These are representative sample records from Science.gov related to your search topic.
For comprehensive and current results, perform a real-time search at Science.gov.
1

Marine Fisheries Marine recreational angling. Florida  

E-print Network

Marine Fisheries ~~WD~W Marine recreational angling. Florida News Bureau photo by Jack Fortune 1980 Jay D. Andrews 1 Social Considerations Associated With Marine Recreational Fishing Under FCMA/NMFS Developments Index, 1980 Papers in Marine Fisheries Review, 1980 Chad P. Dawson and Bruce T. Wilkins 12 Charles

2

Marine Fisheries On the cover: Recreational  

E-print Network

, Marine Fisheries ~@WD@W On the cover: Recreational fishing off the California coast. Articles. Byrne, Administrator William G. Gordon, Assistant Administrator for Fisheries National Marine Fisheries Service Editor: W. L. Hobart Marine Fisheries Review (USPS 090-080) is published quarterly

3

77 FR 14506 - Marine Recreational Fisheries of the United States; Southeast Data, Assessment, and Review (SEDAR...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...0648-XB066 Marine Recreational Fisheries of the United States; Southeast Data, Assessment, and Review...Meetings AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National...Notice of Marine Recreational Fisheries Statistics Survey...

2012-03-12

4

Presence of pathogens and indicator microbes at a non-point source subtropical recreational marine beach.  

PubMed

Swimming in ocean water, including ocean water at beaches not impacted by known point sources of pollution, is an increasing health concern. This study was an initial evaluation of the presence of indicator microbes and pathogens and the association among the indicator microbes, pathogens, and environmental conditions at a subtropical, recreational marine beach in south Florida impacted by non-point sources of pollution. Twelve water and eight sand samples were collected during four sampling events at high or low tide under elevated or reduced solar insolation conditions. The analyses performed included analyses of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) (fecal coliforms, Escherichia coli, enterococci, and Clostridium perfringens), human-associated microbial source tracking (MST) markers (human polyomaviruses [HPyVs] and Enterococcus faecium esp gene), and pathogens (Vibrio vulnificus, Staphylococcus aureus, enterovirus, norovirus, hepatitis A virus, Cryptosporidium spp., and Giardia spp.). The enterococcus concentrations in water and sand determined by quantitative PCR were greater than the concentrations determined by membrane filtration measurement. The FIB concentrations in water were below the recreational water quality standards for three of the four sampling events, when pathogens and MST markers were also generally undetectable. The FIB levels exceeded regulatory guidelines during one event, and this was accompanied by detection of HPyVs and pathogens, including detection of the autochthonous bacterium V. vulnificus in sand and water, detection of the allochthonous protozoans Giardia spp. in water, and detection of Cryptosporidium spp. in sand samples. The elevated microbial levels were detected at high tide and under low-solar-insolation conditions. Additional sampling should be conducted to further explore the relationships between tidal and solar insolation conditions and between indicator microbes and pathogens in subtropical recreational marine waters impacted by non-point source pollution. PMID:19966020

Abdelzaher, Amir M; Wright, Mary E; Ortega, Cristina; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M; Miller, Gary; Elmir, Samir; Newman, Xihui; Shih, Peter; Bonilla, J Alfredo; Bonilla, Tonya D; Palmer, Carol J; Scott, Troy; Lukasik, Jerzy; Harwood, Valerie J; McQuaig, Shannon; Sinigalliano, Chris; Gidley, Maribeth; Plano, Lisa R W; Zhu, Xiaofang; Wang, John D; Fleming, Lora E

2010-02-01

5

Presence of Pathogens and Indicator Microbes at a Non-Point Source Subtropical Recreational Marine Beach ? †  

PubMed Central

Swimming in ocean water, including ocean water at beaches not impacted by known point sources of pollution, is an increasing health concern. This study was an initial evaluation of the presence of indicator microbes and pathogens and the association among the indicator microbes, pathogens, and environmental conditions at a subtropical, recreational marine beach in south Florida impacted by non-point sources of pollution. Twelve water and eight sand samples were collected during four sampling events at high or low tide under elevated or reduced solar insolation conditions. The analyses performed included analyses of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) (fecal coliforms, Escherichia coli, enterococci, and Clostridium perfringens), human-associated microbial source tracking (MST) markers (human polyomaviruses [HPyVs] and Enterococcus faecium esp gene), and pathogens (Vibrio vulnificus, Staphylococcus aureus, enterovirus, norovirus, hepatitis A virus, Cryptosporidium spp., and Giardia spp.). The enterococcus concentrations in water and sand determined by quantitative PCR were greater than the concentrations determined by membrane filtration measurement. The FIB concentrations in water were below the recreational water quality standards for three of the four sampling events, when pathogens and MST markers were also generally undetectable. The FIB levels exceeded regulatory guidelines during one event, and this was accompanied by detection of HPyVs and pathogens, including detection of the autochthonous bacterium V. vulnificus in sand and water, detection of the allochthonous protozoans Giardia spp. in water, and detection of Cryptosporidium spp. in sand samples. The elevated microbial levels were detected at high tide and under low-solar-insolation conditions. Additional sampling should be conducted to further explore the relationships between tidal and solar insolation conditions and between indicator microbes and pathogens in subtropical recreational marine waters impacted by non-point source pollution. PMID:19966020

Abdelzaher, Amir M.; Wright, Mary E.; Ortega, Cristina; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M.; Miller, Gary; Elmir, Samir; Newman, Xihui; Shih, Peter; Bonilla, J. Alfredo; Bonilla, Tonya D.; Palmer, Carol J.; Scott, Troy; Lukasik, Jerzy; Harwood, Valerie J.; McQuaig, Shannon; Sinigalliano, Chris; Gidley, Maribeth; Plano, Lisa R. W.; Zhu, Xiaofang; Wang, John D.; Fleming, Lora E.

2010-01-01

6

POLICY PERSPECTIVE Coral reef quality and recreation fees in marine protected areas  

E-print Network

to damages. Introduction Marine protected areas (MPAs) provide refuge to coral reefs from human exploitationPOLICY PERSPECTIVE Coral reef quality and recreation fees in marine protected areas Jeffrey Wielgus, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA Keywords Coral reefs; diving; economics; financing; management; marine

Gerber, Leah R.

7

Marine recreational fishing is a popular outdoor leisure activity nationwide when measured by number of participants. The National Marine Fisheries Service estimates that 24.7 million  

E-print Network

1 ABSTRACT Marine recreational fishing is a popular outdoor leisure activity nationwide when marine recreational catch, effort, and participation data since 1979 in an effort to assess the influence of recreational fishing on fish stocks. With the passing of the Magnuson-Stevenson Fishery Conservation

8

Human-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from a subtropical recreational marine beach  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Reports of Staphylococcus aureus detected in marine environments have occurred since the early 1990’s. This investigation sought to isolate and characterize S. aureus from marine waters and sand at a subtropical recreational beach, with and without bathers present, in order to investigate possible s...

9

THE EMPACT BEACHES: A CASE STUDY IN RECREATIONAL WATER SAMPLING  

EPA Science Inventory

Various chapters describe sample and experimental design, use of a geometric mean or an arithmetic mean, modeling and forecasting, and risk assessment in relation to monitoring recreational waters for fecal indicators. All of these aspects of monitoring are dependent on the spat...

10

Human-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from a subtropical recreational marine beach.  

PubMed

Reports of Staphylococcus aureus including methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) detected in marine environments have occurred since the early 1990 s. This investigation sought to isolate and characterize S. aureus from marine waters and sand at a subtropical recreational beach, with and without bathers present, in order to investigate possible sources and to identify the risks to bathers of exposure to these organisms. During 40 days over 17 months, 1,001 water and 36 intertidal sand samples were collected by either bathers or investigators at a subtropical recreational beach. Methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) and MRSA were isolated and identified using selective growth media and an organism-specific molecular marker. Antimicrobial susceptibility, staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) type, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) pattern, multi-locus sequence type (MLST), and staphylococcal protein A (spa) type were characterized for all MRSA. S. aureus was isolated from 248 (37 %) bather nearby water samples at a concentration range of <2-780 colony forming units per ml, 102 (31 %) ambient water samples at a concentration range of <2-260 colony forming units per ml, and 9 (25 %) sand samples. Within the sand environment, S. aureus was isolated more often from above the intertidal zone than from intermittently wet or inundated sand. A total of 1334 MSSA were isolated from 37 sampling days and 22 MRSA were isolated from ten sampling days. Seventeen of the 22 MRSA were identified by PFGE as the community-associated MRSA USA300. MRSA isolates were all SCCmec type IVa, encompassed five spa types (t008, t064, t622, t688, and t723), two MLST types (ST8 and ST5), and 21 of 22 isolates carried the genes for Panton-Valentine leukocidin. There was a correlation (r = 0.45; p = 0.05) between the daily average number of bathers and S. aureus in the water; however, no association between exposure to S. aureus in these waters and reported illness was found. This report supports the concept that humans are a potential direct source for S. aureus in marine waters. PMID:23553001

Plano, Lisa R W; Shibata, Tomoyuki; Garza, Anna C; Kish, Jonathan; Fleisher, Jay M; Sinigalliano, Christopher D; Gidley, Maribeth L; Withum, Kelly; Elmir, Samir M; Hower, Suzanne; Jackson, Charlene R; Barrett, John B; Cleary, Timothy; Davidson, Maureen; Davis, Johnnie; Mukherjee, Sampa; Fleming, Lora E; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M

2013-05-01

11

Marine recreation and public health microbiology: quest for the ideal indicator  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Four-fifths of the population of the United States live in close proximity to the oceans or Great Lakes, and approximately 100 million Americans use the marine environment for recreation each year (Thurman 1994). Consequently, contamination of lakes, rivers, and coastal waters raises significant public health issues. Among the leading sources of chemical and biological contamination of these waters and associated beaches are sewer systems, septic tanks, stormwater runoff, industrial wastes, wastewater injection wells, cesspits, animal wastes, commercial and private boat wastes, and human recreation. In 1997, 649 beach closings or advisories were caused by sewage spills and overflows (NRDC 1998). In Florida alone, approximately 500 million gallons of sewage were released along the coast each year during the late 1980s (Neshyba 1987). Thus one of the primary concerns in public health is the risk that humans using the marine environment for recreational activities will encounter microbial pathogens.

Griffin, Dale W.; Lipp, Erin K.; McLaughlin, Molly R.; Rose, Joan B.

2001-01-01

12

A MARINE RECREATIONAL WATER QUALITY CRITERION CONSISTENT WITH INDICATOR CONCEPTS AND RISK ANALYSIS  

EPA Science Inventory

An overivew is provided of water quality criteria developed for marine recreational waters by EPA in 1979. The crierion used is the strength of the association with the rates of the important symptoms, such as those that correlate best with swimming in wastewater-polluted waters....

13

An evaluation of the use of fishing club records in the management of marine recreational fisheries  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although there are limitations to the usefulness of data from fishing club records in management of marine recreational fisheries, the present study shows that, with careful analysis, trends relevant to resource management can be discerned. Club records analysed in the present study show that there are very large differences in catches and catch rates over time, including seasonally throughout the

Donald F. Gartside; Bradley Harrison; Bret L. Ryan

1999-01-01

14

The occurrence of Salmonella serotypes in marine recreational waters of Valencia, Spain.  

PubMed

Salmonellae serotypes were studied in order to know their prevalence in marine recreational areas of Valencia. Two hundred eight strains were isolated. The strains belonging to serogroups B, C, D, E and G. The serotyping yielded twenty one different serotypes. The most frequent salmonellae serotypes were S. anatum and S. bredeney. Our results were compared with those reported by other authors in Spain. PMID:1605921

Alonso, J L; Alonso, M A; Usera, M A; Echeita, A

1992-04-01

15

U.S. Marine Recreational Fisheries DATA COLLECTION. Detailed information on  

E-print Network

for bait, or filleted fish. Catch estimates are stratified by subregion, state, wave (bi- monthly sampling, and recreational catches surpass commercial landings of some species (see figure on preceding page). METHODS they use a telephone survey of boats as the primary method for estimating fishing effort. The weekly survey

16

U.S. Marine Recreational Fisheries DATA COLLECTION. Detailed information on  

E-print Network

for bait, or filleted fish. Catch estimates are stratified by subregion, state, wave (bi- monthly sampling, and recreational catches surpass commercial landings of some species (see figure on preceding page). METHODS). ThesesurveysdifferfromtheCHTSbecausethey use a telephone survey of boats as the primary method for estimating fishing effort

17

U.S. Marine Recreational Fisheries DATA COLLECTION. Detailed information on  

E-print Network

, or filleted fish. Catch estimates are stratified by subregion, state and wave (bimonthly sampling period on preceding page). METHODS. On the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of the US, the recreational fisheries statistics because they use a weekly telephone survey of boats as the primary method for estimating fishing effort

18

Recent developments Is catch-and-release recreational angling compatible with no-take marine protected areas?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Marine protected areas (MPAs) have become a common conservation and management tool for reducing exploitation from the commercial and recreational fisheries sectors. However, the recreational fisheries sector has the potential to be compatible with no-take MPAs when catch- and-release angling is practiced because, in theory, no fish are actually harvested. This presumes that the effects of catch-and-release angling and related

Steven J. Cooke; Andy J. Danylchuk; Sascha E. Danylchuk; Cory D. Suskie; Tony L. Goldberg

19

Consistent size-independent harvest selection on fish body shape in two recreationally exploited marine species  

PubMed Central

Harvesting wild animals may exert size-independent selection pressures on a range of morphological, life history, and behavioral traits. Most work so far has focused on selection pressures on life history traits and body size as morphological trait. We studied here how recreational fishing selects for morphological traits related to body shape, which may correlate with underlying swimming behavior. Using landmark-based geometric morphometrics, we found consistent recreational fishing-induced selection pressures on body shape in two recreationally exploited marine fish species. We show that individuals with larger-sized mouths and more streamlined and elongated bodies were more vulnerable to passively operated hook-and-line fishing independent of the individual's body size or condition. While the greater vulnerability of individuals with larger mouth gapes can be explained by the direct physical interaction with hooks, selection against streamlined and elongated individuals could either involve a specific foraging mode or relate to underlying elevated swimming behavior. Harvesting using passive gear is common around the globe, and thus, size-independent selection on body shape is expected to be widespread potentially leaving behind individuals with smaller oral gapes and more compact bodies. This might have repercussions for food webs by altering foraging and predation. PMID:25360257

Alós, Josep; Palmer, Miquel; Linde-Medina, Marta; Arlinghaus, Robert

2014-01-01

20

Kelp Gulls (Larus dominicanus) killed and injured by discarded monofilament lines at a marine recreational fishery in northern Patagonia.  

PubMed

Among marine debris, monofilament fishing lines often result in negative impacts on marine organisms. We characterized marine debris and incidence of lost and discarded monofilament lines along beaches used by recreational fishers, and report the impact of lines on Kelp Gulls (Larus dominicanus) at the Bahía San Blas protected area, site of one of the main shore-based recreational fisheries of the southwestern Atlantic. Over 55% of the marine debris recorded originated from recreational fishing activities. Balls of tangled monofilament lines were found at a rate of 40.5 items per km. A total of 27 adult Kelp Gulls were found entangled with monofilament. All individuals were tangled to vegetation within colony boundaries. Four of the gulls had a monofilament line protruding from the bill, showing that they may be also killed when trying to obtain bait. Our results indicate that lost or discarded monofilament lines in the Bahía San Blas recreational fishing area result in undesired impacts on coastal wildlife. PMID:24951250

Yorio, Pablo; Marinao, Cristian; Suárez, Nicolás

2014-08-15

21

The Social and Economic Significance of Recreation Activities in the Marine Environment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although the data obtained by an Outdoor Recreation Resources Review Commission in 1960 indicated that 44 percent of participants in outdoor recreation prefer water-based activities, the potential demand for recreation within the coastal zone is much greater than that study indicates, because the unfulfilled recreational demands of the urban…

Ditton, Robert B.

22

Reducing plastic contamination of the marine environment under MARPOL Annex V: A model for recreational harbors and ports  

SciTech Connect

A case study was conducted during Summer, 1990, at the Nantucket Boat Basin, Massachusetts. The purpose of the study was to (1) determine the types and quantities of wastes generated by recreational boaters, particularly plastics and garbage regulated by MARPOL Annex V, (2) develop a model to assist recreational boating facilities to comply with the law and (3) reduce the impact of plastic contamination on the marine environment. An international law which came to force in December, 1988, MARPOL Annex V prohibits the disposal of plastics into the sea and stipulates ocean zones where garbage and other wastes may be disposed. A per capita rate of waste generation by recreational boaters was determined, which will enable recreational harbors and ports to estimate the waste management capacity necessary to meet the requirements of Annex V. In addition to determining the wastestream from the recreational boaters, boaters were surveyed to collect data about pertinent topics including awareness of MARPOL, waste types generated aboard vessels, waste management methods, and how marinas could assist boaters in meeting their waste management needs. As a result of the Boat Basin study, a planning model was developed to assist other recreational harbors and ports to meet the requirements of MARPOL Annex V. Major elements of the model include (1) information Transfer, (2) Waste Management Methods, and (3) the Role of Related Factors such as marina type, and waste characterization and quantification.

Mudar, M.J.

1991-01-01

23

Marine Science: Sample Pathway Semester I Semester II  

E-print Network

Marine Science: Sample Pathway Semester I Semester II Freshman Year CGS Core CGS Core CAS ES144 (MP** CAS ES331 (Marine Breadth) CAS BI260 (or other Marine Breadth Course) CAS Foreign Language (if needed) Senior Year Marine Semester CAS Marine Breadth Course (4 Marine Courses) CAS PY211 CAS Foreign Language

Goldberg, Bennett

24

Marine Recreational Uses of Green Bay: A Survey of Human Behavior and Attitude Patterns of High School Juniors and Seniors.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

From a random sample of high school juniors and seniors in northeastern Wisconsin, this study obtained information concerning the subjects' participation in water recreation activities, their perceptions of water quality, and attitudinal data in related areas. The data obtained from the questionnaire were analyzed by chi-square methods to check…

Ditton, Robert B.; Johnsen, Per K.

25

The value of marine biodiversity to the leisure and recreation industry and its application to marine spatial planning  

Microsoft Academic Search

The incorporation of the ecosystem approach into marine planning requires that all aspects of value associated with marine biodiversity are incorporated into the decision making process. An ecosystem services approach to valuing marine biodiversity is recognised as a framework by which economic, ecological and social values may be incorporated into the decision making process. There are sectors of the marine

Siân E. Rees; Lynda D. Rodwell; Martin J. Attrill; Melanie C. Austen; Steven C. Mangi

2010-01-01

26

DMSWG-1 Project Report MRIP Data Management Standard (MDMS) Database MARINE RECREATIONAL INFORMATION  

E-print Network

, Anjel Lewis, Dennis O'Hern, Risa Oram, Michael Quach, Scott Sauri, Tom Si, Wade Van Buskirk, and Patty-dependent recreational, for-hire, and highly migratory species (HMS) programs. After summarizing this information

27

Traditional and Molecular Analyses for Fecal Indicator Bacteria in Non-point Source Subtropical Recreational Marine Waters  

PubMed Central

The use of enterococci as the primary fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) for the determination of recreational water safety has been questioned, particularly in sub/tropical marine waters without known point sources of sewage. Alternative FIB (such as the Bacteroidales group) and alternative measurement methods (such as rapid molecular testing) have been proposed to supplement or replace current marine water quality testing methods which require culturing enterococci. Moreover, environmental parameters have also been proposed to supplement current monitoring programs. The objective of this study was to evaluate the health risks to humans from exposure to subtropical recreational marine waters with no known point source. The study reported symptoms between one set of human subjects randomly assigned to marine water exposure with intensive environmental monitoring compared with other subjects who did not have exposure. In addition, illness outcomes among the exposed bathers were compared to levels of traditional and alternative FIB (as measured by culture-based and molecular-based methods), and compared to easily measured environmental parameters. Results demonstrated an increase in self-reported gastrointestinal, respiratory and skin illnesses among bathers vs. non-bathers. Among the bathers, a dose-response relationship by logistic regression modeling was observed for skin illness, where illness was positively related to enterococci enumeration by membrane filtration (odds ratio =1.46 [95% confidence interval=0.97-2.21] per increasing log10 unit of enterococci exposure) and positively related to 24 hour antecedent rain fall (1.04 [1.01 – 1.07] per increasing millimeters of rain). Acute febrile respiratory illness was inversely related to water temperature (0.74 [0.56-0.98] per increasing degree of water temperature). There were no significant dose response relationships between report of human illness and any of the other FIB or environmental measures. Therefore, for non-point source subtropical recreational marine waters, this study suggests that humans may be at increased risk of reported illness, and that the currently recommended and investigational FIB may not track gastrointestinal illness under these conditions; the relationship between other human illness and environmental measures is less clear. PMID:20605185

Sinigalliano, Christopher D.; Fleisher, Jay M.; Gidley, Maribeth L.; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M.; Shibata, Tomoyuki; Plano, Lisa R.W.; Elmir, Samir M.; Wanless, David; Bartkowiak, Jakub; Boiteau, Rene; Withum, Kelly; Abdelzaher, Amir M.; He, Guoqing; Ortega, Cristina; Zhu, Xiaofang; Wright, Mary E.; Kish, Jonathan; Hollenbeck, Julie; Scott, Troy; Backer, Lorraine C.; Fleming, Lora E.

2010-01-01

28

QPCR Determined Fecal Indicator Bacterial Densities in Marine Waters from Two Recreational Beaches  

EPA Science Inventory

The use of real-time qPCR to determine fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) densities is currently being investigated by the U.S. EPA. The present recreational water quality guidelines, based on culturable FIB, prevent same day determinations of water quality whereas results from the ...

29

The Evaluation of a Public Document: The Case of FCC's Marine Radio Rules for Recreational Boaters. Document Design Project, Technical Report No. 11.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In a collaborative effort, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and the Document Design Project conducted an evaluation of marine radio rules for recreational boaters that had been rewritten in plain English by FCC personnel. The revised rules were evaluated by 53 experienced boaters and 52 inexperienced boaters, who were given either the…

Felker, Daniel B.; Rose, Andrew M.

30

Voluntary Standards as a Tool for Increasing the Sustainability of the Marine Recreation Industry and Improving MPA Effectiveness in Hawaii and Mesoamerica  

Microsoft Academic Search

Standards have a long history of improving service quality and safety in a wide range of industries. Successful businesses benefit from standards both by actively participating in the standardization process and by using standards as strategic market instruments. The Coral Reef Alliance (CORAL) recently completed a process in which marine recreation industry stakeholders in Hawaii and along the Mesoamerican Barrier

R. MacPherson; R. Wilson; L. Foote

2008-01-01

31

Associations between marine phytoplankton and symptoms of illness among recreational beachgoers in Puerto Rico, 2009  

EPA Science Inventory

While phytoplankton generally have crucial roles in marine ecosystems, a small subset can release toxins and produce harmful algal blooms (HABs). HABs can be a threat to human health as symptoms from exposure range from neurological impairment to gastrointestinal (GI), dermal, a...

32

Adaptive sampling in autonomous marine sensor networks  

E-print Network

In this thesis, an innovative architecture for real-time adaptive and cooperative control of autonomous sensor platforms in a marine sensor network is described in the context of the autonomous oceanographic network scenario. ...

Eickstedt, Donald Patrick

2006-01-01

33

Recreation of Marine Atmospheric Corrosion Condition on Weathering Steel in Laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Salt spray test, autoclave corrosion test, SO2 salt spray test, and Relative humidity test are generally used to assess atmospheric corrosion in laboratories at accelerated rates. However, no test can absolutely simulate the service condition. One can get only approximate corrosion rates using the aforesaid tests which serve as an indicative of corrosion behavior of the material in a service condition. The present work is aimed at creating specific environmental condition in laboratory to get the corrosion test done in short duration to compare with on field exposure test which would otherwise take years to complete. In this work recreation of atmospheric environment of Digha was tried and it was simulated in such a manner that the results of laboratory test could be compared with long time field exposure at Digha. Weathering steel (WS) was taken for experimentations. Potentiostatic electrochemical tests route was adopted to simulate atmospheric condition of Digha. Laboratory test results compared well with 18 month field exposure data in terms of corrosion rate, SEM and Ramon Spectroscopy matching.

Guchhait, S. K.; Dewan, S.; Saha, J. K.; Mitra, P. K.

2014-04-01

34

Performance of barbed and barbless hooks in a marine recreational fishery  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We used an angling study to examine catch per unit effort (CPUE), bait loss, and total landings by anglers fishing with natural bait on barbed and barbless hooks in a nearshore marine sport fishery located in the Gulf of Mexico near St. Petersburg, Florida. Anglers fished half the day with a barbed hook and half the day with a barbless hook. We also recorded anatomical hook placement, severity of injury or bleeding, and hook extraction times for each landed fish. Bait loss, CPUE, and mean length of catch did not differ between gears, but anglers landed 22% more fish with barbed hooks. Loss of hooked fish was significantly higher with barbless hooks, and efficiency appeared to vary among species. Mean unhooking times were significantly shorter with barbless hooks. Anatomical hook placement did not differ between gears and most fish were hooked in the jaws. Bleeding did not differ between gears because bleeding was influenced strongly by hook placement, but barbless hooks reduced unhooking injuries. In this fishery, barbless hooks probably did not reduce hooking mortality and conferred only slight benefits at the expense of reduced catches.

Schaeffer, Jeffrey S.; Hoffman, Elizabeth M.

2002-01-01

35

Quantifying Marine Microbes: A Simulation to Introduce Random Sampling  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Colored beads in a bag are used to represent different types of microbes, with the bag itself representing the ocean. Working in groups, each learner randomly samples ten âmicrobesâ from the âocean,â and records the data. To learn about the inherent variability of random sampling, the learner then compares the composition of their individual samples, their groupâs pooled sample data, and that of the entire population. Introduce this lesson by reading and talking about the diversity of marine microbes.

Bruno, Barbara; Tice, Kimberly; Achilles, Kate; Matsuzaki, Joan

2012-01-01

36

Monitoring marine recreational water quality using multiple microbial indicators in an urban tropical environment  

PubMed Central

The microbial water quality at two beaches, Hobie Beach and Crandon Beach, in Miami-Dade County, Florida, USA was measured using multiple microbial indicators for the purpose of evaluating correlations between microbes and for identifying possible sources of contamination. The indicator microbes chosen for this study (enterococci, Escherichia coli, fecal coliform, total coliform and C. perfringens) were evaluated through three different sampling efforts. These efforts included daily measurements at four locations during a wet season month and a dry season month, spatially intensive water sampling during low- and high-tide periods, and a sand sampling effort. Results indicated that concentrations did not vary in a consistent fashion between one indicator microbe and another. Daily water quality frequently exceeded guideline levels at Hobie Beach for all indicator microbes except for fecal coliform, which never exceeded the guideline. Except for total coliform, the concentrations of microbes did not change significantly between seasons in spite of the fact that the physical–chemical parameters (rainfall, temperature, pH, and salinity) changed significantly between the two monitoring periods. Spatially intense water sampling showed that the concentrations of microbes were significantly different with distance from the shoreline. The highest concentrations were observed at shoreline points and decreased at offshore points. Furthermore, the highest concentrations of indicator microbe concentrations were observed at high tide, when the wash zone area of the beach was submerged. Beach sands within the wash zone tested positive for all indicator microbes, thereby suggesting that this zone may serve as the source of indicator microbes. Ultimate sources of indicator microbes to this zone may include humans, animals, and possibly the survival and regrowth of indicator microbes due to the unique environmental conditions found within this zone. Overall, the results of this study indicated that the concentrations of indicator microbes do not necessarily correlate with one another. Exceedence of water quality guidelines, and thus the frequency of beach advisories, depends upon which indicator microbe is chosen. PMID:15261551

Shibata, Tomoyuki; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M.; Fleming, Lora E.; Elmir, Samir

2008-01-01

37

Marine Fisheries On the cover. Views of marine  

E-print Network

Marine Fisheries ~~WD~W On the cover. Views of marine recreational fisheries. NMFS, NOAA photos. Articles 49(2), 1987 Special Issue: Marine Recreational Fisheries and Fishing Introduction 1 Marine Recreational Fisheries in the Southeastern United States Ronald L. Schmied and Edward E. Burgess 2 Marine

38

Quantifying Marine Microbes: A Simulation to Introduce Random Sampling  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lesson introduces random sampling, one of the key concepts employed by scientists to study the natural environment, including microbial communities. Students first learn about the abundance and diversity of marine microbes. Colored beads in a bag are then used to represent different types of microbes, with the bag itself representing the ocean. Working in groups, each student randomly samples ten "microbes" from the "ocean", and records the data. To learn about the inherent variability of random sampling, the students then compare the composition of their individual samples, their group'Âs pooled sample data, and that of the entire population.

Bruno, Barbara

2012-01-01

39

Optimizing voluntary compliance in marine protected areas: a comparison of recreational fisher and enforcement officer perspectives using multi-criteria analysis.  

PubMed

A comprehensive list of planning criteria for optimizing compliance in Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) was compiled and used to compare the views of recreational fishers and compliance officers for facilitating voluntary compliance in the Port Stephens - Great Lakes Marine Park (PSGLMP). Expert working groups were tasked separately with: 1) criteria identification and weighting; 2) scoring of no-take zones; 3) prioritizing and determining uncertainty; and 4) analysis of results and sensitivity testing. Multi-Criteria Analysis (MCA) revealed that both groups had similar perspectives and recommendations, despite weighting the individual planning criteria differently. Significantly, "manageability" scores for no-take zones from MCA appeared to correlate well with past numbers of enforcement actions recorded for each zone. This provides empirical evidence that adopting manageability criteria during the planning of MPAs could lead to a marked increase in voluntary compliance. As a result, greater consideration to compliance planning during MPA design and zoning is recommended in order to optimize voluntary compliance. Whilst the majority of no-take zones in the PSGLMP case study were evaluated as being relatively effective in terms of optimizing voluntary compliance, there remains considerable potential to improve design, management and use of the poorer performing zones. Finally, the study highlighted the value of recreational fisher engagement in MPA planning processes to maximize voluntary compliance and manageability. PMID:21669486

Read, Andrew D; West, Ronald J; Haste, Max; Jordan, Alan

2011-10-01

40

Water Quality, Weather and Environmental Factors Associated with Fecal Indicator Organism Density in Beach Sand at Two Recreational Marine Beaches  

EPA Science Inventory

Recent studies showing an association between fecal indicator organisms (FIOs and gastrointestinal (GI) illness among beachgoers wit sand contact have important public health implicatons because of the large numbers of people who recreate at beaches and engage in sand contact act...

41

Recreation monitoring  

SciTech Connect

Recreational use and recreational facilities are common features at hydropower projects. In fact, the hydropower industry is a major supplier of recreational opportunities contributing to tourism and rural economic growth in many communities across the country, As demands for public recreation have grown, pressure on the hydropower industry to provide more public access and more facilities has increased. This paper looks at recent developments in the FERC licensing and compliance arenas with regard to planning for and monitoring recreation at hydropower facilities. The paper highlights the increased occurrence of recreation monitoring requirements in license articles and discusses methods for complying with such requirements. The paper also looks at how monitoring data can be used to avoid unnecessary developments and to better plan for future recreation use.

DiGennaro, B. [EDAW, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States); Merklein, G.H. [EDAW, Inc., Atlanta, GA (United States)

1995-12-31

42

Tetra- and tribromophenoxyanisoles in marine samples from Oceania.  

PubMed

Some methoxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (MeO-BDEs) are known halogenated natural products (HNPs) and are frequently detected in higher organisms of the marine environment. In this study we demonstrate that a prominent MeO-BDE, previously detected in marine mammals from Australia, is identical to 3,5-dibromo-2-(2',4'dibromo)phenoxyanisole (BC-3, 6-MeO-BDE 47). Up to 1.9 mg/ kg of 6-MeO-BDE 47 was present in cetaceans from Australia, 0.2-0.3 mg/kg in two crocodile eggs from Australia, but concentrations of 1 or 2 orders of magnitude lower were found in shark liver oil from NewZealand and in marine mammals from Africa and the Antarctic. Concentrations of 6-MeO-BDE 47 in samples from Australia were in the same range as anthropogenic pollutants such as PCB 153 and p,p'-DDE. Along with 6-MeO-BDE 47 and the known HNP 4,6-dibromo-2-(2',4'-dibromo)phenoxyanisole (BC-2, 2'-MeO-BDE 68), several tribromophenoxyanisoles (MeO-triBDE) were present in tissue of Australian cetaceans. To determine their structure, abiotic debromination experiments were performed using 6-MeO-BDE 47 and 2'-MeO-BDE 68 and superreduced dicyanocobalamine. These experiments resulted in formation of eight MeO-triBDEs, all of which were detected in the cetacean samples. Five of these eight MeO-triBDEs could be identified based on two standard compounds as well as gas chromatographic and mass spectrometric features. It was also shown that the first eluting isomer (compound 1), 6-MeO-BDE 17 (compound 2), and 2-MeO-BDE 39 (compound 5) were the most prominent MeO-triBDEs in the Australian cetacean samples. The concentrations of the MeO-triBDEs in two cetacean samples were 0.20 and 0.36 mg/kg, respectively. Although the reductive debromination with dicyanocobalamine resulted in a different congener pattern than was found in the marine mammals, it could not be excluded that the tribromo PMID:16295837

Melcher, Joachim; Olbrich, Daniel; Marsh, Göran; Nikiforov, Vladimir; Gaus, Caroline; Gaul, Simon; Vetter, Walter

2005-10-15

43

Recreational Marine Industry Over 30 years of FRP boat building experience stands behind today's pleasure boats. Complex  

E-print Network

attrition rate of startup builders. Current leading edge marine composite manufacturing technologies industry since the mid 1960s. After about 20 years of development work, manufacturers seized technology and some other firms that have carved out nitches in the industry are presented for illustrative

Colton, Jonathan S.

44

Isolation of microplastics in biota-rich seawater samples and marine organisms  

PubMed Central

Microplastic litter is a pervasive pollutant present in aquatic systems across the globe. A range of marine organisms have the capacity to ingest microplastics, resulting in adverse health effects. Developing methods to accurately quantify microplastics in productive marine waters, and those internalized by marine organisms, is of growing importance. Here we investigate the efficacy of using acid, alkaline and enzymatic digestion techniques in mineralizing biological material from marine surface trawls to reveal any microplastics present. Our optimized enzymatic protocol can digest >97% (by weight) of the material present in plankton-rich seawater samples without destroying any microplastic debris present. In applying the method to replicate marine samples from the western English Channel, we identified 0.27 microplastics m?3. The protocol was further used to extract microplastics ingested by marine zooplankton under laboratory conditions. Our findings illustrate that enzymatic digestion can aid the detection of microplastic debris within seawater samples and marine biota. PMID:24681661

Cole, Matthew; Webb, Hannah; Lindeque, Pennie K.; Fileman, Elaine S.; Halsband, Claudia; Galloway, Tamara S.

2014-01-01

45

Isolation of microplastics in biota-rich seawater samples and marine organisms  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Microplastic litter is a pervasive pollutant present in aquatic systems across the globe. A range of marine organisms have the capacity to ingest microplastics, resulting in adverse health effects. Developing methods to accurately quantify microplastics in productive marine waters, and those internalized by marine organisms, is of growing importance. Here we investigate the efficacy of using acid, alkaline and enzymatic digestion techniques in mineralizing biological material from marine surface trawls to reveal any microplastics present. Our optimized enzymatic protocol can digest >97% (by weight) of the material present in plankton-rich seawater samples without destroying any microplastic debris present. In applying the method to replicate marine samples from the western English Channel, we identified 0.27 microplastics m-3. The protocol was further used to extract microplastics ingested by marine zooplankton under laboratory conditions. Our findings illustrate that enzymatic digestion can aid the detection of microplastic debris within seawater samples and marine biota.

Cole, Matthew; Webb, Hannah; Lindeque, Pennie K.; Fileman, Elaine S.; Halsband, Claudia; Galloway, Tamara S.

2014-03-01

46

40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart G of... - Sampling Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing of Marine Engines  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Selective Enforcement Auditing of Marine Engines A Appendix A to Subpart... CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Selective Enforcement Auditing...Selective Enforcement Auditing of Marine Engines Table 1—Sampling Plan...

2012-07-01

47

40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart G of... - Sampling Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing of Marine Engines  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Selective Enforcement Auditing of Marine Engines A Appendix A to Subpart... CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Selective Enforcement Auditing...Selective Enforcement Auditing of Marine Engines Table 1—Sampling Plan...

2013-07-01

48

40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart G of... - Sampling Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing of Marine Engines  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Selective Enforcement Auditing of Marine Engines A Appendix A to Subpart... CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Selective Enforcement Auditing...Selective Enforcement Auditing of Marine Engines Table 1—Sampling Plan...

2010-07-01

49

40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart G of... - Sampling Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing of Marine Engines  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...Selective Enforcement Auditing of Marine Engines A Appendix A to Subpart... CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Selective Enforcement Auditing...Selective Enforcement Auditing of Marine Engines Table 1—Sampling Plan...

2014-07-01

50

40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart G of... - Sampling Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing of Marine Engines  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Selective Enforcement Auditing of Marine Engines A Appendix A to Subpart... CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Selective Enforcement Auditing...Selective Enforcement Auditing of Marine Engines Table 1—Sampling Plan...

2011-07-01

51

Forecasting models to quantify three anthropogenic stresses on coral reefs from marine recreation: anchor damage, diver contact and copper emission from antifouling paint.  

PubMed

This research focuses on damage to coral reefs from three anthropogenic stresses: the dropping of anchors and their chains, human contact, and emission of copper from antifouling paints. Forecasting models are described that quantify degradation in terms of percentage of coral cover damaged/year or increasing levels of water toxicity/year. The models utilize a Monte Carlo simulation that applies a range of values or a probability distribution to each of the numerous uncertain variables. This model has the flexibility to adapt, and become more accurate, when users input assumptions specific to their diving sites. Given our specific assumptions for a frequently visited site, anchors and their chains forecast a distribution of coral reef cover damage with a mean of 7.11%+/-4.77%, diver contact forecast a distribution of coral reef cover damage with a mean of 0.67%+/-0.38%, and antifouling paint forecast a distribution of copper level increase in the water with a mean of 0.037+/-0.014ppb. The results support recommendations for the implementation and sustained use of several specific marine recreation practices. PMID:16291181

Saphier, Adam D; Hoffmann, Tegan C

2005-01-01

52

Effects of Sodium Azide on the Abundance of Prokaryotes and Viruses in Marine Samples  

E-print Network

Effects of Sodium Azide on the Abundance of Prokaryotes and Viruses in Marine Samples Christian-sur-Mer, France Abstract Flow cytometry is set to become the standard method for enumerating prokaryotes azide as a preservative for prokaryotes and viruses in marine samples as a possible alternative

Winter, Christian

53

50 CFR 600.1417 - Requirements for exempted state designation based on submission of recreational survey data.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01...of recreational survey data. 600.1417 Section 600.1417 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION... Marine Recreational Fisheries of the United States...of recreational survey data. (a) To...

2013-10-01

54

50 CFR 600.1417 - Requirements for exempted state designation based on submission of recreational survey data.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2012-10-01...of recreational survey data. 600.1417 Section 600.1417 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION... Marine Recreational Fisheries of the United States...of recreational survey data. (a) To...

2012-10-01

55

50 CFR 600.1417 - Requirements for exempted state designation based on submission of recreational survey data.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01...of recreational survey data. 600.1417 Section 600.1417 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION... Marine Recreational Fisheries of the United States...of recreational survey data. (a) To...

2010-10-01

56

50 CFR 600.1417 - Requirements for exempted state designation based on submission of recreational survey data.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2011-10-01...of recreational survey data. 600.1417 Section 600.1417 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION... Marine Recreational Fisheries of the United States...of recreational survey data. (a) To...

2011-10-01

57

Recreation for All.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The manual is intended to provide guidelines for the planning and development of parks and recreation facilities which are accessbile to everyone. Separate chapters present guidelines for the following topics (sample subtopics in parentheses): general information (space relationships and wheelchair functions); general site conditions (soil…

Winston, Alan G., Ed.; Seekins, Nancy, Ed.

58

Deinococcus enclensis sp. nov., isolated from a marine sediment sample.  

PubMed

A novel pale-pink coloured strain, designated NIO-1023(T), was isolated from a marine sediment sample from Chorao Island, Goa, India. The taxonomic position of strain NIO-1023(T) was investigated by using a polyphasic approach. The cells were observed to be Gram-stain positive, coccal shaped and non-spore forming. Phylogenetic analyses using the 16S rRNA gene sequence of the isolate indicated that the organism belongs to the genus Deinococcus. The strain NIO-1023(T) showed highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities with Deinococcus ficus (97.8 %), whereas other Deinococcus species showed less than 95 % sequence similarity. The DNA-DNA relatedness with respect to D. ficus CC-FR2-10(T) was 23.9 %. Chemotaxonomic data revealed that strain NIO-1023(T) contains only menaquinone MK-8 as the respiratory quinone and a complex polar lipid profile consisting of different unidentified glycolipids and polar lipids, two unknown phospholipids and three unknown phosphoglycolipids. As in other deinococci, one of these phosphoglycolipids was predominant in the profile. The predominant fatty acids were identified as C17:1 w8c, C16:1 w6c/w7c, C15:1 w6c and C17:1 w9c. The genomic DNA G + C content of strain NIO-1023(T) was determined to be 67.2 mol%. The biochemical and chemotaxonomic properties demonstrate that strain NIO-1023(T) represents a novel species, for which the name Deinococcus enclensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is NIO-1023(T) (=DSM 25127(T) = NCIM 5456(T)). PMID:25344421

Thorat, Meghana N; Mawlankar, Rahul; Sonalkar, Vidya V; Venkata Ramana, V; Joseph, Neetha; Shouche, Yogesh S; Dastager, Syed G

2015-01-01

59

Evaluation of conventional and alternative monitoring methods for a recreational marine beach with nonpoint source of fecal contamination.  

