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Sample records for scaffold degradation elevates

  1. Polymer scaffold degradation control via chemical control

    DOEpatents

    Hedberg-Dirk, Elizabeth L.; Dirk, Shawn; Cicotte, Kirsten

    2016-01-05

    A variety of polymers and copolymers suitable for use as biologically compatible constructs and, as a non-limiting specific example, in the formation of degradable tissue scaffolds as well methods for synthesizing these polymers and copolymers are described. The polymers and copolymers have degradation rates that are substantially faster than those of previously described polymers suitable for the same uses. Copolymers having a synthesis route which enables one to fine tune the degradation rate by selecting the specific stoichiometry of the monomers in the resulting copolymer are also described. The disclosure also provides a novel synthesis route for maleoyl chloride which yields monomers suitable for use in the copolymer synthesis methods described herein.

  2. Fast degradable citrate-based bone scaffold promotes spinal fusion

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jiajun; Guo, Jinshan; Li, Zhen; Yang, Cheng; Xie, Denghui; Chen, Jian; Li, Shengfa; Li, Shaolin; Kim, Gloria B.; Bai, Xiaochun; Zhang, Zhongmin; Yang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that high rates of fusion failure and pseudoarthrosis development (5~35%) are concomitant in spinal fusion surgery, which was ascribed to the shortage of suitable materials for bone regeneration. Citrate was recently recognized to play an indispensable role in enhancing osteconductivity and osteoinductivity, and promoting bone formation. To address the material challenges in spinal fusion surgery, we have synthesized mechanically robust and fast degrading citrate-based polymers by incorporating N-methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) into clickable poly(1, 8-octanediol citrates) (POC-click), referred to as POC-M-click. The obtained POC-M-click were fabricated into POC-M-click-HA matchstick scaffolds by compositing with hydroxyapatite (HA) for interbody spinal fusion in a rabbit model. Spinal fusion was analyzed by radiography, manual palpation, biomechanical testing, and histological evaluation. At 4 and 8 weeks post surgery, POC-M-click-HA scaffolds presented optimal degradation rates that facilitated faster new bone formation and higher spinal fusion rates (11.2±3.7, 80±4.5 at week 4 and 8, respectively) than the poly(L-lactic acid)-HA (PLLA-HA) control group (9.3±2.4 and 71.1±4.4) (p<0.05). The POC-M-click-HA scaffold-fused vertebrates possessed a maximum load and stiffness of 880.8±14.5 N and 843.2±22.4 N/mm, respectively, which were also much higher than those of the PLLA-HA group (maximum: 712.0±37.5 N, stiffness: 622.5±28.4 N/mm, p<0.05). Overall, the results suggest that POC-M-click-HA scaffolds could potentially serve as promising bone grafts for spinal fusion applications. PMID:26213625

  3. In vitro study on the degradation of lithium-doped hydroxyapatite for bone tissue engineering scaffold.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yaping; Yang, Xu; Gu, Zhipeng; Qin, Huanhuan; Li, Li; Liu, Jingwang; Yu, Xixun

    2016-09-01

    Li-doped hydroxyapatite (LiHA) which is prepared through introducing low dose of Li into hydroxyapatite (HA) has been increasingly studied as a bone tissue-engineered scaffold. The degradation properties play a crucial role in the success of long-term implantation of a bone tissue-engineered construct. Herein, the in vitro degradation behaviors of LiHA scaffolds via two approaches were investigated in this study: solution-mediated degradation and osteoblast-mediated degradation. In solution-mediated degradation, after being immersed in simulated body fluid (SBF) for some time, some characteristics of these scaffolds (such as release of ionized lithium and phosphate, pH change, mechanical properties, cytocompatibility and SEM surface characterization) were systematically tested. A similar procedure was also employed to research the degradation behaviors of LiHA scaffolds in osteoblast-mediated degradation. The results suggested that the degradation in SBF and degradation in culture medium with cell existed distinguishing mechanisms. LiHA scaffolds were degraded via a hydrolytic mechanism when they were soaked in SBF. Upon degradation, an apatite precipitation (layer) was formed on the surfaces of scaffolds. While a biological mechanism was presented for the degradation of scaffolds in cell-mediated degradation. Compared with pure HA, LiHA scaffolds had a better effect on the growth of osteoblast cells, meanwhile, the release amount of PO4(3-) in a degradation medium indicated that osteoblasts could accelerate the degradation of LiHA due to the more physiological activities of osteoblast. According to the results from compressive strength test, doping Li into HA could enhance the strength of HA. Moreover, the results from MTT assay and SEM observation showed that the degradation products of LiHA scaffolds were beneficial to the proliferation of osteoblasts. The results of this research can provide the theoretical basis for the clinical application of LiHA scaffolds

  4. In vitro degradation and mechanical properties of PLA-PCL copolymer unit cell scaffolds generated by two-photon polymerization.

    PubMed

    Felfel, R M; Poocza, Leander; Gimeno-Fabra, Miquel; Milde, Tobias; Hildebrand, Gerhard; Ahmed, Ifty; Scotchford, Colin; Sottile, Virginie; Grant, David M; Liefeith, Klaus

    2016-02-01

    The manufacture of 3D scaffolds with specific controlled porous architecture, defined microstructure and an adjustable degradation profile was achieved using two-photon polymerization (TPP) with a size of 2  ×  4  ×  2 mm(3). Scaffolds made from poly(D,L-lactide-co-ɛ-caprolactone) copolymer with varying lactic acid (LA) and ɛ -caprolactone (CL) ratios (LC16:4, 18:2 and 9:1) were generated via ring-opening-polymerization and photoactivation. The reactivity was quantified using photo-DSC, yielding a double bond conversion ranging from 70% to 90%. The pore sizes for all LC scaffolds were see 300 μm and throat sizes varied from 152 to 177 μm. In vitro degradation was conducted at different temperatures; 37, 50 and 65 °C. Change in compressive properties immersed at 37 °C over time was also measured. Variations in thermal, degradation and mechanical properties of the LC scaffolds were related to the LA/CL ratio. Scaffold LC16:4 showed significantly lower glass transition temperature (T g) (4.8 °C) in comparison with the LC 18:2 and 9:1 (see 32 °C). Rates of mass loss for the LC16:4 scaffolds at all temperatures were significantly lower than that for LC18:2 and 9:1. The degradation activation energies for scaffold materials ranged from 82.7 to 94.9 kJ mol(-1). A prediction for degradation time was applied through a correlation between long-term degradation studies at 37 °C and short-term studies at elevated temperatures (50 and 65 °C) using the half-life of mass loss (Time (M1/2)) parameter. However, the initial compressive moduli for LC18:2 and 9:1 scaffolds were 7 to 14 times higher than LC16:4 (see 0.27) which was suggested to be due to its higher CL content (20%). All scaffolds showed a gradual loss in their compressive strength and modulus over time as a result of progressive mass loss over time. The manufacturing process utilized and the scaffolds produced have potential for use in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine

  5. A Porous Tissue Engineering Scaffold Selectively Degraded by Cell-Generated Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Martin, John R.; Gupta, Mukesh K.; Page, Jonathan M.; Yu, Fang; Davidson, Jeffrey M.; Guelcher, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    Biodegradable tissue engineering scaffolds are commonly fabricated from poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) or similar polyesters that degrade by hydrolysis. PLGA hydrolysis generates acidic breakdown products that trigger an accelerated, autocatalytic degradation mechanism that can create mismatched rates of biomaterial breakdown and tissue formation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are key mediators of cell function in both health and disease, especially at sites of inflammation and tissue healing, and induction of inflammation and ROS are natural components of the in vivo response to biomaterial implantation. Thus, polymeric biomaterials that are selectively degraded by cell-generated ROS may have potential for creating tissue engineering scaffolds with better matched rates of tissue in-growth and cell-mediated scaffold biodegradation. To explore this approach, a series of poly(thioketal) (PTK) urethane (PTK-UR) biomaterial scaffolds were synthesized that degrade specifically by an ROS-dependent mechanism. PTK-UR scaffolds had significantly higher compressive moduli than analogous poly(ester urethane) (PEUR) scaffolds formed from hydrolytically-degradable ester-based diols (p < 0.05). Unlike PEUR scaffolds, the PTK-UR scaffolds were stable under aqueous conditions out to 25 weeks but were selectively degraded by ROS, indicating that their biodegradation would be exclusively cell-mediated. The in vitro oxidative degradation rates of the PTK-URs followed first-order degradation kinetics, were significantly dependent on PTK composition (p < 0.05), and correlated to ROS concentration. In subcutaneous rat wounds, PTK-UR scaffolds supported cellular infiltration and granulation tissue formation, followed first-order degradation kinetics over 7 weeks, and produced significantly greater stenting of subcutaneous wounds compared to PEUR scaffolds. These combined results indicate that ROS-degradable PTK-UR tissue engineering scaffolds have significant advantages over analogous

  6. Biocompatibility and degradation of tendon-derived scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Alberti, Kyle A.; Xu, Qiaobing

    2016-01-01

    Decellularized extracellular matrix has often been used as a biomaterial for tissue engineering applications. Its function, once implanted can be crucial to determining whether a tissue engineered construct will be successful, both in terms of how the material breaks down, and how the body reacts to the material’s presence in the first place. Collagen is one of the primary components of extracellular matrix and has been used for a number of biomedical applications. Scaffolds comprised of highly aligned collagen fibrils can be fabricated directly from decellularized tendon using a slicing, stacking, and rolling technique, to create two- and three-dimensional constructs. Here, the degradation characteristics of the material are evaluated in vitro, showing that chemical crosslinking can reduce degradation while maintaining fiber structure. In vivo, non-crosslinked and crosslinked samples are implanted, and their biological response and degradation evaluated through histological sectioning, trichrome staining, and immunohistochemical staining for macrophages. Non-crosslinked samples are rapidly degraded and lose fiber morphology while crosslinked samples retain both macroscopic structure as well as fiber orientation. The cellular response of both materials is also investigated. The in vivo response demonstrates that the decellularized tendon material is biocompatible, biodegradable and can be crosslinked to maintain surface features for extended periods of time in vivo. This study provides material characteristics for the use of decellularized tendon as biomaterial for tissue engineering. PMID:26816651

  7. Evaluating Changes in Structure and Cytotoxicity During In Vitro Degradation of Three-Dimensional Printed Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Martha O.; Piard, Charlotte M.; Melchiorri, Anthony; Dreher, Maureen L.

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the structural, mechanical, and cytocompatibility changes of three-dimensional (3D) printed porous polymer scaffolds during degradation. Three porous scaffold designs were fabricated from a poly(propylene fumarate) (PPF) resin. PPF is a hydrolytically degradable polymer that has been well characterized for applications in bone tissue engineering. Over a 224 day period, scaffolds were hydrolytically degraded and changes in scaffold parameters, such as porosity and pore size, were measured nondestructively using micro-computed tomography. In addition, changes in scaffold mechanical properties were also measured during degradation. Scaffold degradation was verified through decreasing pH and increasing mass loss as well as the formation of micropores and surface channels. Current methods to evaluate polymer cytotoxicity have been well established; however, the ability to evaluate toxicity of an absorbable polymer as it degrades has not been well explored. This study, therefore, also proposes a novel method to evaluate the cytotoxicity of the absorbable scaffolds using a combination of degradation extract, phosphate-buffered saline, and cell culture media. Fibroblasts were incubated with this combination media, and cytotoxicity was evaluated using XTT assay and fluorescence imaging. Cell culture testing demonstrated that the 3D-printed scaffold extracts did not induce significant cell death. In addition, results showed that over a 224 day time period, porous PPF scaffolds provided mechanical stability while degrading. Overall, these results show that degradable, 3D-printed PPF scaffolds are suitable for bone tissue engineering through the use of a novel toxicity during degradation assay. PMID:25627168

  8. Characterization of the Degradation Mechanisms of Lysine-derived Aliphatic Poly(ester urethane) Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Hafeman, Andrea E.; Zienkiewicz, Katarzyna J.; Zachman, Angela L.; Sung, Hak-Joon; Nanney, Lillian B.; Davidson, Jeffrey M.; Guelcher, Scott A.

    2010-01-01

    Characterization of the degradation mechanism of polymeric scaffolds and delivery systems for regenerative medicine is essential to assess their clinical applicability. Key performance criteria include induction of a minimal, transient inflammatory response and controlled degradation to soluble non-cytotoxic breakdown products that are cleared from the body by physiological processes. Scaffolds fabricated from biodegradable poly(ester urethane)s (PEURs) undergo controlled degradation to non-cytotoxic breakdown products and support the ingrowth of new tissue in preclinical models of tissue regeneration. While previous studies have shown that PEUR scaffolds prepared from lysine-derived polyisocyanates degrade faster under in vivo compared to in vitro conditions, the degradation mechanism is not well understood. In this study, we have shown that PEUR scaffolds prepared from lysine triisocyanate (LTI) or a trimer of hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDIt) undergo hydrolytic, esterolytic, and oxidative degradation. Hydrolysis of ester bonds to yield α-hydroxy acids is the dominant mechanism in buffer, and esterolytic media modestly increase the degradation rate. While HDIt scaffolds show a modest (<20%) increase in degradation rate in oxidative medium, LTI scaffolds degrade six times faster in oxidative medium. Furthermore, the in vitro rate of degradation of LTI scaffolds in oxidative medium approximates the in vivo rate in rat excisional wounds, and histological sections show macrophages expressing myeloperoxidase at the material surface. While recent preclinical studies have underscored the potential of injectable PEUR scaffolds and delivery systems for tissue regeneration, this promising class of biomaterials has a limited regulatory history. Elucidation of the macrophage-mediated oxidative mechanism by which LTI scaffolds degrade in vivo provides key insights into the ultimate fate of these materials when injected into the body. PMID:20864156

  9. Characterization of the degradation mechanisms of lysine-derived aliphatic poly(ester urethane) scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Hafeman, Andrea E; Zienkiewicz, Katarzyna J; Zachman, Angela L; Sung, Hak-Joon; Nanney, Lillian B; Davidson, Jeffrey M; Guelcher, Scott A

    2011-01-01

    Characterization of the degradation mechanism of polymeric scaffolds and delivery systems for regenerative medicine is essential to assess their clinical applicability. Key performance criteria include induction of a minimal, transient inflammatory response and controlled degradation to soluble non-cytotoxic breakdown products that are cleared from the body by physiological processes. Scaffolds fabricated from biodegradable poly(ester urethane)s (PEURs) undergo controlled degradation to non-cytotoxic breakdown products and support the ingrowth of new tissue in preclinical models of tissue regeneration. While previous studies have shown that PEUR scaffolds prepared from lysine-derived polyisocyanates degrade faster under in vivo compared to in vitro conditions, the degradation mechanism is not well understood. In this study, we have shown that PEUR scaffolds prepared from lysine triisocyanate (LTI) or a trimer of hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDIt) undergo hydrolytic, esterolytic, and oxidative degradation. Hydrolysis of ester bonds to yield α-hydroxy acids is the dominant mechanism in buffer, and esterolytic media modestly increase the degradation rate. While HDIt scaffolds show a modest (<20%) increase in degradation rate in oxidative medium, LTI scaffolds degrade six times faster in oxidative medium. Furthermore, the in vitro rate of degradation of LTI scaffolds in oxidative medium approximates the in vivo rate in rat excisional wounds, and histological sections show macrophages expressing myeloperoxidase at the material surface. While recent preclinical studies have underscored the potential of injectable PEUR scaffolds and delivery systems for tissue regeneration, this promising class of biomaterials has a limited regulatory history. Elucidation of the macrophage-mediated oxidative mechanism by which LTI scaffolds degrade in vivo provides key insights into the ultimate fate of these materials when injected into the body. PMID:20864156

  10. Degradability, bioactivity, and osteogenesis of biocomposite scaffolds of lithium-containing mesoporous bioglass and mPEG-PLGA-b-PLL copolymer.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yanrong; Guo, Lieping; Shen, Hongxing; An, Xiaofei; Jiang, Hong; Ji, Fang; Niu, Yunfei

    2015-01-01

    Biocomposite scaffolds of lithium (Li)-containing mesoporous bioglass and monomethoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide)-poly(L-lysine) (mPEG-PLGA-b-PLL) copolymer were fabricated in this study. The results showed that the water absorption and degradability of Li-containing mesoporous bioglass/mPEG-PLGA-b-PLL composite (l-MBPC) scaffolds were obviously higher than Li-containing bioglass/mPEG-PLGA-b-PLL composite (l-BPC) scaffolds. Moreover, the apatite-formation ability of l-MBPC scaffolds was markedly enhanced as compared with l-BPC scaffolds, indicating that l-MBPC scaffolds containing mesoporous bioglass exhibited good bioactivity. The cell experimental results showed that cell attachment, proliferation, and alkaline phosphatase activity of MC3T3-E1 cells on l-MBPC scaffolds were remarkably improved as compared to l-BPC scaffolds. In animal experiments, the histological elevation results revealed that l-MBPC scaffolds significantly promoted new bone formation, indicating good osteogenesis. l-MBPC scaffolds with improved properties would be an excellent candidate for bone tissue repair. PMID:26150718

  11. Degradability, bioactivity, and osteogenesis of biocomposite scaffolds of lithium-containing mesoporous bioglass and mPEG-PLGA-b-PLL copolymer

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yanrong; Guo, Lieping; Shen, Hongxing; An, Xiaofei; Jiang, Hong; Ji, Fang; Niu, Yunfei

    2015-01-01

    Biocomposite scaffolds of lithium (Li)-containing mesoporous bioglass and monomethoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide)-poly(L-lysine) (mPEG-PLGA-b-PLL) copolymer were fabricated in this study. The results showed that the water absorption and degradability of Li-containing mesoporous bioglass/mPEG-PLGA-b-PLL composite (l-MBPC) scaffolds were obviously higher than Li-containing bioglass/mPEG-PLGA-b-PLL composite (l-BPC) scaffolds. Moreover, the apatite-formation ability of l-MBPC scaffolds was markedly enhanced as compared with l-BPC scaffolds, indicating that l-MBPC scaffolds containing mesoporous bioglass exhibited good bioactivity. The cell experimental results showed that cell attachment, proliferation, and alkaline phosphatase activity of MC3T3-E1 cells on l-MBPC scaffolds were remarkably improved as compared to l-BPC scaffolds. In animal experiments, the histological elevation results revealed that l-MBPC scaffolds significantly promoted new bone formation, indicating good osteogenesis. l-MBPC scaffolds with improved properties would be an excellent candidate for bone tissue repair. PMID:26150718

  12. A study on the in vitro degradation of poly( l-lactide)/chitosan microspheres scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ning; Cooper, David; Chen, Xiong-Biao; Niu, Catherine Hui

    2013-03-01

    Recent research shows that the addition of chitosan microspheres (CMs) to poly( l-lactide) (PLLA) can result in a composite scaffold material with improved biocompatibility and mechanical properties for tissue engineering applications. However, research regarding the influence of CMs on scaffold degradation is absent in the literature. This paper presents a study on the in vitro degradation of scaffolds made from PLLA with CMs. In this study, the PLLA/CMs scaffolds with a 25% ratio of CMs to PLLA were immersed in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) solution at 37°C for 8 weeks. The in vitro degradation of the scaffolds was investigated using microcomputed tomography (μCT), weight loss analysis, Raman spectroscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Microstructure changes during degradation were monitored using μCT. The μCT results were consistent with the results obtained from Raman spectra and DSC analysis, which reflected that adding CMs into PLLA can decrease the degradation rate compared with pure PLLA scaffolds. The results suggest that PLLA/CMs scaffold degradation can be regulated and controlled to meet requirements imposed a given tissue engineering application.

  13. Synchrotron-Based in Situ Characterization of the Scaffold Mass Loss from Erosion Degradation.

    PubMed

    Bawolin, Nahshon K; Chen, Xiongbaio

    2016-01-01

    The mass loss behavior of degradable tissue scaffolds is critical to their lifespan and other degradation-related properties including mechanical strength and mass transport characteristics. This paper presents a novel method based on synchrotron imaging to characterize the scaffold mass loss from erosion degradation in situ, or without the need of extracting scaffolds once implanted. Specifically, the surface-eroding degradation of scaffolds in a degrading medium was monitored in situ by synchrotron-based imaging; and the time-dependent geometry of scaffolds captured by images was then employed to estimate their mass loss with time, based on the mathematical model that was adopted from the literature of surface erosion with the experimentally-identified model parameters. Acceptable agreement between experimental results and model predictions was observed for scaffolds in a cylindrical shape, made from poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) and polycaprolactone (PCL). This study illustrates that geometry evaluation by synchrotron-based imaging is an effective means to in situ characterize the scaffold mass loss as well as possibly other degradation-related properties. PMID:27399789

  14. Superior Tissue Evolution in Slow-Degrading Scaffolds for Valvular Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Brugmans, Marieke M C P; Soekhradj-Soechit, R Sarita; van Geemen, Daphne; Cox, Martijn; Bouten, Carlijn V C; Baaijens, Frank P T; Driessen-Mol, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic polymers are widely used to fabricate porous scaffolds for the regeneration of cardiovascular tissues. To ensure mechanical integrity, a balance between the rate of scaffold absorption and tissue formation is of high importance. A higher rate of tissue formation is expected in fast-degrading materials than in slow-degrading materials. This could be a result of synthetic cells, which aim to compensate for the fast loss of mechanical integrity of the scaffold by deposition of collagen fibers. Here, we studied the effect of fast-degrading polyglycolic acid scaffolds coated with poly-4-hydroxybutyrate (PGA-P4HB) and slow-degrading poly-ɛ-caprolactone (PCL) scaffolds on amount of tissue, composition, and mechanical characteristics in time, and compared these engineered values with values for native human heart valves. Electrospun PGA-P4HB and PCL scaffolds were either kept unseeded in culture or were seeded with human vascular-derived cells. Tissue formation, extracellular matrix (ECM) composition, remaining scaffold weight, tissue-to-scaffold weight ratio, and mechanical properties were analyzed every week up to 6 weeks. Mass of unseeded PCL scaffolds remained stable during culture, whereas PGA-P4HB scaffolds degraded rapidly. When seeded with cells, both scaffold types demonstrated increasing amounts of tissue with time, which was more pronounced for PGA-P4HB-based tissues during the first 2 weeks; however, PCL-based tissues resulted in the highest amount of tissue after 6 weeks. This study is the first to provide insight into the tissue-to-scaffold weight ratio, therewith allowing for a fair comparison between engineered tissues cultured on scaffolds as well as between native heart valve tissues. Although the absolute amount of ECM components differed between the engineered tissues, the ratio between ECM components was similar after 6 weeks. PCL-based tissues maintained their shape, whereas the PGA-P4HB-based tissues deformed during culture. After 6 weeks

  15. Macroporous photocrosslinked elastomer scaffolds containing microposity: preparation and in vitro degradation properties.

    PubMed

    Ilagan, Bernadette G; Amsden, Brian G

    2010-04-01

    The engineering of soft tissue would benefit from the development of effective biodegradable scaffolds capable of dynamic, elastic loading. For this purpose, highly porous, elastomeric scaffolds containing microporous struts were prepared using a dual porogen approach and a photocrosslinkable elastomer. The combination of paraffin microbeads distributed through a water-in-[star-poly(lactide-co-epsilon-caprolactone) triacrylate dissolved in ethyl acetate] emulsion followed by photocrosslinking generated a macroporous foam scaffold of average porosities between 90% to 93%, with an average pore diameter of 104 +/- 31 microm with struts containing micropores of 3.1 +/- 2 microm average diameter. The mechanical properties of the scaffolds were readily manipulatable by altering the molecular weight of the star-poly(lactide-co-epsilon-caprolactone) triacrylate prepolymer used. The elastomer scaffolds degraded at the same rate as nonporous polymer samples of the same molecular weight, and exhibited similar changes in mass loss, mechanical properties, and sol fraction during in vitro degradation as found with the nonporous scaffolds. The modulus and stress at break of the scaffolds decreased continuously during degradation while the strain at break remained constant. These scaffolds show potential for use in the engineering of soft tissues. PMID:19544482

  16. Near-Infrared Fluorescence Imaging for Noninvasive Trafficking of Scaffold Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soon Hee; Lee, Jeong Heon; Hyun, Hoon; Ashitate, Yoshitomo; Park, GwangLi; Robichaud, Kyle; Lunsford, Elaine; Lee, Sang Jin; Khang, Gilson; Choi, Hak Soo

    2013-01-01

    Biodegradable scaffolds could revolutionize tissue engineering and regenerative medicine; however, in vivo matrix degradation and tissue ingrowth processes are not fully understood. Currently a large number of samples and animals are required to track biodegradation of implanted scaffolds, and such nonconsecutive single-time-point information from various batches result in inaccurate conclusions. To overcome this limitation, we developed functional biodegradable scaffolds by employing invisible near-infrared fluorescence and followed their degradation behaviors in vitro and in vivo. Using optical fluorescence imaging, the degradation could be quantified in real-time, while tissue ingrowth was tracked by measuring vascularization using magnetic resonance imaging in the same animal over a month. Moreover, we optimized the in vitro process of enzyme-based biodegradation to predict implanted scaffold behaviors in vivo, which was closely related to the site of inoculation. This combined multimodal imaging will benefit tissue engineers by saving time, reducing animal numbers, and offering more accurate conclusions. PMID:23386968

  17. Effects of surface area to volume ratio of PLGA scaffolds with different architectures on scaffold degradation characteristics and drug release kinetics.

    PubMed

    Chew, Sue Anne; Arriaga, Marco A; Hinojosa, Victor A

    2016-05-01

    In this work, PLGA scaffolds with different architectures were fabricated to investigate the effects of surface area to volume ratio (SVR) (which resulted from the different architectures) on scaffold degradation characteristics and drug release kinetics with minocycline as the model drug. It was hypothesized that the thin strand scaffolds, which had the highest SVR, would degrade faster than the thick strand and globular scaffolds as the increase in surface area will allow more contact between water molecules and degradable ester groups in the polymer. However, it was found that globular scaffolds, which had the lowest SVR, resulted in the fastest degradation which demonstrated that the amount of degradation of the scaffolds does not only depend on the SVR but also on other factors such as the retention of acidic degradation byproducts in the scaffold and scaffold porosity. PLGA 50 : 50 globular scaffolds resulted in a biphasic release profile, with a burst release in the beginning and the middle of the release study which may be beneficial for some drug delivery applications. A clear correlation between SVR and release rates was not observed, indicating that besides the availability of more surface area for drug to diffuse out of the polymer matrix, other factors such as amount of scaffold degradation and scaffold porosity may play a role in determining drug release kinetics. Further studies, such as scanning electron microscopy, need to be performed in the future to further evaluate the porosity, morphology and structure of the scaffolds. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1202-1211, 2016. PMID:26780154

  18. An animal experimental study of porous magnesium scaffold degradation and osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Y.J.; Yang, Z.Y.; Tan, L.L.; Li, H.; Zhang, Y.Z.

    2014-01-01

    Our objective was to observe the biodegradable and osteogenic properties of magnesium scaffolding under in vivo conditions. Twelve 6-month-old male New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into two groups. The chosen operation site was the femoral condyle on the right side. The experimental group was implanted with porous magnesium scaffolds, while the control group was implanted with hydroxyapatite scaffolds. X-ray and blood tests, which included serum magnesium, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), creatinine (CREA), and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) were performed serially at 1, 2, and 3 weeks, and 1, 2, and 3 months. All rabbits were killed 3 months postoperatively, and the heart, kidney, spleen, and liver were analyzed with hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining. The bone samples were subjected to microcomputed tomography scanning (micro-CT) and hard tissue biopsy. SPSS 13.0 (USA) was used for data analysis, and values of P<0.05 were considered to be significant. Bubbles appeared in the X-ray of the experimental group after 2 weeks, whereas there was no gas in the control group. There were no statistical differences for the serum magnesium concentrations, ALT, BUN, and CREA between the two groups (P>0.05). All HE-stained slices were normal, which suggested good biocompatibility of the scaffold. Micro-CT showed that magnesium scaffolds degraded mainly from the outside to inside, and new bone was ingrown following the degradation of magnesium scaffolds. The hydroxyapatite scaffold was not degraded and had fewer osteoblasts scattered on its surface. There was a significant difference in the new bone formation and scaffold bioabsorption between the two groups (9.29±1.27 vs 1.40±0.49 and 7.80±0.50 vs 0.00±0.00 mm3, respectively; P<0.05). The magnesium scaffold performed well in degradation and osteogenesis, and is a promising material for orthopedics. PMID:25098717

  19. Viscoelastic, physical, and bio-degradable properties of dermal scaffolds and related cell behaviour.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vaibhav; Patel, Nimesha; Kohli, Nupur; Ravindran, Nivedita; Hook, Lilian; Mason, Chris; García-Gareta, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Dermal scaffolds promote healing of debilitating skin injuries caused by burns and chronic skin conditions. Currently available products present disadvantages and therefore, there is still a clinical need for developing new dermal substitutes. This study aimed at comparing the viscoelastic, physical and bio-degradable properties of two dermal scaffolds, the collagen-based and clinically well established Integra(®) and a novel fibrin-based dermal scaffold developed at our laboratory called Smart Matrix(®), to further evaluate our previous published findings that suggested a higher influx of cells, reduced wound contraction and less scarring for Smart Matrix(®) when used in vivo. Rheological results showed that Integra(®) (G'  =  313.74 kPa) is mechanically stronger than Smart Matrix(®) (G'  =  8.26 kPa), due to the presence of the silicone backing layer in Integra(®). Micro-pores were observed on both dermal scaffolds, although nano-pores as well as densely packed nano-fibres were only observed for Smart Matrix(®). Average surface roughness was higher for Smart Matrix(®) (Sa  =  114.776 nm) than for Integra(®) (Sa  =  75.565 nm). Both scaffolds possess a highly porous structure (80-90%) and display a range of pore micro-sizes that represent the actual in vivo scenario. In vitro proteolytic bio-degradation suggested that Smart Matrix(®) would degrade faster upon implantation in vivo than Integra(®). For both scaffolds, the enzymatic digestion occurs via bulk degradation. These observed differences could affect cell behaviour on both scaffolds. Our results suggest that fine-tuning of scaffolds' viscoelastic, physical and bio-degradable properties can maximise cell behaviour in terms of attachment, proliferation and infiltration, which are essential for tissue repair. PMID:27586397

  20. [Effect of processing parameters on the degradation of calcium polyphosphate bioceramic for bone tissue scaffolds].

    PubMed

    Qin, Yingjie; Yu, Xixun; Chen, Yuanwei; Ding, Yulong; Wan, Changxiu

    2007-08-01

    This study was undertaken to elucidate the degradation regularity of calcium polyphosphate (CPP) scaffolds with different preparation parameters. CPP scaffolds with different main crystalline phases were prepared by controlling the particle size of the calcining stuff and the calcining heat. Specimens were soaked into Tris-buffer solution and simulated body fluid (SBF) for 60 days. Results show: alpha-CPP degrades faster than does beta-CPP, and beta-CPP degrades faster than does gamma-CPP; the lower the sinter temperature, the better the degradation of CPP morever, the degradation rate of CPP is inversely proportional to the original particle size. These data suggest that crystal type, sinter temperature and particle size influence the degradation rate of CPP markedly. PMID:17899747

  1. Degradability, cytocompatibility, and osteogenesis of porous scaffolds of nanobredigite and PCL–PEG–PCL composite

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Jun; Fan, Donghui; Zhao, Lingming; Yu, Baoqin; Su, Jiacan; Wei, Jie; Shin, Jung-Woog

    2016-01-01

    Biocomposite scaffolds were fabricated by incorporation of nanobredigite (n-BD) into the polymer of poly(ε-caprolactone)–poly(ethyleneglycol)–poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL–PEG–PCL). The results revealed that the addition of n-BD into PCL–PEG–PCL significantly improved water absorption, compressive strength, and degradability of the scaffolds of n-BD/PCL–PEG–PCL composite (n-BPC) compared with PCL–PEG–PCL scaffolds alone. In addition, the proliferation and alkaline phosphatase activity of MG63 cells cultured on n-BPC scaffolds were obviously higher than that cultured on PCL–PEG–PCL scaffolds. Moreover, the results of the histological evaluation from the animal model revealed that the n-BPC scaffolds significantly improved new bone formation compared with the PCL–PEG–PCL scaffolds, indicating good osteogenesis. The n-BPC scaffolds with good biocompatibility could stimulate cell proliferation, differentiation, and bone tissue regeneration and would be an excellent candidate for bone defect repair. PMID:27555774

  2. Data for accelerated degradation of calcium phosphate surface-coated polycaprolactone and polycaprolactone/bioactive glass composite scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Poh, Patrina S.P.; Hutmacher, Dietmar W.; Holzapfel, Boris M.; Solanki, Anu K.; Woodruff, Maria A.

    2016-01-01

    Polycaprolactone (PCL)-based composite scaffolds containing 50 wt% of 45S5 bioactive glass (45S5) or strontium-substituted bioactive glass (SrBG) particles were fabricated into scaffolds using melt-extrusion based additive manufacturing technique. Additionally, the PCL scaffolds were surface coated with a layer of calcium phosphate (CaP). For a comparison of the scaffold degradation, the scaffolds were then subjected to in vitro accelerated degradation by immersion in 5 M sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution for up to 7 days. The scaffold׳s morphology was observed by means of SEM imaging and scaffold mass loss was recorded over the experimental period. PMID:27081669

  3. Data for accelerated degradation of calcium phosphate surface-coated polycaprolactone and polycaprolactone/bioactive glass composite scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Poh, Patrina S P; Hutmacher, Dietmar W; Holzapfel, Boris M; Solanki, Anu K; Woodruff, Maria A

    2016-06-01

    Polycaprolactone (PCL)-based composite scaffolds containing 50 wt% of 45S5 bioactive glass (45S5) or strontium-substituted bioactive glass (SrBG) particles were fabricated into scaffolds using melt-extrusion based additive manufacturing technique. Additionally, the PCL scaffolds were surface coated with a layer of calcium phosphate (CaP). For a comparison of the scaffold degradation, the scaffolds were then subjected to in vitro accelerated degradation by immersion in 5 M sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution for up to 7 days. The scaffold׳s morphology was observed by means of SEM imaging and scaffold mass loss was recorded over the experimental period. PMID:27081669

  4. In vivo biocompatibilty and degradation behavior of elastic poly(L-lactide-co-epsilon-caprolactone) scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Sung In; Kim, Byung-Soo; Kang, Sun Woong; Kwon, Jae Hyun; Lee, Young Moo; Kim, Soo Hyun; Kim, Young Ha

    2004-12-01

    Tubular scaffolds were fabricated from very elastic poly(L-lactide-co-epsilon-caprolactone) (PLCL, 50:50). The scaffolds were seeded with smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and implanted in nude mice to investigate the tissue compatibility and in vivo degradation behavior. Histological examination of all the implants with haematoxylin and eosin staining, masson trichrome staining, SM alpha-actin antibody, and CM-DiI labeling confirmed that the regular morphology and biofunction of the SMCs seeded and the expression of the vascular smooth muscle matrices in PLCL scaffolds. The implanted PLCL scaffolds displayed a slow degradation on time, where caprolactone units were faster degraded than lactide did. This could be explained by the fact that amorphous regions composed of mainly CL moieties degraded earlier than hard domains where most of the LA units were located. From these results, the scaffolds applied in this study were found to exhibit excellent tissue compatibility to SMCs and might be very useful for vascular tissue engineering. PMID:15183608

  5. Degradation and biocompatibility of porous nano-hydroxyapatite/polyurethane composite scaffold for bone tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Zhihong; Li, Yubao; Zou, Qin

    2009-04-01

    Porous scaffold containing 30 wt% nano-hydroxyapatite (n-HA) and 70 wt% polyurethane (PU) from castor oil was prepared by a foaming method and investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared absorption (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. The results show that n-HA particles disperse homogeneously in the PU matrix. The porous scaffold has not only macropores of 100-800 μm in size but also a lot of micropores on the walls of macropores. The porosity and compressive strength of scaffold are 80% and 271 kPa, respectively. After soaking in simulated body fluid (SBF), hydrolysis and deposition partly occur on the scaffold. The biological evaluation in vitro and in vivo shows that the n-HA/PU scaffold is non-cytotoxic and degradable. The porous structure provides a good microenvironment for cell adherence, growth and proliferation. The n-HA/PU composite scaffold can be satisfied with the basic requirement for tissue engineering, and has the potential to be applied in repair and substitute of human menisci of the knee-joint and articular cartilage.

  6. Synthesis and fabrication of a degradable poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide) scaffold for tissue engineering applications

    PubMed Central

    Galperin, Anna; Long, Thomas J.; Garty, Shai; Ratner, Buddy D.

    2013-01-01

    Biodegradable poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide) (poly-NIPAM) hydrogels with controlled molecular weight of the parent polymer and its degradation products were synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization in the presence of a polycaprolactone-based di-chlorinated macroinitiator and polycaprolactone dimethacrylate. The phase transition temperature, swelling, hydrolytic degradability, and mechanical properties at 25 and 37°C were explored. A cytocompatibility study showed good NIH3T3 cell response over 5 days culture on the surface of the hydrogels, demonstrated by a consistent increase in cell proliferation detected by an Alamar Blue assay. MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazo-lium bromide] results suggested that the hydrogels and their degradation products in the concentration range of 1–25 mg/ mL were not cytotoxic to NIH3T3 cells. A sphere-templating technique was utilized to fabricate biodegradable polyNIPAM scaffolds with monodisperse, pore size. Scaffolds with pore diameter of 48 ± 6 μm were loaded with A-10 smooth muscle cells and then warmed to 37°C entrapping cells in pores approximately 40 μm in diameter, a size we have found to be optimal for angiogenesis and biointegration. Due to their degradable nature, tunable molecular weight, highly interconnected morphology, thermally controlled monodisperse pore size, and temperature-induced volume expansion–contraction, the polyNIPAM-based scaffolds developed in this work will be valuable in tissue engineering. PMID:22961921

  7. Culture & differentiation of mesenchymal stem cell into osteoblast on degradable biomedical composite scaffold: In vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Krishan G.; Mohanty, Sujata; Ray, Alok R.; Malhotra, Rajesh; Airan, Balram

    2015-01-01

    degradable 3D composite may have great potential to be used as scaffold in bone tissue engineering. PMID:26831424

  8. Interface degradation in CAS/Nicalon during elevated temperature aging

    SciTech Connect

    Plucknett, K.P.; Cain, R.L.; Lewis, M.H.

    1995-03-01

    A CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2} (CAS)/Nicalon glass-ceramic matrix composite has been subjected to elevated temperature oxidation heat-treatments between 375 and 1200{degrees}C, for up to 100 hours. Micro- and macro-mechanical properties have been determined by fiber push-down, using a mechanical properties microprobe, and flexure testing, respectively. Aging between 450 and 800{degrees}C results in significant property degradation, with reduced bending modulus and flexure strength, increased fiber sliding stress, and a transition to a purely brittle failure mode. Aging degradation is due to oxidative removal of the carbon interlayer, with the subsequent formation of a silica bond between fiber and matrix. At higher temperatures, carbon is retained due to the formation of a protective silica plug at exposed fiber ends, with the subsequent retention of composite properties. Short duration pre-treatment schedules, at 1000 or 1100{degrees}C, were developed to prevent intermediate temperature property degradation.

  9. Surface modification of PCL-TCP scaffolds in rabbit calvaria defects: Evaluation of scaffold degradation profile, biomechanical properties and bone healing patterns.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Alvin; Wong, Wah Jie; Teoh, Swee-Hin

    2010-06-15

    Traditionally, polycaprolactone (PCL) based scaffolds tend to degrade at a slow rate. Pretreatment of polycaprolactone-20% tricalcium phosphate (PCL-TCP) scaffolds under alkaline conditions can be utilized to increase the degradation rate and improve mechanical properties. Three groups of PCL-TCP scaffolds with varying pretreatment exposures with sodium hydroxide (NaOH) were studied in a rabbit calvaria defect model and analyzed at 2, 4, 8, 12, and 24 weeks. (Group A: Untreated, Group B: 3 M NaOH/ 48 h and Group C: 3 M NaOH/96 h). Micro-CT analysis demonstrated that scaffolds with increased surface roughness (Groups B and C) showed a greater impact on the overall volume loss during the early healing period between 2 and 8 weeks as compared to the untreated group. In addition, greater bone formation was detected in NaOH treated scaffolds as compared to the untreated group throughout the experiment. Scaffolds with increased surface roughness generally reported higher push out test and compressive strength values from 4 to 8 weeks of early healing. Interestingly, the mechanical properties displayed a decline in values from 12 weeks onwards in the modified groups suggesting a favorable breakdown or weakening of PCL-TCP scaffolds tailored for replacement by new bone formation. PMID:19911382

  10. Degradable glycine-based photo-polymerizable polyphosphazenes for use as scaffolds for tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Rothemund, Sandra; Aigner, Tamara B; Iturmendi, Aitziber; Rigau, Maria; Husár, Branislav; Hildner, Florian; Oberbauer, Eleni; Prambauer, Martina; Olawale, Gbenga; Forstner, Reinhard; Liska, Robert; Schröder, Klaus R; Brüggemann, Oliver; Teasdale, Ian

    2015-03-01

    Photo-polymerizable scaffolds are designed and prepared via short chain poly(organo)phosphazene building blocks bearing glycine allylester moieties. The polyphosphazene was combined with a trifunctional thiol and divinylester in various ratios, followed by thiol-ene photo-polymerization to obtain porous matrices. Degradation studies under aqueous conditions showed increasing rates in correlation with the polyphosphazene content. Preliminary cell studies show the non-cytotoxic nature of the polymers and their degradation products, as well as the cell adhesion and proliferation of adipose-derived stem cells. PMID:25355036

  11. Surfactant tuning of hydrophilicity of porous degradable copolymer scaffolds promotes cellular proliferation and enhances bone formation.

    PubMed

    Yassin, Mohammed A; Leknes, Knut N; Sun, Yang; Lie, Stein A; Finne-Wistrand, Anna; Mustafa, Kamal

    2016-08-01

    Poly(l-lactide-co-ɛ-caprolactone) (poly(LLA-co-CL)) has been blended with Tween 80 to tune the material properties and optimize cell-material interactions. Accordingly, the aims of this study were fourfold: to evaluate the effect of low concentrations of Tween 80 on the surface microstructure of 3D poly(LLA-co-CL) porous scaffolds: to determine the effect of different concentrations of Tween 80 on proliferation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in vitro under dynamic cell culture at 7 and 21 days; to assess the influence of Tween 80 on the degradation rate of poly(LLA-co-CL) at 7 and 21 days; and in a subcutaneous rat model, to evaluate the effect on bone formation of porous scaffolds modified with 3% Tween 80 at 2 and 8 weeks. Blending 3% (w/w) Tween 80 with poly(LLA-co-CL) improves the surface wettability (p < 0.001). Poly(LLA-co-CL)/3% Tween 80 shows significantly increased cellular proliferation at days 7 and 21 (p < 0.001). Moreover, the presence of Tween 80 facilitates the degradation of poly(LLA-co-CL). Two weeks post-implantation, the poly(LLA-co-CL)/3% Tween 80 scaffolds exhibit significant mRNA expression of Runx2 (p = 0.004). After 8 weeks, poly(LLA-co-CL)/3% Tween 80 scaffolds show significantly increased de novo bone formation, demonstrated by μ-CT (p = 0.0133) and confirmed histologically. It can be concluded that blending 3% (w/w) Tween 80 with poly (LLA-co-CL) improves the hydrophilicity and osteogenic potential of the scaffolds. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2049-2059, 2016. PMID:27086867

  12. Degradable poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate)-co-polycaprolactone Hydrogels for Tissue Engineering Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Atzet, Sarah; Curtin, Scott; Trinh, Phalen; Bryant, Stephanie

    2009-01-01

    Biodegradable poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) hydrogels for engineered tissue constructs were developed using atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP), a degradable crosslinker and a macroinitiator. Hydrogels are appropriate materials for tissue engineering scaffolds due to their tissue-like mechanical compliance and mass transfer properties. However, many hydrogels that have seen wide application in medicine are not biodegradable or cannot be easily cleared from the body. Poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (pHEMA) was selected for the scaffold material due to its reasonable mechanical strength, elasticity, long history of successful use in medicine and because it can be easily fabricated into numerous configurations. pHEMA was studied at various molecular weights between 2 kDa and 50 kDa. The molecular weight range suitable for renal clearance was an important factor in the experimental design. The fabricated hydrogels contain oligomeric blocks of polycaprolactone (PCL), a hydrolytically and enzymatically degradable polymer, as a crosslinking agent. In addition a degradable macroinitiator also containing oligomeric PCL was used to initiate the ATRP. The chain length, crosslink density, and polymerization solvent were found to greatly affect the mechanical properties of the pHEMA hydrogels. Degradation of the pHEMA hydrogels was characterized using 0.007 M NaOH, lipase solutions and phosphate buffered saline. Mass loss, swelling ratio and tensile modulus were evaluated. Degradation products from the sodium hydroxide were measured using gel permeation chromatography (GPC) to verify the polymer lengths and polydispersity. Erosion was only observed in the sodium hydroxide and lipase solutions. However, swelling ratio and tensile modulus indicate bulk degradation in all PCL containing samples. Degradable hydrogels in enzymatic solutions showed 30% mass loss in 16 weeks. Initial cell toxicity studies indicate no adverse cellular response to the hydrogels or their

  13. Degradable poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate)-co-polycaprolactone hydrogels for tissue engineering scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Atzet, Sarah; Curtin, Scott; Trinh, Phalen; Bryant, Stephanie; Ratner, Buddy

    2008-12-01

    Biodegradable poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate)(pHEMA) hydrogels for engineered tissue constructs were developed by the use of atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP), a degradable cross-linker, and a macroinitiator. Hydrogels are appropriate materials for tissue engineering scaffolds because of their tissue-like mechanical compliance and mass transfer properties. However, many hydrogels that have seen wide application in medicine are not biodegradable or cannot be easily cleared from the body. pHEMA was selected for the scaffold material because of its reasonable mechanical strength, elasticity, and long history of successful use in medicine as well as because it can be easily fabricated into numerous configurations. pHEMA was studied at various molecular weights between 2 and 50 kDa. The molecular weight range suitable for renal clearance was an important factor in the experimental design. The fabricated hydrogels contain oligomeric blocks of polycaprolactone (PCL), a hydrolytically and enzymatically degradable polymer, as a cross-linking agent. In addition, a degradable macroinitiator that also contained oligomeric PCL was used to initiate the ATRP. The chain length, cross-link density, and polymerization solvent were found to affect the mechanical properties of the pHEMA hydrogels. Degradation of the pHEMA hydrogels was characterized by the use of 0.007 M NaOH, lipase solutions, and phosphate-buffered saline. The mass loss, swelling ratio, and tensile modulus were evaluated. Degradation products after sodium hydroxide treatment were measured by the use of gel permeation chromatography (GPC) to verify the polymer lengths and polydispersity. Erosion was observed in only the sodium hydroxide and lipase solutions. However, the swelling ratio and tensile modulus indicate bulk degradation in all PCL-containing samples. Degradable hydrogels in enzymatic solutions showed 30% mass loss in 16 weeks. Initial cell toxicity studies indicate no adverse cellular response

  14. A Degradable, Thermo-sensitive Poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide)-Based Scaffold with Controlled Porosity for Tissue Engineering Applications

    PubMed Central

    Galperin, Anna; Long, Thomas J.; Ratner, Buddy D.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a thermoresponsive poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide)-based scaffold with degradability and controlled porosity. Biodegradable poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide) hydrogels were synthesized by photo-copolymerization of N-isopropylacrylamide with 2-methylene-1,3-dioxepane and polycaprolactone dimethacrylate. The hydrogels’ phase transition temperature, swelling and viscoelastic properties, as well as hydrolytic degradability at 25 and 37°C, were explored. A sphere-templating technique was applied to fabricate hydrogel scaffolds with controllable pore size and a highly interconnected porous structure. The scaffold pore diameter change as a function of temperature was evaluated and, as expected, pores decreased in diameter when the temperature was raised to 37°C. 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) test results suggested neither the scaffolds nor their degradation products were cytotoxic to NIH3T3 cells. Scaffolds with 55±5 μm pore diameter were loaded with NIH3T3 cells and then were warmed to 37°C entrapping cells in pores approximately 39 μm in diameter, a size range we have found to be optimal for angiogenesis and biointegration. Cells showed uniform infiltration and an elongated morphology after 7 days of culture. Due to the controlled monodisperse pore diameter, highly interconnected architecture, fully degradable chemistry and thermoresponsive properties, the polyNIPAM-based scaffolds developed here are attractive for applications in tissue engineering. PMID:20836521

  15. Silicate, borosilicate, and borate bioactive glass scaffolds with controllable degradation rate for bone tissue engineering applications. I. Preparation and in vitro degradation.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiang; Rahaman, Mohamed N; Fu, Hailuo; Liu, Xin

    2010-10-01

    Bioactive glass scaffolds with a microstructure similar to that of dry human trabecular bone but with three different compositions were evaluated for potential applications in bone repair. The preparation of the scaffolds and the effect of the glass composition on the degradation and conversion of the scaffolds to a hydroxyapatite (HA)-type material in a simulated body fluid (SBF) are reported here (Part I). The in vitro response of osteogenic cells to the scaffolds and the in vivo evaluation of the scaffolds in a rat subcutaneous implantation model are described in Part II. Scaffolds (porosity = 78-82%; pore size = 100-500 microm) were prepared using a polymer foam replication technique. The glasses consisted of a silicate (13-93) composition, a borosilicate composition (designated 13-93B1), and a borate composition (13-93B3), in which one-third or all of the SiO2 content of 13-93 was replaced by B2O3, respectively. The conversion rate of the scaffolds to HA in the SBF increased markedly with the B2O3 content of the glass. Concurrently, the pH of the SBF also increased with the B2O3 content of the scaffolds. The compressive strengths of the as-prepared scaffolds (5-11 MPa) were in the upper range of values reported for trabecular bone, but they decreased markedly with immersion time in the SBF and with increasing B2O3 content of the glass. The results show that scaffolds with a wide range of bioactivity and degradation rate can be achieved by replacing varying amounts of SiO(2) in silicate bioactive glass with B2O3. PMID:20544804

  16. Calcium sulfate spinal cord scaffold: a study on degradation and fibroblast growth factor 1 loading and release.

    PubMed

    Åberg, Jonas; Eriksson, Olof; Spens, Erika; Nordblom, Jonathan; Mattsson, Per; Sjödahl, Johan; Svensson, Mikael; Engqvist, Håkan

    2012-02-01

    Currently, there is no regenerative strategy for the spinal cord that is part of clinical standard of core. Current paths usually include combinations of scaffold materials and active molecules. In a recent study, a permanent dental resin scaffold for treatment of spinal cord injury was designed. The results from studies on rats were promising. However, for potential clinical use, a biodegradable scaffold material that facilitates drug delivery and the regeneration of the spinal cord needs to be developed. Also a biodegradable material is expected to allow a better evaluation of the efficacy of the surgical method. In this article, the suitability of hardened calcium sulfate cement (CSC) for use as degradable spinal cord scaffolds is investigated in bench studies and in vitro studies. Compressive strength, degradation and microstructure, and the loading capability of heparin-activated fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF1) via soaking were evaluated. The CSC could easily be injected into the scaffold mold and the obtained scaffolds had sufficient strength to endure the loads applied during surgery. When hardened, the CSC formed a porous microstructure suitable for loading of active substances. It was shown that 10 min of FGF1 soaking was enough to obtain a sustained active FGF1 release for 20-35 days. The results showed that CSC is a promising material for spinal cord scaffold fabrication, since it is biodegradable, has sufficient strength, and allows loading and controlled release of active FGF1. PMID:20624845

  17. Monocyte/macrophage cytokine activity regulates vascular smooth muscle cell function within a degradable polyurethane scaffold.

    PubMed

    Battiston, K G; Ouyang, B; Labow, R S; Simmons, C A; Santerre, J P

    2014-03-01

    Tissue engineering strategies rely on the ability to promote cell proliferation and migration into porous biomaterial constructs, as well as to support specific phenotypic states of the cells in vitro. The present study investigated the use of released factors from monocytes and their derived macrophages (MDM) and the mechanism by which they regulate vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) response in a VSMC-monocyte co-culture system within a porous degradable polyurethane (D-PHI) scaffold. VSMCs cultured in monocyte/MDM-conditioned medium (MCM), generated from the culture of monocytes/MDM on D-PHI scaffolds for up to 28 days, similarly affected VSMC contractile marker expression, growth and three-dimensional migration when compared to direct VSMC-monocyte co-culture. Monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were identified as two cytokines present in MCM, at concentrations that have previously been shown to influence VSMC phenotype. VSMCs cultured alone on D-PHI scaffolds and exposed to MCP-1 (5 ng ml(-1)) or IL-6 (1 ng ml(-1)) for 7 days experienced a suppression in contractile marker expression (with MCP-1 or IL-6) and increased growth (with MCP-1) compared to no cytokine medium supplementation. These effects were also observed in VSMC-monocyte co-culture on D-PHI. Neutralization of IL-6, but not MCP-1, was subsequently shown to decrease VSMC growth and enhance calponin expression for VSMC-monocyte co-cultures on D-PHI scaffolds for 7 days, implying that IL-6 mediates VSMC response in monocyte-VSMC co-cultures. This study highlights the use of monocytes and their derived macrophages in conjunction with immunomodulatory biomaterials, such as D-PHI, as agents for regulating VSMC response, and demonstrates the importance of monocyte/MDM-released factors, such as IL-6 in particular, in this process. PMID:24361424

  18. Factors Controlling Elevated Temperature Strength Degradation of Silicon Carbide Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    For 5 years, the cooperative agreement NCC3-763 has focused on the development and understanding of Sic-based composites. Most of the work was performed in the area of SiC fiber-reinforced composites for UEET and NGLT and in collaboration with Goodrich Corporation under a partially reimbursable Space Act Agreement. A smaller amount of work was performed on C fiber-reinforced SiC matrix composites for NGLT. Major accomplishments during this agreement included: Improvements to the interphase used in melt-infiltrated (MI) SiC/SiC composites which increases the life under stressed-oxidation at intermediate temperatures referred to as "outside-debonding". This concept is currently in the patent process and received a Space Act Award. Mechanistic-based models of intermediate temperature degradation for MI SiC/SiC Quantification and relatively robust relationships for matrix crack evolution under stress in SiC/SiC composites which serve as the basis for stress-strain and elevated temperature life models The furthering of acoustic emission as a useful tool in composite damage evolution and the extension of the technique to other composite systems Development of hybrid C-SiC fiber-reinforced SiC matrix composites Numerous presentations at conferences, industry partners, and government centers and publications in recognized proceedings and journals. Other recognition of the author's accomplishments by NASA with a TGIR award (2004), NASA's Medal for Public Service (2004), and The American Ceramic Society s Richard M. Fulrath Award (2005). The following will briefly describe the work of the past five years in the three areas of interest: SiC/SiC composite development, mechanistic understanding and modeling of SiC/SiC composites, and environmental durability of C/SiC composites. More detail can be found in the publications cited at the end of this report.

  19. Rapid fabrication of poly(DL-lactide) nanofiber scaffolds with tunable degradation for tissue engineering applications by air-brushing

    PubMed Central

    Behrens, Adam M; Kim, Jeffrey; Hotaling, Nathan; Seppala, Jonathan E; Kofinas, Peter; Tutak, Wojtek

    2016-01-01

    Polymer nanofiber based materials have been widely investigated for use as tissue engineering scaffolds. While promising, these materials are typically fabricated through techniques that require significant time or cost. Here we report a rapid and cost effective air-brushing method for fabricating nanofiber scaffolds using a simple handheld apparatus, compressed air, and a polymer solution. Air-brushing also facilities control over the scaffold degradation rate without adversely impacting architecture. This was accomplished through a one step blending process of high (Mw ≈ 100 000 g mol−1) and low (Mw ≈ 25 000 g mol−1) molecular weight poly(DL-lactide) (PDLLA) polymers at various ratios (100:0, 70:30 and 50:50). Through this approach, we were able to control fiber scaffold degradation rate while maintaining similar fiber morphology, scaffold porosity, and bulk mechanical properties across all of the tested compositions. The impact of altered degradation rates was biologically evaluated in human bone marrow stromal cell (hBMSC) cultures for up to 16 days and demonstrated degradation rate dependence of both total DNA concentration and gene regulation. PMID:27121660

  20. Rapid fabrication of poly(DL-lactide) nanofiber scaffolds with tunable degradation for tissue engineering applications by air-brushing.

    PubMed

    Behrens, Adam M; Kim, Jeffrey; Hotaling, Nathan; Seppala, Jonathan E; Kofinas, Peter; Tutak, Wojtek

    2016-01-01

    Polymer nanofiber based materials have been widely investigated for use as tissue engineering scaffolds. While promising, these materials are typically fabricated through techniques that require significant time or cost. Here we report a rapid and cost effective air-brushing method for fabricating nanofiber scaffolds using a simple handheld apparatus, compressed air, and a polymer solution. Air-brushing also facilities control over the scaffold degradation rate without adversely impacting architecture. This was accomplished through a one step blending process of high (M w  ≈  100 000 g mol(-1)) and low (M w  ≈  25 000 g mol(-1)) molecular weight poly(DL-lactide) (PDLLA) polymers at various ratios (100:0, 70:30 and 50:50). Through this approach, we were able to control fiber scaffold degradation rate while maintaining similar fiber morphology, scaffold porosity, and bulk mechanical properties across all of the tested compositions. The impact of altered degradation rates was biologically evaluated in human bone marrow stromal cell (hBMSC) cultures for up to 16 days and demonstrated degradation rate dependence of both total DNA concentration and gene regulation. PMID:27121660

  1. Tailoring the degradation kinetics of poly(ester carbonate urethane)urea thermoplastic elastomers for tissue engineering scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yi; Guan, Jianjun; Fujimoto, Kazuro L; Hashizume, Ryotaro; Pelinescu, Anca L; Wagner, William R

    2010-05-01

    Biodegradable elastomeric scaffolds are of increasing interest for applications in soft tissue repair and regeneration, particularly in mechanically active settings. The rate at which such a scaffold should degrade for optimal outcomes, however, is not generally known and the ability to select from similar scaffolds that vary in degradation behavior to allow such optimization is limited. Our objective was to synthesize a family of biodegradable polyurethane elastomers where partial substitution of polyester segments with polycarbonate segments in the polymer backbone would lead to slower degradation behavior. Specifically, we synthesized poly(ester carbonate)urethane ureas (PECUUs) using a blended soft segment of poly(caprolactone) (PCL) and poly(1,6-hexamethylene carbonate) (PHC), a 1,4-diisocyanatobutane hard segment and chain extension with putrescine. Soft segment PCL/PHC molar ratios of 100/0, 75/25, 50/50, 25/75, and 0/100 were investigated. Polymer tensile strengths varied from 14 to 34 MPa with breaking strains of 660-875%, initial moduli of 8-24 MPa and 100% recovery after 10% strain. Increased PHC content was associated with softer, more distensible films. Scaffolds produced by salt leaching supported smooth muscle cell adhesion and growth in vitro. PECUU in aqueous buffer in vitro and subcutaneous implants in rats of PECUU scaffolds showed degradation slower than comparable poly(ester urethane)urea and faster than poly(carbonate urethane)urea. These slower degrading thermoplastic polyurethanes provide opportunities to investigate the role of relative degradation rates for mechanically supportive scaffolds in a variety of soft tissue repair and reconstructive procedures. PMID:20188411

  2. Role of scaffolding protein CipC of Clostridium cellulolyticum in cellulose degradation.

    PubMed Central

    Pagès, S; Gal, L; Bélaïch, A; Gaudin, C; Tardif, C; Bélaïch, J P

    1997-01-01

    The role of a miniscaffolding protein, miniCipC1, forming part of Clostridium cellulolyticum scaffolding protein CipC in insoluble cellulose degradation was investigated. The parameters of the binding of miniCipC1, which contains a family III cellulose-binding domain (CBD), a hydrophilic domain, and a cohesin domain, to four insoluble celluloses were determined. At saturating concentrations, about 8.2 micromol of protein was bound per g of bacterial microcrystalline cellulose, while Avicel, colloidal Avicel, and phosphoric acid-swollen cellulose bound 0.28, 0.38, and 0.55 micromol of miniCipC1 per g, respectively. The dissociation constants measured varied between 1.3 x 10(-7) and 1.5 x 10(-8) M. These results are discussed with regard to the properties of the various substrates. The synergistic action of miniCipC1 and two forms of endoglucanase CelA (with and without the dockerin domain [CelA2 and CelA3, respectively]) in cellulose degradation was also studied. Although only CelA2 interacted with miniCipC1 (K(d), 7 x 10(-9) M), nonhydrolytic miniCipC1 enhanced the activities of endoglucanases CelA2 and CelA3 with all of the insoluble substrates tested. This finding shows that miniCipC1 plays two roles: it increases the enzyme concentration on the cellulose surface and enhances the accessibility of the enzyme to the substrate by modifying the structure of the cellulose, leading to an increased available cellulose surface area. In addition, the data obtained with a hybrid protein, CelA3-CBD(CipC), which was more active towards all of the insoluble substrates tested confirm that the CBD of the scaffolding protein plays an essential role in cellulose degradation. PMID:9139893

  3. Design, Degradation Mechanism and Long-Term Cytotoxicity of Poly(L-lactide) and Poly(Lactide-co-ϵ-Caprolactone) Terpolymer Film and Air-Spun Nanofiber Scaffold.

    PubMed

    Sabbatier, Gad; Larrañaga, Aitor; Guay-Bégin, Andrée-Anne; Fernandez, Jorge; Diéval, Florence; Durand, Bernard; Sarasua, Jose-Ramon; Laroche, Gaétan

    2015-10-01

    Degradable nanofiber scaffold is known to provide a suitable, versatile and temporary structure for tissue regeneration. However, synthetic nanofiber scaffold must be properly designed to display appropriate tissue response during the degradation process. In this context, this publication focuses on the design of a finely-tuned poly(lactide-co-ϵ-caprolactone) terpolymer (PLCL) that may be appropriate for vascular biomaterials applications and its comparison with well-known semi-crystalline poly(l-lactide) (PLLA). The degradation mechanism of polymer film and nanofiber scaffold and endothelial cells behavior cultured with degradation products is elucidated. The results highlights benefits of using PLCL terpolymer as vascular biomaterial compared to PLLA. PMID:26058993

  4. Enhanced cellulose degradation by nano-complexed enzymes: Synergism between a scaffold-linked exoglucanase and a free endoglucanase.

    PubMed

    Moraïs, Sarah; Heyman, Arnon; Barak, Yoav; Caspi, Jonathan; Wilson, David B; Lamed, Raphael; Shoseyov, Oded; Bayer, Edward A

    2010-06-01

    Protein molecular scaffolds are attracting interest as natural candidates for the presentation of enzymes and acceleration of catalytic reactions. We have previously reported evidence that the stable protein 1 (SP1) from Populustremula can be employed as a molecular scaffold for the presentation of either catalytic or structural binding (cellulosomal cohesin) modules. In the present work, we have displayed a potent exoglucanase (Cel6B) from the aerobic cellulolytic bacterium, Thermobifida fusca, on a cohesin-bearing SP1 scaffold. For this purpose, a chimaeric form of the enzyme, fused to a cellulosomal dockerin module, was prepared. Full incorporation of 12 dockerin-bearing exoglucanase molecules onto the cohesin-bearing scaffold was achieved. Cellulase activity was tested on two cellulosic substrates with different levels of crystallinity, and the activity of the scaffold-linked exoglucanase was significantly reduced, compared to the free dockerin-containing enzyme. However, addition of relatively low concentrations of a free wild-type endoglucanase (T. fusca Cel5A) that bears a cellulose-binding module, in combination with the complexed exoglucanase resulted in a marked rise in activity on both cellulosic substrates. The endoglucanase cleaves internal sites of the cellulose chains, and the new chain ends of the substrate were now readily accessible to the scaffold-borne exoglucanase, thereby resulting in highly effective, synergistic degradation of cellulosic substrates. PMID:20438772

  5. Resilin-PEG Hybrid Hydrogels Yield Degradable Elastomeric Scaffolds with Heterogeneous Microstructure.

    PubMed

    McGann, Christopher L; Akins, Robert E; Kiick, Kristi L

    2016-01-11

    Hydrogels derived from resilin-like polypeptides (RLPs) have shown outstanding mechanical resilience and cytocompatibility; expanding the versatility of RLP-based materials via conjugation with other polypeptides and polymers would offer great promise in the design of a range of materials. Here, we present an investigation of the biochemical and mechanical properties of hybrid hydrogels composed of a recombinant RLP and a multiarm PEG macromer. These hybrid hydrogels can be rapidly cross-linked through a Michael-type addition reaction between the thiols of cysteine residues on the RLP and vinyl sulfone groups on the multiarm PEG. Oscillatory rheology and tensile testing confirmed the formation of elastomeric hydrogels with mechanical resilience comparable to aortic elastin; hydrogel stiffness was easily modulated through the cross-linking ratio. Macromolecular phase separation of the RLP-PEG hydrogels offers the unique advantage of imparting a heterogeneous microstructure, which can be used to localize cells, through simple mixing and cross-linking. Assessment of degradation of the RLP by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) illustrated the specific proteolysis of the polypeptide in both its soluble form and when cross-linked into hydrogels. Finally, the successful encapsulation and viable three-dimensional culture of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) demonstrated the cytocompatibility of the RLP-PEG gels. Overall, the cytocompatibility, elastomeric mechanical properties, microheterogeneity, and degradability of the RLP-PEG hybrid hydrogels offer a suite of promising properties for the development of cell-instructive, structured tissue engineering scaffolds. PMID:26646060

  6. Long-term in vitro degradation of PDLLA/bioglass bone scaffolds in acellular simulated body fluid.

    PubMed

    Blaker, J J; Nazhat, S N; Maquet, V; Boccaccini, A R

    2011-02-01

    The long-term (600days) in vitro degradation of highly porous poly(D,L-lactide) (PDLLA)/Bioglass-filled composite foams developed for bone tissue engineering scaffolds has been investigated in simulated body fluid (SBF). Foams of ∼93% porosity were produced by thermally induced phase separation (TIPS). The degradation profile for foams of neat PDLLA and the influence of Bioglass addition were comprehensively assessed in terms of changes in dimensional stability, pore morphology, weight loss, molecular weight and mechanical properties (dry and wet states). It is shown that the degradation process proceeded in several stages: (a) a quasi-stable stage, where water absorption and plasticization occurred together with weight loss due to Bioglass particle loss and dissolution, resulting in decreased wet mechanical properties; (b) a stage showing a slight increase in the wet mechanical properties and a moderate decrease in dimensions, with the properties remaining moderately constant until the onset of significant weight loss, whilst molecular weight continued to decrease; (c) an end stage of massive weight loss, disruption of the pore structure and the formation of blisters and embrittlement of the scaffold (evident on handling). The findings from this long-term in vitro degradation investigation underpin studies that have been and continue to be performed on highly porous poly(α-hydroxyesters) scaffolds filled with bioactive glasses for bone tissue engineering applications. PMID:20849987

  7. Metabolomics reveals elevated macromolecular degradation in periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Barnes, V M; Ciancio, S G; Shibly, O; Xu, T; Devizio, W; Trivedi, H M; Guo, L; Jönsson, T J

    2011-11-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by tissue destruction. In the diseased oral environment, saliva has primarily been considered to act as a protectant by lubricating the tissue, mineralizing the bones, neutralizing the pH, and combating microbes. To understand the metabolic role that saliva plays in the diseased state, we performed untargeted metabolomic profiling of saliva from healthy and periodontitic individuals. Several classes of biochemicals, including dipeptide, amino acid, carbohydrate, lipids, and nucleotide metabolites, were altered, consistent with increased macromolecular degradation of proteins, triacylglycerol, glycerolphospholipids, polysaccharides, and polynucleotides in the individuals with periodontal disease. These changes partially reflected the enhanced host-bacterial interactions in the diseased state as supported by increased levels of bacterially modified amino acids and creatine metabolite. More importantly, the increased lipase, protease, and glycosidase activities associated with periodontitis generated a more favorable energy environment for oral bacteria, potentially exacerbating the disease state. PMID:21856966

  8. Optimization of acidic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-1) and its delivery through a modified degradable fibrin scaffold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandit, Abhay Smashikant

    The aim of this investigation was to develop a degradable fibrin wound dressing that can deliver an optimized dose of acidic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-1). This aim led to three distinct phases of study. In the first phase, a structurally modified fibrin degradable scaffold was developed and tested in a rabbit ear ulcer model. A significant increase in the angiogenic and fibroblastic response with a corresponding decrease in healing time was seen in the modified fibrin-treated ulcers as compared with untreated ulcers and ulcers treated with non-modified fibrin systems. In the second phase of the study, a biochemical factor, FGF-1, was added to this scaffold. An optimal dose of 8 mug of FGF-1 was determined to be required to initiate a desired wound-healing response in a rabbit ear ulcer model, based on an enhanced angiogenic and fibroblastic response and an increased epithelialization rate. The objective of the last phase was to investigate the efficacy of a modified scaffold as a vehicle for FGF-1. In vivo testing was conducted in a full-thickness defect model in a rabbit. Improvements were seen in the angiogenic and fibroblastic responses in the FGF-1/modified fibrin treatment group and, hence, FGF-1/modified fibrin was the preferred treatment. In conclusion, the modified fibrin/FGF-1 matrix served as a suitable vehicle for the growth factor, providing a desired healing response and a desirable release rate and, thus, was determined to be an effective scaffold.

  9. Degradability, biocompatibility, and osteogenesis of biocomposite scaffolds containing nano magnesium phosphate and wheat protein both in vitro and in vivo for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yan; Zhou, Panyu; Wang, Fei; Qiu, Chao; Wang, Panfeng; Zhang, Yuntong; Zhao, Liming; Xu, Shuogui

    2016-01-01

    In this study, bioactive scaffold of nano magnesium phosphate (nMP)/wheat protein (WP) composite (MWC) was fabricated. The results revealed that the MWC scaffolds had interconnected not only macropores (sized 400-600 μm) but also micropores (sized 10-20 μm) on the walls of macropores. The MWC scaffolds containing 40 w% nMP had an appropriate degradability in phosphate-buffered saline and produced a weak alkaline microenvironment. In cell culture experiments, the results revealed that the MWC scaffolds significantly promoted the MC3T3-E1 cell proliferation, differentiation, and growth into the scaffolds. The results of synchrotron radiation microcomputed tomography and analysis of the histological sections of the in vivo implantation revealed that the MWC scaffolds evidently improved the new bone formation and bone defects repair as compared with WP scaffolds. Moreover, it was found that newly formed bone tissue continued to increase with the gradual reduction of materials residual in the MWC scaffolds. Furthermore, the immunohistochemical analysis further offered the evidence of the stimulatory effects of MWC scaffolds on osteogenic-related cell differentiation and new bone regeneration. The results indicated that MWC scaffolds with good biocompability and degradability could promote osteogenesis in vivo, which would have potential for bone tissue repair. PMID:27555766

  10. Degradability, biocompatibility, and osteogenesis of biocomposite scaffolds containing nano magnesium phosphate and wheat protein both in vitro and in vivo for bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Yan; Zhou, Panyu; Wang, Fei; Qiu, Chao; Wang, Panfeng; Zhang, Yuntong; Zhao, Liming; Xu, Shuogui

    2016-01-01

    In this study, bioactive scaffold of nano magnesium phosphate (nMP)/wheat protein (WP) composite (MWC) was fabricated. The results revealed that the MWC scaffolds had interconnected not only macropores (sized 400–600 μm) but also micropores (sized 10–20 μm) on the walls of macropores. The MWC scaffolds containing 40 w% nMP had an appropriate degradability in phosphate-buffered saline and produced a weak alkaline microenvironment. In cell culture experiments, the results revealed that the MWC scaffolds significantly promoted the MC3T3-E1 cell proliferation, differentiation, and growth into the scaffolds. The results of synchrotron radiation microcomputed tomography and analysis of the histological sections of the in vivo implantation revealed that the MWC scaffolds evidently improved the new bone formation and bone defects repair as compared with WP scaffolds. Moreover, it was found that newly formed bone tissue continued to increase with the gradual reduction of materials residual in the MWC scaffolds. Furthermore, the immunohistochemical analysis further offered the evidence of the stimulatory effects of MWC scaffolds on osteogenic-related cell differentiation and new bone regeneration. The results indicated that MWC scaffolds with good biocompability and degradability could promote osteogenesis in vivo, which would have potential for bone tissue repair. PMID:27555766

  11. Effect of elevated CO2 on chlorpyriphos degradation and soil microbial activities in tropical rice soil.

    PubMed

    Adak, Totan; Munda, Sushmita; Kumar, Upendra; Berliner, J; Pokhare, Somnath S; Jambhulkar, N N; Jena, M

    2016-02-01

    Impact of elevated CO2 on chlorpyriphos degradation, microbial biomass carbon, and enzymatic activities in rice soil was investigated. Rice (variety Naveen, Indica type) was grown under four conditions, namely, chambered control, elevated CO2 (550 ppm), elevated CO2 (700 ppm) in open-top chambers and open field. Chlorpyriphos was sprayed at 500 g a.i. ha(-1) at maximum tillering stage. Chlorpyriphos degraded rapidly from rice soils, and 88.4% of initially applied chlorpyriphos was lost from the rice soil maintained under elevated CO2 (700 ppm) by day 5 of spray, whereas the loss was 80.7% from open field rice soil. Half-life values of chlorpyriphos under different conditions ranged from 2.4 to 1.7 days with minimum half-life recorded with two elevated CO2 treatments. Increased CO2 concentration led to increase in temperature (1.2 to 1.8 °C) that played a critical role in chlorpyriphos persistence. Microbial biomass carbon and soil enzymatic activities specifically, dehydrogenase, fluorescien diacetate hydrolase, urease, acid phosphatase, and alkaline phosphatase responded positively to elevated CO2 concentrations. Generally, the enzyme activities were highly correlated with each other. Irrespective of the level of CO2, short-term negative influence of chlorpyriphos was observed on soil enzymes till day 7 of spray. Knowledge obtained from this study highlights that the elevated CO2 may negatively influence persistence of pesticide but will have positive effects on soil enzyme activities. PMID:26790432

  12. Effect of the preparation methods on architecture, crystallinity, hydrolytic degradation, bioactivity, and biocompatibility of PCL/bioglass composite scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Dziadek, Michal; Pawlik, Justyna; Menaszek, Elzbieta; Stodolak-Zych, Ewa; Cholewa-Kowalska, Katarzyna

    2015-11-01

    In this study, two different composition gel derived silica-rich (S2) or calcium-rich (A2) bioactive glasses (SBG) from a basic CaO-P2 O5 -SiO2 system were incorporated into poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) matrix to obtain novel bioactive composite scaffolds for bone tissue engineering applications. The composites were fabricated in the form of highly porous 3D scaffolds using following preparation methods: solvent casting particulate leaching (SCPL), solid-liquid phase separation, phase inversion (PI). Scaffolds containing 21% vol. of each bioactive glass were characterized for architecture, crystallinity, hydrolytic degradation, surface bioactivity, and cellular response. Results indicated that the use of different preparation methods leads to obtain highly porous (60-90%) materials with differentiated morphology: pore shape, size, and distributions. Thermal analysis (DSC) showed that the preparation method of materials and addition of bioactive glass particles into polymer matrix induced the changes of PCL crystallinity. Composites obtained by SCPL and PI method containing A2 SBG rapidly formed a hydroxyapatite calcium phosphate surface layer after incubation in SBF. Bioactive glasses used as filler in composite scaffolds could neutralize the released acidic by-products of the polymer degradation. Preliminary in vitro biological studies of the composites in contact with osteoblastic cells showed good biocompatibility of the obtained materials. Addition of bioactive glass into the PCL matrix promotes mineralization estimated on the basis of the ALP activity. These results suggest that through a process of selection appropriate methods of preparation and bioglass composition it is possible to design and obtain porous materials with suitable properties for regeneration of bone tissue. PMID:25533304

  13. Degradation characteristics, cell viability and host tissue responses of PDLLA-based scaffold with PRGD and β-TCP nanoparticles incorporation.

