Science.gov

Sample records for scale physical effects

  1. Planck scale effects in neutrino physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmedov, E. K.; Senjanovic, G.; Tao, Zhi-Jan; Berezhiani, Z. G.

    1992-08-01

    We study the phenomenology and cosmology of the Majoron (flavon) models of one inert neutrino and three active ones. We pay special attention to the possible (almost) conserved generalization of the Zeldovich-Konopinski-Mahmoud lepton charge. Using Planck scale physics effects, which provide the breaking of the lepton charge, we show how, in this picture, one can incorporate the solutions to some of the central issues in neutrino physics, such as the solar and atmospheric neutrino puzzles, dark matter, and a 17 keV neutrino. These gravitation effects induce tiny Majorana mass terms for neutrinos and considerable masses for flavons. The cosmological demand for the sufficiently fast decay of flavons implies a lower limit on the electron neutrino mass in the range of 0.1-1 eV.

  2. Planck scale effects in neutrino physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmedov, Eugeni Kh.; Berezhiani, Zurab G.; Senjanović, Goran; Tao, Zhijian

    1993-04-01

    We study the phenomenology and cosmology of the Majoron (flavon) models of three active and one inert neutrino paying special attention to the possible (almost) conserved generalization of the Zeldovich-Konopinski-Mahmoud lepton charge. Using Planck scale physics effects which provide the breaking of the lepton charge, we show how in this picture one can incorporate the solutions to some of the central issues in neutrino physics such as the solar and atmospheric neutrino puzzles and the dark matter problem with the possible existence of a heavy (1-10 keV) neutrino. These gravitational effects induce tiny Majorana mass terms for neutrinos and considerable masses for flavons. The cosmological demand for the sufficiently fast decay of flavons implies a lower limit on the electron-neutrino mass in the range of 0.1-1 eV.

  3. Can basin land use effects on physical characteristics of streams be determined at broad geographic scales?

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Robert M; Carlisle, Daren M; Meador, Michael R; Short, Terry M

    2007-07-01

    The environmental setting (e.g., climate, topography, geology) and land use affect stream physical characteristics singly and cumulatively. At broad geographic scales, we determined the importance of environmental setting and land use in explaining variation in stream physical characteristics. We hypothesized that as the spatial scale decreased from national to regional, land use would explain more of the variation in stream physical characteristics because environmental settings become more homogeneous. At a national scale, stepwise linear regression indicated that environmental setting was more important in explaining variability in stream physical characteristics. Although statistically discernible, the amount of variation explained by land use was not remarkable due to low partial correlations. At level II ecoregion spatial scales (southeastern USA plains, central USA plains, and a combination of the western Cordillera and the western interior basins and ranges), environmental setting variables were again more important predictors of stream physical characteristics, however, as the spatial scale decreased from national to regional, the portion of variability in stream physical characteristics explained by basin land use increased. Development of stream habitat indicators of land use will depend upon an understanding of relations between stream physical characteristics and environmental factors at multiple spatial scales. Smaller spatial scales will be necessary to reduce the confounding effects of variable environmental settings before the effects of land use can be reliably assessed. PMID:17106774

  4. Can basin land use effects on physical characteristics of streams be determined at broad geographic scales?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldstein, R.M.; Carlisle, D.M.; Meador, M.R.; Short, T.M.

    2007-01-01

    The environmental setting (e.g., climate, topography, geology) and land use affect stream physical characteristics singly and cumulatively. At broad geographic scales, we determined the importance of environmental setting and land use in explaining variation in stream physical characteristics. We hypothesized that as the spatial scale decreased from national to regional, land use would explain more of the variation in stream physical characteristics because environmental settings become more homogeneous. At a national scale, stepwise linear regression indicated that environmental setting was more important in explaining variability in stream physical characteristics. Although statistically discernible, the amount of variation explained by land use was not remarkable due to low partial correlations. At level II ecoregion spatial scales (southeastern USA plains, central USA plains, and a combination of the western Cordillera and the western interior basins and ranges), environmental setting variables were again more important predictors of stream physical characteristics, however, as the spatial scale decreased from national to regional, the portion of variability in stream physical characteristics explained by basin land use increased. Development of stream habitat indicators of land use will depend upon an understanding of relations between stream physical characteristics and environmental factors at multiple spatial scales. Smaller spatial scales will be necessary to reduce the confounding effects of variable environmental settings before the effects of land use can be reliably assessed. ?? Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2006.

  5. Upscaling Physics-based Models to Estimate Catchment Scale Effects of Localised Tree Planting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballard, C. E.; Bulygina, N.; McIntyre, N.; Wheater, H. S.

    2010-12-01

    Much of our knowledge about the changes in hydrology related to land use and land management is limited to the very small scale (e.g. changes in water retention properties, interception and runoff processes); however, we are generally most interested in the associated changes in flow regime at the catchment scale. A key methodological challenge is therefore how to upscale information about local scale changes. We present a model upscaling procedure that aims to quantify the changes in peak flows at multiple scales related to localised tree planting. The procedure divides the catchment into a number of hydrological response units, which are each classified based on soil types and land management. For each hydrological response unit, a physics-based model is developed, incorporating our understanding of hydrological processes and properties. The outputs from these physics-based models are used to train simpler “meta-models”, which are then incorporated into a semi-distributed catchment model. In this way, our understanding of local changes in physical properties can be incorporated into a more flexible and computationally efficient catchment scale conceptual model. This procedure previously performed well when supported by a multi-scale monitoring programme for a 12km2 catchment. The applicability of the procedure is now examined for a 260km2 catchment without supporting multi-scale monitoring. Without local data, physics-based models are developed a priori using information from the literature and qualitative field observations. We explore the significance of the uncertainties due to this lack of data and also uncertainties related to the upscaling procedure itself, particularly examining the identifiability of the predicted effects at multiple scales. Based on our findings we comment on the strengths and limitations of physics-based modelling and the upscaling procedure in terms of ability to predict catchment-scale impacts of local land management

  6. Advanced computations of multi-physics, multi-scale effects in beam dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Amundson, J.F.; Macridin, A.; Spentzouris, P.; Stern, E.G.; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    Current state-of-the-art beam dynamics simulations include multiple physical effects and multiple physical length and/or time scales. We present recent developments in Synergia2, an accelerator modeling framework designed for multi-physics, multi-scale simulations. We summarize recent several recent results in multi-physics beam dynamics, including simulations of three Fermilab accelerators: the Tevatron, the Main Injector and the Debuncher. Early accelerator simulations focused on single-particle dynamics. To a first approximation, the forces on the particles in an accelerator beam are dominated by the external fields due to magnets, RF cavities, etc., so the single-particle dynamics are the leading physical effects. Detailed simulations of accelerators must include collective effects such as the space-charge repulsion of the beam particles, the effects of wake fields in the beam pipe walls and beam-beam interactions in colliders. These simulations require the sort of massively parallel computers that have only become available in recent times. We give an overview of the accelerator framework Synergia2, which was designed to take advantage of the capabilities of modern computational resources and enable simulations of multiple physical effects. We also summarize some recent results utilizing Synergia2 and BeamBeam3d, a tool specialized for beam-beam simulations.

  7. Scale problem in wormhole physics

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J. E.; Lee, K.

    1989-07-03

    Wormhole physics from the quantum thoery of gravity coupled to the second-rank antisymmetric tensor or Goldstone-boson fields leads to an effective potential for these fields. The cosmological energy-density bound is shown to put an upper bound on the cosmological constant which wormhole physics can make zero. This upper bound, of order 10/sup 11/ GeV, is far smaller than the Planck scale and barely compatible with the possible cosmological constant arising from grand unified theories. In addition, the effect of wormholes on the axion for the strong /ital CP/ problem is discussed.

  8. Effect of rock fragments on soil physical properties at pore and field scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gargiulo, Laura; Mele, Giacomo; Coppola, Antonio; De Mascellis, Roberto; Di Matteo, Bruno; Terribile, Fabio; Basile, Angelo

    2016-04-01

    Many soils in Mediterranean area contain high amounts of rock fragments as a result of both natural soil forming processes and human activities. Coarse rock fragments have a controversial role in soils. They are often included as a limiting factor in most Land Evaluation and Land Capability schemes throughout the world, but they also protect against soil erosion and soil physical degradation. Some experiments have showed also that, because of the beneficial effect in reducing bulk density and increasing macroporosity in topsoils, field crushing of stones could be considered a better agricultural practice than removing stones from soils. Although many experimental studies have only focused on the effect of (superficial) rock fragments on hydrological properties, direct measurements using soil image analysis allowed to improve the knowledge of the mechanisms of pore formation due to the presence of rock fragments inside the soil profile. In this work, a lab experimental test with two different soils susceptible to compaction was performed. The soils were added with different concentrations of rock fragments and subjected to several wetting/drying cycles, in order to induce formation of soil structure; then hydrological measurement and soil image analysis were performed. The measured changes in soil pore system and hydro-dispersive properties have been following implemented in simulation models in order to predict the effect of such results at field scale on yields of different crops in variable climatic conditions. Therefore, the aim of this work was to evaluate the effect at different scales (pore vs sample vs field) of rock fragment addition on many processes combining hydrological measurements with soil image analysis and modelling. The obtained results showed the usefulness of the use of image analysis to enhance the parameterization of the hydrological models and allowed to observe the role of different soil types in affecting the effect of rock fragment

  9. Effects of pore-scale physics on uranium geochemistry in Hanford sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Qinhong; Ewing, Robert P.

    2013-11-25

    Overall, this work examines a key scientific issue, mass transfer limitations at the pore-scale, using both new instruments with high spatial resolution, and new conceptual and modeling paradigms. The complementary laboratory and numerical approaches connect pore-scale physics to macroscopic measurements, providing a previously elusive scale integration. This Exploratory research project produced five peer-reviewed journal publications and eleven scientific presentations. This work provides new scientific understanding, allowing the DOE to better incorporate coupled physical and chemical processes into decision making for environmental remediation and long-term stewardship.

  10. Space- and time-dependent scaling of numbers in mathematical structures: effects on physical and geometric quantities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benioff, Paul

    2016-03-01

    The relationship between the foundations of mathematics and physics is a topic of of much interest. This paper continues this exploration by examination of the effect of space- and time- dependent number scaling on theoretical descriptions of some physical and geometric quantities. Fiber bundles provide a good framework to introduce a space- and time- or space-time-dependent number scaling field. The effect of the scaling field on a few nonlocal physical and geometric quantities is described. The effect on gauge theories is to introduce a new complex scalar field into the derivatives appearing in Lagrangians. U(1) invariance of Lagrangian terms does not affect the real part of the scaling field. For this field, any mass is possible. The scaling field is also shown to affect quantum wave packets and path lengths, and geodesic equations even on flat space. Scalar fields described so far in physics are possible candidates for the scaling field. The lack of direct evidence for the field in physics restricts the scaling field in that the gradient of the field must be close to zero in a local region of cosmological space and time. There are no restrictions outside the region. It is also seen that the scaling field does not affect comparisons of computation or measurements outputs with one another. However, it does affect the assignment of numerical values to the outputs of computations or measurements. These are needed because theory predictions are in terms of numerical values.

  11. Effects of Land Use, Physical Habitat Type, and Stream Geomorphic Type at Multiple Spatial Scales on Fish Community Diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cianfrani, C. M.; Sullivan, S. P.; Hession, W. C.; Watzin, M. C.

    2006-05-01

    Twenty-five independent stream reaches in northwestern Vermont, USA spanning a range of geomorphic conditions were surveyed to determine the effects of land use and physical habitat on fish community diversity at multiple spatial scales including watershed, local riparian, and in-stream. Watershed-scale parameters were evaluated using a geographic information system (GIS) and the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) watershed modeling software. Riparian vegetation was surveyed and classified in the field. In-stream physical characteristics were assessed using rapid geomorphic and rapid habitat assessments. Detailed in-stream geomorphic surveys and habitat assessments were also completed to provide quantitative data for each site. In-stream physical habitat was classified as having either predominantly pool-riffle type or comprised of multiple channel types. Fish were sampled using a bag seine at three to four locations selected to represent major flow habitats. Three fish community diversity measures were calculated: 1) Species richness (S); Shannon-Weaver Index (H'); and Simpson's Index (1/D). Analysis of variance (ANOVA), principal components analysis (PCA), and multiple regression were used to assess the relative importance of and the relationships between and among land use/physical habitat type and fish community diversity. Watershed scale land use was found to be a significant predictor of fish community diversity. Further, fish community diversity was higher for all three measures in streams with multiple channel types as compared to predominantly pool-riffle streams. Our results suggest that sampling strategies for fish (and potentially other biota) that focus on homogeneous reaches may underestimate diversity. In order to address these issues, comprehensive watershed management and restoration/protection plans should include assessment at multiple scales from a geomorphological, watershed, and ecological perspective.

  12. Scale-free brain dynamics under physical and psychological distress: pre-treatment effects in women diagnosed with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Churchill, Nathan W; Cimprich, Bernadine; Askren, Mary K; Reuter-Lorenz, Patricia A; Jung, Mi Sook; Peltier, Scott; Berman, Marc G

    2015-03-01

    Stressful life events are related to negative outcomes, including physical and psychological manifestations of distress, and behavioral deficits. Patients diagnosed with breast cancer report impaired attention and working memory prior to adjuvant therapy, which may be induced by distress. In this article, we examine whether brain dynamics show systematic changes due to the distress associated with cancer diagnosis. We hypothesized that impaired working memory is associated with suppression of "long-memory" neuronal dynamics; we tested this by measuring scale-free ("fractal") brain dynamics, quantified by the Hurst exponent (H). Fractal scaling refers to signals that do not occur at a specific time-scale, possessing a spectral power curve P(f)∝ f(-β); they are "long-memory" processes, with significant autocorrelations. In a BOLD functional magnetic resonance imaging study, we scanned three groups during a working memory task: women scheduled to receive chemotherapy or radiotherapy and aged-matched controls. Surprisingly, patients' BOLD signal exhibited greater H with increasing intensity of anticipated treatment. However, an analysis of H and functional connectivity against self-reported measures of psychological distress (Worry, Anxiety, Depression) and physical distress (Fatigue, Sleep problems) revealed significant interactions. The modulation of (Worry, Anxiety) versus (Fatigue, Sleep Problems, Depression) showed the strongest effect, where higher worry and lower fatigue was related to reduced H in regions involved in visuospatial search, attention, and memory processing. This is also linked to decreased functional connectivity in these brain regions. Our results indicate that the distress associated with cancer diagnosis alters BOLD scaling, and H is a sensitive measure of the interaction between psychological versus physical distress. PMID:25388082

  13. Effect of Finite Computational Domain on Turbulence Scaling Law in Both Physical and Spectral Spaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Thomas Y.; Wu, Xiao-Hui; Chen, Shiyi; Zhou, Ye

    1998-01-01

    The well-known translation between the power law of energy spectrum and that of the correlation function or the second order structure function has been widely used in analyzing random data. Here, we show that the translation is valid only in proper scaling regimes. The regimes of valid translation are different for the correlation function and the structure function. Indeed, they do not overlap. Furthermore, in practice, the power laws exist only for a finite range of scales. We show that this finite range makes the translation inexact even in the proper scaling regime. The error depends on the scaling exponent. The current findings are applicable to data analysis in fluid turbulence and other stochastic systems.

  14. Physics at the Planck scale

    SciTech Connect

    Gaillard, M.K. California Univ., Berkeley, CA . Dept. of Physics)

    1990-12-06

    Effective supergravity theories suggested by superstrings can be explored to determine their potential for successfully describing both observed physics at zero temperature and an inflationary cosmology. An important ingredient in this study is the dynamics of gaugino condensation, which has been the subject of recent activity. 33 refs., 2 figs.

  15. Spatial-Scale Effects on Relative Importance of Physical Habitat Predictors of Stream Health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frimpong, Emmanuel A.; Sutton, Trent M.; Engel, Bernard A.; Simon, Thomas P.

    2005-12-01

    A common theme in recent landscape studies is the comparison of riparian and watershed land use as predictors of stream health. The objective of this study was to compare the performance of reach-scale habitat and remotely assessed watershed-scale habitat as predictors of stream health over varying spatial extents. Stream health was measured with scores on a fish index of biotic integrity (IBI) using data from 95 stream reaches in the Eastern Corn Belt Plain (ECBP) ecoregion of Indiana. Watersheds hierarchically nested within the ecoregion were used to regroup sampling locations to represent varying spatial extents. Reach habitat was represented by metrics of a qualitative habitat evaluation index, whereas watershed variables were represented by riparian forest, geomorphology, and hydrologic indices. The importance of reach- versus watershed-scale variables was measured by multiple regression model adjusted-R2 and best subset comparisons in the general linear statistical framework. Watershed models had adjusted-R2 ranging from 0.25 to 0.93 and reach models had adjusted-R2 ranging from 0.09 to 0.86. Better-fitting models were associated with smaller spatial extents. Watershed models explained about 15% more variation in IBI scores than reach models on average. Variety of surficial geology contributed to decline in model predictive power. Results should be interpreted bearing in mind that reach habitat was qualitatively measured and only fish assemblages were used to measure stream health. Riparian forest and length-slope (LS) factor were the most important watershed-scale variables and mostly positively correlated with IBI scores, whereas substrate and riffle-pool quality were the important reach-scale variables in the ECBP.

  16. Effect of a physical activity improvement program using the transtheoretical model at a small-scale company.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Atsuko; Nakiri, Makoto; Nagatomi, Kaori; Tsuji, Yoshiyasu; Hoshiko, Michiko; Yamaguchi, Yoshie; Muramoto, Junko; Ishitake, Tatsuya

    2007-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the potential use of the transtheoretical model (TTM) by clarifying the program's effects on workers at a small-scale company. Subjects were 22 male workers at a communication system company. They were divided into two physical activity improvement program groups, the TTM-based assistance group (TTM group, n=12) and the control group (n=10). During the study period each subject was asked to wear a calorie counter and to record daily exercise. Changes in number of steps per day and body weight were measured before, immediately after, and 1 month after the intervention ended. Stage of exercise behavior, health protective behavior, and self-efficacy were also examined by means of self-administered questionnaires. In the control group, the number of steps per day tended to increase immediately after the intervention and then decreased at 1 month after the program ended. In both groups, physical activity peaked during commuting and lunch hours. This peak persisted for 1 month after the intervention in the TTM group, but not in the control group. Moreover, the stage of exercise behavior tended to progress in the TTM group, whereas regression in the stage of exercise behavior was observed in the control group. In the control group, although the exercise self-efficacy score after intervention was higher than that before intervention, the health protective behavior score decreased at 1 month after the program ended. This study suggested that physical activity improvement programs based on TTM may be useful for workers at small-scale companies. However, further study of larger numbers of workers will be needed to confirm the validity and usefulness of these results. PMID:18332591

  17. On physical scales of dark matter halos

    SciTech Connect

    Zemp, Marcel

    2014-09-10

    It is common practice to describe formal size and mass scales of dark matter halos as spherical overdensities with respect to an evolving density threshold. Here, we critically investigate the evolutionary effects of several such commonly used definitions and compare them to the halo evolution within fixed physical scales as well as to the evolution of other intrinsic physical properties of dark matter halos. It is shown that, in general, the traditional way of characterizing sizes and masses of halos dramatically overpredicts the degree of evolution in the last 10 Gyr, especially for low-mass halos. This pseudo-evolution leads to the illusion of growth even though there are no major changes within fixed physical scales. Such formal size definitions also serve as proxies for the virialized region of a halo in the literature. In general, those spherical overdensity scales do not coincide with the virialized region. A physically more precise nomenclature would be to simply characterize them by their very definition instead of calling such formal size and mass definitions 'virial'. In general, we find a discrepancy between the evolution of the underlying physical structure of dark matter halos seen in cosmological structure formation simulations and pseudo-evolving formal virial quantities. We question the importance of the role of formal virial quantities currently ubiquitously used in descriptions, models, and relations that involve properties of dark matter structures. Concepts and relations based on pseudo-evolving formal virial quantities do not properly reflect the actual evolution of dark matter halos and lead to an inaccurate picture of the physical evolution of our universe.

  18. Overview of Icing Physics Relevant to Scaling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, David N.; Tsao, Jen-Ching

    2005-01-01

    An understanding of icing physics is required for the development of both scaling methods and ice-accretion prediction codes. This paper gives an overview of our present understanding of the important physical processes and the associated similarity parameters that determine the shape of Appendix C ice accretions. For many years it has been recognized that ice accretion processes depend on flow effects over the model, on droplet trajectories, on the rate of water collection and time of exposure, and, for glaze ice, on a heat balance. For scaling applications, equations describing these events have been based on analyses at the stagnation line of the model and have resulted in the identification of several non-dimensional similarity parameters. The parameters include the modified inertia parameter of the water drop, the accumulation parameter and the freezing fraction. Other parameters dealing with the leading edge heat balance have also been used for convenience. By equating scale expressions for these parameters to the values to be simulated a set of equations is produced which can be solved for the scale test conditions. Studies in the past few years have shown that at least one parameter in addition to those mentioned above is needed to describe surface-water effects, and some of the traditional parameters may not be as significant as once thought. Insight into the importance of each parameter, and the physical processes it represents, can be made by viewing whether ice shapes change, and the extent of the change, when each parameter is varied. Experimental evidence is presented to establish the importance of each of the traditionally used parameters and to identify the possible form of a new similarity parameter to be used for scaling.

  19. Effects of Physical Processes and Sampling Resolution on Fault Displacement Versus Length Scaling: The Case of the Cantarell Complex Oilfield, Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shunshan; Nieto-Samaniego, Angel F.; Murillo-Muñetón, Gustavo; Alaniz-Álvarez, Susana A.; Grajales-Nishimura, José M.; Velasquillo-Martinez, Luis G.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we first review some factors that may alter the fault D max /L ratio and scaling relationship. The three main physical processes are documented as follows: (1) The D max /L ratio increases in an individual segmented fault, whereas it decreases in a fault array consisting of two or more fault segments. This effect occurs at any scale during fault growth and in any type of rock. (2) Vertical restriction decreases the D max /L ratio along the fault strike due to mechanical layers. (3) The D max /L ratio increases or decreases due to fault reactivation depending on the type of reactivation. Thus, using data from the normal faults of the Cantarell oilfield in the southern Gulf of Mexico, we document that the displacement ( D max ) and length ( L) show a weak correlation of linear or power-law scaling, with exponents that are much less than 1 ( n ≈ 0.5). This scaling relation is due to the combination of the physical processes mentioned above, as well as sampling effects, such as technique resolution. These results indicate that sublinear scaling ( n ≈ 0.5) can occur as a result of more than one physical process during faulting in a studied area. In addition to the physical processes associated with brittle deformation in the studied area, the sampling resolution dramatically affects the exponents of the D max - L scaling.

  20. Effect of Home Exercise Program Performance in Patients with Osteoarthritis of the Knee or the Spine on the Visual Analog Scale after Discharge from Physical Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Hamilton; Onishi, Kentaro

    2012-01-01

    The aim of our study was to assess the effect of the frequency of home exercise program (HEP) performance on pain [10-point visual analog scale (VAS)] in patients with osteoarthritis of the spine or knee after more than 6 months discharge from physical therapy (PT). We performed a retrospective chart review of 48 adult patients with a clinical…

  1. Cosmological texture is incompatible with Planck-scale physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Richard; Hsu, Stephen D. H.; Kolb, Edward W.; Watkins, Richard; Widrow, Lawrence M.

    1992-01-01

    Nambu-Goldstone modes are sensitive to the effects of physics at energies comparable to the scale of spontaneous symmetry breaking. We show that as a consequence of this the global texture proposal for structure formation requires rather severe assumptions about the nature of physics at the Planck scale.

  2. Development of Physics Self-Efficacy Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çalişkan, Serap; Selçuk, Gamze S.; Erol, Mustafa

    2007-04-01

    In this article, we describe development of a Physics Self-Efficacy Scale (PSES) that is a self-administered measure to assess physics self-efficacy beliefs regarding one's ability to successfully perform physics tasks in physics classroom. The scale is initially composed of 56 items prepared following a brief scrutiny of relating literature on self-efficacy. It was initially administered 30 physics teacher candidates and was also examined by 6 experts of physics education, then ambiguous or incomprehensible 6 items were dismissed. This PSES was tested on 558 undergraduate students all completed fundamental physics courses. Cronbach's Alpha reliability coefficient of the PSES was calculated as 0.94. The final version of the PSES contained 30 items with 5 dimensions namely, 1. Self-efficacy towards solving physics problems, 2. Self-efficacy towards physics laboratory, 3. Self-efficacy towards learning physics, 4. Self-efficacy towards application of physics knowledge and 5. Self-efficacy towards memorizing physics knowledge.

  3. PRIMUS: The Effect of Physical Scale on the Luminosity Dependence of Galaxy Clustering via Cross-correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, Aaron D.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Skibba, Ramin A.; Blanton, Michael R.; Coil, Alison L.; Cool, Richard J.; Mendez, Alexander J.; Moustakas, John; Zhu, Guangtun

    2015-10-01

    We report small-scale clustering measurements from the PRIsm MUlti-object Survey (PRIMUS) spectroscopic redshift survey as a function of color and luminosity. We measure the real-space cross-correlations between 62,106 primary galaxies with PRIMUS redshifts and a tracer population of ∼545,000 photometric galaxies over redshifts from z = 0.2 to z = 1. We separately fit a power-law model in redshift and luminosity to each of three independent color-selected samples of galaxies. We report clustering amplitudes at fiducial values of z = 0.5 and L=1.5{L}*. The clustering of the red galaxies is ∼ 3 times as strong as that of the blue galaxies and ∼ 1.5 as strong as that of the green galaxies. We also find that the luminosity dependence of the clustering is strongly dependent on physical scale, with greater luminosity dependence being found between r=0.0625 {h}-1 {Mpc} and r=0.25 {h}-1 {Mpc}, compared to the r=0.5 {h}-1 {Mpc} to r=2 {h}-1 {Mpc} range. Moreover, over a range of two orders of magnitude in luminosity, a single power-law fit to the luminosity dependence is not sufficient to explain the increase in clustering at both the bright and faint ends at the smaller scales. We argue that luminosity-dependent clustering at small scales is a necessary component of galaxy-halo occupation models for blue, star-forming galaxies as well as for red, quenched galaxies.

  4. Effect of Repeated Sterilization Cycles on the Physical Properties of Scaling Instruments: A Scanning Electron Microscopy Study

    PubMed Central

    Porto, Alessandra Nogueira; Borges, Álvaro Henrique; Semenoff-Segundo, Alex; Raslan, Suzane A; Pedro, Fábio Luis Miranda; Jorge, Antônio Olavo Cardoso; Bandeca, Matheus Coelho

    2015-01-01

    Background: Repeated sterilizations cycles cause undesirable alterations in the material properties of the instruments, such as corrosion, alterations in the hardness of the metal and the loss of the cutting sharpness of the instrument. This research examined the effect of repeated dry heat sterilization and autoclaves cycles on carbon steel (CS) and stainless steel (SS) curettes during the scaling and root planning. Materials and Methods: A total of 77 Gracey curettes were used in this study. Of these, 35 were SS and 42 were CS curettes submitted in different process: Dry heat, autoclave, inhibition of corrosion and autoclave, scaling, root planning and dry heat, scaling, root planning, inhibition of corrosion and autoclave. The inhibition of corrosion used on the carbon curettes (prior to sterilization in the autoclave) was sodium nitrite at 2%. The curettes received 10 consecutive cycles of sterilization and after that the cutting edges were examined in the electronic microscope, at 60 and 100 magnification times. Results: The images were evaluated by three independent examiners, who compared the photographs of each group with the control group. Conclusion: The surface corrosion products and a deterioration of the edges were observed and the results showed that the SS curettes suffered little alteration with sterilization, scaling, root planning whereas the CS curettes were visibly affected by sterilization in the autoclave, but when the inhibition of corrosion was used prior to the sterilization, the oxidation was considerably reduced. PMID:26028893

  5. Physical scale experiments on torrential filter structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiari, Michael; Moser, Markus; Trojer, Martin; Hübl, Johannes

    2016-04-01

    In the framework of the INTERREG Project "SedAlp" physical scale model experiments are carried out in the hydraulic laboratory of the Institute of Mountain Risk Engineering at the University of Life Sciences in Vienna in order to optimize torrent protection structures. Two different types of check dams are investigated. A screen-dam with inclined vertical beams is compared with a beam-dam with horizontal beams. The experiments evaluate the variation of sediment transport of these structures including the influence of coarse woody debris. Therefore the distance between the steel elements can be adjusted to show their ability to filter sediment. The physical scale of the experiments is 1:30. All experimental runs are Froude scaled. Both dams are tested in elongated and pear-shaped sediment retention basins in order to investigate the shape effect of the deposition area. For a systematic comparison of the two check dams experiments with fluvial bedload transport are made. First a typical hydrograph for an extreme flood with unlimited sediment supply is modelled. A typical torrential sediment mixture with a wide grain-size distribution is fed by a conveyor belt according the transport capacity of the upstream reach. Then the deposition is scanned with a laser-scan device in order to analyse the deposition pattern and the deposited volume. Afterwards a flood with a lower reoccurrence period without sediment transport from upstream is modelled to investigate the ability of the protection structure for self-emptying. To investigate the influence of driftwood on the deposition behaviour experiments with logs are made. Different log diameters and lengths are added upstream the basin. The results show, that the deposition during the experiments was not controlled by sorting-effects at the location of the dam. The deposition always started from upstream, where the transport capacity was reduced due to the milder slope and the widening of the basin. No grain sorting effects

  6. Small-scale physics of the ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, D. R.

    1983-01-01

    Progress in research on the small-scale physics of the ocean is reviewed. The contribution of such research to the understanding of the large scales is addressed and compared for various depth ranges of the ocean. The traditional framework for discussing small-scale measurements and turbulence is outlined, and recent research in the area is reviewed, citing references. Evidence for the existence of salt fingering in oceanic mixing is discussed. Factors that might inhibit the growth of salt fingers are assessed, and the influence of differences between laboratory tank and ocean in studying the fingers is discussed. The role of salt fingers in creating intrusions is examined. Instruments and methods used to measure the smallest scales at which there is appreciable variation and the stability of the patch of ocean in which the small-scale motions take place are considered.

  7. The Effects of Visual Magnification and Physical Movement Scale on the Manipulation of a Tool with Indirect Vision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohan, Michael; McConnell, Daniel S.; Chaparro, Alex; Thompson, Shelby G.

    2010-01-01

    Modern tools often separate the visual and physical aspects of operation, requiring users to manipulate an instrument while viewing the results indirectly on a display. This can pose usability challenges particularly in applications, such as laparoscopic surgery, that require a high degree of movement precision. Magnification used to augment the…

  8. Perspective on TeV-scale physics

    SciTech Connect

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1989-02-01

    These lectures review theoretical motivations and experimental prospects for the study of TeV-scale physics. Three clues to the importance of TeV physics are discussed: implications of quantum corrections for the masses of a fourth generation quark-lepton family, the gauge hierarchy problem and known solutions, and implications of symmetry and unitarity for the symmetry-breaking sector of the electroweak gauge theory. The experimental prospects are reviewed with emphasis on the multi-TeV pp colliders that may be built in the 1990's. The topics include new phenomena that might occur - e.g., a fourth generation, heavy gauge bosons, composite structure, and supersymmetry - as well as the signals of the unknown SU(2)/sub L/ /times/ U(1)/sub Y/ breaking mechanism that must occur within the TeV domain. 96 refs., 21 figs.

  9. Physical-scale models of engineered log jams in rivers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stream restoration and river engineering projects are employing engineered log jams increasingly for stabilization and in-stream improvements. To further advance the design of these structures and their morphodynamic effects on corridors, the basis for physical-scale models of rivers with engineere...

  10. Effects of Model Resolution and Subgrid-Scale Physics on the Simulation of Daily Precipitation in the Continental United States

    SciTech Connect

    Duffy, P B; Iorio, J P; Govindasamy, B; Thompson, S L; Khairoutdinov, M; Randall, D

    2004-07-28

    We analyze simulations of the global climate performed at a range of spatial resolutions to assess the effects of horizontal spatial resolution on the ability to simulate precipitation in the continental United States. The model investigated is the CCM3 general circulation model. We also preliminarily assess the effect of replacing cloud and convective parameterizations in a coarse-resolution (T42) model with an embedded cloud-system resolving model (CSRM). We examine both spatial patterns of seasonal-mean precipitation and daily-timescale temporal variability of precipitation in the continental United States. For DJF and SON, high-resolution simulations produce spatial patterns of seasonal-mean precipitation that agree more closely with observed precipitation patterns than do results from the same model (CCM3) at coarse resolution. However, in JJA and MAM, there is little improvement in spatial patterns of seasonal-mean precipitation with increasing resolution, particularly in the Southeast. This is owed to the dominance of convective (i.e., parameterized) precipitation in these two seasons. We further find that higher-resolution simulations have more realistic daily precipitation statistics. In particular, the well-known tendency at coarse resolution to have too many days with weak precipitation and not enough intense precipitation is partially eliminated in higher-resolution simulations. However, even at the highest resolution examined here (T239), the simulated intensity of the mean and of high-percentile daily precipitation amounts is too low. This is especially true in the Southeast, where the most extreme events occur. A new GCM, in which a cloud-resolving model (CSRM) is embedded in each grid cell and replaces convective and stratiform cloud parameterizations, solves this problem, and actually produces too much precipitation in the form of extreme events. However, in contrast to high-resolution versions of CCM3, this model produces little improvement in

  11. Physical controls of soil moisture variability at multiple scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, R. B.; Mohanty, B.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding what factors drive soil hydrological processes at different scales and their variability is very critical to further our ability to model the various components of the hydrologic cycle more accurately. Soil moisture, and, by association, soil hydraulic parameters have been known to be a function of location, and the support scale at which they are measured. Recent increase in remote sensing platforms necessitates increased calibration/validation efforts of their soil moisture products with ground-based measurements. Such cal/val operations require some form of up- or down-scaling process. Understanding the factors that drive soil hydrological processes at different scales, and their variability, is very critical to minimize errors due to this step in the cal/val procedure. Existing literature provides a description of the different sources of soil moisture variability across a range of resolutions from point to continental scales, classified under four categories: soil texture and structure, topography, vegetation, and meteorological forcings. While it is accepted that a dynamic relationship exists between these physical controls and the soil hydraulic properties across spatial scales, the nature of the relationship is not very well understood. In order to formulate better scaling algorithms, it is first necessary to determine the form and amount of influence exerted by the controlling factors on the variability of the soil moisture or hydraulic parameters at each scale of interest. One method to understand the effect of the physical controls is to analyze the covariance or coherence of the physical controls with the soil hydraulic properties across multiple scales and different hydro-climates. Such a study, using wavelet analysis, is presented here. A variety of datasets from multiple platforms across the globe were employed in this study. The AMSR-E soil moisture product was used as the remotely sensed, coarse resolution dataset. Fine resolution

  12. Effective Physics Study Habits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zettili, Nouredine

    2011-04-01

    We discuss the methods of efficient study habits and how they can be used by students to help them improve learning physics. In particular, we deal with ideas pertaining to the most effective techniques needed to help students improve their physics study skills. These ideas were developed as part of Project IMPACTSEED (IMproving Physics And Chemistry Teaching in SEcondary Education), an outreach grant funded by the Alabama Commission on Higher Education. This project is motivated by a major pressing local need: A large number of high school physics teachers teach out of field. In the presentation, focus on topics such as the skills of how to develop long term memory, how to improve concentration power, how to take class notes, how to prepare for and take exams, how to study scientific subjects such as physics. We argue that the student who conscientiously uses the methods of efficient study habits will be able to achieve higher results than the student who does not; moreover, a student equipped with the proper study skills will spend much less time to learn a subject than a student who has no good study habits. The underlying issue here is not the quantity of time allocated to the study efforts by the student, but the efficiency and quality of actions. This work is supported by the Alabama Commission on Higher Education as part of IMPACTSEED grant.

  13. Physical naturalness and dynamical breaking of classical scale invariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heikinheimo, Matti; Racioppi, Antonio; Spethmann, Christian; Raidal, Martti; Tuominen, Kimmo

    2014-05-01

    We propose a model of a confining dark sector, dark technicolor, that communicates with the Standard Model (SM) through the Higgs portal. In this model electroweak (EW) symmetry breaking and dark matter (DM) share a common origin, and the EW scale is generated dynamically. Our motivation to suggest this model is the absence of evidence for new physics from recent Large Hadron Collider (LHC) data. Although the conclusion is far from certain at this point, this lack of evidence may suggest that no mechanism exists at the EW scale to stabilize the Higgs mass against radiative corrections from ultraviolet (UV) physics. The usual reaction to this puzzling situation is to conclude that the stabilizing new physics is either hidden from us by accident, or that it appears at energies that are currently inaccessible, such that nature is indeed fine-tuned. In order to re-examine the arguments that have led to this dichotomy, we review the concept of naturalness in effective field theories, discussing in particular the role of quadratic divergences in relation to different energy scales. This leads us to suggest classical scale invariance as a guideline for model building, implying that explicit mass scales are absent in the underlying theory.

  14. Scale effects in crystal plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padubidri Janardhanachar, Guruprasad

    The goal of this research work is to further the understanding of crystal plasticity, particularly at reduced structural and material length scales. Fundamental understanding of plasticity is central to various challenges facing design and manufacturing of materials for structural and electronic device applications. The development of microstructurally tailored advanced metallic materials with enhanced mechanical properties that can withstand extremes in stress, strain, and temperature, will aid in increasing the efficiency of power generating systems by allowing them to work at higher temperatures and pressures. High specific strength materials can lead to low fuel consumption in transport vehicles. Experiments have shown that enhanced mechanical properties can be obtained in materials by constraining their size, microstructure (e.g. grain size), or both for various applications. For the successful design of these materials, it is necessary to have a thorough understanding of the influence of different length scales and evolving microstructure on the overall behavior. In this study, distinction is made between the effect of structural and material length scale on the mechanical behavior of materials. A length scale associated with an underlying physical mechanism influencing the mechanical behavior can overlap with either structural length scales or material length scales. If it overlaps with structural length scales, then the material is said to be dimensionally constrained. On the other hand, if it overlaps with material length scales, for example grain size, then the material is said to be microstructurally constrained. The objectives of this research work are: (1) to investigate scale and size effects due to dimensional constraints; (2) to investigate size effects due to microstructural constraints; and (3) to develop a size dependent hardening model through coarse graining of dislocation dynamics. A discrete dislocation dynamics (DDD) framework where the

  15. Initiation and Detonation Physics on Millimeter Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Philllips, D F; Benterou, J J; May, C A

    2012-03-20

    The LLNL Detonation Science Project has a major interest in understanding the physics of detonation on a millimeter scale. This report summarizes the rate stick experiment results of two high explosives. The GO/NO-GO threshold between varying diameters of ultra-fine TATB (ufTATB) and LX-16 were recorded on an electronic streak camera and analyzed. This report summarizes the failure diameters of rate sticks for ufTATB and LX-16. Failure diameter for the ufTATB explosive, with densities at 1.80 g/cc, begin at 2.34 mm (not maintaining detonation velocity over the entire length of the rate stick). ufTATB rate sticks at the larger 3.18 mm diameter maintain a constant detonation velocity over the complete length. The PETN based and LLNL developed explosive, LX-16, with densities at 1.7 g/cc, shows detonation failure between 0.318 mm and 0.365 mm. Additional tests would be required to narrow this failure diameter further. Many of the tested rate sticks were machined using a femtosecond laser focused into a firing tank - in case of accidental detonation.

  16. Physics Meets Philosophy at the Planck Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callender, Craig; Huggett, Nick

    2001-04-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction Craig Callendar and Nick Huggett; Part I. Theories of Quantum Gravity and their Philosophical Dimensions: 2. Spacetime and the philosophical challenge of quantum gravity Jeremy Butterfield and Christopher Isham; 3. Naive quantum gravity Steven Weinstein; 4. Quantum spacetime: what do we know? Carlo Rovelli; Part II. Strings: 5. Reflections on the fate of spacetime Edward Witten; 6. A philosopher looks at string theory Robert Weingard; 7. Black holes, dumb holes, and entropy William G. Unruh; Part III. Topological Quantum Field Theory: 8. Higher-dimensional algebra and Planck scale physics John C. Baez; Part IV. Quantum Gravity and the Interpretation of General Relativity: 9. On general covariance and best matching Julian B. Barbour; 10. Pre-Socratic quantum gravity Gordon Belot and John Earman; 11. The origin of the spacetime metric: Bell's 'Lorentzian Pedagogy' and its significance in general relativity Harvey R. Brown and Oliver Pooley; Part IV. Quantum Gravity and the Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics: 12. Quantum spacetime without observers: ontological clarity and the conceptual foundations of quantum gravity Sheldon Goldstein and Stefan Teufel; 13. On gravity's role in quantum state reduction Roger Penrose; 14. Why the quantum must yield to gravity Joy Christian.