PubMed

The objectives of this work were to compare enterococci (ENT) measurements based on the membrane filter, ENT(MF) with alternatives that can provide faster results including alternative enterococci methods (e.g., chromogenic substrate (CS), and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR)), and results from regression models based upon environmental parameters that can be measured in real-time. ENT(MF) were also compared to source tracking markers (Staphylococcus aureus, Bacteroidales human and dog markers, and Catellicoccus gull marker) in an effort to interpret the variability of the signal. Results showed that concentrations of enterococci based upon MF (<2 to 3320 CFU/100 mL) were significantly different from the CS and qPCR methods (p < 0.01). The correlations between MF and CS (r = 0.58, p < 0.01) were stronger than between MF and qPCR (r ? 0.36, p < 0.01). Enterococci levels by MF, CS, and qPCR methods were positively correlated with turbidity and tidal height. Enterococci by MF and CS were also inversely correlated with solar radiation but enterococci by qPCR was not. The regression model based on environmental variables provided fair qualitative predictions of enterococci by MF in real-time, for daily geometric mean levels, but not for individual samples. Overall, ENT(MF) was not significantly correlated with source tracking markers with the exception of samples collected during one storm event. The inability of the regression model to predict ENT(MF) levels for individual samples is likely due to the different sources of ENT impacting the beach at any given time, making it particularly difficult to to predict short-term variability of ENT(MF) for environmental parameters. PMID:20925349

Shibata, Tomoyuki; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M; Sinigalliano, Christopher D; Gidley, Maribeth L; Plano, Lisa R W; Fleisher, Jay M; Wang, John D; Elmir, Samir M; He, Guoqing; Wright, Mary E; Abdelzaher, Amir M; Ortega, Cristina; Wanless, David; Garza, Anna C; Kish, Jonathan; Scott, Troy; Hollenbeck, Julie; Backer, Lorraine C; Fleming, Lora E

2010-11-01

60

Acoustically focused adaptive sampling and on-board routing for marine rapid environmental assessment  

E-print Network

Acoustically focused adaptive sampling and on-board routing for marine rapid environmental uncertainty Data assimilation Error subspace ESSE Ocean modeling Acoustic propagation Primitive an acoustic viewpoint, the limited oceanographic measurements and today's ocean computational capabilities

Leonard, John J.

61

Recreation Manual.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Suggestions for recreational activities are outlined in this manual. Instructions are given for games to play in small places, home or party games, paper and pencil games, children's singing games, and dances. Ideas for crafts and special parties are also included. (SW)

North Dakota Farmers Union, Jamestown. Dept. of Youth Activities.

62

Isolation and partial characterization of phosphate solubilizing bacteria isolated from soil and marine samples.  

PubMed

In the present study the potential of indigenous bacterial isolates from soil rhizosphere and marine environment to promote plant growth was determined. Eight bacterial strains isolated from soil and marine samples were characterized for the phosphate solubilizing activity. Qualitative and quantitative estimation of phosphate solubilization is done. MIC of antibiotic and heavy metals were checked for these strains. Strains show a diverse pattern of antibiotic and heavy metals resistance. PMID:25176242

Mujahid, Talat Yasmeen; Siddiqui, Khaizran; Ahmed, Rifat; Kazmi, Shahana U; Ahmed, Nuzhat

2014-09-01

63

ICES Journal of Marine Science, 53: 359361. 1996 Temporal sampling of backscattered sonar signals  

E-print Network

ICES Journal of Marine Science, 53: 359­361. 1996 Temporal sampling of backscattered sonar signals Jules S. Jaffe Jaffe, J. S. 1996. Temporal sampling of backscattered sonar signals. ­ ICES Journal sound from an active sonar system. Here, it is demonstrated how the beam patterns of the sonar, when

Jaffe, Jules

64

HEXACHLOROBENZENE IN SELECTED MARINE SAMPLES: AN ENVIRONMENTAL PERSPECTIVE  

EPA Science Inventory

Hexachlorobenzene (HCB) was designated as a chemical of interest. A new sample of mussel homogenate was spiked with an authentic HCB standard. Recovery of the spike was 56%. Re-examination of previously analyzed GC chromatograms and archived samples revealed peaks that co-eluted ...

65

Seattle University Recreation Position Description  

E-print Network

Seattle University Recreation Position Description Title: Outdoor Adventure Recreation Program University Recreation Position Description Title: Outdoor Adventure Recreation Program Manager Date: 6- inclusive. Duties may be added, deleted and assigned based on Assistant Director of University Recreation

Carter, John

66

Seattle University Recreation Position Description  

E-print Network

Seattle University Recreation Position Description Title: Outdoor Adventure Recreation Program University Recreation Position Description Title: Outdoor Adventure Recreation Program Manager Date: 7- inclusive. Duties may be added, deleted and assigned based on Assistant Director of University Recreation

Carter, John

67

Detection of a Diverse Marine Fish Fauna Using Environmental DNA from Seawater Samples  

PubMed Central

Marine ecosystems worldwide are under threat with many fish species and populations suffering from human over-exploitation. This is greatly impacting global biodiversity, economy and human health. Intriguingly, marine fish are largely surveyed using selective and invasive methods, which are mostly limited to commercial species, and restricted to particular areas with favourable conditions. Furthermore, misidentification of species represents a major problem. Here, we investigate the potential of using metabarcoding of environmental DNA (eDNA) obtained directly from seawater samples to account for marine fish biodiversity. This eDNA approach has recently been used successfully in freshwater environments, but never in marine settings. We isolate eDNA from ½-litre seawater samples collected in a temperate marine ecosystem in Denmark. Using next-generation DNA sequencing of PCR amplicons, we obtain eDNA from 15 different fish species, including both important consumption species, as well as species rarely or never recorded by conventional monitoring. We also detect eDNA from a rare vagrant species in the area; European pilchard (Sardina pilchardus). Additionally, we detect four bird species. Records in national databases confirmed the occurrence of all detected species. To investigate the efficiency of the eDNA approach, we compared its performance with 9 methods conventionally used in marine fish surveys. Promisingly, eDNA covered the fish diversity better than or equal to any of the applied conventional methods. Our study demonstrates that even small samples of seawater contain eDNA from a wide range of local fish species. Finally, in order to examine the potential dispersal of eDNA in oceans, we performed an experiment addressing eDNA degradation in seawater, which shows that even small (100-bp) eDNA fragments degrades beyond detectability within days. Although further studies are needed to validate the eDNA approach in varying environmental conditions, our findings provide a strong proof-of-concept with great perspectives for future monitoring of marine biodiversity and resources. PMID:22952584

Iversen, Lars Lønsmann; Møller, Peter Rask; Rasmussen, Morten; Willerslev, Eske

2012-01-01

68

Determination of adenosine triphosphate on marine particulates: synthesis of methods for use on OTEC samples  

SciTech Connect

Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is an indicator of living biomass in marine particulates. This report details the method used by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to analyze particulate ATP in samples taken from oligotrophic, tropical ocean waters. It represents a synthesis of previously published methods.

Jones, A.T.; Hartwig, E.O.

1982-08-01

69

Determination of Adenosine Triphosphate on Marine Particulates:Synthesis of Methods for Use on OTEC Samples  

SciTech Connect

Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is an indicator of living biomass in marine particulates. This report details the method used by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to analyze particulate ATP in samples taken from oligotrophic, tropical ocean waters. It represents a synthesis of previously published methods.

Jones, Anthony T.; Hartwig, Eric O.

1982-08-01

70

Determination of methylmercury in marine biota samples: method validation.  

PubMed

Regulatory authorities are expected to measure concentration of contaminants in foodstuffs, but the simple determination of total amount cannot be sufficient for fully judging its impact on the human health. In particular, the methylation of metals generally increases their toxicity; therefore validated analytical methods producing reliable results for the assessment of methylated species are highly needed. Nowadays, there is no legal limit for methylmercury (MeHg) in food matrices. Hence, no standardized method for the determination of MeHg exists within the international jurisdiction. Contemplating the possibility of a future legislative limit, a method for low level determination of MeHg in marine biota matrixes, based on aqueous-phase ethylation followed by purge and trap and gas chromatography (GC) coupled to pyrolysis-atomic fluorescence spectrometry (Py-AFS) detection, has been developed and validated. Five different extraction procedures, namely acid and alkaline leaching assisted by microwave and conventional oven heating, as well as enzymatic digestion, were evaluated in terms of their efficiency to extract MeHg from Scallop soft tissue IAEA-452 Certified Reference Material. Alkaline extraction with 25% (w/w) KOH in methanol, microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) with 5M HCl and enzymatic digestion with protease XIV yielded the highest extraction recoveries. Standard addition or the introduction of a dilution step were successfully applied to overcome the matrix effects observed when microwave-assisted extraction using 25% (w/w) KOH in methanol or 25% (w/v) aqueous TMAH were used. ISO 17025 and Eurachem guidelines were followed to perform the validation of the methodology. Accordingly, blanks, selectivity, calibration curve, linearity (0.9995), working range (1-800pg), recovery (97%), precision, traceability, limit of detection (0.45pg), limit of quantification (0.85pg) and expanded uncertainty (15.86%, k=2) were assessed with Fish protein Dorm-3 Certified Reference Material. The major contributions to the expanded uncertainty, i.e. 86.1%, arose from the uncertainty associated with recovery, followed by the contribution from fluorescence signal. Additional validation of the methodology developed was effectuated by the comparison with the values reported for MeHg in the IAEA-452 inter-laboratory comparison exercise. PMID:24720970

Carrasco, Luis; Vassileva, Emilia

2014-05-01

71

Impaired Inhibitory Control in Recreational Cocaine Users  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chronic use of cocaine is associated with impairment in response inhibition but it is an open question whether and to which degree findings from chronic users generalize to the upcoming type of recreational users. This study compared the ability to inhibit and execute behavioral responses in adult recreational users and in a cocaine-free-matched sample controlled for age, race, gender distribution,

Lorenza S. Colzato; Wery P. M. van den Wildenberg; Bernhard Hommel; Antonio Verdejo García

2007-01-01

72

Determination of arsenic species and arsenosugars in marine samples by HPLC-ICP-MS.  

PubMed

Arsenic-speciation analysis in marine samples was performed by high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) with ICP-MS detection. Separation of eight arsenic species--As(III), MMA, DMA, As(V), AB, TMAO, AC and TeMAs(+)--was achieved on a C(18) column with isocratic elution (pH 3.0), under which conditions As(III) and MMA co-eluted. The entire separation was accomplished in 15 min. The HPLC-ICP-MS detection limits for the eight arsenic species were in the range 0.03-0.23 microg L(-1) based on 3 sigma for the blank response (n=5). The precision was calculated to be 2.4-8.0% (RSD) for the eight species. The method was successfully applied to several marine samples, e.g. oysters, fish, shrimps, and marine algae. Low-power microwave digestion was employed for extraction of arsenic from seafood products; ultrasonic extraction was employed for the extraction of arsenic from seaweeds. Separation of arsenosugars was achieved on an anion-exchange column. Concentrations of arsenosugars 2, 3, and 4 in marine algae were in the range 0.18-9.59 microg g(-1). PMID:16132126

Hirata, Shizuko; Toshimitsu, Hideki

2005-10-01

73

Estimates of Marine Debris Accumulation on Beaches Are Strongly Affected by the Temporal Scale of Sampling  

PubMed Central

Marine debris is a global issue with impacts on marine organisms, ecological processes, aesthetics and economies. Consequently, there is increasing interest in quantifying the scale of the problem. Accumulation rates of debris on beaches have been advocated as a useful proxy for at-sea debris loads. However, here we show that past studies may have vastly underestimated the quantity of available debris because sampling was too infrequent. Our study of debris on a small beach in eastern Australia indicates that estimated daily accumulation rates decrease rapidly with increasing intervals between surveys, and the quantity of available debris is underestimated by 50% after only 3 days and by an order of magnitude after 1 month. As few past studies report sampling frequencies of less than a month, estimates of the scale of the marine debris problem need to be critically re-examined and scaled-up accordingly. These results reinforce similar, recent work advocating daily sampling as a standard approach for accurate quantification of available debris in coastal habitats. We outline an alternative approach whereby site-specific accumulation models are generated to correct bias when daily sampling is impractical. PMID:24367607

Smith, Stephen D. A.; Markic, Ana

2013-01-01

74

Multi-Scale Sampling to Evaluate Assemblage Dynamics in an Oceanic Marine Reserve  

PubMed Central

To resolve the capacity of Marine Protected Areas (MPA) to enhance fish productivity it is first necessary to understand how environmental conditions affect the distribution and abundance of fishes independent of potential reserve effects. Baseline fish production was examined from 2002–2004 through ichthyoplankton sampling in a large (10,878 km2) Southern Californian oceanic marine reserve, the Cowcod Conservation Area (CCA) that was established in 2001, and the Southern California Bight as a whole (238,000 km2 CalCOFI sampling domain). The CCA assemblage changed through time as the importance of oceanic-pelagic species decreased between 2002 (La Niña) and 2003 (El Niño) and then increased in 2004 (El Niño), while oceanic species and rockfishes displayed the opposite pattern. By contrast, the CalCOFI assemblage was relatively stable through time. Depth, temperature, and zooplankton explained more of the variability in assemblage structure at the CalCOFI scale than they did at the CCA scale. CalCOFI sampling revealed that oceanic species impinged upon the CCA between 2002 and 2003 in association with warmer offshore waters, thus explaining the increased influence of these species in the CCA during the El Nino years. Multi-scale, spatially explicit sampling and analysis was necessary to interpret assemblage dynamics in the CCA and likely will be needed to evaluate other focal oceanic marine reserves throughout the world. PMID:22448236

Thompson, Andrew R.; Watson, William; McClatchie, Sam; Weber, Edward D.

2012-01-01

75

Results of sediment and water sampling and inorganic, organic, and radionuclide analysis at recreation areas and water intakes - Norris, Melton Hill, and Watts Bar Lakes - Data report  

SciTech Connect

Suspected water quality contamination in Watts Bar Reservoir as a result of activities in past decades at the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Oak Ridge facility is of public concern. DOE, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), the State of Tennessee, and other agencies and officials have received many inquiries from the public in recent years concerning this suspected pollution, especially how this potential contamination may affect the health and safety of those persons who use beaches in the area for swimming or other water-body-contact sports. As a result of these concerns, TVA conducted a study in May and June 1991 to obtain data on potential contaminants of concern in the water and sediment of Watts Bar Reservoir. TVA collected water and sediment samples at a total of 29 sites, including 18 recreation areas and 11 water intake locations, located throughout Norris, Melton Hill, and Watts Bar Reservoirs. The samples were analyzed for radionuclides, metals, and organic compounds which could pose a threat to human health.

NONE

1991-10-01

76

Results of sediment and water sampling for inorganic, organic, and radionuclide analysis at recreation areas and water intakes -- Norris, Melton Hill, and Watts Bar Lakes. Data report  

SciTech Connect

Suspected water quality contamination in Watts Bar Reservoir as a result of activities in past decades at the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Oak Ridge facility is of public concern. DOE, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), the State of Tennessee, and other agencies and officials have received many inquiries from the public in recent years concerning this suspected pollution, especially how this potential contamination may affect the health and safety of those persons who use beaches in the area for swimming or other water-body-contact sports. As a result of these concerns, TVA conducted a study in May and June 1991 to obtain data on potential contaminants of concern in the water and sediment of Watts Bar Reservoir. TVA collected water and sediment samples at a total of 29 sites, including 18 recreation areas and 11 water intake locations, located throughout Norris, Melton Hill, and Watts Bar Reservoirs. The samples were analyzed for radionuclides, metals, and organic compounds which could pose a threat to human health.

NONE

1991-10-01

77

Stereochemistry of amino acids in surface samples of a marine sediment  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In two surface samples of marine sediment, the percentages of d-alanine and d-aspartic acid are significantly higher than the other d-amino acids and are similar to the range found in soils. The percentage of d-glutamic acid is also higher than the other amino acids but less than d-alanine and d-aspartic acid. These d-amino acids may come mainly from bacteria. ?? 1978.

Pollock, G.E.; Kvenvolden, K.A.

1978-01-01

78

Stereochemistry of amino acids in surface samples of a marine sediment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In two surface samples of marine sediment, the percentages of D-alanine and D-aspartic acid are significantly higher than the other D-amino acids and are similar to the range found in soils. The percentage of D-glutamic acid is also higher than the other amino acids but less than D-alanine and D-aspartic acid. These D-amino acids may come mainly from bacteria.

Pollock, G. E.; Kvenvolden, K. A.

1978-01-01

79

DEPARTMENT OF RECREATIONAL SPORTS  

E-print Network

DEPARTMENT OF RECREATIONAL SPORTS ANNUAL REPORT 2010-2011 LEAVE A LEGACY #12;#12;Table of Contents and Opportunities 18 Our Future 20 Governance 22 #12;5 From the Director The Department of Recreational Sports of students through providing recreation, leisure, health, wellness and developmental opportunities

Escher, Christine

80

Time series sampling and data assimilation in a simple marine ecosystem model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Simulated distributions of nutrients, phytoplankton and zooplankton were obtained from a simple marine ecosystem model that included nutrient inputs from episodic events. These distributions were then used in numerical identical twin experiments to test the ability of an adjoint data assimilation method to recover rate parameters, such as population growth and death rates, component initial conditions, and the amplitude of episodic events. Data were assimilated into the marine ecosystem model at monthly, bi-weekly and weekly intervals over a period of about 2 months. The ability to recover rate parameters and component initial conditions was determined primarily by the frequency and type of data that were assimilated. Assimilation of data at monthly intervals proved to be adequate for recovery of most of the rate parameters and some of the initial conditions. Bi-weekly data yielded better recoveries; however, increasing the data availability to weekly intervals did not significantly improve the results relative to the bi-weekly cases. The ability to recover biological rates with only monthly data suggests that these are fundamental aspects of marine ecosystems and can be resolved with only a few measurements. The availability of zooplankton information, even at a reduced frequency relative to phytoplankton or nutrient information, improved the ability to recover rate parameters with data more widely spaced in time. Recovery of component initial conditions was related to the timescales of the biological processes; faster processes required more frequent data. The recovery of the amplitude of the episodic events was related to the timing of the sampling relative to the event, rather than to the frequency at which data were available. The number of iterations needed for convergence when using data assimilation with the marine ecosystem model was dependent not only on the frequency and type of the input data series, but also on the structure of the marine ecosystem model. These results have implications for designing sampling strategies for measurement programs, such as the U.S. Joint Global Ocean Flux Study Hawaii Ocean Time-series and Bermuda Atlantic Time-series sites, so that these multidisciplinary data sets can be used with data-assimilative marine ecosystem models.

Lawson, Linda M.; Hofmann, Eileen E.; Spitz, Yvette H.

81

Taxonomic assessment and enzymes production by yeasts isolated from marine and terrestrial Antarctic samples.  

PubMed

The aim of the present study was to investigate the taxonomic identity of yeasts isolated from the Antarctic continent and to evaluate their ability to produce enzymes (lipase, protease and xylanase) at low and moderate temperatures. A total of 97 yeast strains were recovered from marine and terrestrial samples collected in the Antarctica. The highest amount of yeast strains was obtained from marine sediments, followed by lichens, ornithogenic soils, sea stars, Salpa sp., algae, sea urchin, sea squirt, stone with lichens, Nacella concinna, sea sponge, sea isopod and sea snail. Data from polyphasic taxonomy revealed the presence of 21 yeast species, distributed in the phylum Ascomycota (n = 8) and Basidiomycota (n = 13). Representatives of encapsulated yeasts, belonging to genera Rhodotorula and Cryptococcus were recovered from 7 different Antarctic samples. Moreover, Candida glaebosa, Cryptococcus victoriae, Meyerozyma (Pichia) guilliermondii, Rhodotorula mucilaginosa and R. laryngis were the most abundant yeast species recovered. This is the first report of the occurrence of some species of yeasts recovered from Antarctic marine invertebrates. Additionally, results from enzymes production at low/moderate temperatures revealed that the Antarctic environment contains metabolically diverse cultivable yeasts, which could be considered as a target for biotechnological applications. Among the evaluated yeasts in the present study 46.39, 37.11 and 14.43 % were able to produce lipase (at 15 °C), xylanase (at 15 °C) and protease (at 25 °C), respectively. The majority of lipolytic, proteolytic and xylanolytic strains were distributed in the phylum Basidiomycota and were mainly recovered from sea stars, lichens, sea urchin and marine sediments. PMID:24114281

Duarte, A W F; Dayo-Owoyemi, I; Nobre, F S; Pagnocca, F C; Chaud, L C S; Pessoa, A; Felipe, M G A; Sette, L D

2013-11-01

82

The Index to Marine and Lacustrine Geological Samples: Improving Sample Accessibility and Enabling Current and Future Research  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Index to Marine and Lacustrine Geological Samples is a community designed and maintained resource enabling researchers to locate and request sea floor and lakebed geologic samples archived by partner institutions. Conceived in the dawn of the digital age by representatives from U.S. academic and government marine core repositories and the NOAA National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) at a 1977 meeting convened by the National Science Foundation (NSF), the Index is based on core concepts of community oversight, common vocabularies, consistent metadata and a shared interface. Form and content of underlying vocabularies and metadata continue to evolve according to the needs of the community, as do supporting technologies and access methodologies. The Curators Consortium, now international in scope, meets at partner institutions biennially to share ideas and discuss best practices. NGDC serves the group by providing database access and maintenance, a list server, digitizing support and long-term archival of sample metadata, data and imagery. Over three decades, participating curators have performed the herculean task of creating and contributing metadata for over 195,000 sea floor and lakebed cores, grabs, and dredges archived in their collections. Some partners use the Index for primary web access to their collections while others use it to increase exposure of more in-depth institutional systems. The Index is currently a geospatially-enabled relational database, publicly accessible via Web Feature and Web Map Services, and text- and ArcGIS map-based web interfaces. To provide as much knowledge as possible about each sample, the Index includes curatorial contact information and links to related data, information and images; 1) at participating institutions, 2) in the NGDC archive, and 3) at sites such as the Rolling Deck to Repository (R2R) and the System for Earth Sample Registration (SESAR). Over 34,000 International GeoSample Numbers (IGSNs) linking to SESAR are included in anticipation of opportunities for interconnectivity with Integrated Earth Data Applications (IEDA) systems. To promote interoperability and broaden exposure via the semantic web, NGDC is publishing lithologic classification schemes and terminology used in the Index as Simple Knowledge Organization System (SKOS) vocabularies, coordinating with R2R and the Consortium for Ocean Leadership for consistency. Availability in SKOS form will also facilitate use of the vocabularies in International Standards Organization (ISO) 19115-2 compliant metadata records. NGDC provides stewardship for the Index on behalf of U.S. repositories as the NSF designated "appropriate National Data Center" for data and metadata pertaining to sea floor samples as specified in the 2011 Division of Ocean Sciences Sample and Data Policy, and on behalf of international partners via a collocated World Data Center. NGDC operates on the Open Archival Information System (OAIS) reference model. Active Partners: Antarctic Marine Geology Research Facility, Florida State University; British Ocean Sediment Core Research Facility; Geological Survey of Canada; Integrated Ocean Drilling Program; Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory; National Lacustrine Core Repository, University of Minnesota; Oregon State University; Scripps Institution of Oceanography; University of Rhode Island; U.S. Geological Survey; Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

Moore, C.

2011-12-01

83

Coincident plasmids and antimicrobial resistance in marine bacteria isolated from polluted and unpolluted Atlantic Ocean Samples  

SciTech Connect

Sewage effluent and outfall confluence samples were collected at the Barceloneta Regional Treatment Plant in Barceloneta, Puerto Rico; outfall confluence samples at Ocean City, Md., were also collected. Samples from uncontaminated open ocean areas served as clean-water controls. Bacteria were enriched in marine broth 2216 amended with 1 ..mu..g of one of a set of chemical selected for study per ml: nitrobenzene, dibutyl phthalate, m-cresol, o-cresol, 4-nitroaniline, bis(tributyltin) oxide, and quinone. MICs of the chemicals were determined individually for all isolates. Bacterial isolates were evaluated for resistance to nine different antibiotics and for the presence of plasmid DNA. Treated sewage was found to contain large numbers of bacteria simultaneously possessing antibiotic resistance, chemical resistance, and multiple bands of plasmic DNA. Bacteria resistant to penicillin, erythromycin, nalidixic acid, ampicillin, m-cresol, quinone, and bis(tributyltin) oxide were detected in nearly all samples, but only sewage outfall confluence samples yielded bacterial isolates that were resistant to streptomycin. Bacteria resistant to a combination of antibiotics, including kanamycin, chloramphenicol, gentamicin, and tetracycline, were isolated only from sewage effluent samples. It is concluded that bacterial isolates derived from toxic chemical wastes more frequently contain plasmid DNA and demonstrate antimicrobial resistance than do bacterial isolates from domestic sewage-impacted waters or from uncontaminated open ocean sites.

Baya, A.M.; Brayton, P.R.; Brown, V.L.; Grimes, D.J.; Russek-Cohen, E.; Colwell, R.R.

1986-06-01

84

Optimizing sample pretreatment for compound-specific stable carbon isotopic analysis of amino sugars in marine sediment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Amino sugars are quantitatively significant constituents of soil and marine sediment, but their sources and turnover in environmental samples remain poorly understood. The stable carbon isotopic composition of amino sugars can provide information on the lifestyles of their source organisms and can be monitored during incubations with labeled substrates to estimate the turnover rates of microbial populations. However, until now, such investigation has been carried out only with soil samples, partly because of the much lower abundance of amino sugars in marine environments. We therefore optimized a procedure for compound-specific isotopic analysis of amino sugars in marine sediment employing gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The whole procedure consisted of hydrolysis, neutralization, enrichment, and derivatization of amino sugars. Except for the derivatization step, the protocol introduced negligible isotopic fractionation, and the minimum requirement of amino sugar for isotopic analysis was 20 ng, i.e. equivalent to ~ 8 ng of amino sugar carbon. Our results obtained from ?13C analysis of amino sugars in selected marine sediment samples showed that muramic acid had isotopic imprints from indigenous bacterial activities, whereas glucosamine and galactosamine were mainly derived from organic detritus. The analysis of stable carbon isotopic compositions of amino sugars opens a promising window for the investigation of microbial metabolisms in marine sediments and the deep marine biosphere.

Zhu, R.; Lin, Y.-S.; Lipp, J. S.; Meador, T. B.; Hinrichs, K.-U.

2014-01-01

85

Sampling design for long-term regional trends in marine rocky intertidal communities.  

PubMed

Probability-based designs reduce bias and allow inference of results to the pool of sites from which they were chosen. We developed and tested probability-based designs for monitoring marine rocky intertidal assemblages at Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve (GLBA), Alaska. A multilevel design was used that varied in scale and inference. The levels included aerial surveys, extensive sampling of 25 sites, and more intensive sampling of 6 sites. Aerial surveys of a subset of intertidal habitat indicated that the original target habitat of bedrock-dominated sites with slope ?30° was rare. This unexpected finding illustrated one value of probability-based surveys and led to a shift in the target habitat type to include steeper, more mixed rocky habitat. Subsequently, we evaluated the statistical power of different sampling methods and sampling strategies to detect changes in the abundances of the predominant sessile intertidal taxa: barnacles Balanomorpha, the mussel Mytilus trossulus, and the rockweed Fucus distichus subsp. evanescens. There was greatest power to detect trends in Mytilus and lesser power for barnacles and Fucus. Because of its greater power, the extensive, coarse-grained sampling scheme was adopted in subsequent years over the intensive, fine-grained scheme. The sampling attributes that had the largest effects on power included sampling of "vertical" line transects (vs. horizontal line transects or quadrats) and increasing the number of sites. We also evaluated the power of several management-set parameters. Given equal sampling effort, sampling more sites fewer times had greater power. The information gained through intertidal monitoring is likely to be useful in assessing changes due to climate, including ocean acidification; invasive species; trampling effects; and oil spills. PMID:23420521

Irvine, Gail V; Shelly, Alice

2013-08-01

86

Sampling design for long-term regional trends in marine rocky intertidal communities  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Probability-based designs reduce bias and allow inference of results to the pool of sites from which they were chosen. We developed and tested probability-based designs for monitoring marine rocky intertidal assemblages at Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve (GLBA), Alaska. A multilevel design was used that varied in scale and inference. The levels included aerial surveys, extensive sampling of 25 sites, and more intensive sampling of 6 sites. Aerial surveys of a subset of intertidal habitat indicated that the original target habitat of bedrock-dominated sites with slope ?30° was rare. This unexpected finding illustrated one value of probability-based surveys and led to a shift in the target habitat type to include steeper, more mixed rocky habitat. Subsequently, we evaluated the statistical power of different sampling methods and sampling strategies to detect changes in the abundances of the predominant sessile intertidal taxa: barnacles Balanomorpha, the mussel Mytilus trossulus, and the rockweed Fucus distichus subsp. evanescens. There was greatest power to detect trends in Mytilus and lesser power for barnacles and Fucus. Because of its greater power, the extensive, coarse-grained sampling scheme was adopted in subsequent years over the intensive, fine-grained scheme. The sampling attributes that had the largest effects on power included sampling of “vertical” line transects (vs. horizontal line transects or quadrats) and increasing the number of sites. We also evaluated the power of several management-set parameters. Given equal sampling effort, sampling more sites fewer times had greater power. The information gained through intertidal monitoring is likely to be useful in assessing changes due to climate, including ocean acidification; invasive species; trampling effects; and oil spills.

Irvine, Gail V.; Shelley, Alice

2013-01-01

87

Partners: Promoting Accessible Recreation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Promoting Accessible Recreation through Networking, Education, Resources and Services (PARTNERS) Project, a partnership between Northeast Passage, the University of New Hampshire, and Granite State Independent Living Foundation, helps create barrier-free recreation for individuals with physical disabilities. The paper describes PARTNERS and…

Sable, Janet; Gravink, Jill

1995-01-01

88

Alaska Marine Mammal Tissue Archival Project: Sample inventory and results of analyses of selected samples for organic compounds and trace elements  

SciTech Connect

In 1987, the Alaska Marine Mammal Tissue Archival Project (AMMTAP) was established as part of the National Biomonitoring Specimen Bank (NBSB) program at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).The purpose of the AMMTAP was to establish a representative collection of Alaska marine mammal tissues for future contaminant analyses and documentation of long-term trends in environmental quality. Since 1987, specimens have been collected from 65 animals (seven species) from six different sites. The report contains the current sample inventory and the results of the analysis of selected samples for the measurement of inorganic and organic compounds.

Becker, P.R.; Wise, S.A.; Schantz, M.M.; Koster, B.J.; Zeisler, R.

1992-02-01

89

Recreation/Tourism/Interpretation Graduate Schools  

E-print Network

Recreation/Tourism/Interpretation Graduate Schools Brigham Young University Provo, Utah, Recreation and Tourism Management http://www.hehd.clemson.edu/PRTM/mprtm.htm Colorado State University Programs: Natural Resource Recreation Tourism and Commercial Recreation Campus Recreation, Programming

90

Determination of methylmercury in marine biota samples with advanced mercury analyzer: Method validation.  

PubMed

In this paper, we present a simple, fast and cost-effective method for determination of methyl mercury (MeHg) in marine samples. All important parameters influencing the sample preparation process were investigated and optimized. Full validation of the method was performed in accordance to the ISO-17025 (ISO/IEC, 2005) and Eurachem guidelines. Blanks, selectivity, working range (0.09-3.0ng), recovery (92-108%), intermediate precision (1.7-4.5%), traceability, limit of detection (0.009ng), limit of quantification (0.045ng) and expanded uncertainty (15%, k=2) were assessed. Estimation of the uncertainty contribution of each parameter and the demonstration of traceability of measurement results was provided as well. Furthermore, the selectivity of the method was studied by analyzing the same sample extracts by advanced mercury analyzer (AMA) and gas chromatography-atomic fluorescence spectrometry (GC-AFS). Additional validation of the proposed procedure was effectuated by participation in the IAEA-461 worldwide inter-laboratory comparison exercises. PMID:25624245

Azemard, Sabine; Vassileva, Emilia

2015-06-01

91

Optimizing sample pretreatment for compound-specific stable carbon isotopic analysis of amino sugars in marine sediment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Amino sugars are quantitatively significant constituents of soil and marine sediment, but their sources and turnover in environmental samples remain poorly understood. The stable carbon isotopic composition of amino sugars can provide information on the lifestyles of their source organisms and can be monitored during incubations with labeled substrates to estimate the turnover rates of microbial populations. However, until now, such investigation has been carried out only with soil samples, partly because of the much lower abundance of amino sugars in marine environments. We therefore optimized a procedure for compound-specific isotopic analysis of amino sugars in marine sediment, employing gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The whole procedure consisted of hydrolysis, neutralization, enrichment, and derivatization of amino sugars. Except for the derivatization step, the protocol introduced negligible isotopic fractionation, and the minimum requirement of amino sugar for isotopic analysis was 20 ng, i.e., equivalent to ~8 ng of amino sugar carbon. Compound-specific stable carbon isotopic analysis of amino sugars obtained from marine sediment extracts indicated that glucosamine and galactosamine were mainly derived from organic detritus, whereas muramic acid showed isotopic imprints from indigenous bacterial activities. The ?13C analysis of amino sugars provides a valuable addition to the biomarker-based characterization of microbial metabolism in the deep marine biosphere, which so far has been lipid oriented and biased towards the detection of archaeal signals.

Zhu, R.; Lin, Y.-S.; Lipp, J. S.; Meador, T. B.; Hinrichs, K.-U.

2014-09-01

92

University Recreation Flagship 2020  

E-print Network

University Recreation Flagship 2020 Strategic Plan September 19, 2011 #12 Activities: 39 (+18%) 20112012 IM Activities Target: 43 Adventure Education Establish a trips program 10%) Adventure Education Increase the number of groups participating in the Challenge Course

Harms, Kyle E.

93

Predicting recreation priorities  

E-print Network

priorities. Assessment of residents' recreation priorities has been undertaken to guide provision decision-making. Kibler and Smith (2000) prioritized the recreation priorities of 60 HIV-positive and AIDS patients using importance-perfonnance measures... are "Factors that limit people's participation in leisure activities, people's use of leisure services, or people's enjoyment of current activities" (Scott, 2000). Categories of constraints will be determined using exploratory factor analysis. Different...

Hunt, Kindal Alayne

2012-06-07

94

Availability of Recreational Resources and Physical Activity in Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives. Using data from a large cohort of adults aged 45 to 84 years-old, we investigated whether availability of recreational resources is related to phys- ical activity levels. Methods. Data from a multiethnic sample of 2723 adult residents of New York City, NY; Baltimore, Md; and Forsyth County, NC, were linked to data on locations of recreational resources. We measured

Ana V. Diez Roux; Kelly R. Evenson; Aileen P. McGinn; Daniel G. Brown; Shannon Brines; David R. Jacobs

2007-01-01

95

The Value of a Master's Degree to Recreation Professionals  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study assessed the nature of the relationship between earning advanced degrees and career outcomes such as salary, job satisfaction, social capital, and human capital among professionals in the parks and recreation field. The sample (n = 196) was drawn from parks and recreation agencies located in the United States. Agencies, excluding…

Hodge, Camilla J.; Hill, Brian J.; Brinton, Christian

2012-01-01

96

Extended evaluation of polymeric and lipophilic sorbents for passive sampling of marine toxins.  

PubMed

Marine biotoxins are algal metabolites that can accumulate in fish or shellfish and render these foodstuffs unfit for human consumption. These toxins, released into seawater during algal occurrences, can be monitored through passive sampling. Acetone, methanol and isopropanol were evaluated for their efficiency in extracting toxins from algal biomass. Isopropanol was chosen for further experiments thanks to a slightly higher recovery and no artifact formation. Comparison of Oasis HLB, Strata-X, BondElut C18 and HP-20 sorbent materials in SPE-mode led to the choice of Oasis HLB, HP-20 and Strata-X. These three sorbents were separately exposed as passive samplers for 24 h to seawater spiked with algal extracts containing known amounts of okadaic acid (OA), azaspiracids (AZAs), pinnatoxin-G (PnTX-G), 13-desmethyl spirolide-C (SPX1) and palytoxins (PlTXs). Low density polyethylene (LDPE) and silicone rubber (PDMS) strips were tested in parallel on similar mixtures of spiked natural seawater for 24 h. These strips gave significantly lower recoveries than the polymeric sorbents. Irrespective of the toxin group, the adsorption rate of toxins on HP-20 was slower than on Oasis HLB and Strata-X. However, HP-20 and Strata-X gave somewhat higher recoveries after 24 h exposure. Irrespective of the sorbent tested, recoveries were generally highest for cyclic imines and OA group toxins, slightly lower for AZAs, and the lowest for palytoxins. Trials in re-circulated closed tanks with mussels exposed to Vulcanodinium rugosum or Prorocentrum lima allowed for further evaluation of passive samplers. In these experiments with different sorbent materials competing for toxins in the same container, Strata-X accumulated toxins faster than Oasis HLB, and HP-20, and to higher levels. The deployment of these three sorbents at Ingril French Mediterranean lagoon to detect PnTX-G in the water column showed accumulation of higher levels on HP-20 and Oasis HLB compared to Strata-X. This study has significantly extended the range of sorbents for passive sampling of marine toxins. In particular, sorbents were included that had previously been evaluated for polyhalogenated contaminants, pharmaceuticals, phytochemicals or veterinary residues. Moreover, this study has for the first time demonstrated the usefulness of the polymeric Oasis HLB and Strata-X sorbents in laboratory and field studies for various microalgal toxins. PMID:24709758

Zendong, Zita; Herrenknecht, Christine; Abadie, Eric; Brissard, Charline; Tixier, Céline; Mondeguer, Florence; Séchet, Véronique; Amzil, Zouher; Hess, Philipp

2014-12-01

97

DNA barcoding and metabarcoding of standardized samples reveal patterns of marine benthic diversity.  

PubMed

Documenting the diversity of marine life is challenging because many species are cryptic, small, and rare, and belong to poorly known groups. New sequencing technologies, especially when combined with standardized sampling, promise to make comprehensive biodiversity assessments and monitoring feasible on a large scale. We used this approach to characterize patterns of diversity on oyster reefs across a range of geographic scales comprising a temperate location [Virginia (VA)] and a subtropical location [Florida (FL)]. Eukaryotic organisms that colonized multilayered settlement surfaces (autonomous reef monitoring structures) over a 6-mo period were identified by cytochrome c oxidase subunit I barcoding (>2-mm mobile organisms) and metabarcoding (sessile and smaller mobile organisms). In a total area of ?15.64 m(2) and volume of ?0.09 m(3), 2,179 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were recorded from 983,056 sequences. However, only 10.9% could be matched to reference barcodes in public databases, with only 8.2% matching barcodes with both genus and species names. Taxonomic coverage was broad, particularly for animals (22 phyla recorded), but 35.6% of OTUs detected via metabarcoding could not be confidently assigned to a taxonomic group. The smallest size fraction (500 to 106 ?m) was the most diverse (more than two-thirds of OTUs). There was little taxonomic overlap between VA and FL, and samples separated by ?2 m were significantly more similar than samples separated by ?100 m. Ground-truthing with independent assessments of taxonomic composition indicated that both presence-absence information and relative abundance information are captured by metabarcoding data, suggesting considerable potential for ecological studies and environmental monitoring. PMID:25646458

Leray, Matthieu; Knowlton, Nancy

2015-02-17

98

Determination of total mercury for marine environmental monitoring studies by solid sampling continuum source high resolution atomic absorption spectrometry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The most critical step in almost all commonly used analytical procedures for Hg determination is the sample preparation due to its extreme volatility. One of the possible solutions of this problem is the application of methods for direct analysis of solid samples. The possibilities for solid sampling high resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry (HR CS AAS) determination of total mercury in various marine environmental samples e.g. sediments and biota are object of the present study. The instrumental parameters were optimized in order to obtain reproducible and interference free analytical signal. A calibration technique based on the use of solid standard certified reference materials similar to the nature of the analyzed sample was developed and applied to various CRMs and real samples. This technique allows simple and reliable evaluation of the uncertainty of the result and the metrological characteristics of the method. A validation approach in line with the requirements of ISO 17025 standard and Eurachem guidelines was followed. With this in mind, selectivity, working range (0.06 to 25 ng for biota and 0.025 to 4 ng for sediment samples, expressed as total Hg) linearity (confirmed by Student's t-test), bias (1.6-4.3%), repeatability (4-9%), reproducibility (9-11%), and absolute limit of detection (0.025 ng for sediment, 0.096 ng for marine biota) were systematically assessed using solid CRMs. The relative expanded uncertainty was estimated at 15% for sediment sample and 8.5% for marine biota sample (k = 2). Demonstration of traceability of measurement results is also presented. The potential of the proposed analytical procedure, based on solid sampling HR CS AAS technique was demonstrated by direct analysis of sea sediments form the Caribbean region and various CRMs. Overall, the use of solid sampling HR CS AAS permits obtaining significant advantages for the determination of this complex analyte in marine samples, such as straightforward calibration, a high sample throughput (15 min per sample), sufficient precision, a suitable limit of detection, and reduced risk of analyte loss and contamination.

Mandjukov, Petko; Orani, Anna Maria; Han, Eunmi; Vassileva, Emilia

2015-01-01

99

Partitioning of alcohol ethoxylates and polyethylene glycols in the marine environment: field samplings vs laboratory experiments.  

