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1

Sandia National Laboratories  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Sandia National Laboratories has identified technology transfer to U.S. industry as a laboratory mission which complements our national security mission and as a key component of the Laboratory's future. A number of technology transfer mechanisms - such as CRADA's, licenses, work-for-others, and consortia - are identified and specific examples are given. Sandia's experience with the Specialty Metals Processing Consortium is highlighted with a focus on the elements which have made it successful. A brief discussion of Sandia's potential interactions with NASA under the Space Exploration Initiative was included as an example of laboratory-to-NASA technology transfer. Viewgraphs are provided.

Gilliom, Laura R.

1992-01-01

2

RHIC (Radiation Hardened Integrated Circuit) 2 building deionized water system specification for Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM  

Microsoft Academic Search

The specification for a 150 gpm ultrapure water system has been written to support the development of radiation tolerant submicron silicon integrated circuit technologies and designs of the 1990's in the new Radiation Hardened Integrated Circuit (RHIC) facility at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque. The design, based on comprehensive analyses of the high silica (20 to 40 ppM) well water, the

J. P. Scofield; G. S. Fry; D. L. Weaver; N. E. Brown

1986-01-01

3

Sandia National Laboratories: News Center  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Sandia National Laboratories publishes its quarterly journal of research and development at this Web site. Free to the general public, Sandia Technology summarizes current work related to national security, energy development and infrastructure, and various other advances made at the installation. The fall/ winter 2002 issue centers on sensors for all kinds of purposes. From sensors that monitor water supplies to air-sniffing devices that can detect chemical and biological toxins, Sandia is extremely adept in this area. All back issues of Sandia Technology are also available for browsing, which cover topics such as nuclear power and smart machines.

1999-01-01

4

Sandia National Laboratories embraces ISDN  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia), a multidisciplinary research and development laboratory located on Kirtland Air Force Base, has embraced Integrated Services Digital Network technology as an integral part of its communication network. Sandia and the Department of Energy`s Albuquerque Operations Office have recently completed the installation of a modernized and expanded telephone system based, on the AT&T 5ESS telephone switch. Sandia is committed to ISDN as an integral part of data communication services, and it views ISDN as one part of a continuum of services -- services that range from ISDN`s asynchronous and limited bandwidth Ethernet (250--1000 Kbps) through full bandwidth Ethernet, FDDI, and ATM at Sonet rates. Sandia has demonstrated this commitment through its use of ISDN data features to support critical progmmmatic services such as access to corporate data base systems. In the future, ISDN will provide enhanced voice, data communication, and video services.

Tolendino, L.F.; Eldridge, J.M.

1994-08-01

5

Photometrics at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

This report highlights Sandia National Laboratories' work in the following areas: photometrics and optical development; still and time-lapse photography; real-time motion photography; high-speed photography; image-motion photography; schlieren photography; ultra-high-speed photography; electronic imaging; shuttered video and high-speed video; infrared imaging radiometry; exoatmospheric photography and videography; microdensitometry and image analysis; and optical system design and development.

McWilliams, J.Y.; Hill, R.A.; Hughes, R.L. (eds.)

1990-07-01

6

Sandia National Laboratories 2011 LDRD Annual Report Issued by Sandia National Laboratories, operated for the United States  

E-print Network

1 Sandia National Laboratories 2011 LDRD Annual Report #12;Issued by Sandia National Laboratories LDRD Annual Report 14 SAndiA introduction And overview 14 Sandia National Laboratories' FY 2011 427 individual R&D projects in 12 categories. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi

7

Sandia National Laboratories: The First Fifty Years  

SciTech Connect

On Nov. 1, 1999, Sandia National Laboratories celebrates its 50th birthday. Although Sandia has its roots in the World War II-era Manhattan Project, Sandia began operating as a separate nuclear weapons engineering laboratory under the management of AT&T on Nov. 1, 1949. Today the lab employs more than 7,000 people at its two sites in Albuquerque and Livermore, California, and has research and development missions in national security, energy and environmental technologies, and U.S. economic competitiveness. Lockheed Martin Corporation operates Sandia for the US. Department of Energy.

MORA,CARL J.

1999-11-03

8

Mobile robotics research at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Sandia is a National Security Laboratory providing scientific and engineering solutions to meet national needs for both government and industry. As part of this mission, the Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center conducts research and development in robotics and intelligent machine technologies. An overview of Sandia`s mobile robotics research is provided. Recent achievements and future directions in the areas of coordinated mobile manipulation, small smart machines, world modeling, and special application robots are presented.

Morse, W.D.

1998-09-01

9

POLLUTION PREVENTION OPPORTUNITY ASSESSMENT - GEOCHEMISTRY LABORATORY AT SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES  

EPA Science Inventory

These reports summarize pollution prevention opportunity assessments conducted jointly by EPA and DOE at the Geochemistry Laboratory and the Manufacturing and Fabrication Repair Laboratory at the Department of Energy's Sandia National Laboratories facility in Albuquerque, New Mex...

10

Metamaterials program at Sandia National Laboratories.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories Metamaterial Science and Technology Program has developed novel HPC-based design tools, wafer scale 3D fabrication processes, and characterization tools to enable thermal IR optical metamaterial application studies.

McCormick, Frederick Bossert

2010-10-01

11

Technology transfer at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Transferring technology to the private sector to help improve the competitiveness of key US industries is now an official mission of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) defense program national laboratories. We believe that national laboratories can play an important role in addressing US industrial competitiveness. Sandia is seeking to match laboratory strengths with industry-defined market needs in targeted industrial sectors. Sandia, like other national and federal laboratories, is developing an aggressive technology transfer program. This paper provides a brief review of our program and provides a snap-shot of where we are at today.

Allen, M.S.; Arvizu, D.E.

1993-10-01

12

1Sandia National Laboratories 2010 LDRD Annual Report Issued by Sandia National Laboratories, operated for the United States  

E-print Network

1Sandia National Laboratories 2010 LDRD Annual Report #12;Issued by Sandia National Laboratories Westrich Sheri Martinez Vin LoPresti Donna Chavez #12;3Sandia National Laboratories 2010 LDRD Annual Report, the report includes progress reports from 432 individual R&D projects in 11 categories. Sandia National

13

The Tandem-RFQ Linac Booster at Sandia National Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

A booster linac based on the Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ linac) has been put into routine operation on the 6.5 MV EN tandem accelerator at the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Ion Beam Materials Research Lab (IBMRL) for Radiation Effects Microscopy (REM) experiments with high energy, heavy ion beams. The booster linac consists of two RFQ stages that accelerate heavy ions

F. D. McDaniel; B. L. Doyle; D. L. Buller; R. W. Hamm; Kirtland AFB

14

The Tandem-RFQ Linac Booster at Sandia National Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

A booster linac based on the Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ linac) has been put into routine operation on the 6.5 MV EN tandem accelerator at the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Ion Beam Materials Research Lab (IBMRL) for Radiation Effects Microscopy (REM) experiments with high energy, heavy ion beams. The booster linac consists of two RFQ stages that accelerate heavy ions

F. D. McDaniel; B. L. Doyle; P. Rossi; D. L. Buller; R. W. Hamm; H. Schone

2003-01-01

15

SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES SF 6432-CS (10-98)  

E-print Network

SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES SF 6432-CS (10-98) SECTION II STANDARD TERMS & CONDITIONS FOR COMMERCIAL SERVICES PROCURED ON A FIRM FIXED PRICE OR FIXED RATE BASIS THE FOLLOWING CLAUSES APPLY representative thereof. (b) SANDIA means Sandia National Laboratories, operated by Sandia Corporation under

16

Issued by Sandia National Laboratories, operated for the United States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation.  

E-print Network

Rockett #12;3Sandia National Laboratories 2009 LDRD Annual Report 14 LDRD INTRODUCTION AND OVERVIEW 14 progress report from 406 individual R&D projects in 11 categories. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi#12;Issued by Sandia National Laboratories, operated for the United States Department of Energy

17

Supplier's Quick Guide to Sandia Electronic Invoicing Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory  

E-print Network

-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin electronically. iSupplier portal: https://supplierportal.sandia.gov/OA_HTML/RF.jsp?function_id=1027932&resp-populate with the address associated to your PO in SNL's system. Please review and change if needed. To change the address

18

Characterization of Neutron Test Facilities at Sandia National Laboratories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Sandia Pulsed Reactor (SPR-III) and Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR), with a variety of test environments, have been used for many years at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for radiation effects testing. Dosimetry has played a crucial role in their operation and characterization, and neutron energy spectral determinations have advanced as progress was made in the available nuclear data and spectrum adjustment techniques. This paper presents a historical perspective of the neutron energy spectra for several environments and their impact on several integral parameters of particular interest to facility users.

Vehar, D. W.; Griffin, P. J.; King, D. B.; Depriest, K. R.; Williams, J. G.

2009-08-01

19

Sandia National Laboratories: The Truman Fellowship  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Sandia National Laboratories announces the establishment of the President Harry S. Truman Fellowship in National Security Science and Engineering to attract the best nationally recognized new Ph.D. scientists and engineers. Truman Fellowship candidates are expected to have solved a major scientific or engineering problem in their thesis work or will have provided a new approach or insight to a major problem, as evidenced by a recognized impact in their field. Requirements: Eligibility criteria include: U.S. citizenship, the ability to obtain a DOE "Q" clearance; research in areas of interest to national security; the candidate must have been awarded a Ph.D. (minimum 3.5 undergraduate and 3.7 graduate GPA preferred) within the past 3 years at the time of application or will have completed all Ph.D. requirements by commencement of appointment; and, candidates seeking their first national laboratory appointment (pre postdoc internships excluded). Research at Sandia: Sandia National Laboratories is a federally funded research and development organization and contractor for the U.S. Department of Energy. Sandia has research focus areas in advanced computing; information systems and mathematics; bioscience and technology; combustion, chemical, and plasma sciences; engineering sciences; geosciences; intelligent systems and robotics; materials science and technology; microelectronics and microsystems; nanosciences and technology; pulsed power and directed energy; and remote sensing and satellite systems.

20

Status of repetitive pulsed power at Sandia National Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

Multi-kilojoule repetitive pulsed power technology moved from a laboratory environment into its first commercial application in 1997 as a driver for ion beam surface treatment. Sandia's RHEPP II (Repetitive High energy Pulsed Power), a repetitive 2.5 kJ\\/pulse electron beam accelerator, has supported the development of radiation treatment processes for polymers and elastomers, food products, and high dose-rate effects testing for

L. Schneider; K. Reed; H. Harjes; G. Pena; L. Martinez; M. Harden

1999-01-01

21

Sandia National Laboratories focus issue: introduction.  

PubMed

For more than six decades, Sandia has provided the critical science and technology to address the nation's most challenging issues. Our original nuclear weapons mission has been complemented with work in defense systems, energy and climate, as well as international and homeland security. Our vision is to be a premier science and engineering laboratory for technology solutions to the most challenging problems that threaten peace and freedom for our nation and the globe. PMID:25321140

Boye, Robert

2014-08-20

22

Greg Hebner, Ed Barnat, Paul Miller Sandia National Laboratories  

E-print Network

previous work showed that the spatial ion distribution depe Mexico Yucca Mountain, Nevada Sandia National Laboratories is distributed. #12;Sandia ­­ in round numbers Homeland Security & Defense Anti-crime and anti-terrorism technology Sandia is a National Security

Shyy, Wei

23

Computational geomechanics & applications at Sandia National Laboratories.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is a multi-program national laboratory in the business of national security, whose primary mission is nuclear weapons (NW). It is a prime contractor to the USDOE, operating under the NNSA and is one of the three NW national laboratories. It has a long history of involvement in the area of geomechanics, starting with the some of the earliest weapons tests at Nevada. Projects in which geomechanics support (in general) and computational geomechanics support (in particular) are at the forefront at Sandia, range from those associated with civilian programs to those in the defense programs. SNL has had significant involvement and participation in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (low-level defense nuclear waste), the Yucca Mountain Project (formerly proposed for commercial spent fuel and high-level nuclear waste), and the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (the nation's emergency petroleum store). In addition, numerous industrial partners seek-out our computational/geomechanics expertise, and there are efforts in compressed air and natural gas storage, as well as in CO{sub 2} Sequestration. Likewise, there have also been collaborative past efforts in the areas of compactable reservoir response, the response of salt structures associated with reservoirs, and basin modeling for the Oil & Gas industry. There are also efforts on the defense front, ranging from assessment of vulnerability of infrastructure to defeat of hardened targets, which require an understanding and application of computational geomechanics. Several examples from some of these areas will be described and discussed to give the audience a flavor of the type of work currently being performed at Sandia in the general area of geomechanics.

Arguello, Jose Guadalupe, Jr.

2010-04-01

24

The ATM conversion at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Converting a large, heterogeneous, networked, environment to ATM (Asynchronous Transfer Mode) can yield many benefits. Before these benefits can be reaped, however, numerous decisions must be made and implemented. This paper presents a case study which describes the steps that were necessary to convert a backbone network at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico to ATM. It presents each step by explaining its importance and what options were considered along with their tradeoffs. It is hoped that organizations contemplating converting to ATM will have a better understanding of how the transition is implemented after reading this paper.

Brenkosh, J.P.

1996-08-01

25

Transient dynamics capability at Sandia National Laboratories  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A brief overview of the transient dynamics capabilities at Sandia National Laboratories, with an emphasis on recent new developments and current research is presented. In addition, the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Engineering Analysis Code Access System (SEACAS), which is a collection of structural and thermal codes and utilities used by analysts at SNL, is described. The SEACAS system includes pre- and post-processing codes, analysis codes, database translation codes, support libraries, Unix shell scripts for execution, and an installation system. SEACAS is used at SNL on a daily basis as a production, research, and development system for the engineering analysts and code developers. Over the past year, approximately 190 days of CPU time were used by SEACAS codes on jobs running from a few seconds up to two and one-half days of CPU time. SEACAS is running on several different systems at SNL including Cray Unicos, Hewlett Packard PH-UX, Digital Equipment Ultrix, and Sun SunOS. An overview of SEACAS, including a short description of the codes in the system, are presented. Abstracts and references for the codes are listed at the end of the report.

Attaway, Steven W.; Biffle, Johnny H.; Sjaardema, G. D.; Heinstein, M. W.; Schoof, L. A.

1993-01-01

26

Site environmental report for 2003 Sandia National Laboratories, California.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) is a government-owned/contractor-operated laboratory. Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, operates the laboratory for the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration. The DOE Sandia Site Office oversees operations at the site, using Sandia Corporation as a management and operating contractor. This Site Environmental Report for 2003 was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A. The report provides a summary of environmental monitoring information and compliance activities that occurred at SNL/CA during calendar year 2003. General site and environmental program information is also included.

Larsen, Barbara L.

2004-06-01

27

Site environmental report for 2005 Sandia National Laboratories, California.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) is a government-owned/contractor-operated laboratory. Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, operates the laboratory for the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The DOE/NNSA Sandia Site Office (SSO) oversees operations at the site, using Sandia Corporation as a management and operating contractor. This Site Environmental Report for 2005 was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A. The report provides a summary of environmental monitoring information and compliance activities that occurred at SNL/CA during calendar year 2005. General site and environmental program information is also included.

Larsen, Barbara L.

2006-06-01

28

Space robotics programs at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Existing robotic rover and space satellite technologies at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), coupled with existing launch vehicles and converted military Multiple Independent Reentry Vehicle (MIRV) technologies, can be applied towards the realization of a robotic lunar rover mission in the near term. SNL`s Advanced Vehicle Development Department has been designing, producing, and operating prototype rover systems at the Robotic Vehicle Range facility since 1984, and has extensive experience with teleoperated and semiautonomous mobile robotic systems. SNL`s Space Systems Directorate has been designing, producing, and operating satellite systems and subsystems in earth orbit for national security missions since the early 1960`s. The facilities and robotic vehicle fleet at SNL`s Robotic Vehicle Range (SNL-RVR) have been used to support technology base development in applications ranging from DoD battlefield and security missions, to multi-agency nuclear emergency response team exercises and the development of a prototype robotic rover for planetary exploration. Recent activities at the SNL-RVR include the Robotic All Terrain Lunar Exploration Rover (RATLER) prototype development program, exploratory studies on a Near Term Lunar Return Mission scenario for small robotic rovers based on existing space hardware technology, and demonstrations of the utility of existing rover technologies for performing remote field geology tasks similar to those envisioned on a robotic lunar rover mission. Specific technologies demonstrated include low data rate teleoperation, multi-vehicle control, remote site and sample inspection, and standard bandwidth stereo vision. The paper describes Sandia National Laboratories` activities in the Space Robotics area, and highlights the laboratory`s supporting technical capabilities.

Klarer, P.

1993-01-01

29

At 200 feet tall, the Tower at Sandia National Laboratories  

E-print Network

goal is to provide experimental engineering data for the design, construction, and operation of unique with 34' ceiling. Includes 5 ton mobile crane with 24' lift, welding and machining tools. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned

30

History of Sandia National Laboratories` auxiliary closure mechanisms  

SciTech Connect

An essential component of a horizontal, underground nuclear test setup at the Nevada Test Site is the auxiliary closure system. The massive gates that slam shut immediately after a device has been detonated allow the prompt radiation to pass, but block debris and hot gases from continuing down the tunnel. Thus, the gates protect experiments located in the horizontal line-of-sight steel pipe. Sandia National Laboratories has been the major designer and developer of these closure systems. This report records the history of SNL`s participation in and contributions to the technology of auxiliary closure systems used in horizontal tunnel tests in the underground test program.

Weydert, J.C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ponder, G.M. [Geo-Centers, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-12-01

31

Nanosatellite program at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

The concept of building extremely small satellites which, either independently or as a collective, can perform missions which are comparable to their much larger cousins, has fascinated scientists and engineers for several years now. In addition to the now commonplace microelectronic integrated circuits, the more recent advent of technologies such as photonic integrated circuits (PIC's) and micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) have placed such a goal within their grasp. Key to the acceptance of this technology will be the ability to manufacture these very small satellites in quantity without sacrificing their performance or versatility. In support of its nuclear treaty verification, proliferation monitoring and other remote sensing missions, Sandia National laboratories has had a 35-year history of providing highly capable systems, densely packaged for unintrusive piggyback missions on government satellites. As monitoring requirements have become more challenging and remote sensing technologies become more sophisticated, packaging greater capability into these systems has become a requirement. Likewise, dwindling budgets are pushing satellite programs toward smaller and smaller platforms, reinforcing the need for smaller, cheaper satellite systems. In the next step of its miniaturization plan, Sandia has begun development of technologies for a highly integrated miniature satellite. The focus of this development is to achieve nanosat or smaller dimensions while maintaining significant capability utilizing semiconductor wafer-level integration and, at the same time promoting affordability through modular generic construction.

Reynolds, D.A.; Kern, J.P.; Schoeneman, J.L.

1999-11-11

32

Instrumentation and telemetry at Sandia National Laboratories.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is a Department of Energy multiprogram engineering and scientific facility with unique design, development, and test capabilities arising from their work in nuclear weapons, energy resources, defense systems, nuclear safeguards, and specialized scientific endeavors. To support these programs, they have developed instrumentation and telemetry expertise not available elsewhere. This technology is applicable to projects in government and industry. Since the 1950s, they have applied our technical competence to meet difficult challenges with innovative solutions to data acquisition and telemetry problems. Sandia - with experience in fields as diverse as parachute design and plasma physics, geology and rocket guidance, human factors and high-speed aerodynamics, non-destructive testing and satellite communications - can use the power of synergism among our many disciplines to solve your complex problems of data and acquisition and analysis. SNL solves difficult data acquisition problems for extreme environments with expertise in advanced telemetry techniques, high data rate telemetry design, specialized electronics packaging, MIL-STD-1553 communications, instrumentation development, real-time data analysis, project management, specialized testers and data encryption.

Not Available

1992-01-01

33

Space robotics programs at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Existing robotic rover and space satellite technologies at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), coupled with existing launch vehicles and converted military Multiple Independent Reentry Vehicle (MIRV) technologies, can be applied towards the realization of a robotic lunar rover mission in the near term. SNL's Advanced Vehicle Development Department has been designing, producing, and operating prototype rover systems at the Robotic Vehicle Range facility since 1984, and has extensive experience with teleoperated and semiautonomous mobile robotic systems. SNL's Space Systems Directorate has been designing, producing, and operating satellite systems and subsystems in earth orbit for national security missions since the early 1960's. The facilities and robotic vehicle fleet at SNL's Robotic Vehicle Range (SNL-RVR) have been used to support technology base development in applications ranging from DoD battlefield and security missions, to multi-agency nuclear emergency response team exercises and the development of a prototype robotic rover for planetary exploration. Recent activities at the SNL-RVR include the Robotic All Terrain Lunar Exploration Rover (RATLER) prototype development program, exploratory studies on a Near Term Lunar Return Mission scenario for small robotic rovers based on existing space hardware technology, and demonstrations of the utility of existing rover technologies for performing remote field geology tasks similar to those envisioned on a robotic lunar rover mission. Specific technologies demonstrated include low data rate teleoperation, multi-vehicle control, remote site and sample inspection, and standard bandwidth stereo vision. The paper describes Sandia National Laboratories' activities in the Space Robotics area, and highlights the laboratory's supporting technical capabilities.

Klarer, P.

1993-01-01

34

A History of Building 828, Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the history of Building 828 in Sandia National Laboratories' Technical Area I. Building 828 was constructed in 1946 as a mechanical test laboratory for Los Alamos' Z-Division (later Sandia) as it moved to Sandia Base. The building has undergone significant remodeling over the years and has had a variety of occupants. The building was evaluated in compliance with the National Historic Preservation Act, but was not eligible for the National Register of Historic Places. Nevertheless, for many Labs employees, it was a symbol of Sandia's roots in World War II and the Manhattan Project.

Ullrich, Rebecca

1999-08-01

35

Technology transfer at Sandia National Laboratories. First annual report  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sandia National Laboratories has always transferred some of he technology that it developed to the private sector and to local governments. Recent emphasis on new or alternative energy sources has greatly accelerated this transfer which is valued in the millions of dollars and is now required by law. Sandia has established several transfer methods, ranging from personal contact to written

Stromberg

1983-01-01

36

1988 Annual site environmental report, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sandia National Laboratories at Livermore, California, is located 65 km (50 miles) southeast of San Francisco midway between the Pacific Ocean and the San Joaquin Valley. Sandia conducts various research activities related to Department of Energy interests which have the potential for release of hazardous materials or radionuclides to the environment. A strict environmental control program places maximum emphasis on

Siegfriedt

1989-01-01

37

Technology transfer Sandia National Laboratories, fiscal year 1984, annual report  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sandia National Laboratories has always sought to transfer the technology that it developed to the private sector and to local governments. Sandia has established several transfer methods, ranging from personal contact to written formal reports. Success of our technology efforts has been extraordinary.

Stromberg

1985-01-01

38

Sandia National Laboratories ASCI Applications Software Quality Engineering Practices  

Microsoft Academic Search

This document provides a guide to the deployment of the software verification activities, software engineering practices, and project management principles that guide the development of Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) applications software at Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia). The goal of this document is to identify practices and activities that will foster the development of reliable and trusted products produced by

JOHN D. ZEPPER; KATHRYN MARY ARAGON; MOLLY A. ELLIS; KATHLEEN A. BYLE; DONNA SUE EATON

2003-01-01

39

Sandia National Laboratories 2011 LDRD Annual Report Exceptional service in the national interest  

E-print Network

Sandia National Laboratories 2011 LDRD Annual Report 1 Exceptional service in the national interest Rachel Silva Sandia National Laboratories 2011 LDRD Annual Report 1 Exceptional service in the national Laboratories 201 LDRD Annual Report 14 Sandia introduction and overview 14 Sandia National Laboratories' FY

40

DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: IN SITU ELECTROKINETIC EXTRACTION SYSTEM - SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES  

EPA Science Inventory

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has developed an in situ soil remediation system that uses electrokinetic principles to remediate hexavalent chromium-contaminated unsaturated or partially saturated soils. The technology involves the in situ application of direct current to the...

41

Cold War Context Statement: Sandia National Laboratories, California Site  

SciTech Connect

This document was prepared to support the Department of Energy's compliance with Sections 106 and 110 of the National Historic Preservation Act. It provides an overview of the historic context in which Sandia National Laboratories/California was created and developed. Establishing such a context allows for a reasonable and reasoned historical assessment of Sandia National Laboratories/California properties. The Cold War arms race provides the primary historical context for the SNL/CA built environment.

ULLRICH, REBECCA A.

2003-01-01

42

Tritium monitoring at the Sandia Tritium Research Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sandia Laboratories at Livermore, California, is presently beginning operation of a Tritium Research Laboratory (TRL). The laboratory incorporates containment and cleanup facilities such that any unscheduled tritium release is captured rather than vented to the atmosphere. A sophisticated tritium monitoring system is in use at the TRL to protect operating personnel and the environment, as well as ensure the safe

Devlin

1978-01-01

43

Vibration control for precision manufacturing at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories performs R and D in structural dynamics and vibration suppression for precision applications in weapon systems, space, underwater, transportation and civil structures. Over the last decade these efforts have expanded into the areas of active vibration control and ``smart`` structures and material systems. In addition, Sandia has focused major resources towards technology to support weapon product development and agile manufacturing capability for defense and industrial applications. This paper will briefly describe the structural dynamics modeling and verification process currently in place at Sandia that supports vibration control and some specific applications of these techniques to manufacturing in the areas of lithography, machine tools and flexible robotics.

Hinnerichs, T.; Martinez, D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Structural Dynamics and Vibration Control Dept.

1995-04-01

44

POLLUTION PREVENTION OPPORTUNITY ASSESSMENT - MANUFACTURING AND FABRICATION REPAIR LABORATORY AT SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES  

EPA Science Inventory

These reports summarize pollution prevention opportunity assessments conducted jointly by EPA and DOE at the Geochemistry Laboratory and the Manufacturing and Fabrication Repair Laboratory at the Department of Energy's Sandia National Laboratories facility in Albuquerque, New Mex...

45

1993 Site environmental report Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

This 1993 report contains monitoring data from routine radiological and nonradiological environmental surveillance activities. Summaries of significant environmental compliance programs in progress, such as National Environmental Policy Act documentation, environmental permits, environmental restoration, and various waste management programs for Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, are included. The maximum offsite dose impact was calculated to be 0.0016 millirem. The total population within a 50-mile (80 kilometer) radius of Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico received an estimated collective dose of 0.027 person-rem during 1993 from the laboratories operations, As in the previous year, the 1993 operations at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico had no discernible impact on the general public or on the environment. This report is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy in compliance with DOE Order 5400.1.

Culp, T.A.; Cheng, C.F.; Cox, W.; Durand, N.; Irwin, M.; Jones, A.; Lauffer, F.; Lincoln, M.; McClellan, Y.; Molley, K. [and others] [and others

1994-11-01

46

Sandia National Laboratories Institutional Plan: FY 1999-2004  

SciTech Connect

This Institutional Plan is the most comprehensive yearly "snapshot" available of Sandia National Laboratories' major programs, facilities, human resources, and budget. The document also includes overviews of our missions, organization, capabilities, planning functions, milestones, and accomplishments. The document's purpose is to provide the above information to the US Department of Energy, key congressional committees, Sandia management, and other present and potential customers. Chapter 2 presents information about Sandia's mission and summarizes our recent revision of Sandia's Strategic Plan. Chapter 3 presents an overview of Sandia's strategic objectives, chapter 4 lists laboratory goals and milestones for FY 1999, and chapter 5 presents our accomplishments during FY 1998. Chapters 3 through 5 are organized around our eight strategic objectives. The four primary objectives cover nuclear weapons responsibilities, nonproliferation and materials control, energy and critical infrastructures, and emerging national security threats. The major programmatic initiatives are presented in chapter 7. However, the programmatic descriptions in chapter 6 and the Associated funding tables in chapter 9 continue to be presented by DOE Budget and Reporting Code, as in previous Sandia institutional plans. As an aid to the reader, the four primary strategic objectives in chapter 3 are cross-referenced to the program information in chapter 6.

Garber, D.P.

1999-01-06

47

Sandia National Laboratories corporate mentor program : program review, May 2004.  

SciTech Connect

The Sandia National Laboratories Corporate Mentor Program provides a mechanism for the development and retention of Sandia's people and knowledge. The relationships formed among staff members at different stages in their careers offer benefits to all. These relationships can provide experienced employees with new ideas and insight and give less experienced employees knowledge of Sandia's culture, strategies, and programmatic direction. The program volunteer coordinators are dedicated to the satisfaction of the participants, who come from every area of Sandia. Since its inception in 1995, the program has sustained steady growth and excellent customer satisfaction. This report summarizes the accomplishments, activities, enhancements, and evaluation data for the Corporate Mentor Program for the 2003/2004 program year ending May 1, 2004.

Tibbetts, Tiffany; Tarro, Talitha; Dudeck, William; Bristol, Colette; Stephens, Jim

2005-01-01

48

Sandia National Laboratories/California site environmental report for 1997  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is committed to conducting its operations in an environmentally safe and sound manner. It is mandatory that activities at SNL/California comply with all applicable environmental statutes, regulations, and standards. Moreover, SNL/California continuously strives to reduce risks to employees, the public, and the environment to the lowest levels reasonably possible. To help verify effective protection of public safety and preservation of the environment, SNL/California maintains an extensive, ongoing environmental monitoring program. This program monitors all significant effluents and the environment at the SNL/California site perimeter. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) performs off-site external radiation monitoring for both sites. These monitoring efforts ensure that emission controls are effective in preventing contamination of the environment. As part of SNL/California`s Environmental Monitoring Program, an environmental surveillance system measures the possible presence of hazardous materials in groundwater, stormwater, and sewage. The program also includes an extensive environmental dosimetry program, which measures external radiation levels around the Livermore site and nearby vicinity. The Site Environmental Report describes the results of SNL/California`s environmental protection activities during the calendar year. It also summarizes environmental monitoring data and highlights major environmental programs. Overall, it evaluates SNL/California`s environmental management performance and documents the site`s regulatory compliance status.

Condouris, R.A. [ed.] [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Holland, R.C. [Science Applications International Corp. (United States)

1998-06-01

49

Sandia National Laboratories Institutional Plan FY1994--1999  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a five year plan for the laboratory. This plan takes advantage of the technical strengths of the lab and its staff to address issues of concern to the nation on a scope much broader than Sandia`s original mission, while maintaining the general integrity of the laboratory. The plan proposes initiatives in a number of technologies which overlap the needs of its customers and the strengths of its staff. They include: advanced manufacturing technology; electronics; information and computational technology; transportation energy technology and infrastructure; environmental technology; energy research and technology development; biomedical systems engineering; and post-cold war defense imperatives.

Not Available

1993-10-01

50

76 FR 70456 - Decision To Evaluate a Petition To Designate a Class of Employees From Sandia National Laboratory...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...To Designate a Class of Employees From Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque, NM...to designate a class of employees from Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque, New...evaluation, is as follows: Facility: Sandia National Laboratory. Location:...

2011-11-14

51

The Tandem-RFQ Linac Booster at Sandia National Laboratories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A booster linac based on the Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ linac) has been put into routine operation on the 6.5 MV EN tandem accelerator at the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Ion Beam Materials Research Lab (IBMRL) for Radiation Effects Microscopy (REM) experiments with high energy, heavy ion beams. The booster linac consists of two RFQ stages that accelerate heavy ions with m/q < 8 from 0.25 MeV/amu up to 1.22 MeV/amu in the first stage and to 1.90 MeV/amu in the second stage to produce high Linear Energy Transfer (LET) ions for REM. This RFQ linac has a total length of 6.0 meters and is installed on a new experimental beam line at the SNL IBMRL to measure single-event upset (SEU) cross-sections of integrated circuits (ICs) and to perform radiation hardness research using REM with the associated Ion Electron Emission Microscope (IEEM). This paper presents the recent beam measurement results from operation of the RFQ linac with beams from silicon to gold and compares these results with theoretical beam dynamics calculations. It also describes the details of the experiments to measure SEU cross-sections and IEEM.

McDaniel, F. D.; Doyle, B. L.; Rossi, P.; Buller, D. L.; Hamm, R. W.; Schone, H.

2003-08-01

52

Overview of Sandia National Laboratories pulse nuclear reactors  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories has designed, constructed and operated bare metal Godiva-type and pool-type pulse reactors since 1961. The reactor facilities were designed to support a wide spectrum of research, development, and testing activities associated with weapon and reactor systems.

Schmidt, T.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Reuscher, J.A. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

1994-10-01

53

Sandia National Laboratories, California Chemical Management Program annual report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL\\/CA) Chemical Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL\\/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. This program annual report describes the activities undertaken during the calender past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Chemical Management Program, one of

Brynildson; Mark E

2012-01-01

54

Sandia National Laboratories, California Hazardous Materials Management Program annual report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL\\/CA) Hazardous Materials Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL\\/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. This program annual report describes the activities undertaken during the calender past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Hazardous Materials Management Program,

Brynildson; Mark E

2011-01-01

55

Sandia National Laboratories, California Waste Management Program annual report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL\\/CA) Waste Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL\\/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. This annual program report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Waste Management (WM) Program, one of

Brynildson; Mark E

2010-01-01

56

Sandia National Laboratories photovoltaic balance of systems program  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Sandia National Laboratories photovoltaic balance of system (BOS) program is sponsored by the Department of Energy to increase the reliability and lower the cost of BOS components. Efforts for FY1998 are discussed. Principal efforts include a quality program for inverter manufacturers, a grid-tied anti-islanding program, development of a hybrid inverter, hardware benchmarking program, and a battery evaluation program.

Bonn, Russell H.; Ginn, Jerry; Hund, Tom; Gonzalez, Sigfredo; Ralph, Mark; Strommen, Roger

1999-03-01

57

Equipment qualification testing evaluation experiences at Sandia National Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

The USNRC has sponsored a number of programs at Sandia National Laboratories specifically addressing safety-related equipment qualification. The most visible of these programs has been the Qualification Testing Evaluation (QTE) program. Other relevant programs have included the Equipment Qualification Methodology Research Test program (CAP). Over a ten year period these programs have collectively tested numerous types of safety-related equipment. Some

L. D. Bustard; F. J. Wyant; L. L. Bonzon; K. T. Gillen

1986-01-01

58

Status report on the Sandia Laboratories solar total energy program  

Microsoft Academic Search

A feasibility study of a combination of solar energy collection and total or cascaded energy systems has been underway at Sandia Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico, since the summer of 1972. Results of the systems analysis effort have been previously reported. Systems analyses and hardware design have continued. This paper summarizes results of the program through June 1975 by providing systems

R STROMBERG

1975-01-01

59

Sandia National Laboratories Validation Workshop: Structural dynamics application  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article specifies a virtual structural dynamic subsystem and some systems, as well as mathematical models that approximately simulate them. The purpose is to define a setting for model validations conceived by participants in the Sandia National Laboratories Validation Workshop. Some broad guidelines for the model validations are set, as well as a regulatory requirement to be satisfied by the

J. R. Red-Horse; T. L. Paez

2008-01-01

60

Sandia National Laboratories data engineering for DOE production agencies  

Microsoft Academic Search

At Sandia National Laboratories data engineering is the application of both the art and science aspects of engineering principles to the acquisition and storage of product-related test and traceability data and to the transformation of this data into useful information through data retrieval and analysis processes. This report describes the application of data engineering to the data systems that have

L. Jr. Hernandez; R. F. Jr. Ellison; J. L. Zubersky; G. L. MacCosbe; L. T. Davis

1990-01-01

61

Sandia National Laboratories, California Environmental Management System program manual.  

SciTech Connect

The Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Environmental Management System (EMS) Program Manual documents the elements of the site EMS Program. The SNL/CA EMS Program conforms to the International Standard on Environmental Management Systems, ISO 14001:2004 and Department of Energy (DOE) Order 436.1.

Larsen, Barbara L.

2013-04-01

62

PDC (polycrystalline diamond compact) bit research at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

From the beginning of the geothermal development program, Sandia has performed and supported research into polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) bits. These bits are attractive because they are intrinsically efficient in their cutting action (shearing, rather than crushing) and they have no moving parts (eliminating the problems of high-temperature lubricants, bearings, and seals.) This report is a summary description of the analytical and experimental work done by Sandia and our contractors. It describes analysis and laboratory tests of individual cutters and complete bits, as well as full-scale field tests of prototype and commercial bits. The report includes a bibliography of documents giving more detailed information on these topics. 26 refs.

Finger, J.T.; Glowka, D.A.

1989-06-01

63

Sandia National Laboratories ASCI Applications Software Quality Engineering Practices  

SciTech Connect

This document provides a guide to the deployment of the software verification activities, software engineering practices, and project management principles that guide the development of Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) applications software at Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia). The goal of this document is to identify practices and activities that will foster the development of reliable and trusted products produced by the ASCI Applications program. Document contents include an explanation of the structure and purpose of the ASCI Quality Management Council, an overview of the software development lifecycle, an outline of the practices and activities that should be followed, and an assessment tool. These sections map practices and activities at Sandia to the ASCI Software Quality Engineering: Goals, Principles, and Guidelines, a Department of Energy document.

ZEPPER, JOHN D.; ARAGON, KATHRYN MARY; ELLIS, MOLLY A.; BYLE, KATHLEEN A.; EATON, DONNA SUE

2002-01-01

64

Single media thermocline TES studies at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

The status of thermocline thermal energy storage (TES) development at Sandia National Laboratories is summarized. The work centers around testing in the 1200 gal engineering prototype thermocline test facility. The results of heat loss, charge, discharge and static tests in the prototype tank are described. Also described are analytical work and a supportive laboratory-scale program which is investigating diffusers to inhibit mixing in the tank.

Gross, R.J.

1981-01-01

65

Dual-benefit technologies at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

What does the pulp and paper industry have in common with the desert southwest and nuclear weapons? As a representative of one of the Nations three nuclear weapons design laboratories (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories), my goal is to identify ``dual-benefit`` technologies where codevelopment will both strengthen the nation`s competitive position and enhance national security. In development of this presentation, I found more common elements than I could possibly survey in this brief period.

Schaefer, D.W.

1993-12-31

66

Graphical programming at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Sandia has developed an advanced operational control system approach, called Graphical Programming, to design, program, and operate robotic systems. The Graphical Programming approach produces robot systems that are faster to develop and use, safer in operation, and cheaper overall than altemative teleoperation or autonomous robot control systems. Graphical Programming also provides an efficient and easy-to-use interface to traditional robot systems for use in setup and programming tasks. This paper provides an overview of the Graphical Programming approach and lists key features of Graphical Programming systems. Graphical Programming uses 3-D visualization and simulation software with intuitive operator interfaces for the programming and control of complex robotic systems. Graphical Programming Supervisor software modules allow an operator to command and simulate complex tasks in a graphic preview mode and, when acceptable, command the actual robots and monitor their motions with the graphic system. Graphical Programming Supervisors maintain registration with the real world and allow the robot to perform tasks that cannot be accurately represented with models alone by using a combination of model and sensor-based control.

McDonald, M.J.; Palmquist, R.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Desjarlais, L. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-09-01

67

Dual benefit robotics programs at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories has one of the largest integrated robotics laboratories in the United States. Projects include research, development, and application of one-of-a-kind systems, primarily for the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. This work has been underway for more than 10 years. It began with on-site activities that required remote operation, such as reactor and nuclear waste handling. Special purpose robot systems were developed using existing commercial manipulators and fixtures and programs designed in-house. These systems were used in applications such as servicing the Sandia pulsed reactor and inspecting remote roof bolts in an underground radioactive waste disposal facility. In the beginning, robotics was a small effort, but with increasing attention to the use of robots for hazardous operations, efforts now involve a staff of more than 100 people working in a broad robotics research, development, and applications program that has access to more than 30 robotics systems.

Jones, A.T.

1994-09-01

68

Sandia National Laboratories, California Environmental Management System program manual.  

SciTech Connect

The Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Environmental Management System (EMS) Program Manual documents the elements of the site EMS Program. The SNL/CA EMS Program conforms to the International Standard on Environmental Management Systems, ISO 14001:2004and Department of Energy (DOE) Order 436.1. Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) has maintained functional environmental programs to assist with regulatory compliance for more than 30 years. During 2005, these existing programs were rolled into a formal environmental management system (EMS) that expands beyond the traditional compliance focus to managing and improving environmental performance and stewardship practices for all site activities. An EMS is a set of inter-related elements that represent a continuing cycle of planning, implementing, evaluating, and improving processes and actions undertaken to achieve environmental policy and goals. The SNL/CA EMS Program conforms to the International Standard for Environmental Management Systems, ISO 14001:2004 (ISO 2004). The site first received ISO 14001 certification in September 2006 and recertification in 2009. SNL/CA's EMS Program is applicable to the Sandia, Livermore site only. Although SNL/CA operates as one organizational division of the overall Sandia National Laboratories, the EMS Program is site-specific, with site-specific objectives and targets. SNL/CA (Division 8000) benefits from the organizational structure as it provides corporate level policies, procedures, and standards, and established processes that connect to and support elements of the SNL/CA EMS Program. Additionally, SNL/CA's EMS Program benefits from two corporate functional programs (Facilities Energy and Water Resource Management and Fleet Services programs) that maintain responsibility for energy management and fleet services for all Sandia locations. Each EMS element is further enhanced with site-specific processes and standards. Division 8000 has several groups operating at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM). Although these groups, from an organizational perspective, are part of Division 8000, they are managed locally and fall under the environmental requirements specific to their New Mexico location. The New Mexico groups in Division 8000 follow the corporate EMS Program for New Mexico operations.

Larsen, Barbara L.

2012-03-01

69

Sandia National Laboratories, California Environmental Management System Program Manual.  

SciTech Connect

The Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Environmental Management System (EMS) Program Manual documents the elements of the site EMS Program. The SNL/CA EMS Program conforms to the International Standard on Environmental Management Systems, ISO 14001:2004 and Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1. Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) has maintained functional environmental programs to assist with regulatory compliance for more than 30 years. During 2005, these existing programs were rolled into a formal environmental management system (EMS) that expands beyond the traditional compliance focus to managing and improving environmental performance and stewardship practices for all site activities. An EMS is a set of inter-related elements that represent a continuing cycle of planning, implementing, evaluating, and improving processes and actions undertaken to achieve environmental policy and goals. The SNL/CA EMS Program conforms to the International Standard for Environmental Management Systems, ISO 14001:2004 (ISO 2004). The site received ISO 14001 certification in September 2006. SNL/CA's EMS Program is applicable to the Sandia, Livermore site only. Although SNL/CA operates as one organizational division of the overall Sandia National Laboratories, the EMS Program is site-specific, with site-specific objectives and targets. SNL/CA (Division 8000) benefits from the organizational structure as it provides corporate level policies, procedures, and standards, and established processes that connect to and support elements of the SNL/CA EMS Program. Additionally, SNL/CA's EMS Program benefits from two corporate functional programs (Facilities Energy Management and Fleet Services Environmental programs) that maintain responsibility for energy management and fleet services for all Sandia locations. Each EMS element is further enhanced with site-specific processes and standards. Division 8000 has several groups operating at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM). Although these groups, from an organizational perspective, are part of Division 8000, they are managed locally and fall under the environmental requirements specific to their New Mexico location. The New Mexico groups in Division 8000 follow the corporate EMS Program for New Mexico operations.

Not Available

2009-04-01

70

Sandia National Laboratories, California Environmental Management System Program Manual.  

SciTech Connect

The Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Environmental Management System (EMS) Program Manual documents the elements of the site EMS Program. The SNL/CA EMS Program conforms to the International Standard on Environmental Management Systems, ISO 14001:2004and Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1. Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) has maintained functional environmental programs to assist with regulatory compliance for more than 30 years. During 2005, these existing programs were rolled into a formal environmental management system (EMS) that expands beyond the traditional compliance focus to managing and improving environmental performance and stewardship practices for all site activities. An EMS is a set of inter-related elements that represent a continuing cycle of planning, implementing, evaluating, and improving processes and actions undertaken to achieve environmental policy and goals. The SNL/CA EMS Program conforms to the International Standard for Environmental Management Systems, ISO 14001:2004 (ISO 2004). The site received ISO 14001 certification in September 2006. SNL/CA's EMS Program is applicable to the Sandia, Livermore site only. Although SNL/CA operates as one organizational division of the overall Sandia National Laboratories, the EMS Program is site-specific, with site-specific objectives and targets. SNL/CA (Division 8000) benefits from the organizational structure as it provides corporate level policies, procedures, and standards, and established processes that connect to and support elements of the SNL/CA EMS Program. Additionally, SNL/CA's EMS Program benefits from two corporate functional programs (Facilities Energy Management and Fleet Services programs) that maintain responsibility for energy management and fleet services for all Sandia locations. Each EMS element is further enhanced with site-specific processes and standards. Division 8000 has several groups operating at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM). Although these groups, from an organizational perspective, are part of Division 8000, they are managed locally and fall under the environmental requirements specific to their New Mexico location. The New Mexico groups in Division 8000 follow the corporate EMS Program for New Mexico operations.

Larsen, Barbara L.

2011-04-01

71

Sandia National Laboratories, California Hazardous Materials Management Program annual report.  

SciTech Connect

The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Hazardous Materials Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. This program annual report describes the activities undertaken during the calender past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Hazardous Materials Management Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

Brynildson, Mark E.

2011-02-01

72

1996 Site environmental report Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sandia National Laboratories\\/New Mexico (SNL\\/NM) is operated in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) mission to provide weapon component technology and hardware for national security needs, and to conduct fundamental research and development (R&D) to advance technology in energy research, computer science, waste management, electronics, materials science, and transportation safety for hazardous and nuclear components. In support of

C. H. Fink; D. Duncan; R. Sanchez

1997-01-01

73

Performance indicator report, first quarter, CY 1991: Sandia National Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report represents the first quarterly submittal of data by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for the Department Of Energy (DOE) Headquarters Performance Indicator Program. Secretary of Energy Notice (SEN-29-91) directed that a Department-wide uniform systems of Performance Indicators (PIs) for trending and analyzing operational data to help assess and support progress in improving performance and in strengthening line management control

E. Conway; D. Haycraft

1991-01-01

74

Site Environmental Report for 2010 Sandia National Laboratories, California.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) is a government-owned/contractor-operated laboratory. Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, manages and operates the laboratory for the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The NNSA Sandia Site Office administers the contract and oversees contractor operations at the site. This Site Environmental Report for 2010 was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A (DOE 2004a). The report provides a summary of environmental monitoring information and compliance activities that occurred at SNL/CA during calendar year 2010. General site and environmental program information is also included. The Site Environmental Report is divided into ten chapters. Chapter 1, the Executive Summary, highlights compliance and monitoring results obtained in 2010. Chapter 2 provides a brief introduction to SNL/CA and the existing environment found on site. Chapter 3 summarizes SNL/CA's compliance activities with the major environmental requirements applicable to site operations. Chapter 4 presents information on environmental management, performance measures, and environmental programs. Chapter 5 presents the results of monitoring and surveillance activities in 2010. Chapter 6 discusses quality assurance. Chapters 7 through 9 provide supporting information for the report and Chapter 10 is the report distribution list.

Larsen, Barbara L.

2011-06-01

75

Advanced robotic technologies for transfer at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Hazardous operations which have in the past been completed by technicians are under increased scrutiny due to high costs and low productivity associated with providing protective clothing and environments. As a result, remote systems are needed to accomplish many hazardous materials handling tasks such as the clean-up of waste sites in which the exposure of personnel to radiation, chemical, explosive and other hazardous constituents is unacceptable. Computer models augmented by sensing, and structured, modular computing environments are proving effective in automating many unstructured hazardous tasks. Work at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has focused on applying flexible automation (robotics) to meet the needs of the U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE). Dismantling facilities, environmental remediation, and materials handling in changing, hazardous environments lead to many technical challenges. Computer planning, monitoring and operator assistance shorten training cycles, reduce errors, and speed execution of operations. Robotic systems that re-use well-understood generic technologies can be much better characterized than robotic systems developed for a particular application, leading to a more reliable and safer systems. Further safety in robotic operations results from use of environmental sensors and knowledge of the task and environment. Collision detection and avoidance is achieved from such sensor integration and model-based control. This paper discusses selected technologies developed at SNL for use within the USDOE complex that have been or are ready for transfer to government and industrial suppliers. These technologies include sensors, sub-systems, and the design philosophy applied to quickly integrate them into a working robotic system. This paper represents the work of many people at the Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center at SNL, to whom the credit belongs.

