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Sample records for saturation recovery epr

  1. Saturation recovery EPR and ELDOR at W-band for spin labels.

    PubMed

    Froncisz, Wojciech; Camenisch, Theodore G; Ratke, Joseph J; Anderson, James R; Subczynski, Witold K; Strangeway, Robert A; Sidabras, Jason W; Hyde, James S

    2008-08-01

    A reference arm W-band (94 GHz) microwave bridge with two sample-irradiation arms for saturation recovery (SR) EPR and ELDOR experiments is described. Frequencies in each arm are derived from 2 GHz synthesizers that have a common time-base and are translated to 94 GHz in steps of 33 and 59 GHz. Intended applications are to nitroxide radical spin labels and spin probes in the liquid phase. An enabling technology is the use of a W-band loop-gap resonator (LGR) [J.W. Sidabras, R.R. Mett, W. Froncisz, T.G. Camenisch, J.R. Anderson, J.S. Hyde, Multipurpose EPR loop-gap resonator and cylindrical TE(011) cavity for aqueous samples at 94 GHz, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 78 (2007) 034701]. The high efficiency parameter (8.2 GW(-1/2) with sample) permits the saturating pump pulse level to be just 5 mW or less. Applications of SR EPR and ELDOR to the hydrophilic spin labels 3-carbamoyl-2,2,5,5-tetra-methyl-3-pyrroline-1-yloxyl (CTPO) and 2,2,6,6,-tetramethyl-4-piperidone-1-oxyl (TEMPONE) are described in detail. In the SR ELDOR experiment, nitrogen nuclear relaxation as well as Heisenberg exchange transfer saturation from pumped to observed hyperfine transitions. SR ELDOR was found to be an essential method for measurements of saturation transfer rates for small molecules such as TEMPONE. Free induction decay (FID) signals for small nitroxides at W-band are also reported. Results are compared with multifrequency measurements of T(1e) previously reported for these molecules in the range of 2-35 GHz [J.S. Hyde, J.-J. Yin, W.K. Subczynski, T.G. Camenisch, J.J. Ratke, W. Froncisz, Spin label EPR T(1) values using saturation recovery from 2 to 35 GHz. J. Phys. Chem. B 108 (2004) 9524-9529]. The values of T(1e) decrease at 94 GHz relative to values at 35 GHz. PMID:18547848

  2. Resolving Conformational and Rotameric Exchange in Spin-Labeled Proteins Using Saturation Recovery EPR

    PubMed Central

    Bridges, Michael D.; Hideg, Kálmán

    2010-01-01

    The function of many proteins involves equilibria between conformational substates, and to elucidate mechanisms of function it is essential to have experimental tools to detect the presence of conformational substates and to determine the time scale of exchange between them. Site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) has the potential to serve this purpose. In proteins containing a nitroxide side chain (R1), multicomponent electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra can arise either from equilibria involving different conformational substates or rotamers of R1. To employ SDSL to uniquely identify conformational equilibria, it is thus essential to distinguish between these origins of multicomponent spectra. Here we show that this is possible based on the time scale for exchange of the nitroxide between distinct environments that give rise to multicomponent EPR spectra; rotamer exchange for R1 lies in the ≈0.1–1 μs range, while conformational exchange is at least an order of magnitude slower. The time scales of exchange events are determined by saturation recovery EPR, and in favorable cases, the exchange rate constants between substates with lifetimes of approximately 1–70 μs can be estimated by the approach. PMID:20157634

  3. Saturation recovery EPR and ELDOR at W-band for spin labels

    PubMed Central

    Froncisz, Wojciech; Camenisch, Theodore G.; Ratke, Joseph J.; Anderson, James R.; Subczynski, Witold K.; Strangeway, Robert A.; Sidabras, Jason W.; Hyde, James S.

    2008-01-01

    A reference-arm W-band (94 GHz) microwave bridge with two sample-irradiation arms for saturation recovery (SR) EPR and ELDOR experiments is described. Frequencies in each arm are derived from 2 GHz synthesizers that have a common time-base and are translated to 94 GHz in steps of 33 and 59 GHz. Intended applications are to nitroxide radical spin labels and spin probes in the liquid phase. An enabling technology is the use of a W-band loop-gap resonator (LGR) (J.W. Sidabras et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 78 (2007) 034701). The high efficiency parameter (8.2 GW−1/2 with sample) permits the saturating pump pulse level to be just 5 mW or less. Applications of SR EPR and ELDOR to the hydrophilic spin labels 3-carbamoyl-2,2,5,5-tetra-methyl-3-pyrroline-1-yloxyl (CTPO) and 2,2,6,6,-tetramethyl-4-piperidone-1-oxyl (TEMPONE) are described in detail. In the SR ELDOR experiment, nitrogen nuclear relaxation as well as Heisenberg exchange transfer saturation from pumped to observed hyperfine transitions. SR ELDOR was found to be an essential method for measurements of saturation transfer rates for small molecules such as TEMPONE. Free induction decay (FID) signals for small nitroxides at W-band are also reported. Results are compared with multifrequency measurements of T1e previously reported for these molecules in the range of 2 to 35 GHz (J.S. Hyde et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 108 (2004) 9524–9529). The values of T1e decrease at 94 GHz relative to values at 35 GHz. PMID:18547848

  4. Comparing continuous wave progressive saturation EPR and time domain saturation recovery EPR over the entire motional range of nitroxide spin labels.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Robert D; Canaan, Stephane; Gladden, James A; Gelb, Michael H; Mailer, Colin; Robinson, Bruce H

    2004-07-01

    The measurement of spin-lattice relaxation rates from spin labels, such as nitroxides, in the presence and absence of spin relaxants provides information that is useful for determining biomolecular properties such as nucleic acid dynamics and the interaction of proteins with membranes. We compare X-band continuous wave (CW) and pulsed or time domain (TD) EPR methods for obtaining spin-lattice relaxation rates of spin labels across the entire range of rotational motion to which relaxation rates are sensitive. Model nitroxides and spin-labeled biological species are used to illustrate the potential complications that arise in extracting relaxation data under conditions typical to biological experiments. The effect of super hyperfine (SHF) structure is investigated for both CW and TD spectra. First and second harmonic absorption and dispersion CW spectra of the nitroxide spin label, TEMPOL, are all fit simultaneously to a model of SHF structure over a range of microwave amplitudes. The CW spectra are novel because all harmonics and microwave phases were acquired simultaneously using our homebuilt CW/TD spectrometer. The effect of the SHF structure on the pulsed free induction decay (FID) and pulsed saturation recovery spectrum is shown for both protonated and deuterated TEMPOL. We present novel pulsed saturation recovery measurements on biological molecules, including spin-lattice relaxation rates of spin-labeled proteins and spin-labeled double-stranded DNA. The impact of structure and dynamics on relaxation rates are discussed in the context of each of these examples. Collisional relaxation rates with oxygen and transition metal paramagnetic relaxants are extracted using both continuous wave and time domain methods. The extent of the errors inherent in the CW method and the advantages of pulsed methods for unambiguously measuring collisional relaxation rates are discussed. Spin-lattice relaxation rates, determined by both CW and pulsed methods, are used to determine

  5. Long-Range Distance Measurements in Proteins at Physiological Temperatures Using Saturation Recovery EPR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Site-directed spin labeling in combination with EPR is a powerful method for providing distances on the nm scale in biological systems. The most popular strategy, double electron–electron resonance (DEER), is carried out at cryogenic temperatures (50–80 K) to increase the short spin–spin relaxation time (T2) upon which the technique relies. A challenge is to measure long-range distances (20–60 Å) in proteins near physiological temperatures. Toward this goal we are investigating an alternative approach based on the distance-dependent enhancement of spin–lattice relaxation rate (T1–1) of a nitroxide spin label by a paramagnetic metal. With a commonly used nitroxide side chain (R1) and Cu2+, it has been found that interspin distances ≤25 Å can be determined in this way (Jun et al. Biochemistry2006, 45, 11666). Here, the upper limit of the accessible distance is extended to ≈40 Å using spin labels with long T1, a high-affinity 5-residue Cu2+ binding loop inserted into the protein sequence, and pulsed saturation recovery to measure relaxation enhancement. Time-domain Cu2+ electron paramagnetic resonance, quantum mechanical calculations, and molecular dynamics simulations provide information on the structure and geometry of the Cu2+ loop and indicate that the metal ion is well-localized in the protein. An important aspect of these studies is that both Cu2+/nitroxide DEER at cryogenic temperatures and T1 relaxation measurements at room temperature can be carried out on the same sample, allowing both validation of the relaxation method and assessment of the effect of freezing on protein structure. PMID:25290172

  6. Membrane fluidity profiles as deduced by saturation-recovery EPR measurements of spin-lattice relaxation times of spin labels

    PubMed Central

    Mainali, Laxman; Feix, Jimmy B.; Hyde, James S.; Subczynski, Witold K.

    2011-01-01

    There are no easily obtainable EPR spectral parameters for lipid spin labels that describe profiles of membrane fluidity. The order parameter, which is most often used as a measure of membrane fluidity, describes the amplitude of wobbling motion of alkyl chains relative to the membrane normal and does not contain explicitly time or velocity. Thus, this parameter can be considered as nondynamic. The spin-lattice relaxation rate (T−11) obtained from saturation-recovery EPR measurements of lipid spin labels in deoxygenated samples depends primarily on the rotational correlation time of the nitroxide moiety within the lipid bilayer. Thus, T−11 can be used as a convenient quantitative measure of membrane fluidity that reflects local membrane dynamics. T−11 profiles obtained for 1-palmitoyl-2-(n-doxylstearoyl)phosphatidylcholine (n-PC) spin labels in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) membranes with and without 50 mol% cholesterol are presented in parallel with profiles of the rotational diffusion coefficient, R⊥, obtained from simulation of EPR spectra using Freed's model. These profiles are compared with profiles of the order parameter obtained directly from EPR spectra and with profiles of the order parameter obtained from simulation of EPR spectra. It is shown that T−11 and R⊥ profiles reveal changes in membrane fluidity that depend on the motional properties of the lipid alkyl chain. We find that cholesterol has a rigidifying effect only to the depth occupied by the rigid steroid ring structure and a fluidizing effect at deeper locations. These effects cannot be differentiated by profiles of the order parameter. All profiles in this study were obtained at X-band (9.5 GHz). PMID:21868272

  7. 20 °C, 9 GHz CW-EPR saturation measurements of five selected Alberta coals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudynska, J.; Buckmaster, H. A.; Duczmal, T.

    1991-12-01

    This paper reports the first determination of the spin-lattice (T_1) and spin-spin (T_2) relaxation times at 20 °C for two subbituminous and three hv bituminous selected Alberta coals using 9 GHz CW-EPR saturation measurements. Argand diagrammatic techniques were used to verify that the lineshapes were Lorentzian since the deviation was less than 4%. Consequently, it was assumed that the CW-EPR spectral resonances could be approximated to homogeneously broadened lineshapes and saturation techniques could be used to determine these relaxation times. The T_1 and T_2 relaxation times are in good agreement with values reported in the literature using saturation measurements, but two orders of magnitude shorter than those obtained using ESE because coal EPR spectral resonances are the unresolved superposition of comparatively narrow homogeneous resonances.

  8. The effects of dose and radiation quality on the shape and power saturation of the EPR signal in alanine.

    PubMed

    Ciesielski, B; Wielopolski, L

    1994-10-01

    Variations in the shape and the power saturation of EPR spectra of L-alanine irradiated with photons, electrons, neutrons and protons are reported. It is shown that the ratio of the intensities of the satellite lines attributable to "spin flips" and the central line depend on the EPR microwave power, and it is proposed as a quantitative measure of the signal saturation effect. Dependence of this ratio on the microwave power is affected by the radiation quality and for doses in excess of 10 kGy by the absorbed dose. At high doses of low-LET radiation these changes are attributed to a high local density of free radicals, while for low doses of high-LET radiation these are due to changes induced in the crystal lattice. Consequently, the conventional peak-to-peak amplitude measurement of the EPR signal intensity is inaccurate when used for high doses and for comparison between radiations with different beam quality. The possibility to determine radiation quality from an EPR measurement is discussed. PMID:7938443

  9. Doppler-resolved kinetics of saturation recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Forthomme, Damien; Hause, Michael L.; Yu, Hua -Gen; Dagdigian, Paul J.; Sears, Trevor J.; Hall, Gregory E.

    2015-04-08

    Frequency modulated laser transient absorption has been used to monitor the ground state rotational energy transfer rates of CN radicals in a double-resonance, depletion recovery experiment. When a pulsed laser is used to burn a hole in the equilibrium ground state population of one rotational state without velocity selection, the population recovery rate is found to depend strongly on the Doppler detuning of a narrow-band probe laser. Similar effects should be apparent for any relaxation rate process that competes effectively with velocity randomization. Alternative methods of extracting thermal rate constants in the presence of these non-thermal conditions are evaluated. Total recovery rate constants, analogous to total removal rate constants in an experiment preparing a single initial rotational level, are in good agreement with quantum scattering calculations, but are slower than previously reported experiments and show qualitatively different rotational state dependence between Ar and He collision partners. As a result, quasi-classical trajectory studies confirm that the differing rotational state dependence is primarily a kinematic effect.

  10. Doppler-resolved kinetics of saturation recovery

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Forthomme, Damien; Hause, Michael L.; Yu, Hua -Gen; Dagdigian, Paul J.; Sears, Trevor J.; Hall, Gregory E.

    2015-04-08

    Frequency modulated laser transient absorption has been used to monitor the ground state rotational energy transfer rates of CN radicals in a double-resonance, depletion recovery experiment. When a pulsed laser is used to burn a hole in the equilibrium ground state population of one rotational state without velocity selection, the population recovery rate is found to depend strongly on the Doppler detuning of a narrow-band probe laser. Similar effects should be apparent for any relaxation rate process that competes effectively with velocity randomization. Alternative methods of extracting thermal rate constants in the presence of these non-thermal conditions are evaluated. Totalmore » recovery rate constants, analogous to total removal rate constants in an experiment preparing a single initial rotational level, are in good agreement with quantum scattering calculations, but are slower than previously reported experiments and show qualitatively different rotational state dependence between Ar and He collision partners. As a result, quasi-classical trajectory studies confirm that the differing rotational state dependence is primarily a kinematic effect.« less

  11. Direct Oil Recovery from Saturated Carbon Nanotube Sponges.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiying; Xue, Yahui; Zou, Mingchu; Zhang, Dongxiao; Cao, Anyuan; Duan, Huiling

    2016-05-18

    Oil adsorption by porous materials is a major strategy for water purification and industrial spill cleanup; it is of great interest if the adsorbed oil can be safely recovered from those porous media. Here, direct oil recovery from fully saturated bulk carbon nanotube (CNT) sponges by displacing oil with water in controlled manner is shown. Surfactant-assisted electrocapillary imbibition is adopted to drive aqueous electrolyte into the sponge and extrude organic oil out continuously at low potentials (up to -1.2 V). More than 95 wt % of oil adsorbed within the sponge can be recovered, via a single electrocapillary process. Recovery of different oils with a wide range of viscosities is demonstrated, and the remaining CNT sponge can be reused with similar recovery capacity. A direct and efficient method is provided to recover oil from CNT sponges by water imbibition, which has many potential environmental and energy applications. PMID:27120687

  12. Relaxation time determinations by progressive saturation EPR: effects of molecular motion and Zeeman modulation for spin labels.

    PubMed

    Livshits, V A; Páli, T; Marsh, D

    1998-07-01

    The EPR spectra of nitroxide spin labels have been simulated as a function of microwave field, H1, taking into account both magnetic field modulation and molecular rotation. It is found that the saturation of the second integral, S, of the first harmonic in-phase absorption spectrum is approximated by that predicted for slow-passage conditions, that is, S approximately H1/1 + PH21, in all cases. This result is independent of the degree of inhomogeneous broadening. In general, the fitting parameter, P, depends not only on the T1 and T2 relaxation times, but also on the rate of molecular reorientation and on the modulation frequency. Calibrations for determining the relaxation times are established from the simulations. For a given modulation frequency and molecular reorientation rate, the parameter obtained by fitting the saturation curves is given by 1/P = a + 1/gamma2eT1 . Teff2, where Teff2 is the effective T2. For molecular reorientation frequencies in the range 2 x 10(7)-2 x 10(8) s-1, Teff2 is dominated by the molecular dynamics and is only weakly dependent on the intrinsic T02, allowing a direct estimation of T1. For reorientation frequencies outside this range, the (T1T2) product may be determined from the calibrations. The method is applied to determining relaxation times for spin labels undergoing different rates of rotational reorientation in a variety of environments, including those of biological relevance, and is verified experimentally by the relaxation rate enhancements induced by paramagnetic ions. PMID:9654471

  13. Recovery of ectomycorrhiza after 'nitrogen saturation' of a conifer forest.

    PubMed

    Högberg, Peter; Johannisson, Christian; Yarwood, Stephanie; Callesen, Ingeborg; Näsholm, Torgny; Myrold, David D; Högberg, Mona N

    2011-01-01

    Trees reduce their carbon (C) allocation to roots and mycorrhizal fungi in response to high nitrogen (N) additions, which should reduce the N retention capacity of forests. The time needed for recovery of mycorrhizas after termination of N loading remains unknown. Here, we report the long-term impact of N loading and the recovery of ectomycorrhiza after high N loading on a Pinus sylvestris forest. We analysed the N% and abundance of the stable isotope (15) N in tree needles and soil, soil microbial fatty acid biomarkers and fungal DNA. Needles in N-loaded plots became enriched in (15) N, reflecting decreased N retention by mycorrhizal fungi and isotopic discrimination against (15) N during loss of N. Meanwhile, needles in N-limited (control) plots became depleted in (15) N, reflecting high retention of (15) N by mycorrhizal fungi. N loading was terminated after 20yr. The δ(15) N and N% of the needles decreased 6yr after N loading had been terminated, and approached values in control plots after 15yr. This decrease, and the larger contributions compared with N-loaded plots of a fungal fatty acid biomarker and ectomycorrhizal sequences, suggest recovery of ectomycorrhiza. High N loading rapidly decreased the functional role of ectomycorrhiza in the forest N cycle, but significant recovery occurred within 6-15yr after termination of N loading. PMID:20880225

  14. Spin-Label CW Microwave Power Saturation and Rapid Passage with Triangular Non-Adiabatic Rapid Sweep (NARS) and Adiabatic Rapid Passage (ARP) EPR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kittell, Aaron W.; Hyde, James S.

    2015-01-01

    Non-adiabatic rapid passage (NARS) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was introduced by Kittell, A.W., Camenisch, T.G., Ratke, J.J. Sidabras, J.W., Hyde, J.S., 2011 as a general purpose technique to collect the pure absorption response. The technique has been used to improve sensitivity relative to sinusoidal magnetic field modulation, increase the range of inter-spin distances that can be measured under near physiological conditions, and enhance spectral resolution in copper (II) spectra. In the present work, the method is extended to CW microwave power saturation of spin-labeled T4 Lysozyme (T4L). As in the cited papers, rapid triangular sweep of the polarizing magnetic field was superimposed on slow sweep across the spectrum. Adiabatic rapid passage (ARP) effects were encountered in samples undergoing very slow rotational diffusion as the triangular magnetic field sweep rate was increased. The paper reports results of variation of experimental parameters at the interface of adiabatic and non-adiabatic rapid sweep conditions. Comparison of the forward (up) and reverse (down) triangular sweeps is shown to be a good indicator of the presence of rapid passage effects. Spectral turning points can be distinguished from spectral regions between turning points in two ways: differential microwave power saturation and differential passage effects. Oxygen accessibility data are shown under NARS conditions that appear similar to conventional field modulation data. However, the sensitivity is much higher, permitting, in principle, experiments at substantially lower protein concentrations. Spectral displays were obtained that appear sensitive to rotational diffusion in the range of rotational correlation times of 10−3 to 10−7 s in a manner that is analogous to saturation transfer spectroscopy. PMID:25917132

  15. Spin-label CW microwave power saturation and rapid passage with triangular non-adiabatic rapid sweep (NARS) and adiabatic rapid passage (ARP) EPR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittell, Aaron W.; Hyde, James S.

    2015-06-01

    Non-adiabatic rapid passage (NARS) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was introduced by Kittell et al. (2011) as a general purpose technique to collect the pure absorption response. The technique has been used to improve sensitivity relative to sinusoidal magnetic field modulation, increase the range of inter-spin distances that can be measured under near physiological conditions (Kittell et al., 2012), and enhance spectral resolution in copper (II) spectra (Hyde et al., 2013). In the present work, the method is extended to CW microwave power saturation of spin-labeled T4 Lysozyme (T4L). As in the cited papers, rapid triangular sweep of the polarizing magnetic field was superimposed on slow sweep across the spectrum. Adiabatic rapid passage (ARP) effects were encountered in samples undergoing very slow rotational diffusion as the triangular magnetic field sweep rate was increased. The paper reports results of variation of experimental parameters at the interface of adiabatic and non-adiabatic rapid sweep conditions. Comparison of the forward (up) and reverse (down) triangular sweeps is shown to be a good indicator of the presence of rapid passage effects. Spectral turning points can be distinguished from spectral regions between turning points in two ways: differential microwave power saturation and differential passage effects. Oxygen accessibility data are shown under NARS conditions that appear similar to conventional field modulation data. However, the sensitivity is much higher, permitting, in principle, experiments at substantially lower protein concentrations. Spectral displays were obtained that appear sensitive to rotational diffusion in the range of rotational correlation times of 10-3 to 10-7 s in a manner that is analogous to saturation transfer spectroscopy.

  16. Spin-label CW microwave power saturation and rapid passage with triangular non-adiabatic rapid sweep (NARS) and adiabatic rapid passage (ARP) EPR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kittell, Aaron W; Hyde, James S

    2015-06-01

    Non-adiabatic rapid passage (NARS) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was introduced by Kittell et al. (2011) as a general purpose technique to collect the pure absorption response. The technique has been used to improve sensitivity relative to sinusoidal magnetic field modulation, increase the range of inter-spin distances that can be measured under near physiological conditions (Kittell et al., 2012), and enhance spectral resolution in copper (II) spectra (Hyde et al., 2013). In the present work, the method is extended to CW microwave power saturation of spin-labeled T4 Lysozyme (T4L). As in the cited papers, rapid triangular sweep of the polarizing magnetic field was superimposed on slow sweep across the spectrum. Adiabatic rapid passage (ARP) effects were encountered in samples undergoing very slow rotational diffusion as the triangular magnetic field sweep rate was increased. The paper reports results of variation of experimental parameters at the interface of adiabatic and non-adiabatic rapid sweep conditions. Comparison of the forward (up) and reverse (down) triangular sweeps is shown to be a good indicator of the presence of rapid passage effects. Spectral turning points can be distinguished from spectral regions between turning points in two ways: differential microwave power saturation and differential passage effects. Oxygen accessibility data are shown under NARS conditions that appear similar to conventional field modulation data. However, the sensitivity is much higher, permitting, in principle, experiments at substantially lower protein concentrations. Spectral displays were obtained that appear sensitive to rotational diffusion in the range of rotational correlation times of 10(-3) to 10(-7) s in a manner that is analogous to saturation transfer spectroscopy. PMID:25917132

  17. Direct reconstruction of T1 from k-space using a radial saturation-recovery sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Liyong; DiBella, Edward V. R.

    2011-03-01

    Contrast agent concentration ([CA]) must be known accurately to quantify dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MR imaging. Accurate concentrations can be obtained if the longitudinal relaxation rate constant T1 is known both pre- and post-contrast injection. Post-contrast signal intensity in the images is often saturated and an approximation to T1 can be difficult to obtain. One method that has been proposed for accurate T1 estimation effectively acquires multiple images with different effective saturation recovery times (eSRTs) and fits the images to the equation for T1 recovery to obtain T1 values. This was done with a radial saturation-recovery sequence for 2D imaging of myocardial perfusion with DCE MRI. This multi-SRT method assumes that the signal intensity is constant for different readouts in each image. Here this assumption is not necessary as a model-based reconstruction method is proposed that directly reconstructs an image of T1 values from k-space. The magnetization for each ray at each readout pulse is modeled in the reconstruction with Bloch equations. Computer simulations based on a 72 ray cardiac DCE MRI acquisition were used to test the method. The direct model-based reconstruction gave accurate T1 values and was slightly more accurate than the multi-SRT method that used three sub-images.

  18. Toward Two-Color Sub-Doppler Saturation Recovery Kinetics in CN (x, v = 0, J)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hong; Forthomme, Damien; Sears, Trevor; Hall, Gregory; Dagdigian, Paul

    2015-06-01

    Collision-induced rotational energy transfer among rotational levels of ground state CN (X 2σ+, v = 0) radicals has been probed by saturation recovery experiments, using high-resolution, polarized transient FM spectroscopy to probe the recovery of population and the decay of alignment following ns pulsed laser depletion of selected CN rotational levels. Despite the lack of Doppler selection in the pulsed depletion and the thermal distribution of collision velocities, the recovery kinetics are found to depend on the probed Doppler shift of the depleted signal. The observed Doppler-shift-dependent recovery rates are a measure of the velocity dependence of the inelastic cross sections, combined with the moderating effects of velocity-changing elastic collisions. New experiments are underway, in which the pulsed saturation is performed with sub-Doppler velocity selection. The time evolution of the spectral hole bleached in the initially thermal CN absorption spectrum can characterize speed-dependent inelastic collisions along with competing elastic velocity-changing collisions, all as a function of the initially bleached velocity group and rotational state. The initial time evolution of the depletion recovery spectrum can be compared to a stochastic model, using differential cross sections for elastic scattering as well as speed-dependent total inelastic cross sections, derived from ab initio scattering calculations. Progress to date will be reported. Acknowledgments: Work at Brookhaven National Laboratory was carried out under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886 and DE-SC0012704 with the U.S. Department of Energy and supported by its Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences.

  19. Ultrafast recovery time and broadband saturable absorption properties of black phosphorus suspension

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yingwei; Huang, Guanghui; Chen, Jiazhang; Xiao, Si He, Jun; Mu, Haoran; Bao, Qiaoliang; Lin, Shenghuang

    2015-08-31

    As a new type of two-dimensional crystal material, black phosphorus (BP) exhibits excellent electronics and optical performance. Herein, we focus on carrier relaxation dynamics and nonlinear optical properties of BP suspension. Atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and optical transmission spectrum are employed to characterize the structure and linear optical properties of the BP. Additionally, pump-probe experiments at wavelength of 1550 nm were carried out to study the carrier dynamics in BP suspension, and ultrafast recovery time was observed (τ{sub s} = 24 ± 2 fs). Furthermore, we demonstrate the saturable absorption signals by open aperture Z-scan experiments at wavelengths of 1550 nm, 532 nm, and 680 nm. The results indicate that BP has broadband saturable absorption properties and the nonlinear absorption coefficients were determined to be β{sub 2} = −0.20 ± 0.08 × 10{sup −3 }cm/GW (532 nm), β{sub 2} = −0.12 ± 0.05 × 10{sup −3 }cm/GW (680 nm), and β{sub 2} = −0.15 ± 0.09 × 10{sup −3 }cm/GW (1550 nm)

  20. TIME-LAPSE SEISMIC MODELING & INVERSION OF CO2 SATURATION FOR SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY

    SciTech Connect

    Mark A. Meadows

    2006-03-31

    Injection of carbon dioxide (CO2) into subsurface aquifers for geologic storage/sequestration, and into subsurface hydrocarbon reservoirs for enhanced oil recovery, has become an important topic to the nation because of growing concerns related to global warming and energy security. In this project we developed new ways to predict and quantify the effects of CO2 on seismic data recorded over porous reservoir/aquifer rock systems. This effort involved the research and development of new technology to: (1) Quantitatively model the rock physics effects of CO2 injection in porous saline and oil/brine reservoirs (both miscible and immiscible). (2) Quantitatively model the seismic response to CO2 injection (both miscible and immiscible) from well logs (1D). (3) Perform quantitative inversions of time-lapse 4D seismic data to estimate injected CO2 distributions within subsurface reservoirs and aquifers. This work has resulted in an improved ability to remotely monitor the injected CO2 for safe storage and enhanced hydrocarbon recovery, predict the effects of CO2 on time-lapse seismic data, and estimate injected CO2 saturation distributions in subsurface aquifers/reservoirs. We applied our inversion methodology to a 3D time-lapse seismic dataset from the Sleipner CO2 sequestration project, Norwegian North Sea. We measured changes in the seismic amplitude and traveltime at the top of the Sleipner sandstone reservoir and used these time-lapse seismic attributes in the inversion. Maps of CO2 thickness and its standard deviation were generated for the topmost layer. From this information, we estimated that 7.4% of the total CO2 injected over a five-year period had reached the top of the reservoir. This inversion approach could also be applied to the remaining levels within the anomalous zone to obtain an estimate of the total CO2 injected.

  1. Preoperative mannitol infusion improves perioperative cerebral oxygen saturation and enhances postoperative recovery after laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Mousa, Wesam F.; Mowafi, Hany A.; Al-Metwalli, Roshdi R.; Al-Ghamdi, Abdulmohsin A.; Al-Gameel, Haytham Z.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To test the effect of preoperative mannitol infusion on perioperative decreased cerebral oxygen saturation (rSO2) during laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Methods: Forty patients scheduled for laparoscopic cholecystectomy were enrolled in this study conducted at Dammam Hospital of the University, Dammam, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia from December 2013 to June 2014. Patients received either 0.5 g/kg of 20% intravenous mannitol infusion over 10 minutes before induction of anesthesia (group M), or an equal volume of normal saline instead (group C). Primary outcome variable was rSO2. Other variables included extubation time, clinical assessment of consciousness recovery using the Modified Observer’s Assessment of Alertness/Sedation Scale (OAA/S), and the mini-mental state examination (MMSE) for cognitive evaluation. Results: Anesthesia induction increased rSO2 in both groups. Pneumoperitoneum decreased rSO2 in group C, but not in group M. This drop in rSO2 in the group C reached its maximum 30 minutes after extubation, and was significantly less than the preinduction value. Time to extubation in group M was significantly shorter compared to group C (p=0.007). The OAAS in group M at 10 min after extubation was significantly higher compared to group C. No differences were found between the 2 groups in cognitive function as measured by MMSE score. Conclusion: Preoperative mannitol infusion maintains perioperative rSO2 during laparoscopic cholecystectomy and shortens extubation time with earlier resurgence of OAAS. PMID:26446331

  2. EPR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, Sandra S.; Eaton, Gareth R.

    Useful EPR imaging has been achieved using simple gradient coils on a standard spectrometer. Resolution of less than 1 mm is possible without deconvolution of the resulting spectra. Examples are presented using DPPH and nitroxyl radicals.

  3. Increased endogenous ascorbyl free radical formation with singlet oxygen scavengers in reperfusion injury: an EPR and functional recovery study in rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Lee, J W; Bobst, E V; Wang, Y G; Ashraf, M M; Bobst, A M

    2000-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of singlet oxygen ((1)O2) scavengers on functional recovery and ascorbyl free radical (AFR) formation in isolated ischemic rat hearts. Hearts were subjected to 40 min. of global ischemia followed by 30 min. of reperfusion. Hemodynamics were measured as heart rate (HR), coronary flow (CF), left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP) and contractility (dP/dt). Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was used to measure AFR release in coronary perfusate during the first two min. of reperfusion as a function of ROS scavengers. Relative to ischemic controls the administration of the (1)O2 scavengers 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-piperidone x HCl (4-oxo-TEMP), carnosine (beta-alanyl-L-histidine) or a combination of the two significantly improved functional recovery as measured by LVDP. While no AFR signal was detected in coronary perfusate collected during preischemic perfusion with and without (1)O2 scavengers, the AFR background signal due to ischemia was significantly increased with the (1)O2 and *O2- scavengers. No such increase was observed with the hydroxyl radical (*OH) scavenger mannitol. Besides the AFR increase with the (1)O2 and *O2- scavengers the functional recovery was only significantly improved with the (1)O2 scavengers. In contrast to previous AFR studies we found with endogenous AFR that an increased AFR formation is not necessarily only reflecting increased oxidative stress but can also report improved functional recovery. Combining the hemodynamic data with increased AFR formation in the presence of several different ROS scavengers gives supportive evidence for (1)O2 also being involved in reperfusion injury. PMID:11156483

  4. Recovery of saturated video signals from vidicons by dynamic cathode biasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, G. J.

    1991-05-01

    Vidicons used for imaging of pulsed or transient light sources must instantaneously record gray scale images on photoconductive targets. Typical targets, which store photocharge proportional to the varying light intensity in the optical image, have larger positive charge storage capacity than the negative charge available from the electron beam used for neutralizing the target during read-out. Therefore, the target has much higher dynamic range, typically 3 to 5 times larger than the beam. The result is that several scans of the target are required to obtain all the charge from a fully charged target. For applications where only one scan of the target is permissible, this can result in reading the target data in saturated form, with the loss of gray scale information. However, with dynamic rebiasing of the vidicon cathode, the data can be recovered unsaturated. This technique is extremely powerful because it allows instantaneous adjustment after the target has been exposed to light pulses but before the target is read out. In effect, a real time gain or sensitivity control function is implemented by the technique. Alternatively, the technique can be viewed as a means to dynamically select strategic portions of the vidicon transfer curve for immediate read-out, which otherwise would either be saturated if read out immediate read-out, which otherwise would either be saturated if read out immediately or would require several read-outs. Although only transient imaging applications (usually with single field read-out) are addressed, the technique should find application in conventional continuous read-write TV cameras. The principle of operation, associated circuitry, and examples of image retrieval are presented.

  5. The estimation of recovery time of calf muscle oxygen saturation during exercise by using functional near infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, M. A.; Shojaeifar, M.; Mohajerani, E.

    2014-08-01

    Several methods of near infrared spectroscopy such as functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) and pulse oximetry have been applied for monitoring of tissue oxygenation or arterial oxygen saturation. Some vascular diseases can be diagnosed through measurements of tissue oxygenation. In this study, the temporal variation of oxygenation of calf muscle after exercise is studied by fNIRS. First, the accuracy of a low-cost fNIRS system is studied by measuring the oxygenation of a lipid phantom. Moreover, in-vivo study is performed to evaluate the precision of this system. Then, the variation of muscle oxygenation of four persons during exercise is measured and also the recovery time after walking/running is measured by this fNIRS system.

