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Sample records for sandstone surface crust

  1. Composition of weathering crusts on sandstones from natural outcrops and architectonic elements in an urban environment.

    PubMed

    Marszałek, Mariola; Alexandrowicz, Zofia; Rzepa, Grzegorz

    2014-12-01

    This work presents mineralogical and chemical characteristics of weathering crusts developed on sandstones exposed to various air pollution conditions. The samples have been collected from sandstone tors in the Carpathian Foothill and from buildings in Kraków. It has been stated that these crusts differ in both fabric and composition. The sandstone black crust from tors is rich in organic matter and composed of amorphous silica. Sulphate incrustations accompanied by dust particles have been only sometimes observed. Beneath the black crust, a zone coloured by iron (oxyhydr)oxides occurs. The enrichment of the surface crust in silica and iron compounds protects the rock interior from atmospheric impact. The sandstones from architectonic details are also covered by a thin carbon-rich black crust, but they are visibly loosened. Numerous salts, mainly gypsum and halite, crystallise here, thus enhancing deterioration of the rock. Moreover, spherical particles originated from industrial emissions are much more common. Gypsum in natural outcrops, forms isolated and well-developed crystals, whilst these found on the architectonic details are finer and densely cover the surface. Such diversity reflects various concentrations of acid air pollutants in solutions. PMID:25037099

  2. Chemical analysis of black crust on the Angkor sandstone at the Bayon temple, Cambodia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Wonsuh; Oguchi, Chiaki; Waragai, Tetsuya

    2014-05-01

    The Angkor complex is the one of the greatest cultural heritages in the world. It is constructed in the early 12th century, designated as a world cultural heritage by UNESCO in 1992. The temples at the Angkor complex are mainly made of sandstone and laterite. However, due to the tropical climate, plants, lichens and various microorganisms are growing well on the rock surface. Black crusts are also easily found on the stone surface. The 21st technical session of the International Coordinating Committee for the Safeguarding and Development of the Historic Site of Angkor (ICC-Angkor) held in 2012 recommended that to preserve both the biofilms and the forest cover and to prohibit the biocides (chlorine-based) and organic biocides. However, there are many reports that lichens and microorganisms accelerate rock weathering. It is important to clarify that how the biofilm on the Angkor temples affect Angkor sandstones. We sampled Angkor sandstone covered by black crust at the Bayon temple, Angkor complex, and observed the section and the surface of the rock sample by using SEM. Surfaces of the samples are not polished in order to observe the original condition. The samples are coated with gold for 180 seconds. The depth of the black crust is up to 1 mm. Many filamentous materials were found on the black crust. Average energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy data of the five areas of ca. 20 μm ×15 μm in the black crusts shows that over 80 % of the filamentous materials are compounds of carbon. It seems that these materials are hyphae. The shape of the hypha is like a thread and its size is few μm in diameter and up to several centimeters in length. Black crusts are consisted of elements and compounds of carbon, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Cl, K, Ca, and Fe. Further research has to be done to find out the better and proper way of conservation for the Angkor complex.

  3. The cauliflower-like black crusts on sandstones: A natural passive sampler to evaluate the surrounding environmental pollution.

    PubMed

    Morillas, Héctor; Maguregui, Maite; García-Florentino, Cristina; Carrero, Jose Antonio; Salcedo, Isabel; Madariaga, Juan Manuel

    2016-05-01

    Black crust in buildings can be formed as a result of different kind of chemical and physical reactions between the stone surface and environmental factors (e.g. acid aerosols emitted to the atmosphere, airborne particulate matter, etc.). Moreover, biological colonizations can also be present on them. This kind of pathology is widely present in limestones, but fewer are the case study dealing with the characterization of black crusts on sandstones. In this work we present an innovative methodology based on the use of cauliflower-like black crusts formed on sandstone material as natural passive sampler to evaluate the environmental pollution related with the emission of natural (crustal particles and marine aerosol particles) and metallic elements in the airborne particulate matter from the surrounding atmosphere. To illustrate its usefulness, different cauliflower-like black crusts growing in areas protected from the rain growing in an historical construction, La Galea Fortress, made up of sandstone and placed in the Abra Bay (Getxo, Basque Country, Spain) were characterized. This area suffers the anthropogenic emissions coming from the surrounding industry, traffic, sea port, and the natural ones coming from the surrounding marine atmosphere. The applied analytical methodology began with a previous elemental in situ screening in order to evaluate and compare the presence of the metals trapped in black crusts from different orientations using a hand-held energy dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence spectrometer. After this preliminary study, samples of black crusts were taken in order to characterize them in the laboratory using molecular techniques (Raman spectroscopy and XRD) and elemental techniques (ICP-MS, SEM-EDS and micro energy dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence). With the last two elemental techniques, imaging analyses were performed at different lateral resolutions in order to observe the distribution of the metals and other kind of particles trapped in the black

  4. Surface energy characterization of sandstone rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsalan, Naveed; Palayangoda, Sujeewa S.; Burnett, Daniel J.; Buiting, Johannes J.; Nguyen, Quoc P.

    2013-08-01

    The fundamental forces of adhesion are responsible for the spreading of fluids such as crude oil/brine on the reservoir rock surface. These physico-chemical interactions determine the surface energetics of a reservoir and thus their wetting phenomena. Inverse Gas Chromatography (IGC) is introduced to characterize the surface energy of sandstones (Ottawa sand and Berea sandstone). The surface chemistry of the sandstone rocks is further elucidated using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) techniques. The behavior of the polar and non-polar interaction forces was investigated at varying water coverage and at different temperatures. The results indicated that in general as the water coverage increased, the Lifshitz-van der Waals component of surface energy decreased to nearly that of the bulk water, while the acid-base component also showed a decreasing trend. The Lifshitz-van der Waals component of surface energy always decreased with increase in temperature, while the acid-base properties showed contrasting trends in line with changes in surface chemistry of the sandstones, due to the change in temperature. Finally, the wetting properties arising in reservoir sandstones were related to the surface chemistry of the reservoir fluids and their interactions with the reservoir rock surface.

  5. Ionic surface electrical conductivity in sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, Paul W. J.; Meredith, Philip G.; Sammonds, Peter R.; Murrell, Stanley A. F.

    1994-11-01

    Recent analyses of complex conductivity measurements have indicated that high-frequency dispersions encountered in rocks saturated with low-salinity fluids are due to ionic surface conduction and that the form of these dispersions may be dependent upon the nature of the pore and crack surfaces within the rock (Ruffet et al., 1991). Unfortunately, the mechanisms of surface conduction are not well understood, and no model based on rigorous physical principles exists. This paper is split into two parts: an experimental section followed by the development of a theoretical description of adsorption of ions onto mineral surfaces. We have made complex conductivity measurements upon samples of sandstone saturated with a range of different types and concentrations of aqueous solution with a frequency range of 20 Hz to 1 MHz. The frequency dependence of complex conductivity was analyzed using the empirical model of Cole and Cole (1941). The 'fractal' surface models of Le Mehaute and Crepy (1983), Po Zen Wong (1987), the Ruffet el at. (1991) were used to calculate apparent fractal pore surface dimensions for samples saturated with different solution types and concentrations. These showed a pronounced decrease of apparent fractal surface dimension with decreasing electrolyte concentration and a decrease of apparent fractal dimension with increasing relative ionic radius of the dominant cation in solution. A model for ionic surface concentration (ISCOM I) has been developed as the first step in producing a rigorous physicochemical model of surface conduction in quartz-dominated rocks. The results from ISCOM I show that quartz surfaces are overwhelmingly dominated by adsorbed Na(+) when saturated with NaCl solutions of salinities and pH found in actual geological situations. ISCOM I also shows that the concentration threshold for dominance of surface conduction over bulk conduction is aided by depletion of ions from the bulk fluid as a result of their adsorption onto the mineral

  6. Implications for the evolution of continental crust from Hf isotope systematics of detrital zircons in Archean sandstones

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, R.K.

    1989-01-01

    The fractionation of zircons by sedimentary processes into continental margin sandstone deposits results in a biased preservation of pre-existing continental crust in the form of zircon in those sequences. This provides a unique opportunity to distinguish between the contrasting theories of episodic growth versus constant volume of continental crust over geologic time through Hf isotope ratios of detrital zircons. {sup 176}Hf/{sup 177}Hf ratios were determined for detrital zircon fractions from 2.6-3.0 Ga old sedimentary sequences from the Canadian Shield, North Atlantic, Wyoming, and Kaapvaal Cratons. The data strongly suggest inheritance of pre-3.0 Ga zircons only in areas where pre-3.0 Ga old crust exists today, and imply that the quantity of continental crust prior to 3.0 Ga ago was not much greater in extent than the pre-3.0 Ga crust exposed today. Small amounts of continental crust prior to 3.0 Ga ago and rapid addition of continental crust between 2.5 and 3.0 Ga ago are consistent with the episodic growth theory of crustal evolution.

  7. Strange Star Surface: A Crust with Nuggets

    SciTech Connect

    Jaikumar, Prashanth; Reddy, Sanjay; Steiner, Andrew W.

    2006-02-03

    We reexamine the surface composition of strange stars. Strange quark stars are hypothetical compact stars which could exist if strange quark matter was absolutely stable. It is widely accepted that they are characterized by an enormous density gradient (10{sup 26} g/cm{sup 4}) and large electric fields at the surface. By investigating the possibility of realizing a heterogeneous crust, comprised of nuggets of strange quark matter embedded in an uniform electron background, we find that the strange star surface has a much reduced density gradient and negligible electric field. We comment on how our findings will impact various proposed observable signatures for strange stars.

  8. Surface coating for prevention of crust formation

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1994-01-01

    A flexible surface coating which promotes the removal of deposits as they reach the surface by preventing adhesion and crust formation. Flexible layers are attached to each side of a flexible mesh substrate comprising of a plurality of zones composed of one or more neighboring cells, each zone having a different compressibility than its adjacent zones. The substrate is composed of a mesh made of strands and open cells. The cells may be filled with foam. Studs or bearings may also be positioned in the cells to increase the variation in compressibility and thus the degree of flexing of the coating. Surface loading produces varying amounts of compression from point to point causing the coating to flex as deposits reach it, breaking up any hardening deposits before a continuous crust forms. Preferably one or more additional layers are also used, such as an outer layer of a non-stick material such as TEFLON, which may be pigmented, and an inner, adhesive layer to facilitate applying the coating to a surface.

  9. Optical Characterization of Cryptoendolithic Chemical Biosignatures on Antarctic Sandstone Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harju, Ellen R.

    2005-01-01

    We have used several non-destructive optical techniques to study the distribution of organic molecules on an Antarctic sandstone sample collected at Battleship Promontory. Cryptoendolithic microorganisms have been found to inhabit rocks in the dry valleys of Antarctica. These dry deserts are an Earth analog to Mars. Future Mars rovers may search for life in the rocks of Mars with similar instrumentation used in this study. Light microscopy was used to determine five distinct regions and to determine textures on the sample. Deep ultraviolet fluorescence spectroscopy was used to scan the rock for the presence of organic molecules. Organic molecules were present in three of the five regions but not in the crust. There were similarities between each region, but each region presented a unique signature. Raman spectroscopy identified the minerals present and also provided more definitive identifications of the organic molecules. X-ray diffraction was also used to definitively identify the minerals present and corroborate the Raman mineral results.

  10. Surface contamination and changes of mechanical damping in Berea sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, Will Marlin

    Small changes in the pore fluid chemistry of Berea sandstone cause significant changes in mechanical damping. A method of detecting contaminants in porous rocks is under ongoing development. Here I report several laboratory measurements done in support of this development, including that of a large difference in mechanical damping between clean and chemically treated Berea sandstone. I develop a model of a surface-chemistry related damping mechanism, and qualitatively compare results from calculations to experimental results. I rule out other damping mechanisms, and conclude that the observed damping is due to surface chemistry effects (contact angle hysteresis). To help verify experimental results, an anelastic structure with calculable damping properties was built. Damping of this structure was measured by the same method used for damping measurements on Berea sandstone. Results from these measurements show good agreement to the calculated response of the structure in the frequency range 0.03--1 Hz.* *This dissertation includes a CD that is compound (contains both a paper copy and a D as part of the dissertation. The CD requires the following applications: Adobe Acrobat.

  11. Surface roughness change on sandstone induced by temperature increase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlcko, J.; Kompanikova, Z.; Gomez-Heras, M.; Greif, V.; Durmekova, T.; Brcek, M.

    2012-04-01

    Optical surface profilometer allows capturing the information necessary to provide 3D surface measurements in a single image acquisition with a vertical micrometric resolution. The surface topography can be used for analyses, such as roughness evaluation. In this research, roughness changes of two types of sandstone samples were studied before and after heating to 60, 200, 400, 600 and 800 °C. Measurements obtained were converted into 3D 5 mm x 5 mm (25 mm2) topographic maps with a resolution of 2.5 µm. Surface roughness parameter Sq represents quantifies roughness from the maximum deviation along a mean surface and it is calculated as the root mean squared of five peaks and valleys of the specimen using Gaussian filter and 0.80 mm cut-off. The high spatial resolution obtained from visible-light optical surface profilometer is an ideal tool for observing rock surface alterations caused by decay factors. The authors present complete original process of surface roughness determination on rock samples adopting the portable profilometer using free accessible software packages. The different stability of the fabric of sandstones from Králiky and Oravská Jasenica after heating is due to their different mineral composition and different ratio of minerals that are more or less chemically stable at high temperatures, their resistance to thermal stress and other textural factors related to the distribution of grains and matrix. Percentage of minerals chemically stable at higher temperature, such as quartz, calcite, illite and muscovite, in fresh sandstone samples from Králiky is approximately 48%. Conversely, sandstones from Oravská Jasenica have significantly greater percentage of minerals stable at higher temperatures, such as quartz, albite, orthoclase, muscovite, illite and calcite than of other, less stable, minerals such as chlorite, biotite and kaolinite. Hence, percentage of minerals stable at higher temperatures was approximately 81 %. The results show how the

  12. Acoustic techniques for studying soil-surface seals and crusts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The impact of raindrops on a soil surface during a rainstorm may cause soil-surface sealing and upon drying, soil crusting. Soil-surface sealing is a result of the clogging of interaggregate pores by smaller suspended particles in the water and by structural deformation of the soil fabric, which red...

  13. Contrasting effects of microbiotic crusts on runoff in desert surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidron, Giora J.; Monger, H. Curtis; Vonshak, Ahuva; Conrod, William

    2012-02-01

    Microbiotic crusts (MCs) play an important role in surface hydrology by altering runoff yield. In order to study the crust's role on water redistribution, rainfall and runoff were measured during 1998-2000 at three sites within the northern Chihuahuan Desert, New Mexico, USA: the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge (SEV), the White Sands National Monument (WS), and the Jornada Experimental Range (JER). Whereas quartz and gypsum sand characterize the SEV and WS sites, respectively, both of which have high infiltration rates, silty alluvial deposits characterize the JER site. Runoff was measured in four pairs of 1.8-6.4 m 2 plots having MCs, one of which was scalped in each pair. No runoff was generated at WS, whether on the crusted or the scalped plots. Runoff was however generated at SEV and JER, being higher on the crusted plots at SEV and lower on the JER plots. The results were explained by the combined effect of (a) parent material and (b) the crust properties, such as species composition, microrelief (surface roughness) and exopolysaccharide (EPS) content (reflected in the ratio of carbohydrates to chlorophyll). Whereas the effective rainfall, the fines and the EPS content were found to explain runoff initiation, the effective rainfall and the crust microrelief were found to explain the amount of runoff at SEV and JER where runoff generation took place. The findings attest to the fundamental role of the parent material and the crust's species composition and properties on runoff and hence to the complex interactions and the variable effects that MCs have on dryland hydrology.

  14. Influence of surface crusting on infiltration of a loess plateau soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surface sealing and crusting are common widespread processes that occur in many cultivated soils worldwide, especially in arid and semiarid regions. Soil crusting negatively affects water infiltration, increases surface runoff, reduces seedling emergence, restricts air exchange between the soil and ...

  15. Mineralogical controls on NMR rock surface relaxivity: A case study of the Fontainebleau Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livo, Kurt

    Pore size distribution is derived from nuclear magnetic resonance, but is scaled by surface relaxivity. While nuclear magnetic resonance studies generally focus on the difficulty of determining pore size distribution in unconventional shale reservoirs, there is a lack of discussion concerning pure quartz sandstones. Long surface relaxivity causes complications analyzing nuclear magnetic resonance data for pore size distribution determination. Currently, I am unaware of research that addresses the complicated pore size distribution determination in long relaxing, pure sandstone formations, which is essential to accurate downhole petrophysical modeling. The Fontainebleau sandstone is well known for its homogenous mineralogical makeup and wide range of porosity and permeability. The Hibernia sandstone exhibits a similar mineralogy and is characterized by a similar and porosity-permeability range to the Fontainebleau sandstones, but with a significantly higher portion of clay minerals (1-6%). I present systematic petrophysical properties such as porosity, pore size distribution from nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation times, permeability, and volumetric magnetic susceptibility to aide in characterization of the Fontainebleau sandstone. Analysis of collected nuclear magnetic resonance data is then compared to other petrophysical studies from literature such as helium porosity and permeability, magnetic susceptibility, and electrical conductivity. I find that the lack of impurities on the grain surfaces of pure quartz samples imparts a lower surface relaxivity as compared to clay containing sandstones and makes nuclear magnetic resonance analysis more complex. Thus, inverted nuclear magnetic resonance data from cleaner outcrop samples incorrectly models pore size distribution without accounting for wider surface relaxivity variation and is improperly used when characterizing the Fontainebleau sandstone. This is further supported by evidence from less

  16. Mechanistic study of wettability alteration of oil-wet sandstone surface using different surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Bao-feng; Wang, Ye-fei; Huang, Yong

    2015-03-01

    Different analytical methods including Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), atomic force microscopy (AFM), zeta potential measurements, contact angle measurements and spontaneous imbibition tests were utilized to make clear the mechanism for wettability alteration of oil-wet sandstone surface using different surfactants. Results show that among three types of surfactants including cationic surfactants, anionic surfactants and nonionic surfactants, the cationic surfactant CTAB demonstrates the best effect on the wettability alteration of oil-wet sandstone surface. The positively charged head groups of CTAB molecules and carboxylic acid groups from crude oil could interact to form ion pairs, which could be desorbed from the solid surface and solubilized into the micelle formed by CTAB. Thus, the water-wetness of the solid surface is improved. Nonionic surfactant TX-100 could be adsorbed on oil-wet sandstone surface through hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interaction to alter the wettability of oil-wet solid surface. The wettability alteration of oil-wet sandstone surface using the anionic surfactant POE(1) is caused by hydrophobic interaction. Due to the electrostatic repulsion between the anionic surfactant and the negatively charged surface, POE(1) shows less effect on the wettability alteration of oil-wet sandstone surface.

  17. Evidence from detrital zircons for recycling of Mesoproterozoic and Neoproterozoic crust recorded in Paleozoic and Mesozoic sandstones of southern Libya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinhold, Guido; Morton, Andrew C.; Fanning, C. Mark; Frei, Dirk; Howard, James P.; Phillips, Richard J.; Strogen, Dominic; Whitham, Andrew G.

    2011-12-01

    The geodynamic history of the Precambrian basement in central North Africa as well as the age and provenance of its sedimentary cover sequence are still poorly constrained. Here we present first detrital zircon ages (obtained by LA-SF-ICP-MS and SHRIMP) from Paleozoic and Mesozoic sandstones of the eastern Murzuq Basin, southern Libya, which unconformably overlie the Saharan Metacraton. Establishing the age and provenance of these sandstones has important implications for our understanding of the evolution of northern Gondwana during the Paleozoic, especially for reconstructions of paleo-source areas and transport paths. Detrital zircons from the sandstones show mainly early Paleozoic to Neoarchean ages with four main age populations, at 2750-2500 Ma (8%), 2200-1750 Ma (16%), 1060-920 Ma (18%), and 720-530 Ma (39%). About 13% of all concordant grains yield ages of 1600-1000 Ma. In addition, there are 9 zircon grains (0.7% of all concordant grains) with ages of 3600-2800 Ma. The presence of a high number of ca. 1 Ga zircons is enigmatic and their origin is controversial. Besides direct sourcing from ca. 1 Ga igneous rocks in eastern Chad and ca. 1 Ga igneous rocks along the southeastern margins of the Congo and Tanzania cratons, recycling of Neoproterozoic sediments containing ca. 1 Ga zircons is another alternative hypothesis to explain the presence of ca. 1 Ga zircons in the Paleozoic sedimentary sequence of central North Africa. The ubiquitous occurrence of ca. 1 Ga zircons in Paleozoic sediments of southern Libya provides insights into the correlation and paleotectonic arrangement of Gondwana-derived terranes, present, for example, in the eastern Mediterranean and in southwestern Europe. Current paleotectonic models of dextral terrane transport along the northern Gondwana margin during the early Paleozoic may need to be revised.

  18. Geochemistry of surface and subsurface waters in quartz-sandstones: significance for the geomorphic evolution of tepui table mountains (Gran Sabana, Venezuela)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mecchia, Marco; Sauro, Francesco; Piccini, Leonardo; De Waele, Jo; Sanna, Laura; Tisato, Nicola; Lira, Jesus; Vergara, Freddy

    2014-04-01

    In situ measurements of discharge, pH, electric conductivity (EC), temperature, and SiO2 content have been carried out during five expeditions in the last 20 years on the summit plateaus, inside caves and along the rivers of the surrounding lowlands of three tepui massifs in Venezuela (Auyan, Roraima, and Chimanta). Additionally, detailed chemical analyses were performed on waters sampled in a newly discovered extensive quartz-sandstone cave system on the Auyan Tepui. Rock samples of the quartz-sandstone bedrock from different locations have been analysed to obtain their chemical composition with a wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer. These data show that the majority of silica present in surface and subsurface water comes from dissolution of quartz and only in minor amount from hydrolysis of other silicate minerals. Probably the presence of a hardened crust of iron hydroxides limits the dissolution of silica on the top surface of tepuis. Dissolution in the subsurface, instead, is more significant and causes, in the long term, the “arenisation” of the quartz-sandstone and its subsequent removal by mechanical erosion. On the other hand, waters flowing on the arkosic rock outcropping on the lowland below the tepuis obtain their high dissolved silica content mainly from hydrolysis of silicates. The morphological evolution of these table mountains appears thus to be controlled mainly by the underground weathering of the quartz-sandstone, with the opening of deep fractures (grietas) and the collapse of large underground horizontal cave systems. Scarp retreat, instead, seems to be related to the higher weathering rate of the more arkosic formations underlying the quartz-sandstones.

  19. Mixed-Mode Fracture Behavior and Related Surface Topography Feature of a Typical Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, L.; Xie, L. Z.; Xie, H. P.; Ai, T.; He, B.

    2016-08-01

    The geo-mechanical properties of reservoirs, especially the morphology of the rock surface and the fracture properties of rocks, are of great importance in the modeling and simulation of hydraulic processes. To better understand these fundamental issues, five groups of mixed-mode fracture tests were conducted on sandstone using edge-cracked semi-circular bend specimens. Accordingly, the fracture loads, growth paths and fracture surfaces for different initial mixities of the mixed-mode loadings from pure mode I to pure mode II were then determined. A surface topography measurement for each rough fracture surface was conducted using a laser profilometer, and the fractal properties of these surfaces were then investigated. The fracture path evolution mechanism was also investigated via optical microscopy. Moreover, the mixed-mode fracture strength envelope and the crack propagation trajectories of sandstone were theoretically modeled using three widely accepted fracture criteria (i.e., the MTS, MSED and MERR criterions). The published test results in Hasanpour and Choupani (World Acad Sci Eng Tech 41:764-769, 2008) for limestone were also theoretically investigated to further examine the effectiveness of the above fracture criteria. However, none of these criteria could accurately predict the fracture envelopes of both sandstone and limestone. To better estimate the fracture strength of mixed-mode fractures, an empirical maximum tensile stress (EMTS) criterion was proposed and found to achieve good agreement with the test results. Finally, a uniformly pressurized fracture model was simulated for low pressurization rates using this criterion.

  20. Soil surface disturbances in cold deserts: Effects on nitrogenase activity in cyanobacterial-lichen soil crusts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belnap, Jayne

    1996-01-01

    CyanobacteriaMichen soil crusts can be a dominant source of nitrogen for cold-desert ecosystems. Effects of surface disturbance from footprints, bike and vehicle tracks on the nitrogenase activity in these crusts was investigated. Surface disturbances reduced nitrogenase activity by 30-100%. Crusts dominated by the cyanobacterium Microcoleus vaginatus on sandy soils were the most susceptible to disruption; crusts on gypsiferous soils were the least susceptible. Crusts where the soil lichen Collema tenax was present showed less immediate effects; however, nitrogenase activity still declined over time. Levels of nitrogenase activity reduction were affected by the degree of soil disruption and whether sites were dominated by cyanobacteria with or without heterocysts. Consequently, anthropogenic surface disturbances may have serious implications for nitrogen budgets in these ecosystems.

  1. Surface Deformation of Sandstone during Stress Relaxation under Water-Saturated Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anwar, A.; Choi, J. H.; Ichikawa, Y.

    2005-12-01

    Surface deformation characteristics of sandstone were evaluated during stress relaxation using newly developed equipment connected with a confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM). Use of CLSM could provide the micro-scale measurement of surface deformation where the image was obtained pixel by pixel and line by line. Two types of sandstone according to their bedding plane were used for the uni-axial stress relaxation experiment under water saturated condition. Applied stress level was taken as 55-70% of the water saturated uni-axial strength of the sandstone considering that the maximum surface deformation may occur in this zone of loading. Relaxed stress and constant strain data were collected continuously by a strain gauge data recording system. Microphotographs of a selected grain contact point and several grain surfaces were obtained everyday using CLSM during the stress relaxation period. The grain contact deformation and inter-granular surface deformation were analyzed using a triangulation method drawn on the microphotographs. The strains of each triangle drawn on the surface were calculated through the B-matrix of a constant strain finite element approximation. Results revealed that vigorous grain contact and inter-granular surface deformation occurred during the stress relaxation. B-matrix results showed that the straining occurred higher near the grain boundary than the inter-granular surface. Surface deformation was found higher in the samples where the applied loads were parallel to the bedding plane indicating that the deformation characteristics depend on the internal energy and the stress concentration occurring on the inter-granular surface or the grain contact boundary. Internal energy may change under high stress and temperature condition offering so called dissolution process of rock forming minerals such as quartz and feldspar. However, these experiments were carried out under room temperature and we are currently planning to study this topic

  2. Flow of deep crust in orogens, associated surface dynamics, and the stabilization of continents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teyssier, C. P.; Whitney, D. L.; Mulch, A.; Rey, P. F.

    2013-12-01

    Mountain building throws continental crust into an unstable state; subsequent stabilization of continental crust takes various forms, but flow of low-viscosity crust is the most common. Some of this low-viscosity crust remains at depth- it is the crust we see in the deep portions of Archean and Proterozoic cratons, typically granulite-migmatite terrains that have recorded ~10 kbar pressure, 600-800°C temperature, and intense deformation dominated by subhorizontal fabrics. In some places though, this deep crust reached the surface during the orogenic cycle. This is the case in the North American Cordillera where the deep crust leaked toward the surface and formed a series of metamorphic complexes that are cored by migmatite domes. Within the domes, complex structural overprints and decompression metamorphic paths indicate large-magnitude horizontal and vertical flow of partially molten crust relative to mantling rocks. No matter how the crust reached partial melting (thermal relaxation and/or heating) during continental under-thrusting, crustal thickening, lithosphere foundering, slab break-off, or slab window, the end result is one of an orogenic crust that contains a low viscosity layer at depth. This layer is mobile and opportunistic: it flows laterally and therefore helps keep a flat Moho; it may flow from a thick plateau and thicken the foreland region (mechanism of plateau growth); it fills gaps that open in the upper crust and therefore enhances orogenic collapse by transferring material from deep to shallow levels; ultimately, flow of this layer stabilizes the crust and may bring the end of orogeny. Thermal and mechanical numerical modeling can help evaluate quantitatively the relative importance of crust thickness, geothermal gradients, and tectonic boundary conditions in the evolution of orogenic systems. In the simple case of steady extension of a layered crust, results show that upper-crust extension is dynamically linked to lower crustal flow until

  3. Acoustic Techniques for Measuring Surface Sealing and Crusting of Agricultural Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickey, C. J.; Leary, D.; Dicarlo, D. A.

    2004-12-01

    The microtopography of soils is an important surface characteristic that effects water ponding, infiltration, and consequently soil erosion. During a rainstorm event the surface microtopography and soil matrix evolve, thereby altering the erosion and runoff dynamics. The impact of raindrops cause the breakdown of soil aggregates into smaller particles, which can then be deposited into the smaller depressions. The redistribution of soil particles on the surface during rainfall produce a thin surface layer often referred to as surface sealing or crusting. For the purpose of this presentation, surface sealing will be used to describe a reduction in the ability of fluid to flow across the surface. Surface crusting will be associated with the formation of a thin layer of higher stiffness or larger mechanical strength. The sensitivity of acoustics to the effects of sealing and crusting was examined by measuring the acoustic-to seismic (A/S) transfer function and acoustic reflectivity on two different soils in a dry, wetted and rained-on state. The A/S transfer function measurement involves the use of a suspended loud speaker to impinge acoustic energy from the air onto the sample and a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) is used to measure the induced surface particle velocity. Therefore, the A/S transfer function is a measure of the seismic energy that has been transferred into the soil from the airborne wave. The acoustic surface reflectivity is a measurement of the amount of acoustic energy reflected from the surface and requires the use of a microphone suspended above the surface. Results suggests that the seismic energy transferred (A/S transfer function) is sensitive to crust formation but is not as sensitive to sealing. The amount of reflected acoustic energy appears to be more sensitive to sealing than crusting.

  4. Scaling of sub-surface deformation in hypervelocity impact experiments on porous sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buhl, Elmar; Poelchau, Michael; Dresen, Georg; Kenkmann, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    Two hypervelocity impact experiments into dry sandstone (Seeberger Sandstein, ~ 23% porosity), performed under similar impact conditions but with different projectile sizes, have been analyzed to investigate the size scaling of impact damage. For one experiment a 2.5 mm steel projectile was impacted at 4.8 km s- 1 onto a sandstone cube of 20 cm side length. For the other experiment a 10 mm iron meteorite projectile was impacted at 4.6 km s- 1 onto a sandstone cube of 50 cm side length. The resulting kinetic impact energies of 773 and 42,627 J led to crater cavities of 7600 and 612,000 mm3. Investigation of thin sections along cross-sections through both craters revealed that the same deformation microstructures are present in both experiments. The occurrence of different microstructural patterns was mapped and zones of characteristic deformation were defined. This mapping was used to calculate the volumes of material deformed by specific mechanisms. Comparing the results, normalized to the size of the projectile, showed that the sub-surface damage is very similar in size, volume and geometry for both experiments. Analysis of deformation bands found in both experiments regarding their long axes orientation showed that these features are developed under shear deformation. Particle size distributions (PSD), expressed as power-law fits, were measured to quantify the impact damage. Comparison showed that the decay of the power-law exponents with increasing distance from the impact point source is similar for both experiments. Reconstruction of the loading path allowed to infer the stresses under which distinct deformation microstructures are developed.

  5. Naturally weathered feldspar surfaces in the Navajo Sandstone aquifer, Black Mesa, Arizona: Electron microscopic characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chen; Veblen, David R.; Blum, Alex E.; Chipera, Stephen J.

    2006-09-01

    Naturally weathered feldspar surfaces in the Jurassic Navajo Sandstone at Black Mesa, Arizona, was characterized with high-resolution transmission and analytical electron microscope (HRTEM-AEM) and field emission gun scanning electron microscope (FEG-SEM). Here, we report the first HRTEM observation of a 10-nm thick amorphous layer on naturally weathered K-feldspar in currently slightly alkaline groundwater. The amorphous layer is probably deficient in K and enriched in Si. In addition to the amorphous layer, the feldspar surfaces are also partially coated with tightly adhered kaolin platelets. Outside of the kaolin coatings, feldspar grains are covered with a continuous 3-5 μm thick layer of authigenic smectite, which also coats quartz and other sediment grains. Authigenic K-feldspar overgrowth and etch pits were also found on feldspar grains. These characteristics of the aged feldspar surfaces accentuate the differences in reactivity between the freshly ground feldspar powders used in laboratory experiments and feldspar grains in natural systems, and may partially contribute to the commonly observed apparent laboratory-field dissolution rate discrepancy. At Black Mesa, feldspars in the Navajo Sandstone are dissolving at ˜10 5 times slower than laboratory rate at comparable temperature and pH under far from equilibrium condition. The tightly adhered kaolin platelets reduce the feldspar reactive surface area, and the authigenic K-feldspar overgrowth reduces the feldspar reactivity. However, the continuous smectite coating layer does not appear to constitute a diffusion barrier. The exact role of the amorphous layer on feldspar dissolution kinetics depends on the origin of the layer (leached layer versus re-precipitated silica), which is uncertain at present. However, the nanometer thin layer can be detected only with HRTEM, and thus our study raises the possibility of its wide occurrence in geological systems. Rate laws and proposed mechanisms should consider the

  6. Naturally weathered feldspar surfaces in the Navajo Sandstone aquifer, Black Mesa, Arizona: Electron microscopic characterization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhu, Chen; Veblen, D.R.; Blum, A.E.; Chipera, S.J.

    2006-01-01

    Naturally weathered feldspar surfaces in the Jurassic Navajo Sandstone at Black Mesa, Arizona, was characterized with high-resolution transmission and analytical electron microscope (HRTEM-AEM) and field emission gun scanning electron microscope (FEG-SEM). Here, we report the first HRTEM observation of a 10-nm thick amorphous layer on naturally weathered K-feldspar in currently slightly alkaline groundwater. The amorphous layer is probably deficient in K and enriched in Si. In addition to the amorphous layer, the feldspar surfaces are also partially coated with tightly adhered kaolin platelets. Outside of the kaolin coatings, feldspar grains are covered with a continuous 3-5 ??m thick layer of authigenic smectite, which also coats quartz and other sediment grains. Authigenic K-feldspar overgrowth and etch pits were also found on feldspar grains. These characteristics of the aged feldspar surfaces accentuate the differences in reactivity between the freshly ground feldspar powders used in laboratory experiments and feldspar grains in natural systems, and may partially contribute to the commonly observed apparent laboratory-field dissolution rate discrepancy. At Black Mesa, feldspars in the Navajo Sandstone are dissolving at ???105 times slower than laboratory rate at comparable temperature and pH under far from equilibrium condition. The tightly adhered kaolin platelets reduce the feldspar reactive surface area, and the authigenic K-feldspar overgrowth reduces the feldspar reactivity. However, the continuous smectite coating layer does not appear to constitute a diffusion barrier. The exact role of the amorphous layer on feldspar dissolution kinetics depends on the origin of the layer (leached layer versus re-precipitated silica), which is uncertain at present. However, the nanometer thin layer can be detected only with HRTEM, and thus our study raises the possibility of its wide occurrence in geological systems. Rate laws and proposed mechanisms should consider the

  7. Biological soil crust succession impact on soil moisture and temperature in the sub-surface along a rainfall gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaady, E.; Yizhaq, H.; Ashkenazy, Y.

    2012-04-01

    Biological soil crusts produce mucilage sheets of polysaccharides that cover the soil surface. This hydrophobic coating can seal the soil micro-pores and thus cause reduction of water permeability and may influence soil temperature. This study evaluates the impact of crust composition on sub-surface water and temperature over time. We hypothesized that the successional stages of biological soil crusts, affect soil moisture and temperature differently along a rainfall gradient throughout the year. Four experimental sites were established along a rainfall gradient in the western Negev Desert. At each site three treatments; crust removal, pure sand (moving dune) and natural crusted were monitored. Crust successional stage was measured by biophysiological and physical measurements, soil water permeability by field mini-Infiltrometer, soil moisture by neutron scattering probe and temperature by sensors, at different depths. Our main interim conclusions from the ongoing study along the rainfall gradient are: 1. the biogenic crust controls water infiltration into the soil in sand dunes, 2. infiltration was dependent on the composition of the biogenic crust. It was low for higher successional stage crusts composed of lichens and mosses and high with cyanobacterial crust. Thus, infiltration rate controlled by the crust is inverse to the rainfall gradient. Continuous disturbances to the crust increase infiltration rates, 3. despite the different rainfall amounts at the sites, soil moisture content below 50 cm is almost the same. We therefore predict that climate change in areas that are becoming dryer (desertification) will have a positive effect on soil water content and vice versa.

  8. Linear and nonlinear modulus surfaces in stress space, from stress-strain measurements on Berea sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudjema, M.; Santos, I. B.; McCall, K. R.; Guyer, R. A.; Boitnott, G. N.

    The elastic response of many rocks to quasistatic stress changes is highly nonlinear and hysteretic, displaying discrete memory. Rocks also display unusual nonlinear response to dynamic stress changes. A model to describe the elastic behavior of rocks and other consolidated materials is called the Preisach-Mayergoyz (PM) space model. In contrast to the traditional analytic approach to stress-strain, the PM space picture establishes a relationship between the quasistatic data and a number density of hysteretic mesoscopic elastic elements in the rock. The number density allows us to make quantitative predictions of dynamic elastic properties. Using the PM space model, we analyze a complex suite of quasistatic stress-strain data taken on Berea sandstone. We predict a dynamic bulk modulus and a dynamic shear modulus surface as a function of mean stress and shear stress. Our predictions for the dynamic moduli compare favorably to moduli derived from time of flight measurements. We derive a set of nonlinear elastic constants and a set of constants that describe the hysteretic behavior of the sandstone.

  9. Oxidation of 13C-labeled methane in surface crusts of pig- and cattle slurry.

    PubMed

    Ambus, Per; Petersen, Søren O

    2005-06-01

    Storage tanks for slurry from animal production constitute important point sources for emission of CH4 into the atmosphere. Recent investigations have demonstrated that surface crust formed on top of animal slurry provides a habitat for CH4 oxidation activity, a finding which may open for new opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions during storage of animal wastes. In this work, 13C-labeled CH4 was used as a tracer to examine the absolute rates of CH4 oxidation and production in intact crust materials, collected from six different pig- and cattle slurry tanks in late autumn. Methane concentrations were generally reduced in the presence of surface crust samples, with the exception of a LECA-based (light expanded clay aggregates) crust from a pig slurry tank. In four samples, CH4 consumption was induced following a 2-4 days lag phase, whereas one cattle slurry crust consumed CH4 immediately and showed a 92% decline in CH4 concentration within the first week. Consumption of 13C-labeled CH4 was paralleled by the production of 13C-labeled CO2, thus providing direct evidence that microbial oxidation of CH4 to CO2 was taking place. Between 23% and 36% of the CH4-13C consumed in the active samples was accounted for in the gas phase CO2 indicating incomplete conversion of CH4 to CO2; however, comparable amounts of 13C was immobilized in the crust samples. Overall, the results showed that significant CH4 oxidation to CO2 in slurry crust samples occurs immediately or is inducible upon exposure to CH4. PMID:16191764

  10. The role of moisture on controlling dust emissions from crusted supply-limited surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, James; Wiggs, Giles F. S.; Thomas, David S. G.; Washington, Richard

    2013-04-01

    Dust emissions from crusted surfaces are both highly variable and difficult to measure directly. Seasonal changes in surface soil moisture, temperature, evaporation, surface roughness, and sediment supply result in a highly complex surface condition that remains to be fully described in the context of wind erosion potential. A highly intensive project on Makgadikgadi Pan, Botswana using the PI-SWERL (portable wind tunnel) combined with surface measurements of crust and soil properties has led to a new understanding of the time sensitive controls on wind erosion from these surfaces. The PI-SWERL is a highly portable wind tunnel that applies a shear stress to the surface using a motor-controlled rotating annular blade and measures resulting dust emissions with a PM10 monitor (DustTrak TSI Inc.). We undertook a sequence of tests with the PI-SWERL to obtain both the wind erosion threshold (using a slowly increasing shear velocity) and a dust emission flux (using a constant shear velocity) across a 12 km by 12 km grid across the pan surface. A total of just over 1500 wind tunnel tests and 3000 correlated measurements of a variety of surface properties including crust thickness, surface and subsurface soil moisture, shearing strength (shear vane), normal stress resistance (penetrometer), and surface roughness were conducted in August 2011 and August through October 2012. Two sets of results are presented providing discussion on: 1) Spatial variations in surface characteristics 2) Temporal variation in the control of surface characteristics and climatic conditions on potential dust emissions. These results show that wind erosion potential is best described by measurements of normal stress resistance rather than shearing strength at low dust emission fluxes, but despite their frequent use in wind erosion studies of crusted surfaces neither metric provided a good explanation of higher dust emission fluxes. Surface soil moisture explained the most variation in both dust

  11. The effects of Concentration and Salinity on Polymer Adsorption Isotherm at Sandstone Rock Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, M.; Ben Mahmud, H.

    2015-04-01

    Adsorption of hydrolyzed polyacrylamide (HPAM) polymers on sandstone rock surface was studied by static adsorption experiments. Total of 10 Runs of static experiments were conducted in test tubes by mixing the desired solution with crushed rock sample, at temperature of 25 °C, and salinity range from 0-4 wt%. The results are in conformity with Langmuir's isotherm. Ten different isotherms were generated at each Run. The initial polymer concentration was varied from 0.3-2.1 g/l. The effects of salinity have been studied by observation on Langmuir adsorption coefficients (Y and K). The results show that the adsorption coefficient (Y) was found to have linear relationship with salinity. The adsorption coefficient (K) was found to be related to salinity by a quadratic relationship.