  17. Deep inelastic scaling in nuclear and particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    West, G.B.

    1988-01-01

    These lectures are intended to be a pedagogical introduction to some of the ideas and concepts concerning scaling phenomena which arise in nuclear and particle physics. Topics discussed are: classical scaling and dimensional analysis; non-relativistic treatment; dynamics and scaling; y-scaling; and relativistic treatment (QCD). 22 refs., 16 figs. (LSP)

  18. The physics of musical scales: Theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durfee, Dallin S.; Colton, John S.

    2015-10-01

    The theory of musical scales involves mathematical ratios, harmonic resonators, beats, and human perception and provides an interesting application of the physics of waves and sound. We first review the history and physics of musical scales, with an emphasis on four historically important scales: twelve-tone equal temperament, Pythagorean, quarter-comma meantone, and Ptolemaic just intonation. We then present an easy way for students and teachers to directly experience the qualities of different scales using MIDI synthesis.

  19. Reliability and Validity of the Physical Education Activities Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomason, Diane L.; Feng, Du

    2016-01-01

    Background: Measuring adolescent perceptions of physical education (PE) activities is necessary in understanding determinants of school PE activity participation. This study assessed reliability and validity of the Physical Education Activities Scale (PEAS), a 41-item visual analog scale measuring high school adolescent perceptions of school PE…

  20. Development and Validation of the Physics Anxiety Rating Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahin, Mehmet; Caliskan, Serap; Dilek, Ufuk

    2015-01-01

    This study reports the development and validation process for an instrument to measure university students' anxiety in physics courses. The development of the Physics Anxiety Rating Scale (PARS) included the following steps: Generation of scale items, content validation, construct validation, and reliability calculation. The results of construct…

  1. The effects of physical separtation treatment on the removal of uranium from contaminated soils at Fernald: A bench-scale study

    SciTech Connect

    Sadler, K.G.; Krstich, M.A.

    1994-12-31

    A bench-scale treatability study incorporating the use of physical separation techniques and chemical dispersants/extractants was conducted on uranium contaminated soils at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) site. The soils contained approximately 497 and 450 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg) of total uranium, respectively. Geotechnical characterization indicated that 77.4 and 74.6 percent of the soil was in the less that 50 micrometer ({mu}m) size fraction for the ID-A and ID-B soils, respectively. An initial characterization effort indicated that uranium was distributed among all particle size fractions. After each soil was dispersed in water, it was noted that the uranium concentrated in the sand and clay fractions for the ID-A soil (1028 and 1475 mg kg{sup -1}, respectively) and the clay fraction for ID-B soil (2710 mg kg{sup -1}). Four 1 millimolar (mM) sodium reagent solutions (sodium hydroxide, sodium carbonate, sodium bicarbonate, and a sodium citrate-bicarbonate-dithionite mixture) and potable water were evaluated for effectiveness in dispersing each soil into single grain separates and extracting total uranium from each of the resulting particle size fractions. Dilute sodium solutions were more effective than water in dispersing the soil. The use of dispersants, as compared to water, on the less than 2 mm size fraction causes a shift in the distribution of uranium out of the sand fraction and into the silt and clay fractions for ID-A soil and into the clay fraction for the ID-B soil. Attrition scrubbing tests were conducted on the less than 2 mm size fraction for the ID-A and ID-B soils using water and three alkaline extraction solutions, sodium pyrophosphate, sodium carbonate/bicarbonate, and ammonium carbonate/bicarbonate. There was little difference among the chemical extractants on their effectiveness in removing uranium from the greater than 53 {mu}m (sand) or less than 53 {mu}m (silt and clay) soil fraction.

  2. Conjecture on the physical implications of the scale anomaly

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Christopher T.; /Fermilab

    2005-10-01

    Murray Gell-Mann, after co-inventing QCD, recognized the interplay of the scale anomaly, the renormalization group, and the origin of the strong scale, {Lambda}{sub QCD}. I tell a story, then elaborate this concept, and for the sake of discussion, propose a conjecture that the physical world is scale invariant in the classical, {h_bar}, limit. This principle has implications for the dimensionality of space-time, the cosmological constant, the weak scale, and Planck scale.

  3. The Physical Properties and Effective Temperature Scale of O-Type Stars as a Function of Metallicity. III. More Results From the Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massey, Philip; Zangari, Amanda M.; Morrell, Nidia I.; Puls, Joachim; DeGioia-Eastwood, Kathleen; Bresolin, Fabio; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter

    2009-02-01

    In order to better determine the physical properties of hot, massive stars as a function of metallicity, we obtained very high signal-to-noise ratio optical spectra of 26 O and early B stars in the Magellanic Clouds. These allow accurate modeling even in cases where the He I λ4471 line has an equivalent width of only a few tens of m Å. The spectra were modeled with FASTWIND, with good fits obtained for 18 stars; the remainder show signatures of being binaries. We include stars in common to recent studies to investigate possible systematic differences. The "automatic" FASTWIND modeling method of Mokiem and collaborators produced temperatures 1100 K hotter on average, presumably due to the different emphasis given to various temperature-sensitive lines. More significant, however, is that the automatic method always produced a "best" result for each star, even ones we identify as composite (binaries). The temperatures found by the TLUSTY/CMFGEN modeling of Bouret, Heap, and collaborators yielded temperatures 1000 K cooler than ours, on average. Significant outliers were due either to real differences in the data (some of the Bouret/Heap data were contaminated by moonlight continua) or the fact that we could detect the He I line needed to better constrain the temperature. Our new data agree well with the effective temperature scale we previously presented. We confirm that the "Of" emission characteristics do not track luminosity classes in exactly the same manner as in Milky Way stars. We revisit the issue of the "mass discrepancy," finding that some of the stars in our sample do have spectroscopic masses that are significantly smaller than those derived from stellar evolutionary models. We do not find that the size of the mass discrepancy is simply related to either effective temperature or surface gravity. This paper is based on data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile, and also on observations made with the NASA

  4. Model of cosmology and particle physics at an intermediate scale

    SciTech Connect

    Bastero-Gil, M.; Di Clemente, V.; King, S. F.

    2005-05-15

    We propose a model of cosmology and particle physics in which all relevant scales arise in a natural way from an intermediate string scale. We are led to assign the string scale to the intermediate scale M{sub *}{approx}10{sup 13} GeV by four independent pieces of physics: electroweak symmetry breaking; the {mu} parameter; the axion scale; and the neutrino mass scale. The model involves hybrid inflation with the waterfall field N being responsible for generating the {mu} term, the right-handed neutrino mass scale, and the Peccei-Quinn symmetry breaking scale. The large scale structure of the Universe is generated by the lightest right-handed sneutrino playing the role of a coupled curvaton. We show that the correct curvature perturbations may be successfully generated providing the lightest right-handed neutrino is weakly coupled in the seesaw mechanism, consistent with sequential dominance.

  5. Cosmological bounds on TeV-scale physics and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afshordi, Niayesh; Nelson, Elliot

    2016-04-01

    We study the influence of the fluctuations of a Lorentz-invariant and conserved vacuum on cosmological metric perturbations, and show that they generically blow up in the IR. We compute this effect using the Källén-Lehmann spectral representation of stress correlators in generic quantum field theories, as well as the holographic bound on their entanglement entropy, both leading to an IR cutoff that scales as the fifth power of the highest UV scale (in Planck units). One may view this as analogous to the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, which is imposed on the phase space of gravitational theories by the Einstein constraint equations. The leading effect on cosmological observables comes from anisotropic vacuum stresses which imply: i) any extension of the standard model of particle physics can only have masses (or resonances) ≲24 TeV , and ii) perturbative quantum field theory or quantum gravity become strongly coupled beyond a UV scale of Λ ≲1 PeV . Such a low strong coupling scale is independently motivated by the Higgs hierarchy problem. This result, which we dub the cosmological nonconstant problem, can be viewed as an extension of the cosmological constant (CC) problem, demonstrating the nontrivial UV-IR coupling and (yet another) limitation of effective field theory in gravity. However, it is more severe than the old CC problem, as vacuum fluctuations cannot be tuned to cancel due to the positivity of spectral densities or entropy. We thus predict that future advances in cosmological observations and collider technology will sandwich from above and below, and eventually discover, new (nonperturbative) physics beyond the standard model within the TeV-PeV energy range.

  6. Small-scale physics of the ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, Douglas R.

    1987-01-01

    Observations and theoretical models of small-scale phenomena in the oceans are reviewed, with a focus on progress during the period 1983-1986. Topics examined include surface layers, equatorial turbulence, off-equator mixed layers, the scaling of mixing, turbulence concepts, laboratory results, internal waves and mixing, rings, the nature of the bottom layer, double diffusion and intrusions, salt fingers, and biological interactions. Also discussed are developments in instrumentation (fast sampling profilers with upward-profiling capability, deep profilers, ship-motion correction, horizontal samplers, small submersibles, submarines, towed packages, conductivity sensors, dissolved-oxygen sensors, and acoustic Doppler current profilers) and goals for future research.

  7. New physics at the TeV scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakdar, Shreyashi

    The Standard Model of particle physics is assumed to be a low-energy effective theory with new physics theoretically motivated to be around TeV scale. The thesis presents theories with new physics beyond the Standard Model in the TeV scale testable in the colliders. Work done in chapters 2, 3 and 5 in this thesis present some models incorporating different approaches of enlarging the Standard Model gauge group to a grand unified symmetry with each model presenting its unique signatures in the colliders. The study on leptoquarks gauge bosons in reference to TopSU(5) model in chapter 2 showed that their discovery mass range extends up to 1.5 TeV at 14 TeV LHC with luminosity of 100 fb--1. On the other hand, in chapter 3 we studied the collider phenomenology of TeV scale mirror fermions in Left-Right Mirror model finding that the reaches for the mirror quarks goes upto 750 GeV at the 14 TeV LHC with 300 fb--1 luminosity. In chapter 4 we have enlarged the bosonic symmetry to fermi-bose symmetry e.g. supersymmetry and have shown that SUSY with non-universalities in gaugino or scalar masses within high scale SUGRA set up can still be accessible at LHC with 14 TeV. In chapter 5, we performed a study in respect to the e+e-- collider and find that precise measurements of the higgs boson mass splittings up to ˜ 100 MeV may be possible with high luminosity in the International Linear Collider (ILC). In chapter 6 we have shown that the experimental data on neutrino masses and mixings are consistent with the proposed 4/5 parameter Dirac neutrino models yielding a solution for the neutrino masses with inverted mass hierarchy and large CP violating phase delta and thus can be tested experimentally. Chapter 7 of the thesis incorporates a warm dark matter candidate in context of two Higgs doublet model. The model has several testable consequences at colliders with the charged scalar and pseudoscalar being in few hundred GeV mass range. This thesis presents an endeavor to study

  8. ETHOS - An Effective Theory of Structure Formation: Dark matter physics as a possible explanation of the small-scale CDM problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogelsberger, Mark; Zavala, Jesús; Cyr-Racine, Francis-Yan; Pfrommer, Christoph; Bringmann, Torsten; Sigurdson, Kris

    2016-05-01

    We present the first simulations within an effective theory of structure formation (ETHOS), which includes the effect of interactions between dark matter and dark radiation on the linear initial power spectrum and dark matter self-interactions during non-linear structure formation. We simulate a Milky Way-like halo in four different dark matter models and the cold dark matter case. Our highest resolution simulation has a particle mass of 2.8× 10^4{ M_⊙} and a softening length of 72.4 pc. We demonstrate that all alternative models have only a negligible impact on large scale structure formation. On galactic scales, however, the models significantly affect the structure and abundance of subhaloes due to the combined effects of small scale primordial damping in the power spectrum and late time self-interactions. We derive an analytic mapping from the primordial damping scale in the power spectrum to the cutoff scale in the halo mass function and the kinetic decoupling temperature. We demonstrate that certain models within this extended effective framework that can alleviate the too-big-to-fail and missing satellite problems simultaneously, and possibly the core-cusp problem. The primordial power spectrum cutoff of our models naturally creates a diversity in the circular velocity profiles, which is larger than that found for cold dark matter simulations. We show that the parameter space of models can be constrained by contrasting model predictions to astrophysical observations. For example, some models may be challenged by the missing satellite problem if baryonic processes were to be included and even over-solve the too-big-to-fail problem; thus ruling them out.

  9. ETHOS - an effective theory of structure formation: dark matter physics as a possible explanation of the small-scale CDM problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogelsberger, Mark; Zavala, Jesús; Cyr-Racine, Francis-Yan; Pfrommer, Christoph; Bringmann, Torsten; Sigurdson, Kris

    2016-08-01

    We present the first simulations within an effective theory of structure formation (ETHOS), which includes the effect of interactions between dark matter and dark radiation on the linear initial power spectrum and dark matter self-interactions during non-linear structure formation. We simulate a Milky Way-like halo in four different dark matter models and the cold dark matter case. Our highest resolution simulation has a particle mass of 2.8 × 104 M⊙ and a softening length of 72.4 pc. We demonstrate that all alternative models have only a negligible impact on large-scale structure formation. On galactic scales, however, the models significantly affect the structure and abundance of subhaloes due to the combined effects of small-scale primordial damping in the power spectrum and late-time self-interactions. We derive an analytic mapping from the primordial damping scale in the power spectrum to the cutoff scale in the halo mass function and the kinetic decoupling temperature. We demonstrate that certain models within this extended effective framework that can alleviate the too-big-to-fail and missing satellite problems simultaneously, and possibly the core-cusp problem. The primordial power spectrum cutoff of our models naturally creates a diversity in the circular velocity profiles, which is larger than that found for cold dark matter simulations. We show that the parameter space of models can be constrained by contrasting model predictions to astrophysical observations. For example, some models may be challenged by the missing satellite problem if baryonic processes were to be included and even oversolve the too-big-to-fail problem; thus ruling them out.

  10. Psychometric Properties of the Commitment to Physical Activity Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeBate, Rita DiGioacchino; Huberty, Jennifer; Pettee, Kelley

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To assess psychometric properties of the Commitment to Physical Activity Scale (CPAS). Methods: Girls in third to fifth grades (n = 932) completed the CPAS before and after a physical activity intervention. Psychometric measures included internal consistency, factor analysis, and concurrent validity. Results: Three CPAS factors emerged:…

  11. Planck-scale physics and neutrino masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmedov, Evgenii Kh.; Berezhiani, Zurab G.; Senjanovic, Goran

    1992-11-01

    We discuss gravitationally induced masses and mass splittings of Majorana, Zeldovich-Konopinski-Mahmoud, and Dirac neutrinos. Among other implications, these effects can provide a solution of the solar neutrino puzzle. In particular, we show how this may work in the 17 keV neutrino picture.

  12. Scale dependence of effective media properties

    SciTech Connect

    Tidwell, V.C.; VonDoemming, J.D.; Martinez, K.

    1992-12-31

    For problems where media properties are measured at one scale and applied at another, scaling laws or models must be used in order to define effective properties at the scale of interest. The accuracy of such models will play a critical role in predicting flow and transport through the Yucca Mountain Test Site given the sensitivity of these calculations to the input property fields. Therefore, a research programhas been established to gain a fundamental understanding of how properties scale with the aim of developing and testing models that describe scaling behavior in a quantitative-manner. Scaling of constitutive rock properties is investigated through physical experimentation involving the collection of suites of gas permeability data measured over a range of discrete scales. Also, various physical characteristics of property heterogeneity and the means by which the heterogeneity is measured and described are systematically investigated to evaluate their influence on scaling behavior. This paper summarizes the approach that isbeing taken toward this goal and presents the results of a scoping study that was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of the proposed research.

  13. Scale Development for Perceived School Climate for Girls’ Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Birnbaum, Amanda S.; Evenson, Kelly R.; Motl, Robert W.; Dishman, Rod K.; Voorhees, Carolyn C.; Sallis, James F.; Elder, John P.; Dowda, Marsha

    2008-01-01

    Objectives To test an original scale assessing perceived school climate for girls’ physical activity in middle school girls. Methods Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and structural equation modeling (SEM). Results CFA retained 5 of 14 original items. A model with 2 correlated factors, perceptions about teachers’ and boys’ behaviors, respectively, fit the data well in both sixth and eighth graders. SEM detected a positive, significant direct association of the teacher factor, but not the boy factor, with girls’ self-reported physical activity. Conclusions School climate for girls’ physical activity is a measurable construct, and preliminary evidence suggests a relationship with physical activity. PMID:15899688

  14. TEACHING PHYSICS: Capillary effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Dragia; Petrova, Hristina

    2000-07-01

    We examine capillary tubes with a variable cross section, in which there is a column of fully wetting or fully non-wetting liquid. The direction in which the liquid moves when the tubes are placed horizontally is determined by means of Pascal's law. We promote the idea that the conical capillary tube is a hydraulic machine, whose two pistons are the liquid column's free surfaces, which have different radii. We propose a new way of demonstrating the described capillary effects by means of flat models of capillary tubes, constructed from glass plates. The demonstrations are presented in front of a large audience using an overhead projector.

  15. Polymer physics of chromosome large-scale 3D organisation

    PubMed Central

    Chiariello, Andrea M.; Annunziatella, Carlo; Bianco, Simona; Esposito, Andrea; Nicodemi, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomes have a complex architecture in the cell nucleus, which serves vital functional purposes, yet its structure and folding mechanisms remain still incompletely understood. Here we show that genome-wide chromatin architecture data, as mapped by Hi-C methods across mammalian cell types and chromosomes, are well described by classical scaling concepts of polymer physics, from the sub-Mb to chromosomal scales. Chromatin is a complex mixture of different regions, folded in the conformational classes predicted by polymer thermodynamics. The contact matrix of the Sox9 locus, a region linked to severe human congenital diseases, is derived with high accuracy in mESCs and its molecular determinants identified by the theory; Sox9 self-assembles hierarchically in higher-order domains, involving abundant many-body contacts. Our approach is also applied to the Bmp7 locus. Finally, the model predictions on the effects of mutations on folding are tested against available data on a deletion in the Xist locus. Our results can help progressing new diagnostic tools for diseases linked to chromatin misfolding. PMID:27405443

  16. Polymer physics of chromosome large-scale 3D organisation.

    PubMed

    Chiariello, Andrea M; Annunziatella, Carlo; Bianco, Simona; Esposito, Andrea; Nicodemi, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomes have a complex architecture in the cell nucleus, which serves vital functional purposes, yet its structure and folding mechanisms remain still incompletely understood. Here we show that genome-wide chromatin architecture data, as mapped by Hi-C methods across mammalian cell types and chromosomes, are well described by classical scaling concepts of polymer physics, from the sub-Mb to chromosomal scales. Chromatin is a complex mixture of different regions, folded in the conformational classes predicted by polymer thermodynamics. The contact matrix of the Sox9 locus, a region linked to severe human congenital diseases, is derived with high accuracy in mESCs and its molecular determinants identified by the theory; Sox9 self-assembles hierarchically in higher-order domains, involving abundant many-body contacts. Our approach is also applied to the Bmp7 locus. Finally, the model predictions on the effects of mutations on folding are tested against available data on a deletion in the Xist locus. Our results can help progressing new diagnostic tools for diseases linked to chromatin misfolding. PMID:27405443

  17. Polymer physics of chromosome large-scale 3D organisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiariello, Andrea M.; Annunziatella, Carlo; Bianco, Simona; Esposito, Andrea; Nicodemi, Mario

    2016-07-01

    Chromosomes have a complex architecture in the cell nucleus, which serves vital functional purposes, yet its structure and folding mechanisms remain still incompletely understood. Here we show that genome-wide chromatin architecture data, as mapped by Hi-C methods across mammalian cell types and chromosomes, are well described by classical scaling concepts of polymer physics, from the sub-Mb to chromosomal scales. Chromatin is a complex mixture of different regions, folded in the conformational classes predicted by polymer thermodynamics. The contact matrix of the Sox9 locus, a region linked to severe human congenital diseases, is derived with high accuracy in mESCs and its molecular determinants identified by the theory; Sox9 self-assembles hierarchically in higher-order domains, involving abundant many-body contacts. Our approach is also applied to the Bmp7 locus. Finally, the model predictions on the effects of mutations on folding are tested against available data on a deletion in the Xist locus. Our results can help progressing new diagnostic tools for diseases linked to chromatin misfolding.

  18. Scales and scaling in turbulent ocean sciences; physics-biology coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Francois

    2015-04-01

    Geophysical fields possess huge fluctuations over many spatial and temporal scales. In the ocean, such property at smaller scales is closely linked to marine turbulence. The velocity field is varying from large scales to the Kolmogorov scale (mm) and scalar fields from large scales to the Batchelor scale, which is often much smaller. As a consequence, it is not always simple to determine at which scale a process should be considered. The scale question is hence fundamental in marine sciences, especially when dealing with physics-biology coupling. For example, marine dynamical models have typically a grid size of hundred meters or more, which is more than 105 times larger than the smallest turbulence scales (Kolmogorov scale). Such scale is fine for the dynamics of a whale (around 100 m) but for a fish larvae (1 cm) or a copepod (1 mm) a description at smaller scales is needed, due to the nonlinear nature of turbulence. The same is verified also for biogeochemical fields such as passive and actives tracers (oxygen, fluorescence, nutrients, pH, turbidity, temperature, salinity...) In this framework, we will discuss the scale problem in turbulence modeling in the ocean, and the relation of Kolmogorov's and Batchelor's scales of turbulence in the ocean, with the size of marine animals. We will also consider scaling laws for organism-particle Reynolds numbers (from whales to bacteria), and possible scaling laws for organism's accelerations.

  19. Scaling Effect In Trade Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konar, M.; Lin, X.; Rushforth, R.; Ruddell, B. L.; Reimer, J.

    2015-12-01

    Scaling is an important issue in the physical sciences. Economic trade is increasingly of interest to the scientific community due to the natural resources (e.g. water, carbon, nutrients, etc.) embodied in traded commodities. Trade refers to the spatial and temporal redistribution of commodities, and is typically measured annually between countries. However, commodity exchange networks occur at many different scales, though data availability at finer temporal and spatial resolution is rare. Exchange networks may prove an important adaptation measure to cope with future climate and economic shocks. As such, it is essential to understand how commodity exchange networks scale, so that we can understand opportunities and roadblocks to the spatial and temporal redistribution of goods and services. To this end, we present an empirical analysis of trade systems across three spatial scales: global, sub-national in the United States, and county-scale in the United States. We compare and contrast the network properties, the self-sufficiency ratio, and performance of the gravity model of trade for these three exchange systems.

  20. 2D VARIABLY SATURATED FLOWS: PHYSICAL SCALING AND BAYESIAN ESTIMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A novel dimensionless formulation for water flow in two-dimensional variably saturated media is presented. It shows that scaling physical systems requires conservation of the ratio between capillary forces and gravity forces. A direct result of this finding is that for two phys...

  1. Scale Development for Perceived School Climate for Girls' Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birnbaum, Amanda S.; Evenson, Kelly R.; Motl, Robert W.; Dishman, Rod K.; Voorhees, Carolyn C.; Sallis, James F.; Elder, John P.; Dowda, Marsha

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To test an original scale assessing perceived school climate for girls' physical activity in middle school girls. Methods: Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and structural equation modeling (SEM). Results: CFA retained 5 of 14 original items. A model with 2 correlated factors, perceptions about teachers' and boys' behaviors,…

  2. The Basic Psychological Needs in Physical Education Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vlachopoulos, Symeon P.; Katartzi, Ermioni S.; Kontou, Maria G.

    2011-01-01

    The present study reported on the modification of the Basic Psychological Needs in Exercise Scale (Vlachopoulos & Michailidou, 2006) to assess students' psychological need fulfillment in elementary school, middle school, and high school compulsory physical education classes. Data were collected from 817 5th and 6th grade students, 862 middle…

  3. Development of the Communication and Physical Environment Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, J. David

    A study developed and tested a communication and physical environment scale (CAPES) that consisted of items formulated from previous theoretical and empirical research. Subjects, 52 workers in a warehouse and its offices, completed questionnaires about information dissemination in their organization, the quality of organizational relationships,…

  4. Reactor Physics Methods and Analysis Capabilities in SCALE

    SciTech Connect

    DeHart, Mark D; Bowman, Stephen M

    2011-01-01

    The TRITON sequence of the SCALE code system provides a powerful, robust, and rigorous approach for performing reactor physics analysis. This paper presents a detailed description of TRITON in terms of its key components used in reactor calculations. The ability to accurately predict the nuclide composition of depleted reactor fuel is important in a wide variety of applications. These applications include, but are not limited to, the design, licensing, and operation of commercial/research reactors and spent-fuel transport/storage systems. New complex design projects such as next-generation power reactors and space reactors require new high-fidelity physics methods, such as those available in SCALE/TRITON, that accurately represent the physics associated with both evolutionary and revolutionary reactor concepts as they depart from traditional and well-understood light water reactor designs.

  5. Reactor Physics Methods and Analysis Capabilities in SCALE

    SciTech Connect

    Mark D. DeHart; Stephen M. Bowman

    2011-05-01

    The TRITON sequence of the SCALE code system provides a powerful, robust, and rigorous approach for performing reactor physics analysis. This paper presents a detailed description of TRITON in terms of its key components used in reactor calculations. The ability to accurately predict the nuclide composition of depleted reactor fuel is important in a wide variety of applications. These applications include, but are not limited to, the design, licensing, and operation of commercial/research reactors and spent-fuel transport/storage systems. New complex design projects such as next-generation power reactors and space reactors require new high-fidelity physics methods, such as those available in SCALE/TRITON, that accurately represent the physics associated with both evolutionary and revolutionary reactor concepts as they depart from traditional and well-understood light water reactor designs.

  6. Physics of Multi-scale Convection In The Earth's Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korenaga, J.; Jordan, T. H.

    We investigate the physics of multi-scale convection in the Earth's mantle, character- ized by the coexistence of large-scale mantle circulation associated plate tectonics and small-scale sublithospheric convection. Several basic scaling laws are derived, using a series of 2-D numerical modeling and 3-D linear stability analyses, for the following three distinct phases of sublithospheric convection: (1) onset of convection, (2) lay- ered convection in the upper mantle, and (3) breakdown of layered convection. First, the onset of convection with temperature-dependent viscosity is studied with 2-D con- vection models. A robust scaling law for onset time is derived by a nonlinear scaling analysis based on the concept of the differential Rayleigh number. Next, the planform of sublithospheric convection is studied by a 3-D linear stability analysis of longitu- dinal rolls in the presence of vertical shear. Finally, the temporal and spatial evolu- tion of sublithospheric convection is studied by 2-D whole-mantle convection models with temperature- and depth-dependent viscosity and an endothermic phase transition. Scaling laws for the breakdown of layered convection as well as the strength of con- vection are derived as a function of viscosity layering, the phase buoyancy parameter, and the thermal Rayleigh number. All of these scaling laws are combined to delineate possible dynamic regimes beneath evolving lithosphere.

  7. A Goddard Multi-Scale Modeling System with Unified Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.K.; Anderson, D.; Atlas, R.; Chern, J.; Houser, P.; Hou, A.; Lang, S.; Lau, W.; Peters-Lidard, C.; Kakar, R.; Kumar, S.; Lapenta, W.; Li, X.; Matsui, T.; Rienecker, M.; Shen, B.W.; Shi, J.J.; Simpson, J.; Zeng, X.

    2008-01-01

    Numerical cloud resolving models (CRMs), which are based the non-hydrostatic equations of motion, have been extensively applied to cloud-scale and mesoscale processes during the past four decades. Recent GEWEX Cloud System Study (GCSS) model comparison projects have indicated that CRMs agree with observations in simulating various types of clouds and cloud systems from different geographic locations. Cloud resolving models now provide statistical information useful for developing more realistic physically based parameterizations for climate models and numerical weather prediction models. It is also expected that Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) and regional scale model can be run in grid size similar to cloud resolving model through nesting technique. Current and future NASA satellite programs can provide cloud, precipitation, aerosol and other data at very fine spatial and temporal scales. It requires a coupled global circulation model (GCM) and cloud-scale model (termed a szrper-parameterization or multi-scale modeling -framework, MMF) to use these satellite data to improve the understanding of the physical processes that are responsible for the variation in global and regional climate and hydrological systems. The use of a GCM will enable global coverage, and the use of a CRM will allow for better and more sophisticated physical parameterization. NASA satellite and field campaign can provide initial conditions as well as validation through utilizing the Earth Satellite simulators. At Goddard, we have developed a multi-scale modeling system with unified physics. The modeling system consists a coupled GCM-CRM (or MMF); a state-of-the-art weather research forecast model (WRF) and a cloud-resolving model (Goddard Cumulus Ensemble model). In these models, the same microphysical schemes (2ICE, several 3ICE), radiation (including explicitly calculated cloud optical properties), and surface models are applied. In addition, a comprehensive unified Earth Satellite

  8. Physically representative atomistic modeling of atomic-scale friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yalin

    Nanotribology is a research field to study friction, adhesion, wear and lubrication occurred between two sliding interfaces at nano scale. This study is motivated by the demanding need of miniaturization mechanical components in Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS), improvement of durability in magnetic storage system, and other industrial applications. Overcoming tribological failure and finding ways to control friction at small scale have become keys to commercialize MEMS with sliding components as well as to stimulate the technological innovation associated with the development of MEMS. In addition to the industrial applications, such research is also scientifically fascinating because it opens a door to understand macroscopic friction from the most bottom atomic level, and therefore serves as a bridge between science and engineering. This thesis focuses on solid/solid atomic friction and its associated energy dissipation through theoretical analysis, atomistic simulation, transition state theory, and close collaboration with experimentalists. Reduced-order models have many advantages for its simplification and capacity to simulating long-time event. We will apply Prandtl-Tomlinson models and their extensions to interpret dry atomic-scale friction. We begin with the fundamental equations and build on them step-by-step from the simple quasistatic one-spring, one-mass model for predicting transitions between friction regimes to the two-dimensional and multi-atom models for describing the effect of contact area. Theoretical analysis, numerical implementation, and predicted physical phenomena are all discussed. In the process, we demonstrate the significant potential for this approach to yield new fundamental understanding of atomic-scale friction. Atomistic modeling can never be overemphasized in the investigation of atomic friction, in which each single atom could play a significant role, but is hard to be captured experimentally. In atomic friction, the

  9. Extreme Scale Computing for First-Principles Plasma Physics Research

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Choogn-Seock

    2011-10-12

    World superpowers are in the middle of the “Computnik” race. US Department of Energy (and National Nuclear Security Administration) wishes to launch exascale computer systems into the scientific (and national security) world by 2018. The objective is to solve important scientific problems and to predict the outcomes using the most fundamental scientific laws, which would not be possible otherwise. Being chosen into the next “frontier” group can be of great benefit to a scientific discipline. An extreme scale computer system requires different types of algorithms and programming philosophy from those we have been accustomed to. Only a handful of scientific codes are blessed to be capable of scalable usage of today’s largest computers in operation at petascale (using more than 100,000 cores concurrently). Fortunately, a few magnetic fusion codes are competing well in this race using the “first principles” gyrokinetic equations.These codes are beginning to study the fusion plasma dynamics in full-scale realistic diverted device geometry in natural nonlinear multiscale, including the large scale neoclassical and small scale turbulence physics, but excluding some ultra fast dynamics. In this talk, most of the above mentioned topics will be introduced at executive level. Representative properties of the extreme scale computers, modern programming exercises to take advantage of them, and different philosophies in the data flows and analyses will be presented. Examples of the multi-scale multi-physics scientific discoveries made possible by solving the gyrokinetic equations on extreme scale computers will be described. Future directions into “virtual tokamak experiments” will also be discussed.

  10. Aspects of New Physics at the TeV Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Jiayin

    The Standard Model, despite its great success, is generally considered as an incomplete theory and various reasons suggest that new physics may appear around the TeV scale. The LHC discovered a Standard Model like Higgs boson at around 126 GeV, but has not observed any evidence of new physics yet. As the tension is increasing between the expectation of the TeV scale new physics and the lack of experimental discovery, it is helpful to consider new model building directions and new search strategies. In this thesis, we present a few studies on different aspects of new physics at the TeV scale. First, we present a composite Higgs model based on the top seesaw mechanism. We show that with an approximate U(3)L chiral symmetry, associated with a vector-like quark and the (t, b)L doublet, the lightest CP-even neutral state of the composite scalar sector is lighter than the top quark and can be identified as the newly discovered Higgs boson. Second, we present two studies of search strategies of the stop particle, with the first one focusing on the semi-leptonic channel and the second one focusing on the di-leptonic channel with compressed signal spectra. In both cases, we introduce new kinematic variables which can substantially improve the signal significance. We also present a mass measurement method at hadron colliders for a decay chain of two steps, which ends with a missing particle. We show that it is possible to extract all three invisible particle masses with reasonable accuracies, which was previously thought to be impossible. With the upgrade of the LHC and the possibilities of new larger colliders in the future, the search for new physics will continue on, and our studies can help.

  11. Microphysics in Multi-scale Modeling System with Unified Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2012-01-01

    Recently, a multi-scale modeling system with unified physics was developed at NASA Goddard. It consists of (1) a cloud-resolving model (Goddard Cumulus Ensemble model, GCE model), (2) a regional scale model (a NASA unified weather research and forecast, WRF), (3) a coupled CRM and global model (Goddard Multi-scale Modeling Framework, MMF), and (4) a land modeling system. The same microphysical processes, long and short wave radiative transfer and land processes and the explicit cloud-radiation, and cloud-land surface interactive processes are applied in this multi-scale modeling system. This modeling system has been coupled with a multi-satellite simulator to use NASA high-resolution satellite data to identify the strengths and weaknesses of cloud and precipitation processes simulated by the model. In this talk, a review of developments and applications of the multi-scale modeling system will be presented. In particular, the microphysics development and its performance for the multi-scale modeling system will be presented.

  12. Numerical anomalies mimicking physical effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menikoff, R.

    Numerical simulations of flows with shock waves typically use finite-difference shock-capturing algorithms. These algorithms give a shock a numerical width in order to generate the entropy increase that must occur across a shock wave. For algorithms in conservation form, steady-state shock waves are insensitive to the numerical dissipation because of the Hugoniot jump conditions. However, localized numerical errors occur when shock waves interact. Examples are the 'excess wall heating' in the Noh problem (shock reflected from rigid wall), errors when a shock impacts a material interface or an abrupt change in mesh spacing, and the start-up error from initializing a shock as a discontinuity. This class of anomalies can be explained by the entropy generation that occurs in the transient flow when a shock profile is formed or changed. The entropy error is localized spatially but under mesh refinement does not decrease in magnitude. Similar effects have been observed in shock tube experiments with partly dispersed shock waves. In this case, the shock has a physical width due to a relaxation process. An entropy anomaly from a transient shock interaction is inherent in the structure of the conservation equations for fluid flow. The anomaly can be expected to occur whenever heat conduction can be neglected and a shock wave has a non-zero width, whether the width is physical or numerical. Thus, the numerical anomaly from an artificial shock width mimics a real physical effect.

  13. New physics at the weak scale: axigluon models, scale invariance and naturalness, and interacting dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavares, Gustavo Marques

    The Standard Model of particle physics describes all known elementary particles and their interactions. Despite its great experimental success, we know that the Standard Model is not a complete description of Nature and therefore new phenomena should be observed at higher energies. In the coming years the Large Hadron Collider will test the Standard Model by colliding protons with center of mass energies of up to 14 TeV providing some of the most stringent tests on the Standard Model. Experimental searches for Dark Matter provide a complementary program to test physics at the weak scale. In the near future new experimental data coming from direct detection experiments, and from satellites and telescopes will drastically improve our sensitivity to weak scale dark matter. This could lead to the first direct observation of dark matter, and thus of physics beyond the Standard Model. In this thesis I propose different extensions of the Standard Model and discuss their experimental consequences. I first discuss models for Axigluons, which are spin one particles in the adjoint representation of the SU(3) color gauge group. These models were motivated by the measurement of higher than predicted forward-backward asymmetry in top quark pair production at the Tevatron. I study different scenarios for Axigluon models that can explain the Tevatron result and explore their signatures at the Large Hadron Collider. Second I discuss the implications of ultraviolet scale invariance for the Standard Model, which has been advocated as a solution to the hierarchy problem. I show that in order to solve the hierarchy problem with scale invariance, new physics is required not far from the weak scale. In the last part of this thesis I propose a new model for dark matter, in which dark matter is charged under a hidden non-Abelian gauge group. This leads to modifications in the sensitivity of the usual experimental searches for dark matter in addition to distinct signatures in the Cosmic

  14. Future large scale accelerator projects for particle physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksan, R.

    2013-12-01

    The discovery of a new particle, the properties of which are compatible with the expected Brout-Englert-Higgs scalar field in the Standard Model (SM), is the starting point of an intense program for studying its couplings. With this particle, all the components of the SM have now been unraveled. Yet, the existence of dark matter, baryon asymmetry of the Universe and neutrino mass call for new physics at an energy scale, which is not determined so far. Therefore, new large scale accelerators are needed to investigate these mysteries through ultra-high precision measurements and/or the exploration of higher energy frontiers. In the following, we discuss the various accelerator projects aimed at the achievement of the above objectives. The physics reach of these facilities will be briefly described as well as their main technical features and related challenges, highlighting the importance of accelerator R&D not only for the benefit of particle physics but also for other fields of research, and more generally for the society.

  15. Using Rasch modeling to re-evaluate three scales related to physical activity: enjoyment, perceived benefits and perceived barriers.

    PubMed

    Heesch, K C; Mâsse, L C; Dunn, A L

    2006-12-01

    Studies suggest that enjoyment, perceived benefits and perceived barriers may be important mediators of physical activity. However, the psychometric properties of these scales have not been assessed using Rasch modeling. The purpose of this study was to use Rasch modeling to evaluate the properties of three scales commonly used in physical activity studies: the Physical Activity Enjoyment Scale, the Benefits of Physical Activity Scale and the Barriers to Physical Activity Scale. The scales were administered to 378 healthy adults, aged 25-75 years (50% women, 62% Whites), at the baseline assessment for a lifestyle physical activity intervention trial. The ConQuest software was used to assess model fit, item difficulty, item functioning and standard error of measurement. For all scales, the partial credit model fit the data. Item content of one scale did not adequately cover all respondents. Response options of each scale were not targeting respondents appropriately, and standard error of measurement varied across the total score continuum of each scale. These findings indicate that each scale's effectiveness at detecting differences among individuals may be limited unless changes in scale content and response format are made. PMID:16849389

  16. Measuring Enjoyment of Physical Activity in Children: Validation of the Physical Activity Enjoyment Scale

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    This study sought to determine the reliability and validity of the Physical Activity Enjoyment Scale (PACES) in elementary school children. The sample consisted of 564 3rd grade students (M age = 8.72 ± .54; 268 male, 296 female) surveyed at the beginning of the fall semester. Results indicated that the PACES displayed good internal consistency and item-total correlations. Confirmatory factor analyses supported a unidimensional factor structure. Scores on the PACES were significantly correlated with task goal orientation (r = .65, p < .01), athletic competence (r = .23, p < .01), physical appearance (r = .20, p < .01), and self-reported physical activity (r = .16, p < .01). However, results of invariance analysis suggested the factor structure is variant across sex. The present findings suggest support for the validity of the PACES as a valid measure of enjoyment of physical activity in children; nevertheless, further research examining the invariance of the factor structure across sex is warranted. PMID:20209028

  17. Soil physical properties of agricultural systems in a large-scale study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A large-scale field study was performed to determine the effects of agricultural management systems on soil physical properties, including their spatial and temporal variations. Replicates were established in 1998 at the Center for Environmental Farming Systems, Goldsboro, North Carolina; replicates...

