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1

Sandia National Laboratories  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Sandia National Laboratories has identified technology transfer to U.S. industry as a laboratory mission which complements our national security mission and as a key component of the Laboratory's future. A number of technology transfer mechanisms - such as CRADA's, licenses, work-for-others, and consortia - are identified and specific examples are given. Sandia's experience with the Specialty Metals Processing Consortium is highlighted with a focus on the elements which have made it successful. A brief discussion of Sandia's potential interactions with NASA under the Space Exploration Initiative was included as an example of laboratory-to-NASA technology transfer. Viewgraphs are provided.

Gilliom, Laura R.

1992-01-01

2

Sandia National Laboratories: News Center  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Sandia National Laboratories publishes its quarterly journal of research and development at this Web site. Free to the general public, Sandia Technology summarizes current work related to national security, energy development and infrastructure, and various other advances made at the installation. The fall/ winter 2002 issue centers on sensors for all kinds of purposes. From sensors that monitor water supplies to air-sniffing devices that can detect chemical and biological toxins, Sandia is extremely adept in this area. All back issues of Sandia Technology are also available for browsing, which cover topics such as nuclear power and smart machines.

1999-01-01

3

Sandia National Laboratories embraces ISDN  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia), a multidisciplinary research and development laboratory located on Kirtland Air Force Base, has embraced Integrated Services Digital Network technology as an integral part of its communication network. Sandia and the Department of Energy`s Albuquerque Operations Office have recently completed the installation of a modernized and expanded telephone system based, on the AT&T 5ESS telephone switch. Sandia is committed to ISDN as an integral part of data communication services, and it views ISDN as one part of a continuum of services -- services that range from ISDN`s asynchronous and limited bandwidth Ethernet (250--1000 Kbps) through full bandwidth Ethernet, FDDI, and ATM at Sonet rates. Sandia has demonstrated this commitment through its use of ISDN data features to support critical progmmmatic services such as access to corporate data base systems. In the future, ISDN will provide enhanced voice, data communication, and video services.

Tolendino, L.F.; Eldridge, J.M.

1994-08-01

4

Photometrics at Sandia National Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report highlights Sandia National Laboratories' work in the following areas: photometrics and optical development; still and time-lapse photography; real-time motion photography; high-speed photography; image-motion photography; schlieren photography; ultra-high-speed photography; electronic imaging; shuttered video and high-speed video; infrared imaging radiometry; exoatmospheric photography and videography; microdensitometry and image analysis; and optical system design and development.

J. Y. McWilliams; R. A. Hill; R. L. Hughes

1990-01-01

5

Photometrics at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

This report highlights Sandia National Laboratories' work in the following areas: photometrics and optical development; still and time-lapse photography; real-time motion photography; high-speed photography; image-motion photography; schlieren photography; ultra-high-speed photography; electronic imaging; shuttered video and high-speed video; infrared imaging radiometry; exoatmospheric photography and videography; microdensitometry and image analysis; and optical system design and development.

McWilliams, J.Y.; Hill, R.A.; Hughes, R.L. (eds.)

1990-07-01

6

Electromagnetic test facilities at Sandia National Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper describes major electromagnetic test facilities at Sandia National Laboratories; each has undergone recent upgrades. The paper discusses each facility, their uses, and upgrades pertaining to the facilities performance and diagnostic capabilities. The facilities discussed are the Sandia lightning simulator, the electromagnetic environments simulator (a large TEM cell), the mode-stirred chamber, and the anechoic chamber. Sandia's expertise in electromagnetics

Michele Caldwell; Matthew B. Higgins

2005-01-01

7

Scientific computing practices at Sandia Laboratories, Albuquerque  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sandia Laboratories has major responsibilities in the areas of research and development for nuclear weapons, nuclear material safeguards and security, various energy programs, and nuclear reactor safety. Scientific computing is an indispensible part of the work done in support of these programs. To meet this need, Sandia has developed a large central computing facility. Sandia has taken the position that

R. J. Detry; M. R. Scott

1979-01-01

8

Sandia National Laboratories 2011 LDRD Annual Report Issued by Sandia National Laboratories, operated for the United States  

E-print Network

for the Future of the Labs 15 Sandia FY 20111 Sandia National Laboratories 2011 LDRD Annual Report #12;Issued by Sandia National Laboratories, operated for the United States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE: This report was prepared

9

Mobile robotics research at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Sandia is a National Security Laboratory providing scientific and engineering solutions to meet national needs for both government and industry. As part of this mission, the Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center conducts research and development in robotics and intelligent machine technologies. An overview of Sandia`s mobile robotics research is provided. Recent achievements and future directions in the areas of coordinated mobile manipulation, small smart machines, world modeling, and special application robots are presented.

Morse, W.D.

1998-09-01

10

Sandia National Laboratories Combustion Research Facility  

E-print Network

control & storage system ­ Safety, codes & standards ­ experimental/modeling program #12;Sandia National, Mike Eldrid ­ Optimization software tools for a variety of applications · Susanna Gordon, Larry Brandt Programs ­ Analysis of radiation, nuclear, chemical, biological security issues #12;Sandia National

11

POLLUTION PREVENTION OPPORTUNITY ASSESSMENT - GEOCHEMISTRY LABORATORY AT SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES  

EPA Science Inventory

These reports summarize pollution prevention opportunity assessments conducted jointly by EPA and DOE at the Geochemistry Laboratory and the Manufacturing and Fabrication Repair Laboratory at the Department of Energy's Sandia National Laboratories facility in Albuquerque, New Mex...

12

MEMS packaging efforts at Sandia National Laboratories.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories has programs covering a broad range of MEMS technologies from LIGA to bulk to surface micromachining. These MEMS technologies are being considered for an equally broad range of applications, including sensors, actuators, optics, and microfluidics. As these technologies have moved from the research to the prototype product stage, packaging has been required to develop new capabilities to integrated MEMS and other technologies into functional microsystems. This paper discusses several of Sandia's MEMS packaging efforts, focusing mainly on inserting Sandia's SUMMIT V (5-level polysilicon) surface micromachining technology into fieldable microsystems.

Custer, Jonathan Sloane

2003-02-01

13

Sandia Laboratories rocket program - A review  

Microsoft Academic Search

A historical review of Sandia Laboratories rocket programs is presented. From the 60 rocket systems developed at Sandia since 1957, 1225 rockets have been launched at 19 sites, worldwide. Typical rockets developed for the nuclear readiness test program are the Terrier-Sandhawk sounding rocket (boosts a 91-kg, 33-cm-diam payload to an altitude of 427 km) and the Strypi II warhead carrier

G. A. Fowler; R. C. Maydew; W. R. Barton

1976-01-01

14

Inverter testing at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Inverters are key building blocks of photovoltaic (PV) systems that produce ac power. The balance of systems (BOS) portion of a PV system can account for up to 50% of the system cost, and its reliable operation is essential for a successful PV system. As part of its BOS program, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) maintains a laboratory wherein accurate electrical measurements of power systems can be made under a variety of conditions. This paper outlines the work that is done in that laboratory.

Ginn, J.W.; Bonn, R.H.; Sittler, G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Photovoltaic System Components Dept.

1997-04-01

15

The photovoltics program at Sandia National Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Photovoltaic (PV) Projects at Sandia National Laboratories support the Department of Energy (DOE) National Photovoltaics Program through silicon solar cell research and development, concentrator module research and development, evaluation of cells and modules for both one-sun and concentrator applications development and evaluation of hardware for PV applications, and domestic and international applications identification and verification. In all of these

D. E. Hasti

1992-01-01

16

Packaging test facilities at Sandia National Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many unique facilities exist at Sandia National Laboratories which can be used for completing a range of performance tests on radioactive material packagings or component sections. Both regulatory and extra-regulatory test environments can be simulated. Key factors in the successful utilization of these facilities are the analysis, instrumentation, and support services available and the experience base that has been established

G. C. Allen; D. C. Bickel; F. H. Mathews; N. R. Keltner

1983-01-01

17

Rapid prototyping applications at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

In an effort to reduce the cycle time for producing prototypical mechanical and electro-mechanical components, Sandia National Laboratories has integrated rapid prototyping processes into the design and manufacturing process. The processes currently in operation within the Rapid Prototyping Laboratory are Stereolithography (SL), Selective Laser Sintering (SLS), and Direct Shell Production Casting (DSPC). These emerging technologies have proven to be valuable tools for reducing lead times and fabrication costs. Sandia uses the SL and SLS processes to support internal product development efforts. Their primary use is to fabricate patterns for investment casting in support of a Sandia-managed program called FASTCAST that integrates computational technologies and experimental data into the investment casting process. These processes are also used in the design iteration process to produce proof-of-concept models, hands-on models for design reviews, fit-check models, visual aids for manufacturing, and functional parts in assemblies. The DSPC process is currently being developed as a method of fabricating ceramic investment casting molds directly from a CAD solid model. Sandia is an Alpha machine test site for this process. This presentation will provide an overview of the SL and SLS processes and an update of our experience and success in integrating these technologies into the product development cycle. It will also provide a lead-in for a tour of the Rapid Prototyping Laboratory, where these processes will be demonstrated.

Atwood, C.L.; McCarty, G.D.; Pardo, B.T.; Bryce, E.A.

1994-02-01

18

Sandia National Laboratories: The Truman Fellowship  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Sandia National Laboratories announces the establishment of the President Harry S. Truman Fellowship in National Security Science and Engineering to attract the best nationally recognized new Ph.D. scientists and engineers. Truman Fellowship candidates are expected to have solved a major scientific or engineering problem in their thesis work or will have provided a new approach or insight to a major problem, as evidenced by a recognized impact in their field. Requirements: Eligibility criteria include: U.S. citizenship, the ability to obtain a DOE "Q" clearance; research in areas of interest to national security; the candidate must have been awarded a Ph.D. (minimum 3.5 undergraduate and 3.7 graduate GPA preferred) within the past 3 years at the time of application or will have completed all Ph.D. requirements by commencement of appointment; and, candidates seeking their first national laboratory appointment (pre postdoc internships excluded). Research at Sandia: Sandia National Laboratories is a federally funded research and development organization and contractor for the U.S. Department of Energy. Sandia has research focus areas in advanced computing; information systems and mathematics; bioscience and technology; combustion, chemical, and plasma sciences; engineering sciences; geosciences; intelligent systems and robotics; materials science and technology; microelectronics and microsystems; nanosciences and technology; pulsed power and directed energy; and remote sensing and satellite systems.

19

Characterization of Neutron Test Facilities at Sandia National Laboratories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Sandia Pulsed Reactor (SPR-III) and Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR), with a variety of test environments, have been used for many years at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for radiation effects testing. Dosimetry has played a crucial role in their operation and characterization, and neutron energy spectral determinations have advanced as progress was made in the available nuclear data and spectrum adjustment techniques. This paper presents a historical perspective of the neutron energy spectra for several environments and their impact on several integral parameters of particular interest to facility users.

Vehar, D. W.; Griffin, P. J.; King, D. B.; Depriest, K. R.; Williams, J. G.

2009-08-01

20

Sandia National Laboratories Education Outreach Activities  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy and its national laboratories are a major employer of scientists and engineers and consequently have a strong interest in the development and training of a qualified pool of employment candidates. For many years the DOE and its national laboratories have supported education activities devoted to increasing the number and quality of science and engineering graduates. This is part of the DOE mission because of the critical national need for scientists and engineers and the recognized deficiencies in the education system for science and mathematics training. Though funding support for such activities has waxed and waned, strong education programs have survived in spite of budget pressures. This paper reviews a few of the education programs presently supported at Sandia by the Science and Technology Outreach Department. The US DOE Defense Programs Office and Sandia National Laboratories provide financial support for these education activities.

Dawes, William R. Jr.

1999-08-26

21

Sandia National Laboratories Focus Issue: introduction.  

PubMed

For more than six decades, Sandia has provided the critical science and technology to address the nation's most challenging issues. Our original nuclear weapons mission has been complemented with work in defense systems, energy and climate, as well as international and homeland security. Our vision is to be a premier science and engineering laboratory for technology solutions to the most challenging problems that threaten peace and freedom for our nation and the globe. PMID:25321140

Boye, Robert

2014-08-20

22

Solar activities at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

The use of renewable energy technologies is typically thought of as an integral part of creating and sustaining an environment that maximizes the overall quality of life of the Earth`s present inhabitants and does not leave an undue burden on future generations. Sandia National Laboratories has been a leader in developing and deploying many of these technologies over the last two decades. A common but special aspect of all of these activities is that they are all conducted in cooperation with various types of partners. Some of these partners have an interest in seeing these systems grow in the marketplace, while others are primarily concerned with economic benefits that can come from immediate use of these renewable energy systems. This paper describes solar thermal and photovoltaic technology activities at Sandia that are intended to accelerate the commercialization of these solar systems.

Klimas, P.C.; Hasti, D.E.

1994-03-01

23

Computational geomechanics & applications at Sandia National Laboratories.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is a multi-program national laboratory in the business of national security, whose primary mission is nuclear weapons (NW). It is a prime contractor to the USDOE, operating under the NNSA and is one of the three NW national laboratories. It has a long history of involvement in the area of geomechanics, starting with the some of the earliest weapons tests at Nevada. Projects in which geomechanics support (in general) and computational geomechanics support (in particular) are at the forefront at Sandia, range from those associated with civilian programs to those in the defense programs. SNL has had significant involvement and participation in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (low-level defense nuclear waste), the Yucca Mountain Project (formerly proposed for commercial spent fuel and high-level nuclear waste), and the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (the nation's emergency petroleum store). In addition, numerous industrial partners seek-out our computational/geomechanics expertise, and there are efforts in compressed air and natural gas storage, as well as in CO{sub 2} Sequestration. Likewise, there have also been collaborative past efforts in the areas of compactable reservoir response, the response of salt structures associated with reservoirs, and basin modeling for the Oil & Gas industry. There are also efforts on the defense front, ranging from assessment of vulnerability of infrastructure to defeat of hardened targets, which require an understanding and application of computational geomechanics. Several examples from some of these areas will be described and discussed to give the audience a flavor of the type of work currently being performed at Sandia in the general area of geomechanics.

Arguello, Jose Guadalupe, Jr.

2010-04-01

24

The ATM conversion at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Converting a large, heterogeneous, networked, environment to ATM (Asynchronous Transfer Mode) can yield many benefits. Before these benefits can be reaped, however, numerous decisions must be made and implemented. This paper presents a case study which describes the steps that were necessary to convert a backbone network at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico to ATM. It presents each step by explaining its importance and what options were considered along with their tradeoffs. It is hoped that organizations contemplating converting to ATM will have a better understanding of how the transition is implemented after reading this paper.

Brenkosh, J.P.

1996-08-01

25

Transient dynamics capability at Sandia National Laboratories  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A brief overview of the transient dynamics capabilities at Sandia National Laboratories, with an emphasis on recent new developments and current research is presented. In addition, the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Engineering Analysis Code Access System (SEACAS), which is a collection of structural and thermal codes and utilities used by analysts at SNL, is described. The SEACAS system includes pre- and post-processing codes, analysis codes, database translation codes, support libraries, Unix shell scripts for execution, and an installation system. SEACAS is used at SNL on a daily basis as a production, research, and development system for the engineering analysts and code developers. Over the past year, approximately 190 days of CPU time were used by SEACAS codes on jobs running from a few seconds up to two and one-half days of CPU time. SEACAS is running on several different systems at SNL including Cray Unicos, Hewlett Packard PH-UX, Digital Equipment Ultrix, and Sun SunOS. An overview of SEACAS, including a short description of the codes in the system, are presented. Abstracts and references for the codes are listed at the end of the report.

Attaway, Steven W.; Biffle, Johnny H.; Sjaardema, G. D.; Heinstein, M. W.; Schoof, L. A.

1993-01-01

26

Space robotics programs at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Existing robotic rover and space satellite technologies at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), coupled with existing launch vehicles and converted military Multiple Independent Reentry Vehicle (MIRV) technologies, can be applied towards the realization of a robotic lunar rover mission in the near term. SNL`s Advanced Vehicle Development Department has been designing, producing, and operating prototype rover systems at the Robotic Vehicle Range facility since 1984, and has extensive experience with teleoperated and semiautonomous mobile robotic systems. SNL`s Space Systems Directorate has been designing, producing, and operating satellite systems and subsystems in earth orbit for national security missions since the early 1960`s. The facilities and robotic vehicle fleet at SNL`s Robotic Vehicle Range (SNL-RVR) have been used to support technology base development in applications ranging from DoD battlefield and security missions, to multi-agency nuclear emergency response team exercises and the development of a prototype robotic rover for planetary exploration. Recent activities at the SNL-RVR include the Robotic All Terrain Lunar Exploration Rover (RATLER) prototype development program, exploratory studies on a Near Term Lunar Return Mission scenario for small robotic rovers based on existing space hardware technology, and demonstrations of the utility of existing rover technologies for performing remote field geology tasks similar to those envisioned on a robotic lunar rover mission. Specific technologies demonstrated include low data rate teleoperation, multi-vehicle control, remote site and sample inspection, and standard bandwidth stereo vision. The paper describes Sandia National Laboratories` activities in the Space Robotics area, and highlights the laboratory`s supporting technical capabilities.

Klarer, P.

1993-01-01

27

Nanosatellite program at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

The concept of building extremely small satellites which, either independently or as a collective, can perform missions which are comparable to their much larger cousins, has fascinated scientists and engineers for several years now. In addition to the now commonplace microelectronic integrated circuits, the more recent advent of technologies such as photonic integrated circuits (PIC's) and micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) have placed such a goal within their grasp. Key to the acceptance of this technology will be the ability to manufacture these very small satellites in quantity without sacrificing their performance or versatility. In support of its nuclear treaty verification, proliferation monitoring and other remote sensing missions, Sandia National laboratories has had a 35-year history of providing highly capable systems, densely packaged for unintrusive piggyback missions on government satellites. As monitoring requirements have become more challenging and remote sensing technologies become more sophisticated, packaging greater capability into these systems has become a requirement. Likewise, dwindling budgets are pushing satellite programs toward smaller and smaller platforms, reinforcing the need for smaller, cheaper satellite systems. In the next step of its miniaturization plan, Sandia has begun development of technologies for a highly integrated miniature satellite. The focus of this development is to achieve nanosat or smaller dimensions while maintaining significant capability utilizing semiconductor wafer-level integration and, at the same time promoting affordability through modular generic construction.

Reynolds, D.A.; Kern, J.P.; Schoeneman, J.L.

1999-11-11

28

Space robotics programs at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Existing robotic rover and space satellite technologies at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), coupled with existing launch vehicles and converted military Multiple Independent Reentry Vehicle (MIRV) technologies, can be applied towards the realization of a robotic lunar rover mission in the near term. SNL's Advanced Vehicle Development Department has been designing, producing, and operating prototype rover systems at the Robotic Vehicle Range facility since 1984, and has extensive experience with teleoperated and semiautonomous mobile robotic systems. SNL's Space Systems Directorate has been designing, producing, and operating satellite systems and subsystems in earth orbit for national security missions since the early 1960's. The facilities and robotic vehicle fleet at SNL's Robotic Vehicle Range (SNL-RVR) have been used to support technology base development in applications ranging from DoD battlefield and security missions, to multi-agency nuclear emergency response team exercises and the development of a prototype robotic rover for planetary exploration. Recent activities at the SNL-RVR include the Robotic All Terrain Lunar Exploration Rover (RATLER) prototype development program, exploratory studies on a Near Term Lunar Return Mission scenario for small robotic rovers based on existing space hardware technology, and demonstrations of the utility of existing rover technologies for performing remote field geology tasks similar to those envisioned on a robotic lunar rover mission. Specific technologies demonstrated include low data rate teleoperation, multi-vehicle control, remote site and sample inspection, and standard bandwidth stereo vision. The paper describes Sandia National Laboratories' activities in the Space Robotics area, and highlights the laboratory's supporting technical capabilities.

Klarer, P.

1993-01-01

29

Site environmental report for 2003 Sandia National Laboratories, California.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) is a government-owned/contractor-operated laboratory. Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, operates the laboratory for the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration. The DOE Sandia Site Office oversees operations at the site, using Sandia Corporation as a management and operating contractor. This Site Environmental Report for 2003 was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A. The report provides a summary of environmental monitoring information and compliance activities that occurred at SNL/CA during calendar year 2003. General site and environmental program information is also included.

Larsen, Barbara L.

2004-06-01

30

Site environmental report for 2006 Sandia National Laboratories, California.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) is a government-owned/contractor-operated laboratory. Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, operates the laboratory for the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The NNSA Sandia Site Office oversees operations at the site, using Sandia Corporation as a management and operating contractor. This Site Environmental Report for 2006 was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A (DOE 2004a). The report provides a summary of environmental monitoring information and compliance activities that occurred at SNL/CA during calendar year 2006. General site and environmental program information is also included.

Larsen, Barbara L.

2007-06-01

31

Site environmental report for 2004 Sandia National Laboratories, California.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) is a government-owned/contractor-operated laboratory. Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, operates the laboratory for the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration. The DOE Sandia Site Office oversees operations at the site, using Sandia Corporation as a management and operating contractor. This Site Environmental Report for 2004 was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A. The report provides a summary of environmental monitoring information and compliance activities that occurred at SNL/CA during calendar year 2004. General site and environmental program information is also included.

Larsen, Barbara L. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA)

2005-06-01

32

Site environmental report for 2005 Sandia National Laboratories, California.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) is a government-owned/contractor-operated laboratory. Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, operates the laboratory for the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The DOE/NNSA Sandia Site Office (SSO) oversees operations at the site, using Sandia Corporation as a management and operating contractor. This Site Environmental Report for 2005 was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A. The report provides a summary of environmental monitoring information and compliance activities that occurred at SNL/CA during calendar year 2005. General site and environmental program information is also included.

Larsen, Barbara L.

2006-06-01

33

Overview of Sandia National Laboratories and Antenna Development Department  

SciTech Connect

Sandia is a multiprogram R & D laboratory. It has responsibilities in the following areas: (1) defense programs; (2) energy and environment; and (3) work for others (DOD, NSA, etc.). In 1989, the National Competitiveness Technology Transfer Act added another responsibility -- contributions to industrial competitiveness. Sandia has two major laboratory locations, New Mexico and California, and two flight testing locations, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada and Kauai Test Facility, Hawaii. The last part of this talk was dedicated to antenna research at Sandia.

Brock, B.C.

1994-04-01

34

Sandia National Laboratory High School Internship  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The High School Internship Program at Sandia National Laboratories has a wide variety of challenging and rewarding learning experiences for our nations future engineers, scientists, technologists, and business leaders. This program will provide a year-round opportunity to work with people who are global leaders in their fields. Are you interested in continuing your education and obtaining a science, math, engineering, or business degree? Would you like to see how classroom theory applies in a work environment? If the answer is yes, an exceptional educational experience awaits you. To take advantage of this opportunity, you must... Be attending a local high school in the Albuquerque metropolitan area (Pre-college program for local students only) Be at least 16 years of age Maintain a minimum cumulative 3.2 GPA for technical and business assignments, or a minimum 2.5 GPA for clerical or laborer assignments

35

History of Sandia National Laboratories` auxiliary closure mechanisms  

SciTech Connect

An essential component of a horizontal, underground nuclear test setup at the Nevada Test Site is the auxiliary closure system. The massive gates that slam shut immediately after a device has been detonated allow the prompt radiation to pass, but block debris and hot gases from continuing down the tunnel. Thus, the gates protect experiments located in the horizontal line-of-sight steel pipe. Sandia National Laboratories has been the major designer and developer of these closure systems. This report records the history of SNL`s participation in and contributions to the technology of auxiliary closure systems used in horizontal tunnel tests in the underground test program.

Weydert, J.C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ponder, G.M. [Geo-Centers, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-12-01

36

DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: IN SITU ELECTROKINETIC EXTRACTION SYSTEM - SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES  

EPA Science Inventory

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has developed an in situ soil remediation system that uses electrokinetic principles to remediate hexavalent chromium-contaminated unsaturated or partially saturated soils. The technology involves the in situ application of direct current to the...

37

Partnering with Sandia National Laboratories through alliances or consortia  

SciTech Connect

To better facilitate working with industry, groups of industrial participants, and partners in alliances or consortia, Sandia National Laboratories presents information helpful to those outside groups as to the forms of arrangements that may be used to better facilitate partnering relationships between Sandia National Laboratories and consortia or alliances of outside parties. It is expected that these alliances and consortia will include both large and small for-profit industrial concerns, as well as not-for-profit entities such as universities, institutes, other research facilities, and other nonprofit institutions or consortia containing institutions. The intent of this report is to provide such outside groups with information that will facilitate rapid interactions with Sandia National Laboratories through some of these forms of business which will be discussed in this report. These are not the only approaches to facilitating business interactions with Sandia National Laboratories and it is not intended that this report be legal advice or required approaches to doing business with Sandia National Laboratories. The intent of this report is merely to suggest ways in which Sandia National Laboratories can work with outside parties in the most expeditious manner.

Winchell, B.M.

1994-12-01

38

Partnering with Sandia National Laboratories through alliances or consortia  

SciTech Connect

To better facilitate working with industry, groups of industrial participants, and partners in alliances or consortia, Sandia National laboratories presents information helpful to those outside groups as to the forms of arrangements that may be used to better facilitate partnering relationships between Sandia National Laboratories and consortia or alliances of outside parties. It is expected that these alliances and consortia will include both large and small for-profit industrial concerns, as well as not-for-profit entities such as universities, institutes, other research facilities, and other nonprofit institutions or consortia containing institutions. The intent of this report is to provide such outside groups with information that will facilitate rapid interactions with Sandia National Laboratories through some of these forms of business which will be discussed in this report. These are not the only approaches to facilitating business interactions with Sandia National Laboratories and it is not intended that this report be legal advice or required approaches to doing business with Sandia National Laboratories. The intent of this report is merely to suggest ways in which Sandia National Laboratories can work with outside parties in the most expeditious manner.

Winchell, B.M.

1994-04-01

39

1987 environmental monitoring report, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Labortories conduct various research activities related to Department of Energy interests which have the potential for release of hazardous materials or radionuclides to the environment. A strict environmental control program places maximum emphasis on limiting releases. The environmental monitoring program conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and augmented by Sandia is designed to measure the performance of the environmental controls. The program includes analysis of air, water, soil, vegetation, sewer effluent, ground water, and foodstuffs for various toxic, hazardous, or radioactive materials. Based on these studies, the releases of materials of concern at Sandia during 1987 were well below applicable Department of Energy standards. 8 refs., 3 figs., 12 tabs.

Devlin, T.K.

1988-04-01

40

Vibration control for precision manufacturing at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories performs R and D in structural dynamics and vibration suppression for precision applications in weapon systems, space, underwater, transportation and civil structures. Over the last decade these efforts have expanded into the areas of active vibration control and ``smart`` structures and material systems. In addition, Sandia has focused major resources towards technology to support weapon product development and agile manufacturing capability for defense and industrial applications. This paper will briefly describe the structural dynamics modeling and verification process currently in place at Sandia that supports vibration control and some specific applications of these techniques to manufacturing in the areas of lithography, machine tools and flexible robotics.

Hinnerichs, T.; Martinez, D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Structural Dynamics and Vibration Control Dept.

1995-04-01

41

Sandia National Laboratories participation in the National Ignition Facility project  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility is a $1.1B DOE Defense Programs Inertial Confinement Fusion facility supporting the Science Based Stockpile Stewardship Program. The goal of the facility is to achieve fusion ignition and modest gain in the laboratory. The NIF project is responsible for the design and construction of the 192 beam, 1.8 MJ laser necessary to meet that goal. - The project is a National project with participation by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratory (SNL), the University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics (URLLE) and numerous industrial partners. The project is centered at LLNL which has extensive expertise in large solid state lasers. The other partners in the project have negotiated their participation based on the specific expertise they can bring to the project. In some cases, this negotiation resulted in the overall responsibility for a WBS element; in other cases, the participating laboratories have placed individuals in the project in areas that need their individual expertise. The main areas of Sandia`s participation are in the management of the conventional facility design and construction, the design of the power conditioning system, the target chamber system, target diagnostic instruments, data acquisition system and several smaller efforts in the areas of system integration and engineering analysis. Sandia is also contributing to the technology development necessary to support the project by developing the power conditioning system and several target diagnostics, exploring alternate target designs, and by conducting target experiments involving the ``foot`` region of the NIF power pulse. The project has just passed the mid-point of the Title I (preliminary) design phase. This paper will summarize Sandia`s role in supporting the National Ignition Facility and discuss the areas in which Sandia is contributing. 3 figs.

Boyes, J.; Boyer, W.; Chael, J.; Cook, D.; Cook, W.; Downey, T.; Hands, J.; Harjes, C.; Leeper, R.; McKay, P.; Micano, P.; Olson, R.; Porter, J.; Quintenz, J.; Roberts, V.; Savage, M.; Simpson, W.; Seth, A.; Smith, R.; Wavrik, M.; Wilson, M.

1996-08-01

42

1993 Site environmental report Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

This 1993 report contains monitoring data from routine radiological and nonradiological environmental surveillance activities. Summaries of significant environmental compliance programs in progress, such as National Environmental Policy Act documentation, environmental permits, environmental restoration, and various waste management programs for Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, are included. The maximum offsite dose impact was calculated to be 0.0016 millirem. The total population within a 50-mile (80 kilometer) radius of Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico received an estimated collective dose of 0.027 person-rem during 1993 from the laboratories operations, As in the previous year, the 1993 operations at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico had no discernible impact on the general public or on the environment. This report is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy in compliance with DOE Order 5400.1.

Culp, T.A.; Cheng, C.F.; Cox, W.; Durand, N.; Irwin, M.; Jones, A.; Lauffer, F.; Lincoln, M.; McClellan, Y.; Molley, K. [and others] [and others

1994-11-01

43

1992 Environmental monitoring report, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

This 1992 report contains monitoring data from routine radiological and nonradiological environmental surveillance activities. summaries of significant environmental compliance programs in progress, such as National Environmental Policy Act documentation, environmental permits, envirorunental restoration, and various waste management programs for Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, are included. The maximum offsite dose impact was calculated to be 0.0034 millirem. The total population within a 50-mile radius of Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico received an estimated collective dose of 0.019 person-rem during 1992 from the laboratories` operations. As in the previous year, the 1992 operations at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico had no discernible impact on the general public or on the environment.

Culp, T.; Cox, W.; Hwang, H.; Irwin, M.; Jones, A.; Matz, B.; Molley, K.; Rhodes, W.; Stermer, D.; Wolff, T.

1993-09-01

44

POLLUTION PREVENTION OPPORTUNITY ASSESSMENT - MANUFACTURING AND FABRICATION REPAIR LABORATORY AT SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES  

EPA Science Inventory

These reports summarize pollution prevention opportunity assessments conducted jointly by EPA and DOE at the Geochemistry Laboratory and the Manufacturing and Fabrication Repair Laboratory at the Department of Energy's Sandia National Laboratories facility in Albuquerque, New Mex...

45

Sandia National Laboratories Institutional Plan: FY 1999-2004  

SciTech Connect

This Institutional Plan is the most comprehensive yearly "snapshot" available of Sandia National Laboratories' major programs, facilities, human resources, and budget. The document also includes overviews of our missions, organization, capabilities, planning functions, milestones, and accomplishments. The document's purpose is to provide the above information to the US Department of Energy, key congressional committees, Sandia management, and other present and potential customers. Chapter 2 presents information about Sandia's mission and summarizes our recent revision of Sandia's Strategic Plan. Chapter 3 presents an overview of Sandia's strategic objectives, chapter 4 lists laboratory goals and milestones for FY 1999, and chapter 5 presents our accomplishments during FY 1998. Chapters 3 through 5 are organized around our eight strategic objectives. The four primary objectives cover nuclear weapons responsibilities, nonproliferation and materials control, energy and critical infrastructures, and emerging national security threats. The major programmatic initiatives are presented in chapter 7. However, the programmatic descriptions in chapter 6 and the Associated funding tables in chapter 9 continue to be presented by DOE Budget and Reporting Code, as in previous Sandia institutional plans. As an aid to the reader, the four primary strategic objectives in chapter 3 are cross-referenced to the program information in chapter 6.

Garber, D.P.

1999-01-06

46

Sandia National Laboratories corporate mentor program : program review, May 2004.  

SciTech Connect

The Sandia National Laboratories Corporate Mentor Program provides a mechanism for the development and retention of Sandia's people and knowledge. The relationships formed among staff members at different stages in their careers offer benefits to all. These relationships can provide experienced employees with new ideas and insight and give less experienced employees knowledge of Sandia's culture, strategies, and programmatic direction. The program volunteer coordinators are dedicated to the satisfaction of the participants, who come from every area of Sandia. Since its inception in 1995, the program has sustained steady growth and excellent customer satisfaction. This report summarizes the accomplishments, activities, enhancements, and evaluation data for the Corporate Mentor Program for the 2003/2004 program year ending May 1, 2004.

Tibbetts, Tiffany; Tarro, Talitha; Dudeck, William; Bristol, Colette; Stephens, Jim

2005-01-01

47

Sandia National Laboratories/California site environmental report for 1997  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is committed to conducting its operations in an environmentally safe and sound manner. It is mandatory that activities at SNL/California comply with all applicable environmental statutes, regulations, and standards. Moreover, SNL/California continuously strives to reduce risks to employees, the public, and the environment to the lowest levels reasonably possible. To help verify effective protection of public safety and preservation of the environment, SNL/California maintains an extensive, ongoing environmental monitoring program. This program monitors all significant effluents and the environment at the SNL/California site perimeter. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) performs off-site external radiation monitoring for both sites. These monitoring efforts ensure that emission controls are effective in preventing contamination of the environment. As part of SNL/California`s Environmental Monitoring Program, an environmental surveillance system measures the possible presence of hazardous materials in groundwater, stormwater, and sewage. The program also includes an extensive environmental dosimetry program, which measures external radiation levels around the Livermore site and nearby vicinity. The Site Environmental Report describes the results of SNL/California`s environmental protection activities during the calendar year. It also summarizes environmental monitoring data and highlights major environmental programs. Overall, it evaluates SNL/California`s environmental management performance and documents the site`s regulatory compliance status.

Condouris, R.A. [ed.] [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Holland, R.C. [Science Applications International Corp. (United States)

1998-06-01

48

Sandia National Laboratories Institutional Plan FY1994--1999  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a five year plan for the laboratory. This plan takes advantage of the technical strengths of the lab and its staff to address issues of concern to the nation on a scope much broader than Sandia`s original mission, while maintaining the general integrity of the laboratory. The plan proposes initiatives in a number of technologies which overlap the needs of its customers and the strengths of its staff. They include: advanced manufacturing technology; electronics; information and computational technology; transportation energy technology and infrastructure; environmental technology; energy research and technology development; biomedical systems engineering; and post-cold war defense imperatives.

Not Available

1993-10-01

49

1995 Site environmental report Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

This 1995 report contains data from routine radiological and non-radiological environmental monitoring activities. Summaries of significant environmental compliance programs in progress, such as National Environmental Policy Act documentation, environmental permits, environmental restoration and various waste management programs at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, are included.

Shyr, L.J.; Duncan, D. [eds.] [eds.; Sanchez, R.

1996-09-01

50

The integrated water conservation program at Sandia National Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), located on Kirkland Air Force Base (KAFB) in Albuquerque, NM, is implementing a comprehensive water conservation program. Because the average rainfall in this metropolitan area of 500,000 is approximately 8 inches per year, conservation of this precious resource is critical to the economic health of the city and state, and the continued operations at SNL\\/NM. To

1997-01-01

51

Successful Waste Treatment Methods at Sandia National Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

During the remediation of the waste landfills at Sandia National Laboratory in Albuquerque, New Mexico nine drums of mock high explosives were generated. This mixed waste stream was proposed to several offsite vendors for treatment and prices ranged from $2.50 to $10 per gram a total cost estimated to be in excess of $2 million dollars. This cost represents more

D. M. Rast; J. J. Thompson; T. W. Cooper; D. J Stockham

2007-01-01

52

A Tour of Nanoscience Research at Sandia National Laboratories  

E-print Network

, Journal of Applied Physics, Applied Physics Reviews, and Journal of Materials Research and has published Laboratories, she came to Sandia in 1995. Dr. Phillips holds a Ph.D. in applied physics from Yale University Association for the Advancement of Science. She has served on the editorial boards of Applied Physics Letters

Fisher, Frank

53

Sandia National Laboratories, California Environmental Management System program manual.  

SciTech Connect

The Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Environmental Management System (EMS) Program Manual documents the elements of the site EMS Program. The SNL/CA EMS Program conforms to the International Standard on Environmental Management Systems, ISO 14001:2004 and Department of Energy (DOE) Order 436.1.

Larsen, Barbara L.

2013-04-01

54

An Organizational Cultural Assessment of Sandia National Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

An Organizational Cultural Assessment (OCA) was performed at the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) by administering an Organizational Culture Survey (OCS) that queried employees on the subjects of organizational culture, various aspects of communications, employee commitment, work group cohesion, coordination of work, environmental concerns, hazardous nature of work, safety and overall job satisfaction. Many of these subjects are assessed in the

S. B. Haber; D. A. Crouch

1991-01-01

55

Flat panel display development activities at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

The flat panel display development activities underway at Sandia National Laboratories are described. Research is being conducted in the areas of glass substrates, phosphors, large area processes, and electron emissions. Projects are focused on improving process yield, developing large area processes, and using modeling techniques to predict design performance.

DiBello, E.G.; Worobey, W.; Burchett, S.; Hareland, W.; Felter, T.; Mays, B.

1994-12-31

56

PDC (polycrystalline diamond compact) bit research at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

From the beginning of the geothermal development program, Sandia has performed and supported research into polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) bits. These bits are attractive because they are intrinsically efficient in their cutting action (shearing, rather than crushing) and they have no moving parts (eliminating the problems of high-temperature lubricants, bearings, and seals.) This report is a summary description of the analytical and experimental work done by Sandia and our contractors. It describes analysis and laboratory tests of individual cutters and complete bits, as well as full-scale field tests of prototype and commercial bits. The report includes a bibliography of documents giving more detailed information on these topics. 26 refs.

Finger, J.T.; Glowka, D.A.

1989-06-01

57

Site environmental report for 2009 : Sandia National Laboratories, California.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) is a government-owned/contractor-operated laboratory. Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, operates the laboratory for the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The NNSA Sandia Site Office oversees operations at the site, using Sandia Corporation as a management and operating contractor. This Site Environmental Report for 2009 was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A (DOE 2004a). The report provides a summary of environmental monitoring information and compliance activities that occurred at SNL/CA during calendar year 2009. General site and environmental program information is also included. The Site Environmental Report is divided into ten chapters. Chapter 1, the Executive Summary, highlights compliance and monitoring results obtained in 2009. Chapter 2 provides a brief introduction to SNL/CA and the existing environment found on site. Chapter 3 summarizes SNL/CA's compliance activities with the major environmental requirements applicable to site operations. Chapter 4 presents information on environmental management, performance measures, and environmental programs. Chapter 5 presents the results of monitoring and surveillance activities in 2009. Chapter 6 discusses quality assurance. Chapters 7 through 9 provide supporting information for the report and Chapter 10 is the report distribution list.

Larsen, Barbara L.

2010-06-01

58

76 FR 70456 - Decision To Evaluate a Petition To Designate a Class of Employees From Sandia National Laboratory...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Class of Employees From Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque, NM, To Be...class of employees from Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque, New Mexico...follows: Facility: Sandia National Laboratory. Location:...

2011-11-14

59

Dual-benefit technologies at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

What does the pulp and paper industry have in common with the desert southwest and nuclear weapons? As a representative of one of the Nations three nuclear weapons design laboratories (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories), my goal is to identify ``dual-benefit`` technologies where codevelopment will both strengthen the nation`s competitive position and enhance national security. In development of this presentation, I found more common elements than I could possibly survey in this brief period.

Schaefer, D.W.

1993-12-31

60

1994 Site Environmental Report Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

This 1994 report contains data from routine radiological and nonradiological environmental monitoring activities. Summaries of significant environmental compliance programs in progress, such as National Environmental Policy Act documentation, environmental permits, environmental restoration, and various waste management programs for Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, are included. The maximum off-site dose impact from air emissions was calculated to be 1.5 x 10{sup -4} millirem. The total population within a 50-mile radius of Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico received an estimated collective dose of 0.012 person-rem during 1994 from the laboratories` operations. This report is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy in compliance with DOE Order 5400.1.

Shyr, L.J.; Wiggins, T.; White, B.B. [eds.] [and others

1995-09-01

61

Airbags to Martian Landers: Analyses at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

A new direction for the national laboratories is to assist US business with research and development, primarily through cooperative research and development agreements (CRADAs). Technology transfer to the private sector has been very successful as over 200 CRADAs are in place at Sandia. Because of these cooperative efforts, technology has evolved into some new areas not commonly associated with the former mission of the national laboratories. An example of this is the analysis of fabric structures. Explicit analyses and expertise in constructing parachutes led to the development of a next generation automobile airbag; which led to the construction, testing, and analysis of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Mars Environmental Survey Lander; and finally led to the development of CAD based custom garment designs using 3D scanned images of the human body. The structural analysis of these fabric structures is described as well as a more traditional example Sandia with the test/analysis correlation of the impact of a weapon container.

Gwinn, K.W.

1994-03-01

62

Sandia National Laboratories Combustion Research Facility  

E-print Network

-turbine · Renewable sources -- Photovoltaic, wind turbine, biomass gasification · Vehicle refueling Deliverable · Tool) · High-pressure storage vessel · Electrolyzer · Photovoltaic Solar Collector Module descriptions: · Steam Solar Collector · Model for average solar radiation · Flux is analytic function of longitude, latitude

63

Sandia National Laboratories, California proposed CREATE facility environmental baseline survey.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories, Environmental Programs completed an environmental baseline survey (EBS) of 12.6 acres located at Sandia National Laboratories/California (SNL/CA) in support of the proposed Collaboration in Research and Engineering for Advanced Technology and Education (CREATE) Facility. The survey area is comprised of several parcels of land within SNL/CA, County of Alameda, California. The survey area is located within T 3S, R 2E, Section 13. The purpose of this EBS is to document the nature, magnitude, and extent of any environmental contamination of the property; identify potential environmental contamination liabilities associated with the property; develop sufficient information to assess the health and safety risks; and ensure adequate protection for human health and the environment related to a specific property.

Catechis, Christopher Spyros

2013-10-01

64

Dual benefit robotics programs at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories has one of the largest integrated robotics laboratories in the United States. Projects include research, development, and application of one-of-a-kind systems, primarily for the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. This work has been underway for more than 10 years. It began with on-site activities that required remote operation, such as reactor and nuclear waste handling. Special purpose robot systems were developed using existing commercial manipulators and fixtures and programs designed in-house. These systems were used in applications such as servicing the Sandia pulsed reactor and inspecting remote roof bolts in an underground radioactive waste disposal facility. In the beginning, robotics was a small effort, but with increasing attention to the use of robots for hazardous operations, efforts now involve a staff of more than 100 people working in a broad robotics research, development, and applications program that has access to more than 30 robotics systems.

Jones, A.T.

1994-09-01

65

Sandia National Laboratories, California Environmental Management System Program Manual.  

SciTech Connect

The Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Environmental Management System (EMS) Program Manual documents the elements of the site EMS Program. The SNL/CA EMS Program conforms to the International Standard on Environmental Management Systems, ISO 14001:2004and Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1. Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) has maintained functional environmental programs to assist with regulatory compliance for more than 30 years. During 2005, these existing programs were rolled into a formal environmental management system (EMS) that expands beyond the traditional compliance focus to managing and improving environmental performance and stewardship practices for all site activities. An EMS is a set of inter-related elements that represent a continuing cycle of planning, implementing, evaluating, and improving processes and actions undertaken to achieve environmental policy and goals. The SNL/CA EMS Program conforms to the International Standard for Environmental Management Systems, ISO 14001:2004 (ISO 2004). The site received ISO 14001 certification in September 2006. SNL/CA's EMS Program is applicable to the Sandia, Livermore site only. Although SNL/CA operates as one organizational division of the overall Sandia National Laboratories, the EMS Program is site-specific, with site-specific objectives and targets. SNL/CA (Division 8000) benefits from the organizational structure as it provides corporate level policies, procedures, and standards, and established processes that connect to and support elements of the SNL/CA EMS Program. Additionally, SNL/CA's EMS Program benefits from two corporate functional programs (Facilities Energy Management and Fleet Services programs) that maintain responsibility for energy management and fleet services for all Sandia locations. Each EMS element is further enhanced with site-specific processes and standards. Division 8000 has several groups operating at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM). Although these groups, from an organizational perspective, are part of Division 8000, they are managed locally and fall under the environmental requirements specific to their New Mexico location. The New Mexico groups in Division 8000 follow the corporate EMS Program for New Mexico operations.

Larsen, Barbara L.

2011-04-01

66

Sandia National Laboratories, California Environmental Management System program manual.  

SciTech Connect

The Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Environmental Management System (EMS) Program Manual documents the elements of the site EMS Program. The SNL/CA EMS Program conforms to the International Standard on Environmental Management Systems, ISO 14001:2004and Department of Energy (DOE) Order 436.1. Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) has maintained functional environmental programs to assist with regulatory compliance for more than 30 years. During 2005, these existing programs were rolled into a formal environmental management system (EMS) that expands beyond the traditional compliance focus to managing and improving environmental performance and stewardship practices for all site activities. An EMS is a set of inter-related elements that represent a continuing cycle of planning, implementing, evaluating, and improving processes and actions undertaken to achieve environmental policy and goals. The SNL/CA EMS Program conforms to the International Standard for Environmental Management Systems, ISO 14001:2004 (ISO 2004). The site first received ISO 14001 certification in September 2006 and recertification in 2009. SNL/CA's EMS Program is applicable to the Sandia, Livermore site only. Although SNL/CA operates as one organizational division of the overall Sandia National Laboratories, the EMS Program is site-specific, with site-specific objectives and targets. SNL/CA (Division 8000) benefits from the organizational structure as it provides corporate level policies, procedures, and standards, and established processes that connect to and support elements of the SNL/CA EMS Program. Additionally, SNL/CA's EMS Program benefits from two corporate functional programs (Facilities Energy and Water Resource Management and Fleet Services programs) that maintain responsibility for energy management and fleet services for all Sandia locations. Each EMS element is further enhanced with site-specific processes and standards. Division 8000 has several groups operating at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM). Although these groups, from an organizational perspective, are part of Division 8000, they are managed locally and fall under the environmental requirements specific to their New Mexico location. The New Mexico groups in Division 8000 follow the corporate EMS Program for New Mexico operations.

Larsen, Barbara L.

2012-03-01

67

Sandia National Laboratories, California Hazardous Materials Management Program annual report.  

