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1

SATURN Radiation Facilities, Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

This brochure is a basic source of information for prospective users of Sandia National Laboratories Radiation Facilities. It contains a brief description of the various major radiation sources, a summary of their output characteristics, and additional information useful to experimenters. Radiation source development and source upgrading is an ongoing program with new source configurations and modes of operation continually being devised to satisfy the ever-changing radiation requirements of the users. For most cases, the information presented here should allow a potential user to assess the applicability of a particular radiation facility to a proposed experiment and to permit some preirradiation calculations and planning.

Zawadzkas, G.A.; Kuenstler, P.A.; Choate, L.M.

1985-12-01

2

Nanophotonics at Sandia National Laboratories.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories is leveraging the extensive CMOS, MEMS, compound semiconductor, and nanotechnology fabrication and test resources at Sandia National Laboratories to explore new science and technology in photonic crystals, plasmonics, metamaterials, and silicon photonics.

McCormick, Frederick Bossert

2008-10-01

3

Sandia National Laboratories: News Center  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Sandia National Laboratories publishes its quarterly journal of research and development at this Web site. Free to the general public, Sandia Technology summarizes current work related to national security, energy development and infrastructure, and various other advances made at the installation. The fall/ winter 2002 issue centers on sensors for all kinds of purposes. From sensors that monitor water supplies to air-sniffing devices that can detect chemical and biological toxins, Sandia is extremely adept in this area. All back issues of Sandia Technology are also available for browsing, which cover topics such as nuclear power and smart machines.

1999-01-01

4

Sandia National Laboratories embraces ISDN  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia), a multidisciplinary research and development laboratory located on Kirtland Air Force Base, has embraced Integrated Services Digital Network technology as an integral part of its communication network. Sandia and the Department of Energy`s Albuquerque Operations Office have recently completed the installation of a modernized and expanded telephone system based, on the AT&T 5ESS telephone switch. Sandia is committed to ISDN as an integral part of data communication services, and it views ISDN as one part of a continuum of services -- services that range from ISDN`s asynchronous and limited bandwidth Ethernet (250--1000 Kbps) through full bandwidth Ethernet, FDDI, and ATM at Sonet rates. Sandia has demonstrated this commitment through its use of ISDN data features to support critical progmmmatic services such as access to corporate data base systems. In the future, ISDN will provide enhanced voice, data communication, and video services.

Tolendino, L.F.; Eldridge, J.M.

1994-08-01

5

Sandia Laboratories energy programs  

Microsoft Academic Search

An overview is provided of energy programs being conducted in the development of economical and environmentally acceptable alternative energy sources. About 75 percent of the resources of this laboratory are applied to research and development for national security programs having to do primarily with nuclear weapons. The remaining 25 percent are applied to energy programs and energy-related activities, particularly those

C. D. Lundergan; P. L. Meady; R. S. Gillespie

1977-01-01

6

Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico 1994 site environmental report. Summary pamphlet  

SciTech Connect

This document presents details of the environmental activities that occurred during 1994 at Sandia National Laboratories. Topics include: Background about Sandia; radiation facts; sources of radiation; environmental monitoring; discussion of radiation detectors; radioactive waste management; environmental restoration; and quality assurance.

NONE

1995-12-31

7

History of Building 828, Sandia National Laboratories.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report documents the history of Building 828 in Sandia National Laboratories' Technical Area I. Building 828 was constructed in 1946 as a mechanical test laboratory for Los Alamos' Z-Division (later Sandia) as it moved to Sandia Base. The building ha...

R. Ullrich

1999-01-01

8

Manufacturing Technology - SNLA (Sandia National Laboratories).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Narration and viewgraphs are given for a presentation that overviews Sandia Laboratories with an emphasis on Sandia's involvement in manufacturing technology. The primary mission involves responsibility for nuclear weapon engineering, but other missions o...

J. K. Walters

1983-01-01

9

Sandia National Laboratories: The First Fifty Years  

SciTech Connect

On Nov. 1, 1999, Sandia National Laboratories celebrates its 50th birthday. Although Sandia has its roots in the World War II-era Manhattan Project, Sandia began operating as a separate nuclear weapons engineering laboratory under the management of AT&T on Nov. 1, 1949. Today the lab employs more than 7,000 people at its two sites in Albuquerque and Livermore, California, and has research and development missions in national security, energy and environmental technologies, and U.S. economic competitiveness. Lockheed Martin Corporation operates Sandia for the US. Department of Energy.

MORA,CARL J.

1999-11-03

10

Fiber optic sensors at Sandia National Laboratories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, Calif. and the Mechanical Engineering Department of Stanford University are involved in fiber optic sensor research and development for manufacturing process monitoring, smart materials, and other applications. Projects at Sandia and Stanford involving both embedded and surface mounted fiber optic strain and temperature sensors have demonstrated the desirability of this technology. This paper presents an overview of the fiber optic sensing capabilities at Sandia and a summary of the projects currently in progress.

Lawrence, Craig M.; Nelson, Drew V.; Fuchs, Elizabeth A.; Spingarn, Jay R.; Bennett, Thomas E.

1996-08-01

11

Mobile robotics research at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Sandia is a National Security Laboratory providing scientific and engineering solutions to meet national needs for both government and industry. As part of this mission, the Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center conducts research and development in robotics and intelligent machine technologies. An overview of Sandia`s mobile robotics research is provided. Recent achievements and future directions in the areas of coordinated mobile manipulation, small smart machines, world modeling, and special application robots are presented.

Morse, W.D.

1998-09-01

12

Sandia National Laboratories analysis code data base  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories, mission is to solve important problems in the areas of national defense, energy security, environmental integrity, and industrial technology. The Laboratories` strategy for accomplishing this mission is to conduct research to provide an understanding of the important physical phenomena underlying any problem, and then to construct validated computational models of the phenomena which can be used as tools to solve the problem. In the course of implementing this strategy, Sandia`s technical staff has produced a wide variety of numerical problem-solving tools which they use regularly in the design, analysis, performance prediction, and optimization of Sandia components, systems and manufacturing processes. This report provides the relevant technical and accessibility data on the numerical codes used at Sandia, including information on the technical competency or capability area that each code addresses, code ``ownership`` and release status, and references describing the physical models and numerical implementation.

Peterson, C.W.

1994-11-01

13

Metamaterials program at Sandia National Laboratories.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories Metamaterial Science and Technology Program has developed novel HPC-based design tools, wafer scale 3D fabrication processes, and characterization tools to enable thermal IR optical metamaterial application studies.

McCormick, Frederick Bossert

2010-10-01

14

POLLUTION PREVENTION OPPORTUNITY ASSESSMENT - GEOCHEMISTRY LABORATORY AT SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES  

EPA Science Inventory

These reports summarize pollution prevention opportunity assessments conducted jointly by EPA and DOE at the Geochemistry Laboratory and the Manufacturing and Fabrication Repair Laboratory at the Department of Energy's Sandia National Laboratories facility in Albuquerque, New Mex...

15

Technology transfer at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Transferring technology to the private sector to help improve the competitiveness of key US industries is now an official mission of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) defense program national laboratories. We believe that national laboratories can play an important role in addressing US industrial competitiveness. Sandia is seeking to match laboratory strengths with industry-defined market needs in targeted industrial sectors. Sandia, like other national and federal laboratories, is developing an aggressive technology transfer program. This paper provides a brief review of our program and provides a snap-shot of where we are at today.

Allen, M.S.; Arvizu, D.E.

1993-10-01

16

Characterization of reactor neutron environments at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

To assure quality in the testing of electronic parts in neutron radiation environments, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has incorporated modern techniques and procedures, developed in the last two decades by the radiation effects community, into all of its experimental programs. Attention to the application of all of these methodologies, experiment designs, nuclear data, procedures and controls to the SNL radiation services has led to the much more accurate and reliable environment characterizations required to correlate the effects observed with the radiation delivered.

Kelly, J.G.; Luera, T.F.; Griffin, P.J.; Vehar, D.W.

1994-08-01

17

Sandia National Laboratories analysis code data base  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sandia National Laboratories' mission is to solve important problems in the areas of national defense, energy security, environmental integrity, and industrial technology. The laboratories' strategy for accomplishing this mission is to conduct research to provide an understanding of the important physical phenomena underlying any problem, and then to construct validated computational models of the phenomena which can be used as tools to solve the problem. In the course of implementing this strategy, Sandia's technical staff has produced a wide variety of numerical problem-solving tools which they use regularly in the design, analysis, performance prediction, and optimization of Sandia components, systems, and manufacturing processes. This report provides the relevant technical and accessibility data on the numerical codes used at Sandia, including information on the technical competency or capability area that each code addresses, code 'ownership' and release status, and references describing the physical models and numerical implementation.

Peterson, C. W.

1994-11-01

18

Unique test capabilities at Sandia National Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

A comprehensive testing capability has evolved at Sandia National Laboratories over the last three decades. This capability is primarily dedicated to obtaining test response data to substantiate analytical methods employed at the Laboratories. Unique instrumentation and data transmission techniques have been developed to recover test data. Emphasis has been placed on expeditious processing of test results for correlation with the

J. C. Bushnell; D. C. Bickel

1981-01-01

19

Unique test capabilities at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

A comprehensive testing capability has evolved at Sandia National Laboratories over the last three decades. This capability is primarily dedicated to obtaining test response data to substantiate analytical methods employed at the Laboratories. Unique instrumentation and data transmission techniques have been developed to recover test data. Emphasis has been placed on expeditious processing of test results for correlation with the analytical processes. Numerous facilities address the general environments of acceleration, climate, shock, and vibration. Nondestructive testing includes acoustic emission detection, laser holography, ultrasonics, and radiography. More specific testing exists in the fields of aerodynamics, materials characterization, radiation effects, and energy research. Much of the capability is classical and can be found with degrees of similarity at other laboratories. However, there are certain unique testing capabilities that have been developed to satisfy special requirements. The unique testing facilities described include: rocket sled tracks for ballistics tests and impact tests; aerial cable facilities for free-drop tests of payloads up to 3000 lb from heights up to 600 ft.; explosives testing facilities; large centrifuges; equipment for simulating heating conditions such as reentry heating; a lighting simulator; and an electromagnetic environment simulator. (LCL)

Bushnell, J.C.; Bickel, D.C.

1981-05-01

20

1986 environmental monitoring report, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque (SNLA) is located south of Albuquerque on Kirtland Air Force Base. Because radionuclides potentially are released in small quantities from its research activities, SNLA has a continuing environmental monitoring program which analyzes for cesium-137, tritium, uranium, alpha emitters, and beta emitters in water, soil, air, and vegetation. Measured radiation levels in public areas were consistent with

G. Millard; P. Pei; S. Felicetti; C. Gray; D. Thompson; J. Phelan

1987-01-01

21

1985 environmental monitoring report: Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque (SNLA) is located south of Albuquerque on Kirtland Air Force Base. Because radionuclides are potentially released from its research activities, SNLA has a continuing environmental monitoring program which analyzes for cesium-137, tritium, uranium, alpha emitters, and beta emitters in water, soil, air, and vegetation. Measured radiation levels in public areas were consistent with local background in

G. C. Millard; C. E. Gray; D. J. Thompson

1986-01-01

22

1987 environmental monitoring report: Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque (SNLA) is located south of Albuquerque on Kirtland Air Force Base. Because radionuclides are potentially released in small quantities from its research activities, SNLA has a continuing environmental monitoring program which analyzes for cesium-137, tritium, uranium, alpha emitters, and beta emitters in water, soil, air, and vegetation. Measured radiation levels in public areas were consistent with

G. Millard; P. Pei; S. Felicetti; C. Gray; D. Thompson; J. Phelan

1988-01-01

23

Inverter testing at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Inverters are key building blocks of photovoltaic (PV) systems that produce ac power. The balance of systems (BOS) portion of a PV system can account for up to 50% of the system cost, and its reliable operation is essential for a successful PV system. As part of its BOS program, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) maintains a laboratory wherein accurate electrical measurements of power systems can be made under a variety of conditions. This paper outlines the work that is done in that laboratory.

Ginn, J.W.; Bonn, R.H.; Sittler, G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Photovoltaic System Components Dept.

1997-04-01

24

Strategies for change within Sandia National Laboratories.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This paper identifies some of the sources of resistance to change that face Sandia National Laboratories' management, and examines the mechanisms that are being used to minimize the effects of that resistance. The rapid and radical nature of many of the c...

W. R. Burcham

1992-01-01

25

Shock wave codes at Sandia National Laboratories.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Sandia National Laboratories is very active in developing multi- dimensional, multi-material shock wave physics codes. One example is the state-of-the-art, three-dimensional Eulerian code CTH which is used at numerous government and university sites. CTH ...

J. M. McGlaun

1991-01-01

26

Sandia National Laboratories: The Truman Fellowship  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Sandia National Laboratories announces the establishment of the President Harry S. Truman Fellowship in National Security Science and Engineering to attract the best nationally recognized new Ph.D. scientists and engineers. Truman Fellowship candidates are expected to have solved a major scientific or engineering problem in their thesis work or will have provided a new approach or insight to a major problem, as evidenced by a recognized impact in their field. Requirements: Eligibility criteria include: U.S. citizenship, the ability to obtain a DOE "Q" clearance; research in areas of interest to national security; the candidate must have been awarded a Ph.D. (minimum 3.5 undergraduate and 3.7 graduate GPA preferred) within the past 3 years at the time of application or will have completed all Ph.D. requirements by commencement of appointment; and, candidates seeking their first national laboratory appointment (pre postdoc internships excluded). Research at Sandia: Sandia National Laboratories is a federally funded research and development organization and contractor for the U.S. Department of Energy. Sandia has research focus areas in advanced computing; information systems and mathematics; bioscience and technology; combustion, chemical, and plasma sciences; engineering sciences; geosciences; intelligent systems and robotics; materials science and technology; microelectronics and microsystems; nanosciences and technology; pulsed power and directed energy; and remote sensing and satellite systems.

27

System design and radiation field characteristics of the High Flux Neutron Radiography Facility (HFNRF) at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

The High Flux Neutron Radiography Facility (HFNRF) has been fabricated, tested and used successfully. This paper describes the final design features and presents the results of the radiation measurements made during the characterization tests. A complete neutron spectrum (from 10{sup {minus}8} to 15 MeV) has been measured with the aid of activation foils. Gold foils were used to determine a thermal neutron flux of 9.4 {times} 10{sup 7} n{center_dot}cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1} at the image plane in the Sandia Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) operating at 1.0 MW. The reactor can be operated at 20 MW for 10-second periods with the radiography tube in the central cavity. In pulse mode with peak power of 24,000 MW and a 7.6 ms FWHM {approximately}1.9 {times} 10{sup 10} n{center_dot}cm{sup {minus}2} will be generated with a peak flux of 2.3 {times} 10{sup 12} n{center_dot}cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1}.

Kelly, J.G.; McCrory, F.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Cooper, P.J. [Science and Engineering Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1992-06-01

28

System design and radiation field characteristics of the High Flux Neutron Radiography Facility (HFNRF) at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

The High Flux Neutron Radiography Facility (HFNRF) has been fabricated, tested and used successfully. This paper describes the final design features and presents the results of the radiation measurements made during the characterization tests. A complete neutron spectrum (from 10{sup {minus}8} to 15 MeV) has been measured with the aid of activation foils. Gold foils were used to determine a thermal neutron flux of 9.4 {times} 10{sup 7} n{center dot}cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1} at the image plane in the Sandia Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) operating at 1.0 MW. The reactor can be operated at 20 MW for 10-second periods with the radiography tube in the central cavity. In pulse mode with peak power of 24,000 MW and a 7.6 ms FWHM {approximately}1.9 {times} 10{sup 10} n{center dot}cm{sup {minus}2} will be generated with a peak flux of 2.3 {times} 10{sup 12} n{center dot}cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1}.

Kelly, J.G.; McCrory, F.M. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Cooper, P.J. (Science and Engineering Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States))

1992-01-01

29

Microsystem technology development at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

An overview of the major sensor and actuator projects using the micromachining capabilities of the Microelectronics Development Laboratory at Sandia National Laboratories is presented. Development efforts are underway for a variety of surface micromachined sensors and actuators. A technology that embeds micromechanical devices below the surface of the wafer prior to microelectronics fabrication has also been developed for integrating microelectronics with surface micromachined micromechanical devices.

Smith, J.H.

1995-11-01

30

Characterization of Neutron Test Facilities at Sandia National Laboratories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Sandia Pulsed Reactor (SPR-III) and Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR), with a variety of test environments, have been used for many years at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for radiation effects testing. Dosimetry has played a crucial role in their operation and characterization, and neutron energy spectral determinations have advanced as progress was made in the available nuclear data and spectrum adjustment techniques. This paper presents a historical perspective of the neutron energy spectra for several environments and their impact on several integral parameters of particular interest to facility users.

Vehar, D. W.; Griffin, P. J.; King, D. B.; Depriest, K. R.; Williams, J. G.

2009-08-01

31

Shock wave codes at Sandia National Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sandia National Laboratories is very active in developing multi- dimensional, multi-material shock wave physics codes. One example is the state-of-the-art, three-dimensional Eulerian code CTH which is used at numerous government and university sites. CTH is being ported to both Single Instruction Multiple Data (SIMD) and Multiple Instruction Multiple Data (MIMD) massively parallel computers. The next-generation arbitrary-Lagrangian-Eulerian code RHALE is under

McGlaun

1991-01-01

32

Shock wave codes at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories is very active in developing multi- dimensional, multi-material shock wave physics codes. One example is the state-of-the-art, three-dimensional Eulerian code CTH which is used at numerous government and university sites. CTH is being ported to both Single Instruction Multiple Data (SIMD) and Multiple Instruction Multiple Data (MIMD) massively parallel computers. The next-generation arbitrary-Lagrangian-Eulerian code RHALE is under development. This paper will discuss these codes.

McGlaun, J.M.

1991-08-20

33

Computational geomechanics & applications at Sandia National Laboratories.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is a multi-program national laboratory in the business of national security, whose primary mission is nuclear weapons (NW). It is a prime contractor to the USDOE, operating under the NNSA and is one of the three NW national laboratories. It has a long history of involvement in the area of geomechanics, starting with the some of the earliest weapons tests at Nevada. Projects in which geomechanics support (in general) and computational geomechanics support (in particular) are at the forefront at Sandia, range from those associated with civilian programs to those in the defense programs. SNL has had significant involvement and participation in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (low-level defense nuclear waste), the Yucca Mountain Project (formerly proposed for commercial spent fuel and high-level nuclear waste), and the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (the nation's emergency petroleum store). In addition, numerous industrial partners seek-out our computational/geomechanics expertise, and there are efforts in compressed air and natural gas storage, as well as in CO{sub 2} Sequestration. Likewise, there have also been collaborative past efforts in the areas of compactable reservoir response, the response of salt structures associated with reservoirs, and basin modeling for the Oil & Gas industry. There are also efforts on the defense front, ranging from assessment of vulnerability of infrastructure to defeat of hardened targets, which require an understanding and application of computational geomechanics. Several examples from some of these areas will be described and discussed to give the audience a flavor of the type of work currently being performed at Sandia in the general area of geomechanics.

Arguello, Jose Guadalupe, Jr.

2010-04-01

34

Sandia National Laboratories approach to emergency preparedness  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories is located on Kirtland AFB on Albuquerque, NM. The Air Force Base proper covers about 74 square miles in which SNL maintains 5 technical areas and the Coyote Test Field. These SNL areas add up to about 18,000 acres. However, SNL has other locations where we conduct corporate emergency planning: Kauai Test Facility (at Pacific Missile Range Facility in Kauai, Hawaii), and the Tonopah Test Range (Nevada). SNL/California located in Livermore has an independent emergency preparedness organization for their emergency planning activities.

Galegar, F.H.; Yourick, P.D.; Ross, S.A.

1997-12-31

35

Space robotics programs at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Existing robotic rover and space satellite technologies at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), coupled with existing launch vehicles and converted military Multiple Independent Reentry Vehicle (MIRV) technologies, can be applied towards the realization of a robotic lunar rover mission in the near term. SNL`s Advanced Vehicle Development Department has been designing, producing, and operating prototype rover systems at the Robotic Vehicle Range facility since 1984, and has extensive experience with teleoperated and semiautonomous mobile robotic systems. SNL`s Space Systems Directorate has been designing, producing, and operating satellite systems and subsystems in earth orbit for national security missions since the early 1960`s. The facilities and robotic vehicle fleet at SNL`s Robotic Vehicle Range (SNL-RVR) have been used to support technology base development in applications ranging from DoD battlefield and security missions, to multi-agency nuclear emergency response team exercises and the development of a prototype robotic rover for planetary exploration. Recent activities at the SNL-RVR include the Robotic All Terrain Lunar Exploration Rover (RATLER) prototype development program, exploratory studies on a Near Term Lunar Return Mission scenario for small robotic rovers based on existing space hardware technology, and demonstrations of the utility of existing rover technologies for performing remote field geology tasks similar to those envisioned on a robotic lunar rover mission. Specific technologies demonstrated include low data rate teleoperation, multi-vehicle control, remote site and sample inspection, and standard bandwidth stereo vision. The paper describes Sandia National Laboratories` activities in the Space Robotics area, and highlights the laboratory`s supporting technical capabilities.

Klarer, P.

1993-01-01

36

Space robotics programs at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Existing robotic rover and space satellite technologies at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), coupled with existing launch vehicles and converted military Multiple Independent Reentry Vehicle (MIRV) technologies, can be applied towards the realization of a robotic lunar rover mission in the near term. SNL's Advanced Vehicle Development Department has been designing, producing, and operating prototype rover systems at the Robotic Vehicle Range facility since 1984, and has extensive experience with teleoperated and semiautonomous mobile robotic systems. SNL's Space Systems Directorate has been designing, producing, and operating satellite systems and subsystems in earth orbit for national security missions since the early 1960's. The facilities and robotic vehicle fleet at SNL's Robotic Vehicle Range (SNL-RVR) have been used to support technology base development in applications ranging from DoD battlefield and security missions, to multi-agency nuclear emergency response team exercises and the development of a prototype robotic rover for planetary exploration. Recent activities at the SNL-RVR include the Robotic All Terrain Lunar Exploration Rover (RATLER) prototype development program, exploratory studies on a Near Term Lunar Return Mission scenario for small robotic rovers based on existing space hardware technology, and demonstrations of the utility of existing rover technologies for performing remote field geology tasks similar to those envisioned on a robotic lunar rover mission. Specific technologies demonstrated include low data rate teleoperation, multi-vehicle control, remote site and sample inspection, and standard bandwidth stereo vision. The paper describes Sandia National Laboratories' activities in the Space Robotics area, and highlights the laboratory's supporting technical capabilities.

Klarer, P.

1993-01-01

37

Overview of Sandia National Laboratories and Antenna Development Department  

SciTech Connect

Sandia is a multiprogram R & D laboratory. It has responsibilities in the following areas: (1) defense programs; (2) energy and environment; and (3) work for others (DOD, NSA, etc.). In 1989, the National Competitiveness Technology Transfer Act added another responsibility -- contributions to industrial competitiveness. Sandia has two major laboratory locations, New Mexico and California, and two flight testing locations, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada and Kauai Test Facility, Hawaii. The last part of this talk was dedicated to antenna research at Sandia.

Brock, B.C.

1994-04-01

38

Sandia National Laboratory High School Internship  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The High School Internship Program at Sandia National Laboratories has a wide variety of challenging and rewarding learning experiences for our nations future engineers, scientists, technologists, and business leaders. This program will provide a year-round opportunity to work with people who are global leaders in their fields. Are you interested in continuing your education and obtaining a science, math, engineering, or business degree? Would you like to see how classroom theory applies in a work environment? If the answer is yes, an exceptional educational experience awaits you. To take advantage of this opportunity, you must... Be attending a local high school in the Albuquerque metropolitan area (Pre-college program for local students only) Be at least 16 years of age Maintain a minimum cumulative 3.2 GPA for technical and business assignments, or a minimum 2.5 GPA for clerical or laborer assignments

39

Pyrotechnic component development at Sandia National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Pyrotechnic and explosive devices are designed at Sandia National Laboratories, SNL, which must satisfy high reliability requirements for reliable function and storage life. Since only a small number of devices may be built, high standards of quality of both the explosive and structural materials are necessary. We have developed special alloys and glass-ceramic seals for headers and structural parts of these devices to satisfy requirements for minimum size and weight but with increased ruggedness and safety. Hermetic sealing is used extensively to aid in the control of corrosion and aging effects. There is an increasing demand for the integration of these devices with safer (less sensitive) materials, better handling methods, and the use of electrical or fiber optic logic input elements. This paper addresses the trends in active materials, structural materials and a new method of ignition which enhances device designs compatible with low voltage and digital electronics.

Wilcox, P.D.

1987-01-01

40

History of Sandia National Laboratories` auxiliary closure mechanisms  

SciTech Connect

An essential component of a horizontal, underground nuclear test setup at the Nevada Test Site is the auxiliary closure system. The massive gates that slam shut immediately after a device has been detonated allow the prompt radiation to pass, but block debris and hot gases from continuing down the tunnel. Thus, the gates protect experiments located in the horizontal line-of-sight steel pipe. Sandia National Laboratories has been the major designer and developer of these closure systems. This report records the history of SNL`s participation in and contributions to the technology of auxiliary closure systems used in horizontal tunnel tests in the underground test program.

Weydert, J.C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ponder, G.M. [Geo-Centers, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-12-01

41

A History of Building 828, Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the history of Building 828 in Sandia National Laboratories' Technical Area I. Building 828 was constructed in 1946 as a mechanical test laboratory for Los Alamos' Z-Division (later Sandia) as it moved to Sandia Base. The building has undergone significant remodeling over the years and has had a variety of occupants. The building was evaluated in compliance with the National Historic Preservation Act, but was not eligible for the National Register of Historic Places. Nevertheless, for many Labs employees, it was a symbol of Sandia's roots in World War II and the Manhattan Project.

Ullrich, Rebecca

1999-08-01

42

Micromachined sensor and actuator research at Sandia's Microelectronics Development Laboratory.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

An overview of the major sensor and actuator projects using the micromachining capabilities of the Microelectronics Development Laboratory at Sandia National Laboratories are presented. Development efforts are underway for a variety of micromechanical dev...

J. H. Smith

1995-01-01

43

Technical Safety Appraisal of the Sandia reactors, ACRR (Annular Core Research Reactor), SPR III (Sandia Pulse Reactor III), Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque  

SciTech Connect

This report presents findings and concerns resulting from a Technical Safety Appraisal of Sandia National Laboratories' Sandia Pulse Reactor III (SPR III) and the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR). It was conducted by an appraisal team for the Department of Energy's Office of Safety Appraisals during site visits July 18--22 and August 1--12, 1988. The two reactors are located in Technical Area V of the Sandia Albuquerque site. A third reactor, SPR II, is stored assembled in a vault at the SPR III facility. While the SPR II reactor is still considered operational, there are no plans to use it in the foreseeable future. It was last operated in 1984. This appraisal addresses only the operations associated with SPR III and ACRR. The principle hazards presented by operations in these facilities are routine industrial safety hazards, the beta and gamma radiation fields experienced during maintenance operations at SPR III and during the handling of experimental packages after irradiation in either of the reactors, and localized radiation fields that could result from a highly-unlikely, severe accident. The findings and concerns developed by the appraisal team were shared with senior managers of Sandia National Laboratories and the Albuquerque Operations Office in exit meetings held on August 11 and 12, 1988. The final report of the team has been validated for factual accuracy with Sandia and the Albuquerque Operations Office.

Not Available

1989-05-01

44

Image Gallery from Sandia National Laboratory  

DOE Data Explorer

Sandia makes 300-dpi images available from 2000 through the present. Each of these photographs was originally released with a news article; a link to the original article and photo caption is listed with each image.

45

Sandia National Laboratories and higher education in New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories interacts extensively with colleges and universities in New Mexico. This report briefly covers these relationships in employee education, research contracts, loaned equipment, temporary employment, and other areas. 10 tabs.

Not Available

1988-05-01

46

Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Geographic Data Atlas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Geographic Data Atlas is published jointly by the Environmental Geographic Information System (EGIS) and the Facilities Geographic Information System (FGIS) to support the data-gathering efforts of Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) for ...

D. R. Bleakly L. Eshelman

1999-01-01

47

Parallel solid mechanics codes at Sandia National Laboratories.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Computational physicists at Sandia National Laboratories have moved their production codes to distributed memory parallel computers. The codes include the multi-material CTH Eulerian code, structural mechanics code. This presentation discusses our experie...

M. McGlaun

1994-01-01

48

Sandia National Laboratories, California Waste Management Program Annual Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Waste Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Man...

M. E. Brynildson

2011-01-01

49

Integrated water conservation program at Sandia National Laboratories.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), located on Kirkland Air Force Base (KAFB) in Albuquerque, NM, is implementing a comprehensive water conservation program. SNL/NM is taking a systematic, comprehensive approach to water conservation. The approach is to e...

D. Rogers

1997-01-01

50

Sandia National Laboratories, California Chemical Management Program Annual Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Chemical Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program ...

M. E. Brynildson

2012-01-01

51

Sandia National Laboratories Institutional Plan: FY 1996--2001  

SciTech Connect

Sandia`s Institutional Plan is by necessity a large document. As their missions have grown and diversified over the past decades, the variety of technical and site activities has increased. The programs and activities described here cover an enormous breadth of scientific and technological effort--from the creation of new materials to the development of a Sandia-wide electronic communications system. Today, there are three major themes that greatly influence this work. First, every federally funded institution is being challenged to find ways to become more cost effective, as the US seeks to reduce the deficit and achieve a balanced federal spending plan. Sandia is evaluating its business and operational processes to reduce the overall costs. Second, in response to the Galvin Task Force`s report ``Alternative Futures for the Department of Energy National Laboratories``, Sandia and the Department of Energy are working jointly to reduce the burden of administrative and compliance activities in order to devote more of the total effort to their principal research and development missions. Third, they are reevaluating the match between their missions and the programs they will emphasize in the future. They must demonstrate that Sandia`s roles--in national security, energy security, environmental integrity, and national scientific and technology agenda support--fit their special capabilities and skills and thus ensure their place in these missions for the longer planning horizon. The following areas are covered here: Sandia`s mission; laboratory directives; programmatic activities; technology partnerships and commercialization; Sandia`s resources; and protecting resources and the community.

NONE

1995-12-31

52

Partnering with Sandia National Laboratories through alliances or consortia  

SciTech Connect

To better facilitate working with industry, groups of industrial participants, and partners in alliances or consortia, Sandia National Laboratories presents information helpful to those outside groups as to the forms of arrangements that may be used to better facilitate partnering relationships between Sandia National Laboratories and consortia or alliances of outside parties. It is expected that these alliances and consortia will include both large and small for-profit industrial concerns, as well as not-for-profit entities such as universities, institutes, other research facilities, and other nonprofit institutions or consortia containing institutions. The intent of this report is to provide such outside groups with information that will facilitate rapid interactions with Sandia National Laboratories through some of these forms of business which will be discussed in this report. These are not the only approaches to facilitating business interactions with Sandia National Laboratories and it is not intended that this report be legal advice or required approaches to doing business with Sandia National Laboratories. The intent of this report is merely to suggest ways in which Sandia National Laboratories can work with outside parties in the most expeditious manner.

Winchell, B.M.

1994-12-01

53

Lessons learned from early microelectronics production at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

During the 1980s Sandia designed, developed, fabricated, tested, and delivered hundreds of thousands of radiation hardened Integrated Circuits (IC) for use in weapons and satellites. Initially, Sandia carried out all phases, design through delivery, so that development of next generation ICs and production of current generation circuits were carried out simultaneously. All this changed in the mid-eighties when an outside contractor was brought in to produce ICs that Sandia developed, in effect creating a crisp separation between development and production. This partnership had a severe impact on operations, but its more damaging effect was the degradation of Sandia`s microelectronics capabilities. This report outlines microelectronics development and production in the early eighties and summarizes the impact of changing to a separate contractor for production. This record suggests that low volume production be best accomplished within the development organization.

Weaver, H.T.

1998-02-01

54

Micromachined sensor and actuator research at Sandia`s Microelectronics Development Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

An overview of surface micromachining projects at the Microelectronics Development Laboratory of Sandia National Laboratories is presented. Development efforts are underway for a variety of surface micromachined sensors and actuators. A technology that embeds micromechanical devices below the surface of the wafer prior to microelectronics fabrication has also been developed for integrating microelectronics with surface micromachined micromechanical devices.

Smith, J.H.

1996-02-01

55

Status of Repetitive Pulsed Power at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Multi-kilojoule repetitive pulsed power technology moved from a laboratory environment into its first commercial application in 1997 as a driver for ion beam surface treatment. Sandia's RHEPP II, a repetitive 2.5 kJ/pulse electron beam accelerator, has supported the development of radiation treatment processes for polymers and elastomers, food products, and high dose- rate effects testing for defense programs since early 1996. Dos Lineas, an all solid-state testbed, has demonstrated synchronization techniques for parallel magnetic modulator systems and is continuing the development of design standards for long lifetime magnetic switches and voltage adders at a shot rate capability that exceeds 5x106 pulses per day. This paper will describe progress in multi-kilojoule class repetitive pulsed power technology development, limitations of magnetic switching technology for accelerator and modulator applications, and future research and development directions.

Harden, M.; Harjes, H.; Martinez, L.; Pena, G.; Reed, K.; Schneider, L

1999-06-23

56

Vibration control for precision manufacturing at Sandia National Laboratories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sandia National Laboratories performs R&D in structural dynamics and vibration suppression for precision applications in weapon systems, space, underwater, transportation and civil structures. Over the last decade these efforts have expanded into the areas of active vibration control and 'smart' structures and material systems. In addition, Sandia has focused major resources towards technology to support weapon product development and agile manufacturing capability for defense and industrial applications. This paper will briefly describe the structural dynamics modeling and verification process currently in place at Sandia that supports vibration control and some specific applications of these techniques to manufacturing in the areas of lithography, machine tools and flexible robotics.

Hinnerichs, Terry; Martinez, David

57

Sandia National Laboratories participation in the National Ignition Facility project  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility is a $1.1B DOE Defense Programs Inertial Confinement Fusion facility supporting the Science Based Stockpile Stewardship Program. The goal of the facility is to achieve fusion ignition and modest gain in the laboratory. The NIF project is responsible for the design and construction of the 192 beam, 1.8 MJ laser necessary to meet that goal. - The project is a National project with participation by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratory (SNL), the University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics (URLLE) and numerous industrial partners. The project is centered at LLNL which has extensive expertise in large solid state lasers. The other partners in the project have negotiated their participation based on the specific expertise they can bring to the project. In some cases, this negotiation resulted in the overall responsibility for a WBS element; in other cases, the participating laboratories have placed individuals in the project in areas that need their individual expertise. The main areas of Sandia`s participation are in the management of the conventional facility design and construction, the design of the power conditioning system, the target chamber system, target diagnostic instruments, data acquisition system and several smaller efforts in the areas of system integration and engineering analysis. Sandia is also contributing to the technology development necessary to support the project by developing the power conditioning system and several target diagnostics, exploring alternate target designs, and by conducting target experiments involving the ``foot`` region of the NIF power pulse. The project has just passed the mid-point of the Title I (preliminary) design phase. This paper will summarize Sandia`s role in supporting the National Ignition Facility and discuss the areas in which Sandia is contributing. 3 figs.

Boyes, J.; Boyer, W.; Chael, J.; Cook, D.; Cook, W.; Downey, T.; Hands, J.; Harjes, C.; Leeper, R.; McKay, P.; Micano, P.; Olson, R.; Porter, J.; Quintenz, J.; Roberts, V.; Savage, M.; Simpson, W.; Seth, A.; Smith, R.; Wavrik, M.; Wilson, M.

1996-08-01

58

1992 Environmental monitoring report, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

This 1992 report contains monitoring data from routine radiological and nonradiological environmental surveillance activities. summaries of significant environmental compliance programs in progress, such as National Environmental Policy Act documentation, environmental permits, envirorunental restoration, and various waste management programs for Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, are included. The maximum offsite dose impact was calculated to be 0.0034 millirem. The total population within a 50-mile radius of Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico received an estimated collective dose of 0.019 person-rem during 1992 from the laboratories` operations. As in the previous year, the 1992 operations at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico had no discernible impact on the general public or on the environment.

Culp, T.; Cox, W.; Hwang, H.; Irwin, M.; Jones, A.; Matz, B.; Molley, K.; Rhodes, W.; Stermer, D.; Wolff, T.

1993-09-01

59

1980 environmental monitoring report, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque is located south of the city on two broad mesas. The local climate is arid continental. Radionuclides are potentially released from five technical areas from the Laboratories' research activities. Sandia's environmental monitoring program searches for cesium-137, tritium, uranium, alpha emitters, and beta emitters in water, soil, air, and vegetation. No activity was found in public areas in excess of that found in local background in 1980. The Albuquerque population receives only 0.11 person-rem (estimated) from airborne radioactive releases. While national security research is the Laboratories' major responsibility, energy research is a major area of activity. Both these research areas cause radioactive releases.

Millard, G.C.; Simmons, T.N.; Gray, C.E.; O'Neal, B.L.

1981-04-01

60

Feasibility study of medical isotope production at Sandia National Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

In late 1994, Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, (SNL\\/NM), was instructed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Isotope Production and Distribution Program (IPDP) to examine the feasibility of producing medically useful radioisotopes using the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) and the Hot Cell Facility (HCF). Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) would be expected to supply the targets to

C. D. Massey; D. L. Miller; S. D. Carson

1995-01-01

61

POLLUTION PREVENTION OPPORTUNITY ASSESSMENT - MANUFACTURING AND FABRICATION REPAIR LABORATORY AT SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES  

EPA Science Inventory

These reports summarize pollution prevention opportunity assessments conducted jointly by EPA and DOE at the Geochemistry Laboratory and the Manufacturing and Fabrication Repair Laboratory at the Department of Energy's Sandia National Laboratories facility in Albuquerque, New Mex...

62

Sandia National Laboratories/California site environmental report for 1997  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is committed to conducting its operations in an environmentally safe and sound manner. It is mandatory that activities at SNL/California comply with all applicable environmental statutes, regulations, and standards. Moreover, SNL/California continuously strives to reduce risks to employees, the public, and the environment to the lowest levels reasonably possible. To help verify effective protection of public safety and preservation of the environment, SNL/California maintains an extensive, ongoing environmental monitoring program. This program monitors all significant effluents and the environment at the SNL/California site perimeter. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) performs off-site external radiation monitoring for both sites. These monitoring efforts ensure that emission controls are effective in preventing contamination of the environment. As part of SNL/California`s Environmental Monitoring Program, an environmental surveillance system measures the possible presence of hazardous materials in groundwater, stormwater, and sewage. The program also includes an extensive environmental dosimetry program, which measures external radiation levels around the Livermore site and nearby vicinity. The Site Environmental Report describes the results of SNL/California`s environmental protection activities during the calendar year. It also summarizes environmental monitoring data and highlights major environmental programs. Overall, it evaluates SNL/California`s environmental management performance and documents the site`s regulatory compliance status.

Condouris, R.A. [ed.] [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Holland, R.C. [Science Applications International Corp. (United States)

1998-06-01

63

Micromachined sensor and actuator research at Sandia`s Microelectronics Development Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

An overview of the surface micromachining program at the Microelectronics Development Laboratory of Sandia National Laboratories is presented. Development efforts are underway for a variety of surface micromachined sensors and actuators for both defense and commercial applications. A technology that embeds micromechanical devices below the surface of the wafer prior to microelectronics fabrication has been developed for integrating microelectronics with surface-micromachined micromechanical devices. The application of chemical-mechanical polishing to increase the manufacturability of micromechanical devices is also presented.

Smith, J.H.

1996-11-01

64

Sandia National Laboratories Institutional Plan FY1994--1999  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a five year plan for the laboratory. This plan takes advantage of the technical strengths of the lab and its staff to address issues of concern to the nation on a scope much broader than Sandia`s original mission, while maintaining the general integrity of the laboratory. The plan proposes initiatives in a number of technologies which overlap the needs of its customers and the strengths of its staff. They include: advanced manufacturing technology; electronics; information and computational technology; transportation energy technology and infrastructure; environmental technology; energy research and technology development; biomedical systems engineering; and post-cold war defense imperatives.

Not Available

1993-10-01

65

Applying the Laboratory Integration and Prioritization System (LIPS) to decision-making at Sandia National Laboratories.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Laboratories Services Division of Sandia National Laboratories includes a wide variety of operations such as environmental, safety and health, safeguards and security, facilities, logistics, and sites planning and integration. In the face of declining...

D. S. Barber J. W. Mead

1995-01-01

66

Status report on the Sandia Laboratories solar total energy program  

Microsoft Academic Search

A feasibility study of a combination of solar energy collection and total or cascaded energy systems has been underway at Sandia Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico, since the summer of 1972. Results of the systems analysis effort have been previously reported. Systems analyses and hardware design have continued. This paper summarizes results of the program through June 1975 by providing systems

R STROMBERG

1975-01-01

67

Sodium\\/sulfur battery studies at SNL (Sandia National Laboratories)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Over the past decade, Sandia National Laboratories has managed the Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored programs for the development of the sodium\\/sulfur battery technology. Two DOE offices have provided support for these programs: the Office of Energy Storage and Distribution (OESD) and the Office of Transportation Systems (OTS). The ultimate goal of these ongoing efforts is to develop and demonstrate high

J. W. Braithwaite; J. M. Freese

1989-01-01

68

Equipment qualification testing evaluation experiences at Sandia National Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

The USNRC has sponsored a number of programs at Sandia National Laboratories specifically addressing safety-related equipment qualification. The most visible of these programs has been the Qualification Testing Evaluation (QTE) program. Other relevant programs have included the Equipment Qualification Methodology Research Test program (CAP). Over a ten year period these programs have collectively tested numerous types of safety-related equipment. Some

L. D. Bustard; F. J. Wyant; L. L. Bonzon; K. T. Gillen

1986-01-01

69

Overview of Sandia National Laboratories pulse nuclear reactors  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories has designed, constructed and operated bare metal Godiva-type and pool-type pulse reactors since 1961. The reactor facilities were designed to support a wide spectrum of research, development, and testing activities associated with weapon and reactor systems.

Schmidt, T.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Reuscher, J.A. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

1994-10-01

70

Results of Sandia National Laboratories grid-tied inverter testing  

SciTech Connect

This paper proposes a definition for a Non-Islanding Inverter. This paper also presents methods that can be used to implement such an inverter, along with references to prior work on the subject. Justification for the definition is provided on both a theoretical basis and results from tests conducted at Sandia National Laboratories and Ascension Technology, Inc.

Kern, G.A. [Ascension Technology, Inc., Boulder, CO (United States); Bonn, R.H.; Ginn, J.; Gonzalez, S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1998-07-01

71

Sandia Laboratories Hybrid Computer and Motion Simulator Facilities.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Hybrid computer and motion simulator facilities at Sandia National Laboratories include an AD/FIVE-AD10-PDP11/60, an AD/FIVE-PDP11/45, an EAI7800-EAI640, an EAI580/TR48-Nova 800, and two Carco S-45OR-3/R-493A three-axis motion simulators. An EAI680 is use...

W. H. Curry R. E. French

1980-01-01

72

Parallel solid mechanics codes at Sandia National Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

Computational physicists at Sandia National Laboratories have moved their production codes to distributed memory parallel computers. The codes include the multi-material CTH Eulerian code, structural mechanics code. This presentation discusses our experiences moving the codes to parallel computers and experiences running the codes. Moving large production codes onto parallel computers require developing parallel algorithms, parallel data bases and parallel support

McGlaun

1994-01-01

73

1988 environmental monitoring report, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Albuquerque is located south of Albuquerque on Kirtland Air Force Base. Because radionuclides are potentially released in small quantities from its research activities, SNL, Albuquerque has a continuing environmental monitoring program which analyzes for cesium-137, tritium, uranium, alpha emitters, and beta emitters in water, soil, air, and vegetation. A total of 5.23 curies of argon-41 were

G. Millard; G. Yeager; J. Phelan; T. Wolff; P. Pei; D. Dionne; C. Gray; D. Thompson

1989-01-01

74

Sandia National Laboratories, California Chemical Management Program annual report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL\\/CA) Chemical Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL\\/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. This program annual report describes the activities undertaken during the calender past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Chemical Management Program, one of

Brynildson; Mark E

2012-01-01

75

Solar energy at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Basic concepts for using the energy of the sun have been known for centuries. The challenge today, the goal of the Department of Energy`s National Solar Energy Program is to create the technology needed to establish solar energy as a practical, economical alternative to energy produced by depletable fuels--and to use that solar-produced energy in a wide variety of applications. To assist the DOE in this national effort, Sandia sponsors industrial and university research and development, manages a series of technical programs, operates solar experimental facilities, and carries out its own scientific and engineering research. This booklet describes their projects, their technical objectives, and explains how their experimental facilities are used to find the answers we`re seeking. Prospective participants from companies involved in solar-energy development or applications should find it especially useful since it outlines broad areas of opportunity. Projects include: central receiver technology; line-focus thermal technology; photovoltaic systems technology; wind turbine development; energy storage technology; and applied research in improved polycrystalline materials for solar cells and photoelectrolysis of water.