  6. Pulsed EPR Imaging of Nitroxides in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hyodo, Fuminori; Matsumoto, Shingo; Devasahayam, Nallathamby; Dharmaraj, Christopher; Subramanian, Sankaran; Mitchell, James B.; Krishna, Murali C.

    2012-01-01

    Nitroxides, unlike trityl radicals, have shorter T2s which until now were not detectable by time-domain Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectrometer at 300 MHz pulsed EPR since their phase memory times were shorter than the spectrometer recovery times. In the current version of the time-domain EPR spectrometer with improved spectrometer recovery times, we tested the feasibility of detecting signals from nitroxide radicals. Several nitroxides and the trityl radical Oxo63 were tested. Among the nitroxides evaluated, deuterated 15N-Tempone (15N-PDT) was found to have the longest T2. The signal intensity profile as a function of concentration of these agents was evaluated and a bi-phasic behavior was observed; beyond a nitroxide concentration of 1.5 mM, signal intensity was found to decrease as a result of self-broadening. Imaging experiments were carried out with 15N-PDT in solutions equilibrated with 0, 5, 10 and 21% oxygen using the Single Point Imaging (SPI) modality in EPR. The image intensity in these tubes was found to depend on the oxygen concentration which in turn influences the T2 of 15N-PDT. In vivo experiments were demonstrated with 15N-PDT in anesthetized mice where the distribution and metabolism of 15N-PDT could be monitored. This study, for the first time shows the capability to image a cell-permeable nitroxide in mice using pulsed EPR in the SPI modality. PMID:19157932

  7. Multifrequency EPR study on freeze-dried fruits before and after X-ray irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yordanov, N. D.; Aleksieva, K.; Dimitrova, A.; Georgieva, L.; Tzvetkova, E.

    2006-09-01

    X-, K- and Q-band EPR studies on lyophilized whole pulp parts of blue plum, apricot, peach, melon as well as achens and pulp separately of strawberry before and after X-ray irradiation are reported. Before irradiation all samples show in X band a weak singlet EPR line with g=2.0030±0.0005, except melon, which is EPR silent. Immediately after irradiation all samples exhibit complex fruit-depending spectra, which decay with time and change to give, in ca. 50 days, an asymmetric singlet EPR line with g=2.0041±0.0005. Only apricot pulp gave a typical "sugar-like" EPR spectrum. Singlet EPR lines recorded after irradiation in X -band are K- and Q-band resolved as typical anisotropic EPR spectra with g=2.0023±0.0003 and g⊥=2.0041±0.0005. In addition, K- and Q-band EPR spectra of all samples show a superposition with the six EPR lines of Mn 2+ naturally present in the fruits. The saturation behavior of the EPR spectra of achens of lyophilized and fresh strawberry is also studied. The differences in g factors of samples before and after X-ray irradiation might be used for the identification of radiation processing of fruits in the case of pulp and the differences in the EPR saturation behavior might be used for the achens of strawberry.

  8. Effects of Fluid Saturation on Gas Recovery from Class-3 Hydrate Accumulations Using Depressurization: Case Study of Yuan-An Ridge Site in Southwestern Offshore Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yi-Jyun; Wu, Cheng-Yueh; Hsieh, Bieng-Zih

    2016-04-01

    Gas hydrates are crystalline compounds in which guest gas molecules are trapped in host lattices of ice crystals. In Taiwan, the significant efforts have recently begun to evaluate the reserves of hydrate because the vast accumulations of gas hydrates had been recognized in southwestern offshore Taiwan. Class-3 type hydrate accumulations are referred to an isolated hydrate layer without an underlying zone of mobile fluids, and the entire hydrate layer may be well within the hydrate stability zone. The depressurization method is a useful dissociation method for gas production from Class-3 hydrate accumulations. The dissociation efficiency is controlled by the responses of hydrate to the propagating pressure disturbance, and the pressure propagation is relating to the amount (or saturation) of the mobile fluid in pore space of the hydrate layer. The purpose of this study is to study the effects of fluid saturation on the gas recovery from a class-3 hydrate accumulation using depressurization method. The case of a class-3 hydrate deposit of Yuan-An Ridge in southwestern offshore Taiwan is studied. The numerical method was used in this study. The reservoir simulator we used to study the dissociation of hydrate and the production of gas was the STARS simulator developed by CMG, which coupled heat transfer, geo-chemical, geo-mechanical, and multiphase fluid flow mechanisms. The study case of Yuan-An Ridge is located in southwestern offshore Taiwan. The hydrate deposit was found by the bottom simulating reflectors (BSRs). The geological structure of the studied hydrate deposit was digitized to build the geological model (grids) of the case. The formation parameters, phase behavior data, rock and fluid properties, and formation's initial conditions were assigned sequentially to grid blocks, and the completion and operation conditions were designed to wellbore blocks to finish the numerical model. The changes of reservoir pressure, temperature, saturation due to the hydrate

  9. Pulsed EPR imaging of nitroxides in mice.

    PubMed

    Hyodo, Fuminori; Matsumoto, Shingo; Devasahayam, Nallathamby; Dharmaraj, Christopher; Subramanian, Sankaran; Mitchell, James B; Krishna, Murali C

    2009-04-01

    Nitroxides, unlike trityl radicals, have shorter T(2)s which until now were not detectable in vivo by a time-domain pulsed Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectrometer at 300 MHz since their phase memory times were shorter than the spectrometer recovery times. In the current version of the time-domain EPR spectrometer with improved spectrometer recovery times, the feasibility of detecting signals from nitroxide radicals was tested. Among the nitroxides evaluated, deuterated (15)N-Tempone ((15)N-PDT) was found to have the longest T(2). The signal intensity profile as a function of concentration of these agents was evaluated and a biphasic behavior was observed; beyond a nitroxide concentration of 1.5mM, signal intensity was found to decrease as a result of self-broadening. Imaging experiments were carried out with (15)N-PDT in solutions equilibrated with 0%, 5%, 10%, and 21% oxygen using the single point imaging (SPI) modality in EPR. The image intensity in these tubes was found to depend on the oxygen concentration which in turn influences the T(2) of (15)N-PDT. In vivo experiments were demonstrated with (15)N-PDT in anesthetized mice where the distribution and metabolism of (15)N-PDT could be monitored. This study, for the first time shows the capability to image a cell-permeable nitroxide in mice using pulsed EPR in the SPI modality. PMID:19157932

  10. 1.22 {mu}m GaInNAs Saturable Absorber Mirrors with Tailored Recovery Time

    SciTech Connect

    Puustinen, Janne; Guina, Mircea; Korpijaervi, Ville-Markus; Tukiainen, Antti; Kivistoe, Samuli; Pessa, Markus; Marcinkevicius, Saulius

    2010-11-10

    The effect of in-situ N-ion irradiation on the recombination dynamics of GaInNAs/GaAs semiconductor saturable absorber mirrors has been studied. The samples were fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy using a radio frequency plasma source for nitrogen incorporation in the absorber layers as well as for the irradiation. The recombination dynamics of irradiated samples were studied by pump-probe measurements. The recombination time of the absorbers could be reduced by increasing the irradiation time. The effect of the reduced recombination time on the pulse dynamics of a mode-locked laser setup was studied with a Bi-doped fibre laser. The pulse quality was found to improve with increased irradiation time and reduced recombination time, demonstrating the potential of the in-situ irradiation method for device applications.

  11. Nitrification cessation and recovery in an aerated saturated vertical subsurface flow treatment wetland: Field studies and microscale biofilm modeling.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Clodagh; Rajabzadeh, Amin R; Weber, Kela P; Nivala, Jaime; Wallace, Scott D; Cooper, David J

    2016-06-01

    In aerated treatment wetlands, oxygen availability is not a limiting factor in sustaining a high level of nitrification in wastewater treatment. In the case of an air blower failure, nitrification would cease, potentially causing adverse effects to the nitrifying bacteria. A field trial was completed investigating nitrification loss when aeration is switched off, and the system recovery rate after the aeration is switched back on. Loss of dissolved oxygen was observed to be more rapid than loss of nitrification. Nitrate was observed in the effluent long after the aeration was switched off (48h+). A complementary modeling study predicted nitrate diffusion out of biofilm over a 48h period. After two weeks of no aeration in the established system, nitrification recovered within two days, whereas nitrification establishment in a new system was previously observed to require 20-45days. These results suggest that once established resident nitrifying microbial communities are quite robust. PMID:26967335

  12. Spin labeling EPR.

    PubMed

    Klare, Johann P; Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen

    2009-01-01

    Site-directed spin labeling in combination with electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy has emerged as an efficient tool to elucidate the structure and conformational dynamics of biomolecules under native-like conditions. This article summarizes the basics as well as recent progress of site-directed spin labeling. Continuous wave EPR spectra analyses and pulse EPR techniques are reviewed with special emphasis on applications to the sensory rhodopsin-transducer complex mediating the photophobic response of the halophilic archaeum Natronomonas pharaonis and the photosynthetic reaction center from Rhodobacter sphaeroides R26. PMID:19728138

  13. Combining Steady-State and Dynamic Methods for Determining Absolute Signs of Hyperfine Interactions: Pulsed ENDOR Saturation and Recovery (PESTRE)

    PubMed Central

    Doan, Peter E.

    2010-01-01

    The underlying causes of asymmetric intensities in Davies pulsed ENDOR spectra that are associated with the signs of the hyperfine interaction are reinvestigated. The intensity variations in these asymmetric ENDOR patterns are best described as shifts in an apparent baseline intensity that occurs dynamically following on-resonance ENDOR transitions. We have developed an extremely straightforward multi-sequence protocol that is capable of giving the sign of the hyperfine interaction by probing a single ENDOR transition, without reference to its partner transition. This technique, Pulsed ENDOR Saturatation and Recovery (PESTRE) monitors dynamic shifts in the ‘baseline’ following measurements at a single RF frequency (single ENDOR peak), rather than observing anomalous ENDOR intensity differences between the two branches of an ENDOR response. These baseline shifts, referred to as dynamic reference levels (DRLs), can be directly tied to the electron spin manifold from which that ENDOR transition arises. The application of this protocol is demonstrated on 57Fe ENDOR of a 2Fe-2S ferredoxin. We use the 14N ENDOR transitions of the S = 3/2 [Fe(II)NO]2+ center of the non-heme iron enzyme, anthranilate dioxygenase (AntDO) to examine the details of the relaxation model using PESTRE. PMID:21075026

  14. Spin-label W-band EPR with seven-loop–six-gap resonator: Application to lens membranes derived from eyes of a single donor

    PubMed Central

    Mainali, Laxman; Sidabras, Jason W.; Camenisch, Theodore G.; Ratke, Joseph J.; Raguz, Marija; Hyde, James S.; Subczynski, Witold K.

    2014-01-01

    Spin-label W-band (94 GHz) EPR with a five-loop–four-gap resonator (LGR) was successfully applied to study membrane properties (L. Mainali, J.S. Hyde, W.K. Subczynski, Using spin-label W-band EPR to study membrane fluidity in samples of small volume, J. Magn. Reson. 226 (2013) 35–44). In that study, samples were equilibrated with the selected gas mixture outside the resonator in a sample volume ~100 times larger than the sensitive volume of the LGR and transferred to the resonator in a quartz capillary. A seven-loop–six-gap W-band resonator has been developed. This resonator permits measurements on aqueous samples of 150 nL volume positioned in a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) gas permeable sample tube. Samples can be promptly deoxygenated or equilibrated with an air/nitrogen mixture inside the resonator, which is significant in saturation-recovery measurements and in spin-label oximetry. This approach was tested for lens lipid membranes derived from lipids extracted from two porcine lenses (single donor). Profiles of membrane fluidity and the oxygen transport parameter were obtained from saturation-recovery EPR using phospholipid analog spin-labels. Cholesterol analog spin-labels allowed discrimination of the cholesterol bilayer domain and acquisition of oxygen transport parameter profiles across this domain. Results were compared with those obtained previously for membranes derived from a pool of 100 lenses. Results demonstrate that EPR at W-band can be successfully used to study aqueous biological samples of small volume under controlled oxygen concentration. PMID:25541571

  15. Comparative study of some new EPR dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alzimami, K. S.; Maghraby, Ahmed M.; Bradley, D. A.

    2014-02-01

    Investigations have been made of four new radiation dosimetry EPR candidates from the same family of materials: sulfamic acid, sulfanillic acid, homotaurine, and taurine. Mass energy attenuation coefficients, mass stopping power values and the time dependence of the radiation induced radicals are compared. Also investigated are the microwave saturation behavior and the effect of applied modulation amplitude on both peak-to-peak line width (WPP) and peak-to-peak signal height (HPP). The dosimeters are characterized by simple spectra and stable radiation-induced radicals over reasonable durations, especially in taurine dosimeters. Sulfamic acid dosimeters possessed the highest sensitivity followed by taurine and homotaurine and sulfanillic.

  16. Recovery

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video discusses the recovery events that occur in high-power rocketry and the various devices used in safely recovering the rocket. The video includes a discussion of black powder and ejection...

  17. [Recovery].

    PubMed

    Estingoy, Pierrette; Gilliot, Élodie; Parisot, Clément

    2015-01-01

    The historical fatalism of the impossibility of recovering from psychosis eased from the 1970s with the shaping of the idea of a possible recovery. Recovery is today the objective for the patient and caregivers. The key to achieving this lies in the encounter with Others. A collective approach, on the level of the institution, must be established. The aim is to create opportunities for the patient to express their doubts and feelings. PMID:26363659

  18. Rapid frequency scan EPR.

    PubMed

    Tseitlin, Mark; Rinard, George A; Quine, Richard W; Eaton, Sandra S; Eaton, Gareth R

    2011-08-01

    In rapid frequency scan EPR with triangular scans, sufficient time must be allowed to insure that the magnetization in the x, y plane decays to baseline at the end of the scan, which typically is about 5T(2) after the spins are excited. To permit relaxation of signals excited toward the extremes of the scan the total scan time required may be much longer than 5T(2). However, with periodic, saw-tooth excitation, the slow-scan EPR spectrum can be recovered by Fourier deconvolution of data recorded with a total scan period of 5T(2), even if some spins are excited later in the scan. This scan time is similar to polyphase excitation methods. The peak power required for either polyphase excitation or rapid frequency scans is substantially smaller than for pulsed EPR. The use of an arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) and cross loop resonator facilitated implementation of the rapid frequency scan experiments reported here. The use of constant continuous low B(1), periodic excitation waveform, and constant external magnetic field is similar to polyphase excitation, but could be implemented without the AWG that is required for polyphase excitation. PMID:21664848

  19. Rapid Frequency Scan EPR

    PubMed Central

    Tseitlin, Mark; Rinard, George A.; Quine, Richard W.; Eaton, Sandra S.; Eaton, Gareth R.

    2011-01-01

    In rapid frequency scan EPR with triangular scans, sufficient time must be allowed to insure that the magnetization in the x,y plane decays to baseline at the end of the scan, which typically is about 5 T2 after the spins are excited. To permit relaxation of signals excited toward the extremes of the scan the total scan time required may be much longer than 5 T2. However, with periodic, saw-tooth excitation, the slow-scan EPR spectrum can be recovered by Fourier deconvolution of data recorded with a total scan period of 5 T2, even if some spins are excited later in the scan. This scan time is similar to polyphase excitation methods. The peak power required for either polyphase excitation or rapid frequency scans is substantially smaller than for pulsed EPR. The use of an arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) and cross loop resonator facilitated implementation of the rapid frequency scan experiments reported here. The use of constant continuous low B1, periodic excitation waveform, and constant external magnetic field is similar to polyphase excitation, but could be implemented without the AWG that is required for polyphase excitation. PMID:21664848

  20. Absorption line CW EPR using an amplitude modulated longitudinal field.

    PubMed

    Fedin, Matvey; Gromov, Igor; Schweiger, Arthur

    2004-11-01

    In standard continuous wave electron paramagnetic resonance (CW-EPR) experiments, the first derivative of absorption lines is detected. This type of a line shape is caused by the magnetic field modulation and is usually an undesired feature, since the sensitivity of CW-EPR drastically decreases with increasing linewidth. A new approach is introduced, which allows for the measurement of absorption line EPR spectra in systems with broad inhomogeneous lines. The method makes use of multiple-photon transitions that are induced in spin systems when a transverse microwave and a longitudinal radio frequency field are simultaneously applied. The absorption lines are obtained by using amplitude modulation of the radio frequency field and slight saturation of the spectral lines. The basics of the new approach are discussed and experimental examples are given. PMID:15504685

  1. Broadband Transmission EPR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, Wilfred R.

    2013-01-01

    EPR spectroscopy employs a resonator operating at a single microwave frequency and phase-sensitive detection using modulation of the magnetic field. The X-band spectrometer is the general standard with a frequency in the 9–10 GHz range. Most (bio)molecular EPR spectra are determined by a combination of the frequency-dependent electronic Zeeman interaction and a number of frequency-independent interactions, notably, electron spin – nuclear spin interactions and electron spin – electron spin interactions, and unambiguous analysis requires data collection at different frequencies. Extant and long-standing practice is to use a different spectrometer for each frequency. We explore the alternative of replacing the narrow-band source plus single-mode resonator with a continuously tunable microwave source plus a non-resonant coaxial transmission cell in an unmodulated external field. Our source is an arbitrary wave digital signal generator producing an amplitude-modulated sinusoidal microwave in combination with a broadband amplifier for 0.8–2.7 GHz. Theory is developed for coaxial transmission with EPR detection as a function of cell dimensions and materials. We explore examples of a doublet system, a high-spin system, and an integer-spin system. Long, straigth, helical, and helico-toroidal cells are developed and tested with dilute aqueous solutions of spin label hydroxy-tempo. A detection limit of circa 5 µM HO-tempo in water at 800 MHz is obtained for the present setup, and possibilities for future improvement are discussed. PMID:23555819

  2. Decolouration of H2SO4 leachate from phosphorus-saturated alum sludge using H2O2 and advanced oxidation processes in phosphorus recovery strategy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, X H; Zhao, Y Q

    2009-12-01

    As a part of attempt for phosphorus (P) recovery from P-saturated alum sludge, which was used as a low-cost P-adsorbent in treatment reed bed for wastewater treatment, decolouration of H(2)SO(4) leachate obtained from previous experiment, possessing a great deal of P, aluminum and red-brown coloured materials (RBCMs), by using H(2)O(2) and advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) was investigated. The use of H(2)O(2) and AOPs in the forms of Fenton (H(2)O(2)/Fe(2 +)) and photo-Fenton (UV/H(2)O(2)/Fe(2 +)) were tested. The changes in colour and total organic carbon (TOC) were taken place as a result of mineralization of RBCMs. The results revealed that all of these three processes examined were efficient. It was found that about 98% colour and 47% TOC can be removed under photo-Fenton treatment after 8 hours of UV irradiation.Correspondingly, the reaction rates of H(2)O(2) and Fenton systems were slow, but 100% colour and 59% TOC removal of H(2)O(2) process and 100% colour and 67% TOC reductions of Fenton process can be achieved after 72 hours of reaction. The changes of structure and molecular weight/size of RBCMs were also evaluated by HPLC and UV-vis spectroscopic analysis. From the results, some chromophores of RBCMs such as aromatic groups were appeared to be easily degraded to the smaller refractory components. Hence, based on the experimental results and considering the investment and expediency of operation, H(2)O(2) and Fenton oxidation could be suitable technologies for the treatment of the RBCMs derived from P-extraction stage by using H(2)SO(4) leaching. PMID:20183514

  3. Retrocausal models for EPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corry, Richard

    2015-02-01

    This paper takes up Huw Price's challenge to develop a retrocausal toy model of the Bell-EPR experiment. I develop three such models which show that a consistent, local, hidden-variables interpretation of the EPR experiment is indeed possible, and which give a feel for the kind of retrocausation involved. The first of the models also makes clear a problematic feature of retrocausation: it seems that we cannot interpret the hidden elements of reality in a retrocausal model as possessing determinate dispositions to affect the outcome of experiments. This is a feature which Price has embraced, but Gordon Belot has argued that this feature renders retrocausal interpretations "unsuitable for formal development", and the lack of such determinate dispositions threatens to undermine the motivation for hidden-variables interpretations in the first place. But Price and Belot are both too quick in their assessment. I show that determinate dispositions are indeed consistent with retrocausation. What is more, I show that the ontological economy allowed by retrocausation holds out the promise of a classical understanding of spin and polarization.

  4. Assessment of Lung Function in Asthma and COPD using Hyperpolarized 129Xe Chemical Shift Saturation Recovery Spectroscopy and Dissolved-Phase MR Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Qing, Kun; Mugler, John P.; Altes, Talissa A.; Jiang, Yun; Mata, Jaime F.; Miller, G. Wilson; Ruset, Iulian C.; Hersman, F. William; Ruppert, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic-resonance spectroscopy and imaging using hyperpolarized xenon-129 show great potential for evaluation of the most important function of the human lung -- gas exchange. In particular, Chemical Shift Saturation Recovery (CSSR) xenon-129 spectroscopy provides important physiological information for the lung as a whole by characterizing the dynamic process of gas exchange, while dissolved-phase xenon-129 imaging captures the time-averaged regional distribution of gas uptake by lung tissue and blood. Herein, we present recent advances in assessing lung function using CSSR spectroscopy and dissolved-phase imaging in a total of 45 subjects (23 healthy, 13 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and 9 asthma). From CSSR acquisitions, the COPD subjects showed red blood cell to tissue/plasma (RBC-to-TP) ratios below the average for the healthy subjects (p<0.001), but significantly higher septal wall thicknesses, as compared with the healthy subjects (p<0.005); the RBC-to-TP ratios for the asthmatics fell outside 2 standard deviations (either higher or lower) from the mean of the healthy subjects although there was no statistically significant difference for the average ratio of the study group as a whole. Similarly, from the 3D DP imaging acquisitions, we found all the ratios (TP-to-GP, RBC-to-GP, RBC-to-TP) measured in the COPD subjects were lower than those from the healthy subjects (p<0.05 for all ratios), while these ratios in the asthmatics differed considerably between subjects. Despite having been performed at different lung inflation levels, the RBC-to-TP ratios measured by CSSR and 3D DP imaging were fairly consistent with each other, with a mean difference of 0.037 (ratios from 3D DP imaging larger). In ten subjects the RBC-to-GP ratios obtained from the 3D DP imaging acquisitions were also highly correlated with their DLCO/Va ratios measured by pulmonary function testing (R=0.91). PMID:25146558

  5. Saturation meter

    DOEpatents

    Gregurech, S.

    1984-08-01

    A saturation meter for use in a pressurized water reactor plant comprising a differential pressure transducer having a first and second pressure sensing means and an alarm. The alarm is connected to the transducer and is preset to activate at a level of saturation prior to the formation of a steam void in the reactor vessel.

  6. EPR, Biology, and Consciousness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goradia, Shantilal

    2006-03-01

    It seems that Darwin, in his concluding remark (1859, p490) ruled out the possibility of cosmic connection to evolution based on the fixed law of gravity, known then. More recent Dirac’s Large Number Hypothesis as described in http://www.arXiv.org/pdf/physics/0210040 v1 raises a possibility that the universal constant of gravity is decreasing and all coupling constants are increasing with time, so reported by some observations. Deeper investigation of the connection between evolution and the variation of the universal constant of gravity seems worthwhile to see if it impacts the passage of time in a stronger (gravitational according to the spirit of the above archive) field and affects the aging process, and explains locality and causality in random evolutionary mutations. If there is no physical locality and causality consistent with the special theory of relativity, there must be some spiritual locality and causality at superluminal speeds to explain the implicit hidden variables. Then there is a question of how to test spiritual locality and causality. Psychic effects and dream signals look promising, if they exist and can be tested with space age technology. This is neither about religion nor about Einstein’s orthodoxy in light of the spirit of EPR. This is about frontiers of science of the new millennium: biology, and consciousness.

  7. Using spin-label W-band EPR to study membrane fluidity profiles in samples of small volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mainali, Laxman; Hyde, James S.; Subczynski, Witold K.

    2013-01-01

    Conventional and saturation-recovery (SR) EPR at W-band (94 GHz) using phosphatidylcholine spin labels (labeled at the alkyl chain [n-PC] and headgroup [T-PC]) to obtain profiles of membrane fluidity has been demonstrated. Dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) membranes with and without 50 mol% cholesterol have been studied, and the results have been compared with similar studies at X-band (9.4 GHz) (L. Mainali, J.B. Feix, J.S. Hyde, W.K. Subczynski, J. Magn. Reson. 212 (2011) 418-425). Profiles of the spin-lattice relaxation rate (T1-1) obtained from SR EPR measurements for n-PCs and T-PC were used as a convenient quantitative measure of membrane fluidity. Additionally, spectral analysis using Freed's MOMD (microscopic-order macroscopic-disorder) model (E. Meirovitch, J.H. Freed J. Phys. Chem. 88 (1984) 4995-5004) provided rotational diffusion coefficients (R⊥ and R||) and order parameters (S0). Spectral analysis at X-band provided one rotational diffusion coefficient, R⊥. T1-1, R⊥, and R|| profiles reflect local membrane dynamics of the lipid alkyl chain, while the order parameter shows only the amplitude of the wobbling motion of the lipid alkyl chain. Using these dynamic parameters, namely T1-1, R⊥, and R||, one can discriminate the different effects of cholesterol at different depths, showing that cholesterol has a rigidifying effect on alkyl chains to the depth occupied by the rigid steroid ring structure and a fluidizing effect at deeper locations. The nondynamic parameter, S0, shows that cholesterol has an ordering effect on alkyl chains at all depths. Conventional and SR EPR measurements with T-PC indicate that cholesterol has a fluidizing effect on phospholipid headgroups. EPR at W-band provides more detailed information about the depth-dependent dynamic organization of the membrane compared with information obtained at X-band. EPR at W-band has the potential to be a powerful tool for studying membrane fluidity in samples of small volume, ˜30 n

  8. Migration from a prototype ePR for IA-MISS system to alpha version

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Documet, Jorge R.; Le, Anh; Liu, Brent J.

    2010-03-01

    Last year we presented a paper that describes the design and clinical implementation of an ePR (Electronic Patient Record) system for Image-Assisted Minimally Invasive Spinal Surgery (IA-MISS). The goal of this ePR is to improve the workflow efficiency by providing all the necessary data of a surgical procedure from the preparation stage until the recovery stage. The mentioned ePR has been implemented and installed clinically and it has been in use for more than 16 months. In this paper, we will describe the migration process from a prototype version of the system to a more stable and easily-to-replicate alpha version.

  9. Planar microresonators for EPR experiments.

    PubMed

    Narkowicz, R; Suter, D; Stonies, R

    2005-08-01

    EPR resonators on the basis of standing-wave cavities are optimised for large samples. For small samples it is possible to design different resonators that have much better power handling properties and higher sensitivity. Other parameters being equal, the sensitivity of the resonator can be increased by minimising its size and thus increasing the filling factor. Like in NMR, it is possible to use lumped elements; coils can confine the microwave field to volumes that are much smaller than the wavelength. We discuss the design and evaluation of EPR resonators on the basis of planar microcoils. Our test resonators, which operate at a frequency of 14 GHz, have excellent microwave efficiency factors, achieving 24 ns pi/2 EPR pulses with an input power of 17 mW. The sensitivity tests with DPPH samples resulted in the sensitivity value 2.3 x 10(9) spins.G(-1) Hz(-1/2) at 300 K. PMID:15939642

  10. Planar microresonators for EPR experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narkowicz, R.; Suter, D.; Stonies, R.

    2005-08-01

    EPR resonators on the basis of standing-wave cavities are optimised for large samples. For small samples it is possible to design different resonators that have much better power handling properties and higher sensitivity. Other parameters being equal, the sensitivity of the resonator can be increased by minimising its size and thus increasing the filling factor. Like in NMR, it is possible to use lumped elements; coils can confine the microwave field to volumes that are much smaller than the wavelength. We discuss the design and evaluation of EPR resonators on the basis of planar microcoils. Our test resonators, which operate at a frequency of 14 GHz, have excellent microwave efficiency factors, achieving 24 ns π/2 EPR pulses with an input power of 17 mW. The sensitivity tests with DPPH samples resulted in the sensitivity value 2.3 × 10 9 spins · G -1Hz -1/2 at 300 K.

  11. EPR and (57)Fe ENDOR investigation of 2Fe ferredoxins from Aquifex aeolicus.

    PubMed

    Cutsail, George E; Doan, Peter E; Hoffman, Brian M; Meyer, Jacques; Telser, Joshua

    2012-12-01

    We have employed EPR and a set of recently developed electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) spectroscopies to characterize a suite of [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin clusters from Aquifex aeolicus (Aae Fd1, Fd4, and Fd5). Antiferromagnetic coupling between the Fe(II), S = 2, and Fe(III), S = 5/2, sites of the [2Fe-2S](+) cluster in these proteins creates an S = 1/2 ground state. A complete discussion of the spin-Hamiltonian contributions to g includes new symmetry arguments along with references to related FeS model compounds and their symmetry and EPR properties. Complete (57)Fe hyperfine coupling (hfc) tensors for each iron, with respective orientations relative to g, have been determined by the use of "stochastic" continuous wave and/or "random hopped" pulsed ENDOR, with the relative utility of the two approaches being emphasized. The reported hyperfine tensors include absolute signs determined by a modified pulsed ENDOR saturation and recovery (PESTRE) technique, RD-PESTRE-a post-processing protocol of the "raw data" that comprises an ENDOR spectrum. The (57)Fe hyperfine tensor components found by ENDOR are nicely consistent with those previously found by Mössbauer spectroscopy, while accurate tensor orientations are unique to the ENDOR approach. These measurements demonstrate the capabilities of the newly developed methods. The high-precision hfc tensors serve as a benchmark for this class of FeS proteins, while the variation in the (57)Fe hfc tensors as a function of symmetry in these small FeS clusters provides a reference for higher-nuclearity FeS clusters, such as those found in nitrogenase. PMID:22872138

  12. Selective fermentation of carbohydrate and protein fractions of Scenedesmus, and biohydrogenation of its lipid fraction for enhanced recovery of saturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Lai, YenJung Sean; Parameswaran, Prathap; Li, Ang; Aguinaga, Alyssa; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2016-02-01

    Biofuels derived from microalgae have promise as carbon-neutral replacements for petroleum. However, difficulty extracting microalgae-derived lipids and the co-extraction of non-lipid components add major costs that detract from the benefits of microalgae-based biofuel. Selective fermentation could alleviate these problems by managing microbial degradation so that carbohydrates and proteins are hydrolyzed and fermented, but lipids remain intact. We evaluated selective fermentation of Scenedesmus biomass in batch experiments buffered at pH 5.5, 7, or 9. Carbohydrates were fermented up to 45% within the first 6 days, protein fermentation followed after about 20 days, and lipids (measured as fatty acid methyl esters, FAME) were conserved. Fermentation of the non-lipid components generated volatile fatty acids, with acetate, butyrate, and propionate being the dominant products. Selective fermentation of Scenedesmus biomass increased the amount of extractable FAME and the ratio of FAME to crude lipids. It also led to biohydrogenation of unsaturated FAME to more desirable saturated FAME (especially to C16:0 and C18:0), and the degree of saturation was inversely related to the accumulation of hydrogen gas after fermentation. Moreover, the microbial communities after selective fermentation were enriched in bacteria from families known to perform biohydrogenation, i.e., Porphyromonadaceae and Ruminococcaceae. Thus, this study provides proof-of-concept that selective fermentation can improve the quantity and quality of lipids that can be extracted from Scenedesmus. PMID:26222672

  13. Distributed Saturation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Ming-Ying; Ciardo, Gianfranco; Siminiceanu, Radu I.

    2007-01-01

    The Saturation algorithm for symbolic state-space generation, has been a recent break-through in the exhaustive veri cation of complex systems, in particular globally-asyn- chronous/locally-synchronous systems. The algorithm uses a very compact Multiway Decision Diagram (MDD) encoding for states and the fastest symbolic exploration algo- rithm to date. The distributed version of Saturation uses the overall memory available on a network of workstations (NOW) to efficiently spread the memory load during the highly irregular exploration. A crucial factor in limiting the memory consumption during the symbolic state-space generation is the ability to perform garbage collection to free up the memory occupied by dead nodes. However, garbage collection over a NOW requires a nontrivial communication overhead. In addition, operation cache policies become critical while analyzing large-scale systems using the symbolic approach. In this technical report, we develop a garbage collection scheme and several operation cache policies to help on solving extremely complex systems. Experiments show that our schemes improve the performance of the original distributed implementation, SmArTNow, in terms of time and memory efficiency.