  12. Stabilization of Desert Surfaces and Accumulation of Dust Under Biological Soil Crusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finstad, K. M.; Mcnicol, G.; Pfeiffer, M.; Amundson, R.

    2014-12-01

    Biological soil crusts (BSC) are known to play a critical role in the stabilization of desert surfaces by helping to protect sediment from wind and water erosion and aiding in the trapping of airborne particles. The crusts are often composed of cyanobacteria, algae, and fungi, and occupy the upper few cm of a soil. Due to their high tolerance of desiccation and ability to utilize fog and dew sources, BSC are able to exist in environments that may otherwise be too dry for vascular plants. In the hyperarid Atacama Desert, decades or more between measurable precipitation events has created a landscape devoid of macroscopic life. While precipitation is rare, coastal fog occurs regularly and microbial communities capable of utilizing fog and dew water are able to persist. Here we found cyanobacteria and lichen living in association with a thin sulfate and dust crust (~2 cm) covering the surface of 'dust plateaus'. Topographically the region is highly irregular and part of a largely erosional landscape. We hypothesized that these flat-topped plateaus are accretionary features that have been able to maintain dust accumulation for thousands of years as a result of the surface crusts. To test this hypothesis we conducted radiocarbon analysis of crusts and soil profiles at two sites approximately 30 km apart, one in a high fog zone and another in lower fog frequency zone. The radiocarbon analysis shows that sediment has been accumulating in the 'plateaus' for the past 15,000 years and that biological activity and rates of C cycling in the crust increase with increasing fog frequency and intensity. The ages of organic material in the dust decrease monotonically with decreasing soil thickness, suggestive of progressive upward growth by dust accumulation. Our data indicate that the BSC are capable of surviving in hyperarid the Atacama Desert, a Mars analogue, through the utilization of fog water, and that their presence can leave a visible geomorphic imprint on the landscape.

  13. Tillage effects on surface soil properties, crusting, and sorghum emergence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    No tillage practices can reduce evaporation and increase soil water storage for improved soil water availability in semi-arid regions. However, the information and maintenance of a seal at the soil surface under no tillage has been implicated in reducing infiltration as compared with limited tillage...

  14. Dust emissions from undisturbed and disturbed, crusted playa surfaces: cattle trampling effects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dry playa lake beds can be significant sources of fine dust emission. This study used a portable field wind tunnel to quantify the PM10 emissions from a bare, fine-textured playa surface located in the far northern Chihuahua Desert. The natural, undisturbed crust and its subjection to two levels of ...

  15. The geochemical composition of the terrestrial surface (without soils) and comparison with the upper continental crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Jens; Dürr, Hans H.; Moosdorf, Nils; Meybeck, Michel; Kempe, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    The terrestrial surface, the "skin of the earth", is an important interface for global (geochemical) material fluxes between major reservoirs of the Earth system: continental and oceanic crust, ocean and atmosphere. Because of a lack in knowledge of the geochemical composition of the terrestrial surface, it is not well understood how the geochemical evolution of the Earth's crust is impacted by its properties. Therefore, here a first estimate of the geochemical composition of the terrestrial surface is provided, which can be used for further analysis. The geochemical average compositions of distinct lithological classes are calculated based on a literature review and applied to a global lithological map. Comparison with the bulk composition of the upper continental crust shows that the geochemical composition of the terrestrial surface (below the soil horizons) is significantly different from the assumed average of the upper continental crust. Specifically, the elements Ca, S, C, Cl and Mg are enriched at the terrestrial surface, while Na is depleted (and probably K). Analysis of these results provide further evidence that chemical weathering, chemical alteration of minerals in marine settings, biogeochemical processes (e.g. sulphate reduction in sediments and biomineralization) and evaporite deposition are important for the geochemical composition of the terrestrial surface on geological time scales. The movement of significant amounts of carbonate to the terrestrial surface is identified as the major process for observed Ca-differences. Because abrupt and significant changes of the carbonate abundance on the terrestrial surface are likely influencing CO2-consumption rates by chemical weathering on geological time scales and thus the carbon cycle, refined, spatially resolved analysis is suggested. This should include the recognition of the geochemical composition of the shelf areas, now being below sea level.

  16. Surface disturbance of cryptobiotic soil crusts: nitrogenase activity, chlorophyll content, and chlorophyll degradation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belnap, Jayne; Harper, Kimball T.; Warren, Steven D.

    1994-01-01

    Cryptobiotic soil crusts are an important component of semiarid and arid ecosystems. An important role of these crusts is the contribution of fixed nitrogen to cold‐desert ecosystems. This study examines the residual effects of various intensities and combinations of different surface disturbances (raking, scalping, and tracked vehicles) on nitrogenase activity, chlorophyll content, and chlorophyll degradation in these soil crusts. Nine months after disturbance chlorophyll content of disturbed soils was not statistically different from undisturbed controls, except in the scalped treatments, indicating recovery of this characteristic is fairly quick unless surface material is removed. Differences in chlorophyll degradation among treatments were not statistically significant. However, nitrogenase activity in all treatments showed tremendous reductions, ranging from 77–97%, when compared to the control, indicating this characteristic is slow to recover. Consequently, assessment of crustal recovery from disturbance must include not only visual and biomass characteristics but other physiological measurements as well. Areas dominated by these crusts should be managed conservatively until the implications of crustal disturbance is better understood.

  17. Hydrology of the Ferron Sandstone aquifer and effects of proposed surface-coal mining in Castle Valley, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Lines, G.C.

    1983-01-01

    The availability and quality of groundwater in the coal-bearing Ferron Sandstone, Utah, are evaluated. The report contains structure-contour, thickness and potentiometric-surface maps for the aquifer. Possible hydrologic effects of a proposed surface mine in the Energy Coalfield are also evaluated by use of a 3-dimensional digital-computer model of the aquifer and laboratory experiments that simulated leaching of overburden at the mine.

  18. Surface soil crust types, properties and their response to ameliorants in the irrigated field of Eastern Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kebede, F.; Mekonnen, E.; Taha, N.; Verdoodt, A.; Van Ranst, E.

    2012-04-01

    Soil crusting is a worldwide problem occurring under a wide range of soil and climatic conditions. Soil crusts affect seedling emergence and reduce the infiltration rate causing loss of water and crop yield. Field experiment was conducted in Kombolcha, East Harerge to identify soil crust types and soil ameliorants for crust management under basin and furrow irrigation conditions. The experiment was conducted on plots of 12 m2 (4 m x 3 m) and arranged in RCBD with three replicates. Eight treatment combinations were considered namely: the control (without amendment), FYM, chat residue (decayed leaves of Chata edulis) and sediment (sub surface inorganic material locally called 'decay dimma'). Additionally, field and laboratory methods were employed to study types of surface soil crust. The study revealed that still depositional crust and slaking structural crust types were found as major forms of soil crusts. They are formed from deposition of water suspension on to irrigated land and subsequent slaking of colloidal materials. Furthermore, plots amended with FYM and chat residues made compost were significantly (p < 0.05) improved their moisture content and infiltration rate over the sediment amended plots and the control. Results have also revealed that improvement of infiltration rate, bulk density, porosity and water holding capacity was attained over the compost amended plots. The study concludes that use of chat residue made compost, FYM and the locally known mineral sediment (dicay dimma) are reasonable resources for minimizing structural degradation. Keywords: Soil ameliorant, irrigation practices, organic compost, soil crust, water suspension, and

  19. Numerical Modeling of Porosity Alteration at the Sub-Surface of Impacts in Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güldemeister, N.; Wünnemann, K.; Buhl, E.; Kenkmann, T.; Durr, N.; Hiermaier, S.

    2012-03-01

    In the framework of the MEMIN project the effects of hypervelocity impact shock compression and release in sandstone are investigated. The increase of porosity as a result of the rarefaction wave has been modeled and quantified in impact experiments.

  20. Fusion Crust and the Measurement of Surface Ages of Antarctic Ordinary Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akridge, Jannette M. C.; Benoit, Paul H.; Sears, Derek W. G.

    1997-01-01

    Natural thermoluminescence (TL) reflects radiation exposure and storage temperature. Meteorites generally exhibit thermoluminescence acquired during their long exposure to galactic cosmic rays in space. During atmospheric passage, temperatures are high enough to completely drain the TL, in the first mm of material under the fusion crust. We therefore refer to this surface layer as "fusion crust" although it does include some unmelted material just below the crust. When the meteorite lands on earth this drained layer will begin to build up natural TL once again due to radiation from cosmic rays and internal radionuclides. Cosmic ray annual dose is estimated to be between 0.04 and 0.06 rad/yr on the earth's surface in Antarctica while the internal radionuclides contribute only about 0.01 rad/yr. Therefore the total annual dose received by the meteorite while it is on the surface is between 0.05 and 0.07 rad/yr. If the meteorite is buried deeply in the ice it is effectively shielded from most cosmic rays and thus only internal radioactivity contributes to the annual dose.

  1. Deucalionis Regio, Mars: Evidence for a unique mineralogic endmember and a crusted surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merenyi, E.; Edgett, K. S.; Singer, R. B.

    1993-03-01

    A small equatorial region south of Sinus Meridiani, Deucalionis Regio, has been found spectrally distinct from other regions as seen in a high spectral resolution telescopic image of the meridian hemisphere of Mars. Analysis of Viking IRTM and other related data suggest that Deucalionis Regio has a crusted surface. The crust-bonding minerals may contribute to the spectral uniqueness of this region. Two independent analyses of spectral images, linear spectral mixing and supervised classification based on the spectral shapes, showed that in addition to the well-known spectral endmember regions in this image (western Arabia, south Acidalia, and Sinus Meridiani), Deucalionis Regio has spectral properties that are unique enough to make it a principle endmember unit. In those earlier works, Deucalionis Regio was referred to as 'Meridiani Border.' Analysis of thermal inertia, rock abundance, and albedo information derived from Viking images and Infrared Thermal Mapper (IRTM) data obtained 1977-80 also indicate that Deucalionis Regio has a surface of distinctly different physical properties when compared to Arabia, Sinus Meridiani, and Acidalia. Deucalionis Regio has a thermal inertia equivalent to the Martian average, a low rock abundance (less than 5 percent), and an intermediate albedo and color. Considerable effort by previous investigators has revealed a consistent model for the surface (upper few cm) properties of the endmember reigons Arabia, Sinus Meridiani, and Acidalia. Compared with these regions, we consider that Deucalionis Regio is not a region of either (1) unconsolidated, fine bright dust like Arabia, (2) considerable windblown unconsolidated sand like Sinus Meridiani, or (3) a rocky-and-sandy surface like Acidalia. Thus, we are forced to consider that either the surface of Deucalionis Regio is made of unconsolidated fine to medium sand (about 250 microns) of an unusual and previously unreported color and albedo, or that the surface is crusted, fine

  2. Modelling and interpreting biologically crusted dryland soil sub-surface structure using automated micropenetrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoon, Stephen R.; Felde, Vincent J. M. N. L.; Drahorad, Sylvie L.; Felix-Henningsen, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Soil penetrometers are used routinely to determine the shear strength of soils and deformable sediments both at the surface and throughout a depth profile in disciplines as diverse as soil science, agriculture, geoengineering and alpine avalanche-safety (e.g. Grunwald et al. 2001, Van Herwijnen et al. 2009). Generically, penetrometers comprise two principal components: An advancing probe, and a transducer; the latter to measure the pressure or force required to cause the probe to penetrate or advance through the soil or sediment. The force transducer employed to determine the pressure can range, for example, from a simple mechanical spring gauge to an automatically data-logged electronic transducer. Automated computer control of the penetrometer step size and probe advance rate enables precise measurements to be made down to a resolution of 10's of microns, (e.g. the automated electronic micropenetrometer (EMP) described by Drahorad 2012). Here we discuss the determination, modelling and interpretation of biologically crusted dryland soil sub-surface structures using automated micropenetrometry. We outline a model enabling the interpretation of depth dependent penetration resistance (PR) profiles and their spatial differentials using the model equations, σ {}(z) ={}σ c0{}+Σ 1n[σ n{}(z){}+anz + bnz2] and dσ /dz = Σ 1n[dσ n(z) /dz{} {}+{}Frn(z)] where σ c0 and σ n are the plastic deformation stresses for the surface and nth soil structure (e.g. soil crust, layer, horizon or void) respectively, and Frn(z)dz is the frictional work done per unit volume by sliding the penetrometer rod an incremental distance, dz, through the nth layer. Both σ n(z) and Frn(z) are related to soil structure. They determine the form of σ {}(z){} measured by the EMP transducer. The model enables pores (regions of zero deformation stress) to be distinguished from changes in layer structure or probe friction. We have applied this method to both artificial calibration soils in the

  3. Hydrology of the Ferron sandstone aquifer and effects of proposed surface-coal mining in Castle Valley, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Lines, G.C.; Morrissey, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    Coal in the Ferron Sandstone Member of the Mancos Shale of Cretaceous age has traditionally been mined by underground techniques in the Emery Coal Field in the southern end of Castle Valley in east-central Utah. However, approximately 99 million tons are recoverable by surface mining. Ground water in the Ferron is the sole source of supply for the town of Emery, but the aquifer is essentially untapped outside the Emery area. A three-dimensional digital-computer model was used to simulate ground-water flow in the Ferron sandstone aquifer in the Emery area. The model also was used to predict the effects of dewatering of a proposed surface mine on aquifer potentiometric surfaces and the base flow of streams. Discharge from the proposed surface mine is predicted to average about 0.3 cubic foot per second during the 15 years of mine operation. Dewatering of the mine would affect the potentiometric surface of all sections of the Ferron sanstone aquifer, but the greatest effects would be in the upper section. Modeling results indicate that, except for Christiansen Wash, the dewatering of the proposed surface mine would not affect the base flow of streams.

  4. Dust Emissions from Undisturbed and Disturbed, Crusted Playa Surfaces: Cattle Trampling Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zobeck, T. M.; Baddock, M. C.; van Pelt, R.; Fredrickson, E. L.

    2009-12-01

    Dry playa lake beds can be a significant source of fine dust emissions during high wind events in arid and semiarid landscapes. The physical and chemical properties of the playa surface control the amount and properties of the dust emitted. In this study, we use a field wind tunnel to quantify the dust emissions from a bare, fine-textured playa surface located in the Chihuahua Desert at the Jornada Experimental Range, near Las Cruces, New Mexico, USA. We tested natural, undisturbed crusted surfaces and surfaces that had been subjected to two levels of domestic animal disturbance. The animal disturbance was provided by trampling produced from one and ten passes along the length of the wind tunnel by a 630 kg Angus-Hereford cross cow. The trampling broke the durable crust and created loose erodible material. Each treatment (natural crust, one pass, and ten passes) was replicated three times. A push-type wind tunnel with a 6 m long, 0.5 m wide, and 1 m high test section was used to generate dust emissions under controlled conditions. Clean medium sand was dropped onto the playa surface to act as an abrader material. The tunnel wind speed was equivalent to 15 m/s at a height of 2 m over a smooth soil surface. The tunnel was initially run for ten minutes, with no abrader added. A second 30 minute run was subsequently sampled as abrader was added to the wind stream. Dust and saltating material were collected using an isokinetic slot sampler at the end of the tunnel. Total airborne dust was collected on two 25 cm x 20 cm glass fiber filters (GFF) and measured using a GRIMM particle monitor every 6 sec throughout each test run. Disturbance by trampling generated increased saltating material and airborne dust. The amount of saltating material measured during the initial (no abrader added) run was approximately 70% greater and 5.8 times the amount of saltating material measured on the one pass and ten pass plots, respectively, compared with that observed on the undisturbed

  5. Visually assessing the level of development and soil surface stability of cyanobacterially dominated biological soil crusts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belnap, J.; Phillips, S.L.; Witwicki, D.L.; Miller, M.E.

    2008-01-01

    Biological soil crusts (BSCs) are an integral part of dryland ecosystems and often included in long-term ecological monitoring programs. Estimating moss and lichen cover is fairly easy and non-destructive, but documenting cyanobacterial level of development (LOD) is more difficult. It requires sample collection for laboratory analysis, which causes soil surface disturbance. Assessing soil surface stability also requires surface disturbance. Here we present a visual technique to assess cyanobacterial LOD and soil surface stability. We define six development levels of cyanobacterially dominated soils based on soil surface darkness. We sampled chlorophyll a concentrations (the most common way of assessing cyanobacterial biomass), exopolysaccharide concentrations, and soil surface aggregate stability from representative areas of each LOD class. We found that, in the laboratory and field, LOD classes were effective at predicting chlorophyll a soil concentrations (R2=68-81%), exopolysaccharide concentrations (R2=71%), and soil aggregate stability (R2=77%). We took representative photos of these classes to construct a field guide. We then tested the ability of field crews to distinguish these classes and found this technique was highly repeatable among observers. We also discuss how to adjust this index for the different types of BSCs found in various dryland regions.

  6. A seismic reference model for the crust and uppermost mantle beneath China from surface wave dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Weisen; Ritzwoller, Michael H.; Kang, Dou; Kim, YoungHee; Lin, Fan-Chi; Ning, Jieyuan; Wang, Weitao; Zheng, Yong; Zhou, Longquan

    2016-08-01

    Using data from more than 2000 seismic stations from multiple networks arrayed throughout China (CEArray, China Array, NECESS, PASSCAL, GSN) and surrounding regions (Korean Seismic Network, F-Net, KNET), we perform ambient noise Rayleigh wave tomography across the entire region and earthquake tomography across parts of South China and Northeast China. We produce isotropic Rayleigh wave group and phase speed maps with uncertainty estimates from 8 to 50 s period across the entire region of study, and extend them to 70 s period where earthquake tomography is performed. Maps of azimuthal anisotropy are estimated simultaneously to minimize anisotropic bias in the isotropic maps, but are not discussed here. The 3D model is produced using a Bayesian Monte Carlo formalism covering all of China, extending eastwards through the Korean Peninsula, into the marginal seas, to Japan. We define the final model as the mean and standard deviation of the posterior distribution at each location on a 0.5° × 0.5° grid from the surface to 150 km depth. Surface wave dispersion data do not strongly constrain internal interfaces, but shear wave speeds between the discontinuities in the crystalline crust and uppermost mantle are well determined. We design the resulting model as a reference model, which is intended to be useful to other researchers as a starting model, to predict seismic wave fields and observables and to predict other types of data (e.g. topography, gravity). The model and the data on which it is based are available for download. In addition, the model displays a great variety and considerable richness of geological and tectonic features in the crust and in the uppermost mantle deserving of further focus and continued interpretation.

  7. A seismic reference model for the crust and uppermost mantle beneath China from surface wave dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Weisen; Ritzwoller, Michael H.; Kang, Dou; Kim, Younghee; Lin, Fan-Chi; Ning, Jieyuan; Wang, Weitao; Zheng, Yong; Zhou, Longquan

    2016-04-01

    Using data from more than 2000 seismic stations from multiple networks arrayed throughout China (CEArray, China Array, NECESS, PASSCAL, GSN) and surrounding regions (Korean Seismic Network, F-Net, KNET) we perform ambient noise Rayleigh wave tomography across the entire region and earthquake tomography across parts of South China and Northeast China. We produce isotropic Rayleigh wave group and phase speed maps with uncertainty estimates from 8 to 50 sec period across the entire region of study, and extend them to 70 sec period where earthquake tomography is performed. Maps of azimuthal anisotropy are estimated simultaneously to minimize anisotropic bias in the isotropic maps, but are not discussed here. The 3D model is produced using a Bayesian Monte Carlo formalism covering all of China, extending eastward through the Korean Peninsula, into the marginal seas, to Japan. We define the final model as the mean and standard deviation of the posterior distribution at each location on a 0.5°x0.5° grid from the surface to 150 km depth. Surface wave dispersion data do not strongly constrain internal interfaces, but shear wave speeds between the discontinuities in the crystalline crust and uppermost mantle are well determined. We design the resulting model as a reference model, which is intended to be useful to other researchers as a starting model, to predict seismic wave fields and observables, and to predict other types of data (e.g., topography, gravity). The model and the data on which it is based are available for download. In addition, the model displays a great variety and considerable richness of geological and tectonic features in the crust and in the uppermost mantle deserving of further focus and continued interpretation.

  8. Development and hydrology of biological soil crusts -- first results from a surface inoculation experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mykhailova, Larysa; Raab, Thomas; Gypser, Stella; Fischer, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Representing a set of various micro-biocoenoses, biocrusts often reside in adjacent patches, which not necessarily relate to structural elements of the habitat, like (micro-) topography or vegetational patterns. Such biocrust patches may become more stable through the formation of mutually dependent ecohydrological regimes. For example, algal patches inhibiting infiltration and generating runoff alternate with runoff-receiving moss patches possessing high water holding capacities. Here, we preliminarily report on a lysimeter field experiment where natural biocrust isolates were used for surface inoculation to (I) prove stochastic vs. deterministic biocrust development and (II) to quantitatively relate biocrust development to soil hydrology. Lysimeter sand was collected from 3-4 m below surface at natural dune outcrops in south-eastern Brandenburg, Germany (Glashütte (GLA) and Neuer Lugteich (LUG)), where biocrust samples were collected at the respective dune bases. The lysimeters were designed to prevent runoff. In a completely randomized full-factorial design, three factors were considered. (A) Inocolum in three treatments (bare control, mosses, algae), (B) mineral substrate texture in two treatments (GLA: 55% and LUG: 79% particles >630 μm), and (C) surface compaction in two treatments (control, 41.5 kN m‑2 for 30 seconds). The samples were kept dry and re-moistened to -60 hPa two days before inoculation. After a species inventory, the inoculate was isolated by gently washing off sand particles from the biocrust samples. Algal/lichen crusts were dominated by Zygogonium ericetorum and Cladonia sp. at both sites. All moss crusts were dominated by Polytrichum piliferum and Ceratodon purpureus, whereas Brachythecium albicans was present at GLA only. 20 g of homogenized moist inoculate were spread over the surface of each lysimeter (Ø 19 cm, 22 cm depth). We performed autochthonous inoculation, i.e. biocrust isolates collected from GLA were used for inoculation

  9. Dust emissions from undisturbed and disturbed, crusted playa surfaces: Cattle trampling effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baddock, Matthew C.; Zobeck, Ted M.; Van Pelt, R. Scott; Fredrickson, Ed L.

    2011-06-01

    Dry playa lake beds can be significant sources of fine dust emission. This study used a portable field wind tunnel to quantify the PM 10 emissions from a bare, fine-textured playa surface located in the far northern Chihuahua Desert. The natural, undisturbed crust and its subjection to two levels of animal disturbance (one and ten cow passes) were tested. The wind tunnel generated dust emissions under controlled conditions for firstly an initial blow-off of the surface, followed by two longer runs with sand added to the flow as an abrader material. Dust was measured using a GRIMM particle monitor. For the study playa, no significant differences in PM 10 concentration and emission flux were found between the untrampled surface and following a single animal pass. This was the case for both the initial blow-offs and tests on plots under a steady abrader rate. Significantly higher dust loading was only associated with the effect of 10 animal passes. In the blow-offs, the higher PM 10 yield after 10 passes reflected the greater availability of easily entrainable fine particles. Under abrasion, the effect of the heaviest trampling increased the emission flux by a third and abrasion efficiency by around 50% more than values on the untrampled surface. This enhanced abrasion efficiency persisted for a 30 min period under abrasion before the positive effect of the disturbance was no longer evident. The findings highlight the role of a threshold of disturbance that determines if supply-limited surfaces will exhibit enhanced wind erosion or not after undergoing perturbation.

  10. On the state of stress in the near-surface of the earth's crust

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savage, W.Z.; Swolfs, H.S.; Amadei, B.

    1992-01-01

    Five models for near-surface crustal stresses induced by gravity and horizontal deformation and the influence of rock property contrasts, rock strength, and stress relaxation on these stresses are presented. Three of the models-the lateral constraint model, the model for crustal stresses caused by horizontal deformation, and the model for the effects of anisotropy-are linearly elastic. The other two models assume that crustal rocks are brittle or viscoelastic in order to account for the effects of rock strength and time on near-surface stresses. It is shown that the lateral constraint model is simply a special case of the combined gravity-and deformation-induced stress field when horizontal strains vanish and that the inclusion of the effect of rock anisotropy in the solution for crustal stresses caused by gravity and horizontal deformation broadens the range for predicted stresses. It is also shown that when stress levels in the crust reach the limits of brittle rock strength, these stresses become independent of strain rates and that stress relaxation in ductile crustal rocks subject to constant horizontal strain rates causes horizontal stresses to become independent of time in the long term. ?? 1992 Birkha??user Verlag.

  11. Hydraulic and nutritional feedback controls surface patchiness of biological soil crusts at a post-mining site.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Thomas; Gypser, Stella; Subbotina, Maria; Veste, Maik

    2015-04-01

    In a recultivation area located in Brandenburg, Germany, five types of biocrusts (initial BSC1, developed BSC2 and BSC3, mosses, lichens) and non-crusted mineral substrate were sampled on tertiary sand deposited in 1985-1986 to investigate hydrologic properties of crust patches. It was the aim of the study to demonstrate that (I) two types of BSC with alternative nutritional and hydraulic feedback modes co-exist in one area and that (II) these feedback modes are synergic. The sites to sample were selected by expertise, trying to represent mixed sites dominated by mosses, by lichens, and by visually in the field observable surface properties (colour and crust thickness) for the non-crusted substrate and BSC1 to 3. The non-crusted samples contained minor incrustations of the lichen Placynthiella oligotropha, young leaflets of the moss Ceratodon purpureus, as well as very sparsely present individuals of the green algae Ulothrix spec., Zygogonium spec. and Haematococcus spec. The sample BSC1 was not entirely covered with microphytes, crust patches were smooth, and P. oligotropha was observed to develop on residues of C. purpureus and on unspecified organic detritus. BSC2 covered the surface entirely and was dominated by P. oligotropha and by Zygogonium spec. The sample BSC3 consisted of pad-like patches predominantly growing on organic residues. The moss sample was dominated by C. purpureus and Zygogonium spec. growing between the moss stemlets directly on the mineral surface, the lichen sample was dominated by Cladonia subulata with sparsely scattered individuals of C. purpureus. Hierarchical cluster analysis revealed that BSC2 was floristically and chemically most similar to the moss crust, whereas BSC3 was floristically and chemically most similar to the lichen crust. Crust biomass was lowest in the non-crusted substrate, increased to the initial BSC1 and peaked in the developed BSC2, BSC3, the lichens and the mosses. Water infiltration was highest on the substrate

  12. Combined teleseismic surface wave and receiver function analysis of the crust and upper mantle of Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, M. J.; Aleqabi, G. I.; Wysession, M. E.; Wiens, D. A.; Nyblade, A.; Shore, P.; Rambolamanana, G.; Tsiriandrimanana, R.; Andriampenomanana Ny Ony, F. S. T.

    2014-12-01

    The continental crust and upper mantle velocity structure beneath Madagascar remained poorly constrained until recent deployments of broadband seismic instrumentation across the island. The MACOMO (MAdagascar, COmoros and MOzambique), RHUM-RUM (Réunion Hotspot and Upper Mantle - Réunions Unterer Mantel) and the Madagascar Seismic Profile experiments have opened up this region to be studied in detail for the first time. The island is an amalgamation of an Archean craton, associated with the Western Dhawar craton of southern India, and a series of Proterozoic terranes that comprise the backbone of the island (Tucker et al., 2010). A receiver-function analysis has provided both the first Moho depth measurements and spatially discrete 1-D shear velocity results that matched well with known tectonic regions. To provide a more continuous 2-D and 3-D velocity structure map, teleseismic surface wave analysis is employed. Using Helmholtz tomography as implemented by the ASWMS package (Ge, Gaherty and Hutko; 2014), we are able to map phase velocities from the cross-correlation of station pairs at periods 20-100 s. At periods 20-40 s our results compare well with ambient noise analysis results (see poster by Wysession et al. (this meeting)). The prominent features of these results are a distinct low phase-velocity sector beneath the central Itasy region, with a secondary low phase-velocity region to the north of the island. Both the central part of the island and the northern region have experienced geothermal activity in recent times as well as volcanic activity within the last 10,000 years. This may suggest that the crust and underlying mantle in these regions remains at relatively higher temperatures than the surrounding rock. Combining this information with receiver-function analysis, we jointly invert our data for the shear velocity structure. These analyses will constrain the upper mantle seismic velocities in the region, allowing further analysis from body waves to

  13. Linking playa surface dust emission potential to feedbacks between surface moisture and salt crust expansion through high resolution terrestrial laser scanning measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nield, J. M.; King, J.; Wiggs, G.

    2012-12-01

    The dust emissivity of salt pans (or playas) can be significant but is controlled by interactions between wind erosivity, surface moisture, salt chemistry and crust morphology. These surface properties influence the aeolian transport threshold and can be highly variable over both short temporal and spatial scales. In the past, field studies have been hampered by practical difficulties in accurately measuring properties controlling sediment availability at the surface in high resolution. Studies typically therefore, have investigated large scale monthly or seasonal change using remote sensing and assume a homogeneous surface when predicting dust emissivity. Here we present the first high resolution measurements (sub-cm) of salt crust expansion related to changes in diurnal moisture over daily and weekly time periods using terrestrial laser scanning (TLS, ground-based LiDAR) on Sua Pan, Botswana. The TLS measures both elevation and relative surface moisture change simultaneously, without disturbing the surface. Measurement sequences enable the variability in aeolian sediment availability to be quantified along with temporal feedbacks associated with crust degradation. On crusts with well-developed polygon ridges (high aerodynamic and surface roughness), daily surface expansion was greater than 30mm. The greatest surface change occurred overnight on the upper, exposed sections of the ridges, particularly when surface temperatures dropping below 10°C. These areas also experienced the greatest moisture variation and became increasingly moist overnight in response to an increase in relative humidity. In contrast, during daylight hours, the ridge areas were drier than the lower lying inter-ridge areas. Positive feedbacks between surface topography and moisture reinforced the maximum diurnal moisture variation at ridge peaks, encouraging crust thrusting due to overnight salt hydration, further enhancing the surface, and therefore, aerodynamic roughness. These feedbacks

  14. How biological crusts are stabilizing the soil surface? The devolpment of organo-mineral interactions in the initial phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, T.; Veste, M.; Wiehe, W.; Lange, P.

    2009-04-01

    First colonizers of new land surfaces are cryptogames which often form biological soil crusts (BSC) covering the first millimetre of the top soil in many ecosystems from polar to desert ecosystems. These BSC are assemblages of cyanobacteria, green algae, mosses, liverworts, fungi and/or lichens. The development of soil surface crusts plays a major role for the further vegetation pattern through changes to the physico-chemical conditions and influencing various ecosystem processes. We studied the development of BSC on quaternary substrate of an initial artificial water catchment in Lusatia, Germany. Due to lack of organic matter in the geological substrate, photoautotrophic organisms like green algae and cyanobacteria dominated the initial phases of ecosystem development and, hence, of organo-mineral ineractions. We combined SEM/EDX and FTIR microscopy to study the contact zone of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) of green algae and cyanobacteria with quartz, spars and mica on a >40 µm scale in undisturbed biological soil crusts, which had a maximum thickness of approx. 2 mm. SEM/EDX microscopy was used to determine the spatial distribution of S, Ca, Fe, Al, Si and K in the profiles, organic compounds were identified using FTIR microscopy. Exudates of crust organisms served as cementing material between sand particles. The crust could be subdivided into two horizontal layers. The upper layer, which had a thickness of approx. 200 µm, is characterized by accumulation of Al and K, but absence of Fe in microbial derived organic matter, indicating capture of weathering products of feldspars and mica by microbial exudates. The pore space between mineral particles was entirely filled with organic matter here. The underlying layer can be characterized by empty pores and organo-mineral bridges between the sand particles. Contrarily to the upper layer of the crust, Fe, Al and Si were associated with organic matter here but K was absent. Highest similarity of the FTIR

  15. Quantifying Modern Recharge to the Nubian Sandstone Aquifer System: Inferences from GRACE and Land Surface Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, A.; Sultan, M.; Ahmed, M.; Yan, E.

    2014-12-01

    The Nubian Sandstone Aquifer System (NSAS) is shared by Egypt, Libya, Chad and Sudanand is one of the largest (area: ~ 2 × 106 km2) groundwater systems in the world. Despite its importance to the population of these countries, major hydrological parameters such as modern recharge and extraction rates remain poorly investigated given: (1) the large extent of the NSAS, (2) the absence of comprehensive monitoring networks, (3) the general inaccessibility of many of the NSAS regions, (4) difficulties in collecting background information, largely included in unpublished governmental reports, and (5) limited local funding to support the construction of monitoring networks and/or collection of field and background datasets. Data from monthly Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) gravity solutions were processed (Gaussian smoothed: 100 km; rescaled) and used to quantify the modern recharge to the NSAS during the period from January 2003 to December 2012. To isolate the groundwater component in GRACE data, the soil moisture and river channel storages were removed using the outputs from the most recent Community Land Model version 4.5 (CLM4.5). GRACE-derived recharge calculations were performed over the southern NSAS outcrops (area: 835 × 103 km2) in Sudan and Chad that receive average annual precipitation of 65 km3 (77.5 mm). GRACE-derived recharge rates were estimated at 2.79 ± 0.98 km3/yr (3.34 ± 1.17 mm/yr). If we take into account the total annual extraction rates (~ 0.4 km3; CEDARE, 2002) from Chad and Sudan the average annual recharge rate for the NSAS could reach up to ~ 3.20 ± 1.18 km3/yr (3.84 ± 1.42 mm/yr). Our recharge rates estimates are similar to those calculated using (1) groundwater flow modelling in the Central Sudan Rift Basins (4-8 mm/yr; Abdalla, 2008), (2) WaterGAP global scale groundwater recharge model (< 5 mm/yr, Döll and Fiedler, 2008), and (3) chloride tracer in Sudan (3.05 mm/yr; Edmunds et al. 1988). Given the available global

  16. Crust and upper mantle heterogeneities in the southwest Pacific from surface wave phase velocity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillet, R.; Rouland, D.; Roult, G.; Wiens, D. A.

    1999-02-01

    with most of previous studies: the tomographic imaging shows a large contrast between low and high phase velocities along the Solomon, New Hebrides and Fiji-Tonga trenches. The lowest phase velocity anomalies are distributed beneath northern and southern Fiji basins and the Lau basin (corresponding to the volume situated just above the dipping slabs), whereas the highest values are displayed beneath the Pacific plate and the eastern part of Indian plate downgoing under the North Fiji basin. At shorter periods, our results show that the phase velocity distributions are well correlated with the large structural crustal domains. The use of local temporary broadband stations in the central part of the studied area gives us the opportunity to observe surface waves showing well-dispersed trains, allowing extended velocity measurements down to 8 s although aliasing due to multipaths become important. The continental regions (Eastern Australia, New Guinea, Fiji islands and New Zealand) show low velocities which are likely due to thick continental crust, whereas the Tasmanian, D'Entrecasteaux, and the Northern and Southern Fiji basins are characterized by higher velocities suggesting thinner oceanic crust. Additional analysis including the anisotropic case and S-wave velocity inversion with depth is in progress.

  17. Freshly brewed continental crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazel, E.; Hayes, J. L.; Caddick, M. J.; Madrigal, P.

    2015-12-01

    Earth's crust is the life-sustaining interface between our planet's deep interior and surface. Basaltic crusts similar to Earth's oceanic crust characterize terrestrial planets in the solar system while the continental masses, areas of buoyant, thick silicic crust, are a unique characteristic of Earth. Therefore, understanding the processes responsible for the formation of continents is fundamental to reconstructing the evolution of our planet. We use geochemical and geophysical data to reconstruct the evolution of the Central American Land Bridge (Costa Rica and Panama) over the last 70 Ma. We also include new preliminary data from a key turning point (~12-6 Ma) from the evolution from an oceanic arc depleted in incompatible elements to a juvenile continental mass in order to evaluate current models of continental crust formation. We also discovered that seismic P-waves (body waves) travel through the crust at velocities closer to the ones observed in continental crust worldwide. Based on global statistical analyses of all magmas produced today in oceanic arcs compared to the global average composition of continental crust we developed a continental index. Our goal was to quantitatively correlate geochemical composition with the average P-wave velocity of arc crust. We suggest that although the formation and evolution of continents may involve many processes, melting enriched oceanic crust within a subduction zone, a process probably more common in the Achaean where most continental landmasses formed, can produce the starting material necessary for juvenile continental crust formation.

  18. Wrinkle-ridges as deformed surface crust on ponded mare lava

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, W. B.

    1973-01-01

    The morphological features of Mare Imbrium and Mare Serenitatis are discussed on the basis of Apollo, Ranger, and Orbiter photography. It is suggested that the mare basins were filled relatively slowly by interdigitating, overlapping lava flows, over an extended period of time. Mare wrinkle ridges were formed by localized compression of a relatively thin crust which is effectively decoupled from underlying topography and structure. Since the deformation took place shortly after the time the mare filling was completed, it is possible that this thin crust was underlain by still liquid lava.

  19. Potential fate of SOC eroded from natural crusted soil surface under simulated wind driven storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Liangang; Fister, Wolfgang; Greenwood, Philip; Hu, Yaxian; Kuhn, Nikolaus J.

    2016-04-01

    Improving the assessment of the impact of soil erosion on carbon (C) cycling requires a better understanding of the redistribution of eroded sediment and associated soil organic carbon (SOC) across agricultural landscapes. Recent studies conducted on dry-sieved aggregates in the laboratory demonstrated that aggregation can profoundly skew SOC redistribution and its subsequent fate by accelerating settling velocities of aggregated sediment compared to mineral grains, which in turn can increase SOC mineralization into greenhouse gases. However, the erodibility of the soil in the field is more variable than in the laboratory due to tillage, crus formation, drying-wetting and freeze-thaw cycles, and biological effects. This study aimed to investigate the potential fate of the SOC eroded from naturally developed soil surface and to compare the observations with those made in the laboratory. Simulated, short, high intensity wind driven storms were conducted on a crusted loam in the field. The sediments were fractionated with a settling tube according to their potential transport distances. The soil mass, SOC concentration and cumulative 80-day CO2 emission of each fraction were identified. The results show: 1) 53% of eroded sediment and 62% of eroded SOC from the natural surface in the field would be deposited across landscapes, which is six times and three times higher compared to that implied by mineral grains, respectively; 2) the preferential deposition of SOC-rich fast-settling sediment potentially releases approximately 50% more CO2 than the same layer of the non-eroded soil; 3) the respiration of the slow-settling fraction that is potentially transported to the aquatic systems was much more active compared to the other fractions and the bulk soil. Our results confirm in general the conclusions drawn from laboratory and thus demonstrate that aggregation can affect the redistribution of sediment associated SOC under field conditions, including an increase in

  20. Heat flow and near-surface radioactivity in the Australian continental crust

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sass, J.H.; Jaeger, J.C.; Munroe, Robert J.

    1976-01-01

    Heat-flow data have been obtained at 44 sites in various parts of Australia. These include seven sites from the old (~ 2500 m.y.) Precambrian shield of Western Australia, seventeen from the younger (~ 600- 2000 m.y.) Precambrian rocks of South Australia, the Northern Territory, and Queensland, and twenty within the eastern Paleozoic and younger rocks. Thirty of the sites are located where no previous heat-flow data existed, and the remainder provide significant extensions or refinements of areas previously studied. Where the holes studied penetrated the crystalline basement rocks, or where the latter rocks were exposed within a few kilometers of the holes, the upper crustal radiogenic heat production has been estimated based on gamma-ray spectrometric determinations of U, Th, and K abundances. Three heat-flow provinces are recognized in Australia based on the linear relation (q = q* + DA0 ) between heat flow q and surface radioactivity A0. New data from the Western Australian shield support earlier studies showing that heat flow is low to normal with values ranging from 0.7 to 1.2 hfu and with the majority of values less than 1.0 hfu, and the parameters q* = 0.63 hfu and 0 = 4.5 km determined previously were confirmed. Heat flow in the Proterozoic shield of central Australia is quite variable, with values ranging between about l and 3 hfu. This variability is attributed mainly to variations in near-surface crustal radioactivity. The parameters of the heat-flow line are q* = 0.64 hfu and 0 = 11.1 km and moderately high temperatures are predicted for the lower crust and upper mantle. Previous suggestions of a band of l ow- to - normal heat flow near the coast in eastern Australia were confirmed in some areas, but the zone is interrupted in at least one region (the Sydney Basin), where heat flow is about 2.0 hfu over a large area. The reduced heat flow, q*, in the Paleozoic intrusive rocks of eastern Australia varies from about 0.8 to 2.0 hfu . This variability might

  1. Response of Surface Soil Hydrology to the Micro-Pattern of Bio-Crust in a Dry-Land Loess Environment, China

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei; Yu, Yun; Chen, Liding

    2015-01-01

    The specific bio-species and their spatial patterns play crucial roles in regulating eco-hydrologic process, which is significant for large-scale habitat promotion and vegetation restoration in many dry-land ecosystems. Such effects, however, are not yet fully studied. In this study, 12 micro-plots, each with size of 0.5 m in depth and 1 m in length, were constructed on a gentle grassy hill-slope with a mean gradient of 8° in a semiarid loess hilly area of China. Two major bio-crusts, including mosses and lichens, had been cultivated for two years prior to the field simulation experiments, while physical crusts and non-crusted bare soils were used for comparison. By using rainfall simulation method, four designed micro-patterns (i.e., upper bio-crust and lower bare soil, scattered bio-crust, upper bare soil and lower bio-crust, fully-covered bio-crust) to the soil hydrological response were analyzed. We found that soil surface bio-crusts were more efficient in improving soil structure, water holding capacity and runoff retention particularly at surface 10 cm layers, compared with physical soil crusts and non-crusted bare soils. We re-confirmed that mosses functioned better than lichens, partly due to their higher successional stage and deeper biomass accumulation. Physical crusts were least efficient in water conservation and erosion control, followed by non-crusted bare soils. More importantly, there were marked differences in the efficiency of the different spatial arrangements of bio-crusts in controlling runoff and sediment generation. Fully-covered bio-crust pattern provides the best option for soil loss reduction and runoff retention, while a combination of upper bio-crust and lower bare soil pattern is the least one. These findings are suggested to be significant for surface-cover protection, rainwater infiltration, runoff retention, and erosion control in water-restricted and degraded natural slopes. PMID:26207757

  2. Seismic imaging of crust and upper mantle structure in western North America via surface wave inversion and wavefield depropagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stachnik, Joshua C.