    PubMed

    Yi, Jiling; Xiong, Feng; Li, Binbin; Chen, Heping; Yin, Yixia; Dai, Honglian; Li, Shipu

    2016-09-01

    This study is aimed to evaluate the degradation characteristics, cell viability and host tissue responses of PDLLA/PRGD/β-TCP (PRT) composite nerve scaffold, which was fabricated by poly(d, l-lactic acid) (PDLLA), RGD peptide(Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Tyr, GRGDY, abbreviated as RGD) modified poly-{(lactic acid)-co-[(glycolic acid)-alt-(l-lysine)]}(PRGD) and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP). The scaffolds' in vitro degradation behaviors were investigated in detail by analysing changes in weight loss, pH and morphology. Then, the 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl) -2,5-diphenyl-2 -H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and cell live/dead assay were carried out to assess their cell viability. Moreover, in vivo degradation patterns and host inflammation responses were monitored by subcutaneous implantation of PRT scaffold in rats. Our data showed that, among the tested scaffolds, the PRT scaffold had the best buffering capacity (pH = 6.1-6.3) and fastest degradation rate (12.4%, 8 weeks) during in vitro study, which was contributed by the incorporation of β-TCP nanoparticles. After in vitro and in vivo degradation, the high porosity structure of PRT could be observed using scanning electron microscopy. Meanwhile, the PRT scaffold could significantly promote cell survival. In the PRT scaffold implantation region, less inflammatory cells (especially for neutrophil and lymphocyte) could be detected. These results indicated that the PRT composite scaffold had a good biodegradable property; it could improve cells survival and reduced the adverse host tissue inflammation responses. PMID:27252885

  14. [Degradable performance and bio-mineralization function of PLA-PEG-PLA/PLA tissue engineering scaffold in vitro and in vivo].

    PubMed

    Ge, Jianhua; Wang, Yingjun; Min, Shaoxiong

    2010-10-01

    The degradable performance and bio-mineralization function of PLA-PEG-PLA/PLA tissue engineering scaffolds in vitro and in vivo were systematically studied. The X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectra showed that there was the deposition of bone-like carbonate hydroxyapatite on the surface of scaffolds. We found that the weight of scaffolds did not always decrease with the prolongation of time in vitro. At the same time, we found that after the PLA-PEG-PLA/PLA tissue engineering scaffolds were embedded in skulls of rhesus monkeys, the new bone area reached 75% at the 12th week. Histological observation showed that the new bones were rebuilt and knitted bones were formed at the 12th week. These findings meant that the PLA-PEG-PLA/PLA tissue engineering scaffolds were potential in clinical use. PMID:21089673

  15. Effect of elevated CO2 on degradation of azoxystrobin and soil microbial activity in rice soil.

    PubMed

    Manna, Suman; Singh, Neera; Singh, V P

    2013-04-01

    An experiment was conducted in open-top chambers (OTC) to study the effect of elevated CO2 (580 ± 20 μmol mol(-1)) on azoxystrobin degradation and soil microbial activities. Results indicated that elevated CO2 did not have any significant effect on the persistence of azoxystrobin in rice-planted soil. The half-life values for the azoxystrobin in rice soils were 20.3 days in control (rice grown at ambient CO2 outdoors), 19.3 days in rice grown under ambient CO2 atmosphere in OTC, and 17.5 days in rice grown under elevated CO2 atmosphere in OTC. Azoxystrobin acid was recovered as the only metabolite of azoxystrobin, but it did not accumulate in the soil/water and was further metabolized. Elevated CO2 enhanced soil microbial biomass (MBC) and alkaline phosphatase activity of soil. Compared with rice grown at ambient CO2 (both outdoors and in OTC), the soil MBC at elevated CO2 increased by twofold. Elevated CO2 did not affect dehydrogenase, fluorescein diacetate, and acid phosphatase activity. Azoxystrobin application to soils, both ambient and elevated CO2, inhibited alkaline phosphates activity, while no effect was observed on other enzymes. Slight increase (1.8-2 °C) in temperature inside OTC did not affect microbial parameters, as similar activities were recorded in rice grown outdoors and in OTC at ambient CO2. Higher MBC in soil at elevated CO2 could be attributed to increased carbon availability in the rhizosphere via plant metabolism and root secretion; however, it did not significantly increase azoxystrobin degradation, suggesting that pesticide degradation was not the result of soil MBC alone. Study suggested that increased CO2 levels following global warming might not adversely affect azoxystrobin degradation. However, global warming is a continuous and cumulative process, therefore, long-term studies are necessary to get more realistic assessment of global warming on fate of pesticide. PMID:22773147

  16. Degradation characteristics, cell viability and host tissue responses of PDLLA-based scaffold with PRGD and β-TCP nanoparticles incorporation

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Jiling; Xiong, Feng; Li, Binbin; Chen, Heping; Yin, Yixia; Dai, Honglian; Li, Shipu

    2016-01-01

    This study is aimed to evaluate the degradation characteristics, cell viability and host tissue responses of PDLLA/PRGD/β-TCP (PRT) composite nerve scaffold, which was fabricated by poly(d, l-lactic acid) (PDLLA), RGD peptide(Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Tyr, GRGDY, abbreviated as RGD) modified poly-{(lactic acid)-co-[(glycolic acid)-alt-(l-lysine)]}(PRGD) and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP). The scaffolds’ in vitro degradation behaviors were investigated in detail by analysing changes in weight loss, pH and morphology. Then, the 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl) -2,5-diphenyl-2 -H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and cell live/dead assay were carried out to assess their cell viability. Moreover, in vivo degradation patterns and host inflammation responses were monitored by subcutaneous implantation of PRT scaffold in rats. Our data showed that, among the tested scaffolds, the PRT scaffold had the best buffering capacity (pH = 6.1–6.3) and fastest degradation rate (12.4%, 8 weeks) during in vitro study, which was contributed by the incorporation of β-TCP nanoparticles. After in vitro and in vivo degradation, the high porosity structure of PRT could be observed using scanning electron microscopy. Meanwhile, the PRT scaffold could significantly promote cell survival. In the PRT scaffold implantation region, less inflammatory cells (especially for neutrophil and lymphocyte) could be detected. These results indicated that the PRT composite scaffold had a good biodegradable property; it could improve cells survival and reduced the adverse host tissue inflammation responses. PMID:27252885

  17. Comparison of the properties of collagen-chitosan scaffolds after γ-ray irradiation and carbodiimide cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zihao; Du, Tianming; Tang, Xiangyu; Liu, Changjun; Li, Ruixin; Xu, Cheng; Tian, Feng; Du, Zhenjie; Wu, Jimin

    2016-07-01

    The property of collagen-chitosan porous scaffold varies according to cross-linking density and scaffold composition. This study was designed to compare the properties of collagen-chitosan porous scaffolds cross-linked with γ-irradiation and carbodiimide (CAR) for the first time. Eleven sets of collagen-chitosan scaffolds containing different concentrations of chitosan at a 5% increasing gradient were fabricated. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was performed to confirm the success of cross-linking in the scaffolds. The scaffold morphology was evaluated under scanning electron microscope (SEM). SEM revealed that chitosan was an indispensable material for the fabrication of γ-ray irradiation scaffold. The microstructure of γ-ray irradiation scaffold was less stable than those of alternative scaffolds. Based upon swelling ratio, porosity factor, and collagenase degradation, γ-ray irradiation scaffold was less stable than CAR and 25% proportion of chitosan scaffolds. Mechanical property determines the orientation in γ-irradiation and CAR scaffold. In vitro degradation test indicated that γ-irradiation and CAR cross-linking can elevate the scaffold biocompatibility. Compared with γ-ray irradiation, CAR cross-linked scaffold containing 25% chitosan can more significantly enhance the bio-stability and biocompatibility of collagen-chitosan scaffolds. CAR cross-linked scaffold may be the best choice for future tissue engineering. PMID:27122297

  18. A novel porous Fe/Fe-W alloy scaffold with a double-layer structured skeleton: Preparation, in vitro degradability and biocompatibility.

    PubMed

    He, Jin; He, Feng-Li; Li, Da-Wei; Liu, Ya-Li; Yin, Da-Chuan

    2016-06-01

    A novel porous Fe/Fe-W alloy scaffold with a double-layer structured skeleton was prepared for the first time by electrodeposition. The microstructure of the scaffold was analysed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and mercury porosimetry. Mechanical property, in vitro degradability and biocompatibility were tested by tensile test, immersion and a cytotoxicity test. The results showed that the scaffolds exhibited a cellular structure that is similar to that of cancellous bone and had a considerably large specific surface area. The skeleton of the scaffolds showed a double-layer structure that was composed of a hollow Fe skeleton wrapped in a thin layer of Fe-W alloy. The tensile strength and the apparent density are close to that of cancellous bone. It was also found that the different surface microstructures showed different effects on in vitro degradability and biocompatibility. In the immersion test, the corrosion rate decreased gradually as the immersion time increased. In the cytotoxicity test, the extraction medium of the pure Fe scaffold showed the lowest cell viability, followed by that of 1.5FeW as a close second. The extraction media of FeW, Fe1.5W and Fe2W were similar, and their cell viability was far above that of the Fe and 1.5FeW scaffolds. The structural style of the scaffolds presented in this paper is potentially useful and applicable to developing degradable scaffolds with a tailored corrosion rate. PMID:26970820

  19. A poly(glycerol sebacate)-coated mesoporous bioactive glass scaffold with adjustable mechanical strength, degradation rate, controlled-release and cell behavior for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Lin, Dan; Yang, Kai; Tang, Wei; Liu, Yutong; Yuan, Yuan; Liu, Changsheng

    2015-07-01

    Various requirements in the field of tissue engineering have motivated the development of three-dimensional scaffold with adjustable physicochemical properties and biological functions. A series of multiparameter-adjustable mesoporous bioactive glass (MBG) scaffolds with uncrosslinked poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS) coating was prepared in this article. MBG scaffold was prepared by a modified F127/PU co-templating process and then PGS was coated by a simple adsorption and lyophilization process. Through controlling macropore parameters and PGS coating amount, the mechanical strength, degradation rate, controlled-release and cell behavior of the composite scaffold could be modulated in a wide range. PGS coating successfully endowed MBG scaffold with improved toughness and adjustable mechanical strength covering the bearing range of trabecular bone (2-12MPa). Multilevel degradation rate of the scaffold and controlled-release rate of protein from mesopore could be achieved, with little impact on the protein activity owing to an "ultralow-solvent" coating and "nano-cavity entrapment" immobilization method. In vitro studies indicated that PGS coating promoted cell attachment and proliferation in a dose-dependent manner, without affecting the osteogenic induction capacity of MBG substrate. These results first provide strong evidence that uncrosslinked PGS might also yield extraordinary achievements in traditional MBG scaffold. With the multiparameter adjustability, the composite MBG/PGS scaffolds would have a hopeful prospect in bone tissue engineering. The design considerations and coating method of this study can also be extended to other ceramic-based artificial scaffolds and are expected to provide new thoughts on development of future tissue engineering materials. PMID:25935647

  20. Significant degradability enhancement in multilayer coating of polycaprolactone-bioactive glass/gelatin-bioactive glass on magnesium scaffold for tissue engineering applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdimamaghani, Mostafa; Razavi, Mehdi; Vashaee, Daryoosh; Pothineni, Venkata Raveendra; Rajadas, Jayakumar; Tayebi, Lobat

    2015-05-01

    Magnesium (Mg) is a promising candidate to be used in medical products especially as bone tissue engineering scaffolds. The main challenge for using Mg in biomedical applications is its high degradation rate in the body. For this reason, in this study, a multilayer polymeric layer composed of polycaprolactone (PCL) and gelatin (Gel) reinforced with bioactive glass (BaG) particles has been applied on the surface of Mg scaffolds. The materials characteristics of uncoated Mg scaffold, Mg scaffold coated only with PCL-BaG and Mg scaffold coated with PCL-BaG and Gel-BaG have been analyzed and compared in detail. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were utilized for microstructural studies. In vitro bioactivity and biodegradation evaluations were carried out by submerging the scaffolds in simulated body fluid (SBF) at pre-determined time points. The results demonstrated that Mg scaffold coated with PCL-BaG and Gel-BaG exhibited significant improvement in biodegradability.

  1. X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography visualizes the microstructure and degradation profile of implanted biodegradable scaffolds after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Takashima, Kenta; Hoshino, Masato; Uesugi, Kentaro; Yagi, Naoto; Matsuda, Shojiro; Nakahira, Atsushi; Osumi, Noriko; Kohzuki, Masahiro; Onodera, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering strategies for spinal cord repair are a primary focus of translational medicine after spinal cord injury (SCI). Many tissue engineering strategies employ three-dimensional scaffolds, which are made of biodegradable materials and have microstructure incorporated with viable cells and bioactive molecules to promote new tissue generation and functional recovery after SCI. It is therefore important to develop an imaging system that visualizes both the microstructure of three-dimensional scaffolds and their degradation process after SCI. Here, X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography imaging based on the Talbot grating interferometer is described and it is shown how it can visualize the polyglycolic acid scaffold, including its microfibres, after implantation into the injured spinal cord. Furthermore, X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography images revealed that degradation occurred from the end to the centre of the braided scaffold in the 28 days after implantation into the injured spinal cord. The present report provides the first demonstration of an imaging technique that visualizes both the microstructure and degradation of biodegradable scaffolds in SCI research. X-ray phase-contrast imaging based on the Talbot grating interferometer is a versatile technique that can be used for a broad range of preclinical applications in tissue engineering strategies. PMID:25537600

  2. Lifetime degradation and regeneration in multicrystalline silicon under illumination at elevated temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredemeier, Dennis; Walter, Dominic; Herlufsen, Sandra; Schmidt, Jan

    2016-03-01

    We examine the carrier lifetime evolution of block-cast multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) wafers under illumination (100 mW/cm2) at elevated temperature (75°C). Samples are treated with different process steps typically applied in industrial solar cell production. We observe a pronounced degradation in lifetime after rapid thermal annealing (RTA) at 900°C. However, we detect only a weak lifetime instability in mc-Si wafers which are RTA-treated at 650°C. After completion of the degradation, the lifetime is observed to recover and finally reaches carrier lifetimes comparable to the initial state. To explain the observed lifetime evolution, we suggest a defect model, where metal precipitates in the mc-Si bulk dissolve during the RTA treatment.

  3. Characterization of interphase environmental degradation at elevated temperature of fiber-reinforced TMCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matikas, Theodore E.

    2009-03-01

    Fiber reinforced metallic composite materials are being considered for a number of applications because of their attractive mechanical properties as compared to monolithic metallic alloys. An engineered interphase, including the bond strength between the composite's constituents, contributes to a large extent to the improvement of strength and stiffness properties of this class of materials. However, in high temperature applications, where combination of cyclic loading with environmental effects is expected, consideration should be given to interphase degradation, especially in the vicinity of stress risers, such as notches and holes. The applicability of damage tolerance analysis in structural components made of titanium matrix composite materials designed to operate under high temperature environments would depend on the availability of adequate characterization methods for the evaluation of interfacial degradation. The objective of this work is to provide a basic understanding of interfacial degradation mechanisms due to oxidation in environmentally exposed titanium-based composites subjected to cyclic stresses. A nondestructive method has been developed enabling highresolution monitoring of interfacial damage initiation and accumulation as well as surface/subsurface cracking behavior during interrupted fatigue tests. This nondestructive technique is based on surface acoustic wave propagation in the composites and can detect minute changes in elastic properties of the interfacial region due to elevated temperatures as well as oxygen effects.

  4. Preparation, characterization, and in vitro enzymatic degradation of chitosan-gelatine hydrogel scaffolds as potential biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Gorgieva, Selestina; Kokol, Vanja

    2012-07-01

    The crosslinking of chitosan (CHT) and gelatin (GEL) accomplished with N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-N'-ethylcarbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) was investigated and optimized in relation to hydrogels stability by varying the CHT/GEL mass ratio and the EDC/NHS molar ratio at different and constant EDC concentrations. Hydrogels were also fabricated in the presence of α-tocopherol to assess the release mechanism of a lipophilic drug from a highly-hydrophilic CHT/GEL hydrogel network. Alterations in the physico-chemical properties of hydrogels were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and their biostability was studied within a simulated body-fluid solution (PBS of pH 7.4) at 37 °C for 24 h by evaluating the degree of swelling, followed by topography and morphology characterization using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The analysis confirmed the formation of a modulated hydrogels porosity using different freezing temperatures prior to lyophilization. The in vitro degradation behaviors of the hydrogels were investigated for up to 5 weeks using collagenase, lysozyme, and N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase by monitoring the weight-losses of hydrogels and their degradation products, being identified by UV-Vis spectroscopy and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) as well as the pH monitoring of degraded solutions. It was observed that an inner morphological hydrogel structure influences their swelling and degradation behavior, which is additionally reduced by in-gel-embedded α-tocopherol because of hydrophobic interactions with their constituents, and hindering the effect on collagenase activity. PMID:22447615

  5. Hyaluronic acid hydrogel scaffolds with a triple degradation behavior for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Cui, Ning; Qian, Junmin; Liu, Ting; Zhao, Na; Wang, Hongjie

    2015-08-01

    In this study, in order to better mimick the nature of bone extracellular matrix, hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogels having a triple degradation behavior were synthesized from 3,3'-dithiodipropionate hydrazide-modified HA (DTPH-HA) and polyethylene glycol dilevulinate (LEV-PEG-LEV) via the reaction of the ketone carbonyl groups of LEV-PEG-LEV with the hydrazide groups of DTPH-HA. The HA hydrogels were characterized by solid state (13)C NMR, FT-IR, SEM, and rheological, swelling and degradation tests. The results showed that the HA hydrogels exhibited a highly porous morphology and had pore diameters ranging from 20 to 200 μm. The equilibrium swelling ratio of the HA hydrogels was no less than 37.5. The HA hydrogels could be degraded by hyaluronidase and reducing substances or at acidic pH values. The biocompatibility of the HA hydrogels was evaluated using osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cells by live/dead staining and MTT assays. The results revealed that the HA hydrogels had good biocompatibility and could support the attachment and proliferation of MC3T3-E1 cells. All the results indicated that the HA hydrogels synthesized by hydrazone bond crosslinking might have great potential to be used in bone tissue engineering. PMID:25933539

  6. Seeding bioreactor-produced embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes on different porous, degradable, polyurethane scaffolds reveals the effect of scaffold architecture on cell morphology.

    PubMed

    Fromstein, Joanna D; Zandstra, Peter W; Alperin, Cecilia; Rockwood, Danielle; Rabolt, John F; Woodhouse, Kimberly A

    2008-03-01

    A successful regenerative therapy to treat damage incurred after an ischemic event in the heart will require an integrated approach including methods for appropriate revascularization of the infarct site, mechanical recovery of damaged tissue, and electrophysiological coupling with native cells. Cardiomyocytes are the ideal cell type for heart regeneration because of their inherent electrical and physiological properties, and cardiomyocytes derived from embryonic stem cells (ESCs) represent an attractive option for tissue-engineering therapies. An important step in developing tissue engineering-based approaches to cardiac cell therapy is understanding how scaffold architecture affects cell behavior. In this work, we generated large numbers of ESC-derived cardiomyocytes in bioreactors and seeded them on porous, 3-dimensional scaffolds prepared using 2 different techniques: electrospinning and thermally induced phase separation (TIPS). The effect of material macro-architecture on the adhesion, viability, and morphology of the seeded cells was determined. On the electrospun scaffolds, cells were elongated in shape, a morphology typical of cultured ESC-derived cardiomyocytes, whereas on scaffolds fabricated using TIPS, the cells retained a rounded morphology. Despite these gross phenotypic and physiological differences, sarcomeric myosin and connexin 43 expression was evident, and contracting cells were observed on both scaffold types, suggesting that morphological changes induced by material macrostructure do not directly correlate to functional differences. PMID:18333789

  7. Translating Textiles to Tissue Engineering: Creation and Evaluation of Microporous, Biocompatible, Degradable Scaffolds Using Industry Relevant Manufacturing Approaches and Human Adipose Derived Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Haslauer, Carla M.; Avery, Matthew R.; Pourdeyhimi, Behnam; Loboa, Elizabeth G.

    2014-01-01

    Polymeric scaffolds have emerged as a means of generating three-dimensional tissues, such as for the treatment of bone injuries and non-unions. In this study, a fibrous scaffold was designed using the biocompatible, degradable polymer poly-lactic acid in combination with a water dispersible sacrificial polymer, EastONE. Fibers were generated via industry relevant, facile scale-up melt-spinning techniques with an islands-in-the-sea geometry. Following removal of EastONE, a highly porous fiber remained possessing 12 longitudinal channels and pores throughout all internal and external fiber walls. Weight loss and surface area characterization confirmed the generation of highly porous fibers as observed via focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy. Porous fibers were then knit into a three-dimensional scaffold and seeded with human adipose-derived stem cells (hASC). Confocal microscopy images confirmed hASC attachment to the fiber walls and proliferation throughout the knit structure. Quantification of cell-mediated calcium accretion following culture in osteogenic differentiation medium confirmed hASC differentiation throughout the porous constructs. These results suggest incorporation of a sacrificial polymer within islands-in-the-sea fibers generates a highly porous scaffold capable of supporting stem cell viability and differentiation with the potential to generate large three-dimensional constructs for bone regeneration and/or other tissue engineering applications. PMID:25229198

  8. Translating textiles to tissue engineering: Creation and evaluation of microporous, biocompatible, degradable scaffolds using industry relevant manufacturing approaches and human adipose derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Haslauer, Carla M; Avery, Matthew R; Pourdeyhimi, Behnam; Loboa, Elizabeth G

    2015-07-01

    Polymeric scaffolds have emerged as a means of generating three-dimensional tissues, such as for the treatment of bone injuries and nonunions. In this study, a fibrous scaffold was designed using the biocompatible, degradable polymer poly-lactic acid in combination with a water dispersible sacrificial polymer, EastONE. Fibers were generated via industry relevant, facile scale-up melt-spinning techniques with an islands-in-the-sea geometry. Following removal of EastONE, a highly porous fiber remained possessing 12 longitudinal channels and pores throughout all internal and external fiber walls. Weight loss and surface area characterization confirmed the generation of highly porous fibers as observed via focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy. Porous fibers were then knit into a three-dimensional scaffold and seeded with human adipose-derived stem cells (hASC). Confocal microscopy images confirmed hASC attachment to the fiber walls and proliferation throughout the knit structure. Quantification of cell-mediated calcium accretion following culture in osteogenic differentiation medium confirmed hASC differentiation throughout the porous constructs. These results suggest incorporation of a sacrificial polymer within islands-in-the-sea fibers generates a highly porous scaffold capable of supporting stem cell viability and differentiation with the potential to generate large three-dimensional constructs for bone regeneration and/or other tissue engineering applications. PMID:25229198

  9. Degradation kinetics of the main carbohydrates in birch wood during hot water extraction in a batch reactor at elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Borrega, Marc; Nieminen, Kaarlo; Sixta, Herbert

    2011-11-01

    Hot water extraction of wood at elevated temperatures may be a suitable method to produce hemicellulose-lean pulps and to recover xylan-derived products from the water extract. In this study, water extractions of birch wood were conducted at temperatures between 180 and 240 °C in a batch reactor. Xylan was extensively removed, whereas cellulose was partly degraded only at temperatures above 180 °C. Under severe extraction conditions, acetic acid content in the water extract was higher than the corresponding amount of acetyl groups in wood. In addition to oligo- and monosaccharides, considerable amounts of furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) were recovered from the extracts. After reaching a maximum, the furfural yield remained constant with increasing extraction time. This maximum slightly decreased with increasing extraction temperature, suggesting the preferential formation of secondary degradation products from xylose. Kinetic models fitting experimental data are proposed to explain degradation and conversion reactions of xylan and glucan. PMID:21967712

  10. Responses of Aromatic-Degrading Microbial Communities to Elevated Nitrate in Sediments.

    PubMed

    Xu, Meiying; He, Zhili; Zhang, Qin; Liu, Jin; Guo, Jun; Sun, Guoping; Zhou, Jizhong

    2015-10-20

    A high number of aromatic compounds that have been released into aquatic ecosystems have accumulated in sediment because of their low solubility and high hydrophobicity, causing significant hazards to the environment and human health. Since nitrate is an essential nitrogen component and a more thermodynamically favorable electron acceptor for anaerobic respiration, nitrate-based bioremediation has been applied to aromatic-contaminated sediments. However, few studies have focused on the response of aromatic-degrading microbial communities to nitrate addition in anaerobic sediments. Here we hypothesized that high nitrate inputs would stimulate aromatic-degrading microbial communities and their associated degrading processes, thus increasing the bioremediation efficiency in aromatic compound-contaminated sediments. We analyzed the changes of key aromatic-degrading genes in the sediment samples from a field-scale site for in situ bioremediation of an aromatic-contaminated creek in the Pearl River Delta before and after nitrate injection using a functional gene array. Our results showed that the genes involved in the degradation of several kinds of aromatic compounds were significantly enriched after nitrate injection, especially those encoding enzymes for central catabolic pathways of aromatic compound degradation, and most of the enriched genes were derived from nitrate-reducing microorganisms, possibly accelerating bioremediation of aromatic-contaminated sediments. The sediment nitrate concentration was found to be the predominant factor shaping the aromatic-degrading microbial communities. This study provides new insights into our understanding of the influences of nitrate addition on aromatic-degrading microbial communities in sediments. PMID:26390227

  11. Protection of scaffold protein Isu from degradation by the Lon protease Pim1 as a component of Fe–S cluster biogenesis regulation

    PubMed Central

    Ciesielski, Szymon J.; Schilke, Brenda; Marszalek, Jaroslaw; Craig, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    Iron–sulfur (Fe–S) clusters, essential protein cofactors, are assembled on the mitochondrial scaffold protein Isu and then transferred to recipient proteins via a multistep process in which Isu interacts sequentially with multiple protein factors. This pathway is in part regulated posttranslationally by modulation of the degradation of Isu, whose abundance increases >10-fold upon perturbation of the biogenesis process. We tested a model in which direct interaction with protein partners protects Isu from degradation by the mitochondrial Lon-type protease. Using purified components, we demonstrated that Isu is indeed a substrate of the Lon-type protease and that it is protected from degradation by Nfs1, the sulfur donor for Fe–S cluster assembly, as well as by Jac1, the J-protein Hsp70 cochaperone that functions in cluster transfer from Isu. Nfs1 and Jac1 variants known to be defective in interaction with Isu were also defective in protecting Isu from degradation. Furthermore, overproduction of Jac1 protected Isu from degradation in vivo, as did Nfs1. Taken together, our results lead to a model of dynamic interplay between a protease and protein factors throughout the Fe–S cluster assembly and transfer process, leading to up-regulation of Isu levels under conditions when Fe–S cluster biogenesis does not meet cellular demands. PMID:26842892

  12. Protection of scaffold protein Isu from degradation by the Lon protease Pim1 as a component of Fe-S cluster biogenesis regulation.

    PubMed

    Ciesielski, Szymon J; Schilke, Brenda; Marszalek, Jaroslaw; Craig, Elizabeth A

    2016-04-01

    Iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters, essential protein cofactors, are assembled on the mitochondrial scaffold protein Isu and then transferred to recipient proteins via a multistep process in which Isu interacts sequentially with multiple protein factors. This pathway is in part regulated posttranslationally by modulation of the degradation of Isu, whose abundance increases >10-fold upon perturbation of the biogenesis process. We tested a model in which direct interaction with protein partners protects Isu from degradation by the mitochondrial Lon-type protease. Using purified components, we demonstrated that Isu is indeed a substrate of the Lon-type protease and that it is protected from degradation by Nfs1, the sulfur donor for Fe-S cluster assembly, as well as by Jac1, the J-protein Hsp70 cochaperone that functions in cluster transfer from Isu. Nfs1 and Jac1 variants known to be defective in interaction with Isu were also defective in protecting Isu from degradation. Furthermore, overproduction of Jac1 protected Isu from degradation in vivo, as did Nfs1. Taken together, our results lead to a model of dynamic interplay between a protease and protein factors throughout the Fe-S cluster assembly and transfer process, leading to up-regulation of Isu levels under conditions when Fe-S cluster biogenesis does not meet cellular demands. PMID:26842892

  13. The effects of different crossing-linking conditions of genipin on type I collagen scaffolds: an in vitro evaluation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiujie; Chen, Xueying; Yang, Ting; Zhang, Naili; Dong, Li; Ma, Shaoying; Liu, Xiaoming; Zhou, Mo; Li, Baoxing

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze the properties of fabricating rat tail type I collagen scaffolds cross-linked with genipin under different conditions. The porous genipin cross-linked scaffolds are obtained through a two step freeze-drying process. To find out the optimal cross-link condition, we used different genipin concentrations and various cross-linked temperatures to prepare the scaffolds in this study. The morphologies of the scaffolds were characterized by scanning electron microscope, and the mechanical properties of the scaffolds were evaluated under dynamic compression. Additionally, the cross-linking degree was assessed by ninhydrin assay. To investigate the swelling ratio and the in vitro degradation of the collagen scaffold, the tests were also carried out by immersion of the scaffolds in a PBS solution or digestion in a type I collagenase respectively. The morphologies of the non-cross-linked scaffolds presented a lattice-like structure while the cross-linked ones displayed a sheet-like framework. The morphology of the genipin cross-linked scaffolds could be significantly changed by either increasing genipin concentration or the temperature. The swelling ratio of each cross-linked scaffold was much lower than that of the control (non-cross-linked).The ninhydrin assay demonstrated that the higher temperature and genipin concentration could obviously increase the cross-linking efficiency. The in vitro degradation studies indicated that genipin cross-linking can effectively elevate the biostability of the scaffolds. The biocompatibility and cytotoxicity of the scaffolds was evaluated by culturing rat chondrocytes on the scaffold in vitro and by MTT. The results of MTT and the fact that the chondrocytes adhered well to the scaffolds demonstrated that genipin cross-linked scaffolds possessed an excellent biocompatibility and low cytotoxicity. Based on these results, 0.3 % genipin concentrations and 37 °C cross-linked temperatures are

  14. ERK Signals: Scaffolding Scaffolds?

    PubMed Central

    Casar, Berta; Crespo, Piero

    2016-01-01

    ERK1/2 MAP Kinases become activated in response to multiple intra- and extra-cellular stimuli through a signaling module composed of sequential tiers of cytoplasmic kinases. Scaffold proteins regulate ERK signals by connecting the different components of the module into a multi-enzymatic complex by which signal amplitude and duration are fine-tuned, and also provide signal fidelity by isolating this complex from external interferences. In addition, scaffold proteins play a central role as spatial regulators of ERKs signals. In this respect, depending on the subcellular localization from which the activating signals emanate, defined scaffolds specify which substrates are amenable to be phosphorylated. Recent evidence has unveiled direct interactions among different scaffold protein species. These scaffold-scaffold macro-complexes could constitute an additional level of regulation for ERK signals and may serve as nodes for the integration of incoming signals and the subsequent diversification of the outgoing signals with respect to substrate engagement. PMID:27303664

  15. Echogenicity as a surrogate for bioresorbable everolimus-eluting scaffold degradation: analysis at 1-, 3-, 6-, 12- 18, 24-, 30-, 36- and 42-month follow-up in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Campos, Carlos M; Ishibashi, Yuki; Eggermont, Jeroen; Nakatani, Shimpei; Cho, Yun Kyeong; Dijkstra, Jouke; Reiber, Johan H C; Sheehy, Alexander; Lane, Jennifer; Kamberi, Marika; Rapoza, Richard; Perkins, Laura; Garcia-Garcia, Hector M; Onuma, Yoshinobu; Serruys, Patrick W

    2015-03-01

    The objective of the study is to validate intravascular quantitative echogenicity as a surrogate for molecular weight assessment of poly-l-lactide-acid (PLLA) bioresorbable scaffold (Absorb BVS, Abbott Vascular, Santa Clara, California). We analyzed at 9 time points (from 1- to 42-month follow-up) a population of 40 pigs that received 97 Absorb scaffolds. The treated regions were analyzed by echogenicity using adventitia as reference, and were categorized as more (hyperechogenic or upperechogenic) or less bright (hypoechogenic) than the reference. The volumes of echogenicity categories were correlated with the measurements of molecular weight (Mw) by gel permeation chromatography. Scaffold struts appeared as high echogenic structures. The quantification of grey level intensity in the scaffold-vessel compartment had strong correlation with the scaffold Mw: hyperechogenicity (correlation coefficient = 0.75; P < 0.01), upperechogenicity (correlation coefficient = 0.63; P < 0.01) and hyper + upperechogenicity (correlation coefficient = 0.78; P < 0.01). In the linear regression, the R(2) for high echogenicity and Mw was 0.57 for the combination of hyper and upper echogenicity. IVUS high intensity grey level quantification is correlated to Absorb BVS residual molecular weight and can be used as a surrogate for the monitoring of the degradation of semi-crystalline polymers scaffolds. PMID:25627777

  16. Metabolic effects of elevated temperature on organic acid degradation in ripening Vitis vinifera fruit

    PubMed Central

    Sweetman, C.; Sadras, V. O.; Hancock, R. D.; Soole, K. L.; Ford, C. M.

    2014-01-01

    Berries of the cultivated grapevine Vitis vinifera are notably responsive to temperature, which can influence fruit quality and hence the future compatibility of varieties with their current growing regions. Organic acids represent a key component of fruit organoleptic quality and their content is significantly influenced by temperature. The objectives of this study were to (i) manipulate thermal regimes to realistically capture warming-driven reduction of malate content in Shiraz berries, and (ii) investigate the mechanisms behind temperature-sensitive malate loss and the potential downstream effects on berry metabolism. In the field we compared untreated controls at ambient temperature with longer and milder warming (2–4 °C differential for three weeks; Experiment 1) or shorter and more severe warming (4–6 °C differential for 11 days; Experiment 2). We complemented field trials with control (25/15 °C) and elevated (35/20 °C) day/night temperature controlled-environment trials using potted vines (Experiment 3). Elevating maximum temperatures (4–10 °C above controls) during pre-véraison stages led to higher malate content, particularly with warmer nights. Heating at véraison and ripening stages reduced malate content, consistent with effects typically seen in warm vintages. However, when minimum temperatures were also raised by 4–6 °C, malate content was not reduced, suggesting that the regulation of malate metabolism differs during the day and night. Increased NAD-dependent malic enzyme activity and decreased phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and pyruvate kinase activities, as well as the accumulation of various amino acids and γ-aminobutyric acid, suggest enhanced anaplerotic capacity of the TCA cycle and a need for coping with decreased cytosolic pH in heated fruit. PMID:25180109

  17. The mammalian homologue of yeast Afg1 ATPase (lactation elevated 1) mediates degradation of nuclear-encoded complex IV subunits.

    PubMed

    Cesnekova, Jana; Rodinova, Marie; Hansikova, Hana; Houstek, Josef; Zeman, Jiri; Stiburek, Lukas

    2016-03-15

    Mitochondrial protein homeostasis is crucial for cellular function and integrity and is therefore maintained by several classes of proteins possessing chaperone and/or proteolytic activities. In the present study, we focused on characterization of LACE1 (lactation elevated 1) function in mitochondrial protein homeostasis. LACE1 is the human homologue of yeast mitochondrial Afg1 (ATPase family gene 1) ATPase, a member of the SEC18-NSF, PAS1, CDC48-VCP, TBP family. Yeast Afg1 was shown to mediate degradation of mitochondrially encoded complex IV subunits, and, on the basis of its similarity to CDC48 (p97/VCP), it was suggested to facilitate extraction of polytopic membrane proteins. We show that LACE1, which is a mitochondrial integral membrane protein, exists as part of three complexes of approximately 140, 400 and 500 kDa and is essential for maintenance of fused mitochondrial reticulum and lamellar cristae morphology. We demonstrate that LACE1 mediates degradation of nuclear-encoded complex IV subunits COX4 (cytochrome c oxidase 4), COX5A and COX6A, and is required for normal activity of complexes III and IV of the respiratory chain. Using affinity purification of LACE1-FLAG expressed in a LACE1-knockdown background, we show that the protein interacts physically with COX4 and COX5A subunits of complex IV and with mitochondrial inner-membrane protease YME1L. Finally, we demonstrate by ectopic expression of both K142A Walker A and E214Q Walker B mutants, that an intact ATPase domain is essential for LACE1-mediated degradation of nuclear-encoded complex IV subunits. Thus the present study establishes LACE1 as a novel factor with a crucial role in mitochondrial protein homeostasis. PMID:26759378

  18. Degradation studies of 1, 6-diisocyanatohexane-extended poly (1, 4-butylene succinate) - bioactive glass scaffolds for bone tissue repair applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Kulwinder; Singh, K. J.; Anand, Vikas

    2016-05-01

    Bio composite scaffolds prepared from polymer and bio glass provide necessary sites for bone tissue regeneration. In the presented work, bioactive glass scaffolds have been prepared from 1, 6-diisocyanatohexane-extended poly (1, 4-butylene succinate) with different amount of bioactive glass powder by solvent casting method. Prepared scaffolds have been characterized by XRD, FTIR and FESEM techniques. Effect of content of bioactive glass on biodegradability has been investigated in detail.

  19. Time course of degradation of cardiac troponin I in patients with acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction: the ASSENT-2 troponin substudy.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Lene H; Christensen, Geir; Lund, Terje; Serebruany, Victor L; Granger, Chris B; Hoen, Ingvild; Grieg, Zanina; Alexander, John H; Jaffe, Allan S; Van Eyk, Jennifer E; Atar, Dan

    2006-11-10

    Although measurement of troponin is widely used for diagnosing acute myocardial infarction (AMI), its diagnostic potential may be increased by a more complete characterization of its molecular appearance and degradation in the blood. The aim of this study was to define the time course of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) degradation in patients with acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). In the ASSENT-2 substudy, 26 males hospitalized with STEMI were randomized to 2 different thrombolytic drugs within 6 hours after onset of symptoms. Blood samples were obtained just before initiation of thrombolysis and at 30 minutes intervals (7 samples per patient). Western blot analysis was performed using anti-cTnI antibodies and compared with serum concentrations of cTnI. All patients exceeded the cTnI cutoff for AMI during the sampling period; at initiation of therapy, 23 had elevated cTnI values. All patients demonstrated 2 bands on immunoblot: intact cTnI and a single degradation product as early as 90 minutes after onset of symptoms. On subsequent samples, 15 of 26 patients showed multiple degradation products with up to 7 degradation bands. The appearance of fragments was correlated with higher levels of cTnI (P<0.001) and time to initiation of treatment (P=0.058). This study defines for the first time the initial time course of cTnI degradation in STEMI. Intact cTnI and a single degradation product were detectable on immunoblot as early as 90 minutes after onset of symptoms with further degradation after 165 minutes. Infarct size and time to initiation of treatment was the major determinant for degradation. PMID:17038641

  20. Biocompatibility and Structural Features of Biodegradable Polymer Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Nasonova, M V; Glushkova, T V; Borisov, V V; Velikanova, E A; Burago, A Yu; Kudryavtseva, Yu A

    2015-11-01

    We performed a comparative analysis of physicochemical properties and biocompatibility of scaffolds of different composition on the basis of biodegradable polymers fabricated by casting and electrospinning methods. For production of polyhydroxyalkanoate-based scaffolds by electrospinning method, the optimal concentration of the polymer was 8-10%. Fiber diameter and properties of the scaffold produced by electrospinning method depended on polymer composition. Addition of polycaprolactone increased elasticity of the scaffolds. Bio- and hemocompatibility of the scaffolds largely depended on the composition formulation and method of scaffold fabrication. Polylactide introduced into the composition of polyhydroxybutyrate-oxyvalerate scaffolds accelerated degradation and increased adhesive properties of the scaffolds. PMID:26608377

  1. Solvent/Non-Solvent Sintering To Make Microsphere Scaffolds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laurencin, Cato T.; Brown, Justin L.; Nair, Lakshmi

    2011-01-01

    A solvent/non-solvent sintering technique has been devised for joining polymeric microspheres to make porous matrices for use as drug-delivery devices or scaffolds that could be seeded with cells for growing tissues. Unlike traditional sintering at elevated temperature and pressure, this technique is practiced at room temperature and pressure and, therefore, does not cause thermal degradation of any drug, protein, or other biochemical with which the microspheres might be loaded to impart properties desired in a specific application. Also, properties of scaffolds made by this technique are more reproducible than are properties of comparable scaffolds made by traditional sintering. The technique involves the use of two miscible organic liquids: one that is and one that is not a solvent for the affected polymer. The polymeric microspheres are placed in a mold having the size and shape of the desired scaffold, then the solvent/non-solvent mixture is poured into the mold to fill the void volume between the microspheres, then the liquid mixture is allowed to evaporate. Some of the properties of the resulting scaffold can be tailored through choice of the proportions of the liquids and the diameter of the microspheres.

  2. Scaffolding and Metacognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holton, Derek; Clarke, David

    2006-01-01

    This paper proposes an expanded conception of scaffolding with four key elements: (1) scaffolding agency--expert, reciprocal, and self-scaffolding; (2) scaffolding domain--conceptual and heuristic scaffolding; (3) the identification of self-scaffolding with metacognition; and (4) the identification of six zones of scaffolding activity; each zone…

  3. Evaluation of biodegradable elastic scaffolds made of anionic polyurethane for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Meng-Chao; Hung, Kun-Che; Hung, Shih-Chieh; Hsu, Shan-hui

    2015-01-01

    Biodegradable polyurethane (PU) was synthesized by a water-based process. The process rendered homogenous PU nanoparticles (NPs). Spongy PU scaffolds in large dimensions were obtained by freeze-drying the PU NP dispersion. The spongy scaffolds were characterized in terms of the porous structure, wettability, mechanical properties, degradation behavior, and degradation products. The capacity as cartilage tissue engineering scaffolds was evaluated by growing chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in the scaffolds. Scaffolds made from the PU dispersion had excellent hydrophilicity, porosity, and water absorption. Examination by micro-computed tomography confirmed that PU scaffolds had good pore interconnectivity. The degradation rate of the scaffolds in phosphate buffered saline was much faster than that in papain solution or in deionized water at 37°C. The biodegradable PU appeared to be degraded via the cleavage of ester linkage The intrinsic elastic property of PU and the gyroid-shape porous structure of the scaffolds may have accounted for the outstanding strain recovery (87%) and elongation behavior (257%) of the PU scaffolds, compared to conventional poly(d,l-lactide) (PLA) scaffolds. Chondrocytes were effectively seeded in PU scaffolds without pre-wetting. They grew better and secreted more glycosaminoglycan in PU scaffolds vs. PLA scaffolds. Human MSCs showed greater chondrogenic gene expression in PU scaffolds than in PLA scaffolds after induction. Based on the favorable hydrophilicity, elasticity, and regeneration capacities, the novel biodegradable PU scaffolds may be superior to the conventional biodegradable scaffolds in cartilage tissue engineering applications. PMID:25460599

  4. The use of UAV to document sloping landscapes to produce digital elevation models to examine environmental degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Themistocleous, K.; Agapiou, A.; Papadavid, G.; Christoforou, M.; Hadjimitsis, D. G.

    2015-10-01

    This paper focuses on the use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) over the study area of Pissouri in Cyprus to document the sloping landscapes of the area. The study area has been affected by overgrazing, which has led to shifts in the vegetation patterns and changing microtopography of the soil. The UAV images were used to generate digital elevation models (DEMs) to examine the changes in microtopography. Next to that orthophotos were used to detect changes in vegetation patterns. The combined data of the digital elevation models and the orthophotos will be used to detect the occurrence of catastrophic shifts and mechanisms for desertification in the study area due to overgrazing. This study is part of the "CASCADE- Catastrophic shifts in dryland" project.

  5. Hybrid Macro-Porous Titanium Ornamented by Degradable 3D Gel/nHA Micro-Scaffolds for Bone Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Bo; Ma, Pei; Chen, Jun; Wang, Hai; Wu, Gui; Li, Bo; Li, Qiang; Huang, Zhifeng; Qiu, Guixing; Wu, Zhihong

    2016-01-01

    Porous titanium is a kind of promising material for bone substitution, while its bio-inert property results in demand of modifications to improve the osteointegration capacity. In this study, gelatin (Gel) and nano-hydroxyapatite (nHA) were used to construct 3D micro-scaffolds in the pores of porous titanium in the ratios of Gel:nHA = 1:0, Gel:nHA = 1:1, and Gel:nHA = 1:3, respectively. Cell attachment and proliferation, and gene and protein expression levels of osteogenic markers were evaluated in MC3T3-E1 cells, followed by bone regeneration assessment in a rabbit radius defect model. All hybrid scaffolds with different composition ratio were found to have significant promotional effects in cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation, in which the group with Gel:nHA = 1:1 showed the best performance in vitro, as well as the most bone regeneration volume in vivo. This 3D micro-scaffolds modification may be an innovative method for porous titanium ornamentation and shows potential application values in clinic. PMID:27092492

  6. Scaffolded biology.

    PubMed

    Minelli, Alessandro

    2016-09-01

    Descriptions and interpretations of the natural world are dominated by dichotomies such as organism vs. environment, nature vs. nurture, genetic vs. epigenetic, but in the last couple of decades strong dissatisfaction with those partitions has been repeatedly voiced and a number of alternative perspectives have been suggested, from perspectives such as Dawkins' extended phenotype, Turner's extended organism, Oyama's Developmental Systems Theory and Odling-Smee's niche construction theory. Last in time is the description of biological phenomena in terms of hybrids between an organism (scaffolded system) and a living or non-living scaffold, forming unit systems to study processes such as reproduction and development. As scaffold, eventually, we can define any resource used by the biological system, especially in development and reproduction, without incorporating it as happens in the case of resources fueling metabolism. Addressing biological systems as functionally scaffolded systems may help pointing to functional relationships that can impart temporal marking to the developmental process and thus explain its irreversibility; revisiting the boundary between development and metabolism and also regeneration phenomena, by suggesting a conceptual framework within which to investigate phenomena of regular hypermorphic regeneration such as characteristic of deer antlers; fixing a periodization of development in terms of the times at which a scaffolding relationship begins or is terminated; and promoting plant galls to legitimate study objects of developmental biology. PMID:27287514

  7. Polyetheretherketone/poly (glycolic acid) blend scaffolds with biodegradable properties.

    PubMed

    Shuai, Chenying; Wu, Ping; Zhong, Yancheng; Feng, Pei; Gao, Chengde; Huang, Wei; Zhou, Zhiyang; Chen, Li; Shuai, Cijun

    2016-10-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) is widely applied in tissue engineering due to its good biocompatibility and mechanical properties. However, the slow degradation rate limits its further application. In this study, PEEK blended with plyglycolicacid (PGA) was used to fabricate porous scaffolds via selective laser sintering. The results demonstrated that the blend scaffolds could gradually degrade, and the degradation rate was able to regulate by tailoring the PGA content. Moreover, the scaffolds maintained good biocompatibility and suitable mechanical properties. These were explained as follows: PGA on the surface layer of the scaffolds might degrade first owing to its exposure to the ambient medium. The degraded PGA left much space, which could promote cell attachment and proliferation. Meanwhile, the slow degradation of PEEK was beneficial to sustaining the scaffolds' strength and stable structure. PMID:27398735

  8. Evident elevation of atmospheric monoterpenes due to degradation-induced species changes in a semi-arid grassland.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongjun; Wang, Xinming; Zhang, Yanli; Mu, Yujing; Han, Xingguo

    2016-01-15

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) emitted from plants have substantial effects on atmospheric chemistry/physics and feedbacks on ecosystem function. The on-going climate change and anthropogenic disturbance have been confirmed to cause the evident degradation of grassland with shift of plant community, and hence BVOCs emissions were suspected to be altered due to the different BOVCs emission potentials of different species. In this study, we investigated BVOCs concentration above ground surface during growing season in a degraded semi-arid grassland (41°2' N-45°6' N, 113°5'-117°8') in Inner Mongolia. The observed monoterpenes' concentrations varied from 0.10 to 215.78 μg m(-3) (34.88 ± 9.73 μg m(-3) in average) across 41 sites. Compared to non-degraded grassland, concentrations of monoterpenes were about 180 times higher at the sites dominated by subshrub--Artemisia frigida, a preponderant species under drought stress and over-grazing. The biomass of A. frigida explained 51.39% of the variation of monoterpenes' concentrations. α-pinene, β-pinene and γ-terpinene dominated in the 10 determined monoterpenes, accounting for 37.72 ± 2.98%, 14.65 ± 2.55% and 10.50 ± 2.37% of the total monoterpenes concentration, respectively. Low isoprene concentrations (≤ 3.25 μg m(-3)) were found and sedge biomass contributed about 51.76% to their spatial variation. α-pinene and isoprene emissions at noon were as high as 515.53 ± 88.34 μg m(-2)h(-1) and 7606.19 ± 1073.94 μg m(-2) h(-1) in A. frigida- and sedge-dominated areas where their biomass were 236.90 g m(-2) and 72.37 g m(-2), respectively. Our results suggested that the expansion of A. frigida and sedge caused by over-grazing and climatic stresses may increase local ambient BVOCs concentration in grassland. PMID:26490529

  9. Protease degradable electrospun fibrous hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Wade, Ryan J.; Bassin, Ethan J.; Rodell, Christopher B.; Burdick, Jason A.

    2015-01-01

    Electrospun nanofibers are promising in biomedical applications to replicate features of the natural extracellular matrix (ECM). However, nearly all electrospun scaffolds are either non-degradable or degrade hydrolytically, whereas natural ECM degrades proteolytically, often through matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Here, we synthesize reactive macromers that contain protease-cleavable and fluorescent peptides and are able to form both isotropic hydrogels and electrospun fibrous hydrogels through a photoinitiated polymerization. These biomimetic scaffolds are susceptible to protease-mediated cleavage in vitro in a protease dose dependent manner and in vivo in a subcutaneous mouse model using transdermal fluorescent imaging to monitor degradation. Importantly, materials containing an alternate and non-protease-cleavable peptide sequence are stable in both in vitro and in vivo settings. To illustrate the specificity in degradation, scaffolds with mixed fiber populations support selective fiber degradation based on individual fiber degradability. Overall, this represents a novel biomimetic approach to generate protease-sensitive fibrous scaffolds for biomedical applications. PMID:25799370

  10. Growth of a high-elevation large inland lake, associated with climate change and permafrost degradation in Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Kang, S.; Gong, T.; Lu, A.

    2010-03-01

    This study analyzed satellite images and long term climate variables from a high-elevation meteorological station (4730 m) and streamflow records to examine hydrological response of Nam Co Lake (4718 m), the largest lake on the Tibetan Plateau, over the last 50 years. The results show the lake area extended by 51.8 km2 (2.7% of the total area) when compared with the area in 1976. This change is associated with an annual precipitation increase of 65 mm (18.6%), annual and winter mean temperature increases of 0.9 °C and 2.1 °C respectively, an annual runoff increase of 20% and an annual pan evaporation decrease of about 2%, during the past 20 years. The year of the change point in annual precipitation, air temperature, annual pan evaporation and runoff occurred in 1971, 1983, 1997 and 1997, respectively. The timing of the lake growth corresponds with the abrupt increase in annual precipitation and runoff since the mid-1990s.

  11. Growth of a high-elevation large inland lake, associated with climate change and permafrost degradation in Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Kang, S.; Gong, T.; Lu, A.

    2009-08-01

    This study analyzed satellite images and long term climate variables from a high-elevation meteorological station (4730 m) and streamflow records to examine hydrological response of Nam Co Lake (4718 m), the largest lake on the Tibetan Plateau, over the last 50 years. The results show the lake area extended by 51.8 km2 (2.7% of the total area) when compared with the area in 1976. This change is associated with an annual precipitation increase of 65 mm (18.6%), annual and winter mean temperature increases of 0.9°C and 2.1°C respectively, an annual runoff increase of 20% and an annual pan evaporation decrease of about 2%, during the past 20 years. The year of the change point in annual precipitation, air temperature, annual pan evaporation and runoff occurred in 1971, 1983, 1997 and 1997, respectively. The timing of the lake growth corresponds with the abrupt increase in annual precipitation and runoff since the mid-1990s. This study suggests a strong positive water balance in the largest inland lake on the Tibetan Plateau.

  12. Degradable segmented polyurethane elastomers for bone tissue engineering: effect of polycaprolactone content.

    PubMed

    Kavlock, Katherine D; Whang, Kyumin; Guelcher, Scott A; Goldstein, Aaron S

    2013-01-01

    Segmented polyurethanes (PURs), consisting of degradable poly(a-hydroxy ester) soft segments and aminoacid-derived chain extenders, are biocompatible elastomers with tunable mechanical and degradative properties suitable for a variety of tissue-engineering applications. In this study, a family of linear PURs synthesized from poly(ϵ-caprolactone) (PCL) diol, 1,4-diisocyanobutane and tyramine with theoretical PCL contents of 65-80 wt% were processed into porous foam scaffolds and evaluated for their ability to support osteoblastic differentiation in vitro. Differential scanning calorimetry and mechanical testing of the foams indicated increasing polymer crystallinity and compressive modulus with increasing PCL content. Next, bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) were seeded into PUR scaffolds, as well as poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) scaffolds, and maintained under osteogenic conditions for 14 and 21 days. Analysis of cell number indicated a systematic decrease in cell density with increasing PUR stiffness at both 14 and 21 days in culture. However, at these same time points the relative mRNA expression for the bone-specific proteins osteocalcin and the growth factors bone morphogenetic protein-2 and vascular endothelial growth factor gene expression were similar among the PURs. Finally, prostaglandin E2 production, alkaline phosphatase activity and osteopontin mRNA expression were highly elevated on the most-crystalline PUR scaffold as compared to the PLGA and PUR scaffolds. These results suggest that both the modulus and crystallinity of the PUR scaffolds influence cell proliferation and the expression of osteoblastic proteins. PMID:22304961

  13. Porous Biodegradable Metals for Hard Tissue Scaffolds: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Yusop, A. H.; Bakir, A. A.; Shaharom, N. A.; Abdul Kadir, M. R.; Hermawan, H.

    2012-01-01

    Scaffolds have been utilized in tissue regeneration to facilitate the formation and maturation of new tissues or organs where a balance between temporary mechanical support and mass transport (degradation and cell growth) is ideally achieved. Polymers have been widely chosen as tissue scaffolding material having a good combination of biodegradability, biocompatibility, and porous structure. Metals that can degrade in physiological environment, namely, biodegradable metals, are proposed as potential materials for hard tissue scaffolding where biodegradable polymers are often considered as having poor mechanical properties. Biodegradable metal scaffolds have showed interesting mechanical property that was close to that of human bone with tailored degradation behaviour. The current promising fabrication technique for making scaffolds, such as computation-aided solid free-form method, can be easily applied to metals. With further optimization in topologically ordered porosity design exploiting material property and fabrication technique, porous biodegradable metals could be the potential materials for making hard tissue scaffolds. PMID:22919393

  14. Biodegradation and bioresorption of poly(ɛ-caprolactone) nanocomposite scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Mkhabela, Vuyiswa; Ray, Suprakas Sinha

    2015-08-01

    A new type of hybrid three-dimensional scaffolds was prepared using poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL) and chitosan-modified montmorillonite by solvent casting and particulate leaching method. The scaffolds were characterized by scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and dynamic mechanical analysis to study the structural and mechanical properties. The resulting scaffolds displayed high porosity with highly interconnected pores. EDS analysis confirmed the elemental composition of the scaffolds. The phase composition of the scaffolds was shown by XRD, which also indicated a decrease in crystallinity with the introduction of nanoclay. Biodegradability studies which were conducted in simulated physiological conditions over a period of four weeks revealed that the PCL-based scaffolds degraded by hydrolysis at a slow rate. The overall bioresorbability was also slow, with the composite-based scaffolds recording a faster rate than the neat polymer-based scaffold. PMID:25952165

  15. Microstructure design of biodegradable scaffold and its effect on tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuhang; Zhou, Shiwei; Li, Qing

    2011-08-01

    Biodegradable scaffolds play a critical role in therapeutic tissue engineering, in which the matrix degradation and tissue ingrowth are of particular importance for determining the ongoing performance of tissue-scaffold system during regenerative process. This paper aims to explore the mechanobiological process within biodegradable scaffolds, where the representative volume element (RVE) is extracted from periodic scaffold micro-architectures as a base-cell design model. The degradation of scaffold matrix is modeled in terms of a stochastic hydrolysis process enhanced by diffusion-controlled autocatalysis; and the tissue ingrowth is modeled through the mechano-regulatory theory. By using the finite element based homogenization technique and topology optimization approach, the effective properties of various periodic scaffold structures are obtained. To explore the effect of scaffold design on the mechanobiological evolutions of tissue-scaffold systems, different scaffold architectures are considered for polymer degradation and tissue regeneration. It is found that the different tissues can grow into the degraded voids inside the polymer matrix. It is demonstrated that the design of scaffold architecture has a considerable impact on the tissue regeneration outcome, which exhibits the importance of implementing different criteria in scaffold micro-structural design, before being fabricated via rapid prototyping technique, e.g. solid free-form fabrication (SFF). This study models such an interactive process of scaffold degradation and tissue growth, thereby providing some new insights into design of biodegradable scaffold micro-architecture for tissue engineering. PMID:21529933

  16. Elevated Levels of Serum Fibrin and Fibrinogen Degradation Products Are Independent Predictors of Larger Coronary Plaques and Greater Plaque Necrotic Core

    PubMed Central

    Corban, Michel T; Hung, Olivia Y; Mekonnen, Girum; Eshtehardi, Parham; Eapen, Danny J; Rasoul-Arzrumly, Emad; Kassem, Hatem Al; Manocha, Pankaj; Ko, Yi-An; Sperling, Laurence S; Quyyumi, Arshed A; Samady, Habib

    2016-01-01

    Background Co-existence of vulnerable plaque and pro-thrombotic state may provoke acute coronary events. It was hypothesized that elevated serum levels of fibrin and fibrinogen degradation products (FDP) are associated with larger total plaque and necrotic core (NC) areas. Methods and Results Seventy-five patients presenting with stable anginal symptoms (69%) or stabilized acute coronary syndrome (ACS; 31%), and found to have non-obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) with a fractional flow reserve >0.8, were studied. Invasive virtual histology intravascular ultrasound (VH-IVUS) was performed in 68 LAD arteries, 6 circumflex arteries, and 1 right coronary artery. Serum FDP levels were measured using ELISA technique. Plaque volumetrics and composition were assessed in each VH-IVUS frame and averaged. The median age of patients was 56 (47–63) years; 52% were men and 23% had diabetes. The average length of coronary artery studied was 62 mm. After adjustment for systemic risk factors, medications, CRP levels and ACS, male gender (P<0.001) and serum FDP levels (P=0.02) were independent predictors of a larger NC area. Older age (P<0.001), male gender (P<0.0001) and increased serum FDP level (P=0.03) were associated with a larger plaque area. Conclusions In patients with CAD, a higher serum level of FDP is independently associated with larger plaques and greater plaque NC. PMID:26911453

  17. Mechanism of degradation of surface hardening at elevated temperature in TiAlV-alloys by in situ synchrotron radiation diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berberich, F.; Matz, W.; Kreißig, U.; Schell, N.; Mücklich, A.

    2003-01-01

    The surface hardness of the technically important alloy Ti-6Al-4V (wt.%) can be improved by nitrogen implantation. The structural mechanisms of hardening and of the stability of the improved hardness at elevated temperatures are studied. Ion implanted (II) and plasma immersion ion implanted (PII) samples were used. The formation of small TiN crystallites was detected in the as-implanted state, but only for the II samples a considerable surface hardness increase (factor 3) is observed. The in situ XRD experiments showed, that the TiN phase is stable up to temperatures of 650 °C for both types of implantation. At higher temperature Ti 2N is formed which is stable up to 770 °C. ERDA results indicate a diffusion of nitrogen into the bulk material. The redistribution of N is responsible for the hardness changes: a slight decrease for II samples but an improvement by a factor of 2.5 for PII samples. The improvements/degradations of hardness and wear are discussed in correlation with the nitrogen depth distribution below the surface.

  18. Effect of biodegradation and de novo matrix synthesis on the mechanical properties of valvular interstitial cell-seeded polyglycerol sebacate-polycaprolactone scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Sant, Shilpa; Iyer, Dharini; Gaharwar, Akhilesh K; Patel, Alpesh; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-04-01

    The development of living heart valves that grow with the patient is a promising strategy for heart valve replacements in pediatric patients. Despite active research in the field of tissue engineered heart valves there have been limited efforts to optimize the balance between biodegradation of the scaffolds and de novo extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis by cells and study their consequences on the mechanical properties of the cell-seeded construct. This study investigates the effect of in vitro degradation and ECM secretion on the mechanical properties of hybrid polyester scaffolds. The scaffolds were synthesized from blends of fast degrading polyglycerol sebacate (PGS) and slowly degrading polycaprolactone (PCL). PGS-PCL scaffolds were electrospun using a 2:1 ratio of PGS to PCL. Accelerated hydrolytic degradation in 0.1 mM sodium hydroxide revealed 2-fold faster degradation of PGS-PCL scaffolds compared with PCL scaffolds. Thermal analysis and scanning electron microscopy demonstrated marginal change in PCL scaffold properties, while PGS-PCL scaffolds showed preferential mass loss of PGS and thinning of the individual fibers during degradation. Consequently, the mechanical properties of PGS-PCL scaffolds decreased gradually with no significant change for PCL scaffolds during accelerated degradation. Valvular interstitial cells (VICs) seeded on PGS-PCL scaffolds showed higher ECM protein secretion compared with PCL. Thus the mechanical properties of the cell-seeded PCL scaffolds did not change significantly compared with acellular scaffolds, probably due to slower degradation and ECM deposition by VICs. In contrast, the PGS-PCL scaffolds exhibited a gradual decrease in the mechanical properties of the acellular scaffolds due to degradation, which was compensated for by new matrix secreted by VICs seeded on the scaffolds. Our study demonstrated that the faster degrading PGS component of PGS-PCL accelerated the degradation rate of the scaffolds. VICs, on the other

  19. Fabrication and properties of porous scaffold of magnesium phosphate/polycaprolactone biocomposite for bone tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Fan; Liu, Changsheng; O'Neill, Brian; Wei, Jie; Ngothai, Yung

    2012-07-01

    In this study, porous scaffolds made of magnesium phosphate (MP)/polycaprolactone (PCL) biocomposite were developed for bone tissue engineering applications. The composite scaffolds were fabricated by the particulate leaching method using sodium chloride particles as porogen. The obtained scaffold with porosity around 73% presents a porous structure with interconnected open pores. Hydrophilicity of the scaffolds was enhanced by the incorporation of MP component as demonstrated by the water contact angle measurement. The results of the in vitro degradation study show that the MP/PCL composite scaffolds degraded faster than PCL scaffolds in phosphate buffered saline (PBS). In addition, the degradation rate of the scaffolds could be tuned by adjusting the content of MP component in the composite. The results indicate that the MP/PCL composite scaffold has a potential application in bone tissue engineering.

  20. Fabrication of chitin-chitosan/nano TiO2-composite scaffolds for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Jayakumar, R; Ramachandran, Roshni; Divyarani, V V; Chennazhi, K P; Tamura, H; Nair, S V

    2011-03-01

    In this study, we prepared chitin-chitosan/nano TiO(2) composite scaffolds using lyophilization technique for bone tissue engineering. The prepared composite scaffold was characterized using SEM, XRD, FTIR and TGA. In addition, swelling, degradation and biomineralization capability of the composite scaffolds were evaluated. The developed composite scaffold showed controlled swelling and degradation when compared to the control scaffold. Cytocompatibility of the scaffold was assessed by MTT assay and cell attachment studies using osteoblast-like cells (MG-63), fibroblast cells (L929) and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Results indicated no sign of toxicity and cells were found attached to the pore walls within the scaffolds. These results suggested that the developed composite scaffold possess the prerequisites for tissue engineering scaffolds and it can be used for tissue engineering applications. PMID:21182857

  1. Synergistic Effect of Carbon Nanotubes and Graphene on Diopside Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tingting; Wu, Ping; Gao, Chengde; Feng, Pei; Xiao, Tao; Deng, Youwen; Shuai, Cijun; Peng, Shuping

    2016-01-01

    A synergetic effect between carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene on diopside (Di) scaffolds was demonstrated. 3D network architecture in the matrix was formed through the 1D CNTs inlaid among the 2D graphene platelets (GNPs). The mechanical properties of the CNTs/GNPs/Di scaffolds were significantly improved compared with the CNTs/Di scaffolds and GNPs/Di scaffolds. In addition, the scaffolds exhibited excellent apatite-forming ability, a modest degradation rate, and stable mechanical properties in simulated body fluid (SBF). Moreover, cell culturing tests indicated that the scaffolds supported the cells attachment and proliferation. Taken together, the CNTs/GNPs/Di scaffolds offered great potential for bone tissue engineering. PMID:27144173

  2. Elevating your elevator talk

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An important and often overlooked item that every early career researcher needs to do is compose an elevator talk. The elevator talk, named because the talk should not last longer than an average elevator ride (30 to 60 seconds), is an effective method to present your research and yourself in a clea...

  3. High-fructose feeding promotes accelerated degradation of hepatic LDL receptor and hypercholesterolemia in hamsters via elevated circulating PCSK9 levels

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Bin; Singh, Amar Bahadur; Azhar, Salman; Seidah, Nabil G.; Liu, Jingwen

    2015-01-01

    Background High fructose diet (HFD) induces dyslipidemia and insulin resistance in experimental animals and humans with incomplete mechanistic understanding. By utilizing mice and hamsters as in vivo models, we investigated whether high fructose consumption affects serum PCSK9 and liver LDL receptor (LDLR) protein levels. Results Feeding mice with a HFD increased serum cholesterol and reduced serum PCSK9 levels as compared with the mice fed a normal chow diet (NCD). In contrast to the inverse relationship in mice, serum PCSK9 and cholesterol levels were co-elevated in HFD-fed hamsters. Liver tissue analysis revealed that PCSK9 mRNA and protein levels were both reduced in mice and hamsters by HFD feeding, however, liver LDLR protein levels were markedly reduced by HFD in hamsters but not in mice. We further showed that circulating PCSK9 clearance rates were significantly lower in hamsters fed a HFD as compared with the hamsters fed NCD, providing additional evidence for the reduced hepatic LDLR function by HFD consumption. The majority of PCSK9 in hamster serum was detected as a 53 kDa N-terminus cleaved protein. By conducting in vitro studies, we demonstrate that this 53 kDa truncated hamster PCSK9 is functionally active in promoting hepatic LDLR degradation. Conclusion Our studies for the first time demonstrate that high fructose consumption increases serum PCSK9 concentrations and reduces liver LDLR protein levels in hyperlipidemic hamsters. The positive correlation between circulating cholesterol and PCSK9 and the reduction of liver LDLR protein in HFD-fed hamsters suggest that hamster is a better animal model than mouse to study the modulation of PCSK9/LDLR pathway by atherogenic diets. PMID:25682035

  4. Protease-degradable electrospun fibrous hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, Ryan J.; Bassin, Ethan J.; Rodell, Christopher B.; Burdick, Jason A.

    2015-03-01

    Electrospun nanofibres are promising in biomedical applications to replicate features of the natural extracellular matrix (ECM). However, nearly all electrospun scaffolds are either non-degradable or degrade hydrolytically, whereas natural ECM degrades proteolytically, often through matrix metalloproteinases. Here we synthesize reactive macromers that contain protease-cleavable and fluorescent peptides and are able to form both isotropic hydrogels and electrospun fibrous hydrogels through a photoinitiated polymerization. These biomimetic scaffolds are susceptible to protease-mediated cleavage in vitro in a protease dose-dependent manner and in vivo in a subcutaneous mouse model using transdermal fluorescent imaging to monitor degradation. Importantly, materials containing an alternate and non-protease-cleavable peptide sequence are stable in both in vitro and in vivo settings. To illustrate the specificity in degradation, scaffolds with mixed fibre populations support selective fibre degradation based on individual fibre degradability. Overall, this represents a novel biomimetic approach to generate protease-sensitive fibrous scaffolds for biomedical applications.

  5. Soy Protein Scaffold Biomaterials for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, Karen B.

    Developing functional biomaterials using highly processable materials with tailorable physical and bioactive properties is an ongoing challenge in tissue engineering. Soy protein is an abundant, natural resource with potential use for regenerative medicine applications. Preliminary studies show that soy protein can be physically modified and fabricated into various biocompatible constructs. However, optimized soy protein structures for tissue regeneration (i.e. 3D porous scaffolds) have not yet been designed. Furthermore, little work has established the in vivo biocompatibility of implanted soy protein and the benefit of using soy over other proteins including FDA-approved bovine collagen. In this work, freeze-drying and 3D printing fabrication processes were developed using commercially available soy protein to create porous scaffolds that improve cell growth and infiltration compared to other soy biomaterials previously reported. Characterization of scaffold structure, porosity, and mechanical/degradation properties was performed. In addition, the behavior of human mesenchymal stem cells seeded on various designed soy scaffolds was analyzed. Biological characterization of the cell-seeded scaffolds was performed to assess feasibility for use in liver tissue regeneration. The acute and humoral response of soy scaffolds implanted in an in vivo mouse subcutaneous model was also investigated. All fabricated soy scaffolds were modified using thermal, chemical, and enzymatic crosslinking to change properties and cell growth behavior. 3D printing allowed for control of scaffold pore size and geometry. Scaffold structure, porosity, and degradation rate significantly altered the in vivo response. Freeze-dried soy scaffolds had similar biocompatibility as freeze-dried collagen scaffolds of the same protein content. However, the soy scaffolds degraded at a much faster rate, minimizing immunogenicity. Interestingly, subcutaneously implanted soy scaffolds affected blood

  6. Elastase-Sensitive Elastomeric Scaffolds with Variable Anisotropy for Soft Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Jianjun; Fujimoto, Kazuro L.; Wagner, William R.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To develop elastase-sensitive polyurethane scaffolds that would be applicable to the engineering of mechanically active soft tissues. Methods A polyurethane containing an elastase-sensitive peptide sequence was processed into scaffolds by thermally induced phase separation. Processing conditions were manipulated to alter scaffold properties and anisotropy. The scaffold’s mechanical properties, degradation, and cytocompatibility using muscle-derived stem cells were characterized. Scaffold in vivo degradation was evaluated by subcutaneous implantation. Results When heat transfer was multidirectional, scaffolds had randomly oriented pores. Imposition of a heat transfer gradient resulted in oriented pores. Both scaffolds were flexible and relatively strong with mechanical properties dependent upon fabrication conditions such as solvent type, polymer concentration and quenching temperature. Oriented scaffolds exhibited anisotropic mechanical properties with greater tensile strength in the orientation direction. These scaffolds also supported muscle-derived stem cell growth more effectively than random scaffolds. The scaffolds expressed over 40% weight loss after 56 days in elastase containing buffer. Elastase-sensitive scaffolds were complete degraded after 8 weeks subcutaneous implantation in rats, markedly faster than similar polyurethanes that did not contain the peptide sequence. Conclusion The elastase-sensitive polyurethane scaffolds showed promise for application in soft tissue engineering where controlling scaffold mechanical properties and pore architecture are desirable. PMID:18509596

  7. The influence of scaffold material on chondrocytes in inflammatory conditions

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Heenam; Sun, Lin; Cairns, Dana M.; Rainbow, Roshni S.; Preda, Rucsanda Carmen; Kaplan, David L.; Zeng, Li

    2013-01-01

    Cartilage tissue engineering aims to repair damaged cartilage tissue in arthritic joints. As arthritic joints have significantly higher levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (such as IL-1β and TNFα that cause cartilage destruction, it is critical to engineer stable cartilage in an inflammatory environment. Biomaterial scaffolds constitute an important component of the microenvironment for chondrocytes in engineered cartilage. However, it remains unclear how scaffold material influences the response of chondrocytes seeded in these scaffolds under inflammatory stimuli. Here, we compared the response of articular chondrocytes seeded within three different polymeric scaffolding materials (silk, collagen and polylactic acid (PLA)) to IL-1β and TNFα. These scaffolds have different physical characteristics and yielded significant differences in the expression of genes associated with cartilage matrix production and degradation, cell adhesion and cell death. Silk and collagen scaffolds released pro-inflammatory cytokines faster and had higher uptake water abilities than PLA scaffolds. Correspondingly, chondrocytes cultured in silk and collagen scaffolds maintained higher levels of cartilage matrix than those in PLA, suggesting that these biophysical properties of scaffolds may regulate gene expression and response to inflammatory stimuli in chondrocytes. Based on this study, we concluded that selecting the proper scaffolding material will aid in the engineering of more stable cartilage tissues for cartilage repair; and that silk and collagen are the more optimal scaffolds in supporting the stability of 3D cartilage under inflammatory conditions. PMID:23333441

  8. Reinforcing Silk Scaffolds with Silk Particles

    PubMed Central

    Rajkhowa, Rangam; Gil, Eun Seok; Kluge, Jonathan; Numata, Keiji; Wang, Lijing; Kaplan, David L.

    2014-01-01

    Silk fibroin is a useful protein polymer for biomaterials and tissue engineering. In this work, porogen leached scaffolds prepared from aqueous and HFIP silk solutions were reinforced through the addition of silk particles. This led to about 40 times increase in the specific compressive modulus and the yield strength of HFIP-based scaffolds. This increase in mechanical properties resulted from the high interfacial cohesion between the silk matrix and the reinforcing silk particles, due to partial solubility of the silk particles in HFIP. The porosity of scaffolds was reduced from ≈90% (control) to ≈75% for the HFIP systems containing 200% particle reinforcement, while maintaining pore interconnectivity. The presence of the particles slowed the enzymatic degradation of silk scaffolds. PMID:20166230

  9. Multifunctional Thin Film Biomatrice Biosensor in a Degradable Scaffold Containing Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 (BMP-2) for Controlled Release in Skeletal Tissue Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDaniel, Harvey; Lomax, Linda

    2001-03-01

    Bone morphonogenetic proteins (BMP-2) have been under investigation for three decades. Deminerialized bone and extracts of deminerialized bone are o steoinductive with a temporal sequence of bone induction. Native and recombi nant BMP's have shown the ability, thru growth and differentiative factors t o induce de novo bone formation both invitro and invivo. Their principle fun ction is to induce transformation of undifferentiated mesenchymal cells into osteoblasts. Native and recombinant BMP's, when purified and used without carrier disp erse after implantation and exert no effect on bone induction. The delivery system provides the missing component to successsfully applying osteogenic p roteins for clinical need. Biological and physio-chemical properties are str ictly adhered tofor a successful delivery system. The BMP delivery system ca rrier for osteo inductive payload provided; 1)non tumorgenic genecity, 2) no n immunogenecity, 3) water insoluble, 4) biosorbability with predictable enz ymatic degradation, and 5) an optimized surface for compatibility, cell migr ation and attachment with a negative surface change that encouraged target c ell attachment. Being a controlled Release System, it binded the proteins wi th predictible BMP released kinetics. Porosity with interconnecting voids pr otected the BMP from noon specific proteolysis and promoted rapid vascular a nd mesenchymal invasion. Far wide ranging clinical applications of mechanica l and biofunctional requirements were met with the BMP delivery system. Cohe sion and malleability were reqiured forcontour augmentation, and reconstruct ion of the discontinuity defects, prevented dislocation and retained the sha pe and bone replaced the system. Biological systems have elastic activity associated with them. The activi ty was current associated with a time dependant biological/biochemical react ion (enzymic activity). Bioelectric phoenomena associated with charged molec ules in a biologic structure caused

  10. Scaffolder - software for manual genome scaffolding

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The assembly of next-generation short-read sequencing data can result in a fragmented non-contiguous set of genomic sequences. Therefore a common step in a genome project is to join neighbouring sequence regions together and fill gaps. This scaffolding step is non-trivial and requires manually editing large blocks of nucleotide sequence. Joining these sequences together also hides the source of each region in the final genome sequence. Taken together these considerations may make reproducing or editing an existing genome scaffold difficult. Methods The software outlined here, “Scaffolder,” is implemented in the Ruby programming language and can be installed via the RubyGems software management system. Genome scaffolds are defined using YAML - a data format which is both human and machine-readable. Command line binaries and extensive documentation are available. Results This software allows a genome build to be defined in terms of the constituent sequences using a relatively simple syntax. This syntax further allows unknown regions to be specified and additional sequence to be used to fill known gaps in the scaffold. Defining the genome construction in a file makes the scaffolding process reproducible and easier to edit compared with large FASTA nucleotide sequences. Conclusions Scaffolder is easy-to-use genome scaffolding software which promotes reproducibility and continuous development in a genome project. Scaffolder can be found at http://next.gs. PMID:22640820

  11. Biodegradable Fibrous Scaffolds with Diverse Properties by Electrospinning Candidates from a Combinatorial Macromer Library

    PubMed Central

    Metter, Robert B.; Ifkovits, Jamie L.; Hou, Kevin; Vincent, Ludovic; Hsu, Benjamin; Wang, Louis; Mauck, Robert L.; Burdick, Jason A.