Bennett, P.C.

1994-10-01

76

Sandia`s network for Supercomputing `94: Linking the Los Alamos, Lawrence Livermore, and Sandia National Laboratories using switched multimegabit data service  

SciTech Connect

Supercomputing `94, a high-performance computing and communications conference, was held November 14th through 18th, 1994 in Washington DC. For the past four years, Sandia National Laboratories has used this conference to showcase and focus its communications and networking endeavors. At the 1994 conference, Sandia built a Switched Multimegabit Data Service (SMDS) network running at 44.736 megabits per second linking its private SMDS network between its facilities in Albuquerque, New Mexico and Livermore, California to the convention center in Washington, D.C. For the show, the network was also extended from Sandia, New Mexico to Los Alamos National Laboratory and from Sandia, California to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This paper documents and describes this network and how it was used at the conference.

Vahle, M.O.; Gossage, S.A.; Brenkosh, J.P. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Advanced Networking Integration Dept.

1995-01-01

77

Calendar year 2003 annual site environmental report for Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL\\/NM) is a government-owned, contractor-operated facility owned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and managed by the Sandia Site Office (SSO), Albuquerque, New Mexico. Sandia Corporation, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, operates SNL\\/NM. This annual report summarizes data and the compliance status of Sandia Corporation's environmental protection

Katrina Wagner; Rebecca V. Sanchez; Lucie Mayeux; Susan I. Koss; Stephanie A. Salinas

2004-01-01

78

Calendar year 2004 annual site environmental report:Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL\\/NM) is a government-owned, contractor-operated facility owned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and managed by the Sandia Site Office (SSO), Albuquerque, New Mexico. Sandia Corporation, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, operates SNL\\/NM. This annual report summarizes data and the compliance status of Sandia Corporation's environmental protection

Amber L. Montoya; Teresa Lynn Goering; Katrina Wagner; Susan I. Koss; Stephanie A. Salinas

2005-01-01

79

Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energys National Nuclear Security Administration  

E-print Network

, Jaideep Ray1, Karen Cheng2 and David Crary2 1Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore CA, 2Applied ResearchSandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energys National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL

Ray, Jaideep

80

Progress in Z-Pinch driven dynamic-hohlraums for high-temperature radiation-flow and ICF experiments at Sandia National Laboratories.  

SciTech Connect

Progress in understanding the physics of dynamic-hohlraums is reviewed for a system capable of generating 13 TW of axial radiation for high temperature (>200 eV) radiation-flow experiments and ICF capsule implosions.

Bailey, James E.; Haines, Malcolm G. (Imperial College, London, United Kingdom); Chandler, Gordon Andrew; Bliss, David Emery; Olson, Richard Edward; Sanford, Thomas W. L.; Olson, Craig Lee; Nash, Thomas J.; Ruiz, Carlos L.; Matzen, Maurice Keith; Idzorek, George C. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Stygar, William A.; Apruzese, John P. (Naval Research Laboratory, Washington DC); Cuneo, Michael Edward; Cooper, Gary Wayne (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Chittenden, Jeremy Paul (Imperial College, London, United Kingdom); Chrien, Robert E. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Slutz, Stephen A.; Mock, Raymond Cecil; Leeper, Ramon Joe; Sarkisov, Gennady Sergeevich (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Peterson, Darrell L. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Lemke, Raymond William; Mehlhorn, Thomas Alan; Roderick, Norman Frederick (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Watt, Robert G. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New MM)

2004-06-01

81

Progress in z-pinch driven dynamic-hohlraums for high-temperature radiation-flow and ICF experiments at Sandia National Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

Progress in understanding the physics of dynamic-hohlraums is reviewed for a system capable of generating 13 TW of axial radiation for high temperature (>200 eV) radiation-flow experiments and ICF capsule implosions.

T W L Sanford; T J Nash; R E Olson; David Emery Bliss; R W Lemke; C L Olson; C L Ruiz; R C Mock; J E Bailey; G A Chandler; M E Cuneo; R J Leeper; M K Matzen; T A Mehlhorn; S A Slutz; W A Stygar; D L Peterson; R E Chrien; R G Watt; N F Roderick; G W Cooper; J P Apruzese; G S Sarkisov; J P Chittenden; M G Haines

2004-01-01

82

Sandia National Laboratories CDC7800 version of MORSE-SGC  

SciTech Connect

A version of the MORSE-SGC code has been developed for the Sandia National Laboratories' CDC7600 computer. MORSE is a Monte Carlo code designed to solve neutron and gamma-ray transport problems. This report is intended as a guide for the use of this code and includes discussions of source definition, geometry specification, biasing, and detectors. Preparation of input for the code is described in detail, and several example problems are presented. Use of auxiliary codes PICTURE, SCEPLOT, and LAVA is also discussed.

Dupree, S.A.; Lighthill, R.E.

1982-02-01

83

Update on Engine Combustion Research at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this paper are to describe the research efforts in diesel engine combustion at Sandia National Laboratories' Combustion Research Facility and to provide recent experimental results. We have four diesel engine experiments supported by the Department of Energy, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies: a one-cylinder version of a Cummins heavy-duty engine, a diesel simulation facility, a one-cylinder Caterpillar engine to evaluate combustion of alternative fuels, and a homogeneous-charge, compression ignition (HCCI) engine. Recent experimental results of diesel combustion research will be discussed and a description will be given of our HCCI experimental program and of our HCCI modeling work.

Jay Keller; Gurpreet Singh

2001-05-14

84

Certain irregularities in the use of computer facilities at Sandia Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This report concerns irregularities in the use of computer systems at Sandia Laboratories (Sandia) in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Our interest in this subject was triggered when we learned late last year that the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) was planning to undertake an investigation into possible misuse of the computer systems at Sandia. That investigation, which was carried out with the assistance of our staff, disclosed that an employee of Sandia was apparently using the Sandia computer system to assist in running a bookmaking operation for local gamblers. As a result of that investigation, we decided to conduct a separate review of Sandia's computer systems to determine the extent of computer misuse at Sandia. We found that over 200 employees of Sandia had stored games, personal items, classified material, and otherwise sensitive material on their computer files.

Not Available

1980-10-22

85

Sandia National Laboratories, California Chemical Management Program annual report.  

SciTech Connect

The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Chemical Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. This program annual report describes the activities undertaken during the calender past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Chemical Management Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA. SNL/CA is responsible for tracking chemicals (chemical and biological materials), providing Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) and for regulatory compliance reporting according to a variety of chemical regulations. The principal regulations for chemical tracking are the Emergency Planning Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) and the California Right-to-Know regulations. The regulations, the Hazard Communication/Lab Standard of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) are also key to the CM Program. The CM Program is also responsible for supporting chemical safety and information requirements for a variety of Integrated Enabling Services (IMS) programs primarily the Industrial Hygiene, Waste Management, Fire Protection, Air Quality, Emergency Management, Environmental Monitoring and Pollution Prevention programs. The principal program tool is the Chemical Information System (CIS). The system contains two key elements: the MSDS library and the chemical container-tracking database that is readily accessible to all Members of the Sandia Workforce. The primary goal of the CM Program is to ensure safe and effective chemical management at Sandia/CA. This is done by efficiently collecting and managing chemical information for our customers who include Line, regulators, DOE and ES and H programs to ensure compliance with regulations and to streamline customer business processes that require chemical information.

Brynildson, Mark E.

2012-02-01

86

Applied Numerical Mathematics, 20 (1996) 367386 Sandia National Laboratories Tech. Rep. SAND951142J  

E-print Network

DAAH04­95­1­0091. + Parallel Computing Sciences Department, Sandia National Laboratories, AlbuquerqueApplied Numerical Mathematics, 20 (1996) 367­386 Sandia National Laboratories Tech. Rep. SAND95­1142J 1 Parallel Adaptive hp­Refinement Techniques for Conservation Laws * Karen D. Devine + and Joseph

Devine, Karen

87

Monitoring system of the Tritium Research Laboratory, Sandia Laboratories, Livermore, CA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Automated tritium monitoring is now in use at the Tritium Research Laboratory (TRL). Betatec 100 tritium monitors, along with several Sandia-designed accessories, have been combined with a PDP 11\\/40 computer to automatically read and record tritium concentrations of room air, containment, and cleanup systems. Each individual monitoring system, in addition to a local display in the area of interest, has

W. R. Wall; R. S. Hafner; D. L. Westfall; R. D. Ristau

1978-01-01

88

Fire Protection Research Program at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories is executing a program for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to provide data needed for confirmation of the suitability of current design standards and regulatory guides for fire protection and control in water reactor power plants. This paper summarizes the activities of this ongoing program through October 1980. Characterization of electrically initiated fires revealed a margin of safety in the separation criteria of Regulatory Guide 1.75 for such fires in IEEE-383 qualified cable. However, tests confirmed that these guidelines and standards are not sufficient, in themselves, to protect against exposure fires. This paper describes both small and full scale tests to assess the adequacy of fire retardant coatings and full scale tests on fire shields to determine their effectiveness. It also describes full scale tests to determine the effects of walls and ceilings on fire propagation between cable trays. Some small-scale scoping tests have been conducted to investigate the effects of varying the furnace pressure on cable penetration performance in the ASTM-E-119 Fire Test. The Sandia Fire Research Facility has been completed and a series of tests have been run to assess the effectiveness of Halon-1301 as a suppression system in extinguishing deep-seated cable-tray fires. It was found that given sufficient soak times Halon systems are effective in extinguishing such fires.

Klamerus, L.J.

1980-01-01

89

Exceptional service in the national interest Sandia National Laboratories  

E-print Network

Technology Officer The LDRD Program Innovates for Sandia's Biosciences Mission The face of Sandia of bioscience, is advancing at an astonishing pace. Sandia Bioscience LDRDs are thus faced with the dual task...................................................................................... 4 PART I:Rapid Biothreat Detection and Countermeasures ......................... 6 Rap

90

Epidemiologic surveillance. Annual report for Sandia National Laboratories 1994  

SciTech Connect

Epidemiologic surveillance at DOE facilities consists of regular and systematic collection, analysis, and interpretation of data on absences due to illness and injury in the work force. Its purpose is to provide an early warning system for health problems occurring among employees at participating sites. In this annual report, 1994 morbidity data for the Sandia National Laboratories are summarized. These analyses focus on absences of 5 or more consecutive workdays occurring among workers aged 15-76 years. They are arranged in five sets of tables that present: (1) the distribution of the labor force by occupational category and pay status; (2) the absences per person, diagnoses per absence, and diagnosis rates for the whole work force; (3) diagnosis rates by type of disease or injury; (4) diagnosis rates by occupational category; and (5) relative risks for specific types of disease or injury by occupational category.

NONE

1994-12-31

91

Baseline ecological footprint of Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico.  

SciTech Connect

The Ecological Footprint Model is a mechanism for measuring the environmental effects of operations at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico (SNL/NM). This analysis quantifies environmental impact associated with energy use, transportation, waste, land use, and water consumption at SNL/NM for fiscal year 2005 (FY05). Since SNL/NM's total ecological footprint (96,434 gha) is greater than the waste absorption capacity of its landholdings (338 gha), it created an ecological deficit of 96,096 gha. This deficit is equal to 886,470lha, or about 3,423 square miles of Pinyon-Juniper woodlands and desert grassland. 89% of the ecological footprint can be attributed to energy use, indicating that in order to mitigate environmental impact, efforts should be focused on energy efficiency, energy reduction, and the incorporation of additional renewable energy alternatives at SNL/NM.

Coplen, Amy K.; Mizner, Jack Harry,; Ubechel, Norion M.

2009-01-01

92

1989 Environmental monitoring report, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

This 1989 report contains monitoring data from routine radiological and nonradiological environmental surveillance activities. Summaries of significant environmental compliance programs in progress such as National Environmental Policy Act documentation, environmental permits, environmental restoration, and various waste management programs for Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque (SNL, Albuquerque) are included. The maximum offsite dose impact was calculated to be 8.8 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} mrem. The total Albuquerque population received a collective dose of 0.097 person-rem during 1989 from SNL, Albuquerque, operations. As in the previous year, SNL, Albuquerque, operations in 1989 had no adverse impact on the general public or on the environment. 46 refs., 20 figs., 31 tabs.

Hwang, S.; Chavez, G.; Phelan, J.; Parsons, A.; Yeager, G.; Dionne, D.; Schwartz, B.; Wolff, T.; Fish, J.; Gray, C.; Thompson, D.

1990-05-01

93

1991 Environmental monitoring report Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

This 1991 report contains monitoring data from routine radiological and nonradiological environmental surveillance activities. Summaries of significant environmental compliance programs in progress such as National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documentation, environmental permits, environmental restoration (ER), and various waste management programs for Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque (SNL, Albuquerque) are included. The maximum offsite dose impact was calculated to be 1.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} mrem. The total population within a 50-mile radius of SNL, Albuquerque, received a collective dose of 0.53 person-rem during 1991 from SNL, Albuquerque, operations. As in the previous year, the 1991 operations at SNL, Albuquerque, had no discernible impact on the general public or on the environment.

Culp, T.; Cox, W.; Hwang, S.; Jones, A.; Longley, S.; Parsons, A.; Wolff, T.; Fish, J.; Ward, S.

1992-11-01

94

1990 Environmental Monitoring Report, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

This 1990 report contains monitoring data from routine radiological and nonradiological environmental surveillance activities. Summaries of significant environmental compliance programs in progress such as National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documentation, environmental permits, environmental restoration, and various waste management programs for Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque (SNL, Albuquerque) are included. The maximum offsite dose impact was calculated to be 2.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} mrem. The total 50-mile population received a collective dose of 0.82 person-rem during 1990 from SNL, Albuquerque, operations. As in the previous year, the 1990 SNL operations had no adverse impact on the general public or on the environment. This report is prepared for the US Department of Energy in compliance with DOE Order 5400.1. 97 refs., 30 figs., 137 tabs.

Hwang, S.; Yeager, G.; Wolff, T.; Parsons, A.; Dionne, D.; Massey, C.; Schwartz, B.; Fish, J.; Thompson, D. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Goodrich, M. (GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States))

1991-05-01

95

Fire Protection Research Program at Sandia Laboratories. [BWR; PWR  

SciTech Connect

Sandia Laboratories is executing a program for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to provide data needed for confirmation of the suitability of current design standards and regulatory guides for fire protection and control in water reactor power plants. This paper summarizes the activities of this ongoing program through December 1979. Characterization of electrically initiated fires revealed a margin of safety in the separation criteria of Regulatory Guide 1.75 for such fires in IEEE-383 qualified cable. However, tests confirmed that these guidelines and standards are not sufficient, in themselves, to protect against exposure fires. This paper describes both small and full scale tests to assess the adequacy of fire retardant coatings and full scale tests on fire shields to determine their effectiveness. It also describes full scale tests to determine the effects of walls and ceilings on fire propagation between cable trays.

Klamerus, L.J.

1980-01-01

96

Sandia National Laboratories' 2002 Green Zia Program Feedback Report  

SciTech Connect

The Green Zia Environmental Excellence Program is a voluntary program designed to support and assist New Mexico businesses to achieve environmental excellence through the development of an environmental management system (EMS). Since 2000, organizations within Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) have participated in the program. SNL's Pollution Prevention (P2) program supports and assists SNL organizations by utilizing Green Zia tools to aid in the implementation of each organization's EMS. This report is based on a feedback session held in September 2002 with past SNL Green Zia Program participants. The goal of the feedback session and of this report is to enhance the services that the P2 Program provides to SNL organizations. This report summarizes the feedback received.

RICHARDSON, ANASTASIA DAWN

2002-10-01

97

Organizational cultural assessment of the Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

An Organizational Cultural Assessment (OCA) was performed at the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) by administering an Organizational Culture Survey (OCS) that queried employees on the subjects of organizational culture, various aspects of communications, employee commitment, work group cohesion, coordination of work, environmental concerns, hazardous nature of work, safety, and overall job satisfaction. The purpose of the OCS is to measure in a quantitative and objective way the values, attitudes, and beliefs of the individuals working within the organization. The OCS administration at SNL was the fifth to occur at a DOE facility. The sample was randomly selected from each Vice Presidency group, the largest organizational unit at SNL. Scores and significance are discussed and statistically significant differences between groups are identified and discussed.

Not Available

1991-05-01

98

Calendar Year 2001 Annual Site Environmental Report, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL\\/NM) is a government-owned, contractor-operated facility overseen by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) through the Albuquerque Operations Office (AL), Office of Kirtland Site Operations (OKSO). Sandia Corporation, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, operates SNL\\/NM. Work performed at SNL\\/NM is in support of the DOE and Sandia Corporation's

FRANCINE S. VIGIL; REBECCA D. SANCHEZ; KATRINA WAGNER; LUCIE MAYEUX

2002-01-01

99

Energetic materials research and development activities at Sandia National Laboratories supported under DP-10 programs  

SciTech Connect

This report provides summary descriptions of Energetic Materials (EM) Research and Development activities performed at Sandia National Laboratories and funded through the Department of Energy DP-10 Program Office in FY97 and FY98. The work falls under three major focus areas: EM Chemistry, EM Characterization, and EM Phenomenological Model Development. The research supports the Sandia component mission and also Sandia's overall role as safety steward for the DOE Nuclear Weapons Complex.

Ratzel, A.C. III

1998-09-01

100

Current radar responsive tag development activities at Sandia National Laboratories.  

SciTech Connect

Over the past ten years, Sandia has developed RF radar responsive tag systems and supporting technologies for various government agencies and industry partners. RF tags can function as RF transmitters or radar transponders that enable tagging, tracking, and location determination functions. Expertise in tag architecture, microwave and radar design, signal analysis and processing techniques, digital design, modeling and simulation, and testing have been directly applicable to these tag programs. In general, the radar responsive tag designs have emphasized low power, small package size, and the ability to be detected by the radar at long ranges. Recently, there has been an interest in using radar responsive tags for Blue Force tracking and Combat ID (CID). The main reason for this interest is to allow airborne surveillance radars to easily distinguish U.S. assets from those of opposing forces. A Blue Force tracking capability would add materially to situational awareness. Combat ID is also an issue, as evidenced by the fact that approximately one-quarter of all U.S. casualties in the Gulf War took the form of ground troops killed by friendly fire. Because the evolution of warfare in the intervening decade has made asymmetric warfare the norm rather than the exception, swarming engagements in which U.S. forces will be freely intermixed with opposing forces is a situation that must be anticipated. Increasing utilization of precision munitions can be expected to drive fires progressively closer to engaged allied troops at times when visual de-confliction is not an option. In view of these trends, it becomes increasingly important that U.S. ground forces have a widely proliferated all-weather radar responsive tag that communicates to all-weather surveillance. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the recent, current, and future radar responsive research and development activities at Sandia National Laboratories that support both the Blue Force Tracking and Combat ID application.

Plummer, Kenneth W.; Ormesher, Richard C.

2003-09-01

101

Teamwork and diversity: A survey at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

In September, 1994, Sandia`s Diversity Leadership and Education Outreach Center arid the Corporate Diversity Team commissioned a Diversity Action Team (DAT-Phase II) to address the area of team- work. The goal of this DAT was to identify ways to capitalize on the diversity of people to enhance team success at Sandia. Given a six- month lifetime and funding levels of 12 hours per person per month, we chose to accomplish our goal by gathering and analyzing data on the performance and diversity of Sandia teams and publishing this report of our findings. The work presented herein builds on earlier work of this team.

Apodaca, T.; Berman, M.; Griego, C.; Jansma, R.; Leatherwood, M.; Lovato, L.; Sanchez, A.

1995-11-01

102

JY Tsao Some Simple Physics of Global Warming 2008 April Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States  

E-print Network

JY Tsao · Some Simple Physics of Global Warming · 2008 April Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory Sciences Center Sandia National Laboratories Some Simple Physics of Global Warming · I'm Jeff Tsao. I and on had the opportunity to delve into global warming issues, and I'm happy to be able to share a little

103

76 FR 50212 - Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM)  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL...Environmental Impact Statement (SWEIS) for the Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (DOE...upon request by leaving a message on the Sandia Site Office (SSO) SWEIS Hotline...

2011-08-12

104

Analysis of spatially-resolved M-shell W spectra produced on the Z-accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tungsten wire explosions are being intensively studied at Sandia National Laboratories. High-resolution spatially-resolved x-ray spectral data have been accumulated in tungsten experiments on the SNL-Z accelerator, which require a development of the appropriate theoretical modeling. The University of Nevada, Reno, has developed a collisional-radiative atomic kinetic model which includes the ground states of every ionization stage of W from the

A. S. Shlyaptseva; S. M. Hamasha; S. B. Hansen; J. E. Bailey; P. W. Lake; D. S. Nielsen; W. A. Stygar; P. D. Lepell; T. J. Nash; C. Deeney; U. I. Safronova

2002-01-01

105

Tonopah test range - outpost of Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Tonopah Test Range is a unique historic site. Established in 1957 by Sandia Corporation, Tonopah Test Range in Nevada provided an isolated place for the Atomic Energy Commission to test ballistics and non-nuclear features of atomic weapons. It served this and allied purposes well for nearly forty years, contributing immeasurably to a peaceful conclusion to the long arms race remembered as the Cold War. This report is a brief review of historical highlights at Tonopah Test Range. Sandia`s Los Lunas, Salton Sea, Kauai, and Edgewood testing ranges also receive abridged mention. Although Sandia`s test ranges are the subject, the central focus is on the people who managed and operated the range. Comments from historical figures are interspersed through the narrative to establish this perspective, and at the end a few observations concerning the range`s future are provided.

Johnson, L.

1996-03-01

106

Energy technologies at Sandia National Laboratories: Past, Present, Future  

SciTech Connect

We at Sandia first became involved with developing energy technology when the nation initiated its push toward energy independence in the early 1970s. That involvement continues to be strong. In shaping Sandia's energy programs for the 1990s, we will build on our track record from the 70s and 80s, a record outlined in this publication. It contains reprints of three issues of Sandia's Lab News that were devoted to our non-nuclear energy programs. Together, they summarize the history, current activities, and future of Sandia's diverse energy concerns; hence my desire to see them in one volume. Written in the fall of 1988, the articles cover Sandia's extremely broad range of energy technologies -- coal, oil and gas, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaics, wind, rechargeable batteries, and combustion.

Not Available

1989-08-01

107

AIAA-2000-0057 This work was supported by Sandia National Laboratories under  

E-print Network

AIAA-2000-0057 1 __________________ This work was supported by Sandia National Laboratories under such as polyesters and epoxies will generally absorb several weight percent #12;AIAA-2000-0057 2 moisture, which

108

SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES IN SITU ELECTROKINETIC EXTRACTION TECHNOLOGY; INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT  

EPA Science Inventory

As a part of the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency evaluated the In-Situ Electrokinetic Extraction (ISEE) system at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. The SITE demonstration results show ...

109

Conpendium of solar-thermal collector procurement activities at Sandia Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report provides a single compendium of information about three major solar thermal collector procurement cycles and two special sole-source procurements undertaken by Sandia Laboratories. A summary of the experience and lessons learned from these activities is included.

1979-01-01

110

Technology integration project: Environmental Restoration Technologies Department Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories Environmental Restoration Technologies Department is developing environmental restoration technologies through funding form the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Science and Technology. Initially, this technology development has been through the Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration (MWLID). It is currently being developed through the Contaminant Plume containment and Remediation Focus Area, the Landfill Stabilization Focus Area, and the Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Cross-Cutting Program. This Technology Integration Project (TIP) was responsible for transferring MWLID-developed technologies for routine use by environmental restoration groups throughout the DOE complex and commercializing these technologies to the private sector. The MWLID`s technology transfer/commercialization successes were achieved by involving private industry in development, demonstration, and technology transfer/commercialization activities; gathering and disseminating information about MWLID activities and technologies; and promoting stakeholder and regulatory involvement. From FY91 through FY95, 30 Technical Task Plans (TTPs) were funded. From these TTPs, the MWLID can claim 15 technology transfer/commercialization successes. Another seven technology transfer/commercialization successes are expected. With the changeover to the focus areas, the TIP continued the technology transfer/commercialization efforts begun under the MWLID.

Williams, C.V.; Burford, T.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Environmental Restoration Technologies] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Environmental Restoration Technologies; Allen, C.A. [Tech Reps, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Tech Reps, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-08-01

111

An Organizational Cultural Assessment of Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

An Organizational Cultural Assessment (OCA) was performed at the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) by administering an Organizational Culture Survey (OCS) that queried employees on the subjects of organizational culture, various aspects of communications, employee commitment, work group cohesion, coordination of work, environmental concerns, hazardous nature of work, safety and overall job satisfaction. Many of these subjects are assessed in the OCS through highly developed and validated scales that have been administered in many different types of organizations. Some of the issues, especially the questions on environmental, safety, and health concerns, are newly developed and are still being modified. The purpose of the OCS is to measure in a quantitative and objective way the notion of culture;'' that is, the values, attitudes, and beliefs of the individuals working within the organization. In addition, through the OCS, a broad sample of individuals can be reached that would probably not be interviewed or observed during the course of a typical assessment. The OCS also provides a descriptive profile of the organization at one point in time that can then be compared to a profile taken at a different point in time to assess changes in the culture of the organization. 9 refs., 81 figs., 6 tabs.

Haber, S.B.; Crouch, D.A.

1991-05-01

112

The integrated water conservation program at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), located on Kirkland Air Force Base (KAFB) in Albuquerque, NM, is implementing a comprehensive water conservation program. Because the average rainfall in this metropolitan area of 500,000 is approximately 8 inches per year, conservation of this precious resource is critical to the economic health of the city and state, and the continued operations at SNL/NM. To address this need, SNL/NM is taking a systematic, comprehensive approach to water conservation. The approach is to estimate the water consumption for all of SNL/NM by type of consumption. For each type of water consumption, all cost effective measures for reducing, reclaiming, and/or recycling that usage will be ranked. These water conservation measures range from the simple such as retrofitting plumbing fixtures with low cost devices to reduce water required to flush toilets to the very complex. As an example of the very complex, a Microelectronics Development Laboratory (MDL) lab will implement a near zero water discharge from clean room wet benches. Deionized (DI) water can be sent back to the DI water input generation stream when the DI water is not being used for rinsing wafers. This paper discusses completed, ongoing and proposed projects at SNL/NM to reduce water consumption and recycle water to maximize its use, and how water conservation has resulted in energy savings, reductions in wastewater discharges, reductions in water treatment chemicals, and reduction in hazardous waste. Additionally the paper discusses preparation of SNL/NM`s Water Conservation Plan, and solutions to overcoming programmatic and bureaucratic hurdles to achieve reductions in water use, wastewater discharges, chemical use and energy.

Rogers, D.

1997-08-22

113

Tiger Team Assessment of the Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the results of the Tiger Team Assessment of the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in Livermore, California, conducted from April 30 to May 18, 1990. The purpose of the assessment was to provide the Secretary of Energy with the status of environment, safety and health (ES H) activities at SNL, Livermore. The assessment was conducted by a team consisting of three subteams of federal and private sector technical specialists in the disciplines of environment, safety and health, and management. On-site activities for the assessment included document reviews, observation of site operations, and discussions and interviews with DOE personnel, site contractor personnel, and regulators. Using these sources of information and data, the Tiger Team identified a significant number of findings and concerns having to do with the environment, safety and health, and management, as well as concerns regarding noncompliance with Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standards. Although the Tiger Team concluded that none of the findings or concerns necessitated immediate cessation of any operations at SNL, Livermore, it does believe that a sizable number of them require prompt management attention. A special area of concern identified for the near-term health and safety of on-site personnel pertained to the on-site Trudell Auto Repair Shop site. Several significant OSHA concerns and environmental findings relating to this site prompted the Tiger Team Leader to immediately advise SNL, Livermore and AL management of the situation. A case study was prepared by the Team, because the root causes of the problems associated with this site were believed to reflect the overall root causes for the areas of ES H noncompliance at SNL, Livermore. 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Not Available

1990-08-01

114

Heat Pipe Solar Receiver Development Activities at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Over the past decade, Sandia National Laboratories has been involved in the development of receivers to transfer energy from the focus of a parabolic dish concentrator to the heater tubes of a Stirling engine. Through the isothermal evaporation and condensation of sodium. a heat-pipe receiver can efficiently transfer energy to an engine's working fluid and compensate for irregularities in the flux distribution that is delivered by the concentrator. The operation of the heat pipe is completely passive because the liquid sodium is distributed over the solar-heated surface by capillary pumping provided by a wick structure. Tests have shown that using a heat pipe can boost the system performance by twenty percent when compared to directly illuminating the engine heater tubes. Designing heat pipe solar receivers has presented several challenges. The relatively large area ({approximately}0.2 m{sup 2}) of the receiver surface makes it difficult to design a wick that can continuously provide liquid sodium to all regions of the heated surface. Selecting a wick structure with smaller pores will improve capillary pumping capabilities of the wick, but the small pores will restrict the flow of liquid and generate high pressure drops. Selecting a wick that is comprised of very tine filaments can increase the permeability of the wick and thereby reduce flow losses, however, the fine wick structure is more susceptible to corrosion and mechanical damage. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the issues encountered in the design of heat pipe solar receivers and solutions to problems that have arisen. Topics include: flow characterization in the receiver, the design of wick systems. the minimization of corrosion and dissolution of metals in sodium systems. and the prevention of mechanical failure in high porosity wick structures.

Adkins, D.R.; Andraka, C.E.; Moreno, J.B.; Moss, T.A.; Rawlinson, K.S.; Showalter, S.K.

1999-01-08

115

History and testimony of competency-based development at Sandia National Laboratories.  

SciTech Connect

More than ten years ago, Sandia managers defined a set of traits and characteristics that were needed for success at Sandia. Today, the Sandia National Laboratories Success Profile Competencies continue to be powerful tools for employee and leadership development. The purpose of this report is to revisit the historical events that led to the creation and adaptation of the competencies and to position them for integration in future employee selection, development, and succession planning processes. This report contains an account of how the competencies were developed, testimonies of how they are used within the organization, and a description of how they will be foundational elements of new processes.

Burt, Rebecca A.; Narahara, Sheryl K.

2004-04-01

116

An Approach to Wireless Communications at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Wireless communication plays an increasing role in military, industrial, public safety, and academic computer networks. Although in general, radio transmitters are not currently permitted in secured areas at Sandia, wireless communications would open new opportunities, allowing mobile and pervasive user access. Without wireless communications, we must live in a ''non-mainstream'' world of fixed, wired networks, where it becomes ever more difficult to attract and retain the best professionals. This report provides a review of the current state of wireless communications, which direction wireless technology is heading, and where wireless technology could be employed at Sandia. A list of recommendations on harnessing the power of wireless communications is provided to aid in building a state-of-the-art communication environment for the 21st century at Sandia.

WITZKE, EDWARD L.

2002-10-01

117

An overview of Sandia National Laboratories` plasma switched, gigawatt, ultra-wideband impulse transmitter program  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories has developed several repetitive, ultra-wideband (UWB), impulse transmitters to address impulse source technology and to support experimental applications. The sources fall into two different classes, pulse peaking and pulse shorting depending on how the UWB frequency components are generated. ne frequency spectrum of the radiated pulse from these sources include the spectrum of 100-MHz to 3-GHz. Depending upon the source, repetitive operation from single shot to 5-kHz (1-kHz nominal) has been obtained with excellent reliability and repeatability. SNIPER (Sub-Nanosecond impulse Radiator) is a source which uses an oil peaking switch to obtain a fast risetime (250-pS) pulse of 2-nS duration. The output voltage ranges between few tens of kilovolts to 250-kV. EMBL (EnantioMorphic Blumlein) is a similar device (presently under development) which uses a gas switch to sharpen the trailing edge of a 2-nS pulse to approximately 100-pS. To date, an output voltage of approximately 600-kV has been obtained (700- kV is the design goal). Since the frequency spectra are identical between sources with sharpened leading or trailing edges, alternatively, one can use parallel switches to short the pulse at its peak voltage. The pulse is generated externally and then injected into the antenna. Due to the high powers involved and the need to radiate a broad spectrum of frequencies, Sandia has concentrated on TEM horn. antennas with special high voltage feed adapters. Several TEM horns have been built and used during this program. In those cases where higher gains are desired for the higher frequencies, TEM horn-fed, dish antennas have been employed. An overview of the UWB transmitters, including design and operation of the modulators, the PFN`S, the pulse sharpening switches and the antennas will be presented.

Clark, R.S.; Rinehart, L.F.; Buttram, M.T.; Aurand, J.F.

1992-11-01

118

An overview of Sandia National Laboratories' plasma switched, gigawatt, ultra-wideband impulse transmitter program  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories has developed several repetitive, ultra-wideband (UWB), impulse transmitters to address impulse source technology and to support experimental applications. The sources fall into two different classes, pulse peaking and pulse shorting depending on how the UWB frequency components are generated. ne frequency spectrum of the radiated pulse from these sources include the spectrum of 100-MHz to 3-GHz. Depending upon the source, repetitive operation from single shot to 5-kHz (1-kHz nominal) has been obtained with excellent reliability and repeatability. SNIPER (Sub-Nanosecond impulse Radiator) is a source which uses an oil peaking switch to obtain a fast risetime (250-pS) pulse of 2-nS duration. The output voltage ranges between few tens of kilovolts to 250-kV. EMBL (EnantioMorphic Blumlein) is a similar device (presently under development) which uses a gas switch to sharpen the trailing edge of a 2-nS pulse to approximately 100-pS. To date, an output voltage of approximately 600-kV has been obtained (700- kV is the design goal). Since the frequency spectra are identical between sources with sharpened leading or trailing edges, alternatively, one can use parallel switches to short the pulse at its peak voltage. The pulse is generated externally and then injected into the antenna. Due to the high powers involved and the need to radiate a broad spectrum of frequencies, Sandia has concentrated on TEM horn. antennas with special high voltage feed adapters. Several TEM horns have been built and used during this program. In those cases where higher gains are desired for the higher frequencies, TEM horn-fed, dish antennas have been employed. An overview of the UWB transmitters, including design and operation of the modulators, the PFN'S, the pulse sharpening switches and the antennas will be presented.

Clark, R.S.; Rinehart, L.F.; Buttram, M.T.; Aurand, J.F.

1992-01-01

119

An overview of Sandia National Laboratories' plasma switched, gigawatt, ultra-wideband impulse transmitter program  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sandia National Laboratories has developed several repetitive, ultra-wideband (UWB), impulse transmitters to address impulse source technology and to support experimental applications. The sources fall into two different classes, pulse peaking and pulse shorting depending on how the UWB frequency components are generated. The frequency spectrum of the radiated pulse from these sources include the spectrum of 100-MHz to 3-GHz. Depending upon the source, repetitive operation from single shot to 5-kHz (1-kHz nominal) has been obtained with excellent reliability and repeatability. SNIPER (Sub-Nanosecond Impulse Radiator) is a source which uses an oil peaking switch to obtain a fast risetime (250-pS) pulse of 2-nS duration. The output voltage ranges between few tens of kilovolts to 250-kV. EMBL (EnantioMorphic Blumlein) is a similar device (presently under development) which uses a gas switch to sharpen the trailing edge of a 2-nS pulse to approximately 100-pS. To date, an output voltage of approximately 600-kV has been obtained (700-kV is the design goal). Since the frequency spectra are identical between sources with sharpened leading or trailing edges, alternatively, one can use parallel switches to short the pulse at its peak voltage. The pulse is generated externally and then injected into the antenna. Due to the high powers involved and the need to radiate a broad spectrum of frequencies, Sandia has concentrated on TEM horn antennas with special high voltage feed adapters. Several TEM horns have been built and used during this program. In those cases where higher gains are desired for the higher frequencies, TEM horn-fed, dish antennas have been employed. An overview of the UWB transmitters, including design and operation of the modulators, the PFN'S, the pulse sharpening switches and the antennas will be presented.

Clark, R. S.; Rinehart, L. F.; Buttram, M. T.; Aurand, J. F.

120

Prototype prosperity-diversity game for the Laboratory Development Division of Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

The Prosperity Game conducted for the Laboratory Development Division of National Laboratories on May 24--25, 1995, focused on the individual and organizational autonomy plaguing the Department of Energy (DOE)-Congress-Laboratories` ability to manage the wrenching change of declining budgets. Prosperity Games are an outgrowth and adaptation of move/countermove and seminar War Games. Each Prosperity Game is unique in that both the game format and the player contributions vary from game to game. This particular Prosperity Game was played by volunteers from Sandia National Laboratories, Eastman Kodak, IBM, and AT&T. Since the participants fully control the content of the games, the specific outcomes will be different when the team for each laboratory, Congress, DOE, and the Laboratory Operating Board (now Laboratory Operations Board) is composed of executives from those respective organizations. Nevertheless, the strategies and implementing agreements suggest that the Prosperity Games stimulate cooperative behaviors and may permit the executives of the institutions to safely explore the consequences of a family of DOE concert.

VanDevender, P.; Berman, M.; Savage, K.

1996-02-01

121

Personal nuclear accident dosimetry at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

DOE installations possessing sufficient quantities of fissile material to potentially constitute a critical mass, such that the excessive exposure of personnel to radiation from a nuclear accident is possible, are required to provide nuclear accident dosimetry services. This document describes the personal nuclear accident dosimeter (PNAD) used by SNL and prescribes methodologies to initially screen, and to process PNAD results. In addition, this report describes PNAD dosimetry results obtained during the Nuclear Accident Dosimeter Intercomparison Study (NAD23), held during 12-16 June 1995, at Los Alamos National Laboratories. Biases for reported neutron doses ranged from -6% to +36% with an average bias of +12%.

Ward, D.C.; Mohagheghi, A.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Burrows, R. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Lisle, IL (United States). Division of Nuclear Material Safety

1996-09-01

122

An Approach to Wireless Communications at Sandia National Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

Wireless communication plays an increasing role in military, industrial, public safety, and academic computer networks. Although in general, radio transmitters are not currently permitted in secured areas at Sandia, wireless communications would open new opportunities, allowing mobile and pervasive user access. Without wireless communications, we must live in a ''non-mainstream'' world of fixed, wired networks, where it becomes ever more

EDWARD L

2002-01-01

123

The Z refurbishment project (ZR) at Sandia National Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sandia's Z accelerator completed original construction in 1985 as PBFA II. The center portion was modified in 1996, converting from a high voltage to a high current configuration to drive z-pinch loads. The environments created have enabled critical experiments that address many Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) and High Energy Density Physics (HEDP) program needs. Z has since grown into a

Edward A. Weinbrecht; D. H. McDaniel; D. D. Bloomquist

2003-01-01

124

Calendar Year 2001 Annual Site Environmental Report, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) is a government-owned, contractor-operated facility overseen by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) through the Albuquerque Operations Office (AL), Office of Kirtland Site Operations (OKSO). Sandia Corporation, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, operates SNL/NM. Work performed at SNL/NM is in support of the DOE and Sandia Corporation's mission to provide weapon component technology and hardware for the needs of the nation's security. Sandia Corporation also conducts fundamental research and development (R&D) to advance technology in energy research, computer science, waste management, microelectronics, materials science, and transportation safety for hazardous and nuclear components. In support of Sandia Corporation's mission, the Integrated Safety and Security (ISS) Center and the Environmental Restoration (ER) Project at SNL/NM have established extensive environmental programs to assist Sandia Corporation's line organizations in meeting all applicable local, state, and federal environmental regulations and DOE requirements. This annual report summarizes data and the compliance status of Sandia Corporation's environmental protection and monitoring programs through December 31, 2001. Major environmental programs include air quality, water quality, groundwater protection, terrestrial surveillance, waste management, pollution prevention (P2), environmental remediation, oil and chemical spill prevention, and the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program (DOE 1990) and DOE Order 231.1, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting (DOE 1996).

VIGIL, FRANCINE S.; SANCHEZ, REBECCA D.; WAGNER, KATRINA; MAYEUX, LUCIE

2002-09-01

125

T E C H T R A N S F E R SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES  

E-print Network

Laboratories, Adaptive Methods, Inc., University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center 5 Biomimetic Membranes and Frequency References Sandia National Laboratories, Rockwell Collins 15 Multifunctional Optical Coatings weighs on the minds of security officials. Such an event could result in an extreme emergency situation

126

Initial evaluation of Sandia National Laboratory-prepared crystalline silico-titanates for cesium recovery  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pacific Northwest Laboratory initiated a study of a new class of inorganic ion exchange materials that selectively extracts cesium (Cs), strontium (Sr), and plutonium (Pu) from alkaline radioactive waste solutions. These materials, identified as crystalline silico-titanates (CST), were developed by scientists at the Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) and Texas A&M. This report summarizes preliminary results for the measurement of batch

L. A. Bray; K. J. Carson; R. J. Elovich

1993-01-01

127

Bridging the Cold War and the 21st century: chronicling the history of Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

A historical perspective is given for Sandia National Laboratories from its beginnings as a small engineering group at an offshoot of Los Alamos Laboratory to a facility of 7000 people at its main facility in Albuquerque, another 1000 people in Livermore, California and test ranges in Tonopah, Nevada and Kauai, Hawaii. The Sandia army base became the Z division of Los Alamos and $25 million construction program began the structures that would carry out a test program for nuclear weapons during the cold war. Bell System/AT&T stewardship of the site continued from 1949 to 1993, when Martin Marietta (now Lockheed Martin) was chosen as the new contractor. Management decisions, personnel, and political aspects of the Laboratory are presented up to 1997 and forecasts are given for future policy and programs of Sandia.

Mora, C.J.

1997-04-01

128

Dose algorithm for EXTRAD 4100S extremity dosimeter for use at Sandia National Laboratories.  

SciTech Connect

An updated algorithm for the EXTRAD 4100S extremity dosimeter has been derived. This algorithm optimizes the binning of dosimeter element ratios and uses a quadratic function to determine the response factors for low response ratios. This results in lower systematic bias across all test categories and eliminates the need for the 'red strap' algorithm that was used for high energy beta/gamma emitting radionuclides. The Radiation Protection Dosimetry Program (RPDP) at Sandia National Laboratories uses the Thermo Fisher EXTRAD 4100S extremity dosimeter, shown in Fig 1.1 to determine shallow dose to the extremities of potentially exposed individuals. This dosimeter consists of two LiF TLD elements or 'chipstrates', one of TLD-700 ({sup 7}Li) and one of TLD-100 (natural Li) separated by a tin filter. Following readout and background subtraction, the ratio of the responses of the two elements is determined defining the penetrability of the incident radiation. While this penetrability approximates the incident energy of the radiation, X-rays and beta particles exist in energy distributions that make determination of dose conversion factors less straightforward in their determination.

Potter, Charles Augustus

2011-05-01

129

Molybdenum-99 Isotope Production Preparation at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

`Q&c M. J. McDonald, S. D. Carson, S. W. Longley, E. J. Parma, M. E. Vern `~ I@ .,., Sandia National Laboratories*, P. .0. Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM, 8 W? 1$ tl?;:q `f. (3 . 8 /'~ Abstract This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored byanagency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, make any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof. loading on the Cintichem targets. These tests were designed to gain process knowledge prior to processing an irradiated target. The chemical separation tests were performed in a fime hood During cold testing, several tests were performed on individual components of the process to complete, a series of `hot' tests was designed to process irradiated targets. These were designed to optimize the process, identify problems prior to processing higher inventory targets, and to the shielded containment box (SCB). Table 1 is a summary of the tests performed prior to the Test Target Power Post irradiation Total inventory 99M0 inventory (kW)/ Irradiation decay (hrs) (TBq*) /decay (TBq)/decay Time (hrs) inventory (TBq) inventory(TBq) in the processing boxes as color comparisons. Product quality control testing was conducted for all the tests and the results were compared to The production process generates a high activity acidic liquid waste. Several waste stabilization processing box. The cement, in addition to stabilizing the waste, neutralized the waste resulting The processing hardware and fixtures were developed in parallel to the cold tests and tested in a that expected during processing. During processing, precautions will be taken to minimize the Island incident. The facility consisted of shielded glove boxes, unshielded glove box lines and the the facility for production operations; the glove box lines and shielded glove boxes, all the new configuration will have six windows, four extraction boxes and a waste packaging box on the shielding. The walls and windows of the processing boxes will have the equivalent 150 of the purification box will be considerably less than the processing boxes with dose being from only `gMo. The increased wall thickness will reduce the dose levels to boxes will have under the box transport systems to move material into and out of the boxes. prior to FDA requiring process validation and, consequently, had not pertlormed a process

Carson, S.D.; Longley, S.W.; McDonald, M.J.; Parma, E.J.; Vernon, M.E.

1998-10-07

130

1LDRD Expanding Professional Horizons 2 SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES 3LDRD Expanding Professional Horizons 3LDRD Expanding Professional Horizons  

E-print Network

Professional Horizons For further information, contact: Henry R. Westrich LDRD Program Manager hrwestr1LDRD · Expanding Professional Horizons #12;2 SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES 3LDRD · Expanding Professional Horizons 3LDRD · Expanding Professional Horizons #12;4 SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES 5LDRD

131

Computerized nuclear material system at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

SNLA developed and implemented a nuclear material control and accountability system on an HP 3000 minicomputer. The Sandia Nuclear Materials Computer System (SNMCS) which became operative in January 1980 provides: control of shipments and receivals of nuclear material, control of internal transfers of nuclear material, automated inventory with a bar code system, control of inventory adjustments, automated reporting/transmitting to other contractors and operations offices, automated ledgers and journals for material weights and costs, and interface to the Albuquerque Operations Office (ALO) Automated 741 System.

Tischhauser, J.L.