  18. Physical and computational scaling issues in lattice Boltzmann simulations of binary fluid mixtures.

    PubMed

    Cates, M E; Desplat, J-C; Stansell, P; Wagner, A J; Stratford, K; Adhikari, R; Pagonabarraga, I

    2005-08-15

    We describe some scaling issues that arise when using lattice Boltzmann (LB) methods to simulate binary fluid mixtures--both in the presence and absence of colloidal particles. Two types of scaling problem arise: physical and computational. Physical scaling concerns how to relate simulation parameters to those of the real world. To do this effectively requires careful physics, because (in common with other methods) LB cannot fully resolve the hierarchy of length, energy and time-scales that arise in typical flows of complex fluids. Care is needed in deciding what physics to resolve and what to leave unresolved, particularly when colloidal particles are present in one or both of two fluid phases. This influences steering of simulation parameters such as fluid viscosity and interfacial tension. When the physics is anisotropic (for example, in systems under shear) careful adaptation of the geometry of the simulation box may be needed; an example of this, relating to our study of the effect of colloidal particles on the Rayleigh-Plateau instability of a fluid cylinder, is described. The second and closely related set of scaling issues are computational in nature: how do you scale-up simulations to very large lattice sizes? The problem is acute for systems undergoing shear flow. Here one requires a set of blockwise co-moving frames to the fluid, each connected to the next by a Lees-Edwards like boundary condition. These matching planes lead to small numerical errors whose cumulative effects can become severe; strategies for minimizing such effects are discussed. PMID:16099757

  19. A Multi-Scale Modeling System with Unified Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2008-01-01

    Numerical cloud models, which are based the non-hydrostatic equations of motion, have been extensively applied to cloud-scale and mesoscale processes during the past four decades. Because cloud-scale dynamics are treated explicitly, uncertainties stemming from convection that have to be parameterized in (hydrostatic) large-scale models are obviated, or at least mitigated, in cloud models. Global models will use the non-hydrostatic framework when their horizontal resolution becomes about 10 km, the theoretical limit for the hydrostatic approximation. This juncture will be reached one to two decades from now. In recent years, exponentially increasing computer power has extended cloud-resolving-mode1 integrations from hours to months, the number of computational grid points from less than a thousand to close to ten million. Three-dimensional models are now more prevalent. Much attention is devoted to precipitating cloud systems where the crucial 1-km scales are resolved in horizontal domains as large as 10,000 km in two-dimensions, and 1,000 x 1,000 km2 in three-dimensions. Cloud resolving models now provide statistical information useful for developing more realistic physically based parameterizations for climate models and numerical weather prediction models. It is also expected that NWP and mesoscale model can be run in grid size similar to cloud resolving model through nesting technique.

  20. Role of the subgrid-scale physical processes in supermodelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, J.

    2011-12-01

    The basic ides of supermodelling is in overcoming deficits of existing models by combining them together to improve our ability of climate simulations and prediction. However, in order to exploit this method better, we have to pay special attention to the common defects of the current climate models. Representation of subgrid-scale physical processes is such a particular example. . The present talk presents the author's point of view on representation of subgrid-scale processes in the above general question in mind. The focus of the talk will be on interplay between traditional parameterizations and recently proposed superparameterization (also often called "multiscale modelling"), but it also covers the issues of downscaling as well as possibilities of introducing mesh-refinement approaches into the context of subgrid-scale modelling. The author's main perspective is that the subgrid-scale parameterization should not be considered as a distinguished approach in contrast to explicit (more direct) modelling, such as superparameterization, but a hierarchy of modelling approaches should be constructed by taking various intermediate approaches. The mass-flux convection parameterization is taken as an example in order to make this point. It will be shown that at the most basic level, the mass-flux parameterization is equivalent to a finite-volume numerical approach, though various additional approximations and hypotheses must be introduced in order to arrive at a classical mass-flux parameterization. At the mathematical level, the multiresolution analysis based on wavelet provides a basic source of inspirations for developing this general perspective. From this perspective, the issue of parameterization is considered as "compression" of a full explicit model in the same sense as the wavelet can be used for the image compression. This perspective also leads to a concept of compression of physics. Compression of cloud microphysics would be the most urgent issue

  1. Physical effects in cavitating flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plesset, M. S.

    1974-01-01

    The microscopic and macroscopic aspects of the physical effects of cavitating flows are discussed. The microscopic features are related to the properties of nuclei in liquids and to the moderate tensile strengths which are usually encountered in flows. The macroscopic features are concerned with the growth of vapor or gaseous cavities from a small initial size and with their eventual collapse. Mathematical models are developed to analyze the characteristics of: (1) tensile strength in liquids, (2) growth of vapor bubbles, and (3) collapse of vapor bubbles.

  2. Probing the scale of New Physics at the LHC: The example of Higgs data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fichet, Sylvain

    2014-07-01

    We present a technique to determine the scale of New Physics (NP) compatible with any set of data, relying on well-defined credibility intervals. Our approach relies on the statistical view of the effective field theory capturing New Physics at low energy. We introduce formally the notion of testable NP and show that it ensures integrability of the posterior distribution. We apply our method to the Standard Model Higgs sector in light of recent LHC data, considering two generic scenarios. In the scenario of democratic higher-dimensional operators generated at one-loop, we find the testable NP scale to lie within [10,260] TeV at 95% Bayesian credibility level. In the scenario of loop-suppressed field strength-Higgs operators, the testable NP scale is within [28,1200] TeV at 95% Bayesian credibility level. More specific UV models are necessary to allow lower values of the NP scale.

  3. Lattice physics capabilities of the SCALE code system using TRITON

    SciTech Connect

    DeHart, M. D.

    2006-07-01

    This paper describes ongoing calculations used to validate the TRITON depletion module in SCALE for light water reactor (LWR) fuel lattices. TRITON has been developed to provide improved resolution for lattice physics mixed-oxide fuel assemblies as programs to burn such fuel in the United States begin to come online. Results are provided for coupled TRITON/PARCS analyses of an LWR core in which TRITON was employed for generation of appropriately weighted few-group nodal cross-sectional sets for use in core-level calculations using PARCS. Additional results are provided for code-to-code comparisons for TRITON and a suite of other depletion packages in the modeling of a conceptual next-generation boiling water reactor fuel assembly design. Results indicate that the set of SCALE functional modules used within TRITON provide an accurate means for lattice physics calculations. Because the transport solution within TRITON provides a generalized-geometry capability, this capability is extensible to a wide variety of non-traditional and advanced fuel assembly designs. (authors)

  4. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, Richard A.; Wasserman, Harvey

    2010-11-24

    The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the leading scientific computing facility for the Department of Energy's Office of Science, providing high-performance computing (HPC) resources to more than 3,000 researchers working on about 400 projects. NERSC provides large-scale computing resources and, crucially, the support and expertise needed for scientists to make effective use of them. In November 2009, NERSC, DOE's Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR), and DOE's Office of High Energy Physics (HEP) held a workshop to characterize the HPC resources needed at NERSC to support HEP research through the next three to five years. The effort is part of NERSC's legacy of anticipating users needs and deploying resources to meet those demands. The workshop revealed several key points, in addition to achieving its goal of collecting and characterizing computing requirements. The chief findings: (1) Science teams need access to a significant increase in computational resources to meet their research goals; (2) Research teams need to be able to read, write, transfer, store online, archive, analyze, and share huge volumes of data; (3) Science teams need guidance and support to implement their codes on future architectures; and (4) Projects need predictable, rapid turnaround of their computational jobs to meet mission-critical time constraints. This report expands upon these key points and includes others. It also presents a number of case studies as representative of the research conducted within HEP. Workshop participants were asked to codify their requirements in this case study format, summarizing their science goals, methods of solution, current and three-to-five year computing requirements, and software and support needs. Participants were also asked to describe their strategy for computing in the highly parallel, multi-core environment that is expected to dominate HPC architectures over the next few years. The report includes

  5. A Goddard Multi-Scale Modeling System with Unified Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2008-01-01

    A multi-scale modeling system with unified physics has been developed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The system consists of an MMF, the coupled NASA Goddard finite-volume GCM (fvGCM) and Goddard Cumulus Ensemble model (GCE, a CRM); the state-of-the-art Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) and the stand alone GCE. These models can share the same microphysical schemes, radiation (including explicitly calculated cloud optical properties), and surface models that have been developed, improved and tested for different environments. The following is presented in this report: (1) a brief review of the GCE model and its applications on the impact of aerosols on deep precipitation processes, (2) the Goddard MMF and the major difference between two existing MMFs (CSU MMF and Goddard MMF), and preliminary results (the comparison with traditional GCMs), and (3) a discussion on the Goddard WRF version (its developments and applications).

  6. A Goddard Multi-Scale Modeling System with Unified Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2010-01-01

    A multi-scale modeling system with unified physics has been developed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The system consists of an MMF, the coupled NASA Goddard finite-volume GCM (fvGCM) and Goddard Cumulus Ensemble model (GCE, a CRM); the state-of-the-art Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) and the stand alone GCE. These models can share the same microphysical schemes, radiation (including explicitly calculated cloud optical properties), and surface models that have been developed, improved and tested for different environments. In this talk, I will present: (1) A brief review on GCE model and its applications on the impact of the aerosol on deep precipitation processes, (2) The Goddard MMF and the major difference between two existing MMFs (CSU MMF and Goddard MMF), and preliminary results (the comparison with traditional GCMs), and (3) A discussion on the Goddard WRF version (its developments and applications). We are also performing the inline tracer calculation to comprehend the physical processes (i.e., boundary layer and each quadrant in the boundary layer) related to the development and structure of hurricanes and mesoscale convective systems. In addition, high - resolution (spatial. 2km, and temporal, I minute) visualization showing the model results will be presented.

  7. Physical Modeling of Scaled Water Distribution System Networks.

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hern, Timothy J.; Hammond, Glenn Edward; Orear, Leslie ,; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart G.; Paul Molina; Ross Johnson

    2005-10-01

    Threats to water distribution systems include release of contaminants and Denial of Service (DoS) attacks. A better understanding, and validated computational models, of the flow in water distribution systems would enable determination of sensor placement in real water distribution networks, allow source identification, and guide mitigation/minimization efforts. Validation data are needed to evaluate numerical models of network operations. Some data can be acquired in real-world tests, but these are limited by 1) unknown demand, 2) lack of repeatability, 3) too many sources of uncertainty (demand, friction factors, etc.), and 4) expense. In addition, real-world tests have limited numbers of network access points. A scale-model water distribution system was fabricated, and validation data were acquired over a range of flow (demand) conditions. Standard operating variables included system layout, demand at various nodes in the system, and pressure drop across various pipe sections. In addition, the location of contaminant (salt or dye) introduction was varied. Measurements of pressure, flowrate, and concentration at a large number of points, and overall visualization of dye transport through the flow network were completed. Scale-up issues that that were incorporated in the experiment design include Reynolds number, pressure drop across nodes, and pipe friction and roughness. The scale was chosen to be 20:1, so the 10 inch main was modeled with a 0.5 inch pipe in the physical model. Controlled validation tracer tests were run to provide validation to flow and transport models, especially of the degree of mixing at pipe junctions. Results of the pipe mixing experiments showed large deviations from predicted behavior and these have a large impact on standard network operations models.3

  8. Calcium carbonate scale control, effect of material and inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Macadam, J; Parsons, S A

    2004-01-01

    This paper focuses on developing a reproducible method for reducing calcium carbonate scale formation on heated surfaces where scaling can cause serious problems. It is known that calcium carbonate precipitation is sensitive to impurity ions, such as iron and zinc, even at trace concentration levels. In this paper two sets of experiments are reported. The first experiments were undertaken to investigate the effect of zinc, copper and iron dosing on CaCO3 nucleation and precipitation. Results from the experiments showed that the most effective inhibitor of CaCO3 precipitation was zinc and the effect was linked to dose levels and temperature. Copper and iron had little effect on precipitation in the dose range investigated. The second trial was undertaken to translate the precipitation data to scale formation. These tests were undertaken at 70 degrees C. 5 mg x L(-1) zinc dose reduced the scale formation by 35%. The effect of iron on calcium carbonate scaling rate was not significant. The physical nature of the material on which the scale is formed also influences the scaling. The scaling experiment was also used to investigate the effect of different surface material (stainless steel, copper and aluminium) on CaCO3 scale formation. Copper surface scaled the most. PMID:14982176

  9. Quality physical education: a commentary on effective physical education teaching.

    PubMed

    Dyson, Ben

    2014-06-01

    In my commentary in response to the 3 articles (McKenzie & Lounsbery, 2013; Rink, 2013; Ward, 2013), I focus on 3 areas: (a) content knowledge, (b) a holistic approach to physical education, and (c) policy impact. I use the term quality teaching rather than "teacher effectiveness." Quality teaching is a term with the potential to move our attention beyond a focus merely on issues of effectiveness relating to the achievement of prespecified objectives. I agree with Ward that teacher content knowledge is limited in physical education, and I argue that if the student does not have a connection to or relationship with the content, this will diminish their learning gains. I also argue for a more holistic approach to physical education coming from a broader conception. Physical educators who teach the whole child advocate for a plethora of physical activity, skills, knowledge, and positive attitudes that foster healthy and active playful lifestyles. Play is a valuable educational experience. I also endorse viewing assessment from different perspectives and discuss assessment through a social-critical political lens. The 3 articles also have implications for policy. Physical education is much broader than just physical activity, and we harm the future potential of our field if we adopt a narrow agenda. Looking to the future, I propose that we broaden the kinds of research that we value, support, and appreciate in our field. PMID:25098010

  10. The Physical Character of Small-Scale Interstellar Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauroesch, James T.

    2005-01-01

    The primary objective of this program was to obtain FUSE observations of the multiple interstellar absorption lines of H2 toward the members of 3 resolvable binary/multiple star systems to explore the physical conditions in known interstellar small-scale structures. Each of the selected systems was meant to address a different aspect of the models for the origin of these structures: 1) The stars HD 32039/40 were meant to probe a temporally varying component which probed a cloud with an inferred size of tens to a few hundreds of AU. The goal was to see if there was any significant H2 associated with this component; 2) The star HD 36408B and its companion HD 36408A (observed as part of FUSE GTO program P119) show significant spatial and temporal (proper motion induced) Na I column variations in a strong, relatively isolated component, as well as a relatively simple component structure. The key goal here was to identify any differences in H2 or C I excitation between the sightlines, and to measure the physical conditions (primarily density and temperature) in the temporally varying component; 3) The stars HD 206267C and HD 206267D are highly reddened sightlines which showed significant variations in K I and molecular absorption lines in multiple velocity components. Coupled with FUSE GTO observations of HD 206267A (program P116), the goal was to study the variations in H2 along sightlines which are significantly more distant, with larger separations, and with greater extinctions than the other selected binary systems.

  11. The Physical Origin of Galaxy Morphologies and Scaling Laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinmetz, Matthias; Navarro, Julio F.

    2002-01-01

    We propose a numerical study designed to interpret the origin and evolution of galaxy properties revealed by space- and ground-based imaging and spectroscopical surveys. Our aim is to unravel the physical processes responsible for the development of different galaxy morphologies and for the establishment of scaling laws such as the Tully-Fisher relation for spirals and the Fundamental Plane of ellipticals. In particular, we plan to address the following major topics: (1) The morphology and observability of protogalaxies, and in particular the relationship between primordial galaxies and the z approximately 3 'Ly-break' systems identified in the Hubble Deep Field and in ground-based searches; (2) The origin of the disk and spheroidal components in galaxies, the timing and mode of their assembly, the corresponding evolution in galaxy morphologies and its sensitivity to cosmological parameters; (3) The origin and redshift evolution of the scaling laws that link the mass, luminosity size, stellar content, and metal abundances of galaxies of different morphological types. This investigation will use state-of-the-art N-body/gasdynamical codes to provide a spatially resolved description of the galaxy formation process in hierarchically clustering universes. Coupled with population synthesis techniques. our models can be used to provide synthetic 'observations' that can be compared directly with observations of galaxies both nearby and at cosmologically significant distances. This study will thus provide insight into the nature of protogalaxies and into the formation process of galaxies like our own Milky Way. It will also help us to assess the cosmological significance of these observations within the context of hierarchical theories of galaxy formation and will supply a theoretical context within which current and future observations can be interpreted.

  12. The Assessment of Denial and Physical Complaints: The Validity of the Hy Scale and Associated MMPI Signs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, Robert E.; O'Malley, W. Brian

    1986-01-01

    Using samples of psychiatric, medical, and chronic pain patients, the effectiveness of the Hysteria scale and of various combinations of Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory scales as predictors of the simultaneous occurrence of two characteristics was evaluated: denial of psychological problems and admission of physical problems. The value…

  13. Psychosocial and Physical Effects of Adjuvant Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Hislop, Thomas Gregory; Elwood, J. Mark; Waxler-Morrison, Nancy; Ragaz, Joseph; Skippen, Diane Hazel; Turner, I.D.

    1991-01-01

    Breast cancer patients younger than 55 completed a questionnaire on psychosocial factors and physical side effects shortly after diagnosis and 9 to 15 months after diagnosis. Those who had used adjuvant chemotherapy were more likely than those who had not to report physical side effects; there was little difference in psychosocial factors. Recent users were more likely than ex-users to report physical side effects, difficulties with domestic chores, and improvement in psychosocial factors. PMID:21229020

  14. A Goddard Multi-Scale Modeling System with Unified Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2010-01-01

    A multi-scale modeling system with unified physics has been developed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The system consists of an MMF, the coupled NASA Goddard finite-volume GCM (fvGCM) and Goddard Cumulus Ensemble model (GCE, a CRM); the state-of-the-art Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) and the stand alone GCE. These models can share the same microphysical schemes, radiation (including explicitly calculated cloud optical properties), and surface models that have been developed, improved and tested for different environments. In this talk, I will present: (1) A brief review on GCE model and its applications on the impact of the aerosol on deep precipitation processes, (2) The Goddard MMF and the major difference between two existing MMFs (CSU MMF and Goddard MMF), and preliminary results (the comparison with traditional GCMs), and (3) A discussion on the Goddard WRF version (its developments and applications). We are also performing the inline tracer calculation to comprehend the ph ysical processes (i.e., boundary layer and each quadrant in the boundary layer) related to the development and structure of hurricanes and mesoscale convective systems.

  15. Physical essence of the multibody contact-sliding at atomic scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xuesong

    2014-01-01

    Investigation the multibody contact-sliding occurred at atomic discrete contact spot will play an important role in determine the origin of tribology behavior and evaluates the micro-mechanical property of nanomaterials and thus optimizing the design of surface texture. This paper carries out large scale parallel molecular dynamics simulation on contact-sliding at atomic scale to uncover the special physical essence. The research shows that some kind of force field exists between nanodot pair and the interaction can be expressed by the linear combination of exponential function while the effective interaction distance limited in 1 angstrom for nanodot with several tens of nanometer diameter. The variation tendency about the interaction force between nanodot array is almost the same between nanodot pairs and thus the interaction between two nanodot array can be characterized by parallel mechanical spring. Multibody effect which dominates the interaction between atoms or molecules will gradually diminish with the increasing of length scales.

  16. Synthesizing in-stream structure design guidelines from small-scale and field-scale physical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozarek, J. L.; Hill, C.; Plott, J.; Diplas, P.; Sotiropoulos, F.

    2011-12-01

    Rock vanes, cross vanes, bendway weirs and other similar flow control structures have been studied as part of a multifaceted research program to improve quantitative design guidelines for frequently used stream restoration structures. These structures are typically used in stream restoration projects with the intent of protecting unstable streambanks, preventing undesired lateral migration, or improving aquatic habitat. Despite their frequent use, extensive research-based quantitative design guidelines do not readily exist. As part of this project, a series of small-scale physical model experiments were completed in the St. Anthony Falls Laboratory (SAFL) Tilting Bed Flume measuring 3D flow velocities and sediment scour patterns downstream of stream restoration flow control structures. On a larger scale, similar experiments were completed in the SAFL Outdoor StreamLab (OSL), a near full-scale meandering stream research facility. Two final components of this research program, full-scale field monitoring and computational simulations, provide researchers with a multi-scale dataset. A focal point of the analysis lies on the scour patterns induced by these structures, yet transferring these results into engineering design standards remains a challenge. The issues of dealing with multiple scales of flow control structures, the sediment used in these experiments, and the effects they will have in real-world stream restoration applications is a complex problem. The small-scale flume experiments examined single structures in a straight channel with uniform grain sizes. Large-scale OSL experiments were completed in a specific meandering channel geometry and grain sizes unique to that facility. Field monitoring provides data in complex, real-world environments, yet it is unique to specific locations and at a much lower resolution than available from controlled research facilities. The extensive dataset resulting from this research program provides the means to develop

  17. Quality Physical Education: A Commentary on Effective Physical Education Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyson, Ben

    2014-01-01

    In my commentary in response to the 3 articles (McKenzie & Lounsbery, 2013; Rink, 2013; Ward, 2013), I focus on 3 areas: (a) content knowledge, (b) a holistic approach to physical education, and (c) policy impact. I use the term "quality teaching" rather than "teacher effectiveness." Quality teaching is a term with the…

  18. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Nuclear Physics Research

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, Richard A.; Wasserman, Harvey J.

    2012-03-02

    IThe National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the primary computing center for the DOE Office of Science, serving approximately 4,000 users and hosting some 550 projects that involve nearly 700 codes for a wide variety of scientific disciplines. In addition to large-scale computing resources NERSC provides critical staff support and expertise to help scientists make the most efficient use of these resources to advance the scientific mission of the Office of Science. In May 2011, NERSC, DOE’s Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) and DOE’s Office of Nuclear Physics (NP) held a workshop to characterize HPC requirements for NP research over the next three to five years. The effort is part of NERSC’s continuing involvement in anticipating future user needs and deploying necessary resources to meet these demands. The workshop revealed several key requirements, in addition to achieving its goal of characterizing NP computing. The key requirements include: 1. Larger allocations of computational resources at NERSC; 2. Visualization and analytics support; and 3. Support at NERSC for the unique needs of experimental nuclear physicists. This report expands upon these key points and adds others. The results are based upon representative samples, called “case studies,” of the needs of science teams within NP. The case studies were prepared by NP workshop participants and contain a summary of science goals, methods of solution, current and future computing requirements, and special software and support needs. Participants were also asked to describe their strategy for computing in the highly parallel, “multi-core” environment that is expected to dominate HPC architectures over the next few years. The report also includes a section with NERSC responses to the workshop findings. NERSC has many initiatives already underway that address key workshop findings and all of the action items are aligned with NERSC strategic plans.

  19. Scaling effects in theropod dinosaurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Scott A.

    2014-03-01

    For geometrically similar animals, the length of the leg bones l would scale as the diameter of the leg bone d: d ~ l. In order to maintain the same stresses in the leg bones when standing (i.e., elastic similarity), l3 must scale as d2, yielding d ~ l 3 / 2. Sixty-six femora from more than 30 different species of theropod dinosaurs were studied. Our results yield d ~ l 1 . 16, well below the prediction of elastic similarity. The maximum stresses on the leg bones would have occurred during locomotion when forces on the order of several times the body weight would have been present. Bending and torsional stresses of the femur would have been more likely to break the bone than compression. The ability of the bone to resist bending stresses is given by its section modulus Z. From our data, we find that Z ~ l 3 . 49. The bending torque applied to the femur is expected to scale as roughly l4. Both results indicate that larger theropods had smaller cursorial abilities than smaller theropods, as is observed in extant animals. Assuming that all theropod bones have the same shear modulus, the ability for the femora to resist torsion is given by Q = J/ l where J is the second polar moment of the area. From our data, we find that Q ~ l 3 . 66.

  20. Measuring Teacher Effectiveness in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rink, Judith E.

    2013-01-01

    This article summarizes the research base on teacher effectiveness in physical education from a historical perspective and explores the implications of the recent emphasis on student performance and teacher observation systems to evaluate teachers for physical education. The problems and the potential positive effects of using student performance…

  1. Effective field theory in nuclear physics

    SciTech Connect

    Martin J. Savage

    2000-12-12

    I review recent developments in the application of effective field theory to nuclear physics. Emphasis is placed on precision two-body calculations and efforts to formulate the nuclear shell model in terms of an effective field theory.

  2. Size scale effect in cavitation erosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, P. V.; Rao, B. C.; Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    An overview and data analyses pertaining to cavitation erosion size scale effects are presented. The exponents n in the power law relationship are found to vary from 1.7 to 4.9 for venturi and rotating disk devices supporting the values reported in the literature. Suggestions for future studies were made to arrive at further true scale effects.

  3. Space Weather: Physics and Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, W. Jeffrey

    2009-03-01

    With the launching of Sputnik, Explorer 1, and the other early satellites, the new discipline of space physics was born, about 50 years ago. Although earlier ground-based observations had provided strong hints about the nature of our space environment above the upper atmosphere, those early satellites initiated a series of surprises and discoveries, including Van Allen's discovery of the Earth's radiation belts. Young scientists were attracted to this new field, and it grew quickly. When the Journal of Geophysical Research was divided into two sections, in 1964, one section was devoted to space physics. The field explored not only new regions of space but also a new state of matter: the rarefied, fully ionized plasma that fills space and interacts intimately with magnetic fields.

  4. Scaling up Effects in the Organic Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Persson, Anna; Lindstrom, Ulf M.

    2004-01-01

    A simple and effective way of exposing chemistry students to some of the effects of scaling up an organic reaction is described. It gives the student an experience that may encounter in an industrial setting.

  5. Development of scales to assess children's perceptions of friend and parental influences on physical activity

    PubMed Central

    Jago, Russell; Fox, Kenneth R; Page, Angie S; Brockman, Rowan; Thompson, Janice L

    2009-01-01

    Background Many children do not meet physical activity guidelines. Parents and friends are likely to influence children's physical activity but there is a shortage of measures that are able to capture these influences. Methods A new questionnaire with the following three scales was developed: 1) Parental influence on physical activity; 2) Motives for activity with friends scale; and 3) Physical activity and sedentary group normative values. Content for each scale was informed by qualitative work. One hundred and seventy three, 10-11 year old children completed the new questionnaire twice, one week apart. Participants also wore an accelerometer for 5 days and mean minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity, light physical activity and sedentary time per day were obtained. Test-retest reliability of the items was calculated and Principal Component analysis of the scales performed and sub-scales produced. Alphas were calculated for main scales and sub-scales. Correlations were calculated among sub-scales. Correlations between each sub-scale and accelerometer physical activity variables were calculated for all participants and stratified by sex. Results The Parental influence scale yielded four factors which accounted for 67.5% of the variance in the items and had good (α > 0.7) internal consistency. The Motives for physical activity scale yielded four factors that accounted for 66.1% and had good internal consistency. The Physical activity norms scale yielded 4 factors that accounted for 67.4% of the variance, with good internal consistency for the sub-scales and alpha of .642 for the overall scale. Associations between the sub-scales and physical activity differed by sex. Although only 6 of the 11 sub-scales were significantly correlated with physical activity there were a number of associations that were positively correlated >0.15 indicating that these factors may contribute to the explanation of children's physical activity. Conclusion Three scales that

  6. [Development of Autogenic Training Clinical Effectiveness Scale (ATCES)].

    PubMed

    Ikezuki, Makoto; Miyauchi, Yuko; Yamaguchi, Hajime; Koshikawa, Fusako

    2002-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to develop a scale measuring clinical effectiveness of autogenic training. In Study 1, 167 undergraduates completed a survey of items concerning physical and mental states, which were thought to vary in the course of autogenic training. With item and factor analyses, 20 items were selected, and the resulting scale (ATCES) had high discrimination and clear factor structure. In Study 2, reliability and concurrent and clinical validity of the scale were examined with three groups of respondents: 85 mentally healthy, 31 control, 13 clinical persons. The scale showed a high test-retest correlation (r = .83) and alpha coefficient (alpha = .86). ATCES had a Pearson correlation coefficient of r = .56 with General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12), and r = .73 with trait anxiety (STAI-T). And ATCES successfully discriminated the mentally healthy and clinical groups in terms of clinical effectiveness. These results demonstrated high reliability and sufficient concurrent and clinical validity of the new scale. PMID:11977841

  7. Global scale precipitation from monthly to centennial scales: empirical space-time scaling analysis, anthropogenic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lima, Isabel; Lovejoy, Shaun

    2016-04-01

    The characterization of precipitation scaling regimes represents a key contribution to the improved understanding of space-time precipitation variability, which is the focus here. We conduct space-time scaling analyses of spectra and Haar fluctuations in precipitation, using three global scale precipitation products (one instrument based, one reanalysis based, one satellite and gauge based), from monthly to centennial scales and planetary down to several hundred kilometers in spatial scale. Results show the presence - similarly to other atmospheric fields - of an intermediate "macroweather" regime between the familiar weather and climate regimes: we characterize systematically the macroweather precipitation temporal and spatial, and joint space-time statistics and variability, and the outer scale limit of temporal scaling. These regimes qualitatively and quantitatively alternate in the way fluctuations vary with scale. In the macroweather regime, the fluctuations diminish with time scale (this is important for seasonal, annual, and decadal forecasts) while anthropogenic effects increase with time scale. Our approach determines the time scale at which the anthropogenic signal can be detected above the natural variability noise: the critical scale is about 20 - 40 yrs (depending on the product, on the spatial scale). This explains for example why studies that use data covering only a few decades do not easily give evidence of anthropogenic changes in precipitation, as a consequence of warming: the period is too short. Overall, while showing that precipitation can be modeled with space-time scaling processes, our results clarify the different precipitation scaling regimes and further allow us to quantify the agreement (and lack of agreement) of the precipitation products as a function of space and time scales. Moreover, this work contributes to clarify a basic problem in hydro-climatology, which is to measure precipitation trends at decadal and longer scales and to

  8. Universality and scaling in the N-body sector of Efimov physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gattobigio, Mario

    2014-05-01

    In this talk I will illustrate the universal behavior that we have found inside the window of Efimov physics for systems made of N <= 6 particles. We have solved the Schrödinger equation of the few-body systems using different potentials, and we have changed the potential parameters in such a way to explore a range of two-body scattering length, a, around the unitary limit, | a | --> ∞ . The ground- (EN0) and excited-state (EN1) energies have been analyzed by means of a recent-developed method which allows to remove finite-range effects. In this way we show that the calculated ground- and excited-state energies collapse over the same universal curve obtained in the zero-range three-body systems. Universality and scaling are reminiscent of critical phenomena; in that framework, the critical point is mapped onto a fixed point of the Renormalization Group (RG) where the system displays scale-invariant (SI) symmetry. A consequence of SI symmetry is the scaling of the observables: for different materials, in the same class of universality, a selected observable can be represented as a function of the control parameter and, provided that both the observable and the control parameter are scaled by some material-dependent factor, all representations collapse onto a single universal curve. Efimov physics is a more recent example of universality, but in this case the physics is governed by a limit cycle on the RG flow with the emergence of a discrete scale invariance (DSI). The scaling of the few-body energies can be interpreted as follow: few-body systems (at least up to N = 6), inside the Efimov window, belong to the same class of universality, which is governed by the limit cycle. These results can be summarized by the following formula ENn/E2 =tan2 ξκNnaB +ΓNn = e- Δ (ξ) / 2s0 cosξ . where the function Δ (ξ) is universal and it is determined by the three-body physics, and s0 = 1 . 00624 . The parameter κNn appears as a scale parameter and the shift ΓnN is a

  9. The Other Hall Effect: College Board Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppard, Keith; Gunning, Amanda M.

    2013-09-01

    Edwin Herbert Hall (1855-1938), discoverer of the Hall effect, was one of the first winners of the AAPT Oersted Medal for his contributions to the teaching of physics. While Hall's role in establishing laboratory work in high schools is widely acknowledged, his position as chair of the physics section of the Committee on College Entrance Requirements was contentious and his involvement in launching College Board Physics, what we call the "other Hall effect," has largely been overlooked. This article details Hall's role in the development of College Board Physics.

  10. Scaling and Single Event Effects (SEE) Sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oldham, Timothy R.

    2003-01-01

    This paper begins by discussing the potential for scaling down transistors and other components to fit more of them on chips in order to increasing computer processing speed. It also addresses technical challenges to further scaling. Components have been scaled down enough to allow single particles to have an effect, known as a Single Event Effect (SEE). This paper explores the relationship between scaling and the following SEEs: Single Event Upsets (SEU) on DRAMs and SRAMs, Latch-up, Snap-back, Single Event Burnout (SEB), Single Event Gate Rupture (SEGR), and Ion-induced soft breakdown (SBD).

  11. Validation of psychosocial scales for physical activity in university students.

    PubMed

    Tassitano, Rafael Miranda; de Farias Júnior, José Cazuza; Rech, Cassiano Ricardo; Tenório, Maria Cecília Marinho; Cabral, Poliana Coelho; da Silva, Giselia Alves Pontes

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Translate the Patient-centered Assessment and Counseling for Exercise questionnaire, adapt it cross-culturally and identify the psychometric properties of the psychosocial scales for physical activity in young university students. METHODS The Patient-centered Assessment and Counseling for Exercise questionnaire is made up of 39 items divided into constructs based on the social cognitive theory and the transtheoretical model. The analyzed constructs were, as follows: behavior change strategy (15 items), decision-making process (10), self-efficacy (6), support from family (4), and support from friends (4). The validation procedures were conceptual, semantic, operational, and functional equivalences, in addition to the equivalence of the items and of measurements. The conceptual, of items and semantic equivalences were performed by a specialized committee. During measurement equivalence, the instrument was applied to 717 university students. Exploratory factor analysis was used to verify the loading of each item, explained variance and internal consistency of the constructs. Reproducibility was measured by means of intraclass correlation coefficient. RESULTS The two translations were equivalent and back-translation was similar to the original version, with few adaptations. The layout, presentation order of the constructs and items from the original version were kept in the same form as the original instrument. The sample size was adequate and was evaluated by the Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin test, with values between 0.72 and 0.91. The correlation matrix of the items presented r < 0.8 (p < 0.05). The factor loadings of the items from all the constructs were satisfactory (> 0.40), varying between 0.43 and 0.80, which explained between 45.4% and 59.0% of the variance. Internal consistency was satisfactory (α ≥ 0.70), with support from friends being 0.70 and 0.92 for self-efficacy. Most items (74.3%) presented values above 0.70 for the reproducibility test

  12. Validation of psychosocial scales for physical activity in university students

    PubMed Central

    Tassitano, Rafael Miranda; de Farias, José Cazuza; Rech, Cassiano Ricardo; Tenório, Maria Cecília Marinho; Cabral, Poliana Coelho; da Silva, Giselia Alves Pontes

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Translate the Patient-centered Assessment and Counseling for Exercise questionnaire, adapt it cross-culturally and identify the psychometric properties of the psychosocial scales for physical activity in young university students. METHODS The Patient-centered Assessment and Counseling for Exercise questionnaire is made up of 39 items divided into constructs based on the social cognitive theory and the transtheoretical model. The analyzed constructs were, as follows: behavior change strategy (15 items), decision-making process (10), self-efficacy (6), support from family (4), and support from friends (4). The validation procedures were conceptual, semantic, operational, and functional equivalences, in addition to the equivalence of the items and of measurements. The conceptual, of items and semantic equivalences were performed by a specialized committee. During measurement equivalence, the instrument was applied to 717 university students. Exploratory factor analysis was used to verify the loading of each item, explained variance and internal consistency of the constructs. Reproducibility was measured by means of intraclass correlation coefficient. RESULTS The two translations were equivalent and back-translation was similar to the original version, with few adaptations. The layout, presentation order of the constructs and items from the original version were kept in the same form as the original instrument. The sample size was adequate and was evaluated by the Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin test, with values between 0.72 and 0.91. The correlation matrix of the items presented r < 0.8 (p < 0.05). The factor loadings of the items from all the constructs were satisfactory (> 0.40), varying between 0.43 and 0.80, which explained between 45.4% and 59.0% of the variance. Internal consistency was satisfactory (α ≥ 0.70), with support from friends being 0.70 and 0.92 for self-efficacy. Most items (74.3%) presented values above 0.70 for the reproducibility test

  13. Global scale, physical models of the F region ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sojka, J. J.

    1989-01-01

    Consideration is given to the development and verification of global computer models of the F-region which simulate the interactions between physical processes in the ionosphere. The limitations of the physical models are discussed, focusing on the inputs to the ionospheric system such as magnetospheric electric field and auroral precipitation. The possibility of coupling ionospheric models with thermospheric and magnetospheric models is examined.

  14. Effect of Velocity in Icing Scaling Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, David N.; Bond, Thomas H. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents additional results of a study first published in 1999 to determine the effect of scale velocity on scaled icing test results. Reference tests were made with a 53.3-cm-chord NACA 0012 airfoil model in the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel at an airspeed of 67 m/s, an MVD of 40 microns, and an LWC of 0.6 g/cu m. Temperature was varied to provide nominal freezing fractions of 0.8, 0.6, and 0.5. Scale tests used both 35.6- and 27.7-cm-chord 0012 models for 2/3- and 1/2-size scaling. Scale test conditions were found using the modified Ruff (AEDC) scaling method with the scale velocity determined in five ways. Four of the scale velocities were found by matching the scale and reference values of water-film thickness, velocity, Weber number, and Reynolds number. The fifth scale velocity was simply the average of those found by matching the Weber and Reynolds numbers. The resulting scale velocities ranged from 85 to 220 percent of the reference velocity. For a freezing fraction of 0.8, the value of the scale velocity had no effect on how well the scale ice shape simulated the reference shape. For nominal freezing fractions of 0.5 and 0.6, the best simulation of the reference shape was achieved when the scale velocity was the average of the constant-Weber-number and the constant-Reynolds-number velocities.

  15. Perturbed effects at radiation physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Külahcı, Fatih; Şen, Zekâi

    2013-09-01

    Perturbation methodology is applied in order to assess the linear attenuation coefficient, mass attenuation coefficient and cross-section behavior with random components in the basic variables such as the radiation amounts frequently used in the radiation physics and chemistry. Additionally, layer attenuation coefficient (LAC) and perturbed LAC (PLAC) are proposed for different contact materials. Perturbation methodology provides opportunity to obtain results with random deviations from the average behavior of each variable that enters the whole mathematical expression. The basic photon intensity variation expression as the inverse exponential power law (as Beer-Lambert's law) is adopted for perturbation method exposition. Perturbed results are presented not only in terms of the mean but additionally the standard deviation and the correlation coefficients. Such perturbation expressions provide one to assess small random variability in basic variables.

  16. [Probing Planck-scale Physics with a Ne-21/He-3 Zeeman Maser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Ne-21/He-3 Zeeman maser is a recently developed device which employs co-located ensembles of Ne-21 and He-3 atoms to provide sensitive differential measurements of the noble gas nuclear Zeeman splittings as a function of time, thereby greatly attenuating common-mode systematic effects such as uniform magnetic field variations. The Ne-21 maser will serve as a precision magnetometer to stabilize the system's static magnetic field, while the He-3 maser is used as a sensitive probe for violations of CPT and Lorentz symmetry by searching for small variations in the 3He maser frequency as the spatial orientation of the apparatus changes due to the rotation of the Earth (or placement on a rotating table). In the context of a general extension of the Standard Model of particle physics, the Ne-21/He-3 maser will provide the most sensitive search to date for CPT and Lorentz violation of the neutron: better than 10(exp -32) GeV, an improvement of more than an order of magnitude over past experiments. This exceptional precision will offer a rare opportunity to probe physics at the Planck scale. A future space-based Ne-21/He-3 maser or related device could provide even greater sensitivity to violations of CPT and Lorentz symmetry, and hence to Planck-scale physics, because of isolation from dominant systematic effects associated with ground-based operation, and because of access to different positions in space-time.

  17. A rock-physical modeling method for carbonate reservoirs at seismic scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing-Ye; Chen, Xiao-Hong

    2013-03-01

    Strong heterogeneity and complex pore systems of carbonate reservoir rock make its rock physics model building and fluid substitution difficult and complex. However, rock physics models connect reservoir parameters with seismic parameters and fluid substitution is the most effective tool for reservoir prediction and quantitative characterization. On the basis of analyzing complex carbonate reservoir pore structures and heterogeneity at seismic scale, we use the gridding method to divide carbonate rock into homogeneous blocks with independent rock parameters and calculate the elastic moduli of dry rock units step by step using different rock physics models based on pore origin and structural feature. Then, the elastic moduli of rocks saturated with different fluids are obtained using fluid substitution based on different pore connectivity. Based on the calculated elastic moduli of rock units, the Hashin-Shtrikman-Walpole elastic boundary theory is adopted to calculate the carbonate elastic parameters at seismic scale. The calculation and analysis of carbonate models with different combinations of pore types demonstrate the effects of pore type on rock elastic parameters. The simulated result is consistent with our knowledge of real data.