    2009-01-01

    The properties of electrospun fibrous scaffolds, including degradation, mechanics and cellular interactions, are important for their use in tissue engineering applications. Although some diversity has been obtained previously in fibrous scaffolds, optimization of scaffold properties relies on iterative techniques in both polymer synthesis and processing. Here, we electrospun candidates from a combinatorial library of biodegradable and photopolymerizable poly(β-amino ester)s (PBAEs) to show that the diversity in properties found in this library is retained when processed into fibrous scaffolds. Specifically, three PBAE macromers were electrospun into scaffolds and possessed similar initial mechanical properties, but exhibited mass loss ranging from rapid (complete degradation within ∼2 weeks) to moderate (complete degradation within ∼ 3 months) to slow (only partial degradation after 3 months). These trends in mechanics and degradation mimicked what was previously observed in the bulk polymers. Although cellular adhesion was dependent on the polymer composition in films, adhesion to scaffolds that were electrospun with gelatin was similar on all formulations and controls. To further illustrate the diverse properties that are attainable in these systems, the fastest and slowest degrading polymers were electrospun together into one scaffold, but as distinct fiber populations. This dual-polymer scaffold exhibited behavior in mass loss and mechanics with time that fell between the single-polymer scaffolds. In general, this work indicates that combinatorial libraries may be an important source of information and specific polymer compositions for the fabrication of electrospun fibrous scaffolds with tunable properties. PMID:19853066

  12. Gradual pore formation in natural origin scaffolds throughout subcutaneous implantation

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Ana M.; Kretlow, James D.; Costa-Pinto, Ana R.; Malafaya, Patrícia B.; Fernandes, Emanuel M.; Neves, Nuno M.; Alves, Catarina M.; Mikos, Antonios G.; Kasper, F. Kurtis; Reis, Rui L.

    2012-01-01

    The present study employed a rat subcutaneous implantation model to investigate gradual in situ pore formation in a self-regulating degradable chitosan-based material, which comprises lysozyme incorporated into biomimetic calcium phosphate (CaP) coatings at the surface in order to control the scaffold degradation and subsequent pore formation. Specifically, the in vivo degradation of the scaffolds, the in situ pore formation and the tissue response were investigated. Chitosan or chitosan/starch scaffolds were studied with and without a CaP coating in the presence or absence of lysozyme for a total of 6 experimental groups. Twenty-four scaffolds per group were implanted, and eight scaffolds were retrieved at each of three time points (3, 6 and 12 weeks). Harvested samples were analyzed for weight loss, micro-computed tomography, and histological analysis. All scaffolds showed pronounced weight loss and pore formation as a function of time. The highest weight loss was 29.8 ± 1.5%, obtained at week 12 for CaP chitosan/starch scaffolds with lysozyme incorporated. Moreover, all experimental groups showed a significant increase in porosity after 12 weeks. At all time points no adverse tissue reaction was observed, and as degradation increased, histological analysis showed cellular ingrowth throughout the implants. Using this innovative methodology, the ability to gradually generate pores in situ was clearly demonstrated in vivo. PMID:22213676

  13. ASTM International Workshop on Standards & Measurements for Tissue Engineering Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Carl G.; Yaszemski, Michael J.; Ratcliffe, Anthony; Tomlins, Paul; Luginbuehl, Reto; Tesk, John A.

    2016-01-01

    The “Workshop on Standards & Measurements for Tissue Engineering Scaffolds” was held on May 21, 2013 in Indianapolis, IN and was sponsored by the ASTM International (ASTM). The purpose of the workshop was to identify the highest priority items for future standards work for scaffolds used in the development and manufacture of tissue engineered medical products (TEMPs). Eighteen speakers and 78 attendees met to assess current scaffold standards and to prioritize needs for future standards. A key finding was that the ASTM TEMPs subcommittees (F04.41-46) have many active “guide” documents for educational purposes, but that few standard “test methods” or “practices” have been published. Overwhelmingly, the most clearly identified need was standards for measuring the structure of scaffolds, followed by standards for biological characterization, including in vitro testing, animal models and cell-material interactions. The third most pressing need was to develop standards for assessing the mechanical properties of scaffolds. Additional needs included standards for assessing scaffold degradation, clinical outcomes with scaffolds, effects of sterilization on scaffolds, scaffold composition and drug release from scaffolds. Discussions also highlighted the need for additional scaffold reference materials and the need to use them for measurement traceability. Finally, dialogue emphasized the needs to promote the use of standards in scaffold fabrication, characterization, and commercialization and to assess the use and impact of standards in the TEMPs community. Many scaffold standard needs have been identified and focus should now turn to generating these standards to support the use of scaffolds in TEMPs. PMID:25220952

  14. ASTM international workshop on standards and measurements for tissue engineering scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Simon, Carl G; Yaszemski, Michael J; Ratcliffe, Anthony; Tomlins, Paul; Luginbuehl, Reto; Tesk, John A

    2015-07-01

    The "Workshop on Standards & Measurements for Tissue Engineering Scaffolds" was held on May 21, 2013 in Indianapolis, IN, and was sponsored by the ASTM International (ASTM). The purpose of the workshop was to identify the highest priority items for future standards work for scaffolds used in the development and manufacture of tissue engineered medical products (TEMPs). Eighteen speakers and 78 attendees met to assess current scaffold standards and to prioritize needs for future standards. A key finding was that the ASTM TEMPs subcommittees (F04.41-46) have many active "guide" documents for educational purposes, but few standard "test methods" or "practices." Overwhelmingly, the most clearly identified need was standards for measuring the structure of scaffolds, followed by standards for biological characterization, including in vitro testing, animal models and cell-material interactions. The third most pressing need was to develop standards for assessing the mechanical properties of scaffolds. Additional needs included standards for assessing scaffold degradation, clinical outcomes with scaffolds, effects of sterilization on scaffolds, scaffold composition, and drug release from scaffolds. Discussions highlighted the need for additional scaffold reference materials and the need to use them for measurement traceability. Workshop participants emphasized the need to promote the use of standards in scaffold fabrication, characterization, and commercialization. Finally, participants noted that standards would be more broadly accepted if their impact in the TEMPs community could be quantified. Many scaffold standard needs have been identified and focus is turning to generating these standards to support the use of scaffolds in TEMPs. PMID:25220952

  15. Microporous Dermal-Like Electrospun Scaffolds Promote Accelerated Skin Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Bonvallet, Paul P.; Culpepper, Bonnie K.; Bain, Jennifer L.; Schultz, Matthew J.; Thomas, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to synthesize skin substitutes that blend native extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules with synthetic polymers which have favorable mechanical properties. To this end, scaffolds were electrospun from collagen I (col) and poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL), and then pores were introduced mechanically to promote fibroblast infiltration, and subsequent filling of the pores with ECM. A 70:30 col/PCL ratio was determined to provide optimal support for dermal fibroblast growth, and a pore diameter, 160 μm, was identified that enabled fibroblasts to infiltrate and fill pores with native matrix molecules, including fibronectin and collagen I. Mechanical testing of 70:30 col/PCL scaffolds with 160 μm pores revealed a tensile strength of 1.4 MPa, and the scaffolds also exhibited a low rate of contraction (<19%). Upon implantation, scaffolds should support epidermal regeneration; we, therefore, evaluated keratinocyte growth on fibroblast-embedded scaffolds with matrix-filled pores. Keratinocytes formed a stratified layer on the surface of fibroblast-remodeled scaffolds, and staining for cytokeratin 10 revealed terminally differentiated keratinocytes at the apical surface. When implanted, 70:30 col/PCL scaffolds degraded within 3–4 weeks, an optimal time frame for degradation in vivo. Finally, 70:30 col/PCL scaffolds with or without 160 μm pores were implanted into full-thickness critical-sized skin defects. Relative to nonporous scaffolds or sham wounds, scaffolds with 160 μm pores induced accelerated wound closure, and stimulated regeneration of healthy dermal tissue, evidenced by a more normal-appearing matrix architecture, blood vessel in-growth, and hair follicle development. Collectively, these results suggest that microporous electrospun scaffolds are effective substrates for skin regeneration. PMID:24568584

  16. Electrospun fibrinogen: feasibility as a tissue engineering scaffold in a rat cell culture model.

    PubMed

    McManus, Michael C; Boland, Eugene D; Simpson, David G; Barnes, Catherine P; Bowlin, Gary L

    2007-05-01

    Fibrinogen has a well-established tissue engineering track record because of its ability to induce improved cellular interaction and scaffold remodeling compared to synthetic scaffolds. While the feasibility of electrospinning fibrinogen scaffolds of submicron diameter fibers and their mechanical properties have been demonstrated, in vitro cellular interaction has not yet been evaluated. The goal of this study was to demonstrate, based on cellular interaction and scaffold remodeling, that electrospun fibrinogen can be used successfully as a tissue engineering scaffold. Electrospun fibrinogen scaffolds were disinfected, seeded with neonatal rat cardiac fibroblasts, and cultured for 2, 7, and 14 days. Cultures were treated to regulate scaffold degradation by either supplementing serum-containing media with aprotinin or crosslinking the scaffolds with glutaraldehyde vapor. Biocompatibility was assessed through a WST-1 cell proliferation assay. Postculture scaffolds were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy and histology. Cell culture demonstrated that fibroblasts readily migrate into and remodel electrospun fibrinogen scaffolds with deposition of native collagen. Supplementation of culture media with different concentrations of aprotinin-modulated scaffold degradation in a predictable fashion, but glutaraldehyde vapor fixation was less reliable. Based on the observed cellular interactions, there is tremendous potential for electrospun fibrinogen as a tissue engineering scaffold. PMID:17120217

  17. Degradable Segmented Polyurethane Elastomers for Bone Tissue Engineering: Effect of Polycaprolactone Content

    PubMed Central

    Kavlock, Katherine D.; Whang, Kyumin; Guelcher, Scott A.; Goldstein, Aaron S.

    2016-01-01

    Segmented polyurethanes (PURs) – consisting of degradable poly(α-hydroxy ester) soft segments and amino acid-derived chain extenders – are biocompatible elastomers with tunable mechanical and degradative properties suitable for a variety of tissue engineering applications. In this study, a family of linear PURs synthesized from poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) diol, 1,4-diisocyanobutane and tyramine with theoretical PCL contents of 65 to 80 wt% were processed into porous foam scaffolds and evaluated for their ability to support osteoblastic differentiation in vitro. Differential scanning calorimetry and mechanical testing of the foams indicated increasing polymer crystallinity and compressive modulus with increasing PCL content. Next, bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) were seeded into PUR scaffolds – as well as poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) scaffolds – and maintained under osteogenic conditions for 14 and 21 days. Analysis of cell number indicated a systematic decrease in cell density with increasing PUR stiffness at both 14 and 21 days in culture. However, at these same time points the relative mRNA expression for the bone-specific proteins osteocalcin and the growth factors bone morphogenetic protein-2 and vascular endothelial growth factor gene expression were similar among the PURs. Finally, prostaglandin E2 production, alkaline phosphatase activity, and osteopontin mRNA expression were highly elevated on the most-crystalline PUR scaffold as compared to the PLGA and PUR scaffolds. These results suggest that both the modulus and crystallinity of the PUR scaffolds influence cell proliferation and the expression of osteoblastic proteins. PMID:22304961

  18. Novel Biodegradable Porous Scaffold Applied to Skin Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui-Min; Chou, Yi-Ting; Wen, Zhi-Hong; Wang, Zhao-Ren; Chen, Chun-Hong; Ho, Mei-Ling

    2013-01-01

    Skin wound healing is an important lifesaving issue for massive lesions. A novel porous scaffold with collagen, hyaluronic acid and gelatin was developed for skin wound repair. The swelling ratio of this developed scaffold was assayed by water absorption capacity and showed a value of over 20 g water/g dried scaffold. The scaffold was then degraded in time- and dose-dependent manners by three enzymes: lysozyme, hyaluronidase and collagenase I. The average pore diameter of the scaffold was 132.5±8.4 µm measured from SEM images. With human skin cells growing for 7 days, the SEM images showed surface fractures on the scaffold due to enzymatic digestion, indicating the biodegradable properties of this scaffold. To simulate skin distribution, the human epidermal keratinocytes, melanocytes and dermal fibroblasts were seeded on the porous scaffold and the cross-section immunofluorescent staining demonstrated normal human skin layer distributions. The collagen amount was also quantified after skin cells seeding and presented an amount 50% higher than those seeded on culture wells. The in vivo histological results showed that the scaffold ameliorated wound healing, including decreasing neutrophil infiltrates and thickening newly generated skin compared to the group without treatments. PMID:23762223

  19. Microporous Nanofibrous Fibrin-based Scaffolds for Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Osathanon, Thanaphum; Linnes, Michael L.; Rajachar, Rupak M.; Ratner, Buddy D.; Somerman, Martha J.; Giachelli, Cecilia M.

    2008-01-01

    The fibrotic response of the body to synthetic polymers limits their success in tissue engineering and other applications. Though porous polymers have demonstrated improved healing, difficulty in controlling their pore sizes and pore interconnections has clouded the understanding of this phenomenon. In this study, a novel method to fabricate natural polymer/calcium phosphate composite scaffolds with tightly controllable pore size, pore interconnection, and calcium phosphate deposition was developed. Microporous, nanofibrous fibrin scaffolds were fabricated using sphere-templating methods. Composite scaffolds were created by solution deposition of calcium phosphate on fibrin surfaces or by direct incorporation of nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (nHA). The SEM results showed that fibrin scaffolds exhibited a highly porous and interconnected structure. Osteoblast-like cells, obtained from murine calvaria, attached, spread and showed a polygonal morphology on the surface of the biomaterial. Multiple cell layers and fibrillar matrix deposition were observed. Moreover, cells seeded on mineralized fibrin scaffolds exhibited significantly higher alkaline phosphatase activity as well as osteoblast marker gene expression compared to fibrin scaffolds and nHA incorporated fibrin scaffolds (0.25 g and 0.5 g). All types of scaffolds were degraded both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, these scaffolds promoted bone formation in a mouse calvarial defect model and the bone formation was enhanced by addition of rhBMP-2. PMID:18640716

  20. Vascular Guidance: Microstructural Scaffold Patterning for Inductive Neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Daniel; Chim, Harvey; Bader, Augustinus; Whiteman, Matthew; Schantz, Jan-Thorsten

    2011-01-01

    Current tissue engineering techniques are limited by inadequate vascularisation and perfusion of cell-scaffold constructs. Microstructural patterning through biomimetic vascular channels within a polymer scaffold might induce neovascularization, allowing fabrication of large engineered constructs. The network of vascular channels within a frontal-parietal defect in a patient, originating from the anterior branch of the middle meningeal artery, was modeled using computer-aided design (CAD) techniques and subsequently incorporated into polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffolds fabricated using fused deposition modeling (FDM). Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were seeded onto the scaffolds and implanted into a rat model, with an arteriovenous bundle inserted at the proximal extent of the vascular network. After 3 weeks, scaffolds were elevated as a prefabricated composite tissue-polymer flap and transferred using microsurgical technique. Histological examination of explanted scaffolds revealed vascular ingrowth along patterned channels, with abundant capillary and connective tissue formation throughout experimental scaffolds, while control scaffolds showed only granulation tissue. All prefabricated constructs transferred as free flaps survived and were viable. We term this concept “vascular guidance,” whereby neovascularization is guided through customized channels in a scaffold. Our technique might potentially allow fabrication of much larger tissue-engineered constructs than current technologies allow, as well as allowing tailored construct fabrication with a patient-specific vessel network based on CT scan data and CAD technology. PMID:21188080

  1. [Bone tissue engineering scaffolds].

    PubMed

    Fang, Liru; Weng, Wenjian; Shen, Ge; Han, Gaorong; Santos, J D; Du, Peiyi

    2003-03-01

    Bone tissue engineering may provide an alternative to the repairs to skeletal defects resulting from disease, trauma or surgery. Scaffold has played an important role in bone tissue engineering, which functions as the architecture for bone in growth. In this paper, the authors gave a brief introduction about the requirement of bone tissue engineering scaffold, the key of the design of scaffolds and the current research on this subject. PMID:12744187

  2. Immune Response to Biologic Scaffold Materials

    PubMed Central

    Badylak, Stephen F.; Gilbert, Thomas W.

    2008-01-01

    Biologic scaffold materials composed of mammalian extracellular matrix are commonly used in regenerative medicine and in surgical procedures for the reconstruction of numerous tissue and organs. These biologic materials are typically allogeneic or xenogeneic in origin and are derived from tissues such as small intestine, urinary bladder, dermis, and pericardium. The innate and acquired host immune response to these biologic materials and the effect of the immune response upon downstream remodeling events has been largely unexplored. Variables that affect the host response include manufacturing processes, the rate of scaffold degradation, and the presence of cross species antigens. This manuscript provides an overview of studies that have evaluated the immune response to biologic scaffold materials and variables that affect this response. PMID:18083531

  3. Electrospun Silk Biomaterial Scaffolds for Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaohui; Reagan, Michaela R; Kaplan, David L.

    2009-01-01

    Electrospinning is a versatile technique that enables the development of nanofiber-based biomaterial scaffolds. Scaffolds can be generated that are useful for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine since they mimic the nanoscale properties of certain fibrous components of the native extracellular matrix in tissues. Silk is a natural protein with excellent biocompatibility, remarkable mechanical properties as well as tailorable degradability. Integrating these protein polymer advantages with electrospinning results in scaffolds with combined biochemical, topographical and mechanical cues with versatility for a range of biomaterial, cell and tissue studies and applications. This review covers research related to electrospinning of silk, including process parameters, post treatment of the spun fibers, functionalization of nanofibers, and the potential applications for these material systems in regenerative medicine. Research challenges and future trends are also discussed. PMID:19643154

  4. Nano/macro porous bioactive glass scaffold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shaojie

    Bioactive glass (BG) and ceramics have been widely studied and developed as implants to replace hard tissues of the musculo-skeletal system, such as bones and teeth. Recently, instead of using bulk materials, which usually do not degrade rapidly enough and may remain in the human body for a long time, the idea of bioscaffold for tissue regeneration has generated much interest. An ideal bioscaffold is a porous material that would not only provide a three-dimensional structure for the regeneration of natural tissue, but also degrade gradually and, eventually be replaced by the natural tissue completely. Among various material choices the nano-macro dual porous BG appears as the most promising candidate for bioscaffold applications. Here macropores facilitate tissue growth while nanopores control degradation and enhance cell response. The surface area, which controls the degradation of scaffold can also be tuned by changing the nanopore size. However, fabrication of such 3D structure with desirable nano and macro pores has remained challenging. In this dissertation, sol-gel process combined with spinodal decomposition or polymer sponge replication method has been developed to fabricate the nano-macro porous BG scaffolds. Macropores up to 100microm are created by freezing polymer induced spinodal structure through sol-gel transition, while larger macropores (>200um) of predetermined size are obtained by the polymer sponge replication technique. The size of nanopores, which are inherent to the sol-gel method of glass fabrication, has been tailored using several approaches: Before gel point, small nanopores are generated using acid catalyst that leads to weakly-branched polymer-like network. On the other hand, larger nanopores are created with the base-catalyzed gel with highly-branched cluster-like structure. After the gel point, the nanostructure can be further modified by manipulating the sintering temperature and/or the ammonia concentration used in the solvent

  5. Degradation behavior at elevated temperature of LaNisub5-xSnsubxHsubz for x between 0.20 and 0.25

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, R. C., Jr.; Lindensmith, C. A.; Luo, S.; Flanagan, T. B.; Vogt, T.

    2000-01-01

    Systematic studies of the hydriding behavior of LaNi(sub 5-x)Sn(sub x)H(sub z) alloys with tin contents in the range between 0.20 and 0.25 have revealed changes in the pressure-composition-temperature (PCT) isotherms measured after heating the hydrides above 450 K. These changes are indications of degradation processes and increased disorder within the alloy structure.

  6. Rat costochondral cell characteristics on poly (L-lactide-co-epsilon-caprolactone) scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Honda, M; Morikawa, N; Hata, K; Yada, T; Morita, S; Ueda, M; Kimata, K

    2003-09-01

    This study was designed to examine the adhesion, proliferation, and morphology of chondrocytes on new scaffolds; and to examine these cells histologically for the ability of the chondrocytes to maintain chondrogenic properties after subcutaneous implantation into nude mice. Both 75:25 poly (L-lactide-co-epsilon-caprolactone) (75PLC) and 50:50 poly (L-lactide-co-epsilon-capro-lactone) scaffold (50PLC) were tested as a scaffold for rat costochondral resting zone chondrocytes in comparison with a type I collagen sponge scaffold (collagen scaffold). Both of the poly (L-lactide-co-epsilon-caprolactone) scaffolds (75PLC and 50PLC) were coated with type I collagen solution and the effects of the collagen coat (hybrid-PLC) were also examined. The hybrid-75PLC bound the same number of cells as the collagen scaffold, whereas the 75PLC and the 50PLC bound 60% and 50% fewer cells than the collagen scaffold, respectively. The cell growth on the scaffolds progressed with culture time in all scaffolds. Cell morphology was assessed by scanning electron microscopy for differences in the structure of cellular interaction. Chondrocytes on every scaffold maintained a spherical shape. The hybrid-PLCs were superior to the PLCs with respect to the number of cells attached. The PLCs had an advantageous degradation characteristic in that they retained their original shape better than the collagen scaffold. Additionally, in the PLCs seeded, the cells retained their integrity 4 weeks after implantation, although the volume of collagen scaffold decreased by 50%. PMID:12809780

  7. Dynamic Reciprocity in Cell-Scaffold Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Mauney, Joshua R.; Adam, Rosalyn M.

    2014-01-01

    Tissue engineering in urology has shown considerable promise. However, there is still much to understand, particularly regarding the interactions between scaffolds and their host environment, how these interactions regulate regeneration and how they may be enhanced for optimal tissue repair. In this review, we discuss the concept of dynamic reciprocity as applied to tissue engineering, i.e. how bi-directional signaling between implanted scaffolds and host tissues such as the bladder drives the process of constructive remodeling to ensure successful graft integration and tissue repair. The impact of scaffold content and configuration, the contribution of endogenous and exogenous bioactive factors, the influence of the host immune response and the functional interaction with mechanical stimulation are all considered. In addition, the temporal relationships of host tissue ingrowth, bioactive factor mobilization, scaffold degradation and immune cell infiltration, as well as the reciprocal signaling between discrete cell types and scaffolds are discussed. Improved understanding of these aspects of tissue repair will identify opportunities for optimization of repair that could be exploited to enhance regenerative medicine strategies for urology in future studies. PMID:25453262

  8. Hierarchical scaffolding with Bambus.

    PubMed

    Pop, Mihai; Kosack, Daniel S; Salzberg, Steven L

    2004-01-01

    The output of a genome assembler generally comprises a collection of contiguous DNA sequences (contigs) whose relative placement along the genome is not defined. A procedure called scaffolding is commonly used to order and orient these contigs using paired read information. This ordering of contigs is an essential step when finishing and analyzing the data from a whole-genome shotgun project. Most recent assemblers include a scaffolding module; however, users have little control over the scaffolding algorithm or the information produced. We thus developed a general-purpose scaffolder, called Bambus, which affords users significant flexibility in controlling the scaffolding parameters. Bambus was used recently to scaffold the low-coverage draft dog genome data. Most significantly, Bambus enables the use of linking data other than that inferred from mate-pair information. For example, the sequence of a completed genome can be used to guide the scaffolding of a related organism. We present several applications of Bambus: support for finishing, comparative genomics, analysis of the haplotype structure of genomes, and scaffolding of a mammalian genome at low coverage. Bambus is available as an open-source package from our Web site. PMID:14707177

  9. Preparation and Functional Assessment of Composite Chitosan-Nano-Hydroxyapatite Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Reves, Benjamin T.; Jennings, Jessica A.; Bumgardner, Joel D.; Haggard, Warren O.

    2012-01-01

    Composite chitosan-nano-hydroxyapatite microspheres and scaffolds prepared using a co-precipitation method have shown potential for use in bone regeneration. The goal of this research was to improve the functional properties of the composite scaffolds by modifying the fabrication parameters. The effects of degree of deacetylation (DDA), drying method, hydroxyapatite content and an acid wash on scaffold properties were investigated. Freeze-dried 61% DDA scaffolds degraded faster (3.5 ± 0.5% mass loss) than air-dried 61% DDA scaffolds and 80% DDA scaffolds, but had a lower compressive modulus of 0.12 ± 0.01 MPa. Air-dried 80% DDA scaffolds displayed the highest compressive modulus (3.79 ± 0.51 MPa) and these scaffolds were chosen as the best candidate for use in bone regeneration. Increasing the amount of hydroxyapatite in the air-dried 80% DDA scaffolds did not further increase the compressive modulus of the scaffolds. An acid wash procedure at pH 6.1 was found to increase the degradation of air-dried 80% DDA scaffolds from 1.3 ± 0.1% to 4.4 ± 0.4%. All of the formulations tested supported the proliferation of SAOS-2 cells. PMID:24956519

  10. Oxygen diffusion in marine-derived tissue engineering scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Boccardi, E; Belova, I V; Murch, G E; Boccaccini, A R; Fiedler, T

    2015-06-01

    This paper addresses the computation of the effective diffusivity in new bioactive glass (BG) based tissue engineering scaffolds. High diffusivities facilitate the supply of oxygen and nutrients to grown tissue as well as the rapid disposal of toxic waste products. The present study addresses required novel types of bone tissue engineering BG scaffolds that are derived from natural marine sponges. Using the foam replication method, the scaffold geometry is defined by the porous structure of Spongia Agaricina and Spongia Lamella. These sponges present the advantage of attaining scaffolds with higher mechanical properties (2-4 MPa) due to a decrease in porosity (68-76%). The effective diffusivities of these structures are compared with that of conventional scaffolds based on polyurethane (PU) foam templates, characterised by high porosity (>90%) and lower mechanical properties (>0.05 MPa). Both the spatial and directional variations of diffusivity are investigated. Furthermore, the effect of scaffold decomposition due to immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) on the diffusivity is addressed. Scaffolds based on natural marine sponges are characterised by lower oxygen diffusivity due to their lower porosity compared with the PU replica foams, which should enable the best oxygen supply to newly formed bone according the numerical results. The oxygen diffusivity of these new BG scaffolds increases over time as a consequence of the degradation in SBF. PMID:26111951

  11. Deacetylation of tumor-suppressor MST1 in Hippo pathway induces its degradation through HBXIP-elevated HDAC6 in promotion of breast cancer growth.

    PubMed

    Li, L; Fang, R; Liu, B; Shi, H; Wang, Y; Zhang, W; Zhang, X; Ye, L

    2016-08-01

    Reduction or loss of tumor-suppressor mammalian STE20-like kinase 1 (MST1) in Hippo pathway contributes to the tumorigenesis. However, the mechanism leading to reduction of MST1 in cancers remains poorly understood. In this study, we explored the hypothesis that the oncoprotein hepatitis B X-interacting protein (HBXIP) is involved in the reduction of MST1 in breast cancer. Immunohistochemical analysis of tissue microarrays revealed that the expression of HBXIP was negatively associated with that of MST1 in 98 clinical breast tissue samples. Then we found that HBXIP could posttranslationally downregulate MST1 in breast cancer cells. Mechanistically, we identified that MST1 could be acetylated on its lysine 35 residue in the cells. Strikingly, the treatment with trichostatin A, an inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HDACs), markedly increased the levels of MST1 acetylation and protein in the cells. Interestingly, the oncoprotein HBXIP could significantly inhibit acetylation of MST1, resulting in the reduction of MST1 protein. Notably, we revealed that the HDAC6 could reduce the protein levels of MST1 through deacetylation modification of MST1 in the cells. Moreover, our data revealed that HBXIP upregulated HDAC6 at the levels of mRNA and protein by activating transcription factor nuclear factor-κB. Deacetylation of MST1 promoted the interaction of MST1 with HSC70 in the cells, resulting in a lysosome-dependent degradation of MST1 via chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA). Functionally, the reduction of tumor-suppressor MST1 mediated by HBXIP promoted the growth of breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Thus we conclude that the deacetylation of MST1 mediated by HBXIP-enhanced HDAC6 results in MST1 degradation in a CMA manner in promotion of breast cancer growth. Our finding provides new insights into the mechanism of tumor-suppressor MST1 reduction in breast cancer. PMID:26657153

  12. Preparation and characterization of highly porous, biodegradable polyurethane scaffolds for soft tissue applications

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Jianjun; Fujimoto, Kazuro L.; Sacks, Michael S.; Wagner, William R.

    2010-01-01

    In the engineering of soft tissues, scaffolds with high elastance and strength coupled with controllable biodegradable properties are necessary. To fulfill such design criteria we have previously synthesized two kinds of biodegradable polyurethaneureas, namely poly(ester urethane)urea (PEUU) and poly(ether ester urethane)urea (PEEUU) from polycaprolactone, polycaprolactone-b-polyethylene glycol-b-polycaprolactone, 1,4-diisocyanatobutane and putrescine. PEUU and PEEUU were further fabricated into scaffolds by thermally induced phase separation using dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as a solvent. The effect of polymer solution concentration, quenching temperature and polymer type on pore morphology and porosity was investigated. Scaffolds were obtained with open and interconnected pores having sizes ranging from several μm to more than 150 μm and porosities of 80–97%. By changing the polymer solution concentration or quenching temperature, scaffolds with random or oriented tubular pores could be obtained. The PEUU scaffolds were flexible with breaking strains of 214% and higher, and tensile strengths of approximately 1.0 MPa, whereas the PEEUU scaffolds generally had lower strengths and breaking strains. Scaffold degradation in aqueous buffer was related to the porosity and polymer hydrophilicity. Smooth muscle cells were filtration seeded in the scaffolds and it was shown that both scaffolds supported cell adhesion and growth, with smooth muscle cells growing more extensively in the PEEUU scaffold. These biodegradable and flexible scaffolds demonstrate potential for future application as cell scaffolds in cardiovascular tissue engineering or other soft tissue applications. PMID:15626443

  13. 3. General view of elevators no. 2 and no. 3 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. General view of elevators no. 2 and no. 3 in background right, showing relation to associated Washburn Crosby Milling complex in foreground (left to right: utility building, A mill (with scaffolding), wheat house, Humboldt mill; elevator no. 1 in rear with gold medal flour sign), facing southeast - Washburn Crosby Company Elevators No. 2 & 3, 900 & 1000 Second Avenue, South, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, MN

  14. Human responses to augmented virtual scaffolding models.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Hongwei; Simeonov, Peter; Dotson, Brian; Ammons, Douglas; Kau, Tsui-Ying; Chiou, Sharon

    2005-08-15

    This study investigated the effect of adding real planks, in virtual scaffolding models of elevation, on human performance in a surround-screen virtual reality (SSVR) system. Twenty-four construction workers and 24 inexperienced controls performed walking tasks on real and virtual planks at three virtual heights (0, 6 m, 12 m) and two scaffolding-platform-width conditions (30, 60 cm). Gait patterns, walking instability measurements and cardiovascular reactivity were assessed. The results showed differences in human responses to real vs. virtual planks in walking patterns, instability score and heart-rate inter-beat intervals; it appeared that adding real planks in the SSVR virtual scaffolding model enhanced the quality of SSVR as a human - environment interface research tool. In addition, there were significant differences in performance between construction workers and the control group. The inexperienced participants were more unstable as compared to construction workers. Both groups increased their stride length with repetitions of the task, indicating a possibly confidence- or habit-related learning effect. The practical implications of this study are in the adoption of augmented virtual models of elevated construction environments for injury prevention research, and the development of programme for balance-control training to reduce the risk of falls at elevation before workers enter a construction job. PMID:16253942

  15. Three Dimensional Collagen Scaffold Promotes Intrinsic Vascularisation for Tissue Engineering Applications

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Elsa C.; Kuo, Shyh-Ming; Kong, Anne M.; Morrison, Wayne A.; Dusting, Gregory J.; Mitchell, Geraldine M.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we describe a porous 3-dimensional collagen scaffold material that supports capillary formation in vitro, and promotes vascularization when implanted in vivo. Collagen scaffolds were synthesized from type I bovine collagen and have a uniform pore size of 80 μm. In vitro, scaffolds seeded with primary human microvascular endothelial cells suspended in human fibrin gel formed CD31 positive capillary-like structures with clear lumens. In vivo, after subcutaneous implantation in mice, cell-free collagen scaffolds were vascularized by host neovessels, whilst a gradual degradation of the scaffold material occurred over 8 weeks. Collagen scaffolds, impregnated with human fibrinogen gel, were implanted subcutaneously inside a chamber enclosing the femoral vessels in rats. Angiogenic sprouts from the femoral vessels invaded throughout the scaffolds and these degraded completely after 4 weeks. Vascular volume of the resulting constructs was greater than the vascular volume of constructs from chambers implanted with fibrinogen gel alone (42.7±5.0 μL in collagen scaffold vs 22.5±2.3 μL in fibrinogen gel alone; p<0.05, n = 7). In the same model, collagen scaffolds seeded with human adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) produced greater increases in vascular volume than did cell-free collagen scaffolds (42.9±4.0 μL in collagen scaffold with human ASCs vs 25.7±1.9 μL in collagen scaffold alone; p<0.05, n = 4). In summary, these collagen scaffolds are biocompatible and could be used to grow more robust vascularized tissue engineering grafts with improved the survival of implanted cells. Such scaffolds could also be used as an assay model for studies on angiogenesis, 3-dimensional cell culture, and delivery of growth factors and cells in vivo. PMID:26900837

  16. Exact approaches for scaffolding

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents new structural and algorithmic results around the scaffolding problem, which occurs prominently in next generation sequencing. The problem can be formalized as an optimization problem on a special graph, the "scaffold graph". We prove that the problem is polynomial if this graph is a tree by providing a dynamic programming algorithm for this case. This algorithm serves as a basis to deduce an exact algorithm for general graphs using a tree decomposition of the input. We explore other structural parameters, proving a linear-size problem kernel with respect to the size of a feedback-edge set on a restricted version of Scaffolding. Finally, we examine some parameters of scaffold graphs, which are based on real-world genomes, revealing that the feedback edge set is significantly smaller than the input size. PMID:26451725

  17. Development of model hydroxyapatite bone scaffolds with multiscale porosity for potential load bearing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dellinger, Jennifer Gwynne

    2005-11-01

    Model hydroxyapatite (HA) bone scaffolds consisting of a latticed pattern of rods were fabricated by a solid freeform fabrication (SFF) technique based on the robotic deposition of colloidal pastes. An optimal HA paste formulation for this method was developed. Local porosity, i.e. microporosity (1--30 mum) and sintering porosity (less than 1 mum), were produced by including polymer microsphere porogens in the HA pastes and by controlling the sintering of the scaffolds. Scaffolds with and without local porosity were evaluated with and without in vitro accelerated degradation. Percent weight loss of the scaffolds and calcium and phosphorus concentrations in solution increased with degradation time. After degradation, compressive strength and modulus decreased significantly for scaffolds with local porosity, but did not change significantly for scaffolds without local porosity. The compressive strength and modulus of scaffolds without local porosity were comparable to human cortical bone and were significantly greater than the scaffolds with local porosity. Micropores in HA disks caused surface pits that increased the surface roughness as compared to non-microporous HA disks. Mouse mesenchymal stem cells extended their cell processes into these microporous pits on HA disks in vitro. ALP expression was prolonged, cell attachment strength increased, and ECM production appeared greater on microporous HA disks compared to non-microporous HA disks and tissue culture treated polystyrene controls. Scaffolds with and without microporosity were implanted in goats bones. Microporous scaffolds with rhBMP-2 increased the percent of the scaffold filled with bone tissue compared to microporous scaffolds without rhBMP-2. Lamellar bone inside scaffolds was aligned near the rods junctions whereas lamellar bone was aligned in a more random configuration away from the rod junctions. Microporous scaffolds stained darkly with toluidine blue beneath areas of contact with new bone. This

  18. The anisotropic mechanical behaviour of electro-spun biodegradable polymer scaffolds: Experimental characterisation and constitutive formulation.

    PubMed

    Limbert, Georges; Omar, Rodaina; Krynauw, Hugo; Bezuidenhout, Deon; Franz, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Electro-spun biodegradable polymer fibrous structures exhibit anisotropic mechanical properties dependent on the degree of fibre alignment. Degradation and mechanical anisotropy need to be captured in a constitutive formulation when computational modelling is used in the development and design optimisation of such scaffolds. Biodegradable polyester-urethane scaffolds were electro-spun and underwent uniaxial tensile testing in and transverse to the direction of predominant fibre alignment before and after in vitro degradation of up to 28 days. A microstructurally-based transversely isotropic hyperelastic continuum constitutive formulation was developed and its parameters were identified from the experimental stress-strain data of the scaffolds at various stages of degradation. During scaffold degradation, maximum stress and strain in circumferential direction decreased from 1.02 ± 0.23 MPa to 0.38 ± 0.004 MPa and from 46 ± 11 % to 12 ± 2 %, respectively. In longitudinal direction, maximum stress and strain decreased from 0.071 ± 0.016 MPa to 0.010 ± 0.007 MPa and from 69 ± 24 % to 8 ± 2 %, respectively. The constitutive parameters were identified for both directions of the non-degraded and degraded scaffold for strain range varying between 0% and 16% with coefficients of determination r(2)>0.871. The six-parameter constitutive formulation proved versatile enough to capture the varying non-linear transversely isotropic behaviour of the fibrous scaffold throughout various stages of degradation. PMID:26301317

  19. Boron nitride nanotubes enhance properties of chitosan-based scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Emanet, Melis; Kazanç, Emine; Çobandede, Zehra; Çulha, Mustafa

    2016-10-20

    With their low toxicity, high mechanical strength and chemical stability, boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) are good candidates to enhance the properties of polymers, composites and scaffolds. Chitosan-based scaffolds are exhaustively investigated in tissue engineering because of their biocompatibility and antimicrobial activity. However, their spontaneous degradation prevents their use in a range of tissue engineering applications. In this study, hydroxylated BNNTs (BNNT-OH) were included into a chitosan scaffold and tested for their mechanical strength, swelling behavior and biodegradability. The results show that inclusion of BNNTs-OH into the chitosan scaffold increases the mechanical strength and pore size at values optimal for high cellular proliferation and adhesion. The chitosan/BNNT-OH scaffold was also found to be non-toxic to Human Dermal Fibroblast (HDF) cells due to its slow degradation rate. HDF cell proliferation and adhesion were increased as compared to the chitosan-only scaffold as observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and fluorescent microscopy images. PMID:27474572

  20. Bioresorbable vascular scaffolds: Biodegradation, drug delivery and vascular remodeling.

    PubMed

    Tesfamariam, Belay

    2016-05-01

    The metallic stents with durable polymers have been effective in reducing the need for revascularization, but the permanent presence of the metal and polymer have been associated with persistent inflammation, hypersensitivity reactions and incidence of thrombosis. Recent innovations of bioresorbable polymers are in development which could serve as temporary scaffolds that degrade into molecules and eventually resorb overtime, and leave the artery free of any permanent prosthetic constraints. The transient scaffolding has the advantages of restoring blood vessel to natural state, improve vasomotor tone and increase lumen enlargement because of expansive remodeling following completion of polymer resorption. The success of bioresorbable vascular scaffolds will depend on the degradation timeline, such that the elastic recoil of the blood vessel and negative remodeling which could potentially lead to restenosis are prevented. Bioresorbable scaffolds with bulky backbone and thick struts could lead to prolonged biodegradation, alter blood flow dynamics and increase thrombogenicity. The development of bioresorbable scaffolds is challenging because of the complexity of finding an ideal balance of polymer biodegradation and controlled drug release over time, such that the fractional drug released achieves optimal inhibitory concentration until the blood vessel remodels to a stable set point. This review discusses the various types of biodegradable materials, factors affecting biodegradation, drug release kinetics, vascular biocompatibility, adaptive vascular remodeling, and challenges in the development of bioresorbable scaffolds to treat vascular restenosis. PMID:27001225

  1. Scaffolds in Tendon Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Lamberti, Alfredo; Petrillo, Stefano; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Tissue engineering techniques using novel scaffold materials offer potential alternatives for managing tendon disorders. Tissue engineering strategies to improve tendon repair healing include the use of scaffolds, growth factors, cell seeding, or a combination of these approaches. Scaffolds have been the most common strategy investigated to date. Available scaffolds for tendon repair include both biological scaffolds, obtained from mammalian tissues, and synthetic scaffolds, manufactured from chemical compounds. Preliminary studies support the idea that scaffolds can provide an alternative for tendon augmentation with an enormous therapeutic potential. However, available data are lacking to allow definitive conclusion on the use of scaffolds for tendon augmentation. We review the current basic science and clinical understanding in the field of scaffolds and tissue engineering for tendon repair. PMID:22190961

  2. Engineered Biopolymeric Scaffolds for Chronic Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, Laura E.; Gerecht, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Skin regeneration requires the coordinated integration of concomitant biological and molecular events in the extracellular wound environment during overlapping phases of inflammation, proliferation, and matrix remodeling. This process is highly efficient during normal wound healing. However, chronic wounds fail to progress through the ordered and reparative wound healing process and are unable to heal, requiring long-term treatment at high costs. There are many advanced skin substitutes, which mostly comprise bioactive dressings containing mammalian derived matrix components, and/or human cells, in clinical use. However, it is presently hypothesized that no treatment significantly outperforms the others. To address this unmet challenge, recent research has focused on developing innovative acellular biopolymeric scaffolds as more efficacious wound healing therapies. These biomaterial-based skin substitutes are precisely engineered and fine-tuned to recapitulate aspects of the wound healing milieu and target specific events in the wound healing cascade to facilitate complete skin repair with restored function and tissue integrity. This mini-review will provide a brief overview of chronic wound healing and current skin substitute treatment strategies while focusing on recent engineering approaches that regenerate skin using synthetic, biopolymeric scaffolds. We discuss key polymeric scaffold design criteria, including degradation, biocompatibility, and microstructure, and how they translate to inductive microenvironments that stimulate cell infiltration and vascularization to enhance chronic wound healing. As healthcare moves toward precision medicine-based strategies, the potential and therapeutic implications of synthetic, biopolymeric scaffolds as tunable treatment modalities for chronic wounds will be considered. PMID:27547189

  3. In vivo monitoring of structural and mechanical changes of tissue scaffolds by multi-modality imaging

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dae Woo; Ye, Sang-Ho; Jiang, Hong Bin; Dutta, Debaditya; Nonaka, Kazuhiro; Wagner, William R.; Kim, Kang

    2014-01-01

    Degradable tissue scaffolds are implanted to serve a mechanical role while healing processes occur and putatively assume the physiological load as the scaffold degrades. Mechanical failure during this period can be unpredictable as monitoring of structural degradation and mechanical strength changes at the implant site is not readily achieved in vivo, and non-invasively. To address this need, a multi-modality approach using ultrasound shear wave imaging (USWI) and photoacoustic imaging (PAI) for both mechanical and structural assessment in vivo was demonstrated with degradable poly(ester urethane)urea (PEUU) and polydioxanone (PDO) scaffolds. The fibrous scaffolds were fabricated with wet electrospinning, dyed with indocyanine green (ICG) for optical contrast in PAI, and implanted in the abdominal wall of 36 rats. The scaffolds were monitored monthly using USWI and PAI and were extracted at 0, 4, 8 and 12 wk for mechanical and histological assessment. The change in shear modulus of the constructs in vivo obtained by USWI correlated with the change in average Young's modulus of the constructs ex vivo obtained by compression measurements. The PEUU and PDO scaffolds exhibited distinctly different degradation rates and average PAI signal intensity. The distribution of PAI signal intensity also corresponded well to the remaining scaffolds as seen in explant histology. This evidence using a small animal abdominal wall repair model demonstrates that multi-modality imaging of USWI and PAI may allow tissue engineers to noninvasively evaluate concurrent mechanical stiffness and structural changes of tissue constructs in vivo for a variety of applications. PMID:24951048

  4. Characterization of Mechanical Properties of Tissue Scaffolds by Phase Contrast Imaging and Finite Element Modeling.

    PubMed

    Bawolin, Nahshon K; Dolovich, Allan T; Chen, Daniel X B; Zhang, Chris W J

    2015-08-01

    In tissue engineering, the cell and scaffold approach has shown promise as a treatment to regenerate diseased and/or damaged tissue. In this treatment, an artificial construct (scaffold) is seeded with cells, which organize and proliferate into new tissue. The scaffold itself biodegrades with time, leaving behind only newly formed tissue. The degradation qualities of the scaffold are critical during the treatment period, since the change in the mechanical properties of the scaffold with time can influence cell behavior. To observe in time the scaffold's mechanical properties, a straightforward method is to deform the scaffold and then characterize scaffold deflection accordingly. However, experimentally observing the scaffold deflection is challenging. This paper presents a novel study on characterization of mechanical properties of scaffolds by phase contrast imaging and finite element modeling, which specifically includes scaffold fabrication, scaffold imaging, image analysis, and finite elements (FEs) modeling of the scaffold mechanical properties. The innovation of the work rests on the use of in-line phase contrast X-ray imaging at 20 KeV to characterize tissue scaffold deformation caused by ultrasound radiation forces and the use of the Fourier transform to identify movement. Once deformation has been determined experimentally, it is then compared with the predictions given by the forward solution of a finite element model. A consideration of the number of separate loading conditions necessary to uniquely identify the material properties of transversely isotropic and fully orthotropic scaffolds is also presented, along with the use of an FE as a form of regularization. PMID:25902011

  5. Stabilized Collagen Scaffolds for Heart Valve Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Tedder, Mary E.; Liao, Jun; Weed, Benjamin; Stabler, Christopher; Zhang, Henry; Simionescu, Agneta

    2009-01-01

    Scaffolds for heart valve tissue engineering must function immediately after implantation but also need to tolerate cell infiltration and gradual remodeling. We hypothesized that moderately cross-linked collagen scaffolds would fulfill these requirements. To test our hypothesis, scaffolds prepared from decellularized porcine pericardium were treated with penta-galloyl glucose (PGG), a collagen-binding polyphenol, and tested for biodegradation, biaxial mechanical properties, and in vivo biocompatibility. For controls, we used un-cross-linked scaffolds and glutaraldehyde-treated scaffolds. Results confirmed complete pericardium decellularization and the ability of scaffolds to encourage fibroblast chemotaxis and to aid in creation of anatomically correct valve-shaped constructs. Glutaraldehyde cross-linking fully stabilized collagen but did not allow for tissue remodeling and calcified when implanted subdermally in rats. PGG-treated collagen was initially resistant to collagenase and then degraded gradually, indicating partial stabilization. Moreover, PGG-treated pericardium exhibited excellent biaxial mechanical properties, did not calcify in vivo, and supported infiltration by host fibroblasts and subsequent matrix remodeling. In conclusion, PGG-treated acellular pericardium is a promising scaffold for heart valve tissue engineering. PMID:18928400

  6. 3D conductive nanocomposite scaffold for bone tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Shahini, Aref; Yazdimamaghani, Mostafa; Walker, Kenneth J; Eastman, Margaret A; Hatami-Marbini, Hamed; Smith, Brenda J; Ricci, John L; Madihally, Sundar V; Vashaee, Daryoosh; Tayebi, Lobat

    2014-01-01

    Bone healing can be significantly expedited by applying electrical stimuli in the injured region. Therefore, a three-dimensional (3D) ceramic conductive tissue engineering scaffold for large bone defects that can locally deliver the electrical stimuli is highly desired. In the present study, 3D conductive scaffolds were prepared by employing a biocompatible conductive polymer, ie, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) poly(4-styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS), in the optimized nanocomposite of gelatin and bioactive glass. For in vitro analysis, adult human mesenchymal stem cells were seeded in the scaffolds. Material characterizations using hydrogen-1 nuclear magnetic resonance, in vitro degradation, as well as thermal and mechanical analysis showed that incorporation of PEDOT:PSS increased the physiochemical stability of the composite, resulting in improved mechanical properties and biodegradation resistance. The outcomes indicate that PEDOT:PSS and polypeptide chains have close interaction, most likely by forming salt bridges between arginine side chains and sulfonate groups. The morphology of the scaffolds and cultured human mesenchymal stem cells were observed and analyzed via scanning electron microscope, micro-computed tomography, and confocal fluorescent microscope. Increasing the concentration of the conductive polymer in the scaffold enhanced the cell viability, indicating the improved microstructure of the scaffolds or boosted electrical signaling among cells. These results show that these conductive scaffolds are not only structurally more favorable for bone tissue engineering, but also can be a step forward in combining the tissue engineering techniques with the method of enhancing the bone healing by electrical stimuli. PMID:24399874

  7. 3D conductive nanocomposite scaffold for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Shahini, Aref; Yazdimamaghani, Mostafa; Walker, Kenneth J; Eastman, Margaret A; Hatami-Marbini, Hamed; Smith, Brenda J; Ricci, John L; Madihally, Sundar V; Vashaee, Daryoosh; Tayebi, Lobat

    2014-01-01

    Bone healing can be significantly expedited by applying electrical stimuli in the injured region. Therefore, a three-dimensional (3D) ceramic conductive tissue engineering scaffold for large bone defects that can locally deliver the electrical stimuli is highly desired. In the present study, 3D conductive scaffolds were prepared by employing a biocompatible conductive polymer, ie, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) poly(4-styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS), in the optimized nanocomposite of gelatin and bioactive glass. For in vitro analysis, adult human mesenchymal stem cells were seeded in the scaffolds. Material characterizations using hydrogen-1 nuclear magnetic resonance, in vitro degradation, as well as thermal and mechanical analysis showed that incorporation of PEDOT:PSS increased the physiochemical stability of the composite, resulting in improved mechanical properties and biodegradation resistance. The outcomes indicate that PEDOT:PSS and polypeptide chains have close interaction, most likely by forming salt bridges between arginine side chains and sulfonate groups. The morphology of the scaffolds and cultured human mesenchymal stem cells were observed and analyzed via scanning electron microscope, micro-computed tomography, and confocal fluorescent microscope. Increasing the concentration of the conductive polymer in the scaffold enhanced the cell viability, indicating the improved microstructure of the scaffolds or boosted electrical signaling among cells. These results show that these conductive scaffolds are not only structurally more favorable for bone tissue engineering, but also can be a step forward in combining the tissue engineering techniques with the method of enhancing the bone healing by electrical stimuli. PMID:24399874

  8. Chitosan-collagen/organomontmorillonite scaffold for bone tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xianshuo; Wang, Jun; Liu, Min; Chen, Yong; Cao, Yang; Yu, Xiaolong

    2015-12-01

    A novel composite scaffold based on chitosan-collagen/organomontmorillonite (CS-COL/OMMT) was prepared to improve swelling ratio, biodegradation ratio, biomineralization and mechanical properties for use in tissue engineering applications. In order to expend the basal spacing, montmorillonite (MMT) was modified with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and was characterized by XRD, TGA and FTIR. The results indicated that the anionic surfactants entered into interlayer of MMT and the basal spacing of MMT was expanded to 3.85 nm. The prepared composite scaffolds were characterized by FTIR, XRD and SEM. The swelling ratio, biodegradation ratio and mechanical properties of composite scaffolds were also studied. The results demonstrated that the scaffold decreased swelling ratio, degradation ratio and improved mechanical and biomineralization properties because of OMMT.

  9. Triggerable Degradation of Polyurethanes for Tissue Engineering Applications.

    PubMed

    Xu, Cancan; Huang, Yihui; Wu, Jinglei; Tang, Liping; Hong, Yi

    2015-09-16

    Tissue engineered and bioactive scaffolds with different degradation rates are required for the regeneration of diverse tissues/organs. To optimize tissue regeneration in different tissues, it is desirable that the degradation rate of scaffolds can be manipulated to comply with various stages of tissue regeneration. Unfortunately, the degradation of most degradable polymers relies solely on passive controlled degradation mechanisms. To overcome this challenge, we report a new family of reduction-sensitive biodegradable elastomeric polyurethanes containing various amounts of disulfide bonds (PU-SS), in which degradation can be initiated and accelerated with the supplement of a biological product: antioxidant-glutathione (GSH). The polyurethanes can be processed into films and electrospun fibrous scaffolds. Synthesized materials exhibited robust mechanical properties and high elasticity. Accelerated degradation of the materials was observed in the presence of GSH, and the rate of such degradation depends on the amount of disulfide present in the polymer backbone. The polymers and their degradation products exhibited no apparent cell toxicity while the electrospun scaffolds supported fibroblast growth in vitro. The in vivo subcutaneous implantation model showed that the polymers prompt minimal inflammatory responses, and as anticipated, the polymer with the higher disulfide bond amount had faster degradation in vivo. This new family of polyurethanes offers tremendous potential for directed scaffold degradation to promote maximal tissue regeneration. PMID:26312436

  10. Fabrication and characterization of novel nano-biocomposite scaffold of chitosan-gelatin-alginate-hydroxyapatite for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Chhavi; Dinda, Amit Kumar; Potdar, Pravin D; Chou, Chia-Fu; Mishra, Narayan Chandra

    2016-07-01

    A novel nano-biocomposite scaffold was fabricated in bead form by applying simple foaming method, using a combination of natural polymers-chitosan, gelatin, alginate and a bioceramic-nano-hydroxyapatite (nHAp). This approach of combining nHAp with natural polymers to fabricate the composite scaffold, can provide good mechanical strength and biological property mimicking natural bone. Environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) images of the nano-biocomposite scaffold revealed the presence of interconnected pores, mostly spread over the whole surface of the scaffold. The nHAp particulates have covered the surface of the composite matrix and made the surface of the scaffold rougher. The scaffold has a porosity of 82% with a mean pore size of 112±19.0μm. Swelling and degradation studies of the scaffold showed that the scaffold possesses excellent properties of hydrophilicity and biodegradability. Short term mechanical testing of the scaffold does not reveal any rupturing after agitation under physiological conditions, which is an indicative of good mechanical stability of the scaffold. In vitro cell culture studies by seeding osteoblast cells over the composite scaffold showed good cell viability, proliferation rate, adhesion and maintenance of osteoblastic phenotype as indicated by MTT assay, ESEM of cell-scaffold construct, histological staining and gene expression studies, respectively. Thus, it could be stated that the nano-biocomposite scaffold of chitosan-gelatin-alginate-nHAp has the paramount importance for applications in bone tissue-engineering in future regenerative therapies. PMID:27127072

  11. ELEVATING MECHANISM

    DOEpatents

    Frederick, H.S.; Kinsella, M.A.

    1959-02-24

    An elevator is described, which is arranged for movement both in a horizontal and in a vertical direction so that the elevating mechanism may be employed for servicing equipment at separated points in a plant. In accordance with the present invention, the main elevator chassis is suspended from a monorail. The chassis, in turn supports a vertically moveable carriage, a sub- carriage vertically moveable on the carriage, and a turntable carried by the sub- carriage and moveable through an arc of 90 with the equipment attached thereto. In addition, the chassis supports all the means required to elevate or rotate the equipment.

  12. Nanocomposite scaffold with enhanced stability by hydrogen bonds between collagen, polyvinyl pyrrolidone and titanium dioxide.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Fan, Xialian; Tang, Keyong; Zheng, Xuejing; Liu, Jie; Wang, Baoshi

    2016-04-01

    In this study, three-dimensional (3D) nanocomposite scaffolds, as potential substrates for skin tissue engineering, were fabricated by freeze drying the mixture of type I collagen extracted from porcine skin and polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP)-coated titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles. This procedure was performed without any cross-linker or toxic reagents to generate porosity in the scaffold. Both morphology and thermal stability of the nanocomposite scaffold were examined. The swelling behavior, mechanical properties and hydrolytic degradation of the composite scaffolds were carefully investigated. Our results revealed that collagen, PVP and TiO2 are bonded together by four main hydrogen bonds, which is an essential action for the formation of nanocomposite scaffold. Using Coasts-Redfern model, we were able to calculate the thermal degradation apparent activation energy and demonstrated that the thermal stability of nanocomposites is dependent on amount of PVP incorporated. Furthermore, SEM images showed that the collagen fibers are wrapped and stabilized on scaffolds by PVP molecules, which improve the ultimate tensile strength (UTS). The UTS of PVP-contained scaffold is four times higher than that of scaffold without PVP, whereas ultimate percentage of elongation (UPE) is decreased, and PVP can enhance the degradation resistance. PMID:26764111

  13. The development and implantation of a biologically derived allograft scaffold.

    PubMed

    Nowocin, Anna K; Southgate, Aaron; Shurey, Sandra; Sibbons, Paul; Gabe, Simon M; Ansari, Tahera

    2016-02-01

    Biologically derived scaffolds are becoming viable treatment options for tissue/organ repair and regeneration. A continuing hurdle is the need for a functional blood supply to and from the implanted scaffold. We have addressed this problem by constructing an acellular ileal scaffold with an attached vascular network suitable for implantation and immediate reperfusion with the host's blood. Using a vascular perfusion approach, a segment of porcine ileum up to 30 cm long, together with its attached vasculature, was decellularized as a single entity. The quality of the decellularized scaffold was assessed histologically and using molecular tools. To establish vascular perfusion potentials of the scaffold, a right-sided nephrectomy and end-to-end anastomosis of the decellularized scaffold's vasculature to a renal artery and vein were performed in a pig of similar size to the donor animal. Lengths of ileal scaffold, together with its attached vasculature, were successfully decellularized, with no evidence of intact cells/nuclear material or collagen degradation. The scaffold's decellularized vascular network demonstrated optimum perfusion at 1, 2 and 24 h post-implantation and the mesenteric arcade remained patent throughout the assessment. The 1, 2 and 24 h explanted scaffolds demonstrated signs of cellular attachment, with cells positive for CD68 and CD133 on the vascular luminal aspect. It is possible to decellularize clinically relevant lengths of small intestine, together with the associated vasculature, as a single segment. The functional vascular network may represent a route for recellularization for future regeneration of bowel tissue for patients with short bowel syndrome. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:23554406

  14. Biomimetic hydroxyapatite coating on pore walls improves osteointegration of poly(L-lactic acid) scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Deplaine, H; Lebourg, M; Ripalda, P; Vidaurre, A; Sanz-Ramos, P; Mora, G; Prósper, F; Ochoa, I; Doblaré, M; Gómez Ribelles, J L; Izal-Azcárate, I; Gallego Ferrer, G

    2013-01-01

    Polymer-ceramic composites obtained as the result of a mineralization process hold great promise for the future of tissue engineering. Simulated body fluids (SBFs) are widely used for the mineralization of polymer scaffolds. In this work an exhaustive study with the aim of optimizing the mineralization process on a poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) macroporous scaffold has been performed. We observed that when an air plasma treatment is applied to the PLLA scaffold its hydroxyapatite nucleation ability is considerably improved. However, plasma treatment only allows apatite deposition on the surface of the scaffold but not in its interior. When a 5 wt % of synthetic hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanoparticles is mixed with PLLA a more abundant biomimetic hydroxyapatite layer grows inside the scaffold in SBF. The morphology, amount, and composition of the generated biomimetic hydroxyapatite layer on the pores' surface have been analyzed. Large mineralization times are harmful to pure PLLA as it rapidly degrades and its elastic compression modulus significantly decreases. Degradation is retarded in the composite scaffolds because of the faster and extensive biomimetic apatite deposition and the role of HAp to control the pH. Mineralized scaffolds, covered by an apatite layer in SBF, were implanted in osteochondral lesions performed in the medial femoral condyle of healthy sheep. We observed that the presence of biomimetic hydroxyapatite on the pore's surface of the composite scaffold produces a better integration in the subchondral bone, in comparison to bare PLLA scaffolds. PMID:23152082

  15. Nano-TiO2/collagen-chitosan porous scaffold for wound repairing.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xialian; Chen, Keke; He, Xichan; Li, Na; Huang, Jinbao; Tang, Keyong; Li, Yijin; Wang, Fang

    2016-10-01

    Collagen-Chitosan (COL-CS) porous scaffolds have been widely used as a dermal equivalent to induce fibroblasts infiltration and dermal regeneration. To improve the anti-bacterial properties, nano-TiO2 hydrosol was introduced into COL-CS scaffolds. TiO2/COL-CS porous scaffolds were fabricated through a freeze-drying process, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was employed to study the micro-structure of the scaffolds. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) was used to study the intermolecular interactions in the scaffolds. The swelling property, porosity, degradation, antibacterial behavior, red blood cell aggregation, and cytotoxicity of the composite were investigated. The results showed that the scaffold is good in permeability and it may provide a humid environment for wound repairing. The degradation in lysozyme solution for 4 weeks showed that porous scaffolds are good in stability, which may satisfy the wound coverage protection in the repairing period. An obvious inhibitory effect on Staphylococcus aureus of the porous scaffolds was found, and the red blood cells were easy to form clusters aggregation to stop bleeding. It was suggested that the TiO2/COL-CS composite scaffolds could be a promising candidate for wound repairing dressing. PMID:27238587

  16. Gelatin nanoparticles loaded poly(ε-caprolactone) nanofibrous semi-synthetic scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Binulal, N S; Natarajan, Amrita; Menon, Deepthy; Bhaskaran, V K; Mony, Ullas; Nair, S V

    2012-12-01

    Nanofibrous semi-synthetic polymeric nanocomposite scaffolds were engineered by incorporating a maximum of 15 wt% biopolymeric gelatin nanoparticles (nGs) into the synthetic polymer poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) prior to electrospinning. The effect of nGs in altering the physico-chemical properties, cell material interaction and biodegradability of the scaffolds was evaluated. Experimental results showed that the inherent hydrophobicity of PCL scaffolds remained unaltered even after the incorporation of hydrophilic nGs. However, breakdown of the continuous nanofibers into lengths less than 7 µm occurred within four to eight weeks in the presence of nGs in contrast with the greater than two year time frame for the degradation of PCL fibers alone that is known from the literature. In terms of cell-material interaction, human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were found to attach and spread better and faster on PCL_nG scaffolds compared to PCL scaffolds. However, there was no difference in hMSC proliferation and differentiation into osteogenic lineage between the scaffolds. These results indicate that PCL_nG nanofibrous nanocomposite scaffolds are an improvement over PCL scaffolds for bone tissue engineering applications in that the PCL_nG scaffolds provide improved cell interaction and are able to degrade and resorb more efficiently. PMID:23047255

  17. Biomimetic Scaffolds for Osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Nance; Rezzadeh, Kameron S.; Lee, Justine C.

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal regenerative medicine emerged as a field of investigation to address large osseous deficiencies secondary to congenital, traumatic, and post-oncologic conditions. Although autologous bone grafts have been the gold standard for reconstruction of skeletal defects, donor site morbidity remains a significant limitation. To address these limitations, contemporary bone tissue engineering research aims to target delivery of osteogenic cells and growth factors in a defined three dimensional space using scaffolding material. Using bone as a template, biomimetic strategies in scaffold engineering unite organic and inorganic components in an optimal configuration to both support osteoinduction as well as osteoconduction. This article reviews the various structural and functional considerations behind the development of effective biomimetic scaffolds for osteogenesis and highlights strategies for enhancing osteogenesis. PMID:26413557

  18. A Silk-Based Scaffold Platform with Tunable Architecture for Engineering Critically-Sized Tissue Constructs

    PubMed Central

    Wray, Lindsay S.; Rnjak-Kovacina, Jelena; Mandal, Biman B.; Schmidt, Daniel F.; Seok, Eun; Kaplan, David L.

    2012-01-01

    In the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine there is significant unmet need for critically-sized, fully degradable biomaterial scaffold systems with tunable properties for optimizing tissue formation in vitro and tissue regeneration in vivo. To address this need, we have developed a silk-based scaffold platform that has tunable material properties, including localized and bioactive functionalization, degradation rate, and mechanical properties and that provides arrays of linear hollow channels for delivery of oxygen and nutrients throughout the scaffold bulk. The scaffolds can be assembled with dimensions that range from millimeters to centimeters, addressing the need for a critically-sized platform for tissue formation. We demonstrate that the hollow channel arrays support localized and confluent endothelialization. This new platform offers a unique and versatile tool for engineering `tailored' scaffolds for a range of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine needs. PMID:23036961

  19. Effect of silanization on chitosan porous scaffolds for peripheral nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Li, Guicai; Zhang, Luzhong; Wang, Caiping; Zhao, Xueying; Zhu, Changlai; Zheng, Yanhong; Wang, Yaling; Zhao, Yahong; Yang, Yumin

    2014-01-30

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTE) silanization treatment for modification and biocompatibility of lyophilized chitosan porous scaffolds. The process is beneficial for biomaterial development due to its low toxicity and simplicity. The silanization treatment with low APTE concentration showed no significant influence on the morphology of chitosan scaffolds, while a skin-like surface was observed for the silanized scaffolds treated with high APTE concentration. The porosity and surface amino densities were increased after silanization whereas the swelling ratio was reduced, and the degradation ratio in PBS and anti-acid degradation properties of the silanized chitosan scaffolds were significantly improved. The in vitro Schwann cells culture demonstrated that the silanized scaffolds with 8% APTE could obviously facilitate the attachment and proliferation of Schwann cells, indicating great potential for the application in peripheral nerve regeneration. PMID:24299831

  20. Genipin-cross-linked collagen/chitosan biomimetic scaffolds for articular cartilage tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Yan, Le-Ping; Wang, Ying-Jun; Ren, Li; Wu, Gang; Caridade, Sofia G; Fan, Jia-Bing; Wang, Ling-Yun; Ji, Pei-Hong; Oliveira, Joaquim M; Oliveira, João T; Mano, João F; Reis, Rui L

    2010-11-01

    In this study, genipin-cross-linked collagen/chitosan biodegradable porous scaffolds were prepared for articular cartilage regeneration. The influence of chitosan amount and genipin concentration on the scaffolds physicochemical properties was evaluated. The morphologies of the scaffolds were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and cross-linking degree was investigated by ninhydrin assay. Additionally, the mechanical properties of the scaffolds were assessed under dynamic compression. To study the swelling ratio and the biostability of the collagen/chitosan scaffold, in vitro tests were also carried out by immersion of the scaffolds in PBS solution or digestion in collagenase, respectively. The results showed that the morphologies of the scaffolds underwent a fiber-like to a sheet-like structural transition by increasing chitosan amount. Genipin cross-linking remarkably changed the morphologies and pore sizes of the scaffolds when chitosan amount was less than 25%. Either by increasing the chitosan ratio or performing cross-linking treatment, the swelling ratio of the scaffolds can be tailored. The ninhydrin assay demonstrated that the addition of chitosan could obviously increase the cross-linking efficiency. The degradation studies indicated that genipin cross-linking can effectively enhance the biostability of the scaffolds. The biocompatibility of the scaffolds was evaluated by culturing rabbit chondrocytes in vitro. This study demonstrated that a good viability of the chondrocytes seeded on the scaffold was achieved. The SEM analysis has revealed that the chondrocytes adhered well to the surface of the scaffolds and contacted each other. These results suggest that the genipin-cross-linked collagen/chitosan matrix may be a promising formulation for articular cartilage scaffolding. PMID:20648541

  1. Poly(lactide-co-glycolide) porous scaffolds for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Zhen; Ding, Jiandong

    2012-01-01

    Porous scaffolds fabricated from biocompatible and biodegradable polymers play vital roles in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Among various scaffold matrix materials, poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) is a very popular and an important biodegradable polyester owing to its tunable degradation rates, good mechanical properties and processibility, etc. This review highlights the progress on PLGA scaffolds. In the latest decade, some facile fabrication approaches at room temperature were put forward; more appropriate pore structures were designed and achieved; the mechanical properties were investigated both for dry and wet scaffolds; a long time biodegradation of the PLGA scaffold was observed and a three-stage model was established; even the effects of pore size and porosity on in vitro biodegradation were revealed; the PLGA scaffolds have also been implanted into animals, and some tissues have been regenerated in vivo after loading cells including stem cells. PMID:23741612

  2. A three-dimensional polycaprolactone scaffold combined with a drug delivery system consisting of electrospun nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hyeon; Kim, Geunhyung

    2011-02-01

    A new three-dimensional (3D) scaffold containing a functional drug delivery system (DDS) consisting of electrospun micro/nanofibers is proposed. In the DDS scaffold, a core-shell laminated, structured, electrospun mat of hydrophobic polycaprolactone (PCL) and hydrophilic poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO)/rhodamine-B fibers was embedded in the normal 3D PCL scaffold, which was fabricated by a melt-plotting system. Rhodamine release from the scaffold was controlled physically by the thickness change of the PCL layer, and initial burst in drug release was eliminated by an appropriate thickness of the PCL layer. This simple technique may be useful in fabricating DDS-functional scaffolds for the clinical areas not only of bone and skin regeneration, but also of other tissue regeneration areas, regardless of the degradation rate of the structural scaffold. PMID:20740676

  3. Optimization of keratin/alginate scaffold using RSM and its characterization for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Pratima; Nayak, Kush Kumar

    2016-04-01

    The scaffold for tissue engineering was fabricated from a binary blend of keratin/alginate. The concentration and ratio of keratin and alginate was optimized by response surface methodology in a scaffold. The structural compatibility between keratin and alginate was examined by X-ray diffractometer and Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy. Apparent porosity of the scaffold was calculated by Archimedes principles and its observed value of was found 96.25 ± 0.04%. The pore size of the scaffold was observed in the range between 10 and 200 μm. Tensile strength (0.33 ± 0.26 MPa) and percent of elongation at break (23.33 ± 2.52%) are the reported mechanical strength of the scaffold. Positive antimicrobial activity and in vitro degradation further confirms the fabrication of a scaffold required for tissue engineering application. PMID:26691383

  4. Surface modification of biodegradable porous Mg bone scaffold using polycaprolactone/bioactive glass composite.

    PubMed

    Yazdimamaghani, Mostafa; Razavi, Mehdi; Vashaee, Daryoosh; Tayebi, Lobat

    2015-04-01

    A reduction in the degradation rate of magnesium (Mg) and its alloys is in high demand to enable these materials to be used in orthopedic applications. For this purpose, in this paper, a biocompatible polymeric layer reinforced with a bioactive ceramic made of polycaprolactone (PCL) and bioactive glass (BG) was applied on the surface of Mg scaffolds using dip-coating technique under low vacuum. The results indicated that the PCL-BG coated Mg scaffolds exhibited noticeably enhanced bioactivity compared to the uncoated scaffold. Moreover, the mechanical integrity of the Mg scaffolds was improved using the PCL-BG coating on the surface. The stable barrier property of the coatings effectively delayed the degradation activity of Mg scaffold substrates. Moreover, the coatings induced the formation of apatite layer on their surface after immersion in the SBF, which can enhance the biological bone in-growth and block the microcracks and pore channels in the coatings, thus prolonging their protective effect. Furthermore, it was shown that a three times increase in the concentration of PCL-BG noticeably improved the characteristics of scaffolds including their degradation resistance and mechanical stability. Since bioactivity, degradation resistance and mechanical integrity of a bone substitute are the key factors for repairing and healing fractured bones, we suggest that PCL-BG is a suitable coating material for surface modification of Mg scaffolds. PMID:25686970

  5. In vivo acute and humoral response to three-dimensional porous soy protein scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Chien, Karen B; Aguado, Brian A; Bryce, Paul J; Shah, Ramille N

    2013-11-01

    Increasing interest in using soy biomaterials for tissue engineering applications has prompted investigation into the in vivo biocompatibility of soy implants. In this study, the biocompatibility of soy protein scaffolds fabricated using freeze-drying and 3-D printing was assessed using a subcutaneous implant model in BALB/c mice. The main objectives of this study were: (1) to compare soy protein with bovine collagen, a well-characterized natural protein implant, by implanting scaffolds of the same protein weight, and (2) to observe the effects of soy scaffold microstructure and amount of protein loading, which also alters the degradation properties, on the acute and humoral immune responses towards soy. Results showed that freeze-dried soy scaffolds fully degraded after 14 days, whereas collagen scaffolds (of the same protein weight) remained intact for 56 days. Furthermore, Masson's trichrome staining showed little evidence of damage or fibrosis at the soy implant site. Scaffolds of higher soy protein content, however, were still present after 56 days. H&E staining revealed that macrophage infiltration was hindered in the denser bioplotted soy scaffolds, causing slower degradation. Analysis of soy-specific antibodies in mouse serum after implantation revealed levels of IgG1 that correlated with higher scaffold weight and protein density. However, no soy-specific IgE was detected, indicating the absence of an allergic response to the soy implants. These results demonstrate that soy protein could be an acceptable biocompatible implant for tissue regeneration, and that scaffold porosity, soy protein density and scaffold degradation rate significantly affect the acute and humoral immune response. PMID:23851173

  6. Design and Mechanical Evaluation of a Novel Fiber-Reinforced Scaffold for Meniscus Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Balint, Eric; Gatt, Charles J.; Dunn, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    A fiber-reinforced degradable scaffold for replacement of meniscal tissue was designed, fabricated, and mechanically evaluated. The hypotheses were that 1) the fiber network design would share a portion of compressive loads via the generation of circumferential tensile loads, and 2) the scaffold tensile properties would be similar to those of the meniscus. Two meniscus scaffold designs varying in fiber content (1,000 or 500 fibers: MS1000, MS500) underwent cyclic compressive loading up to 100N and 250N, with resultant tensile loads measured at the anterior and posterior anchors. Standard tensile testing was also performed on each device and ovine menisci. Both scaffolds generated tensile loads directly proportional to the applied compressive loads, with MS1000 scaffolds generating approximately twice the tensile loads of MS500 scaffolds. The tensile strength of MS1000 scaffolds was significantly higher than that of the medial and lateral ovine menisci, and approximately twice that of the MS500 scaffolds. The stiffness of MS1000 scaffolds was lower than that of the lateral meniscus, but not statistically different from that of the medial meniscus. These results support our hypotheses that this novel fiber-reinforced scaffold can mimic the tensile and hoop stress behavior of normal meniscal tissue under compressive loading. The circumferential tensile strength and stiffness are appropriate for a meniscus replacement device. PMID:22021218

  7. Preparation and Evaluation of Gelatin-Chitosan-Nanobioglass 3D Porous Scaffold for Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Maji, Kanchan; Dasgupta, Sudip; Pramanik, Krishna; Bissoyi, Akalabya

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to prepare and characterize bioglass-natural biopolymer based composite scaffold and evaluate its bone regeneration ability. Bioactive glass nanoparticles (58S) in the size range of 20–30 nm were synthesized using sol-gel method. Porous scaffolds with varying bioglass composition from 10 to 30 wt% in chitosan, gelatin matrix were fabricated using the method of freeze drying of its slurry at 40 wt% solids loading. Samples were cross-linked with glutaraldehyde to obtain interconnected porous 3D microstructure with improved mechanical strength. The prepared scaffolds exhibited >80% porosity with a mean pore size range between 100 and 300 microns. Scaffold containing 30 wt% bioglass (GCB 30) showed a maximum compressive strength of 2.2 ± 0.1 MPa. Swelling and degradation studies showed that the scaffold had excellent properties of hydrophilicity and biodegradability. GCB 30 scaffold was shown to be noncytotoxic and supported mesenchymal stem cell attachment, proliferation, and differentiation as indicated by MTT assay and RUNX-2 expression. Higher cellular activity was observed in GCB 30 scaffold as compared to GCB 0 scaffold suggesting the fact that 58S bioglass nanoparticles addition into the scaffold promoted better cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. Thus, the study showed that the developed composite scaffolds are potential candidates for regenerating damaged bone tissue. PMID:26884764

  8. Processing and characterization of chitosan/PVA and methylcellulose porous scaffolds for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Kanimozhi, K; Khaleel Basha, S; Sugantha Kumari, V

    2016-04-01

    Biomimetic porous scaffold chitosan/poly(vinyl alcohol) CS/PVA containing various amounts of methylcellulose (MC) (25%, 50% and 75%) incorporated in CS/PVA blend was successfully produced by a freeze drying method in the present study. The composite porous scaffold membranes were characterized by infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), swelling degree, porosity, degradation of films in Hank's solution and the mechanical properties. Besides these characterizations, the antibacterial activity of the prepared scaffolds was tested, toward the bacterial species Staphylococcus aureus (S.aureus) and Escherichia coli (E.coli). FTIR, XRD and DSC demonstrated that there was strong intermolecular hydrogen bonding between the molecules of CS/PVA and MC. The crystalline microstructure of the scaffold membranes was not well developed. SEM images showed that the morphology and diameter of the scaffolds were mainly affected by the weight ratio of MC. By increasing the MC content in the hybrid scaffolds, their swelling capacity and porosity increased. The mechanical properties of these scaffolds in dry and swollen state were greatly improved with high swelling ratio. The elasticity of films was also significantly improved by the incorporation of MC, and the scaffolds could also bear a relative high tensile strength. These findings suggested that the developed scaffold possess the prerequisites and can be used as a scaffold for tissue engineering. PMID:26838875

  9. Mathematical Abstraction through Scaffolding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozmantar, Mehmet Fatih; Roper, Tom

    2004-01-01

    This paper examines the role of scaffolding in the process of abstraction. An activity-theoretic approach to abstraction in context is taken. This examination is carried out with reference to verbal protocols of two 17 year-old students working together on a task connected to sketching the graph of |f|x|)|. Examination of the data suggests that…

  10. The Potential to Improve Cell Infiltration in Composite Fiber-Aligned Electrospun Scaffolds by the Selective Removal of Sacrificial Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Brendon M.; Gee, Albert O.; Metter, Robert B.; Nathan, Ashwin S.; Marklein, Ross L.; Burdick, Jason A.; Mauck, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    Aligned electrospun scaffolds are a promising tool for engineering fibrous musculoskeletal tissues as they reproduce the mechanical anisotropy of these tissues and can direct ordered neo-tissue formation. However, these scaffolds suffer from a slow cellular infiltration rate, likely due in part to their dense fiber packing. We hypothesized that cell ingress could be expedited in scaffolds by increasing porosity, while at the same time preserving overall scaffold anisotropy. To test this hypothesis, poly(ε-caprolactone) (a slow-degrading polyester) and poly(ethylene oxide) (a water-soluble polymer) were co-electrospun from two separate spinnerets to form dual-polymer composite fiber-aligned scaffolds. Adjusting fabrication parameters produced aligned scaffolds with a full range of sacrificial (PEO) fiber contents. Tensile properties of scaffolds were a function of the ratio of PCL to PEO in the composite scaffolds, and were altered in a predictable fashion with removal of the PEO component. When seeded with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), increases in the starting sacrificial fraction (and porosity) improved cell infiltration and distribution after three weeks in culture. In pure PCL scaffolds, cells lined the scaffold periphery, while scaffolds containing >50% sacrificial PEO content had cells present throughout the scaffold. These findings indicate that cell infiltration can be expedited in dense fibrous assemblies with the removal of sacrificial fibers. This strategy may enhance in vitro and in vivo formation and maturation of a functional constructs for fibrous tissue engineering. PMID:18313138

  11. Scaffolds: A Novel Carrier and Potential Wound Healer.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Chetan; Garg, Tarun

    2015-01-01

    A scaffold is comprised of the polymeric central components, which are used to deliver cells, drugs, and genes into the body. Wounds, which lead to a loss of integrity of the skin and skin mortality, are common challenges encountered in plastic and reconstructive surgery. The primary goals of treatment are rapid closure, restoration of function, and aesthetic satisfaction. A paradigm shift is taking place in medicine from using synthetic implants and tissue grafts to a tissue-engineering approach that uses degradable porous material scaffolds integrated with biological cells or molecules to regenerate tissues. Scaffold structure is a novel carrier for cell and drug delivery that enhances wound healing through differentiation of endothelial and epithelial cells and production of angiogenic growth factors in cutaneous wounds. Currently, scaffolds have application in various fields of tissue engineering in repair of nasal and auricular malformations, in bone formation, in cartilage development, in periodontal regeneration, as artificial corneas, as heart valves, in ligament replacement, in tendon repair, and in tumours. In the present review, we emphasize the role of scaffolds in wound healing, and we outline types of scaffolds, properties, techniques adopted, materials used, and their applications in tissue engineering. PMID:26080925

  12. Scaffolds and cells for tissue regeneration: different scaffold pore sizes-different cell effects.

    PubMed

    Bružauskaitė, Ieva; Bironaitė, Daiva; Bagdonas, Edvardas; Bernotienė, Eiva

    2016-05-01

    During the last decade biomaterial sciences and tissue engineering have become new scientific fields supplying rising demand of regenerative therapy. Tissue engineering requires consolidation of a broad knowledge of cell biology and modern biotechnology investigating biocompatibility of materials and their application for the reconstruction of damaged organs and tissues. Stem cell-based tissue regeneration started from the direct cell transplantation into damaged tissues or blood vessels. However, it is difficult to track transplanted cells and keep them in one particular place of diseased organ. Recently, new technologies such as cultivation of stem cell on the scaffolds and subsequently their implantation into injured tissue have been extensively developed. Successful tissue regeneration requires scaffolds with particular mechanical stability or biodegradability, appropriate size, surface roughness and porosity to provide a suitable microenvironment for the sufficient cell-cell interaction, cell migration, proliferation and differentiation. Further functioning of implanted cells highly depends on the scaffold pore sizes that play an essential role in nutrient and oxygen diffusion and waste removal. In addition, pore sizes strongly influence cell adhesion, cell-cell interaction and cell transmigration across the membrane depending on the various purposes of tissue regeneration. Therefore, this review will highlight contemporary tendencies in application of non-degradable scaffolds and stem cells in regenerative medicine with a particular focus on the pore sizes significantly affecting final recover of diseased organs. PMID:26091616

  13. Vaporizable Scaffolds for Fabricating Thermoelectric Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakamoto, Jeffrey; Yen, Shiao-pin; Fleurial, Jean-Pierre; Paik, Jong-Ah

    2006-01-01

    A process for fabricating thermoelectric modules with vacuum gaps separating the thermoelectric legs has been conceived, and the feasibility of some essential parts of the process has been demonstrated. The vacuum gaps are needed to electrically insulate the legs from each other. The process involves the use of scaffolding in the form of sheets of a polymer to temporarily separate the legs by the desired distance, which is typically about 0.5 mm. During a bonding subprocess that would take place in a partial vacuum at an elevated temperature, the polymer would be vaporized, thereby creating the vacuum gaps.

