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Sample records for scale fabrication final

  1. Exploring the Feasibility of Fabricating Micron-Scale Components Using Microcontact Printing LDRD Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    MYERS, RAMONA L.; RITCHEY, M. BARRY; STOKES, ROBERT N.; CASIAS, ADRIAN L.; ADAMS, DAVID P.; OLIVER, ANDREW D.; EMERSON, JOHN A.

    2003-06-01

    Many microfabrication techniques are being developed for applications in microelectronics, microsensors, and micro-optics. Since the advent of microcomponents, designers have been forced to modify their designs to include limitations of current technology, such as the inability to make three-dimensional structures and the need for piece-part assembly. Many groups have successfully transferred a wide variety of patterns to both two-dimensional and three-dimensional substrates using microcontact printing. Microcontact printing is a technique in which a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) is patterned onto a substrate by transfer printing. The patterned layer can act as an etch resist or a foundation upon which to build new types of microstructures. We created a gold pattern with features as small as 1.2 {micro}m using microcontact printing and subsequent processing. This approach looks promising for constructing single-level structures such as microelectrode arrays and sensors. It can be a viable technique for creating three-dimensional structures such as microcoils and microsprings if the right equipment is available to achieve proper alignment, and if a means is available to connect the final parts to other components in subsequent assembly operations. Microcontact printing provides a wide variety of new opportunities in the fabrication of microcomponents, and increases the options of designers.

  2. Fabrication of full-scale fiber reinforced hot-gas filters by chemical vapor deposition. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.G.

    1994-04-01

    The goal of this program was to develop and fabricate an initial set of ceramic fiber reinforced, ceramic matrix composite, hot gas candle filters for testing in a simulated pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) environment. Four full-scale ceramic fiber reinforced candle filters were fabricated in a multi step process. The substrate was filament wound using Nextel{trademark} 312 yarn and then coated with silicon carbide by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) to form a ceramic composite shape that provides the candle`s structural shape, toughness, and strength. Filter layer material was applied over the surface and then bonded with silicon carbide in a chemical vapor infiltration, CVI, step.

  3. PRSEUS Panel Fabrication Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linton, Kim A.; Velicki, Alexander; Hoffman, Krishna; Thrash, Patrick; Pickell, Robert; Turley, Robert

    2014-01-01

    NASA and the Boeing Company have been working together under the Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project to develop stitched unitized structure for reduced weight, reduced fuel burn and reduced pollutants in the next generation of commercial aircraft. The structural concept being evaluated is PRSEUS (Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure). In the PRSEUS concept, dry carbon fabric, pultruded carbon rods, and foam are stitched together into large preforms. Then these preforms are infused with an epoxy resin into large panels in an out-of-autoclave process. These panels have stiffeners in the length-wise and width-wise directions but contain no fasteners because all stiffeners are stitched to the panel skin. This document contains a description of the fabrication of panels for use in the 30-foot-long Multi-Bay Box test article to be evaluated at NASA LaRC.

  4. Spacecraft fabrication and test MODIL. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, T.T.

    1994-05-01

    This report covers the period from October 1992 through the close of the project. FY 92 closed out with the successful briefing to industry and with many potential and important initiatives in the spacecraft arena. Due to the funding uncertainties, we were directed to proceed as if our funding would be approximately the same as FY 92 ($2M), but not to make any major new commitments. However, the MODIL`s FY 93 funding was reduced to $810K and we were directed to concentrate on the cryocooler area. The cryocooler effort completed its demonstration project. The final meetings with the cryocooler fabricators were very encouraging as we witnessed the enthusiastic reception of technology to help them reduce fabrication uncertainties. Support of the USAF Phillips Laboratory cryocooler program was continued including kick-off meetings for the Prototype Spacecraft Cryocooler (PSC). Under Phillips Laboratory support, Gill Cruz visited British Aerospace and Lucas Aerospace in the United Kingdom to assess their manufacturing capabilities. In the Automated Spacecraft & Assembly Project (ASAP), contracts were pursued for the analysis by four Brilliant Eyes prime contractors to provide a proprietary snap shot of their current status of Integrated Product Development. In the materials and structure thrust the final analysis was completed of the samples made under the contract (``Partial Automation of Matched Metal Net Shape Molding of Continuous Fiber Composites``) to SPARTA. The Precision Technologies thrust funded the Jet Propulsion Laboratory to prepare a plan to develop a Computer Aided Alignment capability to significantly reduce the time for alignment and even possibly provide real time and remote alignment capability of systems in flight.

  5. Three dimensional fabrication at small size scales

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Timothy G.; Zarafshar, Aasiyeh M.; Gracias, David H.

    2010-01-01

    Despite the fact that we live in a three-dimensional (3D) world and macroscale engineering is 3D, conventional sub-mm scale engineering is inherently two-dimensional (2D). New fabrication and patterning strategies are needed to enable truly three-dimensionally-engineered structures at small size scales. Here, we review strategies that have been developed over the last two decades that seek to enable such millimeter to nanoscale 3D fabrication and patterning. A focus of this review is the strategy of self-assembly, specifically in a biologically inspired, more deterministic form known as self-folding. Self-folding methods can leverage the strengths of lithography to enable the construction of precisely patterned 3D structures and “smart” components. This self-assembling approach is compared with other 3D fabrication paradigms, and its advantages and disadvantages are discussed. PMID:20349446

  6. Fabrication of full-scale fiber-reinforced hot-gas filters by chemical vapor depostion. Final report, November 1, 1994 -- December 32, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.G.; Eaton, J.H.; Pysher, D.J.; Leitheiser, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    The overall goal of this contract and its extensions has been to develop a hot gas candle filter which is light weight, has a thin wall, resists mechanical and thermal shock, and is resistive to alkali attack. A ceramic fiber reinforced, ceramic matrix composite approach has been followed to fabricate this new candle filter. Past reports covered the first test results of two ceramic composite candle filters at the Westinghouse Science and Technology Center in March of 1993, subsequent improvements made in the filters construction and fabrication processing, and the testing of six improved full size, 60 mm diameter by 1575 mm length, filters that met or exceeded performance requirements set for them. Completion of the 172 hours of simulated PFBC testing and thermal transients plus maintaining less than 4 ppm clean side ash concentration provided a basis for moving to the next step of testing in the Tidd PFBCC Demonstration Project. In this contract extension 3M fabricated 110 filters to be used for tests in demonstration power plant facilities and other tests that become available. The filters were tested to meet all quality assurance specifications and inventoried for Oak Ridge National Laboratory, ORNL. The filters are being shipped to various industrial, university, and national laboratory test facilities as requested by ORNL. Ten ceramic composite filters were installed in December, 1994 in the Tidd PFBC Demonstration Project filter vessel for their test period No. 5. Five filters were installed in a top cluster and five in a bottom cluster. The filters were removed in May 1995 after operating for 1 1 1 0 hours in a temperature range of 760{degrees}C to 843{degrees}C, with 80% of the run above 815{degrees}C.

  7. Wafer-scale micro-optics fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voelkel, Reinhard

    2012-07-01

    Micro-optics is an indispensable key enabling technology for many products and applications today. Probably the most prestigious examples are the diffractive light shaping elements used in high-end DUV lithography steppers. Highly-efficient refractive and diffractive micro-optical elements are used for precise beam and pupil shaping. Micro-optics had a major impact on the reduction of aberrations and diffraction effects in projection lithography, allowing a resolution enhancement from 250 nm to 45 nm within the past decade. Micro-optics also plays a decisive role in medical devices (endoscopes, ophthalmology), in all laser-based devices and fiber communication networks, bringing high-speed internet to our homes. Even our modern smart phones contain a variety of micro-optical elements. For example, LED flash light shaping elements, the secondary camera, ambient light and proximity sensors. Wherever light is involved, micro-optics offers the chance to further miniaturize a device, to improve its performance, or to reduce manufacturing and packaging costs. Wafer-scale micro-optics fabrication is based on technology established by the semiconductor industry. Thousands of components are fabricated in parallel on a wafer. This review paper recapitulates major steps and inventions in wafer-scale micro-optics technology. The state-of-the-art of fabrication, testing and packaging technology is summarized.

  8. Superconducting-wire fabrication. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Glad, W.E.; Chase, G.G.

    1990-05-01

    Experiments were done leading to the fabrication of high-temperature superconducting composite wire. Bulk superconductor was characterized by using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. The chemical compatibility of superconducting materials with a number of metal sheathing candidates was tested, with silver offering the best compatibility. Wire was fabricated by drawing 0.250-inch-diameter silver tubing packed with superconducting powder. Single core wires were drawn to 0.037-inch diameter. The best critical current performance (660 A/cm2) for leaded bismuth 2-2-2-3 material was achieved by flattening single-core wire before heat treatment.

  9. Composite material fabrication techniques. CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect

    Frame, B J; Paulauskas, F L; Miller, J; Parzych, W

    1996-09-30

    This report describes a low cost method of fabricating components for mockups and training simulators used in the transportation industry. This technology was developed jointly by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Metters Industries, Incorporated (MI) as part of a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) ORNL94-0288 sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Economic Impace and Diversity Minority Business Technology Transfer Consortium. The technology involves fabricating component replicas from fiberglass/epoxy composites using a resin transfer molding (RTM) process. The original components are used as masters to fabricate the molds. The molding process yields parts that duplicate the significant dimensional requirements of the original component while still parts that duplicate the significant dimensional requirements of the original component while still providing adequate strength and stiffness for use in training simulators. This technology permits MI to overcome an acute shortage in surplus military hardware available to them for use in manufacturing training simulators. In addition, the cost of the molded fiberglass components is expected to be less than that of procuring the original components from the military.

  10. Fabrication for precision mechanisms. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gillespie, L.K.

    1980-03-01

    The fabrication of components and assemblies for miniature precision mechanisms provides a variety of exacting manufacturing challenges. Size alone makes many parts hard to pick up, handle, measure, and install. This same small size causes more distortion or bending during machining, assembly, and welding. Some parts even float on the cleaning and deburring solutions. Tools break easily in very small holes, and surface finishes play an important role in part operation. Twenty-five manufacturing operations were studied to improve the precision of existing machining and assembly techniques. The study included the machining of metals and plastics using techniques new to the manufacture of miniature switches, timers, and actuators. Drilling, tapping, and press-fitting miniature features were evaluated. Fixturing and handling techniques, friction reduction, and the forming of ceramic parts were also studied. Many of the new approaches from this study have been incorporated into existing processes and further refined. Detailed observations have been reported in 33 other Bendix reports and the highlights of those observations are summarized in this study.

  11. Fabrication and optimization of micro-scale speckle patterns for digital image correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jianguo; Yan, Gaoshen; He, Guanglong; Chen, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Experimental investigations are performed on the fabrication and optimization of micro-scale speckle patterns formed by spinning an epoxy resin and powder for digital image correlation measurements. New factors influencing the fabrication process, including the ambient temperature, centrifugal velocity, and solidifying time, are carefully analyzed and are evaluated in terms of the average gray gradient and particle agglomeration, and the optimal micro-scale speckle pattern is obtained with the proposed parameters in the fabrication process. Additionally, the micro-scale speckle pattern is experimentally verified by performing prescribed rigid-body translation tests, and the relative errors are approximately 1.5%. Finally, the micro-scale speckle patterns are transferred to tensile specimens of aluminum and a polymer material with a V notch. The measurement results are consistent with the theoretical predictions, and this agreement demonstrates the feasibility and accuracy of the micro-scale speckle patterns.

  12. COATING AND MANDREL EFFECTS ON FABRICATION OF GLOW DISCHARGE POLYMER NIF SCALE INDIRECT DRIVE CAPSULES

    SciTech Connect

    NIKROO,A; PONTELANDOLFO,JM; CASTILLO,ER

    2002-04-01

    OAK A271 COATING AND MANDREL EFFECTS ON FABRICATION OF GLOW DISCHARGE POLYMER NIF SCALE INDIRECT DRIVE CAPSULES. Targets for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) need to be about 200 {micro}m thick and 2 mm in diameter. These dimensions are well beyond those currently fabricated on a routine basis. They have investigated fabrication of near NIF scale targets using the depolymerizable mandrel technique. Poly-alpha-methylstyrene (PAMS) mandrels, about 2 mm in diameter, of varying qualities were coated with as much as 125 {micro}m of glow discharge polymer (GDP). The surface finish of the final shells was examined using a variety of techniques. A clear dependence of the modal spectrum of final GDP shell on the quality of the initial PAMS mandrels was observed. isolated features were found to be the greatest cause for a shell not meeting the NIF standard.

  13. Method for producing fabrication material for constructing micrometer-scaled machines, fabrication material for micrometer-scaled machines

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, F.J.

    1995-12-31

    A method for producing fabrication material for use in the construction of nanometer-scaled machines is provided whereby similar protein molecules are isolated and manipulated at predetermined residue positions so as to facilitate noncovalent interaction, but without compromising the folding configuration or native structure of the original protein biomodules. A fabrication material is also provided consisting of biomodules systematically constructed and arranged at specific solution parameters.

  14. Scaling silicon photonic switch fabrics for data center interconnection networks.

    PubMed

    Nikolova, Dessislava; Rumley, Sébastien; Calhoun, David; Li, Qi; Hendry, Robert; Samadi, Payman; Bergman, Keren

    2015-01-26

    With the rapidly increasing aggregate bandwidth requirements of data centers there is a growing interest in the insertion of optically interconnected networks with high-radix transparent optical switch fabrics. Silicon photonics is a particularly promising and applicable technology due to its small footprint, CMOS compatibility, high bandwidth density, and the potential for nanosecond scale dynamic connectivity. In this paper we analyze the feasibility of building silicon photonic microring based switch fabrics for data center scale optical interconnection networks. We evaluate the scalability of a microring based switch fabric for WDM signals. Critical parameters including crosstalk, insertion loss and switching speed are analyzed, and their sensitivity with respect to device parameters is examined. We show that optimization of physical layer parameters can reduce crosstalk and increase switch fabric scalability. Our analysis indicates that with current state-of-the-art devices, a high radix 128 × 128 silicon photonic single chip switch fabric with tolerable power penalty is feasible. The applicability of silicon photonic microrings for data center switching is further supported via review of microring operations and control demonstrations. The challenges and opportunities for this technology platform are discussed. PMID:25835876

  15. Wafer-Scale Microwire Transistor Array Fabricated via Evaporative Assembly.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae Hoon; Sun, Qijun; Choi, Yongsuk; Lee, Seungwoo; Lee, Dong Yun; Kim, Yong Hoon; Cho, Jeong Ho

    2016-06-22

    One-dimensional (1D) nano/microwires have attracted significant attention as promising building blocks for various electronic and optical device applications. The integration of these elements into functional device networks with controlled alignment and density presents a significant challenge for practical device applications. Here, we demonstrated the fabrication of wafer-scale microwire field-effect transistor (FET) arrays based on well-aligned inorganic semiconductor microwires (indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (IGZO)) and organic polymeric insulator microwires fabricated via a simple and large-area evaporative assembly technique. This microwire fabrication method offers a facile approach to precisely manipulating the channel dimensions of the FETs. The resulting solution-processed monolithic IGZO microwire FETs exhibited a maximum electron mobility of 1.02 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and an on/off current ratio of 1 × 10(6). The appropriate choice of the polymeric microwires used to define the channel lengths enabled fine control over the threshold voltages of the devices, which were employed to fabricate high-performance depletion-load inverters. Low-voltage-operated microwire FETs were successfully fabricated on a plastic substrate using a high-capacitance ion gel gate dielectric. The microwire fabrication technique involving evaporative assembly provided a facile, effective, and reliable method for preparing flexible large-area electronics. PMID:27228025

  16. Wafer-scale fabrication of nanoapertures using corner lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burouni, Narges; Berenschot, Erwin; Elwenspoek, Miko; Sarajlic, Edin; Leussink, Pele; Jansen, Henri; Tas, Niels

    2013-07-01

    Several submicron probe technologies require the use of apertures to serve as electrical, optical or fluidic probes; for example, writing precisely using an atomic force microscope or near-field sensing of light reflecting from a biological surface. Controlling the size of such apertures below 100 nm is a challenge in fabrication. One way to accomplish this scale is to use high resolution tools such as deep UV or e-beam. However, these tools are wafer-scale and expensive, or only provide series fabrication. For this reason, in this study a versatile method adapted from conventional micromachining is investigated to fabricate protruding apertures on wafer-scale. This approach is called corner lithography and offers control of the size of the aperture with diameter less than 50 nm using a low-budget lithography tool. For example, by tuning the process parameters, an estimated mean size of 44.5 nm and an estimated standard deviation of 2.3 nm are found. The technique is demonstrated—based on a theoretical foundation including a statistical analysis—with the nanofabrication of apertures at the apexes of micromachined pyramids. Besides apertures, the technique enables the construction of wires, slits and dots into versatile three-dimensional structures.

  17. Fabrication of toroidal composite pressure vessels. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Dodge, W.G.; Escalona, A.

    1996-11-24

    A method for fabricating composite pressure vessels having toroidal geometry was evaluated. Eight units were fabricated using fibrous graphite material wrapped over a thin-walled aluminum liner. The material was wrapped using a machine designed for wrapping, the graphite material was impregnated with an epoxy resin that was subsequently thermally cured. The units were fabricated using various winding patterns. They were hydrostatically tested to determine their performance. The method of fabrication was demonstrated. However, the improvement in performance to weight ratio over that obtainable by an all metal vessel probably does not justify the extra cost of fabrication.

  18. Large-Scale Graphene Film Deposition for Monolithic Device Fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-shurman, Khaled

    Since 1958, the concept of integrated circuit (IC) has achieved great technological developments and helped in shrinking electronic devices. Nowadays, an IC consists of more than a million of compacted transistors. The majority of current ICs use silicon as a semiconductor material. According to Moore's law, the number of transistors built-in on a microchip can be double every two years. However, silicon device manufacturing reaches its physical limits. To explain, there is a new trend to shrinking circuitry to seven nanometers where a lot of unknown quantum effects such as tunneling effect can not be controlled. Hence, there is an urgent need for a new platform material to replace Si. Graphene is considered a promising material with enormous potential applications in many electronic and optoelectronics devices due to its superior properties. There are several techniques to produce graphene films. Among these techniques, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) offers a very convenient method to fabricate films for large-scale graphene films. Though CVD method is suitable for large area growth of graphene, the need for transferring a graphene film to silicon-based substrates is required. Furthermore, the graphene films thus achieved are, in fact, not single crystalline. Also, graphene fabrication utilizing Cu and Ni at high growth temperature contaminates the substrate that holds Si CMOS circuitry and CVD chamber as well. So, lowering the deposition temperature is another technological milestone for the successful adoption of graphene in integrated circuits fabrication. In this research, direct large-scale graphene film fabrication on silicon based platform (i.e. SiO2 and Si3N4) at low temperature was achieved. With a focus on low-temperature graphene growth, hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (HF-CVD) was utilized to synthesize graphene film using 200 nm thick nickel film. Raman spectroscopy was utilized to examine graphene formation on the bottom side of the Ni film

  19. UV imprint fabrication of polymeric scales for optical rotary encoders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jucius, D.; Grybas, I.; Grigaliūnas, V.; Mikolajūnas, M.; Lazauskas, A.

    2014-03-01

    Optical encoders are one of the most common displacement sensors. Scale gratings for such sensors are usually made of glass. However, polymers can offer several advantages such as lightweight, low cost fabrication and versatility in structures and grades. In this paper application of UV imprint technique to fabricate polymeric scale gratings for rotary encoders is reported. Experiments are performed by imprinting 3 μm layer of UV sensitive photopolymer coated on the substrate made of 200 μm PET film. Process of UV imprinting caused no problems concerned with mould contamination or sticking to the polymer. Optical microscopy and AFM measurements of replicated polymeric scales have demonstrated the absence of macro-defects and good reproducibility of Si mould features with lateral dimensions down to the order of hundreds of nanometers. Measurements of intensity distribution in transmitted diffraction pattern have showed an effective diffraction with most of the diffracted light intensity concentrated in the zero and first diffraction order as it is required for the application in optical rotary encoders employing interferential scanning principle. Commercialization of UV imprint technology would allow replacement of conventional glass scales at least in those applications where lightweight and low price of encoders are of great importance.

  20. Fabrication of whisker-toughened alumina tubes. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Loutfy, R.O.

    1993-09-01

    A process has been developed to fabricate whisker toughened alumina composites by slip casting dense colloidal suspensions of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-15% SiC{sub w}. Optimum processing parameters for slip casting we developed with slip viscosity of 60--70 centipoise and solids content 78--79 wt %. Slip-cast parts with green densities 65 to 68% theoretical were achieved. Composite parts were pressureless sintered to 96--97% theoretical density with <1% open porosity. The composites exhibited strengths of 500 MPa, toughness of 6.5 MPa m{sup 1/2}, and hardness of 17.26 GPa (1765 kg/mm{sup 2}). High temperature strength retention was maintained up to 1200C. Good thermal shock resistance with {Delta}T{sub cr} = 500C was also achieved. The process technology was transferred into pilot scale for producing prototype heat exchanger tubing up to 4 inches in diameter at the facilities of Vesuvius/McDanel.

  1. Ceramic fabrication R D final technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The goal of this research and development project has been to develop the cohesive ceramic fabrication (CCF) process and to demonstrate its application to various defense-related systems. The CCF process, which is proprietary to Ceramic Binder Systems, Inc. (CBSi), involves a binder system that yields a green ceramic having rubbery yet plastic and tacky properties. The tackiness allows green parts to be pressed together with light (hand) pressure, and the bond is maintained through firing. Fabricating of complex parts is possible via the assembly of simple shapes, easily fabricated by plastic forming and followed by firing to produce a ceramic bond. For some applications, this approach offers substantial potential cost savings over more conventional methods. Other possibilities include the potential for fabricating ceramic parts having graded properties and fabricating ceramic matrix composites.

  2. Ceramic fabrication R&D final technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    The goal of this research and development project has been to develop the cohesive ceramic fabrication (CCF) process and to demonstrate its application to various defense-related systems. The CCF process, which is proprietary to Ceramic Binder Systems, Inc. (CBSi), involves a binder system that yields a green ceramic having rubbery yet plastic and tacky properties. The tackiness allows green parts to be pressed together with light (hand) pressure, and the bond is maintained through firing. Fabricating of complex parts is possible via the assembly of simple shapes, easily fabricated by plastic forming and followed by firing to produce a ceramic bond. For some applications, this approach offers substantial potential cost savings over more conventional methods. Other possibilities include the potential for fabricating ceramic parts having graded properties and fabricating ceramic matrix composites.

  3. Application of foams to the processing of fabrics. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bedenbaugh, R.

    1984-06-01

    The overall accomplishments of this work were: commercialization of foam processing in textiles, especially foam finishing, was accelerated by about five years. Since 1979, about 3 billion yards of fabric have been finished by the U.M.M. or subsequently developed foam systems with a savings of about 1.5 to 2 trillion Btu. In 1984 about 15% of all domestic textile finishing was by a foam process. Foam processing of textiles is being practiced throughout the domestic and international textile industry. Foam dyeing is commercial in specialized areas of the textile industry such as carpet dyeing and the pigment dyeing of lightweight filament fabrics. Foam printing will increase with the development of rotary printing machines designed especially for foamed print colors. The use of foamed chemical systems for desizing, scouring and bleaching of fabrics, especially fabrics containing dyed yarns, is increasing. The development of equipment and chemical systems for foam sizing of fabrics was accelerated in 1983, and commercial equipment is expected to be available in 1984. The public disclosure of foam processing technology has led to the development of competitive foam systems as well as alternate low wet pick-up systems. An independent audit of outside (non-U.M. and M.) demonstration sites has unequivocally established the energy savings and economic advantages of foam processing.

  4. Fabrication of Micron Scale Retroreflectors for Novel Biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherlock, Tim

    Many bioanalytical and diagnostic methods detect the presence of secondary labels, such as colored particles, fluorescent molecules, nanoparticles, and enzyme reaction product, when they accumulate in the presence of the target biomolecules (i.e., bacteria, viruses, etc.) at predetermined locations. In this dissertation, we describe the development of a new class of labels consisting of micro-fabricated retroreflectors that are easy to image, compatible with machine vision automation, and can be detected in solution or within microfluidic channels. The retroreflecting structures are designed to return incident light directly back to its source over a large range of angles, making them extremely detectable using low cost, low numerical aperture objectives, as is evidenced by their common use as lane markers and in safety signs. This work describes two different biosensing systems using these labels. In the first, retroreflectors are fabricated at fixed locations at the base of microfluidic channels and their brightness is attenuated by the biologically-driven accumulation of magnetic particles, thus forming a readout strategy that well-suited for automation and multiplexing. The work demonstrates that single, micron-scale magnetic beads can be rapidly detected over very large areas (square millimeters). The second approach uses suspended corner cube retroreflectors, five microns on a side, as ultra bright labels that are bound to magnetic sample preparation beads in the presence of an analyte. The magnetic particles can then be moved to an imaging site within the sample where the cubes are readily detected. The fabrication of these micron-scale retroreflectors required the development of new lithography, thin film disposition, and reactive ion etching tools and the integration of chip-based structures with microfluidic systems. The dissertation also describes the experimental validation of a Fourier optics model that accounts for diffraction inherent to the micron-scale

  5. Intermetallic blades for fabric cutting. CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.; Blue, C.A.; Sklad, S.; Shih, H.R.; Off, J.W.A.

    1998-08-01

    This report describes the evaluation of nickel- and iron-aluminide blades for cutting fabric as opposed to conventional steel blades. The aluminides were selected as blade material because of their extremely high work-hardening rate and the possibility of forming aluminum oxide on the surface to further enhance the wear resistance. Unlike steel blades, they do not require heat treating to become strong. A testing facility using an Eastman cutter was designed and built at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for testing of blades. Denim fabric supplied by Levi Strauss was used. For lack of sufficient fabric, heavy paper was also used. Extensive testing revealed that there were several issues in getting the true comparison between various blades. The most important issue was the consistent sharpening of the blade edge. With all of the effort and precautions, identical edges could not be put on the blades of all the different materials. The second issue was the limited availability of fabric to evaluate the end-of-life limit for the blade edges. Two nickel- and three iron-aluminide compositions were evaluated. Under test conditions, the iron-aluminide alloy (PM-60), based on FeAl, was found to outperform other aluminides and the steel blade. Based on the data presented in this report, the authors recommend that additional testing be carried out on both the steel and aluminide blades to determine the number of times each blade can be sharpened prior to its replacement. However, the recommended testing needs to be conducted on blades for which the identical cutting edges and sharpening are incorporated. They further recommend that if the iron-aluminide blade is truly superior, a cost analysis be performed to determine its commercial feasibility. The best aluminide blades should be tested by commercial textile companies.

  6. MICRO-SEISMOMETERS VIA ADVANCED MESO-SCALE FABRICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Caesar A; Onaran, Guclu; Avenson, Brad; Hall, Neal

    2014-11-07

    The Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) seek revolutionary sensing innovations for the monitoring of nuclear detonations. Performance specifications are to be consistent with those obtainable by only an elite few products available today, but with orders of magnitude reduction in size, weight, power, and cost. The proposed commercial innovation calls upon several technologies including the combination of meso-scale fabrication and assembly, photonics-based displacement / motion detection methods, and the use of digital control electronics . Early Phase II development has demonstrated verified and repeatable sub 2ng noise floor from 3Hz to 100Hz, compact integration of 3-axis prototypes, and robust deployment exercises. Ongoing developments are focusing on low frequency challenges, low power consumption, ultra-miniature size, and low cross axis sensitivity. We are also addressing the rigorous set of specifications required for repeatable and reliable long-term explosion monitoring, including thermal stability, reduced recovery time from mass re-centering and large mechanical shocks, sensitivity stability, and transportability. Successful implementation will result in small, hand-held demonstration units with the ability to address national security needs of the DOE/NNSA. Additional applications envisioned include military/defense, scientific instrumentation, oil and gas exploration, inertial navigation, and civil infrastructure monitoring.

  7. Fabric filter inspection and evaluation manual. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Roeck, D.R.; Dennis, R.

    1984-02-01

    The manual was prepared to assist Federal and State enforcement groups in the following decision-making areas: estimation of filter-system (baghouse) compliance with emissions regulations; appraisal of filter-system adequacy for a specific control application; and evaluation of operating and maintenance procedures in the light of recommended practices. In Chapter 2, basic concepts pertaining to fabric filtration, particle behavior, and particle-size measurements are highlighted so that inspection personnel can evaluate facilities for which no precedence has been established. Given prior experience or the need for immediate action, however, the manual user may go directly to Chapter 3 where important day-to-day aspects of filter-system operation are presented along with emphasis on what may go wrong and what remedial measures should be undertaken. Different types and procedures for baghouse inspections are described in Chapter 4; e.g., compliance determination, startup, troubleshooting, general preventitive maintenance, or special investigations, where the specific information sought and the sequence of the inspection process may vary.

  8. Fabrication of large scale nanostructures based on a modified atomic force microscope nanomechanical machining system.

    PubMed

    Hu, Z J; Yan, Y D; Zhao, X S; Gao, D W; Wei, Y Y; Wang, J H

    2011-12-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) tip-based nanomechanical machining has been demonstrated to be a powerful tool for fabricating complex 2D∕3D nanostructures. But the machining scale is very small, which holds back this technique severely. How to enlarge the machining scale is always a major concern for the researches. In the present study, a modified AFM tip-based nanomechanical machining system is established through combination of a high precision X-Y stage with the moving range of 100 mm × 100 mm and a commercial AFM in order to enlarge the machining scale. It is found that the tracing property of the AFM system is feasible for large scale machining by controlling the constant normal load. Effects of the machining parameters including the machining direction and the tip geometry on the uniform machined depth with a large scale are evaluated. Consequently, a new tip trace and an increasing load scheme are presented to achieve a uniform machined depth. Finally, a polymer nanoline array with the dimensions of 1 mm × 0.7 mm, the line density of 1000 lines/mm and the average machined depth of 150 nm, and a 20 × 20 polymer square holes array with the scale of 380 μm × 380 μm and the average machined depth of 250 nm are machined successfully. The uniform of the machined depths for all the nanostructures is acceptable. Therefore, it is verified that the AFM tip-based nanomechanical machining method can be used to machine millimeter scale nanostructures. PMID:22225244

  9. Nano-Scale Fabrication Using Optical-Near-Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatsui, Takashi; Ohtsu, Motoichi

    This paper reviews the specific nature of nanophotonics, i.e., a novel optical nano-technology, utilizing dressed photon excited in the nano-material. As examples of nanophotnic fabrication, optical near-field etching and increased spatial homogeneity of contents in compound semiconductors is demonstrated with a self-organized manner.

  10. Design and fabrication of a meso-scale stirling engine and combustor.

    SciTech Connect

    Echekki, Tarek (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Haroldsen, Brent L. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Krafcik, Karen L. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Morales, Alfredo Martin; Mills, Bernice E.; Liu, Shiling; Lee, Jeremiah C. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Karpetis, Adionos N. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Chen, Jacqueline H. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Ceremuga, Joseph T. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Raber, Thomas N.; Hekmuuaty, Michelle A.

    2005-05-01

    prototypes to verify the design. A final high precision engine was created via LIGA. The micro-combustor was based on an excess enthalpy concept. Development of a micro-combustor included both modeling and experiments. We developed a suite of simulation tools both in support of the design of the prototype combustors, and to investigate more fundamental aspects of combustion at small scales. Issues of heat management and integration with the micro-scale Stirling engine were pursued using CFD simulations. We found that by choice of the operating conditions and channel dimensions energy conversion occurs by catalysis-dominated or catalysis-then-homogeneous phase combustion. The purpose of the experimental effort in micro-combustion was to study the feasibility and explore the design parameters of excess enthalpy combustors. The efforts were guided by the necessity for a practical device that could be implemented in a miniature power generator, or as a stand-alone device used for heat generation. Several devices were fabricated and successfully tested using methane as the fuel.

  11. Design and fabrication of a glovebox for the Plasma Hearth Process radioactive bench-scale system

    SciTech Connect

    Wahlquist, D.R.

    1996-07-01

    This paper presents some of the design considerations and fabrication techniques for building a glovebox for the Plasma Hearth Process (PHP) radioactive bench-scale system. The PHP radioactive bench-scale system uses a plasma torch to process a variety of radioactive materials into a final vitrified waste form. The processed waste will contain plutonium and trace amounts of other radioactive materials. The glovebox used in this system is located directly below the plasma chamber and is called the Hearth Handling Enclosure (HHE). The HHE is designed to maintain a confinement boundary between the processed waste and the operator. Operations that take place inside the HHE include raising and lowering the hearth using a hydraulic lift table, transporting the hearth within the HHE using an overhead monorail and hoist system, sampling and disassembly of the processed waste and hearth, weighing the hearth, rebuilding a hearth, and sampling HEPA filters. The PHP radioactive bench-scale system is located at the TREAT facility at Argonne National Laboratory-West in Idaho Falls, Idaho.

  12. Development of a Meso-Scale Material Model for Ballistic Fabric and Its Use in Flexible-Armor Protection Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, M.; Bell, W. C.; Arakere, G.; He, T.; Xie, X.; Cheeseman, B. A.

    2010-02-01

    A meso-scale ballistic material model for a prototypical plain-woven single-ply flexible armor is developed and implemented in a material user subroutine for the use in commercial explicit finite element programs. The main intent of the model is to attain computational efficiency when calculating the mechanical response of the multi-ply fabric-based flexible-armor material during its impact with various projectiles without significantly sacrificing the key physical aspects of the fabric microstructure, architecture, and behavior. To validate the new model, a comparative finite element method analysis is carried out in which: (a) the plain-woven single-ply fabric is modeled using conventional shell elements and weaving is done in an explicit manner by snaking the yarns through the fabric and (b) the fabric is treated as a planar continuum surface composed of conventional shell elements to which the new meso-scale unit-cell based material model is assigned. The results obtained show that the material model provides a reasonably good description for the fabric deformation and fracture behavior under different combinations of fixed and free boundary conditions. Finally, the model is used in an investigation of the ability of a multi-ply soft-body armor vest to protect the wearer from impact by a 9-mm round nose projectile. The effects of inter-ply friction, projectile/yarn friction, and the far-field boundary conditions are revealed and the results explained using simple wave mechanics principles, high-deformation rate material behavior, and the role of various energy-absorbing mechanisms in the fabric-based armor systems.