NONE

1981-12-31

76

Videos from Sandia National Laboratories Public Streaming Archive  

DOE Data Explorer

Sandia National Laboratories, with primary locations in New Mexico and California, identifies five key mission areas: 1) Nuclear Weapons security and reliability; 2) Defense Systems and Assessments; 3) Energy, Climate, and Infrastructure Security; 4) International, Homeland and Nuclear Security; and 5) Homeland Security and Defense. The videos available from Sandia's video streaming service include both short clips and longer presentations. They are offered in categories that include Energy, Sciences and Engineering, Health, National Security, etc. The Sciences and Engineering category alone has more than 45 videos. The Archive features five videos at a time and provides easy access, through a listing below the feature area, to all of the many videos.

77

Dual-benefit technologies at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

What does the pulp and paper industry have in common with the desert southwest and nuclear weapons? As a representative of one of the Nations three nuclear weapons design laboratories (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories), my goal is to identify ``dual-benefit`` technologies where codevelopment will both strengthen the nation`s competitive position and enhance national security. In development of this presentation, I found more common elements than I could possibly survey in this brief period.

Schaefer, D.W.

1993-12-31

78

1994 Site Environmental Report Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

This 1994 report contains data from routine radiological and nonradiological environmental monitoring activities. Summaries of significant environmental compliance programs in progress, such as National Environmental Policy Act documentation, environmental permits, environmental restoration, and various waste management programs for Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, are included. The maximum off-site dose impact from air emissions was calculated to be 1.5 x 10{sup -4} millirem. The total population within a 50-mile radius of Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico received an estimated collective dose of 0.012 person-rem during 1994 from the laboratories` operations. This report is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy in compliance with DOE Order 5400.1.

Shyr, L.J.; Wiggins, T.; White, B.B. [eds.] [and others

1995-09-01

79

Airbags to Martian Landers: Analyses at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

A new direction for the national laboratories is to assist US business with research and development, primarily through cooperative research and development agreements (CRADAs). Technology transfer to the private sector has been very successful as over 200 CRADAs are in place at Sandia. Because of these cooperative efforts, technology has evolved into some new areas not commonly associated with the former mission of the national laboratories. An example of this is the analysis of fabric structures. Explicit analyses and expertise in constructing parachutes led to the development of a next generation automobile airbag; which led to the construction, testing, and analysis of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Mars Environmental Survey Lander; and finally led to the development of CAD based custom garment designs using 3D scanned images of the human body. The structural analysis of these fabric structures is described as well as a more traditional example Sandia with the test/analysis correlation of the impact of a weapon container.

Gwinn, K.W.

1994-03-01

80

Sandia National Laboratories, California proposed CREATE facility environmental baseline survey.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories, Environmental Programs completed an environmental baseline survey (EBS) of 12.6 acres located at Sandia National Laboratories/California (SNL/CA) in support of the proposed Collaboration in Research and Engineering for Advanced Technology and Education (CREATE) Facility. The survey area is comprised of several parcels of land within SNL/CA, County of Alameda, California. The survey area is located within T 3S, R 2E, Section 13. The purpose of this EBS is to document the nature, magnitude, and extent of any environmental contamination of the property; identify potential environmental contamination liabilities associated with the property; develop sufficient information to assess the health and safety risks; and ensure adequate protection for human health and the environment related to a specific property.

Catechis, Christopher Spyros

2013-10-01

81

Dual benefit robotics programs at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories has one of the largest integrated robotics laboratories in the United States. Projects include research, development, and application of one-of-a-kind systems, primarily for the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. This work has been underway for more than 10 years. It began with on-site activities that required remote operation, such as reactor and nuclear waste handling. Special purpose robot systems were developed using existing commercial manipulators and fixtures and programs designed in-house. These systems were used in applications such as servicing the Sandia pulsed reactor and inspecting remote roof bolts in an underground radioactive waste disposal facility. In the beginning, robotics was a small effort, but with increasing attention to the use of robots for hazardous operations, efforts now involve a staff of more than 100 people working in a broad robotics research, development, and applications program that has access to more than 30 robotics systems.

Jones, A.T.

1994-09-01

82

Sandia National Laboratories and higher education in New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

New Mexico education institutions have had an extraordinary influence on the Sandia workforce throughout the years. Today, our approximately 8400 employees hold 2028 graduate and undergraduate degrees from the 4-year colleges and universities in the state. This accounts for 22.3% of the degrees held by Sandia employees. Employees also hold another 618 2-year degrees from New Mexico educational institutions. The total number of degrees is nearly twice the number from the next leading state, California. When only the highest degree held by an employee is considered, that degree (PhD, master, or bachelor's) came from a New Mexico college or university 29% of the time. Employees whose highest degree is from the University of New Mexico (UNM) rank, in numbers, at the top of most categories of management and staff at Sandia Albuquerque. UNM, with its proximity to our headquarters in Albuquerque, has granted the most degrees to Sandia employees. Employees also hold degrees from New Mexico State University (NMSU). New Mexico Institute of Mining Technology (NMIMT), and from other 4-year regional institutions in the state. Engineering degrees and degrees in business are the most numerous, although employees hold degrees in many other fields, reflecting the diversity of work being done at the Laboratories by graduates of colleges and universities in the state. For more detailed information, refer to Appendix A. 4 figs., 11 tabs.

Fairbanks, R.R.

1990-03-01

83

Advanced coordinate measuring machine at Sandia National Laboratories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sandia National Laboratories/California has acquired a new Moore M-48V CNC five-axis universal coordinate measuring machine (CMM). Site preparation, acceptance testing, and initial performance results are discussed. Unique features of the machine include a ceramic ram and vacuum evacuated laser pathways (VELPS). The implementation of a VELPS system on the machine imposed certain design requirements and entailed certain start-up problems. The machine's projected capabilities, workload, and research possibilities are outlined.

Pilkey, R. D.; Klevgard, P. A.

1993-03-01

84

Equipment qualification testing evaluation experiences at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

The USNRC has sponsored a number of programs at Sandia National Laboratories specifically addressing safety-related equipment qualification. The most visible of these programs has been the Qualification Testing Evaluation (QTE) program. Other relevant programs have included the Equipment Qualification Methodology Research Test program (CAP). Over a ten year period these programs have collectively tested numerous types of safety-related equipment. Some insights and conclusions extracted from these testing experiences are summarized in this report.

Bustard, L.D.; Wyant, F.J.; Bonzon, L.L.; Gillen, K.T.

1986-01-01

85

Sandia Laboratories hybrid computer and motion simulator facilities  

SciTech Connect

Hybrid computer and motion simulator facilities at Sandia National Laboratories include an AD/FIVE-AD10-PDP11/60, an AD/FIVE-PDP11/45, an EAI7800-EAI640, an EAI580/TR48-Nova 800, and two Carco S-45OR-3/R-493A three-axis motion simulators. An EAI680 is used in the analog mode only. This report describes the current equipment.

Curry, W. H.; French, R. E.

1980-05-01

86

Sandia National Laboratories, California Hazardous Materials Management Program annual report.  

SciTech Connect

The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Hazardous Materials Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. This program annual report describes the activities undertaken during the calender past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Hazardous Materials Management Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

Brynildson, Mark E.

2011-02-01

87

Fast Ignition Studies at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

This talk will describe ongoing and planned fast ignition theoretical and experimental work using the Z-machine in concert with the upgraded Z-Beamlet/PW laser system. Z can produce x-ray powers of 100-250TW, x-ray energies 1-1.8MJ, and > 200eV radiation temperatures and thus represents an interesting platform for compressing large quantities of matter for use as fast ignition targets. Soon Z will undergo refurbishment, and the resulting parameters for Z-R are even more interesting. The Z-Beamlet system is currently undergoing short pulse conversion with the plan that Z-Beamlet/PW will deliver 0.5-2 kJ in 0.5-10 psec in FY07 when Z-R will be available. Numerical simulations of laser/plasma interaction, electron transport, and ion generation at relevant densities are being performed using LSP, a 3D implicit hybrid PIC code. LASNEX simulations of the compression of deuterium/tritium fuel in various reentrant cone geometries are being performed. Analytic and numerical modeling has been performed to determine the conditions required for fast ignition breakeven scaling. These theoretical results indicate that to achieve fusion output equal to the energy deposited by fast particles will require about 5% of the laser energy needed for ignition and might be an achievable goal (within a factor of 2) with Z-Beamlet/PW.

Campbell, R. B.; Cuneo, M. E.; Hanson, D. L.; Matzen, M. K.; Mehlhorn, T. A.; Porter, J. L.; Slutz, S. A.; Vesey, R. A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

2006-04-07

88

Independent technical review of the Sandia National Laboratories human resources program.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report reviews the human resources program of Sandia National Laboratories. The architecture and cost of the Sandia HR Program are fundamentally inconsistent with the commercial business standard. Breakthrough change is required to resolve the archit...

D. Weaver

1994-01-01

89

Results from long conduction time plasma opening switch experiments at Sandia National Laboratories.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Sandia National Laboratories is conducting research on Plasma Opening Switches (POS) with input current fluxing times of 200--250 nanoseconds. The opening switches that have been studied at Sandia employ auxiliary magnetic fields to control the switch pla...

M. E. Savage W. W. Simpson M. A. Usher

1993-01-01

90

Photonics at Sandia National Laboratories: From research to applications  

SciTech Connect

Photonics activities at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) are founded on a strong materials research program. The advent of the Compound Semiconductor Research Laboratory (CSRL) in 1988, accelerated device and materials research and development. Recently, industrial competitiveness has been added as a major mission of the labs. Photonics projects have expanded towards applications-driven programs requiring device and subsystem prototype deliveries and demonstrations. This evolution has resulted in a full range of photonics programs from materials synthesis and device fabrication to subsystem packaging and test.

Meyer, J.; Owyoung, A.; Zipperian, T.E.; Tsao, J.Y.; Myers, D.R.

1994-02-01

91

National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Guide, Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

This report contains a comprehensive National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Guide for the Sandia National Laboratories. It is based on the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) NEPA regulations in 40 CFR Parts 1500 through 1508; the US Department of Energy (DOE) N-EPA implementing procedures in 10 CFR Part 102 1; DOE Order 5440.1E; the DOE ``Secretarial Policy Statement on the National Environmental Policy Act`` of June 1994- Sandia NEPA compliance procedures-, and other CEQ and DOE guidance. The Guide includes step-by-step procedures for preparation of Environmental Checklists/Action Descriptions Memoranda (ECL/ADMs), Environmental Assessments (EAs), and Environmental Impact Statements (EISs). It also includes sections on ``Dealing With NEPA Documentation Problems`` and ``Special N-EPA Compliance Issues.``

Hansen, R.P. [Hansen Environmental Consultants, Englewood, CO (United States)

1995-08-01

92

NDE activities and technology transfer at Sandia National Laboratories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The NDE, Photometrics, and Optical Data Reduction Department at Sandia National Laboratories in New Mexico provides nondestructive evaluation (NDE) support for all phases of research and development at Sandia. Present facilities and personnel provide radiography, acoustic monitoring, ultrasonic scanning, computed tomography, shearography/ESPI, infrared imaging, high speed and ultra-high speed photometrics, and image processing. Although the department includes photometrics and optical data reduction as well as NDE, I will refer to the NDE department from now on for simplicity. The NDE department has worked on technology transfer to organizations inside and outside the weapons complex. This work has been performed in all the Sandia business sectors: defense programs, energy and environment, and work for others. The technology transfer has been in the form of testing for product improvement such as validation of aircraft inspection equipment, consultation such as detecting lathe bearing slip for a major machine tool manufacturer, and products such as an acoustic sand detector for the oil and gas industry.

Shurtleff, W. W.

1993-11-01

93

Radioactive material package testing capabilities at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Evaluation and certification of radioactive and hazardous material transport packages can be accomplished by subjecting these packages to normal transport and hypothetical accident test conditions. The regulations allow package designers to certify packages using analysis, testing, or a combination of analysis and testing. Testing can be used to substantiate assumptions used in analytical models and to demonstrate package structural and thermal response. Regulatory test conditions include impact, puncture, crush, penetration, water spray, immersion, and thermal environments. Testing facilities are used to simulate the required test conditions and provide measurement response data. Over the past four decades, comprehensive testing facilities have been developed at Sandia National Laboratories to perform a broad range of verification and certification tests on hazardous and radioactive material packages or component sections. Sandia`s facilities provide an experience base that has been established during the development and certification of many package designs. These unique facilities, along with innovative instrumentation data collection capabilities and techniques, simulate a broad range of testing environments. In certain package designs, package testing can be an economical alternative to complex analysis to resolve regulatory questions or concerns.

Uncapher, W.L.; Hohnstreiter, G.F.

1995-12-31

94

Parallel solid mechanics codes at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Computational physicists at Sandia National Laboratories have moved their production codes to distributed memory parallel computers. The codes include the multi-material CTH Eulerian code, structural mechanics code. This presentation discusses our experiences moving the codes to parallel computers and experiences running the codes. Moving large production codes onto parallel computers require developing parallel algorithms, parallel data bases and parallel support tools. We rewrote the Eulerian CTH code for parallel computers. We were able to move both ALEGRA and PRONTO to parallel computers with only a modest number of modifications. We restructured the restart and graphics data bases to make them parallel and minimize the I/O to the parallel computer. We developed mesh decomposition tools to divide a rectangular or arbitrary connectivity mesh into sub-meshes. The sub-meshes map to processors and minimize the communication between processors. We developed new visualization tools to process the very large, parallel data bases. This presentation also discusses our experiences running these codes on Sandia`s 1840 compute node Intel Paragon, 1024 processor nCUBE and networked workstations. The parallel version of CTH uses the Paragon and nCUBE for production calculations. The ALEGRA and PRONTO codes are moving off networked workstations onto the Paragon and nCUBE massively parallel computers.

McGlaun, M.

1994-08-01

95

NDE activities and technology transfer at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

The NDE, Photometrics, and Optical Data Reduction Department at Sandia National Laboratories in New Mexico (S provides nondestructive evaluation (NDE) support for all phases of research and development at Sandia. Present facilities and personnel provide radiography, acoustic monitoring, ultrasonic scanning, computed tomography, shearography/ESPI, infrared imaging, high speed and ultra-high speed photometrics, and image processing. Although the department includes photometrics and optical data reduction as well as NDE, I will refer to the NDE department from now on for simplicity. The NDE department has worked on technology transfer to organizations inside and outside the weapons complex. This work has been performed in all the Sandia business sectors: Defense Programs, Energy and Environment, and Work for Others. The technology transfer has been in the form of testing for product improvement such as validation of aircraft inspection equipment, consultation such as detecting lathe bearing slip for a major machine tool manufacturer, and products such as an acoustic sand detector for the oil and gas industry.

Shurtleff, W.W.

1993-12-31

96

Particle-beam fusion research facilities at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Sandia research in inertial-confinement fusion (ICF) is based on pulse-power capabilities that grew out of earlier developments of intense relativistic electron-beam (e-beam) radiation sources for weapon effects studies. ICF involves irradiating a deuterium-tritium pellet with either laser light or particle beams until the center of the pellet is compressed and heated to the point of nuclear fusion. This publication focuses on the use of particle beams to achieve fusion, and on the various facilities that are used in support of the particle-beam fusion (PBF) program.

NONE

1980-12-31

97

Vibration control for precision manufacturing at Sandia National Laboratories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sandia National Laboratories performs R&D in structural dynamics and vibration suppression of precision applications in weapon systems, space, underwater, transportation and civil structures. Over the last decade these efforts have expanded into the areas of active vibration control and 'smart' structures and material systems, In addition, major resources have been focused towards technology to support weapon product development and agile manufacturing capability for defense and industrial applications. This paper will briefly describe the structural dynamics modeling and verification process that supports vibration control and some specific applications of these techniques to manufacturing in the areas of lithography, machine tools and flexible robotics.

Hinnerichs, Terry D.; Martinez, David R.

1995-05-01

98

Update on Engine Combustion Research at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this paper are to describe the research efforts in diesel engine combustion at Sandia National Laboratories' Combustion Research Facility and to provide recent experimental results. We have four diesel engine experiments supported by the Department of Energy, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies: a one-cylinder version of a Cummins heavy-duty engine, a diesel simulation facility, a one-cylinder Caterpillar engine to evaluate combustion of alternative fuels, and a homogeneous-charge, compression ignition (HCCI) engine. Recent experimental results of diesel combustion research will be discussed and a description will be given of our HCCI experimental program and of our HCCI modeling work.

Jay Keller; Gurpreet Singh

2001-05-14

99

Progress in Z-Pinch driven dynamic-hohlraums for high-temperature radiation-flow and ICF experiments at Sandia National Laboratories.  

SciTech Connect

Progress in understanding the physics of dynamic-hohlraums is reviewed for a system capable of generating 13 TW of axial radiation for high temperature (>200 eV) radiation-flow experiments and ICF capsule implosions.

Bailey, James E.; Haines, Malcolm G. (Imperial College, London, United Kingdom); Chandler, Gordon Andrew; Bliss, David Emery; Olson, Richard Edward; Sanford, Thomas W. L.; Olson, Craig Lee; Nash, Thomas J.; Ruiz, Carlos L.; Matzen, Maurice Keith; Idzorek, George C. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Stygar, William A.; Apruzese, John P. (Naval Research Laboratory, Washington DC); Cuneo, Michael Edward; Cooper, Gary Wayne (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Chittenden, Jeremy Paul (Imperial College, London, United Kingdom); Chrien, Robert E. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Slutz, Stephen A.; Mock, Raymond Cecil; Leeper, Ramon Joe; Sarkisov, Gennady Sergeevich (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Peterson, Darrell L. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Lemke, Raymond William; Mehlhorn, Thomas Alan; Roderick, Norman Frederick (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Watt, Robert G. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New MM)

2004-06-01

100

Isotopic power supplies for space and terrestrial systems: quality assurance by Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

The Sandia National Laboratories participation in Quality Assurance (QA) programs for Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generators which have been used in space and terrestrial systems over the past 15 years is summarized. Basic elements of the program are briefly described and recognition of assistance from other Sandia organizations is included. Descriptions of the various systems for which Sandia has had the QA responsibility are also presented. In addition, the outlook for Sandia participation in RTG programs for the next several years is noted.

Hannigan, R.L.; Harnar, R.R.

1981-09-01

101

Sandia National Laboratories, California Chemical Management Program annual report.  

SciTech Connect

The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Chemical Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. This program annual report describes the activities undertaken during the calender past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Chemical Management Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA. SNL/CA is responsible for tracking chemicals (chemical and biological materials), providing Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) and for regulatory compliance reporting according to a variety of chemical regulations. The principal regulations for chemical tracking are the Emergency Planning Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) and the California Right-to-Know regulations. The regulations, the Hazard Communication/Lab Standard of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) are also key to the CM Program. The CM Program is also responsible for supporting chemical safety and information requirements for a variety of Integrated Enabling Services (IMS) programs primarily the Industrial Hygiene, Waste Management, Fire Protection, Air Quality, Emergency Management, Environmental Monitoring and Pollution Prevention programs. The principal program tool is the Chemical Information System (CIS). The system contains two key elements: the MSDS library and the chemical container-tracking database that is readily accessible to all Members of the Sandia Workforce. The primary goal of the CM Program is to ensure safe and effective chemical management at Sandia/CA. This is done by efficiently collecting and managing chemical information for our customers who include Line, regulators, DOE and ES and H programs to ensure compliance with regulations and to streamline customer business processes that require chemical information.

Brynildson, Mark E.

2012-02-01

102

RF and mm-Wave Photonics at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

RF and mm-wave photonic devices and circuits have been developed at Sandia National Laboratories for applications ranging from RF optical data links to optical generation of mm-wave frequencies. This talk will explore recent high-speed photonics technology developments at Sandia including: (1) A monolithic optical integrated circuit for all-optical generation of mm-waves. Using integrated mode-locked diode lasers, amplifiers, and detectors, frequencies between 30 GHz and 90 GHz are generated by a single monolithic (Al,Ga)As optical circuit less than 2mm in its largest dimension. (2) Development of polarization-maintaining, low-insertion-loss, low v-pi, Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) modulators with DC-to-potentially-K-band modulation bandwidth. New low-loss polarization-maintaining waveguide designs using binary alloys have been shown to reduce polarization crosstalk in undoped (Al,Ga)As waveguides, yielding high extinction ratio (>40dB) and low on-chip loss (<6dB) in Mach-Zehnder interferometers. RF drive voltage is reduced through use of 45rnrn-active length devices with modulator sensitivity, v-pi, less than 3V.

Vawter, G.A.; Sullivan, C.

1999-07-08

103

Fire Protection Research Program at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories is executing a program for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to provide data needed for confirmation of the suitability of current design standards and regulatory guides for fire protection and control in water reactor power plants. This paper summarizes the activities of this ongoing program through October 1980. Characterization of electrically initiated fires revealed a margin of safety in the separation criteria of Regulatory Guide 1.75 for such fires in IEEE-383 qualified cable. However, tests confirmed that these guidelines and standards are not sufficient, in themselves, to protect against exposure fires. This paper describes both small and full scale tests to assess the adequacy of fire retardant coatings and full scale tests on fire shields to determine their effectiveness. It also describes full scale tests to determine the effects of walls and ceilings on fire propagation between cable trays. Some small-scale scoping tests have been conducted to investigate the effects of varying the furnace pressure on cable penetration performance in the ASTM-E-119 Fire Test. The Sandia Fire Research Facility has been completed and a series of tests have been run to assess the effectiveness of Halon-1301 as a suppression system in extinguishing deep-seated cable-tray fires. It was found that given sufficient soak times Halon systems are effective in extinguishing such fires.

Klamerus, L.J.

1980-01-01

104

Pulsed power driven hohlraum research at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Three pulsed power driven hohlraum concepts are being investigated at Sandia for application to inertial fusion research. These hohlraums are driven by intense proton and Li ion beams as well as by two different types of z-pinch x-ray sources. Research on these hohlraum systems will continue on Sandia`s PBFA II-Z facility.

Leeper, R.J.; Alberts, T.E.; Allshouse, G.A. [and others

1996-06-01

105

Micromachined sensor and actuator research at Sandia`s Microelectronics Development Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

An overview of the major sensor and actuator projects using the micromachining capabilities of the Microelectronics Development Laboratory at Sandia National Laboratories are presented. Development efforts are underway for a variety of micromechanical devices and control electronics for those devices. Our efforts are concentrated in the area of surface micromachining. Pressure sensors based on silicon nitride diaphragms and hot polysilicon filaments for calorimetric gas sensing have been developed. Accelerometers based upon high-aspect ratio surface micromachining are being developed. Actuation mechanisms employing either electrostatic or steam power are being combined with a three-level active (plus an additional passive level) polysilicon surface micromachining process to couple these actuators to external devices. The results of efforts toward integration of micromechanics with the driving electronics for actuators or the amplification/signal processing electronics for sensors is also described. This effort includes a CMOS-first, tungsten metallization process to allow the CMOS electronics to withstand high-temperature micromechanical processing. Also, a unique micromechanics-first approach is being pursued in which the micromechanical devices are embedded below the surface of the starting material for the CMOS.

Smith, J.H.

1995-08-01

106

Sandia National Laboratories: A product of postwar readiness, 1945-1950  

SciTech Connect

The genesis and growth of Sandia National Laboratories, the nation's largest nuclear weapons lab, stands as a pertinent case study showing the oftentimes complex, but effective interaction of government, industry, and the growth of cooperative research. Originally a part of Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory under management by the University of California, Sandia traces its roots to Z Division, an ordnance-engineering arm located at Sandia Base on the desert outskirts of Albuquerque, New Mexico, in September 1945. For Sandia National Laboratories, the early postwar years/emdash/rather than representing a transformation to peacetime/emdash/were characterized by a continued mobilization of engineering and science in the name of national readiness.

Furman, N.S.

1988-04-01

107

1989 Environmental monitoring report, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

This 1989 report contains monitoring data from routine radiological and nonradiological environmental surveillance activities. Summaries of significant environmental compliance programs in progress such as National Environmental Policy Act documentation, environmental permits, environmental restoration, and various waste management programs for Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque (SNL, Albuquerque) are included. The maximum offsite dose impact was calculated to be 8.8 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} mrem. The total Albuquerque population received a collective dose of 0.097 person-rem during 1989 from SNL, Albuquerque, operations. As in the previous year, SNL, Albuquerque, operations in 1989 had no adverse impact on the general public or on the environment. 46 refs., 20 figs., 31 tabs.

Hwang, S.; Chavez, G.; Phelan, J.; Parsons, A.; Yeager, G.; Dionne, D.; Schwartz, B.; Wolff, T.; Fish, J.; Gray, C.; Thompson, D.

1990-05-01

108

Baseline ecological footprint of Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico.  

SciTech Connect

The Ecological Footprint Model is a mechanism for measuring the environmental effects of operations at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico (SNL/NM). This analysis quantifies environmental impact associated with energy use, transportation, waste, land use, and water consumption at SNL/NM for fiscal year 2005 (FY05). Since SNL/NM's total ecological footprint (96,434 gha) is greater than the waste absorption capacity of its landholdings (338 gha), it created an ecological deficit of 96,096 gha. This deficit is equal to 886,470lha, or about 3,423 square miles of Pinyon-Juniper woodlands and desert grassland. 89% of the ecological footprint can be attributed to energy use, indicating that in order to mitigate environmental impact, efforts should be focused on energy efficiency, energy reduction, and the incorporation of additional renewable energy alternatives at SNL/NM.

Coplen, Amy K.; Mizner, Jack Harry,; Ubechel, Norion M.

2009-01-01

109

Sandia National Laboratories' new high level acoustic test facility  

SciTech Connect

A high intensity acoustic test facility has been designed and is under construction at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, NM. The chamber is designed to provide an acoustic environment of 154dB (re 20 {mu}Pa) overall sound pressure level over the bandwidth of 50 Hz to 10,000 Hz. The chamber has a volume of 16,000 cubic feet with interior dimensions of 21.6 ft {times} 24.6 ft {times} 30 ft. The construction of the chamber should be complete by the summer of 1990. This paper discusses the design goals and constraints of the facility. The construction characteristics are discussed in detail, as are the acoustic performance design characteristics. The authors hope that this work will help others in designing acoustic chambers. 12 refs., 6 figs.

Rogers, J. D.; Hendrick, D. M.

1989-01-01

110

Review of subsidence prediction research conducted at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews the results of the subsidence research program at Sandia National Laboratories. The manuscript highlights the following: the application of empirical methods (profile functions) to the subsidence above longwall panels in the US; the use of the rubble model to describe the behavior of broken strata as it distends when it falls to the mine floor (or top of the rubble pile) and then is subsequently compacted as it is loaded by overlying elements of strata; and, the application of physical modeling techniques (centrifuge simulations) and numerical techniques to study the failure mechanisms in highly structured stratigraphy. The capabilities of the latter two are illustrated by comparing their predictions to the results of a field case that has complicated stratigraphy.

Sutherland, H.J.; Schuler, K.W.

1982-04-01

111

Epidemiologic surveillance. Annual report for Sandia National Laboratories 1994  

SciTech Connect

Epidemiologic surveillance at DOE facilities consists of regular and systematic collection, analysis, and interpretation of data on absences due to illness and injury in the work force. Its purpose is to provide an early warning system for health problems occurring among employees at participating sites. In this annual report, 1994 morbidity data for the Sandia National Laboratories are summarized. These analyses focus on absences of 5 or more consecutive workdays occurring among workers aged 15-76 years. They are arranged in five sets of tables that present: (1) the distribution of the labor force by occupational category and pay status; (2) the absences per person, diagnoses per absence, and diagnosis rates for the whole work force; (3) diagnosis rates by type of disease or injury; (4) diagnosis rates by occupational category; and (5) relative risks for specific types of disease or injury by occupational category.

NONE

1994-12-31

112

Videos from Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) on YouTube  

DOE Data Explorer

In October of 2007, Sandia National Laboratory began posting lab-produced videos on YouTube. These videos may be promotional or educational in nature, and many are short clips. However, some contain excellent scientific and technical information, particularly the entry submission videos for DOE's annual R&D 100 Award. They are freely available to the public for viewing and can be interactively shared or commented on. Users may subscribe and be notified when new videos are posted to their specific area of interest. The number of available videos is growing steadily. Here is a small sample list that highlights scientific and technical content: • Superhydrophobic Coating • Mode Filtered Fiber Amplifier • ElectroNeedle Biological Sensor Array • Self-Assembling Process for Fabricating Tailored Thin Films • Silicon Micromachined Dimensional Calibration Artifact

113

Sandia National Laboratories shock thermodynamics applied research (STAR) facility  

SciTech Connect

The Sandia National Laboratories Shock Thermodynamics Applied Research (STAR) Facility has recently consolidated three different guns and a variety of instrumentation capabilities into a single location. The guns available at the facility consist of a single-stage light gas gun, a single-stage propellant gun and a two-stage light gas gun, which cover a velocity range from 15 m/s to 8 km/s. Instrumentation available at the facility includes optical and microwave interferometry, time-resolved holography, fast x-radiography, framing and streak photography, fast multi-wavelength pyrometry, piezoelectric and piezoresistive gauges and computer data reduction. This report discusses the guns and instrumentation available at the facility and selected recent applications.

Asay, J.R.

1981-08-01

114

Fire Protection Research Program at Sandia Laboratories. [BWR; PWR  

SciTech Connect

Sandia Laboratories is executing a program for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to provide data needed for confirmation of the suitability of current design standards and regulatory guides for fire protection and control in water reactor power plants. This paper summarizes the activities of this ongoing program through December 1979. Characterization of electrically initiated fires revealed a margin of safety in the separation criteria of Regulatory Guide 1.75 for such fires in IEEE-383 qualified cable. However, tests confirmed that these guidelines and standards are not sufficient, in themselves, to protect against exposure fires. This paper describes both small and full scale tests to assess the adequacy of fire retardant coatings and full scale tests on fire shields to determine their effectiveness. It also describes full scale tests to determine the effects of walls and ceilings on fire propagation between cable trays.

Klamerus, L.J.

1980-01-01

115

Characterization of Sandia Laboratories expanded linear array silicon gate CMOS standard cells  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories has developed a family of standard cells based on radiation hardened silicon gate CMOS devices using 4 ..mu..m channel lengths. Because of their arrangement in regular linear patterns, the cells are referred to as expanded linear array (ELA) cells. Other papers submitted to this conference describe the design features of this cell family. This paper describes a systematic approach to the prediction of ELA cell operational characteristics. These characteristics include risetime, faltime, propagation delay, and maximum operating frequency as a function of load capacitance, transistor performance, and supply voltage. Data for these predictions are derived from device and process measurements and from geometrical data taken from mask plots.

Antinone, R.J.; Alexander, D.R.; Brown, G.W.

1980-01-01

116

Technology Transfer from Sandia National Laboratories and Technology Commercialization by MODE/Emcore.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This case study describes a success in technology transfer out of Sandia National Laboratories that resulted in commercialization supporting both the laboratories' national security mission and economic development. This case exemplifies how the process o...

K. S. Clark Romig G. Andranovich

2001-01-01

117

76 FR 50212 - Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM)  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Environmental Impact Statement for Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico for the Installation of a Petawatt Laser System in TA-IV (Petawatt Laser System SA) (DOE/EIS-0281-SA-03); (4) Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico...

2011-08-12

118

Calendar Year 2001 Annual Site Environmental Report, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL\\/NM) is a government-owned, contractor-operated facility overseen by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) through the Albuquerque Operations Office (AL), Office of Kirtland Site Operations (OKSO). Sandia Corporation, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, operates SNL\\/NM. Work performed at SNL\\/NM is in support of the DOE and Sandia Corporation's

FRANCINE S. VIGIL; REBECCA D. SANCHEZ; KATRINA WAGNER; LUCIE MAYEUX

2002-01-01

119

Energetic materials research and development activities at Sandia National Laboratories supported under DP-10 programs  

SciTech Connect

This report provides summary descriptions of Energetic Materials (EM) Research and Development activities performed at Sandia National Laboratories and funded through the Department of Energy DP-10 Program Office in FY97 and FY98. The work falls under three major focus areas: EM Chemistry, EM Characterization, and EM Phenomenological Model Development. The research supports the Sandia component mission and also Sandia's overall role as safety steward for the DOE Nuclear Weapons Complex.

Ratzel, A.C. III

1998-09-01

120

Tonopah test range - outpost of Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Tonopah Test Range is a unique historic site. Established in 1957 by Sandia Corporation, Tonopah Test Range in Nevada provided an isolated place for the Atomic Energy Commission to test ballistics and non-nuclear features of atomic weapons. It served this and allied purposes well for nearly forty years, contributing immeasurably to a peaceful conclusion to the long arms race remembered as the Cold War. This report is a brief review of historical highlights at Tonopah Test Range. Sandia`s Los Lunas, Salton Sea, Kauai, and Edgewood testing ranges also receive abridged mention. Although Sandia`s test ranges are the subject, the central focus is on the people who managed and operated the range. Comments from historical figures are interspersed through the narrative to establish this perspective, and at the end a few observations concerning the range`s future are provided.

Johnson, L.

1996-03-01

121

An overview of semiconductor bridge, SCB, applications at Sandia National Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

The semiconductor bridge, SCB, developed by Sandia National Laboratories is a maturing technology now being used in several applications by Sandia customers. Most applications arose because of a need at the system level to provide explosive assemblies that were light weight, small volume, low cost and required small quantities of electrical energy to function -- for the purposes of this

R. W. Jr. Bickes; M. C. Grubelich; S. M. Harris; J. A. Merson; J. H. Weinlein

1995-01-01

122

Environmental Survey preliminary report, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the preliminary findings based on the first phase of an Environmental Survey at the Department of Energy (DOE) Sandia National Laboratories Livermore (SNLL), located at Livermore, California. The Survey is being conducted by DOE's Office of Environment, Safety and Health. The SNLL Survey is a portion of the larger, comprehensive DOE Environmental Survey encompassing all major operating facilities of DOE. The DOE Environmental Survey is one of a series of initiatives announced on September 18, 1985, by Secretary of Energy, John S. Herrington, to strengthen the environmental, safety, and health programs and activities within DOE. The purpose of the Environmental Survey is to identify, via a no fault'' baseline Survey of all the Department's major operating facilities, environmental problems and areas of environmental risk. The identified problem areas will be prioritized on a Department-wide basis in order of importance in 1989. The findings in this report are subject to modification based on the results from the Sampling and Analysis Phase of the Survey. The findings are also subject to modification based on comments from the Albuquerque Operations Office concerning the technical accuracy of the findings. The modified preliminary findings and any other appropriate changes will be incorporated into an Interim Report. The Interim Report will serve as the site-specific source for environmental information generated by the Survey, and ultimately as the primary source of information for the DOE-wide prioritization of environmental problems in the Survey Summary Report. 43 refs., 21 figs., 24 tabs.

Not Available

1988-01-01

123

1996 Site environmental report Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) is operated in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) mission to provide weapon component technology and hardware for national security needs, and to conduct fundamental research and development (R&D) to advance technology in energy research, computer science, waste management, electronics, materials science, and transportation safety for hazardous and nuclear components. In support of this mission, the Environmental Safety and Health (ES&H) Center at SNL/NM conducts extensive environmental monitoring, surveillance, and compliance activities to assist SNL`s line organizations in meeting all applicable environmental regulations applicable to the site including those regulating radiological and nonradiological effluents and emissions. Also herein are included, the status of environmental programs that direct and manage activities such as terrestrial surveillance; ambient air and meteorological monitoring; hazardous, radioactive, and solid waste management; pollution prevention and waste minimization; environmental restoration (ER); oil and chemical spill prevention; and National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documentation. This report has been prepared in compliance with DOE order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection.

Fink, C.H. [ed.] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Duncan, D. [ed.] [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sanchez, R. [Jobs Plus, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-08-01

124

Criticality facilities and programs at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

The reactor facilities at Sandia National Laboratories have hosted a number of reactors and critical experiments. A critical experiment is currently being done to support an ongoing investigation by the US Department of Energy of the consequences of taking fuel burnup into account in the design of spent fuel transportation packages. A series of experiments, collectively called the Spent Fuel Safety Experiment (SFSX), has been devised to provide integral benchmarks for testing computer-generated predictions of spent fuel behavior. A set of experiments is planned in which sections of unirradiated fuel rods are interchanged with similar sections of spent pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel rods in a critical assembly. By determining the critical size of the arrays, one can obtain benchmark data for comparison with criticality safety calculations. The SFSX provides a direct measurement of the reactivity effects of spent PWR fuel using a well-characterized, spent fuel sample. The SFSX also provides an experimental measurement of the end-effect, i.e., the reactivity effect of the variation of the burnup profile at the ends of PWR fuel rods. The design of the SFSX is optimized to yield accurate benchmark measurements of the effects of interest, well above experimental uncertainties.

Harms, G.A.; Davis, F.J.; Ford, J.T.

1995-12-31

125

The integrated water conservation program at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), located on Kirkland Air Force Base (KAFB) in Albuquerque, NM, is implementing a comprehensive water conservation program. Because the average rainfall in this metropolitan area of 500,000 is approximately 8 inches per year, conservation of this precious resource is critical to the economic health of the city and state, and the continued operations at SNL/NM. To address this need, SNL/NM is taking a systematic, comprehensive approach to water conservation. The approach is to estimate the water consumption for all of SNL/NM by type of consumption. For each type of water consumption, all cost effective measures for reducing, reclaiming, and/or recycling that usage will be ranked. These water conservation measures range from the simple such as retrofitting plumbing fixtures with low cost devices to reduce water required to flush toilets to the very complex. As an example of the very complex, a Microelectronics Development Laboratory (MDL) lab will implement a near zero water discharge from clean room wet benches. Deionized (DI) water can be sent back to the DI water input generation stream when the DI water is not being used for rinsing wafers. This paper discusses completed, ongoing and proposed projects at SNL/NM to reduce water consumption and recycle water to maximize its use, and how water conservation has resulted in energy savings, reductions in wastewater discharges, reductions in water treatment chemicals, and reduction in hazardous waste. Additionally the paper discusses preparation of SNL/NM`s Water Conservation Plan, and solutions to overcoming programmatic and bureaucratic hurdles to achieve reductions in water use, wastewater discharges, chemical use and energy.

Rogers, D.

1997-08-22

126

Weapons Evaluation Test Laboratory at Pantex: Testing and data handling capabilities of Sandia National Laboratories at the Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Weapons Evaluation Test Laboratory (WETL), operated by Sandia Laboratories at the Pantex Plant in Amarillo, Texas, is engaged primarily in the testing of weapon systems in the stockpile or of newly produced weapon systems for the Sandia Surety Assessm...

W. R. Peters

1993-01-01

127

Sandia National Laboratories and higher education in New Mexico: Summary report  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories interacts extensively with colleges and universities in New Mexico. This report summarizes several of these relationships in employee education, research contracts, loaned equipment, temporary employment and other areas. 8 tabs.

Not Available

1988-05-01

128

Sandia National Laboratories and higher education in New Mexico: Summary report  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories interacts extensively with colleges and universities in New Mexico. This report summarizes several of these relationships in employee education, research contracts, loaned equipment, temporary employment, and other areas.

Not Available

1988-06-01

129

Research and Development Program for transportation packagings at Sandia National Laboratories.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This document contains information about the research and development programs dealing with waste transport at Sandia National Laboratories. This paper discusses topics such as: Why new packaging is needed; analytical methodologies and design codes;evalua...

G. F. Hohnstreiter K. B. Sorenson

1995-01-01

130

Sandia National Laboratories Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code: Sediment Transport User Manual.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This document describes the sediment transport subroutines and input files for the Sandia National Laboratories Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (SNL-EFDC). Detailed descriptions of the input files containing data from Sediment Erosion at Depth flume (SE...

M. D. Grace P. H. X. Thanh S. C. James

2008-01-01

131

Meeting the challenge: A case study of Sandia National Laboratories Records Inventory Project.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Sandia National Laboratories determined that the most effective method to address records management initiatives would be through a single, comprehensive facilities wide records inventory and retention schedule project. The logistic of such an undertaking...

L. J. Cusimano C. B. Roberts

1993-01-01

132

Solar Energy Research at Sandia Laboratories with Unique Health and Safety Parameters.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A general review of the major solar energy projects at Sandia Laboratories is given. The Polar Total Energy Test Facility, Solar-Powered Irrigation System, photovoltaics research facilities, and the Solar Thermal Test Facility are described. The hazards a...

L. L. Young

1977-01-01

133

Management of citation verification requests for multiple projects at Sandia National Laboratories.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Sandia National Laboratories' (SNL) Technical Library is now responsible for providing citation verification management support for all references cited in technical reports issued by the Nuclear Waste Management (NWM) Program. This paper describes how th...

C. S. Crawford

1995-01-01

134

Heat Pipe Solar Receiver Development Activities at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Over the past decade, Sandia National Laboratories has been involved in the development of receivers to transfer energy from the focus of a parabolic dish concentrator to the heater tubes of a Stirling engine. Through the isothermal evaporation and condensation of sodium. a heat-pipe receiver can efficiently transfer energy to an engine's working fluid and compensate for irregularities in the flux distribution that is delivered by the concentrator. The operation of the heat pipe is completely passive because the liquid sodium is distributed over the solar-heated surface by capillary pumping provided by a wick structure. Tests have shown that using a heat pipe can boost the system performance by twenty percent when compared to directly illuminating the engine heater tubes. Designing heat pipe solar receivers has presented several challenges. The relatively large area ({approximately}0.2 m{sup 2}) of the receiver surface makes it difficult to design a wick that can continuously provide liquid sodium to all regions of the heated surface. Selecting a wick structure with smaller pores will improve capillary pumping capabilities of the wick, but the small pores will restrict the flow of liquid and generate high pressure drops. Selecting a wick that is comprised of very tine filaments can increase the permeability of the wick and thereby reduce flow losses, however, the fine wick structure is more susceptible to corrosion and mechanical damage. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the issues encountered in the design of heat pipe solar receivers and solutions to problems that have arisen. Topics include: flow characterization in the receiver, the design of wick systems. the minimization of corrosion and dissolution of metals in sodium systems. and the prevention of mechanical failure in high porosity wick structures.

Adkins, D.R.; Andraka, C.E.; Moreno, J.B.; Moss, T.A.; Rawlinson, K.S.; Showalter, S.K.

1999-01-08

135

An Approach to Wireless Communications at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Wireless communication plays an increasing role in military, industrial, public safety, and academic computer networks. Although in general, radio transmitters are not currently permitted in secured areas at Sandia, wireless communications would open new opportunities, allowing mobile and pervasive user access. Without wireless communications, we must live in a ''non-mainstream'' world of fixed, wired networks, where it becomes ever more difficult to attract and retain the best professionals. This report provides a review of the current state of wireless communications, which direction wireless technology is heading, and where wireless technology could be employed at Sandia. A list of recommendations on harnessing the power of wireless communications is provided to aid in building a state-of-the-art communication environment for the 21st century at Sandia.

WITZKE, EDWARD L.

2002-10-01

136

Personal nuclear accident dosimetry at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

DOE installations possessing sufficient quantities of fissile material to potentially constitute a critical mass, such that the excessive exposure of personnel to radiation from a nuclear accident is possible, are required to provide nuclear accident dosimetry services. This document describes the personal nuclear accident dosimeter (PNAD) used by SNL and prescribes methodologies to initially screen, and to process PNAD results. In addition, this report describes PNAD dosimetry results obtained during the Nuclear Accident Dosimeter Intercomparison Study (NAD23), held during 12-16 June 1995, at Los Alamos National Laboratories. Biases for reported neutron doses ranged from -6% to +36% with an average bias of +12%.

Ward, D.C.; Mohagheghi, A.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Burrows, R. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Lisle, IL (United States). Division of Nuclear Material Safety

1996-09-01

137

Prototype prosperity-diversity game for the Laboratory Development Division of Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

The Prosperity Game conducted for the Laboratory Development Division of National Laboratories on May 24--25, 1995, focused on the individual and organizational autonomy plaguing the Department of Energy (DOE)-Congress-Laboratories` ability to manage the wrenching change of declining budgets. Prosperity Games are an outgrowth and adaptation of move/countermove and seminar War Games. Each Prosperity Game is unique in that both the game format and the player contributions vary from game to game. This particular Prosperity Game was played by volunteers from Sandia National Laboratories, Eastman Kodak, IBM, and AT&T. Since the participants fully control the content of the games, the specific outcomes will be different when the team for each laboratory, Congress, DOE, and the Laboratory Operating Board (now Laboratory Operations Board) is composed of executives from those respective organizations. Nevertheless, the strategies and implementing agreements suggest that the Prosperity Games stimulate cooperative behaviors and may permit the executives of the institutions to safely explore the consequences of a family of DOE concert.

VanDevender, P.; Berman, M.; Savage, K.