PubMed

Nowadays, alcohol ethoxylates (AEOs) constitute the most important group of non-ionic surfactants, used in a wide range of applications such as household cleaners and detergents. Significant amounts of these compounds and their degradation products (polyethylene glycols, PEGs, which are also used for many other applications) reach aquatic environments, and are eliminated from the water column by degradation and sorption processes. This work deals with the environmental distribution of AEOs and PEGs in the Long Island Sound Estuary, a setting impacted by sewage discharges from New York City (NYC). The distribution of target compounds in seawater was influenced by tides, consistent with salinity differences, and concentrations in suspended solid samples ranged from 1.5 to 20.5 ?g/g. The more hydrophobic AEOs were mostly attached to the particulate matter whereas the more polar PEGs were predominant in the dissolved form. Later, the sorption of these chemicals was characterized in the laboratory. Experimental and environmental sorption coefficients for AEOs and PEGs showed average values from 3607 to 164,994 L/kg and from 74 to 32,862 L/kg, respectively. The sorption data were fitted to a Freundlich isotherm model with parameters n and log KF between 0.8-1.2 and 1.46-4.39 L/kg, respectively. AEO and PEG sorptions on marine sediment were also found to be mostly not affected by changes in salinity. PMID:24887194

Traverso-Soto, Juan M; Brownawell, Bruce J; González-Mazo, Eduardo; Lara-Martín, Pablo A

2014-08-15

100

Wider sampling reveals a non-sister relationship for geographically contiguous lineages of a marine mussel  

PubMed Central

The accuracy of phylogenetic inference can be significantly improved by the addition of more taxa and by increasing the spatial coverage of sampling. In previous studies, the brown mussel Perna perna showed a sister–lineage relationship between eastern and western individuals contiguously distributed along the South African coastline. We used mitochondrial (COI) and nuclear (ITS) sequence data to further analyze phylogeographic patterns within P. perna. Significant expansion of the geographical coverage revealed an unexpected pattern. The western South African lineage shared the most recent common ancestor (MRCA) with specimens from Angola, Venezuela, and Namibia, whereas eastern South African specimens and Mozambique grouped together, indicating a non-sister relationship for the two South African lineages. Two plausible biogeographic scenarios to explain their origin were both supported by the hypotheses-testing analysis. One includes an Indo-Pacific origin for P. perna, dispersal into the Mediterranean and Atlantic through the Tethys seaway, followed by recent secondary contact after southward expansion of the western and eastern South African lineages. The other scenario (Out of South Africa) suggests an ancient vicariant divergence of the two lineages followed by their northward expansion. Nevertheless, the “Out of South Africa” hypothesis would require a more ancient divergence between the two lineages. Instead, our estimates indicated that they diverged very recently (310 kyr), providing a better support for an Indo-Pacific origin of the two South African lineages. The arrival of the MRCA of P. perna in Brazil was estimated at 10 [0–40] kyr. Thus, the hypothesis of a recent introduction in Brazil through hull fouling in wooden vessels involved in the transatlantic itineraries of the slave trade did not receive strong support, but given the range for this estimate, it could not be discarded. Wider geographic sampling of marine organisms shows that lineages with contiguous distributions need not share a common ancestry. PMID:25360249

Cunha, Regina L; Nicastro, Katy R; Costa, Joana; McQuaid, Christopher D; Serrão, Ester A; Zardi, Gerardo I

2014-01-01

101

Wider sampling reveals a non-sister relationship for geographically contiguous lineages of a marine mussel.  

PubMed

The accuracy of phylogenetic inference can be significantly improved by the addition of more taxa and by increasing the spatial coverage of sampling. In previous studies, the brown mussel Perna perna showed a sister-lineage relationship between eastern and western individuals contiguously distributed along the South African coastline. We used mitochondrial (COI) and nuclear (ITS) sequence data to further analyze phylogeographic patterns within P. perna. Significant expansion of the geographical coverage revealed an unexpected pattern. The western South African lineage shared the most recent common ancestor (MRCA) with specimens from Angola, Venezuela, and Namibia, whereas eastern South African specimens and Mozambique grouped together, indicating a non-sister relationship for the two South African lineages. Two plausible biogeographic scenarios to explain their origin were both supported by the hypotheses-testing analysis. One includes an Indo-Pacific origin for P. perna, dispersal into the Mediterranean and Atlantic through the Tethys seaway, followed by recent secondary contact after southward expansion of the western and eastern South African lineages. The other scenario (Out of South Africa) suggests an ancient vicariant divergence of the two lineages followed by their northward expansion. Nevertheless, the "Out of South Africa" hypothesis would require a more ancient divergence between the two lineages. Instead, our estimates indicated that they diverged very recently (310 kyr), providing a better support for an Indo-Pacific origin of the two South African lineages. The arrival of the MRCA of P. perna in Brazil was estimated at 10 [0-40] kyr. Thus, the hypothesis of a recent introduction in Brazil through hull fouling in wooden vessels involved in the transatlantic itineraries of the slave trade did not receive strong support, but given the range for this estimate, it could not be discarded. Wider geographic sampling of marine organisms shows that lineages with contiguous distributions need not share a common ancestry. PMID:25360249

Cunha, Regina L; Nicastro, Katy R; Costa, Joana; McQuaid, Christopher D; Serrão, Ester A; Zardi, Gerardo I

2014-06-01

102

Tourism and Commercial Recreation Department of Recreation and Leisure Studies  

E-print Network

Tourism and Commercial Recreation Department of Recreation and Leisure Studies Green Mountain College Fall 2005 GENERAL INFORMATION Course: REC 3033, Tourism and Commercial Recreation Credits: 3 DESCRIPTION [From the catalog]. This course is a study of the dynamics of the tourism industry

Brown, Gregory G.

103

Marine Fisheries On the cover: Scenes  

E-print Network

Marine Fisheries ~@WD@W On the cover: Scenes from the Boston Fish Pier. Articles January 1983, 45 and Virginia Fish Ladders, Alaskan Abalones and Salmon, The Pacific Halibut Catch, Florida's Marine Angling and Marine Recreational Fishing, Cephalopod Resources and Their Harvest, and The Environment Near Shore 29

104

Marine Fisheries On the cover: A California  

E-print Network

Marine Fisheries [R3~WD~W On the cover: A California gillnet vessel. Photograph by Ed Ueber. See Time of Individual Fish Bert S. Kikkawa, and Christopher D. Wilson 1 Marine Recreational Boat Fishery William E. Evans, Under Secretary for Oceans and Atmosphere National Marine Fisheries Service Editor: W. L

105

Bacteria and Nutrients in the Obhur Recreational Sharm, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Environmental pollution that render waters along the recreational shore unsatisfactory for use by the general public has become a global health problem. This study was carried out to examine the marine waters in sampling stations located at Sharm Obhur (North of Jeddah). These parameters included: total coliform (TC), l fecal coliform (FC) and nutrients (NO2-N, NO3-N, NH4-N and PO4-P). A comparison of the mean values of nutrients in Sharm Obhur with those of other locations in the Red Sea suggests that the mean levels of nutrients were similar to those of unpolluted areas. TC and FC counts were higher at the north sampling stations than the south ones, and with little variations between their numbers. FC was not recovered at stations to the south. The study shows that TC and FC counts at all sampling stations similar to the levels reported for normal unpolluted sea water. Keywords: Pollution, Nutrients, Coliforms, Sharm Obhur, Red Sea.

Turki, Adnan; Mudarris, Mohammed

2013-04-01

106

Colorado Rural Recreation Director's Project.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Colorado Rural Recreation Director's Project, based on a 1981 national survey identifying recreation/leisure needs of rural Americans, provided summer recreation for 11 western Colorado rural communities. Clinics in New Games, frisbee, hackisac, and tennis were given. Successful networking of resources by all involved parties produced positive…

Long, Patrick T.; Kraus, Barbara

1983-01-01

107

The Structure of Recreation Behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a meta-theoretical analysis of recreation concepts as an argument about organizing and explaining recreation behavior. Recreation activities are behavioral constructions that people build from both prototypic subsystems (those present in virtually all instances of the activity) and design subsystems (optional subsystems that adapt the activity to serve multiple goals). To explain the organizational structure of the behavior, we

Thomas A. More; James R. Averill

2003-01-01

108

Risk Recreation: Exploration and Implications.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this paper is to explore the topic of risk recreation and its implications for the professional recreation director. The question is raised, "Is there a reasonable rationale and justification to warrant public sponsorship of risk recreation programs?" High risk activities are identified, and their relative dangers are examined. The…

Meir, Joel

109

The Spatial Dimension: A New Reservoir and Recreational Behavior  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An initial effort to estimate the nature and extent of a new reservoir's impact upon the recreational behavior of a sample population living in the surrounding area (Keystone Reservoir, Oklahoma) is described. (NQ)

Hecock, Richard D.

1974-01-01

110

Therapeutic Recreation Directory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Therapeutic Recreation Directory has an abundance of information for the therapeutic recreation specialist, or those who study and teach in the field. There is an extensive collection of activity ideas, ranging from sports and cookery, for educators to experiment with in the classroom or for professionals to use on the job. This site also hosts inTeRlink, a long-running and constantly updated newsletter about developments in recreational therapy, found by clicking on the �News� link on the left hand side of the home page. All articles from the last ten years are available in the archive. A bulletin board, chat room, and forum keep professionals and students informed about current TR issues, and surveys help to gather and disseminate information and ideas about new developments in TR services. Visitors will also find the �Forms� link very helpful in nearly every aspect of providing recreational therapy to clients, including forms to help assess and treat patients, and guidelines on planning and implementing new therapeutic programs.

Dixon, Charles C.

2007-02-05

111

The Computer and Recreation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The paper examines the applications of microcomputers to recreation programing for blind persons. The accessibility of microcomputers to this population is discussed, and the advantages as well as disadvantages of speech synthesis equipment are noted. Information is presented on the modification of hardware for Radio Shack and Apple computers.…

Edwards, Paul

112

Methylenedioxymethamphetamine in Recreational Users  

E-print Network

3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; Ecstasy) is a serotonergic neurotoxin in laboratory animals that has been used for recreational purposes by humans. The subjective effects of this drug were determined in recreational users at a university campus. Of individuals who had admitted to using MDMA recreationally, 100 of 1143 agreed to complete a detailed questionnaire concerning the subjective effects of this Schedule I compound. The most common effect of MDMA was a heightened sense of “closeness ” with other people (90 % of subjects). Tachycardia, dry mouth, bruxism and/or trismus were reported by the majority of users. These effects probably result from the amphetaminelike properties of the drug. Visual hallucinations were reported by 20 % of users. Untoward side effects were most common on the day following the use of MDMA, with complaints of muscle aches, fatiguability; depression, and difficulty concentrating noted by 21 % to 36 % of subjects. Sixty-seven percent of frequent users of the drug (six or more separate doses) reported that the “positive ” effects of the drug decreased with successive doses while the “negative ” effects increased. Although these observations should be considered preliminary, they represent the first documentation of the subjective effects of MDMA in recreational users and confirm previous reports obtained — from patients treated with this

Stephen J. Peroutka, Ph.D.; Holly Newman; Hilary Harris

1988-01-01

113

Outdoor Recreation Space Standards.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With increased concern in recent years for the quality of our cultural and physical environment, there has been a corresponding increase in the need for information on standards used for planning playgrounds and parks, sports facilities, and outdoor areas for camping and hiking. Standards for various types of outdoor recreational facilities as…

Bureau of Outdoor Recreation (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

114

Recreational Vehicle Trades.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This curriculum guide provides materials for a competency-based course in recreational vehicle trades at the secondary level. The curriculum design uses the curriculum infused model for the teaching of basic skills as part of vocational education and demonstrates the relationship of vocationally related skills to communication, mathematics, and…

Felice, Michael

115

Comparison of Multi-Drug Resistant Environmental Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from Recreational Beaches and High Touch Surfaces in Built Environments.  

PubMed

Over the last decade community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has emerged as a major cause of disease in the general population with no health care exposure or known classical risk factors for MRSA infections. The potential community reservoirs have not been well defined though certain strains such as ST398 and USA300 have been well studied in some settings. MRSA has been isolated from recreational beaches, high-touch surfaces in homes, universities, and other community environmental surfaces. However, in most cases the strains were not characterized to determine if they are related to community-acquired or hospital-acquired clinical strains. We compared 55 environmental MRSA from 805 samples including sand, fresh, and marine water samples from local marine and fresh water recreational beaches (n?=?296), high touch surfaces on the University of Washington campus (n?=?294), surfaces in UW undergraduate housing (n?=?85), and the local community (n?=?130). Eleven USA300, representing 20% of the isolates, were found on the UW campus surfaces, student housing surfaces, and on the community surfaces but not in the recreational beach samples from the Northwest USA. Similarly, the predominant animal ST133 was found in the recreational beach samples but not in the high touch surface samples. All USA300 isolates were multi-drug resistant carrying two to six different antibiotic resistance genes coding for kanamycin, macrolides and/or macrolides-lincosamides-streptogramin B, and tetracycline, with the majority (72%) carrying four to six different antibiotic resistance genes. A surprising 98% of the 55 MRSA isolates were resistant to other classes of antibiotics and most likely represent reservoirs for these genes in the environment. PMID:23577006

Roberts, Marilyn C; Soge, Olusegun O; No, David

2013-01-01

116

Comparison of Multi-Drug Resistant Environmental Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from Recreational Beaches and High Touch Surfaces in Built Environments  

PubMed Central

Over the last decade community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has emerged as a major cause of disease in the general population with no health care exposure or known classical risk factors for MRSA infections. The potential community reservoirs have not been well defined though certain strains such as ST398 and USA300 have been well studied in some settings. MRSA has been isolated from recreational beaches, high-touch surfaces in homes, universities, and other community environmental surfaces. However, in most cases the strains were not characterized to determine if they are related to community-acquired or hospital-acquired clinical strains. We compared 55 environmental MRSA from 805 samples including sand, fresh, and marine water samples from local marine and fresh water recreational beaches (n?=?296), high touch surfaces on the University of Washington campus (n?=?294), surfaces in UW undergraduate housing (n?=?85), and the local community (n?=?130). Eleven USA300, representing 20% of the isolates, were found on the UW campus surfaces, student housing surfaces, and on the community surfaces but not in the recreational beach samples from the Northwest USA. Similarly, the predominant animal ST133 was found in the recreational beach samples but not in the high touch surface samples. All USA300 isolates were multi-drug resistant carrying two to six different antibiotic resistance genes coding for kanamycin, macrolides and/or macrolides-lincosamides-streptogramin B, and tetracycline, with the majority (72%) carrying four to six different antibiotic resistance genes. A surprising 98% of the 55 MRSA isolates were resistant to other classes of antibiotics and most likely represent reservoirs for these genes in the environment. PMID:23577006

Roberts, Marilyn C.; Soge, Olusegun O.; No, David

2013-01-01

117

Recreational drugs of abuse.  

PubMed

The use of recreational drugs of abuse continues to expand without limitations to national boundaries, social status, race, or education. Beyond the prevalence of illicit drug use and dependence, their contribution to the global burden of disease and death are large and troubling. All medical providers should be aware of the evolving drugs of abuse and their medical and social consequences. In addition to heroin and stimulants such as cocaine and methamphetamine, new designer stimulants called "bath salts" and cannabinoids called "spice," along with the abuse of prescription drugs and volatile substances, are now widely recognized problems in many societies. The wide variety and continuingly expanding clinical manifestations of toxicity of recreational drugs of abuse is not widely appreciated by clinicians. This edition attempts to summarize six major classes of drugs of abuse and their clinical effects with special emphasis on their immunological and respiratory effects. PMID:23832389

Albertson, Timothy E

2014-02-01

118

Time series sampling and data assimilation in a simple marine ecosystem model  

Microsoft Academic Search

Simulated distributions of nutrients, phytoplankton and zooplankton were obtained from a simple marine ecosystem model that included nutrient inputs from episodic events. These distributions were then used in numerical identical twin experiments to test the ability of an adjoint data assimilation method to recover rate parameters, such as population growth and death rates, component initial conditions, and the amplitude of

Linda M. Lawson; Eileen E. Hofmann; Yvette H. Spitz

1996-01-01

119

METHODS FOR THE DETERMINATION OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES IN MARINE AND ESTUARINE ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES  

EPA Science Inventory

This manual contains seven methods for the determination of nutrients, three metals, and chlorophyll a in marine and estuarine environmental matrices. wo of the metals methods are graphite furnace atomic absorption techniques and the third uses inductively coupled plasma mass spe...

120

Uncovering the diversification history of marine tetrapods: ecology influences the effect of geological sampling biases  

E-print Network

with continental flooding. Adaptation to open ocean life allowed plesiosaurs, ichthyosaurs and sea turtles the ichthyosaurs, sauropterygians, thalattosaurs, crocodyliforms, turtles, squamates, and other line- ages. Many passed through a shallow marine phase before becoming adapted for open ocean life. This allows

Cambridge, University of

121

Assessing the Value of Recreational Divers for Censusing Elasmobranchs  

PubMed Central

Background Around the world, researchers are using the observations and experiences of citizens to describe patterns in animal populations. This data is often collected via ongoing sampling or by synthesizing past experiences. Since elasmobranchs are relatively rare, obtaining data for broad-scale trend analysis requires high sampling effort. Elasmobranchs are also relatively large and conspicuous and therefore it may be possible to enlist recreational divers to collect data on their occurrence and relative abundance from daily dive activities. For this, however, a good understanding of the value of data collected by recreational divers is essential. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we explore the value of recreational divers for censusing elasmobranchs using a diverse set of data sources. First, we use a simulation experiment to explore detection rates of the roving diver technique, used by recreational divers, across a range of fish densities and speeds. Next, using a field survey, we show that inexperienced recreational divers detect and count elasmobranchs as well as experienced recreational divers. Finally, we use semi-structured interviews of recreational dive instructors to demonstrate the value of their recollections in terms of effort and their descriptions of spatial and temporal distributions of sharks in Thailand. Conclusions/Significance Overall, this study provides initial ground-work for using recreational divers for monitoring elasmobranch populations. If used appropriately, citizen-collected data may provide additional information that can be used to complement more standardized surveys and to describe population trends across a range of spatial and temporal scales. Due to the non-extractive nature of this data, recreational divers may also provide important insight into the success of conservation initiatives, such as shark sanctuaries and no-take zones. PMID:22016771

Ward-Paige, Christine A.; Lotze, Heike K.

2011-01-01

122

From Recreational Mathematics to Recreational Programming, and Back  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recreational Programming (RecPro) is the discipline that encourages the study of computer programming through ludic problems. Problems that are typically studied within this discipline are similar to those of Recreational Mathematics (RecMat), which sometimes leads to the confusion of these two disciplines. The objective for RecPro is to write…

Ruiz Jimenez, B. C.; Ruiz Munoz, M.

2011-01-01

123

78 FR 73820 - Publicly Managed Recreation Opportunities, Recreation Fees  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Service under the Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act (REA) (16 U.S.C. 6801-6814...Service issued Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act (REA): Forest Service Interim...has considered this final directive in light of the Regulatory Flexibility Act...

2013-12-09

124

University of California Irvine Campus Recreation ANTEATER RECREATION CENTER POLICIES  

E-print Network

will be permitted in the Anteater Recreation Center. Bicycles, In-line Skates and Skateboard Policy Bicycles, in-line skates and skateboards can damage Campus Recreation facilities and are therefore limited to designated storage areas. 1. Bicycles, skateboards, and in-line skates may not be used in any fashion inside

Rose, Michael R.

125

46 CFR 67.23 - Recreational endorsement.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 false Recreational endorsement. 67.23 Section 67.23 Shipping...VESSELS Forms of Documentation; Endorsements; Eligibility of Vessel § 67.23 Recreational endorsement. (a) A recreational...

2010-10-01

126

78 FR 4120 - Recreation Resource Advisory Committees  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...RACs, in each State or region for Federal recreation lands and waters managed by the Forest Service or the BLM. These committees...recreation such as snowshoeing, cross- country and downhill skiing, and snowboarding; (c) Summer motorized recreation...

2013-01-18

127

Goals for American Recreation. Leisure Today.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The American Association for Leisure and Recreation updated its Goals for American Recreation. A series of eight articles discusses these goals and goals for those who provide recreation, park, and leisure services in light of new social needs. (MT)

Dunn, Diana R.; And Others

1986-01-01

128

76 FR 68429 - Availability of Seats for Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...the following vacant seats on the Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council: Research; Chamber of Commerce/Tourism/Recreation; Marine Business/ Ports/Industry; Conservation; Commercial Fishing (alternate position only)....

2011-11-04

129

Community Action for Recreation Development.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examples of projects, notably those using watersheds, that local community action groups can promote in planning and developing needed recreational facilities are discussed in this study report. Objectives of the report are to create an awareness of group action in obtaining recreational development, to emphasize that community action is important…

Christiansen, Rudolph A.; And Others

130

Pioneers in Leisure and Recreation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book consists of brief biographies of people who have contributed to the field of leisure and recreation. The 26 pioneers chronicled span over two thousand years and cross many cultures. Some are theorists, others are practitioners, but all of them left their imprint on the leisure and recreation field. Arranged sequentially by dates, the…

Ibrahim, Hilmi; And Others

131

Hospitality and Leisure\\/Recreation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tourism is playing an increasingly important role in our society. The fields of hospitality and leisure\\/recreation management are closely allied fields in serving the tourism industry, but have come from separate traditions. This paper examines how their relationship is evolving. Looking to the future, it is inevitable that the traditional dividing lines between the hospitality and the leisure\\/recreation fields will

J. S. Perry Hobson; Joseph D. Teaff

1994-01-01

132

Leisure Today. Issues in Correctional Recreation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This series on correctional recreation includes articles on: leisure therapy; treatment teams; rehabilitation; legislation; vocational implications of leisure; and women's correctional recreation services. (CJ)

McCall, Gail E., Ed.; And Others

1981-01-01

133

Wipe sampling of amphetamine-type stimulants and recreational drugs on selected household surfaces with analysis by ultra-performance liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.  

PubMed

Sorption characteristics of eight drugs related to recreational and clandestine activity-amphetamine, cocaine, heroin, N-formyl amphetamine, N-formyl methamphetamine, methamphetamine, 3, 4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), and pseudoephedrine-were evaluated on selected kitchen countertop surfaces. Methanol-dampened Whatman 40 filter paper wipes were used to collect samples from eleven surfaces including alkyd resin, ceramic tiles, glass, granite, laminate, limestone, marble, quartz compac, quartz real, soap stone, and stainless steel. The filter paper wipes were analyzed by a rapid three-minute UPLC-QTOF method, following ammonium acetate buffer (pH 5.8-6.2) extraction. The average percentage recoveries after 15 h of exposure to the surface materials tested, was found to be highest for cocaine and MDMA and lowest for amphetamine and methamphetamine. Among the eleven countertop surfaces, overall recoveries for marble were observed to be the least, whereas soapstone, quartz compac and stainless steel were among the highest. Scanning electron microscopic images of the surfaces provided a unique view of surface irregularities that potentially influenced drug recovery. Aging, migration, solvent composition, and volatility were examined. The variation in recovery of drugs was attributed to four key factors: compound volatility, surface composition, surface-compound interaction, and solvent composition. PMID:23583948

Madireddy, Sri Bharat; Bodeddula, Vanaja Reddy; Mansani, Sravan Kumar; Wells, Martha J M; Boles, Jeffrey O

2013-06-15

134

Trends in Selenium Utilization in Marine Microbial World Revealed through the Analysis of the Global Ocean Sampling (GOS) Project  

PubMed Central

Selenium is an important trace element that occurs in proteins in the form of selenocysteine (Sec) and in tRNAs in the form of selenouridine. Recent large-scale metagenomics projects provide an opportunity for understanding global trends in trace element utilization. Herein, we characterized the selenoproteome of the microbial marine community derived from the Global Ocean Sampling (GOS) expedition. More than 3,600 selenoprotein gene sequences belonging to 58 protein families were detected, including sequences representing 7 newly identified selenoprotein families, such as homologs of ferredoxin–thioredoxin reductase and serine protease. In addition, a new eukaryotic selenoprotein family, thiol reductase GILT, was identified. Most GOS selenoprotein families originated from Cys-containing thiol oxidoreductases. In both Pacific and Atlantic microbial communities, SelW-like and SelD were the most widespread selenoproteins. Geographic location had little influence on Sec utilization as measured by selenoprotein variety and the number of selenoprotein genes detected; however, both higher temperature and marine (as opposed to freshwater and other aquatic) environment were associated with increased use of this amino acid. Selenoproteins were also detected with preference for either environment. We identified novel fusion forms of several selenoproteins that highlight redox activities of these proteins. Almost half of Cys-containing SelDs were fused with NADH dehydrogenase, whereas such SelD forms were rare in terrestrial organisms. The selenouridine utilization trait was also analyzed and showed an independent evolutionary relationship with Sec utilization. Overall, our study provides insights into global trends in microbial selenium utilization in marine environments. PMID:18551170

Zhang, Yan; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

2008-01-01

135

Impaired Inhibitory Control in Recreational Cocaine Users  

PubMed Central

Chronic use of cocaine is associated with impairment in response inhibition but it is an open question whether and to which degree findings from chronic users generalize to the upcoming type of recreational users. This study compared the ability to inhibit and execute behavioral responses in adult recreational users and in a cocaine-free-matched sample controlled for age, race, gender distribution, level of intelligence, and alcohol consumption. Response inhibition and response execution were measured by a stop-signal paradigm. Results show that users and non users are comparable in terms of response execution but users need significantly more time to inhibit responses to stop-signals than non users. Interestingly, the magnitude of the inhibitory deficit was positively correlated with the individuals lifetime cocaine exposure suggesting that the magnitude of the impairment is proportional to the degree of cocaine consumed. PMID:17989775

Colzato, Lorenza S.; van den Wildenberg, Wery P. M.; Hommel, Bernhard

2007-01-01

136

Recreation.gov: Recreational Opportunities on Federal Lands  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

If you are searching for an American summer vacation destination, this site is an excellent starting point. Recreation.gov, provided by several US government agencies, is a searchable database that allows users to select the type of outdoor recreation they are interested in, any of six federal agencies, and geographic location; search results include Bureau of Land Management, Fish and Wildlife Service, Forest Service, Bureau of Reclamation, Corps of Engineers, and National Park Service sites that support the activity or information entered. The database contains 1,956 recreational areas at this time. Contact information and a Weather Service forecast are provided; hyperlinks to the site are also provided, when available.

137

Validation of Ocean Color Satellite Data Products in Under Sampled Marine Areas. Chapter 6  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The planktonic marine cyanobacterium, Trichodesmium sp., is broadly distributed throughout the oligotrophic marine tropical and sub-tropical oceans. Trichodesmium, which typically occurs in macroscopic bundles or colonies, is noteworthy for its ability to form large surface aggregations and to fix dinitrogen gas. The latter is important because primary production supported by N2 fixation can result in a net export of carbon from the surface waters to deep ocean and may therefore play a significant role in the global carbon cycle. However, information on the distribution and density of Trichodesmium from shipboard measurements through the oligotrophic oceans is very sparse. Such estimates are required to quantitatively estimate total global rates of N2 fixation. As a result current global rate estimates are highly uncertain. Thus in order to understand the broader biogeochemical importance of Trichodesmium and N2 fixation in the oceans, we need better methods to estimate the global temporal and spatial variability of this organism. One approach that holds great promise is satellite remote sensing. Satellite ocean color sensors are ideal instruments for estimating global phytoplankton biomass, especially that due to episodic blooms, because they provide relatively high frequency synoptic information over large areas. Trichodesmium has a combination of specific ultrastructural and biochemical features that lend themselves to identification of this organism by remote sensing. Specifically, these features are high backscatter due to the presence of gas vesicles, and absorption and fluorescence of phycoerythrin. The resulting optical signature is relatively unique and should be detectable with satellite ocean color sensors such as the Sea-Viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS).

Subramaniam, Ajit; Hood, Raleigh R.; Brown, Christopher W.; Carpenter, Edward J.; Capone, Douglas G.

2001-01-01

138

Screening for unicellular algae as possible bioassay organisms for monitoring marine water samples.  

PubMed

ECOTOX is an automatic early warning system to monitor potential pollution of freshwater, municipal or industrial waste waters or aquatic ecosystems. It is based on a real time image analysis of the motility and orientation parameters of the unicellular, photosynthetic flagellate Euglena gracilis. In order to widen the use of the device to marine habitats and saline waters nine marine flagellates were evaluated as putative bioassay organisms, viz. Dunaliella salina, Dunaliella viridis, Dunaliella bardawil, Prorocentrum minimum Kattegat, P. minimum Lissabon, Tetraselmis suecica, Heterocapsa triquetra, Gyrodinium dorsum and Cryptomonas maculata. Because of their slow growth the last three strains were excluded from further evaluation. Selection criteria were ease of culture, density of cell suspension, stability of motility and gravitactic orientation. The sensitivity toward toxins was tested using copper(II) ions. The instrument allows the user to automatically determine effect-concentration (EC) curves from which the EC(50) values can be calculated. For the interpretation of the EC curves a sigmoid logistic model was proposed which proved to be satisfactory for all tested strains. The inhibition of the motility was considered as the most appropriate movement parameter as an endpoint. The Dunaliella species had the lowest sensitivity to copper with EC(50) values of 220, 198 and 176 mg/L for D. salina, D. bardawil and D. viridis, respectively, followed by T. suecica with an EC(50) value of 40 mg/L. The Prorocentrum species were found to be the most sensitive with an EC(50) value of 13.5 mg/L for P. minimum Lissabon and 7.5 mg/L for P. minimum Kattegat. PMID:16806394

Millán de Kuhn, Rosmary; Streb, Christine; Breiter, Roman; Richter, Peter; Neesse, Thomas; Häder, Donat-Peter

2006-08-01

139

U.S. Department of Commerce | National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration National Marine Fisheries Service  

E-print Network

of domestically caught fish and shellfish by the commercial fishing industry was approximately $4.0 billion of fishery products for domestic and foreign markets, the commercial marine fishing industry contributed $35 in the recreational fishing industry to design a new data collection program for our nation's marine recreational

140

MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser  

E-print Network

MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser Vol. 453: 227­240, 2012 doi: 10.3354/meps09636 Published May 7 INTRODUCTION Many anthropogenic activities in the marine envi- ronment, for example fisheries, human recreation, marine renewable energy development, mineral ex- traction, transport

Thomas, Len

141

Sample Limited Characterization of a Novel Disulfide-Rich Venom Peptide Toxin from Terebrid Marine Snail Terebra variegata  

PubMed Central

Disulfide-rich peptide toxins found in the secretions of venomous organisms such as snakes, spiders, scorpions, leeches, and marine snails are highly efficient and effective tools for novel therapeutic drug development. Venom peptide toxins have been used extensively to characterize ion channels in the nervous system and platelet aggregation in haemostatic systems. A significant hurdle in characterizing disulfide-rich peptide toxins from venomous animals is obtaining significant quantities needed for sequence and structural analyses. Presented here is a strategy for the structural characterization of venom peptide toxins from sample limited (4 ng) specimens via direct mass spectrometry sequencing, chemical synthesis and NMR structure elucidation. Using this integrated approach, venom peptide Tv1 from Terebra variegata was discovered. Tv1 displays a unique fold not witnessed in prior snail neuropeptides. The novel structural features found for Tv1 suggest that the terebrid pool of peptide toxins may target different neuronal agents with varying specificities compared to previously characterized snail neuropeptides. PMID:24713808

Anand, Prachi; Grigoryan, Alexandre; Bhuiyan, Mohammed H.; Ueberheide, Beatrix; Russell, Victoria; Quinoñez, Jose; Moy, Patrick; Chait, Brian T.; Poget, Sébastien F.; Holford, Mandë

2014-01-01

142

Marine Debris  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Marine debris is an environmental problem of global importance, enlisting the concern and action of scientists, policy makers, as well as the general public. This three-lesson kit focuses primarily on plastic marine debris. Students critically examine data and samples and take part in activities that explore the causes, geographical distribution, and biological impacts of marine debris. Each lesson can be completed in about 50-60 minutes, but many of the activities are discrete and can be easily rearranged to fit various curricular objectives and time constraints.

2012-01-01

143

Outdoor recreational opportunities in Alabama  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

What comes to mind when you think about outdoor recreational opportunities? Diagram of the recreational opportunities to enjoy First we will look at the forest services and recreational opportunities. Forest Services There is plenty of hunting opportunities in Alabama to enjoy. Hunting Opportunities Outdoor tips can be essential when enjoying the outdoors. Outdoor Tips What a better way to spend a weekend then going fishing with family and friends. Places to Fish A great way to spend a weekend could also consist of hiking. Hiking Now ...

Smith, Adam

2012-04-04

144

Archival policies and collections database for the Woods Hole Science Center's marine sediment samples  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Woods Hole Science Center of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been an active member of the Woods Hole research community, Woods Hole, Massachusetts, for over 40 years. In that time there have been many projects that involved the collection of sediment samples conducted by USGS scientists and technicians for the research and study of seabed environments and processes. These samples were collected at sea or near shore and then brought back to the Woods Hole Science Center (WHSC) for analysis. While at the center, samples are stored in ambient temperature, refrigerated and freezing conditions ranging from +2º Celsius to -18º Celsius, depending on the best mode of preparation for the study being conducted or the duration of storage planned for the samples. Recently, storage methods and available storage space have become a major concern at the WHSC. The core and sediment archive program described herein has been initiated to set standards for the management, methods, and duration of sample storage. A need has arisen to maintain organizational consistency and define storage protocol. This handbook serves as a reference and guide to all parties interested in using and accessing the WHSC's sample archive and also defines all the steps necessary to construct and maintain an organized collection of geological samples. It answers many questions as to the way in which the archive functions.

Buczkowski, Brian J.; Kelsey, Sarah A.

2007-01-01

145

Roadmap: Recreation, Park and Tourism Management Recreation Management Bachelor of Science  

E-print Network

16000 Foundations of Recreation and Leisure 3 US 10097 Destination Kent State: First Year Experience 1 of Outdoor Recreation 3 Offered in spring only RPTM 36010 Recreation, Leisure and Aging 3 OfferedRoadmap: Recreation, Park and Tourism Management ­ Recreation Management ­ Bachelor of Science [EH

Sheridan, Scott

146

The distribution of organochlorine pesticides in marine samples along the Indian Ocean coast of Kenya.  

PubMed

The concentrations of organochlorine residues of lindane, aldrin, alpha-endosulfan, dieldrin, endrin, p,p'-DDE, p,p'-DDD and p,p'-DDT in samples of seawater, sediment, fish and seaweed from different locations along the coast of Kenya are discussed in relation to the geographical location of the sampling sites and potential sources of residue over a period of two years. All sediment samples were found to contain very low levels of organic carbon except those sampled from Sabaki River that had high (4.7%) organic carbon due to greater primary activity. Most of the pesticides residues (112 samples analysed in 1997 and 258 analysed in 1998/99) were detected in fish, water, sediments and seaweed. The concentration of some residues was higher during the wet season than the dry season in 1997, but no marked seasonal variation was observed in 1998/99. Lindane, aldrin, p,p'-DDT and p,p'-DDE were the most frequently observed residues in all samples while alpha-endosulfan, dieldrin, p,p'-DDD and endrin were either present low concentrations or absent in most samples. Water samples had the lowest concentrations of residues (range 0.503 - 9.025 ng g(-1)). Sediments had the second highest levels of pesticides residues with a range of 0.584 - 59.00 ng g(-1) while fish lipid content had the highest levels of residues in 1989/99 with p,p'-DDT concentration of 1011 ng g(-1) and 418 ng g(-1) p,p'-DDD in Siganus rivulatus. PMID:12472154

Wandiga, S O; Yugi, P O; Barasa, M W; Jumba, I O; Lalah, J O

2002-11-01

147

Healthy Swimming/Recreational Water  

MedlinePLUS

... New Report Highlights Injuries and Prevention Tips CDC Ebola Update Swimming in U.S. treated recreational water (for ... is not known to pose a risk for Ebola infection. For the most up-to-date information, ...

148

Campus Recreation: The Intramural Revolution  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

While recreational programming on college campuses once emphasized extramural athletics, the trend is now toward broader participation in many sports by both men and women in intramural activities. (JD)

Heywood, Lloyd A.; Warnick, Rodney B.

1976-01-01

149

New procedure for recovering extra- and intracellular DNA from marine sediment samples  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Extracellular DNA (eDNA) is a ubiquitous biological compound in aquatic sediment and soil. Despite major methodological advances, analysis of DNA from sediment is still technically challenging, not just because of the co-elution of inhibitory substances, but also due to co-elution of extracellular DNA, which potentially leads to an overestimate of the actual diversity. Previous studies suggested that eDNA might play an important role in biogeochemical element cycling, horizontal gene transfer and stabilization of biofilm structures. Several protocols based on the precipitation of eDNA e.g. with CTAB and ethanol have already been published. However, using these methods we did not succeed in quantifying very low amounts of eDNA (e.g. <1?g eDNA/g dry wt) in marine sediment even when using DNA carriers like glycogen. Since the recovery of eDNA by precipitation strongly depends on its concentration, these previously published procedures are not adequate for deep biosphere sediment due to the low eDNA content. We have focused on the question whether eDNA could be a source of nitrogen and phosphorus for microbes in the subseafloor biosphere. Therefore we developed a new method for the (semi)-quantitative extraction of eDNA from sediment. The new extraction procedure is based on sequential washing of the sediment to remove simultaneously eDNA and microbial cells without lysing them. After separation of the cells by centrifugation, the eDNA was extracted from the supernatant and purified by adsorption onto a solid phase, followed by removal of the solids and subsequent elution of the pure eDNA. Intracellular DNA (iDNA) was extracted and purified from the cell pellet using a commercial DNA extraction kit. Additional to a very low detection limit and reproducible quantification, this new method allows separation and purification of both extracellular and intracellular DNA to an extent that inhibitors are removed and downstream applications like PCR can be performed. To evaluate the new extraction method two sediments with rather opposing composition were analyzed. Sediment from the South Pacific Gyre, the most oligotrophic oceanic region on earth and organic-rich Baltic Sea sediment (Northern Germany) were processed. Using this new procedure high purity genomic iDNA and eDNA with a molecular size range between 20 bp and 50k bp can be simultaneously recovered even from very oligotrophic sediment with very low cell abundances. The main fraction of recovered eDNA was suitable for downstream applications like PCR and had a molecular size that indicates minimal shearing. Despite about two decades of research many questions about deep subsurface life remain unanswered. The fact that microbes can be found even in deep oligotrophic marine sediment raises the fundamental questions of the types and availability of substrates and their biogeochemical cycling. This is the first study that provides evidence that eDNA is an important potential substrate for microorganisms in the deep biosphere. Also, our results show a link between cell counts and eDNA content, indicating that the eDNA pool in the investigated sediment consist mainly of microbial DNA. Comparative sequence analysis of extracted iDNA and eDNA will provide deeper insights into the origin and turnover of eDNA and the apparent microbial community composition in the deep biosphere.

Alawi, M.; Kallmeyer, J.

2012-12-01

150

Iron mineralogy and bioaccessibility of dust generated from soils as determined by reflectance spectroscopy and magnetic and chemical properties--Nellis Dunes recreational area, Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Atmospheric mineral dust exerts many important effects on the Earth system, such as atmospheric temperatures, marine productivity, and melting of snow and ice. Mineral dust also can have detrimental effects on human health through respiration of very small particles and the leaching of metals in various organs. These effects can be better understood through characterization of the physical and chemical properties of dust, including certain iron oxide minerals, for their extraordinary radiative properties and possible effects on lung inflammation. Studies of dust from the Nellis Dunes recreation area near Las Vegas, Nevada, focus on characteristics of radiative properties (capacity of dust to absorb solar radiation), iron oxide mineral type and size, chemistry, and bioaccessibility of metals in fluids that simulate human gastric, lung, and phagolysosomal fluids. In samples of dust from the Nellis Dunes recreation area with median grain sizes of 2.4, 3.1, and 4.3 micrometers, the ferric oxide minerals goethite and hematite, at least some of it nanosized, were identified. In one sample, in vitro bioaccessibility experiments revealed high bioaccessibility of arsenic in all three biofluids and higher leachate concentration and bioaccessibility for copper, uranium, and vanadium in the simulated lung fluid than in the phagolysosomal fluid. The combination of methods used here to characterize mineral dust at the Nellis Dunes recreation area can be applied to global dust and broad issues of public health.

Goldstein, Harland L.; Reynolds, Richard L.; Morman, Suzette A.; Moskowitz, Bruce; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Goossens, Dirk; Buck, Brenda J.; Flagg, Cody; Till, Jessica; Yauk, Kimberly; Berquó, Thelma S.

2013-01-01

151

Recreational swimmers' exposure to Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus in the Chesapeake Bay, Maryland, USA.  