  13. Large scale molecular dynamics modeling of materials fabrication processes

    SciTech Connect

    Belak, J.; Glosli, J.N.; Boercker, D.B.; Stowers, I.F.

    1994-02-01

    An atomistic molecular dynamics model of materials fabrication processes is presented. Several material removal processes are shown to be within the domain of this simulation method. Results are presented for orthogonal cutting of copper and silicon and for crack propagation in silica glass. Both copper and silicon show ductile behavior, but the atomistic mechanisms that allow this behavior are significantly different in the two cases. The copper chip remains crystalline while the silicon chip transforms into an amorphous state. The critical stress for crack propagation in silica glass was found to be in reasonable agreement with experiment and a novel stick-slip phenomenon was observed.

  14. Large-scale high quality glass microlens arrays fabricated by laser enhanced wet etching.

    PubMed

    Tong, Siyu; Bian, Hao; Yang, Qing; Chen, Feng; Deng, Zefang; Si, Jinhai; Hou, Xun

    2014-11-17

    Large-scale high quality microlens arrays (MLAs) play an important role in enhancing the imaging quality of CCD and CMOS as well as the light extraction efficiency of LEDs and OLEDs. To meet the requirement in MLAs' wide application areas, a rapid fabrication method to fabricate large-scale MLAs with high quality, high fill factor and high uniformity is needed, especially on the glass substrate. In this paper, we present a simple and cost-efficient approach to the development of both concave and convex large-scale microlens arrays (MLAs) by using femtosecond laser wet etching method and replication technique. A large-scale high quality square-shaped microlens array with 512 × 512 units was fabricated.The unit size is 20 × 20 μm² on the whole scale of 1 × 1 cm². Its perfect uniformity and optical performance are demonstrated. PMID:25402166

  15. Improved Structure and Fabrication of Large, High-Power KHPS Rotors - Final Scientific/Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Corren, Dean; Colby, Jonathan; Adonizio, Mary Ann

    2013-01-29

    Verdant Power, Inc, working in partnership with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and the University of Minnesota St. Anthony Falls Laboratory (SAFL), among other partners, used evolving Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and Finite Element Analysis (FEA) models and techniques to improve the structure and fabrication of large, high-power composite Kinetic Hydropower System (KHPS) rotor blades. The objectives of the project were to: design; analyze; develop for manufacture and fabricate; and thoroughly test, in the lab and at full scale in the water, the improved KHPS rotor blade.

  16. Silicon-solar-cell process development, fabrication, and analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Minahan, J.A.

    1981-03-09

    Solar cells have been fabricated from unconventional silicon materials in the second and final phase of the contract. In the most recent period of work, EFG, Web, Hem, and Continuous CZ silicon materials were fabricated into solar cells, measured and analyzed. Current-voltage measurements under AM1 conditions, in addition to those under AMO conditions, were introduced in Phase II. Several low-cost fabrication steps were included in that phase. Both Hem and Continuous CZ silicon were found to be superior to what had been provided in Phase I. Correlation between quality of starting materials and cell conversion efficiency was observed for Hem-grown silicon. Correlation between position in the crystal growth sequence and cell quality was observed for Continuous CZ.

  17. Commercial scale fabrication method for fabricating a gradient refractive-index rod: Overcoming volume shrinkage and chemical restrictions.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hansol; Son, Young Mok; Kim, Mu Gyeom; Ra, Byoung Joo; Park, Joon-Yong; Lee, Seung Hui; Choi, Jin Sung; Song, Min Young; Park, O Ok; Kim, Youn Cheol; Hwang, Jin Taek

    2006-10-01

    We report a fabrication method for a gradient refractive-index polymeric object from a binary comonomer system, regardless of the monomers' reactivity ratio and the molar volume criteria of gradient refractive-index development. To fabricate a large gradient refractive-index rod consisting of a methyl methacrylate and 2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropyl methacrylate comonomer pair that has not been used for fabrication of a copolymer gradient refractive-index rod by previous conventional methods because of chemical restrictions in molar volume and reactivity ratio difference, we use the so-called successive UV polymerization in a controlled radial volume in conjunction with an automatic refill reactor. Simultaneously and automatically, the volume shrinkage problem, an inevitable shortcoming for the fabrication of a large polymeric object in a commercial production scale, is overcome and exploited. The theoretical features of the refractive-index profile generation of this method are also compared with those of conventional methods for which the chemical restrictions of monomers are crucial for the shape of a refractive-index profile. PMID:16983409

  18. Fabrication of 1/3 scale boron/epoxy booster thrust structure, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The design, materials, tooling, various manufacturing processes, quality control, test procedures, and results associated with the fabrication and testing of a 1/3 scale boron/epoxy, booster thrust structure are described. A complete two-dimensional truss type thrust structure, comprised of nine boron/epoxy tubular members and six apex fittings, was fabricated. This resulted in structurally representative flight hardware, and verified the manufacturing feasibility and projected weight savings (30%) for this type of structure.

  19. Subtask 12A1: Fabrication of production-scale heat of V-4Cr-4Ti

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Tsai, H.C.; Smith, D.L.

    1995-03-01

    On the basis of excellent properties that were determined for a laboratory-scale heat, V-4Cr-4Ti has been identified previously as the most promising vanadium-based candidate alloy for application in fusion reactor structural components. The objective of this work is to produce a large-scale (500-kg) ingot of the alloy and fabricate various plates and sheets from the ingot, thereby demonstrating a reliable method of fabricating an industrial-scale heat of V-4Cr-4Ti that exhibits excellent properties. A 500-kg heat of V-4Cr-4Ti, an alloy identified previously as the most promising vanadium-based candidate alloy for application in fusion reactor structural components, has been produced. The ingot was produced by multiple vacuum-arc melting using screened high-quality raw materials of vanadium, chrome, and titanium. Several long bars {approx}64 mm in thickness and {approx}200 mm in width were extruded from the ingot, and plates and sheets of various thicknesses ranging from 1.0 to 29.2 mm were fabricated successfully from the extruded bars. The chemical composition of the ingot and the secondary fabrication procedures, specified on the basis of the experience and knowledge gained from fabrication, testing, and microstructural characterization of a laboratory-scale heat, were found to be satisfactory. Charpy-impact tests showed that mechanical properties of the production-scale heat are as good as those of the laboratory-scale heat. This demonstrates a method of reliable fabrication of industrial-scale heats of V-4Cr-4Ti that exhibit excellent properties. 14 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  20. Systematic investigation of drip stains on apparel fabrics: The effects of prior-laundering, fibre content and fabric structure on final stain appearance.

    PubMed

    de Castro, Therese C; Taylor, Michael C; Kieser, Jules A; Carr, Debra J; Duncan, W

    2015-05-01

    Bloodstain pattern analysis is the investigation of blood deposited at crime scenes and the interpretation of that pattern. The surface that the blood gets deposited onto could distort the appearance of the bloodstain. The interaction of blood and apparel fabrics is in its infancy, but the interaction of liquids and apparel fabrics has been well documented and investigated in the field of textile science (e.g. the processes of wetting and wicking of fluids on fibres, yarns and fabrics). A systematic study on the final appearance of drip stains on torso apparel fabrics (100% cotton plain woven, 100% polyester plain woven, blend of polyester and cotton plain woven and 100% cotton single jersey knit) that had been laundered for six, 26 and 52 cycles prior to testing was investigated in the paper. The relationship between drop velocity (1.66±0.50m/s, 4.07±0.03m/s, 5.34±0.18m/s) and the stain characteristics (parent stain area, axes 1 and 2 and number of satellite stains) for each fabric was examined using analysis of variance. The experimental design and effect of storing blood were investigated on a reference sample, which indicated that the day (up to five days) at which the drops were generated did not affect the bloodstain. The effect of prior-laundering (six, 26 and 52 laundering cycles), fibre content (cotton vs. polyester vs. blend) and fabric structure (plain woven vs. single jersey knit) on the final appearance of the bloodstain were investigated. Distortion in the bloodstains produced on non-laundered fabrics indicated the importance of laundering fabrics to remove finishing treatments before conducting bloodstain experiments. For laundered fabrics, both the cotton fabrics and the blend had a circular to oval stain appearance, while the polyester fabric had a circular appearance with evidence of spread along the warp and weft yarns, which resulted in square-like stains at the lowest drop velocity. A significant (p<0.001) increase in the stain size on

  1. Simulation and fabrication of micro-scaled flow channels for metallic bipolar plates by the electrochemical micro-machining process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Shuo-Jen; Lee, Chi-Yuan; Yang, Kung-Ting; Kuan, Feng-Hui; Lai, Ping-Hung

    In order to take better advantage of metallic bipolar plates for producing metallic fuel cells and make it a feasible technology, it is essential that we have an efficient and cost effective fabrication process for creating micro-scaled flow channels. In this study, an electrochemical micro-machining (EMM) process is developed. In order to have better process control a finite element analysis is employed to ensure machine tool platform rigidity; an electric field analysis is applied for the electrode design; and an electrolytic flow analysis is carried out for the fixture design and the selection of the operational parameter. Finally, flow channels measuring 200 μm in depth and 500 μm in width are fabricated on SS316 stainless steel sheets measuring 50 mm × 0.6 mm thick.

  2. Design and Fabrication of Large Scale Micro-LED Arrays and Silicon Driver for OEIC Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Sang-Baie; Iijima, Ko-Ichiro; Okada, Hiroshi; Iwayama, Sho; Wakahara, Akihiro

    In this paper, we designed and fabricated large scale micro-light-emitting-diode (LED) arrays and silicon driver for single chip device for realizing as prototypes of heterogeneous optoelectronic integrated circuits (OEICs). The large scale micro-LED arrays were separated by a dry etching method from mesa structure to 16,384 pixels of 128 × 128, each with a size of 15µm in radius. Silicon driver was designed the additional bonding pad on each driving transistor for bonding with micro-LED arrays. Fabricated micro-LED arrays and driver were flip-chip bonded using anisotropic conductive adhesive.

  3. Fabrication of small-scale structures with non-planar features

    SciTech Connect

    Burckel, David B.; Ten Eyck, Gregory A.

    2015-11-19

    The fabrication of small-scale structures is disclosed. A unit-cell of a small-scale structure with non-planar features is fabricated by forming a membrane on a suitable material. A pattern is formed in the membrane and a portion of the substrate underneath the membrane is removed to form a cavity. Resonators are then directionally deposited on the wall or sides of the cavity. The cavity may be rotated during deposition to form closed-loop resonators. The resonators may be non-planar. The unit-cells can be formed in a layer that includes an array of unit-cells.

  4. Small-Scale Fabrication of Biomimetic Structures for Periodontal Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Green, David W.; Lee, Jung-Seok; Jung, Han-Sung

    2016-01-01

    The periodontium is the supporting tissues for the tooth organ and is vulnerable to destruction, arising from overpopulating pathogenic bacteria and spirochaetes. The presence of microbes together with host responses can destroy large parts of the periodontium sometimes leading tooth loss. Permanent tissue replacements are made possible with tissue engineering techniques. However, existing periodontal biomaterials cannot promote proper tissue architectures, necessary tissue volumes within the periodontal pocket and a “water-tight” barrier, to become clinically acceptable. New kinds of small-scale engineered biomaterials, with increasing biological complexity are needed to guide proper biomimetic regeneration of periodontal tissues. So the ability to make compound structures with small modules, filled with tissue components, is a promising design strategy for simulating the anatomical complexity of the periodotium attachment complexes along the tooth root and the abutment with the tooth collar. Anatomical structures such as, intima, adventitia, and special compartments such as the epithelial cell rests of Malassez or a stellate reticulum niche need to be engineered from the start of regeneration to produce proper periodontium replacement. It is our contention that the positioning of tissue components at the origin is also necessary to promote self-organizing cell–cell connections, cell–matrix connections. This leads to accelerated, synchronized and well-formed tissue architectures and anatomies. This strategy is a highly effective preparation for tackling periodontitis, periodontium tissue resorption, and to ultimately prevent tooth loss. Furthermore, such biomimetic tissue replacements will tackle problems associated with dental implant support and perimimplantitis. PMID:26903872

  5. Small-Scale Fabrication of Biomimetic Structures for Periodontal Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Green, David W; Lee, Jung-Seok; Jung, Han-Sung

    2016-01-01

    The periodontium is the supporting tissues for the tooth organ and is vulnerable to destruction, arising from overpopulating pathogenic bacteria and spirochaetes. The presence of microbes together with host responses can destroy large parts of the periodontium sometimes leading tooth loss. Permanent tissue replacements are made possible with tissue engineering techniques. However, existing periodontal biomaterials cannot promote proper tissue architectures, necessary tissue volumes within the periodontal pocket and a "water-tight" barrier, to become clinically acceptable. New kinds of small-scale engineered biomaterials, with increasing biological complexity are needed to guide proper biomimetic regeneration of periodontal tissues. So the ability to make compound structures with small modules, filled with tissue components, is a promising design strategy for simulating the anatomical complexity of the periodotium attachment complexes along the tooth root and the abutment with the tooth collar. Anatomical structures such as, intima, adventitia, and special compartments such as the epithelial cell rests of Malassez or a stellate reticulum niche need to be engineered from the start of regeneration to produce proper periodontium replacement. It is our contention that the positioning of tissue components at the origin is also necessary to promote self-organizing cell-cell connections, cell-matrix connections. This leads to accelerated, synchronized and well-formed tissue architectures and anatomies. This strategy is a highly effective preparation for tackling periodontitis, periodontium tissue resorption, and to ultimately prevent tooth loss. Furthermore, such biomimetic tissue replacements will tackle problems associated with dental implant support and perimimplantitis. PMID:26903872

  6. Adhesion promoters for large scale fabrication of dielectric elastomer stack transducers (DESTs) made of pre-fabricated dielectric films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grotepaß, T.; Förster-Zügel, F.; Mößinger, H.; Schlaak, H. F.

    2015-04-01

    Multilayer dielectric elastomer stack transducers (DESTs) are a promising new transducer technology with many applications in different industry sectors, like medical devices, human-machine-interaction, etc. Stacked dielectric elastomer transducers show larger thickness contraction driven by lower voltages than transducers made from a single dielectric layer. Traditionally multilayered DESTs are produced by repeatedly cross-linking a liquid elastomeric pre-polymer into the required shape. Our recent research focusses on a novel fabrication method for large scale stack transducers with a surface area over 200 x 300 mm by processing pre-fabricated elastomeric thin films of less than 50 μm thicknesses. The thin films are provided as two- or three-layer composites, where the elastomer is sandwiched between one or two sacrificial liners. Separating the elastomeric film from the residual layers and assembling them into dielectric elastomer stack transducers poses many challenges concerning adhesion, since the dielectric film merely separates from the liner if the adhesive forces between them are overcome. Conversely, during the assembly of a dielectric elastomer stack transducer, adhesive forces have to be established between two elastomeric layers or between the dielectric and the electrode layer. The very low Young's modulus of at least one adhesion partner requires suitable means of increasing the adhesive forces between the different adhesive layers of a dielectric elastomer stack transducer to prevent a delamination of the transducer during its lifetime. This work evaluates different surface activation treatments - corona, low-pressure plasma and UV-light - and their applicability in the production of large scale DESTs made from pre-fabricated elastomeric films.

  7. Fabrication of silicon molds with multi-level, non-planar, micro- and nano-scale features.

    PubMed

    Azimi, S; Dang, Z Y; Ansari, K; Breese, M B H

    2014-09-19

    A method for single-step fabrication of arbitrary, complex, three-dimensional (3D) silicon structures from the nano- to millimeter-scale at multiple levels on non-planar, curved, or domed surfaces is reported. The fabrication is based on focused or masked ion beam irradiation of p-type silicon followed by electrochemical anodization. The process allows fabrication of a wide range of surface features at multiple heights and with arbitrary orientations by varying the irradiated feature width, ion type, energy fluence, and subsequent anodization conditions. The technology has achieved depth resolution of 10 nm as step heights and is capable of creating lateral features down to 7 nm at high aspect ratios of up to 40, with surface roughness down to 1 nm scaled up to full wafer areas. The single-step ability has seamlessly interfaced a network of complex, integrated micro- to nano-structures in 3D orientations with no alignment required. The final template has been converted to a master copy for nano-imprinting lithography of 3D fluidic structures and optical components. PMID:25148117

  8. A Scaled Final Focus Experiment for Heavy Ion Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    MacLaren, Stephan, Alexander

    2000-09-19

    A one-tenth dimensionally scaled version of a final focus sub-system design for a heavy ion fusion driver is built and tested. By properly scaling the physics parameters that relate particle energy and mass, beam current, beam emittance, and focusing field, the transverse dynamics of a driver scale final focus are replicated in a small laboratory beam. The experiment uses a 95 {micro}A beam of 160 keV Cs{sup +} ions to study the dynamics as the beam is brought to a ballistic focus in a lattice of six quadrupole magnets. Diagnostic stations along the experiment track the evolution of the transverse phase space of the beam. The measured focal spot size is consistent with calculations and the report of the design on which the experiment is based. By uniformly varying the strengths of the focusing fields in the lattice, the chromatic effect of a small energy deviation on the spot size can be reproduced. This is done for {+-}1% and {+-}2% shifts and the changes in the focus are measured. Additionally, a 400 {micro}A beam is propagated through the experiment and partially neutralized after the last magnet using electrons released from a hot tungsten filament. The increase in beam current allows for the observation of significant effects on both the size and shape of the focal spot when the electrons are added.

  9. Fabrication of electron beam deposited tip for atomic-scale atomic force microscopy in liquid.

    PubMed

    Miyazawa, K; Izumi, H; Watanabe-Nakayama, T; Asakawa, H; Fukuma, T

    2015-03-13

    Recently, possibilities of improving operation speed and force sensitivity in atomic-scale atomic force microscopy (AFM) in liquid using a small cantilever with an electron beam deposited (EBD) tip have been intensively explored. However, the structure and properties of an EBD tip suitable for such an application have not been well-understood and hence its fabrication process has not been established. In this study, we perform atomic-scale AFM measurements with a small cantilever and clarify two major problems: contaminations from a cantilever and tip surface, and insufficient mechanical strength of an EBD tip having a high aspect ratio. To solve these problems, here we propose a fabrication process of an EBD tip, where we attach a 2 μm silica bead at the cantilever end and fabricate a 500-700 nm EBD tip on the bead. The bead height ensures sufficient cantilever-sample distance and enables to suppress long-range interaction between them even with a short EBD tip having high mechanical strength. After the tip fabrication, we coat the whole cantilever and tip surface with Si (30 nm) to prevent the generation of contamination. We perform atomic-scale AFM imaging and hydration force measurements at a mica-water interface using the fabricated tip and demonstrate its applicability to such an atomic-scale application. With a repeated use of the proposed process, we can reuse a small cantilever for atomic-scale measurements for several times. Therefore, the proposed method solves the two major problems and enables the practical use of a small cantilever in atomic-scale studies on various solid-liquid interfacial phenomena. PMID:25697199

  10. Large scale fabrication of lightweight Si/SiC lidar mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goela, Jitendra Singh; Taylor, Raymond L.

    1989-10-01

    An up-scalable CVD process has been used to fabricate 7.5-cm models of lightweight Si/SiC mirrors consisting of an f/1.6 concave face-plate of SiC coated with CVD Si, in conjunction with a lightweight backup structure of SiC. Due to CVD chamber fabrication, no bonding agent was required to attach the SiC backup structure to the face-plate. Upon up-scaling, the SiC deposition process has been able to produce 40-cm diameter f/1.6 concave mirror face-plates. The mirrors were polished to a 1/5-wave figure and 10 A rms surface finish. There appear to be no intrinsic physical limits to further up-scaling of this mirror-fabrication process.

  11. APPLYING FABRIC FILTRATION TO REFUSE-FIRED BOILERS: A PILOT-SCALE INVESTIGATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a pilot-scale investigation to determine the techno-economic feasibility of applying fabric filter dust collectors to solid refuse fired boilers. The pilot facility, installed on a slipstream of a 135,000 lb/hr boiler, was sized to handle 9000 acfm at ...

  12. EVALUATION OF FULL SCALE FABRIC FILTERS ON UTILITY BOILERS: SPS HARRINGTON STATION UNIT 3

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of total mass and fractional size particulate emission tests at Southwestern Public Service's Harrington Station Unit 3 from July 8 to 11, 1981, as part of a program to evaluate and characterize the performance of full-scale fabric filter units installed ...

  13. Large scale metal-free synthesis of graphene on sapphire and transfer-free device fabrication.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyun Jae; Son, Minhyeok; Park, Chibeom; Lim, Hyunseob; Levendorf, Mark P; Tsen, Adam W; Park, Jiwoong; Choi, Hee Cheul

    2012-05-21

    Metal catalyst-free growth of large scale single layer graphene film on a sapphire substrate by a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process at 950 °C is demonstrated. A top-gated graphene field effect transistor (FET) device is successfully fabricated without any transfer process. The detailed growth process is investigated by the atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies. PMID:22526246

  14. Comparative Study of Laboratory-Scale and Prototypic Production-Scale Fuel Fabrication Processes and Product Characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas W. Marshall

    2014-10-01

    An objective of the High Temperature Gas Reactor fuel development and qualification program for the United States Department of Energy has been to qualify fuel fabricated in prototypic production-scale equipment. The quality and characteristics of the tristructural isotropic coatings on fuel kernels are influenced by the equipment scale and processing parameters. Some characteristics affecting product quality were suppressed while others have become more significant in the larger equipment. Changes to the composition and method of producing resinated graphite matrix material has eliminated the use of hazardous, flammable liquids and enabled it to be procured as a vendor-supplied feed stock. A new method of overcoating TRISO particles with the resinated graphite matrix eliminates the use of hazardous, flammable liquids, produces highly spherical particles with a narrow size distribution, and attains product yields in excess of 99%. Compact fabrication processes have been scaled-up and automated with relatively minor changes to compact quality to manual laboratory-scale processes. The impact on statistical variability of the processes and the products as equipment was scaled are discussed. The prototypic production-scale processes produce test fuels that meet fuel quality specifications.

  15. Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angel, Roger; Helms, Richard; Bilbro, Jim; Brown, Norman; Eng, Sverre; Hinman, Steve; Hull-Allen, Greg; Jacobs, Stephen; Keim, Robert; Ulmer, Melville

    1992-01-01

    What aspects of optical fabrication technology need to be developed so as to facilitate existing planned missions, or enable new ones? Throughout the submillimeter to UV wavelengths, the common goal is to push technology to the limits to make the largest possible apertures that are diffraction limited. At any one wavelength, the accuracy of the surface must be better than lambda/30 (rms error). The wavelength range is huge, covering four orders of magnitude from 1 mm to 100 nm. At the longer wavelengths, diffraction limited surfaces can be shaped with relatively crude techniques. The challenge in their fabrication is to make as large as possible a reflector, given the weight and volume constraints of the launch vehicle. The limited cargo diameter of the shuttle has led in the past to emphasis on deployable or erectable concepts such as the Large Deployable Reflector (LDR), which was studied by NASA for a submillimeter astrophysics mission. Replication techniques that can be used to produce light, low-cost reflecting panels are of great interest for this class of mission. At shorter wavelengths, in the optical and ultraviolet, optical fabrication will tax to the limit the most refined polishing methods. Methods of mechanical and thermal stabilization of the substrate will be severely stressed. In the thermal infrared, the need for large aperture is tempered by the even stronger need to control the telescope's thermal emission by cooled or cryogenic operation. Thus, the SIRTF mirror at 1 meter is not large and does not require unusually high accuracy, but the fabrication process must produce a mirror that is the right shape at a temperature of 4 K. Future large cooled mirrors will present more severe problems, especially if they must also be accurate enough to work at optical wavelengths. At the very shortest wavelengths accessible to reflecting optics, in the x-ray domain, the very low count fluxes of high energy photons place a premium on the collecting area. It is

  16. 77 FR 31182 - Final Withdrawal of Regulations Pertaining to Imports of Cotton Woven Fabric and Short Supply...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-25

    ... Fabric and Short Supply Procedures: Opportunity for Public Comment, 77 FR 5440 (Feb. 3, 2012). No... Quota Established Under the Tax Relief and Health Care Act of 2006 (Interim Final Rule), 72 FR 40235... Established Under the Tax Relief and Health Care Act of 2006 (Final Rule), 73 FR 39585 (July 10,...

  17. Laser fabrication of large-scale nanoparticle arrays for sensing applications.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Arseniy I; Evlyukhin, Andrey B; Gonçalves, Manuel R; Reinhardt, Carsten; Koroleva, Anastasia; Arnedillo, Maria Luisa; Kiyan, Roman; Marti, Othmar; Chichkov, Boris N

    2011-06-28

    A novel method for high-speed fabrication of large scale periodic arrays of nanoparticles (diameters 40-200 nm) is developed. This method is based on a combination of nanosphere lithography and laser-induced transfer. Fabricated spherical nanoparticles are partially embedded into a polymer substrate. They are arranged into a hexagonal array and can be used for sensing applications. An optical sensor with the sensitivity of 365 nm/RIU and the figure of merit of 21.5 in the visible spectral range is demonstrated. PMID:21539373

  18. Large-scale ordered silicon microtube arrays fabricated by Poisson spot lithography.

    PubMed

    Tian, Shibing; Xia, Xiaoxiang; Sun, Wangning; Li, Wuxia; Li, Junjie; Gu, Changzhi

    2011-09-30

    A novel approach based on the Poisson spot effect in a conventional optical lithography system is presented for fabricating large-scale ordered ring patterns at low cost, in which the pattern geometries are tuned by controlling the exposure dose and deliberate design of the mask patterns. Following this by cryogenic deep etching, the ring patterns are transferred into Si substrates, resulting in various vertical tubular Si array structures. Microscopic analysis indicates that the as-fabricated Si microtubes have smooth interior and exterior surfaces that are uniform in size, shape and wall-thickness, which exhibit potential applications as electronic, biological and medical devices. PMID:21891843

  19. cm-scale variations of crystal orientation fabric in cold Alpine ice core from Colle Gnifetti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerch, Johanna; Weikusat, Ilka; Eisen, Olaf; Wagenbach, Dietmar; Erhardt, Tobias

    2015-04-01

    Analysis of the microstructural parameters of ice has been an important part of ice core analyses so far mainly in polar cores in order to obtain information about physical processes (e.g. deformation, recrystallisation) on the micro- and macro-scale within an ice body. More recently the influence of impurities and climatic conditions during snow accumulation on these processes has come into focus. A deeper understanding of how palaeoclimate proxies interact with physical properties of the ice matrix bears relevance for palaeoclimatic interpretations, improved geophysical measurement techniques and the furthering of ice dynamical modeling. Variations in microstructural parameters e.g. crystal orientation fabric or grain size can be observed on a scale of hundreds and tens of metres but also on a centimetre scale. The underlying processes are not necessarily the same on all scales. Especially for the short-scale variations many questions remain unanswered. We present results from a study that aims to investigate following hypotheses: 1. Variations in grain size and fabric, i.e. strong changes of the orientation of ice crystals with respect to the vertical, occur on a centimetre scale and can be observed in all depths of an ice core. 2. Palaeoclimate proxies like dust and impurities have an impact on the microstructural processes and thus are inducing the observed short-scale variations in grain size and fabric. 3. The interaction of proxies with the ice matrix leads to depth intervals that show correlating behaviour as well as ranges with anticorrelation between microstructural parameters and palaeoclimatic proxies. The respective processes need to be identified. Fabric Analyser measurements were conducted on more than 80 samples (total of 8 m) from different depth ranges of a cold Alpine ice core (72 m length) drilled in 2013 at Colle Gnifetti, Switzerland/Italy. Results were obtained by automatic image processing, providing estimates for grain size distributions

  20. Large-scale fabrication of flexible metallic nanostructure pairs using interference ablation.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Tianrui; Wang, Yonglu; Liu, Hongmei; Zhang, Xinping

    2015-01-26

    Paired one- and two-dimensional metallic nanostructures are created directly by exposing a thin gold film to the interference pattern between ultraviolet laser pulses, where the gold film is coated onto a soft substrate and is sandwiched by another soft slab. Metallic films in the bright fringes are melted and transformed into nanodroplets that are ejected onto the soft slab forming stretchable nanoisland structures. The pattern of the remaining films is coincident with the dark fringes. Thus, complementary metallic nanostructure pairs were fabricated using a single laser pulse. Fano resonance can be observed in the spectroscopic response of the fabricated nanostructures for TM and TE polarizations simultaneously. This nanofabrication technique may provide an annealing-free approach for the fabrication of flexible metallic nanostructures on a large scale and with low cost. PMID:25835940

  1. Fabrication of ordered micro- and nano-scale patterns based on optical discs and nanoimprint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hui-jing; Zhang, Xiao-liang; Li, Xiao-chun

    2016-07-01

    A simple method to fabricate one-dimensional (1-D) and two-dimensional (2-D) ordered micro- and nano-scale patterns is developed based on the original masters from optical discs, using nanoimprint technology and soft stamps. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) was used to replicate the negative image of the 1-D grating pattern on the masters of CD-R, DVD-R and BD-R optical discs, respectively, and then the 1-D pattern on one of the PDMS stamps was transferred to a blank polycarbonate (PC) substrate by nanoimprint. The 2-D ordered patterns were fabricated by the second imprinting using another PDMS stamp. Different 2-D periodic patterns were obtained depending on the PDMS stamps and the angle between the two times of imprints. This method may provide a way for the fabrication of complex 2-D patterns using simple 1-D masters.

  2. Benchtop fabrication of multi-scale micro-electromagnets for capturing magnetic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, A.; Soleymani, L.

    2014-08-01

    Micro-electromagnets hold great promise for integration into portable and handheld lab-on-a- chip systems applicable to point-of-care disease management. Two major requirements must be satisfied in order for such devices to be applicable into practical, miniaturized, and portable biomedical instrumentation: low power operation and low-cost fabrication. In this paper, we use numerical modeling combined with a lithography-free fabrication process to create micro-electromagnets on a polymer substrate. Numerical modeling reveals that active-passive devices—ferromagnetic layers coupled with current-controlled planar coils—are essential for generating a sufficient magnetic force for magnetic particle manipulation at low currents (<50 mA). In addition, it is shown that current carrying conductors created from micro/nanotextured materials further enhance the generated magnetic force at a given current. To combine low-cost fabrication with low-current operation, we developed a benchtop fabrication method based on craft cutting, polymer induced thin film wrinkling, and electrodeposition to create a multilevel arrangement of multi-scale materials essential for low-current operation. We demonstrate that the fabricated active-passive devices featuring wrinkled copper active layers and permalloy passive layers capture 2.8 μm magnetic particles upon the application of a 35 mA current.

  3. Wafer scale fabrication of carbon nanotube thin film transistors with high yield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Boyuan; Liang, Xuelei; Yan, Qiuping; Zhang, Han; Xia, Jiye; Dong, Guodong; Peng, Lianmao; Xie, Sishen

    2016-07-01

    Carbon nanotube thin film transistors (CNT-TFTs) are promising candidates for future high performance and low cost macro-electronics. However, most of the reported CNT-TFTs are fabricated in small quantities on a relatively small size substrate. The yield of large scale fabrication and the performance uniformity of devices on large size substrates should be improved before the CNT-TFTs reach real products. In this paper, 25 200 devices, with various geometries (channel width and channel length), were fabricated on 4-in. size ridged and flexible substrates. Almost 100% device yield were obtained on a rigid substrate with high out-put current (>8 μA/μm), high on/off current ratio (>105), and high mobility (>30 cm2/V.s). More importantly, uniform performance in 4-in. area was achieved, and the fabrication process can be scaled up. The results give us more confidence for the real application of the CNT-TFT technology in the near future.

  4. Fabrication Of Atomic-scale Gold Junctions By Electrochemical Plating Technique Using A Common Medical Disinfectant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umeno, Akinori; Hirakawa, Kazuhiko

    2005-06-01

    Iodine tincture, a medical liquid familiar as a disinfectant, was introduced as an etching/deposition electrolyte for the fabrication of nanometer-separated gold electrodes. In the gold dissolved iodine tincture, the gold electrodes were grown or eroded slowly in atomic scale, enough to form quantum point contacts. The resistance evolution during the electrochemical deposition showed plateaus at integer multiples of the resistance quantum, (2e2/h)-1, at the room temperature. The iodine tincture is a commercially available common material, which makes the fabrication process to be the simple and cost effective. Moreover, in contrast to the conventional electrochemical approaches, this method is free from highly toxic cyanide compounds or extraordinary strong acid. We expect this method to be a useful interface between single-molecular-scale structures and macroscopic opto-electronic devices.