1996-02-01

138

Molybdenum-99 Isotope Production Preparation at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

`Q&c M. J. McDonald, S. D. Carson, S. W. Longley, E. J. Parma, M. E. Vern `~ I@ .,., Sandia National Laboratories*, P. .0. Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM, 8 W? 1$ tl?;:q `f. (3 . 8 /'~ Abstract This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored byanagency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, make any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof. loading on the Cintichem targets. These tests were designed to gain process knowledge prior to processing an irradiated target. The chemical separation tests were performed in a fime hood During cold testing, several tests were performed on individual components of the process to complete, a series of `hot' tests was designed to process irradiated targets. These were designed to optimize the process, identify problems prior to processing higher inventory targets, and to the shielded containment box (SCB). Table 1 is a summary of the tests performed prior to the Test Target Power Post irradiation Total inventory 99M0 inventory (kW)/ Irradiation decay (hrs) (TBq*) /decay (TBq)/decay Time (hrs) inventory (TBq) inventory(TBq) in the processing boxes as color comparisons. Product quality control testing was conducted for all the tests and the results were compared to The production process generates a high activity acidic liquid waste. Several waste stabilization processing box. The cement, in addition to stabilizing the waste, neutralized the waste resulting The processing hardware and fixtures were developed in parallel to the cold tests and tested in a that expected during processing. During processing, precautions will be taken to minimize the Island incident. The facility consisted of shielded glove boxes, unshielded glove box lines and the the facility for production operations; the glove box lines and shielded glove boxes, all the new configuration will have six windows, four extraction boxes and a waste packaging box on the shielding. The walls and windows of the processing boxes will have the equivalent 150 of the purification box will be considerably less than the processing boxes with dose being from only `gMo. The increased wall thickness will reduce the dose levels to boxes will have under the box transport systems to move material into and out of the boxes. prior to FDA requiring process validation and, consequently, had not pertlormed a process

Carson, S.D.; Longley, S.W.; McDonald, M.J.; Parma, E.J.; Vernon, M.E.

1998-10-07

139

Russian surety research projects in the Sandia National Laboratories Cooperative Measures Program  

Microsoft Academic Search

Over forty safety and security related research and development projects have been initiated between Sandia National Laboratories and the Russian nuclear weapons laboratories VNIIEF and VNIITF. About half of these projects have been completed. All relate to either safety or security methodology development, processes, accident environment analysis and testing, accident databases, assessments or product design of devices. All projects have

1996-01-01

140

Evaluation of Laboratory Directed Research and Development investment areas at Sandia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sandia National Laboratories conducts a variety of research projects each year under its Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program. Recently, information visualization techniques have been used with corporate data to map several LDRD investment areas for the purpose of understanding strategic overlaps and identifying potential opportunities for future development outside of our current technologies. Tools, techniques, and specific analyses are

Kevin W. Boyack; Nabeel Rahal

2005-01-01

141

Sandia National Laboratories\\/New Mexico Facilities and Safety Information Document [NOTE: Volume I, Chapter 1  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) began in 1945 as the ''Z'' Division of what was then Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory on Oxnard Field, which was owned by the Air Technical Service Command, as a base of operations to store materials and house personnel. Oxnard Field was transferred to the U.S. Engineers, Manhattan District, on July 21, 1945, who converted several wood

F. March; J. V. Guerrero; W. H. Johns; R. Schetnan; L. S. Bayliss; K. A. Kuzio; B. B. White

1999-01-01

142

Sandia bicycle commuters group -- pollution prevention at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The Sandia Bicycle Commuters Group (SBCG) formed three years ago for the purpose of addressing issues that impact the bicycle commuting option. The meeting that launched the SBCG was scheduled in conjunction with National Bike-to-Work day in May 1995. Results from a survey handed out at the meeting solidly confirmed the issues and that an advocacy group was needed. The purpose statement for the Group headlines its web site and brochure: ``Existing to assist and educate the SNL workforce bicyclist on issues regarding Kirtland Air Force Base (KAFB) access, safety and bicycle-supporting facilities, in order to promote bicycling as an effective and enjoyable means of commuting.`` The SNL Pollution Prevention (P2) Team`s challenge to the SNL workforce is to ``prevent pollution, conserve natural resources, and save money``. In the first winter of its existence, the SBCG sponsored a winter commute contest in conjunction with the City`s Clean Air Campaign (CAC). The intent of the CAC is to promote alternative (to the single-occupant vehicle) commuting during the Winter Pollution Advisory Period (October 1--February 28), when the City runs the greatest risk of exceeding federal pollution limits.

Wrons, R.

1998-06-01

143

Calendar year 2003 annual site environmental report for Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) is a government-owned, contractor-operated facility owned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and managed by the Sandia Site Office (SSO), Albuquerque, New Mexico. Sandia Corporation, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, operates SNL/NM. This annual report summarizes data and the compliance status of Sandia Corporation's environmental protection and monitoring programs through December 31, 2003. Major environmental programs include air quality, water quality, groundwater protection, terrestrial surveillance, waste management, pollution prevention (P2), environmental restoration (ER), oil and chemical spill prevention, and the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 450.1, ''Environmental Protection Program'' (DOE 2003a) and DOE Order 231.1 Chg.2, ''Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting'' (DOE 1996).

Wagner, Katrina; Sanchez, Rebecca V.; Mayeux, Lucie; Koss, Susan I.; Salinas, Stephanie A.

2004-09-01

144

Calendar year 2004 annual site environmental report:Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) is a government-owned, contractor-operated facility owned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and managed by the Sandia Site Office (SSO), Albuquerque, New Mexico. Sandia Corporation, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, operates SNL/NM. This annual report summarizes data and the compliance status of Sandia Corporation's environmental protection and monitoring programs through December 31, 2004. Major environmental programs include air quality, water quality, groundwater protection, terrestrial surveillance, waste management, pollution prevention (P2), environmental restoration (ER), oil and chemical spill prevention, and the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program (DOE 2005) and DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting (DOE 2004a). (DOE 2004a).

Montoya, Amber L.; Goering, Teresa Lynn; Wagner, Katrina; Koss, Susan I.; Salinas, Stephanie A.

2005-09-01

145

Computerized nuclear material system at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

SNLA developed and implemented a nuclear material control and accountability system on an HP 3000 minicomputer. The Sandia Nuclear Materials Computer System (SNMCS) which became operative in January 1980 provides: control of shipments and receivals of nuclear material, control of internal transfers of nuclear material, automated inventory with a bar code system, control of inventory adjustments, automated reporting/transmitting to other contractors and operations offices, automated ledgers and journals for material weights and costs, and interface to the Albuquerque Operations Office (ALO) Automated 741 System.

Tischhauser, J.L.

1980-01-01

146

National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) compliance at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM)  

SciTech Connect

This report on National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) compliance at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) chronicles past and current compliance activities and includes a recommended strategy that can be implemented for continued improvement. This report provides a list of important references. Attachment 1 contains the table of contents for SAND95-1648, National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Guide Sandia National Laboratories (Hansen, 1995). Attachment 2 contains a list of published environmental assessments (EAs) and environmental impact statements (EISs) prepared by SNL/NM. Attachment 3 contains abstracts of NEPA compliance papers authored by SNL/NM and its contractors.

Wolff, T.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Community Involvement and Issues Management Dept.; Hansen, R.P. [Hansen Environmental Consultants, Englewood, CO (United States)

1998-08-01

147

Annotated bibliography National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documents for Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

The following annotated bibliography lists documents prepared by the Department of Energy (DOE), and predecessor agencies, to meet the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) for activities and facilities at Sandia National Laboratories sites. For each NEPA document summary information and a brief discussion of content is provided. This information may be used to reduce the amount of time or cost associated with NEPA compliance for future Sandia National Laboratories projects. This summary may be used to identify model documents, documents to use as sources of information, or documents from which to tier additional NEPA documents.

Harris, J.M.

1995-04-01

148

The Excavation and Remediation of the Sandia National Laboratories Chemical Waste Landfill  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Chemical Waste Landfill (CWL) at Sandia National Laboratories\\/New Mexico (SNL\\/NM) is a 1.9-acre disposal site that was used for the disposal of chemical wastes generated by many of SNL\\/NM research laboratories from 1962 until 1985. These laboratories were primarily involved in the design, research and development of non-nuclear components of nuclear weapons and the waste generated by these labs

DANIEL ALBERT KWIECINSKI; RHONDA KAY METHVIN; DONALD P. SCHOFIELD; SHARISSA G. YOUNG

1999-01-01

149

Pulsed power -- Research and technology at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Over the past 15 years, steady and sometimes exciting progress has been made in the hybrid technology called Pulsed Power. Based on both electrical engineering and physics, pulsed power involves the generation, modification, and use of electrical pulses up to the multitrillion-watt and multimillion-volt ranges. The final product of these powerful pulses can take diverse forms--hypervelocity projectiles or imploding liners, energetic and intense particle beams, X-ray and gamma-ray pulses, laser light beams that cover the spectrum from ultraviolet to infrared, or powerful microwave bursts. At first, the needs of specific applications largely shaped research and technology in this field. New the authors are beginning to see the reverse--new applications arising from technical capabilities that until recently were though impossible. Compressing and heating microscopic quantities of matter until they reach ultra-high energy density represents one boundary of their scientific exploration. The other boundary might be a defensive weapon that can project vast amounts of highly directed energy over long distances. Other applications of the technology may range from the use of electron beams to sterilize sewage, to laboratory simulation of radiation effects on electronics, to electromagnetic launchings of projectiles into earth or into solar orbits. Eventually the authors hope to use pulsed power to produce an inexhaustible supply of energy by means of inertial confinement fusion (ICF)--a technique for heating and containing deuterium-tritium fuel through compression. Topics covered here are: (1) inertial confinement fusion; (2) simulation technology; (3) development of new technology; and (4) application to directed energy technologies.

NONE

1981-12-31

150

Multi-robots to micro-surgery: Selected robotic applications at Sandia National Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center (ISRC) at Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program organization, pursuing research, development and applications in a wide range of field. Activities range from large-scale applications such as nuclear facility dismantlement for the US Department of Energy (DOE), to aircraft inspection and refurbishment, to automated script and program generation for robotic manufacturing and assembly, to

1996-01-01

151

Research and Development Program for transportation packagings at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

This document contains information about the research and development programs dealing with waste transport at Sandia National Laboratories. This paper discusses topics such as: Why new packaging is needed; analytical methodologies and design codes;evaluation of packaging components; materials characterization; creative packaging concepts; packaging engineering and analysis; testing; and certification support.

Hohnstreiter, G.F.; Sorenson, K.B.

1995-02-01

152

Z pinch driven inertial confinement fusion target physics research at Sandia National Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

Three hohlraum concepts are being pursued at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to investigate the possibility of using pulsed power driven magnetic implosions (Z pinches) to drive targets capable of fusion yields in the range 200-1000 MJ. This research is being conducted on SNL's Z facility, which is capable of driving peak currents of 20 MA in various Z pinch load

R. J. Leeper; T. E. Alberts; J. R. Asay; P. M. Baca; K. L. Baker; S. P. Breeze; G. A. Chandler; D. L. Cook; G. W. Cooper; C. Deeney; M. S. Derzon; M. R. Douglas; D. L. Fehl; T. Gilliland; D. E. Hebron; M. J. Hurst; D. O. Jobe; J. W. Kellogg; J. S. Lash; S. E. Lazier; M. K. Matzen; D. H. McDaniel; J. S. McGurn; T. A. Mehlhorn; A. R. Moats; R. C. Mock; D. J. Muron; T. J. Nash; R. E. Olson; J. L. Porter; J. P. Quintenz; P. V. Reyes; L. E. Ruggles; C. L. Ruiz; T. W. L. Sanford; F. A. Schmidlapp; J. F. Seamen; R. B. Spielman; M. A. Stark; K. W. Struve; W. A. Stygar; D. R. Tibbetts-Russell; J. A. Torres; M. Vargas; T. C. Wagoner; C. Wakefield; J. H. Hammer; D. D. Ryutov; M. Tabak; S. C. Wilks; R. L. Bowers; K. D. McLenithan; D. L. Peterson

1999-01-01

153

Sandia National Laboratories Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code: pH Effects User Manual.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This document describes the implementation level changes in the source code and input files of Sandia National Laboratories Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (SNL-EFDC) that are necessary for including pH effects into algae-growth dynamics. The document a...

S. C. James V. Janardhanam

2012-01-01

154

High heat flux testing capabilities at Sandia National Laboratories - New Mexico.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

High heat flux testing for the United States fusion power program is the primary mission of the Plasma Materials Test Facility (PMTF) located at Sandia National Laboratories - New Mexico. This facility, which is owned by the United States Department of En...

D. L. Youchison J. M. McDonald L. S. Wold

1994-01-01

155

Recommendations for color vision testing and criteria for its implementation at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

A color-vision test battery that will classify personnel according to the severity of their color vision abnormality is recommended for use at Sandia National Laboratories. These tests will result in improved job placement of color-vision-deficient personnel and thereby reduce the possibility of job discrimination without adversely affecting safety, health, or logistics. Preliminary etiological and pathophysiological aspects are discussed briefly.

Young, L.L. III; Mossman, P.B.

1982-07-01

156

Sandia National Laboratories environmental fluid dynamics code : sediment transport user manual  

Microsoft Academic Search

This document describes the sediment transport subroutines and input files for the Sandia National Laboratories Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (SNL-EFDC). Detailed descriptions of the input files containing data from Sediment Erosion at Depth flume (SEDflume) measurements are provided along with the description of the source code implementing sediment transport. Both the theoretical description of sediment transport employed in SNL-EFDC and

Matthew D. Grace; Phi Hung X. Thanh; Scott Carlton James

2008-01-01

157

Lessons learned from Sandia National Laboratories' operational readiness review of the Annular Core Research Reactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) (a Hazard Category 2 nuclear reactor facility) was defueled in early 1997 to convert the reactor core and control system to produce medical radioisotopes for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Medical Isotope Production Program. The DOE determined that an operational readiness review (ORR) per DOE 5480.31 or DOE 420.1

A. O. Bendure; J. W. Bryson

1999-01-01

158

Environmental testing philosophy for a Sandia National Laboratories small satellite project.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Sandia National Laboratories is the system integrator on a small satellite project. Following the intent of the NASA GEVS document, an integrated test philosophy was formulated to certify the satellite for flight. The purpose of this paper is to present t...

J. S. Cap N. G. Rackley

1996-01-01

159

Synthetic aperture radar and interferometry development at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Environmental monitoring, earth-resource mapping, and military systems require broad-area imaging at high resolutions. Many times the imagery must be acquired in inclement weather or during night as well as day. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) provides such a capability. SAR systems take advantage of the long-range propagation characteristics of radar signals and the complex information processing capability of modern digital electronics to provide high resolution imagery. SAR complements photographic and other optical imaging capabilities because of the minimum constrains on time-of-day and atmospheric conditions and because of the unique responses of terrain and cultural targets to radar frequencies. Interferometry is a method for generating a three-dimensional image of terrain. The height projection is obtained by acquiring two SAR images from two slightly differing locations. It is different from the common method of stereoscopic imaging for topography. The latter relies on differing geometric projections for triangulation to define the surface geometry whereas interferometry relies on differences in radar propagation times between the two SAR locations. This paper presents the capabilities of SAR, explains how SAR works, describes a few SAR applications, provides an overview of SAR development at Sandia, and briefly describes the motion compensation subsystem.

NONE

1993-04-01

160

Metallization and packaging of compound semiconductor devices at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Recent advances in compound semiconductor technology utilize a variety of metal thin films fabricated by thermal and electron-beam evaporation, and electroplating. An overview of metal processes used by Sandia`s Compound Semiconductor Research Laboratory is presented. Descriptions of electrical n-type and p-type ohmic contact alloys, interconnect metal, and metal layers specifically included for packaging requirements are addressed. Several illustrations of devices incorporating gold plated air bridges are included. ``Back-end`` processes such as flip-chip under bump metallurgy with fluxless solder reflow and plated solder processes are mentioned as current research areas.

Seigal, P.K.; Armendariz, M.G.; Rieger, D.J.; Lear, K.L.; Sullivan, C.T.

1996-11-01

161

Environmental assessment of the Environmental Restoration Project at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) is managed and operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by Sandia Corporation, a subsidiary of the Lockheed Martin Company. SNL/NM is located on land controlled by DOE within the boundaries of Kirtland Air Force Base (KAFB) in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The major responsibilities of SNL/NM are the support of national security and energy projects. This report provides an environmental assessment of proposed remedial action activities at the solid waste management units at SNL/NM. A risk assessment of health hazards is also discussed.

NONE

1996-03-01

162

New model for public participation at Sandia National Laboratories: What comes after environmental restoration?  

SciTech Connect

As the Sandia National Laboratories' Environmental Restoration (ER) project moves toward closure, the project's experiences--including a number of successes in the public participation arena--suggest it is time for a new, more interactive model for future government-citizen involvement. This model would strive to improve the quality of public interaction with the Department of Energy (DOE) and Sandia, by using subject-specific working groups and aiming for long-term trustful relationships with the community. It would make use of interactive techniques, fewer formal public forums, and a variety of polling and communication technologies to improve information gathering and exchange.

KEENER,R. WILLIAM; BACA,STEPHEN S.; BACA,MAUREEN R.; STOTTS,AL; TOOPS,TAMI; WOLFF,THEODORE A.

2000-01-31

163

Sandia National Laboratories' high power electromagnetic impulse sources  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Three impulse sources have been developed to cover a wide range of peak power, bandwidth and center frequency requirements. Each of the sources can operate in single shot, rep-rate, or burst modes. These devices are of rugged construction and are suitable for field use. This paper will describe the specifications and principals of operation for each source. The sources to be described are: SNIPER (Sub-Nanosecond ImPulsE Radiator), a coaxial Blumlein pulser with an in-line (series) peaking switch; EMBL (EnantioMorphic BLurfflein), a bipolar parallel plate Blumlein with a crowbar type (parallel) peaking switch; and the LCO (L-C Oscillator) a spark-switched L-C oscillator with damped sinusoidal output. SNIPER and EMBL are ultra-wideband (UWB) sources which produce a very fast high voltage transition. When differentiated by the antenna, an impulse whose width corresponds to the transition time is radiated. The LCO operates with a center frequency up to 800 MHz and up to 100 MHz bandwidth. Because the LCO output is relatively narrow band, high gain antennas may be employed to produce very high radiated field strengths.

Rinehart, L. F.; Buttram, M. T.; Denison, G. J.; Lundstrom, J. M.; Crowe, W. R.; Aurand, J. F.; Patterson, P. E.

1994-05-01

164

Implementing Virtual Private Networking for Enabling Lower Cost, More Secure Wide Area Communications at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Virtual Private Networking is a new communications technology that promises lower cost, more secure wide area communications by leveraging public networks such as the Internet. Sandia National Laboratories has embraced the technology for interconnecting remote sites to Sandia's corporate network, and for enabling remote access users for both dial-up and broadband access.

MILLER,MARC M.; YONEK JR.,GEORGE A.

2001-08-01

165

Critical experiments at Sandia National Laboratories : technical meeting on low-power critical facilities and small reactors.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has conducted radiation effects testing for the Department of Energy (DOE) and other contractors supporting the DOE since the 1960's. Over this period, the research reactor facilities at Sandia have had a primary mission to provide appropriate nuclear radiation environments for radiation testing and qualification of electronic components and other devices. The current generation of reactors includes the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR), a water-moderated pool-type reactor, fueled by elements constructed from UO2-BeO ceramic fuel pellets, and the Sandia Pulse Reactor III (SPR-III), a bare metal fast burst reactor utilizing a uranium-molybdenum alloy fuel. The SPR-III is currently defueled. The SPR Facility (SPRF) has hosted a series of critical experiments. A purpose-built critical experiment was first operated at the SPRF in the late 1980's. This experiment, called the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Critical Experiment (CX), was designed to explore the reactor physics of a nuclear thermal rocket motor. This experiment was fueled with highly-enriched uranium carbide fuel in annular water-moderated fuel elements. The experiment program was completed and the fuel for the experiment was moved off-site. A second critical experiment, the Burnup Credit Critical Experiment (BUCCX) was operated at Sandia in 2002. The critical assembly for this experiment was based on the assembly used in the CX modified to accommodate low-enriched pin-type fuel in water moderator. This experiment was designed as a platform in which the reactivity effects of specific fission product poisons could be measured. Experiments were carried out on rhodium, an important fission product poison. The fuel and assembly hardware for the BUCCX remains at Sandia and is available for future experimentation. The critical experiment currently in operation at the SPRF is the Seven Percent Critical Experiment (7uPCX). This experiment is designed to provide benchmark reactor physics data to support validation of the reactor physics codes used to design commercial reactor fuel elements in an enrichment range above the current 5% enrichment cap. A first set of critical experiments in the 7uPCX has been completed. More experiments are planned in the 7uPCX series. The critical experiments at Sandia National Laboratories are currently funded by the US Department of Energy Nuclear Criticality Safety Program (NCSP). The NCSP has committed to maintain the critical experiment capability at Sandia and to support the development of a critical experiments training course at the facility. The training course is intended to provide hands-on experiment experience for the training of new and re-training of practicing Nuclear Criticality Safety Engineers. The current plans are for the development of the course to continue through the first part of fiscal year 2011 with the development culminating is the delivery of a prototype of the course in the latter part of the fiscal year. The course will be available in fiscal year 2012.

Harms, Gary A.; Ford, John T.; Barber, Allison Delo

2010-11-01

166

Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Environmental Information Document - Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

This Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Environmental Information Document (EID) compiles information on the existing environment, or environmental baseline, for SNUNM. Much of the information is drawn from existing reports and databases supplemented by new research and data. The SNL/NM EID, together with the Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Facilities and Safety Information Document, provide a basis for assessing the environment, safety, and health aspects of operating selected facilities at SNL/NM. The environmental baseline provides a record of the existing physical, biological, and socioeconomic environment at SNL/NLM prior to being altered (beneficially or adversely) by proposed programs or projects. More specifically, the EID provides information on the following topics: Geology; Land Use; Hydrology and Water Resources; Air Quality and Meteorology; Ecology; Noise and Vibration; Cultural Resources; Visual Resources; Socioeconomic and Community Services; Transportation; Material Management; Waste Management; and Regulatory Requirements.

BAYLISS, LINDA S.; GUERRERO, JOSEPH V.; JOHNS, WILLIAM H.; KUZIO, KENNETH A.; BAILEY-WHITE, BRENDA E.

1999-09-01

167

Z-Pinch Driven Inertial Confinement Fusion Target Physics Research at Sandia National Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

Three hohlraum concepts are being pursued at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to investigate the possibility of using pulsed power driven magnetic implosions (z-pinches) to drive high gain targets capable of yields in the range of 200-1000 MJ. This research is being conducted on SNL'S.Z facility that is capable of driving peak currents of 20 MA in z-pinch loads producing implosion

T. E. Alberts; J. R. Asay; P. M. Baca; K. L. Baker; S. P. Breeze; G. A. Chandler; D. L. Cook; G. W. Cooper; C. Deeney; M. S. Derzon; M. R. Douglas; D. L. Fehl; T. Gilliland; D. E. Hebron; M. J. Hurst; D. O. Jobe; J. W. Kellogg; J. S. Lash; S. E. Lazier; R. J. Leeper; M. K. Matzen; D. H. McDaniel; J. S. McGurn; T. A. Mehlhorn; A. R. Moats; R. C. Mock; D. J. Muron; T. J. Nash; R. E. Olson; J. L. Porter; J. P. Quintenz; P. V. Reyers; L. E. Ruggles; C. L. Ruiz; T. W. L. Sandford; F. A. Schmidlapp; J. F. Seamen; R. B. Spielman; M. A. Stark; K. W. Struve; W. A. Stygar; D. R. Tibbetts-Russell; J. A. Torres; M. Vargas; T. C. Wagoner; C. Wakefield

1998-01-01

168

Coilgun technology, status, applications and future directions at Sandia National Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sandia National Laboratories has been developing coilgun electromagnetic launcher technology since 1980 and is continuing to advance the technology through hardware development, industry collaboration, and pursuit of new applications. Past projects have included a 35 stage, 200 kJ, 50 mm launcher accelerating a 0.23 kg mass to 1 km\\/s velocity, a 6 stage, 280 kJ, 140 mm system accelerating a

T. R. Lockner; R. J. Kaye; B. N. Turman

2004-01-01

169

Sandia National Laboratories environmental fluid dynamics code : pH effects user manual  

Microsoft Academic Search

This document describes the implementation level changes in the source code and input files of Sandia National Laboratories Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (SNL-EFDC) that are necessary for including pH effects into algae-growth dynamics. The document also gives a brief introduction to how pH effects are modeled into the algae-growth model. The document assumes that the reader is aware of the

Vijay Janardhanam; Scott Carlton James

2012-01-01

170

1998 Annual Site Environmental Report Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sandia National Laboratories\\/New Mexico (SNL\\/NM) is operated in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) mission to provide weapon component technology and hardware for national security needs. SNL\\/NM also conducts fundamental research and development to advance technology in energy research, computer science, waste management, microelectronics, materials science, and transportation safety for hazardous and nuclear components. In support of SNL's

D. K. Duncan; C. H. Fink; R. V. Sanchez

1999-01-01

171

2003 Sandia National Laboratories--Albuquerque Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Program report for 2003 for Sandia National Laboratories-Albuquerque. The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The IISP monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2007-05-23

172

ADVANTAGES AND DISADVANTAGES TO OPERATING AN ON-SITE LABORATORY AT THE SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES CHEMICAL WASTE LANDFILL  

SciTech Connect

During the excavation of the Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) Chemical Waste Landfill (CWL), operations were realized by the presence of URS' (formerly known as United Research Services) On-site Mobile Laboratory (OSML) and the close proximity of the SNL/NM Environmental Restoration Chemical Laboratory (ERCL). The laboratory was located adjacent to the landfill in order to provide soil characterization, health and safety support, and waste management data. Although the cost of maintaining and operating an analytical laboratory can be higher than off-site analysis, there are many benefits to providing on site analytical services. This paper describes the synergies between the laboratory, as well as the advantages and disadvantages to having a laboratory on-site during the excavation of SNL/NM CWL.

Young, S.G.; Creech, M.N.

2003-02-27

173

Implementing Virtual Private Networking for Enabling Lower Cost, More Secure Wide Area Communications at Sandia National Laboratories.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Virtual Private Networking is a new communication technology that promises lower cost, more secure wide area communications by leveraging public networks such as the Internet. Sandia National laboratories has embrace the technology for interconnecting rem...

Miller Yonek

2001-01-01

174

Economic impact of Sandia National Laboratories on central New Mexico and the state of New Mexico fiscal year 1997.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) was established in 1949 to perform the engineering development and ordnance responsibilities associated with nuclear weapons. By the early 1960's the facility had evolved into an engineering research and development labo...

R. R. Lansford T. G. Nielsen J. Schultz L. D. Adcock L. M. Gentry

1998-01-01

175

Review of the Sandia National Laboratories -- Albuquerque, New Mexico DOE\\/DP Critical Skills Development Programs FY '02  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sandia National Laboratories has developed a portfolio of programs to address the critical skills needs of the DP labs, as identified by the 1999 Chiles Commission Report. The goals are to attract and retain the best and the brightest students and transition them into Sandia--and DP Complex--employees. The US Department of Energy\\/Defense Programs University Partnerships funded seven laboratory critical skills

KATHERINE SUE

2003-01-01

176

Developing the Sandia National Laboratories transportation infrastructure for isotope products and wastes  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) plans to establish a medical isotope project that would ensure a reliable domestic supply of molybdenum-99 ({sup 99}Mo) and related medical isotopes (Iodine-125, Iodine-131, and Xenon-133). The Department`s plan for production will modify the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) and associated hot cell facility at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)/New Mexico and the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Transportation activities associated with such production is discussed.

Trennel, A.J.

1997-11-01

177

The high current, fast, 100ns, Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) developmental project at Sandia National Laboratories.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, N.M., USA, in collaboration with the High Current Electronic Institute (HCEI), Tomsk, Russia, is developing a new paradigm in pulsed power technology: the Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) technology. This technological approach can provide very compact devices that can deliver very fast high current and high voltage pulses straight out of the cavity with out any complicated pulse forming and pulse compression network. Through multistage inductively insulated voltage adders, the output pulse, increased in voltage amplitude, can be applied directly to the load. The load may be a vacuum electron diode, a z-pinch wire array, a gas puff, a liner, an isentropic compression load (ICE) to study material behavior under very high magnetic fields, or a fusion energy (IFE) target. This is because the output pulse rise time and width can be easily tailored to the specific application needs. In this paper we briefly summarize the developmental work done in Sandia and HCEI during the last few years, and describe our new MYKONOS Sandia High Current LTD Laboratory.

Ward, Kevin S.; Long, Finis W.; Sinebryukhov, Vadim A. (High Current Electronic Institute (HCEI), Tomsk, Russia); Kim, Alexandre A. (High Current Electronic Institute (HCEI), Tomsk, RUSSIA); Wakeland, Peter Eric (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); McKee, G. Randall; Woodworth, Joseph Ray; McDaniel, Dillon Heirman; Fowler, William E.; Mazarakis, Michael Gerrassimos; Porter, John Larry, Jr.; Struve, Kenneth William; Stygar, William A.; LeChien, Keith R.; Matzen, Maurice Keith

2010-04-01

178

The transfer of disruptive technologies: Lessions learned from Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories has learned through their process of technology transfer that not all high tech transfers are alike. They are not alike by the nature of the customers involved, the process of becoming involved with these customers and finally and most importantly the very nature of the technology itself. Here they focus on technology transfer in the microsystems arena and specifically the sacrificial surface version of microsystems. They have learned and helped others learn that many MEMS applications are best realized through the use of surface micromachining (SMM). This is because SMM builds on the substantial integrated circuit industry. In this paper they review Sandia's process for transferring a disruptive MEMS technology in numerous cases.

MCBRAYER,JOHN D.

2000-04-19

179

A pollution prevention chargeback system at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (Sandia/NM) has successfully developed and implemented a chargeback system to fund the implementation of Pollution Prevention activities. In the process of establishing this system, many valuable lessons have been learned. This paper describes how the chargeback system currently functions, the benefits and drawbacks of implementing such a system, and recommendations for implementing a chargeback system at other facilities. The initial goals in establishing a chargeback system were to create (1) funding for pollution prevention implementation, including specific pollution prevention projects; and (2) awareness on the part of the line organizations of the quantities and types of waste that they generate, thus providing them with a direct incentive to reduce that waste. The chargeback system inputs waste generation data and then filters and sorts the data to serve two purposes: (1) the operation of the chargeback system; and (2) the detailed waste generation reporting used for assessing processes and identifying pollution prevention opportunities.

Davis, R.; Fish, J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brown, C. [Ogden Environmental and Energy Services Co., Fairfax, VA (United States)

1994-08-01

180

Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Facilities and Safety Information Document [NOTE: Volume I, Chapter 1  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) began in 1945 as the ''Z'' Division of what was then Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory on Oxnard Field, which was owned by the Air Technical Service Command, as a base of operations to store materials and house personnel. Oxnard Field was transferred to the U.S. Engineers, Manhattan District, on July 21, 1945, who converted several wood frame structures to serve functions that were transferred from Los Alamos. Development of the SNL/New Mexico (SNL/NM) site began in 1946 and 1947 with construction of the first four buildings in what is now Tech Area I. Construction of another 14 permanent buildings in Tech Area I began in 1948. SNL constructed a high-explosive assembly area in Tech Area II, a half mile south of Tech Area I, and started plans for several outdoor testing facilities for Tech Area III, about seven miles to the south of Tech Area I, in 1952. By 1953, SNL completed and put into operation the first group of Tech Area III facilities, which included a rocket sled track, a large centrifuge, a vibration facility, and an instrument control center. Tech Area IV and Tech Area V were developed later to provide facilities for pulsed power and high-energy experiments. As the need developed for outdoor testing facilities remote from the public and other work areas, SNL added many facilities on U.S. Air Force and other federal property in the area known as Coyote Test Field (Sandia National Laboratories, 1997b). Most recently, DOE leased U.S. Air Force facilities in the Manzano Area for SNL to use for storage of low-level radioactive waste, mixed waste (a combination of radioactive and hazardous waste), and transuranic waste (Sandia National Laboratories, 1997a).

March, F.; Guerrero, J.V.; Johns, W.H.; Schetnan, R.; Bayliss, L.S.; Kuzio, K.A.; White, B.B.

1999-09-01

181

Sandia Pulse Reactor-IV Project  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories has developed, designed and operated fast burst reactors for over 20 years. These reactors have been used for a variety of radiation effects programs. During this period, programs have required larger irradiation volumes primarily to expose complex electronic systems to postulated threat environments. As experiment volumes increased, a new reactor was built so that these components could be tested. The Sandia Pulse Reactor-IV is a logical evolution of the two decades of fast burst reactor development at Sandia.

Reuscher, J.A.

1983-01-01

182

On the integration of technology readiness levels at Sandia National Laboratories.  

SciTech Connect

Integrating technology readiness levels (TRL) into the management of engineering projects is critical to the mitigation of risk and improved customer/supplier communications. TRLs provide a common framework and language with which consistent comparisons of different technologies and approaches can be made. At Sandia National Laboratories, where technologies are developed, integrated and deployed into high consequence systems, the use of TRLs may be transformational. They are technology independent and span the full range of technology development including scientific and applied research, identification of customer requirements, modeling and simulation, identification of environments, testing and integration. With this report, we provide a reference set of definitions for TRLs and a brief history of TRLs at Sandia National Laboratories. We then propose and describe two approaches that may be used to integrate TRLs into the NW SMU business practices. In the first approach, we analyze how TRLs can be integrated within concurrent qualification as documented in TBP-100 [1]. In the second approach we take a look at the product realization process (PRP) as documented in TBP-PRP [2]. Both concurrent qualification and product realization are fundamental to the way weapons engineering work is conducted at this laboratory and the NWC (nuclear weapons complex) as a whole. Given the current structure and definitions laid out in the TBP-100 and TBP-PRP, we believe that integrating TRLs into concurrent qualification (TBP-100) rather than TBP-PRP is optimal. Finally, we note that our charter was to explore and develop ways of integrating TRLs into the NW SMU and therefore we do not significantly cover the development and history of TRLs. This work was executed under the auspices and direction of Sandia's Weapon Engineering Program. Please contact Gerry Sleefe, Deputy Program Director, for further information.

Bailey, Beatriz R.; Mitchell, John Anthony

2006-09-01

183

Large-Scale Testing and High-Fidelity Simulation Capabilities at Sandia National Laboratories to Support Space Power and Propulsion  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories, as a Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Agency, has major responsibility to ensure the safety and security needs of nuclear weapons. As such, with an experienced research staff, Sandia maintains a spectrum of modeling and simulation capabilities integrated with experimental and large-scale test capabilities. This expertise and these capabilities offer considerable resources for addressing issues of interest to the space power and propulsion communities. This paper presents Sandia's capability to perform thermal qualification (analysis, test, modeling and simulation) using a representative weapon system as an example demonstrating the potential to support NASA's Lunar Reactor System.

Dobranich, Dean [Thermal and Reactive Processes Department, Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); Blanchat, Thomas K. [Fire Science and Technology Department, Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States)

2008-01-21

184

Monitoring Data from the Chemical Waste Landfill, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico (2003 - 2006)  

DOE Data Explorer

The Chemical Waste Landfill (CWL) was a 1.9 acre site used from 1962 until 1985 for disposal of chemical wastes. The wastes were generated by research at Sandia's laboratories. The excavation of the CWL and the removal of 2000 intact chemical containers was completed safely and successfully. Contaminated soils were also removed for treatment or disposal. An "in-site" chemiresistor sensor was developed for the project that provided continuous monitoring of volatile organic compounds in the air, soil, and water. The monitoring data, collected from March, 2003 through April, 2006 is summarized and presented at this website.

Ho, Cliff (Sandia National Laboratories)

185

High-velocity reverse ballistic rocket sled testing at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

The design of an impact-fuzed weapon is dependent on accurate and predictable information about its behavior in an impact environment. Results from full-scale impact tests are essential in developing and verifying computer codes which model the crush-up of these weapons. This paper discusses the reverse ballistic impact test procedure and the advantages it offers over more conventional test methods for obtaining impact test results. Also described are recent developments by Sandia National Laboratories in the use of rocket sleds to push reverse ballistic impact targets faster than ever before.

Tachau, R.D.M.

1986-01-01

186

Status of the Z Refurbishment project (ZR) at Sandia National Laboratories.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories Z Refurbishment (ZR) Project formally began in August 2002 to increase the Z Accelerator's utilization by providing the capability to perform more shots, improve precision and pulse shape variability, increase delivered current, and accomplish the improvements with minimal disruption to Z's ongoing programs. A project overview was provided at the 14th International Pulsed Power Conference in 2003. This paper provides an update of the project including architectural changes over the past two years, timeframe for completion, and overall design and fabrication status.

Weinbrecht, Edward A.; Bloomquist, Douglas D.; Warner, Peggy Jean; McDaniel, Dillon Heirman; Faturos, Thomas V.; Tabor, Debra Ann; McKee, G. Randall; Weed, John Woodruff

2005-06-01

187

Human factors evaluation of the Auxiliary Hot Cell Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.  

SciTech Connect

The Auxiliary Hot Cell Facility (AHCF) at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) is a Hazard Category 3 nuclear facility used to characterize, treat, and repackage radioactive and mixed material for reuse, recycling, or ultimate disposal. Mixed waste may also be handled at the AHCF. A significant upgrade to a previous facility, the Temporary Hot Cell, was required to perform this mission. A checklist procedure was used to perform a human-factors evaluation of the AHCF modifications. This evaluation resulted in two recommendations, both of which have been implemented.

Hunter, Regina Lee; Whitehurst, Hugh O.

2003-11-01

188

The technology-based regional economic development program at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

In November of 1989, technology transfer became a mission for Sandia National Laboratories, (SNL), with the passage of the National Competitiveness Technology Transfer Act. In order to address the specialized technology transfer needs of small businesses, SNL created and implemented the Technology-Based Regional Economic Development (TRED) program. The TRED model has two major components -- technology assistance (or teaming), and widget transfer.'' In the technology assistance component, SNL's technology resources (expertise, services, and equipment) are made available to companies developing commercial products. In the widget transfer'' component, SNL's intellectual property (patents, copyrights) is placed with private sector firms through various partnership intermediaries

Allen, M.S.

1992-01-01

189

The technology-based regional economic development program at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

In November of 1989, technology transfer became a mission for Sandia National Laboratories, (SNL), with the passage of the National Competitiveness Technology Transfer Act. In order to address the specialized technology transfer needs of small businesses, SNL created and implemented the Technology-Based Regional Economic Development (TRED) program. The TRED model has two major components -- technology assistance (or teaming), and `` widget transfer.`` In the technology assistance component, SNL`s technology resources (expertise, services, and equipment) are made available to companies developing commercial products. In the ``widget transfer`` component, SNL`s intellectual property (patents, copyrights) is placed with private sector firms through various partnership intermediaries

Allen, M.S.

1992-05-01

190

Pollution prevention opportunity assessment for Sandia National Laboratories/California recycling programs.  

SciTech Connect

This Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessment (PPOA) was conducted for the Sandia National Laboratories/California (SNL/CA) Environmental Management Department between May 2006 and March 2007, to evaluate the current site-wide recycling program for potential opportunities to improve the efficiency of the program. This report contains a summary of the information collected and analyses performed with recommended options for implementation. The SNL/NM Pollution Prevention (P2) staff worked with the SNL/CA P2 Staff to arrive at these options.

Wrons, Ralph Jordan; Vetter, Douglas Walter

2007-07-01

191

Isotope production potential at Sandia National Laboratories: Product, waste, packaging, and transportation  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Congress directed the U.S. Department of Energy to establish a domestic source of molybdenum-99, an essential isotope used in nuclear medicine and radiopharmacology. An Environmental Impact Statement for production of {sup 99}Mo at one of four candidate sites is being prepared. As one of the candidate sites, Sandia National Laboratories is developing the Isotope Production Project. Using federally approved processes and procedures now owned by the U.S. Department of Energy, and existing facilities that would be modified to meet the production requirements, the Sandia National Laboratories` Isotope Project would manufacture up to 30 percent of the U.S. market, with the capacity to meet 100 percent of the domestic need if necessary. This paper provides a brief overview of the facility, equipment, and processes required to produce isotopes. Packaging and transportation issues affecting both product and waste are addressed, and the storage and disposal of the four low-level radioactive waste types generated by the production program are considered. Recommendations for future development are provided.

Trennel, A.J.

1995-12-31

192

Overview of the joint US\\/Russia surety program in the Sandia National Laboratories Cooperative Measures Program  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sandia National Laboratories has initiated many joint research and development projects with the two premier Russian nuclear laboratories, VNIIEF and VNIITF, (historically known as Arzamas-16 and Chelyabinsk-70) in a wide spectrum of areas. One of the areas in which critical dialogue and technical exchange is continuing to take place is in the realm of system surety. Activities primarily include either

R. E. Smith; O. S. Vorontsova; I. M. Blinov

1998-01-01

193

Current radar-responsive tag development activities at Sandia National Laboratories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Over the past ten years, Sandia has developed RF radar responsive tag systems and supporting technologies for various government agencies and industry partners. RF tags can function as RF transmitters or radar transponders that enable tagging, tracking, and location determination functions. Expertise in tag architecture, microwave and radar design, signal analysis and processing techniques, digital design, modeling and simulation, and testing have been directly applicable to these tag programs. In general, the radar responsive tag designs have emphasized low power, small package size, and the ability to be detected by the radar at long ranges. Recently, there has been an interest in using radar responsive tags for Blue Force tracking and Combat ID (CID). The main reason for this interest is to allow airborne surveillance radars to easily distinguish U.S. assets from those of opposing forces. A Blue Force tracking capability would add materially to situational awareness. Combat ID is also an issue, as evidenced by the fact that approximately one-quarter of all U.S. casualties in the Gulf War took the form of ground troops killed by friendly fire. Because the evolution of warfare in the intervening decade has made asymmetric warfare the norm rather than the exception, swarming engagements in which U.S. forces will be freely intermixed with opposing forces is a situation that must be anticipated. Increasing utilization of precision munitions can be expected to drive fires progressively closer to engaged allied troops at times when visual de-confliction is not an option. In view of these trends, it becomes increasingly important that U.S. ground forces have a widely proliferated all-weather radar responsive tag that communicates to all-weather surveillance. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the recent, current, and future radar responsive research and development activities at Sandia National Laboratories that support both the Blue Force Tracking and Combat ID application. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company for the United States Departments of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

Ormesher, Richard C.; Plummer, Kenneth W.; Wells, Lars M.

2004-08-01

194

Research on the Use of Robotics in Hazardous Environments at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Many hazardous material handling needs exist in remote unstructured environments. Currently these operations are accomplished using personnel in direct contact with the hazards. A safe and cost effective alternative to this approach is the use of intelligent robotic systems for safe handling, packaging, transport, and even excavation of hazardous materials. The Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center of Sandia National Laboratories has developed and deployed robotic technologies for use in hazardous environments, three of which have been deployed in DOE production facilities for handling of special nuclear materials. Other systems are currently under development for packaging special nuclear materials. This paper presents an overview of the research activities, including five delivered systems, at %ndia National Laboratories on the use of robotics in hazardous environments.

Kwok, Kwan S.

1999-05-04

195

Optical damage testing at the Z-Backlighter facility at Sandia National Laboratories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To enable laser-based radiography of high energy density physics events on the Z-Accelerator[4,5] at Sandia National Laboratories, a facility known as the Z-Backlighter has been developed. Two Nd:Phosphate glass lasers are used to create x-rays and/or proton beams capable of this radiographic diagnosis: Z-Beamlet (a multi-kilojoule laser operating at 527nm in a few nanoseconds) and Z-Petawatt (a several hundred joule laser operating at 1054nm in the subpicosecond regime) [1,2]. At the energy densities used in these systems, it is necessary to use high damage threshold optical materials, some of which are poorly characterized (especially for the sub-picosecond pulse). For example, Sandia has developed a meter-class dielectric coating capability for system optics. Damage testing can be performed by external facilities for nanosecond 532nm pulses, measuring high reflector coating damage thresholds >80J/cm2 and antireflection coating damage thresholds >20J/cm2 [3]. However, available external testing capabilities do not use femtosecond/picosecond scale laser pulses. To this end, we have constructed a sub-picoseond-laser-based optical damage test system. The damage tester system also allows for testing in a vacuum vessel, which is relevant since many optics in the Z-Backlighter system are used in vacuum. This paper will present the results of laser induced damage testing performed in both atmosphere and in vacuum, with 1054nm sub-picosecond laser pulses. Optical materials/coatings discussed are: bare fused silica and protected gold used for benchmarking; BK7; Zerodur; protected silver; and dielectric optical coatings (halfnia/silica layer pairs) produced by Sandia's in-house meter-class coating capability.

Kimmel, Mark; Rambo, Patrick; Broyles, Robin; Geissel, Matthias; Schwarz, Jens; Bellum, John; Atherton, Briggs

2009-10-01

196

Sandia MEMS  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This fun site about MicroElectroMechanical systems (MEMS) is maintained at Sandia National Laboratories. Visitors who don't want to get bogged down with technical aspects of these microscopic machines can browse the image and movie galleries, which show what MEMS look like and how they operate. There is even a live video feed of a microengine system running at Sandia. To learn more about what is involved in MEMS production and operation, the Technical Information section has an informative overview, descriptions of three developing technologies, and examples of prototype systems. The facilities used by Sandia researchers are also described in a virtual tour.