  14. Multi-photon transitions and Rabi resonance in continuous wave EPR.

    PubMed

    Saiko, Alexander P; Fedaruk, Ryhor; Markevich, Siarhei A

    2015-10-01

    The study of microwave-radiofrequency multi-photon transitions in continuous wave (CW) EPR spectroscopy is extended to a Rabi resonance condition, when the radio frequency of the magnetic-field modulation matches the Rabi frequency of a spin system in the microwave field. Using the non-secular perturbation theory based on the Bogoliubov averaging method, the analytical description of the response of the spin system is derived for all modulation frequency harmonics. When the modulation frequency exceeds the EPR linewidth, multi-photon transitions result in sidebands in absorption EPR spectra measured with phase-sensitive detection at any harmonic. The saturation of different-order multi-photon transitions is shown to be significantly different and to be sensitive to the Rabi resonance. The noticeable frequency shifts of sidebands are found to be the signatures of this resonance. The inversion of two-photon lines in some spectral intervals of the out-of-phase first-harmonic signal is predicted under passage through the Rabi resonance. The inversion indicates the transition from absorption to stimulated emission or vice versa, depending on the sideband. The manifestation of the primary and secondary Rabi resonance is also demonstrated in the time evolution of steady-state EPR signals formed by all harmonics of the modulation frequency. Our results provide a theoretical framework for future developments in multi-photon CW EPR spectroscopy, which can be useful for samples with long spin relaxation times and extremely narrow EPR lines. PMID:26295168

  15. A cryogenic receiver for EPR.

    PubMed

    Narkowicz, R; Ogata, H; Reijerse, E; Suter, D

    2013-12-01

    Cryogenic probes have significantly increased the sensitivity of NMR. Here, we present a compact EPR receiver design capable of cryogenic operation. Compared to room temperature operation, it reduces the noise by a factor of ≈2.5. We discuss in detail the design and analyze the resulting noise performance. At low microwave power, the input noise density closely follows the emission of a cooled 50Ω resistor over the whole measurement range from 20K up to room temperature. To minimize the influence of the microwave source noise, we use high microwave efficiency (≈1.1-1.7mTW(-1/2)) planar microresonators. Their efficient conversion of microwave power to magnetic field permits EPR measurements with very low power levels, typically ranging from a few μW down to fractions of nW. PMID:24161681

  16. Protein rotational dynamics investigated with a dual EPR/optical molecular probe. Spin-labeled eosin.

    PubMed Central

    Cobb, C E; Hustedt, E J; Beechem, J M; Beth, A H

    1993-01-01

    An acyl spin-label derivative of 5-aminoeosin (5-SLE) was chemically synthesized and employed in studies of rotational dynamics of the free probe and of the probe when bound noncovalently to bovine serum albumin using the spectroscopic techniques of fluorescence anisotropy decay and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and their long-lifetime counterparts phosphorescence anisotropy decay and saturation transfer EPR. Previous work (Beth, A. H., Cobb, C. E., and J. M. Beechem, 1992. Synthesis and characterization of a combined fluorescence, phosphorescence, and electron paramagnetic resonance probe. Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers. Time-Resolved Laser Spectroscopy III. 504-512) has shown that the spin-label moiety only slightly altered the fluorescence and phosphorescence lifetimes and quantum yields of 5-SLE when compared with 5-SLE whose nitroxide had been reduced with ascorbate and with the diamagnetic homolog 5-acetyleosin. In the present work, we have utilized time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy decay and linear EPR spectroscopies to observe and quantitate the psec motions of 5-SLE in solution and the nsec motions of the 5-SLE-bovine serum albumin complex. Time-resolved phosphorescence anisotropy decay and saturation transfer EPR studies have been carried out to observe and quantitate the microseconds motions of the 5-SLE-albumin complex in glycerol/buffer solutions of varying viscosity. These latter studies have enabled a rigorous comparison of rotational correlation times obtained from these complementary techniques to be made with a single probe. The studies described demonstrate that it is possible to employ a single molecular probe to carry out the full range of fluorescence, phosphorescence, EPR, and saturation transfer EPR studies. It is anticipated that "dual" molecular probes of this general type will significantly enhance capabilities for extracting dynamics and structural information from macromolecules and their functional

  17. EPR-based material modelling of soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faramarzi, Asaad; Alani, Amir M.

    2013-04-01

    In the past few decades, as a result of the rapid developments in computational software and hardware, alternative computer aided pattern recognition approaches have been introduced to modelling many engineering problems, including constitutive modelling of materials. The main idea behind pattern recognition systems is that they learn adaptively from experience and extract various discriminants, each appropriate for its purpose. In this work an approach is presented for developing material models for soils based on evolutionary polynomial regression (EPR). EPR is a recently developed hybrid data mining technique that searches for structured mathematical equations (representing the behaviour of a system) using genetic algorithm and the least squares method. Stress-strain data from triaxial tests are used to train and develop EPR-based material models for soil. The developed models are compared with some of the well-known conventional material models and it is shown that EPR-based models can provide a better prediction for the behaviour of soils. The main benefits of using EPR-based material models are that it provides a unified approach to constitutive modelling of all materials (i.e., all aspects of material behaviour can be implemented within a unified environment of an EPR model); it does not require any arbitrary choice of constitutive (mathematical) models. In EPR-based material models there are no material parameters to be identified. As the model is trained directly from experimental data therefore, EPR-based material models are the shortest route from experimental research (data) to numerical modelling. Another advantage of EPR-based constitutive model is that as more experimental data become available, the quality of the EPR prediction can be improved by learning from the additional data, and therefore, the EPR model can become more effective and robust. The developed EPR-based material models can be incorporated in finite element (FE) analysis.

  18. A simplified apparatus for EPR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jingchuan, Deng; Kuixiang, Wang; Weiqing, Xu

    1996-06-01

    A simple apparatus for sub-surface electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) imaging of a cut sample is described. A two-dimensional EPR image corresponding to the electron spin-density distribution of the DPPH test sample has been obtained by using a marginally oscillating self-detecting microwave frequency EPR spectrometer. Higher spatial resolution is obtained by using a deconvolution algorithm and the image processing technique of inverse filtering.

  19. Saturated fat (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... saturated fats. Vegetable sources of saturated fat include coconut and palm oils. When looking at a food ... saturated fats. Vegetable sources of saturated fat include coconut and palm oils. When looking at a food ...

  20. EPR techniques for space biodosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Haskell, E.; Hayes, R.; Kenner, G.; Sholom, S.; Chumak, V.

    1996-12-31

    Retrospective dosimetry of tooth enamel has become an increasingly complex and difficult discipline to undertake while still attaining accuracy. The paper provides a review of the major obstacles, advances and pertinent phenomenon associated with low level retrospective dosimetry of human tooth enamel. Also covered is the many sources of error in EPR dosimetry, their potential solutions, as well as the different analysis and scanning techniques in use with their prospective pros and cons. Prospective directions for new approaches, methods, and instruments are also reviewed.

  1. EPR STUDIES OF THERMALLY STERILIZED VASELINUM ALBUM.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Paweł; Pilawa, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was used for examination of free radicals in thermally treated vaselinum album (VA). Thermal treatment in hot air as sterilization process was tested. Conditions of thermal sterilization were chosen according to the pharmaceutical norms. Vaselinum album was heated at the following conditions (T--temperature, t--time): T = 160°C and t = 120 min, T = 170°C and t = 60 min and T = 180°C and t = 30 min. The aim of this work was to determine concentration and free radical properties of thermally sterilized VA. EPR analysis for VA was done 15 min after sterilization. EPR measurements were done at room temperature. EPR spectra were recorded in the range of microwave power of 2.2-70 mW. g-Factor, amplitudes (A) and line width (ΔBpp) of the spectra were determined. The shape of the EPR spectra was analyzed. Free radical concentration (N) in the heated samples was determined. EPR spectra were not obtained for the non heated VA. EPR spectra were detected for all thermally sterilized samples. The spectra revealed complex character, their asymmetry depends on microwave power. The lowest free radicals concentration was found for the VA sterilized at 180°C during 30 min. EPR spectroscopy is proposed as the method useful for optimization of sterilization process of drugs. PMID:26647625

  2. EPR dosimetry in chemically treated fingernails

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    By using EPR measurements of radiation-induced radicals it is possible to utilize human fingernails to estimate radiation dose after-the-fact. One of the potentially limiting factors in this approach is the presence of artifacts due to mechanically induced EPR signals (MIS) caused by mechanical str...

  3. Overview of LBB implementation for the EPR

    SciTech Connect

    Cauquelin, C.

    1997-04-01

    This paper presents an overview of the use of leak-before-break (LBB) analysis for EPR reactors. EPR is an evolutionary Nuclear Island of the 4 loop x 1500 Mwe class currently in the design phase. Application of LBB to the main coolant lines and resulting design impacts are summarized. Background information on LBB analysis in France and Germany is also presented.

  4. Optimization of bicelle lipid composition and temperature for EPR spectroscopy of aligned membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaffrey, Jesse E.; James, Zachary M.; Thomas, David D.

    2015-01-01

    We have optimized the magnetic alignment of phospholipid bilayered micelles (bicelles) for EPR spectroscopy, by varying lipid composition and temperature. Bicelles have been extensively used in NMR spectroscopy for several decades, in order to obtain aligned samples in a near-native membrane environment and take advantage of the intrinsic sensitivity of magnetic resonance to molecular orientation. Recently, bicelles have also seen increasing use in EPR, which offers superior sensitivity and orientational resolution. However, the low magnetic field strength (less than 1 T) of most conventional EPR spectrometers results in homogeneously oriented bicelles only at a temperature well above physiological. To optimize bicelle composition for magnetic alignment at reduced temperature, we prepared bicelles containing varying ratios of saturated (DMPC) and unsaturated (POPC) phospholipids, using EPR spectra of a spin-labeled fatty acid to assess alignment as a function of lipid composition and temperature. Spectral analysis showed that bicelles containing an equimolar mixture of DMPC and POPC homogeneously align at 298 K, 20 K lower than conventional DMPC-only bicelles. It is now possible to perform EPR studies of membrane protein structure and dynamics in well-aligned bicelles at physiological temperatures and below.

  5. Saturated fat (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Saturated fat can raise blood cholesterol and can put you at risk for heart disease and stroke. You should ... limit any foods that are high in saturated fat. Sources of saturated fat include whole-milk dairy ...

  6. In Vivo EPR For Dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Swartz, Harold M.; Burke, Greg; Coey, M.; Demidenko, Eugene; Dong, Ruhong; Grinberg, Oleg; Hilton, James; Iwasaki, Akinori; Lesniewski, Piotr; Kmiec, Maciej; Lo, Kai-Ming; Nicolalde, R. Javier; Ruuge, Andres; Sakata, Yasuko; Sucheta, Artur; Walczak, Tadeusz; Williams, Benjamin B.; Mitchell, Chad; Romanyukha, Alex; Schauer, David A.

    2007-01-01

    As a result of terrorism, accident, or war, populations potentially can be exposed to doses of ionizing radiation that could cause direct clinical effects within days or weeks. There is a critical need to determine the magnitude of the exposure to individuals so that those with significant risk have appropriate procedures initiated immediately, while those without a significant probability of acute effects can be reassured and removed from the need for further consideration in the medical/emergency system. In many of the plausible scenarios there is an urgent need to make the determination very soon after the event and while the subject is still present. In vivo EPR measurements of radiation-induced changes in the enamel of teeth is a method, perhaps the only such method, which can differentiate among doses sufficiently for classifying individuals into categories for treatment with sufficient accuracy to facilitate decisions on medical treatment. In its current state, the in vivo EPR dosimeter can provide estimates of absorbed dose with an error approximately ± 50 cGy over the range of interest for acute biological effects of radiation, assuming repeated measurements of the tooth in the mouth of the subject. The time required for acquisition, the lower limit, and the precision are expected to improve, with improvements in the resonator and the algorithm for acquiring and calculating the dose. The magnet system that is currently used, while potentially deployable, is somewhat large and heavy, requiring that it be mounted on a small truck or trailer. Several smaller magnets, including an intraoral magnet are under development, which would extend the ease of use of this technique. PMID:18591988

  7. Homogeneity and EPR metrics for assessment of regular grids used in CW EPR powder simulations.

    PubMed

    Crăciun, Cora

    2014-08-01

    CW EPR powder spectra may be approximated numerically using a spherical grid and a Voronoi tessellation-based cubature. For a given spin system, the quality of simulated EPR spectra depends on the grid type, size, and orientation in the molecular frame. In previous work, the grids used in CW EPR powder simulations have been compared mainly from geometric perspective. However, some grids with similar homogeneity degree generate different quality simulated spectra. This paper evaluates the grids from EPR perspective, by defining two metrics depending on the spin system characteristics and the grid Voronoi tessellation. The first metric determines if the grid points are EPR-centred in their Voronoi cells, based on the resonance magnetic field variations inside these cells. The second metric verifies if the adjacent Voronoi cells of the tessellation are EPR-overlapping, by computing the common range of their resonance magnetic field intervals. Beside a series of well known regular grids, the paper investigates a modified ZCW grid and a Fibonacci spherical code, which are new in the context of EPR simulations. For the investigated grids, the EPR metrics bring more information than the homogeneity quantities and are better related to the grids' EPR behaviour, for different spin system symmetries. The metrics' efficiency and limits are finally verified for grids generated from the initial ones, by using the original or magnetic field-constraint variants of the Spherical Centroidal Voronoi Tessellation method. PMID:24968092

  8. Shared experience in 13 local Danish EPR projects: the Danish EPR Observatory.

    PubMed

    Nøhr, C; Kristensen, M; Andersen, S K; Vingtoft, S; Lippert, S; Berstein, K; Bruun-Rasmussen, M

    2001-01-01

    In 1996 a national strategy for the development of electronic patient records (EPR) for the Danish hospitals and primary care was launched. An element in the strategy was to support a number of regional EPR development projects. The EPR-Observatory has in the two recent years collected data from the regional projects, dealing with the expectations in four areas: 1) Impact on organisational issues, 2) Benefits of EPR, 3) Integration of EPR with other information systems and 4) security aspects of EPR. Among the observations an increasing teamwork and im-proved knowledge about the patient was found. What was expected, but not found, was resistance to EPR, as a result of changes in skills and power. The most obvious benefits are increased data accessibility and improved decision ma-king. The most considerable disadvantage is an enormous growth in discontent with the systems performance and the fact, that all the projects are delayed. Many different types of integration solutions are chosen, because of a lack of a common model for integration. Generally the projects find, that EPJ yields increased security, but logistical problems arise in having the systems running 24 hours 7 days a week. Economical benefits cannot be documented. This relates to the fact, that the regional projects are stand-alone projects. The ongoing growth in discontent with the EPR-systems and the fact, that all the projects are delayed must be subject to further exploration. PMID:11604822

  9. EPR study of free radicals in bread

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yordanov, Nicola D.; Mladenova, Ralitsa

    2004-05-01

    The features of the recorded EPR spectra of paramagnetic species formed in bread and rusk are reported. The appearance of free radicals in them is only connected with their thermal treatment since the starting materials (flour and grains) exhibit very weak EPR signal. The obtained EPR spectra are complex and indicate that: (i) the relative number of paramagnetic species depends on the temperature and treating time of the raw product; (ii) the g-values are strongly temperature dependent with a tendency to coincide at t≥220 °C. Because of the relatively low (150-220 °C) temperature of thermal treatment, the studied free radicals can be assumed to appear in the course of the browning (Maillard) reaction and not to the carbonization of the material.

  10. Can EPR non-locality be geometrical?

    SciTech Connect

    Ne`eman, Y. |; Botero, A.

    1995-10-01

    The presence in Quantum Mechanics of non-local correlations is one of the two fundamentally non-intuitive features of that theory. The non-local correlations themselves fall into two classes: EPR and Geometrical. The non-local characteristics of the geometrical type are well-understood and are not suspected of possibly generating acausal features, such as faster-than-light propagation of information. This has especially become true since the emergence of a geometrical treatment for the relevant gauge theories, i.e. Fiber Bundle geometry, in which the quantum non-localities are seen to correspond to pure homotopy considerations. This aspect is reviewed in section 2. Contrary-wise, from its very conception, the EPR situation was felt to be paradoxical. It has been suggested that the non-local features of EPR might also derive from geometrical considerations, like all other non-local characteristics of QM. In[7], one of the authors was able to point out several plausibility arguments for this thesis, emphasizing in particular similarities between the non-local correlations provided by any gauge field theory and those required by the preservation of the quantum numbers of the original EPR state-vector, throughout its spatially-extended mode. The derivation was, however, somewhat incomplete, especially because of the apparent difference between, on the one hand, the closed spatial loops arising in the analysis of the geometrical non-localities, from Aharonov-Bohm and Berry phases to magnetic monopoles and instantons, and on the other hand, in the EPR case, the open line drawn by the positions of the two moving decay products of the disintegrating particle. In what follows, the authors endeavor to remove this obstacle and show that as in all other QM non-localities, EPR is somehow related to closed loops, almost involving homotopy considerations. They develop this view in section 3.

  11. Biophysical EPR Studies Applied to Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Indra D; Lorigan, Gary A

    2015-01-01

    Membrane proteins are very important in controlling bioenergetics, functional activity, and initializing signal pathways in a wide variety of complicated biological systems. They also represent approximately 50% of the potential drug targets. EPR spectroscopy is a very popular and powerful biophysical tool that is used to study the structural and dynamic properties of membrane proteins. In this article, a basic overview of the most commonly used EPR techniques and examples of recent applications to answer pertinent structural and dynamic related questions on membrane protein systems will be presented. PMID:26855825

  12. Barium dithionate as an EPR dosemeter.

    PubMed

    Baran, M P; Bugay, O A; Kolesnik, S P; Maksimenko, V M; Teslenko, V V; Petrenko, T L; Desrosiers, M F

    2006-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dosimetry is growing in popularity and this success has encouraged the search for other dosimetric materials. Previous studies of gamma-irradiated barium dithionate (BaS(2)O(6) x 2H(2)O) have shown promise for its use as a radiation dosemeter. This work studies in greater detail several essential attributes of the system. Special attention has been directed to the study of EPR response dependences on microwave power, irradiation temperature, minimum detectable dose and post-irradiation stability. PMID:16565205

  13. Application of EPR spectroscopy to the examination of pro-oxidant activity of coffee.

    PubMed

    Krakowian, Daniel; Skiba, Dominik; Kudelski, Adam; Pilawa, Barbara; Ramos, Paweł; Adamczyk, Jakub; Pawłowska-Góral, Katarzyna

    2014-05-15

    Free radicals present in coffee may be responsible for exerting toxic effects on an organism. The objectives of this work were to compare free radicals properties and concentrations in different commercially available coffees, in solid and liquid states, and to determine the effect of roasting on the formation of free radicals in coffee beans of various origins. The free radicals content of 15 commercially available coffees (solid and liquid) was compared and the impact of processing examined using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy at X-band (9.3 GHz). First derivative EPR spectra were measured at microwave power in the range of 0.7-70 mW. The following parameters were calculated for EPR spectra: amplitude (A), integral intensity (I), and line-width (ΔBpp); g-Factor was obtained from resonance condition. Our study showed that free radicals exist in green coffee beans (10(16) spin/g), roasted coffee beans (10(18) spin/g), and in commercially available coffee (10(17)-10(18) spin/g). Free radical concentrations were higher in solid ground coffee than in instant or lyophilised coffee. Continuous microwave saturation indicated homogeneous broadening of EPR lines from solid and liquid commercial coffee samples as well as green and roasted coffee beans. Slow spin-lattice relaxation processes were found to be present in all coffee samples tested, solid and liquid commercial coffees as well as green and roasted coffee beans. Higher free radicals concentrations were obtained for both the green and roasted at 240 °C coffee beans from Peru compared with those originating from Ethiopia, Brazil, India, or Colombia. Moreover, more free radicals occurred in Arabica coffee beans roasted at 240 °C than Robusta. EPR spectroscopy is a useful method of examining free radicals in different types of coffee. PMID:24423509

  14. Preparation of EPR/silica filler by a co-irradiation method forming PP/EPR/silica nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Jun; Dang, Shuaiying; Huang, Zhijuan; Xu, Yongshen

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach to prepare ethylene-propylene rubber (EPR)/silica filler by co-irradiation method forming polypropylene (PP)/EPR/silica nanocomposites. The grafting of maleic anhydride (MAH) on EPR was first studied by co-irradiation in the micro-suspension without any chemical initiator, and the effects of MAH concentration and the total co-irradiation dose on the graft degree of MAH were investigated. Then PP/EPR/silica nanocomposites were successfully prepared by blending of PP matrix and EPR/silica filler, which was obtained by co-irradiation using a mixture of EPR/MAH microsuspension in xylene and tetraethoxysilane/KH560 sol in formic acid. FTIR and SEM results showed that the reactions between MAH on EPR chains and KH560 surrounding silica particles were adopted to form the EPR/silica filler with strong bonding and well silica dispersion. Mechanical properties of PP/EPR/silica nanocomposites with different silica contents and the comparisons with PP, PP/EPR and PP/silica films were studied. The rigid silica particles were trapped in EPR shell and well dispersed in PP/EPR/silica nanocomposites with good compatibility and strong interfacial adhesion, achieving overall improvements in stiffness, strength and toughness compared with pure PP.

  15. EPR: What has it taught us

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stapp, H. P.

    1985-05-01

    Eistein, Podoisky, and Rosen (EPR) paper is discussed. The EPR paper was counterproductive for the following reasons: (1) the work was quickly rebutted by Bohr and this rebuttal was accepted my most workers in the field; (2) scientists who adopted the position advocated by Bohr produced, useful theory, whereas those following the course suggested by EPR produced nothing of any certified practical value; (3) it was shown by Bell that the conclusion reached by EPR is incompatible with their assumptions. The behavior of quantum mechanical systems that are very small, yet large enough to influence their environment in ways that appreciably modify their own behavior, vis-a-vis the behavior they would have if isolated was investigated. Because these systems are neither small enough to be treated as isolated between preparation and detection, nor large enough to be treated classically, they do not conform to the format demanded by the Copenhagen interpretation. The behavior of these systems depends on ontological considerations that were irrelevant in the situations covered by the Copenhagen interpretation, and that were systematically ignored in that interpretation. The task of enlarging the scope of quantum theory to cover these new situations, and comparing the empirical consequences of various ontological assumptions is discussed.

  16. Investigation of EPR signals on tooth enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlenko, A.; Mironova-Ulmane, N.; Polakov, M.; Riekstina, D.

    2007-12-01

    Calcified tissues are involved in continues metabolic process in human organism exchanging a number of chemical elements with environment. The rate of biochemical reactions is tissue dependent and the slowest one at the tooth enamel, the most mineralized tissue of human organism. The long time stability and unique chemical composition make tooth enamel suitable for number of application. The assessment of individual radiation dose by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) and evaluations of elemental composition by Instrumentation Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) are the well known procedures where properties of tooth enamel intensively used. The current work is focused on investigation of EPR signals and determination of chemical composition on several teeth samples having different origin. The EPR spectra and INAA element content of milk tooth, caries tooth, and paradantose tooth have been compared to each other. The results showed that the intensity of EPR signal is much higher for the caries tooth than the for paradantose tooth that is in agreement with depleted Ca content.

  17. Advanced tool kits for EPR security.

    PubMed

    Blobel, B

    2000-11-01

    Responding to the challenge for efficient and high quality health care, the shared care paradigm must be established in health. In that context, information systems such as electronic patient records (EPR) have to meet this paradigm supporting communication and interoperation between the health care establishments (HCE) and health professionals (HP) involved. Due to the sensitivity of personal medical information, this co-operation must be provided in a trustworthy way. To enable different views of HCE and HP ranging from management, doctors, nurses up to systems administrators and IT professionals, a set of models for analysis, design and implementation of secure distributed EPR has been developed and introduced. The approach is based on the popular UML methodology and the component paradigm for open, interoperable systems. Easy to use tool kits deal with both application security services and communication security services but also with the security infrastructure needed. Regarding the requirements for distributed multi-user EPRs, modelling and implementation of policy agreements, authorisation and access control are especially considered. Current developments for a security infrastructure in health care based on cryptographic algorithms as health professional cards (HPC), security services employing digital signatures, and health-related TTP services are discussed. CEN and ISO initiatives for health informatics standards in the context of secure and communicable EPR are especially mentioned. PMID:11154968

  18. Clinical EPR: Unique Opportunities and Some Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Swartz, Harold M.; Williams, Benjamin B.; Zaki, Bassem I.; Hartford, Alan C.; Jarvis, Lesley A.; Chen, Eunice; Comi, Richard J.; Ernstoff, Marc S.; Hou, Huagang; Khan, Nadeem; Swarts, Steven G.; Flood, Ann B.; Kuppusamy, Periannan

    2014-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy has been well established as a viable technique for measurement of free radicals and oxygen in biological systems, from in vitro cellular systems to in vivo small animal models of disease. However, the use of EPR in human subjects in the clinical setting, although attractive for a variety of important applications such as oxygen measurement, is challenged with several factors including the need for instrumentation customized for human subjects, probe and regulatory constraints. This paper describes the rationale and development of the first clinical EPR systems for two important clinical applications, namely, measurement of tissue oxygen (oximetry), and radiation dose (dosimetry) in humans. The clinical spectrometers operate at 1.2 GHz frequency and use surface loop resonators capable of providing topical measurements up to 1 cm depth in tissues. Tissue pO2 measurements can be carried out noninvasively and repeatedly after placement of an oxygen-sensitive paramagnetic material (currently India ink) at the site of interest. Our EPR dosimetry system is capable of measuring radiation-induced free radicals in the tooth of irradiated human subjects to determine the exposure dose. These developments offer potential opportunities for clinical dosimetry and oximetry, which include guiding therapy for individual patients with tumors or vascular disease, by monitoring of tissue oxygenation. Further work is in progress to translate this unique technology to routine clinical practice. PMID:24439333

  19. CORE SATURATION BLOCKING OSCILLATOR

    DOEpatents

    Spinrad, R.J.

    1961-10-17

    A blocking oscillator which relies on core saturation regulation to control the output pulse width is described. In this arrangement an external magnetic loop is provided in which a saturable portion forms the core of a feedback transformer used with the thermionic or semi-conductor active element. A first stationary magnetic loop establishes a level of flux through the saturation portion of the loop. A second adjustable magnet moves the flux level to select a saturation point giving the desired output pulse width. (AEC)

  20. RosettaEPR: An Integrated Tool for Protein Structure Determination from Sparse EPR Data

    PubMed Central

    Hirst, Stephanie J.; Alexander, Nathan; Mchaourab, Hassane S.; Meiler, Jens

    2010-01-01

    Site-directed spin labeling electron paramagnetic resonance (SDSL-EPR) is often used for the structural characterization of proteins that elude other techniques, such as X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). However, high-resolution structures are difficult to obtain due to uncertainty in the spin label location and sparseness of experimental data. Here, we introduce RosettaEPR, which has been designed to improve de novo high-resolution protein structure prediction using sparse SDSL-EPR distance data. The “motion-on-a-cone” spin label model is converted into a knowledge-based potential, which was implemented as a scoring term in Rosetta. RosettaEPR increased the fractions of correctly folded models (RMSDCα < 7.5Å) and models accurate at medium resolution (RMSDCα < 3.5Å) by 25%. The correlation of score and model quality increased from 0.42 when using no restraints to 0.51 when using bounded restraints and again to 0.62 when using RosettaEPR. This allowed for the selection of accurate models by score. After full-atom refinement, RosettaEPR yielded a 1.7Å model of T4-lysozyme, thus indicating that atomic detail models can be achieved by combining sparse EPR data with Rosetta. While these results indicate RosettaEPR’s potential utility in high-resolution protein structure prediction, they are based on a single example. In order to affirm the method’s general performance, it must be tested on a larger and more versatile dataset of proteins. PMID:21029778

  1. Critical condensate saturation in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.; Mohanty, K.K.

    1999-06-15

    The understanding of gas and condensate flow in porous media is critical to the optimum exploitation of gas-condensate reservoirs. Critical condensate saturation and relative permeabilities are the key parameters for the evaluation of possible recovery strategies. This work is aimed at developing a mechanistic network model for the critical condensate saturation in which phase trapping and connectivity in the pore corners are critically examined. Porous media are modeled by networks of pore bodies interconnected by pore throats. Bodies and throats are characterized by their connectivity, shapes, and radii distributions. Pore-level laws are identified from micromodel experiments with near-critical fluids. A nonzero critical condensate saturation can be obtained in the absence of contact angle hysteresis due to the converging-diverging nature of the throats. The critical saturation at which the condensate flows is found to be a function of pore geometry, water saturation, and interfacial tension (or the Bond number). The modified sphere-pack model underpredicts the critical condensate saturation of typical sandstones. The cubic model adequately predicts the critical saturation and its experimentally observed trends.

  2. Substoichiometry and Saturation Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willett, J. E.; Servant, D. M.

    1977-01-01

    Two experiments are described and appropriate discussion is given to illustrate the use of substoichiometry and saturation analysis techniques with undergraduates. The first experiment is the determination of silver content in photographic film. The second is the estimation of a hormone concentration using saturation analysis and a commercially…

  3. Gluon saturation in a saturated environment

    SciTech Connect

    Kopeliovich, B. Z.; Potashnikova, I. K.; Schmidt, Ivan

    2011-07-15

    A bootstrap equation for self-quenched gluon shadowing leads to a reduced magnitude of broadening for partons propagating through a nucleus. Saturation of small-x gluons in a nucleus, which has the form of transverse momentum broadening of projectile gluons in pA collisions in the nuclear rest frame, leads to a modification of the parton distribution functions in the beam compared with pp collisions. In nucleus-nucleus collisions all participating nucleons acquire enhanced gluon density at small x, which boosts further the saturation scale. Solution of the reciprocity equations for central collisions of two heavy nuclei demonstrate a significant, up to several times, enhancement of Q{sub sA}{sup 2}, in AA compared with pA collisions.

  4. Gluon saturation in a saturated environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopeliovich, B. Z.; Potashnikova, I. K.; Schmidt, Ivan

    2011-07-01

    A bootstrap equation for self-quenched gluon shadowing leads to a reduced magnitude of broadening for partons propagating through a nucleus. Saturation of small-x gluons in a nucleus, which has the form of transverse momentum broadening of projectile gluons in pA collisions in the nuclear rest frame, leads to a modification of the parton distribution functions in the beam compared with pp collisions. In nucleus-nucleus collisions all participating nucleons acquire enhanced gluon density at small x, which boosts further the saturation scale. Solution of the reciprocity equations for central collisions of two heavy nuclei demonstrate a significant, up to several times, enhancement of QsA2, in AA compared with pA collisions.

  5. EPR-based material modelling of soils considering volume changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faramarzi, Asaad; Javadi, Akbar A.; Alani, Amir M.

    2012-11-01

    In this paper an approach is presented for developing material models for soils based on evolutionary polynomial regression (EPR), taking into account its volumetric behaviour. EPR is a recently developed hybrid data mining technique that searches for structured mathematical equations (representing the behaviour of a system) using genetic algorithm and the least squares method. Stress-strain data from triaxial test are used to train and develop EPR-based material models for soil. The developed models are compared with some of the well known conventional material models. In particular, the capability of the developed EPR models in predicting volume change behaviour of soils is illustrated. It is also shown that the developed EPR-based material models can be incorporated in finite element (FE) analysis. Two geotechnical examples are presented to verify the developed EPR-based FE model (EPR-FEM). The results of the EPR-FEM are compared with those of a standard FEM where conventional constitutive models are used to describe the material behaviour. The results show that EPR-FEM can be successfully employed to analyse geotechnical engineering problems. The advantages of the proposed EPR models are highlighted.

  6. Deconvolution of sinusoidal rapid EPR scans.

    PubMed

    Tseitlin, Mark; Rinard, George A; Quine, Richard W; Eaton, Sandra S; Eaton, Gareth R

    2011-02-01

    In rapid scan EPR the magnetic field is scanned through the signal in a time that is short relative to electron spin relaxation times. Previously it was shown that the slow-scan lineshape could be recovered from triangular rapid scans by Fourier deconvolution. In this paper a general Fourier deconvolution method is described and demonstrated to recover the slow-scan lineshape from sinusoidal rapid scans. Since an analytical expression for the Fourier transform of the driving function for a sinusoidal scan was not readily apparent, a numerical method was developed to do the deconvolution. The slow scan EPR lineshapes recovered from rapid triangular and sinusoidal scans are in excellent agreement for lithium phthalocyanine, a trityl radical, and the nitroxyl radical, tempone. The availability of a method to deconvolute sinusoidal rapid scans makes it possible to scan faster than is feasible for triangular scans because of hardware limitations on triangular scans. PMID:21163677

  7. Deconvolution of Sinusoidal Rapid EPR Scans

    PubMed Central

    Tseitlin, Mark; Rinard, George A.; Quine, Richard W.; Eaton, Sandra S.; Eaton, Gareth R.

    2011-01-01

    In rapid scan EPR the magnetic field is scanned through the signal in a time that is short relative to electron spin relaxation times. Previously it was shown that the slow scan lineshape could be recovered from triangular rapid scans by Fourier deconvolution. In this paper a general Fourier deconvolution method is described and demonstrated to recover the slow scan lineshape from sinusoidal rapid scans. Since an analytical expression for the Fourier transform of the driving function for a sinusoidal scan was not readily apparent, a numerical method was developed to do the deconvolution. The slow scan EPR lineshapes recovered from rapid triangular and sinusoidal scans are in excellent agreement for lithium phthalocyanine, a trityl radical, and the nitroxyl radical, tempone. The availability of a method to deconvolute sinusoidal rapid scans makes it possible to scan faster than is feasible for triangular scans because of hardware limitations on triangular scans. PMID:21163677

  8. EPR Investigation of Irradiated Curry Powder

    SciTech Connect

    Duliu, O. G.; Ali, S. I.; Georgescu, R.

    2007-04-23

    Gamma-ray irradiated curry powder, a well priced oriental spice was investigated in order to establish the ability of EPR to detect the presence and time stability of free irradiation free-radicals. Accordingly, curry powder aliquots were irradiated with gradually increasing absorbed doses up to 11.3 kGy. The EPR spectra of all irradiated samples show the presence of al last two different species of free radicals, whose concentration increased monotonously with the absorbed doses. A 100 deg. C isothermal annealing of irradiated samples has shown a differential reduction of amplitude of various components of the initial spectra, but even after 3.6 h of thermal treatment, the remaining amplitude represents no less then 30% of the initial ones. The same peculiarities have been noticed after more than one year storage at room temperature, all of them being very useful in establishing the existence of any previous irradiation treatment.

  9. EPR Steering inequalities with Communication Assistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, Sándor; Vértesi, Tamás

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we investigate the communication cost of reproducing Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) steering correlations arising from bipartite quantum systems. We characterize the set of bipartite quantum states which admits a local hidden state model augmented with c bits of classical communication from an untrusted party (Alice) to a trusted party (Bob). In case of one bit of information (c = 1), we show that this set has a nontrivial intersection with the sets admitting a local hidden state and a local hidden variables model for projective measurements. On the other hand, we find that an infinite amount of classical communication is required from an untrusted Alice to a trusted Bob to simulate the EPR steering correlations produced by a two-qubit maximally entangled state. It is conjectured that a state-of-the-art quantum experiment would be able to falsify two bits of communication this way.