1980-01-01

132

Simulating the Hallmarks of Cancer Robert G. Abbott Sandia National Laboratories  

E-print Network

controlled and longevity climbs in developing nations. Although the need for better cancer treatment slow, and treatments are generally limited to specific forms of the disease. Most cancer researchSimulating the Hallmarks of Cancer Robert G. Abbott Sandia National Laboratories P.O. Box 5800

Forrest, Stephanie

133

Long-Term Environmental Stewardship (LTES) life-cycle material management at Sandia National Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Long-Term Environmental Stewardship (LTES) mission is to ensure long-term protection of human health and the environment, and proactive management toward sustainable use and protection of natural and cultural resources affected by any Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) operations and operational legacies. The primary objectives of the LTES program are to: (1) Protect the environment from present and future operations; (2)

Nagy; Michael D

2010-01-01

134

Sandia National Laboratories, California Waste Management Program annual report : February 2009  

Microsoft Academic Search

The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL\\/CA) Waste Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL\\/CA Environmental Management System rogram Manual. This annual program report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Waste Management (WM) Program, one of

Brynildson; Mark E

2009-01-01

135

Sandia National Laboratories, California Hazardous Materials Management Program annual report : February 2009  

Microsoft Academic Search

The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL\\/CA) Hazardous Materials Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL\\/CA Environmental anagement ystem Program Manual. This program annual report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Hazardous Materials Management Program, one

Brynildson; Mark E

2009-01-01

136

Containment-integrity program. FY82 annual report. [PWR; BWR; Sandia National Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

To assess and improve the ability to predict containment behavior during severe accidents and extreme environments, the Systems Safety Technology Division of the LWR Safety Department at Sandia National Laboratories is conducting a combined experimental and analytical program. The experiments are tests of models of entire containment structures at reduced scale and of components or sections of containments at reduced

T. E. Blejwas; R. L. Woodfin; A. W. Dennis; D. S. Horschel

1983-01-01

137

A comprehensive approach to solid waste and recycling at Sandia National Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

The abrupt closure of a nearby, and historically utilized, Kirtland Air Force Base landfill imposed a multitude of solid waste management problems for the Sandia National Laboratories\\/New Mexico (SNL) research and development facilities operated by Lockheed Martin Company. Due to the close proximity of KAFB, SNL historically used KAFB`s landfill for disposal of solid waste. Under this arrangement SNL paid

1997-01-01

138

Z pinch driven inertial confinement fusion target physics research at Sandia National Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

Three hohlraum concepts are being pursued at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to investigate the possibility of using pulsed power driven magnetic implosions (Z pinches) to drive targets capable of fusion yields in the range 200-1000 MJ. This research is being conducted on SNL's Z facility, which is capable of driving peak currents of 20 MA in various Z pinch load

R. J. Leeper; T. E. Alberts; J. R. Asay; P. M. Baca; K. L. Baker; S. P. Breeze; G. A. Chandler; D. L. Cook; G. W. Cooper; C. Deeney; M. S. Derzon; M. R. Douglas; D. L. Fehl; T. Gilliland; D. E. Hebron; M. J. Hurst; D. O. Jobe; J. W. Kellogg; J. S. Lash; S. E. Lazier; M. K. Matzen; D. H. McDaniel; J. S. McGurn; T. A. Mehlhorn; A. R. Moats; R. C. Mock; D. J. Muron; T. J. Nash; R. E. Olson; J. L. Porter; J. P. Quintenz; P. V. Reyes; L. E. Ruggles; C. L. Ruiz; T. W. L. Sanford; F. A. Schmidlapp; J. F. Seamen; R. B. Spielman; M. A. Stark; K. W. Struve; W. A. Stygar; D. R. Tibbetts-Russell; J. A. Torres; M. Vargas; T. C. Wagoner; C. Wakefield; J. H. Hammer; D. D. Ryutov; M. Tabak; S. C. Wilks; R. L. Bowers; K. D. McLenithan; D. L. Peterson

1999-01-01

139

Design and Performance of the Sandia Laboratories Hermes II Flash X-Ray Generator  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pulsed power technology has grown rapidly during the last decade. Particular credit is due to research efforts at United Kingdom Atomic Weapons Research Establishment (AWRE). The largest machine presently in operation is the Sandia Laboratories Hermes II which has produced a 170 kA beam of electrons at energies of 12 million volts for times of 100 ns. This paper reviews

T. H. Martin

1969-01-01

140

Status of the Z Refurbishment Project (ZR) at Sandia National Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sandia National Laboratories' Z Refurbishment (ZR) Project formally began in August 2002 to increase the Z Accelerator's utilization by providing the capability to perform more shots, improve precision and pulse shape variability, increase delivered current, and accomplish the improvements with minimal disruption to Z's ongoing programs. A project overview was provided at the 14th International Pulsed Power Conference in 2003

Edward A. Weinbrecht; Douglas D. Bloomquist; D. H. McDaniel; D. A. Tabor; J. W. Weed; T. V. Faturos; G. Randall McKee; P. J. Warner

2005-01-01

141

Results from Sandia National Laboratories \\/ Lockheed Martin Electromagnetic Missile Launcher (EMML)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sandia national laboratories (SNL) and lockheed martin MS2 are designing an electromagnetic missile launcher (EMML) for naval applications. Lhe EMML uses an induction coilgun topology with the requirement of launching a 3600 lb. missile up to a velocity of 40 m\\/s. Lo demonstrate the feasibility of the electromagnetic propulsion design, a demonstrator launcher was built that consists of approximately 10%

M. S. Aubuchon; T. R. Lockner; B. N. Turman; L Basak; G Root; Mendel D. Floyd

2005-01-01

142

Design and initial deployment of the wireless local area networking infrastructure at Sandia National Laboratories.  

SciTech Connect

A major portion of the Wireless Networking Project at Sandia National Laboratories over the last few years has been to examine IEEE 802.11 wireless networking for possible use at Sandia and if practical, introduce this technology. This project team deployed 802.11a, b, and g Wireless Local Area Networking at Sandia. This report examines the basics of wireless networking and captures key results from project tests and experiments. It also records project members thoughts and designs on wireless LAN architecture and security issues. It documents some of the actions and milestones of this project, including pilot and production deployment of wireless networking equipment, and captures the team's rationale behind some of the decisions made. Finally, the report examines lessons learned, future directions, and conclusions.

Long, John P.; Hamill, Michael J.; Mitchell, M. G.; Miller, Marc M.; Witzke, Edward L.; Wiener, Dallas J

2006-11-01

143

Operation and Performance of the First High Current LTD at Sandia National Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

A High Current Liner Transformer Driver (LTD) laboratory is operating at Sandia National Laboratories with an LTD\\/100 cavity running in rep-rate mode. With over one thousand shots completed the output of the LTD\\/100 is in excellent agreement with circuit model, SCREAMER [1] simulations, and exceeding the original operating predictions. Operating at a rep-rate of 1\\/30 Hz and a charge voltage

S. T. Rogowski; W. E. Fowler; M. Mazarakis; C. L. Olson; D. McDaniel; K. W. Struve; R. A. Sharpe

2005-01-01

144

Implementing Virtual Private Networking for Enabling Lower Cost, More Secure Wide Area Communications at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Virtual Private Networking is a new communications technology that promises lower cost, more secure wide area communications by leveraging public networks such as the Internet. Sandia National Laboratories has embraced the technology for interconnecting remote sites to Sandia's corporate network, and for enabling remote access users for both dial-up and broadband access.

MILLER,MARC M.; YONEK JR.,GEORGE A.

2001-08-01

145

Preliminary safety analysis report for the Auxiliary Hot Cell Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The Auxiliary Hot Cell Facility (AHCF) at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) will be a Hazard Category 3 nuclear facility used to characterize, treat, and repackage radioactive and mixed material and waste for reuse, recycling, or ultimate disposal. A significant upgrade to a previous facility, the Temporary Hot Cell, will be implemented to perform this mission. The following major features will be added: a permanent shield wall; eight floor silos; new roof portals in the hot-cell roof; an upgraded ventilation system; and upgraded hot-cell jib crane; and video cameras to record operations and facilitate remote-handled operations. No safety-class systems, structures, and components will be present in the AHCF. There will be five safety-significant SSCs: hot cell structure, permanent shield wall, shield plugs, ventilation system, and HEPA filters. The type and quantity of radionuclides that could be located in the AHCF are defined primarily by SNL/NM's legacy materials, which include radioactive, transuranic, and mixed waste. The risk to the public or the environment presented by the AHCF is minor due to the inventory limitations of the Hazard Category 3 classification. Potential doses at the exclusion boundary are well below the evaluation guidelines of 25 rem. Potential for worker exposure is limited by the passive design features incorporated in the AHCF and by SNL's radiation protection program. There is no potential for exposure of the public to chemical hazards above the Emergency Response Protection Guidelines Level 2.

OSCAR,DEBBY S.; WALKER,SHARON ANN; HUNTER,REGINA LEE; WALKER,CHERYL A.

1999-12-01

146

Gamma Irradiation Facility at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. Final environmental assessment  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) on the proposed construction and operation of a new Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF) at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM). This facility is needed to: enhance capabilities to assure technical excellence in nuclear weapon radiation environments testing, component development, and certification; comply with all applicable ES and H safeguards, standards, policies, and regulations; reduce personnel radiological exposure to comply with ALARA limits in accordance with DOE orders and standards; consolidate major gamma ray sources into a central, secured area; and reduce operational risks associated with operation of the GIF and LICA in their present locations. This proposed action provides for the design, construction, and operation of a new GIF located within TA V and the removal of the existing GIF and Low Intensity Cobalt Array (LICA). The proposed action includes potential demolition of the gamma shield walls and removal of equipment in the existing GIF and LICA. The shielding pool used by the existing GIF will remain as part of the ACRR facility. Transportation of the existing {sup 60}Co sources from the existing LICA and GIF to the new facility is also included in the proposed action. Relocation of the gamma sources to the new GIF will be accomplished by similar techniques to those used to install the sources originally.

NONE

1995-11-01

147

Synthetic aperture radar and interferometry development at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Environmental monitoring, earth-resource mapping, and military systems require broad-area imaging at high resolutions. Many times the imagery must be acquired in inclement weather or during night as well as day. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) provides such a capability. SAR systems take advantage of the long-range propagation characteristics of radar signals and the complex information processing capability of modern digital electronics to provide high resolution imagery. SAR complements photographic and other optical imaging capabilities because of the minimum constrains on time-of-day and atmospheric conditions and because of the unique responses of terrain and cultural targets to radar frequencies. Interferometry is a method for generating a three-dimensional image of terrain. The height projection is obtained by acquiring two SAR images from two slightly differing locations. It is different from the common method of stereoscopic imaging for topography. The latter relies on differing geometric projections for triangulation to define the surface geometry whereas interferometry relies on differences in radar propagation times between the two SAR locations. This paper presents the capabilities of SAR, explains how SAR works, describes a few SAR applications, provides an overview of SAR development at Sandia, and briefly describes the motion compensation subsystem.

NONE

1993-04-01

148

A review of physical security robotics at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

As an outgrowth of research into physical security technologies, Sandia is investigating the role of robotics in security systems. Robotics may allow more effective utilization of guard forces, especially in scenarios where personnel would be exposed to harmful environments. Robots can provide intrusion detection and assessment functions for failed sensors or transient assets, can test existing fixed site sensors, and can gather additional intelligence and dispense delaying elements. The Robotic Security Vehicle (RSV) program for DOE/OSS is developing a fieldable prototype for an exterior physical security robot based upon a commercial four wheel drive vehicle. The RSV will be capable of driving itself, being driven remotely, or being driven by an onboard operator around a site and will utilize its sensors to alert an operator to unusual conditions. The Remote Security Station (RSS) program for the Defense Nuclear Agency is developing a proof-of-principle robotic system which will be used to evaluate the role, and associated cost, of robotic technologies in exterior security systems. The RSS consists of an independent sensor pod, a mobile sensor platform and a control and display console. Sensor data fusion is used to optimize the system's intrusion detection performance. These programs are complementary, the RSV concentrates on developing autonomous mobility, while the RSS thrust is on mobile sensor employment. 3 figs.

Roerig, S.C.

1990-01-01

149

Russian surety research projects in the Sandia National Laboratories Cooperative Measures Program  

SciTech Connect

Over forty safety and security related research and development projects have been initiated between Sandia National Laboratories and the Russian nuclear weapons laboratories VNIIEF and VNIITF. About half of these projects have been completed. All relate to either safety or security methodology development, processes, accident environment analysis and testing, accident databases, assessments or product design of devices. All projects have a potential benefit to various safety or security programs and some may directly have commercial applications. In general, these projects could benefit risk assessments associated with systems that could result in accidents or incidents having high public consequences. These systems typically have already been engineered to have very low assessed probabilities of occurrence of such accidents or incidents. This paper gives an overview of the Sandia surety program with a focus on the potential for future collaboration between Sandia, three Russian Institutes; VNIIEF, VNIITF and VNIIA, and other industry and government organizations. The intent is to serve as an introduction to a roundtable session on Russian Safety Collaboration at the 14th International System Safety Conference. The current Sandia collaboration program scope and rationale is presented along with the evolved program focus. An overview of the projects is given and a few specific projects are briefly highlighted with tangible results to date.

Smith, R.E.

1996-07-01

150

A report on FY06 IPv6 deployment activities and issues at Sandia National Laboratories.  

SciTech Connect

Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4) has been a mainstay of the both the Internet and corporate networks for delivering network packets to the desired destination. However, rapid proliferation of network appliances, evolution of corporate networks, and the expanding Internet has begun to stress the limitations of the protocol. Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) is the replacement protocol that overcomes the constraints of IPv4. IPv6 deployment in government network backbones has been mandated to occur by 2008. This paper explores the readiness of the Sandia National Laboratories' network backbone to support IPv6, the issues that must be addressed before a deployment begins, and recommends the next steps to take to comply with government mandates. The paper describes a joint, work effort of the Sandia National Laboratories ASC WAN project team and members of the System Analysis & Trouble Resolution and Network System Design & Implementation Departments.

Tolendino, Lawrence F.; Eldridge, John M.; Hu, Tan Chang

2006-06-01

151

Pollution prevention opportunity assessment for Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico's fleet services department.  

SciTech Connect

This Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessment (PPOA) was conducted for the Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico's (SNL/NM) Fleet Services Department between December 2001 and August 2002. This is the third PPOA conducted at Fleet in the last decade. The primary purpose of this PPOA was to review progress of past initiatives and to provide recommendations for future waste reduction measures of hazardous and solid waste streams and increasing the purchase of environmentally friendly products. This report contains a summary of the information collected and analyses performed with recommended options for implementation. The Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Pollution Prevention Group will work with SNL/NM's Fleet Services to implement these options.

Richardson, Anastasia Dawn

2003-06-01

152

Procedure for contact electrical resistance measurements as developed for use at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Military Specifications call out general procedures and guidelines for conducting contact resistance measurements on chemical conversion coated panels. This paper deals with a test procedure developed at Sandia National Laboratories used to conduct contact electrical resistance on non-chromated conversion coated test panels. MIL-C-81706 {open_quotes}Chemical Conversion Materials For Coating Aluminum and Aluminum Alloys{close_quotes} was the reference specification used for guidance.

Finch, J.L.

1994-06-01

153

Long-Term Environmental Stewardship (LTES) life-cycle material management at Sandia National Laboratories.  

SciTech Connect

The Long-Term Environmental Stewardship (LTES) mission is to ensure long-term protection of human health and the environment, and proactive management toward sustainable use and protection of natural and cultural resources affected by any Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) operations and operational legacies. The primary objectives of the LTES program are to: (1) Protect the environment from present and future operations; (2) Preserve and protect natural and cultural resources, and; (3) Apply environmental life-cycle management to SNL operations.

Nagy, Michael D.

2010-09-01

154

1998 Annual Site Environmental Report Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sandia National Laboratories\\/New Mexico (SNL\\/NM) is operated in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) mission to provide weapon component technology and hardware for national security needs. SNL\\/NM also conducts fundamental research and development to advance technology in energy research, computer science, waste management, microelectronics, materials science, and transportation safety for hazardous and nuclear components. In support of SNL's

D. K. Duncan; C. H. Fink; R. V. Sanchez

1999-01-01

155

Sandia National Laboratories site-wide hydrogeologic characterization project calendar year 1992 annual report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL\\/NM) Site-Wide Hydrogeologic Characterization (SWHC) project has been implemented as part of the SNL\\/NM Environmental Restoration (ER) Program to develop the regional hydrogeologic framework and baseline for the approximately 100 mi of Kirtland Air Force Base (KAFB) and adjacent withdrawn public lands upon which SNL\\/NM has performed research and development activities. Additionally, the SWHC

D. Crowson; J. D. Gibson; C. S. Haase; R. Holt; D. Hyndman; J. Krumhansl; F. Lauffer; J. P. McCord; J. T. McCord; D. Neel

1993-01-01

156

Coilgun technology, status, applications and future directions at Sandia National Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sandia National Laboratories has been developing coilgun electromagnetic launcher technology since 1980 and is continuing to advance the technology through hardware development, industry collaboration, and pursuit of new applications. Past projects have included a 35 stage, 200 kJ, 50 mm launcher accelerating a 0.23 kg mass to 1 km\\/s velocity, a 6 stage, 280 kJ, 140 mm system accelerating a

T. R. Lockner; R. J. Kaye; B. N. Turman

2004-01-01

157

Sandia National Laboratories 34-meter diameter vertical axis wind turbine test bed  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sandia National Laboratories has designed, procured, and is erecting a 34-meter diameter vertical axis wind turbine test bed. The turbine incorporates many innovative features to investigate possible reductions in the cost-of-energy produced by wind energy conversion systems. These features include: blade element airfoil sections designed specifically for wind turbines, variable chord-variable section modular blades, stress reducing discontinuous slope blades, and

P. C. Klimas

1987-01-01

158

ADVANTAGES AND DISADVANTAGES TO OPERATING AN ON-SITE LABORATORY AT THE SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES CHEMICAL WASTE LANDFILL  

SciTech Connect

During the excavation of the Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) Chemical Waste Landfill (CWL), operations were realized by the presence of URS' (formerly known as United Research Services) On-site Mobile Laboratory (OSML) and the close proximity of the SNL/NM Environmental Restoration Chemical Laboratory (ERCL). The laboratory was located adjacent to the landfill in order to provide soil characterization, health and safety support, and waste management data. Although the cost of maintaining and operating an analytical laboratory can be higher than off-site analysis, there are many benefits to providing on site analytical services. This paper describes the synergies between the laboratory, as well as the advantages and disadvantages to having a laboratory on-site during the excavation of SNL/NM CWL.

Young, S.G.; Creech, M.N.

2003-02-27

159

Sandia National Laboratories` high power electromagnetic impulse sources  

SciTech Connect

Three impulse sources have been developed to cover a wide range of peak power, bandwidth and center frequency requirements. Each of the sources can operate in single shot, rep-rate, or burst modes. These devices are of rugged construction and are suitable for field use. This paper will describe the specifications and principals of operation for each source. The sources to be described are: SNIPER (Sub-Nanosecond ImPulsE Radiator), a coaxial Blumlein pulser with an in-line (series) peaking switch; EMBL (EnantioMorphic BLurfflein), a bipolar parallel plate Blumlein with a crowbar type (parallel) peaking switch; and the LCO (L-C Oscillator) a spark-switched L-C oscillator with damped sinusoidal output. SNIPER and EMBL are ultra-wideband (UWB) sources which produce a very fast high voltage transition. When differentiated by the antenna, an impulse whose width corresponds to the transition time is radiated. The LCO operates with a center frequency up to 800 MHz and up to 100 MHz bandwidth. Because the LCO output is relatively narrow band, high gain antennas may be employed to produce very high radiated field strengths.

Rinehart, L.F.; Buttram, M.T.; Denison, G.J.; Lundstrom, J.M.; Crowe, W.R.; Aurand, J.F.; Patterson, P.E.

1994-10-01

160

External Review for Sandia National Laboratory Microelectronics and Photonics Program 1998 Review  

SciTech Connect

The committee regards Sandia's Microelectronics and Photonics Program as a vital and strategic resource for the nation. The Microsystems (MEMS) and Chem Lab programs were assessed as unique and best-in-class for the development of significant application areas. They contribute directly to the Sandia mission and impact the development of new commercial areas. The continued development and integration of Radiation hard silicon integrated circuits, micromechanical systems, sensors, and optical communications is essential to the national security mission. The quality of the programs is excellent to outstanding overall. MEMS and Chem Lab activities are examples of outstanding programs. The committee was pleased to see the relationship of the microelectronics development programs to applications in the mission. In a future review the committee would like to see Sandia's research programs and a vision for connectivity to potential national security needs. (This review may be based on analysis and assumptions about the strategic needs of the nation.) In summary, the Microelectronics and Photonics capability affords Sandia the opportunity to deliver exceptional service in the national interest across broad technology areas. The presentations were excellent and well integrated. We received ample pre-reading materials, expectations were well set and the documents were high quality. The committee was provided an agenda with sufficient time among us and some selected one-on-one time with the researchers. The composition of the committee held representation from industry, universities and government. Committee contributions were well balanced and worked as a team. However, the committee was disappointed that no member of Sandia executive management was able to be present for the readout and final debriefing. (A late, higher priority conflict developed.) The members of the EST Program and the committee put substantial effort into the review but a written report like this one is not a substitute for direct feedback in helping SNL leadership assess the value of these programs.

MCWHORTER, PAUL J.; ROMIG JR., ALTON D.

1999-02-01

161

LANMAS alpha configured for Sandia National Laboratories and Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Westinghouse Hanford Company have been working jointly for the past 2 years to develop LANMAS (Local Area Network Material Accountability System), the next generation of a US Department of Energy nuclear material accountability system. LANMAS is being designed to reflect the broad-based needs of the US Department of Energy`s Material Control & Accountability and Nuclear Materials Management communities, and its developers believe that significant cost savings can be achieved by implementing LANMAS complex-wide, where feasible. LANMAS is being designed so that it is transportable to appropriate US Department of Energy sites. To accomplish this, LANMAS will be configurable to local site work culture. Many US Department of Energy sites are interested in the LANMAS project, and several have participated in its development; some have committed resources. The original LANMAS project team included representatives from the Hanford Site and Los Alamos. As of June 1993, the following sites have also supported the project: Sandia National Laboratory Albuquerque; Sandia National Laboratory Livermore; Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant; Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory; and Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory. In addition, LANMAS is being targeted as a candidate for the US Department of Energy Complex 21, a project designed to restructure the nation`s nuclear weapons complex.

Woychick, M.R. [ed.; McRae, L.P. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Bracey, J.T. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kern, E.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Alvarado, A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-07-01

162

LANMAS alpha configured for Sandia National Laboratories and Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Westinghouse Hanford Company have been working jointly for the past 2 years to develop LANMAS, the next generation of a US Department of Energy nuclear material accountability system. LANMAS is being designed to reflect the broad-based needs of the US Department of Energy`s Material Control and Accountability and Nuclear Materials Management communities, and its developers believe that significant cost savings can be achieved by implementing LANMAS complex-wide, where feasible. LANMAS is being designed so that it is transportable to appropriate US Department of Energy sites. To accomplish this, LANMAS will be configurable to local site work culture. Many US Department of Energy sites are interested in the LANMAS project, and several have participated in its development; some have committed resources. The original LANMAS project team included representatives from the Hanford Site and Los Alamos. As of June 1993, the following sites have also supported the project: Sandia National Laboratory-Albuquerque; Sandia National Laboratory-Livermore; Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant; Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory; and Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory. In addition, LANMAS is being targeted as a candidate for the US Department of Energy Complex 21, a project designed to restructure the nation`s nuclear weapons complex.

McRae, L.P. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Kern, E.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Alvarado, A. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bracey, J.T. [Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, KY (United States)

1993-12-31

163

The high current, fast, 100ns, Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) developmental project at Sandia National Laboratories.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, N.M., USA, in collaboration with the High Current Electronic Institute (HCEI), Tomsk, Russia, is developing a new paradigm in pulsed power technology: the Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) technology. This technological approach can provide very compact devices that can deliver very fast high current and high voltage pulses straight out of the cavity with out any complicated pulse forming and pulse compression network. Through multistage inductively insulated voltage adders, the output pulse, increased in voltage amplitude, can be applied directly to the load. The load may be a vacuum electron diode, a z-pinch wire array, a gas puff, a liner, an isentropic compression load (ICE) to study material behavior under very high magnetic fields, or a fusion energy (IFE) target. This is because the output pulse rise time and width can be easily tailored to the specific application needs. In this paper we briefly summarize the developmental work done in Sandia and HCEI during the last few years, and describe our new MYKONOS Sandia High Current LTD Laboratory.

Ward, Kevin S.; Long, Finis W.; Sinebryukhov, Vadim A. (High Current Electronic Institute (HCEI), Tomsk, Russia); Kim, Alexandre A. (High Current Electronic Institute (HCEI), Tomsk, RUSSIA); Wakeland, Peter Eric (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); McKee, G. Randall; Woodworth, Joseph Ray; McDaniel, Dillon Heirman; Fowler, William E.; Mazarakis, Michael Gerrassimos; Porter, John Larry, Jr.; Struve, Kenneth William; Stygar, William A.; LeChien, Keith R.; Matzen, Maurice Keith

2010-04-01

164

Sandia National Laboratories 34-meter diameter vertical axis wind turbine test bed  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sandia National Laboratories has designed, procured, and is erecting a 34-meter diameter vertical axis wind turbine test bed. The turbine incorporates many innovative features to investigate possible reductions in the cost-of-energy produced by wind energy conversion systems. These features include: blade element airfoil sections designed specifically for wind turbines, variable chord-variable section modular blades, stress reducing discontinuous slope blades, and variable speed-constant frequency generation capabilities. The modular blades allow for relatively simple partial configurational changes. Based on Sandia's twelve years of wind turbine research and testing, the test bed is heavily instrumented. The data acquisition and analysis system is capable of rapidly treating large amounts of information on both attended and unattended bases. A comprehensive test plan has been formulated. The turbine is intended to be the primary Department of Energy vehicle for validating concepts intended to improve vertical axis wind energy conversion systems.

Klimas, P. C.

165

Detailed numerical simulation of thermal radiation influence in Sandia flame D  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to investigate the influence of thermal radiation in turbulent combustion processes, Sandia flame D is numerically simulated, with multiple-time scale (MTS) k? turbulence model for turbulence, the combination of probability density function (PDF) transportation method, Lagrangian flamelet model (LFM) and the detailed chemical reaction mechanism GRI 3.0 (consisting of 53 species and 325 elemental reactions) for combustion and

Xiao Xu; YiLiang Chen; Haifeng Wang

2006-01-01

166

Large-Scale Testing and High-Fidelity Simulation Capabilities at Sandia National Laboratories to Support Space Power and Propulsion  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories, as a Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Agency, has major responsibility to ensure the safety and security needs of nuclear weapons. As such, with an experienced research staff, Sandia maintains a spectrum of modeling and simulation capabilities integrated with experimental and large-scale test capabilities. This expertise and these capabilities offer considerable resources for addressing issues of interest to the space power and propulsion communities. This paper presents Sandia's capability to perform thermal qualification (analysis, test, modeling and simulation) using a representative weapon system as an example demonstrating the potential to support NASA's Lunar Reactor System.

Dobranich, Dean [Thermal and Reactive Processes Department, Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); Blanchat, Thomas K. [Fire Science and Technology Department, Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States)

2008-01-21

167

Large-Scale Testing and High-Fidelity Simulation Capabilities at Sandia National Laboratories to Support Space Power and Propulsion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sandia National Laboratories, as a Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Agency, has major responsibility to ensure the safety and security needs of nuclear weapons. As such, with an experienced research staff, Sandia maintains a spectrum of modeling and simulation capabilities integrated with experimental and large-scale test capabilities. This expertise and these capabilities offer considerable resources for addressing issues of interest to the space power and propulsion communities. This paper presents Sandia's capability to perform thermal qualification (analysis, test, modeling and simulation) using a representative weapon system as an example demonstrating the potential to support NASA's Lunar Reactor System.

Dobranich, Dean; Blanchat, Thomas K.

2008-01-01

168

Supplement analysis for continued operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore. Volume 2: Comment response document  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE), prepared a draft Supplement Analysis (SA) for Continued Operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore (SNL-L), in accordance with DOE`s requirements for implementation of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) (10 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 1021.314). It considers whether the Final Environmental Impact Statement and Environmental Impact Report for Continued Operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore (1992 EIS/EIR) should be supplement3ed, whether a new environmental impact statement (EIS) should be prepared, or no further NEPA documentation is required. The SA examines the current project and program plans and proposals for LLNL and SNL-L, operations to identify new or modified projects or operations or new information for the period from 1998 to 2002 that was not considered in the 1992 EIS/EIR. When such changes, modifications, and information are identified, they are examined to determine whether they could be considered substantial or significant in reference to the 1992 proposed action and the 1993 Record of Decision (ROD). DOE released the draft SA to the public to obtain stakeholder comments and to consider those comments in the preparation of the final SA. DOE distributed copies of the draft SA to those who were known to have an interest in LLNL or SNL-L activities in addition to those who requested a copy. In response to comments received, DOE prepared this Comment Response Document.

NONE

1999-03-01

169

On the integration of technology readiness levels at Sandia National Laboratories.  

SciTech Connect

Integrating technology readiness levels (TRL) into the management of engineering projects is critical to the mitigation of risk and improved customer/supplier communications. TRLs provide a common framework and language with which consistent comparisons of different technologies and approaches can be made. At Sandia National Laboratories, where technologies are developed, integrated and deployed into high consequence systems, the use of TRLs may be transformational. They are technology independent and span the full range of technology development including scientific and applied research, identification of customer requirements, modeling and simulation, identification of environments, testing and integration. With this report, we provide a reference set of definitions for TRLs and a brief history of TRLs at Sandia National Laboratories. We then propose and describe two approaches that may be used to integrate TRLs into the NW SMU business practices. In the first approach, we analyze how TRLs can be integrated within concurrent qualification as documented in TBP-100 [1]. In the second approach we take a look at the product realization process (PRP) as documented in TBP-PRP [2]. Both concurrent qualification and product realization are fundamental to the way weapons engineering work is conducted at this laboratory and the NWC (nuclear weapons complex) as a whole. Given the current structure and definitions laid out in the TBP-100 and TBP-PRP, we believe that integrating TRLs into concurrent qualification (TBP-100) rather than TBP-PRP is optimal. Finally, we note that our charter was to explore and develop ways of integrating TRLs into the NW SMU and therefore we do not significantly cover the development and history of TRLs. This work was executed under the auspices and direction of Sandia's Weapon Engineering Program. Please contact Gerry Sleefe, Deputy Program Director, for further information.

Bailey, Beatriz R.; Mitchell, John Anthony

2006-09-01

170

Large-Scale Field Study of Landfill Covers at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

A large-scale field demonstration comparing final landfill cover designs has been constructed and is currently being monitored at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Two conventional designs (a RCRA Subtitle `D' Soil Cover and a RCRA Subtitle `C' Compacted Clay Cover) were constructed side-by-side with four alternative cover test plots designed for dry environments. The demonstration is intended to evaluate the various cover designs based on their respective water balance performance, ease and reliability of construction, and cost. This paper presents an overview of the ongoing demonstration.

Dwyer, S.F.

1998-09-01

171

Pollution prevention opportunity assessment for Sandia National Laboratories/California recycling programs.  

SciTech Connect

This Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessment (PPOA) was conducted for the Sandia National Laboratories/California (SNL/CA) Environmental Management Department between May 2006 and March 2007, to evaluate the current site-wide recycling program for potential opportunities to improve the efficiency of the program. This report contains a summary of the information collected and analyses performed with recommended options for implementation. The SNL/NM Pollution Prevention (P2) staff worked with the SNL/CA P2 Staff to arrive at these options.

Wrons, Ralph Jordan; Vetter, Douglas Walter

2007-07-01

172

Status of the Z Refurbishment project (ZR) at Sandia National Laboratories.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories Z Refurbishment (ZR) Project formally began in August 2002 to increase the Z Accelerator's utilization by providing the capability to perform more shots, improve precision and pulse shape variability, increase delivered current, and accomplish the improvements with minimal disruption to Z's ongoing programs. A project overview was provided at the 14th International Pulsed Power Conference in 2003. This paper provides an update of the project including architectural changes over the past two years, timeframe for completion, and overall design and fabrication status.

Weinbrecht, Edward A.; Bloomquist, Douglas D.; Warner, Peggy Jean; McDaniel, Dillon Heirman; Faturos, Thomas V.; Tabor, Debra Ann; McKee, G. Randall; Weed, John Woodruff

2005-06-01

173

Space Radiation Effects Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The SREL User's Handbook is designed to provide information needed by those who plan experiments involving the accelerators at this laboratory. Thus the Handbook will contain information on the properties of the machines, the beam parameters, the facilities and services provided for experimenters, etc. This information will be brought up to date as new equipment is added and modifications accomplished. This Handbook is influenced by the many excellent models prepared at other accelerator laboratories. In particular, the CERN Synchrocyclotron User's Handbook (November 1967) is closely followed in some sections, since the SREL Synchrocyclotron is a duplicate of the CERN machine. We wish to thank Dr. E. G. Michaelis for permission to draw so heavily on his work, particularly in Section II of this Handbook. We hope that the Handbook will prove useful, and will welcome suggestions and criticism.

1969-01-01

174

Uniprocessor Performance Analysis of a Representative Workload of Sandia National Laboratories' Scientific Applications.  

SciTech Connect

UNIPROCESSOR PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF A REPRESENTATIVE WORKLOAD OF SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES' SCIENTIFIC APPLICATIONS Master of Science in Electrical Engineering New Mexico State University Las Cruces, New Mexico, 2005 Dr. Jeanine Cook, Chair Throughout the last decade computer performance analysis has become absolutely necessary to maximum performance of some workloads. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) located in Albuquerque, New Mexico is no different in that to achieve maximum performance of large scientific, parallel workloads performance analysis is needed at the uni-processor level. A representative workload has been chosen as the basis of a computer performance study to determine optimal processor characteristics in order to better specify the next generation of supercomputers. Cube3, a finite element test problem developed at SNL is a representative workload of their scientific workloads. This workload has been studied at the uni-processor level to understand characteristics in the microarchitecture that will lead to the overall performance improvement at the multi-processor level. The goal of studying vthis workload at the uni-processor level is to build a performance prediction model that will be integrated into a multi-processor performance model which is currently being developed at SNL. Through the use of performance counters on the Itanium 2 microarchitecture, performance statistics are studied to determine bottlenecks in the microarchitecture and/or changes in the application code that will maximize performance. From source code analysis a performance degrading loop kernel was identified and through the use of compiler optimizations a performance gain of around 20% was achieved.

Charles Laverty

2005-10-01

175

A report on IPv6 deployment activities and issues at Sandia National Laboratories:FY2007.  

SciTech Connect

Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4) has been a mainstay of the both the Internet and corporate networks for delivering network packets to the desired destination. However, rapid proliferation of network appliances, evolution of corporate networks, and the expanding Internet has begun to stress the limitations of the protocol. Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) is the replacement protocol that overcomes the constraints of IPv4. As the emerging Internet network protocol, SNL needs to prepare for its eventual deployment in international, national, customer, and local networks. Additionally, the United States Office of Management and Budget has mandated that IPv6 deployment in government network backbones occurs by 2008. This paper explores the readiness of the Sandia National Laboratories network backbone to support IPv6, the issues that must be addressed before a deployment begins, and recommends the next steps to take to comply with government mandates. The paper describes a joint work effort of the Sandia National Laboratories ASC WAN project team and members of the System Analysis & Trouble Resolution, the Communication & Network Systems, and Network System Design & Implementation Departments.

Tolendino, Lawrence F.; Eldridge, John M.; Hu, Tan Chang; Maestas, Joseph H.

2007-06-01

176

Sandia National Laboratories support of the Iraq Nuclear Facility Dismantlement and Disposal Program.  

SciTech Connect

Because of past military operations, lack of upkeep and looting there are now enormous radioactive waste problems in Iraq. These waste problems include destroyed nuclear facilities, uncharacterized radioactive wastes, liquid radioactive waste in underground tanks, wastes related to the production of yellow cake, sealed radioactive sources, activated metals and contaminated metals that must be constantly guarded. Iraq currently lacks the trained personnel, regulatory and physical infrastructure to safely and securely manage these facilities and wastes. In 2005 the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) agreed to organize an international cooperative program to assist Iraq with these issues. Soon after, the Iraq Nuclear Facility Dismantlement and Disposal Program (the NDs Program) was initiated by the U.S. Department of State (DOS) to support the IAEA and assist the Government of Iraq (GOI) in eliminating the threats from poorly controlled radioactive materials. The Iraq NDs Program is providing support for the IAEA plus training, consultation and limited equipment to the GOI. The GOI owns the problems and will be responsible for implementation of the Iraq NDs Program. Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) is a part of the DOS's team implementing the Iraq NDs Program. This report documents Sandia's support of the Iraq NDs Program, which has developed into three principal work streams: (1) training and technical consultation; (2) introducing Iraqis to modern decommissioning and waste management practices; and (3) supporting the IAEA, as they assist the GOI. Examples of each of these work streams include: (1) presentation of a three-day training workshop on 'Practical Concepts for Safe Disposal of Low-Level Radioactive Waste in Arid Settings;' (2) leading GOI representatives on a tour of two operating low level radioactive waste disposal facilities in the U.S.; and (3) supporting the IAEA's Technical Meeting with the GOI from April 21-25, 2008. As noted in the report, there was significant teaming between the various participants to best help the GOI. On-the-ground progress is the focus of the Iraq NDs Program and much of the work is a transfer of technical and practical skills and knowledge that Sandia uses day-to-day. On-the-ground progress was achieved in July of 2008 when the GOI began the physical cleanup and dismantlement of the Active Metallurgical Testing Laboratory (LAMA) facility at Al Tuwaitha, near Baghdad.

Cochran, John Russell; Danneels, Jeffrey John

2009-03-01

177

Current radar-responsive tag development activities at Sandia National Laboratories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Over the past ten years, Sandia has developed RF radar responsive tag systems and supporting technologies for various government agencies and industry partners. RF tags can function as RF transmitters or radar transponders that enable tagging, tracking, and location determination functions. Expertise in tag architecture, microwave and radar design, signal analysis and processing techniques, digital design, modeling and simulation, and testing have been directly applicable to these tag programs. In general, the radar responsive tag designs have emphasized low power, small package size, and the ability to be detected by the radar at long ranges. Recently, there has been an interest in using radar responsive tags for Blue Force tracking and Combat ID (CID). The main reason for this interest is to allow airborne surveillance radars to easily distinguish U.S. assets from those of opposing forces. A Blue Force tracking capability would add materially to situational awareness. Combat ID is also an issue, as evidenced by the fact that approximately one-quarter of all U.S. casualties in the Gulf War took the form of ground troops killed by friendly fire. Because the evolution of warfare in the intervening decade has made asymmetric warfare the norm rather than the exception, swarming engagements in which U.S. forces will be freely intermixed with opposing forces is a situation that must be anticipated. Increasing utilization of precision munitions can be expected to drive fires progressively closer to engaged allied troops at times when visual de-confliction is not an option. In view of these trends, it becomes increasingly important that U.S. ground forces have a widely proliferated all-weather radar responsive tag that communicates to all-weather surveillance. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the recent, current, and future radar responsive research and development activities at Sandia National Laboratories that support both the Blue Force Tracking and Combat ID application. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company for the United States Departments of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

Ormesher, Richard C.; Plummer, Kenneth W.; Wells, Lars M.

2004-08-01

178

Research on the Use of Robotics in Hazardous Environments at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Many hazardous material handling needs exist in remote unstructured environments. Currently these operations are accomplished using personnel in direct contact with the hazards. A safe and cost effective alternative to this approach is the use of intelligent robotic systems for safe handling, packaging, transport, and even excavation of hazardous materials. The Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center of Sandia National Laboratories has developed and deployed robotic technologies for use in hazardous environments, three of which have been deployed in DOE production facilities for handling of special nuclear materials. Other systems are currently under development for packaging special nuclear materials. This paper presents an overview of the research activities, including five delivered systems, at %ndia National Laboratories on the use of robotics in hazardous environments.

Kwok, Kwan S.

1999-05-04

179

Pollution prevention opportunity assessment for MicroFab and SiFab facilities at Sandia National Laboratories.  

SciTech Connect

This Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessment (PPOA) was conducted for the MicroFab and SiFab facilities at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico in Fiscal Year 2011. The primary purpose of this PPOA is to provide recommendations to assist organizations in reducing the generation of waste and improving the efficiency of their processes and procedures. This report contains a summary of the information collected, the analyses performed, and recommended options for implementation. The Sandia National Laboratories Environmental Management System (EMS) and Pollution Prevention (P2) staff will continue to work with the organizations to implement the recommendations.

Gerard, Morgan Evan

2011-12-01

180

Optical damage testing at the Z-Backlighter facility at Sandia National Laboratories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To enable laser-based radiography of high energy density physics events on the Z-Accelerator[4,5] at Sandia National Laboratories, a facility known as the Z-Backlighter has been developed. Two Nd:Phosphate glass lasers are used to create x-rays and/or proton beams capable of this radiographic diagnosis: Z-Beamlet (a multi-kilojoule laser operating at 527nm in a few nanoseconds) and Z-Petawatt (a several hundred joule laser operating at 1054nm in the subpicosecond regime) [1,2]. At the energy densities used in these systems, it is necessary to use high damage threshold optical materials, some of which are poorly characterized (especially for the sub-picosecond pulse). For example, Sandia has developed a meter-class dielectric coating capability for system optics. Damage testing can be performed by external facilities for nanosecond 532nm pulses, measuring high reflector coating damage thresholds >80J/cm2 and antireflection coating damage thresholds >20J/cm2 [3]. However, available external testing capabilities do not use femtosecond/picosecond scale laser pulses. To this end, we have constructed a sub-picoseond-laser-based optical damage test system. The damage tester system also allows for testing in a vacuum vessel, which is relevant since many optics in the Z-Backlighter system are used in vacuum. This paper will present the results of laser induced damage testing performed in both atmosphere and in vacuum, with 1054nm sub-picosecond laser pulses. Optical materials/coatings discussed are: bare fused silica and protected gold used for benchmarking; BK7; Zerodur; protected silver; and dielectric optical coatings (halfnia/silica layer pairs) produced by Sandia's in-house meter-class coating capability.

Kimmel, Mark; Rambo, Patrick; Broyles, Robin; Geissel, Matthias; Schwarz, Jens; Bellum, John; Atherton, Briggs

2009-10-01

181

Sandia MEMS  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This fun site about MicroElectroMechanical systems (MEMS) is maintained at Sandia National Laboratories. Visitors who don't want to get bogged down with technical aspects of these microscopic machines can browse the image and movie galleries, which show what MEMS look like and how they operate. There is even a live video feed of a microengine system running at Sandia. To learn more about what is involved in MEMS production and operation, the Technical Information section has an informative overview, descriptions of three developing technologies, and examples of prototype systems. The facilities used by Sandia researchers are also described in a virtual tour.

182

SAND2013-1223P Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned  

E-print Network

Sustainability & Pollution Prevention Program Plan New Mexico Site PG470227, Revision 7 #12;Sandia National of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Materials

183

A brief history of Sandia National Laboratories and the Department of Energy%3CU%2B2019%3Es Office of Science : interplay between science, technology, and mission  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 1957, Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) initiated its first programs in fundamental science, in support of its primary nuclear weapons mission. In 1974, Sandia initiated programs in fundamental science supported by the Department of Energy's Office of Science (DOE-SC). These latter programs have grown to the point where, today in 2011, support of Sandia's programs in fundamental science is dominated

Jeffrey Yeenien Tsao; Myers Samuel Maxwell Jr; Jerry Alvon Simmons; Andrew McIlroy; Frederick L. Vook; Samuel Scott Collis; Samuel Thomas Picraux

2011-01-01

184

PATRAM '92: 10th international symposium on the packaging and transportation of radioactive materials [Papers presented by Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

This document provides the papers presented by Sandia Laboratories at PATRAM '92, the tenth International symposium on the Packaging and Transportation of Radioactive Materials held September 13--18, 1992 in Yokohama City, Japan. Individual papers have been cataloged separately. (FL)

none,

1992-01-01

185

Ceramic-Metal Brazing, from Fundamentals to Applications: A Review of Sandia National Laboratories Brazing Capabilities, Needs, and Opportunities  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of the report is to summarize discussions from a Ceramic\\/Metal Brazing: From Fundamentals to Applications Workshop that was held at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, NM on April 4, 2001. Brazing experts and users who bridge common areas of research, design, and manufacturing participated in the exercise. External perspectives on the general state of the science and technology

F. MICHAEL HOSKING; JOHN J. STEPHENS JR; S. JILL GLASS; JUSTINE E. JOHANNES; PAUL G. KOTULA; NEIL A. LAPETINA; RONALD E. LOEHMAN; THOMAS P. SWILER; EDMUND B. WEBB; CHARLES H. CADDEN; T. OYAMA; A. P. TOMSIA

2002-01-01

186

Application of non-intrusive geophysical techniques at the Mixed Waste Landfill, Technical Area 3, Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Environmental Restoration Project at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico is tasked with assessment and remediation of the Mixed Waste Landfill in Technical Area 3. The Mixed Waste Landfill is an inactive radioactive and mixed waste disposal site. The landfill contains disposal pits and trenches of questionable location and dimension. Non-intrusive geophysical techniques were utilized to provide an effective means

Jerry L. Peace; David A. Hyndman; Tim J. Goering

1996-01-01

187

Sandia National Laboratories environmental fluid dynamics code : pH effects user manual.  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the implementation level changes in the source code and input files of Sandia National Laboratories Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (SNL-EFDC) that are necessary for including pH effects into algae-growth dynamics. The document also gives a brief introduction to how pH effects are modeled into the algae-growth model. The document assumes that the reader is aware of the existing algae-growth model in SNL-EFDC. The existing model is described by James, Jarardhanam and more theoretical considerations behind modeling pH effects are presented therein. This document should be used in conjunction with the original EFDC manual and the original water-quality manual.

Janardhanam, Vijay (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); James, Scott Carlton

2012-02-01

188

Z-Pinch Driven Inertial Confinement Fusion Target Physics Research at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Three hohlraum concepts are being pursued at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to investigate the possibility of using pulsed power driven magnetic implosions (z-pinches) to drive high gain targets capable of yields in the range of 200-1000 MJ. This research is being conducted on SNL'S.Z facility that is capable of driving peak currents of 20 MA in z-pinch loads producing implosion velocities as high as 7.5X 107 cm/s, x-ray energies approaching 2 MJ, and x-ray powers exceeding 200 TW. This paper will discuss each of these hohlraum concepts and will overview the experiments that have been conducted on these systems to date.

Alberts, T.E.; Asay, J.R.; Baca, P.M.; Baker, K.L.; Breeze, S.P.; Chandler, G.A.; Cook, D.L.; Cooper, G.W.; Deeney, C.; Derzon, M.S.; Douglas, M.R.; Fehl, D.L.; Gilliland, T.; Hebron, D.E.; Hurst, M.J.; Jobe, D.O.; Kellogg, J.W.; Lash, J.S.; Lazier, S.E.; Leeper, R.J.; Matzen, M.K.; McDaniel, D.H.; McGurn, J.S.; Mehlhorn, T.A.; Moats, A.R.; Mock, R.C.; Muron, D.J.; Nash, T.J.; Olson, R.E.; Porter, J.L.; Quintenz, J.P.; Reyers, P.V.; Ruggles, L.E.; Ruiz, C.L.; Sandford, T.W.L.; Schmidlapp, F.A.; Seamen, J.F.; Spielman, R.B.; Stark, M.A.; Struve, K.W.; Stygar, W.A.; Tibbetts-Russell, D.R.; Torres, J.A.; Vargas, M.; Wagoner, T.C.; Wakefield, C.

1998-10-27

189

Overview of Sandia National Laboratories and Khlopin Radium Institute collaborative radiological accident consequence analysis efforts  

SciTech Connect

In January, 1995 a collaborative effort to improve radiological consequence analysis methods and tools was initiated between the V.G. Khlopin Institute (KRI) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The purpose of the collaborative effort was to transfer SNL`s consequence analysis methods to KRI and identify opportunities for collaborative efforts to solve mutual problems relating to the safety of radiochemical facilities. A second purpose was to improve SNL`s consequence analysis methods by incorporating the radiological accident field experience of KRI scientists (e.g. the Chernobyl and Kyshtym accidents). The initial collaborative effort focused on the identification of: safety criteria that radiochemical facilities in Russia must meet; analyses/measures required to demonstrate that safety criteria have been met; and data required to complete the analyses/measures identified to demonstrate the safety basis of a facility.

Young, M.L.; Carlson, D.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lazarev, L.N.; Petrov, B.F.; Romanovskiy, V.N. [V.G. Khlopin Radium Inst., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

1997-05-01

190

The future of infrastructure security : a workshop held at Sandia National Laboratories.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories hosted a workshop on the future of infrastructure security on February 27-28, 2013, in Albuquerque, NM. The 17 participants came from backgrounds as diverse as federal policy, the insurance industry, infrastructure management, and technology development. The purpose of the workshop was to surface key issues, identify directions forward, and lay groundwork for cross-sectoral and cross-disciplinary collaborations. The workshop addressed issues such as the problem space (what is included ininfrastructure' problems?), the general types of threats to infrastructure (such as acute or chronic, system-inherent or exogenously imposed) and definitions ofsecure and resilient' infrastructures. The workshop concluded with a consideration of stakeholders and players in the infrastructure world, and identification of specific activities that could be undertaken by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and other players.

Garcia, Pablo; Turnley, Jessica Glicken; Parrott, Lori K.

2013-05-01

191

Intra-building telecommunications cabling standards for Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

This document establishes a working standard for all telecommunications cable installations at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico. It is based on recent national commercial cabling standards. The topics addressed are Secure and Open/Restricted Access telecommunications environments and both twisted-pair and optical-fiber components of communications media. Some of the state-of-the-art technologies that will be supported by the intrabuilding cable infrastructure are Circuit and Packet Switched Networks (PBX/5ESS Voice and Low-Speed Data), Local Area Networks (Ethernet, Token Ring, Fiber and Copper Distributed Data Interface), and Wide Area Networks (Asynchronous Transfer Mode). These technologies can be delivered to every desk and can transport data at rates sufficient to support all existing applications (such as Voice, Text and graphics, Still Images, Full-motion Video), as well as applications to be defined in the future.

Adams, R.L.

1993-08-01

192

Computer Network Availability at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque NM: Measurement and Perception  

SciTech Connect

The desire to provide a measure of computer network availability at Sandia National Laboratories has existed for along time. Several attempts were made to build this measure by accurately recording network failures, identifying the type of network element involved, the root cause of the problem, and the time to repair the fault. Recognizing the limitations of available methods, it became obvious that another approach of determining network availability had to be defined. The chosen concept involved the periodic sampling of network services and applications from various network locations. A measure of ''network'' availability was then calculated based on the ratio of polling success to failure. The effort required to gather the information and produce a useful metric is not prohibitive and the information gained has verified long held feelings regarding network performance with real data.