  18. Teacher Effectiveness in Physical Education--Consensus?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rink, Judith

    2014-01-01

    This article synthesizes the series of manuscripts on teacher effectiveness in physical education recently published by the "Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport" and highlights both the consensus and points of disagreement. Although there is much agreement as to the mission to develop a physically active lifestyle, there is a great…

  19. The Other Hall Effect: College Board Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheppard, Keith; Gunning, Amanda M.

    2013-01-01

    Edwin Herbert Hall (1855-1938), discoverer of the Hall effect, was one of the first winners of the AAPT Oersted Medal for his contributions to the teaching of physics. While Hall's role in establishing laboratory work in high schools is widely acknowledged, his position as chair of the physics section of the Committee on College Entrance…

  20. Physical meaning of one-machine and multimachine tokamak scalings

    SciTech Connect

    Dnestrovskij, Yu. N. Danilov, A. V.; Dnestrovskij, A. Yu.; Lysenko, S. E.; Ongena, J.

    2013-04-15

    Specific features of energy confinement scalings constructed using different experimental databases for tokamak plasmas are considered. In the multimachine database, some pairs of engineering variables are collinear; e.g., the current I and the input power P both increase with increasing minor radius a. As a result, scalings derived from this database are reliable only for discharges in which such ratios as I/a{sup 2} or P/a{sup 2} are close to their values averaged over the database. The collinearity of variables allows one to exclude the normalized Debye radius d* from the scaling expressed in a nondimensional form. In one-machine databases, the dimensionless variables are functionally dependent, which allow one to cast a scaling without d*. In a database combined from two devices, the collinearity may be absent, so the Debye radius cannot generally be excluded from the scaling. It is shown that the experiments performed in support of the absence of d* in the two-machine scaling are unconvincing. Transformation expressions are given that allow one to compare experiments for the determination of scaling in any set of independent variables.

  1. Physics in space-time with scale-dependent metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balankin, Alexander S.

    2013-10-01

    We construct three-dimensional space Rγ3 with the scale-dependent metric and the corresponding Minkowski space-time Mγ,β4 with the scale-dependent fractal (DH) and spectral (DS) dimensions. The local derivatives based on scale-dependent metrics are defined and differential vector calculus in Rγ3 is developed. We state that Mγ,β4 provides a unified phenomenological framework for dimensional flow observed in quite different models of quantum gravity. Nevertheless, the main attention is focused on the special case of flat space-time M1/3,14 with the scale-dependent Cantor-dust-like distribution of admissible states, such that DH increases from DH=2 on the scale ≪ℓ0 to DH=4 in the infrared limit ≫ℓ0, where ℓ0 is the characteristic length (e.g. the Planck length, or characteristic size of multi-fractal features in heterogeneous medium), whereas DS≡4 in all scales. Possible applications of approach based on the scale-dependent metric to systems of different nature are briefly discussed.

  2. Upward and downward physical appearance comparisons: development of scales and examination of predictive qualities.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Kerry S; Caputi, Peter; Minto, Rona; Peoples, Gregory; Hooper, Carlie; Kell, Sally; Sawley, Elise

    2009-06-01

    Despite good theoretical and empirical rationale for assessing tendencies to make upward and downward physical appearance comparisons no measure for these specific constructs exists. The present work developed and tested the psychometric properties of upward and downward physical appearance comparison scales. The scales were administered to participants (N=224) along with measures of general appearance comparison tendencies, body image, disordered eating, Antifat and Antigay attitudes. The scales displayed good psychometric properties. Importantly, the upward but not downward physical appearance comparison scale predicted lower Appearance Evaluation and higher EAT-26 scores. Conversely, the downward but not upward physical appearance comparison scale predicted higher Appearance Evaluation and greater Antifat Attitudes (Dislike). The scales were unrelated to a nonappearance related construct. These new measures fill a gap in the literature and may be of benefit to researchers interested in body image, appearance concerns, eating disorders, social comparison, and obesity prejudice. PMID:19447692

  3. Physical effects in wormholes and time machines

    SciTech Connect

    Frolov, V.P. P. N. Lebedev, Physical Institute, Moscow ); Novikov, I.D. )

    1990-08-15

    Physical effects in a spacetime with a traversable wormhole are considered. It is shown that the interaction of a wormhole with the surrounding matter and with the external gravitational field almost inevitably transforms it into a time machine.

  4. The effective field theory of cosmological large scale structures

    SciTech Connect

    Carrasco, John Joseph M.; Hertzberg, Mark P.; Senatore, Leonardo

    2012-09-20

    Large scale structure surveys will likely become the next leading cosmological probe. In our universe, matter perturbations are large on short distances and small at long scales, i.e. strongly coupled in the UV and weakly coupled in the IR. To make precise analytical predictions on large scales, we develop an effective field theory formulated in terms of an IR effective fluid characterized by several parameters, such as speed of sound and viscosity. These parameters, determined by the UV physics described by the Boltzmann equation, are measured from N-body simulations. We find that the speed of sound of the effective fluid is c2s ≈ 10–6c2 and that the viscosity contributions are of the same order. The fluid describes all the relevant physics at long scales k and permits a manifestly convergent perturbative expansion in the size of the matter perturbations δ(k) for all the observables. As an example, we calculate the correction to the power spectrum at order δ(k)4. As a result, the predictions of the effective field theory are found to be in much better agreement with observation than standard cosmological perturbation theory, already reaching percent precision at this order up to a relatively short scale k ≃ 0.24h Mpc–1.

  5. Developing a Rasch Measurement Physical Fitness Scale for Hong Kong Primary School-Aged Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yan, Zi; Bond, Trevor G.

    2011-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to develop a Rasch Measurement Physical Fitness Scale (RMPFS) based on physical fitness indicators routinely used in Hong Kong primary schools. A total of 9,439 records of students' performances on physical fitness indicators, retrieved from the database of a Hong Kong primary school, were used to develop the…

  6. Evolving desiderata for validating engineered-physics systems without full-scale testing

    SciTech Connect

    Langenbrunner, James R; Booker, Jane M; Hemez, Francois M; Ross, Timothy J

    2010-01-01

    Theory and principles of engineered-physics designs do not change over time, but the actual engineered product does evolve. Engineered components are prescient to the physics and change with time. Parts are never produced exactly as designed, assembled as designed, or remain unperturbed over time. For this reason, validation of performance may be regarded as evolving over time. Desired use of products evolves with time. These pragmatic realities require flexibility, understanding, and robustness-to-ignorance. Validation without full-scale testing involves engineering, small-scale experiments, physics theory and full-scale computer-simulation validation. We have previously published an approach to validation without full-scale testing using information integration, small-scale tests, theory and full-scale simulations [Langenbrunner et al. 2008]. This approach adds value, but also adds complexity and uncertainty due to inference. We illustrate a validation example that manages evolving desiderata without full-scale testing.

  7. Impacts of Noah model physics on catchment-scale runoff simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Donghai; Van der Velde, Rogier; Su, Zhongbo; Wen, Jun; Wang, Xin; Booij, Martijn J.; Hoekstra, Arjen Y.; Lv, Shihua; Zhang, Yu; Ek, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    Noah model physics options validated for the source region of the Yellow River (SRYR) are applied to investigate their ability in reproducing runoff at the catchment scale. Three sets of augmentations are implemented affecting descriptions of (i) turbulent and soil heat transport (Noah-H), (ii) soil water flow (Noah-W), and (iii) frozen ground processes (Noah-F). Five numerical experiments are designed with the three augmented versions, a control run with default model physics and a run with all augmentations (Noah-A). Each experiment is set up with vegetation and soil parameters from Weather Research and Forecasting data set, soil organic matter content from China Soil Database, 0.1° atmospheric forcing data from Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research (Chinese Academy of Sciences), and initial equilibrium model states achieved using a single-year recurrent spin-up. In situ heat flux, soil temperature (Ts), and soil moisture (θ) profile measurements are available for point-scale assessment, whereas monthly streamflow is utilized for the catchment-scale evaluation. The comparison with point measurements shows that the augmentations invoked with Noah-H resolve issues with the heat flux and Ts simulation and Noah-W mitigates deficiencies in the θ simulation, while Noah-A yields improvements for both simulated surface energy and water budgets. In contrast, Noah-F has a minor effect. Also, at catchment scale, the best model performance is found for Noah-A leading to a base flow-dominated runoff regime, whereby the surface runoff contribution remains significant. This study highlights the need for a complete description of vertical heat and water exchanges to correctly simulate the runoff in the seasonally frozen and high-altitude SRYR at the catchment scale.

  8. Gravitational bar detectors set limits to Planck-scale physics on macroscopic variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin, Francesco; Marino, Francesco; Bonaldi, Michele; Cerdonio, Massimo; Conti, Livia; Falferi, Paolo; Mezzena, Renato; Ortolan, Antonello; Prodi, Giovanni A.; Taffarello, Luca; Vedovato, Gabriele; Vinante, Andrea; Zendri, Jean-Pierre

    2013-02-01

    Different approaches to quantum gravity, such as string theory and loop quantum gravity, as well as doubly special relativity and gedanken experiments in black-hole physics, all indicate the existence of a minimal measurable length of the order of the Planck length, . This observation has motivated the proposal of generalized uncertainty relations, which imply changes in the energy spectrum of quantum systems. As a consequence, quantum gravitational effects could be revealed by experiments able to test deviations from standard quantum mechanics, such as those recently proposed on macroscopic mechanical oscillators. Here we exploit the sub-millikelvin cooling of the normal modes of the ton-scale gravitational wave detector AURIGA, to place an upper limit for possible Planck-scale modifications on the ground-state energy of an oscillator. Our analysis calls for the development of a satisfactory treatment of multi-particle states in the framework of quantum gravity models.

  9. Effective Temperature and Universal Conductivity Scaling in Organic Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdalla, Hassan; van de Ruit, Kevin; Kemerink, Martijn

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the scalability of the temperature- and electric field-dependence of the conductivity of disordered organic semiconductors to ‘universal’ curves by two different but commonly employed methods; by so-called universal scaling and by using the effective temperature concept. Experimentally both scaling methods were found to be equally applicable to the out-of-plane charge transport in PEDOT:PSS thin films of various compositions. Both methods are shown to be equivalent in terms of functional dependence and to have identical limiting behavior. The experimentally observed scaling behavior can be reproduced by a numerical nearest-neighbor hopping model, accounting for the Coulomb interaction, the high charge carrier concentration and the energetic disorder. The underlying physics can be captured in a simple empirical model, describing the effective temperature of the charge carrier distribution as the outcome of a heat balance between Joule heating and (effective) temperature-dependent energy loss to the lattice.

  10. Effective Temperature and Universal Conductivity Scaling in Organic Semiconductors

    PubMed Central

    Abdalla, Hassan; van de Ruit, Kevin; Kemerink, Martijn

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the scalability of the temperature- and electric field-dependence of the conductivity of disordered organic semiconductors to ‘universal’ curves by two different but commonly employed methods; by so-called universal scaling and by using the effective temperature concept. Experimentally both scaling methods were found to be equally applicable to the out-of-plane charge transport in PEDOT:PSS thin films of various compositions. Both methods are shown to be equivalent in terms of functional dependence and to have identical limiting behavior. The experimentally observed scaling behavior can be reproduced by a numerical nearest-neighbor hopping model, accounting for the Coulomb interaction, the high charge carrier concentration and the energetic disorder. The underlying physics can be captured in a simple empirical model, describing the effective temperature of the charge carrier distribution as the outcome of a heat balance between Joule heating and (effective) temperature-dependent energy loss to the lattice. PMID:26581975

  11. Scale effect on unsteady cloud cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dular, M.; Khlifa, I.; Fuzier, S.; Adama Maiga, M.; Coutier-Delgosha, O.

    2012-11-01

    No experiment was conducted, yet, to investigate the scale effects on the dynamics of developed cavitating flow with periodical cloud shedding. The present study was motivated by the unclear results obtained from the experiments in a Venturi-type section that was scaled down 10 times for the purpose of measurements by ultra-fast X-ray imaging (Coutier-Delgosha et al. 2009). Cavitation in the original size scale section (Stutz and Reboud in Exp Fluids 23:191-198, 1997, Exp Fluids 29:545-552 2000) always displays unsteady cloud separation. However, when the geometry was scaled down, the cavitation became quasi steady although some oscillations still existed. To investigate this phenomenon more in detail, experiments were conducted in six geometrically similar Venturi test sections where either width or height or both were scaled. Various types of instabilities are obtained, from simple oscillations of the sheet cavity length to large vapor cloud shedding when the size of the test section is increased. It confirms that small scale has a significant influence on cavitation. Especially the height of the test section plays a major role in the dynamics of the re-entrant jet that drives the periodical shedding observed at large scale. Results suggest that the sheet cavity becomes stabile when the section is scaled down to a certain point because re-entrant jet cannot fully develop.

  12. Effective Teaching in Physical Education: Slovenian Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pišot, Rado; Plevnik, Matej; Štemberger, Vesna

    2014-01-01

    Regular quality physical education (PE) contributes to the harmonized biopsychosocial development of a young person--to relaxation, neutralization of negative effects of sedentary hours, and other unhealthy habits/behaviors. The evaluation approach to PE effectiveness provides important information to PE teachers and also to students. However,…

  13. Fundamental Scalings of Zonal Flows in a Basic Plasma Physics Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Vladimir; Wei, Xiao; Sen, Amiya K.

    2007-11-01

    A basic physics experimental study of zonal flows (ZF) associated with ITG (ion temperature gradient) drift modes has been performed in the Columbia Linear Machine (CLM) and ZF has been definitively identified [1]. However, in contrast to most tokamak experiments, the stabilizing effect of ZF shear to ITG appears to be small in CLM. We now report on the study of important scaling behavior of ZF. First and most importantly, we report on the collisional damping scaling of ZF, which is considered to be its saturation mechanism [2]. By varying the sum of ion-ion and ion-neutral collision frequency over nearly half an order of magnitude, we find no change in the amplitude of ZF. Secondly, we study the scaling of ZF amplitude with ITG amplitude via increasing ITG drive though ηi, as well as feedback (stabilizing / destabilizing). We have observed markedly different scaling near and far above marginal stability. [1] V. Sokolov, X. Wei, A.K. Sen and K. Avinash, Plasma Phys.Controlled Fusion 48, S111 (2006). [2] P.H. Diamond, S.-I. Itoh, K.Itoh and T.S. Hahm, Plasma Phys.Controlled Fusion 47, R35 (2005).

  14. Compact wire array sources: power scaling and implosion physics.

    SciTech Connect

    Serrano, Jason Dimitri; Chuvatin, Alexander S.; Jones, M. C.; Vesey, Roger Alan; Waisman, Eduardo M.; Ivanov, V. V.; Esaulov, Andrey A.; Ampleford, David J.; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Kantsyrev, Victor Leonidovich; Coverdale, Christine Anne; Rudakov, L. I.; Jones, Brent Manley; Safronova, Alla S.; Vigil, Marcelino Patricio

    2008-09-01

    A series of ten shots were performed on the Saturn generator in short pulse mode in order to study planar and small-diameter cylindrical tungsten wire arrays at {approx}5 MA current levels and 50-60 ns implosion times as candidates for compact z-pinch radiation sources. A new vacuum hohlraum configuration has been proposed in which multiple z pinches are driven in parallel by a pulsed power generator. Each pinch resides in a separate return current cage, serving also as a primary hohlraum. A collection of such radiation sources surround a compact secondary hohlraum, which may potentially provide an attractive Planckian radiation source or house an inertial confinement fusion fuel capsule. Prior to studying this concept experimentally or numerically, advanced compact wire array loads must be developed and their scaling behavior understood. The 2008 Saturn planar array experiments extend the data set presented in Ref. [1], which studied planar arrays at {approx}3 MA, 100 ns in Saturn long pulse mode. Planar wire array power and yield scaling studies now include current levels directly applicable to multi-pinch experiments that could be performed on the 25 MA Z machine. A maximum total x-ray power of 15 TW (250 kJ in the main pulse, 330 kJ total yield) was observed with a 12-mm-wide planar array at 5.3 MA, 52 ns. The full data set indicates power scaling that is sub-quadratic with load current, while total and main pulse yields are closer to quadratic; these trends are similar to observations of compact cylindrical tungsten arrays on Z. We continue the investigation of energy coupling in these short pulse Saturn experiments using zero-dimensional-type implosion modeling and pinhole imaging, indicating 16 cm/?s implosion velocity in a 12-mm-wide array. The same phenomena of significant trailing mass and evidence for resistive heating are observed at 5 MA as at 3 MA. 17 kJ of Al K-shell radiation was obtained in one Al planar array fielded at 5.5 MA, 57 ns and we

  15. Effects of a scalar scaling field on quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benioff, Paul

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes the effects of a complex scalar scaling field on quantum mechanics. The field origin is an extension of the gauge freedom for basis choice in gauge theories to the underlying scalar field. The extension is based on the idea that the value of a number at one space time point does not determine the value at another point. This, combined with the description of mathematical systems as structures of different types, results in the presence of separate number fields and vector spaces as structures, at different space time locations. Complex number structures and vector spaces at each location are scaled by a complex space time dependent scaling factor. The effect of this scaling factor on several physical and geometric quantities has been described in other work. Here the emphasis is on quantum mechanics of one and two particles, their states and properties. Multiparticle states are also briefly described. The effect shows as a complex, nonunitary, scalar field connection on a fiber bundle description of nonrelativistic quantum mechanics. The lack of physical evidence for the presence of this field so far means that the coupling constant of this field to fermions is very small. It also means that the gradient of the field must be very small in a local region of cosmological space and time. Outside this region, there are no restrictions on the field gradient.

  16. Effects of a scalar scaling field on quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benioff, Paul

    2016-04-01

    This paper describes the effects of a complex scalar scaling field on quantum mechanics. The field origin is an extension of the gauge freedom for basis choice in gauge theories to the underlying scalar field. The extension is based on the idea that the value of a number at one space time point does not determine the value at another point. This, combined with the description of mathematical systems as structures of different types, results in the presence of separate number fields and vector spaces as structures, at different space time locations. Complex number structures and vector spaces at each location are scaled by a complex space time dependent scaling factor. The effect of this scaling factor on several physical and geometric quantities has been described in other work. Here the emphasis is on quantum mechanics of one and two particles, their states and properties. Multiparticle states are also briefly described. The effect shows as a complex, nonunitary, scalar field connection on a fiber bundle description of nonrelativistic quantum mechanics. The lack of physical evidence for the presence of this field so far means that the coupling constant of this field to fermions is very small. It also means that the gradient of the field must be very small in a local region of cosmological space and time. Outside this region, there are no restrictions on the field gradient.

  17. Extending Higgs inflation with TeV scale new physics

    SciTech Connect

    He, Hong-Jian; Xianyu, Zhong-Zhi E-mail: xianyuzhongzhi@gmail.com

    2014-10-01

    Higgs inflation is among the most economical and predictive inflation models, although the original Higgs inflation requires tuning the Higgs or top mass away from its current experimental value by more than 2σ deviations, and generally gives a negligible tensor-to-scalar ratio r ∼ 10{sup -3} (if away from the vicinity of critical point). In this work, we construct a minimal extension of Higgs inflation, by adding only two new weak-singlet particles at TeV scale, a vector-quark T and a real scalar S. The presence of singlets (T, S) significantly impact the renormalization group running of the Higgs boson self-coupling. With this, our model provides a wider range of the tensor-to-scalar ratio r=O(0.1)-O(10{sup -3}), consistent with the favored r values by either BICEP2 or Planck data, while keeping the successful prediction of the spectral index n{sub s} ≅ 0.96. It allows the Higgs and top masses to fully fit the collider measurements. We also discuss implications for searching the predicted TeV-scale vector-quark T and scalar S at the LHC and future high energy pp colliders.

  18. Extending Higgs inflation with TeV scale new physics

    SciTech Connect

    He, Hong-Jian; Xianyu, Zhong-Zhi

    2014-10-10

    Higgs inflation is among the most economical and predictive inflation models, although the original Higgs inflation requires tuning the Higgs or top mass away from its current experimental value by more than 2σ deviations, and generally gives a negligible tensor-to-scalar ratio r∼10{sup −3} (if away from the vicinity of critical point). In this work, we construct a minimal extension of Higgs inflation, by adding only two new weak-singlet particles at TeV scale, a vector-quark T and a real scalar S . The presence of singlets (T, S) significantly impact the renormalization group running of the Higgs boson self-coupling. With this, our model provides a wider range of the tensor-to-scalar ratio r=O(0.1)−O(10{sup −3}) , consistent with the favored r values by either BICEP2 or Planck data, while keeping the successful prediction of the spectral index n{sub s}≃0.96 . It allows the Higgs and top masses to fully fit the collider measurements. We also discuss implications for searching the predicted TeV-scale vector-quark T and scalar S at the LHC and future high energy pp colliders.

  19. Seismic-Scale Rock Physics of Methane Hydrate

    SciTech Connect

    Amos Nur

    2009-01-08

    We quantify natural methane hydrate reservoirs by generating synthetic seismic traces and comparing them to real seismic data: if the synthetic matches the observed data, then the reservoir properties and conditions used in synthetic modeling might be the same as the actual, in-situ reservoir conditions. This approach is model-based: it uses rock physics equations that link the porosity and mineralogy of the host sediment, pressure, and hydrate saturation, and the resulting elastic-wave velocity and density. One result of such seismic forward modeling is a catalogue of seismic reflections of methane hydrate which can serve as a field guide to hydrate identification from real seismic data. We verify this approach using field data from known hydrate deposits.

  20. Technologies for large-scale physical mapping of human chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Beugelsdijk, T.J.

    1994-12-01

    Since its inception 6 years ago, the Human Genome Project has made rapid progress towards its ultimate goal of developing the complete sequence of all human chromosomes. This progress has been made possible through the development of automated devices by laboratories throughout the world that aid the molecular biologist in various phases of the project. The initial phase involves the generation of physical and genetic maps of each chromosome. This task is nearing completion at a low resolution level with several instances of very high detailed maps being developed for isolated chromosomes. In support of the initial mapping thrust of this program, the robotics and automation effort at Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed DNA gridding technologies along with associated database and user interface systems. This paper will discuss these systems in detail and focus on the formalism developed for subsystems which allow for facile system integration.

  1. A survey of physically-based catchment-scale modeling over the last half century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paniconi, Claudio; Putti, Mario

    2015-04-01

    Integrated, process-based based numerical models in hydrology and connected disciplines (ecohydrology, hydrometeorology, hydrogeomorphology, biogeochemistry, hydrogeophysics, etc) are rapidly evolving, spurred by advances in computer technology, numerical algorithms, and environmental observation, and by the need to better understand the potential impacts of population, land use, and climate change on water and other natural resources. At the catchment scale, simulation models are commonly based on conservation principles for surface and subsurface water flow and mass transport (e.g., the Richards, St. Venant, and advection-dispersion-reaction equations, and approximations thereof), and need to be resolved by robust numerical techniques for space and time discretization, linearization, interpolation, etc. Model development through the years has continually faced physical and numerical challenges arising from heterogeneity and variability in parameters and state variables; nonlinearities and scale effects in process interactions and interface dynamics; and complex or poorly known boundary conditions and initial system states. We give an historical perspective (past 50 years) on some of the key developments in physically-based hydrological modeling, examining how these various challenges have been addressed and providing some insight on future directions as catchment modeling enters a highly interdisciplinary era.

  2. A physical scaling model for aggregation and disaggregation of field-scale surface soil moisture dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojha, Richa; Govindaraju, Rao S.

    2015-07-01

    Scaling relationships are needed as measurements and desired predictions are often not available at concurrent spatial support volumes or temporal discretizations. Surface soil moisture values of interest to hydrologic studies are estimated using ground based measurement techniques or utilizing remote sensing platforms. Remote sensing based techniques estimate field-scale surface soil moisture values, but are unable to provide the local-scale soil moisture information that is obtained from local measurements. Further, obtaining field-scale surface moisture values using ground-based measurements is exhaustive and time consuming. To bridge this scale mismatch, we develop analytical expressions for surface soil moisture based on sharp-front approximation of the Richards equation and assumed log-normal distribution of the spatial surface saturated hydraulic conductivity field. Analytical expressions for field-scale evolution of surface soil moisture to rainfall events are utilized to obtain aggregated and disaggregated response of surface soil moisture evolution with knowledge of the saturated hydraulic conductivity. The utility of the analytical model is demonstrated through numerical experiments involving 3-D simulations of soil moisture and Monte-Carlo simulations for 1-D renderings—with soil moisture dynamics being represented by the Richards equation in each instance. Results show that the analytical expressions developed here show promise for a principled way of scaling surface soil moisture.

  3. Physical and timing verification of subwavelength-scale designs: I. Lithography impact on MOSFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pack, Robert C.; Axelrad, Valery; Shibkov, Andrei; Boksha, Victor V.; Huckabay, Judy A.; Salik, Rachid; Staud, Wolfgang; Wang, Ruoping; Grobman, Warren D.

    2003-07-01

    Subwavelength lithography at low contrast, or low-k1 factor, leads to new requirements for design, design analysis, and design verification techniques. These techniques must account for inherent physical circuit feature distortions resulting from layout pattern-dependent design-to-silicon patterning processes in this era. These distortions are unavoidable, even in the presence of sophisticated Resolution Enhancement Technologies (RET), and are a 'fact-of-life" for the designer implementing nanometer-scale designs for the foreseeable low-k1 future. The consequence is that fabricated silicon feature shapes and dimensions are in general printed with far less fidelity in comparison to the designer"s desired layout than in past generations and that the designer must consider design within significantly different margins of geometry tolerance. Traditional (Mead-Conway originated) WYSIWYG (what you see is what you get) design methodologies, assume that the designer"s physical circuit element shapes are accurate in comparison to the corresponding shapes on the real fabricated IC, and uses design rules to verify satisfactory fabrication compliance, as the input for both interconnect parasitic loading calculations and to transistor models used for performance simulation. However, these assumptions are increasingly poor ones as k1 decreases to unprecidented levels -- with concomitant increase in patterned feature distortion and fabrication yield failure modes. This paper explores a new paradigm for nanometer-scale design, one in which more advanced models of critical low-k1 lithographic printing effects are incorporated into the design flow to improve upon yield and performance verification accuracy. We start with an analysis of a complex 32-bit adder block circuit design to determine systematic changes in gate length, width and shape variations for each MOSFET in the circuit due to optical proximity effects. The physical gate dimensions for all, as predicted by the

  4. Developing an Attitude Scale for the Profession of Physical Education Teaching (ASPPET)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unlu, Huseyin

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the development of a Likert-type attitude scale for the profession of physical education teaching (ASPPET) was aimed. The group of the study was consisted of totally 556 pre-service physical education teachers. In order to determine the structural validity of ASPPET, an exploratory and confirmative factor analyses were performed. A…

  5. Measuring Psychological and Physical Abuse of Children with the Conflict Tactics Scales.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Straus, Murray A.

    Application of the Conflict Tactics Scales (CTS) to the assessment of child abuse is described. The CTS is a brief instrument designed to measure three aspects of parent-to-child behavior: (1) reasoning; (2) psychological aggression; and (3) physical aggression. The psychological and physical aggression indexes are intended to measure the…

  6. Rotating space elevators: Physics of celestial scale spinning strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudsen, Steven; Golubović, Leonardo

    2014-11-01

    We explore classical and statistical mechanics of a novel dynamical system, the Rotating Space Elevator (RSE) (L. Golubović, S. Knudsen, EPL 86, 34001 (2009)). The RSE is a double rotating floppy string reaching extraterrestrial locations. Objects sliding along the RSE string (climbers) do not require internal engines or propulsion to be transported far away from the Earth's surface. The RSE thus solves a major problem in space elevator science, which is how to supply energy to the climbers moving along space elevator strings. The RSE can be made in various shapes that are stabilized by an approximate equilibrium between the gravitational and inertial forces acting in a double rotating frame associated with the RSE. This dynamical equilibrium is achieved by a special ("magical") form of the RSE mass line density derived in this paper. The RSE exhibits a variety of interesting dynamical phenomena explored here by numerical simulations. Thanks to its special design, the RSE exhibits everlasting double rotating motion. Under some conditions, however, we find that the RSE may undergo a morphological transition to a chaotic state reminiscent of fluctuating directed polymers in the realm of the statistical physics of strings and membranes.

  7. Estimations of scale effects on blade cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amromin, Eduard

    2015-12-01

    Estimations of scale effects on blade cavitation require consideration of multiple models for both water flows and cavities. In particular, distinction of laminar and turbulent boundary layers is very important. A qualitative impact of selection of models is manifested for blade sheet cavitation. Its quantitative impact is shown for vortex cavitation inception.

  8. Book Review: Space Weather: Physics and Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, Phil

    2007-11-01

    At 438 pages, Space Weather: Physics and Effects, edited by Volker Bothmer and Ioannis A. Daglis, seems like a daunting read. But its thickness belies its conversational tone, and its content provides a different presentation of material aimed at drawing in a new audience while satisfying the present space weather audience's interest in their subject. I found reading this book a pleasure.

  9. Physical Analysis and Scaling of a Jet and Vortex Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lachowicz, Jason T.; Yao, Chung-Sheng; Joslin, Ronald D.

    2004-01-01

    Our previous studies have shown that the Jet and Vortex Actuator generates free-jet, wall-jet, and near- wall vortex flow fields. That is, the actuator can be operated in different modes by simply varying the driving frequency and/or amplitude. For this study, variations are made in the actuator plate and wide-slot widths and sine/asymmetrical actuator plate input forcing (drivers) to further study the actuator induced flow fields. Laser sheet flow visualization, particle- image velocimetry, and laser velocimetry are used to measure and characterize the actuator induced flow fields. Laser velocimetry measurements indicate that the vortex strength increases with the driver repetition rate for a fixed actuator geometry (wide slot and plate width). For a given driver repetition rate, the vortex strength increases as the plate width decreases provided the wide-slot to plate-width ratio is fixed. Using an asymmetric plate driver, a stronger vortex is generated for the same actuator geometry and a given driver repetition rate. The nondimensional scaling provides the approximate ranges for operating the actuator in the free jet, wall jet, or vortex flow regimes. Finally, phase-locked velocity measurements from particle image velocimetry indicate that the vortex structure is stationary, confirming previous computations. Both the computations and the particle image velocimetry measurements (expectantly) show unsteadiness near the wide-slot opening, which is indicative of mass ejection from the actuator.

  10. The butterfly effect for physics laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claycomb, James R.; Valentine, John H.

    2015-03-01

    A low-cost chaos dynamics lab is developed for quantitative demonstration of the butterfly effect using a magnetic pendulum. Chaotic motion is explored by recording magnetic time series. Students analyze the data in Excel® to investigate the butterfly effect as well as the reconstruction of the strange attractor using time delay plots. The lab exercise is suitable for junior-level modern physics laboratories, or as an extension to traditional first-year laboratories exploring pendulum motion.

  11. Neutrino physics with multi-ton scale liquid xenon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Baudis, L.; Ferella, A.; Kish, A.; Manalaysay, A.; Undagoitia, T. Marrodán; Schumann, M. E-mail: alfredo.ferella@lngs.infn.it E-mail: aaronm@ucdavis.edu E-mail: marc.schumann@lhep.unibe.ch

    2014-01-01

    We study the sensitivity of large-scale xenon detectors to low-energy solar neutrinos, to coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering and to neutrinoless double beta decay. As a concrete example, we consider the xenon part of the proposed DARWIN (Dark Matter WIMP Search with Noble Liquids) experiment. We perform detailed Monte Carlo simulations of the expected backgrounds, considering realistic energy resolutions and thresholds in the detector. In a low-energy window of 2–30 keV, where the sensitivity to solar pp and {sup 7}Be-neutrinos is highest, an integrated pp-neutrino rate of 5900 events can be reached in a fiducial mass of 14 tons of natural xenon, after 5 years of data. The pp-neutrino flux could thus be measured with a statistical uncertainty around 1%, reaching the precision of solar model predictions. These low-energy solar neutrinos will be the limiting background to the dark matter search channel for WIMP-nucleon cross sections below ∼ 2 × 10{sup −48} cm{sup 2} and WIMP masses around 50 GeV⋅c{sup −2}, for an assumed 99.5% rejection of electronic recoils due to elastic neutrino-electron scatters. Nuclear recoils from coherent scattering of solar neutrinos will limit the sensitivity to WIMP masses below ∼ 6 GeV⋅c{sup −2} to cross sections above ∼ 4 × 10{sup −45}cm{sup 2}. DARWIN could reach a competitive half-life sensitivity of 5.6 × 10{sup 26} y to the neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 136}Xe after 5 years of data, using 6 tons of natural xenon in the central detector region.

  12. African-American college student attitudes toward physics and their effect on achievement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, Carl Timothy

    The purpose of this study was to investigate factors affecting the attitudes that African-American college students have towards introductory college physics. The population targeted for this study consisted of African-American males and females enrolled in introductory college physics classes at an urban public historical black college or university (HBCU) located in the southeastern United States. Nine of the Fennema-Sherman Mathematics Attitude Scales, modified for physics, were used to analyze the attitudes of the 135 participants enrolled in an introductory college physics class. The nine scales used to measure the students' attitudes were Attitude Toward Success in Physics Scale (AS), The Physics as a Male Domain Scale (MD), The Mother Scale (M), The Father Scale (F), The Teacher Scale (T), The Confidence in Learning Physics Scale (C), The Physics Anxiety Scale (A), The Effectance Motivation Scale in Physics (E), and The Physics Usefulness Scale (U). Hypothesis I states that there is a significant difference in the domain scores of African-American college students in the Fennema-Sherman Math Attitudes Scales adapted for physics. It was found using a repeated measures ANOVA that there was a significant difference between the attitudes of African-Americans on the nine attitude scales of the Fennema-Sherman Math Attitude Scales, F(8,992) = 43.09, p < .001. Hypothesis II states that there is a statistically significant difference in domain scores between African-American males and African-American females in the Fennema-Sherman Attitude Scales. It was found using a MANOVA that there was not a significant difference between the domain scores of African-American males and African-American females, F(8, 116) = .38, p > .05. Hypothesis III states that there is a statistically significant relationship between attitude towards physics and achievement for African-American students. The students with good attitudes toward physics would have a higher level of achievement

  13. Physics of intense, high energy radiation effects.

    SciTech Connect

    Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; Hartman, E. Frederick; Magyar, Rudolph J.; Crozier, Paul Stewart

    2011-02-01

    This document summarizes the work done in our three-year LDRD project titled 'Physics of Intense, High Energy Radiation Effects.' This LDRD is focused on electrical effects of ionizing radiation at high dose-rates. One major thrust throughout the project has been the radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) produced by the ionizing radiation. Another important consideration has been the electrical effect of dose-enhanced radiation. This transient effect can produce an electromagnetic pulse (EMP). The unifying theme of the project has been the dielectric function. This quantity contains much of the physics covered in this project. For example, the work on transient electrical effects in radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) has been a key focus for the work on the EMP effects. This physics in contained in the dielectric function, which can also be expressed as a conductivity. The transient defects created during a radiation event are also contained, in principle. The energy loss lead the hot electrons and holes is given by the stopping power of ionizing radiation. This information is given by the inverse dielectric function. Finally, the short time atomistic phenomena caused by ionizing radiation can also be considered to be contained within the dielectric function. During the LDRD, meetings about the work were held every week. These discussions involved theorists, experimentalists and engineers. These discussions branched out into the work done in other projects. For example, the work on EMP effects had influence on another project focused on such phenomena in gases. Furthermore, the physics of radiation detectors and radiation dosimeters was often discussed, and these discussions had impact on related projects. Some LDRD-related documents are now stored on a sharepoint site (https://sharepoint.sandia.gov/sites/LDRD-REMS/default.aspx). In the remainder of this document the work is described in catergories but there is much overlap between the atomistic calculations, the

  14. Multi-physics and multi-scale characterization of shale anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarout, J.; Nadri, D.; Delle Piane, C.; Esteban, L.; Dewhurst, D.; Clennell, M. B.

    2012-12-01

    Shales are the most abundant sedimentary rock type in the Earth's shallow crust. In the past decade or so, they have attracted increased attention from the petroleum industry as reservoirs, as well as more traditionally for their sealing capacity for hydrocarbon/CO2 traps or underground waste repositories. The effectiveness of both fundamental and applied shale research is currently limited by (i) the extreme variability of physical, mechanical and chemical properties observed for these rocks, and by (ii) the scarce data currently available. The variability in observed properties is poorly understood due to many factors that are often irrelevant for other sedimentary rocks. The relationships between these properties and the petrophysical measurements performed at the field and laboratory scales are not straightforward, translating to a scale dependency typical of shale behaviour. In addition, the complex and often anisotropic micro-/meso-structures of shales give rise to a directional dependency of some of the measured physical properties that are tensorial by nature such as permeability or elastic stiffness. Currently, fundamental understanding of the parameters controlling the directional and scale dependency of shale properties is far from complete. Selected results of a multi-physics laboratory investigation of the directional and scale dependency of some critical shale properties are reported. In particular, anisotropic features of shale micro-/meso-structures are related to the directional-dependency of elastic and fluid transport properties: - Micro-/meso-structure (μm to cm scale) characterization by electron microscopy and X-ray tomography; - Estimation of elastic anisotropy parameters on a single specimen using elastic wave propagation (cm scale); - Estimation of the permeability tensor using the steady-state method on orthogonal specimens (cm scale); - Estimation of the low-frequency diffusivity tensor using NMR method on orthogonal specimens (<

  15. Physical and emotional effects of whistleblowing.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Sally; Ahern, Kathy

    2002-01-01

    This research examined the stress-induced health effects of whistleblowing and non-whistleblowing on nurses in Western Australia. A descriptive survey design was used to explore the physical and emotional problems experienced by nurses who did and did not blow the whistle on misconduct in the workplace. A questionnaire based on Lazarus and Folkman's Model of Stress and Coping was developed and posted anonymously to general and mental health nurses. Ninety-five nurses responded to the questionnaire, and 70 were identified as whistleblowers and 25 were identified as non-whistleblowers. Results indicated that 70% of whistleblowers and 64% of non-whistleblowers experienced stress-induced physical problems from being involved in a whistleblowing situation. The most common physical problems experienced by nurses were restless sleep, fatigue, headaches, insomnia, and increased smoking. In addition, 94% of whistleblowers and 92% of non-whistleblowers suffered stress-related emotional problems, the most frequent being anger, anxiety, and disillusionment. Whistleblowers and non-whistleblowers suffered a similar percentage of physical health problems, whereas non-whistleblowers suffered a higher percentage of emotional health problems, especially feelings of guilt, shame, and unworthiness. These findings suggest that whistleblowing situations are stressful and may cause physical and emotional health problems whether one blows the whistle or not. PMID:11813350

  16. Hidden from view: coupled dark sector physics and small scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elahi, Pascal J.; Lewis, Geraint F.; Power, Chris; Carlesi, Edoardo; Knebe, Alexander

    2015-09-01

    We study cluster mass dark matter (DM) haloes, their progenitors and surroundings in a coupled dark matter-dark energy (DE) model and compare it to quintessence and Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) models with adiabatic zoom simulations. When comparing cosmologies with different expansions histories, growth functions and power spectra, care must be taken to identify unambiguous signatures of alternative cosmologies. Shared cosmological parameters, such as σ8, need not be the same for optimal fits to observational data. We choose to set our parameters to ΛCDM z = 0 values. We find that in coupled models, where DM decays into DE, haloes appear remarkably similar to ΛCDM haloes despite DM experiencing an additional frictional force. Density profiles are not systematically different and the subhalo populations have similar mass, spin, and spatial distributions, although (sub)haloes are less concentrated on average in coupled cosmologies. However, given the scatter in related observables (V_max,R_{V_max}), this difference is unlikely to distinguish between coupled and uncoupled DM. Observations of satellites of Milky Way and M31 indicate a significant subpopulation reside in a plane. Coupled models do produce planar arrangements of satellites of higher statistical significance than ΛCDM models; however, in all models these planes are dynamically unstable. In general, the non-linear dynamics within and near large haloes masks the effects of a coupled dark sector. The sole environmental signature we find is that small haloes residing in the outskirts are more deficient in baryons than their ΛCDM counterparts. The lack of a pronounced signal for a coupled dark sector strongly suggests that such a phenomena would be effectively hidden from view.