SciTech Connect

The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Hazardous Materials Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. This program annual report describes the activities undertaken during the calender past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Hazardous Materials Management Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

Brynildson, Mark E.

2011-02-01

68

Site Environmental Report for 2010 Sandia National Laboratories, California.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) is a government-owned/contractor-operated laboratory. Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, manages and operates the laboratory for the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The NNSA Sandia Site Office administers the contract and oversees contractor operations at the site. This Site Environmental Report for 2010 was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A (DOE 2004a). The report provides a summary of environmental monitoring information and compliance activities that occurred at SNL/CA during calendar year 2010. General site and environmental program information is also included. The Site Environmental Report is divided into ten chapters. Chapter 1, the Executive Summary, highlights compliance and monitoring results obtained in 2010. Chapter 2 provides a brief introduction to SNL/CA and the existing environment found on site. Chapter 3 summarizes SNL/CA's compliance activities with the major environmental requirements applicable to site operations. Chapter 4 presents information on environmental management, performance measures, and environmental programs. Chapter 5 presents the results of monitoring and surveillance activities in 2010. Chapter 6 discusses quality assurance. Chapters 7 through 9 provide supporting information for the report and Chapter 10 is the report distribution list.

Larsen, Barbara L.

2011-06-01

69

Since 1949, Sandia National Laboratories has developed science-based technologies that  

E-print Network

Since 1949, Sandia National Laboratories has developed science-based technologies that support of major Sandia projects involving areas such as nuclear weapons and power, renewable energy, intelligent machines, robotics, pulsed power, missile defense, field testing, remote sensing, advanced manufacturing

70

Tiger Team assessment of the Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the Tiger Team Assessment of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Albuquerque, located in Albuquerque, New Mexico. SNL, Albuquerque, is operated by the Sandia Corporation (a wholly owned subsidiary of the American Telephone and Telegraph Company) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The environmental assessment also included DOE tenant facilities at Ross Aviation, Albuquerque Microelectronics Operation, and the Central Training Academy. The assessment was conducted from April 15 to May 24, 1991, under the auspices of DOE's Office of Special Projects under the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health (ES H). The assessment was comprehensive, encompassing ES H disciplines, management, self-assessments, and quality assurance; transportation; and waste management operations. Compliance with applicable federal, state, and local regulations; applicable DOE Orders; best management practices; and internal SNL, Albuquerque, requirements were assessed. In addition, an evaluation of the adequacy and effectiveness of DOE and SNL, Albuquerque management of ES H programs was conducted.

Not Available

1991-05-01

71

NDE activities and technology transfer at Sandia National Laboratories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The NDE, Photometrics, and Optical Data Reduction Department at Sandia National Laboratories in New Mexico provides nondestructive evaluation (NDE) support for all phases of research and development at Sandia. Present facilities and personnel provide radiography, acoustic monitoring, ultrasonic scanning, computed tomography, shearography/ESPI, infrared imaging, high speed and ultra-high speed photometrics, and image processing. Although the department includes photometrics and optical data reduction as well as NDE, I will refer to the NDE department from now on for simplicity. The NDE department has worked on technology transfer to organizations inside and outside the weapons complex. This work has been performed in all the Sandia business sectors: defense programs, energy and environment, and work for others. The technology transfer has been in the form of testing for product improvement such as validation of aircraft inspection equipment, consultation such as detecting lathe bearing slip for a major machine tool manufacturer, and products such as an acoustic sand detector for the oil and gas industry.

Shurtleff, W. W.

1993-11-01

72

Parallel solid mechanics codes at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Computational physicists at Sandia National Laboratories have moved their production codes to distributed memory parallel computers. The codes include the multi-material CTH Eulerian code, structural mechanics code. This presentation discusses our experiences moving the codes to parallel computers and experiences running the codes. Moving large production codes onto parallel computers require developing parallel algorithms, parallel data bases and parallel support tools. We rewrote the Eulerian CTH code for parallel computers. We were able to move both ALEGRA and PRONTO to parallel computers with only a modest number of modifications. We restructured the restart and graphics data bases to make them parallel and minimize the I/O to the parallel computer. We developed mesh decomposition tools to divide a rectangular or arbitrary connectivity mesh into sub-meshes. The sub-meshes map to processors and minimize the communication between processors. We developed new visualization tools to process the very large, parallel data bases. This presentation also discusses our experiences running these codes on Sandia`s 1840 compute node Intel Paragon, 1024 processor nCUBE and networked workstations. The parallel version of CTH uses the Paragon and nCUBE for production calculations. The ALEGRA and PRONTO codes are moving off networked workstations onto the Paragon and nCUBE massively parallel computers.

McGlaun, M.

1994-08-01

73

Coupled explosive/structure computational techniques at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Simulation of the effects of explosives on structures is a challenge because the explosive response can best be simulated using Eulerian computational techniques and structural behavior is best modeled using Lagrangian methods. Due to the different methodology of the two computational techniques and code architecture requirements, they are usually implemented in different computer programs. Explosive and structure modeling in two different codes make it difficult or next to impossible to do coupled explosive/structure interaction simulations. Sandia National Laboratories has developed two techniques for solving this problem. The first is called Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH), a relatively new gridless method comparable to Eulerian, that is especially suited for treating liquids and gases such as those produced by an explosive. The SPH capability has been fully implemented into the transient dynamics finite element (Lagrangian) codes PRONTO-2D and -3D. A PRONTO-3D/SPH simulation of the effect of a blast on a protective-wall barrier is presented in this paper. The second technique employed at Sandia uses a new code called Zapotec that combines the 3-D Eulerian code CTH and the Lagrangian code PRONTO-3D with minimal changes to either code. CTH and PRONTO-3D are currently executing on the Sandia Terraflops machine (9000 Pentium Pro processors). Eulerian simulations with 100 million cells have been completed on the current configuration of the machine (4500 Pentium Pro processors). The CTH and PRONTO-3D combination will soon be executing in a coupled fashion on this machine.

Preece, D.S.; Attaway, S.W.; Swegle, J.W. [and others

1997-06-01

74

Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, Environmental Baseline Update  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL) Environmental Baseline Update is to provide the background information necessary for SNL personnel and contractors to prepare clear and concise NEPA documentation. The scope of the Environmental Baseline Update is to provide comprehensive data needed to support a description of the affected environment at the SNL facility. The ``description of the affected environment,`` required by the CEQ regulations in 40 CFR 1502.15, is an essential prerequisite for assessing the environmental consequences (1502.16) of a proposed action (project) to be implemented by SNL.

Not Available

1993-01-01

75

Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, Environmental Baseline Update  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL) Environmental Baseline Update is to provide the background information necessary for SNL personnel and contractors to prepare clear and concise NEPA documentation. The scope of the Environmental Baseline Update is to provide comprehensive data needed to support a description of the affected environment at the SNL facility. The description of the affected environment,'' required by the CEQ regulations in 40 CFR 1502.15, is an essential prerequisite for assessing the environmental consequences (1502.16) of a proposed action (project) to be implemented by SNL.

Not Available

1993-01-01

76

Progress in Z-Pinch driven dynamic-hohlraums for high-temperature radiation-flow and ICF experiments at Sandia National Laboratories.  

SciTech Connect

Progress in understanding the physics of dynamic-hohlraums is reviewed for a system capable of generating 13 TW of axial radiation for high temperature (>200 eV) radiation-flow experiments and ICF capsule implosions.

Bailey, James E.; Haines, Malcolm G. (Imperial College, London, United Kingdom); Chandler, Gordon Andrew; Bliss, David Emery; Olson, Richard Edward; Sanford, Thomas W. L.; Olson, Craig Lee; Nash, Thomas J.; Ruiz, Carlos L.; Matzen, Maurice Keith; Idzorek, George C. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Stygar, William A.; Apruzese, John P. (Naval Research Laboratory, Washington DC); Cuneo, Michael Edward; Cooper, Gary Wayne (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Chittenden, Jeremy Paul (Imperial College, London, United Kingdom); Chrien, Robert E. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Slutz, Stephen A.; Mock, Raymond Cecil; Leeper, Ramon Joe; Sarkisov, Gennady Sergeevich (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Peterson, Darrell L. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Lemke, Raymond William; Mehlhorn, Thomas Alan; Roderick, Norman Frederick (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Watt, Robert G. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New MM)

2004-06-01

77

Progress in z-pinch driven dynamic-hohlraums for high-temperature radiation-flow and ICF experiments at Sandia National Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

Progress in understanding the physics of dynamic-hohlraums is reviewed for a system capable of generating 13 TW of axial radiation for high temperature (>200 eV) radiation-flow experiments and ICF capsule implosions.

T W L Sanford; T J Nash; R E Olson; David Emery Bliss; R W Lemke; C L Olson; C L Ruiz; R C Mock; J E Bailey; G A Chandler; M E Cuneo; R J Leeper; M K Matzen; T A Mehlhorn; S A Slutz; W A Stygar; D L Peterson; R E Chrien; R G Watt; N F Roderick; G W Cooper; J P Apruzese; G S Sarkisov; J P Chittenden; M G Haines

2004-01-01

78

Isotopic power supplies for space and terrestrial systems: quality assurance by Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

The Sandia National Laboratories participation in Quality Assurance (QA) programs for Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generators which have been used in space and terrestrial systems over the past 15 years is summarized. Basic elements of the program are briefly described and recognition of assistance from other Sandia organizations is included. Descriptions of the various systems for which Sandia has had the QA responsibility are also presented. In addition, the outlook for Sandia participation in RTG programs for the next several years is noted.

Hannigan, R.L.; Harnar, R.R.

1981-09-01

79

Certain irregularities in the use of computer facilities at Sandia Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This report concerns irregularities in the use of computer systems at Sandia Laboratories (Sandia) in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Our interest in this subject was triggered when we learned late last year that the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) was planning to undertake an investigation into possible misuse of the computer systems at Sandia. That investigation, which was carried out with the assistance of our staff, disclosed that an employee of Sandia was apparently using the Sandia computer system to assist in running a bookmaking operation for local gamblers. As a result of that investigation, we decided to conduct a separate review of Sandia's computer systems to determine the extent of computer misuse at Sandia. We found that over 200 employees of Sandia had stored games, personal items, classified material, and otherwise sensitive material on their computer files.

Not Available

1980-10-22

80

Prototype dish testing and analysis at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

During the past year, Sandia National Laboratories performed on-sun testing of several dish concentrator concepts. These tests were undertaken at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF). Two of the tests were performed in support of the DOE Concentrator Receiver Development Program. The first was on-sun testing of the single-element stretched-membrane dish; this 7-meter diameter dish uses a single preformed metal membrane with an aluminized polyester optical surface and shows potential for future dish-Stirling systems. The next involved two prototype facets from the Faceted Stretched-Membrane Dish Program. These facets, representing competitive design concepts, are closest to commercialization. Five 1-meter triangular facets were tested on-sun as part of the development program for a solar dynamic system on Space Station Freedom. While unique in character, all the tests utilized the Beam Characterization System (BCS) as the main measurement tool and all were analyzed using the Sandia-developed CIRCE2 computer code. The BCS is used to capture and digitize an image of the reflected concentrator beam that is incident on a target surface. The CIRCE2 program provides a computational tool, which when given the geometry of the concentrator and target as well as other design parameters will predict the flux distribution of the reflected beam. One of these parameters, slope error, is the variable that has a major effect in determining the quality of the reflected beam. The methodology used to combine these two tools to predict uniform slope errors for the dishes is discussed in this document. As the Concentrator Development Programs continue, Sandia will test and evaluate two prototype dish systems. The first, the faceted stretched-membrane dish, is expected to be tested in 1992, followed by the full-scale single-element stretched-membrane dish in 1993. These tests will use the tools and methodology discussed in this document. 14 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs.

Grossman, J.W.; Houser, R.M.; Erdman, W.W.

1991-01-01

81

Sandia National Laboratories, California Chemical Management Program annual report.  

SciTech Connect

The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Chemical Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. This program annual report describes the activities undertaken during the calender past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Chemical Management Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA. SNL/CA is responsible for tracking chemicals (chemical and biological materials), providing Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) and for regulatory compliance reporting according to a variety of chemical regulations. The principal regulations for chemical tracking are the Emergency Planning Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) and the California Right-to-Know regulations. The regulations, the Hazard Communication/Lab Standard of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) are also key to the CM Program. The CM Program is also responsible for supporting chemical safety and information requirements for a variety of Integrated Enabling Services (IMS) programs primarily the Industrial Hygiene, Waste Management, Fire Protection, Air Quality, Emergency Management, Environmental Monitoring and Pollution Prevention programs. The principal program tool is the Chemical Information System (CIS). The system contains two key elements: the MSDS library and the chemical container-tracking database that is readily accessible to all Members of the Sandia Workforce. The primary goal of the CM Program is to ensure safe and effective chemical management at Sandia/CA. This is done by efficiently collecting and managing chemical information for our customers who include Line, regulators, DOE and ES and H programs to ensure compliance with regulations and to streamline customer business processes that require chemical information.

Brynildson, Mark E.

2012-02-01

82

RF and mm-Wave Photonics at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

RF and mm-wave photonic devices and circuits have been developed at Sandia National Laboratories for applications ranging from RF optical data links to optical generation of mm-wave frequencies. This talk will explore recent high-speed photonics technology developments at Sandia including: (1) A monolithic optical integrated circuit for all-optical generation of mm-waves. Using integrated mode-locked diode lasers, amplifiers, and detectors, frequencies between 30 GHz and 90 GHz are generated by a single monolithic (Al,Ga)As optical circuit less than 2mm in its largest dimension. (2) Development of polarization-maintaining, low-insertion-loss, low v-pi, Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) modulators with DC-to-potentially-K-band modulation bandwidth. New low-loss polarization-maintaining waveguide designs using binary alloys have been shown to reduce polarization crosstalk in undoped (Al,Ga)As waveguides, yielding high extinction ratio (>40dB) and low on-chip loss (<6dB) in Mach-Zehnder interferometers. RF drive voltage is reduced through use of 45rnrn-active length devices with modulator sensitivity, v-pi, less than 3V.

Vawter, G.A.; Sullivan, C.

1999-07-08

83

Successful Waste Treatment Methods at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

During the remediation of the waste landfills at Sandia National Laboratory in Albuquerque, New Mexico nine drums of mock high explosives were generated. This mixed waste stream was proposed to several offsite vendors for treatment and prices ranged from $2.50 to $10 per gram a total cost estimated to be in excess of $2 million dollars. This cost represents more than 30 percent of the annual budget for the Sandia Waste Management Operations. Concentrated solutions of common oxidizers, such as nitrates, nitrites, and peroxides, will also act as oxidizers and will give positive results in the Hazard Categorization oxidizer test. These solutions carry an EPA Hazardous Waste Number D001, Ignitable Waste, and Oxidizer as defined in 49 CFR 173.151. Sandia decided that given budget and time constraints to meet a Federal Facilities Compliance Act milestone, a process for onsite treatment should be evaluated. Clean samples of mock high explosive materials were obtained from Pantex excess inventory and treatability studies initiated to develop a treatment formula and process. The following process was developed and implemented in the summer of 2006: - Size reduction to allow for dissolution of the barium nitrate in water; - Dissolution of the Mock HE in water; - Deactivation of the oxidizer; - Stabilization of the barium and the cadmium contamination present as an underlying hazardous constituent. This project was completed and the treatment milestone achieved for less than $300,000. The Disassembly Sanitization Operation (DSO) is a process that was implemented to support weapon disassembly and disposition using recycling and waste minimization while achieving the demilitarization mission. The Department of Energy is faced with disassembling and disposition of a huge inventory of retired weapons, components, training equipment, spare parts, and weapon maintenance equipment. Environmental regulations have caused a dramatic increase for information needed to support the disposal and handling of these parts and materials. Manufacturing information from past decades often does not meet the needs for regulatory decisions of today to assure proper management of weapons components. Huge inventories of classified weapon components were required to have long-term storage at Sandia and many other locations throughout the complex. These materials are stored because they are classified, they may also contain radiological and/or hazardous components and disposal options may not have existed for this material. Long-term storage is costly and somewhat problematic. It requires a secured storage area, monitoring, auditing and it also has the potential for loss or theft of this material. Overall recycling rates for materials sent through the DSO process have enabled 70 to 80% of these components to be recycled. These components are made to extreme standards and are made of high quality materials. Once the material has been sanitized, the demand for these metals is very high. The DSO process for the NGPF classified components established the credibility of this technique as a viable process for addressing the long-term storage requirements of classified weapons component inventory. The success of this operation has generated interest from other Sandia Organization other locations throughout the complex. Other organizations are soliciting the help of the DSO team and the DSO is responding to these solicitations by expanding its scope to include work for other projects. For example, Pantex has asked the DSO team to assist with the destruction of their classified components. The operation is full scale and continues to grow and serve SNL/NM and DoE by providing a solution to this evolving issue. On an ongoing basis, SNL has been incurring expenses for the management and storage of classified components. It is estimated that this project will save the DoE and Sandia several hundreds of thousands of dollars until the excess inventory is eliminated. This innovative approach eliminates the need for long-term storage of classified weapons components and the

Rast, D.M.; Thompson, J.J.; Cooper, T.W.; Stockham, D.J

2007-07-01

84

1989 Environmental monitoring report, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

This 1989 report contains monitoring data from routine radiological and nonradiological environmental surveillance activities. Summaries of significant environmental compliance programs in progress such as National Environmental Policy Act documentation, environmental permits, environmental restoration, and various waste management programs for Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque (SNL, Albuquerque) are included. The maximum offsite dose impact was calculated to be 8.8 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} mrem. The total Albuquerque population received a collective dose of 0.097 person-rem during 1989 from SNL, Albuquerque, operations. As in the previous year, SNL, Albuquerque, operations in 1989 had no adverse impact on the general public or on the environment. 46 refs., 20 figs., 31 tabs.

Hwang, S.; Chavez, G.; Phelan, J.; Parsons, A.; Yeager, G.; Dionne, D.; Schwartz, B.; Wolff, T.; Fish, J.; Gray, C.; Thompson, D.

1990-05-01

85

Organizational cultural assessment of the Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

An Organizational Cultural Assessment (OCA) was performed at the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) by administering an Organizational Culture Survey (OCS) that queried employees on the subjects of organizational culture, various aspects of communications, employee commitment, work group cohesion, coordination of work, environmental concerns, hazardous nature of work, safety, and overall job satisfaction. The purpose of the OCS is to measure in a quantitative and objective way the values, attitudes, and beliefs of the individuals working within the organization. The OCS administration at SNL was the fifth to occur at a DOE facility. The sample was randomly selected from each Vice Presidency group, the largest organizational unit at SNL. Scores and significance are discussed and statistically significant differences between groups are identified and discussed.

Not Available

1991-05-01

86

Explosive Components Facility at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) on the proposed Explosive Components Facility (ECF) at the Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque (SNL). This facility is needed to integrate, centralize, and enhance many of the explosive, neutron generation, and weapons testing programs currently in progress at SNL. In general, there is insufficient space in existing facilities for the development and testing activities required by modern explosives technologies. The EA examined the potential environmental impacts of the proposed ECF project and discussed potential alternatives. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, and CEQ regulations at 40 CFR 1508.18 and 1508.27. Therefore, an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required, and the DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

Not Available

1992-07-01

87

Epidemiologic surveillance. Annual report for Sandia National Laboratories 1994  

SciTech Connect

Epidemiologic surveillance at DOE facilities consists of regular and systematic collection, analysis, and interpretation of data on absences due to illness and injury in the work force. Its purpose is to provide an early warning system for health problems occurring among employees at participating sites. In this annual report, 1994 morbidity data for the Sandia National Laboratories are summarized. These analyses focus on absences of 5 or more consecutive workdays occurring among workers aged 15-76 years. They are arranged in five sets of tables that present: (1) the distribution of the labor force by occupational category and pay status; (2) the absences per person, diagnoses per absence, and diagnosis rates for the whole work force; (3) diagnosis rates by type of disease or injury; (4) diagnosis rates by occupational category; and (5) relative risks for specific types of disease or injury by occupational category.

NONE

1994-12-31

88

Sandia National Laboratories shock thermodynamics applied research (STAR) facility  

SciTech Connect

The Sandia National Laboratories Shock Thermodynamics Applied Research (STAR) Facility has recently consolidated three different guns and a variety of instrumentation capabilities into a single location. The guns available at the facility consist of a single-stage light gas gun, a single-stage propellant gun and a two-stage light gas gun, which cover a velocity range from 15 m/s to 8 km/s. Instrumentation available at the facility includes optical and microwave interferometry, time-resolved holography, fast x-radiography, framing and streak photography, fast multi-wavelength pyrometry, piezoelectric and piezoresistive gauges and computer data reduction. This report discusses the guns and instrumentation available at the facility and selected recent applications.

Asay, J.R.

1981-08-01

89

Baseline ecological footprint of Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico.  

SciTech Connect

The Ecological Footprint Model is a mechanism for measuring the environmental effects of operations at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico (SNL/NM). This analysis quantifies environmental impact associated with energy use, transportation, waste, land use, and water consumption at SNL/NM for fiscal year 2005 (FY05). Since SNL/NM's total ecological footprint (96,434 gha) is greater than the waste absorption capacity of its landholdings (338 gha), it created an ecological deficit of 96,096 gha. This deficit is equal to 886,470lha, or about 3,423 square miles of Pinyon-Juniper woodlands and desert grassland. 89% of the ecological footprint can be attributed to energy use, indicating that in order to mitigate environmental impact, efforts should be focused on energy efficiency, energy reduction, and the incorporation of additional renewable energy alternatives at SNL/NM.

Coplen, Amy K.; Mizner, Jack Harry,; Ubechel, Norion M.

2009-01-01

90

Sandia National Laboratories 2011 LDRD Annual Report Exceptional service in the national interest  

E-print Network

Sandia National Laboratories 2011 LDRD Annual Report 1 Exceptional service in the national interest National Laboratories, operated for the United States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE: http://www.doe.gov/bridge Available to the public from U.S. Department of Commerce National Technical

91

Teamwork and diversity: A survey at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

In September, 1994, Sandia`s Diversity Leadership and Education Outreach Center arid the Corporate Diversity Team commissioned a Diversity Action Team (DAT-Phase II) to address the area of team- work. The goal of this DAT was to identify ways to capitalize on the diversity of people to enhance team success at Sandia. Given a six- month lifetime and funding levels of 12 hours per person per month, we chose to accomplish our goal by gathering and analyzing data on the performance and diversity of Sandia teams and publishing this report of our findings. The work presented herein builds on earlier work of this team.

Apodaca, T.; Berman, M.; Griego, C.; Jansma, R.; Leatherwood, M.; Lovato, L.; Sanchez, A.

1995-11-01

92

Pulsed power safety and technical training at Sandia National Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

The expansion of pulsed power applications research at Sandia National Labs requires increasing technician-level support from individuals trained in high voltage, short pulse technology. Large superpower generators need a broad-based training curriculum in all aspects of accelerator operation to satisfy recent Department of Energy (DOE) desires for formal certification of accelerator operators. This paper discusses the status of Sandia's safety

S. A. Goldstein; G. A. Zawadzkas; G. L. Donovan; K. A. Mikkelson; A. W. Sharpe; R. R. Johnston

1987-01-01

93

A Revolutionary Capability Researchers at Sandia National Laboratories have created a  

E-print Network

A Revolutionary Capability Researchers at Sandia National Laboratories have created a sophisticated speed, resolution, sensitivity, and multiplexing. Unlike other lab-on-a-chip platforms, MICA helps re in a major Sandia research program that is investigating the responses of immune cells to pathogens. When

Singh, Anup

94

R&D 100 EntrySubmitting Organization Sandia National Laboratories  

E-print Network

Albuquerque, NM 87185-0185 Submitter Todd Bauer Sandia National Laboratories. P.O. Box 5800, MS 1077 Albuquerque, NM 87185-1077 USA Phone:: (505)-845-0086 Fax:: (505) 844-7833 tmbaue@sandia.gov Contact Person. P.O. Box 5800, MS 1081 Albuquerque, NM 87185-1081 USA Phone: 505-845-8476 Fax: 505-844-2991 dstein

95

An overview of semiconductor bridge, SCB, applications at Sandia National Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

The semiconductor bridge, SCB, developed by Sandia National Laboratories is a maturing technology now being used in several applications by Sandia customers. Most applications arose because of a need at the system level to provide explosive assemblies that were light weight, small volume, low cost and required small quantities of electrical energy to function -- for the purposes of this

R. W. Jr. Bickes; M. C. Grubelich; S. M. Harris; J. A. Merson; J. H. Weinlein

1995-01-01

96

Environmental Survey preliminary report, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the preliminary findings based on the first phase of an Environmental Survey at the Department of Energy (DOE) Sandia National Laboratories Livermore (SNLL), located at Livermore, California. The Survey is being conducted by DOE's Office of Environment, Safety and Health. The SNLL Survey is a portion of the larger, comprehensive DOE Environmental Survey encompassing all major operating facilities of DOE. The DOE Environmental Survey is one of a series of initiatives announced on September 18, 1985, by Secretary of Energy, John S. Herrington, to strengthen the environmental, safety, and health programs and activities within DOE. The purpose of the Environmental Survey is to identify, via a no fault'' baseline Survey of all the Department's major operating facilities, environmental problems and areas of environmental risk. The identified problem areas will be prioritized on a Department-wide basis in order of importance in 1989. The findings in this report are subject to modification based on the results from the Sampling and Analysis Phase of the Survey. The findings are also subject to modification based on comments from the Albuquerque Operations Office concerning the technical accuracy of the findings. The modified preliminary findings and any other appropriate changes will be incorporated into an Interim Report. The Interim Report will serve as the site-specific source for environmental information generated by the Survey, and ultimately as the primary source of information for the DOE-wide prioritization of environmental problems in the Survey Summary Report. 43 refs., 21 figs., 24 tabs.

Not Available

1988-01-01

97

1996 Site environmental report Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) is operated in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) mission to provide weapon component technology and hardware for national security needs, and to conduct fundamental research and development (R&D) to advance technology in energy research, computer science, waste management, electronics, materials science, and transportation safety for hazardous and nuclear components. In support of this mission, the Environmental Safety and Health (ES&H) Center at SNL/NM conducts extensive environmental monitoring, surveillance, and compliance activities to assist SNL`s line organizations in meeting all applicable environmental regulations applicable to the site including those regulating radiological and nonradiological effluents and emissions. Also herein are included, the status of environmental programs that direct and manage activities such as terrestrial surveillance; ambient air and meteorological monitoring; hazardous, radioactive, and solid waste management; pollution prevention and waste minimization; environmental restoration (ER); oil and chemical spill prevention; and National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documentation. This report has been prepared in compliance with DOE order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection.

Fink, C.H. [ed.] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Duncan, D. [ed.] [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sanchez, R. [Jobs Plus, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-08-01

98

An Organizational Cultural Assessment of Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

An Organizational Cultural Assessment (OCA) was performed at the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) by administering an Organizational Culture Survey (OCS) that queried employees on the subjects of organizational culture, various aspects of communications, employee commitment, work group cohesion, coordination of work, environmental concerns, hazardous nature of work, safety and overall job satisfaction. Many of these subjects are assessed in the OCS through highly developed and validated scales that have been administered in many different types of organizations. Some of the issues, especially the questions on environmental, safety, and health concerns, are newly developed and are still being modified. The purpose of the OCS is to measure in a quantitative and objective way the notion of culture;'' that is, the values, attitudes, and beliefs of the individuals working within the organization. In addition, through the OCS, a broad sample of individuals can be reached that would probably not be interviewed or observed during the course of a typical assessment. The OCS also provides a descriptive profile of the organization at one point in time that can then be compared to a profile taken at a different point in time to assess changes in the culture of the organization. 9 refs., 81 figs., 6 tabs.

Haber, S.B.; Crouch, D.A.

1991-05-01

99

The integrated water conservation program at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), located on Kirkland Air Force Base (KAFB) in Albuquerque, NM, is implementing a comprehensive water conservation program. Because the average rainfall in this metropolitan area of 500,000 is approximately 8 inches per year, conservation of this precious resource is critical to the economic health of the city and state, and the continued operations at SNL/NM. To address this need, SNL/NM is taking a systematic, comprehensive approach to water conservation. The approach is to estimate the water consumption for all of SNL/NM by type of consumption. For each type of water consumption, all cost effective measures for reducing, reclaiming, and/or recycling that usage will be ranked. These water conservation measures range from the simple such as retrofitting plumbing fixtures with low cost devices to reduce water required to flush toilets to the very complex. As an example of the very complex, a Microelectronics Development Laboratory (MDL) lab will implement a near zero water discharge from clean room wet benches. Deionized (DI) water can be sent back to the DI water input generation stream when the DI water is not being used for rinsing wafers. This paper discusses completed, ongoing and proposed projects at SNL/NM to reduce water consumption and recycle water to maximize its use, and how water conservation has resulted in energy savings, reductions in wastewater discharges, reductions in water treatment chemicals, and reduction in hazardous waste. Additionally the paper discusses preparation of SNL/NM`s Water Conservation Plan, and solutions to overcoming programmatic and bureaucratic hurdles to achieve reductions in water use, wastewater discharges, chemical use and energy.

Rogers, D.

1997-08-22

100

Photonics at Sandia National Laboratories: Applying device technology to communication systems  

SciTech Connect

Photonic device activities at Sandia National Laboratories are founded on an extensive materials research program that has expanded to include device development, and an applications focus that heavily emphasizes communications and interconnects. The resulting program spans a full range of photonics research, development, and applications projects, from materials synthesis and device fabrication to packaging, test, and subsystem development. The heart of this effort is the Compound Semiconductor Research Laboratory which was established in 1988 to bring together device and materials research and development to support Sandia`s role in weapons technologies. This paper presents an overview of Sandia`s photonics program and its directions, using three communications-based applications as examples.

Carson, R.F.

1995-07-01

101

Exceptional service in the national interest Sandia National Laboratories  

E-print Network

Agreement Places to Partner n Sandia Science & Technology Park n Livermore Valley Open Campus 1 Technology capabilities to industrial problems, the Labs gain new perspectives on vitally important issues that help them

102

Since 1949, Sandia National Laboratories has developed science-based technologies that  

E-print Network

, intelligent machines, robotics, pulsed power, missile defense, field testing, remote sensing, radar systemSince 1949, Sandia National Laboratories has developed science-based technologies that support security, collaborative technologies, computational science and mathematics, visualization and scientific

103

SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES IN SITU ELECTROKINETIC EXTRACTION TECHNOLOGY; INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT  

EPA Science Inventory

As a part of the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency evaluated the In-Situ Electrokinetic Extraction (ISEE) system at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. The SITE demonstration results show ...

104

Sandia National Laboratories\\/New Mexico Environmental Information Document - Volume II  

Microsoft Academic Search

This Sandia National Laboratories\\/New Mexico Environmental Information Document (EID) compiles information on the existing environment, or environmental baseline, for SNUNM. Much of the information is drawn from existing reports and databases supplemented by new research and data. The SNL\\/NM EID, together with the Sandia National Laboratories\\/New Mexico Facilities and Safety Information Document, provide a basis for assessing the environment, safety,

JOSEPH V. GUERRERO; KENNETH A. KUZIO; WILLIAM H. JOHNS; LINDA S. BAYLISS; BRENDA E. BAILEY-WHITE

1999-01-01

105

Sandia National Laboratories\\/New Mexico Environmental Information Document - Volume 1  

Microsoft Academic Search

This Sandia National Laboratories\\/New Mexico Environmental Information Document (EID) compiles information on the existing environment, or environmental baseline, for SNUNM. Much of the information is drawn from existing reports and databases supplemented by new research and data. The SNL\\/NM EID, together with the Sandia National Laboratories\\/New Mexico Facilities and Safety Information Document, provide a basis for assessing the environment, safety,

LINDA S. BAYLISS; JOSEPH V. GUERRERO; WILLIAM H. JOHNS; KENNETH A. KUZIO; BRENDA E. BAILEY-WHITE

1999-01-01

106

Tiger Team Assessment of the Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the results of the Tiger Team Assessment of the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in Livermore, California, conducted from April 30 to May 18, 1990. The purpose of the assessment was to provide the Secretary of Energy with the status of environment, safety and health (ES H) activities at SNL, Livermore. The assessment was conducted by a team consisting of three subteams of federal and private sector technical specialists in the disciplines of environment, safety and health, and management. On-site activities for the assessment included document reviews, observation of site operations, and discussions and interviews with DOE personnel, site contractor personnel, and regulators. Using these sources of information and data, the Tiger Team identified a significant number of findings and concerns having to do with the environment, safety and health, and management, as well as concerns regarding noncompliance with Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standards. Although the Tiger Team concluded that none of the findings or concerns necessitated immediate cessation of any operations at SNL, Livermore, it does believe that a sizable number of them require prompt management attention. A special area of concern identified for the near-term health and safety of on-site personnel pertained to the on-site Trudell Auto Repair Shop site. Several significant OSHA concerns and environmental findings relating to this site prompted the Tiger Team Leader to immediately advise SNL, Livermore and AL management of the situation. A case study was prepared by the Team, because the root causes of the problems associated with this site were believed to reflect the overall root causes for the areas of ES H noncompliance at SNL, Livermore. 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Not Available

1990-08-01

107

Light ion beam fusion research at Sandia National Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

Data were collected on PBFA 1 using three related diode types: (1) the Ampfion diode, (2) the applied field diode, and (3) the pinch reflex diode. Concurrent with these PBFA 1 experiments, complementary experiments were carried out on Proto 1 at Sandia, as well as the Lion accelerator at Cornell University, and the Gamble 2 accelerator at the Naval Research

G. Yonas

1983-01-01

108

An Approach to Wireless Communications at Sandia National Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

Wireless communication plays an increasing role in military, industrial, public safety, and academic computer networks. Although in general, radio transmitters are not currently permitted in secured areas at Sandia, wireless communications would open new opportunities, allowing mobile and pervasive user access. Without wireless communications, we must live in a ''non-mainstream'' world of fixed, wired networks, where it becomes ever more

EDWARD L

2002-01-01

109

The SEMATECH - Sandia National Laboratories partnership: A case study  

SciTech Connect

SEMATECH was established in 1987 for defense and economic reasons to help the U.S. regain a competitive posture in semiconductor manufacturing. For 10 years SEMATECH was jointly funded by the federal government and semiconductor manufacturing companies representing 85 percent of the U.S. semiconductor industry. SEMATECH has spent about 80 percent of these funds on activities intended to produce useful results between 1 and 3 years. Very early in the establishment of SEMATECH, its members determined that their first priority would be to strengthen their U.S. based suppliers of semiconductor manufacturing equipment. This has been the primary thrust of SEMATECH. SEMATECH first held some 30 workshops on a broad set of technical topics to assess the needs and opportunities to help the industry recover. These workshops scoped manufacturing areas where SEMATECH should focus. These early meetings were an early form of what later came to be termed roadmapping. The scope of R&D needs identified in these workshops well exceeded what SEMATECH could hope to accomplish with its $200 million annual budget. Wayne Johnson of Sandia participated in five of these workshops and used the knowledge gained as the basis for proposals later submitted to SEMATECH on behalf of Sandia. In the fall of 1989 the SETEC program was established at Sandia to support SEMATECH. This was initially a funds-in, work-for-others project that was fully funded by SEMATECH. Thus, the early work was entirely focused on SEMATECH`s needs. Later in the program when SEMATECH funds were supplemented by Department of Energy Cooperative Research and Development funds, attention was given to how this project would benefit Sandia`s defense microelectronics program.

Carayannis, E. [George Washington Univ., DC (United States). School of Business and Public Management; Gover, J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-11-01

110

An analysis of microsystems development at Sandia National Laboratories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

While Sandia initially was motivated to investigate emergent microsystem technology to miniaturize existing macroscale structures, present designs embody innovative approaches that directly exploit the fundamentally different material properties of a new technology at the micro- and nano-scale. Direct, hands-on experience with the emerging technology gave Sandia engineers insights that not only guided the evolution of the technology but also enabled them to address new applications that enlarged the customer base for the new technology. Sandia's early commitment to develop complex microsystems demonstrated the advantages that early adopters gain by developing an extensive design and process tool kit and a shared awareness of multiple approaches to achieve the multiple goals. As with any emergent technology, Sandia's program benefited from interactions with the larger technical community. However, custom development followed a spiral path of direct trial-and-error experience, analysis, quantification of materials properties at the micro- and nano-scale, evolution of design tools and process recipes, and an understanding of reliability factors and failure mechanisms even in extreme environments. The microsystems capability at Sandia relied on three key elements. The first was people: a mix of mechanical and semiconductor engineers, chemists, physical scientists, designers, and numerical analysts. The second was a unique facility that enabled the development of custom technologies without contaminating mainline product deliveries. The third was the arrival of specialized equipment as part of a Cooperative Research And Development Agreement (CRADA) enabled by the National Competitiveness Technology Transfer Act of 1989. Underpinning all these, the program was guided and sustained through the research and development phases by accomplishing intermediate milestones addressing direct mission needs.

Herrera, Gilbert V.; Myers, David R.

2011-06-01

111

History and testimony of competency-based development at Sandia National Laboratories.  

SciTech Connect

More than ten years ago, Sandia managers defined a set of traits and characteristics that were needed for success at Sandia. Today, the Sandia National Laboratories Success Profile Competencies continue to be powerful tools for employee and leadership development. The purpose of this report is to revisit the historical events that led to the creation and adaptation of the competencies and to position them for integration in future employee selection, development, and succession planning processes. This report contains an account of how the competencies were developed, testimonies of how they are used within the organization, and a description of how they will be foundational elements of new processes.

Burt, Rebecca A.; Narahara, Sheryl K.

2004-04-01

112

Prototype prosperity-diversity game for the Laboratory Development Division of Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

The Prosperity Game conducted for the Laboratory Development Division of National Laboratories on May 24--25, 1995, focused on the individual and organizational autonomy plaguing the Department of Energy (DOE)-Congress-Laboratories` ability to manage the wrenching change of declining budgets. Prosperity Games are an outgrowth and adaptation of move/countermove and seminar War Games. Each Prosperity Game is unique in that both the game format and the player contributions vary from game to game. This particular Prosperity Game was played by volunteers from Sandia National Laboratories, Eastman Kodak, IBM, and AT&T. Since the participants fully control the content of the games, the specific outcomes will be different when the team for each laboratory, Congress, DOE, and the Laboratory Operating Board (now Laboratory Operations Board) is composed of executives from those respective organizations. Nevertheless, the strategies and implementing agreements suggest that the Prosperity Games stimulate cooperative behaviors and may permit the executives of the institutions to safely explore the consequences of a family of DOE concert.

VanDevender, P.; Berman, M.; Savage, K.

1996-02-01

113

Calendar year 2003 annual site environmental report for Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) is a government-owned, contractor-operated facility owned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and managed by the Sandia Site Office (SSO), Albuquerque, New Mexico. Sandia Corporation, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, operates SNL/NM. This annual report summarizes data and the compliance status of Sandia Corporation's environmental protection and monitoring programs through December 31, 2003. Major environmental programs include air quality, water quality, groundwater protection, terrestrial surveillance, waste management, pollution prevention (P2), environmental restoration (ER), oil and chemical spill prevention, and the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 450.1, ''Environmental Protection Program'' (DOE 2003a) and DOE Order 231.1 Chg.2, ''Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting'' (DOE 1996).

Wagner, Katrina; Sanchez, Rebecca V.; Mayeux, Lucie; Koss, Susan I.; Salinas, Stephanie A.

2004-09-01

114

Calendar year 2004 annual site environmental report:Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) is a government-owned, contractor-operated facility owned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and managed by the Sandia Site Office (SSO), Albuquerque, New Mexico. Sandia Corporation, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, operates SNL/NM. This annual report summarizes data and the compliance status of Sandia Corporation's environmental protection and monitoring programs through December 31, 2004. Major environmental programs include air quality, water quality, groundwater protection, terrestrial surveillance, waste management, pollution prevention (P2), environmental restoration (ER), oil and chemical spill prevention, and the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program (DOE 2005) and DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting (DOE 2004a). (DOE 2004a).

Montoya, Amber L.; Goering, Teresa Lynn; Wagner, Katrina; Koss, Susan I.; Salinas, Stephanie A.

2005-09-01

115

Bridging the Cold War and the 21st century: chronicling the history of Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

A historical perspective is given for Sandia National Laboratories from its beginnings as a small engineering group at an offshoot of Los Alamos Laboratory to a facility of 7000 people at its main facility in Albuquerque, another 1000 people in Livermore, California and test ranges in Tonopah, Nevada and Kauai, Hawaii. The Sandia army base became the Z division of Los Alamos and $25 million construction program began the structures that would carry out a test program for nuclear weapons during the cold war. Bell System/AT&T stewardship of the site continued from 1949 to 1993, when Martin Marietta (now Lockheed Martin) was chosen as the new contractor. Management decisions, personnel, and political aspects of the Laboratory are presented up to 1997 and forecasts are given for future policy and programs of Sandia.

Mora, C.J.

1997-04-01

116

National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) compliance at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM)  

SciTech Connect

This report on National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) compliance at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) chronicles past and current compliance activities and includes a recommended strategy that can be implemented for continued improvement. This report provides a list of important references. Attachment 1 contains the table of contents for SAND95-1648, National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Guide Sandia National Laboratories (Hansen, 1995). Attachment 2 contains a list of published environmental assessments (EAs) and environmental impact statements (EISs) prepared by SNL/NM. Attachment 3 contains abstracts of NEPA compliance papers authored by SNL/NM and its contractors.

Wolff, T.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Community Involvement and Issues Management Dept.; Hansen, R.P. [Hansen Environmental Consultants, Englewood, CO (United States)

1998-08-01

117

Results from Sandia National Laboratories \\/ Lockheed Martin Electromagnetic Missile Launcher (EMML)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sandia national laboratories (SNL) and lockheed martin MS2 are designing an electromagnetic missile launcher (EMML) for naval applications. Lhe EMML uses an induction coilgun topology with the requirement of launching a 3600 lb. missile up to a velocity of 40 m\\/s. Lo demonstrate the feasibility of the electromagnetic propulsion design, a demonstrator launcher was built that consists of approximately 10%

M. S. Aubuchon; T. R. Lockner; B. N. Turman; L Basak; G Root; Mendel D. Floyd

2005-01-01

118

Environmental testing philosophy for a Sandia National Laboratories small satellite project  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories is the system integrator on a small satellite project. Following the intent of the NASA GEVS document, an integrated test philosophy was formulated to certify the satellite for flight. The purpose of this paper is to present that philosophy.

Cap, J.S.; Rackley, N.G.

1996-03-01

119

Environmental testing philosophy for a Sandia National Laboratories small satellite project  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sandia National Laboratories is the system integrator on a small satellite project. Following the intent of the NASA GEVS document, an integrated test philosophy was formulated to certify the satellite for flight. The purpose of this paper is to present that philosophy.

J. S. Cap; N. G. Rackley

1996-01-01

120

Performance of a solar-heated assembly building at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

The passive solar-heating system of the assembly building at Sandia National Laboratories' Photovoltaic Advanced Systems Test Facility is described and the thermal analysis of the building is given. Performance predictions are also given, and actual performance for December 1979 and January 1980 are shown.

Haskins, D.E.

1980-09-01

121

Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Environmental Baseline update--Revision 1.0  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a baseline update to provide the background information necessary for personnel to prepare clear and consise NEPA documentation. The environment of the Sandia National Laboratories is described in this document, including the ecology, meteorology, climatology, seismology, emissions, cultural resources and land use, visual resources, noise pollution, transportation, and socioeconomics.

NONE

1996-07-01

122

Lessons learned from Sandia National Laboratories' operational readiness review of the Annular Core Research Reactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) (a Hazard Category 2 nuclear reactor facility) was defueled in early 1997 to convert the reactor core and control system to produce medical radioisotopes for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Medical Isotope Production Program. The DOE determined that an operational readiness review (ORR) per DOE 5480.31 or DOE 420.1

A. O. Bendure; J. W. Bryson

1999-01-01

123

Sandia National Laboratories ASCOT (atmospheric studies in complex terrain) field experiment, September 1980  

SciTech Connect

During the period September 8 through September 25, 1980, Sandia National Laboratories, Division 4774, participated in a series of experiments held in the Geysers area of California. These experiments, aimed at providing data on nighttime drainage flow in complex terrain, were intended to provide a reliable basis for mathematical flow modeling. Tracers were released at several points on a valley rim and sampled by a large number of stations at ground level. Sandia's contribution was to make it possible to derive vertical tracer profiles. This was done by taking air samples from a captive balloon at chosen altitudes between the surface and 450 meters above ground.

Woods, R.O.

1982-04-01

124

Environmental assessment of the Environmental Restoration Project at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) is managed and operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by Sandia Corporation, a subsidiary of the Lockheed Martin Company. SNL/NM is located on land controlled by DOE within the boundaries of Kirtland Air Force Base (KAFB) in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The major responsibilities of SNL/NM are the support of national security and energy projects. This report provides an environmental assessment of proposed remedial action activities at the solid waste management units at SNL/NM. A risk assessment of health hazards is also discussed.

NONE

1996-03-01

125

An overview of semiconductor bridge, SCB, applications at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

The semiconductor bridge, SCB, developed by Sandia National Laboratories is a maturing technology now being used in several applications by Sandia customers. Most applications arose because of a need at the system level to provide explosive assemblies that were light weight, small volume, low cost and required small quantities of electrical energy to function -- for the purposes of this paper we define an explosive assembly to mean the combination of the firing set and an explosive component. As a result, and because conventional firing systems could not meet the stringent size, weight and energy requirements of our customers, we designed and are investigating SCB applications that range from devices for Sandia applications to igniters for fireworks. We present in this paper an overview of SCB technology with specific examples of the system designed for our customers to meet modern requirements that sophisticated explosive systems must satisfy in today`s market environments.

Bickes, R.W. Jr.; Grubelich, M.C.; Harris, S.M.; Merson, J.A.; Weinlein, J.H.

1995-05-01

126

Acoustic, fiber optic, and silicon microelectronic microsensors research and development activities at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories, an 8500+ person, multiprogram research and development facility operated for the US Department of Energy, has over 400 research, development and applications scientists and engineers working on sensor technologies. Sandia`s 20 person Microsensors Research and Development Department has invented, developed and fielded sensor systems based on acoustic, fiber optic, and silicon microelectronic technologies. These sensors have been used for diverse applications inducting the monitoring of cleaning chemical concentrations in industrial process effluent streams, detection of explosive gas concentrations in aging industrial equipment, real-time measurements of fluid viscosity in equipment lubricants, and monitoring of contaminant concentration levels in ultrapure process gases. Representative sensor technologies available for technology transfer will be described including bulk acoustic wave resonators, surface acoustic wave devices, fiber optic micromirror sensors, and silicon microelectronic sensors.

Wiczer, J.J.

1993-08-01

127

Design and initial deployment of the wireless local area networking infrastructure at Sandia National Laboratories.  