  10. EPR Steering inequalities with Communication Assistance

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Sándor; Vértesi, Tamás

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the communication cost of reproducing Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) steering correlations arising from bipartite quantum systems. We characterize the set of bipartite quantum states which admits a local hidden state model augmented with c bits of classical communication from an untrusted party (Alice) to a trusted party (Bob). In case of one bit of information (c = 1), we show that this set has a nontrivial intersection with the sets admitting a local hidden state and a local hidden variables model for projective measurements. On the other hand, we find that an infinite amount of classical communication is required from an untrusted Alice to a trusted Bob to simulate the EPR steering correlations produced by a two-qubit maximally entangled state. It is conjectured that a state-of-the-art quantum experiment would be able to falsify two bits of communication this way. PMID:26880376

  11. Bifunctional Spin Labeling of Muscle Proteins: Accurate Rotational Dynamics, Orientation, and Distance by EPR.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Andrew R; Binder, Benjamin P; McCaffrey, Jesse E; Svensson, Bengt; Thomas, David D

    2015-01-01

    While EPR allows for the characterization of protein structure and function due to its exquisite sensitivity to spin label dynamics, orientation, and distance, these measurements are often limited in sensitivity due to the use of labels that are attached via flexible monofunctional bonds, incurring additional disorder and nanosecond dynamics. In this chapter, we present methods for using a bifunctional spin label (BSL) to measure muscle protein structure and dynamics. We demonstrate that bifunctional attachment eliminates nanosecond internal rotation of the spin label, thereby allowing the accurate measurement of protein backbone rotational dynamics, including microsecond-to-millisecond motions by saturation transfer EPR. BSL also allows for accurate determination of helix orientation and disorder in mechanically and magnetically aligned systems, due to the label's stereospecific attachment. Similarly, labeling with a pair of BSL greatly enhances the resolution and accuracy of distance measurements measured by double electron-electron resonance (DEER). Finally, when BSL is applied to a protein with high helical content in an assembly with high orientational order (e.g., muscle fiber or membrane), two-probe DEER experiments can be combined with single-probe EPR experiments on an oriented sample in a process we call BEER, which has the potential for ab initio high-resolution structure determination. PMID:26477249

  12. Self-testing through EPR-steering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šupić, Ivan; Hoban, Matty J.

    2016-07-01

    The verification of quantum devices is an important aspect of quantum information, especially with the emergence of more advanced experimental implementations of quantum computation and secure communication. Within this, the theory of device-independent robust self-testing via Bell tests has reached a level of maturity now that many quantum states and measurements can be verified without direct access to the quantum systems: interaction with the devices is solely classical. However, the requirements for this robust level of verification are daunting and require high levels of experimental accuracy. In this paper we discuss the possibility of self-testing where we only have direct access to one part of the quantum device. This motivates the study of self-testing via EPR-steering, an intermediate form of entanglement verification between full state tomography and Bell tests. Quantum non-locality implies EPR-steering so results in the former can apply in the latter, but we ask what advantages may be gleaned from the latter over the former given that one can do partial state tomography? We show that in the case of self-testing a maximally entangled two-qubit state, or ebit, EPR-steering allows for simpler analysis and better error tolerance than in the case of full device-independence. On the other hand, this improvement is only a constant improvement and (up to constants) is the best one can hope for. Finally, we indicate that the main advantage in self-testing based on EPR-steering could be in the case of self-testing multi-partite quantum states and measurements. For example, it may be easier to establish a tensor product structure for a particular party’s Hilbert space even if we do not have access to their part of the global quantum system.

  13. W-Band Frequency-Swept EPR

    PubMed Central

    Hyde, James S.; Strangeway, Robert A.; Camenisch, Theodore G.; Ratke, Joseph J.; Froncisz, Wojciech

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a novel experiment on nitroxide radical spin labels using a multiarm EPR W-band bridge with a loop-gap resonator (LGR). We demonstrate EPR spectroscopy of spin labels by linear sweep of the microwave frequency across the spectrum. The high bandwidth of the LGR, about 1 GHz between 3 dB points of the microwave resonance, makes this new experiment possible. A frequency-tunable yttrium iron garnet (YIG) oscillator provides sweep rates as high as 1.8 × 105 GHz/s, which corresponds to 6.3 kT/s in magnetic field-sweep units over a 44 MHz range. Two experimental domains were identified. In the first, linear frequency sweep rates were relatively slow, and pure absorption and pure dispersion spectra were obtained. This appears to be a practical mode of operation at the present level of technological development. The main advantage is the elimination of sinusoidal magnetic field modulation. In the second mode, the frequency is swept rapidly across a portion of the spectrum, and then the frequency sweep is stopped for a readout period; FID signals from a swept line oscillate at a frequency that is the difference between the spectral position of the line in frequency units and the readout position. If there is more than one line, oscillations are superimposed. The sweep rates using the YIG oscillator were too slow, and the portion of the spectrum too narrow to achieve the full EPR equivalent of Fourier transform (FT) NMR. The paper discusses technical advances required to reach this goal. The hypothesis that trapezoidal frequency sweep is an enabling technology for FT EPR is supported by this study. PMID:20462775

  14. W-band frequency-swept EPR.

    PubMed

    Hyde, James S; Strangeway, Robert A; Camenisch, Theodore G; Ratke, Joseph J; Froncisz, Wojciech

    2010-07-01

    This paper describes a novel experiment on nitroxide radical spin labels using a multiarm EPR W-band bridge with a loop-gap resonator (LGR). We demonstrate EPR spectroscopy of spin labels by linear sweep of the microwave frequency across the spectrum. The high bandwidth of the LGR, about 1 GHz between 3 dB points of the microwave resonance, makes this new experiment possible. A frequency-tunable yttrium iron garnet (YIG) oscillator provides sweep rates as high as 1.8x10(5) GHz/s, which corresponds to 6.3 kT/s in magnetic field-sweep units over a 44 MHz range. Two experimental domains were identified. In the first, linear frequency sweep rates were relatively slow, and pure absorption and pure dispersion spectra were obtained. This appears to be a practical mode of operation at the present level of technological development. The main advantage is the elimination of sinusoidal magnetic field modulation. In the second mode, the frequency is swept rapidly across a portion of the spectrum, and then the frequency sweep is stopped for a readout period; FID signals from a swept line oscillate at a frequency that is the difference between the spectral position of the line in frequency units and the readout position. If there is more than one line, oscillations are superimposed. The sweep rates using the YIG oscillator were too slow, and the portion of the spectrum too narrow to achieve the full EPR equivalent of Fourier transform (FT) NMR. The paper discusses technical advances required to reach this goal. The hypothesis that trapezoidal frequency sweep is an enabling technology for FT EPR is supported by this study. PMID:20462775

  15. Tetrabromidocuprates(II)-Synthesis, Structure and EPR.

    PubMed

    Zabel, André; Winter, Alette; Kelling, Alexandra; Schilde, Uwe; Strauch, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Metal-containing ionic liquids (ILs) are of interest for a variety of technical applications, e.g., particle synthesis and materials with magnetic or thermochromic properties. In this paper we report the synthesis of, and two structures for, some new tetrabromidocuprates(II) with several "onium" cations in comparison to the results of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopic analyses. The sterically demanding cations were used to separate the paramagnetic Cu(II) ions for EPR measurements. The EPR hyperfine structure in the spectra of these new compounds is not resolved, due to the line broadening resulting from magnetic exchange between the still-incomplete separated paramagnetic Cu(II) centres. For the majority of compounds, the principal g values (g‖ and g⊥) of the tensors could be determined and information on the structural changes in the [CuBr₄](2-) anions can be obtained. The complexes have high potential, e.g., as ionic liquids, as precursors for the synthesis of copper bromide particles, as catalytically active or paramagnetic ionic liquids. PMID:27104522

  16. EPR spin labeling measurements of thylakoid membrane fluidity during barley leaf senescence.

    PubMed

    Jajić, Ivan; Wiśniewska-Becker, Anna; Sarna, Tadeusz; Jemioła-Rzemińska, Małgorzata; Strzałka, Kazimierz

    2014-07-15

    Physical properties of thylakoid membranes isolated from barley were investigated by the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin labeling technique. EPR spectra of stearic acid spin labels 5-SASL and 16-SASL were measured as a function of temperature in secondary barley leaves during natural and dark-induced senescence. Oxygen transport parameter was determined from the power saturation curves of the spin labels obtained in the presence and absence of molecular oxygen at 25°C. Parameters of EPR spectra of both spin labels showed an increase in the thylakoid membrane fluidity during senescence, in the headgroup area of the membrane, as well as in its interior. The oxygen transport parameter also increased with age of barley, indicating easier diffusion of oxygen within the membrane and its higher fluidity. The data are consistent with age-related changes of the spin label parameters obtained directly by EPR spectroscopy. Similar outcome was also observed when senescence was induced in mature secondary barley leaves by dark incubation. Such leaves showed higher membrane fluidity in comparison with leaves of the same age, grown under light conditions. Changes in the membrane fluidity of barley secondary leaves were compared with changes in the levels of carotenoids (car) and proteins, which are known to modify membrane fluidity. Determination of total car and proteins showed linear decrease in their level with senescence. The results indicate that thylakoid membrane fluidity of barley leaves increases with senescence; the changes are accompanied with a decrease in the content of car and proteins, which could be a contributing factor. PMID:24974331

  17. EPR study on gamma-irradiated fruits dehydrated via osmosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yordanov, N. D.; Aleksieva, K.

    2007-06-01

    The shape and time stability of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of non- and γ-irradiated papaya, melon, cherry and fig samples dehydrated via osmosis are reported. It is shown that non-irradiated samples are generally EPR silent whereas γ-irradiated exhibit "sugar-like" EPR spectra. The recorded EPR spectra are monitored for a period of 7 months after irradiation (stored at low humidity and in the dark). The results suggest longer period of unambiguous identification of the radiation processing of osmose dehydrated fruits. Therefore, the Protocol EN 13708,2001 issued by CEN is fully applicable for the studied fruit samples.

  18. Use of the Frank sequence in pulsed EPR.

    PubMed

    Tseitlin, Mark; Quine, Richard W; Eaton, Sandra S; Eaton, Gareth R; Halpern, Howard J; Ardenkjaer-Larsen, J-H

    2011-04-01

    The Frank polyphase sequence has been applied to pulsed EPR of triarylmethyl radicals at 25 6 MHz (9.1 mT magnetic field), using 256 phase pulses. In EPR, as in NMR, use of a Frank sequence of phase steps permits pulsed FID signal acquisition with very low power microwave/RF pulses (ca. 1.5 mW in the application reported here) relative to standard pulsed EPR. A 0.2 mM aqueous solution of a triarylmethyl radical was studied using a 16 mm diameter cross-loop resonator to isolate the EPR signal detection system from the incident pulses. PMID:21371924

  19. Use of the Frank Sequence in Pulsed EPR

    PubMed Central

    Tseitlin, Mark; Quine, Richard W.; Eaton, Sandra S.; Eaton, Gareth R.; Halpern, Howard J.; Ardenkjaer-Larsen, J.-H.

    2011-01-01

    The Frank polyphase sequence has been applied to pulsed EPR of triarylmethyl radicals at 256 MHz (9.1 mT magnetic field), using 256 phase pulses. In EPR, as in NMR, use of a Frank sequence of phase steps permits pulsed FID signal acquisition with very low power microwave/RF pulses (ca. 1.5 mW in the application reported here) relative to standard pulsed EPR. A 0.2 mM aqueous solution of a triarylmethyl radical was studied using a 16 mm diameter cross loop resonator to isolate the EPR signal detection system from the incident pulses. PMID:21371924

  20. Locations of radical species in black pepper seeds investigated by CW EPR and 9 GHz EPR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Kouichi; Epel, Boris

    2014-10-01

    In this study, noninvasive 9 GHz electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)-imaging and continuous wave (CW) EPR were used to investigate the locations of paramagnetic species in black pepper seeds without further irradiation. First, lithium phthalocyanine (LiPC) phantom was used to examine 9 GHz EPR imaging capabilities. The 9 GHz EPR-imager easily resolved the LiPC samples at a distance of ∼2 mm. Then, commercially available black pepper seeds were measured. We observed signatures from three different radical species, which were assigned to stable organic radicals, Fe3+, and Mn2+ complexes. In addition, no EPR spectral change in the seed was observed after it was submerged in distilled H2O for 1 h. The EPR and spectral-spatial EPR imaging results suggested that the three paramagnetic species were mostly located at the seed surface. Fewer radicals were found inside the seed. We demonstrated that the CW EPR and 9 GHz EPR imaging were useful for the determination of the spatial distribution of paramagnetic species in various seeds.

  1. Microwave Saturation of Complex EPR Spectra and Free Radicals of Burnt Skin Treated with Apitherapeutic Agent

    PubMed Central

    Olczyk, Pawel; Ramos, Pawel; Bernas, Marcin; Komosinska-Vassev, Katarzyna; Stojko, Jerzy; Pilawa, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    The effect of microwave power on the complex electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of the burn matrix after the therapy with propolis was examined. The spectra were measured with microwaves in the range of 2.2–79 mW. Three groups of free radicals were found in the damaged skin samples. Their spectral lines evolve differently with the microwave power. In order to detect these free radical groups, the lineshape of the spectra was numerically analysed. The spectra were a superposition of three component lines. The best fit was obtained for the deconvolution of the experimental spectra into one Gauss and two Lorentz lines. The microwave power changes also the lineshape of the spectra of thermally injured skin treated with the conventional agent—silver sulphadiazine. The spectral changes were different for propolis and for silver sulphadiazine. The number of individual groups of free radicals in the wound bed after implementation of these two substances is not equal. It may be explained by a higher activity of propolis than of silver sulphadiazine as therapeutic agents. PMID:23781263

  2. EPR: what has it taught us

    SciTech Connect

    Stapp, H.P.

    1985-05-01

    This symposium commemorating the fiftieth anniversary of the paper of Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen is a fitting place to review what that work and its sequels have taught us. Prima facie, the EPR paper appears to have been exceedingly counter-productive for the following reasons: (1) The work was quickly rebutted by Bohr, and this rebuttal was apparently accepted by most workers in the field. (2) Scientists who adopted the position advocated by Bohr have produced, in the intervening fifty years, a marvelous body of useful theory, whereas those following the course suggested by EPR have produced nothing of any certified practical value. (3) It has been shown by Bell that the conclusion reached by EPR is incompatible with their assumptions. Chemists and physicists have recently begun to examine the behavior of quantum mechanical systems that are very small, yet large enough to influence their environment in ways that appreciably modify their own behavior, vis-a-vis the behavior they would have if isolated. Because these systems are neither small enough to be treated as isolated (or as residing in a classically described environment) between preparation and detection, nor large enough to be treated classically, they do not conform to the format demanded by the Copenhagen interpretation. Indeed, the behavior of these systems depends on ontological considerations that were irrelevant in the situations covered by the Copenhagen interpretation, and that were systematically ignored in that interpretation. Scientists now face the task of enlarging the scope of quantum theory to cover these new situations, and comparing the empirical consequences of various ontological assumptions. 17 refs.

  3. EPR investigations of gamma-irradiated novolacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrödner, M.; Wünsche, P.; Lampe, I. v.

    EPR investigations of γ-irradiated phenol, p-chlorophenol, o-chlorophenol, 3,5-dichlorophenol and p-cresol novolac are presented. The elimination of a chlorine atom from the phenolic ring must be assumed in the case of chlorinated novolacs. The corresponding aryl radical could only be detected in the case of 3,5-dichlorophenol novolac in a large amount. Furthermore phenoxy and cyclohexadienyl radicals were found in the spectra. The radiation chemical as well as the resist sensitivity are enhanced by chlorination but there is no definite correlation between them.

  4. Saturation in coupled oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman, Ahmed; Hanna, James

    2015-03-01

    We consider a weakly nonlinear system consisting of a resonantly forced oscillator coupled to an unforced oscillator. It has long been known that, for quadratic nonlinearities and a 2:1 resonance between the oscillators, a perturbative solution of the dynamics exhibits a phenomenon known as saturation. At low forcing, the forced oscillator responds, while the unforced oscillator is quiescent. Above a critical value of the forcing, the forced oscillator's steady-state amplitude reaches a plateau, while that of the unforced oscillator increases without bound. We show that, contrary to established folklore, saturation is not unique to quadratically nonlinear systems. We present conditions on the form of the nonlinear couplings and resonance that lead to saturation. Our results elucidate a mechanism for localization or diversion of energy in systems of coupled oscillators, and suggest new approaches for the control or suppression of vibrations in engineered systems.

  5. Case Studies in e-RPL and e-PR

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cameron, Roslyn; Miller, Allison

    2014-01-01

    The use of ePortfolios for recognition of prior learning (e-RPL) and for professional recognition (e-PR) is slowly gaining in popularity in the VET sector however their use is sporadic across educational sectors, disciplines, educational institutions and professions. Added to this is an array of purposes and types of e-RPL and e-PR models and…

  6. Quantum Encryption Protocol Based on Continuous Variable EPR Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Guang-Qiang; Zeng, Gui-Hua

    2006-07-01

    A quantum encryption protocol based on Gaussian-modulated continuous variable EPR correlations is proposed. The security is guaranteed by continuous variable EPR entanglement correlations produced by nondegenerate optical parametric amplifier (NOPA). For general beam splitter eavesdropping strategy, the mutual information I(α,epsilon) between Alice and Eve is calculated by employing Shannon information theory. Finally the security analysis is presented.

  7. EPR investigation of some gamma-irradiated excipients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksieva, Katerina; Yordanov, Nicola D.

    2012-09-01

    The results of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies on some excipients: lactose, microcrystalline cellulose (avicel), starch, dioxosilane (aerosil), talc and magnesium stearate before and after gamma-irradiation are reported. Before irradiation, all samples are EPR silent except talc. After gamma-irradiation, they show complex spectra except magnesium stearate, which is EPR silent. Studies show the influence of gamma-irradiation on EPR spectra and stability of gamma-induced radicals. Analysis of the EPR spectrum of gamma-irradiated talc shows that this material is radiation insensitive. Only lactose forms stable-free radicals upon gamma sterilization and can be used for identification of radiation processing for a long time period thereafter.

  8. Pump for Saturated Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, D. G.

    1986-01-01

    Boiling liquids pumped by device based on proven components. Expanding saturated liquid in nozzle and diverting its phases along separate paths in liquid/vapor separator raises pressure of liquid. Liquid cooled in process. Pump makes it unnecessary to pressurize cryogenic liquids in order to pump them. Problems of introducing noncondensable pressurizing gas avoided.

  9. Identification of gamma-irradiated fruit juices by EPR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksieva, K. I.; Dimov, K. G.; Yordanov, N. D.

    2014-10-01

    The results of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) study on commercially available juices from various fruits and different fruit contents: 25%, 40%, 50%, and 100%, homemade juices, nectars and concentrated fruit syrups, before and after gamma-irradiation are reported. In order to remove water from non- and irradiated samples all juices and nectars were filtered; the solid residue was washed with alcohol and dried at room temperature. Only concentrated fruit syrups were dried for 60 min at 40 °C in a standard laboratory oven. All samples under study show a singlet EPR line with g=2.0025 before irradiation with exception of concentrated fruit syrups, which are EPR silent. Irradiation of juice samples gives rise to complex EPR spectra which gradually transferred to “cellulose-like” EPR spectrum from 25% to 100% fruit content. Concentrated fruit syrups show typical “sugar-like“ spectra due to added saccharides. All EPR spectra are characteristic and can prove radiation treatment. The fading kinetics of radiation-induced EPR signals were studied for a period of 60 days after irradiation.

  10. Capillary saturation and desaturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilfer, R.; Armstrong, R. T.; Berg, S.; Georgiadis, A.; Ott, H.

    2015-12-01

    Capillary desaturation experiments produce disconnected (trapped) ganglia of mesoscopic sizes intermediate between pore size and system size. Experimental evidence for interactions between these mesoscale clusters during desaturation is analyzed and discussed within the established microscopic and macroscopic laws of Newton, Young-Laplace, and Darcy. A theoretical expression for capillary number correlations is introduced that seems to have remained unnoticed. It expresses capillary desaturation curves in terms of stationary capillary pressures and relative permeabilities. The theoretical expression shows that the plateau saturation in capillary desaturation curves may in general differ from the residual nonwetting saturation defined through the saturation limit of the main hysteresis loop. Hysteresis effects as well as the difference between wetting and nonwetting fluids are introduced into the analysis of capillary desaturation experiments. The article examines experiments with different desaturation protocols and discusses the existence of a mesoscopic length scale intermediate between pore scale and sample scale. The theoretical expression is derived entirely within the existing traditional theory of two-phase flow in porous media and compared to a recent experiment.

  11. EPR paradox, quantum nonlocality and physical reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupczynski, M.

    2016-03-01

    Eighty years ago Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen demonstrated that instantaneous reduction of wave function, believed to describe completely a pair of entangled physical systems, led to EPR paradox. The paradox disappears in statistical interpretation of quantum mechanics (QM) according to which a wave function describes only an ensemble of identically prepared physical systems. QM predicts strong correlations between outcomes of measurements performed on different members of EPR pairs in far-away locations. Searching for an intuitive explanation of these correlations John Bell analysed so called local realistic hidden variable models and proved that correlations consistent with these models satisfy Bell inequalities which are violated by some predictions of QM and by experimental data. Several different local models were constructed and inequalities proven. Some eminent physicists concluded that Nature is definitely nonlocal and that it is acting according to a law of nonlocal randomness. According to these law perfectly random, but strongly correlated events, can be produced at the same time in far away locations and a local and causal explanation of their occurrence cannot be given. We strongly disagree with this conclusion and we prove the contrary by analysing in detail some influential finite sample proofs of Bell and CHSH inequalities and so called Quantum Randi Challenges. We also show how one can win so called Bell's game without violating locality of Nature. Nonlocal randomness is inconsistent with local quantum field theory, with standard model in elementary particle physics and with causal laws and adaptive dynamics prevailing in the surrounding us world. The experimental violation of Bell-type inequalities does not prove the nonlocality of Nature but it only confirms a contextual character of quantum observables and gives a strong argument against counterfactual definiteness and against a point of view according to which experimental outcomes are produced

  12. Spin relaxation measurements using first-harmonic out-of-phase absorption EPR signals.

    PubMed

    Livshits, V A; Páli, T; Marsh, D

    1998-09-01

    The dependence on spin-lattice (T1) relaxation of the first-harmonic absorption EPR signal (V'1) detected in phase quadrature with the Zeeman modulation has been investigated both theoretically and experimentally for nitroxide spin labels. Spectral simulations were performed by iterative solution of the Bloch equations that contained explicitly both the modulation and microwave magnetic fields (T. Páli, V. A. Livshits, and D. Marsh, 1996, J. Magn. Reson. B 113, 151-159). It was found that, of the various non-linear EPR displays, the first-harmonic out-of-phase V'1-signal, recorded under conditions of partial saturation of the microwave absorption, is particularly favorable for determining spin-lattice relaxation enhancements because of its superior signal intensity and relative insensitivity to spin-spin (T2) relaxation. By varying the Zeeman modulation frequency it is also possible to tune the optimum sensitivity of the V'1-signal to different ranges of the T1-relaxation time. A Zeeman modulation frequency of 25 kHz appears to be particularly suited to spin label applications. Calibrations are given for the dependence on T1-relaxation time of both the amplitude and the second integral of the V'1-signal recorded under standard conditions. Experiments on different spin labels in solution and in membranes demonstrate the practical usable sensitivity of the V'1-signal, even at modulation frequencies of 25 kHz, and these are used to investigate the dependence on microwave field intensity, in comparison with theoretical predictions. The practicable sensitivity to spin-lattice relaxation enhancements is demonstrated experimentally for a spin-labeled membrane system in the presence of paramagnetic ions. The first-harmonic out-of-phase V'1-signal appears to be the non-linear CW EPR method of choice for determining T1-relaxation enhancements in spin-labeled systems. PMID:9740736

  13. Insights into the mechanism of X-ray-induced disulfide-bond cleavage in lysozyme crystals based on EPR, optical absorption and X-ray diffraction studies

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, Kristin A.; Black, Paul J.; Mercer, Kermit R.; Garman, Elspeth F.; Owen, Robin L.; Snell, Edward H.; Bernhard, William A.

    2013-12-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and online UV–visible absorption microspectrophotometry with X-ray crystallography have been used in a complementary manner to follow X-ray-induced disulfide-bond cleavage, to confirm a multi-track radiation-damage process and to develop a model of that process. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and online UV–visible absorption microspectrophotometry with X-ray crystallography have been used in a complementary manner to follow X-ray-induced disulfide-bond cleavage. Online UV–visible spectroscopy showed that upon X-irradiation, disulfide radicalization appeared to saturate at an absorbed dose of approximately 0.5–0.8 MGy, in contrast to the saturating dose of ∼0.2 MGy observed using EPR at much lower dose rates. The observations suggest that a multi-track model involving product formation owing to the interaction of two separate tracks is a valid model for radiation damage in protein crystals. The saturation levels are remarkably consistent given the widely different experimental parameters and the range of total absorbed doses studied. The results indicate that even at the lowest doses used for structural investigations disulfide bonds are already radicalized. Multi-track considerations offer the first step in a comprehensive model of radiation damage that could potentially lead to a combined computational and experimental approach to identifying when damage is likely to be present, to quantitate it and to provide the ability to recover the native unperturbed structure.

  14. Lorentz symmetry breaking effects on relativistic EPR correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belich, H.; Furtado, C.; Bakke, K.

    2015-09-01

    Lorentz symmetry breaking effects on relativistic EPR (Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen) correlations are discussed. From the modified Maxwell theory coupled to gravity, we establish a possible scenario of the Lorentz symmetry violation and write an effective metric for the Minkowski spacetime. Then we obtain the Wigner rotation angle via the Fermi-Walker transport of spinors and consider the WKB (Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin) approximation in order to study the influence of Lorentz symmetry breaking effects on the relativistic EPR correlations.

  15. EFFECT OF MICROWAVE POWER ON SHAPE OF EPR SPECTRA--APPLICATION TO EXAMINATION OF COMPLEX FREE RADICAL SYSTEM IN THERMALLY STERILIZED ACIDUM BORICUM.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Paweł; Pieprzyca, Małgorzata; Pilawa, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Complex free radical system in thermally sterilized acidum boricum (AB) was studied. Acidum boricum was sterilized at temperatures and times given by pharmaceutical norms: 160 degrees C and 120 min, 170 degrees C and 60 min and 180 degrees C and 30 min. The advanced spectroscopic tests were performed. The EPR spectra of free radicals were measured as the first derivatives with microwaves of 9.3 GHz frequency and magnetic modulation of 100 kHz. The Polish X-band electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer of Radiopan (Poznań) was used. EPR lines were not observed for the nonheated AB. The broad EPR asymmetric lines were obtained for all the heated AB samples. The influence of microwave power in the range of 2.2-70 mW on the shape of EPR spectra of the heated drug samples was tested. The following asymmetry parameters: A1/A2, A1-A2, B1/B2, and B1-B2, were analyzed. The changes of these parameters with microwave power were observed. The strong dependence of shape and its parameters on microwave power proved the complex character of free radical system in thermally sterilized AB. Changes of microwave power during the detection of EPR spectra indicated complex character of free radicals in AB sterilized in hot air under all the tested conditions. Thermolysis, interactions between free radicals and interactions of free radicals with oxygen may be responsible for the complex free radicals system in thermally treated AB. Usefulness of continuous microwave saturation of EPR lines and shape analysis to examine free radicals in thermally sterilized drugs was confirmed. PMID:27180421

  16. EPR study on non- and gamma-irradiated herbal pills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksieva, K.; Lagunov, O.; Dimov, K.; Yordanov, N. D.

    2011-06-01

    The results of EPR studies on herbal pills of marigold, hawthorn, yarrow, common balm, tutsan, nettle and thyme before and after gamma-irradiation are reported. Before irradiation all samples exhibit one weak singlet EPR line with a g-factor of 2.0048±0.0005. After irradiation herbal pills could be separated in two groups according to their EPR spectra. Radiation-induced free radicals in pills of marigold, yarrow, nettle, tutsan and thyme could be attributed mainly to saccharide excipients. Tablets of hawthorn and common balm show "cellulose-like" EPR spectrum, superimposed on partly resolved carbohydrate spectrum, due to the active part (herb) and inulin, which is present in the pills as an excipient. Fading study of the radiation-induced EPR signals confirms that sugar radicals are more stable than cellulose species. The reported results show that the presence of characteristic EPR spectra of herbal pills due to excipients or active part can be used as unambiguous proof of radiation processing within 35 or more days after irradiation.

  17. Saturated Zone Colloid Transport

    SciTech Connect

    H. S. Viswanathan

    2004-10-07

    This scientific analysis provides retardation factors for colloids transporting in the saturated zone (SZ) and the unsaturated zone (UZ). These retardation factors represent the reversible chemical and physical filtration of colloids in the SZ. The value of the colloid retardation factor, R{sub col} is dependent on several factors, such as colloid size, colloid type, and geochemical conditions (e.g., pH, Eh, and ionic strength). These factors are folded into the distributions of R{sub col} that have been developed from field and experimental data collected under varying geochemical conditions with different colloid types and sizes. Attachment rate constants, k{sub att}, and detachment rate constants, k{sub det}, of colloids to the fracture surface have been measured for the fractured volcanics, and separate R{sub col} uncertainty distributions have been developed for attachment and detachment to clastic material and mineral grains in the alluvium. Radionuclides such as plutonium and americium sorb mostly (90 to 99 percent) irreversibly to colloids (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170025], Section 6.3.3.2). The colloid retardation factors developed in this analysis are needed to simulate the transport of radionuclides that are irreversibly sorbed onto colloids; this transport is discussed in the model report ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170036]). Although it is not exclusive to any particular radionuclide release scenario, this scientific analysis especially addresses those scenarios pertaining to evidence from waste-degradation experiments, which indicate that plutonium and americium may be irreversibly attached to colloids for the time scales of interest. A section of this report will also discuss the validity of using microspheres as analogs to colloids in some of the lab and field experiments used to obtain the colloid retardation factors. In addition, a small fraction of colloids travels with the groundwater without any significant retardation

  18. Pulsed EPR for studying silver clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalik, J.; Wasowicz, T.; Sadlo, J.; Reijerse, E. J.; Kevan, L.

    1996-01-01

    The cationic silver clusters of different nuclearity have been produced by radiolysis of zeolite A and SAPO molecular sieves containing Ag + as exchangeable cations. The pulsed EPR spectroscopy has been applied for studying the local environment of silver cluster in order to understand the mechanism of cluster formation and stabilization. The electron spin echo modulation (ESEM) results on Ag 6n+ cluster in dehydration zeolite A indicate that the hexameric silver is stabilized only in sodalite cages which are surrounded by α-cages containing no water molecules. Trimeric silver clusters formed in hydrated A zeolites strongly interact with water, thus the paramagnetic center can be considered as a cluster-water adduct. In SAPO-molecular sieves, silver clusters are formed only in the presence of adsorbed alcohol molecules. From ESEM it is determined that Ag 4n+ in SAPO-42 is stabilized in α-cages, where it is directly coordinated by two methanol molecules. Dimeric silver, Ag 2+ in SAPO-5 and SAPO-11 is located in 6-ring channels and interacts with three CH 3OH molecules, each in different 10-ring or 12-ring channels. The differences of Ag 2+ stability in SAPO-5 and SAPO-11 are also discussed.

  19. Sensitivity enhancement in pulse EPR distance measurements.

    PubMed

    Jeschke, G; Bender, A; Paulsen, H; Zimmermann, H; Godt, A

    2004-07-01

    Established pulse EPR approaches to the measurement of small dipole-dipole couplings between electron spins rely on constant-time echo experiments to separate relaxational contributions from dipolar time evolution. This requires a compromise between sensitivity and resolution to be made prior to the measurement, so that optimum data are only obtained if the magnitude of the dipole-dipole coupling is known beforehand to a good approximation. Moreover, the whole dipolar evolution function is measured with relatively low sensitivity. These problems are overcome by a variable-time experiment that achieves suppression of the relaxation contribution by reference deconvolution. Theoretical and experimental results show that this approach leads to significant sensitivity improvements for typical systems and experimental conditions. Further sensitivity improvements or, equivalently, an extension of the accessible distance range can be obtained by matrix deuteration or digital long-pass filtering of the time-domain data. Advantages and limitations of the new variable-time experiment are discussed by comparing it to the established analogous constant-time experiment for measurements of end-to-end distances of 5 and 7.5 nm on rod-like shape-persistent biradicals and for the measurement of a broadly distributed transmembrane distance in a doubly spin-labeled mutant of plant light harvesting complex II. PMID:15183350

  20. High-Frequency EPR and ENDOR Spectroscopy on Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    PubMed Central

    Baranov, Pavel G.; de Mello Donegá, Celso; Schmidt, Jan

    2010-01-01

    is observed. Finally, it is shown that an almost complete dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of the 67Zn nuclear spins in the core of ZnO QDs and of the 1H nuclear spins in the Zn(OH)2 capping layer can be obtained. This DNP is achieved by saturating the EPR transition of SDs present in the QDs with resonant high-frequency microwaves at low temperatures. This nuclear polarization manifests itself as a hole and an antihole in the EPR absorption line of the SD in the QDs and a shift of the hole (antihole). The enhancement of the nuclear polarization opens the possibility to study semiconductor nanostructures with nuclear magnetic resonance techniques. PMID:20936163

  1. Correcting for accidental correlations in saturated avalanche photodiodes.

    PubMed

    Grieve, J A; Chandrasekara, R; Tang, Z; Cheng, C; Ling, A

    2016-02-22

    In this paper we present a general method for estimating rates of accidental coincidence between a pair of single photon detectors operated within their saturation regimes. By folding the effects of recovery time of both detectors and the detection circuit into an "effective duty cycle" we are able to accomodate complex recovery behaviour at high event rates. As an example, we provide a detailed high-level model for the behaviour of passively quenched avalanche photodiodes, and demonstrate effective background subtraction at rates commonly associated with detector saturation. We show that by post-processing using the updated model, we observe an improvement in polarization correlation visibility from 88.7% to 96.9% in our experimental dataset. This technique will be useful in improving the signal-to-noise ratio in applications which depend on coincidence measurements, especially in situations where rapid changes in flux may cause detector saturation. PMID:26907016

  2. Single-wall carbon nanotubes and peapods investigated by EPR.

    PubMed

    Corzilius, B; Dinse, K-P; Hata, K

    2007-12-14

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) prepared by the "super growth" method developed recently exhibit electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signals, which can be attributed to itinerant spins. EPR results indicate very low defect and catalyst concentrations in this superior material. Under these conditions EPR can be used to study details of charge transport properties over a wide temperature range, although the material is still very "heterogeneous" with respect to tube diameter and chirality. Non-resonant microwave absorption in the temperature range below 20 K is indicative for the opening of a small gap at the Fermi energy for tubes of metallic character, which is indicative for a transition into a superconducting state. Using SWNT filled partially with an endohedral spin probe like N@C(60), such "peapods" can be investigated "from the inside". Continuous-wave (cw) and pulsed EPR was used to investigate localization dynamics within the tubes or to check for interaction with itinerant electrons. Using SWNT grown by different methods, the dominant influence of tube diameter on fullerene dynamics was revealed by temperature dependent pulsed EPR experiments. These differences can be correlated with the interactions between the endohedral observer spin and spins on the SWNT. PMID:18167581

  3. Macromolecular therapeutics in cancer treatment: the EPR effect and beyond.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Hiroshi

    2012-12-10

    In this review, I have discussed various issues of the cancer drug targeting primarily related to the EPR (enhanced permeability and retention) effect, which utilized nanomedicine or macromolecular drugs. The content goes back to the development of the first polymer-protein conjugate anticancer agent SMANCS and development of the arterial infusion in Lipiodol formulation into the tumor feeding artery (hepatic artery for hepatoma). The brief account on the EPR effect and its definition, factors involved, heterogeneity, and various methods of augmentation of the EPR effect, which showed remarkably improved clinical outcomes are also discussed. Various obstacles involved in drug developments and commercialization are also discussed through my personal experience and recollections. PMID:22595146

  4. Retrospective dosimetry using EPR and TL techniques: a status report

    SciTech Connect

    Haskell, E.H.