    Surface wave analysis of both earthquake and ambient noise seismic data from arrays of broadband seismic stations provides new high resolution images of shear wave velocity of the crust and upper mantle in western North America. In the Yellowstone Hotspot region, new constraints are shown on the high velocity midcrustal layer of the eastern Snake River Plain that represents approximately 10 km of magmatic thickening and subsequent forcing of lower crustal outflow. In the Coast Mountain Batholith area of western British Columbia, the lack of a significant region of high velocities in the lower crust indicates that the foundering of negatively buoyant eclogitic lower crust has been efficient. A high resolution shear velocity model of the Sierra Nevada batholith region finds crustal thickening beneath the batholith, sinking material beneath the central Sierras with adjacent upwelling asthenospheric mantle, and the new image suggests that the Isabella (San Joaquin Valley) anomaly has a quasi-planar NW-SE striking geometry perhaps more consistent with being a Monterey plate slab remnant than an eclogite dominated feature. In addition to the surface wave results, new constraints are found on the sharpness of the 410-km velocity discontinuity via the wave-field continuation approach applied to five regional earthquakes in western North America. The 410-km discontinuity gradient ranges from 7-25 km, indicating the presence of water atop the transition zone in the two regions with large 410 km discontinuity gradient widths.

  3. Sensitivity of elastic surface deformations caused by atmospheric, hydrologic, and oceanic loads to the Earth's crust and mantle properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dill, Robert; Klemann, Volker; Kaban, Mikhail; Dobslaw, Henryk; Thomas, Maik

    2016-04-01

    The elastic deformation of the Earth's surface due to atmospheric surface pressure, terrestrial water storage, and ocean bottom pressure on seasonal or shorter time scales is usually represented by a set of elastic load Love numbers or the corresponding Green's function, determined from a radial Earth structure like PREM. Thereby, the influence of local deviations of the Earth's crustal and mantle properties is assumed to be negligible. However, local Green's functions derived individually for 1° grid cells from the 3D crustal structure model CRUST1 show large variations for in particular smaller distance angles. The loading response due to small-scale surface loads extending over less than 2500km2 significantly depends on the heterogeneous shallow structure of the Earth. In this contribution, we discuss the influence of lateral variations in the crust and mantle structure on atmospheric, hydrologic, and oceanic surface loads with regard to their spatial scales and distribution. Non-tidal atmospheric loading is calculated from an atmospheric surface pressure time series covering four decades (1976 - 2015) based on 3-hourly atmospheric data of ECMWF that has been homogenized by mapping surface pressure to a common reference orography. Hydrological loading is calculated for daily terrestrial water storage from LSDM over the same time period, where the surface water compartment is mapped from the 0.5° model resolution to a 0.125° GIS-based river network. Ocean tidal loading is exemplarily calculated based on the FES2014 ocean tidal model (0.0625°). Especially along the coasts of the oceans; in regions with steep orographic gradients; and in areas with thick crustal layers or sediments we will show the significant influence of the Earth's structure on small-scale deformation features caused by surface loads.

  4. Evidence for the Buried "Pre-Noachian" Crust Pre-Dating the Oldest Observed Surface Units on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, H. V.; Frey, E. L.; Hartmann, W. K.; Tanaka, K. L. T.

    2003-01-01

    MOLA gridded data shows clear evidence for Quasi-Circular Depressions not visible on images in Early Noachian (EN) terrain units on Mars. We suggest these are buried impact basins that pre-date the superimposed craters whose high density makes these EN units the oldest visible at the surface of Mars. There is crust older than the oldest visible terrain units on Mars, and these EN units cannot date from 4.6 BYA. These and other Noa-chian units have similar total (visible + buried) crater retention ages, suggesting a common "pre-Noachian" crustal age OR crater saturation beyond which we cannot see.

  5. The sensitivity of surface mass loading displacement response to perturbations in the elastic structure of the crust and mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martens, Hilary R.; Rivera, Luis; Simons, Mark; Ito, Takeo

    2016-05-01

    Surface mass loads generate a rich spectrum of deformation responses in the solid Earth that might be exploited to probe the material properties of the crust and mantle. Here we present a detailed examination of load-induced surface displacements and their sensitivities to systematic perturbations in elastic Earth structure. We compute Love numbers and displacement load Green's functions (LGFs) by integrating the equations of motion for spheroidal deformation of a radially heterogeneous and self-gravitating Earth. Sensitivity kernels are derived for individual Love numbers numerically using finite differences and quasi-analytically using calculus of variations. We then generate sensitivity kernels for displacement LGFs by systematically perturbing the preliminary reference Earth model. We find that displacement LGFs are most sensitive to elastic structural perturbations within 500 km depth from the surface and for short source-receiver distances. For separate perturbations to the shear modulus, bulk modulus, and density within the crust and mantle, the sensitivity kernels exhibit unique patterns, consistent with the possibility to constrain the parameters independently given a spatially distributed set of sufficiently accurate loading response observations. The sensitivity to density structure, however, is generally weak in comparison to elastic structure. We also examine the sensitivity of surface displacements caused by M2 ocean tidal loading (OTL) to systematic perturbations in the elastic moduli and density. Since OTL-induced surface displacements are load and site dependent, we focus on high-resolution profiles across Iceland as a case study. The sensitivity kernels constitute a key element in the formulation of the inverse problem with application to geodetic tomography.

  6. Crust and upper-mantle structure of North Africa, Europe and the Middle East from inversion of surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasyanos, Michael E.; Walter, William R.

    2002-05-01

    We estimate the crust and upper-mantle seismic velocity structure in North Africa, southern Europe, and the Middle East using our surface-wave dispersion tomography results from a previous study. The surface wave tomography study provided high-resolution coverage across the region from more than 6800 Rayleigh and 3800 Love wave paths over the period range from 10-60 s. We have also included additional tomography results from 65 to 120 s. The tomography model provides average Rayleigh and Love wave dispersion curves for each 2°× 2° block in the region. We use these results to determine velocity structure by fitting the synthetic curves from simplified crust and upper-mantle models to the tomographic data for each block via a grid search. The grid search technique was chosen in order to map out the complete error space and to easily incorporate other data sets or a priori information. The initial grid search is conducted over sediment thickness, crustal velocity, crustal thickness, and upper-mantle velocity. To keep the grid search computationally reasonable, other parameters are held fixed (sediment velocity, Poisson's ratios, and density). Despite the well-known trade-off between crustal thickness and crustal velocity that occurs when fitting surface wave data, the initial grid search is quite successful in retrieving first order features, such as ocean-continent crustal thickness differences and crustal thickening in all but the oldest orogenic zones. We can resolve major sedimentary basins, active ridges, and see differences based on crustal age (e.g. Archean cratons vs Phanarozoic crust). To better control the trade-off inherent in fitting group velocity curves, we also explore using other information to better constrain the grid searches. In particular, we use a global sediment depth and velocity model to fix those parameters and a regional P n tomography to constrain the upper-mantle velocities. In this constrained grid search, we vary crustal thickness

  7. Altitude and configuration of the potentiometric surface in the Triassic sandstones and shales, northeastern Chester County, Pennsylvania, September 1987 through January 1988

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senior, Lisa A.; Garges, John A.

    1989-01-01

    The altitude of the water levels in the Triassic sandstones and shales in northeastern Chester County is shown on a map at a scale of 1:24,000. The map is based on water levels in 173 non-pumping drilled and dug wells measured in 1956 and 1965, and on the altitude of two springs that were flowing in November and December 1987. Water level altitudes are contoured at an interval of 20 ft. The surface defined by the contoured water levels may approximately represent the water table. Water table altitudes range from 379 ft to less than 80 ft above sea level. (USGS)

  8. Strange Quark Star Crusts

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, Andrew W.

    2007-02-27

    If strange quark matter is absolutely stable, some neutron stars may be strange quark stars. Strange quark stars are usually assumed to have a simple liquid surface. We show that if the surface tension of droplets of quark matter in the vacuum is sufficiently small, droplets of quark matter on the surface of a strange quark star may form a solid crust on top of the strange quark star. This solid crust can significantly modify the predictions for the photon emission for the surface in an observable way.

  9. Raindrop induced crust formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabó, Judit Alexandra; Jakab, Gergely; Józsa, Sándor; Németh, Tibor; Kovács, Ivett; Szalai, Zoltán

    2016-04-01

    Rainfall simulators are wildly used to study soil erosion because all parts of the erosion process can be simulated with them. Small-scale laboratory rainfall simulator was used to examine the detachment phase of the erosion and study the redistribution trend of the organic and mineral components of the soil. Splash erosion often creates crust on the soil surface that decreases porosity and infiltration. Crusts have crucial role in physical soil degradation processes, erosion and crop production fall. Intensive rainfall on a recently tilled Regosol and a Cambisol plots detached the aggregates and the occurred runoff scattered the individual particles on the surface. Oriented thin sections from the various morphological types of surface crusts were made similar as a thin section from any rock but during the preparation the samples were saturated often with dilute two-component adhesive to solidify the soil to preserve the crust. Raman spectroscopy and XRD analysis measurements are in progress in order to identify spatial changes in organic matter and mineralogical composition among the crust layers. Preliminary results suggest the separation of the mineral and organic soil components. The lighter organic matter seems to be enriched in the soil loss while the heavier minerals are deposited and stratified in the deeper micromorphological positions of the surface. The understanding of this selectivity is necessary in soil loss estimation.

  10. A novel Antarctic microbial endolithic community within gypsum crusts.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Kevin A; Lawley, Blair

    2003-07-01

    A novel endolithic microbial habitat is described from a climatically extreme site at Two Step Cliffs, Alexander Island, Antarctic Peninsula (71 degrees 54'S, 68 degrees 13'W). Small endolithic colonies (<3 mm in diameter) are found within the translucent gypsum crust that forms on the surface of sandstone boulders. Gypsum crusts are found on ice-free rocks throughout the Antarctic and therefore offer potential colonization sites at more inhospitable locations, including sites at higher latitudes. Cyanobacterial, bacterial and fungal components were cultured from the crust material and have been identified as Chloroglea sp., Sphingomonas sp. and Verticillium sp. respectively. A non-cultured, black-pigmented fungus was also found. Cyanobacterial primary productivity is low: at depths of 1.2 and 2.5 mm within the crust, estimates of possible cell divisions per year were < 38 and four respectively. This microniche is proposed to provide protection from desiccation, rapid temperature variation and UV radiation flux while allowing penetration of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) for utilization by phototrophs. The endolithic communities are less extensive than those of the Dry Valleys, continental Antarctica, probably owing to only recent deglaciation (<7000 year ago). PMID:12823188

  11. Dust Emissions from Undisturbed and Disturbed, Crusted Playa Surfaces: Cattle Trampling Effect

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dry playa lake beds can be a significant source of fine dust emissions during high wind events in arid and semiarid landscapes. The physical and chemical properties of the playa surface control the amount and properties of the dust emitted. In this study, we use a field wind tunnel to quantify the...

  12. The Role of Gas-Silicate Chemisorption Reactions in Modifying Planetary Crusts and Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, P. L.; Henley, R. W.; Wykes, J. L.; Renggli, C.; Troitzsch, U.; Clark, D.; O'Neill, H. S.

    2014-12-01

    Evidence for gas-solid reactions is found throughout the solar system: for example, sulfidation reactions in some meteorites and secondary phases coating lunar pyroclastic glasses. On Earth, the products of gas-solid reactions are documented in volcanic systems, metalliferous mineral deposits, impact craters, and on dust or meteorites after passage through the atmosphere - such reactions are also likely on the surfaces of Mars and Venus. To understand the chemical dynamics of such gas-solid reactions, we are undertaking systematic experiments and thermochemical modelling. Experiments were conducted in a vertical gas-mixing furnace at 600 - 800 °C and 1 bar, using SO2and a range of Ca-bearing materials: labradorite, feldspar glass and anorthosite (rock). In each case, anhydrite formed rapidly. In shorter experiments with labradorite, isolated anhydrite is observed surrounded by 'moats' of Ca-depleted silicate. In longer experiments, anhydrite is found as clusters of crystals that, in some cases, extend from the substrate forming precarious 'towers' (Figure). Anhydrite fills cracks in porous samples. We propose that the nucleation and rapid growth of anhydrite on the surface of these Ca-rich phases occurs by chemisorption of SO2(g) molecules with slightly negatively charged oxygen onto available near-surface calcium with slight positive charge. Anhydrite growth is sustained by SO2(g) chemisorption and Ca migration through the reacting silicate lattice, accelerated by increased bond lengths at high temperature. Significantly, the chemisorption reaction indicates that SO2 disproportionates to form both oxidized sulfur (as anhydrite) and a reduced sulfur species (e.g., an S* radical ion). On Earth, in the presence of H2O, the predominant reduced sulfur species is H2S, through an overall reaction: 3CaAl2Si2O8 + 4 SO2(g)+ H2O(g) → 3CaSO4 + 3Al2SiO5 + 3SiO2 + H2S(g)The reduced sulfur may react with gas phase Fe, Ni, Zn and Cu cluster compounds to form metal sulfides

  13. Hydrology of the Ferron sandstone aquifer and effects of proposed surface-coal mining in Castle Valley, Utah; with a section on Stratigraphy and Leaching of overburden

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lines, Gregory C.; Morrissey, Daniel J.; Ryer, Thomas A.; Fuller, Richard H.

    1983-01-01

    Coal in the Ferron Sandstone Member of the Mancos Shale of Cretaceous age has traditionally been mined by underground techniques in the Emery Coal Field in the southern end of Castle Valley in east-central Utah. However, approximately 99 million tons are recoverable by surface mining. Ground water in the Ferron is the sole source of supply for the town of Emery, but the aquifer is essentially untapped outside the Emery area. The Ferron Sandstone Member crops out along the eastern edge of Castle Valley and generally dips 2 ? to 10 ? to the northwest. Sandstones in the Ferron are enclosed between relatively impermeable shale in the Tununk and Blue Gate Members of the Mancos Shale. Along the outcrop, the Ferron ranges in thickness from about 80 feet in the northern part of Castle Valley to 850 feet in the southern part. The Ferron also generally thickens in the subsurface downdip from the outcrop. Records from wells and test holes indicate that the full thickness of the Ferron is saturated with water in most areas downdip from the outcrop area. Tests in the Emery area indicate that transmissivity of the Ferron sandstone aquifer ranges from about 200 to 700 feet squared per day where the Ferron is fully saturated. Aquifer transmissivity is greatest near the Paradise Valley-Joes Valley fault system where permeability has been increased by fracturing. Storage coefficient ranges from about 10 .6 to 10 -3 where the Ferron sandstone aquifer is confined and probably averages 5 x 10 -2 where it is unconfined. The largest source of recharge to the Ferron sandstone aquifer in the Emery area is subsurface inflow from the Wasatch Plateau to the west (about 2.4 cubic feet per second during 1979), most of which moves laterally through the more permeable zone along the Paradise Valley-Joes Valley fault system. Little water is recharged to the aquifer by the 8 inches of normal annual precipitation on the outcrop area. Natural discharge from the aquifer is mainly leakage to alluvium

  14. Effect of rainfall and tillage direction on the evolution of surface crusts, soil hydraulic properties and runoff generation for a sandy loam soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ndiaye, Babacar; Esteves, Michel; Vandervaere, Jean-Pierre; Lapetite, Jean-Marc; Vauclin, Michel

    2005-06-01

    The study was aimed at evaluating the effect of rainfall and tillage-induced soil surface characteristics on infiltration and runoff on a 2.8 ha catchment located in the central region of Senegal. This was done by simulating 30 min rain storms applied at a constant rate of about 70 mm h -1, on 10 runoff micro-plots of 1 m 2, five being freshly harrowed perpendicularly to the slope and five along the slope (1%) of the catchment. Runoff was automatically recorded at the outlet of each plot. Hydraulic properties such as capillary sorptivity and hydraulic conductivity of the sandy loam soil close to saturation were determined by running 48 infiltration tests with a tension disc infiltrometer. That allowed the calculation of a mean characteristic pore size hydraulically active and a time to ponding. Superficial water storage capacity was estimated using data collected with an electronic relief meter. Because the soil was subject to surface crusting, crust-types as well as their spatial distribution within micro-plots and their evolution with time were identified and monitored by taking photographs at different times after tillage. The results showed that the surface crust-types as well as their tillage dependent dynamics greatly explain the decrease of hydraulic conductivity and sorptivity as the cumulative rainfall since tillage increases. The exponential decaying rates were found to be significantly greater for the soil harrowed along the slope (where the runoff crust-type covers more than 60% of the surface after 140 mm of rain) than across to the slope (where crusts are mainly of structural (60%) and erosion (40%) types). That makes ponding time smaller and runoff more important. Also it was shown that soil hydraulic properties after about 160 mm of rain were close to those of untilled plot not submitted to any rain. That indicates that the effects of tillage are short lived.

  15. Thin crust beneath the Chaco-Paraná Basin by surface-wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, María Laura; Collaço, Bruno; Assumpção, Marcelo; Sabbione, Nora; Sánchez, Gerardo

    2016-03-01

    We present the results of surface-wave group velocity tomography for South America, using dispersion curves from a) regional earthquakes recorded at permanent and portable stations and b) inter-station cross-correlation of ambient noise for stations in and around the Paraná and Chaco-Paraná basins, achieving better path coverage and a more azimuthally uniform distribution. A 2D group velocity tomographic inversion, using two different smoothing criteria (first- and second-derivative smoothing) was performed in the period 10-150 s for the Rayleigh wave and 10-90 s for the Love wave, displayed improved resolution in northern Argentina and southern Brazil, compared with previous studies. A grid-search method was applied to estimate sediment, crustal thickness and upper mantle Sn velocity maps for the Chaco-Paraná basin. Our results obtained from a more complete dataset reveal an average crustal thickness for the Chaco-Paraná basin of about 35 km, reaching approximately 28-30 km beneath the northern region. S-wave velocities in the uppermost mantle are about 2% lower than IASP91 model, especially for the northern region, suggesting a shallower asthenosphere. These results are consistent with previous estimates, but are more robust because we used a larger dataset and tested different inversion constraints.

  16. New Perspectives on the Old Red Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miall, Andrew D.

    The Old Red Sandstone is amongst the most distinctive and well-known stratigraphic units in the British Isles. It is mainly of Devonian age; in fact, its lower boundary was used to define the base of the Devonian until relatively recently and it was called "Old" back in the nineteenth century to distinguish it from a superficially similar succession of Triassic age named the New Red Sandstone. The Old Red Sandstone has long been known to be a non-marine syntectonic to post-tectonic deposit associated with the Caledonian Orogeny One of the most famous outcrops of the red sandstone is at Siccar Point in northeast England at one of several outcrops named "Hutton's unconformity" where it lies, with marked angularity on Silurian lithic sandstones and shales. It was at these outcrops, toward the end of the eigthteenth century that James Hutton first came to understand the meaning of angular unconformities as structures representing vast amounts of missing time during which major upheavals of the Earth's crust occurred.

  17. What Can Spectral Properties of Martian Surface and Snc Can Tell Us about the Martian Crust Composition and Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ody, A.; Poulet, F.; Baratoux, D.; Quantin, C.; Bibring, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    While the study of Martian meteorites can provide detailed information about the crust and mantle composition and evolution, remote-sensing observations, through the merging of compositional and geological data, allow highlighting planetary-scale trends of the Martian crustal evolution [1,2]. Recently, the analysis of the global distribution of mafic minerals [3] has put new constraints on the Martian crust formation and evolution. One of the major results is a past global event of olivine-bearing fissural volcanism that has filled craters and low depressions in the southern highlands and a large part of the Northern plains during the late Noachian/early Hesperian. Petrologic models show that this sudden increase of the olivine content at the Noachian-Hesperian boundary could be the result of a rapid thickening of the lithosphere at the end of the Noachian era [4]. A recent study based on the OMEGA/MEx data has shown that the spectral properties of the shergottites are similar to those of some Noachian and Hesperian terrains [5]. To contrary, the Nakhla spectral properties are very different from those of the observable surface and could be representative of Amazonian terrains buried under dust. These results are best explained with an old age of the shergottites [6] and with the present understanding of the evolution of magma composition at a planetary scale [7]. On the other hand, if shergottites are young [8], the similarities between the shergottites and ancient terrains implies that exceptional conditions of melting with respect to the ambient mantle (e.g., hot spots or water-rich mantle source) were responsible for the formation of these samples [9]. References: [1] McSween et al., 2009, Science, 324. [2] Ehlmann & Edwards 2014, AREPS, vol. 42. [3] Ody et al., 2013, JGR,117,E00J14. [4] Ody et al., 2014, 8th Inter. Conf. on Mars,#1190. [5] Ody et al., 2013, 44th LPSC, #1719. [6] Bouvier et al., 2009, EPSL, 280. [7] Baratoux et al., 2013, JGR, 118. [8] Nyquist

  18. Extensive surface pedogenic alteration of the Martian Noachian crust suggested by plateau phyllosilicates around Valles Marineris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Deit, Laetitia; Flahaut, Jessica; Quantin, Cathy; Hauber, Ernst; Mège, Daniel; Bourgeois, Olivier; Gurgurewicz, Joanna; Massé, Marion; Jaumann, R.

    2012-03-01

    Thousands of phyllosilicate-rich outcrops, mainly iron or magnesium-rich are exposed on Noachian terrains in the Martian southern highlands. We analyzed 90 CRISM observations and more than a hundred HiRISE images located on the plateaus surrounding Valles Marineris. We mapped an extensive Al- and Fe/Mg-phyllosilicate-rich formation covering at least ˜197,000 km2, for which we introduce the name “Plateau Phyllosilicates.” Tens of meters in thickness, this light-toned formation crops out at various elevations on top of the Noachian units Npl1 and Npl2, as flat exposures on plateaus and along scarps such as valley walls, chasma walls, pit walls and impact crater rims. The Fe/Mg-phyllosilicate-rich lower member of the formation is composed of Fe/Mg-smectites (nontronite, saponite) and vermiculite. The Al-phyllosilicate-rich upper member of the formation contains Al-smectites (montmorillonite, beidellite) and locally kaolinite and/or halloysite. We suggest that the Plateau Phyllosilicates were mainly formed by pedogenesis related to the weathering of the Noachian bedrock by percolation of meteoric water or melted snow under a temperate and subarid climate during the Noachian Epoch in an alkaline to neutral environment. Kaolinite and/or halloysite may have formed in areas of more intense drainage at the surface under slightly acidic environments during the Noachian and Hesperian Epochs. Fluvial activity and deuteric alteration may have locally contributed to the genesis of phyllosilicates. This study suggests that the alteration of the Noachian basement of the plateaus surrounding Valles Marineris was widespread during the Noachian Epoch, and was still active during the Hesperian Epoch even though the water availability was limited.

  19. Distributions of REE, Nd, Hf and Pb isotopes in the surfaces of Fe-Mn crusts from across the Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, N.; Nesbitt, R. W.; German, C. R.; Halbach, P.

    2001-12-01

    Over the past decade, numerous studies have investigated radiogenic isotopes (i.e. Nd, Pb, Hf, Os) in marine Fe-Mn deposits in an attempt to infer changes in ocean circulation throughout the Cenozoic. The use of radiogenic isotopes as paleoceanographic proxies has been challenged recently by evidence that the isotopic composition of crusts from oceanic domains near major river systems (e.g. Amazon, Congo) or old cratonic areas (i.e. the North Atlantic area) could be influenced significantly by continental inputs. Therefore, for any given crust, it is difficult to deduce the extent to which changes in weathering processes rather than ocean circulation may be responsible for observed isotopic variations. This is partly due to the fact that the oceanic budgets for some of these elements remain poorly constrained. In particular, the influence of both the eastward aeolian transport of Chinese loess and the erosion of the young West-Pacific volcanic belt on the isotopic composition of Pacific water masses has been poorly documented. The deep Pacific Ocean is composed of 4 principal water masses: North Pacific Intermediate Water (NPIW), Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW), Pacific Deep Water (PDW) and Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW). AABW, the main source of PDW, flows northward and enters the Central Basin through the Samoan Passage, where it is diverted into two branches: eastward to Line Island Passage and westward through Wake Passage. We will present Nd, Hf and Pb isotopic ratios combined with REE data from the surfaces of 16 Fe-Mn crusts taken at different depths from key areas of the Pacific Ocean. Two crusts were collected from the Izu-Bonin back-arc basin in the western Pacific and, hence, are particularly suitable for monitoring the influence of both continental aeolian and weathering inputs. Two other groups of crusts are from north and south of the equatorial Pacific region. The southern group is situated at the exit of the Samoan Passage, whereas the northern

  20. Eolian sabkha sandstones in the Nugget Sandstone (Jurassic), Vernal area, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Schenk, C.J.; Peterson, F. )

    1991-06-01

    The Jurassic Nugget Sandstone in the Vernal, Utah, area is characterized by thick (up to 25 m) sets of cross-stratified eolian dune sandstone separated by either erosional planar bounding surfaces or thin (mostly < 3 m) sandstones interpreted as sabkha sandstones. Structures in Nugget sabkha sandstones are predominantly wavy or irregular bedding and thin, remnant sets of dune cross-strata consisting of eolian ripple and avalanche strata. The types of sedimentary structures and erosional features in Nugget sabkha sandstones indicate a close relationship between sand deposition and erosion and fluctuations in the local water table. Thin, remnant eolian dune sets are common in Nugget sabkha sandstones. The remnant sets form when dunes migrating across a sabkha are partially wetted as the water table rises slightly (on a scale of tens of centimeters); the lower part of the dune with wetted sand remains on the sabkha as the rest of the dune continues to migrate. Typically, ripple strata of the dune apron and the toes of avalanche strata are preserved in dune remnants. The avalanche strata, being slightly coarser grained, are preferentially deflated, leaving microtopography. This topography is commonly filled in with ripple strata that form as dry sand again blows across the sabkha. Stacked sets of remnant dunes separated by erosional surfaces illustrate the control of sand deposition on eolian sabkhas by the local water table.

  1. Dynamic effects of wet-dry cycles and crust formation on the saturated hydraulic conductivity of surface soils in the constructed Hühnerwasser ("Chicken Creek") catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinz, Christoph; Schümberg, Sabine; Kubitz, Anita; Frank, Franzi; Cheng, Zhang; Nanu Frechen, Tobias; Pohle, Ina

    2016-04-01

    Highly disturbed soils and substrates used in land rehabilitation undergo rapid changes after the first wetting events which in turn can lead to ecosystem degradation. Such changes were detected during the early development of the constructed Hühnerwasser ("Chicken Creek") catchment in Lusatia, Germany. Surface substrates consisting of quaternary sandy sediments formed surface seals during the first rainfall events leading to reduced infiltration and substantially increased surface runoff. Subsequently biological soil crusts formed and stabilised the surface. The aim of this study is to investigate the factors that cause the hydraulic conductivity to decrease using undisturbed and disturbed soil samples. Based on the hypothesis that physical and biological crusts lower the hydraulic conductivity, the first set of experiments with undisturbed soil cores from the Hühnerwasser catchment were carried out to measure the saturated hydraulic conductivity using the constant head method. Measurements were done with intact cores and repeated after the surface crust was removed. As the quaternary glacial sediments tend to display hard setting behaviour, we further hypothesised that the mobilisation of fine particles within the cores lead to pore clogging and that wet-dry cycles will therefore decrease hydraulic conductivity. A second set of experiments using the same methodology consisted of five repeated measurements of hydraulic conductivity after each drying cycle. These measurements were done with undisturbed core samples as well as repacked cores in order to assess how dry packing affects the dynamics of the hydraulic conductivity somewhat similar to the situation during the first wetting after completion of the catchment construction. For all experiments, the temporal evolution of hydraulic conductivity was measured and the turbidity of the effluent was recorded. The results clearly demonstrated that the substrate is highly unstable. The first set of experiments

  2. Investigation of the relationship between CO2 reservoir rock property change and the surface roughness change originating from the supercritical CO2-sandstone-groundwater geochemical reaction at CO2 sequestration condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Minhee; Wang, Sookyun; Kim, Seyoon; Park, Jinyoung

    2015-04-01

    Lab scale experiments were performed to investigate the property changes of sandstone slabs and cores, resulting from the scCO2-rock-groundwater reaction for 180 days under CO2 sequestration conditions (100 bar and 50 °C). The geochemical reactions, including the surface roughness change of minerals in the slab, resulted from the dissolution and the secondary mineral precipitation for the sandstone reservoir of the Gyeongsang basin, Korea were reproduced in laboratory scale experiments and the relationship between the geochemical reaction and the physical rock property change was derived, for the consideration of successful subsurface CO2 sequestration. The use of the surface roughness value (SRrms) change rate and the physical property change rate to quantify scCO2-rock-groundwater reaction is the novel approach on the study area for CO2 sequestration in the subsurface. From the results of SPM (Scanning Probe Microscope) analyses, the SRrms for each sandstone slab was calculated at different reaction time. The average SRrms increased more than 3.5 times during early 90 days reaction and it continued to be steady after 90 days, suggesting that the surface weathering process of sandstone occurred in the early reaction time after CO2 injection into the subsurface reservoir. The average porosity of sandstone cores increased by 8.8 % and the average density decreased by 0.5 % during 90 days reaction and these values slightly changed after 90 days. The average P and S wave velocities of sandstone cores also decreased by 10 % during 90 days reaction. The trend of physical rock property change during the geochemical reaction showed in a logarithmic manner and it was also correlated to the logarithmic increase in SRrms, suggesting that the physical property change of reservoir rocks originated from scCO2 injection directly comes from the geochemical reaction process. Results suggested that the long-term estimation of the physical property change for reservoir rocks in CO2

  3. Seismic Response of Carbonate Cemented Sandstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, T.; Mukerji, T.; Mavko, G.

    2007-12-01

    This study focuses on how carbonate cementation precipitated at the key sequence stratigraphic surfaces impact the seismic impedance. Our goals are two-fold: (1) to identify the sedimentological variations within carbonate- cemented sandstones and (2) to quantify their effects on P-impedance. To accomplish this goal, we identify the relationship between carbonate cementation and key stratigraphic surfaces, such as, the incision surfaces and the flooding surfaces. Next, we use effective medium models to quantify the impact of sediment parameters on P- impedance. We find that the carbonate cemented sandstones are extremely heterogeneous in nature, even within a depth interval of 60 meter in our study area offshore Equatorial Guinea, West Africa. Their grain-size, sorting, mineralogy, clay-content, amount of cement and degree of leaching vary considerably. We identify two distinct clusters of data in the P-impedance vs. porosity plane. The carbonate cemented sandstones from the base of incision are usually associated with lower shaliness, lower porosity and higher P-impedance. On the contrary, data from the top of flooding surfaces exhibit higher shaliness, higher porosity and lower P-impedance. The contact cement model fails to predict the trend shown by the later cluster of data. The predictions using the constant cement model with 1% constant carbonate cement, and the modified stiffsand model with 15% critical porosity agree reasonably well with the data. Furthermore, we find that the modified differential effective media model with 40% percolation porosity, and Berryman's self consistent model with 20% percolation porosity fit P- impedance vs. porosity trend of the carbonated cemented sandstones. In conclusion, the carbonate cements are different than the siliciclastic cements in terms of sedimentological parameters, and the commonly used rock physics model for quartz cemented sandstones are not always suitable to predict P-impedance vs. porosity trends for the

  4. Stochastic reconstruction of sandstones

    PubMed

    Manwart; Torquato; Hilfer

    2000-07-01

    A simulated annealing algorithm is employed to generate a stochastic model for a Berea sandstone and a Fontainebleau sandstone, with each a prescribed two-point probability function, lineal-path function, and "pore size" distribution function, respectively. We find that the temperature decrease of the annealing has to be rather quick to yield isotropic and percolating configurations. A comparison of simple morphological quantities indicates good agreement between the reconstructions and the original sandstones. Also, the mean survival time of a random walker in the pore space is reproduced with good accuracy. However, a more detailed investigation by means of local porosity theory shows that there may be significant differences of the geometrical connectivity between the reconstructed and the experimental samples. PMID:11088546

  5. The Continental Crust.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burchfiel, B. Clark

    1983-01-01

    Continental crust underlies the continents, their margins, and also small shallow regions in oceans. The nature of the crust (much older than oceanic crust) and its dynamics are discussed. Research related to and effects of tectonics, volcanism, erosion, and sedimentation on the crust are considered. (JN)

  6. Rock doughnut and pothole structures of the Clarens Fm. Sandstone in the Karoo Basin, South Africa: Possible links to Lower Jurassic fluid seepage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grab, Stefan; Svensen, Henrik

    2011-08-01

    South Africa has a wealth of sandstone landforms, yet many of these have not been examined in detail to expand knowledge on their morphology and process origins. Here we present data on primary morphological statistics, rock hardness, surface roughness and petrographic investigations of rock doughnuts and associated pothole structures in Golden Gate Highlands National Park (GGHNP) and in the Witkop III complex, with the aim of using such data and field observations to argue their likely origins. Schmidt hammer R-values indicate consistently harder doughnut rims (mean = 48.7; n = 150) than the enclosed potholes (mean = 37.8; n = 150) and surrounding sandstone platform (mean = 39.7; n = 250). The petrography of Clarens Fm. Sandstone shows that the typical whitish sandstone is affected by intense chemical weathering. Pothole rims and the irregular reddish crust typical of the Witkop III outcrops show a secondary cementation by microcrystalline silica. Although preservation of old land surfaces is difficult to prove, small and circular pipe structures filled with calcite-cemented sand are present locally surrounding the Witkop III hydrothermal complex, and represent conduits for fluidized sand. Based on the morphologies of the Witkop III summit with the associated potholes and pipes, we hypothesize that they are remnants of morphologies created by Jurassic fluid seepage, with a superimposed and secondary silica cementation. Given that fluidization structures evidently occur in Clarens Fm. Sandstone, as is the case at Witkop, such mechanisms could possibly have contributed to the observed rock doughnut structures elsewhere on Clarens Fm. Sandstones, such as at the GGHNP where the rock doughnut morphological attributes are typical to landforms originating from fluid venting.

  7. Surface uplift due to thermo-rheological changes in the crust: The case of the southern margin of the Central Anatolian Plateau (S Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Blanco, David; Bertotti, Giovanni; Cassola, Teodoro; Willett, Sean

    2016-04-01

    Late Miocene uplift of the southern margin of the Central Anatolian orogenic plateau (SCAP) can be explained with our proposed surface uplift mechanism. This new model is based on the dynamic interactions between the growth of the Anatolian accretionary subduction margin and thermo-rheological changes at the base of its crust. Our thermo-rheological uplift mechanism fits newly obtained structural data, as well as compiled geological and geophysical data along a 550km-long arc-perpendicular transect. This transect runs between the Cyprian Arc trench and central Turkey through the area of the Anatolian upper-plate with larger uplift, i.e. central south Turkey. Observed deformation patterns and associated vertical motions along this transect indicate distributed shortening in relation to the subduction of the Cyprus slab, which still underlies this area. In the middle sectors of the transect a pre-Miocene basement gently dipping southward underwent regional subsidence since Early Miocene times. After ~8 Ma, surface uplift took place in the area of the future SCAP, as recorded by disruption of marine deposition and the onset of erosion, whereas subsidence persisted to the south of it, in the Cilicia Basin. Overall N-S shortening during this period developed regional contractional structures along the margin: the S-verging Kyrenia thrust system in N Cyprus, the S-dipping thrusts in the center of the Cilicia Basin, and the large-wavelength S-dipping monocline in S Turkey. We tested our proposed mechanism with 2D thermo-mechanically coupled finite elements models. The models demonstrate that sediment accretion and deposition in the central Cyprus accretionary forearc basin system led to crustal thickening of the Anatolian upper-plate, which in turn forced a sedimentary "blanketing" effect. This sedimentary "blanketing" effect controlled the temperature gradient in the crust, with decreased temperatures within the blanket and increased underneath it. Higher temperatures

  8. Development, calibration, and performance of a novel biocrust wetness probe (BWP) measuring the water content of biological soil crusts and surface soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Bettina; Berkemeier, Thomas; Ruckteschler, Nina; Caesar, Jennifer; Ritter, Holger; Heintz, Henno; Brass, Henning

    2015-04-01

    The surface layer of soils as transition zone between pedosphere and atmosphere plays a crucial role in exchange processes of nutrients, atmospheric gases and water. In arid and semiarid regions, this uppermost soil layer is commonly colonized by biological soil crusts (biocrusts), which cover about 46 million km2 worldwide being highly relevant in the global terrestrial carbon and nitrogen cycles. Their water status is of major concern, as activity of these poikilohydric organisms is directly controlled by their water content. On-site analyses of both bare and crusted soils thus are urgently needed to correctly model exchange processes of water, nutrients and trace gases at the soil surface. In this study we present the biocrust wetness probe (BWP), which is the first low-cost sensor to reliably measure the water content within biocrusts or the uppermost 5 mm of the substrate. Using a weak alternating current, the electrical conductivity is assessed and an automatic calibration routine allows calculating the water content and precipitation equivalent of the surface layer over time. During one year of continuous field measurements, 60 BWPs were installed in different types of biocrusts and bare soil to measure at 5-minute intervals in the Succulent Karroo, South Africa. All sensors worked reliably and responded immediately and individually upon precipitation events. Upon completion of field measurements, soil and biocrust samples were collected from all measurement spots to compile calibration curves in the lab. In most soil and biocrust samples the water content rose linearly with increasing electrical conductivity values and only for few samples an exponential relationship was observed. Measurements revealed characteristic differences in biocrust and soil wetness patterns, which affect both the water regime and physiological processes in desert regions. Thus BWPs turned out to be well suited sensors for spatio-temporal monitoring of soil water content, allowing

  9. Seismic velocity structure of the crust and shallow mantle of the Central and Eastern United States by seismic surface wave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollitz, Fred F.; Mooney, Walter D.

    2016-01-01

    Seismic surface waves from the Transportable Array of EarthScope's USArray are used to estimate phase velocity structure of 18 to 125 s Rayleigh waves, then inverted to obtain three-dimensional crust and upper mantle structure of the Central and Eastern United States (CEUS) down to ˜200 km. The obtained lithosphere structure confirms previously imaged CEUS features, e.g., the low seismic-velocity signature of the Cambrian Reelfoot Rift and the very low velocity at >150 km depth below an Eocene volcanic center in northwestern Virginia. New features include high-velocity mantle stretching from the Archean Superior Craton well into the Proterozoic terranes and deep low-velocity zones in central Texas (associated with the late Cretaceous Travis and Uvalde volcanic fields) and beneath the South Georgia Rift (which contains Jurassic basalts). Hot spot tracks may be associated with several imaged low-velocity zones, particularly those close to the former rifted Laurentia margin.

  10. Implications for the evolution of continental crust from Hf isotope systematics of Archean detrital zircons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, Ross K.; Patchett, P. Jonathan

    1990-01-01

    Results from the fractionation of zircon by sedimentary processes into continental margin sandstone yield information on the preservation of preexisting continental crust in the form of zircon, making it possible to distinguish between the contrasting theories of gradual growth versus constant volume of continental crust over geologic time. In this work, Hf-176/Hf-177 ratios were determined for detrital zircon fractions from 2.0-2.5, 2.6-3.0, and pre-3.0 Gyr old sandstones from the Canadian-Shield, the North-Atlantic, the Wyoming, and the Kaapvaal Cratons. Results pointed to small amounts of continental crust prior to 3.0 Gyr ago and a rapid addition of continental crust between 2.5 and 3.0 Gyr ago, consistent with the gradual growth of continental crust, and giving evidence against no-growth histories.

  11. Blueberries on Earth and Mars: Correlations Between Concretions in Navajo Sandstone and Terra Meridiani on Mars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahaney, W. C.; Milner, M. W.; Netoff, D.; Dohm, J.; Kalm, V.; Krinsley, D.; Sodhi, R. N.; Anderson, R. C.; Boccia, S.; Malloch, D.; Kapran, B.; Havics, A.