SciTech Connect

A major portion of the Wireless Networking Project at Sandia National Laboratories over the last few years has been to examine IEEE 802.11 wireless networking for possible use at Sandia and if practical, introduce this technology. This project team deployed 802.11a, b, and g Wireless Local Area Networking at Sandia. This report examines the basics of wireless networking and captures key results from project tests and experiments. It also records project members thoughts and designs on wireless LAN architecture and security issues. It documents some of the actions and milestones of this project, including pilot and production deployment of wireless networking equipment, and captures the team's rationale behind some of the decisions made. Finally, the report examines lessons learned, future directions, and conclusions.

Long, John P.; Hamill, Michael J.; Mitchell, M. G.; Miller, Marc M.; Witzke, Edward L.; Wiener, Dallas J

2006-11-01

128

Applying the Laboratory Integration and Prioritization System (LIPS) to decision-making at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

The Laboratories Services Division of Sandia National Laboratories includes a wide variety of operations such as environmental, safety and health, safeguards and security, facilities, logistics, and sites planning and integration. In the face of declining budgets and increasing requirements, the Management Team needed some tools to assist in negotiating with customers and regulators and in consistently and cost-effectively managing all work performed and/or managed by the Division. The Integrated Services Management System (ISMS) was developed as a series of processes to provide these tools. The Laboratory Integration and Prioritization System (LIPS) was selected as the prioritization methodology for ISMS. The pilot application phase was begun in February 1994 and addressed planning of work and resources for FY95. Extensive training was provided for the Activity Data Sheet (ADS) preparers and the teams which would score each of the activities. After preparation of the ADSs, they were scored by the scoring teams. A division-wide review board reviewed all of the ADSs to ensure consistency of scoring across all of the functional areas. The lessons that were learned from the pilot application were evaluated and improvements incorporated for the FY96 planning and application. The improvements included upgrading the training, providing expert facilitation for scoring boards, modification of the scoring instructions to better represent local situations, and establishing an Validation Board with more authority and accountability to provide quality assurance. The participants in the LIPS process have agreed that no major bases were uncovered, imperfect prioritizations are better than no data, all work packages can be scored and ranked, including core activities, results were objective and quantifiable, and decisions could be made using technically defensible bases.

Barber, D.S.; Mead, J.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Services Management System Office

1995-10-01

129

Gamma Irradiation Facility at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. Final environmental assessment  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) on the proposed construction and operation of a new Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF) at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM). This facility is needed to: enhance capabilities to assure technical excellence in nuclear weapon radiation environments testing, component development, and certification; comply with all applicable ES and H safeguards, standards, policies, and regulations; reduce personnel radiological exposure to comply with ALARA limits in accordance with DOE orders and standards; consolidate major gamma ray sources into a central, secured area; and reduce operational risks associated with operation of the GIF and LICA in their present locations. This proposed action provides for the design, construction, and operation of a new GIF located within TA V and the removal of the existing GIF and Low Intensity Cobalt Array (LICA). The proposed action includes potential demolition of the gamma shield walls and removal of equipment in the existing GIF and LICA. The shielding pool used by the existing GIF will remain as part of the ACRR facility. Transportation of the existing {sup 60}Co sources from the existing LICA and GIF to the new facility is also included in the proposed action. Relocation of the gamma sources to the new GIF will be accomplished by similar techniques to those used to install the sources originally.

NONE

1995-11-01

130

Preliminary safety analysis report for the Auxiliary Hot Cell Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The Auxiliary Hot Cell Facility (AHCF) at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) will be a Hazard Category 3 nuclear facility used to characterize, treat, and repackage radioactive and mixed material and waste for reuse, recycling, or ultimate disposal. A significant upgrade to a previous facility, the Temporary Hot Cell, will be implemented to perform this mission. The following major features will be added: a permanent shield wall; eight floor silos; new roof portals in the hot-cell roof; an upgraded ventilation system; and upgraded hot-cell jib crane; and video cameras to record operations and facilitate remote-handled operations. No safety-class systems, structures, and components will be present in the AHCF. There will be five safety-significant SSCs: hot cell structure, permanent shield wall, shield plugs, ventilation system, and HEPA filters. The type and quantity of radionuclides that could be located in the AHCF are defined primarily by SNL/NM's legacy materials, which include radioactive, transuranic, and mixed waste. The risk to the public or the environment presented by the AHCF is minor due to the inventory limitations of the Hazard Category 3 classification. Potential doses at the exclusion boundary are well below the evaluation guidelines of 25 rem. Potential for worker exposure is limited by the passive design features incorporated in the AHCF and by SNL's radiation protection program. There is no potential for exposure of the public to chemical hazards above the Emergency Response Protection Guidelines Level 2.

OSCAR,DEBBY S.; WALKER,SHARON ANN; HUNTER,REGINA LEE; WALKER,CHERYL A.

1999-12-01

131

Weapons Evaluation Test Laboratory at Pantex: Testing and data handling capabilities of Sandia National Laboratories at the Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Weapons Evaluation Test Laboratory (WETL), operated by Sandia Laboratories at the Pantex Plant in Amarillo, Texas, is engaged primarily in the testing of weapon systems in the stockpile or of newly produced weapon systems for the Sandia Surety Assessment Center. However, the WETL`s unique testing equipment and data-handling facilities are frequently used to serve other organizations. Service to other

1993-01-01

132

Implementing Virtual Private Networking for Enabling Lower Cost, More Secure Wide Area Communications at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Virtual Private Networking is a new communications technology that promises lower cost, more secure wide area communications by leveraging public networks such as the Internet. Sandia National Laboratories has embraced the technology for interconnecting remote sites to Sandia's corporate network, and for enabling remote access users for both dial-up and broadband access.

MILLER,MARC M.; YONEK JR.,GEORGE A.

2001-08-01

133

The rapid, automated, point-of-care system (RapiDx) developed by Sandia National Laboratories is redefining  

E-print Network

expensive and more effective than treatment at later stages. Built on Sandia's advancements in labThe rapid, automated, point-of-care system (RapiDx) developed by Sandia National Laboratories threats. If a crowd is exposed to dangerous biotoxins, potentially Lab-on-a-Chip Technology for Portable

Singh, Anup

134

1982 Environmental monitoring report, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Because radionuclides are potentially released from its research activities, SNL has a continuing environmental monitoring program which analyzes for cesium-137, tritium, uranium, alpha emitter, and beta emitters in water, soil, air, and vegetation. Measured radiation levels in public areas were consistent with local background in 1982. The Albuquerque population received an estimated 0.170 person-rem from airborne radioactive releases, whereas it received greater than 50,400 person-rem from naturally occurring radionuclides.

Millard, G.C.; Gray, C.E.; Simmons, T.N.; O'Neal, B.L.

1983-04-01

135

Critical experiments at Sandia National Laboratories : technical meeting on low-power critical facilities and small reactors.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has conducted radiation effects testing for the Department of Energy (DOE) and other contractors supporting the DOE since the 1960's. Over this period, the research reactor facilities at Sandia have had a primary mission to provide appropriate nuclear radiation environments for radiation testing and qualification of electronic components and other devices. The current generation of reactors includes the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR), a water-moderated pool-type reactor, fueled by elements constructed from UO2-BeO ceramic fuel pellets, and the Sandia Pulse Reactor III (SPR-III), a bare metal fast burst reactor utilizing a uranium-molybdenum alloy fuel. The SPR-III is currently defueled. The SPR Facility (SPRF) has hosted a series of critical experiments. A purpose-built critical experiment was first operated at the SPRF in the late 1980's. This experiment, called the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Critical Experiment (CX), was designed to explore the reactor physics of a nuclear thermal rocket motor. This experiment was fueled with highly-enriched uranium carbide fuel in annular water-moderated fuel elements. The experiment program was completed and the fuel for the experiment was moved off-site. A second critical experiment, the Burnup Credit Critical Experiment (BUCCX) was operated at Sandia in 2002. The critical assembly for this experiment was based on the assembly used in the CX modified to accommodate low-enriched pin-type fuel in water moderator. This experiment was designed as a platform in which the reactivity effects of specific fission product poisons could be measured. Experiments were carried out on rhodium, an important fission product poison. The fuel and assembly hardware for the BUCCX remains at Sandia and is available for future experimentation. The critical experiment currently in operation at the SPRF is the Seven Percent Critical Experiment (7uPCX). This experiment is designed to provide benchmark reactor physics data to support validation of the reactor physics codes used to design commercial reactor fuel elements in an enrichment range above the current 5% enrichment cap. A first set of critical experiments in the 7uPCX has been completed. More experiments are planned in the 7uPCX series. The critical experiments at Sandia National Laboratories are currently funded by the US Department of Energy Nuclear Criticality Safety Program (NCSP). The NCSP has committed to maintain the critical experiment capability at Sandia and to support the development of a critical experiments training course at the facility. The training course is intended to provide hands-on experiment experience for the training of new and re-training of practicing Nuclear Criticality Safety Engineers. The current plans are for the development of the course to continue through the first part of fiscal year 2011 with the development culminating is the delivery of a prototype of the course in the latter part of the fiscal year. The course will be available in fiscal year 2012.

Harms, Gary A.; Ford, John T.; Barber, Allison Delo

2010-11-01

136

Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Environmental Information Document - Volume II  

SciTech Connect

This Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Environmental Information Document (EID) compiles information on the existing environment, or environmental baseline, for SNUNM. Much of the information is drawn from existing reports and databases supplemented by new research and data. The SNL/NM EID, together with the Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Facilities and Safety Information Document, provide a basis for assessing the environment, safety, and health aspects of operating selected facilities at SNL/NM. The environmental baseline provides a record of the existing physical, biological, and socioeconomic environment at SNL/NLM prior to being altered (beneficially or adversely) by proposed programs or projects. More specifically, the EID provides information on the following topics: Geology; Land Use; Hydrology and Water Resources; Air Quality and Meteorology; Ecology; Noise and Vibration; Cultural Resources; Visual Resources; Socioeconomic and Community Services; Transportation; Material Management; Waste Management; and Regulatory Requirements.

GUERRERO, JOSEPH V.; KUZIO, KENNETH A.; JOHNS, WILLIAM H.; BAYLISS, LINDA S.; BAILEY-WHITE, BRENDA E.

1999-09-01

137

Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Environmental Information Document - Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

This Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Environmental Information Document (EID) compiles information on the existing environment, or environmental baseline, for SNUNM. Much of the information is drawn from existing reports and databases supplemented by new research and data. The SNL/NM EID, together with the Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Facilities and Safety Information Document, provide a basis for assessing the environment, safety, and health aspects of operating selected facilities at SNL/NM. The environmental baseline provides a record of the existing physical, biological, and socioeconomic environment at SNL/NLM prior to being altered (beneficially or adversely) by proposed programs or projects. More specifically, the EID provides information on the following topics: Geology; Land Use; Hydrology and Water Resources; Air Quality and Meteorology; Ecology; Noise and Vibration; Cultural Resources; Visual Resources; Socioeconomic and Community Services; Transportation; Material Management; Waste Management; and Regulatory Requirements.

BAYLISS, LINDA S.; GUERRERO, JOSEPH V.; JOHNS, WILLIAM H.; KUZIO, KENNETH A.; BAILEY-WHITE, BRENDA E.

1999-09-01

138

A report on FY06 IPv6 deployment activities and issues at Sandia National Laboratories.  

SciTech Connect

Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4) has been a mainstay of the both the Internet and corporate networks for delivering network packets to the desired destination. However, rapid proliferation of network appliances, evolution of corporate networks, and the expanding Internet has begun to stress the limitations of the protocol. Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) is the replacement protocol that overcomes the constraints of IPv4. IPv6 deployment in government network backbones has been mandated to occur by 2008. This paper explores the readiness of the Sandia National Laboratories' network backbone to support IPv6, the issues that must be addressed before a deployment begins, and recommends the next steps to take to comply with government mandates. The paper describes a joint, work effort of the Sandia National Laboratories ASC WAN project team and members of the System Analysis & Trouble Resolution and Network System Design & Implementation Departments.

Tolendino, Lawrence F.; Eldridge, John M.; Hu, Tan Chang

2006-06-01

139

Annual report: Purchasing and Materials Management Organization, Sandia National Laboratories, fiscal year 1992  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the purchasing and transportation activities of the Purchasing and Materials Management Organization for Fiscal Year 1992. Activities for both the New Mexico and California locations are included. Topics covered in this report include highlights for fiscal year 1992, personnel, procurements (small business procurements, disadvantaged business procurements, woman-owned business procurements, New Mexico commercial business procurements, Bay area commercial business procurements), commitments by states and foreign countries, and transportation activities. Also listed are the twenty-five commercial contractors receiving the largest dollar commitments, commercial contractors receiving commitments of $1,000 or more, integrated contractor and federal agency commitments of $1,000 or more from Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico and California, and transportation commitments of $1,000 or more from Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico and California.

Zaeh, R.A.

1993-04-01

140

1Sandia National Laboratories 2010 LDRD Annual Report Issued by Sandia National Laboratories, operated for the United States  

E-print Network

reprocessing. Lower Panel: Superimposed on the Cu micropillar image is a micrograph (gold) of layered graphene sheets grown on silicon carbide and a drawing of the hexagonal bonding arrangement of the single layer of carbon atoms in graphene Abstract This report summarizes progress from the Laboratory Directed Research

141

Remediation of a Classified Waste Landfill at Sandia National Laboratories, NM  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Sandia National Laboratory es\\/New Mexico (SNLiNM) Environmental Restoration Project is currently excavating the Classified Waste Landfill in Technical Area II (TA-H), which consists of disposal pits and trenches with discrete disposal cells. TA-11 is a secure, controlled assess, research facility managed by SNIJNM for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The 45-acre facility was established in 1948 for the

1998-01-01

142

Sandia National Laboratories environmental fluid dynamics code : pH effects user manual  

Microsoft Academic Search

This document describes the implementation level changes in the source code and input files of Sandia National Laboratories Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (SNL-EFDC) that are necessary for including pH effects into algae-growth dynamics. The document also gives a brief introduction to how pH effects are modeled into the algae-growth model. The document assumes that the reader is aware of the

Vijay Janardhanam; Scott Carlton James

2012-01-01

143

ADVANTAGES AND DISADVANTAGES TO OPERATING AN ON-SITE LABORATORY AT THE SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES CHEMICAL WASTE LANDFILL  

SciTech Connect

During the excavation of the Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) Chemical Waste Landfill (CWL), operations were realized by the presence of URS' (formerly known as United Research Services) On-site Mobile Laboratory (OSML) and the close proximity of the SNL/NM Environmental Restoration Chemical Laboratory (ERCL). The laboratory was located adjacent to the landfill in order to provide soil characterization, health and safety support, and waste management data. Although the cost of maintaining and operating an analytical laboratory can be higher than off-site analysis, there are many benefits to providing on site analytical services. This paper describes the synergies between the laboratory, as well as the advantages and disadvantages to having a laboratory on-site during the excavation of SNL/NM CWL.

Young, S.G.; Creech, M.N.

2003-02-27

144

SANDIA REPORT SAND2006-4466  

E-print Network

Labs. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin CompanyAL85000. This work was supported by Sandia National Labs. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory by Sandia National Labs. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed

Howle, Victoria E.

145

External Review for Sandia National Laboratory Microelectronics and Photonics Program 1998 Review  

SciTech Connect

The committee regards Sandia's Microelectronics and Photonics Program as a vital and strategic resource for the nation. The Microsystems (MEMS) and Chem Lab programs were assessed as unique and best-in-class for the development of significant application areas. They contribute directly to the Sandia mission and impact the development of new commercial areas. The continued development and integration of Radiation hard silicon integrated circuits, micromechanical systems, sensors, and optical communications is essential to the national security mission. The quality of the programs is excellent to outstanding overall. MEMS and Chem Lab activities are examples of outstanding programs. The committee was pleased to see the relationship of the microelectronics development programs to applications in the mission. In a future review the committee would like to see Sandia's research programs and a vision for connectivity to potential national security needs. (This review may be based on analysis and assumptions about the strategic needs of the nation.) In summary, the Microelectronics and Photonics capability affords Sandia the opportunity to deliver exceptional service in the national interest across broad technology areas. The presentations were excellent and well integrated. We received ample pre-reading materials, expectations were well set and the documents were high quality. The committee was provided an agenda with sufficient time among us and some selected one-on-one time with the researchers. The composition of the committee held representation from industry, universities and government. Committee contributions were well balanced and worked as a team. However, the committee was disappointed that no member of Sandia executive management was able to be present for the readout and final debriefing. (A late, higher priority conflict developed.) The members of the EST Program and the committee put substantial effort into the review but a written report like this one is not a substitute for direct feedback in helping SNL leadership assess the value of these programs.

MCWHORTER, PAUL J.; ROMIG JR., ALTON D.

1999-02-01

146

LANMAS alpha configured for Sandia National Laboratories and Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Westinghouse Hanford Company have been working jointly for the past 2 years to develop LANMAS (Local Area Network Material Accountability System), the next generation of a US Department of Energy nuclear material accountability system. LANMAS is being designed to reflect the broad-based needs of the US Department of Energy`s Material Control & Accountability and Nuclear Materials Management communities, and its developers believe that significant cost savings can be achieved by implementing LANMAS complex-wide, where feasible. LANMAS is being designed so that it is transportable to appropriate US Department of Energy sites. To accomplish this, LANMAS will be configurable to local site work culture. Many US Department of Energy sites are interested in the LANMAS project, and several have participated in its development; some have committed resources. The original LANMAS project team included representatives from the Hanford Site and Los Alamos. As of June 1993, the following sites have also supported the project: Sandia National Laboratory Albuquerque; Sandia National Laboratory Livermore; Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant; Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory; and Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory. In addition, LANMAS is being targeted as a candidate for the US Department of Energy Complex 21, a project designed to restructure the nation`s nuclear weapons complex.

Woychick, M.R. [ed.; McRae, L.P. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Bracey, J.T. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kern, E.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Alvarado, A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-07-01

147

The high current, fast, 100ns, Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) developmental project at Sandia National Laboratories.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, N.M., USA, in collaboration with the High Current Electronic Institute (HCEI), Tomsk, Russia, is developing a new paradigm in pulsed power technology: the Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) technology. This technological approach can provide very compact devices that can deliver very fast high current and high voltage pulses straight out of the cavity with out any complicated pulse forming and pulse compression network. Through multistage inductively insulated voltage adders, the output pulse, increased in voltage amplitude, can be applied directly to the load. The load may be a vacuum electron diode, a z-pinch wire array, a gas puff, a liner, an isentropic compression load (ICE) to study material behavior under very high magnetic fields, or a fusion energy (IFE) target. This is because the output pulse rise time and width can be easily tailored to the specific application needs. In this paper we briefly summarize the developmental work done in Sandia and HCEI during the last few years, and describe our new MYKONOS Sandia High Current LTD Laboratory.

Ward, Kevin S.; Long, Finis W.; Sinebryukhov, Vadim A. (High Current Electronic Institute (HCEI), Tomsk, Russia); Kim, Alexandre A. (High Current Electronic Institute (HCEI), Tomsk, RUSSIA); Wakeland, Peter Eric (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); McKee, G. Randall; Woodworth, Joseph Ray; McDaniel, Dillon Heirman; Fowler, William E.; Mazarakis, Michael Gerrassimos; Porter, John Larry, Jr.; Struve, Kenneth William; Stygar, William A.; LeChien, Keith R.; Matzen, Maurice Keith

2010-04-01

148

Developing the Sandia National Laboratories transportation infrastructure for isotope products and wastes  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) plans to establish a medical isotope project that would ensure a reliable domestic supply of molybdenum-99 ({sup 99}Mo) and related medical isotopes (Iodine-125, Iodine-131, and Xenon-133). The Department`s plan for production will modify the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) and associated hot cell facility at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)/New Mexico and the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Transportation activities associated with such production is discussed.

Trennel, A.J.

1997-11-01

149

A pollution prevention chargeback system at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (Sandia/NM) has successfully developed and implemented a chargeback system to fund the implementation of Pollution Prevention activities. In the process of establishing this system, many valuable lessons have been learned. This paper describes how the chargeback system currently functions, the benefits and drawbacks of implementing such a system, and recommendations for implementing a chargeback system at other facilities. The initial goals in establishing a chargeback system were to create (1) funding for pollution prevention implementation, including specific pollution prevention projects; and (2) awareness on the part of the line organizations of the quantities and types of waste that they generate, thus providing them with a direct incentive to reduce that waste. The chargeback system inputs waste generation data and then filters and sorts the data to serve two purposes: (1) the operation of the chargeback system; and (2) the detailed waste generation reporting used for assessing processes and identifying pollution prevention opportunities.

Davis, R.; Fish, J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brown, C. [Ogden Environmental and Energy Services Co., Fairfax, VA (United States)

1994-08-01

150

The transfer of disruptive technologies: Lessions learned from Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories has learned through their process of technology transfer that not all high tech transfers are alike. They are not alike by the nature of the customers involved, the process of becoming involved with these customers and finally and most importantly the very nature of the technology itself. Here they focus on technology transfer in the microsystems arena and specifically the sacrificial surface version of microsystems. They have learned and helped others learn that many MEMS applications are best realized through the use of surface micromachining (SMM). This is because SMM builds on the substantial integrated circuit industry. In this paper they review Sandia's process for transferring a disruptive MEMS technology in numerous cases.

MCBRAYER,JOHN D.

2000-04-19

151

Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Facilities and Safety Information Document [NOTE: Volume I, Chapter 1  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) began in 1945 as the ''Z'' Division of what was then Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory on Oxnard Field, which was owned by the Air Technical Service Command, as a base of operations to store materials and house personnel. Oxnard Field was transferred to the U.S. Engineers, Manhattan District, on July 21, 1945, who converted several wood frame structures to serve functions that were transferred from Los Alamos. Development of the SNL/New Mexico (SNL/NM) site began in 1946 and 1947 with construction of the first four buildings in what is now Tech Area I. Construction of another 14 permanent buildings in Tech Area I began in 1948. SNL constructed a high-explosive assembly area in Tech Area II, a half mile south of Tech Area I, and started plans for several outdoor testing facilities for Tech Area III, about seven miles to the south of Tech Area I, in 1952. By 1953, SNL completed and put into operation the first group of Tech Area III facilities, which included a rocket sled track, a large centrifuge, a vibration facility, and an instrument control center. Tech Area IV and Tech Area V were developed later to provide facilities for pulsed power and high-energy experiments. As the need developed for outdoor testing facilities remote from the public and other work areas, SNL added many facilities on U.S. Air Force and other federal property in the area known as Coyote Test Field (Sandia National Laboratories, 1997b). Most recently, DOE leased U.S. Air Force facilities in the Manzano Area for SNL to use for storage of low-level radioactive waste, mixed waste (a combination of radioactive and hazardous waste), and transuranic waste (Sandia National Laboratories, 1997a).

March, F.; Guerrero, J.V.; Johns, W.H.; Schetnan, R.; Bayliss, L.S.; Kuzio, K.A.; White, B.B.

1999-09-01

152

Geochemical study of groundwater at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico and Kirtland Air Force Base  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) and its contractor, Rust Geotech, support the Kirtland Area Office by assisting Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (Sandia/NM) with remedial action, remedial design, and technical support of its Environmental Restoration Program. To aid in determining groundwater origins and flow paths, the GJPO was tasked to provide interpretation of groundwater geochemical data. The purpose of this investigation was to describe and analyze the groundwater geochemistry of the Sandia/NM Kirtland Air Force Base (KAFB). Interpretations of groundwater origins are made by using these data and the results of {open_quotes}mass balance{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}reaction path{close_quote} modeling. Additional maps and plots were compiled to more fully comprehend the geochemical distributions. A more complete set of these data representations are provided in the appendices. Previous interpretations of groundwater-flow paths that were based on well-head, geologic, and geochemical data are presented in various reports and were used as the basis for developing the models presented in this investigation.

NONE

1995-10-01

153

On the integration of technology readiness levels at Sandia National Laboratories.  

SciTech Connect

Integrating technology readiness levels (TRL) into the management of engineering projects is critical to the mitigation of risk and improved customer/supplier communications. TRLs provide a common framework and language with which consistent comparisons of different technologies and approaches can be made. At Sandia National Laboratories, where technologies are developed, integrated and deployed into high consequence systems, the use of TRLs may be transformational. They are technology independent and span the full range of technology development including scientific and applied research, identification of customer requirements, modeling and simulation, identification of environments, testing and integration. With this report, we provide a reference set of definitions for TRLs and a brief history of TRLs at Sandia National Laboratories. We then propose and describe two approaches that may be used to integrate TRLs into the NW SMU business practices. In the first approach, we analyze how TRLs can be integrated within concurrent qualification as documented in TBP-100 [1]. In the second approach we take a look at the product realization process (PRP) as documented in TBP-PRP [2]. Both concurrent qualification and product realization are fundamental to the way weapons engineering work is conducted at this laboratory and the NWC (nuclear weapons complex) as a whole. Given the current structure and definitions laid out in the TBP-100 and TBP-PRP, we believe that integrating TRLs into concurrent qualification (TBP-100) rather than TBP-PRP is optimal. Finally, we note that our charter was to explore and develop ways of integrating TRLs into the NW SMU and therefore we do not significantly cover the development and history of TRLs. This work was executed under the auspices and direction of Sandia's Weapon Engineering Program. Please contact Gerry Sleefe, Deputy Program Director, for further information.

Bailey, Beatriz R.; Mitchell, John Anthony

2006-09-01

154

Supplement analysis for continued operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore. Volume 2: Comment response document  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE), prepared a draft Supplement Analysis (SA) for Continued Operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore (SNL-L), in accordance with DOE`s requirements for implementation of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) (10 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 1021.314). It considers whether the Final Environmental Impact Statement and Environmental Impact Report for Continued Operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore (1992 EIS/EIR) should be supplement3ed, whether a new environmental impact statement (EIS) should be prepared, or no further NEPA documentation is required. The SA examines the current project and program plans and proposals for LLNL and SNL-L, operations to identify new or modified projects or operations or new information for the period from 1998 to 2002 that was not considered in the 1992 EIS/EIR. When such changes, modifications, and information are identified, they are examined to determine whether they could be considered substantial or significant in reference to the 1992 proposed action and the 1993 Record of Decision (ROD). DOE released the draft SA to the public to obtain stakeholder comments and to consider those comments in the preparation of the final SA. DOE distributed copies of the draft SA to those who were known to have an interest in LLNL or SNL-L activities in addition to those who requested a copy. In response to comments received, DOE prepared this Comment Response Document.

NONE

1999-03-01

155

Pollution prevention opportunity assessment for Sandia National Laboratories/California recycling programs.  

SciTech Connect

This Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessment (PPOA) was conducted for the Sandia National Laboratories/California (SNL/CA) Environmental Management Department between May 2006 and March 2007, to evaluate the current site-wide recycling program for potential opportunities to improve the efficiency of the program. This report contains a summary of the information collected and analyses performed with recommended options for implementation. The SNL/NM Pollution Prevention (P2) staff worked with the SNL/CA P2 Staff to arrive at these options.

Wrons, Ralph Jordan; Vetter, Douglas Walter

2007-07-01

156

Optics and photonics research in the Lasers, Optics and Remote Sensing Department at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Photonic system and device technologies have claimed a significant share of the current high-tech market. In particular, laser systems and optical devices impact a broad range of technological areas including telecommunications, optical computing, optical data storage, integrated photonics, remote environmental sensing and biomedical applications. Below we present an overview of photonics research being conducted within the Lasers, Optics and Remote Sensing department of the Physical and Chemical Sciences Center at Sandia National Laboratories. Recent results in the fields of photosensitive materials and devices, binary optics device applications, wavelength generation using optical parametric oscillators, and remote sensing are highlighted. 11 refs., 6 figs.

Simmons-Potter, K.; Meister, D.C.

1997-04-01

157

EXPEDITING THE PATH TO CLOSURE THE CHEMICAL WASTE LANDFILL, SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES, NEW MEXICO  

SciTech Connect

The Chemical Waste Landfill (CWL) at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) is undergoing closure subject to the requirements of Subtitle C of RCRA. This paper identifies regulatory mechanisms that have and continue to expedite and simplify the closure of the CWL. These include (1) the Environmental Restoration (ER) Programmatic effort to achieve progress quickly with respect to the standard regulatory processes, which resulted in the performance of voluntary corrective measures at the CWL years in advance of the standard process schedule, (2) the management and disposal of CWL remediation wastes and materials according to the risks posed, and (3) the combination of multiple regulatory requirements into a single submittal.

Young, S.G.; Schofield, D.P.; Davis, M.J.; Methvin, R.; Mitchell, M.

2003-02-27

158

Large-Scale Field Study of Landfill Covers at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

A large-scale field demonstration comparing final landfill cover designs has been constructed and is currently being monitored at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Two conventional designs (a RCRA Subtitle `D' Soil Cover and a RCRA Subtitle `C' Compacted Clay Cover) were constructed side-by-side with four alternative cover test plots designed for dry environments. The demonstration is intended to evaluate the various cover designs based on their respective water balance performance, ease and reliability of construction, and cost. This paper presents an overview of the ongoing demonstration.

Dwyer, S.F.

1998-09-01

159

Status of the Z Refurbishment project (ZR) at Sandia National Laboratories.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories Z Refurbishment (ZR) Project formally began in August 2002 to increase the Z Accelerator's utilization by providing the capability to perform more shots, improve precision and pulse shape variability, increase delivered current, and accomplish the improvements with minimal disruption to Z's ongoing programs. A project overview was provided at the 14th International Pulsed Power Conference in 2003. This paper provides an update of the project including architectural changes over the past two years, timeframe for completion, and overall design and fabrication status.

Weinbrecht, Edward A.; Bloomquist, Douglas D.; Warner, Peggy Jean; McDaniel, Dillon Heirman; Faturos, Thomas V.; Tabor, Debra Ann; McKee, G. Randall; Weed, John Woodruff

2005-06-01

160

Uniprocessor Performance Analysis of a Representative Workload of Sandia National Laboratories' Scientific Applications.  

SciTech Connect

UNIPROCESSOR PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF A REPRESENTATIVE WORKLOAD OF SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES' SCIENTIFIC APPLICATIONS Master of Science in Electrical Engineering New Mexico State University Las Cruces, New Mexico, 2005 Dr. Jeanine Cook, Chair Throughout the last decade computer performance analysis has become absolutely necessary to maximum performance of some workloads. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) located in Albuquerque, New Mexico is no different in that to achieve maximum performance of large scientific, parallel workloads performance analysis is needed at the uni-processor level. A representative workload has been chosen as the basis of a computer performance study to determine optimal processor characteristics in order to better specify the next generation of supercomputers. Cube3, a finite element test problem developed at SNL is a representative workload of their scientific workloads. This workload has been studied at the uni-processor level to understand characteristics in the microarchitecture that will lead to the overall performance improvement at the multi-processor level. The goal of studying vthis workload at the uni-processor level is to build a performance prediction model that will be integrated into a multi-processor performance model which is currently being developed at SNL. Through the use of performance counters on the Itanium 2 microarchitecture, performance statistics are studied to determine bottlenecks in the microarchitecture and/or changes in the application code that will maximize performance. From source code analysis a performance degrading loop kernel was identified and through the use of compiler optimizations a performance gain of around 20% was achieved.

Charles Laverty

2005-10-01

161

Modeling, simulation, and analysis at Sandia National Laboratories for health care systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Modeling, Simulation, and Analysis are special competencies of the Department of Energy (DOE) National Laboratories which have been developed and refined through years of national defense work. Today, many of these skills are being applied to the problem of understanding the performance of medical devices and treatments. At Sandia National Laboratories we are developing models at all three levels of health care delivery: (1) phenomenology models for Observation and Test, (2) model-based outcomes simulations for Diagnosis and Prescription, and (3) model-based design and control simulations for the Administration of Treatment. A sampling of specific applications include non-invasive sensors for blood glucose, ultrasonic scanning for development of prosthetics, automated breast cancer diagnosis, laser burn debridement, surgical staple deformation, minimally invasive control for administration of a photodynamic drug, and human-friendly decision support aids for computer-aided diagnosis. These and other projects are being performed at Sandia with support from the DOE and in cooperation with medical research centers and private companies. Our objective is to leverage government engineering, modeling, and simulation skills with the biotechnical expertise of the health care community to create a more knowledge-rich environment for decision making and treatment.

Polito, Joseph

1994-12-01

162

Isotope production potential at Sandia National Laboratories: Product, waste, packaging, and transportation  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Congress directed the U.S. Department of Energy to establish a domestic source of molybdenum-99, an essential isotope used in nuclear medicine and radiopharmacology. An Environmental Impact Statement for production of {sup 99}Mo at one of four candidate sites is being prepared. As one of the candidate sites, Sandia National Laboratories is developing the Isotope Production Project. Using federally approved processes and procedures now owned by the U.S. Department of Energy, and existing facilities that would be modified to meet the production requirements, the Sandia National Laboratories` Isotope Project would manufacture up to 30 percent of the U.S. market, with the capacity to meet 100 percent of the domestic need if necessary. This paper provides a brief overview of the facility, equipment, and processes required to produce isotopes. Packaging and transportation issues affecting both product and waste are addressed, and the storage and disposal of the four low-level radioactive waste types generated by the production program are considered. Recommendations for future development are provided.

Trennel, A.J.

1995-12-31

163

A report on IPv6 deployment activities and issues at Sandia National Laboratories:FY2007.  

SciTech Connect

Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4) has been a mainstay of the both the Internet and corporate networks for delivering network packets to the desired destination. However, rapid proliferation of network appliances, evolution of corporate networks, and the expanding Internet has begun to stress the limitations of the protocol. Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) is the replacement protocol that overcomes the constraints of IPv4. As the emerging Internet network protocol, SNL needs to prepare for its eventual deployment in international, national, customer, and local networks. Additionally, the United States Office of Management and Budget has mandated that IPv6 deployment in government network backbones occurs by 2008. This paper explores the readiness of the Sandia National Laboratories network backbone to support IPv6, the issues that must be addressed before a deployment begins, and recommends the next steps to take to comply with government mandates. The paper describes a joint work effort of the Sandia National Laboratories ASC WAN project team and members of the System Analysis & Trouble Resolution, the Communication & Network Systems, and Network System Design & Implementation Departments.

Tolendino, Lawrence F.; Eldridge, John M.; Hu, Tan Chang; Maestas, Joseph H.

2007-06-01

164

MN-MED026 Sandia National Laboratories 6/1/08 1 Health Benefits & Employee Services (HBE)  

E-print Network

Laboratories 6/1/08 2 · Selection and Appointment of Members · Resignation/Termination of Members · MemberMN-MED026 Sandia National Laboratories 6/1/08 1 Health Benefits & Employee Services (HBE · Initial Review · Amendment Review · Continuation Review · Completion/Termination Review 6.0 RESEARCH

Fuerschbach, Phillip

165

Sandia National Laboratories support of the Iraq Nuclear Facility Dismantlement and Disposal Program.  

SciTech Connect

Because of past military operations, lack of upkeep and looting there are now enormous radioactive waste problems in Iraq. These waste problems include destroyed nuclear facilities, uncharacterized radioactive wastes, liquid radioactive waste in underground tanks, wastes related to the production of yellow cake, sealed radioactive sources, activated metals and contaminated metals that must be constantly guarded. Iraq currently lacks the trained personnel, regulatory and physical infrastructure to safely and securely manage these facilities and wastes. In 2005 the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) agreed to organize an international cooperative program to assist Iraq with these issues. Soon after, the Iraq Nuclear Facility Dismantlement and Disposal Program (the NDs Program) was initiated by the U.S. Department of State (DOS) to support the IAEA and assist the Government of Iraq (GOI) in eliminating the threats from poorly controlled radioactive materials. The Iraq NDs Program is providing support for the IAEA plus training, consultation and limited equipment to the GOI. The GOI owns the problems and will be responsible for implementation of the Iraq NDs Program. Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) is a part of the DOS's team implementing the Iraq NDs Program. This report documents Sandia's support of the Iraq NDs Program, which has developed into three principal work streams: (1) training and technical consultation; (2) introducing Iraqis to modern decommissioning and waste management practices; and (3) supporting the IAEA, as they assist the GOI. Examples of each of these work streams include: (1) presentation of a three-day training workshop on 'Practical Concepts for Safe Disposal of Low-Level Radioactive Waste in Arid Settings;' (2) leading GOI representatives on a tour of two operating low level radioactive waste disposal facilities in the U.S.; and (3) supporting the IAEA's Technical Meeting with the GOI from April 21-25, 2008. As noted in the report, there was significant teaming between the various participants to best help the GOI. On-the-ground progress is the focus of the Iraq NDs Program and much of the work is a transfer of technical and practical skills and knowledge that Sandia uses day-to-day. On-the-ground progress was achieved in July of 2008 when the GOI began the physical cleanup and dismantlement of the Active Metallurgical Testing Laboratory (LAMA) facility at Al Tuwaitha, near Baghdad.

Cochran, John Russell; Danneels, Jeffrey John

2009-03-01

166

Current radar-responsive tag development activities at Sandia National Laboratories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Over the past ten years, Sandia has developed RF radar responsive tag systems and supporting technologies for various government agencies and industry partners. RF tags can function as RF transmitters or radar transponders that enable tagging, tracking, and location determination functions. Expertise in tag architecture, microwave and radar design, signal analysis and processing techniques, digital design, modeling and simulation, and testing have been directly applicable to these tag programs. In general, the radar responsive tag designs have emphasized low power, small package size, and the ability to be detected by the radar at long ranges. Recently, there has been an interest in using radar responsive tags for Blue Force tracking and Combat ID (CID). The main reason for this interest is to allow airborne surveillance radars to easily distinguish U.S. assets from those of opposing forces. A Blue Force tracking capability would add materially to situational awareness. Combat ID is also an issue, as evidenced by the fact that approximately one-quarter of all U.S. casualties in the Gulf War took the form of ground troops killed by friendly fire. Because the evolution of warfare in the intervening decade has made asymmetric warfare the norm rather than the exception, swarming engagements in which U.S. forces will be freely intermixed with opposing forces is a situation that must be anticipated. Increasing utilization of precision munitions can be expected to drive fires progressively closer to engaged allied troops at times when visual de-confliction is not an option. In view of these trends, it becomes increasingly important that U.S. ground forces have a widely proliferated all-weather radar responsive tag that communicates to all-weather surveillance. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the recent, current, and future radar responsive research and development activities at Sandia National Laboratories that support both the Blue Force Tracking and Combat ID application. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company for the United States Departments of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

Ormesher, Richard C.; Plummer, Kenneth W.; Wells, Lars M.

2004-08-01

167

Research on the Use of Robotics in Hazardous Environments at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Many hazardous material handling needs exist in remote unstructured environments. Currently these operations are accomplished using personnel in direct contact with the hazards. A safe and cost effective alternative to this approach is the use of intelligent robotic systems for safe handling, packaging, transport, and even excavation of hazardous materials. The Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center of Sandia National Laboratories has developed and deployed robotic technologies for use in hazardous environments, three of which have been deployed in DOE production facilities for handling of special nuclear materials. Other systems are currently under development for packaging special nuclear materials. This paper presents an overview of the research activities, including five delivered systems, at %ndia National Laboratories on the use of robotics in hazardous environments.

Kwok, Kwan S.

1999-05-04

168

Pollution prevention opportunity assessment for MicroFab and SiFab facilities at Sandia National Laboratories.  

SciTech Connect

This Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessment (PPOA) was conducted for the MicroFab and SiFab facilities at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico in Fiscal Year 2011. The primary purpose of this PPOA is to provide recommendations to assist organizations in reducing the generation of waste and improving the efficiency of their processes and procedures. This report contains a summary of the information collected, the analyses performed, and recommended options for implementation. The Sandia National Laboratories Environmental Management System (EMS) and Pollution Prevention (P2) staff will continue to work with the organizations to implement the recommendations.

Gerard, Morgan Evan

2011-12-01

169

Aquatic macroinvertebrates and water quality of Sandia Canyon, Los Alamos National Laboratory, November 1993--October 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Ecological Studies Team (EST) of ESH-20 at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has collected samples from the stream within Sandia Canyon since the summer of 1990. These field studies gather water quality measurements and collect aquatic macroinvertebrates from permanent sampling sites. Reports by Bennett (1994) and Cross (1994) discuss previous EST aquatic studies in Sandia Canyon. This report updates and expands those findings. EST collected water quality data and aquatic macroinvertebrates at five permanent stations within the canyon from November 1993 through October 1994. The two upstream stations are located below outfalls that discharge industrial and sanitary waste effluent into the stream, thereby maintaining year-round flow. Some water quality parameters are different at the first three stations from those expected of natural streams in the area, indicating degraded water quality due to effluent discharges. The aquatic habitat at the upper stations has also been degraded by sedimentation and channelization. The macroinvertebrate communities at these stations are characterized by low diversities and unstable communities. In contrast, the two downstream stations appear to be in a zone of recovery, where water quality parameters more closely resemble those found in natural streams of the area. The two lower stations have increased macroinvertebrate diversity and stable communities, further indications of downstream water quality improvement.

Cross, S.

1995-08-01

170

Surface-wave and refraction tomography at the FACT Site, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.  

SciTech Connect

We present a technique that allows for the simultaneous acquisition and interpretation of both shear-wave and compressive-wave 3-D velocities. The technique requires no special seismic sources or array geometries, and is suited to studies with small source-receiver offsets. The method also effectively deals with unwanted seismic arrivals by using the statistical properties of the data itself to discriminate against spurious picks. We demonstrate the technique with a field experiment at the Facility for Analysis, Calibration, and Testing at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. The resulting 3-D shear-velocity and compressive-velocity distributions are consistent with surface geologic mapping. The averaged velocities and V{sub p}/V{sub s} ratio in the upper 30 meters are also consistent with examples found in the scientific literature.

Abbott, Robert E.; Bartel, Lewis Clark; Pullammanappallil, Satish (Optim, Inc., Reno, NV); Engler, Bruce Phillip

2006-08-01

171

Z-Pinch Driven Inertial Confinement Fusion Target Physics Research at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Three hohlraum concepts are being pursued at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to investigate the possibility of using pulsed power driven magnetic implosions (z-pinches) to drive high gain targets capable of yields in the range of 200-1000 MJ. This research is being conducted on SNL'S.Z facility that is capable of driving peak currents of 20 MA in z-pinch loads producing implosion velocities as high as 7.5X 107 cm/s, x-ray energies approaching 2 MJ, and x-ray powers exceeding 200 TW. This paper will discuss each of these hohlraum concepts and will overview the experiments that have been conducted on these systems to date.

Alberts, T.E.; Asay, J.R.; Baca, P.M.; Baker, K.L.; Breeze, S.P.; Chandler, G.A.; Cook, D.L.; Cooper, G.W.; Deeney, C.; Derzon, M.S.; Douglas, M.R.; Fehl, D.L.; Gilliland, T.; Hebron, D.E.; Hurst, M.J.; Jobe, D.O.; Kellogg, J.W.; Lash, J.S.; Lazier, S.E.; Leeper, R.J.; Matzen, M.K.; McDaniel, D.H.; McGurn, J.S.; Mehlhorn, T.A.; Moats, A.R.; Mock, R.C.; Muron, D.J.; Nash, T.J.; Olson, R.E.; Porter, J.L.; Quintenz, J.P.; Reyers, P.V.; Ruggles, L.E.; Ruiz, C.L.; Sandford, T.W.L.; Schmidlapp, F.A.; Seamen, J.F.; Spielman, R.B.; Stark, M.A.; Struve, K.W.; Stygar, W.A.; Tibbetts-Russell, D.R.; Torres, J.A.; Vargas, M.; Wagoner, T.C.; Wakefield, C.

1998-10-27

172

Computer Network Availability at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque NM: Measurement and Perception  

SciTech Connect

The desire to provide a measure of computer network availability at Sandia National Laboratories has existed for along time. Several attempts were made to build this measure by accurately recording network failures, identifying the type of network element involved, the root cause of the problem, and the time to repair the fault. Recognizing the limitations of available methods, it became obvious that another approach of determining network availability had to be defined. The chosen concept involved the periodic sampling of network services and applications from various network locations. A measure of ''network'' availability was then calculated based on the ratio of polling success to failure. The effort required to gather the information and produce a useful metric is not prohibitive and the information gained has verified long held feelings regarding network performance with real data.

NELSON,SPENCER D.; TOLENDINO,LAWRENCE F.

1999-11-01

173

The future of infrastructure security : a workshop held at Sandia National Laboratories.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories hosted a workshop on the future of infrastructure security on February 27-28, 2013, in Albuquerque, NM. The 17 participants came from backgrounds as diverse as federal policy, the insurance industry, infrastructure management, and technology development. The purpose of the workshop was to surface key issues, identify directions forward, and lay groundwork for cross-sectoral and cross-disciplinary collaborations. The workshop addressed issues such as the problem space (what is included ininfrastructure' problems?), the general types of threats to infrastructure (such as acute or chronic, system-inherent or exogenously imposed) and definitions ofsecure and resilient' infrastructures. The workshop concluded with a consideration of stakeholders and players in the infrastructure world, and identification of specific activities that could be undertaken by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and other players.

Garcia, Pablo; Turnley, Jessica Glicken; Parrott, Lori K.

2013-05-01

174

Explosive Components Facility at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. Environmental assessment  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) on the proposed Explosive Components Facility (ECF) at the Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque (SNL). This facility is needed to integrate, centralize, and enhance many of the explosive, neutron generation, and weapons testing programs currently in progress at SNL. In general, there is insufficient space in existing facilities for the development and testing activities required by modern explosives technologies. The EA examined the potential environmental impacts of the proposed ECF project and discussed potential alternatives. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, and CEQ regulations at 40 CFR 1508.18 and 1508.27. Therefore, an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required, and the DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

Not Available

1992-07-01

175

Review of Heavy-Duty Engine Combustion Research at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this paper are to describe the research efforts in diesel engine combustion at Sandia National Laboratories' Combustion Research Facility and to provide recent experimental results. We have four diesel engine experiments supported by the Department of Energy, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies: a one-cylinder version of a Cummins heavy-duty engine, a diesel simulation facility, a one-cylinder Caterpillar engine to evaluate combustion of alternative fuels, and a homogeneous-charge, compression-ignition (HCCI) engine facility is under development. Recent experimental results to be discussed are: the effects of injection timing and diluent addition on late-combustion soot burnout, diesel-spray ignition and premixed-burn behavior, a comparison of the combustion characteristics of M85 (a mixture of 85% methanol and 15% gasoline) and DF2 (No.2 diesel reference fuel), and a description of our HCCI experimental program and modeling work.

Robert W. Carling; Gurpreet Singh

2000-06-19

176

Results from Sandia National Laboratories/Lockheed Martin Electromagnetic Missile Launcher (EMML).  