NELSON,SPENCER D.; TOLENDINO,LAWRENCE F.

1999-11-01

193

Sandia National Laboratories environmental fluid dynamics code : sediment transport user manual.  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the sediment transport subroutines and input files for the Sandia National Laboratories Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (SNL-EFDC). Detailed descriptions of the input files containing data from Sediment Erosion at Depth flume (SEDflume) measurements are provided along with the description of the source code implementing sediment transport. Both the theoretical description of sediment transport employed in SNL-EFDC and the source code are described. This user manual is meant to be used in conjunction with the EFDC manual (Hamrick 1996) because there will be no reference to the hydrodynamics in EFDC. Through this document, the authors aim to provide the necessary information for new users who wish to implement sediment transport in EFDC and obtain a clear understanding of the source code.

Grace, Matthew D.; Thanh, Phi Hung X.; James, Scott Carlton

2008-09-01

194

Review of Heavy-Duty Engine Combustion Research at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this paper are to describe the research efforts in diesel engine combustion at Sandia National Laboratories' Combustion Research Facility and to provide recent experimental results. We have four diesel engine experiments supported by the Department of Energy, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies: a one-cylinder version of a Cummins heavy-duty engine, a diesel simulation facility, a one-cylinder Caterpillar engine to evaluate combustion of alternative fuels, and a homogeneous-charge, compression-ignition (HCCI) engine facility is under development. Recent experimental results to be discussed are: the effects of injection timing and diluent addition on late-combustion soot burnout, diesel-spray ignition and premixed-burn behavior, a comparison of the combustion characteristics of M85 (a mixture of 85% methanol and 15% gasoline) and DF2 (No.2 diesel reference fuel), and a description of our HCCI experimental program and modeling work.

Robert W. Carling; Gurpreet Singh

2000-06-19

195

Surface-wave and refraction tomography at the FACT Site, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.  

SciTech Connect

We present a technique that allows for the simultaneous acquisition and interpretation of both shear-wave and compressive-wave 3-D velocities. The technique requires no special seismic sources or array geometries, and is suited to studies with small source-receiver offsets. The method also effectively deals with unwanted seismic arrivals by using the statistical properties of the data itself to discriminate against spurious picks. We demonstrate the technique with a field experiment at the Facility for Analysis, Calibration, and Testing at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. The resulting 3-D shear-velocity and compressive-velocity distributions are consistent with surface geologic mapping. The averaged velocities and V{sub p}/V{sub s} ratio in the upper 30 meters are also consistent with examples found in the scientific literature.

Abbott, Robert E.; Bartel, Lewis Clark; Pullammanappallil, Satish (Optim, Inc., Reno, NV); Engler, Bruce Phillip

2006-08-01

196

Survey of subsurface treatment technologies for environmental restoration sites at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico.  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a survey of remediation and treatment technologies for contaminants of concern at environmental restoration (ER) sites at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico. The sites that were evaluated include the Tijeras Arroyo Groundwater, Technical Area V, and Canyons sites. The primary contaminants of concern at these sites include trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene (PCE), and nitrate in groundwater. Due to the low contaminant concentrations (close to regulatory limits) and significant depths to groundwater ({approx}500 feet) at these sites, few in-situ remediation technologies are applicable. The most applicable treatment technologies include monitored natural attenuation and enhanced bioremediation/denitrification to reduce the concentrations of TCE, PCE, and nitrate in the groundwater. Stripping technologies to remove chlorinated solvents and other volatile organic compounds from the vadose zone can also be implemented, if needed.

McGrath, Lucas K.; Ho, Clifford Kuofei; Wright, Jerome L.

2003-08-01

197

Results from Sandia National Laboratories/Lockheed Martin Electromagnetic Missile Launcher (EMML).  

SciTech Connect

Sandia national laboratories (SNL) and lockheed martin MS2 are designing an electromagnetic missile launcher (EMML) for naval applications. The EMML uses an induction coilgun topology with the requirement of launching a 3600 lb. missile up to a velocity of 40 m/s. To demonstrate the feasibility of the electromagnetic propulsion design, a demonstrator launcher was built that consists of approximately 10% of the propulsion coils needed for a tactical design. The demonstrator verified the design by launching a 1430 lb weighted sled to a height of 24 ft in mid-December 2004 (Figure 1). This paper provides the general launcher design, specific pulsed power system component details, system operation, and demonstration results.

Lockner, Thomas Ramsbeck; Skurdal, Ben (Lockheed Martin MS2, Baltimore, MD); Gaigler, Randy (Lockheed Martin MS2, Baltimore, MD); Basak, L (Lockheed Martin MS2, Baltimore, MD); Root, G (Lockheed Martin MS2, Baltimore, MD); Aubuchon, Matthew S.; Turman, Bobby N.; Floyd, Mendel D. (Lockheed Martin MS2, Baltimore, MD)

2005-05-01

198

Verification testing of the PKI collector at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Verification testing of a solar collector was undertaken prior to its operation as part of an industrial process heat plant at Capitol Concrete Products in Topeka, Kansas. Testing was performed at a control plant installed at Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque, New Mexico (SNLA). Early results show that plant performance is even better than anticipated and far in excess of test criteria. Overall plant efficiencies of 65 to 80 percent were typical during hours of good insolation. A number of flaws and imperfections were detected during operability testing, the most important being a problem in elevation drive alignment due to a manufacturing error. All problems were corrected as they occurred and the plant, with over 40 hours of operation, is currently continuing operability testing in a wholly-automatic mode.

Hauger, J. S.; Pond, S. L.

1982-01-01

199

INFORMATION: Inspection Report on "Removal of Categories I and II Special Nuclear Material from Sandia National Laboratories-New Mexico"  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Sandia National Laboratories-New Mexico (Sandia) develops science-based technologies in support of national security in areas such as nuclear weapons, nonproliferation, military technologies, and homeland security. Sandia's primary mission is ensuring that the U.S. nuclear arsenal is safe, secure, and reliable and can fully support the Nation's deterrence policy. Part of this mission includes systems engineering of nuclear weapons; research, design, and development of non-nuclear components; manufacturing of non-nuclear weapons components; the provision of safety, security, and reliability assessments of stockpile weapons; and the conduct of high-explosives research and development and environmental testing. Sandia Corporation, a subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, operates Sandia for the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). On May 7, 2004, the Secretary announced that the Department would evaluate missions at DOE sites to consolidate Special Nuclear Material (SNM) in the most secure environments possible. The Administrator of the NNSA said that this effort was a key part of an overall plan to transform the nuclear weapons complex into a smaller, safer, more secure, and more efficient national security enterprise. In February 2008, Sandia was the first site to report it had reduced its on-site inventory of nuclear material below 'Categories I and II' levels, which require the highest level of security to protect material such as plutonium and highly enriched uranium. The Office of Inspector General initiated an inspection to determine if Sandia made appropriate adjustments to its security posture in response to the removal of the Categories I and II SNM. We found that Sandia adjusted its security posture in response to the removal of Categories I and II SNM. For example, security posts were closed; unneeded protective force weapons and equipment were excessed from the site; and, Sandia's Site Safeguards and Security Plan was modified. We also found that some highly enriched uranium in a complex material configuration was not removed from Sandia. This material was designated as Category III material using a methodology for assessing the attractiveness of complex materials that was not specifically addressed in any current DOE directive. Although DOE and NNSA officials believed that this designation was appropriate, the methodology used to support this designation had not, as of the time of our review, been incorporated into the DOE directives system. Historically, the Department has considered the categorization of SNM to be an important national security and public policy issue. Consequently, we believe that expedited action should be taken to formalize this methodology in the DOE directives system and that it be disseminated throughout the Department of Energy complex.

None

2010-01-01

200

Analysis of spatially-resolved M-shell W spectra produced on the Z-accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Tungsten wire explosions are being intensively studied at Sandia National Laboratories. High-resolution spatially-resolved x-ray spectral data have been accumulated in tungsten experiments on the SNL-Z accelerator, which require a development of the appropriate theoretical modeling. The University of Nevada, Reno, has developed a collisional-radiative atomic kinetic model which includes the ground states of every ionization stage of W from the bare ion to the neutral W. Detailed atomic structure is included for ionization stages from V-like to Se-like W. The presented work focuses on the application of this model to interpretation of spatially-resolved M-shell W spectra collected in a tungsten shot Z543. These spectra cover the broad spectral region from 3.5 up to 7.5 and indicate three distinctive spectral regions. These three regions are composed from different groups of transitions 3l - 4l',5l'' and show different sensitivity to plasma parameters and opacity effects. The complete modeling of this spectrum allows a detailed diagnostic of a hotter plasma core in z-pinch experiments involving heavy ions.

Shlyaptseva, A. S.; Hamasha, S. M.; Hansen, S. B.; Bailey, J. E.; Lake, P. W.; Nielsen, D. S.; Stygar, W. A.; Lepell, P. D.; Nash, T. J.; Deeney, C.; Safronova, U. I.

2002-11-01

201

Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation,  

E-print Network

Security Program Management Unit (PMU). The PMU mission encompasses nonproliferation and arms control's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. SAND NO. 2012-6251 SP. SCG 10, and Nuclear Security Program Management Unit Jill Hruby is Vice President of two groups at Sandia National

202

``We crash, burn, and crush``: A history of packaging at Sandia National Laboratories, 1978--1997  

SciTech Connect

Even prior to the beginning of the nuclear age, the packaging and transportation of nuclear materials was a prime national concern. Nuclear materials such as uranium and plutonium had to be transported safely (and secretly) to the Manhattan Engineer District Laboratory in Los Alamos, New Mexico. The subsequent post war use of nuclear power for the generation of electricity and accelerated weapons development programs resulted in radioactive waste byproducts, such as spent fuel and plutonium, that were stored on site at utilities and federal weapons sites. While projected repositories for long term storage of radioactive waste are being planned, both low and high level radioactive materials on occasion must be moved safely. Movement to interim storage and, for low level waste, repository sites, is accomplished by a combination of truck, rail, ship, and air. The US Department of Energy (DOE) directs transportation activities including cask development technology for use in single or multimodal (a combination of land, water, and air) transport. In 1978, Sandia National Laboratories was selected as the lead contractor for basic transportation technology. This report is divided into the following topics: (1) early research and development (1936--1978); (2) radioactive material package test (1975--1977); (3) the SNL Transportation Technology Center; (4) TRUPACT-II; (5) beneficial uses of shipping system casks; (6) C-141B drop tests; (7) MIDAS; (8) MOSAIK; (9) SEARAM; (10) PATRAM; and (11) a chronology of transportation activities.

Mora, C.J.; McConnell, P.

1997-11-01

203

Integrated verification experiment data collected as part of the Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Source Region program. Appendix F: Regional data from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratory Seismic Networks  

SciTech Connect

A dataset of regional seismograms assembled for a series of Integrated Verification Experiments conducted by the Los Alamos National Laboratory Source Region program is described. The seismic data has been assembled from networks operated by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratory. Examples of the data are shown and basic recording characteristics of the network are described. The seismograms are available on a data tape in SAC format upon request.

Taylor, S.R.

1993-06-11

204

SF-4601-CAT (7-2008) Supersedes (1-2008) issue UCI Sandia National Laboratories STAFF AUGMENTATION CONTRACT ASSOCIATE TRAVEL AND BUSINESS EXPENSE INVOICE  

E-print Network

SF-4601-CAT (7-2008) Supersedes (1-2008) issue UCI Sandia National Laboratories STAFF AUGMENTATION) TRANSPORTATION EXPENSES #12;INSTRUCTIONS SF-4601-CAT (7-2008) Supersedes (1-2008) issue STAFF AUGMENTATION

Fuerschbach, Phillip

205

Time-resolved 1-10 keV crystal spectrometer for the Z machine at Sandia national laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have designed, fabricated, calibrated, and fielded a fast, time-resolved 1-10 keV crystal spectrometer to observe the evolution of wire pinch spectra at the Z machine at Sandia national laboratories. The instrument has two convex cylindrical crystals (PET and KAP). Both crystals Bragg reflect X-rays into an array of ten silicon diodes, providing continuous spectral coverage in twenty channels from

D. V. Morgan; S. Gardner; R. Lijiestrand; M. Madlener; S. Slavin; M. Wu; T. J. Nash; V. L. Kantsyrev; D. A. Fedin

2003-01-01

206

Final results from the high-current, high-action closing switch test program at Sandia National Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

We tested a variety of high-current closing switches for lifetime and reliability on a dedicated 2 MJ, 500 kA capacitor bank facility at Sandia National Laboratories. Our interest was a switch capable of one shot every few minutes, switching a critically damped, DC-charged 6.2 mF bank at 24 kV, with a peak current of 500 kA. The desired lifetime is

M. E. Savage

1999-01-01

207

Final results from the high-current, high-action closing switch test program at Sandia National Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

We tested a variety of high-current closing switches for lifetime and reliability on a dedicated 2-MJ, 500-kA capacitor bank facility at Sandia National Laboratories. Interest was in a switch capable of one shot every few minutes, switching a critically damped, de-charged 6.2-mF bank at 24 kV, with a peak current of over 500 kA. The desired lifetime is 24000 shots.

Mark E. Savage

2000-01-01

208

Environmental assessment for the Radioactive and Mixed Waste Management Facility: Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-0466) under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 for the proposed completion of construction and subsequent operation of a central Radioactive and Mixed Waste Management Facility (RMWMF), in the southeastern portion of Technical Area III at Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque (SNLA). The RMWMF is designed to receive, store, characterize, conduct limited bench-scale treatment of, repackage, and certify low-level waste (LLW) and mixed waste (MW) (as necessary) for shipment to an offsite disposal or treatment facility. The RMWMF was partially constructed in 1989. Due to changing regulatory requirements, planned facility upgrades would be undertaken as part of the proposed action. These upgrades would include paving of road surfaces and work areas, installation of pumping equipment and lines for surface impoundment, and design and construction of air locks and truck decontamination and water treatment systems. The proposed action also includes an adjacent corrosive and reactive metals storage area, and associated roads and paving. LLW and MW generated at SNLA would be transported from the technical areas to the RMWMF in containers approved by the Department of Transportation. The RMWMF would not handle nonradioactive hazardous waste. Based on the analysis in the EA, the proposed completion of construction and operation of the RMWMF does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA. Therefore, preparation of an environmental impact statement for the proposed action is not required.

Not Available

1993-06-01

209

Z pinch driven inertial confinement fusion target physics research at Sandia National Laboratories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Three hohlraum concepts are being pursued at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to investigate the possibility of using pulsed power driven magnetic implosions (Z pinches) to drive targets capable of fusion yields in the range 200-1000 MJ. This research is being conducted on SNL's Z facility, which is capable of driving peak currents of 20 MA in various Z pinch load configurations that produce implosion velocities as high as 7.5 107cm/s, X ray energies of 1-2 MJ and X ray powers of 100-250 TW. The first concept, denoted dynamic hohlraum, has achieved a temperature of 180 +/- 14 eV in a configuration suitable for driving capsules. In addition, this concept has also achieved a temperature of 230 +/- 18 eV in an arrangement suitable for driving an external hohlraum. The second concept, denoted static walled hohlraum, has achieved temperatures of ~80-100 eV. Experimental investigation of the third concept, denoted Z pinch driven hohlraum, has recently begun. The article discusses each of these hohlraum concepts and provides an overview of the experiments that have been conducted on these systems to date.

Leeper, R. J.; Alberts, T. E.; Asay, J. R.; Baca, P. M.; Baker, K. L.; Breeze, S. P.; Chandler, G. A.; Cook, D. L.; Cooper, G. W.; Deeney, C.; Derzon, M. S.; Douglas, M. R.; Fehl, D. L.; Gilliland, T.; Hebron, D. E.; Hurst, M. J.; Jobe, D. O.; Kellogg, J. W.; Lash, J. S.; Lazier, S. E.; Matzen, M. K.; McDaniel, D. H.; McGurn, J. S.; Mehlhorn, T. A.; Moats, A. R.; Mock, R. C.; Muron, D. J.; Nash, T. J.; Olson, R. E.; Porter, J. L.; Quintenz, J. P.; Reyes, P. V.; Ruggles, L. E.; Ruiz, C. L.; Sanford, T. W. L.; Schmidlapp, F. A.; Seamen, J. F.; Spielman, R. B.; Stark, M. A.; Struve, K. W.; Stygar, W. A.; Tibbetts-Russell, D. R.; Torres, J. A.; Vargas, M.; Wagoner, T. C.; Wakefield, C.; Hammer, J. H.; Ryutov, D. D.; Tabak, M.; Wilks, S. C.; Bowers, R. L.; McLenithan, K. D.; Peterson, D. L.

1999-09-01

210

Routine environmental audit of the Sandia National Laboratories, California, Livermore, California  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of the Routine Environmental Audit of the Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California (SNL/CA). During this audit the activities the Audit Team conducted included reviews of internal documents and reports from preview audits and assessments; interviews with US Department of Energy (DOE), State of California regulators, and contractor personnel; and inspections and observations of selected facilities and operations. The onsite portion of the audit was conducted from February 22 through March 4, 1994, by the DOE Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24), located within the Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH). The audit evaluated the status of programs to ensure compliance with Federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations; compliance with DOE Orders, guidance, and directives; and conformance with accepted industry practices and standards of performance. The audit also evaluated the status and adequacy of the management systems developed to address environmental requirements. The audit`s functional scope was comprehensive and included all areas of environmental management and a programmatic evaluation of NEPA and inactive waste sites.

Not Available

1994-03-01

211

A comprehensive approach to solid waste and recycling at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

The abrupt closure of a nearby, and historically utilized, Kirtland Air Force Base landfill imposed a multitude of solid waste management problems for the Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL) research and development facilities operated by Lockheed Martin Company. Due to the close proximity of KAFB, SNL historically used KAFB`s landfill for disposal of solid waste. Under this arrangement SNL paid little or no cost for disposal of its solid waste stream. The disadvantage was that KAFB personnel did not track waste volumes entering the landfill from SNL. On August 1, 1994 this all came to an end. KAFB, without advance notice, closed the sanitary waste and asbestos cells of the landfill. The rapid resolution of unique regulatory issues; the aggressive accomplishment of reviewing options and implementing transport, screening, recycling and disposal procedures; and the construction and operation of a model, on-site Solid Waste Transfer Facility (SWTF) can serve as a case study for servicing DOE solid waste management and recycling needs in a safe, compliant, and timely manor.

King, G.G.

1997-10-01

212

Air quality investigations of the Sandia National Laboratories Sol se Mete Aerial Cable Facility  

SciTech Connect

The air quality implications of the test and evaluation activities at the Sandia National Laboratories Sol se Mete Aerial Cable Facility are examined. All facets of the activity that affect air quality are considered. Air contaminants produced directly include exhaust products of rocket motors used to accelerate test articles, dust and gas from chemical explosives, and exhaust gases from electricity generators in the test arenas. Air contaminants produced indirectly include fugitive dust and exhaust contaminants from vehicles used to transport personnel and material to the test area, and effluents produced by equipment used to heat the project buildings. Both the ongoing program and the proposed changes in the program are considered. Using a reliable estimate of th maximum annual testing level, the quantities of contaminants released by project activities ar computed either from known characteristics of test items or from EPA-approved emission factors Atmospheric concentrations of air contaminants are predicted using EPA dispersion models. The predicted quantities and concentrations are evaluated in relation to Federal, New Mexico, an Bernalillo County air quality regulations and the human health and safety standards of the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists.

Gutman, W.M.; Silver, R.J. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States). Physical Science Lab.

1994-12-01

213

Passive soil venting at the Chemical Waste Landfill Site at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Passive Soil Vapor Extraction was tested at the Chemical Waste Landfill (CWL) site at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNLIW). Data collected included ambient pressures, differential pressures between soil gas and ambient air, gas flow rates into and out of the soil and concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCS) in vented soil gas. From the differential pressure and flow rate data, estimates of permeability were arrived at and compared with estimates from other studies. Flow, differential pressure, and ambient pressure data were collected for nearly 30 days. VOC data were collected for two six-hour periods during this time. Total VOC emissions were calculated and found to be under the limit set by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Although a complete process evaluation is not possible with the data gathered, some of the necessary information for designing a passive venting process was determined and the important parameters for designing the process were indicated. More study is required to evaluate long-term VOC removal using passive venting and to establish total remediation costs when passive venting is used as a polishing process following active soil vapor extraction.

Phelan, J.M.; Reavis, B.; Cheng, W.C.

1995-05-01

214

An operational waste minimization chargeback system at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, (SNL/NM) has made a commitment to achieve significant reductions in the amount of hazardous wastes generated throughout its operations. The success of the SNL/NM Waste Minimization/Pollution Prevention Program depends primarily on: (1) adequate program funding, and (2) comprehensive collection and dissemination of information pertaining to SNL/NM`s waste. This paper describes the chargeback system that SNL/NM has chosen for funding the implementation of the Waste Minimization/Pollution Prevention program, as well as the waste reporting system that follows naturally from the chargeback system. Both the chargeback and reporting systems have been fully implemented. The details of implementation are discussed, including: the physical means by which waste is managed and data collected; the database systems which have been linked; the flow of data through both human hands and electronic systems; the quality assurance of that data; and the waste report format now in use. Also discussed are intended improvements in the system that are currently planned for the coming years.

Horak, K. [Creative Computer Services, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Peek, D.W. [Ogden Environmental and Energy Services, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Stermer, D.; Dailleboust, L.; Reilly, H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-05-01

215

High heat flux testing capabilities at Sandia National Laboratories - New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

High heat flux testing for the United States fusion power program is the primary mission of the Plasma Materials Test Facility (PMTF) located at Sandia National Laboratories - New Mexico. This facility, which is owned by the United States Department of Energy, has been in operation for over 17 years and has provided much of the high heat flux data used in the design and evaluation of plasma facing components for many of the world`s magnetic fusion, tokamak experiments. In addition to domestic tokamaks such as Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at Princeton and the DIII-D tokamak at General Atomics, components for international experiments like TEXTOR, Tore-Supra, and JET also have been tested at the PMTF. High heat flux testing spans a wide spectrum including thermal shock tests on passively cooled materials, thermal response and thermal fatigue tests on actively cooled components, critical heat flux-burnout tests, braze reliability tests and safety related tests. The objective of this article is to provide a brief overview of the high heat flux testing capabilities at the PMTF and describe a few of the experiments performed over the last year.

Youchison, D.L.; McDonald, J.M.; Wold, L.S.

1994-12-31

216

Geothermal Heat Pump research and development studies at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

The Geothermal Heat Pump (GHP) concept was originally developed in the 1940`s. Recently, because of increasing energy costs, utility interest, and the development of simple and durable ground source heat exchangers, GHP`s have gained international attention as a proven means of energy conservation and electrical peak power demand reduction. GHP systems require installation of a buried heat exchanger to utilize the nearly constant ground temperature making them more efficient than conventional air source heat pumps. However, the high installation cost for both residential and commercial applications is a major obstacle to their market penetration. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) through its sponsors, the Department of Energy (DOE), and the Department of Defense (DOD), has embarked on a research program to find ways to reduce GHP installation costs and improve performance, thereby increasing their market penetration. The major elements of the program are: data acquisition to quantify the performance of GHP`S, research and development (R&D) of the ground source heat exchanger aimed at reducing, installation costs, and support of DOE efforts to market the GHP concept. This paper describes the current status of our program, some experimental and analytical results, and plans for future activities.

Martinez, G.M.; Sullivan, W.N.

1994-08-01

217

Robotic Lunar Rover Technologies and SEI Supporting Technologies at Sandia National Laboratories  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Existing robotic rover technologies at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) can be applied toward the realization of a robotic lunar rover mission in the near term. Recent activities at the SNL-RVR have demonstrated the utility of existing rover technologies for performing remote field geology tasks similar to those envisioned on a robotic lunar rover mission. Specific technologies demonstrated include low-data-rate teleoperation, multivehicle control, remote site and sample inspection, standard bandwidth stereo vision, and autonomous path following based on both internal dead reckoning and an external position location update system. These activities serve to support the use of robotic rovers for an early return to the lunar surface by demonstrating capabilities that are attainable with off-the-shelf technology and existing control techniques. The breadth of technical activities at SNL provides many supporting technology areas for robotic rover development. These range from core competency areas and microsensor fabrication facilities, to actual space qualification of flight components that are designed and fabricated in-house.

Klarer, Paul R.

1992-01-01

218

Sandia technology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

General information is provided on technical programs at Sandia Laboratories. Three such programs are described: terradynamics, in which penetrators probe the Earth's response to high speed intrusion; Auger electron spectroscopy; and the national seismic station program, in which monitoring stations placed inside Russia could detect nuclear tests.

1981-05-01

219

The economic impact of Sandia National Laboratories on central New Mexico and the state of New Mexico fiscal year 1997  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) was established in 1949 to perform the engineering development and ordnance responsibilities associated with nuclear weapons. By the early 1960`s the facility had evolved into an engineering research and development laboratory and became a multiprogram laboratory during the 1970s. Sandia is operated for the US Department of Energy by the Sandia Corporation, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin, Incorporated. For several years, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Albuquerque Operations Office (AL) and New Mexico State University (NMSU) have maintained an inter-industry, input-output model with capabilities to assess the impacts of developments initiated outside the economy such as federal DOE monies that flow into the state, on an economy. This model will be used to assess economic, personal income and employment impacts of SNL on central New Mexico and the state of New Mexico. For this report, the reference period is FY 1997 (October 1, 1996, through September 30, 1997) and includes two major impact analyses: the impact of SNL activities on central New Mexico and the economic impacts of SNL on the state of New Mexico. For purposes of this report, the central New Mexico region includes Bernalillo, Sandoval, Valencia, and Torrance counties. Total impact represents both direct and indirect respending by business, including induced effects (respending by households). The standard multipliers used in determining impacts results from the inter-industry, input-output models developed for the four-county region and the state of New Mexico. 6 figs., 10 tabs.

Lansford, R.R.; Nielsen, T.G.; Schultz, J. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States); Adcock, L.D.; Gentry, L.M. [Dept. of Energy, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Albuquerque Operations Office; Ben-David, S. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Economics; Temple, J. [Temple (John), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1998-05-29

220

Initial evaluation of Sandia National Laboratory-prepared crystalline silico-titanates for cesium recovery  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest Laboratory initiated a study of a new class of inorganic ion exchange materials that selectively extracts cesium (Cs), strontium (Sr), and plutonium (Pu) from alkaline radioactive waste solutions. These materials, identified as crystalline silico-titanates (CST), were developed by scientists at the Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) and Texas A&M. This report summarizes preliminary results for the measurement of batch distribution coefficient (K{sub d}) values for the powdered CST materials compared to previously tested ion exchange materials: IONSIV IE-96 (a zeolite produced by UOP), CS-100 (an organic resin produced by Rohm and Haas), and BIB-DJ (a new resorcinol-formaldehyde organic resin produced by Boulder Scientific). Excellent results were obtained for CST inorganic exchangers that could be significant in the development of processes for the near-term pretreatment of Hanford alkaline wastes. The following observations and conclusions resulted from this study: (1) Several CST samples prepared at SNL had a higher capacity to remove Cs from solution as compared to BIB-DJ, IE-96, and CS-100. (2) Cesium distribution results showed that CST samples TAM-40, -42, -43, -70, and -74 had {lambda} values of {approximately}2,200 ({lambda} = Cs K{sub d} {times} {rho}{sub b}; where {lambda} represents the number of exchanger bed volumes of feed that can be loaded on an ion exchange column) at a pH value >14. (3) Cesium distribution values for CST exchangers doubled as the aqueous temperature decreased from 40{degrees} to 10{degrees}C. (4) Crystalline silico-titanates have the capacity to remove Cs as well as Sr and Pu from alkaline wastes unless organic complexants are present. Experimental results indicated that complexed Sr was not removed, and Pu is not expected to be removed.

Bray, L.A.; Carson, K.J.; Elovich, R.J.

1993-10-01

221

The Los Alamos, Sandia, and Livermore Laboratories: Integration and collaboration solving science and technology problems for the nation  

SciTech Connect

More than 40 years ago, three laboratories were established to take on scientific responsibility for the nation`s nuclear weapons - Los Alamos, Sandia, and Livermore. This triad of laboratories has provided the state-of-the-art science and technology to create America`s nuclear deterrent and to ensure that the weapons are safe, secure, and to ensure that the weapons are safe, secure, and reliable. These national security laboratories carried out their responsibilities through intense efforts involving almost every field of science, engineering, and technology. Today, they are recognized as three of the world`s premier research and development laboratories. This report sketches the history of the laboratories and their evolution to an integrated three-laboratory system. The characteristics that make them unique are described and some of the major contributions they have made over the years are highlighted.

NONE

1994-12-01

222

Knowing what you have to manage: The Sandia National Laboratories Records Inventory Project  

Microsoft Academic Search

The first step in managing any kind of information is to know what you have. The DOE-required, site-wide records inventory provides an opportunity to identify and describe a broad range of records, including databases and other electronic records. The records inventory data will be used to create a retention schedule (a policy document which describes Sandia`s records, who ``owns`` each

1993-01-01

223

Overview of the joint US/Russia surety program in the Sandia National Laboratories Cooperative Measures Program  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories has initiated many joint research and development projects with the two premier Russian nuclear laboratories, VNIIEF and VNIITF, (historically known as Arzamas-16 and Chelyabinsk-70) in a wide spectrum of areas. One of the areas in which critical dialogue and technical exchange is continuing to take place is in the realm of system surety. Activities primarily include either safety or security methodology development, processes, accident environment analyses and testing, accident data-bases, assessments, and product design. Furthermore, a continuing dialog has been established between the organizations with regard to developing a better understanding of how risk is perceived and analyzed in Russia versus that in the US. The result of such efforts could reduce the risk of systems to incur accidents or incidents resulting in high consequences to the public. The purpose of this paper is to provide a current overview of the Sandia surety program and its various initiatives with the Russian institutes, with an emphasis on the program scope and rationale. The historical scope of projects will be indicated. A few specific projects will be discussed, along with results to date. The extension of the joint surety initiatives to other government and industry organizations will be described. This will include the current status of a joint Sandia/VNIIEF initiative to establish an International Surety Center for Energy Intensive and High Consequence Systems and Infrastructures.

Smith, R.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Vorontsova, O.S. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center Inst. of Experimental Physics, Sarov (Russian Federation); Blinov, I.M. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center Inst. of Technical Physics, Snezhinsk (Russian Federation)

1998-02-01

224

Final Report - Advanced Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry Program - Oak Ridge National Laboratory - Sandia National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This report covers the three main projects that collectively comprised the Advanced Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry Program. Chapter 1 describes the direct interrogation of individual particles by laser desorption within the ion trap mass spectrometer analyzer. The goals were (1) to develop an ''intelligent trigger'' capable of distinguishing particles of biological origin from those of nonbiological origin in the background and interferent particles and (2) to explore the capability for individual particle identification. Direct interrogation of particles by laser ablation and ion trap mass spectrometry was shown to have good promise for discriminating between particles of biological origin and those of nonbiological origin, although detailed protocols and operating conditions were not worked out. A library of more than 20,000 spectra of various types of biological particles has been assembled. Methods based on multivariate analysis and on neural networks were used to discriminate between particles of biological origin and those of nonbiological origin. It was possible to discriminate between at least some species of bacteria if mass spectra of several hundred similar particles were obtained. Chapter 2 addresses the development of a new ion trap mass analyzer geometry that offers the potential for a significant increase in ion storage capacity for a given set of analyzer operating conditions. This geometry may lead to the development of smaller, lower-power field-portable ion trap mass spectrometers while retaining laboratory-scale analytical performance. A novel ion trap mass spectrometer based on toroidal ion storage geometry has been developed. The analyzer geometry is based on the edge rotation of a quadrupolar ion trap cross section into the shape of a torus. Initial performance of this device was poor, however, due to the significant contribution of nonlinear fields introduced by the rotation of the symmetric ion-trapping geometry. These nonlinear resonances contributed to poor mass resolution and sensitivity and to erratic ion ejection behavior. To correct for these nonlinear effects, the geometry of the toroid ion trap analyzer has been modified to create an asymmetric torus, as first suggested by computer simulations that predicted significantly improved performance and unit mass resolution for this geometry. A reduced-sized version (one-fifth scale) has been fabricated but was not tested within the scope of this project. Chapter 3 describes groundbreaking progress toward the use of ion-ion chemistry to control the charge state of ions formed by the electrospray ionization process, which in turn enables precision analysis of whole proteins. In addition, this technique may offer the unique possibility of a priori identification of unknown biological material when employed with existing proteomics and genomic databases. Ion-ion chemistry within the ion trap was used to reduce the ions in highly charged states to states of +1 and +2 charges. Reduction in charge greatly simplifies identification of molecular weights of fragments from large biological molecules. This technique enables the analysis of whole proteins as biomarkers for the detection and identification of all three classes of biological weapons (bacteria, toxins, and viruses). In addition to methods development, tests were carried out with samples of tap water, local creek water, and soil (local red clay) spiked with melittin (bee venom), cholera toxin, and virus MS2. All three analytes were identified in tap water and soil; however, all three were problematic for detection in creek water at concentrations of 1 nM. More development of methods is needed.

Whitten, W.B.

2002-12-18

225

Absolute, soft x-ray calorimetry on the Z facility at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Simple and reliable x-ray fluence measurements, in addition to time-resolved diagnostics, are needed to understand the physics of hot Z-pinch plasmas. A commercially available laser calorimeter has been modified for measuring soft x-ray fluence from the Z facility at Sandia National Laboratories. The x-ray absorber of this calorimeter is an aluminum disk, attached to a two-dimensional thermopile and surrounded by an isoperibol shroud. The time-integral and the maximum of the thermopile voltage signal are both proportional to the x-ray energy deposited. Data are collected for 90 seconds, and the instrument has, thus far, been used in the 1--25 mJ range. A wider dynamic measuring range for x-ray fluence (energy/area) can be achieved by varying the area of the defining aperture. The calorimeter is calibrated by an electrical substitution method. Calibrations are performed before and after each x-ray experiment on the Z facility. The calibration of the time-integral of the thermopile voltage vs. energy deposited (or the peak of thermopile voltage vs. energy deposited) is linear with zero offset at the 95% confidence level. The irreproducibility of the calibration is <2%, and the imprecision in the measurement of the incident x-ray energy (inferred from signal noise and the calibration) is estimated to be {approximately}0.9 mJ (95% confidence level). The inaccuracy is estimated at {+-}10%, due to correctable systematic errors (e.g., baseline shifts). Comparisons have been made of the calorimeter to time-resolved x-ray diagnostics, e.g., bolometers and XRD (x-ray diode) arrays, by integrating the flux measured by these instruments over time.

Fehl, D.L.; Muron, D.J.; Leeper, R.J.; Chandler, G.A.; Deeney, C.; Spielman, R.B.

1998-05-01

226

Floodplain Assessment for the Proposed Engineered Erosion Controls at TA-72 in Lower Sandia Canyon, Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is preparing to implement engineering controls in Sandia Canyon at Technical Area (TA) 72. Los Alamos National Security (LANS) biologists conducted a floodplain determination and this project is located within a 100-year floodplain. The proposed project is to rehabilitate the degraded channel in lower Sandia Canyon where it crosses through the outdoor firing range at TA-72 to limit the loss of sediment and dissipate floodwater leaving LANL property (Figure 1). The proposed construction of these engineered controls is part of the New Mexico Environment Department's (NMED) approved LANL Individual Storm Water Permit. The purpose of this project is to install storm water controls at Sandia Watershed Site Monitoring Area 6 (S-SMA-6). Storm water controls will be designed and installed to meet the requirements of NPDES Permit No. NM0030759, commonly referred to as the LANL Individual Storm Water Permit (IP). The storm water control measures address storm water mitigation for the area within the boundary of Area of Concern (AOC) 72-001. This action meets the requirements of the IP for S-SMA-6 for storm water controls by a combination of: preventing exposure of upstream storm water and storm water generated within the channel to the AOC and totally retaining storm water falling outside the channel but within the AOC.

Hathcock, Charles D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-27

227

Lessons Learned from Sandia National Laboratories' Operational Readiness Review of the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR)  

SciTech Connect

The Sandia ACRR (a Hazard Category 2 Nuclear Reactor Facility) was defueled in June 1997 to modify the reactor core and control system to produce medical radioisotopes for the Department of Energy (DOE) Isotope Production Program. The DOE determined that an Operational Readiness Review (ORR) was required to confirm readiness to begin operations within the revised safety basis. This paper addresses the ORR Process, lessons learned from the Sandia and DOE ORRS of the ACRR, and the use of the ORR to confirm authorization basis implementation.

Bendure, Albert O.; Bryson, James W.

1999-05-17

228

History of the Crystalline Silicon Photovoltaic Cell Research Program at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

The Sandia Photovoltaic Program conducted research in crystalline-silicon solar cells between 1986 and 2000 for the U.S. Department of Energy. This period saw rapid improvements in the fundamental understanding of c-Si materials and devices, improvements in c-Si PV manufacturing and control, and a rapid expansion of c-Si PV manufacturing capacity. Crystalline-silicon technology has provided the basis for PV to emerge as a serious option for global energy needs. The c-Si cell research at Sandia examined c-Si materials, devices, processing, and process integration. This report summarizes research conducted in this program over the past 15 years.

RUBY, DOUGLAS S.; GEE, JAMES M.

2001-04-01

229

Efficiencies in the Environmental Restoration Operations at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico - 12198  

SciTech Connect

The mission of the Environmental Restoration Operations at Sandia National Laboratories - New Mexico is to complete all necessary corrective actions at 268 legacy release soil sites and three groundwater Areas of Concern. Additional scope impacted the anticipated 2009 completion of corrective action at the remaining 32 soil sites and the three groundwater Areas of Concern. This additional scope is base-lined to require 10 years (2011-2020) at an estimated cost of $34 M to $39 M. Efficiencies been proposed to reduce the impact of this recently realized additional corrective action scope: (1) Perform activities concurrently when possible to help reduce the length of the overall schedule; (2) Implement a 'high-performance, one-pass' concept based on an early resolution of deficiencies in draft documents and attempt to avoid multi-submission cycles with long turnaround review times, and (3) Assess the appropriateness of progressing 'at risk' from groundwater characterization to groundwater remediation using existing data, conceptual models and potential remedies. The ongoing promotion and implementation of these ideas with the New Mexico Environment Department will produce scope and cost saving -- without any reduction in the protection of public health and the environment. DOE/SSO developed and presented to the NMED three areas where efficiencies in ER Operations may be realized. The NMED has not formally responded to these proposals, but in discussions with NMED in the fall of 2011 the NMED is conceptually supportive of these proposals. NMED cannot commit to an outcome (such as no NOD), but NMED is very willing to seek efficiencies that will reduce the overall scope, while achieving regulatory compliance and considering public input. The challenge of finding efficiencies to reduce the new schedule and cost has become even more of a necessity due to shrinking budgets. A prioritization of remaining activities has been discussed with the regulatory authority. Efficiencies in the ER Operations at SNL have been proposed to reduce the impact of recently realized regulatory delays and additional corrective action scope. The ongoing promotion and implementation of these ideas with the NMED will produce scope and cost saving, without any reduction in the protection of public health and the environment. (authors)

Estrada, Joe G. [National Nuclear Security Administration, Sandia Site Office, Albuquerque New Mexico 87185 (United States); Cochran, John R. [Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, Albuquerque New Mexico 87185 (United States)

2012-07-01

230

Design of Recycling System for Spent Rinse Water from Sandia's Microelectronics Development Laboratory (MDL)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The steps taken at Sandia to install a system for recycling spent rinse waters from its semiconductor fab consisted of the following sequence: 1.) Classifying the properties of the water discharged from all fab wet stations; 2.) Installing a drain system and tank to collect discharge waters from those stations deemed most compatible with recycling; 3.) Instrumenting the tank and

Robert P. Donovan; Dennis J. Morrison; Robert P. Timon; John DeGenova

231

Since 1949, Sandia National Laboratories has developed science-based technologies that  

E-print Network

the blast loading description and the Sierra/SM module simulates the building collapse. Apply your skills the mechanics of a building explosion through simulation. Sandia CTH, a shock physics hydrocode, and Sierra-Scout, shown above, can assess situations and potential hazards and allow operations to move more quickly. BuiLD

232

High Current Fast 100NS LTD Driver Development in Sandia Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

During the last few years Sandia is actively pursuing the development of new accelerators based on the novel technology of linear transformer driver (LTD). This effort is done in close collaboration with the High Current Electronic Institute (HCEI) in Tomsk, Russia, where the LTD idea was first conceived and developed. LTD based drivers are currently considered for many applications including

M. G. Mazarakisaa; W. E. Fowler; F. W. Long; D. H. McDaniel; C. L. Olson; S. T. Rogowski; R. A. Sharpe; K. W. Struve; A. A. Kim

2005-01-01

233

Improved PV system reliability results from surge evaluations at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Electrical surges on ac and dc inverter power wiring and diagnostic cables have the potential to shorten the lifetime of power electronics. These surges may be caused by either nearby lightning or capacitor switching transients. This paper contains a description of ongoing surge evaluations of PV power electronics and surge mitigation hardware at Sandia.

Russell H. Bonn; Sigifredo Gonzalez

2000-04-11

234

Weapons Evaluation Test Laboratory at Pantex: Testing and data handling capabilities of Sandia National Laboratories at the Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The Weapons Evaluation Test Laboratory (WETL), operated by Sandia Laboratories at the Pantex Plant in Amarillo, Texas, is engaged primarily in the testing of weapon systems in the stockpile or of newly produced weapon systems for the Sandia Surety Assessment Center. However, the WETL`s unique testing equipment and data-handling facilities are frequently used to serve other organizations. Service to other organizations includes performing special tests on weapon components, subassemblies, and systems for purposes such as basic development and specific problem investigation. The WETL staff also sends equipment to other laboratories for specific tests that cannot be performed at Pantex. For example, we modified and sent equipment to Brookhaven National Laboratory for testing with their Neutral Particle Beam. WETL supplied the engineering expertise to accomplish the needed modifications to the equipment and the technicians to help perform many special tests at Brookhaven. A variety of testing is possible within the WETL, including: Accelerometer, decelerometer, and G-switch g-level/closure testing; Neutron generator performance testing; weapon systems developmental tests; weapon system component testing; weapon system failure-mode-duplication tests; simultaneity measurements; environmental extreme testing; parachute deployment testing; permissive action link (PAL) testing and trajectory-sensing signal generator (TSSG) testing. WETL`s existing equipment configurations do not restrict the testing performed at the WETL. Equipment and facilities are adapted to specific requirements. The WETL`s facilities can often eliminate the need to build or acquire new test equipment, thereby saving time and expense.

Peters, W.R.

1993-08-01

235

UCD-LLNL-SNL TV link system proof-of-performance, year of 1990. [University of California at Davis, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The proof-of-performance for the 1990--1991 school year took place on September 18--19, 1990. The proof-of-performance is coordinated by LLNL Electronics Engineering personnel and performed by the UCD--LLNL--SNL TV Link technical staff of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, University of California, Davis, and Sandia National Laboratory. The objective of the proof-of-performance is to demonstrate proper system performance and operation on a regular basis. Any discrepancies in the performance of the system or variance in measurements from proof to proof will show problem areas which require attention. The proof-of-performance is designed to proof the entire transmission chain. Both subjective and objective measurements are performed on the entire system. Measurements of separate sections of the transmission path such as the microwave are performed independently. The proof-of-performance of the TV link from University of California at Davis (UCD) to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) involves the measurement of a calibrated test signal that originates in the TV classrooms in Bainer Hall at the UCD campus and is received at various locations at LLNL and SNL. Proof of the TV link from LLNL to UCD involves the measurement of a calibrated test signal that originates at the University Monitoring (UM) racks in B131, Room 1282B, and is received at the Link 1B classroom, RM 1122, Bainer Hall, UCD.

Dirks, D.H.

1990-09-01

236

Vegetation study in support of the design and optimization of vegetative soil covers, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.  

SciTech Connect

A vegetation study was conducted in Technical Area 3 at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico in 2003 to assist in the design and optimization of vegetative soil covers for hazardous, radioactive, and mixed waste landfills at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico and Kirtland Air Force Base. The objective of the study was to obtain site-specific, vegetative input parameters for the one-dimensional code UNSAT-H and to identify suitable, diverse native plant species for use on vegetative soil covers that will persist indefinitely as a climax ecological community with little or no maintenance. The identification and selection of appropriate native plant species is critical to the proper design and long-term performance of vegetative soil covers. Major emphasis was placed on the acquisition of representative, site-specific vegetation data. Vegetative input parameters measured in the field during this study include root depth, root length density, and percent bare area. Site-specific leaf area index was not obtained in the area because there was no suitable platform to measure leaf area during the 2003 growing season due to severe drought that has persisted in New Mexico since 1999. Regional LAI data was obtained from two unique desert biomes in New Mexico, Sevilletta Wildlife Refuge and Jornada Research Station.

Peace, Gerald (Jerry) L.; Goering, Timothy James (GRAM inc., Albuquerque, NM); Knight, Paul J. (Marron and Associates, Albuquerque, NM); Ashton, Thomas S. (Marron and Associates, Albuquerque, NM)

2004-11-01

237

Environmental Testing Philosophy for a Sandia National Laboratories' Small Satellite Project - A Retrospective  

SciTech Connect

Sandia has recently completed the flight certification test series for the Multi-Spectral Thermal Imaging satellite (MTI), which is a small satellite for which Sandia was the system integrator. A paper was presented at the 16th Aerospace Testing Seminar discussing plans for performing the structural dynamics certification program for that satellite. The testing philosophy was originally based on a combination of system level vibroacoustic tests and component level shock and vibration tests. However, the plans evolved to include computational analyses using both Finite Element Analysis and Statistical Energy Analysis techniques. This paper outlines the final certification process and discuss lessons learned including both things that went well and things that should/could have been done differently.

CAP,JEROME S.

2000-08-24

238

Fire accident analysis modeling in support of non-reactor nuclear facilities at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) requires that fire hazard analyses (FHAs) be conducted for all nuclear and new facilities, with results for the latter incorporated into Title I design. For those facilities requiring safety analysis documentation, the FHA shall be documented in the Safety Analysis Reports (SARs). This paper provides an overview of the methodologies and codes being used to support FHAs at Sandia facilities, with emphasis on SARs.

Restrepo, L.F.

1993-06-01

239

The Design-to-Analysis Process at Sandia National Laboratories Observations and Recommendations  

SciTech Connect

The efficiency of the design-to-analysis process for translating solid-model-based design data to computational analysis model data plays a central role in the application of computational analysis to engineering design and certification. A review of the literature from within Sandia as well as from industry shows that the design-to-analysis process involves a number of complex organizational and technological issues. This study focuses on the design-to-analysis process from a business process standpoint and is intended to generate discussion regarding this important issue. Observations obtained from Sandia staff member and management interviews suggest that the current Sandia design-to-analysis process is not mature and that this cross-organizational issue requires committed high-level ownership. A key recommendation of the study is that additional resources should be provided to the computer aided design organizations to support design-to-analysis. A robust community of practice is also needed to continuously improve the design-to-analysis process and to provide a corporate perspective.

BURNS,SHAWN P.; HARRISON,RANDY J.; DOBRANICH,DEAN

2001-08-01

240

Aquatic macroinvertebrates and water quality of Sandia Canyon, Los Alamos National Laboratory, December 1992--October 1993. Status report  

SciTech Connect

In the summer of 1990, an accidental spill from the TA-3 Power Plant Environment Tank released more than 3,785 liters of sulfuric acid into upper Sandia Canyon. The Biological Resource Evaluation Team (BRET) of EM-8 at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has collected aquatic samples from the stream within Sandia Canyon since then. These field studies gather water quality measurements and collect macroinvertebrates from permanent sampling sites. An earlier report by Bennett (1994) discusses previous BRET aquatic studies in Sandia Canyon. This report updates and expands Bennett`s initial findings. During 1993, BRET collected water quality data and aquatic macroinvertebrates at five permanent stations within the canyon. The substrates of the upper three stations are largely sands and silts while the substrates of the two lower stations are largely rock and cobbles. The two upstream stations are located near outfalls that discharge industrial and sanitary waste effluent. The third station is within a natural cattail marsh, approximately 0.4 km (0.25 mi) downstream from Stations SC1 and SC2. Water quality parameters are slightly different at these first three stations from those expected of natural streams, suggesting slightly degraded water quality. Correspondingly, the macroinvertebrate communities at these stations are characterized by low diversities and poorly-developed community structures. The two downstream stations appear to be in a zone of recovery, where water quality parameters more closely resemble those found in natural streams of the area. Macroinvertebrate diversity increases and community structure becomes more complex at the two lower stations, which are further indications of improved water quality downstream.