    2008-12-01

    Concretionary Fe-Mn-rich nodular authigenic constituents of Jurassic Navajo sandstone (moki marbles) bear a certain relationship to similar concretionary forms ('blueberries') observed on Mars. Their origin on Earth is considered to invoke variable redox conditions with underground fluids penetrating porous quartz-rich sandstone leading to precipitation of hematite and goethite-rich material from solution, generally forming around a central nucleus of fine particles of quartz and orthoclase, recently verified by XRD and SEM-EDS analyses. At the outer rim/inner nucleus boundary, bulbous lobes of fine-grained quartz often invade and fracture the outer rim armored matrix. The bulbous forms are interpreted to result from fluid explusion from the inner concretionary mass, a response to pressure changes accompanying overburden loading. Moki marbles, harder than enclosing rock, often weather out of in situ sandstone outcrops that form a surface lag deposit of varnished marbles that locally resemble desert pavement. The marbles appear morphologically similar to 'blueberries' identified on the martian surface in Terra Meridiani through the MER-1 Opportunity rover. On Earth, redox fluids responsible for the genesis of marbles may have emanated from deep in the crust (often influenced by magmatic processes). These fluids, cooling to ambient temperatures, may have played a role in the genesis of the cemented outer rim of the concretions. The low frequency of fungi filaments in the marbles, contrasts with a high occurrence in Fe-encrusted sands of the Navajo formation [1], indicating that microbial content is of secondary importance in marble genesis relative to the fluctuating influx of ambient groundwater. Nevertheless, the presence of filaments in terrestrial concretions hints at the possibility of discovering fossil/extant life on Mars, and thus should be considered as prime targets for future reconnaissance missions to Mars. 1] Mahaney, W.C., et al. (2004), Icarus, 171, 39-53.

  12. Pacific ferromanganese crust geology and geochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, S.I.; Vanstein, B.G.; Anikeeva, L.I. )

    1990-06-01

    Cobaltiferous ferromanganese crusts form part of a large series of oceanic ferromanganese oxide deposits. The crusts show high cobalt (commonly over 0.4%), low nickel and copper sum (0.4-0.8%), considerably high manganese (18-20%), and iron (14-18%). Less abundant elements in crusts are represented by molybdenum and vanadium; the rare-earth elements cerium, lanthenum, and yttrium; and the noble metals platinum and rhodium. Co-rich crusts form at water depths of 600 to 2,500 m. Crust thicknesses range from millimeters to 15-17 cm, averaging 2-6 cm. The most favorable conditions for 4-10 cm thick crusts to occur is at water depths of 1,200-2,200 m. The crusts formed on basaltic, calcareous, siliceous, and breccia bedrock surfaces provided there were conditions preventing bottom sedimentation at them. If the sedimentation takes place, it may be accompanied by nodules similar in composition to the crusts. The most favorable topography for extensive crust formation is considered to be subdued (up to 20{degree}) slopes and summit platforms of conical seamounts, frequently near faults and their intersection zones. Subhorizontal guyot summits do not usually favor crust growth. Crust geochemistry is primarily defined by mineralogy and manganese hydroxides (vernadite)/iron ratio. The first associated group of compounds includes cobalt, nickel, molybdenum, vanadium, cerium, and titanium; the other is strontium, yttrium, cerium, and cadmium. The aluminosilicate phase is associated with titanium, iron, chromium, and vanadium; phosphate biogenic phase includes copper, nickel, zinc, lead, and barium. The crucial point in cobaltiferous crust formation is their growth rate on which is dependent the degree of ferromanganese matrix sorption saturation with cobalt. The optimum for cobalt-rich ferromanganese ores is the conditions facilitating long-term and continuous hydrogenic processes.

  13. Ancient sandstone condition assessment in relation to degradation, cleaning and consolidation phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drdácký, Miloš; Frankeová, Dita; Slížková, Zuzana

    2015-04-01

    Non-invasive methods for assessing the state of historic stone types rely on measurement of their surface or subsurface characteristics, which are supposed to correlate with objective physical characteristics. Such measurements are influenced by surface conditions of stone, as well as by previous conservation treatments. The authors performed a comprehensive study of characteristics and behaviour of typical sandstone types present in the Charles' Bridge in Prague as a preparatory work for its diagnostic and restoration in order to understand the problem of a large, important, and non-homogeneous (from the material point of view) historic structure, that was intended for repair interventions. The study itself took advantage of the combination of non-invasive, or considerately destructive methods and fully destructive tests, because it was possible to use damaged sandstone blocks, which were extracted from a masonry rail of the bridge before replacement with new elements. Stone characteristics were studied on test specimens prepared from materials in various conditions and after various interventions. Seven types of sandstone were tested in nine sets (degraded surface layer with a crust, degraded surface layer after cleaning, and unweathered core material; all three without any consolidation treatment, and all three after consolidation with two products based on silicic acid ester - Funcosil 100 and 300). The paper will present only selected results of experiments and the most important conclusions taken from the tests and their comparison. During experimental work the following characteristics were investigated: bending strength, modulus of elasticity, ultrasonic velocity, micro-drilling resistance, water uptake, porosity, frost resistance, hydric dilation and thermal dilation. The degraded stone had a rather strong variation of its characteristics along the depth profile from the surface inside the stone ashlar. Therefore, the stone samples were prepared in a form

  14. Habitability Of Europa's Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberg, R.; Tufts, B. R.; Geissler, P.; Hoppa, G.

    Physical characterization of Europa's crust shows it to be rich in potentially habitable niches, with several timescales for change that would allow stability for organisms to prosper and still require and drive evolution and adaptation. Studies of tectonics on Europa indicate that tidal stress causes much of the surface cracking, that cracks pen- etrate through to liquid water (so the ice must be thin), and that cracks continue to be worked by tidal stress. Thus a global ocean is (or was until recently) well linked to the surface. Daily tidal flow (period~days) transports substances up and down through the active cracks, mixing surface oxidants and fuels (cometary material) with the oceanic reservoir of endogenic and exogenic substances. Organisms moving with the flow or anchored to the walls could exploit the disequilibrium chemistry, and those within a few meters of the surface could photosynthesize. Cracks remain active for at least ~10,000 yr, but deactivate as nonsynchronous rotation moves them to different stress regimes in less than a million yr. Thus, to survive, organisms squeezed into the ocean must migrate to new cracks, and those frozen in place must hibernate. Most sites remelt and would release captive organisms within about a million yr based on the prevalence of chaotic terrain, which covers nearly half of Europa. Linkage of the ocean to the surface also could help sustain life in the ocean by delivering oxidants and fuels. Suboceanic volcanism (if any) could provide additional sites and support for life, but is not necessary. Recent results support this model. We further constrain the non-synchronous rotation rate, demonstrate the plausibility of episodic melt-through, show that characteristics of pits and uplift features do not imply thick ice, and demonstrate polar wander, i.e. that the ice crust is detached from the solid interior and has slipped as a unit relative to the spin axis. Thus Europa's biosphere (habitable if not inhabited) likely

  15. The Crust and Upper Mantle Structure of the Iranian Plateau from Joint Waveform Tomography Imaging of Body and Surface Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roecker, S. W.; Priestley, K. F.; Tatar, M.

    2014-12-01

    The Iranian Plateau forms a broad zone of deformation between the colliding Arabian and Eurasian plates. The convergence is accommodated in the Zagros Mountains of SW Iran, the Alborz Mountains of northern Iran, and the Kopeh Dagh Mountains of NE Iran. These deforming belts are separated by relatively aseismic depressions such as the Lut Block. It has been suggested that the Arabia-Eurasia collision is similar to the Indo-Eurasia collision but at a early point of development and therefore, it may provide clues to our understanding of the earlier stages of the continent-continent collision process. We present results of the analysis of seismic data collected along two NE-SW trending transects across the Iranian Plateau. The first profile extends from near Bushere on the Persian Gulf coast to near to the Iran-Turkmenistan border north of Mashad, and consists of seismic recordings along the SW portion of the line in 2000-2001 and recording along the NE portion of the line in 2003 and 2006-2008. The second profile extends from near the Iran-Iraq border near the Dezfel embayment to the south Caspian Sea coast north of Tehran. We apply the combined 2.5D finite element waveform tomography algorithm of Baker and Roecker [2014] to jointly invert teleseismic body and surface waves to determine the elastic wavespeed structures of these areas. The joint inversion of these different types of waves affords similar types of advantages that are common to combined surface wave dispersion/receiver function inversions in compensating for intrinsic weaknesses in horizontal and vertical resolution capabilities. We compare results recovered from a finite difference approach to document the effects of various assumptions related to their application, such as the inclusion of topography, on the models recovered. We also apply several different inverse methods, starting with simple gradient techniques to the more sophisticated pseudo-Hessian or L-BFGS approach, and find that the latter are

  16. Emplacement of sandstone intrusions during contractional tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palladino, Giuseppe; Grippa, Antonio; Bureau, Denis; Alsop, G. Ian; Hurst, Andrew

    2016-08-01

    Sandstone injections are created by the forceful emplacement of remobilized sand in response to increases in overpressure. However, the contribution provided by horizontal compressive stress to the build-up in overpressure, and the resulting emplacement of sand injection complexes, is still to be substantiated by robust field observations. An opportunity to address this issue occurs in Central California where a large volume of sandstone intrusions record regionally-persistent supra-lithostatic pore-pressure. Detailed fieldwork allows sandstone-filled thrusts to be recognized and, for the first time, permits us to demonstrate that some sandstone intrusions are linked to contractional deformation affecting the western border of the Great Valley Basin. Fluidized sand was extensively injected along thrust surfaces, and also fills local dilatant cavities linked to thrusting. The main aims of this paper are to provide detailed descriptions of the newly recognized syn-tectonic injections, and describe detailed cross-cutting relationships with earlier sandstone injection complexes in the study area. Finally, an evolutionary model consisting of three phases of sand injection is provided. In this model, sand injection is linked to contractional tectonic episodes affecting the western side of the Great Valley Basin during the Early-Middle Cenozoic. This study demonstrates that sand injections, driven by fluid overpressure, may inject along thrusts and folds and thereby overcome stresses associated with regional contractional deformation. It is shown that different generations of sand injection can develop in the same area under the control of different stress regimes, linked to the evolving mountain chain.

  17. Deep ancient fluids in the continental crust and their impact on near-surface economic, environmental and biological systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballentine, Christopher; Warr, Oliver; Sutcliffe, Chelsea; McDermott, Jill; Fellowes, Jonathan; Holland, Greg; Mabry, Jennifer; Sherwood Lollar, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    With a few exceptions the mobility of water, oil and gas, provides for an ephemeral view of subsurface fluids relative to geological or planetary timescales. Aquifers supplying water for drinking and irrigation have mean residence ages from hundreds to tens of thousands of years; Hydrothermal systems can be active for hundreds of thousands to millions of years forming key mineral reserves; Sedimentary basin formation expels fluids during compaction and generates oil and gas on times scales of millions to hundreds of millions of years. Within these exemplar systems biological activity can play a crucial role by mediating system oxidation state: releasing arsenic into shallow groundwaters; precipitating ore bodies; generating methane; and biodegrading oil. It is becoming increasingly apparent that fluids resident in fractures and porespace in the crystalline basement underlying many of these systems can have a mean residence time that ranges from tens to hundreds of millions of years [1,2] to billions of years [3,4]. These fluids are highly saline and trace element rich; they are abundant in nitrogen, hydrogen, methane and helium and can contain microbes that have uniquely adapted to these isolated environments [5]. We are actively expanding discovery of sites with fluids exhibiting extreme age and have recently shown that these systems contribute to half of the terrestrial hydrogen production; a key component in biosphere energy and carbon cycles [6]. Tectonic or thermal release of these fluids can result in helium deposits; possible ore body generation and the inoculation of near-surface systems with microbial biota protected in the deep surface; the controls and rate of fluid release to shallow systems can fundamentally change the nature of some shallow systems. These deep ancient fluids represent a little tapped scientific resource for understanding how life survives and evolves in such isolation, how life is transported and communicates in extremis together and

  18. A McMC Method for the Inference of Radial and Azimuthal Anisotropy of the Crust and Upper Mantle from Surface-Wave Dispersion Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravenna, Matteo; Lebedev, Sergei

    2016-04-01

    We develop a Markov Chain Monte Carlo method for joint inversion of Rayleigh- and Love-wave dispersion curves that is able to yield robust radially and azimuthally anisotropic shear velocity profiles, with resolution to depths down to the transition zone. The probabilistic feature of the algorithm is a powerful tool that is able to provide error assessment of the shear velocity models, quantify non-uniqueness and address the issue of data noise estimation by treating it as an unknown parameter in the inversion. In a fixed dimensional Bayesian formulation, we choose to set the number of parameters relatively high, with a more dense parametrization in the uppermost mantle in order to have a good resolution of the Litosphere-Astenosphere Boundary region. We apply the MCMC algorithm to the inversion of surface-wave phase velocities accurately determined in broad period ranges in a few test regions. In the Baikal-Mongolia region we invert Rayleigh- and Love- wave dispersion curves for radially anisotropic structure (Vsv,Vsh) of the crust and upper mantle. In the Tuscany region, where we have phase velocity data with good azimuthal coverage, a different implementation of the algorithm is applied that is able to resolve azimuthal anisotropy; the Rayleigh wave dispersion curves measured at different azimuths have been inverted for the Vsv structure and the depth distribution of the 2-psi azimuthal anisotropy of the region, with good resolution down to asthenospheric depths.

  19. Seismic velocity structure of the crust and shallow mantle of the Central and Eastern United States by seismic surface wave imaging

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollitz, Fred; Mooney, Walter D.

    2016-01-01

    Seismic surface waves from the Transportable Array of EarthScope's USArray are used to estimate phase velocity structure of 18 to 125 s Rayleigh waves, then inverted to obtain three-dimensional crust and upper mantle structure of the Central and Eastern United States (CEUS) down to ∼200 km. The obtained lithosphere structure confirms previously imaged CEUS features, e.g., the low seismic-velocity signature of the Cambrian Reelfoot Rift and the very low velocity at >150 km depth below an Eocene volcanic center in northwestern Virginia. New features include high-velocity mantle stretching from the Archean Superior Craton well into the Proterozoic terranes and deep low-velocity zones in central Texas (associated with the late Cretaceous Travis and Uvalde volcanic fields) and beneath the South Georgia Rift (which contains Jurassic basalts). Hot spot tracks may be associated with several imaged low-velocity zones, particularly those close to the former rifted Laurentia margin.

  20. Joint Imaging of the Crust Beneath the Southeastern Margin of the Tibetan Plateau Using Body Wave Travel Times and Surface Wave Dispersion Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Maceira, M.; Yao, H.; van der Hilst, R.

    2011-12-01

    The southeast margin of the Tibetan Plateau lies between the heartland of the plateau to the west and the stable south China block to the east, spanning from western Sichuan to central Yunnan in southwest China. A channel flow model in which a weak zone exists in the mid-to-lower crust has been proposed to explain the low-gradient topographic slope and lack of large-scale young crustal shortening at the southeast plateau margin. Both seismic body wave tomography and surface wave array tomography have revealed widespread zones of low shear wave velocity at mid- or low-crustal depth. However, the spatial distribution and interconnectivity between low velocity zones are not very clear mainly due to intrinsic resolution limitation of individual methods. In this study, we aim at improving the velocity model by joint seismic imaging using seismic travel times and surface wave dispersion curves. The body wave travel times are collected from the Sichuan Provincial Seismological stations for the period of 2001-2004. The surface-wave dispersion curves for periods between 10-150 s are obtained from ambient noise and teleseismic surface-wave two-station analysis using array data from 75 broadband stations in SE Tibet. The joint inversion code is based on the double-difference seismic tomography package tomoFDD. The travel times between events and stations are calculated using the finite-difference travel time calculation method based on Eikonal equation. The imaging results using seismic travel times show that low velocity zones are bounded by or distributed along major faults. The feature appears more clearly on the Vp model. Since short and intermediate period surface-wave dispersion data provide good constraints on the crustal Vs structure and are also quite sensitive to the crustal Vp structure, we expect that the crustal Vs and Vp models will be better constrained by jointly inverting body-wave travel time and surface wave dispersion data. We hope to better characterize

  1. The Oceanic Crust.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francheteau, Jean

    1983-01-01

    The earth's oceanic crust is created and destroyed in a flow outward from midocean ridges to subduction zones, where it plunges back into the mantle. The nature and dynamics of the crust, instrumentation used in investigations of this earth feature, and research efforts/findings are discussed. (JN)

  2. A Bayesian Approach to Infer Radial and Azimuthal Anisotropy of the Crust and Upper Mantle from Surface-Wave Dispersion Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravenna, M.; Lebedev, S.

    2015-12-01

    A reliable approach to quantify non-uniqueness and to provide error estimates in nonlinear inversion problems, as the surface-wave dispersion curves inversion for the seismic velocity structure of the earth, is Monte Carlo sampling in a Bayesian statistical framefork. We develop a Markov Chain Monte Carlo method for joint inversion of Rayleigh- and Love-wave dispersion curves that is able to yield robust radially and azimuthally anisotropic shear velocity profiles, with resolution to depths down to the transition zone.The inversion technique doesn't involve any linearization procedure or strong a priori bounds around a reference model. In a fixed dimensional Bayesian formulation, we choose to set the number of parameters relatively high, with a more dense parametrization in the uppermost mantle in order to have a good resolution of the Litosphere-Astenosphere Boundary region. We apply the MCMC algorithm to the inversion of surface-wave phase velocities accurately determined in broad period ranges in a few test regions. In the Baikal-Mongolia region we invert Rayleigh- and Love- wave dispersion curves for radially anisotropic structure (Vsv,Vsh) of the crust and upper mantle. In the Tuscany region, where we have phase velocity data with good azimuthal coverage, a different implementation of the algorithm is applied that is able to resolve azimuthal anisotropy; the Rayleigh wave dispersion curves measured at different azimuths have been inverted for the Vsv structure and the depth distribution of the 2-ψ azimuthal anisotropy of the region, with good resolution down to asthenospheric and transition zone depths.

  3. Microphytic crusts: 'topsoil' of the desert

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belnap, Jayne

    1990-01-01

    Deserts throughout the world are the home of microphytic, or cryptogamic, crusts. These crusts are dominated by cyanobacteria, previously called blue-green algae, and also include lichens, mosses, green algae, microfungi and bacteria. They are critical components of desert ecosystems, significantly modifying the surfaces on which they occur. In the cold deserts of the Colorado Plateau (including parts of Utah, Arizona, Colorado, and New Mexico), these crusts are extraordinarily well-developed, and may represent 70-80% of the living ground cover.

  4. Log interpretation of shaly sandstones

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, J.F.

    1988-01-01

    The determination of water saturation from electrical resistivity measurements to evaluate the potential of reservoirs is a fundamental tool of the oil industry. Shaly sandstones are difficult to evaluate because clays are conductive and they lower the resistivity of the rock. A review of shaly-sandstone research concerning ''volume-of-shale'' equations reveals three theoretical categories: (1) laminated clay equations, (2) dispersed clay equations, and (3) equations that assume that the effect of the clays on the conductivity measurement is directly related to water saturation. A new model for predicting the relative amounts of laminated and dispersed shales and accounting for their effects according to their abundance can be used for any sandstone, clean or shaly. Equations representing each of the three theoretical categories and the new equation were tested on cored Wilcox sandstones from two wells. Cores were analyzed to determine the volume and distribution of clays and to correlate porosity with the well logs.

  5. Magnetic structure of the crust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasilewski, P.

    1985-01-01

    The bibuniqueness aspect of geophysical interpretation must be constrained by geological insight to limit the range of theoretically possible models. An additional step in depth understanding of the relationship between rock magnetization and geological circumstances on a grand scale is required. Views about crustal structure and the distribution of lithologies suggests a complex situation with lateral and vertical variability at all levels in the crust. Volcanic, plutonic, and metamorphic processes together with each of the observed anomalies. Important questions are addressed: (1) the location of the magnetic bottom; (2) whether the source is a discrete one or are certain parts of the crust cumulatively contributing to the overall magnetization; (3) if the anomaly to some recognizable surface expression is localized, how to arrive at a geologically realistic model incorporating magnetization contrasts which are realistic; (3) in the way the primary mineralogies are altered by metamorphism and the resulting magnetic contracts; (4) the effects of temperature and pressure on magnetization.

  6. Provenance of Mesozoic Sandstones in the Banda Arc, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, S.; Hall, R.

    2014-12-01

    Quartz-rich sandstones in the Banda Arc islands of Tanimbar, Babar, Timor and Sumba are equivalent of Mesozoic sandstones on the Australian margin where they are important hydrocarbon reservoirs. They have been exposed by on-going collision providing an opportunity to study their provenance. Previous studies suggested that rivers draining Australia provided most input. New light mineral, heavy mineral and detrital zircon data provide information on sources of sediments and constraints on palaeogeographic models. Conventional light mineral plots of sandstones from the islands typically show a recycled orogen and continental block origin, consistent with an Australian source. However many of the sandstones are texturally immature. Many samples also contain volcanic quartz and volcanic lithic fragments. Heavy mineral assemblages of most samples contain material from acid igneous and metamorphic rocks, with few indications of mafic or ultramafic sources. Rounded ultrastable minerals are typical, but these are commonly mixed with angular grains. Detrital zircon (LA-ICP-MS) U-Pb ages range from Archean to Mesozoic, but variations in age populations indicate differences in source areas along the Banda Arc in locality and time. We recognise distinctive Permo-Triassic, older Palaeozoic and Proterozoic ages characteristic of a Bird's Head, New Guinea, acid igneous source and this component diminishes from east to west. On Tanimbar and Babar, sediment came from both Australia and the Bird's Head. Sandstones in Timor have immature textures and show differences from east to west. They contain zircons derived from the Birds Head, as well as Precambrian zircons suggesting a northern Australian origin. In contrast, immature textures, heavy minerals and Cretaceous zircon ages in rocks from Sumba suggest that they were mainly derived from metamorphic sources. Mesozoic to Archean zircons indicate derivation from Australian crust that had collided in Sulawesi during the Cretaceous.

  7. Fast evolving conduits in clay-bonded sandstone: Characterization, erosion processes and significance for the origin of sandstone landforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruthans, Jiri; Svetlik, Daniel; Soukup, Jan; Schweigstillova, Jana; Valek, Jan; Sedlackova, Marketa; Mayo, Alan L.

    2012-12-01

    In Strelec Quarry, the Czech Republic, an underground conduit network > 300 m long with a volume of ~ 104 m3 and a catchment of 7 km2 developed over 5 years by groundwater flow in Cretaceous marine quartz sandstone. Similar landforms at natural exposures (conduits, slot canyons, undercuts) are stabilized by case hardening and have stopped evolving. The quarry offers a unique opportunity to study conduit evolution in sandstone at local to regional scales, from the initial stage to maturity, and to characterize the erosion processes which may form natural landforms prior to stabilization. A new technique was developed to distinguish erodible and non-erodible sandstone surfaces. Based on measurements of relative erodibility, drilling resistance, ambient and water-saturated tensile strength (TS) at natural and quarry exposures three distinct kinds of surfaces were found. 1) Erodible sandstone exposed at ~ 60% of surfaces in quarry. This sandstone loses as much as 99% of TS when saturated. 2) Sub-vertical fracture surfaces that are non-erodible already prior to exposure at ground surface and which keep considerable TS if saturated. 3) Case hardened surfaces that start to form after exposure. In favorable conditions they became non-erodible and reach the full TS in just 6 years. An increase in the hydraulic gradient from ~ 0.005 to > 0.02 triggered conduit evolution, based on long-term monitoring of water table in 18 wells and inflows to the quarry. Rapidly evolving major conduits are characterized by a channel gradient of ~ 0.01, a flow velocity ~ 40 cm/s and sediment concentration ~ 10 g/l. Flow in openings with a discharge 1 ml/s and hydraulic gradient > 0.05 exceeds the erosion threshold and initiates piping. In the first phase of conduit evolution, fast concentrated flow mobilizes erodible sandstone between sets of parallel fractures in the shallow phreatic zone. In the second phase the conduit opening mainly expands vertically upward into the vadose zone by mass

  8. Diagenetic origin of ironstone crusts in the Lower Cenomanian Bahariya Formation, Bahariya Depression, Western Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afify, A. M.; Sanz-Montero, M. E.; Calvo, J. P.; Wanas, H. A.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a new interpretation of the ironstone crusts of the Bahariya Formation as late diagenetic products is provided. The siliciclastic Lower Cenomanian Bahariya Formation outcropping in the northern part of the Bahariya Depression (Western Desert, Egypt) is subdivided into three informal units that are mainly composed of thinly laminated siltstone, cross-bedded and massive sandstone, fossiliferous sandstone/sandy limestone and variegated shale. Abundant ironstone crusts occur preferentially within its lower and upper units but are absent in the middle unit. The ironstone crusts show selective replacement of carbonate components, including calcretes, by iron oxyhydroxides. More permeable parts of the terrigenous beds such as burrow traces, subaerial exposure surfaces, concretionary features and soft-sediment deformation structures led to heterogeneous distribution of the iron oxyhydroxides. A variety of diagenetic minerals, where goethite and hematite are the main end-products, were characterized by mineralogical analysis (XRD), petrography and SEM observation, and geochemical determinations (EMPA). Other diagenetic minerals include Fe-dolomite/ankerite, siderite, manganese minerals, barite, silica, illite/smectite mixed-layer, and bitumen. These minerals are interpreted to be formed in different diagenetic stages. Some minerals, especially those formed during eodiagenesis, show features indicative of biogenic activity. During burial, dolomite and ankerite replaced preferentially the depositional carbonates and infilled secondary porosity as well. Also during mesodiagenesis, the decomposition of organic matter resulted in the formation of bitumen and created reducing conditions favorable for the mobilization of iron-rich fluids in divalent stage. Telodiagenesis of the Cenomanian Bahariya deposits took place during the Turonian-Santonian uplift of the region. This resulted in partial or total dissolution of Fe-dolomite and ankerite which was concomitant to

  9. Brittle and compaction creep in porous sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heap, Michael; Brantut, Nicolas; Baud, Patrick; Meredith, Philip

    2015-04-01

    Strain localisation in the Earth's crust occurs at all scales, from the fracture of grains at the microscale to crustal-scale faulting. Over the last fifty years, laboratory rock deformation studies have exposed the variety of deformation mechanisms and failure modes of rock. Broadly speaking, rock failure can be described as either dilatant (brittle) or compactive. While dilatant failure in porous sandstones is manifest as shear fracturing, their failure in the compactant regime can be characterised by either distributed cataclastic flow or the formation of localised compaction bands. To better understand the time-dependency of strain localisation (shear fracturing and compaction band growth), we performed triaxial deformation experiments on water-saturated Bleurswiller sandstone (porosity = 24%) under a constant stress (creep) in the dilatant and compactive regimes, with particular focus on time-dependent compaction band formation in the compactive regime. Our experiments show that inelastic strain accumulates at a constant stress in the brittle and compactive regimes leading to the development of shear fractures and compaction bands, respectively. While creep in the dilatant regime is characterised by an increase in porosity and, ultimately, an acceleration in axial strain to shear failure (as observed in previous studies), compaction creep is characterised by a reduction in porosity and a gradual deceleration in axial strain. The overall deceleration in axial strain, AE activity, and porosity change during creep compaction is punctuated by excursions interpreted as the formation of compaction bands. The growth rate of compaction bands formed during creep is lower as the applied differential stress, and hence background creep strain rate, is decreased, although the inelastic strain required for a compaction band remains constant over strain rates spanning several orders of magnitude. We find that, despite the large differences in strain rate and growth rate

  10. Microstructure of deformed graywacke sandstones

    SciTech Connect

    Dengler, L.A.

    1980-03-05

    Microsctures in low-permeability graywacke sandstones were studied by optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). SEM specimens were prepared by ion-bombardment of thick polished samples. The undeformed rock contains grains in a matrix composed primarily of authigenic chlorite and kaolinite. Chlorite platelets are randomly arranged in face-to-edge relation to one another. Kaolinite occurs as pseudohexagonal crystals stacked face-to-face in pore filling books. Uniaxial-stress experiments covered a range of confining pressures from .1 to 600 MPa. Below 50 MPa confining pressure, intergranular fracturing occurs within the fault zone and near the sample's cylindrical surface. Between 100 and 300 MPa confining pressure, fault zones contain highly fractured grains, gauge and slickensides on grain surfaces. At 600 MPa, the sample contains a diffuse shear zone of highly fractured grains and no well-defined fault. In all samples, the distribution of microcracks is heterogeneous. Different clay minerals exhibit different modes of deformation. Chlorite structure responds to applied stress by compaction, reducing both pore size and volume. Chlorite platelets are plastically deformed in even the least strained samples. Kaolinite does not deform plastically in any of the samples examined. Deformation of kaolinite is restricted to toppling of the book structure. Dilatant crack growth was studied in two samples unloaded prior to failure. Uniaxially-strained samples deform primarily along grain boundaries, producing intergranular cracks and realignment of chlorite platelets. Intragranular crack density is linearly related to axial-strain, although grains are less fractured than in uniaxially-stressed samples tested at equivalent mean pressures. Cracks are rarely longer than a grain diameter. Nuclear-explosively deformed samples were recovered after the Rio Blanco gas stimulation experiment. (JGB)

  11. Magnetization of the Lunar Crust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carley, R. A.; Whaler, K. A.; Purucker, M. E.; Halekas, J. S.

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic fields measured by the satellite Lunar Prospector show large scale features resulting from remanently magnetized crust. Vector data synthesized at satellite altitude from a spherical harmonic model of the lunar crustal field, and the radial component of the magnetometer data, have been used to produce spatially continuous global magnetization models for the lunar crust. The magnetization is expressed in terms of localized basis functions, with a magnetization solution selected having the smallest root-mean square magnetization for a given fit to the data, controlled by a damping parameter. Suites of magnetization models for layers with thicknesses between 10 and 50 km are able to reproduce much of the input data, with global misfits of less than 0.5 nT (within the uncertainties of the data), and some surface field estimates. The magnetization distributions show robust magnitudes for a range of model thicknesses and damping parameters, however the magnetization direction is unconstrained. These global models suggest that magnetized sources of the lunar crust can be represented by a 30 km thick magnetized layer. Average magnetization values in magnetized regions are 30-40 mA/m, similar to the measured magnetizations of the Apollo samples and significantly weaker than crustal magnetizations for Mars and the Earth. These are the first global magnetization models for the Moon, providing lower bounds on the magnitude of lunar crustal magnetization in the absence of multiple sample returns, and can be used to predict the crustal contribution to the lunar magnetic field at a particular location.

  12. Corium crust strength measurements.

    SciTech Connect

    Lomperski, S.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-11-01

    Corium strength is of interest in the context of a severe reactor accident in which molten core material melts through the reactor vessel and collects on the containment basemat. Some accident management strategies involve pouring water over the melt to solidify it and halt corium/concrete interactions. The effectiveness of this method could be influenced by the strength of the corium crust at the interface between the melt and coolant. A strong, coherent crust anchored to the containment walls could allow the yet-molten corium to fall away from the crust as it erodes the basemat, thereby thermally decoupling the melt from the coolant and sharply reducing the cooling rate. This paper presents a diverse collection of measurements of the mechanical strength of corium. The data is based on load tests of corium samples in three different contexts: (1) small blocks cut from the debris of the large-scale MACE experiments, (2) 30 cm-diameter, 75 kg ingots produced by SSWICS quench tests, and (3) high temperature crusts loaded during large-scale corium/concrete interaction (CCI) tests. In every case the corium consisted of varying proportions of UO{sub 2}, ZrO{sub 2}, and the constituents of concrete to represent a LWR melt at different stages of a molten core/concrete interaction. The collection of data was used to assess the strength and stability of an anchored, plant-scale crust. The results indicate that such a crust is likely to be too weak to support itself above the melt. It is therefore improbable that an anchored crust configuration could persist and the melt become thermally decoupled from the water layer to restrict cooling and prolong an attack of the reactor cavity concrete.

  13. Sandstone diagenesis in interbedded carbonate-siliciclastic sequence, Virgilian Holder Formation, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, M.W.; Goldstein, R.H.

    1988-01-01

    The Pennsylvanian (Virgilian) Holder Formation, New Mexico, consists of shales and sandstones interbedded with paleosol-capped limestones. Approximately 10 of these cycles were described in 13 stratigraphic sections. Analyses of paleosols on limestone surfaces and sedimentary structures in overlying sandstones indicate an upward transition from nonmarine to marine conditions. Diagenesis of sandstones was compared to diagenesis of previously studied limestones using transmitted-light, cathodoluminescence, and back-scattered electron microscopy, energy dispersive analysis, and electron microproble analysis for Ca, Mg, Fe, Mn, and Sr. Results suggest that sandstones underwent three temporally distinct stages of diagenesis.

  14. Growth of the lower continental crust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudnick, Roberta L.

    1988-01-01

    One of the largest uncertainties in crustal composition and growth models is the nature of the lower continental crust. Specifically, by what processes is it formed and modified, and when is it formed, particularly in reference to the upper crust? The main reason for this lack of information is the scarcity of lower crustal rock samples. These are restricted to two types: rocks which outcrop in granulite facies terrains and granulite facies xenoliths which are transported to the earth's surface by young volcanics. The important conclusions arising from the xenolith studies are: the majority of mafic lower crustal xenoliths formed through cumulate process, resitic xenoliths are rare; and formation and metamorphism of the deep crust is intimately linked to igneous activity and/or orogeny which are manifest in one form or another at the earth's surface. Therefore, estimates of crustal growth based on surface exposures is representative, although the proportion of remobilized pre-existing crust may be significantly greater at the surface than in the deep crust.

  15. Oxygen consumption in subseafloor basaltic crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orcutt, B. N.; Wheat, C. G.; Hulme, S.; Edwards, K. J.; Bach, W.

    2012-12-01

    Oceanic crust is the largest potential habitat for life on Earth and may contain a significant fraction of Earth's total microbial biomass, yet little is known about the form and function of life in this vast subseafloor realm that covers nearly two-thirds of the Earth's surface. A deep biosphere hosted in subseafloor basalts has been suggested from several lines of evidence; yet, empirical analysis of metabolic reaction rates in basaltic crust is lacking. Here we report the first measure of oxygen consumption in young (~ 8 Ma) and cool (<25 degrees C) basaltic crust, calculated from modeling oxygen and strontium profiles in basal sediments collected during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 336 to 'North Pond', a sediment 'pond' on the western flank of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR), where vigorous fluid circulation within basaltic crust occurs. Dissolved oxygen concentrations increased towards the sediment-basement interface, indicating an upward diffusional supply from oxic fluids circulating within the crust. A parametric reaction-transport model suggests oxygen consumption rates on the order of 0.5-500 nmol per cubic centimeter fluid per day in young and cool basaltic crust, providing sufficient energy to support a subsurface crustal biosphere.

  16. Magmatic intrusions in the lunar crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaut, C.; Thorey, C.

    2015-10-01

    The lunar highlands are very old, with ages covering a timespan between 4.5 to 4.2 Gyr, and probably formed by flotation of light plagioclase minerals on top of the lunar magma ocean. The lunar crust provides thus an invaluable evidence of the geological and magmatic processes occurring in the first times of the terrestrial planets history. According to the last estimates from the GRAIL mission, the lunar primary crust is particularly light and relatively thick [1] This low-density crust acted as a barrier for the dense primary mantle melts. This is particularly evident in the fact that subsequent mare basalts erupted primarily within large impact basin: at least part of the crust must have been removed for the magma to reach the surface. However, the trajectory of the magma from the mantle to the surface is unknown. Using a model of magma emplacement below an elastic overlying layer with a flexural wavelength Λ, we characterize the surface deformations induced by the presence of shallow magmatic intrusions. We demonstrate that, depending on its size, the intrusion can show two different shapes: a bell shape when its radius is smaller than 4 times Λ or a flat top with small bended edges if its radius is larger than 4 times Λ[2]. These characteristic shapes for the intrusion result in characteristic deformations at the surface that also depend on the topography of the layer overlying the intrusion [3].Using this model we provide evidence of the presence of intrusions within the crust of the Moon as surface deformations in the form of low-slope lunar domes and floor-fractured craters. All these geological features have morphologies consistent with models of magma spreading at depth and deforming an overlying elastic layer. Further more,at floor-fractured craters, the deformation is contained within the crater interior, suggesting that the overpressure at the origin of magma ascent and intrusion was less than the pressure due to the weight of the crust removed by

  17. Phase separation in the crust of accreting neutron stars.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, C J; Berry, D K; Brown, E F

    2007-06-01

    Nucleosynthesis, on the surface of accreting neutron stars, produces a range of chemical elements. We perform molecular dynamics simulations of crystallization to see how this complex composition forms new neutron star crust. We find chemical separation, with the liquid ocean phase greatly enriched in low atomic number elements compared to the solid crust. This phase separation should change many crust properties such as the thermal conductivity and shear modulus. PMID:17677319

  18. Transdomes sampling of lower and middle crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teyssier, C. P.; Whitney, D. L.; Roger, F.; Rey, P. F.

    2015-12-01

    Migmatite transdomes are formed by lateral and upward flow of partially molten crust in transtension zones (pull-apart structures). In order to understand the flow leading to this type of domes, 3D numerical models were set-up to simulate the general case of an extensional domain located between two strike-slip faults (pull-apart or dilational bridge). Results show that upper crust extension induces flow of the deep, low-viscosity crust, with rapid upward movement of transdome material when extension becomes localized. At this point a rolling hinge detachment allows rapid removal of upper crust. The internal structure of transdomes includes a subvertical high strain zone located beneath the zone of localized upper crust extension; this shear zone separates two elongate subdomes of foliation that show refolded/sheath folds. Lineation tends to be oriented dominantly subhorizontal when the amount of strike-slip motion is greater than the amount of upward flow of dome rocks. Models also predict nearly isothermal decompression of transdome material and rapid transfer of ~50 km deep rocks to the near surface. These model results are compared to the structural and metamorphic history of several transdomes, and in particular the Variscan Montagne Noire dome (French Massif Central) that consists of two domes separated by a complex high strain zone. The Montagne Noire dome contains ~315 Ma eclogite bodies (U-Pb zircon age) that record 1.4 GPa peak pressure. The eclogite bodies are wrapped in highly sheared migmatite that yield 314-310 Ma monazite ages interpreted as the metamorphism and deformation age. Based on these relations we conclude that the Montagne Noire transdome developed a channel of partially molten crust that likely entrained eclogite bodies from the deep crust (~50 km) before ascending to the near-surface. One implication of this work is that the flowing crust was deeply seated in the orogen although it remained a poor recorder of peak pressure of metamorphism

  19. Operation Sandstone: 1948. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Berkhouse, L.H.; Hallowell, J.H.; McMullan, F.W.; Davis, S.E.; Jones, C.B.

    1983-12-19

    SANDSTONE was a three-detonation atmospheric nuclear weapon test series conducted during the spring of 1948 at Enewetak Atoll in the Marshall Islands. Report emphasis is on the radiological safety of the personnel. Available records on personnel exposure are summarized.

  20. A New Classification of Sandstone.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewer, Roger Clay; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Introduced is a sandstone classification scheme intended for use with thin-sections and hand specimens. Detailed is a step-by-step classification scheme. A graphic presentation of the scheme is presented. This method is compared with other existing schemes. (CW)

  1. Biological Soil Crusts: Webs of Life in the Desert

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belnap, Jayne

    2001-01-01

    Although the soil surface may look like dirt to you, it is full of living organisms that are a vital part of desert ecosystems. This veneer of life is called a biological soil crust. These crusts are found throughout the world, from hot deserts to polar regions. Crusts generally cover all soil spaces not occupied by green plants. In many areas, they comprise over 70% of the living ground cover and are key in reducing erosion, increasing water retention, and increasing soil fertility. In most dry regions, these crusts are dominated by cyanobacteria (previously called blue-green algae), which are one of the oldest known life forms. Communities of soil crusts also include lichens, mosses, microfungi, bacteria, and green algae. These living organisms and their by-products create a continuous crust on the soil surface. The general color, surface appearance, and amount of coverage of these crusts vary depending on climate and disturbance patterns. Immature crusts are generally flat and the color of the soil, which makes them difficult to distinguish from bare ground. Mature crusts, in contrast, are usually bumpy and dark-colored due to the presence of lichens, mosses, and high densities of cyanobacteria and other organisms.

  2. Hydrological modelling in sandstone rocks watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponížilová, Iva; Unucka, Jan

    2015-04-01

    The contribution is focused on the modelling of surface and subsurface runoff in the Ploučnice basin. The used rainfall-runoff model is HEC-HMS comprising of the method of SCS CN curves and a recession method. The geological subsurface consisting of sandstone is characterised by reduced surface runoff and, on the contrary, it contributes to subsurface runoff. The aim of this paper is comparison of the rate of influence of sandstone on reducing surface runoff. The recession method for subsurface runoff was used to determine the subsurface runoff. The HEC-HMS model allows semi- and fully distributed approaches to schematisation of the watershed and rainfall situations. To determine the volume of runoff the method of SCS CN curves is used, which results depend on hydrological conditions of the soils. The rainfall-runoff model assuming selection of so-called methods of event of the SCS-CN type is used to determine the hydrograph and peak flow rate based on simulation of surface runoff in precipitation exceeding the infiltration capacity of the soil. The recession method is used to solve the baseflow (subsurface) runoff. The method is based on the separation of hydrograph to direct runoff and subsurface or baseflow runoff. The study area for the simulation of runoff using the method of SCS CN curves to determine the hydrological transformation is the Ploučnice basin. The Ploučnice is a hydrologically significant river in the northern part of the Czech Republic, it is a right tributary of the Elbe river with a total basin area of 1.194 km2. The average value of CN curves for the Ploučnice basin is 72. The geological structure of the Ploučnice basin is predominantly formed by Mesozoic sandstone. Despite significant initial loss of rainfall the basin response to the causal rainfall was demonstrated by a rapid rise of the surface runoff from the watershed and reached culmination flow. Basically, only surface runoff occures in the catchment during the initial phase of

  3. Organic matter and sandstone-type uranium deposits: a primer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leventhal, Joel S.

