Sample records for sandia laboratories radiation

  1. Sandia National Laboratories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilliom, Laura R.

    1992-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has identified technology transfer to U.S. industry as a laboratory mission which complements our national security mission and as a key component of the Laboratory's future. A number of technology transfer mechanisms - such as CRADA's, licenses, work-for-others, and consortia - are identified and specific examples are given. Sandia's experience with the Specialty Metals Processing Consortium is highlighted with a focus on the elements which have made it successful. A brief discussion of Sandia's potential interactions with NASA under the Space Exploration Initiative was included as an example of laboratory-to-NASA technology transfer. Viewgraphs are provided.

  2. Nanophotonics at Sandia National Laboratories.

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, Frederick Bossert

    2008-10-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is leveraging the extensive CMOS, MEMS, compound semiconductor, and nanotechnology fabrication and test resources at Sandia National Laboratories to explore new science and technology in photonic crystals, plasmonics, metamaterials, and silicon photonics.

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: News Center

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Sandia National Laboratories publishes its quarterly journal of research and development at this Web site. Free to the general public, Sandia Technology summarizes current work related to national security, energy development and infrastructure, and various other advances made at the installation. The fall/ winter 2002 issue centers on sensors for all kinds of purposes. From sensors that monitor water supplies to air-sniffing devices that can detect chemical and biological toxins, Sandia is extremely adept in this area. All back issues of Sandia Technology are also available for browsing, which cover topics such as nuclear power and smart machines.

  4. Sandia National Laboratories embraces ISDN

    SciTech Connect

    Tolendino, L.F.; Eldridge, J.M.

    1994-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia), a multidisciplinary research and development laboratory located on Kirtland Air Force Base, has embraced Integrated Services Digital Network technology as an integral part of its communication network. Sandia and the Department of Energy`s Albuquerque Operations Office have recently completed the installation of a modernized and expanded telephone system based, on the AT&T 5ESS telephone switch. Sandia is committed to ISDN as an integral part of data communication services, and it views ISDN as one part of a continuum of services -- services that range from ISDN`s asynchronous and limited bandwidth Ethernet (250--1000 Kbps) through full bandwidth Ethernet, FDDI, and ATM at Sonet rates. Sandia has demonstrated this commitment through its use of ISDN data features to support critical progmmmatic services such as access to corporate data base systems. In the future, ISDN will provide enhanced voice, data communication, and video services.

  5. Photometrics at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    McWilliams, J.Y.; Hill, R.A.; Hughes, R.L. (eds.)

    1990-07-01

    This report highlights Sandia National Laboratories' work in the following areas: photometrics and optical development; still and time-lapse photography; real-time motion photography; high-speed photography; image-motion photography; schlieren photography; ultra-high-speed photography; electronic imaging; shuttered video and high-speed video; infrared imaging radiometry; exoatmospheric photography and videography; microdensitometry and image analysis; and optical system design and development.

  6. www.sandia.gov Sandia National Laboratories

    E-print Network

    spectrum. 1981 Combustion Research Facility opened at Sandia/CA; available to researchers from around for the high-altitude Dominic nuclear test series. 1962 Began B61 design program to create a flexible. 1970 Designed the Safe Secure Trailer for transporting nuclear weapons; later designed and tested

  7. Sandia National Laboratories: The First Fifty Years

    SciTech Connect

    MORA,CARL J.

    1999-11-03

    On Nov. 1, 1999, Sandia National Laboratories celebrates its 50th birthday. Although Sandia has its roots in the World War II-era Manhattan Project, Sandia began operating as a separate nuclear weapons engineering laboratory under the management of AT&T on Nov. 1, 1949. Today the lab employs more than 7,000 people at its two sites in Albuquerque and Livermore, California, and has research and development missions in national security, energy and environmental technologies, and U.S. economic competitiveness. Lockheed Martin Corporation operates Sandia for the US. Department of Energy.

  8. Characterization of reactor neutron environments at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, J.G.; Luera, T.F.; Griffin, P.J.; Vehar, D.W.

    1994-08-01

    To assure quality in the testing of electronic parts in neutron radiation environments, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has incorporated modern techniques and procedures, developed in the last two decades by the radiation effects community, into all of its experimental programs. Attention to the application of all of these methodologies, experiment designs, nuclear data, procedures and controls to the SNL radiation services has led to the much more accurate and reliable environment characterizations required to correlate the effects observed with the radiation delivered.

  9. Metamaterials program at Sandia National Laboratories.

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, Frederick Bossert

    2010-10-01

    Sandia National Laboratories Metamaterial Science and Technology Program has developed novel HPC-based design tools, wafer scale 3D fabrication processes, and characterization tools to enable thermal IR optical metamaterial application studies.

  10. Technology transfer at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.S.; Arvizu, D.E.

    1993-10-01

    Transferring technology to the private sector to help improve the competitiveness of key US industries is now an official mission of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) defense program national laboratories. We believe that national laboratories can play an important role in addressing US industrial competitiveness. Sandia is seeking to match laboratory strengths with industry-defined market needs in targeted industrial sectors. Sandia, like other national and federal laboratories, is developing an aggressive technology transfer program. This paper provides a brief review of our program and provides a snap-shot of where we are at today.

  11. Characterization of Neutron Test Facilities at Sandia National Laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vehar, D. W.; Griffin, P. J.; King, D. B.; Depriest, K. R.; Williams, J. G.

    2009-08-01

    The Sandia Pulsed Reactor (SPR-III) and Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR), with a variety of test environments, have been used for many years at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for radiation effects testing. Dosimetry has played a crucial role in their operation and characterization, and neutron energy spectral determinations have advanced as progress was made in the available nuclear data and spectrum adjustment techniques. This paper presents a historical perspective of the neutron energy spectra for several environments and their impact on several integral parameters of particular interest to facility users.

  12. Inverter testing at Sandia National Laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginn, Jerry W.; Bonn, Russell H.; Sittler, Greg

    1997-02-01

    Inverters are key building blocks of photovoltaic (PV) systems that produce ac power. The balance of systems (BOS) portion of a PV system can account for up to 50% of the system cost, and its reliable operation is essential for a successful PV system. As part of its BOS program, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) maintains a laboratory wherein accurate electrical measurements of power systems can be made under a variety of conditions. This paper outlines the work that is done in that laboratory.

  13. Inverter testing at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Ginn, J.W.; Bonn, R.H.; Sittler, G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Photovoltaic System Components Dept.

    1997-04-01

    Inverters are key building blocks of photovoltaic (PV) systems that produce ac power. The balance of systems (BOS) portion of a PV system can account for up to 50% of the system cost, and its reliable operation is essential for a successful PV system. As part of its BOS program, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) maintains a laboratory wherein accurate electrical measurements of power systems can be made under a variety of conditions. This paper outlines the work that is done in that laboratory.

  14. Sandia National Laboratories Combustion Research Facility

    E-print Network

    Sandia National Laboratories Combustion Research Facility Power Parks System Simulation A. E. Lutz: · Graphical workspace for block diagram construction · ODE solvers for integration of system in time (not 3. Evaluate system performance of the power park. 4. Implement a control algorithm to optimize

  15. Combustion Research Facility, Sandia National Laboratories,

    E-print Network

    Thole, Karen A.

    W. Colban Combustion Research Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94551-0969 e, Muelheim a. d., Ruhr, Germany A Comparison of Cylindrical and Fan-Shaped Film-Cooling Holes on a Vane to provide superior cooling performance to cylindrical holes along flat plates and turbine airfoils over

  16. Exceptional service in the national interest Sandia National Laboratories

    E-print Network

    Exceptional service in the national interest Sandia National Laboratories LDRD Impacts on the san a t o r i e s From the Chief Technology Officer The LDRD Program Innovates for Sandia's Nuclear Weapons are devoted to exploring future technologies and options for the stockpile, Sandia's Laboratory Directed

  17. Sandia National Laboratories: The Truman Fellowship

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Sandia National Laboratories announces the establishment of the President Harry S. Truman Fellowship in National Security Science and Engineering to attract the best nationally recognized new Ph.D. scientists and engineers. Truman Fellowship candidates are expected to have solved a major scientific or engineering problem in their thesis work or will have provided a new approach or insight to a major problem, as evidenced by a recognized impact in their field.

    Requirements:

    Eligibility criteria include: U.S. citizenship, the ability to obtain a DOE "Q" clearance; research in areas of interest to national security; the candidate must have been awarded a Ph.D. (minimum 3.5 undergraduate and 3.7 graduate GPA preferred) within the past 3 years at the time of application or will have completed all Ph.D. requirements by commencement of appointment; and, candidates seeking their first national laboratory appointment (pre postdoc internships excluded).

    Research at Sandia:

    Sandia National Laboratories is a federally funded research and development organization and contractor for the U.S. Department of Energy.

    Sandia has research focus areas in advanced computing; information systems and mathematics; bioscience and technology; combustion, chemical, and plasma sciences; engineering sciences; geosciences; intelligent systems and robotics; materials science and technology; microelectronics and microsystems; nanosciences and technology; pulsed power and directed energy; and remote sensing and satellite systems.

  18. Sandia National Laboratories Education Outreach Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Dawes, William R. Jr.

    1999-08-26

    The US Department of Energy and its national laboratories are a major employer of scientists and engineers and consequently have a strong interest in the development and training of a qualified pool of employment candidates. For many years the DOE and its national laboratories have supported education activities devoted to increasing the number and quality of science and engineering graduates. This is part of the DOE mission because of the critical national need for scientists and engineers and the recognized deficiencies in the education system for science and mathematics training. Though funding support for such activities has waxed and waned, strong education programs have survived in spite of budget pressures. This paper reviews a few of the education programs presently supported at Sandia by the Science and Technology Outreach Department. The US DOE Defense Programs Office and Sandia National Laboratories provide financial support for these education activities.

  19. Overview of Sandia National Laboratories and Antenna Development Department

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, B.C.

    1994-04-01

    Sandia is a multiprogram R & D laboratory. It has responsibilities in the following areas: (1) defense programs; (2) energy and environment; and (3) work for others (DOD, NSA, etc.). In 1989, the National Competitiveness Technology Transfer Act added another responsibility -- contributions to industrial competitiveness. Sandia has two major laboratory locations, New Mexico and California, and two flight testing locations, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada and Kauai Test Facility, Hawaii. The last part of this talk was dedicated to antenna research at Sandia.

  20. History of Sandia National Laboratories` auxiliary closure mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Weydert, J.C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ponder, G.M. [Geo-Centers, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-12-01

    An essential component of a horizontal, underground nuclear test setup at the Nevada Test Site is the auxiliary closure system. The massive gates that slam shut immediately after a device has been detonated allow the prompt radiation to pass, but block debris and hot gases from continuing down the tunnel. Thus, the gates protect experiments located in the horizontal line-of-sight steel pipe. Sandia National Laboratories has been the major designer and developer of these closure systems. This report records the history of SNL`s participation in and contributions to the technology of auxiliary closure systems used in horizontal tunnel tests in the underground test program.

  1. The ATM conversion at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Brenkosh, J.P.

    1996-08-01

    Converting a large, heterogeneous, networked, environment to ATM (Asynchronous Transfer Mode) can yield many benefits. Before these benefits can be reaped, however, numerous decisions must be made and implemented. This paper presents a case study which describes the steps that were necessary to convert a backbone network at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico to ATM. It presents each step by explaining its importance and what options were considered along with their tradeoffs. It is hoped that organizations contemplating converting to ATM will have a better understanding of how the transition is implemented after reading this paper.

  2. A History of Building 828, Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Ullrich, Rebecca

    1999-08-01

    This report documents the history of Building 828 in Sandia National Laboratories' Technical Area I. Building 828 was constructed in 1946 as a mechanical test laboratory for Los Alamos' Z-Division (later Sandia) as it moved to Sandia Base. The building has undergone significant remodeling over the years and has had a variety of occupants. The building was evaluated in compliance with the National Historic Preservation Act, but was not eligible for the National Register of Historic Places. Nevertheless, for many Labs employees, it was a symbol of Sandia's roots in World War II and the Manhattan Project.

  3. Instrumentation and telemetry at Sandia National Laboratories.

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is a Department of Energy multiprogram engineering and scientific facility with unique design, development, and test capabilities arising from their work in nuclear weapons, energy resources, defense systems, nuclear safeguards, and specialized scientific endeavors. To support these programs, they have developed instrumentation and telemetry expertise not available elsewhere. This technology is applicable to projects in government and industry. Since the 1950s, they have applied our technical competence to meet difficult challenges with innovative solutions to data acquisition and telemetry problems. Sandia - with experience in fields as diverse as parachute design and plasma physics, geology and rocket guidance, human factors and high-speed aerodynamics, non-destructive testing and satellite communications - can use the power of synergism among our many disciplines to solve your complex problems of data and acquisition and analysis. SNL solves difficult data acquisition problems for extreme environments with expertise in advanced telemetry techniques, high data rate telemetry design, specialized electronics packaging, MIL-STD-1553 communications, instrumentation development, real-time data analysis, project management, specialized testers and data encryption.

  4. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy s National Nuclear Security Administration

    E-print Network

    Wolf, Michael M.

    Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States

  5. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: IN SITU ELECTROKINETIC EXTRACTION SYSTEM - SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has developed an in situ soil remediation system that uses electrokinetic principles to remediate hexavalent chromium-contaminated unsaturated or partially saturated soils. The technology involves the in situ application of direct current to the...

  6. Sandia National Laboratories Institutional Plan: FY 1996--2001

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    Sandia`s Institutional Plan is by necessity a large document. As their missions have grown and diversified over the past decades, the variety of technical and site activities has increased. The programs and activities described here cover an enormous breadth of scientific and technological effort--from the creation of new materials to the development of a Sandia-wide electronic communications system. Today, there are three major themes that greatly influence this work. First, every federally funded institution is being challenged to find ways to become more cost effective, as the US seeks to reduce the deficit and achieve a balanced federal spending plan. Sandia is evaluating its business and operational processes to reduce the overall costs. Second, in response to the Galvin Task Force`s report ``Alternative Futures for the Department of Energy National Laboratories``, Sandia and the Department of Energy are working jointly to reduce the burden of administrative and compliance activities in order to devote more of the total effort to their principal research and development missions. Third, they are reevaluating the match between their missions and the programs they will emphasize in the future. They must demonstrate that Sandia`s roles--in national security, energy security, environmental integrity, and national scientific and technology agenda support--fit their special capabilities and skills and thus ensure their place in these missions for the longer planning horizon. The following areas are covered here: Sandia`s mission; laboratory directives; programmatic activities; technology partnerships and commercialization; Sandia`s resources; and protecting resources and the community.

  7. Sandia Laboratories participation in the Avefria experiments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. P. Krein; E. D. Niper; J. H. Smelser; H. N. Post

    1978-01-01

    Sandia designed a 12-inch diameter payload for the Nike Tomahawk booster system to carry a LASL barium injection experiment. The payload included a telemetry system for monitoring payload performance, an attitude control system to aim the injection perpendicular to the magnetic field lines and a command system to permit ground control of on-board payload functions. Sandia also provided necessary support

  8. Vibration control for precision manufacturing at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Hinnerichs, T.; Martinez, D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Structural Dynamics and Vibration Control Dept.

    1995-04-01

    Sandia National Laboratories performs R and D in structural dynamics and vibration suppression for precision applications in weapon systems, space, underwater, transportation and civil structures. Over the last decade these efforts have expanded into the areas of active vibration control and ``smart`` structures and material systems. In addition, Sandia has focused major resources towards technology to support weapon product development and agile manufacturing capability for defense and industrial applications. This paper will briefly describe the structural dynamics modeling and verification process currently in place at Sandia that supports vibration control and some specific applications of these techniques to manufacturing in the areas of lithography, machine tools and flexible robotics.

  9. 1987 environmental monitoring report, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California

    SciTech Connect

    Devlin, T.K.

    1988-04-01

    Sandia National Labortories conduct various research activities related to Department of Energy interests which have the potential for release of hazardous materials or radionuclides to the environment. A strict environmental control program places maximum emphasis on limiting releases. The environmental monitoring program conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and augmented by Sandia is designed to measure the performance of the environmental controls. The program includes analysis of air, water, soil, vegetation, sewer effluent, ground water, and foodstuffs for various toxic, hazardous, or radioactive materials. Based on these studies, the releases of materials of concern at Sandia during 1987 were well below applicable Department of Energy standards. 8 refs., 3 figs., 12 tabs.

  10. 1992 Environmental monitoring report, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Culp, T.; Cox, W.; Hwang, H.; Irwin, M.; Jones, A.; Matz, B.; Molley, K.; Rhodes, W.; Stermer, D.; Wolff, T.

    1993-09-01

    This 1992 report contains monitoring data from routine radiological and nonradiological environmental surveillance activities. summaries of significant environmental compliance programs in progress, such as National Environmental Policy Act documentation, environmental permits, envirorunental restoration, and various waste management programs for Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, are included. The maximum offsite dose impact was calculated to be 0.0034 millirem. The total population within a 50-mile radius of Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico received an estimated collective dose of 0.019 person-rem during 1992 from the laboratories` operations. As in the previous year, the 1992 operations at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico had no discernible impact on the general public or on the environment.

  11. 1993 Site environmental report Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Culp, T.A.; Cheng, C.F.; Cox, W.; Durand, N.; Irwin, M.; Jones, A.; Lauffer, F.; Lincoln, M.; McClellan, Y.; Molley, K. [and others] [and others

    1994-11-01

    This 1993 report contains monitoring data from routine radiological and nonradiological environmental surveillance activities. Summaries of significant environmental compliance programs in progress, such as National Environmental Policy Act documentation, environmental permits, environmental restoration, and various waste management programs for Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, are included. The maximum offsite dose impact was calculated to be 0.0016 millirem. The total population within a 50-mile (80 kilometer) radius of Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico received an estimated collective dose of 0.027 person-rem during 1993 from the laboratories operations, As in the previous year, the 1993 operations at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico had no discernible impact on the general public or on the environment. This report is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy in compliance with DOE Order 5400.1.

  12. Sandia National Laboratories corporate mentor program : program review, May 2004.

    SciTech Connect

    Tibbetts, Tiffany; Tarro, Talitha; Dudeck, William; Bristol, Colette; Stephens, Jim

    2005-01-01

    The Sandia National Laboratories Corporate Mentor Program provides a mechanism for the development and retention of Sandia's people and knowledge. The relationships formed among staff members at different stages in their careers offer benefits to all. These relationships can provide experienced employees with new ideas and insight and give less experienced employees knowledge of Sandia's culture, strategies, and programmatic direction. The program volunteer coordinators are dedicated to the satisfaction of the participants, who come from every area of Sandia. Since its inception in 1995, the program has sustained steady growth and excellent customer satisfaction. This report summarizes the accomplishments, activities, enhancements, and evaluation data for the Corporate Mentor Program for the 2003/2004 program year ending May 1, 2004.

  13. Sandia National Laboratories/California site environmental report for 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Condouris, R.A. [ed.] [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Holland, R.C. [Science Applications International Corp. (United States)

    1998-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is committed to conducting its operations in an environmentally safe and sound manner. It is mandatory that activities at SNL/California comply with all applicable environmental statutes, regulations, and standards. Moreover, SNL/California continuously strives to reduce risks to employees, the public, and the environment to the lowest levels reasonably possible. To help verify effective protection of public safety and preservation of the environment, SNL/California maintains an extensive, ongoing environmental monitoring program. This program monitors all significant effluents and the environment at the SNL/California site perimeter. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) performs off-site external radiation monitoring for both sites. These monitoring efforts ensure that emission controls are effective in preventing contamination of the environment. As part of SNL/California`s Environmental Monitoring Program, an environmental surveillance system measures the possible presence of hazardous materials in groundwater, stormwater, and sewage. The program also includes an extensive environmental dosimetry program, which measures external radiation levels around the Livermore site and nearby vicinity. The Site Environmental Report describes the results of SNL/California`s environmental protection activities during the calendar year. It also summarizes environmental monitoring data and highlights major environmental programs. Overall, it evaluates SNL/California`s environmental management performance and documents the site`s regulatory compliance status.

  14. Sandia National Laboratories Institutional Plan FY1994--1999

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This report presents a five year plan for the laboratory. This plan takes advantage of the technical strengths of the lab and its staff to address issues of concern to the nation on a scope much broader than Sandia`s original mission, while maintaining the general integrity of the laboratory. The plan proposes initiatives in a number of technologies which overlap the needs of its customers and the strengths of its staff. They include: advanced manufacturing technology; electronics; information and computational technology; transportation energy technology and infrastructure; environmental technology; energy research and technology development; biomedical systems engineering; and post-cold war defense imperatives.

  15. The integrated water conservation program at Sandia National Laboratories

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1997-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), located on Kirkland Air Force Base (KAFB) in Albuquerque, NM, is implementing a comprehensive water conservation program. Because the average rainfall in this metropolitan area of 500,000 is approximately 8 inches per year, conservation of this precious resource is critical to the economic health of the city and state, and the continued operations at SNL\\/NM. To

  16. Sandia National Laboratories photovoltaic balance of systems program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonn, Russell H.; Ginn, Jerry; Hund, Tom; Gonzalez, Sigfredo; Ralph, Mark; Strommen, Roger

    1999-03-01

    The Sandia National Laboratories photovoltaic balance of system (BOS) program is sponsored by the Department of Energy to increase the reliability and lower the cost of BOS components. Efforts for FY1998 are discussed. Principal efforts include a quality program for inverter manufacturers, a grid-tied anti-islanding program, development of a hybrid inverter, hardware benchmarking program, and a battery evaluation program.

  17. Flat panel display development activities at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    DiBello, E.G.; Worobey, W.; Burchett, S.; Hareland, W.; Felter, T.; Mays, B.

    1994-12-31

    The flat panel display development activities underway at Sandia National Laboratories are described. Research is being conducted in the areas of glass substrates, phosphors, large area processes, and electron emissions. Projects are focused on improving process yield, developing large area processes, and using modeling techniques to predict design performance.

  18. Exceptional service in the national interest Sandia National Laboratories

    E-print Network

    Exceptional service in the national interest Sandia National Laboratories PartnershiP Opportunities missions and help companies bring exciting technologies to the marketplace as new and improved products array of technologies and expertise in a number of disciplines, ranging from the life and physical

  19. Sandia National Laboratories Information Design Assurance Red TeamTM

    E-print Network

    Fuerschbach, Phillip

    Sandia National Laboratories Information Design Assurance Red TeamTM For more information contact an adversary perspective. The team uses its own IDART red team assessment methods to help program and project strategies so owners can make informed choices IDART's red teaming methodology has been applied to a broad

  20. 1995 Site environmental report Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Shyr, L.J.; Duncan, D. [eds.] [eds.; Sanchez, R.

    1996-09-01

    This 1995 report contains data from routine radiological and non-radiological environmental monitoring activities. Summaries of significant environmental compliance programs in progress, such as National Environmental Policy Act documentation, environmental permits, environmental restoration and various waste management programs at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, are included.

  1. Sandia National Laboratories, California Environmental Management System program manual.

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, Barbara L.

    2013-04-01

    The Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Environmental Management System (EMS) Program Manual documents the elements of the site EMS Program. The SNL/CA EMS Program conforms to the International Standard on Environmental Management Systems, ISO 14001:2004 and Department of Energy (DOE) Order 436.1.

  2. PDC (polycrystalline diamond compact) bit research at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Finger, J.T.; Glowka, D.A.

    1989-06-01

    From the beginning of the geothermal development program, Sandia has performed and supported research into polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) bits. These bits are attractive because they are intrinsically efficient in their cutting action (shearing, rather than crushing) and they have no moving parts (eliminating the problems of high-temperature lubricants, bearings, and seals.) This report is a summary description of the analytical and experimental work done by Sandia and our contractors. It describes analysis and laboratory tests of individual cutters and complete bits, as well as full-scale field tests of prototype and commercial bits. The report includes a bibliography of documents giving more detailed information on these topics. 26 refs.

  3. Renewable energy technology development at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Klimas, P.C.

    1994-03-01

    The use of renewable energy technologies is typically thought of as an integral part of creating and sustaining an environment that maximizes the overall quality of life of the Earths present inhabitants and does not leave an undue burden on future generations. Sandia National Laboratories has been a leader in developing many of these technologies over the last two decades. This paper describes innovative solar, wind and geothermal energy systems and components that Sandia is helping to bring to the marketplace. A common but special aspect of all of these activities is that they are conducted in partnership with non-federal government entities. A number of these partners are from New Mexico.

  4. Dual-benefit technologies at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, D.W.

    1993-12-31

    What does the pulp and paper industry have in common with the desert southwest and nuclear weapons? As a representative of one of the Nations three nuclear weapons design laboratories (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories), my goal is to identify ``dual-benefit`` technologies where codevelopment will both strengthen the nation`s competitive position and enhance national security. In development of this presentation, I found more common elements than I could possibly survey in this brief period.

  5. Airbags to Martian Landers: Analyses at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Gwinn, K.W.

    1994-03-01

    A new direction for the national laboratories is to assist US business with research and development, primarily through cooperative research and development agreements (CRADAs). Technology transfer to the private sector has been very successful as over 200 CRADAs are in place at Sandia. Because of these cooperative efforts, technology has evolved into some new areas not commonly associated with the former mission of the national laboratories. An example of this is the analysis of fabric structures. Explicit analyses and expertise in constructing parachutes led to the development of a next generation automobile airbag; which led to the construction, testing, and analysis of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Mars Environmental Survey Lander; and finally led to the development of CAD based custom garment designs using 3D scanned images of the human body. The structural analysis of these fabric structures is described as well as a more traditional example Sandia with the test/analysis correlation of the impact of a weapon container.

  6. 1994 Site Environmental Report Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Shyr, L.J.; Wiggins, T.; White, B.B. [eds.] [and others

    1995-09-01

    This 1994 report contains data from routine radiological and nonradiological environmental monitoring activities. Summaries of significant environmental compliance programs in progress, such as National Environmental Policy Act documentation, environmental permits, environmental restoration, and various waste management programs for Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, are included. The maximum off-site dose impact from air emissions was calculated to be 1.5 x 10{sup -4} millirem. The total population within a 50-mile radius of Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico received an estimated collective dose of 0.012 person-rem during 1994 from the laboratories` operations. This report is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy in compliance with DOE Order 5400.1.

  7. Life extension research at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Bustard, L.D.; DuCharme, A.R. Jr.; DeBey, T.M.

    1986-01-01

    As part of the Department of Energy (DOE) plant life extension (PLEX) effort, the DOE Technology Management Center at Sandia is actively participating in life extension research efforts. In the areas of reliability and surveillance, systems modelling techniques are being explored to identify those components which, if their reliability changes, could most impact safety. Results of an application of these techniques to the Surry nuclear plant were compared to an industry life extension categorization also performed at Surry. For selected types of components identified during this study, the degradation and failure mechanisms are being explored and state-of-the-art monitoring techniques are being evaluated. Initial results are presented. In the area of cable life extension, a definition study is under way to define utility-specific as well as collective industry actions that would facilitate extending cable life. Some recommendations of this study are also provided.

  8. Sandia National Laboratories, California proposed CREATE facility environmental baseline survey.

    SciTech Connect

    Catechis, Christopher Spyros

    2013-10-01

    Sandia National Laboratories, Environmental Programs completed an environmental baseline survey (EBS) of 12.6 acres located at Sandia National Laboratories/California (SNL/CA) in support of the proposed Collaboration in Research and Engineering for Advanced Technology and Education (CREATE) Facility. The survey area is comprised of several parcels of land within SNL/CA, County of Alameda, California. The survey area is located within T 3S, R 2E, Section 13. The purpose of this EBS is to document the nature, magnitude, and extent of any environmental contamination of the property; identify potential environmental contamination liabilities associated with the property; develop sufficient information to assess the health and safety risks; and ensure adequate protection for human health and the environment related to a specific property.

  9. Sandia National Laboratories, California Waste Management Program annual report.

    SciTech Connect

    Brynildson, Mark E.

    2010-02-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Waste Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. This annual program report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Waste Management (WM) Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  10. Sandia National Laboratories, California Hazardous Materials Management Program annual report.

    SciTech Connect

    Brynildson, Mark E.

    2011-02-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Hazardous Materials Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. This program annual report describes the activities undertaken during the calender past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Hazardous Materials Management Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  11. Sandia Laboratories hybrid computer and motion simulator facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Curry, W. H.; French, R. E.

    1980-05-01

    Hybrid computer and motion simulator facilities at Sandia National Laboratories include an AD/FIVE-AD10-PDP11/60, an AD/FIVE-PDP11/45, an EAI7800-EAI640, an EAI580/TR48-Nova 800, and two Carco S-45OR-3/R-493A three-axis motion simulators. An EAI680 is used in the analog mode only. This report describes the current equipment.

  12. Advanced coordinate measuring machine at Sandia National Laboratories/California

    SciTech Connect

    Pilkey, R.D.; Klevgard, P.A.

    1993-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories/California has acquired a new Moore M-48V CNC five-axis universal coordinate measuring machine (CMM). Site preparation, acceptance testing, and initial performance results are discussed. Unique features of the machine include a ceramic ram and vacuum evacuated laser pathways (VELPS). The implementation of a VELPS system on the machine imposed certain design requirements and entailed certain start-up problems. The machine's projected capabilities, workload, and research possibilities are outlined.

  13. Advanced coordinate measuring machine at Sandia National Laboratories/California

    SciTech Connect

    Pilkey, R.D.; Klevgard, P.A.

    1993-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories/California has acquired a new Moore M-48V CNC five-axis universal coordinate measuring machine (CMM). Site preparation, acceptance testing, and initial performance results are discussed. Unique features of the machine include a ceramic ram and vacuum evacuated laser pathways (VELPS). The implementation of a VELPS system on the machine imposed certain design requirements and entailed certain start-up problems. The machine`s projected capabilities, workload, and research possibilities are outlined.

  14. Equipment qualification testing evaluation experiences at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Bustard, L.D.; Wyant, F.J.; Bonzon, L.L.; Gillen, K.T.

    1986-01-01

    The USNRC has sponsored a number of programs at Sandia National Laboratories specifically addressing safety-related equipment qualification. The most visible of these programs has been the Qualification Testing Evaluation (QTE) program. Other relevant programs have included the Equipment Qualification Methodology Research Test program (CAP). Over a ten year period these programs have collectively tested numerous types of safety-related equipment. Some insights and conclusions extracted from these testing experiences are summarized in this report.

  15. Certain irregularities in the use of computer facilities at Sandia Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-10-22

    This report concerns irregularities in the use of computer systems at Sandia Laboratories (Sandia) in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Our interest in this subject was triggered when we learned late last year that the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) was planning to undertake an investigation into possible misuse of the computer systems at Sandia. That investigation, which was carried out with the assistance of our staff, disclosed that an employee of Sandia was apparently using the Sandia computer system to assist in running a bookmaking operation for local gamblers. As a result of that investigation, we decided to conduct a separate review of Sandia's computer systems to determine the extent of computer misuse at Sandia. We found that over 200 employees of Sandia had stored games, personal items, classified material, and otherwise sensitive material on their computer files.

  16. Tiger Team assessment of the Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-05-01

    This report documents the Tiger Team Assessment of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Albuquerque, located in Albuquerque, New Mexico. SNL, Albuquerque, is operated by the Sandia Corporation (a wholly owned subsidiary of the American Telephone and Telegraph Company) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The environmental assessment also included DOE tenant facilities at Ross Aviation, Albuquerque Microelectronics Operation, and the Central Training Academy. The assessment was conducted from April 15 to May 24, 1991, under the auspices of DOE's Office of Special Projects under the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health (ES H). The assessment was comprehensive, encompassing ES H disciplines, management, self-assessments, and quality assurance; transportation; and waste management operations. Compliance with applicable federal, state, and local regulations; applicable DOE Orders; best management practices; and internal SNL, Albuquerque, requirements were assessed. In addition, an evaluation of the adequacy and effectiveness of DOE and SNL, Albuquerque management of ES H programs was conducted.

  17. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Guide, Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, R.P. [Hansen Environmental Consultants, Englewood, CO (United States)

    1995-08-01

    This report contains a comprehensive National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Guide for the Sandia National Laboratories. It is based on the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) NEPA regulations in 40 CFR Parts 1500 through 1508; the US Department of Energy (DOE) N-EPA implementing procedures in 10 CFR Part 102 1; DOE Order 5440.1E; the DOE ``Secretarial Policy Statement on the National Environmental Policy Act`` of June 1994- Sandia NEPA compliance procedures-, and other CEQ and DOE guidance. The Guide includes step-by-step procedures for preparation of Environmental Checklists/Action Descriptions Memoranda (ECL/ADMs), Environmental Assessments (EAs), and Environmental Impact Statements (EISs). It also includes sections on ``Dealing With NEPA Documentation Problems`` and ``Special N-EPA Compliance Issues.``

  18. Sandia`s network for Supercomputing `94: Linking the Los Alamos, Lawrence Livermore, and Sandia National Laboratories using switched multimegabit data service

    SciTech Connect

    Vahle, M.O.; Gossage, S.A.; Brenkosh, J.P. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Advanced Networking Integration Dept.

    1995-01-01

    Supercomputing `94, a high-performance computing and communications conference, was held November 14th through 18th, 1994 in Washington DC. For the past four years, Sandia National Laboratories has used this conference to showcase and focus its communications and networking endeavors. At the 1994 conference, Sandia built a Switched Multimegabit Data Service (SMDS) network running at 44.736 megabits per second linking its private SMDS network between its facilities in Albuquerque, New Mexico and Livermore, California to the convention center in Washington, D.C. For the show, the network was also extended from Sandia, New Mexico to Los Alamos National Laboratory and from Sandia, California to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This paper documents and describes this network and how it was used at the conference.

  19. Report of multijunction thermal convertor interlaboratory comparison study for measurements at Sandia National Laboratory.

    SciTech Connect

    Klemme, Beverly J.

    2009-07-01

    Two Multijunction Thermal Voltage Converters (MJTCs) were provided to the Sandia National Laboratory Primary Standards Laboratory (Sandia PSL) as part of an interlaboratory comparison (ILC). This report summarizes the results of the measurements of the devices (S 127D1 and S 127C2) measured at Sandia PSL from March 4 to March 15, 2009. The SNL/NM portion of an interlaboratory comparison of multijunction thermal convertors was successfully completed with a demonstrated measurement uncertainty of 60ppm (k=2).

  20. Progress in Z-Pinch driven dynamic-hohlraums for high-temperature radiation-flow and ICF experiments at Sandia National Laboratories.

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, James E.; Haines, Malcolm G. (Imperial College, London, United Kingdom); Chandler, Gordon Andrew; Bliss, David Emery; Olson, Richard Edward; Sanford, Thomas W. L.; Olson, Craig Lee; Nash, Thomas J.; Ruiz, Carlos L.; Matzen, Maurice Keith; Idzorek, George C. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Stygar, William A.; Apruzese, John P. (Naval Research Laboratory, Washington DC); Cuneo, Michael Edward; Cooper, Gary Wayne (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Chittenden, Jeremy Paul (Imperial College, London, United Kingdom); Chrien, Robert E. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Slutz, Stephen A.; Mock, Raymond Cecil; Leeper, Ramon Joe; Sarkisov, Gennady Sergeevich (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Peterson, Darrell L. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Lemke, Raymond William; Mehlhorn, Thomas Alan; Roderick, Norman Frederick (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Watt, Robert G. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New MM)

    2004-06-01

    Progress in understanding the physics of dynamic-hohlraums is reviewed for a system capable of generating 13 TW of axial radiation for high temperature (>200 eV) radiation-flow experiments and ICF capsule implosions.

  1. Progress in z-pinch driven dynamic-hohlraums for high-temperature radiation-flow and ICF experiments at Sandia National Laboratories

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T W L Sanford; T J Nash; R E Olson; David Emery Bliss; R W Lemke; C L Olson; C L Ruiz; R C Mock; J E Bailey; G A Chandler; M E Cuneo; R J Leeper; M K Matzen; T A Mehlhorn; S A Slutz; W A Stygar; D L Peterson; R E Chrien; R G Watt; N F Roderick; G W Cooper; J P Apruzese; G S Sarkisov; J P Chittenden; M G Haines

    2004-01-01

    Progress in understanding the physics of dynamic-hohlraums is reviewed for a system capable of generating 13 TW of axial radiation for high temperature (>200 eV) radiation-flow experiments and ICF capsule implosions.

  2. Radioactive material package testing capabilities at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Uncapher, W.L.; Hohnstreiter, G.F.

    1995-12-31

    Evaluation and certification of radioactive and hazardous material transport packages can be accomplished by subjecting these packages to normal transport and hypothetical accident test conditions. The regulations allow package designers to certify packages using analysis, testing, or a combination of analysis and testing. Testing can be used to substantiate assumptions used in analytical models and to demonstrate package structural and thermal response. Regulatory test conditions include impact, puncture, crush, penetration, water spray, immersion, and thermal environments. Testing facilities are used to simulate the required test conditions and provide measurement response data. Over the past four decades, comprehensive testing facilities have been developed at Sandia National Laboratories to perform a broad range of verification and certification tests on hazardous and radioactive material packages or component sections. Sandia`s facilities provide an experience base that has been established during the development and certification of many package designs. These unique facilities, along with innovative instrumentation data collection capabilities and techniques, simulate a broad range of testing environments. In certain package designs, package testing can be an economical alternative to complex analysis to resolve regulatory questions or concerns.

  3. NDE activities and technology transfer at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Shurtleff, W.W.

    1993-12-31

    The NDE, Photometrics, and Optical Data Reduction Department at Sandia National Laboratories in New Mexico (S provides nondestructive evaluation (NDE) support for all phases of research and development at Sandia. Present facilities and personnel provide radiography, acoustic monitoring, ultrasonic scanning, computed tomography, shearography/ESPI, infrared imaging, high speed and ultra-high speed photometrics, and image processing. Although the department includes photometrics and optical data reduction as well as NDE, I will refer to the NDE department from now on for simplicity. The NDE department has worked on technology transfer to organizations inside and outside the weapons complex. This work has been performed in all the Sandia business sectors: Defense Programs, Energy and Environment, and Work for Others. The technology transfer has been in the form of testing for product improvement such as validation of aircraft inspection equipment, consultation such as detecting lathe bearing slip for a major machine tool manufacturer, and products such as an acoustic sand detector for the oil and gas industry.

  4. Computer-aided design at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Eiffert, A.R.

    1983-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories uses computer-aided design (CAD) equipment for electrical, mechanical, plant facilities and site modeling applications in support of its responsibilities as a prime contractor to the Department of Energy. This paper describes how CAD assists in product design and definition with use of the geometric data base for engineering analysis and computer-aided manufacturing (CAM). The benefits of CAD to these applications are emphasized. Geometric models and their mass properties are passed through a network of CAD computers to a super minicomputer for plot post-processing, analysis, animation and the generation of numerical control codes. Examples of these applications are presented, and some future activities are projected.

  5. Sandia National Laboratories CDC7800 version of MORSE-SGC

    SciTech Connect

    Dupree, S.A.; Lighthill, R.E.

    1982-02-01

    A version of the MORSE-SGC code has been developed for the Sandia National Laboratories' CDC7600 computer. MORSE is a Monte Carlo code designed to solve neutron and gamma-ray transport problems. This report is intended as a guide for the use of this code and includes discussions of source definition, geometry specification, biasing, and detectors. Preparation of input for the code is described in detail, and several example problems are presented. Use of auxiliary codes PICTURE, SCEPLOT, and LAVA is also discussed.

  6. Energetic materials research and development activities at Sandia National Laboratories supported under DP-10 programs

    SciTech Connect

    Ratzel, A.C. III

    1998-09-01

    This report provides summary descriptions of Energetic Materials (EM) Research and Development activities performed at Sandia National Laboratories and funded through the Department of Energy DP-10 Program Office in FY97 and FY98. The work falls under three major focus areas: EM Chemistry, EM Characterization, and EM Phenomenological Model Development. The research supports the Sandia component mission and also Sandia's overall role as safety steward for the DOE Nuclear Weapons Complex.

  7. Prototype dish testing and analysis at Sandia National Laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, J. W.; Houser, R. M.; Erdman, W. W.

    1991-12-01

    During the past year, Sandia National Laboratories performed on-sun testing of several dish concentrator concepts. These tests were undertaken at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF). Two of the tests were performed in support of the DOE Concentrator Receiver Development Program. The first was on-sun testing of the single-element stretched-membrane dish; this 7-meter diameter dish uses a single preformed metal membrane with an aluminized polyester optical surface and shows potential for future dish-Stirling systems. The next involved two prototype facets from the Faceted Stretched-Membrane Dish Program. These facets, representing competitive design concepts, are closest to commercialization. Five 1-meter triangular facets were tested on-sun as part of the development program for a solar dynamic system on Space Station Freedom. While unique in character, all the tests utilized the Beam Characterization System (BCS) as the main measurement tool and all were analyzed using the Sandia-developed CIRCE2 computer code. The BCS is used to capture and digitize an image of the reflected concentrator beam that is incident on a target surface. The CIRCE2 program provides a computational tool, which when given the geometry of the concentrator and target as well as other design parameters will predict the flux distribution of the reflected beam. One of these parameters, slope error, is the variable that has a major effect in determining the quality of the reflected beam. The methodology used to combine these two tools to predict uniform slope errors for the dishes is discussed in this document. As the Concentrator Development Programs continue, Sandia will test and evaluate two prototype dish systems. The first, the faceted stretched-membrane dish, is expected to be tested in 1992, followed by the full-scale single-element stretched-membrane dish in 1993. These tests will use the tools and methodology discussed in this document.

  8. Sandia National Laboratories, California Chemical Management Program annual report.

    SciTech Connect

    Brynildson, Mark E.

    2012-02-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Chemical Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. This program annual report describes the activities undertaken during the calender past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Chemical Management Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA. SNL/CA is responsible for tracking chemicals (chemical and biological materials), providing Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) and for regulatory compliance reporting according to a variety of chemical regulations. The principal regulations for chemical tracking are the Emergency Planning Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) and the California Right-to-Know regulations. The regulations, the Hazard Communication/Lab Standard of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) are also key to the CM Program. The CM Program is also responsible for supporting chemical safety and information requirements for a variety of Integrated Enabling Services (IMS) programs primarily the Industrial Hygiene, Waste Management, Fire Protection, Air Quality, Emergency Management, Environmental Monitoring and Pollution Prevention programs. The principal program tool is the Chemical Information System (CIS). The system contains two key elements: the MSDS library and the chemical container-tracking database that is readily accessible to all Members of the Sandia Workforce. The primary goal of the CM Program is to ensure safe and effective chemical management at Sandia/CA. This is done by efficiently collecting and managing chemical information for our customers who include Line, regulators, DOE and ES and H programs to ensure compliance with regulations and to streamline customer business processes that require chemical information.

  9. SandiaNationalLaboratoriesSupplierQualityRequirementsfor Build to PrintHardwarePurchases

    E-print Network

    SandiaNationalLaboratoriesSupplierQualityRequirementsfor Build to PrintHardwarePurchases Subject: Surveillance of Supplier andSupplier's Sub-Tier Vendors Note107: Supplier Inspection Records Level 2: (Quality-42(QP-28)O4 Quality AssuranceSupplement to SandiaContractsandPurchaseOrders (- rr-°1I 11/18/04 #12

  10. RF and mm-Wave Photonics at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Vawter, G.A.; Sullivan, C.

    1999-07-08

    RF and mm-wave photonic devices and circuits have been developed at Sandia National Laboratories for applications ranging from RF optical data links to optical generation of mm-wave frequencies. This talk will explore recent high-speed photonics technology developments at Sandia including: (1) A monolithic optical integrated circuit for all-optical generation of mm-waves. Using integrated mode-locked diode lasers, amplifiers, and detectors, frequencies between 30 GHz and 90 GHz are generated by a single monolithic (Al,Ga)As optical circuit less than 2mm in its largest dimension. (2) Development of polarization-maintaining, low-insertion-loss, low v-pi, Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) modulators with DC-to-potentially-K-band modulation bandwidth. New low-loss polarization-maintaining waveguide designs using binary alloys have been shown to reduce polarization crosstalk in undoped (Al,Ga)As waveguides, yielding high extinction ratio (>40dB) and low on-chip loss (<6dB) in Mach-Zehnder interferometers. RF drive voltage is reduced through use of 45rnrn-active length devices with modulator sensitivity, v-pi, less than 3V.

  11. JY Tsao Some Simple Physics of Global Warming 2008 April Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States

    E-print Network

    JY Tsao · Some Simple Physics of Global Warming · 2008 April Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory Sciences Center Sandia National Laboratories Some Simple Physics of Global Warming · I'm Jeff Tsao. I and on had the opportunity to delve into global warming issues, and I'm happy to be able to share a little

  12. Epidemiologic surveillance. Annual report for Sandia National Laboratories 1994

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    Epidemiologic surveillance at DOE facilities consists of regular and systematic collection, analysis, and interpretation of data on absences due to illness and injury in the work force. Its purpose is to provide an early warning system for health problems occurring among employees at participating sites. In this annual report, 1994 morbidity data for the Sandia National Laboratories are summarized. These analyses focus on absences of 5 or more consecutive workdays occurring among workers aged 15-76 years. They are arranged in five sets of tables that present: (1) the distribution of the labor force by occupational category and pay status; (2) the absences per person, diagnoses per absence, and diagnosis rates for the whole work force; (3) diagnosis rates by type of disease or injury; (4) diagnosis rates by occupational category; and (5) relative risks for specific types of disease or injury by occupational category.

  13. Overview of Engine Combustion Research at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Robert W. Carling; Gurpreet Singh

    1999-04-26

    The objectives of this paper are to describe the ongoing projects in diesel engine combustion research at Sandia National Laboratories' Combustion Research Facility and to detail recent experimental results. The approach we are employing is to assemble experimental hardware that mimic realistic engine geometries while enabling optical access. For example, we are using multi-cylinder engine heads or one-cylinder versions of production heads mated to one-cylinder engine blocks. Optical access is then obtained through a periscope in an exhaust valve, quartz windows in the piston crown, windows in spacer plates just below the head, or quartz cylinder liners. We have three diesel engine experiments supported by the Department of Energy, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies: a one-cylinder version of a Cummins heavy-duty engine, a diesel simulation facility, and a one-cylinder Caterpillar engine to evaluate combustion of alternative diesel fuels.

  14. 1989 Environmental monitoring report, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, S.; Chavez, G.; Phelan, J.; Parsons, A.; Yeager, G.; Dionne, D.; Schwartz, B.; Wolff, T.; Fish, J.; Gray, C.; Thompson, D.

    1990-05-01

    This 1989 report contains monitoring data from routine radiological and nonradiological environmental surveillance activities. Summaries of significant environmental compliance programs in progress such as National Environmental Policy Act documentation, environmental permits, environmental restoration, and various waste management programs for Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque (SNL, Albuquerque) are included. The maximum offsite dose impact was calculated to be 8.8 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} mrem. The total Albuquerque population received a collective dose of 0.097 person-rem during 1989 from SNL, Albuquerque, operations. As in the previous year, SNL, Albuquerque, operations in 1989 had no adverse impact on the general public or on the environment. 46 refs., 20 figs., 31 tabs.

  15. 1990 Environmental Monitoring Report, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, S.; Yeager, G.; Wolff, T.; Parsons, A.; Dionne, D.; Massey, C.; Schwartz, B.; Fish, J.; Thompson, D. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Goodrich, M. (GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States))

    1991-05-01

    This 1990 report contains monitoring data from routine radiological and nonradiological environmental surveillance activities. Summaries of significant environmental compliance programs in progress such as National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documentation, environmental permits, environmental restoration, and various waste management programs for Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque (SNL, Albuquerque) are included. The maximum offsite dose impact was calculated to be 2.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} mrem. The total 50-mile population received a collective dose of 0.82 person-rem during 1990 from SNL, Albuquerque, operations. As in the previous year, the 1990 SNL operations had no adverse impact on the general public or on the environment. This report is prepared for the US Department of Energy in compliance with DOE Order 5400.1. 97 refs., 30 figs., 137 tabs.

  16. 1991 Environmental monitoring report Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Culp, T.; Cox, W.; Hwang, S.; Jones, A.; Longley, S.; Parsons, A.; Wolff, T.; Fish, J.; Ward, S.

    1992-11-01

    This 1991 report contains monitoring data from routine radiological and nonradiological environmental surveillance activities. Summaries of significant environmental compliance programs in progress such as National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documentation, environmental permits, environmental restoration (ER), and various waste management programs for Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque (SNL, Albuquerque) are included. The maximum offsite dose impact was calculated to be 1.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} mrem. The total population within a 50-mile radius of SNL, Albuquerque, received a collective dose of 0.53 person-rem during 1991 from SNL, Albuquerque, operations. As in the previous year, the 1991 operations at SNL, Albuquerque, had no discernible impact on the general public or on the environment.

  17. Cable condition monitoring research activities at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobus, M.J.; Zigler, G.L.; Bustard, L.D.

    1988-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is currently conducting long-term aging research on representative samples of nuclear power plant cables. The objectives of the program are to determine the suitability of these cables for extended life (beyond 40 year design basis) and to assess various cable condition monitoring techniques for predicting remaining cable life. The cables are being aged for long times at relatively mild exposure conditions with various condition monitoring techniques to be employed during the aging process. Following the aging process, the cables will be exposed to a sequential accident profile consisting of high dose rate irradiation followed by a simulated design basis loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) steam exposure. 12 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  18. Sandia National Laboratories' new high level acoustic test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J. D.; Hendrick, D. M.

    1989-01-01

    A high intensity acoustic test facility has been designed and is under construction at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, NM. The chamber is designed to provide an acoustic environment of 154dB (re 20 {mu}Pa) overall sound pressure level over the bandwidth of 50 Hz to 10,000 Hz. The chamber has a volume of 16,000 cubic feet with interior dimensions of 21.6 ft {times} 24.6 ft {times} 30 ft. The construction of the chamber should be complete by the summer of 1990. This paper discusses the design goals and constraints of the facility. The construction characteristics are discussed in detail, as are the acoustic performance design characteristics. The authors hope that this work will help others in designing acoustic chambers. 12 refs., 6 figs.

  19. Baseline ecological footprint of Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect

    Coplen, Amy K.; Mizner, Jack Harry,; Ubechel, Norion M.

    2009-01-01

    The Ecological Footprint Model is a mechanism for measuring the environmental effects of operations at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico (SNL/NM). This analysis quantifies environmental impact associated with energy use, transportation, waste, land use, and water consumption at SNL/NM for fiscal year 2005 (FY05). Since SNL/NM's total ecological footprint (96,434 gha) is greater than the waste absorption capacity of its landholdings (338 gha), it created an ecological deficit of 96,096 gha. This deficit is equal to 886,470lha, or about 3,423 square miles of Pinyon-Juniper woodlands and desert grassland. 89% of the ecological footprint can be attributed to energy use, indicating that in order to mitigate environmental impact, efforts should be focused on energy efficiency, energy reduction, and the incorporation of additional renewable energy alternatives at SNL/NM.