SciTech Connect

Sandia national laboratories (SNL) and lockheed martin MS2 are designing an electromagnetic missile launcher (EMML) for naval applications. The EMML uses an induction coilgun topology with the requirement of launching a 3600 lb. missile up to a velocity of 40 m/s. To demonstrate the feasibility of the electromagnetic propulsion design, a demonstrator launcher was built that consists of approximately 10% of the propulsion coils needed for a tactical design. The demonstrator verified the design by launching a 1430 lb weighted sled to a height of 24 ft in mid-December 2004 (Figure 1). This paper provides the general launcher design, specific pulsed power system component details, system operation, and demonstration results.

Lockner, Thomas Ramsbeck; Skurdal, Ben (Lockheed Martin MS2, Baltimore, MD); Gaigler, Randy (Lockheed Martin MS2, Baltimore, MD); Basak, L (Lockheed Martin MS2, Baltimore, MD); Root, G (Lockheed Martin MS2, Baltimore, MD); Aubuchon, Matthew S.; Turman, Bobby N.; Floyd, Mendel D. (Lockheed Martin MS2, Baltimore, MD)

2005-05-01

177

Waste Processing To Support {sup 99}Mo Production at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Isotope Production Program at Sandia National Laboratories New Mexico (SNL/NM), procedures are being finalized for the production of {sup 99}Mo from the irradiation of {sup 235}U-coated stainless steel targets at the Technical Area (TA) V reactor and hot cell facilities. Methods have been identified and tested for the management of the non-product (waste) material as the final step in the production process. These methods were developed utilizing the waste material from a series of cold and hot tests, beginning with depleted uranium powder and culminating with a test involving an irradiated {sup 235}U target with an initial fission product inventory of approximately 18,000 Ci at the end of the irradiation cycle.

Longley, Susan; Carson, Susan; McDonald, Marion

1997-06-01

178

Overview of Sandia National Laboratories and Khlopin Radium Institute collaborative radiological accident consequence analysis efforts  

SciTech Connect

In January, 1995 a collaborative effort to improve radiological consequence analysis methods and tools was initiated between the V.G. Khlopin Institute (KRI) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The purpose of the collaborative effort was to transfer SNL`s consequence analysis methods to KRI and identify opportunities for collaborative efforts to solve mutual problems relating to the safety of radiochemical facilities. A second purpose was to improve SNL`s consequence analysis methods by incorporating the radiological accident field experience of KRI scientists (e.g. the Chernobyl and Kyshtym accidents). The initial collaborative effort focused on the identification of: safety criteria that radiochemical facilities in Russia must meet; analyses/measures required to demonstrate that safety criteria have been met; and data required to complete the analyses/measures identified to demonstrate the safety basis of a facility.

Young, M.L.; Carlson, D.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lazarev, L.N.; Petrov, B.F.; Romanovskiy, V.N. [V.G. Khlopin Radium Inst., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

1997-05-01

179

Sandia National Laboratories performance assessment methodology for long-term environmental programs : the history of nuclear waste management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is the world leader in the development of the detailed science underpinning the application of a probabilistic risk assessment methodology, referred to in this report as performance assessment (PA), for (1) understanding and forecasting the long-term behavior of a radioactive waste disposal system, (2) estimating the ability of the disposal system and its various components to

Melvin Gary Marietta; D. Richard Anderson; Evaristo J. Bonano; Paul Gregory Meacham

2011-01-01

180

PATRAM '92: 10th international symposium on the packaging and transportation of radioactive materials [Papers presented by Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

This document provides the papers presented by Sandia Laboratories at PATRAM '92, the tenth International symposium on the Packaging and Transportation of Radioactive Materials held September 13--18, 1992 in Yokohama City, Japan. Individual papers have been cataloged separately. (FL)

none,

1992-01-01

181

Competition, strategic technology options and game theory in science and technology policy: the SEMATECH-Sandia National Laboratories partnership  

Microsoft Academic Search

The semiconductor industry consortium SEMATECH is used as the platform to study and critique science and technology policy on high tech consortia. The concepts of leveraging strategic technology options and competing in a game-theoretic context drive the analysis and research done. The authors focus especially on the collaborative R&D efforts undertaken by Sematech and Sandia National Laboratories

E. G. Carayannis; James Gover

1997-01-01

182

Space Radiation Effects Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The SREL User's Handbook is designed to provide information needed by those who plan experiments involving the accelerators at this laboratory. Thus the Handbook will contain information on the properties of the machines, the beam parameters, the facilities and services provided for experimenters, etc. This information will be brought up to date as new equipment is added and modifications accomplished. This Handbook is influenced by the many excellent models prepared at other accelerator laboratories. In particular, the CERN Synchrocyclotron User's Handbook (November 1967) is closely followed in some sections, since the SREL Synchrocyclotron is a duplicate of the CERN machine. We wish to thank Dr. E. G. Michaelis for permission to draw so heavily on his work, particularly in Section II of this Handbook. We hope that the Handbook will prove useful, and will welcome suggestions and criticism.

1969-01-01

183

INFORMATION: Inspection Report on "Removal of Categories I and II Special Nuclear Material from Sandia National Laboratories-New Mexico"  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Sandia National Laboratories-New Mexico (Sandia) develops science-based technologies in support of national security in areas such as nuclear weapons, nonproliferation, military technologies, and homeland security. Sandia's primary mission is ensuring that the U.S. nuclear arsenal is safe, secure, and reliable and can fully support the Nation's deterrence policy. Part of this mission includes systems engineering of nuclear weapons; research, design, and development of non-nuclear components; manufacturing of non-nuclear weapons components; the provision of safety, security, and reliability assessments of stockpile weapons; and the conduct of high-explosives research and development and environmental testing. Sandia Corporation, a subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, operates Sandia for the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). On May 7, 2004, the Secretary announced that the Department would evaluate missions at DOE sites to consolidate Special Nuclear Material (SNM) in the most secure environments possible. The Administrator of the NNSA said that this effort was a key part of an overall plan to transform the nuclear weapons complex into a smaller, safer, more secure, and more efficient national security enterprise. In February 2008, Sandia was the first site to report it had reduced its on-site inventory of nuclear material below 'Categories I and II' levels, which require the highest level of security to protect material such as plutonium and highly enriched uranium. The Office of Inspector General initiated an inspection to determine if Sandia made appropriate adjustments to its security posture in response to the removal of the Categories I and II SNM. We found that Sandia adjusted its security posture in response to the removal of Categories I and II SNM. For example, security posts were closed; unneeded protective force weapons and equipment were excessed from the site; and, Sandia's Site Safeguards and Security Plan was modified. We also found that some highly enriched uranium in a complex material configuration was not removed from Sandia. This material was designated as Category III material using a methodology for assessing the attractiveness of complex materials that was not specifically addressed in any current DOE directive. Although DOE and NNSA officials believed that this designation was appropriate, the methodology used to support this designation had not, as of the time of our review, been incorporated into the DOE directives system. Historically, the Department has considered the categorization of SNM to be an important national security and public policy issue. Consequently, we believe that expedited action should be taken to formalize this methodology in the DOE directives system and that it be disseminated throughout the Department of Energy complex.

None

2010-01-01

184

Environmental assessment for Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico offsite transportation of low-level radioactive waste  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) is managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company. SNL/NM is located on land owned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) within the boundaries of the Kirtland Air Force Base (KAFB) in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The major responsibilities of SNL/NM are the support of national security and energy projects. Low-level radioactive waste (LLW) is generated by some of the activities performed at SNL/NM in support of the DOE. This report describes potential environmental effects of the shipments of low-level radioactive wastes to other sites.

NONE

1996-09-01

185

Simulation information regarding Sandia National Laboratories%3CU%2B2019%3E trinity capability improvement metric.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory each selected a representative simulation code to be used as a performance benchmark for the Trinity Capability Improvement Metric. Sandia selected SIERRA Low Mach Module: Nalu, which is a uid dynamics code that solves many variable-density, acoustically incompressible problems of interest spanning from laminar to turbulent ow regimes, since it is fairly representative of implicit codes that have been developed under ASC. The simulations for this metric were performed on the Cielo Cray XE6 platform during dedicated application time and the chosen case utilized 131,072 Cielo cores to perform a canonical turbulent open jet simulation within an approximately 9-billion-elementunstructured- hexahedral computational mesh. This report will document some of the results from these simulations as well as provide instructions to perform these simulations for comparison.

Agelastos, Anthony Michael; Lin, Paul T.

2013-10-01

186

Environmental Testing Philosophy for a Sandia National Laboratories' Small Satellite Project - A Retrospective  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sandia has recently completed the flight certification test series for the Multi-Spectral Thermal Imaging satellite (MTI), which is a small satellite for which Sandia was the system integrator. A paper was presented at the 16th Aerospace Testing Seminar discussing plans for performing the structural dynamics certification program for that satellite. The testing philosophy was originally based on a combination of

JEROME S

2000-01-01

187

Laser Tracker III: Sandia National Laboratories' third generation laser tracking system  

Microsoft Academic Search

At Sandia Labs' Coyote Canyon Test Complex, it became necessary to develop a precision single station solution to provide time space position information (tspi) when tracking airborne test vehicles. Sandia's first laser tracker came on line in 1968, replacing the fixed camera technique for producing trajectory data. This system shortened data reduction time from weeks to minutes. Laser Tracker II

Duane L. Patrick

1995-01-01

188

Standard testing procedures for optical fiber and unshielded twisted pair at Sandia National Laboratories. Revision  

SciTech Connect

This revision updates Sandia`s working standard for testing optical fiber and unshielded twisted pair cables included in the Lab-wide telecommunications cabling infrastructure. The purpose of these standard testing procedures is to deliver to all Sandians a reliable, low-maintenance, state-of-the-art, ubiquitous telecommunications cabling infrastructure capable of satisfying all current and future telecommunication needs.

Adams, R.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Communications Dept.

1994-09-01

189

Designing for explosive safety'': The Explosive Components Facility at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

The Explosive Components Facility (ECF) is to be a new major facility in the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Weapons Program. The ECF is a self-contained, secure site on SNL property and is surrounded by Kirtland Air Force Base which is located 6-1/2 miles east of downtown Albuquerque, New Mexico. The ECF will be dedicated to research, development, and testing of detonators, neutron generators, batteries, explosives, and other weapon components. It will have capabilities for conducting explosive test fires, gas gun testing, physical analyses, chemical analyses, electrical testing and ancillary explosive storage in magazines. The ECF complex is composed of a building covering an area of approximately 91,000 square feet, six exterior explosive service magazines and a remote test cell. Approximately 50% of the building space will be devoted to highly specialized laboratory and test areas, the other 50% of the building is considered nonhazardous. Critical to the laboratory and test areas are the blast-structural design consideration and operational considerations, particularly those concerning personnel access control, safety and environmental protection. This area will be decoupled from the rest of the building to the extent that routine tests will not be heard or felt in the administrative area of the building. While the ECF is designed in accordance with the DOE Explosives Safety Manual to mitigate any off-site blast effects, potential injuries or death to the ECF staff may result from an accidental detonation of explosive material within the facility. Therefore, reducing the risk of exposing operation personnel to hazardous and energetic material is paramount in the design of the ECF.

Couch, W.A.

1990-12-01

190

Environmental assessment for the Radioactive and Mixed Waste Management Facility: Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-0466) under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 for the proposed completion of construction and subsequent operation of a central Radioactive and Mixed Waste Management Facility (RMWMF), in the southeastern portion of Technical Area III at Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque (SNLA). The RMWMF is designed to receive, store, characterize, conduct limited bench-scale treatment of, repackage, and certify low-level waste (LLW) and mixed waste (MW) (as necessary) for shipment to an offsite disposal or treatment facility. The RMWMF was partially constructed in 1989. Due to changing regulatory requirements, planned facility upgrades would be undertaken as part of the proposed action. These upgrades would include paving of road surfaces and work areas, installation of pumping equipment and lines for surface impoundment, and design and construction of air locks and truck decontamination and water treatment systems. The proposed action also includes an adjacent corrosive and reactive metals storage area, and associated roads and paving. LLW and MW generated at SNLA would be transported from the technical areas to the RMWMF in containers approved by the Department of Transportation. The RMWMF would not handle nonradioactive hazardous waste. Based on the analysis in the EA, the proposed completion of construction and operation of the RMWMF does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA. Therefore, preparation of an environmental impact statement for the proposed action is not required.

Not Available

1993-06-01

191

Food and Drug Administration process validation activities to support 99Mo production at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Prior to 1989 {sup 99}Mo was produced in the US by a single supplier, Cintichem Inc., Tuxedo, NY. Because of problems associated with operating its facility, in 1989 Cintichem elected to decommission the facility rather than incur the costs for repair. The demise of the {sup 99}Mo capability at Cintichem left the US totally reliant upon a single foreign source, Nordion International, located in Ottawa Canada. In 1992 the DOE purchased the Cintichem {sup 99}Mo Production Process and Drug Master File (DMF). In 1994 the DOE funded Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to produce {sup 99}Mo. Although Cintichem produced {sup 99}Mo and {sup 99m}Tc generators for many years, there was no requirement for process validation which is now required by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). In addition to the validation requirement, the requirements for current Good manufacturing Practices were codified into law. The purpose of this paper is to describe the process validation being conducted at SNL for the qualification of SNL as a supplier of {sup 99}Mo to US pharmaceutical companies.

McDonald, M.J.; Bourcier, S.C.; Talley, D.G.

1997-07-01

192

Air quality investigations of the Sandia National Laboratories Sol se Mete Aerial Cable Facility  

SciTech Connect

The air quality implications of the test and evaluation activities at the Sandia National Laboratories Sol se Mete Aerial Cable Facility are examined. All facets of the activity that affect air quality are considered. Air contaminants produced directly include exhaust products of rocket motors used to accelerate test articles, dust and gas from chemical explosives, and exhaust gases from electricity generators in the test arenas. Air contaminants produced indirectly include fugitive dust and exhaust contaminants from vehicles used to transport personnel and material to the test area, and effluents produced by equipment used to heat the project buildings. Both the ongoing program and the proposed changes in the program are considered. Using a reliable estimate of th maximum annual testing level, the quantities of contaminants released by project activities ar computed either from known characteristics of test items or from EPA-approved emission factors Atmospheric concentrations of air contaminants are predicted using EPA dispersion models. The predicted quantities and concentrations are evaluated in relation to Federal, New Mexico, an Bernalillo County air quality regulations and the human health and safety standards of the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists.

Gutman, W.M.; Silver, R.J. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States). Physical Science Lab.

1994-12-01

193

Routine environmental audit of the Sandia National Laboratories, California, Livermore, California  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of the Routine Environmental Audit of the Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California (SNL/CA). During this audit the activities the Audit Team conducted included reviews of internal documents and reports from preview audits and assessments; interviews with US Department of Energy (DOE), State of California regulators, and contractor personnel; and inspections and observations of selected facilities and operations. The onsite portion of the audit was conducted from February 22 through March 4, 1994, by the DOE Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24), located within the Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH). The audit evaluated the status of programs to ensure compliance with Federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations; compliance with DOE Orders, guidance, and directives; and conformance with accepted industry practices and standards of performance. The audit also evaluated the status and adequacy of the management systems developed to address environmental requirements. The audit`s functional scope was comprehensive and included all areas of environmental management and a programmatic evaluation of NEPA and inactive waste sites.

Not Available

1994-03-01

194

Proximal potentially seismogenic sources for Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Recent geologic and geophysical investigations within the Albuquerque Basin have shed light on the potentially seismogenic sources that might affect Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM), a multi-disciplinary research and engineering facility of the US Department of Energy (DOE). This paper presents a summary of potentially seismogenic sources for SNL/NM, emphasizing those sources within approximately 8 kilometers (km) of the site. Several significant faults of the central Rio Grande rift transect SNL/NM. Although progress has been made on understanding the geometry and interactions of these faults, little is known of the timing of most recent movement or on recurrent intervals for these faults. Therefore, whether particular faults or fault sections have been active during the Holocene or even the late Pleistocene is undocumented. Although the overall subdued surface expression of many of these faults suggests that they have low to moderate slip rates, the proximity of these faults to critical (e.g., nuclear) and non-critical (e.g., high-occupancy, multistory office/light lab) facilities at SNL/NM requires their careful examination for evaluation of potential seismic hazard.

Gibson, J.D.

1995-10-01

195

Addressing environmental justice under the National Environment Policy Act at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Under Executive Order 12898, Federal Actions to Address Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low-Income Populations, the Department of Energy (DOE) and Sandia National Laboratories New Mexico (SNL) are required to identify and address, as appropriate, disproportionately high, adverse human health or environmental effects of their activities on minority and low-income populations. The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) also requires that environmental justice issues be identified and addressed. This presents a challenge for SNL because it is located in a culturally diverse area. Successfully addressing potential impacts is contingent upon accurately identifying them through objective analysis of demographic information. However, an effective public participation process, which is necessarily subjective, is also needed to understand the subtle nuances of diverse populations that can contribute to a potential impact, yet are not always accounted for in a strict demographic profile. Typically, there is little or no coordination between these two disparate processes. This report proposes a five-step method for reconciling these processes and uses a hypothetical case study to illustrate the method. A demographic analysis and community profile of the population within 50 miles of SNL were developed to support the environmental justice analysis process and enhance SNL`s NEPA and public involvement programs. This report focuses on developing a methodology for identifying potentially impacted populations. Environmental justice issues related to worker exposures associated with SNL activities will be addressed in a separate report.

Cohen, T.M.; Bleakly, D.R.

1997-04-01

196

Resource conservation and pollution prevention through process optimization at Sandia National Laboratories` Steam Plant  

SciTech Connect

The Steam Plant at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) supplies on average 680,000 kg/day (1.5 x 10{sup 6} lb/day) of saturated steam for space heating and laboratory processes for SNL/NM, Technical Area 1, the eastern portion of Kirtland Air Force Base, the Department of Energy`s Albuquerque Office, and the KAFB Coronado Club. The primary fuel is natural gas (740 mscf/yr); the secondary fuel in the event of a natural gas interruption is diesel fuel. Two storage tanks provide a diesel fuel reserve of 1.5 million gallons. The Steam Plant has been in continuous operation since 1949, and some of the boilers are past their design life. Each of the boilers is controlled through a central Digital Control System (DCS). The DCS design is based on the stoichiometric equation, where the O{sub 2} stack concentration and load rate are set points and the combustion air and gas flow are adjusted based on the equation. The DCS was installed and programmed in 1992, but has not been updated since. Long range studies are being conducted to determine the fate of the steam plant, but implementation of any of these options is at least 5 years in the future. Because it is a major source of air emissions, water and chemical use, and waste water at SNL/NM, the steam plant pursued immediate solutions to reduce costs and pollutant releases, while still providing uninterrupted, quality service to its customers. This paper will summarize the ongoing efforts to conserve water, and reduce air and wastewater discharges at the SNL/NM Steam Plant. These improvements were identified through a Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessment, an Emissions Reduction Study.

Evans, C.; Chavez, C.

1997-10-01

197

Integrated verification experiment data collected as part of the Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Source Region program. Appendix F: Regional data from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratory Seismic Networks  

SciTech Connect

A dataset of regional seismograms assembled for a series of Integrated Verification Experiments conducted by the Los Alamos National Laboratory Source Region program is described. The seismic data has been assembled from networks operated by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratory. Examples of the data are shown and basic recording characteristics of the network are described. The seismograms are available on a data tape in SAC format upon request.

Taylor, S.R.

1993-06-11

198

The economic impact of Sandia National Laboratories on central New Mexico and the state of New Mexico fiscal year 1997  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) was established in 1949 to perform the engineering development and ordnance responsibilities associated with nuclear weapons. By the early 1960`s the facility had evolved into an engineering research and development laboratory and became a multiprogram laboratory during the 1970s. Sandia is operated for the US Department of Energy by the Sandia Corporation, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin, Incorporated. For several years, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Albuquerque Operations Office (AL) and New Mexico State University (NMSU) have maintained an inter-industry, input-output model with capabilities to assess the impacts of developments initiated outside the economy such as federal DOE monies that flow into the state, on an economy. This model will be used to assess economic, personal income and employment impacts of SNL on central New Mexico and the state of New Mexico. For this report, the reference period is FY 1997 (October 1, 1996, through September 30, 1997) and includes two major impact analyses: the impact of SNL activities on central New Mexico and the economic impacts of SNL on the state of New Mexico. For purposes of this report, the central New Mexico region includes Bernalillo, Sandoval, Valencia, and Torrance counties. Total impact represents both direct and indirect respending by business, including induced effects (respending by households). The standard multipliers used in determining impacts results from the inter-industry, input-output models developed for the four-county region and the state of New Mexico. 6 figs., 10 tabs.

Lansford, R.R.; Nielsen, T.G.; Schultz, J. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States); Adcock, L.D.; Gentry, L.M. [Dept. of Energy, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Albuquerque Operations Office; Ben-David, S. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Economics; Temple, J. [Temple (John), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1998-05-29

199

Gas sensor technology at Sandia National Laboratories: Catalytic gate, Surface Acoustic Wave and Fiber Optic Devices  

SciTech Connect

Sandia`s gas sensor program encompasses three separate electronic platforms: Acoustic Wave Devices, Fiber Optic Sensors and sensors based on silicon microelectronic devices. A review of most of these activities was presented recently in a article in Science under the title ``Chemical Microsensors.`` The focus of the program has been on understanding and developing the chemical sensor coatings that are necessary for using these electronic platforms as effective chemical sensors.

Hughes, R.C.; Moreno, D.J.; Jenkins, M.W.; Rodriguez, J.L.

1993-10-01

200

Clay mineralogy of selected borehole sediments from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California  

SciTech Connect

Smectite, 90 to 100% interstratified illite-smectite, chlorate, and kaolinite are identified in boreholes drilled in fluvial and alluvial fan deposits of the Plio-Pleistocene Livermore Formation in the vicinity of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Livermore. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and electron microprobe studies indicate the clays persist through 150 ft of gravels, sands, silts, and mudstones of the vadose zone to total drilling depths of 200 ft in the saturated zone. Scanning electron microscopy indicates that true clays (layer silicate only) comprise between 2 and 15 modal percent of the Livermore Formation. Authigenic and detrital smectite, 90% interlayered illite-smectite, and chlorate persist throughout the stratigraphic section; kaolinite occurs only in the upper 100 ft of the section and is absent below. Smectite comprises between 60 to 90% of the true (layer silicate only) clay fraction. Illite and kaolinite{plus_minus}chlorite abundances fluctuate between 10 to 30% and 10 to 20% of this fraction, respectively. Authigenic smectite, illite, and chlorate crystallize together with detrital phases; the authigenic component increases with depth. The relative percentages of clay minerals define unique mineralogical intervals, which can be correlated between boreholes. Pervasive microfractures and interconnected porosity are inherent in the finer sediments; the microfractures typically are 1 mm or less in width and are variably spaced. Voids and microfractures are conspicuously lined by clays. Porosity for the argillaceous sediments ranges between 23 and 40%; Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller (BET) specific surface area decreases variably from 40 m{sup 2}/g near the surface to 15 m{sup 2}/g at the 115-ft depth. Within the pelitic matrix, iron, iron-titanium, chromium, and manganese oxides are pervasive.

Smith, D.K. [ed.; Peifer, D.W.; Rood, C.K.

1992-04-01

201

The Los Alamos, Sandia, and Livermore Laboratories: Integration and collaboration solving science and technology problems for the nation  

SciTech Connect

More than 40 years ago, three laboratories were established to take on scientific responsibility for the nation`s nuclear weapons - Los Alamos, Sandia, and Livermore. This triad of laboratories has provided the state-of-the-art science and technology to create America`s nuclear deterrent and to ensure that the weapons are safe, secure, and to ensure that the weapons are safe, secure, and reliable. These national security laboratories carried out their responsibilities through intense efforts involving almost every field of science, engineering, and technology. Today, they are recognized as three of the world`s premier research and development laboratories. This report sketches the history of the laboratories and their evolution to an integrated three-laboratory system. The characteristics that make them unique are described and some of the major contributions they have made over the years are highlighted.

NONE

1994-12-01

202

Absolute, soft x-ray calorimetry on the Z facility at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Simple and reliable x-ray fluence measurements, in addition to time-resolved diagnostics, are needed to understand the physics of hot Z-pinch plasmas. A commercially available laser calorimeter has been modified for measuring soft x-ray fluence from the Z facility at Sandia National Laboratories. The x-ray absorber of this calorimeter is an aluminum disk, attached to a two-dimensional thermopile and surrounded by an isoperibol shroud. The time-integral and the maximum of the thermopile voltage signal are both proportional to the x-ray energy deposited. Data are collected for 90 seconds, and the instrument has, thus far, been used in the 1--25 mJ range. A wider dynamic measuring range for x-ray fluence (energy/area) can be achieved by varying the area of the defining aperture. The calorimeter is calibrated by an electrical substitution method. Calibrations are performed before and after each x-ray experiment on the Z facility. The calibration of the time-integral of the thermopile voltage vs. energy deposited (or the peak of thermopile voltage vs. energy deposited) is linear with zero offset at the 95% confidence level. The irreproducibility of the calibration is <2%, and the imprecision in the measurement of the incident x-ray energy (inferred from signal noise and the calibration) is estimated to be {approximately}0.9 mJ (95% confidence level). The inaccuracy is estimated at {+-}10%, due to correctable systematic errors (e.g., baseline shifts). Comparisons have been made of the calorimeter to time-resolved x-ray diagnostics, e.g., bolometers and XRD (x-ray diode) arrays, by integrating the flux measured by these instruments over time.

Fehl, D.L.; Muron, D.J.; Leeper, R.J.; Chandler, G.A.; Deeney, C.; Spielman, R.B.

1998-05-01

203

1995 annual epidemiologic surveillance report for Sandia National Laboratory-Albuquerque  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) conduct of epidemiologic surveillance provides an early warning system for health problems among workers. This program monitors illnesses and injuries that result in an absence of five or more consecutive workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers. This report provides a summary of epidemiologic surveillance data collected from the Sandia National Laboratory-Albuquerque (SNL-AL) from January 1, 1995 through December 31, 1995. The data were collected by a coordinator at SNL-AL and submitted to the Epidemiologic Surveillance Data Center, located at Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, where quality control procedures and data analyses were carried out. The annual report for 1995 has been redesigned from reports for previous years. Most of the information in the previous reports is also in this report, but some material now appears in the appendices instead of the main body of the report. The information presented in the main body of the report provides a descriptive analysis of the data collected from the site and the appendices provide more detail. A new section of the report presents trends in health over time. The Glossary and an Explanation of Diagnostic Categories have been expanded with more examples of diagnoses to illustrate the content of each category. The data presented here apply only to SNL-AL. The DOE sites are varied, so comparisons of SNL-AL with other DOE sites should be made with caution. It is important to keep in mind that many factors can affect the completeness and accuracy of health information collected at the sites as well as affect patterns of illness and injury observed.

NONE

1995-12-31

204

Development and integration of Raman imaging capabilities to Sandia National Laboratories hyperspectral fluorescence imaging instrument.  

SciTech Connect

Raman spectroscopic imaging is a powerful technique for visualizing chemical differences within a variety of samples based on the interaction of a substance's molecular vibrations with laser light. While Raman imaging can provide a unique view of samples such as residual stress within silicon devices, chemical degradation, material aging, and sample heterogeneity, the Raman scattering process is often weak and thus requires very sensitive collection optics and detectors. Many commercial instruments (including ones owned here at Sandia National Laboratories) generate Raman images by raster scanning a point focused laser beam across a sample--a process which can expose a sample to extreme levels of laser light and requires lengthy acquisition times. Our previous research efforts have led to the development of a state-of-the-art two-dimensional hyperspectral imager for fluorescence imaging applications such as microarray scanning. This report details the design, integration, and characterization of a line-scan Raman imaging module added to this efficient hyperspectral fluorescence microscope. The original hyperspectral fluorescence instrument serves as the framework for excitation and sample manipulation for the Raman imaging system, while a more appropriate axial transmissive Raman imaging spectrometer and detector are utilized for collection of the Raman scatter. The result is a unique and flexible dual-modality fluorescence and Raman imaging system capable of high-speed imaging at high spatial and spectral resolutions. Care was taken throughout the design and integration process not to hinder any of the fluorescence imaging capabilities. For example, an operator can switch between the fluorescence and Raman modalities without need for extensive optical realignment. The instrument performance has been characterized and sample data is presented.

Timlin, Jerilyn Ann; Nieman, Linda T.

2005-11-01

205

Biological investigations of the Sandia National Laboratories Sol se Mete Aerial Cable Facility  

SciTech Connect

This report provides results of a comprehensive biological field survey performed on the Sandia National Laboratories Aerial Cable Facility, at the east end of Kirtland Air Force Base (KAFB), Bernalillo County, New Mexico. This survey was conducted late September through October, 1991. ACF occupies a 440-acre tract of land withdrawn by the US Forest Service (USFS) for use by KAFB, and in turn placed under operational control of SNL by the Department of Energy (DOE). All land used by SNL for ACF is part of a 15,851-acre tract of land withdrawn by the US Forest Service. In addition, a number of different organizations use the 15,851-acre area. The project area used by SNL encompasses portions of approximately six sections (3,840 acres) of US Forest Service land located within the foothills of the west side of the Manzano Mountains (East Mesa). The biological study area is used by the KAFB, the US Department of Interior, and SNL. This area includes: (1) Sol se Mete Springs and Canyon, (2) East Anchor Access Road, (3) East Anchor Site, (4) Rocket Sled Track, (5) North Arena, (6) East Instrumentation Site and Access Road, (7) West Anchor Access Road, (8) West Anchor Site, (9) South Arena, (10) Winch Sites, (11) West Instrumentation Sites, (12) Explosive Assembly Building, (13) Control Building, (14) Lurance Canyon Road and vicinity. Although portions of approximately 960 acres of withdrawn US Forest Service land have been altered, only 700 acres have been disturbed by activities associated with ACF; approximately 2,880 acres consist of natural habitat. Absence of grazing by livestock and possibly native ungulates, and relative lack of human disturbance have allowed this area to remain in a more natural vegetative state relative to the condition of private range lands throughout New Mexico. This report evaluates threatened and endangered species found on ACF, as well as a comprehensive assessment of biological habitats.

Sullivan, R.M.

1994-10-01

206

Lessons Learned from Sandia National Laboratories' Operational Readiness Review of the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR)  

SciTech Connect

The Sandia ACRR (a Hazard Category 2 Nuclear Reactor Facility) was defueled in June 1997 to modify the reactor core and control system to produce medical radioisotopes for the Department of Energy (DOE) Isotope Production Program. The DOE determined that an Operational Readiness Review (ORR) was required to confirm readiness to begin operations within the revised safety basis. This paper addresses the ORR Process, lessons learned from the Sandia and DOE ORRS of the ACRR, and the use of the ORR to confirm authorization basis implementation.

Bendure, Albert O.; Bryson, James W.

1999-05-17

207

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Solar Radiation Research Laboratory  

E-print Network

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) Instrument of Energy (DoE). Objectives · Provide Improved Methods for Radiometer Calibrations · Develop a Solar Energy Resources · Offer Unique Training Methods for Solar Monitoring Network Design, Operation

208

Microcomputer-controlled communication network for Sandia National Laboratories' environmental test chambers  

Microsoft Academic Search

A microcomputer-controlled communication system that links together in a network four data-acquisition computers and four low-level signal scanner\\/amplifiers is described. The scanner\\/amplifiers monitor transducers that are connected to specimens within environmental test chambers located in the high-bay area of Sandia's Building 860. The microcomputer hardware and its controlling program are described.

L. C. Bennett

1981-01-01

209

Lessons Learned from Sandia National Laboratories' Operational Readiness Review of the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Sandia ACRR (a Hazard Category 2 Nuclear Reactor Facility) was defueled in June 1997 to modify the reactor core and control system to produce medical radioisotopes for the Department of Energy (DOE) Isotope Production Program. The DOE determined that an Operational Readiness Review (ORR) was required to confirm readiness to begin operations within the revised safety basis. This paper

Albert O. Bendure; James W. Bryson

1999-01-01

210

The Excavation and Remediation of the Sandia National Laboratories Chemical Waste Landfill  

SciTech Connect

The Chemical Waste Landfill (CWL) at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) is a 1.9-acre disposal site that was used for the disposal of chemical wastes generated by many of SNL/NM research laboratories from 1962 until 1985. These laboratories were primarily involved in the design, research and development of non-nuclear components of nuclear weapons and the waste generated by these labs included small quantities of a wide assortment of chemical products. A Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Closure Plan for the Chemical Waste Landfill was approved by the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) in 1992. Subsequent site characterization activities identified the presence of significant amounts of chromium in the soil as far as 80 feet below ground surface (fbgs) and the delineation of a solvent plume in the vadose zone that extends to groundwater approximately 500 fbgs. Trichloroethylene (TCE) was detected in some groundwater samples at concentrations slightly above the drinking water limit of 5 parts per billion. In 1997 an active vapor extraction system reduced the size of the TCE vapor plume and for the last six quarterly sampling events groundwater samples have not detected TCE above the drinking water standard. A source term removal, being conducted as a Voluntary Corrective Measure (VCM), began in September 1998 and is expected to take up to two years. Four distinct disposal areas were identified from historical data and the contents of disposal pits and trenches in these areas, in addition to much of the highly contaminated soil surrounding the disposal cells, are currently being excavated. Buried waste and debris are expected to extend to a depth of 12 to 15 fbgs. Excavation will focus on the removal of buried debris and contaminated soil in a sequential, area by area manner and will proceed to whatever depth is required in order to remove all pit contents. Up to 50,000 cubic yards of soil and debris will be removed and managed during the excavation of the CWL. As part of the excavation process, soil is being separated from the buried debris using a 2-inch mechanical screen. After separation from the soil, debris items are further-segregated by matrix into the following categories: wood, scrap metal, concrete/aggregates, resins, compatible debris, intact chemical containers, radioactive and mixed waste, and high hazard items. One of the greatest sources of hazards throughout the excavation process is the removal of numerous intact chemical containers with unknown contents. A large portion of the excavated soil is contaminated with metals and/or solvents, Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are also known to be present. Most of the contaminated soils being excavated will be taken to the nearby Corrective Action Management Unit (CAMU) for treatment and management while a majority of the containers will be taken to the Hazardous Waste Management Facility or the Radioactive and Mixed Waste Management Facility for proper treatment and/or disposal at permitted offsite facilities.

KWIECINSKI,DANIEL ALBERT; METHVIN,RHONDA KAY; SCHOFIELD,DONALD P.; YOUNG,SHARISSA G.

1999-11-23

211

Sandia National Laboratories results for the 2010 criticality accident dosimetry exercise, at the CALIBAN reactor, CEA Valduc France.  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the personal nuclear accident dosimeter (PNAD) used by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and presents PNAD dosimetry results obtained during the Nuclear Accident Dosimeter Intercomparison Study held 20-23 September, 2010, at CEA Valduc, France. SNL PNADs were exposed in two separate irradiations from the CALIBAN reactor. Biases for reported neutron doses ranged from -15% to +0.4% with an average bias of -7.7%. PNADs were also exposed on the back side of phantoms to assess orientation effects.

Ward, Dann C.

2011-09-01

212

Environmental Testing Philosophy for a Sandia National Laboratories' Small Satellite Project - A Retrospective  

SciTech Connect

Sandia has recently completed the flight certification test series for the Multi-Spectral Thermal Imaging satellite (MTI), which is a small satellite for which Sandia was the system integrator. A paper was presented at the 16th Aerospace Testing Seminar discussing plans for performing the structural dynamics certification program for that satellite. The testing philosophy was originally based on a combination of system level vibroacoustic tests and component level shock and vibration tests. However, the plans evolved to include computational analyses using both Finite Element Analysis and Statistical Energy Analysis techniques. This paper outlines the final certification process and discuss lessons learned including both things that went well and things that should/could have been done differently.

CAP,JEROME S.

2000-08-24

213

Fire accident analysis modeling in support of non-reactor nuclear facilities at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) requires that fire hazard analyses (FHAs) be conducted for all nuclear and new facilities, with results for the latter incorporated into Title I design. For those facilities requiring safety analysis documentation, the FHA shall be documented in the Safety Analysis Reports (SARs). This paper provides an overview of the methodologies and codes being used to support FHAs at Sandia facilities, with emphasis on SARs.

Restrepo, L.F.

1993-06-01

214

Chemical Microsensor and Micro-Instrument Technology at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Important factors in the application of chemical sensing technology to space applications are low mass, small size, and low power. All of these attributes are enabled by the application of MEMS and micro-fabrication technology to chemical sensing. Several Sandia projects that apply these technologies to the development of new chemical sensing capabilities with the potential for space applications will be described. The Polychromator project is a joint project with Honeywell and MIT to develop an electrically programmable diffraction grating that can be programmed to synthesize the spectra of molecules. This grating will be used as the reference cell in a gas correlation radiometer to enable remote chemical detection of most chemical species. Another area of research where micro-fabrication is having a large impact is the development of a lab on a chip. Sandia's efforts to develop the {mu}ChemLab{trademark} will be described including the development of microfabricated pre-concentrators, chromatographic columns, and detectors. Chemical sensors are evolving in the direction of sensor arrays with pattern recognition methods applied to interpret the pattern of response. Sandia's development of micro-fabricated chemiresistor arrays and the VERI pattern recognition technology to interpret the sensor response will be described.

Butler, M.A.; Frye-Mason, G.C.; Hughes, R.C.; Osbourn, G.C.

1999-03-26

215

Vegetation study in support of the design and optimization of vegetative soil covers, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.  

SciTech Connect

A vegetation study was conducted in Technical Area 3 at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico in 2003 to assist in the design and optimization of vegetative soil covers for hazardous, radioactive, and mixed waste landfills at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico and Kirtland Air Force Base. The objective of the study was to obtain site-specific, vegetative input parameters for the one-dimensional code UNSAT-H and to identify suitable, diverse native plant species for use on vegetative soil covers that will persist indefinitely as a climax ecological community with little or no maintenance. The identification and selection of appropriate native plant species is critical to the proper design and long-term performance of vegetative soil covers. Major emphasis was placed on the acquisition of representative, site-specific vegetation data. Vegetative input parameters measured in the field during this study include root depth, root length density, and percent bare area. Site-specific leaf area index was not obtained in the area because there was no suitable platform to measure leaf area during the 2003 growing season due to severe drought that has persisted in New Mexico since 1999. Regional LAI data was obtained from two unique desert biomes in New Mexico, Sevilletta Wildlife Refuge and Jornada Research Station.

Peace, Gerald (Jerry) L.; Goering, Timothy James (GRAM inc., Albuquerque, NM); Knight, Paul J. (Marron and Associates, Albuquerque, NM); Ashton, Thomas S. (Marron and Associates, Albuquerque, NM)

2004-11-01

216

Sandia microelectronics development  

SciTech Connect

An overview of the operations of Sandia`s Microelectronics Development Lab (MDL) is to develop radiation hardened IC, but techniques used for IC processing have been applied to a variety of related technologies such as micromechanics, smart sensors, and packaging.

Weaver, H.T.

1997-02-01

217

Update of the Z Refurbishment project (ZR) at Sandia National Laboratories.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia's Z Refurbishment (ZR) Project formally began in February 2002 to increase the Z Accelerator's utilization by providing the capability to perform more shots, improve precision and pulse shape variability, and increase delivered current. A project update was provided at the 15th International Pulsed Power Conference in 2005. The Z facility was shut down in July 2006 for structural/infrastructure modifications and installation of new pulsed power systems. The refurbishment will conclude in 2007. This paper provides a status update of the project covering the past 2 years of activities.

Moncayo, Carla; Bloomquist, Douglas D.; Weed, John Woodruff; Tabor, Debra Ann; Donovan, Guy Louis; McKee, G. Randall; Weinbrecht, Edward A.; Faturos, Thomas V.; McDaniel, Dillon Heirman

2007-08-01

218

Aquatic macroinvertebrates and water quality of Sandia Canyon, Los Alamos National Laboratory, December 1992--October 1993. Status report  

SciTech Connect

In the summer of 1990, an accidental spill from the TA-3 Power Plant Environment Tank released more than 3,785 liters of sulfuric acid into upper Sandia Canyon. The Biological Resource Evaluation Team (BRET) of EM-8 at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has collected aquatic samples from the stream within Sandia Canyon since then. These field studies gather water quality measurements and collect macroinvertebrates from permanent sampling sites. An earlier report by Bennett (1994) discusses previous BRET aquatic studies in Sandia Canyon. This report updates and expands Bennett`s initial findings. During 1993, BRET collected water quality data and aquatic macroinvertebrates at five permanent stations within the canyon. The substrates of the upper three stations are largely sands and silts while the substrates of the two lower stations are largely rock and cobbles. The two upstream stations are located near outfalls that discharge industrial and sanitary waste effluent. The third station is within a natural cattail marsh, approximately 0.4 km (0.25 mi) downstream from Stations SC1 and SC2. Water quality parameters are slightly different at these first three stations from those expected of natural streams, suggesting slightly degraded water quality. Correspondingly, the macroinvertebrate communities at these stations are characterized by low diversities and poorly-developed community structures. The two downstream stations appear to be in a zone of recovery, where water quality parameters more closely resemble those found in natural streams of the area. Macroinvertebrate diversity increases and community structure becomes more complex at the two lower stations, which are further indications of improved water quality downstream.

Cross, S. [Ewing Technical Design, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-09-01

219

RADCAL Operations Manual Radiation Calibration Laboratory Protocol  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Life Sciences Division (LSD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has a long record of radiation dosimetry research, primarily using the Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR) and the Radiation Calibration Laboratory (RADCAL) in its Dosimetry Applications Research (DOSAR) Program. These facilities have been used by a broad segment of the research community to perform a variety of experiments in

Bogard

1998-01-01

220

Estimation of the carbon monoxide emissions due to Sandia National Laboratories commuter and on-base traffic for conformity determination  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the analysis and conclusion of an investigation of the carbon monoxide emissions resulting from Sandia National Laboratories and Department of Energy (DOE) commuter and on-base traffic for the Clean Air Act (CAA) Conformity Determination. Albuquerque/Bernalillo County was classified as a nonattainment area by the Environmental Protection Agency. Nonattainment area is an area which is shown by monitored data or which is calculated by air quality modeling to exceed any National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for the pollutant. Albuquerque/Bernalillo County exceeds the NAAQS for carbon monoxide and ozone. The Conformity Determination was needed to complete the CAA Title V Permitting process for SNL and the DOE. The analysis used the EPA approved MOBILE5a Carbon Monoxide (CO) emissions modeling program. This analysis will provide a baseline for mobile sources to allow Sandia to estimate any future activity and how that activity will impact CO emissions. The General Conformity Rule (AQCR 43) requires that operations which will increase CO emissions in nonattaimnent or maintenance areas such as Bernalillo County undergo conformity analyses to determine whether or not they will impact ambient air quality in the area.

McClellan, Y. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Royer, R. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry

1996-09-01

221

Unified parallel C and the computing needs of Sandia National Laboratories.  

SciTech Connect

As Sandia looks toward petaflops computing and other advanced architectures, it is necessary to provide a programming environment that can exploit this additional computing power while supporting reasonable development time for applications. Thus, they evaluate the Partitioned Global Address Space (PGAS) programming model as implemented in Unified Parallel C (UPC) for its applicability. They report on their experiences in implementing sorting and minimum spanning tree algorithms on a test system, a Cray T3e, with UPC support. They describe several macros that could serve as language extensions and several building-block operations that could serve as a foundation for a PGAS programming library. They analyze the limitations of the UPC implementation available on the test system, and suggest improvements necessary before UPC can be used in a production environment.

Brown, Jonathan Leighton; Wen, Zhaofang

2004-09-01

222

Adaptive sampling strategy support for the unlined chromic acid pit, chemical waste landfill, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Adaptive sampling programs offer substantial savings in time and money when assessing hazardous waste sites. Key to some of these savings is the ability to adapt a sampling program to the real-time data generated by an adaptive sampling program. This paper presents a two-prong approach to supporting adaptive sampling programs: a specialized object-oriented database/geographical information system (SitePlanner{trademark} ) for data fusion, management, and display and combined Bayesian/geostatistical methods (PLUME) for contamination-extent estimation and sample location selection. This approach is applied in a retrospective study of a subsurface chromium plume at Sandia National Laboratories` chemical waste landfill. Retrospective analyses suggest the potential for characterization cost savings on the order of 60% through a reduction in the number of sampling programs, total number of soil boreholes, and number of samples analyzed from each borehole.

Johnson, R.L.

1993-11-01

223

The high current, fast, 100ns, Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) developmental project at Sandia Laboratories and HCEI.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, N.M., USA, in collaboration with the High Current Electronic Institute (HCEI), Tomsk, Russia, is developing a new paradigm in pulsed power technology: the Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) technology. This technological approach can provide very compact devices that can deliver very fast high current and high voltage pulses straight out of the cavity with out any complicated pulse forming and pulse compression network. Through multistage inductively insulated voltage adders, the output pulse, increased in voltage amplitude, can be applied directly to the load. The load may be a vacuum electron diode, a z-pinch wire array, a gas puff, a liner, an isentropic compression load (ICE) to study material behavior under very high magnetic fields, or a fusion energy (IFE) target. This is because the output pulse rise time and width can be easily tailored to the specific application needs. In this paper we briefly summarize the developmental work done in Sandia and HCEI during the last few years, and describe our new MYKONOS Sandia High Current LTD Laboratory. An extensive evaluation of the LTD technology is being performed at SNL and the High Current Electronic Institute (HCEI) in Tomsk Russia. Two types of High Current LTD cavities (LTD I-II, and 1-MA LTD) were constructed and tested individually and in a voltage adder configuration (1-MA cavity only). All cavities performed remarkably well and the experimental results are in full agreement with analytical and numerical calculation predictions. A two-cavity voltage adder is been assembled and currently undergoes evaluation. This is the first step towards the completion of the 10-cavity, 1-TW module. This MYKONOS voltage adder will be the first ever IVA built with a transmission line insulated with deionized water. The LTD II cavity renamed LTD III will serve as a test bed for evaluating a number of different types of switches, resistors, alternative capacitor configurations, cores and other cavity components. Experimental results will be presented at the Conference and in future publications.

Ward, Kevin S. (Ketech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Long, Finis W.; Sinebryukhov, Vadim A. (High Current Electronic Institute (HCEI), Tomsk, Russia); Kim, Alexandre A. (High Current Electronic Institute (HCEI), Tomsk, Russia); Wakeland, Peter Eric (Ketech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); McKee, G. Randall; Woodworth, Joseph Ray; McDaniel, Dillon Heirman; Fowler, William E.; Mazarakis, Michael Gerrassimos; Porter, John Larry, Jr.; Struve, Kenneth William; Savage, Mark Edward; Stygar, William A.; LeChien, Keith R.; Matzen, Maurice Keith

2010-09-01

224

Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) software quality plan part 2 mappings for the ASC software quality engineering practices, version 2.0.  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. The plan defines the ASC program software quality practices and provides mappings of these practices to Sandia Corporate Requirements CPR001.3.2 and CPR001.3.6 and to a Department of Energy document, ''ASCI Software Quality Engineering: Goals, Principles, and Guidelines''. This document also identifies ASC management and software project teams' responsibilities in implementing the software quality practices and in assessing progress towards achieving their software quality goals.

