechanical problems, and flexibility exercises. (SM)

  7. Teratogenic Effects of `Recreational' Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Polifka, Janine E.; Friedman, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    Published data from clinical studies for commonly abused substances were identified through a TOXLINE bibliographic search. References in teratology monographs and review articles were also used. Emphasis was placed on controlled epidemiological studies. Available evidence suggests that maternal alcohol or cocaine abuse substantially increases the risk of congenital anomalies among infants. Many recreational drugs cause neurobehavioral dysfunction in neonates exposed before birth. PMID:21229112

  8. Recreational Games for Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hume, Donald

    2005-01-01

    Recreational games can be incorporated into physical education programs to encourage play and activity among students during their leisure time. Students can play their own games during recess, before or after school, during intramural programs, or in their neighborhood with family and friends. This article describes five such games namely:

  9. Leisure Today--Employee Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fain, Gerald S., Ed.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Twelve articles describe developments in the field of employee health and recreation. Establishing programs, designing facilities, evaluating program effectiveness, and relating participation to productivity are highlighted, and program philosophy, participation of the handicapped, and legal responsibility for injuries are discussed. (PP)

  10. RECREATIONAL WATER QUALITY AND HEALTH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The overall objective of this pilot study was to develop and evaluate methods to determine the effect of quality of recreational waters on the health of persons bathing in those waters. There is little scientific evidence upon which to base water quality standards for the safety ...

  11. Recreational exercise in rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Holla, J; Fluit, M; van Schaardenburg, D; Dekker, J; Verhagen, E; Steultjens, M

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate changes in health-related quality of life after eight to twelve months of recreational exercise in patients with rheumatic diseases (inflammatory joint disease, osteoarthritis, fibromyalgia and other generalized pain syndromes), and to determine whether patient (age, sex, diagnosis) and exercise characteristics (follow-up time, type of activity, frequency of participation) are related to health-related quality of life change. Health-related quality of life was assessed twice in 138 patients with rheumatic diseases. 1) At enrolment in a centre for outpatient recreational exercise and 2) following eight to twelve months of recreational exercise. Health-related quality of life was measured using the Short-Form Health Survey 36 and three numeric rating scales for pain, fatigue and general condition. Multiple linear regression was used to analyze the influence of patient and exercise characteristics on follow-up HRQoL-score. Patients showed significant improvements in pain and general condition, and reported a positive change in health. A diagnosis of inflammatory joint disease (e. g. rheumatoid arthritis, polyarthritis, spondylitis) or osteoarthritis, participating in sports activities two to three times per week, and following land-based fitness classes were associated with the most improvement in health-related quality of life. Regular participation in recreational exercise contributes to improved health-related quality of life in patients with rheumatic diseases. PMID:19685415

  12. Haptic Recreation of Elbow Spasticity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jonghyun; Damiano, Diane L.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to develop a haptic device capable of presenting standardized recreation of elbow spasticity. Using the haptic device, clinicians will be able to repeatedly practice the assessment of spasticity without requiring patient involvement, and these practice opportunities will help improve accuracy and reliability of the assessment itself. Haptic elbow spasticity simulator (HESS) was designed and prototyped according to mechanical requirements to recreate the feel of elbow spasticity. Based on the data collected from subjects with elbow spasticity, a mathematical model representing elbow spasticity is proposed. As an attempt to differentiate the feel of each score in Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS), parameters of the model were obtained respectively for three different MAS scores 1, 1+, and 2. The implemented haptic recreation was evaluated by experienced clinicians who were asked to give MAS scores by manipulating the haptic device. The clinicians who participated in the study were blinded to each others scores and to the given models. They distinguished the three models and the MAS scores given to the recreated models matched 100% with the original MAS scores from the patients. PMID:22275660

  13. Keeping recreational water facilities safe.

    PubMed

    Farquhar, Doug

    2015-06-01

    (1) Outbreaks of diseases associated with aquatic venues have nearly quadrupledto more than 40 per year. (2) The Cryptosporidium (Crypto) germ is the leading cause of diarrheal outbreaks related to swimming pools. (3) A national voluntary effort is underway to reduce the number of illnesses and injuries from recreational water facilities. PMID:26137608

  14. The History of Commercial Recreation and Its Role in the Provision of Family Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, E. Taylor

    Commercial recreation is the provision of facilities, equipment, and programs that satisfy public demand for activities during unobligated time and are profitable to the supplier. The term "commercial recreation" has been given a negative connotation in the field of recreation and leisure. This negative concept of commercial recreation continues

  15. The History of Commercial Recreation and Its Role in the Provision of Family Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, E. Taylor

    Commercial recreation is the provision of facilities, equipment, and programs that satisfy public demand for activities during unobligated time and are profitable to the supplier. The term "commercial recreation" has been given a negative connotation in the field of recreation and leisure. This negative concept of commercial recreation continues…

  16. 78 FR 4120 - Recreation Resource Advisory Committees

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-18

    ... recreation such as backpacking, horseback riding, mountain biking, canoeing, and rafting; and (e) Hunting and...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Office of the Secretary Recreation Resource Advisory Committees AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of intent to re-establish the Recreation Resource Advisory...

  17. Northern Suburban Special Recreation Association (NSSRA).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northern Suburban Special Recreation Association, Highland Park, IL.

    This document is a description of the Northern Suburban Special Recreation Association (NSSRA) whose function is to provide recreation for the handicapped, primarily school-aged children. Recreation is defined as not just diversion but the restoration of strength and spirits after toil. It is stated that the NSSRA's programs are grouped to

  18. Recreation Vehicle Mechanic. Occupational Analyses Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Ann; Embree, Rick

    This analysis covers tasks performed by a recreation vehicle mechanic, an occupational title some provinces and territories of Canada have also identified as recreation vehicle technician and recreation vehicle service technician. A guide to analysis discusses development, structure, and validation method; scope of the occupation; trends; and

  19. 36 CFR 261.17 - Recreation fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Recreation fees. 261.17 Section 261.17 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PROHIBITIONS General Prohibitions 261.17 Recreation fees. Failure to pay any recreation fee is...

  20. 18 CFR 801.10 - Recreation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Recreation. 801.10 Section 801.10 Conservation of Power and Water Resources SUSQUEHANNA RIVER BASIN COMMISSION GENERAL POLICIES 801.10 Recreation. (a) The use of surface water resources of the basin for recreation...

  1. 18 CFR 801.10 - Recreation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Recreation. 801.10 Section 801.10 Conservation of Power and Water Resources SUSQUEHANNA RIVER BASIN COMMISSION GENERAL POLICIES 801.10 Recreation. (a) The use of surface water resources of the basin for recreation...

  2. Rural Recreation: Concepts, Concerns and Challenges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neal, Larry L.; Long, Patrick T.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses seven factors that impact upon the establishment/support of recreation/leisure services in rural environments: scale, recreation economics, community customs/traditions, work cycle, program delivery, focus on family, attitudinal variances. Examines how each factor has been used to justify limiting recreational opportunities and provides

  3. Large Indoor Sports and Recreation Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seidler, Todd

    This paper presents an overview and analysis of field houses, stadiums, arenas, and campus recreation centers. All are large indoor sports or recreation facilities. In general, stadiums and arenas are spectator facilities while field houses and campus recreation centers are primarily designed for activity. A college field house is a structure that

  4. Missouri Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan: Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri State Inter-Agency for Outdoor Recreation, Jefferson.

    The document is a summary of the Missouri State Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan, which was designed to provide guidelines for allocation of resources for needed recreation facilities. The plan identifies the present and future needs for outdoor recreation and recommends ways of meeting these needs. This 1967 document provides a brief history

  5. 50 CFR 26.32 - Recreational uses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., water skiing, and other similar activities may be permitted on national wildlife refuges. When such uses... NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM PUBLIC ENTRY AND USE Public Use and Recreation § 26.32 Recreational uses... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Recreational uses. 26.32 Section...

  6. 50 CFR 26.32 - Recreational uses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., water skiing, and other similar activities may be permitted on national wildlife refuges. When such uses... NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM PUBLIC ENTRY AND USE Public Use and Recreation § 26.32 Recreational uses... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Recreational uses. 26.32 Section...

  7. 50 CFR 26.32 - Recreational uses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., water skiing, and other similar activities may be permitted on national wildlife refuges. When such uses... NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM PUBLIC ENTRY AND USE Public Use and Recreation § 26.32 Recreational uses... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Recreational uses. 26.32 Section...

  8. 50 CFR 26.32 - Recreational uses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., water skiing, and other similar activities may be permitted on national wildlife refuges. When such uses... NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM PUBLIC ENTRY AND USE Public Use and Recreation § 26.32 Recreational uses... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Recreational uses. 26.32 Section...

  9. 50 CFR 600.513 - Recreational fishing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Recreational fishing. 600.513 Section 600... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MAGNUSON-STEVENS ACT PROVISIONS Foreign Fishing 600.513 Recreational fishing. (a) Foreign vessels conducting recreational fishing must comply only with this section,...

  10. 50 CFR 600.513 - Recreational fishing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Recreational fishing. 600.513 Section 600... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MAGNUSON-STEVENS ACT PROVISIONS Foreign Fishing 600.513 Recreational fishing. (a) Foreign vessels conducting recreational fishing must comply only with this section,...

  11. 50 CFR 600.513 - Recreational fishing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Recreational fishing. 600.513 Section 600... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MAGNUSON-STEVENS ACT PROVISIONS Foreign Fishing 600.513 Recreational fishing. (a) Foreign vessels conducting recreational fishing must comply only with this section,...

  12. [Recreation for Youth with Deaf Blindness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Theresa, Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This newsletter special issue focuses on recreational programming for people with deaf blindness. The following individual articles are presented: "Strategies To Promote Community Integrated Recreation: Guidelines for Leisure Coaches" by Joann Enos (which lists seven such strategies); "Assessing Recreation and Leisure Preferences" by Laura Rocchio…

  13. The Role of Sports in Kindergarten Teachers' Recreational Habits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozturk, Huseyin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the role of the sports in the recreational habits of kindergarten teachers. The survey population comprises kindergarten teachers who are employed in the province of Gaziantep. The sample constitutes a total of 378 kindergarten teachers determined by circumstantial method. The survey developed by Tunçel was…

  14. 77 FR 23633 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Northeast Multispecies Fishery; Recreational...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-20

    .... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The final rule implementing Amendment 16 to the NE Multispecies FMP (75 FR 18262... (April 9, 2010, 75 FR 18356). Based on Marine Recreational Fishing Statistical Survey (MRFSS) data, the... Panel, NMFS published an interim final rule (76 FR 82197, December 30, 2011) that implemented a...

  15. WATERBORNE DISEASES AND MICROBIAL QUALITY MONITORING FOR RECREATIONAL WATER BODIES USING REGULATORY METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter will provide the reader with a historical perspective of microbial water quality and monitoring of recreational waters, with special attention to marine environments. It will review the regulations that are currently in effect in the United States and discuss critic...

  16. Youth's recreation and drug sensations: is there a relationship?

    PubMed

    Cato, B M

    1992-01-01

    Adolescents' social behaviors remain a mystery to parks and recreation providers. Adolescence is a "high-risk" time for all youth in terms of experimenting with potentially health-compromising behavior, whether alcohol, drugs, or sex. Most of these antisocial behaviors occur during adolescents' leisure time. These inferences gave impetus to this research effort. The study was designed to ascertain information on adolescents' preferences for pleasure: drugs or recreation. Data were collected from a sample of 100 high school students from a medium-sized college town, and 100 students from a rural town in Florida. Findings revealed four statistically significant associations in the motives or pleasures sought in recreation and in drug behaviors: "enhancement of popularity," "provision of a means for self-discovery," "achievement of personal goal," and means to rebel against parents. In reference to the latter motive, findings revealed that neither drugs nor recreation were used to rebel against parents. Findings also provide documentation of the value of recreation in insulating adolescents against many of the stressors of contemporary life. PMID:1484327

  17. Alcohol consumption among recreational boaters: factors for intervention.

    PubMed

    Miller, J R; Pikora, T J

    2008-03-01

    Recreational boating is a popular leisure time activity in many countries. It is estimated that, in Australia, boating incidents cause more harm than rail and air crashes combined and, in terms of transport, are second only to motor vehicle crashes as a cause of serious injury. The consumption of alcohol among recreational boaters is considered an important risk factor for fatalities and injuries among both operators and passengers. Using a database of all recreational vessels registered in Western Australia (WA), a sample of 500 adult boaters was recruited to participate in a telephone survey. The effects of demographic variables and boating characteristics upon the use of alcohol among recreational boaters on their last trip were explored using logistic regression. The odds of not having a drink were associated, after adjusting for age, with having completed a boating education course and with carrying children less than 12 years on board. The use of alcohol was not found to be prevalent among WA recreational boat owners. Based on these findings, it is recommended that efforts to decrease boating-related incidents, such as through education and legislation measures, be monitored over time to determine the effects of these strategies upon safety behaviours. PMID:18329399

  18. Evaluating the multiple benefits of marine water quality improvements: how important are health risk reductions?

    PubMed

    Machado, Fernando S; Mourato, Susana

    2002-07-01

    Marine water pollution affects many recreational sites around the world. It has impacts not only on recreational activities but also on health risks for those who come into direct contact with the water. Few economic studies have explicitly considered the health risks of bathing in polluted marine waters and none have attempted to separate health benefits from other benefits of marine water quality improvements. This paper uses stated preference techniques to separately evaluate the multiple benefits of improving the quality of marine recreational waters at the Estoril Coast in Portugal. The results indicate that health risk reductions are only a small fraction of the total social benefits of water quality improvements. PMID:12357657

  19. Concentration of Beryllium (Be) and Depleted Uranium (DU) in Marine Fauna and Sediment Samples from Illeginni and Boggerik Islands at Kwajalein Atoll

    SciTech Connect

    Robison, W L; Hamilton, T F; Martinelli, R E; Kehl, S R; Lindman, T R

    2005-02-24

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) personnel have supported US Air Force (USAF) ballistic missile flight tests for about 15 years for Peacekeeper and Minuteman missiles launched at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB). Associated re-entry vehicles (RV's) re-enter at Regan Test Site (RTS) at the US Army base at Kwajalein Atoll (USAKA) where LLNL has supported scoring, recovery operations for RV materials, and environmental assessments. As part of ongoing USAF ballistic missile flight test programs, LLNL is participating in an updated EA being written for flights originating at VFAB. Marine fauna and sediments (beach-sand samples) were collected by US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), and LLNL at Illeginni Island and Boggerik Island (serving as a control site) at Kwajalein Atoll. Data on the concentration of DU (hereafter, U) and Be in collected samples was requested by USFWS and NMFS to determine whether or not U and Be in RV's entering the Illeginni area are increasing U and Be concentrations in marine fauna and sediments. LLNL agreed to do the analyses for U and Be in support of the EA process and provide a report of the results. There is no statistically significant difference in the concentration of U and Be in six species of marine fauna from Illeginni and Boggerik Islands (p - 0.14 for U and p = 0.34 for Be). Thus, there is no evidence that there has been any increase in U and Be concentrations in marine fauna as a result of the missile flight test program. Concentration of U in beach sand at Illeginni is the same as soil and beach sand in the rest of the Marshall Islands and again reflects an insignificant impact from the flight test program. Beach sand from Illeginni has a mean concentration of Be higher than that from the control site, Boggeik Island. Seven of 21 samples from Ileginni had detectable Be. Four samples had a concentration of Be ranging from 4 to 7 ng g {sup -1} (4 to 7 parts per billion (ppb)), one was 17 ppb, one was 0.14 parts per million (ppm), and one was 0.48 ppm. These extremely low concentrations of an insoluble form of Be again indicate no impact on marine life or human health at Illeginni as a result of the missile flight test program. Concentration of Fe in marine fauna muscle tissue is much higher at Illeginni Island than at Boggerik Island (control site) as a result of legacy iron piers, dump sites for iron metal along the island, and scrap iron randomly distributed along extensive portions of the reef line as part of programs conducted in the 1960's through 1980's that were not part of the recent flight test program.

  20. Empirical Evidence for Species-Specific Export of Fish Naïveté from a No-Take Marine Protected Area in a Coastal Recreational Hook and Line Fishery

    PubMed Central

    Alós, Josep; Puiggrós, Antoni; Díaz-Gil, Carlos; Palmer, Miquel; Rosselló, Rosario; Arlinghaus, Robert

    2015-01-01

    No-take marine protected areas (MPAs) are assumed to enhance fisheries catch via the “spillover” effect, where biomass is exported to adjacent exploited areas. Recent studies in spearfishing fisheries suggest that the spillover of gear-naïve individuals from protected to unprotected sites increases catch rates outside the boundaries of MPAs. Whether this is a widespread phenomenon that also holds for other gear types and species is unknown. In this study, we tested if the distance to a Mediterranean MPA predicted the degree of vulnerability to hook and line in four small-bodied coastal fish species. With the assistance of underwater video recording, we investigated the interaction effect of the distance to the boundary of an MPA and species type relative to the latency time to ingest a natural bait, which was considered as a surrogate of fish naïveté or vulnerability to fishing. Vulnerability to angling increased (i.e., latency time decreased) within and near the boundary of an MPA for an intrinsically highly catchable species (Serranus scriba), while it remained constant for an intrinsically uncatchable control species (Chromis chromis). While all of the individuals of S. scriba observed within the MPA and surrounding areas were in essence captured by angling gear, only one fifth of individuals in the far locations were captured. This supports the potential for the spillover of gear-naïve and consequently more vulnerable fish from no-take MPAs. Two other species initially characterized as intermediately catchable (Coris julis and Diplodus annularis) also had a shorter latency time in the vicinity of an MPA, but for these two cases the trend was not statistically significant. Overall, our results suggest that an MPA-induced naïveté effect may not be universal and may be confined to only intrinsically highly catchable fish species. This fact emphasizes the importance of considering the behavioural dimension when predicting the outcomes of MPAs, otherwise the effective contribution may be smaller than predicted for certain highly catchable species such as S. scriba. PMID:26275290

  1. Inventory and management of trespass recreation use at Upper Delaware and Scenic and Recreational River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marion, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    Recreational trespass on private lands within the Upper Delaware Scenic and Recreational River, located along the eastern border between Pennsylvania and New York, prompted this survey of recreational trespass sites. The National Park Service has been mandated to manage river recreational use within its boundaries but land ownership shall remain predominantly private. This survey was conducted to document the number and distribution of river recreation trespass sites and to recommend appropriate management actions to minimize trespass use.

  2. Organic UV filter concentrations in marine mussels from French coastal regions.

    PubMed

    Bachelot, Morgane; Li, Zhi; Munaron, Dominique; Le Gall, Patrik; Casellas, Claude; Fenet, Hlne; Gomez, Elena

    2012-03-15

    The accumulation of EHMC, OCT and OD-PABA, three common UV filter compounds, was investigated in marine mussels. Wild Mytilus edulis and Mytilus galloprovincialis were sampled in ten sites along the French Atlantic and Mediterranean coasts from June to November. In mussel tissues, 100% of the samples had quantifiable EHMC concentrations ranging from 3 to 256ngg(-1) dry weight, while 55% of the samples had detectable OCT concentrations ranging from under 2 to 7 112ngg(-1) dry weight. These concentrations significantly increased with the rising air temperature in summer, the recreational pressure and the geomorphological structure of the sampling sites (its lack of openness to the wide). This is the first study to report bioaccumulation of UV filters in marine mussels, thus highlighting the need for further monitoring and assessment. PMID:22330425

  3. Pilot Inventory of Mammals, Reptiles, and Amphibians, Golden Gate National Recreation Area, California, 1990-1997

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Semenoff-Irving, Marcia; Howell, Judd A.

    2005-01-01

    The United States Geological Survey Golden Gate Field Station conducted a baseline inventory of terrestrial vertebrates within the Golden Gate National Recreation Area (GGNRA), Marin, San Francisco, and San Mateo Counties, California between 1990 and 1997. We established 456 permanent study plots in 6 major park habitats, including grassland, coastal scrub, riparian woodland, coastal wetland, broad-leaved evergreen forest, and needle-leaved evergreen forest. We tested multiple inventory methods, including live traps, track plate stations, and artificial cover boards, across all years and habitats. In most years, sampling occurred in 3-4 primary sampling sessions between July and September. In 1994, additional sampling occurred in February and May in conjunction with an assessment of Hantavirus exposure in deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus). Overall, we detected 32 mammal, 14 reptile, and 6 amphibian species during 25,222 trap-nights of effort. The deer mouse-the most abundant species detected--accounted for 67% of total captures. We detected the Federal Endangered salt marsh harvest mouse (Reithrodontomys raviventris) at one coastal wetland plot in 1992. This project represents the first phase in the development of a comprehensive terrestrial vertebrate inventory and monitoring program for GGNRA. This report summarizes data on relative abundance, frequency of occurrence, distribution across habitat types, and trap success for terrestrial vertebrates detected during this 7-year effort. It includes comprehensive descriptions of the inventory methods and sampling strategies employed during this survey and is intended to help guide the park in the implementation of future longterm ecological monitoring programs.

  4. Pilot Inventory of mammals, reptiles, and amphibians, Golden Gate National Recreation Area, California, 1990-1997

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Semenoff-Irving, M.; Howell, J.A.