PubMed

Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus are ubiquitous in the marine-estuarine environment, but the magnitude of human non-ingestion exposure to these waterborne pathogens is largely unknown. We evaluated the magnitude of dermal exposure to V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus among swimmers recreating in Vibrio-populated waters by conducting swim studies at four swimming locations in the Chesapeake Bay in 2009 and 2011. Volunteers (n=31) swam for set time periods, and surface water (n=25) and handwash (n=250) samples were collected. Samples were analyzed for Vibrio concentrations using quantitative PCR. Linear and logistic regressions were used to evaluate factors associated with recreational exposures. Mean surface water V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus concentrations were 1128CFUmL(-1) (95% confidence interval (CI): 665.6, 1591.4) and 18CFUmL(-1) (95% CI: 9.8, 26.1), respectively, across all sampling locations. Mean Vibrio concentrations in handwash samples (V. vulnificus, 180CFUcm(-2) (95% CI: 136.6, 222.5); V. parahaemolyticus, 3CFUcm(-2) (95% CI: 2.4, 3.7)) were significantly associated with Vibrio concentrations in surface water (V. vulnificus, p<0.01; V. parahaemolyticus, p<0.01), but not with salinity or temperature (V. vulnificus, p=0.52, p=0.17; V. parahaemolyticus, p=0.82, p=0.06). Handwashing reduced V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus on subjects' hands by approximately one log (93.9%, 89.4%, respectively). It can be concluded that when Chesapeake Bay surface waters are characterized by elevated concentrations of Vibrio, swimmers and individuals working in those waters could experience significant dermal exposures to V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus, increasing their risk of infection. PMID:25454225

Shaw, Kristi S; Sapkota, Amy R; Jacobs, John M; He, Xin; Crump, Byron C

2015-01-01

152

Marine Sample Exploitation Project: estimates regarding the sensitivity and technology for the detection of nuclear explosion debris in the marine environment  

SciTech Connect

The report discusses the possibility of detecting a small nuclear explosion in which most of the fission products are released to the ocean. The use of marine plankton as bioaccumulators is proposed to deal with the problem of dilution. 7 refs. (ACR)

Marsh, K.V.; Buddemeier, R.W.

1985-06-04

153

Undergraduate Marine Science Program Student Advising Guide  

E-print Network

. Introduction 2. Degree Programs and Sample Curricula MARINE AFFAIRS ­ B.A.M.A MARINE SCIENCE / BIOLOGY ­ B areas, coastal and ocean law, and marine cultural resources Marine Biology Marine biologists studyUndergraduate Marine Science Program Student Advising Guide 2012-2013 #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS 1

Miami, University of

154

Undergraduate Marine Science Program Student Advising Guide  

E-print Network

. Introduction 2. Degree Programs and Sample Curricula MARINE AFFAIRS ­ BAMA MARINE SCIENCE / BIOLOGY ­ BSMAS areas, coastal and ocean law, and marine cultural resources Marine Science/Biology Marine biologistsUndergraduate Marine Science Program Student Advising Guide 2013-2014 #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS 1

Miami, University of

155

Recreational water–related illness  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective To review the risk factors, management, and prevention of recreational water–related illness in family practice. Sources of information Original and review articles from January 1998 to February 2012 were identified using PubMed and the search terms water-related illness, recreational water illness, and swimmer illness. Main message There is a 3% to 8% risk of acute gastrointestinal illness (AGI) after swimming. The high-risk groups for AGI are children younger than 5 years, especially if they have not been vaccinated for rotavirus, and elderly and immunocompromised patients. Children are at higher risk because they swallow more water when swimming, stay in the water longer, and play in the shallow water and sand, which are more contaminated. Participants in sports with a lot of water contact like triathlon and kite surfing are also at high risk, and even activities involving partial water contact like boating and fishing carry a 40% to 50% increase in risk of AGI compared with nonwater recreational activities. Stool cultures should be done when a recreational water illness is suspected, and the clinical dehydration scale is a useful clinical tool for assessing the treatment needs of affected children. Conclusion Recreational water illness is the main attributable cause of AGI during swimming season. Recognition that swimming is a substantial source of illness can help prevent recurrent and secondary cases. Rotavirus vaccine is highly recommended for children who will swim frequently. PMID:23673583

Sanborn, Margaret; Takaro, Tim

2013-01-01

156

WATERBORNE DISEASES AND MICROBIAL QUALITY MONITORING FOR RECREATIONAL WATER BODIES USING REGULATORY METHODS  

EPA Science Inventory

This chapter will provide the reader with a historical perspective of microbial water quality and monitoring of recreational waters, with special attention to marine environments. It will review the regulations that are currently in effect in the United States and discuss critic...

157

76 FR 61284 - Accountability Measures and Reduced Season for the South Atlantic Recreational Sector of Golden...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Tilefish for the 2011 Fishing Year AGENCY: National Marine...Atlantic for the 2011 fishing year through this temporary...This rule reduces the length of the 2011 recreational...a notice to reduce the length of the following fishing...the following fishing year. Additionally, in...

2011-10-04

158

Live Well. Learn Well. Be Well Recreational Sports  

E-print Network

like food samples) Events at RecSports TBD TBD A promotional table at an event. $102 ( half can be inLive Well. Learn Well. Be Well Recreational Sports oregonstate.edu/recsports Disability weeks Ad in RecSports Printed Quarterly Schedule Winter Distributed Nov. 28

Escher, Christine

159

Our New Challenge: Recreation for the Deaf-Blind.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presented are 20 papers delivered at the 1975 Northwest Regional Conference on Recreation for the Deaf-Blind. Included are papers on the following topics (with sample papers in parentheses): national trends; interdisciplinary considerations ("Movement and Physical Activity: the Foundation for the Most Important R" by J. Stein); community…

Brannan, Steve A., Ed.

160

Statistical Approach for Production of PUFA from Kocuria sp. BRI 35 Isolated from Marine Water Sample  

PubMed Central

In this study, Plackett-Burman design was used to identify the most influential parameters affecting PUFA production by Kocuria sp. BRI 35 isolated from Antarctic water sample. Amongst 10 variables evaluated, magnesium chloride, protease peptone, glucose, and temperature were significant. Response surface methodology consisting of a central composite design was developed to study the interactions between the variables and to determine optimal values of significant variables. A quadratic model (R = 0.9652, F = 14.64, P < 0.0001) was built. The contour plots indicated that the isolate produced maximum PUFA at lower concentrations of magnesium sulfate (0.9?g/L) and higher concentrations of protease peptone (5?g/L) and glucose (10?g/L) at 15°C. MgSO4 and glucose exhibited quadratic as well as interactive effect on PUFA production whereas protease peptone and temperature showed interactive effects only. After optimization, PUFA production per unit biomass increased from 0.94?mg/g to 11.12?mg/g. This represented an increase from 3% to 58.62% of the total fatty acids. Among PUFAs, the yield of ?-6 fatty acids increased from 9.66?mg/L to 107.71?mg/L with significant increase in linoleic acid (20.36?mg/L) whereas ?-3 fatty acids increased up to 12.37?mg/L with DHA being the major ?-3 fatty acid produced. PMID:25032215

2014-01-01

161

Statistical approach for production of PUFA from Kocuria sp. BRI 35 isolated from marine water sample.  

PubMed

In this study, Plackett-Burman design was used to identify the most influential parameters affecting PUFA production by Kocuria sp. BRI 35 isolated from Antarctic water sample. Amongst 10 variables evaluated, magnesium chloride, protease peptone, glucose, and temperature were significant. Response surface methodology consisting of a central composite design was developed to study the interactions between the variables and to determine optimal values of significant variables. A quadratic model (R = 0.9652, F = 14.64, P < 0.0001) was built. The contour plots indicated that the isolate produced maximum PUFA at lower concentrations of magnesium sulfate (0.9 g/L) and higher concentrations of protease peptone (5 g/L) and glucose (10 g/L) at 15°C. MgSO4 and glucose exhibited quadratic as well as interactive effect on PUFA production whereas protease peptone and temperature showed interactive effects only. After optimization, PUFA production per unit biomass increased from 0.94 mg/g to 11.12 mg/g. This represented an increase from 3% to 58.62% of the total fatty acids. Among PUFAs, the yield of ? -6 fatty acids increased from 9.66 mg/L to 107.71 mg/L with significant increase in linoleic acid (20.36 mg/L) whereas ? -3 fatty acids increased up to 12.37 mg/L with DHA being the major ? -3 fatty acid produced. PMID:25032215

Pote, Swanandi; Bhadekar, Rama

2014-01-01

162

Quantifying Marine Emissions of Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds Using Laboratory Measurements of Plankton Monocultures and Field Samples  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Marine biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) have been suggested to contribute significant portion of the organic carbon present in ocean atmosphere. In this study emission rates of 40 different hydrocarbons are quantified for lab-grown non-axenic phytoplankton monocultures and ambient samples from the Pamlico-Neuse Estuary, NC. The outcome of environmental conditions on production of BVOCs was examined for different light and temperature conditions. These different regimes are considered proxies for physiological stress-induced effects observed in natural ecosystems. The samples were incubated in a climate controlled room; they were then transferred to smaller volumes (200 ml) for analysis. BVOCs accumulated in the water and headspace above the water were measured by bubbling hydrocarbon-free gas mixture through the sample and passing the gas stream through a gas chromatography/mass spectrometry system equipped with a sample pre-concentrator. Inside the pre-concentrator, the compounds were trapped on a sorbent material, heated, and flushed into the GC-MS column. The pre-concentrator/GC-MS system gave at least 1000 times magnification of the sample concentrations, allowing detection of low ppt levels of hydrocarbons. Here we report results for lab-grown diatoms Thalassiosira weissflogii and Thalassiosira pseudonana, prymnesiophyte Pleurochrysis carterae, and dinoflagellates Karina brevis and Procentrum minimum, as well as field samples. To make results widely usable, all the emissions are normalized to Chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) concentration and cell counts. Our results show that diatoms had the highest isoprene production rate of 2.8 ?mol (g Chl-a)-1 h-1 with ranges between 1.4 and 3.6 ?mol (g Chl-a)-1 h-1 at light levels between 90 and 900 ?E m-2 s-1, respectively. The prymnesiophyte and dinoflagellate species had isoprene production rates of 1.3±0.4 ?mol (g Chl-a)-1 h-1 with a similar light dependency as diatoms. Field samples had comparable isoprene production rate of 3.5 ?mol (g Chl-a)-1 h-1 with ranges between 0.6 and 4.1 ?mol (g Chl-a)-1 h-1 for similar light levels and temperatures between 18 to 30°C. Three monoterpenes detected were ?-pinene, camphene, and d-limonene. Diatoms had the highest ?-pinene and d-limonene production rates of 0.045 ?mol (g Chl-a)-1 h-1 and 0.015 ?mol (g Chl-a)-1 h-1, respectively. The prymnesiophyte species had the highest camphene production of 0.021 ?mol (g Chl-a)-1 h-1. Production rates of d-limonene and camphene did not show a well-defined light dependency, but both isoprene and ?-pinene showed an increase in terpene production with increasing light intensities. Field samples show ?-pinene, d-limonene, and camphene production rates of 0.05 ?mol (g Chl-a)-1 h-1, 0.02 ?mol (g Chl-a)-1 h-1 and 0.018 ?mol (g Chl-a)-1 h-1, respectively. Field samples acclimated at 26°C had the highest terpene production rates. This study tabulates a large number of BVOC emission rates for various phytoplankton species under diverse environmental conditions.

Sabolis, A. W.; Meskhidze, N.; Kamykowski, D.; Reed, R. E.

2010-12-01

163

50 CFR 26.32 - Recreational uses.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... § 26.32 Recreational uses. Recreational uses such as, but not limited to, sightseeing, nature observation and photography, interpretive centers and exhibits, hunting and fishing, bathing, boating, camping, ice skating, picnicking,...

2012-10-01

164

50 CFR 26.32 - Recreational uses.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... § 26.32 Recreational uses. Recreational uses such as, but not limited to, sightseeing, nature observation and photography, interpretive centers and exhibits, hunting and fishing, bathing, boating, camping, ice skating, picnicking,...

2011-10-01

165

IN-SITU SAMPLING AND CHARACTERIZATION OF NATURALLY OCCURRING MARINE METHANE HYDRATE USING THE D/V JOIDES RESOLUTION  

SciTech Connect

The primary activities accomplished during this quarter were continued efforts to develop plans for Phase 2 of this cooperative agreement based on the evolving operational planning for IODP Expedition 311, which will use the JOIDES Resolution to study marine methane hydrates along the Cascadia margin, offshore Vancouver Island. IODP Expedition 311 has been designed to further constrain the models for the formation of marine gas hydrate in subduction zone accretionary prisms. The objectives include characterizing the deep origin of the methane, its upward transport, its incorporation in gas hydrate, and its subsequent loss to the seafloor. The main attention of this expedition is on the widespread seafloor-parallel layer of dispersed gas hydrate located just above the base of the predicted stability field. In a gas hydrate formation model, methane is carried upward through regional sediment or small-scale fracture permeability, driven by the tectonic consolidation of the accretionary prism. The upward moving methane is incorporated into the gas hydrate clathrate as it enters the methane hydrate stability zone. Also important is the focusing of a portion of the upward methane flux into localized plumes or channels to form concentrations of near-seafloor gas hydrate. The amount of gas hydrate in local concentrations near the seafloor is especially important for understanding the response of marine gas hydrate to climate change. The expedition includes coring and downhole measurements at five sites across the Northern Cascadia accretionary prism. The sites will track the history of methane in an accretionary prism from (1) its production by mainly microbiological processes over a thick sediment vertical extent, (2) its upward transport through regional or locally focused fluid flow, (3) its incorporation in the regional hydrate layer above the BSR or in local concentrations at or near the seafloor, (4) methane loss from the hydrate by upward diffusion, and (5) methane oxidation and incorporation in seafloor carbonate, or expulsion to the ocean. This expedition builds on the previous Cascadia gas hydrate drilling of ODP Leg 146 and on more recent ODP Leg 204 off Oregon. Important experiments being considered for DOE/NETL funding as part of the JOI cooperative agreement include, (1) Logging-While-Drilling/Measurements-While-Drilling (LWD/MWD), (2) Pressure Core Sampling (PCS/HYACINTH) of gas hydrate, and fluid recovery under in situ conditions, (3) X-ray CT logging of whole cores under in situ conditions, and (4) Infrared thermal imaging of whole round cores to map temperature variations resulting from the presence of hydrate. Preliminary budget estimates have been made for each of these tasks and discussions are ongoing with DOE/NETL program managers to develop a final plan that can be implemented within the constraints of the available funding and logistical considerations.

Frank R. Rack; Tim Francis; Peter Schultheiss; Philip E. Long; Barry M. Freifeld

2005-04-01

166

BROOKHAVEN EMPLOYEES' RECREATION ASSOCIATION ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL  

E-print Network

Pontieri. . . . . . . . 2018 Joann Giambalvo . ... . . . .2018 Helen Savage. . . . . . . . . .2018 John Attendants Lifeguards Recording Secretary Renee Warno Treasurer Elliott Levitt Recreation Representative

167

Forests for People Access, recreation & tourism  

E-print Network

Strategy Forests for People Access, recreation & tourism on the national forest estate #12;#12;Access, recreation and tourism on the national forest estate | 3 Forests for People Access, recreation and tourism on the national forest estate Setting the scene Everyone has a right of responsible access

168

RECM 300 Recreation Behavior Michael E. Patterson  

E-print Network

of major sociopsychological theories and concepts explaining recreation, leisure, and tourism behaviorRECM 300 Recreation Behavior Michael E. Patterson 410 CHCB Telephone: 6614 michael.patterson@umontana.edu COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course provides an understanding of recreation behavior in wildland

Vonessen, Nikolaus

169

Northern Suburban Special Recreation Association (NSSRA).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document is a description of the Northern Suburban Special Recreation Association (NSSRA) whose function is to provide recreation for the handicapped, primarily school-aged children. Recreation is defined as not just diversion but the restoration of strength and spirits after toil. It is stated that the NSSRA's programs are grouped to…

Northern Suburban Special Recreation Association, Highland Park, IL.

170

REGIONAL RECREATION DEMAND AND BENEFITS MODEL  

EPA Science Inventory

This report describes a regional recreation demand and benefits model that is used to estimate recreation demand and value (consumers' surplus) of four activities at each of 195 sites in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and western Montana. The recreation activities considered are camp...

171

Proceedings of the Third Annual Student Symposium on Marine Affairs (University of Hawaii, Manoa Campus, January 13, 1978).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This volume of the proceedings of the Third Annual Student Symposium on Marine Affairs contains 32 papers in eight categories: (1) coastal zone management; (2) marine resources; (3) aquaculture; (4) alternative marine energy sources; (5) ocean engineering; (6) recreational facilities; (7) marine biology; and (8) options. The papers are the…

1978

172

Inventory and management of trespass recreation use at Upper Delaware and Scenic and Recreational River  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Recreational trespass on private lands within the Upper Delaware Scenic and Recreational River, located along the eastern border between Pennsylvania and New York, prompted this survey of recreational trespass sites. The National Park Service has been mandated to manage river recreational use within its boundaries but land ownership shall remain predominantly private. This survey was conducted to document the number and distribution of river recreation trespass sites and to recommend appropriate management actions to minimize trespass use.

Marion, J.L.

1989-01-01

173

Recreational Games for Physical Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recreational games can be incorporated into physical education programs to encourage play and activity among students during their leisure time. Students can play their own games during recess, before or after school, during intramural programs, or in their neighborhood with family and friends. This article describes five such games namely:…

Hume, Donald

2005-01-01

174

Haptic Recreation of Elbow Spasticity  

PubMed Central

The aim of this paper is to develop a haptic device capable of presenting standardized recreation of elbow spasticity. Using the haptic device, clinicians will be able to repeatedly practice the assessment of spasticity without requiring patient involvement, and these practice opportunities will help improve accuracy and reliability of the assessment itself. Haptic elbow spasticity simulator (HESS) was designed and prototyped according to mechanical requirements to recreate the feel of elbow spasticity. Based on the data collected from subjects with elbow spasticity, a mathematical model representing elbow spasticity is proposed. As an attempt to differentiate the feel of each score in Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS), parameters of the model were obtained respectively for three different MAS scores 1, 1+, and 2. The implemented haptic recreation was evaluated by experienced clinicians who were asked to give MAS scores by manipulating the haptic device. The clinicians who participated in the study were blinded to each other’s scores and to the given models. They distinguished the three models and the MAS scores given to the recreated models matched 100% with the original MAS scores from the patients. PMID:22275660

Kim, Jonghyun; Damiano, Diane L.

2013-01-01

175

Parks, Recreation and Public Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews what current research says about the holistic health benefits of park and recreation services, focusing on: health benefits according to park users; physical activities in parks; stress reduction benefits of park use; social support, self-determination, and stress reduction; observing nature in parks and associated benefits; and the…

Ho, Ching-Hua; Payne, Laura; Orsega-Smith, Elizabeth; Godbey, Geoffrey

2003-01-01

176

Aquatic Recreation for the Blind.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The sixth in a series of booklets on physical education and recreation for the handicapped describes aquatic activities for blind persons. Written by a partially sighted athlete, the document discusses swimming pool characteristics and special pools for the visually impaired. Qualities of swimming instructors are reviewed, and suggestions for…

Cordellos, Harry C.

177

Haptic recreation of elbow spasticity  

Microsoft Academic Search

is to develop a haptic device capable of presenting standardized recreation of elbow spasticity. Using the haptic device, clinicians will be able to repeatedly practice the assessment of spasticity without requiring patient involvement, and these practice opportunities will help improve accuracy and reliability of the assessment itself. Haptic elbow spasticity simulator (HESS) was designed and prototyped according to mechanical requirements

Hyung-Soon Park; Jonghyun Kim; Diane L. Damiano

2011-01-01

178

Heel Pain in Recreational Runners.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides physicians with the signs, symptoms, and management of heel/sole pain in recreational runners (usually due to plantar fasciitis, Achilles tendinitis, and calcaneal stress fractures). Remedies involve palliative treatment of symptoms, correction of underlying biomechanical problems, and flexibility exercises. (SM)

Bazzoli, Allan S.; Pollina, Frank S.

1989-01-01

179

Recreational ecstasy use and depression  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research in laboratory animals has shown that 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA or ecstasy) destroys serotonergic axons in the brain at certain doses. Serotonin is known to take part in the regulation of mood in humans. Many researchers have hypothesized that if recreational ecstasy use destroys serotonergic axons, then a corresponding decline in the mood of ecstasy users should be seen. The purpose

Casey Guillot; David Greenway

2006-01-01

180

Human error in recreational boating  

Microsoft Academic Search

Each year over 600 people die and more than 4000 are reported injured in recreational boating accidents. As with most other accidents, human error is the major contributor. U.S. Coast Guard reports of 3358 accidents were analyzed to identify errors in each of the boat types by which statistics are compiled: auxiliary (motor) sailboats, cabin motorboats, canoes and kayaks, house

A. James McKnight; Wayne W. Becker; Anthony J. Pettit; A. Scott McKnight

2007-01-01

181

Serious Leisure and Recreation Specialization  

Microsoft Academic Search

Most previous research concerning serious leisure has focused on testing the nature of activities using six distinctive qualities proposed by Robert Stebbins. Viewed from a different perspective, our study treats serious leisure as a type of personal characteristic. We tested the causal relationships between serious leisure and recreation specialization. This paper describes how serious leisure has a positive relationship with

Sheng-Hshiung Tsaur; Ying-Wen Liang

2008-01-01

182

Risks of Recreational Exposure to Waterborne Pathogens Among Persons With HIV/AIDS in Baltimore, Maryland  

PubMed Central

Objectives. We assessed the prevalence of recreational activities in the waterways of Baltimore, MD, and the risk of exposure to Cryptosporidium among persons with HIV/AIDS. Methods. We studied patients at the Johns Hopkins Moore Outpatient AIDS Clinic. We conducted oral interviews with a convenience sample of 157 HIV/AIDS patients to ascertain the sites used for recreational water contact within Baltimore waters and assess risk behaviors. Results. Approximately 48% of respondents reported participating in recreational water activities (fishing, crabbing, boating, and swimming). Men and women were almost equally likely to engage in recreational water activities (53.3% versus 51.3%). Approximately 67% (105 of 157) ate their own catch or that of friends or family members, and a majority (61%, or 46 of 75) of respondents who reported recreational water contact reported consumption of their own catch. Conclusions. Baltimoreans with HIV/AIDS are engaging in recreational water activities in urban waters that may expose them to waterborne pathogens and recreational water illnesses. Susceptible persons, such as patients with HIV/AIDS, should be cautioned regarding potential microbial risks from recreational water contact with surface waters. PMID:19372505

Lemerman, Hanna B.; Silbergeld, Ellen K.; Moore, Richard D.; Graczyk, Thaddeus K.

2009-01-01

183

EAARL topography: Gateway National Recreation Area  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This Web site contains Lidar-derived topography (bare earth) maps and GIS files for the Sandy Hook Unit within Gateway National Recreation Area in New Jersey. These Lidar-derived topography maps were produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Coastal and Marine Geology Program, FISC St. Petersburg, the National Park Service (NPS) South Florida/Caribbean Network Inventory and Monitoring Program, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Wallops Flight Facility. One objective of this research is to create techniques to survey coral reefs and barrier islands for the purposes of geomorphic change studies, habitat mapping, ecological monitoring, change detection, and event assessment. As part of this project, data from an innovative instrument under development at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, the NASA Experimental Airborne Advanced Research Lidar (EAARL) are being used. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in this realm for measuring subaerial and submarine topography wthin cross-environment surveys. High spectral resolution, water-column correction, and low costs were found to be key factors in providing accurate and affordable imagery to costal resource managers.

Brock, John C.; Wright, C. Wayne; Patterson, Matt; Nayegandhi, Amar; Patterson, Judd

2007-01-01

184

Guidance For The Bioremediation Of Oil-Contaminated Wetlands, Marshes, And Marine Shorelines  

EPA Science Inventory

Marine shorelines are important public and ecological resources that serve as a home to a variety of wildlife and provide public recreation. Marine oil spills, particularly large scale spill accidents, have posed great threats and cause extensive damage to the marine coastal env...

185

Competing Interests, Economics, and Marine Fisheries Management: An Educational Case Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Managing fish resources in the ocean, known as marine fisheries management, often involves disagreement among many groups of people: commercial fishers, recreational anglers, national and local conservationists, and several branches of government. While managing marine fisheries in federal waters, the federal government must rebuild marine fish…

Thorson, James T.; Berkson, Jim; Murphy, Brian

2010-01-01

186

UndergraduateMarine & Atmospheric Science Program  

E-print Network

UndergraduateMarine & Atmospheric Science Program STUDENT ADVISING GUIDE 2011-2012 #12;1 TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. Introduction 2. Degree Programs and Sample Curricula MARINE SCIENCE / BIOLOGY ­ B.S.M.A.S. MARINE SCIENCE / CHEMISTRY ­ B.S.M.A.S. MARINE SCIENCE / GEOLOGY ­ B.S.M.A.S. MARINE SCIENCE / PHYSICS

Miami, University of

187

Recreational ecstasy use and depression.  

PubMed

Research in laboratory animals has shown that 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA or ecstasy) destroys serotonergic axons in the brain at certain doses. Serotonin is known to take part in the regulation of mood in humans. Many researchers have hypothesized that if recreational ecstasy use destroys serotonergic axons, then a corresponding decline in the mood of ecstasy users should be seen. The purpose of the present study was to look at the relationship between recreational ecstasy use and depression as measured by the Beck Depression Inventory-II. No significant differences were found between Beck Depression Inventory-II scores of heavy ecstasy users and ecstasy-naive college students. No significant relationships were found between Beck Depression Inventory-II scores and any of the measures of ecstasy use. Most ecstasy users who had been diagnosed with a psychiatric disorder reported that being diagnosed preceded their use of ecstasy. PMID:16574715

Guillot, Casey; Greenway, David

2006-05-01

188

Massachusetts Division of Marine Fisheries  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Massachusetts Division of Marine Fisheries website provides health advisories and closures related to seafood consumption and recreational fishing. Links are provided to the Division's programs and projects, including shellfish sanitation and management, and shellfish closures. Maps and notices regarding closures related to paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) are posted with each health notice, as well as a link to general information regarding PSP and the state's PSP monitoring program.

189

Marine Biology  

E-print Network

this  door. ”   Marine  Biology   I  joined  the  military  RIVERSIDE   Marine  Biology   A Thesis submitted in partialBiology                                                                                                                        

Zaffino, Kyle

2013-01-01

190

Recreational ecstasy\\/MDMA and other drug users from the UK and Italy: psychiatric symptoms and psychobiological problems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rationale: Recreational drug use is increas- ingly widespread amongst young people, but there are concerns that psychoactive drugs may be associated with psychiatric symptoms or psychobiological problems. Objectives: To assess the psychiatric health status of a large, non-clinical sample of young adults from Italy and the UK, and relate it to their use of ecstasy\\/MDMA and other recreational drugs. Methods:

Andy C. Parrott; Raffaella M. Milani; Rishee Parmar; John J. D. Turner

2001-01-01

191

Reduced Spontaneous Eye Blink Rates in Recreational Cocaine Users: Evidence for Dopaminergic Hypoactivity  

PubMed Central

Chronic use of cocaine is associated with a reduced density of dopaminergic D2 receptors in the striatum, with negative consequences for cognitive control processes. Increasing evidence suggests that cognitive control is also affected in recreational cocaine consumers. This study aimed at linking these observations to dopaminergic malfunction by studying the spontaneous eyeblink rate (EBR), a marker of striatal dopaminergic functioning, in adult recreational users and a cocaine-free sample that was matched on age, race, gender, and personality traits. Correlation analyses show that EBR is significantly reduced in recreational users compared to cocaine-free controls, suggesting that cocaine use induces hypoactivity in the subcortical dopamine system. PMID:18941515

Colzato, Lorenza S.; van den Wildenberg, Wery P. M.; Hommel, Bernhard

2008-01-01

192

National Marine Fisheries Service's Statistics & Economics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Fisheries Statistics Division collects data and coordinates information and research programs to support the science-based stewardship of the nation's living marine resources. Site features national fisheries data from as far back as 1950. You can search commercial or recreational fisheries data or find economic and world fisheries information. Site is very easy to use and data is readily accessible.

193

The conservation-related benefits of a systematic marine biological sampling programme: The Tasmanian reef bioregionalisation as a case study  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to maximise the conservation value of sites within a proposed system of representative marine protected areas (MPAs) around Tasmania, quantitative surveys of plants and animals were made at over 150 shallow rocky reef sites around the Tasmanian coastline and Bass Strait islands. Data were analysed using several different methods (overlap of species ranges, multidimensional scaling and ecotone analysis)

G. J. Edgar; J. Moverley; N. S. Barrett; D. Peters; C. Reed

1997-01-01

194

In-Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Marine Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution  

SciTech Connect

The primary accomplishments of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter were the implementation of a scientific ocean drilling expedition to study marine methane hydrates along the Cascadia margin, in the NE Pacific as part of Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 311 using the R/V JOIDES Resolution and the deployment of all required equipment and personnel to provide the required services during this expedition. IODP Expedition 311 shipboard activities on the JOIDES Resolution began on August 28 and were concluded on October 28, 2005. New ODP Pressure Coring System (PCS) aluminum autoclave chambers were fabricated prior to the expedition. During the expedition, 16 PCS autoclaves containing pressure cores were X-rayed before and after depressurization using a modified Geotek MSCL-P (multi-sensor core logger-pressure) system. These PCS cores were density scanned using the MSCL-V (multi-sensor core logger-vertical) during depressurization to monitor gas evolution. The MSCL-V was set up in a 20-foot-long refrigerated container provided by Texas A&M University through the JOI contract with TAMRF. IODP Expedition 311 was the first time that PCS cores were examined before (using X-ray), during (using MSCL-V gamma density) and after (using X-ray) degassing to determine the actual volume and distribution of sediment and gas hydrate in the pressurized core, which will be important for more accurate determination of mass balances between sediment, gas, gas hydrate, and fluids in the samples collected. Geotek, Ltd was awarded a contract by JOI to provide equipment and personnel to perform pressure coring and related work on IODP Expedition 311 (Cascadia Margin Gas Hydrates). Geotek, Ltd. provided an automated track for use with JOI's infrared camera systems. Four auxiliary monitors showed infrared core images in real time to aid hydrate identification and sampling. Images were collected from 185 cores during the expedition and processed to provide continuous core temperature data. The HYACINTH pressure coring tools, subsystems, and core logging systems were mobilized to Astoria, Oregon. Both HYACINTH pressure coring tools, the HRC (HYACE Rotary Corer) and the FPC (Fugro Pressure Corer) were mobilized and used during the expedition. Two HYACINTH engineers supervised the use of the tools and five good pressure cores were obtained. Velocity, density and X-ray linear scanning data were collected from these cores at near in situ pressure using the MSCL-P system. Dr. Barry Freifeld from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory provided an X-ray source and detector for X-ray imaging of pressure cores and helped Geotek with the design and mobilization of the MSCL-P system. Pressure core handling, transfer, and logging was performed in a refrigerated 20-foot container supplied by Geotek, Ltd. After scanning, the pressure cores were stored for on-shore analysis in aluminum barrels. Additional studies were conducted at the Pacific Geoscience Center (PGC), where a shore based laboratory was established after Expedition 311.

Frank Rack; Peter Schultheiss; IODP Expedition 311 Scientific Party

2005-12-31

195

36 CFR 71.10 - Special recreation permits and special recreation permit fees.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...laws and regulations on public health, safety, air quality, and water quality; (2) The use will not adversely impact archeological...special recreation permits shall be established by all outdoor recreation bureaus of the Department of the...

2011-07-01

196

36 CFR 71.10 - Special recreation permits and special recreation permit fees.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...laws and regulations on public health, safety, air quality, and water quality; (2) The use will not adversely impact archeological...special recreation permits shall be established by all outdoor recreation bureaus of the Department of the...

2010-07-01

197

Industrial recreation in Texas: an exploratory study  

E-print Network

INDUSTRIAL RECREATION IN TEXAS: AN EXPLORATORY STUDY A Thesis By DEBORAH LOUISE KERS?IAW Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University In partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1982... Major Subject: Recreation and Resources Development INDUSTRIAL RECREATION IN TEXAS: AN EXPLORATORY STUDY A Thesis By DEBORAH LOUISE KERSHAW Approved as to style and content by: (C airman Committee Mem er Mem e ead o Department August 1982...

Kershaw, Deborah Louise

2012-06-07

198

Leisure motivation revisited: why people recreate  

Microsoft Academic Search

The concepts of leisure and recreation have been studied at great length over the past 50 years. In this study, the authors explore whether a unified theory of leisure\\/recreation is possible and, if so, what elements are essential to answer the question of ‘why people recreate’. Utilizing a two-stage research methodology (qualitative and quantitative), the authors discovered four core values\\/motivations

John E. Dillard; Donald L. Bates

2011-01-01

199

77 FR 16212 - Availability of Seats for the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...vacant seats on the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council: Recreational Fishing member and alternate, Tourism member and alternate, Education member and alternate, Chumash member and alternate, Public at large alternates (2),...

2012-03-20

200

75 FR 12726 - Availability of Seats for the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...is seeking applications for the following vacant seats on the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council: Tourism alternate, Recreational Fishing member and alternate, Education member and alternate, Public at Large alternates...

2010-03-17

201

Improvement in the Iatroscan thin-layer chromatographic-flame ionisation detection analysis of marine lipids. Separation and quantitation of monoacylglycerols and diacylglycerols in standards and natural samples.  

PubMed

Mono- and diacylglycerols are important intermediates in glycerolipid biodegradation and intracellular signalling pathways. A method for mass determination of these lipid classes in marine particles was developed using the Iatroscan, which combines thin layer chromatography (TLC) and flame ionisation detection (FID) techniques. We improved existing protocols by adding two elution steps: hexane-diethyl-ether-formic acid (70:30:0.2, v/v/v) after triacylglycerol and free fatty acid scan, and acetone 100% followed by chloroform-acetone-formic acid (99:1:0.2, v/v/v) after 1,2 diacylglycerols. Diacylglycerol isomers 1,2 and 1,3 were separated from each other, as well as from free sterols in standards and marine lipids from sediment trap particles. Monoacylglycerols were separated from pigments and galactosyl-lipids in the same trap samples and in a rich pigment phytoplankton extract of Dunaliella viridis. Quantitation of each class in samples was performed after calibration with 0.5 to 2 micrograms of standards. As many as 17 lipid classes can be identified and quantified in samples using this proposed six-step development. PMID:10457435

Striby, L; Lafont, R; Goutx, M

1999-07-23

202

135Proceedings of the 2009 Northeastern Recreation Research Symposium GTR-NRS-P-66 Christopher J. Wynveen  

E-print Network

environments. Using 20 interviews with recreational visitors to Australia's Great Barrier Reef Marine Park AREAS: THE CASE OF THE GREAT BARRIER REEF #12;136Proceedings of the 2009 Northeastern Recr and diversity of wildlife (especially near reefs) and greater view distances across the water's surface

203

36 CFR 7.62 - Lake Chelan National Recreation Area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Lake Chelan National Recreation Area. 7...OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.62 Lake Chelan National Recreation Area. (a...snowmobiles the following locations within the Lake Chelan National Recreation...

2011-07-01

204

36 CFR 7.62 - Lake Chelan National Recreation Area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lake Chelan National Recreation Area. 7...OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.62 Lake Chelan National Recreation Area. (a...snowmobiles the following locations within the Lake Chelan National Recreation...

2013-07-01

205

36 CFR 7.62 - Lake Chelan National Recreation Area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Lake Chelan National Recreation Area. 7...OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.62 Lake Chelan National Recreation Area. (a...snowmobiles the following locations within the Lake Chelan National Recreation...

2014-07-01

206

36 CFR 7.62 - Lake Chelan National Recreation Area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Lake Chelan National Recreation Area. 7...OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.62 Lake Chelan National Recreation Area. (a...snowmobiles the following locations within the Lake Chelan National Recreation...

2012-07-01

207

40 CFR 230.52 - Water-related recreation.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Water-related recreation. 230...SITES FOR DREDGED OR FILL MATERIAL Potential Effects on Human Use Characteristics § 230.52 Water-related recreation. (a) Water-related recreation...

2014-07-01

208

40 CFR 230.52 - Water-related recreation.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Water-related recreation. 230...SITES FOR DREDGED OR FILL MATERIAL Potential Effects on Human Use Characteristics § 230.52 Water-related recreation. (a) Water-related recreation...

2011-07-01

209

Recreation Management and Youth Patti A. Freeman, Chair  

E-print Network

an undergraduate emphasis from the following areas: leisure services management, therapeutic recreation services designed to meet the recreation, leisure, and youth leadership needs of communities, families Leadership Emphases: Leisure Services Management Therapeutic Recreation Minor Scouting Administration

Hart, Gus

210

Report on three aliphatic dimethylarsinoyl compounds as common minor constituents in marine samples. An investigation using high-performance liquid chromatography/inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry.  

PubMed

Three water-soluble aliphatic arsenicals, dimethylarsinoyl acetate (DMAA), dimethylarsinoyl ethanol (DMAE), and dimethylarsinoyl propionate (DMAP), were identified in marine biological samples. Sample extracts in methanol/water (1 + 1) were analysed by cation-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography/inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC/ICPMS). Eluate fractions from the HPLC/ICPMS analyses containing the compounds in question were collected and subjected to analysis by electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS), which provided supportive evidence for the structures of the three compounds. The concentrations of the three arsenicals were determined in 37 marine organisms comprising algae, crustaceans, bivalves, fish and mammals by HPLC/ICPMS. The three arsenicals DMAA, DMAE and DMAP, which occurred at microg kg(-1) concentrations, were detected in 25, 23 and 17 of the 37 samples analysed, respectively. The limits of detection were 2-3 microg kg(-1) dry mass. The data illustrate that the three compounds are common minor constituents in marine samples. This is the first report on DMAE and DMAP as naturally occurring species in marine samples. The presence of DMAA and DMAE supports a proposed biosynthesis of arsenobetaine (AB) from dimethylarsinoylribosides. Alternative proposals, which explain the presence of the compounds in marine samples, are addressed briefly in the paper. PMID:15593252

Sloth, Jens J; Larsen, Erik H; Julshamn, Kåre

2005-01-01

211

Molecular detection of native and invasive marine invertebrate larvae present in ballast and open water environmental samples collected in Puget Sound  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Non-native marine species have been and continue to be introduced into Puget Sound via several vectors including ship's ballast water. Some non-native species become invasive and negatively impact native species or near shore habitats. We present a new methodology for the development and testing of taxon specific PCR primers designed to assess environmental samples of ocean water for the presence of native and non-native bivalves, crustaceans and algae. The intergenic spacer regions (IGS; ITS1, ITS2 and 5.8S) of the ribosomal DNA were sequenced for adult samples of each taxon studied. We used these data along with those available in Genbank to design taxon and group specific primers and tested their stringency against artificial populations of plasmid constructs containing the entire IGS region for each of the 25 taxa in our study, respectively. Taxon and group specific primer sets were then used to detect the presence or absence of native and non-native planktonic life-history stages (propagules) from environmental samples of ballast water and plankton tow net samples collected in Puget Sound. This methodology provides an inexpensive and efficient way to test the discriminatory ability of taxon specific oligonucleotides (PCR primers) before creating molecular probes or beacons for use in molecular ecological applications such as probe hybridizations or microarray analyses. This work addresses the current need to develop molecular tools capable of diagnosing the presence of planktonic life-history stages from non-native marine species (potential invaders) in ballast water and other environmental samples. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V.

Harvey, J.B.J.; Hoy, M.S.; Rodriguez, R.J.

2009-01-01

212

COST IMPACT OF MARINE POLLUTION ON RECREATION TRAVEL PATTERNS  

EPA Science Inventory

The report of the National Commission on Water Quality (NCWR) September 5, 1975, indicated the clean-up (from point sources) of the nation's lakes and rivers would result in an estimated $6 billion in increased economic activity annually by 1985. Improving the quality of water to...

213

VISITOR POLICY Campus Recreation strives to make the Anteater Recreation Center a visitor friendly facility by allowing visitors to view  

E-print Network

VISITOR POLICY Campus Recreation strives to make the Anteater Recreation Center a visitor friendly at the Anteater Recreation Center and the Crawford Hall Aquatic Center for the date of purchase only. 6. Day pass

Rose, Michael R.

214

Precise measurement of Fe isotopes in marine samples by multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS).  

PubMed

A novel analytical technique for isotopic analysis of dissolved and particulate iron (Fe) from various marine environments is presented in this paper. It combines coprecipitation of dissolved Fe (DFe) samples with Mg(OH)(2), and acid digestion of particulate Fe (PFe) samples with double pass chromatographic separation. Isotopic data were obtained using a Nu Plasma MC-ICP-MS in dry plasma mode, applying a combination of standard-sample bracketing and external normalization by Cu doping. Argon interferences were determined prior to each analysis and automatically subtracted during analysis. Sample size can be varied between 200 and 600 ng of Fe per measurement and total procedural blanks are better than 10 ng of Fe. Typical external precision of replicate analyses (1S.D.) is +/-0.07 per thousand on delta(56)Fe and +/-0.09 per thousand on delta(57)Fe while typical internal precision of a measurement (1S.E.) is +/-0.03 per thousand on delta(56)Fe and +/-0.04 per thousand on delta(57)Fe. Accuracy and precision were assured by the analysis of reference material IRMM-014, an in-house pure Fe standard, an in-house rock standard, as well as by inter-laboratory comparison using a hematite standard from ETH (Zürich). The lowest amount of Fe (200 ng) at which a reliable isotopic measurement could still be performed corresponds to a DFe or PFe concentration of approximately 2 nmol L(-1) for a 2 L sample size. To show the versatility of the method, results are presented from contrasting environments characterized by a wide range of Fe concentrations as well as varying salt content: the Scheldt estuary, the North Sea, and Antarctic pack ice. The range of DFe and PFe concentrations encountered in this investigation falls between 2 and 2000 nmol L(-1) Fe. The distinct isotopic compositions detected in these environments cover the whole range reported in previous studies of natural Fe isotopic fractionation in the marine environment, i.e. delta(56)Fe varies between -3.5 per thousand and +1.5 per thousand. The largest fractionations were observed in environments characterized by redox changes and/or strong Fe cycling. This demonstrates the potential use of Fe isotopes as a tool to trace marine biogeochemical processes involving Fe. PMID:17397660

de Jong, Jeroen; Schoemann, Véronique; Tison, Jean-Louis; Becquevort, Sylvie; Masson, Florence; Lannuzel, Delphine; Petit, Jérôme; Chou, Lei; Weis, Dominique; Mattielli, Nadine

2007-04-18

215

Physical Education and Recreation in Europe.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Physical education and research programs, and recreational and athletic facilities, in Yugoslavia, Sweden, Denmark, Germany, England, and the U.S.S.R. are examined by two faculty members from the University of Alberta. This publication is an abridgement of their report on European approaches to physical education and recreation, giving their…

Howell, M. L.; Van Vliet, M. L.