  17. Psychometric Properties of the Attitudes toward Physical Activity Scale: A Rasch Analysis Based on Data From Five Locations.

    PubMed

    Mok, Magdalena Mo Ching; Chin, Ming Kai; Chen, Shihui; Emeljanovas, Arunas; Mieziene, Brigita; Bronikowski, Michal; Laudanska-Krzeminska, Ida; Milanovic, Ivana; Pasic, Milan; Balasekaran, Govindasamy; Phua, Kia Wang; Makaza, Daga

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the development and validation of the Attitudes toward Physical Activity Scale (APAS) to measure the attitudes, beliefs, and self-efficacy toward physical activity by children at the primary school level. The framework included: physical fitness, self-efficacy, personal best goal orientation in physical activity, interest in physical activity, importance of physical activity, benefits of physical activity, contributions of video exercise to learning in school subjects, contributions of video exercise to learning about health and environmental support. The sample comprised of 630 school students between grades 1 and 7 from five countries, namely Lithuania (29%), Poland (26%), Serbia (19%), Singapore (16%) and Zimbabwe (11%). Rasch analysis found empirical evidence in support of measurement validity of the APAS in terms of Rasch item reliabilities, unidimensionality, effectiveness of response categories, and absence of gender differential item functioning (DIF). The validation of the APAS according to the Rasch model meant that a dependable tool was established for gauging programme effectiveness of intervention programs on physical activity of primary school children in classroom settings at various geographical locations globally. PMID:26771567

  18. Seebeck effect at the atomic scale.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eui-Sup; Cho, Sanghee; Lyeo, Ho-Ki; Kim, Yong-Hyun

    2014-04-01

    The atomic variations of electronic wave functions at the surface and electron scattering near a defect have been detected unprecedentedly by tracing thermoelectric voltages given a temperature bias [Cho et al., Nat. Mater. 12, 913 (2013)]. Because thermoelectricity, or the Seebeck effect, is associated with heat-induced electron diffusion, how the thermoelectric signal is related to the atomic-scale wave functions and what the role of the temperature is at such a length scale remain very unclear. Here we show that coherent electron and heat transport through a pointlike contact produces an atomic Seebeck effect, which is described by the mesoscopic Seebeck coefficient multiplied by an effective temperature drop at the interface. The mesoscopic Seebeck coefficient is approximately proportional to the logarithmic energy derivative of local density of states at the Fermi energy. We deduced that the effective temperature drop at the tip-sample junction could vary at a subangstrom scale depending on atom-to-atom interaction at the interface. A computer-based simulation method of thermoelectric images is proposed, and a point defect in graphene was identified by comparing experiment and the simulation of thermoelectric imaging. PMID:24745445

  19. Scaled-physical-model studies of the steam-drive process. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Doscher, T.M.

    1982-11-01

    The main goal of this project was to gain an understanding of the influence of controllable, operating practices and of reservoir parameters on the steam drive. The steam drive, because the chief phenomena of fluid flow and heat flow obey the same laws of diffusion, can be physically scaled. The validity of the results of the scaled models is evidenced by the correspondence of the results with those reported in field operations. In order to conserve on resources, this report is limited to a summary statement of the findings and conclusions of the overall project with separate chapters devoted to an account of specific tasks which came to fruition during the latter part of the project. Summary of results are presented for the following projects: gravitational instability of a steam drive; roles of oil viscosity and steam temperature on the production of crude oil when the steam flow is stratified; extension of the steam drive to tars and bitumens; occurrence of the optimum steam injection rate; emulsification and oil productivity; role of reservoir thickness; cyclic injection of steam in a steam drive; high gravity crudes; partial substitution of inert gas for steam. Two projects completed and described in detail are: effect of oil viscosity on reservoir thickness on the steam drive; and anticipated effect of diurnal injection on steam efficiency.

  20. Social Support and Peer Norms Scales for Physical Activity in Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Jiying; Robbins, Lorraine B.; Resnicow, Ken; Bakhoya, Marion

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate psychometric properties of a Social Support and Peer Norms Scale in 5th-7th grade urban girls. Methods Baseline data from 509 girls and test-retest data from another 94 girls in the Midwestern US were used. Results Cronbach's alpha was .83 for the Social Support Scale and .72 for the Peer Norms Scale, whereas test-re-test reliability was .78 for both scales. Exploratory factor analysis suggested a single factor structure for the Social Support Scale, and a 3-factor structure for the Peer Norms Scale. Social support was correlated with accelerometer-measured physical activity (r = .13, p = .006), and peer norms (r = .50, p < .0001). Conclusions Both scales have adequate psychometric properties. PMID:25207514

  1. The effects of the "physical BEMER® vascular therapy", a method for the physical stimulation of the vasomotion of precapillary microvessels in case of impaired microcirculation, on sleep, pain and quality of life of patients with different clinical pictures on the basis of three scientifically validated scales.

    PubMed

    Bohn, Wolfgang; Hess, Lorenzo; Burger, Ralph

    2013-01-01

    As part of the statutory market monitoring of certified medical devices, 658 valid patient questionnaires were evaluated between April 2011 and March 2013. The questions consisted mainly of three scientifically recognized scales for assessing the changes of sleep, pain and quality of life in patients who had used the "physical BEMER® vascular therapy" for different diseases over 6 weeks. The result clearly shows that there are significant improvements in all areas surveyed through the application of this complementary treatment option, regardless of the underlying disease. PMID:23940071

  2. Regionalization of subsurface stormflow parameters of hydrologic models: Up-scaling from physically based numerical simulations at hillslope scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Melkamu; Ye, Sheng; Li, Hong-yi; Huang, Maoyi; Leung, L. Ruby; Fiori, Aldo; Sivapalan, Murugesu

    2014-11-01

    Subsurface stormflow is an important component of the rainfall-runoff response, especially in steep forested regions. However; its contribution is poorly represented in current generation of land surface hydrological models (LSMs) and catchment-scale rainfall-runoff models. The lack of physical basis of common parameterizations precludes a priori estimation (i.e. without calibration), which is a major drawback for prediction in ungauged basins, or for use in global models. This paper is aimed at deriving physically based parameterizations of the storage-discharge relationship relating to subsurface flow. These parameterizations are derived through a two-step up-scaling procedure: firstly, through simulations with a physically based (Darcian) subsurface flow model for idealized three dimensional rectangular hillslopes, accounting for within-hillslope random heterogeneity of soil hydraulic properties, and secondly, through subsequent up-scaling to the catchment scale by accounting for between-hillslope and within-catchment heterogeneity of topographic features (e.g., slope). These theoretical simulation results produced parameterizations of the storage-discharge relationship in terms of soil hydraulic properties, topographic slope and their heterogeneities, which were consistent with results of previous studies. Yet, regionalization of the resulting storage-discharge relations across 50 actual catchments in eastern United States, and a comparison of the regionalized results with equivalent empirical results obtained on the basis of analysis of observed streamflow recession curves, revealed a systematic inconsistency. It was found that the difference between the theoretical and empirically derived results could be explained, to first order, by climate in the form of climatic aridity index. This suggests a possible co-dependence of climate, soils, vegetation and topographic properties, and suggests that subsurface flow parameterization needed for ungauged locations

  3. Regionalization of subsurface stormflow parameters of hydrologic models: Up-scaling from physically based numerical simulations at hillslope scale

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Melkamu; Ye, Sheng; Li, Hongyi; Huang, Maoyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Fiori, Aldo; Sivapalan, Murugesu

    2014-07-19

    Subsurface stormflow is an important component of the rainfall-runoff response, especially in steep forested regions. However; its contribution is poorly represented in current generation of land surface hydrological models (LSMs) and catchment-scale rainfall-runoff models. The lack of physical basis of common parameterizations precludes a priori estimation (i.e. without calibration), which is a major drawback for prediction in ungauged basins, or for use in global models. This paper is aimed at deriving physically based parameterizations of the storage-discharge relationship relating to subsurface flow. These parameterizations are derived through a two-step up-scaling procedure: firstly, through simulations with a physically based (Darcian) subsurface flow model for idealized three dimensional rectangular hillslopes, accounting for within-hillslope random heterogeneity of soil hydraulic properties, and secondly, through subsequent up-scaling to the catchment scale by accounting for between-hillslope and within-catchment heterogeneity of topographic features (e.g., slope). These theoretical simulation results produced parameterizations of the storage-discharge relationship in terms of soil hydraulic properties, topographic slope and their heterogeneities, which were consistent with results of previous studies. Yet, regionalization of the resulting storage-discharge relations across 50 actual catchments in eastern United States, and a comparison of the regionalized results with equivalent empirical results obtained on the basis of analysis of observed streamflow recession curves, revealed a systematic inconsistency. It was found that the difference between the theoretical and empirically derived results could be explained, to first order, by climate in the form of climatic aridity index. This suggests a possible codependence of climate, soils, vegetation and topographic properties, and suggests that subsurface flow parameterization needed for ungauged locations must

  4. The Colorado Haemophilia Paediatric Joint Physical Examination Scale: normal values and interrater reliability.

    PubMed

    Hacker, M R; Funk, S M; Manco-Johnson, M J

    2007-01-01

    Persons with haemophilia often experience their first joint haemorrhage in early childhood. Recurrent bleeding into a joint may lead to significant morbidity, specifically haemophilic arthropathy. Early identification of the onset and progression of joint damage is critical to preserving joint structure and function. Physical examination is the most feasible approach to monitor joint health. Our group developed the Colorado Haemophilia Paediatric Joint Physical Examination Scale to identify earlier signs of joint degeneration and incorporate developmentally appropriate tasks for assessing joint function in young children. This study's objectives were to establish normal ranges for this scale and assess interrater reliability. The ankles, knees and elbows of 72 healthy boys aged 1 through 7 years were evaluated by a physical therapist to establish normal ranges. Exactly 10 boys in each age category from 2 to 7 years were evaluated by a second physical therapist to determine interrater reliability. The original scale was modified to account for the finding that mild angulation in the weight-bearing joints is developmentally normal. The interrater reliability of the scale ranged from fair to good, underscoring the need for physical therapists to have specific training in the orthopaedic assessment of very young children and the measurement error inherent in the goniometer. Modifications to axial alignment scoring will allow the scale to distinguish healthy joints from those suffering frequent haemarthroses. PMID:17212728

  5. Resolving Lyman-alpha Emission On Physical Scales < 270 pc at z > 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayliss, Matthew

    2014-10-01

    We propose ACS-WFC Ramp narrowband imaging of six strongly lensed Lyman-alpha Emitters (LAEs) at z > 4 that will spatially resolve the Lyman-alpha line emitting regions on scales < 270 pc. The best available observations (HST, Spitzer, 10m ground based telescopes) are unable to provide robust measurements of the structure of these galaxies from blank field studies, but strong gravitational lensing provides a unique opportunity to peer into the heart of young star forming galaxies at high redshift and address outstanding questions regarding their morphology and evolution. Strong lensing magnifies each of our target LAEs, increasing the effective spatial resolution of ACS-WFC such that the point spread function will correspond to physical scales < 270 parsecs within all six z > 4 galaxies. Additionally, the boost in flux due to gravitational lensing makes our proposed targets the brightest sources of their kind at these redshifts, in spite of the fact that they are intrinsically ~L* LAEs. The proposed observations will probe the morphological properties of Lyman-alpha and UV continuum emission in typical/representative high-redshift LAEs with signal-to-noise and spatial resolution comparable to studies of Lyman-alpha emitting galaxies in the z ~ 0.1 universe. The resulting data will bridge the gap between deep ground-based studies of blank field LAEs at high redshift, and detailed studies of low-redshift LAEs.

  6. Physical Methods for Intracellular Delivery: Practical Aspects from Laboratory Use to Industrial-Scale Processing

    PubMed Central

    Meacham, J. Mark; Durvasula, Kiranmai; Degertekin, F. Levent; Fedorov, Andrei G.

    2015-01-01

    Effective intracellular delivery is a significant impediment to research and therapeutic applications at all processing scales. Physical delivery methods have long demonstrated the ability to deliver cargo molecules directly to the cytoplasm or nucleus, and the mechanisms underlying the most common approaches (microinjection, electroporation, and sonoporation) have been extensively investigated. In this review, we discuss established approaches, as well as emerging techniques (magnetofection, optoinjection, and combined modalities). In addition to operating principles and implementation strategies, we address applicability and limitations of various in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo platforms. Importantly, we perform critical assessments regarding (1) treatment efficacy with diverse cell types and delivered cargo molecules, (2) suitability to different processing scales (from single cell to large populations), (3) suitability for automation/integration with existing workflows, and (4) multiplexing potential and flexibility/adaptability to enable rapid changeover between treatments of varied cell types. Existing techniques typically fall short in one or more of these criteria; however, introduction of micro-/nanotechnology concepts, as well as synergistic coupling of complementary method(s), can improve performance and applicability of a particular approach, overcoming barriers to practical implementation. For this reason, we emphasize these strategies in examining recent advances in development of delivery systems. PMID:23813915

  7. Physical methods for intracellular delivery: practical aspects from laboratory use to industrial-scale processing.

    PubMed

    Meacham, J Mark; Durvasula, Kiranmai; Degertekin, F Levent; Fedorov, Andrei G

    2014-02-01

    Effective intracellular delivery is a significant impediment to research and therapeutic applications at all processing scales. Physical delivery methods have long demonstrated the ability to deliver cargo molecules directly to the cytoplasm or nucleus, and the mechanisms underlying the most common approaches (microinjection, electroporation, and sonoporation) have been extensively investigated. In this review, we discuss established approaches, as well as emerging techniques (magnetofection, optoinjection, and combined modalities). In addition to operating principles and implementation strategies, we address applicability and limitations of various in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo platforms. Importantly, we perform critical assessments regarding (1) treatment efficacy with diverse cell types and delivered cargo molecules, (2) suitability to different processing scales (from single cell to large populations), (3) suitability for automation/integration with existing workflows, and (4) multiplexing potential and flexibility/adaptability to enable rapid changeover between treatments of varied cell types. Existing techniques typically fall short in one or more of these criteria; however, introduction of micro-/nanotechnology concepts, as well as synergistic coupling of complementary method(s), can improve performance and applicability of a particular approach, overcoming barriers to practical implementation. For this reason, we emphasize these strategies in examining recent advances in development of delivery systems. PMID:23813915

  8. High response piezoelectric and piezoresistive materials for fast, low voltage switching: simulation and theory of transduction physics at the nanometer-scale.

    PubMed

    Newns, Dennis M; Elmegreen, Bruce G; Liu, Xiao-Hu; Martyna, Glenn J

    2012-07-17

    Field effect transistors are reaching the limits imposed by the scaling of materials and the electrostatic gating physics underlying the device. In this Communication, a new type of switch based on different physics, which combines known piezoelectric and piezoresistive materials, is described and is shown by theory and simulation to achieve gigahertz digital switching at low voltage (0.1 V). PMID:22689473

  9. Scaling effects for piezoelectric energy harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, D.; Beeby, S. P.

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a fundamental investigation into scaling effects for the mechanical properties and electrical output power of piezoelectric vibration energy harvesters. The mechanical properties investigated in this paper include resonant frequency of the harvester and its frequency tunability, which is essential for the harvester to operate efficiently under broadband excitations. Electrical output power studied includes cases when the harvester is excited under both constant vibration acceleration and constant vibration amplitude. The energy harvester analysed in this paper is based on a cantilever structure, which is typical of most vibration energy harvesters. Both detailed mathematical derivation and simulation are presented. Furthermore, various piezoelectric materials used in MEMS and non-MEMS harvesters are also considered in the scaling analysis.

  10. Multi-scale/multi-physical modeling in head/disk interface of magnetic data storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Pil Seung; Smith, Robert; Vemuri, Sesha Hari; Jhon, Young In; Tak, Kyungjae; Moon, Il; Biegler, Lorenz T.; Jhon, Myung S.

    2012-04-01

    The model integration of the head-disk interface (HDI) in the hard disk drive system, which includes the hierarchy of highly interactive layers (magnetic layer, carbon overcoat (COC), lubricant, and air bearing system (ABS)), has recently been focused upon to resolve technical barriers and enhance reliability. Heat-assisted magnetic recording especially demands that the model simultaneously incorporates thermal and mechanical phenomena by considering the enormous combinatorial cases of materials and multi-scale/multi-physical phenomena. In this paper, we explore multi-scale/multi-physical simulation methods for HDI, which will holistically integrate magnetic layers, COC, lubricants, and ABS in non-isothermal conditions.

  11. Psychometric Evaluation of the Physical Activity Enjoyment Scale in Adults with Functional Limitations.

    PubMed

    Murrock, Carolyn J; Bekhet, Abir; Zauszniewski, Jaclene A

    2016-01-01

    Enjoyment is an important construct for understanding physical activity participation, and it has not been examined in adults with functional limitations. This secondary analysis reported the reliability and validity of the Physical Activity Enjoyment Scale (PACES) in a convenience sample of 40 adults with functional limitations. The participants completed the PACES, Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), and the Late Life Function and Disability Instrument (LLFDI) prior to beginning a 12-week feasibility dance intervention study. Results indicated reliability as Cronbach's alpha was .95 and mean inter-item correlation was .52. To further support reliability, homogeneity of the instrument was evaluated using item-to-total scale correlations. Homogeneity was supported as all items had corrected item-to-total correlations greater than .30. For validity, the PACES was significantly related to only the Physical Function component of the LLFDI (r = .38, p = .02), but not the CES-D. Exploratory factor analysis revealed a 3-factor structure that accounted for 73.76% of the variance. This feasibility intervention dance study represented the first attempt to examine the psychometric properties of the PACES in adults with functional limitations. The findings demonstrate support for the scale's reliability and validity among adults with functional limitations. Results are informative as further psychometric testing of the PACES is recommended using randomized clinical trials with larger sample sizes. Enjoyment for physical activity is an important construct for understanding physical activity participation in adults with functional limitations. PMID:26980666

  12. Probing the scale of new physics by Advanced LIGO/VIRGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dev, P. S. Bhupal; Mazumdar, A.

    2016-05-01

    We show that if the new physics beyond the standard model is associated with a first-order phase transition around 107- 108 GeV , the energy density stored in the resulting stochastic gravitational waves and the corresponding peak frequency are within the projected final sensitivity of the advanced LIGO/VIRGO detectors. We discuss some possible new physics scenarios that could arise at such energies, and in particular, the consequences for Peccei-Quinn and supersymmetry breaking scales.

  13. Sleuth at CDF: A Quasi-model-independent search for new electroweak scale physics

    SciTech Connect

    Choudalakis, Georgios; /MIT, LNS

    2007-10-01

    These proceedings describe Sleuth, a quasi-model-independent search strategy targeting new electroweak scale physics, and its application to 927 pb{sup -1} of CDF II data. Exclusive final states are analyzed for an excess of data beyond the Standard Model prediction at large summed scalar transverse momentum. This analysis of high-pT data represents one of the most encompassing searches so far conducted for new physics at the energy frontier.

  14. Investigation of the physical scaling of sea spray spume droplet production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairall, C. W.; Banner, M. L.; Peirson, W. L.; Asher, W.; Morison, R. P.

    2009-10-01

    In this paper we report on a laboratory study, the Spray Production and Dynamics Experiment (SPANDEX), conducted at the University of New South Wales Water Research Laboratory in Australia. The goals of SPANDEX were to illuminate physical aspects of spume droplet production and dispersion; verify theoretical simplifications used to estimate the source function from ambient droplet concentration measurements; and examine the relationship between the implied source strength and forcing parameters such as wind speed, surface turbulent stress, and wave properties. Observations of droplet profiles give reasonable confirmation of the basic power law profile relationship that is commonly used to relate droplet concentrations to the surface source strength. This essentially confirms that, even in a wind tunnel, there is a near balance between droplet production and removal by gravitational settling. The observations also indicate considerable droplet mass may be present for sizes larger than 1.5 mm diameter. Phase Doppler Anemometry observations revealed significant mean horizontal and vertical slip velocities that were larger closer to the surface. The magnitude seems too large to be an acceleration time scale effect. Scaling of the droplet production surface source strength proved to be difficult. The wind speed forcing varied only 23% and the stress increased a factor of 2.2. Yet, the source strength increased by about a factor of 7. We related this to an estimate of surface wave energy flux through calculations of the standard deviation of small-scale water surface disturbance, a wave-stress parameterization, and numerical wave model simulations. This energy index only increased by a factor of 2.3 with the wind forcing. Nonetheless, a graph of spray mass surface flux versus surface disturbance energy is quasi-linear with a substantial threshold.

  15. Properties of the patient administered questionnaires: new scales measuring physical and psychological symptoms of hip and knee disorders.

    PubMed

    Mancuso, Carol A; Ranawat, Amar S; Meftah, Morteza; Koob, Trevor W; Ranawat, Chitranjan S

    2012-04-01

    The Patient Administered Questionnaires (PAQ) incorporate physical and psychological symptoms into one scale and permit more comprehensive self-reports for hip and knee disorders. We tested the psychometric properties of the PAQ-Hip and PAQ-Knee. Correlations between baseline PAQ-Hip and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) were .39 to .72 (n = 102), .39 to .69 for score change (n = 68 post-total hip arthroplasty), and most κ values > .60 (n = 50). Correlations between baseline PAQ-Knee and WOMAC were .35 to .64 (n = 100), .62 to .79 for score change (n = 43 post-total knee arthroplasty), and most κ values >.60 (n = 51). For both scales, effect sizes were higher than for the WOMAC, and there was modest correlation between physical and psychological questions, indicating these concepts are not completely interchangeable. Thus, the PAQ scales have strong psychometric properties and are unique compared with existing scales by including physical and psychological symptoms. PMID:21945079

  16. Psychometric Properties of the "Sport Motivation Scale (SMS)" Adapted to Physical Education.

    PubMed

    Granero-Gallegos, Antonio; Baena-Extremera, Antonio; Gómez-López, Manuel; Sánchez-Fuentes, José Antonio; Abraldes, J Arturo

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the factor structure of a Spanish version of the Sport Motivation Scale adapted to physical education. A second aim was to test which one of three hypothesized models (three, five and seven-factor) provided best model fit. 758 Spanish high school students completed the Sport Motivation Scale adapted for Physical Education and also completed the Learning and Performance Orientation in Physical Education Classes Questionnaire. We examined the factor structure of each model using confirmatory factor analysis and also assessed internal consistency and convergent validity. The results showed that all three models in Spanish produce good indicators of fitness, but we suggest using the seven-factor model (χ(2)/gl = 2.73; ECVI = 1.38) as it produces better values when adapted to physical education, that five-factor model (χ(2)/gl = 2.82; ECVI = 1.44) and three-factor model (χ(2)/gl = 3.02; ECVI = 1.53). Key PointsPhysical education research conducted in Spain has used the version of SMS designed to assess motivation in sport, but validity reliability and validity results in physical education have not been reported.Results of the present study lend support to the factorial validity and internal reliability of three alternative factor structures (3, 5, and 7 factors) of SMS adapted to Physical Education in Spanish.Although all three models in Spanish produce good indicators of fitness, but we suggest using the seven-factor model. PMID:25435772

  17. Psychometric Properties of the “Sport Motivation Scale (SMS)” Adapted to Physical Education

    PubMed Central

    Granero-Gallegos, Antonio; Baena-Extremera, Antonio; Gómez-López, Manuel; Sánchez-Fuentes, José Antonio; Abraldes, J. Arturo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the factor structure of a Spanish version of the Sport Motivation Scale adapted to physical education. A second aim was to test which one of three hypothesized models (three, five and seven-factor) provided best model fit. 758 Spanish high school students completed the Sport Motivation Scale adapted for Physical Education and also completed the Learning and Performance Orientation in Physical Education Classes Questionnaire. We examined the factor structure of each model using confirmatory factor analysis and also assessed internal consistency and convergent validity. The results showed that all three models in Spanish produce good indicators of fitness, but we suggest using the seven-factor model (χ2/gl = 2.73; ECVI = 1.38) as it produces better values when adapted to physical education, that five-factor model (χ2/gl = 2.82; ECVI = 1.44) and three-factor model (χ2/gl = 3.02; ECVI = 1.53). Key Points Physical education research conducted in Spain has used the version of SMS designed to assess motivation in sport, but validity reliability and validity results in physical education have not been reported. Results of the present study lend support to the factorial validity and internal reliability of three alternative factor structures (3, 5, and 7 factors) of SMS adapted to Physical Education in Spanish. Although all three models in Spanish produce good indicators of fitness, but we suggest using the seven-factor model. PMID:25435772

  18. Development of four self-report measures of job stressors and strain: Interpersonal Conflict at Work Scale, Organizational Constraints Scale, Quantitative Workload Inventory, and Physical Symptoms Inventory.

    PubMed

    Spector, P E; Jex, S M

    1998-10-01

    Despite the widespread use of self-report measures of both job-related stressors and strains, relatively few carefully developed scales for which validity data exist are available. In this article, we discuss 3 job stressor scales (Interpersonal Conflict at Work Scale, Organizational Constraints Scale, and Quantitative Workload Inventory) and 1 job strain scale (Physical Symptoms Inventory). Using meta-analysis, we combined the results of 18 studies to provide estimates of relations between our scales and other variables. Data showed moderate convergent validity for the 3 job stressor scales, suggesting some objectively to these self-reports. Norms for each scale are provided. PMID:9805281

  19. The Effect of Physical Education Climates on Elementary Students' Physical Activity Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wadsworth, Danielle D.; Robinson, Leah E.; Rudisill, Mary E.; Gell, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    Background: With the growing need for children from underserved populations to be physically active it is imperative to create developmentally appropriate and enjoyable physical education programs that promote physical activity. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of mastery and performance climates on physical activity during…

  20. Monitoring Physical and Biogeochemical Dynamics of Uranium Bioremediation at the Intermediate Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarrell, A. N.; Figueroa, L. A.; Rodriguez, D.; Haas, A.; Revil, A.

    2011-12-01

    Subsurface uranium above desired levels for aquifer use categories exists naturally and from historic mining and milling practices. In situ bioimmobilization offers a cost effective alternative to conventional pump and treat methods by stimulating growth of microorganisms that lead to the reduction and precipitation of uranium. Vital to the long-term success of in situ bioimmobilization is the ability to successfully predict and demonstrate treatment effectiveness to assure that regulatory goals are met. However, successfully monitoring the progress over time is difficult and requires long-term stewardship to ensure effective treatment due to complex physical and biogeochemical heterogeneity. In order to better understand these complexities and the resultant effect on uranium immobilization, innovative systematic monitoring approaches with multiple performance indicators must be investigated. A key issue for uranium bioremediation is the long term stability of solid-phase reduction products. It has been shown that a combination of data from electrode-based monitoring, self-potential monitoring, oxidation reduction potential (ORP), and water level sensors provides insight for identifying and localizing bioremediation activity and can provide better predictions of deleterious biogeochemical change such as pore clogging. In order to test the proof-of-concept of these sensing techniques and to deconvolve redox activity from other electric potential changing events, an intermediate scale 3D tank experiment has been developed. Well-characterized materials will be packed into the tank and an artificial groundwater will flow across the tank through a constant-head boundary. The experiment will utilize these sensing methods to image the electrical current produced by bacteria as well as indications of when and where electrical activity is occurring, such as with the reduction of radionuclides. This work will expand upon current knowledge by exploring the behavior of uranium

  1. A multi-scale approach to the physics of ion beam cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solov'yov, A. V.; Surdutovich, E.; Scifoni, E.; Mishustin, I.; Greiner, W.

    2008-12-01

    We are developing a multi-scale approach to understanding the physics related to ion/proton-beam cancer therapy and the calculation of the probability of DNA damage as a result of irradiation of tumours with energetic ions (up to 430 MeV/u). This approach is inclusive with respect to different scales, starting from the long scale, defined by the ion stopping, followed by a smaller scale, defined by secondary electrons and radicals, and ending with the shortest scale, defined by interactions of secondaries with the DNA. We present calculations of the probabilities of single and double strand breaks of DNA and suggest a way to further elaborate on such calculations.

  2. Local topology, multi-scale interactions and stochasticity in space plasma physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Materassi, M.; Consolini, G.

    2014-12-01

    In space physics very important phenomena, as reconnection, are determined by the local topology of the streamlines and magnetic lines of plasma, and by multi-scale interactions. In this work, an attempt is presented to deal with dynamical variables highlighting both the local topology and the role of space scale. In order to promote local topology to the role of a dynamical variable, use is made of the gradients of the velocity and of the magnetic field, through which the description of the local topology becomes very transparent. Such a formulation, well explored in Hydrodynamics, is extended here to the MHD. The new dynamical variables evolve in a finite scale stochastic dynamics: letting the scale appear explicitly as a variable of the problem helps studying inter-scale processes, while statistical aspects of topological variable dynamics are expected to be extremely relevant in the turbulent regime, where a stochastic field scenario is, in practice, taking place.

  3. Affective Response to Physical Activity: Testing for Measurement Invariance of the Physical Activity Affect Scale across Active and Non-Active Individuals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Laura C.; Tompkins, Sara Anne; Schmiege, Sarah J.; Nilsson, Renea; Bryan, Angela

    2010-01-01

    Affective responses to physical activity are assumed to play a role in exercise initiation and maintenance. The Physical Activity Affect Scale measures four dimensions of an individual's affective response to exercise. Group differences in the interpretation of scale items can impact the interpretability of mean differences, underscoring the need…

  4. Evaluation of Social Cognitive Scaling Response Options in the Physical Activity Domain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhodes, Ryan E.; Matheson, Deborah Hunt; Mark, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the reliability, variability, and predictive validity of two common scaling response formats (semantic differential, Likert-type) and two numbers of response options (5-point, 7-point) in the physical activity domain. Constructs of the theory of planned behavior were chosen in this analysis based on its…

  5. The Psychometric Properties of the Physical Education Lesson Attitude Scale for Preservice Classroom Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oncu, Erman

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Physical Education Attitude Scale for Preservice Classroom Teachers (PEAS-PCT). The study was conducted on 561 Turkish preservice classroom teachers at the end of the 2011-2012 Fall Semester. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were conducted to ascertain the…

  6. Retrospective Assessment of Childhood Sexual and Physical Abuse: A Comparison of Scaled and Behaviorally Specific Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiLillo, David; Fortier, Michelle A.; Hayes, Sarah A.; Trask, Emily; Perry, Andrea R.; Messman-Moore, Terri; Fauchier, Angele; Nash, Cindy

    2006-01-01

    This study compared retrospective reports of childhood sexual and physical abuse as assessed by two measures: the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ), which uses a Likert-type scaling approach, and the Computer Assisted Maltreatment Inventory (CAMI), which employs a behaviorally specific means of assessment. Participants included 1,195…

  7. Introduction to SCALE-UP: Student-Centered Activities for Large Enrollment University Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beichner, Robert J.; Saul, Jeffery M.; Allain, Rhett J.; Deardorff, Duane L.; Abbott, David S.

    SCALE-UP is an extension of the highly successful IMPEC (Integrated Math, Physics, Engineering, and Chemistry) project, one of North Carolina State's curricular reform efforts undertaken as part of the SUCCEED coalition. The authors utilize the interactive, collaboratively based instruction that worked well in smaller class settings and find ways…

  8. Reliability and Construct Validity of Turkish Version of Physical Education Activities Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Memis, Ugur Altay

    2013-01-01

    This research was conducted to examine the reliability and construct validity of Turkish version of physical education activities scale (PEAS) which was developed by Thomason (2008). Participants in this study included 313 secondary and high school students from 7th to 11th grades. To analyse the data, confirmatory factor analysis, post hoc…

  9. The VCOP Scale: A Measure of Overprotection in Parents of Physically Vulnerable Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Logan; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Developed Vulnerable Child/Overprotecting Parent Scale to measure overprotecting versus optimal developmental stimulation tendencies for parents of physically vulnerable children. Items were administered to parents whose parenting techniques had been rated as either highly overprotective or as optimal by group of physicians and other…

  10. The Children's Perceived Locus of Causality Scale for Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pannekoek, Linda; Piek, Jan P.; Hagger, Martin S.

    2014-01-01

    A mixed methods design was applied to evaluate the application of the Perceived Locus of Causality scale (PLOC) to preadolescent samples in physical education settings. Subsequent to minor item adaptations to accommodate the assessment of younger samples, qualitative pilot tests were performed (N = 15). Children's reports indicated the need…

  11. Psychological and Physical Well-Being in the Elderly: The Perceived Well-Being Scale (PWB).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reker, Gary T.; Wong, Paul T. P.

    1984-01-01

    Describes the development of the Perceived Well-Being Scale (PWB), which allows for separate assessment of psychological and physical well-being. Several studies bearing on the psychometric properties and usefulness of the PWB are presented and the implications of the findings are discussed. (Author/CT)

  12. Study of the structure and physical properties of quasicrystals using large scale facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boissieu, Marc

    2012-04-01

    Quasicrystals have been puzzling scientists since their discovery. In this article we review some of the recent advances in this field and show how the use of large scale facilities has brought in decisive information for the understanding of their structure and physical properties.

  13. The projected effect of scaling up midwifery.

    PubMed

    Homer, Caroline S E; Friberg, Ingrid K; Dias, Marcos Augusto Bastos; ten Hoope-Bender, Petra; Sandall, Jane; Speciale, Anna Maria; Bartlett, Linda A

    2014-09-20

    We used the Lives Saved Tool (LiST) to estimate deaths averted if midwifery was scaled up in 78 countries classified into three tertiles using the Human Development Index (HDI). We selected interventions in LiST to encompass the scope of midwifery practice, including prepregnancy, antenatal, labour, birth, and post-partum care, and family planning. Modest (10%), substantial (25%), or universal (95%) scale-up scenarios from present baseline levels were all found to reduce maternal deaths, stillbirths, and neonatal deaths by 2025 in all countries tested. With universal coverage of midwifery interventions for maternal and newborn health, excluding family planning, for the countries with the lowest HDI, 61% of all maternal, fetal, and neonatal deaths could be prevented. Family planning alone could prevent 57% of all deaths because of reduced fertility and fewer pregnancies. Midwifery with both family planning and interventions for maternal and newborn health could avert a total of 83% of all maternal deaths, stillbirths, and neonatal deaths. The inclusion of specialist care in the scenarios resulted in an increased number of deaths being prevented, meaning that midwifery care has the greatest effect when provided within a functional health system with effective referral and transfer mechanisms to specialist care. PMID:24965814

  14. Cavitation erosion - scale effect and model investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiger, F.; Rutschmann, P.

    2015-12-01

    The experimental works presented in here contribute to the clarification of erosive effects of hydrodynamic cavitation. Comprehensive cavitation erosion test series were conducted for transient cloud cavitation in the shear layer of prismatic bodies. The erosion pattern and erosion rates were determined with a mineral based volume loss technique and with a metal based pit count system competitively. The results clarified the underlying scale effects and revealed a strong non-linear material dependency, which indicated significantly different damage processes for both material types. Furthermore, the size and dynamics of the cavitation clouds have been assessed by optical detection. The fluctuations of the cloud sizes showed a maximum value for those cavitation numbers related to maximum erosive aggressiveness. The finding suggests the suitability of a model approach which relates the erosion process to cavitation cloud dynamics. An enhanced experimental setup is projected to further clarify these issues.

  15. Gauge Physics of Spin Hall Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Seng Ghee; Jalil, Mansoor B. A.; Ho, Cong Son; Siu, Zhuobin; Murakami, Shuichi

    2015-12-01

    Spin Hall effect (SHE) has been discussed in the context of Kubo formulation, geometric physics, spin orbit force, and numerous semi-classical treatments. It can be confusing if the different pictures have partial or overlapping claims of contribution to the SHE. In this article, we present a gauge-theoretic, time-momentum elucidation, which provides a general SHE equation of motion, that unifies under one theoretical framework, all contributions of SHE conductivity due to the kinetic, the spin orbit force (Yang-Mills), and the geometric (Murakami-Fujita) effects. Our work puts right an ambiguity surrounding previously partial treatments involving the Kubo, semiclassical, Berry curvatures, or the spin orbit force. Our full treatment shows the Rashba 2DEG SHE conductivity to be instead of -, and Rashba heavy hole instead of -. This renewed treatment suggests a need to re-derive and re-calculate previously studied SHE conductivity.

  16. Gauge Physics of Spin Hall Effect

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Seng Ghee; Jalil, Mansoor B. A.; Ho, Cong Son; Siu, Zhuobin; Murakami, Shuichi

    2015-01-01

    Spin Hall effect (SHE) has been discussed in the context of Kubo formulation, geometric physics, spin orbit force, and numerous semi-classical treatments. It can be confusing if the different pictures have partial or overlapping claims of contribution to the SHE. In this article, we present a gauge-theoretic, time-momentum elucidation, which provides a general SHE equation of motion, that unifies under one theoretical framework, all contributions of SHE conductivity due to the kinetic, the spin orbit force (Yang-Mills), and the geometric (Murakami-Fujita) effects. Our work puts right an ambiguity surrounding previously partial treatments involving the Kubo, semiclassical, Berry curvatures, or the spin orbit force. Our full treatment shows the Rashba 2DEG SHE conductivity to be instead of −, and Rashba heavy hole instead of −. This renewed treatment suggests a need to re-derive and re-calculate previously studied SHE conductivity. PMID:26689260

  17. Physics and Dynamics Coupling Across Scales in the Next Generation CESM. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Bacmeister, Julio T.

    2015-06-12

    This project examines physics/dynamics coupling, that is, exchange of meteorological profiles and tendencies between an atmospheric model’s dynamical core and its various physics parameterizations. Most model physics parameterizations seek to represent processes that occur on scales smaller than the smallest scale resolved by the dynamical core. As a consequence a key conceptual aspect of parameterizations is an assumption about the subgrid variability of quantities such as temperature, humidity or vertical wind. Most existing parameterizations of processes such as turbulence, convection, cloud, and gravity wave drag make relatively ad hoc assumptions about this variability and are forced to introduce empirical parameters, i.e., “tuning knobs” to obtain realistic simulations. These knobs make systematic dependences on model grid size difficult to quantify.

  18. Regional scale landslide risk assessment with a dynamic physical model - development, application and uncertainty analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna, Byron Quan; Vidar Vangelsten, Bjørn; Liu, Zhongqiang; Eidsvig, Unni; Nadim, Farrokh

    2013-04-01

    Landslide risk must be assessed at the appropriate scale in order to allow effective risk management. At the moment, few deterministic models exist that can do all the computations required for a complete landslide risk assessment at a regional scale. This arises from the difficulty to precisely define the location and volume of the released mass and from the inability of the models to compute the displacement with a large amount of individual initiation areas (computationally exhaustive). This paper presents a medium-scale, dynamic physical model for rapid mass movements in mountainous and volcanic areas. The deterministic nature of the approach makes it possible to apply it to other sites since it considers the frictional equilibrium conditions for the initiation process, the rheological resistance of the displaced flow for the run-out process and fragility curve that links intensity to economic loss for each building. The model takes into account the triggering effect of an earthquake, intense rainfall and a combination of both (spatial and temporal). The run-out module of the model considers the flow as a 2-D continuum medium solving the equations of mass balance and momentum conservation. The model is embedded in an open source environment geographical information system (GIS), it is computationally efficient and it is transparent (understandable and comprehensible) for the end-user. The model was applied to a virtual region, assessing landslide hazard, vulnerability and risk. A Monte Carlo simulation scheme was applied to quantify, propagate and communicate the effects of uncertainty in input parameters on the final results. In this technique, the input distributions are recreated through sampling and the failure criteria are calculated for each stochastic realisation of the site properties. The model is able to identify the released volumes of the critical slopes and the areas threatened by the run-out intensity. The obtained final outcome is the estimation

  19. The role of physical habitat and sampling effort on estimates of benthic macroinvertebrate taxonomic richness at basin and site scales.