    1996-12-31

    Methods of retrospective dosimetry, including luminescence and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR), rely on measurement of accident dose absorbed by naturally occurring materials - ceramics in the case of both thermoluminescence (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and organic materials and bio- minerals in the case of EPR. Each of these methods relies on measurement of radiation defects resulting from accidental exposure. Since defects also result from natural sources of radiation over the lifetime of a sample, analysis is usually restricted to materials for which the natural dose may be determined and subtracted from the measured cumulative dose. Luminescence dating techniques rely heavily on an accurate assessment of cumulative dose from natural radiation sources, and dating research has provided us with the bulk of our knowledge in this area. Virtually all of the work on natural dose determination can be directly applied to retrospective techniques. With EPR techniques the cumulative dose from diagnostic x- rays is also of importance.

  5. EPR Correlations, Bell Inequalities and Common Cause Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofer-Szabó, Gábor

    2014-03-01

    Standard common causal explanations of the EPR situation assume a so-called joint common cause system that is a common cause for all correlations. However, the assumption of a joint common cause system together with some other physically motivated assumptions concerning locality and no-conspiracy results in various Bell inequalities. Since Bell inequalities are violated for appropriate measurement settings, a local, non-conspiratorial joint common causal explanation of the EPR situation is ruled out. But why do we assume that a common causal explanation of a set of correlation consists in finding a joint common cause system for all correlations and not just in finding separate common cause systems for the different correlations? What are the perspectives of a local, non-conspiratorial separate common causal explanation for the EPR scenario? And finally, how do Bell inequalities relate to the weaker assumption of separate common cause systems?

  6. Reading Recovery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Joanna R., Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This issue of the Arizona Reading Journal focuses on the theme "reading recovery" and includes the following articles: "Why Is an Inservice Programme for Reading Recovery Teachers Necessary?" (Marie M. Clay); "What Is Reading Recovery?" (Gay Su Pinnell); "Teaching a Hard To Teach Child" (Constance A. Compton); "Reading Recovery in Arizona--A…

  7. Effects of positional restraint on oxygen saturation and heart rate following exercise.

    PubMed

    Reay, D T; Howard, J D; Fligner, C L; Ward, R J

    1988-03-01

    This report assesses the effects on peripheral oxygen saturation and heart rate that positional restraint induces when a person is prone, handcuffed, and "hog-tied." Peripheral oxygen saturation and heart rate were monitored at rest, during exercise, and during recovery from exercise for 10 adult subjects. The effects of positional restraint produced a mean recovery time that was significantly prolonged. Consequently, the physiological effects produced by positional restraint should be recognized in deaths where such measures are used. PMID:3354518

  8. Determining the Topology of Integral Membrane Peptides Using EPR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Inbaraj, Johnson J.; Cardon, Thomas B.; Laryukhin, Mikhail; Grosser, Stuart M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of a new structural biology technique for determining the membrane topology of an integral membrane protein inserted into magnetically aligned phospholipid bilayers (bicelles) using EPR spectroscopy. The nitroxide spin probe, 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl-4-amino-4-carboxylic acid (TOAC) was attached to the pore-lining transmembrane domain (M2δ) of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) and incorporated into a bicelle. The corresponding EPR spectra revealed hyperfine splittings that were highly dependent on the macroscopic orientation of the bicelles with respect to the static magnetic field. The helical tilt of the peptide can be easily calculated using the hyperfine splittings gleaned from the orientational dependent EPR spectra. A helical tilt of 14° was calculated for the M2δ peptide with respect to the bilayer normal of the membrane, which agrees well with previous 15N solid-state NMR studies. The helical tilt of the peptide was verified by simulating the corresponding EPR spectra using the standardized MOMD approach. This new method is advantageous because: (1) bicelle samples are easy to prepare, (2) the helical tilt can be directly calculated from the orientational-dependent hyperfine splitting in the EPR spectra, and (3) EPR spectroscopy is approximately 1000 fold more sensitive than 15N solid-state NMR spectroscopy; thus, the helical tilt of an integral membrane peptide can be determined with only 100 μg of peptide. The helical tilt can be determined more accurately by placing TOAC spin labels at several positions with this technique. PMID:16848493

  9. Free-radical probes for functional in vivo EPR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, S.; Krishna, M. C.

    2007-02-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) is one of the recent functional imaging modalities that can provide valuable in vivo physiological information on its own merit and aids as a complimentary imaging technique to MRI and PET of tissues especially with respect to in vivo pO II (oxygen partial pressure), redox status and pharmacology. EPR imaging mainly deals with the measurement of distribution and in vivo dynamics and redox changes using special nontoxic paramagnetic spin probes that can be infused into the object of investigation. These spin probes should be characterized by simple EPR spectra, preferably with narrow EPR lines. The line width should be reversibly sensitive to the concentration of in vivo pO II with a linear dependence. Several non-toxic paramagnetic probes, some particulate and insoluble and others water-soluble and infusible (by intravenous or intramuscular injection) have been developed which can be effectively used to quantitatively assess tissue redox status, and tumor hypoxia. Quantitative assessment of the redox status of tissue in vivo is important in investigating oxidative stress, and that of tissue pO II is very important in radiation oncology. Other areas in which EPR imaging and oxymetry may help are in the investigation of tumorangiogenesis, wound healing, oxygenation of tumor tissue by the ingestion of oxygen-rich gases, etc. The correct choice of the spin probe will depend on the modality of measurement (whether by CW or time-domain EPR imaging) and the particular physiology interrogated. Examples of the available spin probes and some EPR imaging applications employing them are presented.

  10. EPR studies of gamma-irradiated taurine single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulut, A.; Karabulut, B.; Tapramaz, R.; Köksal, F.

    2000-04-01

    An EPR study of gamma-irradiated taurine [C 2H 7NO 3S] single crystal was carried out at room temperature. The EPR spectra were recorded in the three at mutually perpendicular planes. There are two magnetically distinct sites in monoclinic lattice. The principle values of g and hyperfine constants for both sites were calculated. The results have indicated the presence of 32ṠO -2 and 33ṠO -2 radicals. The hyperfine values of 33ṠO -2 radical were used to obtain O-S-O bond angle for both sites.

  11. A new causal interpretation of EPR-B experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gondran, Michel; Gondran, Alexandre

    2012-12-01

    In this paper we study a two-step version of EPR-B experiment, the Bohm version of the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen experiment. Its theoretical resolution in space and time enables us to refute the classic "impossibility" to decompose a pair of entangled atoms into two distinct states, one for each atom. We propose a new causal interpretation of the EPR-B experiment where each atom has a position and a spin while the singlet wave function verifies the two-body Pauli equation. In conclusion we suggest a physical explanation of non-local influences, compatible with Einstein's point of view on relativity.

  12. Adaptive dynamics of saturated polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Kisdi, Éva; Geritz, Stefan A H

    2016-03-01

    We study the joint adaptive dynamics of n scalar-valued strategies in ecosystems where n is the maximum number of coexisting strategies permitted by the (generalized) competitive exclusion principle. The adaptive dynamics of such saturated systems exhibits special characteristics, which we first demonstrate in a simple example of a host-pathogen-predator model. The main part of the paper characterizes the adaptive dynamics of saturated polymorphisms in general. In order to investigate convergence stability, we give a new sufficient condition for absolute stability of an arbitrary (not necessarily saturated) polymorphic singularity and show that saturated evolutionarily stable polymorphisms satisfy it. For the case [Formula: see text], we also introduce a method to construct different pairwise invasibility plots of the monomorphic population without changing the selection gradients of the saturated dimorphism. PMID:26676357

  13. EPR and Primitive Life: Dating and Visualizing the Organic Matter in the Oldest Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binet, L.; Gourier, D.; Skrzypczak-Bonduelle, A.; Delpoux, O.; Derenne, S.

    2007-03-01

    An EPR study of cherts of different ages showed that the age of the embedded fossil organic matter can be estimated from the EPR lineshape of the radicals. Nondestructive 3D visualization of bacterial mats is cherts in also possible by EPR imaging.

  14. Saturation current spikes eliminated in saturable core transformers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, F. C.

    1971-01-01

    Unsaturating composite magnetic core transformer, consisting of two separate parallel cores designed so impending core saturation causes signal generation, terminates high current spike in converter primary circuit. Simplified waveform, demonstrates transformer effectiveness in eliminating current spikes.

  15. New ceramic EPR resonators with high dielectric permittivity.

    PubMed

    Golovina, Iryna; Geifman, Ilia; Belous, Anatolii

    2008-11-01

    New EPR resonators were developed by using a ceramic material with a high dielectric constant, epsilon=160. The resonators have a high quality factor, Q=10(3), and enhance the sensitivity of an EPR spectrometer up to 170 times. Some advantages of the new ceramic resonators are: (1) cheaper synthesis and simplified fabricating technology; (2) wider temperature range; and (3) ease of use. The ceramic material is produced with a titanate of complex oxides of rare-earth and alkaline metals, and has a perovskite type structure. The resonators were tested with X-band EPR spectrometers with cylindrical (TE(011)) and rectangular (TE(102)) cavities at 300 and 77K. We discovered that EPR signal strength enhancement depends on the dielectric constant of the material, resonator geometry and the size of the sample. Also, an unusual resonant mode was found in the dielectric resonator-metallic cavity structure. In this mode, the directions of microwave magnetic fields of the coupled resonators are opposite and the resonant frequency of the structure is higher than the frequency of empty metallic cavity. PMID:18815061

  16. Determination of tritium distribution in labeled compounds using EPR spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Postolache, C.; Matei, L.; Georgescu, R.

    2008-07-15

    Usually, the tritium distribution in a labeled compound is analyzed by T-NMR spectrometry. NMR equipment is expensive and its sensitivity is lower in comparison to EPR spectrometry. In this paper, the possibility of determining the distribution of tritium in a labeled molecule using self-radiolytic decay processes was analyzed. (authors)

  17. Quantitative Analysis of the Enhanced Permeation and Retention (EPR) Effect

    PubMed Central

    Ulmschneider, Martin B.; Searson, Peter C.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor vasculature is characterized by a variety of abnormalities including irregular architecture, poor lymphatic drainage, and the upregulation of factors that increase the paracellular permeability. The increased permeability is important in mediating the uptake of an intravenously administered drug in a solid tumor and is known as the enhanced permeation and retention (EPR) effect. Studies in animal models have demonstrated a cut-off size of 500 nm - 1 µm for molecules or nanoparticles to extravasate into a tumor, however, surprisingly little is known about the kinetics of the EPR effect. Here we present a pharmacokinetic model to quantitatively assess the influence of the EPR effect on the uptake of a drug into a solid tumor. We use pharmacokinetic data for Doxil and doxorubicin from human clinical trials to illustrate how the EPR effect influences tumor uptake. This model provides a quantitative framework to guide preclinical trials of new chemotherapies and ultimately to develop design rules that can increase targeting efficiency and decrease unwanted side effects in normal tissue. PMID:25938565

  18. Development of a Hybrid EPR/NMR Coimaging System

    PubMed Central

    Samouilov, Alexandre; Caia, George L.; Kesselring, Eric; Petryakov, Sergey; Wasowicz, Tomasz; Zweier, Jay L.

    2010-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) is a powerful technique that enables spatial mapping of free radicals or other paramagnetic compounds; however, it does not in itself provide anatomic visualization of the body. Proton magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is well suited to provide anatomical visualization. A hybrid EPR/NMR coimaging instrument was constructed that utilizes the complementary capabilities of both techniques, superimposing EPR and proton-MR images to provide the distribution of paramagnetic species in the body. A common magnet and field gradient system is utilized along with a dual EPR and proton-NMR resonator assembly, enabling coimaging without the need to move the sample. EPRI is performed at ~1.2 GHz/~40 mT and proton MRI is performed at 16.18 MHz/~380 mT; hence the method is suitable for whole-body coimaging of living mice. The gradient system used is calibrated and controlled in such a manner that the spatial geometry of the two acquired images is matched, enabling their superposition without additional postprocessing or marker registration. The performance of the system was tested in a series of phantoms and in vivo applications by mapping the location of a paramagnetic probe in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of mice. This hybrid EPR/NMR coimaging instrument enables imaging of paramagnetic molecules along with their anatomic localization in the body. PMID:17659621

  19. A hand-held EPR scanner for transcutaneous oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfson, Helen; Ahmad, Rizwan; Twig, Ygal; Blank, Aharon; Kuppusamy, Periannan

    2015-03-01

    Cutaneous (skin) oxygenation is an important prognostic factor for the treatment of chronic wounds, skin cancer, diabetes side effects, and limb amputation. Currently, there are no reliable methods for measuring this parameter. Oximetry, using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, is emerging as a potential tool for clinical oximetry, including cutaneous applications. The problem with EPR oximetry, however, is that the conventional EPR design requires the use of a large magnet that can generate homogeneous field across the sample, making it unattractive for clinical practice. We present a novel approach that makes use of a miniature permanent magnet, combined with a small microwave resonator, to enable the acquisition of EPR signals from paramagnetic species placed on the skin. The instrumentation consists of a hand-held, modular, cylindrical probehead with overall dimensions of 36-mm diameter and 24-mm height, with 150-g weight. The probehead includes a Halbach array of 16 pieces (4×4×8 mm3) of Sm-Co permanent magnet and a loop-gap resonator (2.24 GHz). Preliminary measurements using a Hahn-echo pulse sequence (800 echos in 20 ms) showed a signalto- noise ratio of ~70 compared to ~435 in a homogenous magnet under identical settings. Further work is in progress to improve the performance of the probehead and to optimize the hand-held system for clinical use

  20. Numerical analysis of EPR spectra. 7. The simplex algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckwith, Athelstan L. J.; Brumby, Steven

    The Simplex algorithm is well suited to the least-squares analysis of highly complex EPR spectra. The application of the algorithm to the analysis of the spectra of benzo[ a]pyrenyl-6-oxy, chloro(methoxycarbonyl)methyl, and cyano(methoxy)methyl free radicals is described.

  1. EPR investigations of gamma-irradiated ground black pepper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polovka, Martin; Brezová, Vlasta; Staško, Andrej; Mazúr, Milan; Suhaj, Milan; Šimko, Peter

    2006-02-01

    The γ-radiation treatment of ground black pepper samples resulted in the production of three paramagnetic species ( GI- GIII) which arise from a different origin and have different thermal behavior and stability. The axially symmetric spectra can be characterized by the spin Hamiltonian parameters: GI ( g⊥=2.0060, g∥=2.0032; A⊥=0.85 mT, A∥=0.70 mT) and GII ( g⊥=2.0060, g∥=2.0050; A⊥=0.50 mT, A∥=0.40 mT) assigned to carbohydrate radical structures. The parameters of EPR signal GIII ( g⊥=2.0029, g∥=2.0014; A⊥=3.00 mT, A∥=1.80 mT) possessed features characteristic of cellulose radical species. The activation energies, evaluated by Arrhenius analysis, are in order Ea( GI)< Ea( GIII)< Ea( GII). The EPR measurements performed 20 weeks after radiation process confirmed that a temperature increase from 298 to 353 K, caused a significant decrease of integral EPR signal intensity for γ-irradiated samples (˜40%), compared to the reference (non-irradiated) ground black pepper, where a decrease of ˜13% was found. The influence of γ-radiation treatment on the radical-scavenging activities of aqueous and ethanol extracts of black pepper were investigated by both an EPR spin trapping technique and DPPH assay. No changes were detected in either the water or ethanol extracts for a γ-irradiation dose of 10 kGy.

  2. Nonlinear Simulation of the Tooth Enamel Spectrum for EPR Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillov, V. A.; Dubovsky, S. V.

    2016-07-01

    Software was developed where initial EPR spectra of tooth enamel were deconvoluted based on nonlinear simulation, line shapes and signal amplitudes in the model initial spectrum were calculated, the regression coefficient was evaluated, and individual spectra were summed. Software validation demonstrated that doses calculated using it agreed excellently with the applied radiation doses and the doses reconstructed by the method of additive doses.

  3. New ceramic EPR resonators with high dielectric permittivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovina, Iryna; Geifman, Ilia; Belous, Anatolii

    2008-11-01

    New EPR resonators were developed by using a ceramic material with a high dielectric constant, ɛ = 160. The resonators have a high quality factor, Q = 10 3, and enhance the sensitivity of an EPR spectrometer up to 170 times. Some advantages of the new ceramic resonators are: (1) cheaper synthesis and simplified fabricating technology; (2) wider temperature range; and (3) ease of use. The ceramic material is produced with a titanate of complex oxides of rare-earth and alkaline metals, and has a perovskite type structure. The resonators were tested with X-band EPR spectrometers with cylindrical (TE 011) and rectangular (TE 102) cavities at 300 and 77 K. We discovered that EPR signal strength enhancement depends on the dielectric constant of the material, resonator geometry and the size of the sample. Also, an unusual resonant mode was found in the dielectric resonator-metallic cavity structure. In this mode, the directions of microwave magnetic fields of the coupled resonators are opposite and the resonant frequency of the structure is higher than the frequency of empty metallic cavity.

  4. Accurate Extraction of Nanometer Distances in Multimers by Pulse EPR

    PubMed Central

    Valera, Silvia; Ackermann, Katrin; Pliotas, Christos; Huang, Hexian; Naismith, James H.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pulse electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) is gaining increasing importance in structural biology. The PELDOR (pulsed electron–electron double resonance) method allows extracting distance information on the nanometer scale. Here, we demonstrate the efficient extraction of distances from multimeric systems such as membrane‐embedded ion channels where data analysis is commonly hindered by multi‐spin effects. PMID:26865468

  5. EPR/PTFE dosimetry for test reactor environments

    SciTech Connect

    Vehar, D.W.; Griffin, P.J.; Quirk, T.J.

    2011-07-01

    The use of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy with materials such as alanine is well established as a technique for measurement of ionizing radiation absorbed dose in photon and electron fields such as Co-60, high-energy bremsstrahlung and electron-beam fields [1]. In fact, EPR/Alanine dosimetry has become a routine transfer standard for national standards bodies such as NIST and NPL. In 1992 the Radiation Metrology Laboratory (RML) at Sandia National Laboratories implemented EPR/Alanine capabilities for use in routine and calibration activities at its Co-60 and pulsed-power facilities. At that time it also investigated the usefulness of the system for measurement of absorbed dose in the mixed neutron/photon environments of reactors such as the Sandia Pulsed Reactor and the Annular Core Research Reactor used for hardness testing of electronics. The RML concluded that the neutron response of alanine was a sufficiently high fraction of the overall dosimeter response that the resulting uncertainties in the photon dose would be unacceptably large for silicon-device testing. However, it also suggested that non-hydrogenous materials such as polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) would exhibit smaller neutron response and might be useful in mixed environments. Preliminary research with PTFE in photon environments indicated considerable promise, but further development was not pursued at that time. Because of renewed interest in absorbed dose measurements that could better define the individual contributions of photon and neutron components to the overall dose delivered to a test object, the RML has re-initiated the development of an EPR/PTFE dosimetry system. This effort consists of three stages: 1) Identification of PTFE materials that may be suitable for dosimetry applications. It was speculated that the inconsistency of EPR signatures in the earlier samples may have been due to variability in PTFE manufacturing processes. 2) Characterization of dosimetry in

  6. EPR Imaging at a Few Megahertz Using SQUID Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, Inseob; Day, Peter; Penanen, Konstantin; Eom, Byeong Ho

    2010-01-01

    An apparatus being developed for electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) imaging operates in the resonance-frequency range of about 1 to 2 MHz well below the microwave frequencies used in conventional EPR. Until now, in order to obtain sufficient signal-to-noise radios (SNRs) in conventional EPR, it has been necessary to place both detectors and objects to be imaged inside resonant microwave cavities. EPR imaging has much in common with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which is described briefly in the immediately preceding article. In EPR imaging as in MRI, one applies a magnetic pulse to make magnetic moments (in this case, of electrons) precess in an applied magnetic field having a known gradient. The magnetic moments precess at a resonance frequency proportional to the strength of the local magnetic field. One detects the decaying resonance-frequency magnetic- field component associated with the precession. Position is encoded by use of the known relationship between the resonance frequency and the position dependence of the magnetic field. EPR imaging has recently been recognized as an important tool for non-invasive, in vivo imaging of free radicals and reduction/oxidization metabolism. However, for in vivo EPR imaging of humans and large animals, the conventional approach is not suitable because (1) it is difficult to design and construct resonant cavities large enough and having the required shapes; (2) motion, including respiration and heartbeat, can alter the resonance frequency; and (3) most microwave energy is absorbed in the first few centimeters of tissue depth, thereby potentially endangering the subject and making it impossible to obtain adequate signal strength for imaging at greater depth. To obtain greater penetration depth, prevent injury to the subject, and avoid the difficulties associated with resonant cavities, it is necessary to use lower resonance frequencies. An additional advantage of using lower resonance frequencies is that one can use

  7. Landsliding in partially saturated materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Godt, J.W.; Baum, R.L.; Lu, N.

    2009-01-01

    [1] Rainfall-induced landslides are pervasive in hillslope environments around the world and among the most costly and deadly natural hazards. However, capturing their occurrence with scientific instrumentation in a natural setting is extremely rare. The prevailing thinking on landslide initiation, particularly for those landslides that occur under intense precipitation, is that the failure surface is saturated and has positive pore-water pressures acting on it. Most analytic methods used for landslide hazard assessment are based on the above perception and assume that the failure surface is located beneath a water table. By monitoring the pore water and soil suction response to rainfall, we observed shallow landslide occurrence under partially saturated conditions for the first time in a natural setting. We show that the partially saturated shallow landslide at this site is predictable using measured soil suction and water content and a novel unified effective stress concept for partially saturated earth materials. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  8. Brine saturation technique for extracting light filth from ground cinnamon: intralaboratory study.

    PubMed

    Freeman, C C

    1985-01-01

    An intralaboratory study was performed using the new brine saturation technique for isolating light filth from ground cinnamon. Recoveries of light filth averaged greater than or equal to 96.5%. The excellent recovery plus improvements in safety and simplicity give this new technique considerable advantage over the present official method. PMID:4086431

  9. Graphene-clad microfibre saturable absorber for ultrafast fibre lasers.

    PubMed

    Liu, X M; Yang, H R; Cui, Y D; Chen, G W; Yang, Y; Wu, X Q; Yao, X K; Han, D D; Han, X X; Zeng, C; Guo, J; Li, W L; Cheng, G; Tong, L M

    2016-01-01

    Graphene, whose absorbance is approximately independent of wavelength, allows broadband light-matter interactions with ultrafast responses. The interband optical absorption of graphene can be saturated readily under strong excitation, thereby enabling scientists to exploit the photonic properties of graphene to realize ultrafast lasers. The evanescent field interaction scheme of the propagating light with graphene covered on a D-shaped fibre or microfibre has been employed extensively because of the nonblocking configuration. Obviously, most of the fibre surface is unused in these techniques. Here, we exploit a graphene-clad microfibre (GCM) saturable absorber in a mode-locked fibre laser for the generation of ultrafast pulses. The proposed all-surface technique can guarantee a higher efficiency of light-graphene interactions than the aforementioned techniques. Our GCM-based saturable absorber can generate ultrafast optical pulses within 1.5 μm. This saturable absorber is compatible with current fibre lasers and has many merits such as low saturation intensities, ultrafast recovery times, and wide wavelength ranges. The proposed saturable absorber will pave the way for graphene-based wideband photonics. PMID:27181419

  10. Graphene-clad microfibre saturable absorber for ultrafast fibre lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X. M.; Yang, H. R.; Cui, Y. D.; Chen, G. W.; Yang, Y.; Wu, X. Q.; Yao, X. K.; Han, D. D.; Han, X. X.; Zeng, C.; Guo, J.; Li, W. L.; Cheng, G.; Tong, L. M.

    2016-05-01

    Graphene, whose absorbance is approximately independent of wavelength, allows broadband light–matter interactions with ultrafast responses. The interband optical absorption of graphene can be saturated readily under strong excitation, thereby enabling scientists to exploit the photonic properties of graphene to realize ultrafast lasers. The evanescent field interaction scheme of the propagating light with graphene covered on a D-shaped fibre or microfibre has been employed extensively because of the nonblocking configuration. Obviously, most of the fibre surface is unused in these techniques. Here, we exploit a graphene-clad microfibre (GCM) saturable absorber in a mode-locked fibre laser for the generation of ultrafast pulses. The proposed all-surface technique can guarantee a higher efficiency of light–graphene interactions than the aforementioned techniques. Our GCM-based saturable absorber can generate ultrafast optical pulses within 1.5 μm. This saturable absorber is compatible with current fibre lasers and has many merits such as low saturation intensities, ultrafast recovery times, and wide wavelength ranges. The proposed saturable absorber will pave the way for graphene-based wideband photonics.

  11. Graphene-clad microfibre saturable absorber for ultrafast fibre lasers

    PubMed Central

    Liu, X. M.; Yang, H. R.; Cui, Y. D.; Chen, G. W.; Yang, Y.; Wu, X. Q.; Yao, X. K.; Han, D. D.; Han, X. X.; Zeng, C.; Guo, J.; Li, W. L.; Cheng, G.; Tong, L. M.

    2016-01-01

    Graphene, whose absorbance is approximately independent of wavelength, allows broadband light–matter interactions with ultrafast responses. The interband optical absorption of graphene can be saturated readily under strong excitation, thereby enabling scientists to exploit the photonic properties of graphene to realize ultrafast lasers. The evanescent field interaction scheme of the propagating light with graphene covered on a D-shaped fibre or microfibre has been employed extensively because of the nonblocking configuration. Obviously, most of the fibre surface is unused in these techniques. Here, we exploit a graphene-clad microfibre (GCM) saturable absorber in a mode-locked fibre laser for the generation of ultrafast pulses. The proposed all-surface technique can guarantee a higher efficiency of light–graphene interactions than the aforementioned techniques. Our GCM-based saturable absorber can generate ultrafast optical pulses within 1.5 μm. This saturable absorber is compatible with current fibre lasers and has many merits such as low saturation intensities, ultrafast recovery times, and wide wavelength ranges. The proposed saturable absorber will pave the way for graphene-based wideband photonics. PMID:27181419

  12. Saturation of CVD Diamond Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lucile S. Dauffy; Richard A. Lerche; Greg J. Schmid; Jeffrey A. Koch; Christopher Silbernagel

    2005-01-01

    A 5 x 0.25 mm Chemical Vapor Deposited (CVD) diamond detector, with a voltage bias of + 250V, was excited by a 400 nm laser (3.1 eV photons) in order to study the saturation of the wafer and its surrounding electronics. In a first experiment, the laser beam energy was increased from a few tens of a pJ to about 100 µJ, and the signal from the diamond was recorded until full saturation of the detection system was achieved. Clear saturation of the detection system was observed at about 40 V, which corresponds with the expected saturation at 10% of the applied bias (250V). The results indicate that the interaction mechanism of the 3.1 eV photons in the diamond (Ebandgap = 5.45 eV) is not a multi-photon process but is linked to the impurities and defects of the crystal. In a second experiment, the detector was irradiated by a saturating first laser pulse and then by a delayed laser pulse of equal or smaller amplitude with delays of 5, 10, and 20 ns. The results suggest that the diamond and associated electronics recover within 10 to 20 ns after a strong saturating pulse.

  13. Insights into the mechanism of X-ray-induced disulfide-bond cleavage in lysozyme crystals based on EPR, optical absorption and X-ray diffraction studies

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Kristin A.; Black, Paul J.; Mercer, Kermit R.; Garman, Elspeth F.; Owen, Robin L.; Snell, Edward H.; Bernhard, William A.

    2013-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and online UV–visible absorption microspectrophotometry with X-ray crystallography have been used in a complementary manner to follow X-ray-induced disulfide-bond cleavage. Online UV–visible spectroscopy showed that upon X-irradiation, disulfide radicalization appeared to saturate at an absorbed dose of approximately 0.5–0.8 MGy, in contrast to the saturating dose of ∼0.2 MGy observed using EPR at much lower dose rates. The observations suggest that a multi-track model involving product formation owing to the interaction of two separate tracks is a valid model for radiation damage in protein crystals. The saturation levels are remarkably consistent given the widely different experimental parameters and the range of total absorbed doses studied. The results indicate that even at the lowest doses used for structural investigations disulfide bonds are already radicalized. Multi-track considerations offer the first step in a comprehensive model of radiation damage that could potentially lead to a combined computational and experimental approach to identifying when damage is likely to be present, to quantitate it and to provide the ability to recover the native unperturbed structure. PMID:24311579

  14. RosettaEPR: Rotamer Library for Spin Label Structure and Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Nathan S.; Stein, Richard A.; Koteiche, Hanane A.; Kaufmann, Kristian W.; Mchaourab, Hassane S.; Meiler, Jens

    2013-01-01

    An increasingly used parameter in structural biology is the measurement of distances between spin labels bound to a protein. One limitation to these measurements is the unknown position of the spin label relative to the protein backbone. To overcome this drawback, we introduce a rotamer library of the methanethiosulfonate spin label (MTSSL) into the protein modeling program Rosetta. Spin label rotamers were derived from conformations observed in crystal structures of spin labeled T4 lysozyme and previously published molecular dynamics simulations. Rosetta’s ability to accurately recover spin label conformations and EPR measured distance distributions was evaluated against 19 experimentally determined MTSSL labeled structures of T4 lysozyme and the membrane protein LeuT and 73 distance distributions from T4 lysozyme and the membrane protein MsbA. For a site in the core of T4 lysozyme, the correct spin label conformation (Χ1 and Χ2) is recovered in 99.8% of trials. In surface positions 53% of the trajectories agree with crystallized conformations in Χ1 and Χ2. This level of recovery is on par with Rosetta performance for the 20 natural amino acids. In addition, Rosetta predicts the distance between two spin labels with a mean error of 4.4 Å. The width of the experimental distance distribution, which reflects the flexibility of the two spin labels, is predicted with a mean error of 1.3 Å. RosettaEPR makes full-atom spin label modeling available to a wide scientific community in conjunction with the powerful suite of modeling methods within Rosetta. PMID:24039810

  15. Slow light and saturable absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selden, A. C.

    2009-06-01

    Quantitative analysis of slow light experiments utilising coherent population oscillation (CPO) in a range of saturably absorbing media, including ruby and alexandrite, Er3+:Y2SiO5, bacteriorhodopsin, semiconductor quantum devices and erbium-doped optical fibres, shows that the observations may be more simply interpreted as saturable absorption phenomena. A basic two-level model of a saturable absorber displays all the effects normally associated with slow light, namely phase shift and modulation gain of the transmitted signal, hole burning in the modulation frequency spectrum and power broadening of the spectral hole, each arising from the finite response time of the non-linear absorption. Only where hole-burning in the optical spectrum is observed (using independent pump and probe beams), or pulse delays exceeding the limits set by saturable absorption are obtained, can reasonable confidence be placed in the observation of slow light in such experiments. Superluminal (“fast light”) phenomena in media with reverse saturable absorption (RSA) may be similarly explained.

  16. Transpolar potential saturation models compared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siscoe, G.; Raeder, J.; Ridley, A. J.

    2004-09-01

    We compare four explanations of transpolar potential saturation: (1) the magnetic field at the stagnation point weakens, thereby limiting magnetic reconnection; (2) a dimple develops at the stagnation point, which limits the inflow rate to the reconnection line; (3) the magnetopause becomes blunt and the bow shock recedes, thus giving more room for the solar wind to flow around the magnetosphere, thereby reducing the need for magnetic reconnection; (4) the region 1 current system usurps the Chapman-Ferraro current system and saturates when the J × B force it generates balances solar wind ram pressure. The paper's point is that all four mechanisms involve a limit on the strength of the region 1 current system and that the criterion for the onset of transpolar potential saturation in each mechanism is that the region 1 current system generates a magnetic field that is about as strong as the dipole field at the dayside magnetopause. This circumstance prevents tests to discriminate between the four mechanisms based on predictions that relate to their dependencies on the region 1 current system. The group as a whole, however, can be tested to see whether their common criterion that relates the onset of transpolar potential saturation to the total current flowing in the region 1 system holds. The criterion can be formulated in terms of predictions that relate transpolar potential saturation to the strength of the interplanetary electric field, solar wind ram pressure, and ionospheric conductance. Published data analyses and MHD simulations reasonably confirm these predictions.