197

Aquatic macroinvertebrates and water quality of Sandia Canyon, Los Alamos National Laboratory, November 1993--October 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Ecological Studies Team (EST) of ESH-20 at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has collected samples from the stream within Sandia Canyon since the summer of 1990. These field studies gather water quality measurements and collect aquatic macroinvertebrates from permanent sampling sites. Reports by Bennett (1994) and Cross (1994) discuss previous EST aquatic studies in Sandia Canyon. This report updates and expands those findings. EST collected water quality data and aquatic macroinvertebrates at five permanent stations within the canyon from November 1993 through October 1994. The two upstream stations are located below outfalls that discharge industrial and sanitary waste effluent into the stream, thereby maintaining year-round flow. Some water quality parameters are different at the first three stations from those expected of natural streams in the area, indicating degraded water quality due to effluent discharges. The aquatic habitat at the upper stations has also been degraded by sedimentation and channelization. The macroinvertebrate communities at these stations are characterized by low diversities and unstable communities. In contrast, the two downstream stations appear to be in a zone of recovery, where water quality parameters more closely resemble those found in natural streams of the area. The two lower stations have increased macroinvertebrate diversity and stable communities, further indications of downstream water quality improvement.

Cross, S.

1995-08-01

198

Review of Sandia National Laboratories - Albuquerque New Mexico DOE/DP Critical Skills Development Progrmas FY04.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories has developed a portfolio of programs to address the critical skills needs of the DP labs, as identified by the 1999 Chiles Commission Report. The goals are to attract and retain the best and the brightest students and transition them into Sandia - and DP Complex - employees. The US Department of Energy/Defense Programs University Partnerships funded ten laboratory critical skills development programs in FY04. This report provides a qualitative and quantitative evaluation of these programs and their status. 3

Gorman, Anna K; Wilson, Dominique; CLARK, KATHERINE

2005-09-01

199

Technology Transfer from Sandia National Laboratories and Technology Commercialization by MODE/Emcore  

SciTech Connect

This case study describes a success in technology transfer out of Sandia National Laboratories that resulted in commercialization supporting both the laboratories' national security mission and economic development. This case exemplifies how the process of technology innovation stretches from national legislation to laboratory management to entrepreneurs, and then out into the community where the technology must be developed and commercialized if innovation is to occur. Two things emerged from the research for this case study that have implications for technology transfer and commercialization from other national laboratories and may also be relevant to technology commercialization out of other federal laboratories and universities. The first is the very clear theme that partnerships were critical to the ultimate successful commercialization of the technology--partnerships between public and private research groups as well as between business development groups. The second involves identifiable factors that played a role in moving the process forward to successful commercialization. All of the factors, with two significant exceptions, focused on technology and business development directly related to creating research and business partnerships. The two exceptions, a technology with significant market applications, and entrepreneurs willing and able to take the risks and accomplish the hard work of technology innovation, were initiating requirements for the process.

CLARK, KATHERINE SUE; ROMIG, ALTON D. Jr.; ANDRANOVICH, GREG

2001-04-01

200

Space Radiation Effects Laboratory.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The SREL User's Handbook is designed to provide information needed by those who plan experiments involving the accelerators at this laboratory. Thus the Handbook will contain information on the properties of the machines, the beam parameters, the faciliti...

1969-01-01

201

Z-Pinch Driven Inertial Confinement Fusion Target Physics Research at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Three hohlraum concepts are being pursued at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to investigate the possibility of using pulsed power driven magnetic implosions (z-pinches) to drive high gain targets capable of yields in the range of 200-1000 MJ. This research is being conducted on SNL'S.Z facility that is capable of driving peak currents of 20 MA in z-pinch loads producing implosion velocities as high as 7.5X 107 cm/s, x-ray energies approaching 2 MJ, and x-ray powers exceeding 200 TW. This paper will discuss each of these hohlraum concepts and will overview the experiments that have been conducted on these systems to date.

Alberts, T.E.; Asay, J.R.; Baca, P.M.; Baker, K.L.; Breeze, S.P.; Chandler, G.A.; Cook, D.L.; Cooper, G.W.; Deeney, C.; Derzon, M.S.; Douglas, M.R.; Fehl, D.L.; Gilliland, T.; Hebron, D.E.; Hurst, M.J.; Jobe, D.O.; Kellogg, J.W.; Lash, J.S.; Lazier, S.E.; Leeper, R.J.; Matzen, M.K.; McDaniel, D.H.; McGurn, J.S.; Mehlhorn, T.A.; Moats, A.R.; Mock, R.C.; Muron, D.J.; Nash, T.J.; Olson, R.E.; Porter, J.L.; Quintenz, J.P.; Reyers, P.V.; Ruggles, L.E.; Ruiz, C.L.; Sandford, T.W.L.; Schmidlapp, F.A.; Seamen, J.F.; Spielman, R.B.; Stark, M.A.; Struve, K.W.; Stygar, W.A.; Tibbetts-Russell, D.R.; Torres, J.A.; Vargas, M.; Wagoner, T.C.; Wakefield, C.

1998-10-27

202

Surface-wave and refraction tomography at the FACT Site, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.  

SciTech Connect

We present a technique that allows for the simultaneous acquisition and interpretation of both shear-wave and compressive-wave 3-D velocities. The technique requires no special seismic sources or array geometries, and is suited to studies with small source-receiver offsets. The method also effectively deals with unwanted seismic arrivals by using the statistical properties of the data itself to discriminate against spurious picks. We demonstrate the technique with a field experiment at the Facility for Analysis, Calibration, and Testing at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. The resulting 3-D shear-velocity and compressive-velocity distributions are consistent with surface geologic mapping. The averaged velocities and V{sub p}/V{sub s} ratio in the upper 30 meters are also consistent with examples found in the scientific literature.

Abbott, Robert E.; Bartel, Lewis Clark; Pullammanappallil, Satish (Optim, Inc., Reno, NV); Engler, Bruce Phillip

2006-08-01

203

Activation of the Z-petawatt laser at Sandia National Laboratories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To enhance radiographic capabilities on its Z-Accelerator, Sandia National Laboratories is incorporating a petawatt laser system into the existing Z-Backlighter laser facility. A chirped-pulse laser has been constructed to seed the large Beamlet type Nd:Phosphate glass slab amplifiers. This seed laser consists of an optical parametric chirped pulse amplification (OPCPA) system joined to a Nd:Phosphate glass rod amplifier in order to achieve multi-Joule operation. After injection into the main slab amplifiers up to 500 J of chirped pulse energy is achieved. Two compressor options are available for this output: a lower energy compressor for 100TW (50 J/500 fs) operation and a higher energy compressor for 1PW (500 J/500 fs) operation. While the higher energy compressor is under construction, the 100 TW system is now operational and can achieve focal intensities up to 1019 W/cm2.

Schwarz, J.; Rambo, P.; Geissel, M.; Edens, A.; Smith, I.; Brambrink, E.; Kimmel, M.; Atherton, B.

2008-05-01

204

Survey of subsurface treatment technologies for environmental restoration sites at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico.  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a survey of remediation and treatment technologies for contaminants of concern at environmental restoration (ER) sites at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico. The sites that were evaluated include the Tijeras Arroyo Groundwater, Technical Area V, and Canyons sites. The primary contaminants of concern at these sites include trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene (PCE), and nitrate in groundwater. Due to the low contaminant concentrations (close to regulatory limits) and significant depths to groundwater ({approx}500 feet) at these sites, few in-situ remediation technologies are applicable. The most applicable treatment technologies include monitored natural attenuation and enhanced bioremediation/denitrification to reduce the concentrations of TCE, PCE, and nitrate in the groundwater. Stripping technologies to remove chlorinated solvents and other volatile organic compounds from the vadose zone can also be implemented, if needed.

McGrath, Lucas K.; Ho, Clifford Kuofei; Wright, Jerome L.

2003-08-01

205

Overview of Sandia National Laboratories and Khlopin Radium Institute collaborative radiological accident consequence analysis efforts  

SciTech Connect

In January, 1995 a collaborative effort to improve radiological consequence analysis methods and tools was initiated between the V.G. Khlopin Institute (KRI) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The purpose of the collaborative effort was to transfer SNL`s consequence analysis methods to KRI and identify opportunities for collaborative efforts to solve mutual problems relating to the safety of radiochemical facilities. A second purpose was to improve SNL`s consequence analysis methods by incorporating the radiological accident field experience of KRI scientists (e.g. the Chernobyl and Kyshtym accidents). The initial collaborative effort focused on the identification of: safety criteria that radiochemical facilities in Russia must meet; analyses/measures required to demonstrate that safety criteria have been met; and data required to complete the analyses/measures identified to demonstrate the safety basis of a facility.

Young, M.L.; Carlson, D.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lazarev, L.N.; Petrov, B.F.; Romanovskiy, V.N. [V.G. Khlopin Radium Inst., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

1997-05-01

206

The future of infrastructure security : a workshop held at Sandia National Laboratories.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories hosted a workshop on the future of infrastructure security on February 27-28, 2013, in Albuquerque, NM. The 17 participants came from backgrounds as diverse as federal policy, the insurance industry, infrastructure management, and technology development. The purpose of the workshop was to surface key issues, identify directions forward, and lay groundwork for cross-sectoral and cross-disciplinary collaborations. The workshop addressed issues such as the problem space (what is included ininfrastructure' problems?), the general types of threats to infrastructure (such as acute or chronic, system-inherent or exogenously imposed) and definitions ofsecure and resilient' infrastructures. The workshop concluded with a consideration of stakeholders and players in the infrastructure world, and identification of specific activities that could be undertaken by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and other players.

Garcia, Pablo; Turnley, Jessica Glicken; Parrott, Lori K.

2013-05-01

207

Sandia National Laboratories environmental fluid dynamics code : sediment transport user manual.  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the sediment transport subroutines and input files for the Sandia National Laboratories Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (SNL-EFDC). Detailed descriptions of the input files containing data from Sediment Erosion at Depth flume (SEDflume) measurements are provided along with the description of the source code implementing sediment transport. Both the theoretical description of sediment transport employed in SNL-EFDC and the source code are described. This user manual is meant to be used in conjunction with the EFDC manual (Hamrick 1996) because there will be no reference to the hydrodynamics in EFDC. Through this document, the authors aim to provide the necessary information for new users who wish to implement sediment transport in EFDC and obtain a clear understanding of the source code.

Grace, Matthew D.; Thanh, Phi Hung X.; James, Scott Carlton

2008-09-01

208

Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Nuclear Element Tests at Sandia National Laboratories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nuclear Element Tests (NET) are being performed as part of the U.S. Air Force Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) Program to evaluate high performance fuel elements intended for use in future nuclear propulsion systems. The NET experiments are to be performed at the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL's) Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR). Objectives of these experiments are to provide engineering validation and demonstration of critical-fuel-element-related technologies and an experimental data base to support analytical design methods for the SNTP Program. Currently, hardware for the first two fueled NET experiments has been fabricated, and cold flow tests have been accomplished with a representative set of hardware to assure the experimental capability to achieve test objectives in-reactor. Assembly of the first NET experiment to test a representative nuclear fuel element is in progress, and planned operational sequences have been defined.

Mitchell, Gerry W.

1993-01-01

209

Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Nuclear Element Tests at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear Element Tests (NET) are being performed as part of the U.S. Air Force Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) Program to evaluate high performance fuel elements intended for use in future nuclear propulsion systems. The NET experiments are to be performed at the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL's) Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR). Objectives of these experiments are to provide engineering validation and demonstration of critical-fuel-element-related technologies and an experimental data base to support analytical design methods for the SNTP Program. Currently, hardware for the first two fueled NET experiments has been fabricated, and cold flow tests have been accomplished with a representative set of hardware to assure the experimental capability to achieve test objectives in-reactor. Assembly of the first NET experiment to test a representative nuclear fuel element is in progress, and planned operational sequences have been defined.

Mitchell, G.W. (Sandia National Laboratories, Reactor-Laser Systems Department, P.O. Box 5800, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States))

1993-01-15

210

Space nuclear thermal propulsion nuclear element tests at Sandia National Laboratories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nuclear Element Tests (NET) which are being performed as part of the US Air Force Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) Program to evaluate high performance fuel elements intended for use in future nuclear propulsion systems are described. The NET experiments are to be performed at the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL's) Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR). Objectives of these experiments are to provide engineering validation and demonstration of critical-fuel-element-related technologies and an experimental data base to support analytical design methods for the SNTP Program. Currently, hardware for the first two fueled NET experiments was fabricated, and cold flow tests were accomplished with a representative set of hardware to assure the experimental capability to achieve test objectives in-reactor. Assembly of the first NET experiment to test a representative nuclear fuel elements is in progress, and planned operational sequences were defined.

Mitchell, G. W.

1992-12-01

211

Lessons learned from Sandia National Laboratories' operational readiness review of the Annular Core Research Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) (a Hazard Category 2 nuclear reactor facility) was defueled in early 1997 to convert the reactor core and control system to produce medical radioisotopes for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Medical Isotope Production Program. The DOE determined that an operational readiness review (ORR) per DOE 5480.31 or DOE 420.1 was required to confirm the readiness of management systems, personnel, and the physical plant to refuel the reactor and begin operations within the revised safety basis. DOE stated that this was the first reactor ORR conducted within the Complex. The authors address the lessons learned from the ACRR ORR, emphasizing cost savings and the use of the ORR to confirm authorization-basis implementation.

Bendure, A.O.; Bryson, J.W.

1999-07-01

212

Space Radiation Effects Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The SREL User's Handbook is designed to provide information needed by those who plan experiments involving the accelerators at this laboratory. Thus the Handbook will contain information on the properties of the machines, the beam parameters, the facilities and services provided for experimenters, etc. This information will be brought up to date as new equipment is added and modifications accomplished. This Handbook is influenced by the many excellent models prepared at other accelerator laboratories. In particular, the CERN Synchrocyclotron User's Handbook (November 1967) is closely followed in some sections, since the SREL Synchrocyclotron is a duplicate of the CERN machine. We wish to thank Dr. E. G. Michaelis for permission to draw so heavily on his work, particularly in Section II of this Handbook. We hope that the Handbook will prove useful, and will welcome suggestions and criticism.

1969-01-01

213

Engineering Manhattan style: Sandia Laboratories as an example of postwar engineering  

SciTech Connect

A great deal has been written about the history of science in America since World War II. Much of that work has explored the government`s research and development establishment, focusing on the scientific community immediately after the war. It is generally argued that the apparent triumphs of the huge and expensive wartime research and development projects gave rise to a belief that scientific resources should be nurtured and kept on hand - ready to provide service in an emergency. The Cold War drive for more and better weapons further fed this belief, leading to a massive system of national laboratories, military laboratories, and defense industries. The science of this complex is built on extensive financial support, the central strategy of which is that by steadily, and occasionally even lavishly funding large research programs, you will have a constant stream of scientific ideas that can be applied to national security purposes. What is true of science, is also true, in slightly modified form, of postwar engineering. The story I want to tell you today is, I think, an example of the way Cold War engineering r&d for national security worked. This report describes aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories.

NONE

1996-09-01

214

Sandia National Laboratories Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Annual Report 2005.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report summarizes progress from the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program during fiscal year 2005. In addition to a programmatic and financial overview, the report includes progress reports from 410 individual R&D projects in 19...

H. Westrich D. Chavez K. Ortiz D. Montoya S. Martinez

2006-01-01

215

INFORMATION: Inspection Report on "Removal of Categories I and II Special Nuclear Material from Sandia National Laboratories-New Mexico"  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Sandia National Laboratories-New Mexico (Sandia) develops science-based technologies in support of national security in areas such as nuclear weapons, nonproliferation, military technologies, and homeland security. Sandia's primary mission is ensuring that the U.S. nuclear arsenal is safe, secure, and reliable and can fully support the Nation's deterrence policy. Part of this mission includes systems engineering of nuclear weapons; research, design, and development of non-nuclear components; manufacturing of non-nuclear weapons components; the provision of safety, security, and reliability assessments of stockpile weapons; and the conduct of high-explosives research and development and environmental testing. Sandia Corporation, a subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, operates Sandia for the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). On May 7, 2004, the Secretary announced that the Department would evaluate missions at DOE sites to consolidate Special Nuclear Material (SNM) in the most secure environments possible. The Administrator of the NNSA said that this effort was a key part of an overall plan to transform the nuclear weapons complex into a smaller, safer, more secure, and more efficient national security enterprise. In February 2008, Sandia was the first site to report it had reduced its on-site inventory of nuclear material below 'Categories I and II' levels, which require the highest level of security to protect material such as plutonium and highly enriched uranium. The Office of Inspector General initiated an inspection to determine if Sandia made appropriate adjustments to its security posture in response to the removal of the Categories I and II SNM. We found that Sandia adjusted its security posture in response to the removal of Categories I and II SNM. For example, security posts were closed; unneeded protective force weapons and equipment were excessed from the site; and, Sandia's Site Safeguards and Security Plan was modified. We also found that some highly enriched uranium in a complex material configuration was not removed from Sandia. This material was designated as Category III material using a methodology for assessing the attractiveness of complex materials that was not specifically addressed in any current DOE directive. Although DOE and NNSA officials believed that this designation was appropriate, the methodology used to support this designation had not, as of the time of our review, been incorporated into the DOE directives system. Historically, the Department has considered the categorization of SNM to be an important national security and public policy issue. Consequently, we believe that expedited action should be taken to formalize this methodology in the DOE directives system and that it be disseminated throughout the Department of Energy complex.

None

2010-01-01

216

Environmental assessment for Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico offsite transportation of low-level radioactive waste  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) is managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company. SNL/NM is located on land owned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) within the boundaries of the Kirtland Air Force Base (KAFB) in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The major responsibilities of SNL/NM are the support of national security and energy projects. Low-level radioactive waste (LLW) is generated by some of the activities performed at SNL/NM in support of the DOE. This report describes potential environmental effects of the shipments of low-level radioactive wastes to other sites.

NONE

1996-09-01

217

Reactor pumped laser research at the Sandia National Laboratories pulsed reactor facilities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sandia National Labs has been investigating concepts for high power lasers pumped directly by fission energy. The direct pumping of laser media with fission fragments offers the potential advantages of scaling to high powers and very long run times in a compact, self powered system. To investigate the potential of this concept, extensive experiments have been conducted in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) and the Sandia Pulsed Reactor (SPR-3). These experiments include laser physics tests, radiation effects tests on optical materials, and experiments to examine the scaling of reactor pumped lasers to high powers. The SPR-3 is a U-1 0%Mo fast burst reactor which is used for laser physics experiments. SPR-3 is capable of 70 to 1500 micro FWHM pulses generating up to several kW/cc excitation in a liter size laser cavity. The pulse widths greater than a few hundred microseconds are achieved using a pulse stretcher consisting of gram amounts of fissile material surrounded by moderator. The ACRR is a UO2BeO fueled epithermal reactor which is used for larger volume scaling and beam quality experiments. ACRR operates in both steady state and pulsed modes with pulse widths of 7 to 250 ms resulting in excitation rates of (approximately)2 to 100 W/cc in excitation volumes of up to 50 l. Experimental configurations on both reactors have included central cavity and external cavity locations. The experiments on SPR-3 have defined optimum conditions for efficient reactor pumping of rare gas lasers. This information has been used to define scaling experiments now in progress in the ACRR.

Bodette, D. E.; Neal, D. R.; McArthur, D. A.; Pickard, P. S.; Hebner, G.; Michie, R.

218

Reactor pumped laser research at the Sandia National Laboratories pulsed reactor facilities  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Labs has been investigating concepts for high power lasers pumped directly by fission energy. The direct pumping of laser media with fission fragments offers the potential advantages of scaling to high powers and very long run times in a compact, self powered system. To investigate the potential of this concept, extensive experiments have been conducted in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) and the Sandia Pulsed Reactor (SPR-III). These experiments include laser physics tests, radiation effects tests on optical materials, and experiments to examine the scaling of reactor pumped lasers to high powers. The SPR-III is a U-10%Mo fast burst reactor which is used for laser physics experiments. SPR-III is capable of 70 to 1500 {mu}s FWHM pulses generating up to several kW/cc excitation in a liter size laser cavity. The pulse widths greater than a few hundred microseconds are achieved using a pulse stretcher consisting of gram amounts of fissile material surrounded by moderator. The ACRR is a UO{sub 2}BeO fueled epithermal reactor which is used for larger volume scaling and beam quality experiments. ACRR operates in both steady state and pulsed modes with pulse widths of 7 to 250 ms resulting in excitation rates of {approximately}2 to 100 W/cc in excitation volumes of up to 50 1. Experimental configurations on both reactors have included central cavity and external cavity locations. The experiments on SPR-III have defined optimum conditions for efficient reactor pumping of rare gas lasers. This information has been used to define scaling experiments now in progress in the ACRR.

Bodette, D.E.; Neal, D.R.; McArthur, D.A.; Pickard, P.S.; Hebner, G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Michie, R. [Mission Research, Inc.,Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-11-01

219

``We crash, burn, and crush``: A history of packaging at Sandia National Laboratories, 1978--1997  

SciTech Connect

Even prior to the beginning of the nuclear age, the packaging and transportation of nuclear materials was a prime national concern. Nuclear materials such as uranium and plutonium had to be transported safely (and secretly) to the Manhattan Engineer District Laboratory in Los Alamos, New Mexico. The subsequent post war use of nuclear power for the generation of electricity and accelerated weapons development programs resulted in radioactive waste byproducts, such as spent fuel and plutonium, that were stored on site at utilities and federal weapons sites. While projected repositories for long term storage of radioactive waste are being planned, both low and high level radioactive materials on occasion must be moved safely. Movement to interim storage and, for low level waste, repository sites, is accomplished by a combination of truck, rail, ship, and air. The US Department of Energy (DOE) directs transportation activities including cask development technology for use in single or multimodal (a combination of land, water, and air) transport. In 1978, Sandia National Laboratories was selected as the lead contractor for basic transportation technology. This report is divided into the following topics: (1) early research and development (1936--1978); (2) radioactive material package test (1975--1977); (3) the SNL Transportation Technology Center; (4) TRUPACT-II; (5) beneficial uses of shipping system casks; (6) C-141B drop tests; (7) MIDAS; (8) MOSAIK; (9) SEARAM; (10) PATRAM; and (11) a chronology of transportation activities.

Mora, C.J.; McConnell, P.

1997-11-01

220

Lessons learned from in-vessel melt progression research performed at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

The accident at the Three Mile Island unit 2 coincided with a shift in perspective on commercial light water reactor (LWR) safety from one that emphasized design-basis accidents to one that emphasized an increasing concern for low-probability severe accidents. This shift in emphasis was reflected in the research programs initiated by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) as detailed in the Severe Accident Research Plan. In addition to other work, experimental and analytical studies of LWR core-melt progression behavior were initiated at several national laboratories. At Sandia National Laboratories, three separate experimental programs were performed in the annular core research reactor (ACRR) and have provided valuable insights into severe fuel damage processes: the damaged fuel program investigating fuel rod initial heatup and damage; the source term program, investigating fission product release from highly irradiated LWR fuel: and the melt progression program, which investigated the later stages of fuel-melt progression in highly degraded (rubble bed) geometry.

Gauntt, R.O. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States))

1993-01-01

221

A brief history of Sandia National Laboratories and the Department of Energy%3CU%2B2019%3Es Office of Science : interplay between science, technology, and mission  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 1957, Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) initiated its first programs in fundamental science, in support of its primary nuclear weapons mission. In 1974, Sandia initiated programs in fundamental science supported by the Department of Energy's Office of Science (DOE-SC). These latter programs have grown to the point where, today in 2011, support of Sandia's programs in fundamental science is dominated

Jeffrey Yeenien Tsao; Myers Samuel Maxwell Jr; Jerry Alvon Simmons; Andrew McIlroy; Frederick L. Vook; Samuel Scott Collis; Samuel Thomas Picraux

2011-01-01

222

Standard testing procedures for optical fiber and unshielded twisted pair at Sandia National Laboratories. Revision  

SciTech Connect

This revision updates Sandia`s working standard for testing optical fiber and unshielded twisted pair cables included in the Lab-wide telecommunications cabling infrastructure. The purpose of these standard testing procedures is to deliver to all Sandians a reliable, low-maintenance, state-of-the-art, ubiquitous telecommunications cabling infrastructure capable of satisfying all current and future telecommunication needs.

Adams, R.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Communications Dept.

1994-09-01

223

Environmental Testing Philosophy for a Sandia National Laboratories' Small Satellite Project - A Retrospective  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sandia has recently completed the flight certification test series for the Multi-Spectral Thermal Imaging satellite (MTI), which is a small satellite for which Sandia was the system integrator. A paper was presented at the 16th Aerospace Testing Seminar discussing plans for performing the structural dynamics certification program for that satellite. The testing philosophy was originally based on a combination of

JEROME S

2000-01-01

224

Simulation information regarding Sandia National Laboratories%3CU%2B2019%3E trinity capability improvement metric.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory each selected a representative simulation code to be used as a performance benchmark for the Trinity Capability Improvement Metric. Sandia selected SIERRA Low Mach Module: Nalu, which is a uid dynamics code that solves many variable-density, acoustically incompressible problems of interest spanning from laminar to turbulent ow regimes, since it is fairly representative of implicit codes that have been developed under ASC. The simulations for this metric were performed on the Cielo Cray XE6 platform during dedicated application time and the chosen case utilized 131,072 Cielo cores to perform a canonical turbulent open jet simulation within an approximately 9-billion-elementunstructured- hexahedral computational mesh. This report will document some of the results from these simulations as well as provide instructions to perform these simulations for comparison.

Agelastos, Anthony Michael; Lin, Paul T.

2013-10-01

225

Designing for explosive safety'': The Explosive Components Facility at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

The Explosive Components Facility (ECF) is to be a new major facility in the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Weapons Program. The ECF is a self-contained, secure site on SNL property and is surrounded by Kirtland Air Force Base which is located 6-1/2 miles east of downtown Albuquerque, New Mexico. The ECF will be dedicated to research, development, and testing of detonators, neutron generators, batteries, explosives, and other weapon components. It will have capabilities for conducting explosive test fires, gas gun testing, physical analyses, chemical analyses, electrical testing and ancillary explosive storage in magazines. The ECF complex is composed of a building covering an area of approximately 91,000 square feet, six exterior explosive service magazines and a remote test cell. Approximately 50% of the building space will be devoted to highly specialized laboratory and test areas, the other 50% of the building is considered nonhazardous. Critical to the laboratory and test areas are the blast-structural design consideration and operational considerations, particularly those concerning personnel access control, safety and environmental protection. This area will be decoupled from the rest of the building to the extent that routine tests will not be heard or felt in the administrative area of the building. While the ECF is designed in accordance with the DOE Explosives Safety Manual to mitigate any off-site blast effects, potential injuries or death to the ECF staff may result from an accidental detonation of explosive material within the facility. Therefore, reducing the risk of exposing operation personnel to hazardous and energetic material is paramount in the design of the ECF.

Couch, W.A.

1990-12-01

226

Robotic lunar rover technologies and SEI supporting technologies at Sandia National Laboratories  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Existing robotic rover technologies at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) can be applied toward the realization of a robotic lunar rover mission in the near term. Recent activities at the SNL-RVR have demonstrated the utility of existing rover technologies for performing remote field geology tasks similar to those envisioned on a robotic lunar rover mission. Specific technologies demonstrated include low-data-rate teleoperation, multivehicle control, remote site and sample inspection, standard bandwidth stereo vision, and autonomous path following based on both internal dead reckoning and an external position location update system. These activities serve to support the use of robotic rovers for an early return to the lunar surface by demonstrating capabilities that are attainable with off-the-shelf technology and existing control techniques. The breadth of technical activities at SNL provides many supporting technology areas for robotic rover development. These range from core competency areas and microsensor fabrication facilities, to actual space qualification of flight components that are designed and fabricated in-house.

Klarer, Paul R.

1992-01-01

227

An operational waste minimization chargeback system at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, (SNL/NM) has made a commitment to achieve significant reductions in the amount of hazardous wastes generated throughout its operations. The success of the SNL/NM Waste Minimization/Pollution Prevention Program depends primarily on: (1) adequate program funding, and (2) comprehensive collection and dissemination of information pertaining to SNL/NM`s waste. This paper describes the chargeback system that SNL/NM has chosen for funding the implementation of the Waste Minimization/Pollution Prevention program, as well as the waste reporting system that follows naturally from the chargeback system. Both the chargeback and reporting systems have been fully implemented. The details of implementation are discussed, including: the physical means by which waste is managed and data collected; the database systems which have been linked; the flow of data through both human hands and electronic systems; the quality assurance of that data; and the waste report format now in use. Also discussed are intended improvements in the system that are currently planned for the coming years.

Horak, K. [Creative Computer Services, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Peek, D.W. [Ogden Environmental and Energy Services, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Stermer, D.; Dailleboust, L.; Reilly, H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-05-01

228

Routine environmental audit of the Sandia National Laboratories, California, Livermore, California  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of the Routine Environmental Audit of the Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California (SNL/CA). During this audit the activities the Audit Team conducted included reviews of internal documents and reports from preview audits and assessments; interviews with US Department of Energy (DOE), State of California regulators, and contractor personnel; and inspections and observations of selected facilities and operations. The onsite portion of the audit was conducted from February 22 through March 4, 1994, by the DOE Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24), located within the Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH). The audit evaluated the status of programs to ensure compliance with Federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations; compliance with DOE Orders, guidance, and directives; and conformance with accepted industry practices and standards of performance. The audit also evaluated the status and adequacy of the management systems developed to address environmental requirements. The audit`s functional scope was comprehensive and included all areas of environmental management and a programmatic evaluation of NEPA and inactive waste sites.

Not Available

1994-03-01

229

Air quality investigations of the Sandia National Laboratories Sol se Mete Aerial Cable Facility  

SciTech Connect

The air quality implications of the test and evaluation activities at the Sandia National Laboratories Sol se Mete Aerial Cable Facility are examined. All facets of the activity that affect air quality are considered. Air contaminants produced directly include exhaust products of rocket motors used to accelerate test articles, dust and gas from chemical explosives, and exhaust gases from electricity generators in the test arenas. Air contaminants produced indirectly include fugitive dust and exhaust contaminants from vehicles used to transport personnel and material to the test area, and effluents produced by equipment used to heat the project buildings. Both the ongoing program and the proposed changes in the program are considered. Using a reliable estimate of th maximum annual testing level, the quantities of contaminants released by project activities ar computed either from known characteristics of test items or from EPA-approved emission factors Atmospheric concentrations of air contaminants are predicted using EPA dispersion models. The predicted quantities and concentrations are evaluated in relation to Federal, New Mexico, an Bernalillo County air quality regulations and the human health and safety standards of the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists.

Gutman, W.M.; Silver, R.J. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States). Physical Science Lab.

1994-12-01

230

Sandia National Laboratories, California Quality Assurance Project Plan for Environmental Monitoring Program.  

SciTech Connect

This Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) applies to the Environmental Monitoring Program at the Sandia National Laboratories/California. This QAPP follows DOE Quality Assurance Management System Guide for Use with 10 CFR 830 Subpart A, Quality Assurance Requirements, and DOE O 414.1C, Quality Assurance (DOE G 414.1-2A June 17, 2005). The Environmental Monitoring Program is located within the Environmental Operations Department. The Environmental Operations Department is responsible for ensuring that SNL/CA operations have minimal impact on the environment. The Department provides guidance to line organizations to help them comply with applicable environmental regulations and DOE orders. To fulfill its mission, the department has groups responsible for waste management; pollution prevention, air quality; environmental planning; hazardous materials management; and environmental monitoring. The Environmental Monitoring Program is responsible for ensuring that SNL/CA complies with all Federal, State, and local regulations and with DOE orders regarding the quality of wastewater and stormwater discharges. The Program monitors these discharges both visually and through effluent sampling. The Program ensures that activities at the SNL/CA site do not negatively impact the quality of surface waters in the vicinity, or those of the San Francisco Bay. The Program verifies that wastewater and stormwater discharges are in compliance with established standards and requirements. The Program is also responsible for compliance with groundwater monitoring, and underground and above ground storage tanks regulatory compliance. The Program prepares numerous reports, plans, permit applications, and other documents that demonstrate compliance.

Holland, Robert C.

2005-09-01

231

1998 Annual Site Environmental Report Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) is operated in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) mission to provide weapon component technology and hardware for national security needs. SNL/NM also conducts fundamental research and development to advance technology in energy research, computer science, waste management, microelectronics, materials science, and transportation safety for hazardous and nuclear components. In support of SNL's mission, the Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Center and the Environmental Restoration (ER) Project at SNL/NM have established extensive environmental programs to assist SNL's line organizations in meeting all applicable local, State, and Federal environmental regulations and DOE requirements. This annual report for calendar year 1998 (CY98) summarizes the compliance status of environmental regulations applicable to SNL site operations. Environmental program activities include terrestrial surveillance; ambient air and meteorological monitoring hazardous, radioactive, and solid waste management; pollution prevention and waste minimization; environmental remediation; oil and chemical spill prevention; and National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) activities. This report has been prepared in compliance with DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program (DOE 1990).

Duncan, D.K.; Fink, C.H.; Sanchez, R.V.

1999-09-01

232

High heat flux testing capabilities at Sandia National Laboratories - New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

High heat flux testing for the United States fusion power program is the primary mission of the Plasma Materials Test Facility (PMTF) located at Sandia National Laboratories - New Mexico. This facility, which is owned by the United States Department of Energy, has been in operation for over 17 years and has provided much of the high heat flux data used in the design and evaluation of plasma facing components for many of the world`s magnetic fusion, tokamak experiments. In addition to domestic tokamaks such as Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at Princeton and the DIII-D tokamak at General Atomics, components for international experiments like TEXTOR, Tore-Supra, and JET also have been tested at the PMTF. High heat flux testing spans a wide spectrum including thermal shock tests on passively cooled materials, thermal response and thermal fatigue tests on actively cooled components, critical heat flux-burnout tests, braze reliability tests and safety related tests. The objective of this article is to provide a brief overview of the high heat flux testing capabilities at the PMTF and describe a few of the experiments performed over the last year.

Youchison, D.L.; McDonald, J.M.; Wold, L.S.

1994-12-31

233

A comprehensive approach to solid waste and recycling at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

The abrupt closure of a nearby, and historically utilized, Kirtland Air Force Base landfill imposed a multitude of solid waste management problems for the Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL) research and development facilities operated by Lockheed Martin Company. Due to the close proximity of KAFB, SNL historically used KAFB`s landfill for disposal of solid waste. Under this arrangement SNL paid little or no cost for disposal of its solid waste stream. The disadvantage was that KAFB personnel did not track waste volumes entering the landfill from SNL. On August 1, 1994 this all came to an end. KAFB, without advance notice, closed the sanitary waste and asbestos cells of the landfill. The rapid resolution of unique regulatory issues; the aggressive accomplishment of reviewing options and implementing transport, screening, recycling and disposal procedures; and the construction and operation of a model, on-site Solid Waste Transfer Facility (SWTF) can serve as a case study for servicing DOE solid waste management and recycling needs in a safe, compliant, and timely manor.

King, G.G.

1997-10-01

234

Production of fission and activation product isotopes at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

The mission of the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) and the Hot-Cell Facility has recently changed from support of defense and other programs to support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) isotope production and distribution program (IPDP). SNL`s primary role, in support of IPDP, is ensuring a reliable supply of {sup 99}Mo to the U.S. health care system. SNL will also play a role to complement the isotope production of other DOE reactor facilities such as High-Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge, Tennessee, the High-Flux Beam Reactor at Brookhaven, New York, and the Advanced Test Reactor in Idaho. The unique characteristics that the SNL facilities offer to the IPDP facility capability are simplicity, multiple irradiation locations, ready irradiation space access, and co-located hot-cell facilities capable of processing a short decay fission product stream. The SNL {sup 99}Mo effort is characterized elsewhere, and this paper is intended to describe the production of additional isotopes that can be produced for medical and other uses that should start soon after the {sup 99}Mo capability has been established. Isotope production in the SNL facilities is through fission or by neutron activation.

Coats, R.L. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-12-01

235

Production of fission and activation product isotopes at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

The mission of the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) and the Hot Cell Facility (HCF) has recently changed from support of Defense and other programs to support of the Department of Energy (DOE) Isotope Production and Distribution Program (IPDP). SNL`s primary role, in support of IPDP, is ensuring a reliable supply of {sup 99}Mo to the US health care system. SNL will also play a role of complementing the isotope production of other DOE Reactor facilities such as High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge, Tennessee; High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) at Brookhaven, New York, ad Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) in Idaho. The unique characteristics that the SNL facilities offer to the IPDP facility capability are simplicity, multiple irradiation locations, ready irradiation space access and co-located hot cell facilities capable of processing a short decay fission product stream. The SNL {sup 99}Mo effort is characterized elsewhere and this paper is intended to describe the production of additional isotopes for that can be produced medical and other uses planned to start soon after the {sup 99}Mo capability has been established. Isotope production in the SNL facilities is through fission or by neutron activation.

Coats, R.L.

1997-08-01

236

Passive soil venting at the Chemical Waste Landfill Site at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Passive Soil Vapor Extraction was tested at the Chemical Waste Landfill (CWL) site at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNLIW). Data collected included ambient pressures, differential pressures between soil gas and ambient air, gas flow rates into and out of the soil and concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCS) in vented soil gas. From the differential pressure and flow rate data, estimates of permeability were arrived at and compared with estimates from other studies. Flow, differential pressure, and ambient pressure data were collected for nearly 30 days. VOC data were collected for two six-hour periods during this time. Total VOC emissions were calculated and found to be under the limit set by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Although a complete process evaluation is not possible with the data gathered, some of the necessary information for designing a passive venting process was determined and the important parameters for designing the process were indicated. More study is required to evaluate long-term VOC removal using passive venting and to establish total remediation costs when passive venting is used as a polishing process following active soil vapor extraction.

Phelan, J.M.; Reavis, B.; Cheng, W.C.

1995-05-01

237

Addressing environmental justice under the National Environment Policy Act at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Under Executive Order 12898, Federal Actions to Address Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low-Income Populations, the Department of Energy (DOE) and Sandia National Laboratories New Mexico (SNL) are required to identify and address, as appropriate, disproportionately high, adverse human health or environmental effects of their activities on minority and low-income populations. The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) also requires that environmental justice issues be identified and addressed. This presents a challenge for SNL because it is located in a culturally diverse area. Successfully addressing potential impacts is contingent upon accurately identifying them through objective analysis of demographic information. However, an effective public participation process, which is necessarily subjective, is also needed to understand the subtle nuances of diverse populations that can contribute to a potential impact, yet are not always accounted for in a strict demographic profile. Typically, there is little or no coordination between these two disparate processes. This report proposes a five-step method for reconciling these processes and uses a hypothetical case study to illustrate the method. A demographic analysis and community profile of the population within 50 miles of SNL were developed to support the environmental justice analysis process and enhance SNL`s NEPA and public involvement programs. This report focuses on developing a methodology for identifying potentially impacted populations. Environmental justice issues related to worker exposures associated with SNL activities will be addressed in a separate report.

Cohen, T.M.; Bleakly, D.R.

1997-04-01

238

Hazards and controls at the Sandia National Laboratories microelectronics development laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Microelectronics Development Laboratory (MDL) contains 3,000 m{sup 2}, Which includes 1,000 m{sup 2}of Class I clean room space. There are 20 laminar flow Class I clean room bays. The MDL supplies several, full-flow process technologies which produce complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuits using 150 nun diameter silicon wafers. All gases, chemicals and physical hazards used in the fabrication processes are controlled to levels well below regulatory requirements. Facility engineering controls in the MDL include toxic and pyrophoric gas monitoring, interlocks, ventilation, substitution and chemical segregation. Toxic and pyrophoric gases are monitored continuously inside processing tools as well as through the exhaust lines, gas cabinets, the valve boxes, and in general work areas. The toxic gas monitoring systems are interlocked to gas shutoff valves and have both low and high level alarms. In-use process gases are stored in exhausted cabinets. All chemicals and gases are segregated by chemical type. The processes are organized into eight sector areas that consist of photolithography, wet processes, dry etch, ion implant, metals, diffusion, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and chemical mechanical polishing (CW). Each morning, engineering, safety and facilities personnel meet to review the equipment and wafer lot status and discuss processing issues. Hazards are assessed in the MDL with periodic walkthroughs, continuous toxic and pyrophoric gas monitoring and personal monitoring. All chemicals and gases proposed for use in the MDL are reviewed by the industrial hygienist and must be approved by a manager before they are purchased. All new equipment and processes are reviewed by a hazard and barrier committee and cannot be used in the MDL without the committee`s approval and an IH hazard assessment. Overall risk of operating the MDL has been reduced to a level that is as low as reasonable achievable for this research facility.

Benton, M.A.

1997-03-01

239

Final Report - Advanced Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry Program - Oak Ridge National Laboratory - Sandia National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This report covers the three main projects that collectively comprised the Advanced Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry Program. Chapter 1 describes the direct interrogation of individual particles by laser desorption within the ion trap mass spectrometer analyzer. The goals were (1) to develop an ''intelligent trigger'' capable of distinguishing particles of biological origin from those of nonbiological origin in the background and interferent particles and (2) to explore the capability for individual particle identification. Direct interrogation of particles by laser ablation and ion trap mass spectrometry was shown to have good promise for discriminating between particles of biological origin and those of nonbiological origin, although detailed protocols and operating conditions were not worked out. A library of more than 20,000 spectra of various types of biological particles has been assembled. Methods based on multivariate analysis and on neural networks were used to discriminate between particles of biological origin and those of nonbiological origin. It was possible to discriminate between at least some species of bacteria if mass spectra of several hundred similar particles were obtained. Chapter 2 addresses the development of a new ion trap mass analyzer geometry that offers the potential for a significant increase in ion storage capacity for a given set of analyzer operating conditions. This geometry may lead to the development of smaller, lower-power field-portable ion trap mass spectrometers while retaining laboratory-scale analytical performance. A novel ion trap mass spectrometer based on toroidal ion storage geometry has been developed. The analyzer geometry is based on the edge rotation of a quadrupolar ion trap cross section into the shape of a torus. Initial performance of this device was poor, however, due to the significant contribution of nonlinear fields introduced by the rotation of the symmetric ion-trapping geometry. These nonlinear resonances contributed to poor mass resolution and sensitivity and to erratic ion ejection behavior. To correct for these nonlinear effects, the geometry of the toroid ion trap analyzer has been modified to create an asymmetric torus, as first suggested by computer simulations that predicted significantly improved performance and unit mass resolution for this geometry. A reduced-sized version (one-fifth scale) has been fabricated but was not tested within the scope of this project. Chapter 3 describes groundbreaking progress toward the use of ion-ion chemistry to control the charge state of ions formed by the electrospray ionization process, which in turn enables precision analysis of whole proteins. In addition, this technique may offer the unique possibility of a priori identification of unknown biological material when employed with existing proteomics and genomic databases. Ion-ion chemistry within the ion trap was used to reduce the ions in highly charged states to states of +1 and +2 charges. Reduction in charge greatly simplifies identification of molecular weights of fragments from large biological molecules. This technique enables the analysis of whole proteins as biomarkers for the detection and identification of all three classes of biological weapons (bacteria, toxins, and viruses). In addition to methods development, tests were carried out with samples of tap water, local creek water, and soil (local red clay) spiked with melittin (bee venom), cholera toxin, and virus MS2. All three analytes were identified in tap water and soil; however, all three were problematic for detection in creek water at concentrations of 1 nM. More development of methods is needed.

Whitten, W.B.

2002-12-18

240

Integrated verification experiment data collected as part of the Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Source Region program. Appendix F: Regional data from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratory Seismic Networks  

SciTech Connect

A dataset of regional seismograms assembled for a series of Integrated Verification Experiments conducted by the Los Alamos National Laboratory Source Region program is described. The seismic data has been assembled from networks operated by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratory. Examples of the data are shown and basic recording characteristics of the network are described. The seismograms are available on a data tape in SAC format upon request.

Taylor, S.R.

1993-06-11

241

Sandia Fossil Fuel Analytical Laboratory: Procedures Used in Coal Liquefaction Analyses.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Detailed descriptions of equipment, procedures and techniques used for analyzing products from the Sandia Autoclave Facility and the Bench Scale Flow Reactor/Preheater are presented. Asphaltenes, pentane soluble oil, preasphaltenes, and sulfur are determi...

G. T. Noles M. G. Thomas

1978-01-01

242

Shock physics code research at Sandia National Laboratories; massively parallel computers and advanced algorithms  

SciTech Connect

Shock physics researchers at Sandia are working in two areas: massively parallel computing and improved solution algorithms. Our goal is predictive modeling of large, three-dimensional problems. We will discuss the goals, rationale and status of this work.

McGlaun, J.M.; Peery, J.S.; Hertel, E.S.

1996-04-01

243

Lessons Learned from Sandia National Laboratories' Operational Readiness Review of the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Sandia ACRR (a Hazard Category 2 Nuclear Reactor Facility) was defueled in June 1997 to modify the reactor core and control system to produce medical radioisotopes for the Department of Energy (DOE) Isotope Production Program. The DOE determined that ...