Heaphy, Robert; Sturtevant, Judith E.; Hodges, Ann Louise; Boucheron, Edward A.; Drake, Richard Roy; Minana, Molly A.; Hackney, Patricia; Forsythe, Christi A.; Schofield, Joseph Richard, Jr. (,; .); Pavlakos, Constantine James; Williamson, Charles Michael; Edwards, Harold Carter

2006-09-01

225

Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan. Part 2, Mappings for the ASC software quality engineering practices. Version 1.0.  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. The plan defines the ASC program software quality practices and provides mappings of these practices to Sandia Corporate Requirements CPR 1.3.2 and 1.3.6 and to a Department of Energy document, 'ASCI Software Quality Engineering: Goals, Principles, and Guidelines'. This document also identifies ASC management and software project teams responsibilities in implementing the software quality practices and in assessing progress towards achieving their software quality goals.

Ellis, Molly A.; Heaphy, Robert; Sturtevant, Judith E.; Hodges, Ann Louise; Boucheron, Edward A.; Drake, Richard Roy; Forsythe, Christi A.; Schofield, Joseph Richard, Jr.; Pavlakos, Constantine James; Williamson, Charles Michael; Edwards, Harold Carter

2005-01-01

226

Overview of the dynamic-hohlraum x-ray source at Sandia National Laboratories.  

SciTech Connect

Progress in understanding the physics of Dynamic-Hohlraums is reviewed for a system capable of generating 10 TW of axial radiation for high temperature (>200 eV) radiation-flow experiments and ICF capsule implosions. 2D magneto-hydrodynamic simulation comparisons with data show the need to include wire initiation physics and subsequent discrete wire dynamics in the simulations if a predictive capability is to be achieved.

Sanford, Thomas W. L.

2007-04-01

227

Progress in lithium beam focusing and beam-target interaction experiments at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Significant progress in the generation and focusing of ion beams generated by PBFA II has enabled us to begin experiments in ion beam coupling and target physics. Data from these experiments indicates that we can reproducibly deliver {approximately}50 KJ of 5 MeV protons at an average power intensity of 3.5 TW/cm{sup 2} to a 6 mm diameter by 6 mm tall cylindrical target. The implosion of the spherical exploding pusher targets and the radiation production from foam-filled cylindrical thermal targets were studied in these experiments. They demonstrated that high quality target data can be obtained on PBFA II. Specific deposition rates of about 100 TW/g were achieved in these experiments. This deposition rate marks the boundary between the regime where enhanced ion deposition and equation-of-state (EOS) physics are studied (10--100 TW/g) and the regime where radiation-conversion and radiation-transport physics are studied (100--1000 TW/g). Experiments in the radiation-conversion regime are now of primary importance in our program because these experiments will test the target physics basis for ion-driven ICF.

Mehlhorn, T.A.; Bacon, L.D.; Bailey, J.E.; Bloomquist, D.D.; Chandler, G.A.; Costs, R.S.; Cook, D.L.; Cuneo, M.; Derzon, M.S.; Desjarlais, M.P.; Dukart, R.J.; Filuk, A.B.; Haill, T.A.; Hanson, D.; Johnson, D.J.; Leeper, R.J.; Lockner, T.R.; Mendel, C.W.; Mix, L.P.; Moats, A.R.; Quintenz, J.P.; Pointon, T.D. Renk, T.J.; Rochau, G.E.; Rosenthal, S.E.; Ruiz, C.L.; Seidel, D.B.; Slutz, S.A.; Stinnett, R.W.; Stygar, W.A.; Tisone,

1992-01-01

228

Progress in lithium beam focusing and beam-target interaction experiments at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Significant progress in the generation and focusing of ion beams generated by PBFA II has enabled us to begin experiments in ion beam coupling and target physics. Data from these experiments indicates that we can reproducibly deliver {approximately}50 KJ of 5 MeV protons at an average power intensity of 3.5 TW/cm{sup 2} to a 6 mm diameter by 6 mm tall cylindrical target. The implosion of the spherical exploding pusher targets and the radiation production from foam-filled cylindrical thermal targets were studied in these experiments. They demonstrated that high quality target data can be obtained on PBFA II. Specific deposition rates of about 100 TW/g were achieved in these experiments. This deposition rate marks the boundary between the regime where enhanced ion deposition and equation-of-state (EOS) physics are studied (10--100 TW/g) and the regime where radiation-conversion and radiation-transport physics are studied (100--1000 TW/g). Experiments in the radiation-conversion regime are now of primary importance in our program because these experiments will test the target physics basis for ion-driven ICF.

Mehlhorn, T.A.; Bacon, L.D.; Bailey, J.E.; Bloomquist, D.D.; Chandler, G.A.; Costs, R.S.; Cook, D.L.; Cuneo, M.; Derzon, M.S.; Desjarlais, M.P.; Dukart, R.J.; Filuk, A.B.; Haill, T.A.; Hanson, D.; Johnson, D.J.; Leeper, R.J.; Lockner, T.R.; Mendel, C.W.; Mix, L.P.; Moats, A.R.; Quintenz, J.P.; Pointon, T.D. Renk, T.J.; Rochau, G.E.; Rosenthal, S.E.; Ruiz, C.L.; Seidel, D.B.; Slutz, S.A.; Stinnett, R.W.; Stygar, W.A.; Tisone, G.C.; Olson, R.E.; VanDevender, J.P.; Wenger, D.F.

1992-07-01

229

The Sandia Lightning Simulator.  

SciTech Connect

The Sandia Lightning Simulator at Sandia National Laboratories can provide up to 200 kA for a simulated single lightning stroke, 100 kA for a subsequent stroke, and hundreds of Amperes of continuing current. It has recently been recommissioned after a decade of inactivity and the single-stroke capability demonstrated. The simulator capabilities, basic design components, upgrades, and diagnostic capabilities are discussed in this paper.

Martinez, Leonard E.; Caldwell, Michele

2005-01-01

230

A brief history of Sandia National Laboratories and the Department of Energy%3CU%2B2019%3Es Office of Science : interplay between science, technology, and mission.  

SciTech Connect

In 1957, Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) initiated its first programs in fundamental science, in support of its primary nuclear weapons mission. In 1974, Sandia initiated programs in fundamental science supported by the Department of Energy's Office of Science (DOE-SC). These latter programs have grown to the point where, today in 2011, support of Sandia's programs in fundamental science is dominated by that Office. In comparison with Sandia's programs in technology and mission applications, however, Sandia's programs in fundamental science are small. Hence, Sandia's fundamental science has been strongly influenced by close interactions with technology and mission applications. In many instances, these interactions have been of great mutual benefit, with synergies akin to a positive 'Casimir's spiral' of progress. In this report, we review the history of Sandia's fundamental science programs supported by the Office of Science. We present: (a) a technical and budgetary snapshot of Sandia's current programs supported by the various suboffices within DOE-SC; (b) statistics of highly-cited articles supported by DOE-SC; (c) four case studies (ion-solid interactions, combustion science, compound semiconductors, advanced computing) with an emphasis on mutually beneficial interactions between science, technology, and mission; and (d) appendices with key memos and reminiscences related to fundamental science at Sandia.

Tsao, Jeffrey Yeenien; Myers, Samuel Maxwell, Jr.; Simmons, Jerry Alvon; McIlroy, Andrew; Vook, Frederick L.; Collis, Samuel Scott; Picraux, Samuel Thomas

2011-08-01

231

Sandia National Laboratories is seeking applicants for the President Harry S. Truman Fellowship (in National Security Science and Engineering). Candidates for this position are expected to have solved a  

E-print Network

Sandia National Laboratories is seeking applicants for the President Harry S. Truman Fellowship (in National Security Science and Engineering). Candidates for this position are expected to have solved Sandia's national security mission. The appointee is expected to foster creativity and to stimulate

232

Sandia National Laboratories is seeking applicants for the President Harry S. Truman Fellowship in National Security Science and Engineering. Candidates for this position are expected to have solved a  

E-print Network

Sandia National Laboratories is seeking applicants for the President Harry S. Truman Fellowship in National Security Science and Engineering. Candidates for this position are expected to have solved a major Sandia's national security mission. The appointee is expected to foster creativity and to stimulate

233

Global nuclear energy partnership fuels transient testing at the Sandia National Laboratories nuclear facilities : planning and facility infrastructure options.  

SciTech Connect

The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership fuels development program is currently developing metallic, oxide, and nitride fuel forms as candidate fuels for an Advanced Burner Reactor. The Advance Burner Reactor is being designed to fission actinides efficiently, thereby reducing the long-term storage requirements for spent fuel repositories. Small fuel samples are being fabricated and evaluated with different transuranic loadings and with extensive burnup using the Advanced Test Reactor. During the next several years, numerous fuel samples will be fabricated, evaluated, and tested, with the eventual goal of developing a transmuter fuel database that supports the down selection to the most suitable fuel type. To provide a comparative database of safety margins for the range of potential transmuter fuels, this report describes a plan to conduct a set of early transient tests in the Annular Core Research Reactor at Sandia National Laboratories. The Annular Core Research Reactor is uniquely qualified to perform these types of tests because of its wide range of operating capabilities and large dry central cavity which extents through the center of the core. The goal of the fuels testing program is to demonstrate that the design and fabrication processes are of sufficient quality that the fuel will not fail at its design limit--up to a specified burnup, power density, and operating temperature. Transient testing is required to determine the fuel pin failure thresholds and to demonstrate that adequate fuel failure margins exist during the postulated design basis accidents.

Kelly, John E.; Wright, Steven Alan; Tikare, Veena; MacLean, Heather J. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Parma, Edward J., Jr.; Peters, Curtis D.; Vernon, Milton E.; Pickard, Paul S.

2007-10-01

234

Biologic surveys for the Sandia National Laboratories, Coyote Canyon Test Complex, Kirtland Air Force Base, Albuquerque, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

This report provides results of a comprehensive biologic survey performed in Coyote Canyon Test Complex (CCTC), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Bernalillo County, New Mexico, which was conducted during the spring and summer of 1992 and 1993. CCTC is sited on land owned by the Department of Energy (DOE) and Kirtland Air Force Base and managed by SNL. The survey covered 3,760 acres of land, most of which is rarely disturbed by CCTC operations. Absence of grazing by livestock and possibly native ungulates, and relative to the general condition of private range lands throughout New Mexico, and relative to other grazing lands in central New Mexico. Widely dispersed, low intensity use by SNL as well as prohibition of grazing has probably contributed to abundance of special status species such as grama grass cactus within the CCTC area. This report evaluates threatened and endangered species found in the area, as well as comprehensive assessment of biologic habitats. Included are analyses of potential impacts and mitigative measures designed to reduce or eliminate potential impacts. Included is a summary of CCTC program and testing activities.

Sullivan, R.M. [4115 Allen Dr., Kingsville, TX (United States); Knight, P.J. [Marron and Associates, Inc., Corrales, NM (United States)

1994-05-25

235

Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) software quality plan : ASC software quality engineering practices Version 3.0.  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. Quality is defined in the US Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Agency (DOE/NNSA) Quality Criteria, Revision 10 (QC-1) as 'conformance to customer requirements and expectations'. This quality plan defines the SNL ASC Program software quality engineering (SQE) practices and provides a mapping of these practices to the SNL Corporate Process Requirement (CPR) 001.3.6; 'Corporate Software Engineering Excellence'. This plan also identifies ASC management's and the software project teams responsibilities in implementing the software quality practices and in assessing progress towards achieving their software quality goals. This SNL ASC Software Quality Plan establishes the signatories commitments to improving software products by applying cost-effective SQE practices. This plan enumerates the SQE practices that comprise the development of SNL ASC's software products and explains the project teams opportunities for tailoring and implementing the practices.

Turgeon, Jennifer L.; Minana, Molly A.; Hackney, Patricia; Pilch, Martin M.

2009-01-01

236

It's your lab.It's your lab.Sandia. sandia.gov/careers  

E-print Network

service in the national interest'... The nation has consistently called on Sandia to develop solutions be the difference. At Sandia National Laboratories we are looking for people like you who share our dedication to Sandia's mission--serving the nation. Sandia offers many challenging and rewarding career opportunities

237

Process Knowledge Characterization of Radioactive Waste at the Classified Waste Landfill Remediation Project Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the development and application of process knowledge (PK) to the characterization of radioactive wastes generated during the excavation of buried materials at the Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) Classified Waste Landfill (CWLF). The CWLF, located in SNL/NM Technical Area II, is a 1.5-acre site that received nuclear weapon components and related materials from about 1950 through 1987. These materials were used in the development and testing of nuclear weapon designs. The CWLF is being remediated by the SNL/NM Environmental Restoration (ER) Project pursuant to regulations of the New Mexico Environment Department. A goal of the CWLF project is to maximize the amount of excavated materials that can be demilitarized and recycled. However, some of these materials are radioactively contaminated and, if they cannot be decontaminated, are destined to require disposal as radioactive waste. Five major radioactive waste streams have been designated on the CWLF project, including: unclassified soft radioactive waste--consists of soft, compatible trash such as paper, plastic, and plywood; unclassified solid radioactive waste--includes scrap metal, other unclassified hardware items, and soil; unclassified mixed waste--contains the same materials as unclassified soft or solid radioactive waste, but also contains one or more Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) constituents; classified radioactive waste--consists of classified artifacts, usually weapons components, that contain only radioactive contaminants; and classified mixed waste--comprises radioactive classified material that also contains RCRA constituents. These waste streams contain a variety of radionuclides that exist both as surface contamination and as sealed sources. To characterize these wastes, the CWLF project's waste management team is relying on data obtained from direct measurement of radionuclide activity content to the maximum extent possible and, in cases where direct measurement is not technically feasible, from accumulated PK of the excavated materials.

DOTSON,PATRICK WELLS; GALLOWAY,ROBERT B.; JOHNSON JR,CARL EDWARD

1999-11-03

238

The creation of Sandia`s telecommunication cabling infrastructure  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, has adopted strategic, standards-based telecommunication technologies to deliver high-speed communication services to its research and development community. The architecture to provide these services specifies a cabling system capable of carrying high-bandwidth signals to each desktop. While the facilities infrastructure of Sandia has been expanding and evolving over the past four decades to meet the needs of this premier research and development community, the communications infrastructure has remained essentially stagnant. The need to improve Sandia`s telecommunication cable infrastructure gave rise to the Intra-building Recabling Project (IRP). The IRP directed Sandia`s efforts to modernize and standardize the communications infrastructure throughout its New Mexico campus. This report focuses on the development and implementation of the project`s design considerations, concepts, and standards, as well as the adopted transmission media and supporting delivery subsystems.

Adams, R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Francis, T. [Holmes and Narver, Inc. (United States)

1996-01-01

239

Sandia National Laboratories performance assessment methodology for long-term environmental programs : the history of nuclear waste management.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is the world leader in the development of the detailed science underpinning the application of a probabilistic risk assessment methodology, referred to in this report as performance assessment (PA), for (1) understanding and forecasting the long-term behavior of a radioactive waste disposal system, (2) estimating the ability of the disposal system and its various components to isolate the waste, (3) developing regulations, (4) implementing programs to estimate the safety that the system can afford to individuals and to the environment, and (5) demonstrating compliance with the attendant regulatory requirements. This report documents the evolution of the SNL PA methodology from inception in the mid-1970s, summarizing major SNL PA applications including: the Subseabed Disposal Project PAs for high-level radioactive waste; the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant PAs for disposal of defense transuranic waste; the Yucca Mountain Project total system PAs for deep geologic disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste; PAs for the Greater Confinement Borehole Disposal boreholes at the Nevada National Security Site; and PA evaluations for disposal of high-level wastes and Department of Energy spent nuclear fuels stored at Idaho National Laboratory. In addition, the report summarizes smaller PA programs for long-term cover systems implemented for the Monticello, Utah, mill-tailings repository; a PA for the SNL Mixed Waste Landfill in support of environmental restoration; PA support for radioactive waste management efforts in Egypt, Iraq, and Taiwan; and, most recently, PAs for analysis of alternative high-level radioactive waste disposal strategies including repositories deep borehole disposal and geologic repositories in shale and granite. Finally, this report summarizes the extension of the PA methodology for radioactive waste disposal toward development of an enhanced PA system for carbon sequestration and storage systems. These efforts have produced a generic PA methodology for the evaluation of waste management systems that has gained wide acceptance within the international community. This report documents how this methodology has been used as an effective management tool to evaluate different disposal designs and sites; inform development of regulatory requirements; identify, prioritize, and guide research aimed at reducing uncertainties for objective estimations of risk; and support safety assessments.

Marietta, Melvin Gary; Anderson, D. Richard; Bonano, Evaristo J.; Meacham, Paul Gregory (Raytheon Ktech, Albuquerque, NM)

2011-11-01

240

Sandia National Laboratories  

E-print Network

of three High School (9th ­12th grades) or two Middle School (6th ­8th grades) REGIONAL SCIENCE BOWL competitions scheduled for the California Bay Area. The Science Bowl is a Jeopardy-like highly competitive.S. Department of Energy's NATIONAL SCIENCE BOWL® on April 28 - May 3, 2011 in Washington, DC. The Department

241

SANDIA REPORT SAND99-1941  

E-print Network

-1941 Unlimited Release Printed August 1999 A HISTORY OF BUILDING 828, SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES Rebecca No. SA-0004A Abstract This report documents the history of Building 828 in Sandia National the handling of high explosives. I am also grateful to Jim Knecht and John Herron of Sandia organization 4912

Fuerschbach, Phillip

242

Sandia technology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Some of Sandia's activities and accomplishments in unclassified programs are described in this report. The role of Sandia in research and development for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) is discussed. They are responsible for establishing testing, certification, and monitoring procedures for, and predicting the long-term behavior of, the stored petroleum. Studies in simulated Raman spectroscopy are also discussed. Its use in the study of combustion processes and chemical vapor deposition is described.

Willis, H. M.; Thornborough, A. D.; Cocklereas, C. E.; Trennel, A. J.; Hoenstreter, G. F.; Mead, P. L.

1982-05-01

243

Survey of the attitudes, opinions, and use patterns of the patrons of the Technical Library at Sandia Laboratories, Livermore  

Microsoft Academic Search

Results are presented of a Technical Library users survey which was conducted among the members of the technical staff of Sandia Labs, Livermore. The survey was in the form of a written questionnaire, designed to measure users' opinions and use patterns of the technical library services and facilities, as well as elicit suggestions for improvements. The principal findings are summarized

Celoni

1978-01-01

244

SANDIA REPORT SAND2012-0304  

E-print Network

Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 and Livermore, California 94550 Sandia National Laboratories Technology Herbert J. Sutherland HJS Consulting Albuquerque, NM Dale E. Berg and Thomas D. Ashwill Wind Energy Technologies Department Sandia National Laboratories P.O. Box 5800 Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185

245

75 FR 22409 - Decision To Evaluate a Petition To Designate a Class of Employees From the Sandia National...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Employees From the Sandia National Laboratory in Albuquerque, NM, To Be...employees from the Sandia National Laboratory in Albuquerque, New Mexico...follows: Facility: Sandia National Laboratory. Location:...

2010-04-28

246

78 FR 56706 - Decision to Evaluate a Petition to Designate a Class of Employees from the Sandia National...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Employees from the Sandia National Laboratory-Livermore in Livermore...employees from the Sandia National Laboratory- Livermore in Livermore...follows: Facility: Sandia National Laboratory-Livermore Location:...

2013-09-13

247

Review of radiation safety in the cardiac catheterization laboratory  

SciTech Connect

With the increasing use of coronary arteriography and interventional procedures, radiation exposure to patients and personnel working in cardiac catheterization laboratories has increased. Proper technique to minimize both patient and operator exposure is necessary. A practical approach to radiation safety in the cardiac catheterization laboratory is presented. This discussion should be useful to facilities with well-established radiation safety programs as well as facilities that require restructuring to cope with the radiation environment in a modern cardiac catheterization laboratory.

Johnson, L.W.; Moore, R.J.; Balter, S. (St. Joseph's Hospital Health Center, Syracuse, NY (United States))

1992-03-01

248

Final report: survey and removal of radioactive surface contamination at environmental restoration sites, Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the survey and removal of radioactive surface contamination at Sandia`s Environmental Restoration (ER) sites. Radiological characterization was performed as a prerequisite to beginning the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) corrective action process. The removal of radioactive surface contamination was performed in order to reduce potential impacts to human health and the environment. The predominant radiological contaminant of concern was depleted uranium (DU). Between October 1993 and November 1996 scanning surface radiation surveys, using gamma scintillometers, were conducted at 65 sites covering approximately 908 acres. A total of 9,518 radiation anomalies were detected at 38 sites. Cleanup activities were conducted between October 1994 and November 1996. A total of 9,122 anomalies were removed and 2,072 waste drums were generated. The majority of anomalies not removed were associated with a site that has subsurface contamination beyond the scope of this project. Verification soil samples (1,008 total samples) were collected from anomalies during cleanup activities and confirm that the soil concentration achieved in the field were far below the target cleanup level of 230 pCi/g of U-238 (the primary constituent of DU) in the soil. Cleanup was completed at 21 sites and no further radiological action is required. Seventeen sites were not completed since cleanup activities wee precluded by ongoing site activity or were beyond the original project scope.

Lambert, K.A.; Mitchell, M.M. [Brown and Root Environmental, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jean, D. [MDM/Lamb, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brown, C. [Environmental Dimensions, Inc., Albuquerque, NM 87109 (United States); Byrd, C.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-09-01

249

Committee to evaluate Sandia`s risk expertise: Final report. Volume 1: Presentations  

SciTech Connect

On July 1--2, 1997, Sandia National Laboratories hosted the External Committee to Evaluate Sandia`s Risk Expertise. Under the auspices of SIISRS (Sandia`s International Institute for Systematic Risk Studies), Sandia assembled a blue-ribbon panel of experts in the field of risk management to assess their risk programs labs-wide. Panelists were chosen not only for their own expertise, but also for their ability to add balance to the panel as a whole. Presentations were made to the committee on the risk activities at Sandia. In addition, a tour of Sandia`s research and development programs in support of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission was arranged. The panel attended a poster session featuring eight presentations and demonstrations for selected projects. Overviews and viewgraphs from the presentations are included in Volume 1 of this report. Presentations are related to weapons, nuclear power plants, transportation systems, architectural surety, environmental programs, and information systems.

Dudley, E.C.

1998-05-01

250

Quality assurance plan for the data acquisition and management system for monitoring the fuel oil spill at the Sandia National Laboratories installation in Livermore, California  

SciTech Connect

In February 1975, the accidental puncture of an underground transfer line buried about 4 ft below the ground surface at the SNL installation in Livermore, California, resulted in the release of approximately 225.5 m{sup 3} of No. 2 diesel fuel. This report describes the formal quality assurance plan that will be used for the data acquisition and management system developed to monitor a bioremediation pilot study by Argonne National Laboratory in association with Sandia National Laboratories. The data acquisition and management system will record the site data during the bioremediation effort and assist users in site analysis. The designs of the three major subsystems of this system are described in this report. Quality assurance criteria are defined for the management, performance, and assessment of the system. Finally, the roles and responsibilities for configuration management of this system are defined for the entire life cycle of the project.

Peerenboom, J.P.; Leser, C.C.; Ramsey, G.M.; Widing, M.A.

1995-04-01

251

www.sandia.gov Sandia National Laboratories  

E-print Network

, and power subsystems, launched to detect nuclear detonations. 1966 Helped locate the bomb lost in an aircraft collision over Palomares, Spain. Established an independent safety group to assess weapon designs-terrorism. 1973 Initiated research on solar and wind technology, photovoltaics, enhanced fossil fuels recovery

252

Sandia technology & entrepreneurs improve Lasik  

ScienceCinema

Former Sandian Dan Neal started his company, WaveFront Sciences, based on wavefront sensing metrology technologies licensed from Sandia National Laboratories and by taking advantage of its Entrepreneurial Separation to Transfer Technology (ESTT) program. Abbott Medical Optics since acquired WaveFront and estimates that one million patients have improved the quality of their vision thanks to its products. ESTT is a valuable tool which allows Sandia to transfer technology to the private sector and Sandia employees to leave the Labs in order to start up new technology companies or help expand existing companies.

Neal, Dan; Turner, Tim

2014-02-26

253

Sandia technology & entrepreneurs improve Lasik  

SciTech Connect

Former Sandian Dan Neal started his company, WaveFront Sciences, based on wavefront sensing metrology technologies licensed from Sandia National Laboratories and by taking advantage of its Entrepreneurial Separation to Transfer Technology (ESTT) program. Abbott Medical Optics since acquired WaveFront and estimates that one million patients have improved the quality of their vision thanks to its products. ESTT is a valuable tool which allows Sandia to transfer technology to the private sector and Sandia employees to leave the Labs in order to start up new technology companies or help expand existing companies.

Neal, Dan; Turner, Tim

2013-11-21

254

Development of the Sandia Cooler.  

SciTech Connect

This report describes an FY13 effort to develop the latest version of the Sandia Cooler, a breakthrough technology for air-cooled heat exchangers that was developed at Sandia National Laboratories. The project was focused on fabrication, assembly and demonstration of ten prototype systems for the cooling of high power density electronics, specifically high performance desktop computers (CPUs). In addition, computational simulation and experimentation was carried out to fully understand the performance characteristics of each of the key design aspects. This work culminated in a parameter and scaling study that now provides a design framework, including a number of design and analysis tools, for Sandia Cooler development for applications beyond CPU cooling.

Johnson, Terry Alan; Koplow, Jeffrey P.; Staats, Wayne Lawrence,; Curgus, Dita Brigitte; Leick, Michael Thomas.; Matthew, Ned Daniel; Zimmerman, Mark D.; Arienti, Marco; Gharagozloo, Patricia E.; Hecht, Ethan S.; Spencer, Nathan A.; Vanness, Justin William.; Gorman, Ryan

2013-12-01

255

Radiation of kinked faults in laboratory earthquakes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report experimental observations of spontaneously nucleated sub- and supershear ruptures occuring on frictionally held homogeneous interfaces, for both planar and low angle kinked geometries. We monitor acoustic emissions and accelerometric signals, static stress drops, and internal stress field of the samples, using a high-speed camera. We show that, for planar geometries, acoustic sensors clearly detect the Mach wavefront radiation. Conversely, the stress singularity introduced by a kinked geometry completely modifies the rupture propagation and radition patters. Indeed, propagating ruptures may or may not stop when crossing the singularity, depending on the local stress field and the pre-stress level. When they do, arrest phases radiated from the kink are recorded by far field transducers and the accelerometric signature becomes more complex. Finally, we compare our experimental results with both, the Mw7.9 2002 Denali and Mw7.1 1999 Duzce earthquakes, for which ground motion data are available at a unique station before and after the kink respectively. We qualitatively compare velocities and slip functions integrated from accelerometric records for different geometries and show that the same features can be seen at both the laboratory and field scales, enhancing a possible scaling of the experiment to nature.

Nielsen, S. B.; Chanard, K. D.; Schubnel, A. J.; Vinciguerra, S.; Taddeucci, J.; Madariaga, R. I.

2011-12-01

256

Radiation of kinked faults in laboratory earthquakes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report experimental observations of spontaneously nucleated sub- and supershear ruptures occuring on frictionally held homogeneous interfaces, for both planar and low angle kinked geometries. We monitor acoustic emissions and accelerometric signals, static stress drops, and internal stress field of the samples, using a high-speed camera. We show that, for planar geometries, acoustic sensors clearly detect the Mach wavefront radiation. Conversely, the stress singularity introduced by a kinked geometry modifies the rupture propagation and radition patterns. Indeed, propagating ruptures may or may not stop when crossing the singularity, depending on the local stress field and the pre-stress level. When they do, arrest phases radiated from the kink are recorded by far field transducers and the accelerometric signature becomes more complex and includes an important high frequency content. Finally, we compare our experimental results with both, the Mw7.9 2002 Denali and Mw7.1 1999 Duzce earthquakes, for which ground motion data are available at a unique station. We qualitatively compare velocities and slip functions integrated from accelerometric records for different geometries and show that the same features can be seen both at the laboratory and field scales, enhancing a possible scaling of the experiment to nature.

Chanard, K.; Schubnel, A.; Nielsen, S.; Vinciguerra, S.; Tadeucci, J.; Madariaga, R.

2012-04-01

257

Site selection study for Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico as an alternative site for the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to construct and operate the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in support of the Stockpile Stewardship and Management (SSM) Programmatic Environmental impact Statement (PEIS). The National Environmental Policy Act requires the DOE to look at alternative sites for the NIF. The SSM PEIS will evaluate four alternative locations for the NIF. This study documents the process and results of a site selection study for a preferred site for the NIF at SNL/NM. The NIF research objectives are to provide the world`s most powerful laser systems to be used in ignition of fusion fuel and energy gain to perform high energy density and radiation effects experiments in support of the DOE`s national security, energy, and basic science research mission. The most immediate application of the NIF will be to provide nuclear-weapon-related physics data, since many phenomena occurring on the laboratory scale are similar to those that occur in weapons. The NIF may also provide an important capability for weapons effects simulation. The NIF is designed to achieve propagating fusion bum and modest energy gain for development as a source of civilian energy.

Miller, D.; Wheeler, T.; McClellan, Y.

1996-03-01

258

Building Business from Technology: The Sandia Experience  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper describes New Ventures, a new initiative at Sandia National Laboratories that encourages the creation of new businesses based on laboratory technology as a timely, efficient means of technology transfer. Sandia's New Ventures program has shown that a dedicated effort can produce significant results. In the three years prior to this program's launch, just two ventures per year on

Leland Traylor

1996-01-01

259

SF 4400-DPT (01-2012) SANDIA PROPRIETARY INFORMATION  

E-print Network

SF 4400-DPT (01-2012) SANDIA PROPRIETARY INFORMATION PERSONALLY IDENTIFIABLE INFORMATION (PII records. Sworn Affidavit We for Sandia Laboratories health care benefits. Acknowledgements We understand that this may have intended

260

Sandia WIPP calibration traceability  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the work performed to establish calibration traceability for the instrumentation used by Sandia National Laboratories at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) during testing from 1980-1985. Identifying the calibration traceability is an important part of establishing a pedigree for the data and is part of the qualification of existing data. In general, the requirement states that the calibration of Measuring and Test equipment must have a valid relationship to nationally recognized standards or the basis for the calibration must be documented. Sandia recognized that just establishing calibration traceability would not necessarily mean that all QA requirements were met during the certification of test instrumentation. To address this concern, the assessment was expanded to include various activities.

Schuhen, M.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dean, T.A. [RE/SPEC, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [RE/SPEC, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-05-01

261

Characterization, minimization and disposal of radioactive, hazardous, and mixed wastes during cleanup and rransition of the Tritium Research Laboratory (TRL) at Sandia National Laboratories/California (SNL/CA)  

SciTech Connect

This document provides an outline of waste handling practices used during the Sandia National Laboratory/California (SNL/CA), Tritium Research Laboratory (TRL) Cleanup and Transition project. Here we provide background information concerning the history of the TRL and the types of operations that generated the waste. Listed are applicable SNL/CA site-wide and TRL local waste handling related procedures. We describe personnel training practices and outline methods of handling and disposal of compactible and non-compactible low level waste, solidified waste water, hazardous wastes and mixed wastes. Waste minimization, reapplication and recycling practices are discussed. Finally, we provide a description of the process followed to remove the highly contaminated decontamination systems. This document is intended as both a historical record and as a reference to other facilities who may be involved in similar work.

Garcia, T.B.; Gorman, T.P.

1996-12-01

262

Waste minimization/pollution prevention at R&D facilities: A cradle-to-grave tracking and information system that will be implemented at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

A comprehensive environment, safety and health (ES&H) program allocates an extensive portion of its resources to information collection, management, and manipulation. Much of these resources are difficult to obtain and even more costly to ensure that they are sufficiently accurate; however, a system which collects information at the point which a process begins or a material enters a facility and maintains that information throughout its entire life-cycle is a more efficient approach to providing the data necessary to meet ES&H requirements. These data requirements for all the various groups within an ES&H program are associated with the properties and interactions among materials, personnel, facilities, hazards, waste and processes. Although each group is charged with addressing a particular aspect of these properties and interactions, the information they require can be aggregated into a coherent set of common data fields. It is these common data fields that the Cradle-to-Grave Tracking and Information System (CGTIS) is designed to satisfy. Research and development laboratories such as Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) are diverse in nature and, therefore, present a complex challenge to ES&H professionals. The remainder of this paper will describe the CGTIS as envisioned and implemented at SNL, define the requirements of a complete CGTIS, and review the current status of each system module at SNL.

Hollingsworth, M.W. [Rinchem Co., Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kjeldgaard, E.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Navarrete, R. [AT and T Bell Labs., Murray Hill, NJ (United States)

1993-09-01

263

Sandia software guidelines: Software quality planning  

SciTech Connect

This volume is one in a series of Sandia Software Guidelines intended for use in producing quality software within Sandia National Laboratories. In consonance with the IEEE Standard for Software Quality Assurance Plans, this volume identifies procedures to follow in producing a Software Quality Assurance Plan for an organization or a project, and provides an example project SQA plan. 2 figs., 4 tabs.

Not Available

1987-08-01

264

Sandia`s network for supercomputing `95: Validating the progress of Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) switching  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Networking Integration Department at Sandia National Laboratories has used the annual Supercomputing conference sponsored by the IEEE and ACM for the past three years as a forum to demonstrate and focus communication and networking developments. For Supercomputing `95, Sandia elected: to demonstrate the functionality and capability of an AT&T Globeview 20Gbps Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) switch, which represents the core of Sandia`s corporate network, to build and utilize a three node 622 megabit per second Paragon network, and to extend the DOD`s ACTS ATM Internet from Sandia, New Mexico to the conference`s show floor in San Diego, California, for video demonstrations. This paper documents those accomplishments, discusses the details of their implementation, and describes how these demonstrations supports Sandia`s overall strategies in ATM networking.

Pratt, T.J.; Vahle, O.; Gossage, S.A.

1996-04-01

265

Radiation and Health Technology Laboratory Capabilities  

SciTech Connect

The Radiological Standards and Calibrations Laboratory, a part of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)(a) performs calibrations and upholds reference standards necessary to maintain traceability to national standards. The facility supports U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs at the Hanford Site, programs sponsored by DOE Headquarters and other federal agencies, radiological protection programs at other DOE and commercial nuclear sites and research and characterization programs sponsored through the commercial sector. The laboratory is located in the 318 Building of the Hanford Site's 300 Area. The facility contains five major exposure rooms and several laboratories used for exposure work preparation, low-activity instrument calibrations, instrument performance evaluations, instrument maintenance, instrument design and fabrication work, thermoluminescent and radiochromic Dosimetry, and calibration of measurement and test equipment (M&TE). The major exposure facilities are a low-scatter room used for neutron and photon exposures, a source well room used for high-volume instrument calibration work, an x-ray facility used for energy response studies, a high-exposure facility used for high-rate photon calibration work, a beta standards laboratory used for beta energy response studies and beta reference calibrations and M&TE laboratories. Calibrations are routinely performed for personnel dosimeters, health physics instrumentation, photon and neutron transfer standards alpha, beta, and gamma field sources used throughout the Hanford Site, and a wide variety of M&TE. This report describes the standards and calibrations laboratory.

Bihl, Donald E.; Lynch, Timothy P.; Murphy, Mark K.; Myers, Lynette E.; Piper, Roman K.; Rolph, James T.

2005-07-09

266

Radiation and Health Technology Laboratory Capabilities  

SciTech Connect

The Radiological Standards and Calibrations Laboratory, a part of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)(a) performs calibrations and upholds reference standards necessary to maintain traceability to national standards. The facility supports U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs at the Hanford Site, programs sponsored by DOE Headquarters and other federal agencies, radiological protection programs at other DOE and commercial nuclear sites and research and characterization programs sponsored through the commercial sector. The laboratory is located in the 318 Building of the Hanford Site's 300 Area. The facility contains five major exposure rooms and several laboratories used for exposure work preparation, low-activity instrument calibrations, instrument performance evaluations, instrument maintenance, instrument design and fabrication work, thermoluminescent and radiochromic Dosimetry, and calibration of measurement and test equipment (M&TE). The major exposure facilities are a low-scatter room used for neutron and photon exposures, a source well room used for high-volume instrument calibration work, an x-ray facility used for energy response studies, a high-exposure facility used for high-rate photon calibration work, a beta standards laboratory used for beta energy response studies and beta reference calibrations and M&TE laboratories. Calibrations are routinely performed for personnel dosimeters, health physics instrumentation, photon and neutron transfer standards alpha, beta, and gamma field sources used throughout the Hanford Site, and a wide variety of M&TE. This report describes the standards and calibrations laboratory.

Goles, Ronald W.; Johnson, Michelle Lynn; Piper, Roman K.; Peters, Jerry D.; Murphy, Mark K.; Mercado, Mike S.; Bihl, Donald E.; Lynch, Timothy P.

2003-07-15

267

SSRL Lift Plan Procedure Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory  

E-print Network

SSRL Lift Plan Procedure Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory Lead Author ______________________ Oct 16, 2006 SSRL Lift Plan Procedure (SSRL-LPP-000-R1) Page 1 of 7 #12;SSRL Lift Plan Procedure a Lift Plan ....................................................................... 5 3.1 General

Wechsler, Risa H.

268

Technical Justification for Radiation Controls at an Environmental Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the technical approach used to establish radiation protection controls over incoming radioactive materials to an environmental measurements laboratory at the Hanford Site. Conditions that would trigger internal dosimetry, posting.

DUPAQUIER, J.C.

2000-07-01

269

SANDIA CORPORATION SF 6432-TM (10-99)  

E-print Network

AND MATERIALS LABOR HOUR CONTRACTS THE FOLLOWING CLAUSES APPLY TO THIS CONTRACT AS INDICATED UNLESS SPECIFICALLY for all purposes of this contract. (a) SANDIA means Sandia Corporation, the management and operating contractor of Sandia National Laboratories for the United States Department of Energy under Contract No. DE

270

SANDIA CORPORATION SF 6432-TM (10-98)  

E-print Network

AND MATERIALS LABOR HOUR CONTRACTS THE FOLLOWING CLAUSES APPLY TO THIS CONTRACT AS INDICATED UNLESS SPECIFICALLY for all purposes of this contract. (a) SANDIA means Sandia Corporation, the management and operating contractor of Sandia National Laboratories for the United States Department of Energy under Contract No. DE

271

Exceptional service in the national interest www.sandia.gov  

E-print Network

. Sandia has principal sites in Albuquerque, N.M., and Livermore, Calif., an operating revenue of about $2, a position he held until 2009. In 2009, Dr. Hommert moved to Sandia's main site in Albuquerque to become transfer. Dr. Paul Hommert Sandia National Laboratories P.O. Box 5800, MS-0101 Albuquerque, NM 87185

272

Lithium beam-driven target experiments at 10[sup 15] W/g on PBFA II at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

A lithium beam is focused to an intensity 1--2 TW/cm[sup 2]. The beam divergencies have been measured as low as 23 mrad. This lithium beam has the specific power deposition of [similar to]10 W/g, the beam-driven target experiments have achieved radiation temperature of 58 eV.(AIP) [copyright][ital American] [ital Institute] [ital of] [ital Physics] 1994

Mehlhorn, T.A.; Bailey, J.E.; Chandler, G.A.; Coats, R.S.; Cook, D.L.; Derzon, M.S.; Desjarlais, M.P.; Dukart, R.J.; Gerber, R.; Haill, T.A.; Johnson, D.J.; Leeper, R.J.; Lockner, T.R.; Mazarakis, M.G.; Mendel, C.W.; Mix, L.P.; Moats, A.R.; Renk, T.J.; Rochau, G.E.; Rosenthal, S.E.; Ruiz, C.L.; Tisone, G.C.; Olson, R.E.; Wenger, D.F. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque New Mexico (United States))

1994-10-05

273

Aerosciences at Sandia National Labs  

Microsoft Academic Search

A brief overview of Sandia National Laboratories will be presented highlighting the mission of Engineering Science Center. The Engineering Science Center provides a wide range of capabilities to support the lab's missions. As part of the Engineering Science Center the Aeroscience department provides research, development and application expertise in both experimental and computation compressible fluid mechanics. The role of Aeroscience

Jeffrey L

2010-01-01

274

Report of the workshop on Arctic oil and gas recovery held at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico, June 30-July 2, 1980  

SciTech Connect

This report is the result of a workshop on Arctic offshore oil and gas recovery, held at Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico, on June 30-July 2, 1980. Research priorities for the technology related to Arctic offshore oil and gas production were defined. The workshop was preceded by a report entitled, A Review of Technology for Arctic Offshore Oil and Gas Recovery, authored by Dr. W. M. Sackinger. The mission of the workshop was to identify research priorities without considering whether the research should be conducted by government or by industry. Nevertheless, at the end of the meeting the general discussion did consider this, and the concensus was that environmental properties should certainly be of concern to the government, that implementation of petroleum operations was the province of industry, and that overlapping, coordinated areas of interest include both environment and interactions of the environment with structures, transport systems, and operations. An attempt to establish relative importance and a time frame was made after the workshop through the use of a survey form. The form and a summary of its results, and a discussion of its implications, are given.

Sackinger, W. M. [ed.] [ed.

1980-09-01

275

Frank Vignola Solar Radiation Monitoring Laboratory  

E-print Network

.Grover@luminatellc.com Nick.Lemon@luminatellc.com BUILDING A BANKABLE SOLAR RADIATION DATASET ABSTRACT In order to obtain there was a hiatus in building large solar thermal electric facilities. Ten years ago, photovoltaic (PV) systems prompted utilities to either build their own solar generating facilities or, more often, enter into firm

Oregon, University of

276

A Sandia telephone database system  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, may soon have more responsibility for the operation of its own telephone system. The processes that constitute providing telephone service can all be improved through the use of a central data information system. We studied these processes, determined the requirements for a database system, then designed the first stages of a system that meets our needs for work order handling, trouble reporting, and ISDN hardware assignments. The design was based on an extensive set of applications that have been used for five years to manage the Sandia secure data network. The system utilizes an Ingres database management system and is programmed using the Application-By-Forms tools.

Nelson, S.D.; Tolendino, L.F.

1991-08-01

277

SANDIA REPORT SAND2014-2864  

E-print Network

Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE National Laboratory Bikini Atoll Road, MS F600 Los Alamos, NM 87545 Abstract Sandia's Dakota software

278

Sandia programs relevant to microelectronics fabrication  

SciTech Connect

This report was prepared for the Semiconductor Industry and the National Laboratories Workshop held at the National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC, February 24, 1987. It details the current Sandia program activities relevant to microelectronics fabrication.

Picraux, S.T.; Vook, F.L.; Gregory, B.L.

1987-04-01

279

Sandia technology  

SciTech Connect

Four mini-reports are included: modeling Mount St. Helen's volcanic eruption, Sierra Nevada magmatic activity, electro-optics for radiation environments, and compound semiconductors for high-temperature electronics. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the last two mini-reports. (DLC)

Not Available

1983-06-01

280

Sandia's Biofuels Program  

ScienceCinema

Sandia's biofuels program is focused on developing next-generation, renewable fuel solutions derived from biomass. In this video, various Sandia researchers discuss the program and the tools they employ to tackle the technical challenges they face.

Simmons, Blake; Singh, Seema; Lane, Todd; Reichardt, Tom; Davis, Ryan

2014-07-24

281

Application of a NAPL partitioning interwell tracer test (PITT) to support DNAPL remediation at the Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico chemical waste landfill  

SciTech Connect

Chlorinated solvents as dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) are present at a large number of hazardous waste sites across the U.S. and world. DNAPL is difficult to detect in the subsurface, much less characterize to any degree of accuracy. Without proper site characterization, remedial decisions are often difficult to make and technically effective, cost-efficient remediations are even more difficult to obtain. A new non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) characterization technology that is superior to conventional technologies has been developed and applied at full-scale. This technology, referred to as the Partitioning Interwell Tracer Test (PITT), has been adopted from oil-field practices and tailored to environmental application in the vadose and saturated zones. A PITT has been applied for the first time at full-scale to characterize DNAPL in the vadose zone. The PITT was applied in December 1995 beneath two side-by-side organic disposal pits at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) RCRA Interim Status Chemical Waste Landfill (CWL), located in Albuquerque, New Mexico. DNAPL, consisting of a mixture of chlorinated solvents, aromatic hydrocarbons, and PCE oils, is known to exist in at least one of the two buried pits. The vadose zone PITT was conducted by injecting a slug of non-partitioning and NAPL-partitioning tracers into and through a zone of interest under a controlled forced gradient. The forced gradient was created by a balanced extraction of soil gas at a location 55 feet from the injector. The extracted gas stream was sampled over time to define tracer break-through curves. Soil gas sampling ports from multilevel monitoring installations were sampled to define break-through curves at specific locations and depths. Analytical instrumentation such as gas chromatographs and a photoacoustical analyzers operated autonomously, were used for tracer detection.

Studer, J.E. [INTERA Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mariner, P.; Jin, M. [INTERA Inc., Austin, TX (United States)] [and others

1996-05-01

282

Identification of remediation needs and technology development focus areas for the Environmental Restoration (ER) Project at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM)  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Restoration (ER) Project has been tasked with the characterization, assessment, remediation and long-term monitoring of contaminated waste sites at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM). Many of these sites will require remediation which will involve the use of baseline technologies, innovative technologies that are currently under development, and new methods which will be developed in the near future. The Technology Applications Program (TAP) supports the ER Project and is responsible for development of new technologies for use at the contaminated waste sites, including technologies that will be used for remediation and restoration of these sites. The purpose of this report is to define the remediation needs of the ER Project and to identify those remediation needs for which the baseline technologies and the current development efforts are inadequate. The area between the remediation needs and the existing baseline/innovative technology base represents a technology gap which must be filled in order to remediate contaminated waste sites at SNL/NM economically and efficiently. In the first part of this report, the remediation needs of the ER Project are defined by both the ER Project task leaders and by TAP personnel. The next section outlines the baseline technologies, including EPA defined Best Demonstrated Available Technologies (BDATs), that are applicable at SNL/NM ER sites. This is followed by recommendations of innovative technologies that are currently being developed that may also be applicable at SNL/NM ER sites. Finally, the gap between the existing baseline/innovative technology base and the remediation needs is identified. This technology gap will help define the future direction of technology development for the ER Project.

Tucker, M.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Site Restoration Technology Program Office; Valdez, J.M.; Khan, M.A. [IT Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-06-01

283

Review of low-flow bladder pump and high-volume air piston pump groundwater sampling systems at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico.  

