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1

Sports, Recreation, & Leisure Sample Occupations  

E-print Network

Sports, Recreation, & Leisure Sample Occupations Academic Advisor/Athletes Agent, Business Announcer/Broadcaster Sports Industry Publicist Sports Information Director Sports Lawyer Sports Marketing in Travel, Tourism, Hospitality ................. IIB 39-6000 E2 Career Opportunities in the Sports Industry

Ronquist, Fredrik

2

75 FR 67948 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Marine Recreational Information Program (Marine...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Program (Marine Recreational Fisheries Statistics Survey) AGENCY: National...these requirements, NOAA Fisheries has implemented the Marine...replace the Marine Recreational Fisheries Statistics Survey. MRIP is testing...

2010-11-04

3

HEALTH EFFECTS CRITERIA FOR MARINE RECREATIONAL WATERS  

EPA Science Inventory

The report presents health effects quality criteria for marine recreational waters and a recommendation for a specific criterion among those developed. It is the mathematical relationship of the swimming-associated rate of gastrointestinal symptoms among bathers to the quality of...

4

SAMPLING DESIGN FOR ASSESSING RECREATIONAL WATER QUALITY  

EPA Science Inventory

Current U.S. EPA guidelines for monitoring recreatoinal water quality refer to the geometric mean density of indicator organisms, enterococci and E. coli in marine and fresh water, respectively, from at least five samples collected over a four-week period. In order to expand thi...

5

SCHROEDER AND LOVE.: RECREATIONAL FISHING AND MARINE FISH POPULATIONS CalCOFI Rep., Vol. 43, 2002  

E-print Network

SCHROEDER AND LOVE.: RECREATIONAL FISHING AND MARINE FISH POPULATIONS CalCOFI Rep., Vol. 43, 2002 RECREATIONAL FISHING AND MARINE FISH POPULATIONS IN CALIFORNIA DONNA M. SCHROEDER AND MILTON S. LOVE Marine@lifesci.ucsb.edu ABSTRACT We present and review information regarding recre- ational angling and exploited marine fish

Love, Milton

6

76 FR 28421 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Marine Recreational Fisheries Statistics Survey  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Collection; Comment Request; Marine Recreational Fisheries Statistics Survey AGENCY: National Oceanic and Atmospheric...directed to Rob Andrews, NOAA, National Marine Fisheries Service, Fisheries Statistics Division, Phone: (301) 713-2328...

2011-05-17

7

75 FR 21231 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Marine Recreational Fisheries Statistics Survey  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Request; Marine Recreational Fisheries Statistics Survey AGENCY: National Oceanic...provisions of the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act...conservation and management of fishery resources. The marine...

2010-04-23

8

SOUTHEAST MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERY STATISTICAL SURVEY: DISTANCE AND CATCH BASED CHOICE SETS  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we estimate the economic value associated with marine recreational fishing in the southeast United States using the random utility model. The data used is the Southeast (North Carolina to Louisiana) Marine Recreational Fishery Statistics Survey (SE MRFSS). The geographic extent of the market and potential catch are used to determine the effect of choice set definition on

John C. Whitehead; Timothy C. Haab

1999-01-01

9

Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment of Pathogenic Vibrios in Marine Recreational Waters of Southern California  

PubMed Central

This study investigated the occurrence of three types of vibrios in Southern California recreational beach waters during the peak marine bathing season in 2007. Over 160 water samples were concentrated and enriched for the detection of vibrios. Four sets of PCR primers, specific for Vibrio cholerae, V. parahaemolyticus, and V. vulnificus species and the V. parahaemolyticus toxin gene, respectively, were used for the amplification of bacterial genomic DNA. Of 66 samples from Doheny State Beach, CA, 40.1% were positive for V. cholerae and 27.3% were positive for V. parahaemolyticus, and 1 sample (1.5%) was positive for the V. parahaemolyticus toxin gene. Of the 96 samples from Avalon Harbor, CA, 18.7% were positive for V. cholerae, 69.8% were positive for V. parahaemolyticus, and 5.2% were positive for the V. parahaemolyticus toxin gene. The detection of the V. cholerae genetic marker was significantly more frequent at Doheny State Beach, while the detection of the V. parahaemolyticus genetic marker was significantly more frequent at Avalon Harbor. A probability-of-illness model for V. parahaemolyticus was applied to the data. The risk for bathers exposed to recreational waters at two beaches was evaluated through Monte Carlo simulation techniques. The results suggest that the microbial risk from vibrios during beach recreation was below the illness benchmark set by the U.S. EPA. However, the risk varied with location and the type of water recreation activities. Surfers and children were exposed to a higher risk of vibrio diseases. Microbial risk assessment can serve as a useful tool for the management of risk related to opportunistic marine pathogens. PMID:23104412

Dickinson, Gregory; Lim, Keah-ying

2013-01-01

10

Presence of Pathogens and Indicator Microbes at a Non-Point Source Subtropical Recreational Marine Beach ? †  

PubMed Central

Swimming in ocean water, including ocean water at beaches not impacted by known point sources of pollution, is an increasing health concern. This study was an initial evaluation of the presence of indicator microbes and pathogens and the association among the indicator microbes, pathogens, and environmental conditions at a subtropical, recreational marine beach in south Florida impacted by non-point sources of pollution. Twelve water and eight sand samples were collected during four sampling events at high or low tide under elevated or reduced solar insolation conditions. The analyses performed included analyses of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) (fecal coliforms, Escherichia coli, enterococci, and Clostridium perfringens), human-associated microbial source tracking (MST) markers (human polyomaviruses [HPyVs] and Enterococcus faecium esp gene), and pathogens (Vibrio vulnificus, Staphylococcus aureus, enterovirus, norovirus, hepatitis A virus, Cryptosporidium spp., and Giardia spp.). The enterococcus concentrations in water and sand determined by quantitative PCR were greater than the concentrations determined by membrane filtration measurement. The FIB concentrations in water were below the recreational water quality standards for three of the four sampling events, when pathogens and MST markers were also generally undetectable. The FIB levels exceeded regulatory guidelines during one event, and this was accompanied by detection of HPyVs and pathogens, including detection of the autochthonous bacterium V. vulnificus in sand and water, detection of the allochthonous protozoans Giardia spp. in water, and detection of Cryptosporidium spp. in sand samples. The elevated microbial levels were detected at high tide and under low-solar-insolation conditions. Additional sampling should be conducted to further explore the relationships between tidal and solar insolation conditions and between indicator microbes and pathogens in subtropical recreational marine waters impacted by non-point source pollution. PMID:19966020

Abdelzaher, Amir M.; Wright, Mary E.; Ortega, Cristina; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M.; Miller, Gary; Elmir, Samir; Newman, Xihui; Shih, Peter; Bonilla, J. Alfredo; Bonilla, Tonya D.; Palmer, Carol J.; Scott, Troy; Lukasik, Jerzy; Harwood, Valerie J.; McQuaig, Shannon; Sinigalliano, Chris; Gidley, Maribeth; Plano, Lisa R. W.; Zhu, Xiaofang; Wang, John D.; Fleming, Lora E.

2010-01-01

11

Human-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from a subtropical recreational marine beach.  

PubMed

Reports of Staphylococcus aureus including methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) detected in marine environments have occurred since the early 1990 s. This investigation sought to isolate and characterize S. aureus from marine waters and sand at a subtropical recreational beach, with and without bathers present, in order to investigate possible sources and to identify the risks to bathers of exposure to these organisms. During 40 days over 17 months, 1,001 water and 36 intertidal sand samples were collected by either bathers or investigators at a subtropical recreational beach. Methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) and MRSA were isolated and identified using selective growth media and an organism-specific molecular marker. Antimicrobial susceptibility, staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) type, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) pattern, multi-locus sequence type (MLST), and staphylococcal protein A (spa) type were characterized for all MRSA. S. aureus was isolated from 248 (37 %) bather nearby water samples at a concentration range of <2-780 colony forming units per ml, 102 (31 %) ambient water samples at a concentration range of <2-260 colony forming units per ml, and 9 (25 %) sand samples. Within the sand environment, S. aureus was isolated more often from above the intertidal zone than from intermittently wet or inundated sand. A total of 1334 MSSA were isolated from 37 sampling days and 22 MRSA were isolated from ten sampling days. Seventeen of the 22 MRSA were identified by PFGE as the community-associated MRSA USA300. MRSA isolates were all SCCmec type IVa, encompassed five spa types (t008, t064, t622, t688, and t723), two MLST types (ST8 and ST5), and 21 of 22 isolates carried the genes for Panton-Valentine leukocidin. There was a correlation (r = 0.45; p = 0.05) between the daily average number of bathers and S. aureus in the water; however, no association between exposure to S. aureus in these waters and reported illness was found. This report supports the concept that humans are a potential direct source for S. aureus in marine waters. PMID:23553001

Plano, Lisa R W; Shibata, Tomoyuki; Garza, Anna C; Kish, Jonathan; Fleisher, Jay M; Sinigalliano, Christopher D; Gidley, Maribeth L; Withum, Kelly; Elmir, Samir M; Hower, Suzanne; Jackson, Charlene R; Barrett, John B; Cleary, Timothy; Davidson, Maureen; Davis, Johnnie; Mukherjee, Sampa; Fleming, Lora E; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M

2013-05-01

12

A MARINE RECREATIONAL WATER QUALITY CRITERION CONSISTENT WITH INDICATOR CONCEPTS AND RISK ANALYSIS  

EPA Science Inventory

An overivew is provided of water quality criteria developed for marine recreational waters by EPA in 1979. The crierion used is the strength of the association with the rates of the important symptoms, such as those that correlate best with swimming in wastewater-polluted waters....

13

Pathogenic marine vibrio species in selected Nova Scotian recreational coastal waters.  

PubMed

Seven heavily frequented coastal recreation sites serving Metropolitan Halifax and Dartmouth were investigated to determine the numbers and species of pathogenic marine vibrios (PMV) present. Seawater, mussels and sea gull feces were cultured using quantitative methods and the effects of temperature and fecal pollution noted. Emergency rooms serving the sites under surveillance were monitored for PMV-related infections. All 11 recognized species of pathogenic marine vibrios were recovered from the 7 sites. Estuarine sites yielded a greater variety of species and greater numbers of PMV than non-estuarine sites. Culture of hand washings after immersion in seawater did not demonstrate contamination of skin by PMV. We did not demonstrate any cases of PMV infection associated with the 7 surveillance sites. PMV contamination of marine recreational waters does not frequently result in superficial infections. PMID:2207947

Badley, A; Phillips, B; Haldane, D J; Dalton, M T

1990-01-01

14

Consistent size-independent harvest selection on fish body shape in two recreationally exploited marine species  

PubMed Central

Harvesting wild animals may exert size-independent selection pressures on a range of morphological, life history, and behavioral traits. Most work so far has focused on selection pressures on life history traits and body size as morphological trait. We studied here how recreational fishing selects for morphological traits related to body shape, which may correlate with underlying swimming behavior. Using landmark-based geometric morphometrics, we found consistent recreational fishing-induced selection pressures on body shape in two recreationally exploited marine fish species. We show that individuals with larger-sized mouths and more streamlined and elongated bodies were more vulnerable to passively operated hook-and-line fishing independent of the individual's body size or condition. While the greater vulnerability of individuals with larger mouth gapes can be explained by the direct physical interaction with hooks, selection against streamlined and elongated individuals could either involve a specific foraging mode or relate to underlying elevated swimming behavior. Harvesting using passive gear is common around the globe, and thus, size-independent selection on body shape is expected to be widespread potentially leaving behind individuals with smaller oral gapes and more compact bodies. This might have repercussions for food webs by altering foraging and predation. PMID:25360257

Alós, Josep; Palmer, Miquel; Linde-Medina, Marta; Arlinghaus, Robert

2014-01-01

15

A descriptive epidemiology of sport and recreation injuries in a population-based sample: results from the Alberta Sport and Recreation Injury Survey (ASRIS).  

PubMed

The 1996 Alberta Sport and Recreation Injury Survey is a retrospective study describing the annual incidence of injuries in the province of Alberta resulting from sport and recreational involvement. Data was collected by means of a telephone survey using random digit dialing techniques to obtain a representative sample of Albertans in the winter of 1995-96. The sample produced a total of 3,790 respondents from 1,478 households evenly split between genders, with an age range of 6 to 93 years. The survey asked information regarding medically attended, non-fatal injuries resulting from sport and recreational activities. Findings reveal an annual incidence of sport or recreational injuries of 11%. Among those reporting a sport or recreational injury, the most common types of injuries were a sprained/torn ligament (31%), strained/pulled muscle (19%), and fracture (13%). The most common bodily locations of injuries were the knees (21%) and the ankle (14%). PMID:9524392

Mummery, W K; Spence, J C; Vincenten, J A; Voaklander, D C

1998-01-01

16

Water quality, weather and environmental factors associated with fecal indicator organism density in beach sand at two recreational marine beaches.  

PubMed

Recent studies showing an association between fecal indicator organisms (FIOs) in sand and gastrointestinal (GI) illness among beachgoers with sand contact have important public health implications because of the large numbers of people who recreate at beaches and engage in sand contact activities. Yet, factors that influence fecal pollution in beach sand remain unclear. During the 2007 National Epidemiological and Environmental Assessment of Recreational (NEEAR) Water Study, sand samples were collected at three locations (60m apart) on weekend days (Sat, Sun) and holidays between June and September at two marine beaches - Fairhope Beach, AL and Goddard Beach, RI - with nearby publicly-owned treatment works (POTWs) outfalls. F(+) coliphage, enterococci, Bacteroidales, fecal Bacteroides spp., and Clostridium spp. were measured in sand using culture and qPCR-based calibrator-cell equivalent methods. Water samples were also collected on the same days, times and transects as the 144 sand samples and were assayed using the same FIO measurements. Weather and environmental data were collected at the time of sample collection. Mean FIO concentrations in sand varied over time, but not space. Enterococci CFU and CCE densities in sand were not correlated, although other FIOs in sand were. The strongest correlation between FIO density in sand and water was fecal Bacteroides CCE, followed by enterococci CFU, Clostridium spp. CCE, and Bacteroidales CCE. Overall, the factors associated with FIO concentrations in sand were related to the sand-water interface (i.e., sand-wetting) and included daily average densities of FIOs in water, rainfall, and wave height. Targeted monitoring that focuses on daily trends of sand FIO variability, combined with information about specific water quality, weather, and environmental factors may inform beach monitoring and management decisions to reduce microbial burdens in beach sand. The views expressed in this paper are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. PMID:25150738

Heaney, Christopher D; Exum, Natalie G; Dufour, Alfred P; Brenner, Kristen P; Haugland, Richard A; Chern, Eunice; Schwab, Kellogg J; Love, David C; Serre, Marc L; Noble, Rachel; Wade, Timothy J

2014-11-01

17

Kelp Gulls (Larus dominicanus) killed and injured by discarded monofilament lines at a marine recreational fishery in northern Patagonia.  

PubMed

Among marine debris, monofilament fishing lines often result in negative impacts on marine organisms. We characterized marine debris and incidence of lost and discarded monofilament lines along beaches used by recreational fishers, and report the impact of lines on Kelp Gulls (Larus dominicanus) at the Bahía San Blas protected area, site of one of the main shore-based recreational fisheries of the southwestern Atlantic. Over 55% of the marine debris recorded originated from recreational fishing activities. Balls of tangled monofilament lines were found at a rate of 40.5 items per km. A total of 27 adult Kelp Gulls were found entangled with monofilament. All individuals were tangled to vegetation within colony boundaries. Four of the gulls had a monofilament line protruding from the bill, showing that they may be also killed when trying to obtain bait. Our results indicate that lost or discarded monofilament lines in the Bahía San Blas recreational fishing area result in undesired impacts on coastal wildlife. PMID:24951250

Yorio, Pablo; Marinao, Cristian; Suárez, Nicolás

2014-08-15

18

Recreational SCUBA divers' willingness to pay for marine biodiversity in Barbados.  

PubMed

The use of natural resources and the services they provide often do not have an explicit price and are therefore undervalued in decision-making, leading to environmental degradation. To 'monetize' the benefits from these services requires the use of non-market valuation techniques. Using a stated preference survey of recreational divers in Barbados conducted between 2007 and 2009, the economic value of marine biodiversity to recreational SCUBA divers in Barbados was estimated. In addition to a variety of demographic variables, divers were asked about their level of experience, expenditures related to travel and diving, and encounters with fish and sea turtles. Divers then completed a choice experiment, selecting between alternative dives with varying characteristics including price, crowding, fish diversity, encounters with sea turtles, and coral cover. Results indicate that divers in Barbados have a clear appreciation of reef quality variables. Willingness to pay for good coral cover, fish diversity and presence of sea turtles is significantly higher than prices paid for dives. In general, divers valued reef attributes similarly, although their appreciation of low density of divers at a site and high coral cover varied with prior diving experience. The results of this study demonstrate the economic value generated in Barbados by the recreational SCUBA diving industry and highlight the potential for substantial additional economic contributions with improvements to the quality of a variety of reef attributes. These results could inform management decisions regarding reef use and sea turtle conservation, and could aid in the development of informed 'win-win' policies aimed at maximizing returns from diving while reducing negative impacts often associated with tourism activities. PMID:23523829

Schuhmann, Peter W; Casey, James F; Horrocks, Julia A; Oxenford, Hazel A

2013-05-30

19

[Land and marine fauna constituting a threat for recreational divers in the tropics].  

PubMed

Due to intensively growing international tourism, increasing numbers of people leave for countries with hot climates, where various threats for human health and life exist. Besides climatic and sanitary conditions, a rich fauna, represented by predators and venomous animals, can be included. Based on available world literature and their own observations, the authors present the threats that a tourist can possibly encounter whilst relaxing on the beach or during recreational diving in tropical waters. When staying in water, a large threat is posed by marine fish of prey (sharks, barracuda, muraena), Cnidaria (jellyfish, corals, anemones) and venomous animals (fish, sea snakes). On land, on the other hand, a threat can be posed by venomous arthropods (scorpions, spiders) and Hymenoptera insects. The study presents the most important representatives of fauna present in coastal areas frequently visited by diving enthusiasts. Also, clinical image and conduct in the case of body injures are discussed. PMID:19112854

Korzeniewski, Krzysztof

2008-09-01

20

The Social and Economic Significance of Recreation Activities in the Marine Environment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although the data obtained by an Outdoor Recreation Resources Review Commission in 1960 indicated that 44 percent of participants in outdoor recreation prefer water-based activities, the potential demand for recreation within the coastal zone is much greater than that study indicates, because the unfulfilled recreational demands of the urban…

Ditton, Robert B.

21

Cryptosporidium and Giardia in tropical recreational marine waters contaminated with domestic sewage: estimation of bathing-associated disease risks.  

PubMed

Sewage is a major contributor to pollution problems involving human pathogens in tropical coastal areas. This study investigated the occurrence of intestinal protozoan parasites (Giardia and Cryptosporidium) in tropical recreational marine waters contaminated with sewage. The potential risks of Cryptosporidium and Giardia infection from recreational water exposure were estimated from the levels of viable (oo) cysts (DIC+, DAPI+, PI-) found in near-shore swimming areas using an exponential dose response model. A Monte Carlo uncertainty analysis was performed in order to determine the probability distribution of risks. Microbial indicators of recreational water quality (enterococci, Clostridium perfringens) and genetic markers of sewage pollution (human-specific Bacteroidales marker [HF183] and Clostridium coccoides) were simultaneously evaluated in order to estimate the extent of water quality deterioration associated with human wastes. The study revealed the potential risk of parasite infections via primary contact with tropical marine waters contaminated with sewage; higher risk estimates for Giardia than for Cryptosporidium were found. Mean risks estimated by Monte Carlo were below the U.S. EPA upper bound on recreational risk of 0.036 for cryptosporidiosis and giardiasis for both children and adults. However, 95th percentile estimates for giardiasis for children exceeded the 0.036 level. Environmental surveillance of microbial pathogens is crucial in order to control and eradicate the effects that increasing anthropogenic impacts have on marine ecosystems and human health. PMID:24975093

Betancourt, Walter Q; Duarte, Diana C; Vásquez, Rosa C; Gurian, Patrick L

2014-08-15

22

Valuing recreational benefits of coral reefs: the case of Mombasa Marine National Park and Reserve, Kenya.  

PubMed

A contingent valuation study was conducted with adult Kenyan citizens and foreign tourists to estimate the value of recreational benefits arising from coral reefs at Mombasa Marine National Park and Reserve (MMNPR), and to assess the implications for local reef management. Citizen and foreign visitors to MMNPR were willing to pay an extra $2.2 (median = $1.6) and $8 (median = $6.7) per visit respectively, in addition to current park entrance fees, to support reef quality improvements. By aggregating visitors' willingness to pay bids over the number of visitors to MMNPR in 2006-2007 the value of benefits was estimated at $346,733, which was more than twice the total annual operational expenditure of $152,383 for MMNPR. The findings indicate that annual revenues from citizen and foreign visitors may be increased by 60% to $261,932 through the implementation of proposed higher park fees of $3.10 for citizens and $15 for foreign visitors. However, any fee increase would serve to intensify concerns among citizens that only relatively affluent Kenyans can afford to visit MMNPR. Park managers need to demonstrate that the extra revenue would be used to fund the proposed conservation activities. This valuation study demonstrates that visitors are prepared to pay higher user fees for access to the marine protected area revealing considerable untapped resource to finance reef quality improvements. PMID:19937021

Ransom, Kevin P; Mangi, Stephen C

2010-01-01

23

Valuing Recreational Benefits of Coral Reefs: The Case of Mombasa Marine National Park and Reserve, Kenya  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A contingent valuation study was conducted with adult Kenyan citizens and foreign tourists to estimate the value of recreational benefits arising from coral reefs at Mombasa Marine National Park and Reserve (MMNPR), and to assess the implications for local reef management. Citizen and foreign visitors to MMNPR were willing to pay an extra 2.2 (median = 1.6) and 8 (median = 6.7) per visit respectively, in addition to current park entrance fees, to support reef quality improvements. By aggregating visitors’ willingness to pay bids over the number of visitors to MMNPR in 2006-2007 the value of benefits was estimated at 346,733, which was more than twice the total annual operational expenditure of 152,383 for MMNPR. The findings indicate that annual revenues from citizen and foreign visitors may be increased by 60% to 261,932 through the implementation of proposed higher park fees of 3.10 for citizens and 15 for foreign visitors. However, any fee increase would serve to intensify concerns among citizens that only relatively affluent Kenyans can afford to visit MMNPR. Park managers need to demonstrate that the extra revenue would be used to fund the proposed conservation activities. This valuation study demonstrates that visitors are prepared to pay higher user fees for access to the marine protected area revealing considerable untapped resource to finance reef quality improvements.

Ransom, Kevin P.; Mangi, Stephen C.

2010-01-01

24

Traditional and Molecular Analyses for Fecal Indicator Bacteria in Non-point Source Subtropical Recreational Marine Waters  

PubMed Central

The use of enterococci as the primary fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) for the determination of recreational water safety has been questioned, particularly in sub/tropical marine waters without known point sources of sewage. Alternative FIB (such as the Bacteroidales group) and alternative measurement methods (such as rapid molecular testing) have been proposed to supplement or replace current marine water quality testing methods which require culturing enterococci. Moreover, environmental parameters have also been proposed to supplement current monitoring programs. The objective of this study was to evaluate the health risks to humans from exposure to subtropical recreational marine waters with no known point source. The study reported symptoms between one set of human subjects randomly assigned to marine water exposure with intensive environmental monitoring compared with other subjects who did not have exposure. In addition, illness outcomes among the exposed bathers were compared to levels of traditional and alternative FIB (as measured by culture-based and molecular-based methods), and compared to easily measured environmental parameters. Results demonstrated an increase in self-reported gastrointestinal, respiratory and skin illnesses among bathers vs. non-bathers. Among the bathers, a dose-response relationship by logistic regression modeling was observed for skin illness, where illness was positively related to enterococci enumeration by membrane filtration (odds ratio =1.46 [95% confidence interval=0.97-2.21] per increasing log10 unit of enterococci exposure) and positively related to 24 hour antecedent rain fall (1.04 [1.01 – 1.07] per increasing millimeters of rain). Acute febrile respiratory illness was inversely related to water temperature (0.74 [0.56-0.98] per increasing degree of water temperature). There were no significant dose response relationships between report of human illness and any of the other FIB or environmental measures. Therefore, for non-point source subtropical recreational marine waters, this study suggests that humans may be at increased risk of reported illness, and that the currently recommended and investigational FIB may not track gastrointestinal illness under these conditions; the relationship between other human illness and environmental measures is less clear. PMID:20605185

Sinigalliano, Christopher D.; Fleisher, Jay M.; Gidley, Maribeth L.; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M.; Shibata, Tomoyuki; Plano, Lisa R.W.; Elmir, Samir M.; Wanless, David; Bartkowiak, Jakub; Boiteau, Rene; Withum, Kelly; Abdelzaher, Amir M.; He, Guoqing; Ortega, Cristina; Zhu, Xiaofang; Wright, Mary E.; Kish, Jonathan; Hollenbeck, Julie; Scott, Troy; Backer, Lorraine C.; Fleming, Lora E.

2010-01-01

25

RECREATIONAL CONSTITUENTS  

E-print Network

.S. Department of Commerce National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration National Marine Fisheries Service NOAA-F/SPO-141 March 2014 U.S. Department of Commerce Penny Pritzker, Secretary of Commerce National OceanicRECREATIONAL FISHERIES CONSTITUENTS ECONOMICS WORKSHOP Photo credit: Will Satterthwaite U

26

Adaptive sampling in autonomous marine sensor networks  

E-print Network

In this thesis, an innovative architecture for real-time adaptive and cooperative control of autonomous sensor platforms in a marine sensor network is described in the context of the autonomous oceanographic network scenario. ...

Eickstedt, Donald Patrick

2006-01-01

27

QPCR Determined Fecal Indicator Bacterial Densities in Marine Waters from Two Recreational Beaches  

EPA Science Inventory

The use of real-time qPCR to determine fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) densities is currently being investigated by the U.S. EPA. The present recreational water quality guidelines, based on culturable FIB, prevent same day determinations of water quality whereas results from the ...

28

The investment made in serving at-risk children and youth by a national sample of recreation and park agencies  

E-print Network

This study was intended to contribute to a better understanding of the problems, needs, and efforts that are underway in the area of at-risk children and youth programming in a large sample of recreation and park agencies across the nation...

Espericueta, Lorina

2012-06-07

29

Estimation of Recreational Use Value of Forest Resources by Using Individual Travel Cost and Contingent Valuation Methods (Kayabasi Forest Recreation Site Sample)  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, the recreational use value of forest has been estimates by using the Individual Travel Cost and Contingen Valuation Methods with the case study of Kayabasi Forest Recreation site located in Trabzon City of the East Black Sea Region of Turkey. As a result of the study, the value of Kayabasi Forest Recreation Site (Consumer Suplus) was estimated

Mehmet Pak; Mustafa Fehmi Turker

2006-01-01

30

Quantifying Marine Microbes: A Simulation to Introduce Random Sampling  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Colored beads in a bag are used to represent different types of microbes, with the bag itself representing the ocean. Working in groups, each learner randomly samples ten âmicrobesâ from the âocean,â and records the data. To learn about the inherent variability of random sampling, the learner then compares the composition of their individual samples, their groupâs pooled sample data, and that of the entire population. Introduce this lesson by reading and talking about the diversity of marine microbes.

Bruno, Barbara; Tice, Kimberly; Achilles, Kate; Matsuzaki, Joan

2012-01-01

31

Associations between marine phytoplankton and symptoms of illness among recreational beachgoers in Puerto Rico, 2009  

EPA Science Inventory

While phytoplankton generally have crucial roles in marine ecosystems, a small subset can release toxins and produce harmful algal blooms (HABs). HABs can be a threat to human health as symptoms from exposure range from neurological impairment to gastrointestinal (GI), dermal, a...

32

Quantifying Marine Microbes: A Simulation to Introduce Random Sampling  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lesson introduces random sampling, one of the key concepts employed by scientists to study the natural environment, including microbial communities. Students first learn about the abundance and diversity of marine microbes. Colored beads in a bag are then used to represent different types of microbes, with the bag itself representing the ocean. Working in groups, each student randomly samples ten "microbes" from the "ocean", and records the data. To learn about the inherent variability of random sampling, the students then compare the composition of their individual samples, their group'Âs pooled sample data, and that of the entire population.

Bruno, Barbara

2012-01-01

33

Effects of sampling standardization on estimates of Phanerozoic marine diversification  

E-print Network

Museum of Paleontology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1063; kDepartment of Organismic Biology, Ecology of the fossil record and the way the record is reported. These sampling effects are best quantified database of this kind for the Phanerozoic fossil record of marine invertebrates. We apply four

Roy, Kaustuv

34

Sample Nomination Relationship: Kait is a student in the Recreation Management & Policy  

E-print Network

Department, studying Therapeutic Recreation. She began volunteering with us at Northeast Passage through her decided to volunteer to become an Eating Concern Mentor (ECM). ECM's are highly trained peer educators who provide support and education to UNH students struggling with eating concerns. Nomination: When I first

New Hampshire, University of

35

Performance of barbed and barbless hooks in a marine recreational fishery  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We used an angling study to examine catch per unit effort (CPUE), bait loss, and total landings by anglers fishing with natural bait on barbed and barbless hooks in a nearshore marine sport fishery located in the Gulf of Mexico near St. Petersburg, Florida. Anglers fished half the day with a barbed hook and half the day with a barbless hook. We also recorded anatomical hook placement, severity of injury or bleeding, and hook extraction times for each landed fish. Bait loss, CPUE, and mean length of catch did not differ between gears, but anglers landed 22% more fish with barbed hooks. Loss of hooked fish was significantly higher with barbless hooks, and efficiency appeared to vary among species. Mean unhooking times were significantly shorter with barbless hooks. Anatomical hook placement did not differ between gears and most fish were hooked in the jaws. Bleeding did not differ between gears because bleeding was influenced strongly by hook placement, but barbless hooks reduced unhooking injuries. In this fishery, barbless hooks probably did not reduce hooking mortality and conferred only slight benefits at the expense of reduced catches.

Schaeffer, Jeffrey S.; Hoffman, Elizabeth M.

2002-01-01

36

Assessment of Economic Losses to Recreational Activities from 1988 Marine Pollution Events and Assessment of Economic Losses from Long-Term Contamination of Fish within the New York Bight to New Jersey  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper economic losses from recent marine pollution events associated with recreational activities to New Jersey are examined. In addition, assessment of economic losses from long-term contamination of fish from the New York Bight to New Jersey are presented. During the 1987 and 1988 summer season, marine pollution and debris wash-ups occurred almost simultaneously in New York and New

Douglas D Ofiara; Bernard Brown

1999-01-01

37

Physicochemical parameters aid microbial community? A case study from marine recreational beaches, Southern India.  

PubMed

A total of 176 (water and sediment) samples from 22 stations belonging to four different (urban, semi-urban, rural, and holy places) human habitations of Tamil Nadu beaches were collected and analyzed for physiochemical and microbial parameters during 2008-2009. Bacterial counts were two- to tenfold higher in sediments than in water due to strong bacterial aggregations by dynamic flocculation and rich organic content. The elevated bacterial communities during the monsoon explain rainfalls and several other wastes from inlands. Coliform counts drastically increased at holy and urban places due to pilgrimage and other ritual activities. Higher values of the pollution index (PI) ratio (>1) reveals, human fecal pollutions affect the water quality. The averaged PI ratio shows a substantial higher microbial contamination in holy places than in urban areas and the order of decreasing PI ratios observed were: holy places?>?urban areas?>?semi-urban areas?>?rural areas. Correlation and factor analysis proves microbial communities were not related to physicochemical parameters. Principal component analysis indicates 55.32 % of the total variance resulted from human/animal fecal matters and sewage contaminants whereas 19.95 % were related to organic contents and waste materials from the rivers. More than 80 % of the samples showed a higher fecal coliform and Streptococci by crossing the World Health Organization's permissible limits. PMID:24292984

Vignesh, Sivanandham; Dahms, Hans-Uwe; Emmanuel, Kunnampuram Varghese; Gokul, Murugaiah Santhosh; Muthukumar, Krishnan; Kim, Bong-Rae; James, Rathinam Arthur

2014-03-01

38

Rapidly measured indicators of recreational water quality andswimming-associated illness at marine beaches: a prospective cohort study  

EPA Science Inventory

Background: In the United States and elsewhere, recreational water is monitored for fecal indicator bacteria to prevent illness. Standard methods to measure fecal indicator bacteria take at least 24 hours to obtain results. Molecular approaches such as quantitative polymerase cha...

39

COMPARISON OF ENTEROCCOCUS DENSITIES DETERMINED BY CULTURE AND QPCR ANALYSES IN WATER SAMPLES FROM TWO RECREATION BEACHES  

EPA Science Inventory

Previous studies conducted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) have demonstrated that cell densities of the bacterial genus Enterococcus in water samples are directly correlated with gastroenteritis illness rates in swimmers at both marine and fresh water beaches....

40

Effects of sampling standardization on estimates of Phanerozoic marine diversification.  

PubMed

Global diversity curves reflect more than just the number of taxa that have existed through time: they also mirror variation in the nature of the fossil record and the way the record is reported. These sampling effects are best quantified by assembling and analyzing large numbers of locality-specific biotic inventories. Here, we introduce a new database of this kind for the Phanerozoic fossil record of marine invertebrates. We apply four substantially distinct analytical methods that estimate taxonomic diversity by quantifying and correcting for variation through time in the number and nature of inventories. Variation introduced by the use of two dramatically different counting protocols also is explored. We present sampling-standardized diversity estimates for two long intervals that sum to 300 Myr (Middle Ordovician-Carboniferous; Late Jurassic-Paleogene). Our new curves differ considerably from traditional, synoptic curves. For example, some of them imply unexpectedly low late Cretaceous and early Tertiary diversity levels. However, such factors as the current emphasis in the database on North America and Europe still obscure our view of the global history of marine biodiversity. These limitations will be addressed as the database and methods are refined. PMID:11353852

Alroy, J; Marshall, C R; Bambach, R K; Bezusko, K; Foote, M; Fursich, F T; Hansen, T A; Holland, S M; Ivany, L C; Jablonski, D; Jacobs, D K; Jones, D C; Kosnik, M A; Lidgard, S; Low, S; Miller, A I; Novack-Gottshall, P M; Olszewski, T D; Patzkowsky, M E; Raup, D M; Roy, K; Sepkoski, J J; Sommers, M G; Wagner, P J; Webber, A

2001-05-22

41

Effects of sampling standardization on estimates of Phanerozoic marine diversification  

PubMed Central

Global diversity curves reflect more than just the number of taxa that have existed through time: they also mirror variation in the nature of the fossil record and the way the record is reported. These sampling effects are best quantified by assembling and analyzing large numbers of locality-specific biotic inventories. Here, we introduce a new database of this kind for the Phanerozoic fossil record of marine invertebrates. We apply four substantially distinct analytical methods that estimate taxonomic diversity by quantifying and correcting for variation through time in the number and nature of inventories. Variation introduced by the use of two dramatically different counting protocols also is explored. We present sampling-standardized diversity estimates for two long intervals that sum to 300 Myr (Middle Ordovician-Carboniferous; Late Jurassic-Paleogene). Our new curves differ considerably from traditional, synoptic curves. For example, some of them imply unexpectedly low late Cretaceous and early Tertiary diversity levels. However, such factors as the current emphasis in the database on North America and Europe still obscure our view of the global history of marine biodiversity. These limitations will be addressed as the database and methods are refined. PMID:11353852

Alroy, J.; Marshall, C. R.; Bambach, R. K.; Bezusko, K.; Foote, M.; Fürsich, F. T.; Hansen, T. A.; Holland, S. M.; Ivany, L. C.; Jablonski, D.; Jacobs, D. K.; Jones, D. C.; Kosnik, M. A.; Lidgard, S.; Low, S.; Miller, A. I.; Novack-Gottshall, P. M.; Olszewski, T. D.; Patzkowsky, M. E.; Raup, D. M.; Roy, K.; Sepkoski, J. J.; Sommers, M. G.; Wagner, P. J.; Webber, A.

2001-01-01

42

Water Quality, Weather and Environmental Factors Associated with Fecal Indicator Organism Density in Beach Sand at Two Recreational Marine Beaches  

EPA Science Inventory

Recent studies showing an association between fecal indicator organisms (FIOs and gastrointestinal (GI) illness among beachgoers wit sand contact have important public health implicatons because of the large numbers of people who recreate at beaches and engage in sand contact act...

43

Open Recreation Open Recreation Policy  

E-print Network

43 Open Recreation Open Recreation Policy These policies apply to all University Recreation scheduled for their chosen activity at that time. The Open Recreation Policy has been revised to read due to violations of policies or inappropriate behavior, i.e.: fighting, using abusive language, etc

Amin, S. Massoud

44

Isolation of microplastics in biota-rich seawater samples and marine organisms.  

PubMed

Microplastic litter is a pervasive pollutant present in aquatic systems across the globe. A range of marine organisms have the capacity to ingest microplastics, resulting in adverse health effects. Developing methods to accurately quantify microplastics in productive marine waters, and those internalized by marine organisms, is of growing importance. Here we investigate the efficacy of using acid, alkaline and enzymatic digestion techniques in mineralizing biological material from marine surface trawls to reveal any microplastics present. Our optimized enzymatic protocol can digest >97% (by weight) of the material present in plankton-rich seawater samples without destroying any microplastic debris present. In applying the method to replicate marine samples from the western English Channel, we identified 0.27 microplastics m(-3). The protocol was further used to extract microplastics ingested by marine zooplankton under laboratory conditions. Our findings illustrate that enzymatic digestion can aid the detection of microplastic debris within seawater samples and marine biota. PMID:24681661

Cole, Matthew; Webb, Hannah; Lindeque, Pennie K; Fileman, Elaine S; Halsband, Claudia; Galloway, Tamara S

2014-01-01

45

The Copula Approach to Sample Selection Modelling: An Application to the Recreational Value of Forests  

Microsoft Academic Search

The sample selection model is based upon a bivariate or a multivariate structure, and distributional assumptions are in this context more severe than in univariate settings, due to the limited availability of tractable multivariate distributions. While the standard FIML estimation of the selectivity model assumes normality of the joint distribution, alternative approaches require less stringent distributional hypotheses. As shown by

Elisabetta Strazzera; Margarita Genius

2004-01-01

46

The copula approach of sampling selection modelling: an application to the recreational value of forests  

Microsoft Academic Search

The sample selection model is based upon a bivariate or a multivariate structure, and distributional assumptions are in this context more severe than in univariate settings, due to the limited availability of tractable multivariate distributions. While the standard FIML estimation of the selectivity model assumes normality of the joint distribution, alternative approaches require less stringent distributional hypotheses. As shown by

M. Genius; E. Strazzera

2003-01-01

47

ABOUT THE JOURNAL Marine Resource Economics publishes creative and scholarly  

E-print Network

biodiversity, marine and coastal recreation, marine pollution, offshore oil and gas, seabed mining, renewable pollution, coastal and marine recreation, ocean energy resources, coastal climate adaptation, ecosystemABOUT THE JOURNAL Marine Resource Economics publishes creative and scholarly economic analyses

Mateo, Jill M.

48

Bacillus tianshenii sp. nov., isolated from a marine sediment sample.  