  20. Calendar Year 2009 Annual Site Environmental Report for Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2010-09-30

    Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) is a government-owned/contractor operated facility. Sandia Corporation (Sandia), a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation (LMC), manages and operates the laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). #31;The DOE/NNSA, Sandia Site O#30;ffice (SSO) administers the contract and oversees contractor operations at the site. #31;This annual report summarizes data and the compliance status of Sandia Corporation’s environmental protection and monitoring programs through December 31, 2009. Major environmental programs include air quality, water quality, groundwater protection, terrestrial surveillance, waste management, pollution prevention (P2), environmental restoration (ER), oil and chemical spill prevention, and implementation of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program (DOE 2008a) and DOE Manual 231.1-1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting (DOE 2007).

  1. Annual Site Environmental Report Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico, Calendar year 2007

    SciTech Connect

    Agogino, Karen [USDOE, NNSA/SSO; Sanchez, Rebecca [Sandia Corp., Albuquerque, NM (US)

    2008-09-30

    Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) is a government-owned/contractor-operated facility. Sandia Corporation (Sandia), a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, manages and operates the laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The DOE/NNSA Sandia Site Office (SSO) administers the contract and oversees contractor operations at the site. This annual report summarizes data and the compliance status of Sandia Corporation’s environmental protection and monitoring programs through December 31, 2007. Major environmental programs include air quality, water quality, groundwater protection, terrestrial surveillance, waste management, pollution prevention (P2), environmental restoration (ER), oil and chemical spill prevention, and implementation of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program (DOE 2007a) and DOE Manual 231.1-1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting (DOE 2007).

  2. The evolution of Interior Intrusion Detection Technology at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, R.H.; Workhoven, R.M.

    1987-07-01

    Interior Intrusion Detection Technology began at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in 1975 as part of the Fixed Facilities Physical Protection Research and Development program sponsored by the US Department of Energy in connection with their nuclear safeguards effort. This paper describes the evolution of Interior Intrusion Detection Technology at Sandia National Laboratories from the beginning of the Interior Sensor Laboratory to the present. This Laboratory was established in 1976 to evaluate commercial interior intrusion sensors and to assist in site-specific intrusion detection system designs. Examples of special test techniques and new test equipment that were developed at the Lab are presented, including the Sandia Intruder Motion Simulator (SIMS), the Sensor and Environment Monitor (SEM), and the Sandia Interior Robot (SIR). We also discuss new sensors and unique sensor combinations developed when commercial sensors were unavailable and the future application of expert systems.

  3. Zinc/bromine battery evaluation at SNL (Sandia National Laboratory)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lott, S. L.; Butler, P. C.; Freese, J. M.

    Three prototype zinc/bromine batteries were evaluated at Sandia during the last year. The objectives of these tests were to determine performance, cycle life, durability of the auxiliary components, and failure mechanisms. All three were deliverables from a Sandia development contract with Energy Research Corporation (ERC). The test results were communicated to ERC along with suggestions for improving battery design and reliability.

  4. Simulated direct-strike lightning testing at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Maxam, G.L.

    1985-01-01

    The design of the Sandia Lightning Simulator is described and its capabilities are summarized. The approach generally used in testing components and systems including the instrumentation used for test item diagnostics and for data acquisition is also described. Several applications of the simulator test capabilities are examined including Sandia systems, Navy aircraft and an ALCM missile. Some future directions now envisioned are discussed.

  5. Energy technologies at Sandia National Laboratories: Past, Present, Future

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-08-01

    We at Sandia first became involved with developing energy technology when the nation initiated its push toward energy independence in the early 1970s. That involvement continues to be strong. In shaping Sandia's energy programs for the 1990s, we will build on our track record from the 70s and 80s, a record outlined in this publication. It contains reprints of three issues of Sandia's Lab News that were devoted to our non-nuclear energy programs. Together, they summarize the history, current activities, and future of Sandia's diverse energy concerns; hence my desire to see them in one volume. Written in the fall of 1988, the articles cover Sandia's extremely broad range of energy technologies -- coal, oil and gas, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaics, wind, rechargeable batteries, and combustion.

  6. Tonopah test range - outpost of Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, L.

    1996-03-01

    Tonopah Test Range is a unique historic site. Established in 1957 by Sandia Corporation, Tonopah Test Range in Nevada provided an isolated place for the Atomic Energy Commission to test ballistics and non-nuclear features of atomic weapons. It served this and allied purposes well for nearly forty years, contributing immeasurably to a peaceful conclusion to the long arms race remembered as the Cold War. This report is a brief review of historical highlights at Tonopah Test Range. Sandia`s Los Lunas, Salton Sea, Kauai, and Edgewood testing ranges also receive abridged mention. Although Sandia`s test ranges are the subject, the central focus is on the people who managed and operated the range. Comments from historical figures are interspersed through the narrative to establish this perspective, and at the end a few observations concerning the range`s future are provided.

  7. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration

    E-print Network

    Langerhans, Brian

    Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company International Society for Disease Surveillance Conference Dec. 2008, Raleigh) · Inform public health of an environment that senses that environment and acts on it [responsive], over time, in pursuit of its own agenda

  8. An Organizational Cultural Assessment of Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Haber, S.B.; Crouch, D.A.

    1991-05-01

    An Organizational Cultural Assessment (OCA) was performed at the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) by administering an Organizational Culture Survey (OCS) that queried employees on the subjects of organizational culture, various aspects of communications, employee commitment, work group cohesion, coordination of work, environmental concerns, hazardous nature of work, safety and overall job satisfaction. Many of these subjects are assessed in the OCS through highly developed and validated scales that have been administered in many different types of organizations. Some of the issues, especially the questions on environmental, safety, and health concerns, are newly developed and are still being modified. The purpose of the OCS is to measure in a quantitative and objective way the notion of culture;'' that is, the values, attitudes, and beliefs of the individuals working within the organization. In addition, through the OCS, a broad sample of individuals can be reached that would probably not be interviewed or observed during the course of a typical assessment. The OCS also provides a descriptive profile of the organization at one point in time that can then be compared to a profile taken at a different point in time to assess changes in the culture of the organization. 9 refs., 81 figs., 6 tabs.

  9. Meeting the challenge: A case study of Sandia National Laboratories Records Inventory Project

    SciTech Connect

    Cusimano, L.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Roberts, C.B. [Millican and Associates, Fort Lauderdale, FL (United States)

    1993-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories determined that the most effective method to address records management initiatives would be through a single, comprehensive facilities wide records inventory and retention schedule project. The logistic of such an undertaking (estimated at 425,000 linear feet) are demanding. The relatively short time frame required for completion and the project`s size called for sound, up front planning by Sandia and ultimately the support of an outside contractor for qualified resources to execute the plan.

  10. An overview of Sandia National Laboratories` plasma switched, gigawatt, ultra-wideband impulse transmitter program

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R.S.; Rinehart, L.F.; Buttram, M.T.; Aurand, J.F.

    1992-11-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed several repetitive, ultra-wideband (UWB), impulse transmitters to address impulse source technology and to support experimental applications. The sources fall into two different classes, pulse peaking and pulse shorting depending on how the UWB frequency components are generated. ne frequency spectrum of the radiated pulse from these sources include the spectrum of 100-MHz to 3-GHz. Depending upon the source, repetitive operation from single shot to 5-kHz (1-kHz nominal) has been obtained with excellent reliability and repeatability. SNIPER (Sub-Nanosecond impulse Radiator) is a source which uses an oil peaking switch to obtain a fast risetime (250-pS) pulse of 2-nS duration. The output voltage ranges between few tens of kilovolts to 250-kV. EMBL (EnantioMorphic Blumlein) is a similar device (presently under development) which uses a gas switch to sharpen the trailing edge of a 2-nS pulse to approximately 100-pS. To date, an output voltage of approximately 600-kV has been obtained (700- kV is the design goal). Since the frequency spectra are identical between sources with sharpened leading or trailing edges, alternatively, one can use parallel switches to short the pulse at its peak voltage. The pulse is generated externally and then injected into the antenna. Due to the high powers involved and the need to radiate a broad spectrum of frequencies, Sandia has concentrated on TEM horn. antennas with special high voltage feed adapters. Several TEM horns have been built and used during this program. In those cases where higher gains are desired for the higher frequencies, TEM horn-fed, dish antennas have been employed. An overview of the UWB transmitters, including design and operation of the modulators, the PFN`S, the pulse sharpening switches and the antennas will be presented.

  11. An overview of Sandia National Laboratories' plasma switched, gigawatt, ultra-wideband impulse transmitter program

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R.S.; Rinehart, L.F.; Buttram, M.T.; Aurand, J.F.

    1992-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed several repetitive, ultra-wideband (UWB), impulse transmitters to address impulse source technology and to support experimental applications. The sources fall into two different classes, pulse peaking and pulse shorting depending on how the UWB frequency components are generated. ne frequency spectrum of the radiated pulse from these sources include the spectrum of 100-MHz to 3-GHz. Depending upon the source, repetitive operation from single shot to 5-kHz (1-kHz nominal) has been obtained with excellent reliability and repeatability. SNIPER (Sub-Nanosecond impulse Radiator) is a source which uses an oil peaking switch to obtain a fast risetime (250-pS) pulse of 2-nS duration. The output voltage ranges between few tens of kilovolts to 250-kV. EMBL (EnantioMorphic Blumlein) is a similar device (presently under development) which uses a gas switch to sharpen the trailing edge of a 2-nS pulse to approximately 100-pS. To date, an output voltage of approximately 600-kV has been obtained (700- kV is the design goal). Since the frequency spectra are identical between sources with sharpened leading or trailing edges, alternatively, one can use parallel switches to short the pulse at its peak voltage. The pulse is generated externally and then injected into the antenna. Due to the high powers involved and the need to radiate a broad spectrum of frequencies, Sandia has concentrated on TEM horn. antennas with special high voltage feed adapters. Several TEM horns have been built and used during this program. In those cases where higher gains are desired for the higher frequencies, TEM horn-fed, dish antennas have been employed. An overview of the UWB transmitters, including design and operation of the modulators, the PFN'S, the pulse sharpening switches and the antennas will be presented.

  12. The integrated water conservation program at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, D.

    1997-08-22

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), located on Kirkland Air Force Base (KAFB) in Albuquerque, NM, is implementing a comprehensive water conservation program. Because the average rainfall in this metropolitan area of 500,000 is approximately 8 inches per year, conservation of this precious resource is critical to the economic health of the city and state, and the continued operations at SNL/NM. To address this need, SNL/NM is taking a systematic, comprehensive approach to water conservation. The approach is to estimate the water consumption for all of SNL/NM by type of consumption. For each type of water consumption, all cost effective measures for reducing, reclaiming, and/or recycling that usage will be ranked. These water conservation measures range from the simple such as retrofitting plumbing fixtures with low cost devices to reduce water required to flush toilets to the very complex. As an example of the very complex, a Microelectronics Development Laboratory (MDL) lab will implement a near zero water discharge from clean room wet benches. Deionized (DI) water can be sent back to the DI water input generation stream when the DI water is not being used for rinsing wafers. This paper discusses completed, ongoing and proposed projects at SNL/NM to reduce water consumption and recycle water to maximize its use, and how water conservation has resulted in energy savings, reductions in wastewater discharges, reductions in water treatment chemicals, and reduction in hazardous waste. Additionally the paper discusses preparation of SNL/NM`s Water Conservation Plan, and solutions to overcoming programmatic and bureaucratic hurdles to achieve reductions in water use, wastewater discharges, chemical use and energy.

  13. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy s National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

    E-print Network

    Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company85000. Z-Pinch Inertial Fusion Energy Craig L. Olson + Z-IFE Team Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM 87185 Fusion Power Associates Annual Meeting and Symposium Washington, DC October 11-12, 2005

  14. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

    E-print Network

    Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company85000. Progress on Z-Pinch Inertial Fusion Energy Craig L. Olson Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM 87185 USA 20th IAEA Fusion Energy Conference Vilamoura, Portugal 1-6 November 2004 RTL DH

  15. Prototype prosperity-diversity game for the Laboratory Development Division of Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    VanDevender, P.; Berman, M.; Savage, K.

    1996-02-01

    The Prosperity Game conducted for the Laboratory Development Division of National Laboratories on May 24--25, 1995, focused on the individual and organizational autonomy plaguing the Department of Energy (DOE)-Congress-Laboratories` ability to manage the wrenching change of declining budgets. Prosperity Games are an outgrowth and adaptation of move/countermove and seminar War Games. Each Prosperity Game is unique in that both the game format and the player contributions vary from game to game. This particular Prosperity Game was played by volunteers from Sandia National Laboratories, Eastman Kodak, IBM, and AT&T. Since the participants fully control the content of the games, the specific outcomes will be different when the team for each laboratory, Congress, DOE, and the Laboratory Operating Board (now Laboratory Operations Board) is composed of executives from those respective organizations. Nevertheless, the strategies and implementing agreements suggest that the Prosperity Games stimulate cooperative behaviors and may permit the executives of the institutions to safely explore the consequences of a family of DOE concert.

  16. Heat Pipe Solar Receiver Development Activities at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Adkins, D.R.; Andraka, C.E.; Moreno, J.B.; Moss, T.A.; Rawlinson, K.S.; Showalter, S.K.

    1999-01-08

    Over the past decade, Sandia National Laboratories has been involved in the development of receivers to transfer energy from the focus of a parabolic dish concentrator to the heater tubes of a Stirling engine. Through the isothermal evaporation and condensation of sodium. a heat-pipe receiver can efficiently transfer energy to an engine's working fluid and compensate for irregularities in the flux distribution that is delivered by the concentrator. The operation of the heat pipe is completely passive because the liquid sodium is distributed over the solar-heated surface by capillary pumping provided by a wick structure. Tests have shown that using a heat pipe can boost the system performance by twenty percent when compared to directly illuminating the engine heater tubes. Designing heat pipe solar receivers has presented several challenges. The relatively large area ({approximately}0.2 m{sup 2}) of the receiver surface makes it difficult to design a wick that can continuously provide liquid sodium to all regions of the heated surface. Selecting a wick structure with smaller pores will improve capillary pumping capabilities of the wick, but the small pores will restrict the flow of liquid and generate high pressure drops. Selecting a wick that is comprised of very tine filaments can increase the permeability of the wick and thereby reduce flow losses, however, the fine wick structure is more susceptible to corrosion and mechanical damage. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the issues encountered in the design of heat pipe solar receivers and solutions to problems that have arisen. Topics include: flow characterization in the receiver, the design of wick systems. the minimization of corrosion and dissolution of metals in sodium systems. and the prevention of mechanical failure in high porosity wick structures.

  17. Bridging the Cold War and the 21st century: chronicling the history of Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Mora, C.J.

    1997-04-01

    A historical perspective is given for Sandia National Laboratories from its beginnings as a small engineering group at an offshoot of Los Alamos Laboratory to a facility of 7000 people at its main facility in Albuquerque, another 1000 people in Livermore, California and test ranges in Tonopah, Nevada and Kauai, Hawaii. The Sandia army base became the Z division of Los Alamos and $25 million construction program began the structures that would carry out a test program for nuclear weapons during the cold war. Bell System/AT&T stewardship of the site continued from 1949 to 1993, when Martin Marietta (now Lockheed Martin) was chosen as the new contractor. Management decisions, personnel, and political aspects of the Laboratory are presented up to 1997 and forecasts are given for future policy and programs of Sandia.

  18. Dose algorithm for EXTRAD 4100S extremity dosimeter for use at Sandia National Laboratories.

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, Charles Augustus

    2011-05-01

    An updated algorithm for the EXTRAD 4100S extremity dosimeter has been derived. This algorithm optimizes the binning of dosimeter element ratios and uses a quadratic function to determine the response factors for low response ratios. This results in lower systematic bias across all test categories and eliminates the need for the 'red strap' algorithm that was used for high energy beta/gamma emitting radionuclides. The Radiation Protection Dosimetry Program (RPDP) at Sandia National Laboratories uses the Thermo Fisher EXTRAD 4100S extremity dosimeter, shown in Fig 1.1 to determine shallow dose to the extremities of potentially exposed individuals. This dosimeter consists of two LiF TLD elements or 'chipstrates', one of TLD-700 ({sup 7}Li) and one of TLD-100 (natural Li) separated by a tin filter. Following readout and background subtraction, the ratio of the responses of the two elements is determined defining the penetrability of the incident radiation. While this penetrability approximates the incident energy of the radiation, X-rays and beta particles exist in energy distributions that make determination of dose conversion factors less straightforward in their determination.

  19. An Approach to Wireless Communications at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    WITZKE, EDWARD L.

    2002-10-01

    Wireless communication plays an increasing role in military, industrial, public safety, and academic computer networks. Although in general, radio transmitters are not currently permitted in secured areas at Sandia, wireless communications would open new opportunities, allowing mobile and pervasive user access. Without wireless communications, we must live in a ''non-mainstream'' world of fixed, wired networks, where it becomes ever more difficult to attract and retain the best professionals. This report provides a review of the current state of wireless communications, which direction wireless technology is heading, and where wireless technology could be employed at Sandia. A list of recommendations on harnessing the power of wireless communications is provided to aid in building a state-of-the-art communication environment for the 21st century at Sandia.

  20. The Excavation and Remediation of the Sandia National Laboratories Chemical Waste Landfill

    Microsoft Academic Search

    DANIEL ALBERT KWIECINSKI; RHONDA KAY METHVIN; DONALD P. SCHOFIELD; SHARISSA G. YOUNG

    1999-01-01

    The Chemical Waste Landfill (CWL) at Sandia National Laboratories\\/New Mexico (SNL\\/NM) is a 1.9-acre disposal site that was used for the disposal of chemical wastes generated by many of SNL\\/NM research laboratories from 1962 until 1985. These laboratories were primarily involved in the design, research and development of non-nuclear components of nuclear weapons and the waste generated by these labs

  1. Research and Development Program for transportation packagings at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Hohnstreiter, G.F.; Sorenson, K.B.

    1995-02-01

    This document contains information about the research and development programs dealing with waste transport at Sandia National Laboratories. This paper discusses topics such as: Why new packaging is needed; analytical methodologies and design codes;evaluation of packaging components; materials characterization; creative packaging concepts; packaging engineering and analysis; testing; and certification support.

  2. Z pinch driven inertial confinement fusion target physics research at Sandia National Laboratories

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. J. Leeper; T. E. Alberts; J. R. Asay; P. M. Baca; K. L. Baker; S. P. Breeze; G. A. Chandler; D. L. Cook; G. W. Cooper; C. Deeney; M. S. Derzon; M. R. Douglas; D. L. Fehl; T. Gilliland; D. E. Hebron; M. J. Hurst; D. O. Jobe; J. W. Kellogg; J. S. Lash; S. E. Lazier; M. K. Matzen; D. H. McDaniel; J. S. McGurn; T. A. Mehlhorn; A. R. Moats; R. C. Mock; D. J. Muron; T. J. Nash; R. E. Olson; J. L. Porter; J. P. Quintenz; P. V. Reyes; L. E. Ruggles; C. L. Ruiz; T. W. L. Sanford; F. A. Schmidlapp; J. F. Seamen; R. B. Spielman; M. A. Stark; K. W. Struve; W. A. Stygar; D. R. Tibbetts-Russell; J. A. Torres; M. Vargas; T. C. Wagoner; C. Wakefield; J. H. Hammer; D. D. Ryutov; M. Tabak; S. C. Wilks; R. L. Bowers; K. D. McLenithan; D. L. Peterson

    1999-01-01

    Three hohlraum concepts are being pursued at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to investigate the possibility of using pulsed power driven magnetic implosions (Z pinches) to drive targets capable of fusion yields in the range 200-1000 MJ. This research is being conducted on SNL's Z facility, which is capable of driving peak currents of 20 MA in various Z pinch load

  3. Environmental testing philosophy for a Sandia National Laboratories small satellite project

    SciTech Connect

    Cap, J.S.; Rackley, N.G.

    1996-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is the system integrator on a small satellite project. Following the intent of the NASA GEVS document, an integrated test philosophy was formulated to certify the satellite for flight. The purpose of this paper is to present that philosophy.

  4. Systems studies department FY78 activity report. Vol. I. Computing and applied mathematics. [Sandia Laboratories, Livermore

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gold

    1979-01-01

    The Systems Studies Department at Sandia Laboratories, Livermore, has two primary responsibilities: to provide computational and mathematical services and to perform ''systems analysis'' studies. The computational services include applied mathematics, numerical analysis, programming, computer graphics, and management information systems, as well as operation, maintenance, and enhancement of the SLL computer center. The systems analysis studies attempt to evaluate the relative

  5. Results from Sandia National Laboratories \\/ Lockheed Martin Electromagnetic Missile Launcher (EMML)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. S. Aubuchon; T. R. Lockner; B. N. Turman; L Basak; G Root; Mendel D. Floyd

    2005-01-01

    Sandia national laboratories (SNL) and lockheed martin MS2 are designing an electromagnetic missile launcher (EMML) for naval applications. Lhe EMML uses an induction coilgun topology with the requirement of launching a 3600 lb. missile up to a velocity of 40 m\\/s. Lo demonstrate the feasibility of the electromagnetic propulsion design, a demonstrator launcher was built that consists of approximately 10%

  6. Air quality investigations of the Sandia National Laboratories Sol se Mete Aerial Cable Facility

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. M. Gutman; R. J. Silver

    1994-01-01

    The air quality implications of the test and evaluation activities at the Sandia National Laboratories Sol se Mete Aerial Cable Facility are examined. All facets of the activity that affect air quality are considered. Air contaminants produced directly include exhaust products of rocket motors used to accelerate test articles, dust and gas from chemical explosives, and exhaust gases from electricity

  7. Effect of material aging on parachute pack life: a synopsis of Sandia National Laboratories studies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. Auerbach; J. W. Mead; K. E. Mead; R. H. Ericksen; F. B. Burns; C. L. Renschler

    1984-01-01

    A systematic study of the effects of environmental factors on nylon 66 and Kevlar 29 strength degradation in parachute components is being conducted at Sandia National Laboratories. It includes: (1) accelerated aging studies in air, inert environments, humidity, ozone, and smog; (2) a 25-year surveillance program of parachutes in a variety of natural climatic environments; (3) moisture absorption as a

  8. Simulating the Hallmarks of Cancer Robert G. Abbott Sandia National Laboratories

    E-print Network

    Forrest, Stephanie

    Simulating the Hallmarks of Cancer Robert G. Abbott Sandia National Laboratories P.O. Box 5800 Comprehensive Cancer Center 1500 East Medical Center Drive Ann Arbor, MI 48109-0946 kpienta@umich.edu Keywords Cancer, agent simulation, cellular automata Abstract Cancer can be viewed as the loss of cooperative cell

  9. Performance of a solar-heated assembly building at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Haskins, D.E.

    1980-09-01

    The passive solar-heating system of the assembly building at Sandia National Laboratories' Photovoltaic Advanced Systems Test Facility is described and the thermal analysis of the building is given. Performance predictions are also given, and actual performance for December 1979 and January 1980 are shown.

  10. Sandia National Laboratories interactions with organizations in the Former Soviet Union

    SciTech Connect

    Whiting, G.H.; Nokes, K.D.

    1994-03-01

    This document describes Sandia National Laboratories involvement with scientists and engineers at various organizations within the states of the Former Soviet Union (FSU). The purpose of these interactions is twofold: first, to acquire technical information to enhance United States technology and second, to assist FSU states in converting their defense-oriented industry to civilian, market- oriented business.

  11. Implementing Virtual Private Networking for Enabling Lower Cost, More Secure Wide Area Communications at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    MILLER,MARC M.; YONEK JR.,GEORGE A.

    2001-08-01

    Virtual Private Networking is a new communications technology that promises lower cost, more secure wide area communications by leveraging public networks such as the Internet. Sandia National Laboratories has embraced the technology for interconnecting remote sites to Sandia's corporate network, and for enabling remote access users for both dial-up and broadband access.

  12. Environmental assessment of the Environmental Restoration Project at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) is managed and operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by Sandia Corporation, a subsidiary of the Lockheed Martin Company. SNL/NM is located on land controlled by DOE within the boundaries of Kirtland Air Force Base (KAFB) in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The major responsibilities of SNL/NM are the support of national security and energy projects. This report provides an environmental assessment of proposed remedial action activities at the solid waste management units at SNL/NM. A risk assessment of health hazards is also discussed.

  13. Resource conservation and pollution prevention through process optimization at Sandia National Laboratories` Steam Plant

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Evans; C. Chavez

    1997-01-01

    The Steam Plant at Sandia National Laboratories\\/New Mexico (SNL\\/NM) supplies on average 680,000 kg\\/day (1.5 x 10⁶ lb\\/day) of saturated steam for space heating and laboratory processes for SNL\\/NM, Technical Area 1, the eastern portion of Kirtland Air Force Base, the Department of Energy`s Albuquerque Office, and the KAFB Coronado Club. The primary fuel is natural gas (740 mscf\\/yr); the

  14. Design and initial deployment of the wireless local area networking infrastructure at Sandia National Laboratories.

    SciTech Connect

    Long, John P.; Hamill, Michael J.; Mitchell, M. G.; Miller, Marc M.; Witzke, Edward L.; Wiener, Dallas J

    2006-11-01

    A major portion of the Wireless Networking Project at Sandia National Laboratories over the last few years has been to examine IEEE 802.11 wireless networking for possible use at Sandia and if practical, introduce this technology. This project team deployed 802.11a, b, and g Wireless Local Area Networking at Sandia. This report examines the basics of wireless networking and captures key results from project tests and experiments. It also records project members thoughts and designs on wireless LAN architecture and security issues. It documents some of the actions and milestones of this project, including pilot and production deployment of wireless networking equipment, and captures the team's rationale behind some of the decisions made. Finally, the report examines lessons learned, future directions, and conclusions.

  15. An overview of semiconductor bridge, SCB, applications at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Bickes, R.W. Jr.; Grubelich, M.C.; Harris, S.M.; Merson, J.A.; Weinlein, J.H.

    1995-05-01

    The semiconductor bridge, SCB, developed by Sandia National Laboratories is a maturing technology now being used in several applications by Sandia customers. Most applications arose because of a need at the system level to provide explosive assemblies that were light weight, small volume, low cost and required small quantities of electrical energy to function -- for the purposes of this paper we define an explosive assembly to mean the combination of the firing set and an explosive component. As a result, and because conventional firing systems could not meet the stringent size, weight and energy requirements of our customers, we designed and are investigating SCB applications that range from devices for Sandia applications to igniters for fireworks. We present in this paper an overview of SCB technology with specific examples of the system designed for our customers to meet modern requirements that sophisticated explosive systems must satisfy in today`s market environments.

  16. Preliminary safety analysis report for the Auxiliary Hot Cell Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    OSCAR,DEBBY S.; WALKER,SHARON ANN; HUNTER,REGINA LEE; WALKER,CHERYL A.

    1999-12-01

    The Auxiliary Hot Cell Facility (AHCF) at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) will be a Hazard Category 3 nuclear facility used to characterize, treat, and repackage radioactive and mixed material and waste for reuse, recycling, or ultimate disposal. A significant upgrade to a previous facility, the Temporary Hot Cell, will be implemented to perform this mission. The following major features will be added: a permanent shield wall; eight floor silos; new roof portals in the hot-cell roof; an upgraded ventilation system; and upgraded hot-cell jib crane; and video cameras to record operations and facilitate remote-handled operations. No safety-class systems, structures, and components will be present in the AHCF. There will be five safety-significant SSCs: hot cell structure, permanent shield wall, shield plugs, ventilation system, and HEPA filters. The type and quantity of radionuclides that could be located in the AHCF are defined primarily by SNL/NM's legacy materials, which include radioactive, transuranic, and mixed waste. The risk to the public or the environment presented by the AHCF is minor due to the inventory limitations of the Hazard Category 3 classification. Potential doses at the exclusion boundary are well below the evaluation guidelines of 25 rem. Potential for worker exposure is limited by the passive design features incorporated in the AHCF and by SNL's radiation protection program. There is no potential for exposure of the public to chemical hazards above the Emergency Response Protection Guidelines Level 2.

  17. Computerized nuclear material system at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Tischhauser, J.L.

    1980-01-01

    SNLA developed and implemented a nuclear material control and accountability system on an HP 3000 minicomputer. The Sandia Nuclear Materials Computer System (SNMCS) which became operative in January 1980 provides: control of shipments and receivals of nuclear material, control of internal transfers of nuclear material, automated inventory with a bar code system, control of inventory adjustments, automated reporting/transmitting to other contractors and operations offices, automated ledgers and journals for material weights and costs, and interface to the Albuquerque Operations Office (ALO) Automated 741 System.

  18. Russian surety research projects in the Sandia National Laboratories Cooperative Measures Program

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.E.

    1996-07-01

    Over forty safety and security related research and development projects have been initiated between Sandia National Laboratories and the Russian nuclear weapons laboratories VNIIEF and VNIITF. About half of these projects have been completed. All relate to either safety or security methodology development, processes, accident environment analysis and testing, accident databases, assessments or product design of devices. All projects have a potential benefit to various safety or security programs and some may directly have commercial applications. In general, these projects could benefit risk assessments associated with systems that could result in accidents or incidents having high public consequences. These systems typically have already been engineered to have very low assessed probabilities of occurrence of such accidents or incidents. This paper gives an overview of the Sandia surety program with a focus on the potential for future collaboration between Sandia, three Russian Institutes; VNIIEF, VNIITF and VNIIA, and other industry and government organizations. The intent is to serve as an introduction to a roundtable session on Russian Safety Collaboration at the 14th International System Safety Conference. The current Sandia collaboration program scope and rationale is presented along with the evolved program focus. An overview of the projects is given and a few specific projects are briefly highlighted with tangible results to date.

  19. Applying the Laboratory Integration and Prioritization System (LIPS) to decision-making at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, D.S.; Mead, J.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Services Management System Office

    1995-10-01

    The Laboratories Services Division of Sandia National Laboratories includes a wide variety of operations such as environmental, safety and health, safeguards and security, facilities, logistics, and sites planning and integration. In the face of declining budgets and increasing requirements, the Management Team needed some tools to assist in negotiating with customers and regulators and in consistently and cost-effectively managing all work performed and/or managed by the Division. The Integrated Services Management System (ISMS) was developed as a series of processes to provide these tools. The Laboratory Integration and Prioritization System (LIPS) was selected as the prioritization methodology for ISMS. The pilot application phase was begun in February 1994 and addressed planning of work and resources for FY95. Extensive training was provided for the Activity Data Sheet (ADS) preparers and the teams which would score each of the activities. After preparation of the ADSs, they were scored by the scoring teams. A division-wide review board reviewed all of the ADSs to ensure consistency of scoring across all of the functional areas. The lessons that were learned from the pilot application were evaluated and improvements incorporated for the FY96 planning and application. The improvements included upgrading the training, providing expert facilitation for scoring boards, modification of the scoring instructions to better represent local situations, and establishing an Validation Board with more authority and accountability to provide quality assurance. The participants in the LIPS process have agreed that no major bases were uncovered, imperfect prioritizations are better than no data, all work packages can be scored and ranked, including core activities, results were objective and quantifiable, and decisions could be made using technically defensible bases.

  20. ADVANTAGES AND DISADVANTAGES TO OPERATING AN ON-SITE LABORATORY AT THE SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES CHEMICAL WASTE LANDFILL

    SciTech Connect

    Young, S.G.; Creech, M.N.

    2003-02-27

    During the excavation of the Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) Chemical Waste Landfill (CWL), operations were realized by the presence of URS' (formerly known as United Research Services) On-site Mobile Laboratory (OSML) and the close proximity of the SNL/NM Environmental Restoration Chemical Laboratory (ERCL). The laboratory was located adjacent to the landfill in order to provide soil characterization, health and safety support, and waste management data. Although the cost of maintaining and operating an analytical laboratory can be higher than off-site analysis, there are many benefits to providing on site analytical services. This paper describes the synergies between the laboratory, as well as the advantages and disadvantages to having a laboratory on-site during the excavation of SNL/NM CWL.

  1. Batteries for solar energy systems -- A program at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1981-12-31

    DOE has selected Sandia National Laboratories as its lead laboratory to direct a program to develop and test batteries for electrical storage in a variety of solar applications. Initial emphasis is on storage in photovoltaic systems, but wind-energy and solar-thermal systems will be considered later. The BSSAP program is divided functionally into five tasks: Task 1--battery requirements analysis; Task 2--laboratory evaluation; Task 3--PV advanced systems tests; Task 4--applied experiments; Task 5--battery research and development. This report briefly discusses these tasks.

  2. A report on FY06 IPv6 deployment activities and issues at Sandia National Laboratories.

    SciTech Connect

    Tolendino, Lawrence F.; Eldridge, John M.; Hu, Tan Chang

    2006-06-01

    Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4) has been a mainstay of the both the Internet and corporate networks for delivering network packets to the desired destination. However, rapid proliferation of network appliances, evolution of corporate networks, and the expanding Internet has begun to stress the limitations of the protocol. Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) is the replacement protocol that overcomes the constraints of IPv4. IPv6 deployment in government network backbones has been mandated to occur by 2008. This paper explores the readiness of the Sandia National Laboratories' network backbone to support IPv6, the issues that must be addressed before a deployment begins, and recommends the next steps to take to comply with government mandates. The paper describes a joint, work effort of the Sandia National Laboratories ASC WAN project team and members of the System Analysis & Trouble Resolution and Network System Design & Implementation Departments.

  3. Annual report: Purchasing and Materials Management Organization, Sandia National Laboratories, fiscal year 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Zaeh, R.A.

    1993-04-01

    This report summarizes the purchasing and transportation activities of the Purchasing and Materials Management Organization for Fiscal Year 1992. Activities for both the New Mexico and California locations are included. Topics covered in this report include highlights for fiscal year 1992, personnel, procurements (small business procurements, disadvantaged business procurements, woman-owned business procurements, New Mexico commercial business procurements, Bay area commercial business procurements), commitments by states and foreign countries, and transportation activities. Also listed are the twenty-five commercial contractors receiving the largest dollar commitments, commercial contractors receiving commitments of $1,000 or more, integrated contractor and federal agency commitments of $1,000 or more from Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico and California, and transportation commitments of $1,000 or more from Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico and California.

  4. Pollution prevention opportunity assessment for Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico's fleet services department.

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, Anastasia Dawn

    2003-06-01

    This Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessment (PPOA) was conducted for the Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico's (SNL/NM) Fleet Services Department between December 2001 and August 2002. This is the third PPOA conducted at Fleet in the last decade. The primary purpose of this PPOA was to review progress of past initiatives and to provide recommendations for future waste reduction measures of hazardous and solid waste streams and increasing the purchase of environmentally friendly products. This report contains a summary of the information collected and analyses performed with recommended options for implementation. The Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Pollution Prevention Group will work with SNL/NM's Fleet Services to implement these options.

  5. Sandia National Laboratories California Waste Management Program Annual Report February 2008.

    SciTech Connect

    Brynildson, Mark E.

    2008-02-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Waste Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. This annual program report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Waste Management (WM) Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  6. Sandia National Laboratories 34-meter diameter vertical axis wind turbine test bed

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. C. Klimas

    1987-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has designed, procured, and is erecting a 34-meter diameter vertical axis wind turbine test bed. The turbine incorporates many innovative features to investigate possible reductions in the cost-of-energy produced by wind energy conversion systems. These features include: blade element airfoil sections designed specifically for wind turbines, variable chord-variable section modular blades, stress reducing discontinuous slope blades, and

  7. Sandia National Laboratories, California Waste Management Program annual report : February 2009.

    SciTech Connect

    Brynildson, Mark E.

    2009-02-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Waste Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System rogram Manual. This annual program report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Waste Management (WM) Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  8. Sandia National Laboratories, California Hazardous Materials Management Program annual report : February 2009.

    SciTech Connect

    Brynildson, Mark E.

    2009-02-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Hazardous Materials Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental anagement ystem Program Manual. This program annual report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Hazardous Materials Management Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  9. Long-Term Environmental Stewardship (LTES) life-cycle material management at Sandia National Laboratories.

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, Michael D.

    2010-09-01

    The Long-Term Environmental Stewardship (LTES) mission is to ensure long-term protection of human health and the environment, and proactive management toward sustainable use and protection of natural and cultural resources affected by any Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) operations and operational legacies. The primary objectives of the LTES program are to: (1) Protect the environment from present and future operations; (2) Preserve and protect natural and cultural resources, and; (3) Apply environmental life-cycle management to SNL operations.

  10. Sandia bicycle commuters group -- pollution prevention at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Wrons, R.

    1998-06-01

    The Sandia Bicycle Commuters Group (SBCG) formed three years ago for the purpose of addressing issues that impact the bicycle commuting option. The meeting that launched the SBCG was scheduled in conjunction with National Bike-to-Work day in May 1995. Results from a survey handed out at the meeting solidly confirmed the issues and that an advocacy group was needed. The purpose statement for the Group headlines its web site and brochure: ``Existing to assist and educate the SNL workforce bicyclist on issues regarding Kirtland Air Force Base (KAFB) access, safety and bicycle-supporting facilities, in order to promote bicycling as an effective and enjoyable means of commuting.`` The SNL Pollution Prevention (P2) Team`s challenge to the SNL workforce is to ``prevent pollution, conserve natural resources, and save money``. In the first winter of its existence, the SBCG sponsored a winter commute contest in conjunction with the City`s Clean Air Campaign (CAC). The intent of the CAC is to promote alternative (to the single-occupant vehicle) commuting during the Winter Pollution Advisory Period (October 1--February 28), when the City runs the greatest risk of exceeding federal pollution limits.

  11. External Review for Sandia National Laboratory Microelectronics and Photonics Program 1998 Review

    SciTech Connect

    MCWHORTER, PAUL J.; ROMIG JR., ALTON D.

    1999-02-01

    The committee regards Sandia's Microelectronics and Photonics Program as a vital and strategic resource for the nation. The Microsystems (MEMS) and Chem Lab programs were assessed as unique and best-in-class for the development of significant application areas. They contribute directly to the Sandia mission and impact the development of new commercial areas. The continued development and integration of Radiation hard silicon integrated circuits, micromechanical systems, sensors, and optical communications is essential to the national security mission. The quality of the programs is excellent to outstanding overall. MEMS and Chem Lab activities are examples of outstanding programs. The committee was pleased to see the relationship of the microelectronics development programs to applications in the mission. In a future review the committee would like to see Sandia's research programs and a vision for connectivity to potential national security needs. (This review may be based on analysis and assumptions about the strategic needs of the nation.) In summary, the Microelectronics and Photonics capability affords Sandia the opportunity to deliver exceptional service in the national interest across broad technology areas. The presentations were excellent and well integrated. We received ample pre-reading materials, expectations were well set and the documents were high quality. The committee was provided an agenda with sufficient time among us and some selected one-on-one time with the researchers. The composition of the committee held representation from industry, universities and government. Committee contributions were well balanced and worked as a team. However, the committee was disappointed that no member of Sandia executive management was able to be present for the readout and final debriefing. (A late, higher priority conflict developed.) The members of the EST Program and the committee put substantial effort into the review but a written report like this one is not a substitute for direct feedback in helping SNL leadership assess the value of these programs.

  12. Synthetic aperture radar and interferometry development at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1993-04-01

    Environmental monitoring, earth-resource mapping, and military systems require broad-area imaging at high resolutions. Many times the imagery must be acquired in inclement weather or during night as well as day. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) provides such a capability. SAR systems take advantage of the long-range propagation characteristics of radar signals and the complex information processing capability of modern digital electronics to provide high resolution imagery. SAR complements photographic and other optical imaging capabilities because of the minimum constrains on time-of-day and atmospheric conditions and because of the unique responses of terrain and cultural targets to radar frequencies. Interferometry is a method for generating a three-dimensional image of terrain. The height projection is obtained by acquiring two SAR images from two slightly differing locations. It is different from the common method of stereoscopic imaging for topography. The latter relies on differing geometric projections for triangulation to define the surface geometry whereas interferometry relies on differences in radar propagation times between the two SAR locations. This paper presents the capabilities of SAR, explains how SAR works, describes a few SAR applications, provides an overview of SAR development at Sandia, and briefly describes the motion compensation subsystem.

  13. Large-Scale Testing and High-Fidelity Simulation Capabilities at Sandia National Laboratories to Support Space Power and Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Dobranich, Dean [Thermal and Reactive Processes Department, Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); Blanchat, Thomas K. [Fire Science and Technology Department, Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States)

    2008-01-21

    Sandia National Laboratories, as a Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Agency, has major responsibility to ensure the safety and security needs of nuclear weapons. As such, with an experienced research staff, Sandia maintains a spectrum of modeling and simulation capabilities integrated with experimental and large-scale test capabilities. This expertise and these capabilities offer considerable resources for addressing issues of interest to the space power and propulsion communities. This paper presents Sandia's capability to perform thermal qualification (analysis, test, modeling and simulation) using a representative weapon system as an example demonstrating the potential to support NASA's Lunar Reactor System.

  14. Developing the Sandia National Laboratories transportation infrastructure for isotope products and wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Trennel, A.J.

    1997-11-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) plans to establish a medical isotope project that would ensure a reliable domestic supply of molybdenum-99 ({sup 99}Mo) and related medical isotopes (Iodine-125, Iodine-131, and Xenon-133). The Department`s plan for production will modify the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) and associated hot cell facility at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)/New Mexico and the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Transportation activities associated with such production is discussed.

  15. The transfer of disruptive technologies: Lessions learned from Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    MCBRAYER,JOHN D.

    2000-04-19

    Sandia National Laboratories has learned through their process of technology transfer that not all high tech transfers are alike. They are not alike by the nature of the customers involved, the process of becoming involved with these customers and finally and most importantly the very nature of the technology itself. Here they focus on technology transfer in the microsystems arena and specifically the sacrificial surface version of microsystems. They have learned and helped others learn that many MEMS applications are best realized through the use of surface micromachining (SMM). This is because SMM builds on the substantial integrated circuit industry. In this paper they review Sandia's process for transferring a disruptive MEMS technology in numerous cases.

  16. Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy & Radiative Transfer 99 (2006) 341348

    E-print Network

    2006-01-01

    ). 1 Sandia is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin CompanyV blackbody-like radiators [3] are presently used for inertial confinement fusion studies and other work

  17. Personal nuclear accident dosimetry at Sandia National Laboratories

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. C. Ward; A. H. Mohagheghi; R. Burrows

    1996-01-01

    DOE installations possessing sufficient quantities of fissile material to potentially constitute a critical mass, such that the excessive exposure of personnel to radiation from a nuclear accident is possible, are required to provide nuclear accident dosimetry services. This document describes the personal nuclear accident dosimeter (PNAD) used by SNL and prescribes methodologies to initially screen, and to process PNAD results.

  18. Geochemical study of groundwater at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico and Kirtland Air Force Base

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) and its contractor, Rust Geotech, support the Kirtland Area Office by assisting Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (Sandia/NM) with remedial action, remedial design, and technical support of its Environmental Restoration Program. To aid in determining groundwater origins and flow paths, the GJPO was tasked to provide interpretation of groundwater geochemical data. The purpose of this investigation was to describe and analyze the groundwater geochemistry of the Sandia/NM Kirtland Air Force Base (KAFB). Interpretations of groundwater origins are made by using these data and the results of {open_quotes}mass balance{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}reaction path{close_quote} modeling. Additional maps and plots were compiled to more fully comprehend the geochemical distributions. A more complete set of these data representations are provided in the appendices. Previous interpretations of groundwater-flow paths that were based on well-head, geologic, and geochemical data are presented in various reports and were used as the basis for developing the models presented in this investigation.

  19. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

    E-print Network

    Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company Corporation, Albuquerque, NM, USA 15) EG&G, Albuquerque, NM, USA 16) Omicron, Albuquerque, NM, USA 17) Fusion #12;Z-Pinch is the newest of the three major drivers for IFE 1999 Snowmass Fusion Summer Study, IAEA

  20. Sandia National Laboratories` high power electromagnetic impulse sources

    SciTech Connect

    Rinehart, L.F.; Buttram, M.T.; Denison, G.J.; Lundstrom, J.M.; Crowe, W.R.; Aurand, J.F.; Patterson, P.E.

    1994-10-01

    Three impulse sources have been developed to cover a wide range of peak power, bandwidth and center frequency requirements. Each of the sources can operate in single shot, rep-rate, or burst modes. These devices are of rugged construction and are suitable for field use. This paper will describe the specifications and principals of operation for each source. The sources to be described are: SNIPER (Sub-Nanosecond ImPulsE Radiator), a coaxial Blumlein pulser with an in-line (series) peaking switch; EMBL (EnantioMorphic BLurfflein), a bipolar parallel plate Blumlein with a crowbar type (parallel) peaking switch; and the LCO (L-C Oscillator) a spark-switched L-C oscillator with damped sinusoidal output. SNIPER and EMBL are ultra-wideband (UWB) sources which produce a very fast high voltage transition. When differentiated by the antenna, an impulse whose width corresponds to the transition time is radiated. The LCO operates with a center frequency up to 800 MHz and up to 100 MHz bandwidth. Because the LCO output is relatively narrow band, high gain antennas may be employed to produce very high radiated field strengths.

  1. Pollution prevention opportunity assessment for Sandia National Laboratories/California recycling programs.

    SciTech Connect

    Wrons, Ralph Jordan; Vetter, Douglas Walter

    2007-07-01

    This Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessment (PPOA) was conducted for the Sandia National Laboratories/California (SNL/CA) Environmental Management Department between May 2006 and March 2007, to evaluate the current site-wide recycling program for potential opportunities to improve the efficiency of the program. This report contains a summary of the information collected and analyses performed with recommended options for implementation. The SNL/NM Pollution Prevention (P2) staff worked with the SNL/CA P2 Staff to arrive at these options.

  2. EXPEDITING THE PATH TO CLOSURE THE CHEMICAL WASTE LANDFILL, SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES, NEW MEXICO

    SciTech Connect

    Young, S.G.; Schofield, D.P.; Davis, M.J.; Methvin, R.; Mitchell, M.

    2003-02-27

    The Chemical Waste Landfill (CWL) at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) is undergoing closure subject to the requirements of Subtitle C of RCRA. This paper identifies regulatory mechanisms that have and continue to expedite and simplify the closure of the CWL. These include (1) the Environmental Restoration (ER) Programmatic effort to achieve progress quickly with respect to the standard regulatory processes, which resulted in the performance of voluntary corrective measures at the CWL years in advance of the standard process schedule, (2) the management and disposal of CWL remediation wastes and materials according to the risks posed, and (3) the combination of multiple regulatory requirements into a single submittal.

  3. Status of the Z Refurbishment project (ZR) at Sandia National Laboratories.

    SciTech Connect

    Weinbrecht, Edward A.; Bloomquist, Douglas D.; Warner, Peggy Jean; McDaniel, Dillon Heirman; Faturos, Thomas V.; Tabor, Debra Ann; McKee, G. Randall; Weed, John Woodruff

    2005-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories Z Refurbishment (ZR) Project formally began in August 2002 to increase the Z Accelerator's utilization by providing the capability to perform more shots, improve precision and pulse shape variability, increase delivered current, and accomplish the improvements with minimal disruption to Z's ongoing programs. A project overview was provided at the 14th International Pulsed Power Conference in 2003. This paper provides an update of the project including architectural changes over the past two years, timeframe for completion, and overall design and fabrication status.

  4. Large-Scale Field Study of Landfill Covers at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, S.F.

    1998-09-01

    A large-scale field demonstration comparing final landfill cover designs has been constructed and is currently being monitored at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Two conventional designs (a RCRA Subtitle `D' Soil Cover and a RCRA Subtitle `C' Compacted Clay Cover) were constructed side-by-side with four alternative cover test plots designed for dry environments. The demonstration is intended to evaluate the various cover designs based on their respective water balance performance, ease and reliability of construction, and cost. This paper presents an overview of the ongoing demonstration.

  5. Review of Sandia National Laboratories - Albuquerque New Mexico DOE/DP Critical Skills Development Progrmas FY04.

    SciTech Connect

    Gorman, Anna K; Wilson, Dominique; CLARK, KATHERINE

    2005-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a portfolio of programs to address the critical skills needs of the DP labs, as identified by the 1999 Chiles Commission Report. The goals are to attract and retain the best and the brightest students and transition them into Sandia - and DP Complex - employees. The US Department of Energy/Defense Programs University Partnerships funded ten laboratory critical skills development programs in FY04. This report provides a qualitative and quantitative evaluation of these programs and their status. 3

  6. Annual Site Environment Report Summary Pamphlet, Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2010-01-01

    Sandia collects environmental data to determine and report the impact of existing SNL/NM operations on the environment. Sandia’s environmental programs include air and water quality, environmental monitoring and surveillance, and activities associated with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). Sandia’s objective is to maintain compliance with federal, state, and local requirements, and to affect the corporate culture so that environmental compliance practices continue to be an integral part of operations.

  7. A report on IPv6 deployment activities and issues at Sandia National Laboratories:FY2007.

    SciTech Connect

    Tolendino, Lawrence F.; Eldridge, John M.; Hu, Tan Chang; Maestas, Joseph H.

    2007-06-01

    Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4) has been a mainstay of the both the Internet and corporate networks for delivering network packets to the desired destination. However, rapid proliferation of network appliances, evolution of corporate networks, and the expanding Internet has begun to stress the limitations of the protocol. Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) is the replacement protocol that overcomes the constraints of IPv4. As the emerging Internet network protocol, SNL needs to prepare for its eventual deployment in international, national, customer, and local networks. Additionally, the United States Office of Management and Budget has mandated that IPv6 deployment in government network backbones occurs by 2008. This paper explores the readiness of the Sandia National Laboratories network backbone to support IPv6, the issues that must be addressed before a deployment begins, and recommends the next steps to take to comply with government mandates. The paper describes a joint work effort of the Sandia National Laboratories ASC WAN project team and members of the System Analysis & Trouble Resolution, the Communication & Network Systems, and Network System Design & Implementation Departments.