216

Department of Recreational Sports Intramural Sports  

E-print Network

will need to bring their ID card to enter the Tennis Pavilion. B. Team managers must fill out the score six games. VII. SET SCORING #12;Department of Recreational Sports Intramural Sports Team Tennis RulesDepartment of Recreational Sports Intramural Sports Team Tennis Rules Sports and Special Programs

Escher, Christine

217

Annual in Therapeutic Recreation. Volume One, 1990.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This publication contains the following articles: (1) "A Pilot Study of the Relationship between Co-Dependency and Recreation Using Women with Histories of Domestic Violence" (Pamela E. Foti and Lori S. Gelvin); (2) "Discretionary Time Use and the Chronically Mentally Ill" (Thomas K. Skalko); (3) "Therapeutic Recreation and Family Therapy: A Needs…

Crawford, Michael E., Ed.; Card, Jaclyn A., Ed.

218

Adventure Recreation: Coming Soon to Your Community  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Adventure recreation activities like mountain biking, bouldering, and kayaking used to require considerable travel to unique locations. This is changing, however, as the new trend emerges in the United State of providing adventure recreation experiences in cities and towns, such as New York City and Golden, Colorado. This article highlights…

Moorman, Marta; Schlatter, Barbara E.; Hurd, Amy R.

2007-01-01

219

Intelligence and Past Use of Recreational Drugs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One motivation for trying recreational drugs is the desire for novel experiences. More intelligent people tend to value novelty more highly and may therefore be more likely to have tried recreational drugs. Using data from a national survey, it is shown that intelligence tends to be positively related to the probabilities of having tried alcohol,…

Wilmoth, Daniel R.

2012-01-01

220

Recreation and Outdoor Life Directory. First Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

More than 4,800 recreational organizations, agencies, associations, publications, institutions, governmental efforts, and other programs, services, and facilities are included in this directory on recreation and outdoor life. The basic slant is not on sports and games, but rather upon opportunities and features of the American scene dealing with…

Wasserman, Paul, Ed.; Wasserman, Steven R., Ed.

221

UNBC: Outdoor Recreation and Tourism Management Program  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes the University of Northern British Columbia's (UNBC's) Outdoor Recreation and Tourism Management (ORTM) Program, which focuses squarely on the management of outdoor recreation as it relates to conservation (i.e., in and around parks and protected areas), tourism that is both based in and concerned with the natural/cultural…

Maher, Pat

2007-01-01

222

Solid Waste Management in Recreational Forest Areas.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Forest Service, U. S. Department of Agriculture, requested the Bureau of Solid Waste Management to conduct a study of National Forest recreation areas to establish waste generation rates for major recreation activities and to determine the cost of solid waste handling for selected Forest Service Districts. This report describes the 1968 solid…

Spooner, Charles S.

223

Be Well. Be Orange Recreational Sports  

E-print Network

Be Well. Be Orange Recreational Sports oregonstate.edu/recsports Disability Accommodations: 541. Be Orange Recreational Sports oregonstate.edu/recsports Disability Accommodations: 541-737-7096 #12; around 4,000 participants each weekday. $153/ 1 week $255/ 2 weeks $357/ 3 weeks $408/ 4 weeks Ad in RecSports

Escher, Christine

224

Willingness to pay for non angler recreation at the lower Snake River reservoirs  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This study applied the travel cost method to estimate demand for non angler recreation at the impounded Snake River in eastern Washington. Net value per person per recreation trip is estimated for the full non angler sample and separately for camping, boating, water-skiing, and swimming/picnicking. Certain recreation activities would be reduced or eliminated and new activities would be added if the dams were breached to protect endangered salmon and steelhead. The effect of breaching on non angling benefits was found by subtracting our benefits estimate from the projected non angling benefits with breaching. Major issues in demand model specification and definition of the price variables are discussed. The estimation method selected was truncated negative binomial regression with adjustment for self selection bias. Copyright 2005 National Recreation and Park Association.

McKean, J.R.; Johnson, D.; Taylor, R.G.; Johnson, R.L.

2005-01-01

225

Effects of Changed Aircraft Noise Exposure on the Use of Outdoor Recreational Areas  

PubMed Central

This paper examines behavioural responses to changes in aircraft noise exposure in local outdoor recreational areas near airports. Results from a panel study conducted in conjunction with the relocation of Norway’s main airport in 1998 are presented. One recreational area was studied at each airport site. The samples (n = 1,264/1,370) were telephone interviewed about their use of the area before and after the change. Results indicate that changed aircraft noise exposure may influence individual choices to use local outdoor recreational areas, suggesting that careful considerations are needed in the planning of air routes over local outdoor recreational areas. However, considerable stability in use, and also fluctuations in use unrelated to the changes in noise conditions were found. Future studies of noise impacts should examine a broader set of coping mechanisms, like intra- and temporal displacement. Also, the role of place attachment, and the substitutability of local areas should be studied. PMID:21139867

Krog, Norun Hjertager; Engdahl, Bo; Tambs, Kristian

2010-01-01

226

Sampling  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This tutorial covers some of the key terms in sampling like "population" and "sampling frame," some of the statistical terms used in sampling, and the major distinction between probability and Nonprobability sampling methods.

William Trochim (Cornell University)

2006-10-20

227

*THE LOGNORMAL DISTRIBUTION AND USE OF THE GEOMETRIC MEAN AND THE ARITHMETIC MEAN IN RECREATIONAL WATER QUALITY MEASUREMENT  

EPA Science Inventory

Statistical Framework for Recreational Water Quality Criteria and Monitoring offers a practical guide to the statistical methods used for assessing health effects and monitoring and modelling water quality Both traditional and novel sampling designs are discussed. Written by a te...

228

The role of recreation and park amenities in influencing footloose businesses to (Re)locate in Colorado  

E-print Network

The purpose of this study was to determine the relative importance of quality of life and recreation/parks/open space in business location decisions. The study sampled economic development agency officials and business representatives. Following...

Love, Lisa L.

2012-06-07

229

Observer rating of recreational use in wadeable streams of New York State, USA: Implications for nutrient criteria development.  

PubMed

Like most other States and Tribes in the United States, New York State has been working with the United States Environmental Protection Agency to develop numeric nutrient criteria. These criteria are to protect water use such as drinking water supply, aquatic life, and recreation. Although extensive research exists related to the effects of eutrophication on human health and aquatic life, limited information is available on perceived impairment of recreational opportunities in rivers and streams. We present an approach to assess impacts to recreation using information collected by New York State's (NYS) monitoring program. This approach involved a questionnaire adapted from lake management surveys in which field crews rated their perceptions of recreational ability at each site. The ratings were then used to assess the relationship between perceived impact to recreational use and water quality. We include in our analyses the primary nutrient criteria variables total phosphorus (TP), total nitrogen (TN), suspended chlorophyll-a (SChl-a), and turbidity (Tb), as well as biological condition (benthic macroinvertebrate community assessment). We sampled 203 wadeable stream locations throughout NYS between July and September 2008-2012. Field crews ranked most locations as having "Minor aesthetic problems," but still considered them excellent for both primary (34%) and secondary (37%) contact recreation. Field crew rankings of recreational ability coincided with a gradient of nutrients (TP and TN), SChl-a, and Tb concentration. Logistic regression models were developed that identified significant predictors affecting field crew decisions about recreation. These included water clarity, periphyton cover, and odor. Analysis of variance using NYS's multimetric assessment of biological condition and a nutrient specific community metric suggest significant differences in metric scores among recreational use categories. These results indicate correlation of impairment of recreational use with impairment of aquatic life use from nutrient enrichment. The results of this investigation will be used to help establish nutrient endpoints for the protection of recreation in NYS streams and rivers. PMID:25482912

Smith, Alexander J; Duffy, Brian T; Novak, Margaret A

2014-11-24

230

Effect of recreational diving on Patagonian rocky reefs.  

PubMed

Tourism has grown considerably in the last decades, promoting activities such as recreational SCUBA diving that may affect marine benthic communities. In Puerto Madryn, Patagonia Argentina, sub-aquatic tourism areas (STA) receive about 7,000 divers per year. Diving is concentrated on a few small rocky reefs and 50% of the dives occur in summer. In this work, we evaluated the effect of recreational diving activities on benthic communities and determined whether diving causes a press (long-term) or a pulse (short-term) response. We quantified the percentage cover of benthic organisms and compared benthic assemblage structure and composition between two sites with contrasting usage by divers, 'highly disturbed' and 'moderately disturbed' sites, and two 'control' sites with similar physical characteristics but no diving activity, twice before and after the diving peak in summer. We found differences in benthic assemblage structure (identity and relative abundance of taxa) and composition (identity only) among diving sites and controls. These differences were consistent before and after the peak of diving in summer, suggesting that recreational diving may produce a press impact on overall benthic assemblage structure and composition in these STA. At the moderately disturbed site, however, covers of specific taxa, such as some key habitat-forming or highly abundant species, usually differed from those in controls only immediately after summer, after which they begun to resemble controls, suggesting a pulse impact. Thus, STA in Golfo Nuevo seem to respond differently to disturbances of diving depending on the usage of the sites. This information is necessary to develop sound management strategies in order to preserve local biodiversity. PMID:25577688

Bravo, Gonzalo; Márquez, Federico; Marzinelli, Ezequiel M; Mendez, María M; Bigatti, Gregorio

2015-03-01

231

Development of a methodology utilizing gas chromatography ion-trap tandem mass spectrometry for the determination of low levels of caffeine in surface marine and freshwater samples.  

PubMed

A methodology for monitoring low level of caffeine in aqueous samples via gas chromatography coupled with an ion-trap tandem mass spectrometry detection system (IT-MS/MS) was developed. Four IT-MS/MS operating parameters, including the collision-induced dissociation (CID) voltage, the excitation time (ET), the isolation time (IT) and the maximum ionization time (MIT) were optimized in order to maximize the sensitivity of the IT-MS/MS technique towards the analyte and its isotope-labeled standard. After optimization, a limit of detection of 500 fg microl(-1) with S/N = 3 was achieved. Taking into account blank values and the matrix background, a method detection limit of 1.0-2.0 ng l(-1) was derived and applied to all of the samples analyzed in the study. Various mass spectrometric conditions have been applied to caffeine and its trimethyl-(13)C-labeled standard to elucidate fragmentation pathways for new and commonly occurring product ions observed in the collision-induced dissociation (CID) spectra produced by the ion trap. Ion structures and fragmentation pathway mechanisms have been proposed and compared with previously published data. An isotope dilution method using (13)C-labeled caffeine as a surrogate internal standard was employed to determine and correct the recovery of native caffeine in water samples. The developed methodology has been applied for the determination of caffeine in surface marine and freshwater samples collected on the west coast of Vancouver Island in British Columbia, Canada. The results obtained for the marine water samples indicated a wide variation in the level of caffeine, ranging from 4.5 to 149 ng l(-1), depending on the location of the sampling site within the inlet. The concentrations of caffeine in samples from lakes associated with various residential densities ranged from ND to 6.5, 1.8 to 10.4 and 6.1 to 21.7 ng l(-1) for low, moderate and high residential densities, respectively. PMID:18535819

Verenitch, Sergei S; Mazumder, Asit

2008-08-01

232

A method of measurement of (239)Pu, (240)Pu, (241)Pu in high U content marine sediments by sector field ICP-MS and its application to Fukushima sediment samples.  

PubMed

An accurate and precise analytical method is highly needed for the determination of Pu isotopes in marine sediments for the long-term marine environment monitoring that is being done since the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. The elimination of uranium from the sediment samples needs to be carefully checked. We established an analytical method based on anion-exchange chromatography and SF-ICP-MS in this work. A uranium decontamination factor of 2 × 10(6) was achieved, and the U concentrations in the final sample solutions were typically below 4 pg mL(-1), thus no extra correction of (238)U interferences from the Pu spectra was needed. The method was suitable for the analysis of (241)Pu in marine sediments using large sample amounts (>10 g). We validated the method by measuring marine sediment reference materials and our results agreed well with the certified and the literature values. Surface sediments and one sediment core sample collected after the nuclear accident were analyzed. The characterization of (241)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios in the surface sediments and the vertical distribution of Pu isotopes showed that there was no detectable Pu contamination from the nuclear accident in the marine sediments collected 30 km off the plant site. PMID:24328266

Bu, Wenting; Zheng, Jian; Guo, Qiuju; Aono, Tatsuo; Tazoe, Hirofumi; Tagami, Keiko; Uchida, Shigeo; Yamada, Masatoshi

2014-01-01

233

Influence of DNA extraction method, 16S rRNA targeted hypervariable regions, and sample origin on microbial diversity detected by 454 pyrosequencing in marine chemosynthetic ecosystems.  

PubMed

Next-generation sequencing (NGS) opens up exciting possibilities for improving our knowledge of environmental microbial diversity, allowing rapid and cost-effective identification of both cultivated and uncultivated microorganisms. However, library preparation, sequencing, and analysis of the results can provide inaccurate representations of the studied community compositions. Therefore, all these steps need to be taken into account carefully. Here we evaluated the effects of DNA extraction methods, targeted 16S rRNA hypervariable regions, and sample origins on the diverse microbes detected by 454 pyrosequencing in marine cold seep and hydrothermal vent sediments. To assign the reads with enough taxonomic precision, we built a database with about 2,500 sequences from Archaea and Bacteria from deep-sea marine sediments, affiliated according to reference publications in the field. Thanks to statistical and diversity analyses as well as inference of operational taxonomic unit (OTU) networks, we show that (i) while DNA extraction methods do not seem to affect the results for some samples, they can lead to dramatic changes for others; and (ii) the choice of amplification and sequencing primers also considerably affects the microbial community detected in the samples. Thereby, very different proportions of pyrosequencing reads were obtained for some microbial lineages, such as the archaeal ANME-1, ANME-2c, and MBG-D and deltaproteobacterial subgroups. This work clearly indicates that the results from sequencing-based analyses, such as pyrosequencing, should be interpreted very carefully. Therefore, the combination of NGS with complementary approaches, such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)/catalyzed reporter deposition (CARD)-FISH or quantitative PCR (Q-PCR), would be desirable to gain a more comprehensive picture of environmental microbial communities. PMID:24837380

Cruaud, Perrine; Vigneron, Adrien; Lucchetti-Miganeh, Céline; Ciron, Pierre Emmanuel; Godfroy, Anne; Cambon-Bonavita, Marie-Anne

2014-08-01

234

Influence of DNA Extraction Method, 16S rRNA Targeted Hypervariable Regions, and Sample Origin on Microbial Diversity Detected by 454 Pyrosequencing in Marine Chemosynthetic Ecosystems  

PubMed Central

Next-generation sequencing (NGS) opens up exciting possibilities for improving our knowledge of environmental microbial diversity, allowing rapid and cost-effective identification of both cultivated and uncultivated microorganisms. However, library preparation, sequencing, and analysis of the results can provide inaccurate representations of the studied community compositions. Therefore, all these steps need to be taken into account carefully. Here we evaluated the effects of DNA extraction methods, targeted 16S rRNA hypervariable regions, and sample origins on the diverse microbes detected by 454 pyrosequencing in marine cold seep and hydrothermal vent sediments. To assign the reads with enough taxonomic precision, we built a database with about 2,500 sequences from Archaea and Bacteria from deep-sea marine sediments, affiliated according to reference publications in the field. Thanks to statistical and diversity analyses as well as inference of operational taxonomic unit (OTU) networks, we show that (i) while DNA extraction methods do not seem to affect the results for some samples, they can lead to dramatic changes for others; and (ii) the choice of amplification and sequencing primers also considerably affects the microbial community detected in the samples. Thereby, very different proportions of pyrosequencing reads were obtained for some microbial lineages, such as the archaeal ANME-1, ANME-2c, and MBG-D and deltaproteobacterial subgroups. This work clearly indicates that the results from sequencing-based analyses, such as pyrosequencing, should be interpreted very carefully. Therefore, the combination of NGS with complementary approaches, such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)/catalyzed reporter deposition (CARD)-FISH or quantitative PCR (Q-PCR), would be desirable to gain a more comprehensive picture of environmental microbial communities. PMID:24837380

Cruaud, Perrine; Vigneron, Adrien; Lucchetti-Miganeh, Céline; Ciron, Pierre Emmanuel; Godfroy, Anne

2014-01-01

235

Oregon State Parks and Recreation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

What can you do in the great Oregon outdoors? From the world of Cannon Beach to the wild and rugged Snake River, the experiences are diverse, to say the least. The homepage features dramatic vistas, isolated lighthouses, and a whole range of wonderful images to entice visitors. In the Visit area, there is an interactive map of the state that will help plan any trip. Here visitors can select Activities and Facilities to look for specific amenities. Moving along, the Event Calendar area allows visitors to look for upcoming events at a specific park or by category. Policy folks will appreciate the About Us area, as it includes detailed information on the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department's budget, their annual report, information about upcoming initiatives, and construction projects.

236

PARKS, RECREATION & TOURISM Concentration in  

E-print Network

in PRT or 3 or 4 SFR 492 - Capstone Directed Study Electives (take enough to bring total credits to 120) 7 to 4 Total 13 or 14 Total 16 to 14 TOTAL CREDITS 120 PRT core courses credits: 45 CLE 4 SMS 230 Introduction to Marine Policy & Fisheries 3 Core courses for all PRT students

Thomas, Andrew

237

Shedding of Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from adult and pediatric bathers in marine waters  

PubMed Central

Background Staphylococcus aureus including methicillin resistant S. aureus, MRSA, are human colonizing bacteria that commonly cause opportunistic infections primarily involving the skin in otherwise healthy individuals. These infections have been linked to close contact and sharing of common facilities such as locker rooms, schools and prisons Waterborne exposure and transmission routes have not been traditionally associated with S. aureus infections. Coastal marine waters and beaches used for recreation are potential locations for the combination of high numbers of people with close contact and therefore could contribute to the exposure to and infection by these organisms. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the amount and characteristics of the shedding of methicillin sensitive S. aureus, MSSA and MRSA by human bathers in marine waters. Results Nasal cultures were collected from bathers, and water samples were collected from two sets of pools designed to isolate and quantify MSSA and MRSA shed by adults and toddlers during exposure to marine water. A combination of selective growth media and biochemical and polymerase chain reaction analysis was used to identify and perform limited characterization of the S. aureus isolated from the water and the participants. Twelve of 15 MRSA isolates collected from the water had identical genetic characteristics as the organisms isolated from the participants exposed to that water while the remaining 3 MRSA were without matching nasal isolates from participants. The amount of S. aureus shed per person corresponded to 105 to 106 CFU per person per 15-minute bathing period, with 15 to 20% of this quantity testing positive for MRSA. Conclusions This is the first report of a comparison of human colonizing organisms with bacteria from human exposed marine water attempting to confirm that participants shed their own colonizing MSSA and MRSA into their bathing milieu. These findings clearly demonstrate that adults and toddlers shed their colonizing organisms into marine waters and therefore can be sources of potentially pathogenic S. aureus and MRSA in recreational marine waters. Additional research is needed to evaluate recreational beaches and marine waters as potential exposure and transmission pathways for MRSA. PMID:21211014

2011-01-01

238

IN-SITU SAMPLING AND CHARACTERIZATION OF NATURALLY OCCURRING MARINE METHANE HYDRATE USING THE D/V JOIDES RESOLUTION  

SciTech Connect

The primary accomplishments of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter were that: (1) follow-up logging of pressure cores containing hydrate-bearing sediment; and (2) opening of some of these cores to establish ground-truth understanding. The follow-up measurements made on pressure cores in storage are part of a hydrate geriatric study related to ODP Leg 204. These activities are described in detail in Appendices A and B of this report. Work also continued on developing plans for Phase 2 of this cooperative agreement based on evolving plans to schedule a scientific ocean drilling expedition to study marine methane hydrates along the Cascadia margin, in the NE Pacific as part of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) using the R/V JOIDES Resolution.

Frank R. Rack; Peter Schultheiss; Melanie Holland

2005-01-01

239

Recreation and Sport Planning and Design. Second Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book offers guidelines for planning and designing cost-effective community recreation and sports facilities and open spaces in Australia. Seven chapters include: (1) "Benefits of Recreation and Sport" (e.g., quality of life, and diversity of recreation and sport); (2) "Provision of Recreation and Sport Open Spaces" (e.g., overview of…

Daly, Jim

240

A Social Science Bibliography of Leisure and Recreation Research.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This bibliography provides an accessible source to social science research in leisure, recreation, and sports. Topical areas covered include: (1) bibliographic sources on leisure and recreation; (2) philosophical issues in leisure; (3) theories of leisure and recreation; (4) methods in leisure and recreation research; (5) evaluation of leisure and…

Burdge, Rabel J.; And Others

241

DETERMINATION OF FENTHION RESIDUES IN SAMPLES OF MARINE BIOTA AND SEAWATER FROM LABORATORY EXPOSURES AND FIELD APPLICATIONS  

EPA Science Inventory

A method for measuring fenthion in samples from the estuarine environment is described. The method was applied to samples from field applications of fenthion to control saltmarsh mosquitos. The method, offers an improvement in the silica gel cleanup of Watts (11), and yields grea...

242

Recreation motivators and facility factors as relative determinants of urban outdoor recreation behavior and satisfaction  

E-print Network

theoretical basis for this study. Self-administered, mail questionnaires were sent to 6000 Houston residents. Measurement of the respondents' recreation behavior was based upon actual number of annual days part1c1pated in either picnicking, playground use... if relationships exist between recreation motives, facility factors, urban outdoor recreat1on behav1or, and satisfaction. Analysis was based on levels of part1c1pation and perceived adequacy (satisfaction). The writings of Fredereck Her zberg served as a...

Milkes, Jeffrey Stephen

1987-01-01

243

Campus Recreation & Unions Leisure Pass Guidelines (Activities & Recreation Center, Games Area at the Memorial Union, Hickey & Rec Pool)  

E-print Network

Campus Recreation & Unions Leisure Pass Guidelines (Activities & Recreation Center, Games Area are for informal use only. Groups may not utilize recreation space for camp/conference specific programming is going on inside the bathroom. When at the Activities and Recreation Center (ARC) minors are not allowed

Yoo, S. J. Ben

244

GCOOS Web Applications for Recreational Boaters and Fishermen  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Spatial and temporal information on the ecology of marine species and encompassing oceanographic environment is vital to the development of effective strategies for marine resource management and biodiversity conservation. Assembling data and generating products is a time-consuming and often laborious part of the workflow required of fisheries specialists, resource managers, marine scientists and other stakeholder groups for effective fishery management and marine spatial planning. Workflow costs for all groups can be significantly reduced through the use of interoperable networked data systems. The Gulf of Mexico Coastal Ocean Observing System Regional Association (GCOOS-RA) is one of 11 RAs comprising the non-Federal part of the U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS). The RAs serve the region’s needs for data and information: by working with data providers to offer their data in standardized ways following IOOS guidance, by gathering stakeholders’ needs and requirements, and by producing basic products or facilitating product-generation by others to meet those needs. The GCOOS Data Portal aggregates regional near real-time data and serves these data through standardized service interfaces suitable for automated machine access or in formats suitable for human consumption. The related Products Portal generates products in graphical displays for humans and in standard formats for importing into common software packages. Web map applications are created using ArcGIS server RESTful service, publicly available Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web Map Service (WMS) layers, and Web Coverage Service (WCS). Use of standardize interfaces allows us to construct seamless workflows that carry data from sensors through to products in an automated fashion. As a demonstration of the power of interoperable standards-based systems we have developed tailored product web pages for recreational boaters and fishermen. This is a part of an ongoing project to provide an interactive tool for decision support in the Gulf of Mexico.

Kobara, S.; Howard, M. K.; Simoniello, C.; Jochens, A. E.; Gulf Of Mexico Coastal Ocean Observing System Regional Association (Gcoos-Ra)

2010-12-01

245

COMMUNITY RECREATIONAL WATER RISK ASSESSMENT AND PUBLICOUTREACH  

EPA Science Inventory

The City of Milwaukee Health Department and the City of Racine Health Department have formed a consortium with several scientific and community organizations for the purpose of more effectively collecting and disseminating recreational water quality data from several bea...

246

32 CFR 552.166 - Recreational use.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES REGULATIONS AFFECTING MILITARY RESERVATIONS Land Use Policy for Fort Lewis, Yakima Training Center, and Camp Bonneville § 552.166 Recreational use. (a) Fort...

2010-07-01

247

BACTERIAL INDICATORS OF RECREATIONAL WATER QUALITY  

EPA Science Inventory

The selection of bacterial indicators of recreational water quality are considered with respect to suggested ideal characteristics, such as association with pathogens, growth in aquatic environments, resistance to disinfection and ease of enumeration, and through the use of epide...

248

Wheelchair Design Changes: New Opportunities for Recreation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Changes in wheelchair design (such as larger tires and lighter overall weight) make it possible for disabled persons to exercise more mobility and control and participate in a greater variety of recreational activities. (CL)

Exceptional Parent, 1984

1984-01-01

249

50 CFR 36.31 - Recreational activities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Such recreational activities include, but are not limited to, sightseeing, nature observation and photography, sport hunting, sport fishing, boating, camping, hiking, picnicking and other related activities. Any existing special...

2010-10-01

250

50 CFR 36.31 - Recreational activities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...areas were established. Such recreational activities include, but are not limited to, sightseeing, nature observation and photography, sport hunting, sport fishing, boating, camping, hiking, picnicking and other related activities. Any existing...

2013-10-01

251

50 CFR 36.31 - Recreational activities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...areas were established. Such recreational activities include, but are not limited to, sightseeing, nature observation and photography, sport hunting, sport fishing, boating, camping, hiking, picnicking and other related activities. Any existing...

2011-10-01

252

Outdoor Recreation -- Potential in East Texas.  

E-print Network

Potential in tion . . . East Texas Ivan W. Schmedemann, A. B. Wooten and W. D. Franklins* 0 UTDOOR RECREATION ACTIVITIES of various types have experienced a steady in- crease in demand in the United States during the past decade. Such factors...

Schmedemann, Ivan W. (Ivan Wayne); Wooten, Alvin B.; Franklin, W. D. (William D.)

1964-01-01

253

Assessment of Recreational Fishery in Northeastern Mexico  

E-print Network

and to address growing exploitation concerns the Northeastern state of Nuevo Leon has begun to manage selected freshwater fisheries. Intensive management of warm water recreational species, however, does not have a long history in the region. This assessment...

Vale, Arturo J., III

2010-01-14

254

KENT STATE UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF RECREATIONAL SERVICES  

E-print Network

KENT STATE UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF RECREATIONAL SERVICES Equipment Due Date: Fall Semester - Thursday, December 8, 2011 Spring Semester ­ Thursday, April 26, 2012 Sport Club Equipment Loan Form Manager: _________________________________ I agree that I am solely responsible for the equipment listed

Khan, Javed I.

255

In-Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Marine Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution  

SciTech Connect

The primary accomplishments of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter were to refine budgets and operational plans for Phase 2 of this cooperative agreement based on the scheduling of a scientific ocean drilling expedition to study marine methane hydrates along the Cascadia margin, in the NE Pacific as part of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) using the R/V JOIDES Resolution. The proposed statement of work for Phase 2 will include three primary tasks: (1) research management oversight, provided by JOI; (2) mobilization, deployment and demobilization of pressure coring and core logging systems, through a subcontract with Geotek Ltd., who will work with Fugro and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to accomplish some of the subtasks; and, (3) mobilization, deployment and demobilization of a refrigerated container van that will be used for degassing of the Pressure Core Sampler and density logging of these pressure cores, through a subcontract with the Texas A&M Research Foundation (TAMRF). More details about these tasks are provided in the following sections of this report. The appendices to this report contain a copy of the scientific prospectus for the upcoming IODP Expedition 311 (Cascadia Margin Hydrates), which provides details of operational and scientific planning for this expedition.

Frank Rack

2005-06-30

256

Today's Youth in Tomorrow's Sea. Another Title in the Series "Marine Careers."  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A discussion of many career possibilities related to the sea is presented. The false impressions many people have about the sea and about marine careers are dispelled. Among the career areas examined are offshore industry careers such as oil and gas drilling, careers in fishing, in seafaring, marine recreation, oceanography, aquaculture,…

Goodwin, Harold L.

257

Framework for Identifying Key Environmental Concerns in Marine Renewable Energy Projects Appendices  

Microsoft Academic Search

Marine wave and tidal energy technology could interact with marine resources in ways that are not well understood. As wave and tidal energy conversion projects are planned, tested, and deployed, a wide range of stakeholders will be engaged; these include developers, state and federal regulatory agencies, environmental groups, tribal governments, recreational and commercial fishermen, and local communities. Identifying stakeholders environmental

Sharon Kramer; Mirko Previsic; Peter Nelson; Sheri Woo

2010-01-01

258

Accumulation of Marine Debris on an Intertidal Beach in an Urban Park (Halifax Harbour, Nova Scotia)  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study evaluated monthly accumulation rates and types of marine debris washed ashore at a recreational beach in Point Pleasant Park, Halifax Harbour, between April and September 2005. Black Rock Beach is 70 m long and a total of 2129 marine debris items were collected and sorted, representing a mean accumulation rate of 355 (±68 SE) items month-1. The total

Tony R. Walker; Jon Grant; Marie-Claude Archambault

259

Recreation planning for Tallulah Gorge  

SciTech Connect

Georgia Power Company`s North Georgia Project, a member of the Class of `93, offers an example of successful recreation planning and conflict resolution. Following filing of the relicense application in 1991, the American Whitewater Affiliation (AWA) filed a motion to intervene, requesting a study of the feasibility of whitewater boating in Tallulah Gorge, located within the project. Following extensive consultation Georgia Power conducted the test in May 1993. The test garnered a great deal of publicity in Atlanta and North Georgia. At about this time, public support for aesthetics flows arose, and Georgia Power eventually tested several flows to compare aesthetics benefits. Georgia Power negotiated at length with agencies and interest groups to arrive at a proposal for whitewater, aesthetic and fishery enhancement flows and in December 1993, GPC made a proposal to FERC for flows in Tallulah Gorge. During this same time period, Georgia Power and the State of Georgia entered into a partnership agreement to develop a new state park encompassing lands within the North Georgia Project.

Gardner, J. [Georgia Power Co., Atlanta, GA (United States); Vogler, E.; Merklein, G. [EDAW, Inc., Atlanta, GA (United States)

1995-12-31

260

Identification and quantification of polybrominated hexahydroxanthene derivatives and other halogenated natural products in commercial fish and other marine samples.  

PubMed

During routine analysis of commercial fish on halogenated pollutants, an unknown tribromo component (TriBHD) was initially detected as an abundant peak in sample extracts from the Mediterranean Sea. The molecular formula was established to be C16H19Br3O by gas chromatography with electron ionization high-resolution mass spectrometry (GC/EI-HRMS). GC/EI-MS data were virtually identical with a polybrominated hexahydroxanthene derivative (PBHD) previously isolated from an Australian sponge species known to occur in the Mediterranean Sea as well. A tetrabromo isomer (TetraBHD) was also found in the fish samples. The concentrations of TriBHD and other halogenated compounds in commercial fish (sea bass, gilt head bream, anchovy, sardine, and salmon) were estimated with GC/electron capture detection (ECD). Using the ECD response of trans-nonachlor, the concentration of TriBHD reached up to 90 ng/g lipid weight and accounted for up to >90% of the concentration of p,p'-DDE, which was the most abundant peak in the most samples investigated. On the basis of the GC/ECD response, TetraBHD amounted for approximately 1/7 of TriBHD in all fish samples investigated. The sample with the highest content was a green-lipped mussel from New Zealand (236 ng/g lipid weight). The halogenated natural products TBA, Q1, and MHC-1 were also present in most of the samples. We assume that the bulk of the residues in fish from aquaculture may originate from algae and sponges living in proximity of the fish farms. Detection of TriBHD and TetraBHD in blubber of a monk seal (Monachus monachus) suggests that both HNPs may reach the top predators of food webs and thus also humans. PMID:16569057

Hiebl, Josef; Melcher, Joachim; Gundersen, Hans; Schlabach, Martin; Vetter, Walter

2006-04-01

261

18 CFR 8.11 - Information respecting use and development of public recreational opportunities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Information respecting use and development of public recreational opportunities... RECREATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES AND DEVELOPMENT AT LICENSED PROJECTS § 8.11 Information respecting use and development of public recreational...

2010-04-01

262

18 CFR 8.11 - Information respecting use and development of public recreational opportunities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... Information respecting use and development of public recreational opportunities... RECREATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES AND DEVELOPMENT AT LICENSED PROJECTS § 8.11 Information respecting use and development of public recreational...

2013-04-01

263

18 CFR 8.11 - Information respecting use and development of public recreational opportunities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

... Information respecting use and development of public recreational opportunities... RECREATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES AND DEVELOPMENT AT LICENSED PROJECTS § 8.11 Information respecting use and development of public recreational...

2014-04-01

264

18 CFR 8.11 - Information respecting use and development of public recreational opportunities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... Information respecting use and development of public recreational opportunities... RECREATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES AND DEVELOPMENT AT LICENSED PROJECTS § 8.11 Information respecting use and development of public recreational...

2012-04-01

265

18 CFR 8.11 - Information respecting use and development of public recreational opportunities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... Information respecting use and development of public recreational opportunities... RECREATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES AND DEVELOPMENT AT LICENSED PROJECTS § 8.11 Information respecting use and development of public recreational...

2011-04-01

266

Roadmap: Recreation, Park and Tourism Management Recreation Management Bachelor of Science  

E-print Network

3 RPTM 36081 Adventure Education 3 Offered in fall only RPTM 36085 Leisure and Culture 3 16000 Foundations of Recreation and Leisure 3 US 10097 Destination Kent State: FYE 1 Not required Offered in spring only RPTM 36010 Recreation, Leisure and Aging 3 Offered in spring only ECON 22061

Sheridan, Scott

267

CSULB Department of Recreation and Leisure Studies Receives Academic Accreditation The National Recreation and Parks Association's Council on Accreditation for Parks, Recreation,  

E-print Network

CSULB Department of Recreation and Leisure Studies Receives Academic Accreditation The National stated criteria of educational quality." The CSULB Department of Recreation and Leisure Studies has been faculty, staff, alumni, and students of the Department of Recreation and Leisure Studies. The process

Sorin, Eric J.

268

Marine Lubricants  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Marine diesel engines are classified by speed, either large (medium speed) or very large (slow speed) with high efficiencies and burning low-quality fuel. Slow-speed engines, up to 200 rpm, are two-stroke with separate combustion chamber and sump connected by a crosshead, with trunk and system oil lubricants for each. Medium-speed diesels, 300-1500 rpm, are of conventional automotive design with one lubricant. Slow-speed engines use heavy fuel oil of much lower quality than conventional diesel with problems of deposit cleanliness, acidity production and oxidation. Lubricants are mainly SAE 30/40/50 monogrades using paraffinic basestocks. The main types of additives are detergents/dispersants, antioxidants, corrosion inhibitors, anti-wear/load-carrying/ep, pour-point depressants and anti-foam compounds. There are no simple systems for classifying marine lubricants, as for automotive, because of the wide range of engine design, ratings and service applications they serve. There are no standard tests; lubricant suppliers use their own tests or the Bolnes 3DNL, with final proof from field tests. Frequent lubricant analyses safeguard engines and require standard sampling procedures before determination of density, viscosity, flash point, insolubles, base number, water and wear metal content.

Carter, B. H.; Green, D.

269

BULLETIN OF MARINE SCIENCE, 76(3): 699714, 2005 699Bulletin of Marine Science  

E-print Network

BULLETIN OF MARINE SCIENCE, 76(3): 699­714, 2005 699Bulletin of Marine Science © 2005 Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science of the University of Miami NEW TAXA PAPER MARRUS CLAUDANIELIS process, or in the sample canisters on the way to the surface. #12;BULLETIN OF MARINE SCIENCE, VOL. 76, NO

Dunn, Casey

270

A New School of Ocean Technology at the Marine Institute  

Microsoft Academic Search

The oceans have always played a significant role in the economy of the Province of Newfoundland and Labrador. The traditional fishing activities have broadened over the years to now include marine transportation, recreation, ocean observation and science and offshore oil & gas activity. While the types of activity have broadened, the need for training to work safely and effectively in

D. Howse

2007-01-01

271

In-Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Marine Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution  

SciTech Connect

The primary accomplishments of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter were (1) the preliminary postcruise evaluation of the tools and measurement systems that were used during ODP Leg 204 to study hydrate deposits on Hydrate Ridge, offshore Oregon from July through September 2002; and (2) the preliminary study of the hydrate-bearing core samples preserved in pressure vessels and in liquid nitrogen cryofreezers, which are now stored at the ODP Gulf Coast Repository in College Station, TX. During ODP Leg 204, several newly modified downhole tools were deployed to better characterize the subsurface lithologies and environments hosting microbial populations and gas hydrates. A preliminary review of the use of these tools is provided herein. The DVTP, DVTP-P, APC-methane, and APC-Temperature tools (ODP memory tools) were used extensively and successfully during ODP Leg 204 aboard the D/V JOIDES Resolution. These systems provided a strong operational capability for characterizing the in situ properties of methane hydrates in subsurface environments on Hydrate Ridge during ODP Leg 204. Pressure was also measured during a trial run of the Fugro piezoprobe, which operates on similar principles as the DVTP-P. The final report describing the deployments of the Fugro Piezoprobe is provided in Appendix A of this report. A preliminary analysis and comparison between the piezoprobe and DVTP-P tools is provided in Appendix B of this report. Finally, a series of additional holes were cored at the crest of Hydrate Ridge (Site 1249) specifically geared toward the rapid recovery and preservation of hydrate samples as part of a hydrate geriatric study partially funded by the Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, the preliminary results from gamma density non-invasive imaging of the cores preserved in pressure vessels are provided in Appendix C of this report. An initial visual inspection of the samples stored in liquid nitrogen is provided in Appendix D of this report.

Frank Rack; Michael Storms; Derryl Schroeder; Brandon Dugan; Peter Schultheiss; ODP Leg 204 Shipboard Scientific Party

2002-12-31

272

Motivations for Recreating on Farmlands, Private Forests, and State or National Parks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study explores the importance of different motivations to visit three types of recreational settings—farms, private forests, and state or national parks. Data were collected via a mail-back questionnaire administered to a stratified random sample of households in Missouri (USA). Descriptive and inferential statistics reveal both similarities and discontinuities in motivations for visiting farms, private forests, and state or national parks for recreation. Being with family, viewing natural scenery, and enjoying the smells and sounds of nature were all highly important motivations for visiting the three types of settings. However, all 15 motivations examined were perceived to be significantly more important for visits to state or national parks than to farms or private forests. Findings suggest that individuals are more strongly motivated to recreate at state and national parks relative to farmlands or forests. Post hoc paired t tests comparing motivations between both agricultural settings (farms and private forests) revealed significant differences in eight different recreational motivations. Individuals tended to place more importance on the ability to use equipment and test their skills when considering recreating on private forests. Conversely, social motivations (e.g., doing something with the family) were more important when individuals were considering recreating on farmland. Collectively, the findings suggest individuals expect distinctly different outcomes from their visits to farmlands, private forests, or state or national parks. Consequently, all three types of recreational settings have competitive advantages that their managers could capitalize on when making decisions about how to attract new visitors or produce the most desirable experiences for current recreationists.

Sotomayor, Sandra; Barbieri, Carla; Wilhelm Stanis, Sonja; Aguilar, Francisco X.; Smith, Jordan W.

2014-07-01

273

Motivations for recreating on farmlands, private forests, and state or national parks.  

PubMed

This study explores the importance of different motivations to visit three types of recreational settings--farms, private forests, and state or national parks. Data were collected via a mail-back questionnaire administered to a stratified random sample of households in Missouri (USA). Descriptive and inferential statistics reveal both similarities and discontinuities in motivations for visiting farms, private forests, and state or national parks for recreation. Being with family, viewing natural scenery, and enjoying the smells and sounds of nature were all highly important motivations for visiting the three types of settings. However, all 15 motivations examined were perceived to be significantly more important for visits to state or national parks than to farms or private forests. Findings suggest that individuals are more strongly motivated to recreate at state and national parks relative to farmlands or forests. Post hoc paired t tests comparing motivations between both agricultural settings (farms and private forests) revealed significant differences in eight different recreational motivations. Individuals tended to place more importance on the ability to use equipment and test their skills when considering recreating on private forests. Conversely, social motivations (e.g., doing something with the family) were more important when individuals were considering recreating on farmland. Collectively, the findings suggest individuals expect distinctly different outcomes from their visits to farmlands, private forests, or state or national parks. Consequently, all three types of recreational settings have competitive advantages that their managers could capitalize on when making decisions about how to attract new visitors or produce the most desirable experiences for current recreationists. PMID:24803234

Sotomayor, Sandra; Barbieri, Carla; Wilhelm Stanis, Sonja; Aguilar, Francisco X; Smith, Jordan W

2014-07-01

274

Application of pressurized fluid extraction technique in the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry determination of sterols from marine sediment samples.  