A. O. Bendure J. W. Bryson

1999-01-01

244

The economic impact of Sandia National Laboratories on central New Mexico and the state of New Mexico fiscal year 1997  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) was established in 1949 to perform the engineering development and ordnance responsibilities associated with nuclear weapons. By the early 1960`s the facility had evolved into an engineering research and development laboratory and became a multiprogram laboratory during the 1970s. Sandia is operated for the US Department of Energy by the Sandia Corporation, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin, Incorporated. For several years, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Albuquerque Operations Office (AL) and New Mexico State University (NMSU) have maintained an inter-industry, input-output model with capabilities to assess the impacts of developments initiated outside the economy such as federal DOE monies that flow into the state, on an economy. This model will be used to assess economic, personal income and employment impacts of SNL on central New Mexico and the state of New Mexico. For this report, the reference period is FY 1997 (October 1, 1996, through September 30, 1997) and includes two major impact analyses: the impact of SNL activities on central New Mexico and the economic impacts of SNL on the state of New Mexico. For purposes of this report, the central New Mexico region includes Bernalillo, Sandoval, Valencia, and Torrance counties. Total impact represents both direct and indirect respending by business, including induced effects (respending by households). The standard multipliers used in determining impacts results from the inter-industry, input-output models developed for the four-county region and the state of New Mexico. 6 figs., 10 tabs.

Lansford, R.R.; Nielsen, T.G.; Schultz, J. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States); Adcock, L.D.; Gentry, L.M. [Dept. of Energy, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Albuquerque Operations Office; Ben-David, S. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Economics; Temple, J. [Temple (John), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1998-05-29

245

Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Facilities and Safety Information Document [NOTE: Volume I, Chapters 2 through 5  

SciTech Connect

The Facilities Business Unit, which includes the Operations and Engineering Center (7800) and the Facilities Management Center (7900), coordinates decisions about the management of facilities, infrastructure, and sites. These decisions include the following: New construction, including siting; Rehabilitation, and renovation; Relocation; Mothballing; Decontamination and decommissioning; and Demolition. Decisions on these matters flow from a corporate decision process in which SNL directors and vice presidents identify the facility and infrastructure requirements for carrying out work for DOE and other customers. DOE and any non-DOE owners of real estate that is leased or permitted to DOE for SNL/NM use must concur with this identification of requirements. Decision-making follows procedures required by DOE and requirements defined by SNL/NM program executives. See Sandia National Laboratories (1997e), Part II, ''Desired Future State and Strategy,'' and appendices to Sandia National Laboratories (1997e) for more information about planning and decision processes. Decisions on siting take surrounding land uses into account and draw on environmental baseline information maintained at SNL/NM. For environmental baseline and land use information, see Sandia National Laboratories (1999).

March, F.; Guerrero, J.V.; Johns, W.H.; Schetnan, R.; Bayliss, L.S.; Kuzio, K.A.; White, B.B.

1999-09-01

246

Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan. Plan 2: Mappings for the ASC Software Quality Engineering Practies. Version 2.0.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. The plan defines the ASC ...

C. A. Forsythe E. A. Bocheron H. C. Edwards M. Minana R. Heaphy R. R. Drake

2006-01-01

247

Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan Part 1: ASC Software Quality Engineering Practices Version 1.0. (January 2005).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. The plan defines the ASC ...

C. A. Forsythe E. A. Boucheron H. C. Edwards M. A. Ellis R. R. Drake

2005-01-01

248

Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan. Part 1: ASC Software Quality Engineering Practices, Version 2.0.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. The plan defines the ASC ...

A. L. Hodges C. A. Forsythe E. A. Boucheron H. C. Edwards R. Heaphy R. R. Drake

2006-01-01

249

Noise and vibration investigations of the Sandia National Laboratories Sol se Mete Aerial Cable Facility  

SciTech Connect

This document is an assessment of the noise, vibration, and overpressure effects and fragmentation hazards of the operation of the Sandia National Laboratories Sol de Mete Aerial Cable Facility (ACF). Major noise sources associated with project operations and considered in this report include rocket motors, chemical explosions, 3-inch gun, 20-mm gun, vehicular traffic, and engines of electricity generators. In addition, construction equipment noise is considered. Noise exposure of ACF personnel is expressed as the equivalent sound level for the 8-hour work day, and is computed by scaling to the proper distance and combining the appropriate noise values for continuously operating equipment such as vehicles and generators. Explosions and gun firings are impulsive events, and overpressures are predicted and expressed as decibel (dB) at the control building, at other nearby facilities, at Sol se Mete. The conclusion reached in the noise analysis is that continuously operating equipment would not produce a serious noise hazard except in the immediate vicinity of the electricity generators and heavy equipment where hearing protection devices should be used. Rocket motors, guns, and detonations of less than 54 kilograms (kg) (120 lb) of explosives would not produce noise levels above the threshold for individual protection at the control building, other nearby test areas, or Sol se Mete Spring. Rare tests involving explosive weights between 54 and 454 kg (120 and 1,000 lb) could produce impulsive noise levels above 140 dB that would require evacuation or other provision for individual hearing protection at the ACF control building and at certain nearby facilities not associated with ACF. Other blast effects including overpressure, ground vibration, and fragmentation produce hazard radii that generally are small than the corresponding noise hazard radius, which is defined as the distance at which the predicted noise level drops to 140 dB.

Matise, B.K.; Gutman, W.M.; Cunniff, R.A.; Silver, R.J.; Stepp, W.E. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States). Physical Science Lab.

1994-11-01

250

A Criticality Safety Study on Storing Unirradiated Cintichem-Type Targets at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

This criticality safety analysis is performed to determine the effective multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) for a storage cabinet filled with unirradiated Cintichem-type targets. These targets will be used to produce {sup 99}Mo at Sandia National Laboratories and will be stored on-site prior to irradiation in the Annular Core Research Reactor. The analysis consisted of using the Monte Carlo code MCNP (Version 4A) to model and predict the k{sub eff} for the proposed dry storage configuration under credible loss of geometry and moderator control. Effects of target pitch, non-uniform loading, and target internal/external flooding are evaluated. Further studies were done with deterministic methods to verify the results obtained from MCNP and to obtain a clearer understanding of the parameters affecting system criticality. The diffusion accelerated neutral particle transport code ONEDANT was used to model the target in a one-dimensional, infinite half-slab geometry and determine the critical slab thickness. Hand calculations were also completed to determine the critical slab thickness with modified one-group, and one-group, two region approximations. Results obtained from ONEDANT and the hand calculations were compared to applicable cases in a commonly used criticality safety analysis handbook. Overall, the critical slab thicknesses obtained in the deterministic analysis were much larger than the dimensions of the cabinet and further support the predictions by MCNP that a critical system cannot be attained for the base case or in conditions where loss of geometry and moderation control occur.

Romero, D.J.; Parma, E.J.; Busch, R.D.

1999-04-21

251

Overview of the joint US/Russia surety program in the Sandia National Laboratories Cooperative Measures Program  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories has initiated many joint research and development projects with the two premier Russian nuclear laboratories, VNIIEF and VNIITF, (historically known as Arzamas-16 and Chelyabinsk-70) in a wide spectrum of areas. One of the areas in which critical dialogue and technical exchange is continuing to take place is in the realm of system surety. Activities primarily include either safety or security methodology development, processes, accident environment analyses and testing, accident data-bases, assessments, and product design. Furthermore, a continuing dialog has been established between the organizations with regard to developing a better understanding of how risk is perceived and analyzed in Russia versus that in the US. The result of such efforts could reduce the risk of systems to incur accidents or incidents resulting in high consequences to the public. The purpose of this paper is to provide a current overview of the Sandia surety program and its various initiatives with the Russian institutes, with an emphasis on the program scope and rationale. The historical scope of projects will be indicated. A few specific projects will be discussed, along with results to date. The extension of the joint surety initiatives to other government and industry organizations will be described. This will include the current status of a joint Sandia/VNIIEF initiative to establish an International Surety Center for Energy Intensive and High Consequence Systems and Infrastructures.

Smith, R.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Vorontsova, O.S. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center Inst. of Experimental Physics, Sarov (Russian Federation); Blinov, I.M. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center Inst. of Technical Physics, Snezhinsk (Russian Federation)

1998-02-01

252

Lessons Learned from Sandia National Laboratories' Operational Readiness Review of the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR)  

SciTech Connect

The Sandia ACRR (a Hazard Category 2 Nuclear Reactor Facility) was defueled in June 1997 to modify the reactor core and control system to produce medical radioisotopes for the Department of Energy (DOE) Isotope Production Program. The DOE determined that an Operational Readiness Review (ORR) was required to confirm readiness to begin operations within the revised safety basis. This paper addresses the ORR Process, lessons learned from the Sandia and DOE ORRS of the ACRR, and the use of the ORR to confirm authorization basis implementation.

Bendure, Albert O.; Bryson, James W.

1999-05-17

253

Paper 5 : Evaluation of Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Investment Areas at Sandia  

Microsoft Academic Search

The original plan associated with this assessment activity consisted of several steps, which included ways to both benchmark our methods and deliver practical results. The first step was to create Sandia-specific visualizations of the IA's. The purpose of these visualizations was to identify past and present technological competences, and overlaps of competencies, within the IA's. Benchmarked was accomplished by comparing

KEVIN W. BOYACK; NABEEL RAHAL

254

Reactor pumped laser research at the Sandia National Laboratories pulsed reactor facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sandia National Labs has been investigating concepts for high power lasers pumped directly by fission energy. The direct pumping of laser media with fission fragments offers the potential advantages of scaling to high powers and very long run times in a compact, self powered system. To investigate the potential of this concept, extensive experiments have been conducted in the Annular

D. E. Bodette; D. R. Neal; D. A. McArthur; P. S. Pickard; G. Hebner; R. Michie

1994-01-01

255

Improved PV system reliability results from surge evaluations at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Electrical surges on ac and dc inverter power wiring and diagnostic cables have the potential to shorten the lifetime of power electronics. These surges may be caused by either nearby lightning or capacitor switching transients. This paper contains a description of ongoing surge evaluations of PV power electronics and surge mitigation hardware at Sandia.

Russell H. Bonn; Sigifredo Gonzalez

2000-04-11

256

Reactor pumped laser research at the Sandia National Laboratories pulsed reactor facilities.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Sandia National Labs has been investigating concepts for high power lasers pumped directly by fission energy. The direct pumping of laser media with fission fragments offers the potential advantages of scaling to high powers and very long run times in a c...

D. E. Bodette D. R. Neal D. A. McArthur P. S. Pickard G. Hebner

1994-01-01

257

Lessons Learned from Sandia National Laboratories' Operational Readiness Review of the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Sandia ACRR (a Hazard Category 2 Nuclear Reactor Facility) was defueled in June 1997 to modify the reactor core and control system to produce medical radioisotopes for the Department of Energy (DOE) Isotope Production Program. The DOE determined that an Operational Readiness Review (ORR) was required to confirm readiness to begin operations within the revised safety basis. This paper

Albert O. Bendure; James W. Bryson

1999-01-01

258

Floodplain Assessment for the Proposed Engineered Erosion Controls at TA-72 in Lower Sandia Canyon, Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is preparing to implement engineering controls in Sandia Canyon at Technical Area (TA) 72. Los Alamos National Security (LANS) biologists conducted a floodplain determination and this project is located within a 100-year floodplain. The proposed project is to rehabilitate the degraded channel in lower Sandia Canyon where it crosses through the outdoor firing range at TA-72 to limit the loss of sediment and dissipate floodwater leaving LANL property (Figure 1). The proposed construction of these engineered controls is part of the New Mexico Environment Department's (NMED) approved LANL Individual Storm Water Permit. The purpose of this project is to install storm water controls at Sandia Watershed Site Monitoring Area 6 (S-SMA-6). Storm water controls will be designed and installed to meet the requirements of NPDES Permit No. NM0030759, commonly referred to as the LANL Individual Storm Water Permit (IP). The storm water control measures address storm water mitigation for the area within the boundary of Area of Concern (AOC) 72-001. This action meets the requirements of the IP for S-SMA-6 for storm water controls by a combination of: preventing exposure of upstream storm water and storm water generated within the channel to the AOC and totally retaining storm water falling outside the channel but within the AOC.

Hathcock, Charles D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-27

259

Sandia National Laboratories results for the 2010 criticality accident dosimetry exercise, at the CALIBAN reactor, CEA Valduc France.  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the personal nuclear accident dosimeter (PNAD) used by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and presents PNAD dosimetry results obtained during the Nuclear Accident Dosimeter Intercomparison Study held 20-23 September, 2010, at CEA Valduc, France. SNL PNADs were exposed in two separate irradiations from the CALIBAN reactor. Biases for reported neutron doses ranged from -15% to +0.4% with an average bias of -7.7%. PNADs were also exposed on the back side of phantoms to assess orientation effects.

Ward, Dann C.

2011-09-01

260

Fire accident analysis modeling in support of non-reactor nuclear facilities at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) requires that fire hazard analyses (FHAs) be conducted for all nuclear and new facilities, with results for the latter incorporated into Title I design. For those facilities requiring safety analysis documentation, the FHA shall be documented in the Safety Analysis Reports (SARs). This paper provides an overview of the methodologies and codes being used to support FHAs at Sandia facilities, with emphasis on SARs.

Restrepo, L.F.

1993-06-01

261

Chemical Microsensor and Micro-Instrument Technology at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Important factors in the application of chemical sensing technology to space applications are low mass, small size, and low power. All of these attributes are enabled by the application of MEMS and micro-fabrication technology to chemical sensing. Several Sandia projects that apply these technologies to the development of new chemical sensing capabilities with the potential for space applications will be described. The Polychromator project is a joint project with Honeywell and MIT to develop an electrically programmable diffraction grating that can be programmed to synthesize the spectra of molecules. This grating will be used as the reference cell in a gas correlation radiometer to enable remote chemical detection of most chemical species. Another area of research where micro-fabrication is having a large impact is the development of a lab on a chip. Sandia's efforts to develop the {mu}ChemLab{trademark} will be described including the development of microfabricated pre-concentrators, chromatographic columns, and detectors. Chemical sensors are evolving in the direction of sensor arrays with pattern recognition methods applied to interpret the pattern of response. Sandia's development of micro-fabricated chemiresistor arrays and the VERI pattern recognition technology to interpret the sensor response will be described.

Butler, M.A.; Frye-Mason, G.C.; Hughes, R.C.; Osbourn, G.C.

1999-03-26

262

Laboratory and Astrophysical Radiation Hydrodynamics : An Introduction  

SciTech Connect

In this talk, the author discusses some aspects of radiation-material interactions that can produce radiation from a violently moving fluid, or, reciprocally, can result in macroscopic motion in fluids which are subject to intense radiation fields. The author also outlines some similarities and contrasts between 'laboratory' and astrophysical phenomena in which radiation hydrodynamics plays an important role.

Mihalas, Dimitri,

2002-01-01

263

Weapons Evaluation Test Laboratory at Pantex: Testing and data handling capabilities of Sandia National Laboratories at the Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The Weapons Evaluation Test Laboratory (WETL), operated by Sandia Laboratories at the Pantex Plant in Amarillo, Texas, is engaged primarily in the testing of weapon systems in the stockpile or of newly produced weapon systems for the Sandia Surety Assessment Center. However, the WETL`s unique testing equipment and data-handling facilities are frequently used to serve other organizations. Service to other organizations includes performing special tests on weapon components, subassemblies, and systems for purposes such as basic development and specific problem investigation. The WETL staff also sends equipment to other laboratories for specific tests that cannot be performed at Pantex. For example, we modified and sent equipment to Brookhaven National Laboratory for testing with their Neutral Particle Beam. WETL supplied the engineering expertise to accomplish the needed modifications to the equipment and the technicians to help perform many special tests at Brookhaven. A variety of testing is possible within the WETL, including: Accelerometer, decelerometer, and G-switch g-level/closure testing; Neutron generator performance testing; weapon systems developmental tests; weapon system component testing; weapon system failure-mode-duplication tests; simultaneity measurements; environmental extreme testing; parachute deployment testing; permissive action link (PAL) testing and trajectory-sensing signal generator (TSSG) testing. WETL`s existing equipment configurations do not restrict the testing performed at the WETL. Equipment and facilities are adapted to specific requirements. The WETL`s facilities can often eliminate the need to build or acquire new test equipment, thereby saving time and expense.

Peters, W.R.

1993-08-01

264

Laser Tracker III: Sandia National Laboratories` third generation laser tracking system  

SciTech Connect

At Sandia Labs` Coyote Canyon Test Complex, it became necessary to develop a precision single station solution to provide time space position information (tspi) when tracking airborne test vehicles. Sandia`s first laser tracker came on line in 1968, replacing the fixed camera technique for producing trajectory data. This system shortened data reduction time from weeks to minutes. Laser Tracker 11 began operations in 1982, replacing the original tracker. It incorporated improved optics and electronics, with the addition of a microprocessor-based real-time control (rtc) system within the main servo loop. The rtc added trajectory prediction with the loss of adequate tracking signal and automatic control of laser beam divergence according to target range. Laser Tracker III, an even more advanced version of the systems, came on line in 1990. Unlike LTII, which is mounted in a trailer and must by moved by a tractor, LTIII is mounted on its own four-wheel drive carrier. This allows the system to be used at even the most remote locations. It also incorporated improved optics and electronics with the addition of absolute ranging, acquisition on the fly, and automatic transition from manual Joystick tracking to laser tracking for aircraft tests. LTIII provides a unique state of the art tracking capability for missile, rocket sled, aircraft, submunition, and parachute testing. Used in conjunction with LTII, the systems together can provide either simultaneous or extended range tracking. Mobility, accuracy, reliability, and cost effectiveness enable these systems to support a variety of testing at Department of Energy and Department of Defense ranges.

Patrick, D.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Energetic and Environmental Test Dept.

1995-03-01

265

Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Facilities and Safety Information Document [NOTE: Volume II, Chapter 12  

SciTech Connect

Operations in Tech Area IV commenced in 1980 with the construction of Buildings 980 and 981 and the Electron Beam Fusion Accelerator, which at the time was a major facility in SNL's Inertial Confinement Fusion Program. The Electron Beam Fusion Accelerator was a third-generation fusion accelerator that followed Proto I and Proto II, which were operated in Tech Area V. Another accelerator, the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator I, was constructed in Tech Area IV because there was not enough room in Tech Area V, a highly restricted area that contains SNL's reactor facilities. In the early 1980s, more fusion-related facilities were constructed in Tech Area IV. Building 983 was built to house a fourth-generation fusion accelerator, the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II, now called Z Machine, and Buildings 960 and 961 were built to house office space, electrical and mechanical laboratories, and highbay space for pulsed power research and development. In the mid 1980s, Building 970 was constructed to house the Simulation Technology Laboratory. The main facility in the Simulation Technology Laboratory is the High-Energy Radiation Megavolt Electron Source (HERMES) III, a third-generation gamma ray accelerator that is used primarily for the simulation of gamma rays produced by nuclear weapons. The previous generations, HERMES I and HERMES II, had been located in Tech Area V. In the late 1980s, Proto II was moved from Tech Area V to the Simulation Technology Laboratory and modified to function as an x-ray simulation accelerator, and construction of Buildings 962 and 963 began. These buildings comprised the Strategic Defense Facility, which was initially intended to support the nation's Strategic Defense Initiative or ''Star Wars'' program. It was to house a variety of pulsed power-related facilities to conduct research in such areas as directed-energy weapons (electron beams, lasers, and microwaves) and an earth-to-orbit launcher. With the reduction of the Strategic Defense Initiative budget in the early 1990s, however, many of these programs were discontinued and some, such as the High Power Microwave Laboratory and the Repetitive Pulsed Power Laboratory, were established. By 1990, all the Tech Area V accelerators had either been moved to Tech Area IV or decommissioned, and Tech Area IV had become the center for SNL's pulsed power sciences activities. The early 1990s saw an infusion of programs into Tech Area IV that support DOE goals in defense, industrial competitiveness, and the environment. A computer sciences group moved into Building 980, and a group that prepares rocket payloads for flight tests moved into one of the highbays in Building 963. A robotics group moved into Building 966, and a number of diverse groups occupy office and laboratory space in Building 962.

March, F.; Guerrero, J.V.; Johns, W.H.; Schetnan, R.; Bayliss, L.S.; Kuzio, K.A.

1999-08-01

266

Update of the Z Refurbishment project (ZR) at Sandia National Laboratories.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia's Z Refurbishment (ZR) Project formally began in February 2002 to increase the Z Accelerator's utilization by providing the capability to perform more shots, improve precision and pulse shape variability, and increase delivered current. A project update was provided at the 15th International Pulsed Power Conference in 2005. The Z facility was shut down in July 2006 for structural/infrastructure modifications and installation of new pulsed power systems. The refurbishment will conclude in 2007. This paper provides a status update of the project covering the past 2 years of activities.

Moncayo, Carla; Bloomquist, Douglas D.; Weed, John Woodruff; Tabor, Debra Ann; Donovan, Guy Louis; McKee, G. Randall; Weinbrecht, Edward A.; Faturos, Thomas V.; McDaniel, Dillon Heirman

2007-08-01

267

Sandia Pulse Reactor-IV Project  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sandia National Laboratories has developed, designed and operated fast burst reactors for over 20 years. These reactors have been used for a variety of radiation effects programs. During this period, programs have required larger irradiation volumes primarily to expose complex electronic systems to postulated threat environments. As experiment volumes increased, a new reactor was built so that these components could

Reuscher

1983-01-01

268

Aquatic macroinvertebrates and water quality of Sandia Canyon, Los Alamos National Laboratory, December 1992--October 1993. Status report  

SciTech Connect

In the summer of 1990, an accidental spill from the TA-3 Power Plant Environment Tank released more than 3,785 liters of sulfuric acid into upper Sandia Canyon. The Biological Resource Evaluation Team (BRET) of EM-8 at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has collected aquatic samples from the stream within Sandia Canyon since then. These field studies gather water quality measurements and collect macroinvertebrates from permanent sampling sites. An earlier report by Bennett (1994) discusses previous BRET aquatic studies in Sandia Canyon. This report updates and expands Bennett`s initial findings. During 1993, BRET collected water quality data and aquatic macroinvertebrates at five permanent stations within the canyon. The substrates of the upper three stations are largely sands and silts while the substrates of the two lower stations are largely rock and cobbles. The two upstream stations are located near outfalls that discharge industrial and sanitary waste effluent. The third station is within a natural cattail marsh, approximately 0.4 km (0.25 mi) downstream from Stations SC1 and SC2. Water quality parameters are slightly different at these first three stations from those expected of natural streams, suggesting slightly degraded water quality. Correspondingly, the macroinvertebrate communities at these stations are characterized by low diversities and poorly-developed community structures. The two downstream stations appear to be in a zone of recovery, where water quality parameters more closely resemble those found in natural streams of the area. Macroinvertebrate diversity increases and community structure becomes more complex at the two lower stations, which are further indications of improved water quality downstream.

Cross, S. [Ewing Technical Design, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-09-01

269

Sandia microelectronics development  

SciTech Connect

An overview of the operations of Sandia`s Microelectronics Development Lab (MDL) is to develop radiation hardened IC, but techniques used for IC processing have been applied to a variety of related technologies such as micromechanics, smart sensors, and packaging.

Weaver, H.T.

1997-02-01

270

Adaptive sampling strategy support for the unlined chromic acid pit, chemical waste landfill, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Adaptive sampling programs offer substantial savings in time and money when assessing hazardous waste sites. Key to some of these savings is the ability to adapt a sampling program to the real-time data generated by an adaptive sampling program. This paper presents a two-prong approach to supporting adaptive sampling programs: a specialized object-oriented database/geographical information system (SitePlanner{trademark} ) for data fusion, management, and display and combined Bayesian/geostatistical methods (PLUME) for contamination-extent estimation and sample location selection. This approach is applied in a retrospective study of a subsurface chromium plume at Sandia National Laboratories` chemical waste landfill. Retrospective analyses suggest the potential for characterization cost savings on the order of 60% through a reduction in the number of sampling programs, total number of soil boreholes, and number of samples analyzed from each borehole.

Johnson, R.L.

1993-11-01

271

Probabilistic risk assessment for the Sandia National Laboratories Technical Area V Liquid Waste Disposal System surface impoundments  

SciTech Connect

A probabilistic risk assessment was completed for a former radioactive waste disposal site. The site, two unlined surface impoundment, was designed as part of the Liquid Waste Disposal System (LWDS) to receive radioactive effluent from nuclear reactors in Technical Area-V (TA-V) at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM). First, a statistical comparison of site sampling results to natural background, using EPA methods, and a spatial distribution analysis were performed. Risk assessment was conducted with SNL/NM`s Probabilistic Risk Evaluation and Characterization Investigation System model. The risk assessment indicated that contamination from several constituents might have been high enough to require remediation. However, further analysis based on expected site closure activities and recent EPA guidance indicated that No Further Action was acceptable.

Dawson, L.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Eidson, A.F. [International Technologies, Houston, TX (United States)

1996-03-01

272

Passive and active soil gas sampling at the Mixed Waste Landfill, Technical Area III, Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Restoration Project at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico is tasked with assessing and remediating the Mixed Waste Landfill in Technical Area III. The Mixed Waste Landfill is a 2.6 acre, inactive radioactive and mixed waste disposal site. In 1993 and 1994, an extensive passive and active soil gas sampling program was undertaken to identify and quantify volatile organic compounds in the subsurface at the landfill. Passive soil gas surveys identified levels of PCE, TCE, 1,1, 1-TCA, toluene, 1,1,2-trichlorotrifluoroethane, dichloroethyne, and acetone above background. Verification by active soil gas sampling confirmed concentrations of PCE, TCE, 1,1,1-TCA, and 1,1,2-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane at depths of 10 and 30 feet below ground surface. In addition, dichlorodifluoroethane and trichlorofluoromethane were detected during active soil gas sampling. All of the volatile organic compounds detected during the active soil gas survey were present in the low ppb range.

McVey, M.D.; Goering, T.J. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Peace, J.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-02-01

273

Application of non-intrusive geophysical techniques at the Mixed Waste Landfill, Technical Area 3, Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Restoration Project at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico is tasked with assessment and remediation of the Mixed Waste Landfill in Technical Area 3. The Mixed Waste Landfill is an inactive radioactive and mixed waste disposal site. The landfill contains disposal pits and trenches of questionable location and dimension. Non-intrusive geophysical techniques were utilized to provide an effective means of determining the location and dimension of suspected waste disposal trenches before Resource Conservation and Recovery Act intrusive assessment activities were initiated. Geophysical instruments selected for this investigation included a Geonics EM-31 ground conductivity meter, the new Geonics EM-61 high precision, time-domain metal detector, and a Geometrics 856 total field magnetometer. The results of these non-intrusive geophysical techniques were evaluated to enhance the efficiency and cost-effectiveness of future waste-site investigations at Environmental Restoration Project sites.

Peace, J.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Environmental Restoration Project; Hyndman, D.A. [Sunbelt Geophysics, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Goering, T.J. [Gram, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-03-01

274

The high current, fast, 100ns, Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) developmental project at Sandia Laboratories and HCEI.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, N.M., USA, in collaboration with the High Current Electronic Institute (HCEI), Tomsk, Russia, is developing a new paradigm in pulsed power technology: the Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) technology. This technological approach can provide very compact devices that can deliver very fast high current and high voltage pulses straight out of the cavity with out any complicated pulse forming and pulse compression network. Through multistage inductively insulated voltage adders, the output pulse, increased in voltage amplitude, can be applied directly to the load. The load may be a vacuum electron diode, a z-pinch wire array, a gas puff, a liner, an isentropic compression load (ICE) to study material behavior under very high magnetic fields, or a fusion energy (IFE) target. This is because the output pulse rise time and width can be easily tailored to the specific application needs. In this paper we briefly summarize the developmental work done in Sandia and HCEI during the last few years, and describe our new MYKONOS Sandia High Current LTD Laboratory. An extensive evaluation of the LTD technology is being performed at SNL and the High Current Electronic Institute (HCEI) in Tomsk Russia. Two types of High Current LTD cavities (LTD I-II, and 1-MA LTD) were constructed and tested individually and in a voltage adder configuration (1-MA cavity only). All cavities performed remarkably well and the experimental results are in full agreement with analytical and numerical calculation predictions. A two-cavity voltage adder is been assembled and currently undergoes evaluation. This is the first step towards the completion of the 10-cavity, 1-TW module. This MYKONOS voltage adder will be the first ever IVA built with a transmission line insulated with deionized water. The LTD II cavity renamed LTD III will serve as a test bed for evaluating a number of different types of switches, resistors, alternative capacitor configurations, cores and other cavity components. Experimental results will be presented at the Conference and in future publications.

Ward, Kevin S. (Ketech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Long, Finis W.; Sinebryukhov, Vadim A. (High Current Electronic Institute (HCEI), Tomsk, Russia); Kim, Alexandre A. (High Current Electronic Institute (HCEI), Tomsk, Russia); Wakeland, Peter Eric (Ketech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); McKee, G. Randall; Woodworth, Joseph Ray; McDaniel, Dillon Heirman; Fowler, William E.; Mazarakis, Michael Gerrassimos; Porter, John Larry, Jr.; Struve, Kenneth William; Savage, Mark Edward; Stygar, William A.; LeChien, Keith R.; Matzen, Maurice Keith

2010-09-01

275

Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan. Part 2, Mappings for the ASC software quality engineering practices. Version 1.0.  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. The plan defines the ASC program software quality practices and provides mappings of these practices to Sandia Corporate Requirements CPR 1.3.2 and 1.3.6 and to a Department of Energy document, 'ASCI Software Quality Engineering: Goals, Principles, and Guidelines'. This document also identifies ASC management and software project teams responsibilities in implementing the software quality practices and in assessing progress towards achieving their software quality goals.

Ellis, Molly A.; Heaphy, Robert; Sturtevant, Judith E.; Hodges, Ann Louise; Boucheron, Edward A.; Drake, Richard Roy; Forsythe, Christi A.; Schofield, Joseph Richard, Jr.; Pavlakos, Constantine James; Williamson, Charles Michael; Edwards, Harold Carter

2005-01-01

276

Overview of the dynamic-hohlraum x-ray source at Sandia National Laboratories.  

SciTech Connect

Progress in understanding the physics of Dynamic-Hohlraums is reviewed for a system capable of generating 10 TW of axial radiation for high temperature (>200 eV) radiation-flow experiments and ICF capsule implosions. 2D magneto-hydrodynamic simulation comparisons with data show the need to include wire initiation physics and subsequent discrete wire dynamics in the simulations if a predictive capability is to be achieved.

Sanford, Thomas W. L.

2007-04-01

277

Overview of the Dynamic Hohlraum X-Ray Source at Sandia National Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

Progress in understanding the physics of dynamic hohlraums is reviewed for a system that is capable of generating 10 TW of axial radiation for high-temperature ( 200 eV) radiation-flow experiments and inertial confinement fusion capsule implosions. Two-dimensional magneto-hydrodynamic simulation comparisons with data show the need to include wire initiation physics and subsequent discrete-wire dynamics in the simulations if a predictive

Thomas W. L. Sanford

2008-01-01

278

Experiences with electronic laboratory notebook implementation in a materials R&D environment at Sandia National Laboratories.  

SciTech Connect

Changing paradigms from paper laboratory notebooks to electronic creates challenges. Meeting regulatory requirements in an R&D environment drives thorough documentation. Creating complete experimental records is easier using electronic laboratory notebooks. Supporting investigations through re-creating experimental conditions is greatly facilitated using an ELN.

Thornberg, Steven Michael

2010-03-01

279

Progress in lithium beam focusing and beam-target interaction experiments at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Significant progress in the generation and focusing of ion beams generated by PBFA II has enabled us to begin experiments in ion beam coupling and target physics. Data from these experiments indicates that we can reproducibly deliver {approximately}50 KJ of 5 MeV protons at an average power intensity of 3.5 TW/cm{sup 2} to a 6 mm diameter by 6 mm tall cylindrical target. The implosion of the spherical exploding pusher targets and the radiation production from foam-filled cylindrical thermal targets were studied in these experiments. They demonstrated that high quality target data can be obtained on PBFA II. Specific deposition rates of about 100 TW/g were achieved in these experiments. This deposition rate marks the boundary between the regime where enhanced ion deposition and equation-of-state (EOS) physics are studied (10--100 TW/g) and the regime where radiation-conversion and radiation-transport physics are studied (100--1000 TW/g). Experiments in the radiation-conversion regime are now of primary importance in our program because these experiments will test the target physics basis for ion-driven ICF.

Mehlhorn, T.A.; Bacon, L.D.; Bailey, J.E.; Bloomquist, D.D.; Chandler, G.A.; Costs, R.S.; Cook, D.L.; Cuneo, M.; Derzon, M.S.; Desjarlais, M.P.; Dukart, R.J.; Filuk, A.B.; Haill, T.A.; Hanson, D.; Johnson, D.J.; Leeper, R.J.; Lockner, T.R.; Mendel, C.W.; Mix, L.P.; Moats, A.R.; Quintenz, J.P.; Pointon, T.D. Renk, T.J.; Rochau, G.E.; Rosenthal, S.E.; Ruiz, C.L.; Seidel, D.B.; Slutz, S.A.; Stinnett, R.W.; Stygar, W.A.; Tisone, G.C.; Olson, R.E.; VanDevender, J.P.; Wenger, D.F.

1992-07-01

280

Progress in lithium beam focusing and beam-target interaction experiments at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Significant progress in the generation and focusing of ion beams generated by PBFA II has enabled us to begin experiments in ion beam coupling and target physics. Data from these experiments indicates that we can reproducibly deliver {approximately}50 KJ of 5 MeV protons at an average power intensity of 3.5 TW/cm{sup 2} to a 6 mm diameter by 6 mm tall cylindrical target. The implosion of the spherical exploding pusher targets and the radiation production from foam-filled cylindrical thermal targets were studied in these experiments. They demonstrated that high quality target data can be obtained on PBFA II. Specific deposition rates of about 100 TW/g were achieved in these experiments. This deposition rate marks the boundary between the regime where enhanced ion deposition and equation-of-state (EOS) physics are studied (10--100 TW/g) and the regime where radiation-conversion and radiation-transport physics are studied (100--1000 TW/g). Experiments in the radiation-conversion regime are now of primary importance in our program because these experiments will test the target physics basis for ion-driven ICF.

Mehlhorn, T.A.; Bacon, L.D.; Bailey, J.E.; Bloomquist, D.D.; Chandler, G.A.; Costs, R.S.; Cook, D.L.; Cuneo, M.; Derzon, M.S.; Desjarlais, M.P.; Dukart, R.J.; Filuk, A.B.; Haill, T.A.; Hanson, D.; Johnson, D.J.; Leeper, R.J.; Lockner, T.R.; Mendel, C.W.; Mix, L.P.; Moats, A.R.; Quintenz, J.P.; Pointon, T.D. Renk, T.J.; Rochau, G.E.; Rosenthal, S.E.; Ruiz, C.L.; Seidel, D.B.; Slutz, S.A.; Stinnett, R.W.; Stygar, W.A.; Tisone,

1992-01-01

281

Equipment qualification and survivability research at Sandia National Laboratories. [Electrical penetration assemblies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since its inception in 1975, the Qualification Testing Evaluation (QTE) Program has been concerned with several broad issues in safety-related equipment qualification. These concerns encompass both aging simulation methods as well as accident simulation methods. Much of the effort is concerned with combined environments, especially radiation in combination with other environments including oxygen, temperature, mechancial stress, and accident thermodynamic environments

Bonzon

1985-01-01

282

LANMAS alpha configured for Sandia National Laboratories and Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

Microsoft Academic Search

Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Westinghouse Hanford Company have been working jointly for the past 2 years to develop LANMAS (Local Area Network Material Accountability System), the next generation of a US Department of Energy nuclear material accountability system. LANMAS is being designed to reflect the broad-based needs of the US Department of Energy`s Material Control & Accountability and

M. R. Woychick; L. P. McRae; J. T. Bracey; E. A. Kern; A. Alvarado

1993-01-01

283

Sandia`s photonic program and its changing national role  

SciTech Connect

Photonics activities at Sandia National Laboratories are founded on an extensive materials research program. In 1988, the Compound Semiconductor Research Laboratory (CSRL) was established at Sandia to bring together device and materials research and development, in support of Sandia`s role in weapons technologies. Recently, industrial competitiveness has been added as a major mission for the national laboratories. As a result, present photonics programs are not only directed towards internal applications-driven projects, but are increasingly tied to the Department Of Energy`s (DOE`s) Technology Transfer Initiatives (TTIs), Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs), and participation in partnerships and consortia. This evolution yields a full range of photonics programs, ranging from materials synthesis and device fabrication to packaging, test, and subsystem development. This paper presents an overview of Sandia`s photonics-program directions, using three applications as examples.

Carson, R.F.; Meyer, W.J.

1994-03-01

284

The Sandia Lightning Simulator.  

SciTech Connect

The Sandia Lightning Simulator at Sandia National Laboratories can provide up to 200 kA for a simulated single lightning stroke, 100 kA for a subsequent stroke, and hundreds of Amperes of continuing current. It has recently been recommissioned after a decade of inactivity and the single-stroke capability demonstrated. The simulator capabilities, basic design components, upgrades, and diagnostic capabilities are discussed in this paper.

Martinez, Leonard E.; Caldwell, Michele

2005-01-01

285

A brief history of Sandia National Laboratories and the Department of Energy%3CU%2B2019%3Es Office of Science : interplay between science, technology, and mission.  

SciTech Connect

In 1957, Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) initiated its first programs in fundamental science, in support of its primary nuclear weapons mission. In 1974, Sandia initiated programs in fundamental science supported by the Department of Energy's Office of Science (DOE-SC). These latter programs have grown to the point where, today in 2011, support of Sandia's programs in fundamental science is dominated by that Office. In comparison with Sandia's programs in technology and mission applications, however, Sandia's programs in fundamental science are small. Hence, Sandia's fundamental science has been strongly influenced by close interactions with technology and mission applications. In many instances, these interactions have been of great mutual benefit, with synergies akin to a positive 'Casimir's spiral' of progress. In this report, we review the history of Sandia's fundamental science programs supported by the Office of Science. We present: (a) a technical and budgetary snapshot of Sandia's current programs supported by the various suboffices within DOE-SC; (b) statistics of highly-cited articles supported by DOE-SC; (c) four case studies (ion-solid interactions, combustion science, compound semiconductors, advanced computing) with an emphasis on mutually beneficial interactions between science, technology, and mission; and (d) appendices with key memos and reminiscences related to fundamental science at Sandia.

Tsao, Jeffrey Yeenien; Myers, Samuel Maxwell, Jr.; Simmons, Jerry Alvon; McIlroy, Andrew; Vook, Frederick L.; Collis, Samuel Scott; Picraux, Samuel Thomas

2011-08-01

286

Cost-effective instrumentation and control upgrades for commercial nuclear power plants using surety principles developed at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Many nuclear power plants use instrument and control systems based on analog electronics. The state of the art in process control and instrumentation has advanced to use digital electronics and incorporate advanced technology. This technology includes distributed microprocessors, fiber optics, intelligent systems (neural networks), and advanced displays. The technology is used to optimize processes and enhance the man-machine interface while maintaining control and safety of the processes. Nuclear power plant operators have been hesitant to install this technology because of the cost and uncertainty in the regulatory process. This technology can be directly applied in an operating nuclear power plant provided a surety principle-based {open_quotes}administrator{close_quotes} hardware system is included in parallel with the upgrade Sandia National Laboratories has developed a rigorous approach to High Consequence System Surety (HCSS). This approach addresses the key issues of safety, security, and control while satisfying requirements for reliability and quality. HCSS principles can be applied to nuclear power plants in a manner that allows the off-the-shelf use of process control instrumentation while maintaining a high level of safety and enhancing the plant performance. We propose that an HCSS administrator be constructed as a standardized approach to address regulatory issues. Such an administrator would allow a plant control system to be constructed with commercially available, state-of-the-art equipment and be customized to the needs of the individual plant operator.

Rochau, G.E.; Dalton, L.J.

1997-11-01

287

An Effective Waste Management Process for Segregation and Disposal of Legacy Mixed Waste at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) is a research and development facility that generates many highly diverse, low-volume mixed waste streams. Under the Federal Facility Compliance Act, SNL/NM must treat its mixed waste in storage to meet the Land Disposal Restrictions treatment standards. Since 1989, approximately 70 cubic meters (2500 cubic feet) of heterogeneous, poorly characterized and inventoried mixed waste was placed in storage that could not be treated as specified in the SNL/NM Site Treatment Plan. A process was created to sort the legacy waste into sixteen well- defined, properly characterized, and precisely inventoried mixed waste streams (Treatability Groups) and two low-level waste streams ready for treatment or disposal. From June 1995 through September 1996, the entire volume of this stored mixed waste was sorted and inventoried through this process. This process was planned to meet the technical requirements of the sorting operation and to identify and address the hazards this operation presented. The operations were routinely adapted to safely and efficiently handle a variety of waste matrices, hazards, and radiological conditions. This flexibility was accomplished through administrative and physical controls integrated into the sorting operations. Many Department of Energy facilities are currently facing the prospect of sorting, characterizing, and treating a large inventory of mixed waste. The process described in this paper is a proven method for preparing a diverse, heterogeneous mixed waste volume into segregated, characterized, inventoried, and documented waste streams ready for treatment or disposal.

Hallman, Anne K. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Meyer, Dann [IT Corporation, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rellergert, Carla A. [Roy F. Weston, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Schriner, Joseph A. [Automated Solutions of Albuquerque, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1998-06-01

288

An effective waste management process for segregation and disposal of legacy mixed waste at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) is a research and development facility that generates many highly diverse, low-volume mixed waste streams. Under the Federal Facility Compliance Act, SNL/NM must treat its mixed waste in storage to meet the Land Disposal Restrictions treatment standards. Since 1989, approximately 70 cubic meters (2,500 cubic feet) of heterogeneous, poorly characterized and inventoried mixed waste was placed in storage that could not be treated as specified in the SNL/NM Site Treatment Plan. A process was created to sort the legacy waste into sixteen well-defined, properly characterized, and accurately inventoried mixed waste streams (Treatability Groups) and two low-level waste streams ready for treatment or disposal. From June 1995 through September 1996, the entire volume of this stored mixed waste was sorted and inventoried. This process was planned to meet the technical requirements of the sorting operation and to identify and address the hazards this operation presented. The operations were routinely adapted to safely and efficiently handle a variety of waste matrices, hazards, and radiological conditions. This flexibility was accomplished through administrative and physical controls integrated into the sorting operations. Many Department of Energy facilities are currently facing the prospect of sorting, characterizing, and treating a large inventory of mixed waste. The process described in this report is a proven method for preparing a diverse, heterogeneous mixed waste volume into segregated, characterized, inventoried, and documented waste streams ready for treatment or disposal.

Hallman, A.K. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Meyer, D. [IT Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rellergert, C.A. [Roy F. Weston, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Schriner, J.A. [Automated Solutions of Albuquerque, Inc., NM (United States)

1998-04-01

289

Deployment of an alternative cover and final closure of the Mixed Waste Landfill, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.  

SciTech Connect

An alternative cover design consisting of a monolithic layer of native soil is proposed as the closure path for the Mixed Waste Landfill at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico. The proposed design would rely upon soil thickness and evapotranspiration to provide long-term performance and stability, and would be inexpensive to build and maintain. The proposed design is a 3-ft-thick, vegetated soil cover. The alternative cover meets the intent of RCRA Subtitle C regulations in that: (a) water migration through the cover is minimized; (b) maintenance is minimized by using a monolithic soil layer; (c) cover erosion is minimized by using erosion control measures; (d) subsidence is accommodated by using a ''soft'' design; and (e) the permeability of the cover is less than or equal to that of natural subsurface soil present. Performance of the proposed cover is integrated with natural site conditions, producing a ''system performance'' that will ensure that the cover is protective of human health and the environment. Natural site conditions that will produce a system performance include: (a) extremely low precipitation and high potential evapotranspiration; (b) negligible recharge to groundwater; (c) an extensive vadose zone; (d) groundwater approximately 500 ft below the surface; and (e) a versatile, native flora that will persist indefinitely as a climax ecological community with little or no maintenance.

Peace, Gerald (Jerry) L.; Goering, Timothy James (GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM); McVey, Michael David (GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM); Borns, David James

2003-06-01

290

Equipment qualification and survivability research at Sandia National Laboratories. [Electrical penetration assemblies  

SciTech Connect

Since its inception in 1975, the Qualification Testing Evaluation (QTE) Program has been concerned with several broad issues in safety-related equipment qualification. These concerns encompass both aging simulation methods as well as accident simulation methods. Much of the effort is concerned with combined environments, especially radiation in combination with other environments including oxygen, temperature, mechancial stress, and accident thermodynamic environments like pressure/temperature/chemical spray. The Electrical Penetrations Assemblies (EPA) Program is specifically concerned with the survival (i.e., leak-rate integrity) of such assemblies under severe accident conditions. A brief discussion of several current and planned projects illustrate the scope of these NRC-sponsored efforts.

Bonzon, L.L.

1985-01-01

291

Sandia Human Factors Program for Weapon Development.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Sandia Laboratories human factors program for weapon development is based primarily on Man-Machine Systems Analysis (including Task Analysis) and the Sandia human reliability model (THERP-Technique for Human Error Rate Prediction). Application of thes...