    PubMed

    Silva, Déborah R O; Ligeiro, Raphael; Hughes, Robert M; Callisto, Marcos

    2016-06-01

    Taxonomic richness is one of the most important measures of biological diversity in ecological studies, including those with stream macroinvertebrates. However, it is impractical to measure the true richness of any site directly by sampling. Our objective was to evaluate the effect of sampling effort on estimates of macroinvertebrate family and Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, and Trichoptera (EPT) genera richness at two scales: basin and stream site. In addition, we tried to determine which environmental factors at the site scale most influenced the amount of sampling effort needed. We sampled 39 sites in the Cerrado biome (neotropical savanna). In each site, we obtained 11 equidistant samples of the benthic assemblage and multiple physical habitat measurements. The observed basin-scale richness achieved a consistent estimation from Chao 1, Jack 1, and Jack 2 richness estimators. However, at the site scale, there was a constant increase in the observed number of taxa with increased number of samples. Models that best explained the slope of site-scale sampling curves (representing the necessity of greater sampling effort) included metrics that describe habitat heterogeneity, habitat structure, anthropogenic disturbance, and water quality, for both macroinvertebrate family and EPT genera richness. Our results demonstrate the importance of considering basin- and site-scale sampling effort in ecological surveys and that taxa accumulation curves and richness estimators are good tools for assessing sampling efficiency. The physical habitat explained a significant amount of the sampling effort needed. Therefore, future studies should explore the possible implications of physical habitat characteristics when developing sampling objectives, study designs, and calculating the needed sampling effort. PMID:27165604

  20. Pore-scaling Modeling of Physical Property Changes During CO2 Injection into Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keehm, Y.; Yoo, G.

    2009-12-01

    Carbon dioxide is a green-house gas and is believed to be an important factor in global warming and climate change. Many countries around the world are working on reducing and sequestrating CO2 to follow international regulations. One of promising area for CO2 sequestration is the storage in geological formation. To accurately determine the performance of geological injection and storage, quantification and monitoring of the physical property changes are essential. In this paper, we are presenting a new approach for the monitoring of CO2 sequestration in sandstone using pore-scale simulation techniques. The method consists of three steps: 1) acquisition of high-resolution pore microstructures by X-ray micro-tomography; 2) CO2 injection simulation using lattice-Boltzmann (LB) two-phase flow simulation; and 3) FEM property simulations (electrical and elastic) at different CO2 saturations during the injection. We use three different sandstone samples: sand-pack, Berea sandstone, and B2 sandstone from offshore of Korea. The porosity of the sand-pack is 42% and that of two sandstone samples is around 17%. The digital pore structures were obtained by X-ray micro-tomography with a spatial resolution of 2 micron. The LB two-phase flow simulation is then conducted by injecting CO2 into fully water-saturated samples and gives a realistic movement of CO2 in the pore structure. At each CO2 saturation, electrical and elastic properties are determined by pore-scale FEM simulation techniques. The electrical conductivity decreases almost linearly as CO2 saturations increases; however, the P-wave velocity decrease more rapidly at the low CO2 saturation (up to 30%), than at higher saturation. S-wave velocity does not show any significant changes. The higher porosity rock shows more sensitivity to saturation changes. The modeling shows that we can have quantitative relations between physical properties and CO2 saturation, which can be used to determine injection performance and

  1. Precision Higgs Physics, Effective Field Theory, and Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henning, Brian Quinn

    The recent discovery of the Higgs boson calls for detailed studies of its properties. As precision measurements are indirect probes of new physics, the appropriate theoretical framework is effective field theory. In the first part of this thesis, we present a practical three-step procedure of using the Standard Model effective field theory (SM EFT) to connect ultraviolet (UV) models of new physics with weak scale precision observables. With this procedure, one can interpret precision measurements as constraints on the UV model concerned. We give a detailed explanation for calculating the effective action up to one-loop order in a manifestly gauge covariant fashion. The covariant derivative expansion dramatically simplifies the process of matching a UV model with the SM EFT, and also makes available a universal formalism that is easy to use for a variety of UV models. A few general aspects of renormalization group running effects and choosing operator bases are discussed. Finally, we provide mapping results between the bosonic sector of the SM EFT and a complete set of precision electroweak and Higgs observables to which present and near future experiments are sensitive. With a detailed understanding of how to use the SM EFT, we then turn to applications and study in detail two well-motivated test cases. The first is singlet scalar field that enables the first-order electroweak phase transition for baryogenesis; the second example is due to scalar tops in the MSSM. We find both Higgs and electroweak measurements are sensitive probes of these cases. The second part of this thesis centers around dark matter, and consists of two studies. In the first, we examine the effects of relic dark matter annihilations on big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). The magnitude of these effects scale simply with the dark matter mass and annihilation cross-section, which we derive. Estimates based on these scaling behaviors indicate that BBN severely constrains hadronic and radiative dark

  2. Effects of reservoir heterogeneity on scaling of effective mass transfer coefficient for solute transport.

    PubMed

    Leung, Juliana Y; Srinivasan, Sanjay

    2016-09-01

    Modeling transport process at large scale requires proper scale-up of subsurface heterogeneity and an understanding of its interaction with the underlying transport mechanisms. A technique based on volume averaging is applied to quantitatively assess the scaling characteristics of effective mass transfer coefficient in heterogeneous reservoir models. The effective mass transfer coefficient represents the combined contribution from diffusion and dispersion to the transport of non-reactive solute particles within a fluid phase. Although treatment of transport problems with the volume averaging technique has been published in the past, application to geological systems exhibiting realistic spatial variability remains a challenge. Previously, the authors developed a new procedure where results from a fine-scale numerical flow simulation reflecting the full physics of the transport process albeit over a sub-volume of the reservoir are integrated with the volume averaging technique to provide effective description of transport properties. The procedure is extended such that spatial averaging is performed at the local-heterogeneity scale. In this paper, the transport of a passive (non-reactive) solute is simulated on multiple reservoir models exhibiting different patterns of heterogeneities, and the scaling behavior of effective mass transfer coefficient (Keff) is examined and compared. One such set of models exhibit power-law (fractal) characteristics, and the variability of dispersion and Keff with scale is in good agreement with analytical expressions described in the literature. This work offers an insight into the impacts of heterogeneity on the scaling of effective transport parameters. A key finding is that spatial heterogeneity models with similar univariate and bivariate statistics may exhibit different scaling characteristics because of the influence of higher order statistics. More mixing is observed in the channelized models with higher-order continuity. It

  3. Effects of reservoir heterogeneity on scaling of effective mass transfer coefficient for solute transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Juliana Y.; Srinivasan, Sanjay

    2016-09-01

    Modeling transport process at large scale requires proper scale-up of subsurface heterogeneity and an understanding of its interaction with the underlying transport mechanisms. A technique based on volume averaging is applied to quantitatively assess the scaling characteristics of effective mass transfer coefficient in heterogeneous reservoir models. The effective mass transfer coefficient represents the combined contribution from diffusion and dispersion to the transport of non-reactive solute particles within a fluid phase. Although treatment of transport problems with the volume averaging technique has been published in the past, application to geological systems exhibiting realistic spatial variability remains a challenge. Previously, the authors developed a new procedure where results from a fine-scale numerical flow simulation reflecting the full physics of the transport process albeit over a sub-volume of the reservoir are integrated with the volume averaging technique to provide effective description of transport properties. The procedure is extended such that spatial averaging is performed at the local-heterogeneity scale. In this paper, the transport of a passive (non-reactive) solute is simulated on multiple reservoir models exhibiting different patterns of heterogeneities, and the scaling behavior of effective mass transfer coefficient (Keff) is examined and compared. One such set of models exhibit power-law (fractal) characteristics, and the variability of dispersion and Keff with scale is in good agreement with analytical expressions described in the literature. This work offers an insight into the impacts of heterogeneity on the scaling of effective transport parameters. A key finding is that spatial heterogeneity models with similar univariate and bivariate statistics may exhibit different scaling characteristics because of the influence of higher order statistics. More mixing is observed in the channelized models with higher-order continuity. It

  4. Sensitivity of the recent methane budget to LMDz sub-grid-scale physical parameterizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Locatelli, R.; Bousquet, P.; Saunois, M.; Chevallier, F.; Cressot, C.

    2015-09-01

    With the densification of surface observing networks and the development of remote sensing of greenhouse gases from space, estimations of methane (CH4) sources and sinks by inverse modeling are gaining additional constraining data but facing new challenges. The chemical transport model (CTM) linking the flux space to methane mixing ratio space must be able to represent these different types of atmospheric constraints for providing consistent flux estimations. Here we quantify the impact of sub-grid-scale physical parameterization errors on the global methane budget inferred by inverse modeling. We use the same inversion setup but different physical parameterizations within one CTM. Two different schemes for vertical diffusion, two others for deep convection, and one additional for thermals in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) are tested. Different atmospheric methane data sets are used as constraints (surface observations or satellite retrievals). At the global scale, methane emissions differ, on average, from 4.1 Tg CH4 per year due to the use of different sub-grid-scale parameterizations. Inversions using satellite total-column mixing ratios retrieved by GOSAT are less impacted, at the global scale, by errors in physical parameterizations. Focusing on large-scale atmospheric transport, we show that inversions using the deep convection scheme of Emanuel (1991) derive smaller interhemispheric gradients in methane emissions, indicating a slower interhemispheric exchange. At regional scale, the use of different sub-grid-scale parameterizations induces uncertainties ranging from 1.2 % (2.7 %) to 9.4 % (14.2 %) of methane emissions when using only surface measurements from a background (or an extended) surface network. Moreover, spatial distribution of methane emissions at regional scale can be very different, depending on both the physical parameterizations used for the modeling of the atmospheric transport and the observation data sets used to constrain the inverse

  5. Teachers' and Students' Perceptions of Effective Physics Teacher Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korur, Fikret; Eryilmaz, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Problem Statement: What do teachers and students in Turkey perceive as the common characteristics of effective physics teachers? Purpose of Study: The first aim was to investigate the common characteristics of effective physics teachers by asking students and teachers about the effects of teacher characteristics on student physics achievement and…

  6. Direct Physical Effects of CO2-Fertilization on Global Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govindasamy, B.; Caldeira, K.; Mirin, A.; Wickett, M.

    2005-12-01

    CO2-fertilization affects plant growth, which modifies surface physical properties, altering the surface albedo and latent heat fluxes. Here we investigate how such changes to surface properties via CO2-fertilization, including changes in vegetation distribution, would directly affect the physical climate system. We know of no previous study that has investigated this question. Using a global three-dimensional climate-carbon model that simulates vegetation dynamics, we compare two multi-century simulations: a "Control" simulation with no emissions, and a "Fertilization-noGHG" simulation where the land biosphere is fertilized as a result of prescribed CO2 emissions, but where the climate model sees no additional greenhouse gas forcing. Our simulations indicate that the direct physical effect of CO2-fertilization could be warming over a timescale of a few centuries; we obtain an annual- and global-mean warming of about 0.65 K over 430 years in our model. The average land warming is 1.4 K. We find that this warming is mostly due to the albedo decrease in the Northern Hemisphere boreal forest regions. This albedo-based warming could partially offset the century-scale cooling effect of additional CO2 uptake due to CO2-fertilization. Further study is needed to confirm and better quantify our results.

  7. Effect of physical activity on body composition

    SciTech Connect

    Zanzi, I; Ellis, K J; Aloia, J; Cohn, S H

    1980-01-01

    It has been noted that the deleterious effects on bone calcium of prolonged periods of inactivity, such as bed rest, are halted following resumption of activity. It would seem possible in light of the observations that have been made, that exercise may stimulate bone formation and perhaps counter, to some extent, bone loss as observed in the osteoporosis of aging. The present study was designed to determine the relation between total body calcium, total body potassium and bone mineral content of the radius to the degree of physical activity in a population of normal subjects. Measurement of the calcium was made by in-vivo total body neutron activation analysis. Bone mineral content of the radius and total body potassium, (an index of lean body mass) were measured by photon absorptiometry and the whole body counter, respectively.

  8. A Scale Assessing Music Student Teachers' Rehearsal Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergee, Martin J.

    1992-01-01

    Describes the development of a scale for evaluating music student teachers' rehearsal effectiveness. Includes scale items representing aspects of rehearsal effectiveness for three interpretable factors: conducting technique, teacher-student rapport, and instructional skills. Advises that scaling of rehearsal effectiveness should be only part of a…

  9. Exergames: Increasing Physical Activity through Effective Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudella, Jennifer L.; Butz, Jennifer V.

    2015-01-01

    Due to the growing obesity epidemic in the United States, educators must consider new ways to increase physical activity in an effort to address obesity. There are a variety of ways educators can increase physical activity in the classroom, and exergames--video games that require physical movement in order to play--are a modern-day approach to…

  10. A tomographic physical phantom of the newborn child with real-time dosimetry. II. Scaling factors for calculation of mean organ dose in pediatric radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Staton, Robert J.; Jones, A. Kyle; Lee, Choonik; Hintenlang, David E.; Arreola, Manuel M.; Williams, Jonathon L.; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2006-09-15

    Following the recent completion of a tomographic physical newborn dosimetry phantom with incorporated metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimetry system, it was necessary to derive scaling factors in order to calculate organ doses in the physical phantom given point dose measurements via the MOSFET dosimeters (preceding article in this issue). In this study, we present the initial development of scaling factors using projection radiograph data. These point-to-organ dose scaling factors (SF{sub POD}) were calculated using a computational phantom created from the same data set as the physical phantom, but which also includes numerous segmented internal organs and tissues. The creation of these scaling factors is discussed, as well as the errors associated when using only point dose measurements to calculate mean organ doses and effective doses in physical phantoms. Scaling factors for various organs ranged from as low as 0.70 to as high as 1.71. Also, the ability to incorporate improvements in the computational phantom into the physical phantom using scaling factors is discussed. An comprehensive set of SF{sub POD} values is presented in this article for application in pediatric radiography of newborn patients.

  11. Neutrino mass as a signal of TeV scale physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohapatra, Rabindra N.

    2016-07-01

    If the origin of neutrino masses is due to physics at the TeV scale, it would be of tremendous interest since it can be probed using ongoing collider as well as low energy rare process searches. So, a key question is: could the new physics behind neutrino masses be near the TeV scale? In this brief overview, I present arguments in favor of this possibility by presenting the example of TeV scale left-right symmetric models (LRSM) for neutrino mass based on type I seesaw paradigm. A particular issue with understanding the small neutrino masses in TeV scale LRSM is to understand the suppression of type II seesaw contribution to neutrino masses, which a priori could be much larger than desired. I discuss how using either D-parity breaking or by using supersymmetry, one can suppress these contributions to the desired level in a natural way. Experimental probes of this hypothesis are briefly touched upon. Constraints of supersymmetry and that of successful leptogenesis on the left-right scale are also emphasized. The former provides an upper limit and the latter, a lower limit on mWR.

  12. SCALE-UP Your Astronomy and Physics Undergraduate Courses to Incorporate Heliophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Rawi, Ahlam N.; Cox, Amanda; Hoshino, Laura; Fitzgerald, Cullen; Cebulka, Rebecca; Rodriguez Garrigues, Alvar; Montgomery, Michele; Velissaris, Chris; Flitsiyan, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Although physics and astronomy courses include heliophysics topics, students still leave these courses without knowing what heliophysics is and how heliophysics relates to their daily lives. To meet goals of NASA's Living With a Star Program of incorporating heliophysics into undergraduate curriculum, UCF Physics has modified courses such as Astronomy (for non-science majors), Astrophysics, and SCALE-UP: Electricity and Magnetism for Engineers and Scientists to incorporate heliophysics topics. In this presentation, we discuss these incorporations and give examples that have been published in NASA Wavelength. In an associated poster, we present data on student learnin

  13. Physical aspects of a length scale for the Gulf Stream front

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, T.W.

    1983-07-20

    A discussion is presented of the physical interpretation of the length scale, lambda, introduced in a recent paper by Kao and Cheney (1982) to scale the sea surface height anomaly across the Gulf Stream front. Additional results of sea-surface height anomaly profiles computed from the hydrographic data from Fuglister's GULF STREAM 60 are also included. In all cases the width of the anomaly is spanned rather precisely by 2lambda. The relationship between lambda and the internal Rossby radius of deformation lambda, is discussed.

  14. Effects of scale on internal blast measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granholm, R.; Sandusky, H.; Lee, R.

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents a comparative study between large and small-scale internal blast experiments with the goal of using the small-scale analog for energetic performance evaluation. In the small-scale experiment, highly confined explosive samples <0.5 g were subjected to the output from a PETN detonator while enclosed in a 3-liter chamber. Large-scale tests up to 23 kg were unconfined and released in a chamber with a factor of 60,000 increase in volume. The comparative metric in these experiments is peak quasi-static overpressure, with the explosive sample expressed as sample energy/chamber volume, which normalizes measured pressures across scale. Small-scale measured pressures were always lower than the large-scale measurements, because of heat-loss to the high confinement inherent in the small-scale apparatus. This heat-loss can be quantified and used to correct the small-scale pressure measurements. In some cases the heat-loss was large enough to quench reaction of lower energy samples. These results suggest that small-scale internal blast tests do correlate with their large-scale counterparts, provided that heat-loss to confinement can be measured, and that less reactive or lower energy samples are not quenched by heat-loss.

  15. The effective temperature scale of M dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajpurohit, A. S.; Reylé, C.; Allard, F.; Homeier, D.; Schultheis, M.; Bessell, M. S.; Robin, A. C.

    2013-08-01

    Context. Despite their large number in the Galaxy, M dwarfs remain elusive objects and the modeling of their photosphere has long remained a challenge (molecular opacities, dust cloud formation). Aims: Our objectives are to validate the BT-Settl model atmospheres, update the M dwarf Teff-spectral type relation, and find the atmospheric parameters of the stars in our sample. Methods: We compare two samples of optical spectra covering the whole M dwarf sequence with the most recent BT-Settl synthetic spectra and use a χ2 minimization technique to determine Teff. The first sample consists of 97 low-resolution spectra obtained with New Technology Telescope (NTT) at La Silla Observatory. The second sample contains 55 medium-resolution spectra obtained at the Siding Spring Observatory (SSO). The spectral typing is realized by comparison with already classified M dwarfs. Results: We show that the BT-Settl synthetic spectra reproduce the slope of the spectral energy distribution and most of its features. Only the CaOH band at 5570 Å and AlH and NaH hydrides in the blue part of the spectra are still missing in the models. The Teff scale obtained with the higher resolved SSO 2.3 m spectra is consistent with that obtained with the NTT spectra. We compare our Teff scale with those of other authors and with published isochrones using the BT-Settl colors. We also present relations between effective temperature, spectral type, and colors of the M dwarfs. Tables 1 and 2 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  16. Constraining the geometry, size scale and physical conditions of outflowing broad absorption line regions in quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Sui Chi

    Quasars are known for generating luminosities of up to 1047 erg s--1 in volumes of scales smaller than 2 x 10 15 cm. The optical/UV continuum emission is generally believed to arise from a rotating accretion disk (AD) surrounding a supermassive black hole (SMBH) of ˜ 108 M⊙ . Such emission can be calculated by treating the AD as a multi-temperature blackbody. While the continuum emitting region is well defined, the properties, location and kinematics of the broad emission line regions (BELRs) and broad absorption line regions (BALRs) remain unclear. On one hand, the reverberation mapping technique can give constraints on the location of the BELRs, but not the kinematics. On the other hand, the line-of-sight kinematics of the BALRs is directly observable, but their locations are not well constrained, resulting in a large range of inferred distances, from 0.01 pc to tens of kpc. Therefore, I combined observational results to investigate the geometry, size, and physical conditions of the BELRs and BALRs. I verified that the Lyalpha and CIV BELRs are located at a similar distance. Using these findings, I was able to constrain the size of the Lyalpha BELR and place a lower limit on the size of the N V BALR. I built an empirical model with the optical/UV continuum emission from the AD, the BELR from the chromosphere of the AD, and the outflowing BALR. In the continuum region, I found that over 95 percent of the total flux comes from the region at ~ 125rg, where rg is the gravitational radius of the SMBH. For the BELRs, I computed a disk-wind model with relativistic effects to explain the often-observed single-peaked BEL profiles. However, I show that such a model cannot explain the observed blue asymmetries in the high-ionization BELs or their blueshifted peaks relative to low-ionization BELs. Using results on time variability of BALR gas, and assuming the variability is caused by the gas moving perpendicular across the line-of-sight over a time scale of about a year

  17. Gauge Physics of Spin Hall Effect.

    PubMed

    Tan, Seng Ghee; Jalil, Mansoor B A; Ho, Cong Son; Siu, Zhuobin; Murakami, Shuichi

    2015-01-01

    Spin Hall effect (SHE) has been discussed in the context of Kubo formulation, geometric physics, spin orbit force, and numerous semi-classical treatments. It can be confusing if the different pictures have partial or overlapping claims of contribution to the SHE. In this article, we present a gauge-theoretic, time-momentum elucidation, which provides a general SHE equation of motion, that unifies under one theoretical framework, all contributions of SHE conductivity due to the kinetic, the spin orbit force (Yang-Mills), and the geometric (Murakami-Fujita) effects. Our work puts right an ambiguity surrounding previously partial treatments involving the Kubo, semiclassical, Berry curvatures, or the spin orbit force. Our full treatment shows the Rashba 2DEG SHE conductivity to be [formula in text] instead of [formula in text], and Rashba heavy hole [formula in text] instead of [formula in text]. This renewed treatment suggests a need to re-derive and re-calculate previously studied SHE conductivity. PMID:26689260

  18. Scaling and correlation of human movements in cyberspace and physical space.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhi-Dan; Huang, Zi-Gang; Huang, Liang; Liu, Huan; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2014-11-01

    Understanding the dynamics of human movements is key to issues of significant current interest such as behavioral prediction, recommendation, and control of epidemic spreading. We collect and analyze big data sets of human movements in both cyberspace (through browsing of websites) and physical space (through mobile towers) and find a superlinear scaling relation between the mean frequency of visit 〈f〉 and its fluctuation σ:σ∼〈f〉^{β} with β≈1.2. The probability distribution of the visiting frequency is found to be a stretched exponential function. We develop a model incorporating two essential ingredients, preferential return and exploration, and show that these are necessary for generating the scaling relation extracted from real data. A striking finding is that human movements in cyberspace and physical space are strongly correlated, indicating a distinctive behavioral identifying characteristic and implying that the behaviors in one space can be used to predict those in the other. PMID:25493727

  19. Scaling and correlation of human movements in cyberspace and physical space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhi-Dan; Huang, Zi-Gang; Huang, Liang; Liu, Huan; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2014-11-01

    Understanding the dynamics of human movements is key to issues of significant current interest such as behavioral prediction, recommendation, and control of epidemic spreading. We collect and analyze big data sets of human movements in both cyberspace (through browsing of websites) and physical space (through mobile towers) and find a superlinear scaling relation between the mean frequency of visit and its fluctuation σ :σ ˜β with β ≈1.2 . The probability distribution of the visiting frequency is found to be a stretched exponential function. We develop a model incorporating two essential ingredients, preferential return and exploration, and show that these are necessary for generating the scaling relation extracted from real data. A striking finding is that human movements in cyberspace and physical space are strongly correlated, indicating a distinctive behavioral identifying characteristic and implying that the behaviors in one space can be used to predict those in the other.

  20. Assessment of the physical flood susceptibility of buildings on a large scale - conceptual and methodological frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco-Vogt, A.; Schanze, J.

    2014-08-01

    There are various approaches available for assessing the flood vulnerability and damage to buildings and critical infrastructure. They cover pre- and post-event methods for different scales. However, there can hardly be found any method that allows for a large-scale pre-event assessment of the built structures with a high resolution. To make advancements in this respect, the paper presents, first, a conceptual framework for understanding the physical flood susceptibility of buildings and, second, a methodological framework for its assessment. The latter ranges from semi-automatic extraction of buildings, mainly from remote sensing with a subsequent classification and systematic characterisation, to the assessment of the physical flood susceptibility on the basis of depth-impact functions. The work shows results of the methodology's implementation and testing in a settlement of the city of Magangué, along the Magdalena River in Colombia.

  1. Microphysics in the Multi-Scale Modeling Systems with Unified Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Chern, J.; Lamg, S.; Matsui, T.; Shen, B.; Zeng, X.; Shi, R.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, exponentially increasing computer power has extended Cloud Resolving Model (CRM) integrations from hours to months, the number of computational grid points from less than a thousand to close to ten million. Three-dimensional models are now more prevalent. Much attention is devoted to precipitating cloud systems where the crucial 1-km scales are resolved in horizontal domains as large as 10,000 km in two-dimensions, and 1,000 x 1,000 km2 in three-dimensions. Cloud resolving models now provide statistical information useful for developing more realistic physically based parameterizations for climate models and numerical weather prediction models. It is also expected that NWP and mesoscale model can be run in grid size similar to cloud resolving model through nesting technique. Recently, a multi-scale modeling system with unified physics was developed at NASA Goddard. It consists of (l) a cloud-resolving model (Goddard Cumulus Ensemble model, GCE model), (2) a regional scale model (a NASA unified weather research and forecast, WRF), (3) a coupled CRM and global model (Goddard Multi-scale Modeling Framework, MMF), and (4) a land modeling system. The same microphysical processes, long and short wave radiative transfer and land processes and the explicit cloud-radiation, and cloud-surface interactive processes are applied in this multi-scale modeling system. This modeling system has been coupled with a multi-satellite simulator to use NASA high-resolution satellite data to identify the strengths and weaknesses of cloud and precipitation processes simulated by the model. In this talk, the microphysics developments of the multi-scale modeling system will be presented. In particular, the results from using multi-scale modeling system to study the heavy precipitation processes will be presented.

  2. Development and psychometric validation of the Mental, Physical, and Spiritual Well-Being Scale.

    PubMed

    Vella-Brodrick, D A; Allen, F C

    1995-10-01

    Due to the growing interest in holistic health and well-being, the Mental, Physical, and Spiritual Well-being Scale was developed. This well-being scale has 30 items and incorporates mental, physical, and spiritual subscales. An initial set of items was developed and 186 university students responded to these. An exploratory factor analysis was conducted using principal components analysis with varimax rotation (N=100) to reduce the number of items in the scale. Three factors were extracted based on the eigenvalues, loading coefficients exceeding 0.3, and the screen test. Ten items from each of the three factors were selected, reducing the number of items from 66 to 30. Another factor analysis, performed on 129 employees of the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation and 229 students from Monash University, indicated three factors were representative of the mental, physical, and spiritual subscales. Test-retest reliabilities over 1 mo. ranged from 0.87 to 0.97 for the three subscales whilst internal consistency ranged from 0.75 to 0.85. Concurrent validity was examined using the General Health Questionnaire and the Spiritual Well-being Scale. The discriminant validity of the MPS was also explored using three activity groups nominated as highly physical (weight training) or highly mental (chess) or highly spiritual (prayer). Out of a total of 88 cases, 77.3% of these were correctly classified into their actual activity group based on their scores. Sample sizes were moderate and testing was of limited samples. More psychometric work is needed but preliminary findings indicate an accurate and reliable test. PMID:8559898

  3. Materials Science and Physics at Micro/Nano-Scales. FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Judy Z

    2009-09-07

    The scope of this project is to study nanostructures of semiconductors and superconductors, which have been regarded as promising building blocks for nanoelectronic and nanoelectric devices. The emphasis of this project is on developing novel synthesis approaches for fabrication of nanostructures with desired physical properties. The ultimate goal is to achieve a full control of the nanostructure growth at microscopic scales. The major experimental achievements obtained are summarized

  4. Effects of a Physical Education Supportive Curriculum and Technological Devices on Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clapham, Emily Dean; Sullivan, Eileen C.; Ciccomascolo, Lori E.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a physical education supportive curriculum and technological devices, heart rate monitor (HRM) and pedometer (PED), on physical activity. A single-subject ABAB research design was used to examine amount and level of participation in physical activity among 106 suburban fourth and fifth…

  5. The Effects of Exergaming on Physical Activity in a Third-Grade Physical Education Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shayne, Rachel K.; Fogel, Victoria A.; Miltenberger, Raymond G.; Koehler, Shannon

    2012-01-01

    We compared the effects of exergaming and traditional physical education on physical activity among 4 active children who were not overweight and who had experience with the exergaming activities prior to the study. Results showed that exergaming produced substantially higher percentages of physical activity and opportunity to engage in physical…

  6. Sensitivity of the recent methane budget to LMDz sub-grid scale physical parameterizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Locatelli, R.; Bousquet, P.; Saunois, M.; Chevallier, F.; Cressot, C.

    2015-04-01

    With the densification of surface observing networks and the development of remote sensing of greenhouse gases from space, estimations of methane (CH4) sources and sinks by inverse modelling face new challenges. Indeed, the chemical transport model used to link the flux space with the mixing ratio space must be able to represent these different types of constraints for providing consistent flux estimations. Here we quantify the impact of sub-grid scale physical parameterization errors on the global methane budget inferred by inverse modelling using the same inversion set-up but different physical parameterizations within one chemical-transport model. Two different schemes for vertical diffusion, two others for deep convection, and one additional for thermals in the planetary boundary layer are tested. Different atmospheric methane datasets are used as constraints (surface observations or satellite retrievals). At the global scale, methane emissions differ, on average, from 4.1 Tg CH4 per year due to the use of different sub-grid scale parameterizations. Inversions using satellite total-column retrieved by GOSAT satellite are less impacted, at the global scale, by errors in physical parameterizations. Focusing on large-scale atmospheric transport, we show that inversions using the deep convection scheme of Emanuel (1991) derive smaller interhemispheric gradient in methane emissions. At regional scale, the use of different sub-grid scale parameterizations induces uncertainties ranging from 1.2 (2.7%) to 9.4% (14.2%) of methane emissions in Africa and Eurasia Boreal respectively when using only surface measurements from the background (extended) surface network. When using only satellite data, we show that the small biases found in inversions using GOSAT-CH4 data and a coarser version of the transport model were actually masking a poor representation of the stratosphere-troposphere gradient in the model. Improving the stratosphere-troposphere gradient reveals a larger

  7. Physical and biological controls on reach to catchment scale nutrient retention and streamwater composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covino, T. P.; McGlynn, B. L.; Wohl, E.

    2014-12-01

    Physical and biological processes occurring within fluvial networks can have strong influence on catchment scale retention of water and nutrients. Quantifying the physical (i.e., hydrologic exchange) and biological (i.e., nutrient uptake) contributions to total retention and deciphering how they relate to catchment morphology remains a central challenge in the hydrologic and biogeo-sciences. Here we present examples from our research that highlight the interactions between biology, physical hydrology, and geomorphology and how they combine to influence nutrient retention and streamwater compositions. Biological nutrient uptake in streams can have substantial influence on downstream fluxes and induce nutrient transformation along stream networks. Additionally, hydrologic loss of water and associated nutrients from streams to surrounding groundwater systems can greatly elongate water and nutrient retention times. While in-stream nutrient uptake is often associated with hyporheic exchanges that occur at sub-meter scales, these are nested within a larger framework of fluvial exchanges (100s - 1000s of meters). Larger scale exchanges can lead to strong shifts in streamwater composition over relatively short spatial scales (~1km) and are often very pronounced along geomorphic transitions (e.g., mountain to valley) and/or catchment retention zones (e.g., alluvial aquifers, wetlands, lakes). In fact, 50 - 80% of the water in the channel can be exchanged and replaced by different water (i.e., groundwater) along geomorphic transitions/catchment retention zones that are ~1 km in scale. These features can enhance geochemical processing through extended interactions between water, sediment, and nutrients. Accordingly, we suggest that although catchment retention features may be limited in spatial extent (~1km) and frequency they have the capacity to play a disproportionately large role in controlling catchment retention dynamics and setting fluvial network streamwater

  8. High-Fidelity Lattice Physics Capabilities of the SCALE Code System Using TRITON

    SciTech Connect

    DeHart, Mark D

    2007-01-01

    Increasing complexity in reactor designs suggests a need to reexamine of methods applied in spent-fuel characterization. The ability to accurately predict the nuclide composition of depleted reactor fuel is important in a wide variety of applications. These applications include, but are not limited to, the design, licensing, and operation of commercial/research reactors and spent-fuel transport/storage systems. New complex design projects such as space reactors and Generation IV power reactors also require calculational methods that provide accurate prediction of the isotopic inventory. New high-fidelity physics methods will be required to better understand the physics associated with both evolutionary and revolutionary reactor concepts as they depart from traditional and well-understood light-water reactor designs. The TRITON sequence of the SCALE code system provides a powerful, robust, and rigorous approach for reactor physics analysis. This paper provides a detailed description of TRITON in terms of its key components used in reactor calculations.

  9. GENASIS   Basics: Object-oriented utilitarian functionality for large-scale physics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardall, Christian Y.; Budiardja, Reuben D.

    2015-11-01

    Aside from numerical algorithms and problem setup, large-scale physics simulations on distributed-memory supercomputers require more basic utilitarian functionality, such as physical units and constants; display to the screen or standard output device; message passing; I/O to disk; and runtime parameter management and usage statistics. Here we describe and make available Fortran 2003 classes furnishing extensible object-oriented implementations of this sort of rudimentary functionality, along with individual 'unit test' programs and larger example problems demonstrating their use. These classes compose the Basics division of our developing astrophysics simulation code GENASIS  (General Astrophysical Simulation System), but their fundamental nature makes them useful for physics simulations in many fields.

  10. GenASiS Basics: Object-oriented utilitarian functionality for large-scale physics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Cardall, Christian Y.; Budiardja, Reuben D.

    2015-06-11

    Aside from numerical algorithms and problem setup, large-scale physics simulations on distributed-memory supercomputers require more basic utilitarian functionality, such as physical units and constants; display to the screen or standard output device; message passing; I/O to disk; and runtime parameter management and usage statistics. Here we describe and make available Fortran 2003 classes furnishing extensible object-oriented implementations of this sort of rudimentary functionality, along with individual `unit test' programs and larger example problems demonstrating their use. Lastly, these classes compose the Basics division of our developing astrophysics simulation code GenASiS (General Astrophysical Simulation System), but their fundamental nature makes them useful for physics simulations in many fields.

  11. GenASiS Basics: Object-oriented utilitarian functionality for large-scale physics simulations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cardall, Christian Y.; Budiardja, Reuben D.

    2015-06-11

    Aside from numerical algorithms and problem setup, large-scale physics simulations on distributed-memory supercomputers require more basic utilitarian functionality, such as physical units and constants; display to the screen or standard output device; message passing; I/O to disk; and runtime parameter management and usage statistics. Here we describe and make available Fortran 2003 classes furnishing extensible object-oriented implementations of this sort of rudimentary functionality, along with individual `unit test' programs and larger example problems demonstrating their use. Lastly, these classes compose the Basics division of our developing astrophysics simulation code GenASiS (General Astrophysical Simulation System), but their fundamental nature makes themmore » useful for physics simulations in many fields.« less

  12. Physics-based animation of large-scale splashing liquids, elastoplastic solids, and model-reduced flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerszewski, Daniel James

    Physical simulation has become an essential tool in computer animation. As the use of visual effects increases, the need for simulating real-world materials increases. In this dissertation, we consider three problems in physics-based animation: large-scale splashing liquids, elastoplastic material simulation, and dimensionality reduction techniques for fluid simulation. Fluid simulation has been one of the greatest successes of physics-based animation, generating hundreds of research papers and a great many special effects over the last fifteen years. However, the animation of large-scale, splashing liquids remains challenging. We show that a novel combination of unilateral incompressibility, mass-full FLIP, and blurred boundaries is extremely well-suited to the animation of large-scale, violent, splashing liquids. Materials that incorporate both plastic and elastic deformations, also referred to as elastioplastic materials, are frequently encountered in everyday life. Methods for animating such common real-world materials are useful for effects practitioners and have been successfully employed in films. We describe a point-based method for animating elastoplastic materials. Our primary contribution is a simple method for computing the deformation gradient for each particle in the simulation. Given the deformation gradient, we can apply arbitrary constitutive models and compute the resulting elastic forces. Our method has two primary advantages: we do not store or compare to an initial rest configuration and we work directly with the deformation gradient. The first advantage avoids poor numerical conditioning and the second naturally leads to a multiplicative model of deformation appropriate for finite deformations. One of the most significant drawbacks of physics-based animation is that ever-higher fidelity leads to an explosion in the number of degrees of freedom. This problem leads us to the consideration of dimensionality reduction techniques. We present

  13. A Scale Analysis of the Effects of US Federal Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pandya, Jessica Zacher

    2012-01-01

    In this essay I argue that the effects of federal policy can be examined through a scale analysis that helps deconstruct the effect of the current widespread accountability movement in the US educational system. I first discuss the concept of scale, including its thus-far limited use in educational research. I define scales not only as…

  14. Effect of Graph Scale on Risky Choice: Evidence from Preference and Process in Decision-Making

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yan; Li, Shu; Bonini, Nicolao; Liu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the effect of graph scale on risky choices. By (de)compressing the scale, we manipulate the relative physical distance between options on a given attribute in a coordinate graphical context. In Experiment 1, the risky choice changes as a function of the scale in the graph. In Experiment 2, we show that the type of graph scale also affects decision times. In Experiment 3, we examine the graph scale effect by using real money among students who have taken statistics courses. Consequently, the scale effects still appear even when we control the variations in calculation ability and increase the gravity with which participants view the consequence of their decisions. This finding is inconsistent with descriptive invariance of preference. The theoretical implications and practical applications of the findings are discussed. PMID:26771530

  15. Crocodile head scales are not developmental units but emerge from physical cracking.

    PubMed

    Milinkovitch, Michel C; Manukyan, Liana; Debry, Adrien; Di-Poï, Nicolas; Martin, Samuel; Singh, Daljit; Lambert, Dominique; Zwicker, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Various lineages of amniotes display keratinized skin appendages (feathers, hairs, and scales) that differentiate in the embryo from genetically controlled developmental units whose spatial organization is patterned by reaction-diffusion mechanisms (RDMs). We show that, contrary to skin appendages in other amniotes (as well as body scales in crocodiles), face and jaws scales of crocodiles are random polygonal domains of highly keratinized skin, rather than genetically controlled elements, and emerge from a physical self-organizing stochastic process distinct from RDMs: cracking of the developing skin in a stress field. We suggest that the rapid growth of the crocodile embryonic facial and jaw skeleton, combined with the development of a very keratinized skin, generates the mechanical stress that causes cracking. PMID:23196908

  16. Scale and Sampling Effects on Floristic Quality

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Floristic Quality Assessment (FQA) is increasingly influential for making land management decisions, for directing conservation policy, and for research. But, the basic ecological properties and limitations of its metrics are ill defined and not well understood–especially those related to sample methods and scale. Nested plot data from a remnant tallgrass prairie sampled annually over a 12-year period, were used to investigate FQA properties associated with species detection rates, species misidentification rates, sample year, and sample grain/area. Plot size had no apparent effect on Mean C (an area’s average Floristic Quality level), nor did species detection levels above 65% detection. Simulated species misidentifications only affected Mean C values at greater than 10% in large plots, when the replaced species were randomly drawn from the broader county-wide species pool. Finally, FQA values were stable over the 12-year study, meaning that there was no evidence that the metrics exhibit year effects. The FQA metric Mean C is demonstrated to be robust to varied sample methodologies related to sample intensity (plot size, species detection rate), as well as sample year. These results will make FQA measures even more appealing for informing land-use decisions, policy, and research for two reasons: 1) The sampling effort needed to generate accurate and consistent site assessments with FQA measures is shown to be far lower than what has previously been assumed, and 2) the stable properties and consistent performance of metrics with respect to sample methods will allow for a remarkable level of comparability of FQA values from different sites and datasets compared to other commonly used ecological metrics. PMID:27489959

  17. Scale and Sampling Effects on Floristic Quality.

    PubMed

    Spyreas, Greg

    2016-01-01

    Floristic Quality Assessment (FQA) is increasingly influential for making land management decisions, for directing conservation policy, and for research. But, the basic ecological properties and limitations of its metrics are ill defined and not well understood-especially those related to sample methods and scale. Nested plot data from a remnant tallgrass prairie sampled annually over a 12-year period, were used to investigate FQA properties associated with species detection rates, species misidentification rates, sample year, and sample grain/area. Plot size had no apparent effect on Mean C (an area's average Floristic Quality level), nor did species detection levels above 65% detection. Simulated species misidentifications only affected Mean C values at greater than 10% in large plots, when the replaced species were randomly drawn from the broader county-wide species pool. Finally, FQA values were stable over the 12-year study, meaning that there was no evidence that the metrics exhibit year effects. The FQA metric Mean C is demonstrated to be robust to varied sample methodologies related to sample intensity (plot size, species detection rate), as well as sample year. These results will make FQA measures even more appealing for informing land-use decisions, policy, and research for two reasons: 1) The sampling effort needed to generate accurate and consistent site assessments with FQA measures is shown to be far lower than what has previously been assumed, and 2) the stable properties and consistent performance of metrics with respect to sample methods will allow for a remarkable level of comparability of FQA values from different sites and datasets compared to other commonly used ecological metrics. PMID:27489959

  18. Depressive Symptoms Negate the Beneficial Effects of Physical Activity on Mortality Risk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Pai-Lin

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to: (1) compare the association between various levels of physical activity (PA) and mortality; and (2) examine the potential modifying effect of depressive symptoms on the PA-mortality associations. Previous large scale randomized studies rarely assess the association in conjunction with modifying effects of depressive…

  19. Effects of Classroom-Based Energizers on Primary Grade Students' Physical Activity Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Catherine Goffreda; DiPerna, James Clyde

    2015-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to determine the effects of classroom-based exercise breaks (Energizers; Mahar, Kenny, Shields, Scales, & Collins, 2006) on students' physical activity levels during the school day. A multiple baseline design across first grade (N = 3) and second grade (N = 3) classrooms was used to examine the effects of the…

  20. Differential Physical and Psychological Effects of Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilfley, Denise; Kunce, Joseph

    1986-01-01

    Evaluated the physical and psychological benefits of an individualized exercise program for "normal" adults. Differences between program completers and dropouts on persistence, fitness, and physical self-concept are reprinted. A number of special strategies to motivate clients who may benefit most from therapeutic exercise programs as an adjunct…

  1. A Validation and Reliability Study of the Physical Activity and Healthy Food Efficacy Scale for Children (PAHFE)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Christina M.; De Ayala, R. J.; Lebow, Ryan; Hayden, Emily

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to obtain validity evidence for the Physical Activity and Healthy Food Efficacy Scale for Children (PAHFE). Construct validity evidence identifies four subscales: Goal-Setting for Physical Activity, Goal-Setting for Healthy Food Choices, Decision-Making for Physical Activity, and Decision-Making for Healthy Food…

  2. Large and local-scale influences on physical and chemical characteristics of coastal waters of Western Europe during winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tréguer, Paul; Goberville, Eric; Barrier, Nicolas; L'Helguen, Stéphane; Morin, Pascal; Bozec, Yann; Rimmelin-Maury, Peggy; Czamanski, Marie; Grossteffan, Emilie; Cariou, Thierry; Répécaud, Michel; Quéméner, Loic

    2014-11-01

    There is now a strong scientific consensus that coastal marine systems of Western Europe are highly sensitive to the combined effects of natural climate variability and anthropogenic climate change. However, it still remains challenging to assess the spatial and temporal scales at which climate influence operates. While large-scale hydro-climatic indices, such as the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) or the East Atlantic Pattern (EAP) and the weather regimes such as the Atlantic Ridge (AR), are known to be relevant predictors of physical processes, changes in coastal waters can also be related to local hydro-meteorological and geochemical forcing. Here, we study the temporal variability of physical and chemical characteristics of coastal waters located at about 48°N over the period 1998-2013 using (1) sea surface temperature, (2) sea surface salinity and (3) nutrient concentration observations for two coastal sites located at the outlet of the Bay of Brest and off Roscoff, (4) river discharges of the major tributaries close to these two sites and (5) regional and local precipitation data over the region of interest. Focusing on the winter months, we characterize the physical and chemical variability of these coastal waters and document changes in both precipitation and river runoffs. Our study reveals that variability in coastal waters is connected to the large-scale North Atlantic atmospheric circulation but is also partly explained by local river influences. Indeed, while the NAO is strongly related to changes in sea surface temperature at the Brest and Roscoff sites, the EAP and the AR have a major influence on precipitations, which in turn modulate river discharges that impact sea surface salinity at the scale of the two coastal stations.