PubMed

In order to determine steroid compounds in GC/MS an analytical method using pressurized fluid extraction (PFE) was developed. While extracting in-house reference material (coastal sediment) typical recovery in PFE ranged from 80 to 120% (+/-2.5-14.5) and the average extraction yield in PFE in comparison to conventional soxhlet extraction was 115%. In particular, the PFE showed higher extraction efficiency for C29 and dien sterols. Optimizing parameters such as temperature and pressure is critical in achieving this efficiency. Sterols in the sediment were derivatized with silyl reagent BSTFA in acetone for the final determination. A short column florisil cleanup offered the best separation of the GC/MS sensitive derivatives from co-contaminants. Thirty-three coastal sediment samples were analyzed using PFE and Soxhlet extraction methods. The results on extraction efficiency, silyl derivatization kinetics and purification efficiency demonstrated that PFE is far superior in extracting sterols from sediment samples. It is simple, fast, efficient and amenable for automation. PMID:17540389

Li, Donghao; Dong, Meihua; Shim, Won Joon; Kannan, Narayanan

2007-08-10

275

Are the defined substrate-based methods adequate to determine the microbiological quality of natural recreational waters?  

PubMed

Monitoring the microbiological quality of water used for recreational activities is very important to human public health. Although the sanitary quality of recreational marine waters could be evaluated by standard methods, they are time-consuming and need confirmation. For these reasons, faster and more sensitive methods, such as the defined substrate-based technology, have been developed. In the present work, we have compared the standard method of membrane filtration using Tergitol-TTC agar for total coliforms and Escherichia coli, and Slanetz and Bartley agar for enterococci, and the IDEXX defined substrate technology for these faecal pollution indicators to determine the microbiological quality of natural recreational waters. ISO 17994:2004 standard was used to compare these methods. The IDEXX for total coliforms and E. coli, Colilert, showed higher values than those obtained by the standard method. Enterolert test, for the enumeration of enterococci, showed lower values when compared with the standard method. It may be concluded that more studies to evaluate the precision and accuracy of the rapid tests are required in order to apply them for routine monitoring of marine and freshwater recreational bathing areas. The main advantages of these methods are that they are more specific, feasible and simpler than the standard methodology. PMID:20009243

Valente, Marta Sofia; Pedro, Paulo; Alonso, M Carmen; Borrego, Juan J; Dionísio, Lídia

2010-03-01

276

Marine04 Marine radiocarbon age calibration, 26 ? 0 ka BP  

SciTech Connect

New radiocarbon calibration curves, IntCal04 and Marine04, have been constructed and internationally ratified to replace the terrestrial and marine components of IntCal98. The new calibration datasets extend an additional 2000 years, from 0-26 ka cal BP (Before Present, 0 cal BP = AD 1950), and provide much higher resolution, greater precision and more detailed structure than IntCal98. For the Marine04 curve, dendrochronologically dated tree-ring samples, converted with a box-diffusion model to marine mixed-layer ages, cover the period from 0-10.5 ka cal BP. Beyond 10.5 ka cal BP, high-resolution marine data become available from foraminifera in varved sediments and U/Th-dated corals. The marine records are corrected with site-specific {sup 14}C reservoir age information to provide a single global marine mixed-layer calibration from 10.5-26.0 ka cal BP. A substantial enhancement relative to IntCal98 is the introduction of a random walk model, which takes into account the uncertainty in both the calendar age and the radiocarbon age to calculate the underlying calibration curve. The marine datasets and calibration curve for marine samples from the surface mixed layer (Marine04) are discussed here. The tree-ring datasets, sources of uncertainty, and regional offsets are presented in detail in a companion paper by Reimer et al.

Hughen, K; Baille, M; Bard, E; Beck, J; Bertrand, C; Blackwell, P; Buck, C; Burr, G; Cutler, K; Damon, P; Edwards, R; Fairbanks, R; Friedrich, M; Guilderson, T; Kromer, B; McCormac, F; Manning, S; Bronk-Ramsey, C; Reimer, P; Reimer, R; Remmele, S; Southon, J; Stuiver, M; Talamo, S; Taylor, F; der Plicht, J v; Weyhenmeyer, C

2004-11-01

277

Fear Perceptions in Public Parks: Interactions of Environmental Concealment, the Presence of People Recreating, and Gender  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This research examined the effect of concealment (environmental cues), presence or absence of people recreating (social cues), and gender on individuals' fear of crime in a community park setting. Using a 7-point single-item indicator, 732 participants from two samples (540 park visitors and 192 college students) rated their estimates of fear…

Jorgensen, Lisa J.; Ellis, Gary D.; Ruddell, Edward

2013-01-01

278

Recreational exposure to low concentrations of microcystins during an algal bloom in a small lake.  

PubMed

We measured microcystins in blood from people at risk for swallowing water or inhaling spray while swimming, water skiing, jet skiing, or boating during an algal bloom. We monitored water samples from a small lake as a Microcystis aeruginosa bloom developed. We recruited 97 people planning recreational activities in that lake and seven others who volunteered to recreate in a nearby bloom-free lake. We conducted our field study within a week of finding a 10-microg/L microcystin concentration. We analyzed water, air, and human blood samples for water quality, potential human pathogens, algal taxonomy, and microcystin concentrations. We interviewed study participants for demographic and current health symptom information. Water samples were assayed for potential respiratory viruses (adenoviruses and enteroviruses), but none were detected. We did find low concentrations of Escherichia coli, indicating fecal contamination. We found low levels of microcystins (2 microg/L to 5 microg/L) in the water and (<0.1 ng/m(3)) in the aerosol samples. Blood levels of microcystins for all participants were below the limit of detection (0.147 microg/L). Given this low exposure level, study participants reported no symptom increases following recreational exposure to microcystins. This is the first study to report that water-based recreational activities can expose people to very low concentrations of aerosol-borne microcystins; we recently conducted another field study to assess exposures to higher concentrations of these algal toxins. PMID:18728733

Backer, Lorraine C; Carmichael, Wayne; Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Williams, Christopher; Irvin, Mitch; Zhou, Yue; Johnson, Trisha B; Nierenberg, Kate; Hill, Vincent R; Kieszak, Stephanie M; Cheng, Yung-Sung

2008-01-01

279

Recreational Exposure to Low Concentrations of Microcystins During an Algal Bloom in a Small Lake  

PubMed Central

We measured microcystins in blood from people at risk for swallowing water or inhaling spray while swimming, water skiing, jet skiing, or boating during an algal bloom. We monitored water samples from a small lake as a Microcystis aeruginosa bloom developed. We recruited 97 people planning recreational activities in that lake and seven others who volunteered to recreate in a nearby bloom-free lake. We conducted our field study within a week of finding a 10-?g/L microcystin concentration. We analyzed water, air, and human blood samples for water quality, potential human pathogens, algal taxonomy, and microcystin concentrations. We interviewed study participants for demographic and current health symptom information. Water samples were assayed for potential respiratory viruses (adenoviruses and enteroviruses), but none were detected. We did find low concentrations of Escherichia coli, indicating fecal contamination. We found low levels of microcystins (2 ?g/L to 5 ?g/L) in the water and (<0.1 ng/m3) in the aerosol samples. Blood levels of microcystins for all participants were below the limit of detection (0.147?g/L). Given this low exposure level, study participants reported no symptom increases following recreational exposure to microcystins. This is the first study to report that water-based recreational activities can expose people to very low concentrations of aerosol-borne microcystins; we recently conducted another field study to assess exposures to higher concentrations of these algal toxins. PMID:18728733

Backer, Lorraine C.; Carmichael, Wayne; Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Williams, Christopher; Irvin, Mitch; Zhou, Yue; Johnson, Trisha B.; Nierenberg, Kate; Hill, Vincent R.; Kieszak, Stephanie M.; Cheng, Yung-Sung

2008-01-01

280

Views of Students in the Department of Recreation and Sport Management on Distance Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study aims to investigate viewpoints of students in recreation and sport management department on distance education, and the effects of sex, having computers and internet access at home, family's monthly income, district of the family, and students' level of class on these viewpoints. Survey method was used to carry out the study. The sample

Herguner, Gulten

2012-01-01

281

RAPID DETECTION METHOD FOR E.COLI, ENTEROCOCCI AND BACTEROIDES IN RECREATIONAL WATER  

EPA Science Inventory

Current methodology for determining fecal contamination of drinking water sources and recreational waters rely on the time-consuming process of bacterial multiplication and require at least 24 hours from the time of sampling to the possible determination that the water is unsafe ...

282

Determinants of Intensity of Participation in Leisure and Recreational Activities by Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Aim: To test a model of child, family, and service determinants of intensity of participation in leisure and recreational activities by children with cerebral palsy (CP). Method: Participants were 288 children with CP, age range 6 to 12 years (mean 9y 8mo, SD 2y), and their parents from seven children's hospitals. The sample comprised 166 (57.6%)…

Palisano, Robert J.; Chiarello, Lisa A.; Orlin, Margo; Oeffinger, Donna; Polansky, Marcy; Maggs, Jill; Bagley, Anita; Gorton, George

2011-01-01

283

Supplemental Figures and Tables for Groundfish EFH Review Phase 1 Report "Federal and State Marine Protected Areas Type of Fishing Restriction"  

E-print Network

"Federal and State Marine Protected Areas ­ Type of Fishing Restriction" Author and state MPAs depicted in map figures, categorized by level of fishing restriction Fishing Restriction BEFORE AFTER Commercial and Recreational Fishing Prohibited

Goldfinger, Chris

284

SUGGESTED THREE-YEAR GRADUATION PLAN Roadmap: Recreation, Park and Tourism Management  

E-print Network

SUGGESTED THREE-YEAR GRADUATION PLAN Roadmap: Recreation, Park and Tourism Management ­ Recreation-YEAR GRADUATION PLAN Roadmap: Recreation, Park and Tourism Management ­ Recreation Management ­ Bachelor

Sheridan, Scott

285

2013 -2014 | UIC Campus Recreation -2 -www.rec.uic.edu  

E-print Network

RECREATION STAFF Campus Recreation Ideology 3 East Campus Facilities 4 West Campus Facilities 5 Facility RECREATION IDEOLOGY Vision Statement UIC Campus Recreation serves the diverse student body and university

Dai, Yang

286

BOOK REVIEWS Charles C. Bullock and Michael J. Mahon. Introduction to Recreation Services for  

E-print Network

or leisure-studiescurricula.Yet it appearsasifthetextistargeted notsomuchforthetherapeutic recreation studentBOOK REVIEWS Charles C. Bullock and Michael J. Mahon. Introduction to Recreation Services and Recreation University of Southern Mississippi Hattiesburg, Mississippi, USA Introduction to Recreation

Martin, Steven

287

Prospective epidemiological pilot study on the morbidity of bathers exposed to tropical recreational waters and sand.  

PubMed

A prospective cohort epidemiological pilot study was performed at three tropical beaches with point- and non-point-sources of fecal pollution to characterize the risk of illness among swimmers and non-swimmers. There was an increased risk of illness in swimmers as compared to non-swimmers, even when waters met current microbial standards for recreational water quality. Illnesses included gastrointestinal (GI), skin and respiratory symptoms, earache and fever. Odds ratios (ORs) ranged from 0.32 to 42.35 (GI illness), 0.69 to 3.12 (skin infections), 0.71 to 3.21 (respiratory symptoms), 0.52 to 15.32 (earache) and 0.80 to 1.68 (fever), depending on the beach sampled. The indicators that better predicted the risks of symptoms (respiratory) in tropical recreational waters were total (somatic and male-specific) coliphages (OR = 1.56, p < 0.10, R(2) = 3.79%) and Escherichia coli (OR = 1.38, p < 0.10, R(2) = 1.97%). The present study supports the potential of coliphages as good predictors of risks of respiratory illness in tropical recreational waters. This is the first study that has determined risks of illness after exposure to tropical recreational waters with point- and non-point sources of fecal contamination. The results give an opportunity to perform epidemiological studies in tropical recreational waters in Puerto Rico which can include more participants and other indicators and detection techniques. PMID:24937216

Sánchez-Nazario, Elia E; Santiago-Rodriguez, Tasha M; Toranzos, Gary A

2014-06-01

288

Managing for Recreational Experience Opportunities: The Case of Hikers in Protected Areas in Catalonia, Spain  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Planning and management for recreational activities in protected areas involves an understanding of many complex factors. Segmentation of recreation demand and of the main physical or sporting activities can contribute to the design of more efficient management strategies, which may help to maintain or significantly enhance satisfaction with the recreation experience, and this in turn could improve the interest in and appreciation of the natural environment. The current study examined the motivations of hikers in three small Natura 2000 protected areas. It establishes a typology or categorization as a contribution to better management based on a survey conducted through on-site personal interviews with a representative sample of 569 hikers. Through an analysis of the principal intervening components by means of cluster analysis, we identified three groups of hikers based on three motivational dimensions: (1) nature-minded hikers, (2) sporting hikers and (3) general-purpose hikers. The most striking results were the significant differences among group variables related to visit behaviour (frequency and duration of visits and number of people per group), previous knowledge (protection status of the areas) and recreational frequentation (trail categories and protected areas visited). A positive correlation between the degree of sympathy for nature and the degree of satisfaction with the recreational experience (including positive evaluation of the public facilities, signposting and services offered) was also observed. The results are discussed in terms of their applicability and implications in hiking management in protected natural areas such as those of Natura 2000.

Farías Torbidoni, Estela Inés

2011-03-01

289

In-Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Marine Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution  

SciTech Connect

Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41329 between Joint Oceanographic Institutions and DOE-NETL was divided into two phases based on successive proposals and negotiated statements of work pertaining to activities to sample and characterize methane hydrates on ODP Leg 204 (Phase 1) and on IODP Expedition 311 (Phase 2). The Phase 1 Final Report was submitted to DOE-NETL in April 2004. This report is the Phase 2 Final Report to DOE-NETL. The primary objectives of Phase 2 were to sample and characterize methane hydrates using the systems and capabilities of the D/V JOIDES Resolution during IODP Expedition 311, to enable scientists the opportunity to establish the mass and distribution of naturally occurring gas and gas hydrate at all relevant spatial and temporal scales, and to contribute to the DOE methane hydrate research and development effort. The goal of the work was to provide expanded measurement capabilities on the JOIDES Resolution for a dedicated hydrate cruise to the Cascadia continental margin off Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada (IODP Expedition 311) so that hydrate deposits in this region would be well characterized and technology development continued for hydrate research. IODP Expedition 311 shipboard activities on the JOIDES Resolution began on August 28 and were concluded on October 28, 2005. The statement of work for this project included three primary tasks: (1) research management oversight, provided by JOI; (2) mobilization, deployment and demobilization of pressure coring and core logging systems, through a subcontract with Geotek Ltd.; and, (3) mobilization, deployment and demobilization of a refrigerated container van that will be used for degassing of the Pressure Core Sampler and density logging of these pressure cores, through a subcontract with the Texas A&M Research Foundation (TAMRF). Additional small tasks that arose during the course of the research were included under these three primary tasks in consultation with the DOE-NETL Program Manager. All tasks outlined in the original statement of work were accomplished except for the deployment and use of the X-ray CT system under Subtask 2-2. This reduction in scope provided resources that were applied to other activities to support the overall project. Post-expedition analysis of results and report writing will continue beyond this reporting period, however, all field deployments associated with this project have been successfully concluded as of this writing.

Frank R. Rack

2006-09-20

290

In-Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Marine Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution  

SciTech Connect

The primary accomplishment of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter was the deployment of tools and measurement systems on ODP Leg 204 to study hydrate deposits on Hydrate Ridge, offshore Oregon from July through September, 2002. During Leg 204, we cored and logged 9 sites on the Oregon continental margin to determine the distribution and concentration of gas hydrates in an accretionary ridge and adjacent slope basin, investigate the mechanisms that transport methane and other gases into the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ), and obtain constraints on physical properties of hydrates in situ. A 3D seismic survey conducted in 2000 provided images of potential subsurface fluid conduits and indicated the position of the GHSZ throughout the survey region. After coring the first site, we acquired Logging-While-Drilling (LWD) data at all but one site to provide an overview of downhole physical properties. The LWD data confirmed the general position of key seismic stratigraphic horizons and yielded an initial estimate of hydrate concentration through the proxy of in situ electrical resistivity. These records proved to be of great value in planning subsequent coring. The second new hydrate proxy to be tested was infrared thermal imaging of cores on the catwalk as rapidly as possible after retrieval. The thermal images were used to identify hydrate samples and to map estimate the distribution and texture of hydrate within the cores. Geochemical analyses of interstitial waters and of headspace and void gases provide additional information on the distribution and concentration of hydrate within the stability zone, the origin and pathway of fluids into and through the GHSZ, and the rates at which the process of gas hydrate formation is occurring. Bio- and lithostratigraphic description of cores, measurement of physical properties, and in situ pressure core sampling and thermal measurements complement the data set, providing ground-truth tests of inferred physical and sedimentological properties. Among the most interesting preliminary results are: (1) the discovery that gas hydrates are distributed through a broad depth range within the GHSZ and that different physical and chemical proxies for hydrate distribution and concentration give generally consistent results; (2) evidence for the importance of sediment properties for controlling the migration of fluids in the accretionary complex; (3) geochemical indications that the gas hydrate system at Hydrate Ridge contains significant concentrations of higher order hydrocarbons and that fractionation and mixing signals will provide important constraints on gas hydrate dynamics; and (4) the discovery of very high chlorinity values that extend for at least 10 mbsf near the summit, indicating that hydrate formation here must be very rapid.

Frank Rack; Gerhard Bohrmann; Anne Trehu; Michael Storms; Derryl Schroeder; ODP Leg 204 Shipboard Scientific Party

2002-09-30

291

Ward Field and grandstand (Facility S 1009), looking toward Recreation ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Ward Field and grandstand (Facility S 1009), looking toward Recreation Center portion of Facility 161 (visible below tree canopy). - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Recreational Facilities, Various locations throughout base, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

292

36 CFR 7.55 - Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area. ...OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.55 Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area. ...Aircraft. Float planes may be operated on Lake Roosevelt on those waters not...

2013-07-01

293

36 CFR 7.55 - Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area. ...OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.55 Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area. ...Aircraft. Float planes may be operated on Lake Roosevelt on those waters not...

2014-07-01

294

36 CFR 7.55 - Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area. ...OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.55 Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area. ...Aircraft. Float planes may be operated on Lake Roosevelt on those waters not...

2011-07-01

295

36 CFR 7.55 - Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area. ...OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.55 Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area. ...Aircraft. Float planes may be operated on Lake Roosevelt on those waters not...

2012-07-01

296

50 CFR 648.105 - Summer flounder recreational fishing season.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Summer flounder recreational fishing season. 648...UNITED STATES Management Measures for the Summer Flounder Fisheries § 648.105 Summer flounder recreational fishing season....

2012-10-01

297

50 CFR 648.105 - Summer flounder recreational fishing season.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Summer flounder recreational fishing season. 648...UNITED STATES Management Measures for the Summer Flounder Fisheries § 648.105 Summer flounder recreational fishing season....

2013-10-01

298

Leisure Today--Family Cohesion Through Leisure and Recreation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Family relationships can be strengthened through recreation and leisure activities. Articles dealing with leisure research, values, computers, recreation in rural areas, and youth sports are offered for those interested in facilitating the development of strong families. (DF)

Smith, S. Harold, Ed.; And Others

1984-01-01

299

43 CFR 2932.50 - Administration of Special Recreation Permits.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (2000) PERMITS FOR RECREATION ON PUBLIC...Permits for Commercial Use, Competitive Events, Organized Groups, and Recreation...

2014-10-01

300

43 CFR 2932.50 - Administration of Special Recreation Permits.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (2000) PERMITS FOR RECREATION ON PUBLIC...Permits for Commercial Use, Competitive Events, Organized Groups, and Recreation...

2013-10-01

301

43 CFR 2932.30 - Fees for Special Recreation Permits.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (2000) PERMITS FOR RECREATION ON PUBLIC...Permits for Commercial Use, Competitive Events, Organized Groups, and Recreation...

2014-10-01

302

43 CFR 2932.20 - Special Recreation Permit applications.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (2000) PERMITS FOR RECREATION ON PUBLIC...Permits for Commercial Use, Competitive Events, Organized Groups, and Recreation...

2011-10-01

303

43 CFR 2932.50 - Administration of Special Recreation Permits.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (2000) PERMITS FOR RECREATION ON PUBLIC...Permits for Commercial Use, Competitive Events, Organized Groups, and Recreation...

2012-10-01

304

43 CFR 2932.50 - Administration of Special Recreation Permits.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (2000) PERMITS FOR RECREATION ON PUBLIC...Permits for Commercial Use, Competitive Events, Organized Groups, and Recreation...

2011-10-01

305

43 CFR 2932.30 - Fees for Special Recreation Permits.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (2000) PERMITS FOR RECREATION ON PUBLIC...Permits for Commercial Use, Competitive Events, Organized Groups, and Recreation...

2011-10-01

306

43 CFR 2932.20 - Special Recreation Permit applications.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (2000) PERMITS FOR RECREATION ON PUBLIC...Permits for Commercial Use, Competitive Events, Organized Groups, and Recreation...

2013-10-01

307

43 CFR 2932.30 - Fees for Special Recreation Permits.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (2000) PERMITS FOR RECREATION ON PUBLIC...Permits for Commercial Use, Competitive Events, Organized Groups, and Recreation...

2013-10-01

308

43 CFR 2932.20 - Special Recreation Permit applications.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (2000) PERMITS FOR RECREATION ON PUBLIC...Permits for Commercial Use, Competitive Events, Organized Groups, and Recreation...

2014-10-01

309

43 CFR 2932.30 - Fees for Special Recreation Permits.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (2000) PERMITS FOR RECREATION ON PUBLIC...Permits for Commercial Use, Competitive Events, Organized Groups, and Recreation...

2012-10-01

310

43 CFR 2932.20 - Special Recreation Permit applications.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (2000) PERMITS FOR RECREATION ON PUBLIC...Permits for Commercial Use, Competitive Events, Organized Groups, and Recreation...

2012-10-01

311

Odour emission characteristics of 22 recreational rivers in Nanjing.  

PubMed

The odour emission characteristics of 22 recreational rivers in Nanjing were investigated and analysed. Eight odorous compounds (ammonia (NH?), hydrogen sulphide (H?S), sulphur dioxide (SO?), carbon disulphide (CS?), nitrobenzene (C?H?NO?), aniline (C?H?NH?), dimethylamine (C?H?N), and formaldehyde (HCHO)) were measured in odour emission samples collected using a custom-made emission flux hood chamber. The results showed that all odorants were detected in all monitoring rivers. NH? was the main odorant, with emission rates ranging from 4.86 to 15.13 ?g/min m(2). The total odour emission rate of the Nan River, at 1 427.07 OU/s, was the highest of the all investigated rivers. H?S, NH? and nitrobenzene were three key odour emission contributors according to their contributions to the total odour emission. A correlation analysis of the pollutants showed there was a significant positive correlation between the emission rate of NH? and the concentration of ammonia nitrogen (NH? (+)-N) and total nitrogen (TN). The H?S and SO? emission rates had a significant positive correlation with sulphides (S(2-)) and available sulphur (AS) in the water and sediment. The content of TN, NH?(+)-N, S(2-) and AS in the water and sediment affected the concentration of H?S, SO? and NH? in the emission gases. NH?(+)-N, S(2-) and AS are suggested as the key odour control indexes for reducing odours emitted from these recreational rivers. The study provides useful information for effective pollution control, especially for odour emission control for the recreational rivers of the city. It also provides a demonstrate example to show how to monitor and assess a contaminated river when odour emission and its control need to be focused on. PMID:24939710

Wan, Yu; Ruan, Xiaohong; Wang, Xinguang; Ma, Qian; Lu, Xiaoming

2014-10-01

312

Behavioral Responses of North American Elk to Recreational Activity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Off-road recreation on public lands in North America has increased dramatically in recent years. Wild ungulates are sensitive to human activities, but the effect of off-road recreation, both motorized and nonmotorized, is poorly understood. We measured responses of elk (Cervus elaphus) to recreational disturbance in northeast Oregon, USA, from April to October, 2003 and 2004. We subjected elk to 4

Leslie M. Naylor; Michael J. Wisdom; Robert G. Anthony

2009-01-01

313

Recreational Reading of International Students in Academic Libraries  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recreational reading as a method of language learning has been a focus of investigation in second language education. This article considers recreational reading through the additional perspective of academic librarianship. Its purpose is to discover if recreational reading is a topic that lends itself to research through both perspectives. This…

Bordonaro, Karen

2011-01-01

314

Recreational Participation of Children with High Functioning Autism  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The recreation of children with High Functioning Autism (HFA) is not well understood. The objective of this cross-sectional study was to compare the recreational engagement of children with HFA and their typically developing peers. Children with HFA (n = 30) and peers (n = 31) were similar on key characteristics that may impact recreation except…

Potvin, Marie-Christine; Snider, Laurie; Prelock, Patricia; Kehayia, Eva; Wood-Dauphinee, Sharon

2013-01-01

315

Will human recreational activity on levee trails enhance carnivore activity?  

E-print Network

Will human recreational activity on levee trails enhance carnivore activity? Will human is currently proposed to be opened to human recreational traffic. The levee separates the bay from adjacent of trash and human-related food as a result of human recreational use may attract predators. Alternatively

Johnson, Matthew

316

36 CFR 7.57 - Lake Meredith National Recreation Area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Lake Meredith National Recreation Area. 7...OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.57 Lake Meredith National Recreation Area. (a) The operation of motor vehicles within the Lake Meredith Recreation Area is...

2011-07-01

317

36 CFR 7.57 - Lake Meredith National Recreation Area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lake Meredith National Recreation Area. 7...OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.57 Lake Meredith National Recreation Area. (a) The operation of motor vehicles within the Lake Meredith Recreation Area is...

2013-07-01

318

Therapeutic Recreation in the Community: An Inclusive Approach. Second Edition  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The second edition of Therapeutic Recreation in the Community: An Inclusive Approach reflects the changing and evolving nature of recreation and health care services. A number of social, economic, and political directives and technological advancements have fostered recreation in the community for all individuals. Due in part to a rising awareness…

Carter, Marcia Jean; LeConey, Stephen P.

2004-01-01

319

And Our State's Economic Vitality Colorado's Recreation Economy  

E-print Network

And Our State's Economic Vitality Colorado's Recreation Economy Bryan Martin, The Colorado Mountain Club #12;Colorado's Recreation Economy The Colorado Mountain Club · 8,000 Members · 14 Chapters's Recreation Economy By the Numbers · $10 Billion Annually · 107,000 Jobs · $500 Million in State Tax Revenue

320

Serving the Homeless through Recreation Programs. Research Update.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Literature review examines problems faced by homeless adults and children and discusses how recreation programs can serve them. The recreation and leisure profession can offer to the healthy child development through play and recreation, physical fitness, stress management, socialization, opportunities to learn goal-setting, self-esteem building,…

Kunstler, Robin

1993-01-01

321

Graduate Program Department of Recreation Management and Policy  

E-print Network

of Recreation Management & Policy, 105 Hewitt Hall, School of Health and Human Services, 5 Library Way, DurhamGraduate Program Department of Recreation Management and Policy Personal Statement The following of Recreation Management and Policy. Your statement serves to differentiate you from other applicants as to your

New Hampshire, University of

322

Subjective Effects of 3, 4- Methylenedioxymethamphetamine in Recreational Users  

Microsoft Academic Search

3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; Ecstasy) is a serotonergic neurotoxin in laboratory animals that has been used for recreational purposes by humans. The subjective effects of this drug were determined in recreational users at a university campus. Of individuals who had admitted to using MDMA recreationally, 100 of 1143 agreed to complete a detailed questionnaire concerning the subjective effects of this Schedule I

Stephen J. Peroutka; Holly Newman; Hilary Harris

1988-01-01

323

Diffusion of Innovation: A Roadmap for Inclusive Community Recreation Services  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Inclusive community recreation is an optimal environment for the development of recreation and sports skills and social relationships between people with and without disabilities. Although we know much about best practices for inclusion, little systemic change in recreation agencies has transpired. Diffusion of Innovation Theory is proposed as a…

Schleien, Stuart J.; Miller, Kimberly D.

2010-01-01

324

Differentiating outdoor recreation: evidence drawn from national surveys in Scotland  

Microsoft Academic Search

Outdoor recreation participation can be seen to fall into four identifiably different groups. Countryside outdoor recreation has been in decline for at least 25 years because of changing lifestyles and cultures, and targeted policy – which focuses heavily on the supply side – appears to have had little influence over consumption levels. Localised outdoor recreation is on the increase, accommodating

Nigel Curry; Katrina Brown

2010-01-01

325

From "the Pedagogue of Recreation" to Teacher's Assistant.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Studied the conceptualization of the role of the recreation teacher (instructor in leisure time centers in schools) during team planning sessions in two Swedish schools. Recreation instructors were generally viewed as teachers' assistants, a finding that suggests that recreation instructors who want to develop an occupational identity as the…

Calander, Finn

2000-01-01

326

Baccalaureate Programs in Recreation, Park Resources, and Leisure Services.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents a listing of baccalaureate programs in recreation, park resources, and leisure services that are accredited by the National Recreation and Park Association/American Association of Leisure and Recreation Council on Accreditation. Listings are alphabetical by state and present contact name, address, telephone, fax, email, website,…

Parks & Recreation, 2001

2001-01-01

327

The Off-Road Recreation Vehicle--Visual Impacts1  

E-print Network

The Off-Road Recreation Vehicle-- Visual Impacts1 Stephen F. McCool 2/ 1/ Presented at the National: The off-road recreation vehicle (ORV) has become a major influence on the character of wild landscapes for the first climb of the day. The off-road recreation vehicle (ORV) and its impacts are one of the most

Standiford, Richard B.

328

News Release Off-Highway Motor Vehicle Recreation Division  

E-print Network

News Release Off-Highway Motor Vehicle Recreation Division California State Parks 1725 23rd Street Creek Management Area near Hollister, California The Off-Highway Motor Vehicle Recreation (OHMVR at the CCMA to mitigate risk while still allowing access to this premier off-highway vehicle (OHV) recreation

329

Countervailing effects of atrazine on water recreation: How do recreators evaluate them?  

E-print Network

and stated recreation under hypothetical quality conditions, which vary eutrophication-related and fish-related quality independently and jointly. This economic study uses a travel cost framework and the associated contingent behavior framework to analyze...

Earnhart, Dietrich H.; Smith, Val H.

2003-03-02

330

Career Exploration in Hospitality and Recreation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This curriculum guide is designed to help students develop career decisionmaking skills which they may use throughout their lives and examine and explore hospitality and recreation occupations. Nine units are included, with each consisting of a teacher's guide and student materials. The teacher's guide includes an overview, objectives, rationale,…

Wiley, Benaree; And Others

331

Recreational water quality in the Caspian Sea  

Microsoft Academic Search

Health-based monitoring of the Caspian Sea in Turkmenistan and Iran suggests that bathers are intermittently subject to increased levels of faecal pollution which may lead to gastrointestinal illness. This is the first co-ordinated monitoring programme of recreational waters in the Caspian region and highlights the need to extend such a programme to all countries bordering the Caspian Sea. The novel

Katherine R. Pond; Aidan A. Cronin; Steve Pedley

332

Department of Recreational Sports Intramural Sports  

E-print Network

Bowling lanes prior to your game. VI. CONDUCT A. The Intramural Sports program promotes positiveDepartment of Recreational Sports Intramural Sports Team Pocket Billiards Rules I. GOVERNING RULES University Intramural Sports rule applies. II. ELIGIBILITY All Participants must be either students

Escher, Christine

333

Department of Recreational Sports Intramural Sports  

E-print Network

.oregonstate.edu/recsports Revised 6/27/2014 VII. CONDUCT A. The Intramural Sports program promotes positive sportsmanship at allDepartment of Recreational Sports Intramural Sports Sand Volleyball Doubles Rules Sports will apply in all cases except where a special Oregon State University Intramural Sports rule applies. II

Escher, Christine

334

32 CFR 552.166 - Recreational use.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2009-07-01 true Recreational use. 552.166 Section...AFFECTING MILITARY RESERVATIONS Land Use Policy for Fort Lewis...requests. If the requested use is allowable and an appropriate...request. Groups with approved land commitments will be...

2011-07-01

335

32 CFR 552.166 - Recreational use.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...2014-07-01 false Recreational use. 552.166 Section...AFFECTING MILITARY RESERVATIONS Land Use Policy for Fort Lewis...requests. If the requested use is allowable and an appropriate...request. Groups with approved land commitments will be...

2014-07-01

336

32 CFR 552.166 - Recreational use.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Recreational use. 552.166 Section...AFFECTING MILITARY RESERVATIONS Land Use Policy for Fort Lewis...requests. If the requested use is allowable and an appropriate...request. Groups with approved land commitments will be...

2013-07-01

337

32 CFR 552.166 - Recreational use.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2009-07-01 true Recreational use. 552.166 Section...AFFECTING MILITARY RESERVATIONS Land Use Policy for Fort Lewis...requests. If the requested use is allowable and an appropriate...request. Groups with approved land commitments will be...

2012-07-01

338

Recreational Gun Use by California Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Most research on adolescents and firearms focuses on urban populations, handguns, and homicide. This study examines the prevalence and correlates of recreational gun use (RGU)--for hunting or target shooting--among 5,801 community-residing 12- to 17-year-old Californians. Data are from the first statewide California Health Interview Survey (CHIS),…

Vittes, Katherine A.; Sorenson, Susan B.

2005-01-01

339

Physical-Education Facilities/Recreation Centers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents K-12 and college physical education/recreation facilities considered outstanding in a competition, which judged the most outstanding learning environments at educational institutions nationwide. Jurors spent two days reviewing projects, highlighting unique concepts and ideas. For each citation, the article offers information on the firm,…

American School & University, 2003

2003-01-01

340

ATHLETICS & RECREATION Volunteer Student Leadership Job Posting  

E-print Network

ATHLETICS & RECREATION Volunteer Student Leadership Job Posting Position: PACE (Physical Activity students on the benefits of physical activity. To teach students the benefits of exercise & sport, educate them on health factors related to physical activity, encourage them to try new things and help recruit

Boonstra, Rudy

341

Infusing JUST Design in Campus Recreation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This practice brief highlights the collaborative work among a disability resource professional, a university architect, and students with disabilities to create a campus recreation center with universal design features. This partnership serves to illustrate that building to minimum compliance standards does not necessarily remove barriers to…

Staeger-Wilson, Katheryne; Sampson, Douglas H.

2012-01-01

342

Indoor Recreational Places as Glazed Space.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes how creation of a varied, imaginative, and cultivated environment can recreate the pleasure of learning. The development of an indoor-outdoor, public-private, and half-climatized glazed (glass covered) space at the University of Dragvoll in Trondheim, Norway, is described. Well-planned glazed spaces can increase social…

Cold, Birgit

343

24 CFR 1710.114 - Recreational facilities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...recreational facility. Identify closely related facilities (e.g., swimming pool and bathhouse) separately only if their availability...of an asterisk or other appropriate symbol. If a facility is 100 percent completed and in use, no date is needed. (5)...

2010-04-01

344

IMINTRAMURAL RECREATIONAL SPORTS 2013-2014  

E-print Network

IMINTRAMURAL HANDBOOK RECREATIONAL SPORTS 2013-2014 #12;#12;Contents Calender of Events 2 Sports & Special Programs Staff 3 Message from the Associate Director 4 Mission of the Intramural Sports Program 5 Job Opportunities 6 Health Insurance and Injuries 7 Team Managers and Their Duties 8 Entering a Team

Escher, Christine

345

IMINTRAMURAL RECREATIONAL SPORTS 2014-2015  

E-print Network

IMINTRAMURAL HANDBOOK RECREATIONAL SPORTS 2014-2015 #12;#12;Contents Calender of Events 2 Sports & Special Programs Staff 3 Message from the Associate Director 4 Mission of the Intramural Sports Program 5 Job Opportunities 6 Health Insurance and Injuries 7 Team Managers and Their Duties 8 Entering a Team

Escher, Christine

346

Eye Health in Sports and Recreation  

MedlinePLUS

... the Sun Eye Health News Consumer Alerts Eye Health in Sports and Recreation Tweet Tens of thousands of sports ... Updated by David Turbert on Mar. 20, 2014 Sports Eye Injuries by the ... eye MD-reviewed tips and information about eye health and preserving your vision. Privacy Policy Email address ...

347

Vocational Recreational Programs for "Latch Key Kids."  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This package consists of a report describing a project in which child care students served as leaders in after-school recreational programs for latch key children, a series of newspaper articles describing the program, an article by Judy Weber entitled "Latch Key Programs Providing Experiential Opportunities for Child Care Students," and the…

Hamilton, Trudy; And Others

348

Annual in Therapeutic Recreation. Volume 2.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This volume focuses on therapeutic recreation, as a subject of inquiry and as a treatment tool. The 11 articles include original field based research, program development initiatives, issue and theory of practice papers, and original tutorials in assessment and research. The article titles are: "The Role of Leisure Education with Family Caregivers…

Crawford, Michael E., Ed.; Card, Jaclyn A., Ed.

349

Guides to Outdoor Recreation Areas and Facilities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Listed are guides, maps, and directories to recreation areas and facilities in the United States. The guides are categorized as national, regional, or state. Relevant guides are cross-referenced for camping, canoeing, fishing, hiking, and hunting. Prices and sources of supply are indicated. (EB)

Bureau of Outdoor Recreation (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

350

Realia in the Recreation Education Curriculum.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Students of recreation education at the State University College (Cortland, New York) attend a two-week outdoor education practicum held in the Adirondacks. Students study canoeing, crafts, and ecology; practice leadership and teamwork; and take part in a five-day canoeing/hiking trip. (PP)

Carlson, Marcia K.

1983-01-01

351

RURAL RECREATION, NEW OPPORTUNITIES ON PRIVATE LAND.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

ABOUT 90 PERCENT OF ALL AMERICANS PARTICIPATED IN SOME FORM OF OUTDOOR RECREATION IN THE SUMMER OF 1960, AND THE TOTAL NUMBER IS EXPECTED TO INCREASE THREEFOLD BY THE TURN OF THE CENTURY. A LIST OF THE MOST POPULAR OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES INCLUDES DRIVING, WALKING, GAMES, SWIMMING, SIGHTSEEING, BICYCLING, FISHING, HIKING, BOATING, AND PICNICING.…

Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC.

352

Recreation and Leisure Service: A Humanistic Perspective.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Primarily geared to introductory college level courses, this book deals with the history, foundations, community development, and implications of recreation and leisure in American society. It is an attempt to present this information with a new humanistic perspective reflecting a concern for the dignity and worth of man and the development of…

Murphy, James F.

353

Geology Fieldnotes: Chickasaw National Recreation Area, Oklahoma  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site provides information about the Chickasaw National Recreation Area including geology, park maps, visitor information, photographs, and links for more details. The human attraction to the water found there(streams, lakes, and springs), human history, the old mountains (300 million years old - Carboniferous) formed by the Arbuckle uplift, and sedimentary rock deposits are highlighted.

354

RICE 2011-2012 RECREATION Intramural Sports  

E-print Network

with disabilities, where the disability may impact their participation in any team/individual sport, should contactRICE 2011-2012 RECREATION Intramural Sports CENTER RULES AND ELIGIBILITY * RICE UNIVERSITY INTRAMURAL SPORTS ASSUMES NO RESPONSIBILITY FOR ACCIDENTS OR INJURIES, AS ALL PARTICIPANTS ENTER THE ACTIVITY

355

Sampling  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This webpage contains three activities that have students work through problems associated with sampling. Each activity includes a brief description, materials list, and a set of lesson worksheets. The last activity on the page, the "Cereal Toy Investigation" also includes an online simulator in the form of a Java applet.

Kawas, Terry

2012-01-01

356

Assessment of ultrasound-assisted extraction as sample pre-treatment for the measurement of lead isotope ratios in marine biological tissues by multicollector inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this work, ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) was evaluated as a sample preparation procedure for lead isotope ratio measurements in marine biological tissues by multicollector inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. 20 mg of marine biological tissue and 1 mL of acid extractant were sonicated for 3 min at 60% ultrasound amplitude. Matrix separation was performed in the supernatant using a chromatographic exchange resin (Sr-Spec™). Total elimination of organic matter was achieved during the separation step. Microwave-assisted digestion and dry-ashing were used for comparative purposes. No significant differences were found in lead isotope ratios at 95% of confidence level. UAE emerges as an advantageous alternative to classical methods for sample preparation owing to its simplicity and rapidity ( i.e. operation steps were reduced), low reagent consumption and low contamination risks.

Costas-Rodríguez, M.; Lavilla, Isela; Bendicho, Carlos

2011-06-01

357

BODEGA MARINE LABORATORY MARINE OPERATIONS GUIDELINES  

E-print Network

BODEGA MARINE LABORATORY MARINE OPERATIONS GUIDELINES These guidelines cover small boat and diving operations at Bodega Marine Laboratory (BML). This document is intended for faculty, staff, and students

Schladow, S. Geoffrey

358

Marine Debris  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity students will perform experiments to examine if debris will float, or blow in the wind. They will discover which characteristics of trash affect the likelihood that it will become marine debris. Trash that floats or is easily blown around is more likely to become marine debris. As a result of this activity students will be able to define marine debris and categorize different types of debris.

Museum, Bishop

359

Marine Mammals  

Microsoft Academic Search

About 34 species of marine mammals have been documented in Costa Rican waters, representing approximately 26% of all marine\\u000a mammals worldwide. The Costa Rican marine mammal fauna consist of 30 cetacean species, one manatee, and three pinnipeds, one\\u000a of which went extinct since the 1950s. At least 31 of these species most likely also occur in other Central American countries.

Laura May-Collado

360

Fishing, fish consumption and advisory awareness among Louisiana's recreational fishers.  