A. D. Swain

1976-01-01

292

Final Results from the High-Current, High-Action Closing Switch Test Program at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

We tested a variety of high-current closing switches for lifetime and reliability on a dedicated 2 MJ, 500 kA capacitor bank facility at Sandia National Laboratories. Our interest was a switch capable of one shot every few minutes, switching a critically damped, DC-charged 6.2 mF bank at 24 kV, with a peak current of 500 kA. The desired lifetime is 24 thousand shots. Typical of high-energy systems, particularly multi-module systems, the primary parameters of interest related to the switch are: (1) reliability, meaning absence of both pre-fires and no-fires, (2) total switch lifetime or number of shots between maintenance, and (3) cost. Cost was given lower priority at this evaluation stage because there are great uncertainties in estimating higher-quantity prices of these devices, most of which have been supplied before in only small quantities. The categories of switches tested are vacuum discharge, high-pressure discharge, and solid-state. Each group varies in terms of triggering ease, ease of maintenance, and tolerance to faults such as excess current and current reversal. We tested at least two variations of each technology group. The total number of shots on the switch test facility is about 50 thousand. We will present the results from the switch testing. The observed lifetime of different switches varied greatly: the shortest life was one shot; one device was still operating after six thousand shots. On several switches we measured the voltage drop during conduction and calculated energy dissipated in the switch; we will show these data also.

Savage, M.E.

1999-06-23

293

Test plan for the data acquisition and management system for monitoring the fuel oil spill at the Sandia National Laboratories installation in Livermore, California  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the formal test plan that will be used for the data acquisition and management system developed to monitor a bioremediation study by Argonne National Laboratory in association with Sandia National Laboratories. The data acquisition and management system will record the site data during the bioremediation and assist experts in site analysis. The three major subsystems of this system are described in detail in this report. In addition, this report documents the component- and system-level test procedures that will be implemented at each phase of the project. Results of these test procedures are documented in this report.

Widing, M.A.; Dominiak, D.M.; Leser, C.C.; Peerenboom, J.P.; Manning, J.F.

1995-04-01

294

User`s manual for the data acquisition system for monitoring the fuel oil spill at the Sandia National Laboratories installation in Livermore, California  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the use of the data acquisition software developed by Argonne National Laboratory and installed at the fuel oil spill site at Sandia National Laboratories. This software provides various programs for interacting with the monitoring and logging system that collects electronic data from sensors installed downhole in the study area. This manual provides basic information on the design and use of these user interfaces, which assists the site coordinator in monitoring the status of the data collection process. Four software programs are included in the data acquisition software suite to provide the following capabilities: datalogger interaction, file management, and data security.

Widing, M.A.; Leser, C.C.

1995-04-01

295

The economic impact of Sandia National Laboratories on Central New Mexico and the State of New Mexico Fiscal Year 1998  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is a Department of Energy federally funded national security laboratory that uses engineering and science to ensure the security of the Nation. SNL provides scientific and engineering solutions to meet national needs in nuclear weapons and related defense systems, energy security, and environmental integrity. SNL works in partnerships with universities and industry to enhance their mission and transfer technology that will address emerging national challenges for both government and industry. For several years, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Albuquerque Operations Office (AL) and New Mexico State University (NMSU) have maintained an inter-industry, input-output (I/O) model with capabilities to assess the impacts of developments initiated outside the economy such as federal DOE monies that flow into the state, on an economy. This model will be used to assess economic, personal income and employment impacts of SNL on Central New Mexico and the State of New Mexico. Caution should be exercised when comparing economic impacts between fiscal years prior to this report. The I/O model was rebased for FY 1998. The fringe benefits coefficients have been updated for the FY 1996 and FY 1997 economic impacts analysis. Prior to FY 1993 two different I/O base models were used to estimate the impacts. New technical information was released by the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA), U.S. Department of Commerce in 1991 and in 1994 and was incorporated in FY 1991, FY 1993, and FY 1994 I/O models. Also in 1993, the state and local tax coefficients and expenditure patterns were updated from a 1986 study for the FY 1992 report. Further details about the input-output model can be found in ''The Economic Impact of the Department of Energy on the State of New Mexico--FY 1998'' report by Lansford, et al. (1999). For this report, the reference period is FY 1998 (October 1, 1997, through September 30, 1998) and includes two major impact analyses: The impact of SNL activities on Central New Mexico and the economic impacts of SNL on the state of New Mexico. For purposes of this report, the Central New Mexico Region includes: Bernalillo, Sandoval, Valencia, and Torrance Counties (Figure 1). Total impact represents both direct and indirect resending by business, including induced effects (resending by households). The standard multipliers used in determining impacts result from the inter-industry, input-output models developed for the four-county region and the state of New Mexico.

Lansford, Robert R.; Adcock, Larry D.; Gentry, Lucille M.; Ben-David, Shaul; Temple, John

1999-08-09

296

Sandia National Laboratories performance assessment methodology for long-term environmental programs : the history of nuclear waste management.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is the world leader in the development of the detailed science underpinning the application of a probabilistic risk assessment methodology, referred to in this report as performance assessment (PA), for (1) understanding and forecasting the long-term behavior of a radioactive waste disposal system, (2) estimating the ability of the disposal system and its various components to isolate the waste, (3) developing regulations, (4) implementing programs to estimate the safety that the system can afford to individuals and to the environment, and (5) demonstrating compliance with the attendant regulatory requirements. This report documents the evolution of the SNL PA methodology from inception in the mid-1970s, summarizing major SNL PA applications including: the Subseabed Disposal Project PAs for high-level radioactive waste; the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant PAs for disposal of defense transuranic waste; the Yucca Mountain Project total system PAs for deep geologic disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste; PAs for the Greater Confinement Borehole Disposal boreholes at the Nevada National Security Site; and PA evaluations for disposal of high-level wastes and Department of Energy spent nuclear fuels stored at Idaho National Laboratory. In addition, the report summarizes smaller PA programs for long-term cover systems implemented for the Monticello, Utah, mill-tailings repository; a PA for the SNL Mixed Waste Landfill in support of environmental restoration; PA support for radioactive waste management efforts in Egypt, Iraq, and Taiwan; and, most recently, PAs for analysis of alternative high-level radioactive waste disposal strategies including repositories deep borehole disposal and geologic repositories in shale and granite. Finally, this report summarizes the extension of the PA methodology for radioactive waste disposal toward development of an enhanced PA system for carbon sequestration and storage systems. These efforts have produced a generic PA methodology for the evaluation of waste management systems that has gained wide acceptance within the international community. This report documents how this methodology has been used as an effective management tool to evaluate different disposal designs and sites; inform development of regulatory requirements; identify, prioritize, and guide research aimed at reducing uncertainties for objective estimations of risk; and support safety assessments.

Marietta, Melvin Gary; Anderson, D. Richard; Bonano, Evaristo J.; Meacham, Paul Gregory (Raytheon Ktech, Albuquerque, NM)

2011-11-01

297

Sandia software guidelines: Volume 5, Tools, techniques, and methodologies  

SciTech Connect

This volume is one in a series of Sandia Software Guidelines intended for use in producing quality software within Sandia National Laboratories. This volume describes software tools and methodologies available to Sandia personnel for the development of software, and outlines techniques that have proven useful within the Laboratories and elsewhere. References and evaluations by Sandia personnel are included. 6 figs.

Not Available

1989-07-01

298

The NASA High Intensity Radiated Fields Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

High Intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) are the result of a multitude of intentional and nonintentional electromagnetic sources that currently exists in the world. Many of today's digital systems are susceptible to electronic upset if subjected to certain electromagnetic environments (EME). Modern aerospace designers and manufacturers increasingly rely on sophisticated digital electronic systems to provide critical flight control in both military, commercial, and general aviation aircraft. In an effort to understand and emulate the undesired environment that high energy RF provides modern electronics, the Electromagnetics Research Branch (ERB) of the Flight Electronics and Technology Division (FETD) conducts research on RF and microwave measurement methods related to the understanding of HIRF. In the High Intensity Radiated Fields Laboratory, the effects of high energy radiating electromagnetic fields on avionics and electronic systems are tested and studied.

Williams, Reuben A.

1997-01-01

299

An Illustration of the Corrective Action Process, The Corrective Action Management Unit at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Management Units (CAMUs) were established by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to streamline the remediation of hazardous waste sites. Streamlining involved providing cost saving measures for the treatment, storage, and safe containment of the wastes. To expedite cleanup and remove disincentives, EPA designed 40 CFR 264 Subpart S to be flexible. At the heart of this flexibility are the provisions for CAMUs and Temporary Units (TUs). CAMUs and TUs were created to remove cleanup disincentives resulting from other Resource Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous waste provisions--specifically, RCRA land disposal restrictions (LDRs) and minimum technology requirements (MTRs). Although LDR and MTR provisions were not intended for remediation activities, LDRs and MTRs apply to corrective actions because hazardous wastes are generated. However, management of RCRA hazardous remediation wastes in a CAMU or TU is not subject to these stringent requirements. The CAMU at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico (SNL/NM) was proposed through an interactive process involving the regulators (EPA and the New Mexico Environment Department), DOE, SNL/NM, and stakeholders. The CAMU at SNL/NM has been accepting waste from the nearby Chemical Waste Landfill remediation since January of 1999. During this time, a number of unique techniques have been implemented to save costs, improve health and safety, and provide the best value and management practices. This presentation will take the audience through the corrective action process implemented at the CAMU facility, from the selection of the CAMU site to permitting and construction, waste management, waste treatment, and final waste placement. The presentation will highlight the key advantages that CAMUs and TUs offer in the corrective action process. These advantages include yielding a practical approach to regulatory compliance, expediting efficient remediation and site closure, and realizing potentially significant cost savings compared to off-site disposal. Specific examples of CA MU advantages realized by SNL/NM will be presented along with the above highlighted process improvements, Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) performance, and associated lessons learned.

Irwin, M.; Kwiecinski, D.

2002-02-26

300

A description of the SNL (Sandia National Laboratories) clutter model developed for the SRIM (Simulated Radar IMage) code version 2. 2s  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the clutter model developed at Sandia National Laboratories for the SRIM code version 2.2s. The SNL clutter model is a fully polarimetric model that includes both coherent and incoherent scattering effects. The input parameters to the SNL clutter model are chosen so that an acceptable match is obtained between the model predicted data and the appropriate experimental data. These input parameters are then used in the SRIM code to simulated the desired clutter type. 12 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

Lee, C.E.

1990-10-01

301

Chemical analyses of soil samples collected from the vicinity of the thermal test complex at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico environs, 2006.  

SciTech Connect

In the summer of 2006, the Environmental Programs and Assurance Department of Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico (SNL/NM), collected surface soil samples at 37 locations within one mile of the vicinity of the newly constructed Thermal Test Complex (TTC) for the purpose of determining baseline conditions against which potential future impacts to the environs from operations at the facility could be assessed. These samples were submitted to an offsite analytical laboratory for metal-in-soil analyses. This work provided the SNL Environmental Programs and Assurance Department with a sound baseline data reference set against which to assess potential future operational impacts at the TTC. In addition, it demonstrates the commitment that the Laboratories have to go beyond mere compliance to achieve excellence in its operations. This data are presented in graphical format with narrative commentaries on particular items of interest.

Miller, Mark Laverne; Nieto, Danielle M.

2007-01-01

302

Measurement of the photon field on Sandia`s Z facility  

SciTech Connect

The Z Facility at Sandia National Laboratories utilizes z-pinch implosions to produce up to 2 MJ of X-rays. On Z, bremsstrahlung radiation is produced as a product of both power flow electrons and those accelerated in the pinch region. An understanding of the energy spectra and intensity of this radiation is important to both the explanation of the z-pinch physics and the design of new diagnostics. This paper describes the techniques and results used to date for mapping the bremsstrahlung radiation in the vacuum section of the Z Accelerator.

Rochau, G.E.; Derzon, M.; Fehl, D. [and others

1998-06-01

303

Final report: survey and removal of radioactive surface contamination at environmental restoration sites, Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the survey and removal of radioactive surface contamination at Sandia`s Environmental Restoration (ER) sites. Radiological characterization was performed as a prerequisite to beginning the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) corrective action process. The removal of radioactive surface contamination was performed in order to reduce potential impacts to human health and the environment. The predominant radiological contaminant of concern was depleted uranium (DU). Between October 1993 and November 1996 scanning surface radiation surveys, using gamma scintillometers, were conducted at 65 sites covering approximately 908 acres. A total of 9,518 radiation anomalies were detected at 38 sites. Cleanup activities were conducted between October 1994 and November 1996. A total of 9,122 anomalies were removed and 2,072 waste drums were generated. The majority of anomalies not removed were associated with a site that has subsurface contamination beyond the scope of this project. Verification soil samples (1,008 total samples) were collected from anomalies during cleanup activities and confirm that the soil concentration achieved in the field were far below the target cleanup level of 230 pCi/g of U-238 (the primary constituent of DU) in the soil. Cleanup was completed at 21 sites and no further radiological action is required. Seventeen sites were not completed since cleanup activities wee precluded by ongoing site activity or were beyond the original project scope.

Lambert, K.A.; Mitchell, M.M. [Brown and Root Environmental, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jean, D. [MDM/Lamb, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brown, C. [Environmental Dimensions, Inc., Albuquerque, NM 87109 (United States); Byrd, C.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-09-01

304

All things White Dwarf: The State of Stellar Forensics at the University of Texas and Sandia National Laboratories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Astronomy has always been considered an observational science, in contrast with other experimental sciences like physics, chemistry, biology, and geology. This is because it has not been possible to perform experiments on the objects we observe. This situation has changed in a way that is transformational. We are now able to make macroscopic bits of star stuff in the lab: plasmas created under conditions that are the same as the plasmas in stars. Although laboratory astrophysics has long been an important part of astronomical research, what has changed is the ability to produce large enough chunks of a star that we can make measurements and perform experiments. In this way, astronomy joins her sister sciences in becoming an experimental science as well as an observational one. I will describe how this came about, the technology behind it, and the results of recent laboratory experiments. Most importantly, we will discuss how this will change our understanding of the universe and its contents. This work will shed new light on our recent discoveries involving McDonald Observatory: planets around white dwarf stars, massive carbon/oxygen variable white dwarf stars, and white dwarf-white dwarf binaries -- including one detached double eclipsing system with an orbital period of 12 minutes. We should measure the rate of change of the orbital period in this system within a year and we expect it to be the highest S/N source of gravitational radiation, easily detectable with LISA or similar approaches.

Winget, Donald

2011-10-01

305

Sandia technology engineering and science accomplishments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This report briefly discusses the following research being conducted at Sandia Laboratories: Advanced Manufacturing -- Sandia technology helps keep US industry in the lead; Microelectronics -- Sandia's unique facilities transform research advances into manufacturable products; Energy -- Sandia's energy programs focus on strengthening industrial growth and political decisionmaking; Environment -- Sandia is a leader in environmentally conscious manufacturing and hazardous waste reduction; Health Care -- New biomedical technologies help reduce cost and improve quality of health care; Information & Computation -- Sandia aims to help make the information age a reality; Transportation -- This new initiative at the Labs will help improve transportation, safety, efficiency, and economy; Nonproliferation -- Dismantlement and arms control are major areas of emphasis at Sandia; and Awards and Patents -- Talented, dedicated employees are the backbone of Sandia's success.

1994-02-01

306

Materials and process engineering projects for the Sandia National Laboratories/Newly Independent States Industrial Partnering Program. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

In July, 1994, a team of materials specialists from Sandia and US. Industry traveled to Russia and the Ukraine to select and fund projects in materials and process technology in support of the Newly Independent States/Industrial Partnering Program (NIS/IPP). All of the projects are collaborations with scientists and Engineers at NIS Institutes. Each project is scheduled to last one year, and the deliverables are formatted to supply US. Industry with information which will enable rational decisions to be made regarding the commercial value of these technologies. This work is an unedited interim compilation of the deliverables received to date.

Zanner, F.J.; Moffatt, W.C.

1995-07-01

307

Materials and process engineering projects for the Sandia National Laboratories/Newly Independent States Industrial Partnering Program. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

In July, 1994, a team of materials specialists from Sandia and U S Industry traveled to Russia and the Ukraine to select and fund projects in materials and process technology in support of the Newly Independent States/Industrial Partnering Program (NIS/IPP). All of the projects are collaborations with scientists and Engineers at NIS Institutes. Each project is scheduled to last one year, and the deliverables are formatted to supply US Industry with information which will enable rational decisions to be made regarding the commercial value of these technologies. This work is an unedited interim compilation of the deliverables received to date.

Zanner, F.J.; Moffatt, W.C.

1995-07-01

308

Site selection study for Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico as an alternative site for the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to construct and operate the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in support of the Stockpile Stewardship and Management (SSM) Programmatic Environmental impact Statement (PEIS). The National Environmental Policy Act requires the DOE to look at alternative sites for the NIF. The SSM PEIS will evaluate four alternative locations for the NIF. This study documents the process and results of a site selection study for a preferred site for the NIF at SNL/NM. The NIF research objectives are to provide the world`s most powerful laser systems to be used in ignition of fusion fuel and energy gain to perform high energy density and radiation effects experiments in support of the DOE`s national security, energy, and basic science research mission. The most immediate application of the NIF will be to provide nuclear-weapon-related physics data, since many phenomena occurring on the laboratory scale are similar to those that occur in weapons. The NIF may also provide an important capability for weapons effects simulation. The NIF is designed to achieve propagating fusion bum and modest energy gain for development as a source of civilian energy.

Miller, D.; Wheeler, T.; McClellan, Y.

1996-03-01

309

Sandia technology & entrepreneurs improve Lasik  

ScienceCinema

Former Sandian Dan Neal started his company, WaveFront Sciences, based on wavefront sensing metrology technologies licensed from Sandia National Laboratories and by taking advantage of its Entrepreneurial Separation to Transfer Technology (ESTT) program. Abbott Medical Optics since acquired WaveFront and estimates that one million patients have improved the quality of their vision thanks to its products. ESTT is a valuable tool which allows Sandia to transfer technology to the private sector and Sandia employees to leave the Labs in order to start up new technology companies or help expand existing companies.

Neal, Dan; Turner, Tim

2014-02-26

310

Sandia technology & entrepreneurs improve Lasik  

SciTech Connect

Former Sandian Dan Neal started his company, WaveFront Sciences, based on wavefront sensing metrology technologies licensed from Sandia National Laboratories and by taking advantage of its Entrepreneurial Separation to Transfer Technology (ESTT) program. Abbott Medical Optics since acquired WaveFront and estimates that one million patients have improved the quality of their vision thanks to its products. ESTT is a valuable tool which allows Sandia to transfer technology to the private sector and Sandia employees to leave the Labs in order to start up new technology companies or help expand existing companies.

Neal, Dan; Turner, Tim

2013-11-21

311

Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) : appraisal method for the implementation of the ASC software quality engineering practices: Version 1.0.  

SciTech Connect

This document provides a guide to the process of conducting software appraisals under the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) ASC Program. The goal of this document is to describe a common methodology for planning, conducting, and reporting results of software appraisals thereby enabling: development of an objective baseline on implementation of the software quality engineering (SQE) practices identified in the ASC Software Quality Plan across the ASC Program; feedback from project teams on SQE opportunities for improvement; identification of strengths and opportunities for improvement for individual project teams; guidance to the ASC Program on the focus of future SQE activities Document contents include process descriptions, templates to promote consistent conduct of appraisals, and an explanation of the relationship of this procedure to the SNL ASC software program.

Turgeon, Jennifer; Minana, Molly A.

2008-02-01

312

Preliminary data from an instantaneous profile test conducted near the Mixed Waste Landfill, Technical Area 3, Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents data from an instantaneous profile test conducted near the Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Mixed Waste Landfill in Technical Area 3. The test was performed from December 1993 through 1995 as part of the environmental Restoration Project`s Phase 2 RCRA Facility Investigation of the Mixed Waste Landfill. The purpose of the test was to measure the unsaturated hydraulic properties of soils near the Mixed Waste Landfill. The instantaneous profile test and instrumentation are described, and the pressure and moisture content data from the test are presented. These data may be useful for understanding the unsaturated hydraulic properties of soils in Technical Area 3 and for model validation, verification, and calibration.

Bayliss, S.C. [DanShar, Inc., Bosque Farms, NM (United States); Goering, T.J.; McVey, M.D. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Strong, W.R.; Peace, J.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Environmental Restoration Project

1996-04-01

313

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratories (ORNL) joint development of SNL`s sample tracking, analysis and reporting (STAR) information system  

SciTech Connect

A comprehensive environmental sample management program allocates much of its resources to collecting, managing, and manipulating information. A computerized system that collects information at the field sampling point, tracks the sample to analytical labs and loads electronic data deliverables from these labs, while maintaining chain of custody and data integrity, is efficient and cost effective for providing consistent and accurate, legally defensible sample data. In June 1993, a team was formed to gather Sample Management Office requirements and begin development of a sample tracking system. This paper is an overview of experiences encountered when Sandia transferred and implemented sample software from the Waste Area Group (WAG6) at ORNL.

Fish, J.; Campbell, D.; Jenkins, B. [and others

1995-05-01

314

Radiation and Its Use in Biology: A Laboratory Block.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This booklet contains a six-week series of laboratory investigations that may be used individually or in combination to complement other biology course materials or as an independent laboratory course in radiation biology. Contents include twelve activities dealing with radiation biology, five additional activities suitable for individual work,…

Mayer, William V.

315

Inside Sandia  

SciTech Connect

Articles in this issue include ``Molten salt corrosion testing,`` ``Pulsed ion beams for thermal surface treatment: Improved corrosion, wear, and hardness properties at low cost,`` ``Unmasking hidden armaments: Superconducting gravity sensor could find underground weapons, bunkers,`` ``Charbroiled burgers, heterocyclic amines, and cancer: Molecular modeling identifies dangerous mutagens,`` ``Revolutionary airbag offers increased safety options,`` ``EcoSys{sup TM}: an expert system for `Green Design` ``, ``Sandia, salt, and oil: Labs` diagnostics and analysis help maintain vital US oil reserve,`` and ``Automated fixture design speeds development for prototypes and production``.

NONE

1995-12-31

316

This is Sandia  

SciTech Connect

Sandia is a multiprogram engineering and science laboratory operated for the Department of Energy with major facilities at Albuquerque, New Mexico, and Livermore, California, and a test range near Tonapah, Nevada. It has major research and development responsibilities for nuclear weapons, arms control, energy, the environment, economic competitiveness, and other areas of importance to the needs of the nation. The principal mission is to support national defense policies by ensuring that the nuclear weapon stockpile meets the highest standards of safety, reliability, security, use control, and military performance. This publication gives a brief overview of the multifaceted research programs conducted by the laboratory.

Not Available

1995-02-01

317

Waste minimization/pollution prevention at R&D facilities: A cradle-to-grave tracking and information system that will be implemented at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

A comprehensive environment, safety and health (ES&H) program allocates an extensive portion of its resources to information collection, management, and manipulation. Much of these resources are difficult to obtain and even more costly to ensure that they are sufficiently accurate; however, a system which collects information at the point which a process begins or a material enters a facility and maintains that information throughout its entire life-cycle is a more efficient approach to providing the data necessary to meet ES&H requirements. These data requirements for all the various groups within an ES&H program are associated with the properties and interactions among materials, personnel, facilities, hazards, waste and processes. Although each group is charged with addressing a particular aspect of these properties and interactions, the information they require can be aggregated into a coherent set of common data fields. It is these common data fields that the Cradle-to-Grave Tracking and Information System (CGTIS) is designed to satisfy. Research and development laboratories such as Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) are diverse in nature and, therefore, present a complex challenge to ES&H professionals. The remainder of this paper will describe the CGTIS as envisioned and implemented at SNL, define the requirements of a complete CGTIS, and review the current status of each system module at SNL.

Hollingsworth, M.W. [Rinchem Co., Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kjeldgaard, E.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Navarrete, R. [AT and T Bell Labs., Murray Hill, NJ (United States)

1993-09-01

318

Disposition of fuel elements from the Aberdeen and Sandia pulse reactor (SPR-II) assemblies  

Microsoft Academic Search

We describe the disposition of fuel from the Aberdeen (APR) and the Sandia Pulse Reactors (SPR-II) which were used to provide intense neutron bursts for radiation effects testing. The enriched Uranium - 10% Molybdenum fuel from these reactors was shipped to the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for size reduction prior to shipment to the Savannah River Site (SRS) for

Bill Mckerley; Jacqueline M Bustamante; David A Costa; Anthony F Drypolcher; Joseph Hickey

2010-01-01

319

Lithium beam-driven target experiments at 1015 W\\/g on PBFA II at Sandia National Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

A lithium beam is focused to an intensity 1–2 TW\\/cm2. The beam divergencies have been measured as low as 23 mrad. This lithium beam has the specific power deposition of ?10 W\\/g, the beam-driven target experiments have achieved radiation temperature of 58 eV.(AIP)

T. A. Mehlhorn; J. E. Bailey; G. A. Chandler; R. S. Coats; D. L. Cook; M. S. Derzon; M. P. Desjarlais; R. J. Dukart; R. Gerber; T. A. Haill; D. J. Johnson; R. J. Leeper; T. R. Lockner; M. G. Mazarakis; C. W. Mendel; L. P. Mix; A. R. Moats; T. J. Renk; G. E. Rochau; S. E. Rosenthal; C. L. Ruiz; G. C. Tisone; R. E. Olson; D. F. Wenger

1994-01-01

320

Reconsolidation of Crushed Salt to 250°C Under Hydrostatic and Shear Stress Conditions Scott Broome, Frank Hansen, and SJ Bauer Sandia National Laboratories, Geomechanics Department  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Design, analysis and performance assessment of potential salt repositories for heat-generating nuclear waste require knowledge of thermal, mechanical, and fluid transport properties of reconsolidating granular salt. Mechanical properties, Bulk (K) and Elastic (E) Moduli and Poisson's ratio (?) are functions of porosity which decreases as the surrounding salt creeps inward and compresses granular salt within the rooms, drifts or shafts. To inform salt repository evaluations, we have undertaken an experimental program to determine K, E, and ? of reconsolidated granular salt as a function of porosity and temperature and to establish the deformational processes by which the salt reconsolidates. The experiments will be used to populate the database used in the reconsolidation model developed by Callahan (1999) which accounts for the effects of moisture through pressure solution and dislocation creep, with both terms dependent on effective stress to account for the effects of porosity. Mine-run salt from the Waste Isolation Pilot Program (WIPP) was first dried at 105 °C for a few days. Undeformed right-circular cylindrical sample assemblies of unconsolidated granular salt with an initial porosity of ~ 40%, nominally 10 cm in diameter and 17.5 cm in length, are jacketed in lead. Samples are placed in a pressure vessel and kept at test temperatures of 100, 175 or 250 °C; samples are vented to the atmosphere during the entire test procedure. At these test conditions the consolidating salt is always creeping, the creep rate increases with increasing temperature and stress and decreases as porosity decreases. In hydrostatic tests, confining pressure is increased to 20 MPa with periodic unload/reload loops to determine K. Volume strain increases with increasing temperature. In shear tests at 2.5 and 5 MPa confining pressure, after confining pressure is applied, the crushed salt is subjected to a differential stress, with periodic unload/reload loops to determine E and ?. At predetermined differential stress levels the stress is held constant and the salt consolidates. Displacement gages mounted on the samples show little lateral deformation until the samples reach a porosity of ~10%. Interestingly, vapor is vented in tests at 250°C and condenses at the vent port. Release of water is not observed in the lower two test temperatures. It is hypothesized that the water originates from fluid inclusions, which were made accessible by intragranular deformational processes including decrepitation. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

Broome, S. T.

2012-12-01

321

Sandia software guidelines: Software quality planning  

SciTech Connect

This volume is one in a series of Sandia Software Guidelines intended for use in producing quality software within Sandia National Laboratories. In consonance with the IEEE Standard for Software Quality Assurance Plans, this volume identifies procedures to follow in producing a Software Quality Assurance Plan for an organization or a project, and provides an example project SQA plan. 2 figs., 4 tabs.

Not Available

1987-08-01

322

Technical Justification for Radiation Controls at an Environmental Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the technical approach used to establish radiation protection controls over incoming radioactive materials to an environmental measurements laboratory at the Hanford Site. Conditions that would trigger internal dosimetry, posting.

DUPAQUIER, J.C.

2000-07-01

323

Standardization of Rn-222 at the Australian Radiation Laboratory.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The standardization of Rn-222 at the Australian Radiation Laboratory involves the calibration of scintillation cells by two mehtods using standard Ra-226 solutions traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology. One of these methods, name...

T. H. Gan S. B. Solomon J. R. Peggie

1990-01-01

324

Lithium beam-driven target experiments at 10[sup 15] W/g on PBFA II at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

A lithium beam is focused to an intensity 1--2 TW/cm[sup 2]. The beam divergencies have been measured as low as 23 mrad. This lithium beam has the specific power deposition of [similar to]10 W/g, the beam-driven target experiments have achieved radiation temperature of 58 eV.(AIP) [copyright][ital American] [ital Institute] [ital of] [ital Physics] 1994

Mehlhorn, T.A.; Bailey, J.E.; Chandler, G.A.; Coats, R.S.; Cook, D.L.; Derzon, M.S.; Desjarlais, M.P.; Dukart, R.J.; Gerber, R.; Haill, T.A.; Johnson, D.J.; Leeper, R.J.; Lockner, T.R.; Mazarakis, M.G.; Mendel, C.W.; Mix, L.P.; Moats, A.R.; Renk, T.J.; Rochau, G.E.; Rosenthal, S.E.; Ruiz, C.L.; Tisone, G.C.; Olson, R.E.; Wenger, D.F. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque New Mexico (United States))

1994-10-05

325

Lithium beam-driven target experiments at 10[sup 15] W\\/g on PBFA II at Sandia National Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

A lithium beam is focused to an intensity 1--2 TW\\/cm[sup 2]. The beam divergencies have been measured as low as 23 mrad. This lithium beam has the specific power deposition of [similar to]10 W\\/g, the beam-driven target experiments have achieved radiation temperature of 58 eV.(AIP) [copyright][ital American] [ital Institute] [ital of] [ital Physics] 1994

T. A. Mehlhorn; J. E. Bailey; G. A. Chandler; R. S. Coats; D. L. Cook; M. S. Derzon; M. P. Desjarlais; R. J. Dukart; R. Gerber; T. A. Haill; D. J. Johnson; R. J. Leeper; T. R. Lockner; M. G. Mazarakis; C. W. Mendel; L. P. Mix; A. R. Moats; T. J. Renk; G. E. Rochau; S. E. Rosenthal; C. L. Ruiz; G. C. Tisone; R. E. Olson; D. F. Wenger

1994-01-01

326

A reevaluation of the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP - 40 CFR 61, Subpart H) program at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The initial National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP - 40 CFR 61, Subpart H) Program at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) required: (1) continuous air monitoring of sources if the calculated effective dose equivalent (EDE) to the maximum exposed individual (MEI) was > 0.1 mrem/yr; (2) the determination of emissions based on measurements or measured parameters if the EDE to the MEI was < 0.1 mrem/yr; and (3) the calculation of worst case releases when the expected air concentrations were below detection limits using standard monitoring equipment. This conservative interpretation of the regulation guided SNL/NM to model, track, and trend virtually all emission sources with the potential to include any radionuclides. The level of effort required to implement these activities was independent of the EDE contributing from individual sources. A recent programmatic review found the NESHAP program to be in excess of the legal requirements. A further review found that, in summation, 13 of 16 radionuclide sources had a negligible impact on the final calculated EDE to the MEI used to demonstrate compliance at 20 separate on-site receptor locations. A reevaluation was performed to meet the legal requirements of 40 CFR 61, Subpart H, and still be reasonable and appropriate under the existing circumstances.

Culp, T.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hylko, J.M. [Roy F. Weston, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-10-01

327

Report of the workshop on Arctic oil and gas recovery held at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico, June 30-July 2, 1980  

SciTech Connect

This report is the result of a workshop on Arctic offshore oil and gas recovery, held at Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico, on June 30-July 2, 1980. Research priorities for the technology related to Arctic offshore oil and gas production were defined. The workshop was preceded by a report entitled, A Review of Technology for Arctic Offshore Oil and Gas Recovery, authored by Dr. W. M. Sackinger. The mission of the workshop was to identify research priorities without considering whether the research should be conducted by government or by industry. Nevertheless, at the end of the meeting the general discussion did consider this, and the concensus was that environmental properties should certainly be of concern to the government, that implementation of petroleum operations was the province of industry, and that overlapping, coordinated areas of interest include both environment and interactions of the environment with structures, transport systems, and operations. An attempt to establish relative importance and a time frame was made after the workshop through the use of a survey form. The form and a summary of its results, and a discussion of its implications, are given.

Sackinger, W. M. [ed.] [ed.

1980-09-01

328

Evaluation of Radiometers in Full-Time Use at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory Solar Radiation Research Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the evaluation of the relative performance of the complement of solar radiometers deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL).

Wilcox, S. M.; Myers, D. R.

2008-12-01

329

A Sandia telephone database system  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, may soon have more responsibility for the operation of its own telephone system. The processes that constitute providing telephone service can all be improved through the use of a central data information system. We studied these processes, determined the requirements for a database system, then designed the first stages of a system that meets our needs for work order handling, trouble reporting, and ISDN hardware assignments. The design was based on an extensive set of applications that have been used for five years to manage the Sandia secure data network. The system utilizes an Ingres database management system and is programmed using the Application-By-Forms tools.

Nelson, S.D.; Tolendino, L.F.

1991-08-01

330

Sandia programs relevant to microelectronics fabrication  

SciTech Connect

This report was prepared for the Semiconductor Industry and the National Laboratories Workshop held at the National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC, February 24, 1987. It details the current Sandia program activities relevant to microelectronics fabrication.

Picraux, S.T.; Vook, F.L.; Gregory, B.L.

1987-04-01

331

Sandia Explosive Inventory and Information System.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Explosive Inventory and Information System (EIS) is being developed and implemented by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to incorporate a cradle to grave structure for all explosives and explosive containing devices and assemblies at SNL from acquisi...

D. A. Clements

1994-01-01

332

Sandia technology  

SciTech Connect

Four mini-reports are included: modeling Mount St. Helen's volcanic eruption, Sierra Nevada magmatic activity, electro-optics for radiation environments, and compound semiconductors for high-temperature electronics. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the last two mini-reports. (DLC)

Not Available

1983-06-01

333

Identification of remediation needs and technology development focus areas for the Environmental Restoration (ER) Project at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM)  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Restoration (ER) Project has been tasked with the characterization, assessment, remediation and long-term monitoring of contaminated waste sites at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM). Many of these sites will require remediation which will involve the use of baseline technologies, innovative technologies that are currently under development, and new methods which will be developed in the near future. The Technology Applications Program (TAP) supports the ER Project and is responsible for development of new technologies for use at the contaminated waste sites, including technologies that will be used for remediation and restoration of these sites. The purpose of this report is to define the remediation needs of the ER Project and to identify those remediation needs for which the baseline technologies and the current development efforts are inadequate. The area between the remediation needs and the existing baseline/innovative technology base represents a technology gap which must be filled in order to remediate contaminated waste sites at SNL/NM economically and efficiently. In the first part of this report, the remediation needs of the ER Project are defined by both the ER Project task leaders and by TAP personnel. The next section outlines the baseline technologies, including EPA defined Best Demonstrated Available Technologies (BDATs), that are applicable at SNL/NM ER sites. This is followed by recommendations of innovative technologies that are currently being developed that may also be applicable at SNL/NM ER sites. Finally, the gap between the existing baseline/innovative technology base and the remediation needs is identified. This technology gap will help define the future direction of technology development for the ER Project.

Tucker, M.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Site Restoration Technology Program Office; Valdez, J.M.; Khan, M.A. [IT Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-06-01

334

Application of a NAPL partitioning interwell tracer test (PITT) to support DNAPL remediation at the Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico chemical waste landfill  

SciTech Connect

Chlorinated solvents as dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) are present at a large number of hazardous waste sites across the U.S. and world. DNAPL is difficult to detect in the subsurface, much less characterize to any degree of accuracy. Without proper site characterization, remedial decisions are often difficult to make and technically effective, cost-efficient remediations are even more difficult to obtain. A new non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) characterization technology that is superior to conventional technologies has been developed and applied at full-scale. This technology, referred to as the Partitioning Interwell Tracer Test (PITT), has been adopted from oil-field practices and tailored to environmental application in the vadose and saturated zones. A PITT has been applied for the first time at full-scale to characterize DNAPL in the vadose zone. The PITT was applied in December 1995 beneath two side-by-side organic disposal pits at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) RCRA Interim Status Chemical Waste Landfill (CWL), located in Albuquerque, New Mexico. DNAPL, consisting of a mixture of chlorinated solvents, aromatic hydrocarbons, and PCE oils, is known to exist in at least one of the two buried pits. The vadose zone PITT was conducted by injecting a slug of non-partitioning and NAPL-partitioning tracers into and through a zone of interest under a controlled forced gradient. The forced gradient was created by a balanced extraction of soil gas at a location 55 feet from the injector. The extracted gas stream was sampled over time to define tracer break-through curves. Soil gas sampling ports from multilevel monitoring installations were sampled to define break-through curves at specific locations and depths. Analytical instrumentation such as gas chromatographs and a photoacoustical analyzers operated autonomously, were used for tracer detection.

Studer, J.E. [INTERA Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mariner, P.; Jin, M. [INTERA Inc., Austin, TX (United States)] [and others

1996-05-01

335

Metrology laboratory requirements for third-generation synchrotron radiation sources  

SciTech Connect

New third-generation synchrotron radiation sources that are now, or will soon, come on line will need to decide how to handle the testing of optical components delivered for use in their beam lines. In many cases it is desirable to establish an in-house metrology laboratory to do the work. We review the history behind the formation of the Optical Metrology Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory and the rationale for its continued existence. We offer suggestions to those who may be contemplating setting up similar facilities, based on our experiences over the past two decades.

Takacs, P.Z.; Quian, Shinan

1997-11-01

336

Sandia Agile MEMS Prototyping, Layout Tools, Education and Services Program  

SciTech Connect

Research and development in the design and manufacture of Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) is growing at an enormous rate. Advances in MEMS design tools and fabrication processes at Sandia National Laboratories` Microelectronics Development Laboratory (MDL) have broadened the scope of MEMS applications that can be designed and manufactured for both military and commercial use. As improvements in micromachining fabrication technologies continue to be made, MEMS designs can become more complex, thus opening the door to an even broader set of MEMS applications. In an effort to further research and development in MEMS design, fabrication, and application, Sandia National Laboratories has launched the Sandia Agile MEMS Prototyping, Layout Tools, Education and Services Program or SAMPLES program. The SAMPLES program offers potential partners interested in MEMS the opportunity to prototype an idea and produce hardware that can be used to sell a concept. The SAMPLES program provides education and training on Sandia`s design tools, analysis tools and fabrication process. New designers can participate in the SAMPLES program and design MEMS devices using Sandia`s design and analysis tools. As part of the SAMPLES program, participants` designs are fabricated using Sandia`s 4 level polycrystalline silicon surface micromachine technology fabrication process known as SUMMiT (Sandia Ultra-planar, Multi-level MEMS Technology). Furthermore, SAMPLES participants can also opt to obtain state of the art, post-fabrication services provided at Sandia such as release, packaging, reliability characterization, and failure analysis. This paper discusses the components of the SAMPLES program.

Schriner, H.; Davies, B.; Sniegowski, J.; Rodgers, M.S.; Allen, J.; Shepard, C.

1998-05-01

337

Calibration of the Standards and Calibration Laboratory`s Co{sup 60} Radiation Pool  

SciTech Connect

The authors report measurements of dose rates at various locations in the LLNL Standards and Calibrations Laboratory`s Co{sup 60} Radiation Pool. Plots show the dependence of dose rate on radius near the bottom of the pool and the dependence of dose rate on height at a fixed distance from the pool center. The effect of varying sample location within the pool`s dry-well was also investigated.

Wirtenson, G.R.; White, R.H.

1993-01-01

338

Sandia software guidelines. Volume 3. Standards, practices, and conventions  

SciTech Connect

This volume is one in a series of Sandia Software Guidelines intended for use in producing quality software within Sandia National Laboratories. In consonance with the IEEE Standard for Software Quality Assurance Plans, this volume identifies software standards, conventions, and practices. These guidelines are the result of a collective effort within Sandia National Laboratories to define recommended deliverables and to document standards, practices, and conventions which will help ensure quality software. 66 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

Not Available

1986-07-01

339

Savannah River Plant/Savannah River Laboratory radiation exposure report  

SciTech Connect

The protection of worker health and safety is of paramount concern at the Savannah River Site. Since the site is one of the largest nuclear sites in the nation, radiation safety is a key element in the protection program. This report is a compendium of the results in 1988 of the programs at the Savannah River Plant and the Savannah River Laboratory to protect the radiological health of employees. By any measure, the radiation protection performance at this site in 1988 was the best since the beginning of operations. This accomplishment was made possible by the commitment and support at all levels of the organizations to reduce radiation exposures to ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable). The report provides detailed information about the radiation doses received by departments and work groups within these organizations. It also includes exposure data for recent years to allow Plant and Laboratory units to track the effectiveness of their ALARA efforts. Many of the successful practices and methods that reduced radiation exposure are described. A new goal for personnel contamination cases has been established for 1989. Only through continual and innovative efforts to minimize exposures can the goals be met. The radiation protection goals for 1989 and previous years are included in the report. 27 figs., 58 tabs.

Rogers, C.D.; Hyman, S.D.; Keisler, L.L. (Du Pont de Nemours (E.I.) and Co., Aiken, SC (USA). Savannah River Plant); Reeder, D.F.; Jolly, L.; Spoerner, M.T.; Schramm, G.R. (Du Pont de Nemours (E.I.) and Co., Aiken, SC (USA). Savannah River Lab.)

1989-01-01

340

The Sandia Lightning Simulator Recommissioning and upgrades.  

SciTech Connect

The Sandia lightning simulator at Sandia National Laboratories can provide up to 200 kA for a simulated single lightning stroke, 100 kA for a subsequent stroke, and hundreds of Amperes of continuing current. It has recently been recommissioned after a decade of inactivity and the single-stroke capability demonstrated. The simulator capabilities, basic design components, upgrades, and diagnostic capabilities are discussed in this paper.

Martinez, Leonard E.; Caldwell, Michele

2005-08-01

341

Solar radiation-based calibration of laboratory grade radiometers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Remote Sensing Group (RSG) at the University of Arizona Optical Sciences Center has been performing high accuracy laboratory calibration for over 20 years. This work has been done both in support of our work in vicarious calibration of space-borne and airborne imaging sensors and as a standalone means of achieving NIST-traceable radiometric calibration. The solar radiation-based calibration (SRBC) has in the past been a way for the RSG to verify calibration results and to achieve continued calibration of field-grade instruments. This paper presents multiple SRBC results for multiple laboratory-grade radiometers. These results are compared with laboratory calibrations and studied for their merit as a sole means of high-accuracy calibration.

Anderson, Nik; Biggar, Stuart; Thome, Kurt; Leisso, Nathan

2007-10-01

342

Creating a Driven, Collapsed Radiative Shock in the Laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report details of the first experimental campaign to create a driven, planar, radiatively collapsed in laboratory experiment. Radiation hydrodynamics experiments are challenging to realize in a laboratory setting, requiring high temperatures in a system of sufficient extent. The Omega laser at ˜10^15 W/cm^2 drives a thin slab of low-Z material at >100 km/s gas via laser ablation pressure. This slab initially shocks, then continues driving a shock through a cylindrical volume of Xe gas at 6 mg/cc. Simulations predict a collapsed layer in which the density reaches ˜45 times initial density. Side-on x-ray backlighting was the principal diagnostic. We have successfully imaged shocks with average velocities between 95-205 km/sec, with measured thicknesses of 45-150 ?m in experiments lasting up to 20 ns and spanning up 2.5 mm in extent. Comparison of the shock position as a function of time from these experiments to 1D radiation hydrodynamic simulation results show some discrepancy, which will be explored. Optical depth before and behind the shock is important for meaningful comparison to these astrophysical systems. This shock is optically thin to emitted radiation in the unshocked region and optically thick to radiation in the shocked, dense region. We compare this system to collapsed shocks in astrophysical systems with similar optical depth profiles. An experiment using a Thomson scattering diagnostic across the shock front is also discussed. This research was sponsored by the National Nuclear Security Administration under the Stewardship Science Academic Alliances program through DOE Research Grants DE-FG52-03NA00064, DE-FG53-2005-NA26014, and other grants and contracts.

Reighard, Amy

2006-10-01

343

Technical developments at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory.  

PubMed

The NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) located at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a center for space radiation research in both the life and physical sciences. BNL is a multidisciplinary research facility operated for the Office of Science of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The BNL scientific research portfolio supports a large and diverse science and technology program including research in nuclear and high-energy physics, material science, chemistry, biology, medial science, and nuclear safeguards and security. NSRL, in operation since July 2003, is an accelerator-based facility which provides particle beams for radiobiology and physics studies (Lowenstein in Phys Med 17(supplement 1):26-29 2001). The program focus is to measure the risks and to ameliorate the effects of radiation encountered in space, both in low earth orbit and extended missions beyond the earth. The particle beams are produced by the Booster synchrotron, an accelerator that makes up part of the injector sequence of the DOE nuclear physics program's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. Ion species from protons to gold are presently available, at energies ranging from <100 to >1,000 MeV/n. The NSRL facility has recently brought into operation the ability to rapidly switch species and beam energy to supply a varied spectrum onto a given specimen. A summary of past operation performance, plans for future operations and recent and planned hardware upgrades will be described. PMID:17211657

Lowenstein, D I; Rusek, A

2007-06-01

344

Simulation and off-line programming at Sandia`s Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center  

SciTech Connect

One role of the Intelligent Robotics and System Center (ISRC) at Sandia National Laboratories is to address certain aspects of Sandia`s mission to design, manufacture, maintain, and dismantle nuclear weapon components. Hazardous materials, devices, and environments are often involved. Because of shrinking resources, these tasks must be accomplished with a minimum of prototyping, while maintaining high reliability. In this paper, the authors describe simulation, off-line programming/planning, and related tools which are in use, under development, and being researched to solve these problems at the ISRC.