  5. Nonsolvent-assisted fabrication of multi-scaled polylactide as superhydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yafang; Liu, Xuying; Yang, Huige; Zhang, Li; Cui, Zhe; Niu, Mingjun; Liu, Hongzhi; Chen, Jinzhou

    2016-03-14

    The solution-processing fabrication of superhydrophobic surfaces is currently intriguing, owing to high-efficiency, low cost, and energy-consuming. Here, a facile nonsolvent-assisted process was proposed for the fabrication of the multi-scaled surface roughness in polylactide (PLA) films, thereby resulting in a significant transformation in the surface wettability from intrinsic hydrophilicity to superhydrophobicity. Moreover, it was found that the surface topographical structure of PLA films can be manipulated by varying the compositions of the PLA solutions. And the samples showed superhydrophobic surfaces as well as high melting enthalpy and crystallinity. In particular, a high contact angle of 155.8° together with a high adhesive force of 184 μN was yielded with the assistance of a multi-nonsolvent system, which contributed to the co-existence of micro-/nano-scale hierarchical structures. PMID:26860288

  6. Concentrating Solar Power Central Receiver Panel Component Fabrication and Testing FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    McDowell, Michael W; Miner, Kris

    2013-03-30

    The objective of this project is to complete a design of an advanced concentrated solar panel and demonstrate the manufacturability of key components. Then confirm the operation of the key components under prototypic solar flux conditions. This work is an important step in reducing the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) from a central receiver solar power plant. The key technical risk to building larger power towers is building the larger receiver systems. Therefore, this proposed technology project includes the design of an advanced molten salt prototypic sub-scale receiver panel that can be utilized into a large receiver system. Then complete the fabrication and testing of key components of the receive design that will be used to validate the design. This project shall have a significant impact on solar thermal power plant design. Receiver panels of suitable size for utility scale plants are a key element to a solar power tower plant. Many subtle and complex manufacturing processes are involved in producing a reliable, robust receiver panel. Given the substantial size difference between receiver panels manufactured in the past and those needed for large plant designs, the manufacture and demonstration on prototype receiver panel components with representative features of a full-sized panel will be important to improving the build process for commercial success. Given the thermal flux limitations of the test facility, the panel components cannot be rendered full size. Significance changes occurred in the projects technical strategies from project initiation to the accomplishments described herein. The initial strategy was to define cost improvements for the receiver, design and build a scale prototype receiver and test, on sun, with a molten salt heat transport system. DOE had committed to constructing a molten salt heat transport loop to support receiver testing at the top of the NSTTF tower. Because of funding constraints this did not happen. A subsequent plan to

  7. Fabrication of large-scale multilevel phase-type Fresnel zone plate arrays by femtosecond laser direct writing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yan-Hao; Tian, Zhen-Nan; Jiang, Tong; Niu, Li-Gang; Gao, Bing-Rong

    2016-03-01

    We report on the fabrication of large-scale eight-level phase-type Fresnel zone plate arrays (FZPAs) by femtosecond-laser direct writing technology. A high-speed galvanometer scanning system was used to fabricate each Fresnel zone plate to realize high fabrication efficiency. To overcome the limited fabrication scale in the case of galvanometer scanning, inter-plate movements were controlled by multi-axis air-bearing precise positioning stages. With the system, FZPAs whose fill-factor was designed to be 100% realized a diffraction efficiency of 89%. The focusing and imaging properties of the FZPAs were also evaluated, and the FZPAs showed high fidelity.

  8. Subtask 12A2: Fabrication and properties of laboratory-scale heat of V-5Cr-5Ti

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Nowicki, L.; Smith, D.L.

    1995-03-01

    The immediate objective of this work is to fabricate a new laboratory-scale heat of V-5Cr-5Ti and identify optimal annealing procedure that produces the highest impact toughness in the alloy. By comparing the result with the optimal annealing procedure identified for the production- and laboratory-scale heats of V-4Cr-4Ti, the eventual objective of the study is to demonstrate that excellent and reliable mechanical properties of V-(4-5)Cr-(4-5)Ti alloy class can be produced through a common annealing procedure. Impact properties were determined on a new 15-kg laboratory heat of V-5Cr-5Ti, fabricated by the same procedures as those used to produce the 500-kg production-scale heat of V-4Cr-4Ti, to identify optimal annealing procedure of the alloy. Charpy-impact tests were conducted on one-third-size specimens because low-temperature (<0{degrees}C) impact properties have been known to be most sensitive to the structure and quality of V-(4-5)Cr-(4-5)Ti alloy class. After final annealing at {approx}1000{degrees}C for 1 h in high-quality vacuum, the laboratory heat V-5Cr-5Ti exhibited impact properties as excellent as those of the production-scale heat V-4Cr-4Ti; i.e., DBTT < -200{degrees}C and absorbed energies of 10-16 J. This demonstrates that when annealed at common optimal condition of 1000{degrees}C for 1 h, the V-(4-5)Cr-(4-5)Ti alloy class exhibit excellent impact toughness and a sufficient tolerance to minor variations in alloying element composition. 5 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Data processing for fabrication of GMT primary segments: raw data to final surface maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuell, Michael T.; Hubler, William; Martin, Hubert M.; West, Steven C.; Zhou, Ping

    2014-07-01

    The Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT) primary mirror is a 25 meter f/0.7 surface composed of seven 8.4 meter circular segments, six of which are identical off-axis segments. The fabrication and testing challenges with these severely aspheric segments (about 14 mm of aspheric departure, mostly astigmatism) are well documented. Converting the raw phase data to useful surface maps involves many steps and compensations. They include large corrections for: image distortion from the off-axis null test; misalignment of the null test; departure from the ideal support forces; and temperature gradients in the mirror. The final correction simulates the active-optics correction that will be made at the telescope. Data are collected and phase maps are computed in 4D Technology's 4SightTM software. The data are saved to a .h5 (HDF5) file and imported into MATLAB® for further analysis. A semi-automated data pipeline has been developed to reduce the analysis time as well as reducing the potential for error. As each operation is performed, results and analysis parameters are appended to a data file, so in the end, the history of data processing is embedded in the file. A report and a spreadsheet are automatically generated to display the final statistics as well as how each compensation term varied during the data acquisition. This gives us valuable statistics and provides a quick starting point for investigating atypical results.

  10. Teleost fish scales: a unique biological model for the fabrication of materials for corneal stroma regeneration.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Yasuaki; Ura, Kazuhiro

    2007-03-01

    The corneal stroma is composed of multiple lamellae, each containing closely packed collagen fibrils. The orientation of fibrils in a lamella is parallel, but those in different lamellae are orthogonal. As a result, the corneal stroma has a characteristic orthogonal plywood-like structure. Such a highly-regulated three-dimensional arrangement of collagen fibrils gives strength and transparency to the corneal stroma, but it also presents a challenge in the fabrication of materials to replace it. A bioinspired technology is required to process such materials, but the regulatory mechanism of collagen-fibril orientation is still unknown. The low regenerating activity of the corneal stroma seems to be a major factor preventing progress in this field of research. A similarly highly-ordered arrangement of collagen fibrils can be seen in the basal plates of teleost fish scales. Moreover, the scales have high regenerating ability. When a scale is mechanically lost, a new scale is rapidly regenerated. The cells that produce the basal plates are extremely activated; thus, production of the highly-ordered collagen fibrils is very rapid. Therefore, the regenerating scales should be a uniquely helpful biological model for studying the regulatory mechanism of collagen-fibril orientation. Fish-scale collagen has another advantage for use as a biomaterial: the low probability of zoonotic infection. Therefore, scale collagen is a most promising biomaterial for fabricating three-dimensionally arranged collagen fibers to substitute for the corneal stroma. Three tasks that must be clarified for the bioinspired production of a corneal substitute from fish scale collagen are proposed. PMID:17450830

  11. Fabrication of three-dimensional and submicrometer-scaled microstructures based on metal contact printing and silicon bulk machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kao, Kuo-Lun; Chang, Cho-Wei; Lee, Yung-Chun

    2014-04-01

    This paper describes a method that contains a series of processes for producing three-dimensional (3-D) microstructures with a feature size in the submicrometer scale. It starts from using a metal contact printing lithography to pattern a thin metal film on the surface of a (100) silicon substrate. The metal film has a hole-array pattern with a hole diameter ranging from 300 nm to 800 nm and is used as an etching mask for silicon bulk machining to create concave pyramid-shaped surface microstructures. Using this bulk-machined silicon substrate as a template, polymer 3-D microstructures are replicated on top of a silicon dioxide (SiO) layer. Finally, through a dry etching process, 3-D microstructures with a profile similar to the replicated polymer microstructures are formed on the SiO layer. Potential applications of these fabricated SiO microstructures in the light-emitting diode industry will be addressed.

  12. Ultra-high density single nanometer-scale anodic alumina nanofibers fabricated by pyrophosphoric acid anodizing.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Tatsuya; Nishinaga, Osamu; Nakajima, Daiki; Kawashima, Jun; Natsui, Shungo; Sakaguchi, Norihito; Suzuki, Ryosuke O

    2014-01-01

    Anodic oxide fabricated by anodizing has been widely used for nanostructural engineering, but the nanomorphology is limited to only two oxides: anodic barrier and porous oxides. Therefore, the discovery of an additional anodic oxide with a unique nanofeature would expand the applicability of anodizing. Here we demonstrate the fabrication of a third-generation anodic oxide, specifically, anodic alumina nanofibers, by anodizing in a new electrolyte, pyrophosphoric acid. Ultra-high density single nanometer-scale anodic alumina nanofibers (10(10) nanofibers/cm(2)) consisting of an amorphous, pure aluminum oxide were successfully fabricated via pyrophosphoric acid anodizing. The nanomorphologies of the anodic nanofibers can be controlled by the electrochemical conditions. Anodic tungsten oxide nanofibers can also be fabricated by pyrophosphoric acid anodizing. The aluminum surface covered by the anodic alumina nanofibers exhibited ultra-fast superhydrophilic behavior, with a contact angle of less than 1°, within 1 second. Such ultra-narrow nanofibers can be used for various nanoapplications including catalysts, wettability control, and electronic devices. PMID:25491282

  13. Ultra-High Density Single Nanometer-Scale Anodic Alumina Nanofibers Fabricated by Pyrophosphoric Acid Anodizing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Tatsuya; Nishinaga, Osamu; Nakajima, Daiki; Kawashima, Jun; Natsui, Shungo; Sakaguchi, Norihito; Suzuki, Ryosuke O.

    2014-12-01

    Anodic oxide fabricated by anodizing has been widely used for nanostructural engineering, but the nanomorphology is limited to only two oxides: anodic barrier and porous oxides. Therefore, the discovery of an additional anodic oxide with a unique nanofeature would expand the applicability of anodizing. Here we demonstrate the fabrication of a third-generation anodic oxide, specifically, anodic alumina nanofibers, by anodizing in a new electrolyte, pyrophosphoric acid. Ultra-high density single nanometer-scale anodic alumina nanofibers (1010 nanofibers/cm2) consisting of an amorphous, pure aluminum oxide were successfully fabricated via pyrophosphoric acid anodizing. The nanomorphologies of the anodic nanofibers can be controlled by the electrochemical conditions. Anodic tungsten oxide nanofibers can also be fabricated by pyrophosphoric acid anodizing. The aluminum surface covered by the anodic alumina nanofibers exhibited ultra-fast superhydrophilic behavior, with a contact angle of less than 1°, within 1 second. Such ultra-narrow nanofibers can be used for various nanoapplications including catalysts, wettability control, and electronic devices.

  14. Ultra-High Density Single Nanometer-Scale Anodic Alumina Nanofibers Fabricated by Pyrophosphoric Acid Anodizing

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Tatsuya; Nishinaga, Osamu; Nakajima, Daiki; Kawashima, Jun; Natsui, Shungo; Sakaguchi, Norihito; Suzuki, Ryosuke O.

    2014-01-01

    Anodic oxide fabricated by anodizing has been widely used for nanostructural engineering, but the nanomorphology is limited to only two oxides: anodic barrier and porous oxides. Therefore, the discovery of an additional anodic oxide with a unique nanofeature would expand the applicability of anodizing. Here we demonstrate the fabrication of a third-generation anodic oxide, specifically, anodic alumina nanofibers, by anodizing in a new electrolyte, pyrophosphoric acid. Ultra-high density single nanometer-scale anodic alumina nanofibers (1010 nanofibers/cm2) consisting of an amorphous, pure aluminum oxide were successfully fabricated via pyrophosphoric acid anodizing. The nanomorphologies of the anodic nanofibers can be controlled by the electrochemical conditions. Anodic tungsten oxide nanofibers can also be fabricated by pyrophosphoric acid anodizing. The aluminum surface covered by the anodic alumina nanofibers exhibited ultra-fast superhydrophilic behavior, with a contact angle of less than 1°, within 1 second. Such ultra-narrow nanofibers can be used for various nanoapplications including catalysts, wettability control, and electronic devices. PMID:25491282

  15. Direct growth of graphene nanoribbons for large-scale device fabrication.

    PubMed

    Martin-Fernandez, Iñigo; Wang, Debin; Zhang, Yuegang

    2012-12-12

    Graphene being a zero band gap material hinders the use of its intrinsic form for many applications requiring a moderate band gap, such as field effect transistors and optoelectronic devices. Here we demonstrate a scalable method based on chemical vapor deposition for the direct growth of well-registered graphene nanoribbons on SiO(2) substrates with precise control over their width, length, and position. The width of the graphene nanoribbons (∼20 nm) is defined by the thickness of catalyst film, therefore avoiding the diffraction limit of conventional optical lithographic methods. The carrier mobility (over 1000 cm(2)/V·s) is higher than those previously reported graphene nanoribbons fabricated on SiO(2) substrates, thanks to the present transfer-free and contaminant-free direct growth process. This method overcomes many practical limitations of the previously demonstrated methods for the patterning of graphene nanoribbons and is compatible with large-scale fabrication of graphene nanoelectronics. PMID:23134072

  16. Fabrication of atomic-scale gold junctions by electrochemical plating using a common medical liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umeno, A.; Hirakawa, K.

    2005-04-01

    Fabrication of nanometer-separated gold junctions has been performed using "iodine tincture," a medical liquid known as a disinfectant, as an etching/deposition electrolyte. In the gold-dissolved iodine tincture, gold electrodes were grown or eroded slowly enough to form quantum point contacts in an atomic scale. The resistance evolution during the electrochemical deposition showed plateaus at integer multiples of the resistance quantum, (2e2/h)-1, at room temperature (e: the elementary charge, h: the Planck constant). Iodine tincture is a commercially available common material, which makes the fabrication process to be simple and cost effective. Moreover, in contrast to the conventional electrochemical approaches, this method is free from highly toxic cyanide compounds or extraordinarily strong acids.

  17. Fabrication of wafer-scale nanopatterned sapphire substrate through phase separation lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xu; Ni, Mengyang; Zhuang, Zhe; Dai, Jiangping; Wu, Feixiang; Cui, Yushuang; Yuan, Changsheng; Ge, Haixiong; Chen, Yanfeng

    2016-04-01

    A phase separation lithography (PSL) based on polymer blend provides an extremely simple, low-cost, and high-throughput way to fabricate wafer-scale disordered nanopatterns. This method was introduced to fabricate nanopatterned sapphire substrates (NPSSs) for GaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The PSL process only involved in spin-coating of polystyrene (PS)/polyethylene glycol (PEG) polymer blend on sapphire substrate and followed by a development with deionized water to remove PEG moiety. The PS nanoporous network was facilely obtained, and the structural parameters could be effectively tuned by controlling the PS/PEG weight ratio of the spin-coating solution. 2-in. wafer-scale NPSSs were conveniently achieved through the PS nanoporous network in combination with traditional nanofabrication methods, such as O2 reactive ion etching (RIE), e-beam evaporation deposition, liftoff, and chlorine-based RIE. In order to investigate the performance of such NPSSs, typical blue LEDs with emission wavelengths of ~450 nm were grown on the NPSS and a flat sapphire substrate (FSS) by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition, respectively. The integral photoluminescence (PL) intensity of the NPSS LED was enhanced by 32.3 % compared to that of the FSS-LED. The low relative standard deviation of 4.7 % for PL mappings of NPSS LED indicated the high uniformity of PL data across the whole 2-in. wafer. Extremely simple, low cost, and high throughput of the process and the ability to fabricate at the wafer scale make PSL a potential method for production of nanopatterned sapphire substrates.

  18. Application of foams to the processing of fabrics. Final report, October 1, 1977-September 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Namboodri, C.G.

    1981-10-01

    The primary objective of this project was to reduce the energy consumed in the wet processing of fabrics where wet processing encompasses those processes used to convert loomstate (greige) goods to finished textile products. This includes desizing, scouring, bleaching, dyeing, printing, and finishing of fabrics. The energy intensive step in most of these processes is drying the fabric. By having less water on the fabric as it enters a drying oven, proportionately less energy is consumed in drying the fabric. The specific route used in this project to accomplish this objective has been to use air to distribute the finish, dye or printing ink onto the fabric. Rather than saturating the fabric with a dilute finish formulation, a concentrated formulation is mechanically foamed, air serving as the diluting medium and the foam applied to the fabric. In this manner, the water content of the fabric as it enters the drying oven is reduced by as much as 80% thereby leading to a corresponding reduction in the energy required to dry the fabric. Details on the procedure are presented and experimental results are discussed. (MCW)

  19. Plasmonic lithography for fabricating nanoimprint masters with multi-scale patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Howon; Kim, Seok; Han, Dandan; Jang, Jinhee; Oh, Seonghyeon; Choi, Jun-Hyuk; Lee, Eung-Sug; Hahn, Jae W.

    2015-05-01

    We successfully demonstrate the practical application of plasmonic lithography to fabricate nanoimprint masters. Using the properties of a non-propagating near-field, we achieve high-speed multi-scale patterning with different exposure time during the scanning. We modulate the width of the line patterns using a pulse light source with different duty cycles during the scanning of the probe. For practical application in plasmonic lithography, we apply a deep reactive ion etching process to transfer an arbitrary fluidic channel into a silicon substrate and fabricate a high-aspect-ratio imprint master. Subsequently, we carry out the imprint process to replicate the fluidic channel with an aspect ratio of 7.2. For pattern width below 100 nm, we adopt a three-layer structure of photoresist, hard layer, and polymer to record the near field and form a hard mask and transfer mask. Using the multilayer structure, we fabricate high-resolution nanoimprint masters in a silicon substrate with an aspect ratio greater than 1.

  20. Wafer scale fabrication of submicron chessboard gratings using phase masks in proximity lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuerzebecher, Lorenz; Harzendorf, Torsten; Fuchs, Frank; Zeitner, Uwe D.

    2012-03-01

    One and two dimensional grating structures with submicron period have a huge number of applications in optics and photonics. Such structures are conventionally fabricated using interference or e-beam lithography. However, both technologies have significant drawbacks. Interference lithography is limited to rather simple geometries and the sequential writing scheme of e-beam lithography leads to time consuming exposures for each grating. We present a novel fabrication technique for this class of microstructures which is based on proximity lithography in a mask aligner. The technology is capable to pattern a complete wafer within less than one minute of exposure time and offers thereby high lateral resolution and a reliable process. Our advancements compared to standard mask aligner lithography are twofold: First of all, we are using periodic binary phase masks instead of chromium masks to generate an aerial image of high resolution and exceptional light efficiency at certain distances behind the mask. Second, a special mask aligner illumination set-up is employed which allows to precisely control the incidence angles of the exposure light. This degree of freedom allows both, to shape the aerial image (e. g. transformation of a periodic spot pattern into a chessboard pattern) and to increase its depth of focus considerably. That way, our technology enables the fabrication of high quality gratings with arbitrary geometry in a fast and stable wafer scale process.

  1. Mass-producible and efficient optical antennas with CMOS-fabricated nanometer-scale gap.

    PubMed

    Seok, Tae Joon; Jamshidi, Arash; Eggleston, Michael; Wu, Ming C

    2013-07-15

    Optical antennas have been widely used for sensitive photodetection, efficient light emission, high resolution imaging, and biochemical sensing because of their ability to capture and focus light energy beyond the diffraction limit. However, widespread application of optical antennas has been limited due to lack of appropriate methods for uniform and large area fabrication of antennas as well as difficulty in achieving an efficient design with small mode volume (gap spacing < 10nm). Here, we present a novel optical antenna design, arch-dipole antenna, with optimal radiation efficiency and small mode volume, 5 nm gap spacing, fabricated by CMOS-compatible deep-UV spacer lithography. We demonstrate strong surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) signal with an enhancement factor exceeding 108 from the arch-dipole antenna array, which is two orders of magnitude stronger than that from the standard dipole antenna array fabricated by e-beam lithography. Since the antenna gap spacing, the critical dimension of the antenna, can be defined by deep-UV lithography, efficient optical antenna arrays with nanometer-scale gap can be mass-produced using current CMOS technology. PMID:23938507

  2. Fabrication of gray-scale masks and diffractive optical elements with LDW glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolkov, Victor P.; Malyshev, Anatoly I.; Poleshchuk, Alexander G.; Cherkashin, Vadim V.; Tiziani, Hans J.; Pruss, Christof; Schoder, Thomas; Westhauser, Johann; Wu, Chuck

    2001-11-01

    In the last years the application of gray-scale masks (GSM) for diffractive optics manufacturing attracts attention because of cost-effective possibility to produce a lot of diffractive elements on hard and heat-resistant thermally stable substrates. Direct laser writing of GSMs and fabrication of diffractive optical elements are effectively realized with application of LDW-glass (material for Laser Direct Write from CANYON MATERIALS, Inc). An important advantage of this material is the real-time change of transmittance in a single-step process without liquid development. It is shown that optimal transmittance range in which track width is not more than 1 micrometers is from 5-10% (transmittance of unexposed area) to 60-65% for LDW-glass type I having thinner colored layer. Power modulation and surroundings dependent peculiarities of direct laser writing on LDW-glass are discussed. Results of fabrication of diffractive optical elements using LDW-glass masks are presented. Among several types of LDW glasses studied the advantages of new GS-11 glass are elaborated. Application of GS-11 glass for GSMs allowed to fabricate blazed diffractive structures with backward slope width of 0.8 micrometers .

  3. Cobalt oxide hollow microspheres with micro- and nano-scale composite structure: Fabrication and electrochemical performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Feifei; Gao, Cuiling; Wen, Zhenhai; Wang, Qiang; Li, Jinghong; Xu, Zheng

    2009-05-01

    Co 3O 4 hollow microspheres with micro- and nano-scale composite structure self-assembled by nanosheets were successfully fabricated by the template-free wet-chemical approach. This method is simple, facile and effective. The Co 3O 4 hollow microspheres with good purity and homogeneous size were well characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform IR (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer (ICP). The formation mechanism was deeply studied. The micro- and nano-scale composite structure constructed by the porous nanosheets promotes to improve the electrochemical properties of Co 3O 4 hollow microspheres. The high discharge capacity of 1048 mAh g -1 indicates it to be the potential application in electrode materials of Li-ion battery.

  4. Formation and properties of 3D metamaterial composites fabricated using nanometer scale laser lithography (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokes, Sharka M.; Perkins, Frank K.; Glembocki, Orest J.

    2015-08-01

    Metamaterials designed for the visible or near IR wavelengths require patterning on the nanometer scale. To achieve this, e-beam lithography is used, but it is extremely difficult and can only produce 2D structures. A new alternative technique to produce 2D and 3D structures involves laser fabrication using the Nanoscribe 3D laser lithography system. This is a direct laser writing technique which can form arbitrary 3D nanostructures on the nanometer scale and is based on multi-photon polymerization. We are creating 2D and 3D metamaterials via this technique, and subsequently conformally coating them using Atomic Layer Deposition of oxides and Ag. We will discuss the optical properties of these novel composite structures and their potential for dual resonant metamaterials.

  5. Wafer-scale fabrication and growth dynamics of suspended graphene nanoribbon arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Hiroo; Kaneko, Toshiro; Shibuta, Yasushi; Ohno, Munekazu; Maekawa, Yuki; Kato, Toshiaki

    2016-06-01

    Adding a mechanical degree of freedom to the electrical and optical properties of atomically thin materials can provide an excellent platform to investigate various optoelectrical physics and devices with mechanical motion interaction. The large scale fabrication of such atomically thin materials with suspended structures remains a challenge. Here we demonstrate the wafer-scale bottom-up synthesis of suspended graphene nanoribbon arrays (over 1,000,000 graphene nanoribbons in 2 × 2 cm2 substrate) with a very high yield (over 98%). Polarized Raman measurements reveal graphene nanoribbons in the array can have relatively uniform-edge structures with near zigzag orientation dominant. A promising growth model of suspended graphene nanoribbons is also established through a comprehensive study that combined experiments, molecular dynamics simulations and theoretical calculations with a phase-diagram analysis. We believe that our results can contribute to pushing the study of graphene nanoribbons into a new stage related to the optoelectrical physics and industrial applications.

  6. CAD/CAM Fabrication of Definitive Implant Prostheses: A Digital Workflow From Planning to Implant Placement to Final Restoration.

    PubMed

    Baumgarten, Harold S; Wunsche, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Traditional methods of performing dental implant surgery and fabricating a definitive implant-supported prosthesis are being supplanted by digital techniques that provide greater precision and a more durable and esthetic restoration. In the present case, a 68-year-old woman presented a severely compromised dentition. She had received extensive restorative dentistry in the past and, due to recurrent caries and chronic periodontitis, was facing the loss of her maxillary teeth, as well as teeth in the lower left quadrant. This case report illustrates the use of a number of digital techniques for both treatment planning and fabrication of the final restoration. PMID:26625167

  7. Final Report on the Joule-Scale Experimental Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Shverdin, M

    2008-10-01

    We describe the final results of the High Power Laser Pulse Recirculation project. We have developed and implementing a novel technique for picosecond, Joule-class laser pulse recirculation inside a passive cavity. The aim of this project was to develop technology compatible with increasing the efficiency of Compton based light sources by more than an order of magnitude. In year 1 of the project, we achieved a greater than 40 times average power enhancement of the mJ-scale laser pulses inside a passive cavity with internal focus. In year 2, we demonstrated recirculation of lasers pulses with energies up to 191 mJ at 532 nm, at a repetition rate of 10 Hz, and a pulse duration of 20 ps. In this high energy regime, we achieved up to 14 times average power enhancement inside the cavity. This enhancement factor is compatible with the new X-band based mono-energetic gamma-ray machine, Velociraptor, being constructed at LLNL. The demonstrated cavity enhancement is primarily limited by the poor spatial beam quality of the high power laser beam. We expect a nearly diffraction limited laser beam to achieve 40 times or better cavity enhancement, as demonstrated in low energy experiments in FY-07. The two primary obstacles to higher average brightness and conversion efficiency of laser pulse energy to gamma-rays are the relatively small Compton scattering cross-section and the typically low repetition rates of Joule-class interaction lasers (10 Hz). Only a small fraction (10{sup -10}) of the available laser photons is converted to gamma-rays, while the rest is discarded. To significantly reduce the average power requirements of the laser and increase the overall system efficiency, we can recirculate laser light for repeated interactions with electron bunches. Our pulse recirculation scheme is based on nonlinear frequency conversion, termed recirculation injection by nonlinear gating (RING), inside a passive cavity. The main objectives of the two year project were: (1) Validate

  8. Large scale metal-free synthesis of graphene on sapphire and transfer-free device fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hyun Jae; Son, Minhyeok; Park, Chibeom; Lim, Hyunseob; Levendorf, Mark P.; Tsen, Adam W.; Park, Jiwoong; Choi, Hee Cheul

    2012-05-01

    Metal catalyst-free growth of large scale single layer graphene film on a sapphire substrate by a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process at 950 °C is demonstrated. A top-gated graphene field effect transistor (FET) device is successfully fabricated without any transfer process. The detailed growth process is investigated by the atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies.Metal catalyst-free growth of large scale single layer graphene film on a sapphire substrate by a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process at 950 °C is demonstrated. A top-gated graphene field effect transistor (FET) device is successfully fabricated without any transfer process. The detailed growth process is investigated by the atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, transmittance of graphene films, schematic illustration of the growth process, schematic of the α-Al2O3 (0001) substrate, Raman spectra and AFM images of graphene grown on α-Al2O3 (112\\cmb.macr 0) and ST-cut quartz substrates, optical image and Raman spectrum of graphene transferred to the SiO2 (300 nm)/Si substrate. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr30330b

  9. Fabrication of the replica templated from butterfly wing scales with complex light trapping structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Zhiwu; Li, Bo; Mu, Zhengzhi; Yang, Meng; Niu, Shichao; Zhang, Junqiu; Ren, Luquan

    2015-11-01

    The polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) positive replica templated twice from the excellent light trapping surface of butterfly Trogonoptera brookiana wing scales was fabricated by a simple and promising route. The exact SiO2 negative replica was fabricated by using a synthesis method combining a sol-gel process and subsequent selective etching. Afterwards, a vacuum-aided process was introduced to make PDMS gel fill into the SiO2 negative replica, and the PDMS gel was solidified in an oven. Then, the SiO2 negative replica was used as secondary template and the structures in its surface was transcribed onto the surface of PDMS. At last, the PDMS positive replica was obtained. After comparing the PDMS positive replica and the original bio-template in terms of morphology, dimensions and reflectance spectra and so on, it is evident that the excellent light trapping structures of butterfly wing scales were inherited by the PDMS positive replica faithfully. This bio-inspired route could facilitate the preparation of complex light trapping nanostructure surfaces without any assistance from other power-wasting and expensive nanofabrication technologies.

  10. Requirements and approaches to adapting laser writers for fabrication of gray-scale masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolkov, Victor P.; Shimansky, Ruslan; Poleshchuk, Alexander G.; Cherkashin, Vadim V.; Kharissov, Andrey A.; Denk, Dmitry

    2001-11-01

    The photolithography using gray-scale masks (GSM) with multilevel transmittance is now one of promising ways for manufacturing of high efficiency diffractive optical elements and microoptics. Such masks can be most effectively fabricated by laser or electron-beam writers on materials with a transmittance changing under influence of high-energy beams. The basic requirements for adaptation of existing and developed scanning laser writers are formulated. These systems create an image by continuous movement of a writing beam along one coordinate and overlapping of adjacent written tracks along another coordinate. Several problems must be solved at the GSM manufacturing: the calibration of the influence of the laser beam on a recording material without transferring the gray-scale structure into photoresist; the transmittance at the current exposed pixel depends on surrounding structures generated before recording of the current track and a character of the laser beam power modulation; essential increasing of the computed data in comparison with binary elements. The offered solutions are based on the results of investigations of the materials with variable transmittance (LDW-glass, a-Si film) and takes into account the specificity of diffractive blazed microstructures. The reduction of data amount for fabrication of multi-level DOEs is effectively performed using offered vector-gradient data format, which is based on piecewise-linear approximation of phase profile. The presented approaches to adaptation of laser writers are realized in software and hardware, and they allow to solve the basic problems of manufacturing GSMs.

  11. Design and Fabrication of the First Commercial-Scale Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH) Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-21

    The Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOHT) process uses a slurry bubble column reactor to convert synthesis gas (syngas), primarily a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen, to methanol. Because of its superior heat management the process can utilize directly the carbon monoxide (CO)-rich syngas characteristic of the gasification of coal, petroleum coke, residual oil, wastes, or other hydrocarbon feedstocks. The LPMEOHM Demonstration Project at Kingsport, Tennessee, is a $213.7 million cooperative agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Air Products Liquid Phase Conversion Company, L.P., a partnership between Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. and Eastman Chemical Company, to produce methanol from coal-derived syngas. Construction of the LPMEOH~ Process Demonstration Plant at Eastman's chemicals-from-coal complex in Kingsport was completed in January 1997. Following commissioning and shakedown activities, the fwst production of methanol from the facility occurred on April 2, 1997. Nameplate capacity of 260 short tons per day (TPD) was achieved on April 6, 1997, and production rates have exceeded 300 TPD of methanol at times. This report describes the design, fabrication, and installation of the Kingsport LPMEOEFM reactor, which is the first commercial-scale LPMEOEPM reaetor ever built. The vessel is 7.5 feet in diameter and 70 feet tall with design conditions of 1000 psig at 600 `F. These dimensions represent a significant scale-up from prior experience at the DOE-owned Alternative Fuels Development Unit in LaPorte, Texas, where 18-inch and 22-inch diameter reactors have been tested successfidly over thousands of hours. The biggest obstacles discovered during the scale- up, however, were encountered during fabrication of the vessel. The lessons learned during this process must be considered in tailoring the design for future sites, where the reactor dimensions may grow by yet another factor of two.

  12. Large scale silver nanowires network fabricated by MeV hydrogen (H+) ion beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honey, S.; Naseem, S.; Ishaq, A.; Maaza, M.; Bhatti, M. T.; Wan, D.

    2016-04-01

    A random two-dimensional large scale nano-network of silver nanowires (Ag-NWs) is fabricated by MeV hydrogen (H+) ion beam irradiation. Ag-NWs are irradiated under H+ ion beam at different ion fluences at room temperature. The Ag-NW network is fabricated by H+ ion beam-induced welding of Ag-NWs at intersecting positions. H+ ion beam induced welding is confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Moreover, the structure of Ag NWs remains stable under H+ ion beam, and networks are optically transparent. Morphology also remains stable under H+ ion beam irradiation. No slicings or cuttings of Ag-NWs are observed under MeV H+ ion beam irradiation. The results exhibit that the formation of Ag-NW network proceeds through three steps: ion beam induced thermal spikes lead to the local heating of Ag-NWs, the formation of simple junctions on small scale, and the formation of a large scale network. This observation is useful for using Ag-NWs based devices in upper space where protons are abandoned in an energy range from MeV to GeV. This high-quality Ag-NW network can also be used as a transparent electrode for optoelectronics devices. Project supported by the National Research Foundation of South Africa (NRF), the French Centre National pour la Recherche Scientifique, iThemba-LABS, the UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences & Nanotechnology, the Third World Academy of Science (TWAS), Organization of Women in Science for the Developing World (OWSDW), the Abdus Salam ICTP via the Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), and the Higher Education Commission (HEC) of Pakistan.