PubMed

A novel Gram-stain-positive, motile, catalase- and oxidase-positive, aerobic, endospore-forming, peritrichous, rod-shaped bacterium, designated YIM M13235(T), was isolated from a marine sediment sample collected from the South China Sea. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain YIM M13235(T) belonged to the genus Bacillus. The strain grew optimally at 30 °C, pH 7.0 and in the presence of 2-4% (w/v) NaCl. meso-Diaminopimelic acid was present in the cell-wall peptidoglycan. Strain YIM M13235(T) exhibited a menaquinone system with MK-7, and the major polar lipids consisted of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, four unknown phospholipids and one unknown glycolipid. The major fatty acids (>5%) were iso-C(15?:?0), anteiso-C(15?:?0), anteiso-C(17?:?0), iso-C(17?:?1)?10c and summed feature 4 (anteiso-C(17?:?1) and/or iso-C(17?:?1)). The genomic DNA G+C content was 42.1 mol%. The DNA-DNA relatedness values between strain YIM M13235(T) and its close relatives (16S rRNA gene sequence similarities >97%) including Bacillus halmapalus DSM 8723(T), Bacillus horikoshii DSM 8719(T) and Bacillus zhanjiangensis JSM 099021(T) were 41%, 44% and 44%, respectively. On the basis of genotypic, phenotypic and DNA-DNA relatedness data, it is apparent that strain YIM M13235(T) represents a novel species of the genus Bacillus, for which the name Bacillus tianshenii sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is YIM M13235(T) (?=?DSM 25879(T)?=?KCTC 33044(T)). PMID:24614848

Jiang, Zhao; Zhang, Dao-Feng; Khieu, Thi-Nhan; Son, Chu Ky; Zhang, Xiao-Mei; Cheng, Juan; Tian, Xin-Peng; Zhang, Si; Li, Wen-Jun

2014-06-01

49

RECREATIONAL INFORMATION  

E-print Network

..............................................................................................................................7 National Research Council Review of Recreational Fisheries Survey Methods.......................................................................18 Phased implementation of new survey methods ..............................................................................18 Benchmarking new survey methods against old survey methods

50

40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart G of... - Sampling Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing of Marine Engines  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Sampling Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing of Marine Engines A Appendix A to...SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Selective Enforcement Auditing Regulations Pt. 91, Subpt. G, App...Sampling Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing of Marine Engines Table...

2010-07-01

51

Adaptive Sampling for Marine Microorganism Bin Zhang, Gaurav S. Sukhatme and Aristides A. G. Requicha  

E-print Network

Adaptive Sampling for Marine Microorganism Monitoring Bin Zhang, Gaurav S. Sukhatme and Aristides A microorganisms. We present a distributed algorithm using local communication based on binary search to find on a particular application: Marine Microorganism Monitoring, which we introduce next. Microorganisms

Sukhatme, Gaurav S.

52

NATIONAL MARINE SANCTUARY ADVISORY COUNCIL APPLICATION FORM  

E-print Network

Tourism _____ Economic Development _____ Recreational/Commercial Fishing _____ Recreational Diving Home protection and management of marine or Great Lake resources 2. Formal community and professional affiliations

53

Evaluation of Enterolert for enumeration of enterococci in recreational waters.  

PubMed Central

Enterolert (IDEXX Laboratories Inc., Westbrook, Maine), a semiautomated, most probable number method for enumeration of enterococci, was compared with the standard membrane filter method by parallel testing of 138 marine and freshwater recreational bathing water samples. No statistically significant difference and a strong linear correlation were found between methods. Culturing of 501 Enterolert test wells resulted in false-positive and false-negative rates of 5.1 and 0.4%, respectively. Less time for setup, incubation (24 versus 48 h), and reading of Enterolert permits more efficient monitoring of recreational bathing areas. PMID:8837446

Budnick, G E; Howard, R T; Mayo, D R

1996-01-01

54

Operation Recreation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Parents who have a child with a disability often find that recreational activities can be anything but accessible. Time for recreation is drowned by the priorities of caring for a child's needs, and the "umph" to get out can feel like an insurmountable obstacle. The activities parents love and aspire to share with their child may seem like one…

Schutz, Jeff; Schutz, Laurie

2010-01-01

55

Multielement compositions of marine phytoplankton samples from coastal areas of Japan by instrumental neutron activation analysis.  

PubMed

Phytoplankton samples were collected during spring bloom of diatoms from three coastal areas of Japan using a NORPAC P-25 net (25-micron opening) with a NGG52 prenet (335-micron opening), and 25 major and trace elements have been analyzed by INAA. Concentration ranges of analyzed phytoplankton samples are much wider than the concentration ranges compiled by Bowen (1979) except for As, and data of marine phytoplankton samples for Br, Sb, Hf, Sc, La, Ce, Sm, and Eu were not included in the compilation. The 25 analyzed elements have been categorized into three groups: elements showing positive correlation with Br, positive correlation with Al, and no positive correlation with Br or Al. The marine phytoplankton samples have been plotted on a Masuzawa-Koyama-Terazaki (MKT) plot and it proved that the MKT plot is applicable to marine phytoplankton samples. PMID:10676508

Masuzawa, T; Suzuki, T; Seki, K; Kosugi, T; Hibi, Y; Yamamoto, M; Takada, J; Matsushita, R; Yanada, M

1999-01-01

56

Supercritical fluid extraction of polyhalogenated pollutants from aquaculture and marine environmental samples: a review.  

PubMed

This article focuses on the state-of-the-art in sample preparation using supercritical fluid extraction (SFE), to monitor the content of polyhalogenated pollutants in aquaculture and marine environmental samples. Marine sediments and biological applications, including several types of samples matrices (fish, shellfish, seaweed and fish feed) and analyte groups (polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs), polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin (PCDD)/Fs and organochlorinated pesticide (OCPs)) are discussed with respect to SFE use and optimisation of conditions. We also discuss the great analytical potential of SFE, the integration of the extraction and clean-up steps for rapid sample processing justifying its use for routine work. The most recent SFE applications to the determination of these pollutants in marine environmental (biota and sediment) samples, published in the last 15 years, are reviewed. PMID:18398865

García-Rodríguez, Diego; Carro-Díaz, Antonia María; Lorenzo-Ferreira, Rosa Antonia

2008-05-01

57

EFFECTS OF SAMPLE PREPARATION ON THE MEASUREMENT OF ORGANIC CARBON, HYDROGEN, SULFUR, AND OXYGEN CONCENTRATIONS IN MARINE SEDIMENTS  

EPA Science Inventory

The elemental composition of marine sediment provides useful information for the study of environmental processes including biogeochemical cycling and contaminant partitioning. It is common practice to acidify marine sediment samples to remove carbonate before measuring the conce...

58

Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors from Philippine Marine Invertebrate Samples Screened in a New Microplate Assay  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new microplate assay for Ca 2+-induced platelet aggregation as detected by Giemsa dye was used to screen marine invertebrate samples from the Philippines for inhibitors of human platelet aggregation. Out of 261 crude methanol extracts of marine sponges and tunicates, 25 inhibited aggregation at 2 mg\\/ml. Inhibition of agonist-induced aggregation in an aggregometer was used to confirm results of

Sheila Marie V. Pimentel; Zenaida P. Bojo; Amy V. D. Roberto; Jose Enrico H. Lazaro; Gina C. Mangalindan; Leila M. Florentino; Pilar Lim-Navarro; Deniz Tasdemir; Chris M. Ireland; Gisela P. Concepcion

2003-01-01

59

Liquid scintillation spectrometry of beta-emitters in marine samples  

Microsoft Academic Search

Liquid scintillation spectrometry has become the most widespread method for quantitative analysis of low level -emitters in environmental samples. This technique has been applied in the measurements of 241Pu, 3H and 90Sr in seawater and sediment samples. 241Pu can be measured by direct analysis of an electrodeposited source using - discrimination or by extraction of electrodeposited plutonium into a liquid

L. Liong Wee Kwong; J. J. La Rosa; S. H. Lee; P. P. Povinec

2001-01-01

60

Determination of methylmercury in marine biota samples: method validation.  

PubMed

Regulatory authorities are expected to measure concentration of contaminants in foodstuffs, but the simple determination of total amount cannot be sufficient for fully judging its impact on the human health. In particular, the methylation of metals generally increases their toxicity; therefore validated analytical methods producing reliable results for the assessment of methylated species are highly needed. Nowadays, there is no legal limit for methylmercury (MeHg) in food matrices. Hence, no standardized method for the determination of MeHg exists within the international jurisdiction. Contemplating the possibility of a future legislative limit, a method for low level determination of MeHg in marine biota matrixes, based on aqueous-phase ethylation followed by purge and trap and gas chromatography (GC) coupled to pyrolysis-atomic fluorescence spectrometry (Py-AFS) detection, has been developed and validated. Five different extraction procedures, namely acid and alkaline leaching assisted by microwave and conventional oven heating, as well as enzymatic digestion, were evaluated in terms of their efficiency to extract MeHg from Scallop soft tissue IAEA-452 Certified Reference Material. Alkaline extraction with 25% (w/w) KOH in methanol, microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) with 5M HCl and enzymatic digestion with protease XIV yielded the highest extraction recoveries. Standard addition or the introduction of a dilution step were successfully applied to overcome the matrix effects observed when microwave-assisted extraction using 25% (w/w) KOH in methanol or 25% (w/v) aqueous TMAH were used. ISO 17025 and Eurachem guidelines were followed to perform the validation of the methodology. Accordingly, blanks, selectivity, calibration curve, linearity (0.9995), working range (1-800pg), recovery (97%), precision, traceability, limit of detection (0.45pg), limit of quantification (0.85pg) and expanded uncertainty (15.86%, k=2) were assessed with Fish protein Dorm-3 Certified Reference Material. The major contributions to the expanded uncertainty, i.e. 86.1%, arose from the uncertainty associated with recovery, followed by the contribution from fluorescence signal. Additional validation of the methodology developed was effectuated by the comparison with the values reported for MeHg in the IAEA-452 inter-laboratory comparison exercise. PMID:24720970

Carrasco, Luis; Vassileva, Emilia

2014-05-01

61

Detection of a Diverse Marine Fish Fauna Using Environmental DNA from Seawater Samples  

PubMed Central

Marine ecosystems worldwide are under threat with many fish species and populations suffering from human over-exploitation. This is greatly impacting global biodiversity, economy and human health. Intriguingly, marine fish are largely surveyed using selective and invasive methods, which are mostly limited to commercial species, and restricted to particular areas with favourable conditions. Furthermore, misidentification of species represents a major problem. Here, we investigate the potential of using metabarcoding of environmental DNA (eDNA) obtained directly from seawater samples to account for marine fish biodiversity. This eDNA approach has recently been used successfully in freshwater environments, but never in marine settings. We isolate eDNA from ½-litre seawater samples collected in a temperate marine ecosystem in Denmark. Using next-generation DNA sequencing of PCR amplicons, we obtain eDNA from 15 different fish species, including both important consumption species, as well as species rarely or never recorded by conventional monitoring. We also detect eDNA from a rare vagrant species in the area; European pilchard (Sardina pilchardus). Additionally, we detect four bird species. Records in national databases confirmed the occurrence of all detected species. To investigate the efficiency of the eDNA approach, we compared its performance with 9 methods conventionally used in marine fish surveys. Promisingly, eDNA covered the fish diversity better than or equal to any of the applied conventional methods. Our study demonstrates that even small samples of seawater contain eDNA from a wide range of local fish species. Finally, in order to examine the potential dispersal of eDNA in oceans, we performed an experiment addressing eDNA degradation in seawater, which shows that even small (100-bp) eDNA fragments degrades beyond detectability within days. Although further studies are needed to validate the eDNA approach in varying environmental conditions, our findings provide a strong proof-of-concept with great perspectives for future monitoring of marine biodiversity and resources. PMID:22952584

Iversen, Lars L?nsmann; M?ller, Peter Rask; Rasmussen, Morten; Willerslev, Eske

2012-01-01

62

Recreation for All.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The manual is intended to provide guidelines for the planning and development of parks and recreation facilities which are accessbile to everyone. Separate chapters present guidelines for the following topics (sample subtopics in parentheses): general information (space relationships and wheelchair functions); general site conditions (soil…

Winston, Alan G., Ed.; Seekins, Nancy, Ed.

63

CAMPUSDRIVE (Recreation)  

E-print Network

CHURCH STREET DAVIS STREET Ford Motor Company Engineering Design Center Catalysis Center Frances SearleTennis Courts Tennis Courts CAMPUSDRIVE Long Field (Recreation) Patten Gymnasium LINCOLN STREET COLFAX STREET DARTMOUTH PLACE NOYES STREET HAVEN STREET GARRETT PLACE LIBRARY PLACE FOSTER STREET Student

Shahriar, Selim

64

Determination of adenosine triphosphate on marine particulates: synthesis of methods for use on OTEC samples  

SciTech Connect

Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is an indicator of living biomass in marine particulates. This report details the method used by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to analyze particulate ATP in samples taken from oligotrophic, tropical ocean waters. It represents a synthesis of previously published methods.

Jones, A.T.; Hartwig, E.O.

1982-08-01

65

Determination of Adenosine Triphosphate on Marine Particulates:Synthesis of Methods for Use on OTEC Samples  

SciTech Connect

Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is an indicator of living biomass in marine particulates. This report details the method used by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to analyze particulate ATP in samples taken from oligotrophic, tropical ocean waters. It represents a synthesis of previously published methods.

Jones, Anthony T.; Hartwig, Eric O.

1982-08-01

66

DEVELOPMENT OF THE MARINE INCINERATION BIOASSAY SAMPLING SYSTEM (MIBAS) FOR AT-SEA INCINERATION TESTING  

EPA Science Inventory

The paper discusses the development of the Marine Incineration Bioassay Sampling System (MIBAS) for at-sea incineration testing, as part of EPA's overall evaluation of the potential benefits and risks associated with the incineration of hazardous wastes at sea. The related strate...

67

Antibacterial Activity of Marine Culturable Bacteria Collected from a Global Sampling of Ocean Surface Waters and Surface Swabs of Marine Organisms  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of the present study was to isolate marine culturable bacteria with antibacterial activity and hence a potential\\u000a biotechnological use. Seawater samples (244) and 309 swab samples from biotic or abiotic surfaces were collected on a global\\u000a Danish marine research expedition (Galathea 3). Total cell counts at the seawater surface were 5?×?105 to 106?cells\\/ml, of which 0.1–0.2% were culturable

Lone Gram; Jette Melchiorsen; Jesper Bartholin Bruhn

2010-01-01

68

Estimates of Marine Debris Accumulation on Beaches Are Strongly Affected by the Temporal Scale of Sampling  

PubMed Central

Marine debris is a global issue with impacts on marine organisms, ecological processes, aesthetics and economies. Consequently, there is increasing interest in quantifying the scale of the problem. Accumulation rates of debris on beaches have been advocated as a useful proxy for at-sea debris loads. However, here we show that past studies may have vastly underestimated the quantity of available debris because sampling was too infrequent. Our study of debris on a small beach in eastern Australia indicates that estimated daily accumulation rates decrease rapidly with increasing intervals between surveys, and the quantity of available debris is underestimated by 50% after only 3 days and by an order of magnitude after 1 month. As few past studies report sampling frequencies of less than a month, estimates of the scale of the marine debris problem need to be critically re-examined and scaled-up accordingly. These results reinforce similar, recent work advocating daily sampling as a standard approach for accurate quantification of available debris in coastal habitats. We outline an alternative approach whereby site-specific accumulation models are generated to correct bias when daily sampling is impractical. PMID:24367607

Smith, Stephen D. A.; Markic, Ana

2013-01-01

69

Multi-Scale Sampling to Evaluate Assemblage Dynamics in an Oceanic Marine Reserve  

PubMed Central

To resolve the capacity of Marine Protected Areas (MPA) to enhance fish productivity it is first necessary to understand how environmental conditions affect the distribution and abundance of fishes independent of potential reserve effects. Baseline fish production was examined from 2002–2004 through ichthyoplankton sampling in a large (10,878 km2) Southern Californian oceanic marine reserve, the Cowcod Conservation Area (CCA) that was established in 2001, and the Southern California Bight as a whole (238,000 km2 CalCOFI sampling domain). The CCA assemblage changed through time as the importance of oceanic-pelagic species decreased between 2002 (La Niña) and 2003 (El Niño) and then increased in 2004 (El Niño), while oceanic species and rockfishes displayed the opposite pattern. By contrast, the CalCOFI assemblage was relatively stable through time. Depth, temperature, and zooplankton explained more of the variability in assemblage structure at the CalCOFI scale than they did at the CCA scale. CalCOFI sampling revealed that oceanic species impinged upon the CCA between 2002 and 2003 in association with warmer offshore waters, thus explaining the increased influence of these species in the CCA during the El Nino years. Multi-scale, spatially explicit sampling and analysis was necessary to interpret assemblage dynamics in the CCA and likely will be needed to evaluate other focal oceanic marine reserves throughout the world. PMID:22448236

Thompson, Andrew R.; Watson, William; McClatchie, Sam; Weber, Edward D.

2012-01-01

70

Multi-scale sampling to evaluate assemblage dynamics in an oceanic marine reserve.  

PubMed

To resolve the capacity of Marine Protected Areas (MPA) to enhance fish productivity it is first necessary to understand how environmental conditions affect the distribution and abundance of fishes independent of potential reserve effects. Baseline fish production was examined from 2002-2004 through ichthyoplankton sampling in a large (10,878 km(2)) Southern Californian oceanic marine reserve, the Cowcod Conservation Area (CCA) that was established in 2001, and the Southern California Bight as a whole (238,000 km(2) CalCOFI sampling domain). The CCA assemblage changed through time as the importance of oceanic-pelagic species decreased between 2002 (La Niña) and 2003 (El Niño) and then increased in 2004 (El Niño), while oceanic species and rockfishes displayed the opposite pattern. By contrast, the CalCOFI assemblage was relatively stable through time. Depth, temperature, and zooplankton explained more of the variability in assemblage structure at the CalCOFI scale than they did at the CCA scale. CalCOFI sampling revealed that oceanic species impinged upon the CCA between 2002 and 2003 in association with warmer offshore waters, thus explaining the increased influence of these species in the CCA during the El Nino years. Multi-scale, spatially explicit sampling and analysis was necessary to interpret assemblage dynamics in the CCA and likely will be needed to evaluate other focal oceanic marine reserves throughout the world. PMID:22448236

Thompson, Andrew R; Watson, William; McClatchie, Sam; Weber, Edward D

2012-01-01

71

Stereochemistry of amino acids in surface samples of a marine sediment  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In two surface samples of marine sediment, the percentages of d-alanine and d-aspartic acid are significantly higher than the other d-amino acids and are similar to the range found in soils. The percentage of d-glutamic acid is also higher than the other amino acids but less than d-alanine and d-aspartic acid. These d-amino acids may come mainly from bacteria. ?? 1978.

Pollock, G. E.; Kvenvolden, K. A.

1978-01-01

72

The distribution of uranium and thorium in samples taken from different polluted marine environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Concentrations of uranium and thorium in seawater, sediment and some marine species taken from along the coastal areas of Malaysia were determined spectrophotometrically. The uranium and thorium concentrations in seawater were found to vary ranging from 1.80 to 4.1 and 0.14 to 0.88?g\\/L, respectively. The concentration of uranium in sediment samples was reported to range from 3.00 to 6.60?g\\/g while

S. Akyil; A. M. Yusof

2007-01-01

73

RECREATIONAL FISHERIES GUIDELINES FOR  

E-print Network

) and Brett M. Johnson (Colorado State University, the United States of America) under the coordination-5292 RECREATIONAL FISHERIES #12;Cover illustration: Emanuela D'Antoni #12;RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 13 RECREATIONAL

Cooke, Steven J.

74

Application of passive (SPATT) and active sampling methods in the profiling and monitoring of marine biotoxins.  

PubMed

Solid phase adsorbent and toxin tracking (SPATT) enables temporally and spatially integrated monitoring of biotoxins in aquatic environments. Monitoring using two adsorbent resins was performed over a four-month period at Lough Hyne Marine Reserve, Ireland. A range of Diarhettic Shellfish Poisoning (DSP) toxins were detected from SPATT extracts throughout the study period. The majority of biotoxins were detected in the top 20-30 m of the water column and a spike in toxin accumulation was measured during August 2010. Phytoplankton analysis confirmed the presence of toxin-producing species Dinophysis acuta and Dinophysis acuminata during the bloom. SPATT has the potential to provide useful information on phycotoxin distribution in the water column; enabling evidence-based decisions regarding appropriate depths for obtaining phytoplankton and shellfish samples in marine biotoxin monitoring programmes. Active sampling was performed continuously over 7-days and high quantities of toxins were successfully accumulated in the HP-20 resin, okadaic acid (?13 mg), dinophysis toxin-2 (?29 mg), pectenotoxin-2 (?20 mg) and pectenotoxin-2-seco acid (?6 mg) proving this an effective method for accumulating DSP toxins from the marine environment. The method has potential application as a tool for assessing toxin profiles at proposed shellfish harvesting sites. PMID:25064272

McCarthy, Moira; van Pelt, Frank N A M; Bane, Vaishali; O'Halloran, John; Furey, Ambrose

2014-10-01

75

Taxonomic assessment and enzymes production by yeasts isolated from marine and terrestrial Antarctic samples.  

PubMed

The aim of the present study was to investigate the taxonomic identity of yeasts isolated from the Antarctic continent and to evaluate their ability to produce enzymes (lipase, protease and xylanase) at low and moderate temperatures. A total of 97 yeast strains were recovered from marine and terrestrial samples collected in the Antarctica. The highest amount of yeast strains was obtained from marine sediments, followed by lichens, ornithogenic soils, sea stars, Salpa sp., algae, sea urchin, sea squirt, stone with lichens, Nacella concinna, sea sponge, sea isopod and sea snail. Data from polyphasic taxonomy revealed the presence of 21 yeast species, distributed in the phylum Ascomycota (n = 8) and Basidiomycota (n = 13). Representatives of encapsulated yeasts, belonging to genera Rhodotorula and Cryptococcus were recovered from 7 different Antarctic samples. Moreover, Candida glaebosa, Cryptococcus victoriae, Meyerozyma (Pichia) guilliermondii, Rhodotorula mucilaginosa and R. laryngis were the most abundant yeast species recovered. This is the first report of the occurrence of some species of yeasts recovered from Antarctic marine invertebrates. Additionally, results from enzymes production at low/moderate temperatures revealed that the Antarctic environment contains metabolically diverse cultivable yeasts, which could be considered as a target for biotechnological applications. Among the evaluated yeasts in the present study 46.39, 37.11 and 14.43 % were able to produce lipase (at 15 °C), xylanase (at 15 °C) and protease (at 25 °C), respectively. The majority of lipolytic, proteolytic and xylanolytic strains were distributed in the phylum Basidiomycota and were mainly recovered from sea stars, lichens, sea urchin and marine sediments. PMID:24114281

Duarte, A W F; Dayo-Owoyemi, I; Nobre, F S; Pagnocca, F C; Chaud, L C S; Pessoa, A; Felipe, M G A; Sette, L D

2013-11-01

76

Application of curve fitting in thin-layer chromatography-flame ionization detection analysis of the carbohydrate fraction in marine mucilage and marine snow samples from Italian seas.  

PubMed

This paper presents a thin-layer chromatographic-flame ionization detection (TLC-FID) procedure to characterize the carbohydrate fraction of marine mucilage and marine snow samples from the Italian Seas. The identification of the different carbohydrate subfractions is supported by the application of a deconvolution procedure based on a new mathematical function for describing chromatographic peaks and enhancing their resolution. The joint-approach TLC-FID analysis and deconvolution procedure allows for the characterization of the carbohydrate fraction of the marine samples in a single step without using the different derivatization procedures requested by the most common gas chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatographic methods for carbohydrate analysis. In fact, the results obtained by the TLC-FID procedure show that different neutral, uronic acid, and aminosugar subfractions can be present simultaneously in these samples. Moreover, the results support some hypotheses about the causes of the presence of mucilages in the Italian Seas. PMID:15189601

Mecozzi, Mauro; Pápai, Zsuzsa

2004-01-01

77

Determination of the bacterial processes which are sources of nitrous oxide production in marine samples.  

PubMed

Partial denitrification and the initial step of nitrification are the main biological processes which produce nitrous oxide. In order to determine the contribution that these processes have in nitrous oxide production, the efficiency of different inhibitors on nitrifying activity has been tested, and the effect on denitrifying activity has been investigated, using culture strains and natural marine samples. A good nitrification inhibitor should not affect denitrification. A low partial pressure of C2H2 provided the best conditions, inhibiting 75%, Nitrosococcus oceanus (culture sample) and 100% (natural sample) of the nitrifying activity and having only a small inhibitory effect (12%) on denitrifying activity. These conditions have been applied on samples from the dilution plume of the Rh?ne River, an area characterized as a source of nitrous oxide. Using these inhibitors, it has been shown that in this area, incomplete denitrification is the main process producing nitrous oxide in the surface layers at the mouth of the river and in the bottom nepheloid layer, whereas in the marine surface layer the dominant process is nitrification. PMID:11827333

Bonin, Patricia; Tamburini, Christian; Michotey, Valerie

2002-02-01

78

40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart G of... - Sampling Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing of Marine Engines  

...Auditing of Marine Engines A Appendix A to Subpart G of Part 91 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...Enforcement Auditing Regulations Pt. 91, Subpt. G, App. A Appendix A to Subpart G of Part 91—Sampling Plans for Selective...

2014-07-01

79

Seattle University Recreation Position Description  

E-print Network

Seattle University Recreation Position Description Title: Outdoor Adventure Recreation Program University Recreation Position Description Title: Outdoor Adventure Recreation Program Manager Date: 6- inclusive. Duties may be added, deleted and assigned based on Assistant Director of University Recreation

Carter, John

80

Seattle University Recreation Position Description  

E-print Network

Seattle University Recreation Position Description Title: Outdoor Adventure Recreation Program University Recreation Position Description Title: Outdoor Adventure Recreation Program Manager Date: 7- inclusive. Duties may be added, deleted and assigned based on Assistant Director of University Recreation

Carter, John

81

The Index to Marine and Lacustrine Geological Samples: Improving Sample Accessibility and Enabling Current and Future Research  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Index to Marine and Lacustrine Geological Samples is a community designed and maintained resource enabling researchers to locate and request sea floor and lakebed geologic samples archived by partner institutions. Conceived in the dawn of the digital age by representatives from U.S. academic and government marine core repositories and the NOAA National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) at a 1977 meeting convened by the National Science Foundation (NSF), the Index is based on core concepts of community oversight, common vocabularies, consistent metadata and a shared interface. Form and content of underlying vocabularies and metadata continue to evolve according to the needs of the community, as do supporting technologies and access methodologies. The Curators Consortium, now international in scope, meets at partner institutions biennially to share ideas and discuss best practices. NGDC serves the group by providing database access and maintenance, a list server, digitizing support and long-term archival of sample metadata, data and imagery. Over three decades, participating curators have performed the herculean task of creating and contributing metadata for over 195,000 sea floor and lakebed cores, grabs, and dredges archived in their collections. Some partners use the Index for primary web access to their collections while others use it to increase exposure of more in-depth institutional systems. The Index is currently a geospatially-enabled relational database, publicly accessible via Web Feature and Web Map Services, and text- and ArcGIS map-based web interfaces. To provide as much knowledge as possible about each sample, the Index includes curatorial contact information and links to related data, information and images; 1) at participating institutions, 2) in the NGDC archive, and 3) at sites such as the Rolling Deck to Repository (R2R) and the System for Earth Sample Registration (SESAR). Over 34,000 International GeoSample Numbers (IGSNs) linking to SESAR are included in anticipation of opportunities for interconnectivity with Integrated Earth Data Applications (IEDA) systems. To promote interoperability and broaden exposure via the semantic web, NGDC is publishing lithologic classification schemes and terminology used in the Index as Simple Knowledge Organization System (SKOS) vocabularies, coordinating with R2R and the Consortium for Ocean Leadership for consistency. Availability in SKOS form will also facilitate use of the vocabularies in International Standards Organization (ISO) 19115-2 compliant metadata records. NGDC provides stewardship for the Index on behalf of U.S. repositories as the NSF designated "appropriate National Data Center" for data and metadata pertaining to sea floor samples as specified in the 2011 Division of Ocean Sciences Sample and Data Policy, and on behalf of international partners via a collocated World Data Center. NGDC operates on the Open Archival Information System (OAIS) reference model. Active Partners: Antarctic Marine Geology Research Facility, Florida State University; British Ocean Sediment Core Research Facility; Geological Survey of Canada; Integrated Ocean Drilling Program; Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory; National Lacustrine Core Repository, University of Minnesota; Oregon State University; Scripps Institution of Oceanography; University of Rhode Island; U.S. Geological Survey; Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

Moore, C.

2011-12-01

82

Tourism and Commercial Recreation Department of Recreation and Leisure Studies  

E-print Network

Tourism and Commercial Recreation Department of Recreation and Leisure Studies Green Mountain and the commercial recreation enterprise as elements of the leisure services delivery system. Topical areas include

Brown, Gregory G.

83

Coincident plasmids and antimicrobial resistance in marine bacteria isolated from polluted and unpolluted Atlantic Ocean Samples  

SciTech Connect

Sewage effluent and outfall confluence samples were collected at the Barceloneta Regional Treatment Plant in Barceloneta, Puerto Rico; outfall confluence samples at Ocean City, Md., were also collected. Samples from uncontaminated open ocean areas served as clean-water controls. Bacteria were enriched in marine broth 2216 amended with 1 ..mu..g of one of a set of chemical selected for study per ml: nitrobenzene, dibutyl phthalate, m-cresol, o-cresol, 4-nitroaniline, bis(tributyltin) oxide, and quinone. MICs of the chemicals were determined individually for all isolates. Bacterial isolates were evaluated for resistance to nine different antibiotics and for the presence of plasmid DNA. Treated sewage was found to contain large numbers of bacteria simultaneously possessing antibiotic resistance, chemical resistance, and multiple bands of plasmic DNA. Bacteria resistant to penicillin, erythromycin, nalidixic acid, ampicillin, m-cresol, quinone, and bis(tributyltin) oxide were detected in nearly all samples, but only sewage outfall confluence samples yielded bacterial isolates that were resistant to streptomycin. Bacteria resistant to a combination of antibiotics, including kanamycin, chloramphenicol, gentamicin, and tetracycline, were isolated only from sewage effluent samples. It is concluded that bacterial isolates derived from toxic chemical wastes more frequently contain plasmid DNA and demonstrate antimicrobial resistance than do bacterial isolates from domestic sewage-impacted waters or from uncontaminated open ocean sites.

Baya, A.M.; Brayton, P.R.; Brown, V.L.; Grimes, D.J.; Russek-Cohen, E.; Colwell, R.R.

1986-06-01

84

Coincident plasmids and antimicrobial resistance in marine bacteria isolated from polluted and unpolluted Atlantic Ocean samples.  

PubMed Central

Sewage effluent and outfall confluence samples were collected at the Barceloneta Regional Treatment Plant in Barceloneta, Puerto Rico; outfall confluence samples at Ocean City, Md., were also collected. Samples from uncontaminated open ocean areas served as clean-water controls. Bacteria were enriched in marine broth 2216 amended with 1 microgram of one of a set of chemicals selected for study per ml: nitrobenzene, dibutyl phthalate, m-cresol, o-cresol, 4-nitroaniline, bis(tributyltin) oxide, and quinone. MICs of the chemicals were determined individually for all isolates. Bacterial isolates were evaluated for resistance to nine different antibiotics and for the presence of plasmid DNA. Treated sewage was found to contain large numbers of bacteria simultaneously possessing antibiotic resistance, chemical resistance, and multiple bands of plasmid DNA. Bacteria resistant to penicillin, erythromycin, nalidixic acid, ampicillin, m-cresol, quinone, and bis(tributyltin) oxide were detected in nearly all samples, but only sewage outfall confluence samples yielded bacterial isolates that were resistant to streptomycin. Bacteria resistant to a combination of antibiotics, including kanamycin, chloramphenicol, gentamicin, and tetracycline, were isolated only from sewage effluent samples. It is concluded that bacterial isolates derived from toxic chemical wastes more frequently contain plasmid DNA and demonstrate antimicrobial resistance than do bacterial isolates from domestic sewage-impacted waters or from uncontaminated open ocean sites. PMID:3755317

Baya, A M; Brayton, P R; Brown, V L; Grimes, D J; Russek-Cohen, E; Colwell, R R

1986-01-01

85

Optimizing sample pretreatment for compound-specific stable carbon isotopic analysis of amino sugars in marine sediment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Amino sugars are quantitatively significant constituents of soil and marine sediment, but their sources and turnover in environmental samples remain poorly understood. The stable carbon isotopic composition of amino sugars can provide information on the lifestyles of their source organisms and can be monitored during incubations with labeled substrates to estimate the turnover rates of microbial populations. However, until now, such investigation has been carried out only with soil samples, partly because of the much lower abundance of amino sugars in marine environments. We therefore optimized a procedure for compound-specific isotopic analysis of amino sugars in marine sediment employing gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The whole procedure consisted of hydrolysis, neutralization, enrichment, and derivatization of amino sugars. Except for the derivatization step, the protocol introduced negligible isotopic fractionation, and the minimum requirement of amino sugar for isotopic analysis was 20 ng, i.e. equivalent to ~ 8 ng of amino sugar carbon. Our results obtained from ?13C analysis of amino sugars in selected marine sediment samples showed that muramic acid had isotopic imprints from indigenous bacterial activities, whereas glucosamine and galactosamine were mainly derived from organic detritus. The analysis of stable carbon isotopic compositions of amino sugars opens a promising window for the investigation of microbial metabolisms in marine sediments and the deep marine biosphere.

Zhu, R.; Lin, Y.-S.; Lipp, J. S.; Meador, T. B.; Hinrichs, K.-U.

2014-01-01

86

50 CFR 600.1417 - Requirements for exempted state designation based on submission of recreational survey data.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...designation based on submission of recreational survey data. 600.1417 Section 600.1417...designation based on submission of recreational survey data. (a) To be designated as an...state's participation in a regional survey of marine and anadromous...

2011-10-01

87

50 CFR 600.1417 - Requirements for exempted state designation based on submission of recreational survey data.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...designation based on submission of recreational survey data. 600.1417 Section 600.1417...designation based on submission of recreational survey data. (a) To be designated as an...state's participation in a regional survey of marine and anadromous...

2010-10-01

88

Uncovering the diversification history of marine tetrapods: ecology influences the effect of geological sampling biases  

E-print Network

Uncovering the diversification history of marine tetrapods: ecology influences the effect the ichthyosaurs, sauropterygians, thalattosaurs, crocodyliforms, turtles, squamates, and other line- ages. Many. This is congruent with studies of shallow marine invertebrate diversity and suggests that `common cause' effects

Cambridge, University of

89

UAF Recreational Camp UAF RECREATIONAL DAY CAMPS  

E-print Network

to offer a wide range of activities. CAMP STRUCTURE/SUPERVISION Each child will be placed in small age3.21.13 UAF Recreational Camp UAF RECREATIONAL DAY CAMPS We are excited that your child-rounded camp experience. SPECIAL SITUATIONS In order to best accommodate both you and your child, we ask

Hartman, Chris

90

Developing Recreational Trails: Motivations for Recreational Walking  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper seeks to explore the motivations and preferences of recreational walkers in near-urban areas and the implications for trail development. A qualitative focus group method was employed in order to generate open discussion amongst recreational walkers from a range of backgrounds and levels of interest, participation and experience, drawing out motivations to walk, and potential issues relating to trail

Nicholas J. Davies; Leslie M. Lumsdon; Richard Weston

2012-01-01

91

Recreational Drugs and HIV  

MedlinePLUS

... DRUG USE AND HIV DISEASE DRUG INTERACTIONS THE BOTTOM LINE FOR MORE INFORMATION HOW DOES RECREATIONAL DRUG USE ... protease inhibitors may increase effect of marijuana. THE BOTTOM LINE Some recreational drugs may interact with some ARVs. ...

92

[Inclusive Recreation and Families.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This feature issue focuses on inclusive recreation for persons with developmental disabilities and their families. The articles provide information about the benefits of inclusive recreation for individuals and families, the challenges in attempting to create or access community recreation services that offer inclusive programs, and strategies…

Heyne, Linda A., Ed.; And Others

1996-01-01

93

A sampling-based Bayesian model for gas saturation estimationusing seismic AVA and marine CSEM data  

SciTech Connect

We develop a sampling-based Bayesian model to jointly invertseismic amplitude versus angles (AVA) and marine controlled-sourceelectromagnetic (CSEM) data for layered reservoir models. The porosityand fluid saturation in each layer of the reservoir, the seismic P- andS-wave velocity and density in the layers below and above the reservoir,and the electrical conductivity of the overburden are considered asrandom variables. Pre-stack seismic AVA data in a selected time windowand real and quadrature components of the recorded electrical field areconsidered as data. We use Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) samplingmethods to obtain a large number of samples from the joint posteriordistribution function. Using those samples, we obtain not only estimatesof each unknown variable, but also its uncertainty information. Thedeveloped method is applied to both synthetic and field data to explorethe combined use of seismic AVA and EM data for gas saturationestimation. Results show that the developed method is effective for jointinversion, and the incorporation of CSEM data reduces uncertainty influid saturation estimation, when compared to results from inversion ofAVA data only.

Chen, Jinsong; Hoversten, Michael; Vasco, Don; Rubin, Yoram; Hou,Zhangshuan

2006-04-04

94

Ultrasound extraction and thin layer chromatography-flame ionization detection analysis of the lipid fraction in marine mucilage samples.  

PubMed

This paper reports an analytical procedure based on ultrasound to extract lipids in marine mucilage samples. The experimental conditions of the ultrasound procedure (solvent and time) were identified by a FT-IR study performed on different standard samples of lipids and of a standard humic sample, before and after the sonication treatment. This study showed that diethyl ether was a more suitable solvent than methanol for the ultrasonic extraction of lipids from environmental samples because it allowed to minimize the possible oxidative modifications of lipids due to the acoustic cavitation phenomena. The optimized conditions were applied to the extraction of total lipid amount in marine mucilage samples and TLC-flame ionization detection analysis was used to identify the relevant lipid sub-fractions present in samples. PMID:12187991

Mecozzi, M; Amici, M; Romanelli, G; Pietrantonio, E; Deluca, A

2002-07-19

95

Quantification of Diatom and Dinoflagellate Biomasses in Coastal Marine Seawater Samples by Real-Time PCR?  

PubMed Central

Two real-time PCR assays targeting the small-subunit (SSU) ribosomal DNA (rDNA) were designed to assess the proportional biomass of diatoms and dinoflagellates in marine coastal water. The reverse primer for the diatom assay was designed to be class specific, and the dinoflagellate-specific reverse primer was obtained from the literature. For both targets, we used universal eukaryotic SSU rDNA forward primers. Specificity was confirmed by using a BLAST search and by amplification of cultures of various phytoplankton taxa. Reaction conditions were optimized for each primer set with linearized plasmids from cloned SSU rDNA fragments. The number of SSU rDNA copies per cell was estimated for six species of diatoms and nine species of dinoflagellates; these were significantly correlated to the biovolumes of the cells. Nineteen field samples were collected along the Swedish west coast and subjected to the two real-time PCR assays. The linear regression of the proportion of SSU rDNA copies of dinoflagellate and diatom origin versus the proportion of dinoflagellate and diatom biovolumes or biomass per liter was significant. For diatoms, linear regression of the number of SSU rDNA copies versus biovolume or biomass per liter was significant, but no such significant correlation was detected in the field samples for dinoflagellates. The method described will be useful for estimating the proportion of dinoflagellate versus diatom biovolume or biomass and the absolute diatom biovolume or biomass in various aquatic disciplines. PMID:18849462

Godhe, Anna; Asplund, Maria E.; Harnstrom, Karolina; Saravanan, V.; Tyagi, Anuj; Karunasagar, Indrani

2008-01-01

96

Speciation without chromatography using selective hydride generation: inorganic arsenic in rice and samples of marine origin.  