Cross, S. [Ewing Technical Design, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-09-01

241

Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Facilities and Safety Information Document [NOTE: Volume II, Chapter 12  

SciTech Connect

Operations in Tech Area IV commenced in 1980 with the construction of Buildings 980 and 981 and the Electron Beam Fusion Accelerator, which at the time was a major facility in SNL's Inertial Confinement Fusion Program. The Electron Beam Fusion Accelerator was a third-generation fusion accelerator that followed Proto I and Proto II, which were operated in Tech Area V. Another accelerator, the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator I, was constructed in Tech Area IV because there was not enough room in Tech Area V, a highly restricted area that contains SNL's reactor facilities. In the early 1980s, more fusion-related facilities were constructed in Tech Area IV. Building 983 was built to house a fourth-generation fusion accelerator, the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II, now called Z Machine, and Buildings 960 and 961 were built to house office space, electrical and mechanical laboratories, and highbay space for pulsed power research and development. In the mid 1980s, Building 970 was constructed to house the Simulation Technology Laboratory. The main facility in the Simulation Technology Laboratory is the High-Energy Radiation Megavolt Electron Source (HERMES) III, a third-generation gamma ray accelerator that is used primarily for the simulation of gamma rays produced by nuclear weapons. The previous generations, HERMES I and HERMES II, had been located in Tech Area V. In the late 1980s, Proto II was moved from Tech Area V to the Simulation Technology Laboratory and modified to function as an x-ray simulation accelerator, and construction of Buildings 962 and 963 began. These buildings comprised the Strategic Defense Facility, which was initially intended to support the nation's Strategic Defense Initiative or ''Star Wars'' program. It was to house a variety of pulsed power-related facilities to conduct research in such areas as directed-energy weapons (electron beams, lasers, and microwaves) and an earth-to-orbit launcher. With the reduction of the Strategic Defense Initiative budget in the early 1990s, however, many of these programs were discontinued and some, such as the High Power Microwave Laboratory and the Repetitive Pulsed Power Laboratory, were established. By 1990, all the Tech Area V accelerators had either been moved to Tech Area IV or decommissioned, and Tech Area IV had become the center for SNL's pulsed power sciences activities. The early 1990s saw an infusion of programs into Tech Area IV that support DOE goals in defense, industrial competitiveness, and the environment. A computer sciences group moved into Building 980, and a group that prepares rocket payloads for flight tests moved into one of the highbays in Building 963. A robotics group moved into Building 966, and a number of diverse groups occupy office and laboratory space in Building 962.

March, F.; Guerrero, J.V.; Johns, W.H.; Schetnan, R.; Bayliss, L.S.; Kuzio, K.A.

1999-08-01

242

Estimation of the carbon monoxide emissions due to Sandia National Laboratories commuter and on-base traffic for conformity determination  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the analysis and conclusion of an investigation of the carbon monoxide emissions resulting from Sandia National Laboratories and Department of Energy (DOE) commuter and on-base traffic for the Clean Air Act (CAA) Conformity Determination. Albuquerque/Bernalillo County was classified as a nonattainment area by the Environmental Protection Agency. Nonattainment area is an area which is shown by monitored data or which is calculated by air quality modeling to exceed any National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for the pollutant. Albuquerque/Bernalillo County exceeds the NAAQS for carbon monoxide and ozone. The Conformity Determination was needed to complete the CAA Title V Permitting process for SNL and the DOE. The analysis used the EPA approved MOBILE5a Carbon Monoxide (CO) emissions modeling program. This analysis will provide a baseline for mobile sources to allow Sandia to estimate any future activity and how that activity will impact CO emissions. The General Conformity Rule (AQCR 43) requires that operations which will increase CO emissions in nonattaimnent or maintenance areas such as Bernalillo County undergo conformity analyses to determine whether or not they will impact ambient air quality in the area.

McClellan, Y. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Royer, R. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry

1996-09-01

243

Update of the Z Refurbishment project (ZR) at Sandia National Laboratories.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia's Z Refurbishment (ZR) Project formally began in February 2002 to increase the Z Accelerator's utilization by providing the capability to perform more shots, improve precision and pulse shape variability, and increase delivered current. A project update was provided at the 15th International Pulsed Power Conference in 2005. The Z facility was shut down in July 2006 for structural/infrastructure modifications and installation of new pulsed power systems. The refurbishment will conclude in 2007. This paper provides a status update of the project covering the past 2 years of activities.

Moncayo, Carla; Bloomquist, Douglas D.; Weed, John Woodruff; Tabor, Debra Ann; Donovan, Guy Louis; McKee, G. Randall; Weinbrecht, Edward A.; Faturos, Thomas V.; McDaniel, Dillon Heirman

2007-08-01

244

RADCAL Operations Manual Radiation Calibration Laboratory Protocol  

SciTech Connect

The Life Sciences Division (LSD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has a long record of radiation dosimetry research, primarily using the Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR) and the Radiation Calibration Laboratory (RADCAL) in its Dosimetry Applications Research (DOSAR) Program. These facilities have been used by a broad segment of the research community to perform a variety of experiments in areas including, but not limited to, radiobiology, radiation dosimeter and instrumentation development and calibration, and the testing of materials in a variety of radiation environments. Operations of the HPRR were terminated in 1987 and the reactor was moved to storage at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant; however, RADCAL will continue to be operated in accordance with the guidelines of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Secondary Calibration Laboratory program and will meet all requirements for testing dosimeters under the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP). This manual is to serve as the primary instruction and operation manual for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's RADCAL facility. Its purpose is to (1) provide operating protocols for the RADCAL facility, (2) outline the organizational structure, (3) define the Quality Assurance Action Plan, and (4) describe all the procedures, operations, and responsibilities for the safe and proper operation of all routine aspects of the calibration facility.

Bogard, J.S.

1998-12-01

245

Passive and active soil gas sampling at the Mixed Waste Landfill, Technical Area III, Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Restoration Project at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico is tasked with assessing and remediating the Mixed Waste Landfill in Technical Area III. The Mixed Waste Landfill is a 2.6 acre, inactive radioactive and mixed waste disposal site. In 1993 and 1994, an extensive passive and active soil gas sampling program was undertaken to identify and quantify volatile organic compounds in the subsurface at the landfill. Passive soil gas surveys identified levels of PCE, TCE, 1,1, 1-TCA, toluene, 1,1,2-trichlorotrifluoroethane, dichloroethyne, and acetone above background. Verification by active soil gas sampling confirmed concentrations of PCE, TCE, 1,1,1-TCA, and 1,1,2-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane at depths of 10 and 30 feet below ground surface. In addition, dichlorodifluoroethane and trichlorofluoromethane were detected during active soil gas sampling. All of the volatile organic compounds detected during the active soil gas survey were present in the low ppb range.

McVey, M.D.; Goering, T.J. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Peace, J.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-02-01

246

Vertical axis wind turbine turbulent response model. Part 2: Response of Sandia National laboratories' 34-meter VAWT with aeroelastic effects  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The dynamic response of Sandia National Laboratories' 34-m Darrieus rotor wind turbine at Bushland, Texas, is presented. The formulation used a double-multiple streamtube aerodynamic model with a turbulent airflow and included the effects of linear aeroelastic forces. The structural analysis used established procedures with the program MSC/NASTRAN. The effects of aeroelastic forces on the damping of natural modes agree well with previous results at operating rotor speeds, but show some discrepancies at very high rotor speeds. A number of alternative expressions for the spectrum of turbulent wind were investigated. The model loading represented by each does not differ significantly; a more significant difference is caused by imposing a full lateral coherence of the turbulent flow. Spectra of the predicted stresses at various locations show that without aeroelastic forces, very severe resonance is likely to occur at certain natural frequencies. Inclusion of aeroelastic effects greatly attenuates this stochastic response, especially in modes involving in-plane blade bending.

1990-01-01

247

Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) software quality plan. Part 1: ASC software quality engineering practices, Version 2.0.  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. The plan defines the ASC program software quality practices and provides mappings of these practices to Sandia Corporate Requirements CPR 1.3.2 and 1.3.6 and to a Department of Energy document, ASCI Software Quality Engineering: Goals, Principles, and Guidelines. This document also identifies ASC management and software project teams responsibilities in implementing the software quality practices and in assessing progress towards achieving their software quality goals.

Sturtevant, Judith E.; Heaphy, Robert; Hodges, Ann Louise; Boucheron, Edward A.; Drake, Richard Roy; Minana, Molly A.; Hackney, Patricia; Forsythe, Christi A.; Schofield, Joseph Richard, Jr. (,; .); Pavlakos, Constantine James; Williamson, Charles Michael; Edwards, Harold Carter

2006-09-01

248

Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) software quality plan part 2 mappings for the ASC software quality engineering practices, version 2.0.  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. The plan defines the ASC program software quality practices and provides mappings of these practices to Sandia Corporate Requirements CPR001.3.2 and CPR001.3.6 and to a Department of Energy document, ''ASCI Software Quality Engineering: Goals, Principles, and Guidelines''. This document also identifies ASC management and software project teams' responsibilities in implementing the software quality practices and in assessing progress towards achieving their software quality goals.

Heaphy, Robert; Sturtevant, Judith E.; Hodges, Ann Louise; Boucheron, Edward A.; Drake, Richard Roy; Minana, Molly A.; Hackney, Patricia; Forsythe, Christi A.; Schofield, Joseph Richard, Jr. (,; .); Pavlakos, Constantine James; Williamson, Charles Michael; Edwards, Harold Carter

2006-09-01

249

Monochromatic x-ray imaging experiments on the Sandia National Laboratories Z facility (invited)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Z facility is a 20 MA, 100 ns rise time, pulsed power driver for z-pinch plasma radiation sources. The Z facility can make >200 TW, 12 MJ, near-blackbody radiation sources through the compression of cylindrical wire arrays. These sources are being used as drivers to study inertial-confinement fusion capsule implosions, complex radiationhydrodynamic jet experiments, and wire-array z-pinch physics tests.

D. B. Sinars; G. R. Bennett; D. F. Wenger; M. E. Cuneo; D. L. Hanson; J. L. Porter; R. G. Adams; P. K. Rambo; D. C. Rovang; I. C. Smith

2004-01-01

250

Monochromatic x-ray imaging experiments on the Sandia National Laboratories Z facility (invited)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Z facility is a 20 MA, 100 ns rise time, pulsed power driver for z-pinch plasma radiation sources. The Z facility can make >200 TW, 1-2 MJ, near-blackbody radiation sources through the compression of cylindrical wire arrays. These sources are being used as drivers to study inertial-confinement fusion capsule implosions, complex radiation-hydrodynamic jet experiments, and wire-array z-pinch physics tests.

D. B. Sinars; G. R. Bennett; D. F. Wenger; M. E. Cuneo; D. L. Hanson; J. L. Porter; R. G. Adams; P. K. Rambo; D. C. Rovang; I. C. Smith

2004-01-01

251

Modeling and Laboratory Investigations of Radiative Shocks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Supernova remnants are often inhomogeneous, with knots or clumps of material expanding in ambient plasma. This structure may be initiated by hydrodynamic instabilities occurring during the explosion, but it may plausibly be amplified by instabilities of the expanding shocks such as, for example, corrugation instabilities described by Dyakov in 1954, Vishniac in 1983, and observed in the laboratory by Grun et al. in 1991. Shock instability can occur when radiation lowers the effective adiabatic index of the gas. In view of the difficulty of modeling radiation in non-equilibrium plasmas, and the dependence of shock instabilities on such radiation, we are performing a laboratory experiment to study radiative shocks. The shocks are generated in a miniature, laser-driven shock tube. The gas density inside the tube at any instant in time is measured using time and space-resolved interferometry, and the emission spectrum of the gas is measured with time-resolved spectroscopy. We simulate the experiment with a 1D code that models time dependent post-shock ionization and non-equilibrium radiative cooling. S. P. Dyakov, Zhurnal Eksperimentalnoi Teoreticheskoi Fiziki 27, 288 (1954); see also section 90 in L.D. Landau and E.M. Lifshitz, Fluid Mechanics (Butterworth-Heinemann 1987); E.T. Vishniac, Astrophys. J. 236, 880 (1983); J. Grun, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 66, 2738 (1991)

Grun, Jacob; Laming, J. Martin; Manka, Charles; Moore, Christopher; Jones, Ted; Tam, Daniel

2001-10-01

252

SANDIA REPORT SAND98-2668  

E-print Network

. Veers Prepared by Sandia National Laboratories Albuqtmrque, New Mexico 87185 and Livermore, California and Manufacturing Software Paul S. Veers Wind Energy Technology Sandia National Laboratories P.O. BOX 5800SANDIA REPORT SAND98-2668 Unlimited Release Reprinted December 1998 G. Richard Eisler, Paul S

253

The NASA High Intensity Radiated Fields Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

High Intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) are the result of a multitude of intentional and nonintentional electromagnetic sources that currently exists in the world. Many of today's digital systems are susceptible to electronic upset if subjected to certain electromagnetic environments (EME). Modern aerospace designers and manufacturers increasingly rely on sophisticated digital electronic systems to provide critical flight control in both military, commercial, and general aviation aircraft. In an effort to understand and emulate the undesired environment that high energy RF provides modern electronics, the Electromagnetics Research Branch (ERB) of the Flight Electronics and Technology Division (FETD) conducts research on RF and microwave measurement methods related to the understanding of HIRF. In the High Intensity Radiated Fields Laboratory, the effects of high energy radiating electromagnetic fields on avionics and electronic systems are tested and studied.

Williams, Reuben A.

1997-01-01

254

Overview of the dynamic-hohlraum x-ray source at Sandia National Laboratories.  

SciTech Connect

Progress in understanding the physics of Dynamic-Hohlraums is reviewed for a system capable of generating 10 TW of axial radiation for high temperature (>200 eV) radiation-flow experiments and ICF capsule implosions. 2D magneto-hydrodynamic simulation comparisons with data show the need to include wire initiation physics and subsequent discrete wire dynamics in the simulations if a predictive capability is to be achieved.

Sanford, Thomas W. L.

2007-04-01

255

The Sandia Lightning Simulator.  

SciTech Connect

The Sandia Lightning Simulator at Sandia National Laboratories can provide up to 200 kA for a simulated single lightning stroke, 100 kA for a subsequent stroke, and hundreds of Amperes of continuing current. It has recently been recommissioned after a decade of inactivity and the single-stroke capability demonstrated. The simulator capabilities, basic design components, upgrades, and diagnostic capabilities are discussed in this paper.

Martinez, Leonard E.; Caldwell, Michele

2005-01-01

256

Monochromatic x-ray imaging experiments on the Sandia National Laboratories Z facility (invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Z facility is a 20 MA, 100 ns rise time, pulsed power driver for z-pinch plasma radiation sources. The Z facility can make >200 TW, 1-2 MJ, near-blackbody radiation sources through the compression of cylindrical wire arrays. These sources are being used as drivers to study inertial-confinement fusion capsule implosions, complex radiation-hydrodynamic jet experiments, and wire-array z-pinch physics tests. To backlight plasmas in this environment we have built diagnostics based on spherically bent crystals that provide high spatial resolution (9-10 ?m), a narrow spectral bandpass (<0.5 eV), and a large field of view (4 mm20 mm). These diagnostics use the 2 TW, multi-kJ Z-Beamlet laser to produce x-ray emission sources at 1.865 or 6.151 keV for backlighting.

Sinars, D. B.; Bennett, G. R.; Wenger, D. F.; Cuneo, M. E.; Hanson, D. L.; Porter, J. L.; Adams, R. G.; Rambo, P. K.; Rovang, D. C.; Smith, I. C.

2004-10-01

257

ME 361F Radiation and Radiation Protection Laboratory ABET EC2000 syllabus  

E-print Network

ME 361F­ Radiation and Radiation Protection Laboratory Page 1 ABET EC2000 syllabus ME 361F­ Radiation and Radiation Protection Laboratory Summer 2009 Required or Elective: Elective 2008-2010 Catalog Data: Introduction to the application of radiation and radiation protection instrumentation. Lecture

Ben-Yakar, Adela

258

Global nuclear energy partnership fuels transient testing at the Sandia National Laboratories nuclear facilities : planning and facility infrastructure options.  

SciTech Connect

The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership fuels development program is currently developing metallic, oxide, and nitride fuel forms as candidate fuels for an Advanced Burner Reactor. The Advance Burner Reactor is being designed to fission actinides efficiently, thereby reducing the long-term storage requirements for spent fuel repositories. Small fuel samples are being fabricated and evaluated with different transuranic loadings and with extensive burnup using the Advanced Test Reactor. During the next several years, numerous fuel samples will be fabricated, evaluated, and tested, with the eventual goal of developing a transmuter fuel database that supports the down selection to the most suitable fuel type. To provide a comparative database of safety margins for the range of potential transmuter fuels, this report describes a plan to conduct a set of early transient tests in the Annular Core Research Reactor at Sandia National Laboratories. The Annular Core Research Reactor is uniquely qualified to perform these types of tests because of its wide range of operating capabilities and large dry central cavity which extents through the center of the core. The goal of the fuels testing program is to demonstrate that the design and fabrication processes are of sufficient quality that the fuel will not fail at its design limit--up to a specified burnup, power density, and operating temperature. Transient testing is required to determine the fuel pin failure thresholds and to demonstrate that adequate fuel failure margins exist during the postulated design basis accidents.

Kelly, John E.; Wright, Steven Alan; Tikare, Veena; MacLean, Heather J. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Parma, Edward J., Jr.; Peters, Curtis D.; Vernon, Milton E.; Pickard, Paul S.

2007-10-01

259

Biologic surveys for the Sandia National Laboratories, Coyote Canyon Test Complex, Kirtland Air Force Base, Albuquerque, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

This report provides results of a comprehensive biologic survey performed in Coyote Canyon Test Complex (CCTC), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Bernalillo County, New Mexico, which was conducted during the spring and summer of 1992 and 1993. CCTC is sited on land owned by the Department of Energy (DOE) and Kirtland Air Force Base and managed by SNL. The survey covered 3,760 acres of land, most of which is rarely disturbed by CCTC operations. Absence of grazing by livestock and possibly native ungulates, and relative to the general condition of private range lands throughout New Mexico, and relative to other grazing lands in central New Mexico. Widely dispersed, low intensity use by SNL as well as prohibition of grazing has probably contributed to abundance of special status species such as grama grass cactus within the CCTC area. This report evaluates threatened and endangered species found in the area, as well as comprehensive assessment of biologic habitats. Included are analyses of potential impacts and mitigative measures designed to reduce or eliminate potential impacts. Included is a summary of CCTC program and testing activities.

Sullivan, R.M. [4115 Allen Dr., Kingsville, TX (United States); Knight, P.J. [Marron and Associates, Inc., Corrales, NM (United States)

1994-05-25

260

Deployment of an alternative cover and final closure of the Mixed Waste Landfill, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.  

SciTech Connect

An alternative cover design consisting of a monolithic layer of native soil is proposed as the closure path for the Mixed Waste Landfill at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico. The proposed design would rely upon soil thickness and evapotranspiration to provide long-term performance and stability, and would be inexpensive to build and maintain. The proposed design is a 3-ft-thick, vegetated soil cover. The alternative cover meets the intent of RCRA Subtitle C regulations in that: (a) water migration through the cover is minimized; (b) maintenance is minimized by using a monolithic soil layer; (c) cover erosion is minimized by using erosion control measures; (d) subsidence is accommodated by using a ''soft'' design; and (e) the permeability of the cover is less than or equal to that of natural subsurface soil present. Performance of the proposed cover is integrated with natural site conditions, producing a ''system performance'' that will ensure that the cover is protective of human health and the environment. Natural site conditions that will produce a system performance include: (a) extremely low precipitation and high potential evapotranspiration; (b) negligible recharge to groundwater; (c) an extensive vadose zone; (d) groundwater approximately 500 ft below the surface; and (e) a versatile, native flora that will persist indefinitely as a climax ecological community with little or no maintenance.

Peace, Gerald (Jerry) L.; Goering, Timothy James (GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM); McVey, Michael David (GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM); Borns, David James

2003-06-01

261

Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) software quality plan : ASC software quality engineering practices Version 3.0.  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. Quality is defined in the US Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Agency (DOE/NNSA) Quality Criteria, Revision 10 (QC-1) as 'conformance to customer requirements and expectations'. This quality plan defines the SNL ASC Program software quality engineering (SQE) practices and provides a mapping of these practices to the SNL Corporate Process Requirement (CPR) 001.3.6; 'Corporate Software Engineering Excellence'. This plan also identifies ASC management's and the software project teams responsibilities in implementing the software quality practices and in assessing progress towards achieving their software quality goals. This SNL ASC Software Quality Plan establishes the signatories commitments to improving software products by applying cost-effective SQE practices. This plan enumerates the SQE practices that comprise the development of SNL ASC's software products and explains the project teams opportunities for tailoring and implementing the practices.

Turgeon, Jennifer L.; Minana, Molly A.; Hackney, Patricia; Pilch, Martin M.

2009-01-01

262

Floodplain Assessment for the Proposed Outdoor Fire Range Upgrades at TA-72 in Lower Sandia Canyon, Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is preparing to implement actions in Sandia Canyon at Technical Area (TA) 72. Los Alamos National Security (LANS) biologists conducted a floodplain determination and this project is partially located within a 100-year floodplain. The proposed project is to upgrade the existing outdoor shooting range facilities at TA-72. These upgrades will result in increased safety and efficiencies in the training for Protective Force personnel. In order to remain current on training requirements, the firing ranges at TA-72 will be upgraded which will result in increased safety and efficiencies in the training for Protective Force personnel (Figure 1). These upgrades will allow for an increase in class size and more people to be qualified at the ranges. Some of these upgrades will be built within the 100-year floodplain. The upgrades include: concrete pads for turning target systems and shooting positions, new lighting to illuminate the firing range for night fire, a new speaker system for range operations, canopies at two locations, an impact berm at the far end of the 300-yard mark, and a block wall for road protection.

Hathcock, Charles D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-27

263

Sandia software guidelines: Volume 5, Tools, techniques, and methodologies  

SciTech Connect

This volume is one in a series of Sandia Software Guidelines intended for use in producing quality software within Sandia National Laboratories. This volume describes software tools and methodologies available to Sandia personnel for the development of software, and outlines techniques that have proven useful within the Laboratories and elsewhere. References and evaluations by Sandia personnel are included. 6 figs.

Not Available

1989-07-01

264

Functional and operational requirements document : building 1012, Battery and Energy Storage Device Test Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico.  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an overview of information, prior studies, and analyses relevant to the development of functional and operational requirements for electrochemical testing of batteries and energy storage devices carried out by Sandia Organization 2546, Advanced Power Sources R&D. Electrochemical operations for this group are scheduled to transition from Sandia Building 894 to a new Building located in Sandia TA-II referred to as Building 1012. This report also provides background on select design considerations and identifies the Safety Goals, Stakeholder Objectives, and Design Objectives required by the Sandia Design Team to develop the Performance Criteria necessary to the design of Building 1012. This document recognizes the Architecture-Engineering (A-E) Team as the primary design entity. Where safety considerations are identified, suggestions are provided to provide context for the corresponding operational requirement(s).

Johns, William H.

2013-11-01

265

Simulation of the Sandia Laboratory Salt Block II, brine migration experiment  

SciTech Connect

The finite-element code SPECTROM-58 is used to simulate the Salt Block II brine migration experiment. All input quantities for the computer code are treated as stochastic quantities. The measured results of the Salt Block II experiment are within the range of the SPECTROM-58 computed results. However, the range of calculated results that arises from the uncertainty in the input quantities is so large that an evaluation of the aptness of SPECTROM-58 is precluded. The current uncertainty in several of the input parameters must be reduced through laboratory testing before the Salt Block II experiment can be used for validating SPECTROM-58. 29 refs., 22 figs., 11 tabs.

Ratigan, J.L.; Brandshaug, T.

1988-03-01

266

Test plan for the data acquisition and management system for monitoring the fuel oil spill at the Sandia National Laboratories installation in Livermore, California  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the formal test plan that will be used for the data acquisition and management system developed to monitor a bioremediation study by Argonne National Laboratory in association with Sandia National Laboratories. The data acquisition and management system will record the site data during the bioremediation and assist experts in site analysis. The three major subsystems of this system are described in detail in this report. In addition, this report documents the component- and system-level test procedures that will be implemented at each phase of the project. Results of these test procedures are documented in this report.

Widing, M.A.; Dominiak, D.M.; Leser, C.C.; Peerenboom, J.P.; Manning, J.F.

1995-04-01

267

Final Results from the High-Current, High-Action Closing Switch Test Program at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

We tested a variety of high-current closing switches for lifetime and reliability on a dedicated 2 MJ, 500 kA capacitor bank facility at Sandia National Laboratories. Our interest was a switch capable of one shot every few minutes, switching a critically damped, DC-charged 6.2 mF bank at 24 kV, with a peak current of 500 kA. The desired lifetime is 24 thousand shots. Typical of high-energy systems, particularly multi-module systems, the primary parameters of interest related to the switch are: (1) reliability, meaning absence of both pre-fires and no-fires, (2) total switch lifetime or number of shots between maintenance, and (3) cost. Cost was given lower priority at this evaluation stage because there are great uncertainties in estimating higher-quantity prices of these devices, most of which have been supplied before in only small quantities. The categories of switches tested are vacuum discharge, high-pressure discharge, and solid-state. Each group varies in terms of triggering ease, ease of maintenance, and tolerance to faults such as excess current and current reversal. We tested at least two variations of each technology group. The total number of shots on the switch test facility is about 50 thousand. We will present the results from the switch testing. The observed lifetime of different switches varied greatly: the shortest life was one shot; one device was still operating after six thousand shots. On several switches we measured the voltage drop during conduction and calculated energy dissipated in the switch; we will show these data also.

Savage, M.E.

1999-06-23

268

TIME-RESOLVED 1-10 keV CRYSTAL SPECTROMETER FOR THE Z MACHINE AT SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES  

SciTech Connect

We have designed, fabricated, calibrated, and fielded a fast, time-resolved 1-10 keV crystal spectrometer to observe the evolution of wire pinch spectra at the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories. The instrument has two convex cylindrical crystals (PET and KAP). Both crystals Bragg reflect x-rays into an array of ten silicon diodes, providing continuous spectral coverage in twenty channels from 1.0 to 10 keV. The spectral response of the instrument has been calibrated from 1.0 to 6.3 keV at beamline X8A at the National Synchrotron Light Source. The time response of the 1-mm2 silicon detectors was measured with the Pulsed X-ray Source at Bechtel Nevada's Los Alamos Operations, where 2-nanosecond full-width half-maximum (FWHM) waveforms with 700-picosecond rise times typically were observed. The spectrometer has been fielded recently on several experimental runs at the Z Machine. In this paper, we present the time-resolved spectra resulting from the implosions of double-nested tungsten wire arrays onto 5-mm diameter foam cylinders. We also show the results obtained for a double-nested stainless steel wire array with no target cylinder. The spectrometer was located at the end of a 7.1-meter beamline on line-of sight (LOS)21/22, at an angle 12{sup o} above the equatorial plane, and was protected from the debris field by a customized dual-slit fast valve. The soft detector channels below 2.0 keV recorded large signals at pinch time coinciding with signals recorded on vacuum x-ray diodes (XRDs). On experiment Z993, the spectrometer channels recorded a second pulse with a hard x-ray emission spectrum several nanoseconds after pinch time.

D. V. Morgan; S. Gardner; R. Liljestrand; M. Madlener; S. Slavin; M. Wu

2003-06-01

269

75 FR 22409 - Decision To Evaluate a Petition To Designate a Class of Employees From the Sandia National...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Designate a Class of Employees From the Sandia National Laboratory in Albuquerque, NM...designate a class of employees from the Sandia National Laboratory in Albuquerque, New...evaluation, is as follows: Facility: Sandia National Laboratory. Location:...

2010-04-28

270

78 FR 56706 - Decision to Evaluate a Petition to Designate a Class of Employees from the Sandia National...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Designate a Class of Employees from the Sandia National Laboratory-Livermore in Livermore...designate a class of employees from the Sandia National Laboratory- Livermore in Livermore...evaluation, is as follows: Facility: Sandia National Laboratory-Livermore...

2013-09-13

271

Measurement of the photon field on Sandia`s Z facility  

SciTech Connect

The Z Facility at Sandia National Laboratories utilizes z-pinch implosions to produce up to 2 MJ of X-rays. On Z, bremsstrahlung radiation is produced as a product of both power flow electrons and those accelerated in the pinch region. An understanding of the energy spectra and intensity of this radiation is important to both the explanation of the z-pinch physics and the design of new diagnostics. This paper describes the techniques and results used to date for mapping the bremsstrahlung radiation in the vacuum section of the Z Accelerator.

Rochau, G.E.; Derzon, M.; Fehl, D. [and others

1998-06-01

272

A description of the SNL (Sandia National Laboratories) clutter model developed for the SRIM (Simulated Radar IMage) code version 2. 2s  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the clutter model developed at Sandia National Laboratories for the SRIM code version 2.2s. The SNL clutter model is a fully polarimetric model that includes both coherent and incoherent scattering effects. The input parameters to the SNL clutter model are chosen so that an acceptable match is obtained between the model predicted data and the appropriate experimental data. These input parameters are then used in the SRIM code to simulated the desired clutter type. 12 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

Lee, C.E.

1990-10-01

273

Sandia National Laboratories  

E-print Network

of three High School (9th ­12th grades) or two Middle School (6th ­8th grades) REGIONAL SCIENCE BOWL competitions scheduled for the California Bay Area. The Science Bowl is a Jeopardy-like highly competitive.S. Department of Energy's NATIONAL SCIENCE BOWL® on April 28 - May 3, 2011 in Washington, DC. The Department

274

Final report: survey and removal of radioactive surface contamination at environmental restoration sites, Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the survey and removal of radioactive surface contamination at Sandia`s Environmental Restoration (ER) sites. Radiological characterization was performed as a prerequisite to beginning the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) corrective action process. The removal of radioactive surface contamination was performed in order to reduce potential impacts to human health and the environment. The predominant radiological contaminant of concern was depleted uranium (DU). Between October 1993 and November 1996 scanning surface radiation surveys, using gamma scintillometers, were conducted at 65 sites covering approximately 908 acres. A total of 9,518 radiation anomalies were detected at 38 sites. Cleanup activities were conducted between October 1994 and November 1996. A total of 9,122 anomalies were removed and 2,072 waste drums were generated. The majority of anomalies not removed were associated with a site that has subsurface contamination beyond the scope of this project. Verification soil samples (1,008 total samples) were collected from anomalies during cleanup activities and confirm that the soil concentration achieved in the field were far below the target cleanup level of 230 pCi/g of U-238 (the primary constituent of DU) in the soil. Cleanup was completed at 21 sites and no further radiological action is required. Seventeen sites were not completed since cleanup activities wee precluded by ongoing site activity or were beyond the original project scope.

Lambert, K.A.; Mitchell, M.M. [Brown and Root Environmental, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jean, D. [MDM/Lamb, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brown, C. [Environmental Dimensions, Inc., Albuquerque, NM 87109 (United States); Byrd, C.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-09-01

275

Sandia technology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Some of Sandia's activities and accomplishments in unclassified programs are described in this report. The role of Sandia in research and development for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) is discussed. They are responsible for establishing testing, certification, and monitoring procedures for, and predicting the long-term behavior of, the stored petroleum. Studies in simulated Raman spectroscopy are also discussed. Its use in the study of combustion processes and chemical vapor deposition is described.

Willis, H. M.; Thornborough, A. D.; Cocklereas, C. E.; Trennel, A. J.; Hoenstreter, G. F.; Mead, P. L.

1982-05-01

276

All things White Dwarf: The State of Stellar Forensics at the University of Texas and Sandia National Laboratories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Astronomy has always been considered an observational science, in contrast with other experimental sciences like physics, chemistry, biology, and geology. This is because it has not been possible to perform experiments on the objects we observe. This situation has changed in a way that is transformational. We are now able to make macroscopic bits of star stuff in the lab: plasmas created under conditions that are the same as the plasmas in stars. Although laboratory astrophysics has long been an important part of astronomical research, what has changed is the ability to produce large enough chunks of a star that we can make measurements and perform experiments. In this way, astronomy joins her sister sciences in becoming an experimental science as well as an observational one. I will describe how this came about, the technology behind it, and the results of recent laboratory experiments. Most importantly, we will discuss how this will change our understanding of the universe and its contents. This work will shed new light on our recent discoveries involving McDonald Observatory: planets around white dwarf stars, massive carbon/oxygen variable white dwarf stars, and white dwarf-white dwarf binaries -- including one detached double eclipsing system with an orbital period of 12 minutes. We should measure the rate of change of the orbital period in this system within a year and we expect it to be the highest S/N source of gravitational radiation, easily detectable with LISA or similar approaches.

Winget, Donald

2011-10-01

277

SANDIA REPORT SAND 2009-0805  

E-print Network

in Cybersecurity Daniel M. Dunlavy, Bruce Hendrickson, and Tamara G. Kolda Prepared by Sandia National Laboratories in Cybersecurity Daniel M. Dunlavy and Bruce Hendrickson Sandia National Laboratories P.O. Box 5800, Mail Stop 1318 94550 Abstract This white paper is a response to a recent report on cybersecurity submitted to the U

Kolda, Tamara G.

278

Determining the Martian Radiation Environment The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) on Mars Science Laboratory (MSL)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) onboard the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) is performing radiation measurements en route to Mars. On Mars it will measure the broad particle spectrum and determine the dose and dose rate on the martian surface.

Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Hassler, D. M.; Zeitlin, C.; Bttcher, S.; Martin, C.; Andrews, J.; Bhm, E.; Weigle, G.; Brinza, D.; Posner, A.; Burmeister, S.; Epperly, M.; Seimetz, L.; Reitz, G.; Kortmann, O.; Khler, J.; Ehresmann, B.; Neal, K.; Rafkin, S.; Peterson, J.; Tyler, Y.; Smith, K.; Bullock, M.; Cucinotta, F.

2012-03-01

279

Development of the Sandia Cooler.  

SciTech Connect

This report describes an FY13 effort to develop the latest version of the Sandia Cooler, a breakthrough technology for air-cooled heat exchangers that was developed at Sandia National Laboratories. The project was focused on fabrication, assembly and demonstration of ten prototype systems for the cooling of high power density electronics, specifically high performance desktop computers (CPUs). In addition, computational simulation and experimentation was carried out to fully understand the performance characteristics of each of the key design aspects. This work culminated in a parameter and scaling study that now provides a design framework, including a number of design and analysis tools, for Sandia Cooler development for applications beyond CPU cooling.

Johnson, Terry Alan; Koplow, Jeffrey P.; Staats, Wayne Lawrence,; Curgus, Dita Brigitte; Leick, Michael Thomas.; Matthew, Ned Daniel; Zimmerman, Mark D.; Arienti, Marco; Gharagozloo, Patricia E.; Hecht, Ethan S.; Spencer, Nathan A.; Vanness, Justin William.; Gorman, Ryan

2013-12-01

280

Sandia technology & entrepreneurs improve Lasik  

ScienceCinema

Former Sandian Dan Neal started his company, WaveFront Sciences, based on wavefront sensing metrology technologies licensed from Sandia National Laboratories and by taking advantage of its Entrepreneurial Separation to Transfer Technology (ESTT) program. Abbott Medical Optics since acquired WaveFront and estimates that one million patients have improved the quality of their vision thanks to its products. ESTT is a valuable tool which allows Sandia to transfer technology to the private sector and Sandia employees to leave the Labs in order to start up new technology companies or help expand existing companies.

Neal, Dan; Turner, Tim

2014-02-26

281

Sandia technology & entrepreneurs improve Lasik  

SciTech Connect

Former Sandian Dan Neal started his company, WaveFront Sciences, based on wavefront sensing metrology technologies licensed from Sandia National Laboratories and by taking advantage of its Entrepreneurial Separation to Transfer Technology (ESTT) program. Abbott Medical Optics since acquired WaveFront and estimates that one million patients have improved the quality of their vision thanks to its products. ESTT is a valuable tool which allows Sandia to transfer technology to the private sector and Sandia employees to leave the Labs in order to start up new technology companies or help expand existing companies.

Neal, Dan; Turner, Tim

2013-11-21

282

Ris National Laboratory DTU Radiation Research Department  

E-print Network

with relatively high radiation risk following a major nuclear accident, due to the large quantities released may result in high doses after a large nuclear accident16 . A crucial factor determining the magnitude short-lived radioiodine isotopes released from the Chernobyl accident1-4 . Many radiation exposure

283

Materials and process engineering projects for the Sandia National Laboratories/Newly Independent States Industrial Partnering Program. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

In July, 1994, a team of materials specialists from Sandia and US. Industry traveled to Russia and the Ukraine to select and fund projects in materials and process technology in support of the Newly Independent States/Industrial Partnering Program (NIS/IPP). All of the projects are collaborations with scientists and Engineers at NIS Institutes. Each project is scheduled to last one year, and the deliverables are formatted to supply US. Industry with information which will enable rational decisions to be made regarding the commercial value of these technologies. This work is an unedited interim compilation of the deliverables received to date.

Zanner, F.J.; Moffatt, W.C.

1995-07-01

284

Radiation safety procedures for Atomics International Hot Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

The radiation safety procedures for the safe operation of Atomics International Hot Laboratory are contained in this document. Specific operating procedures are included for normal operating and maintenance tasks.

H. E. Clow; W. F. Heine; W. R. McCurnin

1972-01-01

285

Technical Justification for Radiation Controls at an Environmental Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the technical approach used to establish radiation protection controls over incoming radioactive materials to an environmental measurements laboratory at the Hanford Site. Conditions that would trigger internal dosimetry, posting.

DUPAQUIER, J.C.

2000-07-01

286

Radiation and Health Technology Laboratory Capabilities  

SciTech Connect

The Radiological Standards and Calibrations Laboratory, a part of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)(a) performs calibrations and upholds reference standards necessary to maintain traceability to national standards. The facility supports U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs at the Hanford Site, programs sponsored by DOE Headquarters and other federal agencies, radiological protection programs at other DOE and commercial nuclear sites and research and characterization programs sponsored through the commercial sector. The laboratory is located in the 318 Building of the Hanford Site's 300 Area. The facility contains five major exposure rooms and several laboratories used for exposure work preparation, low-activity instrument calibrations, instrument performance evaluations, instrument maintenance, instrument design and fabrication work, thermoluminescent and radiochromic Dosimetry, and calibration of measurement and test equipment (M&TE). The major exposure facilities are a low-scatter room used for neutron and photon exposures, a source well room used for high-volume instrument calibration work, an x-ray facility used for energy response studies, a high-exposure facility used for high-rate photon calibration work, a beta standards laboratory used for beta energy response studies and beta reference calibrations and M&TE laboratories. Calibrations are routinely performed for personnel dosimeters, health physics instrumentation, photon and neutron transfer standards alpha, beta, and gamma field sources used throughout the Hanford Site, and a wide variety of M&TE. This report describes the standards and calibrations laboratory.

Goles, Ronald W.; Johnson, Michelle Lynn; Piper, Roman K.; Peters, Jerry D.; Murphy, Mark K.; Mercado, Mike S.; Bihl, Donald E.; Lynch, Timothy P.

2003-07-15

287

Sandia`s network for Supercomputer `96: Linking supercomputers in a wide area Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) network  

SciTech Connect

The advanced networking department at Sandia National Laboratories has used the annual Supercomputing conference sponsored by the IEEE and ACM for the past several years as a forum to demonstrate and focus communication and networking developments. At Supercomputing 96, for the first time, Sandia National Laboratories, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory combined their Supercomputing 96 activities within a single research booth under the ASO banner. Sandia provided the network design and coordinated the networking activities within the booth. At Supercomputing 96, Sandia elected: to demonstrate wide area network connected Massively Parallel Processors, to demonstrate the functionality and capability of Sandia`s new edge architecture, to demonstrate inter-continental collaboration tools, and to demonstrate ATM video capabilities. This paper documents those accomplishments, discusses the details of their implementation, and describes how these demonstrations support Sandia`s overall strategies in ATM networking.

Pratt, T.J.; Martinez, L.G.; Vahle, M.O. [and others

1997-04-01

288

Visualization in Radiation Oncology: Towards Replacing the Laboratory Notebook  

E-print Network

1 Visualization in Radiation Oncology: Towards Replacing the Laboratory Notebook E.W. Anderson, S Abstract: Data exploration in radiation oncology requires the creation of a large number of visualizations visualizations is needed for assessing the quality of the results. Current visualization systems allow

Utah, University of

289

Transition radiation detectors for underground and space laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

The performances of transition radiation detectors are reviewed. We discuss the applications of these devices to measure the energy of cosmic rays muons in underground laboratories and present the first results from prototypes operating in the TeV energy region. Another interesting application of transition radiation detectors is the discrimination of positron from protons in the outer space to search for

R. Bellotti; F. Cafagna; M. Calicchio; G. de Cataldo; C. de Marzo; O. Erriquez; C. Favuzzi; P. Fusco; N. Giglietto; B. Marangelli; E. Nappi; A. Rain; P. Spinelli

1991-01-01

290

Site selection study for Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico as an alternative site for the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to construct and operate the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in support of the Stockpile Stewardship and Management (SSM) Programmatic Environmental impact Statement (PEIS). The National Environmental Policy Act requires the DOE to look at alternative sites for the NIF. The SSM PEIS will evaluate four alternative locations for the NIF. This study documents the process and results of a site selection study for a preferred site for the NIF at SNL/NM. The NIF research objectives are to provide the world`s most powerful laser systems to be used in ignition of fusion fuel and energy gain to perform high energy density and radiation effects experiments in support of the DOE`s national security, energy, and basic science research mission. The most immediate application of the NIF will be to provide nuclear-weapon-related physics data, since many phenomena occurring on the laboratory scale are similar to those that occur in weapons. The NIF may also provide an important capability for weapons effects simulation. The NIF is designed to achieve propagating fusion bum and modest energy gain for development as a source of civilian energy.

Miller, D.; Wheeler, T.; McClellan, Y.

1996-03-01

291

Aircraft Radiation Shield Experiments Preflight Laboratory Testing  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the past, measurements onboard a research Boeing 57F(RB57-F) aircraft have demonstrated that the neutron environmentwithin the aircraft structure is greater than that in the local externalenvironment. Recent studies onboard Boeing 737 commercial flightshave demonstrated cabin variations in radiation exposure up to30 percent. These prior results were the basis of the present study toquantify the potential effects of aircraft construction

Robert C. Singleterry; Judy L. Shinn; John W. Wilson; Donald L. Maiden; Sheila A. Thibeault; Francis F. Badavi

1999-01-01

292

Characterization, minimization and disposal of radioactive, hazardous, and mixed wastes during cleanup and rransition of the Tritium Research Laboratory (TRL) at Sandia National Laboratories/California (SNL/CA)  

SciTech Connect

This document provides an outline of waste handling practices used during the Sandia National Laboratory/California (SNL/CA), Tritium Research Laboratory (TRL) Cleanup and Transition project. Here we provide background information concerning the history of the TRL and the types of operations that generated the waste. Listed are applicable SNL/CA site-wide and TRL local waste handling related procedures. We describe personnel training practices and outline methods of handling and disposal of compactible and non-compactible low level waste, solidified waste water, hazardous wastes and mixed wastes. Waste minimization, reapplication and recycling practices are discussed. Finally, we provide a description of the process followed to remove the highly contaminated decontamination systems. This document is intended as both a historical record and as a reference to other facilities who may be involved in similar work.

Garcia, T.B.; Gorman, T.P.

1996-12-01

293

Sandia WIPP calibration traceability  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the work performed to establish calibration traceability for the instrumentation used by Sandia National Laboratories at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) during testing from 1980-1985. Identifying the calibration traceability is an important part of establishing a pedigree for the data and is part of the qualification of existing data. In general, the requirement states that the calibration of Measuring and Test equipment must have a valid relationship to nationally recognized standards or the basis for the calibration must be documented. Sandia recognized that just establishing calibration traceability would not necessarily mean that all QA requirements were met during the certification of test instrumentation. To address this concern, the assessment was expanded to include various activities.

Schuhen, M.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dean, T.A. [RE/SPEC, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [RE/SPEC, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-05-01

294

Exceptional service in the national interest www.sandia.gov  

E-print Network

; Director of Nuclear Weapons Science and Technology Programs; Director of the Physical, Chemical, and Nano-mail: jmphill@sandia.gov B I O G R A P H Y Julia M. Phillips Vice President and Chief Technology Officer Sandia National Laboratories Julia M. Phillips is Vice President and Chief Technology Officer at Sandia National

295

Waste minimization/pollution prevention at R&D facilities: A cradle-to-grave tracking and information system that will be implemented at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

A comprehensive environment, safety and health (ES&H) program allocates an extensive portion of its resources to information collection, management, and manipulation. Much of these resources are difficult to obtain and even more costly to ensure that they are sufficiently accurate; however, a system which collects information at the point which a process begins or a material enters a facility and maintains that information throughout its entire life-cycle is a more efficient approach to providing the data necessary to meet ES&H requirements. These data requirements for all the various groups within an ES&H program are associated with the properties and interactions among materials, personnel, facilities, hazards, waste and processes. Although each group is charged with addressing a particular aspect of these properties and interactions, the information they require can be aggregated into a coherent set of common data fields. It is these common data fields that the Cradle-to-Grave Tracking and Information System (CGTIS) is designed to satisfy. Research and development laboratories such as Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) are diverse in nature and, therefore, present a complex challenge to ES&H professionals. The remainder of this paper will describe the CGTIS as envisioned and implemented at SNL, define the requirements of a complete CGTIS, and review the current status of each system module at SNL.

Hollingsworth, M.W. [Rinchem Co., Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kjeldgaard, E.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Navarrete, R. [AT and T Bell Labs., Murray Hill, NJ (United States)

1993-09-01

296

Building business from technology: The Sandia experience  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes New Ventures, a new initiative at Sandia National Laboratories that encourages the creation of new businesses based on laboratory technology as a timely, efficient means of technology transfer. Sandia`s New Ventures program has shown that a dedicated effort can produce significant results. In the three years prior to this program`s launch, just two ventures per year on average were created based on laboratory technology. By comparison, the New Ventures program has enabled 20 new ventures in its first nine months of full operation.

Traylor, L.B.

1995-07-01

297

Metrology laboratory requirements for third-generation synchrotron radiation sources  

SciTech Connect

New third-generation synchrotron radiation sources that are now, or will soon, come on line will need to decide how to handle the testing of optical components delivered for use in their beam lines. In many cases it is desirable to establish an in-house metrology laboratory to do the work. We review the history behind the formation of the Optical Metrology Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory and the rationale for its continued existence. We offer suggestions to those who may be contemplating setting up similar facilities, based on our experiences over the past two decades.