SciTech Connect

Since 1996, Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) has run both a portable high-volume air-piston pump system and a dedicated, low-flow bladder pump system to collect groundwater samples. The groundwater contaminants of concern at SNL/NM are nitrate and the volatile organic compounds trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloethene (PCE). Regulatory acceptance is more common for the high-volume air piston pump system, especially for programs like SNL/NM's, which are regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). This paper describes logistical and analytical results of the groundwater sampling systems used at SNL/NM. With two modifications to the off-the-shelf low-flow bladder pump, SNL/NM consistently operates the dedicated low-flow system at depths greater than 450 feet below ground surface. As such, the low-flow sampling system requires fewer personnel, less time and materials, and generates less purge and decontamination water than does the high-volume system. However, the bladder pump cannot work in wells with less than 4 feet of water. A review of turbidity and laboratory analytical results for TCE, PCE, and chromium (Cr) from six wells highlight the affect or lack of affects the sampling systems have on groundwater samples. In the PVC wells, turbidity typically remained < 5 nephelometric turbidity units (NTU) regardless of the sampling system. In the wells with a stainless steel screen, turbidity typically remained < 5 NTU only with the low-flow system. When the high-volume system was used, the turbidity and Cr concentration typically increased an order of magnitude. TCE concentrations at two wells did not appear to be sensitive to the sampling method used. However, PCE and TCE concentrations dropped an order of magnitude when the high-volume system was used at two other wells. This paper recommends that SNL/NM collaborate with other facilities with similar groundwater depths, continue to pursue regulatory approval for using dedicated the lowflow system, and review data for sample system affects on nitrate concentrations.

Collins, Sue S.; Jackson, Timmie Okchumpulla (Weston Solutions, Inc., Albuquerque, NM); Bailey, Glenn A.

2003-01-01

284

Review Of Low-Flow Bladder Pump And High-Volume Air Piston Pump Groundwater Sampling Systems At Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Since 1996, Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) has run both a portable high-volume air-piston pump system and a dedicated, low-flow bladder pump system to collect groundwater samples. The groundwater contaminants of concern at SNL/NM are nitrate and the volatile organic compounds trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloethene (PCE). Regulatory acceptance is more common for the high-volume air piston pump system, especially for programs like SNL/NM's, which are regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). This paper describes logistical and analytical results of the groundwater sampling systems used at SNL/NM. With two modifications to the off-the-shelf low-flow bladder pump, SNL/NM consistently operates the dedicated low-flow system at depths greater than 450 feet below ground surface. As such, the low-flow sampling system requires fewer personnel, less time and materials, and generates less purge and decontamination water than does the high-volume system. However, the bladder pump cannot work in wells with less than 4 feet of water. A review of turbidity and laboratory analytical results for TCE, PCE, and chromium (Cr) from six wells highlight the affect or lack of affects the sampling systems have on groundwater samples. In the PVC wells, turbidity typically remained < 5 nephelometric turbidity units (NTU) regardless of the sampling system. In the wells with a stainless steel screen, turbidity typically remained < 5 NTU only with the low-flow system. When the high-volume system was used, the turbidity and Cr concentration typically increased an order of magnitude. TCE concentrations at two wells did not appear to be sensitive to the sampling method used. However, PCE and TCE concentrations dropped an order of magnitude when the high-volume system was used at two other wells. This paper recommends that SNL/NM collaborate with other facilities with similar groundwater depths, continue to pursue regulatory approval for using dedicated the lowflow system, and review data for sample system affects on nitrate concentrations.

Collins, S. S.; Bailey, G. A.; Jackson, T. O.

2003-02-25

285

Metrology laboratory requirements for third-generation synchrotron radiation sources  

SciTech Connect

New third-generation synchrotron radiation sources that are now, or will soon, come on line will need to decide how to handle the testing of optical components delivered for use in their beam lines. In many cases it is desirable to establish an in-house metrology laboratory to do the work. We review the history behind the formation of the Optical Metrology Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory and the rationale for its continued existence. We offer suggestions to those who may be contemplating setting up similar facilities, based on our experiences over the past two decades.

Takacs, P.Z.; Quian, Shinan

1997-11-01

286

Sandia software guidelines. Volume 3. Standards, practices, and conventions  

SciTech Connect

This volume is one in a series of Sandia Software Guidelines intended for use in producing quality software within Sandia National Laboratories. In consonance with the IEEE Standard for Software Quality Assurance Plans, this volume identifies software standards, conventions, and practices. These guidelines are the result of a collective effort within Sandia National Laboratories to define recommended deliverables and to document standards, practices, and conventions which will help ensure quality software. 66 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

Not Available

1986-07-01

287

Characterization of radiation environments at selected Pacific Northwest Laboratory facilities  

SciTech Connect

This report is based on a study conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) from December 15, 1990 to December 15, 1991, to characterize the radiation environments at selected locations within PNL facilities. Thermoluminescent dosimeters were placed at 72 locations to measure non-productive radiation exposure to identify areas in which continuous occupation by a staff member would expose the staff member to radiation exceeding the 100 mrem/yr limit. The areas measured were found to be below the 0.05 mR/hr limit with the exception of three locations. At these three locations above the limit, radiation exposure was reduced by changing office locations and by additional shielding around radiation sources. Evaluations are recommended to determine the causes of elevated exposure rate readings.

Oxley, C.L.

1992-10-01

288

SSRL Hoisting & Rigging Lift Plan Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory  

E-print Network

SSRL Hoisting & Rigging Lift Plan Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory May 16, 2005 SSRL will be controlled or mitigated. Rigging Details Attach a rigging sketch or photographs to documentation the rigging the load require SSRL Rigging Panel approval. Lifts that involve loads that, if dropped, could release

Wechsler, Risa H.

289

Radiative transfer theory verified by controlled laboratory experiments  

E-print Network

Radiative transfer theory verified by controlled laboratory experiments Michael I. Mishchenko,1 particles from 2% to 10%. Our results indicate that the VRTE can be applied safely to random particulate the Maxwell equations [1,2] has finally made the RT theory (RTT) a legitimate branch of physical optics. Yet

290

Laboratory investigation of fire radiative energy and smoke aerosol emissions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fuel biomass samples from southern Africa and the United States were burned in a laboratory combustion chamber while measuring the biomass consumption rate, the fire radiative energy (FRE) release rate (Rfre), and the smoke concentrations of carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), and particulate matter (PM). The PM mass emission rate (RPM) was quantified from aerosol optical thickness (AOT) derived

Charles Ichoku; J. Vanderlei Martins; Yoram J. Kaufman; Martin J. Wooster; Patrick H. Freeborn; Wei Min Hao; Stephen Baker; Cecily A. Ryan; Bryce L. Nordgren

2008-01-01

291

Radiation Detection Laboratory The Detection for Nuclear Nonproliferation Lab is used to explore novel techniques for radiation  

E-print Network

NERS Radiation Detection Laboratory The Detection for Nuclear Nonproliferation Lab is used to explore novel techniques for radiation detection and characterization for nuclear nonproliferation sintillaction detectors in the presence of neutron and gamma-ray sources The laboratory is equipped

Kamat, Vineet R.

292

Savannah River Plant/Savannah River Laboratory radiation exposure report  

SciTech Connect

The protection of worker health and safety is of paramount concern at the Savannah River Site. Since the site is one of the largest nuclear sites in the nation, radiation safety is a key element in the protection program. This report is a compendium of the results in 1988 of the programs at the Savannah River Plant and the Savannah River Laboratory to protect the radiological health of employees. By any measure, the radiation protection performance at this site in 1988 was the best since the beginning of operations. This accomplishment was made possible by the commitment and support at all levels of the organizations to reduce radiation exposures to ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable). The report provides detailed information about the radiation doses received by departments and work groups within these organizations. It also includes exposure data for recent years to allow Plant and Laboratory units to track the effectiveness of their ALARA efforts. Many of the successful practices and methods that reduced radiation exposure are described. A new goal for personnel contamination cases has been established for 1989. Only through continual and innovative efforts to minimize exposures can the goals be met. The radiation protection goals for 1989 and previous years are included in the report. 27 figs., 58 tabs.

Rogers, C.D.; Hyman, S.D.; Keisler, L.L. (Du Pont de Nemours (E.I.) and Co., Aiken, SC (USA). Savannah River Plant); Reeder, D.F.; Jolly, L.; Spoerner, M.T.; Schramm, G.R. (Du Pont de Nemours (E.I.) and Co., Aiken, SC (USA). Savannah River Lab.)

1989-01-01

293

Investigations of solar radiation detectors using a laboratory test facility for solar radiation meterological instruments  

Microsoft Academic Search

A laboratory test facility for solar radiation detectors has been built and is in operation at the Aerological Station of the Swiss Meterological Institute (SAP\\/SMI) This installation is conceived as a universal test bed for solar radiation exposed meterological instruments, and consists of a commercially available solar simulator, a laser alignment system, a translation mechanism with instrument mounts, and an

R. Philipona; A. Heimo; B. Hoegger

1993-01-01

294

The Sandia Lightning Simulator Recommissioning and upgrades.  

SciTech Connect

The Sandia lightning simulator at Sandia National Laboratories can provide up to 200 kA for a simulated single lightning stroke, 100 kA for a subsequent stroke, and hundreds of Amperes of continuing current. It has recently been recommissioned after a decade of inactivity and the single-stroke capability demonstrated. The simulator capabilities, basic design components, upgrades, and diagnostic capabilities are discussed in this paper.

Martinez, Leonard E.; Caldwell, Michele

2005-08-01

295

Importance of energy efficiency in the design of the Process and Environmental Technology Laboratory (PETL) at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (NM)  

SciTech Connect

As part of the design of the Process and Environmental Technology Laboratory (PETL) in FY97, an energy conservation report (ECR) was completed. The original energy baseline for the building, established in Title 1 design, was 595,000 BTU/sq. ft./yr, site energy use. Following the input of several reviewers and the incorporation of the various recommendations into the Title 2 design, the projected energy consumption was reduced to 341,000 BTU/sq. ft./yr. Of this reduction, it is estimated that about 150,000 BTU/sq. ft./yr resulted from inclusion of more energy efficient options into the design. The remaining reductions resulted from better accounting of energy consumption between Title 1 ECR and the final ECR. The energy efficient features selected by the outcome of the ECR were: (1) Energy Recovery system, with evaporative cooling assist, for the Exhaust/Make-up Air System; (2) Chilled Water Thermal Storage system; (3) Premium efficiency motors for large, year-round applications; (4) Variable frequency drives for all air handling fan motors; (4) Premium efficiency multiple boiler system; and (5) Lighting control system. The annual energy cost savings due to these measures will be about $165,000. The estimated annual energy savings are two million kWhrs electric, and 168,000 therms natural gas, the total of which is equivalent to 23,000 million BTUs per year. Put into the perspective of a typical office/light lab at SNL/NM, the annual energy savings is equal the consumption of a 125,000 square foot building. The reduced air emissions are approximately 2,500 tons annually.

Wrons, R.

1998-06-01

296

A Radiation Laboratory Curriculum Development at Western Kentucky University  

SciTech Connect

We present the latest developments for the radiation laboratory curriculum at the Department of Physics and Astronomy of Western Kentucky University. During the last decade, the Applied Physics Institute (API) at WKU accumulated various equipment for radiation experimentation. This includes various neutron sources (computer controlled d-t and d-d neutron generators, and isotopic 252 Cf and PuBe sources), the set of gamma sources with various intensities, gamma detectors with various energy resolutions (NaI, BGO, GSO, LaBr and HPGe) and the 2.5-MeV Van de Graaff particle accelerator. XRF and XRD apparatuses are also available for students and members at the API. This equipment is currently used in numerous scientific and teaching activities. Members of the API also developed a set of laboratory activities for undergraduate students taking classes from the physics curriculum (Nuclear Physics, Atomic Physics, and Radiation Biophysics). Our goal is to develop a set of radiation laboratories, which will strengthen the curriculum of physics, chemistry, geology, biology, and environmental science at WKU. The teaching and research activities are integrated into real-world projects and hands-on activities to engage students. The proposed experiments and their relevance to the modern status of physical science are discussed.

Barzilov, Alexander P.; Novikov, Ivan S.; Womble, Phil C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Kentucky University, 1906 College Heights Blvd, 11077, Bowling Green KY 42101 (United States)

2009-03-10

297

PREFACE: Acceleration and radiation generation in space and laboratory plasmas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sixty-six leading researchers from ten nations gathered in the Homeric village of Kardamyli, on the southern coast of mainland Greece, from August 29-September 4, 1993 for the International Workshop on Acceleration and Radiation Generation in Space and Laboratory Plasmas. This Special Issue represents a cross-section of the presentations made at and the research stimulated by that meeting. According to the

R. Bingham; T. Katsouleas; J. M. Dawson; L. Stenflo

1994-01-01

298

A Brief History of the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory Criticality Facility  

SciTech Connect

Thousands of critical and high-multiplication subcritical experiments were performed at the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory (LRL) Critical Facility throughout the 1950s and 1960s. This paper presents a brief history of the origins of the LRL and the critical facility with a synopsis of those experiments that have been evaluated and published or will soon appear in the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments.

Heinrichs, David P.; Wofford, Stephen C. [University of California (United States)

2003-10-15

299

The Vermont-Sandia Smart Grid Partnership Powering the Future: The Vermont Smart Grid and Beyond  

E-print Network

The Vermont-Sandia Smart Grid Partnership Powering the Future: The Vermont Smart Grid and Beyond BURLINGTON SHERATON HOTEL & CONFERENCE CENTER MAY Laboratories 9:10-10:15 a.m. Opening Plenary: The Vermont-Sandia Smart Grid

Hayden, Nancy J.

300

1992 DOE/Sandia crystalline photovoltaic technology project review meeting  

SciTech Connect

This document serves as the proceedings for the annual project review meeting held by Sandia National Laboratories` Photovoltaic Technology and Photovoltaic Evaluation Departments. It contains information supplied by organizations making presentations at the meeting, which was held July 14--15, 1992 at the Sheraton Old Town Hotel in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Overview sessions covered the Department of Energy (DOE) program, including those at Sandia and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and non-DOE programs, including the EPRI concentrator collector program, The Japanese crystalline silicon program, and some concentrating photovoltaic activities in Europe. Additional sessions included papers on Sandia`s Photovoltaic Device Fabrication Laboratory`s collaborative research, cell processing research, the activities of the participants in the Concentrator Initiative Program, and photovoltaic technology evaluation at Sandia and NREL.

Maish, A. [ed.

1992-07-01

301

Simulation and off-line programming at Sandia`s Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center  

SciTech Connect

One role of the Intelligent Robotics and System Center (ISRC) at Sandia National Laboratories is to address certain aspects of Sandia`s mission to design, manufacture, maintain, and dismantle nuclear weapon components. Hazardous materials, devices, and environments are often involved. Because of shrinking resources, these tasks must be accomplished with a minimum of prototyping, while maintaining high reliability. In this paper, the authors describe simulation, off-line programming/planning, and related tools which are in use, under development, and being researched to solve these problems at the ISRC.

Xavier, P.G.; Fahrenholtz, J.C.; McDonald, M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center] [and others

1997-11-01

302

Laboratory Investigation Synergy of gene-mediated immunoprophylaxis and microbeam radiation therapy  

E-print Network

Laboratory Investigation Synergy of gene-mediated immunoprophylaxis and microbeam radiation therapy radiation therapy, rats Summary Purpose: Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT), a novel experimental animals and palliates advanced 9LGS tumors. This report, to our knowledge, is the first demonstration

Terasaki, Mark

303

Technical developments at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory.  

PubMed

The NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) located at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a center for space radiation research in both the life and physical sciences. BNL is a multidisciplinary research facility operated for the Office of Science of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The BNL scientific research portfolio supports a large and diverse science and technology program including research in nuclear and high-energy physics, material science, chemistry, biology, medial science, and nuclear safeguards and security. NSRL, in operation since July 2003, is an accelerator-based facility which provides particle beams for radiobiology and physics studies (Lowenstein in Phys Med 17(supplement 1):26-29 2001). The program focus is to measure the risks and to ameliorate the effects of radiation encountered in space, both in low earth orbit and extended missions beyond the earth. The particle beams are produced by the Booster synchrotron, an accelerator that makes up part of the injector sequence of the DOE nuclear physics program's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. Ion species from protons to gold are presently available, at energies ranging from <100 to >1,000 MeV/n. The NSRL facility has recently brought into operation the ability to rapidly switch species and beam energy to supply a varied spectrum onto a given specimen. A summary of past operation performance, plans for future operations and recent and planned hardware upgrades will be described. PMID:17211657

Lowenstein, D I; Rusek, A

2007-06-01

304

Pulsed Power: Sandia's Plans for the New Millenium  

SciTech Connect

Pulsed power science and engineering activities at Sandia National Laboratories grew out of a programmatic need for intense radiation sources to advance capabilities in radiographic imaging and to create environments for testing and certifying the hardness of components and systems to radiation in hostile environments. By the early 1970s, scientists in laboratories around the world began utilizing pulsed power drivers with very short (10s of nanoseconds) pulse lengths for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments. In the United States, Defense Programs within the Department of Energy has sponsored this research. Recent progress in pulsed power, specifically fast-pulsed-power-driven z pinches, in creating temperatures relevant to ICF has been remarkable. Worldwide developments in pulsed power technologies and increased applications in both defense and industry are contrasted with ever increasing stress on research and development tiding. The current environment has prompted us at Sandia to evaluate our role in the continued development of pulsed power science and to consider options for the future. This presentation will highlight our recent progress and provide an overview of our plans as we begin the new millennium.

QUINTENZ,JEFFREY P.

2000-07-20

305

Supersonic radiatively cooled rotating flows and jets in the laboratory.  

PubMed

The first laboratory astrophysics experiments to produce a radiatively cooled plasma jet with dynamically significant angular momentum are discussed. A new configuration of wire array z pinch, the twisted conical wire array, is used to produce convergent plasma flows each rotating about the central axis. Collision of the flows produces a standing shock and jet that each have supersonic azimuthal velocities. By varying the twist angle of the array, the rotation velocity of the system can be controlled, with jet rotation velocities reaching approximately 18% of the propagation velocity. PMID:18232988

Ampleford, D J; Lebedev, S V; Ciardi, A; Bland, S N; Bott, S C; Hall, G N; Naz, N; Jennings, C A; Sherlock, M; Chittenden, J P; Palmer, J B A; Frank, A; Blackman, E

2008-01-25

306

Another dramatic climb toward fusion conditions for Sandia Z accelerator  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This news article, from Sandia National Laboratories, presents advances made on the Sandia Z- pinch machine, which is an intense X-ray source and a possible candidate for fusion power production. The article describes how the machine works and also describes experimental results. Links to more information and images of the machine are also contained.

2007-04-06

307

The {open_quotes}ASR{close_quotes} story where we are and how we got there: A history of Sandia National Laboratories maintenance employee safety committee  

SciTech Connect

The Area Safety Representative (ASR) Team is an employee based safety committee that was originated in the latter part of 1994. It was introduced by the Operations and Engineering Center ES&H Coordinator who had heard about an employee based safety program implemented at the EG&G Corporation. This information was the first step in creating Sandia`s Maintenance `Area Safety Representative` (ASR) Program. An advertisement went out from the ES&H Coordinator to all the Maintenance Organizations asking for individuals who would be interested in performing as a volunteer safety representative for their section. The interest was moderate but effective. The committee consisted of one volunteer from each of the working sections within the Maintenance Organization, e.e., HVAC Mechanics, Electricians, Millwrights, Plumbers, Sheetmetal Workers, High-Voltage Technicians, a Union Representative, and representatives from the Operations Group that manage sub-contracted personnel. During the past year, organizational changes have brought about the addition of representatives to include the Planners and the Custodians. The original committee members were enrolled in a 30-hour OSHA Voluntary Compliance Outreach Course. This information provided the members with a broad overview of the Safety Guidelines set forth by OSHA for themselves and their coworkers. It is to be noted that this is an employee based safety team. There are no supervisors or managers on the committee but their attendance is always welcomed at the ASR meetings.

NONE

1997-08-01

308

Inside Sandia, April 1996  

SciTech Connect

Brief articles in this issue are entitled: New testing techniques, textiles on the information superhighway, and knowledge preservation; Structural health monitoring techniques and robust analysis tools assess aging and damaged structures; Sandia`s VCSELs (Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers): sparking a laser diode revolution; Fiber-optic instrumentation trims weeks off the wait for cervical cancer test results; DAMA (Demand Activated Manufacturing Architecture) project boosts competitiveness of US textile industry; SEAMIST (Science and Engineering Associates Membrane Instrumentation and Sampling Technique) cuts contamination cleanup costs; RePAVing the roads to the past (Relevant Point of Access Video); and Sandia receives DOE basic energy sciences award for sol-gel achievements.

Locke, T. [ed.

1996-04-01

309

The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, 20 years of synchrotron light  

SciTech Connect

The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) is now operating as a fully dedicated light source with low emittance electron optics, delivering high brightness photon beams to 25 experimental stations six to seven months per year. On October 1, 1993 SSRL became a Division of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, rather than an Independent Laboratory of Stanford University, so that high energy physics and synchrotron radiation now function under a single DOE contract. The SSRL division of SLAC has responsibility for operating, maintaining and improving the SPEAR accelerator complex, which includes the storage ring and a 3 GeV injector. SSRL has thirteen x-ray stations and twelve VUV/Soft x-ray stations serving its 600 users. Recently opened to users is a new spherical grating monochromator (SGM) and a multiundulator beam line. Circularly polarized capabilities are being exploited on a second SGM line. New YB{sub 66} crystals installed in a vacuum double-crystal monochromator line have sparked new interest for Al and Mg edge studies. One of the most heavily subscribed stations is the rotation camera, which has been recently enhanced with a MAR imaging plate detector system for protein crystallography on a multipole wiggler. Under construction is a new wiggler-based structural molecular biology beam line with experimental stations for crystallography, small angle scattering and x-ray absorption spectroscopy. Plans for new developments include wiggler beam lines and associated facilities specialized for environmental research and materials processing.

Cantwell, K.

1993-08-01

310

The Albuquerque Tribune: Science Sandia labs scientist develops armor for cells  

E-print Network

The Albuquerque Tribune: Science Sandia labs scientist develops armor for cells By Sue Vorenberg of New Mexico and a scientist at Sandia National Laboratories. The goal of his experiment was to make was funded by the Air Force, Sandia and UNM through about $500,000 in grants during that time. The problem

Brinker, C. Jeffrey

311

Sulimar Queen environmental restoration project closure package Sandia environmental stewardship exemplar  

Microsoft Academic Search

In March 2008, Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia), in partnership with the Bureau of Land Management, Roswell Field Office, completed its responsibilities to plug and abandon wells and restore the surface conditions for the Sulimar Queens Unit, a 2,500 acre oil field, in Chaves County, Southeast New Mexico. Sandia assumed this liability in an agreement to obtain property to create a

Jack B

2008-01-01

312

Sandia technology, Winter 1975--1976  

Microsoft Academic Search

Unclassified development activities at Sandia Laboratories are described. Information is included on rocket-powered aerial trolleys, material evaluation using a plasmajet, metal-hydride models, glass-ceramic tube insulators, ferroelectric ceramics, and systems to communicate with earth penetrators. (JRD)

J. P. Weber; L. S. Marcrum

1976-01-01

313

SANDIA REPORT SAND2011-3119  

E-print Network

Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE National Laboratories, operated for the United States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE for Electrical Power Generation On-Board Commercial Airplanes Joseph W. Pratt, Leonard E. Klebanoff, Karina Munoz

314

SANDIA REPORT SAND2006-5315  

E-print Network

-Mail: reports@adonis.osti.gov Online ordering: http://www.osti.gov/bridge Available to the public from U.SSANDIA REPORT SAND2006-5315 Unlimited Release Printed August 2006 A generating set direct search. Kolda, R. M. Lewis, and V. Torczon Prepared by Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico

Lewis, Robert Michael

315

Radiative transfer theory verified by controlled laboratory experiments.  

PubMed

We report the results of high-accuracy controlled laboratory measurements of the Stokes reflection matrix for suspensions of submicrometer-sized latex particles in water and compare them with the results of a numerically exact computer solution of the vector radiative transfer equation (VRTE). The quantitative performance of the VRTE is monitored by increasing the volume packing density of the latex particles from 2% to 10%. Our results indicate that the VRTE can be applied safely to random particulate media with packing densities up to ?2%. VRTE results for packing densities of the order of 5% should be taken with caution, whereas the polarized bidirectional reflectivity of suspensions with larger packing densities cannot be accurately predicted. We demonstrate that a simple modification of the phase matrix entering the VRTE based on the so-called static structure factor can be a promising remedy that deserves further examination. PMID:24104804

Mishchenko, Michael I; Goldstein, Dennis H; Chowdhary, Jacek; Lompado, Arthur

2013-09-15

316

PREFACE: Acceleration and radiation generation in space and laboratory plasmas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sixty-six leading researchers from ten nations gathered in the Homeric village of Kardamyli, on the southern coast of mainland Greece, from August 29-September 4, 1993 for the International Workshop on Acceleration and Radiation Generation in Space and Laboratory Plasmas. This Special Issue represents a cross-section of the presentations made at and the research stimulated by that meeting. According to the Iliad, King Agamemnon used Kardamyli as a dowry offering in order to draw a sulking Achilles into the Trojan War. 3000 years later, Kardamyli is no less seductive. Its remoteness and tranquility made it an ideal venue for promoting the free exchange of ideas between various disciplines that do not normally interact. Through invited presen tations, informal poster discussions and working group sessions, the Workshop brought together leaders from the laboratory and space/astrophysics communities working on common problems of acceleration and radiation generation in plasmas. It was clear from the presentation and discussion sessions that there is a great deal of common ground between these disciplines which is not at first obvious due to the differing terminologies and types of observations available to each community. All of the papers in this Special Issue highlight the role collective plasma processes play in accelerating particles or generating radiation. Some are state-of-the-art presentations of the latest research in a single discipline, while others investi gate the applicability of known laboratory mechanisms to explain observations in natural plasmas. Notable among the latter are the papers by Marshall et al. on kHz radiation in the magnetosphere ; Barletta et al. on collective acceleration in solar flares; and by Dendy et al. on ion cyclotron emission. The papers in this Issue are organized as follows: In Section 1 are four general papers by Dawson, Galeev, Bingham et al. and Mon which serves as an introduction to the physical mechanisms of acceleration and radiation generation in plasmas. The next section includes state-of-the-art papers on laboratory accelerators driven by lasers (Nakajima et al., Shukla, Johnson et al.), microwaves (Nishida et al., Bogomolov et al.) and by particle beams (Ogata et al.). Also in this section are theoretical papers presenting new work on synchrotron like oscillations in plasma waves (Fedele) and two types of laboratory radiation sources, FEL's (Marshall et al.) and ionization fronts (Lai et al.), and Frantzeskakis et al. described the Hamiltonian analysis of a slow-wave autonomous cyclotron buncher. Section 3 contains papers on astrophysical plasmas, with the general presentations of Colgate and Krishnan. Kazanas and Krishnan address active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Thielheim discusses general acceleration mech anisms in rotating magnetized systems. Asseo discussed Langmuir solitons in pulsars and Blackman et al. treat magnetic reconnection relativistically. Su et al. analyze the possibility of plasma wave excitation and particle acceleration by neu trinos from supernovae. Dogiel et al. on cosmic ray scattering by MHD fluctuations. The papers in Section 4 treat fusion plasmas (Dendy et al. and Lashmore-Davies et al.). Section 5, space plasmas, includes papers on acceleration processes in the magnetosphere (Anagnostopoulos and Marshall et al.) and the sun (Barletta et al.). It is evident from the Workshop and the papers collected here that this is indeed a rich field of investigations and that both the natural and laboratory plasma communities can benefit from the cross-fertilization of ideas between them. We wish to thank the authors and attendees for their contributions to the success of this workshop, Dr Philip Debenham and Dr David Sutter of the U.S. D.o.E. and Dr Charles Roberson of the U.S. O.N.R. for their financial support (Grants DE-FGO3-93ER40776 and N00014-93-1-0814), and the ECC Twinning Grant SC1*-CT92-0773. We appreciate the considerable local support from Mr Glegles and his staff at the Agricultural Bank of Greece. We thank Mr V. Tataronis, mayor of Kardamyli, and

Bingham, R.; Katsouleas, T.; Dawson, J. M.; Stenflo, L.

1994-01-01

317

Seismic waves radiated during dynamic rupture of granite laboratory samples  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Using arrays of piezoelectric sensors, we analyze the way that seismic waves are radiated during dynamic rupture of saw-cut faults in granite laboratory samples. We compare stick-slip events generated on a on a 0.15 m-long fault in a triaxial apparatus at 70 to 200 MPa normal stress with those on a 2 m-long fault in a large-scale biaxial apparatus at 1 to 7 MPa normal stress. The two machines have different values of unloading stiffness and produce stick-slip events with significantly different properties. Events on the triaxial apparatus have greater overall slip (400 to 1600 ?m) and larger sample-average shear stress changes (25 to 110 MPa) but shorter overall slip duration (200 to 400 ?s) compared to those on the large biaxial apparatus (50 to 150 ?m slip, 0.1 to 0.4 MPa stress changes, and 2 to 4 ms overall slip duration). As a result, the average slip speeds are much larger for events on the triaxial apparatus (2 to 4 m/s) compared to those on the large biaxial apparatus (15 to 75 mm/s). To explore the consequences of these differences, and how they relate to differences in dynamic rupture modes and seismic radiation, each sample is instrumented with at least 15 piezoelectric sensors which are used to study the timing, location, amplitude, and frequency content of radiated seismic waves. In addition, an array of strain gages on the 2 m samples allows us to explore how the local distribution of shear stress along the fault affects the way that fault rupture occurs. We find that at low stress levels fault slip along the 2 m fault occurs as brief bursts of rapid, seismic slip followed by slowly expanding (5 to 200 m/s) fronts of largely aseismic afterslip (80 to 500 ?m/s slip rates). Higher stress levels on the same fault produce ruptures that propagate close to the shear wave speed and continuously radiate seismic waves near the rupture front. In some cases we observe the rapid termination of seismic radiation on the 2 m fault when a rupture front propagates into a low stress region. Finally, we evaluate which of our observations are controlled by the boundary conditions and elastic properties of the apparatus and which are controlled by the elastic and frictional properties of the rocks and are most relevant to dynamic rupture processes that generate natural earthquakes.

Mclaskey, G.; Kilgore, B. D.; Lockner, D. A.; Beeler, N. M.

2013-12-01

318

University of Notre Dame Radiation Laboratory quarterly report, July 1--September 30, 1991  

SciTech Connect

Research carried out at the Notre Dame Radiation Laboratory is briefly described. Research involves areas of electron transfer photoprocesses, photochemistry, pulse radiolysis, and charge transfer reactions. 13 refs.

Not Available

1991-10-15

319

Laboratory Studies of Supersonic Magnetized Plasma Jets and Radiative Shocks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this talk I will focus on laboratory plasma experiments producing magnetically driven supersonic plasma jets and on the interaction of these jets with ambient media. The experiments are scalable to astrophysical flows in that the critical dimensionless numbers such as the plasma collisionality, the plasma beta, the Reynolds number and the magnetic Reynolds number are all in the astrophysically appropriate ranges. The experimental results will be compared with computer simulations performed with laboratory plasma codes and with astrophysical codes. In the experiments the jets are driven and collimated by the toroidal magnetic fields and it is found that the level of MHD instabilities in the jets strongly depends on the strength of the field represented by the ratio of the thermal to magnetic field pressures (plasma beta). The experiments show the possibility of formation of episodic outflows, with periodic ejections of magnetic bubbles naturally evolving into a heterogeneous jet propagating inside a channel made of self-collimated magnetic cavities [1,2]. We also found that it is possible to form quasi-laminar jets which are indirectly collimated by the toroidal magnetic fields, but this requires the presence of the lower density halo plasma surrounding the central jet [3]. Studies of the radiative shocks formed in the interaction of the supersonic magnetized plasma flows with ambient plasma will be also presented, and the development of cooling instabilities in the post-shock plasma will be discussed. This research was sponsored by EPSRC Grant No. EP/G001324/1 and by the OFES DOE under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-SC-0001063. References 1. A. Ciardi, S.V. Lebedev, A. Frank et al., The Astrophysical Journal, 691: L147-L150 (2009) 2. F.A. Suzuki-Vidal, S.V. Lebedev, S.N. Bland et al., Physics of Plasmas, 17, 112708 (2010). 3. F.A. Suzuki-Vidal, M. Bocchi, S.V. Lebedev et al., Physics of Plasmas, 19, 022708 (2012).

Lebedev, Sergey

2013-06-01

320

Thar`s gold in them thar notebooks: benefits of laboratory notebooks in the government archive  

Microsoft Academic Search

As Archive Coordinator for Sandia National Laboratories Corporate Archives, I am responsible for promoting the preservation and value of Sandia`s history. Today I will talk about one important part of Sandia`s historical record--the laboratory notebook. I will start with some brief background on Sandia National Laboratories, including the Laboratories` mission and an example of how the gold in one lab

1996-01-01

321

Aerosciences at Sandia National Labs.  

SciTech Connect

A brief overview of Sandia National Laboratories will be presented highlighting the mission of Engineering Science Center. The Engineering Science Center provides a wide range of capabilities to support the lab's missions. As part of the Engineering Science Center the Aeroscience department provides research, development and application expertise in both experimental and computation compressible fluid mechanics. The role of Aeroscience at Sandia National Labs will be discussed with a focus on current research and development activities within the Aeroscience Department. These activities will be presented within the framework of a current program to highlight the synergy between computational and experimental work. The research effort includes computational and experimental activities covering fluid and structural dynamics disciplines. The presentation will touch on: probable excitation sources that yield the level of random vibration observed during flight; the methods that have been developed to model the random pressure fields in the turbulent boundary layer using a combination of CFD codes and a model of turbulent boundary layer pressure fluctuations; experimental measurement of boundary layer fluctuations; the methods of translating the random pressure fields to time-domain spatially correlated pressure fields.

Payne, Jeffrey L.

2010-10-01

322

Investigations of solar radiation detectors using a laboratory test facility for solar radiation meterological instruments  

SciTech Connect

A laboratory test facility for solar radiation detectors has been built and is in operation at the Aerological Station of the Swiss Meterological Institute (SAP/SMI) This installation is conceived as a universal test bed for solar radiation exposed meterological instruments, and consists of a commercially available solar simulator, a laser alignment system, a translation mechanism with instrument mounts, and an adjustable projection mirror. The solar simulator produces a well characterized radiation beam which can be filtered to match the terrestrial or outer space solar spectrum with an irradiance of up to one solar constant (1367 Wm[sup [minus]2]). The instrument mounts and a HeNe laser beam provide a precise and easy alignment of the reference and the test instruments in the radiation beam, allowing for incident angles in the range of 15[degrees]-75[degrees]. The measurement is based on a comparison of the response of an active cavity absolute radiometer PMO6 with the signal of the test instrument. Detailed investigations of the Haenni Solar 111B type heliometer have revealed important irregularities in the sunshine threshold irradiance angular distribution. Measurements performed with and without the protection glass cover prove the exceedingly high threshold values at large declination angles to be a consequence of enhanced reflections due to the incident angle and inhomogeneities in the glass cover. Very satisfactory results have also been obtained on characterization measurements of pyranometers showing the mean values of the responsivity to be within 0.8% of the calibration values measured at the world radiation center(WRC) at Davos.

Philipona, R.; Heimo, A.; Hoegger, B. (Aerological Station of the Wiss Meterological Institute, Payerne (Switzerland))

1993-08-01

323

Environmental Remediation Sciences Program at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Synchrotron radiation (SR)-based techniques provide unique capabilities to address scientific issues underpinning environmental remediation science and have emerged as major research tools in this field. The high intensity of SR sources and x-ray photon-in/photon-out detection allow noninvasive in-situ analysis of dilute, hydrated, and chemically/structurally complex natural samples. SR x-rays can be focused to beams of micron and sub-micron dimension, which allows the study of microstructures, chemical microgradients, and microenvironments such as in biofilms, pore spaces, and around plant roots, that may control the transformation of contaminants in the environment. The utilization of SR techniques in environmental remediation sciences is often frustrated, however, by an ''activation energy barrier'', which is associated with the need to become familiar with an array of data acquisition and analysis techniques, a new technical vocabulary, beam lines, experimental instrumentation, and user facility administrative procedures. Many investigators find it challenging to become sufficiently expert in all of these areas or to maintain their training as techniques evolve. Another challenge is the dearth of facilities for hard x-ray micro-spectroscopy, particularly in the 15 to 23 KeV range, which includes x-ray absorption edges of the priority DOE contaminants Sr, U, Np, Pu, and Tc. Prior to the current program, there were only two (heavily oversubscribed) microprobe facilities in the U.S. that could fully address this energy range (one at each of APS and NSLS); none existed in the Western U.S., in spite of the relatively large number of DOE laboratories in this region.

Bargar, John R.

2006-11-15

324

Solar Total Energy at Sandia Labs  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Sandia Laboratories' Solar Total Energy Program is described. This program consists of designing, building, installing, and operating a field of concentrating parabolic trough solar collectors which provide energy at 310 C, a 32-kW organic Rankine cycle power plant, and the heating and cooling equipment to utilize the cascaded, low-temperature energy from the turbine\\/generator. Included in the presentation are descriptions

J. A. Leonard

1976-01-01

325

Reverberation Chamber Uniformity Validation and Radiated Susceptibility Test Procedures for the NASA High Intensity Radiated Fields Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA Langley Research Center's High Intensity Radiated Fields Laboratory has developed a capability based on the RTCA/DO-160F Section 20 guidelines for radiated electromagnetic susceptibility testing in reverberation chambers. Phase 1 of the test procedure utilizes mode-tuned stirrer techniques and E-field probe measurements to validate chamber uniformity, determines chamber loading effects, and defines a radiated susceptibility test process. The test procedure is segmented into numbered operations that are largely software controlled. This document is intended as a laboratory test reference and includes diagrams of test setups, equipment lists, as well as test results and analysis. Phase 2 of development is discussed.

Koppen, Sandra V.; Nguyen, Truong X.; Mielnik, John J.

2010-01-01

326

Optimum laboratory radiation source for hardness assurance testing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Silicon-on-insulator (SOI) and bulk-silicon transistors were irradiated using X-ray, Co-60 gamma, and proton radiation sources. Co-60 gamma irradiation generates larger radiation-induced threshold voltage shifts (by a factor of two) in SOI buried oxides and in parasitic field oxides under low-field conditions than X-ray or proton irradiation. For all devices examined, the radiation-induced threshold voltage shifts generated by X-ray irradiation were

J. R. Schwank; M. R. Shaneyfelt; P. Paillet; D. E. Beutler; V. Ferlet-Cavrois; B. L. Draper; R. A. Loemaker; P. E. Dodd; F. W. Sexton

2001-01-01

327

Diurnal Variations of Energetic Particle Radiation Dose Measured by the Mars Science Laboratory Radiation Assessment Detector  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) on board the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover Curiosity has collected data on the interplanetary radiation environment during cruise from Earth to Mars and at the surface of Mars since its landing in August 2012. Any process that changes the column mass of atmosphere should change the dose at the surface due to the shielding effect of the atmosphere. On Mars there are two major processes that substantially change column atmospheric mass. The first is the seasonal condensation cycle during which 25% of the dominant atmospheric constituent (CO2) condenses onto the winter pole. The second major process is related to thermal tides forced by the direct heating of the Martian atmosphere by the Sun. The thermal tide can produce a column mass variation of 10-15% over a Martian day (sol). Here, we report on the total dose rate and neutral count rate measured by MSL RAD and the variation of these dose rates over the diurnal cycle. Further, we show that the variation in the dose rates is very likely due to the variation of column mass, as measured by the pressure sensor on the Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS). While changes in dose were expected from changes in altitude or season, the discovery of a diurnal variation was not anticipated, although it should have been reasonably expected in hindsight.

Rafkin, Scot

328

Space Radiation Research Unit, International Open Laboratory in NIRS  

PubMed Central

The radiation environment encountered by astronauts during spaceflight is far more complex than any radiation field existed on Earth. Space crew living and working in the International Space Station (ISS) are exposed to a mixed radiation field comprises primary high-energy cosmic rays, including energetic protons and heavy ions, and to secondary radiations, including energetic neutrons, produced when the primary radiation interacts with the mass of the space station and its contents. The doses of ionizing radiation received by astronauts and cosmonauts aboard the ISS are many times greater than those received by radiation workers on the ground. Exposure to ionizing radiation in space includes high LET events than can produce significant biological damage in human cells and tissues, and thus represents an important risk to space crew health and safety. The Space Radiation Research Unit at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) includes both physicists and radiation biologists and there is extensive collaboration between these two groups. This provides us with the expertise needed to investigate the effects of space crew exposure to the highly complex, mixed radiation environment encountered in space. In addition, NIRS is home to a heavy ion accelerator, HIMAC and the Medical Cyclotron that can be used to simulate various components of the space radiation environment. Recently, we have developed a medium energy proton radiation field using the NIRS Medical Cyclotron. [How about a sentence or two on the significance of this proton facilities.] In addition, NIRS has also developed a high precision tool, the Single Particle Irradiation System to Cell (SPICE) microbeam facility, for use in investigating various radiobiological endpoints, including the bystander effect and the adaptive response of various cell types, Caenorhabditis elegans and in Medaka fish. Some of these research activities are described in these proceedings [1, 2]. The Space Radiation Research Unit at NIRS has extensive international collaborations with researchers in China, Germany, Russia, USA, Sweden, Austria and other countries. In particular, collaborations with our Russian colleagues has led to opportunities to expose our dosimeters aboard the ISS and to numerous other experiments in the frame of the IOL, as described more fully elsewhere in these proceedings. We believe that the framework of the IOL is very powerful and productive and we plan to continue our collaborative research with our international colleagues.

Uchihori, Yukio; Hei, Tom K.; Konishi, Teruaki; Kobayashi, Alisa; Kitamura, Hisashi; Kodaira, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Shingo

2014-01-01

329

Construction and operation of an improved radiation calibration facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Environmental assessment  

SciTech Connect

Calibration of instruments used to detect and measure ionizing radiation has been conducted over the last 20 years at Brookhaven National Laboratory`s (BNL) Radiation Calibration Facility, Building 348. Growth of research facilities, projects in progress, and more stringent Department of Energy (DOE) orders which involve exposure to nuclear radiation have placed substantial burdens on the existing radiation calibration facility. The facility currently does not meet the requirements of DOE Order 5480.4 or American National Standards Institute (ANSI) N323-1978, which establish calibration methods for portable radiation protection instruments used in the detection and measurement of levels of ionizing radiation fields or levels of radioactive surface contaminations. Failure to comply with this standard could mean instrumentation is not being calibrated to necessary levels of sensitivity. The Laboratory has also recently obtained a new neutron source and gamma beam irradiator which can not be made operational at existing facilities because of geometry and shielding inadequacies. These sources are needed to perform routine periodic calibrations of radiation detecting instruments used by scientific and technical personnel and to meet BNL`s substantial increase in demand for radiation monitoring capabilities. To place these new sources into operation, it is proposed to construct an addition to the existing radiation calibration facility that would house all calibration sources and bring BNL calibration activities into compliance with DOE and ANSI standards. The purpose of this assessment is to identify potential significant environmental impacts associated with the construction and operation of an improved radiation calibration facility at BNL.

NONE

1994-10-01

330

Laboratory Training Manual on the Use of Isotopes and Radiation in Entomology.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This publication should be useful for those who are interested in the theory and application of isotopes and radiation in agriculture and entomology. There are two main parts in the publication. Part I, entitled Basic Part, includes topics which an individual should know about radioisotopes and radiation. There are laboratory exercises included in

International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria).

331

Pacific Northwest Laboratory plan to maintain radiation exposure as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA)  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the radiation safety program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The practices and administrative policies of this program support the principles of ALARA (to maintain radiation exposure as low as reasonably achievable). This document also describes a program to establish safety goals at PNL to help ensure that operations are conducted according to ALARA principles.

Higby, D.P.; Denovan, J.T.

1982-12-01

332

K shell radiation physics in the ultrahigh optical depth pinches of the Z generator  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary form only given. The 60 TW Z generator at Sandia National Laboratories is unique in its ability to strip multi-mg Al plasmas to the Hand He-like ionization stages. Such large plasma masses can produce optical depths in the principal K shell lines of 103. Thus, Z can serve as a unique laboratory facility at which radiation interactions and transport

J. P. Apruzese; P. E. Pulsifer; J. Davis; R. W. Clark; K. G. Whitney; J. W. Thornhill; T. W. L. Sanford; G. A. Chandler; C. Deeney; D. L. Fehl; T. J. Nash; R. B. Spielman; W. A. Stygar; K. W. Struve; R. C. Mock; T. L. Gilliland; D. O. Jobe; J. S. McGurn; J. F. Seamen; J. A. Torres; M. Vargas

1998-01-01

333

Diurnal Variations of Energetic Particle Radiation Dose Measured by the Mars Science Laboratory Radiation Assessment Detector  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) on board the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover Curiosity has collected data on the interplanetary radiation environment during cruise from Earth to Mars and at the surface of Mars since its landing in August 2012. RAD's particle detection capabilities are achieved with a solid-state detector (SSD) stack (A, B, C), a CsI(Tl) scintillator (D), and a plastic scintillator (E) for neutron detection. The D and E detectors are surrounded by an anticoincidence shield (F), also made of plastic scintillator. All scintillators are optically coupled to silicon diodes which convert scintillation light to electrons. RAD is capable of measuring both Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) thought to be produced by supernovae outside the heliosphere and Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs). GCRs are relativistic particles (100 MeV/nuc to >10 GeV/nuc) composed of roughly 89% protons, 10% alpha particles (He), and 1% heavier nuclei [1]. Because of their high energies and continuous nature, GCRs are the dominant source of background radiation at the Martian surface, and are responsible for the production of secondary particles (notably neutrons) via complex interactions in the atmosphere and regolith. SEPs are produced by coronal mass ejections. These intermittent storms are most likely to occur near solar maximum and typical fluxes are dominated by protons with energies lower than 100 MeV/nuc. Unlike the GCR flux, the SEP flux can vary by five or more orders of magnitude over timescales of a day. Even under a constant flux of energetic particle radiation at the top of the atmosphere, the radiation dose at the surface should vary as a function of surface elevation [2]. This variation is directly related to the change in the shielding provided by the total atmospheric mass column, which is to a very good approximation directly related to surface pressure. Thus, the flux of primary energetic particles should increase with altitude, all other things being equal. At present, MSL has been at a nearly constant altitude of ~-4.4 km MOLA so that no elevation-induced changes are expected and none have been observed. However, any process that changes the column mass of atmosphere should change the dose at the surface. On Mars there are two major processes that substantially change column atmospheric mass. The first is the seasonal condensation cycle during which ~25% of the dominant atmospheric constituent (CO2) condenses onto the winter pole. This seasonal signal is very strong and has been observed by surface pressure measurements from the Viking Landers up through MSL [3,4]. The second major process is related to the thermal tide. The direct heating of the Martian atmosphere by the Sun produces global scale waves that redistribute mass [5]. The two most dominant tidal modes are the diurnal and semidiurnal tide. Together, the thermal tide can produce a variation of 10-15% over a Martian day (sol). Here, we report on the dose measured by the RAD E detector and the variation of this dose over the diurnal cycle. Further, we show that the variation in the E dose rate is very likely due to the variation of column mass, as measured by the pressure sensor on the Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS), driven by the thermal tide. While changes in dose were expected from changes in altitude or season, the discovery of a diurnal variation was not anticipated, although it should have been reasonably expected in hindsight.