    1979-01-01

    Organic material is intimately associated with sandstone-type uranium deposits in the western United States.. This report gives details of the types of organic matter and their possible role in producing a uranium deposit. These steps include mobilization of uranium from igneous rocks, transportation from the surface, concentration by organic matter, reduction by organic matter, and preservation of the uranium deposit.

  4. Contractional deformation of porous sandstone: Insights from the Aztec Sandstone, SE Nevada, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossen, Haakon; Zuluaga, Luisa F.; Ballas, Gregory; Soliva, Roger; Rotevatn, Atle

    2015-05-01

    Contractional deformation of highly porous sandstones is poorly explored, as compared to extensional deformation of such sedimentary rocks. In this work we explore the highly porous Aztec Sandstone in the footwall to the Muddy Mountain thrust in SE Nevada, which contains several types of deformation bands in the Buffington tectonic window: 1) Distributed centimeter-thick shear-enhanced compaction bands (SECBs) and 2) rare pure compaction bands (PCBs) in the most porous parts of the sandstone, cut by 3) thin cataclastic shear-dominated bands (CSBs) with local slip surfaces. Geometric and kinematic analysis of the SECBs, the PCBs and most of the CSBs shows that they formed during ∼E-W (∼100) shortening, consistent with thrusting related to the Cretaceous to early Paleogene Sevier orogeny of the North American Cordilleran thrust system. Based on stress path modeling, we suggest that the compactional bands (PCBs and SECBs) formed during contraction at relatively shallow burial depths, before or at early stages of emplacement of the Muddy Mountains thrust sheet. The younger cataclastic shear bands (CSBs, category 3), also related to E-W Sevier thrusting, are thinner and show larger shear offsets and thus more intense cataclasis, consistent with the initiation of cataclastic shear bands in somewhat less porous materials. Observations made in this work support earlier suggestions that contraction lead to more distributed band populations than what is commonly found in the extensional regime, and that shear-enhanced compaction bands are widespread only where porosity (and permeability) is high.

  5. Experimental investigation on mechanical damage characteristics of sandstone under triaxial cyclic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sheng-Qi; Ranjith, P. G.; Huang, Yan-Hua; Yin, Peng-Fei; Jing, Hong-Wen; Gui, Yi-Lin; Yu, Qing-Lei

    2015-05-01

    The mechanical damage characteristics of sandstone subjected to cyclic loading is very significant to evaluate the stability and safety of deep excavation damage zones. However to date, there are very few triaxial experimental studies of sandstone under cyclic loading. Moreover, few X-ray micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) observations have been adopted to reveal the damage mechanism of sandstone under triaxial cyclic loading. Therefore, in this research, a series of triaxial cyclic loading tests and X-ray micro-CT observations were conducted to analyse the mechanical damage characteristics of sandstone with respect to different confining pressures. The results indicated that at lower confining pressures, the triaxial strength of sandstone specimens under cyclic loading is higher than that under monotonic loading; whereas at confining pressures above 20 MPa, the triaxial strength of sandstone under cyclic loading is approximately equal to that under monotonic loading. With the increase of cycle number, the crack damage threshold of sandstone first increases, and then significantly decreases and finally remains constant. Based on the damage evolution of irreversible deformation, it appears that the axial damage value of sandstone is all higher than the radial damage value before the peak strength; whereas the radial damage value is higher than the axial damage value after the peak strength. The evolution of Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio of sandstone can be characterized as having four stages: (i) Stage I: material strengthening; (ii) Stage II: material degradation; (iii) Stage III: material failure and (iv) Stage IV: structure slippage. X-ray micro-CT observations demonstrated that the CT scanning surface images of sandstone specimens are consistent with actual surface crack photographs. The analysis of the cross-sections of sandstone supports that the system of crack planes under triaxial cyclic loading is much more complicated than that under triaxial

  6. Earthquakes in Stable Continental Crust.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Arch C.; Kanter, Lisa R.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed are some of the reasons for earthquakes which occur in stable crust away from familiar zones at the ends of tectonic plates. Crust stability and the reactivation of old faults are described using examples from India and Australia. (CW)

  7. Weathering behavior investigations and treatment of Kom Ombo temple sandstone, Egypt - Based on their sedimentological and petrogaphical information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temraz, Mostafa Gouda; Khallaf, Mohamed K.

    2016-01-01

    The Temple of Kom Ombo is a huge ancient Egyptian temple in Upper Egypt. It was built by Ptolemy VI Philometor (180-145 BC) and added to by subsequent Ptolemys. The structure of the temple is built of local sandstone attributed to the Quseir Formation of "Nubian Sandstone" group at Gebel el-Silsila. Sandstone samples from Kom Ombo temple were taken to verify the source rock of the quarried material. Optical Polarizing Microscope (OPM) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) were used to determine the microstructure and physical properties of the sandstone. X-Ray diffraction (XRD) was carried out for the Sandstone samples to identify its mineralogical composition. The sandstone samples were treated with six polymeric products to determine changes in their physical and mechanical properties after penetration, consolidation of polymers within them. This sandstone is composed mainly of three quartz arenite microfacies (feldspathic, sublithic and calcareous) that are interpreted to have been deposited in fluvial to fluvial-marine environment. Silane polymers is showing a good penetration and filling pores between grains and recommended for treatment and conservation of the sandstone. Acrylic polymer shows random penetration of polymer and formation of a film of polymer on the surface of sandstone. Silo11 gave the best result in consolidation of sandstone samples then primal AC33. Wacker BS29 gave the best result in isolating process of sandstone samples, then wacker BS 290.

  8. Mars Crust: Made of Basalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G. J.

    2009-05-01

    By combining data from several sources, Harry Y. (Hap) McSween (University of Tennessee), G. Jeffrey Taylor (University of Hawaii) and Michael B. Wyatt (Brown University) show that the surface of Mars is composed mostly of basalt not unlike those that make up the Earth's oceanic crust. McSween and his colleagues used data from Martian meteorites, analyses of soils and rocks at robotic landing sites, and chemical and mineralogical information from orbiting spacecraft. The data show that Mars is composed mostly of rocks similar to terrestrial basalts called tholeiites, which make up most oceanic islands, mid-ocean ridges, and the seafloor beneath sediments. The Martian samples differ in some respects that reflect differences in the compositions of the Martian and terrestrial interiors, but in general are a lot like Earth basalts. Cosmochemistst have used the compositions of Martian meteorites to discriminate bulk properties of Mars and Earth, but McSween and coworkers' synthesis shows that the meteorites differ from most of the Martian crust (the meteorites have lower aluminum, for example), calling into question how diagnostic the meteorites are for understanding the Martian interior.

  9. Rocks of the early lunar crust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, O. B.

    1980-01-01

    Data are summarized which suggest a model for the early evolution of the lunar crust. According to the model, during the final stages of accretion, the outer part of the moon melted to form a magma ocean approximately 300 km deep. This ocean fractionated to form mafic and ultramafic cumulates at depth and an overlying anorthositic crust made up of ferroan anorthosites. Subsequent partial melting in the primitive mantle underlying the crystallized magma ocean produced melts which segregated, moved upward, intruded the primordial crust, and crystallized to form layered plutons consisting of Mg-rich plutonic rocks. Intense impact bombardment at the lunar surface mixed and melted the rocks of the two suites to form a thick layer of granulated debris, granulitic breccias, and impact-melt rocks.

  10. Deep-ocean ferromanganese crusts and nodules

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hein, James R.; Koschinsky, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Ferromanganese crusts and nodules may provide a future resource for a large variety of metals, including many that are essential for emerging high- and green-technology applications. A brief review of nodules and crusts provides a setting for a discussion on the latest (past 10 years) research related to the geochemistry of sequestration of metals from seawater. Special attention is given to cobalt, nickel, titanium, rare earth elements and yttrium, bismuth, platinum, tungsten, tantalum, hafnium, tellurium, molybdenum, niobium, zirconium, and lithium. Sequestration from seawater by sorption, surface oxidation, substitution, and precipitation of discrete phases is discussed. Mechanisms of metal enrichment reflect modes of formation of the crusts and nodules, such as hydrogenetic (from seawater), diagenetic (from porewaters), and mixed diagenetic–hydrogenetic processes.

  11. Elemental composition of the Martian crust.

    PubMed

    McSween, Harry Y; Taylor, G Jeffrey; Wyatt, Michael B

    2009-05-01

    The composition of Mars' crust records the planet's integrated geologic history and provides clues to its differentiation. Spacecraft and meteorite data now provide a global view of the chemistry of the igneous crust that can be used to assess this history. Surface rocks on Mars are dominantly tholeiitic basalts formed by extensive partial melting and are not highly weathered. Siliceous or calc-alkaline rocks produced by melting and/or fractional crystallization of hydrated, recycled mantle sources, and silica-poor rocks produced by limited melting of alkali-rich mantle sources, are uncommon or absent. Spacecraft data suggest that martian meteorites are not representative of older, more voluminous crust and prompt questions about their use in defining diagnostic geochemical characteristics and in constraining mantle compositional models for Mars. PMID:19423810

  12. Quantitative analysis of sandstone porosity

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrell, R.E. Jr.; Carpenter, P.K.

    1988-01-01

    A quantitative analysis of changes in porosity associated with sandstone diagenesis was accomplished with digital back-scattered electron image analysis techniques. The volume percent (vol. %) of macroporosity, quartz, clay minerals, feldspar, and other constituents combined with stereological parameters, such as the size and shape of the analyzed features, permitted the determination of cement volumes, the ratio of primary to secondary porosity, and the relative abundance of detrital and authigenic clay minerals. The analyses were produced with a JEOL 733 Superprobe and a TRACOR/NORTHERN 5700 Image Analyzer System. The results provided a numerical evaluation of sedimentological facies controls and diagenetic effects on the permeabilities of potential reservoirs. In a typical application, subtle differences in the diagnetic development of porosity were detected in Wilcox sandstones from central Louisiana. Mechanical compaction of these shoreface sandstones has reduced the porosity to approximately 20%. In most samples with permeabilities greater than 10 md, the measured ratio of macroporosity to microporosity associated with pore-filling kaolinite was 3:1. In other sandstones with lower permeabilities, the measured ratio was higher, but the volume of pore-filling clay was essentially the same. An analysis of the frequency distribution of pore diameters and shapes revealed that the latter samples contained 2-3 vol% of grain-dissolution or moldic porosity. Fluid entry to these large pores was restricted and the clays produced from the grain dissolution products reduced the observed permeability. The image analysis technique provided valuable data for the distinction of productive and nonproductive intervals in this reservoir.

  13. Dynamic triggering during rupture nucleation in sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubnel, Alexandre; Chanard, Kristel; Latour, Soumaya; Petrelis, François; Hatano, Takahiro; Mair, Karen; Vinciguerra, Sergio

    2016-04-01

    Fluid induced stress perturbations in the crust at seismogenic depths can be caused by various sources, such as deglaciation unloading, magmatic intrusion or fluid injection and withdrawal. Numbers of studies have robustly shown their link to earthquake triggering. However, the role of small periodic stress variations induced by solid earth and oceanic tides or seasonal hydrology in the seismic cycle, of the order of a few kPa, remains unclear. Indeed, the existence or absence of correlation between these loading phenomena and earthquakes have been equally proposed in the literature. To investigate this question, we performed a set of triaxial deformation experiments on porous water-saturated Fontainebleau sandstones. Rock samples were loaded by the combined action of steps of constant stress (creep), intended to simulate tectonic loading and small sinusoidal pore pressure variations with a range of amplitudes, analogous to tides or seasonal loading. All tests were conducted at a regulated temperature of 35C and a constant 35 MPa confining pressure. Our experimental results show that (1) pore pressure oscillations do not seem to influence the deformation rate at which the rock fails, (2) they correlate with acoustic emissions. Even more interestingly, we observe a progressive increase of the correlation coefficient in time as the rock approaches failure. The correlation coefficient is also sensitive to the amplitude of pore pressure oscillations as larger oscillations produce higher correlation levels. Finally, we show that, in the last hours of creep before failure, acoustic emissions occur significantly more when the pore pressure is at its lowest. This suggest that the correlation of small stress perturbations and acoustic emissions depend on the state stress of a rock and the amplitude of the perturbations and that emissions occur more likely when cracks are unclamped.

  14. Crust formation and its effect on the molten pool coolability

    SciTech Connect

    Park, R.J.; Lee, S.J.; Sim, S.K.

    1995-09-01

    Experimental and analytical studies of the crust formation and its effect on the molten pool coolability have been performed to examine the crust formation process as a function of boundary temperatures as well as to investigate heat transfer characteristics between molten pool and overlying water in order to evaluate coolability of the molten pool. The experimental test results have shown that the surface temperature of the bottom plate is a dominant parameter in the crust formation process of the molten pool. It is also found that the crust thickness of the case with direct coolant injection into the molten pool is greater than that of the case with a heat exchanger. Increasing mass flow rate of direct coolant injection to the molten pool does not affect the temperature of molten pool after the crust has been formed in the molten pool because the crust behaves as a thermal barrier. The Nusselt number between the molten pool and the coolant of the case with no crust formation is greater than that of the case with crust formation. The results of FLOW-3D analyses have shown that the temperature distribution contributes to the crust formation process due to Rayleigh-Benard natural convection flow.

  15. Late Diagenesis and Mass Transfer in Sandstone Shale Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milliken, K. L.

    2003-12-01

    Between Ca 50 °C and 300 °C, sandstones and mudrocks("shales") undergo massive chemical and textural reorganization. In this temperature interval detrital grains, and the rock textures defined by grains, are lost by reactions with pore fluids. Chemical and physical processes in late diagenesis transform siliciclastic sediments into rocks. Predictive models of porosity evolution with depth depend upon an understanding of these processes. Because the magnitude of the mineralogical changes in late diagenesis is large, these changes also have important implications for understanding rates and mechanisms of element cycling through the crust.Controversy regarding the scale of the elemental mobility that accompanies the mineralogical and textural reorganization has been a defining theme of research in late diagenesis. Conundrums arising from apparent conflicts between petrographic and petrophysical constraints on elemental mobility are well known to students of clastic diagenesis. Interestingly, similar paradoxes have long vexed students of low-grade metamorphism (e.g., Ague, 1991; Rumble, 1994). A related issue in late diagenesis concerns apparent subsurface weathering. Weathering during erosion and transport at the surface fails to remove high-temperature phases from sediments completely, and these detrital components arrive in the realm of late diagenesis with considerable reactive potential. However, after reaching a temperature of 200 °C, these metastable compounds have largely been lost by reaction with pore fluids. Of course, volumetrically significant weathering processes require acid. However, the source(s) of this acid remains disputed. In the context of identifying volumetrically significant sources of acid, other questions arise regarding the extent to which precipitation reactions in late diagenesis should be construed as acid-releasing reverse-weathering reactions.Historically, late diagenesis of siliciclastic rocks was viewed as physical and isochemical

  16. Aleutian basin oceanic crust

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christeson, Gail L.; Barth, Ginger A.

    2015-01-01

    We present two-dimensional P-wave velocity structure along two wide-angle ocean bottom seismometer profiles from the Aleutian basin in the Bering Sea. The basement here is commonly considered to be trapped oceanic crust, yet there is a change in orientation of magnetic lineations and gravity features within the basin that might reflect later processes. Line 1 extends ∼225 km from southwest to northeast, while Line 2 extends ∼225 km from northwest to southeast and crosses the observed change in magnetic lineation orientation. Velocities of the sediment layer increase from 2.0 km/s at the seafloor to 3.0–3.4 km/s just above basement, crustal velocities increase from 5.1–5.6 km/s at the top of basement to 7.0–7.1 km/s at the base of the crust, and upper mantle velocities are 8.1–8.2 km/s. Average sediment thickness is 3.8–3.9 km for both profiles. Crustal thickness varies from 6.2 to 9.6 km, with average thickness of 7.2 km on Line 1 and 8.8 km on Line 2. There is no clear change in crustal structure associated with a change in orientation of magnetic lineations and gravity features. The velocity structure is consistent with that of normal or thickened oceanic crust. The observed increase in crustal thickness from west to east is interpreted as reflecting an increase in melt supply during crustal formation.

  17. [Crusted scabies: A review].

    PubMed

    Jouret, G; Bounemeur, R; Presle, A; Takin, R

    2016-04-01

    Crusted scabies is a rare and severe form of infestation by Sarcoptes scabies var. hominis. It is characterized by profuse hyperkeratosis containing over 4000 mites per gram of skin, with treatment being long and difficult. The condition is both direct and indirectly contagious. It has a central role in epidemic cycles of scabies, the incidence of which is on the rise in economically stable countries. Recent discoveries concerning the biology of mites, the pathophysiology of hyperkeratosis and the key role of IL-17 in this severe form open up new therapeutic perspectives. PMID:26948093

  18. Physical constraints on dolomite crust formation, Ambergris Cay Belize

    SciTech Connect

    Birdwell, B.A.; Bischoff, W.D.; Mazzullo, S.J. )

    1990-05-01

    Dolomitic crusts forming on a peritidal flat on Ambergris Cay, Belize, occur beneath surface sediment adjacent to, but not within, small saline (60-90 ppt) ponds. Upper crusts, 2-12 cm thick forming at or slightly below the water table (approximately equivalent to lagoon water level) are areally restricted by (1) ponds where sediment lies below 20-50 cm of water, (2) high and relatively dry areas where sediment accumulation of more than 15 cm above water level supports diverse vegetation, and (3) low areas affected by mangrove encroachment where preexisting crusts are perforated by roots and displaced. The lower crusts occur immediately above the Pleistocene in lows beneath the Holocene sediment and on exposed Pleistocene surfaces. Estimates from x-ray diffraction analysis indicate 80-100% dolomite content within the upper crusts and 50-60% dolomite content in the lower crusts. Unlithified sediment above and below the upper crust contain up to 80% dolomite. Compositions range from Ca{sub 56}, Mg{sub 44} in the upper crusts to Ca{sub 60} Mg{sub 40} in the lower crusts. There is no correlation between stoichiometry and ordering in the dolomites; all are poorly ordered as indicated by very weak (015) and (021) superstructure peaks. Where crusts are not 100% dolomite, the dolomite is evident as euhedral cements within pores, especially within foraminiferal tests, and as micrite along algal laminations and walls of burrows. However, preliminary examinations with scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray mapping show that magnesium enrichment is pervasive within these crusts and may represent Mg-enrichment of calcite as an intermediate stage in dolomite formation.

  19. Determination of pressure solution shortening in sandstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onasch, Charles M.

    1993-11-01

    A new method for the determination of pressure solution shortening in sandstones uses the geometry of grain-to-grain interpenetrations and grains truncated against solution surfaces. These features are used to construct plots from which the magnitude and direction of the pressure solution shortening can be determined. Using simulated pressure solution deformation of artificial and natural grain populations, the new method is shown to correctly assess a variety of coaxial and non-coaxial shortenings. Although primarily intended to determine shortening, the method can also quantify extension related to growth of beards or overgrowths during pressure solution. Application of the method to naturally deformed quartz arenite samples shows that pressure solution shortening of up to 26% occurred during compaction and 22% during layer-parallel shortening.

  20. The influence of biological soil crusts on dew deposition in Gurbantunggut Desert, Northwestern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Yuan-ming; Downing, Alison; Cheng, Jun-hui; Zhou, Xiao-bing; Zhang, Bing-chang

    2009-12-01

    SummaryDew is an important source of moisture for plants, biological soil crusts, invertebrates and small vertebrates in desert environments. In this paper, measurements were taken to investigate the effects of three different types of biological soil crusts (cyanobacteria, lichen and moss) and bare sand on dew deposition in the Gurbantunggut Desert. Dew quantities were measured using micro-lysimeters with a diameter of 6 cm and a height of 3.5 cm. The results showed that the total amount of dew deposited increased with the development of soil crusts, from bare sand to cyanobacterial crust to lichen crust to moss crust. The average amount of dew deposited daily on the moss crust was the highest of all and it was significant higher than the other three soil surfaces (lichen crust, cyanobacterial crust and bare sand) ( p < 0.05). During the period of the study, for each type of crust studied, the maximum amount of dew recorded was several times greater than the minimum. Moss crust was characterized by having the greatest amount of dew at dawn and also the maximum amount of dew deposited, whereas bare sand yielded the lowest amount of dew, with lichen crust and cyanobacterial crust exhibiting intermediate values. However, this was not the case for dew duration, as bare sand retained moisture for the longest period of time, followed by cyanobacterial crust, moss crust and finally lichen crust. Dew continued to condense even after sunrise. Furthermore, the differences in dew deposition may be partially attributed to an effect of the biological soil crusts on surface area. This study demonstrates the important effect of biological soil crusts upon dew deposition and may assist in evaluating the role of dew in arid and semi-arid environments.

  1. The Mafic Lower Crust of Neoproterozoic age beneath Western Arabia: Implications for Understanding African Lower Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, R. J.; Mooney, W. D.

    2011-12-01

    We review evidence that the lower crust of Arabia - and by implication, that beneath much of Africa was formed at the same time as the upper crust, rather than being a product of Cenozoic magmatic underplating. Arabia is a recent orphan of Africa, separated by opening of the Red Sea ~20 Ma, so our understanding of its lower crust provides insights into that of Africa. Arabian Shield (exposed in W. Arabia) is mostly Neoproterozoic (880-540 Ma) reflecting a 300-million year process of continental crustal growth due to amalgamated juvenile magmatic arcs welded together by granitoid intrusions that make up as much as 50% of the Shield's surface. Seismic refraction studies of SW Arabia (Mooney et al., 1985) reveal two layers, each ~20 km thick, separated by a well-defined Conrad discontinuity. The upper crust has average Vp ~6.3 km/sec whereas the lower crust has average Vp ~7.0 km/sec, corresponding to a granitic upper crust and gabbroic lower crust. Neogene (<30 ma) lava fields in Arabia (harrats) extend over 2500 km, from Yemen to Syria. Many of these lavas contain xenoliths, providing a remarkable glimpse of the lower-crustal and upper-mantle lithosphere beneath W. Arabia. Lower crustal xenoliths brought up in 8 harrats in Saudi Arabia, Jordan, and Syria are mostly 2-pyroxene granulites of igneous (gabbroic, anorthositic, and dioritic) origin. They contain plagioclase, orthopyroxene, and clinopyroxene, and a few contain garnet and rare amphibole and yield mineral-equilibrium temperatures of 700-900°C. Pyroxene-rich and plagioclase-rich suites have mean Al2O3 contents of 13% and 19%, respectively: otherwise the two groups have similar elemental compositions, with ~50% SiO2 and ~1% TiO2, with low K2O (<0.5%) and Na2O (1-3%). Both groups show tholeiitic affinities, unrelated to their alkali basalt hosts. Mean pyroxene-rich and plagioclase-rich suites show distinct mean MgO contents (11% vs. 7%), Mg# (67 vs. 55), and contents of compatible elements Ni (169 vs. 66 ppm

  2. Biosignatures of Hypersaline Environments (Salt Crusts) an Analog for Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, H. D.; Duncan, A. G.; Davilla, A. F.; McKay, C. P.

    2016-05-01

    Halophilic ecosystems are models for life in extreme environments including planetary surfaces such as Mars. Our research focuses on biosignatures in a salt crusts and the detection of these biomarkers by ground and orbital assests.

  3. A complex investigation of building sandstones from Saxony (Germany)

    SciTech Connect

    Goetze, Jens Siedel, Heiner

    2007-11-15

    The present paper provides a methodology for the investigation and characterization of building sandstones. This analytical scheme was designed for distinguishing mature arenites, which in general show very similar properties and are difficult to distinguish. This is shown for Cretaceous sandstones from various occurrences in Saxony (Germany), which have been used for centuries as building materials. The procedure is mainly based on the combination of macroscopic rock description, thin section polarizing microscopy (phase composition, texture, grain-size distribution) and cathodoluminescence (CL) microscopy (quartz types, feldspar and kaolinite content) coupled with image analysis, scanning electron microscopy (accessories, pore cement, diagenetic grain surface features), and analysis of pore space data. Sometimes, additional data from X-ray diffraction or chemical analyses (major and trace elements) can be used. Especially in the case of quartz rich arenites, CL is a powerful tool for provenance analysis. The detailed analysis of sandstone material in most cases allows us to assign historically used building material to a specific sandstone occurrence. These results are important for both interpreting the weathering behaviour of the building material and the conservation, reconstruction and stone replacement of historical monuments.

  4. Negative feedback between stress and erosion: origin of sandstone landforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruthans, Jiri; Soukup, Jan; Vaculikova, Jana; Filippi, Michal; Schweigstillova, Jana; Mayo, Alan; Masin, David; Kletetschka, Gunther; Rihosek, Jaroslav

    2015-04-01

    Weathering and erosion of sandstone produces spectacular landforms such as arches, alcoves, pedestal rocks and pillars. The effect of gravity loading stress has been overlooked or assumed to increase the landform's weathering rate. Here we show by physical and numerical modeling, and field observations of locked sands and sandstones that an increase in stress within the landform reduces weathering and erosion. Material with insufficient loading is rapidly removed by weathering process and the remaining load bearing landform structure is protected by the fabric interlocking mechanism. As the landform evolves the increased stress inhibits erosion from raindrop impact, flowing water and slaking, and retards surface retreat caused by salt and frost weathering. Planar discontinuities in sandstone and negative feedback between stress and weathering/erosion processes are sufficient conditions to create above-mentioned landforms. Our experiments are able to reproduce natural shapes including arches, alcoves, pedestal rocks and pillars using landform material and mimicking natural processes. The proposed negative feedback mechanism is supported by a numerical model of stress pattern in landforms. We conclude that stress field is the primary control of the shape evolution of sandstone landforms.

  5. Analysis of environmental factors determining development and succession in biological soil crusts.

    PubMed

    Lan, Shubin; Wu, Li; Zhang, Delu; Hu, Chunxiang

    2015-12-15

    Biological soil crusts play important ecological functions in arid and semi-arid regions, while different crust successional patterns appeared in different regions. Therefore in this study, the environmental conditions between Shapotou (with cyanobacterial, lichen and moss crusts) and Dalate Banner (with only cyanobacterial and moss crusts) regions of China were compared to investigate why lichen crusts only appeared in Shapotou; at the same time, artificial moss inoculation was conducted to find out the environmental factors promoting crust succession to moss stage. The results showed lichen crusts always developed from cyanobacterial crusts, which provide not only the stable soil surface, but also the biomass basis for lichen formation; furthermore, addition of crust physicochemical characteristics (primarily silt content) play a facilitating effect on lichen emergence (R(2)=0.53). The inoculation experiment demonstrated early crust soil surface and enough water holding content (>4%) provided the essential guarantee for moss germination. Our results show that there is heterogeneity in crust succession in different regions, which may be mainly affected by the ambient soil microenvironments. It is concluded that a positive feedback mechanism is expected between crust succession and ambient soil microenvironments; while a negative feedback mechanism forms between crust succession and free living cyanobacteria and algae. PMID:26318686

  6. Tungsten Stable Isotope Compositions of Ferromanganese Crusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, K.; Barling, J.; Hein, J. R.; Schauble, E. A.; Halliday, A. N.

    2014-12-01

    We report the first accurate and precise data for mass-dependent fractionation of tungsten (W) stable isotopes, using a double spike technique and MC-ICPMS. Results are expressed relative to the NIST 3136 W isotope standard as per mil deviations in 186W/184W (δ186W). Although heavy element mass-dependent fractionations are expected to be small, Tl and U both display significant low temperature isotopic fractionations. Theoretical calculations indicate that W nuclear volume isotopic effects should be smaller than mass-dependent fractionations at low temperatures. Hydrogenetic ferromanganese (Fe-Mn) crusts precipitate directly from seawater and have been used as paleoceanographic recorders of temporal changes in seawater chemistry. Crusts are strongly enriched in W and other metals, and are a promising medium for exploring W isotopic variability. Tungsten has a relatively long residence time in seawater of ~61,000 years, mainly as the tungstate ion (WO42-). Water depth profiles show conservative behaviour. During adsorption on Fe-Mn crusts, W species form inner-sphere complexes in the hexavalent (W6+) state. The major host phase is thought to be Mn oxides and the lighter W isotope is expected to be absorbed preferentially. Surface scrapings of 13 globally distributed hydrogenetic Fe-Mn crusts display δ186W from -0.08 to -0.22‰ (±0.03‰, 2sd). A trend toward lighter W isotope composition exists with increasing water depth (~1500 to ~5200m) and W concentration. One hydrothermal Mn-oxide sample is anomalously light and Mn nodules are both heavy and light relative to Fe-Mn crusts. Tungsten speciation depends on concentration, pH, and time in solution and is not well understood because of the extremely slow kinetics of the reactions. In addition, speciation of aqueous and/or adsorbed species might be sensitive to pressure, showing similar thermodynamic stability but different effective volumes. Thus, W stable isotopes might be used as a water-depth barometer in

  7. Moho vs crust-mantle boundary: Evolution of an idea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Reilly, Suzanne Y.; Griffin, W. L.

    2013-12-01

    The concept that the Mohorovicic Discontinuity (Moho) does not necessarily coincide with the base of the continental crust as defined by rock-type compositions was introduced in the early 1980s. This had an important impact on understanding the nature of the crust-mantle boundary using information from seismology and from deep-seated samples brought to the surface as xenoliths in magmas, or as tectonic terranes. The use of empirically-constrained P-T estimates to plot the locus of temperature vs depth for xenoliths defined a variety of geotherms depending on tectonic environment. The xenolith geotherms provided a framework for constructing lithological sections through the deep lithosphere, and revealed that the crust-mantle boundary in off-craton regions commonly is transitional over a depth range of about 5-20 km. Early seismic-reflection data showed common layering near the Moho, correlating with the petrological observation of multiple episodes of basaltic intrusion around the crust-mantle boundary. Developments in seismology, petrophysics and experimental petrology have refined interpretation of lithospheric domains. The expansion of in situ geochronology (especially zircon U-Pb ages and Hf-isotopes; Os isotopes of mantle sulfides) has defined tectonic events that affected whole crust-mantle sections, and revealed that the crust-mantle boundary can change in depth through time. However, the nature of the crust-mantle boundary in cratonic regions remains enigmatic, mainly due to lack of key xenoliths or exposed sections. The observation that the Moho may lie significantly deeper than the crust-mantle boundary has important implications for modeling the volume of the crust. Mapping the crust using seismic techniques alone, without consideration of the petrological problems, may lead to an overestimation of crustal thickness by 15-30%. This will propagate to large uncertainties in the calculation of elemental mass balances relevant to crust-formation processes

  8. Horizontal surface velocity and strain patterns near thrust and normal faults during the earthquake cycle: The importance of viscoelastic relaxation in the lower crust and implications for interpreting geodetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampel, Andrea; Hetzel, Ralf

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, more and more space-geodetic data on the surface deformation associated with earthquakes on intracontinental normal and thrust faults have become available. However, numerical models investigating the coseismic and postseismic deformation near such faults in a general way, i.e., not focused on a particular earthquake, are still sparse. Here we use three-dimensional finite element models that account for gravity, far-field ("regional") extension/shortening and postseismic relaxation in a viscoelastic lower crust to quantify the surface deformation caused by an Mw ~7 earthquake on a dip-slip fault. The coseismic deformation is characterized by horizontal shortening in the footwall of the normal fault and extension in the hanging wall of the thrust fault—consistent with elastic dislocation models, geological field observations, and GPS data from earthquakes in Italy and Taiwan. During the postseismic phase, domains of extensional and contractional strain exist next to each other near both fault types. The spatiotemporal evolution of these domains as well as the postseismic velocities and strain rates strongly depend on the viscosity of the lower crust. For viscosities of 1018-1020 Pa s, the signal from postseismic relaxation is detectible for 20-50 years after the earthquake. If GPS data containing a postseismic relaxation signal are used to derive regional rates, the stations may show rates that are too high or too low or even an apparently wrong tectonic regime. By quantifying the postseismic deformation through space and time, our models help to interpret GPS data and to identify the most suitable locations for GPS stations.

  9. Measurement of palladium crust thickness on catalyst by EPMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorbier, L.; Gay, A.-S.; Fécant, A.; Moreaud, M.; Brodusch, N.

    2012-03-01

    Selective hydrogenation is a key process in petrochemistry to obtain good feedstock for polymers synthesis. Common catalysts for this process consist in metallic palladium deposited with an eggshell distribution on porous alumina. For this system, the catalytic activity is known to be in strong relation with the thickness of the palladium crust. Typical catalyst consists of 2 - 4 mm diameter spherical beads having a 200 - 400 μm thick palladium crust and a total palladium amount of about 0.3 to 0.5 wt%. The palladium distribution in the catalyst bead can be easily characterized by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) using polished cross-sections of the beads trough their diameter. By measuring the local concentration of palladium on several points along the bead diameter we obtain the distribution profile of palladium in the bead. Two strategies are proposed to measure this palladium crust thickness by EPMA. First the crust thickness is defined by the distance to the catalyst bead surface containing a fixed amount of total palladium (for example 95 % or 98 %). Second, the palladium profile is modelled by a parameterized analytical function from which a crust thickness can be extracted. Catalytic tests on four samples having different palladium crust thicknesses confirm the strong relation between activity and crust thickness. However the crust thickness containing 98 % of the palladium content shows the best correlation with activity.

  10. The evolution of Mercury's crust: a global perspective from MESSENGER.

    PubMed

    Denevi, Brett W; Robinson, Mark S; Solomon, Sean C; Murchie, Scott L; Blewett, David T; Domingue, Deborah L; McCoy, Timothy J; Ernst, Carolyn M; Head, James W; Watters, Thomas R; Chabot, Nancy L

    2009-05-01

    Mapping the distribution and extent of major terrain types on a planet's surface helps to constrain the origin and evolution of its crust. Together, MESSENGER and Mariner 10 observations of Mercury now provide a near-global look at the planet, revealing lateral and vertical heterogeneities in the color and thus composition of Mercury's crust. Smooth plains cover approximately 40% of the surface, and evidence for the volcanic origin of large expanses of plains suggests that a substantial portion of the crust originated volcanically. A low-reflectance, relatively blue component affects at least 15% of the surface and is concentrated in crater and basin ejecta. Its spectral characteristics and likely origin at depth are consistent with its apparent excavation from a lower crust or upper mantle enriched in iron- and titanium-bearing oxides. PMID:19407196

  11. Continental crust: a geophysical approach

    SciTech Connect

    Meissner, R.

    1986-01-01

    This book develops an integrated and balanced picture of present knowledge of the continental crust. Crust and lithosphere are first defined, and the formation of crusts as a general planetary phenomenon is described. The background and methods of geophysical studies of the earth's crust and the collection of related geophysical parameters are examined. Creep and friction experiments and the various methods of radiometric age dating are addressed, and geophysical and geological investigations of the crustal structure in various age provinces of the continents are studied. Specific tectonic structures such as rifts, continental margins, and geothermal areas are discussed. Finally, an attempt is made to give a comprehensive view of the evolution of the continental crust and to collect and develop arguments for crustal accretion and recycling. 647 references.

  12. Ferromanganese crusts as indicators for paleoceanographic events in the NE Atlantic

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koschinsky, A.; Halbach, P.; Hein, J.R.; Mangini, A.

    1996-01-01

    Hydrogenetic ferromanganese crusts reflect the chemical conditions of the seawater from which they formed. Fine-scale geochemical analysis of crust layers in combination with age determinations can therefore be used to investigate paleoceanographic changes which are recorded in geochemical gradients in the crusts. At Tropic seamount (off northwest Africa), uniform crust growth influenced by terrigenous input from the African continent occurred during approximately the past 12 Ma. Phosphatization of these crusts is minor. In contrast, crusts from Lion seamount, located between Madeira and the Portuguese coast, display a much more variable growth history. A pronounced increase in Ni, Cu, and Zn is observed in some intervals of the crusts, which probably reflects increased surface productivity. A thick older phosphatized generation occurs in many samples. Hydrographic profiles indicate that Mediterranean outflow water (MOW) may play an important role in the composition of these crusts. 10Be dating of one sample confirms that the interruption of the MOW during the Messinian salinity crisis (6.2-5 Ma ago) resulted in changes in element composition. Sr-isotope dating of the apatite phase of the old crust generation has been carried out to obtain a minimum age for the older generation of Atlantic crusts and to determine whether crust phosphatization in the Atlantic can be related to phosphatization episodes recorded in Pacific crusts. The preliminary data show that the old phosphatized crust generation might be as old as approximately 30-40 Ma.

  13. The fate of Ceres' original crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, James H.; Rivkin, Andrew S.

    2015-11-01

    The bulk density of Ceres implies that water ice comprises a substantial fraction of Ceres’ interior. However, water ice is not stable at Ceres orbital distance and if exposed would have a loss rate of 1 km Myr-1 or more. The near-hydrostatic shape of Ceres, and relatively low melting point of ice suggests that the interior is at least partly differentiated. Because Ceres’ surface remains exposed to space, it radiates very effectively, and models predicting differentiation retain an undifferentiated crust. This would be denser than the ice shell beneath it resulting in an unstable stratification. This has led to expectations that the crust would founder and the surface of Ceres might be very smooth and relaxed. But could the crust have remained to the present day?Here, we model global-scale overturn on Ceres using both analytical two-layer linear stability analyses, and numerical models to predict the most unstable wavelength, and growth timescales for Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. We find that for a 10 km-thick crust above a 75 km-thick ice layer, instabilities grow fastest at spherical harmonic degree l=4. The growth timescale is a function of the viscosity of the upper layer. This timescale is less than the age of the solar system unless the effective viscosity of the crust is > 1024 Pa s. We conclude that the crust of Ceres could remain at the surface if it either has some finite elastic strength over a ~800 km length scale, or is an unconsolidated regolith with a large, (> 50%) macro-porosity, such that the regolith is buoyant relative to water ice.Neither end-member for the crustal strength precludes convective activity in the underlying ice layer. However we note that a thick, porous regolith is a fantastic insulator and may promote heating of the interior and potential foundering of the regolith if the top of the ice becomes too warm. This possibility can be evaluated by models of thermal evolution (e.g., Castillo-Rogez et al., 2010). An episode of

  14. Formation and origin of tuffaceous sandstones from IODP Expedition 322, Nankai Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutterolf, S.; Schindlbeck, J. C.; Freundt, A.; Scudder, R. P.; Pickering, K. T.; Labanieh, S.; Naruse, H.; Underwood, M.; Wu, H.

    2011-12-01

    During IODP Expedition 322 one major new discovery was an interval of tuffaceous and volcaniclastic sandstones, which has been defined as the middle Shikoku Basin facies. This lithologic Unit II is late Miocene (>7.07 to ~9.0 Ma) in age and can be divided into two subunits by the abundance of volcanic glass shards, mineral and/or lithic contents, and bulk-rock XRF data. The upper subunit IIA consists of moderately lithified and bioturbated silty claystone including three 1 to 10 meter thick interbeds of tuffaceous sandstones containing 35 to 60 vol% pyroclasts. The tuffaceous sandstone packages are build up by one to three density-graded units with lithic fragments and minerals enriched at the base and pumice clasts (remnants) accumulated at the top, interpreted as turbidity current deposits. Major and trace element glass-shard compositions in each sandstone package either have homogeneous composition or define a well-constrained compositional variation trend, implying that each package derived from a single pyroclastic deposit or a single eruptive event as opposed to gravity currents resulting from collapse of large, heterogeneous slope sections. Moreover, glass compositions show that the tuffaceous sandstones all came from a similar source region either at the Izu Bonin rear arc or the Japanese mainland. Magmatic compositions at both regions would be compatible with the moderate K2O concentrations (2 to 3.5 wt%), but high Ba/Zr, Zr/Nb and La/Sm ratios of the glass shards favors the latter one; the Izu Bonin arc can be excluded as a source due to generally lower potassium concentrations. The high incompatible trace element contents of the glasses suggest a source region where the mantle source of magmas lies below continental crust. Therefore, the Japanese mainland seems to be the most likely provenance for the tuffaceous sandstones found ~ 350 km away in the Shikoku Basin.

  15. Evaporative losses from soils covered by physical and different types of biological soil crusts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chamizo, S.; Cantón, Y.; Domingo, F.; Belnap, J.

    2013-01-01

    Evaporation of soil moisture is one of the most important processes affecting water availability in semiarid ecosystems. Biological soil crusts, which are widely distributed ground cover in these ecosystems, play a recognized role on water processes. Where they roughen surfaces, water residence time and thus infiltration can be greatly enhanced, whereas their ability to clog soil pores or cap the soil surface when wetted can greatly decrease infiltration rate, thus affecting evaporative losses. In this work, we compared evaporation in soils covered by physical crusts, biological crusts in different developmental stages and in the soils underlying the different biological crust types. Our results show that during the time of the highest evaporation (Day 1), there was no difference among any of the crust types or the soils underlying them. On Day 2, when soil moisture was moderately low (11%), evaporation was slightly higher in well-developed biological soil crusts than in physical or poorly developed biological soil crusts. However, crust removal did not cause significant changes in evaporation compared with the respective soil crust type. These results suggest that the small differences we observed in evaporation among crust types could be caused by differences in the properties of the soil underneath the biological crusts. At low soil moisture (<6%), there was no difference in evaporation among crust types or the underlying soils. Water loss for the complete evaporative cycle (from saturation to dry soil) was similar in both crusted and scraped soils. Therefore, we conclude that for the specific crust and soil types tested, the presence or the type of biological soil crust did not greatly modify evaporation with respect to physical crusts or scraped soils.