Takacs, P.Z.; Quian, Shinan

1997-11-01

298

Reconsolidation of Crushed Salt to 250C Under Hydrostatic and Shear Stress Conditions Scott Broome, Frank Hansen, and SJ Bauer Sandia National Laboratories, Geomechanics Department  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Design, analysis and performance assessment of potential salt repositories for heat-generating nuclear waste require knowledge of thermal, mechanical, and fluid transport properties of reconsolidating granular salt. Mechanical properties, Bulk (K) and Elastic (E) Moduli and Poisson's ratio (?) are functions of porosity which decreases as the surrounding salt creeps inward and compresses granular salt within the rooms, drifts or shafts. To inform salt repository evaluations, we have undertaken an experimental program to determine K, E, and ? of reconsolidated granular salt as a function of porosity and temperature and to establish the deformational processes by which the salt reconsolidates. The experiments will be used to populate the database used in the reconsolidation model developed by Callahan (1999) which accounts for the effects of moisture through pressure solution and dislocation creep, with both terms dependent on effective stress to account for the effects of porosity. Mine-run salt from the Waste Isolation Pilot Program (WIPP) was first dried at 105 C for a few days. Undeformed right-circular cylindrical sample assemblies of unconsolidated granular salt with an initial porosity of ~ 40%, nominally 10 cm in diameter and 17.5 cm in length, are jacketed in lead. Samples are placed in a pressure vessel and kept at test temperatures of 100, 175 or 250 C; samples are vented to the atmosphere during the entire test procedure. At these test conditions the consolidating salt is always creeping, the creep rate increases with increasing temperature and stress and decreases as porosity decreases. In hydrostatic tests, confining pressure is increased to 20 MPa with periodic unload/reload loops to determine K. Volume strain increases with increasing temperature. In shear tests at 2.5 and 5 MPa confining pressure, after confining pressure is applied, the crushed salt is subjected to a differential stress, with periodic unload/reload loops to determine E and ?. At predetermined differential stress levels the stress is held constant and the salt consolidates. Displacement gages mounted on the samples show little lateral deformation until the samples reach a porosity of ~10%. Interestingly, vapor is vented in tests at 250C and condenses at the vent port. Release of water is not observed in the lower two test temperatures. It is hypothesized that the water originates from fluid inclusions, which were made accessible by intragranular deformational processes including decrepitation. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

Broome, S. T.

2012-12-01

299

Sandia programs relevant to microelectronics fabrication  

SciTech Connect

This report was prepared for the Semiconductor Industry and the National Laboratories Workshop held at the National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC, February 24, 1987. It details the current Sandia program activities relevant to microelectronics fabrication.

Picraux, S.T.; Vook, F.L.; Gregory, B.L.

1987-04-01

300

Impact of different cleaning processes on the laser damage threshold of antireflection coatings for Z-Backlighter optics at Sandia National Laboratories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have examined how three different cleaning processes affect the laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) of antireflection coatings for large dimension, Z-Backlighter laser optics at Sandia National Laboratories. Laser damage thresholds were measured after the coatings were created, and again 4 months later to determine which cleaning processes were most effective. Coatings that received cleaning exhibited the highest LIDTs compared to coatings that were not cleaned. In some cases, there is nearly a twofold increase in the LIDT between the cleaned and uncleaned coatings (19.4 J/cm2 compared to 39.1 J/cm2). Higher LIDTs were realized after 4 months of aging. The most effective cleaning process involved washing the coated surface with mild detergent, and then soaking the optic in a mixture of ethyl alcohol and deionized water. Also, the laser damage results indicate that the presence of nonpropagating (NP) damage sites dominates the LIDTs of almost every optic, despite the cleaning process used. NP damage sites can be attributed to defects such as nodules in the coating or surface contamination, which suggests that pursuing further improvements to the deposition or cleaning processes are worthwhile to achieve even higher LIDTs.

Field, Ella; Bellum, John; Kletecka, Damon

2014-12-01

301

Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) software quality plan. Part 1 : ASC software quality engineering practices version 1.0.  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. Quality is defined in DOE/AL Quality Criteria (QC-1) as conformance to customer requirements and expectations. This quality plan defines the ASC program software quality practices and provides mappings of these practices to the SNL Corporate Process Requirements (CPR 1.3.2 and CPR 1.3.6) and the Department of Energy (DOE) document, ASCI Software Quality Engineering: Goals, Principles, and Guidelines (GP&G). This quality plan identifies ASC management and software project teams' responsibilities for cost-effective software engineering quality practices. The SNL ASC Software Quality Plan establishes the signatories commitment to improving software products by applying cost-effective software engineering quality practices. This document explains the project teams opportunities for tailoring and implementing the practices; enumerates the practices that compose the development of SNL ASC's software products; and includes a sample assessment checklist that was developed based upon the practices in this document.

Minana, Molly A.; Sturtevant, Judith E.; Heaphy, Robert; Hodges, Ann Louise; Boucheron, Edward A.; Drake, Richard Roy; Forsythe, Christi A.; Schofield, Joseph Richard, Jr.; Pavlakos, Constantine James; Williamson, Charles Michael; Edwards, Harold Carter

2005-01-01

302

Report of the workshop on Arctic oil and gas recovery held at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico, June 30-July 2, 1980  

SciTech Connect

This report is the result of a workshop on Arctic offshore oil and gas recovery, held at Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico, on June 30-July 2, 1980. Research priorities for the technology related to Arctic offshore oil and gas production were defined. The workshop was preceded by a report entitled, A Review of Technology for Arctic Offshore Oil and Gas Recovery, authored by Dr. W. M. Sackinger. The mission of the workshop was to identify research priorities without considering whether the research should be conducted by government or by industry. Nevertheless, at the end of the meeting the general discussion did consider this, and the concensus was that environmental properties should certainly be of concern to the government, that implementation of petroleum operations was the province of industry, and that overlapping, coordinated areas of interest include both environment and interactions of the environment with structures, transport systems, and operations. An attempt to establish relative importance and a time frame was made after the workshop through the use of a survey form. The form and a summary of its results, and a discussion of its implications, are given.

Sackinger, W. M. [ed.] [ed.

1980-09-01

303

Evaluation of Radiometers Deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This study analyzes the performance of various commercially available radiometers used for measuring global horizontal irradiances and direct normal irradiances. These include pyranometers, pyrheliometers, rotating shadowband radiometers, and a pyranometer with fixed internal shading and are all deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory. Data from 32 global horizontal irradiance and 19 direct normal irradiance radiometers are presented. The radiometers in this study were deployed for one year (from April 1, 2011, through March 31, 2012) and compared to measurements from radiometers with the lowest values of estimated measurement uncertainties for producing reference global horizontal irradiances and direct normal irradiances.

Habte, A.; Wilcox, S.; Stoffel, T.

2014-02-01

304

Identification of remediation needs and technology development focus areas for the Environmental Restoration (ER) Project at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM)  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Restoration (ER) Project has been tasked with the characterization, assessment, remediation and long-term monitoring of contaminated waste sites at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM). Many of these sites will require remediation which will involve the use of baseline technologies, innovative technologies that are currently under development, and new methods which will be developed in the near future. The Technology Applications Program (TAP) supports the ER Project and is responsible for development of new technologies for use at the contaminated waste sites, including technologies that will be used for remediation and restoration of these sites. The purpose of this report is to define the remediation needs of the ER Project and to identify those remediation needs for which the baseline technologies and the current development efforts are inadequate. The area between the remediation needs and the existing baseline/innovative technology base represents a technology gap which must be filled in order to remediate contaminated waste sites at SNL/NM economically and efficiently. In the first part of this report, the remediation needs of the ER Project are defined by both the ER Project task leaders and by TAP personnel. The next section outlines the baseline technologies, including EPA defined Best Demonstrated Available Technologies (BDATs), that are applicable at SNL/NM ER sites. This is followed by recommendations of innovative technologies that are currently being developed that may also be applicable at SNL/NM ER sites. Finally, the gap between the existing baseline/innovative technology base and the remediation needs is identified. This technology gap will help define the future direction of technology development for the ER Project.

Tucker, M.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Site Restoration Technology Program Office; Valdez, J.M.; Khan, M.A. [IT Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-06-01

305

Laboratory Investigation Synergy of gene-mediated immunoprophylaxis and microbeam radiation therapy  

E-print Network

Laboratory Investigation Synergy of gene-mediated immunoprophylaxis and microbeam radiation therapy, Switzerland Key words: 9L gliosarcoma, advanced brain tumor, gene-mediated immunoprophylaxis, microbeam radiation therapy, rats Summary Purpose: Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT), a novel experimental

Terasaki, Mark

306

Importance of energy efficiency in the design of the Process and Environmental Technology Laboratory (PETL) at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (NM)  

Microsoft Academic Search

As part of the design of the Process and Environmental Technology Laboratory (PETL) in FY97, an energy conservation report (ECR) was completed. The original energy baseline for the building, established in Title 1 design, was 595,000 BTU\\/sq. ft.\\/yr, site energy use. Following the input of several reviewers and the incorporation of the various recommendations into the Title 2 design, the

Wrons

1998-01-01

307

From Catalog to Web: Desktop Access to Sandia Technical Reports.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the processes developed in the Sandia National Laboratories (a Department of Energy multiprogram national laboratory) Technical Library to provide and improve desktop access to Sandia-generated documents. Discusses procedures for cataloging these electronic reports, including identification of the bibliographic information and MARC tags

Stoecker, Nora K.; Alford, Dixie L.

1998-01-01

308

Implementation and Validation of Sandia Outdoor Photovoltaic Test Method and Performance Model at Arizona State University  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper deals with the technology transfer of a specific photovoltaic (PV) module characterization procedure from Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) to Arizona State University Photovoltaic Testing Laboratory (ASU-PTL). This effort was intended to meet industry requests for independent module performance testing that provides the parameters (coefficients) required by the Sandia performance model. The objective of this work was two fold:

Bo Li; David King; William Boyson; Govindasamy TamizhMani

2006-01-01

309

Sandia's Biofuels Program  

ScienceCinema

Sandia's biofuels program is focused on developing next-generation, renewable fuel solutions derived from biomass. In this video, various Sandia researchers discuss the program and the tools they employ to tackle the technical challenges they face.

Simmons, Blake; Singh, Seema; Lane, Todd; Reichardt, Tom; Davis, Ryan

2014-07-24

310

Sandia's Biofuels Program  

SciTech Connect

Sandia's biofuels program is focused on developing next-generation, renewable fuel solutions derived from biomass. In this video, various Sandia researchers discuss the program and the tools they employ to tackle the technical challenges they face.

Simmons, Blake; Singh, Seema; Lane, Todd; Reichardt, Tom; Davis, Ryan

2014-07-22

311

Radiation chemistry in the Jovian stratosphere - Laboratory simulations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The results of the present low-pressure/continuous-flow laboratory simulations of H2/He/CH4/NH3 atmospheres' plasma-induced chemistry indicate radiation yields of both hydrocarbon and N2-containing organic compounds which increase with decreasing pressure. On the basis of these findings, upper limits of 1 million-1 billion molecules/sq cm/sec are established for production rates of major auroral-chemistry species in the Jovian stratosphere. It is noted that auroral processes may account for 10-100 percent of the total abundances of most of the observed polar-region organic species.

Mcdonald, Gene D.; Thompson, W. R.; Sagan, Carl

1992-01-01

312

Supersonic radiatively cooled rotating flows and jets in the laboratory  

E-print Network

The first laboratory astrophysics experiments to produce a radiatively cooled plasma jet with dynamically significant angular momentum are discussed. A new configuration of wire array z-pinch, the twisted conical wire array, is used to produce convergent plasma flows each rotating about the central axis. Collision of the flows produces a standing shock and jet that each have supersonic azimuthal velocities. By varying the twist angle of the array, the rotation velocity of the system can be controlled, with jet rotation velocities reaching ~20% of the propagation velocity.

D. J. Ampleford; S. V. Lebedev; A. Ciardi; S. N. Bland; S. C. Bott; G. N. Hall; N. Naz; C. A. Jennings; M. Sherlock; J. P. Chittenden; J. B. A. Palmer; A. Frank; E. Blackman

2007-04-24

313

The Sandia Lightning Simulator Recommissioning and upgrades.  

SciTech Connect

The Sandia lightning simulator at Sandia National Laboratories can provide up to 200 kA for a simulated single lightning stroke, 100 kA for a subsequent stroke, and hundreds of Amperes of continuing current. It has recently been recommissioned after a decade of inactivity and the single-stroke capability demonstrated. The simulator capabilities, basic design components, upgrades, and diagnostic capabilities are discussed in this paper.

Martinez, Leonard E.; Caldwell, Michele

2005-08-01

314

The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, 20 years of synchrotron light  

SciTech Connect

The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) is now operating as a fully dedicated light source with low emittance electron optics, delivering high brightness photon beams to 25 experimental stations six to seven months per year. On October 1, 1993 SSRL became a Division of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, rather than an Independent Laboratory of Stanford University, so that high energy physics and synchrotron radiation now function under a single DOE contract. The SSRL division of SLAC has responsibility for operating, maintaining and improving the SPEAR accelerator complex, which includes the storage ring and a 3 GeV injector. SSRL has thirteen x-ray stations and twelve VUV/Soft x-ray stations serving its 600 users. Recently opened to users is a new spherical grating monochromator (SGM) and a multiundulator beam line. Circularly polarized capabilities are being exploited on a second SGM line. New YB{sub 66} crystals installed in a vacuum double-crystal monochromator line have sparked new interest for Al and Mg edge studies. One of the most heavily subscribed stations is the rotation camera, which has been recently enhanced with a MAR imaging plate detector system for protein crystallography on a multipole wiggler. Under construction is a new wiggler-based structural molecular biology beam line with experimental stations for crystallography, small angle scattering and x-ray absorption spectroscopy. Plans for new developments include wiggler beam lines and associated facilities specialized for environmental research and materials processing.

Cantwell, K.

1993-08-01

315

Turning a liability into an asset at Sandia California: The Tritium Research Facility transition  

Microsoft Academic Search

With an investment of $20.9 million, Sandia National Laboratories\\/California (Sandia\\/CA) saved the Department of Energy (DOE) an estimated $106.3 million--a 500% return on investment. In cooperation with DOE, Sandia\\/CA decontaminated and transitioned (D and T) the Tritium Research Laboratory (TRL), a DOE non-reactor Category 2 nuclear facility. In support of the DOE`s Office of Defense Programs, Sandia\\/CA had conducted advanced

T. B. Garcia; S. J. Raubfogel

1997-01-01

316

[Estimation of radiation exposure and radiation risk for employees of a heart catheterization laboratory].  

PubMed

The staff at interventional radiological procedures is exposed to high levels of ionizing radiation. This applies especially to measures at cardiac catheterization laboratories. In this study the annual radiation exposure to the staff was estimated by measuring the dose rate under characteristic conditions. It could be shown that the resulting radiation exposure was strongly dependent on the radiation protection measures and is also dependent on the operation conditions of the x-ray-tube. The effective dose for the physician wearing a lead apron and thyroid shield was determined to about 1.7 mSv/a. Without a thyroid shield an effective dose of about 3.5 mSv/a resulted. This corresponds to approximately the natural background radiation of about 2.4 mSv/a in the Federal Republic of Germany. From the number of procedures performed we could derive an effective dose of approximately 1-2 microSv per application for the physician, averaged over all types of procedures. Further, it could be shown that the readings of the film badges, usually worn by the staff, underestimate the effective dose by approximately a factor of two. This is because the film badges do not include the contribution of the unshielded parts of the body to effective dose. From the estimated annual effective dose, a lifetime dose of 68 mSv was estimated for a 40-year working career. The corresponding lifetime risk for induced fatal cancer due to radiation exposure was determined to 0.3% applying the ICRP risk factor of 4 x 10(-2) Sv-1. Considering the NCRP recommendations for a safe occupation, working in a cardiac catheterization laboratory can be considered as safe when applying all radiation protection measures. However, changing the protection measures and modifying the parameters of the x-ray-tube can lead to strong changes of the radiation exposure and the resulting risk estimation. PMID:9235797

Folkerts, K H; Mnz, A; Jung, S

1997-04-01

317

Presented at Sandia National Laboratory  

E-print Network

gravity presents the ultimate challenge to theorists · Explaining high-Tc superconductors · Unstable · Climate prediction is heavy weather · Turbulence nears a final answer · Glass physics: still Particle Transport Macro Stability Edge Fusion Conditions { (, , ), edge, P/PH} #12;Burning Plasma Physics

318

Transportation technology at Sandia  

SciTech Connect

Industrial and military activities in the US produce large amounts of hazardous mixed waste, which includes both radioactive and toxic substances. The already overburdened environment is faced with the task of safely disposing of these complex wastes. A very important aspect of this effort is the safe and economical transportation of radioactive and toxic chemical wastes to projected repositories. Movement of wastes to the repository sites is accomplished by a combination of truck, rail, ship, and air. The DOE directs transportation activities including cask development technology for use in single or multimode transport. Sandia National Laboratories` Transportation Technology programs provide the technology and know-how to support DOE in achieving safe, efficient, and economical packaging and transportation of nuclear and other hazardous waste materials. This brochure describes the Transportation Technology programs and the specialized techniques and capabilities they offer to prospective users.

NONE

1994-12-31

319

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory activity report for 1987  

SciTech Connect

During 1987, SSRL achieved many significant advances and reached several major milestones utilizing both SPEAR and PEP as synchrotron radiation sources as described in this report. Perhaps the following two are worthy of particular mention: (1) SPEAR reached an all time high of 4,190 delivered user-shifts during calendar year 1987, highlights of the many scientific results are given; (2) during a 12 day run in December of 1987, PEP was operated in a low emittance mode (calculated emittance 6.4 nanometer-radians) at 7.1 GeV with currents up to 33 mA. A second undulator beam line on PEP was commissioned during this run and used to record many spectra showing the extremely high brightness of the radiation. PEP is now by far the highest brightness synchrotron radiation source in the world. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) laboratory operations; (2) accelerator physics programs; (3) experimental facilities; (4) engineering division; (5) conferences and workshops; (6) SSRL organization; (7) experimental progress reports; (8) active proposals; (9) SSRL experiments and proposals by institution; and (10) SSRL publications.

Robinson, S.; Cantwell, K. [eds.

1988-12-31

320

Detection of neutral particle radiation with the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

RAD, the Radiation Assessment Detector on NASA's Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover mission is designed to detect a wide range of different particle species at energies up to 100 MeV/nuc. We present the beam testing results for the flight units of the RAD Sensor Head unit (RSH). Neutral particle response, anti-coincidence efficiency as well as behaviour for relativistic high-Z (up to iron) particles will be shown. Additionally, we present the response of our RSH GEANT4 model for the expected (simulated) Mars surface radiation environment.

Kortmann, O.; Martin, C.; Boehm, E.; Boettcher, S.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Burmeister, S.; Ehresmann, B.; Hassler, D. M.; Zeitlin, C.; Posner, A.; Rafkin, S.; Weigle, E.; Neal, K.; Reitz, G.

2008-12-01

321

Radiative Transfer Theory Verified by Controlled Laboratory Experiments  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We report the results of high-accuracy controlled laboratory measurements of the Stokes reflection matrix for suspensions of submicrometer-sized latex particles in water and compare them with the results of a numerically exact computer solution of the vector radiative transfer equation (VRTE). The quantitative performance of the VRTE is monitored by increasing the volume packing density of the latex particles from 2 to 10. Our results indicate that the VRTE can be applied safely to random particulate media with packing densities up to 2. VRTE results for packing densities of the order of 5 should be taken with caution, whereas the polarized bidirectional reflectivity of suspensions with larger packing densities cannot be accurately predicted. We demonstrate that a simple modification of the phase matrix entering the VRTE based on the so-called static structure factor can be a promising remedy that deserves further examination.

Mishchenko, Michael I.; Goldstein, Dennis H.; Chowdhary, Jacek; Lompado, Arthur

2013-01-01

322

Space Radiation Dosimetry with the The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) is a compact, lightweight energetic particle an-alyzer that will fly on the NASA 2011 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Mission. RAD will detect and analyze energetic particle species (p, n, He, 2Z26) relevant for dosimetry on the Martian surface. The Galactic Cosmic Rays and Solar Energetic Particles produce both pri-mary and secondary radiation, with secondaries being created in both the atmosphere and the Martian regolith. Fully characterizing and understanding the surface radiation environment is fundamental to quantitatively assessing the habitability of Mars, and is an essential precursor measurement for future manned Mars missions. An extensive database to be used for calibration has been obtained for a wide range of energetic charged particle beams at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) and the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC). Neutron calibration data at 5, 15, and 19 MeV were obtained at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt. This talk will discuss the highlights of the RAD calibration campaigns and talk about what we have learned from these campaigns with respect to operating RAD on the Martian surface. We will also discuss other mission applications for RAD where dosimetry in mixed fields of energetic charged and neutral particles is needed.

Hassler, Donald M.; Zeitlin, Cary; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.; Boehm, Eckhardt; Boettcher, Stephan; Burmeister, Soenke; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Kortmann, Onno; Martin, Cesar; Posner, Arik; Rafkin, Scot; Reitz, Guenther

323

PREFACE: Acceleration and radiation generation in space and laboratory plasmas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sixty-six leading researchers from ten nations gathered in the Homeric village of Kardamyli, on the southern coast of mainland Greece, from August 29-September 4, 1993 for the International Workshop on Acceleration and Radiation Generation in Space and Laboratory Plasmas. This Special Issue represents a cross-section of the presentations made at and the research stimulated by that meeting. According to the Iliad, King Agamemnon used Kardamyli as a dowry offering in order to draw a sulking Achilles into the Trojan War. 3000 years later, Kardamyli is no less seductive. Its remoteness and tranquility made it an ideal venue for promoting the free exchange of ideas between various disciplines that do not normally interact. Through invited presen tations, informal poster discussions and working group sessions, the Workshop brought together leaders from the laboratory and space/astrophysics communities working on common problems of acceleration and radiation generation in plasmas. It was clear from the presentation and discussion sessions that there is a great deal of common ground between these disciplines which is not at first obvious due to the differing terminologies and types of observations available to each community. All of the papers in this Special Issue highlight the role collective plasma processes play in accelerating particles or generating radiation. Some are state-of-the-art presentations of the latest research in a single discipline, while others investi gate the applicability of known laboratory mechanisms to explain observations in natural plasmas. Notable among the latter are the papers by Marshall et al. on kHz radiation in the magnetosphere ; Barletta et al. on collective acceleration in solar flares; and by Dendy et al. on ion cyclotron emission. The papers in this Issue are organized as follows: In Section 1 are four general papers by Dawson, Galeev, Bingham et al. and Mon which serves as an introduction to the physical mechanisms of acceleration and radiation generation in plasmas. The next section includes state-of-the-art papers on laboratory accelerators driven by lasers (Nakajima et al., Shukla, Johnson et al.), microwaves (Nishida et al., Bogomolov et al.) and by particle beams (Ogata et al.). Also in this section are theoretical papers presenting new work on synchrotron like oscillations in plasma waves (Fedele) and two types of laboratory radiation sources, FEL's (Marshall et al.) and ionization fronts (Lai et al.), and Frantzeskakis et al. described the Hamiltonian analysis of a slow-wave autonomous cyclotron buncher. Section 3 contains papers on astrophysical plasmas, with the general presentations of Colgate and Krishnan. Kazanas and Krishnan address active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Thielheim discusses general acceleration mech anisms in rotating magnetized systems. Asseo discussed Langmuir solitons in pulsars and Blackman et al. treat magnetic reconnection relativistically. Su et al. analyze the possibility of plasma wave excitation and particle acceleration by neu trinos from supernovae. Dogiel et al. on cosmic ray scattering by MHD fluctuations. The papers in Section 4 treat fusion plasmas (Dendy et al. and Lashmore-Davies et al.). Section 5, space plasmas, includes papers on acceleration processes in the magnetosphere (Anagnostopoulos and Marshall et al.) and the sun (Barletta et al.). It is evident from the Workshop and the papers collected here that this is indeed a rich field of investigations and that both the natural and laboratory plasma communities can benefit from the cross-fertilization of ideas between them. We wish to thank the authors and attendees for their contributions to the success of this workshop, Dr Philip Debenham and Dr David Sutter of the U.S. D.o.E. and Dr Charles Roberson of the U.S. O.N.R. for their financial support (Grants DE-FGO3-93ER40776 and N00014-93-1-0814), and the ECC Twinning Grant SC1*-CT92-0773. We appreciate the considerable local support from Mr Glegles and his staff at the Agricultural Bank of Greece. We thank Mr V. Tataronis, mayor of Kardamyli, and

Bingham, R.; Katsouleas, T.; Dawson, J. M.; Stenflo, L.

1994-01-01

324

Pulsed Power: Sandia's Plans for the New Millenium  

SciTech Connect

Pulsed power science and engineering activities at Sandia National Laboratories grew out of a programmatic need for intense radiation sources to advance capabilities in radiographic imaging and to create environments for testing and certifying the hardness of components and systems to radiation in hostile environments. By the early 1970s, scientists in laboratories around the world began utilizing pulsed power drivers with very short (10s of nanoseconds) pulse lengths for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments. In the United States, Defense Programs within the Department of Energy has sponsored this research. Recent progress in pulsed power, specifically fast-pulsed-power-driven z pinches, in creating temperatures relevant to ICF has been remarkable. Worldwide developments in pulsed power technologies and increased applications in both defense and industry are contrasted with ever increasing stress on research and development tiding. The current environment has prompted us at Sandia to evaluate our role in the continued development of pulsed power science and to consider options for the future. This presentation will highlight our recent progress and provide an overview of our plans as we begin the new millennium.

QUINTENZ,JEFFREY P.

2000-07-20

325

Seismic waves radiated during dynamic rupture of granite laboratory samples  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Using arrays of piezoelectric sensors, we analyze the way that seismic waves are radiated during dynamic rupture of saw-cut faults in granite laboratory samples. We compare stick-slip events generated on a on a 0.15 m-long fault in a triaxial apparatus at 70 to 200 MPa normal stress with those on a 2 m-long fault in a large-scale biaxial apparatus at 1 to 7 MPa normal stress. The two machines have different values of unloading stiffness and produce stick-slip events with significantly different properties. Events on the triaxial apparatus have greater overall slip (400 to 1600 ?m) and larger sample-average shear stress changes (25 to 110 MPa) but shorter overall slip duration (200 to 400 ?s) compared to those on the large biaxial apparatus (50 to 150 ?m slip, 0.1 to 0.4 MPa stress changes, and 2 to 4 ms overall slip duration). As a result, the average slip speeds are much larger for events on the triaxial apparatus (2 to 4 m/s) compared to those on the large biaxial apparatus (15 to 75 mm/s). To explore the consequences of these differences, and how they relate to differences in dynamic rupture modes and seismic radiation, each sample is instrumented with at least 15 piezoelectric sensors which are used to study the timing, location, amplitude, and frequency content of radiated seismic waves. In addition, an array of strain gages on the 2 m samples allows us to explore how the local distribution of shear stress along the fault affects the way that fault rupture occurs. We find that at low stress levels fault slip along the 2 m fault occurs as brief bursts of rapid, seismic slip followed by slowly expanding (5 to 200 m/s) fronts of largely aseismic afterslip (80 to 500 ?m/s slip rates). Higher stress levels on the same fault produce ruptures that propagate close to the shear wave speed and continuously radiate seismic waves near the rupture front. In some cases we observe the rapid termination of seismic radiation on the 2 m fault when a rupture front propagates into a low stress region. Finally, we evaluate which of our observations are controlled by the boundary conditions and elastic properties of the apparatus and which are controlled by the elastic and frictional properties of the rocks and are most relevant to dynamic rupture processes that generate natural earthquakes.

Mclaskey, G.; Kilgore, B. D.; Lockner, D. A.; Beeler, N. M.

2013-12-01

326

Simulation and off-line programming at Sandia`s Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center  

SciTech Connect

One role of the Intelligent Robotics and System Center (ISRC) at Sandia National Laboratories is to address certain aspects of Sandia`s mission to design, manufacture, maintain, and dismantle nuclear weapon components. Hazardous materials, devices, and environments are often involved. Because of shrinking resources, these tasks must be accomplished with a minimum of prototyping, while maintaining high reliability. In this paper, the authors describe simulation, off-line programming/planning, and related tools which are in use, under development, and being researched to solve these problems at the ISRC.

Xavier, P.G.; Fahrenholtz, J.C.; McDonald, M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center] [and others

1997-11-01

327

University of Notre Dame Radiation Laboratory quarterly report, July 1--September 30, 1991  

SciTech Connect

Research carried out at the Notre Dame Radiation Laboratory is briefly described. Research involves areas of electron transfer photoprocesses, photochemistry, pulse radiolysis, and charge transfer reactions. 13 refs.

Not Available

1991-10-15

328

Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy s National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.  

E-print Network

Laboratory SNL Collaborating National Laboratories: LLNL, NRL, LANL Collaborating Universities: U.Wisconsin. in progress #12;Z-Pinch IFE Power Plant has a Matrix of Possibilities Repetitive Z-Pinch Driver: _ Marx coating) (e. g., carbon steel) Target: _ double-pinch dynamic hohlraum fast ignition Chamber: _ dry

329

Another dramatic climb toward fusion conditions for Sandia Z accelerator  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This news article, from Sandia National Laboratories, presents advances made on the Sandia Z- pinch machine, which is an intense X-ray source and a possible candidate for fusion power production. The article describes how the machine works and also describes experimental results. Links to more information and images of the machine are also contained.

2007-04-06

330

Sandia SCADA Program -- High Surety SCADA LDRD Final Report  

Microsoft Academic Search

Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems are a part of the nation's critical infrastructure that is especially vulnerable to attack or disruption. Sandia National Laboratories is developing a high-security SCADA specification to increase the national security posture of the U.S. Because SCADA security is an international problem and is shaped by foreign and multinational interests, Sandia is working to

ROLF E

2002-01-01

331

An Agent-Based Simulation Laboratory for Economics and Infrastructure Interdependency David A. Schoenwald, Dianne C. Barton, and Mark A. Ehlen  

E-print Network

Sandia National Laboratories P. O. Box 5800 Albuquerque, NM 87185-0318 daschoe@sandia.gov Abstract Researchers at Sandia National Laboratories have developed a next-generation agent-based economic 'laboratory

Tesfatsion, Leigh

332

Laboratory Studies of Supersonic Magnetized Plasma Jets and Radiative Shocks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this talk I will focus on laboratory plasma experiments producing magnetically driven supersonic plasma jets and on the interaction of these jets with ambient media. The experiments are scalable to astrophysical flows in that the critical dimensionless numbers such as the plasma collisionality, the plasma beta, the Reynolds number and the magnetic Reynolds number are all in the astrophysically appropriate ranges. The experimental results will be compared with computer simulations performed with laboratory plasma codes and with astrophysical codes. In the experiments the jets are driven and collimated by the toroidal magnetic fields and it is found that the level of MHD instabilities in the jets strongly depends on the strength of the field represented by the ratio of the thermal to magnetic field pressures (plasma beta). The experiments show the possibility of formation of episodic outflows, with periodic ejections of magnetic bubbles naturally evolving into a heterogeneous jet propagating inside a channel made of self-collimated magnetic cavities [1,2]. We also found that it is possible to form quasi-laminar jets which are indirectly collimated by the toroidal magnetic fields, but this requires the presence of the lower density halo plasma surrounding the central jet [3]. Studies of the radiative shocks formed in the interaction of the supersonic magnetized plasma flows with ambient plasma will be also presented, and the development of cooling instabilities in the post-shock plasma will be discussed. This research was sponsored by EPSRC Grant No. EP/G001324/1 and by the OFES DOE under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-SC-0001063. References 1. A. Ciardi, S.V. Lebedev, A. Frank et al., The Astrophysical Journal, 691: L147-L150 (2009) 2. F.A. Suzuki-Vidal, S.V. Lebedev, S.N. Bland et al., Physics of Plasmas, 17, 112708 (2010). 3. F.A. Suzuki-Vidal, M. Bocchi, S.V. Lebedev et al., Physics of Plasmas, 19, 022708 (2012).

Lebedev, Sergey

2013-06-01

333

A laboratory study of radiation damage to drift chambers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A laboratory study of aging effects under intense radiation in Ar/C 2H 6 and Ar/CO 2/CH 4 filled drift chambers was carried out in order to establish detector lifetimes. In both gas mixtures stable operation in proportional mode and for Ar/C 2H 6 also in the limited streamer regime was possible up to total collected charges of several times 10 17 e - per mm of anode wire. Gain reductions were observed at rates between 0 and 1% per 10 16 e -/mm for Ar/C 2H 6 depending on the test conditions. Under conditions, where gas amplification was stable in Ar/C 2H 6, gain losses in Ar/CO 2/CH 4 ranged between 1.3 and 3.4% per 10 16 e -/mm. Gain nonuniformities were inferred from broadenings and distortions of the 55Fe 5.9 keV ? line. These gain variations are caused by typically less than 100 nm thick deposits on the aged anode wires of poorly conductive material containing O, Si and C. Admixtures of H 2O did not halt the aging processes, but smoothed local gain variations. Contaminations with organic vapor from soft PVC surfaces initiated and accelerated radiation damage. Spark and glow discharges in Ar/C 2H 6 led to growth of grains and flakes of material containing C as the only detectable element on anode and cathode wires within minutes. In contrast discharges in Ar/CO 2CH 4 did not result in any detectable deposits.

Kotthaus, Rainer

1986-12-01

334

Radiation chemistry in the Jovian stratosphere: laboratory simulations.  

PubMed

Low-pressure continuous-flow laboratory simulations of plasma induced chemistry in H2/He/CH4/NH3 atmospheres show radiation yields of hydrocarbons and nitrogen-containing organic compounds that increase with decreasing pressure in the range 2-200 mbar. Major products of these experiments that have been observed in the Jovian atmosphere are acetylene (C2H2), ethylene (C2H4), ethane (C2H6), hydrogen cyanide (HCN), propane (C3H8), and propyne (C3H4). Major products that have not yet been observed on Jupiter include acetonitrile (CH3CN), methylamine (CH3NH2), propene (C3H6), butane (C4H10), and butene (C4H8). Various other saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons, as well as other amines and nitriles, are present in these experiments as minor products. We place upper limits of 10(6)-10(9) molecules cm-2 sec-1 on production rates of the major species from auroral chemistry in the Jovian stratosphere, and calculate stratospheric mole fraction contributions. This work shows that auroral processes may account for 10-100% of the total abundances of most observed organic species in the polar regions. Our experiments are consistent with models of Jovian polar stratospheric aerosol haze formation from polymerization of acetylene by secondary ultraviolet processing. PMID:11540156

McDonald, G D; Thompson, W R; Sagan, C

1992-09-01

335

The {open_quotes}ASR{close_quotes} story where we are and how we got there: A history of Sandia National Laboratories maintenance employee safety committee  

SciTech Connect

The Area Safety Representative (ASR) Team is an employee based safety committee that was originated in the latter part of 1994. It was introduced by the Operations and Engineering Center ES&H Coordinator who had heard about an employee based safety program implemented at the EG&G Corporation. This information was the first step in creating Sandia`s Maintenance `Area Safety Representative` (ASR) Program. An advertisement went out from the ES&H Coordinator to all the Maintenance Organizations asking for individuals who would be interested in performing as a volunteer safety representative for their section. The interest was moderate but effective. The committee consisted of one volunteer from each of the working sections within the Maintenance Organization, e.e., HVAC Mechanics, Electricians, Millwrights, Plumbers, Sheetmetal Workers, High-Voltage Technicians, a Union Representative, and representatives from the Operations Group that manage sub-contracted personnel. During the past year, organizational changes have brought about the addition of representatives to include the Planners and the Custodians. The original committee members were enrolled in a 30-hour OSHA Voluntary Compliance Outreach Course. This information provided the members with a broad overview of the Safety Guidelines set forth by OSHA for themselves and their coworkers. It is to be noted that this is an employee based safety team. There are no supervisors or managers on the committee but their attendance is always welcomed at the ASR meetings.

NONE

1997-08-01

336

20 Years of Solar Measurements: The Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) at NREL  

E-print Network

20 Years of Solar Measurements: The Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) at NREL Tom to provide for: · Maximum annual solar access · Continuous measurements of key solar radiation resources · Calibrations of instruments used to measure solar radiation · Training of meteorological station operators

337

Radiation effects in optoelectronic devices. [Review  

SciTech Connect

Purpose of this report is to provide not only a summary of radiation damage studies at Sandia National Laboratories, but also of those in the literature on the components of optoelectronic systems: light emitting diodes (LEDs), laser diodes, photodetectors, optical fibers, and optical isolators. This review of radiation damage in optoelectronic components is structured according to device type. In each section, a brief discussion of those device properties relevant to radiation effects is given.

Barnes, C.E.; Wiczer, J.J.

1984-05-01

338

SCOAP: Sandia controllability\\/observability analysis program  

Microsoft Academic Search

SCOAP is a program developed at Sandia National Laboratories for the analysis of digital circuit test- ability. Testability is related to the difficulty of controlling and observing the Logical values of inter- nal nodes from circuit inputs and outputs, respec- tively. This paper reviews the testability analysis algorithms and describes their implementation in the SCOAP program. This paper describes the

Lawrence H. Goldstein; Evelyn L. Thigpen

1988-01-01

339

SCOAP: Sandia controllability\\/observability analysis program  

Microsoft Academic Search

SCOAP is a program developed at Sandia National Laboratories for the analysis of digital circuit testability. Testability is related to the difficulty of controlling and observing the logical values of internal nodes from circuit inputs and outputs, respectively. This paper reviews the testability analysis algorithms and describes their implementation in the SCOAP program.

Lawrence H. Goldstein; Evelyn L. Thigpen

1980-01-01

340

Sandia\\/NIST reference cell calibration procedure  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Photovoltaic Device Measurement Laboratory (PDML) at Sandia in collaboration with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has developed an indoor calibration procedure that improves the accuracy and reduces the time and cost of calibrating photovoltaic reference cells. The calibration procedure involves exposing the reference cell to an accurately known spectral irradiance provided by a 1000 W quartz-tungsten-halogen

David L. King; Bany R Hansen; John K. Jackson

1993-01-01

341

Environmental Remediation Sciences Program at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Synchrotron radiation (SR)-based techniques provide unique capabilities to address scientific issues underpinning environmental remediation science and have emerged as major research tools in this field. The high intensity of SR sources and x-ray photon-in/photon-out detection allow noninvasive in-situ analysis of dilute, hydrated, and chemically/structurally complex natural samples. SR x-rays can be focused to beams of micron and sub-micron dimension, which allows the study of microstructures, chemical microgradients, and microenvironments such as in biofilms, pore spaces, and around plant roots, that may control the transformation of contaminants in the environment. The utilization of SR techniques in environmental remediation sciences is often frustrated, however, by an ''activation energy barrier'', which is associated with the need to become familiar with an array of data acquisition and analysis techniques, a new technical vocabulary, beam lines, experimental instrumentation, and user facility administrative procedures. Many investigators find it challenging to become sufficiently expert in all of these areas or to maintain their training as techniques evolve. Another challenge is the dearth of facilities for hard x-ray micro-spectroscopy, particularly in the 15 to 23 KeV range, which includes x-ray absorption edges of the priority DOE contaminants Sr, U, Np, Pu, and Tc. Prior to the current program, there were only two (heavily oversubscribed) microprobe facilities in the U.S. that could fully address this energy range (one at each of APS and NSLS); none existed in the Western U.S., in spite of the relatively large number of DOE laboratories in this region.

Bargar, John R.

2006-11-15

342

LABORATORY & RADIATION SAFETY Cornell University Department of Environmental Health & Safety  

E-print Network

hazard communication program for any workplace that uses hazardous chemicals. The OSHA "Laboratory for staff working in labs versus other spaces and what exactly defines a lab. The OSHA Hazard Communication: "Laboratory" means a facility where the "laboratory use of hazardous chemicals" occurs. It is a workplace

Pawlowski, Wojtek

343

Sandia Software Guidelines, Volume 2. Documentation  

SciTech Connect

This volume is one in a series of Sandia Software Guidelines intended for use in producing quality software within Sandia National Laboratories. In consonance with the IEEE Standards for software documentation, this volume provides guidance in the selection of an adequate document set for a software project and example formats for many types of software documentation. A tutorial on life cycle documentation is also provided. Extended document thematic outlines and working examples of software documents are available on electronic media as an extension of this volume.

NONE

1995-09-01

344

Inside Sandia, April 1996  

SciTech Connect

Brief articles in this issue are entitled: New testing techniques, textiles on the information superhighway, and knowledge preservation; Structural health monitoring techniques and robust analysis tools assess aging and damaged structures; Sandia`s VCSELs (Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers): sparking a laser diode revolution; Fiber-optic instrumentation trims weeks off the wait for cervical cancer test results; DAMA (Demand Activated Manufacturing Architecture) project boosts competitiveness of US textile industry; SEAMIST (Science and Engineering Associates Membrane Instrumentation and Sampling Technique) cuts contamination cleanup costs; RePAVing the roads to the past (Relevant Point of Access Video); and Sandia receives DOE basic energy sciences award for sol-gel achievements.

Locke, T. [ed.

1996-04-01

345

Parallel detection and elimination of strongly connected components for radiation transport sweeps  

E-print Network

for useful discussions regarding this work. Also, I wish to thank Bruce Hendrickson, Steve Plimpton, and Kent Budge at Sandia National Laboratories; without their guidance this work would not have been accomplished. TABLE OF CONTENTS CHAPTER Page I... to ensure scalable performance. In this thesis we will consider a prototypical radiation transport solver used in an ASCI multi-physics code, such as SnRad [11] from Sandia National Lab- oratories In this module the transport equations are solved using a...

McLendon, William Clarence

2012-06-07

346

Sandia X-ray laser program  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Sandia x-ray laser program is based on the intense keV radiation produced by stagnating gas puff implosions. The laser scheme uses this radiation to photoionize Ne-like ions to F-like ions, and produce a 3p-3s population inversion via recombination. An annular stagnation shell is used to separate the pump from the lasant. Converter technology is being developed to try the

E. J. McGuire; K. Matzen; R. Spielman; M. A. Palmer; B. A. Hammel; D. L. Hansen; T. W. Hussey; W. W. Hsing; R. J. Dukart

1986-01-01

347

Optimum laboratory radiation source for hardness assurance testing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Silicon-on-insulator (SOI) and bulk-silicon transistors were irradiated using X-ray, Co-60 gamma, and proton radiation sources. Co-60 gamma irradiation generates larger radiation-induced threshold voltage shifts (by a factor of two) in SOI buried oxides and in parasitic field oxides under low-field conditions than X-ray or proton irradiation. For all devices examined, the radiation-induced threshold voltage shifts generated by X-ray irradiation were

J. R. Schwank; M. R. Shaneyfelt; P. Paillet; D. E. Beutler; V. Ferlet-Cavrois; B. L. Draper; R. A. Loemaker; P. E. Dodd; F. W. Sexton

2001-01-01

348

Diurnal Variations of Energetic Particle Radiation Dose Measured by the Mars Science Laboratory Radiation Assessment Detector  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) on board the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover Curiosity has collected data on the interplanetary radiation environment during cruise from Earth to Mars and at the surface of Mars since its landing in August 2012. Any process that changes the column mass of atmosphere should change the dose at the surface due to the shielding effect of the atmosphere. On Mars there are two major processes that substantially change column atmospheric mass. The first is the seasonal condensation cycle during which 25% of the dominant atmospheric constituent (CO2) condenses onto the winter pole. The second major process is related to thermal tides forced by the direct heating of the Martian atmosphere by the Sun. The thermal tide can produce a column mass variation of 10-15% over a Martian day (sol). Here, we report on the total dose rate and neutral count rate measured by MSL RAD and the variation of these dose rates over the diurnal cycle. Further, we show that the variation in the dose rates is very likely due to the variation of column mass, as measured by the pressure sensor on the Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS). While changes in dose were expected from changes in altitude or season, the discovery of a diurnal variation was not anticipated, although it should have been reasonably expected in hindsight.

Rafkin, Scot

349

Sandia Strategic Plan 1997  

SciTech Connect

Sandia embarked on its first exercise in corporate strategic planning during the winter of 1989. The results of that effort were disseminated with the publication of Strategic Plan 1990. Four years later Sandia conducted their second major planning effort and published Strategic Plan 1994. Sandia`s 1994 planning effort linked very clearly to the Department of Energy`s first strategic plan, Fueling a Competitive Economy. It benefited as well from the leadership of Lockheed Martin Corporation, the management and operating contractor. Lockheed Martin`s corporate success is founded on visionary strategic planning and annual operational planning driven by customer requirements and technology opportunities. In 1996 Sandia conducted another major planning effort that resulted in the development of eight long-term Strategic Objectives. Strategic Plan 1997 differs from its predecessors in that the robust elements of previous efforts have been integrated into one comprehensive body. The changes implemented so far have helped establish a living strategic plan with a stronger business focus and with clear deployment throughout Sandia. The concept of a personal line of sight for all employees to this strategic plan and its objectives, goals, and annual milestones is becoming a reality.

NONE

1997-12-01

350

Laboratory Specific Training Form (APPENDIX L) Checklist for Worker Training in Radiation Laboratories  

E-print Network

and should be reviewed and signed by the principal investigator and the radiation worker. Please write down have been instructed as to the type and location of all the radioactive materials and/or radiation producing machines in my lab(s). 5. I have read and understand the Radiation Safety Manual or Lab Guide. 6

Berdichevsky, Victor

351

Space Radiation Research Unit, International Open Laboratory in NIRS  

PubMed Central

The radiation environment encountered by astronauts during spaceflight is far more complex than any radiation field existed on Earth. Space crew living and working in the International Space Station (ISS) are exposed to a mixed radiation field comprises primary high-energy cosmic rays, including energetic protons and heavy ions, and to secondary radiations, including energetic neutrons, produced when the primary radiation interacts with the mass of the space station and its contents. The doses of ionizing radiation received by astronauts and cosmonauts aboard the ISS are many times greater than those received by radiation workers on the ground. Exposure to ionizing radiation in space includes high LET events than can produce significant biological damage in human cells and tissues, and thus represents an important risk to space crew health and safety. The Space Radiation Research Unit at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) includes both physicists and radiation biologists and there is extensive collaboration between these two groups. This provides us with the expertise needed to investigate the effects of space crew exposure to the highly complex, mixed radiation environment encountered in space. In addition, NIRS is home to a heavy ion accelerator, HIMAC and the Medical Cyclotron that can be used to simulate various components of the space radiation environment. Recently, we have developed a medium energy proton radiation field using the NIRS Medical Cyclotron. [How about a sentence or two on the significance of this proton facilities.] In addition, NIRS has also developed a high precision tool, the Single Particle Irradiation System to Cell (SPICE) microbeam facility, for use in investigating various radiobiological endpoints, including the bystander effect and the adaptive response of various cell types, Caenorhabditis elegans and in Medaka fish. Some of these research activities are described in these proceedings [1, 2]. The Space Radiation Research Unit at NIRS has extensive international collaborations with researchers in China, Germany, Russia, USA, Sweden, Austria and other countries. In particular, collaborations with our Russian colleagues has led to opportunities to expose our dosimeters aboard the ISS and to numerous other experiments in the frame of the IOL, as described more fully elsewhere in these proceedings. We believe that the framework of the IOL is very powerful and productive and we plan to continue our collaborative research with our international colleagues.

Uchihori, Yukio; Hei, Tom K.; Konishi, Teruaki; Kobayashi, Alisa; Kitamura, Hisashi; Kodaira, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Shingo

2014-01-01

352

Monochromatic x-ray backlighting of tungsten wire arrays on the Sandia Z-machine*  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Z pinches on the Sandia Z-machine are the world's most powerful laboratory x-ray source, capable of producing >200 TW and 1.8 MJ of soft x rays. This is done by passing 15-20 MA of current through an annular wire array, which forms plasma and is compressed by the resulting magnetic forces to the z-axis, where it thermalizes and radiates. Many 2D r-z models of this process have been developed which assume that wires vaporize and form plasma quickly, forming a thin plasma shell before signficant radial motion takes place. Using monochromatic x-ray backlighting techniques, we have imaged 20-mm diameter tungsten arrays relevant to inertial confinement fusion during several stages of the implosion. We have observed the presence of discrete, ablating wire cores that persist for more than 50% of the implosion, delayed implosion trajectories, correlated instabilities at the edge of the wire array, and mass trailing behind the main implosion front. These features are 3D effects that can affect the scaling of wire-array performance with current. *Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

Sinars, Daniel; Cuneo, Michael; Wenger, David; Rambo, Patrick; Smith, Ian; Porter, John

2003-10-01

353

Laboratory Training Manual on the Use of Isotopes and Radiation in Entomology.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This publication should be useful for those who are interested in the theory and application of isotopes and radiation in agriculture and entomology. There are two main parts in the publication. Part I, entitled Basic Part, includes topics which an individual should know about radioisotopes and radiation. There are laboratory exercises included in

International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria).