  13. Large-scale controlled fabrication of highly roughened flower-like silver nanostructures in liquid crystalline phase

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chengliang; Xiang, Xiangjun; Zhang, Ying; Peng, Zenghui; Cao, Zhaoliang; Wang, Junlin; Xuan, Li

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale controllable fabrication of highly roughened flower-like silver nanostructures is demonstrated experimentally via electrodeposition in the liquid crystalline phase. Different sizes of silver flowers are fabricated by adjusting the deposition time and the concentration of the silver nitrate solution. The density of the silver flowers in the sample is also controllable in this work. The flower-like silver nanostructures can serve as effective surface-enhanced Raman scattering and surface-enhanced fluorescence substrates because of their local surface plasmon resonance, and they may have applications in photoluminescence and catalysis. This liquid crystalline phase is used as a soft template for fabricating flower-like silver nanostructures for the first time, and this approach is suitable for large-scale uniform fabrication up to several centimetres. PMID:26216669

  14. Surface-controlled contact printing for nanowire device fabrication on a large scale.

    PubMed

    Roßkopf, D; Strehle, S

    2016-05-01

    Assembly strategies for functional nanowire devices that merge bottom-up and top-down technologies have been debated for over a decade. Although several breakthroughs have been reported, nanowire device fabrication techniques remain generally incompatible with large-scale and high-yield top-down microelectronics manufacturing. Strategies enabling the controlled transfer of nanowires from the growth substrate to pre-defined locations on a target surface would help to address this challenge. Based on the promising concept of mechanical nanowire transfer, we developed the technique of surface-controlled contact printing, which is based purely on dry friction between a nanowire and a target surface. Surface features, so-called catchers, alter the local frictional force or deposition probability and allow the positioning of single nanowires. Surface-controlled contact printing extends the current scope of nanowire alignment strategies with the intention to facilitate efficient nanowire device fabrication. This is demonstrated by the simultaneous assembly of 36 nanowire resistors within a chip area of greater than 2 cm(2) aided only by mask-assisted photolithography. PMID:27007944

  15. Fabrication of CVD graphene-based devices via laser ablation for wafer-scale characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackenzie, David M. A.; Buron, Jonas D.; Whelan, Patrick R.; Jessen, Bjarke S.; Silajdźić, Adnan; Pesquera, Amaia; Centeno, Alba; Zurutuza, Amaia; Bøggild, Peter; Petersen, Dirch H.

    2015-12-01

    Selective laser ablation of a wafer-scale graphene film is shown to provide flexible, high speed (1 wafer/hour) device fabrication while avoiding the degradation of electrical properties associated with traditional lithographic methods. Picosecond laser pulses with single pulse peak fluences of 140 mJ cm-2 for 1064 nm, 40 mJ cm-2 for 532 nm, and 30 mJ cm-2 for 355 nm are sufficient to ablate the graphene film, while the ablation onset for Si/SiO2 (thicknesses 500 μm/302 nm) did not occur until 240 mJ cm-2, 150 mJ cm-2, and 135 mJ cm-2, respectively, allowing all wavelengths to be used for graphene ablation without detectable substrate damage. Optical microscopy and Raman Spectroscopy were used to assess the ablation of graphene, while stylus profilometery indicated that the SiO2 substrate was undamaged. CVD graphene devices were electrically characterized and showed comparable field-effect mobility, doping level, on-off ratio, and conductance minimum before and after laser ablation fabrication.

  16. Surface-controlled contact printing for nanowire device fabrication on a large scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roßkopf, D.; Strehle, S.

    2016-05-01

    Assembly strategies for functional nanowire devices that merge bottom-up and top-down technologies have been debated for over a decade. Although several breakthroughs have been reported, nanowire device fabrication techniques remain generally incompatible with large-scale and high-yield top-down microelectronics manufacturing. Strategies enabling the controlled transfer of nanowires from the growth substrate to pre-defined locations on a target surface would help to address this challenge. Based on the promising concept of mechanical nanowire transfer, we developed the technique of surface-controlled contact printing, which is based purely on dry friction between a nanowire and a target surface. Surface features, so-called catchers, alter the local frictional force or deposition probability and allow the positioning of single nanowires. Surface-controlled contact printing extends the current scope of nanowire alignment strategies with the intention to facilitate efficient nanowire device fabrication. This is demonstrated by the simultaneous assembly of 36 nanowire resistors within a chip area of greater than 2 cm2 aided only by mask-assisted photolithography.

  17. Report on Development of Concepts for the Advanced Casting System in Support of the Deployment of a Remotely Operable Research Scale Fuel Fabrication Facility for Metal Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Ken Marsden

    2007-03-01

    Demonstration of recycle processes with low transuranic losses is key to the successful implementation of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership strategy to manage spent fuel. It is probable that these recycle processes will include remote fuel fabrication. This report outlines the strategy to develop and implement a remote metal fuel casting process with minimal transuranic losses. The approach includes a bench-scale casting system to develop materials, methods, and perform tests with transuranics, and an engineering-scale casting system to demonstrate scalability and remote operability. These systems will be built as flexible test beds allowing exploration of multiple fuel casting approaches. The final component of the remote fuel fabrication demonstration culminates in the installation of an advanced casting system in a hot cell to provide integrated remote operation experience with low transuranic loss. Design efforts and technology planning have begun for the bench-scale casting system, and this will become operational in fiscal year 2008, assuming appropriate funding. Installation of the engineering-scale system will follow in late fiscal year 2008, and utilize materials and process knowledge gained in the bench-scale system. Assuming appropriate funding, the advanced casting system will be installed in a remote hot cell at the end of fiscal year 2009.

  18. Fabrication of photonic quasicrystalline structures in the sub-micrometer scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuai; Sun, XiaoHong; Li, WenYang; Liu, Wei; Jiang, Lei; Han, Juan

    2016-05-01

    Compared to periodic crystals, photonic quasicrystals (PQC) have higher point group symmetry and are more favorable in achieving complete band-gaps. In this report, a top-cut prism interferometer is designed to fabricate ten-fold photonic quasicrystalline structures in the sub-micro scale. Based on the difference of production conditions, a variety of quasicrystals have been obtained in the SU8 photoresist films. Scanning Probe Microscopy and laser diffraction are used to characterize the produced structures. The corresponding theoretical analysis is also provided to compare with the experimental results. This will provide guidance for the large-area and fast production of ten-fold quasicrystalline structures with high quality.

  19. Large-scale fabrication of BN tunnel barriers for graphene spintronics

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Wangyang; Makk, Péter; Maurand, Romain; Bräuninger, Matthias; Schönenberger, Christian

    2014-08-21

    We have fabricated graphene spin-valve devices utilizing scalable materials made from chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Both the spin-transporting graphene and the tunnel barrier material are CVD-grown. The tunnel barrier is realized by Hexagonal boron nitride, used either as a monolayer or bilayer and placed over the graphene. Spin transport experiments were performed using ferromagnetic contacts deposited onto the barrier. We find that spin injection is still greatly suppressed in devices with a monolayer tunneling barrier due to resistance mismatch. This is, however, not the case for devices with bilayer barriers. For those devices, a spin relaxation time of ∼260 ps intrinsic to the CVD graphene material is deduced. This time scale is comparable to those reported for exfoliated graphene, suggesting that this CVD approach is promising for spintronic applications which require scalable materials.

  20. Large-Scale Fabrication of Carbon Nanotube Probe Tips For Atomic Force Microscopy Critical Dimension Imaging Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ye, Qi Laura; Cassell, Alan M.; Stevens, Ramsey M.; Meyyappan, Meyya; Li, Jun; Han, Jie; Liu, Hongbing; Chao, Gordon

    2004-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) probe tips for atomic force microscopy (AFM) offer several advantages over Si/Si3N4 probe tips, including improved resolution, shape, and mechanical properties. This viewgraph presentation discusses these advantages, and the drawbacks of existing methods for fabricating CNT probe tips for AFM. The presentation introduces a bottom up wafer scale fabrication method for CNT probe tips which integrates catalyst nanopatterning and nanomaterials synthesis with traditional silicon cantilever microfabrication technology. This method makes mass production of CNT AFM probe tips feasible, and can be applied to the fabrication of other nanodevices with CNT elements.

  1. Multi-scale modeling of fiber and fabric reinforced cement based composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soranakom, Chote

    With an increased use of fiber reinforced concrete in structural applications, proper characterization techniques and development of design guides are needed. This dissertation presents a multi-scale modeling approach for fiber and fabric reinforced cement-based composites. A micromechanics-based model of the yarn pullout mechanism due to the failure of the interfacial zone is presented. The effect of mechanical anchorage of transverse yarns is simulated using nonlinear spring elements. The yarn pullout mechanism was used in a meso-scale modeling approach to simulate the yarn bridging force in the crack evolution process. The tensile stress-strain response of a tension specimen that experiences distributed cracking can be simulated using a generalized finite difference approach. The stiffness degradation, tension stiffening, crack spacing evolution, and crack width characteristics of cement composites can be derived using matrix, interface and fiber properties. The theoretical models developed for fabric reinforced cement composites were then extended to cover other types of fiber reinforced concrete such as shotcrete, glass fiber reinforced concrete (GFRC), steel fiber reinforced concrete (SFRC), ferrocement and other conventional composite systems. The uniaxial tensile stress-strain response was used to formulate a generalized parametric closed-form solution for predicting flexural behavior of various composites at the macro-structural level. The flexural behaviors of these composites were modeled in a unified manner by means of a moment-curvature relationship based on the uniaxial material models. A variety of theoretical models were developed to address the various mechanisms including: an analytical yarn pullout model; a nonlinear finite difference fabric pullout model; a nonlinear finite difference tension model; closed-form solutions for strain-softening materials; closed-form solutions for strain-softening/hardening materials; and closed-form solutions for

  2. Fabrication of high-resolution reflective scale grating for an optical encoder using a patterned self-assembly process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Shanjin; Jiang, Weitao; Li, Xuan; Yu, Haoyu; Lei, Biao; Shi, Yongsheng; Yin, Lei; Chen, Bangdao; Liu, Hongzhong

    2016-07-01

    Steel tape scale grating of a reflective incremental linear encoder has a key impact on the measurement accuracy of the optical encoder. However, it is difficult for conventional manufacturing processes to fabricate scale grating with high-resolution grating strips, due to process and material problems. In this paper, self-assembly technology was employed to fabricate high-resolution steel tape scale grating for a reflective incremental linear encoder. Graphene oxide nanoparticles were adopted to form anti-reflective grating strips of steel tape scale grating. They were deposited in the tape, which had a hydrophobic and hydrophilic grating pattern when the dispersion of the nanoparticles evaporated. A standard lift-off process was employed to fabricate the hydrophobic grating strips on the steel tape. Simultaneously, the steel tape itself presents a hydrophilic property. The hydrophobic and hydrophilic grating pattern was thus obtained. In this study, octafluorocyclobutane was used to prepare the hydrophobic grating strips, due to its hydrophobic property. High-resolution graphene oxide steel tape scale grating with a pitch of 20 μm was obtained through the self-assembly process. The photoelectric signals of the optical encoder containing the graphene oxide scale grating and conventional scale grating were tested under the same conditions. Comparison test results showed that the graphene oxide scale grating has a better performance in its amplitude and harmonic components than that of the conventional steel tape scale. A comparison experiment of position errors was also conducted, demonstrating an improvement in the positioning error of the graphene oxide scale grating. The comparison results demonstrated the applicability of the proposed self-assembly process to fabricate high-resolution graphene oxide scale grating for a reflective incremental linear encoder.

  3. Modeling and fabrication of scale-like cantilever for cell capturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Boyin; Fu, Jing; Muradoglu, Murat

    2013-12-01

    The micro-domain provides excellent conditions for performing biological experiments on small populations of cells and has given rise to the proliferation of so-called lab-on-a-chip devices. In order to fully utilize the benefits of cell assays, means of retaining cells at defined locations over time are required. Here, the creation of scale-like cantilevers, inspired by biomimetics, on planar silicon nitride (Si3N4) film using focused ion beam machining is described. Using SEM imaging, regular tilting of the cantilever with almost no warping of the cantilever was uncovered. Finite element analysis showed that the scale-like cantilever was best at limiting stress concentration without difficulty in manufacture and having stresses more evenly distributed along the edge. It also had a major advantage in that the degree of deflection could be simply altered by changing the central angle. From a piling simulation conducted, it was found that a random delivery of simulated particles on to the scale-like obstacle should create a triangular collection. In the experimental trapping of polystyrene beads in suspension, the basic triangular piling structure was observed, but with extended tails and a fanning out around the obstacle. This was attributed to the aggregation tendency of polystyrene beads that acted on top of the piling behavior. In the experiment with bacterial cells, triangular pile up behind the cantilever was absent and the bacteria cells were able to slip inside the cantilever's opening despite the size of the bacteria being larger than the gap. Overall, the fabricated scale-like cantilever architectures offer a viable way to trap small populations of material in suspension.

  4. Catalytic fabric filtration for simultaneous NO{sub x} and particulate control. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, G.F.; Dunham, G.E.; Laudal, D.L.; Ness, S.R.; Schelkoph, G.L.

    1994-08-01

    The overall objective of the project proposed was to evaluate the catalyst-coated fabric filter concept for effective control of NO{sub 2} and particulate emissions simultaneously. General goals included demonstrating high removal efficiency of NO{sub x} and particulate matter, acceptable bag and catalyst life, and that process economics show a significant cost savings in comparison to a commercial SCR process and conventional particulate control. Specific goals included the following: reduce NO{sub x} emissions to 60 ppM or less; demonstrate particulate removal efficiency of >99.5%; demonstrate a bag/catalyst life of >1 year; Control ammonia slip to <25 ppM; show that catalytic fabric filtration can achieve a 50% cost savings over conventional fabric filtration and SCR control technology; determine compatibility with S0{sub 2} removal systems; and show that the concept results in a nonhazardous waste product.

  5. Polyethylene encapsulation full-scale technology demonstration. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kalb, P.D.; Lageraaen, P.R.

    1994-10-01

    A full-scale integrated technology demonstration of a polyethylene encapsulation process, sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development (OTD), was conducted at the Environmental & Waste Technology Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL.) in September 1994. As part of the Polymer Solidification National Effort, polyethylene encapsulation has been developed and tested at BNL as an alternative solidification technology for improved, cost-effective treatment of low-level radioactive (LLW), hazardous and mixed wastes. A fully equipped production-scale system, capable of processing 900 kg/hr (2000 lb/hr), has been installed at BNL. The demonstration covered all facets of the integrated processing system including pre-treatment of aqueous wastes, precise feed metering, extrusion processing, on-line quality control monitoring, and process control.

  6. Free-form Light Actuators — Fabrication and Control of Actuation in Microscopic Scale

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Hao; Wasylczyk, Piotr; Parmeggiani, Camilla; Martella, Daniele; Wiersma, Diederik Sybolt

    2016-01-01

    Liquid crystalline elastomers (LCEs) are smart materials capable of reversible shape-change in response to external stimuli, and have attracted researchers' attention in many fields. Most of the studies focused on macroscopic LCE structures (films, fibers) and their miniaturization is still in its infancy. Recently developed lithography techniques, e.g., mask exposure and replica molding, only allow for creating 2D structures on LCE thin films. Direct laser writing (DLW) opens access to truly 3D fabrication in the microscopic scale. However, controlling the actuation topology and dynamics at the same length scale remains a challenge. In this paper we report on a method to control the liquid crystal (LC) molecular alignment in the LCE microstructures of arbitrary three-dimensional shape. This was made possible by a combination of direct laser writing for both the LCE structures as well as for micrograting patterns inducing local LC alignment. Several types of grating patterns were used to introduce different LC alignments, which can be subsequently patterned into the LCE structures. This protocol allows one to obtain LCE microstructures with engineered alignments able to perform multiple opto-mechanical actuation, thus being capable of multiple functionalities. Applications can be foreseen in the fields of tunable photonics, micro-robotics, lab-on-chip technology and others. PMID:27285398

  7. Wafer-scale fabrication and growth dynamics of suspended graphene nanoribbon arrays

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Hiroo; Kaneko, Toshiro; Shibuta, Yasushi; Ohno, Munekazu; Maekawa, Yuki; Kato, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Adding a mechanical degree of freedom to the electrical and optical properties of atomically thin materials can provide an excellent platform to investigate various optoelectrical physics and devices with mechanical motion interaction. The large scale fabrication of such atomically thin materials with suspended structures remains a challenge. Here we demonstrate the wafer-scale bottom–up synthesis of suspended graphene nanoribbon arrays (over 1,000,000 graphene nanoribbons in 2 × 2 cm2 substrate) with a very high yield (over 98%). Polarized Raman measurements reveal graphene nanoribbons in the array can have relatively uniform-edge structures with near zigzag orientation dominant. A promising growth model of suspended graphene nanoribbons is also established through a comprehensive study that combined experiments, molecular dynamics simulations and theoretical calculations with a phase-diagram analysis. We believe that our results can contribute to pushing the study of graphene nanoribbons into a new stage related to the optoelectrical physics and industrial applications. PMID:27250877

  8. Free-form Light Actuators - Fabrication and Control of Actuation in Microscopic Scale.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hao; Wasylczyk, Piotr; Parmeggiani, Camilla; Martella, Daniele; Wiersma, Diederik Sybolt

    2016-01-01

    Liquid crystalline elastomers (LCEs) are smart materials capable of reversible shape-change in response to external stimuli, and have attracted researchers' attention in many fields. Most of the studies focused on macroscopic LCE structures (films, fibers) and their miniaturization is still in its infancy. Recently developed lithography techniques, e.g., mask exposure and replica molding, only allow for creating 2D structures on LCE thin films. Direct laser writing (DLW) opens access to truly 3D fabrication in the microscopic scale. However, controlling the actuation topology and dynamics at the same length scale remains a challenge. In this paper we report on a method to control the liquid crystal (LC) molecular alignment in the LCE microstructures of arbitrary three-dimensional shape. This was made possible by a combination of direct laser writing for both the LCE structures as well as for micrograting patterns inducing local LC alignment. Several types of grating patterns were used to introduce different LC alignments, which can be subsequently patterned into the LCE structures. This protocol allows one to obtain LCE microstructures with engineered alignments able to perform multiple opto-mechanical actuation, thus being capable of multiple functionalities. Applications can be foreseen in the fields of tunable photonics, micro-robotics, lab-on-chip technology and others. PMID:27285398

  9. Synthesis of polydopamine at the femtoliter scale and confined fabrication of Ag nanoparticles on surfaces.

    PubMed

    Guardingo, M; Esplandiu, M J; Ruiz-Molina, D

    2014-10-25

    Nanoscale polydopamine motifs are fabricated on surfaces by deposition of precursor femtolitre droplets using an AFM tip and employed as confined reactors to fabricate Ag nanoparticle patterns by in situ reduction of a Ag(+) salt. PMID:25195667

  10. Methods for reducing volatile organic content in fabric waterproof coatings. Final report, May--November 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Keohan, F.L.; Lazaro, E.

    1994-03-01

    Fabrics for rainwear and outdoor equipment traditionally have been rendered waterproof by coating with solvent-borne rubber solutions, solvent-borne polyurethanes and vinyl plastisols. Regulatory pressure for environmental protection and worker safety has become a potent driving force in eliminating volatile organic solvents and toxic additives from commercial coating products. A variety of low-solvent coating technologies are being introduced to replace the traditional solvent-based products. These include high solids formulation, solventless UV and electron beam curing systems, powder coatings and supercritical, CO{sub 2}-reduced paints. The benefits and limitations of these coating technologies were compared with respect to their applicability to fabric waterproofing. In addition, a novel acrylated surfactant was synthesized and employed in the formulation of UV-curing waterborne coatings for textile waterproofing. The application methods and cure characteristics of the solvent-free formulations are described. Physical properties of cured coating films including tensile strength, percent elongation, water absorption, water drop contact angle, and adhesion to common fabrics were measured and compared to those obtained using a commercial waterborne waterproofing system. One formulation produced cured films having low water absorption, tenacious adhesion to polyester fabric and surface hydrophobicity properties approaching those of polyethylene.

  11. Bench-scale co-processing economic assessment. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gala, H.B.; Marker, T.L.; Miller, E.N.

    1994-11-01

    The UOP Co-Processing scheme is a single-stage slurry catalyzed process in which petroleum vacuum resid and coal are simultaneously upgraded to a high-quality synthetic oil. A highly active dispersed catalyst has been developed which enables the operation of the co-processing unit at relatively moderate and high temperatures and relatively high pressure. Under the current contract, a multi-year research program was undertaken to study the technical and economic feasibility of this technology. All the contractual tasks were completed. Autoclave experiments were carried out to evaluate dispersed vanadium catalysts, molybdenum catalysts, and a less costly UOP-proprietary catalyst preparation technique. Autoclave experiments were also carried out in support of the continuous pilot plant unit operation and to study the effects of the process variables (pressure, temperature, and metal loading on the catalyst). A total of 24 continuous pilot plant runs were made. Research and development efforts during the pilot plant operations were concentrated on addressing the cost effectiveness of the UOP single-stage slurry catalyzed co-processing concept based on UOP experience gained in the previous DOE contract. To this end, effect of catalyst metal concentration was studied and a highly-active Mo-based catalyst was developed. This catalyst enabled successful long-term operation (924 hours) of the continuous bench-scale plant at highly severe operating conditions of 3,000 psig, 465{degree}C temperature, and 2:1 resid-to-MAF (moisture- and ash-free) coal ratio with 0.1 wt % active metal. The metal loading of the catalyst was low enough to consider the catalyst as a disposable slurry catalyst. Also, liquid recycle was incorporated in the pilot plant design to increase the, reactor back mixing and to increase the flow of liquid through the reactor (to introduce turbulence in the reactor) and to represent the design of a commercial-scale reactor.

  12. Final Technical/Scientific Report: Commodity Scale Thermostable Enzymatic Transformations

    SciTech Connect

    James J. Lalonde; Brian Davison

    2003-08-30

    The conversion of corn starch to high fructose corn-syrup sweetener is a commodity process, producing over 3 billion kg/y. In the last step of the process, an enzyme catalyst is used to convert glucose to the much sweeter sugar fructose. Due to incomplete conversion in the last step, the syrup must be purified using a chromatographic separation technique, which results in equal quantities of water being added to the syrup, and finally the water must be evaporated (up to 1 lb of water/lb of syrup). We have estimated the energy requirement in the evaporation step to be on the order of 13 billion BTU's/y. This process inefficiency could be eliminated if a thermostable form of glucose isomerase (GI), the enzyme catalyst used in the final step, was developed. Our chosen strategy was to develop an immobilized form of the enzyme in which the protein is first crystallized and then chemically cross-linked to form an insoluble particle. This so-called cross-linked enzyme crystal (CLE C(reg. sign)) technology had been shown to be a powerful method for enzyme stabilization for several other protein catalysts. In this work we have developed more than 30 CLEC preparations of glucose isomerase and tested them for activity and stability. We found these preparations to be highly active, with a 10-50 fold rate per gram of catalyst increase over existing commercial catalysts. The initial rates were also higher at higher temperatures as expected, however the efficiency of the CLEC GI preparations unexpectedly rapidly decreased to a low constant value with use at the higher temperatures. At this point, the source of this activity loss is unclear, however during this loss, the catalyst is found to form a solid mass indicating either breakage of the chemical cross-links or simple aggregation of the particles. It is likely that the increased mass transfer resistance due to this agglomeration is a major component of the activity loss. This research suggests that one potentially beneficial

  13. Wafer scale fabrication of highly dense and uniform array of sub-5 nm nanogaps for surface enhanced Raman scatting substrates.

    PubMed

    Cai, Hongbing; Wu, YuKun; Dai, Yanmeng; Pan, Nan; Tian, Yangchao; Luo, Yi; Wang, Xiaoping

    2016-09-01

    Metallic nanogap is very important for a verity of applications in plasmonics. Although several fabrication techniques have been proposed in the last decades, it is still a challenge to produce uniform nanogaps with a few nanometers gap distance and high throughput. Here we present a simple, yet robust method based on the atomic layer deposition (ALD) and lift-off technique for patterning ultranarrow nanogaps array. The ability to accurately control the thickness of the ALD spacer layer enables us to precisely define the gap size, down to sub-5 nm scale. Moreover, this new method allows to fabricate uniform nanogaps array along different directions densely arranged on the wafer-scale substrate. It is demonstrated that the fabricated array can be used as an excellent substrate for surface enhanced Raman scatting (SERS) measurements of molecules, even on flexible substrates. This uniform nanogaps array would also find its applications for the trace detection and biosensors. PMID:27607684

  14. Evaluation of three flame retardant (FR) grey cotton blend nonwoven fabrics using micro-scale combustion calorimetry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Unbleached (grey or greige) cotton nonwoven (NW) fabrics (with 12.5% polypropylene scrim) were treated with three phosphate-nitrogen based FR formulations and evaluated with micro-scale combustion calorimetry (MCC). Heat release rate (HRR), Peak heat rate (PHRR), temperature at peak heat release ra...

  15. Molecular-Scale Lubricants for Micromachine Applications: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, A.R.; Dugger, M.T.; Houston, J.E.; Lopez, G.P.; Mayer, T.M.; Michalske, T.A.; Miller, S.L.; Sniegowski, J.J.; Stevens, M.J.; Zhou, Y.

    1998-12-01

    The nature of this work was to develop the physics and chemistry base for understanding molecular-scale lubricants used to reduce of friction- and adhesion-induced failure in silicon micromachines (MEMS). We acquired this new knowledge by tailoring the molecular properties of the lubricants, applying local probes that can directly monitor the response of lubricants in contact conditions, and evaluating the performance of model lubricants MEMS devices. Model lubricants under investigation were the silane coupling agents that form monolayer films on native oxide silicon surfaces, which is the substrate in MEMS. These molecules bind via strong surface bonds and produce a layer of hydro- or fluoro-carbon chains normal to the substrate. "Tailoring" the lubricants entails modifying the chain length, the chain chemical reactivity (H or F), and the density of chain structures. Thus much effort went into understanding the surface chemistry of silane-silicon oxide coupling. With proximal probes such as atomic force microscopy (AFM), interracial force microscopy (FM), and shear force microscopy in combination with IFM, we examined the frictional and adhesive properties of the silane films with very high spatial resolution (< 100 nm) and sensitivity. MEMS structures are treated with silanes under identical conditions, and examined for friction and adhesion under operating conditions. Proper assessment of the lubricants required quantitative analysis of MEMS performance at high speeds and long operating times. Our proximal probe measurements and WS performance analyses form a very important link for future molecular dynamics simulations, that, in turn, should be able to predict MEMS performance under all conditions.

  16. Large-scale graphene-based composite films for flexible transparent electrodes fabricated by electrospray deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Woo Sik; Moon, Sook Young; Kim, Hui Jin; Park, Sungjin; Koyanagi, Jun; Huh, Hoon

    2014-12-01

    Large-scale transparent conducting electrodes were fabricated using the electrospray method on a glass wafer and polyethylene terephthalate film using chemically reduced graphene oxide and poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT). Graphene oxide (GO) is prepared by the modified Hummers method, and reduced GO (RG) is prepared at low temperature. By varying the concentration of RG and PEDOT of the composite material on the substrate, the electrical conductivity and transmittance of the electrode was controlled. The optical transmittance values of the graphene-based electrode at a wavelength of 550 nm were between 81 and 95% and had sheet resistances from 370 to 5400 Ω sq-1. After 1000 cycles of a bending test, the sheet resistances of the graphene-based composite films were unchanged. Different types of graphene and graphene-based electrodes were characterized by field-emission scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, high-resolution Raman spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, transmittance, and electrical conductivity measurements.

  17. Fabrication technique of large-scale lightweight SiC space mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ge; Zhao, Rucheng; Zhao, Wenxing

    2007-12-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is a new type candidate material for large-scale lightweight space mirror. Its low thermal distortion, high stiffness, high optical quality, and its dimensional stability are better than other traditional optical substrate materials such as ULE, Zerodure, Beryllium (Be) and so on. In this paper, the lightweight silicon carbide space mirror blank was fabricated by reaction sintering. As a space born mirror material, silicon carbide must be an optical grade ceramic. So we prepared the silicon carbide green body with gel-casting method. Then some carbon materials were supplemented into the green body which will bring reaction-sintering with silicon in a vacuum furnace during 1500-1600°C, ultimately the reaction bonded silicon carbide was made. The diameter of SiC space mirror blank we have made is 680mm. If expanding the size of the vacuum furnace, bigger mirror blank can be obtained. The test results show that the mechanical and thermal properties of RB-SiC are excellent with bending strength of 350MPa, fracture toughness of 4.1 MPaÂ.m1/2 and coefficient of thermal expansion(CET) of 2.67×10-6/K. The surface roughness(RMS) could be better than 3nm.

  18. Large-scale fabrication of pseudocapacitive glass windows that combine electrochromism and energy storage.

    PubMed

    Yang, Peihua; Sun, Peng; Chai, Zhisheng; Huang, Langhuan; Cai, Xiang; Tan, Shaozao; Song, Jinhui; Mai, Wenjie

    2014-10-27

    Multifunctional glass windows that combine energy storage and electrochromism have been obtained by facile thermal evaporation and electrodeposition methods. For example, WO3 films that had been deposited on fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) glass exhibited a high specific capacitance of 639.8 F g(-1). Their color changed from transparent to deep blue with an abrupt decrease in optical transmittance from 91.3% to 15.1% at a wavelength of 633 nm when a voltage of -0.6 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) was applied, demonstrating its excellent energy-storage and electrochromism properties. As a second example, a polyaniline-based pseudocapacitive glass was also developed, and its color can change from green to blue. A large-scale pseudocapacitive WO3-based glass window (15×15 cm(2)) was fabricated as a prototype. Such smart pseudocapacitive glass windows show great potential in functioning as electrochromic windows and concurrently powering electronic devices, such as mobile phones or laptops. PMID:25212514

  19. USGS Geospatial Fabric and Geo Data Portal for Continental Scale Hydrology Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampson, K. M.; Newman, A. J.; Blodgett, D. L.; Viger, R.; Hay, L.; Clark, M. P.

    2013-12-01

    This presentation describes use of United States Geological Survey (USGS) data products and server-based resources for continental-scale hydrologic simulations. The USGS Modeling of Watershed Systems (MoWS) group provides a consistent national geospatial fabric built on NHDPlus. They have defined more than 100,000 hydrologic response units (HRUs) over the continental United States based on points of interest (POIs) and split into left and right bank based on the corresponding stream segment. Geophysical attributes are calculated for each HRU that can be used to define parameters in hydrologic and land-surface models. The Geo Data Portal (GDP) project at the USGS Center for Integrated Data Analytics (CIDA) provides access to downscaled climate datasets and processing services via web-interface and python modules for creating forcing datasets for any polygon (such as an HRU). These resources greatly reduce the labor required for creating model-ready data in-house, contributing to efficient and effective modeling applications. We will present an application of this USGS cyber-infrastructure for assessments of impacts of climate change on hydrology over the continental United States.

  20. Final design and fabrication of an active control system for flutter suppression on a supercritical aeroelastic research wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, G. E.; Mcgehee, C. R.

    1981-01-01

    The final design and hardware fabrication was completed for an active control system capable of the required flutter suppression, compatible with and ready for installation in the NASA aeroelastic research wing number 1 (ARW-1) on Firebee II drone flight test vehicle. The flutter suppression system uses vertical acceleration at win buttock line 1.930 (76), with fuselage vertical and roll accelerations subtracted out, to drive wing outboard aileron control surfaces through appropriate symmetric and antisymmetric shaping filters. The goal of providing an increase of 20 percent above the unaugmented vehicle flutter velocity but below the maximum operating condition at Mach 0.98 is exceeded by the final flutter suppression system. Results indicate that the flutter suppression system mechanical and electronic components are ready for installation on the DAST ARW-1 wing and BQM-34E/F drone fuselage.

  1. Final-Year Results from the i3 Scale-Up of Reading Recovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Henry; Sirinides, Philip; Gray, Abby; Davila, Heather Goldsworthy; Sam, Cecile; Blalock, Toscha; Blackman, Horatio; Anderson-Clark, Helen; Schiera, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    As part of the 2010 economic stimulus, a $55 million "Investing in Innovation" (i3) grant from the US Department of Education was awarded to scale up Reading Recovery across the nation. This paper presents the final round of results from the large-scale, mixed methods randomized evaluation of the implementation and impacts of Reading…

  2. Fabric composite radiators for space nuclear power applications. Final report, March 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, A.C.; Al-Baroudi, H.; Gulshan-Ara, Z.; Kiestler, W.C.; Snuggerud, R.D.; Abdul-Hamid, S.A.; Marks, T.S.

    1993-03-24

    Nuclear power systems will be required to provide much greater power levels for both civilian and defense space activities in the future than an currently needed. Limitations on the amount of usable power from radioisotope thermal generators and the limited availability of radioisotope heat source materials lead directly to the conclusion that nuclear power reactors will be needed to enhance the exploration of the solar system as well as to provide for an adequate defense. Lunar bases and travel to the Martian surface will be greatly enhanced by the use of high levels of nuclear power. Space based radar systems requiring many kilowatts of electrical power can provide intercontinental airline traffic control and defense early warning systems. Since the, figure of merit used in defining any space power system is the specific power, the decrease in die mass of any reactor system component will yield a tremendous benefit to the overall system performance. Also, since the heat rejection system of any power system can make up a large portion of the total system mass, any reduction in the mass of the heat rejection radiators will significantly affect the performance of the power system. Composite materials which combine the high strength, flexibility, and low mass characteristics of Si% based fibers with the attractive compatibility and heat transfer features of metallic foils, have been proposed for use m a number of space radiator applications. Thus, the weave of the fabric and the high strength capability of the individual fibers are combined with the high conductivity and chemical stability of a metallic liner to provide a light weight, flexible alternative to heavy, rigid, metallic radiator structural containers. The primary focus of this investigation revolves around two applications of the fabric composite materials, notably a fabric heat pipe radiator design and the Bubble Membrane Radiator concept.

  3. Orbital transfer vehicle oxygen turbopump technology. Volume 1: Design, fabrication, and hydrostatic bearing testing. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Buckmann, P.S.; Hayden, W.R.; Lorenc, S.A.; Sabiers, R.L.; Shimp, N.R.

    1990-12-01

    The design, fabrication, and initial testing of a rocket engine turbopump (TPA) for the delivery of high pressure liquid oxygen using hot oxygen for the turbine drive fluid are described. This TPA is basic to the dual expander engine which uses both oxygen and hydrogen as working fluids. Separate tasks addressed the key issue of materials for this TPA. All materials selections emphasized compatibility with hot oxygen. The OX TPA design uses a two-stage centrifugal pump driven by a single-stage axial turbine on a common shaft. The design includes ports for three shaft displacement/speed sensors, various temperature measurements, and accelerometers.

  4. Detailed design, fabrication and testing of an engineering prototype compensated pulsed alternator. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, W.L. Jr.; Woodson, H.H.