Xavier, P.G.; Fahrenholtz, J.C.; McDonald, M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center] [and others

1997-11-01

345

Comparative 2D Radiation MHD Simulations of Argon Gas Puff Z-pinch Plasma Experiments on the Sandia Z Machine Using the Radiative Diffusion and CRE Transport Models  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The recent development of the computationally efficient tabulated collisional radiative equilibrium (TCRE) radiation transport model(J.W. Thornhill, J.P. Apruzese, J. Davis, R.W. Clark, A.L. Velikovich, J.L. Giuliani, Jr., Y.K. Chong, K.G. Whitney, C. Deeney, C.A. Coverdale and F.L. Cochran, Phys. Plasmas 7, 3480 (2001).) has made possible full multidimensional radiation MHD simulations of hot dense Z-pinch plasmas with a realistic description of the non-LTE ionization dynamics and radiation transport physics. In this study, we focus on the implementation of the TCRE radiation transport model in the Mach2 2D radiation MHD code. An application of the model is made through a full dynamical simulation of an argon gas puff pinch driven by a circuit model of the Z generator. An analysis of the simulation, in particular, the K- and L-shell radiation yields, as well as the spectral and spatial characteristics of the radiation will be presented. In addition, a comparison of this multidimensional transport method will be made with the existing radiative diffusion model.

Chong, Y. K.; Thornhill Giuliani, J. W., Jr.; Apruzese, J. P.; Terry, R. E.; Davis, J.

2001-10-01

346

The {open_quotes}ASR{close_quotes} story where we are and how we got there: A history of Sandia National Laboratories maintenance employee safety committee  

SciTech Connect

The Area Safety Representative (ASR) Team is an employee based safety committee that was originated in the latter part of 1994. It was introduced by the Operations and Engineering Center ES&H Coordinator who had heard about an employee based safety program implemented at the EG&G Corporation. This information was the first step in creating Sandia`s Maintenance `Area Safety Representative` (ASR) Program. An advertisement went out from the ES&H Coordinator to all the Maintenance Organizations asking for individuals who would be interested in performing as a volunteer safety representative for their section. The interest was moderate but effective. The committee consisted of one volunteer from each of the working sections within the Maintenance Organization, e.e., HVAC Mechanics, Electricians, Millwrights, Plumbers, Sheetmetal Workers, High-Voltage Technicians, a Union Representative, and representatives from the Operations Group that manage sub-contracted personnel. During the past year, organizational changes have brought about the addition of representatives to include the Planners and the Custodians. The original committee members were enrolled in a 30-hour OSHA Voluntary Compliance Outreach Course. This information provided the members with a broad overview of the Safety Guidelines set forth by OSHA for themselves and their coworkers. It is to be noted that this is an employee based safety team. There are no supervisors or managers on the committee but their attendance is always welcomed at the ASR meetings.

NONE

1997-08-01

347

Overview of Sandia`s Electric Vehicle Battery Program  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories is actively involved several projects which are part of an overall Electric Vehicle Battery Program. Part of this effort is funded by the United States Department of Energy/Office of Transportation Technologies (DOE/OTT) and the remainder is funded through the United States Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC). DOE/OTT supported activities include research and development of zinc/air and sodium/sulfur battery technologies as well as double layer capacitor (DLC) R&D. Projects in the USABC funded work include lithium/polymer electrolyte (LPE) R&D, sodium/sulfur activities and battery test and evaluation.

Clark, R.P.

1993-12-31

348

Another dramatic climb toward fusion conditions for Sandia Z accelerator  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This news article, from Sandia National Laboratories, presents advances made on the Sandia Z- pinch machine, which is an intense X-ray source and a possible candidate for fusion power production. The article describes how the machine works and also describes experimental results. Links to more information and images of the machine are also contained.

2007-04-06

349

Sandia SCADA Program -- High Surety SCADA LDRD Final Report  

Microsoft Academic Search

Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems are a part of the nation's critical infrastructure that is especially vulnerable to attack or disruption. Sandia National Laboratories is developing a high-security SCADA specification to increase the national security posture of the U.S. Because SCADA security is an international problem and is shaped by foreign and multinational interests, Sandia is working to

ROLF E

2002-01-01

350

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory activity report for 1987  

SciTech Connect

During 1987, SSRL achieved many significant advances and reached several major milestones utilizing both SPEAR and PEP as synchrotron radiation sources as described in this report. Perhaps the following two are worthy of particular mention: (1) SPEAR reached an all time high of 4,190 delivered user-shifts during calendar year 1987, highlights of the many scientific results are given; (2) during a 12 day run in December of 1987, PEP was operated in a low emittance mode (calculated emittance 6.4 nanometer-radians) at 7.1 GeV with currents up to 33 mA. A second undulator beam line on PEP was commissioned during this run and used to record many spectra showing the extremely high brightness of the radiation. PEP is now by far the highest brightness synchrotron radiation source in the world. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) laboratory operations; (2) accelerator physics programs; (3) experimental facilities; (4) engineering division; (5) conferences and workshops; (6) SSRL organization; (7) experimental progress reports; (8) active proposals; (9) SSRL experiments and proposals by institution; and (10) SSRL publications.

Robinson, S.; Cantwell, K. [eds.

1988-12-31

351

[Estimation of radiation exposure and radiation risk for employees of a heart catheterization laboratory].  

PubMed

The staff at interventional radiological procedures is exposed to high levels of ionizing radiation. This applies especially to measures at cardiac catheterization laboratories. In this study the annual radiation exposure to the staff was estimated by measuring the dose rate under characteristic conditions. It could be shown that the resulting radiation exposure was strongly dependent on the radiation protection measures and is also dependent on the operation conditions of the x-ray-tube. The effective dose for the physician wearing a lead apron and thyroid shield was determined to about 1.7 mSv/a. Without a thyroid shield an effective dose of about 3.5 mSv/a resulted. This corresponds to approximately the natural background radiation of about 2.4 mSv/a in the Federal Republic of Germany. From the number of procedures performed we could derive an effective dose of approximately 1-2 microSv per application for the physician, averaged over all types of procedures. Further, it could be shown that the readings of the film badges, usually worn by the staff, underestimate the effective dose by approximately a factor of two. This is because the film badges do not include the contribution of the unshielded parts of the body to effective dose. From the estimated annual effective dose, a lifetime dose of 68 mSv was estimated for a 40-year working career. The corresponding lifetime risk for induced fatal cancer due to radiation exposure was determined to 0.3% applying the ICRP risk factor of 4 x 10(-2) Sv-1. Considering the NCRP recommendations for a safe occupation, working in a cardiac catheterization laboratory can be considered as safe when applying all radiation protection measures. However, changing the protection measures and modifying the parameters of the x-ray-tube can lead to strong changes of the radiation exposure and the resulting risk estimation. PMID:9235797

Folkerts, K H; Münz, A; Jung, S

1997-04-01

352

Overview of Sandia's fiber laser program  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sandia National Laboratories' program in high-power fiber lasers has emphasized development of enabling technologies for power scaling and gaining a quantitative understanding of fundamental limits, particularly for high-peak-power, pulsed fiber sources. This paper provides an overview of the program, which includes: (1) power scaling of diffraction-limited fiber amplifiers by bend-loss-induced mode filtering to produce >1 MW peak power and >1 mJ pulse energy with a practical system architecture; (2) demonstration of a widely tunable repetition rate (7.1-27 kHz) while maintaining constant pulse duration and pulse energy, linear output polarization, diffraction-limited beam quality, and <1% pulse-energy fluctuations; (3) development of microlaser seed sources optimized for efficient energy extraction; (4) high-fidelity, three-dimensional, time-dependent modeling of fiber amplifiers, including nonlinear processes; (5) quantitative assessment of the limiting effects of four-wave mixing and self-focusing on fiber-amplifier performance; (6) nonlinear frequency conversion to efficiently generate mid-infrared through deep-ultraviolet radiation; (7) direct diode-bar pumping of a fiber laser using embedded-mirror side pumping, which provides 2.0x higher efficiency and much more compact packaging than traditional approaches employing formatted, fiber-coupled diode bars; and (8) fundamental studies of materials properties, including optical damage, photodarkening, and gamma-radiation-induced darkening.

Kliner, Dahv A. V.; Bambha, Ray P.; Do, Binh T.; Farrow, Roger L.; Fève, Jean-Philippe; Fox, Brian P.; Hadley, G. Ronald; Hansen, Andrea; Hoffman, Hanna J.; Hotoleanu, Mircea; Hoops, Alexandra A.; Hsu, Wen L.; Koplow, Jeffrey P.; Koponen, Joona; Moore, Sean W.; Schmitt, Randal L.; Schrader, Paul E.; Simmons, Joseph H.; Simmons-Potter, Kelly; Smith, Arlee V.; Söderlund, Mikko; Thomes, W. Joseph; Wien, Georg

2008-05-01

353

Sandia Strategic Plan 1997  

SciTech Connect

Sandia embarked on its first exercise in corporate strategic planning during the winter of 1989. The results of that effort were disseminated with the publication of Strategic Plan 1990. Four years later Sandia conducted their second major planning effort and published Strategic Plan 1994. Sandia`s 1994 planning effort linked very clearly to the Department of Energy`s first strategic plan, Fueling a Competitive Economy. It benefited as well from the leadership of Lockheed Martin Corporation, the management and operating contractor. Lockheed Martin`s corporate success is founded on visionary strategic planning and annual operational planning driven by customer requirements and technology opportunities. In 1996 Sandia conducted another major planning effort that resulted in the development of eight long-term Strategic Objectives. Strategic Plan 1997 differs from its predecessors in that the robust elements of previous efforts have been integrated into one comprehensive body. The changes implemented so far have helped establish a living strategic plan with a stronger business focus and with clear deployment throughout Sandia. The concept of a personal line of sight for all employees to this strategic plan and its objectives, goals, and annual milestones is becoming a reality.

NONE

1997-12-01

354

Energy and Environment: A Sandia Technology Bulletin  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Planning and Staff Support of the Sandia National Laboratories publishes a monthly bulletin titled, Energy and Environment. The bulletin facilitates technology exchange with industries, universities, and with other government agencies. This bulletin is for the month of April 1992 and covers such things as new methods of soldering which reduces environmental threats by avoiding chlorofluorocarbon solvents. Some technologies developed

L. Parrott; N. S. Hey; H. Floyd

1992-01-01

355

PREFACE: Acceleration and radiation generation in space and laboratory plasmas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sixty-six leading researchers from ten nations gathered in the Homeric village of Kardamyli, on the southern coast of mainland Greece, from August 29-September 4, 1993 for the International Workshop on Acceleration and Radiation Generation in Space and Laboratory Plasmas. This Special Issue represents a cross-section of the presentations made at and the research stimulated by that meeting. According to the Iliad, King Agamemnon used Kardamyli as a dowry offering in order to draw a sulking Achilles into the Trojan War. 3000 years later, Kardamyli is no less seductive. Its remoteness and tranquility made it an ideal venue for promoting the free exchange of ideas between various disciplines that do not normally interact. Through invited presen tations, informal poster discussions and working group sessions, the Workshop brought together leaders from the laboratory and space/astrophysics communities working on common problems of acceleration and radiation generation in plasmas. It was clear from the presentation and discussion sessions that there is a great deal of common ground between these disciplines which is not at first obvious due to the differing terminologies and types of observations available to each community. All of the papers in this Special Issue highlight the role collective plasma processes play in accelerating particles or generating radiation. Some are state-of-the-art presentations of the latest research in a single discipline, while others investi gate the applicability of known laboratory mechanisms to explain observations in natural plasmas. Notable among the latter are the papers by Marshall et al. on kHz radiation in the magnetosphere ; Barletta et al. on collective acceleration in solar flares; and by Dendy et al. on ion cyclotron emission. The papers in this Issue are organized as follows: In Section 1 are four general papers by Dawson, Galeev, Bingham et al. and Mon which serves as an introduction to the physical mechanisms of acceleration and radiation generation in plasmas. The next section includes state-of-the-art papers on laboratory accelerators driven by lasers (Nakajima et al., Shukla, Johnson et al.), microwaves (Nishida et al., Bogomolov et al.) and by particle beams (Ogata et al.). Also in this section are theoretical papers presenting new work on synchrotron like oscillations in plasma waves (Fedele) and two types of laboratory radiation sources, FEL's (Marshall et al.) and ionization fronts (Lai et al.), and Frantzeskakis et al. described the Hamiltonian analysis of a slow-wave autonomous cyclotron buncher. Section 3 contains papers on astrophysical plasmas, with the general presentations of Colgate and Krishnan. Kazanas and Krishnan address active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Thielheim discusses general acceleration mech anisms in rotating magnetized systems. Asseo discussed Langmuir solitons in pulsars and Blackman et al. treat magnetic reconnection relativistically. Su et al. analyze the possibility of plasma wave excitation and particle acceleration by neu trinos from supernovae. Dogiel et al. on cosmic ray scattering by MHD fluctuations. The papers in Section 4 treat fusion plasmas (Dendy et al. and Lashmore-Davies et al.). Section 5, space plasmas, includes papers on acceleration processes in the magnetosphere (Anagnostopoulos and Marshall et al.) and the sun (Barletta et al.). It is evident from the Workshop and the papers collected here that this is indeed a rich field of investigations and that both the natural and laboratory plasma communities can benefit from the cross-fertilization of ideas between them. We wish to thank the authors and attendees for their contributions to the success of this workshop, Dr Philip Debenham and Dr David Sutter of the U.S. D.o.E. and Dr Charles Roberson of the U.S. O.N.R. for their financial support (Grants DE-FGO3-93ER40776 and N00014-93-1-0814), and the ECC Twinning Grant SC1*-CT92-0773. We appreciate the considerable local support from Mr Glegles and his staff at the Agricultural Bank of Greece. We thank Mr V. Tataronis, mayor of Kardamyli, and

Bingham, R.; Katsouleas, T.; Dawson, J. M.; Stenflo, L.

1994-01-01

356

Sandia Software Guidelines, Volume 2. Documentation  

SciTech Connect

This volume is one in a series of Sandia Software Guidelines intended for use in producing quality software within Sandia National Laboratories. In consonance with the IEEE Standards for software documentation, this volume provides guidance in the selection of an adequate document set for a software project and example formats for many types of software documentation. A tutorial on life cycle documentation is also provided. Extended document thematic outlines and working examples of software documents are available on electronic media as an extension of this volume.

NONE

1995-09-01

357

Technical findings from Sandia`s intrabuilding recabling project  

SciTech Connect

The US and other leading nations are at the forefront of a global trend to implement both national and international enterprise networks via information highways. New or upgraded cabling infrastructures are essential to support these activities. Professionals in the telecommunications industry are keenly aware of the challenges presented by such cabling upgrades. Desktop connectivity must be established before quantum leaps in information flow, as suggested by new technologies and global concepts. Some businesses with campus-type facilities have undertaken this formidable challenge. Universities and other higher-level learning institutions, corporate research facilities, independent and government-funded laboratories, financial institutions, medical facilities, and unique suburban housing test sites have risen to this challenge. Sandia National Laboratories is one such organization. This report presents the lessons learned from this project and gives 13 specific recommendations for manufacturers, buyers, and installers.

Adams, R.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Eberhart, J.A. [Holmes and Narver, Inc., Las Vegas, NV (United States)

1996-02-01

358

Sandia SCADA Program High-Security SCADA LDRD Final Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems are a part of the nation's critical infrastructure that is especially vulnerable to attack or disruption. Sandia National Laboratories is developing a high-security SCADA specification to increase t...

R. Carlson

2002-01-01

359

Bibliography of Reports by the Sandia Photovoltaic Projects.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Sandia Laboratories manages the Systems Definition and Development and the Photovoltaic Concentrator Technology Development projects of the US Department of Energy's Photovoltaics Program. Technical information developed by these projects is disseminated ...

D. G. Schueler

1979-01-01

360

Correlation Between Some Current Parameters and Optical Radiation Generated by 280 mm Long Laboratory Sparks.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Discussed here is the optical radiation generated by 280 mm long laboratory discharges and its relationship to the current flowing in the discharge channel. In an experiment, the optical radiation generated by the discharges was measured at wavelengths 77...

D. Windmar V. Cooray V. Scuka

1991-01-01

361

Laboratory Studies of Supersonic Magnetized Plasma Jets and Radiative Shocks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this talk I will focus on laboratory plasma experiments producing magnetically driven supersonic plasma jets and on the interaction of these jets with ambient media. The experiments are scalable to astrophysical flows in that the critical dimensionless numbers such as the plasma collisionality, the plasma beta, the Reynolds number and the magnetic Reynolds number are all in the astrophysically appropriate ranges. The experimental results will be compared with computer simulations performed with laboratory plasma codes and with astrophysical codes. In the experiments the jets are driven and collimated by the toroidal magnetic fields and it is found that the level of MHD instabilities in the jets strongly depends on the strength of the field represented by the ratio of the thermal to magnetic field pressures (plasma beta). The experiments show the possibility of formation of episodic outflows, with periodic ejections of magnetic bubbles naturally evolving into a heterogeneous jet propagating inside a channel made of self-collimated magnetic cavities [1,2]. We also found that it is possible to form quasi-laminar jets which are “indirectly” collimated by the toroidal magnetic fields, but this requires the presence of the lower density halo plasma surrounding the central jet [3]. Studies of the radiative shocks formed in the interaction of the supersonic magnetized plasma flows with ambient plasma will be also presented, and the development of cooling instabilities in the post-shock plasma will be discussed. This research was sponsored by EPSRC Grant No. EP/G001324/1 and by the OFES DOE under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-SC-0001063. References 1. A. Ciardi, S.V. Lebedev, A. Frank et al., The Astrophysical Journal, 691: L147-L150 (2009) 2. F.A. Suzuki-Vidal, S.V. Lebedev, S.N. Bland et al., Physics of Plasmas, 17, 112708 (2010). 3. F.A. Suzuki-Vidal, M. Bocchi, S.V. Lebedev et al., Physics of Plasmas, 19, 022708 (2012).

Lebedev, Sergey

2013-06-01

362

The NASA Microelectronics Space Radiation Effects Program (MSREP) at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The primary objective of the Microelectronics Space Radiation Effects Program (MSREP) at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is to assist NASA in the selection of radiation hardened microelectronic parts for insertion in NASA space systems through radiation testing and research. Prior to presenting examples of the research and testing on Single Event Effects (SEE) and Total Ionizing Dose (TID) effects, the space radiation environment and radiation requirements for the CRAFT/Cassini program, a typical JPL space project, are discussed.

Barnes, C.; Coss, J.; Nichols, D.; Shaw, D.

1991-01-01

363

Circumsolar Radiation Data: The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Reduced Data Base  

DOE Data Explorer

The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Reduced Data Base contains approximately 288 megabytes of information, including detailed intensity profiles of the solar and circumsolar region, the total and spectrally divided direct normal radiation data, as well as the total hemispherical solar radiation in the horizontal plane and the plane facing the sun. Data are available for 11 locations in the United States in the period 1976 to 1981. The measurements were made by four circumsolar telescopes operating about 16 hours per day. The Reduced Data Base represents about one-tenth of the total data taken by the circumsolar telescopes. The sites, the amount of data available for each site, and the collection dates are: • Albuquerque (STTF), New Mexico (28,971 data sets from 4/77 to 10/79 • Albuquerque (TETF), New Mexico (13,851 data sets from 5/76 to 3/77) • Argonne, Illinois (9,702 data sets from 8/77 to 8/78) • Atlanta, Georgia (38,405 data sets from 6/77 to 6/80) • Barstow, California (36,632 data sets from 7/77 to 10/79) • Boardman, Oregon (4,782 data sets from 2/77 to 5/77) • China Lake, California (10,683 data sets from 7/76 to 3/77) • Colstrip, Montana (616 data sets from 5/77 to 6/77) • Edwards Air Force Base, California (27,344 data sets from 10/79 to 6/81) • Fort Hood (Bunker), Texas (5,150 data sets from 7/76 to 11/76) • Fort Hood (TES), Texas (8,250 data sets from 11/76 to 8/77) Note that each data set is composed of 20 lines of information with each line consistingof 77 characters. These are archived ASCII files. [Information on sites, number of data sets, etc. taken from the online publication (out of print) at http://rredc.nrel.gov/solar/pubs/circumsolar/index.html

364

Laboratory Studies of Magnetically Driven, Radiatively Cooled Supersonic Plasma Jets  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Results of the recent experiments with radiatively cooled jets performed on the pulsed power MAGPIE facility (1.5MA, 250ns) at Imperial College will be presented. The experiments are scalable to astrophysical flows in that critical dimensionless numbers such as the plasma collisionality, the plasma beta, Reynolds number and the magnetic Reynolds number are all in the astrophysically appropriate ranges. The experimental results will be compared with computer simulations performed with laboratory plasma codes and with astrophysical codes. The main part of the presentation will concentrate on the dynamics of magnetically driven jets, in particular on formation of episodic outflows [1]. The experimental results show the periodic ejections of magnetic bubbles naturally evolving into a heterogeneous jet propagating inside a channel made of self-collimated magnetic cavities. Experimental data on the energy balance in the magnetically driven jets, the conversion of the Poynting flux energy into kinetic energy of the outflow, will be also presented. *) In collaboration with A. CIARDI, F.A. SUZUKI-VIDAL, S.N. BLAND, M. BOCCHI, G. BURDIAK, J.P. CHITTENDEN, P. de GROUCHY, G. HALL, A. HARVEY-THOMSON, A. MAROCCHINO, G. SWADLING, A. FRANK, E. G. BLACKMAN, C. STEHLE, M. CAMENZIND. This research was sponsored by EPSRC, by the OFES DOE, by the NNSA under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC03-02NA00057 and by the European Community's Marie Curie Actions within the JETSET network under Contract No. MRTNCT- 2004 005592. References [1] A. Ciardi, S.V. Lebedev, A. Frank et al., The Astrophysical Journal, 691: L147-L150 (2009).

Lebedev, Sergey V.

2010-05-01

365

[Assessment of exposure to laser radiation in research laboratories].  

PubMed

The problem of laser safety is now topical due to the wide use of laser systems in different working environments. The program of prevention and protection prescribed by law 626/94 gives general rules for the elimination (where possible) and/or reduction of risk factors. For this purpose, it is important to determine the parameters that characterize such risks. The Maximum Permissible Exposure (MPE) and the Nominal Ocular Hazard Distance (NOHD) are the most important parameters of laser safety. The evaluation of these parameters requires a detailed knowledge of the standards and of the various techniques which are necessary to measure them. In particular, the MPE parameters are obtained by CEI EN 60825-1 standard in relation to wavelength and emission duration of the investigated laser. Exposure to laser radiation is usually measured in terms of irradiance (W/m2) or radiant exposure (J/m2). The experimental values of irradiance must be compared with the MPE parameters obtained by safety standards. When the values of irradiance exceed the MPE parameters then the NOHD values must to be calculated. The aim of this paper is to offer a general view of the methods for measuring the above-mentioned parameters for the laser sources that are most widely used in research environments and to compare such parameters with those recommended by safety standards. Our results indicate that for almost all the laser sources analysed, the measured exposure values were greater than the MPE recommended by standards, both for eyes and skin. High values of NOHD indicate that it is necessary to use eye protection, beam stops or attenuators at the end of the useful beam path in normal working conditions and especially in research laboratories in which these conditions can often change. PMID:11515152

Falco, M D; Lepore, M; Indovina, P L

2001-01-01

366

Radiation control program at the Donald W. Douglas Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

From third Health Physics Society midyear topical symposium; Los ; Angeles, California, USA (29 Jan 1969). See CONF-690103P1. The McDonnell ; Douglas Astronautics Company built and operates the Donald W. Douglas ; Laboratories at Richland, Washington. The 57,600 ft² facility is located ; on a 112 acre site. One wing of this multipurpose laboratory houses a ; radioisotope laboratory and

M. L. Smith; C. A. Willis

1972-01-01

367

The Sandia structural control experiments  

SciTech Connect

A program was initiated at Sandia National Laboratories to develop the capability to design and implement structural control. To provide focus for the program, we performed a structural control experiment. The controlled structure hardware consisted of a flexible truss structure, a multiple input-output control processor and piezoelectric actuators and sensors. The controllers were designed using different techniques: (1) Reduced order LQG using modal cost for model reduction with the assumption that the separability principle applies, and (2) Optimal Projection which integrates the estimator, regulator and model reduction processes. A NASTRAN finite element model was used as the basis for the control design model. System identification techniques which updated physical parameters in the finite element model were required to develop an accurate control design model. 13 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs.

Allen, J.J.; Lauffer, J.P.; Marek, E.L.

1990-11-01

368

Overview of Sandia's electric vehicle battery program  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sandia National Laboratories is actively involved in several projects which are part of an overall Electric Vehicle Battery Program. Part of this effort is funded by the United States Department of Energy\\/Office of Transportation Technologies (DOE\\/OTT) and the remainder is funded through the United States Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC). DOE\\/OTT supported activities include research and development of zinc\\/air and sodium\\/sulfur

R. P. Clark

1993-01-01

369

Sandia Technology engineering and science accomplishments  

SciTech Connect

This document presents recent accomplishments in engineering and science at Sandia National Laboratories. Commercial-scale parabolic troughs at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility are used for such applications as heating water, producing steam for industrial processes, and driving absorption air conditioning systems. Computerized-aided design, superconductor technology, radar imaging, soldering technology, software development breakthroughs are made known. Defense programs are exhibited. And microchip engineering applications in test chips, flow sensors, miniature computers, integrated circuits, and microsensors are presented.

Van Arsdall, A.; Floyd, H.L.; Goetsch, B.; Parrott, L.; Pruett, H. (eds.)

1992-01-01

370

Reverberation Chamber Uniformity Validation and Radiated Susceptibility Test Procedures for the NASA High Intensity Radiated Fields Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA Langley Research Center's High Intensity Radiated Fields Laboratory has developed a capability based on the RTCA/DO-160F Section 20 guidelines for radiated electromagnetic susceptibility testing in reverberation chambers. Phase 1 of the test procedure utilizes mode-tuned stirrer techniques and E-field probe measurements to validate chamber uniformity, determines chamber loading effects, and defines a radiated susceptibility test process. The test procedure is segmented into numbered operations that are largely software controlled. This document is intended as a laboratory test reference and includes diagrams of test setups, equipment lists, as well as test results and analysis. Phase 2 of development is discussed.

Koppen, Sandra V.; Nguyen, Truong X.; Mielnik, John J.

2010-01-01

371

Synchrotron radiation applications in medical research at Brookhaven National Laboratory.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In the relatively short time that synchrotrons have been available to the scientific community, their characteristic beams of UV and X-ray radiation have been applied to virtually all areas of medical science which use ionizing radiation. The ability to t...

W. Thomlinson

1997-01-01

372

The new Sandia light ion microbeam  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Ion Beam Laboratory of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) was recently relocated into a brand new building. The 6 MV High Voltage Engineering (HVE) tandem accelerator (hosting the heavy ion microbeam and several analytical beam lines) and the 350 kV HVE implanter with a nanobeam were moved to the new building. There were several new pieces of equipment acquired associated with the move, among them a new high brightness 3 MV Pelletron accelerator, a high resolution light ion microbeam, a nanoimplanter, and a transmission electron microscope (TEM) connected to the tandem accelerator. In this paper this new facility will be described, and initial results of the new microbeam will be presented.

Vizkelethy, G.; Doyle, B. L.; McDaniel, F. L.

2012-02-01

373

Laboratory Training Manual on the Use of Isotopes and Radiation in Entomology.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This publication should be useful for those who are interested in the theory and application of isotopes and radiation in agriculture and entomology. There are two main parts in the publication. Part I, entitled Basic Part, includes topics which an individual should know about radioisotopes and radiation. There are laboratory exercises included in…

International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria).

374

Manufacturing technology. A Sandia Technology Bulletin  

SciTech Connect

This item is a copy of the Dec., 1993 issue of Manufacturing Technology, a Sandia Technology Bulletin. It has information on a number of different projects being conducted by Sandia in the general area of manufacturing sciences. Topics addressed include the following: center for information-technology manufacturing gears up, luctrative flat-panel display market targeted; researchers make copper stick to teflon, patterned adhesion may provide ideal conductor/substrate combination for microcircuits; contact algorithm enhances simulation of manufacturing processes, algorithm efficiently handles previously difficult analyses of punching and cutting operations; national machine tool partnership rolls into action, national laboratories share technology to boost US machine-tool industry; closed-loop MAST system eyes robotic manufacturing, fast, accurate, low-cost sensor demonstrated on furnace brazing.

Leonard, J.; Doran, L.; Floyd, H.L.; Goetsch, B.; Parrott, L. [eds.

1993-12-01

375

Aircraft Radiation Shield Experiments--Preflight Laboratory Testing  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the past, measurements onboard a research Boeing 57F (RB57-F) aircraft have demonstrated that the neutron environment within the aircraft structure is greater than that in the local external environment. Recent studies onboard Boeing 737 commercial flights have demonstrated cabin variations in radiation exposure up to 30 percent. These prior results were the basis of the present study to quantify

Robert C. Singleterry Jr.; Judy L. Shinn; John W. Wilson; Donald L. Maiden; Sheila A. Thibeault; Francis F. Badavi; Thomas Conroy; Leslie Braby

1999-01-01

376

Diurnal Variations of Energetic Particle Radiation Dose Measured by the Mars Science Laboratory Radiation Assessment Detector  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) on board the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover Curiosity has collected data on the interplanetary radiation environment during cruise from Earth to Mars and at the surface of Mars since its landing in August 2012. RAD's particle detection capabilities are achieved with a solid-state detector (SSD) stack (A, B, C), a CsI(Tl) scintillator (D), and a plastic scintillator (E) for neutron detection. The D and E detectors are surrounded by an anticoincidence shield (F), also made of plastic scintillator. All scintillators are optically coupled to silicon diodes which convert scintillation light to electrons. RAD is capable of measuring both Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) thought to be produced by supernovae outside the heliosphere and Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs). GCRs are relativistic particles (100 MeV/nuc to >10 GeV/nuc) composed of roughly 89% protons, 10% alpha particles (He), and 1% heavier nuclei [1]. Because of their high energies and continuous nature, GCRs are the dominant source of background radiation at the Martian surface, and are responsible for the production of secondary particles (notably neutrons) via complex interactions in the atmosphere and regolith. SEPs are produced by coronal mass ejections. These intermittent storms are most likely to occur near solar maximum and typical fluxes are dominated by protons with energies lower than 100 MeV/nuc. Unlike the GCR flux, the SEP flux can vary by five or more orders of magnitude over timescales of a day. Even under a constant flux of energetic particle radiation at the top of the atmosphere, the radiation dose at the surface should vary as a function of surface elevation [2]. This variation is directly related to the change in the shielding provided by the total atmospheric mass column, which is to a very good approximation directly related to surface pressure. Thus, the flux of primary energetic particles should increase with altitude, all other things being equal. At present, MSL has been at a nearly constant altitude of ~-4.4 km MOLA so that no elevation-induced changes are expected and none have been observed. However, any process that changes the column mass of atmosphere should change the dose at the surface. On Mars there are two major processes that substantially change column atmospheric mass. The first is the seasonal condensation cycle during which ~25% of the dominant atmospheric constituent (CO2) condenses onto the winter pole. This seasonal signal is very strong and has been observed by surface pressure measurements from the Viking Landers up through MSL [3,4]. The second major process is related to the thermal tide. The direct heating of the Martian atmosphere by the Sun produces global scale waves that redistribute mass [5]. The two most dominant tidal modes are the diurnal and semidiurnal tide. Together, the thermal tide can produce a variation of 10-15% over a Martian day (sol). Here, we report on the dose measured by the RAD E detector and the variation of this dose over the diurnal cycle. Further, we show that the variation in the E dose rate is very likely due to the variation of column mass, as measured by the pressure sensor on the Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS), driven by the thermal tide. While changes in dose were expected from changes in altitude or season, the discovery of a diurnal variation was not anticipated, although it should have been reasonably expected in hindsight.

Rafkin, Scot; Zeitlin, Cary; Ehresmann, Bent; Köhler, Jan; Guo, Jingnan; Kahanpää, Henrik; Hassler, Don; -Gomez, Javier E.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert; Brinza, David; Böttcher, Stephan; Böhm, Eckhard; Burmeister, Sonka; Martin, Cesar; Müller-Mellin, Robert; Appel, Jan; Posner, Arik; Reitz, Gunter; Kharytonov, Aliksandr; Cucinotta, Francis

2013-04-01

377

Building the basis for a comprehensive radiation protection program for a multi-program laboratory  

SciTech Connect

An explicit, workplace-specific training has been developed, implemented, and documented for all radiation workers. In addition to the radiation worker personnel located at reactors, accelerators, radiochemical laboratories, and waste treatment areas, we have trained other personnel who work in areas where a lesser potential for radiological/chemical exposure exists. These workforces include construction crews, site restoration crews, contracted special services such as scoping and site characterization teams, and short-term visitors. We are developing a comprehensive, integrated approach to radiation protection training suited for a multi-purpose research laboratory. 9 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

Copenhaver, E.D.

1987-01-01

378

Laboratory simulations of radiatively induced entrainment in stratiform clouds  

Microsoft Academic Search

Laboratory experiments have been conducted to simulate entrainment in stratiform clouds. In particular, the case of entrainment across a capping temperature inversion and induced by cloud top cooling has been simulated. This geometry is termed interfacial convection, and its physics differ from the more thoroughly studied case of penetrative convection. The dimensionless entrainment rate associated with interfacial convection has been

Bentley J. Sayler; Robert E. Breidenthal

1998-01-01

379

Nanosatellite program at Sandia National Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

The concept of building extremely small satellites which, either independently or as a collective, can perform missions which are comparable to their much larger cousins, has fascinated scientists and engineers for several years now. In addition to the now commonplace microelectronic integrated circuits, the more recent advent of technologies such as photonic integrated circuits (PIC's) and micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) have

D. A. Reynolds; J. P. Kern; J. L. Schoeneman

1999-01-01

380

Measurements of energetic particle radiation in transit to Mars on the Mars Science Laboratory.  

PubMed

The Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft, containing the Curiosity rover, was launched to Mars on 26 November 2011, and for most of the 253-day, 560-million-kilometer cruise to Mars, the Radiation Assessment Detector made detailed measurements of the energetic particle radiation environment inside the spacecraft. These data provide insights into the radiation hazards that would be associated with a human mission to Mars. We report measurements of the radiation dose, dose equivalent, and linear energy transfer spectra. The dose equivalent for even the shortest round-trip with current propulsion systems and comparable shielding is found to be 0.66 ± 0.12 sievert. PMID:23723233

Zeitlin, C; Hassler, D M; Cucinotta, F A; Ehresmann, B; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R F; Brinza, D E; Kang, S; Weigle, G; Böttcher, S; Böhm, E; Burmeister, S; Guo, J; Köhler, J; Martin, C; Posner, A; Rafkin, S; Reitz, G

2013-05-31

381

National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program Calibration Laboratories Technical Guide for Optical Radiation Measurements.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Handbook 150-2E is one of a series of technical guides for the accreditation of calibration laboratories; each handbook corresponds to one of eight fields of physical metrology calibration: (1) electromagnetic dc/low frequency; (2) microwave frequency; (3...

C. D. Faison C. S. Brickenkamp

2000-01-01

382

Time-resolved shock physics studies on the Sandia Z accelerator  

Microsoft Academic Search

Time-resolved shock wave diagnostics have been a principal tool for understanding the response of materials subjected to intense shock loading. We have extended VISAR interferometry previously developed for high pressure shock physics studies at Sandia to enable a variety of shock wave applications on the Sandia Z Pinch radiation source, including determination of high pressure shock Hugoniots and isentropes, study

J. R. Asay; C. A. Hall; C. H. Konrad; K. G. Holland; W. M. Trott; M. Bernard; C. Wakefield; K. J. Fleming; B. F. Clark; R. J. Lawrence; T. G. Trucano; A. Hauer; R. Cauble

1998-01-01

383

Characterization of the Neutron Fields in the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Radiation Calibration Laboratory Low Scatter Calibration Facility  

SciTech Connect

In June 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) revised its rule on Occupational Radiation Protection, Part 10 CFR 835. A significant aspect of the revision was the adoption of the recommendations outlined in International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Report 60 (ICRP-60), including new radiation weighting factors for neutrons, updated internal dosimetric models, and dose terms consistent with the newer ICRP recommendations. ICRP-60 uses the quantities defined by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) for personnel and area monitoring including the ambient dose equivalent H*(d). A Joint Task Group of ICRU and ICRP has developed various fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients which are published in ICRP-74 for both protection and operational quantities. In February 2008, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) replaced its old pneumatic transport neutron irradiation system in the Radiation Calibration Laboratory (RCL) Low Scatter Calibration Facility (B255, Room 183A) with a Hopewell Designs irradiator model N40. The exposure tube for the Hopewell system is located close to, but not in exactly the same position as the exposure tube for the pneumatic system. Additionally, the sources for the Hopewell system are stored in Room 183A where, prior to the change, they were stored in a separate room (Room 183C). The new source configuration and revision of the 10 CFR 835 radiation weighting factors necessitate a re-evaluation of the neutron dose rates in B255 Room 183A. This report deals only with the changes in the operational quantities ambient dose equivalent and ambient dose rate equivalent for neutrons as a result of the implementation of the revised 10 CFR 835. In the report, the terms 'neutron dose' and 'neutron dose rate' will be used for convenience for ambient neutron dose equivalent and ambient neutron dose rate equivalent unless otherwise stated.

Radev, R

2009-09-04

384

Establishment of the Radiation Detection Laboratory at Fisk University  

SciTech Connect

Synthetic CdZnTe (CZT) semiconducting crystals are highly suitable for the room temperature-based detection of gamma radiation. The surface preparation of Au contacts on surfaces of CZT detectors is typically conducted after (1) polishing to remove artifacts from crystal sectioning and (2) chemical etching, which removes residual mechanical surface damage however etching results in a Te rich surface layer that is prone to oxidize. Our studies show that CZT surfaces that are only polished (as opposed to polished and etched) can be contacted with Au and will yield lower surface currents. Due to their decreased dark currents, these as-polished surfaces can be used in the fabrication of gamma detectors exhibiting a higher performance than polished and etched surfaces with relatively less peak tailing and greater energy resolution.032}

Arnold Burger, Ph.D.

2008-02-28

385

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Activity report for 1988  

SciTech Connect

For SSRL operations, 1988 was a year of stark contrasts. The first extended PEP parasitic running since the construction of our two beam lines on that storage ring took place in November and December. Four experiments discussed below, were performed and detailed operational procedures which allowed synchrotron radiation an high energy users to coexist were established. SSRL anticipates that there will be significant amounts of beam time when PEP is run again for high energy physics. On the other hand, activity on SPEAR consisted of brief parasitic running on the VUV lines in December when the ring was operated at 1.85 GeV for colliding beam experiments. There was no dedicated SPEAR running throughout the entire calendar year. This is the first time since dedicated SPEAR operation was initiated in 1980 that there was no such running. The decision was motivated by both cost and performance factors, as discussed in Section 1 of this report. Fortunately, SLAC and SSRL have reached an agreement on SPEAR and PEP dedicated time charges which eliminates the cost volatility which was so important in the cancellation of the June-July dedicated SPEAR run. As discussed in Section 2, the 3 GeV SPEAR injector construction is proceeding on budget and on schedule. The injector will overcome the difficulties associated with the SLC-era constraint of only two injections per day. SSR and SLAC have also embarked on a program to upgrade SPEAR to achieve high reliability and performance. As a consequence, SSRL`s users may anticipate a highly effective SPEAR by 1991, at the latest. At that time, SPEAR is expected to be fully dedicated to synchrotron radiation research and operated by SSRL. Also contained in this report is a discussion of the improvements to SSRL`s experimental facilities and highlights of the experiments of the past year.

Cantwell, K. [ed.

1996-01-01

386

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory activity report for 1986  

SciTech Connect

1986 was another year of major advances for SSRL as the ultimate capabilities of PEP as a synchrotron radiation source became more apparent and a second PEP beam line was initiated, while effective development and utilization of SPEAR proceeded. Given these various PEP developments, SSRL abandoned its plans for a separate diffraction limited ring, as they abandoned their plans for a 6--7 GeV ring of the APS type last year. It has become increasingly apparent that SSRL should concentrate on developing SPEAR and PEP as synchrotron radiation sources. Consequently, initial planning for a 3 GeV booster synchrotron injector for SPEAR was performed in 1986, with a proposal to the Department of Energy resulting. As described in Chapter 2, the New Rings Group and the Machine Physics Group were combined into one Accelerator Physics Group. This group is focusing mainly on the improvement of SPEAR`s operating conditions and on planning for the conversion of PEP into a fourth generation x-ray source. Considerable emphasis is also being given to the training of accelerator physics graduate students. At the same time, several improvements of SSRL`s existing facilities were made. These are described in Chapter 3. Chapter 4 describes new SSRL beam lines being commissioned. Chapter 5 discusses SSRL`s present construction projects. Chapter 6 discusses a number of projects presently underway in the engineering division. Chapter 7 describes SSRL`s advisory panels while Chapter 8 discusses SSRL`s overall organization. Chapter 9 describes the experimental progress reports.

Cantwell, K. [ed.

1987-12-31

387

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Activity report for 1989  

SciTech Connect

The April, 1990 SPEAR synchrotron radiation run was one of the two or three best in SSRL`s history. High currents were accumulated, ramping went easily, lifetimes were long, beam dumps were infrequent and the average current was 42.9 milliamps. In the one month of operation, 63 different experiments involving 208 scientists from 50 institutions received beam. The end-of-run summary forms completed by the experimenters indicated high levels of user satisfaction with the beam quality and with the outstanding support received from the SSRL technical and scientific staffs. These fine experimental conditions result largely from the SPEAR repairs and improvements performed during the past year and described in Section I. Also quite significant was Max Cornacchia`s leadership of the SLAG staff. SPEAR`s performance this past April stands in marked contrast to that of the January-March, 1989 run which is also described in Section I. It is, we hope, a harbinger of the operation which will be provided in FY `91, when the SPEAR injector project is completed and SPEAR is fully dedicated to synchrotron radiation research. Over the coming years, SSRL intends to give highest priority to increasing the effectiveness of SPEAR and its various beam lines. The beam line and facility improvements performed during 1989 are described in Section III. In order to concentrate effort on SSRL`s three highest priorities prior to the March-April run: (1) to have a successful run, (2) to complete and commission the injector, and (3) to prepare to operate, maintain and improve the SPEAR/injector system, SSRL was reorganized. In the new organization, all the technical staff is contained in three groups: Accelerator Research and Operations Division, Injector Project and Photon Research and Operations Division, as described in Section IV. In spite of the limited effectiveness of the January-March, 1989 run, SSRL`s users made significant scientific progress, as described in Section V of this report.

NONE

1996-01-01

388

Strain Gauge Validation Experiments for the Sandia 34-Meter VAWT (Vertical Axis Wind Turbine) Test Bed.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Sandia National Laboratories has erected a research oriented, 34- meter diameter, Darrieus vertical axis wind turbine near Bushland, Texas. This machine, designated the Sandia 34-m VAWT Test Bed, is equipped with a large array of strain gauges that have b...

H. J. Sutherland

1988-01-01

389

Sandia capabilities for the measurement, characterization, and analysis of heliostats for CSP.  

SciTech Connect

The Concentrating Solar Technologies Organization at Sandia National Laboratories has a long history of performing important research, development, and testing that has enabled the Concentrating Solar Power Industry to deploy full-scale power plants. Sandia continues to pursue innovative CSP concepts with the goal of reducing the cost of CSP while improving efficiency and performance. In this pursuit, Sandia has developed many tools for the analysis of CSP performance. The following capabilities document highlights Sandia's extensive experience in the design, construction, and utilization of large-scale testing facilities for CSP and the tools that Sandia has created for the full characterization of heliostats. Sandia has extensive experience in using these tools to evaluate the performance of novel heliostat designs.