    2005-01-01

    The United States Geological Survey Golden Gate Field Station conducted a baseline inventory of terrestrial vertebrates within the Golden Gate National Recreation Area (GGNRA), Marin, San Francisco, and San Mateo Counties, California between 1990 and 1997. We established 456 permanent study plots in 6 major park habitats, including grassland, coastal scrub, riparian woodland, coastal wetland, broad-leaved evergreen forest, and needle-leaved evergreen forest. We tested multiple inventory methods, including live traps, track plate stations, and artificial cover boards, across all years and habitats. In most years, sampling occurred in 3?4 primary sampling sessions between July and September. In 1994, additional sampling occurred in February and May in conjunction with an assessment of Hantavirus exposure in deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus). Overall, we detected 32 mammal, 14 reptile, and 6 amphibian species during 25,222 trap-nights of effort. The deer mouse?the most abundant species detected--accounted for 67% of total captures. We detected the Federal Endangered salt marsh harvest mouse (Reithrodontomys raviventris) at one coastal wetland plot in 1992. This project represents the first phase in the development of a comprehensive terrestrial vertebrate inventory and monitoring program for GGNRA. This report summarizes data on relative abundance, frequency of occurrence, distribution across habitat types, and trap success for terrestrial vertebrates detected during this 7-year effort. It includes comprehensive descriptions of the inventory methods and sampling strategies employed during this survey and is intended to help guide the park in the implementation of future longterm ecological monitoring programs.

  5. Therapeutic and recreational methadone cardiotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Lusetti, Monia; Licata, Manuela; Silingardi, Enrico; Reggiani Bonetti, Luca; Palmiere, Cristian

    2016-04-01

    Several classes of drugs have been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and occurrence of arrhythmias potentially involved in sudden deaths in chronic users even at therapeutic doses. The study presented herein focuses on pathological changes involving the heart possibly due to methadone use. 60 cases were included in the study in total and were divided into three groups (therapeutic methadone users: 20 cases, recreational methadone users: 20 cases, and sudden death group in subjects who had never taken methadone: 20 cases). Autopsies, histology, biochemistry and toxicology were performed in all cases. Macroscopic and microscopic investigation results in therapeutic methadone users were similar to those observed in sudden, unexpected deaths in non-methadone users. In recreational methadone consumers, macroscopic and microscopic examination of the heart failed to provide results consistent with acute or chronic myocardial or coronary damage, thereby corroborating the hypothesis of death most likely following respiratory depression. PMID:26859696

  6. Molecular detection of native and invasive marine invertebrate larvae present in ballast and open water environmental samples collected in Puget Sound

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harvey, J.B.J.; Hoy, M.S.; Rodriguez, R.J.

    2009-01-01

    Non-native marine species have been and continue to be introduced into Puget Sound via several vectors including ship's ballast water. Some non-native species become invasive and negatively impact native species or near shore habitats. We present a new methodology for the development and testing of taxon specific PCR primers designed to assess environmental samples of ocean water for the presence of native and non-native bivalves, crustaceans and algae. The intergenic spacer regions (IGS; ITS1, ITS2 and 5.8S) of the ribosomal DNA were sequenced for adult samples of each taxon studied. We used these data along with those available in Genbank to design taxon and group specific primers and tested their stringency against artificial populations of plasmid constructs containing the entire IGS region for each of the 25 taxa in our study, respectively. Taxon and group specific primer sets were then used to detect the presence or absence of native and non-native planktonic life-history stages (propagules) from environmental samples of ballast water and plankton tow net samples collected in Puget Sound. This methodology provides an inexpensive and efficient way to test the discriminatory ability of taxon specific oligonucleotides (PCR primers) before creating molecular probes or beacons for use in molecular ecological applications such as probe hybridizations or microarray analyses. This work addresses the current need to develop molecular tools capable of diagnosing the presence of planktonic life-history stages from non-native marine species (potential invaders) in ballast water and other environmental samples. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V.

  7. Recreation as a reinforcer: increasing membership and decreasing disruptions in an urban recreation centre1

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Charles H.; Risley, Todd R.

    1974-01-01

    It is presumed that recreation activities have a variety of functions for people, from tension reduction to citizenship development; however, a recreation activity's most empirically obvious function is as a reinforcer. This study demonstrates how two recurrent problems of urban recreation programsrecruitment of members and reduction of disruptive behaviors within the programcan be handled simply by contingently adjusting the amount of time the recreation activities are available. When extra time in the recreation center was provided to those youths who brought new members, dramatic increases in membership were achieved. On the other hand, when the closing time for each evening's recreation program was publicly moved forward by a few minutes for each offense, disruptive behaviors were nearly eliminated. Recreation used as a reinforcer can thus improve the basic operation of a recreation center and might similarly enhance other presumed and desired functions of recreation. PMID:16795471

  8. EAARL topography: Gateway National Recreation Area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brock, John C.; Wright, C. Wayne; Patterson, Matt; Nayegandhi, Amar; Patterson, Judd

    2007-01-01

    This Web site contains Lidar-derived topography (bare earth) maps and GIS files for the Sandy Hook Unit within Gateway National Recreation Area in New Jersey. These Lidar-derived topography maps were produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Coastal and Marine Geology Program, FISC St. Petersburg, the National Park Service (NPS) South Florida/Caribbean Network Inventory and Monitoring Program, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Wallops Flight Facility. One objective of this research is to create techniques to survey coral reefs and barrier islands for the purposes of geomorphic change studies, habitat mapping, ecological monitoring, change detection, and event assessment. As part of this project, data from an innovative instrument under development at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, the NASA Experimental Airborne Advanced Research Lidar (EAARL) are being used. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in this realm for measuring subaerial and submarine topography wthin cross-environment surveys. High spectral resolution, water-column correction, and low costs were found to be key factors in providing accurate and affordable imagery to costal resource managers.

  9. Cryptosporidium and Giardia in recreational water in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Ehsan, Md Amimul; Casaert, Stijn; Levecke, Bruno; Van Rooy, Liesbet; Pelicaen, Joachim; Smis, Anne; De Backer, Joke; Vervaeke, Bart; De Smedt, Sandra; Schoonbaert, Filip; Lammens, Saskia; Warmoes, Thierry; Geurden, Thomas; Claerebout, Edwin

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the presence of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in different recreational water bodies in Belgium and to estimate the infection risk associated with swimming and other recreational activities. Cryptosporidium oocysts and/or Giardia cysts were detected in three out of 37 swimming pools, seven out of 10 recreational lakes, two out of seven splash parks and four out of 16 water fountains. In the swimming pools no infection risk for Cryptosporidium could be calculated, since oocysts were only detected in filter backwash water. The risk of Giardia infection in the swimming pools varied from 1.13×10(-6) to 2.49×10(-6) per swim per person. In recreational lakes, the infection risk varied from 2.79×10(-5) to 5.74×10(-5) per swim per person for Cryptosporidium and from 7.04×10(-5) to 1.46×10(-4) for Giardia. For other outdoor water recreation activities the estimated infection risk was 5.71×10(-6) for Cryptosporidium and 1.47×10(-5) for Giardia. However, most positive samples in the recreational lakes belonged to species/genotypes that are either animal-specific or predominantly found in animals. No Cryptosporidium was found in splash parks and water fountains, but the presence of Giardia cysts suggests a risk for human infection. The infection risk of Giardia infection during a 3.5-minute visit to a splash park for children equalled 1.68×10(-4). PMID:26322773

  10. RAPID MEASUREMENT OF BACTERIAL FECAL POLLUTION INDICATORS AT RECREATIONAL BEACHES BY QUANTITATIVE POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous studies have demonstrated that measurements by the membrane filtration (MF) method of the bacterial indicators Enterococcus and E. coli in recreational beach water samples are correlated with swimming-associated gastroenteritis. These relationships currently serve as the...

  11. Precise measurement of Fe isotopes in marine samples by multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS).

    PubMed

    de Jong, Jeroen; Schoemann, Vronique; Tison, Jean-Louis; Becquevort, Sylvie; Masson, Florence; Lannuzel, Delphine; Petit, Jrme; Chou, Lei; Weis, Dominique; Mattielli, Nadine

    2007-04-18

    A novel analytical technique for isotopic analysis of dissolved and particulate iron (Fe) from various marine environments is presented in this paper. It combines coprecipitation of dissolved Fe (DFe) samples with Mg(OH)(2), and acid digestion of particulate Fe (PFe) samples with double pass chromatographic separation. Isotopic data were obtained using a Nu Plasma MC-ICP-MS in dry plasma mode, applying a combination of standard-sample bracketing and external normalization by Cu doping. Argon interferences were determined prior to each analysis and automatically subtracted during analysis. Sample size can be varied between 200 and 600 ng of Fe per measurement and total procedural blanks are better than 10 ng of Fe. Typical external precision of replicate analyses (1S.D.) is +/-0.07 per thousand on delta(56)Fe and +/-0.09 per thousand on delta(57)Fe while typical internal precision of a measurement (1S.E.) is +/-0.03 per thousand on delta(56)Fe and +/-0.04 per thousand on delta(57)Fe. Accuracy and precision were assured by the analysis of reference material IRMM-014, an in-house pure Fe standard, an in-house rock standard, as well as by inter-laboratory comparison using a hematite standard from ETH (Zrich). The lowest amount of Fe (200 ng) at which a reliable isotopic measurement could still be performed corresponds to a DFe or PFe concentration of approximately 2 nmol L(-1) for a 2 L sample size. To show the versatility of the method, results are presented from contrasting environments characterized by a wide range of Fe concentrations as well as varying salt content: the Scheldt estuary, the North Sea, and Antarctic pack ice. The range of DFe and PFe concentrations encountered in this investigation falls between 2 and 2000 nmol L(-1) Fe. The distinct isotopic compositions detected in these environments cover the whole range reported in previous studies of natural Fe isotopic fractionation in the marine environment, i.e. delta(56)Fe varies between -3.5 per thousand and +1.5 per thousand. The largest fractionations were observed in environments characterized by redox changes and/or strong Fe cycling. This demonstrates the potential use of Fe isotopes as a tool to trace marine biogeochemical processes involving Fe. PMID:17397660

  12. Psychometric investigation of the abbreviated concussion symptom inventory in a sample of U.S. Marines returning from combat.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Justin S; Pulos, Steven; Haran, F Jay; Tsao, Jack W; Alphonso, Aimee L

    2015-01-01

    This study describes the psychometric investigation of an 11-item symptom checklist, the Abbreviated Concussion Symptom Inventory (ACSI). The ACSI is a dichotomously scored list of postconcussive symptoms associated with mild traumatic brain injury. The ACSI was administered to Marines (N=1,435) within the 1st month of their return from combat deployments to Afghanistan. Psychometric analyses based upon nonparametric item response theory supported scoring the ACSI via simple summation of symptom endorsements; doing so produced a total score with good reliability (?=.802). Total scores were also found to significantly differentiate between different levels of head injury complexity during deployment, F(3, 1,431)=100.75, p<.001. The findings support the use of the ASCI in research settings requiring a psychometrically reliable measure of postconcussion symptoms. PMID:25153983

  13. IN-SITU SAMPLING AND CHARACTERIZATION OF NATURALLY OCCURRING MARINE METHANE HYDRATE USING THE D/V JOIDES RESOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Frank R. Rack; Peter Schultheiss; Melanie Holland

    2005-01-01

    The primary accomplishments of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter were that: (1) follow-up logging of pressure cores containing hydrate-bearing sediment; and (2) opening of some of these cores to establish ground-truth understanding. The follow-up measurements made on pressure cores in storage are part of a hydrate geriatric study related to ODP Leg 204. These activities are described in detail in Appendices A and B of this report. Work also continued on developing plans for Phase 2 of this cooperative agreement based on evolving plans to schedule a scientific ocean drilling expedition to study marine methane hydrates along the Cascadia margin, in the NE Pacific as part of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) using the R/V JOIDES Resolution.

  14. Effects of sample handling and cultivation bias on the specificity of bacterial communities in keratose marine sponges

    PubMed Central

    Hardoim, Cristiane C. P.; Cardinale, Massimiliano; Cúcio, Ana C. B.; Esteves, Ana I. S.; Berg, Gabriele; Xavier, Joana R.; Cox, Cymon J.; Costa, Rodrigo

    2014-01-01

    Complex and distinct bacterial communities inhabit marine sponges and are believed to be essential to host survival, but our present-day inability to domesticate sponge symbionts in the laboratory hinders our access to the full metabolic breadth of these microbial consortia. We address bacterial cultivation bias in marine sponges using a procedure that enables direct comparison between cultivated and uncultivated symbiont community structures. Bacterial community profiling of the sympatric keratose species Sarcotragus spinosulus and Ircinia variabilis (Dictyoceratida, Irciniidae) was performed by polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and 454-pyrosequecing of 16S rRNA gene fragments. Whereas cultivation-independent methods revealed species-specific bacterial community structures in these hosts, cultivation-dependent methods resulted in equivalent community assemblages from both species. Between 15 and 18 bacterial phyla were found in S. spinosulus and I. variabilis using cultivation-independent methods. However, Alphaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria dominated the cultivation-dependent bacterial community. While cultivation-independent methods revealed about 200 and 220 operational taxonomic units (OTUs, 97% gene similarity) in S. spinosulus and I. variabilis, respectively, only 33 and 39 OTUs were found in these species via culturing. Nevertheless, around 50% of all cultured OTUs escaped detection by cultivation-independent methods, indicating that standard cultivation makes otherwise host-specific bacterial communities similar by selectively enriching for rarer and generalist symbionts. This study sheds new light on the diversity spectrum encompassed by cultivated and uncultivated sponge-associated bacteria. Moreover, it highlights the need to develop alternative culturing technologies to capture the dominant sponge symbiont fraction that currently remains recalcitrant to laboratory manipulation. PMID:25477868

  15. Comparison of sample preparation methods, validation of an UPLC-MS/MS procedure for the quantification of tetrodotoxin present in marine gastropods and analysis of pufferfish.

    PubMed

    Nzoughet, Judith Kouassi; Campbell, Katrina; Barnes, Paul; Cooper, Kevin M; Chevallier, Olivier P; Elliott, Christopher T

    2013-02-15

    Tetrodotoxin (TTX) is one of the most potent marine neurotoxins reported. The global distribution of this toxin is spreading with the European Atlantic coastline now being affected. Climate change and increasing pollution have been suggested as underlying causes for this. In the present study, two different sample preparation techniques were used to extract TTX from Trumpet shells and pufferfish samples. Both extraction procedures (accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) and a simple solvent extraction) were shown to provide good recoveries (80-92%). A UPLC-MS/MS method was developed for the analysis of TTX and validated following the guidelines contained in the Commission Decision 2002/657/EC for chemical contaminant analysis. The performance of this procedure was demonstrated to be fit for purpose. This study is the first report on the use of ASE as a mean for TTX extraction, the use of UPLC-MS/MS for TTX analysis, and the validation of this method for TTX in gastropods. PMID:23194566

  16. Effects of sample preparation on stable isotope ratios of carbon and nitrogen in marine invertebrates: implications for food web studies using stable isotopes.

    PubMed

    Mateo, Miguel A; Serrano, Oscar; Serrano, Laura; Michener, Robert H

    2008-08-01

    Trophic ecology has benefitted from the use of stable isotopes for the last three decades. However, during the last 10 years, there has been a growing awareness of the isotopic biases associated with some pre-analytical procedures that can seriously hamper the interpretation of food webs. We have assessed the extent of such biases by: (1) reviewing the literature on the topic, and (2) compiling C and N isotopic values of marine invertebrates reported in the literature with the associated sample preparation protocols. The factors considered were: acid-washing, distilled water rinsing (DWR), sample type (whole individuals or pieces of soft tissues), lipid content, and gut contents. Two-level ANOVA revealed overall large and highly significant effects of acidification for both delta(13)C values (up to 0.9 per thousand decrease) and delta(15) N values (up to 2.1 per thousand decrease in whole individual samples, and up to 1.1 per thousand increase in tissue samples). DWR showed a weak overall effect with delta(13)C increments of 0.6 per thousand (for the entire data set) or decrements of 0.7 per thousand in delta(15) N values (for tissue samples). Gut contents showed no overall significant effect, whereas lipid extraction resulted in the greatest biases in both isotopic signatures (delta(13)C, up to -2.0 per thousand in whole individuals; delta(15)N, up to +4.3 per thousand in tissue samples). The study analyzed separately the effects of the various factors in different taxonomic groups and revealed a very high diversity in the extent and direction of the effects. Maxillopoda, Gastropoda, and Polychaeta were the classes that showed the largest isotopic shifts associated with sample preparation. Guidelines for the standardization of sample preparation protocols for isotopic analysis are proposed both for large and small marine invertebrates. Broadly, these guidelines recommend: (1) avoiding both acid washing and DWR, and (2) performing lipid extraction and gut evacuation in most cases. PMID:18465146

  17. DETERMINATION OF FENTHION RESIDUES IN SAMPLES OF MARINE BIOTA AND SEAWATER FROM LABORATORY EXPOSURES AND FIELD APPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method for measuring fenthion in samples from the estuarine environment is described. The method was applied to samples from field applications of fenthion to control saltmarsh mosquitos. The method, offers an improvement in the silica gel cleanup of Watts (11), and yields grea...

  18. Detection of verotoxin producing Escherichia coli in marine environments of the Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Walker, Trisha J; Bachoon, D S; Otero, Ernesto; Ramsubhag, Adesh

    2013-11-15

    The goal of this study was to determine the potential for Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 (EHEC) contamination in tropical marine waters. Samples were collected from urban, suburban, and rural sites around the islands of Puerto Rico and The Republic of Trinidad and Tobago. Quantification of E. coli and EHEC was evaluated using MI plates and qPCR. EHEC was detected in six sites in Puerto Rico: West of La Parguera Town, Boquilla, Oro Creek, Fishers Association, Joyuda Lagoon, and Boqueron Wetland Creek and in two rural sites in Trinidad: Balandra Bay and Quinam Bay. Plate count enumeration of E. coli was not a reliable indicator for the presence of EHEC. The sites where EHEC was detected on both islands are used for recreational bathing, water sports and recreational/commercial fisheries and therefore pose a public potential health risk. PMID:24035427

  19. Influence of DNA Extraction Method, 16S rRNA Targeted Hypervariable Regions, and Sample Origin on Microbial Diversity Detected by 454 Pyrosequencing in Marine Chemosynthetic Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Cruaud, Perrine; Vigneron, Adrien; Lucchetti-Miganeh, Céline; Ciron, Pierre Emmanuel; Godfroy, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) opens up exciting possibilities for improving our knowledge of environmental microbial diversity, allowing rapid and cost-effective identification of both cultivated and uncultivated microorganisms. However, library preparation, sequencing, and analysis of the results can provide inaccurate representations of the studied community compositions. Therefore, all these steps need to be taken into account carefully. Here we evaluated the effects of DNA extraction methods, targeted 16S rRNA hypervariable regions, and sample origins on the diverse microbes detected by 454 pyrosequencing in marine cold seep and hydrothermal vent sediments. To assign the reads with enough taxonomic precision, we built a database with about 2,500 sequences from Archaea and Bacteria from deep-sea marine sediments, affiliated according to reference publications in the field. Thanks to statistical and diversity analyses as well as inference of operational taxonomic unit (OTU) networks, we show that (i) while DNA extraction methods do not seem to affect the results for some samples, they can lead to dramatic changes for others; and (ii) the choice of amplification and sequencing primers also considerably affects the microbial community detected in the samples. Thereby, very different proportions of pyrosequencing reads were obtained for some microbial lineages, such as the archaeal ANME-1, ANME-2c, and MBG-D and deltaproteobacterial subgroups. This work clearly indicates that the results from sequencing-based analyses, such as pyrosequencing, should be interpreted very carefully. Therefore, the combination of NGS with complementary approaches, such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)/catalyzed reporter deposition (CARD)-FISH or quantitative PCR (Q-PCR), would be desirable to gain a more comprehensive picture of environmental microbial communities. PMID:24837380

  20. In-Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Marine Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Frank Rack

    2005-06-30

    The primary accomplishments of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter were to refine budgets and operational plans for Phase 2 of this cooperative agreement based on the scheduling of a scientific ocean drilling expedition to study marine methane hydrates along the Cascadia margin, in the NE Pacific as part of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) using the R/V JOIDES Resolution. The proposed statement of work for Phase 2 will include three primary tasks: (1) research management oversight, provided by JOI; (2) mobilization, deployment and demobilization of pressure coring and core logging systems, through a subcontract with Geotek Ltd., who will work with Fugro and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to accomplish some of the subtasks; and, (3) mobilization, deployment and demobilization of a refrigerated container van that will be used for degassing of the Pressure Core Sampler and density logging of these pressure cores, through a subcontract with the Texas A&M Research Foundation (TAMRF). More details about these tasks are provided in the following sections of this report. The appendices to this report contain a copy of the scientific prospectus for the upcoming IODP Expedition 311 (Cascadia Margin Hydrates), which provides details of operational and scientific planning for this expedition.

  1. Proceedings of the Third Annual Student Symposium on Marine Affairs (University of Hawaii, Manoa Campus, January 13, 1978).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1978

    This volume of the proceedings of the Third Annual Student Symposium on Marine Affairs contains 32 papers in eight categories: (1) coastal zone management; (2) marine resources; (3) aquaculture; (4) alternative marine energy sources; (5) ocean engineering; (6) recreational facilities; (7) marine biology; and (8) options. The papers are the

  2. Proceedings of the Third Annual Student Symposium on Marine Affairs (University of Hawaii, Manoa Campus, January 13, 1978).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1978

    This volume of the proceedings of the Third Annual Student Symposium on Marine Affairs contains 32 papers in eight categories: (1) coastal zone management; (2) marine resources; (3) aquaculture; (4) alternative marine energy sources; (5) ocean engineering; (6) recreational facilities; (7) marine biology; and (8) options. The papers are the…

  3. Solubilities of Al, Pb, Cu, and Zn in rain sampled in the marine environment over the North Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, B.; Jickells, T. D.; Colin, J. L.; Losno, R.