    1980-03-01

    The design, fabrication, and test results of a prototype compensated pulsed alternator are discussed. The prototype compulsator is a vertical shaft single phase alternator with a rotating armature and salient pole stator. The machine is designed for low rep rate pulsed duty and is sized to drive a modified 10 cm Beta amplifier. The load consists of sixteen 15 mm x 20 mm x 112 cm long xenon flashlamps connected in parallel. The prototype compulsator generates an open circuit voltage of 6 kV, 180 Hz, at a maximum design speed of 5400 rpm. At maximum speed, the inertial energy stored in the compulsator rotor is 3.4 megajoules.

  5. Pulse-jet fabric filters for coal-fired utility and industrial boilers: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Dean, A.H.; Cushing, K.M.

    1987-09-01

    Pulse-jet fabric filters rely on the filtration of dirty flue gas by the outside surface of the bags, which are then cleaned by a shock wave from an air pulse entering each bag from the top. The shock wave travels down each bag, flexing the bag and dislodging dustcake as it travels the length of the bag downward and then upward. A venturi may or may not be used to enhance the pulse, and cleaning may be on-line or off-line. This study provides a convenient and versatile information base about pulse-jet fabric filters on coal-fired boilers. Features include an overview of the pulse-jet concept, a discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of pulse-jet cleaning, a survey of vendors and design and hardware features of pulse-jet installations, discussion of these design and hardware characteristics for several vendors, case histories of a wide variety of installations as examples, and a list of pertinent references. The most important part of the study is an exhaustive table of pulse-jet installations and their features, sorted several different ways for accessibility. Predominant features of the installations in the list are analyzed and presented in graphic form.

  6. Wafer-scale fabrication of transistors using CVD-grown graphene and its application to inverter circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakaharai, Shu; Iijima, Tomohiko; Ogawa, Shinichi; Yagi, Katsunori; Harada, Naoki; Hayashi, Kenjiro; Kondo, Daiyu; Takahashi, Makoto; Li, Songlin; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito; Sato, Shintaro; Yokoyama, Naoki

    2015-04-01

    Graphene transistors were fabricated by a wafer-scale “top-down” process using a graphene sheet formed by the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. The devices have a dual-gated structure with an ion-irradiated channel, in which transistor polarity can be electrostatically controlled. We demonstrated, at room temperature, an on/off operation of current and electrostatic control of transistor polarity. By combining two dual-gated transistors, a six-terminal device was fabricated with three top gates and two ion-irradiated channels. In this device, we demonstrated an inverter operation.

  7. Materials Science and Physics at Micro/Nano-Scales. FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Judy Z

    2009-09-07

    The scope of this project is to study nanostructures of semiconductors and superconductors, which have been regarded as promising building blocks for nanoelectronic and nanoelectric devices. The emphasis of this project is on developing novel synthesis approaches for fabrication of nanostructures with desired physical properties. The ultimate goal is to achieve a full control of the nanostructure growth at microscopic scales. The major experimental achievements obtained are summarized

  8. Fabrication and testing of long length high-{Tc} composite conductors. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, L.M.

    1997-12-31

    Presently some methods of HTS-conductors processing are under study in the authors laboratory. ``Powder-in-tube`` (PIT), ``Jelly-roll``, electrophorethis are among them. PIT process has developed predominantly both in a view of the achieved J{sub c} values Bi-2223 phase was used as a core material for these tapes. Since the main purpose of the task order was to enhance the development of long length high temperature superconductor tapes, the authors have considered reasonable to lay the perfection idea of the PIT process step by step or tape by tape. To realize it they have assumed, keeping stable the basic scheme of PIT process, to vary some technological parameters which are as follows: (1) type of initial powder; (2) sheath material; (3) tape construction (filaments number, cross section e.a.); and (4) processing regimes. This report covers the fabrication process and characteristics of the produced conductors.

  9. Advanced fabrication techniques for hydrogen-cooled engine structures. Final report, October 1975-June 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Buchmann, O.A.; Arefian, V.V.; Warren, H.A.; Vuigner, A.A.; Pohlman, M.J.

    1985-11-01

    Described is a program for development of coolant passage geometries, material systems, and joining processes that will produce long-life hydrogen-cooled structures for scramjet applications. Tests were performed to establish basic material properties, and samples constructed and evaluated to substantiate fabrication processes and inspection techniques. Results of the study show that the basic goal of increasing the life of hydrogen-cooled structures two orders of magnitude relative to that of the Hypersonic Research Engine can be reached with available means. Estimated life is 19000 cycles for the channels and 16000 cycles for pin-fin coolant passage configurations using Nickel 201. Additional research is required to establish the fatigue characteristics of dissimilar-metal coolant passages (Nickel 201/Inconel 718) and to investigate the embrittling effects of the hydrogen coolant.

  10. Materials and fabrication methods for the next generation of respiratory protection (RESPO 21). Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, H.S.; Agarwal, R.

    1990-11-02

    Although excellent protective items have been developed in the past, it has become very apparent that there is an urgent need for better masks, hoods, and garments that will protect soldiers and civilians from the chemical threats of terrorist groups and countries. There is much room for improvement in performance and cost in order to make the protection more readily available for military personnel and for mass distribution to civilians. We have prepared an overview of currently available materials and fabrication methods, and have recommended materials and methods that should be considered for future ijmprovements in this field. This overview is presented in addition to our report on the four tasks that were given to us in the statement of work for this program.

  11. Fabrication and development of several heat pipe honeycomb sandwich panel concepts. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Tanzer, H.J.

    1982-06-01

    The feasibility of fabricating and processing liquid metal heat pipes in a low mass honeycomb sandwich panel configuration for application on the NASA Langley airframe-integrated Scramjet engine was investigated. A variety of honeycomb panel facesheet and core-ribbon wick concepts was evaluated within constraints dictated by existing manufacturing technology and equipment. The chosen design consists of an all-stainless steel structure, sintered screen facesheets, and two types of core-ribbon, a diffusion bonded wire mesh and a foil-screen composite. Cleaning, fluid charging, processing, and process port sealing techniques were established. The liquid metals, potassium, sodium and cesium were used as working fluids. Eleven honeycomb panels 15.24 cm X 15.24 cm X 2.94 cm were delivered to NASA Langley for extensive performance testing and evaluation, nine panels were processed as heat pipes, and two panels were left unprocessed.

  12. Fuel Fabrication Capability WBS 01.02.01.05 - HIP Bonding Experiments Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dickerson, Patricia O'Donnell; Summa, Deborah Ann; Liu, Cheng; Tucker, Laura Arias; Chen, Ching-Fong; Aikin, Beverly; Aragon, Daniel Adrian; Beard, Timothy Vance; Montalvo, Joel Dwayne; Pena, Maria Isela; Dombrowski, David E.

    2015-06-10

    The goals of this project were to demonstrate reliable, reproducible solid state bonding of aluminum 6061 alloy plates together to encapsulate DU-10 wt% Mo surrogate fuel foils. This was done as part of the CONVERT Fuel Fabrication Capability effort in Process Baseline Development . Bonding was done using Hot Isotatic Pressing (HIP) of evacuated stainless steel cans (a.k.a HIP cans) containing fuel plate components and strongbacks. Gross macroscopic measurements of HIP cans prior to HIP and after HIP were used as part of this demonstration, and were used to determine the accuracy of a finitie element model of the HIP bonding process. The quality of the bonding was measured by controlled miniature bulge testing for Al-Al, Al-Zr, and Zr-DU bonds. A special objective was to determine if the HIP process consistently produces good quality bonding and to determine the best characterization techniques for technology transfer.

  13. Actinide partitioning-transmutation program final report. IV. Miscellaneous aspects. [Transport; fuel fabrication; decay; policy; economics

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, C.W.; Croff, A.G.

    1980-09-01

    This report discusses seven aspects of actinide partitioning-transmutation (P-T) which are important in any complete evaluation of this waste treatment option but which do not fall within other major topical areas concerning P-T. The so-called miscellaneous aspects considered are (1) the conceptual design of a shipping cask for highly neutron-active fresh and spent P-T fuels, (2) the possible impacts of P-T on mixed-oxide fuel fabrication, (3) alternatives for handling the existing and to-be-produced spent fuel and/or wastes until implementation of P-T, (4) the decay and dose characteristics of P-T and standard reactor fuels, (5) the implications of P-T on currently existing nuclear policy in the United States, (6) the summary costs of P-T, and (7) methods for comparing the risks, costs, and benefits of P-T.

  14. Facile fabrication of wafer-scale MoS2 neat films with enhanced third-order nonlinear optical performance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Saifeng; Chang, Chunxia; Feng, Yanyan; Li, Yuanxin; Dong, Ningning; Wang, Kangpeng; Zhang, Long; Blau, Werner J; Wang, Jun

    2015-02-21

    Wafer-scale MoS2 neat films with controllable thicknesses were successfully fabricated by vacuum filtering liquid-exfoliated MoS2 dispersions. The obtained MoS2 filtered thin films were systematically characterized by UV-Vis spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was found that the fabricated scalable MoS2 films have a smooth surface and high optical homogeneity verified by AFM and a collimated 532 nm beam, respectively. We investigated the ultrafast nonlinear optical (NLO) properties of the filtered films by an open aperture Z-scan method using 515 and 1030 nm femtosecond laser pulses. Saturable absorption was observed at both 515 and 1030 nm with the figure of merit (FOM) values as ∼3.3 × 10(-12) esu cm and ∼3.4 × 10(-14) esu cm, respectively. The observation of ultrafast NLO performance of the MoS2 filtered films indicates that vacuum filtration is a feasible method for the fabrication of optical thin films, which can be expanded to fabricate other two-dimensional films from the corresponding dispersions. This easy film fabrication technology will greatly enlarge the application of graphene analogues including graphene in photonic devices, especially of MoS2 as a saturable absorber. PMID:25597818

  15. Large-scale fabrication of 2-D nanoporous graphene using a thin anodic aluminum oxide etching mask.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Hyun; Jang, Yamujin; Heo, Keun; Lee, Jeong-Mi; Choi, Soon Hyung; Joo, Won-Jae; Hwang, Sung Woo; Whang, Dongmok

    2013-11-01

    A large-scale nanoporous graphene (NPG) fabrication method via a thin anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) etching mask is presented in this paper. A thin AAO film is successfully transferred onto a hydrophobic graphene surface under no external force. The AAO film is completely stacked on the graphene due to the van der Waals force. The neck width of the NPG can be controlled ranging from 10 nm to 30 nm with different AAO pore widening times. Extension of the NPG structure is demonstrated on a centimeter scale up to 2 cm2. AAO and NPG structures are characterized using optical microscopy (OM), Raman spectroscopy and field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). A field effect transistor (FET) is realized by using NPG. Its electrical characteristics turn out to be different from that of pristine graphene, which is due to the periodic nanostructures. The proposed fabrication method could be adapted to a future graphene-based nano device. PMID:24245263

  16. A large-scale fabrication of flower-like submicrometer-sized tungsten whiskers via metal catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yunzhu; Li, Jing; Liu, Wensheng; Shi, Yubin

    2012-06-01

    Tungsten powder mixed with an appropriate amount of nickel and iron powders is used as raw material to fabricate large-scale tungsten whisker-like structure. The morphology, microstructure and composition of the whisker-like tungsten are observed and tested by scanning electron microscope and FESEM, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction, respectively. The main component of the tungsten whisker-like structure is tungsten, which has the axial growth along the <100 > direction with large aspect ratio and possesses flower-like structure. Large-scale submicrometer-sized whisker-like tungsten was fabricated via vapor phase deposition approach with the aid of metal catalysts at 800°C by holding for 6 h in the appropriate atmosphere. The growth procedure of flower-like tungsten whisker is probably based on the vapor-liquid-solid mechanism at beginning of the formation of tungsten nuclei, then vapor-solid mechanism is dominant.

  17. Design fabrication and testing of a low cost ceramic collector panel. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Earl, W.A.; Johnson, P.F.; Sisson, J.C.

    1983-02-01

    The effects of fabrication procedures on the thermal performance of various ceramic systems for active solar applications were investigated. A shale-based structural clay body was used as a standard. This body was also coated with silicon carbide, a glossy black glaze and a matte black glaze. Metal samples used included copper, aluminum and aluminum coated with a flat black paint. Experiments were performed using a solar test box linked to an automated data acquisition system. Temperatures of samples were recorded at 3 min. intervals for 4 h solar periods. An F-statistical analysis was performed on the resulting data and was correlated with total solar emittance, total solar reflectance and monochromatic reflectance as a function of incident wavelength. The information above was also utilized in developing a computer model used to simulate the performance of various materials in active solar testing. Results suggest that a structural clay body fired to maturity and coated with a matte black glaze could be commercially useful for applications requiring large quantities of heated water.

  18. Fabrication, assembly, bench and drilling tests of two prototype downhole pneumatic turbine motors: Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Bookwalter, R.; Duettra, P.D.; Johnson, P.; Lyons, W.C.; Miska, S.

    1987-04-01

    The first and second prototype downhole pneumatic turbine motors have been fabricated, assembled and tested. All bench tests showed that the motor will produce horsepower and bit speeds approximating the predicted values. Specifically, the downhole pneumatic turbine motor produced approximately 50 horsepower at 100 rpm, while being supplied with about 3600 SCFM of compressed air. The first prototype was used in a drilling test from a depth of 389 feet to a depth of 789 feet in the Kirtland formation. This first prototype motor drilled at a rate exceeding 180 ft/hr, utilizing only 3000 SCFM of compressed air. High temperature tests (at approximately 460/sup 0/F) were carried out on the thrust assembly and the gearboxes for the two prototypes. These components operated successfully at these temperatures. Although the bench and drilling tests were successful, the tests revealed design changes that should be made before drilling tests are carried out in geothermal boreholes at the Geysers area, near Santa Rosa, California.

  19. Characterization of photoresist and simulation of a developed resist profile for the fabrication of gray-scale diffractive optic elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jong Rak; Sierchio, Justin; Zaverton, Melissa; Kim, Youngsik; Milster, Tom D.

    2012-02-01

    We have characterized a photoresist used for the fabrication of gray-scale diffractive optic elements in terms of Dill's and Mack's model parameters. The resist model parameters were employed for the simulations of developed resist profiles for sawtooth patterns executed by solving the Eikonal equation with the fast-marching method. The simulated results were shown to be in good agreement with empirical data.

  20. Fabrication of speckle patterns by focused ion beam deposition and its application to micro-scale residual stress measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ronghua; Xie, Huimin; Xue, Yunfei; Wang, Liang; Li, YanJie

    2015-09-01

    This paper deals with the characterization of influence parameters on the fabrication of speckle patterns using FIB deposition. In many manufacturing processes the presence of residual stress is disturbing, and can significantly affect the mechanical properties of materials and structures. Digital image correlation (DIC) is validated to be an effective approach for the determination of micro-scale residual stress under the dual-beam microscope (FIB-EB). Considering the high-quality micro-scale speckle pattern is the prerequisite in DIC measurement, the influence parameters on the deposited speckle patterns, such as the quality of the speckle template, total deposition time, ion beam current density, and dwell time, are primarily discussed. Moreover, in the measurement of residual stress, the integrated fabrication technique under the FIB-EB dual-beam system is also explained, covering the following steps: fabrication of the speckle pattern by FIB deposition, slot milling for stress release by FIB, high-resolution SEM imaging before and after stress release as well as the deformation analysis by DIC. As application, the optimized micro-scale speckle patterns are deposited on the surface of laser shock peened metallic glass, and the residual stress distribution on the sample surface is successfully measured.

  1. Method for large-scale fabrication of atomic-scale structures on material surfaces using surface vacancies

    DOEpatents

    Lim, Chong Wee; Ohmori, Kenji; Petrov, Ivan Georgiev; Greene, Joseph E.

    2004-07-13

    A method for forming atomic-scale structures on a surface of a substrate on a large-scale includes creating a predetermined amount of surface vacancies on the surface of the substrate by removing an amount of atoms on the surface of the material corresponding to the predetermined amount of the surface vacancies. Once the surface vacancies have been created, atoms of a desired structure material are deposited on the surface of the substrate to enable the surface vacancies and the atoms of the structure material to interact. The interaction causes the atoms of the structure material to form the atomic-scale structures.

  2. Ten-channel InP-based large-scale photonic integrated transmitter fabricated by SAG technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Can; Zhu, Hongliang; Liang, Song; Cui, Xiao; Wang, Huitao; Zhao, Lingjuan; Wang, Wei

    2014-12-01

    A 10-channel InP-based large-scale photonic integrated transmitter was fabricated by selective area growth (SAG) technology combined with butt-joint regrowth (BJR) technology. The SAG technology was utilized to fabricate the electroabsorption modulated distributed feedback (DFB) laser (EML) arrays at the same time. The design of coplanar electrodes for electroabsorption modulator (EAM) was used for the flip-chip bonding package. The lasing wavelength of DFB laser could be tuned by the integrated micro-heater to match the ITU grids, which only needs one electrode pad. The average output power of each channel is 250 μW with an injection current of 200 mA. The static extinction ratios of the EAMs for 10 channels tested are ranged from 15 to 27 dB with a reverse bias of 6 V. The frequencies of 3 dB bandwidth of the chip for each channel are around 14 GHz. The novel design and simple fabrication process show its enormous potential in reducing the cost of large-scale photonic integrated circuit (LS-PIC) transmitter with high chip yields.

  3. Fabrication process scale-up and optimization for a boron-aluminum composite radiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okelly, K. P.

    1973-01-01

    Design approaches to a practical utilization of a boron-aluminum radiator for the space shuttle orbiter are presented. The program includes studies of laboratory composite material processes to determine the feasibility of a structural and functional composite radiator panel, and to estimate the cost of its fabrication. The objective is the incorporation of boron-aluminum modulator radiator on the space shuttle.

  4. Scale-up of microwave nitridation of sintered reaction bonded silicon nitride parts. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Tiegs, T.N.; Kiggans, J.O.; Garvey, G.A.

    1997-10-01

    Scale-up were performed in which microwave heating was used to fabricate reaction-bonded silicon nitride and sintered reaction-bonded silicon nitride (SRBSN). Tests were performed in both a 2.45 GHz, 500 liter and a 2.45 GHz, 4000 liter multimode cavities. The silicon preforms processed in the studies were clevis pins for diesel engines. Up to 230 samples were processed in a single microwave furnace run. Data were collected which included weight gains for nitridation and sintering studies were performed using a conventional resistance-heated furnace.

  5. Centimeter-long and large-scale micropatterns of reduced graphene oxide films: fabrication and sensing applications.

    PubMed

    He, Qiyuan; Sudibya, Herry Gunadi; Yin, Zongyou; Wu, Shixin; Li, Hai; Boey, Freddy; Huang, Wei; Chen, Peng; Zhang, Hua

    2010-06-22

    Recently, the field-effect transistors (FETs) with graphene as the conducting channels have been used as a promising chemical and biological sensors. However, the lack of low cost and reliable and large-scale preparation of graphene films limits their applications. In this contribution, we report the fabrication of centimeter-long, ultrathin (1-3 nm), and electrically continuous micropatterns of highly uniform parallel arrays of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) films on various substrates including the flexible polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films by using the micromolding in capillary method. Compared to other methods for the fabrication of graphene patterns, our method is fast, facile, and substrate independent. In addition, we demonstrate that the nanoelectronic FETs based on our rGO patterns are able to label-freely detect the hormonal catecholamine molecules and their dynamic secretion from living cells. PMID:20441213

  6. Thermal chip fabrication with arrays of sensors and heaters for micro-scale impingement cooling heat transfer analysis and measurements.

    PubMed

    Shen, C H; Gau, C

    2004-07-30

    The design and fabrication for a thermal chip with an array of temperature sensors and heaters for study of micro-jet impingement cooling heat transfer process are presented. This thermal chip can minimize the heat loss from the system to the ambient and provide a uniform heat flux along the wall, thus local heat transfer processes along the wall can be measured and obtained. The fabrication procedure presented can reach a chip yield of 100%, and every one of the sensors and heaters on the chip is in good condition. In addition, micro-jet impingement cooling experiments are performed to obtain the micro-scale local heat transfer Nusselt number along the wall. Flow visualization for the micro-impinging jet is also made. The experimental results indicate that both the micro-scale impinging jet flow structure and the heat transfer process along the wall is significantly different from the case of large-scale jet impingement cooling process. PMID:15142582

  7. Fabrication of highly porous platinum electrodes for micro-scale applications by pulsed electrodeposition and dealloying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, Christian; Kloke, Arne; Drzyzga, Anna; Zengerle, Roland; Kerzenmacher, Sven

    2013-11-01

    We present the implementation and optimization of a novel electrodeposition method for the fabrication of highly porous platinum electrodes. It is based on the co-deposition of platinum and copper and the selective dealloying of copper in a pulsed manner. The new process yields mechanically stable platinum electrodes with roughness factors of up to RF = 6500 ± 700, compared to the state-of-the-art cyclic electrodeposition method this corresponds to an improvement in RF by 111%. Furthermore the time demand for fabrication is reduced by 59%, whereas the platinum utilization is increased by 53%. The method is particularly advantageous for applications such as micro fuel cells since it enables the precise deposition of catalytically active electrodes on micro-structured conductive areas. In this context the novel platinum electrodes show higher current densities for the oxidation of formic acid and glucose than state-of-the-art electrodes. In terms of methanol oxidation their catalytic activity is comparable to commercial direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) electrodes, fabricated from Pt-Ru nanoparticles dispersed on carbon black.

  8. Numerical Simulation of Pressure Infiltration Process for Making Metal Matrix Composites Using Dual-Scale Fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bo; Pillai, Krishna M.

    2013-12-01

    Correct modeling of flow and solidification of metal melt in the pressure infiltration process (PIP) is important for accurate simulation and process optimization of the mold-filling process during the making of metal matrix composites. The fiber reinforcements used in this process often consist of fiber tows or bundles that are woven, stitched, or braided to create a dual-scale preform. The physics of melt flow in the dual-scale preform is very different from that in a single-scale preform created from a random distribution of fibers. As a result, the previous PIP simulations, which treat the preform as being single scale, are inaccurate. A pseudo dual-scale approach is presented where the melt flow through such dual-scale porous media is modeled using the conventional single-scale approach using two distinctly different permeabilities in tows and gaps. A three-dimensional finite difference model is developed to model the flow of molten metal in the dual- and single-scale preforms. To track the fluid front during the mold filling and infiltration, the volume of fluid method is used. A source-based method is used to deal with transient heat transfer and phase changes. The computational code is validated against an analytical solution and a published result. Subsequent study reveals that infiltration of an idealized dual-scale preform is marked by irregular flow fronts and an unsaturated region behind the front due to the formation of gas pockets inside fiber tows. Unlike the single-scale preform characterized by sharp temperature gradients near mold walls, the dual-scale preforms are marked by surging of high-temperature melts between tows and by the presence of sharp gradients on the gap-tow interfaces. The parameters such as the (gap-tow) permeability ratio, the (gap-tow) pore volume ratio, and the inlet pressure have a strong influence on the formation of the saturated region in the dual-scale preform.

  9. Fabrication development for high-level nuclear waste containers for the tuff repository; Phase 1 final report

    SciTech Connect

    Domian, H.A.; Holbrook, R.L.; LaCount, D.F. |

    1990-09-01

    This final report completes Phase 1 of an engineering study of potential manufacturing processes for the fabrication of containers for the long-term storage of nuclear waste. An extensive literature and industry review was conducted to identify and characterize various processes. A technical specification was prepared using the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler & Pressure Vessel Code (ASME BPVC) to develop the requirements. A complex weighting and evaluation system was devised as a preliminary method to assess the processes. The system takes into account the likelihood and severity of each possible failure mechanism in service and the effects of various processes on the microstructural features. It is concluded that an integral, seamless lower unit of the container made by back extrusion has potential performance advantages but is also very high in cost. A welded construction offers lower cost and may be adequate for the application. Recommendations are made for the processes to be further evaluated in the next phase when mock-up trials will be conducted to address key concerns with various processes and materials before selecting a primary manufacturing process. 43 refs., 26 figs., 34 tabs.

  10. A Micromechanical Unit Cell Model of 2 × 2 Twill Woven Fabric Textile Composite for Multi Scale Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixit, A.; Mali, H. S.; Misra, R. K.

    2014-04-01

    Woven fabric based composite materials are being considered for potential structural applications in automotive and aircraft industries due to their better out of plane strength, stiffness and toughness properties than ordinary composite laminates. This paper presents the micromechanical unit cell model of 2 × 2 twill woven fabric textile composite for the estimation of in-plane elastic properties. Modelling of unit cell and its analysis for this new model is developed by using open source coded tool TexGen and finite element software, ABAQUS® respectively. The predicted values are in good agreement with the experimental results reported in literature. To ascertain the effectiveness of the developed model parametric studies have also been conducted on the predicted elastic properties in order to investigate the effects of various geometric parameters such as yarn spacing, fabric thickness, yarn width and fibre volume fraction. The scope of altering weave pattern and yarn characteristics is facilitated in this developed model. Further this model can be implemented for the multi-scale micro/macro-mechanical analysis for the calculation of strength and stiffness of laminates structure made of 2 × 2 twill composite.

  11. Fabrication of Self-Cleaning, Reusable Titania Templates for Nanometer and Micrometer Scale Protein Patterning.

    PubMed

    Moxey, Mark; Johnson, Alexander; El-Zubir, Osama; Cartron, Michael; Dinachali, Saman Safari; Hunter, C Neil; Saifullah, Mohammad S M; Chong, Karen S L; Leggett, Graham J

    2015-06-23

    The photocatalytic self-cleaning characteristics of titania facilitate the fabrication of reuseable templates for protein nanopatterning. Titania nanostructures were fabricated over square centimeter areas by interferometric lithography (IL) and nanoimprint lithography (NIL). With the use of a Lloyd's mirror two-beam interferometer, self-assembled monolayers of alkylphosphonates adsorbed on the native oxide of a Ti film were patterned by photocatalytic nanolithography. In regions exposed to a maximum in the interferogram, the monolayer was removed by photocatalytic oxidation. In regions exposed to an intensity minimum, the monolayer remained intact. After exposure, the sample was etched in piranha solution to yield Ti nanostructures with widths as small as 30 nm. NIL was performed by using a silicon stamp to imprint a spin-cast film of titanium dioxide resin; after calcination and reactive ion etching, TiO2 nanopillars were formed. For both fabrication techniques, subsequent adsorption of an oligo(ethylene glycol) functionalized trichlorosilane yielded an entirely passive, protein-resistant surface. Near-UV exposure caused removal of this protein-resistant film from the titania regions by photocatalytic degradation, leaving the passivating silane film intact on the silicon dioxide regions. Proteins labeled with fluorescent dyes were adsorbed to the titanium dioxide regions, yielding nanopatterns with bright fluorescence. Subsequent near-UV irradiation of the samples removed the protein from the titanium dioxide nanostructures by photocatalytic degradation facilitating the adsorption of a different protein. The process was repeated multiple times. These simple methods appear to yield durable, reuseable samples that may be of value to laboratories that require nanostructured biological interfaces but do not have access to the infrastructure required for nanofabrication. PMID:26042335

  12. Industry to Education Technical Transfer Program & Composite Materials. Composite Materials Course. Fabrication I Course. Fabrication II Course. Composite Materials Testing Course. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massuda, Rachel

    These four reports provide details of projects to design and implement courses to be offered as requirements for the associate degree program in composites and reinforced plastics technology. The reports describe project activities that led to development of curricula for four courses: composite materials, composite materials fabrication I,…

  13. Fabrication and characterization of ITO/silicon SIS solar cells. Final report, October 1, 1978-April 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    DuBow, J. B.

    1980-06-01

    The objectives of this research were to optimize the performance of ITO/polycrystalline silicon solar cells, identify performance limitations, identify major stability problems which would inhibit terrestrial application of these devices, evaluate the impact of indium supply and price on terrestrial applications, and evaluate the economic viability of ITO sputter deposited solar cells. These goals were successfully achieved during the course of this multipronged effort. Both area scaling with efficiency maintenance were achieved by process modifications including surface preparation and in-situ passivation techniques. Indium tin oxide on Wacker polycrystalline silicon solar cells were fabricated which achieved 13.7% efficiency for 11 cm/sup 2/ devices. Typical open circuit voltages were 0.525 volts, short circuit currents, 34 mA/cm/sup 2/, and fill factors of 0.75. In the course of this project, three device measurement techniques which assisted in improving cell efficiency and which have broad applicability to all photovoltaic devices were introduced. These were automated admittance and surface state analysis, noise spectral density analysis, and automated I-V and C-V analysis. These measurements were combined with Auger/ESCA, EBIC and flying spot scanner, and other measurement techniques to identify grain boundaries, intragrain defects, edge leakage, and interface losses which were subsequently alleviated through process improvements. It is concluded from this work that prototype production of cells and modules based on this technology would be warranted in the near term.

  14. Large-scale fabrication of achiral plasmonic metamaterials with giant chiroptical response

    PubMed Central

    Slyngborg, Morten; Tsao, Yao-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Summary A variety of extrinsic chiral metamaterials were fabricated by a combination of self-ordering anodic oxidation of aluminum foil, nanoimprint lithography and glancing angle deposition. All of these techniques are scalable and pose a significant improvement to standard metamaterial fabrication techniques. Different interpore distances and glancing angle depositions enable the plasmonic resonance wavelength to be tunable in the range from UVA to IR. These extrinsic chiral metamaterials only exhibit significant chiroptical response at non-normal angles of incidence. This intrinsic property enables the probing of both enantoimeric structures on the same sample, by inverting the tilt of the sample relative to the normal angle. In biosensor applications this allows for more precise, cheap and commercialized devices. As a proof of concept two different molecules were used to probe the sensitivity of the metamaterials. These proved the applicability to sense proteins through non-specific adsorption on the metamaterial surface or through functionalized surfaces to increase the sensing sensitivity. Besides increasing the sensing sensitivity, these metamaterials may also be commercialized and find applications in surface-enhanced IR spectroscopy, terahertz generation and terahertz circular dichroism spectroscopy. PMID:27547608

  15. Large-scale fabrication of achiral plasmonic metamaterials with giant chiroptical response.

    PubMed

    Slyngborg, Morten; Tsao, Yao-Chung; Fojan, Peter

    2016-01-01

    A variety of extrinsic chiral metamaterials were fabricated by a combination of self-ordering anodic oxidation of aluminum foil, nanoimprint lithography and glancing angle deposition. All of these techniques are scalable and pose a significant improvement to standard metamaterial fabrication techniques. Different interpore distances and glancing angle depositions enable the plasmonic resonance wavelength to be tunable in the range from UVA to IR. These extrinsic chiral metamaterials only exhibit significant chiroptical response at non-normal angles of incidence. This intrinsic property enables the probing of both enantoimeric structures on the same sample, by inverting the tilt of the sample relative to the normal angle. In biosensor applications this allows for more precise, cheap and commercialized devices. As a proof of concept two different molecules were used to probe the sensitivity of the metamaterials. These proved the applicability to sense proteins through non-specific adsorption on the metamaterial surface or through functionalized surfaces to increase the sensing sensitivity. Besides increasing the sensing sensitivity, these metamaterials may also be commercialized and find applications in surface-enhanced IR spectroscopy, terahertz generation and terahertz circular dichroism spectroscopy. PMID:27547608

  16. Three-dimensional micro/nano-scale structure fabricated by combination of non-volatile polymerizable RTIL and FIB irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Kuwabata, Susumu; Minamimoto, Hiro; Inoue, Kosuke; Imanishi, Akihito; Hosoya, Ken; Uyama, Hiroshi; Torimoto, Tsukasa; Tsuda, Tetsuya; Seki, Shu

    2014-01-01

    Room-temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) has been widely investigated as a nonvolatile solvent as well as a unique liquid material because of its interesting features, e.g., negligible vapor pressure and high thermal stability. Here we report that a non-volatile polymerizable RTIL is a useful starting material for the fabrication of micro/nano-scale polymer structures with a focused-ion-beam (FIB) system operated under high-vacuum condition. Gallium-ion beam irradiation to the polymerizable 1-allyl-3-ethylimidazolium bis((trifluoromethane)sulfonyl)amide RTIL layer spread on a Si wafer induced a polymerization reaction without difficulty. What is interesting to note is that we have succeeded in provoking the polymerization reaction anywhere on the Si wafer substrate by using FIB irradiation with a raster scanning mode. By this finding, two- and three-dimensional micro/nano-scale polymer structure fabrications were possible at the resolution of 500,000 dpi. Even intricate three-dimensional micro/nano-figures with overhang and hollow moieties could be constructed at the resolution of approximately 100 nm. PMID:24430465

  17. Fracture-based Fabrication of Normally-closed, Adjustable and Fully Reversible Micro-scale Fluidic Channels

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jiexi; Matsuoka, Toshiki; Thouless, M.D.; Takayama, Shuichi

    2014-01-01

    Adjustable fluidic structures play an important role in microfluidic systems. Fracture of multilayered materials under applied tension has been previously demonstrated as a convenient, simple and inexpensive approach to fabricate nano-scale adjustable structures; here, we demonstrate how to extend this concept to the micro-scale. We achieve this by a novel pairing of materials that leverages fracture mechanics to limit crack formation to a specified region, allowing us to create size-controllable and adjustable microfluidic structures. We demonstrate that this technique can be used to fabricate ‘normally-closed’ microfluidic channels that are completely reversible, a feature that is challenging to achieve in conventional systems without careful engineering controls. The adjustable microfluidic channels are then applied to mechanically lyse single cells, and subsequently manipulate the released nuclear chromatin, creating new possibilities for epigenetic analysis of single cells. This simple, versatile and robust technology provides an easily accessible pathway to construct adjustable microfluidic structures, which will be useful in developing complex assays and experiments even in resource-limited settings. PMID:24942855

  18. A large-scale fabrication of flower-like submicrometer-sized tungsten whiskers via metal catalysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Tungsten powder mixed with an appropriate amount of nickel and iron powders is used as raw material to fabricate large-scale tungsten whisker-like structure. The morphology, microstructure and composition of the whisker-like tungsten are observed and tested by scanning electron microscope and FESEM, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction, respectively. The main component of the tungsten whisker-like structure is tungsten, which has the axial growth along the <100 > direction with large aspect ratio and possesses flower-like structure. Large-scale submicrometer-sized whisker-like tungsten was fabricated via vapor phase deposition approach with the aid of metal catalysts at 800°C by holding for 6 h in the appropriate atmosphere. The growth procedure of flower-like tungsten whisker is probably based on the vapor–liquid–solid mechanism at beginning of the formation of tungsten nuclei, then vapor-solid mechanism is dominant. PMID:22721415

  19. A large-scale fabrication of flower-like submicrometer-sized tungsten whiskers via metal catalysis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yunzhu; Li, Jing; Liu, Wensheng; Shi, Yubin

    2012-01-01

    Tungsten powder mixed with an appropriate amount of nickel and iron powders is used as raw material to fabricate large-scale tungsten whisker-like structure. The morphology, microstructure and composition of the whisker-like tungsten are observed and tested by scanning electron microscope and FESEM, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction, respectively. The main component of the tungsten whisker-like structure is tungsten, which has the axial growth along the <100 > direction with large aspect ratio and possesses flower-like structure. Large-scale submicrometer-sized whisker-like tungsten was fabricated via vapor phase deposition approach with the aid of metal catalysts at 800°C by holding for 6 h in the appropriate atmosphere. The growth procedure of flower-like tungsten whisker is probably based on the vapor-liquid-solid mechanism at beginning of the formation of tungsten nuclei, then vapor-solid mechanism is dominant. PMID:22721415

  20. Low-Cost Fabrication of Centimetre-Scale Periodic Arrays of Single Plasmid DNA Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Kirkland, Brett; Wang, Zhibin; Zhang, Peipei; Takebayashi, Shin-ichiro; Lenhert, Steven; Gilbert, David M.