  8. Mixed waste landfill corrective measures study final report Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect

    Peace, Gerald (Jerry) L.; Goering, Timothy James (GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM)

    2004-03-01

    The Mixed Waste Landfill occupies 2.6 acres in the north-central portion of Technical Area 3 at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. The landfill accepted low-level radioactive and mixed waste from March 1959 to December 1988. This report represents the Corrective Measures Study that has been conducted for the Mixed Waste Landfill. The purpose of the study was to identify, develop, and evaluate corrective measures alternatives and recommend the corrective measure(s) to be taken at the site. Based upon detailed evaluation and risk assessment using guidance provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the New Mexico Environment Department, the U.S. Department of Energy and Sandia National Laboratories recommend that a vegetative soil cover be deployed as the preferred corrective measure for the Mixed Waste Landfill. The cover would be of sufficient thickness to store precipitation, minimize infiltration and deep percolation, support a healthy vegetative community, and perform with minimal maintenance by emulating the natural analogue ecosystem. There would be no intrusive remedial activities at the site and therefore no potential for exposure to the waste. This alternative poses minimal risk to site workers implementing institutional controls associated with long-term environmental monitoring as well as routine maintenance and surveillance of the site.

  9. Isotope production potential at Sandia National Laboratories: Product, waste, packaging, and transportation

    SciTech Connect

    Trennel, A.J.

    1995-12-31

    The U.S. Congress directed the U.S. Department of Energy to establish a domestic source of molybdenum-99, an essential isotope used in nuclear medicine and radiopharmacology. An Environmental Impact Statement for production of {sup 99}Mo at one of four candidate sites is being prepared. As one of the candidate sites, Sandia National Laboratories is developing the Isotope Production Project. Using federally approved processes and procedures now owned by the U.S. Department of Energy, and existing facilities that would be modified to meet the production requirements, the Sandia National Laboratories` Isotope Project would manufacture up to 30 percent of the U.S. market, with the capacity to meet 100 percent of the domestic need if necessary. This paper provides a brief overview of the facility, equipment, and processes required to produce isotopes. Packaging and transportation issues affecting both product and waste are addressed, and the storage and disposal of the four low-level radioactive waste types generated by the production program are considered. Recommendations for future development are provided.

  10. Sandia National Laboratories site-wide hydrogeologic characterization project calendar year 1992 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Crowson, D.; Gibson, J.D.; Haase, C.S.; Holt, R.; Hyndman, D.; Krumhansl, J.; Lauffer, F.; McCord, J.P.; McCord, J.T.; Neel, D. [and others

    1993-10-01

    The Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) Site-Wide Hydrogeologic Characterization (SWHC) project has been implemented as part of the SNL/NM Environmental Restoration (ER) Program to develop the regional hydrogeologic framework and baseline for the approximately 100 mi of Kirtland Air Force Base (KAFB) and adjacent withdrawn public lands upon which SNL/NM has performed research and development activities. Additionally, the SWHC project will investigate and characterize generic hydrogeologic issues associated with the 172 ER sites owned by SNL/NM across its facilities on KAFB. As called for in the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B permit agreement between the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as the permitter and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and SNL/NM as the permittees, an annual report is to be prepared by the SWHC project team. This document serves two primary purposes: (1) to identify and describe the conceptual framework for the hydrogeologic system underlying SNL/NM and (2) to describe characterization activities undertaken in the preceding year that add to our understanding (reduce our uncertainties) regarding the conceptual and quantitative hydrogeologic framework. This SWHC project annual report focuses primarily on purpose 1, providing a summary description of the current {open_quotes}state of knowledge{close_quotes} of the Sandia National Laboratories/Kirtland Air Force Base (SNL/KAFB) hydrogeologic setting.

  11. Treatment of Mercury Contaminated Oil from Sandia National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Klasson, KT

    2002-05-28

    First Article Tests of a stabilization method for greater than 260 mg mercury/kg oil were performed under a treatability study. This alternative treatment technology will address treatment of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) organics (mainly used pump oil) contaminated with mercury and other heavy metals. Some of the oil is also co-contaminated with tritium, other radionuclides, and hazardous materials. The technology is based on contacting the oil with a sorbent powder (Self-Assembled Mercaptan on Mesoporous Support, SAMMS), proven to adsorb heavy metals, followed by stabilization of the oil/powder mixture using a stabilization agent (Nochar N990). Two variations of the treatment technology were included in the treatability study. The SAMMS (Self-Assembled Mercaptan on Mesoporous Silica) technology was developed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for removal and stabilization of RCRA metals (i.e., lead, mercury, cadmium, silver, etc.) and for removal of mercury from organic solvents [1]. The SAMMS material is based on self-assembly of functionalized monolayers on mesoporous oxide surfaces. The unique mesoporous oxide supports provide a high surface area, thereby enhancing the metal-loading capacity. SAMMS material has high flexibility in that it binds with different forms of mercury, including metallic, inorganic, organic, charged, and neutral compounds [1] The material removes mercury from both organic wastes, such as pump oils, and from aqueous wastes. Mercury-loaded SAMMS not only passes TCLP tests, but also has good long-term durability as a waste form because: (1) the covalent binding between mercury and SAMMS has good resistance in ion-exchange, oxidation, and hydrolysis over a wide pH range and (2) the uniform and small pore size of the mesoporous silica prevents bacteria from solubilizing the bound mercury. Nochar's N990 Petrobond (Nochar, Inc., Indianapolis, IN) is an oil stabilization agent, specifically formulated for stabilizing vacuum pump oil, which has fewer volatile organics than many other oils. This material is a non-uniform granular powder that resembles ground Styrofoam plastics. This material has previously been used by itself and in combination with SAMMS to stabilize oil containing low levels of mercury {approx}50 mg/kg in surrogate waste studies [2].

  12. Sandia National Laboratories support of the Iraq Nuclear Facility Dismantlement and Disposal Program.

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, John Russell; Danneels, Jeffrey John

    2009-03-01

    Because of past military operations, lack of upkeep and looting there are now enormous radioactive waste problems in Iraq. These waste problems include destroyed nuclear facilities, uncharacterized radioactive wastes, liquid radioactive waste in underground tanks, wastes related to the production of yellow cake, sealed radioactive sources, activated metals and contaminated metals that must be constantly guarded. Iraq currently lacks the trained personnel, regulatory and physical infrastructure to safely and securely manage these facilities and wastes. In 2005 the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) agreed to organize an international cooperative program to assist Iraq with these issues. Soon after, the Iraq Nuclear Facility Dismantlement and Disposal Program (the NDs Program) was initiated by the U.S. Department of State (DOS) to support the IAEA and assist the Government of Iraq (GOI) in eliminating the threats from poorly controlled radioactive materials. The Iraq NDs Program is providing support for the IAEA plus training, consultation and limited equipment to the GOI. The GOI owns the problems and will be responsible for implementation of the Iraq NDs Program. Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) is a part of the DOS's team implementing the Iraq NDs Program. This report documents Sandia's support of the Iraq NDs Program, which has developed into three principal work streams: (1) training and technical consultation; (2) introducing Iraqis to modern decommissioning and waste management practices; and (3) supporting the IAEA, as they assist the GOI. Examples of each of these work streams include: (1) presentation of a three-day training workshop on 'Practical Concepts for Safe Disposal of Low-Level Radioactive Waste in Arid Settings;' (2) leading GOI representatives on a tour of two operating low level radioactive waste disposal facilities in the U.S.; and (3) supporting the IAEA's Technical Meeting with the GOI from April 21-25, 2008. As noted in the report, there was significant teaming between the various participants to best help the GOI. On-the-ground progress is the focus of the Iraq NDs Program and much of the work is a transfer of technical and practical skills and knowledge that Sandia uses day-to-day. On-the-ground progress was achieved in July of 2008 when the GOI began the physical cleanup and dismantlement of the Active Metallurgical Testing Laboratory (LAMA) facility at Al Tuwaitha, near Baghdad.

  13. Current radar-responsive tag development activities at Sandia National Laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ormesher, Richard C.; Plummer, Kenneth W.; Wells, Lars M.

    2004-08-01

    Over the past ten years, Sandia has developed RF radar responsive tag systems and supporting technologies for various government agencies and industry partners. RF tags can function as RF transmitters or radar transponders that enable tagging, tracking, and location determination functions. Expertise in tag architecture, microwave and radar design, signal analysis and processing techniques, digital design, modeling and simulation, and testing have been directly applicable to these tag programs. In general, the radar responsive tag designs have emphasized low power, small package size, and the ability to be detected by the radar at long ranges. Recently, there has been an interest in using radar responsive tags for Blue Force tracking and Combat ID (CID). The main reason for this interest is to allow airborne surveillance radars to easily distinguish U.S. assets from those of opposing forces. A Blue Force tracking capability would add materially to situational awareness. Combat ID is also an issue, as evidenced by the fact that approximately one-quarter of all U.S. casualties in the Gulf War took the form of ground troops killed by friendly fire. Because the evolution of warfare in the intervening decade has made asymmetric warfare the norm rather than the exception, swarming engagements in which U.S. forces will be freely intermixed with opposing forces is a situation that must be anticipated. Increasing utilization of precision munitions can be expected to drive fires progressively closer to engaged allied troops at times when visual de-confliction is not an option. In view of these trends, it becomes increasingly important that U.S. ground forces have a widely proliferated all-weather radar responsive tag that communicates to all-weather surveillance. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the recent, current, and future radar responsive research and development activities at Sandia National Laboratories that support both the Blue Force Tracking and Combat ID application. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company for the United States Departments of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  14. PATRAM '92: 10th international symposium on the packaging and transportation of radioactive materials [Papers presented by Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1992-01-01

    This document provides the papers presented by Sandia Laboratories at PATRAM '92, the tenth International symposium on the Packaging and Transportation of Radioactive Materials held September 13--18, 1992 in Yokohama City, Japan. Individual papers have been cataloged separately. (FL)

  15. Environmental assessment for Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico offsite transportation of low-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) is managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company. SNL/NM is located on land owned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) within the boundaries of the Kirtland Air Force Base (KAFB) in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The major responsibilities of SNL/NM are the support of national security and energy projects. Low-level radioactive waste (LLW) is generated by some of the activities performed at SNL/NM in support of the DOE. This report describes potential environmental effects of the shipments of low-level radioactive wastes to other sites.

  16. Sandia MEMS

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This fun site about MicroElectroMechanical systems (MEMS) is maintained at Sandia National Laboratories. Visitors who don't want to get bogged down with technical aspects of these microscopic machines can browse the image and movie galleries, which show what MEMS look like and how they operate. There is even a live video feed of a microengine system running at Sandia. To learn more about what is involved in MEMS production and operation, the Technical Information section has an informative overview, descriptions of three developing technologies, and examples of prototype systems. The facilities used by Sandia researchers are also described in a virtual tour.

  17. Survey of subsurface treatment technologies for environmental restoration sites at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect

    McGrath, Lucas K.; Ho, Clifford Kuofei; Wright, Jerome L.

    2003-08-01

    This report provides a survey of remediation and treatment technologies for contaminants of concern at environmental restoration (ER) sites at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico. The sites that were evaluated include the Tijeras Arroyo Groundwater, Technical Area V, and Canyons sites. The primary contaminants of concern at these sites include trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene (PCE), and nitrate in groundwater. Due to the low contaminant concentrations (close to regulatory limits) and significant depths to groundwater ({approx}500 feet) at these sites, few in-situ remediation technologies are applicable. The most applicable treatment technologies include monitored natural attenuation and enhanced bioremediation/denitrification to reduce the concentrations of TCE, PCE, and nitrate in the groundwater. Stripping technologies to remove chlorinated solvents and other volatile organic compounds from the vadose zone can also be implemented, if needed.

  18. Multi-robots to micro-surgery: Selected robotic applications at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, P.C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center

    1996-11-01

    The Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center (ISRC) at Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program organization, pursuing research, development and applications in a wide range of field. Activities range from large-scale applications such as nuclear facility dismantlement for the US Department of Energy (DOE), to aircraft inspection and refurbishment, to automated script and program generation for robotic manufacturing and assembly, to miniature robotic devices and sensors for remote sensing and micro-surgery. This paper describes six activities in the large and small scale that are underway and either nearing technology transfer stage or seeking industrial partners to continue application development. The topics of the applications include multiple arm coordination for intuitively maneuvering large, ungainly work pieces; simulation, analysis and graphical training capability for CP-5 research reactor dismantlement; miniature robots with volumes of 16 cubic centimeters and less developed for inspection and sensor deployment; and biomedical sensors to enhance automated prosthetic device production and fill laparoscopic surgery information gap.

  19. Verification testing of the PKI collector at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Hauger, J.S.; Pond, S.L.

    1982-07-01

    Verification testing of a solar collector was undertaken prior to its operation as part of an industrial process heat plant at Capitol Concrete Products in Topeka, Kansas. Testing was performed at a control plant installed at Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque, New Mexico (SNLA). Early results show that plant performance is even better than anticipated and far in excess of test criteria. Overall plant efficiencies of 65 to 80 percent were typical during hours of good insolation. A number of flaws and imperfections were detected during operability testing, the most important being a problem in elevation drive alignment due to a manufacturing error. All problems were corrected as they occurred and the plant, with over 40 hours of operation, is currently continuing operability testing in a wholly-automatic mode. R.J.F

  20. Verification testing of the PKI collector at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauger, J. S.; Pond, S. L.

    1982-07-01

    Verification testing of a solar collector was undertaken prior to its operation as part of an industrial process heat plant at Capitol Concrete Products in Topeka, Kansas. Testing was performed at a control plant installed at Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque, New Mexico (SNLA). Early results show that plant performance is even better than anticipated and far in excess of test criteria. Overall plant efficiencies of 65 to 80 percent were typical during hours of good insolation. A number of flaws and imperfections were detected during operability testing, the most important being a problem in elevation drive alignment due to a manufacturing error. All problems were corrected as they occurred and the plant, with over 40 hours of operation, is currently continuing operability testing in a wholly-automatic mode.

  1. Verification testing of the PKI collector at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauger, J. S.; Pond, S. L.

    1982-01-01

    Verification testing of a solar collector was undertaken prior to its operation as part of an industrial process heat plant at Capitol Concrete Products in Topeka, Kansas. Testing was performed at a control plant installed at Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque, New Mexico (SNLA). Early results show that plant performance is even better than anticipated and far in excess of test criteria. Overall plant efficiencies of 65 to 80 percent were typical during hours of good insolation. A number of flaws and imperfections were detected during operability testing, the most important being a problem in elevation drive alignment due to a manufacturing error. All problems were corrected as they occurred and the plant, with over 40 hours of operation, is currently continuing operability testing in a wholly-automatic mode.

  2. Characterization of septic and drain system releases at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, M.R.; Galloway, R.B. [CDM Federal Programs Corp. (United States)]|[Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) is located in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The SNL/NM Environmental Restoration (ER) Project is tasked with performing the assessment and remediation of environmental releases resulting from the almost 50 years of engineering development and testing activities. Operable Unit 1295, Septic Tanks and Drainfields, includes inactive septic and drain systems at 23 separate ER sites that were listed as Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) in the SNL/NM Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) Module Permit. These sites were identified, based on process histories and interviews with facility personnel, as the subset of all SNL/NM septic and drain systems that had the highest potential for releases of hazardous and radioactive wastes into the environment. An additional 101 septic and drain systems not currently classified as SWMUs also have been identified as needing future characterization.

  3. Effect of material aging on parachute pack life: a synopsis of Sandia National Laboratories studies

    SciTech Connect

    Auerbach, I.; Mead, J.W.; Mead, K.E.; Ericksen, R.H.; Burns, F.B.; Renschler, C.L.

    1984-01-01

    A systematic study of the effects of environmental factors on nylon 66 and Kevlar 29 strength degradation in parachute components is being conducted at Sandia National Laboratories. It includes: (1) accelerated aging studies in air, inert environments, humidity, ozone, and smog; (2) a 25-year surveillance program of parachutes in a variety of natural climatic environments; (3) moisture absorption as a function of humidity; (4) effects of surface coatings normally applied to parachutes; and (5) development of nondestructive evaluation techniques which can be used to map mechanical properties over the entire parachute surface. The accelerated aging and moisture absorption studies show that air, humidity, and smog contribute to degradation. Chemiluminescence, gas chromatographic pyrograms, and uv spectroscopy show promise as nondestructive evaluation techniques.

  4. Radiation Symmetry in Sandia Z Accelerator Dynamic Hohlraums

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. R. Bennett; J. E. Bailey; G. A. Chandler; M. E. Cuneo; D. E. Hebron; J. S. Lash; J. L. Porter; D. G. Schroen-Carey; S. A. Slutz; R. A. Vesey

    2000-01-01

    Although the dynamic hohlraum has achieved the highest radiation temperatures generated by any z-pinch configuration, a number of critical issues remain before the high-yield ICF concept of an internally-located capsule can be considered credible. Of particular importance to the imploding capsule, embedded in foam, is the thermal radiation asymmetry in the hohlraum r-z plane, arising from the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) unstable

  5. Simulation information regarding Sandia National Laboratories%3CU%2B2019%3E trinity capability improvement metric.

    SciTech Connect

    Agelastos, Anthony Michael; Lin, Paul T.

    2013-10-01

    Sandia National Laboratories, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory each selected a representative simulation code to be used as a performance benchmark for the Trinity Capability Improvement Metric. Sandia selected SIERRA Low Mach Module: Nalu, which is a uid dynamics code that solves many variable-density, acoustically incompressible problems of interest spanning from laminar to turbulent ow regimes, since it is fairly representative of implicit codes that have been developed under ASC. The simulations for this metric were performed on the Cielo Cray XE6 platform during dedicated application time and the chosen case utilized 131,072 Cielo cores to perform a canonical turbulent open jet simulation within an approximately 9-billion-elementunstructured- hexahedral computational mesh. This report will document some of the results from these simulations as well as provide instructions to perform these simulations for comparison.

  6. Engineering Manhattan style: Sandia Laboratories as an example of postwar engineering

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    A great deal has been written about the history of science in America since World War II. Much of that work has explored the government`s research and development establishment, focusing on the scientific community immediately after the war. It is generally argued that the apparent triumphs of the huge and expensive wartime research and development projects gave rise to a belief that scientific resources should be nurtured and kept on hand - ready to provide service in an emergency. The Cold War drive for more and better weapons further fed this belief, leading to a massive system of national laboratories, military laboratories, and defense industries. The science of this complex is built on extensive financial support, the central strategy of which is that by steadily, and occasionally even lavishly funding large research programs, you will have a constant stream of scientific ideas that can be applied to national security purposes. What is true of science, is also true, in slightly modified form, of postwar engineering. The story I want to tell you today is, I think, an example of the way Cold War engineering r&d for national security worked. This report describes aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories.

  7. S a n d i a N a t i o n a l L a b o r a t o r i e s Overview of Fusion at Sandia National Laboratories

    E-print Network

    laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States DepartmentS a n d i a N a t i o n a l L a b o r a t o r i e s Overview of Fusion at Sandia National colleagues Fusion Power Associates Annual Meeting and Symposium December 2, 2009 Sandia is a multiprogram

  8. ``We crash, burn, and crush``: A history of packaging at Sandia National Laboratories, 1978--1997

    SciTech Connect

    Mora, C.J.; McConnell, P.

    1997-11-01

    Even prior to the beginning of the nuclear age, the packaging and transportation of nuclear materials was a prime national concern. Nuclear materials such as uranium and plutonium had to be transported safely (and secretly) to the Manhattan Engineer District Laboratory in Los Alamos, New Mexico. The subsequent post war use of nuclear power for the generation of electricity and accelerated weapons development programs resulted in radioactive waste byproducts, such as spent fuel and plutonium, that were stored on site at utilities and federal weapons sites. While projected repositories for long term storage of radioactive waste are being planned, both low and high level radioactive materials on occasion must be moved safely. Movement to interim storage and, for low level waste, repository sites, is accomplished by a combination of truck, rail, ship, and air. The US Department of Energy (DOE) directs transportation activities including cask development technology for use in single or multimodal (a combination of land, water, and air) transport. In 1978, Sandia National Laboratories was selected as the lead contractor for basic transportation technology. This report is divided into the following topics: (1) early research and development (1936--1978); (2) radioactive material package test (1975--1977); (3) the SNL Transportation Technology Center; (4) TRUPACT-II; (5) beneficial uses of shipping system casks; (6) C-141B drop tests; (7) MIDAS; (8) MOSAIK; (9) SEARAM; (10) PATRAM; and (11) a chronology of transportation activities.

  9. Progress toward inertial fusion with light ion beams at Sandia National Laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandevender, J. P.; Bailey, J. E.; Bieg, K. W.; Cook, D. L.; Crow, J. T.; Desjarlais, M. P.; Gerber, R. A.; Goldstein, S. A.; Hamil, R. A.; Holman, G. T.

    1988-09-01

    Inertial Confinement Fusion driven by lithium ion beams is being pursued on the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator 2 at Sandia National Laboratories. Reliably synchronizing the 36 pulsed power modules has allowed the experiments on ion beam production and focusing to progress at the rate of one test per day. The accelerator has been operated at reduced energy to reproduce and extend the data base from previous accelerators. In this mode, 500 kJ are coupled to the diode, 425 kJ to the ion beam, 220 kJ to a single species, but only 75 kJ to the target. Solenoidal lens bending and diode impedance collapse from magnetic field diffusion into the anode plasma explain the inefficiency. The horizontal beam divergence needed for ignition (20 mrads) has been achieved. The divergence is smallest with small gaps between the anode and the virtual cathode. A 10 percent full width at half maximum variation in the instantaneous ion beam energy is recorded. The results are consistent with an electromagnetic instability, although other explanations are possible. The data and associated theory indicate that very high current density diode operation is desirable for efficient beam generation and focusing. The light ion approach to a Laboratory Microfusion Facility that will produce a range of thermonuclear yields from 200 to 1000 MJ is based on the magnetically insulated linear induction accelerator concept recently tested in Hermes 3.

  10. Process Knowledge Characterization of Radioactive Waste at the Classified Waste Landfill Remediation Project Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    Microsoft Academic Search

    PATRICK WELLS DOTSON; ROBERT B. GALLOWAY; CARL EDWARD JOHNSON JR

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses the development and application of process knowledge (PK) to the characterization of radioactive wastes generated during the excavation of buried materials at the Sandia National Laboratories\\/New Mexico (SNL\\/NM) Classified Waste Landfill (CWLF). The CWLF, located in SNL\\/NM Technical Area II, is a 1.5-acre site that received nuclear weapon components and related materials from about 1950 through 1987.

  11. RADCAL Operations Manual Radiation Calibration Laboratory Protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Bogard, J.S.

    1998-12-01

    The Life Sciences Division (LSD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has a long record of radiation dosimetry research, primarily using the Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR) and the Radiation Calibration Laboratory (RADCAL) in its Dosimetry Applications Research (DOSAR) Program. These facilities have been used by a broad segment of the research community to perform a variety of experiments in areas including, but not limited to, radiobiology, radiation dosimeter and instrumentation development and calibration, and the testing of materials in a variety of radiation environments. Operations of the HPRR were terminated in 1987 and the reactor was moved to storage at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant; however, RADCAL will continue to be operated in accordance with the guidelines of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Secondary Calibration Laboratory program and will meet all requirements for testing dosimeters under the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP). This manual is to serve as the primary instruction and operation manual for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's RADCAL facility. Its purpose is to (1) provide operating protocols for the RADCAL facility, (2) outline the organizational structure, (3) define the Quality Assurance Action Plan, and (4) describe all the procedures, operations, and responsibilities for the safe and proper operation of all routine aspects of the calibration facility.

  12. Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Facilities and Safety Information Document [NOTE: Volume I, Chapters 2 through 5

    SciTech Connect

    March, F.; Guerrero, J.V.; Johns, W.H.; Schetnan, R.; Bayliss, L.S.; Kuzio, K.A.; White, B.B.

    1999-09-01

    The Facilities Business Unit, which includes the Operations and Engineering Center (7800) and the Facilities Management Center (7900), coordinates decisions about the management of facilities, infrastructure, and sites. These decisions include the following: New construction, including siting; Rehabilitation, and renovation; Relocation; Mothballing; Decontamination and decommissioning; and Demolition. Decisions on these matters flow from a corporate decision process in which SNL directors and vice presidents identify the facility and infrastructure requirements for carrying out work for DOE and other customers. DOE and any non-DOE owners of real estate that is leased or permitted to DOE for SNL/NM use must concur with this identification of requirements. Decision-making follows procedures required by DOE and requirements defined by SNL/NM program executives. See Sandia National Laboratories (1997e), Part II, ''Desired Future State and Strategy,'' and appendices to Sandia National Laboratories (1997e) for more information about planning and decision processes. Decisions on siting take surrounding land uses into account and draw on environmental baseline information maintained at SNL/NM. For environmental baseline and land use information, see Sandia National Laboratories (1999).

  13. Radiative shocks: New results for laboratory astrophysics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Vinci; M. Koenig; A. Benuzzi-Mounaix; N. Ozaki; A. Ravasio; L. Boireau; C. Michaut; S. Bouquet; S. Atzeni; A. Schiavi; O. Peyrusse

    2006-01-01

    In the framework of the Laboratory Astrophysics, we present new radiative shocks experiments performed using the LULI2000 facility. A strong shock is driven in a multi-layered solid target (CH-Ti-CH) which accelerates into a gas cell (˜ 60 km\\/s) filled with Xenon at low pressure (0.1 - 0.3 bar) and produces a radiative supercritical shock [4, 8]. A low power laser

  14. The Los Alamos, Sandia, and Livermore Laboratories: Integration and collaboration solving science and technology problems for the nation

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1994-12-01

    More than 40 years ago, three laboratories were established to take on scientific responsibility for the nation`s nuclear weapons - Los Alamos, Sandia, and Livermore. This triad of laboratories has provided the state-of-the-art science and technology to create America`s nuclear deterrent and to ensure that the weapons are safe, secure, and to ensure that the weapons are safe, secure, and reliable. These national security laboratories carried out their responsibilities through intense efforts involving almost every field of science, engineering, and technology. Today, they are recognized as three of the world`s premier research and development laboratories. This report sketches the history of the laboratories and their evolution to an integrated three-laboratory system. The characteristics that make them unique are described and some of the major contributions they have made over the years are highlighted.

  15. Standard testing procedures for optical fiber and unshielded twisted pair at Sandia National Laboratories. Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, R.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Communications Dept.

    1994-09-01

    This revision updates Sandia`s working standard for testing optical fiber and unshielded twisted pair cables included in the Lab-wide telecommunications cabling infrastructure. The purpose of these standard testing procedures is to deliver to all Sandians a reliable, low-maintenance, state-of-the-art, ubiquitous telecommunications cabling infrastructure capable of satisfying all current and future telecommunication needs.

  16. Designing for explosive safety'': The Explosive Components Facility at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Couch, W.A.

    1990-12-01

    The Explosive Components Facility (ECF) is to be a new major facility in the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Weapons Program. The ECF is a self-contained, secure site on SNL property and is surrounded by Kirtland Air Force Base which is located 6-1/2 miles east of downtown Albuquerque, New Mexico. The ECF will be dedicated to research, development, and testing of detonators, neutron generators, batteries, explosives, and other weapon components. It will have capabilities for conducting explosive test fires, gas gun testing, physical analyses, chemical analyses, electrical testing and ancillary explosive storage in magazines. The ECF complex is composed of a building covering an area of approximately 91,000 square feet, six exterior explosive service magazines and a remote test cell. Approximately 50% of the building space will be devoted to highly specialized laboratory and test areas, the other 50% of the building is considered nonhazardous. Critical to the laboratory and test areas are the blast-structural design consideration and operational considerations, particularly those concerning personnel access control, safety and environmental protection. This area will be decoupled from the rest of the building to the extent that routine tests will not be heard or felt in the administrative area of the building. While the ECF is designed in accordance with the DOE Explosives Safety Manual to mitigate any off-site blast effects, potential injuries or death to the ECF staff may result from an accidental detonation of explosive material within the facility. Therefore, reducing the risk of exposing operation personnel to hazardous and energetic material is paramount in the design of the ECF.

  17. Nuclear Facilities and Applied Technologies at Sandia

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, Dave; Kaiser, Krista; Martin, Lonnie; Hanson, Don; Harms, Gary; Quirk, Tom

    2014-11-28

    The Nuclear Facilities and Applied Technologies organization at Sandia National Laboratories’ Technical Area Five (TA-V) is the leader in advancing nuclear technologies through applied radiation science and unique nuclear environments. This video describes the organization’s capabilities, facilities, and culture.

  18. Environmental assessment for the Radioactive and Mixed Waste Management Facility: Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-0466) under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 for the proposed completion of construction and subsequent operation of a central Radioactive and Mixed Waste Management Facility (RMWMF), in the southeastern portion of Technical Area III at Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque (SNLA). The RMWMF is designed to receive, store, characterize, conduct limited bench-scale treatment of, repackage, and certify low-level waste (LLW) and mixed waste (MW) (as necessary) for shipment to an offsite disposal or treatment facility. The RMWMF was partially constructed in 1989. Due to changing regulatory requirements, planned facility upgrades would be undertaken as part of the proposed action. These upgrades would include paving of road surfaces and work areas, installation of pumping equipment and lines for surface impoundment, and design and construction of air locks and truck decontamination and water treatment systems. The proposed action also includes an adjacent corrosive and reactive metals storage area, and associated roads and paving. LLW and MW generated at SNLA would be transported from the technical areas to the RMWMF in containers approved by the Department of Transportation. The RMWMF would not handle nonradioactive hazardous waste. Based on the analysis in the EA, the proposed completion of construction and operation of the RMWMF does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA. Therefore, preparation of an environmental impact statement for the proposed action is not required.

  19. Food and Drug Administration process validation activities to support 99Mo production at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, M.J.; Bourcier, S.C.; Talley, D.G.

    1997-07-01

    Prior to 1989 {sup 99}Mo was produced in the US by a single supplier, Cintichem Inc., Tuxedo, NY. Because of problems associated with operating its facility, in 1989 Cintichem elected to decommission the facility rather than incur the costs for repair. The demise of the {sup 99}Mo capability at Cintichem left the US totally reliant upon a single foreign source, Nordion International, located in Ottawa Canada. In 1992 the DOE purchased the Cintichem {sup 99}Mo Production Process and Drug Master File (DMF). In 1994 the DOE funded Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to produce {sup 99}Mo. Although Cintichem produced {sup 99}Mo and {sup 99m}Tc generators for many years, there was no requirement for process validation which is now required by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). In addition to the validation requirement, the requirements for current Good manufacturing Practices were codified into law. The purpose of this paper is to describe the process validation being conducted at SNL for the qualification of SNL as a supplier of {sup 99}Mo to US pharmaceutical companies.

  20. 1998 Annual Site Environmental Report Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, D.K.; Fink, C.H.; Sanchez, R.V.

    1999-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) is operated in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) mission to provide weapon component technology and hardware for national security needs. SNL/NM also conducts fundamental research and development to advance technology in energy research, computer science, waste management, microelectronics, materials science, and transportation safety for hazardous and nuclear components. In support of SNL's mission, the Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Center and the Environmental Restoration (ER) Project at SNL/NM have established extensive environmental programs to assist SNL's line organizations in meeting all applicable local, State, and Federal environmental regulations and DOE requirements. This annual report for calendar year 1998 (CY98) summarizes the compliance status of environmental regulations applicable to SNL site operations. Environmental program activities include terrestrial surveillance; ambient air and meteorological monitoring hazardous, radioactive, and solid waste management; pollution prevention and waste minimization; environmental remediation; oil and chemical spill prevention; and National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) activities. This report has been prepared in compliance with DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program (DOE 1990).

  1. Air quality investigations of the Sandia National Laboratories Sol se Mete Aerial Cable Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Gutman, W.M.; Silver, R.J. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States). Physical Science Lab.

    1994-12-01

    The air quality implications of the test and evaluation activities at the Sandia National Laboratories Sol se Mete Aerial Cable Facility are examined. All facets of the activity that affect air quality are considered. Air contaminants produced directly include exhaust products of rocket motors used to accelerate test articles, dust and gas from chemical explosives, and exhaust gases from electricity generators in the test arenas. Air contaminants produced indirectly include fugitive dust and exhaust contaminants from vehicles used to transport personnel and material to the test area, and effluents produced by equipment used to heat the project buildings. Both the ongoing program and the proposed changes in the program are considered. Using a reliable estimate of th maximum annual testing level, the quantities of contaminants released by project activities ar computed either from known characteristics of test items or from EPA-approved emission factors Atmospheric concentrations of air contaminants are predicted using EPA dispersion models. The predicted quantities and concentrations are evaluated in relation to Federal, New Mexico, an Bernalillo County air quality regulations and the human health and safety standards of the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists.

  2. Sandia National Laboratories, California Quality Assurance Project Plan for Environmental Monitoring Program.

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, Robert C.

    2005-09-01

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) applies to the Environmental Monitoring Program at the Sandia National Laboratories/California. This QAPP follows DOE Quality Assurance Management System Guide for Use with 10 CFR 830 Subpart A, Quality Assurance Requirements, and DOE O 414.1C, Quality Assurance (DOE G 414.1-2A June 17, 2005). The Environmental Monitoring Program is located within the Environmental Operations Department. The Environmental Operations Department is responsible for ensuring that SNL/CA operations have minimal impact on the environment. The Department provides guidance to line organizations to help them comply with applicable environmental regulations and DOE orders. To fulfill its mission, the department has groups responsible for waste management; pollution prevention, air quality; environmental planning; hazardous materials management; and environmental monitoring. The Environmental Monitoring Program is responsible for ensuring that SNL/CA complies with all Federal, State, and local regulations and with DOE orders regarding the quality of wastewater and stormwater discharges. The Program monitors these discharges both visually and through effluent sampling. The Program ensures that activities at the SNL/CA site do not negatively impact the quality of surface waters in the vicinity, or those of the San Francisco Bay. The Program verifies that wastewater and stormwater discharges are in compliance with established standards and requirements. The Program is also responsible for compliance with groundwater monitoring, and underground and above ground storage tanks regulatory compliance. The Program prepares numerous reports, plans, permit applications, and other documents that demonstrate compliance.

  3. An operational waste minimization chargeback system at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Horak, K. [Creative Computer Services, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Peek, D.W. [Ogden Environmental and Energy Services, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Stermer, D.; Dailleboust, L.; Reilly, H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-05-01

    Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, (SNL/NM) has made a commitment to achieve significant reductions in the amount of hazardous wastes generated throughout its operations. The success of the SNL/NM Waste Minimization/Pollution Prevention Program depends primarily on: (1) adequate program funding, and (2) comprehensive collection and dissemination of information pertaining to SNL/NM`s waste. This paper describes the chargeback system that SNL/NM has chosen for funding the implementation of the Waste Minimization/Pollution Prevention program, as well as the waste reporting system that follows naturally from the chargeback system. Both the chargeback and reporting systems have been fully implemented. The details of implementation are discussed, including: the physical means by which waste is managed and data collected; the database systems which have been linked; the flow of data through both human hands and electronic systems; the quality assurance of that data; and the waste report format now in use. Also discussed are intended improvements in the system that are currently planned for the coming years.

  4. Robotic Lunar Rover Technologies and SEI Supporting Technologies at Sandia National Laboratories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klarer, Paul R.

    1992-01-01

    Existing robotic rover technologies at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) can be applied toward the realization of a robotic lunar rover mission in the near term. Recent activities at the SNL-RVR have demonstrated the utility of existing rover technologies for performing remote field geology tasks similar to those envisioned on a robotic lunar rover mission. Specific technologies demonstrated include low-data-rate teleoperation, multivehicle control, remote site and sample inspection, standard bandwidth stereo vision, and autonomous path following based on both internal dead reckoning and an external position location update system. These activities serve to support the use of robotic rovers for an early return to the lunar surface by demonstrating capabilities that are attainable with off-the-shelf technology and existing control techniques. The breadth of technical activities at SNL provides many supporting technology areas for robotic rover development. These range from core competency areas and microsensor fabrication facilities, to actual space qualification of flight components that are designed and fabricated in-house.

  5. Overview of the joint US/Russia surety program in the Sandia National Laboratories Cooperative Measures Program

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Vorontsova, O.S. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center Inst. of Experimental Physics, Sarov (Russian Federation); Blinov, I.M. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center Inst. of Technical Physics, Snezhinsk (Russian Federation)

    1998-02-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has initiated many joint research and development projects with the two premier Russian nuclear laboratories, VNIIEF and VNIITF, (historically known as Arzamas-16 and Chelyabinsk-70) in a wide spectrum of areas. One of the areas in which critical dialogue and technical exchange is continuing to take place is in the realm of system surety. Activities primarily include either safety or security methodology development, processes, accident environment analyses and testing, accident data-bases, assessments, and product design. Furthermore, a continuing dialog has been established between the organizations with regard to developing a better understanding of how risk is perceived and analyzed in Russia versus that in the US. The result of such efforts could reduce the risk of systems to incur accidents or incidents resulting in high consequences to the public. The purpose of this paper is to provide a current overview of the Sandia surety program and its various initiatives with the Russian institutes, with an emphasis on the program scope and rationale. The historical scope of projects will be indicated. A few specific projects will be discussed, along with results to date. The extension of the joint surety initiatives to other government and industry organizations will be described. This will include the current status of a joint Sandia/VNIIEF initiative to establish an International Surety Center for Energy Intensive and High Consequence Systems and Infrastructures.

  6. Initial evaluation of Sandia National Laboratory-prepared crystalline silico-titanates for cesium recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, L.A.; Carson, K.J.; Elovich, R.J.

    1993-10-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory initiated a study of a new class of inorganic ion exchange materials that selectively extracts cesium (Cs), strontium (Sr), and plutonium (Pu) from alkaline radioactive waste solutions. These materials, identified as crystalline silico-titanates (CST), were developed by scientists at the Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) and Texas A&M. This report summarizes preliminary results for the measurement of batch distribution coefficient (K{sub d}) values for the powdered CST materials compared to previously tested ion exchange materials: IONSIV IE-96 (a zeolite produced by UOP), CS-100 (an organic resin produced by Rohm and Haas), and BIB-DJ (a new resorcinol-formaldehyde organic resin produced by Boulder Scientific). Excellent results were obtained for CST inorganic exchangers that could be significant in the development of processes for the near-term pretreatment of Hanford alkaline wastes. The following observations and conclusions resulted from this study: (1) Several CST samples prepared at SNL had a higher capacity to remove Cs from solution as compared to BIB-DJ, IE-96, and CS-100. (2) Cesium distribution results showed that CST samples TAM-40, -42, -43, -70, and -74 had {lambda} values of {approximately}2,200 ({lambda} = Cs K{sub d} {times} {rho}{sub b}; where {lambda} represents the number of exchanger bed volumes of feed that can be loaded on an ion exchange column) at a pH value >14. (3) Cesium distribution values for CST exchangers doubled as the aqueous temperature decreased from 40{degrees} to 10{degrees}C. (4) Crystalline silico-titanates have the capacity to remove Cs as well as Sr and Pu from alkaline wastes unless organic complexants are present. Experimental results indicated that complexed Sr was not removed, and Pu is not expected to be removed.

  7. Gas sensor technology at Sandia National Laboratories: Catalytic gate, Surface Acoustic Wave and Fiber Optic Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.C.; Moreno, D.J.; Jenkins, M.W.; Rodriguez, J.L.

    1993-10-01

    Sandia`s gas sensor program encompasses three separate electronic platforms: Acoustic Wave Devices, Fiber Optic Sensors and sensors based on silicon microelectronic devices. A review of most of these activities was presented recently in a article in Science under the title ``Chemical Microsensors.`` The focus of the program has been on understanding and developing the chemical sensor coatings that are necessary for using these electronic platforms as effective chemical sensors.

  8. User`s manual for the data analysis system for monitoring the fuel oil spill at the Sandia National Laboratories installation in Livermore, California

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. A. Widing; C. C. Leser

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the use of the data analysis software developed by Argonne National laboratory (ANL) and installed at the fuel oil spill site at Sandia National Laboratories. This software provides various programs for anlayzing the data from physical and chemical sensors. This manual provides basic information on the design and use of these user interfaces. Analysts use these interfaces

  9. 1995 annual epidemiologic surveillance report for Sandia National Laboratory-Albuquerque

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) conduct of epidemiologic surveillance provides an early warning system for health problems among workers. This program monitors illnesses and injuries that result in an absence of five or more consecutive workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers. This report provides a summary of epidemiologic surveillance data collected from the Sandia National Laboratory-Albuquerque (SNL-AL) from January 1, 1995 through December 31, 1995. The data were collected by a coordinator at SNL-AL and submitted to the Epidemiologic Surveillance Data Center, located at Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, where quality control procedures and data analyses were carried out. The annual report for 1995 has been redesigned from reports for previous years. Most of the information in the previous reports is also in this report, but some material now appears in the appendices instead of the main body of the report. The information presented in the main body of the report provides a descriptive analysis of the data collected from the site and the appendices provide more detail. A new section of the report presents trends in health over time. The Glossary and an Explanation of Diagnostic Categories have been expanded with more examples of diagnoses to illustrate the content of each category. The data presented here apply only to SNL-AL. The DOE sites are varied, so comparisons of SNL-AL with other DOE sites should be made with caution. It is important to keep in mind that many factors can affect the completeness and accuracy of health information collected at the sites as well as affect patterns of illness and injury observed.

  10. Biological investigations of the Sandia National Laboratories Sol se Mete Aerial Cable Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, R.M.

    1994-10-01

    This report provides results of a comprehensive biological field survey performed on the Sandia National Laboratories Aerial Cable Facility, at the east end of Kirtland Air Force Base (KAFB), Bernalillo County, New Mexico. This survey was conducted late September through October, 1991. ACF occupies a 440-acre tract of land withdrawn by the US Forest Service (USFS) for use by KAFB, and in turn placed under operational control of SNL by the Department of Energy (DOE). All land used by SNL for ACF is part of a 15,851-acre tract of land withdrawn by the US Forest Service. In addition, a number of different organizations use the 15,851-acre area. The project area used by SNL encompasses portions of approximately six sections (3,840 acres) of US Forest Service land located within the foothills of the west side of the Manzano Mountains (East Mesa). The biological study area is used by the KAFB, the US Department of Interior, and SNL. This area includes: (1) Sol se Mete Springs and Canyon, (2) East Anchor Access Road, (3) East Anchor Site, (4) Rocket Sled Track, (5) North Arena, (6) East Instrumentation Site and Access Road, (7) West Anchor Access Road, (8) West Anchor Site, (9) South Arena, (10) Winch Sites, (11) West Instrumentation Sites, (12) Explosive Assembly Building, (13) Control Building, (14) Lurance Canyon Road and vicinity. Although portions of approximately 960 acres of withdrawn US Forest Service land have been altered, only 700 acres have been disturbed by activities associated with ACF; approximately 2,880 acres consist of natural habitat. Absence of grazing by livestock and possibly native ungulates, and relative lack of human disturbance have allowed this area to remain in a more natural vegetative state relative to the condition of private range lands throughout New Mexico. This report evaluates threatened and endangered species found on ACF, as well as a comprehensive assessment of biological habitats.

  11. Noise and vibration investigations of the Sandia National Laboratories Sol se Mete Aerial Cable Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Matise, B.K.; Gutman, W.M.; Cunniff, R.A.; Silver, R.J.; Stepp, W.E. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States). Physical Science Lab.

    1994-11-01

    This document is an assessment of the noise, vibration, and overpressure effects and fragmentation hazards of the operation of the Sandia National Laboratories Sol de Mete Aerial Cable Facility (ACF). Major noise sources associated with project operations and considered in this report include rocket motors, chemical explosions, 3-inch gun, 20-mm gun, vehicular traffic, and engines of electricity generators. In addition, construction equipment noise is considered. Noise exposure of ACF personnel is expressed as the equivalent sound level for the 8-hour work day, and is computed by scaling to the proper distance and combining the appropriate noise values for continuously operating equipment such as vehicles and generators. Explosions and gun firings are impulsive events, and overpressures are predicted and expressed as decibel (dB) at the control building, at other nearby facilities, at Sol se Mete. The conclusion reached in the noise analysis is that continuously operating equipment would not produce a serious noise hazard except in the immediate vicinity of the electricity generators and heavy equipment where hearing protection devices should be used. Rocket motors, guns, and detonations of less than 54 kilograms (kg) (120 lb) of explosives would not produce noise levels above the threshold for individual protection at the control building, other nearby test areas, or Sol se Mete Spring. Rare tests involving explosive weights between 54 and 454 kg (120 and 1,000 lb) could produce impulsive noise levels above 140 dB that would require evacuation or other provision for individual hearing protection at the ACF control building and at certain nearby facilities not associated with ACF. Other blast effects including overpressure, ground vibration, and fragmentation produce hazard radii that generally are small than the corresponding noise hazard radius, which is defined as the distance at which the predicted noise level drops to 140 dB.

  12. Characterization of the neutron irradiation system for use in the Low-Dose-Rate Irradiation Facility at Sandia National Laboratories.

    SciTech Connect

    Franco, Manuel,

    2014-08-01

    The objective of this work was to characterize the neutron irradiation system consisting of americium-241 beryllium (241AmBe) neutron sources placed in a polyethylene shielding for use at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Low Dose Rate Irradiation Facility (LDRIF). With a total activity of 0.3 TBq (9 Ci), the source consisted of three recycled 241AmBe sources of different activities that had been combined into a single source. The source in its polyethylene shielding will be used in neutron irradiation testing of components. The characterization of the source-shielding system was necessary to evaluate the radiation environment for future experiments. Characterization of the source was also necessary because the documentation for the three component sources and their relative alignment within the Special Form Capsule (SFC) was inadequate. The system consisting of the source and shielding was modeled using Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code (MCNP). The model was validated by benchmarking it against measurements using multiple techniques. To characterize the radiation fields over the full spatial geometry of the irradiation system, it was necessary to use a number of instruments of varying sensitivities. First, the computed photon radiography assisted in determining orientation of the component sources. With the capsule properly oriented inside the shielding, the neutron spectra were measured using a variety of techniques. A N-probe Microspec and a neutron Bubble Dosimeter Spectrometer (BDS) set were used to characterize the neutron spectra/field in several locations. In the third technique, neutron foil activation was used to ascertain the neutron spectra. A high purity germanium (HPGe) detector was used to characterize the photon spectrum. The experimentally measured spectra and the MCNP results compared well. Once the MCNP model was validated to an adequate level of confidence, parametric analyses was performed on the model to optimize for potential experimental configurations and neutron spectra for component irradiation. The final product of this work is a MCNP model validated by measurements, an overall understanding of neutron irradiation system including photon/neutron transport and effective dose rates throughout the system, and possible experimental configurations for future irradiation of components.

  13. Weapons Evaluation Test Laboratory at Pantex: Testing and data handling capabilities of Sandia National Laboratories at the Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, W.R.

    1993-08-01

    The Weapons Evaluation Test Laboratory (WETL), operated by Sandia Laboratories at the Pantex Plant in Amarillo, Texas, is engaged primarily in the testing of weapon systems in the stockpile or of newly produced weapon systems for the Sandia Surety Assessment Center. However, the WETL`s unique testing equipment and data-handling facilities are frequently used to serve other organizations. Service to other organizations includes performing special tests on weapon components, subassemblies, and systems for purposes such as basic development and specific problem investigation. The WETL staff also sends equipment to other laboratories for specific tests that cannot be performed at Pantex. For example, we modified and sent equipment to Brookhaven National Laboratory for testing with their Neutral Particle Beam. WETL supplied the engineering expertise to accomplish the needed modifications to the equipment and the technicians to help perform many special tests at Brookhaven. A variety of testing is possible within the WETL, including: Accelerometer, decelerometer, and G-switch g-level/closure testing; Neutron generator performance testing; weapon systems developmental tests; weapon system component testing; weapon system failure-mode-duplication tests; simultaneity measurements; environmental extreme testing; parachute deployment testing; permissive action link (PAL) testing and trajectory-sensing signal generator (TSSG) testing. WETL`s existing equipment configurations do not restrict the testing performed at the WETL. Equipment and facilities are adapted to specific requirements. The WETL`s facilities can often eliminate the need to build or acquire new test equipment, thereby saving time and expense.

  14. Sandia National Laboratories results for the 2010 criticality accident dosimetry exercise, at the CALIBAN reactor, CEA Valduc France.

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, Dann C.

    2011-09-01

    This document describes the personal nuclear accident dosimeter (PNAD) used by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and presents PNAD dosimetry results obtained during the Nuclear Accident Dosimeter Intercomparison Study held 20-23 September, 2010, at CEA Valduc, France. SNL PNADs were exposed in two separate irradiations from the CALIBAN reactor. Biases for reported neutron doses ranged from -15% to +0.4% with an average bias of -7.7%. PNADs were also exposed on the back side of phantoms to assess orientation effects.

  15. Exceptional service in the national interest www.sandia.gov

    E-print Network

    Exceptional service in the national interest www.sandia.gov Sandia National Laboratories is a multi; procurement; intellectual property; technology transfer; and litigation management. As Corporate Secretary

  16. Review of radiation safety in the cardiac catheterization laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, L.W.; Moore, R.J.; Balter, S. (St. Joseph's Hospital Health Center, Syracuse, NY (United States))

    1992-03-01

    With the increasing use of coronary arteriography and interventional procedures, radiation exposure to patients and personnel working in cardiac catheterization laboratories has increased. Proper technique to minimize both patient and operator exposure is necessary. A practical approach to radiation safety in the cardiac catheterization laboratory is presented. This discussion should be useful to facilities with well-established radiation safety programs as well as facilities that require restructuring to cope with the radiation environment in a modern cardiac catheterization laboratory.

  17. Leadership development study :success profile competencies and high-performing leaders at Sandia National Laboratories.

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, Katherine M.; Mulligan, Deborah Rae; Szenasi, Gail L.; Crowder, Stephen Vernon

    2005-04-01

    Sandia is undergoing tremendous change. Sandia's executive management recognized the need for leadership development. About ten years ago the Business, Leadership, and Management Development department in partnership with executive management developed and implemented the organizational leadership Success Profile Competencies to help address some of the changes on the horizon such as workforce losses and lack of a skill set in the area of interpersonal skills. This study addresses the need for the Business, Leadership, and Management Development department to provide statistically sound data in two areas. One is to demonstrate that the organizational 360-degree success profile assessment tool has made a difference for leaders. A second area is to demonstrate the presence of high performing leaders at the Labs. The study utilized two tools to address these two areas. Study participants were made up of individuals who have solid data on Sandia's 360-degree success profile assessment tool. The second assessment tool was comprised of those leaders who participated in the Lockheed Martin Corporation Employee Preferences Survey. Statistical data supports the connection between leader indicators and the 360-degree assessment tool. The study also indicates the presence of high performing leaders at Sandia.

  18. Improved PV system reliability results from surge evaluations at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Russell H. Bonn; Sigifredo Gonzalez

    2000-04-11

    Electrical surges on ac and dc inverter power wiring and diagnostic cables have the potential to shorten the lifetime of power electronics. These surges may be caused by either nearby lightning or capacitor switching transients. This paper contains a description of ongoing surge evaluations of PV power electronics and surge mitigation hardware at Sandia.