  17. Kinetic Measurements Using EPR Imaging with a Modulated Field Gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrling, Thomas; Fuchs, Jürgen; Groth, Norbert

    2002-01-01

    EPR imaging with modulated field gradient was applied for the investigation of fast diffusion processes. Three different imaging methods are possible: spectral-temporal, spatio-temporal, and spectral-spatial imaging. The time resolution is on the order of seconds and the spatial resolution is in the micrometer region. The efficiency of this imaging technique is demonstrated for the penetration of the spin probe Tempol in the skin of hairless mice biopsies. The skin is normally protected against the penetration of water soluble substances by the horny layer, a resistive thin lipophilic layer. Overcoming this horny layer for water soluble ingredients is one of the main practical problems for the topical application of pharmaceutics which could be investigated by EPR imaging. Different images represent the penetration behavior of the water soluble Tempol in the skin after treatment with the penetration enhancer DMSO (Dimethylsulfoxide) and after removing the horny layer.

  18. EPR dosimetry in a mixed neutron and gamma radiation field.

    PubMed

    Trompier, F; Fattibene, P; Tikunov, D; Bartolotta, A; Carosi, A; Doca, M C

    2004-01-01

    Suitability of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy for criticality dosimetry was evaluated for tooth enamel, mannose and alanine pellets during the 'international intercomparison of criticality dosimetry techniques' at the SILENE reactor held in Valduc in June 2002, France. These three materials were irradiated in neutron and gamma-ray fields of various relative intensities and spectral distributions in order to evaluate their neutron sensitivity. The neutron response was found to be around 10% for tooth enamel, 45% for mannose and between 40 and 90% for alanine pellets according their type. According to the IAEA recommendations on the early estimate of criticality accident absorbed dose, analyzed results show the EPR potentiality and complementarity with regular criticality techniques. PMID:15353687

  19. EPR and electronic absorption spectra of copper bearing turquoise mineral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, K. B. N.; Moorthy, L. R.; Reddy, B. J.; Vedanand, S.

    1988-10-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance and optical absorption spectra of turquoise have been studied both at room and low temperatures. It is concluded from the EPR spectra that the ground state of Cu 2+ ion in turquoise is 2A g(d x2- y2) and it is sited in an elongated rhombic octahedron (D 2π). The observed absorption bands at 14970 and 18354 cm -1 are assigned at 2A g→ 2B 1 g( dx2- y2→ xy) and 2A g→[ su2B 3g(d x 2-y 2→d yz) respectively assuming D 2π symmetry which are inconsistent with EPR studies. The three bands in the NIR region are attributed to combinations of fundamental modes of the H 2O molecule present in the sample.

  20. Saturation and pulsed FEL dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Giannessi, L.; Mezi, L.

    1995-12-31

    The behavior of a FEL operating in the saturated pulsed regime, may be reproduced by the linear FEL integral equation, suitably modified to include saturation effects through a gain depression coefficient depending on the laser intensity. This simple method allows to evaluate several FEL parameters like gain, efficiency, band-width and optical pulse duration as functions of the optical cavity length, only with a numerical integration. The predictions have been compared with available experimental and numerical data, and the method has been applied to estimate the operating characteristics of some planned FEL experiments.

  1. Numerical analysis of EPR spectra. 8. Relative concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckwith, Athelstan L. J.; Brumby, Steven

    A method for determining the relative concentrations of paramagnetic species in mixtures by least-squares analysis of the EPR spectra is described. The method is especially useful when the double integration method cannot be used because of overlap between the component spectra. In two examples, the relative steady-state concentrations of free radicals formed during the photolysis of dimethoxymethane/di- tert-butyl peroxide and cyclopropylmethyl methyl ether/di- tert-butyl peroxide/cyclopropane solutions are determined.

  2. Characterization of nuclear waste forms by EPR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Boatner, L.A.; Abraham, M.M.; Rappaz, M.

    1980-10-01

    Single crystals of LaPO/sub 4/ have been grown with the addition of various amounts of PW-4b simulated waste, and the EPR spectra of Gd/sup 3 +/ in these samples have been compared with that obtained for a pure LaPO/sub 4/ single crystal. The relationship between the average linewidth of two symmetric EPR transitions and their magnetic field separation for pure and PW-4b doped LaPO/sub 4/ crystals are shown quantitatively. These measurements were carried out for four different crystals and two different magnetic field orientations. Since the linewidth of each transition is proportional to its magnetic field separation from the central line, it can be concluded that the line broadening is inhomogeneous (i.e., the line broadening is due to a distribution of line positions with this distribution resulting from a distribution of impurities in the crystal). The sensitivity of Gd/sup 3 +/ linewidths to defects or strains is also under investigation as a means of detecting metamictization phenomena in orthophosphates. Mixed Ln/sub 1-x/An/sub x/PO/sub 4/ crystals, where Ln is a rare earth and An an actinide, have been grown and EPR spectra of Gd/sup 3 +/ in these systems are of considerable interest for detecting radiation damage created by ..cap alpha..-particles or recoil of the daughter nuclei. Although the examples of the application of EPR to waste form characterization described here have emphasized studies of lanthanide orthophosphates, the same techniques can be applied to perovskite, hollandite, zirconolite, etc. single crystals or powders or to amorphous materials.

  3. Dosimetry Based on EPR Spectral Analysis of Fingernail Clippings

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, Dean E.; He, Xiaoming; Gui, Jiang; Ruuge, Andres E.; Li, Hongbin; Williams, Benjamin B.; Swartz, Harold M.

    2009-01-01

    Exposure of fingernails and toenails to ionizing radiation creates radicals that are stable over a relatively long period (days to weeks) and characterized by an isotropic EPR signal at g = 2.003 (so-called radiation-induced signal, RIS). This signal in readily obtained fingernail parings has the potential to be used in screening a population for exposure to radiation and determining individual dose to guide medical treatment. However, the mechanical harvesting of fingernail parings also creates radicals and their EPR signals (so-called mechanically-induced signals, MIS) overlap the g ~ 2.0 region, interfering with efforts to quantify the RIS and, therefore, the radiation dose. Careful analysis of the time evolution and power-dependence of the EPR spectra of freshly cut fingernail parings has now resolved the MIS into three major components, including one that is described for the first time. It dominates the MIS soon after cutting, but decays within the first hour, and consists of a unique doublet that can be resolved from the RIS. The MIS obtained within the first few minutes after cutting is consistent among fingernail samples and provides an opportunity to achieve the two important dosimetry objectives. First, perturbation of the initial MIS by the presence of RIS in fingernails that have received a threshold dose of radiation leads to spectral signatures that can be used for rapid screening. Second, decomposition of the EPR spectra from irradiated fingernails into MIS and RIS components can be used to isolate and thus quantify the RIS for determining individual exposure dose. PMID:20065699

  4. Peptide-membrane Interactions by Spin-labeling EPR

    PubMed Central

    Smirnova, Tatyana I.; Smirnov, Alex I.

    2016-01-01

    Site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) in combination with Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy is a well-established method that has recently grown in popularity as an experimental technique, with multiple applications in protein and peptide science. The growth is driven by development of labeling strategies, as well as by considerable technical advances in the field, that are paralleled by an increased availability of EPR instrumentation. While the method requires an introduction of a paramagnetic probe at a well-defined position in a peptide sequence, it has been shown to be minimally destructive to the peptide structure and energetics of the peptide-membrane interactions. In this chapter, we describe basic approaches for using SDSL EPR spectroscopy to study interactions between small peptides and biological membranes or membrane mimetic systems. We focus on experimental approaches to quantify peptide-membrane binding, topology of bound peptides, and characterize peptide aggregation. Sample preparation protocols including spin-labeling methods and preparation of membrane mimetic systems are also described. PMID:26477253

  5. Tetrabromidocuprates(II)—Synthesis, Structure and EPR

    PubMed Central

    Zabel, André; Winter, Alette; Kelling, Alexandra; Schilde, Uwe; Strauch, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Metal-containing ionic liquids (ILs) are of interest for a variety of technical applications, e.g., particle synthesis and materials with magnetic or thermochromic properties. In this paper we report the synthesis of, and two structures for, some new tetrabromidocuprates(II) with several “onium” cations in comparison to the results of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopic analyses. The sterically demanding cations were used to separate the paramagnetic Cu(II) ions for EPR measurements. The EPR hyperfine structure in the spectra of these new compounds is not resolved, due to the line broadening resulting from magnetic exchange between the still-incomplete separated paramagnetic Cu(II) centres. For the majority of compounds, the principal g values (g‖ and g⊥) of the tensors could be determined and information on the structural changes in the [CuBr4]2− anions can be obtained. The complexes have high potential, e.g., as ionic liquids, as precursors for the synthesis of copper bromide particles, as catalytically active or paramagnetic ionic liquids. PMID:27104522

  6. Advances in Probes and Methods for Clinical EPR Oximetry

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Huagang; Khan, Nadeem; Jarvis, Lesley A.; Chen, Eunice Y.; Williams, Benjamin B.; Kuppusamy, Periannan

    2015-01-01

    EPR oximetry, which enables reliable, accurate, and repeated measurements of the partial pressure of oxygen in tissues, provides a unique opportunity to investigate the role of oxygen in the pathogenesis and treatment of several diseases including cancer, stroke, and heart failure. Building on significant advances in the in vivo application of EPR oximetry for small animal models of disease, we are developing suitable probes and instrumentation required for use in human subjects. Our laboratory has established the feasibility of clinical EPR oximetry in cancer patients using India ink, the only material presently approved for clinical use. We now are developing the next generation of probes, which are both superior in terms of oxygen sensitivity and biocompatibility including an excellent safety profile for use in humans. Further advances include the development of implantable oxygen sensors linked to an external coupling loop for measurements of deep-tissue oxygenations at any depth, overcoming the current limitation of 10 mm. This paper presents an overview of recent developments in our ability to make meaningful measurements of oxygen partial pressures in human subjects under clinical settings. PMID:24729217

  7. Implementing Diffie-Hellman key exchange using quantum EPR pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Sayonnha; Parakh, Abhishek

    2015-05-01

    This paper implements the concepts of perfect forward secrecy and the Diffie-Hellman key exchange using EPR pairs to establish and share a secret key between two non-authenticated parties and transfer messages between them without the risk of compromise. Current implementations of quantum cryptography are based on the BB84 protocol, which is susceptible to siphoning attacks on the multiple photons emitted by practical laser sources. This makes BB84-based quantum cryptography protocol unsuitable for network computing environments. Diffie-Hellman does not require the two parties to be mutually authenticated to each other, yet it can provide a basis for a number of authenticated protocols, most notably the concept of perfect forward secrecy. The work proposed in this paper provides a new direction in utilizing quantum EPR pairs in quantum key exchange. Although, classical cryptography boasts of efficient and robust protocols like the Diffie-Hellman key exchange, in the current times, with the advent of quantum computing they are very much vulnerable to eavesdropping and cryptanalytic attacks. Using quantum cryptographic principles, however, these classical encryption algorithms show more promise and a more robust and secure structure for applications. The unique properties of quantum EPR pairs also, on the other hand, go a long way in removing attacks like eavesdropping by their inherent nature of one particle of the pair losing its state if a measurement occurs on the other. The concept of perfect forward secrecy is revisited in this paper to attribute tighter security to the proposed protocol.

  8. A Wire Crossed-Loop-Resonator for Rapid Scan EPR

    PubMed Central

    Rinard, George A.; Quine, Richard W.; Biller, Joshua R.; Eaton, Gareth R.

    2011-01-01

    A crossed-loop (orthogonal mode) resonator (CLR) was constructed of fine wire to achieve design goals for rapid scan in vivo EPR imaging at VHF frequencies (in practice, near 250 MHz). This application requires the resonator to have a very open design to facilitate access to the animal for physiological support during the image acquisition. The rapid scan experiment uses large amplitude magnetic field scans, and sufficiently large resonator and detection bandwidths to record the rapidly-changing signal response. Rapid-scan EPR is sensitive to RF/microwave source noise and to baseline changes that are coherent with the field scan. The sensitivity to source noise is a primary incentive for using a CLR to isolate the detected signal from the RF source noise. Isolation from source noise of 44 and 47 dB was achieved in two resonator designs. Prior results showed that eddy currents contribute to background problems in rapid scan EPR, so the CLR design had to minimize conducting metal components. Using fine (AWG 38) wire for the resonators decreased eddy currents and lowered the resonator Q, thus providing larger resonator bandwidth. Mechanical resonances at specific scan frequencies are a major contributor to rapid scan backgrounds. PMID:21603086

  9. EPR investigation of some traditional oriental irradiated spices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duliu, Octavian G.; Georgescu, Rodica; Ali, Shaban Ibrahim

    2007-06-01

    The 9.50 GHz electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of unirradiated and 60Co γ-ray irradiated cardamom ( Elettaria cardamomum L. Maton, Zingiberaceae), ginger (( Zingiber officinale Rosc., Zingiberaceae), and saffron ( Crocus sativus L., Iridaceae) have been investigated at room temperature. All unirradiated spices presented a weak resonance line with g-factors around free-electron ones. After γ-ray irradiation at an absorbed dose of up to 11.3 kGy, the presence of EPR spectra whose amplitude increase monotonously with the absorbed dose has been noticed with all spices. A 100 °C isothermal annealing of 11.3 kGy irradiated samples has shown a differential reduction of amplitude of various components that compose initial spectra, but even after 3.6 h of thermal treatment, the remaining amplitude represents no less then 30% of the initial ones. The same peculiarities have been noticed after 83 days storage at room temperature but after 340 days storage at ambient conditions only irradiated ginger displays a weak signal that differs from those of unirradiated sample. All these factors could be taken into account in establishing at which extent the EPR is suitable to evidence any irradiation treatment applied to these spices.

  10. VHF EPR analysis of organic sulfur in coal. Technical report, December 1, 1991--February 29, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Clarkson, R.B.; Belford, R.L.

    1992-08-01

    This is a report of the second quarter of a two-year investigation exploiting electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), especially novel, very high frequency (VHF) spectroscopy techniques and instrumentation (the only high-modulation W-band EPR spectrometer in the world) developed earlier by these authors, to conduct further qualitative and quantitative studies of heteroatomic organic molecules in coal with particular emphasis on sulfur. New model compounds have been prepared in EPR-active forms and surveyed with X-band EPR. Previous W-band (96 GHz) VHF-EPR work is being extended to studies of these new model compounds as well as to a variety of coal and desulfurized coal samples. Typically, the model compounds under investigation and their analogues are found in coals as stable free radicals which give rise to an EPR signal.

  11. Light-induced EPR study of charge transfer in poly(3-hexylthiophene)/fullerene bulk heterojunction

    SciTech Connect

    Krinichnyi, V. I.; Yudanova, E. I.; Denisov, N. N.

    2009-07-28

    The first results of the light-induced EPR study of magnetic, relaxation, and dynamic parameters of charge carriers background photoinduced by optical photons (1.7-3.4 eV) in poly(3-hexylthiophene)/fullerene bulk heterojunctions are described. All magnetic resonance parameters for positively charged polaron and negatively charged fullerene ion-radical in radical pairs photoinduced in the composite were determined separately by the steady-state microwave saturation method. Paramagnetic susceptibility of charge carriers reflects their activation dynamics and exchange interaction. A decay of long-living radical pairs depends on the spatial distance between photoinduced charge carriers. The one-dimensional polaron diffusion along the polymer chain and fullerene rotation near the main molecular axis was shown to follow activation Elliot hopping model and to be governed by photon energy. The difference in activation energies of the charge carriers' dynamics and in their dependence on the exciting photon energy proves their noninteracting character in the polymer/fullerene composite. Main magnetic, relaxation and dynamics parameters of charge carriers are governed by the photon energy band due to inhomogeneity of distribution of polymer and fullerene domains in the composite.

  12. Recovery Online

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, John R.

    2007-01-01

    Since the founding of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) in 1935, programs offering opportunity for recovery from alcoholism and other addictions have undergone vast changes. The Internet has created nearly limitless opportunities for recovering people and those seeking recovery to find both meetings and places where they can gather virtually and discuss…

  13. EPR Study of [Cu(Him)4]·2Br Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yıldırım, İ.; Karabulut, B.

    2016-04-01

    The single crystal of [Cu(Him)4]·2Br (Him: C3H4N2, imidazole) complex has been investigated at ambient temperature in three mutually perpendicular planes by EPR technique. The magnetic environments of [Cu(Him)4]·2Br complex have been identified by EPR technique. The study reveals the existence of two magnetically inequivalent Cu2+ sites. The principal values of g tensors were obtained. The EPR parameters show that the paramagnetic centers have rhombic symmetry.

  14. In Vivo Imaging of Tissue Physiological Function using EPR Spectroscopy | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) is a technique for studying chemical species that have one or more unpaired electrons.  The current invention describes Echo-based Single Point Imaging (ESPI), a novel EPR image formation strategy that allows in vivo imaging of physiological function.  The National Cancer Institute's Radiation Biology Branch is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in in-licensing an in vivo imaging using Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) to measure active oxygen species.

  15. Electron paramagnetic resonance- (EPR-) resolved kinetics of cryogenic nitric oxide recombination to cytochrome c oxidase and myoglobin.

    PubMed Central

    LoBrutto, R; Wei, Y H; Yoshida, S; Van Camp, H L; Scholes, C P; King, T E

    1984-01-01

    By the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique, recovery kinetics for nitric oxide (NO) to heme following cryogenic photolysis were studied for the nitrosylferrocytochrome a3 center in cytochrome c oxidase and for myoglobin. The recovery was nonexponential, as has been observed in previous cryogenic CO and O2 rebinding to heme systems. NO rebinding to heme a3 started near a temperature of 50 K and was related to a distribution of thermal activation energies. At the peak of the distribution the activation energy was 3.1 kcal/mol, and the preexponential in the recovery rate was 10(9.9) s-1. For recovery of NO back to the a3 heme, the activation energy was threefold less than that for CO where CO binds to nearby Cua3 following photolysis from heme a3, but was larger than the activation energy for CO, O2, and probably NO rebinding to myoglobin. NO ligand rebinding to myoglobin occurred at a temperature as low as 15 K and in a temperature regime where tunneling could occur. However, the rate of NO rebinding to myoglobin did increase with temperature in the 15-25 K range. PMID:6320917

  16. Implementing a new EPR lineshape parameter for organic radicals in carbonaceous matter

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) is a non-destructive, non-invasive technique useful for the characterization of organic moieties in primitive carbonaceous matter related to the origin of life. The classical EPR parameters are the peak-to-peak amplitude, the linewidth and the g factor; however, such parameters turn out not to suffice to fully determine a single EPR line. Results In this paper, we give the definition and practical implementation of a new EPR parameter based on the signal shape that we call the R10 factor. This parameter was originally defined in the case of a single symmetric EPR line and used as a new datation method for organic matter in the field of exobiology. Conclusion Combined to classical EPR parameters, the proposed shape parameter provides a full description of an EPR spectrum and opens the way to novel applications like datation. Such a parameter is a powerful tool for future EPR studies, not only of carbonaceous matter, but also of any substance which spectrum exhibits a single symmetric line. Reproducibility The paper is a literate program—written using Noweb within the Org-mode as provided by the Emacs editor— and it also describes the full data analysis pipeline that computes the R10 on a real EPR spectrum. PMID:23866970

  17. CW EPR and 9 GHz EPR imaging investigation of stable paramagnetic species and their antioxidant activities in dry shiitake mushroom (Lentinus edodes).

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Kouichi; Hara, Hideyuki

    2016-05-01

    We investigated the antioxidant activities and locations of stable paramagnetic species in dry (or drying) shiitake mushroom (Lentinus edodes) using continuous wave (CW) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and 9 GHz EPR imaging. CW 9 GHz EPR detected paramagnetic species (peak-to-peak linewidth (ΔHpp) = 0.57 mT) in the mushroom. Two-dimensional imaging of the sharp line using a 9 GHz EPR imager showed that the species were located in the cap and shortened stem portions of the mushroom. No other location of the species was found in the mushroom. However, radical locations and concentrations varied along the cap of the mushroom. The 9 GHz EPR imaging determined the exact location of stable paramagnetic species in the shiitake mushroom. Distilled water extracts of the pigmented cap surface and the inner cap of the mushroom showed similar antioxidant activities that reduced an aqueous solution of 0.1 mM 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-oxyl. The present results suggest that the antioxidant activities of the edible mushroom extracts are much weaker than those of ascorbic acid. Thus, CW EPR and EPR imaging revealed the location and distribution of stable paramagnetic species and the antioxidant activities in the shiitake mushroom for the first time. PMID:26846304

  18. X- and Q-band EPR studies on fine powders of irradiated plants. New approach for detection of their radiation history by using Q-band EPR spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yordanov, Nicola D.; Aleksieva, Katerina

    2004-01-01

    X- and Q-band EPR studies after γ-irradiation of some dry spices and aromatic herbs are reported. Before irradiation all samples show only one singlet line in X-band EPR, whereas the Q-band EPR spectrum of the same samples is a superposition of two individual spectra—one corresponding to the above EPR signal, with an anisotropic spectrum, and a second one consisting of six lines due to the Mn 2+ naturally present in plants. The radiation induced EPR signal due to cellulose free radicals was not detected after γ-irradiation, but only the increase of the natural signal present before the irradiation. The fading kinetic of this EPR signal was monitored in three cases—when samples were kept in plastic bags without any special conditioning after irradiation, when samples were covered with paraffin before irradiation and when samples were dried at 60°C for 1 h before irradiation. The studies show that stability of radiation induced EPR signals decreases in the order of: paraffin covered > heated before irradiation > kept at room conditions. The two EPR spectra in the Q-band—one with radiation dependent intensity and a second due to Mn 2+, which is radiation independent allow identification of previous radiation treatment based on the fact that Mn 2+ quantity in the sample is constant whereas the quantity of radiation-induced free radicals is temperature dependent. It was found that for irradiated samples the ratio between EPR intensity of the free radicals and that of Mn 2+ before and after heating decreases with 50-60% whereas for non-irradiated samples it is ca. 10-15%.

  19. Criteria for saturated magnetization loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harres, A.; Mikhov, M.; Skumryev, V.; Andrade, A. M. H. de; Schmidt, J. E.; Geshev, J.

    2016-03-01

    Proper estimation of magnetization curve parameters is vital in studying magnetic systems. In the present article, criteria for discrimination non-saturated (minor) from saturated (major) hysteresis loops are proposed. These employ the analysis of (i) derivatives of both ascending and descending branches of the loop, (ii) remanent magnetization curves, and (iii) thermomagnetic curves. Computational simulations are used in order to demonstrate their validity. Examples illustrating the applicability of these criteria to well-known real systems, namely Fe3O4 and Ni fine particles, are provided. We demonstrate that the anisotropy-field value estimated from a visual examination of an only apparently major hysteresis loop could be more than two times lower than the real one.

  20. Saturation of the turbulent dynamo.

    PubMed

    Schober, J; Schleicher, D R G; Federrath, C; Bovino, S; Klessen, R S

    2015-08-01

    The origin of strong magnetic fields in the Universe can be explained by amplifying weak seed fields via turbulent motions on small spatial scales and subsequently transporting the magnetic energy to larger scales. This process is known as the turbulent dynamo and depends on the properties of turbulence, i.e., on the hydrodynamical Reynolds number and the compressibility of the gas, and on the magnetic diffusivity. While we know the growth rate of the magnetic energy in the linear regime, the saturation level, i.e., the ratio of magnetic energy to turbulent kinetic energy that can be reached, is not known from analytical calculations. In this paper we present a scale-dependent saturation model based on an effective turbulent resistivity which is determined by the turnover time scale of turbulent eddies and the magnetic energy density. The magnetic resistivity increases compared to the Spitzer value and the effective scale on which the magnetic energy spectrum is at its maximum moves to larger spatial scales. This process ends when the peak reaches a characteristic wave number k☆ which is determined by the critical magnetic Reynolds number. The saturation level of the dynamo also depends on the type of turbulence and differs for the limits of large and small magnetic Prandtl numbers Pm. With our model we find saturation levels between 43.8% and 1.3% for Pm≫1 and between 2.43% and 0.135% for Pm≪1, where the higher values refer to incompressible turbulence and the lower ones to highly compressible turbulence. PMID:26382506

  1. Saturating the holographic entropy bound

    SciTech Connect

    Bousso, Raphael; Freivogel, Ben; Leichenauer, Stefan

    2010-10-15

    The covariant entropy bound states that the entropy, S, of matter on a light sheet cannot exceed a quarter of its initial area, A, in Planck units. The gravitational entropy of black holes saturates this inequality. The entropy of matter systems, however, falls short of saturating the bound in known examples. This puzzling gap has led to speculation that a much stronger bound, S < or approx. A{sup 3/4}, may hold true. In this note, we exhibit light sheets whose entropy exceeds A{sup 3/4} by arbitrarily large factors. In open Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universes, such light sheets contain the entropy visible in the sky; in the limit of early curvature domination, the covariant bound can be saturated but not violated. As a corollary, we find that the maximum observable matter and radiation entropy in universes with positive (negative) cosmological constant is of order {Lambda}{sup -1} ({Lambda}{sup -2}), and not |{Lambda}|{sup -3/4} as had hitherto been believed. Our results strengthen the evidence for the covariant entropy bound, while showing that the stronger bound S < or approx. A{sup 3/4} is not universally valid. We conjecture that the stronger bound does hold for static, weakly gravitating systems.

  2. Saturation diving; physiology and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Brubakk, Alf O; Ross, John A S; Thom, Stephen R

    2014-07-01

    In saturation diving, divers stay under pressure until most of their tissues are saturated with breathing gas. Divers spend a long time in isolation exposed to increased partial pressure of oxygen, potentially toxic gases, bacteria, and bubble formation during decompression combined with shift work and long periods of relative inactivity. Hyperoxia may lead to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that interact with cell structures, causing damage to proteins, lipids, and nucleic acid. Vascular gas-bubble formation and hyperoxia may lead to dysfunction of the endothelium. The antioxidant status of the diver is an important mechanism in the protection against injury and is influenced both by diet and genetic factors. The factors mentioned above may lead to production of heat shock proteins (HSP) that also may have a negative effect on endothelial function. On the other hand, there is a great deal of evidence that HSPs may also have a "conditioning" effect, thus protecting against injury. As people age, their ability to produce antioxidants decreases. We do not currently know the capacity for antioxidant defense, but it is reasonable to assume that it has a limit. Many studies have linked ROS to disease states such as cancer, insulin resistance, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular diseases, and atherosclerosis as well as to old age. However, ROS are also involved in a number of protective mechanisms, for instance immune defense, antibacterial action, vascular tone, and signal transduction. Low-grade oxidative stress can increase antioxidant production. While under pressure, divers change depth frequently. After such changes and at the end of the dive, divers must follow procedures to decompress safely. Decompression sickness (DCS) used to be one of the major causes of injury in saturation diving. Improved decompression procedures have significantly reduced the number of reported incidents; however, data indicate considerable underreporting of injuries

  3. EPR, NMR and molecular dynamics in fluoride glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silly, G.; Buzaré, J. Y.; Bureau, B.; Legein, C.; Boulard, B.

    1999-11-01

    This paper deals with the method of investigation of local order in Transition Metal Fluoride Glasses that has been developed in the past few years using magnetic resonance techniques associated to molecular dynamics calculations. The results presented here will concern lead fluoride PZG (PbF2-ZnF2-GaF3) glasses of the PbF2-MtIIF2-MtIIIF3 family, but the method remains valid for any other disordered compound. The only limitations are that the sample may be doped with transition metal ions (S⩾1) for EPR measurements or contain quadrupolar nuclei (I⩾1) to perform NMR investigations.

  4. Mn distribution in natural sphalerites: a micronalytical and EPR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Benedetto, F.; Bernardini, G. P.; Cipriani, C.; Plant, D.; Romanelli, M.; Vaughan, D. J.

    2003-04-01

    Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) has been successfully applied to determine the local coordination and distribution of transition metal cations in sulphides and sulphosalts (Di Benedetto et al., 2002). Due to its enhanced sensitivity and element-specificity it is one of the best tools to monitor Mn(II) behaviour down to very low concentrations. In order to reach a fuller understanding of the spectroscopic results, a microanalytical study has also been undertaken by means of Electron Microprobe Analysis. Operating conditions were chosen to achieve the lowest possible detection limits, taking into account that Mn can replace Zn in the sphalerite lattice both as a minor and trace element, and that EPR can detect Mn(II) below the ppm range. Six natural samples from the Museo di Storia Naturale, Università di Firenze, were selected to have pure single crystals and avoid magnetically active phases associated with the sphalerite. The Mn concentration determined ranges between 30 and 14300 ppm and Mn content varies considerably within the same sample, leading to differences up to the 50% as compared to the mean value. X-ray images confirm Mn to be distributed with an unusual pattern, unrelated to the other common Zn-replacing cations, Fe and Cd, present in the samples. Powder EPR spectra reveal at least three different Mn(II) signals: two sextets, overlapping in all samples containing Mn as trace element, and a single line, present only in the more concentrated samples. While the latter have been attributed to an inhomogeneous Mn distribution, due to an enhanced Mn-Mn superexchange interaction, the difference between the two sextets, observed by means of EEPR investigations in a synthetic sphalerite (Di Benedetto et al., 2002), appears unrelated to the Mn concentration and may be attributed to small differences in the local coordination of Mn(II) ions. This, in turn, may be explained by the segregation of small amounts of Mn into polytypic domains, features which

  5. EPR investigation of libration motion of spin labeled hemerythrin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takacs, Istvan Mihaly; Mot, Augustin; Silaghi-Dumitrescu, Radu; Damian, Grigore

    2014-09-01

    Reported here are room-temperature continuous wave X-band Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectra of the non-heme di-iron protein hemerythrin (Hr), spin labeled at position 51C in different viscous media, illustrating the mobility and oligomeric recombination tendency of the Phascolopsis gouldii Hr. The mobility of a spin labeled Hr depends on the local viscosity and its connectivity to the nature of the molecular environment (glycerol, PEG4000 and BSA). This provides the basis for a tool useful in directly monitoring Hr in ex vivo samples upon injection within the bloodstream of test animals, for blood substitute research.

  6. A Signal-to-Noise Standard for Pulsed EPR

    PubMed Central

    Eaton, Gareth R.; Eaton, Sandra S; Quine, Richard W.; Mitchell, Deborah; Kathirvelu, Velavan; Weber, Ralph T.

    2010-01-01

    A 2 mm diameter by 10 mm long cylinder of fused SiO2 (quartz) γ-irradiated to 1 kGy with 60Co contains about 2×1016 spins/cm3. It is proposed as a standard for monitoring signal-to-noise (S/N) performance of X-band pulsed EPR spectrometers. This sample yields S/N of about 25 on modern spin echo spectrometers, which permits measurement of both signal and noise under the same conditions with an 8-bit digitizer. PMID:20451433

  7. An EPR Experiment for the Undergraduate Physical Chemistry Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butera, R. A.; Waldeck, D. H.

    2000-11-01

    An experiment that illustrates the principles of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy in the undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory is described. Students measure the value of g for DPPH and use it to determine the value of g for two inorganic complexes, Cu(acac)2 and VO(acac)2. The students use two instruments: an instructional device that illustrates the principles of EPR and a commercial Varian E4 spectrometer. This approach allows an elucidation of the principles of the method and provides experience with a more sophisticated research-grade instrument.

  8. Geochemical constraints on the source of EPR MORBs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, L.; Wang, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Geochemical variations of mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORBs) have long been attributed to the presence of compositionally distinct crustal and mantle components in their sources. The oxygen isotope composition of MORBs was proposed to be a valuable tracer of subducted crustal materials [1] since 18O/16O ratios are strongly fractioned during low-temperature water-rock interactions (e.g. seafloor alteration). Here, we present a study of combined oxygen isotopes, radiogenic isotopes, and trace elements on volcanic lavas sampled at both ridge axes and off-axis seamounts in the northern East Pacific Rise (EPR; 5-15°N). The chemical composition of these lavas ranges from normal-MORB to enriched-MORB, and the newly analyzed 18O/16O ratios of hand-picked fresh glasses from these 53 lavas were measured using laser-fluorination technique, with a typical precision of ±0.08‰ (1σ). Our results show that the δ18OSMOW values of EPR glasses span ~0.64‰ (from 5.08‰ to 5.72‰), with an average value of 5.53(±0.12, 1σ) ‰, which is comparable to results from previous survey of global MORBs (5.52±0.11‰) [1]. Two andesitic glasses show unusually lower δ18O values (5.08‰ and 5.27‰, respectively) and exhibit excess Cl addition ([Cl]>3000ppm), probably indicating an assimilation of seawater-derived component (e.g., saline brines or altered oceanic crust). Previous studies [2, 3, 4, 5] have shown the correlated variations of trace element ratios (e.g. La/Sm, and K2O/TiO2 element ratios) and radiogenic isotope compositions (e.g. 87Sr/86Sr, 143Nd/144Nd, Pb isotope ratios), suggesting the presence of at least two components in the source of EPR MORBs, an enriched component and depleted component. Our results show that δ18O values of these glasses lack statistically-significant correlations with other geochemical indicies in the same sample, suggesting that (1) the source of EPR MORBs has a uniform oxygen isotope composition, (2) the enriched components in the sources

  9. The effect of saturation path on three-phase relative permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kianinejad, Amir; Chen, Xiongyu; DiCarlo, David A.

    2015-11-01

    Simulation and fluid flow prediction of many petroleum-enhanced oil recovery methods as well as environmental processes such as carbon dioxide (CO2) geological storage or underground water resources remediation requires accurate modeling and determination of relative permeability under different saturation histories. Based on this critical need, several three-phase relative permeability models were developed to predict relative permeability; however, for practical purposes most of them require a variety of parameters introducing undesired complexity to the models. In this work, we attempt to find out if there is a simpler way to express this functionality. To do so, we experimentally measure three-phase, water/oil/gas, relative permeability in a 1 m long water-wet sand pack, under several saturation flow paths to cover the entire three-phase saturation space. We obtain the in situ saturations along the sand pack using a CT scanner and then determine the relative permeabilities of liquid phases directly from the measured in situ saturations using an unsteady state method. The measured data show that at a specific saturation, the oil relative permeability varies significantly (up to two orders of magnitude), depending on the path through saturation space. The three-phase relative permeability data are modeled using standard relative permeability models, Corey-type, and Saturation Weighted Interpolation (SWI). Our measured data suggest that three-phase oil relative permeability in water-wet media is only a function of its own saturation if the residual oil saturation is treated as a function of two saturations. We determine that residual saturation is the key parameter in modeling three-phase relative permeability (effect of saturation history).