    1994-09-01

    Chemical processes controlling the dissolved and particulate phase distribution of crustal (Al) and noncrustal metals (Pb, Cu, and Zn) appear to differ in marine precipitation sampled over the North Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea. Dissolved Al appears to be in equilibrium with a trivalent Al salt at rainwater pH < 5.1, whereas dissolved Pb, Cu, and Zn concentrations are probably controlled by adsorption/desorption processes in which rainwater particulates provide surface-active sorption sites. In both processes, rainwater pH is a critical parameter. Results suggest that in marine precipitation with pH < 5, > 80% of the total Pb, Cu, and Zn concentrations are delivered to the surface oceans in the dissolved form. For a corresponding pH range, Al solubility varies from <5% to >60%. Over the wider observed pH range (of 3.5 to 6.9), the solubilities of Pb, Cu, Zn, and Al are highly variable. The use of mean trace metal solubilities for the assessment of dissolved atmospheric trace metal wet deposition fluxes, and their effects on surface ocean biogeochemistry should be constrained by taking into account rainwater pH in future estimates in global models.

  4. Recreation for the Aged: The Physician's Role

    PubMed Central

    Schonfield, David

    1970-01-01

    Family physicians could well spend some time intervening on behalf of geriatrics who need a higher income and better recreation facilities. Aside from money, the other needs for geriatric recreation are a proper concept of recreation (one person's work is another person's play) and recognition of age-related changes in performance. Recreation programs should be as varied as possible and should not discount useful tasks. Activities should provide for social interchange and long-term goals. Monetary reward is a good way to stimulate motivation. Imagesp43-a PMID:20468594

  5. Application of passive sampling for measuring dissolved concentrations of organic contaminants in the water column at three marine superfund sites.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Robert M; Lohmann, Rainer; Schubauer-Berigan, Joseph P; Reitsma, Pamela; Perron, Monique M; Lefkovitz, Lisa; Cantwell, Mark G

    2015-08-01

    Currently, there is an effort under way to encourage remedial project managers at contaminated sites to use passive sampling to collect freely dissolved concentrations (Cfree ) of hydrophobic organic contaminants to improve site assessments. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the use of passive sampling for measuring water column Cfree for several hydrophobic organic contaminants at 3 US Environmental Protection Agency Superfund sites. Sites investigated included New Bedford Harbor (New Bedford, MA, USA), Palos Verdes Shelf (Los Angeles, CA, USA), and Naval Station Newport (Newport, RI, USA); and the passive samplers evaluated were polyethylene, polydimethylsiloxane-coated solid-phase microextraction fibers, semipermeable membrane devices, and polyoxymethylene. In general, the different passive samplers demonstrated good agreement, with Cfree values varying by a factor of 2 to 3. Further, at New Bedford Harbor, where conventional water sample concentrations were also measured (i.e., grab samples), passive sampler-based Cfree values agreed within a factor of 2. These findings suggest that all of the samplers were experiencing and measuring similar Cfree during their respective deployments. Also, at New Bedford Harbor, a strong log-linear, correlative, and predictive relationship was found between polyethylene passive sampler accumulation and lipid-normalized blue mussel bioaccumulation of polychlorinated biphenyls (r(2)  = 0.92, p < 0.05). The present study demonstrates the utility of passive sampling for generating scientifically accurate water column Cfree values, which is critical for making informed environmental management decisions at contaminated sediment sites. PMID:26039657

  6. COST IMPACT OF MARINE POLLUTION ON RECREATION TRAVEL PATTERNS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report of the National Commission on Water Quality (NCWR) September 5, 1975, indicated the clean-up (from point sources) of the nation's lakes and rivers would result in an estimated $6 billion in increased economic activity annually by 1985. Improving the quality of water to...

  7. Marine Curators Gather

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoy, Floyd W.

    1977-01-01

    Reports on a recent meeting of marine curators in which data dissemination, standardization of marine curating techniques and methods, responsibilities of curators, funding problems, and sampling equipment were the main areas of discussion. A listing of the major deep sea sample collections in the United States is also provided. (CP)

  8. Water quality as a predictor of gastrointestinal illness following incidental contact water recreation.

    PubMed

    Dorevitch, Samuel; DeFlorio-Barker, Stephanie; Jones, Rachael M; Liu, Li

    2015-10-15

    Microbial measures of water quality are predictors of gastrointestinal illness among swimmers in some settings but not in others. Little is known whether water quality measures predict illness among people who engage in popular water recreation activities such as paddling, rowing, fishing, or boating ("incidental contact water recreation"). We sought to evaluate indicator microbes, protozoan pathogens, and turbidity as predictors of gastrointestinal illness following incidental contact water recreation. A cohort study of incidental contact water recreation was conducted in the Chicago, USA area. Recreation took place on inland lakes, rivers, Lake Michigan, and an urban waterway heavily impacted by wastewater effluent. Water samples were analyzed for Escherichia coli, enterococci, somatic coliphages, F+ coliphages, Giardia spp. and Cryptosporidium spp. (oo)cysts, and for turbidity. Median enterococci concentrations were 71.0 and 199.8 colony forming units/100mLat general use and effluent-dominated waters, respectively. Among 4694 study participants with complete covariate data, 193 (4.1%) developed gastrointestinal illness within three days of water recreation. In multivariable logistic regression analysis, water quality metrics did not predict gastrointestinal illness among water recreators. Several variables other than water quality were associated acute gastrointestinal illness. The odds of such illness was increased by approximately two-fold by the presence of a chronic gastrointestinal condition, water exposure to the face, and by approximately 50% among those who fished (as opposed to other incidental contact activities). The odds of illness were reduced by approximately 50% among individuals who frequently used a water body for recreation. Unlike studies of swimmers at wastewater-impacted beaches that observed associations between water quality and illness incidence, this study did not. Public health protections for incidental contact recreation might focus on reducing exposure, particularly among fishers, those with chronic gastrointestinal conditions, and new recreators. PMID:26141425

  9. Screening for microplastic particles in plankton samples: How to integrate marine litter assessment into existing monitoring programs?

    PubMed

    Gorokhova, Elena

    2015-10-15

    Microplastics (MPs) are a newly recognized type of environmental pollution in aquatic systems; however no monitoring of these contaminants is conducted, mostly due to the lack of routine quantification. In the net samples collected with a 90-?m WP2 net, pelagic MP abundance was quantified by light microscopy and evaluated as a function of inshore-offshore gradient, depth, and season; the same samples were used for zooplankton analysis. The MP abundance was ?10(2)-10(4)particlesm(-3), with no significant inshore-offshore gradient during summer but increasing offshore in winter. MP abundance in deeper layers was positively affected by zooplankton abundance in the upper layers and significantly lower during winter compared to summer. These findings indicate heterogeneity of MP distribution due to biotic and abiotic factors and suggest that samples collected for other purposes can be used for quantification of MPs in the Baltic Sea, thus facilitating integration of MP assessment into existing monitoring schemes. PMID:26231064

  10. Simultaneous analysis of organochlorinated pesticides (OCPs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from marine samples using automated pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) and Power Prep clean-up.

    PubMed

    Helaleh, Murad I H; Al-Rashdan, Amal; Ibtisam, A

    2012-05-30

    An automated pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) method followed by Power Prep clean-up was developed for organochlorinated pesticide (OCP) and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) analysis in environmental marine samples of fish, squid, bivalves, shells, octopus and shrimp. OCPs and PCBs were simultaneously determined in a single chromatographic run using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-negative chemical ionization (GC-MS-NCI). About 5 g of each biological marine sample was mixed with anhydrous sodium sulphate and placed in the extraction cell of the PLE system. PLE is controlled by means of a PC using DMS 6000 software. Purification of the extract was accomplished using automated Power Prep clean-up with a pre-packed disposable silica column (6 g) supplied by Fluid Management Systems (FMS). All OCPs and PCBs were eluted from the silica column using two types of solvent: 80 mL of hexane and a 50 mL mixture of hexane and dichloromethane (1:1). A wide variety of fish and shellfish were collected from the fish market and analyzed using this method. The total PCB concentrations were 2.53, 0.25, 0.24, 0.24, 0.17 and 1.38 ng g(-1) (w/w) for fish, squid, bivalves, shells, octopus and shrimp, respectively, and the corresponding total OCP concentrations were 30.47, 2.86, 0.92, 10.72, 5.13 and 18.39 ng g(-1) (w/w). Lipids were removed using an SX-3 Bio-Beads gel permeation chromatography (GPC) column. Analytical criteria such as recovery, reproducibility and repeatability were evaluated through a range of biological matrices. PMID:22608412

  11. A method of measurement of (239)Pu, (240)Pu, (241)Pu in high U content marine sediments by sector field ICP-MS and its application to Fukushima sediment samples.

    PubMed

    Bu, Wenting; Zheng, Jian; Guo, Qiuju; Aono, Tatsuo; Tazoe, Hirofumi; Tagami, Keiko; Uchida, Shigeo; Yamada, Masatoshi

    2014-01-01

    An accurate and precise analytical method is highly needed for the determination of Pu isotopes in marine sediments for the long-term marine environment monitoring that is being done since the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. The elimination of uranium from the sediment samples needs to be carefully checked. We established an analytical method based on anion-exchange chromatography and SF-ICP-MS in this work. A uranium decontamination factor of 2 10(6) was achieved, and the U concentrations in the final sample solutions were typically below 4 pg mL(-1), thus no extra correction of (238)U interferences from the Pu spectra was needed. The method was suitable for the analysis of (241)Pu in marine sediments using large sample amounts (>10 g). We validated the method by measuring marine sediment reference materials and our results agreed well with the certified and the literature values. Surface sediments and one sediment core sample collected after the nuclear accident were analyzed. The characterization of (241)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios in the surface sediments and the vertical distribution of Pu isotopes showed that there was no detectable Pu contamination from the nuclear accident in the marine sediments collected 30 km off the plant site. PMID:24328266

  12. Development of a liquid chromatography/electrospray selected reaction monitoring method for the determination of organoarsenic species in marine and freshwater samples.

    PubMed

    Schaeffer, Richard; Fodor, Peter; Soeroes, Csilla

    2006-01-01

    Cation- and anion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray selected reaction monitoring (HPLC/ES-SRM) methods were developed for the determination of 15 organoarsenic compounds in marine and freshwater samples. The results demonstrate that the developed HPLC/ES-SRM methods are powerful approaches for the identification of organoarsenic species in crude sample extracts. The detection limits, linearity as well as reproducibility for most of the species are comparable or even better than those measured by the HPLC/inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) technique. The qualitative analysis of the extracts shows that the developed methods allow for the identification of arsenicals which were not detectable by ICPMS. It was also demonstrated that the signal suppression caused by matrix effects means a significant limitation in the quantification of arsenicals by ES-SRM detection. This drawback is manifested especially in the case of the slightly retained species. The three sample-cleanup chromatographic methods including off-line size-exclusion, on-line reversed-phase and on-line oppositely charged ion-exchange approaches proved to be ineffective for separation of the signal-suppressive matrix from the analytes. The standard addition calibration seems to be a suitable solution for such problems. PMID:16953520

  13. Mathematical analysis of marine pipeline leakage monitoring system based on coherent OTDR with improved sensor length and sampling frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pnev, A. B.; Zhirnov, A. A.; Stepanov, K. V.; Nesterov, E. T.; Shelestov, D. A.; Karasik, V. E.

    2015-01-01

    A system based on coherent optical time domain reflectometry (OTDR) for subsea pipeline monitoring is described. The fiber sensor length is increased using erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) cascades. The sampling frequency is increased by dividing the fiber sensor into separate sensitive areas, with parallel scanning. The calculation of the erbium amplifier cascade spontaneous noise influence on the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is carried out.

  14. EXETRA Perspectives: Concepts in Therapeutic Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neal, Larry L.; Edginton, Christopher R.

    Fifteen papers address issues in therapeutic recreation for disabled persons from the perspectives of practitioners, educators, and students. The following papers are presented. "Therapeutic Recreation Service: The Past and Challenging Present" (H. Sessoms); "Therapeutic Recreatiion in an Era of Limits: A Crisis...A Challenge... An Opportunity"

  15. 32 CFR 552.166 - Recreational use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... NATIONAL CEMETERIES REGULATIONS AFFECTING MILITARY RESERVATIONS Land Use Policy for Fort Lewis, Yakima Training Center, and Camp Bonneville § 552.166 Recreational use. (a) Fort Lewis: (1) Individuals or... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Recreational use. 552.166 Section...

  16. 32 CFR 552.166 - Recreational use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... NATIONAL CEMETERIES REGULATIONS AFFECTING MILITARY RESERVATIONS Land Use Policy for Fort Lewis, Yakima Training Center, and Camp Bonneville § 552.166 Recreational use. (a) Fort Lewis: (1) Individuals or... 32 National Defense 3 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Recreational use. 552.166 Section...

  17. 32 CFR 552.166 - Recreational use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... NATIONAL CEMETERIES REGULATIONS AFFECTING MILITARY RESERVATIONS Land Use Policy for Fort Lewis, Yakima Training Center, and Camp Bonneville § 552.166 Recreational use. (a) Fort Lewis: (1) Individuals or... 32 National Defense 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Recreational use. 552.166 Section...

  18. 32 CFR 552.166 - Recreational use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... NATIONAL CEMETERIES REGULATIONS AFFECTING MILITARY RESERVATIONS Land Use Policy for Fort Lewis, Yakima Training Center, and Camp Bonneville § 552.166 Recreational use. (a) Fort Lewis: (1) Individuals or... 32 National Defense 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Recreational use. 552.166 Section...

  19. Adventure Recreation: Coming Soon to Your Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moorman, Marta; Schlatter, Barbara E.; Hurd, Amy R.

    2007-01-01

    Adventure recreation activities like mountain biking, bouldering, and kayaking used to require considerable travel to unique locations. This is changing, however, as the new trend emerges in the United State of providing adventure recreation experiences in cities and towns, such as New York City and Golden, Colorado. This article highlights…

  20. Collegiate Recreation Student Employee as Student Leader.

    PubMed

    McFadden, Cara W; Carr, Julia Wallace

    2015-09-01

    Collegiate recreation student employment opportunities are found in such areas as facilities, intramurals, aquatics, fitness, and outdoor adventure. Recreation is one of the largest providers of student employment opportunities on campuses across the country with an important role in student employee leadership development. PMID:26895015

  1. Intelligence and Past Use of Recreational Drugs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilmoth, Daniel R.

    2012-01-01

    One motivation for trying recreational drugs is the desire for novel experiences. More intelligent people tend to value novelty more highly and may therefore be more likely to have tried recreational drugs. Using data from a national survey, it is shown that intelligence tends to be positively related to the probabilities of having tried alcohol,

  2. Physical Education and Recreation in Europe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, M. L.; Van Vliet, M. L.

    Physical education and research programs, and recreational and athletic facilities, in Yugoslavia, Sweden, Denmark, Germany, England, and the U.S.S.R. are examined by two faculty members from the University of Alberta. This publication is an abridgement of their report on European approaches to physical education and recreation, giving their

  3. Ethics Audit of a Therapeutic Recreation Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nisbett, Nancy; Hinton, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to enhance awareness of the presence of ethics education within the allied health discipline of therapeutic recreation. To achieve this end, a curriculum audit was conducted in a therapeutic recreation course to determine the existence of ethics education within the course. Included topics, methods of delivery, and

  4. Intelligence and Past Use of Recreational Drugs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilmoth, Daniel R.

    2012-01-01

    One motivation for trying recreational drugs is the desire for novel experiences. More intelligent people tend to value novelty more highly and may therefore be more likely to have tried recreational drugs. Using data from a national survey, it is shown that intelligence tends to be positively related to the probabilities of having tried alcohol,…

  5. Guidelines for Recreation and Park Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bannon, Joseph J.; Storey, Edward H.

    In this publication, written for use in guiding community recreation and park systems, the following topics are discussed: why parks and recreational facilities should be developed, the need for governmental participation, and park-system development. Additionally, neighborhood parks, playlots, community parks, city-wide parks, regional parks and

  6. Your Recreation Dollar. [Revised.] Money Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baran, Nancy H., Ed.; Tarrant, Sharon M., Ed.

    This booklet on recreation, 1 in a series of 12, covers all the basic aspects of personal- and family-money management. Suitable for use by high school and college students as well as adults, this handbook suggests ways to plan recreation expenses for special activities, equipment, and vacation travel. Section 1 looks at the need for recreation…

  7. Annual in Therapeutic Recreation. Volume One, 1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Michael E., Ed.; Card, Jaclyn A., Ed.

    This publication contains the following articles: (1) "A Pilot Study of the Relationship between Co-Dependency and Recreation Using Women with Histories of Domestic Violence" (Pamela E. Foti and Lori S. Gelvin); (2) "Discretionary Time Use and the Chronically Mentally Ill" (Thomas K. Skalko); (3) "Therapeutic Recreation and Family Therapy: A Needs…

  8. Colorado Rural Recreation Directors Project: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Patrick T.; Kraus, Barbara E.

    To meet the growing demand for recreation services in rural communities, the Colorado Rural Recreation Director's Project (CRRDP) works as a partnership between the University of Colorado in Boulder and rural Colorado communities. During the summer months, each participating community (52 since the project's beginning in 1981) receives the

  9. 50 CFR 36.31 - Recreational activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM ALASKA NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGES Other Refuge Uses § 36.31 Recreational activities. (a) Public recreational activities within the Alaska National Wildlife Refuges are... to apply to the applicable refuge lands in Alaska National Wildlife Refuges. (b) Surface...

  10. 50 CFR 36.31 - Recreational activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Recreational activities. 36.31 Section 36.31 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM ALASKA NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGES Other Refuge Uses § 36.31 Recreational activities. (a) Public...

  11. 50 CFR 36.31 - Recreational activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Recreational activities. 36.31 Section 36.31 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM ALASKA NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGES Other Refuge Uses § 36.31 Recreational activities. (a) Public...

  12. 50 CFR 36.31 - Recreational activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Recreational activities. 36.31 Section 36.31 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM ALASKA NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGES Other Refuge Uses § 36.31 Recreational activities. (a) Public...

  13. 50 CFR 36.31 - Recreational activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM ALASKA NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGES Other Refuge Uses § 36.31 Recreational activities. (a) Public recreational activities within the Alaska National Wildlife Refuges are... to apply to the applicable refuge lands in Alaska National Wildlife Refuges. (b) Surface...

  14. Rugged Practices: Embodying Authenticity in Outdoor Recreation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senda-Cook, Samantha

    2012-01-01

    When people recreate outdoors, they value the quality of the experience. This study examines rhetorical practices that sustain or undermine perceived authentic outdoor recreation experiences. I conducted a rhetorical analysis of my fieldnotes gathered through participant observation and interview transcripts of online and in-person interviews. I

  15. Solid Waste Management in Recreational Forest Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spooner, Charles S.

    The Forest Service, U. S. Department of Agriculture, requested the Bureau of Solid Waste Management to conduct a study of National Forest recreation areas to establish waste generation rates for major recreation activities and to determine the cost of solid waste handling for selected Forest Service Districts. This report describes the 1968 solid

  16. 18 CFR 801.10 - Recreation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... private agencies in the planning and development of water-related recreation and fish and wildlife... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Recreation. 801.10 Section 801.10 Conservation of Power and Water Resources SUSQUEHANNA RIVER BASIN COMMISSION...

  17. 18 CFR 801.10 - Recreation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... private agencies in the planning and development of water-related recreation and fish and wildlife... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Recreation. 801.10 Section 801.10 Conservation of Power and Water Resources SUSQUEHANNA RIVER BASIN COMMISSION...

  18. 18 CFR 801.10 - Recreation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... private agencies in the planning and development of water-related recreation and fish and wildlife... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Recreation. 801.10 Section 801.10 Conservation of Power and Water Resources SUSQUEHANNA RIVER BASIN COMMISSION...

  19. 36 CFR 294.1 - Recreation areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Miscellaneous Provisions § 294.1 Recreation areas. Suitable areas of national forest land, other than wilderness... the public to enjoy the recreation resources of the national forests. The boundaries of all areas so... conspicuous places thereon. Areas classified under this section shall thereby be set apart and reserved...

  20. 36 CFR 294.1 - Recreation areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Miscellaneous Provisions § 294.1 Recreation areas. Suitable areas of national forest land, other than wilderness... the public to enjoy the recreation resources of the national forests. The boundaries of all areas so... conspicuous places thereon. Areas classified under this section shall thereby be set apart and reserved...

  1. 36 CFR 294.1 - Recreation areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Miscellaneous Provisions § 294.1 Recreation areas. Suitable areas of national forest land, other than wilderness... the public to enjoy the recreation resources of the national forests. The boundaries of all areas so... conspicuous places thereon. Areas classified under this section shall thereby be set apart and reserved...

  2. 36 CFR 294.1 - Recreation areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Miscellaneous Provisions § 294.1 Recreation areas. Suitable areas of national forest land, other than wilderness... the public to enjoy the recreation resources of the national forests. The boundaries of all areas so... conspicuous places thereon. Areas classified under this section shall thereby be set apart and reserved...

  3. 36 CFR 294.1 - Recreation areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Miscellaneous Provisions § 294.1 Recreation areas. Suitable areas of national forest land, other than wilderness... the public to enjoy the recreation resources of the national forests. The boundaries of all areas so... conspicuous places thereon. Areas classified under this section shall thereby be set apart and reserved...

  4. Maine-Niles Association of Special Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa Univ., Iowa City. Recreation Education Program.