Rafkin, Scot; Zeitlin, Cary; Ehresmann, Bent; Khler, Jan; Guo, Jingnan; Kahanp, Henrik; Hassler, Don; -Gomez, Javier E.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert; Brinza, David; Bttcher, Stephan; Bhm, Eckhard; Burmeister, Sonka; Martin, Cesar; Mller-Mellin, Robert; Appel, Jan; Posner, Arik; Reitz, Gunter; Kharytonov, Aliksandr; Cucinotta, Francis

2013-04-01

334

Visualization in Radiation Oncology: Towards Replacing the Laboratory Notebook  

E-print Network

of VisTrails is an action- based mechanism which uniformly captures the provenance of data as well explore the benefits of using VisTrails for large-scale data exploration in radiation oncology. #12. Silva 2 Huy T. Vo 2 1 School of Computing, University of Utah 2 Scientific Computing and Imaging

Utah, University of

335

Total dose hardness assurance testing using laboratory radiation sources  

Microsoft Academic Search

NMOS transistors were irradiated using X-ray, Co-60 gamma, electron, and proton radiation sources. The charge yield was estimated for protons of different energies and electrons, and compared with values obtained for X-ray and Co-60 irradiations.

P. Paillet; J. R. Schwank; M. R. Shaneyfelt; V. Ferlet-Cavrois; R. L. Jones; O. Flament; E. W. Blackmore

2003-01-01

336

Laboratory or Facility Representative Email Addresses Phone # Ames Laboratory Stacy Joiner joiner@ameslab.gov 515-294-5932  

E-print Network

Laboratory Lewis Meixler lmeixler@pppl.gov 609-243-3009 Sandia National Laboratories Pete Atherton prather@sandia), universities and contractors operating national lab- oratories were authorized to retain title to inventions

Ohta, Shigemi

337

Measurements of energetic particle radiation in transit to Mars on the Mars Science Laboratory.  

PubMed

The Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft, containing the Curiosity rover, was launched to Mars on 26 November 2011, and for most of the 253-day, 560-million-kilometer cruise to Mars, the Radiation Assessment Detector made detailed measurements of the energetic particle radiation environment inside the spacecraft. These data provide insights into the radiation hazards that would be associated with a human mission to Mars. We report measurements of the radiation dose, dose equivalent, and linear energy transfer spectra. The dose equivalent for even the shortest round-trip with current propulsion systems and comparable shielding is found to be 0.66 0.12 sievert. PMID:23723233

Zeitlin, C; Hassler, D M; Cucinotta, F A; Ehresmann, B; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R F; Brinza, D E; Kang, S; Weigle, G; Bttcher, S; Bhm, E; Burmeister, S; Guo, J; Khler, J; Martin, C; Posner, A; Rafkin, S; Reitz, G

2013-05-31

338

Power Parks System Simulation Sandia National Laboratories  

E-print Network

the utility grid as a storage device, selling power to the utility when there is excess and drawing power when for power parks suggests that each system will be novel, at least in some aspect of its design. Consequently

339

DOE Vehicular Tank Workshop Sandia National Laboratories  

E-print Network

Health Monitoring · Acousto-Optics AE Development · Embedded Optical Fiber Research - COPVs see http-09 Std Guide for NDT of Polymer Matrix Composites Used in Aerospace Applications ­ E2580-07 Std Practice2581-07 Std Practice for Shearography of Polymer Matrix Composites, Sandwich Core Materials

340

Nanosatellite program at Sandia National Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

The concept of building extremely small satellites which, either independently or as a collective, can perform missions which are comparable to their much larger cousins, has fascinated scientists and engineers for several years now. In addition to the now commonplace microelectronic integrated circuits, the more recent advent of technologies such as photonic integrated circuits (PIC's) and micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) have

D. A. Reynolds; J. P. Kern; J. L. Schoeneman

1999-01-01

341

Sandia Laboratories Technical Capabilities: Materials and Processes.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Materials and process activities have emphasized the balance between research and development necessary to provide materials compatible with the extreme environments and performance requirements associated with nuclear ordnance. Specific technical areas w...

C. D. Lundergan, P. L. Mead

1977-01-01

342

AFTI\\/SITAN (Advanced Fighter Technology Integration\\/Sandia Inertial Terrain-Aided Navigation) final report  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sandia Inertial Terrain-Aided Navigation (SITAN) provides continuous position fixes to an inertial navigation system (INS) by real-time comparison of radar altimeter ground clearance measurements with stored digital terrain elevation data (DTED). This is accomplished by using an extended Kalman filter algorithm to estimate the errors in the reference trajectory provided by an INS. In this report, Sandia National Laboratories documents

Fellerhoff

1988-01-01

343

Synchrotron radiation applications in medical research at Brookhaven National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

In the relatively short time that synchrotrons have been available to the scientific community, their characteristic beams of UV and X-ray radiation have been applied to virtually all areas of medical science which use ionizing radiation. The ability to tune intense monochromatic beams over wide energy ranges clearly differentiates these sources from standard clinical and research tools. The tunable spectrum, high intrinsic collimation of the beams, polarization and intensity of the beams make possible in-vitro and in-vivo research and therapeutic programs not otherwise possible. From the beginning of research operation at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), many programs have been carrying out basic biomedical research. At first, the research was limited to in-vitro programs such as the x-ray microscope, circular dichroism, XAFS, protein crystallography, micro-tomography and fluorescence analysis. Later, as the coronary angiography program made plans to move its experimental phase from SSRL to the NSLS, it became clear that other in-vivo projects could also be carried out at the synchrotron. The development of SMERF (Synchrotron Medical Research Facility) on beamline X17 became the home not only for angiography but also for the MECT (Multiple Energy Computed Tomography) project for cerebral and vascular imaging. The high energy spectrum on X17 is necessary for the MRT (Microplanar Radiation Therapy) experiments. Experience with these programs and the existence of the Medical Programs Group at the NSLS led to the development of a program in synchrotron based mammography. A recent adaptation of the angiography hardware has made it possible to image human lungs (bronchography). Fig. 1 schematically depicts the broad range of active programs at the NSLS.

Thomlinson, W.

1997-08-01

344

Sandia Multispectral Airborne Lidar for UAV Deployment  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories has initiated the development of an airborne system for W laser remote sensing measurements. System applications include the detection of effluents associated with the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and the detection of biological weapon aerosols. This paper discusses the status of the conceptual design development and plans for both the airborne payload (pointing and tracking, laser transmitter, and telescope receiver) and the Altus unmanned aerospace vehicle platform. Hardware design constraints necessary to maintain system weight, power, and volume limitations of the flight platform are identified.

Daniels, J.W.; Hargis,Jr. P.J.; Henson, T.D.; Jordan, J.D.; Lang, A.R.; Schmitt, R.L.

1998-10-23

345

Sandia technology engineering and science accomplishments  

SciTech Connect

Sandia is a DOE multiprogram engineering and science laboratory with major facilities at Albuquerque, New Mexico, and Livermore, California, and a test range near Tonapah, Nevada. We have major research and development responsibilities for nuclear weapons, arms control, energy, the environment, economic competitiveness, and other areas of importance to the needs of the nation. Our principal mission is to support national defense policies by ensuring that the nuclear weapon stockpile meets the highest standards of safety, reliability, security, use control, and military performance. Selected unclassified technical activities and accomplishments are reported here. Topics include advanced manufacturing technologies, intelligent machines, computational simulation, sensors and instrumentation, information management, energy and environment, and weapons technology.

Not Available

1993-03-01

346

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Activity report for 1989  

SciTech Connect

The April, 1990 SPEAR synchrotron radiation run was one of the two or three best in SSRL`s history. High currents were accumulated, ramping went easily, lifetimes were long, beam dumps were infrequent and the average current was 42.9 milliamps. In the one month of operation, 63 different experiments involving 208 scientists from 50 institutions received beam. The end-of-run summary forms completed by the experimenters indicated high levels of user satisfaction with the beam quality and with the outstanding support received from the SSRL technical and scientific staffs. These fine experimental conditions result largely from the SPEAR repairs and improvements performed during the past year and described in Section I. Also quite significant was Max Cornacchia`s leadership of the SLAG staff. SPEAR`s performance this past April stands in marked contrast to that of the January-March, 1989 run which is also described in Section I. It is, we hope, a harbinger of the operation which will be provided in FY `91, when the SPEAR injector project is completed and SPEAR is fully dedicated to synchrotron radiation research. Over the coming years, SSRL intends to give highest priority to increasing the effectiveness of SPEAR and its various beam lines. The beam line and facility improvements performed during 1989 are described in Section III. In order to concentrate effort on SSRL`s three highest priorities prior to the March-April run: (1) to have a successful run, (2) to complete and commission the injector, and (3) to prepare to operate, maintain and improve the SPEAR/injector system, SSRL was reorganized. In the new organization, all the technical staff is contained in three groups: Accelerator Research and Operations Division, Injector Project and Photon Research and Operations Division, as described in Section IV. In spite of the limited effectiveness of the January-March, 1989 run, SSRL`s users made significant scientific progress, as described in Section V of this report.

NONE

1996-01-01

347

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory activity report for 1986  

SciTech Connect

1986 was another year of major advances for SSRL as the ultimate capabilities of PEP as a synchrotron radiation source became more apparent and a second PEP beam line was initiated, while effective development and utilization of SPEAR proceeded. Given these various PEP developments, SSRL abandoned its plans for a separate diffraction limited ring, as they abandoned their plans for a 6--7 GeV ring of the APS type last year. It has become increasingly apparent that SSRL should concentrate on developing SPEAR and PEP as synchrotron radiation sources. Consequently, initial planning for a 3 GeV booster synchrotron injector for SPEAR was performed in 1986, with a proposal to the Department of Energy resulting. As described in Chapter 2, the New Rings Group and the Machine Physics Group were combined into one Accelerator Physics Group. This group is focusing mainly on the improvement of SPEAR`s operating conditions and on planning for the conversion of PEP into a fourth generation x-ray source. Considerable emphasis is also being given to the training of accelerator physics graduate students. At the same time, several improvements of SSRL`s existing facilities were made. These are described in Chapter 3. Chapter 4 describes new SSRL beam lines being commissioned. Chapter 5 discusses SSRL`s present construction projects. Chapter 6 discusses a number of projects presently underway in the engineering division. Chapter 7 describes SSRL`s advisory panels while Chapter 8 discusses SSRL`s overall organization. Chapter 9 describes the experimental progress reports.

Cantwell, K. [ed.

1987-12-31

348

A shallow underground laboratory for low-background radiation measurements and materials development.  

PubMed

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory recently commissioned a new shallow underground laboratory, located at a depth of approximately 30 meters-water-equivalent. This new addition to the small class of radiation measurement laboratories located at modest underground depths houses the latest generation of custom-made, high-efficiency, low-background gamma-ray spectrometers and gas proportional counters. This paper describes the unique capabilities present in the shallow underground laboratory; these include large-scale ultra-pure materials production and a suite of radiation detection systems. Reported data characterize the degree of background reduction achieved through a combination of underground location, graded shielding, and rejection of cosmic-ray events. We conclude by presenting measurement targets and future opportunities. PMID:23206058

Aalseth, C E; Bonicalzi, R M; Cantaloub, M G; Day, A R; Erikson, L E; Fast, J; Forrester, J B; Fuller, E S; Glasgow, B D; Greenwood, L R; Hoppe, E W; Hossbach, T W; Hyronimus, B J; Keillor, M E; Mace, E K; McIntyre, J I; Merriman, J H; Myers, A W; Overman, C T; Overman, N R; Panisko, M E; Seifert, A; Warren, G A; Runkle, R C

2012-11-01

349

A shallow underground laboratory for low-background radiation measurements and materials development  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory recently commissioned a new shallow underground laboratory, located at a depth of approximately 30 meters-water-equivalent. This new addition to the small class of radiation measurement laboratories located at modest underground depths houses the latest generation of custom-made, high-efficiency, low-background gamma-ray spectrometers and gas proportional counters. This paper describes the unique capabilities present in the shallow underground laboratory; these include large-scale ultra-pure materials production and a suite of radiation detection systems. Reported data characterize the degree of background reduction achieved through a combination of underground location, graded shielding, and rejection of cosmic-ray events. We conclude by presenting measurement targets and future opportunities.

Aalseth, C. E.; Bonicalzi, R. M.; Cantaloub, M. G.; Day, A. R.; Erikson, L. E.; Fast, J.; Forrester, J. B.; Fuller, E. S.; Glasgow, B. D.; Greenwood, L. R.; Hoppe, E. W.; Hossbach, T. W.; Hyronimus, B. J.; Keillor, M. E.; Mace, E. K.; McIntyre, J. I.; Merriman, J. H.; Myers, A. W.; Overman, C. T.; Overman, N. R. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); and others

2012-11-15

350

Sample tracking in an automated cytogenetic biodosimetry laboratory for radiation mass casualties  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chromosome-aberration-based dicentric assay is expected to be used after mass-casualty life-threatening radiation exposures to assess radiation dose to individuals. This will require processing of a large number of samples for individual dose assessment and clinical triage to aid treatment decisions. We have established an automated, high-throughput, cytogenetic biodosimetry laboratory to process a large number of samples for conducting the dicentric

P. R. Martin; R. E. Berdychevski; U. Subramanian; W. F. Blakely; P. G. S. Prasanna

2007-01-01

351

Trends in instrumentation for environmental radiation measurements at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Recent instruments developed to fulfill radiation monitoring needs at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory are described. Laboratory instruments that measure tritium gas effluents alone, or in the presence of activated air from D-T fusion reactors are discussed. Fully portable systems for gamma, x-ray, and alpha analyses in the field are described. Also included are descriptions of survey instruments that measure low levels of transuranic contaminants and that measure pulsed-neutron dose rates.

Hiebert, R.D.; Wolf, M.A.

1980-01-01

352

Pulsed power accelerator development at Sandia National Labs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pulsed power development at Sandia had its genesis in radiation effects testing requirements in the mid-1960s. After development and generation of x ray and ..gamma..-ray simulators, interest grew in use of megajoule relativistic electron beam accelerators for application to inertial confinement fusion ignition experiments. This fusion effort which began in 1973, evolved as target design and beam focusing research advanced;

Yonas

1980-01-01

353

Radiation from Small-Scale Magnetic Field Turbulence: Implications for Gamma-Ray Bursts and Laboratory Astrophysical Plasmas  

E-print Network

-like filamentation instability to relevant astrophysical and laboratory plasma scenarios. We calculate the jitter radiation spectra that may be produced in a high-energy density laboratory plasma by using quasi-monoenergetic electron beams to generate and then probe...

Reynolds, Sarah J

2012-05-31

354

Small mammal study of Sandia Canyon, 1994 and 1995  

Microsoft Academic Search

A wide range of plant and wildlife species utilize water discharged from facilities at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The purpose of this study was to gather baseline data of small mammal populations and compare small mammal characteristics within three areas of Sandia Canyon, which receives outfall effluents from multiple sources. Three small mammal trapping webs were placed in the

K. Bennett; J. Biggs

1996-01-01

355

Design and operation of the Sandia Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect

An 8 ton/day dry sewage sludge irradiator was designed and constructed at Sandia National Laboratories in the last half of 1977 and in 1978; and was charged with /sup 137/Cs and made operational in the spring of 1979. The design of the major subsystems of the irradiator is described. Subsequent operational experiences are also summarized.

Morris, M.E.

1980-01-01

356

Turning a liability into an asset at Sandia California: The Tritium Research Facility transition  

SciTech Connect

With an investment of $20.9 million, Sandia National Laboratories/California (Sandia/CA) saved the Department of Energy (DOE) an estimated $106.3 million--a 500% return on investment. In cooperation with DOE, Sandia/CA decontaminated and transitioned (D and T) the Tritium Research Laboratory (TRL), a DOE non-reactor Category 2 nuclear facility. In support of the DOE`s Office of Defense Programs, Sandia/CA had conducted advanced research and development experiments at the TRL since 1977. However, in 1991, Sandia/CA scheduled the TRL for shutdown and decommissioning. By October 1996, the TRL`s D and T, rather than decontamination and demolition (D and D), resulted in the reuse of the building. Implementation of innovative D and T process techniques not only saved millions of dollars, but gained non-monetary benefits. First, the savings and benefits will be detailed, followed by descriptions of the decontamination and pollution prevention techniques.

Garcia, T.B.; Raubfogel, S.J.

1997-11-01

357

ME 361F Radiation and Radiation Protection Laboratory ABET EC2000 syllabus  

E-print Network

-Ray Attenuation · Low-Level Gamma Ray Spectrometry · Reactor Health Physics · Neutron Shielding · Sodium Iodide Data: Introduction to the application of radiation and radiation protection instrumentation. Lecture the concepts and practical applications of health physics nuclear instrumentation. Topics Covered (# of classes

Ben-Yakar, Adela

358

RESULTS OF THE NASA SPACE RADIATION LABORATORY BEAM STUDIES PROGRAM AT BNL.  

SciTech Connect

The NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) was constructed in collaboration with NASA for the purpose of performing radiation effect studies for the NASA space program. The NSRL makes use of heavy ions in the range of 0.05 to 3 GeV/n slow extracted from BNL's AGS Booster. The purpose of the NSRL Beam Studies Program is to develop a clear understanding of the beams delivered to the facility, to fully characterize those beams, and to develop new capabilities in the interest of understanding the radiation environment in space. In this report we will describe the first results from this program.

BROWN,K.A.AHRENS,L.BEUTTENMULLER,R.H.ET AL.

2004-07-05

359

Similarity Properties and Scaling Laws of Radiation Hydrodynamic Flows in Laboratory Astrophysics  

E-print Network

The spectacular recent development of modern high-energy density laboratory facilities which concentrate more and more energy in millimetric volumes allows the astrophysical community to reproduce and to explore, in millimeter-scale targets and during very short times, astrophysical phenomena where radiation and matter are strongly coupled. The astrophysical relevance of these experiments can be checked from the similarity properties and especially scaling laws establishment, which constitutes the keystone of laboratory astrophysics. From the radiating optically thin regime to the so-called optically thick radiative pressure regime, we present in this paper, for the first time, a complete analysis of the main radiating regimes that we encountered in laboratory astrophysics with the same formalism based on the Lie-group theory. The use of the Lie group method appears as systematic which allows to construct easily and orderly the scaling laws of a given problem. This powerful tool permits to unify the recent major advances on scaling laws and to identify new similarity concepts that we discuss in this paper and which opens important applications for the present and the future laboratory astrophysics experiments. All these results enable to demonstrate theoretically that astrophysical phenomena in such radiating regimes can be explored experimentally thanks to powerful facilities. Consequently the results presented here are a fundamental tool for the high-energy density laboratory astrophysics community in order to quantify the astrophysics relevance and justify laser experiments. Moreover, relying on the Lie-group theory, this paper constitutes the starting point of any analysis of the self-similar dynamics of radiating fluids.

Emeric Falize; Claire Michaut; Serge Bouquet

2009-10-13

360

Sample Tracking in an Automated Cytogenetic Biodosimetry Laboratory for Radiation Mass Casualties  

PubMed Central

Chromosome aberration-based dicentric assay is expected to be used after mass casualty life-threatening radiation exposures to assess radiation dose to individuals. This will require processing of a large number of samples for individual dose assessment and clinical triage to aid treatment decisions. We have established an automated, high-throughput, cytogenetic biodosimetry laboratory to process a large number of samples for conducting the dicentric assay using peripheral blood from exposed individuals according to internationally accepted laboratory protocols (i.e., within days following radiation exposures). The components of an automated cytogenetic biodosimetry laboratory include blood collection kits for sample shipment, a cell viability analyzer, a robotic liquid handler, an automated metaphase harvester, a metaphase spreader, high-throughput slide stainer and coverslipper, a high-throughput metaphase finder, multiple satellite chromosome-aberration analysis systems, and a computerized sample tracking system. Laboratory automation using commercially available, off-the-shelf technologies, customized technology integration, and implementation of a laboratory information management system (LIMS) for cytogenetic analysis will significantly increase throughput. This paper focuses on our efforts to eliminate data transcription errors, increase efficiency, and maintain samples positive chain-of-custody by sample tracking during sample processing and data analysis. This sample tracking system represents a beta version, which can be modeled elsewhere in a cytogenetic biodosimetry laboratory, and includes a customized LIMS with a central server, personal computer workstations, barcode printers, fixed station and wireless hand-held devices to scan barcodes at various critical steps, and data transmission over a private intra-laboratory computer network. Our studies will improve diagnostic biodosimetry response, aid confirmation of clinical triage, and medical management of radiation exposed individuals. PMID:18037985

Martin, P.R.; Berdychevski, R.E.; Subramanian, U.; Blakely, W.F.; Prasanna, P.G.S.

2007-01-01

361

Radiation Sources on the Energy Recovery Linac Prototype at Daresbury Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Recovery Linac Prototype (ERLP) is currently being constructed at Daresbury Laboratory primarily to gain understanding of accelerator physics issues for the proposed Fourth Generation Light Source (4GLS). The radiation from two sources on ERLP, THz radiation from the last bending magnet in the bunch compressor, and the IR FEL radiation, will be used for machine diagnostics. Radiation from these sources will be transported into a 'diagnostic room' for power and spectral analysis. The THz radiation will also be used for end user experiments. The layout of the optical transport and detection systems will be presented. Results will also be given for the predicted performance of the optical beamline obtained using wavefront propagation.

Bowler, M. A.; Surman, M.; Quinn, F. M.; Higgins, S. P.; Smith, A. D. [CCLRC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington, WA4 4AD (United Kingdom)

2007-01-19

362

Radiation Sources on the Energy Recovery Linac Prototype at Daresbury Laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Energy Recovery Linac Prototype (ERLP) is currently being constructed at Daresbury Laboratory primarily to gain understanding of accelerator physics issues for the proposed Fourth Generation Light Source (4GLS). The radiation from two sources on ERLP, THz radiation from the last bending magnet in the bunch compressor, and the IR FEL radiation, will be used for machine diagnostics. Radiation from these sources will be transported into a `diagnostic room' for power and spectral analysis. The THz radiation will also be used for end user experiments. The layout of the optical transport and detection systems will be presented. Results will also be given for the predicted performance of the optical beamline obtained using wavefront propagation.

Bowler, M. A.; Surman, M.; Quinn, F. M.; Higgins, S. P.; Smith, A. D.

2007-01-01

363

MULTIPLE FUNCTIONS LONG TRACE PROFILER (LTP-MF) FOR NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON RADIATION LABORATORY OF CHINA.  

SciTech Connect

The Long Trace Profiler (LTP) is a useful optical metrology instrument for measuring the figure and slope error of cylindrical aspheres commonly used as synchrotron radiation (SR) optics. It is used extensively at a number of synchrotron radiation laboratories around the world. In order to improve SR beam line quality and resolution, the National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) of China is developing a versatile LTP that can be used to measure both SR optics and more conventional ''normal'' optical surfaces. The optical metrology laboratories at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and NSRL are collaborating in developing a multiple functions LTP (LTP-MF). Characteristics of the LTP-MF are: a very compact and lightweight optical head, a large angular test range ({+-} 16 mad) and high accuracy. The LTP-MF can be used in various configurations: as a laboratory-based LTP, an in-situ LTP or penta-prism LTP, as an angle monitor, a portable LTP, and a small radius of curvature test instrument. The schematic design of the compact optical head and a new compact slide are introduced. Analysis of different measurements modes and systematic error correction methods are introduced.

QIAN, S.; WANG, Q.; HONG, Y.; TAKACS, P.

2005-07-31

364

The Slanic-Prahova (ROMANIA) underground low-background radiation laboratory.  

PubMed

A low-background radiation laboratory was constructed and fully commissioned in 2006 in the former Unirea (Slanic-Prahova) salt mine at 208 m below surface (estimated to 560 m water equivalent). Preliminary measurements showed a global reduction of the absorbed dose due to natural factors of about 39 times compared to level on the surface, reaching inside the mine 1.17+/-0.14 nGy/h. The total gamma background spectrum between 40 KeV and 3 MeV was 100 times smaller at laboratory level with respect to the same spectrum recorder at surface, in open field. All these experimental facts recommend the Slanic-Prahova low-background radiation laboratory, at present time fully operational, as very suitable for various measurements needing a low background. PMID:18487054

Margineanu, R; Simion, C; Bercea, S; Duliu, O G; Gheorghiu, D; Stochioiu, A; Matei, M

2008-10-01

365

Sandia`s network for SC `97: Supporting visualization, distributed cluster computing, and production data networking with a wide area high performance parallel asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) network  

SciTech Connect

The advanced networking department at Sandia National Laboratories has used the annual Supercomputing conference sponsored by the IEEE and ACM for the past several years as a forum to demonstrate and focus communication and networking developments. At SC `97, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) combined their SC `97 activities within a single research booth under the Advance Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) banner. For the second year in a row, Sandia provided the network design and coordinated the networking activities within the booth. At SC `97, Sandia elected to demonstrate the capability of the Computation Plant, the visualization of scientific data, scalable ATM encryption, and ATM video and telephony capabilities. At SC `97, LLNL demonstrated an application, called RIPTIDE, that also required significant networking resources. The RIPTIDE application had computational visualization and steering capabilities. This paper documents those accomplishments, discusses the details of their implementation, and describes how these demonstrations support Sandia`s overall strategies in ATM networking.

Pratt, T.J.; Martinez, L.G.; Vahle, M.O.; Archuleta, T.V.; Williams, V.K.

1998-05-01

366

Development of explosive event scale model testing capability at Sandia`s large scale centrifuge facility  

SciTech Connect

Geotechnical structures such as underground bunkers, tunnels, and building foundations are subjected to stress fields produced by the gravity load on the structure and/or any overlying strata. These stress fields may be reproduced on a scaled model of the structure by proportionally increasing the gravity field through the use of a centrifuge. This technology can then be used to assess the vulnerability of various geotechnical structures to explosive loading. Applications of this technology include assessing the effectiveness of earth penetrating weapons, evaluating the vulnerability of various structures, counter-terrorism, and model validation. This document describes the development of expertise in scale model explosive testing on geotechnical structures using Sandia`s large scale centrifuge facility. This study focused on buried structures such as hardened storage bunkers or tunnels. Data from this study was used to evaluate the predictive capabilities of existing hydrocodes and structural dynamics codes developed at Sandia National Laboratories (such as Pronto/SPH, Pronto/CTH, and ALEGRA). 7 refs., 50 figs., 8 tabs.

Blanchat, T.K.; Davie, N.T.; Calderone, J.J. [and others

1998-02-01

367

Mars' surface radiation environment measured with the Mars Science Laboratory's Curiosity rover.  

PubMed

The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) on the Mars Science Laboratory's Curiosity rover began making detailed measurements of the cosmic ray and energetic particle radiation environment on the surface of Mars on 7 August 2012. We report and discuss measurements of the absorbed dose and dose equivalent from galactic cosmic rays and solar energetic particles on the martian surface for ~300 days of observations during the current solar maximum. These measurements provide insight into the radiation hazards associated with a human mission to the surface of Mars and provide an anchor point with which to model the subsurface radiation environment, with implications for microbial survival times of any possible extant or past life, as well as for the preservation of potential organic biosignatures of the ancient martian environment. PMID:24324275

Hassler, Donald M; Zeitlin, Cary; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F; Ehresmann, Bent; Rafkin, Scot; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L; Brinza, David E; Weigle, Gerald; Bttcher, Stephan; Bhm, Eckart; Burmeister, Soenke; Guo, Jingnan; Khler, Jan; Martin, Cesar; Reitz, Guenther; Cucinotta, Francis A; Kim, Myung-Hee; Grinspoon, David; Bullock, Mark A; Posner, Arik; Gmez-Elvira, Javier; Vasavada, Ashwin; Grotzinger, John P

2014-01-24

368

Mars'; Surface Radiation Environment Measured with the Mars Science Laboratory's Curiosity Rover  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) on the Mars Science Laboratory's Curiosity rover began making detailed measurements of the cosmic ray and energetic particle radiation environment on the surface of Mars on 7 August 2012. We report and discuss measurements of the absorbed dose and dose equivalent from galactic cosmic rays and solar energetic particles on the martian surface for ~300 days of observations during the current solar maximum. These measurements provide insight into the radiation hazards associated with a human mission to the surface of Mars and provide an anchor point with which to model the subsurface radiation environment, with implications for microbial survival times of any possible extant or past life, as well as for the preservation of potential organic biosignatures of the ancient martian environment.

Hassler, Donald M.; Zeitlin, Cary; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.; Ehresmann, Bent; Rafkin, Scot; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Brinza, David E.; Weigle, Gerald; Bttcher, Stephan; Bhm, Eckart; Burmeister, Soenke; Guo, Jingnan; Khler, Jan; Martin, Cesar; Reitz, Guenther; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Kim, Myung-Hee; Grinspoon, David; Bullock, Mark A.; Posner, Arik; Gmez-Elvira, Javier; Vasavada, Ashwin; Grotzinger, John P.; MSL Science Team; Kemppinen, Osku; Cremers, David; Bell, James F.; Edgar, Lauren; Farmer, Jack; Godber, Austin; Wadhwa, Meenakshi; Wellington, Danika; McEwan, Ian; Newman, Claire; Richardson, Mark; Charpentier, Antoine; Peret, Laurent; King, Penelope; Blank, Jennifer; Schmidt, Mariek; Li, Shuai; Milliken, Ralph; Robertson, Kevin; Sun, Vivian; Baker, Michael; Edwards, Christopher; Ehlmann, Bethany; Farley, Kenneth; Griffes, Jennifer; Miller, Hayden; Newcombe, Megan; Pilorget, Cedric; Rice, Melissa; Siebach, Kirsten; Stack, Katie; Stolper, Edward; Brunet, Claude; Hipkin, Victoria; Lveill, Richard; Marchand, Genevive; Snchez, Pablo Sobrn; Favot, Laurent; Cody, George; Steele, Andrew; Flckiger, Lorenzo; Lees, David; Nefian, Ara; Martin, Mildred; Gailhanou, Marc; Westall, Frances; Isral, Guy; Agard, Christophe; Baroukh, Julien; Donny, Christophe; Gaboriaud, Alain; Guillemot, Philippe; Lafaille, Vivian; Lorigny, Eric; Paillet, Alexis; Prez, Ren; Saccoccio, Muriel; Yana, Charles; Armiens-Aparicio, Carlos; Rodrguez, Javier Caride; Blzquez, Isaas Carrasco; Gmez, Felipe Gmez; Hettrich, Sebastian; Malvitte, Alain Lepinette; Jimnez, Mercedes Marn; Martnez-Fras, Jess; Martn-Soler, Javier; Martn-Torres, F. Javier; Jurado, Antonio Molina; Mora-Sotomayor, Luis; Caro, Guillermo Muoz; Lpez, Sara Navarro; Peinado-Gonzlez, Vernica; Pla-Garca, Jorge; Manfredi, Jos Antonio Rodriguez; Romeral-Planell, Julio Jos; Fuentes, Sara Alejandra Sans; Martinez, Eduardo Sebastian; Redondo, Josefina Torres; Urqui-O'Callaghan, Roser; Mier, Mara-Paz Zorzano; Chipera, Steve; Lacour, Jean-Luc; Mauchien, Patrick; Sirven, Jean-Baptiste; Manning, Heidi; Fairn, Alberto; Hayes, Alexander; Joseph, Jonathan; Squyres, Steven; Sullivan, Robert; Thomas, Peter; Dupont, Audrey; Lundberg, Angela; Melikechi, Noureddine; Mezzacappa, Alissa; Berger, Thomas; Matthia, Daniel; Prats, Benito; Atlaskin, Evgeny; Genzer, Maria; Harri, Ari-Matti; Haukka, Harri; Kahanp, Henrik; Kauhanen, Janne; Kemppinen, Osku; Paton, Mark; Polkko, Jouni; Schmidt, Walter; Siili, Tero; Fabre, Ccile; Wray, James; Wilhelm, Mary Beth; Poitrasson, Franck; Patel, Kiran; Gorevan, Stephen; Indyk, Stephen; Paulsen, Gale; Gupta, Sanjeev; Bish, David; Schieber, Juergen; Gondet, Brigitte; Langevin, Yves; Geffroy, Claude; Baratoux, David; Berger, Gilles; Cros, Alain; d'Uston, Claude; Forni, Olivier; Gasnault, Olivier; Lasue, Jrmie; Lee, Qiu-Mei; Maurice, Sylvestre; Meslin, Pierre-Yves; Pallier, Etienne; Parot, Yann; Pinet, Patrick; Schrder, Susanne; Toplis, Mike; Lewin, ric; Brunner, Will; Heydari, Ezat; Achilles, Cherie; Oehler, Dorothy; Sutter, Brad; Cabane, Michel; Coscia, David; Isral, Guy; Szopa, Cyril; Dromart, Gilles; Robert, Franois; Sautter, Violaine; Le Moulic, Stphane; Mangold, Nicolas; Nachon, Marion; Buch, Arnaud; Stalport, Fabien; Coll, Patrice; Franois, Pascaline; Raulin, Franois; Teinturier, Samuel; Cameron, James; Clegg, Sam; Cousin, Agns; DeLapp, Dorothea; Dingler, Robert; Jackson, Ryan Steele; Johnstone, Stephen; Lanza, Nina; Little, Cynthia; Nelson, Tony; Wiens, Roger C.; Williams, Richard B.; Jones, Andrea; Kirkland, Laurel; Treiman, Allan; Baker, Burt; Cantor, Bruce; Caplinger, Michael; Davis, Scott; Duston, Brian; Edgett, Kenneth; Fay, Donald; Hardgrove, Craig; Harker, David; Herrera, Paul; Jensen, Elsa; Kennedy, Megan R.; Krezoski, Gillian; Krysak, Daniel; Lipkaman, Leslie; Malin, Michael; McCartney, Elaina; McNair, Sean; Nixon, Brian; Posiolova, Liliya; Ravine, Michael; Salamon, Andrew; Saper, Lee; Stoiber, Kevin; Supulver, Kimberley; Van Beek, Jason; Van Beek, Tessa; Zimdar, Robert; French, Katherine Louise; Iagnemma, Karl; Miller, Kristen; Summons, Roger; Goesmann, Fred; Goetz, Walter; Hviid, Stubbe; Johnson, Micah; Lefavor, Matthew; Lyness, Eric; Breves, Elly; Dyar, M. Darby; Fassett, Caleb; Blake, David F.; Bristow, Thomas; DesMarais, David; Edwards, Laurence; Haberle, Robert; Hoehler, Tori; Hollingsworth, Jeff; Kahre, Melinda; Keely, Leslie; McKay, Christopher; Wilhelm, Mary Beth; Bleacher, Lora; Brinckerhoff, William; Choi, David; Conrad, Pamela; Dworkin, Jason P.; Floyd, Melissa

2014-01-01

369

An Experimental Investigation of the Role of Radiation in Laboratory Bench-Top Experiments in Thermal Physics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A simple undergraduate experiment designed to study cooling purely by radiation and cooling by a combination of convection and radiation is described. Results indicate that the contribution from radiative cooling in normal laboratory experiments is more significant than students often realize, even in the case of forced cooling. (Contains 1

Twomey, Patrick; O'Sullivan, Colm; O'Riordan, John

2009-01-01

370

Radiation Laboratory, University of Notre Dame: Quarterly report, October 1--December 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Notre Dame Radiation Laboratory is a facility of the Department of Energy operated for the DOE by the University of Notre Dame under contract No. DE-AC02-76ER00038. This quarterly report summarizes the progress on the programs within the Laboratory for the period of October 1, 193 through December 31, 1993. The activities of the staff during this period are noted. A list of publications is presented. A listing and a brief description of each of the reports issued during this quarter are provided.

Not Available

1994-02-17

371

Pulsed radiation-induced attenuation in certain optical fibers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using the X-ray pulse from the HERMES II simulation machine at Sandia National Laboratories, the pulsed radiation-induced attenuation was measured in two optical fibers considered to be 'nonrad-hard': the 50-micron-core, graded-index fiber from Corning and the plastic (PMMA) fiber from the Mitsubishi Rayon Company. These fibers were exposed to radiation up to doses of 19.5 and 28 krad(Si), respectively. In

Jonathan D. Weiss

1992-01-01

372

Pulsed radiation-induced attenuation in certain optical fibers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using the X-ray pulse from the HERMES II simulation machine at Sandia National Laboratories, the author measured the pulsed radiation-induced attenuation in two optical fibers considered to be `non-rad-hard': the 50 ?m core graded-index fiber from Corning and the plastic (PMMA) fiber from the Mitsubishi Rayon Company. These fibers were exposed to radiation up to doses of 19.5 and 28

J. D. Weiss

1992-01-01

373

Comparison of Martian Surface Radiation Predictions to the Measurements of Mars Science Laboratory Radiation Assessment Detector (MSL/RAD)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

For the analysis of radiation risks to astronauts and planning exploratory space missions, detailed knowledge of particle spectra is an important factor. Detailed measurements of the energetic particle radiation environment on the surface of Mars have been made by the Mars Science Laboratory Radiation Assessment Detector (MSL-RAD) on the Curiosity rover since August 2012, and particle fluxes for a wide range of ion species (up to several hundred MeV/u) and high energy neutrons (8 - 1000 MeV) have been available for the first 200 sols. Although the data obtained on the surface of Mars for 200 sols are limited in the narrow energy spectra, the simulation results using the Badhwar-O'Neill galactic cosmic ray (GCR) environment model and the high-charge and energy transport (HZETRN) code are compared to the data. For the nuclear interactions of primary GCR through Mars atmosphere and Curiosity rover, the quantum multiple scattering theory of nuclear fragmentation (QMSFRG) is used, which includes direct knockout, evaporation and nuclear coalescence. Daily atmospheric pressure measurements at Gale Crater by the MSL Rover Environmental Monitoring Station are implemented into transport calculations for describing the daily column depth of atmosphere. Particles impinging on top of the Martian atmosphere reach the RAD after traversing varying depths of atmosphere that depend on the slant angles, and the model accounts for shielding of the RAD by the rest of the instrument. Calculations of stopping particle spectra are in good agreement with the RAD measurements for the first 200 sols by accounting changing heliospheric conditions and atmospheric pressure. Detailed comparisons between model predictions and spectral data of various particle types provide the validation of radiation transport models, and thus increase the accuracy of the predictions of future radiation environments on Mars. These contributions lend support to the understanding of radiation health risks to astronauts for the planning of various mission scenarios.

Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Zeitlin, Cary; Hassler, Donald M.; Ehresmann, Bent; Rafkin, Scot C. R.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F; Boettcher, Stephan; Boehm, Eckart; Guo, Jingnan; Koehler, Jan; Martin, Cesar; Reitz, Guenther; Posner, Erik

2014-01-01

374

Sandia Combustion Research: Technical review  

SciTech Connect

This report contains reports from research programs conducted at the Sandia Combustion Research Facility. Research is presented under the following topics: laser based diagnostics; combustion chemistry; reacting flow; combustion in engines and commercial burners; coal combustion; and industrial processing. Individual projects were processed separately for entry onto the DOE databases.

NONE

1995-07-01

375

The radiation laboratory of johns hopkins university and memories of Donald D. King  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Johns Hopkins University Radiation Laboratory was located in Baltimore, Maryland. Much of the early research at the Rad. Lab. was on proximity fuzes for surface based anti-aircraft artillery, evolving from World War II R&D. Pioneering work on millimeter wave propagation and component development was a major research effort during the early and mid 50`s. The Director was Dr. Donald

Marvin Cohn

2011-01-01

376

Mobile phone radiation interferes laboratory immunoenzymometric assays: Example chorionic gonadotropin assays.  

PubMed

The radiofrequency radiation is of concern in hospital laboratories as the microwaves have many health effects even on immune functions. The aim of this study was, however, to evaluate the effects of cell phone radiation on chorionic gonadotropin immunoassays of human serum. Two cell phones with 0.69 and 1.09W/kg (head SAR) emitting 900MHz radiation were used. Sixty wells with five human serum concentrations (0, 10, 100, 250, 500mIU/mL) were used in three batches. The well heads in each batch were exposed to 900MHz emitted from these phones, and the 0.69, 1.09W/kg exposed batches were compared with the unexposed controls. Radiation exposure from mobile phones altered the measured serum levels especially in the wells with 100, 250, 500mIU/mL hormone concentrations. Exposure at 1.09W/kg SAR caused a significant loss compared to 0.69W/kg SAR exposure. In conclusion, the microwave exposures may require attention in laboratories using immunoassays. PMID:22325369

Shahbazi-Gahrouei, Daryoush; Mortazavi, Seyed Mohammad Javad; Nasri, Hamid; Baradaran, Azar; Baradaran-Ghahfarokhi, Milad; Baradaran-Ghahfarokhi, Hamid Reza

2012-02-01

377

Correlation between some current parameters and optical radiation generated by 280 mm long laboratory sparks  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Discussed here is the optical radiation generated by 280 mm long laboratory discharges and its relationship to the current flowing in the discharge channel. In an experiment, the optical radiation generated by the discharges was measured at wavelengths 777nm (bandwidth 10 nm) due to O I(1), and 500 nm (bandwidth 5 nm) due to N II(19), and the broadband optical radiation between the wavelengths 400 to 1100 nm. The shape of the current waveform, which had a rise time of 0.1 microsecond and a decay time of 5 microsecond, remained the same with increasing peak value. The experiment was conducted with peak current amplitudes in the range of 1-4 kA. In order to test the effect of current rise time on the optical radiation, researchers also conducted studies with a current waveform having a 5 microsecond rise time. It was observed that the peak amplitude of the optical radiation pulse at the wavelengths mentioned above is proportional to the peak amplitude of the current flowing through the discharge channel. The rise time of the optical radiation pulse at a given wavelength does not depend significantly on the peak amplitude of the current waveform. The rise time of the optical radiation pulse decreases with decreasing wavelength. A slight increase in the decay time of the optical pulse, at a given wavelength, is observed with increasing peak amplitude of the current waveform.The results show that the rise time of the optical radiation pulse increases with the increasing rise time of the current waveform. The relationship between peak current, peak optical power, and peak electrical power is studied. Also, the relationship between peak current, optical energy (400-1100 and 777 nm), and electrical energy is discussed.

Windmar, Dan; Cooray, Vernon; Scuka, Viktor

1991-01-01

378

Massively Parallel Computing: A Sandia Perspective  

SciTech Connect

The computing power available to scientists and engineers has increased dramatically in the past decade, due in part to progress in making massively parallel computing practical and available. The expectation for these machines has been great. The reality is that progress has been slower than expected. Nevertheless, massively parallel computing is beginning to realize its potential for enabling significant break-throughs in science and engineering. This paper provides a perspective on the state of the field, colored by the authors' experiences using large scale parallel machines at Sandia National Laboratories. We address trends in hardware, system software and algorithms, and we also offer our view of the forces shaping the parallel computing industry.

Dosanjh, Sudip S.; Greenberg, David S.; Hendrickson, Bruce; Heroux, Michael A.; Plimpton, Steve J.; Tomkins, James L.; Womble, David E.

1999-05-06

379

Guidelines for Sandia ASCI Verification and Validation Plans - Content and Format: Version 1.0  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes general guidelines for the development of Verification and Validation (V and V) plans for ASCI code projects at Sandia National Laboratories. The main content categories recommended by these guidelines for explicit treatment in Sandia V and V plans are (1) stockpile drivers influencing the code development project (2) the key phenomena to be modeled by the individual code; (3) software verification strategy and test plan; and (4) code validation strategy and test plans. The authors of this document anticipate that the needed content of the V and V plans for the Sandia ASCI codes will evolve as time passes. These needs will be reflected by future versions of this document.

TRUCANO,TIMOTHY G.; MOYA,JAIME L.

1999-12-01

380

Sandia equation of state data base: seslan File  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories maintains several libraries of equation of state tables, in a modified Sesame format, for use in hydrocode calculations and other applications. This report discusses one of those libraries, the seslan file, which contains 78 tables from the Los Alamos equation of state library. Minor changes have been made to these tables, making them more convenient for code users and reducing numerical difficulties that occasionally arise in hydrocode calculations.

Kerley, G.I. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (US); Christian-Frear, T.L. [RE/SPEC Inc., Albuquerque, NM (US)

1993-06-24

381

A Sandia Technology Bulletin: Testing technology, July 1993  

SciTech Connect

Inside this issue various short articles on current testing technology research at Sandia National Laboratories. New techniques of imaging currents in integrated circuits are described. Geomaterials testing is improved with true axial loading under high pressure. Pyroshock simulation tests electronics for space and defense. Insulated cameras get pictures of extremely hot burning fuels. Solar cell testing is improved via spectral response and laser scanning. And missile launching accomplishments are presented.

Not Available

1993-09-01

382

UV Radiation: a new first year physics/life sciences laboratory experiment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Unfortunately, Australia leads the world in the number of skin cancer cases per capita. Three major factors that contribute to this are: 1) the level of damaging ultraviolet (UV) radiation in Australia is higher than in many other countries. This is caused, among other factors, by the stratospheric ozone depletion and Antarctic ozone hole; 2) many people in Australia are of Irish-Scottish origin and their skin can not repair the damage caused by the UV radiation as effectively as the skin of people of other origins; 3) Australia is one of the worlds leaders in the outdoor activities where people tend to spend more time outside. As our experience has shown, most Australian University students, high school students, and even high school teachers were largely unaware of the UV damage details and effective safety measures. Therefore, a need for new ways to educate people became apparent. The general aim of this new 1st year laboratory experiment, developed and first offered at La Trobe University (Melbourne, Australia) in 2009, is to investigate how UV-B radiation levels change under various solar illumination conditions and how effective different types of protection are. After pre-lab readings on physical concepts and biological effects of UV radiation, and after solving all pre-lab problems, the students go outside and measure the actual change in UV-B and UV-A radiation levels under various conditions. Some of these conditions are: direct sun, shade from a building, shade under the roof, reflection from various surfaces, direct sun through cheap and expensive sunglasses and eyeglasses, direct sun through various types of cloth and hair. The equipment used is the UV-Probe manufactured by sglux SolGel Technologies GmbH. The students feedback on this new laboratory experiment was very positive. It was ranked top among all physics experiments offered as part of that subject (Physics for Life Sciences) in 2009 and top among all physics experiments presented for peer evaluation at the Advanced Science Education Learning Laboratory Workshop in April 2010 at the University of Adelaide, Australia. All three main components of the UV Radiation experiment - pre-lab exercises, taking measurements, and a group discussion led by a demonstrator, were assessed by the students and by the teaching academics as a very important and valuable contribution to learning.