PubMed

This paper presents results from the first known population-based survey of recreational fishers in Louisiana (n=1774). The ultimate goal of this study was to obtain data in support of the development of regional advisories for a high exposure population with unique seafood consumption patterns. Between July and August of 2008, a survey was mailed to a random sample of licensed recreational fishers to characterize local fishing habits, sportfish consumption, and advisory awareness. Eighty-eight percent of respondents reported eating sportfish. Respondents ate an estimated mean of four fish meals per month, of which, approximately half were sportfish. Over half of all sportfish meals (54%) were caught in the Gulf of Mexico or bordering brackish areas. Sportfish consumption varied by license and gender; and was highest among Sportsman's Paradise license holders (2.8±0.2 meals per month), and males (2.2±0.1 meals per month). The most frequently consumed sportfish species were red drum, speckled trout, catfish, bass, crappie and bream. Advisory awareness rates varied by gender, ethnicity, geographic area, license type, age and education; and were lowest among women (53%), African-Americans (43%), fishers from the southeast of Louisiana (50%), holders of Senior Hunting and Fishing licenses (51%), individuals between 15 and 19 years of age (41%), and individuals with less than a high school education (43%). Results were used to identify ways to optimize monitoring, advisory development and outreach activities. PMID:21851935

Katner, Adrienne; Ogunyinka, Ebenezer; Sun, Mei-Hung; Soileau, Shannon; Lavergne, David; Dugas, Dianne; Suffet, Mel

2011-11-01

361

MDMA, cortisol, and heightened stress in recreational ecstasy users.  

PubMed

Stress develops when an organism requires additional metabolic resources to cope with demanding situations. This review will debate how recreational 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, 'ecstasy') can increase some aspects of acute and chronic stress in humans. Laboratory studies on the acute effects of MDMA on cortisol release and neurohormone levels in drug-free regular ecstasy/MDMA users have been reviewed, and the role of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in chronic changes in anxiety, stress, and cognitive coping is debated. In the laboratory, acute ecstasy/MDMA use can increase cortisol levels by 100-200%, whereas ecstasy/MDMA-using dance clubbers experience an 800% increase in cortisol levels, because of the combined effects of the stimulant drug and dancing. Three-month hair samples of abstinent users revealed cortisol levels 400% higher than those in controls. Chronic users show heightened cortisol release in stressful environments and deficits in complex neurocognitive tasks. Event-related evoked response potential studies show altered patterns of brain activation, suggestive of increased mental effort, during basic information processing. Chronic mood deficits include more daily stress and higher depression in susceptible individuals. We conclude that ecstasy/MDMA increases cortisol levels acutely and subchronically and that changes in the HPA axis may explain why recreational ecstasy/MDMA users show various aspects of neuropsychobiological stress. PMID:25014666

Parrott, Andrew C; Montgomery, Cathy; Wetherell, Mark A; Downey, Luke A; Stough, Con; Scholey, Andrew B

2014-09-01

362

Impact of bathers on levels of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts and Giardia lamblia cysts in recreational beach waters  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recreational beach water samples collected on weekends and weekdays during 11 consecutive summer weeks were tested for potentially viable Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts and Giardia lamblia cysts using the multiplexed fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method. The levels of oocysts and cysts on weekends were significantly higher than on the weekdays (P<0.01). Concentrations of oocysts in weekend samples (n=27) ranged from

Deirdre Sunderland; Thaddeus K. Graczyk; Leena Tamang; Patrick N. Breysse

2007-01-01

363

Antibiotic-resistance and virulence genes in Enterococcus isolated from tropical recreational waters  

PubMed Central

The prevalence of enterococci harboring tetracycline and vancomycin-resistance genes, as well as the enterococcal surface protein (esp) has mostly been determined in clinical settings, but their prevalence in tropical recreational waters remains largely unknown. The present study determined the prevalence of tetM (tetracycline-resistance), vanA and vanB (vancomycin-resistance) in the bacterial and viral fractions, enterococci and their induced phages isolated from tropical recreational marine and fresh waters, dry and wet sands. Since lysogenic phages can act as vectors for antibiotic-resistance and virulence factors, the prevalence of the mentioned genes, as well as that of an integrase-encoding gene (int) specific for Enterococcus faecalis phages was determined. Up to 60 % and 54 % of the bacterial fractions and enterococci harbored at least one of the tested genes, respectively, suggesting that bacteria in tropical environments may be reservoirs of antibiotic-resistance and virulence genes. int was detected in the viral fractions and in one Enterococcus isolate after induction. This study opens the opportunity to determine if the presence of bacteria harboring antibiotic-resistance and virulence genes in tropical recreational waters represents a threat to public health. PMID:23981868

Santiago-Rodriguez, Tasha M.; Rivera, Jessica I.; Coradin, Mariel; Toranzos, Gary A.

2014-01-01

364

The Effects of Winter Recreation on Alpine and Subalpine Fauna: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis  

PubMed Central

The ski industry is often perceived as having a negative impact on sensitive alpine and subalpine communities. However, empirical evidence of such impacts is lacking. We reviewed the available literature from the last 35 years to quantify the reported effects of winter recreation on faunal communities. Overall, using one-sample binomial tests (‘sign tests’) we found that the effects of all types of winter recreation-related disturbances (i.e. ski runs, resort infrastructure and winter tourism) were more likely to be negative or have no effect, than be positive for wildlife. More specifically, in Europe, where the majority of the available research was conducted, the impacts of winter recreation were most often negative for fauna. In terms of specific taxa, birds and to a lesser extent mammals and arthropods, responded negatively to disturbance. Results from our meta-analysis confirmed the results from our binomial tests. Richness, abundance and diversity of fauna were lower in areas affected by winter recreation when compared with undisturbed areas. For most regions and taxa, however, empirical evidence remains too limited to identify clear impacts of winter recreation. We therefore conclude that the majority of ski resorts are operating in the absence of knowledge needed to inform effective strategies for biodiversity conservation and ecologically-sound management. Thus, there is an urgent need for more empirical research to be conducted throughout this increasingly threatened ecological community, especially given the indication from the available literature that fauna often respond negatively to winter recreation. PMID:23691190

Sato, Chloe F.; Wood, Jeff T.; Lindenmayer, David B.

2013-01-01

365

The effects of winter recreation on alpine and subalpine fauna: a systematic review and meta-analysis.  

PubMed

The ski industry is often perceived as having a negative impact on sensitive alpine and subalpine communities. However, empirical evidence of such impacts is lacking. We reviewed the available literature from the last 35 years to quantify the reported effects of winter recreation on faunal communities. Overall, using one-sample binomial tests ('sign tests') we found that the effects of all types of winter recreation-related disturbances (i.e. ski runs, resort infrastructure and winter tourism) were more likely to be negative or have no effect, than be positive for wildlife. More specifically, in Europe, where the majority of the available research was conducted, the impacts of winter recreation were most often negative for fauna. In terms of specific taxa, birds and to a lesser extent mammals and arthropods, responded negatively to disturbance. Results from our meta-analysis confirmed the results from our binomial tests. Richness, abundance and diversity of fauna were lower in areas affected by winter recreation when compared with undisturbed areas. For most regions and taxa, however, empirical evidence remains too limited to identify clear impacts of winter recreation. We therefore conclude that the majority of ski resorts are operating in the absence of knowledge needed to inform effective strategies for biodiversity conservation and ecologically-sound management. Thus, there is an urgent need for more empirical research to be conducted throughout this increasingly threatened ecological community, especially given the indication from the available literature that fauna often respond negatively to winter recreation. PMID:23691190

Sato, Chloe F; Wood, Jeff T; Lindenmayer, David B

2013-01-01

366

Marine Biomedicine  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes early scientific research involving marine invertebrate pathologic processes that may have led to new insights into human disease. Discussed are inquiries of Metchnikoff, Loeb, and Cantacuzene (immunolgic responses in sea stars, horseshoe crabs, and marine worms, respectively). Describes current research stemming from these early…

Bang, Frederik B.

1977-01-01

367

Marine Biology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A variety of informational material for a course in marine biology or oceanology at the secondary level is presented. Among the topics discussed are: food webs and pyramids, planktonic blooms, marine life, plankton nets, food chains, phytoplankton, zooplankton, larval plankton and filter feeders. (BT)

Dewees, Christopher M.; Hooper, Jon K.

1976-01-01

368

Individual differences in reproductive strategy are related to views about recreational drug use in Belgium, The Netherlands, and Japan.  

PubMed

Individual differences in moral views are often explained as the downstream effect of ideological commitments, such as political orientation and religiosity. Recent studies in the U.S. suggest that moral views about recreational drug use are also influenced by attitudes toward sex and that this relationship cannot be explained by ideological commitments. In this study, we investigate student samples from Belgium, The Netherlands, and Japan. We find that, in all samples, sexual attitudes are strongly related to views about recreational drug use, even after controlling for various ideological variables. We discuss our results in light of reproductive strategies as determinants of moral views. PMID:23660974

Quintelier, Katinka J P; Ishii, Keiko; Weeden, Jason; Kurzban, Robert; Braeckman, Johan

2013-06-01

369

City of New York Parks & Recreation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

New York City's Department of Parks & Recreation oversees 29,000 acres of land, and more than 1,700 parks, playgrounds, and recreation facilities located throughout the five boroughs. Their website provides a great starting point for a virtual visit undaunted by weather. Take a virtual tour along the Bronx River, watch video clips from "It's My Park" (also aired every weekday at 11:00 a.m. on NYC life (channel 25)), and browse the photo gallery, which includes selections from the Parks Photo Archive, dating back to 1856, and the Parks' Flickr Group, with visitor-contributed photos. There are also seasonal features: for February, Black History Month, there's an events listing, an inventory of permanent sculptures honoring African-Americans in the Parks, African American Namesake Parks, and a photo gallery entitled The African American Experience. And of course, there's a Groundhog Day page, presenting the history of weather prediction by the rodent in the NYC Parks.

370

Seattle Parks & Recreation Sherwood History Files  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Seattle Parks & Recreation Sherwood History Files are the work of one Donald N. Sherwood, who worked as an engineer for the department for 22 years. In the course of his work, he began compiling sketch maps of the parks, and annotating them with historical tidbits and other pieces of information. Also, he began writing individual histories for each facility when the information didn't quite fit on the maps. This site afford interested parties access to these remarkable and truly unusual documents. All told, there are over 80 separate files here, documenting unique pieces of the Seattle parks landscape, including Alki Beach Park, Golden Gardens Park, and the celebrated Gas Works Park on Lake Union. For anyone with an interest in parks and recreation management or the Emerald City, this site will be a most welcome find.

2012-02-14

371

Does getting a dog increase recreational walking?  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: This study examines changes in socio-demographic, environmental and intrapersonal factors associated with dog acquisition in non-dog owners at baseline to 12-months follow-up and the effect of dog acquisition on minutes per week of recreational walking. METHODS: RESIDE study participants completed self-administered questionnaires (baseline and 12-months follow-up) measuring physical activity, dog ownership, dog walking behavior as well as environmental, intrapersonal

Hayley E Cutt; Matthew W Knuiman; Billie Giles-Corti

2008-01-01

372

Hooking mortality: A review for recreational fisheries  

Microsoft Academic Search

Length?limit regulations and promotion of catch?and?release fishing have become increasingly important management approaches for recreational fisheries. We review?studies on catch?and?release (hooking) mortality gathered from the existing fisheries literature and from a survey of fisheries management agencies in all 50 states, the U.S. government, all Canadian provinces, and selected academic and research institutions. We identified hooking mortality estimates for 32 taxa.

Maurice I. Muoneke; W. Michael Childress

1994-01-01

373

Recreational boating in North Central Texas  

E-print Network

and to facility preference in a specific area of Texas. The study was based upon the need to know more about the recreational boater, specifically his travel patterns and lake preferences, in order to evaluate the effects of the physical resource factors upon... ? cartographic analysis of lake use and statistical analysis of distance traveled ? indicated a definite trend toward a pattern of spatial behavior for the activity groups. Fishermen differed statisti- cally from water skiers, pleasure cruisers, and non...

Cowart, Michael Ray

2012-06-07

374

Work Experience: Marine Biology A group of 4 to 6 potential marine biology students will spend one week in the  

E-print Network

Work Experience: Marine Biology (ID:209) Outline A group of 4 to 6 potential marine biology of studying Marine Biology at Swansea University and develop a general understanding of the different subject will experience marine sampling techniques, both on board the university research vessel and from the shore

Harman, Neal.A.

375

Energy and recreation: an overview of energy availability and utilization for recreational use. [Monograph  

SciTech Connect

A study of recreational energy requirements in the context of the present US situation and energy needs through the year 2000 shows that 4.4% of automotive fuel is presently used for recreational vehicles. The demand for gasoline may peak in the near future and decline as more-efficient automobiles and fuel substitution increase. The authors conclude that use of fuel for recreation is justifiable for social and economic reasons, although periodic supply disruptions may occur. They feel there is no justification for the limits-to-growth philosophy which projects disaster, because energy-use patterns have historically shifted when it was necessary. They predict that adequate and affordable energy supplies will be available from increased US and world fuel supplies and increased efficiency. 23 references, 11 figures, 11 tables. (DCK)

Armbruster, F.; Brown, W.M.; Thomas, J.P.

1980-01-01

376

Remote sensing in the coastal and marine environment. Proceedings of the US North Atlantic Regional Workshop  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Presentations were grouped in the following categories: (1) a technical orientation of Earth resources remote sensing including data sources and processing; (2) a review of the present status of remote sensing technology applicable to the coastal and marine environment; (3) a description of data and information needs of selected coastal and marine activities; and (4) an outline of plans for marine monitoring systems for the east coast and a concept for an east coast remote sensing facility. Also discussed were user needs and remote sensing potentials in the areas of coastal processes and management, commercial and recreational fisheries, and marine physical processes.

Zaitzeff, J. B. (editor); Cornillon, P. (editor); Aubrey, D. A. (editor)

1980-01-01

377

Comparison of methods for determining Escherichia coli concentrations in recreational waters  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Seventy water samples were collected from three Lake Erie beaches to compare recoveries of Escherichia coli (E. coli) using the USEPA-recommended method for recreational waters (mTEC) to recoveries using three alternative methods (MI, modified mTEC, and Colilert). Statistical tests showed no differences in recoveries of E. coli between MI and mTEC; however, statistically-significant differences were found between modified mTEC or Colilert and mTEC. The MI agar method provided the most similar assessment of recreational water quality to mTEC among the three alternative methods tested. The range of differences between Colilert and mTEC was widest among the three alternative methods. In a sample group with a range of values near the single-sample bathing-water standard, recoveries of E. coli were statistically lower using modified mTEC than mTEC; however, MI and Colilert compared well to mTEC in this range. Because samples were collected in a small geographic area, more work is necessary to test within-method variability of the modified mTEC, MI, and Colilert methods and to evaluate these methods as substitutes for the mTEC method in a variety of recreational waters. Copyright (C) 2000.

Francy, D.S.; Darner, R.A.

2000-01-01

378

Recreation land policies of Texas river authorities operating reservoirs  

E-print Network

RECREATION LAND POLICIES OF TEXAS RIVER AUTHORITIES OPERATING RESERVOIRS A Thesis by LOU ELLEN RUESINK Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A1IM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... December 1979 Major Subject: Recreation and Resources Developmenr. RECREATION LAND POLICIES OF TEXAS RIVER AUTHORITIES OPERATING RESERVOIRS A Thesis by LOU ELLEN RUESINK Approved as to sty1e and content by: (Chairman of o ittee) (Member...

Ruesink, Lou Ellen

2012-06-07

379

Marine Ecosystems  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Marine ecosystem introduction to shorelines, temperate oceans, and tropical oceans. Shoreline topics cover sandy and rocky shores, barrier islands, tide pools, estuaries, salt marshes, mud flats, mangrove forests, tides, waves, currents, and shoreline animals. Students can learn about temperate ocean zonation, light, forests, patterns, and animals. The tropical oceans chapter features coral reefs and tropical ocean animals. This site would provide a comprehensive introduction for a marine ecosystems or an ocean science unit.

380

Marine Ecosystems  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In the wild, small crustaceans known as brine shrimp live in marine habitats such as saltwater lakes. In this activity, learners create a saltwater or marine ecosystem that becomes an experimental brine shrimp hatchery. Learners observe the brine shrimp life cycle and test the effect of salinity (salt content) on brine shrimp eggs and larvae, as well as consider the potential impact of other variables such as water temperature and pollution.

Jersey, New; Center, Liberty S.; Coalition, New J.

2006-01-01

381

Validation of a risk assessment form for recreational water bodies.  

E-print Network

??Pollution of recreational water bodies can pose a significant public health risk. Accurate determination of pollution sources usually requires completion of a sanitary inspection. Therefore,… (more)

Abbott, Bree

2011-01-01

382

The national recreational fishing benefits of water pollution control  

Microsoft Academic Search

Results are presented of an effort to estimate the fresh water recreational fishing benefit derived from water pollution control efforts. Methodology is potentially applicable to other subcategories. (PSB)

Clifford S. Russell; William J. Vaughan

1982-01-01

383

Recreational System Optimization to Reduce Conflict on Public Lands  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In response to federal administrative rule, the Tahoe National Forest (TNF), California, USA engaged in trail-route prioritization for motorized recreation (e.g., off-highway-vehicles) and other recreation types. The prioritization was intended to identify routes that were suitable and ill-suited for maintenance in a transportation system. A recreational user survey was conducted online ( n = 813) for user preferences for trail system characteristics, recreational use patterns, and demographics. Motorized trail users and non-motorized users displayed very clear and contrasting preferences for the same system. As has been found by previous investigators, non-motorized users expressed antagonism to motorized use on the same recreational travel system, whereas motorized users either supported multiple-use routes or dismissed non-motorized recreationists' concerns. To help the TNF plan for reduced conflict, a geographic information system (GIS) based modeling approach was used to identify recreational opportunities and potential environmental impacts of all travel routes. This GIS-based approach was based on an expert-derived rule set. The rules addressed particular environmental and recreation concerns in the TNF. Route segments were identified that could be incorporated into minimal-impact networks to support various types of recreation. The combination of potential impacts and user-benefits supported an optimization approach for an appropriate recreational travel network to minimize environmental impacts and user-conflicts in a multi-purpose system.

Shilling, Fraser; Boggs, Jennifer; Reed, Sarah

2012-09-01

384

Recreational system optimization to reduce conflict on public lands.  

PubMed

In response to federal administrative rule, the Tahoe National Forest (TNF), California, USA engaged in trail-route prioritization for motorized recreation (e.g., off-highway-vehicles) and other recreation types. The prioritization was intended to identify routes that were suitable and ill-suited for maintenance in a transportation system. A recreational user survey was conducted online (n = 813) for user preferences for trail system characteristics, recreational use patterns, and demographics. Motorized trail users and non-motorized users displayed very clear and contrasting preferences for the same system. As has been found by previous investigators, non-motorized users expressed antagonism to motorized use on the same recreational travel system, whereas motorized users either supported multiple-use routes or dismissed non-motorized recreationists' concerns. To help the TNF plan for reduced conflict, a geographic information system (GIS) based modeling approach was used to identify recreational opportunities and potential environmental impacts of all travel routes. This GIS-based approach was based on an expert-derived rule set. The rules addressed particular environmental and recreation concerns in the TNF. Route segments were identified that could be incorporated into minimal-impact networks to support various types of recreation. The combination of potential impacts and user-benefits supported an optimization approach for an appropriate recreational travel network to minimize environmental impacts and user-conflicts in a multi-purpose system. PMID:22773115

Shilling, Fraser; Boggs, Jennifer; Reed, Sarah

2012-09-01

385

Occurrence of Blastocystis in Water of Two Rivers from Recreational Areas in Malaysia  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study reports the occurrence of Blastocystis in water from two rivers, Sungai Congkak and Sungai Batu, located in recreational areas in Malaysia. This protozoan was detected in samples from both rivers with an average of 33.3% and 22.1%, respectively. It was detected highest at the downstream (73.8% and 33.8%) followed by midstream (17.5% and 25.0%) and upstream (8.8% and

I. Ithoi; A. Jali; JW Mak; W. Sulaiman; W. Yusoff; R. Mahmud

2011-01-01

386

Gas phase acid, ammonia and aerosol ionic and trace element concentrations at Cape Verde during the Reactive Halogens in the Marine Boundary Layer (RHaMBLe) 2007 intensive sampling period  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report mixing ratios of soluble reactive trace gases sampled with mist chambers and the chemical composition of bulk aerosol and volatile inorganic bromine (Brg) sampled with filter packs during the Reactive Halogens in the Marine Boundary Layer (RHaMBLe) field campaign at the Cape Verde Atmospheric Observatory (CVAO) on São Vicente island in the tropical North Atlantic in May and June 2007. The gas-phase data include HCl, HNO3, HONO, HCOOH, CH3COOH, NH3, and volatile reactive chlorine other than HCl (Cl*). Aerosol samples were analyzed by neutron activation (Na, Al, Cl, V, Mn, and Br) and ion chromatography (SO42-, Cl-, Br-, NH4+, Na+, K+, Mg2+, and Ca2+). Content and quality of the data, which are available under doi:10.5281/zenodo.6956, are presented and discussed.

Sander, R.; Pszenny, A. A. P.; Keene, W. C.; Crete, E.; Deegan, B.; Long, M. S.; Maben, J. R.; Young, A. H.

2013-12-01

387

ALASKA MARINE Alaska Marine Mammal Observer Program  

E-print Network

ALASKA MARINE MAMMAL PROGRAM 2012 #12;2012 Alaska Marine Mammal Observer Program Observer Manual Contents Section 1: The Alaska Marine Mammal Observer Program 1.0 Introduction 1.1 Marine Mammal Stock Program 1.5 Alaska Marine Mammal Observer Program Section 2: The Southeast Alaska Environment 2

388

Marine Strategy 20142019 1 Marine Strategy 20142019  

E-print Network

Marine Strategy 2014­2019 1 Marine Strategy 2014­2019 Providing Australians with marine environmental intelligence for their safety, sustainability, well-being and prosperity. #12;2 Marine Strategy 2014­2019 #12;Marine Strategy 2014­2019 3 Foreword I am pleased to present the Bureau of Meteorology

Greenslade, Diana

389

Outdoor recreational fires: a review of 329 adult and pediatric patients.  

PubMed

Outdoor recreational fires are a frequent occurrence during the summer months and can be associated with burns resulting in significant morbidity. Both pediatric and adult populations can be affected, and their mechanism of injury is often different. Understanding these mechanisms is important when designing prevention programs. It is the goal of this study to review our experience with outdoor recreational fires. All patients who presented to Spectrum Health Blodgett Regional Burn Unit for burns secondary to an outdoor recreational fire over an 8-year period were reviewed. Demographic data, mechanism of injury, body area involved, TBSA burned, treatments undertaken, and subsequent complications were recorded. Pediatric patients (aged 16 years and younger) were analyzed independently, and risk factors were determined. A total of 329 patients suffered burns secondary to outdoor recreational fires over the length of the study. More than 35% required inpatient treatment, with an average length of stay of 4.8 days. Hands were the most frequently affected body part, with the mean TBSA involved being 3.5%. Ninety-four patients (28.6%) required split-thickness skin grafting. The most common mechanism of injury in both adult and pediatric populations was falling into an ongoing fire. Wound infection was the most common complication. Alcohol intoxication was associated with a higher burn severity and complication rate. Pediatric patients represented 39.8% of the sample. Burns secondary to outdoor recreational fires are associated with significant morbidity. Adult prevention programs should target awareness with respect to alcohol consumption and campfires secondary to the morbidity associated with these injuries. Pediatric patients are particularly susceptible, and parents should remain diligent about campfire safety and be educated about the inherent dangers of both active and extinguished fires. PMID:20859212

Neaman, Keith C; Do, Viet H; Olenzek, Emily K; Baca, Marissa; Ford, Ronald D; Wilcox, Richard M

2010-01-01

390

Assessing and monitoring agroenvironmental determinants of recreational freshwater quality using remote sensing.  

PubMed

Diverse fecal and nonfecal bacterial contamination and nutrient sources (e.g. agriculture, human activities and wildlife) represent a considerable non-point source load entering natural recreational waters which may adversely affect water quality. Monitoring of natural recreational water microbial quality is most often based mainly on testing a set of microbiological indicators. The cost and labour involved in testing numerous water samples may be significant when a large number of sites must be monitored repetitively over time. In addition to water testing, ongoing monitoring of key environmental factors known to influence microbial contamination may be carried out as an additional component. Monitoring of environmental factors can now be performed using remote sensing technology which represents an increasingly recognized source of rigorous and recurrent data, especially when monitoring over a large or difficult to access territory is needed. To determine whether this technology could be useful in the context of recreational water monitoring, we evaluated a set of agroenvironmental determinants associated with fecal contamination of recreational waters through a multivariable logistic regression model built with data extracted from satellite imagery. We found that variables describing the proportions of land with agricultural and impervious surfaces, as derived from remote sensing observations, were statistically associated (odds ratio, OR = 11 and 5.2, respectively) with a higher level of fecal coliforms in lake waters in the southwestern region of Quebec, Canada. From a technical perspective, remote sensing may provide important added-value in the monitoring of microbial risk from recreational waters and further applications of this technology should be investigated to support public health risk assessments and environmental monitoring programs relating to water quality. PMID:23552238

Turgeon, Patricia; Michel, Pascal; Levallois, Patrick; Ravel, André; Archambault, Marie; Lavigne, Martin-Pierre; Kotchi, Serge Olivier; Brazeau, Stéphanie

2013-01-01

391

78 FR 42486 - Notice of New Recreation Fee; Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Coronado National Forest is proposing to add the Portal CCC House and Portal Bunkhouse into the recreation rental program. The proposal is to charge $125.00 per night at the Portal CCC House and $100.00 per night at the...

2013-07-16

392

Recreation and Juvenile Delinquency Prevention: How Recreation Professionals Can Design Programs That Really Work.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Parks and recreation professionals can help prevent juvenile delinquency by learning more about why young people feel disconnected with society and developing programs to help them develop strong ties and relationships with their communities. Social bonds can be developed through attachment, commitment, involvement, and positive beliefs. A sidebar…

Munson, Wayne W.

2002-01-01

393

Relationships between human adenoviruses and faecal indicator organisms in European recreational waters.  

PubMed

Human adenoviruses (HAdV) may be implicated in some disease outbreaks associated with recreational water exposures, typically in swimming pools. Modern molecular methods can be used to detect HAdV in environmental water samples. During the EU FP6 Project VIROBATHE a database of over 290 HAdV analyses with corresponding faecal indicator organism (FIO) determinations was gathered and used to explore statistical associations between HAdV and FIO results. The FIOs measured were Escherichia coli, intestinal enterococci and somatic coliphage. Statistically significant trends of increasing proportions of HAdV-positive results in categories of increasing FIO concentration were found in freshwater but not seawater samples. The analysis of these trends in freshwater samples was refined, the trends remaining statistically significant when using categories of 0.5 log(10) intervals of FIO concentration. Logistic regression models were then developed to predict the probability of a HAdV-positive outcome from FIO concentration. Potential applications of these models to predict the probability of HAdV-positive outcomes from routine FIO determinations used to describe recreational water quality exposures and to classify recreational water quality are discussed. PMID:22633054

Wyer, Mark D; Wyn-Jones, A Peter; Kay, David; Au-Yeung, Ho-Kong Christopher; Gironés, Rosina; López-Pila, Juan; de Roda Husman, Ana Maria; Rutjes, Saskia; Schneider, Oliver

2012-09-01

394

Geology of Lake Mead National Recreation Area  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website of the United States Geological Survey (USGS) and National Park Service (NPS) highlights the geologic history of Lake Mead National Recreation Area in Nevada and Arizona. From the Precambrian (1.8 billion years ago) until the present, the Lake Mead region has been shaped by collisions, uplift, erosion, volcanic activity, submergence, extension, and sedimentation. This site covers these major events and when they occurred in the Lake Mead area. There are links to information about geologic maps, geologic time, rocks and minerals, plate tectonics, and other Lake Mead information sources.

395

Incidence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in recreational and hydrotherapy pools.  

PubMed

Pseudomonas aeruginosa remains an important agent of opportunistic infection in patients, particularly those with respiratory complications and burns. One natural niche of this organism is water and water-associated facilities, hence the aim of this study was to examine specimens from recreational and hydrotherapy pools in Northern Ireland over a two-year period. Water specimens (n = 3,510) were obtained from three amenity categories, namely, 13 hydrotherapy pools (specimen number [n] = 323), 51 Jacuzzis/spas (n = 1,397) and 68 swimming pools (n = 1,790). Specimens (100 ml) were filtered through a cellulose acetate (0.45 micron pore size) gridded filter and the membrane was placed on Pseudomonas CFC agar (Oxoid CM559 + SR103) and incubated at 37 degrees C for 48 +/- 2 h. Colonies that clearly showed pyocyanin production or met other identification criteria were considered P. aeruginosa. Of the amenities examined 4/13 hydrotherapy pools (30.8%), 37/51 Jacuzzis/spas (72.5%) and 26/68 swimming pools (38.2%) were positive for P. aeruginosa. The most heavily contaminated amenity category was the Jacuzzi/spa, where 34.7% and 12% of private and public sites respectively were positive for P. aeruginosa at a level of greater than 1,000 cfu 100 ml-1. Approximately twice as many samples were positive in private Jacuzzis/spas compared to publicly operated facilities. There was a similar trend with respect to public and private hydrotherapy pools, though bacterial counts did not exceed 1,000 cfu 100 ml-1. Recreational and therapeutic amenities involving the use of water may be a potential source of P. aeruginosa for susceptible patient groups, including patients with cystic fibrosis and bronchiectasis. This may vary depending on amenity type and public/private ownership of such amenities. PMID:12070972

Moore, J E; Heaney, N; Millar, B C; Crowe, M; Elborn, J S

2002-03-01

396

The occurrence of Naegleria fowleri in recreational waters in Arizona.  

PubMed

Naegleria fowleri is a free-living amoeba found in waters in warmer regions that causes primary amoebic meningoencephalitis, a rare but almost universally fatal disease. The goal of this project was to assess the occurrence of N. fowleri and other thermophilic amoebae in 33 recreational surface waters across Arizona to determine if their presence could be correlated with seasonal or other environmental factors. First, 1-L grab samples were collected over two years and analyzed using polymerase chain reaction and amoebae viability. Seasonality was observed, with N. fowleri and thermophilic amoebae (20% and 30%, respectively) being detected more often in the winter and spring combined than in the summer and fall combined (7.9% and 9.5%, respectively). The spring and fall both had an average temperature of 18°C, yet had different occurrence data (18.2% versus 5.9% for N. fowleri, respectively; 27.3% versus 0% for viable amoebae, respectively). These results are in stark contrast to previous studies in which N. fowleri has been found almost exclusively during warmer months. Over the two-year study, N. fowleri was detected in six and thermophilic amoebae in eight of the 33 recreational water bodies. Five of these were lakes near Phoenix that tested positive for N. fowleri and thermophilic amoebae over multiple seasons. These lakes differed significantly (P ? 0.05) from the other 28 surface waters, with a lower average temperature in the spring, a higher temperature in the fall, a higher pH and turbidity in the summer, and a lower electro-conductivity in the spring. They also had lower Escherichia coli and heterotrophic bacteria levels during colder months. Future N. fowleri monitoring in Arizona should focus on these five lakes to further elucidate the factors that contribute to the low occurrence of this amoeba in the summer or which might explain why these lakes appear to be reservoirs for the organism. PMID:24967566

Sifuentes, Laura Y; Choate, Brittany L; Gerba, Charles P; Bright, Kelly R

2014-09-19

397

Suburban recreation subdivisions in Montgomery County, Texas - a case study analysis  

E-print Network

information specifically concerning recreation subdivisions. Results from Plat Examination and Interviews Plate which designated the presence of recreation and/or park areas did so with "reserve, " "park, " or "recreation area. " Six- teen of the 148...

Watt, Carson Earl

1969-01-01

398

75 FR 6699 - Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area Advisory Council; Notice of Public Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Islands National Recreation Area Advisory Council; Notice of...Islands National Recreation Area. ACTION: Notice of meeting...Islands National Recreation Area Advisory Council will be held...information concerning the meeting may contact Superintendent Bruce...

2010-02-10

399

77 FR 70183 - Notice of Meeting for Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area Advisory Council  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Islands National Recreation Area Advisory Council AGENCY...Islands National Recreation Area Advisory Council will...submit written comments may contact the Designated Federal...FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Bruce Jacobson, Superintendent...Islands National Recreation Area, at (617)...

2012-11-23

400

75 FR 52023 - Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area Advisory Council; Notice of Public Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Islands National Recreation Area Advisory Council; Notice of...Islands National Recreation Area. ACTION: Notice of meeting...Islands National Recreation Area Advisory Council will be held...information concerning the meeting may contact Superintendent Bruce...

2010-08-24

401

40 CFR 1051.620 - When may a manufacturer obtain an exemption for competition recreational vehicles?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...exemption for competition recreational vehicles? 1051.620 Section 1051.620...EMISSIONS FROM RECREATIONAL ENGINES AND VEHICLES Compliance Provisions § 1051.620...exemption for competition recreational vehicles? (a) We may grant you an...

2014-07-01

402

40 CFR 1051.620 - When may a manufacturer obtain an exemption for competition recreational vehicles?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...exemption for competition recreational vehicles? 1051.620 Section 1051.620...EMISSIONS FROM RECREATIONAL ENGINES AND VEHICLES Compliance Provisions § 1051.620...exemption for competition recreational vehicles? (a) We may grant you an...

2010-07-01

403

46 CFR 160.077-15 - Construction and Performance-Recreational Hybrid PFD.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...General. Each recreational hybrid PFD must— (1) Have one...Buoyancy for Recreational Hybrid PFDs Adult Youth Small...mechanism on a recreational hybrid PFD must— (i) Not require...marked “Jerk to Inflate” at two visible locations. (5)...

2013-10-01

404

46 CFR 160.077-15 - Construction and Performance-Recreational Hybrid PFD.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...General. Each recreational hybrid PFD must— (1) Have one...Buoyancy for Recreational Hybrid PFDs Adult Youth Small...mechanism on a recreational hybrid PFD must— (i) Not require...marked “Jerk to Inflate” at two visible locations. (5)...

2011-10-01

405

46 CFR 160.077-15 - Construction and Performance-Recreational Hybrid PFD.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...General. Each recreational hybrid PFD must— (1) Have one...Buoyancy for Recreational Hybrid PFDs Adult Youth Small...mechanism on a recreational hybrid PFD must— (i) Not require...marked “Jerk to Inflate” at two visible locations. (5)...

2012-10-01

406

78 FR 38999 - Recreational Boating-Estimating Benefits of Reducing Injuries  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Recreational Boating--Estimating Benefits of Reducing Injuries AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS...Guard entitled ``Estimating Benefits of Reducing Recreational Boating Injuries: Alternative...report entitled ``Estimating Benefits of Reducing Recreational Boating Injuries:...

2013-06-28

407

33 CFR 181.704 - Contents of information pamphlet: Recreational hybrid PFD.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Contents of information pamphlet: Recreational hybrid PFD. 181.704 Section 181.704...Contents of information pamphlet: Recreational hybrid PFD. Each information pamphlet for a recreational hybrid PFD approved under 46 CFR 160.077...

2010-07-01

408

77 FR 23633 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Northeast Multispecies Fishery; Recreational...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...by the recreational fishery. Newly available data indicate that there...2011. Using the MRIP data, NMFS determined that the recreational fishery only caught 297...recreational groundfish fishery. Because later data concluded that...

2012-04-20

409

Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus Recovered from Recreational and Commercial Areas of Chesapeake Bay and Maryland Coastal Bays  

PubMed Central

Vibrio vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus in the estuarine-marine environment are of human health significance and may be increasing in pathogenicity and abundance. Vibrio illness originating from dermal contact with Vibrio laden waters or through ingestion of seafood originating from such waters can cause deleterious health effects, particularly if the strains involved are resistant to clinically important antibiotics. The purpose of this study was to evaluate antimicrobial susceptibility among these pathogens. Surface-water samples were collected from three sites of recreational and commercial importance from July to September 2009. Samples were plated onto species-specific media and resulting V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus strains were confirmed using polymerase chain reaction assays and tested for antimicrobial susceptibility using the Sensititre® microbroth dilution system. Descriptive statistics, Friedman two-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and Kruskal-Wallis one-way ANOVA were used to analyze the data. Vibrio vulnificus (n?=?120) and V. parahaemolyticus (n?=?77) were isolated from all sampling sites. Most isolates were susceptible to antibiotics recommended for treating Vibrio infections, although the majority of isolates expressed intermediate resistance to chloramphenicol (78% of V. vulnificus, 96% of V. parahaemolyticus). Vibrio parahaemolyticus also demonstrated resistance to penicillin (68%). Sampling location or month did not significantly impact V. parahaemolyticus resistance patterns, but V. vulnificus isolates from St. Martin's River had lower overall intermediate resistance than that of the other two sampling sites during the month of July (p?=?0.0166). Antibiotics recommended to treat adult Vibrio infections were effective in suppressing bacterial growth, while some antibiotics recommended for pediatric treatment were not effective against some of the recovered isolates. To our knowledge, these are the first antimicrobial susceptibility data of V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus recovered from the Chesapeake Bay. These data can serve as a baseline against which future studies can be compared to evaluate whether susceptibilities change over time. PMID:24586914

Shaw, Kristi S.; Rosenberg Goldstein, Rachel E.; He, Xin; Jacobs, John M.; Crump, Byron C.; Sapkota, Amy R.

2014-01-01

410

THE LOGNORMAL DISTRIBUTION AND USE OF THE GEOMETRIC MEAN AND THE ARITHMETIC MEAN IN RECREATIONAL WATER QUALITY MEASUREMENT  

EPA Science Inventory

Since 1968 United States recreational water quality criteria have set a limit on the geometric mean for fecal indicator bacteria from a number water samples taken over a period of time (National Technical Advisory Committee, 1968; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1976 and 19...

411

Quantitative Evaluation of the Impact of Bather Density on Levels of Human-Virulent Microsporidian Spores in Recreational Water  

Microsoft Academic Search

Received 14 February 2007\\/Accepted 24 April 2007 Microsporidial gastroenteritis, a serious disease of immunocompromised people, can have a waterborne etiology. During summer months, samples of recreational bathing waters were tested weekly for human- virulent microsporidian spores and water quality parameters in association with high and low bather numbers during weekends and weekdays, respectively. Enterocytozoon bieneusi spores were detected in 59%

Thaddeus K. Graczyk; Deirdre Sunderland; Leena Tamang; Timothy M. Shields; Frances E. Lucy; Patrick N. Breysse

2007-01-01

412

Improvement in the Iatroscan thin-layer chromatographic–flame ionisation detection analysis of marine lipids. Separation and quantitation of monoacylglycerols and diacylglycerols in standards and natural samples  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mono- and diacylglycerols are important intermediates in glycerolipid biodegradation and intracellular signalling pathways. A method for mass determination of these lipid classes in marine particles was developed using the Iatroscan, which combines thin layer chromatography (TLC) and flame ionisation detection (FID) techniques. We improved existing protocols by adding two elution steps: hexane–diethyl-ether–formic acid (70:30:0.2, v\\/v\\/v) after triacylglycerol and free fatty

Laurent Striby; Raymond Lafont; Madeleine Goutx

1999-01-01

413

43 CFR 2931.2 - What kinds of permits does BLM issue for recreation-related uses of public lands?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...issue for recreation-related uses of public lands? 2931.2 Section 2931...PERMITS FOR RECREATION ON PUBLIC LANDS Permits for Recreation; General...issue for recreation-related uses of public lands? The regulations in...

2011-10-01

414

43 CFR 2931.2 - What kinds of permits does BLM issue for recreation-related uses of public lands?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...issue for recreation-related uses of public lands? 2931.2 Section 2931...PERMITS FOR RECREATION ON PUBLIC LANDS Permits for Recreation; General...issue for recreation-related uses of public lands? The regulations in...

2013-10-01

415

43 CFR 2931.2 - What kinds of permits does BLM issue for recreation-related uses of public lands?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...issue for recreation-related uses of public lands? 2931.2 Section 2931...PERMITS FOR RECREATION ON PUBLIC LANDS Permits for Recreation; General...issue for recreation-related uses of public lands? The regulations in...

2014-10-01

416

43 CFR 2931.2 - What kinds of permits does BLM issue for recreation-related uses of public lands?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...issue for recreation-related uses of public lands? 2931.2 Section 2931...PERMITS FOR RECREATION ON PUBLIC LANDS Permits for Recreation; General...issue for recreation-related uses of public lands? The regulations in...

2012-10-01

417

North Carolina Division of Marine Fisheries: Cool Kids Fishin'  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Find information on NC's various marine resources such as blue crabs and red drum, commercial and recreational fishing statistics, a fish identification guide, and fun pages for kids. Information is broken up into three categories: Crustaceans, Fish, and Shellfish. Each section in full of great information for both the beginner and the expert. Check out the food chain information to learn why all creatures, big and small, are important to the ecosystem.

418

Prevalence and characteristics of ESBL-producing E. coli in Dutch recreational waters influenced by wastewater treatment plants.  