  19. The Excavation and Remediation of the Sandia National Laboratories Chemical Waste Landfill

    SciTech Connect

    KWIECINSKI,DANIEL ALBERT; METHVIN,RHONDA KAY; SCHOFIELD,DONALD P.; YOUNG,SHARISSA G.

    1999-11-23

    The Chemical Waste Landfill (CWL) at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) is a 1.9-acre disposal site that was used for the disposal of chemical wastes generated by many of SNL/NM research laboratories from 1962 until 1985. These laboratories were primarily involved in the design, research and development of non-nuclear components of nuclear weapons and the waste generated by these labs included small quantities of a wide assortment of chemical products. A Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Closure Plan for the Chemical Waste Landfill was approved by the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) in 1992. Subsequent site characterization activities identified the presence of significant amounts of chromium in the soil as far as 80 feet below ground surface (fbgs) and the delineation of a solvent plume in the vadose zone that extends to groundwater approximately 500 fbgs. Trichloroethylene (TCE) was detected in some groundwater samples at concentrations slightly above the drinking water limit of 5 parts per billion. In 1997 an active vapor extraction system reduced the size of the TCE vapor plume and for the last six quarterly sampling events groundwater samples have not detected TCE above the drinking water standard. A source term removal, being conducted as a Voluntary Corrective Measure (VCM), began in September 1998 and is expected to take up to two years. Four distinct disposal areas were identified from historical data and the contents of disposal pits and trenches in these areas, in addition to much of the highly contaminated soil surrounding the disposal cells, are currently being excavated. Buried waste and debris are expected to extend to a depth of 12 to 15 fbgs. Excavation will focus on the removal of buried debris and contaminated soil in a sequential, area by area manner and will proceed to whatever depth is required in order to remove all pit contents. Up to 50,000 cubic yards of soil and debris will be removed and managed during the excavation of the CWL. As part of the excavation process, soil is being separated from the buried debris using a 2-inch mechanical screen. After separation from the soil, debris items are further-segregated by matrix into the following categories: wood, scrap metal, concrete/aggregates, resins, compatible debris, intact chemical containers, radioactive and mixed waste, and high hazard items. One of the greatest sources of hazards throughout the excavation process is the removal of numerous intact chemical containers with unknown contents. A large portion of the excavated soil is contaminated with metals and/or solvents, Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are also known to be present. Most of the contaminated soils being excavated will be taken to the nearby Corrective Action Management Unit (CAMU) for treatment and management while a majority of the containers will be taken to the Hazardous Waste Management Facility or the Radioactive and Mixed Waste Management Facility for proper treatment and/or disposal at permitted offsite facilities.

  20. Sandia microelectronics development

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, H.T.

    1997-02-01

    An overview of the operations of Sandia`s Microelectronics Development Lab (MDL) is to develop radiation hardened IC, but techniques used for IC processing have been applied to a variety of related technologies such as micromechanics, smart sensors, and packaging.

  1. Exceptional service in the national interest www.sandia.gov

    E-print Network

    Exceptional service in the national interest www.sandia.gov February 2014 Sandia National-mail: jmphill@sandia.gov B I O G R A P H Y Julia M. Phillips Vice President and Chief Technology Officer Sandia National Laboratories Julia M. Phillips is Vice President and Chief Technology Officer at Sandia National

  2. Exceptional service in the national interest www.sandia.gov

    E-print Network

    Exceptional service in the national interest www.sandia.gov January 2014 Sandia National-mail: dbdimos@sandia.gov B I O G R A P H Y Dr. Duane B. Dimos Vice President, Science and Technology Sandia National Laboratories Dr. Duane B. Dimos is Vice President of the Science and Technology Division at Sandia

  3. Production of thermonuclear neutrons from deuterium-filled capsule implosion experiments driven by Z-Pinch dynamic hohlraums at Sandia National Laboratories' Z facility

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. J. Leeper; C. L. Ruiz; G. W. Cooper; S. A. Slutz; J. E. Bailey; G. A. Chandler; T. J. Nash; T. A. Mehlhorn; D. L. Fehl; K. Peterson; G. A. Rochau; W. A. Varnum; K. S. Bell; D. T. Casey; A. J. Nelson; J. Franklin; L. Ziegler

    2006-01-01

    Deuterium-filled capsule implosion experiments that employ the dynamic hohlraum are presently being conducted on the Z facility at Sandia National Laboratories. This paper will address the evidence for thermonuclear neutron production in the initial series and subsequent series of experiments that have been conducted to date employing Be, plastic, and glass capsules. The novelty of this approach motivated using several

  4. Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan. Part 2, Mappings for the ASC software quality engineering practices. Version 1.0.

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, Molly A.; Heaphy, Robert; Sturtevant, Judith E.; Hodges, Ann Louise; Boucheron, Edward A.; Drake, Richard Roy; Forsythe, Christi A.; Schofield, Joseph Richard, Jr.; Pavlakos, Constantine James; Williamson, Charles Michael; Edwards, Harold Carter

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. The plan defines the ASC program software quality practices and provides mappings of these practices to Sandia Corporate Requirements CPR 1.3.2 and 1.3.6 and to a Department of Energy document, 'ASCI Software Quality Engineering: Goals, Principles, and Guidelines'. This document also identifies ASC management and software project teams responsibilities in implementing the software quality practices and in assessing progress towards achieving their software quality goals.

  5. Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) software quality plan. Part 1: ASC software quality engineering practices, Version 2.0.

    SciTech Connect

    Sturtevant, Judith E.; Heaphy, Robert; Hodges, Ann Louise; Boucheron, Edward A.; Drake, Richard Roy; Minana, Molly A.; Hackney, Patricia; Forsythe, Christi A.; Schofield, Joseph Richard, Jr. (,; .); Pavlakos, Constantine James; Williamson, Charles Michael; Edwards, Harold Carter

    2006-09-01

    The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. The plan defines the ASC program software quality practices and provides mappings of these practices to Sandia Corporate Requirements CPR 1.3.2 and 1.3.6 and to a Department of Energy document, ASCI Software Quality Engineering: Goals, Principles, and Guidelines. This document also identifies ASC management and software project teams responsibilities in implementing the software quality practices and in assessing progress towards achieving their software quality goals.

  6. Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) software quality plan part 2 mappings for the ASC software quality engineering practices, version 2.0.

    SciTech Connect

    Heaphy, Robert; Sturtevant, Judith E.; Hodges, Ann Louise; Boucheron, Edward A.; Drake, Richard Roy; Minana, Molly A.; Hackney, Patricia; Forsythe, Christi A.; Schofield, Joseph Richard, Jr. (,; .); Pavlakos, Constantine James; Williamson, Charles Michael; Edwards, Harold Carter

    2006-09-01

    The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. The plan defines the ASC program software quality practices and provides mappings of these practices to Sandia Corporate Requirements CPR001.3.2 and CPR001.3.6 and to a Department of Energy document, ''ASCI Software Quality Engineering: Goals, Principles, and Guidelines''. This document also identifies ASC management and software project teams' responsibilities in implementing the software quality practices and in assessing progress towards achieving their software quality goals.

  7. Contact: Clifford K. Ho, (505) 844-2384, ckho@sandia.gov 1 Updated 6/21/2002 Sandia National Laboratories--LDRD Fact Sheet

    E-print Network

    Ho, Cliff

    Landfill (SNL); Edwards Air Force Base (Work for Others) · Remote Sensing: Sandia Cooperative Monitoring Thomas (1744), Lucas McGrath (6115), Irene Ma (6115), Angela McLain (6115), Jerome Wright (6115), Scott

  8. Environmental Testing Philosophy for a Sandia National Laboratories' Small Satellite Project - A Retrospective

    SciTech Connect

    CAP,JEROME S.

    2000-08-24

    Sandia has recently completed the flight certification test series for the Multi-Spectral Thermal Imaging satellite (MTI), which is a small satellite for which Sandia was the system integrator. A paper was presented at the 16th Aerospace Testing Seminar discussing plans for performing the structural dynamics certification program for that satellite. The testing philosophy was originally based on a combination of system level vibroacoustic tests and component level shock and vibration tests. However, the plans evolved to include computational analyses using both Finite Element Analysis and Statistical Energy Analysis techniques. This paper outlines the final certification process and discuss lessons learned including both things that went well and things that should/could have been done differently.

  9. Estimation of the carbon monoxide emissions due to Sandia National Laboratories commuter and on-base traffic for conformity determination

    SciTech Connect

    McClellan, Y. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Royer, R. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry

    1996-09-01

    This report describes the analysis and conclusion of an investigation of the carbon monoxide emissions resulting from Sandia National Laboratories and Department of Energy (DOE) commuter and on-base traffic for the Clean Air Act (CAA) Conformity Determination. Albuquerque/Bernalillo County was classified as a nonattainment area by the Environmental Protection Agency. Nonattainment area is an area which is shown by monitored data or which is calculated by air quality modeling to exceed any National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for the pollutant. Albuquerque/Bernalillo County exceeds the NAAQS for carbon monoxide and ozone. The Conformity Determination was needed to complete the CAA Title V Permitting process for SNL and the DOE. The analysis used the EPA approved MOBILE5a Carbon Monoxide (CO) emissions modeling program. This analysis will provide a baseline for mobile sources to allow Sandia to estimate any future activity and how that activity will impact CO emissions. The General Conformity Rule (AQCR 43) requires that operations which will increase CO emissions in nonattaimnent or maintenance areas such as Bernalillo County undergo conformity analyses to determine whether or not they will impact ambient air quality in the area.

  10. Chemical Microsensor and Micro-Instrument Technology at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, M.A.; Frye-Mason, G.C.; Hughes, R.C.; Osbourn, G.C.

    1999-03-26

    Important factors in the application of chemical sensing technology to space applications are low mass, small size, and low power. All of these attributes are enabled by the application of MEMS and micro-fabrication technology to chemical sensing. Several Sandia projects that apply these technologies to the development of new chemical sensing capabilities with the potential for space applications will be described. The Polychromator project is a joint project with Honeywell and MIT to develop an electrically programmable diffraction grating that can be programmed to synthesize the spectra of molecules. This grating will be used as the reference cell in a gas correlation radiometer to enable remote chemical detection of most chemical species. Another area of research where micro-fabrication is having a large impact is the development of a lab on a chip. Sandia's efforts to develop the {mu}ChemLab{trademark} will be described including the development of microfabricated pre-concentrators, chromatographic columns, and detectors. Chemical sensors are evolving in the direction of sensor arrays with pattern recognition methods applied to interpret the pattern of response. Sandia's development of micro-fabricated chemiresistor arrays and the VERI pattern recognition technology to interpret the sensor response will be described.

  11. Vertical axis wind turbine turbulent response model. Part 2: Response of Sandia National laboratories' 34-meter VAWT with aeroelastic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-01-01

    The dynamic response of Sandia National Laboratories' 34-m Darrieus rotor wind turbine at Bushland, Texas, is presented. The formulation used a double-multiple streamtube aerodynamic model with a turbulent airflow and included the effects of linear aeroelastic forces. The structural analysis used established procedures with the program MSC/NASTRAN. The effects of aeroelastic forces on the damping of natural modes agree well with previous results at operating rotor speeds, but show some discrepancies at very high rotor speeds. A number of alternative expressions for the spectrum of turbulent wind were investigated. The model loading represented by each does not differ significantly; a more significant difference is caused by imposing a full lateral coherence of the turbulent flow. Spectra of the predicted stresses at various locations show that without aeroelastic forces, very severe resonance is likely to occur at certain natural frequencies. Inclusion of aeroelastic effects greatly attenuates this stochastic response, especially in modes involving in-plane blade bending.

  12. Passive and active soil gas sampling at the Mixed Waste Landfill, Technical Area III, Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    McVey, M.D.; Goering, T.J. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Peace, J.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-02-01

    The Environmental Restoration Project at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico is tasked with assessing and remediating the Mixed Waste Landfill in Technical Area III. The Mixed Waste Landfill is a 2.6 acre, inactive radioactive and mixed waste disposal site. In 1993 and 1994, an extensive passive and active soil gas sampling program was undertaken to identify and quantify volatile organic compounds in the subsurface at the landfill. Passive soil gas surveys identified levels of PCE, TCE, 1,1, 1-TCA, toluene, 1,1,2-trichlorotrifluoroethane, dichloroethyne, and acetone above background. Verification by active soil gas sampling confirmed concentrations of PCE, TCE, 1,1,1-TCA, and 1,1,2-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane at depths of 10 and 30 feet below ground surface. In addition, dichlorodifluoroethane and trichlorofluoromethane were detected during active soil gas sampling. All of the volatile organic compounds detected during the active soil gas survey were present in the low ppb range.

  13. Adaptive sampling strategy support for the unlined chromic acid pit, chemical waste landfill, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.L.

    1993-11-01

    Adaptive sampling programs offer substantial savings in time and money when assessing hazardous waste sites. Key to some of these savings is the ability to adapt a sampling program to the real-time data generated by an adaptive sampling program. This paper presents a two-prong approach to supporting adaptive sampling programs: a specialized object-oriented database/geographical information system (SitePlanner{trademark} ) for data fusion, management, and display and combined Bayesian/geostatistical methods (PLUME) for contamination-extent estimation and sample location selection. This approach is applied in a retrospective study of a subsurface chromium plume at Sandia National Laboratories` chemical waste landfill. Retrospective analyses suggest the potential for characterization cost savings on the order of 60% through a reduction in the number of sampling programs, total number of soil boreholes, and number of samples analyzed from each borehole.

  14. The high current, fast, 100ns, Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) developmental project at Sandia Laboratories and HCEI.

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, Kevin S. (Ketech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Long, Finis W.; Sinebryukhov, Vadim A. (High Current Electronic Institute (HCEI), Tomsk, Russia); Kim, Alexandre A. (High Current Electronic Institute (HCEI), Tomsk, Russia); Wakeland, Peter Eric (Ketech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); McKee, G. Randall; Woodworth, Joseph Ray; McDaniel, Dillon Heirman; Fowler, William E.; Mazarakis, Michael Gerrassimos; Porter, John Larry, Jr.; Struve, Kenneth William; Savage, Mark Edward; Stygar, William A.; LeChien, Keith R.; Matzen, Maurice Keith

    2010-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, N.M., USA, in collaboration with the High Current Electronic Institute (HCEI), Tomsk, Russia, is developing a new paradigm in pulsed power technology: the Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) technology. This technological approach can provide very compact devices that can deliver very fast high current and high voltage pulses straight out of the cavity with out any complicated pulse forming and pulse compression network. Through multistage inductively insulated voltage adders, the output pulse, increased in voltage amplitude, can be applied directly to the load. The load may be a vacuum electron diode, a z-pinch wire array, a gas puff, a liner, an isentropic compression load (ICE) to study material behavior under very high magnetic fields, or a fusion energy (IFE) target. This is because the output pulse rise time and width can be easily tailored to the specific application needs. In this paper we briefly summarize the developmental work done in Sandia and HCEI during the last few years, and describe our new MYKONOS Sandia High Current LTD Laboratory. An extensive evaluation of the LTD technology is being performed at SNL and the High Current Electronic Institute (HCEI) in Tomsk Russia. Two types of High Current LTD cavities (LTD I-II, and 1-MA LTD) were constructed and tested individually and in a voltage adder configuration (1-MA cavity only). All cavities performed remarkably well and the experimental results are in full agreement with analytical and numerical calculation predictions. A two-cavity voltage adder is been assembled and currently undergoes evaluation. This is the first step towards the completion of the 10-cavity, 1-TW module. This MYKONOS voltage adder will be the first ever IVA built with a transmission line insulated with deionized water. The LTD II cavity renamed LTD III will serve as a test bed for evaluating a number of different types of switches, resistors, alternative capacitor configurations, cores and other cavity components. Experimental results will be presented at the Conference and in future publications.

  15. Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Facilities and Safety Information Document [NOTE: Volume II, Chapter 12

    SciTech Connect

    March, F.; Guerrero, J.V.; Johns, W.H.; Schetnan, R.; Bayliss, L.S.; Kuzio, K.A.

    1999-08-01

    Operations in Tech Area IV commenced in 1980 with the construction of Buildings 980 and 981 and the Electron Beam Fusion Accelerator, which at the time was a major facility in SNL's Inertial Confinement Fusion Program. The Electron Beam Fusion Accelerator was a third-generation fusion accelerator that followed Proto I and Proto II, which were operated in Tech Area V. Another accelerator, the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator I, was constructed in Tech Area IV because there was not enough room in Tech Area V, a highly restricted area that contains SNL's reactor facilities. In the early 1980s, more fusion-related facilities were constructed in Tech Area IV. Building 983 was built to house a fourth-generation fusion accelerator, the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II, now called Z Machine, and Buildings 960 and 961 were built to house office space, electrical and mechanical laboratories, and highbay space for pulsed power research and development. In the mid 1980s, Building 970 was constructed to house the Simulation Technology Laboratory. The main facility in the Simulation Technology Laboratory is the High-Energy Radiation Megavolt Electron Source (HERMES) III, a third-generation gamma ray accelerator that is used primarily for the simulation of gamma rays produced by nuclear weapons. The previous generations, HERMES I and HERMES II, had been located in Tech Area V. In the late 1980s, Proto II was moved from Tech Area V to the Simulation Technology Laboratory and modified to function as an x-ray simulation accelerator, and construction of Buildings 962 and 963 began. These buildings comprised the Strategic Defense Facility, which was initially intended to support the nation's Strategic Defense Initiative or ''Star Wars'' program. It was to house a variety of pulsed power-related facilities to conduct research in such areas as directed-energy weapons (electron beams, lasers, and microwaves) and an earth-to-orbit launcher. With the reduction of the Strategic Defense Initiative budget in the early 1990s, however, many of these programs were discontinued and some, such as the High Power Microwave Laboratory and the Repetitive Pulsed Power Laboratory, were established. By 1990, all the Tech Area V accelerators had either been moved to Tech Area IV or decommissioned, and Tech Area IV had become the center for SNL's pulsed power sciences activities. The early 1990s saw an infusion of programs into Tech Area IV that support DOE goals in defense, industrial competitiveness, and the environment. A computer sciences group moved into Building 980, and a group that prepares rocket payloads for flight tests moved into one of the highbays in Building 963. A robotics group moved into Building 966, and a number of diverse groups occupy office and laboratory space in Building 962.

  16. Sandia software guidelines: Volume 5, Tools, techniques, and methodologies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-07-01

    This volume is one in a series of Sandia Software Guidelines intended for use in producing quality software within Sandia National Laboratories. This volume describes software tools and methodologies available to Sandia personnel for the development of software, and outlines techniques that have proven useful within the Laboratories and elsewhere. References and evaluations by Sandia personnel are included. 6 figs.

  17. Sandia's fault analysis system for non-DFT designs

    SciTech Connect

    Hofstadler, P.

    1987-01-01

    A toolset is described that is used to do comprehensive fault analysis on Sandia's past, present, and future generation designs. This toolset provides very fast realistic fault simulation at both the gate and switch level, hierarchical fault reporting, and automatic annotation of undetectable faults. The toolset is built around the Mentor Graphics design system and a Mach1000 hardware accelerator from Silicon Solutions. This session describes the work at Sandia National Laboratories' Center for Radiation Hardened Microelectronics (the CRM) in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The CRM designs and manufactures radiation hardened microelectronics for hostile environments. CRM parts are used in satellites, deep space probes, and weapon systems - hence the reliability of these parts must be exceedingly high. Since the yield of a radiation hardened process is inherently low, Sandia must insure high test vector coverage of all detectable faults.

  18. Update of the Z Refurbishment project (ZR) at Sandia National Laboratories.

    SciTech Connect

    Moncayo, Carla; Bloomquist, Douglas D.; Weed, John Woodruff; Tabor, Debra Ann; Donovan, Guy Louis; McKee, G. Randall; Weinbrecht, Edward A.; Faturos, Thomas V.; McDaniel, Dillon Heirman

    2007-08-01

    Sandia's Z Refurbishment (ZR) Project formally began in February 2002 to increase the Z Accelerator's utilization by providing the capability to perform more shots, improve precision and pulse shape variability, and increase delivered current. A project update was provided at the 15th International Pulsed Power Conference in 2005. The Z facility was shut down in July 2006 for structural/infrastructure modifications and installation of new pulsed power systems. The refurbishment will conclude in 2007. This paper provides a status update of the project covering the past 2 years of activities.

  19. Visualization in Radiation Oncology: Towards Replacing the Laboratory Notebook

    E-print Network

    Utah, University of

    1 Visualization in Radiation Oncology: Towards Replacing the Laboratory Notebook E.W. Anderson, S Abstract: Data exploration in radiation oncology requires the creation of a large number of visualizations explore the benefits of using VisTrails for large-scale data exploration in radiation oncology. #12

  20. Factories: The Ionising Radiations (Sealed Sources) (Laboratory Certificate) Order, 1961 

    E-print Network

    Hare, John

    1961-01-01

    This Order prescribes the particulars to be contained in certificates issued by approved laboratories in pursuance of paragraph (2) of Regulation 23 of the Ionising Radiations (Sealed Sources) Regulations, 1961, as t o ...

  1. The Sandia Lightning Simulator.

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Leonard E.; Caldwell, Michele

    2005-01-01

    The Sandia Lightning Simulator at Sandia National Laboratories can provide up to 200 kA for a simulated single lightning stroke, 100 kA for a subsequent stroke, and hundreds of Amperes of continuing current. It has recently been recommissioned after a decade of inactivity and the single-stroke capability demonstrated. The simulator capabilities, basic design components, upgrades, and diagnostic capabilities are discussed in this paper.

  2. Environmental Health & Radiation Safety rev. 2/11 LABORATORY SAFETY

    E-print Network

    Chapman, Michael S.

    Occupational Medicine 503-726-1021 Providence St. Vincent Med. Ctr. 503-216-7000 Infectious Disease ConsultantsEnvironmental Health & Radiation Safety rev. 2/11 LABORATORY SAFETY MANUAL #12;Oregon Health Services 503-494-4444 OHSU Public Safety 503-494-7744 ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH & RADIATION SAFETY OHSU Paging

  3. Test plan for the data acquisition and management system for monitoring the fuel oil spill at the Sandia National Laboratories installation in Livermore, California

    SciTech Connect

    Widing, M.A.; Dominiak, D.M.; Leser, C.C.; Peerenboom, J.P.; Manning, J.F.

    1995-04-01

    This report describes the formal test plan that will be used for the data acquisition and management system developed to monitor a bioremediation study by Argonne National Laboratory in association with Sandia National Laboratories. The data acquisition and management system will record the site data during the bioremediation and assist experts in site analysis. The three major subsystems of this system are described in detail in this report. In addition, this report documents the component- and system-level test procedures that will be implemented at each phase of the project. Results of these test procedures are documented in this report.

  4. Exceptional service in the national interest www.sandia.gov

    E-print Network

    Exceptional service in the national interest www.sandia.gov October 2014 Sandia National-mail: leland@sandia.gov B I O G R A P H Y Robert W. Leland, Ph.D. Vice President, Science & Technology, Chief Technology Officer Sandia National Laboratories Dr. Robert (Rob) W. Leland is Vice President, Science

  5. An effective waste management process for segregation and disposal of legacy mixed waste at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Hallman, A.K. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Meyer, D. [IT Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rellergert, C.A. [Roy F. Weston, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Schriner, J.A. [Automated Solutions of Albuquerque, Inc., NM (United States)

    1998-04-01

    Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) is a research and development facility that generates many highly diverse, low-volume mixed waste streams. Under the Federal Facility Compliance Act, SNL/NM must treat its mixed waste in storage to meet the Land Disposal Restrictions treatment standards. Since 1989, approximately 70 cubic meters (2,500 cubic feet) of heterogeneous, poorly characterized and inventoried mixed waste was placed in storage that could not be treated as specified in the SNL/NM Site Treatment Plan. A process was created to sort the legacy waste into sixteen well-defined, properly characterized, and accurately inventoried mixed waste streams (Treatability Groups) and two low-level waste streams ready for treatment or disposal. From June 1995 through September 1996, the entire volume of this stored mixed waste was sorted and inventoried. This process was planned to meet the technical requirements of the sorting operation and to identify and address the hazards this operation presented. The operations were routinely adapted to safely and efficiently handle a variety of waste matrices, hazards, and radiological conditions. This flexibility was accomplished through administrative and physical controls integrated into the sorting operations. Many Department of Energy facilities are currently facing the prospect of sorting, characterizing, and treating a large inventory of mixed waste. The process described in this report is a proven method for preparing a diverse, heterogeneous mixed waste volume into segregated, characterized, inventoried, and documented waste streams ready for treatment or disposal.

  6. An Effective Waste Management Process for Segregation and Disposal of Legacy Mixed Waste at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Hallman, Anne K. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Meyer, Dann [IT Corporation, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rellergert, Carla A. [Roy F. Weston, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Schriner, Joseph A. [Automated Solutions of Albuquerque, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1998-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) is a research and development facility that generates many highly diverse, low-volume mixed waste streams. Under the Federal Facility Compliance Act, SNL/NM must treat its mixed waste in storage to meet the Land Disposal Restrictions treatment standards. Since 1989, approximately 70 cubic meters (2500 cubic feet) of heterogeneous, poorly characterized and inventoried mixed waste was placed in storage that could not be treated as specified in the SNL/NM Site Treatment Plan. A process was created to sort the legacy waste into sixteen well- defined, properly characterized, and precisely inventoried mixed waste streams (Treatability Groups) and two low-level waste streams ready for treatment or disposal. From June 1995 through September 1996, the entire volume of this stored mixed waste was sorted and inventoried through this process. This process was planned to meet the technical requirements of the sorting operation and to identify and address the hazards this operation presented. The operations were routinely adapted to safely and efficiently handle a variety of waste matrices, hazards, and radiological conditions. This flexibility was accomplished through administrative and physical controls integrated into the sorting operations. Many Department of Energy facilities are currently facing the prospect of sorting, characterizing, and treating a large inventory of mixed waste. The process described in this paper is a proven method for preparing a diverse, heterogeneous mixed waste volume into segregated, characterized, inventoried, and documented waste streams ready for treatment or disposal.

  7. Biologic surveys for the Sandia National Laboratories, Coyote Canyon Test Complex, Kirtland Air Force Base, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, R.M. [4115 Allen Dr., Kingsville, TX (United States); Knight, P.J. [Marron and Associates, Inc., Corrales, NM (United States)

    1994-05-25

    This report provides results of a comprehensive biologic survey performed in Coyote Canyon Test Complex (CCTC), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Bernalillo County, New Mexico, which was conducted during the spring and summer of 1992 and 1993. CCTC is sited on land owned by the Department of Energy (DOE) and Kirtland Air Force Base and managed by SNL. The survey covered 3,760 acres of land, most of which is rarely disturbed by CCTC operations. Absence of grazing by livestock and possibly native ungulates, and relative to the general condition of private range lands throughout New Mexico, and relative to other grazing lands in central New Mexico. Widely dispersed, low intensity use by SNL as well as prohibition of grazing has probably contributed to abundance of special status species such as grama grass cactus within the CCTC area. This report evaluates threatened and endangered species found in the area, as well as comprehensive assessment of biologic habitats. Included are analyses of potential impacts and mitigative measures designed to reduce or eliminate potential impacts. Included is a summary of CCTC program and testing activities.

  8. Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) software quality plan : ASC software quality engineering practices Version 3.0.

    SciTech Connect

    Turgeon, Jennifer L.; Minana, Molly A.; Hackney, Patricia; Pilch, Martin M.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. Quality is defined in the US Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Agency (DOE/NNSA) Quality Criteria, Revision 10 (QC-1) as 'conformance to customer requirements and expectations'. This quality plan defines the SNL ASC Program software quality engineering (SQE) practices and provides a mapping of these practices to the SNL Corporate Process Requirement (CPR) 001.3.6; 'Corporate Software Engineering Excellence'. This plan also identifies ASC management's and the software project teams responsibilities in implementing the software quality practices and in assessing progress towards achieving their software quality goals. This SNL ASC Software Quality Plan establishes the signatories commitments to improving software products by applying cost-effective SQE practices. This plan enumerates the SQE practices that comprise the development of SNL ASC's software products and explains the project teams opportunities for tailoring and implementing the practices.

  9. Global nuclear energy partnership fuels transient testing at the Sandia National Laboratories nuclear facilities : planning and facility infrastructure options.

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, John E.; Wright, Steven Alan; Tikare, Veena; MacLean, Heather J. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Parma, Edward J., Jr.; Peters, Curtis D.; Vernon, Milton E.; Pickard, Paul S.

    2007-10-01

    The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership fuels development program is currently developing metallic, oxide, and nitride fuel forms as candidate fuels for an Advanced Burner Reactor. The Advance Burner Reactor is being designed to fission actinides efficiently, thereby reducing the long-term storage requirements for spent fuel repositories. Small fuel samples are being fabricated and evaluated with different transuranic loadings and with extensive burnup using the Advanced Test Reactor. During the next several years, numerous fuel samples will be fabricated, evaluated, and tested, with the eventual goal of developing a transmuter fuel database that supports the down selection to the most suitable fuel type. To provide a comparative database of safety margins for the range of potential transmuter fuels, this report describes a plan to conduct a set of early transient tests in the Annular Core Research Reactor at Sandia National Laboratories. The Annular Core Research Reactor is uniquely qualified to perform these types of tests because of its wide range of operating capabilities and large dry central cavity which extents through the center of the core. The goal of the fuels testing program is to demonstrate that the design and fabrication processes are of sufficient quality that the fuel will not fail at its design limit--up to a specified burnup, power density, and operating temperature. Transient testing is required to determine the fuel pin failure thresholds and to demonstrate that adequate fuel failure margins exist during the postulated design basis accidents.

  10. Floodplain Assessment for the Proposed Outdoor Fire Range Upgrades at TA-72 in Lower Sandia Canyon, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Hathcock, Charles D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-27

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is preparing to implement actions in Sandia Canyon at Technical Area (TA) 72. Los Alamos National Security (LANS) biologists conducted a floodplain determination and this project is partially located within a 100-year floodplain. The proposed project is to upgrade the existing outdoor shooting range facilities at TA-72. These upgrades will result in increased safety and efficiencies in the training for Protective Force personnel. In order to remain current on training requirements, the firing ranges at TA-72 will be upgraded which will result in increased safety and efficiencies in the training for Protective Force personnel (Figure 1). These upgrades will allow for an increase in class size and more people to be qualified at the ranges. Some of these upgrades will be built within the 100-year floodplain. The upgrades include: concrete pads for turning target systems and shooting positions, new lighting to illuminate the firing range for night fire, a new speaker system for range operations, canopies at two locations, an impact berm at the far end of the 300-yard mark, and a block wall for road protection.

  11. Multi-method characterization of low-level radioactive waste at two Sandia National Laboratories environmental restoration sites

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C.E. Jr.; Galloway, R.B.; Dotson, P.W.

    1999-12-06

    This paper discusses the application of multiple characterization methods to radioactive wastes generated by the Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) Environmental Restoration (ER) Project during the excavation of buried materials at the Classified Waste Landfill (CWLF) and the Radioactive Waste Landfill (RWL). These waste streams include nuclear weapon components and other refuse that are surface contaminated or contain sealed radioactive sources with unknown radioactivity content. Characterization of radioactive constituents in RWL and CWLF waste has been problematic, due primarily to the lack of documented characterization data prior to burial. A second difficulty derives from the limited information that ER project personnel have about weapons component design and testing that was conducted in the early days of the Cold War. To reduce the uncertainties and achieve the best possible waste characterization, the ER Project has applied both project-specific and industry-standard characterization methods that, in combination, serve to define the types and quantities of radionuclide constituents in the waste. The resulting characterization data have been used to develop waste profiles for meeting disposal site waste acceptance criteria.

  12. Evaluation of Radiometers in Full-Time Use at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory Solar Radiation Research Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, S. M.; Myers, D. R.

    2008-12-01

    This report describes the evaluation of the relative performance of the complement of solar radiometers deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL).

  13. Measurement of the photon field on Sandia`s Z facility

    SciTech Connect

    Rochau, G.E.; Derzon, M.; Fehl, D. [and others

    1998-06-01

    The Z Facility at Sandia National Laboratories utilizes z-pinch implosions to produce up to 2 MJ of X-rays. On Z, bremsstrahlung radiation is produced as a product of both power flow electrons and those accelerated in the pinch region. An understanding of the energy spectra and intensity of this radiation is important to both the explanation of the z-pinch physics and the design of new diagnostics. This paper describes the techniques and results used to date for mapping the bremsstrahlung radiation in the vacuum section of the Z Accelerator.

  14. SANDIA REPORT SAND2006-ABCD

    E-print Network

    Ray, Jaideep

    by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National. Printed in the United States of America. This report has been reproduced directly from the best available dissemination unlimited. #12;Issued by Sandia National Laboratories, operated for the United States Department

  15. Overview of the dynamic-hohlraum x-ray source at Sandia National Laboratories.

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, Thomas W. L.

    2007-04-01

    Progress in understanding the physics of Dynamic-Hohlraums is reviewed for a system capable of generating 10 TW of axial radiation for high temperature (>200 eV) radiation-flow experiments and ICF capsule implosions. 2D magneto-hydrodynamic simulation comparisons with data show the need to include wire initiation physics and subsequent discrete wire dynamics in the simulations if a predictive capability is to be achieved.

  16. Radiation safety program for the cardiac catheterization laboratory.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Charles E; Fetterly, Kenneth A; Holzer, Ralf; Lin, Pei-Jan Paul; Blankenship, James C; Balter, Stephen; Laskey, Warren K

    2011-03-01

    The Society of Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions present a practical approach to assist cardiac catheterization laboratories in establishing a radiation safety program. The importance of this program is emphasized by the appropriate concerns for the increasing use of ionizing radiation in medical imaging, and its potential adverse effects. An overview of the assessment of radiation dose is provided with a review of basic terminology for dose management. The components of a radiation safety program include essential personnel, radiation monitoring, protective shielding, imaging equipment, and training/education. A procedure based review of radiation dose management is described including pre-procedure, procedure and post-procedure best practice recommendations. Specific radiation safety considerations are discussed including women and fluoroscopic procedures as well as patients with congenital and structural heart disease. PMID:21254324

  17. Functional and operational requirements document : building 1012, Battery and Energy Storage Device Test Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect

    Johns, William H.

    2013-11-01

    This report provides an overview of information, prior studies, and analyses relevant to the development of functional and operational requirements for electrochemical testing of batteries and energy storage devices carried out by Sandia Organization 2546, Advanced Power Sources R&D. Electrochemical operations for this group are scheduled to transition from Sandia Building 894 to a new Building located in Sandia TA-II referred to as Building 1012. This report also provides background on select design considerations and identifies the Safety Goals, Stakeholder Objectives, and Design Objectives required by the Sandia Design Team to develop the Performance Criteria necessary to the design of Building 1012. This document recognizes the Architecture-Engineering (A-E) Team as the primary design entity. Where safety considerations are identified, suggestions are provided to provide context for the corresponding operational requirement(s).

  18. Modeling and Laboratory Investigations of Radiative Shocks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jacob Grun; J. Martin Laming; Charles Manka; Christopher Moore; Ted Jones; Daniel Tam

    2001-01-01

    Supernova remnants are often inhomogeneous, with knots or clumps of material expanding in ambient plasma. This structure may be initiated by hydrodynamic instabilities occurring during the explosion, but it may plausibly be amplified by instabilities of the expanding shocks such as, for example, corrugation instabilities described by D'yakov in 1954, Vishniac in 1983, and observed in the laboratory by Grun

  19. Ris National Laboratory DTU Radiation Research Department

    E-print Network

    to be measured for estimation of the total inventory of radioactivity and its variation with time. Due to large volume involved, graphite and biological shield concrete make up a considerable low-medium radioactive in the reactor or contaminated, have to be measured for the radioactivity inventory. In our laboratory, many

  20. Secondary calibration laboratory for ionizing radiation laboratory accreitation program National Institute of Standards and Technology National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, P.R.

    1993-12-31

    This paper presents an overview of the procedures and requirements for accreditation under the Secondary Calibration Laboratory for Ionizing Radiation Program (SCLIR LAP). The requirements for a quality system, proficiency testing and the onsite assessment are discussed. The purpose of the accreditation program is to establish a network of secondary calibration laboratories that can provide calibrations traceable to the primary national standards.

  1. Monochromatic x-ray imaging experiments on the Sandia National Laboratories Z facility (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Sinars, D.B.; Bennett, G.R.; Wenger, D.F.; Cuneo, M.E.; Hanson, D.L.; Porter, J.L.; Adams, R.G.; Rambo, P.K.; Rovang, D.C.; Smith, I.C. [Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1193 (United States)

    2004-10-01

    The Z facility is a 20 MA, 100 ns rise time, pulsed power driver for z-pinch plasma radiation sources. The Z facility can make >200 TW, 1-2 MJ, near-blackbody radiation sources through the compression of cylindrical wire arrays. These sources are being used as drivers to study inertial-confinement fusion capsule implosions, complex radiation-hydrodynamic jet experiments, and wire-array z-pinch physics tests. To backlight plasmas in this environment we have built diagnostics based on spherically bent crystals that provide high spatial resolution (9-10 {mu}m), a narrow spectral bandpass (<0.5 eV), and a large field of view (4 mmx20 mm). These diagnostics use the 2 TW, multi-kJ Z-Beamlet laser to produce x-ray emission sources at 1.865 or 6.151 keV for backlighting.

  2. Committee to evaluate Sandia`s risk expertise: Final report. Volume 1: Presentations

    SciTech Connect

    Dudley, E.C.

    1998-05-01

    On July 1--2, 1997, Sandia National Laboratories hosted the External Committee to Evaluate Sandia`s Risk Expertise. Under the auspices of SIISRS (Sandia`s International Institute for Systematic Risk Studies), Sandia assembled a blue-ribbon panel of experts in the field of risk management to assess their risk programs labs-wide. Panelists were chosen not only for their own expertise, but also for their ability to add balance to the panel as a whole. Presentations were made to the committee on the risk activities at Sandia. In addition, a tour of Sandia`s research and development programs in support of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission was arranged. The panel attended a poster session featuring eight presentations and demonstrations for selected projects. Overviews and viewgraphs from the presentations are included in Volume 1 of this report. Presentations are related to weapons, nuclear power plants, transportation systems, architectural surety, environmental programs, and information systems.

  3. Final Results from the High-Current, High-Action Closing Switch Test Program at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Savage, M.E.

    1999-06-23

    We tested a variety of high-current closing switches for lifetime and reliability on a dedicated 2 MJ, 500 kA capacitor bank facility at Sandia National Laboratories. Our interest was a switch capable of one shot every few minutes, switching a critically damped, DC-charged 6.2 mF bank at 24 kV, with a peak current of 500 kA. The desired lifetime is 24 thousand shots. Typical of high-energy systems, particularly multi-module systems, the primary parameters of interest related to the switch are: (1) reliability, meaning absence of both pre-fires and no-fires, (2) total switch lifetime or number of shots between maintenance, and (3) cost. Cost was given lower priority at this evaluation stage because there are great uncertainties in estimating higher-quantity prices of these devices, most of which have been supplied before in only small quantities. The categories of switches tested are vacuum discharge, high-pressure discharge, and solid-state. Each group varies in terms of triggering ease, ease of maintenance, and tolerance to faults such as excess current and current reversal. We tested at least two variations of each technology group. The total number of shots on the switch test facility is about 50 thousand. We will present the results from the switch testing. The observed lifetime of different switches varied greatly: the shortest life was one shot; one device was still operating after six thousand shots. On several switches we measured the voltage drop during conduction and calculated energy dissipated in the switch; we will show these data also.

  4. A description of the SNL (Sandia National Laboratories) clutter model developed for the SRIM (Simulated Radar IMage) code version 2. 2s

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.E.

    1990-10-01

    This report describes the clutter model developed at Sandia National Laboratories for the SRIM code version 2.2s. The SNL clutter model is a fully polarimetric model that includes both coherent and incoherent scattering effects. The input parameters to the SNL clutter model are chosen so that an acceptable match is obtained between the model predicted data and the appropriate experimental data. These input parameters are then used in the SRIM code to simulated the desired clutter type. 12 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Disposition of fuel elements from the Aberdeen and Sandia pulse reactor (SPR-II) assemblies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bill Mckerley; Jacqueline M Bustamante; David A Costa; Anthony F Drypolcher; Joseph Hickey

    2010-01-01

    We describe the disposition of fuel from the Aberdeen (APR) and the Sandia Pulse Reactors (SPR-II) which were used to provide intense neutron bursts for radiation effects testing. The enriched Uranium - 10% Molybdenum fuel from these reactors was shipped to the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for size reduction prior to shipment to the Savannah River Site (SRS) for

  6. Metrology laboratory requirements for third-generation synchrotron radiation sources

    SciTech Connect

    Takacs, P.Z.; Quian, Shinan

    1997-11-01

    New third-generation synchrotron radiation sources that are now, or will soon, come on line will need to decide how to handle the testing of optical components delivered for use in their beam lines. In many cases it is desirable to establish an in-house metrology laboratory to do the work. We review the history behind the formation of the Optical Metrology Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory and the rationale for its continued existence. We offer suggestions to those who may be contemplating setting up similar facilities, based on our experiences over the past two decades.

  7. Sandia National Laboratories performance assessment methodology for long-term environmental programs : the history of nuclear waste management.

    SciTech Connect

    Marietta, Melvin Gary; Anderson, D. Richard; Bonano, Evaristo J.; Meacham, Paul Gregory (Raytheon Ktech, Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-11-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is the world leader in the development of the detailed science underpinning the application of a probabilistic risk assessment methodology, referred to in this report as performance assessment (PA), for (1) understanding and forecasting the long-term behavior of a radioactive waste disposal system, (2) estimating the ability of the disposal system and its various components to isolate the waste, (3) developing regulations, (4) implementing programs to estimate the safety that the system can afford to individuals and to the environment, and (5) demonstrating compliance with the attendant regulatory requirements. This report documents the evolution of the SNL PA methodology from inception in the mid-1970s, summarizing major SNL PA applications including: the Subseabed Disposal Project PAs for high-level radioactive waste; the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant PAs for disposal of defense transuranic waste; the Yucca Mountain Project total system PAs for deep geologic disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste; PAs for the Greater Confinement Borehole Disposal boreholes at the Nevada National Security Site; and PA evaluations for disposal of high-level wastes and Department of Energy spent nuclear fuels stored at Idaho National Laboratory. In addition, the report summarizes smaller PA programs for long-term cover systems implemented for the Monticello, Utah, mill-tailings repository; a PA for the SNL Mixed Waste Landfill in support of environmental restoration; PA support for radioactive waste management efforts in Egypt, Iraq, and Taiwan; and, most recently, PAs for analysis of alternative high-level radioactive waste disposal strategies including repositories deep borehole disposal and geologic repositories in shale and granite. Finally, this report summarizes the extension of the PA methodology for radioactive waste disposal toward development of an enhanced PA system for carbon sequestration and storage systems. These efforts have produced a generic PA methodology for the evaluation of waste management systems that has gained wide acceptance within the international community. This report documents how this methodology has been used as an effective management tool to evaluate different disposal designs and sites; inform development of regulatory requirements; identify, prioritize, and guide research aimed at reducing uncertainties for objective estimations of risk; and support safety assessments.

  8. Exceptional service in the national interest www.sandia.gov

    E-print Network

    Exceptional service in the national interest www.sandia.gov Sandia National Laboratories is a multi President of the Energy, Security, and Defense Technologies Division at Sandia National Laboratories Security initiative focuses on all aspects of nuclear security includ¬ing nonproliferation, technology

  9. Exceptional service in the national interest www.sandia.gov

    E-print Network

    Exceptional service in the national interest www.sandia.gov Sandia National Laboratories is a multi Laboratories. DS&A is responsible for developing and integrating advanced science and technology into state; surveillance and reconnaissance; and science and technology products. Dr. Isaacson joined Sandia in 2011 from

  10. Laboratory Investigation Synergy of gene-mediated immunoprophylaxis and microbeam radiation therapy

    E-print Network

    Terasaki, Mark

    Laboratory Investigation Synergy of gene-mediated immunoprophylaxis and microbeam radiation therapy radiation therapy, rats Summary Purpose: Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT), a novel experimental, d21). On d14, the remaining 62 rats were given deliberately suboptimal microbeam radiation therapy

  11. Exceptional service in the national interest www.sandia.gov

    E-print Network

    Exceptional service in the national interest www.sandia.gov Sandia National Laboratories is a multi Leadership Development Program and has received a fellowship at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology

  12. Exceptional service in the national interest www.sandia.gov

    E-print Network

    Exceptional service in the national interest www.sandia.gov Sandia National Laboratories is a multi and received a fellowship at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Seminar XXI Program. Before coming

  13. Calibration of the Standards and Calibration Laboratory`s Co{sup 60} Radiation Pool

    SciTech Connect

    Wirtenson, G.R.; White, R.H.

    1993-01-01

    The authors report measurements of dose rates at various locations in the LLNL Standards and Calibrations Laboratory`s Co{sup 60} Radiation Pool. Plots show the dependence of dose rate on radius near the bottom of the pool and the dependence of dose rate on height at a fixed distance from the pool center. The effect of varying sample location within the pool`s dry-well was also investigated.

  14. Savannah River Plant/Savannah River Laboratory radiation exposure report

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, C.D.; Hyman, S.D.; Keisler, L.L. (Du Pont de Nemours (E.I.) and Co., Aiken, SC (USA). Savannah River Plant); Reeder, D.F.; Jolly, L.; Spoerner, M.T.; Schramm, G.R. (Du Pont de Nemours (E.I.) and Co., Aiken, SC (USA). Savannah River Lab.)

    1989-01-01

    The protection of worker health and safety is of paramount concern at the Savannah River Site. Since the site is one of the largest nuclear sites in the nation, radiation safety is a key element in the protection program. This report is a compendium of the results in 1988 of the programs at the Savannah River Plant and the Savannah River Laboratory to protect the radiological health of employees. By any measure, the radiation protection performance at this site in 1988 was the best since the beginning of operations. This accomplishment was made possible by the commitment and support at all levels of the organizations to reduce radiation exposures to ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable). The report provides detailed information about the radiation doses received by departments and work groups within these organizations. It also includes exposure data for recent years to allow Plant and Laboratory units to track the effectiveness of their ALARA efforts. Many of the successful practices and methods that reduced radiation exposure are described. A new goal for personnel contamination cases has been established for 1989. Only through continual and innovative efforts to minimize exposures can the goals be met. The radiation protection goals for 1989 and previous years are included in the report. 27 figs., 58 tabs.

  15. Sandia`s network for Supercomputer `96: Linking supercomputers in a wide area Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) network

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, T.J.; Martinez, L.G.; Vahle, M.O. [and others

    1997-04-01

    The advanced networking department at Sandia National Laboratories has used the annual Supercomputing conference sponsored by the IEEE and ACM for the past several years as a forum to demonstrate and focus communication and networking developments. At Supercomputing 96, for the first time, Sandia National Laboratories, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory combined their Supercomputing 96 activities within a single research booth under the ASO banner. Sandia provided the network design and coordinated the networking activities within the booth. At Supercomputing 96, Sandia elected: to demonstrate wide area network connected Massively Parallel Processors, to demonstrate the functionality and capability of Sandia`s new edge architecture, to demonstrate inter-continental collaboration tools, and to demonstrate ATM video capabilities. This paper documents those accomplishments, discusses the details of their implementation, and describes how these demonstrations support Sandia`s overall strategies in ATM networking.

  16. SANDIA REPORT SAND 2009-0805

    E-print Network

    Kolda, Tamara G.

    in Cybersecurity Daniel M. Dunlavy, Bruce Hendrickson, and Tamara G. Kolda Prepared by Sandia National Laboratories in Cybersecurity Daniel M. Dunlavy and Bruce Hendrickson Sandia National Laboratories P.O. Box 5800, Mail Stop 1318 94550 Abstract This white paper is a response to a recent report on cybersecurity submitted to the U

  17. An Illustration of the Corrective Action Process, The Corrective Action Management Unit at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Irwin, M.; Kwiecinski, D.

    2002-02-26

    Corrective Action Management Units (CAMUs) were established by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to streamline the remediation of hazardous waste sites. Streamlining involved providing cost saving measures for the treatment, storage, and safe containment of the wastes. To expedite cleanup and remove disincentives, EPA designed 40 CFR 264 Subpart S to be flexible. At the heart of this flexibility are the provisions for CAMUs and Temporary Units (TUs). CAMUs and TUs were created to remove cleanup disincentives resulting from other Resource Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous waste provisions--specifically, RCRA land disposal restrictions (LDRs) and minimum technology requirements (MTRs). Although LDR and MTR provisions were not intended for remediation activities, LDRs and MTRs apply to corrective actions because hazardous wastes are generated. However, management of RCRA hazardous remediation wastes in a CAMU or TU is not subject to these stringent requirements. The CAMU at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico (SNL/NM) was proposed through an interactive process involving the regulators (EPA and the New Mexico Environment Department), DOE, SNL/NM, and stakeholders. The CAMU at SNL/NM has been accepting waste from the nearby Chemical Waste Landfill remediation since January of 1999. During this time, a number of unique techniques have been implemented to save costs, improve health and safety, and provide the best value and management practices. This presentation will take the audience through the corrective action process implemented at the CAMU facility, from the selection of the CAMU site to permitting and construction, waste management, waste treatment, and final waste placement. The presentation will highlight the key advantages that CAMUs and TUs offer in the corrective action process. These advantages include yielding a practical approach to regulatory compliance, expediting efficient remediation and site closure, and realizing potentially significant cost savings compared to off-site disposal. Specific examples of CA MU advantages realized by SNL/NM will be presented along with the above highlighted process improvements, Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) performance, and associated lessons learned.

  18. MN-MED026 Sandia National Laboratories 6/1/08 1 Health Benefits & Employee Services (HBE)

    E-print Network

    Fuerschbach, Phillip

    of this document may not be the document currently in effect. The official version is located on the Medical Involving Toxic or Potentially Harmful Agents · Medical Devices and Research Regulated by the FDA Documentation page on the Sandia Restricted Network (SRN). Author: Terry Reser, HSB Administrator, 3333 Issue D

  19. A Radiation Laboratory Curriculum Development at Western Kentucky University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barzilov, Alexander P.; Novikov, Ivan S.; Womble, Phil C.