  10. Solution-phase EPR studies of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Chen, J.; Hu, H.; Hamon, M. A.; Itkis, M. E.; Haddon, R. C.

    1999-01-01

    We report EPR studies on pristine, purified, shortened and soluble SWNTs in various solution phases. Some of these samples give rise to strong, sharp EPR signals, and this technique is useful for monitoring the presence of SWNTs in aqueous and organic solvents. The soluble SWNTs carry about 1 unpaired electron per 10000 carbon atoms and give a free electron g-value.

  11. Gluon Evolution and Saturation Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    McLerran, L.D.

    2010-05-26

    Almost 40 years ago, Gribov and colleagues at the Leningrad Nuclear Physics Institute developed the ideas that led to the Dokhsitzer-Gribov-Altarelli-Parisi the Baltisky-Fadin-Kuraev-Lipatov equations. These equations describe the evolution of the distributions for quarks and gluon inside a hadron to increased resolution scale of a probe or to smaller values of the fractional momentum of a hadronic constituent. I motivate and discuss the generalization required of these equations needed for high energy processes when the density of constituents is large. This leads to a theory of saturation realized by the Color Glass Condensate

  12. Saturation of repeated quantum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haapasalo, Erkka; Heinosaari, Teiko; Kuramochi, Yui

    2016-08-01

    We study sequential measurement scenarios where the system is repeatedly subjected to the same measurement process. We first provide examples of such repeated measurements where further repetitions of the measurement do not increase our knowledge on the system after some finite number of measurement steps. We also prove, however, that repeating the Lüders measurement of an unsharp two-outcome observable never saturates in this sense, and we characterize the observable measured in the limit of infinitely many repetitions. Our result implies that a repeated measurement can be used to correct the inherent noise of an unsharp observable.

  13. Alcoholic extraction enables EPR analysis to characterize radiation-induced cellulosic signals in spices.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jae-Jun; Sanyal, Bhaskar; Akram, Kashif; Kwon, Joong-Ho

    2014-11-19

    Different spices such as turmeric, oregano, and cinnamon were γ-irradiated at 1 and 10 kGy. The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of the nonirradiated samples were characterized by a single central signal (g = 2.006), the intensity of which was significantly enhanced upon irradiation. The EPR spectra of the irradiated spice samples were characterized by an additional triplet signal at g = 2.006 with a hyperfine coupling constant of 3 mT, associated with the cellulose radical. EPR analysis on various sample pretreatments in the irradiated spice samples demonstrated that the spectral features of the cellulose radical varied on the basis of the pretreatment protocol. Alcoholic extraction pretreatment produced considerable improvements of the EPR signals of the irradiated spice samples relative to the conventional oven and freeze-drying techniques. The alcoholic extraction process is therefore proposed as the most suitable sample pretreatment for unambiguous detection of irradiated spices by EPR spectroscopy. PMID:25347931

  14. Double-stacked dielectric resonator for sensitive EPR measurements.

    PubMed

    Jaworski, M; Sienkiewicz, A; Scholes, C P

    1997-01-01

    A new approximate method for predicting the resonant frequencies and for solving the field distribution problem of a cylindrical dielectric resonator (DR) is developed. The model proposed in this paper bridges the gap between rigorous and accurate finite-element or Green function-based numerical methods on the one hand and on the other hand, simple approximate solutions in which the field distribution can be described analytically, but the resulting frequency is accurate within a few percent only. In the method described here, the approximate solution for the microwave field distribution is modified by substituting different values of the radial separation constants inside and outside of the diskshaped DR. The model is generalized for the double-stacked DR structure and enables one to introduce corrections that take into account the presence of the shielding walls and of the cylindrical sample hole. Good agreement is found between experimental and calculated results for both the single and double-stacked structures that are designed around commercially available X-band DRs (9-10 GHz). For the resonant frequency of the lowest transverse-electric TEzero1 delta mode that is commonly used for EPR measurements, the accuracy of the method is better than 1%. Experimentally measured resonator filling factors are also in good agreement with those theoretically estimated. Both the theory and the experimental results suggest that the double-stacked DR structure with finite spacing between the ceramic cylinders is the most suitable for EPR measurements of long lossy samples. PMID:9169212

  15. EPR study of gamma-irradiated single crystal 4-phenylsemicarbazide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayin, U.; Türkkan, E.; Dereli, Ö.; Yüksel, H.; Birey, M.

    2010-08-01

    Single crystals of 4-phenylsemicarbazide (4PSC) were investigated using an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique, with γ irradiation of the crystals at different orientations in the magnetic field between temperatures of 120 and 450 K, and the spectra were found to be temperature independent. Taking into consideration the chemical structure and the experimental spectra of the irradiated single crystal 4PSC, we assumed that one or more paramagnetic species were produced, each having an unpaired electron delocalized in the phenyl ring. Pursuant to this assumption, six possible radicals were modeled using the B3LYP/6-311+G(d) level of density-functional theory. EPR parameters were calculated for these modeled radicals using the B3LYP method and TZVP basis set. The calculated hyperfine coupling constants were used as starting points for simulations. The experimental and simulated spectra for each of the three crystallographic axes were well matched for the modeled radical R6. We thus identified the R6 (C 6H 5NH) radical as a paramagnetic species produced in 4PSC. The experimental g-factor and hyperfine coupling constants of the C 6H 5NH radical were found to be anisotropic, with the average values g=2.00431, aNHN(8)=8.85 G, aNHH(9)=16.85 G, ao,pH(14,16,20)=6.47 G, and amH(18,19)=2.80 G.

  16. W/O microemulsions as dendrimer nanocarriers: an EPR study.

    PubMed

    Rokach, Shifra; Ottaviani, Maria Francesca; Shames, Alexander I; Nir, Ido; Aserin, Abraham; Garti, Nissim

    2012-10-18

    A complex system, based on a dendrimer solubilized in the aqueous core of water-in-oil microemulsion, may combine the advantages of both dendrimers and microemulsions to provide better control of drug release. We report for the first time the use of EPR technique to determine the effect of solubilized dendrimer on the structure of the microemulsion. The solubilized poly(propyleneimine) (PPI-G2) interacts with sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT). EPR analysis provided information on polarity, microviscosity, and molecular order of the systems. Polarity and microviscosity increased from unloaded water-in-oil microemulsion to the system loaded with 0.2 wt % PPI-G2, but remained unchanged with higher PPI-G2 loads. The degree of order also increased with 0.2 wt % PPI-G2 with only minor additional increase with larger quantities (25 wt %) of PPI-G2. Variations in pH only slightly affected the structure of microemulsion in the absence and presence of the loaded dendrimers. Aliphatic oils with longer lipophilic chains enhanced the structural order of the microemulsion. On increasing water content, polarity and degree of order increased. PPI-G2 dendrimer in small loads is attracted by the negatively charged AOT and thus intercalates in the interface of the droplets. Yet, at higher PPI-G2 loads, the excess molecules are solubilized in the water core. PMID:22989387

  17. EPR Studies of Gating Mechanisms in Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Chakrapani, Sudha

    2015-01-01

    Ion channels open and close in response to diverse stimuli, and the molecular events underlying these processes are extensively modulated by ligands of both endogenous and exogenous origin. In the past decade, high-resolution structures of several channel types have been solved, providing unprecedented details of the molecular architecture of these membrane proteins. Intrinsic conformational flexibility of ion channels critically governs their functions. However, the dynamics underlying gating mechanisms and modulations are obscured in the information from crystal structures. While nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic methods allow direct measurements of protein dynamics, they are limited by the large size of these membrane protein assemblies in detergent micelles or lipid membranes. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy has emerged as a key biophysical tool to characterize structural dynamics of ion channels and to determine stimulus-driven conformational transition between functional states in a physiological environment. This review will provide an overview of the recent advances in the field of voltage- and ligand-gated channels and highlight some of the challenges and controversies surrounding the structural information available. It will discuss general methods used in site-directed spin labeling and EPR spectroscopy and illustrate how findings from these studies have narrowed the gap between high-resolution structures and gating mechanisms in membranes, and have thereby helped reconcile seemingly disparate models of ion channel function. PMID:25950970

  18. Antioxidant properties of tea investigated by EPR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Polovka, Martin; Brezová, Vlasta; Stasko, Andrej

    2003-10-01

    The antioxidant properties of green, black and mixed (fruit) tea samples of different origin were investigated by means of EPR spectroscopy. A six line EPR spectrum of solid tea samples indicates the presence of Mn(II) ions and it is superimposed with a sharp singlet line attributed to semiquinone radical species (Delta H(pp)=1 mT; g=2.0022). Antioxidant properties of aqueous tea extracts in H(2)O(2)/NaOH/dimethylsulfoxide system generating reactive radicals (*OH, O(2)*-), *CH(3)) were followed by spin trapping technique. In addition, antioxidant capacity of these samples was assessed using stable radicals 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxy (TEMPOL). Typically, the highest antioxidant potential to terminate superoxide radicals was found in green teas, followed by black and fruity teas. The pro-oxidant activity of green teas evidenced by spin traps was promoted in samples with higher Mn(II) and ascorbic acid concentrations. Various sources of free radicals used in the antioxidant tests due to their specific action show different termination rates in the presence of the individual tea samples. PMID:14516911

  19. EPR Spectroscopic Studies of [FeFe]-Hydrogenase Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Suess, Daniel L. M.

    2015-01-01

    Proton reduction and H2 oxidation are key elementary reactions for solar fuel production. Hydrogenases interconvert H+ and H2 with remarkable efficiency and have therefore received much attention in this context. For [FeFe]-hydrogenases, catalysis occurs at a unique cofactor called the H-cluster. In this article, we discuss ways in which EPR spectroscopy has elucidated aspects of the bioassembly of the H-cluster, with a focus on four case studies: EPR spectroscopic identification of a radical en route to the CO and CN− ligands of the H-cluster, tracing 57Fe from the maturase HydG into the H-cluster, characterization of the auxiliary Fe–S cluster in HydG, and isotopic labeling of the CN− ligands of HydA for electronic structure studies of its Hox state. Advances in cell-free maturation protocols have enabled several of these mechanistic studies, and understanding H-cluster maturation may in turn provide insights leading to improvements in hydrogenase production for biotechnological applications. PMID:26508821

  20. Waste heat recovery method and apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Farnia, Kh.

    1984-05-01

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for the recovery of sensible heat from a hot tar-free gas produced in a coal gasification process and in combined-cycle power generation. The recovered heat is utilized to generate a flow of superheated steam which may be used in the gasification plant. The apparatus includes a first boiler and a superheater fabricated from materials susceptible to damage from thermal shock when a flow of the tar-free gas having a temperature in excess of a predetermined safety temperature is introduced to the superheater when it is dry. The first boiler, filled with a flow of saturated water, initially receives the flow of gas. Within the first boiler, the gas indirectly heats the water converting it to a flow of saturated steam and reducing the gas temperature below the safety temperature. The reduced temperature gas is passed to the superheater and the saturated steam is passed to the superheater. The gas heats the saturated steam in the superheater to convert it to superheated steam and the temperature of the gas is further reduced. The gas flows to a second boiler for converting a flow of saturated water to saturated steam and further reducing the gas temperature. The saturated steam from the second boiler is passed to the superheater and the gas flows to an economizer for converting a flow of unsaturated water to saturated water for the boilers and reducing the temperature of the gas to a final temperature.

  1. VHF EPR analysis of organic sulfur in coal. Final technical report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Clarkson, R.B.; Belford, R.L.

    1992-12-31

    The development of very High Frequency Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (VHF-EPR) into an analytical technique that holds great promise for the non-destructive determination of the amount and structure of organic sulfur in both native and desulfurized coal advanced considerably during the past year. The VHF-EPR spectrometer built with funds from the CRSC is one of two operating near 96 GHz, and the only such instrument in the United States. Earlier work has shown that W-band spectra of Illinois coals and separated macerals shows good sensitivity to forms of organic sulfur present. This work has been extended to improve the use of W-band spectra to provide quantitative as well as qualitative information regarding different sulfur species and, in collaboration with other researchers, their fate during various desulfurizing techniques. A key approach is to synthesize various model compounds, both those from known precursors and those made as sulfurized chars, and to compare their respective W-band spectra (1) with each other, (2) with the predictions of theoretical models, and (3) with the W-band spectra of coal specimens. The quantitative measurement of aromatic sulfur in these compounds has improved as different methods of calibration and indexing are evaluated. Work is also being conducted on apparent variations in spectral line-shapes on evacuation of coal samples. Corroborations of many aspects of W-band organic sulfur interpretation in both raw and desulfurized coals as well as in model compounds are also being carried out by microanalysis and by high-temperature mass spectroscopy. The determination of populations of groups or species of aromatic sulfur molecules is being refined. Especially promising are methods to improve discrimination by differing saturation rates, and by second-derivative spectra.

  2. Redox intermediates of flavonoids and caffeic acid esters from propolis: an EPR spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry study.

    PubMed

    Rapta, P; Misík, V; Stasko, A; Vrábel, I

    1995-05-01

    The redox properties of flavonoids: chrysin (1), tectochrysin (2), galangin (3), isalpinin (4), pinostrobin (5), pinobanksin (6), pinobanksin-3-acetate (7), and of caffeic acid ester (8) and diacetylcaffeic acid ester (9), all isolated from propolis, were investigated by cyclic voltammetry in acetonitrile. The choice of aprotic solvent lowered the reactivity of the radical intermediates and made possible to identify redox steps and intermediates not detected so far. The oxidation potentials (vs. saturated calomel electrode) of the investigated compounds were in the region of 1.5 V for 3 and 4; 1.9 V for 1, 2, and 5; 2.0 V for 6 and 7; 1.29 V for 8; and 2.3 V for 9. These oxidation potentials were mainly influenced by the presence of a double bond in 2,3-position and substituent R1 in position 3. Comparison with our earlier data revealed that flavonoids, 1-4, and caffeic acid ester 8 with lower oxidation potentials showed the maximal lipid antioxidant activity, whereas those with higher potentials (5, 6, 7, and 9) are less active. On reduction of 1-9 several one-electron-steps were typically observed in the potential regions: -1.5 V, -1.8 V, and -2 V. where in simultaneous EPR experiments anion radicals of 1 and 3 were observed with the center of unpaired spin density on ring A. Upon oxidation of flavonoids 1-4 carbonyl carbon-centered radicals, .C(O)R, were identified as consecutive products using the EPR spin trapping technique. PMID:7797098

  3. Perception of saturation in natural scenes.

    PubMed

    Schiller, Florian; Gegenfurtner, Karl R

    2016-03-01

    We measured how well perception of color saturation in natural scenes can be predicted by different measures that are available in the literature. We presented 80 color images of natural scenes or their gray-scale counterparts to our observers, who were asked to choose the pixel from each image that appeared to be the most saturated. We compared our observers' choices to the predictions of seven popular saturation measures. For the color images, all of the measures predicted perception of saturation quite well, with CIECAM02 performing best. Differences between the measures were small but systematic. When gray-scale images were viewed, observers still chose pixels whose counterparts in the color images were saturated above average. This indicates that image structure and prior knowledge can be relevant to perception of saturation. Nevertheless, our results also show that saturation in natural scenes can be specified quite well without taking these factors into account. PMID:26974924

  4. Active cancellation - A means to zero dead-time pulse EPR.

    PubMed

    Franck, John M; Barnes, Ryan P; Keller, Timothy J; Kaufmann, Thomas; Han, Songi

    2015-12-01

    The necessary resonator employed in pulse electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) rings after the excitation pulse and creates a finite detector dead-time that ultimately prevents the detection of signal from fast relaxing spin systems, hindering the application of pulse EPR to room temperature measurements of interesting chemical or biological systems. We employ a recently available high bandwidth arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) to produce a cancellation pulse that precisely destructively interferes with the resonant cavity ring-down. We find that we can faithfully detect EPR signal at all times immediately after, as well as during, the excitation pulse. This is a proof of concept study showcasing the capability of AWG pulses to precisely cancel out the resonator ring-down, and allow for the detection of EPR signal during the pulse itself, as well as the dead-time of the resonator. However, the applicability of this approach to conventional EPR experiments is not immediate, as it hinges on either (1) the availability of low-noise microwave sources and amplifiers to produce the necessary power for pulse EPR experiment or (2) the availability of very high conversion factor micro coil resonators that allow for pulse EPR experiments at modest microwave power. PMID:26507308

  5. Stochastic excitation and Hadamard correlation spectroscopy with bandwidth extension in RF FT-EPR

    PubMed Central

    Pursley, Randall H.; Kakareka, John; Salem, Ghadi; Devasahayam, Nallathamby; Subramanian, Sankaran; Tschudin, Rolf G.; Krishna, Murali C.; Pohida, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    The application of correlation spectroscopy employing stochastic excitation and the Hadamard transform to time-domain Fourier transform electron paramagnetic resonance (FT-EPR) spectroscopy in the radiofrequency (RF) band is described. An existing, time-domain FT-EPR spectrometer system with a Larmor frequency (Lf) of 300 MHz was used to develop this technique by incorporating a pseudo-random pulse sequence generator to output the maximum length binary sequence (MLBS, 10- and 11-bit). Software developed to control the EPR system setup, acquire the signals, and post process the data, is outlined. The software incorporates the Hadamard transform algorithm to perform the required cross-correlation of the acquired signal and the MLBS after stochastic excitation. To accommodate the EPR signals, bandwidth extension was accomplished by sampling at a rate many times faster than the RF pulse repetition rate, and subsequent digital signal processing of the data. The results of these experiments showed that there was a decrease in the total acquisition time, and an improved free induction decay (FID) signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio compared to the conventional coherent averaging approach. These techniques have the potential to reduce the RF pulse power to the levels used in continuous wave (CW) EPR while retaining the advantage of time-domain EPR methods. These methods have the potential to facilitate the progression to in vivo FT-EPR imaging of larger volumes. PMID:12762981

  6. Active cancellation - A means to zero dead-time pulse EPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franck, John M.; Barnes, Ryan P.; Keller, Timothy J.; Kaufmann, Thomas; Han, Songi

    2015-12-01

    The necessary resonator employed in pulse electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) rings after the excitation pulse and creates a finite detector dead-time that ultimately prevents the detection of signal from fast relaxing spin systems, hindering the application of pulse EPR to room temperature measurements of interesting chemical or biological systems. We employ a recently available high bandwidth arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) to produce a cancellation pulse that precisely destructively interferes with the resonant cavity ring-down. We find that we can faithfully detect EPR signal at all times immediately after, as well as during, the excitation pulse. This is a proof of concept study showcasing the capability of AWG pulses to precisely cancel out the resonator ring-down, and allow for the detection of EPR signal during the pulse itself, as well as the dead-time of the resonator. However, the applicability of this approach to conventional EPR experiments is not immediate, as it hinges on either (1) the availability of low-noise microwave sources and amplifiers to produce the necessary power for pulse EPR experiment or (2) the availability of very high conversion factor micro coil resonators that allow for pulse EPR experiments at modest microwave power.

  7. The view from the trenches: part 2-technical considerations for EPR screening.

    PubMed

    Nicolalde, Roberto J; Gougelet, Robert M; Rea, Michael; Williams, Benjamin B; Dong, Ruhong; Kmiec, Maciej M; Lesniewski, Piotr N; Swartz, Harold M

    2010-02-01

    There is growing awareness of the need for methodologies that can be used retrospectively to provide the biodosimetry needed to carry out screening and triage immediately after an event in which large numbers of people have potentially received clinically significant doses of ionizing radiation. The general approach to developing such methodologies has been a technology centric one, often ignoring the system integrations considerations that are key to their effective use. In this study an integrative approach for the evaluation and development of a physical biodosimetry technology was applied based on in vivo electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dosimetry. The EPR measurements are based on physical changes in tissues whose magnitudes are not affected by the factors that can confound biologically-based assessments. In this study the use of a pilot simulation exercise to evaluate an experimental EPR system and gather stakeholders' feedback early on in the development process is described. The exercise involved: ten non-irradiated participants, representatives from a local fire department; Department of Homeland Security certified exercise evaluators, EPR experts, physicians; and a human factors engineer. Stakeholders were in agreement that the EPR technology in its current state of development could be deployed for the screening of mass casualties. Furthermore, stakeholders' recommendations will be prioritized and incorporated in future developments of the EPR technique. While the results of this exercise were aimed specifically at providing feedback for the development of EPR dosimetry for screening mass casualties, the methods and lessons learned are likely to be applicable to other biodosimetric methods. PMID:20065674

  8. Carotenoid cation radicals: electrochemical, optical, and EPR study

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, J.L.; Kramer, V.J.; Ding, R.; Kispert, L.D.

    1988-03-30

    The general aim of this investigation is to determine whether carotenoid cation radicals can be produced, and stabilized, electrochemically. Hence, the authors have undertaken a detailed study of the electrooxidation of various carotenoids (..beta..-carotene (I), ..beta..-apo-8'-carotenal (II), and canthaxanthin (III) using the techniques of cyclic voltammetry, controlled-potential electrolysis (cpe) in conjunction with optical spectroscopy, and EPR spectroscopy coupled with in situ electrolysis. They report the successful generation of carotenoid cation radicals via electrochemical oxidation and, furthermore, the stabilization of these radicals for several minutes in CH/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/ and C/sub 2/H/sub 4/Cl/sub 2/ solvents.

  9. EPR pairing dynamics in Hubbard model with resonant U

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, X. Z.; Song, Z.

    2016-01-01

    We study the dynamics of the collision between two fermions in Hubbard model with on-site interaction strength U. The exact solution shows that the scattering matrix for two-wavepacket collision is separable into two independent parts, operating on spatial and spin degrees of freedom, respectively. The S-matrix for spin configuration is equivalent to that of Heisenberg-type pulsed interaction with the strength depending on U and relative group velocity vr. This can be applied to create distant EPR pair, through a collision process for two fermions with opposite spins in the case of |vr/U| = 1, without the need for temporal control and measurement process. Multiple collision process for many particles is also discussed. PMID:26728282

  10. EPR Oximetry in Three Spatial Dimensions using Sparse Spin Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Som, Subhojit; Potter, Lee C.; Ahmad, Rizwan; Vikram, Deepti S.; Kuppusamy, Periannan

    2008-01-01

    A method is presented to use continuous wave electron paramagnetic resonance imaging for rapid measurement of oxygen partial pressure in three spatial dimensions. A particulate paramagnetic probe is employed to create a sparse distribution of spins in a volume of interest. Information encoding location and spectral linewidth is collected by varying the spatial orientation and strength of an applied magnetic gradient field. Data processing exploits the spatial sparseness of spins to detect voxels with nonzero spin and to estimate the spectral linewidth for those voxels. The parsimonious representation of spin locations and linewidths permits an order of magnitude reduction in data acquisition time, compared to four-dimensional tomographic reconstruction using traditional spectral-spatial imaging. The proposed oximetry method is experimentally demonstrated for a lithium octa-n-butoxy naphthalocyanine (LiNc-BuO) probe using an L-band EPR spectrometer. PMID:18538600

  11. EPR retrospective dosimetry with fingernails: report on first application cases.

    PubMed

    Trompier, Francois; Queinnec, François; Bey, Eric; De Revel, Thierry; Lataillade, Jean Jacques; Clairand, Isabelle; Benderitter, Marc; Bottollier-Depois, Jean-François

    2014-06-01

    For localized irradiation to hands, in case of sources accidentally handled, it is very difficult to estimate the dose distribution by calculation. Doses may reach several tens of grays, and the dose distribution is usually very heterogeneous. Until recently, doses in such situations could be estimated only by analysis of bone biopsies using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. This technique was used previously on surgical wastes or after amputation of a finger. In this case, the dose information was available in one or a few locations on the hand only, due to the limited number of biopsy fragments usually collected. The idea to measure free radicals (FRs) induced by radiation in nails to estimate a dose is not new, but up to now, no application cases were reported. As a matter of fact, the EPR analysis of nails is complex due to the presence of intrinsic signals and parasitic signals induced by the mechanical stress (when nails are collected), which overlaps the radio-induced components. In addition, the radio-induced FRs identified up to now are unstable and very sensitive to humidity. In these conditions, it was difficult to foresee any application for dosimetry with fingernails. Recently, stable radio-induced FRs in nails has been identified and an associated protocol for dose assessment developed. This protocol has been applied by the Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire on fingernail samples from victims of three different radiological accidents that occurred between 2008 and 2012 in different places. PMID:24776914

  12. N-Player Quantum Games in an EPR Setting

    PubMed Central

    Chappell, James M.; Iqbal, Azhar; Abbott, Derek

    2012-01-01

    The -player quantum games are analyzed that use an Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) experiment, as the underlying physical setup. In this setup, a player’s strategies are not unitary transformations as in alternate quantum game-theoretic frameworks, but a classical choice between two directions along which spin or polarization measurements are made. The players’ strategies thus remain identical to their strategies in the mixed-strategy version of the classical game. In the EPR setting the quantum game reduces itself to the corresponding classical game when the shared quantum state reaches zero entanglement. We find the relations for the probability distribution for -qubit GHZ and W-type states, subject to general measurement directions, from which the expressions for the players’ payoffs and mixed Nash equilibrium are determined. Players’ payoff matrices are then defined using linear functions so that common two-player games can be easily extended to the -player case and permit analytic expressions for the Nash equilibrium. As a specific example, we solve the Prisoners’ Dilemma game for general . We find a new property for the game that for an even number of players the payoffs at the Nash equilibrium are equal, whereas for an odd number of players the cooperating players receive higher payoffs. By dispensing with the standard unitary transformations on state vectors in Hilbert space and using instead rotors and multivectors, based on Clifford’s geometric algebra (GA), it is shown how the N-player case becomes tractable. The new mathematical approach presented here has wide implications in the areas of quantum information and quantum complexity, as it opens up a powerful way to tractably analyze N-partite qubit interactions. PMID:22606258

  13. Implementing EPR Dosimetry for Life-Threatening Incidents

    PubMed Central

    Flood, Ann Barry; Bhattacharyya, Shayan; Nicolalde, R. Javier; Swartz, Harold M.

    2007-01-01

    Starting with the assumption that a device to detect unplanned radiation exposures is technically superior to current technology, we examine the additional stakeholders and processes that must be considered to move the device from the lab into use. The use is to provide reliable information to triage people for early treatment of exposure to ionizing radiation that could lead to the Acute Radiation Syndrome. The scenario is a major accident or terrorist event that leaves a large number of people potentially exposed, with the resulting need to identify those to treat promptly or not. In vivo EPR dosimetry is the exemplar of such a technique. Three major areas are reviewed: policy considerations, regulatory clearance, and production of the device. Our analysis of policy-making indicates that the current system is very complex, with multiple significant decision-makers who may have conflicting agendas. Adoption of new technologies by policy-makers is further complicated because many sources of expert input already have made public stances or have reasons to prefer current solutions, e.g., some may have conflicts of interest in approving new devices because they are involved with the development or adoption of competing techniques. Regulatory clearance is complicated by not being able to collect evidence via clinical trials of its intended use, but pathways for approval for emergency use are under development by the FDA. The production of the new device could be problematical if the perceived market is too limited, particularly for private manufacturers; for in vivo EPR dosimetry the potential for other uses may be a mitigating factor. Overall we conclude that technical superiority of a technique does not in itself assure its rapid and effective adoption, even where the need is great and the alternatives are not satisfactory for large populations. Many important steps remain to achieve the goals of approval and adoption for use. PMID:18591990

  14. Measuring tissue oxygen saturation using NIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sircan-Kucuksayan, Aslinur; Uyuklu, Mehmet; Canpolat, Murat

    2014-05-01

    Tissue oxygen saturation (StO2) is known quite useful parameter for medical applications. A spectroscopic method has been developed to diagnose pathologic tissues due to lack of normal blood circulation by measuring tissue oxygen saturation. In the study, human blood samples with different level of oxygen saturations have been prepared and spectra were taken using an optical fiber probe to investigate correlation between the oxygen saturations and the spectra. The experimental set up for the spectroscopic measurements was consists of a miniature NIR light spectrometer, an optical fiber probe, a halogen-tungsten light source and a laptop. A linear correlation between the oxygen saturation of the blood samples and the ratio of the light of wavelengths 660 nm to 790 nm has been found from the spectra. Then, oxygen saturations of the blood samples were estimated from the spectroscopic measurements within an error of 2.9%. Furthermore, it has been shown that the linear dependence between the ratio and the oxygen saturation of the blood samples was valid for the blood samples with different hematocrits. Tissue oxygen saturation has been estimated from the spectroscopic measurements were taken from the fingers of healthy volunteers using the correlation between the spectra and blood oxygen saturation. The tissue StO2 measured was 80% as expected. The technique developed to measure tissue oxygen saturation has potential to diagnose premalignant tissues, follow up prognosis of cancerous tissues, and evaluation of ischemia reperfusion tissues.

  15. EPR as an analytical tool in assessing the mineral nutrients and irradiated food products-vegetables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasuna, C. P. Lakshmi; Chakradhar, R. P. S.; Rao, J. L.; Gopal, N. O.

    2008-12-01

    EPR spectral investigations of some commonly available vegetables in south India, which are of global importance like Daucus carota (carrot), Cyamopsis tetragonoloba (cluster beans), Coccinia indica (little gourd) and Beta vulgaris (beet root) have been carried out. In all the vegetable samples a free radical corresponding to cellulose radical is observed. Almost all the samples under investigation exhibit Mn ions in different oxidation states. The temperature variation EPR studies are done and are discussed in view of the paramagnetic oxidation states. The radiation-induced defects have also been assessed by using the EPR spectra of such irradiated food products.

  16. EPR investigation of some desiccated Ascomycota and Basidiomycota gamma-irradiated mushrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercu, V.; Negut, C. D.; Duliu, O. G.

    2010-12-01

    The suitability of the EPR spectroscopy for detection of γ-irradiation in five species of dried mushroom, currently used in gastronomy: yellow morel— Morchella esculenta, (L.) Pers. (Phylum Ascomycota), button mushroom— Agaricus bisporus (J.E.Lange), Agaricus haemorrhoidarius Fr., golden chantarelle— Cantharellus cibarius Fr., as well as oyster mushroom— Pleurotus ostreatus (Jacq. ex Fr.) (Phylum Basidiomycota) is presented and discussed. Although after irradiation at doses up to 11 kGy, all specimens presented well defined EPR spectra, only A. bisporus EPR signal was enough stable to make detection possible after 18 months.

  17. Bell Correlated and EPR States in the Framework of Jordan Algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamhalter, Jan; Sobotíková, Veronika

    2016-03-01

    We study Bell inequalities and EPR states in the context of Jordan algebras. We show that the set of states violating Bell inequalities across two operator commuting nonmodular Jordan Banach algebras is norm dense in the global state space. It generalizes hitherto known results in quantum field theory in several directions. We propose new Jordan quantity for incommensurable observables in a given state, introduce the concept of EPR state for Jordan structures, and study relationship between EPR states and Bell correlated states. Our analysis shows crucial role of spin factors and Pauli spin matrices for studying noncommutative properties of states and observables.

  18. Optimal strategies for tests of EPR-Steering with no detection loophole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, David A.; Wiseman, Howard M.

    2014-12-01

    It has been shown in earlier works that the vertices of Platonic solids are good measurement choices for tests of EPR-Steering. Such measurements are regularly spaced, and measurement diversity is a good feature for making EPR-Steering inequalities easier to violate with entangled states. However, such measurements are provably suboptimal. By scrutinising not only the average results, but also the measurement statistics of cheating strategies in a Local Hidden State model, we outline a method for devising optimal strategies for EPR-Steering tests with no detection loophole.

  19. EPR dosimetric properties of 2-methylalanine pellet for radiation processing application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soliman, Y. S.; Ali, Laila I.; Moustafa, H.; Tadros, Soad M.

    2014-09-01

    The dosimetric characteristics of γ-radiation induced free radicals in 2-methylalanine (2MA) pellet dosimeter are investigated using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) in the high-dose range of 1-100 kGy. The EPR spectrum of γ-irradiated 2MA exhibits an isotropic EPR signal with seven lines. The dosimeter response is humidity independent in the range of 33-76% relative humidity. The manufactured dosimeter is typically adipose tissue equivalent in the energy level of 0.1-15 MeV. The overall uncertainty (2σ) of the dosimeter is less than 6.9%.

  20. Microwave (EPR) measurements of the penetration depth measurements of high-Tc superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalal, N. S.; Rakvin, B.; Mahl, T. A.; Bhalla, A. S.; Sheng, Z. Z.

    1991-01-01

    The use is discussed of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) as a quick and easily accessible method for measuring the London penetration depth, lambda for the high T sub c superconductors. The method uses the broadening of the EPR signal, due to the emergence of the magnetic flux lattice, of a free radical adsorbed on the surface of the sample. The second moment, of the EPR signal below T sub c is fitted to the Brandt equation for a simple triangular lattice. The precision of this method compares quite favorably with those of the more standard methods such as micro sup(+)SR, neutron scattering, and magnetic susceptibility.

  1. Method for enhanced oil recovery

    DOEpatents

    Comberiati, Joseph R.; Locke, Charles D.; Kamath, Krishna I.

    1980-01-01

    The present invention is directed to an improved method for enhanced recovery of oil from relatively "cold" reservoirs by carbon dioxide flooding. In oil reservoirs at a temperature less than the critical temperature of 87.7.degree. F. and at a pore pressure greater than the saturation pressure of carbon dioxide at the temperature of the reservoir, the carbon dioxide remains in the liquid state which does not satisfactorily mix with the oil. However, applicants have found that carbon dioxide can be vaporized in situ in the reservoir by selectively reducing the pore pressure in the reservoir to a value less than the particular saturated vapor pressure so as to greatly enhance the mixing of the carbon dioxide with the oil.

  2. Power flow control using distributed saturable reactors

    DOEpatents

    Dimitrovski, Aleksandar D.