  14. Effects of designed PLLA and 50:50PLGA scaffold architectures on bone formation in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Eiji; Liao, Elly E.; Hu, Wei-Wen; Krebsbach, Paul H.; Hollister, Scott J.

    2015-01-01

    Biodegradable porous scaffolds have been investigated as an alternative approach to current metal, ceramic, and polymer bone graft substitutes for lost or damaged bone tissues. Although there have been many studies investigating the effects of scaffold architecture on bone formation, many of these scaffolds were fabricated using conventional methods, such as salt leaching and phase separation, and were constructed without designed architecture. To study the effects of both designed architecture and material on bone formation, we designed and fabricated three types of porous scaffold architecture from two biodegradable materials, poly (L-lactic acid) (PLLA) and 50:50Poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) using image based design and indirect solid freeform fabrication techniques, seeded them with bone morphogenic protein-7 transduced human gingival fibroblasts and implanted them subcutaneously into mice for 4 and 8 weeks. Micro-computed tomography data confirmed that the fabricated porous scaffolds replicated the designed architectures. Histological analysis revealed that the 50:50PLGA scaffolds degraded and did not maintain their architecture after 4 weeks. The PLLA scaffolds maintained their architecture at both time points and showed improved bone ingrowth which followed the internal architecture of the scaffolds. Mechanical properties of both PLLA and 50:50PLGA scaffolds decreased, but PLLA scaffolds maintained greater mechanical properties than 50:50PLGA after implantation. The increase of mineralized tissue helped to support mechanical properties of bone tissue and scaffold constructs from 4 to 8 weeks. The results indicated the importance of choice of scaffold materials and computationally designed scaffolds to control tissue formation and mechanical properties for desired bone tissue regeneration. PMID:22162220

  15. Monocular Elevation Deficiency - Double Elevator Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Monocular Elevation Deficiency/ Double Elevator Palsy En Español Read in Chinese What is monocular elevation deficiency (Double Elevator Palsy)? Monocular Elevation Deficiency, also known by the ...

  16. Cellulose acetate based 3-dimensional electrospun scaffolds for skin tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Atila, Deniz; Keskin, Dilek; Tezcaner, Ayşen

    2015-11-20

    Skin defects that are not able to regenerate by themselves are among the major problems faced. Tissue engineering approach holds promise for treating such defects. Development of tissue-mimicking-scaffolds that can promote healing process receives an increasing interest in recent years. In this study, 3-dimensional electrospun cellulose acetate (CA) pullulan (PULL) scaffolds were developed for the first time. PULL was intentionally used to obtain 3D structures with adjustable height. It was removed from the electrospun mesh to increase the porosity and biostability. Different ratios of the polymers were electrospun and analyzed with respect to degradation, porosity, and mechanical properties. It has been observed that fiber diameter, thickness and porosity of scaffolds increased with increased PULL content, on the other hand this resulted with higher degradation of scaffolds. Mechanical strength of scaffolds was improved after PULL removal suggesting their suitability as cell carriers. Cell culture studies were performed with the selected scaffold group (CA/PULL: 50/50) using mouse fibroblastic cell line (L929). In vitro cell culture tests showed that cells adhered, proliferated and populated CA/PULL (50/50) scaffolds showing that they are cytocompatible. Results suggest that uncrosslinked CA/PULL (50/50) electrospun scaffolds hold potential for skin tissue engineering applications. PMID:26344279

  17. Minimally Invasive Approach to the Repair of Injured Skeletal Muscle With a Shape-memory Scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lin; Cao, Lan; Shansky, Janet; Wang, Zheng; Mooney, David; Vandenburgh, Herman

    2014-01-01

    Repair of injured skeletal muscle by cell therapies has been limited by poor survival of injected cells. Use of a carrier scaffold delivering cells locally, may enhance in vivo cell survival, and promote skeletal muscle regeneration. Biomaterial scaffolds are often implanted into muscle tissue through invasive surgeries, which can result in trauma that delays healing. Minimally invasive approaches to scaffold implantation are thought to minimize these adverse effects. This hypothesis was addressed in the context of a severe mouse skeletal muscle injury model. A degradable, shape-memory alginate scaffold that was highly porous and compressible was delivered by minimally invasive surgical techniques to injured tibialis anterior muscle. The scaffold controlled was quickly rehydrated in situ with autologous myoblasts and growth factors (either insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) alone or IGF-1 with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)). The implanted scaffolds delivering myoblasts and IGF-1 significantly reduced scar formation, enhanced cell engraftment, and improved muscle contractile function. The addition of VEGF to the scaffold further improved functional recovery likely through increased angiogenesis. Thus, the delivery of myoblasts and dual local release of VEGF and IGF-1 from degradable scaffolds implanted through a minimally invasive procedure effectively promoted the functional regeneration of injured skeletal muscle. PMID:24769909

  18. Preparation and characterization of (PCL-crosslinked-PEG)/hydroxyapatite as bone tissue engineering scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Koupaei, Narjes; Karkhaneh, Akbar; Daliri Joupari, Morteza

    2015-12-01

    In this study, interconnected porous bioactive scaffolds were synthesized for bone tissue engineering. At the first step, poly( ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL) diols were diacrylated with acryloyl chloride. Then, the scaffolds were synthesized by radical crosslinking reaction of PCL and poly(ethyleneglycol) (PEG) diacrylates in the presence of hydroxyapatite (HA) particles. Morphological, swelling, thermal, and mechanical characteristics as well as degradability of the scaffolds were investigated. Results showed that increasing the ratio of PEG to PCL led to significant increase of swelling ratio and degradation rate, and decrease of crystallinity and compressive modulus of the networks, respectively. It was found that the incorporation of HA particles with the polymer matrices resulted in an augmented crystallinity, a decreased swelling ratio, and also a significantly increased compressive modulus of the networks. Cytocompatability and osteoconductivity of the scaffolds were assessed by MTT and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) assays, respectively. The results confirmed the cytocompatible nature of PCL/PEG/HA scaffolds with no toxicity. MG-63 cells attached and spread on the pore walls offered by the scaffolds. PCL/PEG/HA scaffolds compared with PCL/PEG ones showed higher ALP activity. Thus, the results indicated that the PCL/PEG/HA scaffolds have the potential of being used as promising substrates in bone tissue engineering. PMID:26015080

  19. Poly(ɛ-caprolactone)/gelatin composite electrospun scaffolds with porous crater-like structures for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Patrick T J; Murdock, Kyle; Alexander, Grant C; Salaam, Amanee D; Ng, Joshua I; Lim, Dong-Jin; Dean, Derrick; Jun, Ho-Wook

    2016-04-01

    Electrospinning has been widely used to fabricate scaffolds imitating the structure of natural extracellular matrix (ECM). However, conventional electrospinning produces tightly compacted nanofiber layers with only small superficial pores and a lack of bioactivity, which limit the usefulness of electrospinning in biomedical applications. Thus, a porous poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL)/gelatin composite electrospun scaffold with crater-like structures was developed. Porous crater-like structures were created on the scaffold by a gas foaming/salt leaching process; this unique fiber structure had more large pore areas and higher porosity than the conventional electrospun fiber network. Various ratios of PCL/gelatin (concentration ratios: 100/0, 75/25, and 50/50) composite electrospun scaffolds with and without crater-like structures were characterized by their microstructures, surface chemistry, degradation, mechanical properties, and ability to facilitate cell growth and infiltration. The combination of PCL and gelatin endowed the scaffold with both structural stability of PCL and bioactivity of gelatin. All ratios of scaffolds with crater-like structures showed fairly similar surface chemistry, degradation rates, and mechanical properties to equivalent scaffolds without crater-like structures; however, craterized scaffolds displayed higher human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) proliferation and infiltration throughout the scaffolds after 7-day culture. Therefore, these results demonstrated that PCL/gelatin composite electrospun scaffolds with crater-like structures can provide a structurally and biochemically improved three-dimensional ECM-mimicking microenvironment. PMID:26567028

  20. Preparation and characterization of aligned porous PCL/zein scaffolds as drug delivery systems via improved unidirectional freeze-drying method.

    PubMed

    Fereshteh, Zeinab; Fathi, Mohammadhossein; Bagri, Akbar; Boccaccini, Aldo R

    2016-11-01

    A novel type of drug-delivery scaffold based on poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) and zein blends was prepared by improved unidirectional freeze-drying. Scaffolds with tube-like pore structure and high porosity, up to 89%, were obtained by adjusting the concentration of the PCL and zein solutions. Characters of the prepared scaffolds, such as microstructural, porosity, and compressive strength, were evaluated. The hydrophilicity and the degradability of the composite films were investigated in contact with phosphate buffer saline (PBS). It was found that the presence of zein accelerates the degradation rate of the scaffolds in the period time of investigation (28days). The results showed an acceptable way for controlling the in vitro degradation behavior of PCL composite scaffolds by adapting the concentration of zein. In vitro protein release and degradation results revealed that the absolute weight loss of the PCL/zein scaffolds exhibited an increasing trend by increasing the amount of zein concentration in the scaffolds. The drug delivery capability of the scaffolds was tested using tetracycline hydrochloride (TCH). Sustained release of the drug was obtained, and it was found that the proportion of zein in the scaffold had a great impact on the drug release kinetics. The results demonstrated the potential of the PCL/zein biocomposite scaffolds as a suitable candidate in tissue engineering strategies for bone defect treatment. PMID:27524061

  1. Scaffolding Student Participation in Mathematical Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moschkovich, Judit N.

    2015-01-01

    The concept of scaffolding can be used to describe various types of adult guidance, in multiple settings, across different time scales. This article clarifies what we mean by scaffolding, considering several questions specifically for scaffolding in mathematics: What theoretical assumptions are framing scaffolding? What is being scaffolded? At…

  2. Comparative repair capacity of knee osteochondral defects using regenerated silk fiber scaffolds and fibrin glue with/without autologous chondrocytes during 36 weeks in rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Kazemnejad, Somaieh; Khanmohammadi, Manijeh; Mobini, Sahba; Taghizadeh-Jahed, Masoud; Khanjani, Sayeh; Arasteh, Shaghayegh; Golshahi, Hannaneh; Torkaman, Giti; Ravanbod, Roya; Heidari-Vala, Hamed; Moshiri, Ali; Tahmasebi, Mohammad-Naghi; Akhondi, Mohammad-Mehdi

    2016-06-01

    The reconstruction capability of osteochondral (OCD) defects using silk-based scaffolds has been demonstrated in a few studies. However, improvement in the mechanical properties of natural scaffolds is still challengeable. Here, we investigate the in vivo repair capacity of OCD defects using a novel Bombyx mori silk-based composite scaffold with great mechanical properties and porosity during 36 weeks. After evaluation of the in vivo biocompatibility and degradation rate of these scaffolds, we examined the effectiveness of these fabricated scaffolds accompanied with/without autologous chondrocytes in the repair of OCD lesions of rabbit knees after 12 and 36 weeks. Moreover, the efficiency of these scaffolds was compared with fibrin glue (FG) as a natural carrier of chondrocytes using parallel clinical, histopathological and mechanical examinations. The data on subcutaneous implantation in mice showed that the designed scaffolds have a suitable in vivo degradation rate and regenerative capacity. The repair ability of chondrocyte-seeded scaffolds was typically higher than the scaffolds alone. After 36 weeks of implantation, most parts of the defects reconstructed by chondrocytes-seeded silk scaffolds (SFC) were hyaline-like cartilage. However, spontaneous healing and filling with a scaffold alone did not eventuate in typical repair. We could not find significant differences between quantitative histopathological and mechanical data of SFC and FGC. The fabricated constructs consisting of regenerated silk fiber scaffolds and chondrocytes are safe and suitable for in vivo repair of OCD defects and promising for future clinical trial studies. PMID:26822846

  3. Bioresorbable Scaffolds for Atheroregression: Understanding of Transient Scaffolding.

    PubMed

    Kharlamov, Alexander N

    2016-01-01

    This review focuses on the clinical and biological features of the bioresorbable scaffolds in interventional cardiology highlighting scientific achievements and challenges of the transient scaffolding with Absorb BVS. Special attention is granted to the vascular biology pathways which, involved in the resorption of scaffold, artery remodeling and mechanisms of Glagovian atheroregression setting the stage for subsequent clinical applications. Twenty five years ago Glagov described the phenomenon of limited external elastic membrane enlargement in response to an increase in plaque burden. We believe this threshold becomes the target for development of strategies that reverse atherosclerosis, and particularly transient scaffolding has a potential to be a tool to ultimately conquer atherosclerosis. PMID:26818488

  4. Biocompatibility and bone-repairing effects: comparison between porous poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid and nano-hydroxyapatite/poly(lactic acid) scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Zong, Chen; Qian, Xiaodan; Tang, Zihua; Hu, Qinghong; Chen, Jiarong; Gao, Changyou; Tang, Ruikang; Tong, Xiangmin; Wang, Jinfu

    2014-06-01

    Copolymer composite scaffolds and bioceramic/polymer composite scaffolds are two representative forms of composite scaffolds used for bone tissue engineering. Studies to compare biocompatibility and bone-repairing effects between these two scaffolds are significant for selecting or improving the scaffold for clinical application. We prepared two porous scaffolds comprising poly-lactic-acid/poly-glycolic-acid (PLGA) and poly-lactic-acid/nano-hydroxyapatite (nHAP/PLA) respectively, and examined their biocompatibility with human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) through evaluating adhesion, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation potentials of hMSCs in the scaffold. Then, the PLGA scaffold with hMSCs (PM construct) and the nHAP/PLA scaffold with hMSCs (HPM construct) were transplanted into the rat calvarial defect areas to compare their effects on the bone reconstruction. The results showed that the nHAP/PLA scaffold was in favor of adhesion, matrix deposition and osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs. For in vivo transplantation, both HPM and PM constructs led to mineralization and osteogenesis in the defect area of rat. However, the area grafted with PM construct showed a better formation of mature bone than that with HPM construct. In addition, the evaluation of in vitro and in vivo degradation indicated that the degradation rate of nHAP/PLA scaffold was much lower than that of PLGA scaffold. It is inferred that the lower degradation of nHAP/PLA scaffold should result in its inferior bone reconstruction in rat calvaria. Therefore, the preparation of an ideal composite scaffold for bone tissue engineering should be taken into account of the balance between its biocompatibility, degradation rate, osteoconductivity and mechanical property. PMID:24749403

  5. Primary human osteoblast culture on 3D porous collagen-hydroxyapatite scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Jones, Gemma L; Walton, Robin; Czernuszka, Jan; Griffiths, Sarah L; El Haj, Alicia J; Cartmell, Sarah H

    2010-09-15

    There is a need in tissue-engineering for 3D scaffolds that mimic the natural extracellular matrix of bone to enhance cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. The scaffold is also required to be degradable. A highly porous scaffold has been developed to incorporate two of the extracellular components found in bone-collagen and hydroxyapatite (HA). The scaffold's collagen component is an afibrillar monomeric type I atelocollagen extracted from foetal calf's skin. This provided a novel environment for the inclusion of HA powder. Five hundred thousand primary human osteoblasts were seeded onto 4 mm cubed scaffolds that varied in ratio of HA to collagen. Weight ratios of 1:99, 25:75, 50:50, and 75:25 hydroxyapatite:collagen (HA:Collagen) were analysed. The scaffolds plus cells were cultured for 21 days. DNA assays and live/dead viability staining demonstrated that all of the scaffolds supported cell proliferation and viability. An alkaline phosphatase assay showed similar osteoblast phenotype maintenance on all of the 3D scaffolds analysed at 21 days. MicroCT analysis demonstrated an increase in total sample volume (correlating to increase in unmineralised matrix production). An even distribution of HA throughout the collagen matrix was observed using this technique. Also at 3 weeks, reductions in the percentage of the mineralised phase of the constructs were seen. These results indicate that each of the ratios of HA/collagen scaffolds have great potential for bone tissue engineering. PMID:20694991

  6. Effects of bioactive glass nanoparticles on the mechanical and biological behavior of composite coated scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Roohani-Esfahani, S I; Nouri-Khorasani, S; Lu, Z F; Appleyard, R C; Zreiqat, H

    2011-03-01

    Biphasic calcium phosphates (BCP) scaffolds are widely used for bone tissue regeneration. However, brittleness, low mechanical properties and compromised bioactivities are, at present, their major disadvantages. In this study we coated the struts of a BCP scaffold with a nanocomposite layer consisting of bioactive glass nanoparticles (nBG) and polycaprolactone (PCL) (BCP/PCL-nBG) to enhance its mechanical and biological behavior. The effect of various nBG concentrations (1-90 wt.%) on the mechanical properties and in vitro behavior of the scaffolds was comprehensively examined and compared with that for a BCP scaffold coated with PCL and hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (nHA) (BCP/PCL-nHA) and a BCP scaffold coated with only a PCL layer (BCP/PCL). Introduction of 1-90 wt.% nBG resulted in scaffolds with compressive strengths in the range 0.2-1.45 MPa and moduli in the range 19.3-49.4 MPa. This trend was also observed for BCP/PCL-nHA scaffolds, however, nBG induced even better bioactivity and a faster degradation rate. The maximum compressive strength (increased ∼14 times) and modulus (increased ∼3 times) were achieved when 30 wt.% nBG was added, compared with BCP scaffolds. Moreover, BCP/PCL-nBG scaffolds induced the differentiation of primary human bone-derived cells (HOBs), with significant up-regulation of osteogenic gene expression for Runx2, osteopontin and bone sialoprotein, compared with the other groups. PMID:20971219

  7. Type I collagen and polyvinyl alcohol blend fiber scaffold for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Cai, Changbin; Chen, Cheng; Chen, Guangxing; Wang, Fuyou; Guo, Lin; Yin, Li; Feng, Dehong; Yang, Liu

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to perform an evaluation of a braided fiber scaffold for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The scaffold was composed of 50% type I collagen (Col-I) and 50% polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). First, the biocompatibility and in vitro weight loss of the scaffold were tested. Then, the scaffolds were used to reconstruct the ACL in China Bama mimi pigs. At 24 weeks post-operation, the mechanical properties and histology of the regenerated ACL were analyzed. The maximum load and tensile strength were 472.43± 15.2 N and 29.71± 0.96 MPa, respectively; both were ~75% of those of native ACL and ~90% of those of fiber scaffold. This indicated that the scaffold maintained a large portion of native ACL's mechanical properties, and tissue formation on the scaffold compensated most of the tensile strength loss caused by scaffold degradation. Histology and immunohistology analysis showed the morphology and major extracellular matrix components of the regenerated ligament resembled the native ACL. Thus, the Col-I/PVA blend fiber ACL scaffold showed good potential for clinical applications. PMID:23531980

  8. Design and fabrication of biomimetic multiphased scaffolds for ligament-to-bone fixation.

    PubMed

    He, Jiankang; Zhang, Wenyou; Liu, Yaxiong; Li, Xiang; Li, Dichen; Jin, Zhongmin

    2015-05-01

    Conventional ligament grafts with single material composition cannot effectively integrate with the host bones due to mismatched properties and eventually affect their long-term function in vivo. Here we presented a multi-material strategy to design and fabricate composite scaffolds including ligament, interface and bone multiphased regions. The interface region consists of triphasic layers with varying material composition and porous structure to mimic native ligament-to-bone interface while the bone region contains polycaprolactone (PCL) anchor and microchanneled ceramic scaffolds to potentially provide combined mechanical and biological implant-bone fixation. Finite element analysis (FEA) demonstrated that the multiphased scaffolds with interference value smaller than 0.5 mm could avoid the fracture of ceramic scaffold during the implantation process, which was validated by in-vitro implanting the multiphased scaffolds into porcine joint bones. Pull-out experiment showed that the initial fixation between the multiphased scaffolds with 0.47 mm interference and the host bones could withstand the maximum force of 360.31±97.51 N, which can be improved by reinforcing the ceramic scaffolds with biopolymers. It is envisioned that the multiphased scaffold could potentially induce the regeneration of a new bone as well as interfacial tissue with the gradual degradation of the scaffold and subsequently realize long-term biological fixation of the implant with the host bone. PMID:25746239

  9. Rheological, biocompatibility and osteogenesis assessment of fish collagen scaffold for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Elango, Jeevithan; Zhang, Jingyi; Bao, Bin; Palaniyandi, Krishnamoorthy; Wang, Shujun; Wenhui, Wu; Robinson, Jeya Shakila

    2016-10-01

    In the present investigation, an attempt was made to find an alternative to mammalian collagen with better osteogenesis ability. Three types of collagen scaffolds - collagen, collagen-chitosan (CCH), and collagen-hydroxyapatite (CHA) - were prepared from the cartilage of Blue shark and investigated for their physico-functional and mechanical properties in relation to biocompatibility and osteogenesis. CCH scaffold was superior with pH 4.5-4.9 and viscosity 9.7-10.9cP. Notably, addition of chitosan and HA (hydroxyapatite) improved the stiffness (11-23MPa) and degradation rate but lowered the water binding capacity and porosity of the scaffold. Interestingly, CCH scaffolds remained for 3days before complete in-vitro biodegradation. The decreased amount of viable T-cells and higher level of FAS/APO-1 were substantiated the biocompatibility properties of prepared collagen scaffolds. Osteogenesis study revealed that the addition of CH and HA in both fish and mammalian collagen scaffolds could efficiently promote osteoblast cell formation. The ALP activity was significantly high in CHA scaffold-treated osteoblast cells, which suggests an enhanced bone-healing process. Therefore, the present study concludes that the composite scaffolds prepared from fish collagen with higher stiffness, lower biodegradation rate, better biocompatible, and osteogenesis properties were suitable biomaterial for a bone tissue engineering application as an alternative to mammalian collagen scaffolds. PMID:27211297

  10. BSA/HSA ratio modulates the properties of Ca(2+)-induced cold gelation scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Artur; Volkov, Vadim; Oliveira, Mariana B; Padrão, Jorge; Mano, João F; Gomes, Andreia C; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2016-08-01

    An effective tissue engineering approach requires adjustment according to the target tissue to be engineered. The possibility of obtaining a protein-based formulation for the development of multivalent tunable scaffolds that can be adapted for several types of cells and tissues is explored in this work. The incremental substitution of bovine serum albumin (BSA) by human serum albumin (HSA), changing the scaffolds' hydrophilic/hydrophobic ratio, on a previously optimized scaffold formulation resulted in a set of uniform porous scaffolds with different physical properties and associated cell proliferation profile along time. There was a general trend towards an increase in hydrophilicity, swelling degree and in vitro degradation of the scaffolds with increasing replacement of BSA by HAS. The set of BSA/HSA scaffolds presented distinct values for the storage (elastic) modulus and loss factor which were similar to those described for different native tissues such as bone, cartilage, muscle, skin and neural tissue. The preferential adhesion and proliferation of skin fibroblasts on the BSA25%HSA75% and HSA100% scaffolds, as predicted by their viscoelastic properties, demonstrate that the BSA/HSA scaffold formulation is promising for the development of scaffolds that can be tuned according to the tissue to be repaired and restored. PMID:27156695

  11. Scaffolds containing chitosan/carboxymethyl cellulose/mesoporous wollastonite for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Sainitya, R; Sriram, M; Kalyanaraman, V; Dhivya, S; Saravanan, S; Vairamani, M; Sastry, T P; Selvamurugan, N

    2015-09-01

    Scaffold based bone tissue engineering utilizes a variety of biopolymers in different combinations aiming to deliver optimal properties required for bone regeneration. In the current study, we fabricated bio-composite scaffolds containing chitosan (CS), carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) with varied concentrations of mesoporous wollastonite (m-WS) particles by the freeze drying method. The CS/CMC/m-WS scaffolds were characterized by the SEM, EDS and FT-IR studies. Addition of m-WS particles had no effect on altering the porosity of the scaffolds. m-WS particles at 0.5% concentration in the CS/CMC scaffolds showed significant improvement in the bio-mineralization and protein adsorption properties. Addition of m-WS particles in the CS/CMC scaffolds significantly reduced their swelling and degradation properties. The CS/CMC/m-WS scaffolds also showed cyto-friendly nature to human osteoblastic cells. The osteogenic potential of CS/CMC/m-WS scaffolds was confirmed by calcium deposition and expression of an osteoblast specific microRNA, pre-mir-15b. Thus, the current investigations support the use of CS/CMC/m-WS scaffolds for bone tissue engineering applications. PMID:26188305

  12. Impact of polymer structure and composition on fully resorbable endovascular scaffold performance

    PubMed Central

    Ferdous, Jahid; Kolachalama, Vijaya B.; Shazly, Tarek

    2014-01-01

    Fully erodible endovascular scaffolds are being increasingly considered for the treatment of obstructive arterial disease owing to their potential to mitigate long-term risks associated with permanent alternatives. While complete scaffold erosion facilitates vessel healing, generation and release of material degradation by-products from candidate materials such as poly-l-lactide (PLLA) may elicit local inflammatory responses that limit implant efficacy. We developed a computational framework to quantify how the compositional and structural parameters of PLLA-based fully erodible endovascular scaffolds affect degradation kinetics, erosion kinetics and the transient accumulation of material by-products within the arterial wall. Parametric studies reveal that, while some material properties have similar effects on these critical processes, others induce qualitatively opposing responses. For example, scaffold degradation is only mildly responsive to changes in either PLLA polydispersity or the initial degree of crystallinity, while the erosion kinetics is comparatively sensitive to crystallinity. Moreover, lactide doping can effectively tune both scaffold degradation and erosion, but a concomitant increase in local byproduct accumulation raises concerns about implant safety. Optimized erodible endovascular scaffolds must precisely balance therapeutic function and biological response over the implant lifetime, where compositional and structural parameters will have differential effects on implant performance. PMID:23261926

  13. In vivo study of porous strontium-doped calcium polyphosphate scaffolds for bone substitute applications.

    PubMed

    Tian, Meng; Chen, Feng; Song, Wei; Song, Yancheng; Chen, Yuanwei; Wan, Changxiu; Yu, Xixun; Zhang, Xiaohua

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate in vivo biocompatibility and osteogenesis as well as degradability of the porous strontium-doped calcium polyphosphate (SCPP) scaffolds as a biomaterial for bone substitute applications. The evaluation was performed on a rabbit model over a period of 16 weeks by histology combined with image analysis, X-ray microradiography and immunohistochemistry methods. The histological and X-ray microradiographic results showed that the SCPP scaffold exhibited good biocompatibility and extensive osteoconductivity with host bone. Moreover, a significant more bone formation was observed in the SCPP group compared with that in the CPP group, especially at the initial stage after implantation. New bone volumes (NBVs) of the SCPP group determined at week 4, 8 and 16 were 14, 27 and 45%, respectively. Accordingly, NBVs of the CPP group were 10, 19 and 40%. Immunohistochemical results revealed that both the expression of collagen type I and bone morphogenetic proteins in the SCPP group were higher than that in the CPP group, which might be associated with the release of strontium ions during the implantation. In addition, during 16 weeks implantation the SCPP scaffold exhibited similar degradability with the CPP scaffold in vivo. Both scaffolds showed the greatest degradation rate for the first 4 weeks, and then the degradation rate gradually decreased. The results presented in this study demonstrated that SCPP scaffold can be considered as a biocompatible material, making it attractive for bone substitute application purposes. PMID:19267259

  14. Nanoclay-enriched poly(ɛ-caprolactone) electrospun scaffolds for osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Gaharwar, Akhilesh K; Mukundan, Shilpaa; Karaca, Elif; Dolatshahi-Pirouz, Alireza; Patel, Alpesh; Rangarajan, Kaushik; Mihaila, Silvia M; Iviglia, Giorgio; Zhang, Hongbin; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2014-08-01

    Musculoskeletal tissue engineering aims at repairing and regenerating damaged tissues using biological tissue substitutes. One approach to achieve this aim is to develop osteoconductive scaffolds that facilitate the formation of functional bone tissue. We have fabricated nanoclay-enriched electrospun poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffolds for osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). A range of electrospun scaffolds is fabricated by varying the nanoclay concentrations within the PCL scaffolds. The addition of nanoclay decreases fiber diameter and increases surface roughness of electrospun fibers. The enrichment of PCL scaffold with nanoclay promotes in vitro biomineralization when subjected to simulated body fluid (SBF), indicating bioactive characteristics of the hybrid scaffolds. The degradation rate of PCL increases due to the addition of nanoclay. In addition, a significant increase in crystallization temperature of PCL is also observed due to enhanced surface interactions between PCL and nanoclay. The effect of nanoclay on the mechanical properties of electrospun fibers is also evaluated. The feasibility of using nanoclay-enriched PCL scaffolds for tissue engineering applications is investigated in vitro using hMSCs. The nanoclay-enriched electrospun PCL scaffolds support hMSCs adhesion and proliferation. The addition of nanoclay significantly enhances osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs on the electrospun scaffolds as evident by an increase in alkaline phosphates activity of hMSCs and higher deposition of mineralized extracellular matrix compared to PCL scaffolds. Given its unique bioactive characteristics, nanoclay-enriched PCL fibrous scaffold may be used for musculoskeletal tissue engineering. PMID:24842693

  15. Nanoclay-Enriched Poly(ɛ-caprolactone) Electrospun Scaffolds for Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gaharwar, Akhilesh K.; Mukundan, Shilpaa; Karaca, Elif; Dolatshahi-Pirouz, Alireza; Patel, Alpesh; Rangarajan, Kaushik; Mihaila, Silvia M.; Iviglia, Giorgio; Zhang, Hongbin

    2014-01-01

    Musculoskeletal tissue engineering aims at repairing and regenerating damaged tissues using biological tissue substitutes. One approach to achieve this aim is to develop osteoconductive scaffolds that facilitate the formation of functional bone tissue. We have fabricated nanoclay-enriched electrospun poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffolds for osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). A range of electrospun scaffolds is fabricated by varying the nanoclay concentrations within the PCL scaffolds. The addition of nanoclay decreases fiber diameter and increases surface roughness of electrospun fibers. The enrichment of PCL scaffold with nanoclay promotes in vitro biomineralization when subjected to simulated body fluid (SBF), indicating bioactive characteristics of the hybrid scaffolds. The degradation rate of PCL increases due to the addition of nanoclay. In addition, a significant increase in crystallization temperature of PCL is also observed due to enhanced surface interactions between PCL and nanoclay. The effect of nanoclay on the mechanical properties of electrospun fibers is also evaluated. The feasibility of using nanoclay-enriched PCL scaffolds for tissue engineering applications is investigated in vitro using hMSCs. The nanoclay-enriched electrospun PCL scaffolds support hMSCs adhesion and proliferation. The addition of nanoclay significantly enhances osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs on the electrospun scaffolds as evident by an increase in alkaline phosphates activity of hMSCs and higher deposition of mineralized extracellular matrix compared to PCL scaffolds. Given its unique bioactive characteristics, nanoclay-enriched PCL fibrous scaffold may be used for musculoskeletal tissue engineering. PMID:24842693

  16. Microstructure and properties of polyhydroxybutyrate-chitosan-nanohydroxyapatite composite scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Medvecky, L

    2012-01-01

    Polyhydroxybutyrate-chitosan-hydroxyapatite (PHB-CHT-HAP) composite scaffolds were prepared by the precipitation of biopolymer-nanohydroxyapatite suspensions and following lyophilisation. The propylene carbonate and acetic acid were used as the polyhydroxybutyrate and chitosan solvents, respectively. The high porous microstructure was observed in composites and the macroporosity of scaffolds (pore sizes up to 100 μm) rose with the chitosan content. It was found the reduction in both the PHB melting (70°C) and thermal degradation temperatures of polyhydroxybutyrate and chitosan biopolymers in composites, which confirms the mutual ineraction between polymers and the decrease of PHB lamellar thickness. No preferential preconcentration of individual biopolymers was verified in composites, and the compressive strengths of macroporous PHB-CHT-HAP scaffolds were approximately 2.5 MPa. The high toxic fluorinated cosolvents were avoided from the preparation process. PMID:22547987

  17. Design properties of hydrogel tissue-engineering scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Junmin; Marchant, Roger E

    2011-01-01

    This article summarizes the recent progress in the design and synthesis of hydrogels as tissue-engineering scaffolds. Hydrogels are attractive scaffolding materials owing to their highly swollen network structure, ability to encapsulate cells and bioactive molecules, and efficient mass transfer. Various polymers, including natural, synthetic and natural/synthetic hybrid polymers, have been used to make hydrogels via chemical or physical crosslinking. Recently, bioactive synthetic hydrogels have emerged as promising scaffolds because they can provide molecularly tailored biofunctions and adjustable mechanical properties, as well as an extracellular matrix-like microenvironment for cell growth and tissue formation. This article addresses various strategies that have been explored to design synthetic hydrogels with extracellular matrix-mimetic bioactive properties, such as cell adhesion, proteolytic degradation and growth factor-binding. PMID:22026626

  18. Electrospinning polymer blends for biomimetic scaffolds for ACL tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Vanessa Lizeth

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture is one of the most common knee injuries. Current ACL reconstructive strategies consist of using an autograft or an allograft to replace the ligament. However, limitations have led researchers to create tissue engineered grafts, known as scaffolds, through electrospinning. Scaffolds made of natural and synthetic polymer blends have the potential to promote cell adhesion while having strong mechanical properties. However, enzymes found in the knee are known to degrade tissues and affect the healing of intra-articular injuries. Results suggest that the natural polymers used in this study modify the thermal properties and tensile strength of the synthetic polymers when blended. Scanning electron microscopy display bead-free and enzyme biodegradability of the fibers. Raman spectroscopy confirms the presence of the natural and synthetic polymers in the scaffolds while, amino acid analysis present the types of amino acids and their concentrations found in the natural polymers.

  19. Microstructure and Properties of Polyhydroxybutyrate-Chitosan-Nanohydroxyapatite Composite Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Medvecky, L.

    2012-01-01

    Polyhydroxybutyrate-chitosan-hydroxyapatite (PHB-CHT-HAP) composite scaffolds were prepared by the precipitation of biopolymer-nanohydroxyapatite suspensions and following lyophilisation. The propylene carbonate and acetic acid were used as the polyhydroxybutyrate and chitosan solvents, respectively. The high porous microstructure was observed in composites and the macroporosity of scaffolds (pore sizes up to 100 μm) rose with the chitosan content. It was found the reduction in both the PHB melting (70°C) and thermal degradation temperatures of polyhydroxybutyrate and chitosan biopolymers in composites, which confirms the mutual ineraction between polymers and the decrease of PHB lamellar thickness. No preferential preconcentration of individual biopolymers was verified in composites, and the compressive strengths of macroporous PHB-CHT-HAP scaffolds were approximately 2.5 MPa. The high toxic fluorinated cosolvents were avoided from the preparation process. PMID:22547987

  20. Gelatin/chitosan/hyaluronan ternary complex scaffold containing basic fibroblast growth factor for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Tan, Huaping; Gong, Yihong; Lao, Lihong; Mao, Zhengwei; Gao, Changyou

    2007-10-01

    Gelatin, chitosan and hyaluronan with a weight ratio of 82.6%, 16.5% and 0.1% were chosen as a scaffold material to mimic the composition of natural cartilage matrix for cartilage tissue engineering. Water soluble carbodiimide was added into the biomacromolecule solution with a concentration of 5% to crosslink the complex. Following a freeze-drying procedure, a porous scaffold (control) was then prepared. To enhance chondrogenesis, heparin was covalently immobilized onto the scaffold by carbodiimide chemistry, through which basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) was further incorporated by a bioaffinity force. Incubation in phosphate buffered saline (PBS, pH 7.4) at 37 degrees C caused the weight loss of all kinds of the scaffolds, which could be brought by both the degradation and dissolution of the biomacromolecules. Compared with the control, however, the heparinized scaffold showed stronger ability to resist the weight loss, implying that a higher crosslinking degree was achieved by incorporation of the heparin. Rabbit auricular chondrocytes were seeded onto the ternary complex scaffold containing bFGF to assess cell response. Chondrocytes could adhere and proliferate in all kinds of the scaffold, regardless of the existence of bFGF. No significant difference on glycosaminoglycan (GAG) secretion was recorded between these scaffolds after cultured for 7 and 21 days too, although the absolute value from the Scaffold-heparin-bFGF was somewhat higher. However, chondrocytes seeded in the Scaffold-heparin-bFGF indeed showed significant higher viability than that on the control scaffold. These results reveal that the ternary complex scaffolds, in particular the one containing bFGF, are a potential candidate for cartilage tissue engineering. PMID:17554603

  1. [Advances in the research of natural polymeric materials and their derivatives in the manufacture of scaffolds for dermal tissue engineering].

    PubMed

    Li, R; Wang, H; Leng, C Y; Wang, K; Xie, Y

    2016-05-20

    Natural polymeric materials and their derivatives are organic macromolecular compounds which exist in plants, animals, and micro-organisms. They have been widely used in the preparation of scaffolds for skin tissue engineering recently because of their good histocompatibility and degradability, and low immunogenicity. With the improvement of the preparation technics, composite materials are more commonly used to make scaffolds for dermal tissue engineering. This article summarizes the classification and research status of the commonly used natural polymer materials, their derivatives, and composite scaffold materials, as well as makes a prospect of the research trends of dermal scaffold in the future. PMID:27188491

  2. Accelerated wound healing by injectable microporous gel scaffolds assembled from annealed building blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Donald R.; Weaver, Westbrook M.; Scumpia, Philip O.; di Carlo, Dino; Segura, Tatiana

    2015-07-01

    Injectable hydrogels can provide a scaffold for in situ tissue regrowth and regeneration, yet gel degradation before tissue reformation limits the gels' ability to provide physical support. Here, we show that this shortcoming can be circumvented through an injectable, interconnected microporous gel scaffold assembled from annealed microgel building blocks whose chemical and physical properties can be tailored by microfluidic fabrication. In vitro, cells incorporated during scaffold formation proliferated and formed extensive three-dimensional networks within 48 h. In vivo, the scaffolds facilitated cell migration that resulted in rapid cutaneous-tissue regeneration and tissue-structure formation within five days. The combination of microporosity and injectability of these annealed gel scaffolds should enable novel routes to tissue regeneration and formation in vivo.

  3. Boron nitride nanotubes included thermally cross-linked gelatin-glucose scaffolds show improved properties.

    PubMed

    Şen, Özlem; Culha, Mustafa

    2016-02-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) are increasingly investigated for their medical and biomedical applications due to their unique properties such as resistance to oxidation, thermal and electrical insulation, and biocompatibility. BNNTs can be used to enhance mechanical strength of biomedical structures such as scaffolds in tissue engineering applications. In this study, we report the use of BNNTs and hydroxylated BNNTs (BNNT-OH) to improve the properties of gelatin-glucose scaffolds prepared with electrospinning technique. Human dermal fibroblast (HDF) cells are used for the toxicity assessment and cell seeding studies. It is found that the addition of BNNTs into the scaffold does not influence cell viability, decreases the scaffold degradation rate, and improves cell attachment and proliferation compared to only-gelatin scaffold. PMID:26642075

  4. Collagen/chitosan porous bone tissue engineering composite scaffold incorporated with Ginseng compound K.

    PubMed

    Muthukumar, Thangavelu; Aravinthan, Adithan; Sharmila, Judith; Kim, Nam Soo; Kim, Jong-Hoon

    2016-11-01

    In this study, suitable scaffold materials for bone tissue engineering were successfully prepared using fish scale collagen, hydroxyapatite, chitosan, and beta-tricalcium phosphate. Porous composite scaffolds were prepared by freeze drying method. The Korean traditional medicinal ginseng compound K, a therapeutic agent for the treatment of osteoporosis that reduces inflammation and enhances production of bone morphogenetic protein-2, was incorporated into the composite scaffold. The scaffold was characterized for pore size, swelling, density, degradation, mineralization, cell viability and attachment, and its morphological features were examined using scanning electron microscopy. This characterization and in vitro analysis showed that the prepared scaffold was biocompatible and supported the growth of MG-63 cells, and therefore has potential as an alternative approach for bone regeneration. PMID:27516305

  5. Instruction, Cognitive Scaffolding, and Motivational Scaffolding in Writing Center Tutoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackiewicz, Jo; Thompson, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we quantitatively analyze the discourse of experienced writing center tutors in 10 highly satisfactory conferences. Specifically, we analyze tutors' instruction, cognitive scaffolding, and motivational scaffolding, all tutoring strategies identified in prior research from other disciplines as educationally effective. We find…

  6. A novel alkali metals/strontium co-substituted calcium polyphosphate scaffolds in bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Song, Wei; Wang, Qiguang; Wan, Changxiu; Shi, Tong; Markel, David; Blaiser, Ralph; Ren, Weiping

    2011-08-01

    Our purpose of this study is to develop potassium or sodium/strontium co-substituted calcium polyphosphate (K/Sr-CPP or Na/Sr-CPP) bioceramics in application of bone repairing scaffold. The incorporation of K, Na, and Sr into CPP substrate via a calcining-sintering process was confirmed by X-ray diffractometry and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. In vitro degradation study of co-substituted CPP indicated the incorporation of alkali metal elements promoted the degradability of CPP, and the scanning electron microscope showed the apatite-like minerals were precipitated on the surface of co-substituted CPP. The compress resistant strength of co-substituted CPP was elevated by dopants. The MTT assay and confocal laser-scanning microscope on osteoblasts culturing with co-substituted CPP showed no cytotoxicity. The cell proliferation on co-substituted CPP was even better than others. Thus, this co-substituted CPP bioceramics might have potential of applications in orthopedic field. PMID:21732528

  7. Monocular Elevation Deficiency - Double Elevator Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Eye Terms Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Monocular Elevation Deficiency/ Double Elevator Palsy En Español Read in Chinese What is monocular elevation deficiency (Double Elevator Palsy)? ...

  8. Potential of a PLA-PEO-PLA-based scaffold for skin tissue engineering: in vitro evaluation.

    PubMed

    Garric, Xavier; Guillaume, Olivier; Dabboue, Hinda; Vert, Michel; Molès, Jean-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the in vitro behaviour of porous degradable scaffolds of the PLA-PEO-PLA-type designed prior to in vivo evaluation for skin tissue engineering. Two tri-block co-polymers were synthesized from PEO and DL-lactide and their degradation was studied under conditions that mimic a cutaneous wound environment. 3-D porous scaffolds with interconnected pores were fabricated using the salt leaching method and characterized by ESEM and Hg porosimetry. The degrading action of gamma sterilization was studied on the co-polymers. The less degraded one was selected to make porous scaffolds on which human dermal fibroblasts and human epidermal keratinocytes were cultured. The capacity of such scaffolds to act as a dermal equivalent was also considered. Colonization by human dermal fibroblasts was shown after hematoxylin staining and the production of major proteins normally found in the extracellular matrix was assessed by Western blotting of protein extracts. Finally, a skin substitute was generated by seeding human keratinocytes on the dermal equivalent and a new epidermis was characterized by using immuno-histological staining. Results show that gamma sterilization and that degradation under conditions that mimic skin wound healing were acceptable. The fact that fibroblasts produce extracellular matrix and that keratinocytes generated an epidermal barrier argues in favour of the interest of this type of porous scaffold for skin reconstruction. PMID:21888762

  9. A mixture approach to investigate interstitial growth in engineering scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Vernerey, Franck J

    2016-04-01

    Controlling biological growth within a cell-laden polymeric scaffold is a critical challenge in the tissue engineering community. Indeed, construct growth must often be balanced with scaffold degradation and is often coupled to varying degrees of deformation that originate from swelling, external forces and the effects of confinement. These factors have been shown to affect growth in many ways, but to date, our understanding is mostly qualitative. While cell sensing, molecular transport and scaffold/tissue interactions are believed to be important players, it will be critical to quantify, predict and control these effects in order to eventually optimize tissue growth in the laboratory. The aim of this paper was thus to provide a theoretical framework to better understand how the scaffold-mediated mechanisms of transport, deposition (and possibly degradation) and elasticity affect the overall growth of a tissue subjected to finite deformations. We propose a formulation in which the macroscopic evolutions in tissue size, density as well as the appearance of residual stresses can be directly related to changes in internal composition by considering three fundamental principles: mechanical equilibrium, chemical equilibrium and molecular incompressibility. The resulting model allows us to pay particular attention to features that are critical to the interaction between growth and deformation: osmotic pressure and swelling, the strain mismatch between old and newly deposited material as well as the mechano-sensitive cell-mediated production. We show that all of these phenomena may indeed strongly affect the overall growth of a construct under finite deformations. PMID:26047777

  10. Hydrophobicity as a design criterion for polymer scaffolds in bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Edwin J P; Sladek, Raymond E J; Bahar, Hila; Yaffe, Avinoam; Gijbels, Marion J; Kuijer, Roel; Bulstra, Sjoerd K; Guldemond, Nick A; Binderman, Itzhak; Koole, Leo H

    2005-07-01

    Porous polymeric scaffolds play a key role in most tissue-engineering strategies. A series of non-degrading porous scaffolds was prepared, based on bulk-copolymerisation of 1-vinyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NVP) and n-butyl methacrylate (BMA), followed by a particulate-leaching step to generate porosity. Biocompatibility of these scaffolds was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the scaffold materials were studied using the so-called demineralised bone matrix (DBM) as an evaluation system in vivo. The DBM, which is essentially a part of a rat femoral bone after processing with mineral acid, provides a suitable environment for ectopic bone formation, provided that the cavity of the DBM is filled with bone marrow prior to subcutaneous implantation in the thoracic region of rats. Various scaffold materials, differing with respect to composition and, hence, hydrophilicity, were introduced into the centre of DBMs. The ends were closed with rat bone marrow, and ectopic bone formation was monitored after 4, 6, and 8 weeks, both through X-ray microradiography and histology. The 50:50 scaffold particles were found to readily accommodate formation of bone tissue within their pores, whereas this was much less the case for the more hydrophilic 70:30 counterpart scaffolds. New healthy bone tissue was encountered inside the pores of the 50:50 scaffold material, not only at the periphery of the constructs but also in the center. Active osteoblast cells were found at the bone-biomaterial interfaces. These data indicate that the hydrophobicity of the biomaterial is, most likely, an important design criterion for polymeric scaffolds which should promote the healing of bone defects. Furthermore, it is argued that stable, non-degrading porous biomaterials, like those used in this study, provide an important tool to expand our comprehension of the role of biomaterials in scaffold-based tissue engineering approaches. PMID:15701371

  11. In vitro characterization of chitosan-gelatin scaffolds for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan; Onyeri, Stella; Siewe, Mbonda; Moshfeghian, Aliakbar; Madihally, Sundararajan V

    2005-12-01

    Recently, chitosan-gelatin scaffolds have gained much attention in various tissue engineering applications. However, the underlying cell-matrix interactions remain unclear in addition to the scaffold degradation and mechanical characteristics. In this study, we evaluated (i) the degradation kinetics of chitosan and chitosan-gelatin scaffolds in the presence of 10mg/L of lysozyme for dimensional stability, weight loss, and pH changes for a period of 2 months, (ii) tensile and compressive properties of films and scaffolds in wet state at 37 degrees C, (iii) viability of fibroblasts and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) on scaffolds, and (iv) the alteration in cell spreading characteristics, cytoskeletal actin distribution, focal adhesion kinase (FAK) distribution and PECAM-1 expression of HUVECs under static and 4.5, 8.5, 13 and 18 dyn/cm2 shear stress conditions. Degradation results showed that gelatin-containing chitosan scaffolds had faster degradation rate and significant loss of material than chitosan. Mechanical properties of chitosan are affected by the addition of gelatin although there was no clear trend. Three-dimensional chitosan and chitosan-gelatin scaffolds supported fibroblast viability equally. However, chitosan membranes decreased cell-spreading area, disrupted F-actin and localized FAK in the nucleus of HUVECs. Importantly, the lowest shear stress tested (4.5 dyn/cm2) for 3 h washed away cells on chitosan suggesting weak cell adhesion. In the blends, effect of gelatin was dominant; actin and FAK distribution were comparable to gelatin in static culture. However, at higher shear stresses, presence of chitosan inhibited shear-induced increase in cell spreading and weakened cell adhesive strength. No significant differences were observed in PECAM-1 expression. In summary, these results showed significant influence of blending gelatin with chitosan on scaffold properties and cellular behavior. PMID:16005510

  12. Porous magnesium/PLGA composite scaffolds for enhanced bone regeneration following tooth extraction.

    PubMed

    Brown, Andrew; Zaky, Samer; Ray, Herbert; Sfeir, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Sixty percent of implant-supported dental prostheses require bone grafting to enhance bone quantity and quality prior to implant placement. We have developed a metallic magnesium particle/PLGA composite scaffold to overcome the limitations of currently used dental bone grafting materials. This is the first report of porous metallic magnesium/PLGA scaffolds synthesized using a solvent casting, salt leaching method. We found that incorporation of varying amounts of magnesium into the PLGA scaffolds increased the compressive strength and modulus, as well as provided a porous structure suitable for cell infiltration, as measured by mercury intrusion porosimetry. Additionally, combining basic-degrading magnesium with acidic-degrading PLGA led to an overall pH buffering effect and long-term release of magnesium over the course of a 10-week degradation assay, as measured with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy. Using an indirect proliferation assay adapted from ISO 10993:5, it was found that extracts of medium from degrading magnesium/PLGA scaffolds increased bone marrow stromal cell proliferation in vitro, a phenomenon observed by other groups investigating magnesium's impact on cells. Finally, magnesium/PLGA scaffold biocompatibility was assessed in a canine socket preservation model. Micro-computed tomography and histological analysis showed the magnesium/PLGA scaffolds to be safer and more effective at preserving bone height than empty controls. Three-dimensional magnesium/PLGA composite scaffolds show promise for dental socket preservation and also, potentially, orthopedic bone regeneration. These scaffolds could decrease inflammation observed with clinically used PLGA devices, as well as enhance osteogenesis, as observed with previously studied magnesium devices. PMID:25234156

  13. Mechanical properties evolution of a PLGA-PLCL composite scaffold for ligament tissue engineering under static and cyclic traction-torsion in vitro culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Cyril J F; Ziani, Kahina; Zhang, Ye Min; Liu, Jian; Tran, Nguyen; Babin, Jérôme; de Isla, Natalia; Six, Jean-Luc; Wang, Xiong

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the in vitro degradation of a poly(L-lactic-co-glycolic acid)-poly(L-lactic-co-ϵ-caprolactone) (PLGA-PLCL) composite scaffold's mechanical properties under static culture condition and 2 h period per day of traction-torsion cyclic culture conditions of simultaneous 10% uniaxial strain and 90° of torsion cycles at 0.33 Hz. Scaffolds were cultured in static conditions, during 28 days, with or without cell seeded or under dynamic conditions during 14 days in a bioreactor. Scaffolds' biocompatibility and proliferation were investigated with Alamar Blue tests and cell nuclei staining. Scaffolds' mechanical properties were tested during degradation by uniaxial traction test. The PLGA-PLCL composite scaffold showed a good cytocompatibility and a high degree of colonization in static conditions. Mechanical tests showed a competition between two process of degradation which have been associated to hydrolytic and enzymatic degradation for the reinforce yarn in poly(L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). The enzymatic degradation led to a decrease effect on mechanical properties of cell-seeded scaffolds during the 21st days, but the hydrolytic degradation was preponderant at day 28. In conclusion, the structure of this scaffold is adapted to culture in terms of biocompatibility and cell orientation (microfiber) but must be improved by delaying the degradation of it reinforce structure in PLGA. PMID:23647247

  14. Fabrication and characterization of porous EH scaffolds and EH-PEG bilayers.

    PubMed

    Falco, Erin E; Coates, Emily E; Li, Erik; Roth, J Scott; Fisher, John P

    2011-06-01

    Biomaterials made from synthetic polymers are becoming more pervasive in the medical field. Synthetic polymers are particularly advantageous as their chemical and mechanical properties can be easily tailored to a specific application. This work characterizes polymer scaffolds derived from the cyclic acetal monomer 5-ethyl-5-(hydroxymethyl)-β,β-dimethyl-1,3-dioxane-2-ethanol diacrylate (EHD). Both porous scaffolds and bilayer scaffolds based upon the EHD monomer were fabricated, and the resulting scaffolds' degradation and mechanical properties were studied. The results showed that by modifying the architecture of an EH scaffold, either by adding a porous network or a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) coating, the degradation and Young's modulus of the biomaterial can be significant altered. However, results also indicated that these architectural modifications can be accomplished without a significant loss in the flexural strength of the scaffold. Therefore, we suggest that porous EH scaffolds, and particularly porous EH-PEG bilayers, may be especially useful in dynamic tissue environments due to their advantageous architectural and mechanical properties. PMID:21442727

  15. Laser fabrication of three-dimensional CAD scaffolds from photosensitive gelatin for applications in tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Ovsianikov, Aleksandr; Deiwick, Andrea; Van Vlierberghe, Sandra; Dubruel, Peter; Möller, Lena; Dräger, Gerald; Chichkov, Boris

    2011-04-11

    In the present work, 3D CAD scaffolds for tissue engineering applications were developed starting from methacrylamide-modified gelatin (GelMOD) using two-photon polymerization (2PP). The scaffolds were cross-linked employing the biocompatible photoinitiator Irgacure 2959. Because gelatin is derived from collagen (i.e., the main constituent of the ECM), the developed materials mimic the cellular microenvironment from a chemical point of view. In addition, by applying the 2PP technique, structural properties of the cellular microenvironment can also be mimicked. Furthermore, in vitro degradation assays indicated that the enzymatic degradation capability of gelatin is preserved for the methacrylamide-modified derivative. An in depth morphological analysis of the 2PP-fabricated scaffolds demonstrated that the parameters of the CAD model are reproduced with great precision, including the ridge-like surface topography on the order of 1.5 μm. The developed scaffolds showed an excellent stability in culture medium. In a final part of the present work, the suitability of the developed scaffolds for tissue engineering applications was verified. The results indicated that the applied materials are suitable to support porcine mesenchymal stem cell adhesion and subsequent proliferation. Upon applying osteogenic stimulation, the seeded cells differentiated into the anticipated lineage. Energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis showed the induced calcification of the scaffolds. The results clearly indicate that 2PP is capable of manufacturing precisely constructed 3D tissue engineering scaffolds using photosensitive polymers as starting material. PMID:21366287

  16. Nonmulberry Silk Fibroin Scaffold Shows Superior Osteoconductivity Than Mulberry Silk Fibroin in Calvarial Bone Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Neety; Baligar, Prakash; Midha, Swati; Kundu, Banani; Bhattacharjee, Maumita; Mukherjee, Snehasish; Mukherjee, Souhrid; Maushart, Florian; Das, Sanskrita; Loparic, Marko; Kundu, Subhas C; Ghosh, Sourabh; Mukhopadhyay, Asok

    2015-08-01

    Recent years have witnessed the advancement of silk biomaterials in bone tissue engineering, although clinical application of the same is still in its infancy. In this study, the potential of pure nonmulberry Antheraea mylitta (Am) fibroin scaffold, without preloading with bone precursor cells, to repair calvarial bone defect in a rat model is explored and compared with its mulberry counterpart Bombyx mori (Bm) silk fibroin. After 3 months of implantation, Am scaffold culminates in a completely ossified regeneration with a progressive increase in mineralization at the implanted site. On the other hand, the Bm scaffold fails to repair the damaged bone, presumably due to its low osteoconductivity and early degradation. The deposition of bone matrix on scaffolds is evaluated by scanning electron and atomic force microscopy. These results are corroborated by in vitro studies of enzymatic degradation, colony formation, and secondary conformational features of the scaffold materials. The greater biocompatibility and mineralization in pure nonmulberry fibroin scaffolds warrants the use of these scaffolds as an "ideal bone graft" biomaterial for effective repair of critical size defects. PMID:26084249

  17. On the structural, mechanical, and biodegradation properties of HA/β-TCP robocast scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Houmard, Manuel; Fu, Qiang; Genet, Martin; Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P

    2013-10-01

    Hydroxyapatite/β-tricalcium phosphate (HA/β-TCP) composite scaffolds have shown great potential for bone-tissue engineering applications. In this work, ceramic scaffold with different HA/β-TCP compositions (pure HA, 60HA/40β-TCP, and 20HA/80β-TCP) were fabricated by a robotic-assisted deposition (robocasting) technique using water-based hydrogel inks. A systematic study was conducted to investigate the porosity, mechanical property, and degradation of the scaffolds. Our results indicate that, at a similar volume porosity, the mechanical strength of the sintered scaffolds increased with the decreasing rod diameter. The compressive strength of the fabricated scaffolds (porosity ≈ 25-80 vol %) varied between ∼3 and ∼50 MPa, a value equal or higher than that of human cancellous bone (2-12 MPa). Although there was a slight increase of Ca and P ions in water after 5 month, no noticeable degradation of the scaffolds in SBF or water was observed. Our findings from this work indicate that composite calcium phosphate scaffolds with customer-designed chemistry and architecture may be fabricated by a robotic-assisted deposition method. PMID:23650043

  18. Microwave-assisted synthesis of porous chitosan-modified montmorillonite-hydroxyapatite composite scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Kar, Sumanta; Kaur, Tejinder; Thirugnanam, A

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a porous chitosan-organically modified montmorillonite-hydroxyapatite (CS-OM-HA) composite scaffold was developed by combining microwave irradiation and gas foaming method. Hydroxyapatite (HA) particles of size ∼ 65 nm were synthesized and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. The prepared composite scaffolds were characterized using ATR-FTIR, XRD, mercury intrusion porosimeter (MIP) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies. The synergistic effect of HA and OM on the mechanical and in vitro biological properties (swelling, degradation, protein adsorption and bioactivity) of the composite scaffolds were evaluated. Swelling, degradation, mechanical property, bioactivity and protein adsorption studies of CS-OM-HA composite scaffolds have shown desirable results in comparison with the pure CS and CS-OM composite scaffolds. CS-OM-HA composite scaffolds were also found to be non-cytotoxic to MG 63 osteoblast cell lines. From the study, it can be concluded that the novel CS-OM-HA composite scaffold with improved mechanical and in vitro biological properties has wide potential in non-load bearing bone tissue engineering applications. PMID:26505953

  19. Bioresorbable scaffolds for the treatment of coronary artery disease: current status and future perspective.

    PubMed

    Kraak, Robin P; Grundeken, Maik J; Koch, Karel T; de Winter, Robbert J; Wykrzykowska, Joanna J

    2014-09-01

    Bioresorbable scaffolds represent a novel approach in the treatment of coronary artery disease which allows for vessel wall support without leaving a permanent foreign body in the coronary artery. This technology has the potential to reduce some of the shortcomings of current standard treatment with metallic drug-eluting stents, such as late in-stent restenosis, impaired vasomotion of the stented segment and hindrance of surgical revascularizations. Currently, several bioresorbable scaffolds are available and undergoing clinical or preclinical evaluation. This review will present the current status of development of bioresorbable scaffolds, describe the degradation/resorption process of each device and the clinical data available to date. PMID:25087771

  20. Chitosan-based hydrogel tissue scaffolds made by 3D plotting promotes osteoblast proliferation and mineralization.

    PubMed

    Liu, I-Hsin; Chang, Shih-Hsin; Lin, Hsin-Yi

    2015-06-01

    A 3D plotting system was used to make chitosan-based tissue scaffolds with interconnected pores using pure chitosan (C) and chitosan cross-linked with pectin (CP) and genipin (CG). A freeze-dried chitosan scaffold (CF/D) was made to compare with C, to observe the effects of structural differences. The fiber size, pore size, porosity, compression strength, swelling ratio, drug release efficacy, and cumulative weight loss of the scaffolds were measured. Osteoblasts were cultured on the scaffolds and their proliferation, type I collagen production, alkaline phosphatase activity, calcium deposition, and morphology were observed. C had a lower swelling ratio, degradation, porosity and drug release efficacy and a higher compressional stiffness and cell proliferation compared to CF/D (p < 0.05). Of the 3D-plotted samples, cells on CP exhibited the highest degree of mineralization after 21 d (p < 0.05). CP also had the highest swelling ratio and fastest drug release, followed by C and CG (p < 0.05). Both CP and CG were stiffer and degraded more slowly in saline solution than C (p < 0.05). In summary, 3D-plotted scaffolds were stronger, less likely to degrade and better promoted osteoblast cell proliferation in vitro compared to the freeze-dried scaffolds. C, CP and CG were structurally similar, and the different crosslinking caused significant changes in their physical and biological performances. PMID:25970802

  1. Control of crosslinking for tailoring collagen-based scaffolds stability and mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Davidenko, N.; Schuster, C.F.; Bax, D.V.; Raynal, N.; Farndale, R.W.; Best, S.M.; Cameron, R.E.

    2015-01-01

    We provide evidence to show that the standard reactant concentrations used in tissue engineering to cross-link collagen-based scaffolds are up to 100 times higher than required for mechanical integrity in service, and stability against degradation in an aqueous environment. We demonstrate this with a detailed and systematic study by comparing scaffolds made from (a) collagen from two different suppliers, (b) gelatin (a partially denatured collagen) and (c) 50% collagen–50% gelatin mixtures. The materials were processed, using lyophilisation, to produce homogeneous, highly porous scaffolds with isotropic architectures and pore diameters ranging from 130 to 260 μm. Scaffolds were cross-linked using a carbodiimide treatment, to establish the effect of the variations in crosslinking conditions (down to very low concentrations) on the morphology, swelling, degradation and mechanical properties of the scaffolds. Carbodiimide concentration of 11.5 mg/ml was defined as the standard (100%) and was progressively diluted down to 0.1%. It was found that 10-fold reduction in the carbodiimide content led to the significant increase (almost 4-fold) in the amount of free amine groups (primarily on collagen lysine residues) without compromising mechanics and stability in water of all resultant scaffolds. The importance of this finding is that, by reducing cross-linking, the corresponding cell-reactive carboxylate anions (collagen glutamate or aspartate residues) that are essential for integrin-mediated binding remain intact. Indeed, a 10-fold reduction in carbodiimide crosslinking resulted in near native-like cell attachment to collagen scaffolds. We have demonstrated that controlling the degree of cross-linking, and hence retaining native scaffold chemistry, offers a major step forward in the biological performance of collagen- and gelatin-based tissue engineering scaffolds. Statement of Significance This work developed collagen and gelatine-based scaffolds with structural

  2. In vivo monitoring of structural and mechanical changes of tissue scaffolds by multi-modality imaging.

    PubMed

    Park, Dae Woo; Ye, Sang-Ho; Jiang, Hong Bin; Dutta, Debaditya; Nonaka, Kazuhiro; Wagner, William R; Kim, Kang

    2014-09-01

    Degradable tissue scaffolds are implanted to serve a mechanical role while healing processes occur and putatively assume the physiological load as the scaffold degrades. Mechanical failure during this period can be unpredictable as monitoring of structural degradation and mechanical strength changes at the implant site is not readily achieved in vivo, and non-invasively. To address this need, a multi-modality approach using ultrasound shear wave imaging (USWI) and photoacoustic imaging (PAI) for both mechanical and structural assessment in vivo was demonstrated with degradable poly(ester urethane)urea (PEUU) and polydioxanone (PDO) scaffolds. The fibrous scaffolds were fabricated with wet electrospinning, dyed with indocyanine green (ICG) for optical contrast in PAI, and implanted in the abdominal wall of 36 rats. The scaffolds were monitored monthly using USWI and PAI and were extracted at 0, 4, 8 and 12 wk for mechanical and histological assessment. The change in shear modulus of the constructs in vivo obtained by USWI correlated with the change in average Young's modulus of the constructs ex vivo obtained by compression measurements. The PEUU and PDO scaffolds exhibited distinctly different degradation rates and average PAI signal intensity. The distribution of PAI signal intensity also corresponded well to the remaining scaffolds as seen in explant histology. This evidence using a small animal abdominal wall repair model demonstrates that multi-modality imaging of USWI and PAI may allow tissue engineers to noninvasively evaluate concurrent mechanical stiffness and structural changes of tissue constructs in vivo for a variety of applications. PMID:24951048

  3. A biomimetic scaffold for culturing limbal stem cells: a promising alternative for clinical transplantation.

    PubMed

    Dravida, Subhadra; Gaddipati, Subhash; Griffith, May; Merrett, Kim; Lakshmi Madhira, Soundarya; Sangwan, Virender S; Vemuganti, Geeta K

    2008-07-01

    Limbal tissues can be cultured on various types of scaffolds to create a sheet of limbal-corneal epithelium for research as well as clinical transplantation. An optically clear, biocompatible, biomimetic scaffold would be an ideal replacement graft for transplanting limbal stem cells. In this study, we evaluated the physical and culture characteristics of the recombinant human cross-linked collagen scaffold (RHC-III scaffold) and compared it with denuded human amniotic membrane (HAM). Optical/mechanical properties and microbial susceptibility were measured for the scaffolds. With the approval of the institutional review board, 2 mm fresh human limbal tissues were cultured on 2.5 x 2.5 cm(2) scaffolds in a medium containing autologous serum in a feeder cell-free submerged system. The cultured cell systems were characterized by morphology and immunohistochemistry for putative stem cells and differentiated cell markers. The refractive index (RI) and tensile strength of the RHC-III scaffold were comparable to human cornea, with delayed in vitro degradation compared to HAM. RHC-III scaffolds were 10-fold less susceptible to microbial growth. Cultures were initiated on day 1, expanded to form a monolayer by day 3 and covered the entire growth surface in 10 days. Stratified epithelium on the scaffolds was visualized by transmission electron microscopy. The cultured cells showed p63 and ABCG2 positivity in the basal layer and were immunoreactive for cytokeratin K3 and K12 in the suprabasal layers. RHC-III scaffold supports and retains the growth and stemness of limbal stem cells, in addition to resembling human cornea; thus, it could be a good replacement scaffold for growing cells for clinical transplantation. PMID:18512269

  4. Mechanical evaluation of gradient electrospun scaffolds with 3D printed ring reinforcements for tracheal defect repair.

    PubMed

    Ott, Lindsey M; Zabel, Taylor A; Walker, Natalie K; Farris, Ashley L; Chakroff, Jason T; Ohst, Devan G; Johnson, Jed K; Gehrke, Steven H; Weatherly, Robert A; Detamore, Michael S

    2016-04-01

    Tracheal stenosis can become a fatal condition, and current treatments include augmentation of the airway with autologous tissue. A tissue-engineered approach would not require a donor source, while providing an implant that meets both surgeons' and patients' needs. A fibrous, polymeric scaffold organized in gradient bilayers of polycaprolactone (PCL) and poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) with 3D printed structural ring supports, inspired by the native trachea rings, could meet this need. The purpose of the current study was to characterize the tracheal scaffolds with mechanical testing models to determine the design most suitable for maintaining a patent airway. Degradation over 12 weeks revealed that scaffolds with the 3D printed rings had superior properties in tensile and radial compression, with at least a three fold improvement and 8.5-fold improvement, respectively, relative to the other scaffold groups. The ringed scaffolds produced tensile moduli, radial compressive forces, and burst pressures similar to or exceeding physiological forces and native tissue data. Scaffolds with a thicker PCL component had better suture retention and tube flattening recovery properties, with the monolayer of PCL (PCL-only group) exhibiting a 2.3-fold increase in suture retention strength (SRS). Tracheal scaffolds with ring reinforcements have improved mechanical properties, while the fibrous component increased porosity and cell infiltration potential. These scaffolds may be used to treat various trachea defects (patch or circumferential) and have the potential to be employed in other tissue engineering applications. PMID:27097554

  5. Porous ovalbumin scaffolds with tunable properties: a resource-efficient biodegradable material for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Luo, Baiwen; Choong, Cleo

    2015-01-01

    Natural materials are promising alternatives to synthetic materials used in tissue engineering applications as they have superior biocompatibility and promote better cell attachment and proliferation. Ovalbumin, a natural polymer found in avian egg white, is an example of a nature-derived material. Despite the availability and reported biocompatibility of ovalbumin, limited research has been carried out to investigate the efficacy of ovalbumin-based scaffolds for adipose tissue engineering applications. Hence, the current study was carried out to investigate the effect of different crosslinkers on ovalbumin scaffold properties as first step towards the development of ovalbumin-based scaffolds for adipose tissue engineering applications. In this study, highly porous three-dimensional scaffolds were fabricated by using three different crosslinkers: glutaraldehyde, 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide and 1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether. Results showed that the overall scaffold properties such as morphology, pore size and mechanical properties could be modulated based on the type and concentration of crosslinkers used during the fabrication process. Subsequently, the efficacy of the different scaffolds for supporting cell proliferation was investigated. In vitro degradation was also carried on for the best scaffold based on the mechanical and cellular results. Overall, this study is a demonstration of the viability of ovalbumin-based scaffolds as cell carriers for soft tissue engineering applications. PMID:25158688

  6. Woven silk fabric-reinforced silk nanofibrous scaffolds for regenerating load-bearing soft tissues.

    PubMed

    Han, F; Liu, S; Liu, X; Pei, Y; Bai, S; Zhao, H; Lu, Q; Ma, F; Kaplan, D L; Zhu, H

    2014-02-01

    Although three-dimensional (3-D) porous regenerated silk scaffolds with outstanding biocompatibility, biodegradability and low inflammatory reactions have promising application in different tissue regeneration, the mechanical properties of regenerated scaffolds, especially suture retention strength, must be further improved to satisfy the requirements of clinical applications. This study presents woven silk fabric-reinforced silk nanofibrous scaffolds aimed at dermal tissue engineering. To improve the mechanical properties, silk scaffolds prepared by lyophilization were reinforced with degummed woven silk fabrics. The ultimate tensile strength, elongation at break and suture retention strength of the scaffolds were significantly improved, providing suitable mechanical properties strong enough for clinical applications. The stiffness and degradation behaviors were then further regulated by different after-treatment processes, making the scaffolds more suitable for dermal tissue regeneration. The in vitro cell culture results indicated that these scaffolds maintained their excellent biocompatibility after being reinforced with woven silk fabrics. Without sacrifice of porous structure and biocompatibility, the fabric-reinforced scaffolds with better mechanical properties could facilitate future clinical applications of silk as matrices in skin repair. PMID:24090985

  7. Biodegradable mesoporous calcium-magnesium silicate-polybutylene succinate scaffolds for osseous tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinxin; Zhang, Chi; Xu, Wei; Zhong, Biao; Lin, Feng; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Quanxiang; Ji, Jiajin; Wei, Jie; Zhang, Yang

    2015-01-01

    The structural features of bone engineering scaffolds are expected to exhibit osteoinductive behavior and promote cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. In the present study, we employed synthesized ordered mesoporous calcium-magnesium silicate (om-CMS) and polybutylene succinate (PBSu) to develop a novel scaffold with potential applications in osseous tissue engineering. The characteristics, in vitro bioactivity of om-CMS/PBSu scaffold, as well as the cellular responses of MC3T3-E1 cells to the composite were investigated. Our results showed that the om-CMS/PBSu scaffold possesses a large surface area and highly ordered channel pores, resulting in improved degradation and biocompatibility compared to the PBSu scaffold. Moreover, the om-CMS/PBSu scaffold exhibited significantly higher bioactivity and induced apatite formation on its surface after immersion in the simulated body fluid. In addition, the om-CMS/PBSu scaffold provided a high surface area for cell attachment and released Ca, Mg, and Si ions to stimulate osteoblast proliferation. The unique surface characteristics and higher biological efficacy of the om-CMS/PBSu scaffold suggest that it has great potential for being developed into a system that can be employed in osseous tissue engineering. PMID:26604746

  8. Hybrid nanofibrous scaffolds from electrospinning of a synthetic biodegradable elastomer and urinary bladder matrix

    PubMed Central

    Stankus, John J.; Freytes, Donald O.; Badylak, Stephen F.; Wagner, William R.

    2010-01-01

    Synthetic materials can be electrospun into submicron or nanofibrous scaffolds to mimic extracellular matrix (ECM) scale and architecture with reproducible composition and adaptable mechanical properties. However, these materials lack the bioactivity present in natural ECM. ECM-derived scaffolds contain bioactive molecules that exert in vivo mimicking effects as applied for soft tissue engineering, yet do not possess the same flexibility in mechanical property control as some synthetics. The objective of the present study was to combine the controllable properties of a synthetic, biodegradable elastomer with the inherent bioactivity of an ECM derived scaffold. A hybrid electrospun scaffold composed of a biodegradable poly(ester-urethane)urea (PEUU) and a porcine ECM scaffold (urinary bladder matrix, UBM) was fabricated and characterized for its bioactive and physical properties both in vitro and in vivo. Increasing amounts of PEUU led to linear increases in both tensile strength and breaking strain while UBM incorporation led to increased in vitro smooth muscle cell adhesion and proliferation and in vitro mass loss. Subcutaneous implantation of the hybrid scaffolds resulted in increased scaffold degradation and a large cellular infiltrate when compared with electrospun PEUU alone. Electrospun UBM/PEUU combined the attractive bioactivity and mechanical features of its individual components to result in scaffolds with considerable potential for soft tissue engineering applications. PMID:18419942

  9. Peracetic acid: a practical agent for sterilizing heat-labile polymeric tissue-engineering scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Yoganarasimha, Suyog; Trahan, William R; Best, Al M; Bowlin, Gary L; Kitten, Todd O; Moon, Peter C; Madurantakam, Parthasarathy A

    2014-09-01

    Advanced biomaterials and sophisticated processing technologies aim at fabricating tissue-engineering scaffolds that can predictably interact within a biological environment at the cellular level. Sterilization of such scaffolds is at the core of patient safety and is an important regulatory issue that needs to be addressed before clinical translation. In addition, it is crucial that meticulously engineered micro- and nano- structures are preserved after sterilization. Conventional sterilization methods involving heat, steam, and radiation are not compatible with engineered polymeric systems because of scaffold degradation and loss of architecture. Using electrospun scaffolds made from polycaprolactone, a low melting polymer, and employing spores of Bacillus atrophaeus as biological indicators, we compared ethylene oxide, autoclaving and 80% ethanol to a known chemical sterilant, peracetic acid (PAA), for their ability to sterilize as well as their effects on scaffold properties. PAA diluted in 20% ethanol to 1000 ppm or above sterilized electrospun scaffolds in 15 min at room temperature while maintaining nano-architecture and mechanical properties. Scaffolds treated with PAA at 5000 ppm were rendered hydrophilic, with contact angles reduced to 0°. Therefore, PAA can provide economical, rapid, and effective sterilization of heat-sensitive polymeric electrospun scaffolds that are used in tissue engineering. PMID:24341350

  10. Peracetic Acid: A Practical Agent for Sterilizing Heat-Labile Polymeric Tissue-Engineering Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Yoganarasimha, Suyog; Trahan, William R.; Best, Al M.; Bowlin, Gary L.; Kitten, Todd O.; Moon, Peter C.

    2014-01-01

    Advanced biomaterials and sophisticated processing technologies aim at fabricating tissue-engineering scaffolds that can predictably interact within a biological environment at the cellular level. Sterilization of such scaffolds is at the core of patient safety and is an important regulatory issue that needs to be addressed before clinical translation. In addition, it is crucial that meticulously engineered micro- and nano- structures are preserved after sterilization. Conventional sterilization methods involving heat, steam, and radiation are not compatible with engineered polymeric systems because of scaffold degradation and loss of architecture. Using electrospun scaffolds made from polycaprolactone, a low melting polymer, and employing spores of Bacillus atrophaeus as biological indicators, we compared ethylene oxide, autoclaving and 80% ethanol to a known chemical sterilant, peracetic acid (PAA), for their ability to sterilize as well as their effects on scaffold properties. PAA diluted in 20% ethanol to 1000 ppm or above sterilized electrospun scaffolds in 15 min at room temperature while maintaining nano-architecture and mechanical properties. Scaffolds treated with PAA at 5000 ppm were rendered hydrophilic, with contact angles reduced to 0°. Therefore, PAA can provide economical, rapid, and effective sterilization of heat-sensitive polymeric electrospun scaffolds that are used in tissue engineering. PMID:24341350

  11. Biodegradable mesoporous calcium–magnesium silicate-polybutylene succinate scaffolds for osseous tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinxin; Zhang, Chi; Xu, Wei; Zhong, Biao; Lin, Feng; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Quanxiang; Ji, Jiajin; Wei, Jie; Zhang, Yang

    2015-01-01

    The structural features of bone engineering scaffolds are expected to exhibit osteoinductive behavior and promote cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. In the present study, we employed synthesized ordered mesoporous calcium–magnesium silicate (om-CMS) and polybutylene succinate (PBSu) to develop a novel scaffold with potential applications in osseous tissue engineering. The characteristics, in vitro bioactivity of om-CMS/PBSu scaffold, as well as the cellular responses of MC3T3-E1 cells to the composite were investigated. Our results showed that the om-CMS/PBSu scaffold possesses a large surface area and highly ordered channel pores, resulting in improved degradation and biocompatibility compared to the PBSu scaffold. Moreover, the om-CMS/PBSu scaffold exhibited significantly higher bioactivity and induced apatite formation on its surface after immersion in the simulated body fluid. In addition, the om-CMS/PBSu scaffold provided a high surface area for cell attachment and released Ca, Mg, and Si ions to stimulate osteoblast proliferation. The unique surface characteristics and higher biological efficacy of the om-CMS/PBSu scaffold suggest that it has great potential for being developed into a system that can be employed in osseous tissue engineering. PMID:26604746

  12. Designed hybrid scaffolds consisting of polycaprolactone microstrands and electrospun collagen-nanofibers for bone tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyeongjin; Yeo, Myunggu; Ahn, SeungHyun; Kang, Dong-Oan; Jang, Chul Ho; Lee, Haengnam; Park, Gil-Moon; Kim, Geun Hyung

    2011-05-01

    Biomedical scaffolds used in bone tissue engineering should have various properties including appropriate bioactivity, mechanical strength, and morphologically optimized pore structures. Collagen has been well known as a good biomaterial for various types of tissue regeneration, but its usage has been limited due to its low mechanical property and rapid degradation. In this work, a new hybrid scaffold consisting of polycaprolactone (PCL) and collagen is proposed for bone tissue regeneration. The PCL enhances the mechanical properties of the hybrid scaffold and controls the pore structure. Layered collagen nanofibers were used to enhance the initial cell attachment and proliferation. The results showed that the hybrid scaffold yielded better mechanical properties of pure PCL scaffold as well as enhanced biological activity than the pure PCL scaffold did. The effect of pore size on bone regeneration was investigated using two hybrid scaffolds with pore sizes of 200 ± 20 and 300 ± 27 μm. After post-seeding for 7 days, the cell proliferation with pore size, 200 ± 20 μm, was greater than that with pore size, 300 ± 27 μm, due to the high surface area of the scaffold. PMID:21384546

  13. Biocomposite macroporous cryogels as potential carrier scaffolds for bone active agents augmenting bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Raina, Deepak Bushan; Isaksson, Hanna; Teotia, Arun Kumar; Lidgren, Lars; Tägil, Magnus; Kumar, Ashok

    2016-08-10

    Osteoinduction can be enhanced by combining scaffolds with bone morphogenic protein-2 (BMP-2). However, BMP's are known to also cause bone resorption. This can be controlled using bisphosphonates like zoledronic acid (ZA). In this study, we produced two different scaffolds containing silk-fibroin, chitosan, agarose and hydroxyapatite (HA) with and without bioactive glass. The aims of the study were to fabricate, physico-chemically characterize and evaluate the carrier properties of the scaffolds for recombinant human BMP-2 (rhBMP-2) and ZA. Scaffolds were characterized using various methods to confirm their composition. During cell-material interactions, both scaffolds exhibited gradual but sustained proliferation of both C2C12 and MSCs for a period of 6weeks with augmentative effects on their phenotype indicated by elevated levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) cuing towards osteogenic differentiation. In-vitro effects of rhBMP-2 and ZA contained within both the scaffolds was assessed on MC3T3 preosteoblast cells and the results show a significant increase in the ALP activity of the cells seeded on scaffolds with rhBMP-2. Further, the scaffold with both HA and bioactive glass was considered for the animal study. In-vitro, this scaffold released nearly 25% rhBMP-2 in 21-days and the addition of ZA did not affect the release. In the animal study, the scaffolds were combined with rhBMP-2 and ZA, rhBMP-2 or implanted alone in an ectopic muscle pouch model. Significantly higher bone formation was observed in the scaffold loaded with both rhBMP-2 and ZA as seen from micro-computed tomography, histomorphometry and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. PMID:27252151

  14. Matrices for tissue engineering-scaffold structure for a bioartificial liver support system.

    PubMed

    Mayer, J; Karamuk, E; Akaike, T; Wintermantel, E

    2000-02-14

    This study proposes a new composite scaffold system. A woven polyethylenterephtalate (PET) fabric was coated on one side with a biodegradable PLGA film, in order to obtain a geometrically polarized scaffold structure for an bioartificial liver support system. The composite structure ensures the stability of the membrane during degradation of the membrane polymer. The mesh size of the composite does not significantly influence the degradation behavior. Hepatocyte culturing studies reveal that the formation of aggregates depends on the mesh size and on the pretreatment: The largest aggregates could be observed after 48 h when PVLA coating, large mesh size and EGF were combined. Thus, the combination of a geometrically structured, partially degradable scaffold with receptor-mediated cell attachment sites offers promising possibilities in liver tissue engineering. PMID:10640647

  15. Injectable Biodegradable Polyurethane Scaffolds with Release of Platelet-derived Growth Factor for Tissue Repair and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hafeman, Andrea E.; Li, Bing; Yoshii, Toshitaka; Zienkiewicz, Katarzyna; Davidson, Jeffrey M.; Guelcher, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this work was to investigate the effects of triisocyanate composition on the biological and mechanical properties of biodegradable, injectable polyurethane scaffolds for bone and soft tissue engineering. Methods Scaffolds were synthesized using reactive liquid molding techniques, and were characterized in vivo in a rat subcutaneous model. Porosity, dynamic mechanical properties, degradation rate, and release of growth factors were also measured. Results Polyurethane scaffolds were elastomers with tunable damping properties and degradation rates, and they supported cellular infiltration and generation of new tissue. The scaffolds showed a two-stage release profile of platelet-derived growth factor, characterized by a 75% burst release within the first 24 h and slower release thereafter. Conclusions Biodegradable polyurethanes synthesized from triisocyanates exhibited tunable and superior mechanical properties compared to materials synthesized from lysine diisocyanates. Due to their injectability, biocompatibility, tunable degradation, and potential for release of growth factors, these materials are potentially promising therapies for tissue engineering. PMID:18516665

  16. Using Scaffolds in Problem-Based Hypermedia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Su, Yuyan; Klein, James D.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the use of scaffolds in problem-based hypermedia. Three hundred and twelve undergraduate students enrolled in a computer literacy course worked in project teams to use a hypermedia PBL program focused on designing a personal computer. The PBL program included content scaffolds, metacognitive scaffolds, or no scaffolds.…

  17. Electrospun multifunctional tissue engineering scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chong; Wang, Min

    2014-03-01

    Tissue engineering holds great promises in providing successful treatments of human body tissue loss that current methods are unable to treat or unable to achieve satisfactory clinical outcomes. In scaffold-based tissue engineering, a highperformance scaffold underpins the success of a tissue engineering strategy and a major direction in the field is to create multifunctional tissue engineering scaffolds for enhanced biological performance and for regenerating complex body tissues. Electrospinning can produce nanofibrous scaffolds that are highly desirable for tissue engineering. The enormous interest in electrospinning and electrospun fibrous structures by the science, engineering and medical communities has led to various developments of the electrospinning technology and wide investigations of electrospun products in many industries, including biomedical engineering, over the past two decades. It is now possible to create novel, multicomponent tissue engineering scaffolds with multiple functions. This article provides a concise review of recent advances in the R & D of electrospun multifunctional tissue engineering scaffolds. It also presents our philosophy and research in the designing and fabrication of electrospun multicomponent scaffolds with multiple functions.

  18. Ectopic Osteogenesis and Scaffold Biodegradation of Nano-Hydroxyapatite-Chitosan in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    He, Yiqun; Dong, Youhai; Cui, Fuzhai; Chen, Xujun; Lin, Rongqiang

    2015-01-01

    The bone-formation and scaffold-biodegradation processes have not been fully characterized. This study aimed to determine the osteogenic ability of nHA-CS osteo-induced bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (BMSC) composites and to explore the relationship between bone formation and scaffold biodegradation. The nHA-CS osteo-induced BMSC composites (nHA-CS+cells group) and the nHA-CS scaffolds (nHA-CS group) were implanted into the femoral spatium intermusculare of SD rats. At 2, 4, 6, 8, and 12 weeks post-implantation, the rat femurs were scanned using computerized tomography (CT), and the CT values of the implants were measured and comparatively analyzed. The implants were then harvested and subjected to hematoxylin and eosin (HE) and Masson's trichrome staining, and the percentages of bone area, scaffold area and collagen area were compared between the two groups. The CT values of the implants were higher in the nHA-CS+cells group than the nHA-CS group at the same time points (P < 0.05). Histological analysis revealed that de novo bone and collagen formation in the pores of the scaffolds gradually increased from 2 weeks post-implantation in both groups and that the scaffold gradually degraded as bone formation proceeded. However, more de novo bone and collagen formation and scaffold degradation occurred in the nHA-CS+cells group than in the nHA-CS group at the same time points (P < 0.05). In conclusion, nHA-CS osteo-induced BMSC composites are promising bone tissue engineering substitutes, and osteo-induced BMSCs can significantly enhance the osteogenic ability and play an active role in the degradation of nHA-CS scaffolds on par with bone formation. PMID:26258851

  19. Ectopic osteogenesis and scaffold biodegradation of nano-hydroxyapatite-chitosan in a rat model.

    PubMed

    He, Yiqun; Dong, Youhai; Cui, Fuzhai; Chen, Xujun; Lin, Rongqiang

    2015-01-01

    The bone-formation and scaffold-biodegradation processes have not been fully characterized. This study aimed to determine the osteogenic ability of nHA-CS osteo-induced bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (BMSC) composites and to explore the relationship between bone formation and scaffold biodegradation. The nHA-CS osteo-induced BMSC composites (nHA-CS+cells group) and the nHA-CS scaffolds (nHA-CS group) were implanted into the femoral spatium intermusculare of SD rats. At 2, 4, 6, 8, and 12 weeks post-implantation, the rat femurs were scanned using computerized tomography (CT), and the CT values of the implants were measured and comparatively analyzed. The implants were then harvested and subjected to hematoxylin and eosin (HE) and Masson's trichrome staining, and the percentages of bone area, scaffold area and collagen area were compared between the two groups. The CT values of the implants were higher in the nHA-CS+cells group than the nHA-CS group at the same time points (P < 0.05). Histological analysis revealed that de novo bone and collagen formation in the pores of the scaffolds gradually increased from 2 weeks post-implantation in both groups and that the scaffold gradually degraded as bone formation proceeded. However, more de novo bone and collagen formation and scaffold degradation occurred in the nHA-CS+cells group than in the nHA-CS group at the same time points (P < 0.05). In conclusion, nHA-CS osteo-induced BMSC composites are promising bone tissue engineering substitutes, and osteo-induced BMSCs can significantly enhance the osteogenic ability and play an active role in the degradation of nHA-CS scaffolds on par with bone formation. PMID:26258851

  20. Biologically active collagen-based scaffolds: advances in processing and characterization.

    PubMed

    Yannas, I V; Tzeranis, D S; Harley, B A; So, P T C

    2010-04-28

    A small number of type I collagen-glycosaminoglycan scaffolds (collagen-GAG scaffolds; CGSs) have unusual biological activity consisting primarily in inducing partial regeneration of organs in the adult mammal. Two of these are currently in use in a variety of clinical settings. CGSs appear to induce regeneration by blocking the adult healing response, following trauma, consisting of wound contraction and scar formation. Several structural determinants of biological activity have been identified, including ligands for binding of fibroblasts to the collagen surface, the mean pore size (which affects ligand density) and the degradation rate (which affects the duration of the wound contraction-blocking activity by the scaffold). Processing variables that affect these determinants include the kinetics of swelling of collagen fibres in acetic acid, freezing of the collagen-GAG suspension and cross-linking of the freeze-dried scaffold. Recent developments in the processing of CGSs include fabrication of scaffolds that are paucidisperse in pore size, scaffolds with gradients in physicochemical properties (and therefore biological activity) and scaffolds that incorporate a mineral component. Advances in the characterization of the pore structure of CGSs have been made using confocal and nonlinear optical microscopy (NLOM). The mechanical behaviour of CGSs, as well as the resistance to degradative enzymes, have been studied. Following seeding with cells (typically fibroblasts), contractile forces in the range 26-450 nN per cell are generated by the cells, leading to buckling of scaffold struts. Ongoing studies of cell-seeded CGSs with NLOM have shown an advantage over the use of confocal microscopy due to the ability of the former method to image the CGS surfaces without staining (which alters its surface ligands), reduced cell photodamage, reduced fluorophore photobleaching and the ability to image deeper inside the scaffold. PMID:20308118

  1. Hybrid scaffolds based on PLGA and silk for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Faheem A; Ju, Hyung Woo; Moon, Bo Mi; Lee, Ok Joo; Kim, Jung-Ho; Park, Hyun Jung; Kim, Dong Wook; Kim, Dong-Kyu; Jang, Ji Eun; Khang, Gilson; Park, Chan Hum

    2016-03-01

    Porous silk scaffolds, which are considered to be natural polymers, cannot be used alone because they have a long degradation rate, which makes it difficult for them to be replaced by the surrounding tissue. Scaffolds composed of synthetic polymers, such as PLGA, have a short degradation rate, lack hydrophilicity and their release of toxic by-products makes them difficult to use. The present investigations aimed to study hybrid scaffolds fabricated from PLGA, silk and hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (Hap NPs) for optimized bone tissue engineering. The results from variable-pressure field emission scanning electron microscopy (VP-FE-SEM), equipped with EDS, confirmed that the fabricated scaffolds had a porous architecture, and the location of each component present in the scaffolds was examined. Contact angle measurements confirmed that the introduction of silk and HAp NPs helped to change the hydrophobic nature of PLGA to hydrophilic, which is the main constraint for PLGA used as a biomaterial. Thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) and FT-IR spectroscopy confirmed thermal decomposition and different vibrations caused in functional groups of compounds used to fabricate the scaffolds, which reflected improvement in their mechanical properties. After culturing osteoblasts for 1, 7 and 14 days in the presence of scaffolds, their viability was checked by MTT assay. The fluorescent microscopy results revealed that the introduction of silk and HAp NPs had a favourable impact on the infiltration of osteoblasts. In vivo experiments were conducted by implanting scaffolds in rat calvariae for 4 weeks. Histological examinations and micro-CT scans from these experiments revealed beneficial attributes offered by silk fibroin and HAp NPs to PLGA-based scaffolds for bone induction. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25628059

  2. Biodegradable fibrous scaffolds with tunable properties formed from photo-cross-linkable poly(glycerol sebacate).

    PubMed

    Ifkovits, Jamie L; Devlin, Jeffrey J; Eng, George; Martens, Timothy P; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Burdick, Jason A

    2009-09-01

    It is becoming increasingly apparent that the architecture and mechanical properties of scaffolds, particularly with respect to mimicking features of natural tissues, are important for tissue engineering applications. Acrylated poly(glycerol sebacate) (Acr-PGS) is a material that can be cross-linked upon exposure to ultraviolet light, leading to networks with tunable mechanical and degradation properties through simple changes during Acr-PGS synthesis. For example, the number of acrylate functional groups on the macromer dictates the concentration of cross-links formed in the resulting network. Three macromers were synthesized that form networks that vary dramatically with respect to their tensile modulus ( approximately 30 kPa to 6.6 MPa) and degradation behavior ( approximately 20-100% mass loss at 12 weeks) based on the extent of acrylation ( approximately 1-24%). These macromers were processed into biodegradable fibrous scaffolds using electrospinning, with gelatin as a carrier polymer to facilitate fiber formation and cell adhesion. The resulting scaffolds were also diverse with respect to their mechanics (tensile modulus ranging from approximately 60 kPa to 1 MPa) and degradation ( approximately 45-70% mass loss by 12 weeks). Mesenchymal stem cell adhesion and proliferation on all fibrous scaffolds was indistinguishable from those of controls. The scaffolds showed similar diversity when implanted on the surface of hearts in a rat model of acute myocardial infarction and demonstrated a dependence on the scaffold thickness and chemistry in the host response. In summary, these diverse scaffolds with tailorable chemical, structural, mechanical, and degradation properties are potentially useful for the engineering of a wide range of soft tissues. PMID:20160937

  3. Biodegradable Fibrous Scaffolds with Tunable Properties Formed from Photocrosslinkable Poly(glycerol sebacate)

    PubMed Central

    Ifkovits, Jamie L.; Devlin, Jeffrey J.; Eng, George; Martens, Timothy P.; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Burdick, Jason A.

    2009-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly apparent that the architecture and mechanical properties of scaffolds, particularly with respect to mimicking features of natural tissues, are important for tissue engineering applications. Acrylated poly(glycerol sebacate) (Acr-PGS) is a material that can be crosslinked upon exposure to ultraviolet light, leading to networks with tunable mechanical and degradation properties through simple changes during Acr-PGS synthesis. For example, the number of acrylate functional groups on the macromer dictates the concentration of crosslinks formed in the resulting network. Three macromers were synthesized that form networks that vary dramatically with respect to their tensile modulus (~30 kPa to 6.6 MPa) and degradation behavior (~20 to 100% mass loss at 12 weeks) based on the extent of acrylation (~1 to 24%). These macromers were processed into biodegradable fibrous scaffolds using electrospinning, with gelatin as a carrier polymer to facilitate fiber formation and cell adhesion. The resulting scaffolds were also diverse with respect to their mechanics (tensile modulus ranging from ~60 kPa to 1 MPa) and degradation (~45 to 70% mass loss by 12 weeks). Mesenchymal stem cell adhesion and proliferation on all fibrous scaffolds was indistinguishable from controls. The scaffolds showed similar diversity when implanted on the surface of hearts in a rat model of acute myocardial infarction and demonstrated a dependence on scaffold thickness and chemistry in the host response. In summary, these diverse scaffolds with tailorable chemical, structural, mechanical and degradation properties are potentially useful for the engineering of a wide range of soft tissues. PMID:20160937

  4. Nanotechnology Biomimetic Cartilage Regenerative Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Sardinha, Jose Paulo; Myers, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Cartilage has a limited regenerative capacity. Faced with the clinical challenge of reconstruction of cartilage defects, the field of cartilage engineering has evolved. This article reviews current concepts and strategies in cartilage engineering with an emphasis on the application of nanotechnology in the production of biomimetic cartilage regenerative scaffolds. The structural architecture and composition of the cartilage extracellular matrix and the evolution of tissue engineering concepts and scaffold technology over the last two decades are outlined. Current advances in biomimetic techniques to produce nanoscaled fibrous scaffolds, together with innovative methods to improve scaffold biofunctionality with bioactive cues are highlighted. To date, the majority of research into cartilage regeneration has been focused on articular cartilage due to the high prevalence of large joint osteoarthritis in an increasingly aging population. Nevertheless, the principles and advances are applicable to cartilage engineering for plastic and reconstructive surgery. PMID:24883273

  5. Multilayered Magnetic Gelatin Membrane Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Samal, Sangram K; Goranov, Vitaly; Dash, Mamoni; Russo, Alessandro; Shelyakova, Tatiana; Graziosi, Patrizio; Lungaro, Lisa; Riminucci, Alberto; Uhlarz, Marc; Bañobre-López, Manuel; Rivas, Jose; Herrmannsdörfer, Thomas; Rajadas, Jayakumar; De Smedt, Stefaan; Braeckmans, Kevin; Kaplan, David L; Dediu, V Alek

    2015-10-21

    A versatile approach for the design and fabrication of multilayer magnetic scaffolds with tunable magnetic gradients is described. Multilayer magnetic gelatin membrane scaffolds with intrinsic magnetic gradients were designed to encapsulate magnetized bioagents under an externally applied magnetic field for use in magnetic-field-assisted tissue engineering. The temperature of the individual membranes increased up to 43.7 °C under an applied oscillating magnetic field for 70 s by magnetic hyperthermia, enabling the possibility of inducing a thermal gradient inside the final 3D multilayer magnetic scaffolds. On the basis of finite element method simulations, magnetic gelatin membranes with different concentrations of magnetic nanoparticles were assembled into 3D multilayered scaffolds. A magnetic-gradient-controlled distribution of magnetically labeled stem cells was demonstrated in vitro. This magnetic biomaterial-magnetic cell strategy can be expanded to a number of different magnetic biomaterials for various tissue engineering applications. PMID:26451743

  6. Incorporation of mesoporous silica nanoparticles into random electrospun PLGA and PLGA/gelatin nanofibrous scaffolds enhances mechanical and cell proliferation properties.

    PubMed

    Mehrasa, Mohammad; Asadollahi, Mohammad Ali; Nasri-Nasrabadi, Bijan; Ghaedi, Kamran; Salehi, Hossein; Dolatshahi-Pirouz, Alireza; Arpanaei, Ayyoob

    2016-09-01

    Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and PLGA/gelatin random nanofibrous scaffolds embedded with different amounts of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNPs) were fabricated using electrospinning method. To evaluate the effects of nanoparticles on the scaffolds, physical, chemical, and mechanical properties as well as in vitro degradation behavior of scaffolds were investigated. The mean diameters of nanofibers were 974±68nm for the pure PLGA scaffolds vs 832±70, 764±80, and 486±64 for the PLGA/gelatin, PLGA/10wt% MSNPs, and the PLGA/gelatin/10wt% MSNPs scaffolds, respectively. The results suggested that the incorporation of gelatin and MSNPs into PLGA-based scaffolds enhances the hydrophilicity of scaffolds due to an increase of hydrophilic functional groups on the surface of nanofibers. With porosity examination, it was concluded that the incorporation of MSNPs and gelatin decrease the porosity of scaffolds. Nanoparticles also improved the tensile mechanical properties of scaffolds. Using in vitro degradation analysis, it was shown that the addition of nanoparticles to the nanofibers matrix increases the weight loss percentage of PLGA-based samples, whereas it decreases the weight loss percentage in the PLGA/gelatin composites. Cultivation of rat pheochromocytoma cell line (PC12), as precursor cells of dopaminergic neural cells, on the scaffolds demonstrated that the introduction of MSNPs into PLGA and PLGA/gelatin matrix leads to improved cell attachment and proliferation and enhances cellular processes. PMID:27207035

  7. Physical characteristics and biocompatibility of the polycaprolactone-biphasic calcium phosphate scaffolds fabricated using the modified melt stretching and multilayer deposition.

    PubMed

    Thuaksuban, Nuttawut; Luntheng, Thunmaruk; Monmaturapoj, Naruporn

    2016-05-01

    Physical properties and biocompatibility of polycaprolactone (PCL)-biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) scaffolds fabricated by the modified melt stretching and multilayer deposition (mMSMD) technique were evaluated in vitro. The PCL-BCP scaffold specimens included group A; PCL: BCP (wt%) = 80:20 and group B; 70:30. Mechanical properties of the scaffolds were assessed using a universal testing machine. Degradation behaviors of the scaffolds were assessed over 60 days. The amount of calcium and phosphate ions released from the scaffolds was detected over 30 days. Attachment and growth of osteoblasts on the scaffolds and indirect cytocompatibility to those cells were evaluated. The results showed that the scaffolds of both groups could withstand compressive forces on their superior aspect very well; however, their lateral aspect could only withstand light forces. Degradation of the scaffolds over 2 months was low (group A = 1.92 ± 0.47% and group B = 2.9 ± 1.3%,p > 0.05). The concentrations of calcium and phosphate ions released from the scaffolds of both groups significantly increased on day 7 (p < 0.05). Growth of the cells seemed to relate to accumulative increase in those ions. All results between the two ratios of the scaffolds were not statistically different. PMID:27013219

  8. Oxidation-Induced Degradable Nanogels for Iron Chelation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi; Wang, Yan; Purro, Max; Xiong, May P.

    2016-01-01

    Iron overload can increase cellular oxidative stress levels due to formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS); untreated, it can be extremely destructive to organs and fatal to patients. Since elevated oxidative stress levels are inherent to the condition in such patients, oxidation-induced degradable nanogels for iron chelation were rationally designed by simultaneously polymerizing oxidation-sensitive host-guest crosslinkers between β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) and ferrocene (Fc) and iron chelating moieties composed of deferoxamine (DFO) into the final gel scaffold in reverse emulsion reaction chambers. UV-Vis absorption and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) was used to verify iron chelating capability of nanogels. These materials can degrade into smaller chelating fragments at rates proportional to the level of oxidative stress present. Conjugating DFO reduces the cytotoxicity of the chelator in the macrophage cells. Importantly, the nanogel can effectively reduce cellular ferritin expression in iron overloaded cells and regulate intracellular iron levels at the same time, which is important for maintaining a homeostatic level of this critical metal in cells. PMID:26868174

  9. [Articular cartilage regeneration using scaffold].

    PubMed

    Ishimoto, Yoshiyuki; Hattori, Koji; Ohgushi, Hajime

    2008-12-01

    The self-healing capacity of articular cartilage for repair is limited. For articular cartilage injury, several surgical techniques are used in clinical practice, namely drilling, abrasion arthroplasty, microfracture, or autologous osteochondral grafting, while various methods of autologous chondrocyte transplantation to cartilage defect sites have been reported since 1990s. In a case of chondrocyte transplantation to cartilage defect site, the use of proper scaffold is important. Currently, collagen gel or PLGA is used widely as a scaffold. PMID:19043192

  10. Three-Dimensional Elastomeric Scaffolds Designed with Cardiac-Mimetic Structural and Mechanical Features

    PubMed Central

    Neal, Rebekah A.; Jean, Aurélie; Park, Hyoungshin; Wu, Patrick B.; Hsiao, James; Engelmayr, George C.; Langer, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Tissue-engineered constructs, at the interface of material science, biology, engineering, and medicine, have the capacity to improve outcomes for cardiac patients by providing living cells and degradable biomaterials that can regenerate the native myocardium. With an ultimate goal of both delivering cells and providing mechanical support to the healing heart, we designed three-dimensional (3D) elastomeric scaffolds with (1) stiffnesses and anisotropy mimicking explanted myocardial specimens as predicted by finite-element (FE) modeling, (2) systematically varied combinations of rectangular pore pattern, pore aspect ratio, and strut width, and (3) structural features approaching tissue scale. Based on predicted mechanical properties, three scaffold designs were selected from eight candidates for fabrication from poly(glycerol sebacate) by micromolding from silicon wafers. Large 20×20 mm scaffolds with high aspect ratio features (5:1 strut height:strut width) were reproducibly cast, cured, and demolded at a relatively high throughput. Empirically measured mechanical properties demonstrated that scaffolds were cardiac mimetic and validated FE model predictions. Two-layered scaffolds providing fully interconnected pore networks were fabricated by layer-by-layer assembly. C2C12 myoblasts cultured on one-layered scaffolds exhibited specific patterns of cell elongation and interconnectivity that appeared to be guided by the scaffold pore pattern. Neonatal rat heart cells cultured on two-layered scaffolds for 1 week were contractile, both spontaneously and in response to electrical stimulation, and expressed sarcomeric α-actinin, a cardiac biomarker. This work not only demonstrated several scaffold designs that promoted functional assembly of rat heart cells, but also provided the foundation for further computational and empirical investigations of 3D elastomeric scaffolds for cardiac tissue engineering. PMID:23190320

  11. Conversion of borate-based glass scaffold to hydroxyapatite in a dilute phosphate solution.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Pan, Haobo; Fu, Hailuo; Fu, Qiang; Rahaman, Mohamed N; Huang, Wenhai

    2010-02-01

    Porous scaffolds of a borate-based glass (composition in mol%: 6Na2O, 8K2O, 8MgO, 22CaO, 36B2O3, 18SiO2, 2P2O5), with interconnected porosity of approximately 70% and pores of size 200-500 microm, were prepared by a polymer foam replication technique. The degradation of the scaffolds and conversion to a hydroxyapatite-type material in a 0.02 M K2HPO4 solution (starting pH = 7.0) at 37 degrees C were studied by measuring the weight loss of the scaffolds, as well as the pH and the boron concentration of the solution. X-ray diffraction, scanning electronic microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray analysis showed that a hydroxyapatite-type material was formed on the glass surface within 7 days of immersion in the phosphate solution. Cellular response to the scaffolds was assessed using murine MLO-A5 cells, an osteogenic cell line. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the scaffolds supported cell attachment and proliferation during the 6 day incubation. The results indicate that this borate-based glass could provide a promising degradable scaffold material for bone tissue engineering applications. PMID:20057014

  12. Accelerated wound healing by injectable microporous gel scaffolds assembled from annealed building blocks

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Donald R.; Weaver, Westbrook M.; Scumpia, Philip; Di Carlo, Dino; Segura, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    Summary Injectable hydrogels can provide a scaffold for in situ tissue regrowth and regeneration, however these injected materials require gel degradation prior to tissue reformation limiting their ability to provide physical support. We have created a new class of injectable biomaterial that circumvents this challenge by providing an interconnected microporous network for simultaneous tissue reformation and material degradation. We assemble monodisperse micro-gel building blocks into an interconnected microporous annealed particle (MAP) scaffold. Through microfluidic formation, we tailor the chemical and physical properties of the building blocks, providing downstream control of the physical and chemical properties of the assembled MAP scaffold. In vitro, cells incorporated during MAP scaffold formation proliferated and formed extensive 3D networks within 48 hours. In vivo, the injectable MAP scaffold facilitated cell migration resulting in rapid cutaneous tissue regeneration and tissue structure formation within 5 days. The combination of microporosity and injectability achieved with MAP scaffolds will enable novel routes to tissue regeneration in vivo and tissue creation de novo. PMID:26030305

  13. Electrospun fine-textured scaffolds for heart tissue constructs.

    PubMed

    Zong, Xinhua; Bien, Harold; Chung, Chiung-Yin; Yin, Lihong; Fang, Dufei; Hsiao, Benjamin S; Chu, Benjamin; Entcheva, Emilia

    2005-09-01

    The structural and functional effects of fine-textured matrices with sub-micron features on the growth of cardiac myocytes were examined. Electrospinning was used to fabricate biodegradable non-woven poly(lactide)- and poly(glycolide)-based (PLGA) scaffolds for cardiac tissue engineering applications. Post-processing was applied to achieve macro-scale fiber orientation (anisotropy). In vitro studies confirmed a dose-response effect of the poly(glycolide) concentration on the degradation rate and the pH value changes. Different formulations were examined to assess scaffold effects on cell attachment, structure and function. Primary cardiomyocytes (CMs) were cultured on the electrospun scaffolds to form tissue-like constructs. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that the fine fiber architecture of the non-woven matrix allowed the cardiomyocytes to make extensive use of provided external cues for isotropic or anisotropic growth, and to some extent to crawl inside and pull on fibers. Structural analysis by confocal microscopy indicated that cardiomyocytes had a preference for relatively hydrophobic surfaces. CMs on electrospun poly(L-lactide) (PLLA) scaffolds developed mature contractile machinery (sarcomeres). Functionality (excitability) of the engineered constructs was confirmed by optical imaging of electrical activity using voltage-sensitive dyes. We conclude that engineered cardiac tissue structure and function can be modulated by the chemistry and geometry of the provided nano- and micro-textured surfaces. Electrospinning is a versatile manufacturing technique for design of biomaterials with potentially reorganizable architecture for cell and tissue growth. PMID:15814131

  14. Polyurethane-based scaffolds for myocardial tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Chiono, Valeria; Mozetic, Pamela; Boffito, Monica; Sartori, Susanna; Gioffredi, Emilia; Silvestri, Antonella; Rainer, Alberto; Giannitelli, Sara Maria; Trombetta, Marcella; Nurzynska, Daria; Di Meglio, Franca; Castaldo, Clotilde; Miraglia, Rita; Montagnani, Stefania; Ciardelli, Gianluca

    2014-01-01

    Bi-layered scaffolds with a 0°/90° lay-down pattern were prepared by melt-extrusion additive manufacturing (AM) using a poly(ester urethane) (PU) synthesized from poly(ε-caprolactone) diol, 1,4-butandiisocyanate and l-lysine ethyl ester dihydrochloride chain extender. Rheological analysis and differential scanning calorimetry of the starting material showed that compression moulded PU films were in the molten state at a higher temperature than 155°C. The AM processing temperature was set at 155°C after verifying the absence of PU thermal degradation phenomena by isothermal thermogravimetry analysis and rheological characterization performed at 165°C. Scaffolds highly reproduced computer-aided design geometry and showed an elastomeric-like behaviour which is promising for applications in myocardial regeneration. PU scaffolds supported the adhesion and spreading of human cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs), whereas they did not stimulate CPC proliferation after 1–14 days culture time. In the future, scaffold surface functionalization with bioactive peptides/proteins will be performed to specifically guide CPC behaviour. PMID:24501673

  15. Polyurethane-based scaffolds for myocardial tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Chiono, Valeria; Mozetic, Pamela; Boffito, Monica; Sartori, Susanna; Gioffredi, Emilia; Silvestri, Antonella; Rainer, Alberto; Giannitelli, Sara Maria; Trombetta, Marcella; Nurzynska, Daria; Di Meglio, Franca; Castaldo, Clotilde; Miraglia, Rita; Montagnani, Stefania; Ciardelli, Gianluca

    2014-02-01

    Bi-layered scaffolds with a 0°/90° lay-down pattern were prepared by melt-extrusion additive manufacturing (AM) using a poly(ester urethane) (PU) synthesized from poly(ε-caprolactone) diol, 1,4-butandiisocyanate and l-lysine ethyl ester dihydrochloride chain extender. Rheological analysis and differential scanning calorimetry of the starting material showed that compression moulded PU films were in the molten state at a higher temperature than 155°C. The AM processing temperature was set at 155°C after verifying the absence of PU thermal degradation phenomena by isothermal thermogravimetry analysis and rheological characterization performed at 165°C. Scaffolds highly reproduced computer-aided design geometry and showed an elastomeric-like behaviour which is promising for applications in myocardial regeneration. PU scaffolds supported the adhesion and spreading of human cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs), whereas they did not stimulate CPC proliferation after 1-14 days culture time. In the future, scaffold surface functionalization with bioactive peptides/proteins will be performed to specifically guide CPC behaviour. PMID:24501673

  16. Nanocomposite bone scaffolds based on biodegradable polymers and hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Becker, Johannes; Lu, Lichun; Runge, M Brett; Zeng, Heng; Yaszemski, Michael J; Dadsetan, Mahrokh

    2015-08-01

    In tissue engineering, development of an osteoconductive construct that integrates with host tissue remains a challenge. In this work, the effect of bone-like minerals on maturation of pre-osteoblast cells was investigated using polymer-mineral scaffolds composed of poly(propylene fumarate)-co-poly(caprolactone) (PPF-co-PCL) and nano-sized hydroxyapatite (HA). The HA of varying concentrations was added to an injectable formulation of PPF-co-PCL and the change in thermal and mechanical properties of the scaffolds was evaluated. No change in onset of degradation temperature was observed due to the addition of HA, however compressive and tensile moduli of copolymer changed significantly when HA amounts were increased in composite formulation. The change in mechanical properties of copolymer was found to correlate well to HA concentration in the constructs. Electron microscopy revealed mineral nucleation and a change in surface morphology and the presence of calcium and phosphate on surfaces was confirmed using energy dispersive X-ray analysis. To characterize the effect of mineral on attachment and maturation of pre-osteoblasts, W20-17 cells were seeded on HA/copolymer composites. We demonstrated that cells attached more to the surface of HA containing copolymers and their proliferation rate was significantly increased. Thus, these findings suggest that HA/PPF-co-PCL composite scaffolds are capable of inducing maturation of pre-osteoblasts and have the potential for use as scaffold in bone tissue engineering. PMID:25504776

  17. Electrospinning of PCL/PVP blends for tissue engineering scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gyeong-Man; Le, Kim Huyen Trang; Giannitelli, Sara Maria; Lee, Yu Jin; Rainer, Alberto; Trombetta, Marcella

    2013-06-01

    Currently, one of the main drawbacks of using poly(ε-caprolactone) in the biomedical and pharmaceutical fields is represented by its low biodegradation rate. To overcome this limitation, electrospinning of PCL blended with a water-soluble poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone) was used to fabricate scaffolds with tunable fiber surface morphology and controllable degradation rates. Electrospun scaffolds revealed a highly immiscible blend state. The incorporated PVP phase was dispersed as inclusions within the electrospun fibers, and then easily extracted by immersing them in cell culture medium, exhibiting nanoporosity on the fiber surface. As a striking result, nanoporosity facilitated not only fiber biodegradation rates, but also improved cell attachment and spreading on the blend electrospun scaffolds. The present findings demonstrate that simultaneous electrospinning technique for PCL with water-soluble PVP provides important insights for successful tuning biodegradation rate for the PCL electrospun scaffolds but not limited to expand other high valuable biocompatible polymers for the future biomedical applications, ranging from tissue regeneration to controlled drug delivery. PMID:23468162

  18. Evaluation of bone matrix gelatin/fibrin glue and chitosan/gelatin composite scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z H; Zhang, J; Zhang, Q; Gao, Y; Yan, J; Zhao, X Y; Yang, Y Y; Kong, D M; Zhao, J; Shi, Y X; Li, X L

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate bone matrix gelatin (BMG)/fibrin glue and chitosan/gelatin composite scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering. Chondrocytes were isolated from costal cartilage of Sprague-Dawley rats and seeded on BMG/fibrin glue or chitosan/gelatin composite scaffolds. After different in vitro culture durations, the scaffolds were subjected to hematoxylin and eosin, Masson's trichrome, and toluidine blue staining, anti-collagen II and anti-aggrecan immunohistochemistry, and scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) analysis. After 2 weeks of culture, chondrocytes were distributed evenly on the surfaces of both scaffolds. Cell numbers and the presence of extracellular matrix components were markedly increased after 8 weeks of culture, and to a greater extent on the chitosan/gelatin scaffold. The BMG/fibrin glue scaffold showed signs of degradation after 8 weeks. Immunofluorescence analysis confirmed higher levels of collagen II and aggrecan using the chitosan/gelatin scaffold. SEM revealed that the majority of cells on the surface of the BMG/fibrin glue scaffold demonstrated a round morphology, while those in the chitosan/gelatin group had a spindle-like shape, with pseudopodia. Chitosan/gelatin scaffolds appear to be superior to BMG/ fibrin glue constructs in supporting chondrocyte attachment, proliferation, and biosynthesis of cartilaginous matrix components. PMID:27525846

  19. Low-Temperature Additive Manufacturing of Biomimic Three-Dimensional Hydroxyapatite/Collagen Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kai-Feng; He, Shu; Song, Yue; Wang, Chun-Mei; Gao, Yi; Li, Jun-Qin; Tang, Peng; Wang, Zheng; Bi, Long; Pei, Guo-Xian

    2016-03-23

    Low-temperature additive manufacturing (AM) holds promise for fabrication of three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds containing bioactive molecules and/or drugs. Due to the strict technical limitations of current approaches, few materials are suitable for printing at low temperature. Here, a low-temperature robocasting method was employed to print biomimic 3D scaffolds for bone regeneration using a routine collagen-hydroxyapatite (CHA) composite material, which is too viscous to be printed via normal 3D printing methods at low temperature. The CHA scaffolds had excellent 3D structure and maintained most raw material properties after printing. Compared to nonprinted scaffolds, printed scaffolds promoted bone marrow stromal cell proliferation and improved osteogenic outcome in vitro. In a rabbit femoral condyle defect model, the interconnecting pores within the printed scaffolds facilitated cell penetration and mineralization before the scaffolds degraded and enhanced repair, compared to nonprinted CHA scaffolds. Additionally, the optimal printing parameters for 3D CHA scaffolds were investigated; 600-μm-diameter rods were optimal in terms of moderate mechanical strength and better repair outcome in vivo. This low-temperature robocasting method could enable a variety of bioactive molecules to be incorporated into printed CHA materials and provides a method of bioprinting biomaterials without compromising their natural properties. PMID:26930140

  20. A computer-designed scaffold for bone regeneration within cranial defect using human dental pulp stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Yeon Kwon, Doo; Seon Kwon, Jin; Hun Park, Seung; Hun Park, Ji; Hee Jang, So; Yun Yin, Xiang; Yun, Jeong-Ho; Ho Kim, Jae; Hyun Min, Byoung; Hee Lee, Jun; Kim, Wan-Doo; Suk Kim, Moon

    2015-01-01

    A computer-designed, solvent-free scaffold offer several potential advantages such as ease of customized manufacture and in vivo safety. In this work, we firstly used a computer-designed, solvent-free scaffold and human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) to regenerate neo-bone within cranial bone defects. The hDPSCs expressed mesenchymal stem cell markers and served as an abundant source of stem cells with a high proliferation rate. In addition, hDPSCs showed a phenotype of differentiated osteoblasts in the presence of osteogenic factors (OF). We used solid freeform fabrication (SFF) with biodegradable polyesters (MPEG-(PLLA-co-PGA-co-PCL) (PLGC)) to fabricate a computer-designed scaffold. The SFF technology gave quick and reproducible results. To assess bone tissue engineering in vivo, the computer-designed, circular PLGC scaffold was implanted into a full-thickness cranial bone defect and monitored by micro-computed tomography (CT) and histology of the in vivo tissue-engineered bone. Neo-bone formation of more than 50% in both micro-CT and histology tests was observed at only PLGC scaffold with hDPSCs/OF. Furthermore, the PLGC scaffold gradually degraded, as evidenced by the fluorescent-labeled PLGC scaffold, which provides information to tract biodegradation of implanted PLGC scaffold. In conclusion, we confirmed neo-bone formation within a cranial bone defect using hDPSCs and a computer-designed PLGC scaffold. PMID:26234712

  1. Biodegradable CSMA/PECA/Graphene Porous Hybrid Scaffold for Cartilage Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Liao, JinFeng; Qu, Ying; Chu, BingYang; Zhang, XiaoNing; Qian, ZhiYong

    2015-01-01

    Owing to the limited repair capacity of articular cartilage, it is essential to develop tissue-engineered cartilage for patients suffering from joint disease and trauma. Herein, we prepared a novel hybrid scaffold composed of methacrylated chondroitin sulfate (CSMA), poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether-ε-caprolactone-acryloyl chloride (MPEG-PCL-AC, PECA was used as abbreviation for MPEG-PCL-AC) and graphene oxide (GO) and evaluated its potential application in cartilage tissue engineering. To mimic the natural extracellular matrix (ECM) of cartilage, the scaffold had an adequate pore size, porosity, swelling ability, compression modulus and conductivity. Cartilage cells contacted with the scaffold remained viable and showed growth potential. Furthermore, CSMA/PECA/GO scaffold was biocompatible and had a favorable degradation rate. In the cartilage tissue repair of rabbit, Micro-CT and histology observation showed the group of CSMA/PECA/GO scaffold with cellular supplementation had better chondrocyte morphology, integration, continuous subchondral bone, and much thicker newly formed cartilage compared with scaffold group and control group. Our results show that the CSMA/PECA/GO hybrid porous scaffold can be applied in articular cartilage tissue engineering and may have great potential to in other types of tissue engineering applications. PMID:25961959

  2. Biodegradable CSMA/PECA/Graphene Porous Hybrid Scaffold for Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Liao, JinFeng; Qu, Ying; Chu, BingYang; Zhang, XiaoNing; Qian, ZhiYong

    2015-01-01

    Owing to the limited repair capacity of articular cartilage, it is essential to develop tissue-engineered cartilage for patients suffering from joint disease and trauma. Herein, we prepared a novel hybrid scaffold composed of methacrylated chondroitin sulfate (CSMA), poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether-ε-caprolactone-acryloyl chloride (MPEG-PCL-AC, PECA was used as abbreviation for MPEG-PCL-AC) and graphene oxide (GO) and evaluated its potential application in cartilage tissue engineering. To mimic the natural extracellular matrix (ECM) of cartilage, the scaffold had an adequate pore size, porosity, swelling ability, compression modulus and conductivity. Cartilage cells contacted with the scaffold remained viable and showed growth potential. Furthermore, CSMA/PECA/GO scaffold was biocompatible and had a favorable degradation rate. In the cartilage tissue repair of rabbit, Micro-CT and histology observation showed the group of CSMA/PECA/GO scaffold with cellular supplementation had better chondrocyte morphology, integration, continuous subchondral bone, and much thicker newly formed cartilage compared with scaffold group and control group. Our results show that the CSMA/PECA/GO hybrid porous scaffold can be applied in articular cartilage tissue engineering and may have great potential to in other types of tissue engineering applications. PMID:25961959

  3. Fabrication of gelatin-strontium substituted calcium phosphate scaffolds with unidirectional pores for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yu-Chun; Lin, Wei-Yu; Yang, Chyun-Yu; Lee, Tzer-Min

    2015-03-01

    This study fabricated homogeneous gelatin-strontium substituted calcium phosphate composites via coprecipitation in a gelatin solution. Unidirectional porous scaffolds with an oriented microtubular structure were then manufactured using freeze-drying technology. The resulting structure and pore alignment were determined using scanning electron microscopy. The pore size were in the range of 200-400 μm, which is considered ideal for the engineering of bone tissue. The scaffolds were further characterized using energy dispersive spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Hydroxyapatite was the main calcium phosphate compound in the scaffolds, with strontium incorporated into the crystal structure. The porosity of the scaffolds decreased with increasing concentration of calcium-phosphate. The compressive strength in the longitudinal direction was two to threefold higher than that observed in the transverse direction. Our results demonstrate that the composite scaffolds degraded by approximately 20 % after 5 weeks. Additionally, in vitro results reveal that the addition of strontium significantly increased human osteoblastic cells proliferation. Scaffolds containing strontium with a Sr-CaP/(gelatin + Sr-CaP) ratio of 50 % provided the most suitable environment for cell proliferation, particularly under dynamic culture conditions. This study demonstrates the considerable potential of composite scaffolds composed of gelatin-strontium-substituted calcium phosphate for applications in bone tissue engineering. PMID:25773230

  4. Silk fibroin/poly (vinyl alcohol) blend scaffolds for controlled delivery of curcumin

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaomeng; Qin, Jinli; Ma, Jun

    2015-01-01

    A silk fibroin/poly (vinyl alcohol) porous scaffold with a water vapor transmission rate of 2125 ± 464 g/m2/day has been developed via thermally induced phase separation (gelation) and freeze-drying process. A hierarchical architecture of micropores and nanofibers was observed inside the scaffolds, and the related structures were analyzed. The viability and proliferation of 3T3 fibroblasts were examined, which indicated that the scaffolds exerted low cytotoxicity. After loading curcumin, the scaffolds can suppress the growth of 3T3 fibroblasts. The release behavior of curcumin from the scaffolds was investigated. At pH = 7.2, the release profiles showed no significant difference for the loading amounts of 0.5 mg and 0.25 mg per sample. Meanwhile, the cumulative amount of released drug at pH = 5.7 was significantly more than that in neutral solution due to more degradation of the scaffolds. It was suggested that the silk fibroin/poly (vinyl alcohol) blend scaffolds could be potentially used as wound dressing materials. PMID:26816634

  5. Dexamethasone-releasing biodegradable polymer scaffolds fabricated by a gas-foaming/salt-leaching method.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jun Jin; Kim, Jung Hoe; Park, Tae Gwan

    2003-06-01

    Dexamethasone, a steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, was incorporated into porous biodegradable polymer scaffolds for sustained release. The slowly released dexamethasone from the degrading scaffolds was hypothesized to locally modulate the proliferation and differentiation of various cells. Dexamethasone containing porous poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) scaffolds were fabricated by a gas-foaming/salt-leaching method. Dexamethasone was loaded within the polymer phase of the PLGA scaffold in a molecularly dissolved state. The loading efficiency of dexamethasone varied from 57% to 65% depending on the initial loading amount. Dexamethasone was slowly released out in a controlled manner for over 30 days without showing an initial burst release. Release amount and duration could be adjusted by controlling the initial loading amount within the scaffolds. Released dexamethasone from the scaffolds drastically suppressed the proliferations of lymphocytes and smooth muscle cells in vitro. This study suggests that dexamethasone-releasing PLGA scaffolds could be potentially used either as an anti-inflammatory porous prosthetic device or as a temporal biodegradable stent for reducing intimal hyperplasia in restenosis. PMID:12699670

  6. Laser microstructured biodegradable scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Koroleva, Anastasia; Kufelt, Olga; Schlie-Wolter, Sabrina; Hinze, Ulf; Chichkov, Boris

    2013-10-01

    The two-photon polymerization technique (2PP) uses non-linear absorption of femtosecond laser pulses to selectively polymerize photosensitive materials. 2PP has the ability to fabricate structures with a resolution from tens of micrometers down to hundreds of nanometers. Three-dimensional microstructuring by the 2PP technique provides many interesting possibilities for biomedical applications. This microstructuring technique is suitable with many biocompatible polymeric materials, such as polyethylene glycol, polylactic acid, polycaprolactone, gelatin, zirconium-based hybrids, and others. The process of fabrication does not require clean room conditions and does not use hazard chemicals or high temperatures. The most beneficial property of 2PP is that it is capable of producing especially complex three-dimensional (3-D) structures, including devices with overhangs, without using any supportive structure. The flexibility in controlling geometries and feature sizes and the possibility to fabricate structures without the addition of new material layers makes this technique particularly appealing for fabrication of 3-D scaffolds for tissue engineering. PMID:23729598

  7. Open-Porous Hydroxyapatite Scaffolds for Three-Dimensional Culture of Human Adult Liver Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schmelzer, Eva; Over, Patrick; Nettleship, Ian; Gerlach, Joerg C.

    2016-01-01

    Liver cell culture within three-dimensional structures provides an improved culture system for various applications in basic research, pharmacological screening, and implantable or extracorporeal liver support. Biodegradable calcium-based scaffolds in such systems could enhance liver cell functionality by providing endothelial and hepatic cell support through locally elevated calcium levels, increased surface area for cell attachment, and allowing three-dimensional tissue restructuring. Open-porous hydroxyapatite scaffolds were fabricated and seeded with primary adult human liver cells, which were embedded within or without gels of extracellular matrix protein collagen-1 or hyaluronan. Metabolic functions were assessed after 5, 15, and 28 days. Longer-term cultures exhibited highest cell numbers and liver specific gene expression when cultured on hydroxyapatite scaffolds in collagen-1. Endothelial gene expression was induced in cells cultured on scaffolds without extracellular matrix proteins. Hydroxyapatite induced gene expression for cytokeratin-19 when cells were cultured in collagen-1 gel while culture in hyaluronan increased cytokeratin-19 gene expression independent of the use of scaffold in long-term culture. The implementation of hydroxyapatite composites with extracellular matrices affected liver cell cultures and cell differentiation depending on the type of matrix protein and the presence of a scaffold. The hydroxyapatite scaffolds enable scale-up of hepatic three-dimensional culture models for regenerative medicine applications. PMID:27403430

  8. [Research progress on application of carbon nanotubes in bone tissue engineering scaffold].

    PubMed

    Yao, Mengzhu; Sheng, Xiaoxia; Lin, Jun; Gao, Jianqing

    2016-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes possess excellent mechanical and electrical properties and demonstrate broad application prospects in medical fields. Carbon nanotubes are composed of inorganic materials, natural biodegradable polymer or synthetic biodegradable polymer. The composite bone tissue engineering scaffolds are constructed by particle-hole method, lyophilization, microsphere aggregation method, electrostatic spinning or three-dimensional printing. Composite scaffolds overcome the shortcomings of single material and have good biocompatibility, osteoconduction and osteoinduction. With the study of surface chemistry, toxicology, and biocompatibility, a degradable "human-friendly" carbon nanotubes composite bone tissue scaffold will be available; and under the drive of new fabrication techniques, the clinical application of carbon nanotubes composite bone tissue engineering scaffolds will be better developed. PMID:27273990

  9. Preparation and characterization of crosslinked chitosan/gelatin scaffolds by ice segregation induced self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Nieto-Suárez, Marina; López-Quintela, M Arturo; Lazzari, Massimo

    2016-05-01

    Chitosan and gelatin are biodegradable and biocompatible polymers which may be used in the preparation of 3D scaffolds with applications in biomedicine. Chitosan/gelatin scaffolds crosslinked with glutaraldehyde were prepared by ice segregation induced self-assembly (ISISA); a unidirectional freezing at -196°C followed freeze-drying to produce macroporous materials with a well-patterned structure. This process may be included within the green chemistry by the preparation of the porous structures without using organic solvents, moreover is a versatile, non-difficult and cheap process. The scaffolds prepared by ISISA were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, and their stability was evaluated by degree swelling and degradation tests. The scaffolds present properties as high porosity, high degree swelling and good stability which make them suitable of applications as biomaterials. PMID:26877010

  10. Tunable tissue scaffolds fabricated by in situ crosslink in phase separation system

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xifeng; Chen, Wenjian; Gustafson, Carl T.; Miller, A. Lee; Waletzki, Brian E.; Yaszemski, Michael J.; Lu, Lichun

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) scaffolds with intrinsic porous structures are desirable in various tissue regeneration applications. In this study, a unique method that combines thermally induced phase separation with a photocrosslinking process was developed for the fabrication of 3-D crosslinked polymer scaffolds with densely interconnected porous structures. Biodegradable poly(propylene fumarate)-co-poly(L-lactic acid) with crosslinkable fumarate bonds were used as the structural polymer material and a dioxane/water binary system was applied for the phase separation. By altering the polymer composition (9, 5 and 3 wt%), different types of scaffolds with distinct morphology, mechanical strength, degradation rate, cell growth and morphology, and extracellular matrix production were fabricated. These crosslinked 3-D porous scaffolds with tunable strength and biological responses show promise for potential applications in regenerative therapies, including bone and neural tissue engineering. PMID:26989479

  11. Skeletal Muscle Regeneration on Protein-Grafted and Microchannel-Patterned Scaffold for Hypopharyngeal Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Zhisen; Guo, Shanshan; Ye, Dong; Chen, Jingjing; Kang, Cheng; Qiu, Shejie; Lu, Dakai; Li, Qun; Xu, Kunjie; Lv, Jingjing

    2013-01-01

    In the field of tissue engineering, polymeric materials with high biocompatibility like polylactic acid and polyglycolic acid have been widely used for fabricating living constructs. For hypopharynx tissue engineering, skeletal muscle is one important functional part of the whole organ, which assembles the unidirectionally aligned myotubes. In this study, a polyurethane (PU) scaffold with microchannel patterns was used to provide aligning guidance for the seeded human myoblasts. Due to the low hydrophilicity of PU, the scaffold was grafted with silk fibroin (PU-SF) or gelatin (PU-Gel) to improve its cell adhesion properties. Scaffolds were observed to degrade slowly over time, and their mechanical properties and hydrophilicities were improved through the surface grafting. Also, the myoblasts seeded on PU-SF had the higher proliferative rate and better differentiation compared with those on the control or PU-Gel. Our results demonstrate that polyurethane scaffolds seeded with myoblasts hold promise to guide hypopharynx muscle regeneration. PMID:24175281

  12. Effect of glucose content on thermally cross-linked fibrous gelatin scaffolds for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Siimon, Kaido; Reemann, Paula; Põder, Annika; Pook, Martin; Kangur, Triin; Kingo, Külli; Jaks, Viljar; Mäeorg, Uno; Järvekülg, Martin

    2014-09-01

    Thermally cross-linked glucose-containing electrospun gelatin meshes were studied as possible cell substrate materials. FTIR analysis was used to study the effect of glucose on cross-linking reactions. It was found that the presence of glucose increases the extent of cross-linking of fibrous gelatin scaffolds, which in return determines scaffold properties and their usability in tissue engineering applications. Easy to handle fabric-like scaffolds were obtained from blends containing up to 15% glucose. Maximum extent of cross-linking was reached at nearly 20% glucose content. Cross-linking effectively resulted in decreased solubility and increased resistance to enzymatic degradation. Preliminary short-term cell culture experiments indicate that such thermally cross-linked gelatin-glucose scaffolds are suitable for tissue engineering applications. PMID:25063151

  13. Inorganic-organic hydrogel scaffolds for tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Brennan Margaret

    Analogous to the extracellular matrix (ECM) of natural tissues, properties of a tissue engineering scaffold direct cell behavior and thus regenerated tissue properties. These include both physical properties (e.g. morphology and modulus) and chemical properties (e.g. hydrophobicity, hydration and bioactivity). Notably, recent studies suggest that scaffold properties (e.g. modulus) may be as potent as growth factors in terms of directing stem cell fate. Thus, 3D scaffolds possessing specific properties modified for optimal cell regeneration have the potential to regenerate native-like tissues. Photopolymerizable poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEG-DA)-based hydrogels are frequently used as scaffolds for tissue engineering. They are ideal for controlled studies of cell-material interactions due to their poor protein adsorption in the absence of adhesive ligands thereby making them "biological blank slates". However, their range of physical and chemical properties is limited. Thus, hydrogel scaffolds which maintain the benefits of PEG-DA but possess a broader set of tunable properties would allow the establishment of predictive relationships between scaffold properties, cell behavior and regenerated tissue properties. Towards this goal, this work describes a series of unique hybrid inorganic-organic hydrogel scaffolds prepared using different solvents and also in the form of continuous gradients. Properties relevant to tissue regeneration were investigated including: swelling, morphology, modulus, degradation rates, bioactivity, cytocompatibility, and protein adhesion. These scaffolds were based on the incorporation of hydrophobic, bioactive and osteoinductive methacrylated star polydimethylsiloxane (PDMSstar-MA) ["inorganic component"] into hydrophilic PEG-DA ["organic component"]. The following parameters were varied: molecular weight (Mn) of PEG-DA (Mn = 3k & 6k g/mol) and PDMSstar-MA (Mn = 1.8k, 7k, 14k), ratio of PDMSstar-MA to PEG-DA (0:100 to 20:80), total

  14. Poly(hydroxybutyrate)/cellulose acetate blend nanofiber scaffolds: Preparation, characterization and cytocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Zhijiang, Cai; Yi, Xu; Haizheng, Yang; Jia, Jianru; Liu, Yuanpei

    2016-01-01

    Poly(hydroxybutyrate) (PHB)/cellulose acetate (CA) blend nanofiber scaffolds were fabricated by electrospinning using the blends of chloroform and DMF as solvent. The blend nanofiber scaffolds were characterized by SEM, FTIR, XRD, DSC, contact angle and tensile test. The blend nanofibers exhibited cylindrical, uniform, bead-free and random orientation with the diameter ranged from 80-680 nm. The scaffolds had very well interconnected porous fibrous network structure and large aspect surface areas. It was found that the presence of CA affected the crystallization of PHB due to formation of intermolecular hydrogen bonds, which restricted the preferential orientation of PHB molecules. The DSC result showed that the PHB and CA were miscible in the blend nanofiber. An increase in the glass transition temperature was observed with increasing CA content. Additionally, the mechanical properties of blend nanofiber scaffolds were largely influenced by the weight ratio of PHB/CA. The tensile strength, yield strength and elongation at break of the blend nanofiber scaffolds increased from 3.3 ± 0.35 MPa, 2.8 ± 0.26 MPa, and 8 ± 0.77% to 5.05 ± 0.52 MPa, 4.6 ± 0.82 MPa, and 17.6 ± 1.24% by increasing PHB content from 60% to 90%, respectively. The water contact angle of blend nanofiber scaffolds decreased about 50% from 112 ± 2.1° to 60 ± 0.75°. The biodegradability was evaluated by in vitro degradation test and the results revealed that the blend nanofiber scaffolds showed much higher degradation rates than the neat PHB. The cytocompatibility of the blend nanofiber scaffolds was preliminarily evaluated by cell adhesion studies. The cells incubated with PHB/CA blend nanofiber scaffold for 48 h were capable of forming cell adhesion and proliferation. It showed much better biocompatibility than pure PHB film. Thus, the prepared PHB/CA blend nanofiber scaffolds are bioactive and may be more suitable for cell proliferation suggesting that these scaffolds can be used for

  15. Exploiting novel sterilization techniques for porous polyurethane scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Bertoldi, Serena; Farè, Silvia; Haugen, Håvard Jostein; Tanzi, Maria Cristina

    2015-05-01

    Porous polyurethane (PU) structures raise increasing interest as scaffolds in tissue engineering applications. Understanding the effects of sterilization on their properties is mandatory to assess their potential use in the clinical practice. The aim of this work is the evaluation of the effects of two innovative sterilization techniques (i.e. plasma, Sterrad(®) system, and ozone) on the morphological, chemico-physical and mechanical properties of a PU foam synthesized by gas foaming, using water as expanding agent. In addition, possible toxic effects of the sterilization were evaluated by in vitro cytotoxicity tests. Plasma sterilization did not affect the morphological and mechanical properties of the PU foam, but caused at some extent degradative phenomena, as detected by infrared spectroscopy. Ozone sterilization had a major effect on foam morphology, causing the formation of new small pores, and stronger degradation and oxidation on the structure of the material. These modifications affected the mechanical properties of the sterilized PU foam too. Even though, no cytotoxic effects were observed after both plasma and ozone sterilization, as confirmed by the good values of cell viability assessed by Alamar Blue assay. The results here obtained can help in understanding the effects of sterilization procedures on porous polymeric scaffolds, and how the scaffold morphology, in particular porosity, can influence the effects of sterilization, and viceversa. PMID:25893387

  16. Scaffold-Free, Tissue Engineered Cartilage Implants for Laryngotracheal Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Gilpin, David A.; Weidenbecher, Mark S.; Dennis, James E.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis Donor site morbidity, including pneumothorax, can be a considerable problem when harvesting cartilage grafts for laryngotracheal reconstruction (LTR). Tissue engineered cartilage may offer a solution to this problem. This study investigated the feasibility of using autologous chondrocytes to tissue engineer scaffold free cartilage grafts for LTR in rabbits in order to avoid degradation that often arises from an inflammatory reaction to the scaffold carrier matrix. Study Design Animal study. Methods Auricular cartilage was harvested from 7 New Zealand white rabbits, the chondrocytes expanded, and loaded onto a custom made bioreactor for 7–8 weeks to fabricate autologous scaffold free cartilage sheets. The sheets were cut to size and used for LTR, and the rabbits were sacrificed 4, 8, and 12 weeks after the LTR and prepared for histology. Results None of the 7 rabbits showed signs of respiratory distress. A smooth, noninflammatory scar was visible intraluminally; the remainder of the tracheal lumen was unremarkable. Histologically, the grafts showed no signs of degradation or inflammatory reaction, were covered with mucosal epithelium, but did show signs of mechanical failure at the implantation site. Conclusions These results show that autologous chondrocytes can be used to fabricate an implantable sheet of cartilage that retains a cartilage phenotype, becomes integrated, and does not produce a significant inflammatory reaction. These findings suggest that with the design of stronger implants, these implants can be successfully used as a graft for LTR. PMID:20058322

  17. Characterization of novel akermanite:poly-ϵ-caprolactone scaffolds for human adipose-derived stem cells bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Zanetti, A S; McCandless, G T; Chan, J Y; Gimble, J M; Hayes, D J

    2015-04-01

    In this study, three different akermanite:poly-ϵ-caprolactone (PCL) composite scaffolds (wt%: 75:25, 50:50, 25:75) were characterized in terms of structure, compression strength, degradation rate and in vitro biocompatibility to human adipose-derived stem cells (hASC). Pure ceramic scaffolds [CellCeram™, custom-made, 40:60 wt%; β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP):hydroxyapatite (HA); and akermanite] and PCL scaffolds served as experimental controls. Compared to ceramic scaffolds, the authors hypothesized that optimal akermanite:PCL composites would have improved compression strength and comparable biocompatibility to hASC. Electron microscopy analysis revealed that PCL-containing scaffolds had the highest porosity but CellCeram™ had the greatest pore size. In general, compression strength in PCL-containing scaffolds was greater than in ceramic scaffolds. PCL-containing scaffolds were also more stable in culture than ceramic scaffolds. Nonetheless, mass losses after 21 days were observed in all scaffold types. Reduced hASC metabolic activity and increased cell detachment were observed after acute exposure to akermanite:PCL extracts (wt%: 75:25, 50:50). Among the PCL-containing scaffolds, hASC cultured for 21 days on akermanite:PCL (wt%: 75:25) discs displayed the highest viability, increased expression of osteogenic markers (alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin) and lowest IL-6 expression. Together, the results indicate that akermanite:PCL composites may have appropriate mechanical and biocompatibility properties for use as bone tissue scaffolds. PMID:23166107

  18. Effect of biomimetic conditions on mechanical and structural integrity of PGA/P4HB and electrospun PCL scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Klouda, Leda; Vaz, Claudia M; Mol, Anita; Baaijens, Frank P T; Bouten, Carlijn V C

    2008-03-01

    The selection of an appropriate scaffold represents one major key to success in tissue engineering. In cardiovascular applications, where a load-bearing structure is required, scaffolds need to demonstrate sufficient mechanical properties and importantly, reliable retention of these properties during the developmental phase of the tissue engineered construct. The effect of in vitro culture conditions, time and mechanical loading on the retention of mechanical properties of two scaffold types was investigated. First candidate tested was a poly-glycolic acid non-woven fiber mesh, coated with poly-4-hydroxybutyrate (PGA/P4HB), the standard scaffold used successfully in cardiovascular tissue engineering applications. As an alternative, an electrospun poly-epsilon-caprolactone (PCL) scaffold was used. A 15-day dynamic loading protocol was applied to the scaffolds. Additionally, control scaffolds were incubated statically. All studies were performed in a simulated physiological environment (phosphate-buffered saline solution, T=37 degrees C). PGA/P4HB scaffolds showed a dramatic decrease in mechanical properties as a function of incubation time and straining. Mechanical loading had a significant effect on PCL scaffold properties. Degradation as well as fiber fatigue caused by loading promote loss of mechanical properties in PGA/P4HB scaffolds. For PCL, fiber reorganization due to straining seems to be the main reason behind the brittle behavior that was pronounced in these scaffolds. It is suggested that those changes in scaffolds' mechanical properties must be considered at the application of in vitro tissue engineering protocols and should ideally be taken over by tissue formation to maintain mechanically stable tissue constructs. PMID:17701317

  19. Impact of Scaffold Micro and Macro Architecture on Schwann Cell Proliferation under Dynamic Conditions in a Rotating Wall Vessel Bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Valmikinathan, Chandra M.; Hoffman, John; Yu, Xiaojun

    2011-01-01

    Over the last decade tissue engineering has emerged as a powerful alternative to regenerate lost tissues owing to trauma or tumor. Evidence shows that Schwann cell containing scaffolds have improved performance in vivo as compared to scaffolds that depend on cellularization post implantation. However, owing to limited supply of cells from the patients themselves, several approaches have been taken to enhance cell proliferation rates to produce complete and uniform cellularization of scaffolds. The most common approach is the application of a bioreactor to enhance cell proliferation rate and therefore reduce the time needed to obtain sufficiently significant number of glial cells, prior to implantation. In this study, we show the application of a rotating wall bioreactor system for studying Schwann cell proliferation on nanofibrous spiral shaped scaffolds, prepared by solvent casting and salt leaching techniques. The scaffolds were fabricated from polycaprolactone (PCL), which has ideal mechanical properties and upon degradation does not produce acidic byproducts. The spiral scaffolds were coated with aligned or random nanofibers, produced by electrospinning, to provide a substrate that mimics the native extracellular matrix and the essential contact guidance cues. At the 4 day time point, an enhanced rate of cell proliferation was observed on the open structured nanofibrous spiral scaffolds in a rotating wall bioreactor, as compared to static culture conditions. However, the cell proliferation rate on the other contemporary scaffolds architectures such as the tubular and cylindrical scaffolds show reduced cell proliferation in the bioreactor as compared to static conditions, at the same time point. Moreover, the rotating wall bioreactor does not alter the orientation or the phenotype of the Schwann cells on the aligned nanofiber containing scaffolds, wherein, the cells remain aligned along the length of the scaffolds. Therefore, these open structured spiral

  20. Neuronal Networks on Nanocellulose Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Jonsson, Malin; Brackmann, Christian; Puchades, Maja; Brattås, Karoline; Ewing, Andrew; Gatenholm, Paul; Enejder, Annika

    2015-11-01

    Proliferation, integration, and neurite extension of PC12 cells, a widely used culture model for cholinergic neurons, were studied in nanocellulose scaffolds biosynthesized by Gluconacetobacter xylinus to allow a three-dimensional (3D) extension of neurites better mimicking neuronal networks in tissue. The interaction with control scaffolds was compared with cationized nanocellulose (trimethyl ammonium betahydroxy propyl [TMAHP] cellulose) to investigate the impact of surface charges on the cell interaction mechanisms. Furthermore, coatings with extracellular matrix proteins (collagen, fibronectin, and laminin) were investigated to determine the importance of integrin-mediated cell attachment. Cell proliferation was evaluated by a cellular proliferation assay, while cell integration and neurite propagation were studied by simultaneous label-free Coherent anti-Stokes Raman Scattering and second harmonic generation microscopy, providing 3D images of PC12 cells and arrangement of nanocellulose fibrils, respectively. Cell attachment and proliferation were enhanced by TMAHP modification, but not by protein coating. Protein coating instead promoted active interaction between the cells and the scaffold, hence lateral cell migration and integration. Irrespective of surface modification, deepest cell integration measured was one to two cell layers, whereas neurites have a capacity to integrate deeper than the cell bodies in the scaffold due to their fine dimensions and amoeba-like migration pattern. Neurites with lengths of >50 μm were observed, successfully connecting individual cells and cell clusters. In conclusion, TMAHP-modified nanocellulose scaffolds promote initial cellular scaffold adhesion, which combined with additional cell-scaffold treatments enables further formation of 3D neuronal networks. PMID:26398224

  1. Effects of chitosan and bioactive glass modifications of knitted and rolled polylactide-based 96/4 L/D scaffolds on chondrogenic differentiation of adipose stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ahtiainen, Katja; Sippola, Laura; Nurminen, Manu; Mannerström, Bettina; Haimi, Suvi; Suuronen, Riitta; Hyttinen, Jari; Ylikomi, Timo; Kellomäki, Minna; Miettinen, Susanna

    2015-01-01

    The performance of biodegradable knitted and rolled 3-dimensional (3D) polylactide-based 96/4 scaffolds modified with bioactive glass (BaG) 13-93, chitosan and both was compared with regard to the viability, proliferation and chondrogenic differentiation of rabbit adipose stem cells (ASCs). Scaffold porosities were determined by micro-computed tomography (μCT). Water absorption and degradation of scaffolds were studied during 28-day hydrolysis in Tris-buffer. Viability, number and differentiation of ASCs in PLA96/4 scaffolds were examined in vitro. The dimensions of the scaffolds were maintained during hydrolysis and mass loss was detected only in the BaG13-93 containing scaffolds. ASCs adhered and proliferated on each scaffold type. Cell aggregation and expression of chondral matrix components improved in all scaffold types in chondrogenic medium. Signs of hypertrophy were detected in the modified scaffolds but not in the plain PLA96/4 scaffold. Chondrogenic differentiation was most enhanced in the presence of chitosan. These findings indicate that the plain P scaffold provided a good 3D-matrix for ASC proliferation whereas the addition of chitosan to the PLA96/4 scaffold induced chondrogenic differentiation independent of the medium. Accordingly, a PLA96/4 scaffold modified by chitosan could provide a functional and bioactive basis for tissue-engineered chondral implants. PMID:23086809

  2. Osteogenic Scaffolds for Bone Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ling-jiang; Liu, Ning; Liu, Qing; Jia, Lian-shun; Yuan, Wen

    2012-01-01

    Abstract A highly osteogenic hybrid bioabsorbable scaffold was developed for bone reconstruction/augmentation. Through the use of a solid free-form fabrication technology, a bioabsorbable polycaprolactone (PCL) cage scaffold with a desired size and shape was produced and then filled with osteogenic bone graft particles, that is, morselized autologous bone chips. A rabbit total lamina defect model was chosen to demonstrate its efficacy in regenerating bone with a complicated anatomic shape. Both iliac bone and morselized iliac bone grafts were used in this study for comparison purposes. Serum osteocalcin and collagen type I cross-linked C-terminal telopeptide (CTx) determination showed that active bone remodeling occurred after bone grafts were implanted. X-ray images showed that the bony defects were completely filled with bone mass in all the groups with bone grafts. However, biomechanical tests showed that only the iliac bone and hybrid scaffold groups could restore the mechanical properties to the normal level after 10 weeks of implantation. A histology study showed that both iliac and hybrid scaffold groups had extensive new bone formation, and no adhesion and fibrosis were found. These results indicated that this osteogenic hybrid scaffold can be a good alternative to autologous iliac bone, because it does not need a second iliac bone-harvesting surgery, and thus the morbidity and the possible infections that are often associated with the bone harvesting surgery can be avoided. PMID:23515416

  3. Rapid Engineering of Three-Dimensional, Multicellular Tissues With Polymeric Scaffolds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Jordan, Jacqueline; Fraga, Denise N.

    2007-01-01

    A process has been developed for the rapid tissue engineering of multicellular-tissue-equivalent assemblies by the controlled enzymatic degradation of polymeric beads in a low-fluid-shear bioreactor. In this process, the porous polymeric beads serve as temporary scaffolds to support the assemblies of cells in a tissuelike 3D configuration during the critical initial growth phases of attachment of anchorage-dependent cells, aggregation of the cells, and formation of a 3D extracellular matrix. Once the cells are assembled into a 3D array and enmeshed in a structural supportive 3D extracellular matrix (ECM), the polymeric scaffolds can be degraded in the low-fluid-shear environment of the NASA-designed bioreactor. The natural 3D tissuelike assembly, devoid of any artificial support structure, is maintained in the low-shear bioreactor environment by the newly formed natural cellular/ECM. The elimination of the artificial scaffold allows normal tissue structure and function.

  4. Approaches to Neural Tissue Engineering Using Scaffolds for Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Willerth, Stephanie M.; Sakiyama-Elbert, Shelly E.

    2007-01-01

    This review seeks to give an overview of the current approaches to drug delivery from scaffolds for neural tissue engineering applications. The challenges presented by attempting to replicate the three types of nervous tissue (brain, spinal cord, and peripheral nerve) are summarized. Potential scaffold materials (both synthetic and natural) and target drugs are discussed with the benefits and drawbacks given. Finally, common methods of drug delivery, including degradable/diffusion-based delivery systems, affinity-based delivery systems, immobilized drug delivery systems, and electrically controlled drug delivery systems, are examined and critiqued. Based on the current body of work, suggestions for future directions of research in the field of neural tissue engineering are presented. PMID:17482308

  5. Engineering microporosity in bacterial cellulose scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Bäckdahl, Henrik; Esguerra, Maricris; Delbro, Dick; Risberg, Bo; Gatenholm, Paul

    2008-08-01

    The scaffold is an essential component in tissue engineering. A novel method to prepare three-dimensional (3D) nanofibril network scaffolds with controlled microporosity has been developed. By placing paraffin wax and starch particles of various sizes in a growing culture of Acetobacter xylinum, bacterial cellulose scaffolds of different morphologies and interconnectivity were prepared. Paraffin particles were incorporated throughout the scaffold, while starch particles were found only in the outermost area of the resulting scaffold. The porogens were successfully removed after culture with bacteria and no residues were detected with electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA) or Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FT-IR). Resulting scaffolds were seeded with smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and investigated using histology and organ bath techniques. SMC were selected as the cell type since the main purpose of the resulting scaffolds is for tissue engineered blood vessels. SMCs attached to and proliferated on and partly into the scaffolds. PMID:18615821

  6. MAP kinase cascades: scaffolding signal specificity.

    PubMed

    van Drogen, Frank; Peter, Matthias

    2002-01-22

    Scaffold proteins organize many MAP kinase pathways by interacting with several components of these cascades. Recent studies suggest that scaffold proteins provide local activation platforms that contribute to signal specificity by insulating different MAP kinase pathways. PMID:11818078

  7. Electrospun silk fibroin/poly(lactide-co-ε-caprolactone) nanofibrous scaffolds for bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zi; Lin, Ming; Xie, Qing; Sun, Hao; Huang, Yazhuo; Zhang, DanDan; Yu, Zhang; Bi, Xiaoping; Chen, Junzhao; Wang, Jing; Shi, Wodong; Gu, Ping; Fan, Xianqun

    2016-01-01

    Background Tissue engineering has become a promising therapeutic approach for bone regeneration. Nanofibrous scaffolds have attracted great interest mainly due to their structural similarity to natural extracellular matrix (ECM). Poly(lactide-co-ε-caprolactone) (PLCL) has been successfully used in bone regeneration, but PLCL polymers are inert and lack natural cell recognition sites, and the surface of PLCL scaffold is hydrophobic. Silk fibroin (SF) is a kind of natural polymer with inherent bioactivity, and supports mesenchymal stem cell attachment, osteogenesis, and ECM deposition. Therefore, we fabricated hybrid nanofibrous scaffolds by adding different weight ratios of SF to PLCL in order to find a scaffold with improved properties for bone regeneration. Methods Hybrid nanofibrous scaffolds were fabricated by blending different weight ratios of SF with PLCL. Human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs) were seeded on SF/PLCL nanofibrous scaffolds of various ratios for a systematic evaluation of cell adhesion, proliferation, cytotoxicity, and osteogenic differentiation; the efficacy of the composite of hADSCs and scaffolds in repairing critical-sized calvarial defects in rats was investigated. Results The SF/PLCL (50/50) scaffold exhibited favorable tensile strength, surface roughness, and hydrophilicity, which facilitated cell adhesion and proliferation. Moreover, the SF/PLCL (50/50) scaffold promoted the osteogenic differentiation of hADSCs by elevating the expression levels of osteogenic marker genes such as BSP, Ocn, Col1A1, and OPN and enhanced ECM mineralization. In vivo assays showed that SF/PLCL (50/50) scaffold improved the repair of the critical-sized calvarial defect in rats, resulting in increased bone volume, higher trabecular number, enhanced bone mineral density, and increased new bone areas, compared with the pure PLCL scaffold. Conclusion The SF/PLCL (50/50) nanofibrous scaffold facilitated hADSC proliferation and osteogenic differentiation in

  8. Scaffold pore space modulation through intelligent design of dissolvable microparticles.

    PubMed

    Liebschner, Michael A K; Wettergreen, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this area of research is to manipulate the pore space of scaffolds through the application of an intelligent design concept on dissolvable microparticles. To accomplish this goal, we developed an efficient and repeatable process for fabrication of microparticles from multiple materials using a combination of rapid prototyping (RP) and soft lithography. Phase changed 3D printing was used to create masters for PDMS molds. A photocrosslinkable polymer was then delivered into these molds to make geometrically complex 3D microparticles. This repeatable process has demonstrated to generate the objects with greater than 95% repeatability with complete pattern transfer. This process was illustrated for three different shapes of various complexities. The shapes were based on the extrusion of 2D shapes. This may allow simplification of the fabrication process in the future combined with a direct transfer of the findings. Altering the shapes of particles used for porous scaffold fabrication will allow for tailoring of the pore shapes, and therefore their biological function within a porous tissue engineering scaffold. Through permeation experiments, we have shown that the pore geometry may alter the permeability coefficient of scaffolds while influencing mechanical properties to a lesser extent. By selecting different porogen shapes, the nutrition transport and scaffold degradation can be significantly influenced with minimal effect on the mechanical integrity of the construct. In addition, the different shapes may allow a control of drug release by modifying their surface-to-volume ratio, which could modulate drug delivery over time. While soft lithography is currently used with photolithography, its high precision is offset by high cost of production. The employment of RP to a specific resolution offers a much less expensive alternative with increased throughput due to the speed of current RP systems. PMID:22692605

  9. Biomimetic poly(glycerol sebacate)/poly(l-lactic acid) blend scaffolds for adipose tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Frydrych, Martin; Román, Sabiniano; MacNeil, Sheila; Chen, Biqiong

    2015-05-01

    Large three-dimensional poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS)/poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) scaffolds with similar bulk mechanical properties to native low and high stress adapted adipose tissue were fabricated via a freeze-drying and a subsequent curing process. PGS/PLLA scaffolds containing 73vol.% PGS were prepared using two different organic solvents, resulting in highly interconnected open-pore structures with porosities and pore sizes in the range of 91-92% and 109-141μm, respectively. Scanning electron microscopic analysis indicated that the scaffolds featured different microstructure characteristics, depending on the organic solvent in use. The PGS/PLLA scaffolds had a tensile Young's modulus of 0.030MPa, tensile strength of 0.007MPa, elongation at the maximum stress of 25% and full shape recovery capability upon release of the compressive load. In vitro degradation tests presented mass losses of 11-16% and 54-55% without and with the presence of lipase enzyme in 31days, respectively. In vitro cell tests exhibited clear evidence that the PGS/PLLA scaffolds prepared with 1,4-dioxane as the solvent are suitable for culture of adipose derived stem cells. Compared to pristine PLLA scaffolds prepared with the same procedure, these scaffolds provided favourable porous microstructures, good hydrophilic characteristics, and appropriate mechanical properties for soft tissue applications, as well as enhanced scaffold cell penetration and tissue in-growth characteristics. This work demonstrates that the PGS/PLLA scaffolds have potential for applications in adipose tissue engineering. PMID:25769230

  10. Large defect-tailored composite scaffolds for in vivo bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ronca, Alfredo; Guarino, Vincenzo; Raucci, Maria Grazia; Salamanna, Francesca; Martini, Lucia; Zeppetelli, Stefania; Fini, Milena; Kon, Elisaveta; Filardo, G; Marcacci, Maurilio; Ambrosio, Luigi

    2014-11-01

    The discovery of new strategies to repair large segmental bone defects is currently an open challenge for worldwide clinicians. In the treatment of critical-sized bone defects, an alternative strategy to traditional bone grafting is always more frequently the use of tailor-made scaffolds modelled on the final size and shape of the implant site. Here, poly-ε-caprolactone-based composite scaffolds including poly-L-lactic acid continuous fibres and hyaluronan derivates (i.e. HYAFF11®) have been investigated for the peculiar 3D architecture characterized by interconnected macroporous networks and tunable mechanical properties. Composite scaffolds were immersed in simulated body fluid solution in order to support in vivo tissue in-growth. Scaffolds loaded with autologous cells (bone marrow stromal cells) plus platelet-rich plasma and osteoconductive protein such bone morphogenetic protein-7 were also tested to evaluate eventual enhancement in bone regeneration. The morphological and mechanical properties of poly-L-lactic acid-reinforced composite scaffolds have been studied to identify the optimal scaffold design to match the implant-site requirements of sheep metatarsal defects. Dynamic mechanical tests allowed to underline the viscoelastic response of the scaffold - resulting in elastic moduli from 2.5 to 1.3 MPa, suitable to temporarily support the structural function of damaged bone tissue. In vivo preliminary investigations in a sheep model of metatarsus shaft defect also showed the attitude of the scaffold to promote osteogenesis, preferentially in association with bone marrow stromal cell and platelet-rich plasma, even if the highest amount of mature bone was reached in the case of scaffold loaded with human bone morphogenetic protein-7 released via hydrolytic degradation of HYAFF11® phases in the implant site. PMID:24951457

  11. Antibacterial and bioactive alpha- and beta-chitin hydrogel/nanobioactive glass ceramic/nano silver composite scaffolds for periodontal regeneration.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Sowmya; Kumar, P T Sudheesh; Nair, Sreeja V; Nair, Shantikumar V; Chennazhi, K P; Jayakumar, R

    2013-11-01

    Alveolar bone loss and bone defects are the commonly encountered periodontal problems. Large defects do not heal spontaneously and thus require surgical interventions with bone substitutes. Bone grafts have the disadvantages of eliciting an immunologic response with subsequent graft rejection. The success rate of Guided Tissue Regeneration (GTR) is variable because of high susceptibility to infection. Thus emerged the important role of synthetic biomaterials and hence for this purpose we developed a nanocomposite scaffold, using alpha- and beta-chitin hydrogel with bioactive glass ceramic nanoparticles (nBGC) and silver nanoparticles (nAg) by lyophilization technique (aalpha and beta-chitin hydrogel/nBGC/nAg nanocomposite scaffold). The prepared nanoparticles and nanocomposite scaffolds were characterized. In addition, the porosity, swelling, mechanical properties, antibacterial activity, in vitro degradation and biomineralization, cell viability, cell attachment and cell proliferation ability of the prepared composite scaffolds were also evaluated. The results showed that alpha- and beta-chitin/nBGC/nAg composite scaffolds were porous and have the capacity to absorb fluids and swell. The composite scaffolds also showed enhanced antibacterial activity, bioactivity and controlled degradation in comparison to the control scaffolds. Cell viability studies proved the non-toxic nature of the nanocomposite scaffolds. Cell attachment and cell proliferation studies revealed the attachment and spreading nature of cells. All these studies revealed that, these antibacterial nanocomposite scaffolds could be a promising approach for the management of periodontal defects. PMID:24059080

  12. Developing bioactive composite scaffolds for bone tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yun

    Poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) films were fabricated using the method of dissolving and evaporation. PLLA scaffold was prepared by solid-liquid phase separation of polymer solutions and subsequent sublimation of solvent. Bonelike apatite coating was formed on PLLA films, PLLA scaffolds and poly(glycolic acid) (PGA) scaffolds in 24 hours through an accelerated biomimetic process. The ion concentrations in the simulated body fluid (SBF) were nearly 5 times of those in human blood plasma. The apatite formed was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The apatite formed in 5SBF was similar in morphology and composition to that formed in the classical biomimetic process employing SBF or 1.5SBF, and similar to that of natural bone. This indicated that the biomimetic apatite coating process could be accelerated by using concentrated simulated body fluid at 37°C. Besides saving time, the accelerated biomimetic process is particularly significant to biodegradable polymers. Some polymers which degrade too fast to be coated with apatite by a classical biomimetic process, for example PGA, could be coated with bone-like apatite in an accelerated biomimetic process. Collagen and apatite were co-precipitated as a composite coating on poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) in an accelerated biomimetic process. The incubation solution contained collagen (1g/L) and simulated body fluid (SBF) with 5 times inorganic ionic concentrations as human blood plasma. The coating formed on PLLA films and scaffolds after 24 hours incubation was characterized using EDX, XRD, FTIR, and SEM. It was shown that the coating contained carbonated bone-like apatite and collagen, the primary constituents of natural bone. SEM showed a complex composite coating of submicron bone-like apatite particulates combined with collagen fibrils. This work provided an efficient process to obtain

  13. Design and Fabrication of a Biodegradable, Covalently Crosslinked Shape-Memory Alginate Scaffold for Cell and Growth Factor Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lin; Shansky, Janet; Borselli, Cristina; Mooney, David

    2012-01-01

    The successful use of transplanted cells and/or growth factors for tissue repair is limited by a significant cell loss and/or rapid growth factor diffusion soon after implantation. Highly porous alginate scaffolds formed with covalent crosslinking have been used to improve cell survival and growth factor release kinetics, but require open-wound surgical procedures for insertion and have not previously been designed to readily degrade in vivo. In this study, a biodegradable, partially crosslinked alginate scaffold with shape-memory properties was fabricated for minimally invasive surgical applications. A mixture of high and low molecular weight partially oxidized alginate modified with RGD peptides was covalently crosslinked using carbodiimide chemistry. The scaffold was compressible 11-fold and returned to its original shape when rehydrated. Scaffold degradation properties in vitro indicated ∼85% mass loss by 28 days. The greater than 90% porous scaffolds released the recombinant growth factor insulin-like growth factor-1 over several days in vitro and allowed skeletal muscle cell survival, proliferation, and migration from the scaffold over a 28-day period. The compressible scaffold thus has the potential to be delivered by a minimally invasive technique, and when rehydrated in vivo with cells and/or growth factors, could serve as a temporary delivery vehicle for tissue repair. PMID:22646518

  14. Effect of low-temperature ethylene oxide and electron beam sterilization on the in vitro and in vivo function of reconstituted extracellular matrix-derived scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Proffen, Benedikt L; Perrone, Gabriel S; Fleming, Braden C; Sieker, Jakob T; Kramer, Joshua; Hawes, Michael L; Murray, Martha M

    2015-10-01

    Reconstituted extracellular matrix (ECM)-derived scaffolds are commonly utilized in preclinical tissue engineering studies as delivery vehicles for cells and growth factors. Translation into clinical use requires identifying a sterilization method that effectively removes bacteria but does not harm scaffold function. To determine effectiveness of sterilization and impact on ECM scaffold integrity and function, low-temperature ethylene oxide and 15 kGy electron beam irradiation techniques were evaluated. Scaffold sterility was assessed in accordance to United States Pharmacopeia Chapter 71. Scaffold matrix degradation was determined in vitro using enzymatic resistance tests and gel electrophoresis. Scaffold mechanics including elastic modulus, yield stress and collapse modulus were tested. Lastly, 14 Yorkshire pigs underwent ACL transection and bio-enhanced ACL repair using sterilized scaffolds. Histologic response of ligament, synovium, and lymph nodes was compared at 4, 6, and 8 weeks. Ethylene oxide as well as electron beam irradiation yielded sterile scaffolds. Scaffold resistance to enzymatic digestion and protein integrity slightly decreased after electron beam irradiation while ethylene oxide altered scaffold matrix. Scaffold elastic modulus and yield stress were increased after electron beam treatment, while collapse modulus was increased after ethylene oxide treatment. No significant changes in ACL dimensions, in vivo scaffold resorption rate, or histologic response of synovium, ligament, and lymph nodes with either terminal sterilization technique were detectable. In conclusion, this study identifies two methods to terminally sterilize an ECM scaffold. In vitro scaffold properties were slightly changed without significantly influencing the biologic responses of the surrounding tissues in vivo. This is a critical step toward translating new tissue engineering strategies to clinical trials. PMID:26088294

  15. Designing Online Scaffolds for Interactive Computer Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Ching-Huei; Wu, I-Chia; Jen, Fen-Lan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of online scaffolds in computer simulation to facilitate students' science learning. We first introduced online scaffolds to assist and model students' science learning and to demonstrate how a system embedded with online scaffolds can be designed and implemented to help high…

  16. Rethinking Scaffolding in the Information Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yelland, Nicola; Masters, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    This paper addresses the use of scaffolding in learning contexts that incorporate technologically based novel problems. We suggest that in computer contexts extended conceptualisations of scaffolding are needed in order to gain greater insights into teaching and learning processes. Our work has revealed that traditional forms of scaffolding, based…

  17. Bispidine as a Privileged Scaffold.

    PubMed

    Tomassoli, Isabelle; Gündisch, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Thediazabicyclic molecule bispidine named by the chemist Carl Mannich in 1930, is a naturally occurring scaffold with interesting features. Bispidine can form different conformers, has high basicity, can attack dichloromethane, has metal ion coordination properties and interacts with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. In this review we will discuss important properties, synthetic pathways and biological activities of bispidine and some derivatives. Bispidine can function as a scaffold for compounds with very diverse biological activities, e.g. interacting with ion channels, G-protein coupled receptors, and enzymes, and is even used for the development of new in vivo radiotracers. PMID:26369817

  18. Synthesis of the TACO scaffold as a new selectively deprotectable conformationally restricted triazacyclophane based scaffold.

    PubMed

    Brouwer, Arwin J; van de Langemheen, Helmus; Ciaffoni, Adriano; Schilder, Kitty E; Liskamp, Rob M J

    2014-06-01

    The synthesis of a new triazacyclophane scaffold (TACO scaffold) containing three selectively deprotectable amines is described. The TACO scaffold is conformationally more constrained than our frequently used TAC scaffold, due to introduction of a substituent on the para position of the benzoic acid hinge, which prevents ring flipping and makes it more attractive than the TAC scaffold for preparation of artificial receptor molecules or for mimicking discontinuous epitopes toward protein mimics when more preorganization is required. PMID:24856258

  19. Bioactive glass foam scaffolds are remodelled by osteoclasts and support the formation of mineralized matrix and vascular networks in vitro.

    PubMed

    Midha, Swati; van den Bergh, Wouter; Kim, Taek B; Lee, Peter D; Jones, Julian R; Mitchell, Christopher A

    2013-03-01

    Remodelling of scaffolds and new bone formation is critical for effective bone regeneration. Herein is reported the first demonstration of resorption pits due to osteoclast activity on the surface of sol-gel bioactive glass foam scaffolds. Bioactive glass foam scaffolds are known to have osteogenic potential and suitable pore networks for bone regeneration. Degradation of the scaffolds is known to be initially solution mediated, but for effective bone regeneration, remodelling of the scaffold by osteoclasts and vascularisation of the scaffold is necessary. The culture of C7 macrophages on a bioactive glass scaffold induces the cells to differentiate into (TRAP(+ve) ) osteoclasts. They then form distinctive resorption pits within 3 weeks, while MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblasts deposit mineralized osteoid on their surfaces in co-culture. The scaffolds are of the 70S30C (70 mol% SiO2 , 30 mol% CaO) composition, with modal pore and interconnect diameters of 373 μm and 172 μm respectively (quantified by X-ray micro-tomography and 3D image analysis). The release of soluble silica and calcium ions from 70S30C scaffolds induces an increase in osteoblast numbers as determined via the MTT assay. Scaffolds also support growth of endothelial cells on their surface and tube formation (characteristic of functional microvasculature) following 4 days in culture. This data supports the hypothesis that 70S30C bioactive glass scaffolds promote the differentiation of the 3 main cell types involved in vascularized bone regeneration. PMID:23184651

  20. A tubular gelatin scaffold capable of the time-dependent controlled release of epidermal growth factor and mitomycin C.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jixiang; Yang, Fanwen; He, Fupo; Tian, Xiumei; Tang, Shuo; Chen, Xiaoming

    2015-11-01

    A tubular gelatin scaffold for the time-dependent controlled release of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and mitomycin C (MMC) was fabricated. EGF was incorporated using silk fibroin carriers, and MMC was planted using polylactide (PLA) microspheres. The relationship between scaffold properties and crosslinking degrees was evaluated. As the crosslinking degree was increased from 23.7% to 65.3%, the mechanical properties of the scaffold obviously improved, and the compressive modulus increased to approximately 65kPa. The mass degradation of the scaffold was also controlled from 9 days to approximately 1 month. In vitro release tests indicated that the scaffold mainly released EGF in the early period and MMC in the later period. Urethral epithelial cells (UECs) and urethral scar derived fibroblast cells (UFCs) were coseeded in the scaffold at a ratio of 1:1. After 9 days of coculture, immunostaining results displayed that the proportion of UECs continuously increased to approximately 71%. These changes in cell proportion were confirmed by the results of Western blot analysis. Therefore, the scaffold promoted the growth but inhibited the regeneration of UFCs. This scaffold for time-dependent controlled release of multiple biofactors may be potentially useful in urethral reconstruction and other tissue engineering studies. PMID:26277717

  1. Enhanced depth-independent chondrocyte proliferation and gene expression in an ultrasound bioreactor and an assessment of ultrasound dampening in the scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Thakurta, Sanjukta Guha; Kraft, Mikail; Viljoen, Hendrik J.; Subramanian, Anuradha

    2014-01-01

    Chondrocyte seeded scaffolds were cultured in an ultrasound (US) assisted bioreactor, which supplied the cells with acoustic energy around resonance frequencies (~5.0 MHz). Polyurethane-polycarbonate (BM), chitosan (CS) and chitosan-nButanol (CSB) based scaffolds with varying porosities were chosen and the following US regimen was employed: 15 kPa and 60kPa, 5 mins/application and 6 application/day for 21 days. Non-stimulated scaffolds served as control. For BM scaffolds, US stimulation significantly impacted cell proliferation, and the depth dependent cell population density compared to controls. Highest COL2A1/COL1A1 ratios and ACAN mRNA were noted on US treated BM scaffolds compared to controls. Similar trend was noted on US treated cell-seeded CS and CSB scaffolds, but COL2A1/COL1A1 ratios were significantly lower compared to BM scaffolds. Expression of SOX9 was also elevated under US and paralleled the ratio of COL2A1/COL1A1. As an original contribution, a simplified mathematical model based on Biot theory was developed to understand the propagation of the incident US wave through the scaffolds and the model analysis was connected to cellular responses. Scaffold architecture influenced the distribution of US field; with the US field being the least attenuated in BM scaffolds, thus coupling more mechanical energy into cells, leading to increased cellular activity. PMID:25065549

  2. Enhanced depth-independent chondrocyte proliferation and phenotype maintenance in an ultrasound bioreactor and an assessment of ultrasound dampening in the scaffold.

    PubMed

    Guha Thakurta, Sanjukta; Kraft, Mikail; Viljoen, Hendrik J; Subramanian, Anuradha

    2014-11-01

    Chondrocyte-seeded scaffolds were cultured in an ultrasound (US)-assisted bioreactor, which supplied the cells with acoustic energy around resonance frequencies (~5.0 MHz). Polyurethane-polycarbonate (BM), chitosan (CS) and chitosan-n-butanol (CSB) based scaffolds with varying porosities were chosen and the following US regimen was employed: 15 kPa and 60 kPa, 5 min per application and 6 applications per day for 21 days. Non-stimulated scaffolds served as control. For BM scaffolds, US stimulation significantly impacted cell proliferation and depth-independent cell population density compared to controls. The highest COL2A1/COL1A1 ratios and ACAN mRNA were noted on US-treated BM scaffolds compared to controls. A similar trend was noted on US-treated cell-seeded CS and CSB scaffolds, though COL2A1/COL1A1 ratios were significantly lower compared to BM scaffolds. Expression of Sox-9 was also elevated under US and paralleled the COL2A1/COL1A1 ratio. As an original contribution, a simplified mathematical model based on Biot theory was developed to understand the propagation of the incident US wave through the scaffolds and the model analysis was connected to cellular responses. Scaffold architecture influenced the distribution of US field, with the US field being the least attenuated in BM scaffolds, thus coupling more mechanical energy into cells, and leading to increased cellular activity. PMID:25065549

  3. RHOBTB3 promotes proteasomal degradation of HIFα through facilitating hydroxylation and suppresses the Warburg effect

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chen-Song; Liu, Qi; Li, Mengqi; Lin, Shu-Yong; Peng, Yongying; Wu, Di; Li, Terytty Yang; Fu, Qiang; Jia, Weiping; Wang, Xinjun; Ma, Teng; Zong, Yue; Cui, Jiwen; Pu, Chengfei; Lian, Guili; Guo, Huiling; Ye, Zhiyun; Lin, Sheng-Cai

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are master regulators of adaptive responses to low oxygen, and their α-subunits are rapidly degraded through the ubiquitination-dependent proteasomal pathway after hydroxylation. Aberrant accumulation or activation of HIFs is closely linked to many types of cancer. However, how hydroxylation of HIFα and its delivery to the ubiquitination machinery are regulated remains unclear. Here we show that Rho-related BTB domain-containing protein 3 (RHOBTB3) directly interacts with the hydroxylase PHD2 to promote HIFα hydroxylation. RHOBTB3 also directly interacts with the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) protein, a component of the E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, facilitating ubiquitination of HIFα. Remarkably, RHOBTB3 dimerizes with LIMD1, and constructs a RHOBTB3/LIMD1-PHD2-VHL-HIFα complex to effect the maximal degradation of HIFα. Hypoxia reduces the RHOBTB3-centered complex formation, resulting in an accumulation of HIFα. Importantly, the expression level of RHOBTB3 is greatly reduced in human renal carcinomas, and RHOBTB3 deficiency significantly elevates the Warburg effect and accelerates xenograft growth. Our work thus reveals that RHOBTB3 serves as a scaffold to organize a multi-subunit complex that promotes the hydroxylation, ubiquitination and degradation of HIFα. PMID:26215701

  4. Strategic Scaffolding for Scientific Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shelton, Angela; Natarajan, Uma; Willard, Catherine; Kane, Tera; Ketelhut, Diane Jass; Schifter, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Though many national and international science organizations stress the importance of integrating scientific inquiry into classroom instruction, this is often difficult for teachers. Moreover, assessing and scaffolding inquiry skills for students can be even more of a challenge. This paper investigated the student performances in an inquiry-based,…

  5. Problem Solving, Scaffolding and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Shih-Yin

    2012-01-01

    Helping students to construct robust understanding of physics concepts and develop good solving skills is a central goal in many physics classrooms. This thesis examine students' problem solving abilities from different perspectives and explores strategies to scaffold students' learning. In studies involving analogical problem solving…

  6. Monosaccharide-Responsive Phenylboronate-Polyol Cell Scaffolds for Cell Sheet and Tissue Engineering Applications

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Rachamalla Maheedhar; Srivastava, Akshay; Kumar, Ashok

    2013-01-01

    Analyte-responsive smart polymeric materials are of great interest and have been actively investigated in the field of regenerative medicine. Phenylboronate containing copolymers form gels with polyols under alkaline conditions. Monosaccharides, by virtue of their higher affinity towards boronate, can displace polyols and solubilize such gels. In the present study, we investigate the possibility of utilizing phenylboronate-polyol interactions at physiological pH in order to develop monosaccharide-responsive degradable scaffold materials for systems dealing with cells and tissues. Amine assisted phenylboronate-polyol interactions were employed to develop novel hydrogel and cryogel scaffolds at neutral pH. The scaffolds displayed monosaccharide inducible gel-sol phase transformability. In vitro cell culture studies demonstrated the ability of scaffolds to support cell adhesion, viability and proliferation. Fructose induced gel degradation is used to recover cells cultured on the hydrogels. The cryogels displayed open macroporous structure and superior mechanical properties. These novel phase transformable phenylboronate-polyol based scaffolds displayed a great potential for various cell sheet and tissue engineering applications. Their monosaccharide responsiveness at physiological pH is very useful and can be utilized in the fields of cell immobilization, spheroid culture, saccharide recognition and analyte-responsive drug delivery. PMID:24167587

  7. Europium-Containing Mesoporous Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Stimulating in Vitro and in Vivo Osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chengtie; Xia, Lunguo; Han, Pingping; Mao, Lixia; Wang, Jiacheng; Zhai, Dong; Fang, Bing; Chang, Jiang; Xiao, Yin

    2016-05-11

    Bone tissue engineering offers a possible strategy for regenerating large bone defects, in which how to design beneficial scaffolds for accelerating bone formation remains significantly challenging. Europium, as an important rare earth element, has been used as a solid-state lighting material. However, there are few reports on whether Eu can be used for labeling bone tissue engineering scaffolds, and its biological effect on bone cells and bone tissue regeneration is unknown. In this study, we incorporated Eu into mesoporous bioactive glass (Eu-MBG) scaffolds by an in situ cotemplate method to achieve a bifunctional biomaterial with biolabeling and bone regeneration. The prepared Eu-MBG scaffolds have highly interconnective large pores (300-500 μm), a high specific surface area (140-290 m(2)/g), and well-ordered mesopores (5 nm) as well as uniformly distributed Eu. The incorporation of 2-5 mol % Eu into MBG scaffolds gives them a luminescent property. The in vitro degradation of Eu-MBG scaffolds has a functional effect on the change of the luminescence intensity. In addition, Eu-MBG can be used for labeling bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in vitro and still presents a distinct luminescence signal in deep bone tissues in vivo to label new bone tissue via release of Eu ions. Furthermore, the incorporation of different contents of Eu (1, 2, and 5 mol %) into MBG scaffolds significantly enhances the osteogenic gene expression of BMSCs in the scaffolds. The Eu- and Si-containing ionic products released from Eu-MBG scaffolds distinctly promote the osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs. Critically sized femur defects in ovariectomized (OVX) rats are created to simulate an osteoporotic phenotype. The results show that Eu-MBG scaffolds significantly stimulate new bone formation in osteoporotic bone defects when compared to MBG scaffolds alone and Eu may be involved in the acceleration of bone regeneration in OVX rats. Our study for the first time reports that the

  8. Fabrication and development of artificial osteochondral constructs based on cancellous bone/hydrogel hybrid scaffold.

    PubMed

    Song, Kedong; Li, Liying; Yan, Xinyu; Zhang, Yu; Li, Ruipeng; Wang, Yiwei; Wang, Ling; Wang, Hong; Liu, Tianqing

    2016-06-01

    Using tissue engineering techniques, an artificial osteochondral construct was successfully fabricated to treat large osteochondral defects. In this study, porcine cancellous bones and chitosan/gelatin hydrogel scaffolds were used as substitutes to mimic bone and cartilage, respectively. The porosity and distribution of pore size in porcine bone was measured and the degradation ratio and swelling ratio for chitosan/gelatin hydrogel scaffolds was also determined in vitro. Surface morphology was analyzed with the scanning electron microscope (SEM). The physicochemical properties and the composition were tested by using an infrared instrument. A double layer composite scaffold was constructed via seeding adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) induced to chondrocytes and osteoblasts, followed by inoculation in cancellous bones and hydrogel scaffolds. Cell proliferation was assessed through Dead/Live staining and cellular activity was analyzed with IpWin5 software. Cell growth, adhesion and formation of extracellular matrix in composite scaffolds blank cancellous bones or hydrogel scaffolds were also analyzed. SEM analysis revealed a super porous internal structure of cancellous bone scaffolds and pore size was measured at an average of 410 ± 59 μm while porosity was recorded at 70.6 ± 1.7 %. In the hydrogel scaffold, the average pore size was measured at 117 ± 21 μm and the porosity and swelling rate were recorded at 83.4 ± 0.8 % and 362.0 ± 2.4 %, respectively. Furthermore, the remaining hydrogel weighed 80.76 ± 1.6 % of the original dry weight after hydration in PBS for 6 weeks. In summary, the cancellous bone and hydrogel composite scaffold is a promising biomaterial which shows an essential physical performance and strength with excellent osteochondral tissue interaction in situ. ADSCs are a suitable cell source for osteochondral composite reconstruction. Moreover, the bi-layered scaffold significantly enhanced cell proliferation compared to the cells seeded on

  9. Construction of a 3D rGO-collagen hybrid scaffold for enhancement of the neural differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Weibo; Wang, Shu; Yu, Xin; Qiu, Jichuan; Li, Jianhua; Tang, Wei; Li, Zhou; Mou, Xiaoning; Liu, Hong; Wang, Zhonglin

    2016-01-01

    The cell-material interface is one of the most important considerations in designing a high-performance tissue engineering scaffold because the surface of the scaffold can determine the fate of stem cells. A conductive surface is required for a scaffold to direct stem cells toward neural differentiation. However, most conductive polymers are toxic and not amenable to biological degradation, which restricts the design of neural tissue engineering scaffolds. In this study, we used a bioactive three-dimensional (3D) porcine acellular dermal matrix (PADM), which is mainly composed of type I collagen, as a basic material and successfully assembled a layer of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanosheets on the surface of the PADM channels to obtain a porous 3D, biodegradable, conductive and biocompatible PADM-rGO hybrid neural tissue engineering scaffold. Compared with the PADM scaffold, assembling the rGO into the scaffold did not induce a significant change in the microstructure but endowed the PADM-rGO hybrid scaffold with good conductivity. A comparison of the neural differentiation of rat bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) was performed by culturing the MSCs on PADM and PADM-rGO scaffolds in neuronal culture medium, followed by the determination of gene expression and immunofluorescence staining. The results of both the gene expression and protein level assessments suggest that the rGO-assembled PADM scaffold may promote the differentiation of MSCs into neuronal cells with higher protein and gene expression levels after 7 days under neural differentiation conditions. This study demonstrated that the PADM-rGO hybrid scaffold is a promising scaffold for neural tissue engineering; this scaffold can not only support the growth of MSCs at a high proliferation rate but also enhance the differentiation of MSCs into neural cells.The cell-material interface is one of the most important considerations in designing a high-performance tissue engineering scaffold

  10. Porous hydroxyapatite/gelatine scaffolds with ice-designed channel-like porosity for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Landi, Elena; Valentini, Federica; Tampieri, Anna

    2008-11-01

    A cryogenic process, including freeze-casting and drying has been performed to obtain hydroxyapatite (HA) scaffolds (approx. diameter 10 mm, height 20 mm) with completely lamellar morphology due to preferentially aligned channel-like pores. Changing the process parameters that influence the cold transmission efficiency from the bottom to the top of the poured HA slurry, lamellar ice crystals with different thickness grew throughout the samples. After sintering, scaffolds with porosity features nearly resembling the ice ones were obtained. The interconnection of pores and the ability of the scaffolds to be rapidly penetrated by synthetic body fluid has been proven. Biohybrid HA/gel composites were prepared, infiltrating HA lamellar scaffolds (45-55 vol.% of porosity) with a 10wt.% solution of gelatine. Colouring genipine was used to cross-link gelatine and clearly show the distribution of the protein in the composite. The compressive mechanical properties of lamellar scaffolds improved with the addition of gelatine: the strength increased up to 5-6 times, while the elastic modulus and strain approximately doubled. The effectiveness of the cross-linkage has been preliminarily verified following scaffold degradation in synthetic body fluid. PMID:18579459

  11. A novel open-porous magnesium scaffold with controllable microstructures and properties for bone regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Meng-Qi; Wahafu, Tuerhongjiang; Jiang, Guo-Feng; Liu, Wei; Qiao, Yu-Qin; Peng, Xiao-Chun; Cheng, Tao; Zhang, Xian-Long; He, Guo; Liu, Xuan-Yong

    2016-04-01

    The traditional production methods of porous magnesium scaffolds are difficult to accurately control the pore morphologies and simultaneously obtain appropriate mechanical properties. In this work, two open-porous magnesium scaffolds with different pore size but in the nearly same porosity are successfully fabricated with high-purity Mg ingots through the titanium wire space holder (TWSH) method. The porosity and pore size can be easily, precisely and individually controlled, as well as the mechanical properties also can be regulated to be within the range of human cancellous bone by changing the orientation of pores without sacrifice the requisite porous structures. In vitro cell tests indicate that the scaffolds have good cytocompatibility and osteoblastic differentiation properties. In vivo findings demonstrate that both scaffolds exhibit acceptable inflammatory responses and can be almost fully degraded and replaced by newly formed bone. More importantly, under the same porosity, the scaffolds with larger pore size can promote early vascularization and up-regulate collagen type 1 and OPN expression, leading to higher bone mass and more mature bone formation. In conclusion, a new method is introduced to develop an open-porous magnesium scaffold with controllable microstructures and mechanical properties, which has great potential clinical application for bone reconstruction in the future.

  12. A novel open-porous magnesium scaffold with controllable microstructures and properties for bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Meng-qi; Wahafu, Tuerhongjiang; Jiang, Guo-feng; Liu, Wei; Qiao, Yu-qin; Peng, Xiao-chun; Cheng, Tao; Zhang, Xian-long; He, Guo; Liu, Xuan-yong

    2016-01-01

    The traditional production methods of porous magnesium scaffolds are difficult to accurately control the pore morphologies and simultaneously obtain appropriate mechanical properties. In this work, two open-porous magnesium scaffolds with different pore size but in the nearly same porosity are successfully fabricated with high-purity Mg ingots through the titanium wire space holder (TWSH) method. The porosity and pore size can be easily, precisely and individually controlled, as well as the mechanical properties also can be regulated to be within the range of human cancellous bone by changing the orientation of pores without sacrifice the requisite porous structures. In vitro cell tests indicate that the scaffolds have good cytocompatibility and osteoblastic differentiation properties. In vivo findings demonstrate that both scaffolds exhibit acceptable inflammatory responses and can be almost fully degraded and replaced by newly formed bone. More importantly, under the same porosity, the scaffolds with larger pore size can promote early vascularization and up-regulate collagen type 1 and OPN expression, leading to higher bone mass and more mature bone formation. In conclusion, a new method is introduced to develop an open-porous magnesium scaffold with controllable microstructures and mechanical properties, which has great potential clinical application for bone reconstruction in the future. PMID:27071777

  13. Material characterization of microsphere-based scaffolds with encapsulated raw materials.

    PubMed

    Sridharan, BanuPriya; Mohan, Neethu; Berkland, Cory J; Detamore, Michael S

    2016-06-01

    "Raw materials," or materials capable of serving both as building blocks and as signals, which are often but not always natural materials, are taking center stage in biomaterials for contemporary regenerative medicine. In osteochondral tissue engineering, a field leveraging the underlying bone to facilitate cartilage regeneration, common raw materials include chondroitin sulfate (CS) for cartilage and β-tricalcium phosphate (TCP) for bone. Building on our previous work with gradient scaffolds based on microspheres, here we delved deeper into the characterization of individual components. In the current study, the release of CS and TCP from poly(d,l-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microsphere-based scaffolds was evaluated over a time period of 4weeks. Raw material encapsulated groups were compared to 'blank' groups and evaluated for surface topology, molecular weight, and mechanical performance as a function of time. The CS group may have led to increased surface porosity, and the addition of CS improved the mechanical performance of the scaffold. The finding that CS was completely released into the surrounding media by 4weeks has a significant impact on future in vivo studies, given rapid bioavailability. The addition of TCP seemed to contribute to the rough external appearance of the scaffold. The current study provides an introduction to degradation patterns of homogenous raw material encapsulated scaffolds, providing characterization data to advance the field of microsphere-based scaffolds in tissue engineering. PMID:27040236

  14. Skeletal muscle regeneration via engineered tissue culture over electrospun nanofibrous chitosan/PVA scaffold.

    PubMed

    Kheradmandi, Mahsa; Vasheghani-Farahani, Ebrahim; Ghiaseddin, Ali; Ganji, Fariba

    2016-07-01

    Skeletal muscle tissue shows a remarkable potential in regeneration of injured tissue. However, in some of chronic and volumetric muscle damages, the native tissue is incapable to repair and remodeling the trauma. In the same condition, stem-cell therapy increased regeneration in situations of deficient muscle repair, but the major problem seems to be the lack of ability to attachment and survive of injected cells on the exact location. In this study, chitosan/poly(vinyl alcohol) nanofibrous scaffold was studied to promote cell attachment and provide mechanical support during regeneration. Scaffold was characterized using scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction, and tensile test. Degradation and swelling behavior of scaffold were studied for 20 days. The cell-scaffold interaction was characterized by MTT assay for 10 days and in vivo biocompatibility of scaffold in a rabbit model was evaluated. Results showed that cells had a good viability, adhesion, growth, and spread on the scaffold, which make this mat a desirable engineered muscular graft. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1720-1727, 2016. PMID:26945909

  15. Processing and characterization of porous structures from chitosan and starch for tissue engineering scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Nakamatsu, Javier; Torres, Fernando G; Troncoso, Omar P; Min-Lin, Yuan; Boccaccini, Aldo R

    2006-12-01

    Natural biodegradable polymers were processed by different techniques for the production of porous structures for tissue engineering scaffolds. Potato, corn, and sweet potato starches and chitosan, as well as blends of these, were characterized and used in the experiments. The techniques used to produce the porous structures included a novel solvent-exchange phase separation technique and the well-established thermally induced phase separation method. Characterization of the open pore structures was performed by measuring pore size distribution, density, and porosity of the samples. A wide range of pore structures ranging from 1 to 400 microm were obtained. The mechanisms of pore formation are discussed for starch and chitosan scaffolds. Pore morphology in starch scaffolds seemed to be determined by the initial freezing temperature/freezing rate, whereas in chitosan scaffolds the shape and size of pores may have been determined by the processing route used. The mechanical properties of the scaffolds were assessed by indentation tests, showing that the indentation collapse strength depends on the pore geometry and the material type. Bioactivity and degradation of the potential scaffolds were assessed by immersion in simulated body fluid. PMID:17154462

  16. Immobilization of alkaline phosphatase on microporous nanofibrous fibrin scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Osathanon, Thanaphum; Giachelli, Cecilia M; Somerman, Martha J

    2009-09-01

    Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) promotes bone formation by degrading inorganic pyrophosphate (PP(i)), an inhibitor of hydroxyapatite formation, and generating inorganic phosphate (P(i)), an inducer of hydroxyapatite formation. P(i) is a crucial molecule in differentiation and mineralization of osteoblasts. In this study, a method to immobilize ALP on fibrin scaffolds with tightly controllable pore size and pore interconnection was developed, and the biological properties of these scaffolds were characterized both in vitro and in vivo. Microporous, nanofibrous fibrin scaffolds (FS) were fabricated using a sphere-templating method. ALP was covalently immobilized on the fibrin scaffolds using 1-ethyl-3-(dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC). Scanning electron microscopic observation (SEM) showed that mineral was deposited on immobilized alkaline phosphatase fibrin scaffolds (immobilized ALP/FS) when incubated in medium supplemented with beta-glycerophosphate, suggesting that the immobilized ALP was active. Primary calvarial cells attached, spread and formed multiple layers on the surface of the scaffolds. Mineral deposition was also observed when calvarial cells were seeded on immobilized ALP/FS. Furthermore, cells seeded on immobilized ALP/FS exhibited higher osteoblast marker gene expression compared to control FS. Upon implantation in mouse calvarial defects, both the immobilized ALP/FS and FS alone treated group had higher bone volume in the defect compared to the empty defect control. Furthermore, bone formation in the immobilized ALP/FS treated group was statistically significant compared to FS alone group. However, the response was not robust. PMID:19501906

  17. Fabrication of electrospun poly (lactide-co-glycolide)-fibrin multiscale scaffold for myocardial regeneration in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sreerekha, Perumcherry Raman; Menon, Deepthy; Nair, Shantikumar V; Chennazhi, Krishna Prasad

    2013-04-01

    Myocardial tissue engineering is one of the most promising treatment strategies to restore heart function after a massive heart attack. The biomaterials, cells, and scaffold design play important roles in engineering of heart tissue. In this study, we have developed a fibrin-based multiscale electrospun composite scaffold for myocardial regeneration. Fibrin is the natural wound-healing matrix having angiogenic potential and comprehensively used for tissue engineering applications. It provides a natural environment for cell attachment, migration, and proliferation. Morphological, chemical, and mechanical characterization of the scaffolds was done by scanning electron microscopy, fibrin-specific phosphotungstic acid hematoxylin staining, and mechanical testing. The fiber diameters of fibrin nanofibers range from 50 to 300 nm and that of poly (lactide-co-glycolide) microfibers range from 2 to 4 μm, which mimics the structural hierarchy of native myocardial tissue. Our results indicate that this scaffold enhances the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into cardiomyocytes. The cardiac phenotype of the cells was confirmed by the presence of cardiac-specific proteins like α-sarcomeric actinin, troponin, tropomyosin, desmin, and atrial natriuretic peptide Estimation of D-Dimer in the culture supernatant for 2 weeks and analysis of scaffold for 3 weeks of in vitro culture of cardiomyocytes indicated the degradation of fibrin and presence of newly synthesized collagen respectively. Our results demonstrate the promising potential of this scaffold for myocardial tissue engineering applications. PMID:23083104

  18. Electrospun composite scaffolds containing poly(octanediol-co-citrate) for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Prabhakaran, Molamma P; Nair, A Sreekumaran; Kai, Dan; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2012-07-01

    A biocompatible and elastomeric nanofibrous scaffold is electrospun from a blend of poly(1,8-octanediol-co-citrate) [POC] and poly(L-lactic acid) -co-poly-(3-caprolactone) [PLCL] for application as a bioengineered patch for cardiac tissue engineering. The characterization of the scaffolds was carried out by Fourier transform infra red spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and tensile measurement. The mechanical properties of the scaffolds are studied with regard to the percentage of POC incorporated with PLCL and the results of the study showed that the mechanical property and degradation behavior of the composites can be tuned with respect to the concentration of POC blended with PLCL. The composite scaffolds with POC: PLCL weight ratio of 40:60 [POC/PLCL4060] was found to have a tensile strength of 1.04 ± 0.11 MPa and Young's Modulus of 0.51 ± 0.10 MPa, comparable to the native cardiac tissue. The proliferation of cardiac myoblast cells on the electrospun POC/PLCL scaffolds was found to increase from Days 2 to 8, with the increasing concentration of POC in the composite. The morphology and cytoskeletal observation of the cells also demonstrated the biocompatibility of the POC containing scaffolds. Electrospun POC/PLCL4060 nanofibers are promising elastomeric substrates that might provide the necessary mechanical cues to cardiac muscle cells for regeneration of the heart. PMID:22328272

  19. Chitin Scaffolds in Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Jayakumar, Rangasamy; Chennazhi, Krishna Prasad; Srinivasan, Sowmya; Nair, Shantikumar V.; Furuike, Tetsuya; Tamura, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Tissue engineering/regeneration is based on the hypothesis that healthy stem/progenitor cells either recruited or delivered to an injured site, can eventually regenerate lost or damaged tissue. Most of the researchers working in tissue engineering and regenerative technology attempt to create tissue replacements by culturing cells onto synthetic porous three-dimensional polymeric scaffolds, which is currently regarded as an ideal approach to enhance functional tissue regeneration by creating and maintaining channels that facilitate progenitor cell migration, proliferation and differentiation. The requirements that must be satisfied by such scaffolds include providing a space with the proper size, shape and porosity for tissue development and permitting cells from the surrounding tissue to migrate into the matrix. Recently, chitin scaffolds have been widely used in tissue engineering due to their non-toxic, biodegradable and biocompatible nature. The advantage of chitin as a tissue engineering biomaterial lies in that it can be easily processed into gel and scaffold forms for a variety of biomedical applications. Moreover, chitin has been shown to enhance some biological activities such as immunological, antibacterial, drug delivery and have been shown to promote better healing at a faster rate and exhibit greater compatibility with humans. This review provides an overview of the current status of tissue engineering/regenerative medicine research using chitin scaffolds for bone, cartilage and wound healing applications. We also outline the key challenges in this field and the most likely directions for future development and we hope that this review will be helpful to the researchers working in the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:21673928

  20. Calcium silicate ceramic scaffolds toughened with hydroxyapatite whiskers for bone tissue engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Pei; Wei, Pingpin; Li, Pengjian; Gao, Chengde; Shuai, Cijun; Peng, Shuping

    2014-11-15

    Calcium silicate possessed excellent biocompatibility, bioactivity and degradability, while the high brittleness limited its application in load-bearing sites. Hydroxyapatite whiskers ranging from 0 to 30 wt.% were incorporated into the calcium silicate matrix to improve the strength and fracture resistance. Porous scaffolds were fabricated by selective laser sintering. The effects of hydroxyapatite whiskers on the mechanical properties and toughening mechanisms were investigated. The results showed that the scaffolds had a uniform and continuous inner network with the pore size ranging between 0.5 mm and 0.8 mm. The mechanical properties were enhanced with increasing hydroxyapatite whiskers, reached a maximum at 20 wt.% (compressive strength: 27.28 MPa, compressive Young's modulus: 156.2 MPa, flexural strength: 15.64 MPa and fracture toughness: 1.43 MPa·m{sup 1/2}) and then decreased by addition of more hydroxyapatite whiskers. The improvement of mechanical properties was due to whisker pull-out, crack deflection and crack bridging. Moreover, the degradation rate decreased with the increase of hydroxyapatite whisker content. A layer of bone-like apatite was formed on the scaffold surfaces after being soaked in simulated body fluid. Human osteoblast-like MG-63 cells spread well on the scaffolds and proliferated with increasing culture time. These findings suggested that the calcium silicate scaffolds reinforced with hydroxyapatite whiskers showed great potential for bone regeneration and tissue engineering applications. - Highlights: • HA whiskers were incorporated into CS to improve the properties. • The scaffolds were successfully fabricated by SLS. • Toughening mechanisms was whisker pull-out, crack deflection and bridging. • The scaffolds showed excellent apatite forming ability.

  1. Gold and Hydroxyapatite Nano-Composite Scaffolds for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: In Vitro Characterization.

    PubMed

    Smith, S E; White, R A; Grant, D A; Grant, S A

    2016-01-01

    Current anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) graft replacement materials often fail due to the lack of biological integration. While many newly developed extracellular matrix based scaffolds show good biocompatibility they often do not entice cellular remodeling and the rebuilding of a functional ligament. We have proposed the conjugation of gold nanoparticles (AuNP) and hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (nano-HAp) to acellular tissue to enhance cell attachment and proliferation while maintaining an improved degradation resistance and open microstructure. We are the first to investigate the double conjugation of AuNP and nano-HAp onto decellularized tissue to improve the tissue remodeling response. Decellularized porcine diaphragm was crosslinked with two types of nano-HAp and amine-functionalized AuNP with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethlaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) crosslinker. Scaffolds were characterized using electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and fibroblast assays. Results demonstrated that scaffolds with nano-HAp have increased thermal stability at low levels of crosslinking. The open microstructure of the scaffold was not compromised allowing for cell migration while still providing increased degradation resistance. The addition of < 200 nm nano-HAp decreased cell viability compared to scaffolds without nanoparticles, but the addition of AuNP to scaffolds showed enhanced cell viability in the presence of < 200 nm nano-HAp. The addition of < 40 nm nano-HAp showed an increase in cell viability compared to scaffolds crosslinked without nanoparticles. It is concluded that attaching AuNP and < 40nm nano-HAp to extracellular matrices may improve overall properties. PMID:27398580

  2. Construction of a 3D rGO-collagen hybrid scaffold for enhancement of the neural differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Weibo; Wang, Shu; Yu, Xin; Qiu, Jichuan; Li, Jianhua; Tang, Wei; Li, Zhou; Mou, Xiaoning; Liu, Hong; Wang, Zhonglin

    2016-01-28

    The cell-material interface is one of the most important considerations in designing a high-performance tissue engineering scaffold because the surface of the scaffold can determine the fate of stem cells. A conductive surface is required for a scaffold to direct stem cells toward neural differentiation. However, most conductive polymers are toxic and not amenable to biological degradation, which restricts the design of neural tissue engineering scaffolds. In this study, we used a bioactive three-dimensional (3D) porcine acellular dermal matrix (PADM), which is mainly composed of type I collagen, as a basic material and successfully assembled a layer of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanosheets on the surface of the PADM channels to obtain a porous 3D, biodegradable, conductive and biocompatible PADM-rGO hybrid neural tissue engineering scaffold. Compared with the PADM scaffold, assembling the rGO into the scaffold did not induce a significant change in the microstructure but endowed the PADM-rGO hybrid scaffold with good conductivity. A comparison of the neural differentiation of rat bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) was performed by culturing the MSCs on PADM and PADM-rGO scaffolds in neuronal culture medium, followed by the determination of gene expression and immunofluorescence staining. The results of both the gene expression and protein level assessments suggest that the rGO-assembled PADM scaffold may promote the differentiation of MSCs into neuronal cells with higher protein and gene expression levels after 7 days under neural differentiation conditions. This study demonstrated that the PADM-rGO hybrid scaffold is a promising scaffold for neural tissue engineering; this scaffold can not only support the growth of MSCs at a high proliferation rate but also enhance the differentiation of MSCs into neural cells. PMID:26750302

  3. Biodegradable microfluidic scaffolds for tissue engineering from amino alcohol-based poly(ester amide) elastomers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jane; Bettinger, Christopher J; Langer, Robert S

    2010-01-01

    Biodegradable polymers with high mechanical strength, flexibility and optical transparency, optimal degradation properties and biocompatibility are critical to the success of tissue engineered devices and drug delivery systems. Most biodegradable polymers suffer from a short half-life due to rapid degradation upon implantation, exceedingly high stiffness, and limited ability to functionalize the surface with chemical moieties. This work describes the fabrication of microfluidic networks from poly(ester amide), poly(1,3-diamino-2-hydroxypropane-co-polyol sebacate) (APS), a recently developed biodegradable elastomeric polymer. Microfluidic scaffolds constructed from APS exhibit a much lower Young's modulus and a significantly longer degradation half-life than those of previously reported systems. The device is fabricated using a modified replica-molding technique, which is rapid, inexpensive, reproducible and scalable, making the approach ideal for both rapid prototyping and manufacturing of tissue engineering scaffolds. PMID:21220957

  4. Relevance of PEG in PLA-based blends for tissue engineering 3D-printed scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Serra, Tiziano; Ortiz-Hernandez, Monica; Engel, Elisabeth; Planell, Josep A; Navarro, Melba

    2014-05-01

    Achieving high quality 3D-printed structures requires establishing the right printing conditions. Finding processing conditions that satisfy both the fabrication process and the final required scaffold properties is crucial. This work stresses the importance of studying the outcome of the plasticizing effect of PEG on PLA-based blends used for the fabrication of 3D-direct-printed scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. For this, PLA/PEG blends with 5, 10 and 20% (w/w) of PEG and PLA/PEG/bioactive CaP glass composites were processed in the form of 3D rapid prototyping scaffolds. Surface analysis and differential scanning calorimetry revealed a rearrangement of polymer chains and a topography, wettability and elastic modulus increase of the studied surfaces as PEG was incorporated. Moreover, addition of 10 and 20% PEG led to non-uniform 3D structures with lower mechanical properties. In vitro degradation studies showed that the inclusion of PEG significantly accelerated the degradation rate of the material. Results indicated that the presence of PEG not only improves PLA processing but also leads to relevant surface, geometrical and structural changes including modulation of the degradation rate of PLA-based 3D printed scaffolds. PMID:24656352

  5. Mechanical enhancement of nanofibrous scaffolds through polyelectrolyte complexation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jia; Cai, Ning; Xu, Weixiu; Xue, Yanan; Wang, Zelong; Dai, Qin; Yu, Faquan

    2013-01-01

    Optimization of mechanical properties is required in applications of tissue-engineered scaffolds. In this study, a polyelectrolyte complexation approach is proposed to improve the mechanical properties of the nanofibrous scaffolds. Through an electrospun chitosan/gelatin (CG) model system, it is demonstrated that the storage modulus of CG nanofiber-based complex membranes is over 103-fold higher than that of neat chitosan or gelatin membranes. Further, an annealing process was found to promote the conjugation of the oppositely charged polymers and thus the tensile modulus of CG membranes is 1.9-fold elevated. When the molar ratio of aminoglucoside units in chitosan to carboxyl units in gelatin is 1:1, the complex nanofiber-based membranes (CG2) display the highest mechanical strength. In addition, the complex membranes reveal an excellent swelling capacity. By comparing the CG membranes electrospun with cast, it is deduced that the complexation is one of the main contributing factors to the improvement in mechanical properties. FTIR and DSC analyses confirm that more molecular interactions took place in the complexation. SEM observation clearly displays the electrospinnability of the complex. Therefore, polyelectrolyte complexation is an effective strategy for enhancing mechanical properties of nanofibrous scaffolds. These mechanically enhanced chitosan/gelatin nanofibrous membranes have wider applications than wound dressing.

  6. Effect of adipic dihydrazide modification on the performance of collagen/hyaluronic acid scaffold.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Xiao, Yumei; Jiang, Bo; Fan, Hongsong; Zhang, Xingdong

    2010-02-01

    Collagen and hydrazide-functionalized hyaluronic acid derivatives were hybridized by gelating and genipin crosslinking to form composite hydrogel. The study contributed to the understanding of the effects of adipic dihydrazide modification on the physicochemical and biological properties of the collagen/hyaluronic acid scaffold. The investigation included morphology observation, mechanical measurement, swelling evaluation, and collagenase degradation. The results revealed that the stability of composites was increased through adipic dihydrazide modification and genipin crosslinking. The improved biocompatibility and retention of hyaluronic acid made the composite material more favorable to chondrocytes growing, suggesting the prepared scaffold might be high potential for chondrogenesis. PMID:19810117

  7. Mechanical properties, biological behaviour and drug release capability of nano TiO2-HAp-Alginate composite scaffolds for potential application as bone implant material.

    PubMed

    Naik, Kshipra; Chandran, V Girish; Rajashekaran, Raghavan; Waigaonkar, Sachin; Kowshik, Meenal

    2016-09-01

    Nanocomposite scaffolds of TiO2 and hydroxyapatite nanoparticles with alginate as the binding agent were fabricated using the freeze drying technique. TiO2, hydroxyapatite and alginate were used in the ratio of 1:1:4. The scaffolds were characterized using X-ray diffraction, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The biocompatibility of the scaffolds was evaluated using cell adhesion and MTT assay on osteosarcoma (MG-63) cells. Scanning electron microscopy analysis revealed that cells adhered to the surface of the scaffolds with good spreading. The mechanical properties of the scaffolds were investigated using dynamic mechanical analysis. The swelling ability, porosity, in vitro degradation, and biomineralization of the scaffolds were also evaluated. The results indicated controlled swelling, limited degradation, and enhanced biomineralization. Further, drug delivery studies of the scaffolds using the chemotherapeutic drug methotrexate exhibited an ideal drug release profile. These scaffolds are proposed as potential candidates for bone tissue engineering and drug delivery applications. PMID:27485954

  8. Tailoring chitosan/collagen scaffolds for tissue engineering: Effect of composition and different crosslinking agents on scaffold properties.

    PubMed

    Martínez, A; Blanco, M D; Davidenko, N; Cameron, R E

    2015-11-01

    Chitosan/collagen (Chit/Col) blends have demonstrated great potential for use in tissue engineering (TE) applications. However, there exists a lack of detailed study on the influence of important design parameters (i.e, component ratio or crosslinking methods) on the essential properties of the scaffolds (morphology, mechanical stiffness, swelling, degradation and cytotoxicity). This work entailed a systematic study of these essential properties of three Chit/Col compositions, covering a wide range of component ratios and using different crosslinking methods. Our results showed the possibility of tailoring these properties by changing component ratios, since different interactions occurred between Chit/Col: samples with Chit-enriched compositions showed a hydrogen-bonding type complex (HC), whereas a self-crosslinking phenomenon was induced in Col-enriched scaffolds. Additionally, material and biological properties of the resultant matrices were further adjusted and tuned by changing crosslinking conditions. In such way, we obtained a wide range of scaffolds whose properties were tailored to meet specific needs of TE applications. PMID:26256388

  9. Bone regeneration in rat calvarial defects implanted with fibrous scaffolds composed of a mixture of silicate and borate bioactive glasses.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yifei; Huang, Wenhai; Rahaman, Mohamed N; Day, Delbert E

    2013-11-01

    Previous studies have evaluated the capacity of porous scaffolds composed of a single bioactive glass to regenerate bone. In the present study, scaffolds composed of a mixture of two different bioactive glasses (silicate 13-93 and borate 13-93B3) were created and evaluated for their response to osteogenic MLO-A5 cells in vitro and their capacity to regenerate bone in rat calvarial defects in vivo. The scaffolds, which have similar microstructures (porosity=58-67%) and contain 0, 25, 50 and 100 wt.% 13-93B3 glass, were fabricated by thermally bonding randomly oriented short fibers. The silicate 13-93 scaffolds showed a better capacity to support cell proliferation and alkaline phosphatase activity than the scaffolds containing borate 13-93B3 fibers. The amount of new bone formed in the defects implanted with the 13-93 scaffolds at 12 weeks was 31%, compared to values of 25, 17 and 20%, respectively, for the scaffolds containing 25, 50 and 100% 13-93B3 glass. The amount of new bone formed in the 13-93 scaffolds was significantly higher than in the scaffolds containing 50 and 100% 13-93B3 glass. While the 13-93 fibers were only partially converted to hydroxyapatite at 12 weeks, the 13-93B3 fibers were fully converted and formed a tubular morphology. Scaffolds composed of an optimized mixture of silicate and borate bioactive glasses could provide the requisite architecture to guide bone regeneration combined with a controllable degradation rate that could be beneficial for bone and tissue healing. PMID:23827095

  10. In vitro comparative study of two decellularization protocols in search of an optimal myocardial scaffold for recellularization

    PubMed Central

    Perea-Gil, Isaac; Uriarte, Juan J; Prat-Vidal, Cristina; Gálvez-Montón, Carolina; Roura, Santiago; Llucià-Valldeperas, Aida; Soler-Botija, Carolina; Farré, Ramon; Navajas, Daniel; Bayes-Genis, Antoni

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Selection of a biomaterial-based scaffold that mimics native myocardial extracellular matrix (ECM) architecture can facilitate functional cell attachment and differentiation. Although decellularized myocardial ECM accomplishes these premises, decellularization processes may variably distort or degrade ECM structure. Materials and methods. Two decellularization protocols (DP) were tested on porcine heart samples (epicardium, mid myocardium and endocardium). One protocol, DP1, was detergent-based (SDS and Triton X-100), followed by DNase I treatment. The other protocol, DP2, was focused in trypsin and acid with Triton X-100 treatments. Decellularized myocardial scaffolds were reseeded by embedding them in RAD16-I peptidic hydrogel with adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells (ATDPCs). Results. Both protocols yielded acellular myocardial scaffolds (~82% and ~94% DNA reduction for DP1 and DP2, respectively). Ultramicroscopic assessment of scaffolds was similar for both protocols and showed filamentous ECM with preserved fiber disposition and structure. DP1 resulted in more biodegradable scaffolds (P = 0.04). Atomic force microscopy revealed no substantial ECM stiffness changes post-decellularization compared to native tissue. The Young’s modulus did not differ between heart layers (P = 0.69) or decellularization protocols (P = 0.15). After one week, recellularized DP1 scaffolds contained higher cell density (236 ± 106 and 98 ± 56 cells/mm2 for recellularized DP1 and DP2 scaffolds, respectively; P = 0.04). ATDPCs in both DP1 and DP2 scaffolds expressed the endothelial marker isolectin B4, but only in the DP1 scaffold ATDPCs expressed the cardiac markers GATA4, connexin43 and cardiac troponin T. Conclusions. In our hands, DP1 produced myocardial scaffolds with higher cell repopulation and promotes ATDPCs expression of endothelial and cardiomyogenic markers. PMID:26045895

  11. Alimentary 'green' proteins as electrospun scaffolds for skin regenerative engineering.

    PubMed

    Lin, Leko; Perets, Anat; Har-el, Yah-el; Varma, Devika; Li, Mengyan; Lazarovici, Philip; Woerdeman, Dara L; Lelkes, Peter I

    2013-12-01

    As a potential alternative to currently available skin substitutes and wound dressings, we explored the use of bioactive scaffolds made of plant-derived proteins. We hypothesized that 'green' materials, derived from renewable and biodegradable natural sources, may confer bioactive properties to enhance wound healing and tissue regeneration. We optimized and characterized fibrous scaffolds electrospun from soy protein isolate (SPI) with addition of 0.05% poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) dissolved in 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol, and from corn zein dissolved in glacial acetic acid. Fibrous mats electrospun from either of these plant proteins remained intact without further cross-linking, possessing a skin-like pliability. Soy-derived scaffolds supported the adhesion and proliferation of cultured primary human dermal fibroblasts. Using targeted PCR arrays and qPCR validation, we found similar gene expression profiles of fibroblasts cultured for 2 and 24 h on SPI substrates and on collagen type I at both time points. On both substrates there was a pronounced time-dependent upregulation of several genes related to ECM deposition remodelling, including MMP-10, MMP-1, collagen VII, integrin-α2 and laminin-β3, indicating that both plant- and animal-derived materials induce similar responses from the cells after initial adhesion, degrading substrate proteins and depositing extracellular matrix in a 'normal' remodelling process. These results suggest that 'green' proteins, such as soy and zein, are promising as a platform for organotypic skin equivalent culture, as well as implantable scaffolds for skin regeneration. Future studies will determine specific mechanisms of their interaction with skin cells and their efficacy in wound-healing applications. PMID:22499248

  12. Development of a 3D polymer reinforced calcium phosphate cement scaffold for cranial bone tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alge, Daniel L.

    The repair of critical-sized cranial bone defects represents an important clinical challenge. The limitations of autografts and alloplastic materials make a bone tissue engineering strategy desirable, but success depends on the development of an appropriate scaffold. Key scaffold properties include biocompatibility, osteoconductivity, sufficient strength to maintain its structure, and resorbability. Furthermore, amenability to rapid prototyping fabrication methods is desirable, as these approaches offer precise control over scaffold architecture and have the potential for customization. While calcium phosphate cements meet many of these criteria due to their composition and their injectability, which can be leveraged for scaffold fabrication via indirect casting, their mechanical properties are a major limitation. Thus, the overall goal of this work was to develop a 3D polymer reinforced calcium phosphate cement scaffold for use in cranial bone tissue engineering. Dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) setting cements are of particular interest because of their excellent resorbability. We demonstrated for the first time that DCPD cement can be prepared from monocalcium phosphate monohydrate (MCPM)/hydroxyapatite (HA) mixtures. However, subsequent characterization revealed that MCPM/HA cements rapidly convert to HA during degradation, which is undesirable and led us to choose a more conventional formulation for scaffold fabrication. In addition, we developed a novel method for calcium phosphate cement reinforcement that is based on infiltrating a pre-set cement structure with a polymer, and then crosslinking the polymer in situ. Unlike prior methods of cement reinforcement, this method can be applied to the reinforcement of 3D scaffolds fabricated by indirect casting. Using our novel method, composites of poly(propylene fumarate) (PPF) reinforced DCPD were prepared and demonstrated as excellent candidate scaffold materials, as they had increased strength and ductility

  13. Laser solidification of injectable scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonov, E. N.; Bagratashvili, V. N.; Borschenko, I. A.; Khlebtsov, B. N.; Khlebtsov, N. G.; Minaeva, S. A.; Popov, V. K.; Popova, A. V.

    2012-09-01

    A novel laser sintering approach of polymer powder and surgical suture material within the cavities has been developed to fabricate biodegradable intra-cavity scaffolds. In the frameworks of such sintering approach, laser radiation is absorbed by the surface of the sintered materials only and cannot damage the surrounding tissue. Our experiments demonstrate the feasibility of fabricated solid intra-cavity polymer structures with a minimally invasive endoscopic technique. This novel approach looks very promising for engineering of spinal discs tissues.

  14. Engineered porous scaffolds for periprosthetic infection prevention.

    PubMed

    Iviglia, Giorgio; Cassinelli, Clara; Bollati, Daniele; Baino, Francesco; Torre, Elisa; Morra, Marco; Vitale-Brovarone, Chiara

    2016-11-01

    Periprosthetic infection is a consequence of implant insertion procedures and strategies for its prevention involve either an increase in the rate of new bone formation or the release of antibiotics such as vancomycin. In this work we combined both strategies and developed a novel, multifunctional three-dimensional porous scaffold that was produced using hydroxyapatite (HA) and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP), coupled with a pectin (PEC)-chitosan (CHIT) polyelectrolyte (PEI), and loaded with vancomycin (VCA). By this approach, a controlled vancomycin release was achieved and serial bacterial dilution test demonstrated that, after 1week, the engineered construct still inhibits the bacterial growth. Degradation tests show an excellent behavior in a physiological and acidic environment (<10% of mass loss). Furthermore, the PEI coating shows an anti-inflammatory response, and good cell proliferation and migration were demonstrated in vitro using osteoblast SAOS-2 cell line. This new engineered construct exhibits excellent properties both as an antibacterial material and as a stimulator of bone formation, which makes it a good candidate to contrast periprosthetic infection. PMID:27524071

  15. Ionically cross-linked alginate hydrogels as tissue engineering scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Catherine Kyleen

    Generation of living tissues through tissue engineering can be achieved via incorporation of cells into synthetic scaffolds designed to facilitate new tissue formation. Necessary characteristics of a scaffold include biocompatibility, high porosity with controllable pore size and interconnectivity, moldability, chemical and mechanical stability, and structural homogeneity. Hydrogels often possess many of the necessary characteristics and thus are favorable candidates for scaffolding. Alginate hydrogels are commonly made by ionically crosslinking with calcium ions from CaCl2 or CaSO4. These hydrogels are favored for their mild gel formation, however the gelation rate is rapid and uncontrollable (fast-gelation), resulting in varying crosslinking density throughout the gel. In this work, structurally homogeneous calcium alginate hydrogels were formed via a slow-gelation system that utilizes uniform mixing of CaCO3 with sodium alginate solution, and the addition of slowly hydrolyzing D-gluconic acid lactone to slowly release calcium ions for crosslinking. Homogeneity and mechanical properties of these hydrogels were shown to be superior to those of fast-gelled hydrogels. Gelation rate was controlled through the incorporation of CaSO4, and by varying total calcium content, polymer concentration and gelation temperature. Control over mechanical properties and diffusivity was demonstrated in the homogeneous hydrogels by adjusting compositional variables. Consistent control over solute diffusivity through gel discs reflected the structural homogeneity of the gels. To overcome the instability of ionically crosslinked gels in tissue culture medium, a method was developed to control the hydrogel dimensions by adjusting the ionic concentration of the medium. Stability of the hydrogels in this controlled environment was characterized through swelling experiments and mechanical testing. To provide for scaffold degradation and thereby promote tissue growth, alginate lyase was

  16. Hydrogels and scaffolds for immunomodulation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    For over two decades, immunologists and biomaterials scientists have co-existed in parallel world with the rationale of understanding the molecular profile of immune responses to vaccination, implantation, and treating incurable diseases. Much of the field of biomaterials-based immunotherapy has relied on evaluating model antigens such as chicken egg ovalbumin in mouse models but their relevance to humans has been point of much discussion. Nevertheless, such model antigens have provided important insights about the mechanisms of immune regulation and served as a proof-of-concept for plethora of biomaterials-based vaccines. After years of extensive development of numerous biomaterials for immunomodulation, it is only recently that an experimental scaffold vaccine implanted beneath the skin has begun to use the human model to study the immune responses to cancer vaccination by co-delivering patient-derived tumor lysates and immunomodulatory proteins. If successful, this scaffold vaccine will change the way we approached untreatable cancers, but more importantly, will allow a faster and more rational translation of therapeutic regimes to other cancers, chronic infections, and autoimmune diseases. Most materials reviews have focused on immunomodulatory adjuvants and micro-nano-particles. Here we provide an insight into emerging hydrogel and scaffold based immunomodulatory approaches that continue to demonstrate efficacy against immune associated diseases. PMID:25155610

  17. Scaffold Design for Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Polo-Corrales, Liliana; Latorre-Esteves, Magda; Ramirez-Vick, Jaime E.

    2014-01-01

    The use of bone grafts is the standard to treat skeletal fractures, or to replace and regenerate lost bone, as demonstrated by the large number of bone graft procedures performed worldwide. The most common of these is the autograft, however, its use can lead to complications such as pain, infection, scarring, blood loss, and donor-site morbidity. The alternative is allografts, but they lack the osteoactive capacity of autografts and carry the risk of carrying infectious agents or immune rejection. Other approaches, such as the bone graft substitutes, have focused on improving the efficacy of bone grafts or other scaffolds by incorporating bone progenitor cells and growth factors to stimulate cells. An ideal bone graft or scaffold should be made of biomaterials that imitate the structure and properties of natural bone ECM, include osteoprogenitor cells and provide all the necessary environmental cues found in natural bone. However, creating living tissue constructs that are structurally, functionally and mechanically comparable to the natural bone has been a challenge so far. This focus of this review is on the evolution of these scaffolds as bone graft substitutes in the process of recreating the bone tissue microenvironment, including biochemical and biophysical cues. PMID:24730250

  18. Hydrogels and scaffolds for immunomodulation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ankur; Peppas, Nicholas A

    2014-10-01

    For over two decades, immunologists and biomaterials scientists have co-existed in parallel world with the rationale of understanding the molecular profile of immune responses to vaccination, implantation, and treating incurable diseases. Much of the field of biomaterial-based immunotherapy has relied on evaluating model antigens such as chicken egg ovalbumin in mouse models but their relevance to humans has been point of much discussion. Nevertheless, such model antigens have provided important insights into the mechanisms of immune regulation and served as a proof-of-concept for plethora of biomaterial-based vaccines. After years of extensive development of numerous biomaterials for immunomodulation, it is only recently that an experimental scaffold vaccine implanted beneath the skin has begun to use the human model to study the immune responses to cancer vaccination by co-delivering patient-derived tumor lysates and immunomodulatory proteins. If successful, this scaffold vaccine will change the way we approached untreatable cancers, but more importantly, will allow a faster and more rational translation of therapeutic regimes to other cancers, chronic infections, and autoimmune diseases. Most materials reviews have focused on immunomodulatory adjuvants and micro-nano-particles. Here we provide an insight into emerging hydrogel and scaffold based immunomodulatory approaches that continue to demonstrate efficacy against immune associated diseases. PMID:25155610

  19. Histological evaluation of osteogenesis of 3D-printed poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) scaffolds in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Ge, Zigang; Tian, Xianfeng; Heng, Boon Chin; Fan, Victor; Yeo, Jin Fei; Cao, Tong

    2009-04-01

    Utilizing a suitable combination of lactide and glycolide in a copolymer would optimize the degradation rate of a scaffold upon implantation in situ. Moreover, 3D printing technology enables customizing the shape of the scaffold to biometric data from CT and MRI scans. A previous in vitro study has shown that novel 3D-printed poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) scaffolds had good biocompatibility and mechanical properties comparable with human cancellous bone, while they could support proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of osteoblasts. Based on the previous study, this study evaluated PLGA scaffolds for bone regeneration within a rabbit model. The scaffolds were implanted at two sites on the same animal, within the periosteum and within bi-cortical bone defects on the iliac crest. Subsequently, the efficacy of bone regeneration within the implanted scaffolds was evaluated at 4, 12 and 24 weeks post-surgery through histological analysis. In both the intra-periosteum and iliac bone defect models, the implanted scaffolds facilitated new bone tissue formation and maturation over the time course of 24 weeks, even though there was initially observed to be little tissue ingrowth within the scaffolds at 4 weeks post-surgery. Hence, the 3D-printed porous PLGA scaffolds investigated in this study displayed good biocompatibility and are osteoconductive in both the intra-periosteum and iliac bone defect models. PMID:19208943

  20. Effect of cryomilling times on the resultant properties of porous biodegradable poly(e-caprolactone)/poly(glycolic acid) scaffolds for articular cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Jonnalagadda, John B; Rivero, Iris V

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this research is to develop a parametric investigation of the fabrication of poly(e-caprolactone) (PCL)/poly(glycolic acid) (PGA) scaffolds to decipher the influence of cryomilling time on the scaffolds' resultant physical, morphological and mechanical characteristics. Scaffolds were fabricated via solid-state cryomilling to prepare a homogeneous blend along with conventional compression molding and porogen leaching yielding interconnected porous scaffolds. PCL/PGA scaffolds fabricated through this technique demonstrated high porosity at all cryomilling times. Morphological analysis revealed a co-continuous interconnected pore network. While mean pore size decreased, water uptake and compressive properties increased with increasing cryomilling times. Porous scaffolds cryomilled for 12min exhibited a mean pore size within the optimal range for tissue engineering and chondrocyte ingrowth. And the compressive modulus of scaffolds cryomilled for 12, 30 and 60min matched the compressive modulus of human articular cartilage. In addition, scaffolds exhibited water uptake, a key requirement in tissue engineering. A 60 day in vitro degradation study revealed mass loss starting from day 10 and increasing through day 60, while notable reduction in compressive properties was observed. The results indicated that cryomilling times affected the resultant properties of PCL/PGA scaffolds and will be interesting candidates for articular cartilage tissue engineering. PMID:25194523

  1. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of a novel collagen/cellulose nanocrystals scaffold for achieving the sustained release of basic fibroblast growth factor.

    PubMed

    Li, Weichang; Lan, Yong; Guo, Rui; Zhang, Yi; Xue, Wei; Zhang, Yuanming

    2015-01-01

    Tissue-engineered dermis is thought to be the best treatment for skin defects; however, slow vascularization of these biomaterial scaffolds limits their clinical application. Exogenous administration of angiogenic growth factors is highly desirable for tissue regeneration. In this study, biodegradable gelatin microspheres (GMs) containing basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) were fabricated and incorporated into a porous collagen/cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) scaffold, as a platform for long-term release and consequent angiogenic boosting. The physicochemical properties of these scaffolds were examined and the in vitro release pattern of bFGF from scaffolds was measured by ELISA. Collagen/CNCs scaffolds with and without bFGF-GMs were incubated with human umbilical vein endothelial cells for 1 week, results showed that the scaffolds with bFGF-GMs significantly augmented cell proliferation. Then, four different groups of scaffolds were implanted subcutaneously into Sprague-Dawley rats to study angiogenesis in vivo via macroscopic observation, and hematoxylin and eosin and immunohistochemical staining. The results suggested that the collagen/CNCs/bFGF-GMs scaffolds had a significantly higher number of newly formed and mature blood vessels, and the fastest degradation rate. This study demonstrated that collagen/CNCs/bFGF-GMs scaffolds have great potential in skin tissue engineering. PMID:25114196

  2. In vitro evaluation of the biological performance of macro/micro-porous silk fibroin and silk-nano calcium phosphate scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Yan, L-P; Oliveira, J M; Oliveira, A L; Reis, R L

    2015-05-01

    This study evaluates the biological performance of salt-leached macro/microporous silk scaffolds (S16) and silk-nano calcium phosphate scaffolds (SC16), both deriving from a 16 wt % aqueous SF solution. Enzymatic degradation results showed that the silk-based scaffolds presented desirable biostability, and the incorporation of calcium phosphate further improved the scaffolds' biostability. Human adipose tissue derived stromal cells (hASCs) were cultured onto the scaffolds in vitro. The Alamar blue assay and DNA content revealed that both scaffolds were non-cytotoxic and can support the viability and proliferation of the hASCs. Scanning electron microscopy observation demonstrated that the microporous structure was beneficial for the cell adhesion while the macroporous structure favored the cell migration and proliferation. The histological analysis displayed abundant extracellular matrix formed inside the scaffolds, leading to the significant increase of scaffolds' modulus. These results revealed that S16 and SC16 could be promising alternatives for cartilage and bone tissue engineering scaffolding applications, respectively. PMID:25164158

  3. Cell-scaffold interaction within engineered tissue.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haiping; Liu, Yuanyuan; Jiang, Zhenglong; Chen, Weihua; Yu, Yongzhe; Hu, Qingxi

    2014-05-01

    The structure of a tissue engineering scaffold plays an important role in modulating tissue growth. A novel gelatin-chitosan (Gel-Cs) scaffold with a unique structure produced by three-dimensional printing (3DP) technology combining with vacuum freeze-drying has been developed for tissue-engineering applications. The scaffold composed of overall construction, micro-pore, surface morphology, and effective mechanical property. Such a structure meets the essential design criteria of an ideal engineered scaffold. The favorable cell-matrix interaction supports the active biocompatibility of the structure. The structure is capable of supporting cell attachment and proliferation. Cells seeded into this structure tend to maintain phenotypic shape and secreted large amounts of extracellular matrix (ECM) and the cell growth decreased the mechanical properties of scaffold. This novel biodegradable scaffold has potential applications for tissue engineering based upon its unique structure, which acts to support cell growth. PMID:24631290

  4. Functionalized scaffolds to enhance tissue regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Baolin; Lei, Bo; Li, Peng; Ma, Peter X.

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering scaffolds play a vital role in regenerative medicine. It not only provides a temporary 3-dimensional support during tissue repair, but also regulates the cell behavior, such as cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. In this review, we summarize the development and trends of functional scaffolding biomaterials including electrically conducting hydrogels and nanocomposites of hydroxyapatite (HA) and bioactive glasses (BGs) with various biodegradable polymers. Furthermore, the progress on the fabrication of biomimetic nanofibrous scaffolds from conducting polymers and composites of HA and BG via electrospinning, deposition and thermally induced phase separation is discussed. Moreover, bioactive molecules and surface properties of scaffolds are very important during tissue repair. Bioactive molecule-releasing scaffolds and antimicrobial surface coatings for biomedical implants and scaffolds are also reviewed. PMID:25844177

  5. Investigation of thermal degradation with extrusion-based dispensing modules for 3D bioprinting technology.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyungseok; Yoo, James J; Kang, Hyun-Wook; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2016-03-01

    Recently, numerous three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting systems have been introduced for the artificial regeneration of tissues. Among them, the extrusion-based dispensing module is the most widely used because of the processability it gives various biomaterials. The module uses high forces and temperature to dispense materials through a micro-nozzle. Generally, the harsh conditions induce thermal degradation of the material in the dispensing procedure. The thermal degradation affects the properties of the materials, and the change of the properties should be carefully controlled, because it severely affects the regeneration of tissues. Therefore, in this research, the relationship between the dispensing module and the thermal degradation of material was investigated. Extrusion-based dispensing modules can be divided into the syringe type (ST) and filament type (FT) based on working principles. We prepared a poly lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) scaffold with the two methods at various time points. Then, the characteristics of the printed scaffolds were assessed by measuring molecular weight (M w), glass transition temperature (T g), in vitro degradation, compressive modulus, and cytocompatibility. The results showed that the PLGA scaffold with the FT dispensing module maintained its properties regardless of printing time points. In contrast, severe thermal degradation was observed in the scaffold group prepared by the ST dispensing module. Consequentially, it was obvious that the FT dispensing module was more suitable for producing scaffolds without severe thermal degradation. PMID:26844711

  6. Gelatin-poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) scaffolds with oriented pore channel architecture - From in vitro to in vivo testing.

    PubMed

    Thiem, A; Bagheri, M; Große-Siestrup, C; Zehbe, R

    2016-05-01

    A gelatin-poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid), PLGA, composite scaffold, featuring a highly oriented pore channel structure, was developed as a template for articular cartilage regeneration. As a design principle the composite scaffold was optimized to contain only medical grade educts and accordingly no chemical cross linking agents or other toxicological relevant substances or methods were used. Scaffolds were synthesized using a freeze structuring method combined with an electrochemical process followed by freeze-drying. Finally, cross linking was performed using dehydrothermal treatment, which was simultaneously used for sterilization purposes. These composite scaffolds were analyzed in regard to structural and biomechanical properties, and to their degradation behavior. Furthermore, cell culture performance was tested using chondrocytes originated from joint articular cartilage tissue from 6 to 10months old domestic pigs. Finally, the scaffolds were tested for tissue biocompatibility and their ability for tissue integration in a rat model. The scaffolds showed both excellent functional performance and high biocompatibility in vitro and in vivo. We expect that these gelatin-PLGA scaffolds can effectively support chondrogenesis in vivo demonstrating great potential for the use in cartilage defect treatment. PMID:26952462

  7. Four-order stiffness variation of laser-fabricated photopolymer biodegradable scaffolds by laser parameter modulation.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Balázs; Romano, Ilaria; Ceseracciu, Luca; Diaspro, Alberto; Brandi, Fernando; Beke, Szabolcs

    2015-10-01

    The effects of various fabrication parameters of our Mask Projection Excimer Laser StereoLithography (MPExSL) system were investigated. We demonstrate that laser parameters directly change the physical properties (stiffness, thermal degradation, and height/thickness) of the poly(propylene fumarate) (PFF) scaffold structures. The tested parameters were the number of pulses, fluence per pulse and laser repetition rate. We present a four-order tuning capability of MPExSL-fabricated structures' stiffness without altering the resin composition or using cumbersome post-treatment procedures. Thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry confirmed this tuning capability. Prototype-segmented scaffold designs are presented and analyzed to further expand the concept and exploit this in situ stiffness tuning capability of the scaffolds for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. PMID:26117734

  8. Injectable Polyurethane Composite Scaffolds Delay Wound Contraction and Support Cellular Infiltration and Remodeling in Rat Excisional Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Adolph, Elizabeth J.; Hafeman, Andrea E.; Davidson, Jeffrey M.; Nanney, Lillian B.; Guelcher, Scott A.

    2011-01-01

    Injectable scaffolds present compelling opportunities for wound repair and regeneration due to their ability to fill irregularly shaped defects and deliver biologics such as growth factors. In this study, we investigated the properties of injectable polyurethane biocomposite scaffolds and their application in cutaneous wound repair using a rat excisional model. The scaffolds have a minimal reaction exotherm and clinically relevant working and setting times. Moreover, the biocomposites have mechanical and thermal properties consistent with rubbery elastomers. In the rat excisional wound model, injection of settable biocomposite scaffolds stented the wounds at early time points, resulting in a regenerative rather than a scarring phenotype at later time points. Measurements of wound width and thickness revealed that the treated wounds were less contracted at day 7 compared to blank wounds. Analysis of cell proliferation and apoptosis showed that the scaffolds were biocompatible and supported tissue ingrowth. Myofibroblast formation and collagen fiber organization provided evidence that the scaffolds have a positive effect on extracellular matrix remodeling by disrupting the formation of an aligned matrix under elevated tension. In summary, we have developed an injectable biodegradable polyurethane biocomposite scaffold that enhances cutaneous wound healing in a rat model. PMID:22105887

  9. Cell–scaffold interaction within engineered tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Haiping; Liu, Yuanyuan Jiang, Zhenglong; Chen, Weihua; Yu, Yongzhe; Hu, Qingxi

    2014-05-01

    The structure of a tissue engineering scaffold plays an important role in modulating tissue growth. A novel gelatin–chitosan (Gel–Cs) scaffold with a unique structure produced by three-dimensional printing (3DP) technology combining with vacuum freeze-drying has been developed for tissue-engineering applications. The scaffold composed of overall construction, micro-pore, surface morphology, and effective mechanical property. Such a structure meets the essential design criteria of an ideal engineered scaffold. The favorable cell–matrix interaction supports the active biocompatibility of the structure. The structure is capable of supporting cell attachment and proliferation. Cells seeded into this structure tend to maintain phenotypic shape and secreted large amounts of extracellular matrix (ECM) and the cell growth decreased the mechanical properties of scaffold. This novel biodegradable scaffold has potential applications for tissue engineering based upon its unique structure, which acts to support cell growth. - Highlights: • The scaffold is not only for providing a surface for cell residence but also for determining cell phenotype and retaining structural integrity. • The mechanical property of scaffold can be affected by activities of cell. • The scaffold provides a microenvironment for cell attachment, growth, and migration.

  10. Recent advances in bone tissue engineering scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Susmita; Roy, Mangal; Bandyopadhyay, Amit

    2012-01-01

    Bone disorders are of significant concern due to increase in the median age of our population. Traditionally, bone grafts have been used to restore damaged bone. Synthetic biomaterials are now being used as bone graft substitutes. These biomaterials were initially selected for structural restoration based on their biomechanical properties. Later scaffolds were engineered to be bioactive or bioresorbable to enhance tissue growth. Now scaffolds are designed to induce bone formation and vascularization. These scaffolds are often porous, biodegradable materials that harbor different growth factors, drugs, genes or stem cells. In this review, we highlight recent advances in bone scaffolds and discuss aspects that still need to be improved. PMID:22939815

  11. Multifunctional chitosan/polyvinyl pyrrolidone/45S5 Bioglass® scaffolds for MC3T3-E1 cell stimulation and drug release.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qingqing; Li, Wei; Yu, Shanshan; Ma, Liwei; Jin, Dayong; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Liu, Yong

    2015-11-01

    Novel chitosan-polyvinyl pyrrolidone/45S5 Bioglass® (CS-PVP/BG) scaffolds were prepared via foam replication and chemical cross-linking techniques. The pristine BG, CS-PVP coated BG and genipin cross-linked CS-PVP/BG (G-CS-PVP/BG) scaffolds were synthesized and characterized in terms of chemical composition, physical structure and morphology respectively. Resistance to enzymatic degradation of the scaffold is improved significantly with the use of genipin cross-linked CS-PVP. The bio-effects of scaffolds on MC3T3-E1 osteoblast-like cells were evaluated by studying cell viability, adhesion and proliferation. The CCK-8 assay shows that cell viability on the resulting G-CS-PVP/BG scaffold is improved obviously after cross-linking of genipin. Cell skeleton images exhibit that well-stretched F-actin bundles are obtained on the G-CS-PVP/BG scaffold. SEM results present significant improvement on the cell adhesion and proliferation for cells cultured on the G-CS-PVP/BG scaffold. The drug release performance on the as-synthesized scaffold was studied in a phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution. Vancomycin is found to be released in burst fashion within 24h from the pristine BG scaffold, however, the release period from the G-CS-PVP/BG scaffold is enhanced to 7days, indicating improved drug release properties of the G-CS-PVP/BG scaffold. Our results suggest that the G-CS-PVP/BG scaffolds possess promising physicochemical properties, sustained drug release capability and good biocompatibility for MC3T3-E1 cells' proliferation and adhesion, suggesting their potential applications in areas such as MC3T3-E1 cell stimulation and bone tissue engineering. PMID:26249617

  12. Controllable degradation kinetics of POSS nanoparticle-integrated poly(ε-caprolactone urea)urethane elastomers for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Yildirimer, Lara; Buanz, Asma; Gaisford, Simon; Malins, Edward L; Remzi Becer, C; Moiemen, Naiem; Reynolds, Gary M; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2015-01-01

    Biodegradable elastomers are a popular choice for tissue engineering scaffolds, particularly in mechanically challenging settings (e.g. the skin). As the optimal rate of scaffold degradation depends on the tissue type to be regenerated, next-generation scaffolds must demonstrate tuneable degradation patterns. Previous investigations mainly focussed on the integration of more or less hydrolysable components to modulate degradation rates. In this study, however, the objective was to develop and synthesize a family of novel biodegradable polyurethanes (PUs) based on a poly(ε-caprolactone urea)urethane backbone integrating polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS-PCLU) with varying amounts of hard segments (24%, 28% and 33% (w/v)) in order to investigate the influence of hard segment chemistry on the degradation rate and profile. PUs lacking POSS nanoparticles served to prove the important function of POSS in maintaining the mechanical structures of the PU scaffolds before, during and after degradation. Mechanical testing of degraded samples revealed hard segment-dependent modulation of the materials' viscoelastic properties, which was attributable to (i) degradation-induced changes in the PU crystallinity and (ii) either the presence or absence of POSS. In conclusion, this study presents a facile method of controlling degradation profiles of PU scaffolds used in tissue engineering applications. PMID:26463421

  13. Controllable degradation kinetics of POSS nanoparticle-integrated poly(ε-caprolactone urea)urethane elastomers for tissue engineering applications

    PubMed Central

    Yildirimer, Lara; Buanz, Asma; Gaisford, Simon; Malins, Edward L.; Remzi Becer, C.; Moiemen, Naiem; Reynolds, Gary M.; Seifalian, Alexander M.

    2015-01-01

    Biodegradable elastomers are a popular choice for tissue engineering scaffolds, particularly in mechanically challenging settings (e.g. the skin). As the optimal rate of scaffold degradation depends on the tissue type to be regenerated, next-generation scaffolds must demonstrate tuneable degradation patterns. Previous investigations mainly focussed on the integration of more or less hydrolysable components to modulate degradation rates. In this study, however, the objective was to develop and synthesize a family of novel biodegradable polyurethanes (PUs) based on a poly(ε-caprolactone urea)urethane backbone integrating polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS-PCLU) with varying amounts of hard segments (24%, 28% and 33% (w/v)) in order to investigate the influence of hard segment chemistry on the degradation rate and profile. PUs lacking POSS nanoparticles served to prove the important function of POSS in maintaining the mechanical structures of the PU scaffolds before, during and after degradation. Mechanical testing of degraded samples revealed hard segment-dependent modulation of the materials’ viscoelastic properties, which was attributable to (i) degradation-induced changes in the PU crystallinity and (ii) either the presence or absence of POSS. In conclusion, this study presents a facile method of controlling degradation profiles of PU scaffolds used in tissue engineering applications. PMID:26463421

  14. EDC/NHS cross-linked collagen foams as scaffolds for artificial corneal stroma.

    PubMed

    Vrana, N E; Builles, N; Kocak, H; Gulay, P; Justin, V; Malbouyres, M; Ruggiero, F; Damour, O; Hasirci, V

    2007-01-01

    In this study, a highly porous collagen-based biodegradable scaffold was developed as an alternative to synthetic, non-degradable corneal implants. The developed method involved lyophilization and subsequent stabilization through N-ethyl-N'-[3-dimethylaminopropyl] carbodiimide/N-hydroxy succinimide (EDC/NHS) cross-linking to yield longer lasting, porous scaffolds with a thickness similar to that of native cornea (500 microm). For collagen-based scaffolds, cross-linking is essential; however, it has direct effects on physical characteristics crucial for optimum cell behavior. Hence, the effect of cross-linking was studied by examining the influence of cross-linking on pore size distribution, bulk porosity and average pore size. After seeding the foam with human corneal keratocytes, cell proliferation, cell penetration into the scaffold and ECM production within the scaffold were studied. After a month of culture microscopical and immunohistochemical examinations showed that the foam structure did not undergo any significant loss of integrity, and the human corneal keratocytes populated the scaffold with cells migrating both longitudinally and laterally, and secreted some of the main constituents of the corneal ECM, namely collagen types I, V and VI. The foams had a layer of lower porosity (skin layer) both at the top and the bottom. Foams had an optimal porosity (93.6%), average pore size (67.7 microm), and chemistry for cell attachment and proliferation. They also had a sufficiently rapid degradation rate (73.6+/-1.1% in 4 weeks) and could be produced at a thickness close to that of the natural corneal stroma. Cells were seeded at the top surface of the foams and their numbers there was higher than the rest, basically due to the presence of the skin layer. This is considered to be an advantage when epithelial cells need to be seeded for the construction of hemi or full thickness cornea. PMID:17988518

  15. Hydrolytic and oxidative degradation of electrospun supramolecular biomaterials: In vitro degradation pathways.

    PubMed

    Brugmans, M C P; Sӧntjens, S H M; Cox, M A J; Nandakumar, A; Bosman, A W; Mes, T; Janssen, H M; Bouten, C V C; Baaijens, F P T; Driessen-Mol, A

    2015-11-01

    The emerging field of in situ tissue engineering (TE) of load bearing tissues places high demands on the implanted scaffolds, as these scaffolds should provide mechanical stability immediately upon implantation. The new class of synthetic supramolecular biomaterial polymers, which contain non-covalent interactions between the polymer chains, thereby forming complex 3D structures by self assembly. Here, we have aimed to map the degradation characteristics of promising (supramolecular) materials, by using a combination of in vitro tests. The selected biomaterials were all polycaprolactones (PCLs), either conventional and unmodified PCL, or PCL with supramolecular hydrogen bonding moieties (either 2-ureido-[1H]-pyrimidin-4-one or bis-urea units) incorporated into the backbone. As these materials are elastomeric, they are suitable candidates for cardiovascular TE applications. Electrospun scaffold strips of these materials were incubated with solutions containing enzymes that catalyze hydrolysis, or solutions containing oxidative species. At several time points, chemical, morphological, and mechanical properties were investigated. It was demonstrated that conventional and supramolecular PCL-based polymers respond differently to enzyme-accelerated hydrolytic or oxidative degradation, depending on the morphological and chemical composition of the material. Conventional PCL is more prone to hydrolytic enzymatic degradation as compared to the investigated supramolecular materials, while, in contrast, the latter materials are more susceptible to oxidative degradation. Given the observed degradation pathways of the examined materials, we are able to tailor degradation characteristics by combining selected PCL backbones with additional supramolecular moieties. The presented combination of in vitro test methods can be employed to screen, limit, and select biomaterials for pre-clinical in vivo studies targeted to different clinical applications. PMID:26316031

  16. Repair of articular osteochondral defects of the knee joint using a composite lamellar scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Y. M.; Yu, Q. S.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The major problem with repair of an articular cartilage injury is the extensive difference in the structure and function of regenerated, compared with normal cartilage. Our work investigates the feasibility of repairing articular osteochondral defects in the canine knee joint using a composite lamellar scaffold of nano-ß-tricalcium phosphate (ß-TCP)/collagen (col) I and II with bone marrow stromal stem cells (BMSCs) and assesses its biological compatibility. Methods The bone–cartilage scaffold was prepared as a laminated composite, using hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (nano-HAP)/collagen I/copolymer of polylactic acid–hydroxyacetic acid as the bony scaffold, and sodium hyaluronate/poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) as the cartilaginous scaffold. Ten-to 12-month-old hybrid canines were randomly divided into an experimental group and a control group. BMSCs were obtained from the iliac crest of each animal, and only those of the third generation were used in experiments. An articular osteochondral defect was created in the right knee of dogs in both groups. Those in the experimental group were treated by implanting the composites consisting of the lamellar scaffold of ß-TCP/col I/col II/BMSCs. Those in the control group were left untreated. Results After 12 weeks of implantation, defects in the experimental group were filled with white semi-translucent tissue, protruding slightly over the peripheral cartilage surface. After 24 weeks, the defect space in the experimental group was filled with new cartilage tissues, finely integrated into surrounding normal cartilage. The lamellar scaffold of ß-TCP/col I/col II was gradually degraded and absorbed, while new cartilage tissue formed. In the control group, the defects were not repaired. Conclusion This method can be used as a suitable scaffold material for the tissue-engineered repair of articular cartilage defects. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2015;4:56–64 PMID:25837672

  17. The Potential of Encapsulating “Raw Materials” in 3D Osteochondral Gradient Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Neethu; Gupta, Vineet; Sridharan, BanuPriya; Sutherland, Amanda; Detamore, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Scaffolds with continuous gradients in material composition and bioactive signals enable a smooth transition of properties at the interface. Components like chondroitin sulfate (CS) and bioactive glass (BG) in 3D scaffolds may serve as “raw materials” for synthesis of new extracellular matrix (ECM), and may have the potential to completely or partially replace expensive growth factors. We hypothesized that scaffolds with gradients of ECM components would enable superior performance of engineered constructs. Raw material encapsulation altered the appearance, structure, porosity, and degradation of the scaffolds. They allowed the scaffolds to better retain their 3D structure during culture and provided a buffering effect to the cells in culture. Following seeding of rat mesenchymal stem cells, there were several instances where glycosaminoglycan (GAG), collagen, or calcium contents were higher with the scaffolds containing raw materials (CS or BG) than with those containing transforming growth factor (TGF)-β3 or bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2. It was also noteworthy that a combination of both CS and TGF-β3 increased the secretion of collagen type II. Moreover, cells seeded in scaffolds containing opposing gradients of CS/TGF-β3 and BG/BMP-2 produced clear regional variations in the secretion of tissue-specific ECM. The study demonstrated raw materials have the potential to create a favorable microenvironment for cells; they can significantly enhance the synthesis of certain extracellular matrix (ECM) components when compared to expensive growth factors; either alone or in combination with growth factors they can enhance the secretion of tissue specific matrix proteins. Raw materials are promising candidates that can be used to either replace or be used in combination with growth factors. Success with raw materials in lieu of growth factors could have profound implications in terms of lower cost and faster regulatory approval for more rapid translation of

  18. A Transient Cell-Shielding Method for Viable MSC Delivery within Hydrophobic Scaffolds Polymerized In Situ

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ruijing; Ward, Catherine L.; Davidson, Jeffrey M.; Duvall, Craig L.; Wenke, Joseph C.

    2015-01-01

    Cell-based therapies have emerged as promising approaches for regenerative medicine. Hydrophobic poly(ester urethane)s offer the advantages of robust mechanical properties, cell attachment without the use of peptides, and controlled degradation by oxidative and hydrolytic mechanisms. However, the application of injectable hydrophobic polymers to cell delivery is limited by the challenges of protecting cells from reaction products and creating a macroporous architecture post-cure. We designed injectable carriers for cell delivery derived from reactive, hydrophobic polyisocyanate and polyester triol precursors. To overcome cell death caused by reaction products from in situ polymerization, we encapsulated bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMSCs) in fast-degrading, oxidized alginate beads prior to mixing with the hydrophobic precursors. Cells survived the polymerization at >70% viability, and rapid dissolution of oxidized alginate beads after the scaffold cured created interconnected macropores that facilitated cellular adhesion to the scaffold in vitro. Applying this injectable system to deliver BMSCs to rat excisional skin wounds showed that the scaffolds supported survival of transplanted cells and infiltration of host cells, which improved new tissue formation compared to both implanted, pre-formed scaffolds seeded with cells and acellular controls. Our design is the first to enable injectable delivery of settable, hydrophobic scaffolds where cell encapsulation provides a mechanism for both temporary cytoprotection during polymerization and rapid formation of macropores post-polymerization. This simple approach provides potential advantages for cell delivery relative to hydrogel technologies, which have weaker mechanical properties and require incorporation of peptides to achieve cell adhesion and degradability. PMID:25907036

  19. Design and analysis of tissue engineering scaffolds that mimic soft tissue mechanical anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Courtney, Todd; Sacks, Michael S; Stankus, John; Guan, Jianjun; Wagner, William R

    2006-07-01

    Tissue engineered constructs must exhibit tissue-like functional properties, including mechanical behavior comparable to the native tissues they are intended to replace. Moreover, the ability to reversibly undergo large strains can help to promote and guide tissue growth. Electrospun poly (ester urethane) ureas (ES-PEUU) are elastomeric and allow for the control of fiber diameter, porosity, and degradation rate. ES-PEUU scaffolds can be fabricated to have a well-aligned fiber network, which is important for applications involving mechanically anisotropic soft tissues. We have developed ES-PEUU scaffolds under variable speed conditions and modeled the effects of fiber orientation on the macro-mechanical properties of the scaffold. To illustrate the ability to simulate native tissue mechanical behavior, we demonstrated that the high velocity spun scaffolds exhibited highly anisotropic mechanical properties closely resembling the native pulmonary heart valve leaflet. Moreover, use of the present fiber-level structural constitutive model allows for the determination of electrospinning conditions to tailor ES-PEUU scaffolds for specific soft tissue applications. The results of this study will help to provide the basis for rationally designed mechanically anisotropic soft tissue engineered implants. PMID:16545867

  20. Indirect three-dimensional printing: A method for fabricating polyurethane-urea based cardiac scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Córdova, R; Mathew, D A; Balint, R; Carrillo-Escalante, H J; Cervantes-Uc, J M; Hidalgo-Bastida, L A; Hernández-Sánchez, F

    2016-08-01

    Biomaterial scaffolds are a key part of cardiac tissue engineering therapies. The group has recently synthesized a novel polycaprolactone based polyurethane-urea copolymer that showed improved mechanical properties compared with its previously published counterparts. The aim of this study was to explore whether indirect three-dimensional (3D) printing could provide a means to fabricate this novel, biodegradable polymer into a scaffold suitable for cardiac tissue engineering. Indirect 3D printing was carried out through printing water dissolvable poly(vinyl alcohol) porogens in three different sizes based on a wood-stack model, into which a polyurethane-urea solution was pressure injected. The porogens were removed, leading to soft polyurethane-urea scaffolds with regular tubular pores. The scaffolds were characterized for their compressive and tensile mechanical behavior; and their degradation was monitored for 12 months under simulated physiological conditions. Their compatibility with cardiac myocytes and performance in novel cardiac engineering-related techniques, such as aggregate seeding and bi-directional perfusion, was also assessed. The scaffolds were found to have mechanical properties similar to cardiac tissue, and good biocompatibility with cardiac myocytes. Furthermore, the incorporated cells preserved their phenotype with no signs of de-differentiation. The constructs worked well in perfusion experiments, showing enhanced seeding efficiency. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1912-1921, 2016. PMID:26991636

  1. Graphene-based electroresponsive scaffolds as polymeric implants for on-demand drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Servant, Ania; Leon, Veronica; Jasim, Dhifaf; Methven, Laura; Limousin, Patricia; Fernandez-Pacheco, Ester Vazquez; Prato, Maurizio; Kostarelos, Kostas

    2014-08-01

    Stimuli-responsive biomaterials have attracted significant attention in the field of polymeric implants designed as active scaffolds for on-demand drug delivery. Conventional porous scaffolds suffer from drawbacks such as molecular diffusion and material degradation, allowing in most cases only a zero-order drug release profile. The possibility of using external stimulation to trigger drug release is particularly enticing. In this paper, the fabrication of previously unreported graphene hydrogel hybrid electro-active scaffolds capable of controlled small molecule release is presented. Pristine ball-milled graphene sheets are incorporated into a three dimensional macroporous hydrogel matrix to obtain hybrid gels with enhanced mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties. These electroactive scaffolds demonstrate controlled drug release in a pulsatile fashion upon the ON/OFF application of low electrical voltages, at low graphene concentrations (0.2 mg mL(-1) ) and by maintaining their structural integrity. Moreover, the in vivo performance of these electroactive scaffolds to release drug molecules without any "resistive heating" is demonstrated. In this study, an illustration of how the heat dissipating properties of graphene can provide significant and previously unreported advantages in the design of electroresponsive hydrogels, able to maintain optimal functionality by overcoming adverse effects due to unwanted heating, is offered. PMID:24799416

  2. Genipin-crosslinked chitosan scaffolds and its efficacy in releasing anti-inflammatory medicine.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsin-Yi; Yeh, Chih-Tsung

    2012-01-01

    Controlled release carriers are often made into microspheres or tablets. Systematic and quantitative characterization of porous tissue engineered scaffolds as release carriers have not been done. Chitosan and chitosan crosslinked with various concentrations of genipin were made into porous tissue engineered scaffolds. Their thermal and enzymatic stabilities, hydrophobicities, porous structures, swelling and release properties, and compressional moduli were measured. The effects of scaffolds loaded with pentoxifylline (PTX) in suppressing inflammatory reactions in vitro were quantified.Fourier Transform Infrared spectra showed new bond formation after crosslinking chitosan with genipin. As genipin increased from 0.01% to 0.1%, the crosslinked chitosan scaffolds swelled 0.5% to 1.8% less, had 1.9-5% decrease in PTX release efficiencies, became less wettable, were less favorable for initial cell attachment, had 4-20% increase in Young's modulus and were more resistant to enzymatic degradation. In vitro tests showed that when PTX was released more slowly from crosslinked scaffolds, PTX became more effective in suppressing macrophage cells from releasing IL-6 and TNF-α. PMID:23023149

  3. Exogenous phytoestrogenic molecule icaritin incorporated into a porous scaffold for enhancing bone defect repair.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin-Luan; Xie, Xin-Hui; Zhang, Ge; Chen, Shi-Hui; Yao, Dong; He, Kai; Wang, Xiao-Hong; Yao, Xin-Sheng; Leng, Yang; Fung, Kwok-Pui; Leung, Kwok-Sui; Qin, Ling

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to develop a bioactive scaffold to enhance bone defect repair in steroid-associated osteonecrosis (SAON). Icaritin, a metabolite of the herb Epimedium, has been identified as an angiogenic and osteogenic phytomolecule. Icaritin was homogenized into poly lactic-co-glycolic acid/tricalcium phosphate (PLGA/TCP) to form an icaritin-releasing porous composite scaffold (PLGA/TCP/icaritin) by fine-spinning technology. In vitro, high performance liquid chromatography was used to determine the release of icaritin during degradation of PLGA/TCP/icaritin. The osteogenic effects of PLGA/TCP/icaritin were evaluated using rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs). In vivo, the osteogenic effect of PLGA/TCP/icaritin was determined within a bone tunnel after core decompression in SAON rabbits and angiography within scaffolds was examined in rabbit muscle pouch model. In vitro study confirmed the sustainable release of icaritin from PLGA/TCP/icaritin with the bioactive scaffold promoting the proliferation and osteoblastic differentiation of rat BMSCs. In vivo study showed that PLGA/TCP/icaritin significantly promoted new bone formation within the bone defect after core decompression in SAON rabbits and enhanced neovascularization in the rabbit muscle pouch experiment. In conclusion, PLGA/TCP/icaritin is an innovative local delivery system that demonstrates sustainable release of osteogenic phytomolecule icaritin enhancing bone repair in an SAON rabbit model. The supplement of scaffold materials with bioactive phytomolecule(s) might improve treatment efficiency in challenging orthopedic conditions. PMID:22807243

  4. Biomimetic Concealing of PLGA Microspheres in a 3D Scaffold to Prevent Macrophage Uptake.

    PubMed

    Minardi, Silvia; Corradetti, Bruna; Taraballi, Francesca; Sandri, Monica; Martinez, Jonathan O; Powell, Sebastian T; Tampieri, Anna; Weiner, Bradley K; Tasciotti, Ennio

    2016-03-01

    Scaffolds functionalized with delivery systems for the release of growth factors is a robust strategy to enhance tissue regeneration. However, after implantation, macrophages infiltrate the scaffold, eventually initiating the degradation and clearance of the delivery systems. Herein, it is hypothesized that fully embedding the poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide acid) microspheres (MS) in a highly structured collagen-based scaffold (concealing) can prevent their detection, preserving the integrity of the payload. Confocal laser microscopy reveals that non-embedded MS are easily internalized; when concealed, J774 and bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) cannot detect them. This is further demonstrated by flow cytometry, as a tenfold decrease is found in the number of MS engulfed by the cells, suggesting that collagen can cloak the MS. This correlates with the amount of nitric oxide and tumor necrosis factor-α produced by J774 and BMDM in response to the concealed MS, comparable to that found for non-functionalized collagen scaffolds. Finally, the release kinetics of a reporter protein is preserved in the presence of macrophages, only when MS are concealed. The data provide detailed strategies for fabricating three dimensional (3D) biomimetic scaffolds able to conceal delivery systems and preserve the therapeutic molecules for release. PMID:26797709

  5. Engineering of a polymer layered bio-hybrid heart valve scaffold.

    PubMed

    Jahnavi, S; Kumary, T V; Bhuvaneshwar, G S; Natarajan, T S; Verma, R S

    2015-06-01

    Current treatment strategy for end stage valve disease involves either valvular repair or replacement with homograft/mechanical/bioprosthetic valves. In cases of recurrent stenosis/ regurgitation, valve replacement is preferred choice of treatment over valvular repair. Currently available mechanical valves primarily provide durability whereas bioprosthetic valves have superior tissue compatibility but both lack remodelling and regenerative properties making their utility limited in paediatric patients. With advances in tissue engineering, attempts have been made to fabricate valves with regenerative potential using various polymers, decellularized tissues and hybrid scaffolds. To engineer an ideal heart valve, decellularized bovine pericardium extracellular matrix (DBPECM) is an attractive biocompatible scaffold but has weak mechanical properties and rapid degradation. However, DBPECM can be modified with synthetic polymers to enhance its mechanical properties. In this study, we developed a Bio-Hybrid scaffold with non-cross linked DBPECM in its native structure coated with a layer of Polycaprolactone-Chitosan (PCL-CH) nanofibers that displayed superior mechanical properties. Surface and functional studies demonstrated integration of PCL-CH to the DBPECM with enhanced bio and hemocompatibility. This engineered Bio-Hybrid scaffold exhibited most of the physical, biochemical and functional properties of the native valve that makes it an ideal scaffold for fabrication of cardiac valve with regenerative potential. PMID:25842134

  6. Controlling ion release from bioactive glass foam scaffolds with antibacterial properties.

    PubMed

    Jones, Julian R; Ehrenfried, Lisa M; Saravanapavan, Priya; Hench, Larry L

    2006-11-01

    Bioactive glass scaffolds have been produced, which meet many of the criteria for an ideal scaffold for bone tissue engineering applications, by foaming sol-gel derived bioactive glasses. The scaffolds have a hierarchical pore structure that is very similar to that of cancellous bone. The degradation products of bioactive glasses have been found to stimulate the genes in osteoblasts. This effect has been found to be dose dependent. The addition of silver ions to bioactive glasses has also been investigated to produce glasses with bactericidal properties. This paper discusses how changes in the hierarchical pore structure affect the dissolution of the glass and therefore its bioactivity and rate of ion delivery and demonstrates that silver containing bioactive glass foam scaffolds can be synthesised. It was found that the rate of release of Si and Ca ions was more rapid for pore structures with a larger modal pore diameter, although the effect of tailoring the textural porosity on the rate of ion release was more pronounced. Bioactive glass scaffolds, containing 2 mol% silver, released silver ions at a rate that was similar to that which has previously been found to be bactericidal but not high enough to be cytotoxic to bone cells. PMID:17122909

  7. Fabrication and evaluation of a sustained-release chitosan-based scaffold embedded with PLGA microspheres.

    PubMed

    Song, Kedong; Liu, Yingchao; Macedo, Hugo M; Jiang, Lili; Li, Chao; Mei, Guanyu; Liu, Tianqing

    2013-04-01

    Nutrient depletion within three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds is one of the major hurdles in the use of this technology to grow cells for applications in tissue engineering. In order to help in addressing it, we herein propose to use the controlled release of encapsulated nutrients within polymer microspheres into chitosan-based 3D scaffolds, wherein the microspheres are embedded. This method has allowed maintaining a stable concentration of nutrients within the scaffolds over the long term. The polymer microspheres were prepared using multiple emulsions (w/o/w), in which bovine serum albumin (BSA) and poly (lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) were regarded as the protein pattern and the exoperidium material, respectively. These were then mixed with a chitosan solution in order to form the scaffolds by cryo-desiccation. The release of BSA, entrapped within the embedded microspheres, was monitored with time using a BCA kit. The morphology and structure of the PLGA microspheres containing BSA before and after embedding within the scaffold were observed under a scanning electron microscope (SEM). These had a round shape with diameters in the range of 27-55 μm, whereas the chitosan-based scaffolds had a uniform porous structure with the microspheres uniformly dispersed within their 3D structure and without any morphological change. In addition, the porosity, water absorption and degradation rate at 37 °C in an aqueous environment of 1% chitosan-based scaffolds were (92.99±2.51) %, (89.66±0.66) % and (73.77±3.21) %, respectively. The studies of BSA release from the embedded microspheres have shown a sustained and cumulative tendency with little initial burst, with (20.24±0.83) % of the initial amount released after 168 h (an average rate of 0.12%/h). The protein concentration within the chitosan-based scaffolds after 168 h was found to be (11.44±1.81)×10(-2) mg/mL. This novel chitosan-based scaffold embedded with PLGA microspheres has proven to be a promising technique

  8. Characterization of Silk Fibroin/Chitosan 3D Porous Scaffold and In Vitro Cytology

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Shuguang; Liu, Lei; Shi, Yong; Qiu, Junqi; Fang, Wei; Rong, Mingdeng; Guo, Zehong; Gao, Wenfeng

    2015-01-01

    Bone tissue engineering is a powerful tool to treat bone defects caused by trauma, infection, tumors and other factors. Both silk fibroin (SF) and chitosan (CS) are non-toxic and have good biocompatibility, but are poor biological scaffolds when used alone. In this study, the microscopic structure and related properties of SF/CS composite scaffolds with different component ratios were examined. The scaffold material most suitable for osteoblast growth was determined, and these results offer an experimental basis for the future reconstruction of bone defects. First, via freeze-drying and chemical crosslinking methods, SF/CS composites with different component ratios were prepared and their structure was characterized. Changes in the internal structure of the SF and CS mixture were observed, confirming that the mutual modification between the two components was complete and stable. The internal structure of the composite material was porous and three-dimensional with a porosity above 90%. We next studied the pore size, swelling ratio, water absorption ratio, degradation and in vitro cell proliferation. For the 40% SF-60% CS group, the pore size of the scaffold was suitable for the growth of osteoblasts, and the rate of degradation was steady. This favors the early adhesion, growth and proliferation of MG-63 cells. In addition to good biocompatibility and satisfactory cell affinity, this material promotes the secretion of extracellular matrix materials by osteoblasts. Thus, 40% SF-60% CS is a good material for bone tissue engineering. PMID:26083846

  9. Fibrin Gel as an Injectable Biodegradable Scaffold and Cell Carrier for Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuting; Meng, Hao; Liu, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Due to the increasing needs for organ transplantation and a universal shortage of donated tissues, tissue engineering emerges as a useful approach to engineer functional tissues. Although different synthetic materials have been used to fabricate tissue engineering scaffolds, they have many limitations such as the biocompatibility concerns, the inability to support cell attachment, and undesirable degradation rate. Fibrin gel, a biopolymeric material, provides numerous advantages over synthetic materials in functioning as a tissue engineering scaffold and a cell carrier. Fibrin gel exhibits excellent biocompatibility, promotes cell attachment, and can degrade in a controllable manner. Additionally, fibrin gel mimics the natural blood-clotting process and self-assembles into a polymer network. The ability for fibrin to cure in situ has been exploited to develop injectable scaffolds for the repair of damaged cardiac and cartilage tissues. Additionally, fibrin gel has been utilized as a cell carrier to protect cells from the forces during the application and cell delivery processes while enhancing the cell viability and tissue regeneration. Here, we review the recent advancement in developing fibrin-based biomaterials for the development of injectable tissue engineering scaffold and cell carriers. PMID:25853146

  10. Direct Ink Writing of Highly Porous and Strong Glass Scaffolds for Load-bearing Bone Defects Repair and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Qiang; Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2011-01-01

    The quest for synthetic materials to repair load-bearing bone lost because of trauma, cancer, or congenital bone defects requires development of porous and high-performance scaffolds with exceptional mechanical strength. However, the low mechanical strength of porous bioactive ceramic and glass scaffolds, compared with that of human cortical bone, has limited their use for these applications. In the present work, bioactive 6P53B glass scaffolds with superior mechanical strength were fabricated using a direct ink writing technique. The rheological properties of Pluronic® F-127 (referred to hereafter simply as F-127) hydrogel-based inkswere optimized for the printing of features as fine as 30 μm and of the three-dimensional scaffolds. The mechanical strength and in vitro degradation of the scaffolds were assessed in a simulated body fluid (SBF). The sintered glass scaffolds show a compressive strength (136 ± 22 MPa) comparable to that of human cortical bone (100-150 MPa), while the porosity (60%) is in the range of that of trabecular bone (50-90%).The strength is ~100 times that of polymer scaffolds and 4–5 times that of ceramic and glass scaffolds with comparable porosities. Despite the strength decrease resulting from weight loss during immersion in an SBF, the value (77 MPa) is still far above that of trabecular bone after three weeks. The ability to create both porous and strong structures opens a new avenue for fabricating scaffolds for load-bearing bone defect repair and regeneration. PMID:21745606

  11. Chromosome Scaffold is a Double-Stranded Assembly of Scaffold Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Poonperm, Rawin; Takata, Hideaki; Hamano, Tohru; Matsuda, Atsushi; Uchiyama, Susumu; Hiraoka, Yasushi; Fukui, Kiichi

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome higher order structure has been an enigma for over a century. The most important structural finding has been the presence of a chromosome scaffold composed of non-histone proteins; so-called scaffold proteins. However, the organization and function of the scaffold are still controversial. Here, we use three dimensional-structured illumination microscopy (3D-SIM) and focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM) to reveal the axial distributions of scaffold proteins in metaphase chromosomes comprising two strands. We also find that scaffold protein can adaptably recover its original localization after chromosome reversion in the presence of cations. This reversion to the original morphology underscores the role of the scaffold for intrinsic structural integrity of chromosomes. We therefore propose a new structural model of the chromosome scaffold that includes twisted double strands, consistent with the physical properties of chromosomal bending flexibility and rigidity. Our model provides new insights into chromosome higher order structure. PMID:26132639

  12. Metacognitive Scaffolding in an Innovative Learning Arrangement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molenaar, Inge; van Boxtel, Carla A. M.; Sleegers, Peter J. C.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the effects of metacognitive scaffolds on learning outcomes of collaborating students in an innovative learning arrangement. The triads were supported by computerized scaffolds, which were dynamically integrated into the learning process and took a structuring or problematizing form. In an experimental design the two…

  13. Teaching Writing: A Multilayered Participatory Scaffolding Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dix, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    This article adds to the research on teachers' writing pedagogy. It reviews and challenges the research literature on scaffolding as an instructional practice and presents a more inclusive framework for analysis. As student participation and voice were absent from much of the literature, a participatory scaffolding framework was developed to…

  14. Scaffolding Mathematical Modelling with a Solution Plan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schukajlow, Stanislaw; Kolter, Jana; Blum, Werner

    2015-01-01

    In the study presented in this paper, we examined the possibility to scaffold mathematical modelling with strategies. The strategies were prompted using an instrument called "solution plan" as a scaffold. The effects of this step by step instrument on mathematical modelling competency and on self-reported strategies were tested using…

  15. Recombinant protein scaffolds for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Werkmeister, Jerome A; Ramshaw, John A M

    2012-02-01

    New biological materials for tissue engineering are now being developed using common genetic engineering capabilities to clone and express a variety of genetic elements that allow cost-effective purification and scaffold fabrication from these recombinant proteins, peptides or from chimeric combinations of these. The field is limitless as long as the gene sequences are known. The utility is dependent on the ease, product yield and adaptability of these protein products to the biomedical field. The development of recombinant proteins as scaffolds, while still an emerging technology with respect to commercial products, is scientifically superior to current use of natural materials or synthetic polymer scaffolds, in terms of designing specific structures with desired degrees of biological complexities and motifs. In the field of tissue engineering, next generation scaffolds will be the key to directing appropriate tissue regeneration. The initial period of biodegradable synthetic scaffolds that provided shape and mechanical integrity, but no biological information, is phasing out. The era of protein scaffolds offers distinct advantages, particularly with the combination of powerful tools of molecular biology. These include, for example, the production of human proteins of uniform quality that are free of infectious agents and the ability to make suitable quantities of proteins that are found in low quantity or are hard to isolate from tissue. For the particular needs of tissue engineering scaffolds, fibrous proteins like collagens, elastin, silks and combinations of these offer further advantages of natural well-defined structural scaffolds as well as endless possibilities of controlling functionality by genetic manipulation. PMID:22262725

  16. Information Scaffolding: Application to Technical Animation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Catherine Claire

    2010-01-01

    Information Scaffolding is a user-centered approach to information design; a method devised to aid "everyday" authors in information composition. Information Scaffolding places a premium on audience-centered documents by emphasizing the information needs and motivations of a multimedia document's intended audience. The aim of this…

  17. Lithographically defined 3-dimensional graphene scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burckel, D. Bruce; Xiao, Xiaoyin; Polsky, Ronen

    2015-09-01

    Interferometrically defined 3D photoresist scaffolds are formed through a series of three successive two-beam interference exposures, a post exposure bake and development. Heating the resist scaffold in a reducing atmosphere to > 1000 °C, results in the conversion of the resist structure into a carbon scaffold through pyrolysis, resulting in a 3D sp3- bonded glassy carbon scaffold which maintains the same in-plane morphology as the resist despite significant shrinkage. The carbon scaffolds are readily modified using a variety of deposition methods such as electrochemical, sputtering and CVD/ALD. Remarkably, sputtering metal into scaffolds with ~ 5 unit cells tall results in conformal coating of the scaffold with the metal. When the metal is a transition metal such as nickel, the scaffold can be re-annealed, during which time the carbon diffuses through the nickel, emerging on the exterior of the nickel as sp2-bonded carbon, termed 3D graphene. This paper details the fabrication, characterization and some potential applications for these structures.

  18. Understanding Literacy Teacher Educators' Use of Scaffolding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Many, Joyce E.; Aoulou, Eudes

    2014-01-01

    This inquiry examined four literacy teacher educators' perspectives and practices as related to scaffolding by using document analysis (i.e. syllabus), observations, and interviews. Findings indicated these teacher educators used scaffolding to develop preservice teachers' dispositions, strategies, and conceptual understandings. Faculty used…

  19. Functional Electrospun Nanofibrous Scaffolds for Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Dehai; Hsiao, Benjamin S.; Chu, Benjamin

    2009-01-01

    Functional nanofibrous scaffolds produced by electrospinning have great potential in many biomedical applications, such as tissue engineering, wound dressing, enzyme immobilization and drug (gene) delivery. For a specific successful application, the chemical, physical and biological properties of electrospun scaffolds should be adjusted to match the environment by using a combination of multi-component compositions and fabrication techniques where electrospinning has often become a pivotal tool. The property of the nanofibrous scaffold can be further improved with innovative development in electrospinning processes, such as two-component electrospinning and in-situ mixing electrospinning. Post modifications of electrospun membranes also provide effective means to render the electrospun scaffolds with controlled anisotropy and porosity. In this review, we review the materials, techniques and post modification methods to functionalize electrospun nanofibrous scaffolds suitable for biomedical applications. PMID:17884240

  20. Silk scaffolds for musculoskeletal tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Yao, Danyu; Liu, Haifeng; Fan, Yubo

    2016-02-01

    The musculoskeletal system, which includes bone, cartilage, tendon/ligament, and skeletal muscle, is becoming the targets for tissue engineering because of the high need for their repair and regeneration. Numerous factors would affect the use of musculoskeletal tissue engineering for tissue regeneration ranging from cells used for scaffold seeding to the manufacture and structures of materials. The essential function of the scaffolds is to convey growth factors as well as cells to the target site to aid the regeneration of the injury. Among the variety of biomaterials used in scaffold engineering, silk fibroin is recognized as an ideal material for its impressive cytocompatibility, slow biodegradability, and excellent mechanical properties. The current review describes the advances made in the fabrication of silk fibroin scaffolds with different forms such as films, particles, electrospun fibers, hydrogels, three-dimensional porous scaffolds, and their applications in the regeneration of musculoskeletal tissues. PMID:26445979

  1. Titanate nanotube coatings on biodegradable photopolymer scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Beke, S; Kőrösi, L; Scarpellini, A; Anjum, F; Brandi, F

    2013-05-01

    Rigid, biodegradable photopolymer scaffolds were coated with titanate nanotubes (TNTs) by using a spin-coating method. TNTs were synthesized by a hydrothermal process at 150 °C under 4.7 bar ambient pressure. The biodegradable photopolymer scaffolds were produced by mask-assisted excimer laser photocuring at 308 nm. For scaffold coating, a stable ethanolic TNT sol was prepared by a simple colloid chemical route without the use of any binding compounds or additives. Scanning electron microscopy along with elemental analysis revealed that the scaffolds were homogenously coated by TNTs. The developed TNT coating can further improve the surface geometry of fabricated scaffolds, and therefore it can further increase the cell adhesion. PMID:23498284

  2. Thermally drawn fibers as nerve guidance scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Koppes, Ryan A; Park, Seongjun; Hood, Tiffany; Jia, Xiaoting; Abdolrahim Poorheravi, Negin; Achyuta, Anilkumar Harapanahalli; Fink, Yoel; Anikeeva, Polina

    2016-03-01

    Synthetic neural scaffolds hold promise to eventually replace nerve autografts for tissue repair following peripheral nerve injury. Despite substantial evidence for the influence of scaffold geometry and dimensions on the rate of axonal growth, systematic evaluation of these parameters remains a challenge due to limitations in materials processing. We have employed fiber drawing to engineer a wide spectrum of polymer-based neural scaffolds with varied geometries and core sizes. Using isolated whole dorsal root ganglia as an in vitro model system we have identified key features enhancing nerve growth within these fiber scaffolds. Our approach enabled straightforward integration of microscopic topography at the scale of nerve fascicles within the scaffold cores, which led to accelerated Schwann cell migration, as well as neurite growth and alignment. Our findings indicate that fiber drawing provides a scalable and versatile strategy for producing nerve guidance channels capable of controlling direction and accelerating the rate of axonal growth. PMID:26717246

  3. Cell colonization in degradable 3D porous matrices

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Benjamin J

    2008-01-01

    Cell colonization is an important in a wide variety of biological processes and applications including vascularization, wound healing, tissue engineering, stem cell differentiation and biosensors. During colonization porous 3D structures are used to support and guide the ingrowth of cells into the matrix. In this review, we summarize our understanding of various factors affecting cell colonization in three-dimensional environment. The structural, biological and degradation properties of the matrix all play key roles during colonization. Further, specific scaffold properties such as porosity, pore size, fiber thickness, topography and scaffold stiffness as well as important cell material interactions such as cell adhesion and mechanotransduction also influence colonization. PMID:19262124

  4. Proton transfer in organic scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basak, Dipankar

    This dissertation focuses on the fundamental understanding of the proton transfer process and translating the knowledge into design/development of new organic materials for efficient non-aqueous proton transport. For example, what controls the shuttling of a proton between two basic sites? a) Distance between two groups? or b) the basicity? c) What is the impact of protonation on molecular conformation when the basic sites are attached to rigid scaffolds? For this purpose, we developed several tunable proton sponges and studied proton transfer in these scaffolds theoretically as well as experimentally. Next we moved our attention to understand long-range proton conduction or proton transport. We introduced liquid crystalline (LC) proton conductor based on triphenylene molecule and established that activation energy barrier for proton transport is lower in the LC phase compared to the crystalline phase. Furthermore, we investigated the impact of several critical factors: the choice of the proton transferring groups, mobility of the charge carriers, intrinsic vs. extrinsic charge carrier concentrations and the molecular architectures on long-range proton transport. The outcome of this research will lead to a deeper understanding of non-aqueous proton transfer process and aid the design of next generation proton exchange membrane (PEM) for fuel cell.

  5. Scaffolds from alternating block polyurethanes of poly(ɛ-caprolactone) and poly(ethylene glycol) with stimulation and guidance of nerve growth and better nerve repair than autograft.

    PubMed

    Niu, Yuqing; Li, Linjing; Chen, Kevin C; Chen, Feiran; Liu, Xiangyu; Ye, Jianfu; Li, Wei; Xu, Kaitian

    2015-07-01

    Nerve repair scaffolds from novel alternating block polyurethanes (PUCL-alt-PEG) based on PCL and PEG without additional growth factors or proteins were prepared by a particle leaching method. The scaffolds have pore size 10-20 µm and porosity 92%. Mechanical tests showed that the polyurethane scaffolds have maximum loads of 5.97 ± 0.35 N and maximal stresses of 8.84 ± 0.5 MPa. Histocompatiblity of the nerve repair scaffolds was tested in a SD rat model for peripheral nerve defect treatment. Two types of treatments including PUCL-alt-PEG scaffolds and autografts were compared in rat model. After 32 weeks, bridging of a 12 mm defect gap by the regenerated nerve was observed in all rats. The nerve regeneration was systematically characterized by sciatic function index (SFI), electrophysiology, histological assessment including HE staining, immunohistochemistry, ammonia sliver staining, Masson's trichrome staining and TEM observation. Results revealed that nerve repair scaffolds from PUCL-alt-PEG exhibit better regeneration effects compared to autografts. Electrophysiological recovery was seen in 90% and 87% of rats in PUCL-alt-PEG and autograft groups respectively. Biodegradation in vitro and in vivo shows good degradation match of PUCL-alt-PEG scaffolds with nerve regeneration. It demonstrates that plain nerve repair scaffolds from PUCL-alt-PEG biomaterials can achieve peripheral nerve regeneration satisfactorily. PMID:25410272

  6. Mechanical properties and drug release behavior of PCL/zein coated 45S5 bioactive glass scaffolds for bone tissue engineering application

    PubMed Central

    Fereshteh, Zeinab; Nooeaid, Patcharakamon; Fathi, Mohammadhossein; Bagri, Akbar; Boccaccini, Aldo R.

    2015-01-01

    This article presents data related to the research article entitled “The effect of coating type on mechanical properties and controlled drug release of PCL/zein coated 45S5 bioactive glass scaffolds for bone tissue engineering” [1]. We provide data on mechanical properties, in vitro bioactivity and drug release of bioactive glass (BG) scaffolds coated by poly (ε-caprolactone) (PCL) and zein used as a controlled release device for tetracycline hydrochloride (TCH). By coating the BG scaffolds with PCL or PCL/zein blend the mechanical properties of the scaffolds were substantially improved, i.e., the compressive strength increased from 0.004±0.001 MPa (uncoated BG scaffolds) to 0.15±0.02 MPa (PCL/zein coated BG scaffolds). A dense bone-like apatite layer formed on the surface of PCL/zein coated scaffolds immersed for 14 days in simulated body fluid (SBF). The data describe control of drug release and in vitro degradation behavior of coating by engineering the concentration of zein. Thus, the developed scaffolds exhibit attractive properties for application in bone tissue engineering research. PMID:26966716

  7. Optimization of protein cross-linking in bicomponent electrospun scaffolds for therapeutic use

    SciTech Connect

    Papa, Antonio; Guarino, Vincenzo Cirillo, Valentina; Oliviero, Olimpia; Ambrosio, Luigi

    2015-12-17

    Bio-instructive electrospun scaffolds based on the combination of synthetic polymers, such as PCL or PLLA, and natural polymers (e.g., collagen) have been extensively investigated as temporary extracellular matrix (ECM) analogues able to support cell proliferation and stem cell differentiation for the regeneration of several tissues. The growing use of natural polymers as carrier of bioactive molecules is introducing new ideas for the design of polymeric drug delivery systems based on electrospun fibers with improved bioavailability, therapeutic efficacy and programmed drug release. In particular, the release mechanism is driven by the use of water soluble proteins (i.e., collagen, gelatin) which fully degrade in in vitro microenvironment, thus delivering the active principles. However, these protein are generally rapidly digested by enzymes (i.e., collagenase) produced by many different cell types, both in vivo and in vitro with significant drawbacks in tissue engineering and controlled drug delivery. Here, we aim at investigating different chemical strategies to improve the in vitro stability and mechanical strength of scaffolds against enzymatic degradation, by modifying the biodegradation rates of proteins embedded in bicomponent fibers. By comparing scaffolds treated by different cross-linking agents (i.e., GC, EDC, BDDGE), we have provided an extensive morphological/chemical/physical characterization via SEM and TGA to identify the best conditions to control drug release via protein degradation from bicomponent fibers without compromising in vitro cell response.

  8. Optimization of protein cross-linking in bicomponent electrospun scaffolds for therapeutic use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papa, Antonio; Guarino, Vincenzo; Cirillo, Valentina; Oliviero, Olimpia; Ambrosio, Luigi

    2015-12-01

    Bio-instructive electrospun scaffolds based on the combination of synthetic polymers, such as PCL or PLLA, and natural polymers (e.g., collagen) have been extensively investigated as temporary extracellular matrix (ECM) analogues able to support cell proliferation and stem cell differentiation for the regeneration of several tissues. The growing use of natural polymers as carrier of bioactive molecules is introducing new ideas for the design of polymeric drug delivery systems based on electrospun fibers with improved bioavailability, therapeutic efficacy and programmed drug release. In particular, the release mechanism is driven by the use of water soluble proteins (i.e., collagen, gelatin) which fully degrade in in vitro microenvironment, thus delivering the active principles. However, these protein are generally rapidly digested by enzymes (i.e., collagenase) produced by many different cell types, both in vivo and in vitro with significant drawbacks in tissue engineering and controlled drug delivery. Here, we aim at investigating different chemical strategies to improve the in vitro stability and mechanical strength of scaffolds against enzymatic degradation, by modifying the biodegradation rates of proteins embedded in bicomponent fibers. By comparing scaffolds treated by different cross-linking agents (i.e., GC, EDC, BDDGE), we have provided an extensive morphological/chemical/physical characterization via SEM and TGA to identify the best conditions to control drug release via protein degradation from bicomponent fibers without compromising in vitro cell response.

  9. Design and characterization of a biodegradable double-layer scaffold aimed at periodontal tissue-engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Requicha, João F; Viegas, Carlos A; Hede, Shantesh; Leonor, Isabel B; Reis, Rui L; Gomes, Manuela E

    2016-05-01

    The inefficacy of the currently used therapies in achieving the regeneration ad integrum of the periodontium stimulates the search for alternative approaches, such as tissue-engineering strategies. Therefore, the core objective of this study was to develop a biodegradable double-layer scaffold for periodontal tissue engineering. The design philosophy was based on a double-layered construct obtained from a blend of starch and poly-ε-caprolactone (30:70 wt%; SPCL). A SPCL fibre mesh functionalized with silanol groups to promote osteogenesis was combined with a SPCL solvent casting membrane aiming at acting as a barrier against the migration of gingival epithelium into the periodontal defect. Each layer of the double-layer scaffolds was characterized in terms of morphology, surface chemical composition, degradation behaviour and mechanical properties. Moreover, the behaviour of seeded/cultured canine adipose-derived stem cells (cASCs) was assessed. In general, the developed double-layered scaffolds demonstrated adequate degradation and mechanical behaviour for the target application. Furthermore, the biological assays revealed that both layers of the scaffold allow adhesion and proliferation of the seeded undifferentiated cASCs, and the incorporation of silanol groups into the fibre-mesh layer enhance the expression of a typical osteogenic marker. This study allowed an innovative construct to be developed, combining a three-dimensional (3D) scaffold with osteoconductive properties and with potential to assist periodontal regeneration, carrying new possible solutions to current clinical needs. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:23997028

  10. Fabrication and in vitro evaluation of a sponge-like bioactive-glass/gelatin composite scaffold for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Nadeem, Danish; Kiamehr, Mostafa; Yang, Xuebin; Su, Bo

    2013-07-01

    In this work a bioactive composite scaffold, comprised of bioactive-glass and gelatin, is introduced. Through direct foaming a sponge-like composite of a sol-gel derived bioactive-glass (70S30C; 70% SiO2, 30% CaO) and porcine gelatin was developed for use as a biodegradable scaffold for bone tissue engineering. The composite was developed to provide a suitable alternative to synthetic polymer based scaffolds, allowing directed regeneration of bone tissue. The fabricated scaffold was characterised through X-ray microtomography, scanning electron and light microscopy demonstrating a three dimensionally porous and interconnected structure, with an average pore size (170 μm) suitable for successful cell proliferation and tissue ingrowth. Acellular bioactivity was assessed through apatite formation during submersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) whereby the rate and onset of apatite nucleation was found to be comparable to that of bioactive-glass. Modification of dehydrothermal treatment parameters induced varying degrees of crosslinking, allowing the degradation of the composite to be tailored to suit specific applications and establishing its potential for a wide range of applications. Use of genipin to supplement crosslinking by dehydrothermal treatment provided further means of modifying degradability. Biocompatibility of the composite was qualified through successful cultures of human dental pulp stem cells (HDPSCs) on samples of the composite scaffold. Osteogenic differentiation of HDPSCs and extracellular matrix deposition were confirmed through positive alkaline phosphatase staining and immunohistochemistry. PMID:23623083

  11. Scaffolding Strategies in Electronic Performance Support Systems: Types and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cagiltay, Kursat

    2006-01-01

    In the study described in this paper, the major components of an electronic performance support system are described and the use of scaffolding techniques within such electronic environments is explored. Four different types of scaffolding are discussed: "conceptual" (supportive) scaffolding, "metacognitive" (reflective) scaffolding, "procedural"…

  12. Scaffold Translation: Barriers Between Concept and Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, William L.

    2011-01-01

    Translation of scaffold-based bone tissue engineering (BTE) therapies to clinical use remains, bluntly, a failure. This dearth of translated tissue engineering therapies (including scaffolds) remains despite 25 years of research, research funding totaling hundreds of millions of dollars, over 12,000 papers on BTE and over 2000 papers on BTE scaffolds alone in the past 10 years (PubMed search). Enabling scaffold translation requires first an understanding of the challenges, and second, addressing the complete range of these challenges. There are the obvious technical challenges of designing, manufacturing, and functionalizing scaffolds to fill the Form, Fixation, Function, and Formation needs of bone defect repair. However, these technical solutions should be targeted to specific clinical indications (e.g., mandibular defects, spine fusion, long bone defects, etc.). Further, technical solutions should also address business challenges, including the need to obtain regulatory approval, meet specific market needs, and obtain private investment to develop products, again for specific clinical indications. Finally, these business and technical challenges present a much different model than the typical research paradigm, presenting the field with philosophical challenges in terms of publishing and funding priorities that should be addressed as well. In this article, we review in detail the technical, business, and philosophical barriers of translating scaffolds from Concept to Clinic. We argue that envisioning and engineering scaffolds as modular systems with a sliding scale of complexity offers the best path to addressing these translational challenges. PMID:21902613

  13. Surface Characterization of Extracellular Matrix Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Bryan N.; Barnes, Christopher A.; Kasick, Rena T.; Michel, Roger; Gilbert, Thomas W.; Beer-Stolz, Donna; Castner, David G.; Ratner, Buddy D.; Badylak, Stephen F.

    2009-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) scaffolds prepared from different tissue sources or using different methods have been demonstrated to have distinctive effects upon cell adhesion patterns and the ability to support and maintain differentiated phenotypes. It is unknown whether the molecular composition or the ultrastructure of the ECM plays a greater role in determining the phenotype of the cells with which it comes into contact. However, when implanted, the topology and ligand landscape of the material will determine the host molecules that bind and the type and behavior of cells that mediate the host response. Therefore, a comprehensive understanding of surface characteristics is essential in the design of scaffolds for specific clinical applications. The surface characteristics of ECM scaffolds derived from porcine urinary bladder, small intestine, and liver as well as the effects of two commonly used methods of chemical cross-linking upon UBM were investigated. Electron microscopy and time of flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy were used to examine the surface characteristics of the scaffolds. The results show that ECM scaffolds have unique morphologic and structural properties which are dependant on the organ or tissue from which the scaffold is harvested. Furthermore, the results show that the surface characteristics of an ECM scaffold are changed through chemical cross-linking. PMID:19828192

  14. Scaffolds in vascular regeneration: current status

    PubMed Central

    Thottappillil, Neelima; Nair, Prabha D

    2015-01-01

    An ideal vascular substitute, especially in <6 mm diameter applications, is a major clinical essentiality in blood vessel replacement surgery. Blood vessels are structurally complex and functionally dynamic tissue, with minimal regeneration potential. These have composite extracellular matrix (ECM) and arrangement. The interplay between ECM components and tissue specific cells gives blood vessels their specialized functional attributes. The core of vascular tissue engineering and regeneration relies on the challenges in creating vascular conduits that match native vessels and adequately regenerate in vivo. Out of numerous vascular regeneration concerns, the relevance of ECM emphasizes much attention toward appropriate choice of scaffold material and further scaffold development strategies. The review is intended to be focused on the various approaches of scaffold materials currently in use in vascular regeneration and current state of the art. Scaffold of choice in vascular tissue engineering ranges from natural to synthetic, decellularized, and even scaffold free approach. The applicability of tubular scaffold for in vivo vascular regeneration is under active investigation. A patent conduit with an ample endothelial luminal layer that can regenerate in vivo remains an unanswered query in the field of small diameter vascular tissue engineering. Besides, scaffolds developed for vascular regeneration, should aim at providing functional substitutes for use in a regenerative approach from the laboratory bench to patient bedside. PMID:25632236

  15. A comprehensive evaluation of assembly scaffolding tools

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Genome assembly is typically a two-stage process: contig assembly followed by the use of paired sequencing reads to join contigs into scaffolds. Scaffolds are usually the focus of reported assembly statistics; longer scaffolds greatly facilitate the use of genome sequences in downstream analyses, and it is appealing to present larger numbers as metrics of assembly performance. However, scaffolds are highly prone to errors, especially when generated using short reads, which can directly result in inflated assembly statistics. Results Here we provide the first independent evaluation of scaffolding tools for second-generation sequencing data. We find large variations in the quality of results depending on the tool and dataset used. Even extremely simple test cases of perfect input, constructed to elucidate the behaviour of each algorithm, produced some surprising results. We further dissect the performance of the scaffolders using real and simulated sequencing data derived from the genomes of Staphylococcus aureus, Rhodobacter sphaeroides, Plasmodium falciparum and Homo sapiens. The results from simulated data are of high quality, with several of the tools producing perfect output. However, at least 10% of joins remains unidentified when using real data. Conclusions The scaffolders vary in their usability, speed and number of correct and missed joins made between contigs. Results from real data highlight opportunities for further improvements of the tools. Overall, SGA, SOPRA and SSPACE generally outperform the other tools on our datasets. However, the quality of the results is highly dependent on the read mapper and genome complexity. PMID:24581555

  16. Preparation, characterization and in vitro biological study of biomimetic three-dimensional gelatin-montmorillonite/cellulose scaffold for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Haroun, Ahmed A; Gamal-Eldeen, Amira; Harding, David R K

    2009-12-01

    This work focused on studying the effect of blending gelatin (Gel) with Cellulose (Cel), in the presence of montmorillonite (MMT), on the swelling behavior, in vitro degradation and surface morphology. Additionally, the effect of the prepared biocomposites on the characteristics of the human osteosarcoma cells (Saos-2), including proliferation, scaffold/cells interactions, apoptosis and their potential of the cells to induce osteogenesis and differentiation was evaluated. The crosslinked biocomposites with glutaraldehyde (GA) or N,N-methylene-bisacrylamide (MBA) was prepared via an intercalation process and freeze-drying technique. Properties including SEM morphology, X-ray diffraction characterization and in vitro biodegradation were investigated. The successful generation of 3-D biomimetic porous scaffolds incorporating Saos-2 cells indicated their potential for de novo bone formation that exploits cell-matrix interactions. In vitro studies revealed that the scaffolds containing 12 and 6% MMT crosslinked by 5 and 0.5% GA seem to be the two most efficient and effective biodegradable scaffolds, which promoted Saos-2 cells proliferation, migration, expansion, adhesion, penetration, spreading, and differentiation, respectively. MMT improved cytocompatibility between the osteoblasts and the biocomposite. In vitro analysis indicated good biocompatibility of the scaffold and presents the scaffold as a new potential candidate as suitable biohybrid material for tissue engineering. PMID:19629650

  17. Nanocalcium-deficient hydroxyapatite-poly (e-caprolactone)-polyethylene glycol-poly (e-caprolactone) composite scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiwei; Li, Ming; Yu, Baoqing; Cao, Liehu; Yang, Qingsong; Su, Jiacan

    2012-01-01

    A bioactive composite of nano calcium-deficient apatite (n-CDAP) with an atom molar ratio of calcium to phosphate (Ca/P) of 1.50 and poly(ɛ-caprolactone)-poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL-PEG-PCL) was synthesized, and a composite scaffold was fabricated. The composite scaffolds with 40 wt% n-CDAP contained well interconnected macropores around 400 μm, and exhibited a porosity of 75%. The weight-loss ratio of the n-CDAP/PCL-PEG-PCL was significantly greater than nano hydroxyapatite (n-HA, Ca/P = 1.67)/PCL-PEG-PCL composite scaffolds during soaking into phosphate-buffered saline (pH 7.4) for 70 days, indicating that n-CDAP-based composite had good degradability compared with n-HA. The viability ratio of MG-63 cells was significantly higher on n-CDAP than n-HA-based composite scaffolds at 3 and 5 days. In addition, the alkaline phosphatase activity of the MG-63 cells cultured on n-CDAP was higher than n-HA-based composite scaffolds at 7 days. Histological evaluation showed that the introduction of n-CDAP into PCL-PEG-PCL enhanced the efficiency of new bone formation when the composite scaffolds were implanted into rabbit bone defects. The results suggested that the n-CDAP-based composite exhibits good biocompatibility, biodegradation, and osteogenesis in vivo. PMID:22848159

  18. The effect of collagen-chitosan porous scaffold thickness on dermal regeneration in a one-stage grafting procedure.

    PubMed

    Haifei, Shi; Xingang, Wang; Shoucheng, Wu; Zhengwei, Mao; Chuangang, You; Chunmao, Han

    2014-01-01

    Dermal substitutes are used as dermal regeneration templates to reduce scar formation and improve wound healing. Unlike autografts, dermal substitutes lack normal vascular networks. The increased distance required for diffusion of oxygen and nutrients to the autograft following interpositioning of the substitute dramatically affects graft survival. To evaluate the effect of collagen-chitosan scaffold thickness on dermal regeneration, single-layer collagen-chitosan porous scaffolds of 0.5-, 1- and 2-mm thicknesses were fabricated and used to treat full-thickness wounds in a one-stage grafting procedure in a rat model. Skin-graft viability, wound contraction, histological changes, and wound tensile strength were evaluated. The results indicated that the distance for the diffusion of oxygen and nutrients to the autograft in the 2-mm-thick scaffold provided less support for graft take, which resulted in graft necrosis, extensive inflammatory reaction, marked foreign-body reaction (FBR), rapid scaffold degradation, and abnormal collagen deposition and remodeling. In contrast, the thinner scaffolds, especially of that 0.5-mm thickness, promoted earlier angiogenesis, ensuring skin-graft viability with a mild FBR, and ordered fibroblast infiltration and better collagen remodeling. It can be concluded that collagen-chitosan porous scaffolds with a thickness of <1mm are more suitable for dermal regeneration and can be used as dermal templates for treatment of dermal defects using a one-stage grafting procedure. PMID:24076783

  19. Constitution and in vivo test of micro-porous tubular scaffold for esophageal tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Hou, Lei; Jin, Jiachang; Lv, Jingjing; Chen, Ling; Zhu, Yabin; Liu, Xingyu

    2015-11-01

    Current clinical techniques in treating long-gap esophageal defects often lead to complications and high morbidity. Aiming at long-gap synthetic esophageal substitute, we had synthesized a biodegradable copolymer, poly(L-lactide-co-caprolactone) (PLLC), with low glass transition temperature. In this work, we developed a tubular PLLC porous scaffold using a self-designed tubular mold and thermal induced phase separation (TIPS) method. In order to enhance the interaction between tissue and scaffold, fibrin, a natural fibrous protein derived from blood fibrinogen, was coated on the scaffold circumferential surface. The fibrin density was measured to be 1.23 ± 0.04 mg/cm(2). Primary epithelial cell culture demonstrated the improved in vitro biocompatibility. In animal study with partial scaffold implantation, in situ mucosa regeneration was observed along the degradation of the scaffold. These indicate that fibrin incorporated PLLC scaffold can greatly improve epithelial regeneration in esophagus repair, therefore serve as a good candidate for long-term evaluation of post-implantation at excision site. PMID:26208515

  20. 54. West elevation of portion of elevated Mainline structure (Section ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    54. West elevation of portion of elevated Mainline structure (Section F-5) over Washington Street - looking East - at the corner of Bray Street. - Boston Elevated Railway, Elevated Mainline, Washington Street, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  1. Porous scaffold architecture guides tissue formation.