    2009-03-01

    We present the latest developments for the radiation laboratory curriculum at the Department of Physics and Astronomy of Western Kentucky University. During the last decade, the Applied Physics Institute (API) at WKU accumulated various equipment for radiation experimentation. This includes various neutron sources (computer controlled d-t and d-d neutron generators, and isotopic 252 Cf and PuBe sources), the set of gamma sources with various intensities, gamma detectors with various energy resolutions (NaI, BGO, GSO, LaBr and HPGe) and the 2.5-MeV Van de Graaff particle accelerator. XRF and XRD apparatuses are also available for students and members at the API. This equipment is currently used in numerous scientific and teaching activities. Members of the API also developed a set of laboratory activities for undergraduate students taking classes from the physics curriculum (Nuclear Physics, Atomic Physics, and Radiation Biophysics). Our goal is to develop a set of radiation laboratories, which will strengthen the curriculum of physics, chemistry, geology, biology, and environmental science at WKU. The teaching and research activities are integrated into real-world projects and hands-on activities to engage students. The proposed experiments and their relevance to the modern status of physical science are discussed.

  20. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

    E-print Network

    /DPP November 15, 2004; 2 Sandia ICF/HEDP Collaborators and Partners · Atomic Weapons Establishment · Bechtel Nevada · Defense Threat Reduction Agency · DGA, Gramat · General Atomics · High Current Electronics

  1. Sandia National Laboratories

    E-print Network

    of three High School (9th ­12th grades) or two Middle School (6th ­8th grades) REGIONAL SCIENCE BOWL science academic event for teams of either high school or middle school students. The winning team (5 Area competitions: Date (all on Saturdays): Location: Host: Regional HIGH SCHOOL Science Bowls January

  2. All things White Dwarf: The State of Stellar Forensics at the University of Texas and Sandia National Laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winget, Donald

    2011-10-01

    Astronomy has always been considered an observational science, in contrast with other experimental sciences like physics, chemistry, biology, and geology. This is because it has not been possible to perform experiments on the objects we observe. This situation has changed in a way that is transformational. We are now able to make macroscopic bits of star stuff in the lab: plasmas created under conditions that are the same as the plasmas in stars. Although laboratory astrophysics has long been an important part of astronomical research, what has changed is the ability to produce large enough chunks of a star that we can make measurements and perform experiments. In this way, astronomy joins her sister sciences in becoming an experimental science as well as an observational one. I will describe how this came about, the technology behind it, and the results of recent laboratory experiments. Most importantly, we will discuss how this will change our understanding of the universe and its contents. This work will shed new light on our recent discoveries involving McDonald Observatory: planets around white dwarf stars, massive carbon/oxygen variable white dwarf stars, and white dwarf-white dwarf binaries -- including one detached double eclipsing system with an orbital period of 12 minutes. We should measure the rate of change of the orbital period in this system within a year and we expect it to be the highest S/N source of gravitational radiation, easily detectable with LISA or similar approaches.

  3. Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) : appraisal method for the implementation of the ASC software quality engineering practices: Version 1.0.

    SciTech Connect

    Turgeon, Jennifer; Minana, Molly A.

    2008-02-01

    This document provides a guide to the process of conducting software appraisals under the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) ASC Program. The goal of this document is to describe a common methodology for planning, conducting, and reporting results of software appraisals thereby enabling: development of an objective baseline on implementation of the software quality engineering (SQE) practices identified in the ASC Software Quality Plan across the ASC Program; feedback from project teams on SQE opportunities for improvement; identification of strengths and opportunities for improvement for individual project teams; guidance to the ASC Program on the focus of future SQE activities Document contents include process descriptions, templates to promote consistent conduct of appraisals, and an explanation of the relationship of this procedure to the SNL ASC software program.

  4. Cultural resources regulatory analysis, area overview, and assessment of previous Department of Energy and Kirtland Air Force Base inventories for Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Hoagland, S.R.; Lord, K.J. (Chambers Group, Inc., Santa Ana, CA (United States))

    1993-01-01

    The following regulatory analysis and literature review of archaeological and historic resources on the Sandia National Laboratory/New Mexico (SNL/NM) occupied properties was prepared by the Chambers Group Inc. in January 1992. Based upon compliance surveys of Technical Area I through V undertaken in 1990 and 1991 the report concludes that, although consultation with the Department of Energy and State Historic Preservation Officer will still be required for particular projects, cultural resources should not affect the overall planning and development of future SNL/NM projects. As SNL/NM buildings approach 50 years in age additional analysis and consultations may be required. In order to protect sensitive resources, the location coordinates and maps provided in the original report are not included here.

  5. Technical developments at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Lowenstein, D I; Rusek, A

    2007-06-01

    The NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) located at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a center for space radiation research in both the life and physical sciences. BNL is a multidisciplinary research facility operated for the Office of Science of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The BNL scientific research portfolio supports a large and diverse science and technology program including research in nuclear and high-energy physics, material science, chemistry, biology, medial science, and nuclear safeguards and security. NSRL, in operation since July 2003, is an accelerator-based facility which provides particle beams for radiobiology and physics studies (Lowenstein in Phys Med 17(supplement 1):26-29 2001). The program focus is to measure the risks and to ameliorate the effects of radiation encountered in space, both in low earth orbit and extended missions beyond the earth. The particle beams are produced by the Booster synchrotron, an accelerator that makes up part of the injector sequence of the DOE nuclear physics program's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. Ion species from protons to gold are presently available, at energies ranging from <100 to >1,000 MeV/n. The NSRL facility has recently brought into operation the ability to rapidly switch species and beam energy to supply a varied spectrum onto a given specimen. A summary of past operation performance, plans for future operations and recent and planned hardware upgrades will be described. PMID:17211657

  6. Characterization, minimization and disposal of radioactive, hazardous, and mixed wastes during cleanup and rransition of the Tritium Research Laboratory (TRL) at Sandia National Laboratories/California (SNL/CA)

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, T.B.; Gorman, T.P.

    1996-12-01

    This document provides an outline of waste handling practices used during the Sandia National Laboratory/California (SNL/CA), Tritium Research Laboratory (TRL) Cleanup and Transition project. Here we provide background information concerning the history of the TRL and the types of operations that generated the waste. Listed are applicable SNL/CA site-wide and TRL local waste handling related procedures. We describe personnel training practices and outline methods of handling and disposal of compactible and non-compactible low level waste, solidified waste water, hazardous wastes and mixed wastes. Waste minimization, reapplication and recycling practices are discussed. Finally, we provide a description of the process followed to remove the highly contaminated decontamination systems. This document is intended as both a historical record and as a reference to other facilities who may be involved in similar work.

  7. Materials and process engineering projects for the Sandia National Laboratories/Newly Independent States Industrial Partnering Program. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Zanner, F.J.; Moffatt, W.C.

    1995-07-01

    In July, 1994, a team of materials specialists from Sandia and U S Industry traveled to Russia and the Ukraine to select and fund projects in materials and process technology in support of the Newly Independent States/Industrial Partnering Program (NIS/IPP). All of the projects are collaborations with scientists and Engineers at NIS Institutes. Each project is scheduled to last one year, and the deliverables are formatted to supply US Industry with information which will enable rational decisions to be made regarding the commercial value of these technologies. This work is an unedited interim compilation of the deliverables received to date.

  8. Materials and process engineering projects for the Sandia National Laboratories/Newly Independent States Industrial Partnering Program. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Zanner, F.J.; Moffatt, W.C.

    1995-07-01

    In July, 1994, a team of materials specialists from Sandia and US. Industry traveled to Russia and the Ukraine to select and fund projects in materials and process technology in support of the Newly Independent States/Industrial Partnering Program (NIS/IPP). All of the projects are collaborations with scientists and Engineers at NIS Institutes. Each project is scheduled to last one year, and the deliverables are formatted to supply US. Industry with information which will enable rational decisions to be made regarding the commercial value of these technologies. This work is an unedited interim compilation of the deliverables received to date.

  9. Supersonic radiatively cooled rotating flows and jets in the laboratory

    E-print Network

    D. J. Ampleford; S. V. Lebedev; A. Ciardi; S. N. Bland; S. C. Bott; G. N. Hall; N. Naz; C. A. Jennings; M. Sherlock; J. P. Chittenden; J. B. A. Palmer; A. Frank; E. Blackman

    2008-01-02

    The first laboratory astrophysics experiments to produce a radiatively cooled plasma jet with dynamically significant angular momentum are discussed. A new configuration of wire array z-pinch, the twisted conical wire array, is used to produce convergent plasma flows each rotating about the central axis. Collision of the flows produces a standing shock and jet that each have supersonic azimuthal velocities. By varying the twist angle of the array, the rotation velocity of the system can be controlled, with jet rotation velocities reaching ~20% of the propagation velocity.

  10. Supersonic radiatively cooled rotating flows and jets in the laboratory.

    PubMed

    Ampleford, D J; Lebedev, S V; Ciardi, A; Bland, S N; Bott, S C; Hall, G N; Naz, N; Jennings, C A; Sherlock, M; Chittenden, J P; Palmer, J B A; Frank, A; Blackman, E

    2008-01-25

    The first laboratory astrophysics experiments to produce a radiatively cooled plasma jet with dynamically significant angular momentum are discussed. A new configuration of wire array z pinch, the twisted conical wire array, is used to produce convergent plasma flows each rotating about the central axis. Collision of the flows produces a standing shock and jet that each have supersonic azimuthal velocities. By varying the twist angle of the array, the rotation velocity of the system can be controlled, with jet rotation velocities reaching approximately 18% of the propagation velocity. PMID:18232988

  11. SANDIA REPORT SAND930731 s UC706

    E-print Network

    Kansas, University of

    March 1993 Distribution Category UC-706 Spaceborne SAR Study: LDRD '92 Final Report D. L. Bickel RadarSANDIA REPORT SAND93­0731 s UC­706 Unlimited Release Printed March 1993 Spaceborne SAR Study: LDRD Development Department Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 C. T. Allen Radar & Antenna

  12. Sandia software guidelines, Volume 4: Configuration management

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    This volume is one in a series of Sandia Software Guidelines for use in producing quality software within Sandia National Laboratories. This volume is based on the IEEE standard and guide for software configuration management. The basic concepts and detailed guidance on implementation of these concepts are discussed for several software project types. Example planning documents for both projects and organizations are included.

  13. SANDIA REPORT SAND2006-5000

    E-print Network

    O'Leary, Dianne P.

    Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration;Issued by Sandia National Laboratories, operated for the United States Department of Energy by Sandia in the United States of America. This report has been reproduced directly from the best available copy

  14. [Estimation of radiation exposure and radiation risk for employees of a heart catheterization laboratory].

    PubMed

    Folkerts, K H; Münz, A; Jung, S

    1997-04-01

    The staff at interventional radiological procedures is exposed to high levels of ionizing radiation. This applies especially to measures at cardiac catheterization laboratories. In this study the annual radiation exposure to the staff was estimated by measuring the dose rate under characteristic conditions. It could be shown that the resulting radiation exposure was strongly dependent on the radiation protection measures and is also dependent on the operation conditions of the x-ray-tube. The effective dose for the physician wearing a lead apron and thyroid shield was determined to about 1.7 mSv/a. Without a thyroid shield an effective dose of about 3.5 mSv/a resulted. This corresponds to approximately the natural background radiation of about 2.4 mSv/a in the Federal Republic of Germany. From the number of procedures performed we could derive an effective dose of approximately 1-2 microSv per application for the physician, averaged over all types of procedures. Further, it could be shown that the readings of the film badges, usually worn by the staff, underestimate the effective dose by approximately a factor of two. This is because the film badges do not include the contribution of the unshielded parts of the body to effective dose. From the estimated annual effective dose, a lifetime dose of 68 mSv was estimated for a 40-year working career. The corresponding lifetime risk for induced fatal cancer due to radiation exposure was determined to 0.3% applying the ICRP risk factor of 4 x 10(-2) Sv-1. Considering the NCRP recommendations for a safe occupation, working in a cardiac catheterization laboratory can be considered as safe when applying all radiation protection measures. However, changing the protection measures and modifying the parameters of the x-ray-tube can lead to strong changes of the radiation exposure and the resulting risk estimation. PMID:9235797

  15. The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, 20 years of synchrotron light

    SciTech Connect

    Cantwell, K.

    1993-08-01

    The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) is now operating as a fully dedicated light source with low emittance electron optics, delivering high brightness photon beams to 25 experimental stations six to seven months per year. On October 1, 1993 SSRL became a Division of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, rather than an Independent Laboratory of Stanford University, so that high energy physics and synchrotron radiation now function under a single DOE contract. The SSRL division of SLAC has responsibility for operating, maintaining and improving the SPEAR accelerator complex, which includes the storage ring and a 3 GeV injector. SSRL has thirteen x-ray stations and twelve VUV/Soft x-ray stations serving its 600 users. Recently opened to users is a new spherical grating monochromator (SGM) and a multiundulator beam line. Circularly polarized capabilities are being exploited on a second SGM line. New YB{sub 66} crystals installed in a vacuum double-crystal monochromator line have sparked new interest for Al and Mg edge studies. One of the most heavily subscribed stations is the rotation camera, which has been recently enhanced with a MAR imaging plate detector system for protein crystallography on a multipole wiggler. Under construction is a new wiggler-based structural molecular biology beam line with experimental stations for crystallography, small angle scattering and x-ray absorption spectroscopy. Plans for new developments include wiggler beam lines and associated facilities specialized for environmental research and materials processing.

  16. Sandia technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, H. M.; Thornborough, A. D.; Cocklereas, C. E.; Trennel, A. J.; Hoenstreter, G. F.; Mead, P. L.

    1982-05-01

    Some of Sandia's activities and accomplishments in unclassified programs are described in this report. The role of Sandia in research and development for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) is discussed. They are responsible for establishing testing, certification, and monitoring procedures for, and predicting the long-term behavior of, the stored petroleum. Studies in simulated Raman spectroscopy are also discussed. Its use in the study of combustion processes and chemical vapor deposition is described.

  17. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratories (ORNL) joint development of SNL`s sample tracking, analysis and reporting (STAR) information system

    SciTech Connect

    Fish, J.; Campbell, D.; Jenkins, B. [and others

    1995-05-01

    A comprehensive environmental sample management program allocates much of its resources to collecting, managing, and manipulating information. A computerized system that collects information at the field sampling point, tracks the sample to analytical labs and loads electronic data deliverables from these labs, while maintaining chain of custody and data integrity, is efficient and cost effective for providing consistent and accurate, legally defensible sample data. In June 1993, a team was formed to gather Sample Management Office requirements and begin development of a sample tracking system. This paper is an overview of experiences encountered when Sandia transferred and implemented sample software from the Waste Area Group (WAG6) at ORNL.

  18. Radiation safety and quality control in the cyclotron laboratory.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sushil; Krause, Gregory; Ebadi, Manuchair

    2006-01-01

    Radiation safety was determined to maintain quality control in the cyclotron laboratory. Based on the results of 438 runs in the Faraday cup (20 microA for 10 min), 20 runs on 18O-water target (40 microA for 2 h) and 10 runs on 18O-gas targets (30 microA for 45 min), we have established that occupationally exposed workers remain 10 +/- 5 times below federal regulatory limits (FRLs) in the cyclotron vault, 30 +/- 8 times below FRL in the radiochemistry laboratory and 200 +/- 10 times below the FRL outside the cyclotron laboratory during beam operation. (The FRL for unrestricted area are <20 microSv in 1 h.) The non-occupationally exposed workers serving in offices in the vicinity of the cyclotron vault within 100 m distance remained 200 times below the FRL irrespective of beam being on or off, suggesting that routine beam operation of 40 microA for 2 h once a day during office hours is safe provided quality control and system performance measures as discussed in this report are strictly maintained. PMID:16497875

  19. The NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory: Preparation and delivery of ion beams for space radiation research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Kevin; Ahrens, Leif; Hung Chiang, I.; Gardner, Christopher; Gassner, David; Hammons, Lee; Harvey, Margaret; Kling, Nicholas; Morris, John; Pile, Phillip; Rusek, Adam; Sivertz, Mike; Steski, Dannie; Tsoupas, Nick; Zeno, Keith

    2010-06-01

    The NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) was commissioned in October 2002 and became operational in July 2003. The NSRL was constructed in collaboration with NASA for the purpose of performing space radiation research as part of the NASA space program. The NSRL can accept a wide variety of ions from BNL's Collider Accelerator Department (CAD) Booster accelerator. These ion beams are extracted from the accelerator with kinetic energies ranging from 0.05 to 3 GeV/nucleon. Many different beam conditions have been produced for experiments at NSRL. The facilities at BNL and the design of the NSRL facility permit a wide variety of beams to be produced with a great degree of flexibility in the delivery of ion beams to experiments. In this report we will describe the facility and its performance over the eight experimental run periods that have taken place since it became operational. We will also describe the current and future capabilities of the NSRL.

  20. Radiation Detection Laboratory The Detection for Nuclear Nonproliferation Lab is used to explore novel techniques for radiation

    E-print Network

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    NERS Radiation Detection Laboratory The Detection for Nuclear Nonproliferation Lab is used to explore novel techniques for radiation detection and characterization for nuclear nonproliferation); Development of TlBr wide band-gap semiconductor detectors (Radiation Monitoring Devices and DNDO of DHS

  1. New Neutron Simulation Capabilities Provided by the Sandia Pulse Reactor-III (SPR-III) and the Upgraded Annular Core Pulse Reactor (ACPR)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Larry M. Choate; Theodore R. Schmidt

    1978-01-01

    The paper briefly describes the nuclear reactor facilities at Sandia Laboratories which are used for simulating nuclear weapon produced neutron environments. These reactor facilities are used principally in support of continuing R and D programs for the Department of Energy\\/Office of Military Application (DOE\\/OMA) in studying the effects of radiation on nuclear weapon systems and components. As such, the reactors

  2. Reconsolidation of Crushed Salt to 250°C Under Hydrostatic and Shear Stress Conditions Scott Broome, Frank Hansen, and SJ Bauer Sandia National Laboratories, Geomechanics Department

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broome, S. T.

    2012-12-01

    Design, analysis and performance assessment of potential salt repositories for heat-generating nuclear waste require knowledge of thermal, mechanical, and fluid transport properties of reconsolidating granular salt. Mechanical properties, Bulk (K) and Elastic (E) Moduli and Poisson's ratio (?) are functions of porosity which decreases as the surrounding salt creeps inward and compresses granular salt within the rooms, drifts or shafts. To inform salt repository evaluations, we have undertaken an experimental program to determine K, E, and ? of reconsolidated granular salt as a function of porosity and temperature and to establish the deformational processes by which the salt reconsolidates. The experiments will be used to populate the database used in the reconsolidation model developed by Callahan (1999) which accounts for the effects of moisture through pressure solution and dislocation creep, with both terms dependent on effective stress to account for the effects of porosity. Mine-run salt from the Waste Isolation Pilot Program (WIPP) was first dried at 105 °C for a few days. Undeformed right-circular cylindrical sample assemblies of unconsolidated granular salt with an initial porosity of ~ 40%, nominally 10 cm in diameter and 17.5 cm in length, are jacketed in lead. Samples are placed in a pressure vessel and kept at test temperatures of 100, 175 or 250 °C; samples are vented to the atmosphere during the entire test procedure. At these test conditions the consolidating salt is always creeping, the creep rate increases with increasing temperature and stress and decreases as porosity decreases. In hydrostatic tests, confining pressure is increased to 20 MPa with periodic unload/reload loops to determine K. Volume strain increases with increasing temperature. In shear tests at 2.5 and 5 MPa confining pressure, after confining pressure is applied, the crushed salt is subjected to a differential stress, with periodic unload/reload loops to determine E and ?. At predetermined differential stress levels the stress is held constant and the salt consolidates. Displacement gages mounted on the samples show little lateral deformation until the samples reach a porosity of ~10%. Interestingly, vapor is vented in tests at 250°C and condenses at the vent port. Release of water is not observed in the lower two test temperatures. It is hypothesized that the water originates from fluid inclusions, which were made accessible by intragranular deformational processes including decrepitation. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  3. Seismic waves radiated during dynamic rupture of granite laboratory samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mclaskey, G.; Kilgore, B. D.; Lockner, D. A.; Beeler, N. M.

    2013-12-01

    Using arrays of piezoelectric sensors, we analyze the way that seismic waves are radiated during dynamic rupture of saw-cut faults in granite laboratory samples. We compare stick-slip events generated on a on a 0.15 m-long fault in a triaxial apparatus at 70 to 200 MPa normal stress with those on a 2 m-long fault in a large-scale biaxial apparatus at 1 to 7 MPa normal stress. The two machines have different values of unloading stiffness and produce stick-slip events with significantly different properties. Events on the triaxial apparatus have greater overall slip (400 to 1600 ?m) and larger sample-average shear stress changes (25 to 110 MPa) but shorter overall slip duration (200 to 400 ?s) compared to those on the large biaxial apparatus (50 to 150 ?m slip, 0.1 to 0.4 MPa stress changes, and 2 to 4 ms overall slip duration). As a result, the average slip speeds are much larger for events on the triaxial apparatus (2 to 4 m/s) compared to those on the large biaxial apparatus (15 to 75 mm/s). To explore the consequences of these differences, and how they relate to differences in dynamic rupture modes and seismic radiation, each sample is instrumented with at least 15 piezoelectric sensors which are used to study the timing, location, amplitude, and frequency content of radiated seismic waves. In addition, an array of strain gages on the 2 m samples allows us to explore how the local distribution of shear stress along the fault affects the way that fault rupture occurs. We find that at low stress levels fault slip along the 2 m fault occurs as brief bursts of rapid, seismic slip followed by slowly expanding (5 to 200 m/s) fronts of largely aseismic afterslip (80 to 500 ?m/s slip rates). Higher stress levels on the same fault produce ruptures that propagate close to the shear wave speed and continuously radiate seismic waves near the rupture front. In some cases we observe the rapid termination of seismic radiation on the 2 m fault when a rupture front propagates into a low stress region. Finally, we evaluate which of our observations are controlled by the boundary conditions and elastic properties of the apparatus and which are controlled by the elastic and frictional properties of the rocks and are most relevant to dynamic rupture processes that generate natural earthquakes.

  4. A brief history of Sandia's National security missions.

    SciTech Connect

    Drewien, Celeste A.; O'Canna, Myra Lynn; Stikar, John Anthony.

    2014-09-01

    To help members of the workforce understand what factors contribute to Sandia National Laboratories national security mission, the authors describe the evolution of Sandias core mission and its other mission components. The mission of Sandia first as a division of Los Alamos and later as Sandia Corporation underlies our core nuclear weapon mission of today. Sandias mission changed in 1963 and twice more in the 1970s. This report should help staff and management appreciate the need for mission evolution. A clear definition and communication of a consistent corporate mission statement is still needed.

  5. Sandia WIPP calibration traceability

    SciTech Connect

    Schuhen, M.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dean, T.A. [RE/SPEC, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [RE/SPEC, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-05-01

    This report summarizes the work performed to establish calibration traceability for the instrumentation used by Sandia National Laboratories at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) during testing from 1980-1985. Identifying the calibration traceability is an important part of establishing a pedigree for the data and is part of the qualification of existing data. In general, the requirement states that the calibration of Measuring and Test equipment must have a valid relationship to nationally recognized standards or the basis for the calibration must be documented. Sandia recognized that just establishing calibration traceability would not necessarily mean that all QA requirements were met during the certification of test instrumentation. To address this concern, the assessment was expanded to include various activities.

  6. Radiation effects in optoelectronic devices. [Review

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, C.E.; Wiczer, J.J.

    1984-05-01

    Purpose of this report is to provide not only a summary of radiation damage studies at Sandia National Laboratories, but also of those in the literature on the components of optoelectronic systems: light emitting diodes (LEDs), laser diodes, photodetectors, optical fibers, and optical isolators. This review of radiation damage in optoelectronic components is structured according to device type. In each section, a brief discussion of those device properties relevant to radiation effects is given.

  7. Laboratories to Explore, Explain VLBACHANDRA

    E-print Network

    Argonne National Laboratory Bechtel Technology and Consulting General Atomics Technology Georgia Institute of Technology Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Massachusetts Institute of Technology Oak Ridge National Laboratory Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Sandia National

  8. Monochromatic x-ray backlighting of tungsten wire arrays on the Sandia Z-machine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel Sinars; Michael Cuneo; David Wenger; Patrick Rambo; Ian Smith; John Porter

    2003-01-01

    Z pinches on the Sandia Z-machine are the world's most powerful laboratory x-ray source, capable of producing >200 TW and 1.8 MJ of soft x rays. This is done by passing 15-20 MA of current through an annular wire array, which forms plasma and is compressed by the resulting magnetic forces to the z-axis, where it thermalizes and radiates. Many

  9. The Vermont-Sandia Smart Grid Partnership Powering the Future: The Vermont Smart Grid and Beyond

    E-print Network

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    The Vermont-Sandia Smart Grid Partnership Powering the Future: The Vermont Smart Grid and Beyond BURLINGTON SHERATON HOTEL & CONFERENCE CENTER MAY Laboratories 9:10-10:15 a.m. Opening Plenary: The Vermont-Sandia Smart Grid

  10. Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) software quality plan. Part 1 : ASC software quality engineering practices version 1.0.

    SciTech Connect

    Minana, Molly A.; Sturtevant, Judith E.; Heaphy, Robert; Hodges, Ann Louise; Boucheron, Edward A.; Drake, Richard Roy; Forsythe, Christi A.; Schofield, Joseph Richard, Jr.; Pavlakos, Constantine James; Williamson, Charles Michael; Edwards, Harold Carter

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. Quality is defined in DOE/AL Quality Criteria (QC-1) as conformance to customer requirements and expectations. This quality plan defines the ASC program software quality practices and provides mappings of these practices to the SNL Corporate Process Requirements (CPR 1.3.2 and CPR 1.3.6) and the Department of Energy (DOE) document, ASCI Software Quality Engineering: Goals, Principles, and Guidelines (GP&G). This quality plan identifies ASC management and software project teams' responsibilities for cost-effective software engineering quality practices. The SNL ASC Software Quality Plan establishes the signatories commitment to improving software products by applying cost-effective software engineering quality practices. This document explains the project teams opportunities for tailoring and implementing the practices; enumerates the practices that compose the development of SNL ASC's software products; and includes a sample assessment checklist that was developed based upon the practices in this document.

  11. Exceptional service in the national interest www.sandia.gov

    E-print Network

    Exceptional service in the national interest www.sandia.gov Sandia National Laboratories is a multi's technology transfer activities. The award recognizes federal laboratories and their industry partners for outstanding technology transfer efforts and has become one of the most prestigious honors in technology

  12. A Sandia telephone database system

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, S.D.; Tolendino, L.F.

    1991-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, may soon have more responsibility for the operation of its own telephone system. The processes that constitute providing telephone service can all be improved through the use of a central data information system. We studied these processes, determined the requirements for a database system, then designed the first stages of a system that meets our needs for work order handling, trouble reporting, and ISDN hardware assignments. The design was based on an extensive set of applications that have been used for five years to manage the Sandia secure data network. The system utilizes an Ingres database management system and is programmed using the Application-By-Forms tools.

  13. Reverberation Chamber Uniformity Validation and Radiated Susceptibility Test Procedures for the NASA High Intensity Radiated Fields Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koppen, Sandra V.; Nguyen, Truong X.; Mielnik, John J.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center's High Intensity Radiated Fields Laboratory has developed a capability based on the RTCA/DO-160F Section 20 guidelines for radiated electromagnetic susceptibility testing in reverberation chambers. Phase 1 of the test procedure utilizes mode-tuned stirrer techniques and E-field probe measurements to validate chamber uniformity, determines chamber loading effects, and defines a radiated susceptibility test process. The test procedure is segmented into numbered operations that are largely software controlled. This document is intended as a laboratory test reference and includes diagrams of test setups, equipment lists, as well as test results and analysis. Phase 2 of development is discussed.

  14. Report of work done for technical assistance agreement 1269 between Sandia National Laboratories and the Watkins-Johnson Company: Chemical reaction mechanisms for computational models of SiO{sub 2} CVD

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, P.; Johannes, J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kudriavtsev, V. [Watkins-Johnson Co., Scotts Valley, CA (United States)] [Watkins-Johnson Co., Scotts Valley, CA (United States)

    1997-10-01

    The use of computational modeling to improve equipment and process designs for chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactors is becoming increasingly common. Commercial codes are available that facilitate the modeling of chemically-reacting flows, but chemical reaction mechanisms must be separately developed for each system of interest. One f the products of the Watkins-Johnson Company (WJ) is a reactor marketed to semiconductor manufacturers for the atmospheric-pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) of silicon oxide films. In this process, TEOS (tetraethoxysilane, Si(OC{sub 2}H{sub 5}){sub 4}) and ozone (O{sub 3}) are injected (in nitrogen and oxygen carrier gases) over hot silicon wafers that are being carried through the system on a moving belt. As part of their equipment improvement process, WJ is developing computational models of this tool. In this effort, they are collaborating with Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to draw on Sandia`s experience base in understanding and modeling the chemistry of CVD processes.

  15. Environmental Remediation Sciences Program at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Bargar, John R.

    2006-11-15

    Synchrotron radiation (SR)-based techniques provide unique capabilities to address scientific issues underpinning environmental remediation science and have emerged as major research tools in this field. The high intensity of SR sources and x-ray photon-in/photon-out detection allow noninvasive in-situ analysis of dilute, hydrated, and chemically/structurally complex natural samples. SR x-rays can be focused to beams of micron and sub-micron dimension, which allows the study of microstructures, chemical microgradients, and microenvironments such as in biofilms, pore spaces, and around plant roots, that may control the transformation of contaminants in the environment. The utilization of SR techniques in environmental remediation sciences is often frustrated, however, by an ''activation energy barrier'', which is associated with the need to become familiar with an array of data acquisition and analysis techniques, a new technical vocabulary, beam lines, experimental instrumentation, and user facility administrative procedures. Many investigators find it challenging to become sufficiently expert in all of these areas or to maintain their training as techniques evolve. Another challenge is the dearth of facilities for hard x-ray micro-spectroscopy, particularly in the 15 to 23 KeV range, which includes x-ray absorption edges of the priority DOE contaminants Sr, U, Np, Pu, and Tc. Prior to the current program, there were only two (heavily oversubscribed) microprobe facilities in the U.S. that could fully address this energy range (one at each of APS and NSLS); none existed in the Western U.S., in spite of the relatively large number of DOE laboratories in this region.

  16. Radiation exposure and protection in cardiac catheterization laboratories

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephen W. Miller; Frank P. Castronovo Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Cardiac catheterization with angiography can deliver the greatest dose of x-radiation of any diagnostic medical examination. The physicians and technologists in the angiography room receive low-level scattered radiation over a period of months to decades. Although the radiobiology is complex, the physicians who perform cardiac catheterization should be familiar with the potential genetic and somatic effects of radiation and with

  17. Application of a NAPL partitioning interwell tracer test (PITT) to support DNAPL remediation at the Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico chemical waste landfill

    SciTech Connect

    Studer, J.E. [INTERA Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mariner, P.; Jin, M. [INTERA Inc., Austin, TX (United States)] [and others

    1996-05-01

    Chlorinated solvents as dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) are present at a large number of hazardous waste sites across the U.S. and world. DNAPL is difficult to detect in the subsurface, much less characterize to any degree of accuracy. Without proper site characterization, remedial decisions are often difficult to make and technically effective, cost-efficient remediations are even more difficult to obtain. A new non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) characterization technology that is superior to conventional technologies has been developed and applied at full-scale. This technology, referred to as the Partitioning Interwell Tracer Test (PITT), has been adopted from oil-field practices and tailored to environmental application in the vadose and saturated zones. A PITT has been applied for the first time at full-scale to characterize DNAPL in the vadose zone. The PITT was applied in December 1995 beneath two side-by-side organic disposal pits at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) RCRA Interim Status Chemical Waste Landfill (CWL), located in Albuquerque, New Mexico. DNAPL, consisting of a mixture of chlorinated solvents, aromatic hydrocarbons, and PCE oils, is known to exist in at least one of the two buried pits. The vadose zone PITT was conducted by injecting a slug of non-partitioning and NAPL-partitioning tracers into and through a zone of interest under a controlled forced gradient. The forced gradient was created by a balanced extraction of soil gas at a location 55 feet from the injector. The extracted gas stream was sampled over time to define tracer break-through curves. Soil gas sampling ports from multilevel monitoring installations were sampled to define break-through curves at specific locations and depths. Analytical instrumentation such as gas chromatographs and a photoacoustical analyzers operated autonomously, were used for tracer detection.

  18. Identification of remediation needs and technology development focus areas for the Environmental Restoration (ER) Project at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM)

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, M.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Site Restoration Technology Program Office; Valdez, J.M.; Khan, M.A. [IT Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-06-01

    The Environmental Restoration (ER) Project has been tasked with the characterization, assessment, remediation and long-term monitoring of contaminated waste sites at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM). Many of these sites will require remediation which will involve the use of baseline technologies, innovative technologies that are currently under development, and new methods which will be developed in the near future. The Technology Applications Program (TAP) supports the ER Project and is responsible for development of new technologies for use at the contaminated waste sites, including technologies that will be used for remediation and restoration of these sites. The purpose of this report is to define the remediation needs of the ER Project and to identify those remediation needs for which the baseline technologies and the current development efforts are inadequate. The area between the remediation needs and the existing baseline/innovative technology base represents a technology gap which must be filled in order to remediate contaminated waste sites at SNL/NM economically and efficiently. In the first part of this report, the remediation needs of the ER Project are defined by both the ER Project task leaders and by TAP personnel. The next section outlines the baseline technologies, including EPA defined Best Demonstrated Available Technologies (BDATs), that are applicable at SNL/NM ER sites. This is followed by recommendations of innovative technologies that are currently being developed that may also be applicable at SNL/NM ER sites. Finally, the gap between the existing baseline/innovative technology base and the remediation needs is identified. This technology gap will help define the future direction of technology development for the ER Project.

  19. The Sandia Lightning Simulator Recommissioning and upgrades.

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Leonard E.; Caldwell, Michele

    2005-08-01

    The Sandia lightning simulator at Sandia National Laboratories can provide up to 200 kA for a simulated single lightning stroke, 100 kA for a subsequent stroke, and hundreds of Amperes of continuing current. It has recently been recommissioned after a decade of inactivity and the single-stroke capability demonstrated. The simulator capabilities, basic design components, upgrades, and diagnostic capabilities are discussed in this paper.

  20. Peak radiated power measurement of the DOE Mark II container tag with integrated ST-676 sensor radio frequency identification device.

    SciTech Connect

    Jursich, Mark

    2010-04-01

    The total peak radiated power of the Department of Energy Mark II container tag was measured in the electromagnetic reverberation chamber facility at Sandia National Laboratories. The tag's radio frequency content was also evaluated for possible emissions outside the intentional transmit frequency band. No spurious emissions of any significance were found, and the radiated power conformed to the manufacturer's specifications.

  1. 2006/11/27 Yonsei University Atmospheric Radiation Laboratory Relevance of climate change for the

    E-print Network

    Wang, Yuhang

    to the MODIS data. · Summary #12;2006/11/27 Yonsei University Atmospheric Radiation Laboratory Site Scene (Since 2005) - Detecting : Solar flux (total, direct, diffuse) - Wavelength : 412.8, 495.2, 611.9, 672

  2. Review Of Low-Flow Bladder Pump And High-Volume Air Piston Pump Groundwater Sampling Systems At Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, S. S.; Bailey, G. A.; Jackson, T. O.

    2003-02-25

    Since 1996, Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) has run both a portable high-volume air-piston pump system and a dedicated, low-flow bladder pump system to collect groundwater samples. The groundwater contaminants of concern at SNL/NM are nitrate and the volatile organic compounds trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloethene (PCE). Regulatory acceptance is more common for the high-volume air piston pump system, especially for programs like SNL/NM's, which are regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). This paper describes logistical and analytical results of the groundwater sampling systems used at SNL/NM. With two modifications to the off-the-shelf low-flow bladder pump, SNL/NM consistently operates the dedicated low-flow system at depths greater than 450 feet below ground surface. As such, the low-flow sampling system requires fewer personnel, less time and materials, and generates less purge and decontamination water than does the high-volume system. However, the bladder pump cannot work in wells with less than 4 feet of water. A review of turbidity and laboratory analytical results for TCE, PCE, and chromium (Cr) from six wells highlight the affect or lack of affects the sampling systems have on groundwater samples. In the PVC wells, turbidity typically remained < 5 nephelometric turbidity units (NTU) regardless of the sampling system. In the wells with a stainless steel screen, turbidity typically remained < 5 NTU only with the low-flow system. When the high-volume system was used, the turbidity and Cr concentration typically increased an order of magnitude. TCE concentrations at two wells did not appear to be sensitive to the sampling method used. However, PCE and TCE concentrations dropped an order of magnitude when the high-volume system was used at two other wells. This paper recommends that SNL/NM collaborate with other facilities with similar groundwater depths, continue to pursue regulatory approval for using dedicated the lowflow system, and review data for sample system affects on nitrate concentrations.

  3. Space Radiation Research Unit, International Open Laboratory in NIRS

    PubMed Central

    Uchihori, Yukio; Hei, Tom K.; Konishi, Teruaki; Kobayashi, Alisa; Kitamura, Hisashi; Kodaira, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Shingo

    2014-01-01

    The radiation environment encountered by astronauts during spaceflight is far more complex than any radiation field existed on Earth. Space crew living and working in the International Space Station (ISS) are exposed to a mixed radiation field comprises primary high-energy cosmic rays, including energetic protons and heavy ions, and to secondary radiations, including energetic neutrons, produced when the primary radiation interacts with the mass of the space station and its contents. The doses of ionizing radiation received by astronauts and cosmonauts aboard the ISS are many times greater than those received by radiation workers on the ground. Exposure to ionizing radiation in space includes high LET events than can produce significant biological damage in human cells and tissues, and thus represents an important risk to space crew health and safety. The Space Radiation Research Unit at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) includes both physicists and radiation biologists and there is extensive collaboration between these two groups. This provides us with the expertise needed to investigate the effects of space crew exposure to the highly complex, mixed radiation environment encountered in space. In addition, NIRS is home to a heavy ion accelerator, HIMAC and the Medical Cyclotron that can be used to simulate various components of the space radiation environment. Recently, we have developed a medium energy proton radiation field using the NIRS Medical Cyclotron. [How about a sentence or two on the significance of this proton facilities.] In addition, NIRS has also developed a high precision tool, the Single Particle Irradiation System to Cell (SPICE) microbeam facility, for use in investigating various radiobiological endpoints, including the bystander effect and the adaptive response of various cell types, Caenorhabditis elegans and in Medaka fish. Some of these research activities are described in these proceedings [1, 2]. The Space Radiation Research Unit at NIRS has extensive international collaborations with researchers in China, Germany, Russia, USA, Sweden, Austria and other countries. In particular, collaborations with our Russian colleagues has led to opportunities to expose our dosimeters aboard the ISS and to numerous other experiments in the frame of the IOL, as described more fully elsewhere in these proceedings. We believe that the framework of the IOL is very powerful and productive and we plan to continue our collaborative research with our international colleagues.

  4. Laboratory Simulation of CO2 Ice Condensation on Mars by Radiative Cooling

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. E. Wood; D. A. Paige; W. D. Smythe

    1997-01-01

    We have performed realistic laboratory simulations of the thermal and radiative environment at the surface of Mars to produce the first samples of carbon dioxide ice formed as it does on Mars, by radiative cooling from a 600 Pa, near-pure CO2 gas. It is important to determine the physical characteristics of Mars' seasonal CO2 polar ice caps because these determine

  5. Pacific Northwest Laboratory plan to maintain radiation exposure as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA)

    SciTech Connect

    Higby, D.P.; Denovan, J.T.

    1982-12-01

    This document describes the radiation safety program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The practices and administrative policies of this program support the principles of ALARA (to maintain radiation exposure as low as reasonably achievable). This document also describes a program to establish safety goals at PNL to help ensure that operations are conducted according to ALARA principles.

  6. Exceptional service in the national interest www.sandia.gov

    E-print Network

    Missiles and Space Division and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). He Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DEExceptional service in the national interest www.sandia.gov Sandia National Laboratories is a multi

  7. Building the basis for a comprehensive radiation protection program for a multi-program laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Copenhaver, E.D.

    1987-01-01

    An explicit, workplace-specific training has been developed, implemented, and documented for all radiation workers. In addition to the radiation worker personnel located at reactors, accelerators, radiochemical laboratories, and waste treatment areas, we have trained other personnel who work in areas where a lesser potential for radiological/chemical exposure exists. These workforces include construction crews, site restoration crews, contracted special services such as scoping and site characterization teams, and short-term visitors. We are developing a comprehensive, integrated approach to radiation protection training suited for a multi-purpose research laboratory. 9 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  8. Computer simulation of grain growth kinetics with solute drag P.O. Box 5800, MS 1411, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185

    E-print Network

    Chen, Long-Qing

    Computer simulation of grain growth kinetics with solute drag D. Fan P.O. Box 5800, MS 1411, Sandia; accepted 1 June 1998) The effects of solute drag on grain growth kinetics were studied in two-dimensional (2D) computer simulations by using a diffuse-interface field model. It is shown that, in the low

  9. Sandia's Biofuels Program

    ScienceCinema

    Simmons, Blake; Singh, Seema; Lane, Todd; Reichardt, Tom; Davis, Ryan

    2014-07-24

    Sandia's biofuels program is focused on developing next-generation, renewable fuel solutions derived from biomass. In this video, various Sandia researchers discuss the program and the tools they employ to tackle the technical challenges they face.

  10. Sandia's Biofuels Program

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, Blake; Singh, Seema; Lane, Todd; Reichardt, Tom; Davis, Ryan

    2014-07-22

    Sandia's biofuels program is focused on developing next-generation, renewable fuel solutions derived from biomass. In this video, various Sandia researchers discuss the program and the tools they employ to tackle the technical challenges they face.

  11. Sandia Combustion Research Program

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, S.C.; Palmer, R.E.; Montana, C.A. (eds.)

    1988-01-01

    During the late 1970s, in response to a national energy crisis, Sandia proposed to the US Department of Energy (DOE) a new, ambitious program in combustion research. Shortly thereafter, the Combustion Research Facility (CRF) was established at Sandia's Livermore location. Designated a ''user facility,'' the charter of the CRF was to develop and maintain special-purpose resources to support a nationwide initiative-involving US inventories, industry, and national laboratories--to improve our understanding and control of combustion. This report includes descriptions several research projects which have been simulated by working groups and involve the on-site participation of industry scientists. DOE's Industry Technology Fellowship program, supported through the Office of Energy Research, has been instrumental in the success of some of these joint efforts. The remainder of this report presents results of calendar year 1988, separated thematically into eleven categories. Referred journal articles appearing in print during 1988 and selected other publications are included at the end of Section 11. Our traditional'' research activities--combustion chemistry, reacting flows, diagnostics, engine and coal combustion--have been supplemented by a new effort aimed at understanding combustion-related issues in the management of toxic and hazardous materials.

  12. Measurements of energetic particle radiation in transit to Mars on the Mars Science Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Zeitlin, C; Hassler, D M; Cucinotta, F A; Ehresmann, B; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R F; Brinza, D E; Kang, S; Weigle, G; Böttcher, S; Böhm, E; Burmeister, S; Guo, J; Köhler, J; Martin, C; Posner, A; Rafkin, S; Reitz, G

    2013-05-31

    The Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft, containing the Curiosity rover, was launched to Mars on 26 November 2011, and for most of the 253-day, 560-million-kilometer cruise to Mars, the Radiation Assessment Detector made detailed measurements of the energetic particle radiation environment inside the spacecraft. These data provide insights into the radiation hazards that would be associated with a human mission to Mars. We report measurements of the radiation dose, dose equivalent, and linear energy transfer spectra. The dose equivalent for even the shortest round-trip with current propulsion systems and comparable shielding is found to be 0.66 ± 0.12 sievert. PMID:23723233

  13. Radiative transfer theory verified by controlled laboratory experiments

    E-print Network

    and engineering for more than a century, the radiative transfer equation (RTE) had not had a solid physical foundation until quite recently. The derivation of the RTE for sparse discrete random media directly from and compare them with the results of numerically exact com- puter solutions of the vector RTE. By increasing

  14. Importance of energy efficiency in the design of the Process and Environmental Technology Laboratory (PETL) at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (NM)

    SciTech Connect

    Wrons, R.

    1998-06-01

    As part of the design of the Process and Environmental Technology Laboratory (PETL) in FY97, an energy conservation report (ECR) was completed. The original energy baseline for the building, established in Title 1 design, was 595,000 BTU/sq. ft./yr, site energy use. Following the input of several reviewers and the incorporation of the various recommendations into the Title 2 design, the projected energy consumption was reduced to 341,000 BTU/sq. ft./yr. Of this reduction, it is estimated that about 150,000 BTU/sq. ft./yr resulted from inclusion of more energy efficient options into the design. The remaining reductions resulted from better accounting of energy consumption between Title 1 ECR and the final ECR. The energy efficient features selected by the outcome of the ECR were: (1) Energy Recovery system, with evaporative cooling assist, for the Exhaust/Make-up Air System; (2) Chilled Water Thermal Storage system; (3) Premium efficiency motors for large, year-round applications; (4) Variable frequency drives for all air handling fan motors; (4) Premium efficiency multiple boiler system; and (5) Lighting control system. The annual energy cost savings due to these measures will be about $165,000. The estimated annual energy savings are two million kWhrs electric, and 168,000 therms natural gas, the total of which is equivalent to 23,000 million BTUs per year. Put into the perspective of a typical office/light lab at SNL/NM, the annual energy savings is equal the consumption of a 125,000 square foot building. The reduced air emissions are approximately 2,500 tons annually.

  15. Effect of pulsed progressive fluoroscopy on reduction of radiation dose in the cardiac catheterization laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, D.R. Jr.; Wondrow, M.A.; Gray, J.E.; Vetter, R.J.; Fellows, J.L.; Julsrud, P.R. (Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The increased application of therapeutic interventional cardiology procedures is associated with increased radiation exposure to physicians, patients and technical personnel. New advances in imaging techniques have the potential for reducing radiation exposure. A progressive scanning video system with a standard vascular phantom has been shown to decrease entrance radiation exposure. The effect of this system on reducing actual radiation exposure to physicians and technicians was assessed from 1984 through 1987. During this time, progressive fluoroscopy was added sequentially to all four adult catheterization laboratories; no changes in shielding procedures were made. During this time, the case load per physician increased by 63% and the number of percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty procedures (a high radiation procedure) increased by 244%. Despite these increases in both case load and higher radiation procedures, the average radiation exposure per physician declined by 37%. During the same time, the radiation exposure for technicians decreased by 35%. Pulsed progressive fluoroscopy is effective for reducing radiation exposure to catheterization laboratory physicians and technical staff.

  16. Aircraft Radiation Shield Experiments--Preflight Laboratory Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singleterry, Robert C., Jr.; Shinn, Judy L.; Wilson, John W.; Maiden, Donald L.; Thibeault, Sheila A.; Badavi, Francis F.; Conroy, Thomas; Braby, Leslie

    1999-04-01

    In the past, measurements onboard a research Boeing 57F (RB57-F) aircraft have demonstrated that the neutron environment within the aircraft structure is greater than that in the local external environment. Recent studies onboard Boeing 737 commercial flights have demonstrated cabin variations in radiation exposure up to 30 percent. These prior results were the basis of the present study to quantify the potential effects of aircraft construction materials on the internal exposures of the crew and passengers. The present study constitutes preflight measurements using an unmoderated Cf-252 fission neutron source to quantify the effects of three current and potential aircraft materials (aluminum, titanium, and graphite-epoxy composite) on the fast neutron flux. Conclusions about the effectiveness of the three selected materials for radiation shielding must wait until testing in the atmosphere is complete; however, it is clear that for shielding low-energy neutrons, the composite material is an improved shielding material over aluminum or titanium.

  17. Aircraft Radiation Shield Experiments--Preflight Laboratory Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singleterry, Robert C., Jr.; Shinn, Judy L.; Wilson, John W.; Maiden, Donald L.; Thibeault, Sheila A.; Badavi, Francis F.; Conroy, Thomas; Braby, Leslie

    1999-01-01

    In the past, measurements onboard a research Boeing 57F (RB57-F) aircraft have demonstrated that the neutron environment within the aircraft structure is greater than that in the local external environment. Recent studies onboard Boeing 737 commercial flights have demonstrated cabin variations in radiation exposure up to 30 percent. These prior results were the basis of the present study to quantify the potential effects of aircraft construction materials on the internal exposures of the crew and passengers. The present study constitutes preflight measurements using an unmoderated Cf-252 fission neutron source to quantify the effects of three current and potential aircraft materials (aluminum, titanium, and graphite-epoxy composite) on the fast neutron flux. Conclusions about the effectiveness of the three selected materials for radiation shielding must wait until testing in the atmosphere is complete; however, it is clear that for shielding low-energy neutrons, the composite material is an improved shielding material over aluminum or titanium.

  18. Presented at Sandia National Laboratory

    E-print Network

    . Rochester Aug 99 NYU Oct 99 PPPL/SFG Aug 99 U. Wis Oct 99 FPA Oct 99 SOFE Oct 99 APS-DPP Nov 99 U. Maryland. Wis Mar 00/Apr00 EPS/Budapest Jun 00 IPP/Garching Jun 00 CEA/Cadarache Jun 00 JET-EFDA Jun 00 NSO

  19. Sandia Technology: Engineering and science accomplishments, February 1995

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1995-02-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is one of the Department of Energy`s primary research and development laboratories. Our essential mission is to support the national interests of the US in defense, energy, and the environment. Managed by Martin Marietta Corporation for DOE, Sandia focuses its resources on problems of national interest that require the integration of science and technology for their solution. We all hope that this period of sweeping alterations in international affairs will result in a successful transition from the Cold War to a period of sustainable global security and prosperity. In the meantime, our nation`s interests are best served by continued commitment to Sandia`s traditional responsibilities. Nonetheless, as momentous developments are reshaping the world, Sandia is also changing from its beginning as a closed operation concentrating on classified defense programs, Sandia has become a more accessible resource that focuses on research and development partnerships with industry and universities as a way to ensure continued success in DOE`s evolving core mission area of nuclear weapons, energy, environment, and the basis sciences. Through these collaborative efforts, Sandia and its partners are also benefiting the economic competitiveness of our nation. Sandia places a special emphasis on working with small businesses as both technology transfer partners and suppliers of goods and services. We are also reaching out the the larger community surrounding Sandia, striving to provide technological solution and accurate information to meet community needs. We believe that the dialogue we are creating will benefit Sandia, the community, and the nation. Our goal is to render `` exceptional service in the national interest`` by returning maximum value on the investment in the labs. As you review this document, look for new ways in which Sandia can contribute to the solution of problems facing our nation.

  20. Synchrotron radiation applications in medical research at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Thomlinson, W.