    Presented are duplications of the responses given by Maine-Niles Association of Special Recreation (Skokie, Illinois) as part of a project to collect, share, and compile information about, and techniques in the operation of 18 community action models for recreation services to the disabled. Model programs are categorized as consumer, client

  5. BBM Approach to Outdoor Recreation Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harwell, Rick; Brookover, Bob

    The benefits based management (BBM) approach to outdoor recreation programming is a technique focused on outcomes and benefits derived from participating in outdoor recreation activities. This approach can be used to establish the significance of college outdoor programs on campus. The four premises of BBM are the articulation of outcome-oriented

  6. 76 FR 27002 - Information Collection; National Recreation Program Administration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-10

    ... Forest Service Information Collection; National Recreation Program Administration AGENCY: Forest Service... new information collection, National Recreation Program Administration. DATES: Comments must be... INFORMATION: Title: National Recreation Program Administration. OMB Number: 0596-New. Expiration Date...

  7. 78 FR 29321 - Colorado Recreation Resource Advisory Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-20

    ... Forest Service Colorado Recreation Resource Advisory Committee Meeting AGENCY: Rocky Mountain Region, Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Colorado Recreation Resource Advisory... National Forest. Proposals, updates, and other information can be found on the Colorado Recreation...

  8. The distribution of organic-walled dinoflagellate cysts in marine surface samples of the eastern Indian Ocean in relation to environmental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hessler, I.; Young, M.; Mohtadi, M.; Lckge, A.; Behling, H.

    2012-04-01

    The eastern Indian Ocean is characterised by a complex system of surface currents that move according to the monsoon-dominated wind regime and show a strong seasonality. The Indonesian Throughflow, which originates in the northwestern and tropical Pacific and passes through the Indonesian archipelago into the Indian Ocean, is the only low-latitude oceanic connection between the Pacific and Indian Oceans and represents a key element in the global thermohaline circulation and hence the global climate system. In recent decades it has become increasingly important to understand the atmospheric and oceanographic processes involved in climate variations. Assemblages of organic-walled dinoflagellate cysts (dinocysts) from marine surface samples provide insights into the relationship between the spatial distribution of dinocysts and modern local environmental conditions (e.g. sea surface temperature, sea surface salinity, productivity). These information are of great value for the interpretation of past variations in surface water conditions. We present an extensive data-set of marine surface samples (n=116) from the Eastern Indian Ocean. The conducted Principal Component Analysis (PCA) illustrates the variation of species association between the sites and reveals a geographical affinity of the samples to the regions of (1) Western Indonesia, (2) Java, (3) the Indonesian Throughflow and (4) Western Australia including the Timor Sea. The results of the PCA further indicate the existence of two environmental gradients in the study area, a nutrient gradient increasing from Western Indonesia towards the Indonesian Throughflow region and a temperature gradient increasing from Western Australia towards Western Indonesia. The Redundancy Analysis indicates the presence of three dominating taxa in the sample set, namely Spiniferites spp., Operculodinium centrocarpum and Brigantedinium spp., and reveals significant correlations of the three dominant taxa to specific environmental parameter. While Spiniferites spp. strongly correlates with the silicate concentrations of the surface water between April and June, O. centrocarpum, T. vancampoae and Impagidinirum species show a negative correlation with the annual sea surface temperature. Brigantedinium spp. as well as nearly all other heterotrophic cyst species and L. machaerophorum show a positive correlation with the chlorophyll-a concentration between July and September, hence indicating an affinity of these species with seasonal upwelling.

  9. Guidance For The Bioremediation Of Oil-Contaminated Wetlands, Marshes, And Marine Shorelines

    EPA Science Inventory

    Marine shorelines are important public and ecological resources that serve as a home to a variety of wildlife and provide public recreation. Marine oil spills, particularly large scale spill accidents, have posed great threats and cause extensive damage to the marine coastal env...

  10. Competing Interests, Economics, and Marine Fisheries Management: An Educational Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorson, James T.; Berkson, Jim; Murphy, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Managing fish resources in the ocean, known as marine fisheries management, often involves disagreement among many groups of people: commercial fishers, recreational anglers, national and local conservationists, and several branches of government. While managing marine fisheries in federal waters, the federal government must rebuild marine fish…

  11. Competing Interests, Economics, and Marine Fisheries Management: An Educational Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorson, James T.; Berkson, Jim; Murphy, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Managing fish resources in the ocean, known as marine fisheries management, often involves disagreement among many groups of people: commercial fishers, recreational anglers, national and local conservationists, and several branches of government. While managing marine fisheries in federal waters, the federal government must rebuild marine fish

  12. Comparison of Enterococcus qPCR analysis results from fresh and marine water samples on two real-time instruments - poster

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will be recommending a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) method targeting Enterococcus spp. as an option for monitoring recreational beach water quality. A practical consideration for widespread implementation of this or ...

  13. In-Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Marine Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Rack, Frank; Storms, Michael; Schroeder, Derryl; Dugan, Brandon; Schultheiss, Peter

    2002-12-31

    The primary accomplishments of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter were (1) the preliminary postcruise evaluation of the tools and measurement systems that were used during ODP Leg 204 to study hydrate deposits on Hydrate Ridge, offshore Oregon from July through September 2002; and (2) the preliminary study of the hydrate-bearing core samples preserved in pressure vessels and in liquid nitrogen cryofreezers, which are now stored at the ODP Gulf Coast Repository in College Station, TX. During ODP Leg 204, several newly modified downhole tools were deployed to better characterize the subsurface lithologies and environments hosting microbial populations and gas hydrates. A preliminary review of the use of these tools is provided herein. The DVTP, DVTP-P, APC-methane, and APC-Temperature tools (ODP memory tools) were used extensively and successfully during ODP Leg 204 aboard the D/V JOIDES Resolution. These systems provided a strong operational capability for characterizing the in situ properties of methane hydrates in subsurface environments on Hydrate Ridge during ODP Leg 204. Pressure was also measured during a trial run of the Fugro piezoprobe, which operates on similar principles as the DVTP-P. The final report describing the deployments of the Fugro Piezoprobe is provided in Appendix A of this report. A preliminary analysis and comparison between the piezoprobe and DVTP-P tools is provided in Appendix B of this report. Finally, a series of additional holes were cored at the crest of Hydrate Ridge (Site 1249) specifically geared toward the rapid recovery and preservation of hydrate samples as part of a hydrate geriatric study partially funded by the Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, the preliminary results from gamma density non-invasive imaging of the cores preserved in pressure vessels are provided in Appendix C of this report. An initial visual inspection of the samples stored in liquid nitrogen is provided in Appendix D of this report.

  14. Human error in recreational boating.

    PubMed

    McKnight, A James; Becker, Wayne W; Pettit, Anthony J; McKnight, A Scott

    2007-03-01

    Each year over 600 people die and more than 4000 are reported injured in recreational boating accidents. As with most other accidents, human error is the major contributor. U.S. Coast Guard reports of 3358 accidents were analyzed to identify errors in each of the boat types by which statistics are compiled: auxiliary (motor) sailboats, cabin motorboats, canoes and kayaks, house boats, personal watercraft, open motorboats, pontoon boats, row boats, sail-only boats. The individual errors were grouped into categories on the basis of similarities in the behavior involved. Those presented here are the categories accounting for at least 5% of all errors when summed across boat types. The most revealing and significant finding is the extent to which the errors vary across types. Since boating is carried out with one or two types of boats for long periods of time, effective accident prevention measures, including safety instruction, need to be geared to individual boat types. PMID:17049472

  15. Marine litter on Mediterranean shores: Analysis of composition, spatial distribution and sources in north-western Adriatic beaches.

    PubMed

    Munari, Cristina; Corbau, Corinne; Simeoni, Umberto; Mistri, Michele

    2016-03-01

    Marine litter is one descriptor in the EU Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD). This study provides the first account of an MSFD indicator (Trends in the amount of litter deposited on coastlines) for the north-western Adriatic. Five beaches were sampled in 2015. Plastic dominated in terms of abundance, followed by paper and other groups. The average density was 0.2litteritemsm(-2), but at one beach it raised to 0.57itemsm(-2). The major categories were cigarette butts, unrecognizable plastic pieces, bottle caps, and others. The majority of marine litter came from land-based sources: shoreline and recreational activities, smoke-related activities and dumping. Sea-based sources contributed for less. The abundance and distribution of litter seemed to be particularly influenced by beach users, reflecting inadequate disposal practices. The solution to these problems involves implementation and enforcement of local educational and management policies. PMID:26725754

  16. 50 CFR 600.1417 - Requirements for exempted state designation based on submission of recreational survey data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requirements for exempted state... Requirements for exempted state designation based on submission of recreational survey data. (a) To be designated as an exempted state based on the state's participation in a regional survey of marine...

  17. 50 CFR 600.1417 - Requirements for exempted state designation based on submission of recreational survey data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Requirements for exempted state... Requirements for exempted state designation based on submission of recreational survey data. (a) To be designated as an exempted state based on the state's participation in a regional survey of marine...

  18. 50 CFR 600.1417 - Requirements for exempted state designation based on submission of recreational survey data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Requirements for exempted state... Requirements for exempted state designation based on submission of recreational survey data. (a) To be designated as an exempted state based on the state's participation in a regional survey of marine...

  19. Use of solid-phase microextraction/gas chromatography-electron capture detection for the determination of energetic chemicals in marine samples.

    PubMed

    Monteil-Rivera, Fanny; Beaulieu, Chantale; Hawari, Jalal

    2005-02-25

    Gas chromatography with electron capture detection (GC-ECD) is a highly explosive-sensitive analytical technique. However, its application to the analysis of sediment extracts is hampered by the presence of numerous endogenous interferences. In the present study, solid-phase microextraction (SPME) was used both as a purification technique for sediment extracts and as an extraction technique for water samples prior to analysis by GC-ECD. SPME/GC-ECD coupling was optimized and applied to the trace analysis of nine explosives including nitroaromatics and RDX in real seawater and marine sediment samples. Addition of a high concentration of salt (30%, w/v) in the aqueous medium and use of a carbowax/divinylbenzene (CW/DVB) coating led to optimal extraction efficiencies. Method detection limits (MDLs) ranged from 0.05 to 0.81 microg/L in water and from 1 to 9 microg/kg in dry sediment. Except for RDX, spike recoveries in seawater were satisfactory (89-147%) when samples were fortified at 2 microg/L of each analyte. Spike recoveries from dry sediment fortified at 10 microg/kg of each analyte gave lower recoveries but these could also be due to degradation in the matrix. With a smaller volume of aqueous sample required compared to solid-phase extraction (SPE), SPME is an attractive method for the analysis of limited volumes of sediment pore-water. Moreover, the use of SPME eliminated interferences present in sediment extracts thus allowing the detection of the target analytes that were otherwise difficult to detect by direct injection. PMID:15794569

  20. Unveiling of the Diversity of Prasinoviruses (Phycodnaviridae) in Marine Samples by Using High-Throughput Sequencing Analyses of PCR-Amplified DNA Polymerase and Major Capsid Protein Genes

    PubMed Central

    Clerissi, Camille; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Hingamp, Pascal; Poulain, Julie; Desdevises, Yves

    2014-01-01

    Viruses strongly influence the ecology and evolution of their eukaryotic hosts in the marine environment, but little is known about their diversity and distribution. Prasinoviruses infect an abundant and widespread class of phytoplankton, the Mamiellophyceae, and thereby exert a specific and important role in microbial ecosystems. However, molecular tools to specifically identify this viral genus in environmental samples are still lacking. We developed two primer sets, designed for use with polymerase chain reactions and 454 pyrosequencing technologies, to target two conserved genes, encoding the DNA polymerase (PolB gene) and the major capsid protein (MCP gene). While only one copy of the PolB gene is present in Prasinovirus genomes, there are at least seven paralogs for MCP, the copy we named number 6 being shared with other eukaryotic alga-infecting viruses. Primer sets for PolB and MCP6 were thus designed and tested on 6 samples from the Tara Oceans project. The results suggest that the MCP6 amplicons show greater richness but that PolB gave a wider coverage of Prasinovirus diversity. As a consequence, we recommend use of the PolB primer set, which will certainly reveal exciting new insights about the diversity and distribution of prasinoviruses at the community scale. PMID:24632251

  1. In-Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Marine Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Frank R. Rack

    2006-09-20

    Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41329 between Joint Oceanographic Institutions and DOE-NETL was divided into two phases based on successive proposals and negotiated statements of work pertaining to activities to sample and characterize methane hydrates on ODP Leg 204 (Phase 1) and on IODP Expedition 311 (Phase 2). The Phase 1 Final Report was submitted to DOE-NETL in April 2004. This report is the Phase 2 Final Report to DOE-NETL. The primary objectives of Phase 2 were to sample and characterize methane hydrates using the systems and capabilities of the D/V JOIDES Resolution during IODP Expedition 311, to enable scientists the opportunity to establish the mass and distribution of naturally occurring gas and gas hydrate at all relevant spatial and temporal scales, and to contribute to the DOE methane hydrate research and development effort. The goal of the work was to provide expanded measurement capabilities on the JOIDES Resolution for a dedicated hydrate cruise to the Cascadia continental margin off Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada (IODP Expedition 311) so that hydrate deposits in this region would be well characterized and technology development continued for hydrate research. IODP Expedition 311 shipboard activities on the JOIDES Resolution began on August 28 and were concluded on October 28, 2005. The statement of work for this project included three primary tasks: (1) research management oversight, provided by JOI; (2) mobilization, deployment and demobilization of pressure coring and core logging systems, through a subcontract with Geotek Ltd.; and, (3) mobilization, deployment and demobilization of a refrigerated container van that will be used for degassing of the Pressure Core Sampler and density logging of these pressure cores, through a subcontract with the Texas A&M Research Foundation (TAMRF). Additional small tasks that arose during the course of the research were included under these three primary tasks in consultation with the DOE-NETL Program Manager. All tasks outlined in the original statement of work were accomplished except for the deployment and use of the X-ray CT system under Subtask 2-2. This reduction in scope provided resources that were applied to other activities to support the overall project. Post-expedition analysis of results and report writing will continue beyond this reporting period, however, all field deployments associated with this project have been successfully concluded as of this writing.

  2. In-Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Marine Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Rack, Frank; Bohrmann, Gerhard; Trehu, Anne; Storms, Michael; Schroeder, Derryl

    2002-09-30

    The primary accomplishment of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter was the deployment of tools and measurement systems on ODP Leg 204 to study hydrate deposits on Hydrate Ridge, offshore Oregon from July through September, 2002. During Leg 204, we cored and logged 9 sites on the Oregon continental margin to determine the distribution and concentration of gas hydrates in an accretionary ridge and adjacent slope basin, investigate the mechanisms that transport methane and other gases into the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ), and obtain constraints on physical properties of hydrates in situ. A 3D seismic survey conducted in 2000 provided images of potential subsurface fluid conduits and indicated the position of the GHSZ throughout the survey region. After coring the first site, we acquired Logging-While-Drilling (LWD) data at all but one site to provide an overview of downhole physical properties. The LWD data confirmed the general position of key seismic stratigraphic horizons and yielded an initial estimate of hydrate concentration through the proxy of in situ electrical resistivity. These records proved to be of great value in planning subsequent coring. The second new hydrate proxy to be tested was infrared thermal imaging of cores on the catwalk as rapidly as possible after retrieval. The thermal images were used to identify hydrate samples and to map estimate the distribution and texture of hydrate within the cores. Geochemical analyses of interstitial waters and of headspace and void gases provide additional information on the distribution and concentration of hydrate within the stability zone, the origin and pathway of fluids into and through the GHSZ, and the rates at which the process of gas hydrate formation is occurring. Bio- and lithostratigraphic description of cores, measurement of physical properties, and in situ pressure core sampling and thermal measurements complement the data set, providing ground-truth tests of inferred physical and sedimentological properties. Among the most interesting preliminary results are: (1) the discovery that gas hydrates are distributed through a broad depth range within the GHSZ and that different physical and chemical proxies for hydrate distribution and concentration give generally consistent results; (2) evidence for the importance of sediment properties for controlling the migration of fluids in the accretionary complex; (3) geochemical indications that the gas hydrate system at Hydrate Ridge contains significant concentrations of higher order hydrocarbons and that fractionation and mixing signals will provide important constraints on gas hydrate dynamics; and (4) the discovery of very high chlorinity values that extend for at least 10 mbsf near the summit, indicating that hydrate formation here must be very rapid.

  3. 40 CFR 1042.601 - General compliance provisions for marine engines and vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... recreational marine engine in a vessel that is not a recreational vessel is a violation of 40 CFR 1068.101(a)(1... the provisions of this part, the requirements and prohibitions in 40 CFR part 1068, and the provisions of the Clean Air Act. The provisions of 40 CFR part 1068 apply for compression-ignition...

  4. Effect of recreational diving on Patagonian rocky reefs.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Gonzalo; Márquez, Federico; Marzinelli, Ezequiel M; Mendez, María M; Bigatti, Gregorio

    2015-03-01

    Tourism has grown considerably in the last decades, promoting activities such as recreational SCUBA diving that may affect marine benthic communities. In Puerto Madryn, Patagonia Argentina, sub-aquatic tourism areas (STA) receive about 7,000 divers per year. Diving is concentrated on a few small rocky reefs and 50% of the dives occur in summer. In this work, we evaluated the effect of recreational diving activities on benthic communities and determined whether diving causes a press (long-term) or a pulse (short-term) response. We quantified the percentage cover of benthic organisms and compared benthic assemblage structure and composition between two sites with contrasting usage by divers, 'highly disturbed' and 'moderately disturbed' sites, and two 'control' sites with similar physical characteristics but no diving activity, twice before and after the diving peak in summer. We found differences in benthic assemblage structure (identity and relative abundance of taxa) and composition (identity only) among diving sites and controls. These differences were consistent before and after the peak of diving in summer, suggesting that recreational diving may produce a press impact on overall benthic assemblage structure and composition in these STA. At the moderately disturbed site, however, covers of specific taxa, such as some key habitat-forming or highly abundant species, usually differed from those in controls only immediately after summer, after which they begun to resemble controls, suggesting a pulse impact. Thus, STA in Golfo Nuevo seem to respond differently to disturbances of diving depending on the usage of the sites. This information is necessary to develop sound management strategies in order to preserve local biodiversity. PMID:25577688

  5. Effects of Changed Aircraft Noise Exposure on the Use of Outdoor Recreational Areas

    PubMed Central

    Krog, Norun Hjertager; Engdahl, Bo; Tambs, Kristian

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines behavioural responses to changes in aircraft noise exposure in local outdoor recreational areas near airports. Results from a panel study conducted in conjunction with the relocation of Norway’s main airport in 1998 are presented. One recreational area was studied at each airport site. The samples (n = 1,264/1,370) were telephone interviewed about their use of the area before and after the change. Results indicate that changed aircraft noise exposure may influence individual choices to use local outdoor recreational areas, suggesting that careful considerations are needed in the planning of air routes over local outdoor recreational areas. However, considerable stability in use, and also fluctuations in use unrelated to the changes in noise conditions were found. Future studies of noise impacts should examine a broader set of coping mechanisms, like intra- and temporal displacement. Also, the role of place attachment, and the substitutability of local areas should be studied. PMID:21139867

  6. 28 CFR 551.115 - Recreation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the Bureau of Prisons rules on Inmate Discipline. (See 28 CFR part 541, subpart B.) (e) Provisions of... opportunities: (1) One hour daily of outside recreation, weather permitting; or (2) Two hours daily of...

  7. 28 CFR 551.115 - Recreation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the Bureau of Prisons rules on Inmate Discipline. (See 28 CFR part 541, subpart B.) (e) Provisions of... opportunities: (1) One hour daily of outside recreation, weather permitting; or (2) Two hours daily of...

  8. 28 CFR 551.115 - Recreation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the Bureau of Prisons rules on Inmate Discipline. (See 28 CFR part 541, subpart B.) (e) Provisions of... opportunities: (1) One hour daily of outside recreation, weather permitting; or (2) Two hours daily of...

  9. 28 CFR 551.115 - Recreation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the Bureau of Prisons rules on Inmate Discipline. (See 28 CFR part 541, subpart B.) (e) Provisions of... opportunities: (1) One hour daily of outside recreation, weather permitting; or (2) Two hours daily of...

  10. BACTERIAL INDICATORS OF RECREATIONAL WATER QUALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The selection of bacterial indicators of recreational water quality are considered with respect to suggested ideal characteristics, such as association with pathogens, growth in aquatic environments, resistance to disinfection and ease of enumeration, and through the use of epide...

  11. Physical-Education Facilities/Recreation Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School & University, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Describes the design of notable school physical education/recreation facilities, including the educational context and design goals. Includes information on architects, suppliers, and cost, as well as photographs. (EV)

  12. Wheelchair Design Changes: New Opportunities for Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Exceptional Parent, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Changes in wheelchair design (such as larger tires and lighter overall weight) make it possible for disabled persons to exercise more mobility and control and participate in a greater variety of recreational activities. (CL)

  13. Deep Ecology and Outdoor Recreation--Incompatible?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Karla A.

    1990-01-01

    This article defines deep ecology and contrasts this philosophy for thinking and living with the views of traditional and liberal environmentalists. The article also explores areas of compatibility and incompatibility between deep ecology and outdoor recreation/education. (IAH)

  14. Parents Creating Recreational Experiences: Kamp for Kids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Exceptional Parent, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Kamp for Kids, an innovative summer recreation program for disabled and nondisabled children, was begun and maintained largely by parents efforts. Families periodically spend a weekend at the camp learning to play together and to function as a unit. (CL)

  15. 36 CFR 71.9 - Establishment of recreation use fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Establishment of recreation use fees. 71.9 Section 71.9 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RECREATION FEES § 71.9 Establishment of recreation use fees. (a) Recreation use fees shall be established by all outdoor...