354

Addressing sophisticated cyber threats demands a multidisciplinary team with a unique mindset. Sandia provides  

E-print Network

Addressing sophisticated cyber threats demands a multidisciplinary team with a unique mindset and recreational opportunities. For more information or to apply online visit: http://careers.sandia.gov/cyber #12;A Career in Cyber Security Research Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory

355

SANDIA-ORIGEN user's manual. [In FORTRAN 4 for CDC 6400, 6600, and 7600  

Microsoft Academic Search

The SANDIA-ORIGEN code calculates the detailed isotopic composition as a function of time in nuclear reactor fuel irradiation and radioactive decay problems. This code was developed specifically for Control Data Corporation computers from the original Oak Ridge National Laboratory ORIGEN code. The nuclear data file used with the code at Sandia Laboratories contains 1063 isotopes (254 structural materials, 101 actinides,

1979-01-01

356

Programmable SAW development :Sandia/NASA project final report.  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a project to develop both fixed and programmable surface acoustic wave (SAW) correlators for use in a low power space communication network. This work was funded by NASA at Sandia National Laboratories for fiscal years 2004, 2003, and the final part of 2002. The role of Sandia was to develop the SAW correlator component, although additional work pertaining to use of the component in a system and system optimization was also done at Sandia. The potential of SAW correlator-based communication systems, the design and fabrication of SAW correlators, and general system utilization of those correlators are discussed here.

Brocato, Robert Wesley

2004-10-01

357

Proposed Design and Operation of a Heat Pipe Reactor using the Sandia National Laboratories Annular Core Test Facility and Existing UZrH Fuel Pins  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Heat Pipe Reactors (HPR) for space power conversion systems offer a number of advantages not easily provided by other systems. They require no pumping, their design easily deals with freezing and thawing of the liquid metal, and they can provide substantial levels of redundancy. Nevertheless, no reactor has ever been operated and cooled with heat pipes, and the startup and other operational characteristics of these systems remain largely unknown. Signification deviations from normal reactor heat removal mechanisms exist, because the heat pipes have fundamental heat removal limits due to sonic flow issues at low temperatures. This paper proposes an early prototypic test of a Heat Pipe Reactor (using existing 20% enriched nuclear fuel pins) to determine the operational characteristics of the HPR. The proposed design is similar in design to the HOMER and SAFE-300 HPR designs (Elliot, Lipinski, and Poston, 2003; Houts, et. al, 2003). However, this reactor uses existing UZrH fuel pins that are coupled to potassium heat pipes modules. The prototype reactor would be located in the Sandia Annular Core Research Reactor Facility where the fuel pins currently reside. The proposed reactor would use the heat pipes to transport the heat from the UZrH fuel pins to a water pool above the core, and the heat transport to the water pool would be controlled by adjusting the pressure and gas type within a small annulus around each heat pipe. The reactor would operate as a self-critical assembly at power levels up to 200 kWth. Because the nuclear heated HPR test uses existing fuel and because it would be performed in an existing facility with the appropriate safety authorization basis, the test could be performed rapidly and inexpensively. This approach makes it possible to validate the operation of a HPR and also measure the feedback mechanisms for a typical HPR design. A test of this nature would be the world's first operating Heat Pipe Reactor. This reactor is therefore called "HPR-1".

Wright, Steven A.; Lipinski, Ronald J.; Pandya, Tara; Peters, Curtis

2005-02-01

358

Building the basis for a comprehensive radiation protection program for a multi-program laboratory  

SciTech Connect

An explicit, workplace-specific training has been developed, implemented, and documented for all radiation workers. In addition to the radiation worker personnel located at reactors, accelerators, radiochemical laboratories, and waste treatment areas, we have trained other personnel who work in areas where a lesser potential for radiological/chemical exposure exists. These workforces include construction crews, site restoration crews, contracted special services such as scoping and site characterization teams, and short-term visitors. We are developing a comprehensive, integrated approach to radiation protection training suited for a multi-purpose research laboratory. 9 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

Copenhaver, E.D.

1987-01-01

359

Diurnal Variations of Energetic Particle Radiation Dose Measured by the Mars Science Laboratory Radiation Assessment Detector  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) on board the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover Curiosity has collected data on the interplanetary radiation environment during cruise from Earth to Mars and at the surface of Mars since its landing in August 2012. RAD's particle detection capabilities are achieved with a solid-state detector (SSD) stack (A, B, C), a CsI(Tl) scintillator (D), and a plastic scintillator (E) for neutron detection. The D and E detectors are surrounded by an anticoincidence shield (F), also made of plastic scintillator. All scintillators are optically coupled to silicon diodes which convert scintillation light to electrons. RAD is capable of measuring both Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) thought to be produced by supernovae outside the heliosphere and Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs). GCRs are relativistic particles (100 MeV/nuc to >10 GeV/nuc) composed of roughly 89% protons, 10% alpha particles (He), and 1% heavier nuclei [1]. Because of their high energies and continuous nature, GCRs are the dominant source of background radiation at the Martian surface, and are responsible for the production of secondary particles (notably neutrons) via complex interactions in the atmosphere and regolith. SEPs are produced by coronal mass ejections. These intermittent storms are most likely to occur near solar maximum and typical fluxes are dominated by protons with energies lower than 100 MeV/nuc. Unlike the GCR flux, the SEP flux can vary by five or more orders of magnitude over timescales of a day. Even under a constant flux of energetic particle radiation at the top of the atmosphere, the radiation dose at the surface should vary as a function of surface elevation [2]. This variation is directly related to the change in the shielding provided by the total atmospheric mass column, which is to a very good approximation directly related to surface pressure. Thus, the flux of primary energetic particles should increase with altitude, all other things being equal. At present, MSL has been at a nearly constant altitude of ~-4.4 km MOLA so that no elevation-induced changes are expected and none have been observed. However, any process that changes the column mass of atmosphere should change the dose at the surface. On Mars there are two major processes that substantially change column atmospheric mass. The first is the seasonal condensation cycle during which ~25% of the dominant atmospheric constituent (CO2) condenses onto the winter pole. This seasonal signal is very strong and has been observed by surface pressure measurements from the Viking Landers up through MSL [3,4]. The second major process is related to the thermal tide. The direct heating of the Martian atmosphere by the Sun produces global scale waves that redistribute mass [5]. The two most dominant tidal modes are the diurnal and semidiurnal tide. Together, the thermal tide can produce a variation of 10-15% over a Martian day (sol). Here, we report on the dose measured by the RAD E detector and the variation of this dose over the diurnal cycle. Further, we show that the variation in the E dose rate is very likely due to the variation of column mass, as measured by the pressure sensor on the Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS), driven by the thermal tide. While changes in dose were expected from changes in altitude or season, the discovery of a diurnal variation was not anticipated, although it should have been reasonably expected in hindsight.

Rafkin, Scot; Zeitlin, Cary; Ehresmann, Bent; Khler, Jan; Guo, Jingnan; Kahanp, Henrik; Hassler, Don; -Gomez, Javier E.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert; Brinza, David; Bttcher, Stephan; Bhm, Eckhard; Burmeister, Sonka; Martin, Cesar; Mller-Mellin, Robert; Appel, Jan; Posner, Arik; Reitz, Gunter; Kharytonov, Aliksandr; Cucinotta, Francis

2013-04-01

360

Aerosciences at Sandia National Labs.  

SciTech Connect

A brief overview of Sandia National Laboratories will be presented highlighting the mission of Engineering Science Center. The Engineering Science Center provides a wide range of capabilities to support the lab's missions. As part of the Engineering Science Center the Aeroscience department provides research, development and application expertise in both experimental and computation compressible fluid mechanics. The role of Aeroscience at Sandia National Labs will be discussed with a focus on current research and development activities within the Aeroscience Department. These activities will be presented within the framework of a current program to highlight the synergy between computational and experimental work. The research effort includes computational and experimental activities covering fluid and structural dynamics disciplines. The presentation will touch on: probable excitation sources that yield the level of random vibration observed during flight; the methods that have been developed to model the random pressure fields in the turbulent boundary layer using a combination of CFD codes and a model of turbulent boundary layer pressure fluctuations; experimental measurement of boundary layer fluctuations; the methods of translating the random pressure fields to time-domain spatially correlated pressure fields.

Payne, Jeffrey L.

2010-10-01

361

Construction and operation of an improved radiation calibration facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory: Environmental assessment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Calibration of instruments used to detect and measure ionizing radiation has been conducted over the last 20 years at Brookhaven National Laboratory's (BNL) Radiation Calibration Facility, Building 348. Growth of research facilities, projects in progress, and more stringent Department of Energy (DOE) orders which involve exposure to nuclear radiation have placed substantial burdens on the existing radiation calibration facility. The facility currently does not meet the requirements of DOE Order 5480.4 or American National Standards Institute (ANSI) N323-1978, which establish calibration methods for portable radiation protection instruments used in the detection and measurement of levels of ionizing radiation fields or levels of radioactive surface contaminations. Failure to comply with this standard could mean instrumentation is not being calibrated to necessary levels of sensitivity. The laboratory has also recently obtained a new neutron source and gamma beam irradiator which can not be made operational at existing facilities because of geometry and shielding inadequacies. These sources are needed to perform routine periodic calibrations of radiation detecting instruments used by scientific and technical personnel and to meet BNL's substantial increase in demand for radiation monitoring capabilities. To place these new sources into operation, it is proposed to construct an addition to the existing radiation calibration facility that would house all calibration sources and bring BNL calibration activities into compliance with DOE and ANSI standards. The purpose of this assessment is to identify potential significant environmental impacts associated with the construction and operation of an improved radiation calibration facility at BNL.

1994-10-01

362

Aircraft Radiation Shield Experiments--Preflight Laboratory Testing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the past, measurements onboard a research Boeing 57F (RB57-F) aircraft have demonstrated that the neutron environment within the aircraft structure is greater than that in the local external environment. Recent studies onboard Boeing 737 commercial flights have demonstrated cabin variations in radiation exposure up to 30 percent. These prior results were the basis of the present study to quantify the potential effects of aircraft construction materials on the internal exposures of the crew and passengers. The present study constitutes preflight measurements using an unmoderated Cf-252 fission neutron source to quantify the effects of three current and potential aircraft materials (aluminum, titanium, and graphite-epoxy composite) on the fast neutron flux. Conclusions about the effectiveness of the three selected materials for radiation shielding must wait until testing in the atmosphere is complete; however, it is clear that for shielding low-energy neutrons, the composite material is an improved shielding material over aluminum or titanium.

Singleterry, Robert C., Jr.; Shinn, Judy L.; Wilson, John W.; Maiden, Donald L.; Thibeault, Sheila A.; Badavi, Francis F.; Conroy, Thomas; Braby, Leslie

1999-01-01

363

Z Machine at Sandia Labs  

SciTech Connect

Sandia Labs' Z machine is the largest laboratory source of x-rays in the world. For the few nanoseconds of a Z Machine test, its electrical output equals the output of 50x the electrical generating stations of all the power plants on earth. The Z Machine complex encompasses an area roughly the size of a major college basketball arena. Originally created to validate nuclear weapons models, the Z Machine is also considered a "dark horse" in the race for viable fusion energy production. After the famous "arcs and sparks" photo of Z (a photo no longer possible after its refurbishment), this is a fast-motion video of workers completing Z's recent refurbishment.

2007-10-17

364

Synchrotron radiation applications in medical research at Brookhaven National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

In the relatively short time that synchrotrons have been available to the scientific community, their characteristic beams of UV and X-ray radiation have been applied to virtually all areas of medical science which use ionizing radiation. The ability to tune intense monochromatic beams over wide energy ranges clearly differentiates these sources from standard clinical and research tools. The tunable spectrum, high intrinsic collimation of the beams, polarization and intensity of the beams make possible in-vitro and in-vivo research and therapeutic programs not otherwise possible. From the beginning of research operation at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), many programs have been carrying out basic biomedical research. At first, the research was limited to in-vitro programs such as the x-ray microscope, circular dichroism, XAFS, protein crystallography, micro-tomography and fluorescence analysis. Later, as the coronary angiography program made plans to move its experimental phase from SSRL to the NSLS, it became clear that other in-vivo projects could also be carried out at the synchrotron. The development of SMERF (Synchrotron Medical Research Facility) on beamline X17 became the home not only for angiography but also for the MECT (Multiple Energy Computed Tomography) project for cerebral and vascular imaging. The high energy spectrum on X17 is necessary for the MRT (Microplanar Radiation Therapy) experiments. Experience with these programs and the existence of the Medical Programs Group at the NSLS led to the development of a program in synchrotron based mammography. A recent adaptation of the angiography hardware has made it possible to image human lungs (bronchography). Fig. 1 schematically depicts the broad range of active programs at the NSLS.

Thomlinson, W.

1997-08-01

365

Characterization of the Neutron Fields in the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Radiation Calibration Laboratory Low Scatter Calibration Facility  

SciTech Connect

In June 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) revised its rule on Occupational Radiation Protection, Part 10 CFR 835. A significant aspect of the revision was the adoption of the recommendations outlined in International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Report 60 (ICRP-60), including new radiation weighting factors for neutrons, updated internal dosimetric models, and dose terms consistent with the newer ICRP recommendations. ICRP-60 uses the quantities defined by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) for personnel and area monitoring including the ambient dose equivalent H*(d). A Joint Task Group of ICRU and ICRP has developed various fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients which are published in ICRP-74 for both protection and operational quantities. In February 2008, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) replaced its old pneumatic transport neutron irradiation system in the Radiation Calibration Laboratory (RCL) Low Scatter Calibration Facility (B255, Room 183A) with a Hopewell Designs irradiator model N40. The exposure tube for the Hopewell system is located close to, but not in exactly the same position as the exposure tube for the pneumatic system. Additionally, the sources for the Hopewell system are stored in Room 183A where, prior to the change, they were stored in a separate room (Room 183C). The new source configuration and revision of the 10 CFR 835 radiation weighting factors necessitate a re-evaluation of the neutron dose rates in B255 Room 183A. This report deals only with the changes in the operational quantities ambient dose equivalent and ambient dose rate equivalent for neutrons as a result of the implementation of the revised 10 CFR 835. In the report, the terms 'neutron dose' and 'neutron dose rate' will be used for convenience for ambient neutron dose equivalent and ambient neutron dose rate equivalent unless otherwise stated.

Radev, R

2009-09-04

366

Sandia Heavy Oil Subprogram. FY 1982 annual report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Sandia National Laboratories Heavy Oil Subprogram is concerned with the evaluation of the controlled source audiofrequency magnetotelluric (CSAMT) technique for surface mapping of thermal fronts associated with enhanced oil recovery (EOR). The activities from October 1, 1981, to September 30, 1982, included scaled laboratory CSAMT experiments, a development of grid electode sensors which were placed in a combustion tube

J. R. Wayland; D. O. Lee

1983-01-01

367

A shallow underground laboratory for low-background radiation measurements and materials development.  

PubMed

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory recently commissioned a new shallow underground laboratory, located at a depth of approximately 30 meters-water-equivalent. This new addition to the small class of radiation measurement laboratories located at modest underground depths houses the latest generation of custom-made, high-efficiency, low-background gamma-ray spectrometers and gas proportional counters. This paper describes the unique capabilities present in the shallow underground laboratory; these include large-scale ultra-pure materials production and a suite of radiation detection systems. Reported data characterize the degree of background reduction achieved through a combination of underground location, graded shielding, and rejection of cosmic-ray events. We conclude by presenting measurement targets and future opportunities. PMID:23206058

Aalseth, C E; Bonicalzi, R M; Cantaloub, M G; Day, A R; Erikson, L E; Fast, J; Forrester, J B; Fuller, E S; Glasgow, B D; Greenwood, L R; Hoppe, E W; Hossbach, T W; Hyronimus, B J; Keillor, M E; Mace, E K; McIntyre, J I; Merriman, J H; Myers, A W; Overman, C T; Overman, N R; Panisko, M E; Seifert, A; Warren, G A; Runkle, R C

2012-11-01

368

A shallow underground laboratory for low-background radiation measurements and materials development  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory recently commissioned a new shallow underground laboratory, located at a depth of approximately 30 meters-water-equivalent. This new addition to the small class of radiation measurement laboratories located at modest underground depths houses the latest generation of custom-made, high-efficiency, low-background gamma-ray spectrometers and gas proportional counters. This paper describes the unique capabilities present in the shallow underground laboratory; these include large-scale ultra-pure materials production and a suite of radiation detection systems. Reported data characterize the degree of background reduction achieved through a combination of underground location, graded shielding, and rejection of cosmic-ray events. We conclude by presenting measurement targets and future opportunities.

Aalseth, C. E.; Bonicalzi, R. M.; Cantaloub, M. G.; Day, A. R.; Erikson, L. E.; Fast, J.; Forrester, J. B.; Fuller, E. S.; Glasgow, B. D.; Greenwood, L. R.; Hoppe, E. W.; Hossbach, T. W.; Hyronimus, B. J.; Keillor, M. E.; Mace, E. K.; McIntyre, J. I.; Merriman, J. H.; Myers, A. W.; Overman, C. T.; Overman, N. R.; Panisko, M. E.; Seifert, A.; Warren, G. A.; Runkle, R. C.

2012-11-01

369

A shallow underground laboratory for low-background radiation measurements and materials development  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory recently commissioned a new shallow underground laboratory, located at a depth of approximately 30 meters-water-equivalent. This new addition to the small class of radiation measurement laboratories located at modest underground depths houses the latest generation of custom-made, high-efficiency, low-background gamma-ray spectrometers and gas proportional counters. This paper describes the unique capabilities present in the shallow underground laboratory; these include large-scale ultra-pure materials production and a suite of radiation detection systems. Reported data characterize the degree of background reduction achieved through a combination of underground location, graded shielding, and rejection of cosmic-ray events. We conclude by presenting measurement targets and future opportunities.

Aalseth, C. E.; Bonicalzi, R. M.; Cantaloub, M. G.; Day, A. R.; Erikson, L. E.; Fast, J.; Forrester, J. B.; Fuller, E. S.; Glasgow, B. D.; Greenwood, L. R.; Hoppe, E. W.; Hossbach, T. W.; Hyronimus, B. J.; Keillor, M. E.; Mace, E. K.; McIntyre, J. I.; Merriman, J. H.; Myers, A. W.; Overman, C. T.; Overman, N. R. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); and others

2012-11-15

370

A Shallow Underground Laboratory for Low-Background Radiation Measurements and Materials Development  

SciTech Connect

Abstract: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory recently commissioned a new shallow underground laboratory, located at a depth of approximately 30 meters water-equivalent. This new addition to the small class of radiation measurement laboratories located at modest underground depths worldwide houses the latest generation of custom-made, high-efficiency, low-background gamma-ray spectrometers and gas proportional counters. This manuscript describes the unique capabilities present in the shallow underground laboratory; these include large-scale ultra-pure materials production and a suite of radiation detection systems. Reported data characterize the degree of background reduction achieved through a combination of underground location, graded shielding, and rejection of cosmic-ray events. We conclude by presenting measurement targets and future opportunities.

Aalseth, Craig E.; Bonicalzi, Ricco; Cantaloub, Michael G.; Day, Anthony R.; Erikson, Luke E.; Fast, James E.; Forrester, Joel B.; Fuller, Erin S.; Glasgow, Brian D.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Hoppe, Eric W.; Hossbach, Todd W.; Hyronimus, Brian J.; Keillor, Martin E.; Mace, Emily K.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Merriman, Jason H.; Myers, Allan W.; Overman, Cory T.; Overman, Nicole R.; Panisko, Mark E.; Seifert, Allen; Warren, Glen A.; Runkle, Robert C.

2012-11-08

371

Hole trapping, recombination, and space charge in irradiated Sandia oxides  

Microsoft Academic Search

A computer model for calculating radiation effects in MOS oxides is presented. Good agreement is obtained between theory and photoconductivity experiments (photocurrent and flat band shift as a function of total dose) on Sandia radiation hard oxides. It is also shown that doses above 10⁸ rads (delivered by a focused electron beam) are required to produce a significant number of

R. C. Hughes; C. H. Seager

1983-01-01

372

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Activity report for 1988  

SciTech Connect

For SSRL operations, 1988 was a year of stark contrasts. The first extended PEP parasitic running since the construction of our two beam lines on that storage ring took place in November and December. Four experiments discussed below, were performed and detailed operational procedures which allowed synchrotron radiation an high energy users to coexist were established. SSRL anticipates that there will be significant amounts of beam time when PEP is run again for high energy physics. On the other hand, activity on SPEAR consisted of brief parasitic running on the VUV lines in December when the ring was operated at 1.85 GeV for colliding beam experiments. There was no dedicated SPEAR running throughout the entire calendar year. This is the first time since dedicated SPEAR operation was initiated in 1980 that there was no such running. The decision was motivated by both cost and performance factors, as discussed in Section 1 of this report. Fortunately, SLAC and SSRL have reached an agreement on SPEAR and PEP dedicated time charges which eliminates the cost volatility which was so important in the cancellation of the June-July dedicated SPEAR run. As discussed in Section 2, the 3 GeV SPEAR injector construction is proceeding on budget and on schedule. The injector will overcome the difficulties associated with the SLC-era constraint of only two injections per day. SSR and SLAC have also embarked on a program to upgrade SPEAR to achieve high reliability and performance. As a consequence, SSRL`s users may anticipate a highly effective SPEAR by 1991, at the latest. At that time, SPEAR is expected to be fully dedicated to synchrotron radiation research and operated by SSRL. Also contained in this report is a discussion of the improvements to SSRL`s experimental facilities and highlights of the experiments of the past year.

Cantwell, K. [ed.

1996-01-01

373

Measuring Neutrons and Gamma Rays on Mars The Mars Science Laboratory Radiation Assessment Detector MSL/RAD  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) will measure the radiation environment including the neutral component on the martian surface. We present initial studies on the inversion of neutron calibration results.

Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Martin, C.; Kortmann, O.; Boehm, E.; Boettcher, S.; Kharytonov, A.; Ehresmann, B.; Hassler, D. M.; Zeitlin, C.

2010-03-01

374

Four years of progress in the Sandia high-energy-density physics program  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In May 1996, modifications were made to the PBFA II accelerator in order to produce fast (submicrosecond) plasma implosions, called z pinches, that are driven by intense (1000 Tesla) magnetic fields associated with large (20 MA) axial currents in multiple wire arrays. Today, the facility, renamed Z, is the most energetic source of x rays in a laboratory environment and is also used in a short circuit mode to produce high pressures for measuring material properties. With Z we support research on ICF, radiation-hydrodynamics, equations of state, radiation effects, and the development of advanced diagnostics and advanced simulation codes for five of the Department of Energy's stockpile stewardship campaigns. In these endeavors, Sandia scientists benefit directly from interactions with researchers at other laboratories and at universities in the U.S. and abroad. In this presentation, highlights from the four years of progress on Z are summarized, with particular emphasis on the last year. For additional details about Z and our research, see our external web site (http://www.sandia.gov/pulspowr/ppt).

Sweeney, M. A.

2000-10-01

375

Sample Tracking in an Automated Cytogenetic Biodosimetry Laboratory for Radiation Mass Casualties  

PubMed Central

Chromosome aberration-based dicentric assay is expected to be used after mass casualty life-threatening radiation exposures to assess radiation dose to individuals. This will require processing of a large number of samples for individual dose assessment and clinical triage to aid treatment decisions. We have established an automated, high-throughput, cytogenetic biodosimetry laboratory to process a large number of samples for conducting the dicentric assay using peripheral blood from exposed individuals according to internationally accepted laboratory protocols (i.e., within days following radiation exposures). The components of an automated cytogenetic biodosimetry laboratory include blood collection kits for sample shipment, a cell viability analyzer, a robotic liquid handler, an automated metaphase harvester, a metaphase spreader, high-throughput slide stainer and coverslipper, a high-throughput metaphase finder, multiple satellite chromosome-aberration analysis systems, and a computerized sample tracking system. Laboratory automation using commercially available, off-the-shelf technologies, customized technology integration, and implementation of a laboratory information management system (LIMS) for cytogenetic analysis will significantly increase throughput. This paper focuses on our efforts to eliminate data transcription errors, increase efficiency, and maintain samples positive chain-of-custody by sample tracking during sample processing and data analysis. This sample tracking system represents a beta version, which can be modeled elsewhere in a cytogenetic biodosimetry laboratory, and includes a customized LIMS with a central server, personal computer workstations, barcode printers, fixed station and wireless hand-held devices to scan barcodes at various critical steps, and data transmission over a private intra-laboratory computer network. Our studies will improve diagnostic biodosimetry response, aid confirmation of clinical triage, and medical management of radiation exposed individuals. PMID:18037985

Martin, P.R.; Berdychevski, R.E.; Subramanian, U.; Blakely, W.F.; Prasanna, P.G.S.

2007-01-01

376

Multiple functions long trace profiler (LTP-MF) for National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory of China  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Long Trace Profiler (LTP) is a useful optical metrology instrument for measuring the figure and slope error of cylindrical aspheres commonly used as synchrotron radiation (SR) optics. It is used extensively at a number of synchrotron radiation laboratories around the world. In order to improve SR beam line quality and resolution, the National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) of China is developing a versatile LTP that can be used to measure both SR optics and more conventional "normal" optical surfaces. The optical metrology laboratories at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and NSRL are collaborating in developing a multiple functions LTP (LTP-MF). Characteristics of the LTP-MF are: a very compact and lightweight optical head, a large angular test range (+/-16 mrad) and high accuracy. The LTP-MF can be used in various configurations: as a laboratory-based LTP, an in-situ LTP or penta-prism LTP, as an angle monitor, a portable LTP, and a small radius of curvature test instrument. The schematic design of the compact optical head and a new compact slide are introduced. Analysis of different measurements modes and systematic error correction methods are introduced.

Qian, Shinan; Wang, Qiuping; Hong, Yilin; Takacs, Peter

2005-08-01

377

Peer Review Process for the Sandia ASCI V and V Program: Version 1.0  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the initial definition of the Verification and Validation (V and V) Plan Peer Review Process at Sandia National Laboratories. V and V peer review at Sandia is intended to assess the ASCI code team V and V planning process and execution. Our peer review definition is designed to assess the V and V planning process in terms of the content specified by the Sandia Guidelines for V and V plans. Therefore, the peer review process and process for improving the Guidelines are necessarily synchronized, and form parts of a larger quality improvement process supporting the ASCI V and V program at Sandia.

Pilch, M.; Trucano, T.G.; Peercy, D.E.; Hodges, A.L.; Young, E.R.; Moya, J.L.

2001-01-01

378

Large eddy simulation of a turbulent nonpremixed piloted methane jet flame (Sandia Flame D)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Large eddy simulation (LES) is conducted of the Sandia Flame D [Proc. Combust. Inst. 27 (1998) 1087, Sandia National Laboratories (2004)], which is a turbulent piloted nonpremixed methane jet flame. The subgrid scale (SGS) closure is based on the scalar filtered mass density function (SFMDF) methodology [J. Fluid Mech. 401 (1999) 85]. The SFMDF is basically the mass weighted probability

M. R. H. Sheikhi; T. G. Drozda; P. Givi; F. A. Jaberi; S. B. Pope

2005-01-01

379

Sandia capabilities for the measurement, characterization, and analysis of heliostats for CSP.  

SciTech Connect

The Concentrating Solar Technologies Organization at Sandia National Laboratories has a long history of performing important research, development, and testing that has enabled the Concentrating Solar Power Industry to deploy full-scale power plants. Sandia continues to pursue innovative CSP concepts with the goal of reducing the cost of CSP while improving efficiency and performance. In this pursuit, Sandia has developed many tools for the analysis of CSP performance. The following capabilities document highlights Sandia's extensive experience in the design, construction, and utilization of large-scale testing facilities for CSP and the tools that Sandia has created for the full characterization of heliostats. Sandia has extensive experience in using these tools to evaluate the performance of novel heliostat designs.

Andraka, Charles E.; Christian, Joshua Mark; Ghanbari, Cheryl M.; Gill, David Dennis; Ho, Clifford Kuofei; Kolb, William J.; Moss, Timothy A.; Smith, Edward J.; Yellowhair, Julius

2013-07-01

380

NIF Laboratory Astrophysics Experiments Investigating The Effects Of A Radiative Shock On Hydrodynamic Instabilities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper will describe ongoing laboratory astrophysics experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) relevant to the complex radiation hydrodynamics that occurs in red supergiant, and core-collapse supernovae. Experiments on NIF can deliver 300 eV radiative heating that can be utilized uniquely access the regime in which radiation affects the development of hydrodynamic instabilities within an evolving object. This is relevant to the dynamics that occur during the core-collapse explosions of red supergiant stars. These stars have dense circumstellar plasma, producing a strongly radiative shock whose radiation interacts with the hydrodynamic structures produced by instabilities during the explosion. While published astrophysical simulations have not included complex, multidimensional radiation hydrodynamics, such effects are very physical and expected to affect the evolution of early stages of astrophycal objects described above. This presentation will include a summary of the two test shots that we have performed on NIF, including a 0.7 scale, gas-filled hohlraum test shot, and a description of the integrated physics shots scheduled at the facility. This work is funded by the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas under grant number DE-FG52-09NA29548 , the Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344 and Predictive Sciences Academic Alliances Program in NNSA-ASC via grant DEFC52- 08NA28616.

Kuranz, Carolyn; Drake, R. P.; Park, H. S.; Remington, B. A.; Huntington, C. M.; Doss, F. W.; Krauland, C. M.; Harding, E. C.; Grosskopf, M. J.; Marion, D. C.; Myra, E.; Fryxell, B.; Kalantar, D. H.; Keane, C. J.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Robey, H. F.; Maddox, B. R.; Miles, A. R.; Wallace, R. J.; May, M. J.; Kline, J. L.; Kyrala, G. A.; Plewa, T.; Wheeler, J. C.; Arnett, W. D.; Giraldez, E.; Nikroo, A.

2010-05-01

381

NIF Laboratory Astrophysics Experiments Investigating The Effects Of A Radiative Shock On Hydrodynamic Instabilities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper will describe ongoing laboratory astrophysics experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) relevant to the complex radiation hydrodynamics that occurs in red supergiant, and core-collapse supernovae. Experiments on NIF can deliver 300 eV radiative heating that can be utilized uniquely access the regime in which radiation affects the development of hydrodynamic instabilities within an evolving object. This is relevant to the dynamics that occur during the core-collapse explosions of red supergiant stars. These stars have dense circumstellar plasma, producing a strongly radiative shock whose radiation interacts with the hydrodynamic structures produced by instabilities during the explosion. While published astrophysical simulations have not included complex, multidimensional radiation hydrodynamics, such effects are very physical and expected to affect the evolution of early stages of astrophysical objects described above. This presentation will include a summary of the two test shots that we have performed on NIF, including a 0.7 scale, gas-filled hohlraum test shot, and a description of the integrated physics shots scheduled at the facility. This work is funded by the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas under grant number DE-FG52-09NA29548 , the Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344 and Predictive Sciences Academic Alliances Program in NNSA-ASC via grant DEFC52- 08NA28616.

Kuranz, Carolyn C.; Drake, R. P.; Huntington, C. M.; Klein, S. R.; Trantham, M. R.; Park, H. S.; Remington, B. A.; Miles, A. R.; Raman, K.; Kline, J. L.; Plewa, T.

2012-05-01

382

TechRealization Day Pacific Northwest National Laboratory  

E-print Network

House Senate TVC Original Partners Sandia S&T Park @ UNM LRRI SNL Procurement Facilities Tech TransferTechRealization Day Pacific Northwest National Laboratory August 27, 2008 Sandia Science & Technology Park "A National Laboratory Research Park Model" Jackie Kerby Moore Executive Director #12;Sandia

383

Mars'; Surface Radiation Environment Measured with the Mars Science Laboratory's Curiosity Rover  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) on the Mars Science Laboratory's Curiosity rover began making detailed measurements of the cosmic ray and energetic particle radiation environment on the surface of Mars on 7 August 2012. We report and discuss measurements of the absorbed dose and dose equivalent from galactic cosmic rays and solar energetic particles on the martian surface for ~300 days of observations during the current solar maximum. These measurements provide insight into the radiation hazards associated with a human mission to the surface of Mars and provide an anchor point with which to model the subsurface radiation environment, with implications for microbial survival times of any possible extant or past life, as well as for the preservation of potential organic biosignatures of the ancient martian environment.

Hassler, Donald M.; Zeitlin, Cary; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.; Ehresmann, Bent; Rafkin, Scot; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Brinza, David E.; Weigle, Gerald; Bttcher, Stephan; Bhm, Eckart; Burmeister, Soenke; Guo, Jingnan; Khler, Jan; Martin, Cesar; Reitz, Guenther; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Kim, Myung-Hee; Grinspoon, David; Bullock, Mark A.; Posner, Arik; Gmez-Elvira, Javier; Vasavada, Ashwin; Grotzinger, John P.; MSL Science Team; Kemppinen, Osku; Cremers, David; Bell, James F.; Edgar, Lauren; Farmer, Jack; Godber, Austin; Wadhwa, Meenakshi; Wellington, Danika; McEwan, Ian; Newman, Claire; Richardson, Mark; Charpentier, Antoine; Peret, Laurent; King, Penelope; Blank, Jennifer; Schmidt, Mariek; Li, Shuai; Milliken, Ralph; Robertson, Kevin; Sun, Vivian; Baker, Michael; Edwards, Christopher; Ehlmann, Bethany; Farley, Kenneth; Griffes, Jennifer; Miller, Hayden; Newcombe, Megan; Pilorget, Cedric; Rice, Melissa; Siebach, Kirsten; Stack, Katie; Stolper, Edward; Brunet, Claude; Hipkin, Victoria; Lveill, Richard; Marchand, Genevive; Snchez, Pablo Sobrn; Favot, Laurent; Cody, George; Steele, Andrew; Flckiger, Lorenzo; Lees, David; Nefian, Ara; Martin, Mildred; Gailhanou, Marc; Westall, Frances; Isral, Guy; Agard, Christophe; Baroukh, Julien; Donny, Christophe; Gaboriaud, Alain; Guillemot, Philippe; Lafaille, Vivian; Lorigny, Eric; Paillet, Alexis; Prez, Ren; Saccoccio, Muriel; Yana, Charles; Armiens-Aparicio, Carlos; Rodrguez, Javier Caride; Blzquez, Isaas Carrasco; Gmez, Felipe Gmez; Hettrich, Sebastian; Malvitte, Alain Lepinette; Jimnez, Mercedes Marn; Martnez-Fras, Jess; Martn-Soler, Javier; Martn-Torres, F. Javier; Jurado, Antonio Molina; Mora-Sotomayor, Luis; Caro, Guillermo Muoz; Lpez, Sara Navarro; Peinado-Gonzlez, Vernica; Pla-Garca, Jorge; Manfredi, Jos Antonio Rodriguez; Romeral-Planell, Julio Jos; Fuentes, Sara Alejandra Sans; Martinez, Eduardo Sebastian; Redondo, Josefina Torres; Urqui-O'Callaghan, Roser; Mier, Mara-Paz Zorzano; Chipera, Steve; Lacour, Jean-Luc; Mauchien, Patrick; Sirven, Jean-Baptiste; Manning, Heidi; Fairn, Alberto; Hayes, Alexander; Joseph, Jonathan; Squyres, Steven; Sullivan, Robert; Thomas, Peter; Dupont, Audrey; Lundberg, Angela; Melikechi, Noureddine; Mezzacappa, Alissa; Berger, Thomas; Matthia, Daniel; Prats, Benito; Atlaskin, Evgeny; Genzer, Maria; Harri, Ari-Matti; Haukka, Harri; Kahanp, Henrik; Kauhanen, Janne; Kemppinen, Osku; Paton, Mark; Polkko, Jouni; Schmidt, Walter; Siili, Tero; Fabre, Ccile; Wray, James; Wilhelm, Mary Beth; Poitrasson, Franck; Patel, Kiran; Gorevan, Stephen; Indyk, Stephen; Paulsen, Gale; Gupta, Sanjeev; Bish, David; Schieber, Juergen; Gondet, Brigitte; Langevin, Yves; Geffroy, Claude; Baratoux, David; Berger, Gilles; Cros, Alain; d'Uston, Claude; Forni, Olivier; Gasnault, Olivier; Lasue, Jrmie; Lee, Qiu-Mei; Maurice, Sylvestre; Meslin, Pierre-Yves; Pallier, Etienne; Parot, Yann; Pinet, Patrick; Schrder, Susanne; Toplis, Mike; Lewin, ric; Brunner, Will; Heydari, Ezat; Achilles, Cherie; Oehler, Dorothy; Sutter, Brad; Cabane, Michel; Coscia, David; Isral, Guy; Szopa, Cyril; Dromart, Gilles; Robert, Franois; Sautter, Violaine; Le Moulic, Stphane; Mangold, Nicolas; Nachon, Marion; Buch, Arnaud; Stalport, Fabien; Coll, Patrice; Franois, Pascaline; Raulin, Franois; Teinturier, Samuel; Cameron, James; Clegg, Sam; Cousin, Agns; DeLapp, Dorothea; Dingler, Robert; Jackson, Ryan Steele; Johnstone, Stephen; Lanza, Nina; Little, Cynthia; Nelson, Tony; Wiens, Roger C.; Williams, Richard B.; Jones, Andrea; Kirkland, Laurel; Treiman, Allan; Baker, Burt; Cantor, Bruce; Caplinger, Michael; Davis, Scott; Duston, Brian; Edgett, Kenneth; Fay, Donald; Hardgrove, Craig; Harker, David; Herrera, Paul; Jensen, Elsa; Kennedy, Megan R.; Krezoski, Gillian; Krysak, Daniel; Lipkaman, Leslie; Malin, Michael; McCartney, Elaina; McNair, Sean; Nixon, Brian; Posiolova, Liliya; Ravine, Michael; Salamon, Andrew; Saper, Lee; Stoiber, Kevin; Supulver, Kimberley; Van Beek, Jason; Van Beek, Tessa; Zimdar, Robert; French, Katherine Louise; Iagnemma, Karl; Miller, Kristen; Summons, Roger; Goesmann, Fred; Goetz, Walter; Hviid, Stubbe; Johnson, Micah; Lefavor, Matthew; Lyness, Eric; Breves, Elly; Dyar, M. Darby; Fassett, Caleb; Blake, David F.; Bristow, Thomas; DesMarais, David; Edwards, Laurence; Haberle, Robert; Hoehler, Tori; Hollingsworth, Jeff; Kahre, Melinda; Keely, Leslie; McKay, Christopher; Wilhelm, Mary Beth; Bleacher, Lora; Brinckerhoff, William; Choi, David; Conrad, Pamela; Dworkin, Jason P.; Floyd, Melissa

2014-01-01

384

Experiences and Management of Pregnant Radiation Workers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Radiation workers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are divided into two classes based on whether or not they can encounter radioactive contamination in the normal course of their work. Level I workers primarily handle sealed radioactive materials such as those used to calibrate detectors. Level II workers perform benchtop chemistry. The U.S. Department of Energy has strict guidelines on the management of pregnant radiation workers. Staff members may voluntarily notify their line managers of a pregnancy and be subjected to stringent radiation exposure limits for the developing fetus. The staff member and manager develop a plan to limit and monitor radiation dose for the remainder of the pregnancy. Several examples of dose management plans and case examples of the impact of pregnancy on staff member?s technical work and projects will be presented.

Bliss, Mary; Bowyer, Sonya M.; Bryant, Janet L.; Lipton, Mary S.; Wahl, Karen L.

2001-03-06

385

An Experimental Investigation of the Role of Radiation in Laboratory Bench-Top Experiments in Thermal Physics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A simple undergraduate experiment designed to study cooling purely by radiation and cooling by a combination of convection and radiation is described. Results indicate that the contribution from radiative cooling in normal laboratory experiments is more significant than students often realize, even in the case of forced cooling. (Contains 1

Twomey, Patrick; O'Sullivan, Colm; O'Riordan, John

2009-01-01

386

Radiation Laboratory, University of Notre Dame: Quarterly report, October 1--December 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Notre Dame Radiation Laboratory is a facility of the Department of Energy operated for the DOE by the University of Notre Dame under contract No. DE-AC02-76ER00038. This quarterly report summarizes the progress on the programs within the Laboratory for the period of October 1, 193 through December 31, 1993. The activities of the staff during this period are noted. A list of publications is presented. A listing and a brief description of each of the reports issued during this quarter are provided.

Not Available

1994-02-17

387

Job factors, radiation and cancer mortality at Oak Ridge National Laboratory: Follow-up through 1984  

Microsoft Academic Search

A previous study of mortality among white men hired at Oak Ridge National Laboratory between 1943 and 1972 (n = 8,318) revealed an association between low-dose external penetrating ionizing radiation and cancer mortality in follow-up through 1984. The association was not observed in follow-up through 1977. This report considers the role of possible selection and confounding factors not previously studied.

Steve Wing; Carl M. Shy; Joy L. Wood; Susanne Wolf; Donna L. Cragle; William Tankersley; E. L. Frome

1993-01-01

388

Sandia tar-sands subprogram FY81 annual report  

Microsoft Academic Search

During FY81, Sandia National Laboratories assisted the Laramie Energy Technology Center's Tar Sands Program in the areas of reservoir access and alternate extraction concepts. This report covers the work done in the areas of controlled source audio magnetotelluric mapping, radio-frequency heating instrumentation, and joint US\\/Canadian permeability enhancement.

J. R. Jr

1982-01-01

389

Sandia heavy-oil subprogram FY81 annual report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Sandia National Laboratories Heavy Oil Program is concerned with reservoir access, as defined in the Department of Energy Heavy Oil Program Plan. The program is divided into two major areas: (1) drilling technology and (2) well completions, physical stimulations, and downhole steam production. This report documents the activities in those areas from 1 October 1980 to 30 September 1981.

1982-01-01

390

Exceptional service in the national interest www.sandia.gov  

E-print Network

and computing science, algorithm and tool development, computational sciences and cognitive sciences. He also and management of corporate research and development and capabilities stewardship at Sandia National Laboratories development, sparse iterative methods and applied graph theory. There he co- authored Chaco, a graph

391

The Sandia Report and U.S. Achievement: An Assessment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The article assesses the report of the Sandia National Laboratory's contentions about decline in Scholactic Aptitude Test Scores, National Assessment of Educational Progress achievement, and international assessments. The article suggests the report is generally right about steady trends but seriously flawed by several errors. (SM)

Stedman, Lawrence C.

1994-01-01

392

Sandia Multispectral Airborne Lidar for UAV Deployment  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories has initiated the development of an airborne system for W laser remote sensing measurements. System applications include the detection of effluents associated with the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and the detection of biological weapon aerosols. This paper discusses the status of the conceptual design development and plans for both the airborne payload (pointing and tracking, laser transmitter, and telescope receiver) and the Altus unmanned aerospace vehicle platform. Hardware design constraints necessary to maintain system weight, power, and volume limitations of the flight platform are identified.

Daniels, J.W.; Hargis,Jr. P.J.; Henson, T.D.; Jordan, J.D.; Lang, A.R.; Schmitt, R.L.

1998-10-23

393

Laboratory simulation of interplanetary ultraviolet radiation (broad spectrum) and its effects on Deinococcus radiodurans  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The radiation-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans was exposed to a simulated interplanetary UV radiation at the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS). Bacterial samples were irradiated on different substrates to investigate the influence of surface relief on cell survival. The effects of cell multi-layers were also investigated. The ratio of viable microorganisms remained virtually the same (average 2%) for integrated doses from 1.2 to 12 kJ m -2, corresponding to 16 h of irradiation at most. The asymptotic profiles of the curves, clearly connected to a shielding effect provided by multi-layering cells on a cavitary substrate (carbon tape), means that the inactivation rate may not change significantly along extended periods of exposure to radiation. Such high survival rates reinforce the possibility of an interplanetary transfer of viable microbes.

Paulino-Lima, Ivan Glucio; Pilling, Srgio; Janot-Pacheco, Eduardo; de Brito, Arnaldo Naves; Barbosa, Joo Alexandre Ribeiro Gonalves; Leito, Alvaro Costa; Lage, Claudia de Alencar Santos

2010-08-01

394

Sandia National Laboratories Combustion Research Facility  

E-print Network

, altitude, and time · PV module uses a solar-electric conversion efficiency · Function of panel area to construct simulations of H2 systems, including power parks, to analyze performance (thermodynamic efficiency) · High-pressure storage vessel · Electrolyzer · Photovoltaic Solar Collector Module descriptions: · Steam

395

Combustion Research Facility, Sandia National Laboratories,  

E-print Network

, Muelheim a. d., Ruhr, Germany A Comparison of Cylindrical and Fan-Shaped Film-Cooling Holes on a Vane Endwall at Low and High Freestream Turbulence Levels Fan-shaped film-cooling holes have been shown a large range of different conditions. Benefits of fan-shaped holes include less required cooling air

Thole, Karen A.

396

Sandia Extended Network: Design Requirements  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the design requirements for creating a limited-access Sandia Extended Network (SXN), which would be used to collaborate with Nuclear Weapons Complex Labs personnel, university collaborators, industry, and others who may not be allowed accounts on the Sandia Restricted Network (SRN). This document contains the design requirements for creating a limited-access Sandia Extended Network (SXN), which would be used by non-Sandians to collaborate with NWC Labs personnel and others who are not allowed accounts on the Sandia Restricted Network (SRN). Its main purpose is to articulate the requirements upon which the design options and hardware costs for the Sandia eXtended Network (SXN) can be based and in turn presented to 8900 and 9300 Management. The requirements are further addressed in reports outlining its security architecture and in the five-volume set of network architecture reports: An Architecture for the Sandia Extended Network: Overview; Detailed Description of the Architecture, Design of the Model, and Balanced Protections; Background of the Architecture and its Relevance to Sandia; Terminology and Concepts Relevant to Networks; and Policy-Based Networks and Information Management.

GOMEZ, MICHAEL D.; GOSSAGE, STEVEN A.

2002-11-01

397

Correlation between some current parameters and optical radiation generated by 280 mm long laboratory sparks  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Discussed here is the optical radiation generated by 280 mm long laboratory discharges and its relationship to the current flowing in the discharge channel. In an experiment, the optical radiation generated by the discharges was measured at wavelengths 777nm (bandwidth 10 nm) due to O I(1), and 500 nm (bandwidth 5 nm) due to N II(19), and the broadband optical radiation between the wavelengths 400 to 1100 nm. The shape of the current waveform, which had a rise time of 0.1 microsecond and a decay time of 5 microsecond, remained the same with increasing peak value. The experiment was conducted with peak current amplitudes in the range of 1-4 kA. In order to test the effect of current rise time on the optical radiation, researchers also conducted studies with a current waveform having a 5 microsecond rise time. It was observed that the peak amplitude of the optical radiation pulse at the wavelengths mentioned above is proportional to the peak amplitude of the current flowing through the discharge channel. The rise time of the optical radiation pulse at a given wavelength does not depend significantly on the peak amplitude of the current waveform. The rise time of the optical radiation pulse decreases with decreasing wavelength. A slight increase in the decay time of the optical pulse, at a given wavelength, is observed with increasing peak amplitude of the current waveform.The results show that the rise time of the optical radiation pulse increases with the increasing rise time of the current waveform. The relationship between peak current, peak optical power, and peak electrical power is studied. Also, the relationship between peak current, optical energy (400-1100 and 777 nm), and electrical energy is discussed.

Windmar, Dan; Cooray, Vernon; Scuka, Viktor

1991-01-01

398

LANL Transfers Glowing Bio Technology to Sandia Biotech  

SciTech Connect

Partnering with Los Alamos National Laboratory, an Albuquerque-based company is seeking to transform the way protein and peptide analysis is conducted around the world. Sandia Biotech is using a biological technology licensed from Los Alamos called split green fluorescent protein (sGFP), as a detecting and tracking tool for the protein and peptide industry, valuable in the fields of Alzheimer's research, drug development and other biotechnology fields using protein folding to understand protein expression and mechanisms of action. http://www.lanl.gov/news/stories/glowing-future-for-los-alamos-and-sandia-b iotech-partnership.html

Rorick, Kevin

2012-01-01

399

LANL Transfers Glowing Bio Technology to Sandia Biotech  

ScienceCinema

Partnering with Los Alamos National Laboratory, an Albuquerque-based company is seeking to transform the way protein and peptide analysis is conducted around the world. Sandia Biotech is using a biological technology licensed from Los Alamos called split green fluorescent protein (sGFP), as a detecting and tracking tool for the protein and peptide industry, valuable in the fields of Alzheimer's research, drug development and other biotechnology fields using protein folding to understand protein expression and mechanisms of action. http://www.lanl.gov/news/stories/glowing-future-for-los-alamos-and-sandia-b iotech-partnership.html

Rorick, Kevin

2012-08-02

400

Radiation heat savings in polysilicon production: Validation of results through a CVD laboratory prototype  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This work aims at a deeper understanding of the energy loss phenomenon in polysilicon production reactors by the so-called Siemens process. Contributions to the energy consumption of the polysilicon deposition step are studied in this paper, focusing on the radiation heat loss phenomenon. A theoretical model for radiation heat loss calculations is experimentally validated with the help of a laboratory CVD prototype. Following the results of the model, relevant parameters that directly affect the amount of radiation heat losses are put forward. Numerical results of the model applied to a state-of-the-art industrial reactor show the influence of these parameters on energy consumption due to radiation per kilogram of silicon produced; the radiation heat loss can be reduced by 3.8% when the reactor inner wall radius is reduced from 0.78 to 0.70 m, by 25% when the wall emissivity is reduced from 0.5 to 0.3, and by 12% when the final rod diameter is increased from 12 to 15 cm.