    1997-08-01

    In the relatively short time that synchrotrons have been available to the scientific community, their characteristic beams of UV and X-ray radiation have been applied to virtually all areas of medical science which use ionizing radiation. The ability to tune intense monochromatic beams over wide energy ranges clearly differentiates these sources from standard clinical and research tools. The tunable spectrum, high intrinsic collimation of the beams, polarization and intensity of the beams make possible in-vitro and in-vivo research and therapeutic programs not otherwise possible. From the beginning of research operation at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), many programs have been carrying out basic biomedical research. At first, the research was limited to in-vitro programs such as the x-ray microscope, circular dichroism, XAFS, protein crystallography, micro-tomography and fluorescence analysis. Later, as the coronary angiography program made plans to move its experimental phase from SSRL to the NSLS, it became clear that other in-vivo projects could also be carried out at the synchrotron. The development of SMERF (Synchrotron Medical Research Facility) on beamline X17 became the home not only for angiography but also for the MECT (Multiple Energy Computed Tomography) project for cerebral and vascular imaging. The high energy spectrum on X17 is necessary for the MRT (Microplanar Radiation Therapy) experiments. Experience with these programs and the existence of the Medical Programs Group at the NSLS led to the development of a program in synchrotron based mammography. A recent adaptation of the angiography hardware has made it possible to image human lungs (bronchography). Fig. 1 schematically depicts the broad range of active programs at the NSLS.

  1. SANDYL radiation transport code at the Naval Research Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langworthy, J. B.

    1984-07-01

    SANDYL is a Monte Carlo photon and electron transport code used mainly to calculate dose in any material. This report is a history of the translation and modification of the local version, which is being run on the Texas Instrument Advanced Scientific Computer, and the report details how this version differs from the original versions. Together with original documentation, it will serve as a user's manual. Use of codes like SANDYL or of equivalent more expensive, experimental information is necessary in radiation vulnerability studies and hardness design work on Navy satellites. The special utility of SANDYL lies in its ability to handle rather general geometries while retaining a close connection with physical mechanism.

  2. Implementing QML (Qualified Manufacturers List) for radiation hardness assurance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. S. Winokur; F. W. Sexton; D. M. Fleetwood; M. D. Terry; M. R. Shaneyfelt; P. V. Dressendorfer; J. R. Schwank

    1990-01-01

    Statistical process control (SPC) of technology parameters relevant to radiation hardness, test structure to Integrated Circuit (IC) correlation, and extrapolation from laboratory to threat scenarios are keys to implementing Qualified Manufacture's List (QML) for radiation hardness assurance in a cost-effective manner. Data from approximately 300 wafer lots fabricated in Sandia's 4\\/3-μm and Complementry Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) IIIA (2-μm) technologies

  3. Advanced Materials Laboratory Sandia National Laboratories

    E-print Network

    Shelnutt, John A.

    co-developed with Denis Rousseau. 1968 - 1970 Naval Weapons Center China Lake, CA Systems in Physics - 1968 Teaching Experience 1989 - 2002 Graduate-Level Chemistry Courses Taught: Electronic-SNL/LDRD: Improving Electronic Structure Calculations to Predict Nano-optoelectronics and Nanocatalyst Function, 2006

  4. Sandia Multispectral Airborne Lidar for UAV Deployment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. W. Daniels; Jr. P. J. Hargis; T. D. Henson; J. D. Jordan; A. R. Lang; R. L. Schmitt

    1998-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has initiated the development of an airborne system for W laser remote sensing measurements. System applications include the detection of effluents associated with the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and the detection of biological weapon aerosols. This paper discusses the status of the conceptual design development and plans for both the airborne payload (pointing and tracking,

  5. Sandia technology, Winter 1975--1976

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. P. Weber; L. S. Marcrum

    1976-01-01

    Unclassified development activities at Sandia Laboratories are described. Information is included on rocket-powered aerial trolleys, material evaluation using a plasmajet, metal-hydride models, glass-ceramic tube insulators, ferroelectric ceramics, and systems to communicate with earth penetrators. (JRD)

  6. SANDIA REPORT SAND2014-17400

    E-print Network

    , or any of their contractors. Printed in the United States of America. This report has been reproduced Laboratories, operated for the United States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE: This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United

  7. SANDIA REPORT SAND2014-2864

    E-print Network

    National Laboratories, operated for the United States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE: This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government, nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, nor any

  8. SANDIA REPORT SAND2006-6286

    E-print Network

    , a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security. #12;Issued by Sandia National Laboratories, operated for the United States Department of Energy in the United States of America. This report has been reproduced directly from the best available copy

  9. MULTIPLE FUNCTIONS LONG TRACE PROFILER (LTP-MF) FOR NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON RADIATION LABORATORY OF CHINA.

    SciTech Connect

    QIAN, S.; WANG, Q.; HONG, Y.; TAKACS, P.

    2005-07-31

    The Long Trace Profiler (LTP) is a useful optical metrology instrument for measuring the figure and slope error of cylindrical aspheres commonly used as synchrotron radiation (SR) optics. It is used extensively at a number of synchrotron radiation laboratories around the world. In order to improve SR beam line quality and resolution, the National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) of China is developing a versatile LTP that can be used to measure both SR optics and more conventional ''normal'' optical surfaces. The optical metrology laboratories at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and NSRL are collaborating in developing a multiple functions LTP (LTP-MF). Characteristics of the LTP-MF are: a very compact and lightweight optical head, a large angular test range ({+-} 16 mad) and high accuracy. The LTP-MF can be used in various configurations: as a laboratory-based LTP, an in-situ LTP or penta-prism LTP, as an angle monitor, a portable LTP, and a small radius of curvature test instrument. The schematic design of the compact optical head and a new compact slide are introduced. Analysis of different measurements modes and systematic error correction methods are introduced.

  10. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy s National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

    E-print Network

    Laboratory SNL Collaborating National Laboratories: LLNL, NRL, LANL Collaborating Universities: U.Wisconsin. in progress #12;Z-Pinch IFE Power Plant has a Matrix of Possibilities Repetitive Z-Pinch Driver: _ Marx coating) (e. g., carbon steel) Target: _ double-pinch dynamic hohlraum fast ignition Chamber: _ dry

  11. NIF Laboratory Astrophysics Experiments Investigating The Effects Of A Radiative Shock On Hydrodynamic Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuranz, Carolyn C.; Drake, R. P.; Huntington, C. M.; Klein, S. R.; Trantham, M. R.; Park, H. S.; Remington, B. A.; Miles, A. R.; Raman, K.; Kline, J. L.; Plewa, T.

    2012-05-01

    This paper will describe ongoing laboratory astrophysics experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) relevant to the complex radiation hydrodynamics that occurs in red supergiant, and core-collapse supernovae. Experiments on NIF can deliver 300 eV radiative heating that can be utilized uniquely access the regime in which radiation affects the development of hydrodynamic instabilities within an evolving object. This is relevant to the dynamics that occur during the core-collapse explosions of red supergiant stars. These stars have dense circumstellar plasma, producing a strongly radiative shock whose radiation interacts with the hydrodynamic structures produced by instabilities during the explosion. While published astrophysical simulations have not included complex, multidimensional radiation hydrodynamics, such effects are very physical and expected to affect the evolution of early stages of astrophysical objects described above. This presentation will include a summary of the two test shots that we have performed on NIF, including a 0.7 scale, gas-filled hohlraum test shot, and a description of the integrated physics shots scheduled at the facility. This work is funded by the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas under grant number DE-FG52-09NA29548 , the Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344 and Predictive Sciences Academic Alliances Program in NNSA-ASC via grant DEFC52- 08NA28616.

  12. NIF Laboratory Astrophysics Experiments Investigating The Effects Of A Radiative Shock On Hydrodynamic Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuranz, Carolyn; Drake, R. P.; Park, H. S.; Remington, B. A.; Huntington, C. M.; Doss, F. W.; Krauland, C. M.; Harding, E. C.; Grosskopf, M. J.; Marion, D. C.; Myra, E.; Fryxell, B.; Kalantar, D. H.; Keane, C. J.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Robey, H. F.; Maddox, B. R.; Miles, A. R.; Wallace, R. J.; May, M. J.; Kline, J. L.; Kyrala, G. A.; Plewa, T.; Wheeler, J. C.; Arnett, W. D.; Giraldez, E.; Nikroo, A.

    2010-05-01

    This paper will describe ongoing laboratory astrophysics experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) relevant to the complex radiation hydrodynamics that occurs in red supergiant, and core-collapse supernovae. Experiments on NIF can deliver 300 eV radiative heating that can be utilized uniquely access the regime in which radiation affects the development of hydrodynamic instabilities within an evolving object. This is relevant to the dynamics that occur during the core-collapse explosions of red supergiant stars. These stars have dense circumstellar plasma, producing a strongly radiative shock whose radiation interacts with the hydrodynamic structures produced by instabilities during the explosion. While published astrophysical simulations have not included complex, multidimensional radiation hydrodynamics, such effects are very physical and expected to affect the evolution of early stages of astrophycal objects described above. This presentation will include a summary of the two test shots that we have performed on NIF, including a 0.7 scale, gas-filled hohlraum test shot, and a description of the integrated physics shots scheduled at the facility. This work is funded by the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas under grant number DE-FG52-09NA29548 , the Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344 and Predictive Sciences Academic Alliances Program in NNSA-ASC via grant DEFC52- 08NA28616.

  13. Sandia Software Guidelines, Volume 2. Documentation

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    This volume is one in a series of Sandia Software Guidelines intended for use in producing quality software within Sandia National Laboratories. In consonance with the IEEE Standards for software documentation, this volume provides guidance in the selection of an adequate document set for a software project and example formats for many types of software documentation. A tutorial on life cycle documentation is also provided. Extended document thematic outlines and working examples of software documents are available on electronic media as an extension of this volume.

  14. Experiences and Management of Pregnant Radiation Workers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Bliss, Mary; Bowyer, Sonya M.; Bryant, Janet L.; Lipton, Mary S.; Wahl, Karen L.

    2001-03-06

    Radiation workers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are divided into two classes based on whether or not they can encounter radioactive contamination in the normal course of their work. Level I workers primarily handle sealed radioactive materials such as those used to calibrate detectors. Level II workers perform benchtop chemistry. The U.S. Department of Energy has strict guidelines on the management of pregnant radiation workers. Staff members may voluntarily notify their line managers of a pregnancy and be subjected to stringent radiation exposure limits for the developing fetus. The staff member and manager develop a plan to limit and monitor radiation dose for the remainder of the pregnancy. Several examples of dose management plans and case examples of the impact of pregnancy on staff member?s technical work and projects will be presented.

  15. Sandia technology

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-06-01

    Four mini-reports are included: modeling Mount St. Helen's volcanic eruption, Sierra Nevada magmatic activity, electro-optics for radiation environments, and compound semiconductors for high-temperature electronics. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the last two mini-reports. (DLC)

  16. Initial experimental results of CAEP photoinjector 1 Work Supported by High Power Radiation Laboratory. 1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mao-rong Yang; Xing-shao Du; Zheng-hong Li; Ming Li; Ke-song Hu; Ming-quan Qian; Qing Pan; Gong-he Chai; Zhou Xu; Ren-pei Deng; Zhong-fa Wu

    1998-01-01

    An RF photocathode gun which, along with a compact linac, forms the injection system for a planned FIR FEL amplifier experiment, has been commissioned in the high power radiation laboratory. This high-gradient gun has emitted 60ps, 10A electron beams of up to 3MeV energy. These beams have been characterized by a variety of diagnostics. The quantum efficiency of Cs2Te has

  17. The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) and Implications for IRAS on ExoMars

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert F. Wimmer-Schweingruber; Cary Zeitlin; Stephan Boettcher; Cesar Martin; Onno Kortmann; Arik Posner; Guenther Reitz; Eckhardt Boehm; Scot Rafkin; Soenke Burmeister; Donald M. Hassler

    2008-01-01

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) on NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission is being built to characterize the broad-spectrum of the surface radiation environment, including galactic cosmic radiation, solar proton events, and secondary neutrons. This overarching mission goal is met by RADs science objectives 1-5: 1.)Characterize the energetic particle spectrum incident at the surface of Mars, including direct and indirect radiation

  18. MOS-transistor radiation detectors and X-ray dose-enhancement effects

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. D. Posey; T. F. Wrobel; D. C. Evans; W. Beezhold; J. G. Kelly; C. J. MacCallum; F. N. Coppage; T. F. Luera; A. J. Smith

    1985-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) CMOS IC dose detectors and 3N161 MOS Transistors were evaluated as pulsed X-radiation dosimeters and used as monitors to measure dose-enhancement effects. Measurements were made in the photon environments from the HydraMITE II, SPR III, MBS and PITHON radiation sources. The dosimetric evaluation data suggest that the 3N161 MOS transistors are useful dosimeters for measuring flash

  19. MOS-transistor radiation detectors and x-ray dose-enhancement effects

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. D. Posey; T. F. Wrobel; D. C. Evans; W. Beezhold; J. G. Kelly; C. J. MacCallum; F. N. Coppage; T. F. Luera; A. J. Smith

    1985-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) CMOS IC dose detectors and 3N161 MOS Transistors were evaluated as pulsed x-radiation dosimeters and used as monitors to measure dose-enhancement effects. Measurements were made in the photon environments from the HydraMITE II, SPR III, MBS and PITHON radiation sources. The dosimetric evaluation data suggest that the 3N161 MOS transistors are useful dosimeters for measuring flash

  20. J. H. Scofield and D. M. Fleetwood, IEEE Transactions on Nuclear Science NS-38, 1567-77 (December 1991). PHYSICAL BASIS FOR NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTS OF MOS RADIATION HARDNESS*

    E-print Network

    Scofield, John H.

    J. H. Scofield and D. M. Fleetwood, IEEE Transactions on Nuclear Science NS-38, 1567-77 (December 1991). PHYSICAL BASIS FOR NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTS OF MOS RADIATION HARDNESS* John H. Scofield Department of Physics, Oberlin College Oberlin, OH 44074 and D.M. Fleetwood Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM

  1. Technical findings from Sandia`s intrabuilding recabling project

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, R.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Eberhart, J.A. [Holmes and Narver, Inc., Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    1996-02-01

    The US and other leading nations are at the forefront of a global trend to implement both national and international enterprise networks via information highways. New or upgraded cabling infrastructures are essential to support these activities. Professionals in the telecommunications industry are keenly aware of the challenges presented by such cabling upgrades. Desktop connectivity must be established before quantum leaps in information flow, as suggested by new technologies and global concepts. Some businesses with campus-type facilities have undertaken this formidable challenge. Universities and other higher-level learning institutions, corporate research facilities, independent and government-funded laboratories, financial institutions, medical facilities, and unique suburban housing test sites have risen to this challenge. Sandia National Laboratories is one such organization. This report presents the lessons learned from this project and gives 13 specific recommendations for manufacturers, buyers, and installers.

  2. Australian radiation laboratory (ARL) solar-UVR measurement network: calibation and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gies, H. P.; Roy, Colin R.; Toomey, S.; Tomlinson, D. W.

    1994-09-01

    The Australian Radiation Laboratory (ARL) has been involved for many years in the measurement of solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) using spectroradiometers and a network of broadband detectors at 20 sites in Australia and Antarctica. Measurement sites range from polar to tropical, with vastly different weather conditions and as a result there are many difficulties associated with maintenance of the network to ensure accurate and reliable data collection. Calibration procedures for the various detector systems involve simultaneous spectral measurements using a portable spectroradiometer incorporating a double monochromator, calibrated against 1000 watt standard lamps traceable to the CSIRO National Measurement Laboratory. The spectroradiometer was also checked when ARL participated in an international intercomparison of spectroradiometers at Lauder, NZ in February 1993 and a further intercomparison takes place in Germany during 1994. Detector-datalogger systems are intercompared at the Yallambie site for a number of months before installation at another site. As an additional check on the calibrations, computer models of solar UVR at the earth's surface for days with clear sky and known ozone are compared with the UV radiometer measurements. This paper details many of the procedures and difficulties and presents some measurement results. Network data are used to determine the ultraviolet radiation (UVR) levels to which the Australian population is exposed, in educating the public with presentation of the daily UVB on the news/weather reports in the capital cities each evening, as input for epidemiological studies of skin cancer rates and for personal dosimetry studies using polysulphone film.

  3. UV Radiation: a new first year physics/life sciences laboratory experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petelina, S. V.; Siddaway, J. M.

    2010-12-01

    Unfortunately, Australia leads the world in the number of skin cancer cases per capita. Three major factors that contribute to this are: 1) the level of damaging ultraviolet (UV) radiation in Australia is higher than in many other countries. This is caused, among other factors, by the stratospheric ozone depletion and Antarctic ozone hole; 2) many people in Australia are of Irish-Scottish origin and their skin can not repair the damage caused by the UV radiation as effectively as the skin of people of other origins; 3) Australia is one of the world’s leaders in the outdoor activities where people tend to spend more time outside. As our experience has shown, most Australian University students, high school students, and even high school teachers were largely unaware of the UV damage details and effective safety measures. Therefore, a need for new ways to educate people became apparent. The general aim of this new 1st year laboratory experiment, developed and first offered at La Trobe University (Melbourne, Australia) in 2009, is to investigate how UV-B radiation levels change under various solar illumination conditions and how effective different types of protection are. After pre-lab readings on physical concepts and biological effects of UV radiation, and after solving all pre-lab problems, the students go outside and measure the actual change in UV-B and UV-A radiation levels under various conditions. Some of these conditions are: direct sun, shade from a building, shade under the roof, reflection from various surfaces, direct sun through cheap and expensive sunglasses and eyeglasses, direct sun through various types of cloth and hair. The equipment used is the UV-Probe manufactured by sglux SolGel Technologies GmbH. The students’ feedback on this new laboratory experiment was very positive. It was ranked top among all physics experiments offered as part of that subject (Physics for Life Sciences) in 2009 and top among all physics experiments presented for peer evaluation at the Advanced Science Education Learning Laboratory Workshop in April 2010 at the University of Adelaide, Australia. All three main components of the UV Radiation experiment - pre-lab exercises, taking measurements, and a group discussion led by a demonstrator, were assessed by the students and by the teaching academics as a very important and valuable contribution to learning.

  4. Axial ion–electron emission microscopy of IC radiation hardness

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. L. Doyle; G. Vizkelethy; D. S. Walsh; D. Swenson

    2002-01-01

    A new system for performing radiation effects microscopy (REM) has been developed at Sandia National Laboratory in Albuquerque. This system combines two entirely new concepts in accelerator physics and nuclear microscopy. A radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linac is used to boost the energy of ions accelerated by a conventional Tandem Van de Graaff–Pelletron to velocities of 1.9 MeV\\/amu. The electronic

  5. Axial ion-electron emission microscopy of IC radiation hardness

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. L. Doyle; G. Vizkelethy; D. S. Walsh; D. Swenson

    2002-01-01

    A new system for performing radiation effects microscopy (REM) has been developed at Sandia National Laboratory in Albuquerque. This system combines two entirely new concepts in accelerator physics and nuclear microscopy. A radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linac is used to boost the energy of ions accelerated by a conventional Tandem Van de Graaff-Pelletron to velocities of 1.9 MeV\\/amu. The electronic

  6. Sandia capabilities for the measurement, characterization, and analysis of heliostats for CSP.

    SciTech Connect

    Andraka, Charles E.; Christian, Joshua Mark; Ghanbari, Cheryl M.; Gill, David Dennis; Ho, Clifford Kuofei; Kolb, William J.; Moss, Timothy A.; Smith, Edward J.; Yellowhair, Julius

    2013-07-01

    The Concentrating Solar Technologies Organization at Sandia National Laboratories has a long history of performing important research, development, and testing that has enabled the Concentrating Solar Power Industry to deploy full-scale power plants. Sandia continues to pursue innovative CSP concepts with the goal of reducing the cost of CSP while improving efficiency and performance. In this pursuit, Sandia has developed many tools for the analysis of CSP performance. The following capabilities document highlights Sandia's extensive experience in the design, construction, and utilization of large-scale testing facilities for CSP and the tools that Sandia has created for the full characterization of heliostats. Sandia has extensive experience in using these tools to evaluate the performance of novel heliostat designs.

  7. Radiation Center Space Allocation Policy This document presents a policy to establish criteria and procedures for both laboratory and

    E-print Network

    1 Radiation Center Space Allocation Policy This document presents a policy to establish criteria and procedures for both laboratory and office space allocation. Considering the immense pressure exerted policies across OSU. Goals of a Radiation Center Space Allocation Policy The overarching goals

  8. Antenna radiation patterns in the whistler wave regime measured in a large laboratory plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenzel, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    Antenna radiation patterns of balanced electric dipoles and shielded magnetic loop antennas are obtained by measuring the relative wave amplitude with a small receiver antenna scanned around the exciter in a large uniform collisionless magnetized laboratory plasma in the whistler wave regime. The boundary effects are assumed to be negligible even for many farfield patterns. Characteristic differences are observed between electrically short and long antennas, the former exhibiting resonance cones and the latter showing dipole-like antenna patterns along the magnetic field. Resonance cones due to small electric dipoles and magnetic loops are observed in both the near zone and the far zone. A self-focusing process is revealed which produces a pencil-shaped field-aligned radiation pattern.

  9. PERFORMANCE AND CAPABILITIES OF THE NASA SPACE RADIATION LABORATORY AT BNL.

    SciTech Connect

    BROWN, K.A.; AHRENS, L.; CHIANG, I.H.; GARDNER, C.; GASSNER, D.; HAMMONS, L.; HARVEY, M.; MORRIS, J.; RUSEK, A.; SAMPSON, P.; SIVERTZ, M.; TSOUPAS, N.; ZENO, K.

    2006-06-23

    The NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at BNL was commissioned in October 2002 and the facility became operational in July 2003. NSRL was constructed in collaboration with NASA for the purpose of performing radiation effect studies for the NASA space program. NSRL can accept a wide variety of ions from BNL's AGS Booster; these are slow extracted with kinetic energies ranging from 0.3 to 3 GeV/n. Fast extraction from Booster to NSRL has also been developed and used. Many different beam conditions have been produced for experiments at NSRL, including very low intensity. In this report we will describe the facility and its performance over the eight experimental run periods that have taken place since it became operational. We will also describe the current and future capabilities of the NSRL.

  10. SAPLE: Sandia Advanced Personnel Locator Engine.

    SciTech Connect

    Procopio, Michael J.

    2010-04-01

    We present the Sandia Advanced Personnel Locator Engine (SAPLE) web application, a directory search application for use by Sandia National Laboratories personnel. SAPLE's purpose is to return Sandia personnel 'results' as a function of user search queries, with its mission to make it easier and faster to find people at Sandia. To accomplish this, SAPLE breaks from more traditional directory application approaches by aiming to return the correct set of results while placing minimal constraints on the user's query. Two key features form the core of SAPLE: advanced search query interpretation and inexact string matching. SAPLE's query interpretation permits the user to perform compound queries when typing into a single search field; where able, SAPLE infers the type of field that the user intends to search on based on the value of the search term. SAPLE's inexact string matching feature yields a high-quality ranking of personnel search results even when there are no exact matches to the user's query. This paper explores these two key features, describing in detail the architecture and operation of SAPLE. Finally, an extensive analysis on logged search query data taken from an 11-week sample period is presented.

  11. Sandia Strategic Plan 1997

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    Sandia embarked on its first exercise in corporate strategic planning during the winter of 1989. The results of that effort were disseminated with the publication of Strategic Plan 1990. Four years later Sandia conducted their second major planning effort and published Strategic Plan 1994. Sandia`s 1994 planning effort linked very clearly to the Department of Energy`s first strategic plan, Fueling a Competitive Economy. It benefited as well from the leadership of Lockheed Martin Corporation, the management and operating contractor. Lockheed Martin`s corporate success is founded on visionary strategic planning and annual operational planning driven by customer requirements and technology opportunities. In 1996 Sandia conducted another major planning effort that resulted in the development of eight long-term Strategic Objectives. Strategic Plan 1997 differs from its predecessors in that the robust elements of previous efforts have been integrated into one comprehensive body. The changes implemented so far have helped establish a living strategic plan with a stronger business focus and with clear deployment throughout Sandia. The concept of a personal line of sight for all employees to this strategic plan and its objectives, goals, and annual milestones is becoming a reality.

  12. Absorption spectroscopy of a laboratory photoionized plasma experiment at Z

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, I. M.; Durmaz, T.; Mancini, R. C. [Physics Department, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States)] [Physics Department, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); Bailey, J. E.; Rochau, G. A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Golovkin, I. E.; MacFarlane, J. J. [Prism Computational Sciences, Madison, Wisconsin 53711 (United States)] [Prism Computational Sciences, Madison, Wisconsin 53711 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    The Z facility at the Sandia National Laboratories is the most energetic terrestrial source of X-rays and provides an opportunity to produce photoionized plasmas in a relatively well characterised radiation environment. We use detailed atomic-kinetic and spectral simulations to analyze the absorption spectra of a photoionized neon plasma driven by the x-ray flux from a z-pinch. The broadband x-ray flux both photoionizes and backlights the plasma. In particular, we focus on extracting the charge state distribution of the plasma and the characteristics of the radiation field driving the plasma in order to estimate the ionisation parameter.

  13. [Radiation exposure of health personnel and patients in the heart catheterization laboratory in during vascular brachytherapy].

    PubMed

    Folkerts, K H; Franz, A; Kiefer, A; Hennersdorf, G

    2002-06-01

    Interventional radiological measures can lead to high radiation exposures for medical staff. In order to determine the radiation exposure to staff and patients, the resulting radiation exposures were directly measured for 52 measures at an cardiac catheterization laboratory with a new dosimetry system DIS (Direct Ion Storage). Beside the measurement of body dose behind the lead apron, measurements of radiation doses were performed in front of the lead apron and at the wrist of the physician. These measurements were taken as an approximation of the radiation exposure of the non-shielded body parts. The patients dose was estimated by placing a dosemeter close to the head of the patient and from the dose-area product. The mean value of body dose from 52 measurements for the physician behind the lead apron was 1.9 microSv per procedure with a range of 0-9 microSv. In front of the lead apron, a mean value of 53.9 microSv (3-233 microSv) per procedure was obtained. The mean value of partial body dose at the physician's wrist was determined to be 163.2 microSv (12-603 microSv) per procedure. It could be shown that measures combined with interventions lead to higher exposures compared with measures without interventions. For the medical technician, the mean value behind the lead apron was 3.9 microSv (0-58 microSv) per procedure. For the patient, a mean value of 800 microSv (119-8642 microSv) was measured close to the head. The mean dose to the skin of the patient at radiation entrance was determined to be 307 mGy (70-1190 mGy). From this data, the radiation dose per year for the physician performing 1000 measures, was determined to be 1.9 mSv/year. This is below the new dose limit of 20 mSv/year. Also the estimations for the dose to the eye lens and the hands of the physician show no conflicts with actual dose limits when obeying all radiation regulations. The results for vascular brachytherapy did not show significantly higher exposures, compared with conventional measures including interventions. PMID:12219698

  14. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Radiation Control Program - Partners in Site Restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S. L.; Stafford, M. W.

    2002-02-26

    In 1998, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) awarded the Management and Integration (M&I) contract for all five of the Oak Ridge Operations (ORO) facilities to Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC). At Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), a world renowned national laboratory and research and development facility, the BJC mission involves executing the DOE Environmental Management (EM) program. In addition to BJC's M&I contract, UT-Battelle, LLC, a not-for-profit company, is the Management and Operating (M&O) contractor for DOE on the ORNL site. As part of ORNL's EM program, legacy inactive facilities (i.e., reactors, nuclear material research facilities, burial grounds, and underground storage tanks) are transferred to BJC and are designated as remediation, decontamination and decommissioning (D&D), or long-term surveillance and maintenance (S&M) facilities. Facilities operated by both UT-Battelle and BJC are interspersed throughout the site and are usually in close proximity. Both UT-Battelle and BJC have DOE-approved Radiation Protection Programs established in accordance with 10 CFR 835. The BJC Radiological Control (RADCON) Program adapts to the M&I framework and is comprised of a combination of subcontracted program responsibilities with BJC oversight. This paper focuses on the successes and challenges of executing the BJC RADCON Program for BJC's ORNL Project through a joint M&I contractor relationship, while maintaining a positive working relationship and partnership with UT-Battelle's Radiation Protection organization.

  15. Sandia`s computer support units: The first three years

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, R.N. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Labs. Computing Dept.] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Labs. Computing Dept.

    1997-11-01

    This paper describes the method by which Sandia National Laboratories has deployed information technology to the line organizations and to the desktop as part of the integrated information services organization under the direction of the Chief Information officer. This deployment has been done by the Computer Support Unit (CSU) Department. The CSU approach is based on the principle of providing local customer service with a corporate perspective. Success required an approach that was both customer compelled at times and market or corporate focused in most cases. Above all, a complete solution was required that included a comprehensive method of technology choices and development, process development, technology implementation, and support. It is the authors hope that this information will be useful in the development of a customer-focused business strategy for information technology deployment and support. Descriptions of current status reflect the status as of May 1997.

  16. Laboratories to Explore, Explain VLBACHANDRA

    E-print Network

    Institute of Technology Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Massachusetts Institute of Technology Oak Ridge National Laboratory Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Sandia for Technology. FIRE has benefited from the prior design and R&D activities on BPX, TPX and ITER. Advanced Energy

  17. Progress In Iron Transmission Measurements Relevant to the Solar Convection/Radiation Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Jim; Nagayama, T.; Loisel, G.; Rochau, G. A; Blancard, C.; Colgan, J.; Cosse, Ph; Faussurier, G.; Fontes, Christopher J; Golovkin, I.; Hansen, S. B; Iglesias, C. A; Kilcrease, D. P; MacFarlane, Joseph J.; Mancini, Roberto; Nahar, S. N; Nash, T. J; Orban, Chris; Pinsonneault, Marc H.; Pradhan, Anil Kumar; Sherrill, M.; Wilson, B. G

    2014-06-01

    Iron plasma opacity influences the internal structure of the sun. However, opacity models have never been experimentally tested at stellar interior conditions. Recent iron opacity experiments at the Sandia Z facility reached 195 eV temperatures, nearly the same as the solar convection/radiation zone boundary (CZB), at electron densities that are roughly ½ the solar CZB value. Progress to solidify these results and use them to examine the physical underpinnings of opacity models will be described. We will also discuss impact of the results on the Rosseland mean opacities important for stellar physics.++Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  18. Progress in iron transmission measurements relevant to the solar convection/radiation boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, James; Rochau, G. A.; Hansen, S. B.; Lake, P. W.; Nash, T. J.; Nielsen, D. S.; Thomas, R. D.; Iglesias, C. A.; Abdallah, J.; Sherrill, M. E.; Macfarlane, J. J.; Golovkin, I.; Mancini, R. C.; Blancard, C.; Cosse, Ph.; Faussurier, G.; Gilleron, F.; Pain, J. C.; Pradhan, A. K.; Nahar, S. N.; Pinsonneault, M.

    2010-11-01

    Iron plasma opacity influences the internal structure of the sun. However, opacity models have never been experimentally tested at stellar interior conditions. Initial experiments at the Sandia Z facility reached temperatures high enough to investigate the iron charge states that exist near the convection/radiation zone (CZ) boundary. In these experiments the density was an order of magnitude lower than at the CZ boundary, preventing studies of important effects such as line broadening. New experiments have reached higher densities and temperatures. Progress to solidify these results and use them to examine opacity models will be described.++Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  19. SF 4400-RSS (12-2011) Supersedes (10-2011) Issue SANDIA PROPRIETARY INFORMATION

    E-print Network

    on your award. Sandia National Laboratories Memory Book Do you want to order a memory book? Yes No Choose to order an Eagle? Yes No If ordering an Eagle, please specify exactly how you want your name engraved

  20. Z Machine at Sandia Labs

    SciTech Connect

    2007-10-17

    Sandia Labs' Z machine is the largest laboratory source of x-rays in the world. For the few nanoseconds of a Z Machine test, its electrical output equals the output of 50x the electrical generating stations of all the power plants on earth. The Z Machine complex encompasses an area roughly the size of a major college basketball arena. Originally created to validate nuclear weapons models, the Z Machine is also considered a "dark horse" in the race for viable fusion energy production. After the famous "arcs and sparks" photo of Z (a photo no longer possible after its refurbishment), this is a fast-motion video of workers completing Z's recent refurbishment.

  1. The Sandia total-dose estimator: SANDOSE description and user guide

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, C.D.

    1995-02-01

    The SANdia total-DOSe Estimator (SANDOSE) is used to estimate total radiation dose to a (BRL-CAT) solid model, SANDOSE uses the mass-sectoring technique to sample the model using ray-tracing techniques. The code is integrated directly into the BRL-CAD solid model editor and is operated using a simple graphical user interface. Several diagnostic tools are available to allow the user to analyze the results. Based on limited validation using several benchmark problems, results can be expected to fall between a 10% underestimate and a factor of 2 overestimate of the actual dose predicted by rigorous radiation transport techniques. However, other situations may be encountered where the results might fall outside of this range. The code is written in C and uses X-windows graphics. It presently runs on SUN SPARCstations, but in theory could be ported to any workstation with a C compiler and X-windows. SANDOSE is available via license by contacting either the Sandia National Laboratories Technology Transfer Center or the author.

  2. Laboratory Kinetic Studies of OH and CO2 Relevant to Upper Atmospheric Radiation Balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, David D.; Villalta, Peter; Zahniser, Mark S.; Kolb, Charles E.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to quantify the rates of two processes which are crucial to our understanding of radiative energy balance in the upper atmosphere. The first process is radiative emission from vibrationally hot OH radicals following the H + O3 reaction in the upper mesosphere. The importance of this process depends strongly on the OH radiative emission coefficients. Our goal was to measure the OH permanent dipole moment in excited vibrational states and to use these measurements to construct an improved OH dipole moment function and improved radiative emission coefficients. Significant progress was made on these experiments including the construction of a supersonic jet source for vibrationally excited OH radicals. Unfortunately, our efforts to transport the OH radicals into a second lower pressure vacuum chamber were not successful, and we were unable to make improved dipole moment measurements for OH. The second key kinetic process which we attempted to quantify during this project is the rate of relaxation of bend-excited CO2 by oxygen atoms. Since excitation of the bending vibrational mode of CO2 is the major cooling mechanism in the upper mesosphere/lower thermosphere, the cooling rate of this region depends crucially on the rate of energy transfer out of this state. It is believed that the most efficient transfer mechanism is via atomic oxygen but the rate for this process has not been directly measured in the laboratory at appropriate temperatures and even the room temperature rate remains controversial. We attempted to directly measure the relaxation rate Of CO2 (010) by oxygen atoms using the discharge flow technique. This experiment was set up at Aerodyne Research. Again, significant progress was achieved in this experiment. A hot CO2 source was set up, bend excited CO2 was detected and the rate of relaxation of bend excited CO2 by He atoms was measured. Unfortunately, the project ran out of time before the oxygen atom kinetic studies could be implemented.

  3. Laboratory Simulation of CO2 Ice Condensation on Mars by Radiative Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, S. E.; Paige, D. A.; Smythe, W. D.

    1997-07-01

    We have performed realistic laboratory simulations of the thermal and radiative environment at the surface of Mars to produce the first samples of carbon dioxide ice formed as it does on Mars, by radiative cooling from a 600 Pa, near-pure CO2 gas. It is important to determine the physical characteristics of Mars' seasonal CO2 polar ice caps because these determine their radiative properties which, in turn, control the polar energy balance and the seasonal variation in global surface pressure. It is not known whether they form as fluffy fine-grained deposits, dense solid ice, or something in between. Previous simulations have used conductive cooling, condensing CO2 onto a substrate cooled by liquid nitrogen (Kieffer 1968, Ditteon and Kieffer 1979). This technique favors the growth of grains having the best thermal contact with the surface, resulting in large grain sizes and a coarse texture. On Mars, however, the latent heat released by condensation must be lost radiatively to space. To simulate this process in a lab it is necessary to separate the gas from the space simulator (a lN2-cooled black copper plate) using a material which is transparent at the appropriate thermal infrared wavelengths (> 10 /mu). For this experiment, we have constructed a Mars simulation chamber, an air-tight copper pot containing low thermal conductivity "soil" and CO2 gas, placed inside a thermal/vacuum chamber for insulation. To enable radiative cooling of the gas and "soil" inside the Mars chamber, its top is an infrared window; thin (12 /mum) polypropylene film. To be sure that the latent heat of condensation is not lost conductively to the chamber, the walls of the Mars chamber are maintained at a temperature just slightly higher than the condensation temperature. As the CO2 condenses, the pressure is maintained at 600 Pa automatically with a pressure control system. We will present measurements of the physical and radiative properties of the ice including; temperature, texture, grain size, and broadband emissivity.

  4. Manufacturing technology. A Sandia Technology Bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, J.; Doran, L.; Floyd, H.L.; Goetsch, B.; Parrott, L. [eds.

    1993-12-01

    This item is a copy of the Dec., 1993 issue of Manufacturing Technology, a Sandia Technology Bulletin. It has information on a number of different projects being conducted by Sandia in the general area of manufacturing sciences. Topics addressed include the following: center for information-technology manufacturing gears up, luctrative flat-panel display market targeted; researchers make copper stick to teflon, patterned adhesion may provide ideal conductor/substrate combination for microcircuits; contact algorithm enhances simulation of manufacturing processes, algorithm efficiently handles previously difficult analyses of punching and cutting operations; national machine tool partnership rolls into action, national laboratories share technology to boost US machine-tool industry; closed-loop MAST system eyes robotic manufacturing, fast, accurate, low-cost sensor demonstrated on furnace brazing.

  5. Effects of ultraviolet radiation on early larval stages of the Alpine newt, Triturus alpestris , under natural and laboratory conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alexander M. Nagl; Rudolf Hofer

    1997-01-01

    Although Alpine newts (Triturus alpestris) are found at altitudes up to 2500 m, their larvae proved to be extremely sensitive to UV radiation when exposed in clear\\u000a tapwater to natural sunlight or to comparable artificial UV-B radiation in the laboratory. The experiments revealed severe\\u000a skin damages (lysis of epithelial cells) and mortality after a few days of exposure. In their

  6. Rock Formation and Cosmic Radiation Exposure Ages in Gale Crater Mudstones from the Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahaffy, Paul; Farley, Ken; Malespin, Charles; Gellert, Ralph; Grotzinger, John

    2014-05-01

    The quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) in the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) suite of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) has been utilized to secure abundances of 3He, 21Ne, 36Ar, and 40Ar thermally evolved from the mudstone in the stratified Yellowknife Bay formation in Gale Crater. As reported by Farley et al. [1] these measurements of cosmogenic and radiogenic noble gases together with Cl and K abundances measured by MSL's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer enable a K-Ar rock formation age of 4.21+0.35 Ga to be established as well as a surface exposure age to cosmic radiation of 78+30 Ma. Understanding surface exposures to cosmic radiation is relevant to the MSL search for organic compounds since even the limited set of studies carried out, to date, indicate that even 10's to 100's of millions of years of near surface (1-3 meter) exposure may transform a significant fraction of the organic compounds exposed to this radiation [2,3,4]. Transformation of potential biosignatures and even loss of molecular structural information in compounds that could point to exogenous or endogenous sources suggests a new paradigm in the search for near surface organics that incorporates a search for the most recently exposed outcrops through erosional processes. The K-Ar rock formation age determination shows promise for more precise in situ measurements that may help calibrate the martian cratering record that currently relies on extrapolation from the lunar record with its ground truth chronology with returned samples. We will discuss the protocol for the in situ noble gas measurements secured with SAM and ongoing studies to optimize these measurements using the SAM testbed. References: [1] Farley, K.A.M Science Magazine, 342, (2013). [2] G. Kminek et al., Earth Planet Sc Lett 245, 1 (2006). [3] Dartnell, L.R., Biogeosciences 4, 545 (2007). [4] Pavlov, A. A., et al. Geophys Res Lett 39, 13202 (2012).

  7. Aquatic macroinvertebrates and water quality in Sandia Canyon

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1994-01-01

    In 1990, field studies of water quality and stream macroinvertebrate communities were initiated in Sandia Canyon at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The studies were designed to establish baseline data and to determine the effects of routine discharges of industrial and sanitary waste. Water quality measurements were taken and aquatic macroinvertebrates sampled at three permanent stations within the canyon. Two of

  8. Design and operation of the Sandia Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, M.E.

    1980-01-01

    An 8 ton/day dry sewage sludge irradiator was designed and constructed at Sandia National Laboratories in the last half of 1977 and in 1978; and was charged with /sup 137/Cs and made operational in the spring of 1979. The design of the major subsystems of the irradiator is described. Subsequent operational experiences are also summarized.

  9. SANDIA CORPORATION SF 6432-TM (10-99)

    E-print Network

    ) GOVERNMENT means the United States of America. (d ) DOE means the United States Department of Energy contractor of Sandia National Laboratories for the United States Department of Energy under Contract No. DE of the United States and of the State, territory, and political subdivision in which the work under

  10. SANDIA CORPORATION SF 6432-EI (12-99)

    E-print Network

    ) GOVERNMENT means the United States of America. (d) DOE means the United States Department of Energy and operating Contractor of Sandia National Laboratories for the United States Department of Energy under or licenses and abide by all applicable laws, regulations, and ordinances of the United States

  11. SANDIA CORPORATION SF 6432-EI (10-99)

    E-print Network

    ) GOVERNMENT means the United States of America. (d) DOE means the United States Department of Energy and operating Contractor of Sandia National Laboratories for the United States Department of Energy under or licenses and abide by all applicable laws, regulations, and ordinances of the United States

  12. SANDIA CORPORATION SF 6432-TM (10-98)

    E-print Network

    ) GOVERNMENT means the United States of America. (d) DOE means the United States Department of Energy contractor of Sandia National Laboratories for the United States Department of Energy under Contract No. DE of the United States and of the State, territory, and political subdivision in which the work under

  13. Simulations of the radiation-flow within a silica-aerogel target

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. B. Aubrey; B. P. Wood; D. L. Peterson; George A. Kyrala

    2002-01-01

    Summary form only given. The interaction of a silica-aerogel target with a source of soft X-rays is calculated using two-dimensional Lagrangian and Eulerian codes. The radiation is generated by a Z-pinch contained within a vacuum hohlraum at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, NM. The source has been well-characterized using both experiments and simulations. Burn-through foils are used to shield the

  14. For the Meyer Fund for Sustainable Development and the University of Oregon Department of Physics and Solar Radiation Monitoring Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Oregon, University of

    For the Meyer Fund for Sustainable Development and the University of Oregon Department of Physics and Solar Radiation Monitoring Laboratory Page C.1 6/20/2011 Appendix C: Vocabulary The following an electrical current when illuminated by light­ also called a solar cell Photovoltaic Module A group

  15. RADIOFREQUENCY RADIATION EXPOSURE FACILITIES FOR BIO-EFFECTS RESEARCH AT THE HEALTH EFFECTS RESEARCH LABORATORY, RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK, NORTH CAROLINA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes the multi-user radiofrequency radiation exposure facilities for bio-effects research in use at the Health Effects Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, NC. Four facilities are described: (1) a 100 MHz CW exposure system, (2) a 2450 MHz CW exposure syst...

  16. Laboratories are Needed to Explore, Explain VLBACHANDRA

    E-print Network

    Institute of Technology Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Massachusetts Institute of Technology Oak Ridge National Laboratory Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Sandia Laboratory for Technology. FIRE has benefited from the prior design and R&D activities on BPX, TPX and ITER

  17. LANL Transfers Glowing Bio Technology to Sandia Biotech

    ScienceCinema

    Rorick, Kevin

    2012-08-02

    Partnering with Los Alamos National Laboratory, an Albuquerque-based company is seeking to transform the way protein and peptide analysis is conducted around the world. Sandia Biotech is using a biological technology licensed from Los Alamos called split green fluorescent protein (sGFP), as a detecting and tracking tool for the protein and peptide industry, valuable in the fields of Alzheimer's research, drug development and other biotechnology fields using protein folding to understand protein expression and mechanisms of action. http://www.lanl.gov/news/stories/glowing-future-for-los-alamos-and-sandia-b iotech-partnership.html

  18. Laboratory Simulation of Frozen Methanol Under X-ray Radiation Field: Relevancies to Astrophysical Ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, Diana; Rocco, Maria Luiza M.; Boechat-Roberty, Heloisa Maria

    The origin of complex organic molecules detected in comets, meteorites, star-forming regions and other environments are currently subject of discussion. Depending on the environment, it is dominated by X-rays, UV photons as well as by charged particles, electrons and ions with high or low energies. Every particle will promote a different fragmentation in the molecule and different phenomena in the ice, favoring the formation of an ion species rather than another. To predict the chemical evolution and to quantify the complex organics incorporated into grains or desorbed to the gas phase, it is necessary to establish the main formation route, which can be tested in the laboratories. In this way, the study of the effects of different ionization agents on the ices becomes crucial. Methanol (CH3 OH), the simplest organic alcohol, is an important precursor of more complex prebiotic species and is found abundantly in icy mantles on interstellar and protostellar dust grains. This molecule has been detected through infrared spectroscopy in some astrophysics environments as W33A and RAFGL 7009. Additionally, methanol has been found in comets, as Hale-Bopp, and other solar system bodies, such as the centaur 5145 Pholus. All of these astronomical environments are subjected to some form of ionizing agents such as cosmic rays, electrons and photons (e.g. stellar radiation field). In this work, synchrotron radiation from the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory at the O 1s-edge was employed to perform desorption experiments on the frozen methanol. The desorp-tion rates (desorbed ion per incident photon) of the most intense ions desorbed from methanol due soft X-ray bombardment are estimated. The desorption rates are critical parameters for modeling the chemistry of interstellar clouds. Moreover, a comparison among our results and literature using different ionization agents and different phases (photons at 292 eV and elec-trons at 70 eV in gaseous phase and heavy ions around 65 MeV on methanol ice) is given and discussed.

  19. Direct Penetrating Radiation Monitoring Systems: Technical Evaluation for Use at Area G, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    D. Kraig; W. A. Treadaway; R. J. Wechsler

    1999-10-01

    Recent advances and commercialization of electret-ion-chamber (EIC) technology for photon measurements prompted us to consider EKs as a replacement for our TLD system. After laboratory tests indicated that both systems gave adequate results for controlled exposures, throughout 1998 we conducted field tests with paired TLDs and EICS, in LANL technical areas and in public areas. We had approximately 30 paired sampling sites at Area G. At each sampling site, we deployed three TLDs and three EICS. The EICS were contained in air-tight jars, each of which was placed in a Tyvek envelope and hung about 1 m above the ground. The dosimeters were read (and, if necessary, replaced) every three months. At the sites outside Area G, the TLD readings for the first two quarters were statistically significantly higher than those of the EICS: group average exposures were 38 and 36, compared with 33 mR (both quarters) for the EICS; during quarter 3, the EIC average (40 mR) was higher than the TLD average (34 mR); and during quarter 4, the two systems were statistically the same: EIC = 42, TLD = 41 with a p-value of 0.61. We are still evaluating these differences and performing additional laboratory studies to determine causes. At the Area G sites,we noticed that several of the TLDs gave much higher readings than their co-located EICS; we believe that the TLDs were over-responding by {approx}50% to the low-energy (60-keV) gamma radiation associated with {sup 241}Am, whereas the EICS were responding accurately. We conclude that EICS are more accurate at a wide range of gamma energies and are preferable to TLDs in environments where a significant fraction of the photons are low energy.

  20. Development of an on-line radiation detection and measurements laboratory course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, Derick G.

    An on-line radiation detection and measurements lab is being developed with a grant from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The on-line laboratory experiments are designed to provide a realistic laboratory experience and will be offered to students at colleges/universities where such a course is not offered. This thesis presents four web-based experiments: 1) nuclear electronics, 2) gamma-ray spectroscopy with scintillation detectors, 3) gamma-ray attenuation in matter and external dosimetry, and 4) alpha spectroscopy and absorption in matter. The students access the experiments through a broad-band internet connection. Computer-controlled instrumentation developed in National Instruments (NI) LabVIEW(TM) communicates with the URSA-II (SE International, Inc.) data acquisition system, which controls the detector bias voltage, pulse shaping, amplifier gain, and ADC. Detector and amplifier output pulses can be displayed with other instrumentation developed in LabVIEW(TM) for the digital oscilloscope (USB-5132, NI). Additional instrumentation developed in LabVIEW(TM) is used to control the positions of all sources with stepper motor controllers (VXM-1, Velmex, Inc.) and to adjust pressure in the alpha chamber with a digital vacuum regulator (Model 200, J-KEM, Inc.). Unique interactive interfaces are created by integrating all of the necessary instrumentation to conduct each lab. These interfaces provide students with seamless functionality for data acquisition, experimental control, and live data display with real-time updates for each experiment. A webcam is set up to stream the experiment live so the student can observe the physical instruments and receive visual feedback from the system in real time.

  1. The LBL 55-meter spherical grating monochromator at SSRL (Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    McKinney, W.R.; Howells, M.R.; Lauritzen, T.; Chin, J.; DiGennaro, R.; Fong, E.; Gath, W.; Guigli, J.; Hogrefe, H.; Meneghetti, J.; Plate, D.; Heimann, P.A.; Terminello, L.; Ji, Z.; Shirley, D. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)); Senf, S. (Stanford Univ., CA (USA). Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lab.)

    1989-08-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 55-m spherical grating monochromator (SGM) beamline is located as a branch line of the 54-pole wiggler/undulator at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL). It was designed and constructed by LBL's Center for X-Ray Optics and the engineering staff of LBL's Advanced Light Source with the cooperation and assistance of the research group of David Shirley at LBL and the staff of SSRL. The main goals of the project were to test the SGM concept and to develop a capability for designing and building a water-cooled mirror and grating capability in anticipation of the ALS. A water-cooled plane mirror deflects the beam horizontally, taking in general a small fraction of the flux from the 54-pole insertion device. This mirror is a brazed assembly of Glidcop (a proprietary alumina-dispersion-strengthened copper alloy) and OFHC copper. Its surface was finished in polished electroless nickel, then overcoated with gold as all optics in the beamline are overcoated. Next in the line is a fused silica toroid which focuses the SPEAR source vertically onto the entrance slit of the monochromator and horizontally onto the nominal position of the exit slit, in the manner of Rense and Violett. The magnification factors are 0.3x vertically and 0.7x horizontally. The monochromator is a Rowland-circle design; both slits move on large granite-based slides that maintain flatness of travel to {plus minus}2 {mu}m in peak-to-peak variation from straightness.

  2. Sandia Multispectral Airborne Lidar for UAV Deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, J.W.; Hargis,Jr. P.J.; Henson, T.D.; Jordan, J.D.; Lang, A.R.; Schmitt, R.L.