  16. 36 CFR 71.9 - Establishment of recreation use fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Establishment of recreation use fees. 71.9 Section 71.9 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RECREATION FEES § 71.9 Establishment of recreation use fees. (a) Recreation use fees shall be established by all outdoor...

  17. A Social Science Bibliography of Leisure and Recreation Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burdge, Rabel J.; And Others

    This bibliography provides an accessible source to social science research in leisure, recreation, and sports. Topical areas covered include: (1) bibliographic sources on leisure and recreation; (2) philosophical issues in leisure; (3) theories of leisure and recreation; (4) methods in leisure and recreation research; (5) evaluation of leisure and…

  18. Supporting Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder in Recreation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coyne, Phyllis; Fullerton, Ann

    2004-01-01

    This book was developed to assist recreation service providers, as well as families, to understand strategies for supporting individuals with ASD in community and school recreation programs. The ideas have many practical uses in generic and specialized recreation programs. A variety of audiences, including teachers, recreation service providers,

  19. 36 CFR 71.11 - Collection of Federal recreation fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... recreation fees. 71.11 Section 71.11 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RECREATION FEES 71.11 Collection of Federal recreation fees. The bureaus of the Department of the Interior administering outdoor recreation programs shall provide for the collection...

  20. Expanding Horizons in Commercial Recreation for Disabled People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nesbitt, John A.

    Based on a presentation given at the 1974 National Conference on Commercial Recreation for Disabled People, the paper examines the role of commercial recreation in the lives of the handicapped. Examples of commercial recreation enterprises are listed for equipment, goods and products; recreation centers, services, and schools; entertainment;

  1. Recreation and Sport Planning and Design. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daly, Jim

    This book offers guidelines for planning and designing cost-effective community recreation and sports facilities and open spaces in Australia. Seven chapters include: (1) "Benefits of Recreation and Sport" (e.g., quality of life, and diversity of recreation and sport); (2) "Provision of Recreation and Sport Open Spaces" (e.g., overview of

  2. 36 CFR 71.9 - Establishment of recreation use fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Establishment of recreation use fees. 71.9 Section 71.9 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RECREATION FEES § 71.9 Establishment of recreation use fees. (a) Recreation use fees shall be established by all outdoor...

  3. 36 CFR 71.9 - Establishment of recreation use fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Establishment of recreation use fees. 71.9 Section 71.9 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RECREATION FEES § 71.9 Establishment of recreation use fees. (a) Recreation use fees shall be established by all outdoor...

  4. 40 CFR 230.52 - Water-related recreation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Water-related recreation. 230.52... Effects on Human Use Characteristics § 230.52 Water-related recreation. (a) Water-related recreation... disposal of dredged or fill material may adversely modify or destroy water use for recreation by...

  5. 40 CFR 230.52 - Water-related recreation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Water-related recreation. 230.52... Effects on Human Use Characteristics § 230.52 Water-related recreation. (a) Water-related recreation... disposal of dredged or fill material may adversely modify or destroy water use for recreation by...

  6. 40 CFR 230.52 - Water-related recreation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Water-related recreation. 230.52... Effects on Human Use Characteristics § 230.52 Water-related recreation. (a) Water-related recreation... disposal of dredged or fill material may adversely modify or destroy water use for recreation by...

  7. 40 CFR 230.52 - Water-related recreation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Water-related recreation. 230.52... Effects on Human Use Characteristics § 230.52 Water-related recreation. (a) Water-related recreation... disposal of dredged or fill material may adversely modify or destroy water use for recreation by...

  8. Observer rating of recreational use in wadeable streams of New York State, USA: implications for nutrient criteria development.

    PubMed

    Smith, Alexander J; Duffy, Brian T; Novak, Margaret A

    2015-02-01

    Like most other States and Tribes in the United States, New York State has been working with the United States Environmental Protection Agency to develop numeric nutrient criteria. These criteria are to protect water use such as drinking water supply, aquatic life, and recreation. Although extensive research exists related to the effects of eutrophication on human health and aquatic life, limited information is available on perceived impairment of recreational opportunities in rivers and streams. We present an approach to assess impacts to recreation using information collected by New York State's (NYS) monitoring program. This approach involved a questionnaire adapted from lake management surveys in which field crews rated their perceptions of recreational ability at each site. The ratings were then used to assess the relationship between perceived impact to recreational use and water quality. We include in our analyses the primary nutrient criteria variables total phosphorus (TP), total nitrogen (TN), suspended chlorophyll-a (SChl-a), and turbidity (Tb), as well as biological condition (benthic macroinvertebrate community assessment). We sampled 203 wadeable stream locations throughout NYS between July and September 2008-2012. Field crews ranked most locations as having "Minor aesthetic problems," but still considered them excellent for both primary (34%) and secondary (37%) contact recreation. Field crew rankings of recreational ability coincided with a gradient of nutrients (TP and TN), SChl-a, and Tb concentration. Logistic regression models were developed that identified significant predictors affecting field crew decisions about recreation. These included water clarity, periphyton cover, and odor. Analysis of variance using NYS's multimetric assessment of biological condition and a nutrient specific community metric suggest significant differences in metric scores among recreational use categories. These results indicate correlation of impairment of recreational use with impairment of aquatic life use from nutrient enrichment. The results of this investigation will be used to help establish nutrient endpoints for the protection of recreation in NYS streams and rivers. PMID:25482912

  9. *THE LOGNORMAL DISTRIBUTION AND USE OF THE GEOMETRIC MEAN AND THE ARITHMETIC MEAN IN RECREATIONAL WATER QUALITY MEASUREMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Statistical Framework for Recreational Water Quality Criteria and Monitoring offers a practical guide to the statistical methods used for assessing health effects and monitoring and modelling water quality Both traditional and novel sampling designs are discussed. Written by a te...

  10. Epidemiological study of foot and ankle injuries in recreational sports

    PubMed Central

    Luciano, Alexandre de Paiva; Lara, Luiz Carlos Ribeiro

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This is a retrospective study showing the incidence, type and extent of injuries occurring in the foot and/or ankle as a result of recreational sports practice. METHODS: We treated 131 patients, of which 123 were male and 8 female, with a history of trauma and pain in the foot and/or ankle after the practicing recreational sports. The average age of the male patients was 24.53 years. The evaluation was done through a research protocol, which contained the variables age, sex, diagnosis, and type of recreational sport. RESULTS: The sports were classified according to the American Medical Association, which divides them into contact and non-contact sports. 82.4% of the sample practiced contact sports, while 17.6% practiced sports classified as non-contact. CONCLUSIONS: The sprained ankle was the most frequent type of injury, especially those of grade I and II. Soccer was the sport responsible for the highest incidence of injuries and among its various forms the indoor soccer presented the highest frequency of injuries (35%). In the non-contact sports, the highest incidence was found in running. Level of Evidence IV, Case Series. PMID:24453628

  11. Detection of microsporidia in drinking water, wastewater and recreational rivers.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, Fernando; Castro Hermida, Jos Antonio; Fenoy, Soledad; Mezo, Mercedes; Gonzlez-Warleta, Marta; del Aguila, Carmen

    2011-10-15

    Diarrhea is the main health problem caused by human-related microsporidia, and waterborne transmission is one of the main risk factors for intestinal diseases. Recent studies suggest the involvement of water in the epidemiology of human microsporidiosis. However, studies related to the presence of microsporidia in different types of waters from countries where human microsporidiosis has been described are still scarce. Thirty-eight water samples from 8 drinking water treatment plants (DWTPs), 8 wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) and 6 recreational river areas (RRAs) from Galicia (NW Spain) have been analyzed. One hundred liters of water from DWTPs and 50L of water from WWTPs and RRAs were filtered to recover parasites, using the IDEXX Filta-Max system. Microsporidian spores were identified by Weber's stain and positive samples were analyzed by PCR, using specific primers for Enterocytozoon bieneusi, Encephalitozoon intestinalis, Encephalitozoon cuniculi, and Encephalitozoon hellem. Microsporidia spores were identified by staining protocols in eight samples (21.0%): 2 from DWTPs, 5 from WWTPs, and 1 from an RRA. In the RRA sample, the microsporidia were identified as E. intestinalis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of human-pathogenic microsporidia in water samples from DWTPs, WWTPs and RRAs in Spain. These observations add further evidence to support that new and appropriate control and regulations for drinking, wastewater, and recreational waters should be established to avoid health risks from this pathogen. PMID:21774958

  12. GCOOS Web Applications for Recreational Boaters and Fishermen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobara, S.; Howard, M. K.; Simoniello, C.; Jochens, A. E.; Gulf Of Mexico Coastal Ocean Observing System Regional Association (Gcoos-Ra)

    2010-12-01

    Spatial and temporal information on the ecology of marine species and encompassing oceanographic environment is vital to the development of effective strategies for marine resource management and biodiversity conservation. Assembling data and generating products is a time-consuming and often laborious part of the workflow required of fisheries specialists, resource managers, marine scientists and other stakeholder groups for effective fishery management and marine spatial planning. Workflow costs for all groups can be significantly reduced through the use of interoperable networked data systems. The Gulf of Mexico Coastal Ocean Observing System Regional Association (GCOOS-RA) is one of 11 RAs comprising the non-Federal part of the U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS). The RAs serve the region’s needs for data and information: by working with data providers to offer their data in standardized ways following IOOS guidance, by gathering stakeholders’ needs and requirements, and by producing basic products or facilitating product-generation by others to meet those needs. The GCOOS Data Portal aggregates regional near real-time data and serves these data through standardized service interfaces suitable for automated machine access or in formats suitable for human consumption. The related Products Portal generates products in graphical displays for humans and in standard formats for importing into common software packages. Web map applications are created using ArcGIS server RESTful service, publicly available Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web Map Service (WMS) layers, and Web Coverage Service (WCS). Use of standardize interfaces allows us to construct seamless workflows that carry data from sensors through to products in an automated fashion. As a demonstration of the power of interoperable standards-based systems we have developed tailored product web pages for recreational boaters and fishermen. This is a part of an ongoing project to provide an interactive tool for decision support in the Gulf of Mexico.

  13. Dynamic catch trends in the history of recreational spearfishing in Australia.

    PubMed

    Young, Matthew A L; Foale, Simon; Bellwood, David R

    2015-06-01

    The sustained decline in marine fisheries worldwide underscores the need to understand and monitor fisheries trends and fisher behavior. Recreational fisheries are unique in that they are not subject to the typical drivers that influence commercial and artisanal fisheries (e.g., markets or food security). Nevertheless, although exposed to a different set of drivers (i.e., interest or relaxation), recreational fisheries can contribute to fishery declines. Recreational fisheries are also difficult to assess due to an absence of past monitoring and traditional fisheries data. Therefore, we utilized a nontraditional data source (a chronology of spearfishing publications) to document historical trends in recreational spearfishing in Australia between 1952 and 2009. We extracted data on reported fish captures, advertising, and spearfisher commentary and used regression models and ordination analyses to assess historical change. The proportion of coastal fish captures reported declined approximately 80%, whereas the proportion of coral reef and pelagic fish reports increased 1750% and 560%, respectively. Catch composition shifted markedly from coastal temperate or subtropical fishes during the 1950s to 1970s to coral reef and pelagic species in the 1990s to 2000s. Advertising data and commentary by spearfishers indicated that pelagic fish species became desired targets. The mean weight of trophy coral reef fishes also declined significantly over the study period (from approximately 30-8 kg). Recreational fishing presents a highly dynamic social-ecological interface and a challenge for management. Our results emphasize the need for regulatory agencies to work closely with recreational fishing bodies to observe fisher behavior, detect shifts in target species or fishing intensity, and adapt regulatory measures. PMID:25627009

  14. Transfer of microcystin from freshwater lakes to Puget Sound, WA and toxin accumulation in marine mussels (Mytilus trossulus).

    PubMed

    Preece, E P; Moore, Barry C; Hardy, F Joan

    2015-12-01

    Many eutrophic inland freshwater lakes in the Puget Sound Washington region produce toxic cyanobacteria blooms annually. While such blooms in lakes tend to be viewed as a localized phenomenon, there is significant potential for downstream export of toxins to freshwater streams, and marine and brackish water environments. However, monitoring for cyanotoxins typically associated with freshwaters, such as the hepatotoxin, microcystin (MC) in marine receiving waters is rare. In 2013 we studied four eutrophic Puget Sound area lakes to assess both toxin transport to marine waters and its potential accumulation in marine shellfish, specifically mussels. Shellfish beds are extensive throughout Puget Sound, and recreational harvest occurs downstream of our study lakes, so a study goal was to also assess if shellfish consumption poses a human health risk for MC exposure. We confirm, for the first time, freshwater to marine transfer of MCs in Puget Sound with subsequent bioaccumulation of MC by mussels. ELISA analysis estimated maximum MC concentrations in source lakes of 2700 μg/L, up to 0.34 μg/L in marine waters and 6.5 μg/kg in mussels. Confirmatory analyses by LC-MS/MS on water and mussel samples identified MC-LA as the major toxin. Although we found relatively low MC levels in mussels, our study implies that potential concern for human food safety is justified and warrants further investigation. PMID:26218554

  15. Community Recreation and Community Recreation/Education: Bibliographies on Educational Topics No. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Teacher Education, Washington, DC.

    This publication, the fourth in the series of Bibliographies on Educational Topics, focuses on community recreation and community recreation/education. Citations were selected from the two files contained in the ERIC data base: RESOURCES IN EDUCATION (RIE) and CURRENT INDEX TO JOURNALS IN EDUCATION (CIJE). Each topic is presented separately with a

  16. Social-Psychological Factors Influencing Recreation Demand: Evidence from Two Recreational Rivers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Jordan W.; Moore, Roger L.

    2013-01-01

    Traditional methods of estimating demand for recreation areas involve making inferences about individuals' preferences. Frequently, the assumption is made that recreationists' cost of traveling to a site is a reliable measure of the value they place on that resource and the recreation opportunities it provides. This assumption may ignore

  17. 76 FR 10915 - Notice of Use Authorizations; Special Recreation Permits, Other Than on Developed Recreation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-28

    .... SUMMARY: The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is adjusting certain special recreation permit fees for various recreation activities on BLM administered Public Lands and related waters. The BLM is adjusting... per permit. The BLM Director is authorized to periodically adjust fees by the regulations found at...

  18. Decompression sickness and recreational scuba divers

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, H; Shibayama, M; Yamami, N; Togawa, S; Takahashi, M; Mano, Y

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study is to clear the status of recreational scuba divers in Japan for promoting safety in recreational diving. Methods: A five year (from 1996 to 2001) questionnaire survey was performed of Japanese divers at the Osezaki area in Japan. The subjects of this survey included diving instructors as well as recreational divers. Based on the obtained data, the study investigated the theory predicted incidence of decompression sickness (DCS) among Japanese recreational divers. Results: The average (SD) of the maximum depth for diving was 37.4 (13.1) metres, which was deeper than the recommended depth of recreational diving. The incident rate of nitrogen narcosis (12%) was the most frequent, followed by barotraumas of the ear (11%) and barotraumas of the paranasal sinus (5.6%). The rate of DCS was 1.9 % (60 divers) during investigated period, and that DCS occurred once per 19 011 dives in calculation. Conclusions: This investigation showed that the status of leisure diving in Japan is still serious, because DCS would be expected to occur once a weekend in Japan. It is speculated that many divers may develop DCS while moving through high altitudes after diving, particularly at the Osezaki diving spot in Japan. Based on the results of this study, it is emphasised that every Japanese leisure diver should take an increasing interest in the safety of diving activity. PMID:12835342

  19. 76 FR 64074 - Request for Applications for Vacant Seats on the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-17

    ...The ONMS is seeking applications for the following six vacant seats on the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council: recreational diving, oil and gas operations, recreational fishing, commercial fishing, research and education. Applicants are chosen based upon their particular expertise and experience in relation to the seat for which they are applying; community and......

  20. Shedding of Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from adult and pediatric bathers in marine waters

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Staphylococcus aureus including methicillin resistant S. aureus, MRSA, are human colonizing bacteria that commonly cause opportunistic infections primarily involving the skin in otherwise healthy individuals. These infections have been linked to close contact and sharing of common facilities such as locker rooms, schools and prisons Waterborne exposure and transmission routes have not been traditionally associated with S. aureus infections. Coastal marine waters and beaches used for recreation are potential locations for the combination of high numbers of people with close contact and therefore could contribute to the exposure to and infection by these organisms. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the amount and characteristics of the shedding of methicillin sensitive S. aureus, MSSA and MRSA by human bathers in marine waters. Results Nasal cultures were collected from bathers, and water samples were collected from two sets of pools designed to isolate and quantify MSSA and MRSA shed by adults and toddlers during exposure to marine water. A combination of selective growth media and biochemical and polymerase chain reaction analysis was used to identify and perform limited characterization of the S. aureus isolated from the water and the participants. Twelve of 15 MRSA isolates collected from the water had identical genetic characteristics as the organisms isolated from the participants exposed to that water while the remaining 3 MRSA were without matching nasal isolates from participants. The amount of S. aureus shed per person corresponded to 105 to 106 CFU per person per 15-minute bathing period, with 15 to 20% of this quantity testing positive for MRSA. Conclusions This is the first report of a comparison of human colonizing organisms with bacteria from human exposed marine water attempting to confirm that participants shed their own colonizing MSSA and MRSA into their bathing milieu. These findings clearly demonstrate that adults and toddlers shed their colonizing organisms into marine waters and therefore can be sources of potentially pathogenic S. aureus and MRSA in recreational marine waters. Additional research is needed to evaluate recreational beaches and marine waters as potential exposure and transmission pathways for MRSA. PMID:21211014

  1. A trophic cascade triggers collapse of a salt-marsh ecosystem with intensive recreational fishing.

    PubMed

    Altieri, Andrew H; Bertness, Mark D; Coverdale, Tyler C; Herrmann, Nicholas C; Angelini, Christine

    2012-06-01

    Overexploitation of predators has been linked to the collapse of a growing number of shallow-water marine ecosystems. However, salt-marsh ecosystems are often viewed and managed as systems controlled by physical processes, despite recent evidence for herbivore-driven die-off of marsh vegetation. Here we use field observations, experiments, and historical records at 14 sites to examine whether the recently reported die-off of northwestern Atlantic salt marshes is associated with the cascading effects of predator dynamics and intensive recreational fishing activity. We found that the localized depletion of top predators at sites accessible to recreational anglers has triggered the proliferation of herbivorous crabs, which in turn results in runaway consumption of marsh vegetation. This suggests that overfishing may be a general mechanism underlying the consumer-driven die-off of salt marshes spreading throughout the western Atlantic. Our findings support the emerging realization that consumers play a dominant role in regulating marine plant communities and can lead to ecosystem collapse when their impacts are amplified by human activities, including recreational fishing. PMID:22834380

  2. Detection of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from recreational beach using the mecA gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulkifli, Aisya; Ahmad, Asmat

    2015-09-01

    Water samples were collected in triplicates from three different locations choosen from the recreational beach of Teluk Kemang, Port Dickson as sampling station including main area of recreation activity for the public. Bacteria were isolated from the water and cultured. Out of 286 presumptive Staphylococcus aureus enumerated by using culture method, only 4 (1.4 %) confirmed as Meticillin Resistant S. aureus (MRSA) based on PCR detection of mecA gene. Interestingly, all of MRSA detections were found at the main area of recreational activity. Our results suggested that public beaches may be reservoir for transmission of MRSA to beach visitors and PCR using the mecA gene is the fastest way to detect this pathogenic bacteria.

  3. Solar energy for a community recreation center

    SciTech Connect

    Libman, D.E.

    1980-01-01

    A 58,000 ft/sup 2/ recreation center in Shenandoah, Georgia is described. Rooftop solar collectors and reflectors serve as a basis for the active solar heating and cooling systems. The recreation center clearly demonstrates the technical feasibility of solar application in a recreation setting; economically, however, results are shown to be mixed. Although effective in the heating mode, solar cooling is considered as questionable in terms of a reasonable payoff period. A computer model predicts a payoff period of 11 years based on 1977 energy prices. The design and construction costs of the solar heating and cooling system ($726,000) was 90% financed by ERDA. A hockey-size ice rink and a gymnasium plus locker rooms and meeting rooms comprised the major part of the floor space. Problems encountered and operation of the facility are described. (MJJ)

  4. Can visitor regulations enhance recreational experiences?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Jeffrey E.; McCool, Stephen F.

    1988-01-01

    Regulations at recreation sites have been described as anathema to recreation itself. Many recent authors have suggested that managers use more light-handed techniques, such as information and education, before attempting regulatory and intrusive actions. This study of visitors to Glacier National Park in Montana, USA, during the fall bald eagle migration season demonstrates that, under certain conditions, recreationists will view regulations as a way to enhance the opportunity rather than detract from it. The results reinforce previous suggestions in the literature that managers carefully examine the objectives and consequences of regulations prior to their use.

  5. Recreational damages from reservoir storage level changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huszar, Eric; Shaw, W. Douglass; Englin, Jeffrey; Netusil, Noelwah

    1999-11-01

    Several extreme events affecting recreation have occurred in the Humboldt River Basin of northern Nevada. In 1992, agricultural users completely drained Rye Patch Reservoir killing millions of fish. Additionally, since 1990 gold mines located in the basin have pumped and discharged water into the Humboldt River; in recent years, discharges have equaled approximately 60% of the river's annual flow. In this paper we develop and estimate a joint model of fish catch and recreation demand, both of which depend on water levels, to assess the losses and gains from water level changes tied to events in the basin.

  6. Microbial source tracking markers at three inland recreational lakes in Ohio, 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Francy, Donna S.; Stelzer, Erin A.

    2012-01-01

    During the 2011 recreational season, samples were collected for E. coli and microbial source tracking (MST) marker concentrations to begin to understand potential sources of fecal contamination at three inland recreational lakes in Ohio - Buckeye, Atwood, and Tappan Lakes. The results from 32 regular samples, 4 field blanks, and 7 field replicates collected at 5 sites are presented in this report. At the three lakes, the ruminant-associated marker was found most often (57-73 percent of samples) but at estimated quantities, followed by the dog-associated marker (30-43 percent of samples). The human-associated marker was found in 14 and 50 percent of samples from Atwood and Tappan Lakes, respectively, but was not found in any samples from the two Buckeye Lake sites. The gull-associated marker was detected in only two samples, both from Tappan Lake.

  7. Marine Lubricants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, B. H.; Green, D.

    Marine diesel engines are classified by speed, either large (medium speed) or very large (slow speed) with high efficiencies and burning low-quality fuel. Slow-speed engines, up to 200 rpm, are two-stroke with separate combustion chamber and sump connected by a crosshead, with trunk and system oil lubricants for each. Medium-speed diesels, 300-1500 rpm, are of conventional automotive design with one lubricant. Slow-speed engines use heavy fuel oil of much lower quality than conventional diesel with problems of deposit cleanliness, acidity production and oxidation. Lubricants are mainly SAE 30/40/50 monogrades using paraffinic basestocks. The main types of additives are detergents/dispersants, antioxidants, corrosion inhibitors, anti-wear/load-carrying/ep, pour-point depressants and anti-foam compounds. There are no simple systems for classifying marine lubricants, as for automotive, because of the wide range of engine design, ratings and service applications they serve. There are no standard tests; lubricant suppliers use their own tests or the Bolnes 3DNL, with final proof from field tests. Frequent lubricant analyses safeguard engines and require standard sampling procedures before determination of density, viscosity, flash point, insolubles, base number, water and wear metal content.

  8. Recreational Use and Value of Water at Elephant Butte and Navajo Reservoirs. New Mexico State University Agricultural Experiment Station Bulletin 535.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coppedge, Robert O.; Gray, James R.

    This document is a descriptive study of the recreational use and the value of water at Elephant Butte and Navajo Reservoirs. Previous research studies, as well as the study areas and recreational characteristics and procedures of investigation used in this study (sampling and data collection, data organization, analysis) are described. Discussions

  9. Coupling a high-temperature catalytic oxidation total organic carbon analyzer to an isotope ratio mass spectrometer to measure natural-abundance delta13C-dissolved organic carbon in marine and freshwater samples.

    PubMed

    Panetta, Robert J; Ibrahim, Mina; Glinas, Yves

    2008-07-01

    The stable isotope composition of dissolved organic carbon (delta(13)C-DOC) provides powerful information toward understanding carbon sources and cycling, but analytical limitations have precluded its routine measurement in natural samples. Recent interfacing of wet oxidation-based dissolved organic carbon analyzers and isotope ratio mass spectrometers has simplified the measurement of delta(13)C-DOC in freshwaters, but the analysis of salty estuarine/marine samples still proves difficult. Here we describe the coupling of the more widespread high-temperature catalytic oxidation-based total organic carbon analyzer to an isotope ratio mass spectrometer (HTC-IRMS) through cryogenic trapping of analyte gases exiting the HTC analyzer for routine analysis of delta(13)C-DOC in aquatic and marine samples. Targeted elimination of major sources of background CO2 originating from the HTC analyzer allows for the routine measurement of samples over the natural range of DOC concentrations (from 40 microM to over 2000 microM), and salinities (<0.1-36 g/kg). Because consensus reference natural samples for delta(13)C-DOC do not exist, method validation was carried out with water-soluble stable isotope standards as well as previously measured natural samples (IAEA sucrose, Suwannee River Fulvic Acids, Deep Sargasso Sea consensus reference material, and St. Lawrence River water) and result in excellent delta(13)C-DOC accuracy (+/-0.2 per thousand) and precision (+/-0.3 per thousand). PMID:18529015

  10. Motivations for recreating on farmlands, private forests, and state or national parks.

    PubMed

    Sotomayor, Sandra; Barbieri, Carla; Wilhelm Stanis, Sonja; Aguilar, Francisco X; Smith, Jordan W

    2014-07-01

    This study explores the importance of different motivations to visit three types of recreational settings--farms, private forests, and state or national parks. Data were collected via a mail-back questionnaire administered to a stratified random sample of households in Missouri (USA). Descriptive and inferential statistics reveal both similarities and discontinuities in motivations for visiting farms, private forests, and state or national parks for recreation. Being with family, viewing natural scenery, and enjoying the smells and sounds of nature were all highly important motivations for visiting the three types of settings. However, all 15 motivations examined were perceived to be significantly more important for visits to state or national parks than to farms or private forests. Findings suggest that individuals are more strongly motivated to recreate at state and national parks relative to farmlands or forests. Post hoc paired t tests comparing motivations between both agricultural settings (farms and private forests) revealed significant differences in eight different recreational motivations. Individuals tended to place more importance on the ability to use equipment and test their skills when considering recreating on private forests. Conversely, social motivations (e.g., doing something with the family) were more important when individuals were considering recreating on farmland. Collectively, the findings suggest individuals expect distinctly different outcomes from their visits to farmlands, private forests, or state or national parks. Consequently, all three types of recreational settings have competitive advantages that their managers could capitalize on when making decisions about how to attract new visitors or produce the most desirable experiences for current recreationists. PMID:24803234

  11. Motivations for Recreating on Farmlands, Private Forests, and State or National Parks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotomayor, Sandra; Barbieri, Carla; Wilhelm Stanis, Sonja; Aguilar, Francisco X.; Smith, Jordan W.

    2014-07-01

    This study explores the importance of different motivations to visit three types of recreational settings—farms, private forests, and state or national parks. Data were collected via a mail-back questionnaire administered to a stratified random sample of households in Missouri (USA). Descriptive and inferential statistics reveal both similarities and discontinuities in motivations for visiting farms, private forests, and state or national parks for recreation. Being with family, viewing natural scenery, and enjoying the smells and sounds of nature were all highly important motivations for visiting the three types of settings. However, all 15 motivations examined were perceived to be significantly more important for visits to state or national parks than to farms or private forests. Findings suggest that individuals are more strongly motivated to recreate at state and national parks relative to farmlands or forests. Post hoc paired t tests comparing motivations between both agricultural settings (farms and private forests) revealed significant differences in eight different recreational motivations. Individuals tended to place more importance on the ability to use equipment and test their skills when considering recreating on private forests. Conversely, social motivations (e.g., doing something with the family) were more important when individuals were considering recreating on farmland. Collectively, the findings suggest individuals expect distinctly different outcomes from their visits to farmlands, private forests, or state or national parks. Consequently, all three types of recreational settings have competitive advantages that their managers could capitalize on when making decisions about how to attract new visitors or produce the most desirable experiences for current recreationists.

  12. Ward Field and grandstand (Facility S 1009), looking toward Recreation ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Ward Field and grandstand (Facility S 1009), looking toward Recreation Center portion of Facility 161 (visible below tree canopy). - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Recreational Facilities, Various locations throughout base, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  13. Accreditation: A Method for Evaluating Public Park and Recreation Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Twardzik, Louis F.

    1987-01-01

    This article considers the concept of accreditation as a proper method of evaluating public park and recreation systems. Arguments for accreditation are presented, and the system used to evaluate college park and recreation curricula and administration is described. (MT)

  14. VIEW OF THE LOUVERED CLERESTORY OF THE RECREATION CENTER. VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF THE LOUVERED CLERESTORY OF THE RECREATION CENTER. VIEW FACING NORTH - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Bloch Recreation Center & Arena, Between Center Drive & North Road near Nimitz Gate, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  15. Entrance terrace with recreation center portion to left and arena ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Entrance terrace with recreation center portion to left and arena portion to right. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Bloch Recreation Center & Arena, Between Center Drive & North Road near Nimitz Gate, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  16. OVERVIEW OF RECREATION CENTER PORTION OF FACILITY 161. VIEW FACING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERVIEW OF RECREATION CENTER PORTION OF FACILITY 161. VIEW FACING SOUTHWEST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Bloch Recreation Center & Arena, Between Center Drive & North Road near Nimitz Gate, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  17. Today's Youth in Tomorrow's Sea. Another Title in the Series "Marine Careers."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Harold L.

    A discussion of many career possibilities related to the sea is presented. The false impressions many people have about the sea and about marine careers are dispelled. Among the career areas examined are offshore industry careers such as oil and gas drilling, careers in fishing, in seafaring, marine recreation, oceanography, aquaculture,

  18. Marine pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Albaiges, J. )

    1989-01-01

    This book covers the following topics: Transport of marine pollutants; Transformation of pollutants in the marine environment; Biological effects of marine pollutants; Sources and transport of oil pollutants in the Persian Gulf; Trace metals and hydrocarbons in Syrian coastal waters; and Techniques for analysis of trace pollutants.

  19. RURAL RECREATION, NEW OPPORTUNITIES ON PRIVATE LAND.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC.

    ABOUT 90 PERCENT OF ALL AMERICANS PARTICIPATED IN SOME FORM OF OUTDOOR RECREATION IN THE SUMMER OF 1960, AND THE TOTAL NUMBER IS EXPECTED TO INCREASE THREEFOLD BY THE TURN OF THE CENTURY. A LIST OF THE MOST POPULAR OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES INCLUDES DRIVING, WALKING, GAMES, SWIMMING, SIGHTSEEING, BICYCLING, FISHING, HIKING, BOATING, AND PICNICING.

  20. 32 CFR 552.166 - Recreational use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Recreational use. 552.166 Section 552.166 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES REGULATIONS AFFECTING MILITARY RESERVATIONS Land Use Policy for Fort Lewis, Yakima Training Center, and Camp Bonneville §...

  1. Outdoor Recreation in Two European Countries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubenstein, James M.

    1987-01-01

    Questionnaires completed by older adults in Luxembourg (N=138) and in France (N=100) revealed a high extent of participation in outdoor recreation (a demonstrated predictor of successful aging) in the two countries. Identified similarities and differences in socioeconomic characteristics, attitudes, and environmental factors associated with…

  2. Infusing JUST Design in Campus Recreation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staeger-Wilson, Katheryne; Sampson, Douglas H.

    2012-01-01

    This practice brief highlights the collaborative work among a disability resource professional, a university architect, and students with disabilities to create a campus recreation center with universal design features. This partnership serves to illustrate that building to minimum compliance standards does not necessarily remove barriers to…

  3. Aquatic Therapy. Making Waves in Therapeutic Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broach, Ellen; Dattilo, John

    1996-01-01

    Therapeutic recreation professionals often use aquatic therapy to improve physiological and psychological functioning, and they have reported improvements for people with many different types of disabilities. The paper discusses aquatic therapy methods, water as a therapeutic environment, professional training and development, and lifestyle…

  4. Therapeutic recreation treatment time during inpatient rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Gassaway, Julie; Dijkers, Marcel; Rider, Cecelia; Edens, Kelly; Cahow, Claire; Joyce, Joan

    2011-01-01

    Objective Following spinal cord injury (SCI), certified therapeutic recreation specialists (CTRSs) work with patients during rehabilitation to re-create leisure lifestyles. Although there is much literature available to describe the benefits of recreation, little has been written about the process of inpatient or outpatient rehabilitation therapeutic recreation (TR) programs or the effectiveness of such programs. To delineate how TR time is used during inpatient rehabilitation for SCI. Methods Six rehabilitation centers enrolled 600 patients with traumatic SCI for an observational study. CTRSs documented time spent on each of a set of specific TR activities during each patient encounter. Patterns of time use are described, for all patients and by neurologic category. Ordinary least-squares stepwise regression models are used to identify patient and injury characteristics predictive of total treatment time (overall and average per week) and time spent in TR activities. Results Ninety-four percent of patients enrolled in the SCIRehab study participated in TR. Patients received a mean total of 17.5 hours of TR; significant differences were seen in the amount of time spent in each activity among and within neurologic groups. The majority (76%) of patients participated in at least one structured therapeutic outing. Patient and injury characteristics explained little of the variation in time spent within activities. Conclusion The large amount of variability seen in TR treatment time within and among injury group categories, which is not explained well by patient and injury characteristics, sets the stage for future analyses to associate treatments with outcomes. PMID:21675356

  5. Guidelines for Recreation and Athletic Field Lighting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crookham, Joe P.

    1982-01-01

    Guidelines for planning the lighting facilities for recreational and other athletic fields are presented (a softball field is used for an example). Guidelines are given for determining (1) lighting needs and levels of uniformity; (2) lamp choice; (3) structural requirements; (4) operating and maintenance costs; and (5) financing options. (PP)

  6. Annual in Therapeutic Recreation. Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Michael E., Ed.; Card, Jaclyn A., Ed.

    This volume focuses on therapeutic recreation, as a subject of inquiry and as a treatment tool. The 11 articles include original field based research, program development initiatives, issue and theory of practice papers, and original tutorials in assessment and research. The article titles are: "The Role of Leisure Education with Family Caregivers

  7. COMMUNITY RECREATIONAL WATER RISK ASSESSMENT AND PUBLICOUTREACH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The City of Milwaukee Health Department and the City of Racine Health Department have formed a consortium with several scientific and community organizations for the purpose of more effectively collecting and disseminating recreational water quality data from several bea...

  8. Recreational Reading and the Reluctant Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allan, T. L.; MacDonald, Catherine

    1971-01-01

    The primary aim of this project was to stimulate interest in reading for pleasure. An experiment was conducted on a top second-year high school class, whose attitude toward recreational reading had been apathetic. The class was informed they were to read and review fiction with a Scottish setting over a five-month period, the end product of which

  9. Re-Creating Pablo Picasso's "Guernica"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daseler, Jack C.

    2010-01-01

    Recently, the teachers at the author's school completed a group project with their eighth-graders in which they recreated a mural version of the famous painting by Pablo Picasso, "Guernica." This activity was aimed at: (1) studying the rise of Fascism in Spain and Germany during the Spanish Civil War prior to World War II; (2) learning about the…

  10. Children's Recreation Activities: Facilities and Animation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mugglin, Gustav

    This study assessed recreational facilities for European children 5 to 15 years of age, and discussed the best means of meeting needs. The first chapter reviews the educational aspects of children's play--including physical, social, and creative development--as they pertain to various age groups. The second chapter considers the types of

  11. 50 CFR 600.513 - Recreational fishing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Recreational fishing. 600.513 Section 600.513 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MAGNUSON-STEVENS ACT PROVISIONS Foreign Fishing § 600.513...

  12. 50 CFR 600.513 - Recreational fishing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Recreational fishing. 600.513 Section 600.513 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MAGNUSON-STEVENS ACT PROVISIONS Foreign Fishing § 600.513...

  13. Research on Texas Water and Recreation Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas A and M Univ., College Station. Texas Agricultural Experiment Station.

    The need for research pertaining to the best use of water and recreation resources in Texas is emphasized in these four papers presented at the 1968 Experiment Station Conference, College Station, Texas. "Parameters of Water Resources in Texas" identifies and elaborates upon the important elements presently constituting the water resources

  14. Recreation for Retarded Teenagers and Young Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Bernice Wells; Ginglend, David R.

    Intended for recreational leaders, classroom teachers, volunteers, and parents, the text presents guidelines for planning and conducting activities for mentally retarded youth and young adults. Consideration of understanding the maturing retardate and his social needs includes different kinds of beneficial social experiences, the maturing

  15. Recreation Research Publications. Bibliography 1961-1982.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Echelberger, Herbert E., Comp.; And Others

    This bibliography identifies, by author and subject matter, recreational research publications, by Forest Service scientists, that have been published from 1961 through 1982. Publications are classified under six major topic areas: (1) management of areas and facilities (including such topics as wilderness/backcountry resources and use of

  16. Re-Creating Pablo Picasso's "Guernica"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daseler, Jack C.

    2010-01-01

    Recently, the teachers at the author's school completed a group project with their eighth-graders in which they recreated a mural version of the famous painting by Pablo Picasso, "Guernica." This activity was aimed at: (1) studying the rise of Fascism in Spain and Germany during the Spanish Civil War prior to World War II; (2) learning about the

  17. Personality, Outdoor Recreation, and Expected Consequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Driver, B. L.; Knoph, Richard C.

    1977-01-01

    Results of exploratory research on relationships between personality characteristics (measured by Jackson's Personality Research Form), choice of recreation activities engaged in actively, frequency of participation in those activities, and the desired consequences expected from that participation are reported. (Editors/BT)

  18. Indoor Recreational Places as Glazed Space.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cold, Birgit

    This paper describes how creation of a varied, imaginative, and cultivated environment can recreate the pleasure of learning. The development of an indoor-outdoor, public-private, and half-climatized glazed (glass covered) space at the University of Dragvoll in Trondheim, Norway, is described. Well-planned glazed spaces can increase social

  19. Career Exploration in Hospitality and Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiley, Benaree; And Others

    This curriculum guide is designed to help students develop career decisionmaking skills which they may use throughout their lives and examine and explore hospitality and recreation occupations. Nine units are included, with each consisting of a teacher's guide and student materials. The teacher's guide includes an overview, objectives, rationale,…

  20. Recreational Gun Use by California Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vittes, Katherine A.; Sorenson, Susan B.

    2005-01-01

    Most research on adolescents and firearms focuses on urban populations, handguns, and homicide. This study examines the prevalence and correlates of recreational gun use (RGU)--for hunting or target shooting--among 5,801 community-residing 12- to 17-year-old Californians. Data are from the first statewide California Health Interview Survey (CHIS),…

  1. Outdoor Recreation. Curriculum Materials for Agricultural Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McElwee, Robert; And Others

    This curriculum guide for agricultural education contains nine chapters on outdoor recreation. Each is written by a different author (professors at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University) and follows a similar format: Objectives, list of references, list of teaching materials, notes on teacher preparation, content for presentation,…

  2. Recreational Gun Use by California Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vittes, Katherine A.; Sorenson, Susan B.

    2005-01-01

    Most research on adolescents and firearms focuses on urban populations, handguns, and homicide. This study examines the prevalence and correlates of recreational gun use (RGU)--for hunting or target shooting--among 5,801 community-residing 12- to 17-year-old Californians. Data are from the first statewide California Health Interview Survey (CHIS),

  3. Baccalaureate Programs in Recreation, Park Resources, and Leisure Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parks & Recreation, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Presents a listing of baccalaureate programs in recreation, park resources, and leisure services that are accredited by the National Recreation and Park Association/American Association of Leisure and Recreation Council on Accreditation. Listings are alphabetical by state and present contact name, address, telephone, fax, email, website,

  4. 36 CFR 71.2 - Types of Federal recreation fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Types of Federal recreation fees. 71.2 Section 71.2 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RECREATION FEES 71.2 Types of Federal recreation fees. There shall be three types of...

  5. Serving the Homeless through Recreation Programs. Research Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunstler, Robin

    1993-01-01

    Literature review examines problems faced by homeless adults and children and discusses how recreation programs can serve them. The recreation and leisure profession can offer to the healthy child development through play and recreation, physical fitness, stress management, socialization, opportunities to learn goal-setting, self-esteem building,…

  6. Recreational Participation of Children with High Functioning Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potvin, Marie-Christine; Snider, Laurie; Prelock, Patricia; Kehayia, Eva; Wood-Dauphinee, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    The recreation of children with High Functioning Autism (HFA) is not well understood. The objective of this cross-sectional study was to compare the recreational engagement of children with HFA and their typically developing peers. Children with HFA (n = 30) and peers (n = 31) were similar on key characteristics that may impact recreation except

  7. RECREATION PROBLEMS OF RURAL YOUTH IN A CHANGING ENVIRONMENT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PRENDERGAST, JOSEPH

    RURAL YOUTH WHO ARE MOVING TO URBAN AREAS ARE NOT PREPARED TO PARTICIPATE IN URBAN TYPES OF RECREATION PROGRAMS. THE RECREATION SKILLS OF THOSE WHO HAVE LEFT THE FARM BUT ARE STILL IN RURAL SETTINGS DO NOT MATCH THE URBAN OPPORTUNITIES REACHING OUT TO THEM. THOSE STILL ON THE FARMS ARE GETTING RECREATION IDEAS THROUGH MASS MEDIA WITHOUT FINDING

  8. Recreational Reading of International Students in Academic Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bordonaro, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Recreational reading as a method of language learning has been a focus of investigation in second language education. This article considers recreational reading through the additional perspective of academic librarianship. Its purpose is to discover if recreational reading is a topic that lends itself to research through both perspectives. This

  9. RECREATION PROBLEMS OF RURAL YOUTH IN A CHANGING ENVIRONMENT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PRENDERGAST, JOSEPH

    RURAL YOUTH WHO ARE MOVING TO URBAN AREAS ARE NOT PREPARED TO PARTICIPATE IN URBAN TYPES OF RECREATION PROGRAMS. THE RECREATION SKILLS OF THOSE WHO HAVE LEFT THE FARM BUT ARE STILL IN RURAL SETTINGS DO NOT MATCH THE URBAN OPPORTUNITIES REACHING OUT TO THEM. THOSE STILL ON THE FARMS ARE GETTING RECREATION IDEAS THROUGH MASS MEDIA WITHOUT FINDING…

  10. Recreational Reading of International Students in Academic Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bordonaro, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Recreational reading as a method of language learning has been a focus of investigation in second language education. This article considers recreational reading through the additional perspective of academic librarianship. Its purpose is to discover if recreational reading is a topic that lends itself to research through both perspectives. This…

  11. Organisation of Recreation for the Blind in the USSR.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulicheva, N.