  3. [PHYSICAL EXERCISE AFTER STROKE: EFFECTS, RECOMMENDATIONS AND BARRIERS].

    PubMed

    Barak, Sharon; Hutzler, Yeshayahu; Dubnov-Razi, Gal

    2016-06-01

    This review summarizes the knowledge regarding the effects and recommendations for physical training (PTr) post-stroke. In addition, perceived benefits/barriers to PTr post-stroke are reviewed. PTr is an important post-stroke rehabilitation goal. Before beginning a PTr program it is recommended to conduct a physical examination. There is evidence that aerobic training post-stroke has a positive effect on gait and on risk factors for recurrent stroke. Similarly, strength training is also safe and effective. However, this training modality does not improve.gait functions. Neuromuscular training post-stroke is also a recommended training method. In the various studies conducted, there was diversity with regard to duration and frequency of PTr. It is recommended that individuals post-stroke engage in aerobic training 3-5 days a week. During the acute phase, the rating of perceived exertion should be "fairly light" (less or equal to 11 on the Borg scale, which ranges 6-20). In more advanced phases of recovery, one ca exercise at a higher intensity of up to "somewhat hard" (rating of perceived exertion 11-14; 55-80% of maximal heart rate). It is also recommended to conduct strength training (2-3 days per week, 1-3 sets of 10-15 repetitions), and flexibility and neuromuscular training (2-3 days per week). In order to encourage individuals post-stroke to conduct PTr there is a need for social support (from caregivers and family) and to provide PTr consultation. PTr barriers consist of both personal (e.g., depression, knowledge regarding physical activity centers) and environmental (e.g., lack of transportation) factors. PMID:27544993

  4. Geothermal alteration of Kamchatka rock physical properties: experimental and pore-scale modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanina, Violetta; Gerke, Kirill; Bichkov, Andrey; Korost, Dmitry

    2013-04-01

    X-ray microtomography prior to any alteration and after the experiments. 3D images were used to quantify structural changes and to determine permeability values using a pore-scale modeling approach, as laboratory measurements with through flow are known to have a potential to modify the pore structure. Chemical composition and local mineral formations were investigated using a «Spectroscan Max GV» spectrometer and scanning electron microscope imaging. Our study revealed significant relationships between structure modifications, physical properties and alteration conditions. Main results and conclusions include: 1) initial porosity and its connectivity have substantial effect on alteration dynamics, rocks with higher porosity values and connected pore space exhibit more pronounced alterations; 2) under similar experimental conditions (pressure, temperature, duration) pH plays an important role, acidic conditions result in significant new mineral formation; 3) almost all physical properties, including porosity, permeability, and elastic properties, were seriously modified in the modeled geothermal processes within short (from geological point of view) time frames; 4) X-ray microtomography was found useful for mineral phases distribution and the pore-scale modeling approach was found to be a promising technique to numerically obtain rock properties based on 3D scans; 5) we conclude that alteration and change of reservoir rocks should be taken into account for re-injecting well and geothermal power-plant design.

  5. The effects of exergaming on physical activity among inactive children in a physical education classroom.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Victoria A; Miltenberger, Raymond G; Graves, Rachel; Koehler, Shannon

    2010-01-01

    Childhood obesity, which is due in part to lack of physical activity, is a serious concern that requires the attention of the behavioral community. Although excessive video game play has been noted in the literature as a contributor to childhood obesity, newer video gaming technology, called exergaming, has been designed to capitalize on the reinforcing effects of video games to increase physical activity in children. This study evaluated the effects of exergaming on physical activity among 4 inactive children in a physical education (PE) classroom. Results showed that exergaming produced substantially more minutes of physical activity and more minutes of opportunity to engage in physical activity than did the standard PE program. In addition, exergaming was socially acceptable to both the students and the PE teacher. Exergaming appears to hold promise as a method for increasing physical activity among inactive children and might be a possible intervention for childhood obesity. PMID:21541146

  6. BOOK REVIEW: Nonequilibrium Physics at Short Time Scales: Formation of Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peliti, L.

    2005-02-01

    It is a happy situation when similar concepts and theoretical techniques can be applied to widely different physical systems because of a deep similarity in the situations being studied. The book illustrates this well; it focuses on the description of correlations in quantum systems out of equilibrium at very short time scales, prompted by experiments with short laser pulses in semiconductors, and in complex reactions in heavy nuclei. In both cases the experiments are characterized by nonlinear dynamics and by strong correlations out of equilibrium. In some systems there are also important finite-size effects. The book comprises several independent contributions of moderate length, and I sometimes felt that a more intensive effort in cross-coordination of the different contributions could have been of help. It is divided almost equally between theory and experiment. In the theoretical part, there is a thorough discussion both of the kinematic aspects (description of correlations) and the dynamical ones (evaluation of correlations). The experimental part is naturally divided according to the nature of the system: the interaction of pulsed lasers with matter on the one hand, and the correlations in finite-size systems (nanoparticles and nuclei) on the other. There is also a discussion on the dynamics of superconductors, a subject currently of great interest. Although an effort has been made to keep each contribution self-contained, I must admit that reading level is uneven. However, there are a number of thorough and stimulating contributions that make this book a useful introduction to the topic at the level of graduate students or researchers acquainted with quantum statistical mechanics.

  7. Effects of sport participation on the basketball skills and physical self of adolescents with conduct disorders.

    PubMed

    Maïano, Christophe; Ninot, Grégory; Morin, Alexandre J S; Bilard, Jean

    2007-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the long-term effects of sport participation on the basketball skills and physical self-concept of adolescents with conduct disorders (CD). Participants were 24 adolescent males with CD, divided equally into three groups: (a) inter-establishment basketball (IEBB), (b) integrated scholastic basketball (ISBB), and (c) control-adapted physical activity (APA). The basketball skills tests and physical self-concept were both administrated 4 times over an 18-month period. Results indicated (a) an improvement in basketball skills in both competitive groups (i.e., ISBB, IEBB), (b) a significant curvilinear trend of physical self-worth scale in the three groups, and (c) no significant changes in physical self-concept in the three groups (ISBB, IEBB, and APA). In conclusion, the integrated and segregated competitive programs did not represent an effective means for improving the physical self-concept of adolescents with CD. PMID:17916916

  8. Scaling of Wakefield Effects in Recirculating Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    L. Merminga; G. R. Neil; B. C. Yunn; J. J. Bisognano

    2001-07-01

    Expressions for the induced energy spread and emittance degradation of a single bunch due to the longitudinal and transverse impedance of rf cavities at the end of a linac structure are presented. Scaling of the formulae with rf frequency is derived. Scaling of the threshold current for the multibunch, multipass beam breakup (BBU) instability in recirculating linacs with accelerator and beam parameters is also derived.

  9. Effective Computer Use in Physics Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bork, Alfred M.

    1975-01-01

    Illustrates a sample remedial program in mathematics for physics students. Describes two computer games with successful instructional strategies and programs which help mathematically unsophisticated students to grasp the notion of a differential equation. (GH)

  10. Modeling Randomness in Judging Rating Scales with a Random-Effects Rating Scale Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Wen-Chung; Wilson, Mark; Shih, Ching-Lin

    2006-01-01

    This study presents the random-effects rating scale model (RE-RSM) which takes into account randomness in the thresholds over persons by treating them as random-effects and adding a random variable for each threshold in the rating scale model (RSM) (Andrich, 1978). The RE-RSM turns out to be a special case of the multidimensional random…

  11. The physics of energy transfer toward improved subgrid-scale models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cimarelli, Andrea; De Angelis, Elisabetta

    2014-05-01

    Starting from physical insight on the energy transfer phenomena in wall turbulent flows, it is shown how modeling of subgrid stresses in large-eddy simulations can be improved. Each model should aim at reproducing the double feature of energy sink and source of the small scales of wall flows which become relevant when large filter lengths are considered. Here we propose one possible choice where the main ingredient is the coupling of the classical linear formulation of eddy viscosity with the nonlinear anisotropic features of the velocity increments tensor. This approach, which actually presents most of the features of the mixed models, captures the near-wall dynamics for very large filter lengths reproducing the small scales source physics responsible for backward energy transfer. A posteriori tests show excellent agreement with direct numerical simulation of turbulent channel flows even when very coarse grids are considered. The capability of the balance of the filtered second order structure function as a post-processing tool to evaluate the physics of any model is also shown.

  12. DAG Software Architectures for Multi-Scale Multi-Physics Problems at Petascale and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berzins, Martin

    2015-03-01

    The challenge of computations at Petascale and beyond is to ensure how to make possible efficient calculations on possibly hundreds of thousands for cores or on large numbers of GPUs or Intel Xeon Phis. An important methodology for achieving this is at present thought to be that of asynchronous task-based parallelism. The success of this approach will be demonstrated using the Uintah software framework for the solution of coupled fluid-structure interaction problems with chemical reactions. The layered approach of this software makes it possible for the user to specify the physical problems without parallel code, for that specification to be translated into a parallel set of tasks. These tasks are executed using a runtime system that executes tasks asynchronously and sometimes out-of-order. The scalability and portability of this approach will be demonstrated using examples from large scale combustion problems, industrial detonations and multi-scale, multi-physics models. The challenges of scaling such calculations to the next generations of leadership class computers (with more than a hundred petaflops) will be discussed. Thanks to NSF, XSEDE, DOE NNSA, DOE NETL, DOE ALCC and DOE INCITE.

  13. String theory effects on black hole physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Alejandra

    2009-09-01

    This thesis focuses on recent developments in black hole physics in the context of string theory. The two main topics discussed here are: the effects of quantum/string corrections to five dimensional black holes; and the holographic description of two dimensional black holes. In the gravitational theory the quantum/string corrections are encoded in higher derivative terms in the supergravity action, which are governed by the mixed gauge-gravitational Chern-Simons term. We describe the full asymptotically flat solution of black strings and black holes, and construct the near horizon attractor geometries. With these solutions in hand, we study the thermodynamic properties of black holes beyond the leading order. One important achievement was finding the corrected attractor geometries that contain a three dimensional Anti-de Sitter factor. This allows us to verify that the space-time central charge and the anomaly based derivation of it exactly agree. Another motivation to study higher derivative corrections is to resolve the singularities of small black strings. These objects correspond to classical solutions with a naked singularity and vanishing entropy. Once the stringy corrections are included, we obtain completely smooth geometries with the correct asymptotic behavior. We also studied the effect of the Taub-NUT geometry on the sub-leading corrections to the black hole entropy. This space contains a contractible circle that allows one to lift a four dimensional black hole to a five dimensional black hole by tuning the size of the circle. In the microscopic theory, due to the presence of Taub-NUT, the spectrum of states acquires additional modes. These states exactly account for the shift between 5D and 4D corrections to the entropy. Finally, we develop holographic renormalization for two dimensional gravity on Anti-de Sitter space. The transformation properties of the stress tensor indicate that the asymptotic SL(2,R) conformal symmetry of the theory is enhanced

  14. Cooperative Learning: Exploring Its Effectiveness in the Physics Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Fui Fong; Boo, Hong Kwen

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on the results of an action research to explore the effectiveness of using cooperative learning strategies on students' academic achievement, their understanding of physics concepts and their motivation to learn in the physics classroom. The study involved a secondary four express physics class of 41 students in a neighbourhood…

  15. Effects of Vigorous Intensity Physical Activity on Mathematics Test Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, David S.; Hannon, James C.; Castelli, Darla M.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of an acute bout of physical activity on academic performance in school-based settings is under researched. The purpose of this study was to examine associations between a single, vigorous (70-85%) bout of physical activity completed during physical education on standardized mathematics test performance among 72, eighth grade students…

  16. Enhancing Transfer of Knowledge in Physics through Effective Teaching Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akinbobola, Akinyemi Olufunminiyi

    2015-01-01

    The study assessed the enhancement of transfer of knowledge in physics through the use of effective teaching strategies in Nigerian senior secondary schools. Non-randomized pretest-posttest control group design was adopted for the study. A total of 278 physics students took part in the study. Transfer of Knowledge Test in Physics (TKTP) with the…

  17. Attitudes towards health and physical activity in the elderly. Effects of a physical training program.

    PubMed

    Sidney, K H; Shephard, R J

    1976-01-01

    Attitudes towards physical activity, perceived health, body image, anxiety and life satisfaction have been studied in men and women 60 years of age and older, volunteering for progressive endurance training. Relative to other studies of younger volunteers, the senior citizens placed more value upon activity as "an esthetic experience" and as "a means to health and fitness" showing less interest in "the pursuit of vertigo." Many non-participants and "drop-outs" perceived their current fitness as satisfactory. Subjects who selected a low frequency and low intensity of training were obese, with high Cornell Medical Index (CMI) scores on both organic and psychological scales. After 14 weeks of conditioning, 83% of subjects reported improvements in well-being. However, CMI scores were reduced on only one of twelve organic scales and none of the behavior, mood and feeling scales. Neugarten's Life Satisfaction Index, Kenyon's Body Image scales, and McPherson's the Real Me scores remained unchanged, but there was a decrease of Manifest Anxiety (Taylor scale) and a greater regard for physical activity as "the relief of tension." When subjects were classed according to changes in aerobic power, between group differences were found for "Real Me" scores and for three of Kenyon's attitude scales. Persons who trained frequently and intensively showed improvements for body image and for five of Kenyon's attitude scales. PMID:1011965

  18. Attitudes towards health and physical activity in the elderly. Effects of a physical training program.

    PubMed

    Sidney, K H; Shephard, R J

    1976-01-01

    Attitudes towards physical activity, perceived health, body image, anxiety and life satisfaction have been studied in men and women 60 years of age and older, volunteering for progressive endurance training. Relative to other studies of younger volunteers, the senior citizens placed more value upon activity as "an esthetic experience" and as "a means to health and fitness" showing less interest in "the pursuit of vertigo." Many non-participants and "drop-outs" perceived their current fitness as satisfactory. Subjects who selected a low frequency and low intensity of training were obese, with high Cornell Medical Index (CMI) scores on both organic and psychological scales. After 14 weeks of conditioning, 83% of subjects reported improvements in well-being. However, CMI scores were reduced on only one of twelve organic scales and none of the behavior, mood and feeling scales. Neugarten's Life Satisfaction Index, Kenyon's Body Image scales, and McPherson's the Real Me scores remained unchanged, but there was a decrease of Manifest Anxiety (Taylor scale) and a greater regard of physical activity as "the relief of tension." When subjects were classed according to changes in aerobic power, between group differences were found for "Real Me" scores and for three of Kenyon's attitude scales. Persons who trained frequently and intensively showed improvements for body image and for five of Kenyon's attitude scales. PMID:1011964

  19. Scaling effects in direct shear tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orlando, A.D.; Hanes, D.M.; Shen, H.H.

    2009-01-01

    Laboratory experiments of the direct shear test were performed on spherical particles of different materials and diameters. Results of the bulk friction vs. non-dimensional shear displacement are presented as a function of the non-dimensional particle diameter. Simulations of the direct shear test were performed using the Discrete Element Method (DEM). The simulation results show Considerable differences with the physical experiments. Particle level material properties, such as the coefficients of static friction, restitution and rolling friction need to be known a priori in order to guarantee that the simulation results are an accurate representation of the physical phenomenon. Furthermore, laboratory results show a clear size dependency on the results, with smaller particles having a higher bulk friction than larger ones. ?? 2009 American Institute of Physics.

  20. Effects of spatial variability and scale on areal -average evapotranspiration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Famiglietti, J. S.; Wood, Eric F.

    1993-01-01

    This paper explores the effect of spatial variability and scale on areally-averaged evapotranspiration. A spatially-distributed water and energy balance model is employed to determine the effect of explicit patterns of model parameters and atmospheric forcing on modeled areally-averaged evapotranspiration over a range of increasing spatial scales. The analysis is performed from the local scale to the catchment scale. The study area is King's Creek catchment, an 11.7 sq km watershed located on the native tallgrass prairie of Kansas. The dominant controls on the scaling behavior of catchment-average evapotranspiration are investigated by simulation, as is the existence of a threshold scale for evapotranspiration modeling, with implications for explicit versus statistical representation of important process controls. It appears that some of our findings are fairly general, and will therefore provide a framework for understanding the scaling behavior of areally-averaged evapotranspiration at the catchment and larger scales.

  1. The VCOP Scale: a measure of overprotection in parents of physically vulnerable children.

    PubMed

    Wright, L; Mullen, T; West, K; Wyatt, P

    1993-11-01

    A scale is developed for measuring the overprotecting vs. optimal developmental stimulation tendencies for parents of physically "vulnerable" children. A series of items were administered to parents whose parenting techniques had been rated as either highly overprotective or as optimal by a group of MDs and other professionals. Correlations were estimated between each of the items and parental tendencies as rated by professionals. Twenty-eight items were selected that provided maximum prediction of over-protection. The resulting R2 was extraordinarily high (.94). Coefficient alpha and test-retest coefficients were acceptable. It is hoped that release of the new instrument (VCOPS) at this time will allow others to join in determining the clinical and experimental validity of this scale. PMID:8300867

  2. On the observed hysteresis in field-scale soil moisture variability and its physical controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mascaro, G.; Vivoni, E. R.

    2016-08-01

    The spatiotemporal variability of soil moisture (θ) has rarely been studied at the field scale across different seasons and sites. Here, we utilized 9 months of θ data in two semiarid ecosystems of North America to investigate the key relationship between the spatial mean (<θ>) and standard deviation (σ θ ) at the field-scale (∼100 m). Analyses revealed a strong seasonal control on the σ θ versus <θ> relation and the existence of hysteretic cycles where wetting and dry-down phases have notably different behavior. Empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs) showed that θ variability depends on two dominant spatial patterns, with time-stable and seasonally varying contributions in time, respectively. Correlations between EOFs and land surface properties also indicated that θ patterns are linked to vegetation (terrain and soil) factors at the site with higher (lower) vegetation cover. These physical controls explained the observed hysteresis cycles, thus confirming interpretations from previous modeling studies for the first time.

  3. [The preventive effects of physical activity in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Blain, H; Vuillemin, A; Blain, A; Jeandel, C

    2000-06-24

    PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND AGING: Physical activity prevents some age-related impairment. Physical activity reduces the decline of physical capacity which remains limited by maximal heart rate, and reduces the incidence of cardiovascular diseases by decreasing and preventing associated risk factors. Physical activity reduces age-related bone loss, its effect being potentialized by hormonal replacement therapy, and improves balance function, leading to a lower incidence of falls and fractures in older subjects. Physical activity helps to preserve nutritional balance and lean mass/fat mass ratio and reduces age-related insulin resistance. Moreover, physical activity has a beneficial influence on psychological function by improving cognitive performances and decreasing incidence of depression. Lastly, physical activity seems to reduce the incidence of several cancers, colic and mammary cancers particularly. PHYSICAL ACTIVITY, QUANTITY AND QUALITY OF LIFE: These multiple actions explain that physical activity, if it's adapted to subject's specificities increases longevity, delay entry in dependence and improves quality of life in older subjects. WHAT ARE THE RECOMMENDED ACTIVITIES: There is a superiority of individualized programs giving greater place to warm-up and associated endurance and resistive exercises intended to improve simultaneously cardiovascular and muscular functions. SPECIAL INTERESTS OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY IN FRAIL AND VERY OLD SUBJECTS: Throughout its beneficial effects on aerobic capacity, muscular function, social integration, cognitive function and autonomy, physical activity may have a particular interest in frail subjects, when programs are adapted to physical capacities of these subjects and associated with nutritional supplements. PMID:10916538

  4. Physical and chemical nature of the scaling relations between adsorption energies of atoms on metal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Calle-Vallejo, F; Martínez, J I; García-Lastra, J M; Rossmeisl, J; Koper, M T M

    2012-03-16

    Despite their importance in physics and chemistry, the origin and extent of the scaling relations between the energetics of adsorbed species on surfaces remain elusive. We demonstrate here that scalability is not exclusive to adsorbed atoms and their hydrogenated species but rather a general phenomenon between any set of adsorbates bound similarly to the surface. On the example of the near-surface alloys of Pt, we show that scalability is a result of identical variations of adsorption energies with respect to the valence configuration of both the surface components and the adsorbates. PMID:22540492

  5. Electron electric dipole moment as a sensitive probe of PeV scale physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Tarek; Itani, Ahmad; Nath, Pran

    2014-09-01

    We give a quantitative analysis of the electric dipole moments as a probe of high scale physics. We focus on the electric dipole moment of the electron since the limit on it is the most stringent. Further, theoretical computations of it are free of QCD uncertainties. The analysis presented here first explores the probe of high scales via electron electric dipole moment (EDM) within minimal supersymmetric standard model where the contributions to the EDM arise from the chargino and the neutralino exchanges in loops. Here it is shown that the electron EDM can probe mass scales from tens of TeV into the PeV range. The analysis is then extended to include a vectorlike generation which can mix with the three ordinary generations. Here new CP phases arise and it is shown that the electron EDM now has not only a supersymmetric (SUSY) contribution from the exchange of charginos and neutralinos but also a nonsupersymmetric contribution from the exchange of W and Z bosons. It is further shown that the interference of the supersymmetric and the nonsupersymmetric contribution leads to the remarkable phenomenon where the electron EDM as a function of the slepton mass first falls and become vanishingly small and then rises again as the slepton mass increases. This phenomenon arises as a consequence of cancellation between the SUSY and the non-SUSY contribution at low scales while at high scales the SUSY contribution dies out and the EDM is controlled by the non-SUSY contribution alone. The high mass scales that can be probed by the EDM are far in excess of what accelerators will be able to probe. The sensitivity of the EDM to CP phases both in the SUSY and the non-SUSY sectors are also discussed.

  6. Towards physics responsible for large-scale Lyman-α forest bias parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieplak, Agnieszka M.; Slosar, Anže

    2016-03-01

    Using a series of carefully constructed numerical experiments based on hydrodynamic cosmological SPH simulations, we attempt to build an intuition for the relevant physics behind the large scale density (bδ) and velocity gradient (bη) biases of the Lyman-α forest. Starting with the fluctuating Gunn-Peterson approximation applied to the smoothed total density field in real-space, and progressing through redshift-space with no thermal broadening, redshift-space with thermal broadening and hydrodynamically simulated baryon fields, we investigate how approximations found in the literature fare. We find that Seljak's 2012 analytical formulae for these bias parameters work surprisingly well in the limit of no thermal broadening and linear redshift-space distortions. We also show that his bη formula is exact in the limit of no thermal broadening. Since introduction of thermal broadening significantly affects its value, we speculate that a combination of large-scale measurements of bη and the small scale flux PDF might be a sensitive probe of the thermal state of the IGM. We find that large-scale biases derived from the smoothed total matter field are within 10-20% to those based on hydrodynamical quantities, in line with other measurements in the literature.

  7. Towards physics responsible for large-scale Lyman-α forest bias parameters

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Agnieszka M. Cieplak; Slosar, Anze

    2016-03-08

    Using a series of carefully constructed numerical experiments based on hydrodynamic cosmological SPH simulations, we attempt to build an intuition for the relevant physics behind the large scale density (bδ) and velocity gradient (bη) biases of the Lyman-α forest. Starting with the fluctuating Gunn-Peterson approximation applied to the smoothed total density field in real-space, and progressing through redshift-space with no thermal broadening, redshift-space with thermal broadening and hydrodynamically simulated baryon fields, we investigate how approximations found in the literature fare. We find that Seljak's 2012 analytical formulae for these bias parameters work surprisingly well in the limit of no thermalmore » broadening and linear redshift-space distortions. We also show that his bη formula is exact in the limit of no thermal broadening. Since introduction of thermal broadening significantly affects its value, we speculate that a combination of large-scale measurements of bη and the small scale flux PDF might be a sensitive probe of the thermal state of the IGM. Lastly, we find that large-scale biases derived from the smoothed total matter field are within 10–20% to those based on hydrodynamical quantities, in line with other measurements in the literature.« less

  8. IMPORTANCE OF PHYSICAL SCALING FACTORS TO BENTHIC MARINE INVERTEBRATE RECOLONIZATION OF LABORATORY MICROCOSMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Five laboratory studies of benthic macroinvertebrate recolonization were conducted for 6-wk periods to evaluate the effects of physical factors (i.e., microcosm size, seawater flow rates and sediment depth) on benthic community structure. esign variables included4 open-faced acry...

  9. Effects of small scale energy injection on large scales in turbulent reaction flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuan, Yuan

    2014-11-01

    Turbulence causes the generation of eddies of various length scales. In turbulent non-reacting flows, most of the kinetic energy is contained in large scale turbulent structures and dissipated at small scales. This energy cascade process from large scales to small scales provides the foundation of a lot of turbulence models, especially for Large Eddy Simulations. However, in turbulent reacting flows, chemical energy is converted locally to heat and therefore deploys energy at the smallest scales. As such, effects of small scale energy injection due to combustion on large scale turbulent motion may become important. These effects are investigated in the case of auto-ignition under homogeneous isotropic turbulence. Impact of small scale heat release is examined by comparing various turbulent statistics (e.g. energy spectrum, two-point correlation functions, and structure functions) in the reacting case to the non-reacting case. Emphasis is placed on the identification of the most relevant turbulent quantities in reflecting such small-large scale interactions.

  10. Effect of primary hypohydration on physical work capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichan, G.; Gauttam, R. K.; Tomar, O. S.; Bajaj, A. C.

    1988-09-01

    Physical work capacity (PWC180) was assessed with different levels of hypohydration in 25 heat-acclimatized male volunteers in hot dry (45°C DB, 30% RH) and hot humid (39°C DB, 60% RH) conditions equated to a heat stress level of 34°C on the WBGT scale. Heat acclimatization was carried out by exposing the subjects for 8 consecutive days in a climatic chamber with moderate work for two 50 min work cycles and 10 min intervening rest pauses. Acclimatization resulted in significant decreases in heart rate (27 bpm), oral temperature (0.8°C), mean skin temperature (1.2°C) and a significant increase in sweating rate (120 g h-1 m-2). Day-to-day variations in body hypohydration levels during heat acclimatization were not significantly different, although water intake was found to increase significantly from day 3 onwards when the subjects were in ad lib water intake state. The heat acclimatized subjects were then hypohydrated to varying degrees, viz. 1%, 2% and 3% body weight deficit, with moderate work in heat in the climatic chamber and after successful recovery from the effects of thermal stress and exercise; their physical work capacity was assessed individually. Physical work capacity was found to decrease significantly with hypohydration as compared to controls. The decrease was of the order of 9%, 11% and 22% in the hot dry condition and 6%, 8% and 20% in the hot humid condition with hypohydration levels of 1%, 2% and 3% respectively. The decrease was more pronounced during 3% hypohydration level under both heat stress conditions. This decrease was in spite of significant increases in maximal ventilation. However, the PWC180 under the two heat stress conditions, when compared, did not reveal any significant difference. It was concluded that the heat stress vehicle did not adversely affect the physical work capacity. On the other hand, the decreases in physical work capacity were found to be closely related to the primary hypohydration level in heat

  11. Effects of Daily Physical Education on Physical Fitness and Weight Status in Middle School Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erfle, Stephen E.; Gamble, Abigail

    2014-01-01

    Background: In 2009, the Pennsylvania Department of Health developed the Active Schools Program (ASP) which required 30?minutes of daily physical education (PE) in middle schools to reduce childhood obesity. This investigation evaluated the ASP effects on physical fitness and weight status in middle school adolescents throughout 1 academic year.…

  12. Scaling properties of collective effects at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaytsev, A. S.

    2016-02-01

    Azimuthal anisotropy is one of the key observables to study the properties of matter created in high energy heavy-ion collisions at RHIC and the LHC. The collective behaviour is quantified in terms of anisotropy coefficients vn measured with respect to their corresponding event planes. Predictions from the viscous hydrodynamics for the scaling of the anisotropic flow coefficients vn with eccentricity, system size and transverse energy are tested using the recent data from PHENIX Collaboration.

  13. Effective wavelength scaling of rectangular aperture antennas.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuanyuan; Yu, Li; Zhang, Jiasen; Gordon, Reuven

    2015-04-20

    We investigate the resonances of aperture antennas from the visible to the terahertz regime, with comparison to comprehensive simulations. Simple piecewise analytic behavior is found for the wavelength scaling over the entire spectrum, with a linear regime through the visible and near-IR. This theory will serve as a useful and simple design tool for applications including biosensors, nonlinear plasmonics and surface enhanced spectroscopies. PMID:25969079

  14. Low (Linear) Teacher Effect on Student Achievement in Pre-Academic Physics Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cottaar, Alice

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of physics education on students' achievement in a large-scale quantitative study of pre-academic high school students throughout the Netherlands. Two aspects of teacher characteristics as perceived by their students are included: "pleasantness" principally defined by their perceived friendliness and positive…

  15. Relationship of Physical Attractiveness to Students' Ratings of Teaching Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Reilly, Maria T.

    1987-01-01

    A study found that the physical attractiveness of a dental school teacher affected the student's opinion of teaching effectiveness, regardless of the student's sex, with effectiveness ratings correlating with pleasing appearance. (MSE)

  16. Characterizing the effects of scale and heating rate on micro-scale explosive ignition criteria.

    SciTech Connect

    Hafenrichter, Everett Shingo; Pahl, Robert J.

    2005-01-01

    Laser diode ignition experiments were conducted in an effort to characterize the effects of scale and heating rate on micro-scale explosive ignition criteria. Over forty experiments were conducted with various laser power densities and laser spot sizes. In addition, relatively simple analytical and numerical calculations were performed to assist with interpretation of the experimental data and characterization of the explosive ignition criteria.

  17. A Confirmatory Study of Rating Scale Category Effectiveness for the Coaching Efficacy Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Nicholas D.; Feltz, Deborah L.; Wolfe, Edward W.

    2008-01-01

    This study extended validity evidence for measures of coaching efficacy derived from the Coaching Efficacy Scale (CES) by testing the rating scale categorizations suggested in previous research. Previous research provided evidence for the effectiveness of a four-category (4-CAT) structure for high school and collegiate sports coaches; it also…

  18. Modeling the Role of Small Scale Physics in Sediment Transport From Grain Size to Grain Shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calantoni, J.; Holland, K. T.

    2007-12-01

    In recent years work has focused on the detailed physics of sediment transport at or near the grain scale. Although computational resources often restrict the domain size, deterministic models for sediment motions can prove useful in improving our understanding of sediment dynamics. Using a discrete particle model (DPM), we have performed computer simulations that describe the collective and individual motions of sediment grains immersed in fluid in an effort to emulate the physics of the sea floor, at the fluid-sediment interface, in shallow water under forcing from waves and currents. Examples of our DPM (briefly described) are shown for research applications at a range scales from millimeters to meters involving fluid flow models from simple one- dimensional eddy viscosity up to three-dimensional direct numerical simulation. Based on hundreds of different simulations over the past decade, our findings have shown: how a parameterization of pressure gradients or equivalently fluid accelerations on particle motions under waves influences sand bar migration in the surf zone; how grain shape changes bulk bedload transport rates; how efforts to model sediment particle motions in the swash zone can yield insight toward models for shoreline erosion and accretion; how recently simulated bedload transport using bimodal size distributions has uncovered a new power law; how upcoming work focuses on simulating the role of grain size distributions in small-scale sand ripple dynamics. Good agreement is found between comparisons of model output for both bulk transport rates and time dependent concentration profiles with laboratory data. Likewise, parameterizations obtained from simulation results have demonstrated skill in hindcast applications to both field and laboratory measurements. Conclusions will discuss the future role of reductionism in sediment transport modeling.

  19. Physical descriptions of the bacterial nucleoid at large scales, and their biological implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benza, Vincenzo G.; Bassetti, Bruno; Dorfman, Kevin D.; Scolari, Vittore F.; Bromek, Krystyna; Cicuta, Pietro; Cosentino Lagomarsino, Marco

    2012-07-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical approaches have attempted to quantify the physical organization (compaction and geometry) of the bacterial chromosome with its complement of proteins (the nucleoid). The genomic DNA exists in a complex and dynamic protein-rich state, which is highly organized at various length scales. This has implications for modulating (when not directly enabling) the core biological processes of replication, transcription and segregation. We overview the progress in this area, driven in the last few years by new scientific ideas and new interdisciplinary experimental techniques, ranging from high space- and time-resolution microscopy to high-throughput genomics employing sequencing to map different aspects of the nucleoid-related interactome. The aim of this review is to present the wide spectrum of experimental and theoretical findings coherently, from a physics viewpoint. In particular, we highlight the role that statistical and soft condensed matter physics play in describing this system of fundamental biological importance, specifically reviewing classic and more modern tools from the theory of polymers. We also discuss some attempts toward unifying interpretations of the current results, pointing to possible directions for future investigation.

  20. PROSPECTS FOR COLLIDERS AND COLLIDER PHYSICS TO THE 1 PEV ENERGY SCALE

    SciTech Connect

    KING,B.J.

    2000-05-05

    A review is given of the prospects for future colliders and collider physics at the energy frontier. A proof-of-plausibility scenario is presented for maximizing the authors progress in elementary particle physics by extending the energy reach of hadron and lepton colliders as quickly and economically as might be technically and financially feasible. The scenario comprises 5 colliders beyond the LHC--one each of e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} and hadron colliders and three {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} colliders--and is able to hold to the historical rate of progress in the log-energy reach of hadron and lepton colliders, reaching the 1 PeV constituent mass scale by the early 2040's. The technical and fiscal requirements for the feasibility of the scenario are assessed and relevant long-term R and D projects are identified. Considerations of both cost and logistics seem to strongly favor housing most or all of the colliders in the scenario in a new world high energy physics laboratory.

  1. Inflation Physics from the Cosmic Microwave Background and Large Scale Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abazajian, K.N.; Arnold,K.; Austermann, J.; Benson, B.A.; Bischoff, C.; Bock, J.; Bond, J.R.; Borrill, J.; Buder, I.; Burke, D.L.; Calabrese, E.; Carlstrom, J.E.; Carvalho, C.S.; Chang, C.L.; Chiang, H.C.; Church, S.; Cooray, A.; Crawford, T.M.; Crill, B.P.; Dawson, K.S.; Das, S.; Devline, M.J.; Dobbs, M.; Dodelson, S; Wollack, E. J.

    2013-01-01

    Fluctuations in the intensity and polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and the large-scale distribution of matter in the universe each contain clues about the nature of the earliest moments of time. The next generation of CMB and large-scale structure (LSS) experiments are poised to test the leading paradigm for these earliest moments---the theory of cosmic inflation---and to detect the imprints of the inflationary epoch, thereby dramatically increasing our understanding of fundamental physics and the early universe. A future CMB experiment with sufficient angular resolution and frequency coverage that surveys at least 1 of the sky to a depth of 1 uK-arcmin can deliver a constraint on the tensor-to-scalar ratio that will either result in a 5-sigma measurement of the energy scale of inflation or rule out all large-field inflation models, even in the presence of foregrounds and the gravitational lensing B-mode signal. LSS experiments, particularly spectroscopic surveys such as the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument, will complement the CMB effort by improving current constraints on running of the spectral index by up to a factor of four, improving constraints on curvature by a factor of ten, and providing non-Gaussianity constraints that are competitive with the current CMB bounds.

  2. Inflation physics from the cosmic microwave background and large scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abazajian, K. N.; Arnold, K.; Austermann, J.; Benson, B. A.; Bischoff, C.; Bock, J.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Buder, I.; Burke, D. L.; Calabrese, E.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Carvalho, C. S.; Chang, C. L.; Chiang, H. C.; Church, S.; Cooray, A.; Crawford, T. M.; Crill, B. P.; Dawson, K. S.; Das, S.; Devlin, M. J.; Dobbs, M.; Dodelson, S.; Doré, O.; Dunkley, J.; Feng, J. L.; Fraisse, A.; Gallicchio, J.; Giddings, S. B.; Green, D.; Halverson, N. W.; Hanany, S.; Hanson, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hincks, A.; Hlozek, R.; Holder, G.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Honscheid, K.; Horowitz, G.; Hu, W.; Hubmayr, J.; Irwin, K.; Jackson, M.; Jones, W. C.; Kallosh, R.; Kamionkowski, M.; Keating, B.; Keisler, R.; Kinney, W.; Knox, L.; Komatsu, E.; Kovac, J.; Kuo, C.-L.; Kusaka, A.; Lawrence, C.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E.; Linde, A.; Linder, E.; Lubin, P.; Maldacena, J.; Martinec, E.; McMahon, J.; Miller, A.; Mukhanov, V.; Newburgh, L.; Niemack, M. D.; Nguyen, H.; Nguyen, H. T.; Page, L.; Pryke, C.; Reichardt, C. L.; Ruhl, J. E.; Sehgal, N.; Seljak, U.; Senatore, L.; Sievers, J.; Silverstein, E.; Slosar, A.; Smith, K. M.; Spergel, D.; Staggs, S. T.; Stark, A.; Stompor, R.; Vieregg, A. G.; Wang, G.; Watson, S.; Wollack, E. J.; Wu, W. L. K.; Yoon, K. W.; Zahn, O.; Zaldarriaga, M.