  16. Anaerobic abiotic transformations of cis-1,2-dichloroethene in fractured sandstone.

    PubMed

    Darlington, Ramona; Lehmicke, Leo G; Andrachek, Richard G; Freedman, David L

    2013-02-01

    A fractured sandstone aquifer at an industrial site is contaminated with trichloroethene to depths greater than 244 m. Field data indicate that trichloroethene is undergoing reduction to cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cDCE); vinyl chloride and ethene are present at much lower concentrations. Transformation of cDCE by pathways other than reductive dechlorination (abiotic and/or biotic) is of interest. Pyrite, which has been linked to abiotic transformation of chlorinated ethenes, is present at varying levels in the sandstone. To evaluate the possible role of pyrite in transforming cDCE, microcosms were prepared with groundwater, ~40 mg L(-1) cDCE+[(14)C]cDCE, and crushed solids (pure pyrite, pyrite-rich sandstone, or typical sandstone). During 120 d of incubation, the highest level of cDCE transformation occurred with typical sandstone (11-14% (14)CO(2), 1-3% (14)C-soluble products), followed by pyrite-rich sandstone (2-4% (14)CO(2), 1% (14)C-soluble products) and even lesser amounts with pure pyrite. These results indicate pyrite is not likely the mineral involved in transforming cDCE. A separate experiment using only typical sandstone compared the rate of cDCE transformation in non-sterilized, autoclaved, and propylene-oxide sterilized treatments, with pseudo-first order rate constants of 8.7, 5.4, and 1.0 yr(-1), respectively; however, transformation stopped after several months of incubation. Autoclaving increased the volume of pores, adsorption pore diameter, and surface area in comparison to non-sterilized typical sandstone. Nevertheless, autoclaving was less disruptive than chemical sterilization. The results provide definitive experimental evidence that cDCE undergoes anaerobic abiotic and biotic transformation in typical sandstone, with formation of CO(2) and soluble products. PMID:23102697

  17. Uranium migration through intact sandstone cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, D.; Lawless, T. A.; Sims, R. J.; Butter, K. R.

    1993-06-01

    Uranium is often considered to be a mobile radioelement in the natural environment owing to its tendency to form stable complexes with a number of aqueous anions, particularly in oxidising milieu. A series of infiltration experiments were devised to investigate this migration behaviour under rigidly controlled laboratory conditions. Intact cores of Permo-Triassic Clashach Sandstone were pre-equilibrated with synthetic groundwater solutions and continuous flow-through of uranium monitored together with pH and concentrations of other ions. Prior to performing each experiment a simulation was carried out using a one-dimensional coupled chemical transport code, encompassing a thermodynamic description of the electrical double layer. These calculations together with electron microscopy indicated the potential role played by iron oxyhydroxide grain coatings in retarding the uranium plume. Thus, a second series of experiments was initiated on pre-acidified cores from which all surface exposed iron had been removed, allowing an assessment of the retention capacity of non-ferric components. Taken together, the data clearly illustrate the strong affinity of aqueous uranium species for natural surfaces even under strongly oxidising conditions. The success of the model in predicting a priori the dominant trends in uranium migration behaviour is encouraging and may aid in prioritising analytical requirements for investigations in more complex geochemical situations than those studied here.

  18. Evidence of Non-Linear Elasticity of the Crust from the Mw7.6 Manyi (Tibet) Earthquake Surface Displacement Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peltzer, G.; Crampe, F.; King, G.

    1999-01-01

    Satellite synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometry shows that the magnitude 7.6 Manyi earthquake of 8 November 1997 produces a 170 km-long surface break with up to 7m of left-lateral slip, reactivating a North 76 degrees East quaternary fault in western Tibet.

  19. Magnetic Sources in the Crust of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This is a simple schematic representation of localized magnetic sources in the crust of Mars, buried beneath the surface, and revealed by observation of the magnetic field (blue) extending up to satellite altitude (about 120 kilometers). Most of our close passes to date - for which we have data - reveal the presence of one or more magnetic anomalies close to the path of the spacecraft. Since the sources must be close to the path of the satellite, we can only infer that the crust of Mars is strewn with similar magnetic anomalies, awaiting discovery. Where we can obtain enough data - that is to say, spaced more or less evenly in longitude with a spacing comparable to our periapsis altitude - we can construct a detailed image of the magnetic state of the Martian crust. We can then perhaps learn about the history of the now-extinct early Mars dynamo and the evolution of the surface of Mars.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  20. Composition of weakly altered Martian crust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mustard, J. F.; Murchie, S. L.; Erard, S.

    1993-01-01

    The mineralogic and chemical composition of weakly altered crust remains an unresolved question for Mars. Dark regions hold clues to the composition since they are thought to comprise surface exposures of weakly altered crustal materials. Understanding the in situ composition of relatively pristine crustal rocks in greater detail is important for investigating basic volcanic processes. Also, this will provide additional constraints on the chemical pathways by which pristine rocks are altered to produce the observed ferric iron-bearing assemblages and inferred clay silicate, sulphate, and magnetic oxide phases. Reflectance spectra of dark regions obtained with the ISM instrument are being used to determine the basic mineralogy of weakly altered crust for a variety of regions on Mars.

  1. Resistivity variations in eocene sandstones from the Laney Shale member, Green River formation, Green River Basin, Wyoming, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Vinopal, R.J.; Nuhfer, E.B.

    1996-06-01

    Resistivity variations in two cores from the Laney Shale sandstone interval correlate with differences in the type and morphology of zeolite cements present in the sandstones. Resistivity of the Laney Shale sandstones varies from 12 to 30 ohm-meters. and shows a significant lateral difference in two wells spaced 6 miles apart. Mean sandstone porosity (27%) is the same in both cored intervals and does not correlate with differences in resistivity response. Thin section, x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and whole rock chemical analysis show that variation in the content of the zeolites analcime and clinoptilolite is the most significant mineralogical difference between the two cores. The sodium zeolite, analcime, shows a trend of increasing abundance with depth through the higher resistivity sandstone interval. The blocky analcime cement increases sandstone resistivity by decreasing the abundance of conducting pathways. Lower resistivity sandstones contain the sodium-potassium-calcium zeolite, clinoptilolite. Clinoptilolite occurs as a microcrystalline cement in the form of small prismatic crystals that line pores. The clinoptilolite crystals have a much higher surface area to volume ratio than do the larger analcime crystals. This produces a greater abundance of conducting pathways, via ion exchange surfaces, on clinoptilolite crystals. Zeolite cements in the Laney Shale sandstones formed at shallow burial depths, most likely from the interaction of migrating sodium-rich, high pH connate brines with volcaniclastic grain components.

  2. Diagenetic history of fluvial and lacustrine sandstones of the Hartford Basin (Triassic Jurassic), Newark Supergroup, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolela, A. M.; Gierlowski-Kordesch, E. H.

    2007-04-01

    The early introduction of clays into continental sandstones has been attributed to mechanical infiltration by percolation of clay-rich surface waters into grain framework or cutans formed from pedogenic processes. The discovery of pedogenic mud aggregates as traction-load mud in ancient fluvial deposits suggests that permeability and porosity of terrigenous sandstones can be influenced at deposition and control early diagenetic patterns. This study compares diagenesis in fluvial (subaerially exposed) sandstones with lacustrine (subaqueous) sandstones in a Triassic-Jurassic continental rift basin (Hartford Basin, Newark Supergroup). Diversity of diagenetic minerals and sequence of diagenetic alteration can be directly related to depositional environment. The fluvial sandstones in the New Haven Arkose, East Berlin Formation, and Shuttle Meadow Formation of the Hartford Basin are dominated by concretionary calcite and early calcite cement, infiltrated clays (illite-smectite), pedogenic mud aggregates (smectite and illite-smectite), grain coating clays (illite/hematite, illite-chlorite/hematite), quartz overgrowths, late stage carbonate cements (calcite, ferroan calcite), pore-filling clays (illite, kaolinite with minor amounts of smectite, smectite-chlorite, illite-smectite) and hematite. However, pedogenic processes in these fluvial sandstones retarded the development of quartz and feldspar overgrowths, and carbonate authigenesis, as well as the quality of diagenetically enhanced porosity. Dark gray-black lacustrine (subaqueous) sandstones and mudrocks in the East Berlin and Shuttle Meadow Formations are dominated by pyrite, concretionary dolomite and early dolomite cement, radial grain coating clays (smectite-chlorite, illite-smectite), late stage carbonate cements (dolomite, ferroan dolomite, ankerite), albite and pore-filling clays (smectite-chlorite, illite-smectite, illite-chlorite). Clay minerals exist as detrital, mechanically infiltrated, and neoformed clay

  3. Composition and origin of ferromanganese crusts from equatorial western Pacific seamounts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guozhi; Jansa, Luba; Chu, Fengyou; Zou, Can; Sun, Guosheng

    2015-04-01

    In the equatorial western Pacific, iron-manganese oxyhydroxide crusts (Fe-Mn crusts) and nodules form on basaltic seamounts and on the top of drowned carbonate platform guyots that have been swept free of pelagic sediments. To date, the Fe-Mn crusts have been considered to be almost exclusively of abiotic origin. However, it has recently been suggested that these crusts may be a result of biomineralization. Although the Fe-Mn crust textures in the equatorial western Pacific are similar to those constructed by bacteria and algae, and biomarkers also document the existence of bacteria and algae dispersed within the Fe-Mn crusts, the precipitation, accumulation and distribution of elements, such as Fe, Mn, Ni and Co in Fe-Mn crusts are not controlled by microbial activity. Bacteria and algae are only physically incorporated into the crusts when dead plankton settle on the ocean floor and are trapped on the crust surface. Geochemical evidence suggests a hydrogenous origin of Fe-Mn crusts in the equatorial western Pacific, thus verifying a process for Fe-Mn crusts that involves the precipitation of colloidal phases from seawater followed by extensive scavenging of dissolved trace metals into the mineral phase during crust formation.

  4. Dynamics of the Precambrian Continental Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perchuk, L. L.; Gerya, T. V.; van Reenen, D. D.; Smit, C. A.

    2003-04-01

    zone strongly indicates simultaneous dynamics of both contacting complexes: while GFC move up to the surface, relatively cool the GGB metabasalts and metakomatiites therefore move down, cooling the granulites next to the bounding shear zone. The existence of both DC and IC paths in the same GGB can thus be explained by differences in the movement of different crustal 3blocks* during their ascent. The results of our numerical modelling suggest that GFC may develop as crustal scale intrusive shaped bodies in a period of about 8.5 Myr. Seismic tomography shows that the mantle underneath the Limpopo GFC exhibits a cratonic signature, indicating intracratonic origin. Thus, the studied GFC were initially formed from GGB and then exhumed within relatively thin (30 35 km thick) continental crust.

  5. Diffuse degassing through magmatic arc crust (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, C. E.; Ingebritsen, S.

    2013-12-01

    The crust of magmatic arcs plays an important role in the volatile cycle at convergent margins. The fluxes of subduction- and arc-related volatiles such as H2O, C, Cl, S are poorly known. It is commonly believed that gases emitted from volcanoes account nearly quantitatively for the volatiles that cross the Moho beneath the volcanic front. This volcanic degassing may occur during eruption, emission from summit fumaroles and hot springs, or more 'diffuse' delivery to volcano flanks. However, several observations suggest that volatiles also transit arc crust by even more diffuse pathways, which could account for significant volatile loss on long time and length scales. Active metamorphism of arc crust produces crustal-scale permeability that is sufficient to transport a large volume of subducted volatiles (Ingebritsen and Manning, 2002, PNAS, 99, 9113). Arc magmas may reach volatile saturation deeper than the maximum depths recorded by melt inclusions (e.g., Blundy et al., 2010, EPSL, 290, 289), and exhumed sections of magmatic arc crust typically record voluminous plutons reflecting magma crystallization and volatile loss at depths well below the volcanic edifice. At shallower depths, topographically driven meteoric groundwater systems can absorb magmatic volatiles and transport them laterally by tens of km (e.g., James et al., 1999, Geology, 27, 823; Evans et al., 2002, JVGR, 114, 291). Hydrothermal ore deposits formed at subvolcanic depths sequester vast amounts of volatiles, especially sulfur, that are only returned to the surface on the time scale of exhumation and/or erosion. Water-rich metamorphic fluids throughout the crust can readily carry exsolved volcanic gases because the solubilities of volatile bearing minerals such as calcite, anhydrite, and fluorite are quite high at elevated pressure and temperature (e.g., Newton and Manning, 2002, Am Min, 87, 1401; 2005, J Pet, 46, 701; Tropper and Manning, 2007, Chem Geol, 242, 299). Taken together, these

  6. Update on CRUST1.0 - A 1-degree Global Model of Earth's Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laske, Gabi; Masters, Guy; Ma, Zhitu; Pasyanos, Mike

    2013-04-01

    Our new 1-by-1 degree global crustal model, CRUST1.0, was introduced last year and serves as starting model in a comprehensive effort to compile a global model of Earth's crust and lithosphere, LITHO1.0 (Pasyanos et al., 2012). The Moho depth in CRUST1.0 is based on 1-degree averages of a recently updated database of crustal thickness data from active source seismic studies as well as from receiver function studies. In areas where such constraints are still missing, for example in Antarctica, crustal thicknesses are estimated using gravity constraints. The compilation of the new crustal model initially followed the philosophy of the widely used crustal model CRUST2.0 (Bassin et al., 2000; http://igppweb.ucsd.edu/~gabi/crust2.html) to assign elastic properties in the crystalline crust according to basement age or tectonic setting (loosely following an updated map by Artemieva and Mooney (2001; http://www.lithosphere.info). For cells with no local seismic or gravity constraints, statistical averages of crustal properties, including crustal thickness, were extrapolated. However, in places with constraints the depth to basement and mantle are given explicitly and no longer assigned by crustal type. This allows for much smaller errors in both. In each 1-degree cell, boundary depth, compressional and shear velocity as well as density is given for 8 layers: water, ice, 3 sediment layers and upper, middle and lower crystalline crust. Topography, bathymetry and ice cover are taken from ETOPO1. The sediment cover is based on our sediment model (Laske and Masters, 1997; http://igppweb.ucsd.edu/~sediment.html), with some near-coastal updates. In an initial step toward LITHO1.0, the model is then validated against new global surface wave disperison maps and adjusted in areas of extreme misfit. This poster presents the next validation step: compare the new Moho depths with in-situ active source and receiver function results. We also present comparisons with CRUST2.0. CRUST1.0 is

  7. Porosity prediction in sandstones using erosional unconformities

    SciTech Connect

    Shanmugam, G.

    1989-03-01

    Erosional unconformities of subaerial origin are created by tectonic uplifts and eustatic sea level fall. Most erosional unconformities developed on sandstones are planes of increased porosity because uplifted sandstones are exposed to undersaturated CO/sub 2/-charged meteoric waters that result in dissolution of unstable framework grains and cements. The chemical weathering of sandstones is intensified in humid regions by the heavy rainfall, soil zones, lush vegetation, and accompanying voluminous production of organic and inorganic acids. Erosional unconformities are considered hydrologically open systems because of abundant supply of fresh meteoric water and relatively unrestricted transport of dissolved constituents away from the site of dissolution, causing a net gain in porosity near unconformities. Thus, porosity in sandstones tends to increase toward overlying unconformities. Such porosity trends have been observed in hydrocarbon-bearing sandstone reservoirs in Alaska, Algeria, Australia, China, Libya, Netherlands, Norwegian North Sea, Norwegian Sea, and Texas. A common attribute of these reservoirs is that they were all subaerially exposed under heavy rainfall conditions. An empirical model has been developed for the Triassic and Jurassic sandstone reservoirs in the Norwegian North Sea on the basis of the observed relationship that shows an increase in porosity in these reservoirs with increasing proximity to the overlying base of Cretaceous unconformity. An important practical attribute of this model is that it allows for the prediction of porosity in the neighboring undrilled areas by recognizing the base of Cretaceous unconformity in seismic reflection profiles and by constructing subcrop maps.

  8. Provenance of Norphlet sandstone, northern Gulf Coast

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, W.P.; Ward, W.C.; Kuglar, R.L.

    1987-09-01

    The Upper Jurassic Norphlet sandstone of the northern Gulf Coast is predominantly subarkose, with some arkose in the eastern area and sublitharenite and quartzarenite in the western area. Despite great depths of burial and despite feldspar and rock-fragment constituents, diagenesis has not appreciably altered the composition of Norphlet sandstone. Therefore, reconstruction of original composition of Norphlet sandstone presented little difficulty. Variation in detrital modes of the Norphlet suggests compositionally distinct source terranes. Samples from Florida, Alabama, and Mississippi reflect the influence of metamorphic and plutonic rocks of the Appalachian Piedmont Province and of Triassic-Jurassic volcanic rocks. Sandstones in east Texas, northern Louisiana, and southern Arkansas were derived from sedimentary and metasedimentary rocks of the Ouachita system. The Arbuckle Mountains and Llano uplift may have supplied trace amounts of quartzo-feldspathic and volcanic-rock fragments to the extreme western part of the study area. Norphlet sandstones represent a mixture of collision-orogen-derived sediment from the Appalachian and/or Ouachita system and continental-block-derived sediment from paleohighs and uplifts within the Gulf basin. However, Norphlet sandstones plot in the craton-interior and transitional-continental fields on Q-F-L and QM-F-Lt tectonic-provenance diagrams, because of mineralogically mature source rocks, elimination of unstable grains by abrasion and sorting during deposition, and/or sediment mixing from different source terranes.

  9. Radial spreading of viscous-gravity currents with solidifying crust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Jonathan H.; Griffiths, Ross W.

    1990-01-01

    In the present investigation of solidifying-crust effects on the dynamics and surface morphology of radial viscous-gravity currents, polyethylene glycol inflows into the base of a tank holding a cold sucrose solution are used as analogs. As the radial current advanced away from the inlet, its surface solidified and deformed through a combination of folding anf fracturing. When cooling was sufficiently rapid, solid crust formed and caused the spreading rate to increase; progressively colder experiments revealed a sequence of surface morphologies resembling features of cooling lava flows and lava lakes, including multiarmed rift structures with shear offsets and bulbous lobate forms resembling pillow lavas on the ocean floor.

  10. The frictional properties and deformation mechanisms of faults in near-surface, poorly lithified sediments: implications for rupture propagation in the shallow crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Paola, N.; Bullock, R. J.; Holdsworth, R.; Marco, S.

    2015-12-01

    To improve our understanding of the factors controlling rupture propagation to the surface it is critical to constrain the frictional properties and deformation mechanisms of shallow crustal fault zones in poorly lithified sediments. We performed a set of rotary shear friction experiments on clay-rich, carbonate synthetic gouges, from the seismogenic Masada (Dead Sea) fault zone in Israel. The experiments were run at low- (0-130 μm/s) and high-velocity (1.3 m/s), at normal stress of 1-18 MPa (equivalent to a depth range of 0.05-1 km), and under room-humidity, water-saturated and brine-saturated conditions. During rate and state, low-velocity experiments at 1 MPa, all gouges behave in a velocity-strengthening manner, particularly when fluid-saturated. During high-velocity experiments at 1 MPa, all gouges have large slip weakening distances of >16 m. In both cases, the dominant deformation mechanism is distributed particulate flow. During low-velocity experiments at 18 MPa, a transition to velocity-weakening behaviour is observed in the room-humidity and water-saturated gouges at displacements > 15 cm, corresponding to shear localization. However, the brine-saturated gouge remains velocity-strengthening throughout. The dominant deformation mechanism in these gouges is distributed cataclasis. During high-velocity experiments at 18 MPa, all gouges exhibit small slip-weakening distances of <1.7 m for dry gouges, and <<0.1 m for fluid saturated gouges, which also exhibit low fracture energy. The dominant deformation mechanism is localized cataclasis in the dry gouge, with evidence for frictional heating, and distributed particulate flow in the fluid-saturated gouges, with no evidence of significant frictional heating. Our results show that the lack of fracturing during seismic faulting in saturated, clay-rich sediments will result in earthquakes rupturing the faults having very low fracture energy, thus greatly facilitating rupture propagation to the surface. The fact

  11. Basin-wide architecture of sandstone reservoirs in the Fort Union Formation, Wind River basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Flores, R.M.; Keighin, C.W.; Keefer, W.R. )

    1991-06-01

    Architecture of hydrocarbon-bearing sandstone reservoirs of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation in the Wind River basin, Wyoming, was studied using lithofacies, grain size, bounding surfaces, sedimentary structures, internal organization, and geometry. Two principal groups of reservoirs, both erosionally based and fining upward, consist of either conglomeratic sandstone or sandstone lithofacies. Two types of architecture were recognized in conglomeratic sandstone reservoirs: (1) heterogeneous, multistacked, lenticular and (2) homogeneous, multiscoured, wedge-sheet bodies. Three types of architecture were recognized in sandstone reservoirs: (3) heterogeneous, multistacked, elongate; (4) homogeneous, multilateral, lenticular; and (5) homogeneous, ribbon-lensoid bodies. Conglomeratic sandstone reservoirs in the southern and southwestern parts of the basin suggest deposition in gravel-bedload fluvial systems influenced by provenance uplift of the Granite and southern Wind River mountains. Type 2 reservoirs represent deposits of eastward-flowing braided streams aggrading an alluvial valley in response to base level rise. Thus, to determine basin-wide architecture of reservoirs requires understanding the interplay between base level conditions, basin subsidence, and provenance uplift. These interrelated factors, in turn, control differences in hierarchies of fluvial systems throughout the basin.

  12. Depositional environments of Upper Triassic sandstones, El Borma oil field, southwestern Tunisia

    SciTech Connect

    Bentahar, H.; Ethridge, F.G. )

    1991-03-01

    El Borma oil field in southwestern Tunisia is located on the Algerian border and produces from five Upper Triassic sandstone reservoirs at depths ranging from 2,300 to 2,400 m. The 250 km{sup 2} field has recoverable reserves of 770 mm bbl of equivalent oil. Reservoir sandstones rest unconformably on south-dipping Lower Devonian clastic deposits. Silurian shale represents the major oil source rock and the field is capped by 550 m of shale, carbonate, and evaporite. Hercynian, topography below the reservoir sandstones comprises an 18 km wide, northeast-oriented paleovalley. Each of the four lower reservoir sandstones, bounded by a lower scour surface and a basal lag deposit, is commonly discontinuous and separated by lenticular shale beds. These 5 to 15 m thick sandstones display in channels flowing to the northeast. The overlying 12 m thick transgressive marine dolomitic shale contains carbonized bivalves and is capped by a paleosoil with root structures and siderite cement indicating subaerial exposure. The clay-rich and locally bioturbated uppermost reservoir sandstone was probably deposited in a tidally influenced estuary. Overall, the Upper Triassic reservoirs at El Borma consists of valley-fill estuary deposits that were formed during transgression of the sea from the northeast.

  13. "Sydney sandstone": Heritage Stone from Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Barry; Kramar, Sabina

    2014-05-01

    Sydney is Australia's oldest city being founded in 1788. The city was fortunate to be established on an extensive and a relatively undeformed layer of lithified quartz sandstone of Triassic age that has proved to be an ideal building stone. The stone has been long identified by geologists as the Hawkesbury Sandstone. On the other hand the term "Sydney sandstone" has also been widely used over a long period, even to the extent of being utilised as the title of published books, so its formal designation as a heritage stone will immediately formalise this term. The oldest international usage is believed to be its use in the construction of the Stone Store at Kerikeri, New Zealand (1832-1836). In the late 19th century, public buildings such as hospitals, court houses as well as the prominent Sydney Town Hall, Sydney General Post Office, Art Gallery of New South Wales, State Library of New South Wales as well as numerous schools, churches, office building buildings, University, hotels, houses, retaining walls were all constructed using Sydney sandstone. Innumerable sculptures utilising the gold-coloured stone also embellished the city ranging from decorative friezes and capitals on building to significant monuments. Also in the late 19th and early 20th century, Sydney sandstone was used for major construction in most other major Australian cities especially Melbourne, Adelaide and Brisbane to the extent that complaints were expressed that suitable local stone materials were being neglected. Quarrying of Sydney sandstone continues today. In 2000 it was recorded noted that there were 33 significant operating Sydney sandstone quarries including aggregate and dimension stone operations. In addition sandstone continues to be sourced today from construction sites across the city area. Today major dimension stone producers (eg Gosford Quarries) sell Sydney sandstone not only into the Sydney market but also on national and international markets as cladding and paving products

  14. GREYBULL SANDSTONE PETROLEUM POTENTIAL ON THE CROW INDIAN RESERVATION, SOUTH-CENTRAL MONTANA

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Lopez

    2000-12-14

    Evaluation of the Lower Cretaceous Greybull Sandstone on the Crow Indian Reservation for potential stratigraphic traps in the valley-fill sandstone was the focus of this project. The Crow Reservation area, located in south-central Montana, is part of the Rocky Mountain Foreland structural province, which is characterized by Laramide uplifts and intervening structural basins. The Pryor and Bighorn mountains, like other foreland uplifts, are characterized by asymmetrical folds associated with basement-involved reverse faults. The reservation area east of the mountains is on the northwestern flank of the Powder River Basin. Therefore, regional dips are eastward and southeastward; however, several prominent structural features interrupt these regional dips. The nearly 4,000 mi{sup 2} reservation is under explored but has strong potential for increased oil and gas development. Oil and gas production is well established in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming to the south as well as in the areas north and west of the reservation. However, only limited petroleum production has been established within the reservation. Geologic relations and trends indicate strong potential for oil and gas accumulations, but drilling has been insufficient for their discovery. The Greybull Sandstone, which is part of the transgressive systems tract that includes the overlying Fall River Sandstone, was deposited on a major regional unconformity. The erosional surface at the base of the Greybull Sandstone is the +100 Ma, late Aptian-Early Albian regional unconformity of Weimer (1984). This lowstand erosional surface was controlled by a basin-wide drop in sea level. In areas where incised Greybull channels are absent, the lowstand erosional unconformity is at the base of the Fall River Sandstone and equivalent formations. During the pre-Greybull lowstand, sediment bypassed this region. In the subsequent marine transgression, streams began to aggrade and deposit sand of the lower Greybull Sandstone

  15. CRUSTS/STRUCTURAL

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many of the processes defining soil productivity such as supplying crop nutrient and water needs are governed at the soil-atmosphere interface. That is, physical or transport limitations within a thin surface layer overlying the bulk soil govern various fundamental hydrologic and biologic processes....

  16. Seismic velocity structure of the crust and upper mantle beneath the Texas-Gulf of Mexico margin from joint inversion of Ps and Sp receiver functions and surface wave dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, M.; Pulliam, J.; Sen, M. K.

    2013-12-01

    The seismic structure beneath Texas Gulf Coast Plain (GCP) is determined via velocity analysis of stacked common conversion point (CCP) Ps and Sp receiver functions and surface wave dispersion. The GCP is a portion of a ocean-continental transition zone, or 'passive margin', where seismic imaging of lithospheric Earth structure via passive seismic techniques has been rare. Seismic data from a temporary array of 22 broadband stations, spaced 16-20 km apart, on a ~380-km-long profile from Matagorda Island, a barrier island in the Gulf of Mexico, to Johnson City, Texas were employed to construct a coherent image of the crust and uppermost mantle. CCP stacking was applied to data from teleseismic earthquakes to enhance the signal-to-noise ratios of converted phases, such as Ps phases. An inaccurate velocity model, used for time-to-depth conversion in CCP stacking, may produce higher errors, especially in a region of substantial lateral velocity variations. An accurate velocity model is therefore essential to constructing high quality depth-domain images. To find accurate velocity P- and S-wave models, we applied a joint modeling approach that searches for best-fitting models via simulated annealing. This joint inversion approach, which we call 'multi objective optimization in seismology' (MOOS), simultaneously models Ps receiver functions, Sp receiver functions and group velocity surface wave dispersion curves after assigning relative weights for each objective function. Weights are computed from the standard deviations of the data. Statistical tools such as the posterior parameter correlation matrix and posterior probability density (PPD) function are used to evaluate the constraints that each data type places on model parameters. They allow us to identify portions of the model that are well or poorly constrained.

  17. Oceanic crust deep seismic survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBride, J. H.; White, R. S.

    In September 1991, the British Institutions Reflection Profiling Syndicate (BIRPS) collected 578 km of deep seismic reflection profiles over the oceanic crust beneath the Cape Verde abssyal plain in approximately 4900 m of water (Fig. 1). The survey, under the direction of J. H. McBride, was undertaken in response to a proposal made by R. S. White at the 1990 BIRPS open syndicate meeting in Birmingham, England, and was acquired using GECO-PRAKLA'S M/V Bin Hai 511. The survey consisted of two strike lines parallel to magnetic sea-floor lineations and nine orthogonal crossing lines oriented parallel to the spreading direction (Fig. 2). Adjacent lines are spaced at 4 km. For the first time, this provides the ability to map oceanic crust in “3D,” since the line spacing is less than or equal to the Fresnel-zone diameter for the lower crust.

  18. Profiling planktonic foraminiferal crust formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhardt, Juliane; de Nooijer, Lennart L. J.; Brummer, Geert-Jan; Reichart, Gert-Jan

    2015-07-01

    Planktonic foraminifera migrate vertically through the water column during their life, thereby growing and calcifying over a range of depth-associated conditions. Some species form a calcite veneer, crust, or cortex at the end of their lifecycle. This additional calcite layer may vary in structure, composition, and thickness, potentially accounting for most of their total shell mass and thereby dominating the element and isotope signature of the whole shell. Here we apply laser ablation ICP-MS depth profiling to assess variability in thickness and Mg/Ca composition of shell walls of three encrusting species derived from sediment traps. Compositionally, Mg/Ca is significantly lower in the crusts of Neogloboquadrina dutertrei and Globorotalia scitula, as well as in the cortex of Pulleniatina obliquiloculata, independent of the species-specific Mg/Ca of their lamellar calcite shell. Wall thickness accounts for nearly half of the total thickness in both crustal species and nearly a third in cortical P. obliquiloculata, regardless of their initial shell wall thickness. Crust thickness and crustal Mg/Ca decreases toward the younger chambers in N. dutertrei and to a lesser extent, also in G. scitula. In contrast, the cortex of P. obliquiloculata shows a nearly constant thickness and uniform Mg/Ca through the complete chamber wall. Patterns in thickness and Mg/Ca of the crust indicate that temperature is not the dominant factor controlling crust formation. Instead, we present a depth-resolved model explaining compositional differences within individuals and between successive chambers as well as compositional heterogeneity of the crust and lamellar calcite in all three species studied here.

  19. Aging of oceanic crust at the Southern East Pacific Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigel, W.; Grevemeyer, I.; Kaul, N.; Villinger, H.; Lüdmann, T.; Wong, H. K.

    The oceanic crust covers almost 57% of the Earth's surface and is created by seafloor spreading at mid-ocean ridges. Although crustal structure is similar everywhere, seismic experiments near spreading ridges indicate that seismic velocities in the top of the igneous crust are typically much lower than those in mature oceanic crust. While profound differences between juvenile and mature crust have long been recognized, little is known about the relationship between crustal aging and the properties of oceanic crust.German researchers from the Universities of Hamburg and Bremen explored seafloor created over the last 8 million years at the “super-fast” spreading East Pacific Rise south of the Garrett Fracture Zone (14-16°S) during a 52-day marine geophysical survey aboard the R/V Sonne. The seafloor in that area spreads at a rate of 150 mm/yr. The researchers studied age-dependent trends in the structure and properties of upper oceanic crust; this was the first study in nearly two decades to use an integrated approach to study variations and heat transfer in the upper crustal structure.

  20. Carbon in black crusts from the Tower of London

    SciTech Connect

    Alessandra Bonazza; Peter Brimblecombe; Carlota M. Grossi; Cristina Sabbioni

    2007-06-15

    This paper investigates the origin, fluxes, and transformation of carbon compounds within black crusts on the stone walls of the Tower of London. The crusts were analyzed for elemental and organic carbon, including the water soluble fraction. The stratigraphy of the old, thicker crusts highlighted the presence of prismatic particles, spherical aluminosilicates and metals, and carbonaceous particles. These are indicative of wood, coal and oil combustion processes. Elemental carbon and low solubility compounds such as oxalates appeared to be conserved because of long residence times. Conversely, more soluble ions, like chloride and formate would be removed from the layers relatively quickly by rainfall. At higher organic carbon concentrations acetic acid may be produced within the crusts from biological transformations. Currently, traffic sources contribute to increasingly organic rich crusts. The deposition of elemental carbon to buildings darkens surfaces and has important aesthetic implications. The increased organic content may have further aesthetic consequence by changing the color of buildings to warmer tones, particularly browns and yellows. Management of historic buildings requires us to recognize the shift away from simple gypsum crusts to those richer in organic materials. 26 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Contaminant-induced mechanical damping in partially saturated Berea sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, W. M.; Spetzler, H. A.

    2002-08-01

    We have measured mechanical damping in partially saturated Berea sandstone that is strongly dependent on the presence of a small amount of oil. This effect is observed as a function of water saturation and average strain amplitude. These observations are presented as evidence of a damping mechanism previously observed and characterized in artificial cracks. We conclude that this damping effect is due to surface chemistry changes in the rock, and infer that seismic attenuation can be used to monitor small changes in pore fluid chemistry under certain conditions.

  2. Development of Shear Banding in Berea Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedel, J. J.; Labuz, J. F.

    2004-05-01

    Closed-loop, servo-controlled testing was used to investigate the development of shear failure in Berea sandstone under low confining pressure. The experiments were performed with the University of Minnesota Plane-Strain Apparatus, designed to allow the failure plane to propagate in an unrestricted manner. Deformation was imposed into the strain softening regime and controlled so that the specimens remained intact. Thin-section microscopy provided direct observation in, adjacent to, and around the tip of the rupture zone. The shear band appeared to initiate near a stress concentration, either the corner of the specimen or, when present, an imperfection (3 mm diameter hole) introduced into the specimen. Intragranular microcracking was the dominant observable failure mechanism. The intensity of grain cracking was greatest near the initiation point and decreased as the failure surface was traced towards the tip. Areas of high crack density also appeared to have the greatest amount of grain size reduction and there seemed to be a larger amount of pore space. In areas where intragranular microcracks were distinguishable, (e.g. near the tip of the rupture zone), microcracks showed very little or no shear displacement, suggesting the features were not reoriented after formation. Microcrack orientations showed a dominant direction of -16 degrees from the maximum principal stress direction and -26 degrees from the failure surface. A numerical imaging technique was developed to provide an efficient means for analyzing the relative porosity of epoxy-impregnated thin-sections. The code was set up to receive a digital image (*.bmp), where three parameters (R, G, and B) describe the color of each pixel. The intensity of the R channel consistently defined the boundary of grain and pore space and was used to differentiate blue pore space from the white grains composing the matrix. Porosity increase within the rupture zone was 3-4 grain diameters wide. An absence of notable

  3. Reservoir Characterization and Tectonic Settings of Ahwaz Sandstone Member of the Asmari Formation in the Zagros Mountain, SW of Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adabi, M. H.; Sadeghi, A. D.; Hosseini, M.; Moalemi, A.; Lotfpour, A.; Khatibi Mehr, M.; Salehi, M.; Zohdi, A.; Jafarzadeh, M.

    2009-04-01

    The Ahwaz Sandstone Member of the Asmari Formation, the major oil reservoir in Zagros mountain, have been studied to understand the distribution, provenance, tectonic setting and reservoir characteristic of Ahwaz Sandstone intervals as an exploration target. This study was based on petrographic and geochemical analysis of 16 core samples from 13 oilfields in the Dezful Embayment zone, and 2 surface sections (Katula and Khami) in Izeh zone. Petrographic studies of 400 thin sections and geochemical analysis indicated that sandstones consist of quartzarenite (Khami surface section), sublitharenite ( Katula surface section) and subarkose (subsurface sections). The modal analysis of medium size and well sorted samples show a recycled orogen (Katula outcrop) and craton (Khami and subsurface sections) tectonic setting. The parent rocks for Ahwaz Sandstone, based on petrographic point counting suggest a low to medium grade metamorphic and plutonic source. Petrographic and grain size analysis indicate a shallow shoreline to barrier bar environments. Heavy minerals in sandstones have mostly plutonic source and abundance of stable heavy mineral, along with well rounded and high sphericity, support stable cratonic source for subsurface sections and Khami surface section. However, in Katula section, heavy minerals have metamorphic source. Facies map illustrated that siliciclastic sediments in Asmari Formation during Rupelian time comes from south-west and north west of the study area. During Chattian, sand distribution reaches to the maximum level and sediments arrived from south-west, north-west and also north-east of the study area. In Aquitanian, sandstones sourced from two areas of south-west and north-west. In Burdigalian stage, sandstone sourced only from south and south-west. These sandstones have limited distributions. Tectonic settings based on geochemical analysis, plotted on discrimination diagrams, suggest that passive continental margin. These sandstones were

  4. Statistics of Magnetar Crusts Magnetoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondratyev, V. N.; Korovina, Yu. V.

    2016-05-01

    Soft repeating gamma-ray (SGR) bursts are considered as magnetoemission of crusts of magnetars (ultranamagnetized neutron stars). It is shown that all the SGR burst observations can be described and systematized within randomly jumping interacting moments model including quantum fluctuations and internuclear magnetic interaction in an inhomogeneous crusty nuclear matter.

  5. Delayed onset sandstone pneumoconiosis: a case report

    SciTech Connect

    Symanski, H.

    1981-01-01

    An unusual case of silicosis is described in a worker who inhaled the dust of pure silica while working in a sandstone quarry. The exposure lasted only eight years. In 1980, 45 years after exposure ceased, severe clinical manifestations of silicosis appeared for the first time. The chest X-ray showed a pneumoconiosis A 2mn/A2 Mn Cor, em, hilus, based on the International Classification of Geneva, 1958. A diagnosis of sandstone pneumoconiosis was made. The case is one further example of late-occurring disease appearing after a latency of several decades.

  6. The Lower Cretaceous Chouf Sandstone of Lebanon: is it a syn-rift clastic sequence?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatzenbichler, Georg; Bauer, Harald; Grasemann, Bernhard; Tari, Gabor; Nader, Fadi H.; Church, Jonathan; Schneider, Dave

    2013-04-01

    The lowermost unit of the Cretaceous succession onshore Lebanon is a widespread prominent sandstone formation traditionally known as the "Grès de Base". The Chouf Sandstone is one of the most distinctive geologic units in Lebanon and is extensively quarried as building sand. The formation commonly consists of a brown to white sandstone with associated claystones, shales, locally volcanics and lignites. Based on outcrop samples taken in the central and northern parts of Mount Lebanon the petrographical composition of the typical Chouf Sandstone is dominated by monocrystalline quartz (85-95%) indicating a well-sorted sandstone. Sedimentological observations suggest deposition of the formation was typically in fluvial, coastal plain and deltaic environments. The Chouf Sandstone is variable in thickness, ranging from a few metres to 300 m. In certain areas rapid lateral thickness changes have been reported which may reflect a paleo-topography or syn-depositional block faulting. Similar thickness variations in the underlying Upper Jurassic formations might be interpreted as the result of syn-rift normal faulting. In order to test the syn-rift nature of the Chouf Sandstone, modern high-resolution satellite data sets (with ~ 0.75 m horizontal and 4 m vertical resolution) were used to derive thickness data points for the Chouf Sandstone in NW Lebanon. One important reason to use high-resolution satellite data for onshore Lebanon is the general lack of structural measurements on the existing vintage geologic maps. In lieu of these basic data, the common surface point method was used to derive this information in a consistent manner across the study area. First results obtained by remote sensing techniques do reveal local variations in the thickness of the Chouf Sandstone, on order of tens to hundreds of meters. These isopach variations in a map-view sense are interpreted to be the result of deposition in individual extensional half-grabens in a much larger overall basin

  7. Permeability within basaltic oceanic crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Andrew T.

    1998-05-01

    Water-rock interactions within the seafloor are responsible for significant energy and solute fluxes between basaltic oceanic crust and the overlying ocean. Permeability is the primary hydrologic property controlling the form, intensity, and duration of seafloor fluid circulation, but after several decades of characterizing shallow oceanic basement, we are still learning how permeability is created and distributed and how it changes as the crust ages. Core-scale measurements of basaltic oceanic crust yield permeabilities that are quite low (generally 10-22 to 10-17 m²), while in situ measurements in boreholes suggest an overlapping range of values extending several orders of magnitude higher (10-18 to 10-13 m²). Additional indirect estimates include calculations made from borehole temperature and flow meter logs (10-16 to 10-11 m²), numerical models of coupled heat and fluid flow at the ridge crest and within ridge flanks (10-16 to 10-9 m²), and several other methods. Qualitative indications of permeability within the basaltic oceanic crust come from an improved understanding of crustal stratigraphy and patterns of alteration and tectonic modification seen in ophiolites, seafloor samples and boreholes. Difficulties in reconciling the wide range of estimated permeabilities arise from differences in experimental scale and critical assumptions regarding the nature and distribution of fluid flow. Many observations and experimental and modeling results are consistent with permeability varying with depth into basement and with primary basement lithology. Permeability also seems to be highly heterogeneous and anisotropic throughout much of the basaltic crust, as within crystalline rocks in general. A series of focused experiments is required to resolve permeability in shallow oceanic basement and to directly couple upper crustal hydrogeology to magmatic, tectonic, and geochemical crustal evolution.