    2013-01-01

    We report development of a low-cost method to generate a centimetre-scale periodic array of single plasmid DNA of 11 kilobase pairs. The arrayed DNA is amenable to enzymatic and physical manipulation. PMID:23824041

  1. Polycrystalline thin-film, cadmium-telluride solar cells fabricated by electrodeposition cells. Final subcontract report, March 20, 1992--April 27, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Trefny, J.U.; Mao, D.; Kim, D.

    1995-10-01

    The objective of this project was to develop improved processes for the fabrication of CdTe/CdS polycrystalline thin film solar cells. The technique we used for the formation of CdTe, electrodeposition, was a non-vacuum, low-cost technique that is attractive for economic, large-scale production. Annealing effects and electrical properties are discussed.

  2. SRC burn test in 700-hp oil-designed boiler. Annex Volume E. Evaluation of fabric filter for particulate emission control. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-09-01

    Three types of Solvent Refined Coal Fuels namely, Pulverized SRC Fuel Solids, SRC Residual Fuel Oil and SRC Fuel Water Slurry were fired, one at a time, in a 700 HP boiler designed for oil firing. The purpose was to demonstrate the suitability of SRC Fuels in serving as an alternative to fuel oil and to evaluate the feasibility of fabric filters for control of emissions from SRC fuel fired boilers. Two types of fabric filters, namely a Pulse Jet, full scale Baghouse and a Reverse Air, pilot scale filter were tested. The Pulse Jet Baghouse was an existing full scale unit with a cloth area of 1924 square feet and a gas flow capacity of approximately 10,000 ACFM at 400/sup 0/F. The Reverse Air Pilot Filter was a bench scale, portable unit with a cloth area of 1 square foot and a gas flow capacity of up to 6 ACFM at 400/sup 0/F. This report presents the results of particulate mass emission rates, operating conditions and performance of the two fabric filters. The particulate emissions from all fuel types were easily controlled to less than 0.01 lb/million Btu within normal and conventional working range of the fabric filters and with no special or restrictive operating conditions.

  3. Design and evaluation of improved barrier fabrics for protection against toxic aerosols and biological agents. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hersh, S.P.; Tucker, P.A.

    1993-09-01

    The structure of nine fabrics, their resistance to aerosol penetration, and their pore size distributions were evaluated to determine their suitability as barrier fabrics for protection against aerosols. A main objective is to gain insight and knowledge which will be useful for designing fabrics that will provide better protection with minimum discomfort. Aerosol penetration was assessed using fluorescent polystyrene latex spheres ranging in diameter from 0.6 to 4.5 um at a face velocity of 1.8 cm/s. The maximum penetration occurred for 1.01 micrometers diameter spheres. Fabric pore size distributions were measured by liquid extrusion and microscopical image analysis, and the maximum pore size was also measured by liquid critical breakthrough pressure. Results obtained by all three techniques were fairly consistent. The best correlation between fabric structure and particle penetration at this time is between fabric density and weave type, with penetration decreasing with increasing fabric areal density and being lower for plain weave fabrics than for twill weaves. Biological aerosols, Chemical protective clothing, Biological agents, Fabrics, Aerosol penetration, Aerosols, Pore size.

  4. Design and fabrication of large-scale lightweight SiC space mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianhan; Zhang, Yumin; Han, Jiecai; He, Xiaodong; Yao, Wang

    2006-02-01

    Silicon carbide is a new type of optics material developed in recent years because it offered some advantages over other traditional optical substrate materials such as low density, low thermal expansion coefficient, high thermal conductivity, big special heat, big modulus of elasticity and potential cost and schedule. So in this paper, the silicon carbide space mirror was fabricated by both reaction bonded (RB) and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. The green body of the space mirror was prepared by silicon carbide powder, carbon powder, dilution and solidified agent using slip casting method. The space mirror blank was prepared by green body and pure silicon powder. They were laid in vacuum sintering furnace and sintered at 1500°C. In this temperature, silicon was melting then infiltrated in SiC green body and reacted with carbon to generate the new SiC, at the same time, bonded original SiC powder, in the end, the nonporous SiC/Si space mirror blank was fabricated. The reaction bonded silicon carbide (RBSiC) was consistent with original SiC powder, new generated SiC and unreacted Si. Because RBSiC was SiC/Si two-phase structure, the hardness difference between SiC and Si made the space mirror difficult to achieve precision optical surface by grinding. So a full density SiC thin film was coated on the surface of space mirror blank with RBSiC by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. The raw material was CH3SiCl3. The hydrogen (H2) was catalyst. The deposition temperature was 1300°C. The cooling rate could be controlled. The SiC space mirror was honeycomb open back lightweight structure. The honeycomb cellar could be triangle, rectangle, hexogen and sector. The biggest diameter of SiC space mirror blank which has been fabricated is approach one meter by forgoing process. In order to the forgoing process was feasible, a flat round SiC space mirror with 250mm diameter. The space mirror was composed of a 4mm thick round plane faceplate and hexagonal cellar

  5. Full-Scale GRCop-84 Combustion Chamber Liner Preform Fabricated Successfully

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, David L.; Russell, Carolyn K.; Goudy, Rick

    2005-01-01

    GRCop-84 (Cu-8 at.% Cr-4 at.% Nb) has been under development at the NASA Glenn Research Center for several years. The alloy possesses a unique combination of good thermal conductivity, high elevated temperature strength, long creep life, and long low-cycle- fatigue. The alloy is also more oxidation resistant than pure copper and most competitive alloys. The combination of properties has attracted attention from major rocket engine manufacturers who are interested in the alloy for the combustion chamber liner in their next generation of regeneratively cooled engines. Before GRCop-84 can be used in a main combustion chamber application, it must be demonstrated that the alloy can be made successfully to the large sizes and proper shape needed and that it retain useful properties. Recent efforts have successfully demonstrated the ability to fabricate a liner preform via metal spinning that retains the alloy s strength even in the welded sections.

  6. Fabrication of commercial-scale fiber-reinforced hot-gas filters by chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    White, L.R.

    1992-11-01

    Goal was to fabricate a filter for removing particulates from hot gases; principal applications would be in advanced utility processes such as pressurized fluidized bed combustion or coal gasification combined cycle systems. Filters were made in two steps: make a ceramic fiber preform and coat it with SiC by chemical vapor infiltration (CVD). The most promising construction was felt/filament wound. Light, tough ceramic composite filters can be made; reinforcement by continuous fibers is needed to avoid brittleness. Direct metal to filter contact does not damage the top which simplifies installation. However, much of the filter surface of felt/filament wound structures is closed over by the CVD coating, and the surface is rough and subject to delamination. Recommendations are given for improving the filters.

  7. Textured micrometer scale templates as light managing fabrication platform for organic solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Chaudhary, Sumit; Ho, Kai-Ming; Park, Joong-Mok; Nalwa, Kanwar Singh; Leung, Wai Y.

    2016-07-26

    A three-dimensional, microscale-textured, grating-shaped organic solar cell geometry. The solar cells are fabricated on gratings to give them a three-dimensional texture that provides enhanced light absorption. Introduction of microscale texturing has a positive effect on the overall power conversion efficiency of the devices. This grating-based solar cell having a grating of pre-determined pitch and height has shown improved power-conversion efficiency over a conventional flat solar cell. The improvement in efficiency is accomplished by homogeneous coverage of the grating with uniform thickness of the active layer, which is attributed to a sufficiently high pitch and low height of the underlying gratings. Also the microscale texturing leads to suppressed reflection of incident light due to the efficient coupling of the incident light into modes that are guided in the active layer.

  8. Fabrication and testing of gas filled targets for large scale plasma experiments on Nova

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, G.F.; Spragge, M.; Wallace, R.J.; Rivers, C.J. |

    1995-03-06

    An experimental campaign on the Nova laser was started in July 1993 to study one st of target conditions for the point design of the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The targets were specified to investigate the current NIF target conditions--a plasma of {approximately}3 keV electron temperature and an electron density of {approximately}1.0 E + 21 cm{sup {minus}3}. A gas cell target design was chosen to confine as gas of {approximately}0.01 cm{sup 3} in volume at {approximately} 1 atmosphere. This paper will describe the major steps and processes necessary in the fabrication, testing and delivery of these targets for shots on the Nova Laser at LLNL.

  9. Development of the Plastic Melt Waste Compactor- Design and Fabrication of the Half-Scale Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pace, Gregory S.; Fisher, John

    2005-01-01

    A half scale version of a device called the Plastic Melt Waste Compactor prototype has been developed at NASA Ames Research Center to deal with plastic based wastes that are expected to be encountered in future human space exploration scenarios such as Lunar or Martian Missions. The Plastic Melt Waste Compactor design was based on the types of wastes produced on the International Space Station, Space Shuttle, MIR and Skylab missions. The half scale prototype unit will lead to the development of a full scale Plastic Melt Waste Compactor prototype that is representative of flight hardware that would be used on near and far term space missions. This report details the progress of the Plastic Melt Waste Compactor Development effort by the Solid Waste Management group at NASA Ames Research Center.

  10. Final Report, Validation of Novel Planar Cell Design for MW-Scale SOFC Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Swartz, Dr Scott L.; Thrun, Dr Lora B.; Arkenberg, Mr Gene B.; Chenault, Ms Kellie M.

    2012-01-03

    This report describes the work completed by NexTech Materials, Ltd. during a three-year project to validate an electrolyte-supported planar solid oxide fuel cell design, termed the FlexCell, for coal-based, megawatt-scale power generation systems. This project was focused on the fabrication and testing of electrolyte-supported FlexCells with yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) as the electrolyte material. YSZ based FlexCells were made with sizes ranging from 100 to 500 cm2. Single-cell testing was performed to confirm high electrochemical performance, both with diluted hydrogen and simulated coal gas as fuels. Finite element analysis modeling was performed at The Ohio State University was performed to establish FlexCell architectures with optimum mechanical robustness. A manufacturing cost analysis was completed, which confirmed that manufacturing costs of less than $50/kW are achievable at high volumes (500 MW/year).

  11. A multi-scale PDMS fabrication strategy to bridge the size mismatch between integrated circuits and microfluidics†

    PubMed Central

    Muluneh, Melaku

    2015-01-01

    In recent years there has been great progress harnessing the small-feature size and programmability of integrated circuits (ICs) for biological applications, by building microfluidics directly on top of ICs. However, a major hurdle to the further development of this technology is the inherent size-mismatch between ICs (~mm) and microfluidic chips (~cm). Increasing the area of the ICs to match the size of the microfluidic chip, as has often been done in previous studies, leads to a waste of valuable space on the IC and an increase in fabrication cost (>100×). To address this challenge, we have developed a three dimensional PDMS chip that can straddle multiple length scales of hybrid IC/microfluidic chips. This approach allows millimeter-scale ICs, with no post-processing, to be integrated into a centimeter-sized PDMS chip. To fabricate this PDMS chip we use a combination of soft-lithography and laser micromachining. Soft lithography was used to define micrometer-scale fluid channels directly on the surface of the IC, allowing fluid to be controlled with high accuracy and brought into close proximity to sensors for highly sensitive measurements. Laser micromachining was used to create ~50 μm vias to connect these molded PDMS channels to a larger PDMS chip, which can connect multiple ICs and house fluid connections to the outside world. To demonstrate the utility of this approach, we built and demonstrated an in-flow magnetic cytometer that consisted of a 5 × 5 cm2 microfluidic chip that incorporated a commercial 565 × 1145 μm2 IC with a GMR sensing circuit. We additionally demonstrated the modularity of this approach by building a chip that incorporated two of these GMR chips connected in series. PMID:25284502

  12. Design and fabrication of the NASA HL-20 full scale research model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driver, K. Dean; Vess, Robert J.

    1991-01-01

    A full-scale engineering model of the HL-20 Personnel Launch System (PLS) was constructed for systems and human factors evaluation. Construction techniques were developed to enable the vehicle to be constructed with a minimum of time and cost. The design and construction of the vehicle are described.

  13. Submicron-scale high- Tc superconducting Bi-2212 stack fabrication for single-Cooper-pair tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.-J.; Latyshev, Yu. I.; Yamashita, T.; Sato, N.; Kishida, S.

    2000-07-01

    We report the characteristics of Bi-2212 intrinsic Josephson junctions (IJJ) showing single-Cooper-pair tunneling effect with a decrease of their in-plane area, S, smaller than a micron scale. The junctions show the typical slope of critical current and current peak-like structure up to 37 K.

  14. Comparison of Fabrication Techniques for Micro-Scale Spark Gap Plasma Switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnette, Matthew; Staack, David

    2014-10-01

    Microplasma spark gaps with 2D geometries were fabricated by two techniques on alumina, first using photolithography and metal sputtering with thicknesses of hundreds of nanometers, and second using thermal-spray several microns thick, but with lower feature resolution. Several high temperature metals were tested as electrode material for the microplamsa device, including tungsten and chromium; however the chromium samples were not robust enough, eroding away too quickly for extensive testing. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images were taken before and after testing to determine the wear on the samples. The sputtered tungsten thin films and thermal-spray deposited nickel films on alumina were compared after testing in 1 atm of helium running for one hour at a current of 1 mA. Slight wear and discoloration were noted on the anodes, yet significant erosion occurred on the cathodes; no wear was noted on the alumina. The thermally-sprayed nickel sample had the least wear, while the thin tungsten sample had the most wear. Discoloration was also seen on the nearby floating-voltage electrodes despite not being a part of the circuit, most likely due to heating. As the electrodes eroded, the plasma attachment point moved unpredictably. This work was supported in part by the Department of Defense Army Research Office under Grant W911NF1210007.

  15. Ultrasonic pilot-scale reactor for enzymatic bleaching of cotton fabrics.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Idalina; Herrero-Yniesta, Victor; Perales Arce, Iratxe; Escrigas Castañeda, Monica; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur; Silva, Carla

    2014-07-01

    The potential of ultrasound-assisted technology has been demonstrated by several laboratory scale studies. However, their successful industrial scaling-up is still a challenge due to the limited pilot and commercial sonochemical reactors. In this work, a pilot reactor for laccase-hydrogen peroxide cotton bleaching assisted by ultrasound was scaled-up. For this purpose, an existing dyeing machine was transformed and adapted by including piezoelectric ultrasonic devices. Laboratory experiments demonstrated that both low frequency, high power (22 kHz, 2100 W) and high frequency, low power ultrasounds (850 kHz, 400 W) were required to achieve satisfactory results. Standard half (4 g/L H2O2 at 90 °C for 60 min) and optical (8 g/L H2O2 at 103 °C for 40 min) cotton bleaching processes were used as references. Two sequential stages were established for cotton bleaching: (1) laccase pretreatment assisted by high frequency ultrasound (850 kHz, 400 W) and (2) bleaching using high power ultrasound (22 kHz, 2100 W). When compared with conventional methods, combined laccase-hydrogen peroxide cotton bleaching with ultrasound energy improved the whitening effectiveness. Subsequently, less energy (temperature) and chemicals (hydrogen peroxide) were needed for cotton bleaching thus resulting in costs reduction. This technology allowed the combination of enzyme and hydrogen peroxide treatment in a continuous process. The developed pilot-scale reactor offers an enhancement of the cotton bleaching process with lower environmental impact as well as a better performance of further finishing operations. PMID:24618529

  16. Wafer-scale fabrication of nanofluidic arrays and networks using nanoimprint lithography and lithographically patterned nanowire electrodeposition gold nanowire masters.

    PubMed

    Halpern, Aaron R; Donavan, Keith C; Penner, Reginald M; Corn, Robert M

    2012-06-01

    Wafer scale (cm(2)) arrays and networks of nanochannels were created in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) from a surface pattern of electrodeposited gold nanowires in a master-replica process and characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and fluorescence imaging measurements. Patterns of gold nanowires with cross-sectional dimensions as small as 50 nm in height and 100 nm in width were prepared on silica substrates using the process of lithographically patterned nanowire electrodeposition (LPNE). These nanowire patterns were then employed as masters for the fabrication of inverse replica nanochannels in a special formulation of PDMS. SEM and AFM measurements verified a linear correlation between the widths and heights of the nanowires and nanochannels over a range of 50 to 500 nm. The PDMS replica was then oxygen plasma-bonded to a glass substrate in order to create a linear array of nanofluidic channels (up to 1 mm in length) filled with solutions of either fluorescent dye or 20 nm diameter fluorescent polymer nanoparticles. Nanochannel continuity and a 99% fill success rate was determined from the fluorescence imaging measurements, and the electrophoretic injection of both dye and nanoparticles in the nanochannel arrays was also demonstrated. Employing a double LPNE fabrication method, this master-replica process was also used to create a large two-dimensional network of crossed nanofluidic channels. PMID:22533970

  17. Characteristics of Al substituted nanowires fabricated by self-aligned growth for future large scale integration interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudo, Hiroshi; Kurahashi, Teruo

    2011-06-01

    Substituted Al nanowires for use in future large scale integration interconnects were fabricated by self-aligned growth. The resistivity of an Al substituted nanowire 80 nm in width, 100 nm in height, and 20 μm in length was 4.7 μΩ cm, which is 48% lower than that of an Al nanowire with the same dimensions fabricated using a bottom-up approach. The variation in the resistivity was in a narrow range (14%) over a Si wafer. The TEM imaging revealed that the Al substituted nanowire had a bamboo-like structure with grains larger than 1.6 μm. The electromigration activation energy was 0.72 eV, which is comparable to that of a pure Al wire with a bamboo-like structure. The product of the critical current density and wire length was 1.3 × 103 A/cm at 250 °C; 2.1 times higher than that of a pure Al wire with a polycrystalline structure. The acceleration of electromigration due to current density was 2.0, indicating that incubation time dominates electromigration lifetime. The prolonged incubation time observed in the electromigration test is attributed to the reduction in electromigration-induced mass transport due to the microstructure of the Al substituted nanowire. Even the formation of a small void immediately after incubation may be a fatal defect for nanoscale Al wires.

  18. Configurable low-cost plotter device for fabrication of multi-color sub-cellular scale microarrays.

    PubMed

    Arrabito, Giuseppe; Schroeder, Hendrik; Schröder, Kathrin; Filips, Christian; Marggraf, Ulrich; Dopp, Christian; Venkatachalapathy, Muthukumaran; Dehmelt, Leif; Bastiaens, Philippe I H; Neyer, Andreas; Niemeyer, Christof M

    2014-07-23

    The construction and operation of a low-cost plotter for fabrication of microarrays for multiplexed single-cell analyses is reported. The printing head consists of polymeric pyramidal pens mounted on a rotation stage installed on an aluminium frame. This construction enables printing of microarrays onto glass substrates mounted on a tilt stage, controlled by a Lab-View operated user interface. The plotter can be assembled by typical academic workshops from components of less than 15,000 Euro. The functionality of the instrument is demonstrated by printing DNA microarrays on the area of 0.5 cm2 using up to three different oligonucleotides. Typical feature sizes are 5 μm diameter with a pitch of 15 μm, leading to densities of up to 10(4)-10(5) spots/mm2. The fabricated DNA microarrays are used to produce sub-cellular scale arrays of bioactive epidermal growth factor peptides by means of DNA-directed immobilization. The suitability of these biochips for cell biological studies is demonstrated by specific recruitment, concentration, and activation of EGF receptors within the plasma membrane of adherent living cells. This work illustrates that the presented plotter gives access to bio-functionalized arrays usable for fundamental research in cell biology, such as the manipulation of signal pathways in living cells at subcellular resolution. PMID:24678019

  19. Fabrication and Scale-up of Polybenzimidazole (PBI) Membrane Based System for Precombustion-Based Capture of Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, Gopala; Jayaweera, Indira; Sanjrujo, Angel; O'Brien, Kevin; Callahan, Richard; Berchtold, Kathryn; Roberts, Daryl-Lynn; Johnson, Will

    2012-03-31

    The primary objectives of this project are to (1) demonstrate the performance and fabrication of a technically and economically viable pre-combustion-based CO{sub 2} capture system based on the high temperature stability and permeance of PBI membranes, (2) optimize a plan for integration of PBI capture system into an IGCC plant and (3) develop a commercialization plan that addresses technical issues and business issues to outline a clear path for technology transfer of the PBI membrane technology. This report describes research conducted from April 1, 2007 to March 30, 2012 and focused on achieving the above objectives. PBI-based hollow fibers have been fabricated at kilometer lengths and bundled as modules at a bench-scale level for the separation of CO{sub 2} from H{sub 2} at high temperatures and pressures. Long term stability of these fibers has been demonstrated with a relatively high H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity (35 to 50) and H{sub 2} permeance (80 GPU) at temperatures exceeding 225°C. Membrane performance simulations and systems analysis of an IGCC system incorporating a PBI hollow fiber membrane modules have demonstrated that the cost of electricity for CO{sub 2} capture (<10%) using such a high temperature separator. When the cost of transporting, storing, and monitoring the CO{sub 2} is accounted for, the increase in the COE is only 14.4%.

  20. Fabrication of a Carbon Nanotube-Embedded Silicon Nitride Membrane for Studies of Nanometer-Scale Mass Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, J K; Noy, A; Huser, T; Eaglesham, D; Bakajin, O

    2004-08-25

    A membrane consisting of multiwall carbon nanotubes embedded in a silicon nitride matrix was fabricated for fluid mechanics studies on the nanometer scale. Characterization by tracer diffusion and scanning electron microscopy suggests that the membrane is free of large voids. An upper limit to the diffusive flux of D{sub 2}O of 2.4x10-{sup 8} mole/m{sup 2}-s was determined, indicating extremely slow transport. By contrast, hydrodynamic calculations of water flow across a nanotube membrane of similar specifications predict a much higher molar flux of 1.91 mole/m{sup 2}-s, suggesting that the nanotubes produced possess a 'bamboo' morphology. The carbon nanotube membranes were used to make nanoporous silicon nitride membranes, fabricated by sacrificial removal of the carbon. Nitrogen flow measurements on these structures give a membrane permeance of 4.7x10{sup -4} mole/m{sup 2}-s-Pa at a pore density of 4x10{sup 10} cm{sup -2}. Using a Knudsen diffusion model, the average pore size of this membrane is estimated to be 66 nm, which agrees well with TEM observations of the multiwall carbon nanotube outer diameter. These membranes are a robust platform for the study of confined molecular transport, with applications inseparations and chemical sensing.

  1. Dielectric strength of voidless BaTiO{sub 3} films with nano-scale grains fabricated by aerosol deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hong-Ki; Lee, Young-Hie; Lee, Seung-Hwan; In Kim, Soo; Woo Lee, Chang; Rag Yoon, Jung; Lee, Sung-Gap

    2014-01-07

    In order to investigate the dielectric strength properties of the BaTiO{sub 3} films with nano-scale grains with uniform grain size and no voids, BaTiO{sub 3} films were fabricated with a thickness of 1 μm by an AD process, and the fabricated films were sintered at 800, 900, and 1000 °C in air and reducing atmosphere. The films have superior dielectric strength properties due to their uniform grain size and high density without any voids. In addition, based on investigation of the leakage current (intrinsic) properties, it was confirmed that the sintering conditions of the reducing atmosphere largely increase leakage currents due to generated electrons and doubly ionized oxygen vacancies following the Poole-Frenkel emission mechanism, and increased leakage currents flow at grain boundary regions. Therefore, we conclude that the extrinsic breakdown factors should be eliminated for superior dielectric strength properties, and it is important to enhance grain boundaries by doping acceptors and rare-earth elements.

  2. Semiconductor Nanowire Light-Emitting Diodes Grown on Metal: A Direction Toward Large-Scale Fabrication of Nanowire Devices.

    PubMed

    Sarwar, A T M Golam; Carnevale, Santino D; Yang, Fan; Kent, Thomas F; Jamison, John J; McComb, David W; Myers, Roberto C

    2015-10-28

    Bottom-up nanowires are attractive for realizing semiconductor devices with extreme heterostructures because strain relaxation through the nanowire sidewalls allows the combination of highly lattice mismatched materials without creating dislocations. The resulting nanowires are used to fabricate light-emitting diodes (LEDs), lasers, solar cells, and sensors. However, expensive single crystalline substrates are commonly used as substrates for nanowire heterostructures as well as for epitaxial devices, which limits the manufacturability of nanowire devices. Here, nanowire LEDs directly grown and electrically integrated on metal are demonstrated. Optical and structural measurements reveal high-quality, vertically aligned GaN nanowires on molybdenum and titanium films. Transmission electron microscopy confirms the composition variation in the polarization-graded AlGaN nanowire LEDs. Blue to green electroluminescence is observed from InGaN quantum well active regions, while GaN active regions exhibit ultraviolet emission. These results demonstrate a pathway for large-scale fabrication of solid state lighting and optoelectronics on metal foils or sheets. PMID:26307552

  3. Towards the hand-held mass spectrometer: design considerations, simulation, and fabrication of micrometer-scaled cylindrical ion traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blain, Matthew G.; Riter, Leah S.; Cruz, Dolores; Austin, Daniel E.; Wu, Guangxiang; Plass, Wolfgang R.; Cooks, R. Graham

    2004-08-01

    Breakthrough improvements in simplicity and reductions in the size of mass spectrometers are needed for high-consequence fieldable applications, including error-free detection of chemical/biological warfare agents, medical diagnoses, and explosives and contraband discovery. These improvements are most likely to be realized with the reconceptualization of the mass spectrometer, rather than by incremental steps towards miniaturization. Microfabricated arrays of mass analyzers represent such a conceptual advance. A massively parallel array of micrometer-scaled mass analyzers on a chip has the potential to set the performance standard for hand-held sensors due to the inherit selectivity, sensitivity, and universal applicability of mass spectrometry as an analytical method. While the effort to develop a complete micro-MS system must include innovations in ultra-small-scale sample introduction, ion sources, mass analyzers, detectors, and vacuum and power subsystems, the first step towards radical miniaturization lies in the design, fabrication, and characterization of the mass analyzer itself. In this paper we discuss design considerations and results from simulations of ion trapping behavior for a micrometer scale cylindrical ion trap (CIT) mass analyzer (internal radius r0 = 1 [mu]m). We also present a description of the design and microfabrication of a 0.25 cm2 array of 106 one-micrometer CITs, including integrated ion detectors, constructed in tungsten on a silicon substrate.

  4. Fabrication of a wafer-scale uniform array of single-crystal organic nanowire complementary inverters by nanotransfer printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kyung Sun; Baek, Jangmi; Koo Lee, Yong-Eun; Sung, Myung Mo

    2015-02-01

    We report the fabrication and electrical characterization of a wafer-scale array of organic complementary inverters using single-crystal 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl) pentacene (TIPS-PEN) and fullerene (C60) nanowires as p- and n-channels, respectively. Two arrays of single-crystal organic nanowires were generated consecutively on desired locations of a common substrate with a desired mutual alignment by a direct printing method (liquid-bridge-mediated nanotransfer molding). Another direct printing of silver micron scale structures, as source and drain electrodes, on the substrate with the two printed nanowire arrays produced an array of complementary inverters with a bottom gate, top contact configuration. Field-effect mobilities of single-crystal TIPS-PEN and C60 nanowire field-effect transistors (FETs) in the arrays were uniform with 1.01 ± 0.14 and 0.10 ± 0.01 cm2V-1 s-1, respectively. A wafer-scale array of complementary inverters produced all by the direct printing method showed good performance with an average gain of 25 and with low variations among the inverters.

  5. Deposition, fabrication and analysis of polycrystalline silicon MIS solar cells. Final Report, January 1-December 31, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, W.A.

    1980-03-01

    Discussion of MIS cell fabrication techniques, protovoltaic response data, I-V-T analysis to reveal conduction mechanisms, a detailed computer model, optimum MIS solar cell design, surface state effects, Auger studies, reliability studies and e-beam deposition of thin silicon films are included. The most important features of the work during 1979 include the one pump-down fabrication process, establishing a consistent fabrication sequence, achieving 13% efficiency of 2 cm/sup 2/ area, an evaluation of conduction mechanisms, establishing a detailed computer model and setting up an improved e-beam system to deposit thin silicon films. Details are reported. (WHK)

  6. Investigation of Springback Associated with Composite Material Component Fabrication (MSFC Center Director's Discretionary Fund Final Report, Project 94-09)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benzie, M. A.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this research project was to examine processing and design parameters in the fabrication of composite components to obtain a better understanding and attempt to minimize springback associated with composite materials. To accomplish this, both processing and design parameters were included in a Taguchi-designed experiment. Composite angled panels were fabricated, by hand layup techniques, and the fabricated panels were inspected for springback effects. This experiment yielded several significant results. The confirmation experiment validated the reproducibility of the factorial effects, error recognized, and experiment as reliable. The material used in the design of tooling needs to be a major consideration when fabricating composite components, as expected. The factors dealing with resin flow, however, raise several potentially serious material and design questions. These questions must be dealt with up front in order to minimize springback: viscosity of the resin, vacuum bagging of the part for cure, and the curing method selected. These factors directly affect design, material selection, and processing methods.

  7. Semi-Solid Metal Freeform Fabrication - Phase I Final Report for Period September 4, 1999--June 14, 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Chris S. Rice

    2000-07-25

    Semi-Solid Technologies, Inc. developed a semi-solid deposition system for semi-solid aluminum alloys. This technology addresses the direct, rapid, freeform fabrication of relatively large metallic components.

  8. Nanometer-scale fabrication of hydrogen silsesquioxane (HSQ) films with post exposure baking.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Hyun; Kang, Se-Koo; Yeom, Geun-Young; Jang, Jae-Hyung

    2013-03-01

    A nanometer-scale grating structure with a 60-nm-wide gap and 200-nm-wide ridge has been successfully demonstrated on a silicon-on-insulator substrate by using a 220-nm-thick hydrogen silsesquioxane (HSQ) negative tone electron beam resist. A post exposure baking (PEB) process and hot development process with low concentration (3.5 wt%) of tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) solution were introduced to realize the grating pattern. To study the effects of post exposure baking on the HSQ resist, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses were carried out. From the FT-IR and XPS analyses, it was verified that a thin SiO2 with high cross-linked network structure was formed on the HSQ surface during the PEB step. This SiO2 layer prevents the formation of unwanted bonds on the HSQ surface, which results in clearly defined grating structures with a 60-nm-gap and 200-nm-wide-ridge on the 220-nm-thick HSQ resist. The nanometer-scale grating pattern was successfully transfered to the 280-nm-thick silicon layer of a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrate by using inductively-coupled-plasma-reactive-ion-etching (ICP-RIE). PMID:23755620

  9. Variable UV laser exposure processing of photosensitive glass-ceramics: maskless micro- to meso-scale structure fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livingston, F. E.; Helvajian, H.

    2005-12-01

    A novel variable UV laser processing technique was developed that enables the concurrent fabrication of structures in photosensitive glass-ceramic (PSGC) materials that range from the micro-scale to the meso-scale domains. This technique combines the advantages of direct-write volumetric laser patterning and batch chemical processing. The merged non-thermal laser fabrication approach relies on the ability to precisely and selectively alter the chemical etch rate of the PSGC by varying the laser exposure during pattern formation. The present study determined that the chemical etch rate of a commercial photosensitive glass-ceramic (FoturanTM, Schott Corp., Germany) in dilute hydrofluoric (HF) acid is strongly dependent on the incident laser irradiance during patterning at λ=266 nm and λ=355 nm. For low laser irradiances, the etch rate ratio (Rexposed/Runexposed) increased nearly linearly with laser irradiance. The slopes of the linear ranges of the etch rate ratios were measured to be 435.9±46.7 μm2/mW and 46.2±2.3 μm2/mW for λ=266 nm and λ=355 nm, respectively. For high laser irradiances, the measured etch rate ratio saturated at ˜30:1 with a maximum absolute etch rate of 18.62±0.30 μm/min. The maximum absolute chemical etch rate was independent of the exposure wavelength. Consequently, variation of the laser exposure during direct-write patterning permits the formation of variegated and proximal high and low aspect ratio structures on a common substrate. The results show that adjacent microstructures with aspect ratios ranging from <1:1 to ˜30:1 can be fabricated in a single, simultaneous batch chemical etch step without the need for a complex masking sequence or post-process ablation step. This new technique facilitates rapid prototype processing with pattern and component uniformity, and achieves material processing over large areas without incurring high cost.