Ramos, A.; del Caizo, C.; Valdehita, J.; Zamorano, J. C.; Luque, A.

2013-07-01

401

UV Radiation: a new first year physics/life sciences laboratory experiment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Unfortunately, Australia leads the world in the number of skin cancer cases per capita. Three major factors that contribute to this are: 1) the level of damaging ultraviolet (UV) radiation in Australia is higher than in many other countries. This is caused, among other factors, by the stratospheric ozone depletion and Antarctic ozone hole; 2) many people in Australia are of Irish-Scottish origin and their skin can not repair the damage caused by the UV radiation as effectively as the skin of people of other origins; 3) Australia is one of the worlds leaders in the outdoor activities where people tend to spend more time outside. As our experience has shown, most Australian University students, high school students, and even high school teachers were largely unaware of the UV damage details and effective safety measures. Therefore, a need for new ways to educate people became apparent. The general aim of this new 1st year laboratory experiment, developed and first offered at La Trobe University (Melbourne, Australia) in 2009, is to investigate how UV-B radiation levels change under various solar illumination conditions and how effective different types of protection are. After pre-lab readings on physical concepts and biological effects of UV radiation, and after solving all pre-lab problems, the students go outside and measure the actual change in UV-B and UV-A radiation levels under various conditions. Some of these conditions are: direct sun, shade from a building, shade under the roof, reflection from various surfaces, direct sun through cheap and expensive sunglasses and eyeglasses, direct sun through various types of cloth and hair. The equipment used is the UV-Probe manufactured by sglux SolGel Technologies GmbH. The students feedback on this new laboratory experiment was very positive. It was ranked top among all physics experiments offered as part of that subject (Physics for Life Sciences) in 2009 and top among all physics experiments presented for peer evaluation at the Advanced Science Education Learning Laboratory Workshop in April 2010 at the University of Adelaide, Australia. All three main components of the UV Radiation experiment - pre-lab exercises, taking measurements, and a group discussion led by a demonstrator, were assessed by the students and by the teaching academics as a very important and valuable contribution to learning.

Petelina, S. V.; Siddaway, J. M.

2010-12-01

402

The present status of the Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory of the Institute for Solid State Physics of The University of Tokyo  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present status of the Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory of the Institute for Solid-State Physics of The University of Tokyo is described. Explanation is made mostly for the beam lines of SOR-RING as well as the new beam lines built in the Photon Factory ring. A short history of the laboratory is also given.

T. Ishii

1992-01-01

403

Radiation Center Space Allocation Policy This document presents a policy to establish criteria and procedures for both laboratory and  

E-print Network

1 Radiation Center Space Allocation Policy This document presents a policy to establish criteria and procedures for both laboratory and office space allocation. Considering the immense pressure exerted policies across OSU. Goals of a Radiation Center Space Allocation Policy The overarching goals

404

Greater sensitivity to ionizing radiation at older age: follow-up of workers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory through 1990  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background Workers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) were individually monitored for whole body exposure to ionizing radiation. Studies of these workers may pro- vide valuable information about the long-term effects of occupational exposure to ionizing radiation. Since biological changes occur as adults age, a potentially important question in these investigations is whether sensitivity to the carcino- genic effects of

David B Richardson; Steve Wing

405

Solar and Photovoltaic Data from the University of Oregon Solar Radiation Monitoring Laboratory (UO SRML)  

DOE Data Explorer

The UO SRML is a regional solar radiation data center whose goal is to provide sound solar resource data for planning, design, deployment, and operation of solar electric facilities in the Pacific Northwest. The laboratory has been in operation since 1975. Solar data includes solar resource maps, cumulative summary data, daily totals, monthly averages, single element profile data, parsed TMY2 data, and select multifilter radiometer data. A data plotting program and other software tools are also provided. Shade analysis information and contour plots showing the effect of tilt and orientation on annual solar electric system perfomance make up a large part of the photovoltaics data.(Specialized Interface)

406

Development of explosive event scale model testing capability at Sandia`s large scale centrifuge facility  

SciTech Connect

Geotechnical structures such as underground bunkers, tunnels, and building foundations are subjected to stress fields produced by the gravity load on the structure and/or any overlying strata. These stress fields may be reproduced on a scaled model of the structure by proportionally increasing the gravity field through the use of a centrifuge. This technology can then be used to assess the vulnerability of various geotechnical structures to explosive loading. Applications of this technology include assessing the effectiveness of earth penetrating weapons, evaluating the vulnerability of various structures, counter-terrorism, and model validation. This document describes the development of expertise in scale model explosive testing on geotechnical structures using Sandia`s large scale centrifuge facility. This study focused on buried structures such as hardened storage bunkers or tunnels. Data from this study was used to evaluate the predictive capabilities of existing hydrocodes and structural dynamics codes developed at Sandia National Laboratories (such as Pronto/SPH, Pronto/CTH, and ALEGRA). 7 refs., 50 figs., 8 tabs.

Blanchat, T.K.; Davie, N.T.; Calderone, J.J. [and others

1998-02-01

407

Guidelines for Sandia ASCI Verification and Validation Plans - Content and Format: Version 1.0  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes general guidelines for the development of Verification and Validation (V and V) plans for ASCI code projects at Sandia National Laboratories. The main content categories recommended by these guidelines for explicit treatment in Sandia V and V plans are (1) stockpile drivers influencing the code development project (2) the key phenomena to be modeled by the individual code; (3) software verification strategy and test plan; and (4) code validation strategy and test plans. The authors of this document anticipate that the needed content of the V and V plans for the Sandia ASCI codes will evolve as time passes. These needs will be reflected by future versions of this document.

TRUCANO,TIMOTHY G.; MOYA,JAIME L.

1999-12-01

408

Application of modern radiative transfer tools to model laboratory quartz emissivity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Planetary remote sensing of regolith surfaces requires use of theoretical models for interpretation of constituent grain physical properties. In this work, we review and critically evaluate past efforts to strengthen numerical radiative transfer (RT) models with comparison to a trusted set of nadir incidence laboratory quartz emissivity spectra. By first establishing a baseline statistical metric to rate successful model-laboratory emissivity spectral fits, we assess the efficacy of hybrid computational solutions (Mie theory + numerically exact RT algorithm) to calculate theoretical emissivity values for micron-sized ?-quartz particles in the thermal infrared (2000-200 cm-1) wave number range. We show that Mie theory, a widely used but poor approximation to irregular grain shape, fails to produce the single scattering albedo and asymmetry parameter needed to arrive at the desired laboratory emissivity values. Through simple numerical experiments, we show that corrections to single scattering albedo and asymmetry parameter values generated via Mie theory become more necessary with increasing grain size. We directly compare the performance of diffraction subtraction and static structure factor corrections to the single scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, and emissivity for dense packing of grains. Through these sensitivity studies, we provide evidence that, assuming RT methods work well given sufficiently well-quantified inputs, assumptions about the scatterer itself constitute the most crucial aspect of modeling emissivity values.

Pitman, Karly M.; Wolff, Michael J.; Clayton, Geoffrey C.

2005-08-01

409

Absorption spectroscopy of a laboratory photoionized plasma experiment at Z  

SciTech Connect

The Z facility at the Sandia National Laboratories is the most energetic terrestrial source of X-rays and provides an opportunity to produce photoionized plasmas in a relatively well characterised radiation environment. We use detailed atomic-kinetic and spectral simulations to analyze the absorption spectra of a photoionized neon plasma driven by the x-ray flux from a z-pinch. The broadband x-ray flux both photoionizes and backlights the plasma. In particular, we focus on extracting the charge state distribution of the plasma and the characteristics of the radiation field driving the plasma in order to estimate the ionisation parameter.

Hall, I. M.; Durmaz, T.; Mancini, R. C. [Physics Department, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States)] [Physics Department, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); Bailey, J. E.; Rochau, G. A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Golovkin, I. E.; MacFarlane, J. J. [Prism Computational Sciences, Madison, Wisconsin 53711 (United States)] [Prism Computational Sciences, Madison, Wisconsin 53711 (United States)

2014-03-15

410

Laboratory Kinetic Studies of OH and CO2 Relevant to Upper Atmospheric Radiation Balance  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The purpose of this project was to quantify the rates of two processes which are crucial to our understanding of radiative energy balance in the upper atmosphere. The first process is radiative emission from vibrationally hot OH radicals following the H + O3 reaction in the upper mesosphere. The importance of this process depends strongly on the OH radiative emission coefficients. Our goal was to measure the OH permanent dipole moment in excited vibrational states and to use these measurements to construct an improved OH dipole moment function and improved radiative emission coefficients. Significant progress was made on these experiments including the construction of a supersonic jet source for vibrationally excited OH radicals. Unfortunately, our efforts to transport the OH radicals into a second lower pressure vacuum chamber were not successful, and we were unable to make improved dipole moment measurements for OH. The second key kinetic process which we attempted to quantify during this project is the rate of relaxation of bend-excited CO2 by oxygen atoms. Since excitation of the bending vibrational mode of CO2 is the major cooling mechanism in the upper mesosphere/lower thermosphere, the cooling rate of this region depends crucially on the rate of energy transfer out of this state. It is believed that the most efficient transfer mechanism is via atomic oxygen but the rate for this process has not been directly measured in the laboratory at appropriate temperatures and even the room temperature rate remains controversial. We attempted to directly measure the relaxation rate Of CO2 (010) by oxygen atoms using the discharge flow technique. This experiment was set up at Aerodyne Research. Again, significant progress was achieved in this experiment. A hot CO2 source was set up, bend excited CO2 was detected and the rate of relaxation of bend excited CO2 by He atoms was measured. Unfortunately, the project ran out of time before the oxygen atom kinetic studies could be implemented.

Nelson, David D.; Villalta, Peter; Zahniser, Mark S.; Kolb, Charles E.

1997-01-01

411

77 FR 9254 - Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH or Advisory Board), National Institute for...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Berkeley National Laboratory and Stanford Linear...Spring, MO), Sandia National Laboratories, Clinton Engineering Works (Oak Ridge, TN), Feed Materials...and Brookhaven National Laboratory; SEC Petition...

2012-02-16

412

LANL Transfers Glowing Bio Technology to Sandia Biotech  

SciTech Connect

Partnering with Los Alamos National Laboratory, an Albuquerque-based company is seeking to transform the way protein and peptide analysis is conducted around the world. Sandia Biotech is using a biological technology licensed from Los Alamos called split green fluorescent protein (sGFP), as a detecting and tracking tool for the protein and peptide industry, valuable in the fields of Alzheimer's research, drug development and other biotechnology fields using protein folding to understand protein expression and mechanisms of action.

Nakhla, Tony; ,

2012-05-21

413

A Sandia Technology Bulletin: Testing technology, July 1993  

SciTech Connect

Inside this issue various short articles on current testing technology research at Sandia National Laboratories. New techniques of imaging currents in integrated circuits are described. Geomaterials testing is improved with true axial loading under high pressure. Pyroshock simulation tests electronics for space and defense. Insulated cameras get pictures of extremely hot burning fuels. Solar cell testing is improved via spectral response and laser scanning. And missile launching accomplishments are presented.

Not Available

1993-09-01

414

Sandia equation of state data base: seslan File  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories maintains several libraries of equation of state tables, in a modified Sesame format, for use in hydrocode calculations and other applications. This report discusses one of those libraries, the seslan file, which contains 78 tables from the Los Alamos equation of state library. Minor changes have been made to these tables, making them more convenient for code users and reducing numerical difficulties that occasionally arise in hydrocode calculations.

Kerley, G.I. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (US); Christian-Frear, T.L. [RE/SPEC Inc., Albuquerque, NM (US)

1993-06-24

415

The Sandia Plasma Materials Test Facility in 2007  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Plasma Materials Test Facility, in its third decade of operation at Sandia National Laboratories, upgraded the 30-kW system to 60kW (EB60) with a new gun, grid control and power supply. In 2007 we are testing mockups in EB60 to assess processes for joining Be to CuCrZr and CuCrZr to 316LN-IG for the fabrication of US first wall (FW) panels

J. M. McDonald; T. J. Lutz; D. L. Youchison; F. J. Bauer; K. P. Troncosa; R. E. Nygren

2008-01-01

416

AFTI/SITAN (Advanced Fighter Technology Integration/Sandia Inertial Terrain-Aided Navigation) final report  

SciTech Connect

Sandia Inertial Terrain-Aided Navigation (SITAN) provides continuous position fixes to an inertial navigation system (INS) by real-time comparison of radar altimeter ground clearance measurements with stored digital terrain elevation data (DTED). This is accomplished by using an extended Kalman filter algorithm to estimate the errors in the reference trajectory provided by an INS. In this report, Sandia National Laboratories documents the results of a reimbursable effort funded by the Air Force Wright Aeronautical Laboratories (AFWAL) Avionics Laboratory to flight test SITAN as implemented onboard the Advanced Fighter Technology Integration (AFTI)F-16. 5 refs., 101 figs., 1 tab.

Fellerhoff, J.R.

1988-11-01

417

Effects of ultraviolet radiation on early larval stages of the Alpine newt, Triturus alpestris , under natural and laboratory conditions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although Alpine newts (Triturus alpestris) are found at altitudes up to 2500 m, their larvae proved to be extremely sensitive to UV radiation when exposed in clear\\u000a tapwater to natural sunlight or to comparable artificial UV-B radiation in the laboratory. The experiments revealed severe\\u000a skin damages (lysis of epithelial cells) and mortality after a few days of exposure. In their

Alexander M. Nagl; Rudolf Hofer

1997-01-01

418

Laboratory measurement of cyclotron radiation inhibition by background plasma relevant to the polar magnetosphere  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Auroral Kilometric Radiation (AKR) emitted at polar regions of magnetised planets such as Saturn and Earth arises as particles descend and accelerate through an auroral density cavity (partial plasma depletion region, fpe9kHz and np10^6m-3) into the increasing magnetic field at the poles. Adiabatic conservation of the magnetic moment increases the pitch angle of each electron causing an increase in perpendicular velocity, resulting in a horseshoe shaped distribution function in velocity space. This distribution has been shown to be unstable to a cyclotron resonance maser type interaction and produces radiation with spectral peaks at 300kHz, GW's of power and with wave propagation in the X-mode. A scaled laboratory experiment allows magnetic compression of an electron beam to represent the action of the Earth's magnetic field on the particles. A Penning trap was incorporated into the experimental apparatus to allow generation of background plasma. Results showed that the background plasma affected the EM wave generation, characterised by reduced intensity, intermittent radio emission compared to the stable emission observed in the absence of plasma.

McConville, Sandra L.; King, Martin; Koepke, Mark; Speirs, David; Gillespie, Karen; Phelps, Alan; Cross, Adrian; Matheson, Kathleen; Cairns, Alan; Vorgul, Irena; Bingham, Robert; Kellett, Barry; Ronald, Kevin

2012-10-01

419

Sandia Combustion Research: Technical review  

SciTech Connect

This report contains reports from research programs conducted at the Sandia Combustion Research Facility. Research is presented under the following topics: laser based diagnostics; combustion chemistry; reacting flow; combustion in engines and commercial burners; coal combustion; and industrial processing. Individual projects were processed separately for entry onto the DOE databases.

NONE

1995-07-01

420

Rock Formation and Cosmic Radiation Exposure Ages in Gale Crater Mudstones from the Mars Science Laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) in the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) suite of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) has been utilized to secure abundances of 3He, 21Ne, 36Ar, and 40Ar thermally evolved from the mudstone in the stratified Yellowknife Bay formation in Gale Crater. As reported by Farley et al. [1] these measurements of cosmogenic and radiogenic noble gases together with Cl and K abundances measured by MSL's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer enable a K-Ar rock formation age of 4.21+0.35 Ga to be established as well as a surface exposure age to cosmic radiation of 78+30 Ma. Understanding surface exposures to cosmic radiation is relevant to the MSL search for organic compounds since even the limited set of studies carried out, to date, indicate that even 10's to 100's of millions of years of near surface (1-3 meter) exposure may transform a significant fraction of the organic compounds exposed to this radiation [2,3,4]. Transformation of potential biosignatures and even loss of molecular structural information in compounds that could point to exogenous or endogenous sources suggests a new paradigm in the search for near surface organics that incorporates a search for the most recently exposed outcrops through erosional processes. The K-Ar rock formation age determination shows promise for more precise in situ measurements that may help calibrate the martian cratering record that currently relies on extrapolation from the lunar record with its ground truth chronology with returned samples. We will discuss the protocol for the in situ noble gas measurements secured with SAM and ongoing studies to optimize these measurements using the SAM testbed. References: [1] Farley, K.A.M Science Magazine, 342, (2013). [2] G. Kminek et al., Earth Planet Sc Lett 245, 1 (2006). [3] Dartnell, L.R., Biogeosciences 4, 545 (2007). [4] Pavlov, A. A., et al. Geophys Res Lett 39, 13202 (2012).

Mahaffy, Paul; Farley, Ken; Malespin, Charles; Gellert, Ralph; Grotzinger, John

2014-05-01

421

RADIOFREQUENCY RADIATION EXPOSURE FACILITIES FOR BIO-EFFECTS RESEARCH AT THE HEALTH EFFECTS RESEARCH LABORATORY, RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK, NORTH CAROLINA  

EPA Science Inventory

The report describes the multi-user radiofrequency radiation exposure facilities for bio-effects research in use at the Health Effects Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, NC. Four facilities are described: (1) a 100 MHz CW exposure system, (2) a 2450 MHz CW exposure syst...

422

SANDIA CORPORATION SF 6432-CS (03-05)  

E-print Network

of the parties hereto shall be governed by this contract and construed in accordance with the law of the state consent of Sandia. However, Contractor may assign rights to be paid amounts due or to become due if Sandia not yet accepted by Sandia. (b) Sandia may terminate for the convenience of Sandia or the government

423

Laboratory Simulation of Frozen Methanol Under X-ray Radiation Field: Relevancies to Astrophysical Ices  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The origin of complex organic molecules detected in comets, meteorites, star-forming regions and other environments are currently subject of discussion. Depending on the environment, it is dominated by X-rays, UV photons as well as by charged particles, electrons and ions with high or low energies. Every particle will promote a different fragmentation in the molecule and different phenomena in the ice, favoring the formation of an ion species rather than another. To predict the chemical evolution and to quantify the complex organics incorporated into grains or desorbed to the gas phase, it is necessary to establish the main formation route, which can be tested in the laboratories. In this way, the study of the effects of different ionization agents on the ices becomes crucial. Methanol (CH3 OH), the simplest organic alcohol, is an important precursor of more complex prebiotic species and is found abundantly in icy mantles on interstellar and protostellar dust grains. This molecule has been detected through infrared spectroscopy in some astrophysics environments as W33A and RAFGL 7009. Additionally, methanol has been found in comets, as Hale-Bopp, and other solar system bodies, such as the centaur 5145 Pholus. All of these astronomical environments are subjected to some form of ionizing agents such as cosmic rays, electrons and photons (e.g. stellar radiation field). In this work, synchrotron radiation from the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory at the O 1s-edge was employed to perform desorption experiments on the frozen methanol. The desorp-tion rates (desorbed ion per incident photon) of the most intense ions desorbed from methanol due soft X-ray bombardment are estimated. The desorption rates are critical parameters for modeling the chemistry of interstellar clouds. Moreover, a comparison among our results and literature using different ionization agents and different phases (photons at 292 eV and elec-trons at 70 eV in gaseous phase and heavy ions around 65 MeV on methanol ice) is given and discussed.

Andrade, Diana; Rocco, Maria Luiza M.; Boechat-Roberty, Heloisa Maria

424

The LBL 55-meter spherical grating monochromator at SSRL (Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory)  

SciTech Connect

The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 55-m spherical grating monochromator (SGM) beamline is located as a branch line of the 54-pole wiggler/undulator at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL). It was designed and constructed by LBL's Center for X-Ray Optics and the engineering staff of LBL's Advanced Light Source with the cooperation and assistance of the research group of David Shirley at LBL and the staff of SSRL. The main goals of the project were to test the SGM concept and to develop a capability for designing and building a water-cooled mirror and grating capability in anticipation of the ALS. A water-cooled plane mirror deflects the beam horizontally, taking in general a small fraction of the flux from the 54-pole insertion device. This mirror is a brazed assembly of Glidcop (a proprietary alumina-dispersion-strengthened copper alloy) and OFHC copper. Its surface was finished in polished electroless nickel, then overcoated with gold as all optics in the beamline are overcoated. Next in the line is a fused silica toroid which focuses the SPEAR source vertically onto the entrance slit of the monochromator and horizontally onto the nominal position of the exit slit, in the manner of Rense and Violett. The magnification factors are 0.3x vertically and 0.7x horizontally. The monochromator is a Rowland-circle design; both slits move on large granite-based slides that maintain flatness of travel to {plus minus}2 {mu}m in peak-to-peak variation from straightness.

McKinney, W.R.; Howells, M.R.; Lauritzen, T.; Chin, J.; DiGennaro, R.; Fong, E.; Gath, W.; Guigli, J.; Hogrefe, H.; Meneghetti, J.; Plate, D.; Heimann, P.A.; Terminello, L.; Ji, Z.; Shirley, D. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)); Senf, S. (Stanford Univ., CA (USA). Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lab.)

1989-08-01

425

Laboratory Experiments on Rotation of Micron Size Cosmic Dust Grains with Radiation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The processes and mechanisms involved in the rotation and alignment of interstellar dust grains have been of great interest in astrophysics ever since the surprising discovery of the polarization of starlight more than half a century ago. Numerous theories, detailed mathematical models and numerical studies of grain rotation and alignment along the Galactic magnetic field have been presented in the literature. In particular, the subject of grain rotation and alignment by radiative torques has been shown to be of particular interest in recent years. However, despite many investigations, a satisfactory theoretical understanding of the processes involved in grain rotation and alignment has not been achieved. As there appears to be no experimental data available on this subject, we have carried out some unique experiments to illuminate the processes involved in rotation of dust grains in the interstellar medium. In this paper we present the results of some preliminary laboratory experiments on the rotation of individual micron/submicron size nonspherical dust grains levitated in an electrodynamic balance evacuated to pressures of approx. 10(exp -3) to 10(exp -5) torr. The particles are illuminated by laser light at 5320 A, and the grain rotation rates are obtained by analyzing the low frequency (approx. 0-100 kHz) signal of the scattered light detected by a photodiode detector. The rotation rates are compared with simple theoretical models to retrieve some basic rotational parameters. The results are examined in the light of the current theories of alignment.

Abbas, M. M.; Craven, P. D.; Spann, J. F.; Tankosic, D.; LeClair, A.; Gallagher, D. L.; West, E.; Weingartner, J.; Witherow, W. K.

2004-01-01

426

Laboratory Experiments on Rotation and Alignment of the Analogs of Interstellar Dust Grains by Radiation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The processes and mechanisms involved in the rotation and alignment of interstellar dust grains have been of great interest in astrophysics ever since the surprising discovery of the polarization of starlight more than half a century ago. Numerous theories, detailed mathematical models and numerical studies of grain rotation and alignment with respect to the Galactic magnetic field have been presented in the literature. In particular, the subject of grain rotation and alignment by radiative torques has been shown to be of particular interest in recent years. However, despite many investigations, a satisfactory theoretical understanding of the processes involved in grain rotation and alignment has not been achieved. As there appears to be no experimental data available on this subject, we have carried out some unique experiments to illuminate the processes involved in rotation of dust grains in the interstellar medium. In this paper we present the results of some preliminary laboratory experiments on the rotation of individual micron/submicron size nonspherical dust grains levitated in an electrodynamic balance evacuated to pressures of approximately 10(exp -3) to 10(exp -5) torr. The particles are illuminated by laser light at 5320 Angstroms, and the grain rotation rates are obtained by analyzing the low frequency (approximately 0-100 kHz) signal of the scattered light detected by a photodiode detector. The rotation rates are compared with simple theoretical models to retrieve some basic rotational parameters. The results are examined in the light of the current theories of alignment.

Abbas, M. M.; Craven, P. D.; Spann, J. F.; Tankosic, D.; LeClair, A.; Gallagher, D. L.; West, E. A.; Weingartner, J. C.; Witherow, W. K.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

2004-01-01

427

Laboratory Experiments on Rotation and Alignment of the Analogs of Interstellar Dust Grains by Radiation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The processes and mechanisms involved in the rotation and alignment of interstellar dust grains have been of great interest in astrophysics ever since the surprising discovery of the polarization of starlight more than half a century ago. Numerous theories, detailed mathematical models, and numerical studies of grain rotation and alignment with respect to the Galactic magnetic field have been presented in the literature. In particular, the subject of grain rotation and alignment by radiative torques has been shown to be of particular interest in recent years. However, despite many investigations, a satisfactory theoretical understanding of the processes involved in subject, we have carried out some unique experiments to illuminate the processes involved in the rotation of dust grains in the interstellar medium. In this paper we present the results of some preliminary laboratory experiments on the rotation of individual micron/submicron-sized, nonspherical dust grains levitated in an electrodynamic balance evacuated to pressures of approximately 10(exp -3) to 10(exp -5) torr. The particles are illuminated by laser light at 5320 A, and the grain rotation rates are obtained by analyzing the low-frequency (approximately 0 - 100 kHz) signal of the scattered light detected by a photodiode detector. The rotation rates are compared with simple theoretical models to retrieve some basic rotational parameters. The results are examined in light of the current theories of alignment.

Abbas, M. M.; Craven, P. D.; Spann, J. F.; Tankosic, D.; LeClair, A.; Gallagher, D. L.; West, E. A.; Weingartner, J. C.; Witherow, W. K.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

2004-01-01

428

Sandia and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, 1974--1999  

SciTech Connect

Engineers have learned to design and build big projects, which certainly describes the WIPP project, but also includes defense projects, highway networks, space exploration, the Internet, etc., through what has been called a messily complex embracing of contradictions. When something massive and complicated has to be built these days, it leads to a protracted political process in which every special interest makes a stand, lobbyists exert what influence they can, lawmakers bicker, contractors change things, Congress struggles with costs, environmentalists hold things up--and this is good. It may seem amazing that anything gets done, but when it does, everyone has had their say. It's an intensely democratic, even if expensive and time-consuming, process. The corporate historian of Sandia National Laboratories presents a unique background of the WIPP project and Sandia's part in it.

MORA,CARL J.

2000-04-11

429

Sandia SCADA Program -- High Surety SCADA LDRD Final Report  

SciTech Connect

Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems are a part of the nation's critical infrastructure that is especially vulnerable to attack or disruption. Sandia National Laboratories is developing a high-security SCADA specification to increase the national security posture of the U.S. Because SCADA security is an international problem and is shaped by foreign and multinational interests, Sandia is working to develop a standards-based solution through committees such as the IEC TC 57 WG 15, the IEEE Substation Committee, and the IEEE P1547-related activity on communications and controls. The accepted standards are anticipated to take the form of a Common Criteria Protection Profile. This report provides the status of work completed and discusses several challenges ahead.

CARLSON, ROLF E.

2002-04-01

430

IP address management : augmenting Sandia's capabilities through open source tools.  

SciTech Connect

Internet Protocol (IP) address management is an increasingly growing concern at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the networking community as a whole. The current state of the available IP addresses indicates that they are nearly exhausted. Currently SNL doesn't have the justification to obtain more IP address space from Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA). There must exist a local entity to manage and allocate IP assignments efficiently. Ongoing efforts at Sandia have been in the form of a multifunctional database application notably known as Network Information System (NWIS). NWIS is a database responsible for a multitude of network administrative services including IP address management. This study will explore the feasibility of augmenting NWIS's IP management capabilities utilizing open source tools. Modifications of existing capabilities to better allocate available IP address space are studied.

Nayar, R. Daniel

2005-08-01

431

www.sandia.gov/emergency/index.html E M E R G E N C I E S AT S A N D I A  

E-print Network

communications: An Alert, the least severe emergency classification, is an incident that has led or could leadwww.sandia.gov/emergency/index.html E M E R G E N C I E S AT S A N D I A Sandia National Laboratories' Emergency Management Program is responsible for minimizing the effect of an emergency on people

432

Solar collector field subsystem program on the fixed mirror solar concentrator. Final report, March 28, 1976September 30, 1976. [For Sandia Solar Total Energy System  

Microsoft Academic Search

The work done by General Atomic Company (GA) to complete the preliminary design of a fixed mirror solar concentrator (FMSC) for Sandia Laboratories as part of Phase I of the Sandia Solar Total Energy System is described. The objective of this work was to establish an FMSC preliminary design, based upon a GA patent, that would deliver approximately 2 x

G. H. Eggers; J. J. Housman; F. L. Openshaw; J. L. Jr. Russell

1976-01-01

433

Measuring Neutrons and Gamma Rays on Mars - The Mars Science Laboratory Radiation Assessment Detector MSL/RAD  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) missions Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) will measure the radiation environment on the Martian surface. One of the difficult measurements is that of the neutral radiation component consisting of neutrons and gamma rays. Different from Earth, this neutral component contributes substantially to the total dose on the planetary surface, principally because the Martian atmosphere is so thin. We will present methods to invert neutral particle data acquired with MSL's RAD instrument and compare them with calibration data. While the agreement is good for neutrons from a calibration beam in a forward model, more work is required for omnidirectional neutrons with unknown spectral properties using other inversion techniques. We expect an asymmetry in fluxes from soil and sky for neutrons. Preliminary simulation results show a different behavior for gamma rays. Therefore, models of the IRF are likely to require additional inputs about the radiation environement.

Martin, Cesar; Kortmann, Onno; Boehm, Eckart; Boettcher, Stephan; Kharytonov, Alexander; Ehresmann, Bent; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.; Hassler, Donald M.; Zeitlin, Cary

2010-05-01

434

A user`s guide to LHS: Sandia`s Latin Hypercube Sampling Software  

Microsoft Academic Search

This document is a reference guide for LHS, Sandia`s Latin Hypercube Sampling Software. This software has been developed to generate either Latin hypercube or random multivariate samples. The Latin hypercube technique employs a constrained sampling scheme, whereas random sampling corresponds to a simple Monte Carlo technique. The present program replaces the previous Latin hypercube sampling program developed at Sandia National

Gregory D. Wyss; Kelly H. Jorgensen

1998-01-01

435

A user`s guide to GAETR: Sandia`s {open_quotes}Graphical Analysis of Event Trees{close_quotes} software  

SciTech Connect

This document is a reference guide for GAETR, Graphical Analysis of Event Trees, a software package developed at Sandia National Laboratories. GAETR may be used as a stand-alone code or as a module in the ARRAMIS{trademark} risk and reliability code suite. GAETR is designed to graphically create event trees and plot SETAC (Sandia Event Tree Analysis Code) output on IBM-compatible personal computers using the Microsoft{reg_sign} Windows{trademark} 95/NT operating environment. This manual explains the fundamentals of creating an event tree, including formatting, saving sequence information, printing, editing, and importing graphics to other software packages.

Hays, K.M.

1997-09-01

436

SANDIA CORPORATION SF 6432CI (0305)  

E-print Network

of this contract. CI02 APPLICABLE LAW The rights and obligations of the parties hereto shall be governed rights or obligations to third parties without the prior written consent of Sandia. However, Contractor or the government this contract, in whole or in part, for any item or services not yet accepted by Sandia

437

SANDIA MOUNTAIN WILDERNESS, NEW MEXICO.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Geologic and mineral-resource investigations in the Sandia Mountains in New Mexico indicate that a small part of the area has a probable mineral-resource potential. Most of the mineral occurrences are small barite-fluorite veins that occur along faults on the eastern slope of the range. The barite veins in the Landsend area and in the Tunnel Spring area are classed as having a probable mineral-resource potential. Fluorite veins which occur at the La Luz mine contain silver-bearing galeana and the area near this mine is regarded as having a probable resource potential for silver. No energy resources were identified in this study.

Hedlund, D.C.; Kness, R.F.

1984-01-01

438

Summary of Sandia research on metal tritides : FY 2007.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories has cradle to grave responsibility for all neutron generators in the US nuclear weapons stockpile. As such, much research effort is exerted to develop a comprehensive understanding of all the major components of a neutron generator. One of the key components is the tritium containing target. The target is a thin metal tritide film. Sandia's research into metal tritides began in the early 1960's with a collaboration with the Denver Research Institute (DRI) and continues to this day with a major in house research effort. This document is an attempt to briefly summarize what is known about the aging of erbium tritide and to review the major publications conducted at Sandia in FY 07. First, a review of our knowledge of helium in erbium tritide will be presented. Second, executive summaries of the six major SAND reports regarding neutron tube targets published in FY07 by Department 2735, the Applied Science and Technology Maturation Department, and research partners are presented.

Browning, James Frederick (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Kammler, Daniel R.; Snow, Clark Sheldon; Ferrizz, Robert Matthew; Rodriguez, Mark Andrew; Wixom, Ryan R.; Espada, Loren I.

2008-05-01

439

The U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory P.O. Box 5000, Upton NY 11973 631 344-2345 www.bnl.gov NASA Space Radiation Laboratory  

E-print Network

and easily penetrate shuttle and space station walls, as well as human skin, cells, and DNA. This ionizing Laboratory Assessing the risks of space radiation to human space travelers As the National Aeronautics of cosmic radiation are still uncertain. Before humans can travel for extended periods outside Earth

Ohta, Shigemi

440

Sandia invention to make parabolic trough solar collector systems more energy efficient  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This news release, from Sandia National Laboratories, announces the development of a system to align the long parabolic trough mirrors in a solar collector, thereby making it much more efficient. The article contains a description of how such trough solar collector systems and the new mirror alignment devices operate. Images are provided along with an outline of the group's anticipated progress.

2007-09-25

441

High velocity flyer plate launch capability on the Sandia Z accelerator  

Microsoft Academic Search

A method has been developed for launching plates useful for equation of state (EOS) studies to high velocities using fast pulsed power on the Sandia National Laboratories Z Accelerator. The technique employs magnetic pressure developed in an insulating gap between the anode and cathode of the machine to provide smoothly increasing, quasi-isentropic loading to plates of 9 12 mm

C. A. Hall; M. D. Knudson; J. R. Asay; R. Lemke; B. Oliver

2001-01-01

442

SANDIA CORPORATION SF 6432-CI (01-02)  

E-print Network

hereto shall be governed by this Contract and construed in accordance with federal law of government parties without the prior written consent of Sandia. However, Seller may assign rights to be paid amounts by Sandia. (b) Sandia may terminate for the convenience of Sandia or the Government this Contract, in whole

443

Charged particle spectra obtained with the Mars Science Laboratory Radiation Assessment Detector (MSL/RAD) on the surface of Mars  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD)situated inside the Mars Science Laboratory's Curiosity roveris the first ever instrument to measure the energetic particle radiation environment on the surface of Mars. To fully understand the influence of this surface radiation field in terms of potential hazard to life, a detailed knowledge of its composition is necessary. Charged particles are a major component of this environment, both galactic cosmic rays propagating to the Martian surface and secondary particles created by interactions of these cosmic rays with the atoms of the Martian atmosphere and soil. Here we present particle fluxes for a wide range of ion species, providing detailed energy spectra in the low-energy range (up to several hundred MeV/nucleon particle energy), and integral fluxes for higher energies. In addition to being crucial for the understanding of the hazards of this radiation to possible future manned missions to Mars, the data reported here provide valuable input for evaluating and validating particle transport models currently used to estimate the radiation environment on Mars and elsewhere in space. It is now possible for the first time to compare model results for expected surface particle fluxes with actual ground-based measurements.

Ehresmann, Bent; Zeitlin, Cary; Hassler, Donald M.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.; Bhm, Eckart; Bttcher, Stephan; Brinza, David E.; Burmeister, Snke; Guo, Jingnan; Khler, Jan; Martin, Cesar; Posner, Arik; Rafkin, Scot; Reitz, Gnther

2014-03-01

444

Sandia's mentoring program : an ongoing success.  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the Mentoring Program at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), which has been an on-going success since its inception in 1995. The Mentoring Program provides a mechanism to develop a workforce able to respond to changing requirements and complex customer needs. The program objectives are to enhance employee contributions through increased knowledge of SNL culture, strategies, and programmatic direction. Mentoring is a proven mechanism for attracting new employees, retaining employees, and developing leadership. It helps to prevent the loss of corporate knowledge from attrition and retirement, and it increases the rate and level of contributions of new managers and employees, also spurring cross-organizational teaming. The Mentoring Program is structured as a one-year partnership between an experienced staff member or leader and a less experienced one. Mentors and mentees are paired according to mutual objectives and interests. Support is provided to the matched pairs from their management as well as division program coordinators in both New Mexico and California locations. In addition, bi-monthly large-group training sessions are held.

Brewer, Soila

2003-12-01

445

Radiatively Driven Thermal Convection Bounded by an InversionA Laboratory Simulation of Stratus Clouds  

Microsoft Academic Search

The radiative loss from stratus clouds is simulated by the radiative heating of the lower part of a turbid warm layer of water overlying cold clear water. The color change of thymol blue indicator effects the turbidity change between layers and simulates changes in liquid water content between a cloud and the dry air above it. Heat absorption in the

A. D. McEwan; G. W. Paltridge

1976-01-01

446

Sandia Wind Turbine Loads Database  

DOE Data Explorer

The Sandia Wind Turbine Loads Database is divided into six files, each corresponding to approximately 16 years of simulation. The files are text files with data in columnar format. The 424MB zipped file containing six data files can be downloaded by the public. The files simulate 10-minute maximum loads for the NREL 5MW wind turbine. The details of the loads simulations can be found in the paper: Decades of Wind Turbine Loads Simulations, M. Barone, J. Paquette, B. Resor, and L. Manuel, AIAA2012-1288 (3.69MB PDF). Note that the site-average wind speed is 10 m/s (class I-B), not the 8.5 m/s reported in the paper.

447

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory?s Book of Minimum Detectable Activity for Direct Measurement of Internally Deposited Radionuclides in Radiation Workers  

SciTech Connect

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory maintains an in vivo measurement program designed to identify and evaluate the activity of radionuclides deposited in the body. Two types of systems are primarily used for the routine monitoring of radiation workers, the lung counting system and the scanning bed whole body counting system. The lung counting system is comprised of two Canberra ACTII detector sets. Each ACTII set contains two planar germanium detectors with carbon composite end windows optimized to measure low energy photon emitting radionuclides. The ACTII detectors are placed on the upper torso over the lungs for the direct measurement of internally deposited radionuclides in the lungs that emit low energy photons. A correction for the thickness of the chest wall is applied to the efficiency. Because the thickness of the chest wall is a key factor in the measurement of low energy photon emitting radionuclides in the lung, the minimum detectable activity is a function of the chest wall thickness. The scanning bed whole body counting system is comprised of a thin air mattress on top of a carbon fiber bed that slowly scans over four high purity germanium detectors. The scanning system is designed to minimize variations in detected activity due to radionuclide distribution in the body. The scanning bed detection system is typically used for the measurement of internally deposited radionuclides that emit photons above 100 to 200 keV. MDAs have been generated for radionuclides that provide energies above 80 keV since the lowest calibration energy for the system is approximately 86 keV. The following charts and table provide best determination of minimum detectable activity using human subjects as controls for the background contributions. A wide variety of radionuclides are used throughout the laboratory and the following pages represent several of the radionuclides that have been encountered at the Whole Body and Spectroscopy Laboratories within Hazards Control.

Hickman, D P

2008-10-08

448

COBRA accelerator for Sandia ICF diode research at Cornell University  

SciTech Connect

The new COBRA accelerator is being built in stages at the Laboratory of Plasma Studies in Cornell University where its applications will include extraction diode and ion beam research in support of the light ion inertial confinement fusion (ICF) program at Sandia National Laboratories. The 4- to 5-MV, 125- to 250-kA accelerator is based on a four-cavity inductive voltage adder (IVA) design. It is a combination of new ferromagnetically-isolated cavities and self magnetically insulated transmission line (MITL) hardware and components from existing Sandia and Cornell facilities: Marx generator capacitors, hardware, and power supply from the DEMON facility; water pulse forming lines (PFL) and gas switch from the Subsystem Test Facility (STF); a HERMES-III intermediate store capacitor (ISC); and a modified ion diode from Cornell`s LION. The present accelerator consists of a single modified cavity similar to those of the Sandia SABRE accelerator and will be used to establish an operating system for the first stage initial lower voltage testing. Four new cavities will be fabricated and delivered in the first half of FY96 to complete the COBRA accelerator. COBRA is unique in the sense that each cavity is driven by a single pulse forming line, and the IVA output polarity may be reversed by rotating the cavities 180{degrees} about their vertical axis. The site preparations, tank construction, and diode design and development are taking place at Cornell with growing enthusiasm as this machine becomes a reality. Preliminary results with the single cavity and short positive inner cylinder MITL configuration will soon be available.

Smith, D.L.; Ingwersen, P.; Bennett, L.F.; Boyes, J.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Anderson, D.E.; Greenly, J.B.; Sudan, R.N. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

1995-05-01

449

Mortality through 1990 among white male workers at the Los Alamos National Laboratory: Considering exposures to plutonium and external ionizing radiation  

Microsoft Academic Search

A cohort mortality study was conducted of 15,727 white men employed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory, a nuclear research and development facility. Some of the workers at this facility have been exposed to various forms of ionizing radiation and other potentially hazardous materials. These analyses focused on whole-body ionizing radiation exposures and internal depositions of plutonium. The results indicated

Laurie D. Wiggs; Emily R. Johnson; Carol A. Cox-Devore; George L. Voelz

1994-01-01

450

Modeling X-Ray Photoionized Plasmas Produced at the Sandia Z-Facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

In experiments at the high-power Z-facility at Sandia National Laboratory in Albuquerque, New Mexico, we have been able to produce a low density photoionized laboratory plasma of Fe mixed with NaF. The conditions in the experiment allow a meaningful comparison with X-ray emission from astrophysical sources. The charge state distributions of Fe, Na and F are determined in this plasma

P. A. M. Hoof; M. E. Foord; R. F. Heeter; J. E. Bailey; H.-K. Chung; M. E. Cuneo; W. H. Goldstein; V. Jonauskas; F. P. Keenan; R. Kisielius; D. A. Liedahl; C. Ramsbottom; S. J. Rose; P. T. Springer; R. S. Thoe

2005-01-01

451

Turbulence radiation interaction in Reynolds-averaged NavierStokes simulations of nonpremixed piloted turbulent laboratory-scale flames  

Microsoft Academic Search

Numerical simulation results are presented for two axisymmetric, nonluminous turbulent piloted jet diffusion flames: Sandia Flame D (SFD) and Delft Flame III (DFIII). Turbulence is represented by a Reynolds stress transport model, while chemistry is modeled by means of steady laminar flamelets. We use the preassumed PDF approach for turbulencechemistry interaction. A weighted sum of gray gases model is used

A. Habibi; B. Merci; D. Roekaerts

2007-01-01

452

Turbulence radiation interaction in Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes simulations of nonpremixed piloted turbulent laboratory-scale flames  

Microsoft Academic Search

Numerical simulation results are presented for two axisymmetric, nonluminous turbulent piloted jet diffusion flames: Sandia Flame D (SFD) and Delft Flame III (DFIII). Turbulence is represented by a Reynolds stress transport model, while chemistry is modeled by means of steady laminar flamelets. We use the preassumed PDF approach for turbulence-chemistry interaction. A weighted sum of gray gases model is used

A. Habibi; B. Merci; D. Roekaerts

2007-01-01

453

Measuring Neutrons and Gamma Rays on Mars - The Mars Science Laboratory Radiation Assessment Detector MSL/RAD  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) missions Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) will measure the radiation environment on the Martian surface. One of the difficult measurements is that of the neutral radiation component consisting of neutrons and gamma rays. Different from Earth, this neutral component contributes substantially to the total dose on the planetary surface, principally because the Martian atmosphere is so thin. The RAD instrument is capable of measuring neutral particles through a combination of sensitive anti-coincidence and organic and inorganic scintillator materials. In this work, we will explain how RAD will measure the neutral particle radiation on Mars and compare with calibration results. The problem of inverting measured neutron and gamma data is a non-trivial task. For all inversions, one generally assumes that the measurement process can be described by a system of linear equations, A ?c{f} = ?c{z}, where the matrix A describes the instrument response function (IRF), ?c{f} the underlying, but unknown, ``real'' physical parameters, and ?c{z} the measured data. The inversion of this deceptively simple-looking set of equations is in fact a key example of an ill-posed or inverse problem. Such problems are notoriously difficult to solve.

Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Martin, C.; Kortmann, O.; Boehm, E.; Kharytonov, A.; Ehresmann, B.; Hassler, D. M.; Zeitlin, C.; Rad Team

2010-12-01

454

RADIATION MEASUREMENTS BY BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY DURING THE WOODS HOLE OCEANOGRAPHIC INSTITUTION INTERCOMPARISON STUDY, MAY-JUNE 2000.  

SciTech Connect

The WHOI buoy radiometer intercomparison took place during May and June, 2000 at the WHOI facility. The WHOI IMET, JAMSTEC Triton, and NOAA TAO buoy systems were operated from a beach site and the Brookhaven National Laboratory set up two Portable Radiation Package systems (P01 and P02) alongside the WHOI instrumentation on the roof of the Clark Building, about 300 m away. The BNL instruments were named ''P01'' and ''P02'' and were identical. Buoy instruments were all leveled to {+-}1{degree} to horizontal. The purpose of the project was to compare the buoy systems with precision measurements so that any differences in data collection or processing would be evaluated. BNL was pleased to participate so the PRP system could be evaluated as a calibration tool. The Portable Radiation Package is an integral component of the BNL Shipboard Oceanographic and Atmospheric Radiation (SOAR) system. It is designed to make accurate downwelling radiation measurements, including the three solar irradiance components (direct normal, diffuse and global) at six narrowband channels, aerosol optical depth measurements, and broadband longwave and shortwave irradiance measurements.

REYNOLDS, R.M.; BARTHOLOMEW, M.J.; MILLER, M.A.; SMITH, S.; EDWARDS, R.

2000-12-01

455

Modeling Laboratory Astrophysics Experiments in the High-Energy-Density Regime Using the CRASH Radiation-Hydrodynamics Model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The radiation hydrodynamics code developed by the Center for Radiative Shock Hydrodynamics (CRASH) at the University of Michigan has been used to model experimental designs for high-energy-density physics campaigns on OMEGA and other high-energy laser facilities. This code is an Eulerian, block-adaptive AMR hydrodynamics code with implicit multigroup radiation transport and electron heat conduction. CRASH model results have shown good agreement with a experimental results from a variety of applications, including: radiative shock, Kelvin-Helmholtz and Rayleigh-Taylor experiments on the OMEGA laser; as well as laser-driven ablative plumes in experiments by the Astrophysical Collisionless Shocks Experiments with Lasers (ACSEL), collaboration. We report a series of results with the CRASH code in support of design work for upcoming high-energy-density physics experiments, as well as comparison between existing experimental data and simulation results. This work is funded by the Predictive Sciences Academic Alliances Program in NNSA-ASC via grant DEFC52- 08NA28616, by the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas, grant number DE-FG52-09NA29548, and by the National Laser User Facility Program, grant number DE-NA0000850.

Grosskopf, M. J.; Drake, R. P.; Trantham, M. R.; Kuranz, C. C.; Keiter, P. A.; Rutter, E. M.; Sweeney, R. M.; Malamud, G.

2012-10-01