PubMed

Because of the toxicity of inorganic arsenic (iAs), only iAs needs to be monitored in food and feedstuff. This demands the development of easy and quick analytical methods to screen large number of samples. This work focuses on hydride generation (HG) coupled with an ICPMS as an arsenic detector where the HG is added as a selective step to determine iAs in the gaseous phase while organically bound As remains in the solution. iAs forms volatile arsine species with high efficiency when treated with NaBH4 at acidic conditions, whereas most other organoarsenic compounds do not form any or only less volatile arsines. Additionally, using high concentrations of HCl further reduces the production of the less volatile arsines and iAs is almost exclusively formed, therefore enabling to measure iAs without a prior step of species separation using chromatography. Here, we coupled a commercially available HG system to an ICPMS and optimized for determination of iAs in rice and samples of marine origin using different acid concentrations, wet and dry plasma conditions, and different reaction gas modes. Comparing this method to conventional HPLC-ICPMS, no statistical difference in iAs concentration was found and comparable limits of detections were achieved using less than half the instrument time. PMID:24354293

Musil, Stanislav; Pétursdóttir, Ásta H; Raab, Andrea; Gunnlaugsdóttir, Helga; Krupp, Eva; Feldmann, Jörg

2014-01-21

97

Optimizing sample pretreatment for compound-specific stable carbon isotopic analysis of amino sugars in marine sediment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Amino sugars are quantitatively significant constituents of soil and marine sediment, but their sources and turnover in environmental samples remain poorly understood. The stable carbon isotopic composition of amino sugars can provide information on the lifestyles of their source organisms and can be monitored during incubations with labeled substrates to estimate the turnover rates of microbial populations. However, until now, such investigation has been carried out only with soil samples, partly because of the much lower abundance of amino sugars in marine environments. We therefore optimized a procedure for compound-specific isotopic analysis of amino sugars in marine sediment, employing gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The whole procedure consisted of hydrolysis, neutralization, enrichment, and derivatization of amino sugars. Except for the derivatization step, the protocol introduced negligible isotopic fractionation, and the minimum requirement of amino sugar for isotopic analysis was 20 ng, i.e., equivalent to ~8 ng of amino sugar carbon. Compound-specific stable carbon isotopic analysis of amino sugars obtained from marine sediment extracts indicated that glucosamine and galactosamine were mainly derived from organic detritus, whereas muramic acid showed isotopic imprints from indigenous bacterial activities. The ?13C analysis of amino sugars provides a valuable addition to the biomarker-based characterization of microbial metabolism in the deep marine biosphere, which so far has been lipid oriented and biased towards the detection of archaeal signals.

Zhu, R.; Lin, Y.-S.; Lipp, J. S.; Meador, T. B.; Hinrichs, K.-U.

2014-09-01

98

Oregon Beach Monitoring Program: Bacterial exceedances in marine and freshwater creeks/outfall samples, October 2002-April 2005.  

PubMed

A total of 3086 samples, both marine (2916) and freshwater creeks/outfall samples (170) were collected and analyzed for enterococci during October 2002-April 2005, from 52 designated beaches in Oregon. A total of 3.2% (99/3086) of the samples at 21 beaches exceeded 158 most probable number (MPN)/100 milliliters (mL). The average enterococci levels of these 99 exceedances was 559 MPN/100 mL, with a maximum of 4352 MPN/100 mL (Otter Rock and Ona) and a minimum of 160 MPN/100 mL (Sunset Bay State Park, Bastendorff, and Mill). For marine water, 77/2916 (2.6%) exceeded 158 MPN/100 mL. For freshwater, 22/170 (12.9%) exceeded 158 MPN/100 mL, with a maximum of 587 MPN/100 mL at Sunset Bay. Sixty percent of the marine and 9% of freshwater exceedances occurred during the winter. Seventy-two percent (55/77) of the marine exceedances occurred after rainfall events (0.01-60.0 mm). At Harris and Mill Beaches, cumulative rainfall was highly correlated with bacterial densities, R = 0.7. Rainfall, at both beaches, explained about one-half the variation in log10 bacteria density (R2 = 0.5). Additional monitoring is warranted to further characterize bacterial contamination in Oregon waters. PMID:16698045

Neumann, C M; Harding, A K; Sherman, J M

2006-10-01

99

Partitioning of alcohol ethoxylates and polyethylene glycols in the marine environment: field samplings vs laboratory experiments.  

PubMed

Nowadays, alcohol ethoxylates (AEOs) constitute the most important group of non-ionic surfactants, used in a wide range of applications such as household cleaners and detergents. Significant amounts of these compounds and their degradation products (polyethylene glycols, PEGs, which are also used for many other applications) reach aquatic environments, and are eliminated from the water column by degradation and sorption processes. This work deals with the environmental distribution of AEOs and PEGs in the Long Island Sound Estuary, a setting impacted by sewage discharges from New York City (NYC). The distribution of target compounds in seawater was influenced by tides, consistent with salinity differences, and concentrations in suspended solid samples ranged from 1.5 to 20.5 ?g/g. The more hydrophobic AEOs were mostly attached to the particulate matter whereas the more polar PEGs were predominant in the dissolved form. Later, the sorption of these chemicals was characterized in the laboratory. Experimental and environmental sorption coefficients for AEOs and PEGs showed average values from 3607 to 164,994 L/kg and from 74 to 32,862 L/kg, respectively. The sorption data were fitted to a Freundlich isotherm model with parameters n and log KF between 0.8-1.2 and 1.46-4.39 L/kg, respectively. AEO and PEG sorptions on marine sediment were also found to be mostly not affected by changes in salinity. PMID:24887194

Traverso-Soto, Juan M; Brownawell, Bruce J; González-Mazo, Eduardo; Lara-Martín, Pablo A

2014-08-15

100

Neutron activation analysis of stoney spherules from a marine sediment sample  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The identification of extraterrestrial material in samples collected at the surface of the Earth is discussed. Criteria were established for black magnetic spherules which involve the presence of: Fe, Ni, and Co in iron meteoritic ratios, wustite, and Fe-Ni metal while reliable criteria for stoney spherules are not well established. Neutron activation analysis was performed on eight stony spherules separated from the same marine sediment used by Millard and Finkelman. The 22 elements were determined by Compton suppression and triple coincidence gamma counting. It is found that Fe, Mg, Al, Ni, Cr, Co, Ir, and Sc are the best discriminators between chondritic and terrestrial compositions. Three of the spherules have compositions very close to chondrites and of these, two contain 0.5 and 0.25 ppm Ir. The other five spherules contain much less than chondritic concentrations of Ni but this element may be segregated and lost during ablation of the parent meteorite. One of these five low Ni spherules contains 2.9 ppm Ir while the other four contain less than 0.05 ppm Ir.

Millar, H. T., Jr.; Englert, P.

1984-01-01

101

Wider sampling reveals a non-sister relationship for geographically contiguous lineages of a marine mussel  

PubMed Central

The accuracy of phylogenetic inference can be significantly improved by the addition of more taxa and by increasing the spatial coverage of sampling. In previous studies, the brown mussel Perna perna showed a sister–lineage relationship between eastern and western individuals contiguously distributed along the South African coastline. We used mitochondrial (COI) and nuclear (ITS) sequence data to further analyze phylogeographic patterns within P. perna. Significant expansion of the geographical coverage revealed an unexpected pattern. The western South African lineage shared the most recent common ancestor (MRCA) with specimens from Angola, Venezuela, and Namibia, whereas eastern South African specimens and Mozambique grouped together, indicating a non-sister relationship for the two South African lineages. Two plausible biogeographic scenarios to explain their origin were both supported by the hypotheses-testing analysis. One includes an Indo-Pacific origin for P. perna, dispersal into the Mediterranean and Atlantic through the Tethys seaway, followed by recent secondary contact after southward expansion of the western and eastern South African lineages. The other scenario (Out of South Africa) suggests an ancient vicariant divergence of the two lineages followed by their northward expansion. Nevertheless, the “Out of South Africa” hypothesis would require a more ancient divergence between the two lineages. Instead, our estimates indicated that they diverged very recently (310 kyr), providing a better support for an Indo-Pacific origin of the two South African lineages. The arrival of the MRCA of P. perna in Brazil was estimated at 10 [0–40] kyr. Thus, the hypothesis of a recent introduction in Brazil through hull fouling in wooden vessels involved in the transatlantic itineraries of the slave trade did not receive strong support, but given the range for this estimate, it could not be discarded. Wider geographic sampling of marine organisms shows that lineages with contiguous distributions need not share a common ancestry. PMID:25360249

Cunha, Regina L; Nicastro, Katy R; Costa, Joana; McQuaid, Christopher D; Serrao, Ester A; Zardi, Gerardo I

2014-01-01

102

Antibacterial activity of marine culturable bacteria collected from a global sampling of ocean surface waters and surface swabs of marine organisms.  

PubMed

The purpose of the present study was to isolate marine culturable bacteria with antibacterial activity and hence a potential biotechnological use. Seawater samples (244) and 309 swab samples from biotic or abiotic surfaces were collected on a global Danish marine research expedition (Galathea 3). Total cell counts at the seawater surface were 5 x 10(5) to 10(6) cells/ml, of which 0.1-0.2% were culturable on dilute marine agar (20 degrees C). Three percent of the colonies cultured from seawater inhibited Vibrio anguillarum, whereas a significantly higher proportion (13%) of colonies from inert or biotic surfaces was inhibitory. It was not possible to relate a specific kind of eukaryotic surface or a specific geographic location to a general high occurrence of antagonistic bacteria. Five hundred and nineteen strains representing all samples and geographic locations were identified on the basis of partial 16S rRNA gene sequence homology and belonged to three major groups: Vibrionaceae (309 strains), Pseudoalteromonas spp. (128 strains), and the Roseobacter clade (29 strains). Of the latter, 25 strains were identified as Ruegeria mobilis or pelagia. When re-testing against V. anguillarum, only 409 (79%) retained some level of inhibitory activity. Many strains, especially Pseudoalteromonas spp. and Ruegeria spp., also inhibited Staphylococcus aureus. The most pronounced antibacterial strains were pigmented Pseudoalteromonas strains and Ruegeria spp. The inhibitory, pigmented Pseudoalteromonas were predominantly isolated in warmer waters from swabs of live or inert surfaces. Ruegeria strains were isolated from all ocean areas except for Arctic and Antarctic waters and inhibitory activity caused by production of tropodithietic acid. PMID:19823914

Gram, Lone; Melchiorsen, Jette; Bruhn, Jesper Bartholin

2010-08-01

103

Titan Recreation-Open Recreation Student Engagement Report  

E-print Network

Titan Recreation-Open Recreation Student Engagement Report FY 2010-2011 Purpose Statement Titan and overall wellness. Titan Recreation also provides opportunities for cooperative and competitive play, team building and interpersonal skills. Leadership and participation opportunities within Titan

de Lijser, Peter

104

Titan Recreation-Open Recreation Student Engagement Report  

E-print Network

Titan Recreation-Open Recreation Student Engagement Report FY 2011-2012 Purpose Statement Titan and overall wellness. Titan Recreation also provides opportunities for cooperative and competitive play, team building and interpersonal skills. Leadership and participation opportunities within Titan

de Lijser, Peter

105

Titan Recreation-Open Recreation Student Engagement Report  

E-print Network

Titan Recreation-Open Recreation Student Engagement Report FY 2012-2013 Purpose Statement Titan and overall wellness. Titan Recreation also provides opportunities for cooperative and competitive play, team building and interpersonal skills. Leadership and participation opportunities within Titan

de Lijser, Peter

106

Nocardioides nanhaiensis sp. nov., an actinobacterium isolated from a marine sediment sample.  

PubMed

A rod- to coccus-shaped, non-spore-forming actinobacterium, strain YIM M13091(T), was isolated from a marine sediment sample collected from the South China Sea and examined by a polyphasic approach to clarify its taxonomic position. This Gram-staining-positive, aerobic actinobacterium did not produce substrate mycelium and aerial hyphae, and no diffusible pigments were produced on the media tested. The optimum growth occurred at 30 °C, 1% (w/v) NaCl and pH 8.0. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the isolate belongs to the genus Nocardioides, with low levels (?96.2%) of sequence similarity with respect to Nocardioides kribbensis KSL-2(T) and other members of the genus Nocardioides. Whole-organism hydrolysates of the strain contained ll-2,6-diaminopimelic acid as the diagnostic diamino acid. The predominant menaquinone was MK-8(H4), with MK-8 in a minor amount. Diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylinositol, hydroxyphosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylcholine, were the main polar lipids detected, while iso-C(16?:?0) and C(18?:?1)?9c were the major fatty acids. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 68.5 mol%. Based on phylogenetic analysis, phenotypic and genotypic data, it is concluded that the isolate represents a member of the genus Nocardioides, and the name Nocardioides nanhaiensis sp. nov. (Type strain YIM M13091(T)?=?JCM 18127(T)?=?CCTCC AA 2011020(T)) is proposed for the novel species. PMID:24844261

Zhang, Dao-Feng; Zhong, Jing-Mei; Zhang, Xiao-Mei; Jiang, Zhao; Zhou, En-Min; Tian, Xin-Peng; Zhang, Si; Li, Wen-Jun

2014-08-01

107

Recreation Leadership. Third Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This text is intended for use in college recreation courses. It presents leadership techniques and teaching methods for conducting successful recreation programs in community centers, schools, churches, industry, hospitals, prisons, and on playgrounds. Over 1,000 program ideas and ways to teach are suggested that cover a wide range of activities…

Vannier, Maryhelen

108

Sheridan County Recreation Plan.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A pilot project investigating the feasibility of year-round recreational programs in rural counties of populations of less than 10,000 is described in this report. (Sheridan County, Kansas, was chosen as the project site.) Part I, the introductory section, briefly defines recreation and its relation to human needs. Part II provides a geographic…

Webster, Elaine

109

Outdoor Recreation Management  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The complex problems facing the manager of an outdoor recreation area are outlined and discussed. Eighteen chapters cover the following primary concerns of the manager of such a facility: (1) an overview of the management process; (2) the basic outdoor recreation management model; (3) the problem-solving process; (4) involvement of the public in…

Jubenville, Alan

110

Berkeley Outreach Recreation Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presented are duplications of the responses given by the Berkeley Outreach Recreation Program (California) as part of a project to collect, share, and compile information about, and techniques in the operation of 18 community action models for recreation services to the disabled. Model programs are categorized as consumer, client competency,…

Iowa Univ., Iowa City. Recreation Education Program.

111

Integrated Leisure and Recreation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This "feature issue" focuses on integrated leisure and recreation for developmentally disabled persons and includes descriptions of innovative leisure/recreation programs which allow the realization of the concepts of normalization and least restrictive environment. Brief articles include the following titles and authors: "Challenging the…

Schleien, Stuart, Ed.; Rynders, John, Ed.

1989-01-01

112

National Marine Sanctuary Program  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The National Marine Sanctuary Program identifies, designates and manages areas of the marine environment of special national significance due to their conservation, recreational, ecological, historical, research, educational, or aesthetic qualities. Access information and pictures of marine sanctuaries all over the U.S. and its territories. Discover ways to get involved with the sanctuary program, no matter where you live. Scientific publications are available for download.

113

Quantifying Marine Emissions of Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds Using Laboratory Measurements of Plankton Monocultures and Field Samples  

Microsoft Academic Search

Marine biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) have been suggested to contribute significant portion of the organic carbon present in ocean atmosphere. In this study emission rates of 40 different hydrocarbons are quantified for lab-grown non-axenic phytoplankton monocultures and ambient samples from the Pamlico-Neuse Estuary, NC. The outcome of environmental conditions on production of BVOCs was examined for different light and

A. W. Sabolis; N. Meskhidze; D. Kamykowski; R. E. Reed

2010-01-01

114

ESTIMATED SAILFISH CATCH-PER-UNIT-EFFORT FOR THE U.S. RECREATIONAL BILLFISH TOURNAMENTS AND U.S. RECREATIONAL FISHERY (1973-2007)  

Microsoft Academic Search

SUMMARY An index of abundance for sailfish from the United States recreational billfish tournament fishery is presented for the period 1973-2006 and for non-tournament recreational fisheries for the period 1981-2007. Tournament catch-per-unit-effort (number of fish caught per 1000 hours fishing) was estimated from catch and effort data submitted by recreational tournament coordinators and U.S. National Marine Fisheries observers under the

John P. Hoolihan; Mauricio Ortiz; Guillermo A. Diaz; Eric D. Prince

115

Variation sources of marine periphyton 1 Submersion time, depth, substrate type and sampling method  

E-print Network

in African and Asian brackish and freshwater fish ponds. The present study was a preliminary assessment). This assemblage comprises bacteria, fungi, protozoa, phyto and zoo-plankton, benthic organisms and detritus (Azim in freshwater fish culture (Azim et al., 2005), the use of periphyton in brackish or marine waters (van Dam et

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

116

Artifacts arising from sampling interval in dive depth studies of marine endotherms  

Microsoft Academic Search

Most depth recorders used to study the diving behaviour of polar marine endotherms record depth data at specific time intervals. The length of recording interval can have potentially profound implications for the interpretation of the data. We used data acquired on the diving behaviour of king penguins, Aptenodytes patagonicus, to examine the validity of various analyses routinely conducted on depth

Rory P. Wilson; Klemens Pütz; Jean-Benoît Charrassin; Jochim Lage

1995-01-01

117

University Recreation Flagship 2020  

E-print Network

University Recreation Flagship 2020 Strategic Plan September 19, 2011 #12 Activities: 39 (+18%) 20112012 IM Activities Target: 43 Adventure Education Establish a trips program 10%) Adventure Education Increase the number of groups participating in the Challenge Course

Harms, Kyle E.

118

Predicting recreation priorities  

E-print Network

was to determine the relative contribution of these factors for predicting recreation priorities. Data was collected using a self-administered questionnaire distributed to all households at Fort Hood military housing post in Texas. The questionnaire was designed...

Hunt, Kindal Alayne

2012-06-07

119

Low molecular weight dicarboxylic acids and related polar compounds in the remote marine rain samples collected from Western Pacific  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During the western Pacific Ocean cruise of R/V Hakuho-Maru (20°N-40°S), fourteen rainwater samples were collected. They were studied by a capillary gas chromatography (GC) and GC-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) for the molecular distributions of C 2?C 10 ?, ?-dicarboxylic acids and related polar compounds, i.e. ketoacids (C 2?C 9) and ?-dicarbonyls (C 2?C 3). Samples were also analysed for dissolved (DOC) and total organic carbon (TOC). Total diacid concentration range was 36-959 ?g l-1 and accounted for 3% (av.) of TOC (1.2-2.5 mgC l-1), which is much higher than the previous numbers found in Tokyo rain samples (av. 1 %). This indicates that low molecular weight dicarboxylic acids are an important class of organic compounds in the marine rains. All the samples showed that the smallest diacid (oxalic acid) which comprised 50% of the total diacids was the most abundant followed by malonic (C 3) or succinic acid (C 4). The shorter chain diacids (C 2?C 4) accounted for 63-90% (av. 80%) of total diacids and their relative abundances increase from the Northern to the Southern Hemisphere. These results suggest that shorter chain diacids are in part produced in the marine atmosphere by photochemical oxidation of organic matter through the intermediates such as ketoacids and dicarbonyls. The major portion of diacids and their precursors is probably derived from the Asian and Australian continents by a long-range transport.

Sempéré, Richard; Kawamura, Kimitaka

120

Recreational stream assessment using Malaysia water quality index  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

River water quality assessment is crucial in order to quantify and monitor spatial and temporally. Malaysia is producing WQI and NWQS indices to evaluate river water quality. However, the study on recreational river water quality is still scarce. A study was conducted to determine selected recreational river water quality area and to determine impact of recreation on recreational stream. Three recreational streams namely Sungai Benus, Sungai Cemperuh and Sungai Luruh in Janda Baik, Pahang were selected. Five sampling stations were chosen from each river with a 200-400 m interval. Six water quality parameters which are BOD5, COD, TSS, pH, ammoniacal-nitrogen and dissolved oxygen were measured. Sampling and analysis was conducted following standard method prepared by USEPA. These parameters were used to calculate the water quality subindex and finally an indicative WQI value using Malaysia water quality index formula. Results indicate that all recreational streams have excellent water quality with WQI values ranging from 89 to 94. Most of water quality parameter was homogenous between sampling sites and between streams. An one-way ANOVA test indicates that no significant difference was observed between each sub index values (p> 0.05, ?=0.05). Only BOD and COD exhibit slightly variation between stations that would be due to organic domestic wastes done by visitors. The study demonstrated that visitors impact on recreational is minimum and recreation streams are applicable for direct contact recreational.

Ibrahim, Hanisah; Kutty, Ahmad Abas

2013-11-01

121

Social Barriers to Sustainable Recreational Fisheries Management Under Quasicommon Property Fishing Rights Regime  

Microsoft Academic Search

When debated publicly, the challenge to reconcile fishery resource use and resource conservation is often only discussed with regard to marine commercial fisheries. Recreational fisheries are often not considered despite their high social and economic importance across the industrialized world. This paper addresses key obstacles to the reconciliation of fishery resource use and resource conservation with respect to freshwater recreational

ROBERT ARLINGHAUS

122

IMPACTS OF RECREATIONAL SCUBA DIVING ON SHIP WRECKS IN AUSTRALIA AND THE PACIFIC A Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reviews the impacts of recreational scuba diving on the cultural heritage and recreational dive values of ship- wrecks in marine environments in Australia and the western Pacific Ocean, excluding South East Asia. Shipwrecks are unique, fragile, non-renewable cultural resources that are an important element of underwater heritage, and are of great interest to society. Shipwrecks also offer unique,

Joanne Edney

123

The Process of Recreation Programming. Theory and Technique.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book is directed to the student of recreational programming. Seven chapters cover the following areas: (1) scope of the audience for recreational programming, human life stages and cycles, and program approaches; (2) sample programs with specified objectives, selection of activities, meeting criteria, goals, and objectives; (3) program…

Farrell, Patricia; Lundegren, Herberta M.

124

The Value of a Master's Degree to Recreation Professionals  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study assessed the nature of the relationship between earning advanced degrees and career outcomes such as salary, job satisfaction, social capital, and human capital among professionals in the parks and recreation field. The sample (n = 196) was drawn from parks and recreation agencies located in the United States. Agencies, excluding…

Hodge, Camilla J.; Hill, Brian J.; Brinton, Christian

2012-01-01

125

Recreation Specialization and Anglers’ Attitudes Towards Restricted Fishing Areas  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study explored relationships between specialization and anglers’ attitudes and beliefs connected to marine protected areas (MPAs). A mail survey questionnaire was sent to 697 private boat saltwater anglers in five northeastern states (62% response, n = 419). Although recreation specialization theory predicts that more specialized participants will indicate greater support for management regulations than will less specialized participants, the

Ronald J. Salz; David K. Loomis

2005-01-01

126

Validation of Ocean Color Satellite Data Products in Under Sampled Marine Areas. Chapter 6  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The planktonic marine cyanobacterium, Trichodesmium sp., is broadly distributed throughout the oligotrophic marine tropical and sub-tropical oceans. Trichodesmium, which typically occurs in macroscopic bundles or colonies, is noteworthy for its ability to form large surface aggregations and to fix dinitrogen gas. The latter is important because primary production supported by N2 fixation can result in a net export of carbon from the surface waters to deep ocean and may therefore play a significant role in the global carbon cycle. However, information on the distribution and density of Trichodesmium from shipboard measurements through the oligotrophic oceans is very sparse. Such estimates are required to quantitatively estimate total global rates of N2 fixation. As a result current global rate estimates are highly uncertain. Thus in order to understand the broader biogeochemical importance of Trichodesmium and N2 fixation in the oceans, we need better methods to estimate the global temporal and spatial variability of this organism. One approach that holds great promise is satellite remote sensing. Satellite ocean color sensors are ideal instruments for estimating global phytoplankton biomass, especially that due to episodic blooms, because they provide relatively high frequency synoptic information over large areas. Trichodesmium has a combination of specific ultrastructural and biochemical features that lend themselves to identification of this organism by remote sensing. Specifically, these features are high backscatter due to the presence of gas vesicles, and absorption and fluorescence of phycoerythrin. The resulting optical signature is relatively unique and should be detectable with satellite ocean color sensors such as the Sea-Viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS).

Subramaniam, Ajit; Hood, Raleigh R.; Brown, Christopher W.; Carpenter, Edward J.; Capone, Douglas G.

2001-01-01

127

Recreation Handbook for State and Local Unit Recreation Committees.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The recreation handbook provides broad guidelines and lists sources of information for state and local units of the National Association for Retarded Citizens (NARC) to develop recreational programs throughout the nation. Described are the importance of recreation for reasons such as developing good habits of physical fitness, survey results…

National Association for Retarded Citizens, Arlington, TX.

128

Marine Mammal Center  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A non-profit hospital located in the Golden Gate National Recreation Area near Sausalito, California that rescues and rehabilitates marine mammals. Site contains information on education, research, and adopt-a-seal; features a photo gallery and FAQs. Volunteer, membership, and donation opportunities available. Information on what to do when finding a stranded marine mammal and stay current with the Center's patients. Education programs available at the Center or at your location (fees associated).

2010-09-16

129

Marine Mammal Center  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A non-profit hospital located in the Golden Gate National Recreation Area near Sausalito, California that rescues and rehabilitates marine mammals. Site contains information on education, research, and adopt-a-seal; features a photo gallery and FAQs. Volunteer, membership, and donation opportunities available. Information on what to do when finding a stranded marine mammal and stay current with the Center's patients. Education programs available at the Center or at your location (fees associated).

130

Recreation-Related Head Injuries  

MedlinePLUS

Recreation-Related Head Injuries Top 15 Recreation/Leisure-Related Head Injuries by Product Product Category Estimated Injuries 1. Toys (all toy categories combined) 17,924 2. Swimming/Wading Pools, Pool Equipment ...

131

36 CFR 1002.23 - Recreation fees.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Recreation fees. (a) Recreation fees shall be charged in the area...the same extent that recreation fees have been established for the Golden Gate National Recreation Area in accordance...Entering designated entrance fee areas or using...

2011-07-01

132

36 CFR 1002.23 - Recreation fees.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Recreation fees. (a) Recreation fees shall be charged in the area...the same extent that recreation fees have been established for the Golden Gate National Recreation Area in accordance...Entering designated entrance fee areas or using...

2013-07-01

133

36 CFR 1002.23 - Recreation fees.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Recreation fees. (a) Recreation fees shall be charged in the area...the same extent that recreation fees have been established for the Golden Gate National Recreation Area in accordance...Entering designated entrance fee areas or using...

2012-07-01

134

36 CFR 1002.23 - Recreation fees.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Recreation fees. (a) Recreation fees shall be charged in the area...the same extent that recreation fees have been established for the Golden Gate National Recreation Area in accordance...Entering designated entrance fee areas or using...

2010-07-01

135

36 CFR 1002.23 - Recreation fees.  

...Recreation fees. (a) Recreation fees shall be charged in the area...the same extent that recreation fees have been established for the Golden Gate National Recreation Area in accordance...Entering designated entrance fee areas or using...

2014-07-01

136

Recreation and the Returning Female Student.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study evaluated the leisure attitudes and recreation participation patterns of a sample of returning female college students. Interviews were conducted with 36 full-time women students who had returned to graduate school after a five-year lapse in their formal training. The women placed a high value on the cognitive and affective aspects of…

Bialeschki, M. Deborah; Henderson, Karla A.

137

Recreational Prescription Drug Use among College Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to explore recreational prescription drug use among undergraduate students. Although anecdotal accounts on this subject abound, empirical research is extremely limited. Data from a survey of a random sample of 734 students at a large public research university in the Northeast were examined. Results indicate that a…

Kolek, Ethan A.

2006-01-01

138

CAMPUS RECREATION STUDENT EMPLOYMENT  

E-print Network

Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday #12;PLEASE CHECK ALL CERTIFICATIONS YOU MAINTAIN CERTIFICATION CERT ORG: Reason for Leaving: Work Performed: Employer Name: Job Title: Dates Employed: Supervisor Name: Supervisor Phone: Reason for Leaving: Work Performed: WORK EXPERIENCE #12;CAMPUS RECREATION STUDENT STAFF POSITION

Azevedo, Ricardo

139

CAMPUS RECREATION CLEMSON UNIVERSITY  

E-print Network

Corporate Sponsorship program provides a prime opportunity to directly market goods and services to our provides the university with an essential global perspective that maintains Clemson's reputation as one of recreational sports facilities for your employees and corporate partners. CAUSE-RELATED MARKETING Develop

Stuart, Steven J.

140

Recreational Vehicle Trades.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This curriculum guide provides materials for a competency-based course in recreational vehicle trades at the secondary level. The curriculum design uses the curriculum infused model for the teaching of basic skills as part of vocational education and demonstrates the relationship of vocationally related skills to communication, mathematics, and…

Felice, Michael

141

Recreative Arts Outdoor Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Emphasizing an interdisciplinary, experiential learning approach, this curriculum guide is designed for a one year recreative arts-outdoor education course for high school students in the Dallas (Texas) Independent School District. The course objective is to develop the skills and knowledge necessary for fostering responsible behavior in an…

Myers, Ray

142

Marine Technician's Handbook, Instructions for Taking Air Samples on Board Ship: Carbon Dioxide Project.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This booklet is one of a series intended to provide explicit instructions for the collection of oceanographic data and samples at sea. The methods and procedures described have been used by the Scripps Institution of Oceanography and found reliable and up-to-date. Instructions are given for taking air samples on board ship to determine the…

Keeling, Charles D.

143

Careers in Parks and Recreation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As reported in the document, the park and recreation profession, a growing field, emphasizes involving people in meaningful leisure activities. This service profession offers varied career opportunities in the areas of public recreation, park management, conservation and outdoor recreation, and park and resource planning. Positions are also…

Oregon Univ., Eugene. Center of Leisure Studies.

144

Risk Recreation: Exploration and Implications.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this paper is to explore the topic of risk recreation and its implications for the professional recreation director. The question is raised, "Is there a reasonable rationale and justification to warrant public sponsorship of risk recreation programs?" High risk activities are identified, and their relative dangers are examined. The…

Meir, Joel

145

Measuring 15 N –NH 4 + in marine, estuarine and fresh waters: An adaptation of the ammonia diffusion method for samples with low ammonium concentrations  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a method for measuring 15N–NH4+ in marine, estuarine and fresh waters. The advantage of this method is that it is broadly applicable to all types of water and it allows measurements in samples with lower ammonium concentrations than has previously been possible. The procedure is a modification of the ammonia diffusion method and uses large sample volumes (often

R. M Holmes; J. W McClelland; D. M Sigman; B Fry; B. J Peterson

1998-01-01

146

Archival policies and collections database for the Woods Hole Science Center's marine sediment samples  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Woods Hole Science Center of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been an active member of the Woods Hole research community, Woods Hole, Massachusetts, for over 40 years. In that time there have been many projects that involved the collection of sediment samples conducted by USGS scientists and technicians for the research and study of seabed environments and processes. These samples were collected at sea or near shore and then brought back to the Woods Hole Science Center (WHSC) for analysis. While at the center, samples are stored in ambient temperature, refrigerated and freezing conditions ranging from +2º Celsius to -18º Celsius, depending on the best mode of preparation for the study being conducted or the duration of storage planned for the samples. Recently, storage methods and available storage space have become a major concern at the WHSC. The core and sediment archive program described herein has been initiated to set standards for the management, methods, and duration of sample storage. A need has arisen to maintain organizational consistency and define storage protocol. This handbook serves as a reference and guide to all parties interested in using and accessing the WHSC's sample archive and also defines all the steps necessary to construct and maintain an organized collection of geological samples. It answers many questions as to the way in which the archive functions.

Buczkowski, Brian J.; Kelsey, Sarah A.

2007-01-01

147

Sample Limited Characterization of a Novel Disulfide-Rich Venom Peptide Toxin from Terebrid Marine Snail Terebra variegata  

PubMed Central

Disulfide-rich peptide toxins found in the secretions of venomous organisms such as snakes, spiders, scorpions, leeches, and marine snails are highly efficient and effective tools for novel therapeutic drug development. Venom peptide toxins have been used extensively to characterize ion channels in the nervous system and platelet aggregation in haemostatic systems. A significant hurdle in characterizing disulfide-rich peptide toxins from venomous animals is obtaining significant quantities needed for sequence and structural analyses. Presented here is a strategy for the structural characterization of venom peptide toxins from sample limited (4 ng) specimens via direct mass spectrometry sequencing, chemical synthesis and NMR structure elucidation. Using this integrated approach, venom peptide Tv1 from Terebra variegata was discovered. Tv1 displays a unique fold not witnessed in prior snail neuropeptides. The novel structural features found for Tv1 suggest that the terebrid pool of peptide toxins may target different neuronal agents with varying specificities compared to previously characterized snail neuropeptides. PMID:24713808

Anand, Prachi; Grigoryan, Alexandre; Bhuiyan, Mohammed H.; Ueberheide, Beatrix; Russell, Victoria; Quinonez, Jose; Moy, Patrick; Chait, Brian T.; Poget, Sebastien F.; Holford, Mande

2014-01-01

148

New procedure for recovering extra- and intracellular DNA from marine sediment samples  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Extracellular DNA (eDNA) is a ubiquitous biological compound in aquatic sediment and soil. Despite major methodological advances, analysis of DNA from sediment is still technically challenging, not just because of the co-elution of inhibitory substances, but also due to co-elution of extracellular DNA, which potentially leads to an overestimate of the actual diversity. Previous studies suggested that eDNA might play an important role in biogeochemical element cycling, horizontal gene transfer and stabilization of biofilm structures. Several protocols based on the precipitation of eDNA e.g. with CTAB and ethanol have already been published. However, using these methods we did not succeed in quantifying very low amounts of eDNA (e.g. <1?g eDNA/g dry wt) in marine sediment even when using DNA carriers like glycogen. Since the recovery of eDNA by precipitation strongly depends on its concentration, these previously published procedures are not adequate for deep biosphere sediment due to the low eDNA content. We have focused on the question whether eDNA could be a source of nitrogen and phosphorus for microbes in the subseafloor biosphere. Therefore we developed a new method for the (semi)-quantitative extraction of eDNA from sediment. The new extraction procedure is based on sequential washing of the sediment to remove simultaneously eDNA and microbial cells without lysing them. After separation of the cells by centrifugation, the eDNA was extracted from the supernatant and purified by adsorption onto a solid phase, followed by removal of the solids and subsequent elution of the pure eDNA. Intracellular DNA (iDNA) was extracted and purified from the cell pellet using a commercial DNA extraction kit. Additional to a very low detection limit and reproducible quantification, this new method allows separation and purification of both extracellular and intracellular DNA to an extent that inhibitors are removed and downstream applications like PCR can be performed. To evaluate the new extraction method two sediments with rather opposing composition were analyzed. Sediment from the South Pacific Gyre, the most oligotrophic oceanic region on earth and organic-rich Baltic Sea sediment (Northern Germany) were processed. Using this new procedure high purity genomic iDNA and eDNA with a molecular size range between 20 bp and 50k bp can be simultaneously recovered even from very oligotrophic sediment with very low cell abundances. The main fraction of recovered eDNA was suitable for downstream applications like PCR and had a molecular size that indicates minimal shearing. Despite about two decades of research many questions about deep subsurface life remain unanswered. The fact that microbes can be found even in deep oligotrophic marine sediment raises the fundamental questions of the types and availability of substrates and their biogeochemical cycling. This is the first study that provides evidence that eDNA is an important potential substrate for microorganisms in the deep biosphere. Also, our results show a link between cell counts and eDNA content, indicating that the eDNA pool in the investigated sediment consist mainly of microbial DNA. Comparative sequence analysis of extracted iDNA and eDNA will provide deeper insights into the origin and turnover of eDNA and the apparent microbial community composition in the deep biosphere.

Alawi, M.; Kallmeyer, J.

2012-12-01

149

As, Cd, Cr, Ni and Pb pressurized liquid extraction with acetic acid from marine sediment and soil samples  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Rapid leaching procedures by Pressurized Liquid Extraction (PLE) have been developed for As, Cd, Cr, Ni and Pb leaching from environmental matrices (marine sediment and soil samples). The Pressurized Liquid Extraction is completed after 16 min. The released elements by acetic acid Pressurized Liquid Extraction have been evaluated by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry. The optimum multi-element leaching conditions when using 5.0 ml stainless steel extraction cells, were: acetic acid concentration 8.0 M, extraction temperature 100 °C, pressure 1500 psi, static time 5 min, flush solvent 60%, two extraction steps and 0.50 g of diatomaceous earth as dispersing agent (diatomaceous earth mass/sample mass ratio of 2). Results have showed that high acetic acid concentrations and high extraction temperatures increase the metal leaching efficiency. Limits of detection (between 0.12 and 0.5 ?g g - 1 ) and repeatability of the over-all procedure (around 6.0%) were assessed. Finally, accuracy was studied by analyzing PACS-2 (marine sediment), GBW-07409 (soil), IRANT-12-1-07 (cambisol soil) and IRANT-12-1-08 (luvisol soil) certified reference materials (CRMs). These certified reference materials offer certified concentrations ranges between 2.9 and 26.2 ?g g - 1 for As, from 0.068 to 2.85 ?g g - 1 for Cd, between 26.4 and 90.7 ?g g - 1 for Cr, from 9.3 to 40.0 ?g g - 1 for Ni and between 16.3 and 183.0 ?g g - 1 for Pb. Recoveries after analysis were between 95.7 and 105.1% for As, 96.2% for Cd, 95.2 and 100.6% for Cr, 95.7 and 103% for Ni and 94.2 and 105.5% for Pb.

Moreda-Piñeiro, Jorge; Alonso-Rodríguez, Elia; López-Mahía, Purificación; Muniategui-Lorenzo, Soledad; Prada-Rodríguez, Darío; Moreda-Piñeiro, Antonio; Bermejo-Barrera, Adela; Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar

2006-12-01

150

Applicability of passive sampling to bioanalytical screening of bioaccumulative chemicals in marine wildlife.  

PubMed

Quantification of bioaccumulative contaminants in biota is time and cost-intensive and the required extensive cleanup steps make it selective toward targeted chemical groups. Therefore tissue extracts prepared for chemical analysis are not amenable to assess the combined effects of unresolved complex mixtures. Passive equilibrium sampling with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) has the potential for unbiased sampling of mixtures, and the PDMS extracts can be directly dosed into cell-based bioassays. The passive sampling approach was tested by exposing PDMS to lipid-rich tissue (dugong blubber; 85% lipid) spiked with a known mixture of hydrophobic contaminants (five congeners of tetra- to octachloro-dibenzo-p-dioxins). The equilibrium was attained within 24 h. Lipid-PDMS partition coefficients (Klip-PDMS) ranged from 20 to 38, were independent of hydrophobicity, and within the range of those previously measured for organochlorine compounds. To test if passive sampling can be combined with bioanalysis without the need for chemical cleanup, spiked blubber-PDMS extracts were dosed into the CAFLUX bioassay, which specifically targets dioxin-like chemicals. Small quantities of lipids coextracted by the PDMS were found to affect the kinetics in the regularly applied 24-h bioassay; however, this effect was eliminated by a longer exposure period (72 h). The validated method was applied to 11 unspiked dugong blubber samples with known (native) dioxin concentrations. These results provide the first proof of concept for linking passive sampling of lipid-rich tissue with cell-based bioassays, and could be further extended to other lipid rich species and a wider range of bioanalytical end points. PMID:23758596

Jin, Ling; Gaus, Caroline; van Mourik, Louise; Escher, Beate I

2013-07-16

151

Wipe sampling of amphetamine-type stimulants and recreational drugs on selected household surfaces with analysis by ultra-performance liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.  

PubMed

Sorption characteristics of eight drugs related to recreational and clandestine activity-amphetamine, cocaine, heroin, N-formyl amphetamine, N-formyl methamphetamine, methamphetamine, 3, 4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), and pseudoephedrine-were evaluated on selected kitchen countertop surfaces. Methanol-dampened Whatman 40 filter paper wipes were used to collect samples from eleven surfaces including alkyd resin, ceramic tiles, glass, granite, laminate, limestone, marble, quartz compac, quartz real, soap stone, and stainless steel. The filter paper wipes were analyzed by a rapid three-minute UPLC-QTOF method, following ammonium acetate buffer (pH 5.8-6.2) extraction. The average percentage recoveries after 15 h of exposure to the surface materials tested, was found to be highest for cocaine and MDMA and lowest for amphetamine and methamphetamine. Among the eleven countertop surfaces, overall recoveries for marble were observed to be the least, whereas soapstone, quartz compac and stainless steel were among the highest. Scanning electron microscopic images of the surfaces provided a unique view of surface irregularities that potentially influenced drug recovery. Aging, migration, solvent composition, and volatility were examined. The variation in recovery of drugs was attributed to four key factors: compound volatility, surface composition, surface-compound interaction, and solvent composition. PMID:23583948

Madireddy, Sri Bharat; Bodeddula, Vanaja Reddy; Mansani, Sravan Kumar; Wells, Martha J M; Boles, Jeffrey O

2013-06-15

152

A Social and Economic Characterization of the U.S. Gulf of Mexico Recreational Shark Fishery  

E-print Network

A Social and Economic Characterization of the U.S. Gulf of Mexico Recreational Shark Fishery MARK R. FISHER and ROBERT B. DITTON Introduction To protect sharks from overfishing, the National Marine tions of the National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA. ABSTRACT-A mail survey of tourna ment shark

153

Comparison of Multi-Drug Resistant Environmental Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from Recreational Beaches and High Touch Surfaces in Built Environments  

PubMed Central

Over the last decade community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has emerged as a major cause of disease in the general population with no health care exposure or known classical risk factors for MRSA infections. The potential community reservoirs have not been well defined though certain strains such as ST398 and USA300 have been well studied in some settings. MRSA has been isolated from recreational beaches, high-touch surfaces in homes, universities, and other community environmental surfaces. However, in most cases the strains were not characterized to determine if they are related to community-acquired or hospital-acquired clinical strains. We compared 55 environmental MRSA from 805 samples including sand, fresh, and marine water samples from local marine and fresh water recreational beaches (n?=?296), high touch surfaces on the University of Washington campus (n?=?294), surfaces in UW undergraduate housing (n?=?85), and the local community (n?=?130). Eleven USA300, representing 20% of the isolates, were found on the UW campus surfaces, student housing surfaces, and on the community surfaces but not in the recreational beach samples from the Northwest USA. Similarly, the predominant animal ST133 was found in the recreational beach samples but not in the high touch surface samples. All USA300 isolates were multi-drug resistant carrying two to six different antibiotic resistance genes coding for kanamycin, macrolides and/or macrolides-lincosamides-streptogramin B, and tetracycline, with the majority (72%) carrying four to six different antibiotic resistance genes. A surprising 98% of the 55 MRSA isolates were resistant to other classes of antibiotics and most likely represent reservoirs for these genes in the environment. PMID:23577006

Roberts, Marilyn C.; Soge, Olusegun O.; No, David

2013-01-01

154

Development of a subcritical fluid extraction and GC-MS validation method for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in marine samples.  

PubMed

This paper describes a new procedure for extracting polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from marine samples using subcritical 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (R134a). The extraction procedure was optimized at temperatures varying from 20 to 70°C and pressures ranging from 3 to 15 MPa. The volume of the co-solvent was then optimized using 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (R134a) as the subcritical phase. PCBs were characterized by GC-MS using the optimized conditions of 3 MPa, 30°C, and a co-solvent volume of 6 mL. The average yields of PCBs from subcritical fluid extraction of spiked oyster samples were measured and found to be greater than 90%, with relative standard deviations (RSD) of less than 10%. Detection limits of this method were in the range of 0.045-0.108 ng/g of dry mass. The method was compared to Soxhlet extraction and then applied for monitoring PCBs in oysters from Qingdao, Shandong, China. PMID:23455072

Jia, Kai; Feng, Xiaomei; Liu, Kun; Han, Yuqian; Xue, Yong; Xue, Changhu

2013-04-01

155

Characterization of mucilage aggregates in Adriatic and Tyrrhenian Sea: structure similarities between mucilage samples and the insoluble fractions of marine humic substance.  

PubMed

The appearance of gelatinous aggregates called mucilages causes serious damages to tourism and fishery industries of the Adriatic Sea. So, many studies have been planned and some of them are still in progress to clarify the origin and causes of the phenomenon. The scientific research has showed that mucilages are produced by several marine organisms when peculiar climatic and trophic conditions occur. Moreover, as far as the mucilage composition is concerned, although it is well known that polysaccharides give a high contribution, knowledge of the structural characteristics of mucilages and their relationship with the natural organic matter of the marine environment has not been clarified yet. In this paper a study on the characterization of the marine mucilage samples collected in the Adriatic and Tyrrhenian Seas is described. The study was performed by spectroscopic (infrared and colorimetric) techniques, and elemental analysis. The results showed that mucilage samples have chemical and structural similarities with the insoluble fraction of the marine humic substance (humin). According to experimental evidences it is possible to establish the relationship between mucilages and the dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the marine environment in order to identify the most likely pathways of mucilage formation. PMID:11482660

Mecozzi, M; Acquistucci, R; Di Noto, V; Pietrantonio, E; Amici, M; Cardarilli, D

2001-08-01

156

Marine Sample Exploitation Project: estimates regarding the sensitivity and technology for the detection of nuclear explosion debris in the marine environment  

SciTech Connect

The report discusses the possibility of detecting a small nuclear explosion in which most of the fission products are released to the ocean. The use of marine plankton as bioaccumulators is proposed to deal with the problem of dilution. 7 refs. (ACR)

Marsh, K.V.; Buddemeier, R.W.

1985-06-04

157

A procedure for separate recovery of extra- and intracellular DNA from a single marine sediment sample.  

PubMed

Extracellular DNA (eDNA) is a ubiquitous biological compound in aquatic sediment and soil. Previous studies suggested that eDNA plays an important role in biogeochemical element cycling, horizontal gene transfer and stabilization of biofilm structures. Previous methods for eDNA extraction were either not suitable for oligotrophic sediments or only allowed quantification but no genetic analyses. Our procedure is based on cell detachment and eDNA liberation from sediment particles by sequential washing with an alkaline sodium phosphate buffer followed by a separation of cells and eDNA. The separated eDNA is then bound onto silica particles and purified, whereas the intracellular DNA from the separated cells is extracted using a commercial kit. The method provides extra- and intracellular DNA of high purity that is suitable for downstream applications like PCR. Extracellular DNA was extracted from organic-rich shallow sediment of the Baltic Sea, glacially influenced sediment of the Barents Sea and from the oligotrophic South Pacific Gyre. The eDNA concentration in these samples varied from 23 to 626ngg(-1) wet weight sediment. A number of experiments were performed to verify each processing step. Although extraction efficiency is higher than other published methods, it is not fully quantitative. PMID:24955890

Alawi, Mashal; Schneider, Beate; Kallmeyer, Jens

2014-09-01

158

From Recreational Mathematics to Recreational Programming, and Back  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recreational Programming (RecPro) is the discipline that encourages the study of computer programming through ludic problems. Problems that are typically studied within this discipline are similar to those of Recreational Mathematics (RecMat), which sometimes leads to the confusion of these two disciplines. The objective for RecPro is to write…

Ruiz Jimenez, B. C.; Ruiz Munoz, M.

2011-01-01

159

Assessing the Value of Recreational Divers for Censusing Elasmobranchs  

PubMed Central

Background Around the world, researchers are using the observations and experiences of citizens to describe patterns in animal populations. This data is often collected via ongoing sampling or by synthesizing past experiences. Since elasmobranchs are relatively rare, obtaining data for broad-scale trend analysis requires high sampling effort. Elasmobranchs are also relatively large and conspicuous and therefore it may be possible to enlist recreational divers to collect data on their occurrence and relative abundance from daily dive activities. For this, however, a good understanding of the value of data collected by recreational divers is essential. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we explore the value of recreational divers for censusing elasmobranchs using a diverse set of data sources. First, we use a simulation experiment to explore detection rates of the roving diver technique, used by recreational divers, across a range of fish densities and speeds. Next, using a field survey, we show that inexperienced recreational divers detect and count elasmobranchs as well as experienced recreational divers. Finally, we use semi-structured interviews of recreational dive instructors to demonstrate the value of their recollections in terms of effort and their descriptions of spatial and temporal distributions of sharks in Thailand. Conclusions/Significance Overall, this study provides initial ground-work for using recreational divers for monitoring elasmobranch populations. If used appropriately, citizen-collected data may provide additional information that can be used to complement more standardized surveys and to describe population trends across a range of spatial and temporal scales. Due to the non-extractive nature of this data, recreational divers may also provide important insight into the success of conservation initiatives, such as shark sanctuaries and no-take zones. PMID:22016771

Ward-Paige, Christine A.; Lotze, Heike K.

2011-01-01

160

Quantifying Marine Emissions of Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds Using Laboratory Measurements of Plankton Monocultures and Field Samples  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Marine biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) have been suggested to contribute significant portion of the organic carbon present in ocean atmosphere. In this study emission rates of 40 different hydrocarbons are quantified for lab-grown non-axenic phytoplankton monocultures and ambient samples from the Pamlico-Neuse Estuary, NC. The outcome of environmental conditions on production of BVOCs was examined for different light and temperature conditions. These different regimes are considered proxies for physiological stress-induced effects observed in natural ecosystems. The samples were incubated in a climate controlled room; they were then transferred to smaller volumes (200 ml) for analysis. BVOCs accumulated in the water and headspace above the water were measured by bubbling hydrocarbon-free gas mixture through the sample and passing the gas stream through a gas chromatography/mass spectrometry system equipped with a sample pre-concentrator. Inside the pre-concentrator, the compounds were trapped on a sorbent material, heated, and flushed into the GC-MS column. The pre-concentrator/GC-MS system gave at least 1000 times magnification of the sample concentrations, allowing detection of low ppt levels of hydrocarbons. Here we report results for lab-grown diatoms Thalassiosira weissflogii and Thalassiosira pseudonana, prymnesiophyte Pleurochrysis carterae, and dinoflagellates Karina brevis and Procentrum minimum, as well as field samples. To make results widely usable, all the emissions are normalized to Chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) concentration and cell counts. Our results show that diatoms had the highest isoprene production rate of 2.8 ?mol (g Chl-a)-1 h-1 with ranges between 1.4 and 3.6 ?mol (g Chl-a)-1 h-1 at light levels between 90 and 900 ?E m-2 s-1, respectively. The prymnesiophyte and dinoflagellate species had isoprene production rates of 1.3±0.4 ?mol (g Chl-a)-1 h-1 with a similar light dependency as diatoms. Field samples had comparable isoprene production rate of 3.5 ?mol (g Chl-a)-1 h-1 with ranges between 0.6 and 4.1 ?mol (g Chl-a)-1 h-1 for similar light levels and temperatures between 18 to 30°C. Three monoterpenes detected were ?-pinene, camphene, and d-limonene. Diatoms had the highest ?-pinene and d-limonene production rates of 0.045 ?mol (g Chl-a)-1 h-1 and 0.015 ?mol (g Chl-a)-1 h-1, respectively. The prymnesiophyte species had the highest camphene production of 0.021 ?mol (g Chl-a)-1 h-1. Production rates of d-limonene and camphene did not show a well-defined light dependency, but both isoprene and ?-pinene showed an increase in terpene production with increasing light intensities. Field samples show ?-pinene, d-limonene, and camphene production rates of 0.05 ?mol (g Chl-a)-1 h-1, 0.02 ?mol (g Chl-a)-1 h-1 and 0.018 ?mol (g Chl-a)-1 h-1, respectively. Field samples acclimated at 26°C had the highest terpene production rates. This study tabulates a large number of BVOC emission rates for various phytoplankton species under diverse environmental conditions.

Sabolis, A. W.; Meskhidze, N.; Kamykowski, D.; Reed, R. E.

2010-12-01

161

FACULTY OF KINESIOLOGY AND RECREATION MANAGEMENT  

E-print Network

FACULTY OF KINESIOLOGY AND RECREATION MANAGEMENT Application Information Bulletin for 2014 of Kinesiology and Recreation Management programs: Bachelor of Kinesiology - BKin Bachelor of Kinesiology faculty representatives of the Faculty of Kinesiology and Recreation Management Director of Enrolment

Major, Arkady

162

Recreational Services for the Handicapped.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presented are duplications of the responses given by Recreational Services for the Handicapped (Baltimore, Maryland) as part of a project to collect, share, and compile information about, and techniques in the operation of 18 community action models for recreation services to the disabled. Model programs are categorized as consumer, client…

Iowa Univ., Iowa City. Recreation Education Program.

163

Military Recreation and Mission Accomplishment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the importance of military recreation to mission accomplishment in the armed forces, noting the current financial problems faced by many such programs. The article discusses sports, entertainment, arts and crafts, libraries, and outdoor recreation, all of which contribute to readiness, deployment, recruitment, and retention. (SM)

Kinsman, Francis R.

1991-01-01

164

Financing of Private Outdoor Recreation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A survey of financial institutions was undertaken by the Bureau of Outdoor Recreation to evaluate the demand and availability of private credit for enterprises that provide outdoor recreation. The survey provided basic information for (1) evaluating legislative proposals for loan guarantee programs, (2) nationwide planning, and (3) assessing the…

Bureau of Outdoor Recreation (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

165

RECREATION AND RISK: POTENTIAL EXPOSURE  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Department of Energy and other federal facilities are reclaiming land through the process of remediation and restoration, and this land will eventually be turned over for future land uses that may involve recreation. Understanding the amount of recreation that is likely (and thus individual exposure) is an essential element in decisions about cleanup standards. In this article the number

Joanna Burger

1997-01-01

166

50 CFR 80.23 - Allocation of funds between marine and freshwater fishery projects.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Allocation of funds between marine and freshwater fishery projects. 80.23 Section...Allocation of funds between marine and freshwater fishery projects. (a) Each...projects having recreational benefits for freshwater fisheries. (1) Coastal...

2010-10-01

167

Marine Debris  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Marine debris is an environmental problem of global importance, enlisting the concern and action of scientists, policy makers, as well as the general public. This three-lesson kit focuses primarily on plastic marine debris. Students critically examine data and samples and take part in activities that explore the causes, geographical distribution, and biological impacts of marine debris. Each lesson can be completed in about 50-60 minutes, but many of the activities are discrete and can be easily rearranged to fit various curricular objectives and time constraints.

2012-01-01

168

www.sciencemag.org SCIENCE VOL 295 15 FEBRUARY 2002 1233 Marine Reserves and  

E-print Network

Recreational Fisheries Statistics Survey, the mean weight of red drum and black drum in east Florida has more Recreational Fisheries Statistics Survey available at http://www.st.nmfs.gov/st1/recreational/queries/ index.sciencemag.org SCIENCE VOL 295 15 FEBRUARY 2002 1233 Marine Reserves and Fisheries Management IN THEIR REPORT "EFFECTS

Latham, Peter

169

Sampling  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This tutorial covers some of the key terms in sampling like "population" and "sampling frame," some of the statistical terms used in sampling, and the major distinction between probability and Nonprobability sampling methods.

William Trochim (Cornell University)

2006-10-20

170

Beyond Screen Time: Assessing Recreational Sedentary Behavior among Adolescent Girls  

PubMed Central

Most studies of sedentary behavior have focused on television use or screen time. This study aims to examine adolescent girls' participation in a variety of recreational sedentary behaviors (e.g., talking on the phone and hanging around), and their association with physical activity (PA), dietary behaviors, and body mass index. Data were from a sample of 283 adolescent girls. Recreational sedentary behavior, PA, and dietary behaviors were self-reported, and girls' height and weight were measured. Over 95% of girls engaged in at least one recreational sedentary behavior during the recall period. Watching television and hanging around were the most common behaviors. Watching television, using the Internet, and hanging around were associated with less PA; watching television, hanging around, and talking on the phone were associated with less healthful dietary behaviors. No associations were found with body mass index. Interventions may benefit from capitalizing on and intervening upon girls' common recreational sedentary behaviors. PMID:22013514

Bauer, Katherine W.; Friend, Sarah; Graham, Daniel J.; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

2012-01-01

171

Outdoor recreational opportunities in Alabama  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

What comes to mind when you think about outdoor recreational opportunities? Diagram of the recreational opportunities to enjoy First we will look at the forest services and recreational opportunities. Forest Services There is plenty of hunting opportunities in Alabama to enjoy. Hunting Opportunities Outdoor tips can be essential when enjoying the outdoors. Outdoor Tips What a better way to spend a weekend then going fishing with family and friends. Places to Fish A great way to spend a weekend could also consist of hiking. Hiking Now ...

Smith, Adam

2012-04-04

172

Environmental Impacts of Marine Exotics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The issue-focused interview exposes marine exotic, or invasive, species as a global problem. These uninvited plants and animals: compete with native species for space, food, and other resources, put a strain on the economy, such as commercial fisheries, can contribute to public health problems, and impact recreational enjoyment by fouling the environment.

James Carlton (Williams College, Williamstown, Massachusetts;)

2004-05-01

173

GMRT Recreation Club Annual Report  

E-print Network

's.........................................................................26 14.Inter Departmental cricket matches's.....................................................................................................................38 19.Sports and Recreation Facilities their sports and cultural activities. GRC is also a forum for nurturing creativity and talent. The report

Udgaonkar, Jayant B.

174

BS in RECREATION MANAGEMENT: Therapeutic Recreation Emphasis (664523) MAP Sheet Department of Recreation Management  

E-print Network

The Individual and Society Citizenship American Heritage Global & Cultural Awareness Skills Effective Analysis IS 201 Intro to Management Information Systems M Com 320* Communication in Organizational Settings Org B 321 Organizational Effectiveness Complete the following Therapeutic Recreation courses: PDBio

Olsen Jr., Dan R.

175

In-Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Marine Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution  

SciTech Connect

The primary accomplishments of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter were the implementation of a scientific ocean drilling expedition to study marine methane hydrates along the Cascadia margin, in the NE Pacific as part of Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 311 using the R/V JOIDES Resolution and the deployment of all required equipment and personnel to provide the required services during this expedition. IODP Expedition 311 shipboard activities on the JOIDES Resolution began on August 28 and were concluded on October 28, 2005. New ODP Pressure Coring System (PCS) aluminum autoclave chambers were fabricated prior to the expedition. During the expedition, 16 PCS autoclaves containing pressure cores were X-rayed before and after depressurization using a modified Geotek MSCL-P (multi-sensor core logger-pressure) system. These PCS cores were density scanned using the MSCL-V (multi-sensor core logger-vertical) during depressurization to monitor gas evolution. The MSCL-V was set up in a 20-foot-long refrigerated container provided by Texas A&M University through the JOI contract with TAMRF. IODP Expedition 311 was the first time that PCS cores were examined before (using X-ray), during (using MSCL-V gamma density) and after (using X-ray) degassing to determine the actual volume and distribution of sediment and gas hydrate in the pressurized core, which will be important for more accurate determination of mass balances between sediment, gas, gas hydrate, and fluids in the samples collected. Geotek, Ltd was awarded a contract by JOI to provide equipment and personnel to perform pressure coring and related work on IODP Expedition 311 (Cascadia Margin Gas Hydrates). Geotek, Ltd. provided an automated track for use with JOI's infrared camera systems. Four auxiliary monitors showed infrared core images in real time to aid hydrate identification and sampling. Images were collected from 185 cores during the expedition and processed to provide continuous core temperature data. The HYACINTH pressure coring tools, subsystems, and core logging systems were mobilized to Astoria, Oregon. Both HYACINTH pressure coring tools, the HRC (HYACE Rotary Corer) and the FPC (Fugro Pressure Corer) were mobilized and used during the expedition. Two HYACINTH engineers supervised the use of the tools and five good pressure cores were obtained. Velocity, density and X-ray linear scanning data were collected from these cores at near in situ pressure using the MSCL-P system. Dr. Barry Freifeld from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory provided an X-ray source and detector for X-ray imaging of pressure cores and helped Geotek with the design and mobilization of the MSCL-P system. Pressure core handling, transfer, and logging was performed in a refrigerated 20-foot container supplied by Geotek, Ltd. After scanning, the pressure cores were stored for on-shore analysis in aluminum barrels. Additional studies were conducted at the Pacific Geoscience Center (PGC), where a shore based laboratory was established after Expedition 311.

Frank Rack; Peter Schultheiss; IODP Expedition 311 Scientific Party

2005-12-31

176

The influence of family’s participation in recreational sports on its resilience and communication facilitation  

PubMed Central

This study aims to define the influence of the motive and degree of family’s participation in recreational sports on its resilience and communication facilitation. Of members of sports centers in Seoul and Gyeonggi areas, 202 people who participated in recreational sports together with their family members were sampled as the population. Input data were computerized for analysis, using PASW 22.0 and AMOS 18.0 programs. Data statistical processing methods of reliability analysis and structural equation modeling were used, and the results are outlined as follows. Motive for family’s participation in recreational sports did not influence family resilience and communication facilitation. However, the degree of family’s participation in recreational sports influenced family resilience and communication facilitation. Degree of family’s participation in recreational sports did not directly influence communication facilitation, but boosted family resilience, further facilitating family communication. In other words, family resilience is an important parameter between recreational sports and communication facilitation.

Cho, Min-soo

2014-01-01

177

Recreational water–related illness  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective To review the risk factors, management, and prevention of recreational water–related illness in family practice. Sources of information Original and review articles from January 1998 to February 2012 were identified using PubMed and the search terms water-related illness, recreational water illness, and swimmer illness. Main message There is a 3% to 8% risk of acute gastrointestinal illness (AGI) after swimming. The high-risk groups for AGI are children younger than 5 years, especially if they have not been vaccinated for rotavirus, and elderly and immunocompromised patients. Children are at higher risk because they swallow more water when swimming, stay in the water longer, and play in the shallow water and sand, which are more contaminated. Participants in sports with a lot of water contact like triathlon and kite surfing are also at high risk, and even activities involving partial water contact like boating and fishing carry a 40% to 50% increase in risk of AGI compared with nonwater recreational activities. Stool cultures should be done when a recreational water illness is suspected, and the clinical dehydration scale is a useful clinical tool for assessing the treatment needs of affected children. Conclusion Recreational water illness is the main attributable cause of AGI during swimming season. Recognition that swimming is a substantial source of illness can help prevent recurrent and secondary cases. Rotavirus vaccine is highly recommended for children who will swim frequently. PMID:23673583

Sanborn, Margaret; Takaro, Tim

2013-01-01

178

Iron mineralogy and bioaccessibility of dust generated from soils as determined by reflectance spectroscopy and magnetic and chemical properties--Nellis Dunes recreational area, Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Atmospheric mineral dust exerts many important effects on the Earth system, such as atmospheric temperatures, marine productivity, and melting of snow and ice. Mineral dust also can have detrimental effects on human health through respiration of very small particles and the leaching of metals in various organs. These effects can be better understood through characterization of the physical and chemical properties of dust, including certain iron oxide minerals, for their extraordinary radiative properties and possible effects on lung inflammation. Studies of dust from the Nellis Dunes recreation area near Las Vegas, Nevada, focus on characteristics of radiative properties (capacity of dust to absorb solar radiation), iron oxide mineral type and size, chemistry, and bioaccessibility of metals in fluids that simulate human gastric, lung, and phagolysosomal fluids. In samples of dust from the Nellis Dunes recreation area with median grain sizes of 2.4, 3.1, and 4.3 micrometers, the ferric oxide minerals goethite and hematite, at least some of it nanosized, were identified. In one sample, in vitro bioaccessibility experiments revealed high bioaccessibility of arsenic in all three biofluids and higher leachate concentration and bioaccessibility for copper, uranium, and vanadium in the simulated lung fluid than in the phagolysosomal fluid. The combination of methods used here to characterize mineral dust at the Nellis Dunes recreation area can be applied to global dust and broad issues of public health.

Goldstein, Harland L.; Reynolds, Richard L.; Morman, Suzette A.; Moskowitz, Bruce; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Goossens, Dirk; Buck, Brenda J.; Flagg, Cody; Till, Jessica; Yauk, Kimberly; Berquó, Thelma S.

2013-01-01

179

Non-market Recreational Value of a National Forest: Survey Design and Results  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents and discusses the main features of a forest recreation survey. The first objective of the survey is the collection of primary data to be used in non-market valuation through the application of the travel cost and contingent behaviour methods. The second is to improve available data regarding people environmental perceptions and recreational preferences. Respondents in the sample

Paula Simões; Luís Cruz; Eduardo Barata

2012-01-01

180

Sulfur-nanoparticle-based method for separation and preconcentration of some heavy metals in marine samples prior to flame atomic absorption spectrometry determination.  

PubMed

The application of sulfur-nanoparticle-loaded alumina as an efficient adsorbent for the solid-phase extraction (SPE) and determination of trace amounts of Cd, Cu, Zn, and Pb ions was investigated in marine samples using flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The nanometer-sized sulfur particles were synthesized in situ, physically loaded onto alumina microparticles, and the parameters influencing the preconcentration of the analytes, such as the pH, solution flow rate and volume, eluent solution, and interfering ions, were examined. The results showed that the optimal conditions for quantitative recovery of the metal ions by adsorption and elution on the sulfur nanoparticles (SNPs) was achieved by employing a flow rate of 15 mL min(-1), a pH of 8.5 for the sample solutions, and an eluent composed of 3.0 mol L(-1) HNO(3) in methanol. The detection limits of this method for Cd, Zn, Cu, and Pb ions were 0.30, 0.21, 0.24, and 0.63 ?g L(-1) (n=10), respectively. Application of the proposed method to the analysis of fish certified reference material (DORM-3) produced results that were in good agreement with the certified values. The proposed method was also successfully applied to the determination of analytes in marine samples, including seawater, fish, and oysters. PMID:21645771

Ghanemi, Kamal; Nikpour, Yadollah; Omidvar, Omid; Maryamabadi, Ammar

2011-07-15

181

WATERBORNE DISEASES AND MICROBIAL QUALITY MONITORING FOR RECREATIONAL WATER BODIES USING REGULATORY METHODS  

EPA Science Inventory

This chapter will provide the reader with a historical perspective of microbial water quality and monitoring of recreational waters, with special attention to marine environments. It will review the regulations that are currently in effect in the United States and discuss critic...

182

76 FR 61284 - Accountability Measures and Reduced Season for the South Atlantic Recreational Sector of Golden...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Sector of Golden Tilefish for the 2011 Fishing Year AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries...tilefish in the South Atlantic for the 2011 fishing year through this temporary final rule...reduces the length of the 2011 recreational fishing season for golden tilefish based on...

2011-10-04

183

RECREATION GUIDE University of Pennsylvania Department of Recreation  

E-print Network

/ Business Services Office. robert a. fox fitness center Located at Gate 2 within the Weiss PavilionID/RecCard or be sponsored by another member and pay the $20.00 guest fee. FACIlITY REnTAl Department of Recreation indoor

Sharp, Kim

184

Student Recreation and Wellness Center Campus Recreational Services -Aquatics  

E-print Network

, earn a living, engage in other business, social and recreational activities and generally to enjoy life or reason that would prevent me from safely participating in swimming activities. I understand and agree those related to the pool area. I agree that if my child fails to abide by such rules and regulations

Hemmers, Oliver

185

Student Manager, Aquatics Programs Campus Recreation  

E-print Network

to promote professional development in recreation. Provide leadership to lifeguards through role modeling program and services for the campus community featuring Aquatics, Intramural Sports, Fitness, Wellness, Open Recreation, Outdoor Adventure, and Sport Club activities. Department Mission: In alliance

Karonis, Nicholas T.

186

24 CFR 1710.114 - Recreational facilities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...cost or assessments (1) Facility. Identify each recreational facility. Identify closely related facilities (e.g., swimming pool and bathhouse) separately only if their availability dates differ. If any recreational facility is not owned by...

2010-04-01

187

50 CFR 600.513 - Recreational fishing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Recreational fishing. 600.513 Section 600.513 Wildlife... MAGNUSON-STEVENS ACT PROVISIONS Foreign Fishing § 600.513 Recreational fishing. (a) Foreign vessels conducting...

2012-10-01

188

50 CFR 600.513 - Recreational fishing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Recreational fishing. 600.513 Section 600.513 Wildlife... MAGNUSON-STEVENS ACT PROVISIONS Foreign Fishing § 600.513 Recreational fishing. (a) Foreign vessels conducting...

2011-10-01

189

50 CFR 600.513 - Recreational fishing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Recreational fishing. 600.513 Section 600.513 Wildlife... MAGNUSON-STEVENS ACT PROVISIONS Foreign Fishing § 600.513 Recreational fishing. (a) Foreign vessels conducting...

2010-10-01

190

Molecular detection of native and invasive marine invertebrate larvae present in ballast and open water environmental samples collected in Puget Sound  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Non-native marine species have been and continue to be introduced into Puget Sound via several vectors including ship's ballast water. Some non-native species become invasive and negatively impact native species or near shore habitats. We present a new methodology for the development and testing of taxon specific PCR primers designed to assess environmental samples of ocean water for the presence of native and non-native bivalves, crustaceans and algae. The intergenic spacer regions (IGS; ITS1, ITS2 and 5.8S) of the ribosomal DNA were sequenced for adult samples of each taxon studied. We used these data along with those available in Genbank to design taxon and group specific primers and tested their stringency against artificial populations of plasmid constructs containing the entire IGS region for each of the 25 taxa in our study, respectively. Taxon and group specific primer sets were then used to detect the presence or absence of native and non-native planktonic life-history stages (propagules) from environmental samples of ballast water and plankton tow net samples collected in Puget Sound. This methodology provides an inexpensive and efficient way to test the discriminatory ability of taxon specific oligonucleotides (PCR primers) before creating molecular probes or beacons for use in molecular ecological applications such as probe hybridizations or microarray analyses. This work addresses the current need to develop molecular tools capable of diagnosing the presence of planktonic life-history stages from non-native marine species (potential invaders) in ballast water and other environmental samples. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V.

Harvey, J.B.J.; Hoy, M.S.; Rodriguez, R.J.

2009-01-01

191

Recreational Drug Use and Suicidality Among Italian Young Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of the study was to explore recreational drug use patterns among a sample of Italian young adults and to examine the role of substance misuse on suicidality. Three hundred and forty Italian young adults between 19 and 30 years of age completed measures of suicidality (Reasons for Living Inventory, Beck Hopelessness Scale, and Suicide Score Scale), depression (Zung

Marco Innamorati; Maurizio Pompili; David Lester; Roberto Tatarelli; Paolo Girardi

2008-01-01

192

The History of Commercial Recreation and Its Role in the Provision of Family Recreation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Commercial recreation is the provision of facilities, equipment, and programs that satisfy public demand for activities during unobligated time and are profitable to the supplier. The term "commercial recreation" has been given a negative connotation in the field of recreation and leisure. This negative concept of commercial recreation continues…

Ellis, E. Taylor

193

Teratogenic Effects of `Recreational' Drugs  

PubMed Central

Published data from clinical studies for commonly abused substances were identified through a TOXLINE bibliographic search. References in teratology monographs and review articles were also used. Emphasis was placed on controlled epidemiological studies. Available evidence suggests that maternal alcohol or cocaine abuse substantially increases the risk of congenital anomalies among infants. Many recreational drugs cause neurobehavioral dysfunction in neonates exposed before birth. PMID:21229112

Polifka, Janine E.; Friedman, J.M.

1991-01-01

194

Campus Recreation Annual Health Update  

E-print Network

Campus Recreation Annual Health Update Please Print Legibly Athlete's Name taken supplements or vitamins protective eyewear? ____ ____ To help you gain or lose weight or improve:____________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Athlete/Patient Consent for Release Information I hereby certify that the answers to the above questions

Thomas, Andrew

195

Issues in Recreational Language Classes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A key consideration in course planning and teaching is motivation, which is sometimes considered the single most important factor in the practical realisation of language teaching in the classroom. The motivation students have for attending recreational courses can be somewhat different from that of students in school and university programs.…

Kawano, Mikiko

2007-01-01

196

Outdoor Recreation welcomes new director  

E-print Network

& March 2013 2/1 Delta Sigma Pi Rush 2/2 Indian Cultural Exchange Basketball Tournament 2/8-10 PalmettoBasketball teams registered for Intramural Sports leagues 83,245Total visits to Campus Recreation facilities Classic Basketball Tournament 2/18 Graduate Assistant Recruitment Program Event 2/21 NROTC Company

Almor, Amit

197

Seattle University Recreation Position Description  

E-print Network

Sports, Outdoor Adventure Recreation, and Fitness Center Staff as needed · Additional duties as assigned/3/2012 Knowledge and Skills Required · Interpersonal/communication skills · Leadership and professional development also have the ability to effectively deal with conflicts and crisis situations. Performance

Carter, John

198

Seattle University Recreation Position Description  

E-print Network

Sports, Outdoor Adventure Recreation, and Fitness Center Staff as needed · Additional duties as assigned/23/2013 Knowledge and Skills Required · Interpersonal/communication skills · Leadership and professional development also have the ability to effectively deal with conflicts and crisis situations. Performance

Carter, John

199

Heel Pain in Recreational Runners.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides physicians with the signs, symptoms, and management of heel/sole pain in recreational runners (usually due to plantar fasciitis, Achilles tendinitis, and calcaneal stress fractures). Remedies involve palliative treatment of symptoms, correction of underlying biomechanical problems, and flexibility exercises. (SM)

Bazzoli, Allan S.; Pollina, Frank S.

1989-01-01

200

2014 -2015 TO CAMPUS RECREATION  

E-print Network

are FREE to members! Dance & Martial Arts Classes Campus Recreation offers a variety of fee-based Dance and Martial Arts classes, providing opportunities to try something new or continue skill development. Classes Come by our state-of-the-art cycling studio and pedal through the ride of your life! Sweat your stress

201

Parks, Recreation and Public Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews what current research says about the holistic health benefits of park and recreation services, focusing on: health benefits according to park users; physical activities in parks; stress reduction benefits of park use; social support, self-determination, and stress reduction; observing nature in parks and associated benefits; and the…

Ho, Ching-Hua; Payne, Laura; Orsega-Smith, Elizabeth; Godbey, Geoffrey

2003-01-01

202

Haptic Recreation of Elbow Spasticity  

PubMed Central

The aim of this paper is to develop a haptic device capable of presenting standardized recreation of elbow spasticity. Using the haptic device, clinicians will be able to repeatedly practice the assessment of spasticity without requiring patient involvement, and these practice opportunities will help improve accuracy and reliability of the assessment itself. Haptic elbow spasticity simulator (HESS) was designed and prototyped according to mechanical requirements to recreate the feel of elbow spasticity. Based on the data collected from subjects with elbow spasticity, a mathematical model representing elbow spasticity is proposed. As an attempt to differentiate the feel of each score in Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS), parameters of the model were obtained respectively for three different MAS scores 1, 1+, and 2. The implemented haptic recreation was evaluated by experienced clinicians who were asked to give MAS scores by manipulating the haptic device. The clinicians who participated in the study were blinded to each other’s scores and to the given models. They distinguished the three models and the MAS scores given to the recreated models matched 100% with the original MAS scores from the patients. PMID:22275660

Kim, Jonghyun; Damiano, Diane L.

2013-01-01

203

Northern Suburban Special Recreation Association (NSSRA).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document is a description of the Northern Suburban Special Recreation Association (NSSRA) whose function is to provide recreation for the handicapped, primarily school-aged children. Recreation is defined as not just diversion but the restoration of strength and spirits after toil. It is stated that the NSSRA's programs are grouped to…

Northern Suburban Special Recreation Association, Highland Park, IL.

204

Large Indoor Sports and Recreation Facilities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper presents an overview and analysis of field houses, stadiums, arenas, and campus recreation centers. All are large indoor sports or recreation facilities. In general, stadiums and arenas are spectator facilities while field houses and campus recreation centers are primarily designed for activity. A college field house is a structure that…

Seidler, Todd

205

Missouri Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan: Executive Summary.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The document is a summary of the Missouri State Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan, which was designed to provide guidelines for allocation of resources for needed recreation facilities. The plan identifies the present and future needs for outdoor recreation and recommends ways of meeting these needs. This 1967 document provides a brief history…

Missouri State Inter-Agency for Outdoor Recreation, Jefferson.

206

Outdoor Recreation Action: Federal, State, Local, Private.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This booklet reports on outdoor recreation actions taken at the federal, state, local, and private levels. The Land and Water Conservation Fund and the financing of outdoor recreation on all levels are discussed. New agencies, personnel, reorganizations, resolutions, and recommendations for the organization and administration of outdoor recreation

Kyle, George M., Ed.

207

Recreation for Autistic and Emotionally Disturbed Children.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Over 200 questionnaire responses from parents of autistic children describing recreational activities that appealed to their children are reported. Recreation is defined as a means of skill development, an outlet for emotions, and an inspiration for living. Parents are encouraged to stimulate recreational interests by taking children along on…

Dewey, Margaret A.

208

Forests for People Access, recreation & tourism  

E-print Network

Strategy Forests for People Access, recreation & tourism on the national forest estate #12;#12;Access, recreation and tourism on the national forest estate | 3 Forests for People Access, recreation and tourism on the national forest estate Setting the scene Everyone has a right of responsible access

209

Recreation Vehicle Mechanic. Occupational Analyses Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This analysis covers tasks performed by a recreation vehicle mechanic, an occupational title some provinces and territories of Canada have also identified as recreation vehicle technician and recreation vehicle service technician. A guide to analysis discusses development, structure, and validation method; scope of the occupation; trends; and…

Dean, Ann; Embree, Rick

210

[Recreation for Youth with Deaf Blindness.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This newsletter special issue focuses on recreational programming for people with deaf blindness. The following individual articles are presented: "Strategies To Promote Community Integrated Recreation: Guidelines for Leisure Coaches" by Joann Enos (which lists seven such strategies); "Assessing Recreation and Leisure Preferences" by Laura Rocchio…

Carr, Theresa, Ed.

1992-01-01

211

Worcester Polytechnic Institute SPORTS AND RECREATION CENTER  

E-print Network

in activities or use of equipment in the Sports and Recreation Center. I do also hereby release all of those participation in any activities or the use of any equipment or facilities at the Sports and Recreation Center, including the use of exercise equipment and any Sports and Recreation Center facility, are potentially

Camesano, Terri

212

Sampling  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This webpage contains three activities that have students work through problems associated with sampling. Each activity includes a brief description, materials list, and a set of lesson worksheets. The last activity on the page, the "Cereal Toy Investigation" also includes an online simulator in the form of a Java applet.

Kawas, Terry

2012-01-01

213

Pilot Inventory of Mammals, Reptiles, and Amphibians, Golden Gate National Recreation Area, California, 1990-1997  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The United States Geological Survey Golden Gate Field Station conducted a baseline inventory of terrestrial vertebrates within the Golden Gate National Recreation Area (GGNRA), Marin, San Francisco, and San Mateo Counties, California between 1990 and 1997. We established 456 permanent study plots in 6 major park habitats, including grassland, coastal scrub, riparian woodland, coastal wetland, broad-leaved evergreen forest, and needle-leaved evergreen forest. We tested multiple inventory methods, including live traps, track plate stations, and artificial cover boards, across all years and habitats. In most years, sampling occurred in 3-4 primary sampling sessions between July and September. In 1994, additional sampling occurred in February and May in conjunction with an assessment of Hantavirus exposure in deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus). Overall, we detected 32 mammal, 14 reptile, and 6 amphibian species during 25,222 trap-nights of effort. The deer mouse-the most abundant species detected--accounted for 67% of total captures. We detected the Federal Endangered salt marsh harvest mouse (Reithrodontomys raviventris) at one coastal wetland plot in 1992. This project represents the first phase in the development of a comprehensive terrestrial vertebrate inventory and monitoring program for GGNRA. This report summarizes data on relative abundance, frequency of occurrence, distribution across habitat types, and trap success for terrestrial vertebrates detected during this 7-year effort. It includes comprehensive descriptions of the inventory methods and sampling strategies employed during this survey and is intended to help guide the park in the implementation of future longterm ecological monitoring programs.

Semenoff-Irving, Marcia; Howell, Judd A.

2005-01-01

214

Pilot Inventory of mammals, reptiles, and amphibians, Golden Gate National Recreation Area, California, 1990-1997  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The United States Geological Survey Golden Gate Field Station conducted a baseline inventory of terrestrial vertebrates within the Golden Gate National Recreation Area (GGNRA), Marin, San Francisco, and San Mateo Counties, California between 1990 and 1997. We established 456 permanent study plots in 6 major park habitats, including grassland, coastal scrub, riparian woodland, coastal wetland, broad-leaved evergreen forest, and needle-leaved evergreen forest. We tested multiple inventory methods, including live traps, track plate stations, and artificial cover boards, across all years and habitats. In most years, sampling occurred in 3?4 primary sampling sessions between July and September. In 1994, additional sampling occurred in February and May in conjunction with an assessment of Hantavirus exposure in deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus). Overall, we detected 32 mammal, 14 reptile, and 6 amphibian species during 25,222 trap-nights of effort. The deer mouse?the most abundant species detected--accounted for 67% of total captures. We detected the Federal Endangered salt marsh harvest mouse (Reithrodontomys raviventris) at one coastal wetland plot in 1992. This project represents the first phase in the development of a comprehensive terrestrial vertebrate inventory and monitoring program for GGNRA. This report summarizes data on relative abundance, frequency of occurrence, distribution across habitat types, and trap success for terrestrial vertebrates detected during this 7-year effort. It includes comprehensive descriptions of the inventory methods and sampling strategies employed during this survey and is intended to help guide the park in the implementation of future longterm ecological monitoring programs.

Semenoff-Irving, M.; Howell, J.A.

2005-01-01

215

Marine Biology  

E-print Network

this  door. ”   Marine  Biology   I  joined  the  military  RIVERSIDE   Marine  Biology   A Thesis submitted in partialBiology                                                                                                                        

Zaffino, Kyle

2013-01-01

216

Detection of verotoxin producing Escherichia coli in marine environments of the Caribbean.  

PubMed

The goal of this study was to determine the potential for Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 (EHEC) contamination in tropical marine waters. Samples were collected from urban, suburban, and rural sites around the islands of Puerto Rico and The Republic of Trinidad and Tobago. Quantification of E. coli and EHEC was evaluated using MI plates and qPCR. EHEC was detected in six sites in Puerto Rico: West of La Parguera Town, Boquilla, Oro Creek, Fishers Association, Joyuda Lagoon, and Boqueron Wetland Creek and in two rural sites in Trinidad: Balandra Bay and Quinam Bay. Plate count enumeration of E. coli was not a reliable indicator for the presence of EHEC. The sites where EHEC was detected on both islands are used for recreational bathing, water sports and recreational/commercial fisheries and therefore pose a public potential health risk. PMID:24035427

Walker, Trisha J; Bachoon, D S; Otero, Ernesto; Ramsubhag, Adesh

2013-11-15

217

DETERMINATION OF FENTHION RESIDUES IN SAMPLES OF MARINE BIOTA AND SEAWATER FROM LABORATORY EXPOSURES AND FIELD APPLICATIONS  

EPA Science Inventory

A method for measuring fenthion in samples from the estuarine environment is described. The method was applied to samples from field applications of fenthion to control saltmarsh mosquitos. The method, offers an improvement in the silica gel cleanup of Watts (11), and yields grea...

218

Influence of DNA extraction method, 16S rRNA targeted hypervariable regions, and sample origin on microbial diversity detected by 454 pyrosequencing in marine chemosynthetic ecosystems.  

PubMed

Next-generation sequencing (NGS) opens up exciting possibilities for improving our knowledge of environmental microbial diversity, allowing rapid and cost-effective identification of both cultivated and uncultivated microorganisms. However, library preparation, sequencing, and analysis of the results can provide inaccurate representations of the studied community compositions. Therefore, all these steps need to be taken into account carefully. Here we evaluated the effects of DNA extraction methods, targeted 16S rRNA hypervariable regions, and sample origins on the diverse microbes detected by 454 pyrosequencing in marine cold seep and hydrothermal vent sediments. To assign the reads with enough taxonomic precision, we built a database with about 2,500 sequences from Archaea and Bacteria from deep-sea marine sediments, affiliated according to reference publications in the field. Thanks to statistical and diversity analyses as well as inference of operational taxonomic unit (OTU) networks, we show that (i) while DNA extraction methods do not seem to affect the results for some samples, they can lead to dramatic changes for others; and (ii) the choice of amplification and sequencing primers also considerably affects the microbial community detected in the samples. Thereby, very different proportions of pyrosequencing reads were obtained for some microbial lineages, such as the archaeal ANME-1, ANME-2c, and MBG-D and deltaproteobacterial subgroups. This work clearly indicates that the results from sequencing-based analyses, such as pyrosequencing, should be interpreted very carefully. Therefore, the combination of NGS with complementary approaches, such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)/catalyzed reporter deposition (CARD)-FISH or quantitative PCR (Q-PCR), would be desirable to gain a more comprehensive picture of environmental microbial communities. PMID:24837380

Cruaud, Perrine; Vigneron, Adrien; Lucchetti-Miganeh, Céline; Ciron, Pierre Emmanuel; Godfroy, Anne; Cambon-Bonavita, Marie-Anne

2014-08-01

219

EAARL topography: Gateway National Recreation Area  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This Web site contains Lidar-derived topography (bare earth) maps and GIS files for the Sandy Hook Unit within Gateway National Recreation Area in New Jersey. These Lidar-derived topography maps were produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Coastal and Marine Geology Program, FISC St. Petersburg, the National Park Service (NPS) South Florida/Caribbean Network Inventory and Monitoring Program, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Wallops Flight Facility. One objective of this research is to create techniques to survey coral reefs and barrier islands for the purposes of geomorphic change studies, habitat mapping, ecological monitoring, change detection, and event assessment. As part of this project, data from an innovative instrument under development at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, the NASA Experimental Airborne Advanced Research Lidar (EAARL) are being used. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in this realm for measuring subaerial and submarine topography wthin cross-environment surveys. High spectral resolution, water-column correction, and low costs were found to be key factors in providing accurate and affordable imagery to costal resource managers.

Brock, John C.; Wright, C. Wayne; Patterson, Matt; Nayegandhi, Amar; Patterson, Judd

2007-01-01

220

In-Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Marine Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution  

SciTech Connect

The primary accomplishments of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter were to refine budgets and operational plans for Phase 2 of this cooperative agreement based on the scheduling of a scientific ocean drilling expedition to study marine methane hydrates along the Cascadia margin, in the NE Pacific as part of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) using the R/V JOIDES Resolution. The proposed statement of work for Phase 2 will include three primary tasks: (1) research management oversight, provided by JOI; (2) mobilization, deployment and demobilization of pressure coring and core logging systems, through a subcontract with Geotek Ltd., who will work with Fugro and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to accomplish some of the subtasks; and, (3) mobilization, deployment and demobilization of a refrigerated container van that will be used for degassing of the Pressure Core Sampler and density logging of these pressure cores, through a subcontract with the Texas A&M Research Foundation (TAMRF). More details about these tasks are provided in the following sections of this report. The appendices to this report contain a copy of the scientific prospectus for the upcoming IODP Expedition 311 (Cascadia Margin Hydrates), which provides details of operational and scientific planning for this expedition.

Frank Rack

2005-06-30

221

Determination of plutonium and its isotopic ratio in marine sediment samples using quadrupole ICP-MS with the shield torch system under normal plasma conditions.  

PubMed

An analytical method for determining (239)Pu and (240)Pu in marine sediment samples, which uses quadrupole ICP-MS, was developed in this work. A simple anion-exchange chromatography system was employed for the separation and purification of Pu from the sample matrix. A sufficient decontamination factor of 1.4 x 10(4) for U, which interferes with the determination of (239)Pu, was achieved. High sensitivity Pu determination was obtained, which led to an extremely low concentration detection limit of approximately 8 fg/ml (0.019 mBq/ml for (239)Pu; 0.071 mBq/ml for (240)Pu) in a sample solution, or an absolute detection limit of 42 fg in a 5 ml sample solution, by using the shield torch technique. Analytical results for the determination of the (239+240)Pu and the (240)Pu/(239)Pu ratio in IAEA 368 (ocean sediment) reference material indicated that the accuracy of the method was satisfactory. The method developed was successfully applied to a study of Pu behavior in the sediments from Sagami Bay, Japan. The observed high (240)Pu/(239)Pu ratio in the sediment core indicated that there was additional Pu input derived from close-in fallout in addition to the global fallout. PMID:15118798

Zheng, Jian; Yamada, Masatoshi; Wang, Zhongliang; Aono, Tatsuo; Kusakabe, Masashi

2004-06-01

222

Low molecular weight dicarboxylic acids and related polar compounds in the remote marine rain samples collected from Western Pacific  

Microsoft Academic Search

During the western Pacific Ocean cruise of R\\/V Hakuho-Maru (20°N-40°S), fourteen rainwater samples were collected. They were studied by a capillary gas chromatography (GC) and GC-mass spectrometry (GC\\/MS) for the molecular distributions of C2?C10 ?, ?-dicarboxylic acids and related polar compounds, i.e. ketoacids (C2?C9) and ?-dicarbonyls (C2?C3). Samples were also analysed for dissolved (DOC) and total organic carbon (TOC). Total

Richard Sempéré; Kimitaka Kawamura

1996-01-01

223

Massachusetts Division of Marine Fisheries  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Massachusetts Division of Marine Fisheries website provides health advisories and closures related to seafood consumption and recreational fishing. Links are provided to the Division's programs and projects, including shellfish sanitation and management, and shellfish closures. Maps and notices regarding closures related to paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) are posted with each health notice, as well as a link to general information regarding PSP and the state's PSP monitoring program.

2010-02-12

224

Competing Interests, Economics, and Marine Fisheries Management: An Educational Case Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Managing fish resources in the ocean, known as marine fisheries management, often involves disagreement among many groups of people: commercial fishers, recreational anglers, national and local conservationists, and several branches of government. While managing marine fisheries in federal waters, the federal government must rebuild marine fish…

Thorson, James T.; Berkson, Jim; Murphy, Brian

2010-01-01

225

Guidance For The Bioremediation Of Oil-Contaminated Wetlands, Marshes, And Marine Shorelines  

EPA Science Inventory

Marine shorelines are important public and ecological resources that serve as a home to a variety of wildlife and provide public recreation. Marine oil spills, particularly large scale spill accidents, have posed great threats and cause extensive damage to the marine coastal env...

226

National Marine Fisheries Service's Statistics & Economics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Fisheries Statistics Division collects data and coordinates information and research programs to support the science-based stewardship of the nation's living marine resources. Site features national fisheries data from as far back as 1950. You can search commercial or recreational fisheries data or find economic and world fisheries information. Site is very easy to use and data is readily accessible.

2011-01-24

227

COST IMPACT OF MARINE POLLUTION ON RECREATION TRAVEL PATTERNS  

EPA Science Inventory

The report of the National Commission on Water Quality (NCWR) September 5, 1975, indicated the clean-up (from point sources) of the nation's lakes and rivers would result in an estimated $6 billion in increased economic activity annually by 1985. Improving the quality of water to...

228

Marine Recreational Fishing and Associated State-Federal Research in  

E-print Network

equitably without overhar vest of the resource. In particular, state and Federal fishery managers will need composition and weights. All salmon boat anglers are excluded from the survey as each state estimates its own

229

Application of passive sampling devices for screening of micro-pollutants in marine aquaculture using LC-MS/MS.  

PubMed

Knowledge on the presence of micro-pollutants, in particular emerging contaminants, such as pharmaceuticals, biocides or some pesticides, in semi-enclosed coastal areas, where fish farms are installed, is very limited. This article shows data on the presence of micro-pollutants over 1 year monitoring campaign carried out in a fish farm placed on the Mediterranean Sea. With this work, the results of the development of an analytical procedure which, makes use of passive sampling techniques (with polar organic chemical integrative samplers, POCIS, pharmaceutical configuration) and of the LC-QLIT-MS system, are presented. The development of the analytical procedure entail laboratory-based calibration with the samplers POCIS, for calculating uptake rates and sampling rates of compounds representative of a wide range of polarity (4.56>or=logK(ow)>or=-0.12). The uptake of the target compounds in the sampler POCIS, follows a linear pattern for most compounds, and sampling rates varied from 0.001 to 0.319l/d. The calibration experiments have shown that POCIS pharmaceutical configuration could be used for sampling other non-target compounds, such as pesticides and biocides with a logK(ow)sampling rates for each selected compound were obtained using spiked seawater for further estimation of time-weighted average (TWA) concentration of micro-pollutants in the water column, during the field study. An analytical method was developed with the LC-QLIT-MS system and validated to ensure a satisfactory performance for the detection of the target micro-pollutants in water. The limits of detection (LODs) achieved were between 0.01 and 1.50 microg/l. During the monitoring campaign, among the selected compounds, metronidazole, erythromycin, simazine, atrazine, diuron, terbutryn, irgarol, trimethoprim, carbaryl, flumequine, TCMTB and diphenyl sulphone (DPS) were detected. Most of target compounds found were at average concentrations which ranged from 0.01 to 75 ng/l. Irgarol, simazine, diuron, atrazine and DPS were the micro-pollutants most frequently detected over the period of the monitoring programme carried out. PMID:19084673

Martínez Bueno, María Jesús; Hernando, María Dolores; Agüera, Ana; Fernández-Alba, Amadeo R

2009-02-15

230

Industrial recreation in Texas: an exploratory study  

E-print Network

INDUSTRIAL RECREATION IN TEXAS: AN EXPLORATORY STUDY A Thesis By DEBORAH LOUISE KERS?IAW Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University In partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1982... Major Subject: Recreation and Resources Development INDUSTRIAL RECREATION IN TEXAS: AN EXPLORATORY STUDY A Thesis By DEBORAH LOUISE KERSHAW Approved as to style and content by: (C airman Committee Mem er Mem e ead o Department August 1982...

Kershaw, Deborah Louise

2012-06-07

231

Department of Recreational Sports Live Well. Learn Well. Be Well Recreational Sports  

E-print Network

Department of Recreational Sports Live Well. Learn Well. Be Well Recreational Sports oregonstate ___ Climbing Center Staff ___ Facility Operations Staff ___ Rec Services Staff ___ Facility/Equipment Maintenance Staff ___ Fitness Staff ___ Graphic Designer Staff ___ Intramural Sports & Sport Club Staff

Escher, Christine

232

Fuel used for off-highway recreation  

SciTech Connect

The Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991 (ISTEA) established a National Recreational Trails Funding Program and the National Recreational Trails Trust Fund. ISTEA requires that tax revenue generated from the sales of motor fuel used for off-highway recreation by transferred from the Highway Trust Fund to the Trails Trust Fund for recreational trail and facility improvements. In order to apportion the Trails Trust Fund of individual states equitably, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) asked the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to estimate the amount of motor fuel used for off-highway recreation at the state level by different vehicle types. This report documents this estimation procedure. For this estimation procedure, off-highway recreational fuel use was defined as Federally taxed gasoline, gasohol, diesel fuel, or special fuel used in recreational motorized vehicles on recreational trails or back country terrain. Fuel used in outdoor non-engine recreational equipment, such as camp stoves, heaters, and lanterns, was excluded from the analysis. Vehicle types included in this study were: pickup truck, light utility vehicle, motorcycle, all terrain vehicle (ATV), and snowmobile.

Hu, P.S.; Trumble, D.; Lu, A.

1994-07-01

233

In-Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Marine Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution  

SciTech Connect

The primary accomplishments of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter were (1) the preliminary postcruise evaluation of the tools and measurement systems that were used during ODP Leg 204 to study hydrate deposits on Hydrate Ridge, offshore Oregon from July through September 2002; and (2) the preliminary study of the hydrate-bearing core samples preserved in pressure vessels and in liquid nitrogen cryofreezers, which are now stored at the ODP Gulf Coast Repository in College Station, TX. During ODP Leg 204, several newly modified downhole tools were deployed to better characterize the subsurface lithologies and environments hosting microbial populations and gas hydrates. A preliminary review of the use of these tools is provided herein. The DVTP, DVTP-P, APC-methane, and APC-Temperature tools (ODP memory tools) were used extensively and successfully during ODP Leg 204 aboard the D/V JOIDES Resolution. These systems provided a strong operational capability for characterizing the in situ properties of methane hydrates in subsurface environments on Hydrate Ridge during ODP Leg 204. Pressure was also measured during a trial run of the Fugro piezoprobe, which operates on similar principles as the DVTP-P. The final report describing the deployments of the Fugro Piezoprobe is provided in Appendix A of this report. A preliminary analysis and comparison between the piezoprobe and DVTP-P tools is provided in Appendix B of this report. Finally, a series of additional holes were cored at the crest of Hydrate Ridge (Site 1249) specifically geared toward the rapid recovery and preservation of hydrate samples as part of a hydrate geriatric study partially funded by the Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, the preliminary results from gamma density non-invasive imaging of the cores preserved in pressure vessels are provided in Appendix C of this report. An initial visual inspection of the samples stored in liquid nitrogen is provided in Appendix D of this report.

Frank Rack; Michael Storms; Derryl Schroeder; Brandon Dugan; Peter Schultheiss; ODP Leg 204 Shipboard Scientific Party

2002-12-31

234

Unveiling of the Diversity of Prasinoviruses (Phycodnaviridae) in Marine Samples by Using High-Throughput Sequencing Analyses of PCR-Amplified DNA Polymerase and Major Capsid Protein Genes  

PubMed Central

Viruses strongly influence the ecology and evolution of their eukaryotic hosts in the marine environment, but little is known about their diversity and distribution. Prasinoviruses infect an abundant and widespread class of phytoplankton, the Mamiellophyceae, and thereby exert a specific and important role in microbial ecosystems. However, molecular tools to specifically identify this viral genus in environmental samples are still lacking. We developed two primer sets, designed for use with polymerase chain reactions and 454 pyrosequencing technologies, to target two conserved genes, encoding the DNA polymerase (PolB gene) and the major capsid protein (MCP gene). While only one copy of the PolB gene is present in Prasinovirus genomes, there are at least seven paralogs for MCP, the copy we named number 6 being shared with other eukaryotic alga-infecting viruses. Primer sets for PolB and MCP6 were thus designed and tested on 6 samples from the Tara Oceans project. The results suggest that the MCP6 amplicons show greater richness but that PolB gave a wider coverage of Prasinovirus diversity. As a consequence, we recommend use of the PolB primer set, which will certainly reveal exciting new insights about the diversity and distribution of prasinoviruses at the community scale. PMID:24632251

Clerissi, Camille; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Hingamp, Pascal; Poulain, Julie; Desdevises, Yves

2014-01-01

235

Education and Recreation Standards: I & R Programs--Outdoor Classrooms, Interpretation, Recreation, Program Information, Dedicated Areas.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The standards presented in this document are used to evaluate the educational and recreational programs of the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS). These standards are grouped into the FWS interpretation and recreation (I&R) program areas of outdoor classrooms, interpretation, recreation, program information, and dedicated areas. Each…

Fish and Wildlife Service (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

236

The Potential for Using Very High Spatial Resolution Imagery for Marine Search and Rescue Surveillance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recreational boating activities represent one of the highest risk populations in the marine environment. Moreover, there is a trend of increased risk exposure by recreational boaters such as those who undertake adventure tourism, sport fishing\\/hunting, and personal watercraft (PWC) activities. When trying to plan search and rescue activities, there are data deficiencies regarding inventories, activity type, and spatial location of

Kevin H. Pegler; David J. Coleman; Yun Zhang; Ronald P. Pelot

2003-01-01

237

Risk assessment of hull fouling as a vector for marine non-natives in Scotland  

Microsoft Academic Search

To determine the importance of recreational boating as a vector for distributing marine organisms, including non-native species, the extent of hull fouling species on recreational yachts in Scotland was assessed. In August 2006, up to 100 yachts in each of the ten largest marinas in Scotland were ranked using a fouling index. 23 yacht owners were asked a questionnaire to

Gail Ashton; Karin Boos; Richard Shucksmith; Elizabeth Cook

2006-01-01

238

THE ECONOMIC VALUE OF MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHING: APPLYING BENEFIT TRANSFER TO MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES STATISTICS SURVEY (MRFSS)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using two data sets from the same source but in different years (1994 and 1997) and regions (Northeast and Southeast), benefit transfer estimates are compared with original estimates to examine the convergent validity of benefit function transfer. Although benefit transfer error could go up to over 400% of original estimates for a particular case, the magnitude of benefit transfer error

Hyojin Jeong; Timothy C. Haab

2004-01-01

239

A Study on the Employee's Work Situation and Work Tiredness for Sports and Recreational Business in the Middle of Taiwan  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to investigate the employee's work situation and work tiredness in the sports and recreational business. Convenience sampling was used among 250 employees from sports and recreational industry in the middle of Taiwan and collected data was analyzed by factor analysis, correlation analysis and

Lin Yuan-Ming

240

Recreational ecstasy\\/MDMA and other drug users from the UK and Italy: psychiatric symptoms and psychobiological problems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rationale: Recreational drug use is increas- ingly widespread amongst young people, but there are concerns that psychoactive drugs may be associated with psychiatric symptoms or psychobiological problems. Objectives: To assess the psychiatric health status of a large, non-clinical sample of young adults from Italy and the UK, and relate it to their use of ecstasy\\/MDMA and other recreational drugs. Methods:

Andy C. Parrott; Raffaella M. Milani; Rishee Parmar; John J. D. Turner

2001-01-01

241

In-Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Marine Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution  

SciTech Connect

Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41329 between Joint Oceanographic Institutions and DOE-NETL was divided into two phases based on successive proposals and negotiated statements of work pertaining to activities to sample and characterize methane hydrates on ODP Leg 204 (Phase 1) and on IODP Expedition 311 (Phase 2). The Phase 1 Final Report was submitted to DOE-NETL in April 2004. This report is the Phase 2 Final Report to DOE-NETL. The primary objectives of Phase 2 were to sample and characterize methane hydrates using the systems and capabilities of the D/V JOIDES Resolution during IODP Expedition 311, to enable scientists the opportunity to establish the mass and distribution of naturally occurring gas and gas hydrate at all relevant spatial and temporal scales, and to contribute to the DOE methane hydrate research and development effort. The goal of the work was to provide expanded measurement capabilities on the JOIDES Resolution for a dedicated hydrate cruise to the Cascadia continental margin off Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada (IODP Expedition 311) so that hydrate deposits in this region would be well characterized and technology development continued for hydrate research. IODP Expedition 311 shipboard activities on the JOIDES Resolution began on August 28 and were concluded on October 28, 2005. The statement of work for this project included three primary tasks: (1) research management oversight, provided by JOI; (2) mobilization, deployment and demobilization of pressure coring and core logging systems, through a subcontract with Geotek Ltd.; and, (3) mobilization, deployment and demobilization of a refrigerated container van that will be used for degassing of the Pressure Core Sampler and density logging of these pressure cores, through a subcontract with the Texas A&M Research Foundation (TAMRF). Additional small tasks that arose during the course of the research were included under these three primary tasks in consultation with the DOE-NETL Program Manager. All tasks outlined in the original statement of work were accomplished except for the deployment and use of the X-ray CT system under Subtask 2-2. This reduction in scope provided resources that were applied to other activities to support the overall project. Post-expedition analysis of results and report writing will continue beyond this reporting period, however, all field deployments associated with this project have been successfully concluded as of this writing.

Frank R. Rack

2006-09-20

242

In-Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Marine Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution  

SciTech Connect

The primary accomplishment of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter was the deployment of tools and measurement systems on ODP Leg 204 to study hydrate deposits on Hydrate Ridge, offshore Oregon from July through September, 2002. During Leg 204, we cored and logged 9 sites on the Oregon continental margin to determine the distribution and concentration of gas hydrates in an accretionary ridge and adjacent slope basin, investigate the mechanisms that transport methane and other gases into the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ), and obtain constraints on physical properties of hydrates in situ. A 3D seismic survey conducted in 2000 provided images of potential subsurface fluid conduits and indicated the position of the GHSZ throughout the survey region. After coring the first site, we acquired Logging-While-Drilling (LWD) data at all but one site to provide an overview of downhole physical properties. The LWD data confirmed the general position of key seismic stratigraphic horizons and yielded an initial estimate of hydrate concentration through the proxy of in situ electrical resistivity. These records proved to be of great value in planning subsequent coring. The second new hydrate proxy to be tested was infrared thermal imaging of cores on the catwalk as rapidly as possible after retrieval. The thermal images were used to identify hydrate samples and to map estimate the distribution and texture of hydrate within the cores. Geochemical analyses of interstitial waters and of headspace and void gases provide additional information on the distribution and concentration of hydrate within the stability zone, the origin and pathway of fluids into and through the GHSZ, and the rates at which the process of gas hydrate formation is occurring. Bio- and lithostratigraphic description of cores, measurement of physical properties, and in situ pressure core sampling and thermal measurements complement the data set, providing ground-truth tests of inferred physical and sedimentological properties. Among the most interesting preliminary results are: (1) the discovery that gas hydrates are distributed through a broad depth range within the GHSZ and that different physical and chemical proxies for hydrate distribution and concentration give generally consistent results; (2) evidence for the importance of sediment properties for controlling the migration of fluids in the accretionary complex; (3) geochemical indications that the gas hydrate system at Hydrate Ridge contains significant concentrations of higher order hydrocarbons and that fractionation and mixing signals will provide important constraints on gas hydrate dynamics; and (4) the discovery of very high chlorinity values that extend for at least 10 mbsf near the summit, indicating that hydrate formation here must be very rapid.

Frank Rack; Gerhard Bohrmann; Anne Trehu; Michael Storms; Derryl Schroeder; ODP Leg 204 Shipboard Scientific Party

2002-09-30

243

Estimating the economic burden from illnesses associated with recreational coastal water pollution—a case study in Orange County, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

A cost-of-illness framework was applied to health and income data to quantify the health burden from illnesses associated with exposure to polluted recreational marine waters. Using data on illness severity due to exposure to polluted coastal water and estimates of mean annual salaries and medical costs (adjusted to 2001 values) for residents of Orange County, California, we estimated that the

Ryan H. Dwight; Linda M. Fernandez; Dean B. Baker; Jan C. Semenza; Betty H. Olson

2005-01-01

244

135Proceedings of the 2009 Northeastern Recreation Research Symposium GTR-NRS-P-66 Christopher J. Wynveen  

E-print Network

environments. Using 20 interviews with recreational visitors to Australia's Great Barrier Reef Marine Park AREAS: THE CASE OF THE GREAT BARRIER REEF #12;136Proceedings of the 2009 Northeastern Recr and diversity of wildlife (especially near reefs) and greater view distances across the water's surface

245

40 CFR 230.52 - Water-related recreation.  

...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Water-related recreation. 230...SITES FOR DREDGED OR FILL MATERIAL Potential Effects on Human Use Characteristics § 230.52 Water-related recreation. (a) Water-related recreation...

2014-07-01

246

Titan Recreation-Titan Bowl and Billiards Student Engagement Report  

E-print Network

Titan Recreation-Titan Bowl and Billiards Student Engagement Report FY 2009-2010 Purpose Statement Titan Recreation strives to enhance participant experiences at CSUF through providing quality physical fitness and overall wellness. Titan Recreation also provides opportunities for cooperative

de Lijser, Peter

247

Titan Recreation-Titan Bowl and Billiards Student Engagement Report  

E-print Network

Titan Recreation-Titan Bowl and Billiards Student Engagement Report FY 2008-2009 Purpose Statement Titan Recreation strives to enhance participant experiences at CSUF through providing quality physical fitness and overall wellness. Titan Recreation also provides opportunities for cooperative

de Lijser, Peter

248

Titan Recreation-Group Fitness Student Engagement Report  

E-print Network

Titan Recreation-Group Fitness Student Engagement Report FY 2012-2013 Purpose Statement Titan fitness and overall wellness. Titan Recreation also provides opportunities for cooperative and competitive within Titan Recreation are designed to enhance social, psychological and physiological development

de Lijser, Peter

249

Titan Recreation-Intramural Sports Student Engagement Report  

E-print Network

Titan Recreation-Intramural Sports Student Engagement Report FY 2011-2012 Purpose Statement Titan fitness and overall wellness. Titan Recreation also provides opportunities for cooperative and competitive within Titan Recreation are designed to enhance social, psychological and physiological development

de Lijser, Peter

250

Titan Recreation-Titan Bowl and Billiards Student Engagement Report  

E-print Network

Titan Recreation-Titan Bowl and Billiards Student Engagement Report FY 2012-2013 Purpose Statement Titan Recreation strives to enhance participant experiences at CSUF through providing quality physical fitness and overall wellness. Titan Recreation also provides opportunities for cooperative

de Lijser, Peter

251

Titan Recreation-Intramural Sports Student Engagement Report  

E-print Network

Titan Recreation-Intramural Sports Student Engagement Report FY 2012-2013 Purpose Statement Titan fitness and overall wellness. Titan Recreation also provides opportunities for cooperative and competitive within Titan Recreation are designed to enhance social, psychological and physiological development

de Lijser, Peter

252

Titan Recreation-Titan Bowl and Billiards Student Engagement Report  

E-print Network

Titan Recreation-Titan Bowl and Billiards Student Engagement Report FY 2010-2011 Purpose Statement Titan Recreation strives to enhance participant experiences at CSUF through providing quality physical fitness and overall wellness. Titan Recreation also provides opportunities for cooperative

de Lijser, Peter

253

36 CFR 7.62 - Lake Chelan National Recreation Area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lake Chelan National Recreation Area. 7...OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.62 Lake Chelan National Recreation Area. (a...snowmobiles the following locations within the Lake Chelan National Recreation...

2013-07-01

254

36 CFR 7.62 - Lake Chelan National Recreation Area.  

...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Lake Chelan National Recreation Area. 7...OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.62 Lake Chelan National Recreation Area. (a...snowmobiles the following locations within the Lake Chelan National Recreation...

2014-07-01

255

36 CFR 7.62 - Lake Chelan National Recreation Area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Lake Chelan National Recreation Area. 7...OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.62 Lake Chelan National Recreation Area. (a...snowmobiles the following locations within the Lake Chelan National Recreation...

2012-07-01

256

36 CFR 7.62 - Lake Chelan National Recreation Area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Lake Chelan National Recreation Area. 7...OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.62 Lake Chelan National Recreation Area. (a...snowmobiles the following locations within the Lake Chelan National Recreation...

2011-07-01

257

76 FR 4281 - Recreation Resource Advisory Committees Charter Reestablishment  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act (REA), signed in December 2004, directs the...program; and fee- level changes. The REA grants flexibility to Recreation RACs by...Recreation RACs for the purposes stated in REA. Dated: December 13, 2010. Pearlie...

2011-01-25

258

50 CFR 660.721 - Recreational fishing bag limits.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... 2011-10-01 false Recreational fishing bag limits. 660.721 Section 660...Fisheries § 660.721 Recreational fishing bag limits. This section applies to recreational fishing for HMS management unit...

2011-10-01

259

50 CFR 660.721 - Recreational fishing bag limits.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2010-10-01 false Recreational fishing bag limits. 660.721 Section 660...Fisheries § 660.721 Recreational fishing bag limits. This section applies to recreational fishing for HMS management unit...

2010-10-01

260

50 CFR 660.721 - Recreational fishing bag limits.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... 2012-10-01 false Recreational fishing bag limits. 660.721 Section 660...Fisheries § 660.721 Recreational fishing bag limits. This section applies to recreational fishing for HMS management unit...

2012-10-01

261

Recreation/Tourism/Interpretation Graduate Schools  

E-print Network

://www.indiana.edu/~recpark/grad_overview.html Michigan State University East Lansing, Michigan 488241222 Program: Park, Recreation and Tourism://www.siu.edu/~hedrec/Programs/AboutREC.html Texas A&M University College Station, Texas 778432261 Programs: Recreation, Park, and Tourism Sciences http://www.rpts.tamu.edu/graduate.htm University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 Program: Parks

262

SPONSOR PARTNERSHIP GUIDELINES RECREATIONAL SPORTS PARTNERSHIPS  

E-print Network

opportunities that foster healthy living. · Vision Statement o The Department of Recreational Sports healthy and creative learning. · Guiding Principles o We are committed to providing recreational and educational experiences to the University community that supports a well-rounded education and healthy

Escher, Christine

263

King County Division of Parks and Recreation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presented are duplications of the responses given by the King County Division of Parks and Recreation (Seattle, Washington) as part of a project to collect, share, and compile information about, and techniques in the operation of 18 community action models for recreation services to the disabled. Model programs are categorized as consumer, client…

Iowa Univ., Iowa City. Recreation Education Program.

264

Maine-Niles Association of Special Recreation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presented are duplications of the responses given by Maine-Niles Association of Special Recreation (Skokie, Illinois) as part of a project to collect, share, and compile information about, and techniques in the operation of 18 community action models for recreation services to the disabled. Model programs are categorized as consumer, client…

Iowa Univ., Iowa City. Recreation Education Program.

265

Recreational sport participation and migrants' acculturation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The current research examines whether migrants' recreational sport participation (RSP) and recreational sport function (RSF) can be considered as indicators of assimilation or integration as outcomes of acculturation. Both RSP and RSF are considered along with the traditional indicators of language, food preference, media use and ethnic identity. A multiattribute survey instrument was distributed to 179 migrants from 12 Asian

Young-Sook Lee; Daniel C. Funk

2011-01-01

266

Annual in Therapeutic Recreation. Volume One, 1990.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This publication contains the following articles: (1) "A Pilot Study of the Relationship between Co-Dependency and Recreation Using Women with Histories of Domestic Violence" (Pamela E. Foti and Lori S. Gelvin); (2) "Discretionary Time Use and the Chronically Mentally Ill" (Thomas K. Skalko); (3) "Therapeutic Recreation and Family Therapy: A Needs…

Crawford, Michael E., Ed.; Card, Jaclyn A., Ed.

267

Recreational therapy for the chronic alcoholic  

Microsoft Academic Search

This discussion aims to develop an impressionistic study of recreational therapy in its general and specific application to various types of chronic alcoholics observed over a period of 20 years. This observation of the chronic alcoholic in recreation was made at Veterans' Administration and other institutions in various parts of the country, such as the Institute of Living. Most of

John Eisele Davis

1945-01-01

268

Truman State University Campus Recreation Intern  

E-print Network

of Intramural Recreational Sports or Director of Fitness/Wellness and will be able to operate within Truman Campus Recreation assures all interns of an enriching and motivating experience that includes training in a wide variety of facility operations and the opportunity to experience customer service, fitness

Gering, Jon C.

269

Adapting Activities for Therapeutic Recreation Service.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recreational activities can be adapted for disabled persons by using a functional device (such as a handle or extension), using an alternative stimulus (such as using tactile cues for blind persons), changing the participation technique (such as wheelchair basketball), or creating transitional recreation experiences (teaching prerequisite skills…

Exceptional Parent, 1984

1984-01-01

270

Be Well. Be Orange Recreational Sports  

E-print Network

hosted by Recreational Sports that attracts approximately 3,000 new and returning students. $680 (half-Newsletter distributed to 200 club officers every week, 50 words or less with an active link to your website. $68,000 students receive electronic $76.5/ newsletter #12;Be Well. Be Orange Recreational Sports oregonstate

Escher, Christine

271

75 FR 19608 - Recreation Resource Advisory Committees  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...RACs can be obtained from the Forest Service Regional Office listed...Information for Recreation RACs Each Forest Service Recreation RAC shall...as follows: a. A State tourism official to represent the State...nor live in a State in which Forest Service-managed lands...

2010-04-15

272

The Therapeutic Recreation Professional: Microcomputer Applications.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Therapeutic recreation professionals can work with computer specialists to develop uses for microcomputers with special populations. Computers can help sensory-impaired individuals, physically disabled, the aged, and special education students. Computer professionals benefit from receiving feedback from therapeutic recreation professionals on…

Beland, Robert M.

1984-01-01

273

Outdoor Recreation Action. Report No. 11.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Statements of several national and state leaders concerning the importance of outdoor recreation begin this report. Methods of financing outdoor recreation by State and Federal agencies, private foundations, and regional and intergovernmental departments are given and briefly discussed. The section on organization and administration is divided…

Bureau of Outdoor Recreation (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

274

Therapeutic Recreation for the Institutionalized Elderly  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the perceptions of recreation therapists, administrators and residents from six nursing homes in Alberta, Canada regarding participation in recreation programs. The processes by which the residents were allowed to make decisions were analyzed within a potential staff conflict-abuse model. The results demonstrated that the residents' behaviors were being externally controlled and their needs to have self-determination, control,

Barry L. Hall; Jochen G Bocksnick

1996-01-01

275

FRATERNITY CHAMPIONS HISTORY Intramural Sports -Recreational Sports  

E-print Network

FRATERNITY CHAMPIONS HISTORY Intramural Sports - Recreational Sports Penn State University 1946 ) Recreational Sport logo history 2010 - present year 1975-1999 2000-2009 #12;YEAR 1946-47 1947-48 1948-49 1949 Cross Country Indiv. x x x x Cross Country Team Chi Phi x x x Football Touch Delta Upsilon Phi Epsilon

Yener, Aylin

276

Adventure Recreation: Coming Soon to Your Community  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Adventure recreation activities like mountain biking, bouldering, and kayaking used to require considerable travel to unique locations. This is changing, however, as the new trend emerges in the United State of providing adventure recreation experiences in cities and towns, such as New York City and Golden, Colorado. This article highlights…

Moorman, Marta; Schlatter, Barbara E.; Hurd, Amy R.

2007-01-01

277

Decay of intestinal enterococci concentrations in high-energy estuarine and coastal waters: towards real-time T 90 values for modelling faecal indicators in recreational waters  

Microsoft Academic Search

Intestinal enterococci are the principal ‘health-evidence-based’ parameter recommended by WHO for the assessment of marine recreational water compliance. Understanding the survival characteristics of these organisms in nearshore waters is central to public health protection using robust modelling to effect real-time prediction of water quality at recreation sites as recently suggested by WHO and the Commission of the European Communities Previous

D. Kay; C. M. Stapleton; M. D. Wyer; A. T. McDonald; J. Crowther; N. Paul; K. Jones; C. Francis; J. Watkins; J. Wilkinson; N. Humphrey; B. Lin; L. Yang; R. A. Falconer; S. Gardner

2005-01-01

278

Marine Careers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The five papers in this publication on marine careers were selected so that science teachers, guidance councilors, and students could benefit from the experience and knowledge of individuals active in marine science. The areas considered are indicated by the titles: Professional Careers in Marine Science with the Federal Government, Marine Science…

Gordon, Bernard L.

279

Willingness to pay for non angler recreation at the lower Snake River reservoirs  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This study applied the travel cost method to estimate demand for non angler recreation at the impounded Snake River in eastern Washington. Net value per person per recreation trip is estimated for the full non angler sample and separately for camping, boating, water-skiing, and swimming/picnicking. Certain recreation activities would be reduced or eliminated and new activities would be added if the dams were breached to protect endangered salmon and steelhead. The effect of breaching on non angling benefits was found by subtracting our benefits estimate from the projected non angling benefits with breaching. Major issues in demand model specification and definition of the price variables are discussed. The estimation method selected was truncated negative binomial regression with adjustment for self selection bias. Copyright 2005 National Recreation and Park Association.

McKean, J.R.; Johnson, D.; Taylor, R.G.; Johnson, R.L.

2005-01-01

280

GCOOS Web Applications for Recreational Boaters and Fishermen  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Spatial and temporal information on the ecology of marine species and encompassing oceanographic environment is vital to the development of effective strategies for marine resource management and biodiversity conservation. Assembling data and generating products is a time-consuming and often laborious part of the workflow required of fisheries specialists, resource managers, marine scientists and other stakeholder groups for effective fishery management and marine spatial planning. Workflow costs for all groups can be significantly reduced through the use of interoperable networked data systems. The Gulf of Mexico Coastal Ocean Observing System Regional Association (GCOOS-RA) is one of 11 RAs comprising the non-Federal part of the U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS). The RAs serve the region’s needs for data and information: by working with data providers to offer their data in standardized ways following IOOS guidance, by gathering stakeholders’ needs and requirements, and by producing basic products or facilitating product-generation by others to meet those needs. The GCOOS Data Portal aggregates regional near real-time data and serves these data through standardized service interfaces suitable for automated machine access or in formats suitable for human consumption. The related Products Portal generates products in graphical displays for humans and in standard formats for importing into common software packages. Web map applications are created using ArcGIS server RESTful service, publicly available Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web Map Service (WMS) layers, and Web Coverage Service (WCS). Use of standardize interfaces allows us to construct seamless workflows that carry data from sensors through to products in an automated fashion. As a demonstration of the power of interoperable standards-based systems we have developed tailored product web pages for recreational boaters and fishermen. This is a part of an ongoing project to provide an interactive tool for decision support in the Gulf of Mexico.

Kobara, S.; Howard, M. K.; Simoniello, C.; Jochens, A. E.; Gulf Of Mexico Coastal Ocean Observing System Regional Association (Gcoos-Ra)

2010-12-01

281

A Benefit Transfer of Ecosystem Values - Recreation in Forests  

Microsoft Academic Search

A benefit function transfer of forest recreation values will be carried out at a global level and is expected to deliver a recreational demand function that is partly dependent on forest attributes. The demand function is the result of a meta-analysis of forest recreation valuation studies using travel cost methods (TCM). The demand function for forest recreation allows a non-market

Marianne Zandersen; Richard S. J. Tol; Michael Otto

282

Recreation for the Mentally Retarded: A Handbook for Ward Personnel.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Designed primarily for use by ward personnel in residential facilities for the mentally retarded, the manual presents an overview of recreational services. Four papers introduce the importance of recreation and consider approaches for its provision: "Why Recreation?" (W. Lawler); "The Role of the Attendant in Providing Recreation for the Retarded"…

Southern Regional Education Board, Atlanta, GA.

283

Recreation and Sport Planning and Design. Second Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book offers guidelines for planning and designing cost-effective community recreation and sports facilities and open spaces in Australia. Seven chapters include: (1) "Benefits of Recreation and Sport" (e.g., quality of life, and diversity of recreation and sport); (2) "Provision of Recreation and Sport Open Spaces" (e.g., overview of…

Daly, Jim

284

The role of recreation and park amenities in influencing footloose businesses to (Re)locate in Colorado  

E-print Network

The purpose of this study was to determine the relative importance of quality of life and recreation/parks/open space in business location decisions. The study sampled economic development agency officials and business representatives. Following...

Love, Lisa L.

2012-06-07

285

*THE LOGNORMAL DISTRIBUTION AND USE OF THE GEOMETRIC MEAN AND THE ARITHMETIC MEAN IN RECREATIONAL WATER QUALITY MEASUREMENT  

EPA Science Inventory

Statistical Framework for Recreational Water Quality Criteria and Monitoring offers a practical guide to the statistical methods used for assessing health effects and monitoring and modelling water quality Both traditional and novel sampling designs are discussed. Written by a te...

286

50 CFR 36.31 - Recreational activities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...collection methods which may result in disturbance of ground surface, such as the use of shovels, pickaxes, sluice boxes and dredges, are prohibited. The recreation activities specified in paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section may be prohibited or...

2010-10-01

287

Eye Health in Sports and Recreation  

MedlinePLUS

... and recreation-related eye injuries occur each year. The good news is that 90 percent of serious eye injuries are preventable through use of appropriate protective eyewear . Recognizing and Treating ...

288

McGILL UNIVERSITY Athletics & Recreation  

E-print Network

& Recreation is unequivocally opposed to any manner of hazing associated with our sport programs. Please and federal laws relating to hazing and to the use of alcohol and illegal drugs. · Studentathletes

Barthelat, Francois

289

18 CFR 801.10 - Recreation.  

...and Water Resources SUSQUEHANNA RIVER BASIN COMMISSION GENERAL POLICIES § 801...The use of surface water resources of the basin for recreation purposes is extensive...wildlife programs and projects within the basin and shall: (1) Promote public...

2014-04-01

290

18 CFR 801.10 - Recreation.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...and Water Resources SUSQUEHANNA RIVER BASIN COMMISSION GENERAL POLICIES § 801...The use of surface water resources of the basin for recreation purposes is extensive...wildlife programs and projects within the basin and shall: (1) Promote public...

2010-04-01

291

18 CFR 801.10 - Recreation.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...and Water Resources SUSQUEHANNA RIVER BASIN COMMISSION GENERAL POLICIES § 801...The use of surface water resources of the basin for recreation purposes is extensive...wildlife programs and projects within the basin and shall: (1) Promote public...

2012-04-01

292

18 CFR 801.10 - Recreation.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...and Water Resources SUSQUEHANNA RIVER BASIN COMMISSION GENERAL POLICIES § 801...The use of surface water resources of the basin for recreation purposes is extensive...wildlife programs and projects within the basin and shall: (1) Promote public...

2011-04-01

293

18 CFR 801.10 - Recreation.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...and Water Resources SUSQUEHANNA RIVER BASIN COMMISSION GENERAL POLICIES § 801...The use of surface water resources of the basin for recreation purposes is extensive...wildlife programs and projects within the basin and shall: (1) Promote public...

2013-04-01

294

Physical-Education Facilities/Recreation Centers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the design of notable school physical education/recreation facilities, including the educational context and design goals. Includes information on architects, suppliers, and cost, as well as photographs. (EV)

American School & University, 2002

2002-01-01

295

78 FR 4120 - Recreation Resource Advisory Committees  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...for the Black Hills National Forest in South Dakota. In addition...initially appointed to the Forest Service established Recreation...persons who are-- (a) State tourism official representing the State...co-chair responsibility. The Forest Service Regional...

2013-01-18

296

Wheelchair Design Changes: New Opportunities for Recreation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Changes in wheelchair design (such as larger tires and lighter overall weight) make it possible for disabled persons to exercise more mobility and control and participate in a greater variety of recreational activities. (CL)

Exceptional Parent, 1984

1984-01-01

297

Department of Recreational Sports Intramural Sports  

E-print Network

Membership. For more information on eligibility, consult the Intramural Sports Handbook. III. EQUIPMENT ADepartment of Recreational Sports Intramural Sports Volleyball Rules I. GOVERNING RULES The rules Oregon State University Intramural Sports rule applies. II. ELIGIBILITY All participants must be either

Escher, Christine

298

Department of Recreational Sports Intramural Sports  

E-print Network

. For more information on eligibility, consult the Intramural Sports Handbook. III. UNIFORMS/EQUIPMENT ADepartment of Recreational Sports Intramural Sports Softball Rules Sports and Special Programs University Intramural Sports rule applies. II. ELIGIBILITY All participants must be either students

Escher, Christine

299

Assessment of ultrasound-assisted extraction as sample pre-treatment for the measurement of lead isotope ratios in marine biological tissues by multicollector inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this work, ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) was evaluated as a sample preparation procedure for lead isotope ratio measurements in marine biological tissues by multicollector inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. 20 mg of marine biological tissue and 1 mL of acid extractant were sonicated for 3 min at 60% ultrasound amplitude. Matrix separation was performed in the supernatant using a chromatographic exchange resin (Sr-Spec™). Total elimination of organic matter was achieved during the separation step. Microwave-assisted digestion and dry-ashing were used for comparative purposes. No significant differences were found in lead isotope ratios at 95% of confidence level. UAE emerges as an advantageous alternative to classical methods for sample preparation owing to its simplicity and rapidity ( i.e. operation steps were reduced), low reagent consumption and low contamination risks.

Costas-Rodríguez, M.; Lavilla, Isela; Bendicho, Carlos

2011-06-01

300

Facility Focus: Athletic and Recreation Centers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents three examples showing how bigger is better in the design of athletic and recreation buildings. The benefits of a new 225,000 square foot university recreation and athletic center or explored as are the expansion of a 25-year-old, 3,500-seat gymnasium to a 10,000-seat, multipurpose arena; and the features of a multi-level 153,000 square…

College Planning & Management, 1999

1999-01-01

301

Recreational boating in North Central Texas  

E-print Network

OF TABLES LIST OF FIGURES INTRODUCTION Page vi ix x Ob)ectives and Scope Nature of the Problem Justification 2 3 6 RELATED LITERATURE Frame of Reference Estimating Recreation Travel Flow Boating Studies User Preferences 9 10 13 18... OF TABLES LIST OF FIGURES INTRODUCTION Page vi ix x Ob)ectives and Scope Nature of the Problem Justification 2 3 6 RELATED LITERATURE Frame of Reference Estimating Recreation Travel Flow Boating Studies User Preferences 9 10 13 18...

Cowart, Michael Ray

2012-06-07

302

Outdoor Recreation Participation Trends in Texas  

E-print Network

__________ * Associate Professors and Extension Specialists, The Texas A&M System; and graduate student, Department of Recreation, Park and Tourism Sciences, Texas A & M University. Michael A. Schuett, Scott Shafer and Jiaying Lu* O...__________ * Associate Professors and Extension Specialists, The Texas A&M System; and graduate student, Department of Recreation, Park and Tourism Sciences, Texas A & M University. Michael A. Schuett, Scott Shafer and Jiaying Lu* O...

Schuett, Michael A.; Shafer, Carl Scott; Lu, Jiaying

2009-01-06

303

Availability of Recreational Resources and Physical Activity in Adults  

PubMed Central

Objectives. Using data from a large cohort of adults aged 45 to 84 years-old, we investigated whether availability of recreational resources is related to physical activity levels. Methods. Data from a multiethnic sample of 2723 adult residents of New York City, NY; Baltimore, Md; and Forsyth County, NC, were linked to data on locations of recreational resources. We measured the availability (density) of resources within 0.5 (0.8 km), 1, 2, and 5 miles of each participant’s residence and used binomial regression to investigate associations of density with physical activity. Results. After adjustment for potential confounders, individuals in the tertile of participants residing in areas with the highest density of resources were more likely to report physical activity during a typical week than were individuals in the lowest tertile. Associations between availability of recreational resources and physical activity levels were not present for the smallest area assessed (0.5 miles) but were present for areas ranging from 1 to 5 miles. These associations were slightly stronger among minority and low-income residents. Conclusions. Availability of resources may be 1 of several environmental factors that influence individuals’ physical activity behaviors. PMID:17267710

Roux, Ana V. Diez; Evenson, Kelly R.; McGinn, Aileen P.; Brown, Daniel G.; Moore, Latetia; Brines, Shannon; Jacobs, David R.

2007-01-01

304

Postactivation potentiation response in athletic and recreationally trained individuals.  

PubMed

To determine if training status directly impacted the response to postactivation potentiation, athletes in sports requiring explosive strength (ATH; n = 7) were compared to recreationally trained (RT; n = 17) individuals. Over the course of 4 sessions, subjects performed rebound and concentric-only jump squats with 30%, 50%, and 70% 1 RM loads. Jump squats were performed 5 minutes and 18.5 minutes following control or heavy load warm-ups. Heavy load warm-up consisted of 5 sets of 1 repetition at 90% 1 RM back squat. Jump squat performance was assessed with a force platform and position transducer. Heavy load warm-up did not have an effect on the subjects as a single sample. However, when percent potentiation was compared between ATH and RT groups, force and power parameters were significantly greater for ATH (p < 0.05). Postactivation potentiation may be a viable method of acutely enhancing explosive strength performance in athletic but not recreationally trained individuals. Reference Data: Chiu, L.Z.F., A.C. Fry, L.W. Weiss, B.K. Schilling, L.E. Brown, and S.L. Smith. Postactivation potentiation response in athletic and recreationally trained individuals. PMID:14636093

Chiu, Loren Z F; Fry, Andrew C; Weiss, Lawrence W; Schilling, Brian K; Brown, Lee E; Smith, Stacey L

2003-11-01

305

Detection of microsporidia in drinking water, wastewater and recreational rivers.  

PubMed

Diarrhea is the main health problem caused by human-related microsporidia, and waterborne transmission is one of the main risk factors for intestinal diseases. Recent studies suggest the involvement of water in the epidemiology of human microsporidiosis. However, studies related to the presence of microsporidia in different types of waters from countries where human microsporidiosis has been described are still scarce. Thirty-eight water samples from 8 drinking water treatment plants (DWTPs), 8 wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) and 6 recreational river areas (RRAs) from Galicia (NW Spain) have been analyzed. One hundred liters of water from DWTPs and 50 L of water from WWTPs and RRAs were filtered to recover parasites, using the IDEXX Filta-Max® system. Microsporidian spores were identified by Weber's stain and positive samples were analyzed by PCR, using specific primers for Enterocytozoon bieneusi, Encephalitozoon intestinalis, Encephalitozoon cuniculi, and Encephalitozoon hellem. Microsporidia spores were identified by staining protocols in eight samples (21.0%): 2 from DWTPs, 5 from WWTPs, and 1 from an RRA. In the RRA sample, the microsporidia were identified as E. intestinalis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of human-pathogenic microsporidia in water samples from DWTPs, WWTPs and RRAs in Spain. These observations add further evidence to support that new and appropriate control and regulations for drinking, wastewater, and recreational waters should be established to avoid health risks from this pathogen. PMID:21774958

Izquierdo, Fernando; Castro Hermida, José Antonio; Fenoy, Soledad; Mezo, Mercedes; González-Warleta, Marta; del Aguila, Carmen

2011-10-15

306

Marine Biotechnology  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Biotechnology based upon genes from the marine environment (sometimes referred to as “blue-biotechnology”) has a considerable,\\u000a if hitherto relatively unused, potential because of the enormous phylogenetic diversity of marine organisms and the potential\\u000a for novel undiscovered biological mechanisms, including biochemical pathways. The increasing knowledge of marine genomics\\u000a has started to have a major impact on the field of marine biotechnology.

Joel Querellou; Jean-Paul Cadoret; Michael J. Allen; Jonas Collén

307

Isolation and identification of Acanthamoeba from Taiwan spring recreation areas using culture enrichment combined with PCR.  

PubMed

In the study, 52 spring water samples were collected from three hot spring recreation areas in northern Taiwan and Acanthamoebae were isolated from 11 samples (21.2%) on two hot spring recreation areas and mainly present in the hot spring water, hot tubs and wastewater. The most frequently identified Acanthamoeba genotype was T15, followed by T6, and then T5. Genotype T1, T2, T3 and T4 were detected once, respectively. The presence or absence of Acanthamoeba within the spring water samples showed significant difference with the levels of heterotrophic plate counts (HPC). Genotype T2-T6 and genotype T15, the organism responsible for Acanthamoeba keratitis, and the Acanthamoeba species organism, retained pathogenic Legionella, and should be considered a potential health threat associated with human activities in spring recreation areas. PMID:20434423

Huang, Shih-Wei; Hsu, Bing-Mu

2010-09-01

308

Accumulation of Marine Debris on an Intertidal Beach in an Urban Park (Halifax Harbour, Nova Scotia)  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study evaluated monthly accumulation rates and types of marine debris washed ashore at a recreational beach in Point Pleasant Park, Halifax Harbour, between April and September 2005. Black Rock Beach is 70 m long and a total of 2129 marine debris items were collected and sorted, representing a mean accumulation rate of 355 (±68 SE) items month-1. The total

Tony R. Walker; Jon Grant; Marie-Claude Archambault

309

Seeking Consensus on Designing Marine Protected Areas: Keeping the Fishing Community Engaged  

Microsoft Academic Search

A community group was formed to consider establishing marine reserves within the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary in southern California. Membership included representatives from resource agencies, environmental organizations, commercial and recreational fishing interests, and the general public. While the group agreed on several areas for fishing closures, members could not reach consensus on a specific network design. Several factors interfered

MARK HELVEY

2004-01-01

310

Health and Safety in Australian Marine Tourism: A social, medical and legal appraisal  

Microsoft Academic Search

As an island holiday destination Australia offers a large range of leisure activities in the area of marine tourism. This paper examines marine settings as tourist destinations and considers the social, medical and legal aspects of ensuring visitors have a safe and enjoyable holiday experience. Currently there is very little empirical data on tourists' recreational activities in Australia, especially the

Jeffrey Wilks

311

NOAA HABITAT BLUEPRINT Healthy habitats that sustain resilient and thriving marine  

E-print Network

· Recovered threatened and endangered species · Protected coastal and marine areas and habitats at risk and coastal resources, communities, and economies. OUTCOMES · Sustainable and abundant fish populations · Resilient coastal communities · Increased coastal/marine tourism, access, and recreation PURPOSE The Habitat

312

Today's Youth in Tomorrow's Sea. Another Title in the Series "Marine Careers."  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A discussion of many career possibilities related to the sea is presented. The false impressions many people have about the sea and about marine careers are dispelled. Among the career areas examined are offshore industry careers such as oil and gas drilling, careers in fishing, in seafaring, marine recreation, oceanography, aquaculture,…

Goodwin, Harold L.

313

Social-Psychological Factors Influencing Recreation Demand: Evidence from Two Recreational Rivers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Traditional methods of estimating demand for recreation areas involve making inferences about individuals' preferences. Frequently, the assumption is made that recreationists' cost of traveling to a site is a reliable measure of the value they place on that resource and the recreation opportunities it provides. This assumption may ignore…

Smith, Jordan W.; Moore, Roger L.

2013-01-01

314

Department of Recreational Sports The Sport Clubs staff and the Department of Recreational Sports would  

E-print Network

are not allowed on artificial turf playing areas. No sports drinks or liquids other than water are allowedDepartment of Recreational Sports #12;The Sport Clubs staff and the Department of Recreational Sports would like to welcome your team to Texas A&M University. We hope you find the following

Behmer, Spencer T.

315

Preschool Recreation Enrichment Program (PREP): Manual. Volume II. An Aid for Recreation Leaders and Instructional Personnel.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Based on the Preschool Recreation Enrichment Program (PREP), the manual--one third of which consists of appendixes--is intended to assist recreation personnel in developing programs addressing the motor and associative learning needs of preschool children who demonstrate delays in motor, language, and/or socialization skills. The manual describes…

Littman, Karen; Leslie, Lin

316

Department of Recreational Sports The Sport Clubs staff and the Department of Recreational Sports would  

E-print Network

activity on the sports fields must wear athletic footwear -Equipment may not be moved without permissionDepartment of Recreational Sports 2013 clubs visiting team guide sport #12;The Sport Clubs staff and the Department of Recreational Sports would like to welcome your team to Texas A&M University. We hope you find

Behmer, Spencer T.

317

Department of Recreational Sports The Sport Clubs staff and the Department of Recreational Sports would  

E-print Network

activity on the sports fields must wear athletic footwear -Equipment may not be moved without permissionDepartment of Recreational Sports 2012 clubs visiting team guide sport #12;The Sport Clubs staff and the Department of Recreational Sports would like to welcome your team to Texas A&M University. We hope you find

318

A trophic cascade triggers collapse of a salt-marsh ecosystem with intensive recreational fishing.  

PubMed

Overexploitation of predators has been linked to the collapse of a growing number of shallow-water marine ecosystems. However, salt-marsh ecosystems are often viewed and managed as systems controlled by physical processes, despite recent evidence for herbivore-driven die-off of marsh vegetation. Here we use field observations, experiments, and historical records at 14 sites to examine whether the recently reported die-off of northwestern Atlantic salt marshes is associated with the cascading effects of predator dynamics and intensive recreational fishing activity. We found that the localized depletion of top predators at sites accessible to recreational anglers has triggered the proliferation of herbivorous crabs, which in turn results in runaway consumption of marsh vegetation. This suggests that overfishing may be a general mechanism underlying the consumer-driven die-off of salt marshes spreading throughout the western Atlantic. Our findings support the emerging realization that consumers play a dominant role in regulating marine plant communities and can lead to ecosystem collapse when their impacts are amplified by human activities, including recreational fishing. PMID:22834380

Altieri, Andrew H; Bertness, Mark D; Coverdale, Tyler C; Herrmann, Nicholas C; Angelini, Christine

2012-06-01

319

Transcriptome of the dead: characterisation of immune genes and marker development from necropsy samples in a free-ranging marine mammal  

PubMed Central

Background Transcriptomes are powerful resources, providing a window on the expressed portion of the genome that can be generated rapidly and at low cost for virtually any organism. However, because many genes have tissue-specific expression patterns, developing a complete transcriptome usually requires a 'discovery pool' of individuals to be sacrificed in order to harvest mRNA from as many different types of tissue as possible. This hinders transcriptome development in large, charismatic and endangered species, many of which stand the most to gain from such approaches. To circumvent this problem in a model pinniped species, we 454 sequenced cDNA from testis, heart, spleen, intestine, kidney and lung tissues obtained from nine adult male Antarctic fur seals (Arctocephalus gazella) that died of natural causes at Bird Island, South Georgia. Results After applying stringent quality control criteria based on length and annotation, we obtained 12,397 contigs which, in combination with 454 data previously obtained from skin, gave a total of 23,096 unique contigs. Homology was found to 77.0% of dog (Canis lupus familiaris) transcripts, suggesting that the combined assembly represents a substantial proportion of this species' transcriptome. Moreover, only 0.5% of transcripts revealed sequence similarity to bacteria, implying minimal contamination, and the percentage of transcripts involved in cell death was low at 2.6%. Transcripts with immune-related annotations were almost five-fold enriched relative to skin and represented 13.2% of all spleen-specific contigs. By reference to the dog, we also identified transcripts revealing homology to five class I, ten class II and three class III genes of the Major Histocompatibility Complex and derived the putative genomic distribution of 17,121 contigs, 2,119 in silico mined microsatellites and 9,382 single nucleotide polymorphisms. Conclusions Our findings suggest that transcriptome development based on samples collected post mortem may greatly facilitate genomic studies, not only of marine mammals but also more generally of species that are of conservation concern. PMID:23347513

2013-01-01

320

Decompression sickness and recreational scuba divers  

PubMed Central

Objectives: The aim of this study is to clear the status of recreational scuba divers in Japan for promoting safety in recreational diving. Methods: A five year (from 1996 to 2001) questionnaire survey was performed of Japanese divers at the Osezaki area in Japan. The subjects of this survey included diving instructors as well as recreational divers. Based on the obtained data, the study investigated the theory predicted incidence of decompression sickness (DCS) among Japanese recreational divers. Results: The average (SD) of the maximum depth for diving was 37.4 (13.1) metres, which was deeper than the recommended depth of recreational diving. The incident rate of nitrogen narcosis (12%) was the most frequent, followed by barotraumas of the ear (11%) and barotraumas of the paranasal sinus (5.6%). The rate of DCS was 1.9 % (60 divers) during investigated period, and that DCS occurred once per 19 011 dives in calculation. Conclusions: This investigation showed that the status of leisure diving in Japan is still serious, because DCS would be expected to occur once a weekend in Japan. It is speculated that many divers may develop DCS while moving through high altitudes after diving, particularly at the Osezaki diving spot in Japan. Based on the results of this study, it is emphasised that every Japanese leisure diver should take an increasing interest in the safety of diving activity. PMID:12835342

Nakayama, H; Shibayama, M; Yamami, N; Togawa, S; Takahashi, M; Mano, Y

2003-01-01

321

The Tasmanian Marine Analysis Network (TasMAN)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Tasmanian Marine Analysis Network (TasMAN) has been developed and deployed to help manage the multiple uses of the estuaries and coastal regions of southern Tasmania, Australia. These regions are used by industry, shipping, aquaculture and tourism operators along with commercial and recreational boaters and fishers. The network is designed to collect real-time data that will help monitor the health

G. P. Timms; J. W. McCulloch; P. McCarthy; B. Howell; P. A. de Souza; M. D. Dunbabin; K. Hartmann

2009-01-01

322

Microbial source tracking markers at three inland recreational lakes in Ohio, 2011  

USGS Publications Warehouse

During the 2011 recreational season, samples were collected for E. coli and microbial source tracking (MST) marker concentrations to begin to understand potential sources of fecal contamination at three inland recreational lakes in Ohio - Buckeye, Atwood, and Tappan Lakes. The results from 32 regular samples, 4 field blanks, and 7 field replicates collected at 5 sites are presented in this report. At the three lakes, the ruminant-associated marker was found most often (57-73 percent of samples) but at estimated quantities, followed by the dog-associated marker (30-43 percent of samples). The human-associated marker was found in 14 and 50 percent of samples from Atwood and Tappan Lakes, respectively, but was not found in any samples from the two Buckeye Lake sites. The gull-associated marker was detected in only two samples, both from Tappan Lake.

Francy, Donna S.; Stelzer, Erin A.

2012-01-01

323

Solar energy for a community recreation center  

SciTech Connect

A 58,000 ft/sup 2/ recreation center in Shenandoah, Georgia is described. Rooftop solar collectors and reflectors serve as a basis for the active solar heating and cooling systems. The recreation center clearly demonstrates the technical feasibility of solar application in a recreation setting; economically, however, results are shown to be mixed. Although effective in the heating mode, solar cooling is considered as questionable in terms of a reasonable payoff period. A computer model predicts a payoff period of 11 years based on 1977 energy prices. The design and construction costs of the solar heating and cooling system ($726,000) was 90% financed by ERDA. A hockey-size ice rink and a gymnasium plus locker rooms and meeting rooms comprised the major part of the floor space. Problems encountered and operation of the facility are described. (MJJ)

Libman, D.E.

1980-01-01

324

Snorkelers impact on fish communities and algae in a temperate marine protected area  

Microsoft Academic Search

Multiple-use marine protected areas (MPAs) are used to manage marine resources, allocate space to different users and reduce\\u000a conflicts while protecting marine biodiversity. In the Mediterranean, MPA managers are increasingly interested in containing\\u000a the effects of coastal recreation within underwater trails, but snorkelers impacts on the surrounding ecosystem remain largely\\u000a unknown. In a Mediterranean MPA, an underwater snorkeling trail was

Joachim Claudet; Philippe Lenfant; Muriel Schrimm

2010-01-01

325

Recreational damages from reservoir storage level changes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Several extreme events affecting recreation have occurred in the Humboldt River Basin of northern Nevada. In 1992, agricultural users completely drained Rye Patch Reservoir killing millions of fish. Additionally, since 1990 gold mines located in the basin have pumped and discharged water into the Humboldt River; in recent years, discharges have equaled approximately 60% of the river's annual flow. In this paper we develop and estimate a joint model of fish catch and recreation demand, both of which depend on water levels, to assess the losses and gains from water level changes tied to events in the basin.

Huszar, Eric; Shaw, W. Douglass; Englin, Jeffrey; Netusil, Noelwah

1999-11-01

326

Marine Mammals  

Microsoft Academic Search

About 34 species of marine mammals have been documented in Costa Rican waters, representing approximately 26% of all marine\\u000a mammals worldwide. The Costa Rican marine mammal fauna consist of 30 cetacean species, one manatee, and three pinnipeds, one\\u000a of which went extinct since the 1950s. At least 31 of these species most likely also occur in other Central American countries.

Laura May-Collado

327

Marine Debris  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity students will perform experiments to examine if debris will float, or blow in the wind. They will discover which characteristics of trash affect the likelihood that it will become marine debris. Trash that floats or is easily blown around is more likely to become marine debris. As a result of this activity students will be able to define marine debris and categorize different types of debris.

Museum, Bishop

328

Motivations for recreating on farmlands, private forests, and state or national parks.  

PubMed

This study explores the importance of different motivations to visit three types of recreational settings--farms, private forests, and state or national parks. Data were collected via a mail-back questionnaire administered to a stratified random sample of households in Missouri (USA). Descriptive and inferential statistics reveal both similarities and discontinuities in motivations for visiting farms, private forests, and state or national parks for recreation. Being with family, viewing natural scenery, and enjoying the smells and sounds of nature were all highly important motivations for visiting the three types of settings. However, all 15 motivations examined were perceived to be significantly more important for visits to state or national parks than to farms or private forests. Findings suggest that individuals are more strongly motivated to recreate at state and national parks relative to farmlands or forests. Post hoc paired t tests comparing motivations between both agricultural settings (farms and private forests) revealed significant differences in eight different recreational motivations. Individuals tended to place more importance on the ability to use equipment and test their skills when considering recreating on private forests. Conversely, social motivations (e.g., doing something with the family) were more important when individuals were considering recreating on farmland. Collectively, the findings suggest individuals expect distinctly different outcomes from their visits to farmlands, private forests, or state or national parks. Consequently, all three types of recreational settings have competitive advantages that their managers could capitalize on when making decisions about how to attract new visitors or produce the most desirable experiences for current recreationists. PMID:24803234

Sotomayor, Sandra; Barbieri, Carla; Wilhelm Stanis, Sonja; Aguilar, Francisco X; Smith, Jordan W

2014-07-01

329

In Search of Pleasure: An Exploration of Teenage Recreational Sex  

E-print Network

This thesis utilizes a qualitative method to investigate recreational sex among teenagers as recounted by current college-aged students. As defined for the purposes of this thesis, recreational sex is any consensual sexual activity undertaken...

Reichstein, Lauren

2012-02-14

330

50 CFR 648.105 - Summer flounder recreational fishing season.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 false Summer flounder recreational fishing season. 648.105 Section 648.105 Wildlife and Fisheries...Fisheries § 648.105 Summer flounder recreational fishing season. Unless otherwise specified pursuant to §...

2012-10-01

331

50 CFR 648.105 - Summer flounder recreational fishing season.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 false Summer flounder recreational fishing season. 648.105 Section 648.105 Wildlife and Fisheries...Fisheries § 648.105 Summer flounder recreational fishing season. Unless otherwise specified pursuant to §...

2013-10-01

332

Titan Recreation-Intramural Sports Student Engagement Report  

E-print Network

Titan Recreation-Intramural Sports Student Engagement Report FY 2010-2011 Purpose Statement Titan and overall wellness. Titan Recreation also provides opportunities for cooperative and competitive play, team building and interpersonal skills. Leadership and participation opportunities within Titan

de Lijser, Peter

333

Titan Recreation-Group Fitness Student Engagement Report  

E-print Network

Titan Recreation-Group Fitness Student Engagement Report FY 2010-2011 Purpose Statement Titan and overall wellness. Titan Recreation also provides opportunities for cooperative and competitive play, team building and interpersonal skills. Leadership and participation opportunities within Titan

de Lijser, Peter

334

The Restoration and Recreational Enhancement of Lake Marion and the  

E-print Network

The Restoration and Recreational Enhancement of Lake Marion and the Black Earth Creek Corridor 2010 - Madison #12;THE RESTORATION AND RECREATIONAL ENHANCEMENT OF LAKE MARION AND THE BLACK EARTH CREEK CORRIDOR ....................................................................................................................... 1 LAKE MARION'S WATERSHED

Sheridan, Jennifer

335

Exploring Korean Americans’ Interracial Contact Experiences During Recreational Sport Activities  

E-print Network

in recreational sport settings. This study was guided by three research questions: (1) Do Korean Americans perceive the presence of contact hypothesis' optimal conditions in recreational sport settings? (2) What factors influence Korean Americans' perception...

Lee, Kang Jae

2010-07-14

336

American Samoa Territorial Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan 1980-1985.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of a comprehensive outdoor recreation plan is to organize and coordinate solutions to meet the needs of general public recreation within the Territory. The study area is the Territory of American Samoa excepting privately owned Swain's Island....

1980-01-01

337

40 CFR 247.14 - Park and recreation products.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Park and recreation products. 247.14 ...MATERIALS Item Designations § 247.14 Park and recreation products. (a) Playground...construction or other applications. (c) Park benches and picnic tables containing...

2010-07-01

338

78 FR 78810 - Pacific Southwest Recreation Resource Advisory Committee  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...will meet in San Bernardino, California. The Recreation RAC is authorized under the Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act (REA) (Pub. L. 108-447) and operates in compliance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act (FACA) (Pub. L....

2013-12-27

339

Recreational Multifunctionality and its implications for agroforestry diffusion  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recreational Multifunctionality refers to those farms providing at least one recreational service to members of the farm household\\u000a or the public. Based on the types of recreational services offered, two types of landowners have been identified: Productivists and Ruralists. They differ on their extent of Recreational Multifunctionality, farm household attributes and farm representation. Both\\u000a types of landowners also have different

Carla Barbieri; Corinne Valdivia

2010-01-01

340

Determinants of Intensity of Participation in Leisure and Recreational Activities by Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Aim: To test a model of child, family, and service determinants of intensity of participation in leisure and recreational activities by children with cerebral palsy (CP). Method: Participants were 288 children with CP, age range 6 to 12 years (mean 9y 8mo, SD 2y), and their parents from seven children's hospitals. The sample comprised 166 (57.6%)…

Palisano, Robert J.; Chiarello, Lisa A.; Orlin, Margo; Oeffinger, Donna; Polansky, Marcy; Maggs, Jill; Bagley, Anita; Gorton, George

2011-01-01

341

Vibrio cholerae in recreational beach waters and tributaries of Southern California  

Microsoft Academic Search

Vibrio cholerae is the causative agent of the severe dehydrating diarrheal disease cholera. This bacterium has been detected in many estuaries around the world and the United States. In this study we examine the abundance and distribution of V. cholerae in recreational beach waters and tributaries of Southern California. Water samples were taken from 11 beach locations adjacent to freshwater

Sunny C. Jiang

2001-01-01

342

Fear Perceptions in Public Parks: Interactions of Environmental Concealment, the Presence of People Recreating, and Gender  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This research examined the effect of concealment (environmental cues), presence or absence of people recreating (social cues), and gender on individuals' fear of crime in a community park setting. Using a 7-point single-item indicator, 732 participants from two samples (540 park visitors and 192 college students) rated their estimates of fear…

Jorgensen, Lisa J.; Ellis, Gary D.; Ruddell, Edward

2013-01-01

343

Views of Students in the Department of Recreation and Sport Management on Distance Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study aims to investigate viewpoints of students in recreation and sport management department on distance education, and the effects of sex, having computers and internet access at home, family's monthly income, district of the family, and students' level of class on these viewpoints. Survey method was used to carry out the study. The sample

Herguner, Gulten

2012-01-01

344

Factors Influencing the Hooking Mortality of Walleyes Caught by Recreational Anglers on Mille Lacs, Minnesota  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent implementation of size-based regulations in recreational fisheries for walleye Sander vitreus have led to more released walleyes and presumably to more losses of released fish. We conducted this study to estimate hooking mortality in Mille Lacs, Minnesota, and to determine factors that influence the survival of released walleyes. Volunteers and Minnesota Department of Natural Resources employees sampled walleyes with

Keith A. Reeves; Richard E. Bruesewitz

2007-01-01

345

Gas phase acid, ammonia and aerosol ionic and trace element concentrations at Cape Verde during the Reactive Halogens in the Marine Boundary Layer (RHaMBLe) 2007 intensive sampling period  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report mixing ratios of soluble reactive trace gases sampled with mist chambers and the chemical composition of bulk aerosol and volatile inorganic bromine (Brg) sampled with filter packs during the Reactive Halogens in the Marine Boundary Layer (RHaMBLe) field campaign at the Cape Verde Atmospheric Observatory (CVAO) on São Vicente island in the tropical North Atlantic in May and June 2007. The gas-phase data include HCl, HNO3, HONO, HCOOH, CH3COOH, NH3, and volatile reactive chlorine other than HCl (Cl*). Aerosol samples were analyzed by neutron activation (Na, Al, Cl, V, Mn, and Br) and ion chromatography (SO42-, Cl-, Br-, NH4+, Na+, K+, Mg2+, and Ca2+). Content and quality of the data, which are available under doi:10.5281/zenodo.6956, are presented and discussed.

Sander, R.; Pszenny, A. A. P.; Keene, W. C.; Crete, E.; Deegan, B.; Long, M. S.; Maben, J. R.; Young, A. H.

2013-12-01

346

Gas phase acid, ammonia and aerosol ionic and trace element concentrations at Cape Verde during the Reactive Halogens in the Marine Boundary Layer (RHaMBLe) 2007 intensive sampling period  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report mixing ratios of soluble reactive trace gases sampled with mist chambers and the chemical composition of bulk aerosol and volatile inorganic bromine (Brg) sampled with filter packs during the Reactive Halogens in the Marine Boundary Layer (RHaMBLe) field campaign at the Cape Verde Atmospheric Observatory (CVAO) on São Vicente island in the tropical North Atlantic in May and June 2007. The gas-phase data include HCl, HNO3, HONO, HCOOH, CH3COOH, NH3, and volatile reactive chlorine other than HCl (Cl*). Aerosol samples were analyzed by neutron activation (Na, Al, Cl, V, Mn, and Br) and ion chromatography (SO42-, Cl-, Br-, NH4+, Na+, K+, Mg2+, and Ca2+). Content and quality of the data, which are available under doi:10.5281/zenodo.6956, are presented and discussed.

Sander, R.; Pszenny, A. A. P.; Keene, W. C.; Crete, E.; Deegan, B.; Long, M. S.; Maben, J. R.; Young, A. H.

2013-07-01

347

Annual in Therapeutic Recreation. Volume 2.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This volume focuses on therapeutic recreation, as a subject of inquiry and as a treatment tool. The 11 articles include original field based research, program development initiatives, issue and theory of practice papers, and original tutorials in assessment and research. The article titles are: "The Role of Leisure Education with Family Caregivers…

Crawford, Michael E., Ed.; Card, Jaclyn A., Ed.

348

Grassroots Involvement in Recreation for Native Americans.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Through efforts of concerned, knowledgeable, and culturally aware individuals, recreational programs which may help the special needs of Native Americans can be designed and implemented. Knowledge of tribal similarities and differences, cultural values, diverse life-styles, tribal beliefs, socioeconomic status, and leisure pursuits is paramount in…

Carleton, Nancy L.; And Others

349

Recreational water quality in the Caspian Sea  

Microsoft Academic Search

Health-based monitoring of the Caspian Sea in Turkmenistan and Iran suggests that bathers are intermittently subject to increased levels of faecal pollution which may lead to gastrointestinal illness. This is the first co-ordinated monitoring programme of recreational waters in the Caspian region and highlights the need to extend such a programme to all countries bordering the Caspian Sea. The novel

Katherine R. Pond; Aidan A. Cronin; Steve Pedley

350

Rescuing Reality: Viewer interpretation of Television Recreations.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

While contemporary communication perspectives often make a distinction between reality and the televised presentation of reality, viewers may find this distinction difficult to maintain. Television is imbued with perceived objectivity. The use of recreations in popular television programming requires a reconceptualization of how viewers perceive…

Sullivan, David B.; Dobkin, Bethami A.

351

Campus Recreation Sport Club Liability Release Form  

E-print Network

Campus Recreation Sport Club Liability Release Form I, ____________________________ , entirely upon my own initiative risk, and responsibility am about to participate in a sport club which is funded parent/legal guardian permission to participate in the UMaine Sport Clubs Program as indicated

Thomas, Andrew

352

How Electronic Media Impacts Nature Recreation  

E-print Network

How Electronic Media Impacts Nature Recreation Friday, March 22, 2013 12:00 - 1:30 p.m. Wrigley Pergams and his colleague Patrica Zaradic will speak about their work on people's changing relationship being the increased time spent on electronic media. Pergams will discuss broad-reaching impacts

Hall, Sharon J.

353

Research on Texas Water and Recreation Resources.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The need for research pertaining to the best use of water and recreation resources in Texas is emphasized in these four papers presented at the 1968 Experiment Station Conference, College Station, Texas. "Parameters of Water Resources in Texas" identifies and elaborates upon the important elements presently constituting the water resources…

Texas A and M Univ., College Station. Texas Agricultural Experiment Station.

354

Recreational Sports Annual Report 2007-2008  

E-print Network

and sanity. Wake up to the thrill of controlling your own universe. If you want to take a walk then make time & Programs 20 Adventure & Outdoor Recreation 24 Facilities & Operations 27 Fitness & Wellness 30 Safety approach our work on behalf of Oregon State University. Our responsibilities to the students, faculty

Escher, Christine

355

The Environmental Approach to Recreation Services  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents an environmental recreation program set up to initiate and improve upon the levels of personal and social functioning of the handicapped child. Programs are based in community centers or parks, in a neighborhood play area or near a woods. It is considered a nonthreatening approach. (EB)

Littman, Karen; Baron, Diane T.

1976-01-01

356

ATHLETICS & RECREATION Volunteer Student Leadership Job Posting  

E-print Network

ATHLETICS & RECREATION Volunteer Student Leadership Job Posting Position: PACE (Physical Activity students on the benefits of physical activity. To teach students the benefits of exercise & sport, educate them on health factors related to physical activity, encourage them to try new things and help recruit

Boonstra, Rudy

357

Career Exploration in Hospitality and Recreation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This curriculum guide is designed to help students develop career decisionmaking skills which they may use throughout their lives and examine and explore hospitality and recreation occupations. Nine units are included, with each consisting of a teacher's guide and student materials. The teacher's guide includes an overview, objectives, rationale,…

Wiley, Benaree; And Others

358

Department of Recreational Sports Intramural Sports  

E-print Network

Department of Recreational Sports Intramural Sports Wheelchair Basketball Rules I. GOVERNING RULES The Rules of the National Wheelchair Basketball Association (NWBA) will apply in all situations, except Sports Intramural Sports Wheelchair Basketball Rules A. Game time listed on the schedule is the official

Escher, Christine

359

MEN & WOMEN'S VOLLEYBALL RULES Titan Recreation  

E-print Network

Sports modifications: 1. PLAYERS & EQUIPMENT Each participant must present a current CSUF student1 MEN & WOMEN'S VOLLEYBALL RULES Titan Recreation Intramural Sports All games will be governed. 2. GAME FORMAT Each match will consist of the best 2 out of 3 games. The first team scoring twenty

de Lijser, Peter

360

Recreation for the Incarcerated: Treatment or Privilege?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With the shift in correctional philosophy from punishment to rehabilitation, juvenile correction facilities are aimed toward providing a specialized program for confined youth. The primary goal is to reintegrate the youthful offender with society through a rehabilitation program involving therapeutic recreation. (JN)

Schleien, Stuart J.; O'Morrow, Gerald

1981-01-01

361

Recreation Research Publications. Bibliography 1961-1982.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This bibliography identifies, by author and subject matter, recreational research publications, by Forest Service scientists, that have been published from 1961 through 1982. Publications are classified under six major topic areas: (1) management of areas and facilities (including such topics as wilderness/backcountry resources and use of…

Echelberger, Herbert E., Comp.; And Others

362

77 FR 36250 - Recreation Resource Advisory Committees  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Advisory Committees AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Call...recreation fees to both the Forest Service and the Bureau of Land...Local Environmental, State Tourism, Local Government, and Tribal...RACs can be obtained from the Forest Service Regional Office...

2012-06-18

363

Recreational Gun Use by California Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Most research on adolescents and firearms focuses on urban populations, handguns, and homicide. This study examines the prevalence and correlates of recreational gun use (RGU)--for hunting or target shooting--among 5,801 community-residing 12- to 17-year-old Californians. Data are from the first statewide California Health Interview Survey (CHIS),…

Vittes, Katherine A.; Sorenson, Susan B.

2005-01-01

364

University of Montana Campus Recreation Youth Camps  

E-print Network

of various recreational sports, fitness, and outdoor activities Creative minded and willing to contribute recruitment, hiring, training, and evaluation Oversee the drop off and pick up of campers Run director regarding your performance Knowledge and experience in policy development General knowledge

Vonessen, Nikolaus

365

Outdoor Recreation Action. Report No. 10  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Actions taken in the area of outdoor recreation on Federal, State, local, and private levels are reported in the document. Financing actions are listed according to states, government agencies, and names of private financers. The organization and administration section includes new agencies, personnel, reorganizations, and significant resolutions…

Bureau of Outdoor Recreation (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

366

Indoor Recreational Places as Glazed Space.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes how creation of a varied, imaginative, and cultivated environment can recreate the pleasure of learning. The development of an indoor-outdoor, public-private, and half-climatized glazed (glass covered) space at the University of Dragvoll in Trondheim, Norway, is described. Well-planned glazed spaces can increase social…

Cold, Birgit

367

Environmental diversity in recreational choice modelling  

Microsoft Academic Search

The accuracy of environmental valuation studies relies, to a great extent, on the suitability of the proxy measures used to capture individuals' preferences. While important advances have been achieved in the last years concerning the characterization of the physical background in which recreational choices are made, Travel Cost Method applications have failed to consider the heterogeneity of landscape and the

Angel Bujosa Bestard

2009-01-01

368

Environmental diversity in recreational choice modelling  

Microsoft Academic Search

The accuracy of environmental valuation studies relies, to a great extent, on the suitability of the proxy measures used to capture individuals’ preferences. While important advances have been achieved in last years concerning the characterization of the physical background in which recreational choices are made, Travel Cost Method applications have failed to consider the heterogeneity of landscape and the spatial

Angel Bujosa Bestard

2008-01-01

369

Recreation for Retarded Teenagers and Young Adults.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Intended for recreational leaders, classroom teachers, volunteers, and parents, the text presents guidelines for planning and conducting activities for mentally retarded youth and young adults. Consideration of understanding the maturing retardate and his social needs includes different kinds of beneficial social experiences, the maturing…

Carlson, Bernice Wells; Ginglend, David R.

370

ADVANCED RECREATIONAL DIVING: ADVANTAGES AND HAZARDS  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the past few years many recreational training agencies have taught divers to make dives only on compressed air, within the no-stop limits and have encouraged trainees to dive safely and not too deeply. In the past year the use of oxygen-enriched air (\\

A. Marroni; D. H Elliott

371

Therapeutic recreation treatment time during inpatient rehabilitation  

PubMed Central

Objective Following spinal cord injury (SCI), certified therapeutic recreation specialists (CTRSs) work with patients during rehabilitation to re-create leisure lifestyles. Although there is much literature available to describe the benefits of recreation, little has been written about the process of inpatient or outpatient rehabilitation therapeutic recreation (TR) programs or the effectiveness of such programs. To delineate how TR time is used during inpatient rehabilitation for SCI. Methods Six rehabilitation centers enrolled 600 patients with traumatic SCI for an observational study. CTRSs documented time spent on each of a set of specific TR activities during each patient encounter. Patterns of time use are described, for all patients and by neurologic category. Ordinary least-squares stepwise regression models are used to identify patient and injury characteristics predictive of total treatment time (overall and average per week) and time spent in TR activities. Results Ninety-four percent of patients enrolled in the SCIRehab study participated in TR. Patients received a mean total of 17.5 hours of TR; significant differences were seen in the amount of time spent in each activity among and within neurologic groups. The majority (76%) of patients participated in at least one structured therapeutic outing. Patient and injury characteristics explained little of the variation in time spent within activities. Conclusion The large amount of variability seen in TR treatment time within and among injury group categories, which is not explained well by patient and injury characteristics, sets the stage for future analyses to associate treatments with outcomes. PMID:21675356

Gassaway, Julie; Dijkers, Marcel; Rider, Cecelia; Edens, Kelly; Cahow, Claire; Joyce, Joan

2011-01-01

372

UNH Campus Recreation Intramurals Policy Handbook  

E-print Network

called to its attention are dealt with according to the rules. Sports managers and team captains................................................................................6 #12;3 Participation Eligibility Policy Responsibility for Eligibility - The Campus Recreation Staff does not assume responsibility for checking on the eligibility of participants but any cases

New Hampshire, University of

373

Rochester Recreation Club for the Deaf  

E-print Network

failure Diabetes also causes: ­ High blood pressure ­ Nerve damage (neuropathy) *American Diabetes"Diabetes" Rochester Recreation Club for the Deaf January 21, 2010 #12;Supporters Deaf Health ("REAP") #12;Overview What is diabetes? How common is diabetes? Symptoms and signs of diabetes Prevention

Goldman, Steven A.

374

Department of Recreational Sports Intramural Sports  

E-print Network

information on eligibility, consult the Intramural Sports Handbook. III. EQUIPMENT A. No jewelry (earringsDepartment of Recreational Sports Intramural Sports Water Polo Rules I. GOVERNING RULES The rules Oregon State University Intramural Sports rule applies. II. ELIGIBILITY All participants must be either

Escher, Christine

375

Department of Recreational Sports Intramural Sports  

E-print Network

on eligibility, consult the Intramural Sports Handbook. III. EQUIPMENT A. No jewelry (earrings, necklacesDepartment of Recreational Sports Intramural Sports Bowling Rules I. GOVERNING RULES The Rules Sports rule applies. II. ELIGIBILITY All Participants must be either students registered at Oregon State

Escher, Christine

376

Oregon State University Department of Recreational Sports  

E-print Network

Oregon State University Department of Recreational Sports --- Indoor Climbing Center --- ASSUMPTION, equipment failure, bad decision making, inattentive belayers, and holds that have become loose or damaged, harnesses, hardware, anchors, and all equipment, and to advise the facility staff if I do any damage

Escher, Christine

377

Department of Recreational Sports Intramural Sports  

E-print Network

on eligibility, consult the Intramural Sports Handbook. III. UNIFORMS/EQUIPMENT A. No Jewelry (earringsDepartment of Recreational Sports Intramural Sports Ultimate Disc Rules Sports and Special Programs Intramural Sports rule applies. II. ELIGIBILITY All Participants must be either students registered at Oregon

Escher, Christine

378

DIVISION OF RECREATIONAL SPORTS Personal Training  

E-print Network

and weaknesses, set realistic and attainable goals and measure progress. Assessments will include body trainer will develop a personalized exercise program based on your health history, goals and fitness levelDIVISION OF RECREATIONAL SPORTS Personal Training New Client Packet Personal Training Package

Pittendrigh, Barry

379

Managing for Recreational Experience Opportunities: The Case of Hikers in Protected Areas in Catalonia, Spain  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Planning and management for recreational activities in protected areas involves an understanding of many complex factors. Segmentation of recreation demand and of the main physical or sporting activities can contribute to the design of more efficient management strategies, which may help to maintain or significantly enhance satisfaction with the recreation experience, and this in turn could improve the interest in and appreciation of the natural environment. The current study examined the motivations of hikers in three small Natura 2000 protected areas. It establishes a typology or categorization as a contribution to better management based on a survey conducted through on-site personal interviews with a representative sample of 569 hikers. Through an analysis of the principal intervening components by means of cluster analysis, we identified three groups of hikers based on three motivational dimensions: (1) nature-minded hikers, (2) sporting hikers and (3) general-purpose hikers. The most striking results were the significant differences among group variables related to visit behaviour (frequency and duration of visits and number of people per group), previous knowledge (protection status of the areas) and recreational frequentation (trail categories and protected areas visited). A positive correlation between the degree of sympathy for nature and the degree of satisfaction with the recreational experience (including positive evaluation of the public facilities, signposting and services offered) was also observed. The results are discussed in terms of their applicability and implications in hiking management in protected natural areas such as those of Natura 2000.

Farías Torbidoni, Estela Inés

2011-03-01

380

Prospective epidemiological pilot study on the morbidity of bathers exposed to tropical recreational waters and sand.  

PubMed

A prospective cohort epidemiological pilot study was performed at three tropical beaches with point- and non-point-sources of fecal pollution to characterize the risk of illness among swimmers and non-swimmers. There was an increased risk of illness in swimmers as compared to non-swimmers, even when waters met current microbial standards for recreational water quality. Illnesses included gastrointestinal (GI), skin and respiratory symptoms, earache and fever. Odds ratios (ORs) ranged from 0.32 to 42.35 (GI illness), 0.69 to 3.12 (skin infections), 0.71 to 3.21 (respiratory symptoms), 0.52 to 15.32 (earache) and 0.80 to 1.68 (fever), depending on the beach sampled. The indicators that better predicted the risks of symptoms (respiratory) in tropical recreational waters were total (somatic and male-specific) coliphages (OR = 1.56, p < 0.10, R(2) = 3.79%) and Escherichia coli (OR = 1.38, p < 0.10, R(2) = 1.97%). The present study supports the potential of coliphages as good predictors of risks of respiratory illness in tropical recreational waters. This is the first study that has determined risks of illness after exposure to tropical recreational waters with point- and non-point sources of fecal contamination. The results give an opportunity to perform epidemiological studies in tropical recreational waters in Puerto Rico which can include more participants and other indicators and detection techniques. PMID:24937216

Sánchez-Nazario, Elia E; Santiago-Rodriguez, Tasha M; Toranzos, Gary A

2014-06-01

381

Marine Biomedicine  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes early scientific research involving marine invertebrate pathologic processes that may have led to new insights into human disease. Discussed are inquiries of Metchnikoff, Loeb, and Cantacuzene (immunolgic responses in sea stars, horseshoe crabs, and marine worms, respectively). Describes current research stemming from these early…

Bang, Frederik B.

1977-01-01

382

Marine Biology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A variety of informational material for a course in marine biology or oceanology at the secondary level is presented. Among the topics discussed are: food webs and pyramids, planktonic blooms, marine life, plankton nets, food chains, phytoplankton, zooplankton, larval plankton and filter feeders. (BT)

Dewees, Christopher M.; Hooper, Jon K.

1976-01-01

383

News Release Off-Highway Motor Vehicle Recreation Division  

E-print Network

News Release Off-Highway Motor Vehicle Recreation Division California State Parks 1725 23rd Street Creek Management Area near Hollister, California The Off-Highway Motor Vehicle Recreation (OHMVR at the CCMA to mitigate risk while still allowing access to this premier off-highway vehicle (OHV) recreation

384

Identifying the Computer Competency Levels of Recreation Department Undergraduates  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Computer-based and web-based applications are as major instructional tools to increase undergraduates' motivation at school. In the recreation field usage of, computer and the internet based recreational applications has become more prevalent in order to present visual and interactive entertainment activities. Recreation department undergraduates…

Zorba, Erdal

2011-01-01

385

Diffusion of Innovation: A Roadmap for Inclusive Community Recreation Services  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Inclusive community recreation is an optimal environment for the development of recreation and sports skills and social relationships between people with and without disabilities. Although we know much about best practices for inclusion, little systemic change in recreation agencies has transpired. Diffusion of Innovation Theory is proposed as a…

Schleien, Stuart J.; Miller, Kimberly D.

2010-01-01

386

Behind the Veil: Exploring the Recreation Needs of Muslim Women  

Microsoft Academic Search

The recreation needs of minority groups are often subjugated or marginalized when facilities and\\/or programs are designed to cater for exigencies of the general population. This situation is further exacerbated when these recreation services, by the nature of their provision, informally exclude the participation of certain groups of people. This paper details a research project exploring the recreation needs of

Tracy Taylor; Kristine Toohey

2001-01-01

387

PERSPECTIVES ON RECREATION AND TOURISM GEOGRAPHIES IN SOUTH AFRICA  

Microsoft Academic Search

TThis paper seeks to reflect on the relationships between recreation, tourism and geography. In the first section of the paper, a conceptual framework for understanding the meaning and history of recreation and tourism in South Africa is provided. This is followed by a description and categorisation of recreation and tourism research studies in South Africa. Finally, analyses and review of

LINDISIZWE M. MAGI; THANDI A. NZAMA

2002-01-01

388

Baccalaureate Programs in Recreation, Park Resources, and Leisure Services.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents a listing of baccalaureate programs in recreation, park resources, and leisure services that are accredited by the National Recreation and Park Association/American Association of Leisure and Recreation Council on Accreditation. Listings are alphabetical by state and present contact name, address, telephone, fax, email, website,…

Parks & Recreation, 2001

2001-01-01

389

Perceived Problems in Campus Recreation Programs in North America  

Microsoft Academic Search

Major problems in campus recreation programs were investigated. The participants were 269 campus recreation directors in colleges and universities throughout North America. Participants were asked to indicate whether they agreed, disagreed, or had no opinion regarding statements presented to them on a survey that consisted of the following three general problem areas in campus recreation: (a) conflict, (b) equipment, and

Robert C. Schneider; William F. Stier; Stephen Kampf; Gregory E Wilding; Scott G. Haines

2007-01-01

390

Valuing Recreation and Amenities at San Diego County Beaches  

Microsoft Academic Search

Policymakers and analysts concerned with coastal issues often need economic value information to evaluate policies that affect beach recreation. This paper presents economic values associated with beach recreation in San Diego County generated from a recreation demand model that explains a beach user's choice of which beach to visit. These include estimates of the economic values of a beach day,

DANIEL K. LEW; DOUGLAS M. LARSON

2005-01-01

391

And Our State's Economic Vitality Colorado's Recreation Economy  

E-print Network

And Our State's Economic Vitality Colorado's Recreation Economy Bryan Martin, The Colorado Mountain Club #12;Colorado's Recreation Economy The Colorado Mountain Club · 8,000 Members · 14 Chapters's Recreation Economy By the Numbers · $10 Billion Annually · 107,000 Jobs · $500 Million in State Tax Revenue

392

Physical Recreation of Blind Adults: Present Practices and Childhood Memories.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Analysis of tape-recorded responses of 30 blind adults to a 22-question interview showed that most respondents had positive attitudes toward physical education and recreation, but felt that little encouragement had been offered them. Leisure education and counseling for blind persons and recreation personnel can improve physical recreation and…

Sherrill, Claudine; And Others

1984-01-01

393

50 CFR 648.127 - Scup recreational fishing season.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 false Scup recreational fishing season. 648.127 Section 648.127 Wildlife...648.127 Scup recreational fishing season. Fishermen and vessels that are...128(a). The recreational fishing season may be adjusted pursuant to the...

2013-10-01

394

Professional Preparation of the Intramural-Recreational Sports Specialist.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document is a guideline that outlines specific information for creating an intramural-recreational sports concentration and/or option within a physical education or recreation curriculum. Since each institution is unique, this document is to be used as a framework to help institutions develop curricula for the intramural-recreational sports…

Beardsley, Kathy Pedro, Ed.

395

36 CFR 7.69 - Ross Lake National Recreation Area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Ross Lake National Recreation Area. 7.69 Section...NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.69 Ross Lake National Recreation Area. (a) Snowmobiles...the following locations within the Ross Lake National Recreation Area: (1)...

2012-07-01

396

36 CFR 7.69 - Ross Lake National Recreation Area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Ross Lake National Recreation Area. 7.69 Section...NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.69 Ross Lake National Recreation Area. (a) Snowmobiles...the following locations within the Ross Lake National Recreation Area: (1)...

2013-07-01

397

36 CFR 7.69 - Ross Lake National Recreation Area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ross Lake National Recreation Area. 7.69 Section...NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.69 Ross Lake National Recreation Area. (a) Snowmobiles...the following locations within the Ross Lake National Recreation Area: (1)...

2011-07-01

398

36 CFR 7.69 - Ross Lake National Recreation Area.  

...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Ross Lake National Recreation Area. 7.69 Section...NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.69 Ross Lake National Recreation Area. (a) Snowmobiles...the following locations within the Ross Lake National Recreation Area: (1)...

2014-07-01

399

36 CFR 7.69 - Ross Lake National Recreation Area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ross Lake National Recreation Area. 7.69 Section...NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.69 Ross Lake National Recreation Area. (a) Snowmobiles...the following locations within the Ross Lake National Recreation Area: (1)...

2010-07-01

400

RECREATION AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY FOR THE MENTALLY RETARDED.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

SPECIAL EDUCATORS, PHYSICAL EDUCATORS, PARENTS, AND VOLUNTEERS CAN PROVIDE RECREATION FOR THE MENTALLY HANDICAPPED. BACKGROUND INFORMATION ABOUT THE MENTALLY HANDICAPPED AND THEIR SPECIAL NEEDS IN A RECREATIONAL PROGRAM ARE CONSIDERED. OBJECTIVES OF PLAY AND OF RECREATIONAL PROGRAMS AND SUGGESTIONS FOR PROGRAM IMPLEMENTATION AND INSTRUCTION ARE…

American Association for Health, Physical Education, and Recreation, Washington, DC.

401

36 CFR 7.97 - Golden Gate National Recreation Area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Golden Gate National Recreation Area. 7.97 Section...NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.97 Golden Gate National Recreation Area. (a) Boat...Upon all designated routes in Golden Gate National Recreation Area. (ii)...

2010-07-01

402

36 CFR 7.97 - Golden Gate National Recreation Area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Golden Gate National Recreation Area. 7.97 Section...NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.97 Golden Gate National Recreation Area. (a) Boat...Upon all designated routes in Golden Gate National Recreation Area. (ii)...

2011-07-01

403

36 CFR 7.97 - Golden Gate National Recreation Area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Golden Gate National Recreation Area. 7.97 Section...NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.97 Golden Gate National Recreation Area. (a) Boat...Upon all designated routes in Golden Gate National Recreation Area. (ii)...

2013-07-01

404

36 CFR 7.97 - Golden Gate National Recreation Area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Golden Gate National Recreation Area. 7.97 Section...NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.97 Golden Gate National Recreation Area. (a) Boat...Upon all designated routes in Golden Gate National Recreation Area. (ii)...

2012-07-01

405

50 CFR 648.127 - Scup recreational fishing season.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 false Scup recreational fishing season. 648.127 Section 648.127...Fishery § 648.127 Scup recreational fishing season. Fishermen and vessels that...in § 648.128(a). The recreational fishing season may be adjusted pursuant to...

2012-10-01

406

Odour emission characteristics of 22 recreational rivers in Nanjing.  

PubMed

The odour emission characteristics of 22 recreational rivers in Nanjing were investigated and analysed. Eight odorous compounds (ammonia (NH?), hydrogen sulphide (H?S), sulphur dioxide (SO?), carbon disulphide (CS?), nitrobenzene (C?H?NO?), aniline (C?H?NH?), dimethylamine (C?H?N), and formaldehyde (HCHO)) were measured in odour emission samples collected using a custom-made emission flux hood chamber. The results showed that all odorants were detected in all monitoring rivers. NH? was the main odorant, with emission rates ranging from 4.86 to 15.13 ?g/min m(2). The total odour emission rate of the Nan River, at 1 427.07 OU/s, was the highest of the all investigated rivers. H?S, NH? and nitrobenzene were three key odour emission contributors according to their contributions to the total odour emission. A correlation analysis of the pollutants showed there was a significant positive correlation between the emission rate of NH? and the concentration of ammonia nitrogen (NH? (+)-N) and total nitrogen (TN). The H?S and SO? emission rates had a significant positive correlation with sulphides (S(2-)) and available sulphur (AS) in the water and sediment. The content of TN, NH?(+)-N, S(2-) and AS in the water and sediment affected the concentration of H?S, SO? and NH? in the emission gases. NH?(+)-N, S(2-) and AS are suggested as the key odour control indexes for reducing odours emitted from these recreational rivers. The study provides useful information for effective pollution control, especially for odour emission control for the recreational rivers of the city. It also provides a demonstrate example to show how to monitor and assess a contaminated river when odour emission and its control need to be focused on. PMID:24939710

Wan, Yu; Ruan, Xiaohong; Wang, Xinguang; Ma, Qian; Lu, Xiaoming

2014-10-01

407

Recreation motivators and facility factors as relative determinants of urban outdoor recreation behavior and satisfaction  

E-print Network

with psychological motives than with facility (hygiene) factors. It was also revealed by the study that motives and facility factors are moderately associated with each other. Finally, satisfaction with urban outdoor recreation opportunities does not appear... with psychological motives than with facility (hygiene) factors. It was also revealed by the study that motives and facility factors are moderately associated with each other. Finally, satisfaction with urban outdoor recreation opportunities does not appear...

Milkes, Jeffrey Stephen

2012-06-07

408

Marine Microbial Ecology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This image-rich website from the Australian Antarctic Division's Biology program describes its research in marine microbial ecology. It includes an introduction of microbial ecology and microbial processes, followed by information about the research project. Field sampling, microscopy, flow cytometry, pigment analysis, flourometry, HPLC, culturing, feeding experiments, and the research staff are each discussed using vivid imagery. Links are provided to related websites.

Division, Australian A.

409

Robot therapy as for recreation for elderly people with dementia - Game recreation using a pet-type robot -  

Microsoft Academic Search

Most elderly people staying in nursing homes have considerable dementia, and various kinds of recreation program have hence been executed in order to improve or prevent this problem. However the effect of recreation has not been proved quantitatively. In this paper, we show the relationship between actions of elderly people with considerable dementia during recreation and abilities of memorization, emotion

Toshimitsu Hamada; Hiroki Okubo; Kazuya Inoue; Joji Maruyama; Hisashi Onari; Yoshihito Kagawa; Tomomi Hashimoto

2008-01-01

410

GUIDE FOR TRAINING RECREATION LEADERS IN CONSTRUCTIVE AND CREATIVE RECREATION ACTIVITIES FOR THE MENTALLY RETARDED. IN SERVICE TRAINING MANUAL.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

DEVELOPED AS A GUIDE FOR RECREATION LEADERS AND VOLUNTEERS WORKING WITH THE MENTALLY HANDICAPPED, THIS BOOKLET PRESENTS GUIDELINES AND SPECIFIC ACTIVITIES FOR PHYSICAL CONDITIONING AND SOCIAL-RECREATIONAL ACTIVITIES. RECREATIONAL THEORIES AND THEIR APPLICATION TO THE MENTALLY HANDICAPPED ARE PRESENTED. DIRECTIONS ARE GIVEN FOR PHYSICAL EXERCISES,…

HATCH, MODESTA; AND OTHERS

411

Toxicological findings of synthetic cannabinoids in recreational users.  

PubMed

In recent years, several synthetic cannabinoid compounds have become popular recreational drugs of abuse because of their psychoactive properties. This paper presents toxicological findings of synthetic cannabinoids in whole blood from some cases of severe intoxication including quantitative data from recreational users and a fatal intoxication. Samples were analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in a scheduled multiple reaction mode after a basic liquid extraction. Twenty-nine synthetic cannabinoids were included in the method. In our data set of ~3000 cases, 28% were found positive for one or more synthetic cannabinoid(s). The most common finding was AM-2201. Most of the analytes had median concentrations of <0.5 ng/g in agreement with other published data. The emerging drugs MAM-2201 (n = 151) and UR-144 (n = 181) had mean (median) concentrations of 1.04 (0.37) and 1.26 (0.34), respectively. The toxicity of the synthetic cannabinoids seems to be worse than that of natural cannabis, probably owing to the higher potency and perhaps also to the presence of several different cannabinoids in the smoked incense and the difficulties of proper dosing. The acute toxic effects may under certain circumstances contribute to death. PMID:23970540

Kronstrand, Robert; Roman, Markus; Andersson, Mikael; Eklund, Arne

2013-10-01

412

MDMA, cortisol, and heightened stress in recreational ecstasy users.  

PubMed

Stress develops when an organism requires additional metabolic resources to cope with demanding situations. This review will debate how recreational 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, 'ecstasy') can increase some aspects of acute and chronic stress in humans. Laboratory studies on the acute effects of MDMA on cortisol release and neurohormone levels in drug-free regular ecstasy/MDMA users have been reviewed, and the role of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in chronic changes in anxiety, stress, and cognitive coping is debated. In the laboratory, acute ecstasy/MDMA use can increase cortisol levels by 100-200%, whereas ecstasy/MDMA-using dance clubbers experience an 800% increase in cortisol levels, because of the combined effects of the stimulant drug and dancing. Three-month hair samples of abstinent users revealed cortisol levels 400% higher than those in controls. Chronic users show heightened cortisol release in stressful environments and deficits in complex neurocognitive tasks. Event-related evoked response potential studies show altered patterns of brain activation, suggestive of increased mental effort, during basic information processing. Chronic mood deficits include more daily stress and higher depression in susceptible individuals. We conclude that ecstasy/MDMA increases cortisol levels acutely and subchronically and that changes in the HPA axis may explain why recreational ecstasy/MDMA users show various aspects of neuropsychobiological stress. PMID:25014666

Parrott, Andrew C; Montgomery, Cathy; Wetherell, Mark A; Downey, Luke A; Stough, Con; Scholey, Andrew B

2014-09-01

413

Contamination of soil with eggs of geohelminths in recreational areas in the Lublin region of Poland.  

PubMed

Recreational areas cover parks, bicycle paths, lawns, urban squares, sports complexes, holiday camp areas, playgrounds for children, beaches, and even spontaneously used green field open spaces. While using recreational areas, people take with them accompanying animals (dogs, cats). These animals constitute the main source and reservoir of many dangerous zoonoses, including parasitoses caused by roundworms of the genus Toxocara and Trichuris. The objective of the presented study was determination of the level of contamination of soil with parasites' developmental forms (eggs of Toxocara spp., Ascaris spp., Trichuris spp and Ancylostoma) in selected recreational areas in the Lublin Region of southeastern Poland. The material for the study was collected from beaches in recreational areas located around the Bia?e Lake near W?odawa, the water reservoirs in Krasnobród and Janów Lubelski. The studies were carried out from May-October 2010 durng which time a total number of 215 samples of sand were collected. Eggs of Ascaris spp. and Trichuris spp. were detected based on the Polish Standard PN-Z-19000-4/2001. Beaches on the Bia?e Lake were the most contaminated. The eggs of intestinal parasites were isolated from 6 per 15 samples examined, which is 40%. In one sample, the presence of the eggs of 3 types of parasites were observed, while the eggs of Ancylostoma were not found in any of the samples. Attention should also be paid to the possibility of contamination of recreational areas with the eggs of intestinal parasites by wild animals. Recently in Poland, as well as in many other European countries, the phenomenon of synantropization of wild living animals has been observed, which most frequently concerned wild boar (Sus scrofa) and red fox (Vulpes vulpes). PMID:22742799

Bojar, Hubert; K?ape?, Teresa

2012-01-01

414

Antibiotic-resistance and virulence genes in Enterococcus isolated from tropical recreational waters  

PubMed Central

The prevalence of enterococci harboring tetracycline and vancomycin-resistance genes, as well as the enterococcal surface protein (esp) has mostly been determined in clinical settings, but their prevalence in tropical recreational waters remains largely unknown. The present study determined the prevalence of tetM (tetracycline-resistance), vanA and vanB (vancomycin-resistance) in the bacterial and viral fractions, enterococci and their induced phages isolated from tropical recreational marine and fresh waters, dry and wet sands. Since lysogenic phages can act as vectors for antibiotic-resistance and virulence factors, the prevalence of the mentioned genes, as well as that of an integrase-encoding gene (int) specific for Enterococcus faecalis phages was determined. Up to 60 % and 54 % of the bacterial fractions and enterococci harbored at least one of the tested genes, respectively, suggesting that bacteria in tropical environments may be reservoirs of antibiotic-resistance and virulence genes. int was detected in the viral fractions and in one Enterococcus isolate after induction. This study opens the opportunity to determine if the presence of bacteria harboring antibiotic-resistance and virulence genes in tropical recreational waters represents a threat to public health. PMID:23981868

Santiago-Rodriguez, Tasha M.; Rivera, Jessica I.; Coradin, Mariel; Toranzos, Gary A.

2014-01-01

415

Marine structure  

SciTech Connect

A marine structure is described having a base and a foundation means projecting downwardly from the base for pressing into the sea bed. The foundation comprises a wall system with pile means on both sides of the wall(s).

Olsen, O.

1981-12-08

416

Marine Ecosystems  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In the wild, small crustaceans known as brine shrimp live in marine habitats such as saltwater lakes. In this activity, learners create a saltwater or marine ecosystem that becomes an experimental brine shrimp hatchery. Learners observe the brine shrimp life cycle and test the effect of salinity (salt content) on brine shrimp eggs and larvae, as well as consider the potential impact of other variables such as water temperature and pollution.

Jersey, New; Center, Liberty S.; Coalition, New J.

2006-01-01

417

Spatial allocation of forest recreation value  

Microsoft Academic Search

Non-market valuation methods and geographic information systems are useful planning and management tools for public land managers. Recent attention has been given to investigation and demonstration of methods for combining these tools to provide spatially-explicit representations of non-market value. Most of these efforts have focused on spatial allocation of ecosystem service values based on land cover types, but recreation value

Kenneth A. Baerenklau; Armando González-Cabán; Catrina Paez; Edgar Chavez

2010-01-01

418

Automated microextraction sample preparation coupled on-line to FT-ICR-MS: application to desalting and concentration of river and marine dissolved organic matter  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sample preparation procedures are in most cases sample- and time-consuming and commonly require the use of a large amount\\u000a of solvents. Automation in this regard can optimize the minimal-needed injection volume and the solvent consumption will be\\u000a efficiently reduced. A new fully automated sample desalting and pre-concentration technique employing microextraction by packed\\u000a sorbents (MEPS) cartridges is implemented and coupled to

Gabriel Morales-Cid; Istvan Gebefugi; Basem Kanawati; Mourad Harir; Norbert Hertkorn; Ramón Rosselló-Mora; Philippe Schmitt-Kopplin

2009-01-01

419

Marine Fungi: Their Ecology and Molecular Diversity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fungi appear to be rare in marine environments. There are relatively few marine isolates in culture, and fungal small subunit ribosomal DNA (SSU rDNA) sequences are rarely recovered in marine clone library experiments (i.e., culture-independent sequence surveys of eukaryotic microbial diversity from environmental DNA samples). To explore the diversity of marine fungi, we took a broad selection of SSU rDNA data sets and calculated a summary phylogeny. Bringing these data together identified a diverse collection of marine fungi, including sequences branching close to chytrids (flagellated fungi), filamentous hypha-forming fungi, and multicellular fungi. However, the majority of the sequences branched with ascomycete and basidiomycete yeasts. We discuss evidence for 36 novel marine lineages, the majority and most divergent of which branch with the chytrids. We then investigate what these data mean for the evolutionary history of the Fungi and specifically marine-terrestrial transitions. Finally, we discuss the roles of fungi in marine ecosystems.

Richards, Thomas A.; Jones, Meredith D. M.; Leonard, Guy; Bass, David

2012-01-01

420

The Effects of Winter Recreation on Alpine and Subalpine Fauna: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis  

PubMed Central

The ski industry is often perceived as having a negative impact on sensitive alpine and subalpine communities. However, empirical evidence of such impacts is lacking. We reviewed the available literature from the last 35 years to quantify the reported effects of winter recreation on faunal communities. Overall, using one-sample binomial tests (‘sign tests’) we found that the effects of all types of winter recreation-related disturbances (i.e. ski runs, resort infrastructure and winter tourism) were more likely to be negative or have no effect, than be positive for wildlife. More specifically, in Europe, where the majority of the available research was conducted, the impacts of winter recreation were most often negative for fauna. In terms of specific taxa, birds and to a lesser extent mammals and arthropods, responded negatively to disturbance. Results from our meta-analysis confirmed the results from our binomial tests. Richness, abundance and diversity of fauna were lower in areas affected by winter recreation when compared with undisturbed areas. For most regions and taxa, however, empirical evidence remains too limited to identify clear impacts of winter recreation. We therefore conclude that the majority of ski resorts are operating in the absence of knowledge needed to inform effective strategies for biodiversity conservation and ecologically-sound management. Thus, there is an urgent need for more empirical research to be conducted throughout this increasingly threatened ecological community, especially given the indication from the available literature that fauna often respond negatively to winter recreation. PMID:23691190

Sato, Chloe F.; Wood, Jeff T.; Lindenmayer, David B.

2013-01-01

421

Energy and recreation: an overview of energy availability and utilization for recreational use. [Monograph  

SciTech Connect

A study of recreational energy requirements in the context of the present US situation and energy needs through the year 2000 shows that 4.4% of automotive fuel is presently used for recreational vehicles. The demand for gasoline may peak in the near future and decline as more-efficient automobiles and fuel substitution increase. The authors conclude that use of fuel for recreation is justifiable for social and economic reasons, although periodic supply disruptions may occur. They feel there is no justification for the limits-to-growth philosophy which projects disaster, because energy-use patterns have historically shifted when it was necessary. They predict that adequate and affordable energy supplies will be available from increased US and world fuel supplies and increased efficiency. 23 references, 11 figures, 11 tables. (DCK)

Armbruster, F.; Brown, W.M.; Thomas, J.P.

1980-01-01

422

CSULB Department of Recreation and Leisure Studies Receives Academic Accreditation The National Recreation and Parks Association's Council on Accreditation for Parks, Recreation,  

E-print Network

CSULB Department of Recreation and Leisure Studies Receives Academic Accreditation The National and Leisure Studies on October 7, 2013 in Houston, Texas. In its report, the Council said, "the department has stated criteria of educational quality." The CSULB Department of Recreation and Leisure Studies has been

Sorin, Eric J.

423

Remote sensing in the coastal and marine environment. Proceedings of the US North Atlantic Regional Workshop  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Presentations were grouped in the following categories: (1) a technical orientation of Earth resources remote sensing including data sources and processing; (2) a review of the present status of remote sensing technology applicable to the coastal and marine environment; (3) a description of data and information needs of selected coastal and marine activities; and (4) an outline of plans for marine monitoring systems for the east coast and a concept for an east coast remote sensing facility. Also discussed were user needs and remote sensing potentials in the areas of coastal processes and management, commercial and recreational fisheries, and marine physical processes.

Zaitzeff, J. B. (editor); Cornillon, P. (editor); Aubrey, D. A. (editor)

1980-01-01

424

Individual differences in reproductive strategy are related to views about recreational drug use in Belgium, The Netherlands, and Japan.  

PubMed

Individual differences in moral views are often explained as the downstream effect of ideological commitments, such as political orientation and religiosity. Recent studies in the U.S. suggest that moral views about recreational drug use are also influenced by attitudes toward sex and that this relationship cannot be explained by ideological commitments. In this study, we investigate student samples from Belgium, The Netherlands, and Japan. We find that, in all samples, sexual attitudes are strongly related to views about recreational drug use, even after controlling for various ideological variables. We discuss our results in light of reproductive strategies as determinants of moral views. PMID:23660974

Quintelier, Katinka J P; Ishii, Keiko; Weeden, Jason; Kurzban, Robert; Braeckman, Johan

2013-06-01

425

Marine Antimalarials  

PubMed Central

Malaria is an infectious disease causing at least 1 million deaths per year, and, unfortunately, the chemical entities available to treat malaria are still too limited. In this review we highlight the contribution of marine chemistry in the field of antimalarial research by reporting the most important results obtained until the beginning of 2009, with particular emphasis on recent discoveries. About 60 secondary metabolites produced by marine organisms have been grouped into three structural types and discussed in terms of their reported antimalarial activities. The major groups of metabolites include isonitrile derivatives, alkaloids and endoperoxide derivatives. The following discussion evidences that antimalarial marine molecules can efficiently integrate the panel of lead compounds isolated from terrestrial sources with new chemical backbones and, sometimes, with unique functional groups. PMID:19597577

Fattorusso, Ernesto; Taglialatela-Scafati, Orazio

2009-01-01

426

The influence of use-related, environmental, and managerial factors on soil loss from recreational trails  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Recreational uses of unsurfaced trails inevitably result in their degradation, with the type and extent of resource impact influenced by factors such as soil texture, topography, climate, trail design and maintenance, and type and amount of use. Of particular concern, the loss of soil through erosion is generally considered a significant and irreversible form of trail impact. This research investigated the influence of several use-related, environmental, and managerial factors on soil loss on recreational trails and roads at Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area, a unit of the U.S. National Park Service. Regression modeling revealed that trail position, trail slope alignment angle, grade, water drainage, and type of use are significant determinants of soil loss. The introduction of individual and groups of variables into a series of regression models provides improved understanding and insights regarding the relative influence of these variables, informing the selection of more effective trail management actions. Study results suggest that trail erosion can be minimized by avoiding ?fall-line? alignments, steep grades, and valley-bottom alignments near streams, installing and maintaining adequate densities of tread drainage features, applying gravel to harden treads, and reducing horse and all-terrain vehicle use or restricting them to more resistant routes. This research also sought to develop a more efficient Variable Cross-Sectional Area method for assessing soil loss on trails. This method permitted incorporation of CSA measures in a representative sampling scheme applied to a large (24%) sample of the park's 526 km trail system. The variety of soil loss measures derived from the Variable CSA method, including extrapolated trail-wide soil loss estimates, permit an objective quantification of soil erosion on recreational trails and roads. Such data support relational analyses to increase understanding of trail degradation, and long-term monitoring of the natural and recreational integrity of the trail system infrastructure.

Olive, N.D.; Marion, J.L.

2009-01-01

427

Recreational conflict: an exploration of the role of tolerance  

E-print Network

RECREATIONAL CONFLICT: AN EXPLORATION OF THE ROLE OF TOLERANCE A THESIS by MARK IAN IVY Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May... 1990 Major Subject: Recreation and Resource Development RECREATIONAL CONFLICT: AN EXPLORATION OF THE ROLE OF TOLERANCE A Thesis by MARK IAN IVY Approved as to style and content by: William P. Stewart (Chair of Committee) James H. G amann e er...

Ivy, Mark Ian

2012-06-07

428

Distribution of sea snakes in the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park: observations from 10 yrs of baited remote underwater video station (BRUVS) sampling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The distributions of three species of sea snake (olive sea snake: Aipysurus laevis, spine-bellied sea snake: Lapemis curtus, and ornate sea snake: Hydrophis ocellatus) were estimated over 14° of latitude within the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park (GBRMP) using data from baited remote underwater video stations (BRUVS). A total of 2,471 deployments of BRUVS were made in a range of locations, in sites open and closed to trawl fishing. Sightings of sea snakes were analysed alongside six spatial factors [depth, relative distance across (longitude) and along (latitude) the GBRMP, proximity to land, proximity to the nearest reef, and habitat complexity] to determine the factors that most strongly influenced the distribution and abundance of sea snakes. The results showed a strong latitudinal effect on the distribution of all three sea snake species, with the highest densities and diversities occurring in central and southern GBRMP locations, while the northern Great Barrier Reef was relatively depauperate in terms of both occurrence and diversity. Shallow inshore areas were identified as key habitats for A. laevis and L. curtus, whereas deeper offshore habitats were most important for H. ocellatus. No significant difference was found in the mean number of snakes sighted per hour between sites open and closed to trawling. There was a high degree of congruence in the distribution of sea snakes estimated from the BRUVS data and results from previous trawl and underwater visual surveys, demonstrating the utility of BRUVS to estimate distribution and relative abundance in these species of sea snake at broad spatial scales in a non-extractive manner.

Udyawer, Vinay; Cappo, Mike; Simpfendorfer, Colin A.; Heupel, Michelle R.; Lukoschek, Vimoksalehi

2014-09-01

429

Survey of Naegleria from Taiwan recreational waters using culture enrichment combined with PCR.  

PubMed

Naegleria is a free-living amoeba. Pathogenic Naegleria may pose a health risk to people who come in contact with recreational waters. Here, we used Naegleria culture enrichment with PCR to identify the Naegleria species and investigated the distribution of Naegleria spp. in recreational waters including spring water, stream water and raw domestic water in central and southern Taiwan. In this study, Naegleria spp. were detected in 19 (17.8%) of the water samples. The occurrence of Naegleria in raw domestic water was 28.6%, higher than in stream water (14.7%) and in spring water (6.5%). The most frequently identified species exhibiting the closest phylogenetic relationships to the isolates were N. australiensis (n=4) and N. canariensis (n=4), followed by N. clarki (n=3) and N. philippinensis (n=3); N. americana (n=2). N. lovaniensis, N. dobsoni, and N. gruberi were each detected once. The pathogenic species N. fowleri was not detected, probably due to the low incubation temperature; however, the isolates exhibiting the closest phylogenetic relationships to the pathogenic species in mice of PAM, N. australiensis and N. philippinensis, were found. Results of this survey suggest the distribution of Naegleria spp. excluding N. fowleri in recreational waters. It should be considered a potential threat for health associated with human activities in recreational waters. PMID:21640066

Huang, Shih-Wei; Hsu, Bing-Mu

2011-08-01

430

Recreational system optimization to reduce conflict on public lands.  

PubMed

In response to federal administrative rule, the Tahoe National Forest (TNF), California, USA engaged in trail-route prioritization for motorized recreation (e.g., off-highway-vehicles) and other recreation types. The prioritization was intended to identify routes that were suitable and ill-suited for maintenance in a transportation system. A recreational user survey was conducted online (n = 813) for user preferences for trail system characteristics, recreational use patterns, and demographics. Motorized trail users and non-motorized users displayed very clear and contrasting preferences for the same system. As has been found by previous investigators, non-motorized users expressed antagonism to motorized use on the same recreational travel system, whereas motorized users either supported multiple-use routes or dismissed non-motorized recreationists' concerns. To help the TNF plan for reduced conflict, a geographic information system (GIS) based modeling approach was used to identify recreational opportunities and potential environmental impacts of all travel routes. This GIS-based approach was based on an expert-derived rule set. The rules addressed particular environmental and recreation concerns in the TNF. Route segments were identified that could be incorporated into minimal-impact networks to support various types of recreation. The combination of potential impacts and user-benefits supported an optimization approach for an appropriate recreational travel network to minimize environmental impacts and user-conflicts in a multi-purpose system. PMID:22773115

Shilling, Fraser; Boggs, Jennifer; Reed, Sarah

2012-09-01

431

Geology of Lake Mead National Recreation Area  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website of the United States Geological Survey (USGS) and National Park Service (NPS) highlights the geologic history of Lake Mead National Recreation Area in Nevada and Arizona. From the Precambrian (1.8 billion years ago) until the present, the Lake Mead region has been shaped by collisions, uplift, erosion, volcanic activity, submergence, extension, and sedimentation. This site covers these major events and when they occurred in the Lake Mead area. There are links to information about geologic maps, geologic time, rocks and minerals, plate tectonics, and other Lake Mead information sources.

432

Hip pains in a recreational runner.  

PubMed

A 29 year old female recreational runner presented with two separate episodes of hip pain. The first, affecting the right hip was an uncommon cause of hip pain--an osteoid osteoma. The second, affecting the left hip was a more predictable cause of hip pain in a runner--a femoral stress fracture. Management of the subsequent stress fracture enabled more detailed and prolonged observation of the natural history and clinical course of the osteoid osteoma. The presentation and management of each of the conditions is discussed. PMID:8776213

Batt, M E; Timmerman, L A

1995-11-01

433

Survey of Legionella spp. in Mud Spring Recreation Area  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Legionella genera are parasites of FLA, and intracellular bacterial replication within the FLA plays a major role in the transmission of disease. At least 13 FLA species—including Acanthamoeba spp., Naegleria spp., and Hartmannella spp.—support intracellular bacterial replication. In the study, Legionellae were detected with microbial culture or by direct DNA extraction and analysis from concentrated water samples or cultured free-living amoebae, combined with molecular methods that allow the taxonomic identification of these pathogens. The water samples were taken from a mud spring recreation area located in a mud-rock-formation area in southern Taiwan. Legionella were detected in 15 of the 34 samples (44.1%). Four of the 34 samples analyzed by Legionella culture were positive for Legionella, five of 34 were positive for Legionella when analyzed by direct DNA extraction and analysis, and 11 of 34 were positive for amoebae-resistant Legionella when analyzed by FLA culture. Ten samples were shown to be positive for Legionella by one analysis method and five samples were shown to be positive by two analysis methods. However, Legionella was detected in no sample by all three analysis methods. This suggests that the three analysis methods should be used together to detect Legionella in aquatic environments. In this study, L. pneumophila serotype 6 coexisted with A. polyphaga, and two uncultured Legionella spp. coexisted with either H. vermiformis or N. australiensis. Of the unnamed Legionella genotypes detected in six FLA culture samples, three were closely related to L. waltersii and the other three were closely related to L. pneumophila serotype 6. Legionella pneumophila serotype 6, L. drancourtii, and L. waltersii are noted endosymbionts of FLA and are categorized as pathogenic bacteria. This is significant for human health because these Legionella exist within FLA and thus come into contact with typically immunocompromised people.

Hsu, B.-M.; Ma, P.-H.; Su, I.-Z.; Chen, N.-S.

2009-04-01

434

Comparison of methods for determining Escherichia coli concentrations in recreational waters  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Seventy water samples were collected from three Lake Erie beaches to compare recoveries of Escherichia coli (E. coli) using the USEPA-recommended method for recreational waters (mTEC) to recoveries using three alternative methods (MI, modified mTEC, and Colilert). Statistical tests showed no differences in recoveries of E. coli between MI and mTEC; however, statistically-significant differences were found between modified mTEC or Colilert and mTEC. The MI agar method provided the most similar assessment of recreational water quality to mTEC among the three alternative methods tested. The range of differences between Colilert and mTEC was widest among the three alternative methods. In a sample group with a range of values near the single-sample bathing-water standard, recoveries of E. coli were statistically lower using modified mTEC than mTEC; however, MI and Colilert compared well to mTEC in this range. Because samples were collected in a small geographic area, more work is necessary to test within-method variability of the modified mTEC, MI, and Colilert methods and to evaluate these methods as substitutes for the mTEC method in a variety of recreational waters. Copyright (C) 2000.

Francy, D.S.; Darner, R.A.

2000-01-01

435

Marine Technology Student: Marine Farming  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this video adapted from Pathways to Technology, learn how a degree in marine technology helped one student go from working at a marine farming company to becoming a partner in that company. Trevor Fay uses the GPS/GIS technology he studied in school to farm the red abalone, tracking their locations and monitoring their population. This technology helps marine farmers maintain healthy populations of sea creatures and understand more about the important ecosystem of the ocean.The video runs 4:18 and is accompanied by a background essay, standards alignment, and discussion questions. Users who sign up for a free account can save the resource and download the video as well.

2012-05-30

436

Gulf of Maine Marine Habitat Primer  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This book provides an overview of the Gulf of Maine's coastal and offshore habitats for resource managers and other coastal decision-makers in government, Non-Government Organizations (NGOs), and the private sector. Illustrated with color photographs and drawings, the primer describes habitat characteristics, ecological functions, economic and recreational values, human impacts, and management considerations. It is intended as a tool for resource managers, planners, legislators, conservation commissioners, NGO staff members, and other people seeking a better understanding of marine habitats from Massachusetts to Nova Scotia. The book is available in six downloadable sections, or it can be ordered as a hard copy.

437

Sedimentology of rocky shorelines 5: The marine samples at + 326m from ‘Stearns swale’ (Lanai, Hawai´i) and their paleo-environmental and sedimentary process implications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fossiliferous gravels on Lanai, one of the smaller Hawaiian islands, are known collectively as the Hulopoe Gravel. Since 1984 several workers have attributed these gravels to deposition from the run-ups and retreats of mega-tsunami. Other workers, before and since, have interpreted the gravels as rocky shoreline deposits exposed by island uplift. The existence of Harold Stearns' Makana paleoshoreline on Lanai, at 326-365 m elevation, is particularly controversial. In 1936 Stearns collected some marine molluscan fossils from a site at 326 m elevation on the southern slope of Lanai, now known as "Stearns swale". Details of the site, the fossils and his installed markers were recorded in his field note-book now held by the US Geological Survey in Honolulu. The fossils were lodged in the National Museum of Natural History in Washington D.C. During WW II the 326 m site became a military installation, and Stearns' markers and any remaining fossils were destroyed. We have examined Stearns' notebook, the 326 m site and the fossils. Two types of sediment adhere to the fossils: (a) weakly cemented well-rounded biocalcarenite grainstones with minor subrounded basalt fragments; (b) calcite-cemented sub-rounded to well-rounded volcanic litharenite or lithrudite with some bioclasts. The fossil molluscs and the bioclasts in the adhering sands represent organisms typical of Hawaiian rocky shorelines and adjacent submarine slopes. These features are consistent with (1) deposition of the sediments on or closely overlying an unconformity surface cut in basalt bedrock in the vicinity of a rocky shoreline. They are also consistent with (2) derivation of the materials from rocky shorelines or shorefaces at lower elevations and their transport up-slope by waves generated by a Category 5 hurricane or by a mega-tsunami. We prefer the first scenario, as Lanai's vertical mobility is indicated by at least ten topographically distinct shoreline-related deposits located at various elevations on or adjacent to Lanai, including six submerged terraces on its western flank.

Crook, Keith A. W.; Felton, E. Anne

2008-04-01

438

Marine Pollution  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Created by William Barker and David Smith for the Connected Curriculum Project, this module enables the user to carry out a short study of the relationship between concentration of a marine pollutant and shell thickness of mussels; to practice writing about the results of a mathematical study. This is one within a much larger set of learning modules hosted by Duke University.

Barker, William; Smith, David

2010-06-04

439

Marine Mammals.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Marine mammals have not only fascinated and inspired human beings for thousands of years, but they also support a big business by providing flesh for sea-borne factories, sustaining Arctic lifestyles and traditions, and attracting tourists to ocean aquaria. While they are being harpooned, bludgeoned, shot, netted, and trained to jump through…

Meith, Nikki

440

Fish Consumption and Mercury Exposure among Louisiana Recreational Anglers  

PubMed Central

Background Methylmercury (MeHg) exposure assessments among average fish consumers in the United States may underestimate exposures among U.S. subpopulations with high intakes of regionally specific fish. Objectives We examined relationships among fish consumption, estimated mercury (Hg) intake, and measured Hg exposure within one such potentially highly exposed group, recreational anglers in the state of Louisiana, USA. Methods We surveyed 534 anglers in 2006 using interviews at boat launches and fishing tournaments combined with an Internet-based survey method. Hair samples from 402 of these anglers were collected and analyzed for total Hg. Questionnaires provided information on species-specific fish consumption during the 3 months before the survey. Results Anglers’ median hair Hg concentration was 0.81 ?g/g (n = 398; range, 0.02–10.7 ?g/g); 40% of participants had levels >1 ?g/g, which approximately corresponds to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s reference dose. Fish consumption and Hg intake were significantly positively associated with hair Hg. Participants reported consuming nearly 80 different fish types, many of which are specific to the region. Unlike the general U.S. population, which acquires most of its Hg from commercial seafood sources, approximately 64% of participants’ fish meals and 74% of their estimated Hg intake came from recreationally caught seafood. Conclusions Study participants had relatively elevated hair Hg concentrations and reported consumption of a wide variety of fish, particularly locally caught fish. This group represents a highly exposed subpopulation with an exposure profile that differs from fish consumers in other regions of the United States, suggesting a need for more regionally specific exposure estimates and public health advisories. PMID:20980220

Lincoln, Rebecca A.; Shine, James P.; Chesney, Edward J.; Vorhees, Donna J.; Grandjean, Philippe; Senn, David B.

2011-01-01

441

SCIRehab Project Series: The Therapeutic Recreation Taxonomy  

PubMed Central

Background/Objective: Outcomes research of therapeutic recreation (TR) activities and interventions for spinal cord injury (SCI) rehabilitation is made more difficult by a lack of uniform descriptions and the absence of a formal treatments classification system (taxonomy). The objective of this study was to describe a taxonomy developed by Certified Therapeutic Recreation Specialists. Methods: TR lead clinicians and researchers from 6 SCI rehabilitation centers developed a TR documentation system to describe the details of each TR session involving patients with SCI enrolled in the SCIRehab study. The SCIRehab study uses the practice-based evidence methodology, a rigorous observational methodology that examines current practice without introducing additional treatments, to capture details of each TR session for 1,500 SCI rehabilitation patients at 6 US inpatient SCI rehabilitation facilities. This may be the first attempt to document the many details of the TR rehabilitation process for patients with SCI. Results: The TR taxonomy consists of 6 activities (eg, leisure education and counseling, outings, and leisure skill work in center) and activity-specific interventions, as well as time spent on each activity. Activity descriptions are enhanced with additional details that focus on assistance needs for each activity, patient ability to direct care, and patient/family involvement, which may help to determine TR activity selection. Conclusion: Development and application of a TR taxonomy, which is comprehensive for patients with SCI and efficient to use, are feasible despite significantly different TR programs at the 6 SCIRehab centers. PMID:19810631

Cahow, Claire; Skolnick, Susan; Joyce, Joan; Jug, Julie; Dragon, Charlotte; Gassaway, Julie

2009-01-01

442

Dioxin-like compounds in HPLC-fractionated extracts of marine samples from the east and west coast of Sweden: Bioassay and instrumentally-derived TCDD equivalents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lipophilic extracts of sediment, settling particulate matter (SPM) and blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) samples, collected at coastal locations on the east and west coast of Sweden, were HPLC-separated into three fractions containing 1. monoaromatic\\/aliphatic, 2. diaromatic (e.g. polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polychlorinated dibenzodioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDDs\\/Fs)), and 3. polyaromatic compounds (e.g. polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)). The fractions were tested for

Magnus Engwall; Dag Broman; Carina Näf; Yngve Zebühr; Björn Brunström

1997-01-01

443

Preparation of DNA extracted from environmental water samples for PCR amplification 1 Contribution number 268 from the Center of Marine Biotechnology. 1  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sephadex G-200 spun columns have been used to purify DNA extracted from aquatic samples. Nucleic acid recovery using a previously-described protocol was only 10 to 15%. We optimized this method by employing a high salt (0.2 M NaCl) TE buffer (pH 8.0) and four slow-speed centrifugation steps (130×g) in a swing-out centrifuge. DNA recovery improved to approximately 75%. Purified DNA

Victoria M Boccuzzi; William L. Straube; Jacques Ravel; Rita R Colwell; Russell T Hill

1998-01-01

444

Underway Sampling of Marine Inherent Optical Properties on the Tara Oceans Expedition as a Novel Resource for Ocean Color Satellite Data Product Validation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Developing and validating data records from operational ocean color satellite instruments requires substantial volumes of high quality in situ data. In the absence of broad, institutionally supported field programs, organizations such as the NASA Ocean Biology Processing Group seek opportunistic datasets for use in their operational satellite calibration and validation activities. The publicly available, global biogeochemical dataset collected as part of the two and a half year Tara Oceans expedition provides one such opportunity. We showed how the inline measurements of hyperspectral absorption and attenuation coefficients collected onboard the R/V Tara can be used to evaluate near-surface estimates of chlorophyll-a, spectral particulate backscattering coefficients, particulate organic carbon, and particle size classes derived from the NASA Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer onboard Aqua (MODISA). The predominant strength of such flow-through measurements is their sampling rate-the 375 days of measurements resulted in 165 viable MODISA-to-in situ match-ups, compared to 13 from discrete water sampling. While the need to apply bio-optical models to estimate biogeochemical quantities of interest from spectroscopy remains a weakness, we demonstrated how discrete samples can be used in combination with flow-through measurements to create data records of sufficient quality to conduct first order evaluations of satellite-derived data products. Given an emerging agency desire to rapidly evaluate new satellite missions, our results have significant implications on how calibration and validation teams for these missions will be constructed.

Werdell, P. Jeremy; Proctor, Christopher W.; Boss, Emmanuel; Leeuw, Thomas; Ouhssain, Mustapha

2013-01-01

445

Monitoring coastal marine waters for spore-forming bacteria of faecal and soil origin to determine point from non-point source pollution.  

PubMed

The US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) and the World Health Organization (WHO) have established recreational water quality standards limiting the concentrations of faecal indicator bacteria (faecal coliform, E. coli, enterococci) to ensure that these waters are safe for swimming. In the application of these hygienic water quality standards, it is assumed that there are no significant environmental sources of these faecal indicator bacteria which are unrelated to direct faecal contamination. However, we previously reported that these faecal indicator bacteria are able to grow in the soil environment of humid tropical island environments such as Hawaii and Guam and are transported at high concentrations into streams and storm drains by rain. Thus, streams and storm drains in Hawaii contain consistently high concentrations of faecal indicator bacteria which routinely exceed the EPA and WHO recreational water quality standards. Since, streams and storm drains eventually flow out to coastal marine waters, we hypothesize that all the coastal beaches which receive run-off from streams and storm drains will contain elevated concentrations of faecal indicator bacteria. To test this hypothesis, we monitored the coastal waters at four beaches known to receive water from stream or storm drains for salinity, turbidity, and used the two faecal indicator bacteria (E. coli, enterococci) to establish recreational water quality standards. To determine if these coastal waters are contaminated with non-point source pollution (streams) or with point source pollution (sewage effluent), these same water samples were also assayed for spore-forming bacteria of faecal origin (Cl. perfringens) and of soil origin (Bacillus species). Using this monitoring strategy it was possible to determine when coastal marine waters were contaminated with non-point source pollution and when coastal waters were contaminated with point source pollution. The results of this study are most likely applicable to all countries in the warm and humid region of the world. PMID:11724486

Fujioka, R S

2001-01-01

446

The effect of recreational homes on willow ptarmigan ( Lagopus lagopus ) in a mountain area of Norway  

Microsoft Academic Search

The increasing development of recreational resorts and second homes in mountain regions worldwide require substantial infrastructure,\\u000a and have large impact on habitats and ecosystems. We hypothesized that developed areas would attract predators and lead to\\u000a higher predation on willow ptarmigan and lower their abundance. In a 500-km2 study area in south-central Norway, we sampled the density of territorial cocks in

Ole-Gunnar Støen; Per Wegge; Stian Heid; Olav Hjeljord; Christian Nellemann

2010-01-01

447

The Effects of Livestock Grazing and Recreation on Irish Machair Grassland Vegetation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Machair grassland uniquely occurs over sandy, calcareous soils of coastal sand-plains in dune systems of north-western Scotland and Ireland. This study assesses the plant species composition of Irish machair grassland at a landscape-scale. Machair sites were sampled with quadrats and multivariate analysis was used to assess relationships between species abundance, soil physical variables, livestock grazing and recreation activity. Grazing by

A. Cooper; T. McCann; E. Ballard

2005-01-01

448

Assessing and monitoring agroenvironmental determinants of recreational freshwater quality using remote sensing.  

PubMed

Diverse fecal and nonfecal bacterial contamination and nutrient sources (e.g. agriculture, human activities and wildlife) represent a considerable non-point source load entering natural recreational waters which may adversely affect water quality. Monitoring of natural recreational water microbial quality is most often based mainly on testing a set of microbiological indicators. The cost and labour involved in testing numerous water samples may be significant when a large number of sites must be monitored repetitively over time. In addition to water testing, ongoing monitoring of key environmental factors known to influence microbial contamination may be carried out as an additional component. Monitoring of environmental factors can now be performed using remote sensing technology which represents an increasingly recognized source of rigorous and recurrent data, especially when monitoring over a large or difficult to access territory is needed. To determine whether this technology could be useful in the context of recreational water monitoring, we evaluated a set of agroenvironmental determinants associated with fecal contamination of recreational waters through a multivariable logistic regression model built with data extracted from satellite imagery. We found that variables describing the proportions of land with agricultural and impervious surfaces, as derived from remote sensing observations, were statistically associated (odds ratio, OR = 11 and 5.2, respectively) with a higher level of fecal coliforms in lake waters in the southwestern region of Quebec, Canada. From a technical perspective, remote sensing may provide important added-value in the monitoring of microbial risk from recreational waters and further applications of this technology should be investigated to support public health risk assessments and environmental monitoring programs relating to water quality. PMID:23552238

Turgeon, Patricia; Michel, Pascal; Levallois, Patrick; Ravel, André; Archambault, Marie; Lavigne, Martin-Pierre; Kotchi, Serge Olivier; Brazeau, Stéphanie

2013-01-01

449

33 CFR 181.704 - Contents of information pamphlet: Recreational hybrid PFD.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Contents of information pamphlet: Recreational hybrid PFD. 181.704 Section 181.704...Contents of information pamphlet: Recreational hybrid PFD. Each information pamphlet for a recreational hybrid PFD approved under 46 CFR 160.077...

2011-07-01

450

75 FR 50745 - Information Collection; National Survey on Recreation and the Environment (NSRE)  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...National Survey on Recreation and the Environment (NSRE) AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA...National Survey on Recreation and the Environment. DATES: Comments must be received...National Survey on Recreation and the Environment. OMB Number: 0596-0127....

2010-08-17

451

75 FR 17618 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Black Sea Bass Recreational Fishery; Emergency Rule...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...the Northeastern United States; Black Sea Bass Recreational Fishery; Emergency...rule that closed the recreational black sea bass fishery in the Federal waters...prohibition on recreational fishing for black sea bass in the EEZ beyond the...

2010-04-07

452

78 FR 19523 - General Management Plan, Draft Environmental Impact Statement, Lake Meredith National Recreation...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Environmental Impact Statement, Lake Meredith National Recreation Area and Alibates...for the General Management Plan, Lake Meredith National Recreation Area and Alibates...Arlene Wimer, Chief of Resources, Lake Meredith National Recreation Area, P.O....

2013-04-01

453

18 CFR 8.11 - Information respecting use and development of public recreational opportunities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...and development of public recreational opportunities. 8.11 Section 8.11 Conservation...THE FEDERAL POWER ACT RECREATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES AND DEVELOPMENT AT LICENSED PROJECTS...and development of public recreational opportunities. (a) Applicability....

2010-04-01

454

78 FR 14447 - Special Regulations; Areas of the National Park System, Chattahoochee River National Recreation...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...the National Park System, Chattahoochee River National Recreation Area, Bicycle Routes...certain multi-use pathways in Chattahoochee River National Recreation Area as routes for...of multi-use pathways at Chattahoochee River National Recreation Area have been,...

2013-03-06

455

78 FR 70509 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Modifications of the West Coast Commercial and Recreational...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...States; Modifications of the West Coast Commercial and Recreational Salmon Fisheries...These inseason actions modified the commercial and recreational salmon fisheries in...May 3, 2013), NMFS announced the commercial and recreational fisheries in...

2013-11-26

456

76 FR 3652 - Dog Management Plan/Environmental Impact Statement, Golden Gate National Recreation Area, California  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Environmental Impact Statement, Golden Gate National Recreation Area, California AGENCY...Statement for the Dog Management Plan, Golden Gate National Recreation Area...Management Plan (Draft Plan/EIS), Golden Gate National Recreation Area (GGNRA),...

2011-01-20

457

78 FR 55093 - Dog Management Plan, Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement, Golden Gate National Recreation...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Environmental Impact Statement, Golden Gate National Recreation Area, California AGENCY...Management Plan (Plan/SEIS), Golden Gate National Recreation Area (GGNRA), California...Shirwin Smith, Management Assistant, Golden Gate National Recreation Area, Fort...

2013-09-09

458

76 FR 22917 - Dog Management Plan/Draft Environmental Impact Statement, Golden Gate National Recreation Area...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Environmental Impact Statement, Golden Gate National Recreation Area, California AGENCY...Statement/Dog Management Plan, Golden Gate National Recreation Area...for dog management in 21 areas of Golden Gate National Recreation Area (GGNRA)....

2011-04-25

459

76 FR 79708 - Draft Environmental Impact Statement/General Management Plan, Golden Gate National Recreation...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Statement/General Management Plan, Golden Gate National Recreation Area, CA AGENCY...Statement/General Management Plan, Golden Gate National Recreation Area...current approach to management in Golden Gate National Recreation Area (GGNRA)...

2011-12-22

460

14 CFR Appendix A to Part 141 - Recreational Pilot Certification Course  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false Recreational Pilot Certification Course A Appendix A to Part 141 Aeronautics...141—Recreational Pilot Certification Course 1. Applicability. This appendix...for a recreational pilot certification course under this part, for the following...

2010-01-01

461

14 CFR Appendix A to Part 141 - Recreational Pilot Certification Course  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false Recreational Pilot Certification Course A Appendix A to Part 141 Aeronautics...141—Recreational Pilot Certification Course 1. Applicability. This appendix...for a recreational pilot certification course under this part, for the following...

2013-01-01

462

14 CFR Appendix A to Part 141 - Recreational Pilot Certification Course  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...false Recreational Pilot Certification Course A Appendix A to Part 141 Aeronautics...141—Recreational Pilot Certification Course 1. Applicability. This appendix...for a recreational pilot certification course under this part, for the following...

2012-01-01

463

14 CFR Appendix A to Part 141 - Recreational Pilot Certification Course  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...false Recreational Pilot Certification Course A Appendix A to Part 141 Aeronautics...141—Recreational Pilot Certification Course 1. Applicability. This appendix...for a recreational pilot certification course under this part, for the following...

2011-01-01

464

Department of Campus Recreation 2012 2013 Annual Report  

E-print Network

Department of Campus Recreation 2012 ­ 2013 Annual Report Executive Summary Major Accomplishments 1 is a personalized radio station designed for the FAU Recreation and Fitness Center. The computer software streams. Wasson Student Leadership & Academic Award. In addition, Erin was awarded a Region II Scholarship. c

Fernandez, Eduardo

465

Oblique of recreation center portion, showing onestory exercise room with ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Oblique of recreation center portion, showing one-story exercise room with louvered windows and two-story section as left. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Bloch Recreation Center & Arena, Between Center Drive & North Road near Nimitz Gate, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

466

Powerful Partnerships: Parents & Professionals Building Inclusive Recreation Programs Together.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This collection of readings is intended to help parents of children with disabilities join together or with professionals to advocate for inclusive recreational programs for their children. The following 15 readings are included: "To Play or Not To Play? A History of Recreation in America" (Carla E. S. Tabourne et al.); "Why Is Inclusive…

Schleien, Stuart J., Ed.; And Others

467

NOAA Recreational Fisheries Strategic Plan FY2005-FY2010  

E-print Network

of Commerce #12;2 PPresidents dating back to Teddy Roosevelt have understood recreational fishing as a basic PPresidents dating back to Teddy Roosevelt have understood recreational fishing as a basic Ppart of the life- sources for more than 30 years. With the release of the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy's 2004 report

468

Leadership for Recreation, Parks, and Leisure Services. Fourth Edition  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Leadership for Recreation, Parks and Leisure Services" presents new perspectives on the importance of leadership in the profession. Integrating theory with practice, the book provides foundational perspectives in the study of leadership at all levels--direct service, supervisory, managerial and community/civic--in recreation, parks and leisure…

Edginton, Christopher R.; Hudson, Susan D.; Scholl, Kathleen G.; Lauzon, Lara

2011-01-01

469

Leisure, Recreation, and Play from a Developmental Context  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The terms "play, recreation, and leisure" can evoke thoughts of frivolity, fun, sociability, competition, slothfulness, or idleness. However, there is substantial evidence that what people do in their discretionary or free time has important developmental and health implications. In this article, the authors examine how play, recreation, and…

Caldwell, Linda L.; Witt, Peter A.

2011-01-01

470

Women Faculty, Higher Education, and the Recreation/Leisure Field  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Women represent growing numbers of faculty members in higher education as well as in recreation/leisure departments. The purpose of this study is to describe the career development of women faculty in recreation-related areas and to offer implications for faculty development and the preparation of future faculty. Data were collected from women who…

Henderson, Karla A.; Harrolle, Michelle; Rich, Samantha; Moretz, Janell

2012-01-01

471

Township recreation patterns and the new order in South Africa  

Microsoft Academic Search

A successful and sustainable recreation system is dependent on local people's awareness and participation levels, as well as on the government's capacity to provide facilities. Recreation in many African (black) communities in South Africa has been plagued by apartheid?related misfortunes. However, since the democratic changes starting in 1994, there has been a turn for the better. A conceptual understanding of

Lindisizwe M. Magi

1999-01-01

472

Recreation as an Industry. Appalachian Research Report No. 2.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The role which recreation as an industry can play in economic development of an area -- through creation of jobs, generation of incomes, and stimulation of public and private investment -- is the primary concern of this 1966 study. The document establishes the tourism-recreation industry as being resource-based, with enterprises which are mainly…

Nathan (Robert R.) Associates, Inc., Washington, DC.

473

ORIGINAL PAPER Recreational Use of Erectile Dysfunction Medications  

E-print Network

ORIGINAL PAPER Recreational Use of Erectile Dysfunction Medications in Undergraduate Men,and lifetimenumberof``one-nightstands.''RecreationalEDMusers also reported a 2.5-fold rate of erectile difficulties not solely occur within the environments of venues that cater to men having sex with men. Keywords Erectile

Meston, Cindy

474

Factors Affecting Recreation Preferences and Expectations of Disabled Adult Learners  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Generalizing recreation services, one of the essential well-being sources of disabled persons who experience deprivation in many dimensions of life and which fulfill their learning needs, is a social responsibility. The present study aims to determine factors effective on recreation preferences and expectations of the disabled individuals who…

Arslan, Sibel

2014-01-01

475

How do women construct adventure recreation in their lives?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research into adventure recreation has tended to be located in the experiences of men. This is largely due to a history of dominant male participation, though it is acknowledged that more women are accessing these forms of leisure experiences. This paper reports a study of forty-two women who had participated in adventure recreation at some stage throughout their adult lives.

Donna E. Little

2002-01-01

476

Adventure recreation reconceived: Positive forms of deviant leisure  

Microsoft Academic Search

The concept of adventure remains deeply rooted in the domain of recreation and leisure. Adventure recreation defined is “a variety of self?initiated activities utilizing an interaction with the natural environment, that contains elements of real or apparent danger in which the outcome, while uncertain, can be influenced by the participant and circumstance” (Ewert, 1989). Miriam?Webster defines adventure as: an undertaking

Shayne Galloway

2006-01-01

477

DRIVING TO DISTRACTIONS: RECREATIONAL TRIPS IN PRIVATE VEHICLES  

Microsoft Academic Search

An increasing amount of travel, both long- and short-distance trips, is made in private vehicles for recreation. Peak congestion around attractions and leisure spots can be worse than congestion in the city center during peak periods. Moreover, recreational travel within, to, and through metropolitan areas contributes to congestion problems and points to the need for its incorporation into travel forecasting.

William Mallett; Nancy McGuckin

2000-01-01

478

Rural landowner liability for recreational injuries: Myths, perceptions, and realities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Concern about closure of private, rural lands to outdoor recreation has been documented in the research literature for several decades. While many reasons for this phenomenon have been posited, liability for recreational injuries has been identified as a particularly worrisome problem for landowners. However, landowners' perceptions of liability are not commensurate with the reality of legal risks. This article examines

B. A. Wright; R. A. Kaiser; S. Nicholls

479

HOW TO PRINT YOUR VISIT HISTORY RECREATIONAL SPORTS  

E-print Network

HOW TO PRINT YOUR VISIT HISTORY RECREATIONAL SPORTS STEP 1: Visit Web Trac: https current membership, go to "My Account" and then "My History" #12;STEP 6: Once you have selected your-737-2943. For Recreational Sports membership questions, please contact Ali Casqueiro, Membership Coordinator, at ali

Escher, Christine

480

Therapeutic Recreation--Meeting the Challenge of New Demands.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Nine articles discuss therapeutic recreation, focusing on community reintegration, social skills training in mental illness, computer links for social service providers, approaches to professional preparation, assistive technology, play environments, self-esteem in adult clients, volunteers, and recreation and music therapy for sexually abused…

Anderson, Stephen C. Ed.

1991-01-01

481

Report of the Technical Committee for Hospitality, Tourism, Recreation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This color-coded committee report identifies the skills and knowledge required by employees in the hospitality/tourism/recreation occupational area. The reports of four subcommittees focused on food/beverage, hotel/motel, recreation/leisure, and travel/tourism skills are also included. Introductory materials include a general statement of the…

Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem. Div. of Vocational Education.

482

Principles and Methods of Adapted Physical Education and Recreation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This text is designed for the elementary and secondary school physical educator and the recreation specialist in adapted physical education and, more specifically, as a text for college courses in adapted and corrective physical education and therapeutic recreation. The text is divided into four major divisions: scope, key teaching and therapy…

Arnheim, Daniel D.; And Others

483

Literature Review on Learning through Recreation. CPRN Discussion Paper.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This review of primarily Canadian literature summarizes what is known about the access of youth age 10-15 years to structured recreational activities and the effects of these activities. Data come from literature reviews and reference documents on the subject of recreation, leisure, or physical activity as well as books on the subject. Researchers…

Beauvais, Caroline

484

New England Heritage. The Connecticut River National Recreation Area Study.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The findings and recommendations of the Bureau of Outdoor Recreation study of the Connecticut River Valley in response to P. L. 89-616, 89th Congress, are presented in this document. Federal, State, and private action is recommended which would provide recreation opportunities for several million persons; and would preserve the historical…

Bureau of Outdoor Recreation (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

485

Out, out, and Away! Collection Development: Outdoor Recreation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Summer is fast approaching, and it will soon be time to climb the mountains to get their good tidings, as naturalist John Muir put it. In other words, librarians must now prepare for the influx of patrons making weekend recreational and summer vacation plans by stocking up on books and other resources on the great outdoors. Outdoor recreational

Helling, John

2009-01-01

486

2012 Big Ten Recreational Sports Conference Partnership Proposal  

E-print Network

schools together for leadership development, networking, sharing best practices and increasing equipment2012 Big Ten Recreational Sports Conference Partnership Proposal Executive Summary: We are looking to partner with vendors in a mutually beneficial way for the annual Big Ten Recreational Sports Conference

487

RECREATION FOR THE HANDICAPPED, A BIBLIOGRAPHY. SUPPLEMENT I.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

LISTING 442 REFERENCES FROM JANUARY 1, 1965 TO JANUARY 1, 1967, THIS BIBLIOGRAPHY ON RECREATION FOR THE HANDICAPPED SUPPLEMENTS THE ORIGINAL BIBLIOGRAPHY OF REFERENCES FROM THE 1950-65 PERIOD. ENTRIES ARE ARRANGED IN 13 CATEGORIES SUGGESTED BY AN ADVISORY COMMITTEE--(1) GENERAL PHILOSOPHY, (2) ADMINISTRATION OF RECREATION FACILITIES, (3)…

FREEBERG, WILLIAM H.; LUNAN, BERT

488

Recreation and Tourism and the Future in Lodgepole Pine Forests  

E-print Network

Recreation and Tourism and the Future in Lodgepole Pine Forests: Pros and ConsPros and Cons Stuart Watersheds damaged by wildfires. Changes in recreational experience / tourism experience Aesthetic values (e.g., on the ski slopes) Educational values (e.g., dynamic forest ecology) Research gaps #12;Catastrophic wildfire

489

Marketing Recreation and Physical Activity Programs for Females.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explores how marketing recreation and physical activity programs for females might be undertaken based on the growing body of research about female involvement in recreation, sport, and leisure. The paper addresses product, place, price, and promotion, discussing females as people who represent a growing market segment with unique characteristics.…

Henderson, Karla A.

1995-01-01

490

Assessing the Impact of New Student Campus Recreation Centers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The student recreation center (SRC) at many colleges and universities has evolved from being a place to lift weights and take aerobics classes to becoming a high-powered recruitment tool (Colleges use recreation, 2002). The present study included the development of an instrument to assess the use and impact of SRCs. Students (N = 655; users = 537,…

Zizzi, Samuel; Ayers, Suzan F.; Watson II, Jack C.; Keeler, Linda A.

2004-01-01

491

Resource Investments and Loyalty to Recreational Sport Tourism Event  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sport tourism events have a marketing possibility in the Japanese tourism industry. The ultramarathon is a very popular recreational sport event in the world. This type of sport tourism event has shared with completive and enjoyment factors in relation to participant's motivation. Loyalty is a very important factor with attendance to recreational sport events. Generally, as many researchers indicated, that

Isao Okayasu; Haruo Nogawa; Duarte B. Morais

2010-01-01

492

36 CFR 7.48 - Lake Mead National Recreation Area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Lake Mead National Recreation Area. 7.48...OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.48 Lake Mead National Recreation Area. (a...1)(i) The entire water surface of Lakes Mead and Mohave are designated...

2012-07-01

493

36 CFR 7.48 - Lake Mead National Recreation Area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lake Mead National Recreation Area. 7.48...OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.48 Lake Mead National Recreation Area. (a...1)(i) The entire water surface of Lakes Mead and Mohave are designated...

2013-07-01

494

36 CFR 7.48 - Lake Mead National Recreation Area.  

...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Lake Mead National Recreation Area. 7.48...OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.48 Lake Mead National Recreation Area. (a...1)(i) The entire water surface of Lakes Mead and Mohave are designated...

2014-07-01

495

36 CFR 7.48 - Lake Mead National Recreation Area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Lake Mead National Recreation Area. 7.48...OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.48 Lake Mead National Recreation Area. (a...1)(i) The entire water surface of Lakes Mead and Mohave are designated...

2011-07-01

496

DETAIL OF THE EXTERIOR WALL OF THE RECREATION CENTER. NOTE ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

DETAIL OF THE EXTERIOR WALL OF THE RECREATION CENTER. NOTE THE CONCRETE SLAB WITH ORIGINAL GREEN-STAINED FINISH, OCTAGONAL CAST CONCRETE COLUMN SUPPORTING 6" X 12" BEAM AND TAPERED RAFTERS. VIEW FACING NORTH - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Bloch Recreation Center & Arena, Between Center Drive & North Road near Nimitz Gate, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

497

Medical Use of Recreational Drugs by AIDS Patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

A survey of 72 patients at an AIDS clinic regarding self-medication with recreational drugs for medical or psychological conditions related to their illness disclosed that marijuana was the primary drug used. The perceived benefit was for gastrointestinal conditions such as nausea, vomiting, indigestion and appetite improvement. Use of other “recreational” drugs as self-medication was reported to usually be ineffective or

Daniel A. Dansak

1997-01-01

498

On the distance to recreational forests in Sweden  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is a strong tradition in Sweden of using forested areas for recreation. Earlier research has shown that on average, Swedes visit a forest at least every other week. This study surveyed 1000 randomly chosen individuals about their present distance, and what they considered to be the preferred (ideal) distance, between their residence and the closest recreational forest. Attitudes towards

Lisa Hörnsten; Peter Fredman

2000-01-01

499

A technique for valuing nonpriced recreational features of commercial forests  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article describes a method for estimating recreational visitors’ valuations of environmental attributes at 14 commercial forest districts throughout Great Britain. Respondents were invited to allocate tokens to forest attributes during a recreational visit. The token scores were then used to disaggregate the total value of the visit, which was estimated using the travel?cost method, although the technique could also

John F. Benson

1993-01-01

500

Children of a Lesser God. "Core Values in Therapeutic Recreation"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Students in recreation programs are often introduced to laws that apply to therapeutic or community recreation services. Several of these laws have to do with policy regarding people who experience a disability. One important law is the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). In order for students to better understand the law and its…

Barney, Keith W.

2013-01-01