  10. SUPPLEMENTARY COMPARISON: Final report on CCL-S3 supplementary line scale comparison Nano3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosse, Harald; Häßler-Grohne, Wolfgang; Flügge, Jens; Köning, Rainer

    2003-01-01

    edge quality of both scales allowed a meaningful separation of the length-dependent and length-independent deviations from the weighted mean values. Therefore a meaningful comparison of these deviations with the evaluated uncertainty contributions of the participating institutes was possible. For the most important measurand of this comparison, namely the position deviations of the line structures on the 280 mm main graduation, three results out of the 11 data sets provided had to be excluded by application of the En-criterion for the quartz and Zerodur scales respectively. Investigations of the reasons for the deviations have already been started by the respective institutes, including bilateral follow-up line scale comparisons with the Nano3 pilot laboratory. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCL, according to the provisions of the Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  11. Fabrication, testing and modeling of a new flexible armor inspired from natural fish scales and osteoderms.

    PubMed

    Chintapalli, Ravi Kiran; Mirkhalaf, Mohammad; Dastjerdi, Ahmad Khayer; Barthelat, Francois

    2014-09-01

    Crocodiles, armadillo, turtles, fish and many other animal species have evolved flexible armored skins in the form of hard scales or osteoderms, which can be described as hard plates of finite size embedded in softer tissues. The individual hard segments provide protection from predators, while the relative motion of these segments provides the flexibility required for efficient locomotion. In this work, we duplicated these broad concepts in a bio-inspired segmented armor. Hexagonal segments of well-defined size and shape were carved within a thin glass plate using laser engraving. The engraved plate was then placed on a soft substrate which simulated soft tissues, and then punctured with a sharp needle mounted on a miniature loading stage. The resistance of our segmented armor was significantly higher when smaller hexagons were used, and our bio-inspired segmented glass displayed an increase in puncture resistance of up to 70% compared to a continuous plate of glass of the same thickness. Detailed structural analyses aided by finite elements revealed that this extraordinary improvement is due to the reduced span of individual segments, which decreases flexural stresses and delays fracture. This effect can however only be achieved if the plates are at least 1000 stiffer than the underlying substrate, which is the case for natural armor systems. Our bio-inspired system also displayed many of the attributes of natural armors: flexible, robust with 'multi-hit' capabilities. This new segmented glass therefore suggests interesting bio-inspired strategies and mechanisms which could be systematically exploited in high-performance flexible armors. This study also provides new insights and a better understanding of the mechanics of natural armors such as scales and osteoderms. PMID:24613857

  12. Large-scale fabrication of micro-lens array by novel end-fly-cutting-servo diamond machining.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhiwei; To, Suet; Zhang, Shaojian

    2015-08-10

    Fast/slow tool servo (FTS/STS) diamond turning is a very promising technique for the generation of micro-lens array (MLA). However, it is still a challenge to process MLA in large scale due to certain inherent limitations of this technique. In the present study, a novel ultra-precision diamond cutting method, as the end-fly-cutting-servo (EFCS) system, is adopted and investigated for large-scale generation of MLA. After a detailed discussion of the characteristic advantages for processing MLA, the optimal toolpath generation strategy for the EFCS is developed with consideration of the geometry and installation pose of the diamond tool. A typical aspheric MLA over a large area is experimentally fabricated, and the resulting form accuracy, surface micro-topography and machining efficiency are critically investigated. The result indicates that the MLA with homogeneous quality over the whole area is obtained. Besides, high machining efficiency, extremely small volume of control points for the toolpath, and optimal usage of system dynamics of the machine tool during the whole cutting can be simultaneously achieved. PMID:26367912

  13. Fabrication and testing of gas-filled targets for large-scale plasma experiments on nova

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, G.F.; Rivers, C.J.; Spragge, M.R.; Wallace, R.J.

    1996-06-01

    The proposed next-generation ICF facility, the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is designed to produce energy gain from x-ray heated {open_quotes}indirect-drive{close_quotes} fuel capsules. For indirect-drive targets, laser light heats the inside of the Au hohlraum wall and produces x rays which in turn heat and implode the capsule to produce fusion conditions in the fuel. Unlike Nova targets, in NIF-scale targets laser light will propagate through several millimeters of gas, producing a plasma, before impinging upon the Au hohlraum wall. The purpose of the gas-produced plasma is to provide sufficient pressure to keep the radiating Au surface from expanding excessively into the hohlraum cavity. Excessive expansion of the Au wall interacts with the laser pulse and degrades the drive symmetry of the capsule implosion. The authors have begun an experimental campaign on the Nova laser to study the effect of hohlraum gas on both laser-plasma interaction and implosion symmetry. In their current NIF target design, the calculated plasma electron temperature is T{sub e} {approx} 3 keV and the electron density is N{sub e} {approx} 10{sup 21}cm{sup {minus}3}.

  14. Novel two-stage selenization methods for fabrication of thin-film CIS cells and submodules. Final subcontract report, March 1, 1993--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Basol, B.; Kapur, V.; Halani, A.; Leidholm, C.; Minnick, A.

    1995-06-01

    This is the Phase 11 Final Technical Report of the subcontract titled {open_quotes}Novel Two-Stage Selenization Methods for Fabrication of Thin Film CIS Cells and Submodules.{close_quotes} The general objectives of the program are the development of a cost-effective, large-area process for CIS film deposition, optimization of the various layers forming the CIS device structure, and fabrication of high efficiency submodules using these optimized device components. During this research period, growth parameters of ZnO window layers were varied to optimize their electrical and optical properties. Investigation of the chemical interactions between the glass substrates, Mo layers and the selenization atmosphere revealed that the nature of the glass/Mo substrate greatly influenced the quality of the solar cells fabricated on them. Moderate amounts of sodium diffusing from the soda-lime glass substrate into the CIS film improved the efficiencies of the solar cells fabricated on such films. Mo layers allowing excessive Na diffusion through them, on the other hand, reacted excessively with the H{sup 2}Se environment and deteriorated the solar cell performance. Addition of Ga into the CIS layers by the two-stage selenization technique yielded graded absorber structures with higher Ga content near the Mo/absorber interface. Cu-rich CIS layers were grown with grain sizes of larger than 5 {mu}m. In the Phase I Annual Report large area CIS submodules with efficiencies of about 3% were reported. During the present Phase II program 1 ft{sup 2} size CIS submodule efficiency was improved to 7%. Smaller area submodules with efficiencies as high as 9.79% were also fabricated using CIS layers obtained by the H{sub 2}Se selenization method. The processing yield of the devices based on a non-vacuum CIS deposition approach was improved and solar cells with efficiencies greater than 10% were fabricated.

  15. 78 FR 11150 - Utility Scale Wind Towers From the Socialist Republic of Vietnam: Amended Final Determination of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-15

    ...Based on affirmative final determinations by the Department of Commerce (the ``Department'') and the International Trade Commission (``ITC''), the Department is issuing an antidumping duty order on utility scale wind towers (``wind towers'') from the Socialist Republic of Vietnam (``Vietnam''). In addition, the Department is amending its final determination to correct certain ministerial......

  16. Study of Micro and Nano Scale Features in the Fabrication, Performance, and Degradation of Advanced Engineering Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardo, Jeffrey John

    Increasingly, modern engineering materials are designed on a micron or nano scale to fulfill a given set of requirements or to enhance the material's performance. In this dissertation several such materials will be studied including catalyst particles for carbon nanotube (CNT) growth by use of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) by reactor scale modeling, hermetic carbon coatings by focused ion beam/ scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) the latter of which was performed by Andrei Stolov at OFS Specialty Photonics Division (Avon, CT), and Ni/Yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anodes using X-ray nanotomography (XNT) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) the second of which was performed by Barry Lai at APS (Argonne National Lab, IL). For each material, a subset of the material properties will be looked at to determine how the selected property affects either the fabrication, performance, or degradation of the material. Following the analysis of these materials, it was found that although the materials are different, the study of micron and nano scale features has many related traits. X-rays and electrons are frequently used to examine nanoscale structures, numerical study can be exploited to expedite measurements and extract additional information from experiments, and the study of these requires knowledge across many scientific fields. As a product of this research, detailed information about all of the materials studied has been contributed to the scientific literature including size dependance information about the oxidation states of nanometer size iron particles, optimal CVD reactor growth conditions for different CNT catalyst particle sizes and number of walls, a technique for rapid measurement of hermetic carbon film thickness, and detailed microstructural detail and sulfur poisoning mapping for Ni/YSZ SOFC anodes.

  17. Design, fabrication and testing of a low headroom conveyor transfer chute. Final technical report. [Chutes for transferring material from one conveyor to another

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, S. B.; Larson, P.

    1980-12-01

    This document contains the results of tests performed on eight one-sixth scale models of low headroom transfer chutes for underground belt conveyors. The models were evaluated using a methodology technique to select one chute for further full-scale testing in an underground mine. The study concludes that the slide chute should be tested in an underground 90/sup 0/ transfer point. The report contains a state-of-the-art survey, a literature search, data from mine visits, test results, evaluation based on the methodology technique, and a set of guidelines for the design of low headroom transfer chutes. Also included are the preliminary designs of the slide and stone box chutes, scaled up from the designs used in the tests. Following the first phase of the program, the contract was terminated for the convenience of the government; therefore, the program did not progress to the Phase II full-scale chute fabrication or Phase III field testing.

  18. 77 FR 50715 - Utility Scale Wind Towers From China and Vietnam; Scheduling of the Final Phase of Countervailing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-22

    ... electronic filing have been amended. The amendments took effect on November 7, 2011. See 76 FR 61937 (Oct. 6... COMMISSION Utility Scale Wind Towers From China and Vietnam; Scheduling of the Final Phase of Countervailing... from China and Vietnam of utility scale wind towers, provided for in subheading 7308.20.00 of...

  19. Final Scientific Report: A Scalable Development Environment for Peta-Scale Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Karbach, Carsten; Frings, Wolfgang

    2013-02-22

    This document is the final scientific report of the project DE-SC000120 (A scalable Development Environment for Peta-Scale Computing). The objective of this project is the extension of the Parallel Tools Platform (PTP) for applying it to peta-scale systems. PTP is an integrated development environment for parallel applications. It comprises code analysis, performance tuning, parallel debugging and system monitoring. The contribution of the Juelich Supercomputing Centre (JSC) aims to provide a scalable solution for system monitoring of supercomputers. This includes the development of a new communication protocol for exchanging status data between the target remote system and the client running PTP. The communication has to work for high latency. PTP needs to be implemented robustly and should hide the complexity of the supercomputer's architecture in order to provide a transparent access to various remote systems via a uniform user interface. This simplifies the porting of applications to different systems, because PTP functions as abstraction layer between parallel application developer and compute resources. The common requirement for all PTP components is that they have to interact with the remote supercomputer. E.g. applications are built remotely and performance tools are attached to job submissions and their output data resides on the remote system. Status data has to be collected by evaluating outputs of the remote job scheduler and the parallel debugger needs to control an application executed on the supercomputer. The challenge is to provide this functionality for peta-scale systems in real-time. The client server architecture of the established monitoring application LLview, developed by the JSC, can be applied to PTP's system monitoring. LLview provides a well-arranged overview of the supercomputer's current status. A set of statistics, a list of running and queued jobs as well as a node display mapping running jobs to their compute resources form the

  20. Fabrication and demonstration of an integrally heated and pressurized mold system. Final report Jul 79-Oct 80

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.G.; Blake, E.E.

    1981-03-01

    The objectives of this research program are to reduce tooling costs for a composite tail rotor blade; reduce bond cure cycle time spans; and realize energy savings when compared to the conventional autoclave cure system. A thermally efficient mold bond insert and structure was designed and fabricated. Three bearingless tail rotor blades for a light helicopter were manufactured.

  1. Pilot-scale production of grout with simulated double-shell slurry feed. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Whyatt, G.A.

    1994-08-01

    This report describes the pilot-scale production of grout with simulated double-shell slurry feed (DSSF) waste performed in November 1988, and the subsequent thermal behavior of the grout as it cured in a large, insulated vessel. The report was issued in draft form in April 1989 and comments were subsequently received; however, the report was not finalized until 1994. In finalizing this report, references or information gained after the report was drafted in April 1989 have not been incorporated to preserve the report`s historical perspective. This report makes use of criteria from Ridelle (1987) to establish formulation criteria. This document has since been superseded by a document prepared by Reibling and Fadeef (1991). However, the reference to Riddelle (1987) and any analysis based on its content have been maintained within this report. In addition, grout is no longer being considered as the waste form for disposal of Hanford`s low-level waste. However, grout disposal is being maintained as an option in case there is an emergency need to provide additional tank space. Current plans are to vitrify low-level wastes into a glass matrix.

  2. Quantifying rock's structural fabric: a multi-scale hierarchical approach to natural fracture systems and stochastic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardebol, Nico; Bertotti, Giovanni; Weltje, Gert Jan

    2014-05-01

    We propose the description of fracture-fault systems in terms of a multi-scale hierarchical network. In most generic form, such arrangement is referred to as a structural fabric and applicable across the length scale spectrum. The statistical characterisation combines the fracture length and orientation distributions and intersection-termination relationships. The aim is a parameterised description of the network that serves as input in stochastic network simulations that should reproduce the essence of natural fracture networks and encompass its variability. The quality of the stochastically generated fabric is determined by comparison with deterministic descriptions on which the model parameterisation is based. Both the deterministic and stochastic derived fracture network description can serve as input in fluid flow or mechanical simulations that accounts explicitly for the discrete features and the response of the system can be compared. The deterministic description of our current study in the framework of tight gas reservoirs is obtained from coastal pavements that expose a horizontal slice through a fracture-fault network system in fine grained sediments in Yorkshire, UK. Fracture hierarchies have often been described at one observation scale as a two-tier hierarchy in terms of 1st order systematic joints and 2nd order cross-joints. New in our description is the bridging between km-sized faults with notable displacement down to sub-meter scale shear and opening mode fractures. This study utilized a drone to obtain cm-resolution imagery of pavements from ~30m altitude and the large coverage up to 1-km by flying at a ~80m. This unique set of images forms the basis for the digitizing of the fracture-fault pattern and helped determining the nested nature of the network as well as intersection and abutment relationships. Fracture sets were defined from the highest to lowest hierarchical order and probability density functions were defined for the length

  3. Fabrication and testing of a ceramic two-cycle diesel engine. Final report, 29 November 1983-31 January 1986

    SciTech Connect

    MacBeth, J.W.

    1986-03-31

    The project effort was focused around evaluating the friction horsepower performance of a single-cylinder two-stroke opposed-piston diesel engine, fabricated from conventional metal components and then with the substitution of ceramic components for the cylinder liner and pistons. The ceramic configurations were run ringless and without cylinder lubrication. Frictional torque measurements were 50% lower than in the standard baseline case.

  4. Large-area perovskite nanowire arrays fabricated by large-scale roll-to-roll micro-gravure printing and doctor blading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Qiao; Wu, Han; Sun, Jia; Yan, Donghang; Gao, Yongli; Yang, Junliang

    2016-02-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid halide perovskite nanowires (PNWs) show great potential applications in electronic and optoelectronic devices such as solar cells, field-effect transistors and photodetectors. It is very meaningful to fabricate ordered, large-area PNW arrays and greatly accelerate their applications and commercialization in electronic and optoelectronic devices. Herein, highly oriented and ultra-long methylammonium lead iodide (CH3NH3PbI3) PNW array thin films were fabricated by large-scale roll-to-roll (R2R) micro-gravure printing and doctor blading in ambient environments (humility ~45%, temperature ~28 °C), which produced PNW lengths as long as 15 mm. Furthermore, photodetectors based on these PNWs were successfully fabricated on both silicon oxide (SiO2) and flexible polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates and showed moderate performance. This study provides low-cost, large-scale techniques to fabricate large-area PNW arrays with great potential applications in flexible electronic and optoelectronic devices.Organic-inorganic hybrid halide perovskite nanowires (PNWs) show great potential applications in electronic and optoelectronic devices such as solar cells, field-effect transistors and photodetectors. It is very meaningful to fabricate ordered, large-area PNW arrays and greatly accelerate their applications and commercialization in electronic and optoelectronic devices. Herein, highly oriented and ultra-long methylammonium lead iodide (CH3NH3PbI3) PNW array thin films were fabricated by large-scale roll-to-roll (R2R) micro-gravure printing and doctor blading in ambient environments (humility ~45%, temperature ~28 °C), which produced PNW lengths as long as 15 mm. Furthermore, photodetectors based on these PNWs were successfully fabricated on both silicon oxide (SiO2) and flexible polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates and showed moderate performance. This study provides low-cost, large-scale techniques to fabricate large-area PNW arrays

  5. Bioresorbable scaffolds for bone tissue engineering: optimal design, fabrication, mechanical testing and scale-size effects analysis.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Pedro G; Hollister, Scott J; Flanagan, Colleen L; Fernandes, Paulo R

    2015-03-01

    Bone scaffolds for tissue regeneration require an optimal trade-off between biological and mechanical criteria. Optimal designs may be obtained using topology optimization (homogenization approach) and prototypes produced using additive manufacturing techniques. However, the process from design to manufacture remains a research challenge and will be a requirement of FDA design controls to engineering scaffolds. This work investigates how the design to manufacture chain affects the reproducibility of complex optimized design characteristics in the manufactured product. The design and prototypes are analyzed taking into account the computational assumptions and the final mechanical properties determined through mechanical tests. The scaffold is an assembly of unit-cells, and thus scale size effects on the mechanical response considering finite periodicity are investigated and compared with the predictions from the homogenization method which assumes in the limit infinitely repeated unit cells. Results show that a limited number of unit-cells (3-5 repeated on a side) introduce some scale-effects but the discrepancies are below 10%. Higher discrepancies are found when comparing the experimental data to numerical simulations due to differences between the manufactured and designed scaffold feature shapes and sizes as well as micro-porosities introduced by the manufacturing process. However good regression correlations (R(2) > 0.85) were found between numerical and experimental values, with slopes close to 1 for 2 out of 3 designs. PMID:25640805

  6. Large Scale Laser Two-Photon Polymerization Structuring for Fabrication of Artificial Polymeric Scaffolds for Regenerative Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinauskas, M.; Purlys, V.; Žukauskas, A.; Rutkauskas, M.; Danilevičius, P.; Paipulas, D.; Bičkauskaitė, G.; Bukelskis, L.; Baltriukienė, D.; Širmenis, R.; Gaidukevičiutė, A.; Bukelskienė, V.; Gadonas, R.; Sirvydis, V.; Piskarskas, A.

    2010-11-01

    We present a femtosecond Laser Two-Photon Polymerization (LTPP) system of large scale three-dimensional structuring for applications in tissue engineering. The direct laser writing system enables fabrication of artificial polymeric scaffolds over a large area (up to cm in lateral size) with sub-micrometer resolution which could find practical applications in biomedicine and surgery. Yb:KGW femtosecond laser oscillator (Pharos, Light Conversion. Co. Ltd.) is used as an irradiation source (75 fs, 515 nm (frequency doubled), 80 MHz). The sample is mounted on wide range linear motor driven stages having 10 nm sample positioning resolution (XY—ALS130-100, Z—ALS130-50, Aerotech, Inc.). These stages guarantee an overall travelling range of 100 mm into X and Y directions and 50 mm in Z direction and support the linear scanning speed up to 300 mm/s. By moving the sample three-dimensionally the position of laser focus in the photopolymer is changed and one is able to write complex 3D (three-dimensional) structures. An illumination system and CMOS camera enables online process monitoring. Control of all equipment is automated via custom made computer software "3D-Poli" specially designed for LTPP applications. Structures can be imported from computer aided design STereoLihography (stl) files or programmed directly. It can be used for rapid LTPP structuring in various photopolymers (SZ2080, AKRE19, PEG-DA-258) which are known to be suitable for bio-applications. Microstructured scaffolds can be produced on different substrates like glass, plastic and metal. In this paper, we present microfabricated polymeric scaffolds over a large area and growing of adult rabbit myogenic stem cells on them. Obtained results show the polymeric scaffolds to be applicable for cell growth practice. It exhibit potential to use it for artificial pericardium in the experimental model in the future.

  7. Large Scale Laser Two-Photon Polymerization Structuring for Fabrication of Artificial Polymeric Scaffolds for Regenerative Medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Malinauskas, M.; Purlys, V.; Zukauskas, A.; Rutkauskas, M.; Danilevicius, P.; Paipulas, D.; Bickauskaite, G.; Gadonas, R.; Piskarskas, A.; Bukelskis, L.; Baltriukiene, D.; Bukelskiene, V.; Sirmenis, R.; Gaidukeviciute, A.; Sirvydis, V.

    2010-11-10

    We present a femtosecond Laser Two-Photon Polymerization (LTPP) system of large scale three-dimensional structuring for applications in tissue engineering. The direct laser writing system enables fabrication of artificial polymeric scaffolds over a large area (up to cm in lateral size) with sub-micrometer resolution which could find practical applications in biomedicine and surgery. Yb:KGW femtosecond laser oscillator (Pharos, Light Conversion. Co. Ltd.) is used as an irradiation source (75 fs, 515 nm (frequency doubled), 80 MHz). The sample is mounted on wide range linear motor driven stages having 10 nm sample positioning resolution (XY--ALS130-100, Z--ALS130-50, Aerotech, Inc.). These stages guarantee an overall travelling range of 100 mm into X and Y directions and 50 mm in Z direction and support the linear scanning speed up to 300 mm/s. By moving the sample three-dimensionally the position of laser focus in the photopolymer is changed and one is able to write complex 3D (three-dimensional) structures. An illumination system and CMOS camera enables online process monitoring. Control of all equipment is automated via custom made computer software ''3D-Poli'' specially designed for LTPP applications. Structures can be imported from computer aided design STereoLihography (stl) files or programmed directly. It can be used for rapid LTPP structuring in various photopolymers (SZ2080, AKRE19, PEG-DA-258) which are known to be suitable for bio-applications. Microstructured scaffolds can be produced on different substrates like glass, plastic and metal. In this paper, we present microfabricated polymeric scaffolds over a large area and growing of adult rabbit myogenic stem cells on them. Obtained results show the polymeric scaffolds to be applicable for cell growth practice. It exhibit potential to use it for artificial pericardium in the experimental model in the future.

  8. FINAL REPORT: Mechanistically-Base Field Scale Models of Uranium Biogeochemistry from Upscaling Pore-Scale Experiments and Models

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Brian D.

    2013-11-04

    Biogeochemical reactive transport processes in the subsurface environment are important to many contemporary environmental issues of significance to DOE. Quantification of risks and impacts associated with environmental management options, and design of remediation systems where needed, require that we have at our disposal reliable predictive tools (usually in the form of numerical simulation models). However, it is well known that even the most sophisticated reactive transport models available today have poor predictive power, particularly when applied at the field scale. Although the lack of predictive ability is associated in part with our inability to characterize the subsurface and limitations in computational power, significant advances have been made in both of these areas in recent decades and can be expected to continue. In this research, we examined the upscaling (pore to Darcy and Darcy to field) the problem of bioremediation via biofilms in porous media. The principle idea was to start with a conceptual description of the bioremediation process at the pore scale, and apply upscaling methods to formally develop the appropriate upscaled model at the so-called Darcy scale. The purpose was to determine (1) what forms the upscaled models would take, and (2) how one might parameterize such upscaled models for applications to bioremediation in the field. We were able to effectively upscale the bioremediation process to explain how the pore-scale phenomena were linked to the field scale. The end product of this research was to produce a set of upscaled models that could be used to help predict field-scale bioremediation. These models were mechanistic, in the sense that they directly incorporated pore-scale information, but upscaled so that only the essential features of the process were needed to predict the effective parameters that appear in the model. In this way, a direct link between the microscale and the field scale was made, but the upscaling process

  9. Roll-to-roll fabrication of large scale and regular arrays of three-dimensional nanospikes for high efficiency and flexible photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Siu-Fung; Gu, Leilei; Zhang, Qianpeng; Tsui, Kwong-Hoi; Shieh, Jia-Min; Shen, Chang-Hong; Hsiao, Tzu-Hsuan; Hsu, Chin-Hung; Lu, Linfeng; Li, Dongdong; Lin, Qingfeng; Fan, Zhiyong

    2014-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) nanostructures have demonstrated enticing potency to boost performance of photovoltaic devices primarily owning to the improved photon capturing capability. Nevertheless, cost-effective and scalable fabrication of regular 3-D nanostructures with decent robustness and flexibility still remains as a challenging task. Meanwhile, establishing rational design guidelines for 3-D nanostructured solar cells with the balanced electrical and optical performance are of paramount importance and in urgent need. Herein, regular arrays of 3-D nanospikes (NSPs) were fabricated on flexible aluminum foil with a roll-to-roll compatible process. The NSPs have precisely controlled geometry and periodicity which allow systematic investigation on geometry dependent optical and electrical performance of the devices with experiments and modeling. Intriguingly, it has been discovered that the efficiency of an amorphous-Si (a-Si) photovoltaic device fabricated on NSPs can be improved by 43%, as compared to its planar counterpart, in an optimal case. Furthermore, large scale flexible NSP solar cell devices have been fabricated and demonstrated. These results not only have shed light on the design rules of high performance nanostructured solar cells, but also demonstrated a highly practical process to fabricate efficient solar panels with 3-D nanostructures, thus may have immediate impact on thin film photovoltaic industry.

  10. Roll-to-roll fabrication of large scale and regular arrays of three-dimensional nanospikes for high efficiency and flexible photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Leung, Siu-Fung; Gu, Leilei; Zhang, Qianpeng; Tsui, Kwong-Hoi; Shieh, Jia-Min; Shen, Chang-Hong; Hsiao, Tzu-Hsuan; Hsu, Chin-Hung; Lu, Linfeng; Li, Dongdong; Lin, Qingfeng; Fan, Zhiyong

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) nanostructures have demonstrated enticing potency to boost performance of photovoltaic devices primarily owning to the improved photon capturing capability. Nevertheless, cost-effective and scalable fabrication of regular 3-D nanostructures with decent robustness and flexibility still remains as a challenging task. Meanwhile, establishing rational design guidelines for 3-D nanostructured solar cells with the balanced electrical and optical performance are of paramount importance and in urgent need. Herein, regular arrays of 3-D nanospikes (NSPs) were fabricated on flexible aluminum foil with a roll-to-roll compatible process. The NSPs have precisely controlled geometry and periodicity which allow systematic investigation on geometry dependent optical and electrical performance of the devices with experiments and modeling. Intriguingly, it has been discovered that the efficiency of an amorphous-Si (a-Si) photovoltaic device fabricated on NSPs can be improved by 43%, as compared to its planar counterpart, in an optimal case. Furthermore, large scale flexible NSP solar cell devices have been fabricated and demonstrated. These results not only have shed light on the design rules of high performance nanostructured solar cells, but also demonstrated a highly practical process to fabricate efficient solar panels with 3-D nanostructures, thus may have immediate impact on thin film photovoltaic industry. PMID:24603964

  11. Trace metal distribution and control in the pilot-scale bubbling fluidized bed combustor equipped with the pulse-jet fabric filter, limestone injection, and the humidification reactor.

    PubMed

    Kouvo, Petri

    2003-04-01

    This work focused on trace metal behavior and removal in a fabric filter or in a humidification reactor during the cofiring of sawdust and refuse-derived fuels (RDFs) in a pilot-scale bubbling fluidized bed (BFB) boiler. Trace metal emissions measurements before and after the fabric filter revealed that removal efficiency in the fabric filter was in the range of 80-100%, and that the European Union (EU) Directive on Incineration of Waste restrictions for trace metal emissions are easily achieved even if addition of RDFs substantially increases the concentration of trace metals in fuel blends. Limestone injection enhanced the removal of As and Se but had no noticeable effect on the removal of other trace metals. Extensive formation of HgCl2 and condensation on fly ash particles during sawdust plus 40% RDF cofiring resulted in a 92% Hg removal efficiency in the fabric filter. Limestone injection had no effect on the Hg removal in the fabric filter but decreased the Hg removal in a humidification reactor from 40 to 28%. Results of the bed material and fly ash analysis suggested capture of Cu, Pb, Mn, Ni, and Zn in the bed material but also suggested that these metals may be released from the bed if the fuel characteristics or process conditions are changed. PMID:12708504

  12. Atomically Traceable Nanostructure Fabrication.

    PubMed

    Ballard, Josh B; Dick, Don D; McDonnell, Stephen J; Bischof, Maia; Fu, Joseph; Owen, James H G; Owen, William R; Alexander, Justin D; Jaeger, David L; Namboodiri, Pradeep; Fuchs, Ehud; Chabal, Yves J; Wallace, Robert M; Reidy, Richard; Silver, Richard M; Randall, John N; Von Ehr, James

    2015-01-01

    Reducing the scale of etched nanostructures below the 10 nm range eventually will require an atomic scale understanding of the entire fabrication process being used in order to maintain exquisite control over both feature size and feature density. Here, we demonstrate a method for tracking atomically resolved and controlled structures from initial template definition through final nanostructure metrology, opening up a pathway for top-down atomic control over nanofabrication. Hydrogen depassivation lithography is the first step of the nanoscale fabrication process followed by selective atomic layer deposition of up to 2.8 nm of titania to make a nanoscale etch mask. Contrast with the background is shown, indicating different mechanisms for growth on the desired patterns and on the H passivated background. The patterns are then transferred into the bulk using reactive ion etching to form 20 nm tall nanostructures with linewidths down to ~6 nm. To illustrate the limitations of this process, arrays of holes and lines are fabricated. The various nanofabrication process steps are performed at disparate locations, so process integration is discussed. Related issues are discussed including using fiducial marks for finding nanostructures on a macroscopic sample and protecting the chemically reactive patterned Si(100)-H surface against degradation due to atmospheric exposure. PMID:26274555

  13. Large-area perovskite nanowire arrays fabricated by large-scale roll-to-roll micro-gravure printing and doctor blading.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qiao; Wu, Han; Sun, Jia; Yan, Donghang; Gao, Yongli; Yang, Junliang

    2016-02-25

    Organic-inorganic hybrid halide perovskite nanowires (PNWs) show great potential applications in electronic and optoelectronic devices such as solar cells, field-effect transistors and photodetectors. It is very meaningful to fabricate ordered, large-area PNW arrays and greatly accelerate their applications and commercialization in electronic and optoelectronic devices. Herein, highly oriented and ultra-long methylammonium lead iodide (CH3NH3PbI3) PNW array thin films were fabricated by large-scale roll-to-roll (R2R) micro-gravure printing and doctor blading in ambient environments (humility ∼45%, temperature ∼28 °C), which produced PNW lengths as long as 15 mm. Furthermore, photodetectors based on these PNWs were successfully fabricated on both silicon oxide (SiO2) and flexible polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates and showed moderate performance. This study provides low-cost, large-scale techniques to fabricate large-area PNW arrays with great potential applications in flexible electronic and optoelectronic devices. PMID:26883938

  14. Microwave sintering of MoSi{sub 2}-Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3} to promote a final nanometer-scale microstructure and suppressing of pesting phenomenon

    SciTech Connect

    Arreguin-Zavala, J. Turenne, S.; Martel, A.; Benaissa, A.

    2012-06-15

    This work shows an innovative sintering process for molybdenum disilicide (MoSi{sub 2}) and molybdenum silicide (Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3}) in order to have a final nanometer-scale microstructure. Sintered MoSi{sub 2}-Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3} was fabricated by microwave sintering. The final material showed a significant reduction of pesting phenomena for MoSi{sub 2}. The final microstructure is a mix of micrometer-scale MoSi{sub 2} and nanometer-scale Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3} immersed in an amorphous SiO{sub 2} phase. This material was characterized by X-Ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA). - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We sintered the MoSi{sub 2}-Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3} by microwave and obtained high final density material. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We got a final nanostructured material. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We inhibited pesting phenomenon for MoSi{sub 2}.

  15. Advanced Fabrication Techniques for Precisely Controlled Micro and Nano Scale Environments for Complex Tissue Regeneration and Biomedical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Benjamin

    As modern medicine advances, it is still very challenging to cure joint defects due to their poor inherent regenerative capacity, complex stratified architecture, and disparate biomechanical properties. The current clinical standard for catastrophic or late stage joint degradation is a total joint implant, where the damaged joint is completely excised and replaced with a metallic or artificial joint. However, these procedures still only lasts for 10-15 years, and there are hosts of recovery complications which can occur. Thus, these studies have sought to employ advanced biomaterials and scaffold fabricated techniques to effectively regrow joint tissue, instead of merely replacing it with artificial materials. We can hypothesize here that the inclusion of biomimetic and bioactive nanomaterials with highly functional electrospun and 3D printed scaffold can improve physical characteristics (mechanical strength, surface interactions and nanotexture) enhance cellular growth and direct stem cell differentiation for bone, cartilage and vascular growth as well as cancer metastasis modeling. Nanomaterial inclusion and controlled 3D printed features effectively increased nano surface roughness, Young's Modulus and provided effective flow paths for simulated arterial blood. All of the approaches explored proved highly effective for increasing cell growth, as a result of increasing micro-complexity and nanomaterial incorporation. Additionally, chondrogenic and osteogenic differentiation, cell migration, cell to cell interaction and vascular formation were enhanced. Finally, growth-factor(gf)-loaded polymer nanospheres greatly improved vascular cell behavior, and provided a highly bioactive scaffold for mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) and human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) co-culture and bone formation. In conclusion, electrospinning and 3D printing when combined effectively with biomimetic and bioactive nanomaterials (i.e. carbon nanomaterials, collagen, nHA, polymer

  16. 77 FR 75992 - Utility Scale Wind Towers From the People's Republic of China: Final Determination of Sales at...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-26

    ...On August 2, 2012, the Department of Commerce (the ``Department'') published its preliminary determination of sales at less than fair value (``LTFV'') and postponement of final determination in the antidumping investigation of utility scale wind towers (``wind towers'') from the People's Republic of China (``PRC'').\\1\\ Based on an analysis of the comments received, the Department has made......

  17. Physics and dynamics coupling across scales in the next generation CESM: Meeting the challenge of high resolution. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, Vincent E.

    2015-02-21

    This is a final report for a SciDAC grant supported by BER. The project implemented a novel technique for coupling small-scale dynamics and microphysics into a community climate model. The technique uses subcolumns that are sampled in Monte Carlo fashion from a distribution of subgrid variability. The resulting global simulations show several improvements over the status quo.

  18. Wafer-scale fabrication of self-actuated piezoelectric nanoelectromechanical resonators based on lead zirconate titanate (PZT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dezest, D.; Thomas, O.; Mathieu, F.; Mazenq, L.; Soyer, C.; Costecalde, J.; Remiens, D.; Deü, J. F.; Nicu, L.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper we report an unprecedented level of integration of self-actuated nanoelectromechanical system (NEMS) resonators based on a 150 nm thick lead zirconate titanate (PZT) thin film at the wafer-scale. A top-down approach combining ultraviolet (UV) lithography with other standard planar processing technologies allows us to achieve high-throughput manufacturing. Multilayer stack cantilevers with different geometries have been implemented with measured fundamental resonant frequencies in the megahertz range and Q-factor values ranging from ~130 in air up to ~900 in a vacuum at room temperature. A refined finite element model taking into account the exact configuration of the piezoelectric stack is proposed and demonstrates the importance of considering the dependence of the beam’s cross-section upon the axial coordinate. We extensively investigate both experimentally and theoretically the transduction efficiency of the implemented piezoelectric layer and report for the first time at this integration level a piezoelectric constant of {{d}31}=15  fm V-1. Finally, we discuss the current limitations to achieve piezoelectric detection.

  19. Creating the final conversations scale: a measure of end-of-life relational communication with terminally ill individuals.

    PubMed

    Generous, Mark Alan; Keeley, Maureen P

    2014-01-01

    Final conversations (FCs) are defined as the communicative interactions, both verbal and nonverbal, that occur between terminally ill patients and relational partners. In this study, the "Final Conversations Scale" was developed and tested. A total of 152 participants that had engaged in final conversations with individuals that were terminally ill completed the newly developed instrument. Factor analysis produced a five-factor structure, including: messages of spirituality/religion; expressions of love; proactive difficult relationship talk; everyday communication; and talk about illness/death. Participants' perceptions of the relational closeness and difficulty with the deceased significantly influenced the individuals' recalled frequency of FCs messages. Practical and scholarly implications focus on the needs of the family members regarding their communication with terminally ill individuals, as well as directions for future research with the FCs Scale. PMID:25148453

  20. Ventilation-kinetics testing of a steel frame/rubber fabric underground shelter. Final report, Aug 89-Aug 90

    SciTech Connect

    Seitzinger, A.T.

    1991-05-01

    Design modifications were implemented on a respectively new steel frame/rubber fabric underground shelter to improve its collective protection characteristics for usage in an NBC warfare environment. Design changes were evaluated by analyzing volumetric air flow and pressure data collected from ventilation tests conducted for each design modification. Modifications to doors within the shelter proved to have significant impact on its performance. One door modification utilized velcro and rubber adhesives to attach the doorflap on the positive pressure side of the doorway. This modification increased maximum overpressure attained by the shelter from 0.125 inches of water (in.WG) to 1.8 in.WG over its original design. Test results indicated that this was due to a substantial decrease in the effective leakage areas associated with all of the doorways. At this higher overpressure, the risk of airborne nuclear fallout, biological agents, or vapors from chemical agents or aerosols penetrating into the shelter during exit/entry operations would be greatly reduced.

  1. Fabricating superhydrophilic wool fabrics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dong; Tan, Longfei; Liu, Huiyu; Hu, Junyan; Li, Yi; Tang, Fangqiong

    2010-04-01

    A simple method for fabricating environmentally stable superhydrophilic wool fabrics is reported here. An ultrathin silica layer coated on the wool altered both the surface roughness and the surface energy of the fiber and endowed the wool fabrics with excellent water absorption. The process of coating silica sols was dependent on an acid solution of low pH, which influenced the electrostatic interactions between nanoparticles and wool fibers. The morphology and composition of silica-sol-coated wool fabrics were characterized by a combination of SEM, TEM, EDX, FTIR, and XPS measurements. The possible mechanism and size effect of silica nanoparticles on the hydrophilic property of wool fabric were discussed. The washing fastness of the superhydrophilic wool fabrics in perchlorethylene and water was also evaluated. This study shows that wool fabrics modified by optical transparence, chemical stability, and nontoxic silica sols are promising in constructing smart textiles. PMID:19908843

  2. Economics of scale in the electric-utility industry: a review. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-09-01

    Purpose of this paper is to examine the literature dealing with the issue of economy of scale, outline its effects on, and implications for, the electric utility industry, and to review the economies of scale for both conventional and renewable (or inexhaustible) utility technologies. The key characteristics of utility technology and other factors which influence economies of scale are included to provide historical and future perspective on the importance of the economy-of-scale issue. Intent of this paper is to review the role of scale economies in the electric utility industry in order to structure the discussion on and gain perspective on their continued importance.

  3. Advanced industrial gas turbine technology readiness demonstration program. Phase II. Final report: compressor rig fabrication assembly and test

    SciTech Connect

    Schweitzer, J. K.; Smith, J. D.

    1981-03-01

    The results of a component technology demonstration program to fabricate, assemble and test an advanced axial/centrifugal compressor are presented. This work was conducted to demonstrate the utilization of advanced aircraft gas turbine cooling and high pressure compressor technology to improve the performance and reliability of future industrial gas turbines. Specific objectives of the compressor component testing were to demonstrate 18:1 pressure ratio on a single spool at 90% polytropic efficiency with 80% fewer airfoils as compared to current industrial gas turbine compressors. The compressor design configuration utilizes low aspect ratio/highly-loaded axial compressor blading combined with a centrifugal backend stage to achieve the 18:1 design pressure ratio in only 7 stages and 281 axial compressor airfoils. Initial testing of the compressor test rig was conducted with a vaneless centrifugal stage diffuser to allow documentation of the axial compressor performance. Peak design speed axial compressor performance demonstrated was 91.8% polytropic efficiency at 6.5:1 pressure ratio. Subsequent documentation of the combined axial/centrifugal performance with a centrifugal stage pipe diffuser resulted in the demonstration of 91.5% polytropic efficiency and 14% stall margin at the 18:1 overall compressor design pressure ratio. The demonstrated performance not only exceeded the contract performance goals, but also represents the highest known demonstrated compressor performance in this pressure ratio and flow class. The performance demonstrated is particularly significant in that it was accomplished at airfoil loading levels approximately 15% higher than that of current production engine compressor designs. The test results provide conclusive verification of the advanced low aspect ratio axial compressor and centrifugal stage technologies utilized.

  4. Final LDRD report : design and fabrication of advanced device structures for ultra high efficiency solid state lighting.

    SciTech Connect

    Koleske, Daniel David; Bogart, Katherine Huderle Andersen; Shul, Randy John; Wendt, Joel Robert; Crawford, Mary Hagerott; Allerman, Andrew Alan; Fischer, Arthur Joseph

    2005-04-01

    The goal of this one year LDRD was to improve the overall efficiency of InGaN LEDs by improving the extraction of light from the semiconductor chip. InGaN LEDs are currently the most promising technology for producing high efficiency blue and green semiconductor light emitters. Improving the efficiency of InGaN LEDs will enable a more rapid adoption of semiconductor based lighting. In this LDRD, we proposed to develop photonic structures to improve light extraction from nitride-based light emitting diodes (LEDs). While many advanced device geometries were considered for this work, we focused on the use of a photonic crystal for improved light extraction. Although resonant cavity LEDs and other advanced structures certainly have the potential to improve light extraction, the photonic crystal approach showed the most promise in the early stages of this short program. The photonic crystal (PX)-LED developed here incorporates a two dimensional photonic crystal, or photonic lattice, into a nitride-based LED. The dimensions of the photonic crystal are selected such that there are very few or no optical modes in the plane of the LED ('lateral' modes). This will reduce or eliminate any radiation in the lateral direction so that the majority of the LED radiation will be in vertical modes that escape the semiconductor, which will improve the light-extraction efficiency. PX-LEDs were fabricated using a range of hole diameters and lattice constants and compared to control LEDs without a photonic crystal. The far field patterns from the PX-LEDs were dramatically modified by the presence of the photonic crystal. An increase in LED brightness of 1.75X was observed for light measured into a 40 degree emission cone with a total increase in power of 1.5X for an unencapsulated LED.

  5. Fabrication and optical characterization of large scale membrane containing InP/AlGaInP quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niederbracht, H.; Hargart, F.; Schwartz, M.; Koroknay, E.; Kessler, C. A.; Jetter, M.; Michler, P.

    2015-06-01

    Single-photon sources with a high extraction efficiency are a prerequisite for applications in quantum communication and quantum computation schemes. One promising approach is the fabrication of a quantum dot containing membrane structure in combination with a solid immersion lens and a metal mirror. We have fabricated an 80 nm thin semiconductor membrane with incorporated InP quantum dots in an AlGaInP double hetero barrier via complete substrate removal. In addition, a gold layer was deposited on one side of the membrane acting as a mirror. The optical characterization shows in detail that the unique properties of the quantum dots are preserved in the membrane structure.

  6. A facile route for the fabrication of large-scale gate-all-around nanofluidic field-effect transistors with low leakage current.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sangwoo; Kim, Beom Seok; Song, Jiwoon; Lee, Hwanseong; Cho, Hyung Hee

    2012-07-21

    Active modulation of ions and molecules via field-effect gating in nanofluidic channels is a crucial technology for various promising applications such as DNA sequencing, drug delivery, desalination, and energy conversion. Developing a rapid and facile fabrication method for ionic field-effect transistors (FET) over a large area may offer exciting opportunities for both fundamental research and innovative applications. Here, we report a rapid, cost-effective route for the fabrication of large-scale nanofluidic field-effect transistors using a simple, lithography-free two-step fabrication process that consists of sputtering and barrier-type anodization. A robust alumina gate dielectric layer, which is formed by anodizing sputtered aluminium, can be rapidly fabricated in the order of minutes. When anodizing aluminium, we employ a hemispherical counter electrode in order to give a uniform electric field that encompasses the whole sputtered aluminium layer which has high surface roughness. In consequence, a well-defined thin layer of alumina with perfect step coverage is formed on a highly rough aluminium surface. A gate-all-around nanofluidic FET with a leak-free gate dielectric exhibits outstanding gating performance despite a large channel size. The thin and robust anodized alumina gate dielectric plays a crucial role in achieving such excellent capacitive coupling. The combination of a gate-all-around structure with a leak-free gate dielectric over a large area could yield breakthroughs in areas ranging from biotechnology to energy and environmental applications. PMID:22584915

  7. The Scaling of the Slip Weakening Distance (Dc) With Final Slip During Dynamic Earthquake Rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinti, E.; Fukuyama, E.; Cocco, M.; Piatanesi, A.

    2005-12-01

    Several numerical approaches have been recently proposed to retrieve the evolution of dynamic traction during the earthquake propagation on extended faults. Although many studies have shown that the shear traction evolution as a function of time and/or slip may be complex, they all reveal an evident dynamic weakening behavior during faulting. The main dynamic parameters describing traction evolution are: the yield stress, the residual kinetic stress level and the characteristic slip weakening distance Dc. Recent investigations on real data yield the estimate of large Dc values on the fault plane and a correlation between Dc and the final slip. In this study, we focus our attention on the characteristic slip weakening distance Dc and on its variability on the fault plane. Different physical mechanisms have been proposed to explain the origin of Dc, some of them consider this parameter as a scale dependent quantity. We have computed the rupture history from several spontaneous dynamic models imposing a slip weakening law with prescribed Dc distributions on the fault plane. These synthetic models provide the slip velocity evolution during the earthquake rupture. We have therefore generated a set of slip velocity models by fitting the "true" slip velocity time histories with an analytical source time function. To this goal we use the Yoffe function [Tinti et al. 2005], which is dynamically consistent and allows a flexible parameterization. We use these slip velocity histories as a boundary condition on the fault plane to compute the traction evolution. We estimate the Dc values from the traction versus slip curves. We therefore compare the inferred Dc values with those of the original dynamic models and we found that the Dc estimates are very sensitive to the adopted slip velocity function. Despite the problem of resolution that limits the estimate of Dc from kinematic earthquake models and the tradeoff that exists between Dc and strength excess, we show that to

  8. High-Accuracy X-ray Imaging of Meso-scale Targets -- Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Nederbragt, W W

    2004-02-12

    Hundreds of target assemblies will be constructed annually for use on NIF or OMEGA in the near future. Currently, we do not have the capability to tomographically characterize the target assemblies at the desired resolution. Hence, we cannot verify if an assembly has been assembled correctly. The Engineering Directorate, through the LDRD program, provided funding to help solve this problem. This report describes the work accomplished by this LDRD ER (tracking number: 01-ERD-093). The main focus of the LDRD was on the research and development of an x-ray imaging instrument. The instrument design was based on a Woelter [1] Type-I design. The LDRD-ER began as a mid-year project in April 2001. After 2.5 years the LDRD-ER was combined with other work to create a new LDRD-SI. The LDRD-SI was terminated in December 2003. The x-ray microscope research and development was never completed. This report describes the work that was accomplished. It includes discussions on the instrument concept, the optical design, mandrel fabrication, instrument fabrication, optic fabrication, and optic testing.

  9. FABRICATION AND PILOT SCALE TESTING OF A PROTOTYPE DONNAN DIALYZER FOR THE REMOVAL OF TOXIC METALS FROM ELECTROPLATING RINSE WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report concerns research performed to develop anion-exchange membranes for the removal of copper, cadmium and zinc, as their complex cyanide anions, from cyanide process electroplating rinse waters by Donnan dialysis, and to fabricate and evaluate a prototype Donnan dialyzer ...

  10. Large-scale fabrication of free-standing, micropatterned silica nanotubes via a hybrid hydrogel-templated route.

    PubMed

    Chen, Song; Shi, Xuetao; Chinnathambi, Shanmugavel; Hanagata, Nobutaka

    2013-08-01

    Free-standing, micropatterned silica nanotube membranes are in situ fabricated using a micropatterned silica-coated collagen hybrid hydrogel as template. They are substrate-free, and not only maintained their micropatterned microstructure well, but also exhibited strong cell contact guidance ability to direct cell alignment and differentiation, indicating their good potential for biomedical applications. PMID:23386331

  11. Multi-scale soft-lithographic lift-off and grafting (MS-SLLOG) process for active polymer nanophotonic device fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Yi-Chung; Truxal, Steven C.; Kurabayashi, Katsuo

    2005-12-01

    This paper reports a new microfabrication process named "Multi-Scale Soft-Lithographic Lift-Off and Grafting (MS-SLLOG)" used to construct active nanophotonic devices. MS-SLLOG is a low-temperature (less than 150°C) microfabrication technique that allows soft lithographically molded polymer micro-structures to be integrated together with silicon-based microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) structures to perform active control. Moreover, MS-SLLOG process allows us to achieve a hierarchical device structure seamlessly accommodating feature sizes ranging from tens of nanometer to sub-millimeters on a single chip for nanophotonic structure integration. To demonstrate the MS-SLLOG process capability, a strain-controlled micro-optical grating device is fabricated and experimentally characterized. The experimental results successfully show the operation of an active polymer nanophotonic device fabricated by the MS-SLLOG process.

  12. Final Report Full-Scale Test of DWPF Advanced Liquid-Level and Density Measurement Bubblers

    SciTech Connect

    Duignan, M.R.; Weeks, G.E.

    1999-07-01

    As requested by the Technical Task Request (1), a full-scale test was carried out on several different liquid-level measurement bubblers as recommended from previous testing (2). This final report incorporates photographic evidence (Appendix B) of the bubblers at different stages of testing, along with the preliminary results (Appendix C) which were previously reported (3), and instrument calibration data (Appendix D); while this report contains more detailed information than previously reported (3) the conclusions remain the same. The test was performed under highly prototypic conditions from November 26, 1996 to January 23, 1997 using the full-scale SRAT/SME tank test facilities located in the 672-T building at TNX. Two different types of advanced bubblers were subjected to approximately 58 days of slurry operation; 14 days of which the slurry was brought to boiling temperatures.The test showed that the large diameter tube bubbler (2.64 inches inside diameter) operated successfully throughout the2-month test by not plugging with the glass-frit ladened slurry which was maintained at a minimum temperature of 50 deg Cand several days of boiling temperatures. However, a weekly blow-down with air or water is recommended to minimize the slurry which builds up.The small diameter porous tube bubbler (0.62 inch inside diameter; water flow {gt} 4 milliliters/hour = 1.5 gallons/day) operated successfully on a daily basis in the glass-frit ladened slurry which was maintained at a minimum temperature of 50 degrees C and several days of boiling temperatures. However, a daily blow-down with air, or air and water, is necessary to maintain accurate readings.For the small diameter porous tube bubbler (0.62 inch inside diameter; water flow {gt} 4 milliliters/hour = 1.5 gallons/day) there were varying levels of success with the lower water-flow tubes and these tubes would have to be cleaned by blowing with air, or air and water, several times a day to maintain them plug free. This

  13. Final Report for Enhancing the MPI Programming Model for PetaScale Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gropp, William Douglas

    2013-07-22

    This project performed research into enhancing the MPI programming model in two ways: developing improved algorithms and implementation strategies, tested and realized in the MPICH implementation, and exploring extensions to the MPI standard to better support PetaScale and ExaScale systems.

  14. PILOT-SCALE INVESTIGATION OF CLOSED-LOOP FLY ASH SLUICING. VOLUME 1. FINAL REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a pilot-scale demonstration of the technical feasibility of closed-loop operation of fly ash sluicing systems. Chemical species leached from the ash increase the dissolved solids concentration of recycled sluice water to a point where equipment scaling...

  15. Design and fabrication of polymer-concrete-lined pipe for testing in geothermal-energy processes. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kaeding, A.O.

    1981-12-01

    A specific polymer-concrete formulation was applied as a steel pipe liner in response to a need for durable, economical materials for use in contact with high temperature geothermal brine. Processes are described for centrifugally applying the liner to straight pipe, for casting the liner in pipe fittings, and for closure of field joints. Physical properties of the liner materials were measured. Compressive strengths of up to 165.8 MPa (24,045 psi) and splitting tensile strengths of 23.5 MPa (3408 psi) were measured at ambient temperature. Compressive strengths of 24 MPa (3490 psi) and splitting tensile strengths of 2.5 MPa (366 psi) were measured at about 150/sup 0/C (302/sup 0/F). A full-scale production plant is described which would be capable of producing about 950 m (3120 ft) of lined 305-mm-diam (12 in.) pipe per day. Capital cost of the plant is estimated to be about $8.6 million with a calculated return on investment of 15.4%. Cost of piping a geothermal plant with PC and PC-lined steel pipe is calculated to be $1.21 million, which compares favorably with a similar plant piped with alloy steel piping at a cost of $1.33 million. Life-cycle cost analysis indicates that the cost of PC-lined steel pipe would be 82% of that of carbon steel pipe over a 20-year plant operating life.

  16. Design and fabrication of nano-scale single crystal diamond cutting tool by focused ion beam (FIB) milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Seung-Yub

    2015-07-01

    Micro/nanoscale diamond cutting tools used in ultra-precision machining can be fabricated by precision grinding, but it is hard to fabricate a tool with a nanometric cutting edge and complex configurations. High-precision geometry accuracy and special shapes for microcutting tools with sharp edges can be achieved by FIB milling. Because the FIB milling method induces much smaller machining stress compared with conventional precision grinding methods. In this study, the FIB milling characteristics of single-crystal diamond were investigated, along with methods for decreasing the FIB-induced damage on diamond tools. Lift-off process method and Pt(Platinum) coating process method with FIB milling were investigated to reduce the damage layer on diamond substrate and quadrilateral-shaped single-crystal diamond cutting tool with cutting edge width under 500 nm were obtained.

  17. Fabrication and optical characterization of large scale membrane containing InP/AlGaInP quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Niederbracht, H; Hargart, F; Schwartz, M; Koroknay, E; Kessler, C A; Jetter, M; Michler, P

    2015-06-12

    Single-photon sources with a high extraction efficiency are a prerequisite for applications in quantum communication and quantum computation schemes. One promising approach is the fabrication of a quantum dot containing membrane structure in combination with a solid immersion lens and a metal mirror. We have fabricated an 80 nm thin semiconductor membrane with incorporated InP quantum dots in an AlGaInP double hetero barrier via complete substrate removal. In addition, a gold layer was deposited on one side of the membrane acting as a mirror. The optical characterization shows in detail that the unique properties of the quantum dots are preserved in the membrane structure. PMID:25994204

  18. Molecular-scale studies of single-channel membrane pores : final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, James Grant; Evans, Kervin O.; Burns, Alan Richard; Swartzentruber, Brian Shoemaker

    2003-10-01

    We present our research results on membrane pores. The study was divided into two primary sections. The first involved the formation of protein pores in free-standing lipid bilayer membranes. The second involved the fabrication via surface micromachining techniques and subsequent testing of solid-state nanopores using the same characterization apparatus and procedures as that used for the protein pores. We were successful in our ability to form leak-free lipid bilayers, to detect the formation of single protein pores, and to monitor the translocation dynamics of individual homogeneous 100 base strands of DNA. Differences in translocation dynamics were observed when the base was switched from adenine to cytosine. The solid state pores (2-5 nm estimated) were fabricated in thin silicon nitride membranes. Testing of the solid sate pores indicated comparable currents for the same size protein pore with excellent noise and sensitivity. However, there were no conditions under which DNA translocation was observed. After considerable effort, we reached the unproven conclusion that multiple (<1 nm) pores were formed in the nitride membrane, thus explaining both the current sensitivity and the lack of DNA translocation blockages.

  19. LDRD final report on nano-scale engineering of smart membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Loy, D.A.; Jamison, G.M.; Assink, R.A.

    1997-09-01

    A new approach to the fabrication of porous, amorphous inorganic membranes using organic pore templates was investigated. The pore templates were a new family of hybrid organic-inorganic monomers. As background for membrane work, the monomers were polymerized by sol-gel techniques to make crosslinked polymers. Molecular modeling was used to create computer simulations of the materials and provide insight into their composites, were then converted into porous silicas using low temperature oxygen plasma techniques. A select few of the monomers were copolymerized with silica monomers to form non-porous thin films on mesoporous substrates. The films were converted into porous silica thin films with thermal oxidations and the resulting membranes were tested for gas selectivities and flux.

  20. Efficiency scaling for railgun armatures. Final report, October 1987-September 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Thornhill, L.; Batteh, J.; Littrell, D.

    1988-12-01

    Results of a numerical study on three hypervelocity railgun-armature options are presented. Considered are the plasma, the hybrid, and the transitioning armatures. Several scaling studies presented illustrate the sensitivity of armature performance to variations in various railgun parameters. Armature performance scaling with projectile velocity, bore size (projectile mass), and current per unit rail height are all examined. An interesting conclusion is that armature efficiency tends to improve with increasing bore size. Also, results are presented from studies that determine how armature performance scales with uncertain parameters such as the ablation entrainment fraction, the skin coefficient, and the contact potential. These studies indicate which parameters have the greatest impact on armature performance and, therefore, need to be determined more accurately to predict railgun performance.

  1. Seismic decoupling of an explosion centered in a granite chimney rubble -- scaled experiment results. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, C.; Miller, S.; Florence, A.; Fogle, M.; Kilb, D.

    1991-12-01

    This report describes the small scale evaluation of the feasibility of significant decoupling by siting an explosion in granite rubble. The chimney characteristics scaled to laboratory dimensions were those of the PILE DRIVER event. The scaled charges were of 1 KT and 8KT in the PILE DRIVER chimney. The measure of the effect was the velocity field history in the granite outside the chimney volume with the chimney rubble and with no rubble. A number of chimney sizes and shapes were studied. The explosion process was modeled via two-din=mensional, finite-difference methods used for prediction of velocity histories at the Nevada Test Site. The result was that both the spectral shape and the magnitude of the transmitted shock wave were drastically altered. The chimney geometry was as important as the rubble characteristics.

  2. Test report for the trial burn of Dinoseb in a pilot-scale incinerator. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Oberacker, D.; Wool, M.; Villa, F.; Mason, H.

    1989-06-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has determined that the herbicide Dinoseb represents a significant human health hazard. EPA estimates that there are approximately 5 million gallons affected by this action. As part of a program by the EPA Office of Research and Development (ORD) to determine which technically viable disposal option is appropriate, pilot-scale test burns were made of a mixture of Dinoseb products at the John Zink Company Research Incineration Facility in Tulsa, Oklahoma. The mixture represented the various Dinoseb products to be destroyed. The rationale for doing the pilot-scale test was that specific performance data were needed to address, with confidence, any public or permitting questions that may arise in authorizing a full-scale incineration disposal operation. The test burns were successfully performed between February 18 and February 26, 1988. The report gives an overall summary of the test program.

  3. Design and fabrication of a compact chip-scale optical cross-connect enabled by photonic crystals for optical interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zablocki, Mathew Joseph

    As integrated circuits, such as microprocessors, are fabricated with higher yields and with increasing numbers of smaller and smaller transistors, the communication between discrete elements becomes as important as the elements themselves. The delays associated with signal distribution across the chip have become a limiting factor for processor speeds, and are primarily located within the global interconnect layers for intra-chip and inter-chip communication. Optical interconnects have the potential to relieve the restrictions set by the interconnect bottleneck by taking advantage of their reduced power demands for signal distribution and their lower propagation delays. The work within this dissertation discusses the design, fabrication and characterization of an ultra-compact photonic crystal optical switch for use within a transparent optical cross-connect (OXC). To reduce the size and power consumption of the switch, perturbations were made within the photonic crystal structure to achieve a degree of slow light, decreasing the group velocity of the propagating signals. Further, as a means to integrate the developed switch matrix to a microprocessor in order to serve as a chip's optical global interconnect, a process was developed to transfer the switch fabric to a new substrate as a silicon-nanomembrane (Si-NM). The developed transfer process allows the transfer and stacking of intricate photonic devices, such as the aforementioned switch matrix, to new material platforms and substrates that would be incompatible with typical complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor CMOS processing. The developed Si-NM processing along with the developed switch matrix for a transparent OXC are significant steps toward implementing an optical interconnect network on a chip.

  4. Micro/nano-scale fabrication of integrated polymer optical wire circuit arrays for optical printed circuit board (O-PCB) application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, El-Hang; Lee, Seung G.; Park, Se G.; Kim, Kyong H.; Kang, Jin K.; Chin, In J.; Kwon, Y. K.; Choi, Young W.

    2005-02-01

    We report on the results of our study on the micro/nano-scale design, fabrication and integration of waveguide arrays for optical printed circuit boards (O-PCBs) and VLSI micro/nano-photonic applications. The O-PCBs are designed to perform the functions of transporting, switching, routing and distributing optical signals on flat modular boards or substrates. We have assembled O-PCBs using optical waveguide arrays and circuits made of polymer materials and have examined information handling performances. We also designed power beam splitters and waveguide filters, using nano-scale photonic band-gap crystals, for VLSI photonic integration application. We discuss potential applications of polymer optical waveguide devices and arrays for O-PCB and VLSI micro/nano-photonics for computers, telecommunications, and transportation systems.

  5. Refinement of the Experiencing Scale as a Counseling Tool. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiesler, Donald J.

    The first study concerns the effects of level of clinical experience of judges on reliability and validity of Experiencing Scale (EXP) ratings. Inexperienced and experienced judges rated tape-segments from psychotherapy sessions. No differences existed between ratings. The second study focuses on the relationships of in-therapy patient…

  6. 77 FR 75978 - Utility Scale Wind Towers From the People's Republic of China: Final Affirmative Countervailing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-26

    ...The Department of Commerce (the Department) determines that countervailable subsidies are being provided to producers and exporters of utility scale wind towers (wind towers) from the People's Republic of China (the PRC). For information on the estimated subsidy rates, see the ``Suspension of Liquidation'' section of this...

  7. Fabrication of large-volume, low-cost ceramic lanthanum halide scintillators for gamma ray detection : final report for DHS/DNDO/TRDD project TA-01-SL01.

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, Timothy J.; Ottley, Leigh Anna M.; Yang, Pin; Chen, Ching-Fong; Sanchez, Margaret R.; Bell, Nelson Simmons

    2008-10-01

    This project uses advanced ceramic processes to fabricate large, optical-quality, polycrystalline lanthanum halide scintillators to replace small single crystals produced by the conventional Bridgman growth method. The new approach not only removes the size constraint imposed by the growth method, but also offers the potential advantages of both reducing manufacturing cost and increasing production rate. The project goal is to fabricate dense lanthanum halide ceramics with a preferred crystal orientation by applying texture engineering and solid-state conversion to reduce the thermal mechanical stress in the ceramic and minimize scintillation light scattering at grain boundaries. Ultimately, this method could deliver the sought-after high sensitivity and <3% energy resolution at 662 keV of lanthanum halide scintillators and unleash their full potential for advanced gamma ray detection, enabling rapid identification of radioactive materials in a variety of practical applications. This report documents processing details from powder synthesis, seed particle growth, to final densification and texture development of cerium doped lanthanum bromide (LaBr{sub 3}:Ce{sup +3}) ceramics. This investigation demonstrated that: (1) A rapid, flexible, cost efficient synthesis method of anhydrous lanthanum halides and their solid solutions was developed. Several batches of ultrafine LaBr{sub 3}:Ce{sup +3} powder, free of oxyhalide, were produced by a rigorously controlled process. (2) Micron size ({approx} 5 {micro}m), platelet shape LaBr{sub 3} seed particles of high purity can be synthesized by a vapor phase transport process. (3) High aspect-ratio seed particles can be effectively aligned in the shear direction in the ceramic matrix, using a rotational shear-forming process. (4) Small size, highly translucent LaBr{sub 3} (0.25-inch diameter, 0.08-inch thick) samples were successfully fabricated by the equal channel angular consolidation process. (5) Large size, high density

  8. Fast and robust hydrogen sensors based on discontinuous palladium films on polyimide, fabricated on a wafer scale.

    PubMed

    Kiefer, T; Villanueva, L G; Fargier, F; Favier, F; Brugger, J

    2010-12-17

    Fast hydrogen sensors based on discontinuous palladium (Pd) films on supporting polyimide layers, fabricated by a cost-efficient and full-wafer compatible process, are presented. The films, deposited by electron-beam evaporation with a nominal thickness of 1.5 nm, consist of isolated Pd islands that are separated by nanoscopic gaps. On hydrogenation, the volume expansion of Pd brings initially separated islands into contact which leads to the creation of new electrical pathways through the film. The supporting polyimide layer provides both sufficient elasticity for the Pd nanoclusters to expand on hydrogenation and a sufficiently high surface energy for good adhesion of both film and contacting electrodes. The novel order of the fabrication processes involves a dicing step prior to the Pd deposition and stencil lithography for the patterning of microelectrodes. This allows us to preserve the as-deposited film properties. The devices work at room temperature, show response times of a few seconds and have a low power consumption of some tens of nW. PMID:21098952

  9. An in-situ hard mask block copolymer approach for the fabrication of ordered, large scale, horizontally aligned, Si nanowire arrays on Si substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoshal, Tandra; Senthamaraikannan, Ramsankar; Shaw, Matthew T.; Holmes, Justin D.; Morris, Michael A.

    2014-03-01

    We report a simple technique to fabricate horizontal, uniform Si nanowire arrays with controlled orientation and density at spatially well defined locations on substrate based on insitu hard mask pattern formation approach by microphase separated polystyrene-b-poly(ethylene oxide) (PS-b-PEO) block copolymer (BCP) thin films. The methodology may be applicable to large scale production. Ordered microphase separated patterns of the BCP were defined by solvent annealing and the orientation was controlled by film thickness and annealing time. Films of PEO cylinders with parallel orientation (to the surface plane) were applied to create `frames' for the generation of inorganic oxide nanowire arrays. These PEO cylinders were subject to selective metal ion inclusion and subsequent processing was used to create iron oxide nanowire arrays. The oxide nanowires were isolated, of uniform diameter and their structure a mimic of the original BCP nanopatterns. The phase purity, crystallinity and thermal stability of the nanowires coupled to the ease of large scale production may make them useful in technological applications. Here, we demonstrate that the oxide nanowire arrays could be used as a resist mask to fabricate densely packed, identical ordered, good fidelity silicon nanowire arrays on the substrate. The techniques may have significant application in the manufacture of transistor circuitry.

  10. Large-scale fabrication of tower-like, flower-like, and tube-like ZnO arrays by a simple chemical solution route.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuo; Qian, Xue-Feng; Yin, Jie; Zhu, Zi-Kang

    2004-04-13

    Large-scale arrayed ZnO crystals with a series of novel morphologies, including tower-like, flower-like, and tube-like samples, have been successfully fabricated by a simple aqueous solution route. The morphology and orientation of the obtained ZnO crystal arrays can be conveniently tailored by changing the reactants and experimental conditions. For example, the tower-like ZnO crystal arrays were obtained in a reaction solution system including zinc salt, ammonia, ammonium salt, and thiourea, and the orientation of these tower-like crystals could be controlled by the contents of these reactants. Flower-like ZnO arrays were obtained at lower temperatures, and tube-like ZnO arrays were obtained by ultrasonic pretreatment of the reaction system. The growth mechanism of the tower-like and tube-like ZnO crystals was investigated by FESEM. The results show that tower-like crystals grow layer by layer, while tube-like crystals grow from active nanowires. Ultrasonic pretreatment is proved to be effective in promoting the formation of active nuclei, which have important effects on the formation of the tube-like ZnO crystals. In addition, large-scale arrays of these ZnO crystals can be successfully synthesized onto various substrates such as amorphous glass, crystalline quartz, and PET. This implies this chemical method has a wide application in the fabrication of nano-/microscale devices. PMID:15875880