PubMed

Outside health care settings, people may acquire ESBL-producing bacteria through different exposure routes, including contact with human or animal carriers or consumption of contaminated food. However, contact with faecally contaminated surface water may also represent a possible exposure route. The current study investigated the prevalence and characteristics of ESBL-producing Escherichia coli in four Dutch recreational waters and the possible role of nearby waste water treatment plants (WWTP) as contamination source. Isolates from recreational waters were compared with isolates from WWTP effluents, from surface water upstream of the WWTPs, at WWTP discharge points, and in connecting water bodies not influenced by the studied WWTPs. ESBL-producing E. coli were detected in all four recreational waters, with an average concentration of 1.3 colony forming units/100ml, and in 62% of all samples. In surface waters not influenced by the studied WWTPs, ESBL-producing E. coli were detected in similar concentrations, indicating the existence of additional ESBL-E. coli contamination sources. Isolates with identical ESBL-genes, phylogenetic background, antibiotic resistance profiles, and sequence type, were obtained from effluent and different surface water sites in the same watershed, on the same day; occasionally this included isolates from recreational waters. Recreational waters were identified as a potential exposure source of ESBL-producing E. coli. WWTPs were shown to contribute to the presence of these bacteria in surface waters, but other (yet unidentified) sources likely co-contribute. PMID:24690376

Blaak, Hetty; de Kruijf, Patrick; Hamidjaja, Raditijo A; van Hoek, Angela H A M; de Roda Husman, Ana Maria; Schets, Franciska M

2014-07-16

419

Marine Biodiversity in South Africa: An Evaluation of Current States of Knowledge  

PubMed Central

Continental South Africa has a coastline of some 3,650 km and an Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) of just over 1 million km2. Waters in the EEZ extend to a depth of 5,700 m, with more than 65% deeper than 2,000 m. Despite its status as a developing nation, South Africa has a relatively strong history of marine taxonomic research and maintains comprehensive and well-curated museum collections totaling over 291,000 records. Over 3 million locality records from more than 23,000 species have been lodged in the regional AfrOBIS (African Ocean Biogeographic Information System) data center (which stores data from a wider African region). A large number of regional guides to the marine fauna and flora are also available and are listed. The currently recorded marine biota of South Africa numbers at least 12,914 species, although many taxa, particularly those of small body size, remain poorly documented. The coastal zone is relatively well sampled with some 2,500 samples of benthic invertebrate communities have been taken by grab, dredge, or trawl. Almost none of these samples, however, were collected after 1980, and over 99% of existing samples are from depths shallower than 1,000 m—indeed 83% are from less than 100 m. The abyssal zone thus remains almost completely unexplored. South Africa has a fairly large industrial fishing industry, of which the largest fisheries are the pelagic (pilchard and anchovy) and demersal (hake) sectors, both focused on the west and south coasts. The east coast has fewer, smaller commercial fisheries, but a high coastal population density, resulting in intense exploitation of inshore resources by recreational and subsistence fishers, and this has resulted in the overexploitation of many coastal fish and invertebrate stocks. South Africa has a small aquaculture industry rearing mussels, oysters, prawns, and abalone—the latter two in land-based facilities. Compared with many other developing countries, South Africa has a well-conserved coastline, 23% of which is under formal protection, however deeper waters are almost entirely excluded from conservation areas. Marine pollution is confined mainly to the densely populated KwaZulu-Natal coast and the urban centers of Cape Town and Port Elizabeth. Over 120 introduced or cryptogenic marine species have been recorded, but most of these are confined to the few harbors and sheltered sites along the coast. PMID:20689849

Griffiths, Charles L.; Robinson, Tamara B.; Lange, Louise; Mead, Angela

2010-01-01

420

A Proposal for Source Tracking of Fecal Pollution in Recreational Waters by Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis  

PubMed Central

This study aimed to identify specific river sources of fecal contamination by applying pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) to environmental water samples from a recreational beach in Japan. The genotypes of all Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis strains used as indicators of fecal pollution on the recreational beach and rivers were analyzed by PFGE, and the PFGE profiles of the strains were classified at a 0.9 similarity level using dendrogram analysis. PFGE types of E. faecium isolated from Sakai River or urban drainage were classified in the same cluster. Therefore, the probable sources of fecal pollution on the recreational beach were Sakai River and urban drainage. The approaches for microbial source tracking employed in this study used PFGE with Enterococcus species as an indicator can be a potential tool to specify the source(s) of fecal pollution and contribute to improved public health in coastal environments. PMID:24256972

Furukawa, Takashi; Suzuki, Yoshihiro

2013-01-01

421

A proposal for source tracking of fecal pollution in recreational waters by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis.  

PubMed

This study aimed to identify specific river sources of fecal contamination by applying pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) to environmental water samples from a recreational beach in Japan. The genotypes of all Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis strains used as indicators of fecal pollution on the recreational beach and rivers were analyzed by PFGE, and the PFGE profiles of the strains were classified at a 0.9 similarity level using dendrogram analysis. PFGE types of E. faecium isolated from Sakai River or urban drainage were classified in the same cluster. Therefore, the probable sources of fecal pollution on the recreational beach were Sakai River and urban drainage. The approaches for microbial source tracking employed in this study used PFGE with Enterococcus species as an indicator can be a potential tool to specify the source(s) of fecal pollution and contribute to improved public health in coastal environments. PMID:24256972

Furukawa, Takashi; Suzuki, Yoshihiro

2013-01-01

422

Recreation and Tourism and the Future in Lodgepole Pine Forests  

E-print Network

Recreation and Tourism and the Future in Lodgepole Pine Forests: Pros and ConsPros and Cons Stuart Watersheds damaged by wildfires. Changes in recreational experience / tourism experience Aesthetic values (e to waterways from erosion Trees no longer holding soil Results into possible loss of tourism revenue

423

SDSU General Catalog 2010-2011 399 Recreation and Tourism  

E-print Network

SDSU General Catalog 2010-2011 399 RTM Recreation and Tourism Management In the School of Hospitality and Tourism Management In the College of Professional Studies and Fine Arts OFFICE: Professional of Hospitality and Tourism Management Major in recreation administration with the B.S. degree in applied arts

Gallo, Linda C.

424

Coastal Climatology Products for Recreation and Tourism End Users  

E-print Network

Coastal Climatology Products for Recreation and Tourism End Users in Southeastern North Carolina of this project was to develop a test coastal climatology product for recreation and tourism end users the southeastern U.S. Such products are important because tourism is a major sector of the global economy with 693

Gamble, Douglas W.

425

Private and Commercial Recreation: A Text and Reference.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this book is to help to draw together and cement the relationship between the public and private sectors in the field of recreation and to remove the observable lines of difference between the two. It is also intended to introduce prospective students to private and commercial recreation, particularly those who may be considering…

Epperson, Arlin F.

426

Preparing Students to Write a Professional Philosophy of Recreation Paper  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes a process for guiding students through the writing of a Professional Philosophy of Recreation Paper and a one-page philosophy statement suitable for use in students' professional portfolios. The authors describe how the review of recreation education literature, scholarship on teaching and learning, and assessment of student…

Stevens, Cheryl; Schneider, Paige P.; Johnson, Corey W.

2012-01-01

427

Nature-Based Recreation and Spirituality: A Complex Relationship  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article examines empirical studies and theoretical models that explain the complex relationship between nature-based recreation and spirituality. Antecedent conditions include personal history, current circumstances, attitude, motivation, socio-demographic characteristics, and spiritual tradition. Setting components include being in nature, being away to a different environment, and place processes. Recreation components include activity, free time, solitude, group experiences, and facilitation. The article

Paul Heintzman

2009-01-01

428

36 CFR 7.48 - Lake Mead National Recreation Area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lake Mead National Recreation Area. 7.48...OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.48 Lake Mead National Recreation Area. (a...1)(i) The entire water surface of Lakes Mead and Mohave are designated...

2013-07-01

429

36 CFR 7.48 - Lake Mead National Recreation Area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Lake Mead National Recreation Area. 7.48...OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.48 Lake Mead National Recreation Area. (a...1)(i) The entire water surface of Lakes Mead and Mohave are designated...

2012-07-01

430

Marginal Cost Pricing and Efficient Provision of Public Recreation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Analysis of supply and demand functions for public campground recreation indicated that the estimated equilibrium price was considerably below the current price and that social welfare can be increased by charging the equilibrium price. Shifting to the equilibrium price had significantly negative revenue effects on the recreation-providing agency.…

Daniels, Steven E.

1987-01-01

431

Recreation Therapy: Implications for the Ventilator Assisted Child.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The paper examines the role of the recreation therapist in the new trend towards home care for the ventilator assisted individual. The focus on home care necessitates that the recreation therapist familiarize parents with the rationale for activities as well as providing them with information about a variety of future leisure pursuits. In…

Keeker, Susan M.

432

Linking Biodiversity and Recreational Merits of Urban Green Spaces  

E-print Network

Linking Biodiversity and Recreational Merits of Urban Green Spaces Methodological Development Ling, Alnarp 2014 Cover: A view of Ramlösa Brunnspark, Helsingborg (photo: Ling Qiu) #12;Linking Biodiversity an important role in promoting both biodiversity and human recreation. This thesis therefore attempted to link

433

Collegiate Recreational Sports: Pivotal Players in Student Success  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents an overview of the rise of modern-day collegiate recreational sports and their relevance to student learning and quality of life. The author discusses planning considerations for collegiate recreational sports facilities and the importance of these facilities as a recruitment and retention tool. (Contains 4 figures.)

Blumenthal, Kent J.

2009-01-01

434

50 CFR 660.721 - Recreational fishing bag limits.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 false Recreational fishing bag limits. 660.721 Section 660.721...Fisheries § 660.721 Recreational fishing bag limits. This section applies to...EEZ is responsible for ensuring that the bag limits of this section are not...

2012-10-01

435

50 CFR 660.721 - Recreational fishing bag limits.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...2014-10-01 false Recreational fishing bag limits. 660.721 Section 660.721...Fisheries § 660.721 Recreational fishing bag limits. This section applies to...EEZ is responsible for ensuring that the bag limits of this section are not...

2014-10-01

436

50 CFR 660.721 - Recreational fishing bag limits.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 false Recreational fishing bag limits. 660.721 Section 660.721...Fisheries § 660.721 Recreational fishing bag limits. This section applies to...EEZ is responsible for ensuring that the bag limits of this section are not...

2011-10-01

437

50 CFR 660.721 - Recreational fishing bag limits.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 false Recreational fishing bag limits. 660.721 Section 660.721...Fisheries § 660.721 Recreational fishing bag limits. This section applies to...EEZ is responsible for ensuring that the bag limits of this section are not...

2010-10-01

438

50 CFR 660.721 - Recreational fishing bag limits.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 false Recreational fishing bag limits. 660.721 Section 660.721...Fisheries § 660.721 Recreational fishing bag limits. This section applies to...EEZ is responsible for ensuring that the bag limits of this section are not...

2013-10-01

439

Out, out, and Away! Collection Development: Outdoor Recreation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Summer is fast approaching, and it will soon be time to climb the mountains to get their good tidings, as naturalist John Muir put it. In other words, librarians must now prepare for the influx of patrons making weekend recreational and summer vacation plans by stocking up on books and other resources on the great outdoors. Outdoor recreational

Helling, John

2009-01-01

440

Operation Sports, Health and Recreation Program. Reprint 1972.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This publication provides a variety of activities that have been useful in developing and conducting physical education and recreation programs at residential centers for mentally retarded persons throughout Texas. Easy-to-learn activities of this sports, health and recreation program (Operation SHARP) are presented in ways that minimize necessity…

Texas State Dept. of Mental Health and Mental Retardation, Austin.

441

A Lifespan Perspective on Women and Physical Recreation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

When applying a lifespan perspective to the study of recreation and leisure behavior, a woman's interest and involvement in physical recreation must be viewed not only in terms of her current psychological and biological status, but also within the context of her sociocultural environment and her personal and "group" history. (IAH)

Freysinger, Valeria J.

1990-01-01

442

The Restoration and Recreational Enhancement of Lake Marion and the  

E-print Network

The Restoration and Recreational Enhancement of Lake Marion and the Black Earth Creek Corridor 2010 - Madison #12;THE RESTORATION AND RECREATIONAL ENHANCEMENT OF LAKE MARION AND THE BLACK EARTH CREEK CORRIDOR .......................................................... 4 1950: AFTER A MAJOR FLOOD, ATTEMPTS TO RESTORE THE FISH HATCHERY ........................ 7 1978

Sheridan, Jennifer

443

Assessment of exposures to fecally-contaminated recreational water  

EPA Science Inventory

Exposure to fecally-contaminated recreational waters can pose a health risk to swimmers and other recreators. Since 2003, we have interviewed nearly 27,000 respondents at seven beaches impacted by treated sewage discharge. Information was collected about the duration and exposure...

444

Leisure Today--Special Recreation: Programming for Everyone.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This series of articles focuses on the provision of special recreation services in the community for a variety of populations including the elderly, latch-key kids, cardiac patients, physically and mentally disturbed children, adolescents, adults, juveniles, and the multihandicapped. The quest for "recreation for all" on a national level requires…

Crawford, Michael E., Ed.

1985-01-01

445

Addressing Challenges to the Shared Use of School Recreational Facilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The shared use of school recreational facilities holds the potential to offer activity opportunities for many people, especially those in low-income, minority, and under-resourced communities. School facilities are usually easily accessible and offer safe, free or low cost, and convenient recreation and sport opportunities. However, a number of…

Spengler, John O.; Connaughton, Daniel P.; Carroll, Michael S.

2011-01-01

446

Research Update. Recreation and AIDS: Reflections and Reaffirmation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although there is no cure in sight, the life expectancy of people with HIV/AIDS has greatly increased thanks to significant medical advancements. Recreation professionals must take the lead in improving these people's quality of life by providing meaningful leisure outlets. This paper discusses the status of recreation for this population and…

Lord, Michal Anne

2000-01-01

447

Assessing the Impact of New Student Campus Recreation Centers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The student recreation center (SRC) at many colleges and universities has evolved from being a place to lift weights and take aerobics classes to becoming a high-powered recruitment tool (Colleges use recreation, 2002). The present study included the development of an instrument to assess the use and impact of SRCs. Students (N = 655; users = 537,…

Zizzi, Samuel; Ayers, Suzan F.; Watson II, Jack C.; Keeler, Linda A.

2004-01-01

448

Rent Dissipation in Chartered Recreational Fishing: Inside the Black Box  

Microsoft Academic Search

A canvass of the resource economics literature of the last thirty years yields a limited number of applications of economic theory to the problems of recreational fishing, especially compared to the depth of contributions to commercial fisheries over this era. This neglect may be linked to the relatively short shrift given to the control of recreational fisheries (relative to commercial

Joshua K. Abbott; James E. Wilen

2008-01-01

449

Recreation Programming: Designing Leisure Experiences. 5th Edition  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Originally published in 1989, "Recreation Programming: Designing Leisure Experiences" has become a standard in the park, recreation, and leisure service industry. This title has been used to teach beginning and experienced programmers in over 100 higher-education institutions, both nationally and internationally. Designed in a user-friendly…

Rossman, J. Robert; Schlatter, Barbara Elwood

2008-01-01

450

Serious Leisure and Recreation Specialization: An Uneasy Marriage  

Microsoft Academic Search

A case is made to wed research on serious leisure and recreation specialization. Before such a marriage can occur, the strengths and differences of the two perspectives must be examined. In this article, four important contributions of the recreation specialization are put forward that will further our understanding of serious leisure and intense forms of leisure. These are (1) there

David Scott

2012-01-01

451

Children of a Lesser God. "Core Values in Therapeutic Recreation"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Students in recreation programs are often introduced to laws that apply to therapeutic or community recreation services. Several of these laws have to do with policy regarding people who experience a disability. One important law is the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). In order for students to better understand the law and its…

Barney, Keith W.

2013-01-01

452

Job Title Recreation Specialist Employer/ Agency Houston Areas Community Services  

E-print Network

Job Title Recreation Specialist Employer/ Agency Houston Areas Community Services Job Description homeless persons with mental and/or physical illnesses to develop healthy ways to spend their leisure time. Therapeutic recreation programs offer creative, social, and exercise opportunities for people with physical

Azevedo, Ricardo

453

Leisure, Recreation, and Play from a Developmental Context  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The terms "play, recreation, and leisure" can evoke thoughts of frivolity, fun, sociability, competition, slothfulness, or idleness. However, there is substantial evidence that what people do in their discretionary or free time has important developmental and health implications. In this article, the authors examine how play, recreation, and…

Caldwell, Linda L.; Witt, Peter A.

2011-01-01

454

The relationship between leisure theory and recreation practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between leisure theory and recreation practice, using a cognitive approach. Seventeen male and 3 female public leisure service managers took part in the investigation. A pile?sort technique was used to ascertain the structure of the conceptual domain consisting of the Accreditation Standards of the National Recreation and Park Association (1991).

Mary Greenwood Parr

1996-01-01

455

Preschool Children's Emerging Participation in Leisure and Recreation Activities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Parents (n = 1509) of young children birth to 6 years of age were surveyed about their children's participation in 30 leisure and recreation community activities. Analyses focused on similarities and differences according to type of activity (leisure vs. recreation), child age, and child developmental condition (children with vs. children without disabilities or delays). Results showed that there were age-related

Carl J. Dunst; Debbie Hamby; Donna Snyder

2009-01-01

456

Women Faculty, Higher Education, and the Recreation/Leisure Field  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Women represent growing numbers of faculty members in higher education as well as in recreation/leisure departments. The purpose of this study is to describe the career development of women faculty in recreation-related areas and to offer implications for faculty development and the preparation of future faculty. Data were collected from women who…

Henderson, Karla A.; Harrolle, Michelle; Rich, Samantha; Moretz, Janell

2012-01-01

457

Leadership for Recreation, Parks, and Leisure Services. Third Edition  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This third edition of "Leadership for Recreation, Parks, and Leisure Services" is unique from many different perspectives.The current effort of this book is focused on bringing together a number of interrelated elements that influence leadership in recreation, parks, and leisure service organizations. Thus, the authors have focused the effort on…

Edginton, Christopher R.; Hudson, Susan D.; Scholl, Kathleen G.

2005-01-01

458

Outdoor Recreation, Health, and Wellness: Understanding and Enhancing the Relationship  

Microsoft Academic Search

The research literature on outdoor recreation as it relates to human health is vast and growing. To help policymakers take new and emerging findings into account when designing recreation and park services and initiatives for the 21st century, this paper summarizes the salient issues and identifies research gaps. It considers how being outside in natural surroundings may improve health and

Geoffrey Godbey

459

Outdoor Recreation on Government Lands in Texas, An Analysis.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study represents an inventory of major government, non-urban outdoor recreation programs and facilities in Texas, as well as an indication of visitor use reported by individual agencies. The purpose of the analysis is to illustrate the importance of outdoor recreation in Texas and the contribution of various agencies, rather than to determine…

Reed, David J.; Reid, Leslie M.

460

Principles and Methods of Adapted Physical Education and Recreation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This text is designed for the elementary and secondary school physical educator and the recreation specialist in adapted physical education and, more specifically, as a text for college courses in adapted and corrective physical education and therapeutic recreation. The text is divided into four major divisions: scope, key teaching and therapy…

Arnheim, Daniel D.; And Others

461

Sports and Recreation for the Disabled: A Resource Manual.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This resource manual represents the most comprehensive information available on adapted sport and recreation activities for people with disabilities. The book focuses on ways that people with disabilities can access sport and recreational opportunities from which they have been traditionally excluded. The manual takes a cross-disability view of…

Paciorek, Michael J.; Jones, Jeffery A.

462

97. Cumberland knob recreation area. The visitor contact center originally ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

97. Cumberland knob recreation area. The visitor contact center originally opened in 1941 as a combined sandwich shop, picnic area, and comfort station, the central building of the first recreation area to open looking north. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

463

Leadership for Recreation, Parks, and Leisure Services. Fourth Edition  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Leadership for Recreation, Parks and Leisure Services" presents new perspectives on the importance of leadership in the profession. Integrating theory with practice, the book provides foundational perspectives in the study of leadership at all levels--direct service, supervisory, managerial and community/civic--in recreation, parks and leisure…

Edginton, Christopher R.; Hudson, Susan D.; Scholl, Kathleen G.; Lauzon, Lara

2011-01-01

464

The queen conch (Strombus gigas) is a large marine gastropod harvested  

E-print Network

278 The queen conch (Strombus gigas) is a large marine gastropod harvested intensively throughout the Caribbean for its meat and shell. In the Florida Keys, conch once supported commercial and recreational fisheries, but overhar- vesting severely depleted the popula- tion. The harvesting of conch has been banned

465

The Legacy of Marin Mersenne: The Search for Primal Order and the Mentoring of Young Minds  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes the pivotal roles that Marin Mersenne played--as a recreational mathematician in search of prime number patterns and as a mentor to young mathematicians and scientists. His work is used as an example for today's mathematics teachers in encouraging students to work together and creating environments that foster success for…

Wanko, Jeffrey J.

2005-01-01

466

Turning the Tide on Trash: A Learning Guide on Marine Debris.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The oceans covering two-thirds of the earth's surface constitute a resource for animal life, fishing industries, coastal economies, and recreation. This learning guide is a collection of 14 activities integrating art, language arts, mathematics, music, science, and social studies with the study of marine debris. A student survey is used to…

Eastern Research Group, Inc., Lexington, MA.

467

Health Risks of Limited-Contact Water Recreation  

PubMed Central

Background: Wastewater-impacted waters that do not support swimming are often used for boating, canoeing, fishing, kayaking, and rowing. Little is known about the health risks of these limited-contact water recreation activities. Objectives: We evaluated the incidence of illness, severity of illness, associations between water exposure and illness, and risk of illness attributable to limited-contact water recreation on waters dominated by wastewater effluent and on waters approved for general use recreation (such as swimming). Methods: The Chicago Health, Environmental Exposure, and Recreation Study was a prospective cohort study that evaluated five health outcomes among three groups of people: those who engaged in limited-contact water recreation on effluent-dominated waters, those who engaged in limited-contact recreation on general-use waters, and those who engaged in non–water recreation. Data analysis included survival analysis, logistic regression, and estimates of risk for counterfactual exposure scenarios using G-computation. Results: Telephone follow-up data were available for 11,297 participants. With non–water recreation as the reference group, we found that limited-contact water recreation was associated with the development of acute gastrointestinal illness in the first 3 days after water recreation at both effluent-dominated waters [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 1.46; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.08, 1.96] and general-use waters (1.50; 95% CI: 1.09, 2.07). For every 1,000 recreators, 13.7 (95% CI: 3.1, 24.9) and 15.1 (95% CI: 2.6, 25.7) cases of gastrointestinal illness were attributable to limited-contact recreation at effluent-dominated waters and general-use waters, respectively. Eye symptoms were associated with use of effluent-dominated waters only (AOR 1.50; 95% CI: 1.10, 2.06). Among water recreators, our results indicate that illness was associated with the amount of water exposure. Conclusions: Limited-contact recreation, both on effluent-dominated waters and on waters designated for general use, was associated with an elevated risk of gastrointestinal illness. PMID:22030231

Pratap, Preethi; Wroblewski, Meredith; Hryhorczuk, Daniel O.; Li, Hong; Liu, Li C.; Scheff, Peter A.

2011-01-01

468

Escherichia coli Concentrations in Recreational Streams and Backcountry Drinking-Water Supplies in Shenandoah National Park, Virginia, 2005-2006  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Although fecal contamination of streams is a problem of national scope, few investigations have been directed at relatively pristine streams in forested basins in national parks. With approximately 1.8 million visitors annually, Shenandoah National Park in Virginia is subject to extensive recreational use. The effects of these visitors and their recreational activities on fecal indicator bacteria levels in the streams are poorly understood and of concern for Shenandoah National Park managers. During 2005 and 2006, streams and springs in Shenandoah National Park were sampled for Escherichia coli (E. coli) concentrations. The first study objective was to evaluate the effects of recreational activities on E. coli concentrations in selected streams. Of the 20 streams that were selected, 14 were in basins with extensive recreational activity, and 6 were in control basins where minimal recreational activities occurred. Water-quality sampling was conducted during low-flow conditions during the relatively warm months, as this is when outdoor recreation and bacterial survivorship are greatest. Although most sampling was conducted during low-flow conditions, approximately three stormflow samples were collected from each stream. The second study objective was to evaluate E. coli levels in backcountry drinking-water supplies throughout Shenandoah National Park. Nineteen drinking-water supplies (springs and streams) were sampled two to six times each by Shenandoah National Park staff and analyzed by the U.S. Geological Survey for this purpose. The water-quality sampling results indicated relatively low E. coli concentrations during low-flow conditions, and no statistically significant increase in E. coli concentrations was observed in the recreational streams relative to the control streams. These results indicate that during low-flow conditions, recreational activities had no significant effect on E. coli concentrations. During stormflow conditions, E. coli concentrations increased by nearly a factor of 10 in both basin types, and the Virginia instantaneous water-quality standard for E. coli (235 colonies per 100 milliliters) frequently was exceeded. The sampling results from drinking-water supplies throughout Shenandoah National Park indicated relatively low E. coli concentrations in all springs that were sampled. Several of the streams that were sampled had slightly higher E. coli concentrations relative to the springs, but no E. coli concentrations exceeded the instantaneous water-quality standard. Although E. coli concentrations in all the drinking-water supplies were relatively low, Shenandoah National Park management continues to stress that all hikers must treat drinking water from all streams and springs prior to consumption. After determining that recreational activities in Shenandoah National Park did not have a statistically significant effect on low-flow E. coli concentrations, an additional concern was addressed regarding the quality of the water releases from the wastewater-treatment plants in the park. Sampling of three wastewater-treatment plant outfalls was conducted in 2006 to evaluate their effects on water quality. Samples were analyzed for E. coli and a collection of wastewater organic compounds that may be endocrine disruptors. Relatively elevated E. coli concentrations were observed in 2 of the 3 samples, and between 9 and 13 wastewater organic compounds were detected in the samples, including 3 known and 5 suspected endocrine-disrupting compounds.

Hyer, Kenneth E.

2007-01-01

469

Marine Technology Student: Marine Farming  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this video adapted from Pathways to Technology, learn how a degree in marine technology helped one student go from working at a marine farming company to becoming a partner in that company. Trevor Fay uses the GPS/GIS technology he studied in school to farm the red abalone, tracking their locations and monitoring their population. This technology helps marine farmers maintain healthy populations of sea creatures and understand more about the important ecosystem of the ocean.The video runs 4:18 and is accompanied by a background essay, standards alignment, and discussion questions. Users who sign up for a free account can save the resource and download the video as well.

470

Marine ecological-risk assessment pilot study for Allen Harbor, Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island. Professional paper  

SciTech Connect

An ecological risk assessment framework was applied to characterize aquatic risks associated with hazardous waste disposal at Naval Construction Battalion Center (NCBC) Davisville, Rhode Island. An initial screening phase (I) assessed exposure and related that exposure to toxicological endpoints for bivalves, amphipods, sea urchins, and biomarker assays. Results showed little evidence of major contamination in sediments or tissues except for relatively high levels of polychlorinated biphenols (PBC), butyltins compounds (TBT), and fecal coliforms observed in Allen Harbor. Effects were detected in mussel physiology, sea urchin fertilization and development, biomarker responses, and soft shell clam histology. Possible sources of contamination and toxicity from the landfill leachate, surface runoff, and recreational boating were examined using a temporaland spatial sampling scheme. Chemical and toxicological information obtained implicated all three sources as affecting Allen Harbor water quality. Laboratory bioassays of landfill exposure media, employing a variety of marine species using acute and chronic endpoints, are being used to provide data for the development of an exposure-response model for risk to the marine environment. The model will define current risk and provide an interpretive framework for long-term monitoring.

Johnston, R.K.; Munns, W.R.; Mueller, C.; Nelson, W.G.; Pesch, G.G.

1992-01-01

471

Marine Trades.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This curriculum guide provides materials for a competency-based course in marine trades at the secondary level. The curriculum design uses the curriculum infused model for the teaching of basic skills as part of vocational education and demonstrates the relationship of vocationally related skills to communication, mathematics, and science…

Abbott, Alan

472

Marine envenomations.  

PubMed

This article describes the epidemiology and presentation of human envenomation from marine organisms. Venom pathophysiology, envenomation presentation, and treatment options are discussed for sea snake, stingray, spiny fish, jellyfish, octopus, cone snail, sea urchin, and sponge envenomation. The authors describe the management of common exposures that cause morbidity as well as the keys to recognition and treatment of life-threatening exposures. PMID:24275176

Balhara, Kamna S; Stolbach, Andrew

2014-02-01

473

Marine Pollution  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Created by William Barker and David Smith for the Connected Curriculum Project, this module enables the user to carry out a short study of the relationship between concentration of a marine pollutant and shell thickness of mussels; to practice writing about the results of a mathematical study. This is one within a much larger set of learning modules hosted by Duke University.

Barker, William

474

Marine Pollution  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

With some knowledge of MatLab, Mathcad, Maple, or Mathmatica, one should be able to carry out a short study of the relationship between concentration of a marine pollutant and shell thickness of mussels and practice writing about the results of a mathematical study.

Smith, David

2001-01-22

475

Mariner Missions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mariner was the name given to the earliest set of American space missions to explore the planets and to the spacecraft developed to carry them out. The missions were planned and executed by the JET PROPULSION LABORATORY (JPL) of the California Institute of Technology, which had been designated by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) as its lead center for planetary missions....

Snyder, C.; Murdin, P.

2000-11-01

476

Marine Mammals.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Marine mammals have not only fascinated and inspired human beings for thousands of years, but they also support a big business by providing flesh for sea-borne factories, sustaining Arctic lifestyles and traditions, and attracting tourists to ocean aquaria. While they are being harpooned, bludgeoned, shot, netted, and trained to jump through…

Meith, Nikki

477

Recreational Value of an Oasis in Oman  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Increasing demand for water to develop non-agricultural activities is causing water to be diverted to high-value uses at the expense of irrigation. However, agriculture provides a flow of amenities in the desert environment which are not either accounted or paid. Oases are spread all over the globe and are threatened for various reasons among which is the high pressure of demand for fresh water. This paper estimates the recreation use value of an oasis. The paper is based on the Misfat Al-Abryeen oasis in Oman, a man-made area of streams and woodland. The travel cost method is used through an on-site questionnaire distributed to 230 visitors. Around 75% of visitors to the oasis also visited other historical or ecological sites during the same day-trip. The econometric model is estimated using negative binomial regression with endogenous stratification. The average consumer surplus, or benefit, from visiting Misfat Al-Abryeen is estimated at US 104.74 per individual per trip. The total social benefit from this oasis is estimated at 366,590 per year. These results underscore the importance of the role played by irrigated agriculture in the provision of amenity services for the tourism sector in a desert environment. The sustainability of the irrigation activity depends on the recognition of the recreation role of oases and the transfer of part of these benefits to the farmers who maintain the irrigation system. The implementation of an entrance fee to the oasis might increase farmers' profit by 6-21%.

Zekri, Slim; Mbaga, Msafiri; Fouzai, Ayoub; Al-Shaqsi, Saif

2011-07-01

478

Relationship between Enterococcal Levels and Sediment Biofilms at Recreational Beaches in South Florida  

PubMed Central

Enterococci, recommended at the U.S. federal level for monitoring water quality at marine recreational beaches, have been found to reside and grow within beach sands. However, the environmental and ecological factors affecting enterococcal persistence remain poorly understood, making it difficult to determine levels of fecal pollution and assess human health risks. Here we document the presence of enterococci associated with beach sediment biofilms at eight south Florida recreational beaches. Enterococcal levels were highest in supratidal sands, where they displayed a nonlinear, unimodal relationship with extracellular polymeric secretions (EPS), the primary component of biofilms. Enterococcal levels peaked at intermediate levels of EPS, suggesting that biofilms may promote the survival of enterococci but also inhibit enterococci as the biofilm develops within beach sands. Analysis of bacterial community profiles determined by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphisms showed the bacterial communities of supratidal sediments to be significantly different from intertidal and subtidal communities; however, no differences were observed in bacterial community compositions associated with different EPS concentrations. Our results suggest that supratidal sands are a microbiologically unique environment favorable for the incorporation and persistence of enterococci within beach sediment biofilms. PMID:22706061

Piggot, Alan M.; Johnson, Sara; Phillips, Matthew C.; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M.

2012-01-01

479

Ghent University: Marine Biology Section  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website features Ghent University's Marine Biology Section. The Section's homepage links to information on research, publications, section staff, and more. Involved in marine ecosystem research since the 1970s, some of the Marine Biology Section's current interests include: Atlantic Ocean Deep-sea Areas, Biology of the Antartic Meiobenthos, Ecology of Tropical Estuaries and Lagoons, Ecophysiology of Meiobenthos, and more. The site links to basic information about recent research projects as well as information on environmental management research for coastal zones, sampling and analyses equipment, and one available database focusing on marine Nematoda and Mysida. The site provides research interests and contact information for faculty, and a list of publications and Ph.D. Theses from 1969-2003 (with PDF files for publication abstracts from 1994 on). The site also offers a list of relevant links.

480

Opinions of fisheries researchers, managers, and anglers towards recreational fishing issues: an exploratory analysis for North America  

SciTech Connect

There is a need to better understand the perspectives of various recreational fishing stakeholder groups regarding key issues related to fisheries sustainability. To provide a first snapshot and to inform future human dimension studies in this area, we distributed a Web-based open-access survey to fisheries researchers, fisheries managers, and anglers in North America. Attitudes of these respondents towards issues such as overharvest, impacts of catch and release, recreational fisheries management, and research priorities for the future were assessed. We found similar opinions and perspectives by the responding recreational anglers, managers,and researchers on a number of issues, such as the perceived impact of commercial fishing contributing to fish stock declines, the perceived importance of using and promoting gear that minimizes stress and injury to individual fish when fish are to be released, and the belief that conflicts among stakeholders is growing as is the global anti-fishing movement based on animal rights thinking. Differences among responding groups included that researchers tended to be more concerned than anglers and managers with the potential of recreational angling contributing to fish stock declines. Responding anglers were also less content with their involvement in the fisheries management process than were responding managers and researchers, and these anglers also indicated a greater desire for more human dimensions research on understanding angler attitudes and behavior than was evident for responding managers and researchers. This preliminary survey revealed some variation in attitudes among recreational fisheries stakeholders. However, due to lack of random sampling, the study results cannot be extrapolated to the population level. We nevertheless conclude that improved communication and better understanding about the different perspectives among fisheries researchers, managers, and anglers and intrasectorally among different angling groups are needed, particularly when addressing contentious issues of relevance for the entire recreational fishing sector.

Hasler, Caleb T.; Colotelo, Alison HA; Rapp, Tobias; Jamieson, Elizabeth; Bellehumeur, Karyne; Arlinghaus, Robert; Cooke, Steven J.

2011-05-02

481

Recreation ecology research findings: Implications for wilderness and park managers  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Recreationists unintentionally trample vegetation, erode soil, and disturb wildlife. Such human-related impacts present a dilemma for managers charged with the dual objectives of providing recreational opportunities and preserving natural environments. This paper presents some of the principal findings and management implications from research on visitor impacts to protected areas, termed recreation ecology research. This field of study seeks to identify the type and extent of resource impacts and to evaluate relationships between use-related, environmental, and managerial factors. The capabilities and managerial utility of recreation impact monitoring are also described.

Marion, J.L.

1998-01-01

482

Using Challenge Cost-Share Partnerships to Communicate with Ethnically Diverse Recreation Users in  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recreation managers have established more effective communication with dispersed recreation users of the Angeles National Forest in southern California, through the development and use of Challenge Cost-Share Partnerships with regional non-profit organizations. From 1988 to 1990, researchers con­ ducted a series of surveys of recreation visitor populations in the heavily used dispersed recreation areas of San Gabriel Canyon, on the

Thomas W. Spencer; Robert E. Pfister

483

Subdividing Rural America: Impacts of Recreational Lot and Second Home Development. Executive Summary.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recreational land development in the United States falls into three general categories with the first two being more popular: (1) unimproved recreational subdivisions, largely speculative investments; (2) improved second home projects, used both for recreation and speculation; and (3) high amenity resort communities, recreational areas for higher…

American Society of Planning Officials, Chicago, IL.

484

Private Assistance in Outdoor Recreation. A Directory of Organizations Providing Aid to Individuals and Public Groups.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In an effort to aid private recreation area developers and operators, and other individuals interested in outdoor recreation, this Bureau of Outdoor Recreation publication lists a number of professional societies and national organizations providing low-cost publications and other aids to planning, development, and operation of outdoor recreation

Bureau of Outdoor Recreation (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

485

Problem Solving: Tools and Techniques for the Park and Recreation Administrator. Fourth Edition  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book is a useful tool for recreation educators in carrying out their responsibilities for preparing the next generation for effective service in recreation and parks. The need for this book is apparent, because few recreation curricula include courses in problem solving. It is true that many texts dealing with recreation describe policies and…

Arnold, Margaret L.; Heyne, Linda A.; Busser, James A.

2005-01-01

486

Marine Jet  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The marine turbine pump pictured is the Jacuzzi 12YJ, a jet propulsion system for pleasure or commercial boating. Its development was aided by a NASA computer program made available by the Computer Software Management and Information Center (COSMIC) at the University of Georgia. The manufacturer, Jacuzzi Brothers, Incorporated, Little Rock, Arkansas, used COSMIC'S Computer Program for Predicting Turbopump Inducer Loading, which enabled substantial savings in development time and money through reduction of repetitive testing.

1978-01-01

487

Marine Iguana  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

No iguana wants to be cooked alive on a hot rock and then served up as dinner for a Galapagos hawk. But it turns out the marine iguanas have a strategy that warns them of the presence of hawks they canât see. They learned to tune in to a kind of police scannerâ¦the alarm calls of mockingbirds.Also included is a Learn More section that provides background information on the scientists recorded in the podcast, lessons, images, and cool facts.

2009-01-01

488

Mariners' Museum  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Located in Newport News, Virginia, the Mariner's Museum is one of the largest international maritime history museums filled to the crow's nest with prized artifacts that celebrate the spirit of seafaring adventure. Site features eight online exhibitions including: The Age of Exploration, the USS Monitor, Chesapeake Bay, the Transatlantic Slave Trade, and more. Also includes visitor information, permanent and temporary museum exhibit information, and an image collection.

489

Marine Sanctuaries  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this Science NetLinks lesson, students will learn about the national marine sanctuaries found in the Pacific and Atlantic oceans and off the coast of American Samoa. They include breeding and feeding grounds of whales, sea lions, sharks, and sea turtles; significant coral reefs and kelp forest habitats; and the remains of the U.S.S. Monitor, a Civil War ironclad sunk off the coast of North Carolina.

Science Netlinks;

2002-06-10

490

Biomarkers of lung inflammation in recreational joggers exposed to ozone.  

PubMed

Humans exhibit an acute inflammatory response in the lungs after controlled laboratory exposure to ozone. The present study was designed to test whether biomarkers of inflammation are detectable in humans exposed to ozone and associated copollutants under natural conditions outdoors. Bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was carried out on 19 normal volunteer joggers from Governors Island, NY, who exercised in the afternoon during the 1992 summer (S1) season. Fifteen subjects were retested during the following, low ozone, winter season (W). The BAL protocol involved an initial instillation of 20 ml saline followed by four sequential 50-ml saline washes carried out in both the right middle lobe and the lingula. The eight 50-ml samples were pooled as the 'alveolar' sample. Analyses performed on the alveolar lavage samples included cell differentials, release of IL-8, TNF-alpha, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) by pooled cells, and levels of IL-8, protein, LDH, fibronectin, alpha1-antitrypsin (alpha1-AT), complement fragment 3a (C3a), and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in lavage fluids. Release of ROS by stimulated BAL cells was lower in S1 than in W (p = 0.03). In contrast, LDH levels in BAL fluids were 2-fold higher in S1 than in W (p = 0.02), as were IL-8 (p = 0.12) and PGE2 (p = 0.06). These results suggest a possible ongoing inflammatory response in the lungs of recreational joggers exposed to ozone and associated copollutants during the summer months. PMID:8912760

Kinney, P L; Nilsen, D M; Lippmann, M; Brescia, M; Gordon, T; McGovern, T; El-Fawal, H; Devlin, R B; Rom, W N

1996-11-01

491

PRELIMINARY HEALTH BURDEN ANALYSIS FOR EPIDEMIOLOGIC RECREATIONAL WATER STUDY  

EPA Science Inventory

Introduction: The National Epidemiological and Environmental Assessment of Recreational Water Study (NEEAR) offers a rare opportunity for researchers. The study's design involves the collection of health data before and after visiting the beach in conjunction with water quality...

492

109. Doughton Park Recreation Area. View of alligator back and ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

109. Doughton Park Recreation Area. View of alligator back and the parkway seen from bluff mountain. Looking west. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

493

114. Doughton Park Recreation Area. View of Laurel Spring Valley ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

114. Doughton Park Recreation Area. View of Laurel Spring Valley in distance, alligator back, and overlook in foreground. Looking west. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

494

115. Doughton Park Recreation Area. View of roadway alignment around ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

115. Doughton Park Recreation Area. View of roadway alignment around alligator back and parking overlook in foreground. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

495

111. Doughton Park Recreation Area. View of parkway with the ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

111. Doughton Park Recreation Area. View of parkway with the road crossing alligator back. Facing southeast. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

496

36 CFR 7.48 - Lake Mead National Recreation Area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Mead National Recreation Area. (a) Aircraft, designated...i) The entire water surface of Lakes Mead and Mohave are designated landing areas, except as restricted...under power on those water surface areas designated as...

2011-07-01

497

67. Smart view recreation area comfort station, reflecting Appalachian Architecture, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

67. Smart view recreation area comfort station, reflecting Appalachian Architecture, was completed by the summer of 1940 by era crews. View to the south-southeast. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

498

70. Smart view recreation area entrance road. View of the ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

70. Smart view recreation area entrance road. View of the snake or worm fences used to reinforce the roadway alignment. Looking north-northwest. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

499

69. Smart view recreation area picnic shelter is a postandbeam ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

69. Smart view recreation area picnic shelter is a post-and-beam structure. Facing south-southwest. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

500

68. Smart view recreation area comfort station with postandrail fence ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

68. Smart view recreation area comfort station with post-and-rail fence reflecting Appalachian culture. Facing west. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC