Sample records for samples marine recreational

  1. LUMINEX DETECTION OF FECAL INDICATORS IN RIVER SAMPLES, MARINE RECREATIONAL WATER, AND BEACH SAND

    PubMed Central

    Baums, Iliana B.; Goodwin, Kelly D.; Kiesling, Traci; Wanless, David; Fell, Jack W.

    2007-01-01

    Research to understand and remediate coastal pollution is moving toward a multitiered approach in which traditional enumeration of fecal indicators is accompanied by molecular analysis of a variety of targets. Technology that rapidly detects multiple microbial contaminants would benefit from such an approach. The Luminex® 100™ system is a suspension array that assays multiple analytes rapidly in a single well of a microtiter plate. The ability of the system to simultaneously detect multiple fecal indicating bacteria in environmental samples was tested. Primer/probe sets were designed to simultaneously detect the following fecal indicators: the Bacteroides fragilis group, Enterococcus spp., Escherichia coli & Shigella spp., B. distasonis, and Ent. faecalis. Specificity and sensitivity of the Luminex probes was tested against laboratory cultures. In addition, sequencing, culture plate testing, and specificity testing with environmental isolates were steps taken to validate the function of the assay with environmental samples. Luminex response to cultures and to environmental samples was consistent with sequencing results, suggesting that the technology has the potential to simultaneously detect multiple targets for coastal water quality applications, particularly as progress is made to efficiently extract DNA from water and sediment matrices. PMID:17350051

  2. 75 FR 67948 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Marine Recreational Information Program (Marine...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-04

    ...Marine Recreational Fisheries Statistics Survey) AGENCY: National...Marine Recreational Fisheries Statistics Survey. MRIP is testing alternative...timeliness of recreational fishing statistics. II. Method of Collection...Individuals or households, business or other for- profit...

  3. The definition of marine recreational fishing in Europe

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. G. Pawson; H. Glenn; G. Padda

    2008-01-01

    To describe marine recreational fisheries, their socio-economic importance and interactions with other fisheries and the environment, it is necessary to define what is meant by recreational fishing. A review of European Member States’ national legislation revealed considerable variation in ownership and access to coastal waters\\/fisheries, and in the legal distinction between sport fishing and other recreational uses of marine fisheries

  4. Marine Engine Emissions in Recreational Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, G. C.; Hoonhout, C.; Sufka, E.; Fiore-Wagner, M.; Allen, B.; Reuter, J.

    2001-12-01

    Release of gasoline and other contaminants, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, from marine engines into fresh water lakes has become a concern both due to potential impacts on drinking water sources, but also due to potential ecological impacts. Lake Tahoe, an ultraoligotrophic lake shared by Nevada and California, receives extensive recreational watercraft use, and analysis of water samples in 1997 and 1998 revealed widespread occurrence of MTBE, benzene, toluene, xylenes and ethyl benzene. Because carbureted two-cycle engines are known to release approximately 25% of gasoline unburned, these marine engines were suspected as a primary source of these volatile constituents. Further tests on a variety of engines confirmed that the carbureted two-cycle engines released greater amounts of gasoline components into water than either the newer direct injected two-stroke engines (Ficht technology) or four stroke engines. Using toluene as a surrogate for gasoline, and comparing other engines to a two-stroke carbureted engine, the direct injected two-stroke engine had an approximate 80% reduction in toluene released, and a four stroke engine had greater 90% reduction in toluene released. Based on these and other data obtained, a modeling effort indicated that banning of carbureted two-stroke engines at Lake Tahoe would result in an 80% reduction in gasoline constituents in the Lake. In June of 1999 a near complete ban on these engines was implemented by the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency, and by late summer of 1999 gasoline constituents had been reduced by 80-95%. Further research on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons has indicated that two cycle engines are also a major source of these phototoxic contaminants.

  5. SAMPLING DESIGN FOR ASSESSING RECREATIONAL WATER QUALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current U.S. EPA guidelines for monitoring recreatoinal water quality refer to the geometric mean density of indicator organisms, enterococci and E. coli in marine and fresh water, respectively, from at least five samples collected over a four-week period. In order to expand thi...

  6. Using a Recreational Marine Survey to Improve Spatial and Temporal Allocations in the Houston-Galveston-Brazoria Area

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rachel Anderson; Kirstin Thesing; Jim Wilson; Theodore Kosub

    The temporal and spatial allocation of recreational marine vessel emissions in the greater Houston area was updated using data collected from a boat count survey. The number and types of boats entering and exiting the water were recorded in boat count logs from a sampling of marinas and ramps that serve as water entry sites around the Houston area. The

  7. Review of Recreational Economic Data at the National Marine Fisheries For the Center for Independent Experts

    E-print Network

    . · With reasonable expectations about the growth of marine recreational fishing, greater research funds will have in the allocation of fish stocks. The reviewers doubt that funds for large-scale national surveys would be the most

  8. POLICY PERSPECTIVE Coral reef quality and recreation fees in marine protected areas

    E-print Network

    Gerber, Leah R.

    visitors who dive in MPAs of develop- ing countries are frequently willing to pay diving fees, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA Keywords Coral reefs; diving; economics; financing; management; marine The recreational use of marine protected areas (MPAs) is a potential source of funding for MPAs in developing

  9. Human-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from a subtropical recreational marine beach

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reports of Staphylococcus aureus detected in marine environments have occurred since the early 1990’s. This investigation sought to isolate and characterize S. aureus from marine waters and sand at a subtropical recreational beach, with and without bathers present, in order to investigate possible s...

  10. Is catch-and-release recreational angling compatible with no-take marine protected areas?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steven J. Cooke; Andy J. Danylchuk; Sascha E. Danylchuk; Cory D. Suski; Tony L. Goldberg

    2006-01-01

    Marine protected areas (MPAs) have become a common conservation and management tool for reducing exploitation from the commercial and recreational fisheries sectors. However, the recreational fisheries sector has the potential to be compatible with no-take MPAs when catch-and-release angling is practiced because, in theory, no fish are actually harvested. This presumes that the effects of catch-and-release angling and related activities

  11. Marine recreation and public health microbiology: quest for the ideal indicator

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffin, Dale W.; Lipp, Erin K.; McLaughlin, Molly R.; Rose, Joan B.

    2001-01-01

    Four-fifths of the population of the United States live in close proximity to the oceans or Great Lakes, and approximately 100 million Americans use the marine environment for recreation each year (Thurman 1994). Consequently, contamination of lakes, rivers, and coastal waters raises significant public health issues. Among the leading sources of chemical and biological contamination of these waters and associated beaches are sewer systems, septic tanks, stormwater runoff, industrial wastes, wastewater injection wells, cesspits, animal wastes, commercial and private boat wastes, and human recreation. In 1997, 649 beach closings or advisories were caused by sewage spills and overflows (NRDC 1998). In Florida alone, approximately 500 million gallons of sewage were released along the coast each year during the late 1980s (Neshyba 1987). Thus one of the primary concerns in public health is the risk that humans using the marine environment for recreational activities will encounter microbial pathogens.

  12. Marine Recreational Boat Fishery of the New York Bight Apex in 1971

    E-print Network

    composition, and effort rates for party and charter boats sailing from Bight ports between Jones Inlet, N in the proportional composition of boat types engaged in the fishery since 1949, with an increase in private boatMarine Recreational Boat Fishery of the New York Bight Apex in 1971 CHESTER C. BUCHANAN, RICHARD

  13. Spatial analysis of recreational boating as a first key step for marine spatial planning in Mallorca (Balearic Islands, Spain)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Balaguer; A. Diedrich; R. Sardá; M. Fuster; B. Cañellas; J. Tintoré

    2011-01-01

    Recreational boating is an important, growing leisure activity on the island of Mallorca, Balearic Islands, Spain. This spatial analysis of anchoring of recreational boating along the coast of Mallorca is intended to generate new data to contribute to the achievement of a comprehensive marine and coastal spatial planning on the island in addition to providing important information related to the

  14. U.S. Marine Recreational Fisheries DATA COLLECTION. Detailed information on

    E-print Network

    a particularoceanportinletonsampleddays.Thecatchdata consist of fish species composition from sampled boats, numbersofanglersRecreationalFisheriesStatisticsSurvey(MRFSS), covering all fishing modes (private/rental boat, party/ charter boat, and shore), and including estuarine (bimonthly sampling period), species, fishing mode (private/rental boat, party/charter boat, and shore

  15. Consistent size-independent harvest selection on fish body shape in two recreationally exploited marine species.

    PubMed

    Alós, Josep; Palmer, Miquel; Linde-Medina, Marta; Arlinghaus, Robert

    2014-06-01

    Harvesting wild animals may exert size-independent selection pressures on a range of morphological, life history, and behavioral traits. Most work so far has focused on selection pressures on life history traits and body size as morphological trait. We studied here how recreational fishing selects for morphological traits related to body shape, which may correlate with underlying swimming behavior. Using landmark-based geometric morphometrics, we found consistent recreational fishing-induced selection pressures on body shape in two recreationally exploited marine fish species. We show that individuals with larger-sized mouths and more streamlined and elongated bodies were more vulnerable to passively operated hook-and-line fishing independent of the individual's body size or condition. While the greater vulnerability of individuals with larger mouth gapes can be explained by the direct physical interaction with hooks, selection against streamlined and elongated individuals could either involve a specific foraging mode or relate to underlying elevated swimming behavior. Harvesting using passive gear is common around the globe, and thus, size-independent selection on body shape is expected to be widespread potentially leaving behind individuals with smaller oral gapes and more compact bodies. This might have repercussions for food webs by altering foraging and predation. PMID:25360257

  16. Rapidly measured indicators of recreational water quality and swimming-associated illness at marine beaches: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction In the United States and elsewhere, recreational water quality is monitored for fecal indicator bacteria to help prevent swimming-associated illnesses. Standard methods to measure these bacteria take at least 24 hours to obtain results. Molecular approaches such as quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) can estimate these bacteria faster, in under 3 hours. Previously, we demonstrated that measurements of the fecal indicator bacteria Enterococcus using qPCR were associated with gastrointestinal (GI) illness among swimmers at freshwater beaches. In this paper, we report on results from three marine beach sites. Methods We interviewed beach-goers and collected water samples at marine beaches affected by treated sewage discharges in Mississippi in 2005, and Rhode Island and Alabama in 2007. Ten to twelve days later, we obtained information about gastrointestinal, respiratory, eye, ear and skin symptoms by telephone. We tested water samples for fecal indicator organisms using qPCR and other methods. Results We enrolled 6,350 beach-goers. The occurrence of GI illness among swimmers was associated with a log10-increase in exposure to qPCR-determined estimates of fecal indicator organisms in the genus Enterococcus (AOR = 2.6, 95% CI 1.3-5.1) and order Bacteroidales (AOR = 1.9, 95% CI 1.3-2.9). Estimates of organisms related to Clostridium perfringens and a subgroup of organisms in the genus Bacteroides were also determined by qPCR in 2007, as was F+ coliphage, but relationships between these indicators and illness were not statistically significant. Conclusions This study provides the first evidence of a relationship between gastrointestinal illness and estimates of fecal indicator organisms determined by qPCR at marine beaches. PMID:21040526

  17. Human viruses and viral indicators in marine water at two recreational beaches in Southern California, USA.

    PubMed

    Love, David C; Rodriguez, Roberto A; Gibbons, Christopher D; Griffith, John F; Yu, Qilu; Stewart, Jill R; Sobsey, Mark D

    2014-03-01

    Waterborne enteric viruses may pose disease risks to bather health but occurrence of these viruses has been difficult to characterize at recreational beaches. The aim of this study was to evaluate water for human virus occurrence at two Southern California recreational beaches with a history of beach closures. Human enteric viruses (adenovirus and norovirus) and viral indicators (F+ and somatic coliphages) were measured in water samples over a 4-month period from Avalon Beach, Catalina Island (n = 324) and Doheny Beach, Orange County (n = 112). Human viruses were concentrated from 40 L samples and detected by nested reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Detection frequencies at Doheny Beach were 25.5% (adenovirus) and 22.3% (norovirus), and at Avalon Beach were 9.3% (adenovirus) and 0.7% (norovirus). Positive associations between adenoviruses and fecal coliforms were observed at Doheny (p = 0.02) and Avalon (p = 0.01) Beaches. Human viruses were present at both beaches at higher frequencies than previously detected in the region, suggesting that the virus detection methods presented here may better measure potential health risks to bathers. These virus recovery, concentration, and molecular detection methods are advancing practices so that analysis of enteric viruses can become more effective and routine for recreational water quality monitoring. PMID:24642440

  18. Recreational SCUBA divers' willingness to pay for marine biodiversity in Barbados.

    PubMed

    Schuhmann, Peter W; Casey, James F; Horrocks, Julia A; Oxenford, Hazel A

    2013-05-30

    The use of natural resources and the services they provide often do not have an explicit price and are therefore undervalued in decision-making, leading to environmental degradation. To 'monetize' the benefits from these services requires the use of non-market valuation techniques. Using a stated preference survey of recreational divers in Barbados conducted between 2007 and 2009, the economic value of marine biodiversity to recreational SCUBA divers in Barbados was estimated. In addition to a variety of demographic variables, divers were asked about their level of experience, expenditures related to travel and diving, and encounters with fish and sea turtles. Divers then completed a choice experiment, selecting between alternative dives with varying characteristics including price, crowding, fish diversity, encounters with sea turtles, and coral cover. Results indicate that divers in Barbados have a clear appreciation of reef quality variables. Willingness to pay for good coral cover, fish diversity and presence of sea turtles is significantly higher than prices paid for dives. In general, divers valued reef attributes similarly, although their appreciation of low density of divers at a site and high coral cover varied with prior diving experience. The results of this study demonstrate the economic value generated in Barbados by the recreational SCUBA diving industry and highlight the potential for substantial additional economic contributions with improvements to the quality of a variety of reef attributes. These results could inform management decisions regarding reef use and sea turtle conservation, and could aid in the development of informed 'win-win' policies aimed at maximizing returns from diving while reducing negative impacts often associated with tourism activities. PMID:23523829

  19. Reducing plastic contamination of the marine environment under MARPOL Annex V: A model for recreational harbors and ports

    SciTech Connect

    Mudar, M.J.

    1991-01-01

    A case study was conducted during Summer, 1990, at the Nantucket Boat Basin, Massachusetts. The purpose of the study was to (1) determine the types and quantities of wastes generated by recreational boaters, particularly plastics and garbage regulated by MARPOL Annex V, (2) develop a model to assist recreational boating facilities to comply with the law and (3) reduce the impact of plastic contamination on the marine environment. An international law which came to force in December, 1988, MARPOL Annex V prohibits the disposal of plastics into the sea and stipulates ocean zones where garbage and other wastes may be disposed. A per capita rate of waste generation by recreational boaters was determined, which will enable recreational harbors and ports to estimate the waste management capacity necessary to meet the requirements of Annex V. In addition to determining the wastestream from the recreational boaters, boaters were surveyed to collect data about pertinent topics including awareness of MARPOL, waste types generated aboard vessels, waste management methods, and how marinas could assist boaters in meeting their waste management needs. As a result of the Boat Basin study, a planning model was developed to assist other recreational harbors and ports to meet the requirements of MARPOL Annex V. Major elements of the model include (1) information Transfer, (2) Waste Management Methods, and (3) the Role of Related Factors such as marina type, and waste characterization and quantification.

  20. POPULATION-SPECIFIC RECREATION DEMAND MODELS AND THE CONSEQUENCES OF POOLING SAMPLE DATA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rod F. Ziemer; Wesley N. Musser

    1979-01-01

    This paper considers the implications of different geographical population definitions in analysis of demand for wildlife recreation. Demand functions for fishing, small game hunting, big game hunting, and wildlife enjoyment are estimated for individual Southeastern states and also for a pooled sample of all the states. Statistically significant differences between the state and regional estimates of the variable cost coefficient

  1. U.S. Marine Recreational Fisheries DATA COLLECTION. Detailed information on

    E-print Network

    /charter boat, and shore), and including estuarine and brackish water. Although the annual recreational harvest of participation are produced. Texas estimates are from Texas Parks and Wildlife Department recreational survey

  2. Enteric pathogens in stool samples of Chicago-area water recreators with new-onset gastrointestinal symptoms5

    E-print Network

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    Enteric pathogens in stool samples of Chicago-area water recreators with new-onset gastrointestinal June 2012 Available online 6 July 2012 Keywords: Water recreation Wastewater Enteric pathogens Gastrointestinal illness Environmental epidemiology a b s t r a c t Background: Characterizing pathogens

  3. Marine Recreational Uses of Green Bay: A Survey of Human Behavior and Attitude Patterns of High School Juniors and Seniors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ditton, Robert B.; Johnsen, Per K.

    From a random sample of high school juniors and seniors in northeastern Wisconsin, this study obtained information concerning the subjects' participation in water recreation activities, their perceptions of water quality, and attitudinal data in related areas. The data obtained from the questionnaire were analyzed by chi-square methods to check…

  4. Measurement of curium in marine samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, D. L.; Livingston, H. D.

    1984-06-01

    Measurement of environmentally small but detectable amounts of curium requires reliable, accureate, and sensitive analytical methods. The radiochemical separation developed at Woods Hole is briefly reviewed with specific reference to radiochemical interferences in the alpha spectrometric measurement of curium nuclides and to the relative amounts of interferences expected in different oceanic regimes and sample types. Detection limits for 242 Cm and 244 Cm are ultimately limited by their presence in the 243Am used as curium yield monitor. Environmental standard reference materials are evaluated with regard to curium. The marine literature is reviewed and curium measurements are discussed in relation to their source of introduction to the environment. Sources include ocean dumping of low-level radioactive wastes and discharges from nuclear fuel reporcessing activities, In particular, the question of a detectable presence of 244Cm in global fallout from nuclear weapons testing is addressed and shown to be essentially negligible. Analyses of Scottish coastal sedimantes show traces of 242Cm and 244Cm activity which are believed to originate from transport from sources in the Irish Sea.

  5. U.S. Marine Recreational Fisheries DATA COLLECTION. Detailed information on

    E-print Network

    /charter boat, and shore), and including estuarine and brackish water. Although the annual recreational harvest fished, and catch type. In addition, estimates of participation are produced. Texas estimates are from TexasParksandWildlifeDepartmentrecreationalsurvey data. On the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts, California

  6. U.S. Marine Recreational Fisheries DATA COLLECTION. Detailed information on

    E-print Network

    /charter boat, and shore), and including estuarine and brackish water. Although the annual recreational harvest fished, and catch type. In addition, estimates of participation are produced. Texas estimates are from TexasParksandWildlifeDepartmentrecreationalsurvey data. Alaska conducts an annual mail survey in place

  7. The investment made in serving at-risk children and youth by a national sample of recreation and park agencies 

    E-print Network

    Espericueta, Lorina

    1995-01-01

    This study was intended to contribute to a better understanding of the problems, needs, and efforts that are underway in the area of at-risk children and youth programming in a large sample of recreation and park agencies across the nation...

  8. Sediment Contaminants and Infauna Associated with Recreational Boating Structures in a Multi-Use Marine Park

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Vivian X. Y.; Dafforn, Katherine A.; Simpson, Stuart L.; Kelaher, Brendan P.; Johnston, Emma L.

    2015-01-01

    Multi-use marine parks achieve conservation through spatial management of activities. Zoning of marine parks in New South Wales, Australia, includes high conservation areas and special purpose zones (SPZ) where maritime activities are concentrated. Although such measures geographically constrain anthropogenic impacts, we have limited understanding of potential ecological effects. We assessed sediment communities and contaminants adjacent to boating infrastructure (boat ramps, jetties and a marina) in a SPZ from the Clyde Estuary in Batemans Marine Park. Metal concentrations and fines content were elevated at boating structures compared to reference sites. Species richness was higher at sites with boating structures, where capitellid polychaetes and nematodes dominated the communities. Changes associated with boating structures were localised and did not extend beyond breakwalls or to reference sites outside the SPZ. The study highlights the benefits of appropriate zoning in a multi-use marine park and the potential to minimise stress on pristine areas through the application of spatial management. PMID:26086427

  9. Quantifying Marine Microbes: A Simulation to Introduce Random Sampling

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Barbara Bruno

    2012-01-01

    This lesson introduces random sampling, one of the key concepts employed by scientists to study the natural environment, including microbial communities. Students first learn about the abundance and diversity of marine microbes. Colored beads in a bag are then used to represent different types of microbes, with the bag itself representing the ocean. Working in groups, each student randomly samples ten "microbes" from the "ocean", and records the data. To learn about the inherent variability of random sampling, the students then compare the composition of their individual samples, their group'?s pooled sample data, and that of the entire population.

  10. Reducing plastic contamination of the marine environment under MARPOL Annex V: A model for recreational harbors and ports

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mudar

    1991-01-01

    A case study was conducted during Summer, 1990, at the Nantucket Boat Basin, Massachusetts. The purpose of the study was to (1) determine the types and quantities of wastes generated by recreational boaters, particularly plastics and garbage regulated by MARPOL Annex V, (2) develop a model to assist recreational boating facilities to comply with the law and (3) reduce the

  11. Monitoring marine recreational water quality using multiple microbial indicators in an urban tropical environment

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Tomoyuki; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M.; Fleming, Lora E.; Elmir, Samir

    2008-01-01

    The microbial water quality at two beaches, Hobie Beach and Crandon Beach, in Miami-Dade County, Florida, USA was measured using multiple microbial indicators for the purpose of evaluating correlations between microbes and for identifying possible sources of contamination. The indicator microbes chosen for this study (enterococci, Escherichia coli, fecal coliform, total coliform and C. perfringens) were evaluated through three different sampling efforts. These efforts included daily measurements at four locations during a wet season month and a dry season month, spatially intensive water sampling during low- and high-tide periods, and a sand sampling effort. Results indicated that concentrations did not vary in a consistent fashion between one indicator microbe and another. Daily water quality frequently exceeded guideline levels at Hobie Beach for all indicator microbes except for fecal coliform, which never exceeded the guideline. Except for total coliform, the concentrations of microbes did not change significantly between seasons in spite of the fact that the physical–chemical parameters (rainfall, temperature, pH, and salinity) changed significantly between the two monitoring periods. Spatially intense water sampling showed that the concentrations of microbes were significantly different with distance from the shoreline. The highest concentrations were observed at shoreline points and decreased at offshore points. Furthermore, the highest concentrations of indicator microbe concentrations were observed at high tide, when the wash zone area of the beach was submerged. Beach sands within the wash zone tested positive for all indicator microbes, thereby suggesting that this zone may serve as the source of indicator microbes. Ultimate sources of indicator microbes to this zone may include humans, animals, and possibly the survival and regrowth of indicator microbes due to the unique environmental conditions found within this zone. Overall, the results of this study indicated that the concentrations of indicator microbes do not necessarily correlate with one another. Exceedence of water quality guidelines, and thus the frequency of beach advisories, depends upon which indicator microbe is chosen. PMID:15261551

  12. Directory of National Recreation Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Exceptional Parent, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Thirty national recreation organizations serving individuals with disabilities are listed, along with addresses and telephone numbers. Sample recreational activities covered include Boy Scouts and Girls Scouts, various wheelchair sports, skiing, golfing, and horticultural therapy. (JDD)

  13. Isolation of microplastics in biota-rich seawater samples and marine organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Matthew; Webb, Hannah; Lindeque, Pennie K.; Fileman, Elaine S.; Halsband, Claudia; Galloway, Tamara S.

    2014-03-01

    Microplastic litter is a pervasive pollutant present in aquatic systems across the globe. A range of marine organisms have the capacity to ingest microplastics, resulting in adverse health effects. Developing methods to accurately quantify microplastics in productive marine waters, and those internalized by marine organisms, is of growing importance. Here we investigate the efficacy of using acid, alkaline and enzymatic digestion techniques in mineralizing biological material from marine surface trawls to reveal any microplastics present. Our optimized enzymatic protocol can digest >97% (by weight) of the material present in plankton-rich seawater samples without destroying any microplastic debris present. In applying the method to replicate marine samples from the western English Channel, we identified 0.27 microplastics m-3. The protocol was further used to extract microplastics ingested by marine zooplankton under laboratory conditions. Our findings illustrate that enzymatic digestion can aid the detection of microplastic debris within seawater samples and marine biota.

  14. Isolation of microplastics in biota-rich seawater samples and marine organisms.

    PubMed

    Cole, Matthew; Webb, Hannah; Lindeque, Pennie K; Fileman, Elaine S; Halsband, Claudia; Galloway, Tamara S

    2014-01-01

    Microplastic litter is a pervasive pollutant present in aquatic systems across the globe. A range of marine organisms have the capacity to ingest microplastics, resulting in adverse health effects. Developing methods to accurately quantify microplastics in productive marine waters, and those internalized by marine organisms, is of growing importance. Here we investigate the efficacy of using acid, alkaline and enzymatic digestion techniques in mineralizing biological material from marine surface trawls to reveal any microplastics present. Our optimized enzymatic protocol can digest >97% (by weight) of the material present in plankton-rich seawater samples without destroying any microplastic debris present. In applying the method to replicate marine samples from the western English Channel, we identified 0.27 microplastics m(-3). The protocol was further used to extract microplastics ingested by marine zooplankton under laboratory conditions. Our findings illustrate that enzymatic digestion can aid the detection of microplastic debris within seawater samples and marine biota. PMID:24681661

  15. Isolation of microplastics in biota-rich seawater samples and marine organisms

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Matthew; Webb, Hannah; Lindeque, Pennie K.; Fileman, Elaine S.; Halsband, Claudia; Galloway, Tamara S.

    2014-01-01

    Microplastic litter is a pervasive pollutant present in aquatic systems across the globe. A range of marine organisms have the capacity to ingest microplastics, resulting in adverse health effects. Developing methods to accurately quantify microplastics in productive marine waters, and those internalized by marine organisms, is of growing importance. Here we investigate the efficacy of using acid, alkaline and enzymatic digestion techniques in mineralizing biological material from marine surface trawls to reveal any microplastics present. Our optimized enzymatic protocol can digest >97% (by weight) of the material present in plankton-rich seawater samples without destroying any microplastic debris present. In applying the method to replicate marine samples from the western English Channel, we identified 0.27 microplastics m?3. The protocol was further used to extract microplastics ingested by marine zooplankton under laboratory conditions. Our findings illustrate that enzymatic digestion can aid the detection of microplastic debris within seawater samples and marine biota. PMID:24681661

  16. Valuing National Forest Recreation Access: Using a Stratified On-Site Sample to Generate Values Across Activities for a Nationally Pooled Sample

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James Michael Bowker; Donald B. K. English; John C. Bergstrom; C. Meghan Starbuck

    2005-01-01

    The Forest Service controls vast quantities of natural resources including timber, wildlife, watersheds, air sheds, and ecosystems. For many of these resources, recreation is one of the primary uses of the natural asset. Recreation visits taken to National Forests are not \\

  17. Coincident plasmids and antimicrobial resistance in marine bacteria isolated from polluted and unpolluted Atlantic Ocean Samples

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. M. Baya; P. R. Brayton; V. L. Brown; D. J. Grimes; E. Russek-Cohen; R. R. Colwell

    1986-01-01

    Sewage effluent and outfall confluence samples were collected at the Barceloneta Regional Treatment Plant in Barceloneta, Puerto Rico; outfall confluence samples at Ocean City, Md., were also collected. Samples from uncontaminated open ocean areas served as clean-water controls. Bacteria were enriched in marine broth 2216 amended with 1 ..mu..g of one of a set of chemical selected for study per

  18. EFFECTS OF SAMPLE PREPARATION ON THE MEASUREMENT OF ORGANIC CARBON, HYDROGEN, SULFUR, AND OXYGEN CONCENTRATIONS IN MARINE SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The elemental composition of marine sediment provides useful information for the study of environmental processes including biogeochemical cycling and contaminant partitioning. It is common practice to acidify marine sediment samples to remove carbonate before measuring the conce...

  19. Multiplex biotoxin surface plasmon resonance method for marine biotoxins in algal and seawater samples.

    PubMed

    McNamee, Sara E; Elliott, Christopher T; Delahaut, Philippe; Campbell, Katrina

    2013-10-01

    A multiplex surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor method for the detection of paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) toxins, okadaic acid (and analogues) and domoic acid was developed. This method was compared to enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methods. Seawater samples (n=256) from around Europe were collected by the consortia of an EU project MIcroarrays for the Detection of Toxic Algae (MIDTAL) and evaluated using each method. A simple sample preparation procedure was developed which involved lysing and releasing the toxins from the algal cells with glass beads followed by centrifugation and filtering the extract before testing for marine biotoxins by both multi-SPR and ELISA. Method detection limits based on IC20 values for PSP, okadaic acid and domoic acid toxins were 0.82, 0.36 and 1.66 ng/ml, respectively, for the prototype multiplex SPR biosensor. Evaluation by SPR for seawater samples has shown that 47, 59 and 61 % of total seawater samples tested positive (result greater than the IC20) for PSP, okadaic acid (and analogues) and domoic acid toxins, respectively. Toxic samples were received mainly from Spain and Ireland. This work has demonstrated the potential of multiplex analysis for marine biotoxins in algal and seawater samples with results available for 24 samples within a 7 h period for three groups of key marine biotoxins. Multiplex immunological methods could therefore be used as early warning monitoring tools for a variety of marine biotoxins in seawater samples. PMID:23250726

  20. HEXACHLOROBENZENE IN SELECTED MARINE SAMPLES: AN ENVIRONMENTAL PERSPECTIVE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hexachlorobenzene (HCB) was designated as a chemical of interest. A new sample of mussel homogenate was spiked with an authentic HCB standard. Recovery of the spike was 56%. Re-examination of previously analyzed GC chromatograms and archived samples revealed peaks that co-eluted ...

  1. Marine reservoir effect on the Southeastern coast of Brazil: results from the Tarioba shellmound paired samples.

    PubMed

    Macario, K D; Souza, R C C L; Aguilera, O A; Carvalho, C; Oliveira, F M; Alves, E Q; Chanca, I S; Silva, E P; Douka, K; Decco, J; Trindade, D C; Marques, A N; Anjos, R M; Pamplona, F C

    2015-05-01

    On the Southeastern coast of Brazil the presence of many archaeological shellmounds offers a great potential for studying the radiocarbon marine reservoir effect (MRE). However, very few such studies are available for this region. These archaeological settlements, mostly dating from 5 to 2 kyr cal BP, include both terrestrial and marine remains in good stratigraphic context and secure association, enabling the comparison of different carbon reservoirs. In a previous study the chronology of the Sambaqui da Tarioba, located in Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil, was established based on marine mollusc shells and charcoal samples from hearths, from several layers in two excavated sectors. We now compare the different materials with the aim of studying the MRE in this region. Calibration was performed with Oxford software OxCal v4.2.3 using the marine curve Marine13 with an undetermined offset to account for local corrections for shell samples, and the atmospheric curve SHCal13 for charcoal samples. The distribution of results considering a phase model indicates a ?R value of -127 ± 67 (14)C yr in the 1 sigma range and the multi-paired approach leads to a mean value of -110 ± 94 (14)C yr. PMID:25703433

  2. Social Services: Recreation Occupations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rones, Philip L.

    1976-01-01

    Description of recreation services for the elderly in two areas, community recreation and therapeutic recreation, includes employment information for the various levels: Recreation director, supervisor, leader, activity specialist, and aide. (JT)

  3. Marine Fisheries Marine recreational angling. Florida

    E-print Network

    . Articles A Review of Introductions of Exotic Oysters and Biological Planning for New Importations December Trends in Ex-vessel Value and Size Composition of Annual Landings of Brown, Pink, and White Shrimp From

  4. Stereochemistry of amino acids in surface samples of a marine sediment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollock, G. E.; Kvenvolden, K. A.

    1978-01-01

    In two surface samples of marine sediment, the percentages of D-alanine and D-aspartic acid are significantly higher than the other D-amino acids and are similar to the range found in soils. The percentage of D-glutamic acid is also higher than the other amino acids but less than D-alanine and D-aspartic acid. These D-amino acids may come mainly from bacteria.

  5. Selected Outdoor Recreation Statistics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Outdoor Recreation (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    In this recreational information report, 96 tables are compiled from Bureau of Outdoor Recreation programs and surveys, other governmental agencies, and private sources. Eight sections comprise the document: (1) The Bureau of Outdoor Recreation, (2) Federal Assistance to Recreation, (3) Recreation Surveys for Planning, (4) Selected Statistics of…

  6. Softball Recreation Soccer Fields

    E-print Network

    Meng, Yizhi

    Entrances Softball Recreation Softball Recreation Softball Recreation Fields Soccer Practice Field Track Practice Field Soccer Practice Field Outdoor Basketball Courts Lacrosse Practice Field Varsity Tennis Courts Recreation Tennis Courts Soccer Fields Recreation Fields Soccer Fields Kenneth P. LaValle Athletic

  7. Recreational drugs.

    PubMed

    Iven, V G

    1998-04-01

    The war against substance abuse continues in today's society and the sports world often seems to be in the middle of all the attention, especially among the media. New recreational drugs arrive on the scene from time to time, much like GHB, but the predominant substances of abuse continue to be marijuana, cocaine, and alcohol. As research evolves in efforts to stay current and determine any potential performance effects of new substances, the literature has changed very little regarding the more common recreational drug and their effects on athletic participation. New studies are emerging comparing recreational drug use among athletes versus nonathletes. Findings include differences among these groups regarding individual sports, team sports, contact versus noncontact sports, and gender-specific sports. Higher risk-taking behavior contribute to these findings and is known to be more prevalent among an athletic population. Overall, illicit drug use in America in 1996 remained about the same as in 1995 after rising steadily since the early 1990s. About 13 million Americans used drugs at least monthly in 1996, up slightly from 12.8 million in 1995. Teenage drug and alcohol use fell to 9% in 1996, down from 10.9% in 1995. Attempts to recognize the early signs of substance abuse and identify those athletes "at risk" of experimenting with elicit drugs are paramount to the optimal treatment response program. The preparticipation examination remains the best initial format for establishing a sound physician-patient relationship. A thorough history including risk factors, family history, and personnel tendencies toward substance abuse should be obtained followed by an ongoing relationship between the athlete and his team physician. The better rapport between the athlete and team physician, the higher likelihood of early recognition of a developing substance abuse problem. Likewise, the earliest intervention usually leads to the most optimal treatment response. PMID:9580840

  8. Application of passive (SPATT) and active sampling methods in the profiling and monitoring of marine biotoxins.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Moira; van Pelt, Frank N A M; Bane, Vaishali; O'Halloran, John; Furey, Ambrose

    2014-10-01

    Solid phase adsorbent and toxin tracking (SPATT) enables temporally and spatially integrated monitoring of biotoxins in aquatic environments. Monitoring using two adsorbent resins was performed over a four-month period at Lough Hyne Marine Reserve, Ireland. A range of Diarhettic Shellfish Poisoning (DSP) toxins were detected from SPATT extracts throughout the study period. The majority of biotoxins were detected in the top 20-30 m of the water column and a spike in toxin accumulation was measured during August 2010. Phytoplankton analysis confirmed the presence of toxin-producing species Dinophysis acuta and Dinophysis acuminata during the bloom. SPATT has the potential to provide useful information on phycotoxin distribution in the water column; enabling evidence-based decisions regarding appropriate depths for obtaining phytoplankton and shellfish samples in marine biotoxin monitoring programmes. Active sampling was performed continuously over 7-days and high quantities of toxins were successfully accumulated in the HP-20 resin, okadaic acid (?13 mg), dinophysis toxin-2 (?29 mg), pectenotoxin-2 (?20 mg) and pectenotoxin-2-seco acid (?6 mg) proving this an effective method for accumulating DSP toxins from the marine environment. The method has potential application as a tool for assessing toxin profiles at proposed shellfish harvesting sites. PMID:25064272

  9. Time series sampling and data assimilation in a simple marine ecosystem model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, Linda M.; Hofmann, Eileen E.; Spitz, Yvette H.

    Simulated distributions of nutrients, phytoplankton and zooplankton were obtained from a simple marine ecosystem model that included nutrient inputs from episodic events. These distributions were then used in numerical identical twin experiments to test the ability of an adjoint data assimilation method to recover rate parameters, such as population growth and death rates, component initial conditions, and the amplitude of episodic events. Data were assimilated into the marine ecosystem model at monthly, bi-weekly and weekly intervals over a period of about 2 months. The ability to recover rate parameters and component initial conditions was determined primarily by the frequency and type of data that were assimilated. Assimilation of data at monthly intervals proved to be adequate for recovery of most of the rate parameters and some of the initial conditions. Bi-weekly data yielded better recoveries; however, increasing the data availability to weekly intervals did not significantly improve the results relative to the bi-weekly cases. The ability to recover biological rates with only monthly data suggests that these are fundamental aspects of marine ecosystems and can be resolved with only a few measurements. The availability of zooplankton information, even at a reduced frequency relative to phytoplankton or nutrient information, improved the ability to recover rate parameters with data more widely spaced in time. Recovery of component initial conditions was related to the timescales of the biological processes; faster processes required more frequent data. The recovery of the amplitude of the episodic events was related to the timing of the sampling relative to the event, rather than to the frequency at which data were available. The number of iterations needed for convergence when using data assimilation with the marine ecosystem model was dependent not only on the frequency and type of the input data series, but also on the structure of the marine ecosystem model. These results have implications for designing sampling strategies for measurement programs, such as the U.S. Joint Global Ocean Flux Study Hawaii Ocean Time-series and Bermuda Atlantic Time-series sites, so that these multidisciplinary data sets can be used with data-assimilative marine ecosystem models.

  10. Virulence genes of Aeromonas isolates, bacterial endotoxins and cyanobacterial toxins from recreational water samples associated with human health symptoms.

    PubMed

    Berg, Katri A; Lyra, Christina; Niemi, R Maarit; Heens, Benoit; Hoppu, Kalle; Erkomaa, Kirsti; Sivonen, Kaarina; Rapala, Jarkko

    2011-12-01

    Exposure to cyanobacterial water blooms has been associated with various kinds of adverse health effects. In addition to cyanobacteria and their toxins, the bacteria associated with cyanobacteria could also be the etiological agents. We isolated Aeromonas strains (n = 176) from water samples (n = 38) taken from sites where cyanobacteria were suspected to have caused human health symptoms, of which fever and gastrointestinal symptoms were the most common. The isolates were screened by PCR for six virulence gene types (12 genes). The majority (90%) of the strains contained at least one of the virulence genes. Most common amplification products were those of genes (act/aerA/hlyA) that encode cytotoxic enterotoxin and haemolytic products. The genes encoding cytotonic enterotoxins (ast and alt), phospholipase (lip/pla/lipH3/alp-1), elastase (ahyB) and flagellin subunits (flaA/flaB) were also present in 5-37% of the Aeromonas strains. Analysed toxins (cyanobacterial hepatotoxins and neurotoxins, and bacterial endotoxins) were not detectable or were present in only low concentrations in the majority of the samples. The results indicated that the toxins were unlikely to be the main cause of the reported adverse health effects, whereas more attention should be paid to bacteria associated with cyanobacteria as a source of health effects. PMID:22048427

  11. 50 CFR 600.1417 - Requirements for exempted state designation based on submission of recreational survey data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...designation based on submission of recreational survey data. 600.1417 Section 600.1417...designation based on submission of recreational survey data. (a) To be designated as an...state's participation in a regional survey of marine and anadromous...

  12. Coincident plasmids and antimicrobial resistance in marine bacteria isolated from polluted and unpolluted Atlantic Ocean samples.

    PubMed Central

    Baya, A M; Brayton, P R; Brown, V L; Grimes, D J; Russek-Cohen, E; Colwell, R R

    1986-01-01

    Sewage effluent and outfall confluence samples were collected at the Barceloneta Regional Treatment Plant in Barceloneta, Puerto Rico; outfall confluence samples at Ocean City, Md., were also collected. Samples from uncontaminated open ocean areas served as clean-water controls. Bacteria were enriched in marine broth 2216 amended with 1 microgram of one of a set of chemicals selected for study per ml: nitrobenzene, dibutyl phthalate, m-cresol, o-cresol, 4-nitroaniline, bis(tributyltin) oxide, and quinone. MICs of the chemicals were determined individually for all isolates. Bacterial isolates were evaluated for resistance to nine different antibiotics and for the presence of plasmid DNA. Treated sewage was found to contain large numbers of bacteria simultaneously possessing antibiotic resistance, chemical resistance, and multiple bands of plasmid DNA. Bacteria resistant to penicillin, erythromycin, nalidixic acid, ampicillin, m-cresol, quinone, and bis(tributyltin) oxide were detected in nearly all samples, but only sewage outfall confluence samples yielded bacterial isolates that were resistant to streptomycin. Bacteria resistant to a combination of antibiotics, including kanamycin, chloramphenicol, gentamicin, and tetracycline, were isolated only from sewage effluent samples. It is concluded that bacterial isolates derived from toxic chemical wastes more frequently contain plasmid DNA and demonstrate antimicrobial resistance than do bacterial isolates from domestic sewage-impacted waters or from uncontaminated open ocean sites. PMID:3755317

  13. Sampling design for long-term regional trends in marine rocky intertidal communities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Irvine, Gail V.; Shelley, Alice

    2013-01-01

    Probability-based designs reduce bias and allow inference of results to the pool of sites from which they were chosen. We developed and tested probability-based designs for monitoring marine rocky intertidal assemblages at Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve (GLBA), Alaska. A multilevel design was used that varied in scale and inference. The levels included aerial surveys, extensive sampling of 25 sites, and more intensive sampling of 6 sites. Aerial surveys of a subset of intertidal habitat indicated that the original target habitat of bedrock-dominated sites with slope ?30° was rare. This unexpected finding illustrated one value of probability-based surveys and led to a shift in the target habitat type to include steeper, more mixed rocky habitat. Subsequently, we evaluated the statistical power of different sampling methods and sampling strategies to detect changes in the abundances of the predominant sessile intertidal taxa: barnacles Balanomorpha, the mussel Mytilus trossulus, and the rockweed Fucus distichus subsp. evanescens. There was greatest power to detect trends in Mytilus and lesser power for barnacles and Fucus. Because of its greater power, the extensive, coarse-grained sampling scheme was adopted in subsequent years over the intensive, fine-grained scheme. The sampling attributes that had the largest effects on power included sampling of “vertical” line transects (vs. horizontal line transects or quadrats) and increasing the number of sites. We also evaluated the power of several management-set parameters. Given equal sampling effort, sampling more sites fewer times had greater power. The information gained through intertidal monitoring is likely to be useful in assessing changes due to climate, including ocean acidification; invasive species; trampling effects; and oil spills.

  14. Optimizing sample pretreatment for compound-specific stable carbon isotopic analysis of amino sugars in marine sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, R.; Lin, Y.-S.; Lipp, J. S.; Meador, T. B.; Hinrichs, K.-U.

    2014-01-01

    Amino sugars are quantitatively significant constituents of soil and marine sediment, but their sources and turnover in environmental samples remain poorly understood. The stable carbon isotopic composition of amino sugars can provide information on the lifestyles of their source organisms and can be monitored during incubations with labeled substrates to estimate the turnover rates of microbial populations. However, until now, such investigation has been carried out only with soil samples, partly because of the much lower abundance of amino sugars in marine environments. We therefore optimized a procedure for compound-specific isotopic analysis of amino sugars in marine sediment employing gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The whole procedure consisted of hydrolysis, neutralization, enrichment, and derivatization of amino sugars. Except for the derivatization step, the protocol introduced negligible isotopic fractionation, and the minimum requirement of amino sugar for isotopic analysis was 20 ng, i.e. equivalent to ~ 8 ng of amino sugar carbon. Our results obtained from ?13C analysis of amino sugars in selected marine sediment samples showed that muramic acid had isotopic imprints from indigenous bacterial activities, whereas glucosamine and galactosamine were mainly derived from organic detritus. The analysis of stable carbon isotopic compositions of amino sugars opens a promising window for the investigation of microbial metabolisms in marine sediments and the deep marine biosphere.

  15. [Infections related to recreational waters].

    PubMed

    Doménech-Sánchez, Antonio; Olea, Francisco; Berrocal, Clara I

    2008-11-01

    Recreational waters are a source of infection by several microorganisms causing acute gastrointestinal, cutaneous and respiratory illnesses. Cryptosporidium, noroviruses and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli strains are the most important causes of diarrhea, while Pseudomonas and Staphylococcus aureus are the main causes of cutaneous infections, and Legionella is the major cause of acute lower respiratory disease. Approximately 90% of outbreaks occur in treated recreational waters (swimming pools, spas and recreational parks), while the remaining 10% arise from natural waters used for leisure (bathing in rivers, beaches, etc). In spas, most infections are caused by thermophilic bacteria, such as Pseudomonas and Legionella, since overgrowth of these bacteria is facilitated by the direct effect of temperature and, indirectly, by the evaporation of the disinfectant. Outbreaks related to recreational waters usually reflect deficient control of the system: a low level of disinfectant, or the use of an inappropriate disinfectant, insufficient maintenance and cleaning of the installation, higher than recommended usage, and failure of the disinfectant dosage system. The correct design, maintenance and use of these facilities drastically lower the risk of infections from recreational waters. Thus, other key actions to minimize this risk are the existence of, and compliance with, regulatory rules, as well as educational campaigns on good hygiene practices directed at users. Rapid etiologic diagnosis of affected patients, together with an epidemiological survey and detection of the pathogen implicated in water samples are the keys to outbreak control. PMID:19100165

  16. A sampling-based Bayesian model for gas saturation estimationusing seismic AVA and marine CSEM data

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jinsong; Hoversten, Michael; Vasco, Don; Rubin, Yoram; Hou,Zhangshuan

    2006-04-04

    We develop a sampling-based Bayesian model to jointly invertseismic amplitude versus angles (AVA) and marine controlled-sourceelectromagnetic (CSEM) data for layered reservoir models. The porosityand fluid saturation in each layer of the reservoir, the seismic P- andS-wave velocity and density in the layers below and above the reservoir,and the electrical conductivity of the overburden are considered asrandom variables. Pre-stack seismic AVA data in a selected time windowand real and quadrature components of the recorded electrical field areconsidered as data. We use Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) samplingmethods to obtain a large number of samples from the joint posteriordistribution function. Using those samples, we obtain not only estimatesof each unknown variable, but also its uncertainty information. Thedeveloped method is applied to both synthetic and field data to explorethe combined use of seismic AVA and EM data for gas saturationestimation. Results show that the developed method is effective for jointinversion, and the incorporation of CSEM data reduces uncertainty influid saturation estimation, when compared to results from inversion ofAVA data only.

  17. American Therapeutic Recreation Association

    MedlinePLUS

    American Therapeutic Recreation Association Promoting Health & Wellness Services Access to Inpt Rehab Therapy Act - ACT NOW 2015 Annual Conference will ... Policy Matters to Every RT Join thousands of Therapeutic Recreation specialists today Join Now Renew your membership today ...

  18. CAMPUS RECREATION CLEMSON UNIVERSITY

    E-print Network

    Stuart, Steven J.

    of recreational sports facilities for your employees and corporate partners. CAUSE-RELATED MARKETING Develop in prominent high traffic areas located strategically in the Clemson Campus Recreation facilities. EMAIL

  19. [Inclusive Recreation and Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heyne, Linda A., Ed.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    This feature issue focuses on inclusive recreation for persons with developmental disabilities and their families. The articles provide information about the benefits of inclusive recreation for individuals and families, the challenges in attempting to create or access community recreation services that offer inclusive programs, and strategies…

  20. Department of Recreational Sports

    E-print Network

    Behmer, Spencer T.

    Department of Recreational Sports Student Staff Scholarship Spring 2011 This packet contains: ________________ 2 Texas A&M University Department of Recreational Sports Student Staff Scholarship Mission: The Department of Recreational Sports Student Staff Scholarship program was created to recognize and reward

  1. Prevalence of Cryptosporidium species in recreational versus non-recreational water sources.

    PubMed

    Loganthan, Sasdekumar; Yang, Rongchang; Bath, Andrew; Gordon, Cameron; Ryan, Una

    2012-08-01

    Cryptosporidiosis, caused by the protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium, represents the major public health concern of water utilities in developed nations due to its small size, resistance to disinfection and ability to be shed in large numbers in faeces. In Australia, recreational access is not allowed on direct supply sources, however, in Western Australia, limited recreational access to drinking water catchments has been allowed, although only in the outer catchment. Recreational activities within 2 km of the drinking water body is prohibited. The present study compared the amount, prevalence and species of Cryptosporidium in recreational versus non-recreational water catchments in the south west of Western Australia (WA). Recreational water catchments, which allowed swimming and camping had a higher prevalence of Cryptosporidium and the majority of samples were the human-associated C. hominis. Non-recreational catchments had a lower prevalence and all the samples genotyped were C. parvum. Risk analysis identified increasing population as strongly correlated with an increase in the prevalence of Cryptosporidium in recreational catchments. This suggests that recreational access to drinking water catchments is a serious public health risk and government policy limiting activities to the outer catchment should be supported. PMID:22609970

  2. Optimizing sample pretreatment for compound-specific stable carbon isotopic analysis of amino sugars in marine sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, R.; Lin, Y.-S.; Lipp, J. S.; Meador, T. B.; Hinrichs, K.-U.

    2014-09-01

    Amino sugars are quantitatively significant constituents of soil and marine sediment, but their sources and turnover in environmental samples remain poorly understood. The stable carbon isotopic composition of amino sugars can provide information on the lifestyles of their source organisms and can be monitored during incubations with labeled substrates to estimate the turnover rates of microbial populations. However, until now, such investigation has been carried out only with soil samples, partly because of the much lower abundance of amino sugars in marine environments. We therefore optimized a procedure for compound-specific isotopic analysis of amino sugars in marine sediment, employing gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The whole procedure consisted of hydrolysis, neutralization, enrichment, and derivatization of amino sugars. Except for the derivatization step, the protocol introduced negligible isotopic fractionation, and the minimum requirement of amino sugar for isotopic analysis was 20 ng, i.e., equivalent to ~8 ng of amino sugar carbon. Compound-specific stable carbon isotopic analysis of amino sugars obtained from marine sediment extracts indicated that glucosamine and galactosamine were mainly derived from organic detritus, whereas muramic acid showed isotopic imprints from indigenous bacterial activities. The ?13C analysis of amino sugars provides a valuable addition to the biomarker-based characterization of microbial metabolism in the deep marine biosphere, which so far has been lipid oriented and biased towards the detection of archaeal signals.

  3. Extended evaluation of polymeric and lipophilic sorbents for passive sampling of marine toxins.

    PubMed

    Zendong, Zita; Herrenknecht, Christine; Abadie, Eric; Brissard, Charline; Tixier, Céline; Mondeguer, Florence; Séchet, Véronique; Amzil, Zouher; Hess, Philipp

    2014-12-01

    Marine biotoxins are algal metabolites that can accumulate in fish or shellfish and render these foodstuffs unfit for human consumption. These toxins, released into seawater during algal occurrences, can be monitored through passive sampling. Acetone, methanol and isopropanol were evaluated for their efficiency in extracting toxins from algal biomass. Isopropanol was chosen for further experiments thanks to a slightly higher recovery and no artifact formation. Comparison of Oasis HLB, Strata-X, BondElut C18 and HP-20 sorbent materials in SPE-mode led to the choice of Oasis HLB, HP-20 and Strata-X. These three sorbents were separately exposed as passive samplers for 24 h to seawater spiked with algal extracts containing known amounts of okadaic acid (OA), azaspiracids (AZAs), pinnatoxin-G (PnTX-G), 13-desmethyl spirolide-C (SPX1) and palytoxins (PlTXs). Low density polyethylene (LDPE) and silicone rubber (PDMS) strips were tested in parallel on similar mixtures of spiked natural seawater for 24 h. These strips gave significantly lower recoveries than the polymeric sorbents. Irrespective of the toxin group, the adsorption rate of toxins on HP-20 was slower than on Oasis HLB and Strata-X. However, HP-20 and Strata-X gave somewhat higher recoveries after 24 h exposure. Irrespective of the sorbent tested, recoveries were generally highest for cyclic imines and OA group toxins, slightly lower for AZAs, and the lowest for palytoxins. Trials in re-circulated closed tanks with mussels exposed to Vulcanodinium rugosum or Prorocentrum lima allowed for further evaluation of passive samplers. In these experiments with different sorbent materials competing for toxins in the same container, Strata-X accumulated toxins faster than Oasis HLB, and HP-20, and to higher levels. The deployment of these three sorbents at Ingril French Mediterranean lagoon to detect PnTX-G in the water column showed accumulation of higher levels on HP-20 and Oasis HLB compared to Strata-X. This study has significantly extended the range of sorbents for passive sampling of marine toxins. In particular, sorbents were included that had previously been evaluated for polyhalogenated contaminants, pharmaceuticals, phytochemicals or veterinary residues. Moreover, this study has for the first time demonstrated the usefulness of the polymeric Oasis HLB and Strata-X sorbents in laboratory and field studies for various microalgal toxins. PMID:24709758

  4. DNA barcoding and metabarcoding of standardized samples reveal patterns of marine benthic diversity.

    PubMed

    Leray, Matthieu; Knowlton, Nancy

    2015-02-17

    Documenting the diversity of marine life is challenging because many species are cryptic, small, and rare, and belong to poorly known groups. New sequencing technologies, especially when combined with standardized sampling, promise to make comprehensive biodiversity assessments and monitoring feasible on a large scale. We used this approach to characterize patterns of diversity on oyster reefs across a range of geographic scales comprising a temperate location [Virginia (VA)] and a subtropical location [Florida (FL)]. Eukaryotic organisms that colonized multilayered settlement surfaces (autonomous reef monitoring structures) over a 6-mo period were identified by cytochrome c oxidase subunit I barcoding (>2-mm mobile organisms) and metabarcoding (sessile and smaller mobile organisms). In a total area of ? 15.64 m(2) and volume of ? 0.09 m(3), 2,179 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were recorded from 983,056 sequences. However, only 10.9% could be matched to reference barcodes in public databases, with only 8.2% matching barcodes with both genus and species names. Taxonomic coverage was broad, particularly for animals (22 phyla recorded), but 35.6% of OTUs detected via metabarcoding could not be confidently assigned to a taxonomic group. The smallest size fraction (500 to 106 ?m) was the most diverse (more than two-thirds of OTUs). There was little taxonomic overlap between VA and FL, and samples separated by ? 2 m were significantly more similar than samples separated by ? 100 m. Ground-truthing with independent assessments of taxonomic composition indicated that both presence-absence information and relative abundance information are captured by metabarcoding data, suggesting considerable potential for ecological studies and environmental monitoring. PMID:25646458

  5. Determination of total mercury for marine environmental monitoring studies by solid sampling continuum source high resolution atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandjukov, Petko; Orani, Anna Maria; Han, Eunmi; Vassileva, Emilia

    2015-01-01

    The most critical step in almost all commonly used analytical procedures for Hg determination is the sample preparation due to its extreme volatility. One of the possible solutions of this problem is the application of methods for direct analysis of solid samples. The possibilities for solid sampling high resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry (HR CS AAS) determination of total mercury in various marine environmental samples e.g. sediments and biota are object of the present study. The instrumental parameters were optimized in order to obtain reproducible and interference free analytical signal. A calibration technique based on the use of solid standard certified reference materials similar to the nature of the analyzed sample was developed and applied to various CRMs and real samples. This technique allows simple and reliable evaluation of the uncertainty of the result and the metrological characteristics of the method. A validation approach in line with the requirements of ISO 17025 standard and Eurachem guidelines was followed. With this in mind, selectivity, working range (0.06 to 25 ng for biota and 0.025 to 4 ng for sediment samples, expressed as total Hg) linearity (confirmed by Student's t-test), bias (1.6-4.3%), repeatability (4-9%), reproducibility (9-11%), and absolute limit of detection (0.025 ng for sediment, 0.096 ng for marine biota) were systematically assessed using solid CRMs. The relative expanded uncertainty was estimated at 15% for sediment sample and 8.5% for marine biota sample (k = 2). Demonstration of traceability of measurement results is also presented. The potential of the proposed analytical procedure, based on solid sampling HR CS AAS technique was demonstrated by direct analysis of sea sediments form the Caribbean region and various CRMs. Overall, the use of solid sampling HR CS AAS permits obtaining significant advantages for the determination of this complex analyte in marine samples, such as straightforward calibration, a high sample throughput (15 min per sample), sufficient precision, a suitable limit of detection, and reduced risk of analyte loss and contamination.

  6. Determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in marine samples by high-performance liquid chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Obana, H.; Hori, S.; Kashimoto, T.

    1981-05-01

    It has been reported that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are widely distributed in the environment, although their concentrations are quite low. Some PAHs, benzo(a)pyrene, dibenz(a,h)anthracene and 3-methycholanthrene, are carcinogenic to mammals after in vivo hydroxylation by mixed function oxidases. PAHs originate largely from smoke, soot, and exhaust gas produced by combustion and from petroleum oil spilled into the sea, so that the quantity of PAHs in the environment is broadly related to the level of contamination in a given region. Although PAHs have been determined by a TLC-fluorescence method, these methods suffer from complex pretreatment. On the other hand, the development of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) has made it possible to analyze PAHs with good separation and high sensitivity and to simplify the pretreatment processes. In this study, ten PAHs in sediments, oyster, and wakame seaweed were determined by HPLC with a fluorescence detector (HPLC-FD). The contents and the patterns of PAHs found in sediments and marine samples may be used as an indicator of petroleum contamination in the sea.

  7. Partitioning of alcohol ethoxylates and polyethylene glycols in the marine environment: field samplings vs laboratory experiments.

    PubMed

    Traverso-Soto, Juan M; Brownawell, Bruce J; González-Mazo, Eduardo; Lara-Martín, Pablo A

    2014-08-15

    Nowadays, alcohol ethoxylates (AEOs) constitute the most important group of non-ionic surfactants, used in a wide range of applications such as household cleaners and detergents. Significant amounts of these compounds and their degradation products (polyethylene glycols, PEGs, which are also used for many other applications) reach aquatic environments, and are eliminated from the water column by degradation and sorption processes. This work deals with the environmental distribution of AEOs and PEGs in the Long Island Sound Estuary, a setting impacted by sewage discharges from New York City (NYC). The distribution of target compounds in seawater was influenced by tides, consistent with salinity differences, and concentrations in suspended solid samples ranged from 1.5 to 20.5 ?g/g. The more hydrophobic AEOs were mostly attached to the particulate matter whereas the more polar PEGs were predominant in the dissolved form. Later, the sorption of these chemicals was characterized in the laboratory. Experimental and environmental sorption coefficients for AEOs and PEGs showed average values from 3607 to 164,994 L/kg and from 74 to 32,862 L/kg, respectively. The sorption data were fitted to a Freundlich isotherm model with parameters n and log KF between 0.8-1.2 and 1.46-4.39 L/kg, respectively. AEO and PEG sorptions on marine sediment were also found to be mostly not affected by changes in salinity. PMID:24887194

  8. Wider sampling reveals a non-sister relationship for geographically contiguous lineages of a marine mussel.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Regina L; Nicastro, Katy R; Costa, Joana; McQuaid, Christopher D; Serrão, Ester A; Zardi, Gerardo I

    2014-06-01

    The accuracy of phylogenetic inference can be significantly improved by the addition of more taxa and by increasing the spatial coverage of sampling. In previous studies, the brown mussel Perna perna showed a sister-lineage relationship between eastern and western individuals contiguously distributed along the South African coastline. We used mitochondrial (COI) and nuclear (ITS) sequence data to further analyze phylogeographic patterns within P. perna. Significant expansion of the geographical coverage revealed an unexpected pattern. The western South African lineage shared the most recent common ancestor (MRCA) with specimens from Angola, Venezuela, and Namibia, whereas eastern South African specimens and Mozambique grouped together, indicating a non-sister relationship for the two South African lineages. Two plausible biogeographic scenarios to explain their origin were both supported by the hypotheses-testing analysis. One includes an Indo-Pacific origin for P. perna, dispersal into the Mediterranean and Atlantic through the Tethys seaway, followed by recent secondary contact after southward expansion of the western and eastern South African lineages. The other scenario (Out of South Africa) suggests an ancient vicariant divergence of the two lineages followed by their northward expansion. Nevertheless, the "Out of South Africa" hypothesis would require a more ancient divergence between the two lineages. Instead, our estimates indicated that they diverged very recently (310 kyr), providing a better support for an Indo-Pacific origin of the two South African lineages. The arrival of the MRCA of P. perna in Brazil was estimated at 10 [0-40] kyr. Thus, the hypothesis of a recent introduction in Brazil through hull fouling in wooden vessels involved in the transatlantic itineraries of the slave trade did not receive strong support, but given the range for this estimate, it could not be discarded. Wider geographic sampling of marine organisms shows that lineages with contiguous distributions need not share a common ancestry. PMID:25360249

  9. Ultradeep 16S rRNA Sequencing Analysis of Geographically Similar but Diverse Unexplored Marine Samples Reveal Varied Bacterial Community Composition

    PubMed Central

    Karutha Pandian, Shunmugiah

    2013-01-01

    Background Bacterial community composition in the marine environment differs from one geographical location to another. Reports that delineate the bacterial diversity of different marine samples from geographically similar location are limited. The present study aims to understand whether the bacterial community compositions from different marine samples harbour similar bacterial diversity since these are geographically related to each other. Methods and Principal Findings In the present study, 16S rRNA deep sequencing analysis targeting V3 region was performed using Illumina bar coded sequencing. A total of 22.44 million paired end reads were obtained from the metagenomic DNA of Marine sediment, Rhizosphere sediment, Seawater and the epibacterial DNA of Seaweed and Seagrass. Diversity index analysis revealed that Marine sediment has the highest bacterial diversity and the least bacterial diversity was observed in Rhizosphere sediment. Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes were the dominant taxa present in all the marine samples. Nearly 62–71% of rare species were identified in all the samples and most of these rare species were unique to a particular sample. Further taxonomic assignment at the phylum and genus level revealed that the bacterial community compositions differ among the samples. Conclusion This is the first report that supports the fact that, bacterial community composition is specific for specific samples irrespective of its similar geographical location. Existence of specific bacterial community for each sample may drive overall difference in bacterial structural composition of each sample. Further studies like whole metagenomic sequencing will throw more insights to the key stone players and its interconnecting metabolic pathways. In addition, this is one of the very few reports that depicts the unexplored bacterial diversity of marine samples (Marine sediment, Rhizosphere sediment, Seawater) and the host associated marine samples (Seaweed and Seagrass) at higher depths from uncharacterised coastal region of Palk Bay, India using next generation sequencing technology. PMID:24167548

  10. Hierarchical Probabilistic Regression for AUV-based Adaptive Sampling of Marine Phenomena

    E-print Network

    Sukhatme, Gaurav S.

    Jnaneshwar Das, Julio Harvey, Frédéric Py, Harshvardhan Vathsangam, Rishi Graham, Kanna Rajan, Gaurav S,vathsang,gaurav}@usc.edu, {jharvey,fpy,rishi,kanna.rajan}@mbari.org Abstract-- Marine phenomena such as algal blooms can be detected

  11. Determination of organochlorine pesticides in marine sediments samples using ultrasonic solvent extraction followed by GC\\/ECD

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. C. Vagi; A. S. Petsas; M. N. Kostopoulou; M. K. Karamanoli; T. D. Lekkas

    2007-01-01

    A rapid multiresidue method has been developed for the analysis of 17 organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) (?-HCH, ?-HCH, ?-HCH, ?-HCH, aldrin, heptachlor epoxide, endosulfan I, 4,4-DDE, dieldrin, endrin, 4,4-DDD, endosulfan II, 4,4-DDT, endrin aldehyde, endosulfan sulfate, methoxychlor and endrin ketone) in marine sediments. The method is based on the ultrasonic solvent extraction (USE) of sediment samples. The extraction procedure was optimised

  12. Recreational Water Illness (RWI): MRSA

    MedlinePLUS

    ... MRSA website. Can MRSA be spread at recreational water facilities? MRSA does not survive long in recreational ... myself, my family, and others when visiting recreational water facilities? Take action! There are steps you can ...

  13. Past-year recreational gambling in a nationally representative sample: Correlates of casino, non-casino, and both casino/non-casino gambling

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Christine A.; Maciejewski, Paul K.; Potenza, Marc N.

    2013-01-01

    Data from the Gambling Impact and Behavior Study (GIBS), a national survey of 2,417 U.S. adults, were examined by multivariate analysis to investigate characteristics of past-year recreational gamblers who participated in casino-only, non-casino-only, and both casino and non-casino gambling. Compared to non-casino-only gamblers, individuals who gambled in both locations had higher rates of alcohol use and abuse/dependence, lower rates of drug use, more frequent gambling, and larger wins and losses. Compared to casino-only gamblers, individuals who gambled in both locations reported less drug use, poorer subjective health, earlier age of gambling onset, greater frequency of gambling, and larger wins and losses. Compared to casino-only or non-casino-only gambling, gambling in both locations was associated with more frequent and heavier gambling. Findings suggest aspects of recreational gambling, such as gambling venue, may have important public health implications and should be considered in guidelines for responsible gambling. PMID:21550124

  14. North Campus Recreation Complex

    E-print Network

    North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

    Recreation Complex Kenan Stadium Field Bryson Field Hooker Fields Fetzer Field Henry Stadium Field Navy Field Navy Field Ehringhaus Field Tennis Court W. Tennis Court S. Tennis Court E. South Campus Recreation Women's and Children's Health Bell Tower South Brooks Computer Science Old Well South Gardner Play

  15. North Campus Recreation Complex

    E-print Network

    North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

    Recreation Complex Kenan Stadium Field Bryson Field Hooker Fields Fetzer Field Henry Stadium Field Navy Field Navy Field Ehringhaus Field South Campus Recreation Complex Sciences Peabody Craige Center Jones Graham Phillips F Teague South NC Women's and Children's Education Center Taylor Undergrad Steam

  16. Campus Recreation Membership 03

    E-print Network

    Campus Recreation Fall 2014 #12;Membership 03 Facilities 05 Shocker Fit 07 Personal Training 09 Massage Therapy 11 Learn 2 Swim 13 Intramural Sports 15 Sport Clubs 17 Shocker Rowing 19 Events 21 Family Rentals Lifeguard Training Alternate Hours of Operation Where to Find Campus Recreation Back Cover Table

  17. Recreation Service Handicapped Inc.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa Univ., Iowa City. Recreation Education Program.

    Presented are duplications of the responses given by Recreation Service Handicapped (Memphis, Tennessee) as part of a project to collect, share, and compile information about, and techniques in the operation of 18 community action models for recreation services to the disabled. Model programs are categorized as consumer, client competency,…

  18. Integrated Leisure and Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schleien, Stuart, Ed.; Rynders, John, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    This "feature issue" focuses on integrated leisure and recreation for developmentally disabled persons and includes descriptions of innovative leisure/recreation programs which allow the realization of the concepts of normalization and least restrictive environment. Brief articles include the following titles and authors: "Challenging the…

  19. Recreation Leadership. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vannier, Maryhelen

    This text is intended for use in college recreation courses. It presents leadership techniques and teaching methods for conducting successful recreation programs in community centers, schools, churches, industry, hospitals, prisons, and on playgrounds. Over 1,000 program ideas and ways to teach are suggested that cover a wide range of activities…

  20. Sports Union Recreational Sport

    E-print Network

    Howie, Jim

    Sports Union Recreational Sport Programme Futsal(5 a-side Football) Play football on a weekly basis and Semester 2 Entry form You must fill in a Recreational Sport Entry Form. This can be collected from the Sports Centre reception and hand it in along with your entry fee. Find us on Facebook at Heriot

  1. Recreation/Tourism/Interpretation Graduate Schools

    E-print Network

    Recreation/Tourism/Interpretation Graduate Schools Brigham Young University Provo, Utah, Recreation and Tourism Management http://www.hehd.clemson.edu/PRTM/mprtm.htm Colorado State University Programs: Natural Resource Recreation Tourism and Commercial Recreation Campus Recreation, Programming

  2. NOAA HABITAT BLUEPRINT Healthy habitats that sustain resilient and thriving marine

    E-print Network

    NOAA HABITAT BLUEPRINT VISION Healthy habitats that sustain resilient and thriving marine · Recovered threatened and endangered species · Protected coastal and marine areas and habitats at risk · Resilient coastal communities · Increased coastal/marine tourism, access, and recreation PURPOSE The Habitat

  3. University of California Irvine Campus Recreation ANTEATER RECREATION CENTER POLICIES

    E-print Network

    Rose, Michael R.

    University of California Irvine ­ Campus Recreation ANTEATER RECREATION CENTER POLICIES Code has no place in the Anteater Recreation Center (ARC). 4. Proper attire and shoes are required at all times. 5. No grasping or hanging on any basketball rim or net in the Anteater Recreation Center. 6

  4. Recreational stream assessment using Malaysia water quality index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Hanisah; Kutty, Ahmad Abas

    2013-11-01

    River water quality assessment is crucial in order to quantify and monitor spatial and temporally. Malaysia is producing WQI and NWQS indices to evaluate river water quality. However, the study on recreational river water quality is still scarce. A study was conducted to determine selected recreational river water quality area and to determine impact of recreation on recreational stream. Three recreational streams namely Sungai Benus, Sungai Cemperuh and Sungai Luruh in Janda Baik, Pahang were selected. Five sampling stations were chosen from each river with a 200-400 m interval. Six water quality parameters which are BOD5, COD, TSS, pH, ammoniacal-nitrogen and dissolved oxygen were measured. Sampling and analysis was conducted following standard method prepared by USEPA. These parameters were used to calculate the water quality subindex and finally an indicative WQI value using Malaysia water quality index formula. Results indicate that all recreational streams have excellent water quality with WQI values ranging from 89 to 94. Most of water quality parameter was homogenous between sampling sites and between streams. An one-way ANOVA test indicates that no significant difference was observed between each sub index values (p> 0.05, ?=0.05). Only BOD and COD exhibit slightly variation between stations that would be due to organic domestic wastes done by visitors. The study demonstrated that visitors impact on recreational is minimum and recreation streams are applicable for direct contact recreational.

  5. Time series sampling and data assimilation in a simple marine ecosystem model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Linda M. Lawson; Eileen E. Hofmann; Yvette H. Spitz

    1996-01-01

    Simulated distributions of nutrients, phytoplankton and zooplankton were obtained from a simple marine ecosystem model that included nutrient inputs from episodic events. These distributions were then used in numerical identical twin experiments to test the ability of an adjoint data assimilation method to recover rate parameters, such as population growth and death rates, component initial conditions, and the amplitude of

  6. METHODS FOR THE DETERMINATION OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES IN MARINE AND ESTUARINE ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This manual contains seven methods for the determination of nutrients, three metals, and chlorophyll a in marine and estuarine environmental matrices. wo of the metals methods are graphite furnace atomic absorption techniques and the third uses inductively coupled plasma mass spe...

  7. Relationships Between Sand and Water Quality at Recreational Beaches

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Matthew C.; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M.; Piggot, Alan M.; Klaus, James S.; Zhang, Yifan

    2011-01-01

    Enterococci are used to assess the risk of negative human health impacts from recreational waters. Studies have shown sustained populations of enterococci within sediments of beaches but comprehensive surveys of multiple tidal zones on beaches in a regional area and their relationship to beach management decisions are limited. We sampled three tidal zones on eight South Florida beaches in Miami-Dade and Broward counties and found that enterococci were ubiquitous within South Florida beach sands although their levels varied greatly both among the beaches and between the supratidal, intertidal and subtidal zones. The supratidal sands consistently had significantly higher (p<0.003) levels of enterococci (average 40 CFU/g dry sand) than the other two zones. Levels of enterococci within the subtidal sand correlated with the average level of enterococci in the water (CFU/100mL) for the season during which samples were collected (rs= 0.73). The average sand enterococci content over all the zones on each beach correlated with the average water enterococci levels of the year prior to sand samplings (rs=0.64) as well as the average water enterococci levels for the month after sand samplings (rs=0.54). Results indicate a connection between levels of enterococci in beach water and sands throughout South Florida’s beaches and suggest that the sands are one of the predominant reservoirs of enterococci impacting beach water quality. As a result, beaches with lower levels of enterococci in the sand had fewer exceedences relative to beaches with higher levels of sand enterococci. More research should focus on evaluating beach sand quality as a means to predict and regulate marine recreational water quality. PMID:22071324

  8. Predicting recreation priorities

    E-print Network

    Hunt, Kindal Alayne

    2003-01-01

    priorities. Assessment of residents' recreation priorities has been undertaken to guide provision decision-making. Kibler and Smith (2000) prioritized the recreation priorities of 60 HIV-positive and AIDS patients using importance-perfonnance measures... are "Factors that limit people's participation in leisure activities, people's use of leisure services, or people's enjoyment of current activities" (Scott, 2000). Categories of constraints will be determined using exploratory factor analysis. Different...

  9. Catfish Ponds for Recreation 

    E-print Network

    Masser, Michael P.; Steinbach, Don W.; Higginbotham, Billy

    1999-08-02

    require minimum effort by the owner if they are managed at low to moderate stocking and feeding lev- els. Recreational catfish ponds provide enjoyable outdoor recreation as well as excellent food fish. Anglers of all ages can catch catfish relatively... stocking rate is fishing or harvesting pressure. Most catfish pond owners say they harvested fewer fish than they intended when they stocked the pond. Consider these questions: n How much fishing pressure will the pond receive? n Will the anglers...

  10. The Value of a Master's Degree to Recreation Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodge, Camilla J.; Hill, Brian J.; Brinton, Christian

    2012-01-01

    This study assessed the nature of the relationship between earning advanced degrees and career outcomes such as salary, job satisfaction, social capital, and human capital among professionals in the parks and recreation field. The sample (n = 196) was drawn from parks and recreation agencies located in the United States. Agencies, excluding…

  11. Recreational Exercise Motives of Adolescents and Young Adults

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Emine Caglar; Yusuf Canlan; Murat Demir

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the motives for taking part in recreational exercise\\/sporting activities based on a sample of Turkish young people. Secondly, gender and age group differences with motivational dimensions were investigated. A total of 298 members of 6 Youth Centers voluntarily participated in this study. The Recreational Exercise Moti- vation Measure (REMM) was administered to all participants. Two x two

  12. Assessing the Value of Recreational Divers for Censusing Elasmobranchs

    E-print Network

    Myers, Ransom A.

    Assessing the Value of Recreational Divers for Censusing Elasmobranchs Christine A. Ward elasmobranchs are relatively rare, obtaining data for broad-scale trend analysis requires high sampling effort. Elasmobranchs are also relatively large and conspicuous and therefore it may be possible to enlist recreational

  13. Nutritional Properties of Recreationally Caught Marine Fishes

    E-print Network

    ). For low calorie diets (as for weight re duction), species of fish in category A are especially desirable as other flesh foods. Category B corre sponds to fish having composition com parable to meat (excepting, changes due to spawning conditions and migra tions, and other factors. Fish Composition Compared

  14. Healthy habitat keeps commercial and recreational fisheries strong

    E-print Network

    Healthy habitat keeps commercial and recreational fisheries strong Office of Habitat Conservation Office of Habitat Conservation | Great Lakes Habitat Restoration U.S.DepartmentofCommerce | NationalOceanicandAtmosphericAdministration | NationalMarineFisheriesService Habitat provides important feeding and breeding grounds for fish. With- out

  15. Marine Mammal Center

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    A non-profit hospital located in the Golden Gate National Recreation Area near Sausalito, California that rescues and rehabilitates marine mammals. Site contains information on education, research, and adopt-a-seal; features a photo gallery and FAQs. Volunteer, membership, and donation opportunities available. Information on what to do when finding a stranded marine mammal and stay current with the Center's patients. Education programs available at the Center or at your location (fees associated).

  16. An evaluation of southeastern Ontario recreational water quality.

    PubMed

    Bennell, Maria C; Joyce, Alan; Gardner, Edward; Majury, Anna

    2015-06-01

    Fecal contamination in recreational waters causes adverse health outcomes in humans; yet, surprisingly, a paucity of literature addresses recreational water quality in North America. The authors addressed this gap by evaluating E. coli contamination of southeastern Ontario, Canada, recreational beach waters between the years 2008-2011. They tested water samples for microbial contamination by the membrane filtration method. They used Friedman's and repeated measures analyses of variance and descriptive statistics to assess annual and monthly E. coli levels as well as noncompliance to the Ontario bathing beach standard. Seven waters showed high noncompliance to the Ontario standard, which could negatively affect the health of local recreational beach users. The authors' study provides much needed baseline information on beach water quality. They call for greater recreational water sampling and reporting standardization across North American jurisdictions. PMID:26058219

  17. Incorporation of organic contaminants into geochemical samples and an assessment of potential sources: Examples from Geoscience Australia marine survey S282

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Emmanuelle Grosjean; Graham A. Logan

    2007-01-01

    Organic geochemists are increasingly involved in multi-disciplinary collaborative studies but not often in the initial sample collection phase, so understanding the origin and source of contaminants derived from sample handling and containers is of vital importance as standard laboratory blanks cannot assess this contamination. A variety of organic contaminants was detected in different sediments collected during Geoscience Australia marine survey

  18. Trends in Selenium Utilization in Marine Microbial World Revealed through the Analysis of the Global Ocean Sampling (GOS) Project

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2008-01-01

    Selenium is an important trace element that occurs in proteins in the form of selenocysteine (Sec) and in tRNAs in the form of selenouridine. Recent large-scale metagenomics projects provide an opportunity for understanding global trends in trace element utilization. Herein, we characterized the selenoproteome of the microbial marine community derived from the Global Ocean Sampling (GOS) expedition. More than 3,600 selenoprotein gene sequences belonging to 58 protein families were detected, including sequences representing 7 newly identified selenoprotein families, such as homologs of ferredoxin–thioredoxin reductase and serine protease. In addition, a new eukaryotic selenoprotein family, thiol reductase GILT, was identified. Most GOS selenoprotein families originated from Cys-containing thiol oxidoreductases. In both Pacific and Atlantic microbial communities, SelW-like and SelD were the most widespread selenoproteins. Geographic location had little influence on Sec utilization as measured by selenoprotein variety and the number of selenoprotein genes detected; however, both higher temperature and marine (as opposed to freshwater and other aquatic) environment were associated with increased use of this amino acid. Selenoproteins were also detected with preference for either environment. We identified novel fusion forms of several selenoproteins that highlight redox activities of these proteins. Almost half of Cys-containing SelDs were fused with NADH dehydrogenase, whereas such SelD forms were rare in terrestrial organisms. The selenouridine utilization trait was also analyzed and showed an independent evolutionary relationship with Sec utilization. Overall, our study provides insights into global trends in microbial selenium utilization in marine environments. PMID:18551170

  19. Recreational Sports -seattleu.edu/recreation SEATTLE UNIVERSITY SPORT CLUBS

    E-print Network

    Carter, John

    and intramural sports, fitness programs, outdoor recreation, using the Connolly Center or participat- ing- tional Sports, Connolly Center and Seattle University. I understand that the safe and proper useRecreational Sports - seattleu.edu/recreation SEATTLE UNIVERSITY SPORT CLUBS MEMBER REGISTRATION

  20. Tourism and Commercial Recreation Department of Recreation and Leisure Studies

    E-print Network

    Brown, Gregory G.

    Tourism and Commercial Recreation Department of Recreation and Leisure Studies Green Mountain College Fall 2005 GENERAL INFORMATION Course: REC 3033, Tourism and Commercial Recreation Credits: 3 DESCRIPTION [From the catalog]. This course is a study of the dynamics of the tourism industry

  1. Validation of Ocean Color Satellite Data Products in Under Sampled Marine Areas. Chapter 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subramaniam, Ajit; Hood, Raleigh R.; Brown, Christopher W.; Carpenter, Edward J.; Capone, Douglas G.

    2001-01-01

    The planktonic marine cyanobacterium, Trichodesmium sp., is broadly distributed throughout the oligotrophic marine tropical and sub-tropical oceans. Trichodesmium, which typically occurs in macroscopic bundles or colonies, is noteworthy for its ability to form large surface aggregations and to fix dinitrogen gas. The latter is important because primary production supported by N2 fixation can result in a net export of carbon from the surface waters to deep ocean and may therefore play a significant role in the global carbon cycle. However, information on the distribution and density of Trichodesmium from shipboard measurements through the oligotrophic oceans is very sparse. Such estimates are required to quantitatively estimate total global rates of N2 fixation. As a result current global rate estimates are highly uncertain. Thus in order to understand the broader biogeochemical importance of Trichodesmium and N2 fixation in the oceans, we need better methods to estimate the global temporal and spatial variability of this organism. One approach that holds great promise is satellite remote sensing. Satellite ocean color sensors are ideal instruments for estimating global phytoplankton biomass, especially that due to episodic blooms, because they provide relatively high frequency synoptic information over large areas. Trichodesmium has a combination of specific ultrastructural and biochemical features that lend themselves to identification of this organism by remote sensing. Specifically, these features are high backscatter due to the presence of gas vesicles, and absorption and fluorescence of phycoerythrin. The resulting optical signature is relatively unique and should be detectable with satellite ocean color sensors such as the Sea-Viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS).

  2. Financial Issues in Campus Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Howard; Canning, William F.; Brailsford, Paul; Rokosz, Frank

    2003-01-01

    Campus recreation centers, originally quasi-academic facilities, have evolved since the early 1980s: first into campus amenities and then into auxiliary business enterprises. Financial issues affecting campus recreation have changed accordingly and are discussed in this chapter. (Author)

  3. Department of Recreational Sports Sports & Special Programs

    E-print Network

    Escher, Christine

    ....................................................................................................... - 6 - DEPARTMENT OF RECREATIONAL SPORTS VISION STATEMENT ..................................................................................................................................................................... - 6 - STUDENT AFFAIRS MISSION STATEMENT .................................................................................................................................... - 6 - DEPARTMENT OF RECREATIONAL SPORTS MISSION STATEMENT

  4. Department of Recreational Sports Sports & Special Programs

    E-print Network

    Escher, Christine

    ....................................................................................................... - 7 - DEPARTMENT OF RECREATIONAL SPORTS VISION STATEMENT ..................................................................................................................................................................... - 7 - STUDENT AFFAIRS MISSION STATEMENT .................................................................................................................................... - 7 - DEPARTMENT OF RECREATIONAL SPORTS MISSION STATEMENT

  5. [Composition of marine sediment samples in the Costa Rica intertidal zones using X-Ray fluorescence analysis].

    PubMed

    Salazar, Alfonso; Lizano, Omar G; Alfaro, Eric J

    2004-12-01

    Using an energy dispersive X-Ray fluorescence analysis, simultaneous evaluation of K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Ge, Ni, Cu, Zn, Br, Rb, Sr and Pb in 74 marine sediment samples from the Costa Rica intertidal zones was conducted. Samples were collected between June 1999 and December 2001, from Caribbean and Pacific beaches of Costa Rica. Calcium and iron showed the highest abundances and are indicators of the natural origin of the sediments. Calcium is associated with biogenic processes such as coral reefs near the sampling sites and iron indicates a terrigenous origin. In general, the beaches of the Caribbean and North Pacific regions showed the greatest concentration of calcium. This is indicative of the abundant reef structures near these beaches. The beaches of the Central and South Pacific show the greatest iron concentrations, indicating an important lithosphere contribution and/or little contribution of calcium carbonate due to the poor development of coralline structures near the sampling sites. Finally, the analyses did not show evidence of elements associated with anthropogenic pollution. Only a northern section of Puerto Viejo beach showed high concentrations of lead, zinc and titanium, perhaps associated with hydrothermal sources. PMID:17465132

  6. The Spatial Dimension: A New Reservoir and Recreational Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hecock, Richard D.

    1974-01-01

    An initial effort to estimate the nature and extent of a new reservoir's impact upon the recreational behavior of a sample population living in the surrounding area (Keystone Reservoir, Oklahoma) is described. (NQ)

  7. recreate load le Rick Whitman

    E-print Network

    Sirianni, Marco

    recreate load le Rick Whitman November 27, 1996 Usage The tool is invoked by entering recreate load le on the command line followed by one argument which is a reference le name. For example: recreate_load will be a single load le named the same as the input reference le name but with the extension \\.lod". For example

  8. Archival policies and collections database for the Woods Hole Science Center's marine sediment samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buczkowski, Brian J.; Kelsey, Sarah A.

    2007-01-01

    The Woods Hole Science Center of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been an active member of the Woods Hole research community, Woods Hole, Massachusetts, for over 40 years. In that time there have been many projects that involved the collection of sediment samples conducted by USGS scientists and technicians for the research and study of seabed environments and processes. These samples were collected at sea or near shore and then brought back to the Woods Hole Science Center (WHSC) for analysis. While at the center, samples are stored in ambient temperature, refrigerated and freezing conditions ranging from +2º Celsius to -18º Celsius, depending on the best mode of preparation for the study being conducted or the duration of storage planned for the samples. Recently, storage methods and available storage space have become a major concern at the WHSC. The core and sediment archive program described herein has been initiated to set standards for the management, methods, and duration of sample storage. A need has arisen to maintain organizational consistency and define storage protocol. This handbook serves as a reference and guide to all parties interested in using and accessing the WHSC's sample archive and also defines all the steps necessary to construct and maintain an organized collection of geological samples. It answers many questions as to the way in which the archive functions.

  9. Wilderness Recreation Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drury, Jack K.

    1977-01-01

    A Wilderness Recreation Education program aims to: offer students an opportunity to be involved with direct learning in the outdoors; instill an understanding of ways to exist within and enjoy the wilderness environment; and develop an awareness of an appreciation for the need to conserve and maintain the wilderness environment for generations to…

  10. Therapeutic Recreation Directory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Dixon, Charles C.

    The Therapeutic Recreation Directory has an abundance of information for the therapeutic recreation specialist, or those who study and teach in the field. There is an extensive collection of activity ideas, ranging from sports and cookery, for educators to experiment with in the classroom or for professionals to use on the job. This site also hosts inTeRlink, a long-running and constantly updated newsletter about developments in recreational therapy, found by clicking on the �News� link on the left hand side of the home page. All articles from the last ten years are available in the archive. A bulletin board, chat room, and forum keep professionals and students informed about current TR issues, and surveys help to gather and disseminate information and ideas about new developments in TR services. Visitors will also find the �Forms� link very helpful in nearly every aspect of providing recreational therapy to clients, including forms to help assess and treat patients, and guidelines on planning and implementing new therapeutic programs.

  11. The Consumer and Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Secondary Curriculum Development.

    This publication deals with recreation and leisure in American society. It is stated that the greater mobility of Americans, the increased time and money available for leisure time pursuits, the higher degree of educational level with accompanying wider interests, and the changing attitudes toward the balance between work and play are having…

  12. New procedure for recovering extra- and intracellular DNA from marine sediment samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alawi, M.; Kallmeyer, J.

    2012-12-01

    Extracellular DNA (eDNA) is a ubiquitous biological compound in aquatic sediment and soil. Despite major methodological advances, analysis of DNA from sediment is still technically challenging, not just because of the co-elution of inhibitory substances, but also due to co-elution of extracellular DNA, which potentially leads to an overestimate of the actual diversity. Previous studies suggested that eDNA might play an important role in biogeochemical element cycling, horizontal gene transfer and stabilization of biofilm structures. Several protocols based on the precipitation of eDNA e.g. with CTAB and ethanol have already been published. However, using these methods we did not succeed in quantifying very low amounts of eDNA (e.g. <1?g eDNA/g dry wt) in marine sediment even when using DNA carriers like glycogen. Since the recovery of eDNA by precipitation strongly depends on its concentration, these previously published procedures are not adequate for deep biosphere sediment due to the low eDNA content. We have focused on the question whether eDNA could be a source of nitrogen and phosphorus for microbes in the subseafloor biosphere. Therefore we developed a new method for the (semi)-quantitative extraction of eDNA from sediment. The new extraction procedure is based on sequential washing of the sediment to remove simultaneously eDNA and microbial cells without lysing them. After separation of the cells by centrifugation, the eDNA was extracted from the supernatant and purified by adsorption onto a solid phase, followed by removal of the solids and subsequent elution of the pure eDNA. Intracellular DNA (iDNA) was extracted and purified from the cell pellet using a commercial DNA extraction kit. Additional to a very low detection limit and reproducible quantification, this new method allows separation and purification of both extracellular and intracellular DNA to an extent that inhibitors are removed and downstream applications like PCR can be performed. To evaluate the new extraction method two sediments with rather opposing composition were analyzed. Sediment from the South Pacific Gyre, the most oligotrophic oceanic region on earth and organic-rich Baltic Sea sediment (Northern Germany) were processed. Using this new procedure high purity genomic iDNA and eDNA with a molecular size range between 20 bp and 50k bp can be simultaneously recovered even from very oligotrophic sediment with very low cell abundances. The main fraction of recovered eDNA was suitable for downstream applications like PCR and had a molecular size that indicates minimal shearing. Despite about two decades of research many questions about deep subsurface life remain unanswered. The fact that microbes can be found even in deep oligotrophic marine sediment raises the fundamental questions of the types and availability of substrates and their biogeochemical cycling. This is the first study that provides evidence that eDNA is an important potential substrate for microorganisms in the deep biosphere. Also, our results show a link between cell counts and eDNA content, indicating that the eDNA pool in the investigated sediment consist mainly of microbial DNA. Comparative sequence analysis of extracted iDNA and eDNA will provide deeper insights into the origin and turnover of eDNA and the apparent microbial community composition in the deep biosphere.

  13. Wipe sampling of amphetamine-type stimulants and recreational drugs on selected household surfaces with analysis by ultra-performance liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Madireddy, Sri Bharat; Bodeddula, Vanaja Reddy; Mansani, Sravan Kumar; Wells, Martha J M; Boles, Jeffrey O

    2013-06-15

    Sorption characteristics of eight drugs related to recreational and clandestine activity-amphetamine, cocaine, heroin, N-formyl amphetamine, N-formyl methamphetamine, methamphetamine, 3, 4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), and pseudoephedrine-were evaluated on selected kitchen countertop surfaces. Methanol-dampened Whatman 40 filter paper wipes were used to collect samples from eleven surfaces including alkyd resin, ceramic tiles, glass, granite, laminate, limestone, marble, quartz compac, quartz real, soap stone, and stainless steel. The filter paper wipes were analyzed by a rapid three-minute UPLC-QTOF method, following ammonium acetate buffer (pH 5.8-6.2) extraction. The average percentage recoveries after 15 h of exposure to the surface materials tested, was found to be highest for cocaine and MDMA and lowest for amphetamine and methamphetamine. Among the eleven countertop surfaces, overall recoveries for marble were observed to be the least, whereas soapstone, quartz compac and stainless steel were among the highest. Scanning electron microscopic images of the surfaces provided a unique view of surface irregularities that potentially influenced drug recovery. Aging, migration, solvent composition, and volatility were examined. The variation in recovery of drugs was attributed to four key factors: compound volatility, surface composition, surface-compound interaction, and solvent composition. PMID:23583948

  14. Sample preparation methods for quantitative detection of DNA by molecular assays and marine biosensors.

    PubMed

    Cox, Annie M; Goodwin, Kelly D

    2013-08-15

    The need for quantitative molecular methods is growing in environmental, food, and medical fields but is hindered by low and variable DNA extraction and by co-extraction of PCR inhibitors. DNA extracts from Enterococcus faecium, seawater, and seawater spiked with E. faecium and Vibrio parahaemolyticus were tested by qPCR for target recovery and inhibition. Conventional and novel methods were tested, including Synchronous Coefficient of Drag Alteration (SCODA) and lysis and purification systems used on an automated genetic sensor (the Environmental Sample Processor, ESP). Variable qPCR target recovery and inhibition were measured, significantly affecting target quantification. An aggressive lysis method that utilized chemical, enzymatic, and mechanical disruption enhanced target recovery compared to commercial kit protocols. SCODA purification did not show marked improvement over commercial spin columns. Overall, data suggested a general need to improve sample preparation and to accurately assess and account for DNA recovery and inhibition in qPCR applications. PMID:23790450

  15. Flow cytometric applicability to evaluate UV inactivation of phytoplankton in marine water samples.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Ranveig Ottoey; Hess-Erga, Ole-Kristian; Larsen, Aud; Thuestad, Gunnar; Tobiesen, August; Hoell, Ingunn Alne

    2015-07-15

    Disinfection of microbes is of importance to prevent the spread of pathogens and non-indigenous species in the environment. Here we test the applicability of using flow cytometry (FCM) to evaluate inactivation of the phytoplankter Tetraselmis suecica after UV irradiation and labeling with the esterase substrate 5-carboxyfluorescein diacetate acetoxymethyl ester (CFDA-AM). Non-irradiated and UV irradiated samples were analyzed with the plate count technique and FCM for 24days. The numbers of colony forming units were used as a standard to develop a FCM protocol. Our protocol readily distinguishes live and dead cells, but challenges were encountered when determining whether UV damaged cells are dying or repairable. As damaged cells can represent a risk to aquatic organisms and/or humans, this was taken into account when developing the FCM protocol. In spite of the above mentioned challenges we argue that FCM represents an accurate and rapid method to analyze T. suecica samples. PMID:25960276

  16. Non-lethal method to obtain stomach samples from a large marine predator and the use of DNA analysis to improve dietary information

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Adam Barnett; Kevin S. Redd; Stewart D. Frusher; John D. Stevens; Jayson M. Semmens

    2010-01-01

    Dietary information of apex predators is crucial to understanding community dynamics and ecosystem processes. However, as dietary studies traditionally involve lethal sampling, obtaining this essential information can have repercussions on predator populations and the structure and functioning of marine ecosystems. With stronger emphasis being placed on conservation of species that are vulnerable to overexploitation, the need for non-destructive methods of

  17. Development of a subcritical fluid extraction and GC-MS validation method for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in marine samples.

    PubMed

    Jia, Kai; Feng, Xiaomei; Liu, Kun; Han, Yuqian; Xue, Yong; Xue, Changhu

    2013-04-01

    This paper describes a new procedure for extracting polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from marine samples using subcritical 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (R134a). The extraction procedure was optimized at temperatures varying from 20 to 70°C and pressures ranging from 3 to 15 MPa. The volume of the co-solvent was then optimized using 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (R134a) as the subcritical phase. PCBs were characterized by GC-MS using the optimized conditions of 3 MPa, 30°C, and a co-solvent volume of 6 mL. The average yields of PCBs from subcritical fluid extraction of spiked oyster samples were measured and found to be greater than 90%, with relative standard deviations (RSD) of less than 10%. Detection limits of this method were in the range of 0.045-0.108 ng/g of dry mass. The method was compared to Soxhlet extraction and then applied for monitoring PCBs in oysters from Qingdao, Shandong, China. PMID:23455072

  18. Inventory of For-Hire Data Collections in the United States and U.S. Territories Prepared by the For-Hire Workgroup of the Marine Recreational Information Program

    E-print Network

    Marine Fisheries Service, Northeast Fisheries Science Center Jason Didden, Mid-Atlantic Fishery documents include: Rob Andrews, Han-Lin Lai, and John Foster, NOAA Fisheries, Office of Science) ...................................................39 Jason Didden Region 8: North-Atlantic (Connecticut to Maine

  19. 76 FR 68429 - Availability of Seats for Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-04

    ...the following vacant seats on the Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council: Research; Chamber of Commerce/Tourism/Recreation; Marine Business/ Ports/Industry; Conservation; Commercial Fishing (alternate position only)....

  20. Assessing the Value of Recreational Divers for Censusing Elasmobranchs

    PubMed Central

    Ward-Paige, Christine A.; Lotze, Heike K.

    2011-01-01

    Background Around the world, researchers are using the observations and experiences of citizens to describe patterns in animal populations. This data is often collected via ongoing sampling or by synthesizing past experiences. Since elasmobranchs are relatively rare, obtaining data for broad-scale trend analysis requires high sampling effort. Elasmobranchs are also relatively large and conspicuous and therefore it may be possible to enlist recreational divers to collect data on their occurrence and relative abundance from daily dive activities. For this, however, a good understanding of the value of data collected by recreational divers is essential. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we explore the value of recreational divers for censusing elasmobranchs using a diverse set of data sources. First, we use a simulation experiment to explore detection rates of the roving diver technique, used by recreational divers, across a range of fish densities and speeds. Next, using a field survey, we show that inexperienced recreational divers detect and count elasmobranchs as well as experienced recreational divers. Finally, we use semi-structured interviews of recreational dive instructors to demonstrate the value of their recollections in terms of effort and their descriptions of spatial and temporal distributions of sharks in Thailand. Conclusions/Significance Overall, this study provides initial ground-work for using recreational divers for monitoring elasmobranch populations. If used appropriately, citizen-collected data may provide additional information that can be used to complement more standardized surveys and to describe population trends across a range of spatial and temporal scales. Due to the non-extractive nature of this data, recreational divers may also provide important insight into the success of conservation initiatives, such as shark sanctuaries and no-take zones. PMID:22016771

  1. Marine Sample Exploitation Project: estimates regarding the sensitivity and technology for the detection of nuclear explosion debris in the marine environment

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, K.V.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    1985-06-04

    The report discusses the possibility of detecting a small nuclear explosion in which most of the fission products are released to the ocean. The use of marine plankton as bioaccumulators is proposed to deal with the problem of dilution. 7 refs. (ACR)

  2. Quantifying Marine Emissions of Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds Using Laboratory Measurements of Plankton Monocultures and Field Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabolis, A. W.; Meskhidze, N.; Kamykowski, D.; Reed, R. E.

    2010-12-01

    Marine biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) have been suggested to contribute significant portion of the organic carbon present in ocean atmosphere. In this study emission rates of 40 different hydrocarbons are quantified for lab-grown non-axenic phytoplankton monocultures and ambient samples from the Pamlico-Neuse Estuary, NC. The outcome of environmental conditions on production of BVOCs was examined for different light and temperature conditions. These different regimes are considered proxies for physiological stress-induced effects observed in natural ecosystems. The samples were incubated in a climate controlled room; they were then transferred to smaller volumes (200 ml) for analysis. BVOCs accumulated in the water and headspace above the water were measured by bubbling hydrocarbon-free gas mixture through the sample and passing the gas stream through a gas chromatography/mass spectrometry system equipped with a sample pre-concentrator. Inside the pre-concentrator, the compounds were trapped on a sorbent material, heated, and flushed into the GC-MS column. The pre-concentrator/GC-MS system gave at least 1000 times magnification of the sample concentrations, allowing detection of low ppt levels of hydrocarbons. Here we report results for lab-grown diatoms Thalassiosira weissflogii and Thalassiosira pseudonana, prymnesiophyte Pleurochrysis carterae, and dinoflagellates Karina brevis and Procentrum minimum, as well as field samples. To make results widely usable, all the emissions are normalized to Chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) concentration and cell counts. Our results show that diatoms had the highest isoprene production rate of 2.8 ?mol (g Chl-a)-1 h-1 with ranges between 1.4 and 3.6 ?mol (g Chl-a)-1 h-1 at light levels between 90 and 900 ?E m-2 s-1, respectively. The prymnesiophyte and dinoflagellate species had isoprene production rates of 1.3±0.4 ?mol (g Chl-a)-1 h-1 with a similar light dependency as diatoms. Field samples had comparable isoprene production rate of 3.5 ?mol (g Chl-a)-1 h-1 with ranges between 0.6 and 4.1 ?mol (g Chl-a)-1 h-1 for similar light levels and temperatures between 18 to 30°C. Three monoterpenes detected were ?-pinene, camphene, and d-limonene. Diatoms had the highest ?-pinene and d-limonene production rates of 0.045 ?mol (g Chl-a)-1 h-1 and 0.015 ?mol (g Chl-a)-1 h-1, respectively. The prymnesiophyte species had the highest camphene production of 0.021 ?mol (g Chl-a)-1 h-1. Production rates of d-limonene and camphene did not show a well-defined light dependency, but both isoprene and ?-pinene showed an increase in terpene production with increasing light intensities. Field samples show ?-pinene, d-limonene, and camphene production rates of 0.05 ?mol (g Chl-a)-1 h-1, 0.02 ?mol (g Chl-a)-1 h-1 and 0.018 ?mol (g Chl-a)-1 h-1, respectively. Field samples acclimated at 26°C had the highest terpene production rates. This study tabulates a large number of BVOC emission rates for various phytoplankton species under diverse environmental conditions.

  3. Recreational scuba diving injuries.

    PubMed

    Clenney, T L; Lassen, L F

    1996-04-01

    Because of the increasing popularity of recreational scuba diving, primary care physicians should be familiar with common diving injuries. One form of barotrauma, middle ear squeeze, is the most common diving injury. Other important diving injuries include inner ear barotrauma and pulmonary barotrauma. Arterial gas embolism, a potentially life-threatening form of pulmonary barotrauma, requires hyperbaric treatment. Decompression sickness is the result of bubble formation in body tissue. Symptoms of decompression sickness range from joint pain to neurologic or pulmonary problems. Recompression is the mainstay of treatment. PMID:8623700

  4. Catfish Ponds for Recreation

    E-print Network

    Masser, Michael P.; Steinbach, Don W.; Higginbotham, Billy

    1999-08-02

    and bull- heads often invade catfish ponds and compete with the catfish for food and oxygen. They also increase the likelihood of disease. Because cat- fish eat mostly aquatic insects and Catfish Ponds FOR RECREATION Michael P. Masser, Don Steinbach... inches, no fertil- ization is needed. Fertilize if the Secchi disk can still be seen at 24 or more inches. If the disk disappears between 12 and 18 inches, the bloom is too dense; watch the pond closely for oxygen problems (see Water quality). If the disk...

  5. FACULTY OF KINESIOLOGY AND RECREATION MANAGEMENT

    E-print Network

    Major, Arkady

    , Athletic Therapy Program - BKin (AT) Bachelor of Physical Education - BPE Bachelor of RecreationFACULTY OF KINESIOLOGY AND RECREATION MANAGEMENT Application Information Bulletin for 2014 of Kinesiology and Recreation Management programs: Bachelor of Kinesiology - BKin Bachelor of Kinesiology

  6. IN-SITU SAMPLING AND CHARACTERIZATION OF NATURALLY OCCURRING MARINE METHANE HYDRATE USING THE D/V JOIDES RESOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Frank R. Rack; Tim Francis; Peter Schultheiss; Philip E. Long; Barry M. Freifeld

    2005-04-01

    The primary activities accomplished during this quarter were continued efforts to develop plans for Phase 2 of this cooperative agreement based on the evolving operational planning for IODP Expedition 311, which will use the JOIDES Resolution to study marine methane hydrates along the Cascadia margin, offshore Vancouver Island. IODP Expedition 311 has been designed to further constrain the models for the formation of marine gas hydrate in subduction zone accretionary prisms. The objectives include characterizing the deep origin of the methane, its upward transport, its incorporation in gas hydrate, and its subsequent loss to the seafloor. The main attention of this expedition is on the widespread seafloor-parallel layer of dispersed gas hydrate located just above the base of the predicted stability field. In a gas hydrate formation model, methane is carried upward through regional sediment or small-scale fracture permeability, driven by the tectonic consolidation of the accretionary prism. The upward moving methane is incorporated into the gas hydrate clathrate as it enters the methane hydrate stability zone. Also important is the focusing of a portion of the upward methane flux into localized plumes or channels to form concentrations of near-seafloor gas hydrate. The amount of gas hydrate in local concentrations near the seafloor is especially important for understanding the response of marine gas hydrate to climate change. The expedition includes coring and downhole measurements at five sites across the Northern Cascadia accretionary prism. The sites will track the history of methane in an accretionary prism from (1) its production by mainly microbiological processes over a thick sediment vertical extent, (2) its upward transport through regional or locally focused fluid flow, (3) its incorporation in the regional hydrate layer above the BSR or in local concentrations at or near the seafloor, (4) methane loss from the hydrate by upward diffusion, and (5) methane oxidation and incorporation in seafloor carbonate, or expulsion to the ocean. This expedition builds on the previous Cascadia gas hydrate drilling of ODP Leg 146 and on more recent ODP Leg 204 off Oregon. Important experiments being considered for DOE/NETL funding as part of the JOI cooperative agreement include, (1) Logging-While-Drilling/Measurements-While-Drilling (LWD/MWD), (2) Pressure Core Sampling (PCS/HYACINTH) of gas hydrate, and fluid recovery under in situ conditions, (3) X-ray CT logging of whole cores under in situ conditions, and (4) Infrared thermal imaging of whole round cores to map temperature variations resulting from the presence of hydrate. Preliminary budget estimates have been made for each of these tasks and discussions are ongoing with DOE/NETL program managers to develop a final plan that can be implemented within the constraints of the available funding and logistical considerations.

  7. U.S. Department of Commerce | National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration National Marine Fisheries Service

    E-print Network

    of domestically caught fish and shellfish by the commercial fishing industry was approximately $4.0 billion of fishery products for domestic and foreign markets, the commercial marine fishing industry contributed $35 in the recreational fishing industry to design a new data collection program for our nation's marine recreational

  8. Recreation Programs for the Handicapped.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa Univ., Iowa City. Recreation Education Program.

    Presented are duplications of the responses given by Recreation Programs for the Handicapped (Miami, Florida) as part of a project to collect, share, and compile information about, and techniques in the operation of 18 community action models for recreation services to the disabled. Model programs are categorized as consumer, client competency,…

  9. Leisure Today. Issues in Correctional Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCall, Gail E., Ed.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    This series on correctional recreation includes articles on: leisure therapy; treatment teams; rehabilitation; legislation; vocational implications of leisure; and women's correctional recreation services. (CJ)

  10. Improvements of a combined size exclusion chromatography and solid phase extraction approach for the clean-up of marine sediment samples for trace analysis of pesticides

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Bester; Heinrich Hühnerfuss

    1997-01-01

    Two methods based on gel permeation chromatography (GPC) [size exclusion chromatography] for the analysis of traces (ng\\/kg)\\u000a of nitrogen and phosphorus containing pesticides (like triazines or phosphothionates) from marine sediment samples are compared:\\u000a A macro GPC with Biobeads SX-3 and a chromatography on a high-performance (HP-GPC) column with UV-detection. Results for eight\\u000a triazine herbicides, two triazine metabolites, the phenylurea derivative

  11. Non-destructive alpha-particle activation analysis of P, Cl, K and Ca in marine macro-alga samples using synthetic multielement reference material as comparative standard

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y. Iwata; H. Naitoh; N. Suzuki

    1992-01-01

    A Synthetic Reference Material (SyRM) composed with accurately known amounts of 12 elements has been prepared. The elemental composition of the SyRM is closely similar to that of marine macro-algac sample. The elemental composition of the SyRM was regulated by the starting materials used for the synthesis. The SyRM was used as a comparative standard for non-destructive alpha-particle activation analysis

  12. Marine sediments monitoring studies for trace elements with the application of fast temperature programs and solid sampling high resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orani, Anna Maria; Han, Eunmi; Mandjukov, Petko; Vassileva, Emilia

    2015-01-01

    Analytical procedure for the determination of As, Cd, Cu, Ni, Co and Cr in marine sediment samples using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HR CS AAS) and direct solid sample analysis has been developed. The application of fast programs in combination with direct solid sampling allows to eliminate the drying and pretreatment steps, however makes impossible the use of liquid standards for calibration. Iridium treated platforms were applied throughout the present study. Calibration technique based on the use of solid certified reference materials (marine sediments) similar to the nature of the analyzed sample and statistics of regression analysis were applied to the real sediment samples. The instrumental parameters were optimized in order to obtain reproducible and interference free analytical signals. The ISO-17025 requirements and Eurachem guidelines were followed in the validation of the proposed analytical procedure. Accordingly, blanks, selectivity, calibration, linearity, working range, trueness, repeatability reproducibility, limits of detection and quantification and expanded uncertainty (k = 2) for all investigated elements were assessed. Two different approaches for the estimation of measurement uncertainty were applied and obtained results compared. The major contributors to the combined uncertainty of the analyte mass fraction were found to be the homogeneity of the samples and the microbalance precision. The influence of sample particle sizes on the total combined uncertainty was also evaluated. Traceability to SI system of units of the obtained by the proposed analytical procedure results was demonstrated. Additionally, validation of the methodology developed was effectuated by the comparison of the obtained results with independent method e.g. ICP-MS with external calibration. The use of solid sampling HR CS AAS for the determination of trace elements in marine sediment matrix gives significant advantages, such as straightforward calibration, a high sample throughput, sufficient precision, suitable limits of detection, appropriate for monitoring studies concentration range and reduced risk of analyte loss and contamination. This approach allows comparatively simple and reliable evaluation of uncertainty of the results and the basic validation parameters and in a natural way provides traceability of the obtained results. A comparison between the proposed fast programs with solid standard calibration and the conventional ones with liquid standard calibration demonstrates advantages of the new methodology. It provides faster, accurate and unbiased results typically with significantly lower uncertainties. The potential of the HR CS AAS technique is demonstrated by direct analysis of marine sediments form the Caribbean region and various sediment CRMs within the frame of monitoring program for this region.

  13. A survey of dioxin-like contaminants in fish from recreational fishing.

    PubMed

    Heimstad, Eldbjørg Sofie; Grønstøl, Gaute; Hetland, Karl Torstein; Alarcon, Javier Martinez; Rylander, Charlotta; Mariussen, Espen

    2015-08-01

    The dioxin and dioxin-like compounds are regarded as one of the most toxic group of environmental contaminants. Food for the commercial market is regularly monitored for their dioxin levels and the concentration allowed in food is strictly regulated. Less is known about locally caught fish from recreational fishing, which is often brought home for consumption. This can be fish caught from nearby lakes or streams or fish with marine origin close to industrial areas or harbours that are not regularly monitored for their dioxin levels. In this study, we established collaboration with schools in 13 countries. We received 203 samples of 29 different fish species of which Atlantic cod was the most abundant followed by brown trout and pollock. In general, the majority of samples from the participating countries had low concentrations (between 0.1 and 0.2 pg/g chemical-activated luciferase gene expression toxic equivalency wet weight (CALUX TEQ w.w.)) of dioxins and dioxin-like PCBs. Only 18 samples had concentrations above 1 pg/g CALUX TEQ w.w., and only 2 dab samples had concentration above maximum levels set by the European Commission. The Atlantic cod samples showed a significant reduction in the concentrations of dioxins with increasing latitude indicating less contamination of dioxin and dioxin-like compounds in the north of Norway. The results indicate that a moderate consumption of self-caught fish at presumed non-contaminated sites does not represent a major risk for exposure to dioxins or dioxin-like compounds at concentrations associated with adverse health effects. Recreational fishermen should, however, obtain knowledge about local fish consumption advice. PMID:26187791

  14. Organic UV filter concentrations in marine mussels from French coastal regions.

    PubMed

    Bachelot, Morgane; Li, Zhi; Munaron, Dominique; Le Gall, Patrik; Casellas, Claude; Fenet, Hélène; Gomez, Elena

    2012-03-15

    The accumulation of EHMC, OCT and OD-PABA, three common UV filter compounds, was investigated in marine mussels. Wild Mytilus edulis and Mytilus galloprovincialis were sampled in ten sites along the French Atlantic and Mediterranean coasts from June to November. In mussel tissues, 100% of the samples had quantifiable EHMC concentrations ranging from 3 to 256ngg(-1) dry weight, while 55% of the samples had detectable OCT concentrations ranging from under 2 to 7 112ngg(-1) dry weight. These concentrations significantly increased with the rising air temperature in summer, the recreational pressure and the geomorphological structure of the sampling sites (its lack of openness to the wide). This is the first study to report bioaccumulation of UV filters in marine mussels, thus highlighting the need for further monitoring and assessment. PMID:22330425

  15. Undergraduate Marine Science Program Student Advising Guide

    E-print Network

    Miami, University of

    . Introduction 2. Degree Programs and Sample Curricula MARINE AFFAIRS ­ BAMA MARINE SCIENCE / BIOLOGY ­ BSMAS areas, coastal and ocean law, and marine cultural resources Marine Science/Biology Marine biologistsUndergraduate Marine Science Program Student Advising Guide 2013-2014 #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS 1

  16. Undergraduate Marine Science Program Student Advising Guide

    E-print Network

    Miami, University of

    . Introduction 2. Degree Programs and Sample Curricula MARINE AFFAIRS ­ B.A.M.A MARINE SCIENCE / BIOLOGY ­ B areas, coastal and ocean law, and marine cultural resources Marine Biology Marine biologists studyUndergraduate Marine Science Program Student Advising Guide 2012-2013 #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS 1

  17. Outdoor recreational opportunities in Alabama

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    adam smith

    2012-04-04

    What comes to mind when you think about outdoor recreational opportunities? Diagram of the recreational opportunities to enjoy First we will look at the forest services and recreational opportunities. Forest Services There is plenty of hunting opportunities in Alabama to enjoy. Hunting Opportunities Outdoor tips can be essential when enjoying the outdoors. Outdoor Tips What a better way to spend a weekend then going fishing with family and friends. Places to Fish A great way to spend a weekend could also consist of hiking. Hiking Now ...

  18. Mississippi Statewide Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatum, W. Hugh; And Others

    Objectives of the official comprehensive outdoor recreation plan for the State of Mississippi are (1) to guide recreational development in Mississippi in an orderly fashion on a statewide level; (2) to survey public, semipublic, commercial, and private outdoor recreational opportunities; (3) to determine recreational needs for meeting present and…

  19. Iron mineralogy and bioaccessibility of dust generated from soils as determined by reflectance spectroscopy and magnetic and chemical properties--Nellis Dunes recreational area, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldstein, Harland L.; Reynolds, Richard L.; Morman, Suzette A.; Moskowitz, Bruce; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Goossens, Dirk; Buck, Brenda J.; Flagg, Cody; Till, Jessica; Yauk, Kimberly; Berquó, Thelma S.

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric mineral dust exerts many important effects on the Earth system, such as atmospheric temperatures, marine productivity, and melting of snow and ice. Mineral dust also can have detrimental effects on human health through respiration of very small particles and the leaching of metals in various organs. These effects can be better understood through characterization of the physical and chemical properties of dust, including certain iron oxide minerals, for their extraordinary radiative properties and possible effects on lung inflammation. Studies of dust from the Nellis Dunes recreation area near Las Vegas, Nevada, focus on characteristics of radiative properties (capacity of dust to absorb solar radiation), iron oxide mineral type and size, chemistry, and bioaccessibility of metals in fluids that simulate human gastric, lung, and phagolysosomal fluids. In samples of dust from the Nellis Dunes recreation area with median grain sizes of 2.4, 3.1, and 4.3 micrometers, the ferric oxide minerals goethite and hematite, at least some of it nanosized, were identified. In one sample, in vitro bioaccessibility experiments revealed high bioaccessibility of arsenic in all three biofluids and higher leachate concentration and bioaccessibility for copper, uranium, and vanadium in the simulated lung fluid than in the phagolysosomal fluid. The combination of methods used here to characterize mineral dust at the Nellis Dunes recreation area can be applied to global dust and broad issues of public health.

  20. Automated microextraction sample preparation coupled on-line to FT-ICR-MS: application to desalting and concentration of river and marine dissolved organic matter.

    PubMed

    Morales-Cid, Gabriel; Gebefugi, Istvan; Kanawati, Basem; Harir, Mourad; Hertkorn, Norbert; Rosselló-Mora, Ramón; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe

    2009-10-01

    Sample preparation procedures are in most cases sample- and time-consuming and commonly require the use of a large amount of solvents. Automation in this regard can optimize the minimal-needed injection volume and the solvent consumption will be efficiently reduced. A new fully automated sample desalting and pre-concentration technique employing microextraction by packed sorbents (MEPS) cartridges is implemented and coupled to an ion cyclotron resonance Fourier-transform mass spectrometer (ICR-FT/MS). The performance of non-target mass spectrometric analysis is compared for the automated versus off-line sample preparation for several samples of aqueous natural organic matter. This approach can be generalized for any metabolite profiling or metabolome analysis of biological materials but was optimized herein using a well characterized but highly complex organic mixture: a surface water and its well-characterized natural organic matter and a marine sample having a highly salt charge and enabling to validate the presented automatic system for salty samples. The analysis of Suwannee River water showed selective C18-MEPS enrichment of chemical signatures with average H/C and O/C elemental ratios and loss of both highly polar and highly aromatic structures from the original sample. Automated on-line application to marine samples showed desalting and different chemical signatures from surface to bottom water. Relative comparison of structural footprints with the C18-concentration/desalting procedure however enabled to demonstrate that the surface water film was more concentrated in surface-active components of natural (fatty acids) and anthropogenic origin (sulfur-containing surfactants). Overall, the relative standard deviation distribution in terms of peak intensity was improved by automating the proposed on-line method. PMID:19685041

  1. Recreational swimmers' exposure to Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus in the Chesapeake Bay, Maryland, USA.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Kristi S; Sapkota, Amy R; Jacobs, John M; He, Xin; Crump, Byron C

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus are ubiquitous in the marine-estuarine environment, but the magnitude of human non-ingestion exposure to these waterborne pathogens is largely unknown. We evaluated the magnitude of dermal exposure to V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus among swimmers recreating in Vibrio-populated waters by conducting swim studies at four swimming locations in the Chesapeake Bay in 2009 and 2011. Volunteers (n=31) swam for set time periods, and surface water (n=25) and handwash (n=250) samples were collected. Samples were analyzed for Vibrio concentrations using quantitative PCR. Linear and logistic regressions were used to evaluate factors associated with recreational exposures. Mean surface water V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus concentrations were 1128CFUmL(-1) (95% confidence interval (CI): 665.6, 1591.4) and 18CFUmL(-1) (95% CI: 9.8, 26.1), respectively, across all sampling locations. Mean Vibrio concentrations in handwash samples (V. vulnificus, 180CFUcm(-2) (95% CI: 136.6, 222.5); V. parahaemolyticus, 3CFUcm(-2) (95% CI: 2.4, 3.7)) were significantly associated with Vibrio concentrations in surface water (V. vulnificus, p<0.01; V. parahaemolyticus, p<0.01), but not with salinity or temperature (V. vulnificus, p=0.52, p=0.17; V. parahaemolyticus, p=0.82, p=0.06). Handwashing reduced V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus on subjects' hands by approximately one log (93.9%, 89.4%, respectively). It can be concluded that when Chesapeake Bay surface waters are characterized by elevated concentrations of Vibrio, swimmers and individuals working in those waters could experience significant dermal exposures to V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus, increasing their risk of infection. PMID:25454225

  2. Healthy Swimming/Recreational Water

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Facts Index of Healthy Water-related Topics Healthy Water Sites Healthy Water Home Drinking Water Healthy Swimming/ ... minimizing the risk of illness and injury. Recreational Water Illness (noun): Illness caused by germs and chemicals ...

  3. Seattle University Recreation Position Description

    E-print Network

    Carter, John

    will assist in the promotion and awareness of the University Recreation Brand and programs to the students standards, professionalism and consistency are maintained and met through collateral material, display cases

  4. An investigation into the impacts of recreational activities on Intertidal assemblages at Westward Ho, Devon

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ruth C. Prescott

    The effects of human recreational activities on Intertidal communities were examined at Westward Ho, North Devon. Intertidal communities were sampled along eight transects located along the shoreline to represent a gradient of increasing recreational disturbance, and human activity was recorded on eight occasions during weekdays, normal weekends and holiday weekends. Transects closest to beach and access points were most frequently

  5. Recreational exposure to microcystins during algal blooms in two California lakes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lorraine C. Backer; Sandra V. McNeel; Terry Barber; Barbara Kirkpatrick; Christopher Williams; Mitch Irvin; Yue Zhou; Trisha B. Johnson; Kate Nierenberg; Mark Aubel; Rebecca LePrell; Andrew Chapman; Amanda Foss; Susan Corum; Vincent R. Hill; Stephanie M. Kieszak; Yung-Sung Cheng

    2010-01-01

    We conducted a study of recreational exposure to microcystins among 81 children and adults planning recreational activities on either of three California reservoirs, two with significant, ongoing blooms of toxin-producing cyanobacteria, including Microcystis aeruginosa (Bloom Lakes), and one without a toxin-producing algal bloom (Control Lake). We analyzed water samples for algal taxonomy, microcystin concentrations, and potential respiratory viruses (adenoviruses and

  6. In-Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Marine Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Frank Rack; Peter Schultheiss; IODP Expedition 311 Scientific Party

    2005-12-31

    The primary accomplishments of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter were the implementation of a scientific ocean drilling expedition to study marine methane hydrates along the Cascadia margin, in the NE Pacific as part of Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 311 using the R/V JOIDES Resolution and the deployment of all required equipment and personnel to provide the required services during this expedition. IODP Expedition 311 shipboard activities on the JOIDES Resolution began on August 28 and were concluded on October 28, 2005. New ODP Pressure Coring System (PCS) aluminum autoclave chambers were fabricated prior to the expedition. During the expedition, 16 PCS autoclaves containing pressure cores were X-rayed before and after depressurization using a modified Geotek MSCL-P (multi-sensor core logger-pressure) system. These PCS cores were density scanned using the MSCL-V (multi-sensor core logger-vertical) during depressurization to monitor gas evolution. The MSCL-V was set up in a 20-foot-long refrigerated container provided by Texas A&M University through the JOI contract with TAMRF. IODP Expedition 311 was the first time that PCS cores were examined before (using X-ray), during (using MSCL-V gamma density) and after (using X-ray) degassing to determine the actual volume and distribution of sediment and gas hydrate in the pressurized core, which will be important for more accurate determination of mass balances between sediment, gas, gas hydrate, and fluids in the samples collected. Geotek, Ltd was awarded a contract by JOI to provide equipment and personnel to perform pressure coring and related work on IODP Expedition 311 (Cascadia Margin Gas Hydrates). Geotek, Ltd. provided an automated track for use with JOI's infrared camera systems. Four auxiliary monitors showed infrared core images in real time to aid hydrate identification and sampling. Images were collected from 185 cores during the expedition and processed to provide continuous core temperature data. The HYACINTH pressure coring tools, subsystems, and core logging systems were mobilized to Astoria, Oregon. Both HYACINTH pressure coring tools, the HRC (HYACE Rotary Corer) and the FPC (Fugro Pressure Corer) were mobilized and used during the expedition. Two HYACINTH engineers supervised the use of the tools and five good pressure cores were obtained. Velocity, density and X-ray linear scanning data were collected from these cores at near in situ pressure using the MSCL-P system. Dr. Barry Freifeld from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory provided an X-ray source and detector for X-ray imaging of pressure cores and helped Geotek with the design and mobilization of the MSCL-P system. Pressure core handling, transfer, and logging was performed in a refrigerated 20-foot container supplied by Geotek, Ltd. After scanning, the pressure cores were stored for on-shore analysis in aluminum barrels. Additional studies were conducted at the Pacific Geoscience Center (PGC), where a shore based laboratory was established after Expedition 311.

  7. Assessing the effectiveness of marine reserves on unsustainably harvested long-lived sessile invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Linares, Cristina; Garrabou, Joaquim; Hereu, Bernat; Diaz, David; Marschal, Christian; Sala, Enric; Zabala, Mikel

    2012-02-01

    Although the rapid recovery of fishes after establishment of a marine reserve is well known, much less is known about the response of long-lived, sessile, benthic organisms to establishment of such reserves. Since antiquity, Mediterranean red coral (Corallium rubrum) has been harvested intensively for use in jewelry, and its distribution is currently smaller than its historical size throughout the Mediterranean Sea. To assess whether establishment of marine reserves is associated with a change in the size and number of red coral colonies that historically were not harvested sustainably, we analyzed temporal changes in mean colony diameter and density from 1992 to 2005 within red coral populations at different study sites in the Medes Islands Marine Reserve (established in 1992) and in adjacent unprotected areas. Moreover, we compared colony size in the Medes Islands Marine Reserve, where recreational diving is allowed and poaching has been observed after reserve establishment, with colony size in three other marine protected areas (Banyuls, Carry-le-Rouet, and Scandola) with the enforced prohibition of fishing and diving. At the end of the study, the size of red coral colonies at all sampling sites in the Medes Islands was significantly smaller than predicted by growth models and smaller than those in marine protected areas without fishing and diving. The annual number of recreational dives and the percent change in the basal diameter of red coral colonies were negatively correlated, which suggests that abrasion by divers may increase the mortality rates of the largest red coral colonies within this reserve . Our study is the first quantitative assessment of a poaching event, which was detected during our monitoring in 2002, inside the marine reserve. Poaching was associated with a loss of approximately 60% of the biomass of red coral colonies. PMID:22098377

  8. CSULB Department of Recreation and Leisure Studies Receives Academic Accreditation The National Recreation and Parks Association's Council on Accreditation for Parks, Recreation,

    E-print Network

    Sorin, Eric J.

    .A. in Recreation with an option in Recreation Therapy, in addition to an M.S. in Recreation Administration, and created a distinct B.A. in Recreation with an option in Recreation Therapy in addition to the existing BCSULB Department of Recreation and Leisure Studies Receives Academic Accreditation The National

  9. 75 FR 39170 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Recreational Management Measures for the Summer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-08

    ...with the New England and South Atlantic Fishery Management Councils...deg]09.8500'W long. In Core and Clubfoot creeks, the Highway...56 cm) TL in internal and Atlantic Ocean fishing waters for recreational...Summer Flounder Board of the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries...

  10. WATERBORNE DISEASES AND MICROBIAL QUALITY MONITORING FOR RECREATIONAL WATER BODIES USING REGULATORY METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter will provide the reader with a historical perspective of microbial water quality and monitoring of recreational waters, with special attention to marine environments. It will review the regulations that are currently in effect in the United States and discuss critic...

  11. A Social and Economic Characterization of the U.S. Gulf of Mexico Recreational Shark Fishery

    E-print Network

    yield for large coastal sharks (Parrack, 1990), 2) foreign demand for shark fins that ledA Social and Economic Characterization of the U.S. Gulf of Mexico Recreational Shark Fishery MARK R. FISHER and ROBERT B. DITTON Introduction To protect sharks from overfishing, the National Marine

  12. Improvement in the Iatroscan thin-layer chromatographic-flame ionisation detection analysis of marine lipids. Separation and quantitation of monoacylglycerols and diacylglycerols in standards and natural samples.

    PubMed

    Striby, L; Lafont, R; Goutx, M

    1999-07-23

    Mono- and diacylglycerols are important intermediates in glycerolipid biodegradation and intracellular signalling pathways. A method for mass determination of these lipid classes in marine particles was developed using the Iatroscan, which combines thin layer chromatography (TLC) and flame ionisation detection (FID) techniques. We improved existing protocols by adding two elution steps: hexane-diethyl-ether-formic acid (70:30:0.2, v/v/v) after triacylglycerol and free fatty acid scan, and acetone 100% followed by chloroform-acetone-formic acid (99:1:0.2, v/v/v) after 1,2 diacylglycerols. Diacylglycerol isomers 1,2 and 1,3 were separated from each other, as well as from free sterols in standards and marine lipids from sediment trap particles. Monoacylglycerols were separated from pigments and galactosyl-lipids in the same trap samples and in a rich pigment phytoplankton extract of Dunaliella viridis. Quantitation of each class in samples was performed after calibration with 0.5 to 2 micrograms of standards. As many as 17 lipid classes can be identified and quantified in samples using this proposed six-step development. PMID:10457435

  13. An intercomparison of cross-flow filtration techniques used for sampling marine colloids: Overview and organic carbon results

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. O. Buesseler; J. E. Bauer; R. F. Chen; T. I. Eglinton; O. Gustafsson; W. Landing; K. Mopper; S. B. Moran; P. H. Santschi; R. VernonClark; M. L. Wells

    1996-01-01

    An intercomparison was conducted between 14 different cross-flow filtration (CFF) systems. Each CFF membrane had a 1000 nominal molecular weight cut-off, and five different manufacturers' membranes were tested. The goal of this exercise was to examine whether the different CFF systems were behaving in a well-defined and operationally reproducible manner in marine applications. Surface seawater from Woods Hole and mid-depth

  14. Preliminary estimates of marine mammal bycatch mortality and biological sampling of cetaceans in California gillnet fisheries for

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James V. Carretta; Susanj. Chivers; Kerri Danil

    ABSTRACT Preliminary estimates of marine mammal bycatchin the California\\/Oregon large-mesh (? 14-inch) drift gillnet fishery for thresher shark and swordfish and the small-mesh (6.5-inch) drift gillnet fishery for white seabass, yellowtail, barracuda, and tuna are summarized for calendar year 2004. A third fishery, the set gillnet fishery for halibut and angel shark (8.5-inch mesh), has not been observed since 2000

  15. Draft genome sequence of the extremely halophilic archaeon Halococcus sediminicola CBA1101(T) isolated from a marine sediment sample.

    PubMed

    Yim, Kyung June; Kim, Byung-Yong; Lee, Hae-Won; Song, Hye Seon; Nam, Young-Do; Choi, Jong-Soon; Choi, Hak-Jong; Seo, Myung-Ji; Yoon, Changmann; Kim, Kil-Nam; Kim, Daekyung; Rhee, Jin-Kyu; Roh, Seong Woon

    2014-10-22

    Halococcus sediminicola CBA1101(T) (=CECT 8275(T), JCM 18965(T)) is an extremely halophilic strain isolated from a marine sediment collected from the bay of Gangjin in the Republic of Korea. We found that the draft genome of H. sediminicola CBA1101(T) contains 3,764,367bp, with 62.3% G+C content. This is the one of the few genomes to be sequenced in the genus Halococcus. PMID:25468064

  16. Proceedings of the Third Annual Student Symposium on Marine Affairs (University of Hawaii, Manoa Campus, January 13, 1978).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1978

    This volume of the proceedings of the Third Annual Student Symposium on Marine Affairs contains 32 papers in eight categories: (1) coastal zone management; (2) marine resources; (3) aquaculture; (4) alternative marine energy sources; (5) ocean engineering; (6) recreational facilities; (7) marine biology; and (8) options. The papers are the…

  17. Interest group lifecycles and recreational fishing: an exploratory study in the evolution of two sport fishing groups 

    E-print Network

    Faulkner, Kelly Patrice

    1993-01-01

    have resulted in increased governmental regulation and legislation. How marine interests are reacting to and organizing around these issues is most evident in the conflict between recreational anglers and commercial fishermen. Several examples... of this conflict demonstrate that these are national concerns whose similarities appear along each coastline. . In southern California, conllict between commercial fishermen and recreational anglers arose over the anchovy fishery. While anchovy were...

  18. Recreational water–related illness

    PubMed Central

    Sanborn, Margaret; Takaro, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To review the risk factors, management, and prevention of recreational water–related illness in family practice. Sources of information Original and review articles from January 1998 to February 2012 were identified using PubMed and the search terms water-related illness, recreational water illness, and swimmer illness. Main message There is a 3% to 8% risk of acute gastrointestinal illness (AGI) after swimming. The high-risk groups for AGI are children younger than 5 years, especially if they have not been vaccinated for rotavirus, and elderly and immunocompromised patients. Children are at higher risk because they swallow more water when swimming, stay in the water longer, and play in the shallow water and sand, which are more contaminated. Participants in sports with a lot of water contact like triathlon and kite surfing are also at high risk, and even activities involving partial water contact like boating and fishing carry a 40% to 50% increase in risk of AGI compared with nonwater recreational activities. Stool cultures should be done when a recreational water illness is suspected, and the clinical dehydration scale is a useful clinical tool for assessing the treatment needs of affected children. Conclusion Recreational water illness is the main attributable cause of AGI during swimming season. Recognition that swimming is a substantial source of illness can help prevent recurrent and secondary cases. Rotavirus vaccine is highly recommended for children who will swim frequently. PMID:23673583

  19. Molecular detection of native and invasive marine invertebrate larvae present in ballast and open water environmental samples collected in Puget Sound

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harvey, J.B.J.; Hoy, M.S.; Rodriguez, R.J.

    2009-01-01

    Non-native marine species have been and continue to be introduced into Puget Sound via several vectors including ship's ballast water. Some non-native species become invasive and negatively impact native species or near shore habitats. We present a new methodology for the development and testing of taxon specific PCR primers designed to assess environmental samples of ocean water for the presence of native and non-native bivalves, crustaceans and algae. The intergenic spacer regions (IGS; ITS1, ITS2 and 5.8S) of the ribosomal DNA were sequenced for adult samples of each taxon studied. We used these data along with those available in Genbank to design taxon and group specific primers and tested their stringency against artificial populations of plasmid constructs containing the entire IGS region for each of the 25 taxa in our study, respectively. Taxon and group specific primer sets were then used to detect the presence or absence of native and non-native planktonic life-history stages (propagules) from environmental samples of ballast water and plankton tow net samples collected in Puget Sound. This methodology provides an inexpensive and efficient way to test the discriminatory ability of taxon specific oligonucleotides (PCR primers) before creating molecular probes or beacons for use in molecular ecological applications such as probe hybridizations or microarray analyses. This work addresses the current need to develop molecular tools capable of diagnosing the presence of planktonic life-history stages from non-native marine species (potential invaders) in ballast water and other environmental samples. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V.

  20. Our New Challenge: Recreation for the Deaf-Blind.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brannan, Steve A., Ed.

    Presented are 20 papers delivered at the 1975 Northwest Regional Conference on Recreation for the Deaf-Blind. Included are papers on the following topics (with sample papers in parentheses): national trends; interdisciplinary considerations ("Movement and Physical Activity: the Foundation for the Most Important R" by J. Stein); community…

  1. Comparison of sample preparation methods, validation of an UPLC-MS/MS procedure for the quantification of tetrodotoxin present in marine gastropods and analysis of pufferfish.

    PubMed

    Nzoughet, Judith Kouassi; Campbell, Katrina; Barnes, Paul; Cooper, Kevin M; Chevallier, Olivier P; Elliott, Christopher T

    2013-02-15

    Tetrodotoxin (TTX) is one of the most potent marine neurotoxins reported. The global distribution of this toxin is spreading with the European Atlantic coastline now being affected. Climate change and increasing pollution have been suggested as underlying causes for this. In the present study, two different sample preparation techniques were used to extract TTX from Trumpet shells and pufferfish samples. Both extraction procedures (accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) and a simple solvent extraction) were shown to provide good recoveries (80-92%). A UPLC-MS/MS method was developed for the analysis of TTX and validated following the guidelines contained in the Commission Decision 2002/657/EC for chemical contaminant analysis. The performance of this procedure was demonstrated to be fit for purpose. This study is the first report on the use of ASE as a mean for TTX extraction, the use of UPLC-MS/MS for TTX analysis, and the validation of this method for TTX in gastropods. PMID:23194566

  2. 75 FR 19608 - Recreation Resource Advisory Committees

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-15

    ...motorized recreation, such as motorcycles, boaters, and off-highway vehicles; d. Summer nonmotorized recreation, such as backpacking, horseback riding, mountain biking, canoeing, and rafting; and e. Hunting and fishing. 2. Three persons who...

  3. 78 FR 4120 - Recreation Resource Advisory Committees

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-18

    ...recreation such as motorcycling, boating, and off-highway vehicle driving; (d) Summer nonmotorized recreation such as backpacking, horseback riding, mountain biking, canoeing, and rafting; and (e) Hunting and fishing. (2) Three persons who...

  4. Developing a Sports and Recreation Master Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fink, Ira; Body, David

    1983-01-01

    The sports facilities situation has become critical at many universities. The methods for evaluating athletics and recreation physical plants, their utilization, and needs are reviewed, along with the creation of a successful sports and recreation master plan. (MLW)

  5. 50 CFR 26.32 - Recreational uses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... § 26.32 Recreational uses. Recreational uses such as, but not limited to, sightseeing, nature observation and photography, interpretive centers and exhibits, hunting and fishing, bathing, boating, camping, ice skating, picnicking,...

  6. Corporate Benefits of Employee Recreation Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finney, Craig

    1984-01-01

    Employee recreation programs have been shown to reduce absenteeism, increase performance and productivity, reduce stress levels, and increase job satisfaction. Studies that present positive results of employee recreation are discussed. (DF)

  7. 50 CFR 26.32 - Recreational uses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... § 26.32 Recreational uses. Recreational uses such as, but not limited to, sightseeing, nature observation and photography, interpretive centers and exhibits, hunting and fishing, bathing, boating, camping, ice skating, picnicking,...

  8. 50 CFR 26.32 - Recreational uses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... § 26.32 Recreational uses. Recreational uses such as, but not limited to, sightseeing, nature observation and photography, interpretive centers and exhibits, hunting and fishing, bathing, boating, camping, ice skating, picnicking,...

  9. Therapeutic Recreation: Recreation with Purpose for Exceptional Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fine, Aubrey H.

    The paper examines the role of therapeutic recreation with disabled children. The underlying philosophy of the field is interpreted and its development from beginnings in World War II is reviewed. Three specific levels of services within a comprehensive model are delineated: therapy (to improve functional behavior through assessment, planning,…

  10. Campus Recreation Center Sports and Recreation Management Internship/Practicum

    E-print Network

    Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

    of supervisory style best suits your learning needs? 6. Please list two references and their contact (phone or practicum, a learning contract will be established between the Director of Campus Recreation and the student ______________________________ ____________ ___________________________ University/College GPA Academic Status (i.e. Jr, Sr, Grad

  11. The History of Commercial Recreation and Its Role in the Provision of Family Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, E. Taylor

    Commercial recreation is the provision of facilities, equipment, and programs that satisfy public demand for activities during unobligated time and are profitable to the supplier. The term "commercial recreation" has been given a negative connotation in the field of recreation and leisure. This negative concept of commercial recreation continues…

  12. RAPID MEASUREMENT OF BACTERIAL FECAL POLLUTION INDICATORS AT RECREATIONAL BEACHES BY QUANTITATIVE POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous studies have demonstrated that measurements by the membrane filtration (MF) method of the bacterial indicators Enterococcus and E. coli in recreational beach water samples are correlated with swimming-associated gastroenteritis. These relationships currently serve as the...

  13. BROOKHAVEN EMPLOYEES' RECREATION ASSOCIATION ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL

    E-print Network

    BROOKHAVEN EMPLOYEES' RECREATION ASSOCIATION (BERA) ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL Revised September 3, 2014 is the responsibility of the Manager, Staff Services. The Brookhaven Employees' Recreation Association (BERA) assists AND BYLAWS OF THE BROOKHAVEN EMPLOYEES RECREATION ASSOCIATION ARTICLES OF THE CONSTITUTION Article I - Name

  14. Department of Recreational Sports Intramural Sports

    E-print Network

    Escher, Christine

    Sports and Special Programs Office (541)737-4083 111 Dixon Recreation Center wwwDepartment of Recreational Sports Intramural Sports Team Tennis Rules Sports and Special Programs Office (541)737-4083 111 Dixon Recreation Center www.oregonstate.edu/recsports Revised 4/16/2013 I

  15. Department of Recreational Sports Intramural Sports

    E-print Network

    Escher, Christine

    Rules Sports and Special Programs Office (541)737-4083 111 Dixon Recreation Center wwwDepartment of Recreational Sports Intramural Sports Sand Volleyball Doubles Rules Sports and Special Programs Office (541)737-4083 111 Dixon Recreation Center www.oregonstate.edu/recsports Revised 6

  16. Department of Recreational Sports Intramural Sports

    E-print Network

    Escher, Christine

    Rules Sports and Special Programs Office (541)737-4083 111 Dixon Recreation Center wwwDepartment of Recreational Sports Intramural Sports Ultimate Disc Rules Sports and Special Programs Office (541)737-4083 111 Dixon Recreation Center www.oregonstate.edu/recsports Revised 4/16/2013 I

  17. Department of Recreational Sports Intramural Sports

    E-print Network

    Escher, Christine

    Recreation Center www.oregonstate.edu/recsports Revised 1/17/2014 #12;Department of Recreational SportsDepartment of Recreational Sports Intramural Sports Wiffle Ball Rules I. GOVERNING RULES The rules a special Oregon State University Intramural Sports rule applies. II. ELIGIBILITY All participants must

  18. REGIONAL RECREATION DEMAND AND BENEFITS MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes a regional recreation demand and benefits model that is used to estimate recreation demand and value (consumers' surplus) of four activities at each of 195 sites in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and western Montana. The recreation activities considered are camp...

  19. Large Indoor Sports and Recreation Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seidler, Todd

    This paper presents an overview and analysis of field houses, stadiums, arenas, and campus recreation centers. All are large indoor sports or recreation facilities. In general, stadiums and arenas are spectator facilities while field houses and campus recreation centers are primarily designed for activity. A college field house is a structure that…

  20. Forests for People Access, recreation & tourism

    E-print Network

    Strategy Forests for People Access, recreation & tourism on the national forest estate #12;#12;Access, recreation and tourism on the national forest estate | 3 Forests for People Access, recreation and tourism on the national forest estate Setting the scene Everyone has a right of responsible access

  1. Guidance For The Bioremediation Of Oil-Contaminated Wetlands, Marshes, And Marine Shorelines

    EPA Science Inventory

    Marine shorelines are important public and ecological resources that serve as a home to a variety of wildlife and provide public recreation. Marine oil spills, particularly large scale spill accidents, have posed great threats and cause extensive damage to the marine coastal env...

  2. THE CONVERGENT AND DISCRIMINANT VALIDITY OF FIVE-FACTOR TRAITS: CURRENT AND PROSPECTIVE SOCIAL, WORK, AND RECREATIONAL DYSFUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Hopwood, Christopher J.; Morey, Leslie C.; Ansell, Emily B.; Grilo, Carlos M.; Sanislow, Charles A.; McGlashan, Thomas H.; Markowitz, John C.; Gunderson, John G.; Yen, Shirley; Shea, M. Tracie; Skodol, Andrew E.

    2010-01-01

    The convergent and discriminant validity of Five Factor Model (FFM) personality traits with concurrent and prospective social, work, and recreational dysfunction was assessed in a large, longitudinal clinical sample. Consistent with five factor theoretical expectations, neuroticism is broadly related to dysfunction across domains; extraversion is primarily related to social and recreational dysfunction; openness to recreational dysfunction; agreeableness to social dysfunction; and conscientiousness to work dysfunction. Findings support five factor theory and the clinical assessment of normative personality traits. PMID:19817628

  3. Inventory and management of trespass recreation use at Upper Delaware and Scenic and Recreational River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marion, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    Recreational trespass on private lands within the Upper Delaware Scenic and Recreational River, located along the eastern border between Pennsylvania and New York, prompted this survey of recreational trespass sites. The National Park Service has been mandated to manage river recreational use within its boundaries but land ownership shall remain predominantly private. This survey was conducted to document the number and distribution of river recreation trespass sites and to recommend appropriate management actions to minimize trespass use.

  4. Parks, Recreation and Public Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Ching-Hua; Payne, Laura; Orsega-Smith, Elizabeth; Godbey, Geoffrey

    2003-01-01

    Reviews what current research says about the holistic health benefits of park and recreation services, focusing on: health benefits according to park users; physical activities in parks; stress reduction benefits of park use; social support, self-determination, and stress reduction; observing nature in parks and associated benefits; and the…

  5. Recreational exercise in rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Holla, J; Fluit, M; van Schaardenburg, D; Dekker, J; Verhagen, E; Steultjens, M

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate changes in health-related quality of life after eight to twelve months of recreational exercise in patients with rheumatic diseases (inflammatory joint disease, osteoarthritis, fibromyalgia and other generalized pain syndromes), and to determine whether patient (age, sex, diagnosis) and exercise characteristics (follow-up time, type of activity, frequency of participation) are related to health-related quality of life change. Health-related quality of life was assessed twice in 138 patients with rheumatic diseases. 1) At enrolment in a centre for outpatient recreational exercise and 2) following eight to twelve months of recreational exercise. Health-related quality of life was measured using the Short-Form Health Survey 36 and three numeric rating scales for pain, fatigue and general condition. Multiple linear regression was used to analyze the influence of patient and exercise characteristics on follow-up HRQoL-score. Patients showed significant improvements in pain and general condition, and reported a positive change in health. A diagnosis of inflammatory joint disease (e. g. rheumatoid arthritis, polyarthritis, spondylitis) or osteoarthritis, participating in sports activities two to three times per week, and following land-based fitness classes were associated with the most improvement in health-related quality of life. Regular participation in recreational exercise contributes to improved health-related quality of life in patients with rheumatic diseases. PMID:19685415

  6. Leisure and Recreation in Kuwait.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behbehan, Khalifa; Hashem, Jawad

    1996-01-01

    Recent rapid economic and social development has brought more sophisticated leisure-based activities to a wide sector of Kuwait society. This article examines the development of leisure activities, and factors that affect recreation participation by Kuwait's population, noting the relationship between leisure and the government, education, the…

  7. Human error in recreational boating

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. James McKnight; Wayne W. Becker; Anthony J. Pettit; A. Scott McKnight

    2007-01-01

    Each year over 600 people die and more than 4000 are reported injured in recreational boating accidents. As with most other accidents, human error is the major contributor. U.S. Coast Guard reports of 3358 accidents were analyzed to identify errors in each of the boat types by which statistics are compiled: auxiliary (motor) sailboats, cabin motorboats, canoes and kayaks, house

  8. RECREATIONAL WATER QUALITY AND HEALTH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The overall objective of this pilot study was to develop and evaluate methods to determine the effect of quality of recreational waters on the health of persons bathing in those waters. There is little scientific evidence upon which to base water quality standards for the safety ...

  9. IN-SITU SAMPLING AND CHARACTERIZATION OF NATURALLY OCCURRING MARINE METHANE HYDRATE USING THE D/V JOIDES RESOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Frank R. Rack; Peter Schultheiss; Melanie Holland

    2005-01-01

    The primary accomplishments of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter were that: (1) follow-up logging of pressure cores containing hydrate-bearing sediment; and (2) opening of some of these cores to establish ground-truth understanding. The follow-up measurements made on pressure cores in storage are part of a hydrate geriatric study related to ODP Leg 204. These activities are described in detail in Appendices A and B of this report. Work also continued on developing plans for Phase 2 of this cooperative agreement based on evolving plans to schedule a scientific ocean drilling expedition to study marine methane hydrates along the Cascadia margin, in the NE Pacific as part of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) using the R/V JOIDES Resolution.

  10. Elevated nitrogen-containing particles observed in Asian dust aerosol samples collected at the marine boundary layer of the Bohai Sea and the Yellow Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, H.; Park, Y.; Hwang, H.; Kang, S.; Ro, C.-U.

    2009-09-01

    Low-Z particle electron probe X-ray microanalysis (low-Z particle EPMA) shows powerful advantages for the characterization of ambient particulate matter in environmental and geological applications. By the application of the low-Z particle EPMA single particle analysis, an overall examination of 1800 coarse and fine particles (aerodynamic diameters: 2.5-10 ?m and 1.0-2.5 ?m, respectively) in six samples collected on 28 April-1 May 2006 in the marine boundary layer (MBL) of the Bohai Sea and Yellow Sea was conducted. Three samples (D1, D2, and D3) were collected along the Bohai Bay, Bohai Straits, and Yellow Sea near Korea during an Asian dust storm event while the other three samples (N3, N2, and N1) were collected on non-Asian dust (NAD) days. Based on X-ray spectral and secondary electron image data, 15 different types of particles were identified, in which soil-derived particles were encountered with the largest frequency, followed by (C, N, O)-rich droplets (likely the mixture of organic matter and NH4NO3), particles of marine origin, and carbonaceous, Fe-rich, fly ash, and (C, N, O, S)-rich droplet particles. Results show that during the Asian dust storm event relative abundances of the (C, N, O)-rich droplets and the nitrate-containing secondary soil-derived particles were markedly increased (on average by a factor of 4.5 and 2, respectively in PM2.5-10 fraction and by a factor of 1.9 and 1.5, respectively in PM1.0-2.5 fraction) in the MBL of the Bohai Sea and Yellow Sea, implying that Asian dust aerosols in springtime are an important carrier of gaseous inorganic nitrogen species, especially NOx (or HNO3) and NH3.

  11. Influence of DNA Extraction Method, 16S rRNA Targeted Hypervariable Regions, and Sample Origin on Microbial Diversity Detected by 454 Pyrosequencing in Marine Chemosynthetic Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Cruaud, Perrine; Vigneron, Adrien; Lucchetti-Miganeh, Céline; Ciron, Pierre Emmanuel; Godfroy, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) opens up exciting possibilities for improving our knowledge of environmental microbial diversity, allowing rapid and cost-effective identification of both cultivated and uncultivated microorganisms. However, library preparation, sequencing, and analysis of the results can provide inaccurate representations of the studied community compositions. Therefore, all these steps need to be taken into account carefully. Here we evaluated the effects of DNA extraction methods, targeted 16S rRNA hypervariable regions, and sample origins on the diverse microbes detected by 454 pyrosequencing in marine cold seep and hydrothermal vent sediments. To assign the reads with enough taxonomic precision, we built a database with about 2,500 sequences from Archaea and Bacteria from deep-sea marine sediments, affiliated according to reference publications in the field. Thanks to statistical and diversity analyses as well as inference of operational taxonomic unit (OTU) networks, we show that (i) while DNA extraction methods do not seem to affect the results for some samples, they can lead to dramatic changes for others; and (ii) the choice of amplification and sequencing primers also considerably affects the microbial community detected in the samples. Thereby, very different proportions of pyrosequencing reads were obtained for some microbial lineages, such as the archaeal ANME-1, ANME-2c, and MBG-D and deltaproteobacterial subgroups. This work clearly indicates that the results from sequencing-based analyses, such as pyrosequencing, should be interpreted very carefully. Therefore, the combination of NGS with complementary approaches, such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)/catalyzed reporter deposition (CARD)-FISH or quantitative PCR (Q-PCR), would be desirable to gain a more comprehensive picture of environmental microbial communities. PMID:24837380

  12. Marine Biology

    E-print Network

    Zaffino, Kyle

    2013-01-01

    this  door. ”   Marine  Biology   I  joined  the  military  RIVERSIDE   Marine  Biology   A Thesis submitted in partialBiology                                                                                                                        

  13. In-Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Marine Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Frank Rack

    2005-06-30

    The primary accomplishments of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter were to refine budgets and operational plans for Phase 2 of this cooperative agreement based on the scheduling of a scientific ocean drilling expedition to study marine methane hydrates along the Cascadia margin, in the NE Pacific as part of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) using the R/V JOIDES Resolution. The proposed statement of work for Phase 2 will include three primary tasks: (1) research management oversight, provided by JOI; (2) mobilization, deployment and demobilization of pressure coring and core logging systems, through a subcontract with Geotek Ltd., who will work with Fugro and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to accomplish some of the subtasks; and, (3) mobilization, deployment and demobilization of a refrigerated container van that will be used for degassing of the Pressure Core Sampler and density logging of these pressure cores, through a subcontract with the Texas A&M Research Foundation (TAMRF). More details about these tasks are provided in the following sections of this report. The appendices to this report contain a copy of the scientific prospectus for the upcoming IODP Expedition 311 (Cascadia Margin Hydrates), which provides details of operational and scientific planning for this expedition.

  14. 75 FR 12726 - Availability of Seats for the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-17

    ...is seeking applications for the following vacant seats on the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council: Tourism alternate, Recreational Fishing member and alternate, Education member and alternate, Public at Large alternates...

  15. 77 FR 16212 - Availability of Seats for the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-20

    ...vacant seats on the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council: Recreational Fishing member and alternate, Tourism member and alternate, Education member and alternate, Chumash member and alternate, Public at large alternates (2),...

  16. SUGGESTED THREE-YEAR GRADUATION PLAN Roadmap: Recreation, Park and Tourism Management

    E-print Network

    Sheridan, Scott

    SUGGESTED THREE-YEAR GRADUATION PLAN Roadmap: Recreation, Park and Tourism Management ­ Recreation-YEAR GRADUATION PLAN Roadmap: Recreation, Park and Tourism Management ­ Recreation Management ­ Bachelor

  17. The distribution of organic-walled dinoflagellate cysts in marine surface samples of the eastern Indian Ocean in relation to environmental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hessler, I.; Young, M.; Mohtadi, M.; Lückge, A.; Behling, H.

    2012-04-01

    The eastern Indian Ocean is characterised by a complex system of surface currents that move according to the monsoon-dominated wind regime and show a strong seasonality. The Indonesian Throughflow, which originates in the northwestern and tropical Pacific and passes through the Indonesian archipelago into the Indian Ocean, is the only low-latitude oceanic connection between the Pacific and Indian Oceans and represents a key element in the global thermohaline circulation and hence the global climate system. In recent decades it has become increasingly important to understand the atmospheric and oceanographic processes involved in climate variations. Assemblages of organic-walled dinoflagellate cysts (dinocysts) from marine surface samples provide insights into the relationship between the spatial distribution of dinocysts and modern local environmental conditions (e.g. sea surface temperature, sea surface salinity, productivity). These information are of great value for the interpretation of past variations in surface water conditions. We present an extensive data-set of marine surface samples (n=116) from the Eastern Indian Ocean. The conducted Principal Component Analysis (PCA) illustrates the variation of species association between the sites and reveals a geographical affinity of the samples to the regions of (1) Western Indonesia, (2) Java, (3) the Indonesian Throughflow and (4) Western Australia including the Timor Sea. The results of the PCA further indicate the existence of two environmental gradients in the study area, a nutrient gradient increasing from Western Indonesia towards the Indonesian Throughflow region and a temperature gradient increasing from Western Australia towards Western Indonesia. The Redundancy Analysis indicates the presence of three dominating taxa in the sample set, namely Spiniferites spp., Operculodinium centrocarpum and Brigantedinium spp., and reveals significant correlations of the three dominant taxa to specific environmental parameter. While Spiniferites spp. strongly correlates with the silicate concentrations of the surface water between April and June, O. centrocarpum, T. vancampoae and Impagidinirum species show a negative correlation with the annual sea surface temperature. Brigantedinium spp. as well as nearly all other heterotrophic cyst species and L. machaerophorum show a positive correlation with the chlorophyll-a concentration between July and September, hence indicating an affinity of these species with seasonal upwelling.

  18. Recreational Physical Activity and Steroid Hormone Levels in Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Tworoger, Shelley S.; Hankinson, Susan E.

    2009-01-01

    Recreational physical activity has been both positively and inversely associated with cancer risk for postmenopausal women, acting presumably through hormonal mechanisms. Relatively little is known about the effects of exercise on postmenopausal steroid hormone levels. The authors evaluated the association between recreational activity and plasma steroid hormones among 623 US healthy, postmenopausal women in the Nurses’ Health Study not using exogenous hormones at the time of blood draw (1989–1990). Participants self-reported recreational physical activity by questionnaire in 1986, 1988, and 1992. Plasma samples were assayed for estrogens, androgens, and sex hormone-binding globulin. Geometric mean hormone levels adjusted and not adjusted for body mass index were calculated. In general, estrogen and androgen levels were lower in the most- and the least-active women compared with those reporting moderate activity, suggesting a U-shaped relation. For example, estrone sulfate levels in quintiles 1–5 of metabolic equivalent task-hours were 197, 209, 222, 214, and 195 pg/mL, respectively. Tests for nonlinearity using polynomial regression were significant for several estrogens, androgens, and sex hormone-binding globulin (2-sided P ? 0.01). These results suggest the possibility of a nonlinear relation between recreational physical activity and hormone levels in postmenopausal women. PMID:19783585

  19. Application of passive sampling for measuring dissolved concentrations of organic contaminants in the water column at three marine superfund sites.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Robert M; Lohmann, Rainer; Schubauer-Berigan, Joseph P; Reitsma, Pamela; Perron, Monique M; Lefkovitz, Lisa; Cantwell, Mark G

    2015-08-01

    Currently, there is an effort under way to encourage remedial project managers at contaminated sites to use passive sampling to collect freely dissolved concentrations (Cfree ) of hydrophobic organic contaminants to improve site assessments. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the use of passive sampling for measuring water column Cfree for several hydrophobic organic contaminants at 3 US Environmental Protection Agency Superfund sites. Sites investigated included New Bedford Harbor (New Bedford, MA, USA), Palos Verdes Shelf (Los Angeles, CA, USA), and Naval Station Newport (Newport, RI, USA); and the passive samplers evaluated were polyethylene, polydimethylsiloxane-coated solid-phase microextraction fibers, semipermeable membrane devices, and polyoxymethylene. In general, the different passive samplers demonstrated good agreement, with Cfree values varying by a factor of 2 to 3. Further, at New Bedford Harbor, where conventional water sample concentrations were also measured (i.e., grab samples), passive sampler-based Cfree values agreed within a factor of 2. These findings suggest that all of the samplers were experiencing and measuring similar Cfree during their respective deployments. Also, at New Bedford Harbor, a strong log-linear, correlative, and predictive relationship was found between polyethylene passive sampler accumulation and lipid-normalized blue mussel bioaccumulation of polychlorinated biphenyls (r(2) ?=?0.92, p?sampling for generating scientifically accurate water column Cfree values, which is critical for making informed environmental management decisions at contaminated sediment sites. Environ Toxicol Chem 2015;34:1720-1733. Published 2015 SETAC. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. PMID:26039657

  20. Department of Recreational Sports Live Well. Learn Well. Be Well Recreational Sports

    E-print Network

    Escher, Christine

    Department of Recreational Sports Live Well. Learn Well. Be Well Recreational Sports oregonstate ___ Climbing Center Staff ___ Facility Operations Staff ___ Rec Services Staff ___ Facility/Equipment Maintenance Staff ___ Fitness Staff ___ Graphic Designer Staff ___ Intramural Sports & Sport Club Staff

  1. Mathematical analysis of marine pipeline leakage monitoring system based on coherent OTDR with improved sensor length and sampling frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pnev, A. B.; Zhirnov, A. A.; Stepanov, K. V.; Nesterov, E. T.; Shelestov, D. A.; Karasik, V. E.

    2015-01-01

    A system based on coherent optical time domain reflectometry (OTDR) for subsea pipeline monitoring is described. The fiber sensor length is increased using erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) cascades. The sampling frequency is increased by dividing the fiber sensor into separate sensitive areas, with parallel scanning. The calculation of the erbium amplifier cascade spontaneous noise influence on the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is carried out.

  2. Unveiling of the Diversity of Prasinoviruses (Phycodnaviridae) in Marine Samples by Using High-Throughput Sequencing Analyses of PCR-Amplified DNA Polymerase and Major Capsid Protein Genes

    PubMed Central

    Clerissi, Camille; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Hingamp, Pascal; Poulain, Julie; Desdevises, Yves

    2014-01-01

    Viruses strongly influence the ecology and evolution of their eukaryotic hosts in the marine environment, but little is known about their diversity and distribution. Prasinoviruses infect an abundant and widespread class of phytoplankton, the Mamiellophyceae, and thereby exert a specific and important role in microbial ecosystems. However, molecular tools to specifically identify this viral genus in environmental samples are still lacking. We developed two primer sets, designed for use with polymerase chain reactions and 454 pyrosequencing technologies, to target two conserved genes, encoding the DNA polymerase (PolB gene) and the major capsid protein (MCP gene). While only one copy of the PolB gene is present in Prasinovirus genomes, there are at least seven paralogs for MCP, the copy we named number 6 being shared with other eukaryotic alga-infecting viruses. Primer sets for PolB and MCP6 were thus designed and tested on 6 samples from the Tara Oceans project. The results suggest that the MCP6 amplicons show greater richness but that PolB gave a wider coverage of Prasinovirus diversity. As a consequence, we recommend use of the PolB primer set, which will certainly reveal exciting new insights about the diversity and distribution of prasinoviruses at the community scale. PMID:24632251

  3. Application of passive sampling devices for screening of micro-pollutants in marine aquaculture using LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Martínez Bueno, María Jesús; Hernando, María Dolores; Agüera, Ana; Fernández-Alba, Amadeo R

    2009-02-15

    Knowledge on the presence of micro-pollutants, in particular emerging contaminants, such as pharmaceuticals, biocides or some pesticides, in semi-enclosed coastal areas, where fish farms are installed, is very limited. This article shows data on the presence of micro-pollutants over 1 year monitoring campaign carried out in a fish farm placed on the Mediterranean Sea. With this work, the results of the development of an analytical procedure which, makes use of passive sampling techniques (with polar organic chemical integrative samplers, POCIS, pharmaceutical configuration) and of the LC-QLIT-MS system, are presented. The development of the analytical procedure entail laboratory-based calibration with the samplers POCIS, for calculating uptake rates and sampling rates of compounds representative of a wide range of polarity (4.56>or=logK(ow)>or=-0.12). The uptake of the target compounds in the sampler POCIS, follows a linear pattern for most compounds, and sampling rates varied from 0.001 to 0.319l/d. The calibration experiments have shown that POCIS pharmaceutical configuration could be used for sampling other non-target compounds, such as pesticides and biocides with a logK(ow)sampling rates for each selected compound were obtained using spiked seawater for further estimation of time-weighted average (TWA) concentration of micro-pollutants in the water column, during the field study. An analytical method was developed with the LC-QLIT-MS system and validated to ensure a satisfactory performance for the detection of the target micro-pollutants in water. The limits of detection (LODs) achieved were between 0.01 and 1.50 microg/l. During the monitoring campaign, among the selected compounds, metronidazole, erythromycin, simazine, atrazine, diuron, terbutryn, irgarol, trimethoprim, carbaryl, flumequine, TCMTB and diphenyl sulphone (DPS) were detected. Most of target compounds found were at average concentrations which ranged from 0.01 to 75 ng/l. Irgarol, simazine, diuron, atrazine and DPS were the micro-pollutants most frequently detected over the period of the monitoring programme carried out. PMID:19084673

  4. In-Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Marine Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Frank Rack; Michael Storms; Derryl Schroeder; Brandon Dugan; Peter Schultheiss; ODP Leg 204 Shipboard Scientific Party

    2002-12-31

    The primary accomplishments of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter were (1) the preliminary postcruise evaluation of the tools and measurement systems that were used during ODP Leg 204 to study hydrate deposits on Hydrate Ridge, offshore Oregon from July through September 2002; and (2) the preliminary study of the hydrate-bearing core samples preserved in pressure vessels and in liquid nitrogen cryofreezers, which are now stored at the ODP Gulf Coast Repository in College Station, TX. During ODP Leg 204, several newly modified downhole tools were deployed to better characterize the subsurface lithologies and environments hosting microbial populations and gas hydrates. A preliminary review of the use of these tools is provided herein. The DVTP, DVTP-P, APC-methane, and APC-Temperature tools (ODP memory tools) were used extensively and successfully during ODP Leg 204 aboard the D/V JOIDES Resolution. These systems provided a strong operational capability for characterizing the in situ properties of methane hydrates in subsurface environments on Hydrate Ridge during ODP Leg 204. Pressure was also measured during a trial run of the Fugro piezoprobe, which operates on similar principles as the DVTP-P. The final report describing the deployments of the Fugro Piezoprobe is provided in Appendix A of this report. A preliminary analysis and comparison between the piezoprobe and DVTP-P tools is provided in Appendix B of this report. Finally, a series of additional holes were cored at the crest of Hydrate Ridge (Site 1249) specifically geared toward the rapid recovery and preservation of hydrate samples as part of a hydrate geriatric study partially funded by the Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, the preliminary results from gamma density non-invasive imaging of the cores preserved in pressure vessels are provided in Appendix C of this report. An initial visual inspection of the samples stored in liquid nitrogen is provided in Appendix D of this report.

  5. Decay of intestinal enterococci concentrations in high-energy estuarine and coastal waters: towards real-time T 90 values for modelling faecal indicators in recreational waters

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Kay; C. M. Stapleton; M. D. Wyer; A. T. McDonald; J. Crowther; N. Paul; K. Jones; C. Francis; J. Watkins; J. Wilkinson; N. Humphrey; B. Lin; L. Yang; R. A. Falconer; S. Gardner

    2005-01-01

    Intestinal enterococci are the principal ‘health-evidence-based’ parameter recommended by WHO for the assessment of marine recreational water compliance. Understanding the survival characteristics of these organisms in nearshore waters is central to public health protection using robust modelling to effect real-time prediction of water quality at recreation sites as recently suggested by WHO and the Commission of the European Communities Previous

  6. Marine Recreational Fishing and Associated State-Federal Research in

    E-print Network

    composition and weights. All salmon boat anglers are excluded from the survey as each state estimates its own boat slips and berths (Morash, 1986), and continued interest in quality fishing and fishery products

  7. Titan Recreation-Titan Bowl and Billiards Student Engagement Report

    E-print Network

    de Lijser, Peter

    Titan Recreation-Titan Bowl and Billiards Student Engagement Report FY 2012-2013 Purpose Statement Titan Recreation strives to enhance participant experiences at CSUF through providing quality physical fitness and overall wellness. Titan Recreation also provides opportunities for cooperative

  8. Titan Recreation-Group Fitness Student Engagement Report

    E-print Network

    de Lijser, Peter

    Titan Recreation-Group Fitness Student Engagement Report FY 2012-2013 Purpose Statement Titan fitness and overall wellness. Titan Recreation also provides opportunities for cooperative and competitive within Titan Recreation are designed to enhance social, psychological and physiological development

  9. Titan Recreation-Titan Bowl and Billiards Student Engagement Report

    E-print Network

    de Lijser, Peter

    Titan Recreation-Titan Bowl and Billiards Student Engagement Report FY 2010-2011 Purpose Statement Titan Recreation strives to enhance participant experiences at CSUF through providing quality physical fitness and overall wellness. Titan Recreation also provides opportunities for cooperative

  10. Titan Recreation-Intramural Sports Student Engagement Report

    E-print Network

    de Lijser, Peter

    Titan Recreation-Intramural Sports Student Engagement Report FY 2012-2013 Purpose Statement Titan fitness and overall wellness. Titan Recreation also provides opportunities for cooperative and competitive within Titan Recreation are designed to enhance social, psychological and physiological development

  11. Titan Recreation-Intramural Sports Student Engagement Report

    E-print Network

    de Lijser, Peter

    Titan Recreation-Intramural Sports Student Engagement Report FY 2011-2012 Purpose Statement Titan fitness and overall wellness. Titan Recreation also provides opportunities for cooperative and competitive within Titan Recreation are designed to enhance social, psychological and physiological development

  12. SDSU General Catalog 2011-2012 399 Recreation and Tourism

    E-print Network

    Gallo, Linda C.

    in outdoor resource management. Emphasis in recreation systems management. Emphasis in sustainable tourism management. Minor in recreation. The Major A commitment to working with people to enhance the quality. Recreation systems management stresses the effective organiza- tion, administration, and supervision

  13. 404 SDSU General Catalog 2012-2013 Recreation and Tourism

    E-print Network

    Gallo, Linda C.

    in outdoor resource management. Emphasis in recreation systems management. Emphasis in sustainable tourism management. Minor in recreation. The Major A commitment to working with people to enhance the quality. Recreation systems management stresses the effective organiza- tion, administration, and supervision

  14. In-Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Marine Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Frank Rack; Gerhard Bohrmann; Anne Trehu; Michael Storms; Derryl Schroeder; ODP Leg 204 Shipboard Scientific Party

    2002-09-30

    The primary accomplishment of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter was the deployment of tools and measurement systems on ODP Leg 204 to study hydrate deposits on Hydrate Ridge, offshore Oregon from July through September, 2002. During Leg 204, we cored and logged 9 sites on the Oregon continental margin to determine the distribution and concentration of gas hydrates in an accretionary ridge and adjacent slope basin, investigate the mechanisms that transport methane and other gases into the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ), and obtain constraints on physical properties of hydrates in situ. A 3D seismic survey conducted in 2000 provided images of potential subsurface fluid conduits and indicated the position of the GHSZ throughout the survey region. After coring the first site, we acquired Logging-While-Drilling (LWD) data at all but one site to provide an overview of downhole physical properties. The LWD data confirmed the general position of key seismic stratigraphic horizons and yielded an initial estimate of hydrate concentration through the proxy of in situ electrical resistivity. These records proved to be of great value in planning subsequent coring. The second new hydrate proxy to be tested was infrared thermal imaging of cores on the catwalk as rapidly as possible after retrieval. The thermal images were used to identify hydrate samples and to map estimate the distribution and texture of hydrate within the cores. Geochemical analyses of interstitial waters and of headspace and void gases provide additional information on the distribution and concentration of hydrate within the stability zone, the origin and pathway of fluids into and through the GHSZ, and the rates at which the process of gas hydrate formation is occurring. Bio- and lithostratigraphic description of cores, measurement of physical properties, and in situ pressure core sampling and thermal measurements complement the data set, providing ground-truth tests of inferred physical and sedimentological properties. Among the most interesting preliminary results are: (1) the discovery that gas hydrates are distributed through a broad depth range within the GHSZ and that different physical and chemical proxies for hydrate distribution and concentration give generally consistent results; (2) evidence for the importance of sediment properties for controlling the migration of fluids in the accretionary complex; (3) geochemical indications that the gas hydrate system at Hydrate Ridge contains significant concentrations of higher order hydrocarbons and that fractionation and mixing signals will provide important constraints on gas hydrate dynamics; and (4) the discovery of very high chlorinity values that extend for at least 10 mbsf near the summit, indicating that hydrate formation here must be very rapid.

  15. In-Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Marine Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Frank R. Rack

    2006-09-20

    Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41329 between Joint Oceanographic Institutions and DOE-NETL was divided into two phases based on successive proposals and negotiated statements of work pertaining to activities to sample and characterize methane hydrates on ODP Leg 204 (Phase 1) and on IODP Expedition 311 (Phase 2). The Phase 1 Final Report was submitted to DOE-NETL in April 2004. This report is the Phase 2 Final Report to DOE-NETL. The primary objectives of Phase 2 were to sample and characterize methane hydrates using the systems and capabilities of the D/V JOIDES Resolution during IODP Expedition 311, to enable scientists the opportunity to establish the mass and distribution of naturally occurring gas and gas hydrate at all relevant spatial and temporal scales, and to contribute to the DOE methane hydrate research and development effort. The goal of the work was to provide expanded measurement capabilities on the JOIDES Resolution for a dedicated hydrate cruise to the Cascadia continental margin off Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada (IODP Expedition 311) so that hydrate deposits in this region would be well characterized and technology development continued for hydrate research. IODP Expedition 311 shipboard activities on the JOIDES Resolution began on August 28 and were concluded on October 28, 2005. The statement of work for this project included three primary tasks: (1) research management oversight, provided by JOI; (2) mobilization, deployment and demobilization of pressure coring and core logging systems, through a subcontract with Geotek Ltd.; and, (3) mobilization, deployment and demobilization of a refrigerated container van that will be used for degassing of the Pressure Core Sampler and density logging of these pressure cores, through a subcontract with the Texas A&M Research Foundation (TAMRF). Additional small tasks that arose during the course of the research were included under these three primary tasks in consultation with the DOE-NETL Program Manager. All tasks outlined in the original statement of work were accomplished except for the deployment and use of the X-ray CT system under Subtask 2-2. This reduction in scope provided resources that were applied to other activities to support the overall project. Post-expedition analysis of results and report writing will continue beyond this reporting period, however, all field deployments associated with this project have been successfully concluded as of this writing.

  16. Is the Cape Roux marine protected area (Saint-Raphaël, Mediterranean Sea) an efficient tool to sustain artisanal fisheries? First indications from visual censuses and trammel net sampling

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Catherine Seytre; Patrice Francoura

    2008-01-01

    In recent decades, marine reserves have been established either to protect ecosystem structure and biolog- ical diversity or to serve as management tools to counter the overexploitation of fish stocks. The Cape Roux marine protected area (MPA), in the Mediterranean Sea, was established in December 2003 for the management of artisanal fisheries and enhancement target fish stocks. Monitoring of littoral

  17. CAMPUS RECREATION 2012 2013 Annual Report

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    CAMPUS RECREATION 2012 ­ 2013 Annual Report July 1, 2012 ­ June 30, 2013 Mission The mission of Campus Recreation is to enhance the quality of life of the Florida Atlantic University community by encouraging active and balanced lifestyles and to facilitate student learning through participation in Campus

  18. Recreational therapy for the chronic alcoholic

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John Eisele Davis

    1945-01-01

    This discussion aims to develop an impressionistic study of recreational therapy in its general and specific application to various types of chronic alcoholics observed over a period of 20 years. This observation of the chronic alcoholic in recreation was made at Veterans' Administration and other institutions in various parts of the country, such as the Institute of Living. Most of

  19. Annual in Therapeutic Recreation. Volume One, 1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Michael E., Ed.; Card, Jaclyn A., Ed.

    This publication contains the following articles: (1) "A Pilot Study of the Relationship between Co-Dependency and Recreation Using Women with Histories of Domestic Violence" (Pamela E. Foti and Lori S. Gelvin); (2) "Discretionary Time Use and the Chronically Mentally Ill" (Thomas K. Skalko); (3) "Therapeutic Recreation and Family Therapy: A Needs…

  20. UNBC: Outdoor Recreation and Tourism Management Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maher, Pat

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the University of Northern British Columbia's (UNBC's) Outdoor Recreation and Tourism Management (ORTM) Program, which focuses squarely on the management of outdoor recreation as it relates to conservation (i.e., in and around parks and protected areas), tourism that is both based in and concerned with the natural/cultural…

  1. Los Angeles County Parks and Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa Univ., Iowa City. Recreation Education Program.

    Presented are duplications of the responses given by the Los Angeles County Parks and Recreation Rehabilitation Unit (California) as part of a project to collect, share, and compile information about, and techniques in the operation of 18 community action models for recreation services to the disabled. Model programs are categorized as consumer,…

  2. Maine-Niles Association of Special Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa Univ., Iowa City. Recreation Education Program.

    Presented are duplications of the responses given by Maine-Niles Association of Special Recreation (Skokie, Illinois) as part of a project to collect, share, and compile information about, and techniques in the operation of 18 community action models for recreation services to the disabled. Model programs are categorized as consumer, client…

  3. Intelligence and Past Use of Recreational Drugs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilmoth, Daniel R.

    2012-01-01

    One motivation for trying recreational drugs is the desire for novel experiences. More intelligent people tend to value novelty more highly and may therefore be more likely to have tried recreational drugs. Using data from a national survey, it is shown that intelligence tends to be positively related to the probabilities of having tried alcohol,…

  4. Department of Recreational Sports Intramural Sports

    E-print Network

    Escher, Christine

    on the Intramural Sports website. Sports and Special Programs Office (541)737-4083 111 Dixon Recreation Center wwwDepartment of Recreational Sports Intramural Sports Bowling Rules I. GOVERNING RULES The Rules Sports rule applies. II. ELIGIBILITY All Participants must be either students registered at Oregon State

  5. Department of Recreational Sports Intramural Sports

    E-print Network

    Escher, Christine

    Department of Recreational Sports Intramural Sports Softball Rules Sports and Special Programs Office (541)737-4083 111 Dixon Recreation Center www.oregonstate.edu/recsports Revised 4/16/2013 I University Intramural Sports rule applies. II. ELIGIBILITY All participants must be either students

  6. Department of Recreational Sports Intramural Sports

    E-print Network

    Escher, Christine

    . Sports and Special Programs Office (541)737-4083 111 Dixon Recreation Center wwwDepartment of Recreational Sports Intramural Sports Volleyball Rules I. GOVERNING RULES The rules Oregon State University Intramural Sports rule applies. II. ELIGIBILITY All participants must be either

  7. Department of Recreational Sports Intramural Sports

    E-print Network

    Escher, Christine

    Department of Recreational Sports Intramural Sports Soccer Rules Sports and Special Programs Office (541) 737-4083 111 Dixon Recreation Center www.oregonstate.edu/recsports Revised 4/16/2013 I. GOVERNING cases except where a special Oregon State University Intramural Sports rule applies. II. ELIGIBILITY All

  8. Department of Recreational Sports Intramural Sports

    E-print Network

    Escher, Christine

    Issue in the Dixon Recreation Center. V. GAME TIME Sport Clubs and Intramural Sports Office 737-4083 111Department of Recreational Sports Intramural Sports Wheelchair Basketball Rules I. GOVERNING RULES where a special Oregon State University Intramural Sports rule applies. Rules of Team Balance

  9. Department of Recreational Sports Intramural Sports

    E-print Network

    Escher, Christine

    Department of Recreational Sports Intramural Sports Team Golf Rules Sports and Special Programs Office (541)737-4083 111 Dixon Recreation Center www.oregonstate.edu/recsports Revised 4/16/2013 I a special Oregon State University Intramural Sports rule applies. II. ELIGIBILITY All Participants must

  10. Department of Recreational Sports Intramural Sports

    E-print Network

    Escher, Christine

    Department of Recreational Sports Intramural Sports Par 3 Golf Rules Sports and Special Programs where a special Oregon State University Intramural Sports rule applies. II. ELIGIBILITY All Participants/Staff/Affiliate with a Recreational Sports Membership. For more information on eligibility, consult the Intramural Sports Handbook

  11. Effects of changed aircraft noise exposure on the use of outdoor recreational areas.

    PubMed

    Krog, Norun Hjertager; Engdahl, Bo; Tambs, Kristian

    2010-11-01

    This paper examines behavioural responses to changes in aircraft noise exposure in local outdoor recreational areas near airports. Results from a panel study conducted in conjunction with the relocation of Norway's main airport in 1998 are presented. One recreational area was studied at each airport site. The samples (n = 1,264/1,370) were telephone interviewed about their use of the area before and after the change. Results indicate that changed aircraft noise exposure may influence individual choices to use local outdoor recreational areas, suggesting that careful considerations are needed in the planning of air routes over local outdoor recreational areas. However, considerable stability in use, and also fluctuations in use unrelated to the changes in noise conditions were found. Future studies of noise impacts should examine a broader set of coping mechanisms, like intra- and temporal displacement. Also, the role of place attachment, and the substitutability of local areas should be studied. PMID:21139867

  12. Fuel Used for Off-Highway Recreation

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, P.S.

    1994-01-01

    The Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991 (ISTEA) established a National Recreational Trails Funding Program and the National Recreational Trails Trust Fund. ISTEA requires that tax revenue generated from the sales of motor fuel used for off-highway recreation be transferred from the Highway Trust Fund to the Trails Trust Fund for recreational trail and facility improvements. In order to apportion the Trails Trust Fund to individual states equitably, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) asked the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to estimate the amount of motor fuel used for off-highway recreation at the state level by different vehicle types. This report documents this estimation procedure. For this estimation procedure, off-highway recreational fuel use was defined as Federally taxed gasoline, gasohol, diesel fuel, or special fuel used in recreational motorized vehicles on recreational trails or back country terrain. Fuel used in outdoor non-engine recreational equipment, such as camp stoves, heaters, and lanterns, was excluded from the analysis. Vehicle types included in this study were: pickup truck, light utility vehicle, motorcycle, all terrain vehicle (ATV), and snowmobile. Two factors governed the development of this estimation procedure. First, individual state shares of the total Trust Funds need to be developed using a uniform approach. Second, data needed for the estimation procedure should be publicly available and easily obtainable so that estimates for all subsequent years can be generated easily. Estimates were developed based on existing data sources. Adjustment factors were developed to take into account different vehicular off-highway recreational usage among states.

  13. 76 FR 79176 - Notice of Availability of Draft Recreational Water Quality Criteria and Request for Scientific Views

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-21

    ...the beach season. Sampling of waterbodies should be representative of meteorological conditions (e.g., wet and dry weather) for the recreational season. Frequency: EPA recommends a frequency of zero exceedances of the GM...

  14. The role of recreation and park amenities in influencing footloose businesses to (Re)locate in Colorado 

    E-print Network

    Love, Lisa L.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relative importance of quality of life and recreation/parks/open space in business location decisions. The study sampled economic development agency officials and business representatives. Following...

  15. *THE LOGNORMAL DISTRIBUTION AND USE OF THE GEOMETRIC MEAN AND THE ARITHMETIC MEAN IN RECREATIONAL WATER QUALITY MEASUREMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Statistical Framework for Recreational Water Quality Criteria and Monitoring offers a practical guide to the statistical methods used for assessing health effects and monitoring and modelling water quality Both traditional and novel sampling designs are discussed. Written by a te...

  16. Effect of recreational diving on Patagonian rocky reefs.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Gonzalo; Márquez, Federico; Marzinelli, Ezequiel M; Mendez, María M; Bigatti, Gregorio

    2015-03-01

    Tourism has grown considerably in the last decades, promoting activities such as recreational SCUBA diving that may affect marine benthic communities. In Puerto Madryn, Patagonia Argentina, sub-aquatic tourism areas (STA) receive about 7,000 divers per year. Diving is concentrated on a few small rocky reefs and 50% of the dives occur in summer. In this work, we evaluated the effect of recreational diving activities on benthic communities and determined whether diving causes a press (long-term) or a pulse (short-term) response. We quantified the percentage cover of benthic organisms and compared benthic assemblage structure and composition between two sites with contrasting usage by divers, 'highly disturbed' and 'moderately disturbed' sites, and two 'control' sites with similar physical characteristics but no diving activity, twice before and after the diving peak in summer. We found differences in benthic assemblage structure (identity and relative abundance of taxa) and composition (identity only) among diving sites and controls. These differences were consistent before and after the peak of diving in summer, suggesting that recreational diving may produce a press impact on overall benthic assemblage structure and composition in these STA. At the moderately disturbed site, however, covers of specific taxa, such as some key habitat-forming or highly abundant species, usually differed from those in controls only immediately after summer, after which they begun to resemble controls, suggesting a pulse impact. Thus, STA in Golfo Nuevo seem to respond differently to disturbances of diving depending on the usage of the sites. This information is necessary to develop sound management strategies in order to preserve local biodiversity. PMID:25577688

  17. Oregon State Parks and Recreation

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    What can you do in the great Oregon outdoors? From the world of Cannon Beach to the wild and rugged Snake River, the experiences are diverse, to say the least. The homepage features dramatic vistas, isolated lighthouses, and a whole range of wonderful images to entice visitors. In the Visit area, there is an interactive map of the state that will help plan any trip. Here visitors can select Activities and Facilities to look for specific amenities. Moving along, the Event Calendar area allows visitors to look for upcoming events at a specific park or by category. Policy folks will appreciate the About Us area, as it includes detailed information on the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department's budget, their annual report, information about upcoming initiatives, and construction projects.

  18. Human error in recreational boating.

    PubMed

    McKnight, A James; Becker, Wayne W; Pettit, Anthony J; McKnight, A Scott

    2007-03-01

    Each year over 600 people die and more than 4000 are reported injured in recreational boating accidents. As with most other accidents, human error is the major contributor. U.S. Coast Guard reports of 3358 accidents were analyzed to identify errors in each of the boat types by which statistics are compiled: auxiliary (motor) sailboats, cabin motorboats, canoes and kayaks, house boats, personal watercraft, open motorboats, pontoon boats, row boats, sail-only boats. The individual errors were grouped into categories on the basis of similarities in the behavior involved. Those presented here are the categories accounting for at least 5% of all errors when summed across boat types. The most revealing and significant finding is the extent to which the errors vary across types. Since boating is carried out with one or two types of boats for long periods of time, effective accident prevention measures, including safety instruction, need to be geared to individual boat types. PMID:17049472

  19. Lake Mead National Recreation Area

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This Lake Mead National Recreation Area site contains a section to plan a visit to the Boulder Basin, Lake Mohave, Overton Arm, and East Lake Mead areas; a park newspaper; park maps; and a photo archive. There is information on the natural history of plant and animal life in the park, including a species list of birds, mammals, plants, and reptiles; sections on bats, spring flowers, and algae bloom on Lake Mead; and a link about the geology of Lake Mead. Environmental lesson plans involving the Mojave Desert for grades 1-5 include: Animals Among Us, Cactus Clues, Going Buggy, Tortoise Tracks, Keyed Into Plants, Puzzle Pieces of the Past, Nocturnal Detective, Landforms in Motion, Weather Wise, and Do Not Be Trashy! There are also field trip guides to explore the Mojave Desert.

  20. Assessment of ultrasound-assisted extraction as sample pre-treatment for the measurement of lead isotope ratios in marine biological tissues by multicollector inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costas-Rodríguez, M.; Lavilla, Isela; Bendicho, Carlos

    2011-06-01

    In this work, ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) was evaluated as a sample preparation procedure for lead isotope ratio measurements in marine biological tissues by multicollector inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. 20 mg of marine biological tissue and 1 mL of acid extractant were sonicated for 3 min at 60% ultrasound amplitude. Matrix separation was performed in the supernatant using a chromatographic exchange resin (Sr-Spec™). Total elimination of organic matter was achieved during the separation step. Microwave-assisted digestion and dry-ashing were used for comparative purposes. No significant differences were found in lead isotope ratios at 95% of confidence level. UAE emerges as an advantageous alternative to classical methods for sample preparation owing to its simplicity and rapidity ( i.e. operation steps were reduced), low reagent consumption and low contamination risks.

  1. Health and Safety in Australian Marine Tourism: A social, medical and legal appraisal

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeffrey Wilks

    As an island holiday destination Australia offers a large range of leisure activities in the area of marine tourism. This paper examines marine settings as tourist destinations and considers the social, medical and legal aspects of ensuring visitors have a safe and enjoyable holiday experience. Currently there is very little empirical data on tourists' recreational activities in Australia, especially the

  2. Scuba diving and marine conservation: collaboration at two Australian subtropical destinations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zan Hammerton; Kay Dimmock; Christine Hahn; Steven J Dalton; Stephen DA Smith

    2012-01-01

    Divers are increasingly becoming involved in marine conservation, often doing so as part of their recreational activities. Two New South Wales (NSW) volunteer underwater conservation groups [Solitary Islands Underwater Research Group Inc. (SURG) and Byron Underwater Research Groups(BURG)] were studied to characterize members’ motivations to assist with conservation in subtropical\\/temperate marine environments. The collaboration between private and government organizations at

  3. Today's Youth in Tomorrow's Sea. Another Title in the Series "Marine Careers."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Harold L.

    A discussion of many career possibilities related to the sea is presented. The false impressions many people have about the sea and about marine careers are dispelled. Among the career areas examined are offshore industry careers such as oil and gas drilling, careers in fishing, in seafaring, marine recreation, oceanography, aquaculture,…

  4. GCOOS Web Applications for Recreational Boaters and Fishermen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobara, S.; Howard, M. K.; Simoniello, C.; Jochens, A. E.; Gulf Of Mexico Coastal Ocean Observing System Regional Association (Gcoos-Ra)

    2010-12-01

    Spatial and temporal information on the ecology of marine species and encompassing oceanographic environment is vital to the development of effective strategies for marine resource management and biodiversity conservation. Assembling data and generating products is a time-consuming and often laborious part of the workflow required of fisheries specialists, resource managers, marine scientists and other stakeholder groups for effective fishery management and marine spatial planning. Workflow costs for all groups can be significantly reduced through the use of interoperable networked data systems. The Gulf of Mexico Coastal Ocean Observing System Regional Association (GCOOS-RA) is one of 11 RAs comprising the non-Federal part of the U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS). The RAs serve the region’s needs for data and information: by working with data providers to offer their data in standardized ways following IOOS guidance, by gathering stakeholders’ needs and requirements, and by producing basic products or facilitating product-generation by others to meet those needs. The GCOOS Data Portal aggregates regional near real-time data and serves these data through standardized service interfaces suitable for automated machine access or in formats suitable for human consumption. The related Products Portal generates products in graphical displays for humans and in standard formats for importing into common software packages. Web map applications are created using ArcGIS server RESTful service, publicly available Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web Map Service (WMS) layers, and Web Coverage Service (WCS). Use of standardize interfaces allows us to construct seamless workflows that carry data from sensors through to products in an automated fashion. As a demonstration of the power of interoperable standards-based systems we have developed tailored product web pages for recreational boaters and fishermen. This is a part of an ongoing project to provide an interactive tool for decision support in the Gulf of Mexico.

  5. Modeling Marine Phage Ecology Joseph M. Mahaffy

    E-print Network

    Mahaffy, Joseph M.

    liter sample · Filter water so only phage particles remain · Extract the phage DNA · Randomly breakModeling Marine Phage Ecology Joseph M. Mahaffy Nonlinear Dynamical Systems Group Computational/3 #12;Outline · Introduction to Marine Phage · Discuss Biological Experiments · Contig Analysis

  6. A Social Science Bibliography of Leisure and Recreation Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burdge, Rabel J.; And Others

    This bibliography provides an accessible source to social science research in leisure, recreation, and sports. Topical areas covered include: (1) bibliographic sources on leisure and recreation; (2) philosophical issues in leisure; (3) theories of leisure and recreation; (4) methods in leisure and recreation research; (5) evaluation of leisure and…

  7. Expanding Horizons in Commercial Recreation for Disabled People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nesbitt, John A.

    Based on a presentation given at the 1974 National Conference on Commercial Recreation for Disabled People, the paper examines the role of commercial recreation in the lives of the handicapped. Examples of commercial recreation enterprises are listed for equipment, goods and products; recreation centers, services, and schools; entertainment;…

  8. Recreation and Sport Planning and Design. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daly, Jim

    This book offers guidelines for planning and designing cost-effective community recreation and sports facilities and open spaces in Australia. Seven chapters include: (1) "Benefits of Recreation and Sport" (e.g., quality of life, and diversity of recreation and sport); (2) "Provision of Recreation and Sport Open Spaces" (e.g., overview of…

  9. COMMUNITY RECREATIONAL WATER RISK ASSESSMENT AND PUBLICOUTREACH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The City of Milwaukee Health Department and the City of Racine Health Department have formed a consortium with several scientific and community organizations for the purpose of more effectively collecting and disseminating recreational water quality data from several bea...

  10. BACTERIAL INDICATORS OF RECREATIONAL WATER QUALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The selection of bacterial indicators of recreational water quality are considered with respect to suggested ideal characteristics, such as association with pathogens, growth in aquatic environments, resistance to disinfection and ease of enumeration, and through the use of epide...

  11. SPONSOR PARTNERSHIP GUIDELINES RECREATIONAL SPORTS PARTNERSHIPS

    E-print Network

    Escher, Christine

    Mission Statement, Vision Statement and Guiding Principles. PERSONS AFFECTED All program areas our guiding principles, mission, and vision parameters. Key components from each of our statements opportunities that foster healthy living. · Vision Statement o The Department of Recreational Sports

  12. Outdoors America: recreational opportunites on public lands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1992-01-01

    What comes to your mind when you think of outdoor recreation? Boating? Camping? Hiking or backpacking? Horse-back riding? Hunting or fishing? Chances are, if you can name an outdoor activity, you can do it on public lands.

  13. 36 CFR 294.1 - Recreation areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...liveries, garages, and similar types of public service accommodations), bathing beaches, winter sports areas, lodges, and similar facilities and appurtenant structures needed by the public to enjoy the recreation resources of the...

  14. 36 CFR 294.1 - Recreation areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...liveries, garages, and similar types of public service accommodations), bathing beaches, winter sports areas, lodges, and similar facilities and appurtenant structures needed by the public to enjoy the recreation resources of the...

  15. 36 CFR 294.1 - Recreation areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...liveries, garages, and similar types of public service accommodations), bathing beaches, winter sports areas, lodges, and similar facilities and appurtenant structures needed by the public to enjoy the recreation resources of the...

  16. Physical-Education Facilities/Recreation Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School & University, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Describes the design of notable school physical education/recreation facilities, including the educational context and design goals. Includes information on architects, suppliers, and cost, as well as photographs. (EV)

  17. University of Massachusetts Lowell Campus Recreation Department

    E-print Network

    Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

    Current NIRSA (National Intramural Recreational Sport Association) & NFHS (National Federation of State of the players in order of the serve shall be Right Back, Right Front, Center Front, Left Front, Left Back

  18. University of Massachusetts Lowell Campus Recreation Department

    E-print Network

    Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

    Current NIRSA (National Intramural Recreational Sport Association) & NFHS (National Federation of State in a point for the opponent. 4. The p e Right Back, Right Front, Center Front, Left Front, L osition

  19. 77 FR 36250 - Recreation Resource Advisory Committees

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-18

    ...Outfitter and Guide Recreation, Local Environmental, State Tourism, Local Government, and Tribal. The public is invited to...environmental groups. 3. Three persons, as follows: a. A State tourism official to represent the State; b. A person who...

  20. Wheelchair Design Changes: New Opportunities for Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Exceptional Parent, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Changes in wheelchair design (such as larger tires and lighter overall weight) make it possible for disabled persons to exercise more mobility and control and participate in a greater variety of recreational activities. (CL)

  1. Industrial recreation in Texas: an exploratory study

    E-print Network

    Kershaw, Deborah Louise

    1982-01-01

    . The Texas inventory of facilities, programs and personnel was compared to the 1978 national study. Industrial Recreation: Outlook for the Future (Groves, Rath, McGinn, and Decarlo, 1979) is the report of this This thesis follows the style put forth... as a tool to retain presently employed workers. Finally, another benefit that a company seeks to obtain is the healthy psychological outlook of its employees near retirement. By providing a means in which an employee can develop new recreation...

  2. Marine04 Marine radiocarbon age calibration, 26 ? 0 ka BP

    SciTech Connect

    Hughen, K; Baille, M; Bard, E; Beck, J; Bertrand, C; Blackwell, P; Buck, C; Burr, G; Cutler, K; Damon, P; Edwards, R; Fairbanks, R; Friedrich, M; Guilderson, T; Kromer, B; McCormac, F; Manning, S; Bronk-Ramsey, C; Reimer, P; Reimer, R; Remmele, S; Southon, J; Stuiver, M; Talamo, S; Taylor, F; der Plicht, J v; Weyhenmeyer, C

    2004-11-01

    New radiocarbon calibration curves, IntCal04 and Marine04, have been constructed and internationally ratified to replace the terrestrial and marine components of IntCal98. The new calibration datasets extend an additional 2000 years, from 0-26 ka cal BP (Before Present, 0 cal BP = AD 1950), and provide much higher resolution, greater precision and more detailed structure than IntCal98. For the Marine04 curve, dendrochronologically dated tree-ring samples, converted with a box-diffusion model to marine mixed-layer ages, cover the period from 0-10.5 ka cal BP. Beyond 10.5 ka cal BP, high-resolution marine data become available from foraminifera in varved sediments and U/Th-dated corals. The marine records are corrected with site-specific {sup 14}C reservoir age information to provide a single global marine mixed-layer calibration from 10.5-26.0 ka cal BP. A substantial enhancement relative to IntCal98 is the introduction of a random walk model, which takes into account the uncertainty in both the calendar age and the radiocarbon age to calculate the underlying calibration curve. The marine datasets and calibration curve for marine samples from the surface mixed layer (Marine04) are discussed here. The tree-ring datasets, sources of uncertainty, and regional offsets are presented in detail in a companion paper by Reimer et al.

  3. Marine pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Albaiges, J. (Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo, CSIC, Barcelona (ES))

    1989-01-01

    This book covers the following topics: Transport of marine pollutants; Transformation of pollutants in the marine environment; Biological effects of marine pollutants; Sources and transport of oil pollutants in the Persian Gulf; Trace metals and hydrocarbons in Syrian coastal waters; and Techniques for analysis of trace pollutants.

  4. Marine biology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. V. Thurman; H. H. Webber

    1984-01-01

    This book discusses both taxonomic and ecological topics on marine biology. Full coverage of marine organisms of all five kingdoms is provided, along with interesting and thorough discussion of all major marine habitats. Organization into six major parts allows flexibility. It also provides insight into important topics such as disposal of nuclear waste at sea, the idea that life began

  5. Economic valuation for the conservation of marine biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, N J; Austen, M C; Mangi, S C; Townsend, M

    2008-03-01

    Policy makers are increasingly recognising the role of environmental valuation to guide and support the management and conservation of biodiversity. This paper presents a goods and services approach to determine the economic value of marine biodiversity in the UK, with the aim of clarifying the role of valuation in the management of marine biodiversity. The goods and services resulting from UK marine biodiversity are detailed, and 8 of the 13 services are valued in monetary terms. It is found that a decline in UK marine biodiversity could result in a varying, and at present unpredictable, change in the provision of goods and services, including reduced resilience and resistance to change, declining marine environmental health, reduced fisheries potential, and loss of recreational opportunities. The results suggest that this approach can facilitate biodiversity management by enabling the optimal allocation of limited management resources and through raising awareness of the importance of marine biodiversity. PMID:18191954

  6. Determinants of Intensity of Participation in Leisure and Recreational Activities by Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palisano, Robert J.; Chiarello, Lisa A.; Orlin, Margo; Oeffinger, Donna; Polansky, Marcy; Maggs, Jill; Bagley, Anita; Gorton, George

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To test a model of child, family, and service determinants of intensity of participation in leisure and recreational activities by children with cerebral palsy (CP). Method: Participants were 288 children with CP, age range 6 to 12 years (mean 9y 8mo, SD 2y), and their parents from seven children's hospitals. The sample comprised 166 (57.6%)…

  7. Coming of Age: How Adolescent Boys Construct Masculinities via Substance Use, Juvenile Delinquency, and Recreation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jolene M. Sanders

    2011-01-01

    This research aims to uncover aspects of adolescent masculine development among adult substance abusers. In-depth interviews and the resulting narrative provide the data for this exploratory analysis. Three main areas of adolescent masculinities are discussed: substance abuse, juvenile delinquency, and recreation. The findings are interpreted in light of Connell's conceptualization of hegemonic masculinities. Based on this sample, masculinities are constructed

  8. Estimating Recreational Boater Expenditures on Trips and Boating Use in a Wave Survey

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hee-Chan Lee

    2003-01-01

    This study developed methodological refinements for estimating both annual use and trip expenditures of recreational boaters using a single survey. Data were collected through sample survey of Michigan registered boat owners. An in-season survey was utilized to estimate boating activity and trip spending. Surveys were sent out in nine waves every week over the 1998 summer. Annual use per boat

  9. RAPID DETECTION METHOD FOR E.COLI, ENTEROCOCCI AND BACTEROIDES IN RECREATIONAL WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current methodology for determining fecal contamination of drinking water sources and recreational waters rely on the time-consuming process of bacterial multiplication and require at least 24 hours from the time of sampling to the possible determination that the water is unsafe ...

  10. Views of Students in the Department of Recreation and Sport Management on Distance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herguner, Gulten

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to investigate viewpoints of students in recreation and sport management department on distance education, and the effects of sex, having computers and internet access at home, family's monthly income, district of the family, and students' level of class on these viewpoints. Survey method was used to carry out the study. The sample

  11. Prospective epidemiological pilot study on the morbidity of bathers exposed to tropical recreational waters and sand.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Nazario, Elia E; Santiago-Rodriguez, Tasha M; Toranzos, Gary A

    2014-06-01

    A prospective cohort epidemiological pilot study was performed at three tropical beaches with point- and non-point-sources of fecal pollution to characterize the risk of illness among swimmers and non-swimmers. There was an increased risk of illness in swimmers as compared to non-swimmers, even when waters met current microbial standards for recreational water quality. Illnesses included gastrointestinal (GI), skin and respiratory symptoms, earache and fever. Odds ratios (ORs) ranged from 0.32 to 42.35 (GI illness), 0.69 to 3.12 (skin infections), 0.71 to 3.21 (respiratory symptoms), 0.52 to 15.32 (earache) and 0.80 to 1.68 (fever), depending on the beach sampled. The indicators that better predicted the risks of symptoms (respiratory) in tropical recreational waters were total (somatic and male-specific) coliphages (OR = 1.56, p < 0.10, R(2) = 3.79%) and Escherichia coli (OR = 1.38, p < 0.10, R(2) = 1.97%). The present study supports the potential of coliphages as good predictors of risks of respiratory illness in tropical recreational waters. This is the first study that has determined risks of illness after exposure to tropical recreational waters with point- and non-point sources of fecal contamination. The results give an opportunity to perform epidemiological studies in tropical recreational waters in Puerto Rico which can include more participants and other indicators and detection techniques. PMID:24937216

  12. Gambling motivation and passion: a comparison study of recreational and pathological gamblers.

    PubMed

    Back, Ki-Joon; Lee, Choong-Ki; Stinchfield, Randy

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the structural relationship among gambling motivation, gambling passion, and behavioral intentions to gamble between recreational and pathological gamblers. Specifically, this study aimed to shed light on the different ways in which gambling motivation and affective attitude are associated with recreational and pathological gamblers. Using a purposive sampling method, 400 subjects were selected for and participated in this study during their visits to a casino. Study results echoed the notion of distinctive and separate gambling motivations and passions between recreational and pathological gamblers. Also, results identified specific areas to which casino operators or policy makers should pay special attention in developing effective marketing strategies to promote responsible gambling. PMID:20680417

  13. Survey of non-charter boat recreational fishing in the U.S. Virgin Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jennings, C.A.

    1992-01-01

    A telephone survey was conducted by the U.S. Virgin Islands Division of Fish and Wildlife from July- September 1986 to evaluate the efficacy of telephone surveys as a sampling technique for obtaining reliable fisheries data, and to collect fisheries data for the recreational non-charter boat fishery around the Virgin Islands. Results suggest that telephone surveys by themselves may provide biased data on recreational fishing in the Virgin Islands. Additional methods, such as mail surveys and limited creel surveys could be used to supplement the fisheries data gathered through telephone surveys. The results of this survey indicate that during the mid 1980s 10.8% of the residents of the Virgin Islands ( similar to 10,800) fished recreationally (i.e., non-charter boat anglers). These anglers made modest demands of the resources (effort: 19,200 manhours/yr;

  14. In Search of Pleasure: An Exploration of Teenage Recreational Sex 

    E-print Network

    Reichstein, Lauren

    2012-02-14

    This thesis utilizes a qualitative method to investigate recreational sex among teenagers as recounted by current college-aged students. As defined for the purposes of this thesis, recreational sex is any consensual sexual activity undertaken...

  15. 50 CFR 648.105 - Summer flounder recreational fishing season.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Summer flounder recreational fishing season. 648.105 Section 648.105 Wildlife and Fisheries...Fisheries § 648.105 Summer flounder recreational fishing season. Unless otherwise specified pursuant to §...

  16. 50 CFR 648.105 - Summer flounder recreational fishing season.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Summer flounder recreational fishing season. 648.105 Section 648.105 Wildlife and Fisheries...Fisheries § 648.105 Summer flounder recreational fishing season. Unless otherwise specified pursuant to §...

  17. 50 CFR 648.105 - Summer flounder recreational fishing season.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Summer flounder recreational fishing season. 648.105 Section 648.105 Wildlife and Fisheries...Fisheries § 648.105 Summer flounder recreational fishing season. Unless otherwise specified pursuant to §...

  18. 18 CFR 2.7 - Recreational development at licensed projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...purposes. (2) To provide either by itself or through arrangement with others for facilities to process adequately sewage, litter, and other wastes from recreation facilities including wastes from watercraft, at recreation facilities maintained and...

  19. THE CONTRIBUTION OF OUTDOOR-BASED RECREATION OPPORTUNITIES TO LOCAL

    E-print Network

    strategy for outdoor-recreation based tourism development. Despite its reputation as a leading rock development are provided. Keywords: economic impact analysis; tourism development; recreation-based tourism; rock climbing; visitor monitoring Subject Terms: Leisure -- Economic aspects; Tourism -- Economic

  20. Titan Recreation-Intramural Sports Student Engagement Report

    E-print Network

    de Lijser, Peter

    Titan Recreation-Intramural Sports Student Engagement Report FY 2010-2011 Purpose Statement Titan and overall wellness. Titan Recreation also provides opportunities for cooperative and competitive play, team building and interpersonal skills. Leadership and participation opportunities within Titan

  1. STUDENT RECREATION CENTER FACILITY REQUEST Group Name: ____________________________ Today's Date: __________

    E-print Network

    STUDENT RECREATION CENTER FACILITY REQUEST · Group Name: ____________________________ Today's Date/Speaker ___Meeting ___Sports Tournament ___ Club Special Event ___ Sale/Fundraiser Other. _______________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________________ By requesting the Colorado School of Mines Student Recreation Center, I acknowledge that the requested activity

  2. Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University Department of Recreational Sports

    E-print Network

    Buehrer, R. Michael

    Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University Department of Recreational Sports Assumption Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University Department of Recreational Sports facilities, equipment and programs, sporting activities, running, weight lifting, use of equipment and swimming pools and/or mere

  3. 4. Photocopy of a 1942 architectural drawing titled: 'Patients Recreation, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Photocopy of a 1942 architectural drawing titled: 'Patients Recreation, REC-F-H. First Floor Plan & Details.' 10-31-42 - Madigan Hospital, Patients' Recreation, Bounded by Wilson & McKinley Avenues & Garfield & Lincoln Streets, Tacoma, Pierce County, WA

  4. Undergraduate and graduate degrees from the School of Recreation,

    E-print Network

    Leadership* licensure Virginia teaching licensure in Health and Physical Education (PK-12) *Interdisciplinary · hospitality management · kinesiology · physical education · recreation management · sport management Recreation BSEd | Physical Education BS | Tourism and Events Management Concentrations ­ Events Management

  5. 36 CFR 7.51 - Curecanti Recreation Area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Curecanti Recreation Area. 7.51 Section 7.51 Parks, Forests...THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.51 Curecanti Recreation Area. (a) Hunting. Hunting is...

  6. 36 CFR 7.51 - Curecanti Recreation Area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Curecanti Recreation Area. 7.51 Section 7.51 Parks, Forests...THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.51 Curecanti Recreation Area. (a) Hunting. Hunting is...

  7. 36 CFR 7.51 - Curecanti Recreation Area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Curecanti Recreation Area. 7.51 Section 7.51 Parks, Forests...THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.51 Curecanti Recreation Area. (a) Hunting. Hunting is...

  8. 36 CFR 7.51 - Curecanti Recreation Area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Curecanti Recreation Area. 7.51 Section 7.51 Parks, Forests...THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.51 Curecanti Recreation Area. (a) Hunting. Hunting is...

  9. Marine Microbial Ecology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Australian Antarctic Division

    This image-rich website from the Australian Antarctic Division's Biology program describes its research in marine microbial ecology. It includes an introduction of microbial ecology and microbial processes, followed by information about the research project. Field sampling, microscopy, flow cytometry, pigment analysis, flourometry, HPLC, culturing, feeding experiments, and the research staff are each discussed using vivid imagery. Links are provided to related websites.

  10. Odour emission characteristics of 22 recreational rivers in Nanjing.

    PubMed

    Wan, Yu; Ruan, Xiaohong; Wang, Xinguang; Ma, Qian; Lu, Xiaoming

    2014-10-01

    The odour emission characteristics of 22 recreational rivers in Nanjing were investigated and analysed. Eight odorous compounds (ammonia (NH?), hydrogen sulphide (H?S), sulphur dioxide (SO?), carbon disulphide (CS?), nitrobenzene (C?H?NO?), aniline (C?H?NH?), dimethylamine (C?H?N), and formaldehyde (HCHO)) were measured in odour emission samples collected using a custom-made emission flux hood chamber. The results showed that all odorants were detected in all monitoring rivers. NH? was the main odorant, with emission rates ranging from 4.86 to 15.13 ?g/min m(2). The total odour emission rate of the Nan River, at 1 427.07 OU/s, was the highest of the all investigated rivers. H?S, NH? and nitrobenzene were three key odour emission contributors according to their contributions to the total odour emission. A correlation analysis of the pollutants showed there was a significant positive correlation between the emission rate of NH? and the concentration of ammonia nitrogen (NH? (+)-N) and total nitrogen (TN). The H?S and SO? emission rates had a significant positive correlation with sulphides (S(2-)) and available sulphur (AS) in the water and sediment. The content of TN, NH?(+)-N, S(2-) and AS in the water and sediment affected the concentration of H?S, SO? and NH? in the emission gases. NH?(+)-N, S(2-) and AS are suggested as the key odour control indexes for reducing odours emitted from these recreational rivers. The study provides useful information for effective pollution control, especially for odour emission control for the recreational rivers of the city. It also provides a demonstrate example to show how to monitor and assess a contaminated river when odour emission and its control need to be focused on. PMID:24939710

  11. Recreational Reading of International Students in Academic Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bordonaro, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Recreational reading as a method of language learning has been a focus of investigation in second language education. This article considers recreational reading through the additional perspective of academic librarianship. Its purpose is to discover if recreational reading is a topic that lends itself to research through both perspectives. This…

  12. News Release Off-Highway Motor Vehicle Recreation Division

    E-print Network

    News Release Off-Highway Motor Vehicle Recreation Division California State Parks 1725 23rd Street Creek Management Area near Hollister, California The Off-Highway Motor Vehicle Recreation (OHMVR at the CCMA to mitigate risk while still allowing access to this premier off-highway vehicle (OHV) recreation

  13. Will human recreational activity on levee trails enhance carnivore activity?

    E-print Network

    Johnson, Matthew

    before- after-control-impact (BACI) experiment. RESULTS · Simulated human recreational activityWill human recreational activity on levee trails enhance carnivore activity? Will human is currently proposed to be opened to human recreational traffic. The levee separates the bay from adjacent

  14. A Recreation and Leisure Inventory: Development and Application.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glausier, Sheryl R.; And Others

    The Recreation and Leisure Inventory (RLI) was developed to assist disabled adolescents and young adults in determining their recreation and leisure preferences. The RLI had three prototypes, all of which used an interview format to assess participants' preferences for recreational and leisure activities. The Needs Assessment for Adults with…

  15. 50 CFR 648.127 - Scup recreational fishing season.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Scup recreational fishing season. 648.127 Section 648.127 Wildlife...648.127 Scup recreational fishing season. Fishermen and vessels that are...128(a). The recreational fishing season may be adjusted pursuant to the...

  16. 50 CFR 648.127 - Scup recreational fishing season.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Scup recreational fishing season. 648.127 Section 648.127 Wildlife...648.127 Scup recreational fishing season. Fishermen and vessels that are...128(a). The recreational fishing season may be adjusted pursuant to the...

  17. 50 CFR 648.127 - Scup recreational fishing season.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Scup recreational fishing season. 648.127 Section 648.127 Wildlife...648.127 Scup recreational fishing season. Fishermen and vessels that are...128(a). The recreational fishing season may be adjusted pursuant to the...

  18. Department of Recreation, Park and Tourism Sciences Academic Program Review

    E-print Network

    -845-7234 January 4, 2013 #12;Executive Summary Self-Study, Department of Recreation, Park and Tourism SciencesDepartment of Recreation, Park and Tourism Sciences Academic Program Review Academic Year 2013 Department of Recreation, Park and Tourism Sciences 2261 TAMU College Station, TX 77843-2261 979

  19. Differentiating outdoor recreation: evidence drawn from national surveys in Scotland

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nigel Curry; Katrina Brown

    2010-01-01

    Outdoor recreation participation can be seen to fall into four identifiably different groups. Countryside outdoor recreation has been in decline for at least 25 years because of changing lifestyles and cultures, and targeted policy – which focuses heavily on the supply side – appears to have had little influence over consumption levels. Localised outdoor recreation is on the increase, accommodating

  20. Leisure Today. Recreation Development in the American Countryside.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Patrick R., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    This special feature, an introduction and nine articles, highlights the continued impact of rural America on recreational lifestyles of both rural and urban residents. Topics include change, the role of leisure, local park and recreation departments, corporate cooperation, recreation development, health/wellness, festivals/special events, and…

  1. Diffusion of Innovation: A Roadmap for Inclusive Community Recreation Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schleien, Stuart J.; Miller, Kimberly D.

    2010-01-01

    Inclusive community recreation is an optimal environment for the development of recreation and sports skills and social relationships between people with and without disabilities. Although we know much about best practices for inclusion, little systemic change in recreation agencies has transpired. Diffusion of Innovation Theory is proposed as a…

  2. University of Wisconsin -Milwaukee Recreation 2009 -Benchmark Description

    E-print Network

    Saldin, Dilano

    to attend UWM, how important were Recreational Sports facilities in your decision? Count Percent 112 9. - In deciding to continue at UWM, how important are Recreational Sports facilities? Count Percent 241 19;Q6. Do you utilize any of UWM's Recreational Sports facilities, programs, or services (Klotsche

  3. University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Department of Recreational Sports & Facilities

    E-print Network

    Saldin, Dilano

    1 042412 University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Department of Recreational Sports & Facilities Emergency Action Plan #12;2 UWM Recreational Sports and Facilities EMERGENCY ACTION PLAN INTRODUCTION 1. Purpose The purpose of the Emergency Action Plan, for the Department of Recreational Sports and Facilities

  4. WPI Sports and Recreation Center GUEST PASS POLICY

    E-print Network

    Camesano, Terri

    WPI Sports and Recreation Center GUEST PASS POLICY Members of the Sports and Recreation Center-transferable and non-refundable. Management of the Sports and Recreation Center reserves the right to refuse times. Failure to do so may result in termination of the sponsor's membership to the Sports

  5. An Economic Valuation of Recreational Shellfishing On Cape Cod

    E-print Network

    Schweik, Charles M.

    An Economic Valuation of Recreational Shellfishing On Cape Cod David T. Damery1 and P. Geoffrey holders in 2002 to 2,766 and 2,704 respectively. An individual's valuation of recreational shellfishing valuation, recreational fishing, willingness-to-pay JEL Classification: Q26, Q28, H42

  6. Organisation of Recreation for the Blind in the USSR.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulicheva, N.

    The booklet contains a brief description of recreation under the auspices of the All-Russia Society for the Blind in the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics and a number of photographs illustrating recreational activities. It is noted that approximately 24,000 blind persons participate in recreational activities located in club rooms near their…

  7. On-line solid-phase extraction coupled to ultra-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry detection for the determination of benzotriazole UV stabilizers in coastal marine and wastewater samples.

    PubMed

    Montesdeoca-Esponda, Sarah; Sosa-Ferrera, Zoraida; Santana-Rodríguez, José Juan

    2012-05-01

    Benzotriazoles are a group of UV absorbing compounds considered emerging contaminants that are used in different personal care products, and therefore, it is of high interest to develop sensitive and fast methods for investigating their presence in the environment. In this work, we present the development and application of a novel method based on on-line solid-phase extraction coupled to ultra-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry detection (SPE-UPLC-MS/MS) for the determination of seven benzotriazole UV stabilizers (BUVSs) in coastal marine and wastewater samples. This process is compared with a conventional off-line SPE procedure followed by UPLC-MS/MS. The parameters affecting the performance of the sample preparation and determination processes were evaluated. The results indicate that the on-line procedure provides for better sensitivity and reproducibility and is faster and easier than the off-line procedure. The detection limits and quantification limits achieved were in the range of 0.6-4.1 ng?L(-1) and 2.1-14 ng?L(-1) and relative standard deviation between 6.2 and 10%. The developed method was applied to coastal marine and wastewater samples from Gran Canaria Island (Spain). All of the BUVSs studied were detected in the samples from wastewater treatment plants and two were found in the seawater samples (UV P in the range of 2.8-4.4 ng?L(-1) and UV 360 between 3.6 and 5.2 ng?L(-1)). PMID:22411539

  8. Countervailing effects of atrazine on water recreation: How do recreators evaluate them?

    E-print Network

    Earnhart, Dietrich H.; Smith, Val H.

    2003-03-02

    This paper examines the countervailing effects of atrazine on water recreational choices. The presence of atrazine in waterbodies potentially reduces the symptoms of eutrophication, which is a condition of low water quality due to nutrient...

  9. Work Experience: Marine Biology A group of 4 to 6 potential marine biology students will spend one week in the

    E-print Network

    Harman, Neal.A.

    Work Experience: Marine Biology (ID:209) Outline A group of 4 to 6 potential marine biology of studying Marine Biology at Swansea University and develop a general understanding of the different subject will experience marine sampling techniques, both on board the university research vessel and from the shore

  10. Marine Biomedicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bang, Frederik B.

    1977-01-01

    Describes early scientific research involving marine invertebrate pathologic processes that may have led to new insights into human disease. Discussed are inquiries of Metchnikoff, Loeb, and Cantacuzene (immunolgic responses in sea stars, horseshoe crabs, and marine worms, respectively). Describes current research stemming from these early…

  11. Marine Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewees, Christopher M.; Hooper, Jon K.

    1976-01-01

    A variety of informational material for a course in marine biology or oceanology at the secondary level is presented. Among the topics discussed are: food webs and pyramids, planktonic blooms, marine life, plankton nets, food chains, phytoplankton, zooplankton, larval plankton and filter feeders. (BT)

  12. Recreational Gun Use by California Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vittes, Katherine A.; Sorenson, Susan B.

    2005-01-01

    Most research on adolescents and firearms focuses on urban populations, handguns, and homicide. This study examines the prevalence and correlates of recreational gun use (RGU)--for hunting or target shooting--among 5,801 community-residing 12- to 17-year-old Californians. Data are from the first statewide California Health Interview Survey (CHIS),…

  13. Therapeutic recreation treatment time during inpatient rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Gassaway, Julie; Dijkers, Marcel; Rider, Cecelia; Edens, Kelly; Cahow, Claire; Joyce, Joan

    2011-01-01

    Objective Following spinal cord injury (SCI), certified therapeutic recreation specialists (CTRSs) work with patients during rehabilitation to re-create leisure lifestyles. Although there is much literature available to describe the benefits of recreation, little has been written about the process of inpatient or outpatient rehabilitation therapeutic recreation (TR) programs or the effectiveness of such programs. To delineate how TR time is used during inpatient rehabilitation for SCI. Methods Six rehabilitation centers enrolled 600 patients with traumatic SCI for an observational study. CTRSs documented time spent on each of a set of specific TR activities during each patient encounter. Patterns of time use are described, for all patients and by neurologic category. Ordinary least-squares stepwise regression models are used to identify patient and injury characteristics predictive of total treatment time (overall and average per week) and time spent in TR activities. Results Ninety-four percent of patients enrolled in the SCIRehab study participated in TR. Patients received a mean total of 17.5 hours of TR; significant differences were seen in the amount of time spent in each activity among and within neurologic groups. The majority (76%) of patients participated in at least one structured therapeutic outing. Patient and injury characteristics explained little of the variation in time spent within activities. Conclusion The large amount of variability seen in TR treatment time within and among injury group categories, which is not explained well by patient and injury characteristics, sets the stage for future analyses to associate treatments with outcomes. PMID:21675356

  14. Campus Recreation Sport Club Liability Release Form

    E-print Network

    Thomas, Andrew

    Campus Recreation Sport Club Liability Release Form I, ____________________________ , entirely upon my own initiative risk, and responsibility am about to participate in a sport club which is funded parent/legal guardian permission to participate in the UMaine Sport Clubs Program as indicated

  15. Old Dominion University Student Recreation Center

    E-print Network

    Old Dominion University Student Recreation Center Winter Break Group Exercise Schedule December 16 posture and balance by strengthening the abdominal and low back area. POWER HOUR: Cardio and strength and plyometric conditioning for a COMPLETE FULL BODY workout. This is an athletic cardio dance class that unites

  16. DEPARTMENT OF RECREATIONAL SPORTS Oregon State University

    E-print Network

    Escher, Christine

    : Graduate Assistant, Sports and Special Programs .49 FTE for academic (2012-2013) This positionDEPARTMENT OF RECREATIONAL SPORTS Oregon State University Position Announcement 2012-13 Position is responsible for the coordination, administration, and supervision of a portion of the Intramural Sports

  17. DEPARTMENT OF RECREATIONAL SPORTS Oregon State University

    E-print Network

    Escher, Christine

    : Graduate Assistant, Competitive Sports (2 positions) .49 FTE for academic (2010-2011) These positionsDEPARTMENT OF RECREATIONAL SPORTS Oregon State University Position Announcement 2010-11 Position Sports and Sport Clubs Programs with direct oversight for 10-20 sport clubs as well as assigned

  18. Physical-Education Facilities/Recreation Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School & University, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Presents K-12 and college physical education/recreation facilities considered outstanding in a competition, which judged the most outstanding learning environments at educational institutions nationwide. Jurors spent two days reviewing projects, highlighting unique concepts and ideas. For each citation, the article offers information on the firm,…

  19. 36 CFR 294.1 - Recreation areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...classified by the Chief of the Forest Service or by such officers...classified by the Chief of the Forest Service or by such officers...facilities and appurtenant structures needed by the public to enjoy...recreation resources of the national forests. The boundaries of...

  20. 36 CFR 294.1 - Recreation areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...classified by the Chief of the Forest Service or by such officers...classified by the Chief of the Forest Service or by such officers...facilities and appurtenant structures needed by the public to enjoy...recreation resources of the national forests. The boundaries of...

  1. Purdue University Division of Recreational Sports

    E-print Network

    Jiang, Wen

    Purdue University Division of Recreational Sports http://www.purdue.edu/recsports/ Intramural Sports Participant Handbook (2012-2013) #12;2 Table of Contents Page Introduction .......................................................................................16 #12;3 Introduction The Intramural Sports Program is designed to provide an opportunity

  2. Ominous trends in nature recreation Peter Kareiva*

    E-print Network

    Wisenden, Brian D.

    a trend in human behavior that ultimately may be far more foreboding for the environment than even-based recreation. The importance of human behavior and attitudes to our environmental future is not a new idea Kennedy (4) to call in 2005 for a global assessment of human behaviors. What is less clear is how human

  3. A Bibliography of Recreational Mathematics, Volume 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaaf, William L.

    This book is a partially annotated bibliography of books, articles and periodicals concerned with mathematical games, puzzles, tricks, amusements, and paradoxes. Because the literature in recreational mathematics has proliferated to amazing proportions since Volume 2 of this series (ED 040 874), Volume 3 is more than just an updating of the…

  4. Public Administration of Recreational Services. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hjelte, George; Shivers, Jay S.

    Oriented toward a consideration of administration from the standpoint of departmental problems, this textbook deals with administrative techniques and practices pertaining to public administration of recreational services. It covers organization, operation, planning, development, and managerial procedures, and also describes the basic elements of…

  5. Truman State University Campus Recreation Intern

    E-print Network

    Gering, Jon C.

    , schedule flexibility, sport and resource knowledge, and be self-motivated. Desired skills include standard Campus Recreation assures all interns of an enriching and motivating experience that includes training or Exercise focused course of study. Applicants should possess a positive attitude, outgoing personality

  6. 32 CFR 552.166 - Recreational use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Recreational use. 552.166 Section...AFFECTING MILITARY RESERVATIONS Land Use Policy for Fort Lewis...requests. If the requested use is allowable and an appropriate...request. Groups with approved land commitments will be...

  7. Re-Creating Pablo Picasso's "Guernica"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daseler, Jack C.

    2010-01-01

    Recently, the teachers at the author's school completed a group project with their eighth-graders in which they recreated a mural version of the famous painting by Pablo Picasso, "Guernica." This activity was aimed at: (1) studying the rise of Fascism in Spain and Germany during the Spanish Civil War prior to World War II; (2) learning about the…

  8. Recreational Fisheries: Socioeconomic Importance, Conservation Issues and

    E-print Network

    Cooke, Steven J.

    and Department of Biology, Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada Introduction Human exploitation of fish and other has pro- vided humanity with food, income and other social goods such as recreation. Fishing where the primary objective is not to produce food or generate income through the sale or trade of fishing products

  9. Research on Texas Water and Recreation Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas A and M Univ., College Station. Texas Agricultural Experiment Station.

    The need for research pertaining to the best use of water and recreation resources in Texas is emphasized in these four papers presented at the 1968 Experiment Station Conference, College Station, Texas. "Parameters of Water Resources in Texas" identifies and elaborates upon the important elements presently constituting the water resources…

  10. Clemson University Campus Recreation Employee Membership Form

    E-print Network

    Stuart, Steven J.

    or their guests. I understand that there are numerous risks of injury associated with exercise, the use of fitness and sports equipment, the use of Campus Recreation facilities (gyms, swimming pool, indoor track, climbing, head and/or brain injuries, broken teeth, dehydration, respiratory problems, heart problems, heart

  11. Contamination of soil with eggs of geohelminths in recreational areas in the Lublin region of Poland.

    PubMed

    Bojar, Hubert; K?ape?, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    Recreational areas cover parks, bicycle paths, lawns, urban squares, sports complexes, holiday camp areas, playgrounds for children, beaches, and even spontaneously used green field open spaces. While using recreational areas, people take with them accompanying animals (dogs, cats). These animals constitute the main source and reservoir of many dangerous zoonoses, including parasitoses caused by roundworms of the genus Toxocara and Trichuris. The objective of the presented study was determination of the level of contamination of soil with parasites' developmental forms (eggs of Toxocara spp., Ascaris spp., Trichuris spp and Ancylostoma) in selected recreational areas in the Lublin Region of southeastern Poland. The material for the study was collected from beaches in recreational areas located around the Bia?e Lake near W?odawa, the water reservoirs in Krasnobród and Janów Lubelski. The studies were carried out from May-October 2010 durng which time a total number of 215 samples of sand were collected. Eggs of Ascaris spp. and Trichuris spp. were detected based on the Polish Standard PN-Z-19000-4/2001. Beaches on the Bia?e Lake were the most contaminated. The eggs of intestinal parasites were isolated from 6 per 15 samples examined, which is 40%. In one sample, the presence of the eggs of 3 types of parasites were observed, while the eggs of Ancylostoma were not found in any of the samples. Attention should also be paid to the possibility of contamination of recreational areas with the eggs of intestinal parasites by wild animals. Recently in Poland, as well as in many other European countries, the phenomenon of synantropization of wild living animals has been observed, which most frequently concerned wild boar (Sus scrofa) and red fox (Vulpes vulpes). PMID:22742799

  12. Hydroelectric project recreation partners in river access program

    SciTech Connect

    Thacker, C.M. [Appalachian Power Co., Roanoke, VA (United States); Karas, M.; McDonough, K.E. [American Electric Power Service Corp., Columbus, OH (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Most often, a license applicant`s proposed recreational additions or enhancements are proposals for specific developments on the hydroelectric projects reservoirs or tailwater(s), or are stand-alone off site mitigation proposals. By taking an innovative and proactive approach to recreational resource development, Appalachian Power Company and the Virginia Departments of Conservation and Recreation and Game and Inland Fisheries have entered into an agreement for development of 17 public recreation sites that provides for a broader, better managed approach to recreational development than typically evolves from the traditional relicensing process.

  13. Factors affecting the presence of human-associated and fecal indicator real-time quantitative PCR genetic markers in urban-impacted recreational beaches.

    PubMed

    Molina, Marirosa; Hunter, Shayla; Cyterski, Mike; Peed, Lindsay A; Kelty, Catherine A; Sivaganesan, Mano; Mooney, Thomas; Prieto, Lourdes; Shanks, Orin C

    2014-11-01

    Urban runoff can carry a variety of pollutants into recreational beaches, often including bacterial pathogens and indicators of fecal contamination. To develop complete recreational criteria and risk assessments, it is necessary to understand conditions under which human contamination could be present at beaches solely impacted by urban runoff. Accurately estimating risk requires understanding sources, concentrations, and transport mechanisms of microbial contaminants in these environments. By applying microbial source tracking methods and empirical modeling, we assessed the presence and level of human contamination at urban runoff impacted recreational beaches. We also identified environmental parameters and pollution sources that can influence the concentration and transport of culturable and molecular fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) in systems impacted solely by urban runoff. Water samples and physico-chemical parameters were collected from shoreline locations from three South Carolina (SC) beaches (five locations per beach) and two Florida (FL) beaches (three locations per beach). Each SC beach was directly impacted by swashes or tidal creeks receiving stormwater runoff from the urbanized area and therefore were designated as swash drain associated (SDA) beaches, while FL beaches were designated as non-swash drain associated (NSDA). Sampling in swash drains (SD; three sites per SD) directly impacting each SC beach was also conducted. Results indicate that although culturable (enterococci) and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) (EC23S857, Entero1, and GenBac3) FIB concentrations were, on average, higher at SD locations, SDA beaches did not have consistently higher molecular FIB signals compared to NSDA beaches. Both human-associated markers (HF183 and HumM2) were concomitantly found only at SDA beaches. Bacteroidales species-specific qPCR markers (BsteriF1 and BuniF2) identified differences in the Bacteroidales community, depending on beach type. The marker for general Bacteroidales was most abundant at SD locations and exhibited a high correlation with both culturable and other molecular markers. Combining molecular information with predictive modeling allowed us to identify both alongshore movement of currents and SD outflow as significant influences on the concentration of molecular and culturable indicators in the bathing zone. Data also suggests that combining methodologies is a useful and cost effective approach to help understand transport dynamics of fecal contamination and identify potential sources of contamination at marine beaches. PMID:25061692

  14. Addressing public health risks for cyanobacteria in recreational freshwaters: the Oregon and Vermont framework.

    PubMed

    Stone, David; Bress, William

    2007-01-01

    Toxigenic cyanobacteria, commonly known as blue green algae, are an emerging public health issue. The toxins produced by cyanobacteria have been detected across the United States in marine, freshwater and estuarine systems and associated with adverse health outcomes. The intent of this paper is to focus on how to address risk in a recreational freshwater scenario when toxigenic cyanobacteria are present. Several challenges exist for monitoring, assessing and posting water bodies and advising the public when toxigenic cyanobacteria are present. These include addressing different recreational activities that are associated with varying levels of risk, the dynamic temporal and spatial aspects of blooms, data gaps in toxicological information and the lack of training and resources for adequate surveillance. Without uniform federal guidance, numerous states have taken public health action for cyanobacteria with different criteria. Vermont and Oregon independently developed a tiered decision-making framework to reduce risk to recreational users when toxigenic cyanobacteria are present. This framework is based on a combination of qualitative and quantitative information. PMID:17283602

  15. Rapidly Measured Indicators of Recreational Water Quality Are Predictive of Swimming-Associated Gastrointestinal Illness

    PubMed Central

    Wade, Timothy J.; Calderon, Rebecca L.; Sams, Elizabeth; Beach, Michael; Brenner, Kristen P.; Williams, Ann H.; Dufour, Alfred P.

    2006-01-01

    Standard methods to measure recreational water quality require at least 24 hr to obtain results, making it impossible to assess the quality of water within a single day. Methods to measure recreational water quality in ? 2 hr have been developed. Application of rapid methods could give considerably more accurate and timely assessments of recreational water quality. We conducted a prospective study of beachgoers at two Great Lakes beaches to examine the association between recreational water quality, obtained using rapid methods, and gastrointestinal (GI) illness after swimming. Beachgoers were asked about swimming and other beach activities and 10–12 days later were asked about the occurrence of GI symptoms. We tested water samples for Enterococcus and Bacteroides species using the quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. We observed significant trends between increased GI illness and Enterococcus at the Lake Michigan beach and a positive trend for Enterococcus at the Lake Erie beach. The association remained significant for Enterococcus when the two beaches were combined. We observed a positive trend for Bacteroides at the Lake Erie beach, but no trend was observed at the Lake Michigan beach. Enterococcus samples collected at 0800 hr were predictive of GI illness that day. The association between Enterococcus and illness strengthened as time spent swimming in the water increased. This is the first study to show that water quality measured by rapid methods can predict swimming-associated health effects. PMID:16393653

  16. Remote sensing in the coastal and marine environment. Proceedings of the US North Atlantic Regional Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaitzeff, J. B. (editor); Cornillon, P. (editor); Aubrey, D. A. (editor)

    1980-01-01

    Presentations were grouped in the following categories: (1) a technical orientation of Earth resources remote sensing including data sources and processing; (2) a review of the present status of remote sensing technology applicable to the coastal and marine environment; (3) a description of data and information needs of selected coastal and marine activities; and (4) an outline of plans for marine monitoring systems for the east coast and a concept for an east coast remote sensing facility. Also discussed were user needs and remote sensing potentials in the areas of coastal processes and management, commercial and recreational fisheries, and marine physical processes.

  17. Rapid determination of scopolamine in evidence of recreational and predatory use.

    PubMed

    Sáiz, Jorge; Mai, Thanh Duc; López, María López; Bartolomé, Carmen; Hauser, Peter C; García-Ruiz, Carmen

    2013-12-01

    In recent years, scopolamine has become a drug of common use for recreational and predatory purposes and several ways of administration have been devised. A method for the rapid analysis of suspicious samples was developed, using a portable capillary electrophoresis with contactless conductivity detection. The method allows the separation of scopolamine from atropine which has a similar structure and is present along with scopolamine in some samples. The method was demonstrated to be useful for the fast analysis of several types of evidential items which have recently been reported to have been abused with fatal consequences or employed for criminal purposes. An infusion of Datura stramonium L., in which scopolamine and atropine naturally coexist, was analyzed for being frequently consumed for recreational purposes. A spiked moisturizing cream and six spiked alcoholic beverages were also analyzed. In spite of the complexity of the specimens, the sample pre-treatment methods developed were simple and fast. PMID:24188342

  18. Individual differences in reproductive strategy are related to views about recreational drug use in Belgium, The Netherlands, and Japan.

    PubMed

    Quintelier, Katinka J P; Ishii, Keiko; Weeden, Jason; Kurzban, Robert; Braeckman, Johan

    2013-06-01

    Individual differences in moral views are often explained as the downstream effect of ideological commitments, such as political orientation and religiosity. Recent studies in the U.S. suggest that moral views about recreational drug use are also influenced by attitudes toward sex and that this relationship cannot be explained by ideological commitments. In this study, we investigate student samples from Belgium, The Netherlands, and Japan. We find that, in all samples, sexual attitudes are strongly related to views about recreational drug use, even after controlling for various ideological variables. We discuss our results in light of reproductive strategies as determinants of moral views. PMID:23660974

  19. Marine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, O.

    1981-12-08

    A marine structure is described having a base and a foundation means projecting downwardly from the base for pressing into the sea bed. The foundation comprises a wall system with pile means on both sides of the wall(s).

  20. Marine Ecosystems

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    New Jersey

    2006-01-01

    In the wild, small crustaceans known as brine shrimp live in marine habitats such as saltwater lakes. In this activity, learners create a saltwater or marine ecosystem that becomes an experimental brine shrimp hatchery. Learners observe the brine shrimp life cycle and test the effect of salinity (salt content) on brine shrimp eggs and larvae, as well as consider the potential impact of other variables such as water temperature and pollution.

  1. Speed and Exercise Intensity of Recreational Walkers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elaine M. Murtagh; Colin A. G. Boreham; Marie H. Murphy

    2002-01-01

    Background. Brisk walking has been identified as an activity suited to meet American College of Sport Medicine\\/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommendations for moderate intensity exercise (55–69% HRmax, 40–59% VO2R). However, little is known about whether recreational walkers self-select a pace which elicits this intensity and how they interpret the term “brisk walking.”Methods. The walking speed of 82 adults

  2. Monitoring coastal marine waters for spore-forming bacteria of faecal and soil origin to determine point from non-point source pollution.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, R S

    2001-01-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) and the World Health Organization (WHO) have established recreational water quality standards limiting the concentrations of faecal indicator bacteria (faecal coliform, E. coli, enterococci) to ensure that these waters are safe for swimming. In the application of these hygienic water quality standards, it is assumed that there are no significant environmental sources of these faecal indicator bacteria which are unrelated to direct faecal contamination. However, we previously reported that these faecal indicator bacteria are able to grow in the soil environment of humid tropical island environments such as Hawaii and Guam and are transported at high concentrations into streams and storm drains by rain. Thus, streams and storm drains in Hawaii contain consistently high concentrations of faecal indicator bacteria which routinely exceed the EPA and WHO recreational water quality standards. Since, streams and storm drains eventually flow out to coastal marine waters, we hypothesize that all the coastal beaches which receive run-off from streams and storm drains will contain elevated concentrations of faecal indicator bacteria. To test this hypothesis, we monitored the coastal waters at four beaches known to receive water from stream or storm drains for salinity, turbidity, and used the two faecal indicator bacteria (E. coli, enterococci) to establish recreational water quality standards. To determine if these coastal waters are contaminated with non-point source pollution (streams) or with point source pollution (sewage effluent), these same water samples were also assayed for spore-forming bacteria of faecal origin (Cl. perfringens) and of soil origin (Bacillus species). Using this monitoring strategy it was possible to determine when coastal marine waters were contaminated with non-point source pollution and when coastal waters were contaminated with point source pollution. The results of this study are most likely applicable to all countries in the warm and humid region of the world. PMID:11724486

  3. Occurrence of human adenoviruses at two recreational beaches of the great lakes.

    PubMed

    Xagoraraki, Irene; Kuo, David H-W; Wong, Kelvin; Wong, Mark; Rose, Joan B

    2007-12-01

    Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) have been related to several waterborne diseases such as acute gastroenteritis, conjunctivitis, and respiratory illness, and it has been shown that an important human exposure pathway is through recreational waters. However, HAdV occurrence at recreational freshwater beaches has not been previously investigated. In this study, a total of 58 water samples were collected from two recreational beaches on Lake Michigan (i.e., Silver Beach and Washington Park Beach) during the summer of 2004. Occurrences of HAdVs in these lake samples were determined using two hexon-based real-time PCR assays (one for monitoring all 51 serotypes of HAdVs and another for specifically detecting F species HAdVs, i.e., serotypes 40 and 41) and compared to an integrated cell culture (ICC) PCR method. The real-time PCR results showed that 8 of 30 Silver Beach samples and 6 of 28 Washington Park Beach samples contained HAdVs, and F species HAdVs were detected in three of these positive samples. The concentrations of HAdVs ranged from (1.7 +/- 0.7) x 10(1) to (3.4 +/- 0.8) x 10(2) and from (7 +/- 2) x 10(0) to (3.8 +/- 0.3) x 10(3) virus particles/liter for Silver Beach and Washington Park Beach, respectively. F species HAdVs were detected at levels ranging from (4.8 +/- 0.8) x 10(1) to (4.6 +/- 1.5) x 10(2) virus particles/liter. Approximately 60% of the ICC-PCR analyses agreed with the real-time PCR results. This study revealed the occurrence of HAdVs at Lake Michigan recreational beaches. Given the potential health risks, further assessment regarding sources, virus transport, and survival is needed to improve the safety of the region. PMID:17933924

  4. Survey of Naegleria from Taiwan recreational waters using culture enrichment combined with PCR.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shih-Wei; Hsu, Bing-Mu

    2011-08-01

    Naegleria is a free-living amoeba. Pathogenic Naegleria may pose a health risk to people who come in contact with recreational waters. Here, we used Naegleria culture enrichment with PCR to identify the Naegleria species and investigated the distribution of Naegleria spp. in recreational waters including spring water, stream water and raw domestic water in central and southern Taiwan. In this study, Naegleria spp. were detected in 19 (17.8%) of the water samples. The occurrence of Naegleria in raw domestic water was 28.6%, higher than in stream water (14.7%) and in spring water (6.5%). The most frequently identified species exhibiting the closest phylogenetic relationships to the isolates were N. australiensis (n=4) and N. canariensis (n=4), followed by N. clarki (n=3) and N. philippinensis (n=3); N. americana (n=2). N. lovaniensis, N. dobsoni, and N. gruberi were each detected once. The pathogenic species N. fowleri was not detected, probably due to the low incubation temperature; however, the isolates exhibiting the closest phylogenetic relationships to the pathogenic species in mice of PAM, N. australiensis and N. philippinensis, were found. Results of this survey suggest the distribution of Naegleria spp. excluding N. fowleri in recreational waters. It should be considered a potential threat for health associated with human activities in recreational waters. PMID:21640066

  5. Recreation land policies of Texas river authorities operating reservoirs

    E-print Network

    Ruesink, Lou Ellen

    1979-01-01

    RECREATION LAND POLICIES OF TEXAS RIVER AUTHORITIES OPERATING RESERVOIRS A Thesis by LOU ELLEN RUESINK Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A1IM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... December 1979 Major Subject: Recreation and Resources Developmenr. RECREATION LAND POLICIES OF TEXAS RIVER AUTHORITIES OPERATING RESERVOIRS A Thesis by LOU ELLEN RUESINK Approved as to sty1e and content by: (Chairman of o ittee) (Member...

  6. Campers' facility preferences, recreation area selection consistency, and satisfactions

    E-print Network

    Marnell, John Andrew

    1983-01-01

    to the concerns in the management of natural areas. This is because areas varying with respect to the amount of development they have undergone can be expected to attract users with differing attitudes about the recreational experience and differing desires... of the types of recreation areas used on previous camping trips. Attitudes were measured as visitor preferences for convenience facility development, and intentions as their hypothetical choice of an alternative recreation area. Visitor behavior...

  7. Recreation and large mammal activity in an urban nature reserve

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shalene L. George; Kevin R. Crooks

    2006-01-01

    Human recreation has immediate and long-term impacts on wildlife, and exposure to recreational activities might be particularly high in urban systems. We investigated the relationship between human recreation and the spatial and temporal activity patterns of large mammals in an urban nature reserve. Data from remotely triggered infra-red cameras (1999–2001) were used to assess activity for bobcat, coyote, mule deer,

  8. Marine Strategy 20142019 1 Marine Strategy 20142019

    E-print Network

    Greenslade, Diana

    as marine reserve management, air-sea rescue, fisheries management, marine transport, naval defence, coastal the Convention of the World Meteorological Organization, the Convention on International Civil Aviation

  9. Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus Recovered from Recreational and Commercial Areas of Chesapeake Bay and Maryland Coastal Bays

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Kristi S.; Rosenberg Goldstein, Rachel E.; He, Xin; Jacobs, John M.; Crump, Byron C.; Sapkota, Amy R.

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus in the estuarine-marine environment are of human health significance and may be increasing in pathogenicity and abundance. Vibrio illness originating from dermal contact with Vibrio laden waters or through ingestion of seafood originating from such waters can cause deleterious health effects, particularly if the strains involved are resistant to clinically important antibiotics. The purpose of this study was to evaluate antimicrobial susceptibility among these pathogens. Surface-water samples were collected from three sites of recreational and commercial importance from July to September 2009. Samples were plated onto species-specific media and resulting V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus strains were confirmed using polymerase chain reaction assays and tested for antimicrobial susceptibility using the Sensititre® microbroth dilution system. Descriptive statistics, Friedman two-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and Kruskal-Wallis one-way ANOVA were used to analyze the data. Vibrio vulnificus (n?=?120) and V. parahaemolyticus (n?=?77) were isolated from all sampling sites. Most isolates were susceptible to antibiotics recommended for treating Vibrio infections, although the majority of isolates expressed intermediate resistance to chloramphenicol (78% of V. vulnificus, 96% of V. parahaemolyticus). Vibrio parahaemolyticus also demonstrated resistance to penicillin (68%). Sampling location or month did not significantly impact V. parahaemolyticus resistance patterns, but V. vulnificus isolates from St. Martin's River had lower overall intermediate resistance than that of the other two sampling sites during the month of July (p?=?0.0166). Antibiotics recommended to treat adult Vibrio infections were effective in suppressing bacterial growth, while some antibiotics recommended for pediatric treatment were not effective against some of the recovered isolates. To our knowledge, these are the first antimicrobial susceptibility data of V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus recovered from the Chesapeake Bay. These data can serve as a baseline against which future studies can be compared to evaluate whether susceptibilities change over time. PMID:24586914

  10. roof truss detail, historic strap hinge detail Chopawamsic Recreational ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    roof truss detail, historic strap hinge detail - Chopawamsic Recreational Demonstration Area - Cabin Camp 1, Main Arts and Crafts Lodge, Prince William Forest Park, Triangle, Prince William County, VA

  11. The national recreational fishing benefits of water pollution control

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Clifford S. Russell; William J. Vaughan

    1982-01-01

    Results are presented of an effort to estimate the fresh water recreational fishing benefit derived from water pollution control efforts. Methodology is potentially applicable to other subcategories. (PSB)

  12. The Effects of Livestock Grazing and Recreation on Irish Machair Grassland Vegetation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Cooper; T. McCann; E. Ballard

    2005-01-01

    Machair grassland uniquely occurs over sandy, calcareous soils of coastal sand-plains in dune systems of north-western Scotland and Ireland. This study assesses the plant species composition of Irish machair grassland at a landscape-scale. Machair sites were sampled with quadrats and multivariate analysis was used to assess relationships between species abundance, soil physical variables, livestock grazing and recreation activity. Grazing by

  13. Marine antimalarials.

    PubMed

    Fattorusso, Ernesto; Taglialatela-Scafati, Orazio

    2009-01-01

    Malaria is an infectious disease causing at least 1 million deaths per year, and, unfortunately, the chemical entities available to treat malaria are still too limited. In this review we highlight the contribution of marine chemistry in the field of antimalarial research by reporting the most important results obtained until the beginning of 2009, with particular emphasis on recent discoveries. About 60 secondary metabolites produced by marine organisms have been grouped into three structural types and discussed in terms of their reported antimalarial activities. The major groups of metabolites include isonitrile derivatives, alkaloids and endoperoxide derivatives. The following discussion evidences that antimalarial marine molecules can efficiently integrate the panel of lead compounds isolated from terrestrial sources with new chemical backbones and, sometimes, with unique functional groups. PMID:19597577

  14. Marine Ecomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denny, Mark W.; Gaylord, Brian

    2010-01-01

    The emerging field of marine ecomechanics provides an explicit physical framework for exploring interactions among marine organisms and between these organisms and their environments. It exhibits particular utility through its construction of predictive, mechanistic models, a number of which address responses to changing climatic conditions. Examples include predictions of (a) the change in relative abundance of corals as a function of colony morphology, ocean acidity, and storm intensity; (b) the rate of disturbance and patch formation in beds of mussels, a competitive dominant on many intertidal shores; (c) the dispersal and recruitment patterns of giant kelps, an important nearshore foundation species; (d) the effects of turbulence on external fertilization, a widespread method of reproduction in the sea; and (e) the long-term incidence of extreme ecological events. These diverse examples emphasize the breadth of marine ecomechanics. Indeed, its principles can be applied to any ecological system.

  15. Distribution of sea snakes in the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park: observations from 10 yrs of baited remote underwater video station (BRUVS) sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udyawer, Vinay; Cappo, Mike; Simpfendorfer, Colin A.; Heupel, Michelle R.; Lukoschek, Vimoksalehi

    2014-09-01

    The distributions of three species of sea snake (olive sea snake: Aipysurus laevis, spine-bellied sea snake: Lapemis curtus, and ornate sea snake: Hydrophis ocellatus) were estimated over 14° of latitude within the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park (GBRMP) using data from baited remote underwater video stations (BRUVS). A total of 2,471 deployments of BRUVS were made in a range of locations, in sites open and closed to trawl fishing. Sightings of sea snakes were analysed alongside six spatial factors [depth, relative distance across (longitude) and along (latitude) the GBRMP, proximity to land, proximity to the nearest reef, and habitat complexity] to determine the factors that most strongly influenced the distribution and abundance of sea snakes. The results showed a strong latitudinal effect on the distribution of all three sea snake species, with the highest densities and diversities occurring in central and southern GBRMP locations, while the northern Great Barrier Reef was relatively depauperate in terms of both occurrence and diversity. Shallow inshore areas were identified as key habitats for A. laevis and L. curtus, whereas deeper offshore habitats were most important for H. ocellatus. No significant difference was found in the mean number of snakes sighted per hour between sites open and closed to trawling. There was a high degree of congruence in the distribution of sea snakes estimated from the BRUVS data and results from previous trawl and underwater visual surveys, demonstrating the utility of BRUVS to estimate distribution and relative abundance in these species of sea snake at broad spatial scales in a non-extractive manner.

  16. Red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) is a pelagic marine fish that is dis-

    E-print Network

    127 Red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) is a pelagic marine fish that is dis- tributed over a large- nitude (Gold et al., 1993). Red drum supports highly valu- able commercial and recreational fisheries the status of red drum spawning stocks. Because there have been no prolonged offshore fisheries for adult red

  17. The Legacy of Marin Mersenne: The Search for Primal Order and the Mentoring of Young Minds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wanko, Jeffrey J.

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the pivotal roles that Marin Mersenne played--as a recreational mathematician in search of prime number patterns and as a mentor to young mathematicians and scientists. His work is used as an example for today's mathematics teachers in encouraging students to work together and creating environments that foster success for…

  18. An evaluation of a management saga: The Banks Peninsula Marine Mammal Sanctuary, New Zealand

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. F. D. Hughey

    2000-01-01

    The Banks Peninsula Marine Mammal Sanctuary, Canterbury, New Zealand, was established in 1988 to protect the Hector's dolphin Cephalorhynchus hectori from accidental entanglement in set nets (gill nets). Sanctuary establishment was strongly supported by environmental groups but has continued to be strongly opposed by both commercial and recreational fishers. This paper evaluates the issues surrounding sanctuary establishment, the process of

  19. The queen conch (Strombus gigas) is a large marine gastropod harvested

    E-print Network

    278 The queen conch (Strombus gigas) is a large marine gastropod harvested intensively throughout the Caribbean for its meat and shell. In the Florida Keys, conch once supported commercial and recreational fisheries, but overhar- vesting severely depleted the popula- tion. The harvesting of conch has been banned

  20. Conflict and Impacts of Divers and Anglers in a Marine Park

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tim P. Lynch; Elizabeth Wilkinson; Louise Melling; Rebecca Hamilton; Anne Macready; Sue Feary

    2004-01-01

    The New South Wales State Government (Australia) gazetted the Jervis Bay Marine Park (JBMP) in 1998. During the preparation of the draft zoning plan in 2000, societal data on two conflicting park user groups—recreational scuba divers and fishers (anglers)—was collected. While conflict resolution was a plan priority, other factors, such as cumulative environmental impacts of users and protection for the

  1. Red drum, Sciaenops ocellatus, is an estuary-dependent marine spe-

    E-print Network

    730 Red drum, Sciaenops ocellatus, is an estuary-dependent marine spe- cies found in coastal to Vera Cruz, Mexico (Yokel, 1966, 1980). Red drum are highly sought after as food and gamefish. Annual the sale of red drum was pro- hibited. Recreational fishing effort directed toward red drum in Florida has

  2. The occurrence of Naegleria fowleri in recreational waters in Arizona.

    PubMed

    Sifuentes, Laura Y; Choate, Brittany L; Gerba, Charles P; Bright, Kelly R

    2014-09-19

    Naegleria fowleri is a free-living amoeba found in waters in warmer regions that causes primary amoebic meningoencephalitis, a rare but almost universally fatal disease. The goal of this project was to assess the occurrence of N. fowleri and other thermophilic amoebae in 33 recreational surface waters across Arizona to determine if their presence could be correlated with seasonal or other environmental factors. First, 1-L grab samples were collected over two years and analyzed using polymerase chain reaction and amoebae viability. Seasonality was observed, with N. fowleri and thermophilic amoebae (20% and 30%, respectively) being detected more often in the winter and spring combined than in the summer and fall combined (7.9% and 9.5%, respectively). The spring and fall both had an average temperature of 18°C, yet had different occurrence data (18.2% versus 5.9% for N. fowleri, respectively; 27.3% versus 0% for viable amoebae, respectively). These results are in stark contrast to previous studies in which N. fowleri has been found almost exclusively during warmer months. Over the two-year study, N. fowleri was detected in six and thermophilic amoebae in eight of the 33 recreational water bodies. Five of these were lakes near Phoenix that tested positive for N. fowleri and thermophilic amoebae over multiple seasons. These lakes differed significantly (P ? 0.05) from the other 28 surface waters, with a lower average temperature in the spring, a higher temperature in the fall, a higher pH and turbidity in the summer, and a lower electro-conductivity in the spring. They also had lower Escherichia coli and heterotrophic bacteria levels during colder months. Future N. fowleri monitoring in Arizona should focus on these five lakes to further elucidate the factors that contribute to the low occurrence of this amoeba in the summer or which might explain why these lakes appear to be reservoirs for the organism. PMID:24967566

  3. Recreation and Juvenile Delinquency Prevention: How Recreation Professionals Can Design Programs That Really Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munson, Wayne W.

    2002-01-01

    Parks and recreation professionals can help prevent juvenile delinquency by learning more about why young people feel disconnected with society and developing programs to help them develop strong ties and relationships with their communities. Social bonds can be developed through attachment, commitment, involvement, and positive beliefs. A sidebar…

  4. Quantitative Evaluation of the Impact of Bather Density on Levels of Human-Virulent Microsporidian Spores in Recreational Water

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thaddeus K. Graczyk; Deirdre Sunderland; Leena Tamang; Timothy M. Shields; Frances E. Lucy; Patrick N. Breysse

    2007-01-01

    Received 14 February 2007\\/Accepted 24 April 2007 Microsporidial gastroenteritis, a serious disease of immunocompromised people, can have a waterborne etiology. During summer months, samples of recreational bathing waters were tested weekly for human- virulent microsporidian spores and water quality parameters in association with high and low bather numbers during weekends and weekdays, respectively. Enterocytozoon bieneusi spores were detected in 59%

  5. THE LOGNORMAL DISTRIBUTION AND USE OF THE GEOMETRIC MEAN AND THE ARITHMETIC MEAN IN RECREATIONAL WATER QUALITY MEASUREMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Since 1968 United States recreational water quality criteria have set a limit on the geometric mean for fecal indicator bacteria from a number water samples taken over a period of time (National Technical Advisory Committee, 1968; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1976 and 19...

  6. Recreating Fundamental Effects in the Laboratory?

    E-print Network

    Ralf Schützhold

    2010-04-14

    This article provides a brief (non-exhaustive) overview of some possibilities for recreating fundamental effects which are relevant for black holes (and other gravitational scenarios) in the laboratory. Via suitable condensed matter analogues and other laboratory systems, it might be possible to model the Penrose process (superradiant scattering), the Unruh effect, Hawking radiation, the Eardley instability, black-hole lasers, cosmological particle creation, the Gibbons-Hawking effect, and the Schwinger mechanism. Apart from an experimental verification of these yet unobserved phenomena, the study of these laboratory systems might shed light onto the underlying ideas and problems and should therefore be interesting from a (quantum) gravity point of view as well.

  7. Recreating kidney progenitors from pluripotent cells.

    PubMed

    Takasato, Minoru; Maier, Barbara; Little, Melissa H

    2014-04-01

    Access to human pluripotent cells theoretically provides a renewable source of cells that can give rise to any required cell type for use in cellular therapy or bioengineering. However, successfully directing this differentiation remains challenging for most desired endpoints cell type, including renal cells. This challenge is compounded by the difficulty in identifying the required cell type in vitro and the multitude of renal cell types required to build a kidney. Here we review our understanding of how the embryo goes about specifying the cells of the kidney and the progress to date in adapting this knowledge for the recreation of nephron progenitors and their mature derivatives from pluripotent cells. PMID:24026757

  8. Geology of Lake Mead National Recreation Area

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This website of the United States Geological Survey (USGS) and National Park Service (NPS) highlights the geologic history of Lake Mead National Recreation Area in Nevada and Arizona. From the Precambrian (1.8 billion years ago) until the present, the Lake Mead region has been shaped by collisions, uplift, erosion, volcanic activity, submergence, extension, and sedimentation. This site covers these major events and when they occurred in the Lake Mead area. There are links to information about geologic maps, geologic time, rocks and minerals, plate tectonics, and other Lake Mead information sources.

  9. Outdoor Recreation -- Potential in East Texas. 

    E-print Network

    Schmedemann, Ivan W. (Ivan Wayne); Wooten, Alvin B.; Franklin, W. D. (William D.)

    1964-01-01

    Potential Texas .- CREATION ... TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY TEXAS A6RlCULTURAl EXPERIMENT STATION - - - TEXAS A6RluuLn1 Pa8Im-a e+a+iam Tauam of hunting and fishing in Texas. The to R. B. Davis, associate professor, problems. A. C. Allen..., hunted Population projections for the lation increase of 2,132,000 f into tf outdo01 from t: Texar , reatic le future, and demand for all types of r recreation should be up considerably he 1960 level. rhe 12-county study area designated East...

  10. 75 FR 50745 - Information Collection; National Survey on Recreation and the Environment (NSRE)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-17

    ...National Survey on Recreation and the Environment (NSRE) AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA...National Survey on Recreation and the Environment. DATES: Comments must be received...National Survey on Recreation and the Environment. OMB Number: 0596-0127....

  11. 43 CFR 2933.21 - When are fees charged for Recreation Use Permits?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...ON PUBLIC LANDS Recreation Use Permits for Fee Areas § 2933...are fees charged for Recreation Use Permits? You must pay a...individual or group recreational use if the area is posted to that...field offices or BLM Internet...

  12. 43 CFR 2933.21 - When are fees charged for Recreation Use Permits?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...ON PUBLIC LANDS Recreation Use Permits for Fee Areas § 2933...are fees charged for Recreation Use Permits? You must pay a...individual or group recreational use if the area is posted to that...field offices or BLM Internet...

  13. 43 CFR 2933.21 - When are fees charged for Recreation Use Permits?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...ON PUBLIC LANDS Recreation Use Permits for Fee Areas § 2933...are fees charged for Recreation Use Permits? You must pay a...individual or group recreational use if the area is posted to that...field offices or BLM Internet...

  14. 43 CFR 2933.21 - When are fees charged for Recreation Use Permits?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...ON PUBLIC LANDS Recreation Use Permits for Fee Areas § 2933...are fees charged for Recreation Use Permits? You must pay a...individual or group recreational use if the area is posted to that...field offices or BLM Internet...

  15. 18 CFR 141.14 - Form No. 80, Licensed Hydropower Development Recreation Report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... false Form No. 80, Licensed Hydropower Development Recreation Report...141.14 Form No. 80, Licensed Hydropower Development Recreation Report. The form of the report, Licensed Hydropower Development Recreation...

  16. 18 CFR 141.14 - Form No. 80, Licensed Hydropower Development Recreation Report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... false Form No. 80, Licensed Hydropower Development Recreation Report...141.14 Form No. 80, Licensed Hydropower Development Recreation Report. The form of the report, Licensed Hydropower Development Recreation...

  17. 18 CFR 141.14 - Form No. 80, Licensed Hydropower Development Recreation Report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... false Form No. 80, Licensed Hydropower Development Recreation Report...141.14 Form No. 80, Licensed Hydropower Development Recreation Report. The form of the report, Licensed Hydropower Development Recreation...

  18. 18 CFR 141.14 - Form No. 80, Licensed Hydropower Development Recreation Report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... false Form No. 80, Licensed Hydropower Development Recreation Report...141.14 Form No. 80, Licensed Hydropower Development Recreation Report. The form of the report, Licensed Hydropower Development Recreation...

  19. 18 CFR 141.14 - Form No. 80, Licensed Hydropower Development Recreation Report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... false Form No. 80, Licensed Hydropower Development Recreation Report...141.14 Form No. 80, Licensed Hydropower Development Recreation Report. The form of the report, Licensed Hydropower Development Recreation...

  20. 43 CFR 2932.51 - When can I renew my Special Recreation Permit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...can I renew my Special Recreation Permit? 2932.51 Section 2932.51 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating...Organized Groups, and Recreation Use in Special Areas § 2932.51 When can I renew my Special Recreation...

  1. 43 CFR 2932.51 - When can I renew my Special Recreation Permit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...can I renew my Special Recreation Permit? 2932.51 Section 2932.51 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating...Organized Groups, and Recreation Use in Special Areas § 2932.51 When can I renew my Special Recreation...

  2. 43 CFR 2932.51 - When can I renew my Special Recreation Permit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...can I renew my Special Recreation Permit? 2932.51 Section 2932.51 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating...Organized Groups, and Recreation Use in Special Areas § 2932.51 When can I renew my Special Recreation...

  3. 43 CFR 2932.51 - When can I renew my Special Recreation Permit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...can I renew my Special Recreation Permit? 2932.51 Section 2932.51 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating...Organized Groups, and Recreation Use in Special Areas § 2932.51 When can I renew my Special Recreation...

  4. Marine Pollution

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Barker, William

    Created by William Barker and David Smith for the Connected Curriculum Project, the purpose of this module is to carry out a short study of the relationship between concentration of a marine pollutant and shell thickness of mussels; to practice writing about the results of a mathematical study. This is one lesson within a much larger set hosted by Duke University.

  5. Marine Pollution

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Barker, William

    Created by William Barker and David Smith for the Connected Curriculum Project, this module enables the user to carry out a short study of the relationship between concentration of a marine pollutant and shell thickness of mussels; to practice writing about the results of a mathematical study. This is one within a much larger set of learning modules hosted by Duke University.

  6. Marine Trades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbott, Alan

    This curriculum guide provides materials for a competency-based course in marine trades at the secondary level. The curriculum design uses the curriculum infused model for the teaching of basic skills as part of vocational education and demonstrates the relationship of vocationally related skills to communication, mathematics, and science…

  7. Elevated nitrogen-containing particles observed in Asian dust aerosol samples collected at the marine boundary layer of the Bohai Sea and the Yellow Sea

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Geng; Y.-M. Park; H.-J. Hwang; S. Kang; C.-U. Ro

    2009-01-01

    Low-Z particle electron probe X-ray microanalysis (low-Z particle EPMA) shows powerful advantages for the characterization of ambient particulate matter in environmental and geological applications. By the application of the low-Z particle EPMA single particle analysis, an overall examination of 1800 coarse and fine particles (aerodynamic diameters: 2.5-10 mum and 1.0-2.5 mum, respectively) in six samples collected on 28 April-1 May

  8. 43 CFR 2931.2 - What kinds of permits does BLM issue for recreation-related uses of public lands?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...issue for recreation-related uses of public lands? 2931.2 Section 2931...PERMITS FOR RECREATION ON PUBLIC LANDS Permits for Recreation; General...issue for recreation-related uses of public lands? The regulations in...

  9. 43 CFR 2931.2 - What kinds of permits does BLM issue for recreation-related uses of public lands?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...issue for recreation-related uses of public lands? 2931.2 Section 2931...PERMITS FOR RECREATION ON PUBLIC LANDS Permits for Recreation; General...issue for recreation-related uses of public lands? The regulations in...

  10. 43 CFR 2931.2 - What kinds of permits does BLM issue for recreation-related uses of public lands?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...issue for recreation-related uses of public lands? 2931.2 Section 2931...PERMITS FOR RECREATION ON PUBLIC LANDS Permits for Recreation; General...issue for recreation-related uses of public lands? The regulations in...

  11. 43 CFR 2931.2 - What kinds of permits does BLM issue for recreation-related uses of public lands?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...issue for recreation-related uses of public lands? 2931.2 Section 2931...PERMITS FOR RECREATION ON PUBLIC LANDS Permits for Recreation; General...issue for recreation-related uses of public lands? The regulations in...

  12. An effect of physical activity-based recreation programs on children’s optimism, humor styles, and school life adjustment

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Jae-Eun; Lee, Gwang-Uk

    2015-01-01

    This study puts its purpose in identifying the effect of the participation in physical activity-based recreation programs on the optimism of children, humor styles, and school life adjustment. To achieve the study purpose, this study selected 190 subjects as samples were extracted targeting senior students of elementary schools who participated in the physical activity-based recreation in the metropolitan areas as of 2014. As research methods, questionnaire papers were used and reliability analysis, factor analysis, correlation analysis, and multiple regression analysis were conducted by utilizing SPSS 18.0 after inputting analysis data into the computer. The study results, obtained in this study are as follows: First, in terms of the effect of the participation in physical activity-based recreation programs on optimism, participation frequency and participation intensity would have an effect on optimism, while participation period would have a significant effect on being positive among the sub-factors of optimism. Second, participation in physical activity-based recreation programs might have a significant effect on humor styles. Third, in terms of the effect of the participation in physical activity-based recreation programs on the school life adjustment, it was demonstrated that participation period and participation intensity would have a significant effect on school life adjustment, while participation frequency would have a significant effect on regulation-observance and school life satisfaction. PMID:26171384

  13. Protocol for cardiac assessment of recreational athletes.

    PubMed

    Chinea, Ana M; Lollett, Carlos; Herrera, Hector; Passariello, Gianfranco; Wong, Sara

    2012-01-01

    In this work, the development of a database on physical fitness is presented. As initial population to fill this database, people who practice recreational sports at the Universidad Simon Bolivar (USB) were chosen. The goal was studying individual physical fitness in order to structure exercise routines that gives certain benefits without risking the individual health, promoting a less sedentary way of life. Before the study, a low-cost noninvasive protocol was designed to determine the level of physical fitness. The methodology consisted of four steps: a) A review of existing protocols to propose a set of physical fitness (International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ)), cardiovascular (heart rate variability, heart rate recovery time and arterial blood pressure), anthropomorphic, aerobic (maximum oxygen consumption) and mood state (Profile of Mood State (POMS)) measurements, which allow sketching a complete profile on the sportsman physical fitness. b) Instrumental data collection. c) Electrocardiographic signal processing. d) Data post-processing using multivariate analysis. The database was composed of 26 subject from USB. Ten subjects were soccer players, ten were mountain climbers and six were sedentary people. Results showed that the heart rate recover time after 2-3 min, IPAQ and maximum oxygen consumption have higher weights for classifying individuals according to their habitual physical activity. Heart rate variability, as well as, POMS did not contribute greatly for discriminating recreational sport from sedentary persons. PMID:23366343

  14. SCIRehab Project Series: The Therapeutic Recreation Taxonomy

    PubMed Central

    Cahow, Claire; Skolnick, Susan; Joyce, Joan; Jug, Julie; Dragon, Charlotte; Gassaway, Julie

    2009-01-01

    Background/Objective: Outcomes research of therapeutic recreation (TR) activities and interventions for spinal cord injury (SCI) rehabilitation is made more difficult by a lack of uniform descriptions and the absence of a formal treatments classification system (taxonomy). The objective of this study was to describe a taxonomy developed by Certified Therapeutic Recreation Specialists. Methods: TR lead clinicians and researchers from 6 SCI rehabilitation centers developed a TR documentation system to describe the details of each TR session involving patients with SCI enrolled in the SCIRehab study. The SCIRehab study uses the practice-based evidence methodology, a rigorous observational methodology that examines current practice without introducing additional treatments, to capture details of each TR session for 1,500 SCI rehabilitation patients at 6 US inpatient SCI rehabilitation facilities. This may be the first attempt to document the many details of the TR rehabilitation process for patients with SCI. Results: The TR taxonomy consists of 6 activities (eg, leisure education and counseling, outings, and leisure skill work in center) and activity-specific interventions, as well as time spent on each activity. Activity descriptions are enhanced with additional details that focus on assistance needs for each activity, patient ability to direct care, and patient/family involvement, which may help to determine TR activity selection. Conclusion: Development and application of a TR taxonomy, which is comprehensive for patients with SCI and efficient to use, are feasible despite significantly different TR programs at the 6 SCIRehab centers. PMID:19810631

  15. A Guide to Books on Recreation, Fourteenth Annual Edition-1971.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Recreation and Park Association, Arlington, VA.

    Brief descriptions of 869 books and magazines are presented in this booklist which represents the best books available in the park, recreation, and conservation field. It is noted that textbooks and professional aids are available for recreation professionals, while laymen can find books to satisfy any number of leisure-time interests. Also listed…

  16. Assessing the Impact of New Student Campus Recreation Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zizzi, Samuel; Ayers, Suzan F.; Watson II, Jack C.; Keeler, Linda A.

    2004-01-01

    The student recreation center (SRC) at many colleges and universities has evolved from being a place to lift weights and take aerobics classes to becoming a high-powered recruitment tool (Colleges use recreation, 2002). The present study included the development of an instrument to assess the use and impact of SRCs. Students (N = 655; users = 537,…

  17. Leadership for Recreation, Parks, and Leisure Services. Fourth Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edginton, Christopher R.; Hudson, Susan D.; Scholl, Kathleen G.; Lauzon, Lara

    2011-01-01

    "Leadership for Recreation, Parks and Leisure Services" presents new perspectives on the importance of leadership in the profession. Integrating theory with practice, the book provides foundational perspectives in the study of leadership at all levels--direct service, supervisory, managerial and community/civic--in recreation, parks and leisure…

  18. Accounting for Geographic Heterogeneity in Recreation Demand Models

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kavita Sardana; James Michael Bowker; John C. Bergstrom; C. Meghan Starbuck; Donald B. K. English

    2008-01-01

    Spatial differences in site characteristics and user populations may result in heterogeneity of recreation preferences and values across geographic regions. Non-linear mixed effects models provide a potential means of accounting for this heterogeneity. This approach was tested by estimating a national-level recreation demand model with encouraging results.

  19. Women Faculty, Higher Education, and the Recreation/Leisure Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Karla A.; Harrolle, Michelle; Rich, Samantha; Moretz, Janell

    2012-01-01

    Women represent growing numbers of faculty members in higher education as well as in recreation/leisure departments. The purpose of this study is to describe the career development of women faculty in recreation-related areas and to offer implications for faculty development and the preparation of future faculty. Data were collected from women who…

  20. SATORI: Situation Assessment Through the Re-creation of Incidents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark D. Rodgers; Duane A. Duke

    1993-01-01

    A system was developed that graphically re-creates the radar data recorded at En Route air traffic control (ATC) facilities. Each facility records data sent to the displays associated with the airspace under its control on a System Analysis Report (SAR) tape. SATORI (Situation Assessment Through Re-creation of Incidents) overlays the SAR data on the appropriate sector maps using map data

  1. Texas A&M University Department of Recreational Sports

    E-print Network

    Behmer, Spencer T.

    1 Texas A&M University Department of Recreational Sports Intramural Sports SAND VOLLEYBALL-aid or athletic tape. The Department of Recreational Sports WILL NOT provide band-aids or athletic tape to cover Regulations published in the Texas A&M Intramural Sports Handbook will be the governing policies for all

  2. -Texas A&M University-Department of Recreational Sports

    E-print Network

    Behmer, Spencer T.

    -Texas A&M University- Department of Recreational Sports INTRAMURAL SPORTS INDOOR SOCCER. The Department of Recreational Sports WILL NOT provide band-aids or athletic tape to cover jewelry items Regulations published in the Texas A&M Rec Sports Handbook will be the governing policies for all intramural

  3. -Texas A&M University-Department of Recreational Sports

    E-print Network

    Behmer, Spencer T.

    -Texas A&M University- Department of Recreational Sports INTRAMURAL SPORTS OUTDOOR SOCCER. The goalkeeper may be of either gender. 3. ELIGIBILITY/RESTRICTED PLAYERS Participants may NOT represent more, with a band-aid or athletic tape. The Department of Recreational Sports WILL NOT provide band-aids or athletic

  4. -Texas A&M University-Department of Recreational Sports

    E-print Network

    -Texas A&M University- Department of Recreational Sports INTRAMURAL SPORTS OUTDOOR SOCCER, 4M/4F iii. The goalkeeper may be of either gender. 3. ELIGIBILITY/RESTRICTED PLAYERS Participants of Recreational Sports WILL NOT provide band-aids or athletic tape to cover jewelry items. If covered, jewelry

  5. Department of Campus Recreation 2013 2014 Annual Report

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    1,200 runners participate in the kickoff to Homecoming Week. 7. Campus Recreation hosted the EVOLVE of the international movie event. 9. Increased female participation in clubs sports approximately 23%. 10. Saw a 65Department of Campus Recreation 2013 ­ 2014 Annual Report Executive Summary Major Accomplishments 1

  6. -Texas A&M University-DEPARTMENT OF RECREATIONAL SPORTS

    E-print Network

    Behmer, Spencer T.

    1 -Texas A&M University- DEPARTMENT OF RECREATIONAL SPORTS INTRAMURAL SPORTS DODGEBALL Regulations-aid or athletic tape. The Department of Recreational Sports WILL NOT provide band-aids or athletic tape to cover published in the Texas A&M Rec Sports Handbook will be the governing policies for all intramural sports

  7. -Texas A&M University-DEPARTMENT OF RECREATIONAL SPORTS

    E-print Network

    Behmer, Spencer T.

    1 -Texas A&M University- DEPARTMENT OF RECREATIONAL SPORTS INTRAMURAL SPORTS DODGEBALL Regulations, with a band-aid or athletic tape. The Department of Recreational Sports WILL NOT provide band-aids or athletic published in the Texas A&M Rec Sports Handbook will be the governing policies for all intramural sports

  8. Texas A&M University Department of Recreational Sports

    E-print Network

    Behmer, Spencer T.

    1 Texas A&M University Department of Recreational Sports SAND VOLLEYBALL RULES Regulations arriving at the game site, with a band-aid or athletic tape. The Department of Recreational Sports published in the Texas A&M Intramural Sports Handbook will be the governing policies for all intramural

  9. -Texas A&M University-Department of Recreational Sports

    E-print Network

    Behmer, Spencer T.

    -Texas A&M University- Department of Recreational Sports INTRAMURAL SPORTS OUTDOOR SOCCER RULES. 3. ELIGIBILITY/RESTRICTED PLAYERS Participants may NOT represent more than one team in any sport at the game site, with a band-aid or athletic tape. The Department of Recreational Sports WILL NOT provide

  10. Department of Campus Recreation 2012 2013 Annual Report

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    fitness studio/club sports practice space, gender neutral locker room, conference room, and additional day and recognition during 2012 ­ 2013: a. Ava Kwasnieski was selected as a Graduate Assistant for Recreational SportsDepartment of Campus Recreation 2012 ­ 2013 Annual Report Executive Summary Major Accomplishments 1

  11. Therapeutic recreation interventions for need-driven dementia-compromised

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Suzanne Fitzsimmons; Linda L. Buettner

    2002-01-01

    This study describes a clinical trial of at-home recreational therapy for community dwelling older adults with dementia and disturbing behaviors. After two weeks of daily, individualized recreational therapy interventions (TRIs), results indicated a significant decrease in levels of both passivity and agitation. Biograph data collection was useful in identifying the physiological changes that occurred with each intervention technique. Specific information

  12. Reflections on Therapeutic Recreation and Youth: Possibilities for Broadening Horizons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, Linda L.

    2001-01-01

    Introduces a special issue on youth, discussing current youth-focused therapeutic recreation research and practice, comparing this issue with another theme journal on youth (emphasizing the roles of professional preparation and professional organizations), examining the role of therapeutic recreation and adventure therapy, and noting theoretical…

  13. Recreation Therapy: Implications for the Ventilator Assisted Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeker, Susan M.

    The paper examines the role of the recreation therapist in the new trend towards home care for the ventilator assisted individual. The focus on home care necessitates that the recreation therapist familiarize parents with the rationale for activities as well as providing them with information about a variety of future leisure pursuits. In…

  14. Therapeutic Recreation--Meeting the Challenge of New Demands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Stephen C. Ed.

    1991-01-01

    Nine articles discuss therapeutic recreation, focusing on community reintegration, social skills training in mental illness, computer links for social service providers, approaches to professional preparation, assistive technology, play environments, self-esteem in adult clients, volunteers, and recreation and music therapy for sexually abused…

  15. Outdoor Recreation on Government Lands in Texas, An Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, David J.; Reid, Leslie M.

    This study represents an inventory of major government, non-urban outdoor recreation programs and facilities in Texas, as well as an indication of visitor use reported by individual agencies. The purpose of the analysis is to illustrate the importance of outdoor recreation in Texas and the contribution of various agencies, rather than to determine…

  16. Recreation and river type: Social-environmental relationships

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert E. Manning; Charles P. Ciali

    1981-01-01

    Recreation use was studied on a diverse state river system to test the hypothesis that recreation use patterns vary systematically by river type. River segments were classified into representative river types through application of a two-fold classification system. The first classification factor, generalized geomorphology, defines and groups the dominant resource bases of which rivers are comprised. The second classification factor,

  17. Resource Investments and Loyalty to Recreational Sport Tourism Event

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Isao Okayasu; Haruo Nogawa; Duarte B. Morais

    2010-01-01

    Sport tourism events have a marketing possibility in the Japanese tourism industry. The ultramarathon is a very popular recreational sport event in the world. This type of sport tourism event has shared with completive and enjoyment factors in relation to participant's motivation. Loyalty is a very important factor with attendance to recreational sport events. Generally, as many researchers indicated, that

  18. University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Department of Recreational Sports & Facilities

    E-print Network

    Saldin, Dilano

    1 University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Department of Recreational Sports & Facilities Emergency Action;3 Introduction Purpose The purpose of the Emergency Action Plan for the Department of Recreational Sports and Facilities is to provide an organizational structure and proper procedures for facility staff, university

  19. Recreational Sports -seattleu.edu/recsports SEATTLE UNIVERSITY SPORT CLUBS

    E-print Network

    Carter, John

    and intramural sports, fitness programs, outdoor recreation, using the Connolly Center or participat- ing- tional Sports, Connolly Center and Seattle University. I understand that the safe and proper useRecreational Sports - seattleu.edu/recsports SEATTLE UNIVERSITY SPORT CLUBS MEMBER REGISTRATION

  20. Study of college leisure education based on the recreational sport

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lili He

    2010-01-01

    In this paper; Chinese University of existing physical education model analyzes the construction with Chinese universities as the center of leisure sport “club” type of recreational sport education model. Research shows that education is an adaptive recreational sports leisure times through body movement, seeking to set individual mental and physical development of competitive, exhibition, entertainment and educational activities for the

  1. Recreation as an Industry. Appalachian Research Report No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nathan (Robert R.) Associates, Inc., Washington, DC.

    The role which recreation as an industry can play in economic development of an area -- through creation of jobs, generation of incomes, and stimulation of public and private investment -- is the primary concern of this 1966 study. The document establishes the tourism-recreation industry as being resource-based, with enterprises which are mainly…

  2. Medical Use of Recreational Drugs by AIDS Patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel A. Dansak

    1997-01-01

    A survey of 72 patients at an AIDS clinic regarding self-medication with recreational drugs for medical or psychological conditions related to their illness disclosed that marijuana was the primary drug used. The perceived benefit was for gastrointestinal conditions such as nausea, vomiting, indigestion and appetite improvement. Use of other “recreational” drugs as self-medication was reported to usually be ineffective or

  3. Research Update. Recreation and AIDS: Reflections and Reaffirmation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lord, Michal Anne

    2000-01-01

    Although there is no cure in sight, the life expectancy of people with HIV/AIDS has greatly increased thanks to significant medical advancements. Recreation professionals must take the lead in improving these people's quality of life by providing meaningful leisure outlets. This paper discusses the status of recreation for this population and…

  4. An Overview of Legal Issues in Recreational Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, John H.

    1989-01-01

    Legal issues which intramural and recreational sports professionals should understand are discussed. These professionals need continuing education, and legal issues should be part of professional development programs in recreational sports, emphasizing programing (civil liberties, civil rights, and criminal issues) and administration…

  5. Children of a Lesser God. "Core Values in Therapeutic Recreation"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barney, Keith W.

    2013-01-01

    Students in recreation programs are often introduced to laws that apply to therapeutic or community recreation services. Several of these laws have to do with policy regarding people who experience a disability. One important law is the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). In order for students to better understand the law and its…

  6. Campus Recreation Users: Their Preferences and Administrative Priorities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammitt, Sally A.; Hammitt, William E.

    1980-01-01

    Survey results indicate the preferences of recreationists for program and facilities planning. Indoor campus recreation users have strong reasons for participation, prefer to decrease programs rather than increase fees or decrease operating hours, and value the recreational facilities and the opportunities they provide. (CJ)

  7. Hospitality, Recreation, and Personal Service Occupations: Grade 8. Cluster V.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calhoun, Olivia H.

    A curriculum guide for grade 8, the document is devoted to the occupational cluster "Hospitality, Recreation, and Personal Service Occupations." It is divided into four units: recreational resources for education, employment, and professional opportunities; barbering and cosmetology; mortuary science; hotel-motel management. Each unit is…

  8. -Texas A&M University-DEPARTMENT OF RECREATIONAL SPORTS

    E-print Network

    1 -Texas A&M University- DEPARTMENT OF RECREATIONAL SPORTS INTRAMURAL SPORTS ULTIMATE FRISBEE RULES card in order to be eligible to participate. If a participant has lost his/her ID card, a Lost ID BEFORE arriving at the game site, with a band-aid or athletic tape. The Department of Recreational Sports

  9. Out, out, and Away! Collection Development: Outdoor Recreation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helling, John

    2009-01-01

    Summer is fast approaching, and it will soon be time to climb the mountains to get their good tidings, as naturalist John Muir put it. In other words, librarians must now prepare for the influx of patrons making weekend recreational and summer vacation plans by stocking up on books and other resources on the great outdoors. Outdoor recreational

  10. Two Approaches to Limiting Liability in Recreational Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smissen, Betty van der

    1989-01-01

    The article discusses ways in which recreation professionals can limit liability in recreation activities by facilitating participation without the liability of sponsorship (e.g. sign-out forms, rental agreements), and by endeavoring to place upon participants certain responsibilities through "Agreements to Participate" in sponsored activities,…

  11. PARKS, RECREATION AND TOURISM MANAGEMENT ON-CAMPUS TRANSFER APPLICATION

    E-print Network

    Parker, Matthew D. Brown

    NC STATE PARKS, RECREATION AND TOURISM MANAGEMENT ON-CAMPUS TRANSFER APPLICATION Box 8004, Raleigh PGM Office: 4023 Biltmore Hall 9/05 ____ BS Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management _____ Double Major Concentration ____Park and Natural Resources 1st degree ______________ ____Tourism and Commercial

  12. Recreation and Tourism and the Future in Lodgepole Pine Forests

    E-print Network

    Recreation and Tourism and the Future in Lodgepole Pine Forests: Pros and ConsPros and Cons Stuart Watersheds damaged by wildfires. Changes in recreational experience / tourism experience Aesthetic values (e to waterways from erosion Trees no longer holding soil Results into possible loss of tourism revenue

  13. SDSU General Catalog 2010-2011 399 Recreation and Tourism

    E-print Network

    Gallo, Linda C.

    SDSU General Catalog 2010-2011 399 RTM Recreation and Tourism Management In the School of Hospitality and Tourism Management In the College of Professional Studies and Fine Arts OFFICE: Professional of Hospitality and Tourism Management Major in recreation administration with the B.S. degree in applied arts

  14. Coastal Climatology Products for Recreation and Tourism End Users

    E-print Network

    Gamble, Douglas W.

    Coastal Climatology Products for Recreation and Tourism End Users in Southeastern North Carolina of this project was to develop a test coastal climatology product for recreation and tourism end users the southeastern U.S. Such products are important because tourism is a major sector of the global economy with 693

  15. 410 SDSU General Catalog 2013-2014 Recreation and Tourism

    E-print Network

    Gallo, Linda C.

    410 SDSU General Catalog 2013-2014 Recreation and Tourism Management In the L. Robert Payne School of Hospitality and Tourism Management In the College of Professional Studies and Fine Arts OFFICE: Professional of Hospitality and Tourism Management Major in recreation administration with the B.S. degree in applied arts

  16. SCORP-The Statewide Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlisle, Robert L.

    The creation and meaning of a comprehensive outdoor recreation plan for the state of Texas is the topic of this address presented to the Department of Recreation and Parks, Texas A & M University, in February, 1968. Overall, the plan is concerned with any and all participation in leisure time activities conducted in an out-of-doors setting, rather…

  17. Origin of dolomite in deep marine sediments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. N. Lumsden; D. M. Daigle

    1985-01-01

    Deep marine sediments present an unexcelled opportunity to study dolomite origin uncomplicated by meteoric, shallow marine or deep burial influences. Fifty samples of dolomite from DSDP cores were analyzed for details of associated sediment mineralogy, as well as dolomite crystal size, morphology, and composition. Data from DSDP smear slide and x-ray data files was used to further characterize the mineralogical

  18. Review article: Marine mammal neoplasia: A review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shelley Newman; S A Smith

    2006-01-01

    A review of the published literature indicates that marine mammal neoplasia includes the types and distributions of tumors seen in domestic species. A routine collection of samples from marine mammal species is hampered, and, hence, the literature is principally composed of reports from early whaling expeditions, captive zoo mammals, and epizootics that affect larger numbers of animals from a specific

  19. Escherichia coli Concentrations in Recreational Streams and Backcountry Drinking-Water Supplies in Shenandoah National Park, Virginia, 2005-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hyer, Kenneth E.

    2007-01-01

    Although fecal contamination of streams is a problem of national scope, few investigations have been directed at relatively pristine streams in forested basins in national parks. With approximately 1.8 million visitors annually, Shenandoah National Park in Virginia is subject to extensive recreational use. The effects of these visitors and their recreational activities on fecal indicator bacteria levels in the streams are poorly understood and of concern for Shenandoah National Park managers. During 2005 and 2006, streams and springs in Shenandoah National Park were sampled for Escherichia coli (E. coli) concentrations. The first study objective was to evaluate the effects of recreational activities on E. coli concentrations in selected streams. Of the 20 streams that were selected, 14 were in basins with extensive recreational activity, and 6 were in control basins where minimal recreational activities occurred. Water-quality sampling was conducted during low-flow conditions during the relatively warm months, as this is when outdoor recreation and bacterial survivorship are greatest. Although most sampling was conducted during low-flow conditions, approximately three stormflow samples were collected from each stream. The second study objective was to evaluate E. coli levels in backcountry drinking-water supplies throughout Shenandoah National Park. Nineteen drinking-water supplies (springs and streams) were sampled two to six times each by Shenandoah National Park staff and analyzed by the U.S. Geological Survey for this purpose. The water-quality sampling results indicated relatively low E. coli concentrations during low-flow conditions, and no statistically significant increase in E. coli concentrations was observed in the recreational streams relative to the control streams. These results indicate that during low-flow conditions, recreational activities had no significant effect on E. coli concentrations. During stormflow conditions, E. coli concentrations increased by nearly a factor of 10 in both basin types, and the Virginia instantaneous water-quality standard for E. coli (235 colonies per 100 milliliters) frequently was exceeded. The sampling results from drinking-water supplies throughout Shenandoah National Park indicated relatively low E. coli concentrations in all springs that were sampled. Several of the streams that were sampled had slightly higher E. coli concentrations relative to the springs, but no E. coli concentrations exceeded the instantaneous water-quality standard. Although E. coli concentrations in all the drinking-water supplies were relatively low, Shenandoah National Park management continues to stress that all hikers must treat drinking water from all streams and springs prior to consumption. After determining that recreational activities in Shenandoah National Park did not have a statistically significant effect on low-flow E. coli concentrations, an additional concern was addressed regarding the quality of the water releases from the wastewater-treatment plants in the park. Sampling of three wastewater-treatment plant outfalls was conducted in 2006 to evaluate their effects on water quality. Samples were analyzed for E. coli and a collection of wastewater organic compounds that may be endocrine disruptors. Relatively elevated E. coli concentrations were observed in 2 of the 3 samples, and between 9 and 13 wastewater organic compounds were detected in the samples, including 3 known and 5 suspected endocrine-disrupting compounds.

  20. Recreation and jobs in the Glen Canyon Dam region

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, A.J.; Harpman, D.A. [National Biological Survey, Ft. Collins, CO (United States); [Denver Federal Center, CO (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Natural resource economists have estimated the nonmarket benefits provided by streamflows in several recent research papers. The current paper also examines the economic implications of water based recreational activities. The analysis uses a software package and database called IMPLAN to estimate the jobs impacts of expenditures for recreation trips to the Lee`s Ferry reach on the Colorado River. The discussion describes the basic input-output model and water based recreation activities at the Lee`s Ferry reach. Non-resident river recreation trip expenditures to the Glen Canyon Dam region generate 585 jobs. The estimates presented here add further credence and policy weight to the premise that the outdoor recreation sector of the economy is relatively labor intensive.

  1. Degradation in Cemented Marine Clay Subjected to Cyclic Compressive Loading

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. GERALD MOSES; S. NARASIMHA RAO

    2003-01-01

    The influence of cyclic loading on the strength and deformation behavior of cemented marine clay has been studied. This marine clay is of recent Pleistocene origin and deposited in a shallow water marine environment. Open pits were dug in sheeted enclosures and from these pits, undisturbed samples were taken for strength testing. A series of standard triaxial shear tests and

  2. Characterisation of baroreflex sensitivity of recreational ultra-endurance athletes.

    PubMed

    Foulds, Heather J A; Cote, Anita T; Phillips, Aaron A; Charlesworth, Sarah A; Bredin, Shannon S D; Burr, Jamie F; Drury, Chipman Taylor; Ngai, Shirley; Fougere, Renee J; Ivey, Adam C; Warburton, Darren E R

    2014-01-01

    Altered autonomic function has been identified following ultra-endurance event participation among elite world-class athletes. Despite dramatic increases in recreational athlete participation in these ultra-endurance events, the physiological effects on these athletes are less known. This investigation sought to characterise changes in surrogate measures of autonomic function: heart rate variability (HRV), blood pressure variability (BPV) and baroreceptor sensitivity (BRS) following ultra-endurance race participation. Further, we sought to compare baseline measures among ultra-endurance athletes and recreationally active controls not participating in the ultra-endurance race. Recreational ultra-endurance athletes (n = 25, 44.6 ± 8.2 years, 8 females) and recreationally active age, sex and body mass index matched controls (n = 25) were evaluated. Measurements of HRV, BPV and BRS were collected pre- and post-race for recreational ultra-endurance athletes and at baseline, for recreationally active controls. Post-race, ultra-endurance athletes demonstrated significantly greater sympathetic modulation [low frequency (LF) power HRV: 50.3 ± 21.6 normalised units (n.u.) to 65.9 ± 20.4 n.u., p = 0.01] and significantly lower parasympathetic modulation [high frequency (HF) power HRV: 45.0 ± 22.4 n.u. to 23.9 ± 13.1 n.u., p < 0.001] and BRS. Baseline measurements BRS (spectral: 13.96 ± 10.82 ms·mmHg(-1) vs. 11.39 ± 5.33 ms·mmHg(-1)) were similar among recreational ultra-endurance athletes and recreationally active controls, though recreational ultra-endurance athletes demonstrated greater parasympathetic modulation of some HRV and BPV measures. Recreational ultra-endurance athletes experienced increased sympathetic tone and declines in BRS post-race, similar to previously reported elite world-class ultra-endurance athletes, though still within normal population ranges. PMID:24601942

  3. Evaluation of ultrasound-assisted extraction as sample pre-treatment for quantitative determination of rare earth elements in marine biological tissues by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Costas, M; Lavilla, I; Gil, S; Pena, F; de la Calle, I; Cabaleiro, N; Bendicho, C

    2010-10-29

    In this work, the determination of rare earth elements (REEs), i.e. Y, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb and Lu in marine biological tissues by inductively coupled-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) after a sample preparation method based on ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) is described. The suitability of the extracts for ICP-MS measurements was evaluated. For that, studies were focused on the following issues: (i) use of clean up of extracts with a C18 cartridge for non-polar solid phase extraction; (ii) use of different internal standards; (iii) signal drift caused by changes in the nebulization efficiency and salt deposition on the cones during the analysis. The signal drift produced by direct introduction of biological extracts in the instrument was evaluated using a calibration verification standard for bracketing (standard-sample bracketing, SSB) and cumulative sum (CUSUM) control charts. Parameters influencing extraction such as extractant composition, mass-to-volume ratio, particle size, sonication time and sonication amplitude were optimized. Diluted single acids (HNO(3) and HCl) and mixtures (HNO(3)+HCl) were evaluated for improving the extraction efficiency. Quantitative recoveries for REEs were achieved using 5 mL of 3% (v/v) HNO(3)+2% (v/v) HCl, particle size <200 ?m, 3 min of sonication time and 50% of sonication amplitude. Precision, expressed as relative standard deviation from three independent extractions, ranged from 0.1 to 8%. In general, LODs were improved by a factor of 5 in comparison with those obtained after microwave-assisted digestion (MAD). The accuracy of the method was evaluated using the CRM BCR-668 (mussel tissue). Different seafood samples of common consumption were analyzed by ICP-MS after UAE and MAD. PMID:20951856

  4. Comparative Mammalian cell cytotoxicity of water concentrates from disinfected recreational pools.

    PubMed

    Plewa, Michael J; Wagner, Elizabeth D; Mitch, William A

    2011-05-01

    Disinfection of recreational pools is essential to prevent outbreaks of infectious disease. Despite the health benefits of swimming, recent research demonstrated an association between the application of disinfectants to recreational pools and adverse health outcomes. Pool waters are extreme cases of disinfection that differ in important respects from disinfected drinking waters. Pool waters are continuously exposed to disinfectants over average residence times extending to months. Disinfection byproduct (DBP) precursors in pools include natural humic substances deriving from the tap water source plus inputs from bathers through urine, sweat, hair, skin, and consumer products including sunscreens and cosmetics. This study presents a systematic, chronic in vitro mammalian cell cytotoxicity analysis of different recreational waters with varied environmental conditions that were derived from a common tap water source. Recreational waters were significantly more toxic than their tap water source. Because trihalomethane concentrations are similar between tap waters and pool waters, using trihalomethanes to monitor exposure in epidemiological studies may not be the best metric. Of primary importance for cytotoxicity were illumination conditions. Pools subjected to a combination of ultraviolet light and free chlorine disinfection indoors, or outdoor sunlight exposure exhibited lower cytotoxicity than their indoor counterparts disinfected with free chlorine. Temperature and total organic carbon content, as an indirect measure of DBP precursors, were less important. Previous research on the same samples demonstrated the genotoxicity of an indoor pool disinfected with bromochlorodimethylhydantoin; the cytotoxicity of this sample was confirmed in the present study. While the association of reduced toxicity with illumination indicates that the agents responsible are photolabile, their identity is unclear. As a broad measure of adverse biological responses, cytotoxicity may be a useful metric to gauge the health impacts of alterations in pool operating conditions. PMID:21466188

  5. Mariners' Museum

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Located in Newport News, Virginia, the Mariners' Museum is one of the largest international maritime history museums filled to the crow's nest with prized artifacts that celebrate the spirit of seafaring adventure. Site features eight online exhibitions including: The Age of Exploration, the USS Monitor, Chesapeake Bay, the Transatlantic Slave Trade, and more. Also includes visitor information, permanent and temporary museum exhibit information, and an image collection.

  6. Mariners' Museum

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Located in Newport News, Virginia, the Mariner's Museum is one of the largest international maritime history museums filled to the crow's nest with prized artifacts that celebrate the spirit of seafaring adventure. Site features eight online exhibitions including: The Age of Exploration, the USS Monitor, Chesapeake Bay, the Transatlantic Slave Trade, and more. Also includes visitor information, permanent and temporary museum exhibit information, and an image collection.

  7. Marine Sanctuaries

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Science Netlinks

    2002-06-10

    In this Science NetLinks lesson, students will learn about the national marine sanctuaries found in the Pacific and Atlantic oceans and off the coast of American Samoa. They include breeding and feeding grounds of whales, sea lions, sharks, and sea turtles; significant coral reefs and kelp forest habitats; and the remains of the U.S.S. Monitor, a Civil War ironclad sunk off the coast of North Carolina.

  8. Relationship between enterococcal levels and sediment biofilms at recreational beaches in South Florida.

    PubMed

    Piggot, Alan M; Klaus, James S; Johnson, Sara; Phillips, Matthew C; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M

    2012-09-01

    Enterococci, recommended at the U.S. federal level for monitoring water quality at marine recreational beaches, have been found to reside and grow within beach sands. However, the environmental and ecological factors affecting enterococcal persistence remain poorly understood, making it difficult to determine levels of fecal pollution and assess human health risks. Here we document the presence of enterococci associated with beach sediment biofilms at eight south Florida recreational beaches. Enterococcal levels were highest in supratidal sands, where they displayed a nonlinear, unimodal relationship with extracellular polymeric secretions (EPS), the primary component of biofilms. Enterococcal levels peaked at intermediate levels of EPS, suggesting that biofilms may promote the survival of enterococci but also inhibit enterococci as the biofilm develops within beach sands. Analysis of bacterial community profiles determined by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphisms showed the bacterial communities of supratidal sediments to be significantly different from intertidal and subtidal communities; however, no differences were observed in bacterial community compositions associated with different EPS concentrations. Our results suggest that supratidal sands are a microbiologically unique environment favorable for the incorporation and persistence of enterococci within beach sediment biofilms. PMID:22706061

  9. Relationship between Enterococcal Levels and Sediment Biofilms at Recreational Beaches in South Florida

    PubMed Central

    Piggot, Alan M.; Johnson, Sara; Phillips, Matthew C.; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M.

    2012-01-01

    Enterococci, recommended at the U.S. federal level for monitoring water quality at marine recreational beaches, have been found to reside and grow within beach sands. However, the environmental and ecological factors affecting enterococcal persistence remain poorly understood, making it difficult to determine levels of fecal pollution and assess human health risks. Here we document the presence of enterococci associated with beach sediment biofilms at eight south Florida recreational beaches. Enterococcal levels were highest in supratidal sands, where they displayed a nonlinear, unimodal relationship with extracellular polymeric secretions (EPS), the primary component of biofilms. Enterococcal levels peaked at intermediate levels of EPS, suggesting that biofilms may promote the survival of enterococci but also inhibit enterococci as the biofilm develops within beach sands. Analysis of bacterial community profiles determined by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphisms showed the bacterial communities of supratidal sediments to be significantly different from intertidal and subtidal communities; however, no differences were observed in bacterial community compositions associated with different EPS concentrations. Our results suggest that supratidal sands are a microbiologically unique environment favorable for the incorporation and persistence of enterococci within beach sediment biofilms. PMID:22706061

  10. Quantitative analysis of plastic debris on recreational beaches in Mumbai, India.

    PubMed

    Jayasiri, H B; Purushothaman, C S; Vennila, A

    2013-12-15

    Plastic litter was quantified on four sandy beaches in Mumbai. The mean abundance of 7.49 g and 68.83 items per square metre was recorded. The abundance of plastics significantly varied among the beaches showing an increasing trend in the southern part. The abundance of plastics by weight in Dadar was significantly higher than that in Aksa. The size fractionation of plastics proved that small particles (1-20 mm) are predominant with 41.85% microplastics (1-5 mm) which emphasizes the high risk to marine organisms due to possible ingestion. The highest quantity of microplastics was seen in Juhu beach (55.33%) followed by Versova, Aksa and Dadar. The major contributing factors for the abundance are beach usage for different activities such as recreational, religious and fishing which suggest that the land-based sources provide major inputs to plastic pollution in these beaches. PMID:24210947

  11. Recreational injuries in children: incidence and prevention.

    PubMed

    Purvis, J M; Burke, R G

    2001-01-01

    Participation in eight common types of recreational activities leads annually to more than 2 million medically treated musculoskeletal injuries in children aged 5 to 14 years. Many of these injuries could have been prevented if current safety guidelines and protective equipment had been used. Studies have demonstrated the value of safety education programs in preventing injuries. Parents consider their child's physician an important source of safety education, and orthopaedic surgeons have a unique opportunity to provide injury prevention counseling. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons recognizes the importance of injury prevention and has developed advocacy programs that are readily available to physicians and the public. Individual orthopaedists should be involved in injury prevention through patient education, research, community programs, and regulatory efforts that promote safe play for children. PMID:11730329

  12. 16 How Recreational Drugs Affect Asthma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Timothy E. Albertson; Steve Offerman; Nicholas J. Kenyon

    \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a • \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Because of the recent epidemic, drugs of abuse have more opportunity to interact with a common disease such as asthma.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a • \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Drugs of abuse have not been proven to cause asthma, but they may exacerbate preexisting asthma.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a • \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Case reports of asthma exacerbations after recreational drug abuse continue to increase.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a • \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Abuse of cocaine and the opioid heroin have

  13. Behavioral responses of north American Elk to recreational activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naylor, L.M.; Wisdom, M.J.; Anthony, R.G.

    2009-01-01

    Off-road recreation on public lands in North America has increased dramatically in recent years. Wild ungulates are sensitive to human activities, but the effect of off-road recreation, both motorized and nonmotorized, is poorly understood. We measured responses of elk (Cervus elaphus) to recreational disturbance in northeast Oregon, USA, from April to October, 2003 and 2004. We subjected elk to 4 types of recreational disturbance: all-terrain vehicle (ATV) riding, mountain biking, hiking, and horseback riding. Motion sensors inside radiocollars worn by 13 female elk recorded resting, feeding, and travel activities at 5-minute intervals throughout disturbance and control periods. Elk fed and rested during control periods, with little time spent traveling. Travel time increased in response to all 4 disturbances and was highest in mornings. Elk travel time was highest during ATV exposure, followed by exposure to mountain biking, hiking, and horseback riding. Feeding time decreased during ATV exposure and resting decreased when we subjected elk to mountain biking and hiking disturbance in 2003. Our results demonstrated that activities of elk can be substantially affected by off-road recreation. Mitigating these effects may be appropriate where elk are a management priority. Balancing management of species like elk with off-road recreation will become increasingly important as off-road recreational uses continue to increase on public lands in North America.

  14. Using HSDP Samples to Evaluate the Staudigel et al. Model of Euendolithic Microbial Alteration of Marine Basalt Glass: A Peek at the Unseen Majority

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walton, A. W.

    2008-12-01

    Staudigel et al. (2008, Earth Science Reviews 89 156-176.) recognize separate alteration processes of basalt glass in oceanic crust and elsewhere: Formation of palagonite and pore-filling cements is abiotic, while microbes form granular and tubular textures. Granular alteration begins shortly after glass cools to a habitable state and is a product of organisms that etch the surface of basalt glass by adjusting pH. These organisms ultimately dissolve the glass surface to form an agglomeration of micrometer-scale sub-spherical cavities. Smectite, zeolites, Fe-oxide, and Ti-rich structures occupy the cavities. Together with microbes, they form a bio- and mineral film that ultimately shuts down the system. Tubular structures reflect the activity of hypha-bearing organisms that mine the glass to get nutrients. Hyphae allow the organisms to remain in contact with circulating water while penetrating any biofilm and mining nutrients from unaltered glass. Tubules are about 1 micrometer in diameter and 10s to 100s of micrometers long. Both suites of organisms use reduced elements from the glass as sources of electrons for their metabolism. Activity ceases when secondary minerals reduce permeability to circulating seawater and availability of some nutrients. HSDP results, from an ocean island, show some areas of agreement. Petrographic studies indicate that initiation of tubules post-dates crushing of grains during early burial and formation of isopachous smectite grain coatings. Growth of tubules may be very slow; they grow during a time window of about 30000 to 60000 years, although duration of growth of individual tubules may be much shorter. Tubules and other textures of alteration are commonly coated with ferric hydroxide, perhaps a product of microbial oxidation. However, some features of biotic alteration in HSDP hyaloclastites are inconsistent with the proposed model. Smectitic grain replacement, which resembles granular alteration, forms in HSDP samples after and in association with tubular structures. Smectite replacement of glass is relatively less abundant than tubular alteration; many areas of tubular alteration lack any granular associates. Biotic alteration of glass does not itself develop pore-blocking minerals, but early isopachous smectite and later zeolites formed during palagonitic alteration reduce porosity to a few percent, effectively terminating boring. Tubules undergo modification from cylindrical to steep cones and develop minute branches. Tubule configuration indicates that boring organisms were attracted to olivine crystals and avoided plagioclase.

  15. Opinions of fisheries researchers, managers, and anglers towards recreational fishing issues: an exploratory analysis for North America

    SciTech Connect

    Hasler, Caleb T.; Colotelo, Alison HA; Rapp, Tobias; Jamieson, Elizabeth; Bellehumeur, Karyne; Arlinghaus, Robert; Cooke, Steven J.

    2011-05-02

    There is a need to better understand the perspectives of various recreational fishing stakeholder groups regarding key issues related to fisheries sustainability. To provide a first snapshot and to inform future human dimension studies in this area, we distributed a Web-based open-access survey to fisheries researchers, fisheries managers, and anglers in North America. Attitudes of these respondents towards issues such as overharvest, impacts of catch and release, recreational fisheries management, and research priorities for the future were assessed. We found similar opinions and perspectives by the responding recreational anglers, managers,and researchers on a number of issues, such as the perceived impact of commercial fishing contributing to fish stock declines, the perceived importance of using and promoting gear that minimizes stress and injury to individual fish when fish are to be released, and the belief that conflicts among stakeholders is growing as is the global anti-fishing movement based on animal rights thinking. Differences among responding groups included that researchers tended to be more concerned than anglers and managers with the potential of recreational angling contributing to fish stock declines. Responding anglers were also less content with their involvement in the fisheries management process than were responding managers and researchers, and these anglers also indicated a greater desire for more human dimensions research on understanding angler attitudes and behavior than was evident for responding managers and researchers. This preliminary survey revealed some variation in attitudes among recreational fisheries stakeholders. However, due to lack of random sampling, the study results cannot be extrapolated to the population level. We nevertheless conclude that improved communication and better understanding about the different perspectives among fisheries researchers, managers, and anglers and intrasectorally among different angling groups are needed, particularly when addressing contentious issues of relevance for the entire recreational fishing sector.

  16. A self-determination theory approach to adults' healthy body weight motivation: A longitudinal study focussing on food choices and recreational physical activity.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Christina; Dohle, Simone; Siegrist, Michael

    2015-08-01

    This study focuses on body weight motivation based on self-determination theory. The impact of body weight motivation on longitudinal changes in food choices, recreational physical activity and body mass index was explored. A sample of adults (N = 2917, 47% men), randomly selected from the telephone book, completed a questionnaire in two consecutive years (2012, 2013), self-reporting food choices, recreational physical activity and body weight motivation. Types of body weight motivation at T1 (autonomous regulation, introjected regulation, and external regulation) were tested with regard to their predictive potential for changes in food choices, recreational physical activity and body mass index (BMI). Autonomous motivation predicted improvements in food choices and long-term adherence to vigorous recreational physical activity in both genders. Introjected motivation predicted long-term adherence to vigorous recreational physical activity only in women. External motivation predicted negative changes in food choices; however, the type of body weight motivation had no impact on BMI in overweight adults in the long term. Autonomous goal-setting regarding body weight seems to be substantial for healthy food choices and adherence to recreational physical activity. PMID:25584714

  17. A Competency-Based Approach to Preparing Staff as Recreation and Youth Development Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barcelona, Robert J.; Hurd, Amy R.; Bruggeman, Jennifer A.

    2011-01-01

    Youth are often the primary group for parks and recreation organizations, yet recreation professionals are often not adequately prepared in the principles and practices of youth development. Similarly, youth workers outside the recreation field often lack information on basic recreation program design and activity leadership. Improving access to…

  18. Problem Solving: Tools and Techniques for the Park and Recreation Administrator. Fourth Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Margaret L.; Heyne, Linda A.; Busser, James A.

    2005-01-01

    This book is a useful tool for recreation educators in carrying out their responsibilities for preparing the next generation for effective service in recreation and parks. The need for this book is apparent, because few recreation curricula include courses in problem solving. It is true that many texts dealing with recreation describe policies and…

  19. Getting All Girls into the Game: Physically Active Recreation for Girls with Disabilities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Denise M. Anderson; Leandra A. Bedini; Leslie Moreland

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: Local public parks and recreation programs are beginning to address the problems associated with inactivity among America's youth. With a mission that focuses on serving all populations through recreation programming, community recreation seems an ideal conduit for increasing social justice. However, research as recent as 2003 (Jones, 2003) found that girls with disabilities are still overlooked in recreation

  20. University of WisconsinMilwaukee (UWM) Recreational Sports and Facilities (RSF)

    E-print Network

    Saldin, Dilano

    University of Wisconsin­Milwaukee (UWM) Recreational Sports and Facilities (RSF) Recreation Locker the Klotsche Center are part of university space assigned to Recreational Sports and Facilities to support Room Policy The recreation locker room facilities (Klotsche Center Rooms 113, 119 and 131) within

  1. Multiobjective planning for integrated land use and outside?allied transportation systems in recreational areas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1996-01-01

    In recent decades, recreational needs have dramatically increased due in part to increased economic prosperity and people becoming more wealthy. As a result, the utilization of recreational resources and the management of recreational areas has become an urgent issue for the government and private authorities. In past studies, the planning or developing of land use for recreational areas almost only

  2. Benthic macroinvertebrates diversity and water quality assessment at Sungai Congkak recreational area, Hulu Langat, Selangor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustaqim-Alias, M.; Ahmad, A. K.

    2013-11-01

    A study on benthic macroinvertebrates diversity and water quality assessment was conducted at Sungai Congkak recreational area in Hulu Langat, Selangor. Sums of eight sampling stations were selected with a distance of 100-200 m interval between each station. Benthic macroinvertebrates was sampled using a Surber net, while water sampling and analysis were undertaken according to HACH standard methods. A total of 3754 individuals from 40 families of benthic macroinvertebrates were recorded at this river. Ecological indices namely Shannon diversity index (2.49), Pielou evenness index (0.77) and Margalef richness index (4.06) demonstrate that Sungai Congkak is at good condition and benthic macroinvertebrates has homogeneous distribution along the sampling sites. Elmidae, Hydrophilidae, Baetidae and Perlidae were most dominant families present in that area and adapted progressively with excellent water quality (> 300 individuals). As regards to Malaysian's Water Quality Index (WQI), the study area at Sungai Congkak is classified in class I which has good water quality conditions. The Pearson correlation test indicates that ecological indices have strong correlation toward WQI at all sampling stations. As a conclusion, the benthic macroinvertebrates and WQI data demonstrated that Sungai Congkak is clean and suitable as recreational stream based on this study.

  3. U.S. Recreational Water Quality Criteria: A Vision for the Future.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, Roger S; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara N; Kirs, Marek

    2015-07-01

    This manuscript evaluates the U.S. Recreational Water Quality Criteria (RWQC) of 2012, based upon discussions during a conference held 11-13 March 2013, in Honolulu, Hawaii. The RWQC of 2012 did not meet expectations among the research community because key recommended studies were not completed, new data to assess risks to bathers exposed to non-point sources of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) were not developed, and the 2012 RWQC did not show marked improvements in strategies for assessing health risks for bathers using all types of recreational waters. The development of the 2012 RWQC was limited in scope because the epidemiologic studies at beach sites were restricted to beaches with point sources of pollution and water samples were monitored for only enterococci. The vision for the future is development of effective RWQC guidelines based on epidemiologic and quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) studies for sewage specific markers, as well as human enteric pathogens so that health risks for bathers at all recreational waters can be determined. The 2012 RWQC introduced a program for states and tribes to develop site-specific water quality criteria, and in theory this approach can be used to address the limitations associated with the measurements of the traditional FIB. PMID:26184253

  4. Marine Iguana

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2009-01-01

    No iguana wants to be cooked alive on a hot rock and then served up as dinner for a Galapagos hawk. But it turns out the marine iguanas have a strategy that warns them of the presence of hawks they can’t see. They learned to tune in to a kind of police scanner…the alarm calls of mockingbirds.Also included is a Learn More section that provides background information on the scientists recorded in the podcast, lessons, images, and cool facts.

  5. Impaired cognitive performance in drug free users of recreational ecstasy (MDMA)

    PubMed Central

    Gouzoulis-Mayfran..., E.; Daumann, J.; Tuchtenhagen, F.; Pelz, S.; Becker, S.; Kunert, H.; Fimm, B.; Sass, H.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Ecstasy (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and related congerers: MDA, MDEA) is the name given to a group of popular recreational drugs. Animal data raise concern about neurotoxic effects of high doses of ecstasy on central serotonergic systems. The threshold dose for neurotoxicity in humans is not clear and serotonin is involved in several functions including cognition. The purpose of this study was to investigate cognitive performance in a group of typical recreational ecstasy users.?METHODS—A comprehensive cognitive test battery was administered to 28 abstinent ecstasy users with concomitant use of cannabis only and to two equally sized matched groups of cannabis users and non-users. The sample consisted of ecstasy users with a typical recreational use pattern and did not include very heavy users.?RESULTS—Ecstasy users were unimpaired in simple tests of attention (alertness). However, they performed worse than one or both control groups in the more complex tests of attention, in memory and learning tasks, and in tasks reflecting aspects of general intelligence. Heavier ecstasy and heavier cannabis use were associated with poorer performance in the group of ecstasy users. By contrast, the cannabis users did not differ significantly in their performance from the non-users.?CONCLUSIONS—The present data raise concern that use of ecstasy possibly in conjunction with cannabis may lead to cognitive decline in otherwise healthy young people. Although the nature of the emerging cognitive disturbance is not yet clear, an impairment of working memory might be the common denominator underlying or contributing to declines of performance in various tasks. The cognitive disturbance is likely to be related to the well recognised neurotoxic potential of ecstasy. The data suggest that even typical recreational doses of ecstasy are sufficient to cause neurotoxicity in humans.?? PMID:10811694

  6. Freshwater and marine ecosystems are globally threatened. The decline in water quality and quantity will soon overtake oil as the

    E-print Network

    Schladow, S. Geoffrey

    Freshwater and marine ecosystems are globally threatened. The decline in water quality and quantity. The protection of drinking water sources is of urgent global concern, as is the conservation of lakes and streams for recreation and food production. Lake Tahoe is a microcosm for the study of environmental change. The Lake

  7. Microbiological Water Quality in Relation to Water-Contact Recreation, Cuyahoga River, Cuyahoga Valley National Park, Ohio, 2000 and 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bushon, Rebecca N.; Koltun, G.F.

    2004-01-01

    The microbiological water quality of a 23-mile segment of the Cuyahoga River within the Cuyahoga Valley National Park was examined in this study. This segment of the river receives discharges of contaminated water from stormwater, combined-sewer overflows, and incompletely disinfected wastewater. Frequent exceedances of Ohio microbiological water-quality standards result in a health risk to the public who use the river for water-contact recreation. Water samples were collected during the recreational season of May through October at four sites on the Cuyahoga River in 2000, at three sites on the river in 2002, and from the effluent of the Akron Water Pollution Control Station (WPCS) both years. The samples were collected over a similar range in streamflow in 2000 and 2002. Samples were analyzed for physical and chemical constituents, as well as the following microbiological indicators and pathogenic organisms: Escherichia coli (E. coli), Salmonella, F-specific and somatic coliphage, enterovirus, infectious enterovirus, hepatitis A virus, Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens), Cryptosporidium, and Giardia. The relations of the microorganisms to each other and to selected water-quality measures were examined. All microorganisms analyzed for, except Cryptosporidium, were detected at least once at each sampling site. Concentrations of E. coli exceeded the Ohio primary-contact recreational standard (298 colonies per 100 milliliters) in approximately 87 percent of the river samples and generally were higher in the river samples than in the effluent samples. C. perfringens concentrations were positively and significantly correlated with E. coli concentrations in the river samples and generally were higher in the effluent samples than in the river samples. Several of the river samples that met the Ohio E. coli secondary-contact recreational standard (576 colonies per 100 milliliters) had detections of enterovirus, infectious enterovirus, hepatitis A virus, and Salmonella, indicating that there are still risks even when the E. coli standard is not exceeded. River samples in which the secondary-contact recreational standard for E. coli was exceeded showed a higher percentage of the co-occurrence of pathogenic organisms than samples that met the standard. This indicates that in this study area, E. coli is a useful indicator of human health risk. Detections of hepatitis A virus tended to be associated with higher median concentrations of somatic coliphage, F-specific coliphage, and infectious enterovirus. In addition, geometric mean C. perfringens concentrations tended to be higher in samples where hepatitis A virus was present than in samples where hepatitis A virus was absent. Hepatitis A virus was not detected in samples collected upstream from the Akron WPCS; all downstream detections had coincident detections in the Akron WPCS effluent, suggesting that Akron WPCS was a principal source of hepatitis A virus at the downstream sites. Geometric mean concentrations of E. coli were calculated on the basis of analytical results from at least five samples collected at each river site during May, July, and September of 2000. In each case, the Ohio geometric-mean primary-contact recreational standard of 126 col/100 mL was exceeded. E. coli concentrations were significantly correlated with streamflow and increased with streamflow at sites upstream and downstream from the Akron WPCS. This indicates that E. coli loads from sources upstream from the Akron WPCS have the potential to appreciably influence the frequency of attainment of recreational water-quality standards at downstream locations.

  8. Chemoreception in the marine environment Many marine crustaceans rely heavily on olfaction to find

    E-print Network

    Koehl, Mimi

    Chemoreception in the marine environment Many marine crustaceans rely heavily on olfaction to find. Stomatopods are good model systems for studies of flow and olfaction We use stomatopod antennules here Gonodactylaceus mutatus. Flicking, fluid flow and olfaction Many crustaceans sample their chemical environment

  9. Marine seismic profiling and shallow marine sand resistivity investigations in Jervis Bay, NSW, Australia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Julian Vrbancich; Robert J. Whiteley; Don W. Emerson

    2011-01-01

    A marine continuous seismic profiling (CSP) study and a resistivity study of vibrocore samples of shallow marine sands were undertaken in Jervis Bay, NSW, Australia, to characterise the seabed. The CSP study also included Crookhaven Bight, adjacent to Jervis Bay facing north-east to the ocean. The overall aims were: (i) to estimate sediment thickness, and surficial sediment resistivity (upper 3m)

  10. Strategy for mitigation of marine debris: analysis of sources and composition of marine debris in northern Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Fan-Jun; Huang, Hsiang-Wen

    2014-06-15

    Six sites (two sites for each of rocky shores, sandy beaches, and fishing ports) in northern Taiwan were selected to investigate the amount and density of marine debris in each of the four seasons and after spring and neap tides from 2012 to 2013. The results indicate that marine debris was higher on rocky shores than sandy beaches and fishing ports. There is no significant difference between season and tide. The dominant debris was plastic-type, followed by polystyrene. The majority of debris originated from recreational activities, followed from ocean/waterway activities. The results suggest that the following actions are needed: (1) continue and reinforce the plastic-limit policy; (2) increase the cleaning frequency at rocky shores; (3) promote marine environmental education, with a goal of debris-free coasts; (4) recycle fishing gear and to turn that gear into energy; and (5) coordinate between agencies to establish a mechanism to monitor debris. PMID:24775064

  11. Steps of Healthy Swimming: Protection against Recreational Water Illnesses (RWIs)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Compartir Steps of Healthy Swimming: Protection Against Recreational Water Illnesses (RWIs) You can choose to swim healthy! ... pee, poop, sweat, and dirt out of the water! Stay out of the water if you have ...

  12. 40 CFR 230.52 - Water-related recreation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    (a) Water-related recreation encompasses activities undertaken for amusement and relaxation. Activities encompass two broad categories of use: consumptive, e.g., harvesting resources by hunting and fishing; and non-comsumptive, e.g. canoeing and...

  13. 40 CFR 230.52 - Water-related recreation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    (a) Water-related recreation encompasses activities undertaken for amusement and relaxation. Activities encompass two broad categories of use: consumptive, e.g., harvesting resources by hunting and fishing; and non-comsumptive, e.g. canoeing and...

  14. An Analysis: Outdoor Recreation on Government Lands in Texas.

    E-print Network

    Reed, David J.; Reid, Leslie M.

    1969-01-01

    . Stamfc Abiler Colem Brady Wichit Grahc Cisco Alice Miner Weatl Arlinc Clebu Dalla Terrel urface Recreation Reservoir acres development Acre drninistering agency REFERENCE: NE1VSF.iPERS AND M.IGAZINES Argolv. I

  15. Fitzsimons General Hospital, Women's Army Corps Recreation & Administration Building, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Fitzsimons General Hospital, Women's Army Corps Recreation & Administration Building, North Hickey Street, west side, 75 feet north of intersection of West Pennington Avenue & North Hickey Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  16. 36 CFR 261.16 - Developed recreation sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...portion of the site for other than recreation purposes. (b) Building, attending, maintaining, or using a fire outside of a fire ring provided by the Forest Service for such purpose or outside of a stove, grill or fireplace. (c)...

  17. 70. Smart view recreation area entrance road. View of the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    70. Smart view recreation area entrance road. View of the snake or worm fences used to reinforce the roadway alignment. Looking north-northwest. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  18. Increasing Hispanic Participation in a Public Recreation Center 

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Mariela

    2012-10-19

    This study analyzed the reasons why a limited number of Hispanic parents take their children to a local public recreation center. The center historically serves the African American population of the community, with many ...

  19. 28. VIEW SHOWING NORTH SIDE OF MISSISSIPPI RIVER RECREATION OFFICE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. VIEW SHOWING NORTH SIDE OF MISSISSIPPI RIVER RECREATION OFFICE BUILDING, LE CLAIRE BASE COMPOUND - Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 14, Upper Mississippi River, Le Claire, Scott County, IA

  20. 29. INTERIOR VIEW OF MISSISSIPPI RIVER RECREATION OFFICE BUILDING, LE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. INTERIOR VIEW OF MISSISSIPPI RIVER RECREATION OFFICE BUILDING, LE CLAIRE BASE COMPOUND, LOOKING WEST - Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 14, Upper Mississippi River, Le Claire, Scott County, IA

  1. 27. VIEW SHOWING SOUTH SIDE OF MISSISSIPPI RIVER RECREATION OFFICE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. VIEW SHOWING SOUTH SIDE OF MISSISSIPPI RIVER RECREATION OFFICE BUILDING, LE CLAIRE BASE COMPOUND - Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 14, Upper Mississippi River, Le Claire, Scott County, IA

  2. 30. INTERIOR VIEW OF MISSISSIPPI RIVER RECREATION OFFICE, LE CLAIRE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. INTERIOR VIEW OF MISSISSIPPI RIVER RECREATION OFFICE, LE CLAIRE BASE COMPOUND, LOOKING EAST - Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 14, Upper Mississippi River, Le Claire, Scott County, IA

  3. 3. EAST SIDE SHOWING RECREATION PATIO ADDITION AT SOUTHERN END. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. EAST SIDE SHOWING RECREATION PATIO ADDITION AT SOUTHERN END. TWO-STORY PORTION AT SOUTHERN END CONTAINS 'RIGGING LOFT.' - Chollas Heights Naval Radio Transmitting Facility, Public Works Shop, 6410 Zero Road, San Diego, San Diego County, CA

  4. 40 CFR 230.51 - Recreational and commercial fisheries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Discharges can result in the chemical contamination of recreational or commercial fisheries...organisms upon which they depend for food. Any of these impacts can be of short...discharge and the biological availability of contaminants to aquatic...

  5. DISINFECTION OF WATER: DRINKING WATER, RECREATIONAL WATER, AND WASTEWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter describes and categorizes the methodology used for disinfection of drinking water, recreational water and wastewater including wastewater sludges. It largely is a literature summary and references articles covering the years of 1939 through 1999, with a few reference...

  6. 114. Doughton Park Recreation Area. View of Laurel Spring Valley ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    114. Doughton Park Recreation Area. View of Laurel Spring Valley in distance, alligator back, and overlook in foreground. Looking west. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  7. 109. Doughton Park Recreation Area. View of alligator back and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    109. Doughton Park Recreation Area. View of alligator back and the parkway seen from bluff mountain. Looking west. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  8. 111. Doughton Park Recreation Area. View of parkway with the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    111. Doughton Park Recreation Area. View of parkway with the road crossing alligator back. Facing southeast. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  9. 115. Doughton Park Recreation Area. View of roadway alignment around ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    115. Doughton Park Recreation Area. View of roadway alignment around alligator back and parking overlook in foreground. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  10. Effectiveness of internet information for park, recreation and tourism practitioners 

    E-print Network

    Patterson, Joni Denise

    2004-09-30

    This research is a four-step process. 1) Development of the Park, Recreation and Tourism (PRT) Planning Web site to meet the needs of rural communities, indicated through the Texas Community Futures Forum needs assessment process. 2) Evaluation...

  11. THE 1978 SPRING RECREATIONAL CATCH OF ATLANTIC MACKEREL, SCOMBER SCOMBRUS,

    E-print Network

    THE 1978 SPRING RECREATIONAL CATCH OF ATLANTIC MACKEREL, SCOMBER SCOMBRUS, OFF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC REGION Atlantic mackerel, Scomber scombrus, season- ally migrate through the Middle Atlantic region of Atlantic mackerel in New Jersey in 1975 was

  12. Increasing Hispanic Participation in a Public Recreation Center

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Mariela

    2012-10-19

    This study analyzed the reasons why a limited number of Hispanic parents take their children to a local public recreation center. The center historically serves the African American population of the community, with many African Americans living...

  13. Testing a Sociological Theory of Recreational Drug Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orcutt, James D.; Briggs, Donald A.

    1975-01-01

    The hypothesis that the normal effects of recreationally used drugs vary across substances, users, and situations as a function of normative content, normative clarity, and situational context was tested. (Author/JC)

  14. Effectiveness of internet information for park, recreation and tourism practitioners

    E-print Network

    Patterson, Joni Denise

    2004-09-30

    This research is a four-step process. 1) Development of the Park, Recreation and Tourism (PRT) Planning Web site to meet the needs of rural communities, indicated through the Texas Community Futures Forum needs assessment process. 2) Evaluation...

  15. RECREATION OF C. 1913 PHOTOGRAPH ?TOMB OF VICEPRESIDENT ELBRIDGE GERRY? ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    RECREATION OF C. 1913 PHOTOGRAPH ?TOMB OF VICE-PRESIDENT ELBRIDGE GERRY? (SEE FIGURE 6 IN HISTORICAL REPORT FOR HISTORIC VIEW). - Congressional Cemetery, 1801 E Street, Southeast, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  16. Depositional Environments of Jeffreys Ledge, Western Gulf of Maine: Impacts of Glaciation, Sea-Level Fluctuations and Marine Processes Assessed Using High Resolution Multibeam Bathymetry, Subbottom Seismics, Videography, and Direct Sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, L. G.; Johnson, P. D.; Malik, M. A.; Grizzle, R. E.

    2014-12-01

    Jeffreys Ledge, located ~50 km off the coast of New Hampshire, USA, is a major physiographic feature in the western Gulf of Maine (WGOM), extending over 100 km along its axis, while generally only being 5 to 10 km in width (~20 km maximum). The feature rises over 200 m from nearby basins to depths less than 50 m on the ridge surface. A major field campaign was undertaken at Jeffreys Ledge and adjacent areas in order to assess the roles of glaciation, sea-level fluctuations, and marine processes on the development of the major depositional environments. The study focused on an ~500 sq km area that extended from the shallowest reaches to the deep adjacent basins utilizing high resolution multibeam echosounder bathymetry (synthesized and gridded at the highest possible resolution), subbottom seismics, videography, and bottom sediment sampling. Due to the coarseness of the sediments composing the surface of Jeffreys Ledge (which frequently included cobbles and boulders), direct sampling was largely limited. Therefore, a descriptive seafloor classification utilizing video was developed and applied. The seafloor on Jeffreys Ledge typically ranges from sandy pebble gravel to pebble cobble gravel with boulders. Major glacial features include several boulder ridges ~ 5m in elevation that extend kms in length. These ridges, which run roughly parallel to the axis of Jeffreys Ledge, likely reflect winnowed recessional moraines. Smaller, asymmetric linear ridges with varying orientations are found on the western (landward) boundary. Although the origin of these features are unknown, they are believed to be relict glacial features as well. On the seaward (east) edge of the platform facing the open Gulf of Maine is a relatively smooth, sandy bathymetric high that likely was formed by wave processes during the last sea-level low stand. Subbottom seismics show evidence of soft sediment faulting and slumping on the flanks of the ridge and in the adjacent muddy basins. The use of high resolution bathymetry, along with the subbottom seismics, video, and direct sampling, reveal features not previously identified aiding our understanding of the development and controls on the major depositional environments.

  17. Less of a Luxury: The Rise of Recreation since 1888

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dora L. Costa

    1997-01-01

    I show that recreation has become much more egalitarian over the last hundred years by estimating recreational expenditure elasticities in 1888-1890, 1917-1919, 1935-1936, 1972-1973, and 1991. I find that expenditure elasticities have fallen from around two at the beginning of the century to slightly more than one today and attribute this decline to rising incomes, declines in the price of

  18. Sedentariness, Small-Screen Recreation, and Fitness in Youth

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Louise L. Hardy; Timothy A. Dobbins; Elizabeth A. Denney-Wilson; Anthony D. Okely; Michael L. Booth

    2009-01-01

    Background: There are concerns that sedentariness among young people has increased and that this may be detrimental to their health. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between sedentary activities, including small-screen recreation (SSR: watching TV\\/DVDs\\/videos, recreational computer use) and cardiorespiratory endurance (CRE) in children aged 11-15 years. Methods: A cross-sectional representative population survey was taken of

  19. [Recreational attraction of urban park wetlands in Beijing].

    PubMed

    Li, Fen; Sun, Ran-Hao; Chen, Li-Ding

    2012-08-01

    Taking the 20 urban park wetlands in Beijing as test objects, a 3-layer evaluation index system including urban park wetland landscape quality, location condition, and accessibility for the recreational attraction of urban bark wetlands was established, and, by using analytic hierarchy process (AHP) and an integrating index evaluation method, the recreational attraction of the urban park wetlands in Beijing was quantitatively assessed, and validated with questionnaire data. In Beijing, the urban park wetlands with high recreational attraction were in the order of the Summer Palace, Olympic Park, Qinglong Lake Park, Beihai Park, Yuanmingyuan Park, Yuyuantan Park, Shidu, Golden Sea Lake scenic area, Taoranting Park, and Yeyahu wetland. The Rice Fragrance Lake wetland and Zhenzhuhu scenic area had the lowest recreational attraction, and the others were fair. The evaluation results were supported by the questionnaire data, which indicated that the index system and evaluation model were useful. According to the recreational services, the 20 park wetlands in Beijing could be clustered into four categories, which could be managed in different ways. Appropriately assessing the recreational services of urban park wetlands could help the decision-making on the urban parks optimal planning and designing, improve human living environment, and optimize the spatial distribution of urban landscape. PMID:23189684

  20. Marine Biodiversity & Biotechnology

    E-print Network

    Howie, Jim

    Centre for Marine Biodiversity & Biotechnology No one knows how many species live in the sea Biodiversity & Biotechnology. The CMBB was established in 1999 to tackle the challenges of understanding marine biodiversity, unlock the biotechnological potential of marine organisms and understand how marine life can cope