Petelina, S. V.; Siddaway, J. M.

2010-12-01

383

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data Archive PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Raymond A. McCord  

E-print Network

) PARTNERS: Argonne National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Lawrence Liver- more National Laboratory, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories PROJECT WEBSITE: http

384

Laboratory-based maximum slip rates in earthquake rupture zones and radiated energy  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Laboratory stick-slip friction experiments indicate that peak slip rates increase with the stresses loading the fault to cause rupture. If this applies also to earthquake fault zones, then the analysis of rupture processes is simplified inasmuch as the slip rates depend only on the local yield stress and are independent of factors specific to a particular event, including the distribution of slip in space and time. We test this hypothesis by first using it to develop an expression for radiated energy that depends primarily on the seismic moment and the maximum slip rate. From laboratory results, the maximum slip rate for any crustal earthquake, as well as various stress parameters including the yield stress, can be determined based on its seismic moment and the maximum slip within its rupture zone. After finding that our new equation for radiated energy works well for laboratory stick-slip friction experiments, we used it to estimate radiated energies for five earthquakes with magnitudes near 2 that were induced in a deep gold mine, an M 2.1 repeating earthquake near the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) site and seven major earthquakes in California and found good agreement with energies estimated independently from spectra of local and regional ground-motion data. Estimates of yield stress for the earthquakes in our study range from 12 MPa to 122 MPa with a median of 64 MPa. The lowest value was estimated for the 2004 M 6 Parkfield, California, earthquake whereas the nearby M 2.1 repeating earthquake, as recorded in the SAFOD pilot hole, showed a more typical yield stress of 64 MPa.

McGarr, A.; Fletcher, J. B.; Boettcher, M.; Beeler, N.; Boatwright, J.

2010-01-01

385

Detectors & Other Instrumentation for Research in Environmental Chemistry & Heterogeneous Catalysis at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

OAK 270 The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) is a national user facility used by an international body of scientists to perform x-ray spectroscopy and x-ray scattering research using our high-intensity x-ray beam lines. The primary objectives for DOE grant DE FG03 96ER14650 was to leverage these facilities by providing advanced detectors and instrumentation for use by visiting scientists at the new beam line 11-2, which is dedicated to environmental sciences, and at other SSRL beam lines used for environmental sciences research. All items are now available for use at various SSRL beam lines.

Brown, Gordon

2003-01-21

386

Solar and Photovoltaic Data from the University of Oregon Solar Radiation Monitoring Laboratory (UO SRML)  

DOE Data Explorer

The UO SRML is a regional solar radiation data center whose goal is to provide sound solar resource data for planning, design, deployment, and operation of solar electric facilities in the Pacific Northwest. The laboratory has been in operation since 1975. Solar data includes solar resource maps, cumulative summary data, daily totals, monthly averages, single element profile data, parsed TMY2 data, and select multifilter radiometer data. A data plotting program and other software tools are also provided. Shade analysis information and contour plots showing the effect of tilt and orientation on annual solar electric system perfomance make up a large part of the photovoltaics data.(Specialized Interface)

387

For the Meyer Fund for Sustainable Development and the University of Oregon Department of Physics and Solar Radiation Monitoring Laboratory  

E-print Network

For the Meyer Fund for Sustainable Development and the University of Oregon Department of Physics and Solar Radiation Monitoring Laboratory Page C.1 6/20/2011 Appendix C: Vocabulary The following cell or module Global Irradiance (GHI) Total solar radiation on a horizontal surface Direct Normal

Oregon, University of

388

The present status of the Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory of the Institute for Solid State Physics of The University of Tokyo  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present status of the Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory of the Institute for Solid-State Physics of The University of Tokyo is described. Explanation is made mostly for the beam lines of SOR-RING as well as the new beam lines built in the Photon Factory ring. A short history of the laboratory is also given.

T. Ishii

1992-01-01

389

AFTI/SITAN (Advanced Fighter Technology Integration/Sandia Inertial Terrain-Aided Navigation) final report  

SciTech Connect

Sandia Inertial Terrain-Aided Navigation (SITAN) provides continuous position fixes to an inertial navigation system (INS) by real-time comparison of radar altimeter ground clearance measurements with stored digital terrain elevation data (DTED). This is accomplished by using an extended Kalman filter algorithm to estimate the errors in the reference trajectory provided by an INS. In this report, Sandia National Laboratories documents the results of a reimbursable effort funded by the Air Force Wright Aeronautical Laboratories (AFWAL) Avionics Laboratory to flight test SITAN as implemented onboard the Advanced Fighter Technology Integration (AFTI)F-16. 5 refs., 101 figs., 1 tab.

Fellerhoff, J.R.

1988-11-01

390

[Radiation exposure of health personnel and patients in the heart catheterization laboratory in during vascular brachytherapy].  

PubMed

Interventional radiological measures can lead to high radiation exposures for medical staff. In order to determine the radiation exposure to staff and patients, the resulting radiation exposures were directly measured for 52 measures at an cardiac catheterization laboratory with a new dosimetry system DIS (Direct Ion Storage). Beside the measurement of body dose behind the lead apron, measurements of radiation doses were performed in front of the lead apron and at the wrist of the physician. These measurements were taken as an approximation of the radiation exposure of the non-shielded body parts. The patients dose was estimated by placing a dosemeter close to the head of the patient and from the dose-area product. The mean value of body dose from 52 measurements for the physician behind the lead apron was 1.9 microSv per procedure with a range of 0-9 microSv. In front of the lead apron, a mean value of 53.9 microSv (3-233 microSv) per procedure was obtained. The mean value of partial body dose at the physician's wrist was determined to be 163.2 microSv (12-603 microSv) per procedure. It could be shown that measures combined with interventions lead to higher exposures compared with measures without interventions. For the medical technician, the mean value behind the lead apron was 3.9 microSv (0-58 microSv) per procedure. For the patient, a mean value of 800 microSv (119-8642 microSv) was measured close to the head. The mean dose to the skin of the patient at radiation entrance was determined to be 307 mGy (70-1190 mGy). From this data, the radiation dose per year for the physician performing 1000 measures, was determined to be 1.9 mSv/year. This is below the new dose limit of 20 mSv/year. Also the estimations for the dose to the eye lens and the hands of the physician show no conflicts with actual dose limits when obeying all radiation regulations. The results for vascular brachytherapy did not show significantly higher exposures, compared with conventional measures including interventions. PMID:12219698

Folkerts, K H; Franz, A; Kiefer, A; Hennersdorf, G

2002-06-01

391

SANDIA REPORT SAND2004-4596  

E-print Network

applications (e.g., drinking water, storm water, pretreatment, and air emissions), and sensor requirements85000. Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited. #12;Issued by Sandia National

Ho, Cliff

392

Oak Ridge National Laboratory Radiation Control Program - Partners in Site Restoration  

SciTech Connect

In 1998, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) awarded the Management and Integration (M&I) contract for all five of the Oak Ridge Operations (ORO) facilities to Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC). At Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), a world renowned national laboratory and research and development facility, the BJC mission involves executing the DOE Environmental Management (EM) program. In addition to BJC's M&I contract, UT-Battelle, LLC, a not-for-profit company, is the Management and Operating (M&O) contractor for DOE on the ORNL site. As part of ORNL's EM program, legacy inactive facilities (i.e., reactors, nuclear material research facilities, burial grounds, and underground storage tanks) are transferred to BJC and are designated as remediation, decontamination and decommissioning (D&D), or long-term surveillance and maintenance (S&M) facilities. Facilities operated by both UT-Battelle and BJC are interspersed throughout the site and are usually in close proximity. Both UT-Battelle and BJC have DOE-approved Radiation Protection Programs established in accordance with 10 CFR 835. The BJC Radiological Control (RADCON) Program adapts to the M&I framework and is comprised of a combination of subcontracted program responsibilities with BJC oversight. This paper focuses on the successes and challenges of executing the BJC RADCON Program for BJC's ORNL Project through a joint M&I contractor relationship, while maintaining a positive working relationship and partnership with UT-Battelle's Radiation Protection organization.

Jones, S. L.; Stafford, M. W.

2002-02-26

393

J. H. Scofield and D. M. Fleetwood, IEEE Transactions on Nuclear Science NS-38, 1567-77 (December 1991). PHYSICAL BASIS FOR NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTS OF MOS RADIATION HARDNESS*  

E-print Network

J. H. Scofield and D. M. Fleetwood, IEEE Transactions on Nuclear Science NS-38, 1567-77 (December 1991). PHYSICAL BASIS FOR NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTS OF MOS RADIATION HARDNESS* John H. Scofield Department of Physics, Oberlin College Oberlin, OH 44074 and D.M. Fleetwood Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM

Scofield, John H.

394

IP address management : augmenting Sandia's capabilities through open source tools.  

SciTech Connect

Internet Protocol (IP) address management is an increasingly growing concern at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the networking community as a whole. The current state of the available IP addresses indicates that they are nearly exhausted. Currently SNL doesn't have the justification to obtain more IP address space from Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA). There must exist a local entity to manage and allocate IP assignments efficiently. Ongoing efforts at Sandia have been in the form of a multifunctional database application notably known as Network Information System (NWIS). NWIS is a database responsible for a multitude of network administrative services including IP address management. This study will explore the feasibility of augmenting NWIS's IP management capabilities utilizing open source tools. Modifications of existing capabilities to better allocate available IP address space are studied.

Nayar, R. Daniel

2005-08-01

395

Sandia and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, 1974--1999  

SciTech Connect

Engineers have learned to design and build big projects, which certainly describes the WIPP project, but also includes defense projects, highway networks, space exploration, the Internet, etc., through what has been called a messily complex embracing of contradictions. When something massive and complicated has to be built these days, it leads to a protracted political process in which every special interest makes a stand, lobbyists exert what influence they can, lawmakers bicker, contractors change things, Congress struggles with costs, environmentalists hold things up--and this is good. It may seem amazing that anything gets done, but when it does, everyone has had their say. It's an intensely democratic, even if expensive and time-consuming, process. The corporate historian of Sandia National Laboratories presents a unique background of the WIPP project and Sandia's part in it.

MORA,CARL J.

2000-04-11

396

Absorption spectroscopy of a laboratory photoionized plasma experiment at Z  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Z facility at the Sandia National Laboratories is the most energetic terrestrial source of X-rays and provides an opportunity to produce photoionized plasmas in a relatively well characterised radiation environment. We use detailed atomic-kinetic and spectral simulations to analyze the absorption spectra of a photoionized neon plasma driven by the x-ray flux from a z-pinch. The broadband x-ray flux both photoionizes and backlights the plasma. In particular, we focus on extracting the charge state distribution of the plasma and the characteristics of the radiation field driving the plasma in order to estimate the ionisation parameter.

Hall, I. M.; Durmaz, T.; Mancini, R. C.; Bailey, J. E.; Rochau, G. A.; Golovkin, I. E.; MacFarlane, J. J.

2014-03-01

397

COBOL programming standards at Sandia Labs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sandia has developed an extensive set of programming standards, some of which are highlighted. These standards are designed to encourage maintainable, readable, reliable, transportable, and efficient programs. The Standards Review Committee operates as Sandia's vehicle for accommodating revisions to standards, and the methods used to implement standards include documentation, training, and structured walk-thrus.

1983-01-01

398

Turbulence radiation interaction in Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes simulations of nonpremixed piloted turbulent laboratory-scale flames  

SciTech Connect

Numerical simulation results are presented for two axisymmetric, nonluminous turbulent piloted jet diffusion flames: Sandia Flame D (SFD) and Delft Flame III (DFIII). Turbulence is represented by a Reynolds stress transport model, while chemistry is modeled by means of steady laminar flamelets. We use the preassumed PDF approach for turbulence-chemistry interaction. A weighted sum of gray gases model is used for the gas radiative properties. The radiative transfer equation is solved using the discrete ordinates method in the conservative finite-volume formulation. The radiative loss leads to a decrease in mean temperature, but does not significantly influence the flow and mixing fields, in terms either of mean values or of rms values of fluctuations. A systematic analysis of turbulence-radiation interaction (TRI) is carried out. By considering five different TRI formulations, and comparing also with a simple optically thin model, individual TRI contributions are isolated and quantified. For both flames, effects are demonstrated of (1) influence of temperature fluctuations on the mean Planck function, (2) temperature and composition fluctuations on the mean absorption coefficient, and (3) correlation between absorption coefficient and Planck function. The strength of the last effect is stronger in DFIII than in SFD, because of stronger turbulence-chemistry interaction and lower mean temperature in DFIII. The impact of the choice of TRI model on the prediction of the temperature-sensitive minor species NO is determined in a postprocessing step with fixed flow and mixing fields. Best agreement for NO is obtained using the most complete representation of TRI. (author)

Habibi, A.; Merci, B. [Department of Flow, Heat and Combustion Mechanics, Ghent University, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Roekaerts, D. [Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands)

2007-10-15

399

Rock Formation and Cosmic Radiation Exposure Ages in Gale Crater Mudstones from the Mars Science Laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) in the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) suite of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) has been utilized to secure abundances of 3He, 21Ne, 36Ar, and 40Ar thermally evolved from the mudstone in the stratified Yellowknife Bay formation in Gale Crater. As reported by Farley et al. [1] these measurements of cosmogenic and radiogenic noble gases together with Cl and K abundances measured by MSL's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer enable a K-Ar rock formation age of 4.21+0.35 Ga to be established as well as a surface exposure age to cosmic radiation of 78+30 Ma. Understanding surface exposures to cosmic radiation is relevant to the MSL search for organic compounds since even the limited set of studies carried out, to date, indicate that even 10's to 100's of millions of years of near surface (1-3 meter) exposure may transform a significant fraction of the organic compounds exposed to this radiation [2,3,4]. Transformation of potential biosignatures and even loss of molecular structural information in compounds that could point to exogenous or endogenous sources suggests a new paradigm in the search for near surface organics that incorporates a search for the most recently exposed outcrops through erosional processes. The K-Ar rock formation age determination shows promise for more precise in situ measurements that may help calibrate the martian cratering record that currently relies on extrapolation from the lunar record with its ground truth chronology with returned samples. We will discuss the protocol for the in situ noble gas measurements secured with SAM and ongoing studies to optimize these measurements using the SAM testbed. References: [1] Farley, K.A.M Science Magazine, 342, (2013). [2] G. Kminek et al., Earth Planet Sc Lett 245, 1 (2006). [3] Dartnell, L.R., Biogeosciences 4, 545 (2007). [4] Pavlov, A. A., et al. Geophys Res Lett 39, 13202 (2012).

Mahaffy, Paul; Farley, Ken; Malespin, Charles; Gellert, Ralph; Grotzinger, John

2014-05-01

400

Transfer of security technology from Sandia to industry  

SciTech Connect

The National Competitiveness Technology Transfer Act of 1989 made technology transfer a mission for the national laboratories. The intent is to maximize the benefit from public monies and to improve the economic position of US industry in the world marketplace. A key instrument created by this legislation is the Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between a private company and a government-owned contractor-operated R D lab. Under these provisions, the national laboratories can negotiate directly with industry, grant title to intellectual property developed in a CRADA, and withhold publication of commercially-valuable information developed in a CRADA for up to five years. Sandia National Laboratories is very proactive in the transfer of technology developed as the DOE lead laboratory for physical security R D and from work for other government agencies. Specific security-related products have frequently evolved from government user needs into initial concepts followed by research and development into field prototypes which finally have a system design package appropriate for transfer to industry. In the past year several meetings announced in the Commerce Business Daily (CBD) were held with industry to present specific systems and to initiate discussions toward establishing a GRADA and/or granting a product license. Several examples and updates will be presented to illustrate this new process for security technology transfer from Sandia to industry. 2 refs.

Williams, J.D.; Matter, J.C.

1991-01-01

401

A user`s guide to GAETR: Sandia`s {open_quotes}Graphical Analysis of Event Trees{close_quotes} software  

SciTech Connect

This document is a reference guide for GAETR, Graphical Analysis of Event Trees, a software package developed at Sandia National Laboratories. GAETR may be used as a stand-alone code or as a module in the ARRAMIS{trademark} risk and reliability code suite. GAETR is designed to graphically create event trees and plot SETAC (Sandia Event Tree Analysis Code) output on IBM-compatible personal computers using the Microsoft{reg_sign} Windows{trademark} 95/NT operating environment. This manual explains the fundamentals of creating an event tree, including formatting, saving sequence information, printing, editing, and importing graphics to other software packages.

Hays, K.M.

1997-09-01

402

Sandia Wind Turbine Loads Database  

DOE Data Explorer

The Sandia Wind Turbine Loads Database is divided into six files, each corresponding to approximately 16 years of simulation. The files are text files with data in columnar format. The 424MB zipped file containing six data files can be downloaded by the public. The files simulate 10-minute maximum loads for the NREL 5MW wind turbine. The details of the loads simulations can be found in the paper: Decades of Wind Turbine Loads Simulations, M. Barone, J. Paquette, B. Resor, and L. Manuel, AIAA2012-1288 (3.69MB PDF). Note that the site-average wind speed is 10 m/s (class I-B), not the 8.5 m/s reported in the paper.

403

Sandia's mentoring program : an ongoing success.  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the Mentoring Program at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), which has been an on-going success since its inception in 1995. The Mentoring Program provides a mechanism to develop a workforce able to respond to changing requirements and complex customer needs. The program objectives are to enhance employee contributions through increased knowledge of SNL culture, strategies, and programmatic direction. Mentoring is a proven mechanism for attracting new employees, retaining employees, and developing leadership. It helps to prevent the loss of corporate knowledge from attrition and retirement, and it increases the rate and level of contributions of new managers and employees, also spurring cross-organizational teaming. The Mentoring Program is structured as a one-year partnership between an experienced staff member or leader and a less experienced one. Mentors and mentees are paired according to mutual objectives and interests. Support is provided to the matched pairs from their management as well as division program coordinators in both New Mexico and California locations. In addition, bi-monthly large-group training sessions are held.

Brewer, Soila

2003-12-01

404

Energy and Environment: A Sandia Technology Bulletin  

SciTech Connect

The Planning and Staff Support of the Sandia National Laboratories publishes a monthly bulletin titled, Energy and Environment. The bulletin facilitates technology exchange with industries, universities, and with other government agencies. This bulletin is for the month of April 1992 and covers such things as new methods of soldering which reduces environmental threats by avoiding chlorofluorocarbon solvents. Some technologies developed are soldering in controlled atmospheres, acid-vapor soldering, and laser soldering. Another topic in this bulletin is the designing of catalysts of chemical reactions by computers. Biomimetic catalysts are being created by Computer-Aided Molecular Design. These biomimetic catalysts can aid in fuel conversion. In-situ remediation of soils contaminated by heavy metals was another topic in this bulletin. This in-situ process is called, electrokinetic remediation. It uses electrodes to induce a metal-attracting electric field in the ground. The last topic in this bulletin is the design of a semiconductor bridge (SCB) which is used to improve the timing and effectiveness of blasting. Timing and accuracy is important; and the blasting industry is no exception. This SCB gives a low-energy pulse which causes a doped region on a polysilicon substrate into a bright plasma. This plasma discharge causes the ignition and produces an accurate explosion in microseconds. (MB)

Parrott, L.; Hey, N.S.; Floyd, H. (eds.)

1992-04-01

405

www.sandia.gov/emergency/index.html E M E R G E N C I E S AT S A N D I A  

E-print Network

communications: An Alert, the least severe emergency classification, is an incident that has led or could leadwww.sandia.gov/emergency/index.html E M E R G E N C I E S AT S A N D I A Sandia National Laboratories' Emergency Management Program is responsible for minimizing the effect of an emergency on people

406

Bhm extrapolation chamber: Study of its behavior in beta radiation fields at the Calibration Laboratory of IPEN  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Calibration Laboratory (LCI) at the Instituto de Pesquisas Energticas e Nucleares (IPEN) is going to establish a Bhm extrapolation chamber as a primary standard system for the dosimetry and calibration of beta radiation sources and detectors. This chamber was already tested in beta radiation beams with an aluminized Mylar entrance window, and now, it was characterized with an original Hostaphan entrance window. A comparison between the results of the extrapolation chamber with the two entrance windows was performed. The results showed that this extrapolation chamber presents the same effectiveness in beta radiation fields as a primary standard system with both entrance windows, showing that any one of them may be utilized.

Antonio, Patrcia L.; Xavier, Marcos; Caldas, Linda V. E.

2014-11-01

407

Sandia`s research network for Supercomputing `93: A demonstration of advanced technologies for building high-performance networks  

SciTech Connect

Supercomputing `93, a high-performance computing and communications conference, was held November 15th through 19th, 1993 in Portland, Oregon. For the past two years, Sandia National Laboratories has used this conference to showcase and focus its communications and networking endeavors. At the 1993 conference, the results of Sandia`s efforts in exploring and utilizing Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) and Synchronous Optical Network (SONET) technologies were vividly demonstrated by building and operating three distinct networks. The networks encompassed a Switched Multimegabit Data Service (SMDS) network running at 44.736 megabits per second, an ATM network running on a SONET circuit at the Optical Carrier (OC) rate of 155.52 megabits per second, and a High Performance Parallel Interface (HIPPI) network running over a 622.08 megabits per second SONET circuit. The SMDS and ATM networks extended from Albuquerque, New Mexico to the showroom floor, while the HIPPI/SONET network extended from Beaverton, Oregon to the showroom floor. This paper documents and describes these networks.

Gossage, S.A.; Vahle, M.O.

1993-12-01

408

Radiation and mortality of workers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory: positive associations for doses received at older ages.  

PubMed Central

We examined associations between low-level exposure to ionizing radiation and mortality among 14,095 workers hired at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory between 1943 and 1972. Workers at the facility were individually monitored for external exposure to ionizing radiation and have been followed through 1990 to ascertain cause of death information. Positive associations were observed between low-level exposure to external ionizing radiation and mortality. These associations were larger for doses received after 45 years of age, larger under longer lag assumptions, and primarily due to cancer causes of death. All cancer mortality was estimated to increase 4.98% [standard error (SE) = 1.5] per 10-mSv cumulative dose received after age 45 under a 10-year lag, and 7.31% (SE = 2.2) per 10-mSv cumulative dose received after age 45 under a 20-year lag. Associations between radiation dose and lung cancer were of similar magnitude to associations between radiation dose and all cancers except lung cancer. Nonmalignant respiratory disease exhibited a positive association with cumulative radiation dose received after age 45, whereas ischemic heart disease exhibited no association with radiation dose. These findings suggest increases in cancer mortality associated with low-level external exposure to ionizing radiation and potentially greater sensitivity to the carcinogenic effects of ionizing radiation with older ages at exposure. Images Figure 1 PMID:10417363

Richardson, D B; Wing, S

1999-01-01

409

Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory general circulation model investigation of the indirect radiative effects  

E-print Network

Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory general circulation model investigation of the indirect Corporation for Atmospheric Research, Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey, USA V. Ramaswamy, Paul A. Ginoux, and Larry W. Horowitz Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Princeton, New

Russell, Lynn

410

Laboratory Simulation of Frozen Methanol Under X-ray Radiation Field: Relevancies to Astrophysical Ices  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The origin of complex organic molecules detected in comets, meteorites, star-forming regions and other environments are currently subject of discussion. Depending on the environment, it is dominated by X-rays, UV photons as well as by charged particles, electrons and ions with high or low energies. Every particle will promote a different fragmentation in the molecule and different phenomena in the ice, favoring the formation of an ion species rather than another. To predict the chemical evolution and to quantify the complex organics incorporated into grains or desorbed to the gas phase, it is necessary to establish the main formation route, which can be tested in the laboratories. In this way, the study of the effects of different ionization agents on the ices becomes crucial. Methanol (CH3 OH), the simplest organic alcohol, is an important precursor of more complex prebiotic species and is found abundantly in icy mantles on interstellar and protostellar dust grains. This molecule has been detected through infrared spectroscopy in some astrophysics environments as W33A and RAFGL 7009. Additionally, methanol has been found in comets, as Hale-Bopp, and other solar system bodies, such as the centaur 5145 Pholus. All of these astronomical environments are subjected to some form of ionizing agents such as cosmic rays, electrons and photons (e.g. stellar radiation field). In this work, synchrotron radiation from the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory at the O 1s-edge was employed to perform desorption experiments on the frozen methanol. The desorp-tion rates (desorbed ion per incident photon) of the most intense ions desorbed from methanol due soft X-ray bombardment are estimated. The desorption rates are critical parameters for modeling the chemistry of interstellar clouds. Moreover, a comparison among our results and literature using different ionization agents and different phases (photons at 292 eV and elec-trons at 70 eV in gaseous phase and heavy ions around 65 MeV on methanol ice) is given and discussed.

Andrade, Diana; Rocco, Maria Luiza M.; Boechat-Roberty, Heloisa Maria

411

Development of an on-line radiation detection and measurements laboratory course  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An on-line radiation detection and measurements lab is being developed with a grant from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The on-line laboratory experiments are designed to provide a realistic laboratory experience and will be offered to students at colleges/universities where such a course is not offered. This thesis presents four web-based experiments: 1) nuclear electronics, 2) gamma-ray spectroscopy with scintillation detectors, 3) gamma-ray attenuation in matter and external dosimetry, and 4) alpha spectroscopy and absorption in matter. The students access the experiments through a broad-band internet connection. Computer-controlled instrumentation developed in National Instruments (NI) LabVIEW(TM) communicates with the URSA-II (SE International, Inc.) data acquisition system, which controls the detector bias voltage, pulse shaping, amplifier gain, and ADC. Detector and amplifier output pulses can be displayed with other instrumentation developed in LabVIEW(TM) for the digital oscilloscope (USB-5132, NI). Additional instrumentation developed in LabVIEW(TM) is used to control the positions of all sources with stepper motor controllers (VXM-1, Velmex, Inc.) and to adjust pressure in the alpha chamber with a digital vacuum regulator (Model 200, J-KEM, Inc.). Unique interactive interfaces are created by integrating all of the necessary instrumentation to conduct each lab. These interfaces provide students with seamless functionality for data acquisition, experimental control, and live data display with real-time updates for each experiment. A webcam is set up to stream the experiment live so the student can observe the physical instruments and receive visual feedback from the system in real time.

Kopp, Derick G.

412

Diurnal variations of energetic particle radiation at the surface of Mars as observed by the Mars Science Laboratory Radiation Assessment Detector  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Radiation Assessment Detector onboard the Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity is detecting the energetic particle radiation at the surface of Mars. Data collected over the first 350 Martian days of the nominal surface mission show a pronounced diurnal cycle in both the total dose rate and the neutral particle count rate. The diurnal variations detected by the Radiation Assessment Detector were neither anticipated nor previously considered in the literature. These cyclic variations in dose rate and count rate are shown to be the result of changes in atmospheric column mass driven by the atmospheric thermal tide that is characterized through pressure measurements obtained by the Rover Environmental Monitoring Station, also onboard the rover. In addition to bulk changes in the radiation environment, changes in atmospheric shielding forced by the thermal tide are shown to disproportionately affect heavy ions compared to H and He nuclei.

Rafkin, Scot C. R.; Zeitlin, Cary; Ehresmann, Bent; Hassler, Don; Guo, Jingnan; Khler, Jan; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert; Gomez-Elvira, Javier; Harri, Ari-Matti; Kahanp, Henrik; Brinza, David E.; Weigle, Gerald; Bttcher, Stephan; Bhm, Eckart; Burmeister, Senke; Martin, Cesar; Reitz, Genther; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Kim, Myung-Hee; Grinspoon, David; Bullock, Mark A.; Posner, Arik

2014-06-01

413

High performance computing at Sandia National Labs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sandia`s High Performance Computing Environment requires a hierarchy of resources ranging from desktop, to department, to centralized, and finally to very high-end corporate resources capable of teraflop performance linked via high-capacity Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) networks. The mission of the Scientific Computing Systems Department is to provide the support infrastructure for an integrated corporate scientific computing environment that will meet

R. M. Cahoon; J. P. Noe; W. H. Vandevender

1995-01-01

414

1LDRD Impacts on Sandia and the Nation 2 SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES 3LDRD Impacts on Sandia and the Nation  

E-print Network

of the case studies in this brochure: a near-UV light- emitting diode (LED), a cell membrane, a NISAC model of optoelectronics, materials science, and microelectronics have led to new scientific discoveries and strategic

415

SF 4400-RSS (12-2011) Supersedes (10-2011) Issue SANDIA PROPRIETARY INFORMATION  

E-print Network

Identifiable Information (when completed) Sandia National Laboratories Retirement Gift Selection Sheet Employee Information Name: SNL ID: Retirement Date: Phone: Years of Service: Example: (1979-2010) Ship to Address Use Only Date Shipped: Shipper/Trip No.: Benefit Representative Signature Return to Retirement

416

Building on and spinning off: Sandia National Labs` creation of sensors for Vietnam  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper discusses Sandia National Laboratories` development of new technologies for use in the Vietnam War - specifically the seismic sensors deployed to detect troop and vehicle movement - first along the Ho Chi Minh Trail and later in perimeter defense for American military encampments in South Vietnam. Although the sensor story is a small one, it is interesting because

Ullrich

1996-01-01

417

Sandia invention to make parabolic trough solar collector systems more energy efficient  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This news release, from Sandia National Laboratories, announces the development of a system to align the long parabolic trough mirrors in a solar collector, thereby making it much more efficient. The article contains a description of how such trough solar collector systems and the new mirror alignment devices operate. Images are provided along with an outline of the group's anticipated progress.

2007-09-25

418

The ⁹⁹Mo production program at Sandia National Labs  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 1994, Sandia Laboratories (SNL) was funded by the DOE to initiate preparations for the production of Molybdenum 99 and associated medically useful isotopes using the annular core research reactor (ACRR) and the hot cell facility. The goal of SNL preparation effort is to provide the physical plant capability, infrastructure, and necessary staffing. The preparation efforts involves modifications to the

Coats

1995-01-01

419

Sandia HLW canister\\/overpack studies applicable for a salt repository  

Microsoft Academic Search

An experimental program to develop candidate materials for use as high-level waste (HLW) overpacks or canisters in a salt repository has been in progress at Sandia National Laboratories since 1976. The main objective of this program has been to provide a waste package barrier having a long lifetime in the chemical and physical environment of a repository. This paper summarizes

M. A. Molecke; D. W. Schaefer; R. S. Glass; J. A. Ruppen

1981-01-01

420

COBRA accelerator for Sandia ICF diode research at Cornell University  

SciTech Connect

The new COBRA accelerator is being built in stages at the Laboratory of Plasma Studies in Cornell University where its applications will include extraction diode and ion beam research in support of the light ion inertial confinement fusion (ICF) program at Sandia National Laboratories. The 4- to 5-MV, 125- to 250-kA accelerator is based on a four-cavity inductive voltage adder (IVA) design. It is a combination of new ferromagnetically-isolated cavities and self magnetically insulated transmission line (MITL) hardware and components from existing Sandia and Cornell facilities: Marx generator capacitors, hardware, and power supply from the DEMON facility; water pulse forming lines (PFL) and gas switch from the Subsystem Test Facility (STF); a HERMES-III intermediate store capacitor (ISC); and a modified ion diode from Cornell`s LION. The present accelerator consists of a single modified cavity similar to those of the Sandia SABRE accelerator and will be used to establish an operating system for the first stage initial lower voltage testing. Four new cavities will be fabricated and delivered in the first half of FY96 to complete the COBRA accelerator. COBRA is unique in the sense that each cavity is driven by a single pulse forming line, and the IVA output polarity may be reversed by rotating the cavities 180{degrees} about their vertical axis. The site preparations, tank construction, and diode design and development are taking place at Cornell with growing enthusiasm as this machine becomes a reality. Preliminary results with the single cavity and short positive inner cylinder MITL configuration will soon be available.

Smith, D.L.; Ingwersen, P.; Bennett, L.F.; Boyes, J.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Anderson, D.E.; Greenly, J.B.; Sudan, R.N. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

1995-05-01

421

Small mammal study of Sandia Canyon, 1994 and 1995  

SciTech Connect

A wide range of plant and wildlife species utilize water discharged from facilities at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The purpose of this study was to gather baseline data of small mammal populations and compare small mammal characteristics within three areas of Sandia Canyon, which receives outfall effluents from multiple sources. Three small mammal trapping webs were placed in the upper portion of Sandia Canyon, the first two were centered in a cattail-dominated marsh with a ponderosa pine overstory and the third web was placed in a much drier transition area with a ponderosa pine overstory. Webs 1 and 2 had the highest species diversity indices with deer mice the most commonly captured species in all webs. However, at Web 1, voles, shrews, and harvest mice, species more commonly found in moist habitats, made up a much greater overall percentage (65.6%) than did deer mice and brush mice (34.5%). The highest densities and biomass of animals were found in Web 1 with a continual decrease in density estimates in each web downstream. There is no statistical difference between the mean body weights of deer mice and brush mice between sites. Mean body length was also determined not to be statistically different between the webs (GLM [deer mouse], F = 0.89, p = 0.4117; GLM [brush mouse], F = 2.49, p = 0.0999). Furthermore, no statistical difference between webs was found for the mean lean body masses of deer and brush mice (GLM [deer mouse], F = 2.54, p = 0.0838; GLM [brush mouse], F = 1.60, p = 0.2229). Additional monitoring studies should be conducted in Sandia Canyon so comparisons over time can be made. In addition, rodent tissues should be sampled for contaminants and then compared to background or control populations elsewhere at the Laboratory or at an off-site location.

Bennett, K.; Biggs, J.

1996-11-01

422

Technical specification for the Sandia Management Restructure Study Team (MRST) Prototype Information System  

SciTech Connect

This document contains implementation details for the Sandia Management Restructure Study Team (MRST) Prototype Information System, which resides on a Sun SPARC II workstation employing the INGRES RDBMS. The INGRES/Windows 4GL application editor was used to define the components of the two user applications which comprise the system. These specifications together with the MRST information model and corresponding database definition constitute the MRST Prototype Information System technical specification and implementation description presented herein. The MRST Prototype Information System represents a completed software product which has been presented to the Management Restructure Study Team to support the management restructing processes at Sandia National Laboratories.

Wyatt, T.R.; Hall, R.C.; Davis, L.T.; Klamerus, E.J.; Thurston, I.

1992-01-01

423

Experiences implementing the MPI standard on Sandia`s lightweight kernels  

SciTech Connect

This technical report describes some lessons learned from implementing the Message Passing Interface (MPI) standard, and some proposed extentions to MPI, at Sandia. The implementations were developed using Sandia-developed lightweight kernels running on the Intel Paragon and Intel TeraFLOPS platforms. The motivations for this research are discussed, and a detailed analysis of several implementation issues is presented.

Brightwell, R.; Greenberg, D.S.

1997-10-01

424

Charged Particle Measurements with the Radiation Assessment Detector on Board the Mars Science Laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) on board the MSL Curiosity rover is conducting the first-ever radiation measurements on the martian surface. Here, we present measurement results of charged particle fluxes and their temporal evolution.

Ehresmann, B.; Hassler, D. M.; Zeitlin, C.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Koehler, J.; Appel, J. K.; Boehm, E.; Boettcher, S.; Brinza, D. E.; Burmeister, S.; Guo, J.; Lohf, H.; Martin, C.; Posner, A.; Rafkin, S.; Reitz, G.

2014-07-01

425

Thar`s gold in them thar notebooks: benefits of laboratory notebooks in the government archive  

SciTech Connect

As Archive Coordinator for Sandia National Laboratories Corporate Archives, I am responsible for promoting the preservation and value of Sandia`s history. Today I will talk about one important part of Sandia`s historical record--the laboratory notebook. I will start with some brief background on Sandia National Laboratories, including the Laboratories` mission and an example of how the gold in one lab notebook helped to give a picture of Sandia`s early history. Next, I will talk about the use of notebooks at Sandia Labs, how they represent technology developed at Sandia, and include noteworthy examples of how patent information has been collected, used, and released to the public. Then, I will discuss how the National Competitiveness Technology Transfer Act of 1989 authorized technology transfer initiatives and the exclusive use of patented information, resulting in many golden opportunities for the national laboratories to work with private industry to further technology. I will briefly discuss laboratory notebook retention schedules and mention a new initiative to better utilize Laboratory notebooks. And, finally, I will summarize how the `gold` in laboratory notebooks in government archives are a reflection of the valuable and extensive research authorized and funded by the government to benefit the public.

O`Canna, M.

1996-01-01

426

The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) and Implications for IRAS on ExoMars  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) on NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission is being built to characterize the broad-spectrum of the surface radiation environment, including galactic cosmic radiation, solar proton events, and secondary neutrons. This overarching mission goal is met by RADs science objectives 1-5: 1.)Characterize the energetic particle spectrum incident at the surface of Mars, including direct and indirect radiation created in the atmosphere and regolith. 2.)Validate Mars atmospheric transmission models and radiation transport codes. 3.)Determine the radiation Dose rate and Equivalent Dose rate for humans on the Martian surface. 4.)Determine the radiation hazard and mutagenic influences to life, past and present, at and beneath the Martian surface. 5.)Determine the chemical and isotopic effects of energetic particle radiation on the Martian surface and atmosphere. To achieve these objectives, RAD will operate autonomously to provide measurements of protons from 10 to 100 MeV and heavy ions from 30 to 200 MeV/nuc, and discriminate between the various nuclei. RAD will also provide LET measurements and time series of SEP events and discriminate between neutrons and gamma rays. A pathfinder model with flight-like properties, and, by the time of the conference, a flight and flight spare model, have been tested at BNL, PTB, iThemba, CERN/CERF, and using various radioactive sources to demonstrate the measurement capabilities required by its science objectives. We will present first calibration results and compare them with GEANT4 simulations. The neutron-gamma discrimination can be achieved in a statistical manner using a combination of different scintillators1 and will also presented. Finally, we will discuss implications for the Ionizing RAdiation Sensor (IRAS) for ESA's ExoMars mission.

Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.; Zeitlin, Cary; Boettcher, Stephan; Martin, Cesar; Kortmann, Onno; Posner, Arik; Reitz, Guenther; Boehm, Eckhardt; Rafkin, Scot; Burmeister, Soenke; Hassler, Donald M.

427

Evaluation of a scanning transmission x-ray microscope using undulator radiation at the SERC Daresbury Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

A scanning transmission x-ray microscope with Fresnel zone-plate focusing optics has been used to form images with monochromatic 400 eV x-rays. In initial experiments on the undulator beamline at the SERC Daresbury Laboratory's synchrotron radiation source, a resolution of about 150 nm has been achieved with a focused x-ray flux of more than 104 photons per second.

J. M. Kenney; G. R. Morrison; M. T. Browne; C. J. Buckley; R. E. Burge; R. C. Cave; P. S. Charalambous; P. J. Duke; A. R. Hare; C. P. B. Hills; A. G. Michette; K. Ogawa; A. M. Rogoyski

1989-01-01

428

A case for Sandia investment in complex adaptive systems science and technology.  

SciTech Connect

This white paper makes a case for Sandia National Laboratories investments in complex adaptive systems science and technology (S&T) -- investments that could enable higher-value-added and more-robustly-engineered solutions to challenges of importance to Sandia's national security mission and to the nation. Complex adaptive systems are ubiquitous in Sandia's national security mission areas. We often ignore the adaptive complexity of these systems by narrowing our 'aperture of concern' to systems or subsystems with a limited range of function exposed to a limited range of environments over limited periods of time. But by widening our aperture of concern we could increase our impact considerably. To do so, the science and technology of complex adaptive systems must mature considerably. Despite an explosion of interest outside of Sandia, however, that science and technology is still in its youth. What has been missing is contact with real (rather than model) systems and real domain-area detail. With its center-of-gravity as an engineering laboratory, Sandia's has made considerable progress applying existing science and technology to real complex adaptive systems. It has focused much less, however, on advancing the science and technology itself. But its close contact with real systems and real domain-area detail represents a powerful strength with which to help complex adaptive systems science and technology mature. Sandia is thus both a prime beneficiary of, as well as potentially a prime contributor to, complex adaptive systems science and technology. Building a productive program in complex adaptive systems science and technology at Sandia will not be trivial, but a credible path can be envisioned: in the short run, continue to apply existing science and technology to real domain-area complex adaptive systems; in the medium run, jump-start the creation of new science and technology capability through Sandia's Laboratory Directed Research and Development program; and in the long run, inculcate an awareness at the Department of Energy of the importance of supporting complex adaptive systems science through its Office of Science.

Colbaugh, Richard; Tsao, Jeffrey Yeenien; Johnson, Curtis Martin; Backus, George A.; Brown, Theresa Jean; Jones, Katherine A.

2012-05-01

429

Defense programs: A Sandia weapon review bulletin  

SciTech Connect

Sandia`s mission to explore technology that enhances US nuclear weapons capabilities has been the primary impetus for the development of a class of inertial measurement units not available commercially. The newest member of the family is the Ring Laser Gyro Assembly. The product of a five-year joint effort by Sandia and Honeywell`s Space and Strategic Systems Operation, the RLGA is a small, one-nautical-mile-per-hour-class inertial measurement unit that consumes only 16 watts - attributes that are important to a guidance and control capability for new or existing weapons. These same attributes led the Central Inertial Guidance Test Facility at Holloman Air Force Base to select the RLGA for their newest test instrumentation pod. The RLGA sensor assembly is composed of three Honeywell ring laser gyroscopes and three Sundstrand Data Control accelerometers that are selected from three types according to the user`s acceleration range and accuracy needs.

Floyd, H.L.; Goetsch, B.; Doran, L. [eds.

1993-11-01

430

Moessbauer investigation of materials used in Sandia`s DCL catalyst testing program  

SciTech Connect

Moessbauer spectroscopy has been used to determine the iron-bearing phases in the coal, catalysts, and IOM products used and generated in the Direct Coal Liquefaction (DCL) catalyst testing program at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico. DCL experiments were conducted with a Blind Canyon, Utah, coal both thermally and with three different iron-based catalysts: (1) a sulfated hematite catalyst (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}), (2) a 6-line ferrihydrite catalyst, and (3) iron-oxide impregnated directly into coal. The catalysts were added to the coal at both a 0.5 and a 1.0 wt% level and sufficient sulfur was added to ensure complete sulfidation of the iron. The Moessbauer spectrum of the Blind Canyon coal revealed that the major iron-bearing mineral present was ankerite, Ca(Fe,Mg)(CO{sub 3}){sub 2}, which converts firs to {gamma}-Fe (austenitic iron) before undergoing partial sulfidation to pyrrhotite in the thermal runs. The percentages of pyrrhotite formed in the catalytic runs were higher than those in the thermal runs indicating that sulfidation of the added iron occurs more rapidly than with the ankerite. Moessbauer data on the amount of pyrrhotite present does not correlate well with THF and heptane conversion percentages, indicating that other parameters like catalyst dispersion must also be considered.

Rao, K.R.P.M.; Huggins, F.E.; Huffman, G.P. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States); Stohl, F.V. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-07-01

431

3D Spectral Radiative Transfer with IRIS: Application to the Simulation of Laboratory Models of Accretion Shocks in Young Stellar Objects  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

IRIS is a new three-dimensional radiative transfer code that provides spectroscopic diagnostics of hydrodynamics structures. We present its major numerical features and capabilities. We investigate the dynamical, radiative and spectral properties of laboratory generated radiative shocks, with the aim of improving our understanding of the mechanisms of accretion in young stellar objects. We employed IRIS to generate X-UV theoretical spectra, while three-dimensional non-stationary radiation hydrodynamics simulations were performed with the code HERACLES.

Ibgui, L.; Hubeny, I.; Lanz, T.; Stehl, C.; Gonzlez, M.; Chize, J. P.

2013-04-01

432

Radiation from small-scale magnetic field turbulence: Implications for gamma-ray bursts and laboratory astrophysical plasmas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Relativistic charged particles moving within regions of small-scale magnetic field turbulence radiate as they undergo transverse accelerations reflective of the magnetic field variation along the particle's path. For a particle of Lorentz factor gamma, relativistic beaming concentrates the bulk of the particle's emission within a small angle 1/gamma from the particle's forward direction. Synchrotron radiation is produced when large-scale magnetic fields cause the charged particles to gyrate, with the resulting radiation spectrum being primarily determined by the intermittent sweep of the relativistic beaming cone past the direction to the observer. In small-scale magnetic field turbulence, magnetic fields may be locally strong but varies over sufficiently small scales that the particle's emission is more consistently oriented towards a particular direction. Consequently, deflection effects cease to dominate the observed spectrum and the standard synchrotron model no longer applies. In this dissertation, we focus on the strong jitter radiation regime, in which the field varies over sufficiently short scales that the particle is never substantially deviated from a straight line path and an observer in the particle's forward direction receives consistently strong radiation over many correlation lengths of the magnetic field. We develop the general jitter radiation solutions for such a case and demonstrate that the resulting radiation spectrum differs notably from the synchtrotron spectrum and depends directly on the spectral distribution of the magnetic field encountered by the particle. The Weibel-like filamentation instability generates small-scale magnetic field turbulence through current filamentation in counterstreaming particle populations, such as may be found at or near propagating shock fronts, in outflow from regions of magnetic reconnection, or from a variety of other scenarios producing an anisotropic particle velocity distribution. The current filamentation produces an anisotropy in magnetic field distribution that causes the jitter radiation spectrum to be sensitive to the radiating particle's orientation with respect to the filamentation axis. Because the spectrum observed from any given direction will be dominated by emission from particle's moving along that particular line-of-sight, this results in a natural angular dependence of the jitter radiation spectrum. We explore the implications of jitter radiation's spectral sensitivity to the field anisotropy produced by the Weibel-like filamentation instability to relevant astrophysical and laboratory plasma scenarios. We calculate the jitter radiation spectra that may be produced in a high-energy density laboratory plasma by using quasi-monoenergetic electron beams to generate and then probe a region of current filamentation, and show that the jitter radiation may be used as a radiative diagnostic to determine features of the magnetic field distribution within this region. For gamma-ray bursts, this instability may play a significant role in generating magnetic field strength from relativistic collisionless shocks or other particle acceleration mechanisms. We show that the viewing angle dependence of the jitter radiation spectrum can result in a rapidly time-evolving spectrum whose hard-to-soft evolution, synchrotron-violating low-energy spectral indices, and correlation between low-energy spectral hardness and the flux at peak energy may explain trends noticed in time-resolved GRB spectral evolution. We generate the jitt