    2016-02-13

    A magnetic amplifier includes a saturable core having a plurality of legs. Control windings wound around separate legs are spaced apart from each other and connected in series in an anti-symmetric relation. The control windings are configured in such a way that a biasing magnetic flux arising from a control current flowing through one of the plurality of control windings is substantially equal to the biasing magnetic flux flowing into a second of the plurality of control windings. The flow of the control current through each of the plurality of control windings changes the reactance of the saturable core reactor by driving those portions of the saturable core that convey the biasing magnetic flux in the saturable core into saturation. The phasing of the control winding limits a voltage induced in the plurality of control windings caused by a magnetic flux passing around a portion of the saturable core.

  3. Reproducibility of muscle oxygen saturation.

    PubMed

    Thiel, C; Vogt, L; Himmelreich, H; Hübscher, M; Banzer, W

    2011-04-01

    The present study evaluated the reproducibility of tissue oxygenation in relation to oxygen consumption (VO2) across cycle exercise intensities in a test-retest design. 12 subjects (25.7±2.1 years; 24.7±1.9 kg · m(-2)) twice performed an incremental bicycle exercise protocol, while tissue oxygen saturation (StO2) in the vastus lateralis muscle was monitored by a commercially available NIRS unit and VO2 determined by an open-circuit indirect calorimetric system. Coefficients of variation across rest, workloads corresponding to 25, 50 and 75% of individual maximum capacity, and maximum load were 5.8, 4.6, 6.1, 8.0, 11.0% (StO2) and 7.6, 6.0, 3.7, 3.4, 3.1% (VO2), respectively. 95 % CI of relative test-retest differences ranged from -5.6 to +5.4% at 25% load to -17.2 to +7.5% at maximum load for StO2 and from -7.3 to +7.7% at rest to -3.3 to +3.2% at maximum load for VO2. With advancing exercise intensity, within-subject variability of StO2 was augmented, whereas VO2 variability slightly attenuated. NIRS measurements at higher workloads need to be interpreted with caution. PMID:21271493

  4. Casimir experiments showing saturation effects

    SciTech Connect

    Sernelius, Bo E.

    2009-10-15

    We address several different Casimir experiments where theory and experiment disagree. First out is the classical Casimir force measurement between two metal half spaces; here both in the form of the torsion pendulum experiment by Lamoreaux and in the form of the Casimir pressure measurement between a gold sphere and a gold plate as performed by Decca et al.; theory predicts a large negative thermal correction, absent in the high precision experiments. The third experiment is the measurement of the Casimir force between a metal plate and a laser irradiated semiconductor membrane as performed by Chen et al.; the change in force with laser intensity is larger than predicted by theory. The fourth experiment is the measurement of the Casimir force between an atom and a wall in the form of the measurement by Obrecht et al. of the change in oscillation frequency of a {sup 87}Rb Bose-Einstein condensate trapped to a fused silica wall; the change is smaller than predicted by theory. We show that saturation effects can explain the discrepancies between theory and experiment observed in all these cases.

  5. Impact of the track density versus linear density trade-off on the read channel: TCPR4 versus EPR4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayiner, Necip

    1995-12-01

    The areal density on a magnetic recording medium can be increased by increasing the linear bit density, or by increasing the track density, or, more commonly, by a combination of both. Equalizing the signal to a higher order partial response polynomial (i.e. EPR4), and employing a trellis code in conjunction with a PR4 channel (i.e. TCPR4) are among the techniques to achieve this goal by providing performance gains over a PR4 system. In this study, the potential increases in linear and track densities that could be afforded by EPR4 and TCPR4 are investigated by simulating a read channel model which incorporates the effects of non-ideal timing recovery, A/D conversion, and finite register-lengths, using spinstand data. In order to quantify the effects of the increased track density, intertrack interference (ITI) is taken into account in evaluating the performance, by defining the interference as a function of the track misregistration. The trade-offs concerning the equalizer loss due to a higher linear bit density and the SNR loss due to a narrower track, as a function of PW50/T, are addressed. The measure of performance used captures the coding gain, the rate loss due to coding, the loss of the equalizer, and the degradation due to ITI. Assuming similar hardware complexity for the detectors, the two alternatives are compared in terms of the areal density increase they provide over a range of user bit densities that are of current practical interest.

  6. Self isolating high frequency saturable reactor

    DOEpatents

    Moore, James A.

    1998-06-23

    The present invention discloses a saturable reactor and a method for decoupling the interwinding capacitance from the frequency limitations of the reactor so that the equivalent electrical circuit of the saturable reactor comprises a variable inductor. The saturable reactor comprises a plurality of physically symmetrical magnetic cores with closed loop magnetic paths and a novel method of wiring a control winding and a RF winding. The present invention additionally discloses a matching network and method for matching the impedances of a RF generator to a load. The matching network comprises a matching transformer and a saturable reactor.

  7. Adiabatic and fast passage ultra-wideband inversion in pulsed EPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doll, Andrin; Pribitzer, Stephan; Tschaggelar, René; Jeschke, Gunnar

    2013-05-01

    We demonstrate that adiabatic and fast passage ultra-wideband (UWB) pulses can achieve inversion over several hundreds of MHz and thus enhance the measurement sensitivity, as shown by two selected experiments. Technically, frequency-swept pulses are generated by a 12 GS/s arbitrary waveform generator and upconverted to X-band frequencies. This pulsed UWB source is utilized as an incoherent channel in an ordinary pulsed EPR spectrometer. We discuss experimental methodologies and modeling techniques to account for the response of the resonator, which can strongly limit the excitation bandwidth of the entire non-linear excitation chain. Aided by these procedures, pulses compensated for bandwidth or variations in group delay reveal enhanced inversion efficiency. The degree of bandwidth compensation is shown to depend critically on the time available for excitation. As a result, we demonstrate optimized inversion recovery and double electron electron resonance (DEER) experiments. First, virtually complete inversion of the nitroxide spectrum with an adiabatic pulse of 128 ns length is achieved. Consequently, spectral diffusion between inverted and non-inverted spins is largely suppressed and the observation bandwidth can be increased to increase measurement sensitivity. Second, DEER is performed on a terpyridine-based copper (II) complex with a nitroxide-copper distance of 2.5 nm. As previously demonstrated on this complex, when pumping copper spins and observing nitroxide spins, the modulation depth is severely limited by the excitation bandwidth of the pump pulse. By using fast passage UWB pulses with a maximum length of 64 ns, we achieve up to threefold enhancement of the modulation depth. Associated artifacts in distance distributions when increasing the bandwidth of the pump pulse are shown to be small.

  8. Preparation and EPR characterization of N@C60 and N@C70 based peapods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corzilius, B.; Gembus, A.; Weiden, N.; Dinse, K.-P.

    2005-09-01

    Using the quartet spin of encased nitrogen atoms as an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) probe, it is possible to examine the fullerene/nanotube interactions in a peapod. A purification method is developed which allows low temperature filling of nanotubes with endohedral fullerenes. The paramagnetic impurities of undoped single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) are characterized via EPR resulting in a broad superparamagnetic signal of the remaining catalyst particles and a rather narrow signal of carbonaceous material. Comparison of EPR spectra of several nitrogen endohedral doped peapods with their analogues obtained in a solid fullerene matrix shows a significant broadening of N@C60 and N@C70 EPR signals. This broadening is related to a non-vanishing zero-field splitting caused by deformation of the fullerene cage upon encapsulation.

  9. Crystal field effect on EPR and optical absorption properties of natural green zoisite.

    PubMed

    Javier-Ccallata, Henry; Watanabe, Shigueo

    2013-03-01

    In this study the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and optical absorption (OA) of natural crystal of zoisite were investigated after γ ((60)Co) irradiation and high temperature annealing. EPR measurements show that the zoisite from Tefilo Otoni MG Brazil contain Cr(3+), Fe(3+) and Mn(2+) ions and occupy distorted Al(3+) octahedral and tetrahedral sites which are subjected to the action of a strong crystal field in axial direction. Absorption bands which in principle give rise to sets of EPR lines between 500 and 2500 G were found using the deconvolution method. The application of high doses of gamma ray and high temperature annealing has shown no significant effects on EPR and OA spectra. Spin-allowed, spin-forbidden and crystal field parameters were calculated for 3d(3) configuration and interpreted using the spin Hamiltonian formalism containing axial and rhombic terms in low symmetries. PMID:23291113

  10. Variable temperature EPR studies of Illinois No. 6 coal treated with donor and acceptor molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, R.L.; Rothenberger, K.S.; Retcofsky, H.L.

    1996-10-01

    Variable, temperature EPR studies of Illinois No. 6 coal, its pyridine extract, and samples of each after treatment with known donor and acceptor molecules are reported. The purpose of the study was to explore the origin of the EPR signals near g = 2 and to assess the contribution of certain non-bonded interactions in coal. Curie Law behavior is exhibited for each sample indicating that the EPR signals are dominated by doublet state radicals. No evidence for thermally accessible, low-lying triplet states, such as those found in some charge-transfer complexes, was found. Infrared spectroscopy reveals, however, that some electron density is transferred from the coal after treatment with acceptors such as TCNQ and TCNE. EPR studies of chromat graphic fractions of the pyridine extract (approximately five percent of the whole coal), both untreated and treated with TTF and TCNE, indicated some minor contributions of low-lying triplet states.

  11. Wormhole and entanglement (non-)detection in the ER=EPR correspondence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Ning; Pollack, Jason; Remmen, Grant N.

    2015-11-01

    The recently proposed ER=EPR correspondence postulates the existence of wormholes (Einstein-Rosen bridges) between entangled states (such as EPR pairs). Entanglement is famously known to be unobservable in quantum mechanics, in that there exists no observable (or, equivalently, projector) that can accurately pick out whether a generic state is entangled. Many features of the geometry of spacetime, however, are observables, so one might worry that the presence or absence of a wormhole could identify an entangled state in ER=EPR, violating quantum mechanics, specifically, the property of state-independence of observables. In this note, we establish that this cannot occur: there is no measurement in general relativity that unambiguously detects the presence of a generic wormhole geometry. This statement is the ER=EPR dual of the undetectability of entanglement.

  12. Nitrite binding to globins: linkage isomerism, EPR silence and reductive chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Silaghi-Dumitrescu, Radu; Svistunenko, Dimitri A.; Cioloboc, Daniela; Bischin, Cristina; Scurtu, Florina; Cooper, Chris E.

    2014-01-01

    The nitrite adducts of globins can potentially bind via O- or N- linkage to the heme iron. We have used EPR (electron paramagnetic resonance) and DFT (density functional theory) to explore these binding modes to myoglobin and hemoglobin. We demonstrate that the nitrite adducts of both globins have detectable EPR signals; we provide an explanation for the difficulty in detecting these EPR features, based on uniaxial state considerations. The EPR and DFT data show that both nitrite linkage isomers can be present at the same time and that the two isomers are readily interconvertible in solution. The millisecond-scale process of nitrite reduction by Hb is investigated in search of the elusive Fe(II)-nitrite adduct. PMID:25172022

  13. EPR spectroscopy of protein microcrystals oriented in a liquid crystalline polymer medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldeira, Jorge; Figueirinhas, João Luis; Santos, Celina; Godinho, Maria Helena

    2004-10-01

    Correlation of the g-tensor of a paramagnetic active center of a protein with its structure provides a unique experimental information on the electronic structure of the metal site. To address this problem, we made solid films containing metalloprotein ( Desulfovibrio gigas cytochrome c3) microcrystals. The microcrystals in a liquid crystalline polymer medium (water/hydroxypropylcellulose) were partially aligned by a shear flow. A strong orientation effect of the metalloprotein was observed by EPR spectroscopy and polarizing optical microscopy. The EPR spectra of partially oriented samples were simulated, allowing for molecular orientation distribution function determination. The observed effect results in enhanced sensitivity and resolution of the EPR spectra and provides a new approach towards the correlation of spectroscopic data, obtained by EPR or some other technique, with the three-dimensional structure of a protein or a model compound.

  14. EPR investigations of silicon carbide nanoparticles functionalized by acid doped polyaniline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karray, Fekri; Kassiba, Abdelhadi

    2012-06-01

    Nanocomposites (SiC-PANI) based on silicon carbide nanoparticles (SiC) encapsulated in conducting polyaniline (PANI) are synthesized by direct polymerization of PANI on the nanoparticle surfaces. The conductivity of PANI and the nanocomposites was modulated by several doping levels of camphor sulfonic acid (CSA). Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) investigations were carried out on representative SiC-PANI samples over the temperature range [100-300 K]. The features of the EPR spectra were analyzed taking into account the paramagnetic species such as polarons with spin S=1/2 involved in two main environments realized in the composites as well as their thermal activation. A critical temperature range 200-225 K was revealed through crossover changes in the thermal behavior of the EPR spectral parameters. Insights on the electronic transport properties and their thermal evolutions were inferred from polarons species probed by EPR and the electrical conductivity in doped nanocomposites.

  15. Characterizing Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient Binding to Human Serum Albumin by Spin-Labeling and EPR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hauenschild, Till; Reichenwallner, Jörg; Enkelmann, Volker; Hinderberger, Dariush

    2016-08-26

    Drug binding to human serum albumin (HSA) has been characterized by a spin-labeling and continuous-wave (CW) EPR spectroscopic approach. Specifically, the contribution of functional groups (FGs) in a compound on its albumin-binding capabilities is quantitatively described. Molecules from different drug classes are labeled with EPR-active nitroxide radicals (spin-labeled pharmaceuticals (SLPs)) and in a screening approach CW-EPR spectroscopy is used to investigate HSA binding under physiological conditions and at varying ratios of SLP to protein. Spectral simulations of the CW-EPR spectra allow extraction of association constants (KA ) and the maximum number (n) of binding sites per protein. By comparison of data from 23 SLPs, the mechanisms of drug-protein association and the impact of chemical modifications at individual positions on drug uptake can be rationalized. Furthermore, new drug modifications with predictable protein binding tendency may be envisaged. PMID:27460503

  16. Einstein locality, EPR locality, and the significance for science of the nonlocal character of quantum theory

    SciTech Connect

    Stapp, H.P.

    1985-10-01

    The immense difference between Einstein locality and EPR locality is discussed. The latter provides a basis for establishing the nonlocal character of quantum theory, whereas the former does not. A model representing Heisenberg's idea of physical reality is introduced. It is nondeterministic and holistic: the objects, measuring devices, and their environment are treated as an inseparable entity, with, however, macroscopically localizable attributes. The EPR principle that no disturbance can propagate faster than light is imposed without assuming any structure incompatible with orthodox quantum thinking. This locality requirement renders the model incompatible with rudimentary predictions of quantum theory. A more general proof not depending on any model is also given. A recent argument that purports to show that quantum theory is compatible with EPR locality is examined. It illustrates the importance of the crucial one-world assumption. The significance for science of the failure of EPR locality is discussed.

  17. Does deformation saturate seismic anisotropy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatham, D. J.; Lloyd, G. E.; Butler, R. W.; Casey, M.

    2006-12-01

    The progressive simple shear deformation that characterizes ductile fault zones in the crust involves both rotation and intensification of the strain ellipsoid. These mathematic predictions have been confirmed repeatedly by finite strain determinations in outcrop studies of natural shear zones and used to test geodynamic models of mountain belts. Seismic anisotropy (SA) methods offer the opportunity to pursue these approaches in situ. First however, we must calibrate the magnitude and orientation of the SA ellipsoid against naturally deformed tectonites of known strain state and microstructure. Here we present data from a field analogue of mafic ductile crust in an amphibolite-facies shear zone developed in a deformed mafic dyke embedded within the Lewisian Gneiss (Badcall, NW Scotland). Deflection of pre-existing linear and planar elements and attenuation of the dyke into the shear zone are used to determine the strain gradient. Specimens collected along this gradient were used to establish the geometric fabric intensity defined by different minerals (hornblende grain alignment and ellipticity of plagioclase clots). Finally, petrophysical properties were calculated for the specimens using the SEM-EBSD measured populations of lattice preferred orientations (LPO) for all mineral phases. It is the hornblende-plagioclase LPO, combined in their modal proportions and modulated by the individual mineral single crystal elastic properties, which define the SA profile across the shear zone. Hornblende develops a strong preferred dimensional orientation and hence LPO at shear strains of about 2, whereas the plagioclase LPO remains close to random regardless of bulk strain. The modelled SA of the samples is dominated therefore by the amphibole LPO. Although the values of bulk shear strain vary across the shear zone (0 at the margins to greater than 12 in the centre), the calculated intensity of SA saturates at a shear strain of about 2. These results, if typical of large

  18. EPR spectra induced by gamma-irradiation of some dry medical herbs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yordanov, N. D.; Lagunov, O.; Dimov, K.

    2009-04-01

    The radiation-induced EPR spectra in some medical herbs are reported. The samples studied are: (i) leaves of nettle, common balm, peppermint and thyme; (ii) stalks of common balm, thyme, milfoil, yarrow and marigold; (iii) blossoms of yarrow and marigold; (iv) blossoms and leaves of hawthorn and tutsan; and (v) roots of common valerian, nettle, elecampane (black and white), restharrows and carlina. Before irradiation all samples exhibit one weak anisotropic singlet EPR line with effective g-value of 2.0050±0.0002. The radiation-induced spectra fall into three groups. EPR spectra of irradiated blossoms of yarrow and marigold, stalks of common balm, thyme, tutsan and yarrow as well as roots of common valerian, nettle and elecampane (black and white) show "cellulose-like" EPR spectrum typical for irradiated plants. It is characterized by one intense central line with g=2.0050±0.0005 and two weak satellite lines situated ca. 30 G left and right to it. EPR spectra of gamma-irradiated restharrows and carlina are complex. They may be represented by one triplet corresponding to the "cellulose-like" EPR spectrum, one relatively intense singlet, situated in the center of the spectrum, and five weak additional satellite lines left and right to the center. The last spectrum was assigned as "carbohydrate-like" type. Only one intense EPR singlet with g=2.0048±0.0005 was recorded after irradiation of leaves of nettle and common balm. The lifetime of the radiation-induced EPR spectra was followed for a period of 3 months.

  19. Preparation and applicability of fresh fruit samples for the identification of radiation treatment by EPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yordanov, Nicola D.; Aleksieva, Katerina

    2009-03-01

    The results of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) study on fresh fruits (whole pulp of pears, apples, peaches, apricots, avocado, kiwi and mango) before and after gamma-irradiation are reported using two drying procedures before EPR investigation. In order to remove water from non-irradiated and irradiated samples of the first batch, the pulp of fresh fruits is pressed, and the solid residue is washed with alcohol and dried at room temperature. The fruits of the second batch are pressed and dried in a standard laboratory oven at 40 °C. The results obtained with both drying procedures are compared. All samples under study show a singlet EPR line with g=2.0048±0.0005 before irradiation. Irradiation gives rise to typical "cellulose-like" EPR spectrum featuring one intensive line with g=2.0048±0.0005 and two very weak satellite lines situated 3 mT at left and right of the central line. Only mango samples show a singlet line after irradiation. The fading kinetics of radiation-induced EPR signal is studied for a period of 50 days after irradiation. When the irradiated fruit samples are stored in their natural state and dried just before each EPR measurement, the satellite lines are measurable for less than 17 days of storage. Irradiated fruit samples, when stored dried, lose for 50 days ca. 40% of their radiation-induced radicals if treated with alcohol or ca. 70% if dried in an oven. The reported results unambiguously show that the presence of the satellite lines in the EPR spectra could be used for identification of radiation processing of fresh fruits, thus extending the validity of European Protocol EN 1787 (2000). Foodstuffs—Detection of Irradiated Food Containing Cellulose by EPR Spectroscopy. European Committee for Standardisation. Brussels for dry herbs.

  20. Gamma-irradiated dry fruits. An example of a wide variety of long-time dependent EPR spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yordanov, Nicola D.; Pachova, Zdravka

    2006-03-01

    EPR spectra of dry, sugar containing fruits—raisins, sultanas, figs, dates, peaches, blue plums and chokeberry recorded before and after irradiation with gamma-rays, are reported. It is shown that weak singlet EPR line with 2.0031 ± 0.0005 can be recorded before irradiation of seeds, stones or skin of chokeberry, figs and raisins as well as flesh of blue plum, raisins and peaches. EPR signals of various shape are distinguished after irradiation in different parts of the fruits, as well as in randomly cut pieces of them: Seeds of raisins, chokeberry and figs give a singlet line. Stones from blue plums and peaches exhibit typical "cellulose-like" EPR signal consisting of an intense singlet line with g = 2.0033 ± 0.0005 and 2 week satellite lines situated ca. 30 G left and right to it. Stones of dates are the only sample in which "sugar-like" spectrum is recorded. Skin of raisins and figs exhibits "sugar-like" EPR spectrum whereas that of dates and chokeberry—a singlet line. Under the same experimental conditions skin of sultanas, peaches and blue plums are EPR silent. Flesh of raisins, sultanas, figs, dates and peaches exhibits "sugar-like" EPR spectrum, flesh of blue plums gives a singlet EPR line and that of chokeberry is EPR silent. As a result, randomly cut pieces of dry fruits suitable for EPR studies, containing various constituents, exhibit different in shape and intensity EPR spectra. Kinetic studies followed for 1 year on the time stability of all reported EPR signals indicate that intensity ratio between the simultaneously appearing EPR signals in particular fruit varies from 1:20 immediately after irradiation to 1:0.5 at the end of the period. These observations open a new possibility for identification of irradiated fruits - using the magnitude of the intensity ratio to find the approximate date of radiation processing in the first ca. 30-100 days.

  1. Transport de paires EPR dans des structures mesoscopiques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupont, Emilie

    Dans cette these, nous nous sommes particulierement interesses a la propagation de paires EPR1 delocalisees et localisees, et a l'influence d'un supraconducteur sur le transport de ces paires. Apres une introduction de cette etude, ainsi que du cadre scientifique qu'est l'informatique quantique dans lequel elle s'inscrit, nous allons dans le chapitre 1 faire un rappel sur le systeme constitue de deux points quantiques normaux entoures de deux fils supraconducteurs. Cela nous permettra d'introduire une methode de calcul qui sera reutilisee par la suite, et de trouver egalement le courant Josephson produit par ce systeme transforme en SQUID-dc par l'ajout d'une jonction auxiliaire. Le SQUID permet de mesurer l'etat de spin (singulet ou triplet), et peut etre forme a partir d'autres systemes que nous etudierons ensuite. Dans le chapitre 2, nous rappellerons l'etude detaillee d'un intricateur d'Andreev faite par un groupe de Bale. La matrice T, permettant d'obtenir le courant dans les cas ou les electrons sont separes spatialement ou non, sera etudiee en detail afin d'en faire usage au chapitre suivant. Le chapitre 3 est consacre a l'etude de l'influence du bruit sur le fonctionnement de l'intricateur d'Andreev. Ce bruit modifie la forme du courant jusqu'a aboutir a d'autres conditions de fonctionnement de l'intricateur. En effet, le bruit present sur les points quantiques peut perturber le transport des paires EPR par l'intermediaire des degres de liberte. Nous montrerons que, du fait de l'"intrication" entre la charge de la paire et le bruit, la paire est detruite pour des temps longs. Cependant, le resultat le plus important sera que le bruit perturbe plus le transport des paires delocalisees, qui implique une resonance de Breit-Wigner a deux particules. Le transport parasite n'implique pour sa part qu'une resonance de Breit-Wigner a une particule. Dans le chapitre 4, nous reviendrons au systeme constitue de deux points quantiques entoures de deux fils

  2. Alanine-EPR as a transfer standard dosimetry system for low energy X radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoury, H. J.; da Silva, E. J.; Mehta, K.; de Barros, V. S.; Asfora, V. K.; Guzzo, P. L.; Parker, A. G.

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the use of alanine-EPR as a transfer standard dosimetry system for low energy X radiation, such as that in RS-2400, which operates in the range from 25 to 150 kV and 2 to 45 mA. Two types of alanine dosimeters were investigated. One is a commercial alanine pellets from Aérial-Centre de Ressources Technologiques, France and one was prepared in our laboratory (LMRI-DEN/UFPE). The EPR spectra of the irradiated dosimeters were recorded in the Nuclear Energy Department of UFPE, using a Bruker EMX10 EPR spectrometer operating in the X-band. The alanine-EPR dosimetry system was calibrated in the range of 20-220 Gy in this X-ray field, against an ionization chamber calibrated at the relevant X-ray energy with traceability to PTB. The results showed that both alanine dosimeters presented a linear dose response the same sensitivity, when the EPR signal was normalized to alanine mass. The total uncertainty in the measured dose was estimated to be about 3%. The results indicate that it is possible to use the alanine-EPR dosimetry system for validation of a low-energy X ray irradiator, such as RS-2400.

  3. EPR and ENDOR studies of point defects in lithium tetraborate crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchanan, Douglas A.

    Lithium tetraborate (Li2B4O7 or LTB) is a promising material for both radiation dosimetry and neutron detection applications. LTB crystals can be grown pure or doped with different impurities including transition-metal and rare-earth ions. Research in this dissertation focuses on undoped LTB crystals and LTB crystals doped with copper and silver. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) are used to characterize point defects in the lithium tetraborate crystals. Thermoluminescence (TL), photoluminescence (PL), photoluminescence excitation (PLE), and optical absorption (OA) are also used. An intrinsic hole trap associated with lithium vacancies is characterized with EPR and ENDOR and its thermal stability is determined using thermoluminescence. A "perturbed" hole trap due to Ag2+ ions is characterized in doped crystals using EPR data alone. This method is tested on a previously studied hole center where both EPR and ENDOR were used. New x-ray induced centers are identified in copper-doped crystals. These include two Cu 2+ hole centers and two Cu0 electron centers. These centers are characterized with EPR and their thermal stability explains TL peaks in glow curves. Finally, a comprehensive study utilizing EPR, OA, PL, and PLE data provide convincing explanations for the absorption and emission features of silver-doped crystals.

  4. EPR and IR spectral investigations on some leafy vegetables of Indian origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasuna, C. P. Lakshmi; Chakradhar, R. P. S.; Rao, J. L.; Gopal, N. O.

    2009-09-01

    EPR spectral investigations have been carried out on four edible leafy vegetables of India, which are used as dietary component in day to day life. In Rumex vesicarius leaf sample, EPR spectral investigations at different temperatures indicate the presence of anti-ferromagnetically coupled Mn(IV)-Mn(IV) complexes. EPR spectra of Trigonella foenum graecum show the presence of Mn ions in multivalent state and Fe 3+ ions in rhombic symmetry. EPR spectra of Basella rubra indicate the presence of Mn(IV)-O-Mn(IV) type complexes. The EPR spectra of Basella rubra have been studied at different temperatures. It is found that the spin population for the resonance signal at g = 2.06 obeys the Boltzmann distribution law. The EPR spectra of Moringa oliefera leaves show the presence of Mn 2+ ions. Radiation induced changes in free radical of this sample have also been studied. The FT-IR spectra of Basella rubra and Moringa oliefera leaves show the evidences for the protein matrix bands and those corresponding to carboxylic C dbnd O bonds.

  5. EPR and IR spectral investigations on some leafy vegetables of Indian origin.

    PubMed

    Prasuna, C P Lakshmi; Chakradhar, R P S; Rao, J L; Gopal, N O

    2009-09-15

    EPR spectral investigations have been carried out on four edible leafy vegetables of India, which are used as dietary component in day to day life. In Rumex vesicarius leaf sample, EPR spectral investigations at different temperatures indicate the presence of anti-ferromagnetically coupled Mn(IV)-Mn(IV) complexes. EPR spectra of Trigonella foenum graecum show the presence of Mn ions in multivalent state and Fe(3+) ions in rhombic symmetry. EPR spectra of Basella rubra indicate the presence of Mn(IV)-O-Mn(IV) type complexes. The EPR spectra of Basella rubra have been studied at different temperatures. It is found that the spin population for the resonance signal at g=2.06 obeys the Boltzmann distribution law. The EPR spectra of Moringa oliefera leaves show the presence of Mn(2+) ions. Radiation induced changes in free radical of this sample have also been studied. The FT-IR spectra of Basella rubra and Moringa oliefera leaves show the evidences for the protein matrix bands and those corresponding to carboxylic CO bonds. PMID:19546024

  6. Photosynthetic reaction center of green sulfur bacteria studied by EPR

    SciTech Connect

    Nitschke, W.; Rutherford, A.W. ); Fieler, U. )

    1990-04-24

    Membrane preparations of two species of the green sulfur bacteria Chlorobium have been studied be EPR. Three signals were detected which were attributed to iron-sulfur centers acting as electron acceptors in the photosynthetic reaction center. (1) A signal from a center designated F{sub B}, was photoinduced at 4K. (2) A similar signal, F{sub A}, was photoinduced in addition to the F{sub B} signal upon a short period of illumination at 200 K. (3) Further illumination at 200 K resulted in the appearance of a broad feature at g=1.78. This is attributed to the g{sub x} component of an iron-sulfur center designated F{sub X}. The designations of these signals as F{sub B}, F{sub A}, and F{sub X} are based on their spectroscopic similarities to signals in photosystem I (PS I). The orientation dependence of these EPR signals in ordered Chlorobium membrane multilayers is remarkably similar to that of their PS I homologues. A magnetic interaction between the reduced forms of F{sub B} and F{sub A} occurs, which is also very similar to that seen in PS I. The triplet state of P{sub 840}, the primary electron donor, could be photoinduced at 4 K in samples which had been preincubated with sodium dithionite and methyl viologen and then preilluminated at 200 K. The preillumination reduces the iron-sulfur centers while the preincubation is thought to result in the inactivation of an earlier electron acceptor. Orientation studies of the triplet signal in ordered multilayers indicate that the bacteriochlorophylls which act as the primary electron donor in Chlorobium are arranged with a structural geometry almost identical with that of the special pair in purple bacteria. The Chlorobium reaction center appears to be similar in some respects to both PS I and to the purple bacterial reaction center. This is discussed with regard to the evolution of the different types of reaction centers from a common ancestor.

  7. Calibration of helical tomotherapy machine using EPR/alanine dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Perichon, Nicolas; Garcia, Tristan; Francois, Pascal; Lourenco, Valerie; Lesven, Caroline; Bordy, Jean-Marc

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: Current codes of practice for clinical reference dosimetry of high-energy photon beams in conventional radiotherapy recommend using a 10x10 cm{sup 2} square field, with the detector at a reference depth of 10 cm in water and 100 cm source to surface distance (SSD) (AAPM TG-51) or 100 cm source-to-axis distance (SAD) (IAEA TRS-398). However, the maximum field size of a helical tomotherapy (HT) machine is 40x5 cm{sup 2} defined at 85 cm SAD. These nonstandard conditions prevent a direct implementation of these protocols. The purpose of this study is twofold: To check the absorbed dose in water and dose rate calibration of a tomotherapy unit as well as the accuracy of the tomotherapy treatment planning system (TPS) calculations for a specific test case. Method: Both topics are based on the use of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) using alanine as transfer dosimeter between the Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel (LNHB) {sup 60}Co-{gamma}-ray reference beam and the Institut Curie's HT beam. Irradiations performed in the LNHB reference {sup 60}Co-{gamma}-ray beam allowed setting up the calibration method, which was then implemented and tested at the LNHB 6 MV linac x-ray beam, resulting in a deviation of 1.6% (at a 1% standard uncertainty) relative to the reference value determined with the standard IAEA TRS-398 protocol. Results: HT beam dose rate estimation shows a difference of 2% with the value stated by the manufacturer at a 2% standard uncertainty. A 4% deviation between measured dose and the calculation from the tomotherapy TPS was found. The latter was originated by an inadequate representation of the phantom CT-scan values and, consequently, mass densities within the phantom. This difference has been explained by the mass density values given by the CT-scan and used by the TPS which were not the true ones. Once corrected using Monte Carlo N-Particle simulations to validate the accuracy of this process, the difference between corrected TPS

  8. Pulsed EPR characterization of encapsulated atomic hydrogen in octasilsesquioxane cages.

    PubMed

    Mitrikas, George

    2012-03-21

    Hydrogen atoms encapsulated in molecular cages are potential candidates for quantum computing applications. They provide the simplest two-spin system where the 1s electron spin, S = 1/2, is hyperfine-coupled to the proton nuclear spin, I = 1/2, with a large isotropic hyperfine coupling (A = 1420.40575 MHz for a free atom). While hydrogen atoms can be trapped in many matrices at cryogenic temperatures, it has been found that they are exceptionally stable in octasilsesquioxane cages even at room temperature [Sasamori et al., Science, 1994, 256, 1691]. Here we present a detailed spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation study of atomic hydrogen encapsulated in Si(8)O(12)(OSiMe(2)H)(8) using X-band pulsed EPR spectroscopy. The spin-lattice relaxation times T(1) range between 1.2 s at 20 K and 41.8 μs at room temperature. The temperature dependence of the relaxation rate shows that for T < 60 K the spin-lattice relaxation is best described by a Raman process with a Debye temperature of θ(D) = 135 K, whereas for T > 100 K a thermally activated process with activation energy E(a) = 753 K (523 cm(-1)) prevails. The phase memory time T(M) = 13.9 μs remains practically constant between 200 and 300 K and is determined by nuclear spin diffusion. At lower temperatures T(M) decreases by an order of magnitude and exhibits two minima at T = 140 K and T = 60 K. The temperature dependence of T(M) between 20 and 200 K is attributed to dynamic processes that average inequivalent hyperfine couplings, e.g. rotation of the methyl groups of the cage organic substituents. The hyperfine couplings of the encapsulated proton and the cage (29)Si nuclei are obtained through numerical simulations of field-swept FID-detected EPR spectra and HYSCORE experiments, respectively. The results are discussed in terms of existing phenomenological models based on the spherical harmonic oscillator and compared to those of endohedral fullerenes. PMID:22323086

  9. Interpreting HSE Contents of Planetary Basalts: The Importance of Sulfide Saturation and Under-Saturation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, K.

    2000-01-01

    Highly siderophile elements provide important constraints on planetary differentiation due to their siderophile behavior. Their interpretation in terms of planetary differentiation models has so far overlooked the importance of sulfide saturation and under-saturation.

  10. NITROGEN SATURATION IN NORTHERN FOREST ECOSYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this article we provide a formal definition of nitrogen saturation and set forth a series of testable hypotheses regarding the states of forest ecosystem response to chronic nitrogen deposition. hese hypotheses are used to suggest early indicators of nitrogen saturation and to...