    The booklet contains a brief description of recreation under the auspices of the All-Russia Society for the Blind in the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics and a number of photographs illustrating recreational activities. It is noted that approximately 24,000 blind persons participate in recreational activities located in club rooms near their

  12. Therapeutic Recreation in the Community: An Inclusive Approach. Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Marcia Jean; LeConey, Stephen P.

    2004-01-01

    The second edition of Therapeutic Recreation in the Community: An Inclusive Approach reflects the changing and evolving nature of recreation and health care services. A number of social, economic, and political directives and technological advancements have fostered recreation in the community for all individuals. Due in part to a rising awareness…

  13. 36 CFR 30.4 - Recreation District II.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Recreation District II. 30.4 Section 30.4 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR WHISKEYTOWN-SHASTA-TRINITY NATIONAL RECREATION AREA: ZONING STANDARDS FOR WHISKEYTOWN UNIT § 30.4 Recreation District II. (a) Definition: This...

  14. Diffusion of Innovation: A Roadmap for Inclusive Community Recreation Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schleien, Stuart J.; Miller, Kimberly D.

    2010-01-01

    Inclusive community recreation is an optimal environment for the development of recreation and sports skills and social relationships between people with and without disabilities. Although we know much about best practices for inclusion, little systemic change in recreation agencies has transpired. Diffusion of Innovation Theory is proposed as a

  15. 50 CFR 648.127 - Scup recreational fishing season.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Scup recreational fishing season. 648.127... Measures for the Scup Fishery 648.127 Scup recreational fishing season. Fishermen and vessels that are... possession limit specified in 648.128(a). The recreational fishing season may be adjusted pursuant to...

  16. 50 CFR 648.127 - Scup recreational fishing season.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Scup recreational fishing season. 648.127... Measures for the Scup Fishery 648.127 Scup recreational fishing season. Fishermen and vessels that are... possession limit specified in 648.128(a). The recreational fishing season may be adjusted pursuant to...

  17. 50 CFR 648.127 - Scup recreational fishing season.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Scup recreational fishing season. 648.127... Measures for the Scup Fishery 648.127 Scup recreational fishing season. Fishermen and vessels that are... possession limit specified in 648.128(a). The recreational fishing season may be adjusted pursuant to...

  18. 50 CFR 635.22 - Recreational retention limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    .... The recreational retention limits for North Atlantic swordfish apply to persons who fish in any manner... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Recreational retention limits. 635.22....22 Recreational retention limits. (a) General. (1) Atlantic HMS caught, possessed, retained,...

  19. 50 CFR 635.22 - Recreational retention limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Recreational retention limits. 635.22....22 Recreational retention limits. (a) General. Atlantic HMS caught, possessed, retained, or landed.... Recreational retention limits apply to a longbill spearfish taken or possessed shoreward of the outer...

  20. 50 CFR 635.22 - Recreational retention limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    .... The recreational retention limits for North Atlantic swordfish apply to persons who fish in any manner... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Recreational retention limits. 635.22....22 Recreational retention limits. (a) General. (1) Atlantic HMS caught, possessed, retained,...

  1. 50 CFR 635.22 - Recreational retention limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Recreational retention limits. 635.22....22 Recreational retention limits. (a) General. (1) Atlantic HMS caught, possessed, retained, or... purpose. Recreational retention limits apply to a longbill spearfish taken or possessed shoreward of...

  2. Beware the Public Mentality. Ethical Dilemmas for the Recreational Entrepreneur.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolff, Robert

    1988-01-01

    This article discusses issues related to the role of ethics in shaping policy decisions of recreation industry entrepreneurs. Also described are philosophical differences between commercial and public sector recreation facilities, and the extent to which public values have a place on the recreation entrepreneur's agenda. (IAH)

  3. Diffusion of Innovation: A Roadmap for Inclusive Community Recreation Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schleien, Stuart J.; Miller, Kimberly D.

    2010-01-01

    Inclusive community recreation is an optimal environment for the development of recreation and sports skills and social relationships between people with and without disabilities. Although we know much about best practices for inclusion, little systemic change in recreation agencies has transpired. Diffusion of Innovation Theory is proposed as a…

  4. Therapeutic Recreation in the Community: An Inclusive Approach. Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Marcia Jean; LeConey, Stephen P.

    2004-01-01

    The second edition of Therapeutic Recreation in the Community: An Inclusive Approach reflects the changing and evolving nature of recreation and health care services. A number of social, economic, and political directives and technological advancements have fostered recreation in the community for all individuals. Due in part to a rising awareness

  5. RAPID DETECTION METHOD FOR E.COLI, ENTEROCOCCI AND BACTEROIDES IN RECREATIONAL WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current methodology for determining fecal contamination of drinking water sources and recreational waters rely on the time-consuming process of bacterial multiplication and require at least 24 hours from the time of sampling to the possible determination that the water is unsafe ...

  6. Determinants of Intensity of Participation in Leisure and Recreational Activities by Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palisano, Robert J.; Chiarello, Lisa A.; Orlin, Margo; Oeffinger, Donna; Polansky, Marcy; Maggs, Jill; Bagley, Anita; Gorton, George

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To test a model of child, family, and service determinants of intensity of participation in leisure and recreational activities by children with cerebral palsy (CP). Method: Participants were 288 children with CP, age range 6 to 12 years (mean 9y 8mo, SD 2y), and their parents from seven children's hospitals. The sample comprised 166 (57.6%)…

  7. Recreational Exposure to Low Concentrations of Microcystins During an Algal Bloom in a Small Lake

    PubMed Central

    Backer, Lorraine C.; Carmichael, Wayne; Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Williams, Christopher; Irvin, Mitch; Zhou, Yue; Johnson, Trisha B.; Nierenberg, Kate; Hill, Vincent R.; Kieszak, Stephanie M.; Cheng, Yung-Sung

    2008-01-01

    We measured microcystins in blood from people at risk for swallowing water or inhaling spray while swimming, water skiing, jet skiing, or boating during an algal bloom. We monitored water samples from a small lake as a Microcystis aeruginosa bloom developed. We recruited 97 people planning recreational activities in that lake and seven others who volunteered to recreate in a nearby bloom-free lake. We conducted our field study within a week of finding a 10-?g/L microcystin concentration. We analyzed water, air, and human blood samples for water quality, potential human pathogens, algal taxonomy, and microcystin concentrations. We interviewed study participants for demographic and current health symptom information. Water samples were assayed for potential respiratory viruses (adenoviruses and enteroviruses), but none were detected. We did find low concentrations of Escherichia coli, indicating fecal contamination. We found low levels of microcystins (2 ?g/L to 5 ?g/L) in the water and (<0.1 ng/m3) in the aerosol samples. Blood levels of microcystins for all participants were below the limit of detection (0.147?g/L). Given this low exposure level, study participants reported no symptom increases following recreational exposure to microcystins. This is the first study to report that water-based recreational activities can expose people to very low concentrations of aerosol-borne microcystins; we recently conducted another field study to assess exposures to higher concentrations of these algal toxins. PMID:18728733

  8. Determinants of Intensity of Participation in Leisure and Recreational Activities by Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palisano, Robert J.; Chiarello, Lisa A.; Orlin, Margo; Oeffinger, Donna; Polansky, Marcy; Maggs, Jill; Bagley, Anita; Gorton, George

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To test a model of child, family, and service determinants of intensity of participation in leisure and recreational activities by children with cerebral palsy (CP). Method: Participants were 288 children with CP, age range 6 to 12 years (mean 9y 8mo, SD 2y), and their parents from seven children's hospitals. The sample comprised 166 (57.6%)

  9. Fear Perceptions in Public Parks: Interactions of Environmental Concealment, the Presence of People Recreating, and Gender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jorgensen, Lisa J.; Ellis, Gary D.; Ruddell, Edward

    2013-01-01

    This research examined the effect of concealment (environmental cues), presence or absence of people recreating (social cues), and gender on individuals' fear of crime in a community park setting. Using a 7-point single-item indicator, 732 participants from two samples (540 park visitors and 192 college students) rated their estimates of fear…

  10. Fear Perceptions in Public Parks: Interactions of Environmental Concealment, the Presence of People Recreating, and Gender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jorgensen, Lisa J.; Ellis, Gary D.; Ruddell, Edward

    2013-01-01

    This research examined the effect of concealment (environmental cues), presence or absence of people recreating (social cues), and gender on individuals' fear of crime in a community park setting. Using a 7-point single-item indicator, 732 participants from two samples (540 park visitors and 192 college students) rated their estimates of fear

  11. Odour emission characteristics of 22 recreational rivers in Nanjing.

    PubMed

    Wan, Yu; Ruan, Xiaohong; Wang, Xinguang; Ma, Qian; Lu, Xiaoming

    2014-10-01

    The odour emission characteristics of 22 recreational rivers in Nanjing were investigated and analysed. Eight odorous compounds (ammonia (NH?), hydrogen sulphide (H?S), sulphur dioxide (SO?), carbon disulphide (CS?), nitrobenzene (C?H?NO?), aniline (C?H?NH?), dimethylamine (C?H?N), and formaldehyde (HCHO)) were measured in odour emission samples collected using a custom-made emission flux hood chamber. The results showed that all odorants were detected in all monitoring rivers. NH? was the main odorant, with emission rates ranging from 4.86 to 15.13 ?g/min m(2). The total odour emission rate of the Nan River, at 1 427.07 OU/s, was the highest of the all investigated rivers. H?S, NH? and nitrobenzene were three key odour emission contributors according to their contributions to the total odour emission. A correlation analysis of the pollutants showed there was a significant positive correlation between the emission rate of NH? and the concentration of ammonia nitrogen (NH? (+)-N) and total nitrogen (TN). The H?S and SO? emission rates had a significant positive correlation with sulphides (S(2-)) and available sulphur (AS) in the water and sediment. The content of TN, NH?(+)-N, S(2-) and AS in the water and sediment affected the concentration of H?S, SO? and NH? in the emission gases. NH?(+)-N, S(2-) and AS are suggested as the key odour control indexes for reducing odours emitted from these recreational rivers. The study provides useful information for effective pollution control, especially for odour emission control for the recreational rivers of the city. It also provides a demonstrate example to show how to monitor and assess a contaminated river when odour emission and its control need to be focused on. PMID:24939710

  12. Genotoxicity of water concentrates from recreational pools after various disinfection methods.

    PubMed

    Liviac, Danae; Wagner, Elizabeth D; Mitch, William A; Altonji, Matthew J; Plewa, Michael J

    2010-05-01

    Swimming and hot tub bathing are popular exercises and diversions. Disinfection of recreational pools is essential to prevent outbreaks of infectious disease. Recent research demonstrated an association between the application of disinfectants to recreational pools and adverse health outcomes. These pool waters represent extreme cases of disinfection that differ from disinfecting drinking waters. Pool waters are continuously exposed to disinfectants over average residence times extending to months. Disinfection byproduct (DBP) precursors include natural humic substances plus inputs from bathers through urine, sweat, hair, skin, and consumer products including cosmetics and sunscreens. This study presents a systematic mammalian cell genotoxicity analysis to evaluate different recreational waters derived from a common tap water source. The data demonstrated that all disinfected recreational pool water samples induced more genomic DNA damage than the source tap water. The type of disinfectant and illumination conditions altered the genotoxicity of the water. Accordingly, care should be taken in the disinfectant employed to treat recreational pool waters. The genotoxicity data suggest that brominating agents should be avoided. Combining chlorine with UV may be beneficial as compared to chlorination alone. During the recycling of pool water the organic carbon could be removed prior to disinfection. Behavior modification by swimmers may be critical in reducing the genotoxicity of pool water. Actions such as showering before entering the water and informing patrons about the potential harm from urinating in a pool could reduce the precursors of toxic DBPs. PMID:20380372

  13. Prospective epidemiological pilot study on the morbidity of bathers exposed to tropical recreational waters and sand.

    PubMed

    Snchez-Nazario, Elia E; Santiago-Rodriguez, Tasha M; Toranzos, Gary A

    2014-06-01

    A prospective cohort epidemiological pilot study was performed at three tropical beaches with point- and non-point-sources of fecal pollution to characterize the risk of illness among swimmers and non-swimmers. There was an increased risk of illness in swimmers as compared to non-swimmers, even when waters met current microbial standards for recreational water quality. Illnesses included gastrointestinal (GI), skin and respiratory symptoms, earache and fever. Odds ratios (ORs) ranged from 0.32 to 42.35 (GI illness), 0.69 to 3.12 (skin infections), 0.71 to 3.21 (respiratory symptoms), 0.52 to 15.32 (earache) and 0.80 to 1.68 (fever), depending on the beach sampled. The indicators that better predicted the risks of symptoms (respiratory) in tropical recreational waters were total (somatic and male-specific) coliphages (OR = 1.56, p < 0.10, R(2) = 3.79%) and Escherichia coli (OR = 1.38, p < 0.10, R(2) = 1.97%). The present study supports the potential of coliphages as good predictors of risks of respiratory illness in tropical recreational waters. This is the first study that has determined risks of illness after exposure to tropical recreational waters with point- and non-point sources of fecal contamination. The results give an opportunity to perform epidemiological studies in tropical recreational waters in Puerto Rico which can include more participants and other indicators and detection techniques. PMID:24937216

  14. Impact of recreation on recreational water quality of a small tropical stream.

    PubMed

    Phillip, Dawn Arlene Teresa; Antoine, Peter; Cooper, Vincent; Francis, Lorraine; Mangal, Erin; Seepersad, Nabilla; Ragoo, Rajesh; Ramsaran, Shalini; Singh, Ianthe; Ramsubhag, Adash

    2009-06-01

    A study was conducted to determine the possible influence of recreation on microbiological water quality of a tropical stream. Microbiological water quality was measured at several recreational sites along the stream and a separate experiment was conducted to look at the effect of sediment resuspension on microbiological water quality. Microbiological quality of the water in the stream was generally poor and varied widely with faecal coliform and Escherichia coli levels ranging from 1 to > 16,000 and 14 to 9615 organisms 100 ml(-1) respectively. Levels of faecal coliforms were higher in the wet (median = 700 organisms 100 ml(-1)) than the dry (median = 500 organisms 100 ml(-1)) season while the reverse was true for E. coli (median = 300 and 220 organisms 100 ml(-1) in the wet and dry seasons respectively). Recreational activity resulted in reduced water quality: sites with recreation had poorer water quality than those without; water quality was generally poorer when there were high numbers of recreational users. Wading resulted in a 4-fold increase in mean E. coli densities and a 3-fold increase in total suspended sediments in the overlying water suggesting that the increases were due to suspension of bacteria from the sediments. We conclude that water quality monitoring methodology for assessing recreational water quality should be amended to factor in the effects of wading since environmental strains of bacteria can be pathogenic and thus represent a human health threat. PMID:19513450

  15. Discovery of novel metabolites from marine actinomycetes.

    PubMed

    Lam, Kin S

    2006-06-01

    Recent findings from culture-dependent and culture-independent methods have demonstrated that indigenous marine actinomycetes exist in the oceans and are widely distributed in different marine ecosystems. There is tremendous diversity and novelty among the marine actinomycetes present in marine environments. Progress has been made to isolate novel actinomycetes from samples collected at different marine environments and habitats. These marine actinomycetes produce different types of new secondary metabolites. Many of these metabolites possess biological activities and have the potential to be developed as therapeutic agents. Marine actinomycetes are a prolific but underexploited source for the discovery of novel secondary metabolites. PMID:16675289

  16. Survey of non-charter boat recreational fishing in the U.S. Virgin Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jennings, C.A.

    1992-01-01

    A telephone survey was conducted by the U.S. Virgin Islands Division of Fish and Wildlife from July- September 1986 to evaluate the efficacy of telephone surveys as a sampling technique for obtaining reliable fisheries data, and to collect fisheries data for the recreational non-charter boat fishery around the Virgin Islands. Results suggest that telephone surveys by themselves may provide biased data on recreational fishing in the Virgin Islands. Additional methods, such as mail surveys and limited creel surveys could be used to supplement the fisheries data gathered through telephone surveys. The results of this survey indicate that during the mid 1980s 10.8% of the residents of the Virgin Islands ( similar to 10,800) fished recreationally (i.e., non-charter boat anglers). These anglers made modest demands of the resources (effort: 19,200 manhours/yr;

  17. Water Quality Conditions Associated with Cattle Grazing and Recreation on National Forest Lands

    PubMed Central

    Roche, Leslie M.; Kromschroeder, Lea; Atwill, Edward R.; Dahlgren, Randy A.; Tate, Kenneth W.

    2013-01-01

    There is substantial concern that microbial and nutrient pollution by cattle on public lands degrades water quality, threatening human and ecological health. Given the importance of clean water on multiple-use landscapes, additional research is required to document and examine potential water quality issues across common resource use activities. During the 2011 grazing-recreation season, we conducted a cross sectional survey of water quality conditions associated with cattle grazing and/or recreation on 12 public lands grazing allotments in California. Our specific study objectives were to 1) quantify fecal indicator bacteria (FIB; fecal coliform and E. coli), total nitrogen, nitrate, ammonium, total phosphorus, and soluble-reactive phosphorus concentrations in surface waters; 2) compare results to a) water quality regulatory benchmarks, b) recommended maximum nutrient concentrations, and c) estimates of nutrient background concentrations; and 3) examine relationships between water quality, environmental conditions, cattle grazing, and recreation. Nutrient concentrations observed throughout the grazing-recreation season were at least one order of magnitude below levels of ecological concern, and were similar to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) estimates for background water quality conditions in the region. The relative percentage of FIB regulatory benchmark exceedances widely varied under individual regional and national water quality standards. Relative to USEPAs national E. coli FIB benchmarksthe most contemporary and relevant standards for this studyover 90% of the 743 samples collected were below recommended criteria values. FIB concentrations were significantly greater when stream flow was low or stagnant, water was turbid, and when cattle were actively observed at sampling. Recreation sites had the lowest mean FIB, total nitrogen, and soluble-reactive phosphorus concentrations, and there were no significant differences in FIB and nutrient concentrations between key grazing areas and non-concentrated use areas. Our results suggest cattle grazing, recreation, and provisioning of clean water can be compatible goals across these national forest lands. PMID:23826370

  18. Survey of Alaskan subsistence fish, marine mammal, and invertebrate samples collected 1989-91 for exposure to oil spilled from the Exxon Valdez. Volume 1. Technical memo

    SciTech Connect

    Varanasi, U.; Brown, D.W.; Hom, T.; Burrows, D.G.; Sloan, C.A.

    1993-10-01

    The Exxon Valdez ran aground on Bligh Reef, Prince William Sound, Alaska on March 24, 1989, spilling millions of gallons of Prudhoe Bay crude oil (PBCO). During the weeks following the spill, large amounts of oil flowed towards southwestern Prince William Sound, and as a result, many shorelines were oiled. In the study, edible flesh of fish, marine mammals, and shellfish from 22 native subsistence food collection areas and from two reference areas (Angoon and Yakutat) were analyzed for aromatic compounds (ACs). Vertebrates can readily biotransform ACs to metabolites that are concentrated in bile for excretion. This process greatly limits the accumulation of ACs in tissues such as edible flesh. Thus, for fish and marine mammals, bile was first analyzed for the presence of fluorescent aromatic compounds (FACs) as an indication of exposure to petroleum.

  19. Fishing, fish consumption and advisory awareness among Louisiana's recreational fishers.

    PubMed

    Katner, Adrienne; Ogunyinka, Ebenezer; Sun, Mei-Hung; Soileau, Shannon; Lavergne, David; Dugas, Dianne; Suffet, Mel

    2011-11-01

    This paper presents results from the first known population-based survey of recreational fishers in Louisiana (n=1774). The ultimate goal of this study was to obtain data in support of the development of regional advisories for a high exposure population with unique seafood consumption patterns. Between July and August of 2008, a survey was mailed to a random sample of licensed recreational fishers to characterize local fishing habits, sportfish consumption, and advisory awareness. Eighty-eight percent of respondents reported eating sportfish. Respondents ate an estimated mean of four fish meals per month, of which, approximately half were sportfish. Over half of all sportfish meals (54%) were caught in the Gulf of Mexico or bordering brackish areas. Sportfish consumption varied by license and gender; and was highest among Sportsman's Paradise license holders (2.80.2 meals per month), and males (2.20.1 meals per month). The most frequently consumed sportfish species were red drum, speckled trout, catfish, bass, crappie and bream. Advisory awareness rates varied by gender, ethnicity, geographic area, license type, age and education; and were lowest among women (53%), African-Americans (43%), fishers from the southeast of Louisiana (50%), holders of Senior Hunting and Fishing licenses (51%), individuals between 15 and 19 years of age (41%), and individuals with less than a high school education (43%). Results were used to identify ways to optimize monitoring, advisory development and outreach activities. PMID:21851935

  20. Presence of enteroviruses in recreational water in Wuhan, China.

    PubMed

    Allmann, Erin; Pan, Lei; Li, Lu; Li, Dejia; Wang, Suqing; Lu, Yuanan

    2013-11-01

    Contaminated recreational waters pose a public health concern, as the potential for waterborne diseases exists in water contaminated with human fecal waste. Worldwide, bacterial indicators such as Escherichia coli, enterococci, and total and fecal coliform are used as indicators of water quality. However, enteric viruses also present a public health concern and their presence cannot always be determined based on bacterial indicators. This study explores the use of molecular detection methods of enteric viruses as indicators of fecal contamination. Four viruses, enterovirus, norovirus genogroups I and II, and male-specific FRNA coliphage, were tested in this study. Highly sensitive RT-PCR methods developed at the University of Hawaii at Manoa were utilized to evaluate environmental samples collected from three lakes in Wuhan, Hubei Province, China. Sixteen of twenty-five sites tested positive for at least one virus. Enterovirus was the most commonly detected virus, followed by norovirus genogroup I. These findings support the use of molecular detection methods to test for enteric virus presence in recreational freshwater sources in China as alternative water quality indicators, and utilize recently developed, highly sensitive methods of detection of these viruses. In addition, these findings suggest that there is substantial fecal contamination of the three lakes tested in this study. PMID:23827950

  1. Marine biology

    SciTech Connect

    Thurman, H.V.; Webber, H.H.