Andraka, Charles E.; Christian, Joshua Mark; Ghanbari, Cheryl M.; Gill, David Dennis; Ho, Clifford Kuofei; Kolb, William J.; Moss, Timothy A.; Smith, Edward J.; Yellowhair, Julius

2013-07-01

390

Dynamics of the optical response of Nd:YAG to ionizing radiation: testing for radiation hardness using UV laser radiation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The optical response of single-crystal Nd:YAG and Cr3+:YAG to ionizing radiation has been previously studied using intense pulses of gamma-rays at the HERMES III facility at Sandia National Laboratory, where samples' transmission at 1064 nm was observed during exposure to gamma radiation. A further study of similar samples when exposed to 10-ns UV laser pulses reveals nearly identical dynamics, with

B. L. Glebov; K. Simmons-Potter; D. C. Meister

2009-01-01

391

Sandia Pulse Reactor personnel dose reduction program  

SciTech Connect

A personnel dose reduction and facility modernization program has resulted in a new appearance and new methods of operation at the Sandia Pulse Reactor (SPR) Facility. By making improvements in many diverse areas - the facility, facility support systems, the reactor stand, and administrative policies - a significant reduction (60%) in the overall personnel dose has been achieved. New Support systems include a remotely controlled, chain-driven experiment retrieval device and a movable, 1.75-inch thick, lead shadow shield. The shadow shield attenuates the radiation field by factors of 10 or higher at normal positions occupied by personnel performing the tasks.

Philbin, J.S.

1986-01-01

392

A shallow underground laboratory for low-background radiation measurements and materials development  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory recently commissioned a new shallow underground laboratory, located at a depth of approximately 30 meters-water-equivalent. This new addition to the small class of radiation measurement laboratories located at modest underground depths houses the latest generation of custom-made, high-efficiency, low-background gamma-ray spectrometers and gas proportional counters. This paper describes the unique capabilities present in the shallow underground laboratory; these include large-scale ultra-pure materials production and a suite of radiation detection systems. Reported data characterize the degree of background reduction achieved through a combination of underground location, graded shielding, and rejection of cosmic-ray events. We conclude by presenting measurement targets and future opportunities.

Aalseth, C. E.; Bonicalzi, R. M.; Cantaloub, M. G.; Day, A. R.; Erikson, L. E.; Fast, J.; Forrester, J. B.; Fuller, E. S.; Glasgow, B. D.; Greenwood, L. R.; Hoppe, E. W.; Hossbach, T. W.; Hyronimus, B. J.; Keillor, M. E.; Mace, E. K.; McIntyre, J. I.; Merriman, J. H.; Myers, A. W.; Overman, C. T.; Overman, N. R. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); and others

2012-11-15

393

A shallow underground laboratory for low-background radiation measurements and materials development  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory recently commissioned a new shallow underground laboratory, located at a depth of approximately 30 meters-water-equivalent. This new addition to the small class of radiation measurement laboratories located at modest underground depths houses the latest generation of custom-made, high-efficiency, low-background gamma-ray spectrometers and gas proportional counters. This paper describes the unique capabilities present in the shallow underground laboratory; these include large-scale ultra-pure materials production and a suite of radiation detection systems. Reported data characterize the degree of background reduction achieved through a combination of underground location, graded shielding, and rejection of cosmic-ray events. We conclude by presenting measurement targets and future opportunities.

Aalseth, C. E.; Bonicalzi, R. M.; Cantaloub, M. G.; Day, A. R.; Erikson, L. E.; Fast, J.; Forrester, J. B.; Fuller, E. S.; Glasgow, B. D.; Greenwood, L. R.; Hoppe, E. W.; Hossbach, T. W.; Hyronimus, B. J.; Keillor, M. E.; Mace, E. K.; McIntyre, J. I.; Merriman, J. H.; Myers, A. W.; Overman, C. T.; Overman, N. R.; Panisko, M. E.; Seifert, A.; Warren, G. A.; Runkle, R. C.

2012-11-01

394

Sandia Multispectral Airborne Lidar for UAV Deployment  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories has initiated the development of an airborne system for W laser remote sensing measurements. System applications include the detection of effluents associated with the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and the detection of biological weapon aerosols. This paper discusses the status of the conceptual design development and plans for both the airborne payload (pointing and tracking, laser transmitter, and telescope receiver) and the Altus unmanned aerospace vehicle platform. Hardware design constraints necessary to maintain system weight, power, and volume limitations of the flight platform are identified.

Daniels, J.W.; Hargis,Jr. P.J.; Henson, T.D.; Jordan, J.D.; Lang, A.R.; Schmitt, R.L.

1998-10-23

395

Overview of Sandia's electric vehicle battery program  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sandia National Laboratories is actively involved in several projects which are part of an overall Electric Vehicle Battery Program. Part of this effort is funded by the United States Department of Energy/Office of Transportation Technologies (DOE/OTT) and the remainder is funded through the United States Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC). DOE/OTT supported activities include research and development of zinc/air and sodium/sulfur battery technologies as well as double layer capacitor (DLC) R&D. Projects in the USABC funded work include lithium/polymer electrolyte (LPE) R&D, sodium/sulfur activities and battery test and evaluation.

Clark, R. P.

1993-11-01

396

Radiation safety systems at Brookhaven National Laboratory's low-energy accelerators  

Microsoft Academic Search

Brookhaven National Laboratory has several low-energy accelerators in use at the present time. I intend to discuss the radiation safety systems installed at five of these accelerators. The accelerators included are a Dynamitron, 3.5 MeV Van de Graaff, 60'' Cyclotron, 41'' Cyclotron and Tandem Van de Graaff facility. All of these accelerators are capable of producing radiation levels in excess

Charles W. Flood; C. W. Jr

1983-01-01

397

Trends in instrumentation for environmental radiation measurements at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Recent instruments developed to fulfill radiation monitoring needs at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory are described. Laboratory instruments that measure tritium gas effluents alone, or in the presence of activated air from D-T fusion reactors are discussed. Fully portable systems for gamma, x-ray, and alpha analyses in the field are described. Also included are descriptions of survey instruments that measure low levels of transuranic contaminants and that measure pulsed-neutron dose rates.

Hiebert, R.D.; Wolf, M.A.

1980-01-01

398

Trends in instrumentation for environmental radiation measurements at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Recent instruments developed to fulfill radiation monitoring needs at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory are described. Laboratory instruments that measure tritium gas effluents alone, or in the presence of activated air from D-T fusion reactors are discussed. Fully portable systems for gamma, x-ray, and alpha analyses in the field are described. Also included are descriptions of survey instruments that measure low levels of transuranic contaminants and that measure pulsed-neutron dose rates.

Hiebert, R.D.; Wolf, M.A.

1981-02-01

399

RESULTS OF THE NASA SPACE RADIATION LABORATORY BEAM STUDIES PROGRAM AT BNL.  

SciTech Connect

The NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) was constructed in collaboration with NASA for the purpose of performing radiation effect studies for the NASA space program. The NSRL makes use of heavy ions in the range of 0.05 to 3 GeV/n slow extracted from BNL's AGS Booster. The purpose of the NSRL Beam Studies Program is to develop a clear understanding of the beams delivered to the facility, to fully characterize those beams, and to develop new capabilities in the interest of understanding the radiation environment in space. In this report we will describe the first results from this program.

BROWN,K.A.AHRENS,L.BEUTTENMULLER,R.H.ET AL.

2004-07-05

400

Patient radiation exposure in a modern, large-volume, pediatric cardiac catheterization laboratory.  

PubMed

Radiation exposure from pediatric cardiac catheterization may be substantial, although published estimates vary. We sought to report patient radiation dose across a range of diagnostic and interventional cases in a modern, high-volume pediatric catheterization laboratory. We retrospectively reviewed diagnostic and interventional cases performed in our pediatric catheterization laboratory from 1 April 2009 to 30 September 2011 for which radiation usage data were available as reported by the Artis Zee(®) (Siemens Medical Solutions) system. Electrophysiology cases were excluded. Radiation dose was quantified as air kerma dose (mGy) and dose-area product (DAP; ?Gy m(2)). The DAP was converted to an effective dose millisievert (mSv) using the Monte Carlo method. Radiation usage data were available from 2,265 diagnostic and interventional cases with an overall median air kerma dose of 135 mGy [interquartile range (IQR) 59-433], median DAP of 760 ?Gy m(2) (IQR 281-2,810), of which 75 % (IQR 59-90 %) was derived from fluoroscopy, and median effective dose of 6.2 mSv (IQR 2.7-14.1). Air kerma dose from a single camera >2,000 mGy occurred in 1.8 % of cases. Significant differences in all measures of radiation exposure existed based on procedural and interventional types (p = 0.0001), with interventional cases associated with the highest effective dose after adjusting for patient weight category (p < 0.001). Patient weight, age, fluoroscopy time, and proportional use of digital acquisition were independent predictors of exposure (p ? 0.001; R (2) = 0.59-0.64). In a modern, large-volume pediatric catheterization laboratory, the median effective dose is 6.2 mSv with a wide range of exposure based on patient- and procedure-specific factors. Radiation monitoring is an important component of a pediatric laboratory and further dose reduction strategies are warranted. PMID:24442220

Glatz, Andrew C; Patel, Akash; Zhu, Xiaowei; Dori, Yoav; Hanna, Brian D; Gillespie, Matthew J; Rome, Jonathan J

2014-06-01

401

Energy and Environment: A Sandia Technology Bulletin, November 1992  

SciTech Connect

This publication presents information from Sandia laboratories concerning developments in the following areas: a miniaturized sensor system for the testing and analysis of hazardous wastes;a cross-well seismic receiver for petroleum deposit detection; and computer codes for designing dish-stirling sytems.

Parrott, L.; Floyd, H.L.; Goetsch, B.; Doran, L.

1992-12-01

402

Energy and Environment: A Sandia Technology Bulletin, November 1992  

SciTech Connect

This publication presents information from Sandia laboratories concerning developments in the following areas: a miniaturized sensor system for the testing and analysis of hazardous wastes;a cross-well seismic receiver for petroleum deposit detection; and computer codes for designing dish-stirling sytems.

Parrott, L.; Floyd, H.L.; Goetsch, B.; Doran, L.

1992-01-01

403

Thermal hydraulics model for Sandia's annular core research reactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

A thermal hydraulics model was developed for the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) at Sandia National Laboratories. The coupled mass, momentum and energy equations for the core were solved simultaneously using an explicit forward marching numerical technique. The model predictions of the temperature rise across the central channel of the ACRR core were within {+-} 10 percent agreement with the

Dasari V. Rao; Mohamed S. El-Genk; Reuben A. Rubio; James W. Bryson; Fabian C. Foushee

1988-01-01

404

MULTIPLE FUNCTIONS LONG TRACE PROFILER (LTP-MF) FOR NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON RADIATION LABORATORY OF CHINA.  

SciTech Connect

The Long Trace Profiler (LTP) is a useful optical metrology instrument for measuring the figure and slope error of cylindrical aspheres commonly used as synchrotron radiation (SR) optics. It is used extensively at a number of synchrotron radiation laboratories around the world. In order to improve SR beam line quality and resolution, the National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) of China is developing a versatile LTP that can be used to measure both SR optics and more conventional ''normal'' optical surfaces. The optical metrology laboratories at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and NSRL are collaborating in developing a multiple functions LTP (LTP-MF). Characteristics of the LTP-MF are: a very compact and lightweight optical head, a large angular test range ({+-} 16 mad) and high accuracy. The LTP-MF can be used in various configurations: as a laboratory-based LTP, an in-situ LTP or penta-prism LTP, as an angle monitor, a portable LTP, and a small radius of curvature test instrument. The schematic design of the compact optical head and a new compact slide are introduced. Analysis of different measurements modes and systematic error correction methods are introduced.

QIAN, S.; WANG, Q.; HONG, Y.; TAKACS, P.

2005-07-31

405

Missing dose from mortality studies of radiation effects among workers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.  

PubMed

Missing dose is a problem that has not been adequately addressed in the mortality studies of radiation effects among workers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The missing dose is a result of recording a zero for below-detectable doses, especially for frequent (weekly) film badge readings. To make the thorough dosimetry assessment needed in the current Oak Ridge National Laboratory worker studies, it will probably be necessary to consider all data at hand including personnel dose records, daily pocket meter readings used to supplement weekly and quarterly readings from other dosimeters, and monitoring results from both building surveys and fixed stations. The fixed-station data should be extremely useful in developing a better understanding of the unusual temporal variation of the external radiation doses to Oak Ridge National Laboratory workers during the high exposure-rate periods of the 1950s and early 1960s. PMID:8282563

Kerr, G D

1994-02-01

406

LANL Transfers Glowing Bio Technology to Sandia Biotech  

ScienceCinema

Partnering with Los Alamos National Laboratory, an Albuquerque-based company is seeking to transform the way protein and peptide analysis is conducted around the world. Sandia Biotech is using a biological technology licensed from Los Alamos called split green fluorescent protein (sGFP), as a detecting and tracking tool for the protein and peptide industry, valuable in the fields of Alzheimer's research, drug development and other biotechnology fields using protein folding to understand protein expression and mechanisms of action. http://www.lanl.gov/news/stories/glowing-future-for-los-alamos-and-sandia-b iotech-partnership.html

407

LANL Transfers Glowing Bio Technology to Sandia Biotech  

SciTech Connect

Partnering with Los Alamos National Laboratory, an Albuquerque-based company is seeking to transform the way protein and peptide analysis is conducted around the world. Sandia Biotech is using a biological technology licensed from Los Alamos called split green fluorescent protein (sGFP), as a detecting and tracking tool for the protein and peptide industry, valuable in the fields of Alzheimer's research, drug development and other biotechnology fields using protein folding to understand protein expression and mechanisms of action. http://www.lanl.gov/news/stories/glowing-future-for-los-alamos-and-sandia-b iotech-partnership.html

Rorick, Kevin

2012-01-01

408

LANL Transfers Glowing Bio Technology to Sandia Biotech  

ScienceCinema

Partnering with Los Alamos National Laboratory, an Albuquerque-based company is seeking to transform the way protein and peptide analysis is conducted around the world. Sandia Biotech is using a biological technology licensed from Los Alamos called split green fluorescent protein (sGFP), as a detecting and tracking tool for the protein and peptide industry, valuable in the fields of Alzheimer's research, drug development and other biotechnology fields using protein folding to understand protein expression and mechanisms of action. http://www.lanl.gov/news/stories/glowing-future-for-los-alamos-and-sandia-b iotech-partnership.html

Rorick, Kevin

2012-08-02

409

NIF Laboratory Astrophysics Experiments Investigating The Effects Of A Radiative Shock On Hydrodynamic Instabilities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper will describe ongoing laboratory astrophysics experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) relevant to the complex radiation hydrodynamics that occurs in red supergiant, and core-collapse supernovae. Experiments on NIF can deliver 300 eV radiative heating that can be utilized uniquely access the regime in which radiation affects the development of hydrodynamic instabilities within an evolving object. This is relevant to the dynamics that occur during the core-collapse explosions of red supergiant stars. These stars have dense circumstellar plasma, producing a strongly radiative shock whose radiation interacts with the hydrodynamic structures produced by instabilities during the explosion. While published astrophysical simulations have not included complex, multidimensional radiation hydrodynamics, such effects are very physical and expected to affect the evolution of early stages of astrophysical objects described above. This presentation will include a summary of the two test shots that we have performed on NIF, including a 0.7 scale, gas-filled hohlraum test shot, and a description of the integrated physics shots scheduled at the facility. This work is funded by the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas under grant number DE-FG52-09NA29548 , the Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344 and Predictive Sciences Academic Alliances Program in NNSA-ASC via grant DEFC52- 08NA28616.

Kuranz, Carolyn C.; Drake, R. P.; Huntington, C. M.; Klein, S. R.; Trantham, M. R.; Park, H. S.; Remington, B. A.; Miles, A. R.; Raman, K.; Kline, J. L.; Plewa, T.

2012-05-01

410

Sandia/Arzamas-16 Magazine-to-Magazine Remote Monitoring Field Trial Evaluation.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Sandia National Laboratories and the Russian Federal Nuclear Center-All Russian Research Institute for Experimental Physics (VNIIEF) (also known as Arzamas-16) are collaborating on ways to assure the highest standards of safety, security, and internationa...

B. Barkanov S. Blagin D. Croessmann J. Damico S. Ehle C. Nilsen

1999-01-01

411

Sandia Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine Project. Technical Quarterly Report, April--June 1976.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report summarizes activities within the Sandia Laboratories Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine Project that occurred during the fourth quarter of fiscal year 1976. Included are highlights for the quarter and status reports on activities in areas of systems s...

R. C. Reuter R. E. Sheldahl

1977-01-01

412

Sandia Explosive Inventory and Information System  

SciTech Connect

The Explosive Inventory and Information System (EIS) is being developed and implemented by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to incorporate a cradle to grave structure for all explosives and explosive containing devices and assemblies at SNL from acquisition through use, storage, reapplication, transfer or disposal. The system does more than track all material inventories. It provides information on material composition, characteristics, shipping requirements; life cycle cost information, plan of use; and duration of ownership. The system also provides for following the processes of explosive development; storage review; justification for retention; Resource, Recovery and Disposition Account (RRDA); disassembly and assembly; and job description, hazard analysis and training requirements for all locations and employees involved with explosive operations. In addition, other information systems will be provided through the system such as the Department of Energy (DOE) and SNL Explosive Safety manuals, the Navy`s Department of Defense (DoD) Explosive information system, and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories (LLNL) Handbook of Explosives.

Clements, D.A.

1994-08-01

413

Radio frequency resonator structure and diagnostic measurements for a laboratory simulation of Auroral Kilometric Radiation  

SciTech Connect

Auroral Kilometric Radiation is emitted from regions of depleted plasma density in the Earth's polar magnetosphere. The radiation frequency is close to the local electron cyclotron frequency, polarized in the X-mode with an efficiency of {approx}1%, with power up to 1 GW. Kinetic analysis of the instability in the descending auroral flux indicated that the phenomena scaled with the cyclotron frequency. Therefore, an experimental reproduction of the auroral geometry has been created scaled to laboratory dimensions by raising the radiation frequency to the microwave range. The experiment transports a 75-85 keV electron beam through a region of increasing magnetic flux density, with a mirror ratio of up to 30. The experiments measured the mode, spectrum, power, and conversion efficiency of the emitted radiation as a function of the mirror ratio in two resonance regimes, with frequencies of 4.42 and 11.7 GHz. The microwave diagnostics and measurements will be presented in this paper.

Ronald, K.; Speirs, D. C.; McConville, S. L.; Phelps, A. D. R.; Robertson, C. W.; Whyte, C. G.; He, W.; Gillespie, K. M.; Cross, A. W. [Scottish Universities Physics Alliance and Department of Physics, John Anderson Building, 107 Rottenrow, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Bingham, R. [Scottish Universities Physics Alliance and Department of Physics, John Anderson Building, 107 Rottenrow, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Space Science and Technology Department, Science and Technology Facility Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

2008-05-15

414

Development of explosive event scale model testing capability at Sandia`s large scale centrifuge facility  

SciTech Connect

Geotechnical structures such as underground bunkers, tunnels, and building foundations are subjected to stress fields produced by the gravity load on the structure and/or any overlying strata. These stress fields may be reproduced on a scaled model of the structure by proportionally increasing the gravity field through the use of a centrifuge. This technology can then be used to assess the vulnerability of various geotechnical structures to explosive loading. Applications of this technology include assessing the effectiveness of earth penetrating weapons, evaluating the vulnerability of various structures, counter-terrorism, and model validation. This document describes the development of expertise in scale model explosive testing on geotechnical structures using Sandia`s large scale centrifuge facility. This study focused on buried structures such as hardened storage bunkers or tunnels. Data from this study was used to evaluate the predictive capabilities of existing hydrocodes and structural dynamics codes developed at Sandia National Laboratories (such as Pronto/SPH, Pronto/CTH, and ALEGRA). 7 refs., 50 figs., 8 tabs.

Blanchat, T.K.; Davie, N.T.; Calderone, J.J. [and others

1998-02-01

415

Radiation Laboratory, University of Notre Dame: Quarterly report, October 1--December 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Notre Dame Radiation Laboratory is a facility of the Department of Energy operated for the DOE by the University of Notre Dame under contract No. DE-AC02-76ER00038. This quarterly report summarizes the progress on the programs within the Laboratory for the period of October 1, 193 through December 31, 1993. The activities of the staff during this period are noted. A list of publications is presented. A listing and a brief description of each of the reports issued during this quarter are provided.

Not Available

1994-02-17

416

An Experimental Investigation of the Role of Radiation in Laboratory Bench-Top Experiments in Thermal Physics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A simple undergraduate experiment designed to study cooling purely by radiation and cooling by a combination of convection and radiation is described. Results indicate that the contribution from radiative cooling in normal laboratory experiments is more significant than students often realize, even in the case of forced cooling. (Contains 1…

Twomey, Patrick; O'Sullivan, Colm; O'Riordan, John

2009-01-01

417

Sandia combustion research program: Annual report, 1987  

SciTech Connect

More than a decade ago, in response to a national energy crisis, Sandia proposed to the US Department of Energy a new, ambitious program in combustion research. Our strategy was to apply the rapidly increasing capabilities in lasers and computers to combustion science and technology. Shortly thereafter, the Combustion Research Facility (CRF) was established at Sandia's Livermore location. Designated a ''User Facility,'' the charter of the CRF was to develop and maintain special-purpose resources to support a nationwide initiative--involving US universities, industry, and national laboratories--to improve our understanding and control of combustion. This report includes descriptions of several research projects which have been stimulated by Working Groups and involve the on-site participation of industry scientists. DOE's Industry Technology Fellowship Program has been instrumental in the success of some of the joint efforts. The remainder of this report presents research results of calendar year 1987, separated thematically into nine categories. Refereed journal articles appearing in print during 1987, along with selected other publications, are included at the end of Section 10. In addition to our ''traditional'' research--chemistry, reacting flow, diagnostics, engine combustion, and coal combustion--you will note continued progress in somewhat recent themes: pulse combustion, high temperature materials, and energetic materials, for example. Moreover, we have just started a small, new effort to understand combustion-related issues in the management of toxic and hazardous materials.

Palmer, R.E.; Sanders, B.R.; Ivanetich, C.A. (eds.)

1988-01-01

418

Modeling a 1-D bremsstrahlung and neutron imaging array for use on Sandia`s Z machine  

SciTech Connect

Inertial confinement fusion is being studied on the Z facility at Sandia National Laboratories. Z is a large z-pinch machine which can provide 20 MA of current to z-pinch loads producing {approximately}1.8 MJ of soft x-rays in less than 10 ns. Within the pinch region, decelerated electrons produce a strong source of bremsstrahlung radiation which varies from shot to shot. Additionally, a variety of ICF targets produce fusion neutrons whose intensity and distribution depend on the temperature and density of the target compression in the pinch. This paper describes the computer modeling behind the shielding design of a simple time-resolved, 1-D imaging array which can provide a time history of both the bremsstrahlung and neutron production as a function of height within the target region. It is demonstrated that by building an array of scintillator fibers separated by long, thin tungsten collimator plates, a spatial resolution of 0.254 mm at the target can be achieved. The corresponding channel-to-channel discrimination for such a design is shown to be better than 1000::1 for <4 MeV photons and 100::1 for 2.45 MeV neutrons. By coupling scintillator fibers to a fiber-optic streak camera system, the signal can also be given as a function of time with a temporal resolution of about 1.2 ns.

Rochau, G.A.; Derzon, M.S.; Fehl, D.; Rochau, G.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lazier, S. [Ktech Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Droemer, D. [Bechtel Nevada (United States)

1998-06-01

419

Sandia Combustion Research: Technical review  

SciTech Connect

This report contains reports from research programs conducted at the Sandia Combustion Research Facility. Research is presented under the following topics: laser based diagnostics; combustion chemistry; reacting flow; combustion in engines and commercial burners; coal combustion; and industrial processing. Individual projects were processed separately for entry onto the DOE databases.

NONE

1995-07-01

420

Laboratory simulation of interplanetary ultraviolet radiation (broad spectrum) and its effects on Deinococcus radiodurans  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The radiation-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans was exposed to a simulated interplanetary UV radiation at the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS). Bacterial samples were irradiated on different substrates to investigate the influence of surface relief on cell survival. The effects of cell multi-layers were also investigated. The ratio of viable microorganisms remained virtually the same (average 2%) for integrated doses from 1.2 to 12 kJ m -2, corresponding to 16 h of irradiation at most. The asymptotic profiles of the curves, clearly connected to a shielding effect provided by multi-layering cells on a cavitary substrate (carbon tape), means that the inactivation rate may not change significantly along extended periods of exposure to radiation. Such high survival rates reinforce the possibility of an interplanetary transfer of viable microbes.

Paulino-Lima, Ivan Gláucio; Pilling, Sérgio; Janot-Pacheco, Eduardo; de Brito, Arnaldo Naves; Barbosa, João Alexandre Ribeiro Gonçalves; Leitão, Alvaro Costa; Lage, Claudia de Alencar Santos

2010-08-01

421

Mobile phone radiation interferes laboratory immunoenzymometric assays: Example chorionic gonadotropin assays.  

PubMed

The radiofrequency radiation is of concern in hospital laboratories as the microwaves have many health effects even on immune functions. The aim of this study was, however, to evaluate the effects of cell phone radiation on chorionic gonadotropin immunoassays of human serum. Two cell phones with 0.69 and 1.09W/kg (head SAR) emitting 900MHz radiation were used. Sixty wells with five human serum concentrations (0, 10, 100, 250, 500mIU/mL) were used in three batches. The well heads in each batch were exposed to 900MHz emitted from these phones, and the 0.69, 1.09W/kg exposed batches were compared with the unexposed controls. Radiation exposure from mobile phones altered the measured serum levels especially in the wells with 100, 250, 500mIU/mL hormone concentrations. Exposure at 1.09W/kg SAR caused a significant loss compared to 0.69W/kg SAR exposure. In conclusion, the microwave exposures may require attention in laboratories using immunoassays. PMID:22325369

Shahbazi-Gahrouei, Daryoush; Mortazavi, Seyed Mohammad Javad; Nasri, Hamid; Baradaran, Azar; Baradaran-Ghahfarokhi, Milad; Baradaran-Ghahfarokhi, Hamid Reza

2012-02-01

422

Correlation between some current parameters and optical radiation generated by 280 mm long laboratory sparks  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Discussed here is the optical radiation generated by 280 mm long laboratory discharges and its relationship to the current flowing in the discharge channel. In an experiment, the optical radiation generated by the discharges was measured at wavelengths 777nm (bandwidth 10 nm) due to O I(1), and 500 nm (bandwidth 5 nm) due to N II(19), and the broadband optical radiation between the wavelengths 400 to 1100 nm. The shape of the current waveform, which had a rise time of 0.1 microsecond and a decay time of 5 microsecond, remained the same with increasing peak value. The experiment was conducted with peak current amplitudes in the range of 1-4 kA. In order to test the effect of current rise time on the optical radiation, researchers also conducted studies with a current waveform having a 5 microsecond rise time. It was observed that the peak amplitude of the optical radiation pulse at the wavelengths mentioned above is proportional to the peak amplitude of the current flowing through the discharge channel. The rise time of the optical radiation pulse at a given wavelength does not depend significantly on the peak amplitude of the current waveform. The rise time of the optical radiation pulse decreases with decreasing wavelength. A slight increase in the decay time of the optical pulse, at a given wavelength, is observed with increasing peak amplitude of the current waveform.The results show that the rise time of the optical radiation pulse increases with the increasing rise time of the current waveform. The relationship between peak current, peak optical power, and peak electrical power is studied. Also, the relationship between peak current, optical energy (400-1100 and 777 nm), and electrical energy is discussed.

Windmar, Dan; Cooray, Vernon; Scuka, Viktor

1991-01-01

423

Massively Parallel Computing: A Sandia Perspective  

SciTech Connect

The computing power available to scientists and engineers has increased dramatically in the past decade, due in part to progress in making massively parallel computing practical and available. The expectation for these machines has been great. The reality is that progress has been slower than expected. Nevertheless, massively parallel computing is beginning to realize its potential for enabling significant break-throughs in science and engineering. This paper provides a perspective on the state of the field, colored by the authors' experiences using large scale parallel machines at Sandia National Laboratories. We address trends in hardware, system software and algorithms, and we also offer our view of the forces shaping the parallel computing industry.

Dosanjh, Sudip S.; Greenberg, David S.; Hendrickson, Bruce; Heroux, Michael A.; Plimpton, Steve J.; Tomkins, James L.; Womble, David E.

1999-05-06

424

Radiation heat savings in polysilicon production: Validation of results through a CVD laboratory prototype  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This work aims at a deeper understanding of the energy loss phenomenon in polysilicon production reactors by the so-called Siemens process. Contributions to the energy consumption of the polysilicon deposition step are studied in this paper, focusing on the radiation heat loss phenomenon. A theoretical model for radiation heat loss calculations is experimentally validated with the help of a laboratory CVD prototype. Following the results of the model, relevant parameters that directly affect the amount of radiation heat losses are put forward. Numerical results of the model applied to a state-of-the-art industrial reactor show the influence of these parameters on energy consumption due to radiation per kilogram of silicon produced; the radiation heat loss can be reduced by 3.8% when the reactor inner wall radius is reduced from 0.78 to 0.70 m, by 25% when the wall emissivity is reduced from 0.5 to 0.3, and by 12% when the final rod diameter is increased from 12 to 15 cm.

Ramos, A.; del Cañizo, C.; Valdehita, J.; Zamorano, J. C.; Luque, A.

2013-07-01

425

Job factors, radiation and cancer mortality at Oak Ridge National Laboratory: Follow-up through 1984  

SciTech Connect

A previous study of mortality among white men hired at Oak Ridge National Laboratory between 1943 and 1972 (n = 8,318) revealed an association between low-dose external penetrating ionizing radiation and cancer mortality in follow-up through 1984. The association was not observed in follow-up through 1977. This report considers the role of possible selection and confounding factors not previously studied. Control for hire during the World War II era and employment duration of less than 1 year had little effect on the radiation risk estimates. Risks associated with length of time spent in 15 job categories were considered as proxies for the effects of other occupational carcinogens. Adjustment for employment duration in each job category one at a time produced only small changes in the radiation risk estimate. Adjustment for potential exposures to beryllium, lead, and mercury also had little effect on the radiation risk estimates. These analyses suggest that selection factors and potential for chemical exposure do not account for the previously noted association of external radiation dose with cancer mortality. However, power to detect effects of chemical exposures is limited by a lack of individual exposure measures.

Wing, S.; Shy, C.M.; Wood, J.L.; Wolf, S.; Cragle, D.L.; Tankersley, W.; Frome, E.L. (Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (United States))

1993-01-01

426

UV Radiation: a new first year physics/life sciences laboratory experiment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Unfortunately, Australia leads the world in the number of skin cancer cases per capita. Three major factors that contribute to this are: 1) the level of damaging ultraviolet (UV) radiation in Australia is higher than in many other countries. This is caused, among other factors, by the stratospheric ozone depletion and Antarctic ozone hole; 2) many people in Australia are of Irish-Scottish origin and their skin can not repair the damage caused by the UV radiation as effectively as the skin of people of other origins; 3) Australia is one of the world’s leaders in the outdoor activities where people tend to spend more time outside. As our experience has shown, most Australian University students, high school students, and even high school teachers were largely unaware of the UV damage details and effective safety measures. Therefore, a need for new ways to educate people became apparent. The general aim of this new 1st year laboratory experiment, developed and first offered at La Trobe University (Melbourne, Australia) in 2009, is to investigate how UV-B radiation levels change under various solar illumination conditions and how effective different types of protection are. After pre-lab readings on physical concepts and biological effects of UV radiation, and after solving all pre-lab problems, the students go outside and measure the actual change in UV-B and UV-A radiation levels under various conditions. Some of these conditions are: direct sun, shade from a building, shade under the roof, reflection from various surfaces, direct sun through cheap and expensive sunglasses and eyeglasses, direct sun through various types of cloth and hair. The equipment used is the UV-Probe manufactured by sglux SolGel Technologies GmbH. The students’ feedback on this new laboratory experiment was very positive. It was ranked top among all physics experiments offered as part of that subject (Physics for Life Sciences) in 2009 and top among all physics experiments presented for peer evaluation at the Advanced Science Education Learning Laboratory Workshop in April 2010 at the University of Adelaide, Australia. All three main components of the UV Radiation experiment - pre-lab exercises, taking measurements, and a group discussion led by a demonstrator, were assessed by the students and by the teaching academics as a very important and valuable contribution to learning.

Petelina, S. V.; Siddaway, J. M.

2010-12-01

427

Health Hazard Evaluation Report No. HETA 82-002-1312, Metabolism and Radiation Research Laboratory (MRRL), Fargo, North Dakota.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In September 1981, a survey of employees at the USDA Metabolism and Radiation Research Laboratory (MRRL) was conducted using mailed self-administered questionnaires. Follow-up medical interviews and an industrial hygiene survey were conducted from Novembe...

M. Bauer R. Patnode K. Morring

1983-01-01

428

Sandia equation of state data base: seslan File  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories maintains several libraries of equation of state tables, in a modified Sesame format, for use in hydrocode calculations and other applications. This report discusses one of those libraries, the seslan file, which contains 78 tables from the Los Alamos equation of state library. Minor changes have been made to these tables, making them more convenient for code users and reducing numerical difficulties that occasionally arise in hydrocode calculations.

Kerley, G.I. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (US); Christian-Frear, T.L. [RE/SPEC Inc., Albuquerque, NM (US)

1993-06-24

429

LANL Transfers Glowing Bio Technology to Sandia Biotech  

SciTech Connect

Partnering with Los Alamos National Laboratory, an Albuquerque-based company is seeking to transform the way protein and peptide analysis is conducted around the world. Sandia Biotech is using a biological technology licensed from Los Alamos called split green fluorescent protein (sGFP), as a detecting and tracking tool for the protein and peptide industry, valuable in the fields of Alzheimer's research, drug development and other biotechnology fields using protein folding to understand protein expression and mechanisms of action.

Nakhla, Tony; ,

2012-05-21

430

LANL Transfers Glowing Bio Technology to Sandia Biotech  

ScienceCinema

Partnering with Los Alamos National Laboratory, an Albuquerque-based company is seeking to transform the way protein and peptide analysis is conducted around the world. Sandia Biotech is using a biological technology licensed from Los Alamos called split green fluorescent protein (sGFP), as a detecting and tracking tool for the protein and peptide industry, valuable in the fields of Alzheimer's research, drug development and other biotechnology fields using protein folding to understand protein expression and mechanisms of action.

Nakhla, Tony;

2014-06-25

431

A Sandia Technology Bulletin: Testing technology, July 1993  

SciTech Connect

Inside this issue various short articles on current testing technology research at Sandia National Laboratories. New techniques of imaging currents in integrated circuits are described. Geomaterials testing is improved with true axial loading under high pressure. Pyroshock simulation tests electronics for space and defense. Insulated cameras get pictures of extremely hot burning fuels. Solar cell testing is improved via spectral response and laser scanning. And missile launching accomplishments are presented.

Not Available

1993-09-01

432

Sandia Technology engineering and science accomplishments. Volume 15, No. 1  

SciTech Connect

This document presents recent accomplishments in engineering and science at Sandia National Laboratories. Commercial-scale parabolic troughs at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility are used for such applications as heating water, producing steam for industrial processes, and driving absorption air conditioning systems. Computerized-aided design, superconductor technology, radar imaging, soldering technology, software development breakthroughs are made known. Defense programs are exhibited. And microchip engineering applications in test chips, flow sensors, miniature computers, integrated circuits, and microsensors are presented.

Van Arsdall, A.; Floyd, H.L.; Goetsch, B.; Parrott, L.; Pruett, H. [eds.

1992-12-01

433

The {sup 99}Mo production program at Sandia National Labs.  

SciTech Connect

In 1994, Sandia Laboratories (SNL) was funded by the DOE to initiate preparations for the production of Molybdenum 99 and associated medically useful isotopes using the annular core research reactor (ACRR) and the hot cell facility. The goal of SNL preparation effort is to provide the physical plant capability, infrastructure, and necessary staffing. The preparation efforts involves modifications to the ACRR and hot cell facility, as well as preparations to handle the associated wastes and National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process.

Coats, R.L. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-12-31

434

The Sandia\\/Arzamas-16 Magazine-to-Magazine Remote Monitoring Field Trial Evaluation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sandia National Laboratories and the Russian Federal Nuclear Center-All Russian Research Institute for Experimental Physics (VNIIEF) (also known as Arzamas-16) are collaborating on ways to assure the highest standards of safety, security, and international accountability of fissile material. For these collaborations, sensors and information technologies have been identified as important in reaching these standards in a cost-effective manner. Specifically, Sandia

Boris Barkanov; Sergei Blagin; Dennis Croessmann; Joe Damico; Steve Ehle; Curt Nilsen

1999-01-01

435

Laboratory-based maximum slip rates in earthquake rupture zones and radiated energy  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Laboratory stick-slip friction experiments indicate that peak slip rates increase with the stresses loading the fault to cause rupture. If this applies also to earthquake fault zones, then the analysis of rupture processes is simplified inasmuch as the slip rates depend only on the local yield stress and are independent of factors specific to a particular event, including the distribution of slip in space and time. We test this hypothesis by first using it to develop an expression for radiated energy that depends primarily on the seismic moment and the maximum slip rate. From laboratory results, the maximum slip rate for any crustal earthquake, as well as various stress parameters including the yield stress, can be determined based on its seismic moment and the maximum slip within its rupture zone. After finding that our new equation for radiated energy works well for laboratory stick-slip friction experiments, we used it to estimate radiated energies for five earthquakes with magnitudes near 2 that were induced in a deep gold mine, an M 2.1 repeating earthquake near the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) site and seven major earthquakes in California and found good agreement with energies estimated independently from spectra of local and regional ground-motion data. Estimates of yield stress for the earthquakes in our study range from 12 MPa to 122 MPa with a median of 64 MPa. The lowest value was estimated for the 2004 M 6 Parkfield, California, earthquake whereas the nearby M 2.1 repeating earthquake, as recorded in the SAFOD pilot hole, showed a more typical yield stress of 64 MPa.

McGarr, A.; Fletcher, J. B.; Boettcher, M.; Beeler, N.; Boatwright, J.

2010-01-01

436

Antenna radiation patterns in the whistler wave regime measured in a large laboratory plasma  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Antenna radiation patterns of balanced electric dipoles and shielded magnetic loop antennas are obtained by measuring the relative wave amplitude with a small receiver antenna scanned around the exciter in a large uniform collisionless magnetized laboratory plasma in the whistler wave regime. The boundary effects are assumed to be negligible even for many farfield patterns. Characteristic differences are observed between electrically short and long antennas, the former exhibiting resonance cones and the latter showing dipole-like antenna patterns along the magnetic field. Resonance cones due to small electric dipoles and magnetic loops are observed in both the near zone and the far zone. A self-focusing process is revealed which produces a pencil-shaped field-aligned radiation pattern.

Stenzel, R. L.

1976-01-01

437

EVENT DRIVEN AUTOMATIC STATE MODIFICATION OF BNL'S BOOSTER FOR NASA SPACE RADIATION LABORATORY SOLAR PARTICLE SIMULATOR.  

SciTech Connect

The NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) was constructed in collaboration with NASA for the purpose of performing radiation effect studies for the NASA space program. The NSRL makes use of heavy ions in the range of 0.05 to 3 GeV/n slow extracted from BNL's AGS Booster. NASA is interested in reproducing the energy spectrum from a solar flare in the space environment for a single ion species. To do this we have built and tested a set of software tools which allow the state of the Booster and the NSRL beam line to be changed automatically. In this report we will describe the system and present results of beam tests.

BROWN, D.; BINELLO, S.; HARVEY, M.; MORRIS, J.; RUSEK, A.; TSOUPAS, N.

2005-05-16

438

PERFORMANCE AND CAPABILITIES OF THE NASA SPACE RADIATION LABORATORY AT BNL.  

SciTech Connect

The NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at BNL was commissioned in October 2002 and the facility became operational in July 2003. NSRL was constructed in collaboration with NASA for the purpose of performing radiation effect studies for the NASA space program. NSRL can accept a wide variety of ions from BNL's AGS Booster; these are slow extracted with kinetic energies ranging from 0.3 to 3 GeV/n. Fast extraction from Booster to NSRL has also been developed and used. Many different beam conditions have been produced for experiments at NSRL, including very low intensity. In this report we will describe the facility and its performance over the eight experimental run periods that have taken place since it became operational. We will also describe the current and future capabilities of the NSRL.

BROWN, K.A.; AHRENS, L.; CHIANG, I.H.; GARDNER, C.; GASSNER, D.; HAMMONS, L.; HARVEY, M.; MORRIS, J.; RUSEK, A.; SAMPSON, P.; SIVERTZ, M.; TSOUPAS, N.; ZENO, K.

2006-06-23

439

Solar and Photovoltaic Data from the University of Oregon Solar Radiation Monitoring Laboratory (UO SRML)  

DOE Data Explorer

The UO SRML is a regional solar radiation data center whose goal is to provide sound solar resource data for planning, design, deployment, and operation of solar electric facilities in the Pacific Northwest. The laboratory has been in operation since 1975. Solar data includes solar resource maps, cumulative summary data, daily totals, monthly averages, single element profile data, parsed TMY2 data, and select multifilter radiometer data. A data plotting program and other software tools are also provided. Shade analysis information and contour plots showing the effect of tilt and orientation on annual solar electric system perfomance make up a large part of the photovoltaics data.(Specialized Interface)

440

Proceedings of the Air Force Geophysics Laboratory Workshop on the Earth's Radiation Belts: 26-27 January 1981.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A two-day workshop on the earth's radiation belts was held on 26-27 January 1981 at the Air Force Geophysics Laboratory. The workshop reviewed the present state of knowledge of the radiation belts and the effects of energetic particles on microelectronic ...

R. C. Sagalyn W. N. Spjeldvik W. J. Burke

1981-01-01

441

The present status of the Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory of the Institute for Solid State Physics of The University of Tokyo  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present status of the Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory of the Institute for Solid-State Physics of The University of Tokyo is described. Explanation is made mostly for the beam lines of SOR-RING as well as the new beam lines built in the Photon Factory ring. A short history of the laboratory is also given.

T. Ishii

1992-01-01

442

Oak Ridge National Laboratory Radiation Control Program - Partners in Site Restoration  

SciTech Connect

In 1998, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) awarded the Management and Integration (M&I) contract for all five of the Oak Ridge Operations (ORO) facilities to Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC). At Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), a world renowned national laboratory and research and development facility, the BJC mission involves executing the DOE Environmental Management (EM) program. In addition to BJC's M&I contract, UT-Battelle, LLC, a not-for-profit company, is the Management and Operating (M&O) contractor for DOE on the ORNL site. As part of ORNL's EM program, legacy inactive facilities (i.e., reactors, nuclear material research facilities, burial grounds, and underground storage tanks) are transferred to BJC and are designated as remediation, decontamination and decommissioning (D&D), or long-term surveillance and maintenance (S&M) facilities. Facilities operated by both UT-Battelle and BJC are interspersed throughout the site and are usually in close proximity. Both UT-Battelle and BJC have DOE-approved Radiation Protection Programs established in accordance with 10 CFR 835. The BJC Radiological Control (RADCON) Program adapts to the M&I framework and is comprised of a combination of subcontracted program responsibilities with BJC oversight. This paper focuses on the successes and challenges of executing the BJC RADCON Program for BJC's ORNL Project through a joint M&I contractor relationship, while maintaining a positive working relationship and partnership with UT-Battelle's Radiation Protection organization.

Jones, S. L.; Stafford, M. W.

2002-02-26

443

BOOSTER MAIN MAGNET POWER SUPPLY IMPROVEMENTS FOR NASA SPACE RADIATION LABORATORY AT BNL  

SciTech Connect

The NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL), constructed at Brookhaven National Laboratory, under contract from NASA, is a new experimental facility, taking advantage of heavy-ion beams from the Brookhaven Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) Booster accelerator, to study radiation effect on humans, for prolonged space missions beyond the protective terrestrial magnetosphere. This paper describes the modifications and operation of the Booster Main Magnet Power Supply (MMPS) for NSRL applications. The requirement is to run up to 1 sec flattops as high as 5000 Amps with 25% duly cycle. The controls for the Main Magnet Power Supply were modified, including the Booster Main Magnet application program, to enable flattop operation with low ripple and spill control. An active filter (AF) consisting of a {+-}120 volts, {+-}700 Amps power supply transformer coupled through a filter choke, in series with the Main Magnet voltage, was added to the system to enable further ripple reduction during the flattops. We will describe the spill servo system, designed to provide a uniform beam current, during the flattop. Results from system commissioning will be presented.

MARNERIS,I.BROWN,K.A.GLENN,J.W.MCNERNEY,A., MORRIS, J., SANDBERG,J., SAVATTERI, S.

2003-05-12

444

AFTI/SITAN (Advanced Fighter Technology Integration/Sandia Inertial Terrain-Aided Navigation) final report  

SciTech Connect

Sandia Inertial Terrain-Aided Navigation (SITAN) provides continuous position fixes to an inertial navigation system (INS) by real-time comparison of radar altimeter ground clearance measurements with stored digital terrain elevation data (DTED). This is accomplished by using an extended Kalman filter algorithm to estimate the errors in the reference trajectory provided by an INS. In this report, Sandia National Laboratories documents the results of a reimbursable effort funded by the Air Force Wright Aeronautical Laboratories (AFWAL) Avionics Laboratory to flight test SITAN as implemented onboard the Advanced Fighter Technology Integration (AFTI)F-16. 5 refs., 101 figs., 1 tab.

Fellerhoff, J.R.

1988-11-01