  8. Is Ishtar Terra a thickened basaltic crust?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arkani-Hamed, Jafar

    1992-01-01

    The mountain belts of Ishtar Terra and the surrounding tesserae are interpreted as compressional regions. The gravity and surface topography of western Ishtar Terra suggest a thick crust of 60-110 km that results from crustal thickening through tectonic processes. Underthrusting was proposed for the regions along Danu Montes and Itzpapalotl Tessera. Crustal thickening was suggested for the entire Ishtar Terra. In this study, three lithospheric models with total thicknesses of 40.75 and 120 km and initial crustal thicknesses of 3.9 and 18 km are examined. These models could be produced by partial melting and chemical differentiation in the upper mantle of a colder, an Earth-like, and a hotter Venus having temperatures of respectively 1300 C, 1400 C, and 1500 C at the base of their thermal boundary layers associated with mantle convection. The effects of basalt-granulite-eclogite transformation (BGET) on the surface topography of a thickening basaltic crust is investigated adopting the experimental phase diagram and density variations through the phase transformation.

  9. Digital characterization and preliminary computer modeling of hydrocarbon bearing sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latief, Fourier Dzar Eljabbar; Haq, Tedy Muslim

    2014-03-01

    With the advancement of three dimensional imaging technologies, especially the μCT scanning systems, we have been able to obtain three-dimensional digital representation of porous rocks in the scale of micrometers. Characterization was then also possible to conduct using computational approach. Hydrocarbon bearing sandstone has become one of interesting objects to analyze in the last decade. In this research, we performed digital characterization of hydrocarbon bearing sandstone reservoir from Sumatra. The sample was digitized using a μCT scanner (Skyscan 1173) which produced series of reconstructed images with the spatial resolution of 15 μm. Using computational approaches, i.e., image processing, image analysis, and simulation of fluid flow inside the rock using Lattice Boltzmann Method, we have been able to obtain the porosity of the sandstone, which is 23.89%, and the permeability, which is 9382 mD. Based on visual inspection, the porosity value, along with the calculated specific surface area, we produce a preliminary computer model of the rock using grain based method. This method employs a reconstruction of grains using the non-spherical model, and a purely random deposition of the grains in a virtual three dimensional cube with the size of 300 × 300 × 300. The model has porosity of 23.96%, and the permeability is 7215 mD. While the error of the porosity is very small (which is only 0.3%), the permeability has error of around 23% from the real sample which is considered very significant. This suggests that the modeling based on porosity and specific surface area is not satisfactory to produce a representative model. However, this work has been a good example of how characterization and modeling of porous rock can be conducted using a non-destructive computational approach.

  10. Microenvironments and microscale productivity of cyanobacterial desert crusts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garcia-Pichel, F.; Belnap, Jayne

    1996-01-01

    We used microsensors to characterize physicochemical microenvironments and photosynthesis occurring immediately after water saturation in two desert soil crusts from southeastern Utah, which were formed by the cyanobacteria Microcoleus vaginatus Gomont, Nostoc spp., and Scytonema sp. The light fields within the crusts presented steep vertical gradients in magnitude and spectral composition. Near-surface light-trapping zones were formed due to the scattering nature of the sand particles, but strong light attenuation resulted in euphotic zones only ca. 1 mm deep, which were progressively enriched in longer wavelengths with depth. Rates of gross photosynthesis (3.4a??9.4 mmol O2A?ma??2A?ha??1) and dark respiration (0.81a??3.1 mmol Oa??2A?ma??2A?ha??1) occurring within 1 to several mm from the surface were high enough to drive the formation of marked oxygen microenvironments that ranged from oxygen supersaturation to anoxia. The photosynthetic activity also resulted in localized pH values in excess of 10, 2a??3 units above the soil pH. Differences in metabolic parameters and community structure between two types of crusts were consistent with a successional pattern, which could be partially explained on the basis of the microenvironments. We discuss the significance of high metabolic rates and the formation of microenvironments for the ecology of desert crusts, as well as the advantages and limitations of microsensor-based methods for crust investigation.

  11. Relationships among low frequency (2 Hz) electrical resistivity, porosity, clay content and permeability in reservoir sandstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Tongcheng; Best, Angus I.; Sothcott, Jeremy; North, Laurence J.; MacGregor, Lucy M.

    2015-01-01

    The improved interpretation of marine controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) data requires knowledge of the inter-relationships between reservoir parameters and low frequency electrical resistivity. Hence, the electrical resistivities of 67 brine (35 g/l) saturated sandstone samples with a range of petrophysical properties (porosity from 2% to 29%, permeability from 0.0001 mD to 997.49 mD and volumetric clay content from 0 to 28%) were measured in the laboratory at a frequency of 2 Hz using a four-electrode circumferential resistivity method with an accuracy of ± 2%. The results show that sandstones with porosity higher than 9% and volumetric clay content up to 22% behave like clean sandstones and follow Archie's law for a brine concentration of 35 g/l. By contrast, at this brine salinity, sandstones with porosity less than 9% and volumetric clay content above 10% behave like shaly sandstones with non-negligible grain surface conductivity. A negative, linear correlation was found between electrical resistivity and hydraulic permeability on a logarithmic scale. We also found good agreement between our experimental results and a clay pore blocking model based on pore-filling and load-bearing clay in a sand/clay mixture, variable (non-clay) cement fraction and a shaly sandstone resistivity model. The model results indicate a general transition in shaly sandstones from clay-controlled resistivity to sand-controlled resistivity at about 9% porosity. At such high brine concentrations, no discernible clay conduction effect was observed above 9% porosity.

  12. Collescipoli - An unusual fusion crust glass. [chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nozette, S.

    1979-01-01

    An electron microprobe study was conducted on glass fragments taken from the fusion crust and an internal glass-lined vein in the H-5 chondrite Collescipoli. Microprobe analyses of the glasses revealed an unusual fusion crust composition, and analyses of glass from inside the meteorite showed compositions expected for a melt of an H-group chondrite. Studies of fusion crusts by previous workers, e.g., Krinov and Ramdohr, showed that fusion crusts contain large amounts of magnetite and other oxidized minerals. The Collescipoli fusion crusts do contain these minerals, but they also contain relatively large amounts of reduced metal, sulphide, and a sodium-rich glass. This study seems to indicate that Collescipoli preserved an early type of fusion crust. Oxidation was incomplete in the fusion crust melt that drained into a crack. From this study it is concluded that fusion crust formation does not invariably result in complete oxidation of metal and sulphide phases.

  13. MAGNETIC FIELD-DECAY-INDUCED ELECTRON CAPTURES: A STRONG HEAT SOURCE IN MAGNETAR CRUSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Randall L.; Kaplan, David L. E-mail: dkaplan@kitp.ucsb.edu

    2010-01-10

    We propose a new heating mechanism in magnetar crusts. Magnetars' crustal magnetic fields are much stronger than their surface fields; therefore, magnetic pressure partially supports the crust against gravity. The crust loses magnetic pressure support as the field decays and must compensate by increasing the electron degeneracy pressure; the accompanying increase in the electron Fermi energy induces nonequilibrium, exothermic electron captures. The total heat released via field-decay electron captures is comparable to the total magnetic energy in the crust. Thus, field-decay electron captures are an important, if not the primary, mechanism powering magnetars' soft X-ray emission.

  14. Relation between crust development and heterocyclic aromatic amine formation when air-roasting a meat cylinder.

    PubMed

    Kondjoyan, Alain; Chevolleau, Sylvie; Portanguen, Stéphane; Molina, Jérôme; Ikonic, Predrag; Clerjon, Sylvie; Debrauwer, Laurent

    2016-12-15

    The meat crust that develops during cooking is desired by consumers for its organoleptic properties, but it is also where heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAs) are formed. Here we measured HAs formation during the development of a colored crust on the surface of a beef meat piece. HAs formation was lower in the crust than previously measured in meat slices subjected to the same air jet conditions. This difference is explained by a lower average temperature in the colored crust than in the meat slices. Temperature effects can also explain why colored crust failed to reproduce the plateauing and decrease in HAs content observed in meat slices. We observed a decrease in creatine content from the center of the meat piece to the crust area. In terms of the implications for practice, specific heating conditions can be found to maintain a roast beef meat aspect while dramatically reducing HAs content. PMID:27451229

  15. Fractures and stresses in Bone Spring sandstones

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, J.C.; Warpinski, N.R.; Sattler, A.R.; Northrop, D.A.

    1990-09-01

    This project is a collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories and Harvey E. Yates Company being conducted under the auspices of the Oil Recovery Technology Partnership. The project seeks to apply perspectives related to the effects of natural fractures, stress, and sedimentology to the simulation and production of low-permeability gas reservoirs to low-permeability oil reservoirs as typified by the Bone Spring sandstones of the Permian Basin, southeast New Mexico. This report presents the results and analysis obtained in 1989 from 233 ft of oriented core, comprehensive suite of logs, various in situ stress measurements, and detailed well tests conducted in conjunction with the drilling of two development wells. Natural fractures were observed in core and logs in the interbed carbonates, but there was no direct evidence of fractures in the sandstones. However, production tests of the sandstones indicated permeabilities and behavior typical of a dual porosity reservoir. A general northeast trend for the maximum principal horizontal stress was observed in an elastic strain recovery measurements and in strikes of drilling-induced fractures; this direction is subparallel to the principal fracture trend observed in the interbed carbonates. Many of the results presented are believed to be new information for the Bone Spring sandstones. 57 figs., 18 tabs.

  16. The velocity structure of the lunar crust.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovach, R. L.; Watkins, J. S.

    1973-01-01

    Seismic refraction data, obtained at the Apollo 14 and 16 sites, when combined with other lunar seismic data, allow a compressional wave velocity profile of the lunar near-surface and crust to be derived. The regolith, although variable in thickness over the lunar surface, possesses surprisingly similar seismic properties. Underlying the regolith at both the Apollo 14 Fra Mauro site and the Apollo 16 Descartes site is low-velocity brecciated material or impact derived debris. Key features of the lunar seismic velocity profile are: (1) velocity increases from 100 to 300 m/sec in the upper 100 m to about 4 km/sec at 5 km depth, (2) a more gradual increase from about 4 km/sec to about 6 km/sec at 25 km depth,(3) a discontinuity at a depth of 25 km, and (4) a constant value of about 7 km/sec at depths from 25 km to about 60 km.

  17. Hydrogeology of a Transboundary Sandstone Aquifer, Quebec - New York

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nastev, M.; Lamontagne, C.; Morin, R.; Williams, J.; Lavigne, M.; Croteau, A.; Tremblay, T.; Godin, R.; Dagenais, M.; Rouleau, A.

    2005-12-01

    The Potsdam sandstone aquifer of Cambrian age straddles southern Quebec and northern New York in a region known for its abundant and good quality groundwater, a resource that recently has been coveted by several bottling companies. The potential conflicts and concerns of the mainly rural and groundwater dependent population about the possible overuse of this resource has led the Quebec Ministry of Environment, Geological Survey of Canada and the U. S. Geological Survey to jointly carry out a transboundary hydrogeological study of the Potsdam sandstone aquifer. The Potsdam sandstone aquifer consists of a lower unit of arkose and conglomerate and an upper unit of well-cemented quartz arenite. The thickness of the regional aquifer ranges from nil at the base of Adirondacks to more than 500 m near the St. Lawrence River. Glacial till, littoral sand and gravel, and marine silt and clay discontinuously overlie the aquifer. The aquifer's water budget is characterized by low rates of surface runoff and high rates of infiltration and sub-surface runoff. Major recharge areas are present at higher altitudes near and to the south of the border. Strong downward hydraulic gradients in these areas result in cascading water and water-level depths of more than 30 m in deep wells. Bedding in the Potsdam sandstone is gently dipping with fractures along sub-horizontal bedding planes forming major flow conduits. Bedrock folds and faults, mainly developed by east-west compression during the Appalachian orogenies, locally complicates aquifer geometry and groundwater flow. Hydraulic tests (pump, slug, flowmeter and straddle packer) indicate similar horizontal transmissivities in the lower and upper aquifer units. However, differences in lithology and structure of the aquifer units impose some apparent differences in hydraulic properties and groundwater flow patterns. In the lower unit, regional flow appears to be sustained by a limited number of laterally extensive bedding-plane fractures

  18. Fe and O isotope composition of meteorite fusion crusts: Possible natural analogues to chondrule formation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hezel, Dominik C.; Poole, Graeme M.; Hoyes, Jack; Coles, Barry J.; Unsworth, Catherine; Albrecht, Nina; Smith, Caroline; RehkäMper, Mark; Pack, Andreas; Genge, Matthew; Russell, Sara S.

    2015-02-01

    Meteorite fusion crust formation is a brief event in a high-temperature (2000-12,000 K) and high-pressure (2-5 MPa) regime. We studied fusion crusts and bulk samples of 10 ordinary chondrite falls and 10 ordinary chondrite finds. The fusion crusts show a typical layering and most contain vesicles. All fusion crusts are enriched in heavy Fe isotopes, with δ56Fe values up to +0.35‰ relative to the solar system mean. On average, the δ56Fe of fusion crusts from finds is +0.23‰, which is 0.08‰ higher than the average from falls (+0.15‰). Higher δ56Fe in fusion crusts of finds correlate with bulk chondrite enrichments in mobile elements such as Ba and Sr. The δ56Fe signature of meteorite fusion crusts was produced by two processes (1) evaporation during atmospheric entry and (2) terrestrial weathering. Fusion crusts have either the same or higher δ18O (0.9-1.5‰) than their host chondrites, and the same is true for Δ17O. The differences in bulk chondrite and fusion crust oxygen isotope composition are explained by exchange of oxygen between the molten surface of the meteorites with the atmosphere and weathering. Meteorite fusion crust formation is qualitatively similar to conditions of chondrule formation. Therefore, fusion crusts may, at least to some extent, serve as a natural analogue to chondrule formation processes. Meteorite fusion crust and chondrules exhibit a similar extent of Fe isotope fractionation, supporting the idea that the Fe isotope signature of chondrules was established in a high-pressure environment that prevented large isotope fractionations. The exchange of O between a chondrule melt and an 16O-poor nebula as the cause for the observed nonmass dependent O isotope compositions in chondrules is supported by the same process, although to a much lower extent, in meteorite fusion crusts.

  19. Relamination and the Differentiation of Continental Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacker, B. R.; Kelemen, P. B.; Behn, M. D.

    2014-12-01

    Most immature crust must be refined to attain the composition of mature continental crust. This refining may take the form of weathering, delamination, or relamination. Although delamination and relamination both call upon gravity-driven separation of felsic rock into the crust and mafic rock into the mantle, delamination involves foundering of rock from the base of active magmatic arcs, whereas relamination involves the underplating/diapirism of subducted sediment, arc crust, and continent crust to the base of the crust in any convergence zone. Relamination may be more efficient than lower crustal foundering at generating large volumes of material with the major- and trace-element composition of continental crust, and may have operated rapidly enough to have refined the composition of the entire continental crust over the lifetime of Earth. If so, felsic rocks could form much of the lower crust, and the bulk continental crust may be more silica rich than generally considered. Seismic wavespeeds require that only ~10-20% of the lowermost 5-15 km of continental crust must be mafic; combined heat-flow and wavespeed constraints permit continental lower crust to have 50 to 65 wt% SiO2.

  20. The influence of biological soil crusts on mineral uptake by associated vascular plants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harper, K.T.; Belnap, Jayne

    2001-01-01

    Soil surfaces dominated by cyanobacteria and cyanolichens (such as Collema sp.) are widespread in deserts of the world. The influence of these biological soil crusts on the uptake of bioessential elements is reported for the first time for six seed plants of the deserts of Utah. This sample almost doubles the number of species for which the influence of biological soil crusts on mineral uptake of associated vascular plants is known. These new case studies, and others previously published, demonstrate that cyanobacterial or cyanobacteria- Collema crusts significantly alter uptake by plants of many bioessential elements. In studies now available, these crusts always increase the N content of associated seed plants. Uptake of Cu, K, Mg, and Zn is usually (>70% of reported cases) increased in the presence of the biological soil crusts. Soil crusts are generally negatively associated with Fe and P levels in associated seed plant tissue, while plant tissue levels of Ca, Mn, and Na are positively as often as negatively associated with the presence of soil crusts. Increases in bioessential elements in vascular plant tissue from biologically-crusted areas are greatest for short-lived herbs that are rooted primarily within the surface soil, the horizon most influenced by crustal organisms. The mineral content of a deeply rooted shrub (Coleogyne ramosissima) was less influenced by co-occurrence of biological soil crusts.

  1. Windblown soil crust formation under light rainfall in a semiarid region

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many soils in arid and semi-arid regions of the world are affected by crusting, the process of forming a compact layer or thin mantle of consolidated material at the soil surface. Our objective was to evaluate the effect of rainfall quantity on crust formation of five soil types prominent in the Col...

  2. Chronology of early lunar crust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dasch, E. J.; Nyquist, L. E.; Ryder, G.

    1988-01-01

    The chronology of lunar rocks is summarized. The oldest pristine (i.e., lacking meteoritic contamination of admixed components) lunar rock, recently dated with Sm-Nd by Lugmair, is a ferroan anorthosite, with an age of 4.44 + 0.02 Ga. Ages of Mg-suite rocks (4.1 to 4.5 Ga) have large uncertainties, so that age differences between lunar plutonic rock suites cannot yet be resolved. Most mare basalts crystallized between 3.1 and 3.9 Ga. The vast bulk of the lunar crust, therefore, formed before the oldest preserved terrestrial rocks. If the Moon accreted at 4.56 Ga, then 120 Ma may have elapsed before lunar crust was formed.

  3. Dynamics of Pre-3 Ga Crust-Mantle Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patchett, P. J.; Chase, C. G.; Vervoort, J. D.

    2004-05-01

    During 3.0 to 2.7 Ga, the Earth's crust underwent a non-uniformitarian change from a pre-3.0 Ga environment where long-term preservation of cratons was rare and difficult, to post-2.7 Ga conditions where cratons were established and new continental crust generation took place largely at craton margins. Many models view the Earth's surface during pre-3 Ga time as broadly equivalent to the post 2.7 Ga regime. Any such uniformitarian or gradual evolution cannot explain the conundrum that only a tiny amount of pre-3 Ga crust is preserved today coupled with the fact that very little pre-3 Ga crust was incorporated into the large amount of new craton that came into existence during 3.0-2.7 Ga. If large volumes of pre-3 Ga continental crust existed, it disappeared either just prior to 3 Ga, or during 3.0-2.7 Ga. To explain sudden appearance of surviving but dominantly juvenile continental crust in a model where continents were large prior to 3 Ga, it would be necessary either that pre-3 Ga continent was recycled into the mantle at sites systematically different from those where new 3.0-2.7 Ga crust was made, or that widespread continent destruction preceded the 3.0-2.7 Ga crustal genesis. From expected mantle overturn in response to the heat budget, it is likely that most pre-3 Ga crust was both more mafic and shorter-lived than after 3 Ga. Although Nd and Hf ratios for pre-3 Ga rocks are uncertain due to polymetamorphism, it appears that depleted upper mantle was widespread by 2.7 Ga, even pre-3 Ga. Depletion may have been largely achieved by formation, subduction and storage of mafic crust for periods of 200-500 m.y. The rapid change to large surviving continents during 3.0-2.7 Ga was due to declining mantle overturn, and particularly to development of the ability to maintain subduction in one zone of the earth's surface for the time needed to allow evolution to felsic igneous rock compositions. In as much as storage of subducted slabs is probably occurring today, and

  4. Modifications of the porous network of sandstone accompanying the formation of black varnish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomachot-Schneider, C.; Gommeaux, M.; Fronteau, G.

    2008-12-01

    Black varnish commonly develops on rain-washed fine-grained monument sandstone. Stone modifications are, to the naked eye, limited to 10-μm thick black film and underlying modified zone about 1-mm thick. Transfer properties (absorption and drying kinetics and permeability) are, however, modified several centimetres under the surface. The present study investigates the modifications of black-varnish covered siliceous sandstones taken from Alsatian monuments (East of France) and of fresh sandstone undergoing wetting-drying cycles in the laboratory. Double-coloured thin-sections revealed gradual changes in the porous network, up to 3 cm under the black varnish. SEM observations showed that the film was mainly composed of iron and phosphorus while the modified zone was rich in calcium and sulphur. Fifty capillary absorption-drying cycles were carried out on fresh sandstone. Absorption kinetics was measured at each cycle. A continuous decrease of sandstone absorption kinetics over the fifty cycles was interpreted as a reorganisation of the porous network, reducing the connectivity of the porous network although total porosity remained unchanged. Wetting-drying cycles carried out under an environmental microscope (ESEM) showed a displacement of the finest particles (clay clusters), filling the macroporosity and decreasing the connectivity.

  5. Provenance, tectonics and palaeoclimate of Proterozoic Chandarpur sandstones, Chattisgarh basin: A petrographic view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Basudeb

    2005-06-01

    Sandstones of early Neoproterozoic Chandarpur Group, Chattisgarh Supergroup, central India display progressive change towards greater textural and mineralogical maturity from base to top of the succession. The clay-silt matrix decreases, sorting of sand grains improves, frequency of rounded grains increases, monocrystalline quartz content increases with concomitant decrease in polycrystalline quartz, feldspar and rock fragments. The trend of variations in different mineralogical and textural attributes, however, exhibits inflections at different stratigraphic levels. The sandstones of the basal Lohardih Formation are alluvial fan deposits, characterized by high matrix and feldspar content, iron-oxide impregnated highly angular grains and poor sorting. Petrographic properties collectively indicate that the sandstones were derived from a weathered granitic crust under a humid climatic condition. Abundance of well rounded grains within the alluvial fan and overlying braided fluvial deposit indicates prolonged wind action during episodes of high aridity. The shallow marine deposit overlying the fluvial deposits in the upper part of the Lohardih Formation exhibits bed-to-bed variation in the frequency of angular grains, feldspar content and overall maturity suggesting environmentally controlled segregation of sediments. The abrupt appearance of coarse-grained immature sandstones with concomitant reappearance of iron-oxide impregnated/altered feldspar grains in the upper part of the shelf deposits of the Chaporadih Formation point to a phase of tectonic uplift that possibly triggered a regression. Continued regression and peneplanation heralded the deposition of supermature medium-grained purple quartzarenite of the upper shoreface Kansapathar Formation in the uppermost part of the Chandarpur succession under a hot desertic climatic condition. The provenance analysis revealed that the Chandarpur clastics were derived from granites and granite-gneisses of a continental

  6. Investigation of elastic weakening in limestone and sandstone samples from moisture adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimienta, L.; Fortin, J.; Guéguen, Y.

    2014-10-01

    Elastic and mechanical weakening from water saturation are widely known to occur in sedimentary rocks, and particularly in carbonate rocks. To improve our understanding of the physics underlying this phenomenon, ultrasonic (f ˜ 0.5 MHz) elastic properties are measured on a large suite of clean limestones and sandstones at very low saturations from relative humidity (RH) variations at ambient conditions. Measurements clearly highlight an elastic weakening (i.e. decrease in elastic wave velocity) from moisture adsorption. P- and S-wave velocities are similarly affected by adsorption, but in a different way for limestones and sandstone samples. While the elastic properties of limestone samples show almost no RH dependence, a large weakening is observed for samples of Fontainebleau sandstone that increases with the samples' porosity. The main elastic weakening effect is likely to result from adsorption of fluid at grain contacts. It thus affects particularly granular rocks such as sandstones while well-cemented limestones are not affected. The granular model from Murphy et al., accounting for surface energy effects, proves to be appropriate. Applying this model, it is shown that (i) P- and S-wave velocities have the same dependence on surface energy, which is consistent with the measurements and (ii) surface energy values obtained from the ultrasonic data using this model correlate with RH, and are consistent with the expected value for quartz crystals at vapour pressure. Yet, porosity, which relates to degree of cementation in the particular case of Fontainebleau sandstone, appears to be an additional parameter. A modified model is thus derived using the cementation model from Digby, accounting for a bonding radius at grain contact. It proves to apply well to the measured data. The fundamental difference between limestones' and sandstones' dependence to RH appears to be related to a microstructural difference. Saturation variations from RH increase depend on specific

  7. Soil stabilization by biological soil crusts in arid Tunisia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidez, Sabine; Couté, Alain; Bardat, Jacques

    2015-04-01

    As part of the fight against desertification (LCD) in arid Tunisia, we have been able to highlight the important role played by biological soil crusts (BSC) in soil stabilization. The identification of the major species of cyanobacteria, lichens and bryophytes, their adaptation and terrestrial colonization strategies in this high climatic constraints area through their morpho-anatomical criteria have been set. In addition to their biological composition, their internal arrangement (i.e. texture and microstructure) reflects the structural stability of BSC against erosion. Precisely, the aggregative power of cyanobacteria and their ways of moving inside a soil, the capacity of mosses to grow through the sediments and lichens ability to bind at particles on surface, thus stabilizing the substrate have been demonstrated. Then, the three biological components ability to capture soil particles has been widely illustrated, proving the major environmental contribution of BSC in arid areas biological crusts formation, providing that soils will experience an increase of organic matter and fine particles rates subsequently gaining faster and better stability. Although the thickness and the morphology of crusts are related to the cover rates of these different biological components, the water properties of the latter, studied at the environmental SEM, illustrate their important role in altering the water cycle. Thus, the mixed crusts, i.e. with good presence of three biological components, cause the highest runoff rates by their ability to retain the water and spread on the surface. In spite of a swelling coefficient in presence of water higher than cryptogams, the cyanobacterial crusts located in newly stabilized areas of our studied region, remain finally insufficiently dense to impact surface hydrology. But, we showed after all that the cyanobacteria, pioneer species, have a certain environmental role. The lichen crusts cause a increased runoff because the lichens have a

  8. Experimental Analysis of Hybrid Fracture in Berea Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobich, J. K.; Chester, F. M.; Chester, J. S.

    2004-12-01

    Previous triaxial extension experiments investigating the transition from extension fracture to shear fracture in low porosity, polycrystalline Carrara marble demonstrate abrupt changes in strength and a continuous transition in fracture orientation and morphology with increasing confining pressure, Pc. New tests on Berea sandstone investigate the same transition in a porous aggregate. Notch cut cylinders (30 mm neck diameter) of Berea sandstone (18% porosity, 0.15 mm average grain size, 80% quartz, 20% feldspar, and trace rutile and kaolinite) were extended in a triaxial apparatus from 0 to 160 MPa confining pressure at a rate of 20 μ m/s. Stress at fracture is characterized by the least compressive principal stress, S3, and maximum compressive principal stress, S1 (S1=Pc). An abrupt change in fracture strength at Pc=50 MPa corresponds to a change from pure macroscopic extension fracture to mixed-mode opening and shear (hybrid) fracture. Within the extension fracture regime, S3 at failure becomes slightly more tensile with an increase in Pc, unlike the constant tensile strength observed for marble. Within the hybrid and shear fracture regimes, S3 at failure becomes more compressive with an increase in Pc. The angle between the fracture surface and S1 increases continuously with Pc, consistent with the marble results. In both rock types, hybrid fractures appear as linked, stepped extension fractures; the length of extensional segments decreases with increasing pressure. The abrupt change in failure strength at the transition from extension to hybrid modes in both rock types likely reflects the increase in mean stress that suppresses the propagation of extension fractures, and the interaction between closely-spaced stepped cracks. In the extension fracture regime, the different dependence of fracture strength on Pc for sandstone and marble may reflect differences in grain scale deformation mechanisms.

  9. Continental crust beneath southeast Iceland.

    PubMed

    Torsvik, Trond H; Amundsen, Hans E F; Trønnes, Reidar G; Doubrovine, Pavel V; Gaina, Carmen; Kusznir, Nick J; Steinberger, Bernhard; Corfu, Fernando; Ashwal, Lewis D; Griffin, William L; Werner, Stephanie C; Jamtveit, Bjørn

    2015-04-14

    The magmatic activity (0-16 Ma) in Iceland is linked to a deep mantle plume that has been active for the past 62 My. Icelandic and northeast Atlantic basalts contain variable proportions of two enriched components, interpreted as recycled oceanic crust supplied by the plume, and subcontinental lithospheric mantle derived from the nearby continental margins. A restricted area in southeast Iceland--and especially the Öræfajökull volcano--is characterized by a unique enriched-mantle component (EM2-like) with elevated (87)Sr/(86)Sr and (207)Pb/(204)Pb. Here, we demonstrate through modeling of Sr-Nd-Pb abundances and isotope ratios that the primitive Öræfajökull melts could have assimilated 2-6% of underlying continental crust before differentiating to more evolved melts. From inversion of gravity anomaly data (crustal thickness), analysis of regional magnetic data, and plate reconstructions, we propose that continental crust beneath southeast Iceland is part of ∼350-km-long and 70-km-wide extension of the Jan Mayen Microcontinent (JMM). The extended JMM was marginal to East Greenland but detached in the Early Eocene (between 52 and 47 Mya); by the Oligocene (27 Mya), all parts of the JMM permanently became part of the Eurasian plate following a westward ridge jump in the direction of the Iceland plume. PMID:25825769

  10. Continental crust beneath southeast Iceland

    PubMed Central

    Torsvik, Trond H.; Amundsen, Hans E. F.; Trønnes, Reidar G.; Doubrovine, Pavel V.; Gaina, Carmen; Kusznir, Nick J.; Steinberger, Bernhard; Corfu, Fernando; Ashwal, Lewis D.; Griffin, William L.; Werner, Stephanie C.; Jamtveit, Bjørn

    2015-01-01

    The magmatic activity (0–16 Ma) in Iceland is linked to a deep mantle plume that has been active for the past 62 My. Icelandic and northeast Atlantic basalts contain variable proportions of two enriched components, interpreted as recycled oceanic crust supplied by the plume, and subcontinental lithospheric mantle derived from the nearby continental margins. A restricted area in southeast Iceland—and especially the Öræfajökull volcano—is characterized by a unique enriched-mantle component (EM2-like) with elevated 87Sr/86Sr and 207Pb/204Pb. Here, we demonstrate through modeling of Sr–Nd–Pb abundances and isotope ratios that the primitive Öræfajökull melts could have assimilated 2–6% of underlying continental crust before differentiating to more evolved melts. From inversion of gravity anomaly data (crustal thickness), analysis of regional magnetic data, and plate reconstructions, we propose that continental crust beneath southeast Iceland is part of ∼350-km-long and 70-km-wide extension of the Jan Mayen Microcontinent (JMM). The extended JMM was marginal to East Greenland but detached in the Early Eocene (between 52 and 47 Mya); by the Oligocene (27 Mya), all parts of the JMM permanently became part of the Eurasian plate following a westward ridge jump in the direction of the Iceland plume. PMID:25825769

  11. Reservoir characterization of Mesaverde (Campanian) bedload fluvial meanderbelt sandstones, northwestern Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, J.R. Jr.

    1984-04-01

    Reservoir characterization of Mesaverde meanderbelt sandstones is used to determined directional continuity of permeable zones. A 500-m (1600 ft) wide fluvial meanderbelt in the Mesaverde Group is exposed as laterally continuous 3-10-m (10-33-ft) high sandstone cliffs north of Rangely, Colorado. Forty-eight detailed measured sections through 3 point bar complexes oriented at right angles to the long axis of deposition and 1 complex oriented parallel to deposition were prepared. Sections were tied together by detailed sketches delineating and tracing major bounding surfaces such as scours and clay drapes. These complexes contain 3 to 8 multilateral sandstone packages separated by 5-20 cm (2-8 in.) interbedded siltstone and shale beds. Component facies are point bars, crevasse splays, chute bars, and floodplain/overbank deposits. Two types of lateral accretion surfaces are recognized in the point bar facies. Gently dipping lateral accretions containing fining-upward sandstone packages. Large scale trough cross-bedding at the base grades upward into ripples and plane beds. Steeply dipping lateral accretion surfaces enclose beds characterized by climbing ripple cross laminations. Bounding surfaces draped by shale lags can seal vertically stacked point bars from reservoir communication. Scoured boundaries allow communication in some stacked point bars. Crevasse splays showing climbing ripples form tongues of very fine-grained sandstone which flank point bars. Chute channels commonly cut upper point bar surfaces at their downstream end. Chute facies are upward-fining with small scale troughs and common dewatering structures. Siltstones and shales underlie the point bar complexes and completely encase the meanderbelt system. Bounding surfaces at the base of the complexes are erosional and contain large shale rip-up clasts.

  12. Building icelandic igneous crust by repeated melt injections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenfield, Tim; White, Robert S.

    2015-11-01

    Observations of microseismicity provide a powerful tool for mapping the movement of melt in the crust. Here we record remarkable sequences of earthquakes 20 km below the surface in the normally ductile crust in the vicinity of Askja Volcano, in northeast Iceland. The earthquakes occur in swarms consisting of identical waveforms repeating as frequently as every 8 s for up to 3 h. We use template waveforms from each swarm to detect and locate earthquakes with an automated cross-correlation technique. Events are located in the lower crust and are inferred to be the result of melt being injected into the crust. During melt intrusion high strain rates are produced in conjunction with high pore fluid pressures from the melt or exsolved carbon dioxide. These cause brittle failure on high-angle fault planes located at the tips of sills. Moment tensor solutions show that most of the earthquakes are opening cracks accompanied by volumetric increases. This is consistent with the failure causing the earthquakes by melt injection opening new tensile cracks. Analysis of the magnitude distribution of earthquakes within a swarm reveals a complicated relationship between the imposed strain rates and the fluids that cause brittle failure. The magnitude of the earthquakes is controlled by the distance fluids can migrate along a fault, whereas the frequency of the events is controlled by the strain rate. Faults at the tips of sills act to focus melt transport between sills and so must be an important method of transporting melt through the lower crust.

  13. Snow and Ice Crust Changes over Northern Eurasia since 1966

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulygina, O.; Groisman, P. Y.; Razuvaev, V.; Radionov, V.

    2009-12-01

    When temperature of snow cover reaches zero Celsius first time since its establishment, snowmelt starts. In many parts of the world this process can be lengthy. The initial amount of heat that “arrives” to the snowpack might be insufficient for complete snowmelt, during the colder nights re-freeze of the melted snow may occur (thus creating the ice crust layers), and a new cold front (or the departure of the warm front that initiated melt) can decrease temperatures below the freezing point again and stop the snowmelt completely. It well can be that first such snowmelt occurs in winter (thaw day) and for several months thereafter snowpack stays on the ground. However, even the first such melt initiates a process of snow metamorphosis on its surface changing snow albedo and generating snow crust as well as on its bottom generating ice crust. Once emerged, the crusts will not disappear until the complete snowmelt. Furthermore, these crusts have numerous pathways of impact on the wild birds and animals in the Arctic environment as well as on domesticated reindeers. In extreme cases, the crusts may kill some wild species and prevent reindeers’ migration and feeding. Ongoing warming in high latitudes created situations when in the western half of Eurasian continent days with thaw became more frequent. Keeping in mind potential detrimental impacts of winter thaws and associated with them snow/ice crust development, it is worthwhile to study directly what are the major features of snow and ice crust over Eurasia and what is their dynamics. For the purpose of this study, we employed the national snow survey data set archived at the Russian Institute for Hydrometeorological Information. The dataset has routine snow surveys run throughout the cold season each decade (during the intense snowmelt, each 5 days) at all meteorological stations of the former USSR, thereafter, in Russia since 1966. Prior to 1966 snow surveys are also available but the methodology of

  14. The Mendocino crustal conveyor: Making and breaking the California crust

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Furlong, K.P.; Lock, J.; Guzofski, C.; Whitlock, J.; Benz, H.

    2003-01-01

    The northward migration of the Mendocino triple junction has resulted in a fundamental modification of the crust of coastal California. As a consequence of viscous coupling between the southern edge of the Gorda slab and the base of the North American crust beneath the Coast Ranges of central and northern California, the crust of coastal California was first thickened and then thinned. This viscous coupling and ephemeral crustal thickening has produced a distinctive pattern of uplift that allows us to map the three-dimensional extent of crustal modification. This pattern of crustal deformation has combined with the strain field of the developing San Andreas fault system to produce the observed pattern of near-surface deformation. The rapid rise in heat flow south of the triple junction observed in the northern Coast Ranges is a direct consequence of development and removal of the crustal welt that migrated with the triple junction.

  15. Sandstone diagenesis above and below a pressure seal - Tuscaloosa Trend, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Weedman, S.D.; Albrecht, W.; Brantley, S.L. )

    1991-03-01

    Significant diagenetic differences are observed in the Lower Tuscaloosa sandstone sampled above and below a pressure seal. Additionally, textural evidence suggests that the high porosity (> 20%) in some of the sandstones is secondary. Samples are classified into two groups: normal' (< 12%) and high porosity (12-24%). The normal' porosity sandstones, situated predominantly above the seal, are cemented by either quartz or calcite. At some grain-quartz overgrowth contacts, dissolution of overgrowths and portions of grains is concurrent with precipitation of calcite; some calcite is partially replaced by saddle dolomite. Pore-lining chlorite is present but rare in the normal' porosity sandstones. The high porosity sandstones, situated predominantly below the seal, retain remnants of quartz and carbonate cements; virtually all pores are lined with chlorite. High porosity is attributed primarily to dissolution of carbonate cement. Evidence for previously existing carbonate cement includes: remnant cement, rhomb-shaped porosity, and partially dissolved quartz grains whose surfaces are similar to grain surfaces of the calcite-cemented sandstones. The characteristic robust pore-lining chlorite growth is attributed to accelerated dissolution of volcanic rock fragments with the increase in porosity and permeability after carbonate dissolution. The authors suggest that the pressure seal plays two roles in creating and preserving high porosity: (1) the seal impedes fluid flow between two zones of different fluid chemistry and therefore different paragenesis in rocks of essentially the same age and depositional environment, and (2) the seal creates a compartment in which fluid pressures support the rock, inhibiting further compaction after the dissolution of the cement.

  16. Three-dimensional morphology of pores and cracks in intact and mechanically deformed sandstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menendez, B.; David, C.; Wong, T.-F.; Martinez-Nistal, A.

    2003-04-01

    We have studied four different sandstones under confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). In order to discriminate the void space from the grains, the samples were impregnated with a fluorescent dyed (Rhodamine B) resin and thin-sections with a thickness larger than usual were prepared and studied with CSLM. Two different kinds of samples have been studied: mechanically deformed samples of Darley Dale and Berea sandstones and intact samples of Rothbach and Bentheim sandstones. On each sample several three dimensional blocks have been investigated with size 228 by 152 microns and depths ranging from 35 to 100 microns. From each block a series of tens of parallel "virtual sections" has been recorded, separated by 1 or 2 microns in depth. First we show some examples on Darley Dale and Berea sandstone samples deformed in triaxial experiments. Rotating animations are built from series of 3D views of reconstructed crack networks taken step by step for different block orientations. When put together these 3D views nicely simulate a rotation of the 3D block. To create and run the animations we used the Confocal Assistant free software on a PC. Spectacular 3D animations representing crack networks in mechanically deformed samples are obtained this way in a very short time: some examples will be shown on the screen. Secondly we show on a poster some static 3D reconstructions of the pore and/or crack networks obtained using the Slicer Dicer software. For the intact samples we observe that pore (or grain) walls are smoother in Bentheim sandstone whereas in Rothbach sandstone the presence of a significant amount of coating clay minerals results in a visible surface roughness. Some differences in pore size and pore shape were also observed, with a more homogeneous distribution in Bentheim sandstone than in Rothbach sandstone. In both sandstones we observe the classical pore-to-throats junctions. Complex contact geometry between adjacent grains are sometimes observed. In the

  17. Global Geodynamic Constraints on the Structure and Dynamic State of the Continental Lower crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auerbach, P.; Forte, A.; Moucha, R.; Perry, C.

    2009-05-01

    Owing to the paucity of direct observations or constraints, the structure, composition and rheology of the lower crust of continents is not as well understood as the upper crust. Knowledge of lower crustal rheology is important for understanding how deep-seated lithospheric stresses generated by the convecting mantle are transmitted to the overlying brittle crust and how these stresses maintain surface topographic inequalities. Understanding the lateral variability of lower crustal thickness and density yields important clues on the thermo-chemical processes that have controlled the evolution, growth and mineralogy of the continental crust. Here we present the initial results of a global-scale study concerned with inferring the lateral changes in the lowermost crustal thickness and/or density and the implications for the stresses acting between the lithospheric mantle and the crust. Our approach involves quantifying the relationship between components of the non-isostatic topography, inferred by stripping away the isostatically compensated CRUST2.0 (Bassin et al. 2003) model, and predictions of surface dynamic topography predicted on the basis of a mantle convection model incorporating a recent joint seismic-geodynamic tomography model (Simmons et al. 2009). The specific focus will be on the modifications needed in lower crust structure that yield an optimal match between the CRUST2.0 inferences of non-isostatic topography and convection-driven dynamic undulations. The modified crustal structure will be used to explore the implications for the gravitational potential energy (GPE) of the compensated crust and hence the basal stresses acting at crust-mantle interface. Our overall objective is to constrain the dynamics of crust-mantle coupling and its contribution to surface geophysical observables.

  18. Wind erodibility response of physical and biological crusts to rain and flooding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubault, H.; Bullard, J. E.; Strong, C. L.; Ghadiri, H.; McTainsh, G. H.