    PubMed

    Cipitria, Amaia; Lange, Claudia; Schell, Hanna; Wagermaier, Wolfgang; Reichert, Johannes C; Hutmacher, Dietmar W; Fratzl, Peter; Duda, Georg N

    2012-06-01

    Critical-sized bone defect regeneration is a remaining clinical concern. Numerous scaffold-based strategies are currently being investigated to enable in vivo bone defect healing. However, a deeper understanding of how a scaffold influences the tissue formation process and how this compares to endogenous bone formation or to regular fracture healing is missing. It is hypothesized that the porous scaffold architecture can serve as a guiding substrate to enable the formation of a structured fibrous network as a prerequirement for later bone formation. An ovine, tibial, 30-mm critical-sized defect is used as a model system to better understand the effect of the scaffold architecture on cell organization, fibrous tissue, and mineralized tissue formation mechanisms in vivo. Tissue regeneration patterns within two geometrically distinct macroscopic regions of a specific scaffold design, the scaffold wall and the endosteal cavity, are compared with tissue formation in an empty defect (negative control) and with cortical bone (positive control). Histology, backscattered electron imaging, scanning small-angle X-ray scattering, and nanoindentation are used to assess the morphology of fibrous and mineralized tissue, to measure the average mineral particle thickness and the degree of alignment, and to map the local elastic indentation modulus. The scaffold proves to function as a guiding substrate to the tissue formation process. It enables the arrangement of a structured fibrous tissue across the entire defect, which acts as a secondary supporting network for cells. Mineralization can then initiate along the fibrous network, resulting in bone ingrowth into a critical-sized defect, although not in complete bridging of the defect. The fibrous network morphology, which in turn is guided by the scaffold architecture, influences the microstructure of the newly formed bone. These results allow a deeper understanding of the mode of mineral tissue formation and the way this is

  2. In vitro evaluation of bi-layer silk fibroin scaffolds for gastrointestinal tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Franck, Debra; Chung, Yeun Goo; Coburn, Jeannine; Kaplan, David L; Estrada, Carlos R

    2014-01-01

    Silk fibroin scaffolds were investigated for their ability to support attachment, proliferation, and differentiation of human gastrointestinal epithelial and smooth muscle cell lines in order to ascertain their potential for tissue engineering. A bi-layer silk fibroin matrix composed of a porous silk fibroin foam annealed to a homogeneous silk fibroin film was evaluated in parallel with small intestinal submucosa scaffolds. AlamarBlue analysis revealed that silk fibroin scaffolds supported significantly higher levels of small intestinal smooth muscle cell, colon smooth muscle cell, and esophageal smooth muscle cell attachment in comparison to small intestinal submucosa. Following 7 days of culture, relative numbers of each smooth muscle cell population maintained on both scaffold groups were significantly elevated over respective 1-day levels—indicative of cell proliferation. Real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated that both silk fibroin and small intestinal submucosa scaffolds were permissive for contractile differentiation of small intestinal smooth muscle cell, colon smooth muscle cell, esophageal smooth muscle cell as determined by significant upregulation of α-smooth muscle actin and SM22α messenger RNA and protein expression levels following transforming growth factor-β1 stimulation. AlamarBlue analysis demonstrated that both matrix groups supported similar degrees of attachment and proliferation of gastrointestinal epithelial cell lines including colonic T84 cells and esophageal epithelial cells. Following 14 days of culture on both matrices, spontaneous differentiation of T84 cells toward an enterocyte lineage was confirmed by expression of brush border enzymes, lactase, and maltase, as determined by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemical analyses. In contrast to small intestinal submucosa scaffolds, silk fibroin scaffolds supported

  3. Polysaccharide Degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Bruce A.; Svensson, Birte; Collins, Michelle E.; Rastall, Robert A.

    An overview of current and potential enzymes used to degrade polysaccharides is presented. Such depolymerases are comprised of glycoside hydrolases, glycosyl transferases, phosphorylases and lyases, and their classification, active sites and action patterns are discussed. Additionally, the mechanisms that these enzymes use to cleave glycosidic linkages is reviewed as are inhibitors of depolymerase activity; reagents which react with amino acid residues, glycoside derivatives, transition state inhibitors and proteinaceous inhibitors. The characterization of various enzymes of microbial, animal or plant origin has led to their widespread use in the production of important oligosaccharides which can be incorporated into food stuffs. Sources of polysaccharides of particular interest in this chapter are those from plants and include inulin, dextran, xylan and pectin, as their hydrolysis products are purported to be functional foods in the context of gastrointestinal health. An alternative use of degraded polysaccharides is in the treatment of disease. The possibility exists to treat bacterial exopolysaccharide with lyases from bacteriophage to produce oligosaccharides exhibiting bioactive sequences. Although this area is currently in its infancy the knowledge is available to investigate further.

  4. Ionic solutes impact collagen scaffold bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Pawelec, K M; Husmann, A; Wardale, R J; Best, S M; Cameron, R E

    2015-02-01

    The structure of ice-templated collagen scaffolds is sensitive to many factors. By adding 0.5 wt% of sodium chloride or sucrose to collagen slurries, scaffold structure could be tuned through changes in ice growth kinetics and interactions of the solute and collagen. With ionic solutes (sodium chloride) the entanglements of the collagen molecule decreased, leading to fibrous scaffolds with increased pore size and decreased attachment of chondrocytes. With non-ionic solutes (sucrose) ice growth was slowed, leading to significantly reduced pore size and up-regulated cell attachment. This highlights the large changes in structure and biological function stimulated by solutes in ice-templating systems. PMID:25649518

  5. Cell penetration to nanofibrous scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Rampichová, Michala; Buzgo, Matej; Chvojka, Jiří; Prosecká, Eva; Kofroňová, Olga; Amler, Evžen

    2014-01-01

    Cell infiltration is a critical parameter for the successful development of 3D matrices for tissue engineering. Application of electrospun nanofibers in tissue engineering has recently attracted much attention. Notwithstanding several of their advantages, small pore size and small thickness of the electrospun layer limit their application for development of 3D scaffolds. Several methods for the pore size and/or electrospun layer thickness increase have been recently developed. Nevertheless, tissue engineering still needs emerging of either novel nanofiber-enriched composites or new techniques for 3D nanofiber fabrication. Forcespinning® seems to be a promising alternative. The potential of the Forcespinning® method is illustrated in preliminary experiment with mesenchymal stem cells. PMID:24429388

  6. Electrospinning of Bioinspired Polymer Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Jose V; Carvalho, Pedro P; Best, Serena M

    2015-01-01

    Electrospinning is a technique used in the production of polymer nanofibre meshes. The use of biodegradable and biocompatible polymers to produce nanofibres that closely mimic the extracellular matrix (ECM) of different tissues has opened a wide range of possibilities for the application of electrospinning in Tissue Engineering. It is believed that nano-features (such as voids and surface cues) present in nanofibre mesh scaffolds, combined with the chemical composition of the fibres, can stimulate cell attachment, growth and differentiation. Despite the widespread use of electrospun nanofibres in tissue engineering, the present chapter will focus on the advances made in the utilisation of these materials in bone, cartilage and tooth related applications. Several aspects will be taken into consideration, namely the choice of polymers, the surface modification of the nanofibres in order to achieve mineralisation, and also the biological application of such materials. PMID:26545743

  7. A transient cell-shielding method for viable MSC delivery within hydrophobic scaffolds polymerized in situ.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ruijing; Ward, Catherine L; Davidson, Jeffrey M; Duvall, Craig L; Wenke, Joseph C; Guelcher, Scott A

    2015-06-01

    Cell-based therapies have emerged as promising approaches for regenerative medicine. Hydrophobic poly(ester urethane)s offer the advantages of robust mechanical properties, cell attachment without the use of peptides, and controlled degradation by oxidative and hydrolytic mechanisms. However, the application of injectable hydrophobic polymers to cell delivery is limited by the challenges of protecting cells from reaction products and creating a macroporous architecture post-cure. We designed injectable carriers for cell delivery derived from reactive, hydrophobic polyisocyanate and polyester triol precursors. To overcome cell death caused by reaction products from in situ polymerization, we encapsulated bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMSCs) in fastdegrading, oxidized alginate beads prior to mixing with the hydrophobic precursors. Cells survived the polymerization at >70% viability, and rapid dissolution of oxidized alginate beads after the scaffold cured created interconnected macropores that facilitated cellular adhesion to the scaffold in vitro. Applying this injectable system to deliver BMSCs to rat excisional skin wounds showed that the scaffolds supported survival of transplanted cells and infiltration of host cells, which improved new tissue formation compared to both implanted, pre-formed scaffolds seeded with cells and acellular controls. Our design is the first to enable injectable delivery of settable, hydrophobic scaffolds where cell encapsulation provides a mechanism for both temporary cytoprotection during polymerization and rapid formation of macropores post-polymerization. This simple approach provides potential advantages for cell delivery relative to hydrogel technologies, which have weaker mechanical properties and require incorporation of peptides to achieve cell adhesion and degradability. PMID:25907036

  8. Nanofibrous poly(3-hydroxybutyrate)/poly(3-hydroxyoctanoate) scaffolds provide a functional microenvironment for cartilage repair.

    PubMed

    Ching, Kuan Y; Andriotis, Orestis G; Li, Siwei; Basnett, Pooja; Su, Bo; Roy, Ipsita; Tare, Rahul S; Sengers, Bram G; Stolz, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Articular cartilage defects, when repaired ineffectively, often lead to further deterioration of the tissue, secondary osteoarthritis and, ultimately, joint replacement. Unfortunately, current surgical procedures are unable to restore normal cartilage function. Tissue engineering of cartilage provides promising strategies for the regeneration of damaged articular cartilage. As yet, there are still significant challenges that need to be overcome to match the long-term mechanical stability and durability of native cartilage. Using electrospinning of different blends of biodegradable poly(3-hydroxybutyrate)/poly(3-hydroxyoctanoate), we produced polymer scaffolds and optimised their structure, stiffness, degradation rates and biocompatibility. Scaffolds with a poly(3-hydroxybutyrate)/poly(3-hydroxyoctanoate) ratio of 1:0.25 exhibit randomly oriented fibres that closely mimic the collagen fibrillar meshwork of native cartilage and match the stiffness of native articular cartilage. Degradation of the scaffolds into products that could be easily removed from the body was indicated by changes in fibre structure, loss of molecular weight and a decrease in scaffold stiffness after one and four months. Histological and immunohistochemical analysis after three weeks of culture with human articular chondrocytes revealed a hyaline-like cartilage matrix. The ability to fine tune the ultrastructure and mechanical properties using different blends of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate)/poly(3-hydroxyoctanoate) allows to produce a cartilage repair kit for clinical use to reduce the risk of developing secondary osteoarthritis. We further suggest the development of a toolbox with tailor-made scaffolds for the repair of other tissues that require a 'guiding' structure to support the body's self-healing process. PMID:27013217

  9. Bioimprinted Polymer Scaffolds for Selective Recognition of RGD Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, Nicole; Peppas, Nicholas A.

    2003-03-01

    Fibronectin and a number of other plasma and extracellular matrix (ECM) adhesion proteins contain the tetrapeptide arginine-glycine-aspartic acid-serine (RGDS), and this sequence can be summarily recognized and bound by integrins present on cell membranes. Upon integrin binding, cells adhere to the substrate, and this adherence encourages ECM deposition and other cellular remodeling events. By targeting specific chemical functional groups on the peptide using non-covalent molecular imprinting, biomimetic polymeric scaffolds can be designed to mimic protein-ECM binding both on the surface and in the bulk during polymer degradation. Methacrylic acid-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (MAA-g-EGDMA) copolymer films were prepared by free-radical ultraviolet polymerization in the presence of RGDS to create novel imprinted matrices for possible tissue engineering scaffolds. SEM analysis revealed a highly macroporous structure in peptide-imprinted polymers compared to controls. Optimal crosslinking ratios for peptide imprinting were determined using a small molecular weight fluorescent tag, 4-chloro-7-nitrobenzofurazan, and analyzed using fluorescent microscopy. Higher crosslinking ratios yielded better template recognition and gels exhibited specific recognition in aqueous media to RGDS molecules when in the presence of similar tetrapeptides.

  10. Using glucosamine to improve the properties of photocrosslinked gelatin scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Suo, Hairui; Xu, Kedi; Zheng, Xiaoxiang

    2015-02-01

    The use of hydrogel-based cell transport scaffolds holds great promise in regenerative medicine, such as treating osteoarthritis. Gelatin and glucosamine are the ideal materials to be used in the hydrogel scaffolds for cartilage regeneration for they could act as compositions of cartilage. To overcome the weak strength of traditional gelatin hydrogels and down-regulate cell toxicity of glucosamine, gelatin and glucosamine molecules were grafted with acrylate groups and covalently crosslinked under photo-radiation to form hydrogels. Hydrogels with tuning physiochemical properties were produced according to different proportions of methacrylate gelatin (GelMA) and N-acryloyl glucosamine (AGA). The process of photocrosslinking was elaborated, and the hypothesis of increasing AGA concentration leading to higher strength of hydrogels was corroborated by testing rheological property and scanning micro-morphological features. A serial of properties, including smaller swelling ratio, lower gelatin dissolution and slower degradation of GelMA/AGA hydrogels with higher AGA concentration further proved our hypothesis. Moreover, AGA molecules showed less cytotoxicity than unmodified glucosamine molecules and the incorporation of AGA molecules in GelMA/AGA hydrogels upregulated cell adhesion and spreading on the hydrogel surface. All of these results indicated that addition of AGA molecules could significantly alter the physiochemical properties of GelMA/AGA hydrogels, which may have broad application prospects in the future. PMID:25248323

  11. Functionalized mesoporous bioactive glass scaffolds for enhanced bone tissue regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xingdi; Zeng, Deliang; Li, Nan; Wen, Jin; Jiang, Xinquan; Liu, Changsheng; Li, Yongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Mesoporous bioactive glass (MBG), which possesses excellent bioactivity, biocompatibility and osteoconductivity, has played an important role in bone tissue regeneration. However, it is difficult to prepare MBG scaffolds with high compressive strength for applications in bone regeneration; this difficulty has greatly hindered its development and use. To solve this problem, a simple powder processing technique has been successfully developed to fabricate a novel type of MBG scaffold (MBGS). Furthermore, amino or carboxylic groups could be successfully grafted onto MBGSs (denoted as N-MBGS and C-MBGS, respectively) through a post-grafting process. It was revealed that both MBGS and the functionalized MBGSs could significantly promote the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of bMSCs. Due to its positively charged surface, N-MBGS presented the highest in vitro osteogenic capability of the three samples. Moreover, in vivo testing results demonstrated that N-MBGS could promote higher levels of bone regeneration compared with MBGS and C-MBGS. In addition to its surface characteristics, it is believed that the decreased degradation rate of N-MBGS plays a vital role in promoting bone regeneration. These findings indicate that MBGSs are promising materials with potential practical applications in bone regeneration, which can be successfully fabricated by combining a powder processing technique and post-grafting process. PMID:26763311

  12. Hybrid Tissue Engineering Scaffolds by Combination of Three-Dimensional Printing and Cell Photoencapsulation

    PubMed Central

    Markovic, Marica; Van Hoorick, Jasper; Hölzl, Katja; Tromayer, Maximilian; Gruber, Peter; Nürnberger, Sylvia; Dubruel, Peter; Van Vlierberghe, Sandra; Liska, Robert; Ovsianikov, Aleksandr

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing offers versatile possibilities for adapting the structural parameters of tissue engineering scaffolds. However, it is also essential to develop procedures allowing efficient cell seeding independent of scaffold geometry and pore size. The aim of this study was to establish a method for seeding the scaffolds using photopolymerizable cell-laden hydrogels. The latter facilitates convenient preparation, and handling of cell suspension, while distributing the hydrogel precursor throughout the pores, before it is cross-linked with light. In addition, encapsulation of living cells within hydrogels can produce constructs with high initial cell loading and intimate cell-matrix contact, similar to that of the natural extra-cellular matrix (ECM). Three dimensional scaffolds were produced from poly(lactic) acid (PLA) by means of fused deposition modeling. A solution of methacrylamide-modified gelatin (Gel-MOD) in cell culture medium containing photoinitiator Li-TPO-L was used as a hydrogel precursor. Being an enzymatically degradable derivative of natural collagen, gelatin-based matrices are biomimetic and potentially support the process of cell-induced remodeling. Preosteoblast cells MC3T3-E1 at a density of 10 × 106 cells per 1 mL were used for testing the seeding procedure and cell proliferation studies. Obtained results indicate that produced constructs support cell survival and proliferation over extended duration of our experiment. The established two-step approach for scaffold seeding with the cells is simple, rapid, and is shown to be highly reproducible. Furthermore, it enables precise control of the initial cell density, while yielding their uniform distribution throughout the scaffold. Such hybrid tissue engineering constructs merge the advantages of rigid 3D printed constructs with the soft hydrogel matrix, potentially mimicking the process of ECM remodeling. PMID:26858826

  13. Hybrid biomimetic scaffold composed of electrospun polycaprolactone nanofibers and self-assembled peptide amphiphile nanofibers

    PubMed Central

    Tambralli, Ajay; Blakeney, Bryan; Anderson, Joel; Kushwaha, Meenakshi; Andukuri, Adinarayana; Dean, Derrick; Jun, Ho-Wook

    2011-01-01

    Nanofibrous electrospun poly (ε-caprolactone) (ePCL) scaffolds have inherent structural advantages, but lack of bioactivity has limited their usefulness in biomedical applications. Thus, here we report the development of a hybrid, nanostructured, extracellular matrix (ECM) mimicking scaffold by a combination of ePCL nanofibers and self-assembled peptide amphiphile (PA) nanofibers. The PAs have ECM mimicking characteristics including a cell adhesive ligand (RGDS) and matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) mediated degradable sites. TEM imaging verified successful PA self-assembly into nanofibers (diameters of 8 – 10 nm) using a solvent evaporation method. This evaporation coating method was then used to successfully coat PAs onto ePCL nanofibers (diameters of 300 – 400 nm), to develop the hybrid, bioactive scaffolds. SEM characterization showed that the PA coatings did not interfere with the porous ePCL nanofiber network. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were seeded onto the hybrid scaffolds to evaluate their bioactivity. Significantly greater attachment and spreading of hMSCs were observed on ePCL nanofibers coated with PA-RGDS as compared to ePCL nanofibers coated with PA-S (no cell adhesive ligand) and uncoated ePCL nanofibers. Overall, this novel strategy presents a new solution to overcome the current bioactivity challenges of electrospun scaffolds and combines the unique characteristics of ePCL nanofibers and self-assembled PA nanofibers to provide an ECM mimicking environment. This has great potential to be applied to many different electrospun scaffolds for various biomedical applications. PMID:20811101

  14. Calcium Phosphate Scaffolds Combined with Bone Morphogenetic Proteins or Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Han; Yang, Hui-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to review the current status of calcium phosphate (CaP) scaffolds combined with bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) or mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in the field of bone tissue engineering (BTE). Date Sources: Data cited in this review were obtained primarily from PubMed and Medline in publications from 1979 to 2014, with highly regarded older publications also included. The terms BTE, CaP, BMPs, and MSC were used for the literature search. Study Selection: Reviews focused on relevant aspects and original articles reporting in vitro and/or in vivo results concerning the efficiency of CaP/BMPs or CaP/MSCs composites were retrieved, reviewed, analyzed, and summarized. Results: An ideal BTE product contains three elements: Scaffold, growth factors, and stem cells. CaP-based scaffolds are popular because of their outstanding biocompatibility, bioactivity, and osteoconductivity. However, they lack stiffness and osteoinductivity. To solve this problem, composite scaffolds of CaP with BMPs have been developed. New bone formation by CaP/BMP composites can reach levels similar to those of autografts. CaP scaffolds are compatible with MSCs and CaP/MSC composites exhibit excellent osteogenesis and stiffness. In addition, a CaP/MSC/BMP scaffold can repair bone defects more effectively than an autograft. Conclusions: Novel BTE products possess remarkable osteoconduction and osteoinduction capacities, and exhibit balanced degradation with osteogenesis. Further work should yield safe, viable, and efficient materials for the repair of bone lesions. PMID:25881610

  15. Comparative study of two perfusion routes with different flow in decellularization to harvest an optimal pulmonary scaffold for recellularization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiyi; Wang, Zhibin; Yu, Qing; Xi, Haitao; Weng, Jie; Du, Xiaohong; Chen, Daqing; Ma, Jianshe; Mei, Jin; Chen, Chan

    2016-10-01

    Decellularization processes may variably distort or degrade extracellular matrix (ECM) structure. In this study, two perfusion routes (PR) were tested on SD rat lung samples. One decellularization protocol, PR1, was perfused through the pulmonary artery. The other decellularization protocol, PR2, was perfused through the trachea. Both decellularization protocols were used by the same detergent-based (sodium dodecyl sulphate and Triton X-100) with different flow continuous perfusion. There was no visible difference in vessel architecture between PR1- and PR2-decellularized scaffold. However, the airway structure and alveoli architecture of pulmonary decellularized scaffolds generated through PR2 at a flow rate of 8 mL/min were destroyed partly when compared to that in native lung and PR1-decellularized scaffold. Ultramicroscopic assessment of scaffolds was similar in both protocols and showed filamentous ECM with preserved fiber disposition and structure. Histological analysis and immunostaining showed no detectable cells remaining in the pulmonary scaffolds compare with native lung. The DNA concentration was significantly reduced in the decellularized scaffolds compared to the native lungs. A549 cells reseeded onto decellularized pulmonary scaffolds were no significant difference between PR1 and PR2 in cell viability, p > 0.05. We conclude that under the same high flow velocity status, perfusion decellularization through the pulmonary artery may be an optimal pathway to obtain decellularized scaffolds for pulmonary regeneration. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2567-2575, 2016. PMID:27227902

  16. Characterization of hydroxyapatite whisker reinforced composites and scaffolds for mechanical and biological function in orthopaedic and spinal implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, Timothy L.

    The overall objective of this study was to investigate the mechanical and biological properties of HA whisker reinforced polyaryletherketone (PAEK) composites and scaffolds which are key to clinical translation for orthopedic and spinal implants. The fatigue behavior of polyetherketoneketone (PEKK) reinforced with 0, 20, and 40 vol% hydroxyapatite (HA) was investigated in four-point bending fatigue. The fatigue life decreased with increasing HA reinforcement. However, PEKK reinforced with 40 vol% HA whiskers exhibited a fatigue life greater than 2.106 cycles at 40 MPa. Moreover, HA whisker reinforcement resulted in decreased creep deformation and minimal modulus degradation. The effects of the mold temperature and polyetheretherketone (PEEK) powder were investigated on the mechanical properties and crystallinity of HA whisker reinforced PEEK scaffolds prepared using compression molding and porogen leaching. The mechanical properties of the scaffolds increased while the PEEK crystallinity decreased, with increasing mold temperature and suggested an optimal mold temperature of 370--375°C for PEEK scaffolds comprising of 75% porosity and 20 vol% HA whisker reinforcement, regardless of the PEEK powder size. The effects of the porogen morphology on the architecture, mechanical properties, and permeability of HA whisker reinforced PEEK scaffolds were investigated in 75--90% porous scaffolds. HA whisker reinforced PEEK scaffolds prepared with an ellipsoidal porogen exhibited a greater permeability than scaffolds prepared with a cubic porogen. The compressive modulus, yield strength, and yield strain were not affected by the porogen morphology. The effects of HA reinforcement morphology and content was investigated on the behavior of primary osteoblasts on dense HA reinforced PEEK substrates in vitro. At day 7, the number of osteoblasts attached to PEEK substrate surfaces increased with increasing HA content and for HA whiskers compared to equiaxed HA powder reinforcement

  17. Bioresorbable vascular scaffolds technology: current use and future developments

    PubMed Central

    Giacchi, Giuseppe; Ortega-Paz, Luis; Brugaletta, Salvatore; Ishida, Kohki; Sabaté, Manel

    2016-01-01

    Coronary bioresorbable vascular scaffolds are a new appealing therapeutic option in interventional cardiology. The most used and studied is currently the Absorb BVS™. Its backbone is made of poly-L-lactide and coated by a thin layer of poly-D,L-lactide, it releases everolimus and is fully degraded to H2O and CO2 in 2–3 years. Absorb BVS™ seems to offer several theoretical advantages over metallic stent, as it gives temporary mechanical support to vessel wall without permanently caging it. Therefore, long-term endothelial function and structure are not affected. A possible future surgical revascularization is not compromised. Natural vasomotion in response to external stimuli is also recovered. Several observational and randomized trials have been published about BVS clinical outcomes. The main aim of this review is to carry out a systematic analysis about Absorb BVS™ studies, evaluating also the technical improvements of the Absorb GT1 BVS™. PMID:27468252

  18. NATIONAL ELEVATION DATASET

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USGS National Elevation Dataset (NED) has been developed by merging the highest-resolution, best-quality elevation data available across the United States into a seamless raster format. NED is the result of the maturation of the USGS effort to provide 1:24,000-scale Digital ...

  19. NATIONAL ELEVATION DATASET HILLSHADE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USGS National Elevation Dataset (NED) has been developed bymerging the highest-resolution, best-quality elevation data available across the United States into a seamless raster format. NED is the result of the maturation of the USGS effort to provide 1:24,000-scale Digital E...

  20. Fabrication of hybrid nanocomposite scaffolds by incorporating ligand-free hydroxyapatite nanoparticles into biodegradable polymer scaffolds and release studies

    PubMed Central

    Farkas, Balazs; Rodio, Marina; Romano, Ilaria; Diaspro, Alberto; Intartaglia, Romuald

    2015-01-01

    Summary We report on the optical fabrication approach of preparing free-standing composite thin films of hydroxyapatite (HA) and biodegradable polymers by combining pulsed laser ablation in liquid and mask-projection excimer laser stereolithography (MPExSL). Ligand-free HA nanoparticles were prepared by ultrafast laser ablation of a HA target in a solvent, and then the nanoparticles were dispersed into the liquid polymer resin prior to the photocuring process using MPExSL. The resin is poly(propylene fumarate) (PPF), a photo-polymerizable, biodegradable material. The polymer is blended with diethyl fumarate in 7:3 w/w to adjust the resin viscosity. The evaluation of the structural and mechanical properties of the fabricated hybrid thin film was performed by means of SEM and nanoindentation, respectively, while the chemical and degradation studies were conducted through thermogravimetric analysis, and FTIR. The photocuring efficiency was found to be dependent on the nanoparticle concentration. The MPExSL process yielded PPF thin films with a stable and homogenous dispersion of the embedded HA nanoparticles. Here, it was not possible to tune the stiffness and hardness of the scaffolds by varying the laser parameters, although this was observed for regular PPF scaffolds. Finally, the gradual release of the hydroxyapatite nanoparticles over thin film biodegradation is reported. PMID:26734513

  1. Fabrication of hybrid nanocomposite scaffolds by incorporating ligand-free hydroxyapatite nanoparticles into biodegradable polymer scaffolds and release studies.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Balazs; Rodio, Marina; Romano, Ilaria; Diaspro, Alberto; Intartaglia, Romuald; Beke, Szabolcs

    2015-01-01

    We report on the optical fabrication approach of preparing free-standing composite thin films of hydroxyapatite (HA) and biodegradable polymers by combining pulsed laser ablation in liquid and mask-projection excimer laser stereolithography (MPExSL). Ligand-free HA nanoparticles were prepared by ultrafast laser ablation of a HA target in a solvent, and then the nanoparticles were dispersed into the liquid polymer resin prior to the photocuring process using MPExSL. The resin is poly(propylene fumarate) (PPF), a photo-polymerizable, biodegradable material. The polymer is blended with diethyl fumarate in 7:3 w/w to adjust the resin viscosity. The evaluation of the structural and mechanical properties of the fabricated hybrid thin film was performed by means of SEM and nanoindentation, respectively, while the chemical and degradation studies were conducted through thermogravimetric analysis, and FTIR. The photocuring efficiency was found to be dependent on the nanoparticle concentration. The MPExSL process yielded PPF thin films with a stable and homogenous dispersion of the embedded HA nanoparticles. Here, it was not possible to tune the stiffness and hardness of the scaffolds by varying the laser parameters, although this was observed for regular PPF scaffolds. Finally, the gradual release of the hydroxyapatite nanoparticles over thin film biodegradation is reported. PMID:26734513

  2. Biodegradable synthetic scaffolds for tendon regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Reverchon, Ernesto; Baldino, Lucia; Cardea, Stefano; De Marco, Iolanda

    2012-01-01

    Summary Tissue regeneration is aimed at producing biological or synthetic scaffolds to be implanted in the body for regenerate functional tissues. Several techniques and materials have been used to obtain biodegradable synthetic scaffolds, on which adhesion, growth, migration and differentiation of human cells has been attempted. Scaffolds for tendon regeneration have been less frequently proposed, because they have a complex hierarchical structure and it is very difficult to mimic their peculiar mechanical properties. In this review, we critically analyzed the proposed materials and fabrication techniques for tendon tissue engineering and we indicated new preparation processes, based on the use of supercritical fluids, to produce scaffolds with characteristics very similar to the native tendon structure. PMID:23738295

  3. Biomimetic biphasic scaffolds for osteochondral defect repair

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuezhou; Ding, Jianxun; Wang, Jincheng; Zhuang, Xiuli; Chen, Xuesi

    2015-01-01

    The osteochondral defects caused by vigorous trauma or physical disease are difficult to be managed. Tissue engineering provides a possible option to regenerate the damaged osteochondral tissues. For osteochondral reconstruction, one intact scaffold should be considered to support the regeneration of both cartilage and subchondral bone. Therefore, the biphasic scaffolds with the mimic structures of osteochondral tissues have been developed to close this chasm. A variety of biomimetic bilayer scaffolds fabricated from natural or synthetic polymers, or the ones loading with growth factors, cells, or both of them make great progresses in osteochondral defect repair. In this review, the preparation and in vitro and/or in vivo verification of bioinspired biphasic scaffolds are summarized and discussed, as well as the prospect is predicted. PMID:26816644

  4. Mars elevation distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Sherman S. C.; Howington-Kraus, Annie E.; Ablin, Karyn K.

    1991-01-01

    A Digital Terrain Model (DTM) of Mars was derived with both Mercator and Sinusoidal Equal-Area projections from the global topographic map of Mars (scale 1:15 million, contour interval 1 km). Elevations on the map are referred to Mars' topographic datum that is defined by the gravity field at a 6.1-millibar pressure surface with respect to the center of mass of Mars. The DTM has a resolution at the equator of 1/59.226 degrees (exactly 1 km) per pixel. By using the DTM, the volumetric distribution of Mars topography above and below the datum has previously been calculated. Three types of elevation distributions of Mars' topography were calculated from the same DTM: (1) the frequency distribution of elevations at the pixel resolution; (2) average elevations in increments of 6 degrees in both longitude and latitude; and (3) average elevations in 36 separate blocks, each covering 30 degrees of latitude and 60 degrees of longitude.

  5. Biomimetic nanoclay scaffolds for bone tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambre, Avinash Harishchandra

    Tissue engineering offers a significant potential alternative to conventional methods for rectifying tissue defects by evoking natural regeneration process via interactions between cells and 3D porous scaffolds. Imparting adequate mechanical properties to biodegradable scaffolds for bone tissue engineering is an important challenge and extends from molecular to macroscale. This work focuses on the use of sodium montmorillonite (Na-MMT) to design polymer composite scaffolds having enhanced mechanical properties along with multiple interdependent properties. Materials design beginning at the molecular level was used in which Na-MMT clay was modified with three different unnatural amino acids and further characterized using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD). Based on improved bicompatibility with human osteoblasts (bone cells) and intermediate increase in d-spacing of MMT clay (shown by XRD), 5-aminovaleric acid modified clay was further used to prepare biopolymer (chitosan-polygalacturonic acid complex) scaffolds. Osteoblast proliferation in biopolymer scaffolds containing 5-aminovaleric acid modified clay was similar to biopolymer scaffolds containing hydroxyapatite (HAP). A novel process based on biomineralization in bone was designed to prepare 5-aminovaleric acid modified clay capable of imparting multiple properties to the scaffolds. Bone-like apatite was mineralized in modified clay and a novel nanoclay-HAP hybrid (in situ HAPclay) was obtained. FTIR spectroscopy indicated a molecular level organic-inorganic association between the intercalated 5-aminovaleric acid and mineralized HAP. Osteoblasts formed clusters on biopolymer composite films prepared with different weight percent compositions of in situ HAPclay. Human MSCs formed mineralized nodules on composite films and mineralized extracellular matrix (ECM) in composite scaffolds without the use of osteogenic supplements. Polycaprolactone (PCL), a synthetic polymer, was

  6. Optimization of a biomimetic poly-(lactic acid) ligament scaffold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uehlin, Andrew F.

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is the most commonly injured ligament of the knee, often requiring orthopedic reconstruction using autograft or allograph tissue, both with significant disadvantages. As a result, tissue engineering an ACL replacement graft has been heavily investigated. The present study attempts to replicate the morphology and mechanical properties of the ACL using a nanomatrix composite of highly-aligned poly(lactic acid) (PLA) fibers with various surface and biochemical modifications. Additionally, this study attempts to recreate the natural mineralization gradient found at the ACL enthesis onto the scaffold, capable of inducing a favorable cellular response in vitro. Unidirectional electrospinning was used to create nanofibers of PLA, followed by an induced degradation of the nanofibers via 0.25M NaOH hydrolysis. The effects of the unidirectional electrospinning as well as the effects of NaOH hydrolysis on fiber alignment, fiber diameter, surface morphology, crystallinity, in vitro swelling, immobilization of fibrin, and mechanical properties were investigated, resulting in a modified morphology correlating to the microstructure of native ligament tissue with similar mechanical properties. Furthering the development of the PLA nanomatrix composite, a bioinkjet printer was used to immobilize nanoparticulate hydroxyapatite (HANP) on the surface of the scaffold. A series of 300pL droplets of HANP bioink were printed over a gradient pattern mimetic of (and spatially corresponding to) the mineralization gradient found over the microanatomy at the ACL enthesis. Proliferation and differentiation response of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) in vitro was assessed on a variety of conditions and combinations of the PLA nanofiber scaffold surface modifications (inclusive and exclusive of HANP, fibrin, and various time dependent NaOH treatments). It was found that a combinatory effect of the HANP gradient with fibrin on 20 minute NaOH treated PLA

  7. A novel method to in vitro evaluate biocompatibility of nanoscaled scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoming; Wang, Zheng; Zhao, Tianxiao; Yu, Bo; Fan, Yubo; Feng, Qingling; Cui, Fu-Zhai; Watari, Fumio

    2016-09-01

    This study provided a new method to in vitro evaluate the biocompatibility of nanoscaled scaffolds for tissue engineering with neutrophils other than ordinary cell culture. The neutrophils were separated from human peripheral blood of healthy subjects. In vitro degradation product of nanohydroxyapatite/collagen (nHAC), nanohydroxyapatite/collagen/poly (L-lactic acid) (nHACP), and nHACP reinforced by chitin fibers (nHACP/CF) in the D-Hank's Balanced Salt Solution (D-HBSS) was used as the testing solution, which was thereafter mixed with the neutrophils. It was shown that the cell survival rate in the testing solutions had no significant difference from that in the D-HBSS (control). However, from both gene and protein expression levels, the lactate dehydrogenase and tumor necrosis factor-alpha of the neutrophils in the nHACP/CF testing solution were found lowest during the whole testing period; the main reasons of which might be that the calcium release rate of the scaffold was slowest and that the pH value of its degradation solution was nearest to that of human body. Moreover, in vivo experiments showed that most inflammation reactions happened for nHAC and poly (L-lactic acid) groups, while the least inflammation reactions happened for nHACP/CF group in the subcutaneous dorsum of mice at 2 weeks after the surgery, which confirmed the in vitro findings. These results indicated that the pH value and the certain metal iron concentration of the nanoscaled scaffold degradation solution should be two important factors that significantly affect its biocompatibility. This study provides a simple and effective biocompatibility test method for biodegradable nanoscaled tissue engineering scaffolds. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2117-2125, 2016. PMID:27087116

  8. Polycaprolactone-Coated 3D Printed Tricalcium Phosphate Scaffolds for Bone Tissue Engineering: In Vitro Alendronate Release Behavior and Local Delivery Effect on In Vivo Osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of in vitro alendronate (AD) release behavior through polycaprolactone (PCL) coating on in vivo bone formation using PCL-coated 3D printed interconnected porous tricalcium phosphate (TCP) scaffolds. Higher AD and Ca2+ ion release was observed at lower pH (5.0) than that at higher pH (7.4). AD and Ca2+ release, surface morphology, and phase analysis after release indicated a matrix degradation dominated AD release caused by TCP dissolution. PCL coating showed its effectiveness for controlled and sustained AD release. Six different scaffold compositions, namely, (i) TCP (bare TCP), (ii) TCP + AD (AD-coated TCP), (iii) TCP + PCL (PCL-coated TCP), (iv) TCP + PCL + AD, (v) TCP + AD + PCL, and (vi) TCP + AD + PCL + AD were tested in the distal femoral defect of Sprague–Dawley rats for 6 and 10 weeks. An excellent bone formation inside the micro and macro pores of the scaffolds was observed from histomorphology. Histomorphometric analysis revealed maximum new bone formation in TCP + AD + PCL scaffolds after 6 weeks. No adverse effect of PCL on bioactivity of TCP and in vivo bone formation was observed. All scaffolds with AD showed higher bone formation and reduced TRAP (tartrate resistant acid phosphatase) positive cells activity compared to bare TCP and TCP coated with only PCL. Bare TCP scaffolds showed the highest TRAP positive cells activity followed by TCP + PCL scaffolds, whereas TCP + AD scaffolds showed the lowest TRAP activity. A higher TRAP positive cells activity was observed in TCP + AD + PCL compared to TCP + AD scaffolds after 6 weeks. Our results show that in vivo local AD delivery from PCL-coated 3DP TCP scaffolds could further induce increased early bone formation. PMID:24826838

  9. Antimicrobial Cu-bearing stainless steel scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Ren, Ling; Li, Xiaopeng; Zhang, Shuyuan; Sercombe, Timothy B; Yang, Ke

    2016-11-01

    Copper-bearing stainless steel scaffolds with two different structures (Body Centered Cubic and Gyroid labyrinth) at two solid fractions (25% and 40%) were fabricated from both 316L powder and a mixture of 316L and elemental Cu powder using selective laser melting, and relative 316L scaffolds were served as control group. After processing, the antimicrobial testing demonstrated that the 316L-Cu scaffolds presented excellent antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, and the cell viability assay indicated that there was no cytotoxic effect of 316L-Cu scaffolds on rat marrow mesenchymal stem cells. As such, these have the potential to reduce implant-associated infections. The Cu was also found to homogeneously distribute within the microstructure by scanning electronic microcopy. The addition of Cu would not significantly affect its strength and stiffness compared to 316L scaffold, and the stiffness of all the scaffolds (3-20GPa) is similar to that of bone and much less than that of bulk stainless steel. Consequently, fabrication of such low stiffness porous structures, especially coupled with the addition of antimicrobial Cu, may provide a new direction for medical stainless steels. PMID:27524049

  10. Strategies for osteochondral repair: Focus on scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Seog-Jin; Mahapatra, Chinmaya; Singh, Rajendra K; Knowles, Jonathan C

    2014-01-01

    Interest in osteochondral repair has been increasing with the growing number of sports-related injuries, accident traumas, and congenital diseases and disorders. Although therapeutic interventions are entering an advanced stage, current surgical procedures are still in their infancy. Unlike other tissues, the osteochondral zone shows a high level of gradient and interfacial tissue organization between bone and cartilage, and thus has unique characteristics related to the ability to resist mechanical compression and restoration. Among the possible therapies, tissue engineering of osteochondral tissues has shown considerable promise where multiple approaches of utilizing cells, scaffolds, and signaling molecules have been pursued. This review focuses particularly on the importance of scaffold design and its role in the success of osteochondral tissue engineering. Biphasic and gradient composition with proper pore configurations are the basic design consideration for scaffolds. Surface modification is an essential technique to improve the scaffold function associated with cell regulation or delivery of signaling molecules. The use of functional scaffolds with a controllable delivery strategy of multiple signaling molecules is also considered a promising therapeutic approach. In this review, we updated the recent advances in scaffolding approaches for osteochondral tissue engineering. PMID:25343021

  11. Bioinspired Strong and Highly Porous Glass Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2011-01-01

    The quest for more efficient energy-related technologies is driving the development of porous and high-performance structural materials with exceptional mechanical strength. Natural materials achieve their strength through complex hierarchical designs and anisotropic structures that are extremely difficult to replicate synthetically. We emulate nature’s design by direct-ink-write assembling of glass scaffolds with a periodic pattern, and controlled sintering of the filaments into anisotropic constructs similar to biological materials. The final product is a porous glass scaffold with a compressive strength (136 MPa) comparable to that of cortical bone and a porosity (60%) comparable to that of trabecular bone. The strength of this porous glass scaffold is ~100 times that of polymer scaffolds and 4–5 times that of ceramic and glass scaffolds with comparable porosities reported elsewhere. The ability to create both porous and strong structures opens a new avenue for fabricating scaffolds for a broad array of applications, including tissue engineering, filtration, lightweight composites, and catalyst support. PMID:21544222

  12. Premixed macroporous calcium phosphate cement scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Lisa E.; Simon, Carl G.

    2009-01-01

    Calcium phosphate cement (CPC) sets in situ to form resorbable hydroxyapatite and is promising for orthopaedic applications. However, it requires on-site powder-liquid mixing during surgery, which prolongs surgical time and raises concerns of inhomogeneous mixing. The objective of this study was to develop a premixed CPC scaffold with macropores suitable for tissue ingrowth. To avoid the on-site powder-liquid mixing, the CPC paste was mixed in advance and did not set in storage; it set only after placement in a physiological solution. Using 30% and 40% mass fractions of mannitol porogen, the premixed CPC scaffold with fibers had flexural strength (mean ± sd; n = 5) of (3.9 ± 1.4) MPa and (1.8 ± 0.8) MPa, respectively. The scaffold porosity reached (68.6 ± 0.7)% and (74.7 ± 1.2)%, respectively. Osteoblast cells colonized in the surface macropores of the scaffold and attached to the hydroxyapatite crystals. Cell viability values for the premixed CPC scaffold was not significantly different from that of a conventional non-premixed CPC known to be biocompatible (P > 0.1). In conclusion, using fast-dissolving porogen and slow-dissolving fibers, a premixed macroporous CPC scaffold was developed with strength approaching the reported strengths of sintered porous hydroxyapatite implants and cancellous bone, and non-cytotoxicity similar to a biocompatible non-premixed CPC. PMID:17277972

  13. Multi-component nanofibrous scaffolds with tunable properties for bone tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jose, Moncy V.

    Bone is a highly complex tissue which is an integral part of vertebrates and hence any damage has a major negative effect on the quality of life. Tissue engineering is regarded as an ideal route to resolve the issues related to the scarcity of tissue and organ for transplantation. Apart from cell line and growth factors, the choice of materials and fabrication technique for scaffold are equally important. The goal of this work was to develop a multi-component nanofibrous scaffold based on a synthetic polymer (poly(lactic-co-glycolide) (PLGA)), a biopolymer (collagen) and a biomineral (nano-hydroxyapatite (nano-HA)) by electrospinning technique, which mimics the nanoscopic, chemical, and anisotropic features of bone. Preliminary studies involved fabrication of nanocomposite scaffolds based on PLGA and nano-HA. Morphological and mechanical characterizations revealed that at low concentrations, nano-HA acted as reinforcements, whereas at higher concentrations the presence of aggregation was detrimental to the scaffold. Hydrolytic degradation studies revealed the scaffold had a little mass loss and the mechanical property was maintained for a period of 6 weeks. This study was followed by evaluation of a blend system based on PLGA and collagen. Collagen addition provides hydrophilicity and the necessary cell binding sites in PLGA. The structural characterization revealed that the blend had limited interactions between the two components. The mechanical characterization revealed that with increasing collagen concentration, there was a decline in mechanical properties. However, crosslinking of the blend system, with carbodiimide (EDC) resulted in improving the mechanical properties of the scaffolds. A multi-component system was developed by adding different concentrations of nano-HA to a fixed PLGA/collagen blend composition (80/20). Morphological and mechanical characterizations revealed properties similar to the PLGA/HA system. Cyto-compatibility studies revealed

  14. Development and characterization of novel porous 3D alginate-cockle shell powder nanobiocomposite bone scaffold.

    PubMed

    Bharatham, B Hemabarathy; Abu Bakar, Md Zuki; Perimal, Enoch Kumar; Yusof, Loqman Mohamed; Hamid, Muhajir

    2014-01-01

    A novel porous three-dimensional bone scaffold was developed using a natural polymer (alginate/Alg) in combination with a naturally obtained biomineral (nano cockle shell powder/nCP) through lyophilization techniques. The scaffold was developed in varying composition mixture of Alg-nCP and characterized using various evaluation techniques as well as preliminary in vitro studies on MG63 human osteoblast cells. Morphological observations using SEM revealed variations in structures with the use of different Alg-nCP composition ratios. All the developed scaffolds showed a porous structure with pore sizes ideal for facilitating new bone growth; however, not all combination mixtures showed subsequent favorable characteristics to be used for biological applications. Scaffolds produced using the combination mixture of 40% Alg and 60% nCP produced significantly promising results in terms of mechanical strength, degradation rate, and increased cell proliferation rates making it potentially the optimum composition mixture of Alg-nCP with future application prospects. PMID:25110655

  15. Development and Characterization of Novel Porous 3D Alginate-Cockle Shell Powder Nanobiocomposite Bone Scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Bharatham, B. Hemabarathy; Abu Bakar, Md. Zuki; Perimal, Enoch Kumar; Yusof, Loqman Mohamed; Hamid, Muhajir

    2014-01-01

    A novel porous three-dimensional bone scaffold was developed using a natural polymer (alginate/Alg) in combination with a naturally obtained biomineral (nano cockle shell powder/nCP) through lyophilization techniques. The scaffold was developed in varying composition mixture of Alg-nCP and characterized using various evaluation techniques as well as preliminary in vitro studies on MG63 human osteoblast cells. Morphological observations using SEM revealed variations in structures with the use of different Alg-nCP composition ratios. All the developed scaffolds showed a porous structure with pore sizes ideal for facilitating new bone growth; however, not all combination mixtures showed subsequent favorable characteristics to be used for biological applications. Scaffolds produced using the combination mixture of 40% Alg and 60% nCP produced significantly promising results in terms of mechanical strength, degradation rate, and increased cell proliferation rates making it potentially the optimum composition mixture of Alg-nCP with future application prospects. PMID:25110655

  16. A biomimetic tubular scaffold with spatially designed nanofibers of protein/PDS bio-blends.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Vinoy; Zhang, Xing; Vohra, Yogesh K

    2009-12-01

    Electrospun tubular conduit (4 mm inner diameter) based on blends of polydioxanone (PDS II(R)) and proteins such as gelatin and elastin having a spatially designed trilayer structure was prepared for arterial scaffolds. SEM analysis of scaffolds showed random nanofibrous morphology and well-interconnected pore network. Due to protein blending, the fiber diameter was reduced from 800-950 nm range to 300-500 nm range. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) results confirmed the blended composition and crystallinity of fibers. Pure PDS scaffold under hydrated state exhibited a tensile strength of 5.61 +/- 0.42 MPa and a modulus of 17.11 +/- 1.13 MPa with a failure strain of 216.7 +/- 13%. The blending of PDS with elastin and gelatin has decreased the tensile properties. A trilayer tubular scaffold was fabricated by sequential electrospinning of blends of elastin/gelatin, PDS/elastin/gelatin, and PDS/gelatin (EG/PEG/PG) to mimic the complex matrix structure of native arteries. Under hydrated state, the trilayer conduit exhibited tensile properties (tensile strength of 1.77 +/- 0.2 MPa and elastic modulus of 5.74 +/- 3 MPa with a failure strain of 75.08 +/- 10%) comparable to those of native arteries. In vitro degradation studies for up to 30 days showed about 40% mass loss and increase in crystallinity due to the removal of proteins and "cleavage-induced crystallization" of PDS. PMID:19575442

  17. 3D Printing of Composite Calcium Phosphate and Collagen Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Inzana, Jason A.; Olvera, Diana; Fuller, Seth M.; Kelly, James P.; Graeve, Olivia A.; Schwarz, Edward M.; Kates, Stephen L.; Awad, Hani A.

    2014-01-01

    Low temperature 3D printing of calcium phosphate scaffolds holds great promise for fabricating synthetic bone graft substitutes with enhanced performance over traditional techniques. Many design parameters, such as the binder solution properties, have yet to be optimized to ensure maximal biocompatibility and osteoconductivity with sufficient mechanical properties. This study tailored the phosphoric acid-based binder solution concentration to 8.75 wt% to maximize cytocompatibility and mechanical strength, with a supplementation of Tween 80 to improve printing. To further enhance the formulation, collagen was dissolved into the binder solution to fabricate collagen-calcium phosphate composites. Reducing the viscosity and surface tension through a physiologic heat treatment and Tween 80, respectively, enabled reliable thermal inkjet printing of the collagen solutions. Supplementing the binder solution with 1–2 wt% collagen significantly improved maximum flexural strength and cell viability. To assess the bone healing performance, we implanted 3D printed scaffolds into a critically sized murine femoral defect for 9 weeks. The implants were confirmed to be osteoconductive, with new bone growth incorporating the degrading scaffold materials. In conclusion, this study demonstrates optimization of material parameters for 3D printed calcium phosphate scaffolds and enhancement of material properties by volumetric collagen incorporation via inkjet printing. PMID:24529628

  18. Use of polycaprolactone (PCL) as scaffolds for the regeneration of nerve tissue.

    PubMed

    Barbarisi, Manlio; Marino, Gerardo; Armenia, Emilia; Vincenzo, Quagliariello; Rosso, Francesco; Porcelli, Marina; Barbarisi, Alfonso

    2015-05-01

    Adipose tissue is an easily accessible source of stem cells for use in tissue regenerative medicine. In the literature, different methods have been used to stimulate acquisition of neuronal characteristics by adipose-derived stem cells (ADSC). Herein we study the growth and neuronal differentiation potential of ADSC seeded onto a porous polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffold. The objective of this study is to demonstrate that PCL can be used as a scaffold to support reconstruction of new nervous tissue using adipose stem cells. We have previously shown that undifferentiated ADSC adhere and grow on PCL. Herein we show that, after culture on PCL in neuronal differentiation medium, ADSC expressed molecular markers characteristic of neuronal cells (β-tubulin-III, Neuron-Specific Enolase (NSE), Nestin) and secrete brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF). This study suggests that PCL can be used as a scaffold to generate nervous tissue in vitro. PLC has excellent mechanical properties and a slow degradation rate. Moreover, on the basis of our results, we propose that PCL could be used for to make in vitro, scaffold coated with neuronal cells derived from Adipose stem cells (ADSC). Neuronal cells-coated PCL could find several applications to replace damaged area of ​​the body; for example, a possible use could be the generation of nerves. PMID:25202882

  19. Highly Elastic and Suturable Electrospun Poly(Glycerol Sebacate) Fibrous Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Jeffries, Eric M.; Allen, Robert A.; Gao, Jin; Pesce, Matt; Wang, Yadong

    2015-01-01

    Poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS) is a thermally-crosslinked elastomer suitable for tissue regeneration due to its elasticity, degradability, and pro-regenerative inflammatory response. Pores in PGS scaffolds are typically introduced by porogen leaching, which compromises strength. Methods for producing fibrous PGS scaffolds are very limited. Electrospinning is the most widely used method for laboratory scale production of fibrous scaffolds. Electrospinning PGS by itself is challenging, necessitating a carrier polymer which can affect material properties if not removed. We report a simple electrospinning method to produce distinct PGS fibers while maintaining the desired mechanical and cytocompatibility properties of thermally crosslinked PGS. Fibrous PGS demonstrated 5 times higher tensile strength and increased suture retention compared to porous PGS foams. Additionally, similar modulus and elastic recovery were observed. A final advantage of fibrous PGS sheets is the ability to create multi-laminate constructs due to fiber bonding that occurs during thermal crosslinking. Taken together, these highly elastic fibrous PGS scaffolds will enable new approaches in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:25686558

  20. Scaffolds Containing Spirulina sp. LEB 18 Biomass: Development, Characterization and Evaluation of In Vitro Biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Schmatz, Daiane Angelica; Uebel, Livia Da Silva; Kuntzler, Suelen Goettems; Dora, Cristiana Lima; Costa, Jorge Alberto Vieira; de Morais, Michele Greque

    2016-01-01

    Polymer nanofibers are nanomaterials that can be used as scaffolds in tissue engineering. The objective of this study was to develop, characterize and evaluate the in vitro degradation of a biomaterial consisting of nanofibers produced from biodegradable and biocompatible polymers with potential applications as a scaffold for tissue regeneration and containing Spirulina sp. LEB 18 biomass as the bioactive compound. The polymers used were poly(hydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate) and polycaprolactone. The polymeric solutions exhibited sufficiently high viscosity to produce uniform nanofibers with diameters between 335 and 617 nm. The applied conditions were as follows: a voltage of 25 kV, a distance from the capillary to the collector of 120 mm, a capillary diameter of 0.80 mm, and 12% polycaprolactone and a blend of 5% polycaprolactone and 10% poly(hydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate). The biomass was incorporated into the nanofibers at a concentration of 3%, and the incorporation was confirmed using confocal microscopy. The nanofibers were characterized using differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis, which showed that the addition of biomass did not alter the thermal properties of the biomaterial. The addition of biomass improved the tensile strength and elongation of the scaffolds compared with those produced with polymers alone. A biodegradation assay showed enzymatic action toward the biomaterial, simulating the behavior of natural tissue. Based on the analysis, it was concluded that the scaffolds that were produced have the potential to be applied in the field of tissue regeneration as biomaterials with pharmacological properties. PMID:27398568

  1. Highly elastic and suturable electrospun poly(glycerol sebacate) fibrous scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Jeffries, Eric M; Allen, Robert A; Gao, Jin; Pesce, Matt; Wang, Yadong

    2015-05-01

    Poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS) is a thermally-crosslinked elastomer suitable for tissue regeneration due to its elasticity, degradability, and pro-regenerative inflammatory response. Pores in PGS scaffolds are typically introduced by porogen leaching, which compromises strength. Methods for producing fibrous PGS scaffolds are very limited. Electrospinning is the most widely used method for laboratory scale production of fibrous scaffolds. Electrospinning PGS by itself is challenging, necessitating a carrier polymer which can affect material properties if not removed. We report a simple electrospinning method to produce distinct PGS fibers while maintaining the desired mechanical and cytocompatibility properties of thermally crosslinked PGS. Fibrous PGS demonstrated 5 times higher tensile strength and increased suture retention compared to porous PGS foams. Additionally, similar modulus and elastic recovery were observed. A final advantage of fibrous PGS sheets is the ability to create multi-laminate constructs due to fiber bonding that occurs during thermal crosslinking. Taken together, these highly elastic fibrous PGS scaffolds will enable new approaches in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:25686558

  2. Biomineralized hydroxyapatite nanoclay composite scaffolds with polycaprolactone for stem cell-based bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Ambre, Avinash H; Katti, Dinesh R; Katti, Kalpana S

    2015-06-01

    Nanoclay modified with unnatural amino acid was used to design a nanoclay-hydroxyapatite (HAP) hybrid by mineralizing HAP in the nanoclay galleries mimicking biomineralization. This hybrid (in situ HAPclay) was used to fabricate polycaprolactone (PCL)/in situ HAPclay films and scaffolds for bone regeneration. Cell culture assays and imaging were used to study interactions between human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and PCL/in situ HAPclay composites (films and scaffolds). SEM imaging indicated MSC attachment, formation of mineralized extracellular (ECM) on PCL/in situ HAPclay films, and infiltration of MSCs to the interior of PCL/in situ HAPclay scaffolds. Mineralized ECM was formed by MSCs without use of osteogenic supplements. AFM imaging performed on this in vitro generated mineralized ECM on PCL/in situ HAPclay films revealed presence of components (collagen and mineral) of hierarchical organization reminiscent of natural bone. Cellular events observed during two-stage seeding experiments on PCL/in situ HAPclay films indicated similarities with events occurring during in vivo bone formation. PCL/in situ HAPclay films showed significantly increased (100-595% increase in elastic moduli) nanomechanical properties and PCL/in situ HAPclay scaffolds showed increased degradation. This work puts forth PCL/in situ HAPclay composites as viable biomaterials for bone tissue engineering. PMID:25331212

  3. Proangiogenic Hydrogels Within Macroporous Scaffolds Enhance Islet Engraftment in an Extrahepatic Site

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Ann-Christina; Martino, Mikaël M.; Pedraza, Eileen; Sukert, Steve; Pileggi, Antonello; Ricordi, Camillo; Hubbell, Jeffrey A.

    2013-01-01

    The transplantation of allogeneic islets in recent clinical trials has shown substantial promise as a therapy for type 1 diabetes; however, long-term insulin independence remains inadequate. This has been largely attributed to the current intravascular, hepatic transplant site, which exposes islets to mechanical and inflammatory stresses. A highly macroporous scaffold, housed within an alternative transplant site, can support an ideal environment for islet transplantation by providing three-dimensional distribution of islets, while permitting the infiltration of host vasculature. In the present study, we sought to evaluate the synergistic effect of a proangiogenic hydrogel loaded within the void space of a macroporous poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) scaffold on islet engraftment. The fibrin-based proangiogenic hydrogel tested presents platelet derived growth factor (PDGF-BB), via a fibronectin (FN) fragment containing growth factor and major integrin binding sites in close proximity. The combination of the proangiogenic hydrogel with PDMS scaffolds resulted in a significant decrease in the time to normoglycemia for syngeneic mouse islet transplants. This benefit was associated with an observed increase in competent vessel branching, as well as mature intraislet vessels. Overall, the addition of the proangiogenic factor PDGF-BB, delivered via the FN fragment-functionalized hydrogel, positively influenced the efficiency of engraftment. These characteristics, along with its ease of retrieval, make this combination of a biostable macroporous scaffold and a degradable proangiogenic hydrogel a supportive structure for insulin-producing cells implanted in extrahepatic sites. PMID:23790218

  4. Porous bioactive scaffolds: characterization and biological performance in a model of tibial bone defect in rats.

    PubMed

    Kido, Hueliton Wilian; Tim, Carla Roberta; Bossini, Paulo Sérgio; Parizotto, Nivaldo Antônio; de Castro, Cynthia Aparecida; Crovace, Murilo Camuri; Rodrigues, Ana Candida Martins; Zanotto, Edgar Dutra; Peitl Filho, Oscar; de Freitas Anibal, Fernanda; Rennó, Ana Claudia Muniz

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of highly porous Biosilicate(®) scaffolds on bone healing in a tibial bone defect model in rats by means of histological evaluation (histopathological and immunohistochemistry analysis) of the bone callus and the systemic inflammatory response (immunoenzymatic assay). Eighty Wistar rats (12 weeks-old, weighing±300 g) were randomly divided into 2 groups (n=10 per experimental group, per time point): control group and Biosilicate® group (BG). Each group was euthanized 3, 7, 14 and 21 days post-surgery. Histological findings revealed a similar inflammatory response in both experimental groups, 3 and 7 days post-surgery. During the experimental periods (3-21 days post-surgery), it was observed that the biomaterial degradation, mainly in the periphery region, provided the development of the newly formed bone into the scaffolds. Immunohistochemistry analysis demonstrated that the Biosilicate® scaffolds stimulated cyclooxygenase-2, vascular endothelial growth factor and runt-related transcription factor 2 expression. Furthermore, in the immunoenzymatic assay, BG presented no difference in the level of tumor necrosis factor alpha in all experimental periods. Still, BG showed a higher level of interleukin 4 after 14 days post-implantation and a lower level of interleukin 10 in 21 days post-surgery. Our results demonstrated that Biosilicate® scaffolds can contribute for bone formation through a suitable architecture and by stimulating the synthesis of markers related to the bone repair. PMID:25631271

  5. 3D printing of porous hydroxyapatite scaffolds intended for use in bone tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Cox, Sophie C; Thornby, John A; Gibbons, Gregory J; Williams, Mark A; Mallick, Kajal K

    2015-02-01

    A systematic characterisation of bone tissue scaffolds fabricated via 3D printing from hydroxyapatite (HA) and poly(vinyl)alcohol (PVOH) composite powders is presented. Flowability of HA:PVOH precursor materials was observed to affect mechanical stability, microstructure and porosity of 3D printed scaffolds. Anisotropic behaviour of constructs and part failure at the boundaries of interlayer bonds was highlighted by compressive strength testing. A trade-off between the ability to facilitate removal of PVOH thermal degradation products during sintering and the compressive strength of green parts was revealed. The ultimate compressive strength of 55% porous green scaffolds printed along the Y-axis and dried in a vacuum oven for 6h was 0.88 ± 0.02 MPa. Critically, the pores of 3D printed constructs could be user designed, ensuring bulk interconnectivity, and the imperfect packing of powder particles created an inherent surface roughness and non-designed porosity within the scaffold. These features are considered promising since they are known to facilitate osteoconduction and osteointegration in-vivo. Characterisation techniques utilised in this study include two funnel flow tests, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), compressive strength testing and computed tomography (CT). PMID:25492194

  6. Preparation and characterization of fibrous chitosan-glued phosphate glass fiber scaffolds for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Kai; Wu, Zhaoying; Wei, Jie; Rűssel, Christian; Liang, Wen; Boccaccini, Aldo R

    2015-08-01

    Phosphate glass fibers (PGF) have emerged as promising building blocks for constructing bone scaffolds. In this study, fibrous scaffolds (PGFS) were fabricated using a facile binding method at room temperature. PGFS exhibited an extracellular matrix-like morphology and were composed of PGF as matrix and chitosan as the natural binding glue. They showed an interconnected porous structure with a porosity of ~87% and pore size of 100-500 µm. PGFS exhibited the typical compressive stress-strain behaviour of highly porous, low-density, open-cell scaffolds. Their yield stress and modulus were ~0.38 and ~2.84 MPa, respectively, with the strength being higher than the lower bound of the compressive strength of cancellous bone. PGFS were degradable and the weight loss was about 25% after immersion in stimulated body fluid (SBF) for 28 days. In addition, the yield stress and the modulus decreased with increasing immersion time in SBF. Apatite formation could be detected on the surface of PGFS within 7 days of immersion in SBF. MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay indicated that PGFS were non-cytotoxic against bone marrow stromal cells (bMSCs) after culture for up to 72 h. These results suggest that PGFS could be promising scaffolds for bone regeneration applications. PMID:26271217

  7. Signs, dispositions, and semiotic scaffolding.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Eliseo

    2015-12-01

    scaffolding. These interactions transpire between energetic causal chains and a wide range of converging semiotic transactions unfolding within each individual organism and between organisms and their environment. The perspective advanced here helps elucidate the manner in which physical and semiotic causation cooperate in an orchestrated fashion, giving rise to an ever-expanding profusion of scaffolding structures and processes. Using simple examples I outline some mechanisms that bring about this orchestration as well as the resultant channeling activities that eventually merge and find their culmination in the enactment of goal-oriented behavior. PMID:26276462

  8. A Hydrogel-Mineral Composite Scaffold for Osteochondral Interface Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Khanarian, Nora T.; Jiang, Jie; Wan, Leo Q.; Mow, Van C.

    2012-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is the leading cause of physical disability among Americans, and tissue engineered cartilage grafts have emerged as a promising treatment option for this debilitating condition. Currently, the formation of a stable interface between the cartilage graft and subchondral bone remains a significant challenge. This study evaluates the potential of a hybrid scaffold of hydroxyapatite (HA) and alginate hydrogel for the regeneration of the osteochondral interface. Specifically, the effects of HA on the response of chondrocytes were determined, focusing on changes in matrix production and mineralization, as well as scaffold mechanical properties over time. Additionally, the optimal chondrocyte population for interface tissue engineering was evaluated. It was observed that the HA phase of the composite scaffold promoted the formation of a proteoglycan- and type II collagen–rich matrix when seeded with deep zone chondrocytes. More importantly, the elevated biosynthesis translated into significant increases in both compressive and shear moduli relative to the mineral-free control. Presence of HA also promoted chondrocyte hypertrophy and type X collagen deposition. These results demonstrate that the hydrogel–calcium phosphate composite supported the formation of a calcified cartilage-like matrix and is a promising scaffold design for osteochondral interface tissue engineering. PMID:21919797

  9. Degradable/non-degradable polymer composites for in-situ tissue engineering small diameter vascular prosthesis application.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fujun; Mohammed, Abedalwafa; Li, Chaojing; Ge, Peng; Wang, Lu; King, Martin W

    2014-01-01

    Various tissue-engineered vascular grafts have been studied in order to overcome the clinical disadvantages associated with conventional prostheses. However, previous tissue-engineered vascular grafts have possessed insufficient mechanical properties and thus have generally required either preoperative cellular manipulation or the use of bioreactors to improve their performance. In this study, we focused on the concept of in situ cellularization and developed a tissue-engineered vascular graft with degradable/non-degradable polymer composites for arterial reconstruction that would facilitate the renewal of autologous tissue without any pretreatment. Additionally, these composites are designed to improve the mechanical performance of a small-diameter vascular prosthesis scaffold that is made from a flexible membrane of poly(e-caprolactone) (PCL). The PCL scaffold was reinforced by embedding a tubular fabric that was knitted from polyethylene terephthalate (PET) yarns within the freeze-dried composite structure. Adding this knitted fabric component significantly improved the mechanical properties of the composite scaffold, such as its tensile strength and initial modulus, radial compliance, compression recovery, and suture retention force. Finally, this reinforced composite structure is a promising candidate for use as a tissue-engineered scaffold for a future small diameter vascular prosthesis. PMID:25226910

  10. Modifying the mechanical properties of silk nanofiber scaffold by knitted orientation for regenerative medicine applications.

    PubMed

    Dodel, M; Hemmati Nejad, N; Bahrami, S H; Soleimani, M; Hanaee-Ahvaz, H

    2016-01-01

    Tissue reconstruction is among the increasing applications of polymer nanofibers. Fibrous scaffolds (mats) can be easily produced using the electrospinning method with structure and biomechanical properties similar to those of a cellular matrix. Electrospinning is widely used in the production of nanofibers and the GAP-method electrospinning is one of the means of producing fully aligned nanofibers. In this research, using the GAP-method, knitted fibrous scaffolds were made of silk fibroin, which is a biocompatible and biodegradable polymer. To extract fibroin from cocoons, the sodium chloride solution as well as dialysis and freeze-drying techniques were employed. The molecular weight of the extracted fibroin was measured with the SDS-Page electrophoresis technique. Moreover, the pure fibroin structure was examined using the ATR-FTIR method, and the viscosity of the solution used for electrospinning was measured with the Brookfield rotational viscometer. The scaffolds were prepared through electrospinning of the silk fibroin in pure formic acid solution. The following three structures were electrospun: 1) a random structure; 2) a knitted structure with an interstitial angle of 60 degrees; 3) a knitted structure with an interstitial angle of 90 degrees. Morphology of the resulting fibers was studied with a SEM (scanning electron microscope). Fibroin scaffolds are degradable in water. Therefore, they were fixated through immersion in methanol to be prepared for assays. The mechanical properties of the scaffolds were also studied using a tensile strength test device. The effect of methanol on the strength properties of the samples was also assessed. The hydrophilic potential of the samples was measured via a contact angle test. To increase the hydrophilicity of the scaffold surfaces, the cold oxygen plasma technique was employed. Finally, the biocompatibility and cell adhesion of the resulting scaffolds were examined through a HEK 293 cell culture, and the results

  11. Tubular inverse opal scaffolds for biomimetic vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ze; Wang, Jie; Lu, Jie; Yu, Yunru; Fu, Fanfan; Wang, Huan; Liu, Yuxiao; Zhao, Yuanjin; Gu, Zhongze

    2016-07-01

    There is a clinical need for tissue-engineered blood vessels that can be used to replace or bypass damaged arteries. The success of such grafts depends strongly on their ability to mimic native arteries; however, currently available artificial vessels are restricted by their complex processing, controversial integrity, or uncontrollable cell location and orientation. Here, we present new tubular scaffolds with specific surface microstructures for structural vessel mimicry. The tubular scaffolds are fabricated by rotationally expanding three-dimensional tubular inverse opals that are replicated from colloidal crystal templates in capillaries. Because of the ordered porous structure of the inverse opals, the expanded tubular scaffolds are imparted with circumferentially oriented elliptical pattern microstructures on their surfaces. It is demonstrated that these tailored tubular scaffolds can effectively make endothelial cells to form an integrated hollow tubular structure on their inner surface and induce smooth muscle cells to form a circumferential orientation on their outer surface. These features of our tubular scaffolds make them highly promising for the construction of biomimetic blood vessels.There is a clinical need for tissue-engineered blood vessels that can be used to replace or bypass damaged arteries. The success of such grafts depends strongly on their ability to mimic native arteries; however, currently available artificial vessels are restricted by their complex processing, controversial integrity, or uncontrollable cell location and orientation. Here, we present new tubular scaffolds with specific surface microstructures for structural vessel mimicry. The tubular scaffolds are fabricated by rotationally expanding three-dimensional tubular inverse opals that are replicated from colloidal crystal templates in capillaries. Because of the ordered porous structure of the inverse opals, the expanded tubular scaffolds are imparted with circumferentially

  12. Combining Scaffolding for Content and Scaffolding for Dialogue to Support Conceptual Breakthroughs in Understanding Probability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazak, Sibel; Wegerif, Rupert; Fujita, Taro

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the relationship between scaffolding, dialogue, and conceptual breakthroughs, using data from a design-based research study that focuses on the development of understanding of probability in 10-12 year old students. The aim of the study is to gain insight into how the combination of scaffolding for content using…

  13. Scaffold Seeking: A Reverse Design of Scaffolding in Computer-Supported Word Problem Solving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Hercy N. H.; Yang, Euphony F. Y.; Liao, Calvin C. Y.; Chang, Ben; Huang, Yana C. Y.; Chan, Tak-Wai

    2015-01-01

    Although well-designed scaffolding may assist students to accomplish learning tasks, its insufficient capability to dynamically assess students' abilities and to adaptively support them may result in the problem of overscaffolding. Our previous project has also shown that students using scaffolds to solve mathematical word problems for a long time…

  14. Scaffolding the "Scaffolding" Metaphor: From Inspiration to a Practical Tool for Kindergarten Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eshach, Haim; Dor-Ziderman, Yair; Arbel, Yael

    2011-01-01

    The present research aims shifting "scaffolding" from an inspiring metaphor to a practical tool to be used by kindergarten teachers when conducting scientific activities. It identifies scaffolding strategies that three experienced kindergarten teachers, ones acknowledged as excelling in science teaching, implicitly used when conducting science…

  15. Knitted polylactide 96/4 L/D structures and scaffolds for tissue engineering: Shelf life, in vitro and in vivo studies

    PubMed Central

    Ellä, Ville; Annala, Tuija; Länsman, Satu; Nurminen, Manu; Kellomäki, Minna

    2011-01-01

    This study covers the whole production cycle, from biodegradable polymer processing to an in vivo tissue engineered construct. Six different biodegradable polylactide 96/4 L/D single jersey knits were manufactured using either four or eight multifilament fiber batches. The properties of those were studied in vitro for 42 weeks and in 0- to 3-year shelf life studies. Three types (Ø 12, 15 and 19 mm) of cylindrical scaffolds were manufactured from the knit, and the properties of those were studied in vitro for 48 weeks. For the Ø 15 mm scaffold type, mechanical properties were also studied in a one-year in vivo experiment. The scaffolds were implanted in the rat subcutis. All the scaffolds were g-irradiated prior to the studies. In vitro, all the knits lost 99% of their mechanical strength in 30 weeks. In the three-year follow up of shelf life properties, there was no decrease in the mechanical properties due to the storage time and only a 12% decrease in molecular weight. The in vitro and in vivo scaffolds lost their mechanical properties after 1 week. In the case of the in vivo samples, the mechanical properties were restored again, stepwise, by the presence of growing/maturing tissue between weeks 3 and 12. Faster degradation was observed with in vitro scaffolds compared to in vivo scaffolds during the one-year follow up. PMID:23507732

  16. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic) Acid/Nanohydroxyapatite Scaffold Containing Chitosan Microspheres with Adrenomedullin Delivery for Modulation Activity of Osteoblasts and Vascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chunyan; Chen, Yingxin; Dong, Shujun; Chen, Xuesi; Zhou, Yanmin

    2013-01-01

    Adrenomedullin (ADM) is a bioactive regulatory peptide that affects migration and proliferation of diverse cell types, including endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and osteoblast-like cells. This study investigated the effects of sustained release of ADM on the modulation activity of osteoblasts and vascular endothelial cells in vitro. Chitosan microspheres (CMs) were developed for ADM delivery. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid and nano-hydroxyapatite were used to prepare scaffolds containing microspheres with ADM. The CMs showed rough surface morphology and high porosity, and they were well-distributed. The scaffolds exhibited relatively uniform pore sizes with interconnected pores. The addition of CMs improved the mechanical properties of the scaffolds without affecting their high porosity. In vitro degradation tests indicated that the addition of CMs increased the water absorption of the scaffolds and inhibited pH decline of phosphate-buffered saline medium. The expression levels of osteogenic-related and angiogenic-related genes were determined in MG63 cells and in human umbilical vein endothelial cells cultured on the scaffolds, respectively. The expression levels of osteogenic-related and angiogenic-related proteins were also detected by western blot analysis. Their expression levels in cells were improved on the ADM delivery scaffolds at a certain time point. The in vitro evaluation suggests that the microsphere-scaffold system is suitable as a model for bone tissue engineering. PMID:23841075

  17. Fabrication and characterization of toughness-enhanced scaffolds comprising β-TCP/POC using the freeform fabrication system with micro-droplet jetting.

    PubMed

    Gao, Li; Li, Cuidi; Chen, Fangping; Liu, Changsheng

    2015-06-01

    A novel elastomeric material, poly(1,8-octanediol-co-citrate) (POC), has demonstrated tremendous versatility because of its advantageous toughness, tunable degradation properties, and efficient drug release capability. In this study, POC was used to improve the mechanical perfo