    1998-10-23

    Sandia National Laboratories has initiated the development of an airborne system for W laser remote sensing measurements. System applications include the detection of effluents associated with the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and the detection of biological weapon aerosols. This paper discusses the status of the conceptual design development and plans for both the airborne payload (pointing and tracking, laser transmitter, and telescope receiver) and the Altus unmanned aerospace vehicle platform. Hardware design constraints necessary to maintain system weight, power, and volume limitations of the flight platform are identified.

  3. Mission and Objectives for the X-1 Advanced Radiation Source*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochau, Gary E.; Ramirez, Juan J.; Raglin, Paul S.

    1998-11-01

    Sandia National Laboratories PO Box 5800, MS-1178, Albuquerque, NM 87185 The X-1 Advanced Radiation Source represents a next step in providing the U.S. Department of Energy's Stockpile Stewardship Program with the high-energy, large volume, laboratory x-ray source for the Radiation Effects Science and Simulation, Inertial Confinement Fusion, and Weapon Physics Programs. Advances in fast pulsed power technology and in z-pinch hohlraums on Sandia National Laboratories' Z Accelerator provide sufficient basis for pursuing the development of X-1. The X-1 plan follows a strategy based on scaling the 2 MJ x-ray output on Z via a 3-fold increase in z-pinch load current. The large volume (>5 cm3), high temperature (>150 eV), temporally long (>10 ns) hohlraums are unique outside of underground nuclear weapon testing. Analytical scaling arguments and hydrodynamic simulations indicate that these hohlraums at temperatures of 230-300 eV will ignite thermonuclear fuel and drive the reaction to a yield of 200 to 1,200 MJ in the laboratory. Non-ignition sources will provide cold x-ray environments (<15 keV) and high yield fusion burn sources will provide high fidelity warm x-ray environments (15 keV-80 keV). This paper will introduce the X-1 Advanced Radiation Source Facility Project, describe the project mission, objective, and preliminary schedule.

  4. Guidelines for Sandia ASCI Verification and Validation Plans - Content and Format: Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    TRUCANO,TIMOTHY G.; MOYA,JAIME L.

    1999-12-01

    This report summarizes general guidelines for the development of Verification and Validation (V and V) plans for ASCI code projects at Sandia National Laboratories. The main content categories recommended by these guidelines for explicit treatment in Sandia V and V plans are (1) stockpile drivers influencing the code development project (2) the key phenomena to be modeled by the individual code; (3) software verification strategy and test plan; and (4) code validation strategy and test plans. The authors of this document anticipate that the needed content of the V and V plans for the Sandia ASCI codes will evolve as time passes. These needs will be reflected by future versions of this document.

  5. Microscopic properties of xenon plasmas for density and temperature regimes of laboratory astrophysics experiments on radiative shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, R.; Espinosa, G.; Gil, J. M.; Stehlé, C.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Rubiano, J. G.; Martel, P.; Mínguez, E.

    2015-05-01

    This work is divided into two parts. In the first one, a study of radiative properties (such as monochromatic and the Rosseland and Planck mean opacities, monochromatic emissivities, and radiative power loss) and of the average ionization and charge state distribution of xenon plasmas in a range of plasma conditions of interest in laboratory astrophysics and extreme ultraviolet lithography is performed. We have made a particular emphasis in the analysis of the validity of the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium and the influence of the atomic description in the calculation of the radiative properties. Using the results obtained in this study, in the second part of the work we have analyzed a radiative shock that propagated in xenon generated in an experiment carried out at the Prague Asterix Laser System. In particular, we have addressed the effect of plasma self-absorption in the radiative precursor, the influence of the radiation emitted from the shocked shell and the plasma self-emission in the radiative precursor, the cooling time in the cooling layer, and the possibility of thermal instabilities in the postshock region.

  6. Laboratories to Explore and Expand VLBACHANDRA

    E-print Network

    Institute of Technology Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Massachusetts Institute of Technology Oak Ridge National Laboratory Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Sandia for Technology. FIRE has benefited from the prior design and R&D activities on BPX, TPX and ITER. Advanced Energy

  7. The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) and Implications for IRAS on ExoMars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.; Zeitlin, Cary; Boettcher, Stephan; Martin, Cesar; Kortmann, Onno; Posner, Arik; Reitz, Guenther; Boehm, Eckhardt; Rafkin, Scot; Burmeister, Soenke; Hassler, Donald M.

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) on NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission is being built to characterize the broad-spectrum of the surface radiation environment, including galactic cosmic radiation, solar proton events, and secondary neutrons. This overarching mission goal is met by RADs science objectives 1-5: 1.)Characterize the energetic particle spectrum incident at the surface of Mars, including direct and indirect radiation created in the atmosphere and regolith. 2.)Validate Mars atmospheric transmission models and radiation transport codes. 3.)Determine the radiation Dose rate and Equivalent Dose rate for humans on the Martian surface. 4.)Determine the radiation hazard and mutagenic influences to life, past and present, at and beneath the Martian surface. 5.)Determine the chemical and isotopic effects of energetic particle radiation on the Martian surface and atmosphere. To achieve these objectives, RAD will operate autonomously to provide measurements of protons from 10 to 100 MeV and heavy ions from 30 to 200 MeV/nuc, and discriminate between the various nuclei. RAD will also provide LET measurements and time series of SEP events and discriminate between neutrons and gamma rays. A pathfinder model with flight-like properties, and, by the time of the conference, a flight and flight spare model, have been tested at BNL, PTB, iThemba, CERN/CERF, and using various radioactive sources to demonstrate the measurement capabilities required by its science objectives. We will present first calibration results and compare them with GEANT4 simulations. The neutron-gamma discrimination can be achieved in a statistical manner using a combination of different scintillators1 and will also presented. Finally, we will discuss implications for the Ionizing RAdiation Sensor (IRAS) for ESA's ExoMars mission.

  8. Continuous Commissioning® of an Office/Laboratory Building

    E-print Network

    Evans, C.; Cordero, J.; Atencio, M.; Claridge, D. E.; Martinez, J.; Oberle, C.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Zhu, Y.

    2005-01-01

    ESL-IC-10/05-20 1 Continuous Commissioning ® of an Office/Laboratory Building Chris Evans Julie Cordero Miguel Atencio Sandia National Laboratory David E. Claridge P.E. Ph.D. Joseph T. Martinez Juan-Carlos Baltazar Yiwen... Zhu Clifton Oberle Energy Systems Laboratory The Texas A&M University System Abstract Initial implementation of Continuous Commissioning ® (CC ® ) measures in Building 6585, the Technology Support Center at Sandia National Laboratory...

  9. Hybrid-structure atomic models for HED laboratory plasma diagnostics and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Stephanie

    2010-03-01

    While theoretical atomic physics calculations are well developed for isolated atoms and have been thoroughly benchmarked against low-density laboratory sources such as electron beam ion traps and tokamak plasmas, the high energy density (HED) regime offers significant challenges for atomic physics and spectroscopic modeling. High plasma densities lead to collective effects such as continuum lowering, line broadening, and significant populations in multiply excited atomic states. These effects change the plasma equation of state and the character of emission and absorption spectra and must be accounted for in order to accurately simulate radiative transfer in and apply spectroscopic diagnostics to HED plasmas. Modeling complex mid- and high-Z ions in the HED regime is a particular challenge because exponential growth in accessible configuration space overwhelms the reduction of the Rydberg levels through continuum lowering. This talk will discuss one approach to generating a tractable spectroscopic-quality atomic kinetics model and describe its application to HED laboratory plasmas produced on Sandia's Z facility. [4pt] Sandia is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  10. DOE Vehicular Tank Workshop Sandia National Laboratories

    E-print Network

    . Physical and chemical changes to target appropriate NDE 2. Any NDE response that correlates to progression indications and structural/damage tolerance parameter of interest (i.e., consideration of strength, residual strength, bond strength, remaining life, etc.) · Need for physical standards with well characterized

  11. Sandia National Laboratories Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    E-print Network

    Ahmed Ismail,2 and Gregory T. Roselle1 1. Repository Performance Dept. 6712 2. Performance Assessment, 6711 Date Author: Gregory T. Roselle, 6712 Date Technical Reviewer: Haoran Deng, 6712 Date QA Reviewer

  12. Darrieus wind turbine program at Sandia Laboratories

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. C. Klimas

    1979-01-01

    The design and development of vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs) are discussed. Aerodynamic, structural, testing, and systems analyses capabilites for the development program are reported. The aerodynamic and structural characteristics of the VAWT are presented.

  13. Sandia National Laboratories Combustion Research Facility

    E-print Network

    collector, compressor, high-P storage, pump, FC stack (efficiency vs power) · Developing: ICE gen-set, wind with thermochemical H2 production ­ Solar central receiver with thermochemical H2 production ­ Fossil energy to H2 (sample projects) · Remote Area Power Program: evaluated reformer + FC systems · H2-ICE development

  14. Development of explosive event scale model testing capability at Sandia`s large scale centrifuge facility

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchat, T.K.; Davie, N.T.; Calderone, J.J. [and others

    1998-02-01

    Geotechnical structures such as underground bunkers, tunnels, and building foundations are subjected to stress fields produced by the gravity load on the structure and/or any overlying strata. These stress fields may be reproduced on a scaled model of the structure by proportionally increasing the gravity field through the use of a centrifuge. This technology can then be used to assess the vulnerability of various geotechnical structures to explosive loading. Applications of this technology include assessing the effectiveness of earth penetrating weapons, evaluating the vulnerability of various structures, counter-terrorism, and model validation. This document describes the development of expertise in scale model explosive testing on geotechnical structures using Sandia`s large scale centrifuge facility. This study focused on buried structures such as hardened storage bunkers or tunnels. Data from this study was used to evaluate the predictive capabilities of existing hydrocodes and structural dynamics codes developed at Sandia National Laboratories (such as Pronto/SPH, Pronto/CTH, and ALEGRA). 7 refs., 50 figs., 8 tabs.

  15. Sandia Explosive Inventory and Information System

    SciTech Connect

    Clements, D.A.

    1994-08-01

    The Explosive Inventory and Information System (EIS) is being developed and implemented by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to incorporate a cradle to grave structure for all explosives and explosive containing devices and assemblies at SNL from acquisition through use, storage, reapplication, transfer or disposal. The system does more than track all material inventories. It provides information on material composition, characteristics, shipping requirements; life cycle cost information, plan of use; and duration of ownership. The system also provides for following the processes of explosive development; storage review; justification for retention; Resource, Recovery and Disposition Account (RRDA); disassembly and assembly; and job description, hazard analysis and training requirements for all locations and employees involved with explosive operations. In addition, other information systems will be provided through the system such as the Department of Energy (DOE) and SNL Explosive Safety manuals, the Navy`s Department of Defense (DoD) Explosive information system, and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories (LLNL) Handbook of Explosives.

  16. Transient radiation-induced absorption in materials for the DOI laser

    SciTech Connect

    Brannon, P.J.

    1995-01-01

    This is the final report on a series of experiments concerned with transient radiation-induced absorption in materials for a Cr,Nd:GSGG laser. Both the Sandia National Laboratories SPR III pulsed reactor and the Hermes III pulsed X-ray machine are used as radiation sources. The time dependence and the magnitude of the induced absorption in filter glasses and in doped and undoped LiNbO{sub 3} Q-switch materials have been measured. Gain has been observed in Cr,Nd:GSGG, the laser medium, when it is irradiated by X-rays.

  17. Indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion using highly supersonic, radiatively cooled, plasma slugs.

    PubMed

    Chittenden, J P; Dunne, M; Zepf, M; Lebedev, S V; Ciardi, A; Bland, S N

    2002-06-10

    We present a new approach to indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion which makes use of highly supersonic, radiatively cooled, slugs of plasma to energize a hohlraum. 2D resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations of slug formation in shaped liner Z-pinch implosions are presented along with 2D-radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of the slug impacting a converter foil and 3D-view-factor simulations of a double-ended hohlraum. Results for the Z facility at Sandia National Laboratory indicate that two synchronous slugs of 250 kJ kinetic energy could be produced, resulting in a capsule surface temperature of approximately 225 eV. PMID:12059369

  18. By Stanley Micklavzina, James Utterback and Frank Vignola for the Meyer Fund for Sustainable Development and the University of Oregon Department of Physics and Solar Radiation Monitoring Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Oregon, University of

    Development and the University of Oregon Department of Physics and Solar Radiation Monitoring Laboratory significantly change the incident solar radiation and this will affect the experimental results. The idea. Fig. 6.1: Connecting the amp meter to the Fig. 6.2: Using a protractor to measure the solar

  19. Mortality through 1990 among white male workers at the Los Alamos National Laboratory: Considering exposures to plutonium and external ionizing radiation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Laurie D. Wiggs; Emily R. Johnson; Carol A. Cox-Devore; George L. Voelz

    1994-01-01

    A cohort mortality study was conducted of 15,727 white men employed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory, a nuclear research and development facility. Some of the workers at this facility have been exposed to various forms of ionizing radiation and other potentially hazardous materials. These analyses focused on whole-body ionizing radiation exposures and internal depositions of plutonium. The results indicated

  20. Sandia equation of state data base: seslan File

    SciTech Connect

    Kerley, G.I. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (US); Christian-Frear, T.L. [RE/SPEC Inc., Albuquerque, NM (US)

    1993-06-24

    Sandia National Laboratories maintains several libraries of equation of state tables, in a modified Sesame format, for use in hydrocode calculations and other applications. This report discusses one of those libraries, the seslan file, which contains 78 tables from the Los Alamos equation of state library. Minor changes have been made to these tables, making them more convenient for code users and reducing numerical difficulties that occasionally arise in hydrocode calculations.

  1. LANL Transfers Glowing Bio Technology to Sandia Biotech

    ScienceCinema

    Nakhla, Tony;

    2014-06-25

    Partnering with Los Alamos National Laboratory, an Albuquerque-based company is seeking to transform the way protein and peptide analysis is conducted around the world. Sandia Biotech is using a biological technology licensed from Los Alamos called split green fluorescent protein (sGFP), as a detecting and tracking tool for the protein and peptide industry, valuable in the fields of Alzheimer's research, drug development and other biotechnology fields using protein folding to understand protein expression and mechanisms of action.

  2. A Sandia Technology Bulletin: Testing technology, July 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    Inside this issue various short articles on current testing technology research at Sandia National Laboratories. New techniques of imaging currents in integrated circuits are described. Geomaterials testing is improved with true axial loading under high pressure. Pyroshock simulation tests electronics for space and defense. Insulated cameras get pictures of extremely hot burning fuels. Solar cell testing is improved via spectral response and laser scanning. And missile launching accomplishments are presented.

  3. Measurements of Radiation Effects on Optoelectronics Conducted by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tetsuo F. Miyahira; Farokh Irom; Allan H. Johnston

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports radiation test results for variety of optoelectronic devices that includes LEDs, optocouplers, and photo transistors. The data was collected to evaluate these devices for possible use in NASA spacecrafts

  4. X-ray structure analysis of the polycrystalline complex of copper (II) chloride with 1,5-dimethyltetrazole. Application of synchrotron radiation and laboratory diffraction data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivashkevich, L. S.; Lyakhov, A. S.; Shmakov, A. N.; Efimov, V. V.; Ivashkevich, O. A.; Tyutyunnikov, S. I.

    2008-01-01

    The structure of the complex of copper (II) chloride CuCl2 L, where L is 1,5-dimethyltetrazole, was refined with the Rietveld method using three sets of powder diffraction data obtained at laboratory diffractometers and with synchrotron radiation. The comparative analysis of the results of the structure refinement was performed; this analysis showed that the application of the laboratory data for the wavelength of X-rays ? = 1.7902 Å (Co K? radiation) provides the structural characteristics of the complex comparable in accuracy with those obtained using the synchrotron radiation for the wavelength ? = 1.5443 Å.

  5. Growth and nitrogen utilization in seedlings of mountain birch ( Betula pubescens ssp. tortuosa ?) as affected by ultraviolet radiation (UVA and UV-B) under laboratory and outdoor conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Martin Weih; Ulf Johanson; Dylan Gwynn-Jones

    1998-01-01

    Growth patterns and nitrogen economy were studied in pot-grown seedlings of mountain birch subjected to different ultraviolet\\u000a radiation under both laboratory and outdoor conditions at Abisko in northern Sweden. In the laboratory, nutrient supply, temperature,\\u000a humidity, ultraviolet radiation-A (UV-A, 320–400 nm) and B (UV-B, 280–320 nm) were controlled, while photosynthetically active\\u000a radiation (PAR, 400–700 nm) and photoperiod varied naturally. Under

  6. Disposition of fuel elements from the Aberdeen and Sandia pulse reactor (SPR-II) assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Mckerley, Bill [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bustamante, Jacqueline M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Costa, David A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Drypolcher, Anthony F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hickey, Joseph [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    We describe the disposition of fuel from the Aberdeen (APR) and the Sandia Pulse Reactors (SPR-II) which were used to provide intense neutron bursts for radiation effects testing. The enriched Uranium - 10% Molybdenum fuel from these reactors was shipped to the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for size reduction prior to shipment to the Savannah River Site (SRS) for final disposition in the H Canyon facility. The Shipper/Receiver Agreements (SRA), intra-DOE interfaces, criticality safety evaluations, safety and quality requirements and key materials management issues required for the successful completion of this project will be presented. This work is in support of the DOE Consolidation and Disposition program. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has operated pulse nuclear reactor research facilities for the Department of Energy since 1961. The Sandia Pulse Reactor (SPR-II) was a bare metal Godiva-type reactor. The reactor facilities have been used for research and development of nuclear and non-nuclear weapon systems, advanced nuclear reactors, reactor safety, simulation sources and energy related programs. The SPR-II was a fast burst reactor, designed and constructed by SNL that became operational in 1967. The SPR-ll core was a solid-metal fuel enriched to 93% {sup 235}U. The uranium was alloyed with 10 weight percent molybdenum to ensure the phase stabilization of the fuel. The core consisted of six fuel plates divided into two assemblies of three plates each. Figure 1 shows a cutaway diagram of the SPR-II Reactor with its decoupling shroud. NNSA charged Sandia with removing its category 1 and 2 special nuclear material by the end of 2008. The main impetus for this activity was based on NNSA Administrator Tom D'Agostino's six focus areas to reenergize NNSA's nuclear material consolidation and disposition efforts. For example, the removal of SPR-II from SNL to DAF was part of this undertaking. This project was in support of NNSA's efforts to consolidate the locations of special nuclear material (SNM) to reduce the cost of securing many SNM facilities. The removal of SPR-II from SNL was a significant accomplishment in SNL's de-inventory efforts and played a key role in reducing the number of locations requiring the expensive security measures required for category 1 and 2 SNM facilities. A similar pulse reactor was fabricated at the Y-12 National Security Complex beginning in the late 1960's. This Aberdeen Pulse Reactor (APR) was operated at the Army Pulse Radiation Facility (APRF) located at the Aberdeen Test Center (ATC) in Maryland. When the APRF was shut down in 2003, a portion of the DOE-owned Special Nuclear Material (SNM) was shipped to an interim facility for storage. Subsequently, the DOE determined that the material from both the SPR-II and the APR would be processed in the H-Canyon at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Because of the SRS receipt requirements some of the material was sent to the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for size-reduction prior to shipment to the SRS for final disposition.

  7. Charged Particle Measurements with the Mars Science Laboratory's Radiation Assessment Detector (MSL/RAD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehresmann, B.; Hassler, D.; Zeitlin, C. J.; Kohler, J.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Appel, J. K.; Boehm, E.; Böttcher, S. I.; Brinza, D. E.; Burmeister, S.; Guo, J.; Lohf, H.; Martin-Garcia, C.; Matthiae, D.; Posner, A.; Rafkin, S. C.; Reitz, G.

    2014-12-01

    Since the Curiosity rover's landing in Gale crater on the surface of Mars, the Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) on board the rover has been conducting the first-ever measurements of the Martian surface radiation field. This field is induced by Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) and their interactions with the atoms of the Martian atmosphere and soil. Furthermore, sporadic Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) events can lead to large, but short-term enhancements in the intensity of the radiation field. A large part of the radiation environment is made up of charged particles, e.g., ions and their isotopes, electrons, and positrons amongst others. There are mainly two factors influencing the surface radiation field: the modulation of the incoming GCR flux due to the solar magnetic field correlating with the solar cycle; the amount of atmospheric column mass above Gale crater resulting in changes of GCR penetration depth into the atmosphere, as well as influencing the secondary particle production rate. Here, we focus on the temporal evolution of the radiation environment since the landing, analyzing changes in the measured particle spectra for different phases in the Martian seasonal cycle and solar activity. Furthermore, we present enhancements in the proton flux during directly observed SEP events.

  8. Hydrogen combustion results from the Sandia intermediate-scale (VGES) tank and the Sandia critical-tube-diameter test facility. [PWR; BWR

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. C. Cummings; W. B. Benedick; P. G. Prassinos

    1983-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is currently involved in several experimental projects to provide data that will help quantify the threat of hydrogen combustion during LWR accidents. One project, which employs several experimental facilities, is the Variable Geometry Experimental System (VGES). The purpose of this paper is to present descriptions of an experimental results from two of these facilities: an intermediate-scale burn

  9. UV Radiation: a new first year physics\\/life sciences laboratory experiment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. V. Petelina; J. M. Siddaway

    2010-01-01

    Unfortunately, Australia leads the world in the number of skin cancer cases per capita. Three major factors that contribute to this are: 1) the level of damaging ultraviolet (UV) radiation in Australia is higher than in many other countries. This is caused, among other factors, by the stratospheric ozone depletion and Antarctic ozone hole; 2) many people in Australia are

  10. 20 Years of Solar Measurements: The Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) at NREL

    E-print Network

    reports, or, for the technically savvy, 9-track tape. In January 1997, we first connected SRRL to the internet, greatly enhancing our philosophy of open and free access to this valuable scientific data set to provide for: · Maximum annual solar access · Continuous measurements of key solar radiation resources

  11. A photohabitable zone in the martian snowpack? A laboratory and radiative-transfer study of dusty water-ice snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    France, J. L.; King, M. D.; MacArthur, A.

    2010-05-01

    Dusty water-ice snowpacks on Mars may provide a habitable zone for DNA based photosynthetic life. Previous work has over estimated the depths and thicknesses of such photohabitable zones by not considering the effect of red dust within the snowpack. For the summer solar solstice, at 80°N and a surface albedo of 0.45, there is a calculated photohabitable zone in the snowpack between depths of 5.5 and 7.5 cm. For an albedo of 0.62, there is a calculated photohabitable zone in the snowpack between depths of 8 and 11 cm. A coupled atmosphere-snow radiative-transfer model was set to model the Photosynthetic Active Radiation and DNA dose rates through water-ice snow at the north polar region of Mars. The optical properties of the polar caps were determined by creating a laboratory analogue to the Mars north polar deposits, and directly measuring light penetration and albedo. It is important for future exobiology missions to the polar regions of Mars to consider the implications of these findings, as drilling to depths of ˜11 cm should be sufficient to determine whether life exists within the martian snows, whether it is photosynthetic or otherwise, as at this depth the snow cover will provide a permanent protection from DNA damaging UV radiation.

  12. IP address management : augmenting Sandia's capabilities through open source tools.

    SciTech Connect

    Nayar, R. Daniel

    2005-08-01

    Internet Protocol (IP) address management is an increasingly growing concern at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the networking community as a whole. The current state of the available IP addresses indicates that they are nearly exhausted. Currently SNL doesn't have the justification to obtain more IP address space from Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA). There must exist a local entity to manage and allocate IP assignments efficiently. Ongoing efforts at Sandia have been in the form of a multifunctional database application notably known as Network Information System (NWIS). NWIS is a database responsible for a multitude of network administrative services including IP address management. This study will explore the feasibility of augmenting NWIS's IP management capabilities utilizing open source tools. Modifications of existing capabilities to better allocate available IP address space are studied.

  13. Laboratory observation of secondary shock formation ahead of a strongly radiative blast wave

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, J.F.; Edwards, M.J.; Froula, D.H.; Gregori, G.; Edens, A.D.; Ditmire, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); LRC-Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2006-02-15

    High Mach number blast waves were created by focusing a laser pulse on a solid pin, surrounded by nitrogen or xenon gas. In xenon, the initial shock is strongly radiative, sending out a supersonic radiative heat wave far ahead of itself. The shock propagates into the heated gas, diminishing in strength as it goes. The radiative heat wave also slows, and when its Mach number drops to two with respect to the downstream plasma, the heat wave drives a second shock ahead of itself to satisfy mass and momentum conservation in the heat wave reference frame; the heat wave becomes subsonic behind the second shock. For some time both shocks are observed simultaneously. Eventually the initial shock diminishes in strength so much that it can longer be observed, but the second shock continues to propagate long after this time. This sequence of events is a new phenomenon that has not previously been discussed in the literature. Numerical simulation clarifies the origin of the second shock, and its position is consistent with an analytical estimate.

  14. Measurement and simulation of the impact of coherent synchrotron radiation on the Jefferson Laboratory energy recovery linac electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, C. C.; Biedron, S. G.; Edelen, A. L.; Milton, S. V.; Benson, S.; Douglas, D.; Li, R.; Tennant, C. D.; Carlsten, B. E.

    2015-03-01

    In an experiment conducted on the Jefferson Laboratory IR free-electron laser driver, the effects of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) on beam quality were studied. The primary goal of this work was to explore CSR output and effect on the beam with variation of the bunch compression in the IR recirculator. Here we examine the impact of CSR on the average energy loss as a function of bunch compression as well as the impact of CSR on the energy spectrum of the bunch. Simulation of beam dynamics in the machine, including the one-dimensional CSR model, shows very good agreement with the measured effect of CSR on the average energy loss as a function of compression. Finally, a well-defined structure is observed in the energy spectrum with a feature in the spectrum that varies as a function of the compression. This effect is examined in simulations, as well, and a simple explanation for the variation is proposed.

  15. Channeling-radiation measurements at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, B.L.; Dahling, B.A.; Datz, S.; Kephart, J.O.; Klein, R.K.; Pantell, R.H.; Park, H.

    1984-10-01

    In the last few years, the amount and quality of channeling-radiation data have increased enormously, owing largely to much improved experimental capabilities. Current results included improved interplanar potentials for diamond, the description of the effect of platelets in diamond as an average thermal vibration, an improved determination of the Debye temperature of silicon, an improved determination of the thermal-vibration amplitude of LiD, and the demonstration that LiF crystal structures can survive intense electron bombardment. 40 references, 8 figures.

  16. Laboratory kinetic studies of OH and CO2 relevant to upper atmospheric radiation balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, David D.; Zahniser, Mark S.; Kolb, Charles E.

    1994-01-01

    During the first year of this program, we have made considerable progress toward the measurement of the dipole moments of vibrationally excited OH radicals. Our primary accomplishments have been 1) the modification of the original slit jet spectrometer for the study of radical species and 2) the observation of infrared chemiluminescence from the vibrationally excited OH radicals formed in the H + ozone reaction in the supersonic jet. We are optimistic that we will soon observe OH* laser induced fluorescence in the jet. Modulation of this fluorescence with microwave radiation in an applied electric field will be the final step required for the precise determination of the vibrational dependence of the OH dipole moment.

  17. Systems analysis and engineering of the X-1 Advanced Radiation Source

    SciTech Connect

    Rochau, G.E.; Hands, J.A.; Raglin, P.S.; Ramirez, J.J.

    1998-10-01

    The X-1 Advanced Radiation Source, which will produce {approximately} 16 MJ in x-rays, represents the next step in providing US Department of Energy`s Stockpile Stewardship program with the high-energy, large volume, laboratory x-ray sources needed for the Radiation Effects Science and Simulation (RES), Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF), and Weapon Physics (WP) Programs. Advances in fast pulsed power technology and in z-pinch hohlraums on Sandia National Laboratories` Z Accelerator in 1997 provide sufficient basis for pursuing the development of X-1. This paper will introduce the X-1 Advanced Radiation Source Facility Project, describe the systems analysis and engineering approach being used, and identify critical technology areas being researched.

  18. Structural design and fabrication of the Sandia 34-meter Vertical Axis Wind Turbine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. D. Ashwill

    1987-01-01

    The Wind Energy Research Division of Sandia National Laboratories has been funded by the Wind\\/Ocean Technology Division of the Department of Energy (DOE) to design and build a 34-meter diameter Vertical Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT). The turbine design incorporates the results of recent VAWT research in aerodynamics and structural dynamics. Initial system concept studies identified several blade options that met

  19. Initial structural response measurements for the Sandia 34-meter VAWT (vertical axis wind turbine) Test Bed

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ashwill

    1988-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has designed and constructed a 34-meter diameter vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) Test Bed. The machine will be used to advance research in aerodynamics and structural dynamics, improve fatigue life prediction capabilities, and investigate control algorithms and systems concepts. The Test Bed has extensive instrumentation including 70 strain gauges to measure blade and tower response. Immediately

  20. Operating experience with the Sandia terminal switching network and fiber optic loop

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. F. Tolendino; S. D. Nelson; S. A. Gossage; D. L. Bickel

    1989-01-01

    At Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, secure data communications are provided by a system whose major elements include a fiber loop, technical control centers, and a terminal switching network. The optical fiber loop supplies the advantages of high bandwidth, negligible cross talk, and immunity to interference. The technical control centers, as elements on the fiber-optic loop, focus regional communications and simplify

  1. The Sandia 34-meter VAWT (Vertical Axis Wind Turbine) test bed

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. D. Ashwill; D. E. Berg; L. R. Gallo; R. D. Grover; P. C. Klimas; M. E. Ralph; M. A. Rumsey; W. A. Stephenson; H. J. Sutherland

    1987-01-01

    The Wind Energy Research Division of Sandia National Laboratories has been funded by the Wind\\/Ocean Technology Division of the Department of Energy (DOE) to design and build a 34-meter diameter Vertical Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT) incorporating the results of recent research in VAWT aerodynamics and structural dynamics. The design and fabrication of all turbine parts has been completed, and construction

  2. Sandia Combustion Research: Technical review

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    This report contains reports from research programs conducted at the Sandia Combustion Research Facility. Research is presented under the following topics: laser based diagnostics; combustion chemistry; reacting flow; combustion in engines and commercial burners; coal combustion; and industrial processing. Individual projects were processed separately for entry onto the DOE databases.

  3. Laboratory investigation of electric charging of dust particles by electrons, ions, and UV radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svestka, Jiri; Pinter, S.; Gruen, E.

    1989-01-01

    In many cosmic environments electric charging of dust particles occurs by electrons, ions, and UV radiation. In case of interstellar dust particles the value of their electric charge can have, for instance, very important consequences for their destruction rate in supernova remnant's shock waves and can globally influence the overall life cycle of dust particles in galaxies. For experimental simulation of charging processes a vacuum chamber was used in which the particles fall through an electron or ion beam of energies up to 10 KeV. The aim of the experiments was to attain maximum charge of dust particles. Furthermore the influence of the rest gas was also determined because electrons and ions produced by collisional ionization of the rest gas can result in significant effects. For measurement particles from 1 to 100 microns from glass, carbon, Al, Fe, MgO, and very loosely bound conglomerates of Al2O3 were used.

  4. Laboratory Astrophysics and Collimated Stellar Outflows: The Production of Radiatively Cooled Hypersonic Plasma Jets

    E-print Network

    S. V. Lebedev; J. P. Chittenden; F. N. Beg; S. N. Bland; A. Ciardi; D. Ampleford; S. Hughes; M. G. Haines; A. Frank; E. G. Blackman; T. Gardiner

    2001-08-03

    We present first results of astrophysically relevant experiments where highly supersonic plasma jets are generated via conically convergent flows. The convergent flows are created by electrodynamic acceleration of plasma in a conical array of fine metallic wires (a modification of the wire array Z-pinch). Stagnation of plasma flow on the axis of symmetry forms a standing conical shock effectively collimating the flow in the axial direction. This scenario is essentially similar to that discussed by Canto\\' ~and collaborators as a purely hydrodynamic mechanism for jet formation in astrophysical systems. Experiments using different materials (Al, Fe and W) show that a highly supersonic ($M\\sim 20$), well-collimated jet is generated when the radiative cooling rate of the plasma is significant. We discuss scaling issues for the experiments and their potential use for numerical code verification. The experiments also may allow direct exploration of astrophysically relevant issues such as collimation, stability and jet-cloud interactions.

  5. Structural health monitoring activities at National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, C.R.; Doebling, S.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); James, G.H.; Simmermacher, T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories and Los Alamos National Laboratory have on-going programs to assess damage in structures and mechanical systems from changes in their dynamic characteristics. This paper provides a summary of how both institutes became involved with this technology, their experience in this field and the directions that their research in this area will be taking in the future.

  6. Structural health monitoring activities at National Laboratories

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Charles R. Farrar; Scott W. Doebling; George H. James; Todd Simmermacher

    1997-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories and Los Alamos National Laboratory have on-going programs to assess damage in structures and mechanical systems from changes in their dynamic characteristics. This paper provides a summary of how both institutes became involved with this technology, their experience in this field and the directions that their research in this area will be taking in the future.

  7. Rotor instrumentation circuits for the Sandia 34-meter vertical axis wind turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, H.J.; Stephenson, W.A.

    1988-07-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has erected a research oriented, 34-meter diameter, Darrieus vertical axis wind turbine near Bushland, Texas, which has been designated the Sandia 34-m VAWT Test Bed. To meet present and future research needs, the machine was equipped with a large array of sensors. This manuscript details the sensors initially placed on the rotor, their respective instrumentation circuits, and the provisions incorporated into the design of the rotor instrumentation circuits for future research. This manuscript was written as a reference manual for the rotor instrumentation of the Test Bed. 16 refs., 8 figs., 7 tabs.

  8. Technical specification for the Sandia Management Restructure Study Team (MRST) Prototype Information System

    SciTech Connect

    Wyatt, T.R.; Hall, R.C.; Davis, L.T.; Klamerus, E.J.; Thurston, I.

    1992-01-01

    This document contains implementation details for the Sandia Management Restructure Study Team (MRST) Prototype Information System, which resides on a Sun SPARC II workstation employing the INGRES RDBMS. The INGRES/Windows 4GL application editor was used to define the components of the two user applications which comprise the system. These specifications together with the MRST information model and corresponding database definition constitute the MRST Prototype Information System technical specification and implementation description presented herein. The MRST Prototype Information System represents a completed software product which has been presented to the Management Restructure Study Team to support the management restructing processes at Sandia National Laboratories.

  9. By Stanley Micklavzina, Asher Tubman, and Frank Vignola for the Meyer Fund for Sustainable Development and the University of Oregon Department of Physics and Solar Radiation Monitoring Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Oregon, University of

    Development and the University of Oregon Department of Physics and Solar Radiation Monitoring Laboratory of solar cells when they are connected in series or in parallel. To help answer the question of how solar cells behave like batteries. Current meter measuring short circuit current for two cells

  10. By Stanley Micklavzina, Asher Tubman, and Frank Vignola for the Meyer Fund for Sustainable Development and the University of Oregon Department of Physics and Solar Radiation Monitoring Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Oregon, University of

    Development and the University of Oregon Department of Physics and Solar Radiation Monitoring Laboratory as the distance between the solar cell and the lamp changes. The power generated by the solar cell is calculated Circuit Current and PV Cell Power Output 1. Connect one Solar Cell in the PV Module to an ammeter

  11. By Asher Tubman for the Meyer Fund for Sustainable Development and the University of Oregon Department of Physics and Solar Radiation Monitoring Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Oregon, University of

    to this type of project very well. Between the filters, the fans, the resistors, the area of a cell shaded Department of Physics and Solar Radiation Monitoring Laboratory Page F.1 6/20/2011 Appendix F light bulb in the lamp affected the current put out by the cell. These kits really provided a great

  12. Results of environmental radiation monitoring at the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Engineering Laboratories, JAEA, following the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Masanori Takeyasu; Masanao Nakano; Hiroki Fujita; Akira Nakada; Hitoshi Watanabe; Shuichi Sumiya; Sadaaki Furuta

    2012-01-01

    In response to the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, emergency monitoring of the environmental radiation was performed at the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Engineering Laboratories (NCL), Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). This article describes the results of the monitoring, including air absorbed dose rate and radionuclide concentration in air and fallout. The air absorbed dose rate began to

  13. Aluminum Hugoniot Measurement on the Sandia Z Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, C. A.; Asay, J. R.; Trott, W. M.; Flemming, K. J.; Bernard, M. A.; Clark, B.; Hauer, A.; Kyrala, G.

    1999-06-01

    (Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC04-94AL8500.) Aluminum has been investigated at multi-Mbar pressures through planar impacts generated by guns and explosives, and ablatively driven shocks from lasers. Because it is well characterized, it is often used as a reference in relative Hugoniot measurements. To demonstrate equation of state measurement capabilities on the Sandia Z accelerator, Hugoniot states of type 1100 aluminum are being determined in the 1.8 to 4.5 Mbar range for comparisons to published data. Ablatively driven shocks on 6mm diameter samples are being measured using velocity interferometry and laser-based shock arrival sensors. In each experiment, both shock and particle velocities are being measured to determine Hugoniot states. Many of the experiments performed had multiple, independent determinations of these two parameters for redundancy and diagnostic validation. Results indicate preliminary agreement with the previously established Hugoniot.

  14. Energy Efficient Legged Robotics at Sandia Labs

    SciTech Connect

    Buerger, Steve

    2014-12-16

    Sandia is developing energy efficient actuation and drive train technologies to dramatically improve the charge life of legged robots. The work is supported by DARPA, and Sandia will demonstrate an energy efficient bipedal robot at the technology exposition section of the DARPA Robotics Challenge Finals in June, 2015. This video, the first in a series, describes early development and initial integration of the Sandia Transmission Efficient Prototype Promoting Research (STEPPR) robot.

  15. NREL Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL): Baseline Measurement System (BMS); Golden, Colorado (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Stoffel, T.; Andreas, A.

    The SRRL was established at the Solar Energy Research Institute (now NREL) in 1981 to provide continuous measurements of the solar resources, outdoor calibrations of pyranometers and pyrheliometers, and to characterize commercially available instrumentation. The SRRL is an outdoor laboratory located on South Table Mountain, a mesa providing excellent solar access throughout the year, overlooking Denver. Beginning with the basic measurements of global horizontal irradiance, direct normal irradiance and diffuse horizontal irradiance at 5-minute intervals, the SRRL Baseline Measurement System now produces more than 130 data elements at 1-min intervals that are available from the Measurement & Instrumentation Data Center Web site. Data sources include global horizontal, direct normal, diffuse horizontal (from shadowband and tracking disk), global on tilted surfaces, reflected solar irradiance, ultraviolet, infrared (upwelling and downwelling), photometric and spectral radiometers, sky imagery, and surface meteorological conditions (temperature, relative humidity, barometric pressure, precipitation, snow cover, wind speed and direction at multiple levels). Data quality control and assessment include daily instrument maintenance (M-F) with automated data quality control based on real-time examinations of redundant instrumentation and internal consistency checks using NREL's SERI-QC methodology. Operators are notified of equipment problems by automatic e-mail messages generated by the data acquisition and processing system. Radiometers are recalibrated at least annually with reference instruments traceable to the World Radiometric Reference (WRR).

  16. Lacustrine mollusc radiations in the Malawi Basin: experiments in a natural laboratory for evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Damme, D.; Gautier, A.

    2012-12-01

    In Terminal Pliocene-Early Pleistocene times, part of the Malawi Basin was occupied by palaeo-lake Chiwondo. Molluscan biostratigraphy situates this freshwater lake either in the East African wet phase between 2.7-2.4 Ma or that of 2.0-1.8 Ma. In-lake divergent evolution remained restricted to a few molluscan taxa and was very modest. The lacustrine Chiwondo fauna went extinct at the beginning of the Pleistocene. The Modern Lake Malawi malacofauna is poor and descends from ubiquistic South-East African taxa and some Malawi Basin endemics that invaded the present lake after the Late Pleistocene mega-droughts. The Pleistocene aridity crises caused dramatic changes, affecting the malacofauna of all East African lakes. All lacustrine endemic faunas that had evolved in the Pliocene rift lakes, such as palaeo-lake Chiwondo, became extinct. In Lake Tanganyika, the freshwater ecosystem did not crash as in other lakes, but the environmental changes were sufficiently important to trigger a vast radiation. All African endemic lacustrine molluscan clades that are the result of in-lake divergence are hence geologically young, including the vast Lavigeria clade in Lake Tanganyika (ca. 43 species).

  17. Lacustrine mollusc radiations in the Lake Malawi Basin: experiments in a natural laboratory for evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Damme, D.; Gautier, A.

    2013-09-01

    In terminal Pliocene-early Pleistocene times, part of the Malawi Basin was occupied by paleo-lake Chiwondo. Molluscan biostratigraphy situates this freshwater lake either in the East African wet phase between 2.7-2.4 Ma or that of 2.0-1.8 Ma. In-lake divergent evolution remained restricted to a few molluscan taxa and was very modest. The lacustrine Chiwondo fauna went extinct at the beginning of the Pleistocene. The modern Lake Malawi malacofauna is depauperate and descends from ubiquistic southeast African taxa and some Malawi basin endemics that invaded the present lake after the Late Pleistocene mega-droughts. The Pleistocene aridity crises caused dramatic changes, affecting the malacofauna of all East African lakes. All lacustrine endemic faunas that had evolved in the Pliocene rift lakes, such as paleo-lake Chiwondo, became extinct. In Lake Tanganyika, the freshwater ecosystem did not crash as in other lakes, but the environmental changes were sufficiently important to trigger a vast radiation. All African endemic lacustrine molluscan clades that are the result of in-lake divergence are hence geologically young, including the vast Lavigeria clade in Lake Tanganyika (ca. 43 species).

  18. Radiation-Induced Prompt Photocurrents in Microelectronics: Physics

    SciTech Connect

    DODD, PAUL E.; VIZKELETHY, GYORGY; WALSH, DAVID S.; BULLER, DANIEL L.; DOYLE, BARNEY L.; BEEZHLD, WENDLAND

    2003-01-01

    The effects of photocurrents in nuclear weapons induced by proximal nuclear detonations are well known and remain a serious hostile environment threat for the US stockpile. This report describes the final results of an LDRD study of the physical phenomena underlying prompt photocurrents in microelectronic devices and circuits. The goals of this project were to obtain an improved understanding of these phenomena, and to incorporate improved models of photocurrent effects into simulation codes to assist designers in meeting hostile radiation requirements with minimum build and test cycles. We have also developed a new capability on the ion microbeam accelerator in Sandia's Ion Beam Materials Research Laboratory (the Transient Radiation Microscope, or TRM) to supply ionizing radiation in selected micro-regions of a device. The dose rates achieved in this new facility approach those possible with conventional large-scale dose-rate sources at Sandia such as HERMES III and Saturn. It is now possible to test the physics and models in device physics simulators such as Davinci in ways not previously possible. We found that the physical models in Davinci are well suited to calculating prompt photocurrents in microelectronic devices, and that the TRM can reproduce results from conventional large-scale dose-rate sources in devices where the charge-collection depth is less than the range of the ions used in the TRM.

  19. [Assessment of the genetic risk of radiation by irradiation data from laboratory mammals].

    PubMed

    Benova, D K; Ba?rakova, A K; V?glenov, A K; Kusheva, R P; Rupova, I M

    1985-04-01

    An attempt has been made to assess quantitatively genetic risk of radiation for man based on mammalian (mostly mouse) data and using the direct method proposed by UNSCEAR. The parameter employed was induction of reciprocal translocations. Two assumptions were made: human radiosensitivity equals that of the mouse; and dose-response is linear. From observations with acute gamma irradiation the estimate of risk per 10(-2) Gy was as follows: 39 translocation heterozygotes are expected among one million F1 conceptions, 5 cases of multiple congenital anomalies, 25 abortions recorded and 49 unrecorded. Chronic gamma irradiation at dose rates of 1.3 X 10(-5), 1.7 X 10(-4) and 1.0 X 10(-4) Gy/min was 3 to 10 times less effective. Exposure to 4.2 GeV deuterons proved inferior in effectiveness to gamma irradiation. Chronic exposure to 4.1 MeV neutrons delivered at 8 X 10(-4) Gy/min showed 7 times the effectiveness of chronic gamma irradiation. Administration of tritiated water (from 37 to 37 X 10(2) kBq/g b.w.) to rats entailed a risk of the same order of magnitude as external chronic gamma irradiation. Reduction of genetic risk was achieved by pretreatment with either AFT-, ATP-serotonin mixtures or the molecular combinations, Adeturon and Cytriphos. Study of interspecies differences in genetic radiosensitivity showed decline in the following order: rat-rabbit-mouse-Syrian hamster. A dose-rate effect was most clearly seen in the rat, and least clearly in the rabbit. In female mice, examination of oocyte depletion indicated primary follicles to be highly susceptible to acute gamma irradiation; decrease in sensitivity was observed beginning with stage 4. Chronic gamma irradiation was found to be less effective. PMID:4007485

  20. 1989 neutron and gamma personnel dosimetry intercomparison study using RADCAL (Radiation Calibration Laboratory) sources

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, C.S.; Casson, W.H.; Patterson, G.R. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Murakami, H. (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Dept. of Health Physics); Liu, J.C. (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (USA))

    1990-10-01

    The fourteenth Personnel Dosimetry Intercomparison Study (i.e., PDIS 14) was conducted during May 1-5, 1989. A total of 48 organizations (33 from the US and 15 from abroad) participated in PDIS 14. Participants submitted by mail a total of 1,302 neutron and gamma dosimeters for this mixed field study. The type of neutron dosimeter and the percentage of participants submitting that type are as follows: TLD-albedo (40%), direct interaction TLD (22%), track (20%), film (7%), combination (7%), and bubble detectors (4%). The type of gamma dosimeter and the percentage of participants submitting that type are as follows: TLD (84%) and film (16%). Radiation sources used in the six PDIS 14 exposures included {sup 252}Cf moderated by 15-cm D{sub 2}O, {sup 252}Cf moderated by 15-cm polyethylene (gamma-enhanced with {sup 137}Cs), and {sup 238}PuBe. Neutron dose equivalents ranged from 0.44--2.63 mSv and gamma doses ranged from 0. 01-1.85 mSv. One {sup 252}Cf(D{sub 2}O) exposure was performed at a 60{degree} angle of incidence (most performance tests are at perpendicular incidence). The average neutron dosimeter response for this exposure was 70% of that at normal incidence. The average gamma dosimeter response was 96% of that at normal incidence. A total of 70% of individual reported neutron dosimeter measurements were within {plus minus}50% of reference values. If the 0.01 mSv data are omitted, approximately 90% of the individual reported gamma measurements were within {plus minus}50% of reference values. 33 refs., 9 figs., 27 tabs.

  1. Sandia`s research network for Supercomputing `93: A demonstration of advanced technologies for building high-performance networks

    SciTech Connect

    Gossage, S.A.; Vahle, M.O.

    1993-12-01

    Supercomputing `93, a high-performance computing and communications conference, was held November 15th through 19th, 1993 in Portland, Oregon. For the past two years, Sandia National Laboratories has used this conference to showcase and focus its communications and networking endeavors. At the 1993 conference, the results of Sandia`s efforts in exploring and utilizing Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) and Synchronous Optical Network (SONET) technologies were vividly demonstrated by building and operating three distinct networks. The networks encompassed a Switched Multimegabit Data Service (SMDS) network running at 44.736 megabits per second, an ATM network running on a SONET circuit at the Optical Carrier (OC) rate of 155.52 megabits per second, and a High Performance Parallel Interface (HIPPI) network running over a 622.08 megabits per second SONET circuit. The SMDS and ATM networks extended from Albuquerque, New Mexico to the showroom floor, while the HIPPI/SONET network extended from Beaverton, Oregon to the showroom floor. This paper documents and describes these networks.

  2. Update on the structural design of the Sandia 34-M vertical axis wind turbine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. F. Berg; T. D. Ashwill

    1986-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories, as lead Department of Energy (DOE) laboratory for Vertical Axis Wind Turbine (VWAT) technology development in the USA, has been funded by the Wind\\/Oceans Technologies Division of the DOE to design and build a 34-M research-oriented VAWT. The machine will incorporate step-tapered blades with natural laminar flow blade sections, and will be capable of operating as either

  3. The Sandia/Arzamas-16 Magazine-to-Magazine Remote Monitoring Field Trial Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Barkanov, Boris; Blagin, Sergei; Croessmann, Dennis; Damico, Joe; Ehle, Steve; Nilsen, Curt

    1999-07-12

    Sandia National Laboratories and the Russian Federal Nuclear Center-All Russian Research Institute for Experimental Physics (VNIIEF) (also known as Arzamas-16) are collaborating on ways to assure the highest standards of safety, security, and international accountability of fissile material. For these collaborations, sensors and information technologies have been identified as important in reaching these standards in a cost-effective manner. Specifically, Sandia and VNIIEF have established a series of remote monitoring field trials to provide a mechanism for joint research and development on storage monitoring systems. These efforts consist of the ''Container-to-Container'', ''Magazine-to-Magazine'', and ''Facility-to-Facility'' field trials. This paper will describe the evaluation exercise Sandia and VNIIEF conducted on the Magazine-to-Magazine systems. Topics covered will include a description of the evaluation philosophy, how the various sensors and system features were tested, evaluation results, and lessons learned.

  4. Radiative forces on macroscopic porous bodies in protoplanetary disks: laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duermann, Christoph; Wurm, Gerhard; Kuepper, Markus

    2013-10-01

    In optically thin parts of protoplanetary disks photophoresis is a significant force not just for dust grains, but also for macroscopic bodies. The absolute strength on the supposedly highly porous objects is not known in detail as yet. We set up a low pressure torsion balance and studied photophoretic forces down to 100 nN on plates at a light flux of 100 W/m2. We investigated the dependence on plate dimensions and on ambient pressure and considered the influence of channels through the plates. As samples for full (no channel) plates we used tissue with 2 mm thickness and circular shape with diameters of 10 mm, 30 mm and 50 mm. The influence of channels was probed on rectangular-shaped circuit boards of 35 mm × 35 mm area and 1.5 mm thickness. The number of channels was 169 and 352. The pressure was varied over three decades between 0.001 and 1 mbar. At low pressure, the absolute photophoretic force is proportional to the cross section of the plates. At high pressure, gas flow through the channels enhances the photophoretic force. The pressure dependence of the radiative force can (formally) be calculated by photophoresis on particles with a characteristic length. We derived two characteristic length scales l depending on the plate radius r1, the channel radius r2, and the thickness of the plate, which equals the length of the channel d as l = r0.35 × d0.65. The highest force is found at a pressure pmax = 15 × l-1 Pa mm. In total, the photophoretic force on a plate with channels can be well described by a superposition of the two components: photophoresis due to the overall size and cross section of the plate and photophoresis due to the channels, both with their characteristic pressure dependencies. We applied these results to the transport of large solids in protoplanetary disks and found that the influence of porosity on the photophoretic force can reverse the inward drift of large solids, for instance meter-sized bodies, and push them outward within the optically thin parts of the disk.