    2015-12-01

    Soil surface crusts are important controllers of the small-scale wind entrainment processes that occur across all dust source regions globally. The crust type influences water and wind erosion by impacting infiltration, runoff, threshold wind velocity and surface storage capacity of both water and loose erodible material. The spatial and temporal patterning of both physical and biological crusts is known to change with rainfall and flooding. However, little is known about the impact of differing water quantity (from light rainfall through to flooding) on soil crusting characteristics (strength, roughness, sediment loss). This study compares the response of two soil types (loamy sand - LS, sandy loam - SL) with and without BSCs to three different rainfall events (2mm, 8mm, 15mm). Two BSC treatments were used one that simulated a young cyanobacteria dominated crust and an older flood induced multi species biological crust. For both soil types, soil surface strength increased with increasing rainfall amount with LS having consistently higher resistance to rupture than SL. Regardless of texture, soils with BSCs were more resistant and strength did not change in response to rainfall impact. Soil loss due to wind erosion was substantially higher on bare LS (4 times higher) and SL (3 times higher) soils compared with those with BSCs. Our results also show that young biological crust (formed by the rainfall event) have reduced soil erodibility with notably greater strength, roughness and reduced sediment losses when compared to soils with physical crust. Interestingly though, the erodibility of the old BSC did not differ greatly from that of the young BSC with respect to strength, roughness and sediment loss. This raises questions regarding the rapid soil surface protection offered by young colonising cyanobacteria crusts. Further analyses exploring the role of biological soil crusts on surface response to rainfall and wind saltation impact are ongoing.

  19. Algal biomass and primary production within a temperate zone sandstone

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, R.A.; Sommerfeld, M.R. )

    1987-02-01

    The use of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) to extract chlorophyll a and {sup 14}C-labelled photosynthate from endolithic algae of sparsely vegetated, cold temperate grasslands on the Colorado Plateau in Arizona has yielded the first estimates of biomass and photosynthesis for this unusual community. These subsurface microorganisms are found widespread in exposed Coconino Sandstone, a predominant formation in this cold temperate region. The endolithic community in Coconino Sandstone, composed primarily of coccoid blue-green and coccoid/sarcinoid green algae, yielded a biomass value (as chlorophyll a content) of 87 mg m{sup {minus}2} rock surface area and a photosynthetic rate of 0.37 mg CO{sub 2} dm{sup {minus}2} hr{sup {minus}1} or 0.48 mg CO{sub 2} mg{sup {minus}1} chl a hr{sup {minus}1}. The endolithic algal community contributes moderate biomass (5-10%) and substantial photosynthesis (20-80%) to the sparse grassland ecosystem.

  20. True triaxial testing of Castlegate sandstone.

    SciTech Connect

    Ingraham, M. D.; Holcomb, David Joseph; Issen, Kathleen A.

    2010-03-01

    Deformation bands in high porosity sandstone are an important geological feature for geologists and petroleum engineers; however, their formation is not fully understood. Axisymmetric compression, the common test for this material, is not sufficient to fully evaluate localization criteria. This study seeks to investigate the influence of the second principal stress on the failure and the formation of deformation bands in Castlegate sandstone. Experimental results from tests run in the axisymmetric compression stress state, as well as a stress state between axisymmetric compression and pure shear will be presented. Samples are tested using a custom triaxial testing rig at Sandia National Laboratories capable of applying stresses up to 400 MPa. Acoustic emissions are used to locate deformation bands should they not be visible on the specimen exterior. It is suspected that the second invariant of stress has a strong contribution to the failure mode and band formation. These results could have significant bearing on petroleum extraction as well as carbon dioxide sequestration.

  1. Preserving Native American petroglyphs on porous sandstone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grisafe, D.A.

    1996-01-01

    A new method of chemical treatment is proposed to improve the durability of soft, porous sandstones onto which Native American petroglyphs have been carved. Cores of Dakota Sandstone from the Faris Cave site, located along the Smoky Hill River in Ellsworth County, Kansas, were treated with ethyl silicate dissolved in a lightweight ketone carrier, and some cores were subsequently treated with a combination of ethyl silicate and silane using the same solvent. Measurement of the resulting physical properties, when compared to untreated cores, indicate the treatments substantially increased the compressive strength and freeze-thaw resistance of the stone without discoloring the stone or completely sealing the pore system. The treatment increases the durability of the stone and provides a method for preserving the petroglyphs at the site. After treating test panels at the site, the petroglyphs were treated in like manner.

  2. Radionuclide transport in sandstones with WIPP brine

    SciTech Connect

    Weed, H.C.; Bazan, F.; Fontanilla, J.; Garrison, J.; Rego, J.; Winslow, A.M.

    1981-02-01

    Retardation factors (R) have been measured for the transport of /sup 3/H, /sup 95m/Tc, and /sup 85/Sr in WIPP brine using St. Peter, Berea, Kayenta, and San Felipe sandstone cores. If tritium is assumed to have R=1, /sup 95m/Tc has R=1.0 to 1.3 and therefore is essentially not retarded. Strontium-85 has R = 1.0 to 1.3 on St. Peter, Berea, and Kayenta, but R=3 on San Felipe. This is attributed to sorption on the matrix material of San Felipe, which has 45 volume % matrix compared with 1 to 10 volume % for the others. Retardation factors (R/sub s/) for /sup 85/Sr calculated from static sorption measurements are unity for all the sandstones. Therefore, the static and transport results for /sup 85/Sr disagree in the case of San Felipe, but agree for St. Peter, Berea, and Kayenta.

  3. Oceanic Crust in the Canada Basin of the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchinson, Deborah; Chian, Deping; Jackson, Ruth; Lebedeva-Ivanova, Nina; Shimeld, John; Li, Qingmou; Mosher, David; Saltus, Richard; Oakey, Gordon

    2015-04-01

    Canada Basin show the topography of the basement surface varies with the crustal types determined by the velocity data. The top of oceanic crust is generally a weak reflection with a high-relief blocky character, and rare deeper reflections. The top of transitional crust is a low-relief, bright reflection with numerous subparallel bright reflections that extend as much as .5 km deeper. The areas of continental crust show grabens possibly associated with rifting. Previously published longer offset wide-angle reflection/refraction experiments in the southern Canada Basin are consistent with the lack of oceanic layer 3 velocities and the depth to Moho based on our interpretation of the sonobuoy profiles. Our new sonobuoy results show a restricted area of oceanic crust centered within the middle of Canada Basin. This result has implications for plate reconstruction models, which now must close a smaller area and must also account for the poorly known but finite extension in the transitional crust.

  4. Isotopic fractionation of uranium in sandstone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosholt, J.N.; Shields, W.R.; Garner, E.L.

    1963-01-01

    Relatively unoxidized black uranium ores from sandstone deposits in the western United States show deviations in the uranium-235 to uranium-234 ratio throughout a range from 40 percent excess uranium-234 to 40 percent deficient uranium-234 with respect to a reference uranium-235 to uranium-234 ratio. The deficient uranium-234 is leached preferentially to uranium-238 and the excess uranium-234 is believed to result from deposition of uranium-234 enriched in solutions from leached deposits.

  5. History of the earth's crust

    SciTech Connect

    Eicher, D.L.; Mcalester, A.L.; Rottman, M.L.

    1984-01-01

    The history of the earth's crust since its formation 4.6 Gyr ago is traced in an introductory textbook, with consideration of the global climate and the general outline of biological evolution. The methodology of paleogeology is introduced, and the origin of the solar system, the accumulation and differentiation of the earth, the beginnings of life, and the history of the moon are examined. Separate chapters are then devoted to the Precambrian, Paleozoic, Mesozoic, and Cenozoic earth. Photographs, maps, diagrams, and drawings are provided. 49 references.

  6. Sensitivity of desert cryptograms to air pollutants: soil crusts and rock lichens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belnap, J.

    1991-01-01

    Parks throughout the West are being faced with increasing air pollution threats from current or proposed industries near their boundaries. For this reason, it is important to understand the effects these industries may have on desert ecosystems. Rock lichens can be excellent biomonitors, acting as early warning systems of impending damage to other components of the desert ecosystem. Cryptogamic crusts, consisting mostly of cyanobacteria and lichens, may not only be excellent bioindicators, but also are an essential part of the desert ecosystem. Their presence is critical for soil stability as well as for the contribution of nitrogen to the ecosystem in a form available to higher plants. Air pollutants, such as emissions from coal-fired power plants, may threaten the healthy functioning of these non-vascular plants. The purpose of this study is to determine if, in fact, air pollutants do have an impact on the physiological functioning of cryptogamic crusts or rock lichens in desert systems and, if so, to what extent. Some results have already been obtained. Both rock lichens and cryptogamic crusts exhibit physiological damage in the vicinity of the Navajo Generating Station in Page, Arizona. Increased electrolyte leakage and chlorophyll degradation, along with reduced nitrogen fixation, have been found. Preliminary studies comparing sensitivity between substrates indicate that crusts on limestone and sandstone substrates may be more sensitive than those on gypsum.

  7. Constraints on the Composition and Petrogenesis of the Martian Crust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McSween, Harry Y., Jr.; Grove, Timothy L.; Wyatt, Michael B.

    2003-01-01

    Spectral interpretation that silicic rocks are widespread on Mars implies that Earth's differentiated crust is not unique. Evaluation of observations bearing on the composition of the Martian crust (Martian meteorite petrology and a possible crustal assimilant, analysis of Mars Pathfinder rocks, composition of Martian fines, interpretation of spacecraft thermal emission spectra, and inferred crustal densities) indicates that the crust can be either basalt plus andesite or basalt plus weathering products. New calculated chemical compositions for Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) global surface units indicate that surface type 1 has basaltic andesite composition and surface type 2 has the composition of andesite. If these materials represent volcanic rocks, their calc-alkaline compositions on a FeO*/MgO versus silica diagram suggest formation by hydrous melting and fractional crystallization. On Earth, this petrogenesis requires subduction, and it may suggest an early period of plate tectonics on Mars. However, anorogenic production of andesite might have been possible if the primitive Martian mantle was wet. Alternatively, chemical weathering diagrams suggest that surface type 2 materials could have formed by partial weathering of surface type 1 rocks, leading to depletion in soluble cations and mobility of silica. A weathered crust model is consistent with the occurrence of surface type 2 materials as sediments in a depocenter and with the alpha proton X-ray spectrometer (APXS) analysis of excess oxygen suggesting weathering rinds on Pathfinder rocks. If surface type 1 materials are also weathered or mixed with weathered materials, this might eliminate the need for hydrous melting, consistent with a relatively dry Martian mantle without tectonics.

  8. Earth’s earliest evolved crust generated in an Iceland-like setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimink, Jesse R.; Chacko, Thomas; Stern, Richard A.; Heaman, Larry M.

    2014-07-01

    It is unclear how the earliest continental crust formed on an Earth that was probably originally surfaced with oceanic crust. Continental crust may have first formed in an ocean island-like setting, where upwelling mantle generates magmas that crystallize to form new crust. Of the oceanic plateaux, Iceland is closest in character to continental crust, because its crust is anomalously thick and contains a relatively high proportion of silica-rich (sialic) rocks. Iceland has therefore been considered a suitable analogue for the generation of Earth’s earliest continental crust. However, the geochemical signature of sialic rocks from Iceland is distinct from the typical 3.9- to 2.5-billion-year-old Archaean rocks discovered so far. Here we report the discovery of an exceptionally well-preserved, 4.02-billion-year-old tonalitic gneiss rock unit within the Acasta Gneiss Complex in Canada. We use geochemical analyses to show that this rock unit is characterized by iron enrichment, negative Europium anomalies, unfractionated rare-earth-element patterns, and magmatic zircons with low oxygen isotope ratios. These geochemical characteristics are unlike typical Archaean igneous rocks, but are strikingly similar to those of the sialic rocks from Iceland and imply that this ancient rock unit was formed by shallow-level magmatic processes that include assimilation of rocks previously altered by surface waters. Our data provide direct evidence that Earth’s earliest continental crust formed in a tectonic setting comparable to modern Iceland.

  9. Soil crusts to warm the planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Pichel, Ferran; Couradeau, Estelle; Karaoz, Ulas; da Rocha Ulisses, Nunes; Lim Hsiao, Chiem; Northen, Trent; Brodie, Eoin

    2016-04-01

    Soil surface temperature, an important driver of terrestrial biogeochemical processes, depends strongly on soil albedo, which can be significantly modified by factors such as plant cover. In sparsely vegetated lands, the soil surface can also be colonized by photosynthetic microbes that build biocrust communities. We used concurrent physical, biochemical and microbiological analyses to show that mature biocrusts can increase surface soil temperature by as much as 10 °C through the accumulation of large quantities of a secondary metabolite, the microbial sunscreen scytonemin, produced by a group of late-successional cyanobacteria. Scytonemin accumulation decreases soil albedo significantly. Such localized warming had apparent and immediate consequences for the crust soil microbiome, inducing the replacement of thermosensitive bacterial species with more thermotolerant forms. These results reveal that not only vegetation but also microorganisms are a factor in modifying terrestrial albedo, potentially impacting biosphere feedbacks on past and future climate, and call for a direct assessment of such effects at larger scales. Based on estimates of the global biomass of cyanobacteria in soil biocrusts, one can easily calculate that there must currently exist about 15 million metric tons of scytonemin at work, warming soil surfaces worldwide

  10. Time-dependent Brittle Deformation in Darley Dale Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baud, P.; Heap, M. J.; Meredith, P. G.; Bell, A. F.; Main, I. G.

    2008-12-01

    The characterization of time-dependent brittle rock deformation is fundamental to understanding the long- term evolution and dynamics of the Earth's upper crust. The chemical influence of water promotes time- dependent deformation through stress corrosion cracking that allows rocks to deform at stresses far below their short-term failure strength. Here we report results from a study of time-dependent brittle creep in water- saturated samples of Darley Dale sandstone (initial porosity of 13%). Conventional creep experiments (or 'static fatigue' tests) show that time to failure decreases dramatically with the imposed deviatoric stress. They also suggest the existence of a critical level of damage beyond which localized failure develops. Sample variability results however in significant scattering in the experimental data and numerous tests are needed to clearly define a relation between the strain rate and the applied stress. We show here that stress-stepping experiments provide a means to overcome this problem and that it is possible this way to obtain the strain rate dependence on applied stress with a single test. This allows to study in details the impact of various thermodynamical conditions on brittle creep. The influence of effective stress was investigated in stress-stepping experiments with effective confining pressures of 10, 30 and 50 MPa (whilst maintaining a constant pore fluid pressure of 20 MPa). In addition to the expected purely mechanical influence of an elevated effective stress our results also demonstrate that stress corrosion appears to be inhibited at higher effective stresses. The influence of doubling the pore fluid pressure however, whilst maintaining a constant effective stress, is shown to have no effect on the rate of stress corrosion. We then discuss the results in light of acoustic emission hypocentre location data and optical microscope analysis and use our experimental data to validate proposed macroscopic creep laws. Finally, using

  11. Impacts of biological soil crust disturbance and composition on C and N loss from water erosion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barger, N.N.; Herrick, J.E.; Van Zee, J.; Belnap, J.

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we conducted rainfall simulation experiments in a cool desert ecosystem to examine the role of biological soil crust disturbance and composition on dissolved and sediment C and N losses. We compared runoff and sediment C and N losses from intact late-successional dark cyanolichen crusts (intact) to both trampled dark crusts (trampled) and dark crusts where the top 1 cm of the soil surface was removed (scraped). In a second experiment, we compared C and N losses in runoff and sediments in early-successional light cyanobacterial crusts (light) to that of intact late-successional dark cyanolichen crusts (dark). A relatively high rainfall intensity of approximately 38 mm per 10-min period was used to ensure that at least some runoff was generated from all plots. Losses of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), and ammonium (NH 4+ ) were significantly higher from trampled plots as compared to scraped and intact plots. Sediment C and N losses, which made up more than 98% of total nutrient losses in all treatments, were more than 4-fold higher from trampled plots relative to intact plots (sediment C g/m2, intact = 0.74, trampled = 3.47; sediment N g/m2, intact = 0.06, trampled = 0.28). In light crusts, DOC loss was higher relative to dark crusts, but no differences were observed in dissolved N. Higher sediment loss in light crusts relative to dark crusts resulted in 5-fold higher loss of sediment-bound C and N. Total C flux (sediment + dissolved) was on the order of 0.9 and 7.9 g/m2 for dark and light crusts, respectively. Sediment N concentration in the first minutes after runoff from light crusts was 3-fold higher than the percent N of the top 1 cm of soil, suggesting that even short-term runoff events may have a high potential for N loss due to the movement of sediments highly enriched in N. Total N loss from dark crusts was an order of magnitude lower than light crusts (dark = 0.06 g N/m2, light = 0.63 g/m2). Overall, our

  12. Compaction localization and constitutive behavior of weak porous sandstone.

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, David Joseph; Dewers, Thomas A.; Issen, Kathleen

    2009-06-01

    A combined experimental and constitutive modeling program for weak porous sandstone deformation is described. A series of axisymmetric compression tests were performed over a range of mean stresses to study dilatational, compactional and transitional regimes. Experimental results were used both to derive constitutive parameters for testing localization theory and to parameterize a poroelastic-plastic model. Observed strain localization, imaged syn-deformationally using acoustic emissions, includes high- and low-angle shear and low angle compactional features or 'bands'. Isotropic elastic moduli measured via unloading loops show a progressive degradation pre-failure as decreasing functions of work-conjugate plastic strains and increasing functions of stress magnitude. The degradation pathway is unique for samples which underwent localization versus those that underwent spatially pervasive pore collapse. Total shear and volume strains are partitioned into elastic and plastic portions including the ''coupling'' strain associated with modulus degradation. Plastic strain calculated with and without the coupling term is compared with regard to localization predictions. Both coupled and uncoupled cases predict high angle shear bands for uniaxial and low mean stress conditions on the dilatational side of the yield surface. Uncoupled predictions show progressively lower angle shear bands approaching the transitional regime (stress conditions approaching the 'cap' surface). When elastic-plastic coupling is accounted for, compaction bands are predicted for the transitional regime, as are observed in the experiments. Finite element modeling efforts are described using a 3-invariant, mixed-hardening, continuous yield surface, elasto-plasticity model that includes several features important for porous sandstone constitutive behavior and observed experimentally, including non-associativity, nonlinear elasticity, elastic-plastic coupling, and kinematic hardening. Modeled

  13. Seastacks buried beneath newly reported Lower Miocene sandstone, northern Santa Barbara County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Fritsche, A.E.; Hanna, F.M.

    1985-04-01

    Three large, isolated exposures of a light-gray, coarse-grained, thick-bedded sandstone unit occur in the northern San Rafael Mountains of Santa Barbara County, California. These rocks are moderately fossiliferous and contain Vertipecten bowersi, Amussiopecten vanvlecki, Aequipecten andersoni, Otrea howelli, shark teeth, whale bones, and regular echinoid spines. The fossils indicate that the sandstone unit, although previously reported as upper(.) Miocene, correlates best with the lower Miocene Vaqueros Formation. This unit was deposited in angular unconformity on a Cretaceous, greenish-gray turbidite sequence of interbedded sandstone and shale, and onlaps the unconformity erosion surface from west to east, the unit being thicker in the west and older at its base. The underlying Cretaceous sandstone beds are well indurated, and during the eastward transgression of the early Miocene sea, they resisted wave erosion and stood as seastacks offshore of the advancing coastline, thus creating a very irregular topographic surface upon which the Vaqueros Formation was deposited. Some seastacks were as much as 4 m tall, as indicated by inliers of Cretaceous rock surrounded by 4-m thick sections of the Vaqueros Formation.

  14. Diazotrophic Community Structure and Function in Two Successional Stages of Biological Soil Crusts from the Colorado Plateau and Chihuahuan Desert

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yeager, C.M.; Kornosky, J.L.; Housman, D.C.; Grote, E.E.; Belnap, J.; Kuske, C.R.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the community structure and activity of N2-fixing microorganisms in mature and poorly developed biological soil crusts from both the Colorado Plateau and Chihuahuan Desert. Nitrogenase activity was approximately 10 and 2.5 times higher in mature crusts than in poorly developed crusts at the Colorado Plateau site and Chihuahuan Desert site, respectively. Analysis of nifH sequences by clone sequencing and the terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism technique indicated that the crust diazotrophic community was 80 to 90% heterocystous cyanobacteria most closely related to Nostoc spp. and that the composition of N2-fixing species did not vary significantly between the poorly developed and mature crusts at either site. In contrast, the abundance of nifH sequences was approximately 7.5 times greater (per microgram of total DNA) in mature crusts than in poorly developed crusts at a given site as measured by quantitative PCR. 16S rRNA gene clone sequencing and microscopic analysis of the cyanobacterial community within both crust types demonstrated a transition from a Microcoleus vaginatus-dominated, poorly developed crust to mature crusts harboring a greater percentage of Nostoc and Scytonema spp. We hypothesize that ecological factors, such as soil instability and water stress, may constrain the growth of N2-fixing microorganisms at our study sites and that the transition to a mature, nitrogen-producing crust initially requires bioengineering of the surface microenvironment by Microcoleus vaginatus.

  15. Evolution of Fractal Parameters through Development Stage of Soil Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ospina, Abelardo; Florentino, Adriana; Tarquis, Ana Maria

    2016-04-01

    Soil surface characteristics are subjected to changes driven by several interactions between water, air, biotic and abiotic components. One of the examples of such interactions is provided through biological soil crusts (BSC) in arid and semi-arid environments. BSC are communities composed of cyanobacteria, fungi, mosses, lichens, algae and liverworts covering the soil surface and play an important role in ecosystem functioning. The characteristics and formation of these BSC influence the soil hydrological balance, control the mass of eroded sediment, increase stability of soil surface, and influence plant productivity through the modification of nitrogen and carbon cycle. The site of this work is located at Quibor and Ojo de Agua (Lara state, Venezuela). The Quibor Depression in Venezuela is a major agricultural area being at semi-arid conditions and limited drainage favor the natural process of salinization. Additionally, the extension and intensification of agriculture has led to over-exploitation of groundwater in the past 30 years (Méndoza et al., 2013). The soil microbial crust develops initially on physical crusts which are mainly generated since wetting and drying, being a recurrent feature in the Quíbor arid zone. The microbiotic crust is organic, composed of macro organisms (bryophytes and lichens) and microorganisms (cyanobacteria, fungi algae, etc.); growing on the ground, forming a thickness no greater than 3 mm. For further details see Toledo and Florentino (2009). This study focus on characterize the development stage of the BSC based on image analysis. To this end, grayscale images of different types of biological soil crust at different stages where taken, each image corresponding to an area of 12.96 cm2 with a resolution of 1024x1024 pixels (Ospina et al., 2015). For each image lacunarity and fractal dimension through the differential box counting method were calculated. These were made with the software ImageJ/Fraclac (Karperien, 2013

  16. Pulsar glitches: the crust is not enough.

    PubMed

    Andersson, N; Glampedakis, K; Ho, W C G; Espinoza, C M

    2012-12-14

    Pulsar glitches are traditionally viewed as a manifestation of vortex dynamics associated with a neutron superfluid reservoir confined to the inner crust of the star. In this Letter we show that the nondissipative entrainment coupling between the neutron superfluid and the nuclear lattice leads to a less mobile crust superfluid, effectively reducing the moment of inertia associated with the angular momentum reservoir. Combining the latest observational data for prolific glitching pulsars with theoretical results for the crust entrainment, we find that the required superfluid reservoir exceeds that available in the crust. This challenges our understanding of the glitch phenomenon, and we discuss possible resolutions to the problem. PMID:23368300

  17. Geochemical characteristics and metal element enrichment in crusts from seamounts of the Western Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoyu; Zhu, Kechao; Du, Yong; Zhang, Fuyuan; Zhang, Weiyan; Ren, Xiangwen; Jiang, Binbin; Huang, Dasong

    2016-03-01

    Elemental geochemistry is an essential part of understanding mineralization mechanisms. In this paper, a data set of 544 cobalt crust samples from seamounts of the Western Pacific are used to study the enrichment characteristics of metal elements. REE normalization is utilized to reveal the origin of the crusts; effects of water depth on Co enrichment and impacts of phosphatization on mineral quality are discussed to obtain the evolution of these marine mineral deposits, which gives support to further resource assessment. Conclusions are reached as follows: 1) Elemental abundances, inter-element relationships, and shale-normalized REE patterns for phosphate-poor crusts from different locations reflect hydrogenetic origin of the crusts. EFs (enrichment coefficients) of REE exhibit exponential increase from surface sediments to phosphorite to polymetallic nodules to crusts, suggesting that the improved degree of hydrogeneous origin induces the enrichment of REE. 2) The crusts in the Western Pacific, formed through hotspot produced guyots trails, have relatively lower REE than those in the Mid-Pacific. The latter could be attributed to the peculiar submarine topography of seamounts formed by intraplate volcanism. 3) The non-phosphatized younger crust layers have 40% higher Co than the phosphatized older layers. This indicates the modification of the elemental composition in these crusts by phosphatization. A general depletion of hydroxide-dominated elements such as Co, Ni, and Mn and enrichment of P, Ca, Ba, and Sr is evident in phosphatized crusts, whereas non-phosphatized younger generation crusts are rich in terrigenous aluminosilicate detrital matter. 4) Co increases above the carbonate compensation depth (CCD) from less than 0.53% to over 0.65% in seamount regions with water depth of less than 2,500 m, suggesting the significance of the dissolution of carbonate in the sea water column to the growth and composition of crusts.

  18. Apulian crust: Top to bottom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amato, Alessandro; Bianchi, Irene; Agostinetti, Nicola Piana

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the crustal seismic structure of the Adria plate using teleseismic receiver functions (RF) recorded at 12 broadband seismic stations in the Apulia region. Detailed models of the Apulian crust, e.g. the structure of the Apulian Multi-layer Platform (AMP), are crucial for assessing the presence of potential décollements at different depth levels that may play a role in the evolution of the Apenninic orogen. We reconstruct S-wave velocity profiles applying a trans-dimensional Monte Carlo method for the inversion of RF data. Using this method, the resolution at the different depth level is completely dictated by the data and we avoid introducing artifacts in the crustal structure. We focus our study on three different key-elements: the Moho depth, the lower crust S-velocity, and the fine-structure of the AMP. We find a well defined and relatively flat Moho discontinuity below the region at 28-32 km depth, possibly indicating that the original Moho is still preserved in the area. The lower crust appears as a generally low velocity layer (average Vs = 3.7 km/s in the 15-26 km depth interval), likely suggestive of a felsic composition, with no significant velocity discontinuities except for its upper and lower boundaries where we find layering. Finally, for the shallow structure, the comparison of RF results with deep well stratigraphic and sonic log data allowed us to constrain the structure of the AMP and the presence of underlying Permo-Triassic (P-T) sediments. We find that the AMP structure displays small-scale heterogeneities in the region, with a thickness of the carbonates layers varying between 4 and 12 km, and is underlain by a thin, discontinuous layer of P-T terrigenous sediments, that are lacking in some areas. This fact may be due to the roughness in the original topography of the continental margins or to heterogeneities in its shallow structure due to the rifting process.

  19. Early Formation of Terrestrial Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, T. M.; Schmitt, A. K.; McCulloch, M. T.; Lovera, O. M.

    2007-12-01

    Early (≥4.5 Ga) Formation of Terrestrial Crust T.M. Harrison1, A.K. Schmitt1, M.T. McCulloch2, and O.M. Lovera1 1Department of Earth and Space Sciences and IGPP, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA; 2Research School of Earth Sciences, Australian National University, Canberra, A.C.T. 2601 AUSTRALIA Large deviations in ǎrepsilonHf(T) from bulk silicate Earth seen in >4 Ga detrital zircons from Jack Hills, Western Australia, have been interpreted as reflecting a major differentiation of the silicate Earth at ca. 4.4 to 4.5 Ga. We have expanded the characterization of 176Hf/177Hf (Hf) in Hadean zircons by acquiring a further 116 laser ablation Lu-Hf measurements on 87 grains with ion microprobe 207Pb/206Pb ages up to 4.36 Ga. Most measurements employed concurrent Lu-Hf and 207Pb/206Pb analyses, permitting assessment of the use of ion microprobe data to characterize the age of the volumetrically larger domain sampled by laser drilling. Our new results confirm and extend the earlier observation of significant negative deviations in ǎrepsilonHf(T) throughout the Hadean, although no positive ǎrepsilonHf(T) values were documented in this study. These data yields an essentially uniform spectrum of single-stage model ages between 4.54 and 4.20 Ga for extraction of the zircons' protoliths from a chondritic reservoir. We derived the full error propagation expression for a parameter, ǎrepsilono, which measures the difference of a sample from solar system initial (Hf) (Hfo), and from this conclude that data plotting close to (Hfo), are statistically meaningful and consistent with silicate differentiation at 4.540±0.006 Ga. δ18O and Ti thermometry for these Hadean zircons show little obvious correlation with initial (Hf), consistent with their derivation through fusion of a broad suite of crustal rock types under near water-saturated conditions. Together with the inclusion assemblage and other isotopic and trace element data obtained from these ancient zircons, our results

  20. Archean upper crust transition from mafic to felsic marks the onset of plate tectonics.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ming; Chen, Kang; Rudnick, Roberta L

    2016-01-22

    The Archean Eon witnessed the production of early continental crust, the emergence of life, and fundamental changes to the atmosphere. The nature of the first continental crust, which was the interface between the surface and deep Earth, has been obscured by the weathering, erosion, and tectonism that followed its formation. We used Ni/Co and Cr/Zn ratios in Archean terrigenous sedimentary rocks and Archean igneous/metaigneous rocks to track the bulk MgO composition of the Archean upper continental crust. This crust evolved from a highly mafic bulk composition before 3.0 billion years ago to a felsic bulk composition by 2.5 billion years ago. This compositional change was attended by a fivefold increase in the mass of the upper continental crust due to addition of granitic rocks, suggesting the onset of global plate tectonics at ~3.0 billion years ago. PMID:26798012

  1. Archean upper crust transition from mafic to felsic marks the onset of plate tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Ming; Chen, Kang; Rudnick, Roberta L.

    2016-01-01

    The Archean Eon witnessed the production of early continental crust, the emergence of life, and fundamental changes to the atmosphere. The nature of the first continental crust, which was the interface between the surface and deep Earth, has been obscured by the weathering, erosion, and tectonism that followed its formation. We used Ni/Co and Cr/Zn ratios in Archean terrigenous sedimentary rocks and Archean igneous/metaigneous rocks to track the bulk MgO composition of the Archean upper continental crust. This crust evolved from a highly mafic bulk composition before 3.0 billion years ago to a felsic bulk composition by 2.5 billion years ago. This compositional change was attended by a fivefold increase in the mass of the upper continental crust due to addition of granitic rocks, suggesting the onset of global plate tectonics at ~3.0 billion years ago.

  2. Submarine-fan facies associations of the Upper Cretaceous and Paleocene Gottero Sandstone, Ligurian Apennines, Italy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nilsen, T.H.; Abbate, E.

    1984-01-01

    The Upper Cretaceous and Paleocene Gottero Sandstone was deposited as a small deep-sea fan on ophiolitic crust in a trench-slope basin. It was thrust northeastward as an allochthonous sheet in Early and Middle Cenozoic time. The Gottero, as thick as 1500 m, was probably derived from erosion of Hercynian granites and associated metamorphic rocks in northern Corsica. Outcrops of inner-fan channel, middle-fan channel and interchannel, outer-fan lobe, fan-fringe, and basin-plain facies associations indicate that the depositional model of Mutti and Ricci Lucchi for mixed-sediment deep-sea fans can be used. The original fan had a radius of 30 to 50 km. ?? 1984 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

  3. Excavation and melting of the Hadean continental crust by Late Heavy Bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibaike, Yuhito; Sasaki, Takanori; Ida, Shigeru

    2016-03-01

    No Hadean rocks have ever been found on Earth's surface except for zircons-evidence of continental crust, suggesting that Hadean continental crust existed but later disappeared. One hypothesis for the disappearance of the continental crust is excavation/melting by the Late Heavy Bombardment (LHB), a concentration of impacts in the last phase of the Hadean eon. In this paper, we calculate the effects of LHB on Hadean continental crust in order to investigate this hypothesis. Approximating the size-frequency distribution of the impacts by a power-law scaling with an exponent α as a parameter, we have derived semi-analytical expressions for the effects of LHB impacts. We calculated the total excavation/melting volume and area affected by the LHB from two constraints of LHB on the Moon, the size of the largest basin during LHB, and the density of craters larger than 20 km. We also investigated the effects of the value of α. Our results show that LHB does not excavate/melt all of Hadean continental crust directly, but over 70% of the Earth's surface area can be covered by subsequent melts in a broad range of α. If there have been no overturns of the continental crust until today, LHB could be responsible for the absence of Hadean rocks because most of Hadean continental crust is not be exposed on the Earth's surface in this case.

  4. Failure mode and weakening effect of water on sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baud, Patrick; Zhu, Wenlu; Wong, Teng-Fong

    2000-07-01

    Previous studies have shown that brittle strength of a rock is generally reduced in the presence of water. However, for siliciclastic rocks, there is a paucity of data on the waterweakening behavior in the cataclastic flow regime. To compare the weakening effect of water in the brittle faulting and cataclastic flow regime, triaxial compression experiments were conducted on the Berea, Boise, Darley Dale, and Gosford sandstones (with nominal porosities ranging from 11% to 35%) under nominally dry and saturated conditions at room temperature. Inelastic behavior and failure mode of the nominal dry samples were qualitatively similar to those of water-saturated samples. At elevated pressures, shear localization was inhibited, and all the samples failed by strain hardening. The compactive yield strengths (associated with the onset of shear-enhanced compaction) in the saturated samples were lower than those in the dry samples deformed under comparable pressure conditions by 20% to 70%. The reductions of brittle strength in the presence of water ranged from 5% to 17%. The water-weakening effects were most and least significant in the Gosford and Berea sandstones, respectively. The relation between water weakening and failure mode is consistently explained by micromechanical models formulated on the basis that the specific surface energy in the presence of water is lowered than that in vacuum by the ratio λ. In accordance with the Hertzian fracture model the initial yield stress in the compactive cataclastic flow regime scales with the grain-crushing pressure, which is proportional to λ3/2. In the brittle faulting regime, damage mechanics models predict that the uniaxial compressive strength scales with λ1/2. In the presence of water the confined brittle strength is lower due to reductions of both the specific surface energy and friction coefficient.

  5. Microbial Community Analysis of Fresh and Old Microbial Biofilms on Bayon Temple Sandstone of Angkor Thom, Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Wensheng; Li, Hui; Wang, Wei-Dong; Katayama, Yoko

    2010-01-01

    The temples of Angkor monuments including Angkor Thom and Bayon in Cambodia and surrounding countries were exclusively constructed using sandstone. They are severely threatened by biodeterioration caused by active growth of different microorganisms on the sandstone surfaces, but knowledge on the microbial community and composition of the biofilms on the sandstone is not available from this region. This study investigated the microbial community diversity by examining the fresh and old biofilms of the biodeteriorated bas-relief wall surfaces of the Bayon Temple by analysis of 16S and 18S rRNA gene sequences. The results showed that the retrieved sequences were clustered in 11 bacterial, 11 eukaryotic and two archaeal divisions with disparate communities (Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Cyanobacteria, Proteobacteria; Alveolata, Fungi, Metazoa, Viridiplantae; Crenarchaeote, and Euyarchaeota). A comparison of the microbial communities between the fresh and old biofilms revealed that the bacterial community of old biofilm was very similar to the newly formed fresh biofilm in terms of bacterial composition, but the eukaryotic communities were distinctly different between these two. This information has important implications for understanding the formation process and development of the microbial diversity on the sandstone surfaces, and furthermore to the relationship between the extent of biodeterioration and succession of microbial communities on sandstone in tropic region. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00248-010-9707-5) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20593173

  6. Seismic amplitude anomalies associated with thick First Leo sandstone lenses, eastern Powder River basin, Wyoming.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Balch, A.H.; Lee, M.W.; Miller, J.J.; Ryder, R.T.

    1981-01-01

    Several new discoveries of oil production in the Leo sandstone, an economic unit in the Pennsylvanian middle member of the Minnelusa formation, eastern Powder River basin, Wyoming-Nebraska-South Dakota, have renewed exploration interest in this area. Vertical seismic profiles (VSP) and model studies suggested that a measurable seismic amplitude anomaly is frequently associated with the thick First Leo sandstone lenses. To test this concept, a surface reflection seismic profile was run between two wells about 12 miles apart. The First Leo was present and productive in one well and thin and barren in the other. The surface profile shows the predicted amplitude anomaly at the well where a thick lens is known to exist. Two other First Leo amplitude anomalies also appear on the surface seismic profile between the two wells, which may indicate the presence of additional lenses.-Authors

  7. Mineralogy and diagenesis of low-permeability sandstones of Late Cretaceous age, Piceance Creek Basin, northwestern Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansley, Paula L.; Johnson, Ronald C.

    1980-01-01

    This report presents preliminary results of a mineralogic and diagenetic study of some low-permeability sandstones from measured surface sections and cores obtained from drill holes in the Piceance Creek Basin of northwestern Colorado. A documentation of the mineralogy and diagenetic history will aid in the exploration for natural gas and in the development of recovery technology in these low-permability sandstones. These sandstones are in the nonmarine upper part of the Mesaverde Formation (or Group) of Late Cretaceous age and are separated from overlying lower Tertiary rocks by a major regional unconformity. Attention is focused on the sandstone units of the Ohio Creek Member, which directly underlies the unconformity; however, comparisons between the mineralogy of the Ohio Creek strata and that of the underlying sandstone units are made whenever possible. The Ohio Creek is a member of the Hunter Canyon Formation (Mesaverde Group) in the southwestern part of the basin, and the Mesaverde Formation in the southern and central parts of the basin. The detrital mineralogy is fairly constant throughout all of these nonrnarine Cretaceous sandstone units; however, in the southeastern part of the basin, there is an increase in percentage of feldspar, quartzite, and igneous rock fragments in sandstones of the Ohio Creek Member directly underlying the unconformity. In the southwestern part of the basin, sandstones of the Ohio Creek Member are very weathered and are almost-entirely comprised of quartz, chert, and kaolinite. A complex diagenetic history, partly related to the overlying unconformity, appears to be responsible for transforming these sandstones into potential gas reservoirs. The general diagenetic sequence for the entire Upper Cretaceous interval studied is interpreted to be (early to late): early(?) calcite cement, chlorite, quartz overgrowths, calcite cement, secondary porosity, analcime (surface only), kaolinite and illite, and late carbonate cements

  8. Recent Progress in Understanding the Structure of the Lunar Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuber, Maria T.

    2016-04-01

    High-resolution gravity from GRAIL and high-resolution topography from LRO/LOLA are providing new insight into the lunar crust. Bouguer gravity and its gradient are providing the unique opportunity to explore the shallow internal structure of the lunar crust in greater detail than for any other solid planetary body beyond Earth. Gravity and topography combined produce Bouguer gravity that reveals the distribution of mass in the subsurface. At high degrees, the spherical harmonic expansion is sensitive to shallower structure, with the depth taken to correspond to the spatial block size or half wavelength of the spherical harmonic degree. Using models of density contrasts within the crust and their expression at the lunar surface, we compare model results to observations acknowledging the inherent non-uniqueness of gravity. We have initially focused on highlands crust, where >98% of free air gravity is associated with topography, so high degree and order mass anomalies that remain after the Bouguer correction constitute <2% of the full gravitational signal. We deconstructed the Bouguer gravity field into degree-ranges and plot the implied subsurface distribution of density anomalies for several regions of the lunar highlands including several basins.

  9. Magnetization of the oceanic crust: TRM or CRM?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raymond, C. A.; Labrecque, J. L.

    1987-01-01

    A model was proposed in which chemical remanent magnetization (CRM) acquired within the first 20 Ma of crustal evolution may account for 80% of the bulk natural remanent magnetization (NRM) of older basalts. The CRM of the crust is acquired as the original thermoremanent magnetization (TRM) is lost through low temperature alteration. The CRM intensity and direction are controlled by the post-emplacement polarity history. This model explains several independent observations concerning the magnetization of the oceanic crust. The model accounts for amplitude and skewness discrepancies observed in both the intermediate wavelength satellite field and the short wavelength sea surface magnetic anomaly pattern. It also explains the decay of magnetization away from the spreading axis, and the enhanced magnetization of the Cretaceous Quiet Zones while predicting other systematic variations with age in the bulk magnetization of the oceanic crust. The model also explains discrepancies in the anomaly skewness parameter observed for anomalies of Cretaceous age. Further studies indicate varying rates of TRM decay in very young crust which depicts the advance of low temperature alteration through the magnetized layer.

  10. Local structures of Ca, Ti and Fe in meteorite fusion crusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobase, T.; Yoshiasa, A.; Hiratoko, T.; Hongu, H.; Isobe, H.; Nakatsuka, A.; Arima, H.; Sugiyama, K.

    2016-05-01

    The local structures of meteorite fusion crusts were studied by Ca, Ti and Fe K-edge XANES and EXAFS spectroscopy. The surface of meteorites were melted and volatilized with extreme high temperature and large temperature gradient when meteorites were rushed into atmosphere. This study indicated that meteorite fusion crusts have unique local structures. The local structures of fusion crusts differ from tektites especially in intensity of the shoulder in the rising flank of the edge in Ca XANES spectra. It is consistent with chemical composition change by the volatilization of Si at fusion during atmospheric entry. The high estimated Fe3+/ (Fe2++Fe3+) ratio in meteorite fusion crusts indicates that meteorite fusion crusts are formed into atmospheric oxidation condition. The Ca-O distances in meteorite fusion crusts are 2.612.66 A and are extremely longer than in other natural glasses. The fusion crusts have unique local structure since they experienced extremely high temperature and short quenching time. The XAFS method is effective in distinction of meteorite fusion crusts and classification of natural glass.