    1984-01-01

    This book discusses both taxonomic and ecological topics on marine biology. Full coverage of marine organisms of all five kingdoms is provided, along with interesting and thorough discussion of all major marine habitats. Organization into six major parts allows flexibility. It also provides insight into important topics such as disposal of nuclear waste at sea, the idea that life began on the ocean floor, and how whales, krill, and people interact. A full-color photo chapter reviews questions, and exercises. The contents are: an overview marine biology: fundamental concepts/investigating life in the ocean; the physical ocean, the ocean floor, the nature of water, the nature and motion of ocean water; general ecology, conditions for life in the sea, biological productivity and energy transfer; marine organisms; monera, protista, mycota and metaphyta; the smaller marine animals, the large animals marine habitats, the intertidal zone/benthos of the continental shelf, the photic zone, the deep ocean, the ocean under stress, marine pollution, appendix a: the metric system and conversion factors/ appendix b: prefixes and suffixes/ appendix c: taxonomic classification of common marine organisms, and glossary, and index.

  2. Recreation utilization of surface-mined lands

    SciTech Connect

    Klimstra, W.D.; Nawrot, J.R.; Santner, M.R.

    1985-12-09

    Seventy-one sites totaling 10,785 ha of surface mined land, are used for organized recreation in 15 Illinois counties; Fulton, Grunday, Perry, Randolph, Vermilion, and Will counties contain 80%. There are 54 private sites, 8 public, 5 use by permit, and 5 commercial. At least 1 city with 25,000 or greater population is located within 40 km of 60 (85%) sites. Fishing, picnicking, camping, swimming, other (primarily residential), and hunting are the most regularly documented uses/activities; greatest variety occurs in northeastern Illinois. Private sites offer most activities in contrast to public, permit, or commercial. Fifty-nine sites (6380 ha) were mined before the Illinois Open Cut Land Reclamation Act of 1962 took effect: 7 (4006 ha) were partly pre-law. Post mining characteristics of most sites were unsuitable for row crop agriculture due to steep slopes or surface stoniness. It is believed that future expansion or development of new recreation sites will occur in Grundy, Henry, Kankakee, Knox, Vermilion, and Will counties, due to demand for recreation areas and the availability and quality of pre-law mined lands. 13 references, 1 figure, 5 tables.

  3. Gas phase acid, ammonia and aerosol ionic and trace element concentrations at Cape Verde during the Reactive Halogens in the Marine Boundary Layer (RHaMBLe) 2007 intensive sampling period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sander, R.; Pszenny, A. A. P.; Keene, W. C.; Crete, E.; Deegan, B.; Long, M. S.; Maben, J. R.; Young, A. H.

    2013-12-01

    We report mixing ratios of soluble reactive trace gases sampled with mist chambers and the chemical composition of bulk aerosol and volatile inorganic bromine (Brg) sampled with filter packs during the Reactive Halogens in the Marine Boundary Layer (RHaMBLe) field campaign at the Cape Verde Atmospheric Observatory (CVAO) on São Vicente island in the tropical North Atlantic in May and June 2007. The gas-phase data include HCl, HNO3, HONO, HCOOH, CH3COOH, NH3, and volatile reactive chlorine other than HCl (Cl*). Aerosol samples were analyzed by neutron activation (Na, Al, Cl, V, Mn, and Br) and ion chromatography (SO42-, Cl-, Br-, NH4+, Na+, K+, Mg2+, and Ca2+). Content and quality of the data, which are available under doi:10.5281/zenodo.6956, are presented and discussed.

  4. Gas phase acid, ammonia and aerosol ionic and trace element concentrations at Cape Verde during the Reactive Halogens in the Marine Boundary Layer (RHaMBLe) 2007 intensive sampling period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sander, R.; Pszenny, A. A. P.; Keene, W. C.; Crete, E.; Deegan, B.; Long, M. S.; Maben, J. R.; Young, A. H.

    2013-07-01

    We report mixing ratios of soluble reactive trace gases sampled with mist chambers and the chemical composition of bulk aerosol and volatile inorganic bromine (Brg) sampled with filter packs during the Reactive Halogens in the Marine Boundary Layer (RHaMBLe) field campaign at the Cape Verde Atmospheric Observatory (CVAO) on São Vicente island in the tropical North Atlantic in May and June 2007. The gas-phase data include HCl, HNO3, HONO, HCOOH, CH3COOH, NH3, and volatile reactive chlorine other than HCl (Cl*). Aerosol samples were analyzed by neutron activation (Na, Al, Cl, V, Mn, and Br) and ion chromatography (SO42-, Cl-, Br-, NH4+, Na+, K+, Mg2+, and Ca2+). Content and quality of the data, which are available under doi:10.5281/zenodo.6956, are presented and discussed.

  5. Economic valuation for the conservation of marine biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, N J; Austen, M C; Mangi, S C; Townsend, M

    2008-03-01

    Policy makers are increasingly recognising the role of environmental valuation to guide and support the management and conservation of biodiversity. This paper presents a goods and services approach to determine the economic value of marine biodiversity in the UK, with the aim of clarifying the role of valuation in the management of marine biodiversity. The goods and services resulting from UK marine biodiversity are detailed, and 8 of the 13 services are valued in monetary terms. It is found that a decline in UK marine biodiversity could result in a varying, and at present unpredictable, change in the provision of goods and services, including reduced resilience and resistance to change, declining marine environmental health, reduced fisheries potential, and loss of recreational opportunities. The results suggest that this approach can facilitate biodiversity management by enabling the optimal allocation of limited management resources and through raising awareness of the importance of marine biodiversity. PMID:18191954

  6. Antibiotic-resistance and virulence genes in Enterococcus isolated from tropical recreational waters

    PubMed Central

    Santiago-Rodriguez, Tasha M.; Rivera, Jessica I.; Coradin, Mariel; Toranzos, Gary A.

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of enterococci harboring tetracycline and vancomycin-resistance genes, as well as the enterococcal surface protein (esp) has mostly been determined in clinical settings, but their prevalence in tropical recreational waters remains largely unknown. The present study determined the prevalence of tetM (tetracycline-resistance), vanA and vanB (vancomycin-resistance) in the bacterial and viral fractions, enterococci and their induced phages isolated from tropical recreational marine and fresh waters, dry and wet sands. Since lysogenic phages can act as vectors for antibiotic-resistance and virulence factors, the prevalence of the mentioned genes, as well as that of an integrase-encoding gene (int) specific for Enterococcus faecalis phages was determined. Up to 60 % and 54 % of the bacterial fractions and enterococci harbored at least one of the tested genes, respectively, suggesting that bacteria in tropical environments may be reservoirs of antibiotic-resistance and virulence genes. int was detected in the viral fractions and in one Enterococcus isolate after induction. This study opens the opportunity to determine if the presence of bacteria harboring antibiotic-resistance and virulence genes in tropical recreational waters represents a threat to public health. PMID:23981868

  7. Antibiotic-resistance and virulence genes in Enterococcus isolated from tropical recreational waters.

    PubMed

    Santiago-Rodriguez, Tasha M; Rivera, Jessica I; Coradin, Mariel; Toranzos, Gary A

    2013-09-01

    The prevalence of enterococci harboring tetracycline- and vancomycin-resistance genes, as well as the enterococcal surface protein (esp) has mostly been determined in clinical settings, but their prevalence in tropical recreational waters remains largely unknown. The present study determined the prevalence of tetM (tetracycline-resistance), vanA and vanB (vancomycin-resistance) in the bacterial and viral fractions, enterococci and their induced phages isolated from tropical recreational marine and fresh waters, dry and wet sands. Since lysogenic phages can act as vectors for antibiotic-resistance and virulence factors, the prevalence of the mentioned genes, as well as that of an integrase-encoding gene (int) specific for Enterococcus faecalis phages was determined. Up to 60 and 54% of the bacterial fractions and enterococci, respectively, harbored at least one of the tested genes suggesting that bacteria in tropical environments may be reservoirs of antibiotic-resistance and virulence genes. int was detected in the viral fractions and in one Enterococcus isolate after induction. This study presents the opportunity to determine if the presence of bacteria harboring antibiotic-resistance and virulence genes in tropical recreational waters represents a threat to public health. PMID:23981868

  8. Rapidly Measured Indicators of Recreational Water Quality Are Predictive of Swimming-Associated Gastrointestinal Illness

    PubMed Central

    Wade, Timothy J.; Calderon, Rebecca L.; Sams, Elizabeth; Beach, Michael; Brenner, Kristen P.; Williams, Ann H.; Dufour, Alfred P.

    2006-01-01

    Standard methods to measure recreational water quality require at least 24 hr to obtain results, making it impossible to assess the quality of water within a single day. Methods to measure recreational water quality in ? 2 hr have been developed. Application of rapid methods could give considerably more accurate and timely assessments of recreational water quality. We conducted a prospective study of beachgoers at two Great Lakes beaches to examine the association between recreational water quality, obtained using rapid methods, and gastrointestinal (GI) illness after swimming. Beachgoers were asked about swimming and other beach activities and 1012 days later were asked about the occurrence of GI symptoms. We tested water samples for Enterococcus and Bacteroides species using the quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. We observed significant trends between increased GI illness and Enterococcus at the Lake Michigan beach and a positive trend for Enterococcus at the Lake Erie beach. The association remained significant for Enterococcus when the two beaches were combined. We observed a positive trend for Bacteroides at the Lake Erie beach, but no trend was observed at the Lake Michigan beach. Enterococcus samples collected at 0800 hr were predictive of GI illness that day. The association between Enterococcus and illness strengthened as time spent swimming in the water increased. This is the first study to show that water quality measured by rapid methods can predict swimming-associated health effects. PMID:16393653

  9. Marine Biomedicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bang, Frederik B.

    1977-01-01

    Describes early scientific research involving marine invertebrate pathologic processes that may have led to new insights into human disease. Discussed are inquiries of Metchnikoff, Loeb, and Cantacuzene (immunolgic responses in sea stars, horseshoe crabs, and marine worms, respectively). Describes current research stemming from these early

  10. Marine Biomedicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bang, Frederik B.

    1977-01-01

    Describes early scientific research involving marine invertebrate pathologic processes that may have led to new insights into human disease. Discussed are inquiries of Metchnikoff, Loeb, and Cantacuzene (immunolgic responses in sea stars, horseshoe crabs, and marine worms, respectively). Describes current research stemming from these early…

  11. Marine Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewees, Christopher M.; Hooper, Jon K.

    1976-01-01

    A variety of informational material for a course in marine biology or oceanology at the secondary level is presented. Among the topics discussed are: food webs and pyramids, planktonic blooms, marine life, plankton nets, food chains, phytoplankton, zooplankton, larval plankton and filter feeders. (BT)

  12. The Effects of Winter Recreation on Alpine and Subalpine Fauna: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Chloe F.; Wood, Jeff T.; Lindenmayer, David B.

    2013-01-01

    The ski industry is often perceived as having a negative impact on sensitive alpine and subalpine communities. However, empirical evidence of such impacts is lacking. We reviewed the available literature from the last 35 years to quantify the reported effects of winter recreation on faunal communities. Overall, using one-sample binomial tests (‘sign tests’) we found that the effects of all types of winter recreation-related disturbances (i.e. ski runs, resort infrastructure and winter tourism) were more likely to be negative or have no effect, than be positive for wildlife. More specifically, in Europe, where the majority of the available research was conducted, the impacts of winter recreation were most often negative for fauna. In terms of specific taxa, birds and to a lesser extent mammals and arthropods, responded negatively to disturbance. Results from our meta-analysis confirmed the results from our binomial tests. Richness, abundance and diversity of fauna were lower in areas affected by winter recreation when compared with undisturbed areas. For most regions and taxa, however, empirical evidence remains too limited to identify clear impacts of winter recreation. We therefore conclude that the majority of ski resorts are operating in the absence of knowledge needed to inform effective strategies for biodiversity conservation and ecologically-sound management. Thus, there is an urgent need for more empirical research to be conducted throughout this increasingly threatened ecological community, especially given the indication from the available literature that fauna often respond negatively to winter recreation. PMID:23691190

  13. The effects of winter recreation on alpine and subalpine fauna: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Sato, Chloe F; Wood, Jeff T; Lindenmayer, David B

    2013-01-01

    The ski industry is often perceived as having a negative impact on sensitive alpine and subalpine communities. However, empirical evidence of such impacts is lacking. We reviewed the available literature from the last 35 years to quantify the reported effects of winter recreation on faunal communities. Overall, using one-sample binomial tests ('sign tests') we found that the effects of all types of winter recreation-related disturbances (i.e. ski runs, resort infrastructure and winter tourism) were more likely to be negative or have no effect, than be positive for wildlife. More specifically, in Europe, where the majority of the available research was conducted, the impacts of winter recreation were most often negative for fauna. In terms of specific taxa, birds and to a lesser extent mammals and arthropods, responded negatively to disturbance. Results from our meta-analysis confirmed the results from our binomial tests. Richness, abundance and diversity of fauna were lower in areas affected by winter recreation when compared with undisturbed areas. For most regions and taxa, however, empirical evidence remains too limited to identify clear impacts of winter recreation. We therefore conclude that the majority of ski resorts are operating in the absence of knowledge needed to inform effective strategies for biodiversity conservation and ecologically-sound management. Thus, there is an urgent need for more empirical research to be conducted throughout this increasingly threatened ecological community, especially given the indication from the available literature that fauna often respond negatively to winter recreation. PMID:23691190

  14. Tiered approach for identification of a human fecal pollution source at a recreational beach: case study at Avalon Bay, Catalina Island, California.

    PubMed

    Boehm, Alexandria B; Fuhrman, Jed A; Mrse, Robert D; Grant, Stanley B

    2003-02-15

    Recreational marine beaches in California are posted as unfit for swimming when the concentration of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) exceeds any of seven concentration standards. Finding and mitigating sources of shoreline FIB is complicated by the many potential human and nonhuman sources of these organisms and the complex fate and transport processes that control their concentrations. In this study, a three-tiered approach is used to identify human and nonhuman sources of FIB in Avalon Bay, a popular resort community on Catalina Island in southern California. The first and second tiers utilize standard FIB tests to spatially isolate the FIB signal, to characterize the variability of FIB over a range of temporal scales, and to measure FIB concentrations in potential sources of these organisms. In the third tier, water samples from FIB "hot spots" and sources are tested for human-specific bacteria Bacteroides/Prevotella and enterovirus to determine whether the FIB are from human sewage or from nonhuman sources such as bird feces. FIB in Avalon Bay appear to be from multiple, primarily land-based, sources including bird droppings, contaminated subsurface water, leaking drains, and runoff from street wash-down actvities. Multiple shoreline samples and two subsurface water samples tested positive for human-specific bacteria and enterovirus, suggesting that at least a portion of the FIB contamination is from human sewage. PMID:12636264

  15. Rapid determination of scopolamine in evidence of recreational and predatory use.

    PubMed

    Sáiz, Jorge; Mai, Thanh Duc; López, María López; Bartolomé, Carmen; Hauser, Peter C; García-Ruiz, Carmen

    2013-12-01

    In recent years, scopolamine has become a drug of common use for recreational and predatory purposes and several ways of administration have been devised. A method for the rapid analysis of suspicious samples was developed, using a portable capillary electrophoresis with contactless conductivity detection. The method allows the separation of scopolamine from atropine which has a similar structure and is present along with scopolamine in some samples. The method was demonstrated to be useful for the fast analysis of several types of evidential items which have recently been reported to have been abused with fatal consequences or employed for criminal purposes. An infusion of Datura stramonium L., in which scopolamine and atropine naturally coexist, was analyzed for being frequently consumed for recreational purposes. A spiked moisturizing cream and six spiked alcoholic beverages were also analyzed. In spite of the complexity of the specimens, the sample pre-treatment methods developed were simple and fast. PMID:24188342

  16. Socio-cultural factors that foster use and abuse of alcohol among a sample of enlisted personnel at four Navy and Marine Corps installations.

    PubMed

    Poehlman, Jon A; Schwerin, Michael J; Pemberton, Michael R; Isenberg, Karen; Lane, Marian E; Aspinwall, Kimberly

    2011-04-01

    Rates of heavy drinking are consistently higher among U.S. military personnel than among civilians, particularly among young male personnel. In addressing drinking in the military, more information is needed on contextual factors influencing drinking to better understand the conditions that lead to or facilitate drinking. Results from 15 focus groups conducted with enlisted personnel at 2 Navy and 2 Marine Corps installations as part of formative research for an alcohol abuse prevention trial are reported in this article. The study explored the "drinking climate" of each installation in terms of shared attitudes and recognized norms regarding alcohol use and installation personnel's general understanding of policies concerning alcohol consumption. Analysis revealed several contextual factors that add to our understanding of drinking behaviors. PMID:21539161

  17. Medical and recreational marijuana: commentary and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Samuel T

    2013-01-01

    Recent years have seen substantial shifts in cultural attitudes towards marijuana for medical and recreational use. Potential problems with the approval, production, dispensation, route of administration, and negative health effects of medical and recreational marijuana are reviewed. Medical marijuana should be subject to the same rigorous approval process as other medications prescribed by physicians. Legalizing recreational marijuana may have negative public health effects. PMID:24564006

  18. [Recreation as one of the trends in human ecology].

    PubMed

    Preobrazhenskiĭ, V S; Vedenin, Iu A

    1989-01-01

    The significance of the recreation complex of branches of recreation sciences--in the development of human ecology is examined. Much attention is payed to the problems of human interaction with environment, to the analysis of specific qualities of arising integral socio-political formations--recreation systems, and to the questions of human adaptation to different qualities of natural and social geosystems. PMID:2816005

  19. Recreational nitrous oxide use: Prevalence and risks.

    PubMed

    van Amsterdam, Jan; Nabben, Ton; van den Brink, Wim

    2015-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O; laughing gas) is clinically used as a safe anesthetic (dentistry, ambulance, childbirth) and appreciated for its anti-anxiety effect. Since five years, recreational use of N2O is rapidly increasing especially in the dance and festival scene. In the UK, N2O is the second most popular recreational drug after cannabis. In most countries, nitrous oxide is a legal drug that is widely available and cheap. Last month prevalence of use among clubbers and ravers ranges between 40 and almost 80 percent. Following one inhalation, mostly from a balloon, a euphoric, pleasant, joyful, empathogenic and sometimes hallucinogenic effect is rapidly induced (within 10s) and disappears within some minutes. Recreational N2O use is generally moderate with most users taking less than 10 balloons of N2O per episode and about 80% of the users having less than 10 episodes per year. Side effects of N2O include transient dizziness, dissociation, disorientation, loss of balance, impaired memory and cognition, and weakness in the legs. When intoxicated accidents like tripping and falling may occur. Some fatal accidents have been reported due to due to asphyxia (hypoxia). Heavy or sustained use of N2O inactivates vitamin B12, resulting in a functional vitamin B12 deficiency and initially causing numbness in fingers, which may further progress to peripheral neuropathy and megaloblastic anemia. N2O use does not seem to result in dependence. Considering the generally modest use of N2O and its relative safety, it is not necessary to take legal measures. However, (potential) users should be informed about the risk of vitamin B12-deficiency related neurological and hematological effects associated with heavy use. PMID:26496821

  20. The influence of use-related, environmental, and managerial factors on soil loss from recreational trails.

    PubMed

    Olive, Nathaniel D; Marion, Jeffrey L

    2009-03-01

    Recreational uses of unsurfaced trails inevitably result in their degradation, with the type and extent of resource impact influenced by factors such as soil texture, topography, climate, trail design and maintenance, and type and amount of use. Of particular concern, the loss of soil through erosion is generally considered a significant and irreversible form of trail impact. This research investigated the influence of several use-related, environmental, and managerial factors on soil loss on recreational trails and roads at Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area, a unit of the U.S. National Park Service. Regression modeling revealed that trail position, trail slope alignment angle, grade, water drainage, and type of use are significant determinants of soil loss. The introduction of individual and groups of variables into a series of regression models provides improved understanding and insights regarding the relative influence of these variables, informing the selection of more effective trail management actions. Study results suggest that trail erosion can be minimized by avoiding "fall-line" alignments, steep grades, and valley-bottom alignments near streams, installing and maintaining adequate densities of tread drainage features, applying gravel to harden treads, and reducing horse and all-terrain vehicle use or restricting them to more resistant routes. This research also sought to develop a more efficient Variable Cross-Sectional Area method for assessing soil loss on trails. This method permitted incorporation of CSA measures in a representative sampling scheme applied to a large (24%) sample of the park's 526 km trail system. The variety of soil loss measures derived from the Variable CSA method, including extrapolated trail-wide soil loss estimates, permit an objective quantification of soil erosion on recreational trails and roads. Such data support relational analyses to increase understanding of trail degradation, and long-term monitoring of the natural and recreational integrity of the trail system infrastructure. PMID:19062152