  5. Polarized Radiative Capture Reactions below 100 keV, a New Laboratory for Nuclear Physics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weller, H. R.

    1996-05-01

    Despite the importance of low energy radiative capture reactions in nuclear astrophysics, very little is known and very few measurements have been made below 100 keV. The energy change of a factor of 100 as we go from 1 to 100 keV can be accompanied by huge changes in proton penetrabilities (of the order of 10^8), making extrapolations difficult. Although meson-exchange current effects are known to be important at thermal energies, no studies of these effects have been performed at finite low-energies. The availability of large high-resolution Germanium detectors (HPGe) and high intensity polarized beams has made it possible to begin to study these reactions between 10 and 100 keV in considerable detail. Our study of the D(p, ?)^3He and the ^1H(d, ?)^3He reactions using polarized beams below 80 keV has revealed a wealth of new information. The energy dependence of the cross section below 80 keV was determined experimentally for the first time. Our results indicate an astrophysical S-factor which is 34% smaller than the presently accepted value. Our detailed measurements of cross section, vector and tensor analyzing powers, and gamma-ray polarizations as a function of energy and angle have been compared with the results of new few-body calculations by Schiavilla et al.(R. Schiavilla, CEBAF Theory Group, private communication (1995).) which include Coulomb and MEC effects. Dramatic effects due to the tensor force and the associated two-body currents are observed in the vector and tensor analyzing powers for the first time. A detailed study of the ^7Li(p, ?)^8Be reaction has revealed the presence of a significant p-wave capture amplitude at these energies which affects the extrapolation used to obtain the S-factor. A recent measurement of the ^7Li(p, ?_3)^8Be (2^+, T=0+1) reaction has been performed using polarized protons below 80 keV. This reaction is especially interesting due to its close relationship to the ^7Be(p, ?)^8B (2^+, T=1) reaction, the source of high energy solar neutrinos. The results of this work and preliminary studies of several other reactions below 80 keV will be described. Work partially supported by USDOE grant No. DEFG05-91-ER40619

  6. Full-system tests using the Sandia lightning simulator

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.A.

    1983-03-01

    Direct-stroke, very high-level natural lightning is simulated with a developmental lightning simulator, which has been used to apply fast-rising, high-current, high-energy outputs to full-scale operational systems. Samples of the wide range in output capabilities of this high-voltage, multiple-pulse simulator are described. Circuit considerations related to its use for testing physically large test items are discussed. The simulator is primarily used for conducting internal Sandia National Laboratories test programs, but example waveforms from direct-strike lightning simulation tests made for the Navy with functional F-14 and F/A-18 aircraft are also presented.

  7. Measurement and simulation of the impact of coherent synchrotron radiation on the Jefferson Laboratory energy recovery linac electron beam

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hall, C C.; Biedron, S G.; Edelen, A L.; Milton, S V.; Benson, S; Douglas, D; Li, R; Tennant, C D.; Carlsten, B E.

    2015-03-01

    In an experiment conducted on the Jefferson Laboratory IR free-electron laser driver, the effects of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) on beam quality were studied. The primary goal of this work was to explore CSR output and effect on the beam with variation of the bunch compression in the IR recirculator. Here we examine the impact of CSR on the average energy loss as a function of bunch compression as well as the impact of CSR on the energy spectrum of the bunch. Simulation of beam dynamics in the machine, including the one-dimensional CSR model, shows very good agreement with themore »measured effect of CSR on the average energy loss as a function of compression. Finally, a well-defined structure is observed in the energy spectrum with a feature in the spectrum that varies as a function of the compression. This effect is examined in simulations, as well, and a simple explanation for the variation is proposed.« less

  8. 1Laboratory Directed Research and Development 2010 Highlights SANDIANATIONALLABORATORIES

    E-print Network

    1Laboratory Directed Research and Development · 2010 Highlights #12;2 SANDIANATIONALLABORATORIES From the Chief Technology Officer The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program@sandia.gov 505-844-3882 #12;3Laboratory Directed Research and Development · 2010 Highlights About LDRD

  9. 1Laboratory Directed Research and Development 2009 Highlights SANDIANATIONALLABORATORIES

    E-print Network

    1Laboratory Directed Research and Development · 2009 Highlights #12;2 SANDIANATIONALLABORATORIES From the Chief Technology O cer The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program@sandia.gov 505-844-3882 #12;3Laboratory Directed Research and Development · 2009 Highlights About LDRD

  10. Laboratory accreditation

    SciTech Connect

    Pettit, R.B.

    1998-08-01

    Accreditation can offer many benefits to a testing or calibration laboratory, including increased marketability of services, reduced number of outside assessments, and improved quality of services. Compared to ISO 9000 registration, the accreditation process includes a review of the entire quality system, but in addition a review of testing or calibration procedures by a technical expert and participation in proficiency testing in the areas of accreditation. Within the DOE, several facilities have recently become accredited in the area of calibration, including Sandia National Laboratories, Oak Ridge, AlliedSignal FM and T; Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., and Pacific Northwest National Lab. At the national level, a new non-profit organization was recently formed called the National Cooperation for Laboratory Accreditation (NACLA). The goal of NACLA is to develop procedures, following national and international requirements, for the recognition of competent accreditation bodies in the US. NACLA is a voluntary partnership between the public and private sectors with the goal of a test or calibration performed once and accepted world wide. The NACLA accreditation body recognition process is based on the requirements of ISO Guide 25 and Guide 58. A membership drive will begin some time this fall to solicit organizational members and an election of a permanent NACLA Board of Directors will follow later this year or early 1999.

  11. SANDIA REPORT SAND2005-7981

    E-print Network

    Ray, Jaideep

    operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE: This report was prepared as an account of work, or any of their contractors. Printed in the United States of America. This report has been reproduced

  12. COBOL programming standards at Sandia Labs

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, L.

    1983-01-01

    Sandia has developed an extensive set of programming standards, some of which are highlighted. These standards are designed to encourage maintainable, readable, reliable, transportable, and efficient programs. The Standards Review Committee operates as Sandia's vehicle for accommodating revisions to standards, and the methods used to implement standards include documentation, training, and structured walk-thrus.

  13. A laboratory evaluation of color video monitors

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, P.L.

    1993-07-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has considerable experience with monochrome video monitors used in alarm assessment video systems. Most of these systems, used for perimeter protection, were designed to classify rather than to identify intruders. There is a growing interest in the identification function of security video systems for both access control and insider protection. Because color video technology is rapidly changing and because color information is useful for identification purposes, Sandia National Laboratories established a program to evaluate the newest relevant color video equipment. This report documents the evaluation of an integral component, color monitors. It briefly discusses a critical parameter, dynamic range, details test procedures, and evaluates the results.

  14. Pollution prevention opportunity assessment for electronics prototype laboratory.

    SciTech Connect

    Gerard, Morgan Evan

    2005-10-01

    This Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessment (PPOA) was conducted for Sandia National Laboratories/California Electronics Prototype Laboratory (EPL) in May 2005. The primary purpose of this PPOA is to provide recommendations to assist Electronics Prototype Laboratory personnel in reducing the generation of waste and improving the efficiency of their processes. This report contains a summary of the information collected, analyses performed and recommended options for implementation. The Sandia National Laboratories Pollution Prevention staff will continue to work with the EPL to implement the recommendations.

  15. Laboratory insights into the chemical and kinetic evolution of several organic molecules under simulated Mars surface UV radiation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poch, O.; Kaci, S.; Stalport, F.; Szopa, C.; Coll, P.

    2014-11-01

    The search for organic carbon at the surface of Mars, as clues of past habitability or remnants of life, is a major science goal of Mars' exploration. Understanding the chemical evolution of organic molecules under current martian environmental conditions is essential to support the analyses performed in situ. What molecule can be preserved? What is the timescale of organic evolution at the surface? This paper presents the results of laboratory investigations dedicated to monitor the evolution of organic molecules when submitted to simulated Mars surface ultraviolet radiation (190-400 nm), mean temperature (218 ± 2 K) and pressure (6 ± 1 mbar) conditions. Experiments are done with the MOMIE simulation setup (for Mars Organic Molecules Irradiation and Evolution) allowing both a qualitative and quantitative characterization of the evolution the tested molecules undergo (Poch, O. et al. [2013]. Planet. Space Sci. 85, 188-197). The chemical structures of the solid products and the kinetic parameters of the photoreaction (photolysis rate, half-life and quantum efficiency of photodecomposition) are determined for glycine, urea, adenine and chrysene. Mellitic trianhydride is also studied in order to complete a previous study done with mellitic acid (Stalport, F., Coll, P., Szopa, C., Raulin, F. [2009]. Astrobiology 9, 543-549), by studying the evolution of mellitic trianhydride. The results show that solid layers of the studied molecules have half-lives of 10-103 h at the surface of Mars, when exposed directly to martian UV radiation. However, organic layers having aromatic moieties and reactive chemical groups, as adenine and mellitic acid, lead to the formation of photoresistant solid residues, probably of macromolecular nature, which could exhibit a longer photostability. Such solid organic layers are found in micrometeorites or could have been formed endogenously on Mars. Finally, the quantum efficiencies of photodecomposition at wavelengths from 200 to 250 nm, determined for each of the studied molecules, range from 10-2 to 10-6 molecule photon-1 and apply for isolated molecules exposed at the surface of Mars. These kinetic parameters provide essential inputs for numerical modeling of the evolution of Mars' current reservoir of organic molecules. Organic molecules adsorbed on martian minerals may have different kinetic parameters and lead to different endproducts. The present study paves the way for the interpretation of more complex simulation experiments where organics will be mixed with martian mineral analogs.

  16. Radiators

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1985-01-01

    A heat-exchange radiator is connected to a fluid flow circuit by a connector which provides one member of an interengageable spigot and socket pair for push-fit, fluid-tight, engagement between the connector and the radiator, with latching formations at least one of which is resilient. Preferably the connector carries the spigot which tapers and engages with a socket of corresponding shape,

  17. Radiation 

    E-print Network

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    State. s. ABSTRACT This study is an attempt to find a tentative atmospheric index of human comfort and to show its applications for the area of College Station~ Texas. Temperature, relative humidity~ air move- ment, and global short-wave radiation... (direct plus diffuse) were combined into a single numerical expression for outdoor human comfort. The contribution of global short-wave radiation to the heat load on man also is evaluated in a single numerical expression, and expressed as an equivalent...

  18. Note: Recent achievements at the 60-MeV Linac for sub-picosecond terahertz radiation at the Pohang Accelerator Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Yim, Changmook; Hong, Juho; Parc, Yongwoon; Ko, In Soo [Department of Physics, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Seonghoon; Park, Jaehun; Kang, Heung-Sik [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Daehun [Department of Physics, KAIST, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Jaehyun [Department of Chemistry, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    A femtosecond (fs) terahertz (THz) linac has been constructed to generate fs-THz radiation by using ultrashort electron beam at the Pohang Accelerator Laboratory. To generate an ultrashort electron beam with 60-MeV energy, a chicane bunch compressor has been adopted. Simulation studies have been conducted to design the linac. In this note, recent achievements at 60-MeV linac are presented.

  19. Sandia's mentoring program : an ongoing success.

    SciTech Connect

    Brewer, Soila

    2003-12-01

    This report summarizes the Mentoring Program at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), which has been an on-going success since its inception in 1995. The Mentoring Program provides a mechanism to develop a workforce able to respond to changing requirements and complex customer needs. The program objectives are to enhance employee contributions through increased knowledge of SNL culture, strategies, and programmatic direction. Mentoring is a proven mechanism for attracting new employees, retaining employees, and developing leadership. It helps to prevent the loss of corporate knowledge from attrition and retirement, and it increases the rate and level of contributions of new managers and employees, also spurring cross-organizational teaming. The Mentoring Program is structured as a one-year partnership between an experienced staff member or leader and a less experienced one. Mentors and mentees are paired according to mutual objectives and interests. Support is provided to the matched pairs from their management as well as division program coordinators in both New Mexico and California locations. In addition, bi-monthly large-group training sessions are held.

  20. THE BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF IONIZING RADIATION: EPIDEMIOLOGICAL SURVEYS AND LABORATORY ANIMAL EXPERIMENTS. IMPLICATIONS FOR RISK EVALUATION AND DECISION PROCESSES

    E-print Network

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    2010-01-01

    radiation exposure of human populations and to the delayed or late healthhealth effects in human populations exposed to low levels of ionizing radiation.radiation increases above very low levels, the risk of these deleterious health effects increases in exposed human

  1. Analysis of the frequency response of a TeO{sub 2} slow shear wave acousto-optic cell exposed to radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Erteza, I.A.

    1995-04-01

    Radiation testing of photonic components is not new, however component level testing to date has not completely addressed quantities which are important to system behavior. One characteristic that is of particular importance for optical processing systems is the frequency response. In this report, we present the analysis of data from an experiment designed to provide a preliminary understanding of the effects of radiation on the frequency response of acousto-optic devices. The goal of the analysis is to describe possible physical mechanisms responsible for the radiation effects and to discuss the effects on signal processing functionality. The experiment discussed in this report was designed by Sandia National Laboratories and performed by Sandia and Phillips Laboratory personnel at White Sands Missile Range (WSMR). In the experiment, a TeO{sub 2} slow shear wave acousto-optic cell was exposed to radiation from the WSMR linear accelerator. The TeO{sub 2} cell was placed in an experimental configuration which allowed swept frequency diffracted power measurements to be taken during radiation exposure and recovery. A series of exposures was performed. Each exposure consisted of between 1 to 800, 1{mu}sec radiation pulses (yielding exposures of 2.25 kRad(Si) to 913 kRad(Si)), followed by recovery time. At low total and cumulative doses, the bandshape of the frequency response (i.e. diffracted power vs. frequency) remained almost identical during and after radiation. At the higher exposures, however, the amplitude and width of the frequency response changed as the radiation continued, but returned to the original shape slowly after the radiation stopped and recovery proceeded. It is interesting to note that the location of the Bragg degeneracy does not change significantly with radiation. In this report, we discuss these effects from the perspective of anisotropic Bragg diffraction and momentum mismatch, and we discuss the effect on the signal processing functionality.

  2. Measurement and analysis of near ultraviolet solar radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Mehos, M.S.; Pacheco, K.A.; Link, H.F.

    1991-12-01

    The photocatalytic detoxification of organic contaminants is currently being investigated by a number of laboratories, universities, and institutions throughout the world. The photocatalytic oxidation process requires that contaminants come in contact with a photocatalyst such as titanium dioxide, under illumination of ultraviolet (UV) radiation in order for the decomposition reaction to take place. Researches from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Sandia National Laboratories are currently investigating the use of solar energy as a means of driving this photocatalytic process. Measurements of direct-normal and global-horizontal ultraviolet (280--385 nm) and full-spectrum (280--4000 nm) solar radiation taken in Golden, Colorado over a one-year period are analyzed, and comparisons are made with data generated from a clear-sky solar radiation model (BRITE) currently in use for predicting the performance of solar detoxification processes. Analysis of the data indicates a ratio of global-horizontal ultraviolet to full-spectrum radiation of 4%--6% that is weakly dependent on air mass. Conversely, data for direct-normal ultraviolet radiation indicate a much large dependence on air mass, with a ratio of approximately 5% at low air mass to 1% at higher at masses. Results show excellent agreement between the measured data and clear-sky predictions for both the ultraviolet and the full-spectrum global-horizontal radiation. For the direct-normal components, however, the tendency is for the clear-sky model to underpredict the measured that. Averaged monthly ultraviolet radiation available for the detoxification process indicates that the global-horizontal component of the radiation exceeds the direct-normal component throughout the year. 9 refs., 7 figs.

  3. Detector calibration at the radiometry laboratory of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt in the VUV and soft x-ray spectral ranges using synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lederer, Thomas; Rabus, Hans; Scholze, Frank; Thornagel, R.; Ulm, Gerhard

    1995-06-01

    In the vacuum ultraviolet and soft x-ray spectral ranges the radiometry laboratory of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt at the synchrotron radiation facility BESSY offers two different methods for the calibration of radiation detectors. The electron storage ring BESSY, in combination with suitable monochromators, reproducible produces monochromatic radiation of tunable photon energy, high spectral purity, and high radiant power which can be reduced by twelve orders of magnitude. With this source of monochromatic radiation a cryogenic electrical substitution radiometer (ESR) is operated as a primary detector standard in the photon energy range from 3 eV to 1500 eV. The ESR is optimized for synchrotron radiation, capable of measuring radiant power in the order of some (mu) W with an uncertainty below 0.2%. Radiation detectors can be calibrated against the ESR with uncertainties well below 1%. Recent progress in this field will be demonstrated for the calibration of photodiodes. The electron storage ring BESSY is also used as a primary source standard, in the photon energy range from the infrared to the soft x-ray range. The spectral and spatial distribution of the broadband radiation, emitted in the range from 1 eV to 15 keV, is calculable from the known storage ring parameters with uncertainties from 0.04% to 0.35%, respectively. This allows the detection efficiency of energy-dispersive detectors such as solid-state detectors, charge- coupled devices, and others to be determined, provided the detector response function to monochromatic radiation is measured as well.

  4. The Role of Radiation in the Solar Nebula: Correlated Chemistry-Structure- Isotope Studies of Laboratory and Extraterrestrial Organics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nittler, Larry

    This proposal outlines an interdisciplinary effort aimed at quantitatively evaluating the roles that irradiation played in the evolution of ices and organics in the solar nebula and the potential trapping of noble gases in primitive solids. The collective effort outlined here and in two partnered proposals (PIs Scott Sandford and Fred Ciesla) involves individuals at five primary institutions. We define a series of coordinated experimental, theoretical, and observational projects that are necessary to begin to recognize and understand the complex effects of irradiation in the early Solar System. This coordinated effort is in line with the latest emphasis on interdisciplinary work by the Origins of Solar System program. The specific goal of the CIW-NRL component of the effort is to conduct comparative studies of the isotope composition, chemistry and structure of organic residues from ices subjected to controlled radiation exposures, with those of organic matter in primitive Solar System materials, primarily interplanetary dust particles (IDPs). Three broad tasks will be undertaken: 1) Evaluate the extent to which organic molecules were formed and restructured as they and their icy precursors were irradiated by UV, x-rays and cosmic-rays in the solar nebula. Specifically, we will revisit the model of Ciesla and Sandford (Science, 2012), and evaluate the irradiation doses seen by ices and organics in the disk, as well as the chemical evolution of these species as they move through more realistic disk structures. The detailed consequences of this irradiation, as well as the rates and fluences required to drive changes in chemistry and physical structure, will be determined by complementary experiments and analytic studies. 2) Quantitatively explore the history of noble gases in ices and organics in the outer solar nebula as water ice is desorbed (due to thermal or photo effects) and reformed in the solar nebula. We will also explore how such ices are irradiated and the structural changes that occur in these ices and resulting photo-products. We will determine the extent to which noble gases remain trapped in these ices after processing and in the residues that form from this irradiation, and the extent to which this residue replicates the properties of the enigmatic phase Q carrier of noble gases in meteorites. 3) Determine the isotopic effects of C, H, and N induced by irradiation of ices and organics. We will carry out experiments to determine how enrichments in heavy isotopes may be passed forward from target ices into organics and the extent to which irradiation itself results in isotopic differences between target materials and residues. These results will be combined with dynamical models to determine the range of isotopic ratios expected from irradiative processing in the solar nebula. Each of these experimental and theoretical tasks will be complemented by coordinated microanalytical (chemical-microstructural-isotopic) studies of relevant, naturally- occurring, organic matter in anhydrous chondritic porous IDPs and, if available, ultracarbonaceous micrometeorites. Both are among the most primitive planetary materials available for laboratory study. These observations will be used to better understand the range of properties of early Solar System organic matter and to directly search for evidence of the radiation processing signatures identified by the three major tasks above. Thus, the IDP and micrometeorite analyses are necessary to provide ground-truth for the extensive theoretical and experimental work.

  5. Manual of analytical methods for the Industrial Hygiene Chemistry Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Greulich, K.A.; Gray, C.E. (comp.)

    1991-08-01

    This Manual is compiled from techniques used in the Industrial Hygiene Chemistry Laboratory of Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The procedures are similar to those used in other laboratories devoted to industrial hygiene practices. Some of the methods are standard; some, modified to suit our needs; and still others, developed at Sandia. The authors have attempted to present all methods in a simple and concise manner but in sufficient detail to make them readily usable. It is not to be inferred that these methods are universal for any type of sample, but they have been found very reliable for the types of samples mentioned.

  6. Structural design of the Sandia 34-M Vertical Axis Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, D.E.

    1985-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories, as the lead DOE laboratory for Vertical Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT) development, is currently designing a 34-meter diameter Darrieus-type VAWT. This turbine will be a research test bed which provides a focus for advancing technology and validating design and fabrication techniques in a size range suitable for utility use. Structural data from this machine will allow structural modeling to be refined and verified for a turbine on which the gravity effects and stochastic wind loading are significant. Performance data from it will allow aerodynamic modeling to be refined and verified. The design effort incorporates Sandia's state-of-the-art analysis tools in the design of a complete machine. This paper describes the analytic tools we are using, summarizes the conceptual design procedure and presents portions of our detailed design as it exists in September 1984.

  7. Structural design of the Sandia 34-meter Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, D.E.

    1985-04-01

    Sandia National Laboratories, as the lead Department of Energy laboratory for Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine development, is currently designing a 34-m diameter Darrieus-type vertical-axis wind turbine. This turbine will be a research test bed that provides a focus for advancing technology and validating design and fabrication techniques in a size range suitable for utility use. Structural data from this machine will allow structural modeling to be refined and verified for a turbine on which the gravity effects and stochastic wind loading are significant. Performance data from it will allow aerodynamic modeling to be refined and verified. This design effort incorporates Sandia's state-of-the-art analysis tools in the design of a complete machine. This report describes the analytic tools being used, summarizes the conceptual design procedure, and presents portions of the detailed design as it existed in September 1984.

  8. A user`s guide to SABLE 2.0: The Sandia Automated Boolean Logic Evaluation software

    SciTech Connect

    Hays, K.M.; Wyss, G.D.; Daniel, S.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Risk Assessment and Systems Modeling Dept.

    1996-04-01

    This document is a reference guide for the Sandia Automated Boolean Logic Evaluation software (SABLE) version 2.0 developed at Sandia National Laboratories. SABLE 2.0 is designed to solve and quantify fault trees on IBM-compatible personal computers using the Microsoft Windows operating environment. SABLE 2.0 consists of a Windows user interface combined with a fault tree solution engine that is derived from the well-known SETS fault tree analysis code. This manual explains the fundamentals of solving fault trees and shows how to use the Windows SABLE 2.0 interface to specify a problem, solve the problem, and view the output.

  9. Validating Radiation Transport Calculations with Z-Experiments on SiO2 Foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Robert R.; Kyrala, George A.; Keiter, Paul A.; Watt, Robert G.; Peterson, Darrell L.; Wood, Blake P.; Chrien, Robert E.

    2003-10-01

    Radiation transport in the trans-sonic regime, when the speed of a Marshak wave is approximately equal to the shock speed, is relevant to various problems involving radiating plasmas. For example, some inertial confinement fusion reactor concepts invoke the use of a gas to stop target produce x-rays and ions which creates a fireball in the gas that exhibits trans-sonic radiation transport. To calculate the trans-sonic radiation transport, hydrodynamics of the foam needs to be correctly modeled. The Z facility at Sandia National Laboratories is an excellent environment to do experiments that study radiation transport in SiO2 foams. In these experiments, samples of 25 - 38 mg/cm3 SiO2 foam are mounted on the sides of hohlraums that are filled with radiation from W wire-arrays. This radiation drives Marshak waves in the foams. Experimental results will be presented that show radiographic data of the shock motion and Si-diode measurements of the radiation that transits the foam. These results are compared with computer code simulations to demonstrate the codes' ability to model trans-sonic radiation transport.

  10. Radiation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Erik Seedhouse

    \\u000a It is more than forty years since astronauts ventured beyond Earth’s protective magnetic shield and travelled to the Moon.\\u000a Although the Apollo missions subjected astronauts to space radiation, the short duration minimized the risk, but an ECM will\\u000a subject astronauts to much longer exposure. In fact, astronauts will be in deep space for so long, they will run the risk

  11. ADVANCED RADIATION THEORY SUPPORT ANNUAL REPORT 2002, FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    J. DAVIS; J. APRUZESE; , Y. CHONG; R. CLARK; A. DASGUPTA; J. GIULIANI; P. KEPPLE; R. TERRY; J. THORNHILL; A. VELIKOVICH

    2003-05-01

    Z-PINCH PHYSICS RADIATION FROM WIRE ARRAYS. This report describes the theory support of DTRA's Plasma Radiation Source (PRS) program carried out by NRL's Radiation Hydrodynamics Branch (Code 6720) in FY 2002. Included is work called for in DTRA MIPR 02-2045M - ''Plasma Radiation Theory Support'' and in DOE's Interagency Agreement DE-AI03-02SF22562 - ''Spectroscopic and Plasma Theory Support for Sandia National Laboratories High Energy Density Physics Campaign''. Some of this year's work was presented at the Dense Z-Pinches 5th International Conference held June 23-28 in Albuquerque, New Mexico. A common theme of many of these presentations was a demonstration of the importance of correctly treating the radiation physics for simulating Plasma Radiation Source (PRS) load behavior and diagnosing load properties, e.g, stagnation temperatures and densities. These presentations are published in the AIP Conference Proceedings and, for reference, they are included in Section 1 of this report. Rather than describe each of these papers in the Executive Summary, they refer to the abstracts that accompany each paper. As a testament to the level of involvement and expertise that the Branch brings to DTRA as well as the general Z-Pinch community, eight first-authored presentations were contributed at this conference as well as a Plenary and an Invited Talk. The remaining four sections of this report discuss subjects either not presented at the conference or requiring more space than allotted in the Proceedings.

  12. Preliminary experiments on the production of high photon energy continuum radiation from a Z-pinch at the Z accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coverdale, C. A.; Deeney, C.; Harper-Slaboscewica, V. J.; Lepell, P. D.; Velikovich, A. L.; Davis, J.; Oreshkin, V. I.

    2003-10-01

    Traditionally, the generation of multi-keV x-ray radiation from Z-pinch plasmas has focused on K-shell emissions from moderate Z materials. While this approach has worked well, it requires increasingly higher energies be coupled to each ion to produce substantial output as the photon energy increases. An alternate approach to generating multi-keV radiation, proposed in Ref. 1, utilizes lower Z materials than are necessary to generate the appropriate K-shell lines, but tailors the Z-pinch load to overheat the plasma in order to enhance the recombination radiation that is generated. Initial experiments have been performed at the Z Accelerator to evaluate the level of recombination radiation that can be generated through the tailoring of initial load radius and mass with Aluminum and Titanium wire arrays. In this paper, the results of these experiments will be presented. Measurements of yield were made for several photon energy ranges and spectra were collected to evaluate the high energy continuum. These results will be compared with simulations and theoretical predictions to evaluate the feasibility of an overheated plasma for generating higher photon energy emissions. This work is supported by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency and the Department of Energy. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC04-94AI85000. *Ktech Corporation [1] A.L. Velikovich, et. al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 4509 (2001).

  13. Experiences implementing the MPI standard on Sandia`s lightweight kernels

    SciTech Connect

    Brightwell, R.; Greenberg, D.S.

    1997-10-01

    This technical report describes some lessons learned from implementing the Message Passing Interface (MPI) standard, and some proposed extentions to MPI, at Sandia. The implementations were developed using Sandia-developed lightweight kernels running on the Intel Paragon and Intel TeraFLOPS platforms. The motivations for this research are discussed, and a detailed analysis of several implementation issues is presented.

  14. Primary Standards Laboratory report 1st half 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, W.G.T. [comp.

    1993-11-01

    Sandia National Laboratories operates the Primary Standards Laboratory for the Department of Energy, Albuquerque Operations Office (DOE/AL). This report summarizes metrology activities that received emphasis in the first half of 1993 and provides information pertinent to the operation of the DOE/AL system-wide Standards and Calibration Program.

  15. Continuous Commissioning® of an Office/Laboratory Building 

    E-print Network

    Evans, C.; Cordero, J.; Atencio, M.; Claridge, D. E.; Martinez, J.; Oberle, C.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Zhu, Y.

    2005-01-01

    ESL-IC-10/05-20 1 Continuous Commissioning ® of an Office/Laboratory Building Chris Evans Julie Cordero Miguel Atencio Sandia National Laboratory David E. Claridge P.E. Ph.D. Joseph T. Martinez Juan-Carlos Baltazar Yiwen...

  16. Primary standards laboratory report, 1st half 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    Sandia National Laboratories operates the Primary Standards Laboratory for the Department of Energy, Albuquerque Operations Office (DOE/AL). This report summarizes metrology activities that received emphasis in the first half of 1994 and provides information pertinent to the operation of the DOE/AL system-wide Standards and Calibration Program.

  17. This manual does not address chemical, physical and/or radiation hazards that are commonly encountered in a laboratory setting and is to be regarded as an addendum to the UNBC Chemical

    E-print Network

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    Manual This manual does not address chemical, physical and/or radiation hazards that are commonly encountered in a laboratory setting and is to be regarded as an addendum to the UNBC Chemical Laboratory, handling, waste disposal and emergency management of bio-hazardous materials for the University of Northern

  18. A Sandia weapon review bulletin : defense programs, Autumn 1992.

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    Topics in this issue: (1) Focal Point and STEP. Sandia National Laboratories has always focused its advanced weapon development not only on future weapon needs, but also on the engineering and manufacturing sciences needed to meet them. Both areas are changing dramatically. As the nation dismantles many of its warheads, it becomes essential that those that remain are increasingly reliable, secure, capable, and safe. And as development resources diminish, it becomes vital that they are applied to the most critical technologies in a disciplined manner. The mission of the Focal Point program and the Stockpile Transition Enabling Program (STEP) is to develop processes for meeting these challenges. Focal Point offers a decision-making process for allocating Sandia's resources to meets its defense programs strategic goals. (2) Defense Programs news in brief. (3) Dismantling the nuclear stockpile. (4) W88/MK5: Arming, Fuzing, and Firing system meets all requirements and goals. (5) The Common Radar Fuze. (6) Insertable-explosive arming of firing sets. (7) Preparing for fewer underground tests.

  19. Manual versus automated ?-H2AX foci analysis across five European laboratories: can this assay be used for rapid biodosimetry in a large scale radiation accident?

    PubMed

    Rothkamm, Kai; Barnard, Stephen; Ainsbury, Elizabeth A; Al-Hafidh, Jenna; Barquinero, Joan-Francesc; Lindholm, Carita; Moquet, Jayne; Perälä, Marjo; Roch-Lefèvre, Sandrine; Scherthan, Harry; Thierens, Hubert; Vral, Anne; Vandersickel, Veerle

    2013-08-30

    The identification of severely exposed individuals and reassurance of the 'worried well' are of prime importance for initial triage following a large scale radiation accident. We aim to develop the ?-H2AX foci assay into a rapid biomarker tool for use in accidents. Here, five laboratories established a standard operating procedure and analysed 100 ex vivo ?-irradiated, 4 or 24h incubated and overnight-shipped lymphocyte samples from four donors to generate ?-H2AX reference data, using manual and/or automated foci scoring strategies. In addition to acute, homogeneous exposures to 0, 1, 2 and 4Gy, acute simulated partial body (4Gy to 50% of cells) and protracted exposures (4Gy over 24h) were analysed. Data from all laboratories could be satisfactorily fitted with linear dose response functions. Average yields observed at 4h post exposure were 2-4 times higher than at 24h and varied considerably between laboratories. Automated scoring caused larger uncertainties than manual scoring and was unable to identify partial exposures, which were detectable in manually scored samples due to their overdispersed foci distributions. Protracted exposures were detectable but doses could not be accurately estimated with the ?-H2AX assay. We conclude that the ?-H2AX assay may be useful for rapid triage following a recent acute radiation exposure. The potentially higher speed and convenience of automated relative to manual foci scoring needs to be balanced against its compromised accuracy and inability to detect partial body exposures. Regular re-calibration or inclusion of reference samples may be necessary to ensure consistent results between laboratories or over long time periods. PMID:23648320

  20. SANDIA CORPORATION SF 6432-CS (01-02)

    E-print Network

    of the parties hereto shall be governed by this Contract and construed in accordance with federal law of government contracts and then by Article 2 of the Uniform Commercial Code as enacted in the Stateof delivery by Sandia. (b) Sandia may terminate for the convenience of Sandia or the Government this Contract, in whole

  1. Source term calculations for assessing radiation dose to equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Denning, R.S.; Freeman-Kelly, R.; Cybulskis, P.; Curtis, L.A.

    1989-07-01

    This study examines results of analyses performed with the Source Term Code Package to develop updated source terms using NUREG-0956 methods. The updated source terms are to be used to assess the adequacy of current regulatory source terms used as the basis for equipment qualification. Time-dependent locational distributions of radionuclides within a containment following a severe accident have been developed. The Surry reactor has been selected in this study as representative of PWR containment designs. Similarly, the Peach Bottom reactor has been used to examine radionuclide distributions in boiling water reactors. The time-dependent inventory of each key radionuclide is provided in terms of its activity in curies. The data are to be used by Sandia National Laboratories to perform shielding analyses to estimate radiation dose to equipment in each containment design. See NUREG/CR-5175, Beta and Gamma Dose Calculations for PWR and BWR Containments.'' 6 refs., 11 tabs.

  2. X-ray line formation in radiation dominated astrophysical plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loisel, G.; Bailey, J. E.; Hansen, S. B.; Nagayama, T.; Rochau, G. A.; Liedahl, D.; Mancini, R.; Koepke, M.

    2014-10-01

    A remarkable opportunity to observe matter in a regime where the effects of General Relativity are significant has arisen through measurements of strongly red-shifted iron x-ray lines emitted from black hole accretion disks. A major uncertainty in the spectral formation models is the efficiency of Resonant Auger Destruction (RAD), in which fluorescent Ka photons are resonantly absorbed by neighbor ions. The absorbing ion preferentially decays by Auger ionization, thus reducing the emerging Ka intensity. If Ka lines from L-shell ions are not observed in iron spectral emission, why are such lines observed from silicon plasma surrounding other accretion powered objects? To help answer this question, we are investigating photoionized silicon plasmas produced using intense x-rays from the Z facility. For the first time in a terrestrial lab, we measured simultaneous absorption and emission spectra from these plasmas at high resolution. The charge state distribution, electron temperature, and electron density are determined through space-resolved absorption spectra. The emission spectra have been recorded at different column densities thus testing different radiative transport regime. These should allow us to answer quantitatively the original RAD hypothesis. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  3. Foreign technology assessment: Environmental evaluation of a radiation-hard oscillator/divider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvorack, M. A.

    1993-03-01

    Salford Electrical Instruments, Ltd., and the General Electric Company's Hirst Research Center, under contract to the United Kingdom's (UK) Ministry of Defence, developed a radiation-hard, leadless chip-carrier-packaged oscillator/divider. Two preproduction clocks brought to Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) by a potential SNL customer underwent mechanical and thermal environmental evaluation. Because of the subsequent failure of one device and the deteriorating condition of another device, the devices were not subjected to radiation tests. The specifics of the environmental evaluation performed on these two clocks and the postmortem analysis of one unit, which ultimately failed, are described. Clock startup time versus temperature studies were also performed and compared to an SNL-designed clock having the same fundamental frequency.

  4. Mechanical properties of cables exposed to simultaneous thermal and radiation aging

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobus, M.J. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Fuehrer, G.F. (Science and Engineering Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is conducting long-term aging research on representative samples of nuclear power plant Class 1E cables. The objectives of this program are to determine the suitability of these cables for extended life (beyond the 40-year design basis) and to assess various cable condition monitoring (CM) techniques for predicting remaining cable life. This paper provides the results of mechanical measurements that were performed on cable specimens cross-linked polyethylene neoprene jackets: chlorinated polyethylene jackets, fiberglass braid jackets, and chlorosulfonated polyethylene jackets aged at relatively mild, simultaneous thermal and radiation exposure conditions for periods of up to nine months. After aging, some of the aged samples, as well as some unaged samples, were exposed to accident gamma radiation at ambient temperature. The mechanical measurements discussed in this paper include tensile strength, ultimate elongation, and compressive modulus. 10 refs., 22 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Steamboat Springs, Colorado, for the Storm Peak Laboratory Cloud Property Validation Experiment (STORMVEX)

    DOE Data Explorer

    In October 2010, the initial deployment of the second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2) took place at Steamboat Springs, Colorado, for the Storm Peak Laboratory Cloud Property Validation Experiment (STORMVEX). The objective of this field campaign was to obtain data about liquid and mixed-phase clouds using AMF2 instruments in conjunction with Storm Peak Laboratory (located at an elevation of 3220 meters on Mt. Werner), a cloud and aerosol research facility operated by the Desert Research Institute. STORMVEX datasets are freely available for viewing and download. Users are asked to register with the ARM Archive; the user's email address is used from that time forward as the login name.

  6. Time-resolved characterization of Hohlraum radiation temperature via interferometer measurement of quartz shock velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, R. E.; Bradley, D. K.; Rochau, G. A.; Collins, G. W.; Leeper, R. J.; Suter, L. J.

    2006-10-01

    A new technique for time-resolved measurement of Hohlraum radiation temperature has been successfully tested in Hohlraums with radiation temperatures in the range of 90-170eV. In these experiments, Hohlraum radiation fields produced ablatively driven shock waves in quartz samples. A line-imaging velocity interferometer was used to track the quartz shock velocity as a function of time, and an empirical relationship (determined in these experiments) was used to relate the measured shock velocity to the Hohlraum radiation temperature. The test experiments were performed at the Omega facility [J. M. Soures et al., Phys. Plasmas 3, 2108 (1996)] at the University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics. The technique should also be useful for Hohlraum temperature measurements at other DOE/NNSA high energy density experimental facilities, such as the Z facility [R. B. Spielman et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 2105 (1998)] at Sandia National Laboratories and the National Ignition Facility [E. I. Moses, Fusion Sci. Technol. 44, 11 (2003)] at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  7. Laboratory tests of pulse shape discrimination techniques for correcting the effects of radiation damage in germanium coaxial detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boggs, S. E.; Hull, E. L.; Lin, R. P.; Madden, N. W.; McBride, S.; Pehl, R. H.; Primbsch, J. H.; Slassi-Sennou, S.

    2000-04-01

    A reverse-electrode closed-end germanium coaxial detector was irradiated with 183-MeV neutrons to evaluate the value of Pulse Shape Discrimination (PSD) techniques in restoring the energy resolution and line shape of the radiation damaged detector. Two consecutive irradiations were performed for total fluences of 5.0×10 8 and 10.4×10 8 n/ cm2, with PSD tests performed after each irradiation. These irradiations degraded the energy resolution and line shapes; however, PSD corrections significantly restored the performance, even after severe damage. These PSD techniques delay and potentially eliminate, in some experimental situations, the need to anneal germanium detectors in damaging radiation environments.

  8. A preliminary benefit-cost study of a Sandia wind farm.

    SciTech Connect

    Ehlen, Mark Andrew; Griffin, Taylor; Loose, Verne W.

    2011-03-01

    In response to federal mandates and incentives for renewable energy, Sandia National Laboratories conducted a feasibility study of installing an on-site wind farm on Sandia National Laboratories and Kirtland Air Force Base property. This report describes this preliminary analysis of the costs and benefits of installing and operating a 15-turbine, 30-MW-capacity wind farm that delivers an estimated 16 percent of 2010 onsite demand. The report first describes market and non-market economic costs and benefits associated with operating a wind farm, and then uses a standard life-cycle costing and benefit-cost framework to estimate the costs and benefits of a wind farm. Based on these 'best-estimates' of costs and benefits and on factor, uncertainty and sensitivity analysis, the analysis results suggest that the benefits of a Sandia wind farm are greater than its costs. The analysis techniques used herein are applicable to the economic assessment of most if not all forms of renewable energy.

  9. Sulimar Queen environmental restoration project closure package Sandia environmental stewardship exemplar.

    SciTech Connect

    Tillman, Jack B.

    2008-09-01

    In March 2008, Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia), in partnership with the Bureau of Land Management, Roswell Field Office, completed its responsibilities to plug and abandon wells and restore the surface conditions for the Sulimar Queens Unit, a 2,500 acre oil field, in Chaves County, Southeast New Mexico. Sandia assumed this liability in an agreement to obtain property to create a field laboratory to perform extensive testing and experimentation on enhanced oil recovery techniques for shallow oil fields. In addition to plugging and abandoning 28 wells, the project included the removal of surface structures and surface reclamation of disturbed lands associated with all plugged and abandoned wells, access roads, and other auxiliary facilities within unit boundaries. A contracting strategy was implemented to mitigate risk and reduce cost. As the unit is an important wildlife habitat for prairie chickens, sand dune lizards, and mule deer, the criteria for the restoration and construction process were designed to protect and enhance the wildlife habitat. Lessons learned from this project include: (1) extreme caution should be exercised when entering agreements that include future liabilities, (2) partnering with the regulator has huge benefits, and (3) working with industry experts, who were familiar with the work, and subcontractors, who provided the network to complete the project cost effectively.

  10. Photosynthate production in laboratory cultures (UV conditioned and unconditioned) of Cryptomonas erosa under simulated doses of UV radiation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. J. Plante; M. T. Arts

    1998-01-01

    We used a device called a Phototron to measure the effects of UV radiation on the cosmopolitan algae, Cryptomonas erosa, grown in continuous cultures. In the Phototron, we investigated changes in photosynthetic parameters (Pmax – specific production rate at optimal light intensity; a – initial slope of the linear portion of the Photosynthesis-Irradiance curve; and ? – the convexity or

  11. Design of a synchrotron radiation detector for the test beam lines at the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Hutton, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    As part of the particle- and momentum-tagging instrumentation required for the test beam lines of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC), the synchrotron radiation detector (SRD) was designed to provide electron tagging at momentum above 75 GeV. In a parallel effort to the three test beam lines at the SSC, schedule demands required testing and calibration operations to be initiated at Fermilab. Synchrotron radiation detectors also were to be installed in the NM and MW beam lines at Femilab before the test beam lines at the SSC would become operational. The SRD is the last instrument in a series of three used in the SSC test beam fines. It follows a 20-m drift section of beam tube downstream of the last silicon strip detector. A bending dipole just in of the last silicon strip detector produces the synchrotron radiation that is detected in a 50-mm-square cross section NaI crystal. A secondary scintillator made of Bicron BC-400 plastic is used to discriminate whether it is synchrotron radiation or a stray particle that causes the triggering of the NaI crystal`s photo multiplier tube (PMT).

  12. InterLaboratory Comparisons for Radiated Emissions Measurements in Compact, Fully-Anechoic, Rooms: a Proposed Simplified Protocol

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Carlo F. M. Carobbi; Marco Cati; Carlo Panconi; Luigi M. Millanta

    1 - Scope All radiated emission measurements for EMC applications suffer from some lack of reproducibility, with presumably less favourable figures when more economic solutions are adopted, which is the case for small- size rooms. The so called Compact Fully-Anechoic Rooms (CFAR) have become very popular for their op- eration agility and their relatively moderate cost. The de-facto standard adopted

  13. Imaging penetrating radiation through ion photon emission microscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, Barney Lee; Rossi, Paolo; Powell, Cody Joseph; Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy; Branson, Janelle Villone

    2010-07-01

    The ion photon emission microscope (IPEM), a new radiation effects microscope for the imaging of single event effects from penetrating radiation, is being developed at Sandia National Laboratories and implemented on the 88' cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories. The microscope is designed to permit the direct correlation between the locations of high-energy heavy-ion strikes and single event effects in microelectronic devices. The development of this microscope has required the production of a robust optical system that is compatible with the ion beam lines, design and assembly of a fast single photon sensitive measurement system to provide the necessary coincidence, and the development and testing of many scintillating films. A wide range of scintillating material for application to the ion photon emission microscope has been tested with few meeting the stringent radiation hardness, intensity, and photon lifetime requirements. The initial results of these luminescence studies and the current operation of the ion photon emission microscope will be presented. Finally, the planned development for future microscopes and ion luminescence testing chambers will be discussed.

  14. Defense programs: A Sandia weapon review bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    Floyd, H.L.; Goetsch, B.; Doran, L. [eds.

    1993-11-01

    Sandia`s mission to explore technology that enhances US nuclear weapons capabilities has been the primary impetus for the development of a class of inertial measurement units not available commercially. The newest member of the family is the Ring Laser Gyro Assembly. The product of a five-year joint effort by Sandia and Honeywell`s Space and Strategic Systems Operation, the RLGA is a small, one-nautical-mile-per-hour-class inertial measurement unit that consumes only 16 watts - attributes that are important to a guidance and control capability for new or existing weapons. These same attributes led the Central Inertial Guidance Test Facility at Holloman Air Force Base to select the RLGA for their newest test instrumentation pod. The RLGA sensor assembly is composed of three Honeywell ring laser gyroscopes and three Sundstrand Data Control accelerometers that are selected from three types according to the user`s acceleration range and accuracy needs.

  15. Strain gauge validation experiments for the Sandia 34-meter VAWT (Vertical Axis Wind Turbine) test bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, Herbert J.

    1988-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has erected a research oriented, 34- meter diameter, Darrieus vertical axis wind turbine near Bushland, Texas. This machine, designated the Sandia 34-m VAWT Test Bed, is equipped with a large array of strain gauges that have been placed at critical positions about the blades. This manuscript details a series of four-point bend experiments that were conducted to validate the output of the blade strain gauge circuits. The output of a particular gauge circuit is validated by comparing its output to equivalent gauge circuits (in this stress state) and to theoretical predictions. With only a few exceptions, the difference between measured and predicted strain values for a gauge circuit was found to be of the order of the estimated repeatability for the measurement system.

  16. Strain gauge validation experiments for the Sandia 34-meter VAWT (vertical axis wind turbine) Test Bed

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, H.J.

    1988-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has erected a research oriented, 34- meter diameter, Darrieus vertical axis wind turbine near Bushland, Texas. This machine, designated the Sandia 34-m VAWT Test Bed, is equipped with a large array of strain gauges that have been placed at critical positions about the blades. This manuscript details a series of four-point bend experiments that were conducted to validate the output of the blade strain gauge circuits. The output of a particular gauge circuit is validated by comparing its output to ''equivalent'' gauge circuits (in this stress state) and to theoretical predictions. With only a few exceptions, the difference between measured and predicted strain values for a gauge circuit was found to be of the order of the estimated repeatability for the measurement system. 8 refs., 20 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Joint Sandia/NIOSH exercise on aerosol contamination using the BROOM tool.

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, James L., Jr. (.,; .); Melton, Brad; Finley, Patrick; Brockman, John; Peyton, Chad E.; Tucker, Mark David; Einfeld, Wayne; Brown, Gary Stephen; Griffith, Richard O.; Lucero, Daniel A.; Knowlton, Robert G.; McKenna, Sean Andrew; Ho, Pauline

    2006-06-01

    In February of 2005, a joint exercise involving Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) was conducted in Albuquerque, NM. The SNL participants included the team developing the Building Restoration Operations and Optimization Model (BROOM), a software product developed to expedite sampling and data management activities applicable to facility restoration following a biological contamination event. Integrated data-collection, data-management, and visualization software improve the efficiency of cleanup, minimize facility downtime, and provide a transparent basis for reopening. The exercise was held at an SNL facility, the Coronado Club, a now-closed social club for Sandia employees located on Kirtland Air Force Base. Both NIOSH and SNL had specific objectives for the exercise, and all objectives were met.

  18. ``Cats and Dogs'' disposition at Sandia: Last of the legacy materials

    SciTech Connect

    STRONG,WARREN R.; JACKSON,JOHN L.

    2000-05-03

    Over the past 12 months, Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM), has successfully conducted an evaluation of its nuclear material holdings. As a result, approximately 46% of these holdings (36% by mass) have been reclassified as no defined use (NDU). Reclassification as NDU allows Sandia to determine the final disposition of a significant percentage of its legacy nuclear material. Disposition will begin some time in mid CY2000. This reclassification and the proposed disposition of the material has resulted in an extensive coordination effort lead by the Nuclear Materials Management Team (NMMT), which includes the nuclear material owners, the Radioactive Waste/Nuclear Material Disposition Department (7135), and DOE Albuquerque Operations Office. The process of identifying and reclassifying the cats and dogs or miscellaneous lots of nuclear material has also presented a number of important lessons learned for other sites in the DOE complex.

  19. Description of heat flux measurement methods used in hydrocarbon and propellant fuel fires at Sandia.

    SciTech Connect

    Nakos, James Thomas

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the methods commonly used to measure heat flux in fire applications at Sandia National Laboratories in both hydrocarbon (JP-8 jet fuel, diesel fuel, etc.) and propellant fires. Because these environments are very severe, many commercially available heat flux gauges do not survive the test, so alternative methods had to be developed. Specially built sensors include 'calorimeters' that use a temperature measurement to infer heat flux by use of a model (heat balance on the sensing surface) or by using an inverse heat conduction method. These specialty-built sensors are made rugged so they will survive the environment, so are not optimally designed for ease of use or accuracy. Other methods include radiometers, co-axial thermocouples, directional flame thermometers (DFTs), Sandia 'heat flux gauges', transpiration radiometers, and transverse Seebeck coefficient heat flux gauges. Typical applications are described and pros and cons of each method are listed.

  20. Analysis of stray radiation produced by the advanced light source (1.9 GeV synchrotron radiation source) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Ajemian, R.C. [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Dept. of Environmental Sciences and Engineering

    1995-12-31

    The yearly environmental dose equivalent likely to result at the closest site boundary from the Advanced Light Source was determined by generating multiple linear regressions. The independent variables comprised quantified accelerator operating parameters and measurements from synchronized, in-close (outside shielding prior to significant atmospheric scattering), state-of-the-art neutron remmeters and photon G-M tubes. Neutron regression models were more successful than photon models due to lower relative background radiation and redundant detectors at the site boundary. As expected, Storage Ring Beam Fill and Beam Crashes produced radiation at a higher rate than gradual Beam Decay; however, only the latter did not include zero in its 95% confidence interval. By summing for all three accelerator operating modes, a combined yearly DE of 4.3 mRem/yr with a 90% CI of (0.04-8.63) was obtained. These results fall below the DOE reporting level of 10 mRem/yr and suggest repeating the study with improved experimental conditions.