    2015-03-01

    Fluctuations in the intensity and polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and the large-scale distribution of matter in the universe each contain clues about the nature of the earliest moments of time. The next generation of CMB and large-scale structure (LSS) experiments are poised to test the leading paradigm for these earliest moments-the theory of cosmic inflation-and to detect the imprints of the inflationary epoch, thereby dramatically increasing our understanding of fundamental physics and the early universe. A future CMB experiment with sufficient angular resolution and frequency coverage that surveys at least 1% of the sky to a depth of 1 uK-arcmin can deliver a constraint on the tensor-to-scalar ratio that will either result in a 5 σ measurement of the energy scale of inflation or rule out all large-field inflation models, even in the presence of foregrounds and the gravitational lensing B-mode signal. LSS experiments, particularly spectroscopic surveys such as the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument, will complement the CMB effort by improving current constraints on running of the spectral index by up to a factor of four, improving constraints on curvature by a factor of ten, and providing non-Gaussianity constraints that are competitive with the current CMB bounds.

  3. Evaluating Introductory Physics Classes in Light of the ABET Criteria: An Example from the SCALE-UP Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saul, Jeffery M.; Deardorff, Duane L.; Abbott, David S.; Allain, Rhett J.; Beichner, Robert J.

    The Student-Centered Activities for Large Enrollment University Physics (SCALE-UP) project at North Carolina State University (NCSU) is developing a curriculum to promote learning through in-class group activities in introductory physics classes up to 100 students. The authors are currently in Phase II of the project using a specially designed…

  4. Effect of wettability on scale-up of multiphase flow from core-scale to reservoir fine-grid-scale

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.C.; Mani, V.; Mohanty, K.K.

    1997-08-01

    Typical field simulation grid-blocks are internally heterogeneous. The objective of this work is to study how the wettability of the rock affects its scale-up of multiphase flow properties from core-scale to fine-grid reservoir simulation scale ({approximately} 10{prime} x 10{prime} x 5{prime}). Reservoir models need another level of upscaling to coarse-grid simulation scale, which is not addressed here. Heterogeneity is modeled here as a correlated random field parameterized in terms of its variance and two-point variogram. Variogram models of both finite (spherical) and infinite (fractal) correlation length are included as special cases. Local core-scale porosity, permeability, capillary pressure function, relative permeability functions, and initial water saturation are assumed to be correlated. Water injection is simulated and effective flow properties and flow equations are calculated. For strongly water-wet media, capillarity has a stabilizing/homogenizing effect on multiphase flow. For small variance in permeability, and for small correlation length, effective relative permeability can be described by capillary equilibrium models. At higher variance and moderate correlation length, the average flow can be described by a dynamic relative permeability. As the oil wettability increases, the capillary stabilizing effect decreases and the deviation from this average flow increases. For fractal fields with large variance in permeability, effective relative permeability is not adequate in describing the flow.

  5. The effect of the scale of horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands on flow and transport parameters.

    PubMed

    Suliman, F; French, H; Haugen, L E; Kløve, B; Jenssen, P

    2005-01-01

    Horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands have proven their efficiency in treating wastewater and removing the pollutants of concern. Treatment efficiency depends on the wastewater residence time, which is a function of the hydraulic loading and the physical conditions of the constructed filter system, which can be described with effective parameters such as: hydraulic conductivity, porosity, dispersivity etc. Because spatial variability is often scale dependent, these effective parameters may be affected by the scale of the system being studied. In this paper the results of tracer experiments in constructed filters using saturated horizontal flow at three scales (small and medium lab scales and full-scale system) using the same filter media is reported. Light-weight aggregate (filter media termed Filtralite-P) was used at all scales. Increasing the scale was associated with increasing dispersivity, meanwhile hydraulic conductivity experienced dramatic reduction and variation by increasing the examined scale. Observed changes in the hydraulic parameters indicate that heterogeneity at different scales should be taken into account when the performance of LWA filters are evaluated from small-scale experiments. PMID:16042266

  6. A Scale for Home Visiting Nurses to Identify Risks of Physical Abuse and Neglect among Mothers with Newborn Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grietens, Hans; Geeraert, Liesl; Hellinckx, Walter

    2004-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to construct and test the reliability (utility, internal consistency, interrater agreement) and the validity (internal validity, concurrent validity) of a scale for home visiting social nurses to identify risks of physical abuse and neglect in mothers with a newborn child. Method: A 71-item scale was constructed based on a…

  7. Micrometer-Scale Physical Structure and Microbial Composition of Soil Macroaggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Vanessa L.; McCue, Lee Ann; Fansler, Sarah J.; Boyanov, Maxim I.; DeCarlo, F.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Konopka, Allan

    2013-10-01

    Soil macroaggregates are discrete, separable units of soil that we hypothesize contain smaller assemblages of microorganisms than bulk soil, and represent a scale potentially consistent with naturally occurring microbial communities. We posed two questions to explore microbial community composition in the context of the macroaggregate: 1) Is there a relationship between macroaggregate physical structure and microbial community composition in individual macroaggregates? And, 2) How similar are the bacterial communities in individual sub-millimeter soil macroaggregates sampled from the same 5-cm core? To address these questions, individual macroaggregates of three arbitrary size classes (250–425, 425–841, and 841–1000 μm) were sampled from a grassland field. The physical structures of 14 individual macroaggregates were characterized using synchrotron-radiation based transmission X-ray tomography, revealing that a greater proportion of the pore space in the small- and medium-sized macroaggregates is as relatively smaller pores, resulting in greater overall porosity and pore–mineral interface area in these smaller macroaggregates. Microbial community composition was characterized using 16S rRNA pyrosequencing data. Rarefaction analyses indicated that the membership of each macroaggregate was sufficiently sampled with only a few thousand sequences; in addition, the community membership varied widely between macroaggregates and the structure varied from those communities strongly dominated by a few phylotypes to communities that were evenly distributed among several phylotypes. We found no strong relationship of physical structure with community membership; this may be due to the low number of aggregates (10) for which we have both physical and biological data. Our results do support our initial expectation that individual macroaggregate communities were significantly less diverse than bulk soil from the same grassland field site.

  8. Effective parameters, effective processes: From porous flow physics to in situ remediation technology

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, K.

    1995-06-01

    This paper examines the conceptualization of multiphase flow processes on the macroscale, as needed in field applications. It emphasizes that upscaling from the pore-level will in general not only introduce effective parameters but will also give rise to ``effective processes,`` i.e., the emergence of new physical effects that may not have a microscopic counterpart. ``Phase dispersion`` is discussed as an example of an effective process for the migration and remediation of non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) contaminants in heterogeneous media. An approximate space-and-time scaling invariance is derived for gravity-driven liquid flow in unsaturated two-dimensional porous media (fractures). Issues for future experimental and theoretical work are identified.

  9. Multi-scale Drivers of Variations in Atmospheric Evaporative Demand Based on Observations and Physically-based Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, L.; Sheffield, J.; Li, D.

    2015-12-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is a key link between the availability of water resources and climate change and climate variability. Variability of ET has important environmental and socioeconomic implications for managing hydrological hazards, food and energy production. Although there have been many observational and modeling studies of ET, how ET has varied and the drivers of the variations at different temporal scales remain elusive. Much of the uncertainty comes from the atmospheric evaporative demand (AED), which is the combined effect of radiative and aerodynamic controls. The inconsistencies among modeled AED estimates and the limited observational data may originate from multiple sources including the limited time span and uncertainties in the data. To fully investigate and untangle the intertwined drivers of AED, we present a spectrum analysis to identify key controls of AED across multiple temporal scales. We use long-term records of observed pan evaporation for 1961-2006 from 317 weather stations across China and physically-based model estimates of potential evapotranspiration (PET). The model estimates are based on surface meteorology and radiation derived from reanalysis, satellite retrievals and station data. Our analyses show that temperature plays a dominant role in regulating variability of AED at the inter-annual scale. At the monthly and seasonal scales, the primary control of AED shifts from radiation in humid regions to humidity in dry regions. Unlike many studies focusing on the spatial pattern of ET drivers based on a traditional supply and demand framework, this study underlines the importance of temporal scales when discussing controls of ET variations.

  10. The Effect of Physical Education Climates on Elementary Students’ Physical Activity Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Wadsworth, Danielle D.; Robinson, Leah E.; Rudisill, Mary E.; Gell, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND With the growing need for children from underserved populations to be physically active it is imperative to create developmentally appropriate and enjoyable physical education programs that promote physical activity. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of mastery and performance climates on physical activity during physical education. METHODS Children (N = 108) in grades K-2 from a rural southeastern elementary school in the US were randomly assigned to a mastery or performance oriented climate. The climates were implemented over 10 school days during regular scheduled physical education classes, and physical activity was measured with pedometers and SOFIT. Two experts in mastery motivational climates served as teachers for the study and were counterbalanced between conditions. RESULTS Results showed that steps/minute were significantly higher for the mastery condition and participants in the mastery condition spent significantly less time sitting (p < .001) and in management (p < .001) and more time in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA; p = .002) and fitness activities (p = .001). CONCLUSION Results indicate that a mastery approach, which allows children the opportunity to drive their own physical activity, elicits higher step counts and more time spent in MVPA compared to a performance-oriented approach. PMID:23516997

  11. Kinematical evidence for physically different classes of large-scale coronal EUV waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warmuth, A.; Mann, G.

    2011-08-01

    Context. Large-scale wavelike disturbances have been observed in the solar corona in the EUV range since more than a decade. The physical nature of these so-called "EIT waves" is still being debated controversially. The two main contenders are on the one hand MHD waves and/or shocks, and on the other hand magnetic reconfiguration in the framework of an expanding CME. There is a lot of observational evidence backing either one or the other scenario, and no single model has been able to reproduce all observational constraints, which are partly even contradictory. This suggests that there may actually exist different classes of coronal waves that are caused by distinct physical processes. Then, the problems in interpreting coronal waves would be mainly caused by mixing together different physical processes. Aims: We search for evidence for physically different classes of large-scale coronal EUV waves. Methods: Kinematics is the most important characteristic of any moving disturbance, hence we focus on this aspect of coronal waves. Identifying distinct event classes requires a large event sample, which is up to now only available from SOHO/EIT. We analyze the kinematics of a sample of 176 EIT waves. In order to check if the results are severely affected by the low cadence of EIT, we complement this with high-cadence data for 17 events from STEREO/EUVI. In particular, we focus on the wave speeds and their evolution. Results: Based on their kinematical behavior, we find evidence for three distinct populations of coronal EUV waves: initially fast waves (v ≥ 320 km s-1) that show pronounced deceleration (class 1 events), waves with moderate (v ≈ 170-320 km s-1) and nearly constant speeds (class 2), and slow waves (v ≤ 130 km s-1) showing a rather erratic behavior (class 3). Conclusions: The kinematical behavior of the fast decelerating disturbances is consistent with nonlinear large-amplitude waves or shocks that propagate faster than the ambient fast-mode speed and

  12. Scale Development for Measuring and Predicting Adolescents’ Leisure Time Physical Activity Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Ries, Francis; Romero Granados, Santiago; Arribas Galarraga, Silvia

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a scale for assessing and predicting adolescents’ physical activity behavior in Spain and Luxembourg using the Theory of Planned Behavior as a framework. The sample was comprised of 613 Spanish (boys = 309, girls = 304; M age =15.28, SD =1.127) and 752 Luxembourgish adolescents (boys = 343, girls = 409; M age = 14.92, SD = 1.198), selected from students of two secondary schools in both countries, with a similar socio-economic status. The initial 43-items were all scored on a 4-point response format using the structured alternative format and translated into Spanish, French and German. In order to ensure the accuracy of the translation, standardized parallel back-translation techniques were employed. Following two pilot tests and subsequent revisions, a second order exploratory factor analysis with oblimin direct rotation was used for factor extraction. Internal consistency and test-retest reliabilities were also tested. The 4-week test-retest correlations confirmed the items’ time stability. The same five factors were obtained, explaining 63.76% and 63.64% of the total variance in both samples. Internal consistency for the five factors ranged from α = 0.759 to α = 0. 949 in the Spanish sample and from α = 0.735 to α = 0.952 in the Luxembourgish sample. For both samples, inter-factor correlations were all reported significant and positive, except for Factor 5 where they were significant but negative. The high internal consistency of the subscales, the reported item test-retest reliabilities and the identical factor structure confirm the adequacy of the elaborated questionnaire for assessing the TPB-based constructs when used with a population of adolescents in Spain and Luxembourg. The results give some indication that they may have value in measuring the hypothesized TPB constructs for PA behavior in a cross-cultural context. Key points When using the structured alternative format, weak internal consistency was obtained

  13. Orbital and physical characteristics of meter-scale impactors from airburst observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, P.; Wiegert, P.; Clark, D.; Tagliaferri, E.

    2016-03-01

    We have analyzed the orbits and ablation characteristics in the atmosphere of 59 Earth-impacting fireballs, produced by meteoroids 1 m in diameter or larger, described here as meter-scale. Using heights at peak luminosity as a proxy for strength, we determine that there is roughly an order of magnitude spread in strengths of the population of meter-scale impactors at the Earth. We use fireballs producing recovered meteorites and well documented fireballs from ground-based camera networks to calibrate our ablation model interpretation of the observed peak height of luminosity as a function of speed. The orbits and physical strength of these objects are consistent with the majority being asteroidal bodies originating from the inner main asteroid belt. This is in contrast to earlier suggestions by Ceplecha (Ceplecha, Z. [1994]. Astron. Astrophys. 286, 967-970) that the majority of meter-tens of meter sized meteoroids are "… cometary bodies of the weakest known structure". We find a lower limit of ∼10-15% of our objects have a possible cometary (Jupiter-Family comet and/or Halley-type comet) origin based on orbital characteristics alone. Only half this number, however, also show evidence for weaker than average structure. Two events, Sumava and USG 20131121, have exceptionally high (relative to the remainder of the population) heights of peak brightness. These are physically most consistent with high microporosity objects, though both were on asteroidal-type orbits. We also find three events, including the Oct 8, 2009 airburst near Sulawesi, Indonesia, which display comparatively low heights of peak brightness, consistent with strong monolithic stones or iron meteoroids. Based on orbital similarity, we find a probable connection among several events in our population with the Taurid meteoroid complex; no other major meteoroid streams show probable linkages to the orbits of our meter-scale population. Our impactors cover almost four orders of magnitude in mass, but

  14. The Butterfly Effect for Physics Laboratories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claycomb, James R.; Valentine, John H.

    2015-01-01

    A low-cost chaos dynamics lab is developed for quantitative demonstration of the butterfly effect using a magnetic pendulum. Chaotic motion is explored by recording magnetic time series. Students analyze the data in Excel® to investigate the butterfly effect as well as the reconstruction of the strange attractor using time delay plots. The lab…

  15. Some aspects of wind tunnel magnetic suspension systems with special application at large physical scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britcher, C. P.

    1983-01-01

    Wind tunnel magnetic suspension and balance systems (MSBSs) have so far failed to find application at the large physical scales necessary for the majority of aerodynamic testing. Three areas of technology relevant to such application are investigated. Two variants of the Spanwise Magnet roll torque generation scheme are studied. Spanwise Permanent Magnets are shown to be practical and are experimentally demonstrated. Extensive computations of the performance of the Spanwise Iron Magnet scheme indicate powerful capability, limited principally be electromagnet technology. Aerodynamic testing at extreme attitudes is shown to be practical in relatively conventional MSBSs. Preliminary operation of the MSBS over a wide range of angles of attack is demonstrated. The impact of a requirement for highly reliable operation on the overall architecture of Large MSBSs is studied and it is concluded that system cost and complexity need not be seriously increased.

  16. A statistical physics view of financial fluctuations: Evidence for scaling and universality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, H. Eugene; Plerou, Vasiliki; Gabaix, Xavier

    2008-06-01

    The unique scaling behavior of financial time series have attracted the research interest of physicists. Variables such as stock returns, share volume, and number of trades have been found to display distributions that are consistent with a power-law tail. We present an overview of recent research joining practitioners of economic theory and statistical physics to try to understand better some puzzles regarding economic fluctuations. One of these puzzles is how to describe outliers, i.e. phenomena that lie outside of patterns of statistical regularity. We review recent research, which suggests that such outliers may not in fact exist and that the same laws seem to govern outliers as well as day-to-day fluctuations.

  17. Dynamic scaling and temperature effects in thin film roughening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Assis, T. A.; Aarão Reis, F. D. A.

    2015-06-01

    The dynamic scaling of mesoscopically thick films (up to 104 atomic layers) grown with the Clarke-Vvedensky model is investigated numerically in 2 + 1 dimensions for broad ranges of values of the diffusion-to-deposition ratio R and lateral neighbor detachment probability ɛ, but with no barrier at step edges. The global roughness scales with the film thickness t as W ˜ tβ/[R3/2(ɛ + a)], where β ≈ 0.2 is the growth exponent consistent with Villain-Lai-Das Sarma (VLDS) scaling and a = 0.025. This general dependence on R and ɛ is inferred from renormalization studies and shows a remarkable effect of the former but a small effect of the latter, for ɛ ⩽ 0.1. For R ⩾ 104, very smooth surfaces are always produced. The local roughness shows apparent anomalous scaling for very low temperatures (R ⩽ 102), which is a consequence of large scaling corrections to asymptotic normal scaling. The scaling variable R3/2(ɛ + a) also represents the temperature effects in the scaling of the correlation length and appears in the dynamic scaling relation of the local roughness, which gives dynamic exponent z ≈ 3.3 also consistent with the VLDS class.

  18. The Perceived Relationship between Physical Attractiveness and Social Influence Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longo, Laura C.; Ashmore, Richard D.

    The power of beauty has been contemplated by writers, poets, and philosophers for centuries. The link between the target physical attractiveness and perceived social influence effectiveness has not been directly and systematically investigated. The goal of this study was to assess whether physically attractive (versus unattractive) individuals are…

  19. Effective Teaching Methods--Project-based Learning in Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holubova, Renata

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents results of the research of new effective teaching methods in physics and science. It is found out that it is necessary to educate pre-service teachers in approaches stressing the importance of the own activity of students, in competences how to create an interdisciplinary project. Project-based physics teaching and learning…

  20. Physical Education Teacher Effectiveness in a Public Health Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenzie, Thomas L.; Lounsbery, Monica A. F.

    2013-01-01

    The health benefits of physical activity are well documented, and the important role that schools and physical education (PE) can play in reducing sedentary behavior and contributing to population health has been identified. Although effective teaching is ultimately judged by student achievement, a major component of teacher and school…

  1. A Small-scale Physical Model of the Lower Mississippi River for Studying the Potential of Medium- and Large-scale Diversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willson, C. S.

    2011-12-01

    Over the past several thousand years the Mississippi River has formed one of the world's largest deltas and much of the Louisiana coast. However, in the last 100 years or so, anthropogenic controls have been placed on the system to maintain important navigation routes and for flood control resulting in the loss of the natural channel shifting necessary for replenishment of the deltaic coast with fresh sediment and resources. In addition, the high relative sea level rise in the lowermost portion of the river is causing a change in the distributary flow patterns of the river and deposition center. River and sediment diversions are being proposed as way to re-create some of the historical distribution of river water and sediments into the delta region. In response to a need for improving the understanding of the potential for medium- and large-scale river and sediment diversions, the state of Louisiana funded the construction of a small-scale physical model (SSPM) of the lower ~76 river miles (RM). The SSPM is a 1:12,000 horizontal, 1:500 vertical, highly-distorted, movable bed physical model designed to provide qualitative and semi-quantitative results regarding bulk noncohesive sediment transport characteristics in the river and through medium- and large-scale diversion structures. The SSPM was designed based on Froude similarity for the hydraulics and Shields similarity for sand transport and has a sediment time scale of 1 year prototype to 30 minutes model allowing for decadal length studies of the land building potential of diversions. Annual flow and sediment hydrographs were developed from historical records and a uniform relative sea level rise of 3 feet in 100 years is used to account for the combined effects of eustatic sea level rise and subsidence. Data collected during the experiments include river stages, dredging amounts and high-resolution video of transport patterns within the main channel and photographs of the sand deposition patterns in the

  2. Physical Distance and Attraction: An Intensification Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schiffenbauer, Allen; Schiavo, R. Steven

    1976-01-01

    This study was designed to test the effects of both interaction distance and the quality of the interaction upon attraction. The implications of this research for studies concerning crowding is discussed, as are possible explanatory mechanisms. (Editor/RK)

  3. The Random-Effect Generalized Rating Scale Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Wen-Chung; Wu, Shiu-Lien

    2011-01-01

    Rating scale items have been widely used in educational and psychological tests. These items require people to make subjective judgments, and these subjective judgments usually involve randomness. To account for this randomness, Wang, Wilson, and Shih proposed the random-effect rating scale model in which the threshold parameters are treated as…

  4. Structurally Dynamic Cellular Networks as Models for Planck Scale Physics and the Quantum Vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Requardt, Manfred

    Starting from the working hypothesis that both physics and the corresponding mathematics have to be described by means of discrete concepts on the Planck scale, one of the many problems one has to face in this enterprise is to find the discrete protoforms of the building blocks of our ordinary continuum physics and mathematics. We regard these continuum concepts and continuum space-time (S-T) in particular as being emergent, coarse-grained and derived relative to an underlying erratic and disordered microscopic substratum which is expected to play by quite different rules. A central role in our analysis is played by a geometric renormalization group which creates (among other things) a kind of sparse translocal network of correlations in classical continuous space-time and underlies in our view such mysterious phenomena as holography and the black hole entropy-area law. The same point of view holds for quantum theory which we also regard as a low-energy, coarse-grained continuum theory, being emergent from something more fundamental.

  5. Prediction of full-scale dewatering results of sewage sludges by the physical water distribution.

    PubMed

    Kopp, J; Dichtl, N

    2001-01-01

    The dewaterability of sewage sludge can be described by the total solids concentration of the sludge cake and the polymer-demand for conditioning. The total solids concentration of the sludge cake depends on the physical water distribution. The various types of water in sewage sludge are mainly distinguished by the type and the intensity of their physical bonding to the solids. In a sewage sludge suspension four different types of water can be distinguished. These are the free water, which is not bound to the particles, the interstitial water, which is bound by capillary forces between the sludge flocs, the surface water, which is bound by adhesive forces and intracellular water. Only the share of free water can be separated during mechanical dewatering. It can be shown, that by thermo-gravimeteric measurement of the free water content, an exact prediction of full-scale dewatering results is possible. By separation of all free water during centrifugation the maximum dewatering result is reached. Polymer conditioning increases the velocity of the sludge water release, but the free water content is not influenced by this process. Furthermore it is not possible, to replace the measuring of the water distribution by other individual parameters such as ignition loss. PMID:11443955

  6. [Effect of physical activity on anxiety and depression].

    PubMed

    De Matos, Margarida Gaspar; Calmeiro, Luis; Da Fonseca, David

    2009-05-01

    The advantages of physical activity are widely recognised from both a physiological and a psychological perspective. Evidence seems to demonstrate that physical activity is associated with decreases in depression and anxiety in clinical and non-clinical populations. There are a number of physiological, biochemical and psychological explanations which should be considered to understand the psychological effects of exercise. Physical activity may be considered as an adjunct to psychotherapeutic and pharmacological treatments of depression and anxiety. Physical activity appears to be a non-specific form of treatment with psychotherapeutic potential that should not be ignored. PMID:19135849

  7. Influence of physical exercise on simple reaction time: effect of physical fitness.

    PubMed

    Brisswalter, J; Arcelin, R; Audiffren, M; Delignières, D

    1997-12-01

    The influence of physical fitness and energy expenditure on a simple reaction time task performed during exercise was investigated. Two groups of 10 subjects were used, one was composed of trained middle-distance runners and one of students who had no regular physical training. The subjects performed a simple reaction time task while pedalling on a cycloergometer at different relative power output corresponding to 20, 40, 60, and 80% of their own maximal aerobic power and immediately after exercise. During exercise, the results showed a decrease in cognitive performance for both groups whereas no significant effect was found after exercise. A significant effect of physical fitness on simple reaction time was noted during exercise. The data are interpreted in terms of optimization of performance focusing particularly on the relations between energy cost of the physical task and attentional demand. PMID:9399313

  8. Physical activity and its mechanistic effects on prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Wekesa, A; Harrison, M; Watson, R W

    2015-09-01

    Beneficial effects of physical activity have been illustrated in numerous aspects of health. With the increasing incidence of prostate cancer and changes in physical activity of men, understanding the link between the two has important implications for changing this cancer burden. Both positive and negative associations between physical activity and prostate cancer have been previously demonstrated in observational epidemiological studies. Elucidating the biological mechanisms would lead to a better understanding of how physical activity influences the progression of prostate cancer. This review was undertaken to: (1) identify evidence in literature that demonstrates the effects of physical activity on skeletal muscle secretomes, (2) indicate the plausible signaling pathways these proteins might activate, and (3) identify evidence in literature that demonstrates the roles of the signaling pathways in prostate cancer progression and regression. We also discuss proposed biological mechanisms and signaling pathways by which physical activity may prevent the development and progression of prostate cancer. We discuss proteins involved in the normal and aberrant growth and development of the prostate gland that may be affected by physical activity. We further identify future directions for research, including a better understanding of the biological mechanisms, the need to standardize physical activity and identify mechanistic end points of physical activity that can then be correlated with outcomes. PMID:25800589

  9. Large-Scale Physical Modelling of Complex Tsunami-Generated Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynett, P. J.; Kalligeris, N.; Ayca, A.

    2014-12-01

    For tsunamis passing through sharp bathymetric variability, such as a shoal or a harbor entrance channel, z-axis vortical motions are created. These structures are often characterized by a horizontal length scale that is much greater than the local depth and are herein called shallow turbulent coherent structures (TCS). These shallow TCS can greatly increase the drag force on affected infrastructure and the ability of the flow to transport debris and floating objects. Shallow TCS typically manifest as large "whirlpools" during tsunamis, very commonly in ports and harbors. Such structures have been observed numerous times in the tsunamis over the past decade, and are postulated as the cause of large vessels parting their mooring lines due to yaw induced by the rotational eddy. Through the NSF NEES program, a laboratory study to examine a shallow TCS was performed during the summer of 2014. To generate this phenomenon, a 60 second period long wave was created and then interacted with a breakwater in the basin, forcing the generation of a large and stable TCS. The model scale is 1:30, equating to a 5.5 minute period and 0.5 m amplitude in the prototype scale. Surface tracers, dye studies, AVD's, wave gages, and bottom pressure sensors are used to characterize the flow. Complex patterns of surface convergence and divergence are easily seen in the data, indicating three-dimensional flow patterns. Dye studies show areas of relatively high and low spatial mixing. Model vessels are placed in the basin such that ship motion in the presence of these rapidly varying currents might be captured. The data obtained from this laboratory study should permit a better physical understanding of the nearshore currents that tsunamis are known to generate, as well as provide a benchmark for numerical modelers who wish to simulate currents.

  10. Subgrid-scale physical parameterization in atmospheric modeling: How can we make it consistent?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Jun-Ichi

    2016-07-01

    Approaches to subgrid-scale physical parameterization in atmospheric modeling are reviewed by taking turbulent combustion flow research as a point of reference. Three major general approaches are considered for its consistent development: moment, distribution density function (DDF), and mode decomposition. The moment expansion is a standard method for describing the subgrid-scale turbulent flows both in geophysics and engineering. The DDF (commonly called PDF) approach is intuitively appealing as it deals with a distribution of variables in subgrid scale in a more direct manner. Mode decomposition was originally applied by Aubry et al (1988 J. Fluid Mech. 192 115-73) in the context of wall boundary-layer turbulence. It is specifically designed to represent coherencies in compact manner by a low-dimensional dynamical system. Their original proposal adopts the proper orthogonal decomposition (empirical orthogonal functions) as their mode-decomposition basis. However, the methodology can easily be generalized into any decomposition basis. Among those, wavelet is a particularly attractive alternative. The mass-flux formulation that is currently adopted in the majority of atmospheric models for parameterizing convection can also be considered a special case of mode decomposition, adopting segmentally constant modes for the expansion basis. This perspective further identifies a very basic but also general geometrical constraint imposed on the massflux formulation: the segmentally-constant approximation. Mode decomposition can, furthermore, be understood by analogy with a Galerkin method in numerically modeling. This analogy suggests that the subgrid parameterization may be re-interpreted as a type of mesh-refinement in numerical modeling. A link between the subgrid parameterization and downscaling problems is also pointed out.

  11. Sill effects on physical dynamics in eastern Long Island Sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitney, Michael M.; Jia, Yan; McManus, Pearse M.; Kunz, Christopher J.

    2014-03-01

    This study investigates how Mattituck Sill influences circulation patterns and physical dynamics in eastern Long Island Sound, a major estuary on the U.S. east coast. Observations show there is pronounced across-estuary transport in the area and suggest there may be subtidal anticyclonic flow around the sill. Model runs, with and without sill bathymetry, exhibit this across-estuary transport and anticyclonic circulation. Comparison between these runs indicates that the sill intensifies the anticyclonic circulation. This study finds the sill does not exert internal hydraulic control during neap, mean, or spring tidal conditions. Nevertheless, along-estuary exchange is reduced over the sill and across-estuary fluxes are increased. The Connecticut River plume enters close to the estuary mouth. The sill deflects more of the plume waters towards the mouth, causing less freshwater to take the long looping route through the estuary. The subtidal circulation balance around the sill indicates a barotropic balance between the tidal advection of tidal vorticity and friction. The subtidal vorticity balance indicates the net effect of tidal advection of relative vorticity is balanced with frictional curl associated with lateral speed gradients and vorticity dissipation. Previously developed scalings based on the circulation balance (Nature 290:549-555, 1981), frictional vorticity generation mechanisms (Deep-Sea Res 28:195-212, 1981), and tidal diffusion of potential vorticity (J Phys Oceanogr 29:821-827, 1999) are applicable to Mattituck Sill and predict circulation with a similar magnitudes to model results.

  12. Effects of Music on Physical Activity Rates of Elementary Physical Education Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barney, David; Prusak, Keven A.

    2015-01-01

    Music is a pervasive presence in society and is routinely used to influence human behavior in a variety of settings and for a variety of purposes including exercise behaviors and physical education (PE) classes. However, little evidence exists to support what effect, if any, music has on learner outcomes in PE. The effects that playing music…

  13. Physical Health Effects of Intimate Partner Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sillito, Carrie LeFevre

    2012-01-01

    Although intimate partner violence has been recognized as both a social problem and health issue, the extent to which it is a health issue for both males and females in the general population is largely unknown. This longitudinal research uses data from the National Survey of Family and Households (1987-2003). Random effects logistic regression…

  14. The Moire Effect in Physics Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernero, Bruce

    1989-01-01

    The Moire pattern is the shimmering pattern which looks like an odd interference pattern in window screens or folds of nylon shower curtain. Illustrates some of the ways the effect may be used, including demonstration of wave interference, detection of small displacement, persistence of vision, contour measurement, beats, and optical clearness.…

  15. Nicholas Metropolis Award for Outstanding Doctoral Thesis Work in Computational Physics Talk: Understanding Nano-scale Electronic Systems via Large-scale Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Chao

    2009-03-01

    Nano-scale physical phenomena and processes, especially those in electronics, have drawn great attention in the past decade. Experiments have shown that electronic and transport properties of functionalized carbon nanotubes are sensitive to adsorption of gas molecules such as H2, NO2, and NH3. Similar measurements have also been performed to study adsorption of proteins on other semiconductor nano-wires. These experiments suggest that nano-scale systems can be useful for making future chemical and biological sensors. Aiming to understand the physical mechanisms underlying and governing property changes at nano-scale, we start off by investigating, via first-principles method, the electronic structure of Pd-CNT before and after hydrogen adsorption, and continue with coherent electronic transport using non-equilibrium Green’s function techniques combined with density functional theory. Once our results are fully analyzed they can be used to interpret and understand experimental data, with a few difficult issues to be addressed. Finally, we discuss a newly developed multi-scale computing architecture, OPAL, that coordinates simultaneous execution of multiple codes. Inspired by the capabilities of this computing framework, we present a scenario of future modeling and simulation of multi-scale, multi-physical processes.

  16. Effect of New Physics in Astrophysical Neutrino Flavor.

    PubMed

    Argüelles, Carlos A; Katori, Teppei; Salvado, Jordi

    2015-10-16

    Astrophysical neutrinos are powerful tools for investigating the fundamental properties of particle physics through their flavor content. In this Letter, we perform the first general new physics study on ultrahigh energy neutrino flavor content by introducing effective operators. We find that, at the current limits on these operators, new physics terms cause maximal effects on the flavor content; however, the flavor content on the Earth is confined to a region related to the assumed initial flavor content. Furthermore, we conclude that a precise measure of the flavor content on the Earth will provide orders of magnitude improvement on new physics bounds. Finally, we discuss the current best fits of flavor content of the IceCube data and their interplay with new physics scenarios. PMID:26550862

  17. The Effects of Scales on Autorotation of Monarch Butterfly Forewings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dechello, Nicole; Lang, Amy

    2014-11-01

    The wings of Monarch butterflies (Danus plexippus) have scales of approximately 100 micrometers that cover their wings in a roof-shingle pattern, and these scales are hypothesized to help improve flight efficiency for their long migration. The aerodynamic effects of the scales, particularly involving the leading edge vortex formation and resulting lift, were investigated by observing the natural autorotation of forewing specimen when dropped in quiescent air. A high-speed camera recorded drop tests of 32 forewings both with scales and after removal of the scales. It was found that the scales, on average, comprised 17% of the forewing mass. Tracking software was used to analyze the videos for several parameters, including descent speed and radius of rotation. NSF ECE Grant #1358991 supported the first author as an research experience for undergraduate (REU) student.

  18. IRRADIATION EFFECTS ON THE PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF SEWAGE SLUDGE

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M-J.; Lee, J-K.; Yoo, D-H.; Ho, K.

    2004-10-05

    The radiation effects on the physical characteristic of the sewage sludge were studied in order to obtain information which will be used for study on the enhancement of the sludge's dewaterability. Water contents, capillary suction time, zeta potential, irradiation dose, sludge acidity, total solid concentration, sludge particle size and microbiology before and after irradiation were investigated. Irradiation gave an effect on physical characteristics sludge. Water content in sludge cake could be reduced by irradiation at the dose of 10kGy.

  19. Roughness effects on fine-scale anisotropy and anomalous scaling in atmospheric flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katul, G. G.; Porporato, A.; Poggi, D.

    2009-03-01

    The effects of surface roughness on various measures of fine-scale intermittency within the inertial subrange were analyzed using two data sets that span the roughness "extremes" encountered in atmospheric flows, an ice sheet and a tall rough forest, and supplemented by a large number of existing literature data. Three inter-related problems pertaining to surface roughness effects on (i) anomalous scaling in higher-order structure functions, (ii) generalized dimensions and singularity spectra of the componentwise turbulent kinetic energy, and (iii) scalewise measures such local flatness factors and stretching exponents were addressed. It was demonstrated that surface roughness effects do not impact the fine-scale intermittency in u (the longitudinal velocity component), consistent with previous laboratory experiments. However, fine-scale intermittency in w (the vertical velocity component) increased with decreasing roughness. The consequence of this external intermittency (i.e., surface roughness induced) is that the singularity spectra of the scaling exponents are much broader for w when compared u in the context of the multifractal formalism for the local kinetic energy (instead of the usual conservative cascade studied for the dissipation rate). The scalewise evolution of the flatness factors and stretching exponents collapse when normalized using a global Reynolds number Rt=σLI/ν, where σ is the velocity standard deviation, LI is the integral length scale, and ν is the fluid viscosity.

  20. Scale effects of nitrate sinks and sources in stream networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuetz, Tobias; Weiler, Markus; Gascuel-Odoux, Chantal

    2014-05-01

    Increasing N-fertilizer applications in agricultural catchments are considered as one of the major sources for dissolved nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N) in surface water. While NO3-N mobilization pathways depend on catchment's pedological and hydrogeological characteristics and its runoff generation processes, in-stream retention and removal processes depend on local/reach-scale conditions such as weather, discharge, channel morphology, vegetation, shading or hyporheic exchange and others. However, knowledge is still limited to scale up locally observable retention and removal processes to larger stream networks to understand the spatial and temporal dynamics of in-stream NO3-N concentrations. Relevant processes to consider explicitly are the effects of 'hot spots', dominant NO3-N sources (e.g. sub-catchments, 'critical source areas') or specific NO3-N sinks (e.g. riparian wetlands and stream reaches with high biogeochemical activity). We studied these processes in a 1.7 km2 agricultural headwater catchment, where distinct locations of groundwater inflow (a dense artificial drainage network) and a predominantly impervious streambed allowed separating mixing and dilution processes as well as in-stream retention and removal processes. During two summer seasons we conducted a set (25) of stream network wide (stream water and drainage water) synoptic sampling campaigns including climate parameters, discharge, channel geomorphology, vegetation, stream water chemistry and physical water parameters (dissolved oxygen concentration, water temperatures, electrical conductivity, pH). Analyzing these data sets we were able to determine a) time variant NO3-N concentrations and loads for all sub-catchments (sources), b) time variant in-stream removal rates for all stream reaches (sinks) and c) the hierarchical order of all contributing NO3-N sinks and sources and their time variant influence on total NO3-N export. Climate parameters, discharge, channel geomorphology, vegetation, stream

  1. Use of Plot Scale Observations to gauge the applicability of Physically-Based Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kormos, P. R.; McNamara, J. P.; Marks, D. G.; Flores, A. N.; Marshall, H.; Boe, E.

    2011-12-01

    Catchment hydrologic modeling efforts should be initiated with a comparison between a perceptual model of how the basin functions, and what processes the numerical hydrologic model represents. The majority of recent attention in literature has been focused on using this process to inform conceptual model structures aimed at predicting streamflow from precipitation events. However, this method may also be used to assess the applicability of physically-based models when lumped parameter models are insufficient for research questions. Physically-based models are chosen over lumped parameter conceptual models for their ability to provide detailed spatial information on soil moisture, ephemeral streamflow, and differential snow melt. A plot scale study was conducted in a 0.02 km2 headwater catchment to build a perceptual model of the Tree Line (TL) Experimental Catchment within the Dry Creek Experimental Watershed (DCEW) in the semi-arid foothills north of Boise, ID. Overland flow, through flow, and radiation flux measurements were taken in addition to existing weather station variables (air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and direction, snow depth, and soil moisture) for the 2011 water year. The 2011 water year is typical of this study site and is characterized by a shallow snowpack that lasts from the late fall to early spring and includes several rain-on-snow events. A soil storage field capacity threshold in the upper highly conductive soil (approximately 145 mm) must be crossed before lateral flow is observed. The total soil storage threshold for lateral flow slowly increases from 253 mm during a December rain-on-snow event, to 269 mm during the spring melt event as deeper, less conductive soils wet up. Lateral flow primarily takes place as overland flow and as concentrated flow paths at the soil-bedrock interface, which are controlled by bedrock topography. Results suggest that the watershed models used in TL need to account for unsaturated soil storage

  2. Scale effects in single-asperity friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robbins, Mark O.; Sharp, Tristan; Ligneres, Vincent; Pastewka, Lars

    2014-03-01

    Simulations are used to examine the static friction in model single-asperity contacts between a sphere and a flat elastic substrate. The two surfaces have the same crystalline structure. The radius R of the sphere and a of the contact are varied from nanometers to micrometers. For small contacts the atoms move coherently and the coefficient of friction μ is independent of load. As contact size increases, μ begins to drop. Results from a wide range of systems can be collapsed when μ is plotted against a2 / Ra0 where a0 nearest-neighbor spacing. The results are compared to Cattaneo-Mindlin continuum theory and dislocation-based models of contact-size effects from Hurtado and Kim and Gao. Supported by National Science Foundation Grant DMR 1006805 and IGERT 0801471.

  3. The Effects of Stress on Physical Activity and Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Stults-Kolehmainen, Matthew A.; Sinha, Rajita

    2013-01-01

    Background Psychological stress and physical activity (PA) are believed to be reciprocally related; however, most research examining the relationship between these constructs is devoted to the study of exercise and/or PA as an instrument to mitigate distress. Objective The aim of this paper was to review the literature investigating the influence of stress on indicators of PA and exercise. Methods A systematic search of Web of Science, Pub-Med, and SPORTDiscus was employed to find all relevant studies focusing on human participants. Search terms included “stress”, “exercise”, and “physical activity”. A rating scale (0–9) modified for this study was utilized to assess the quality of all studies with multiple time points. Results The literature search found 168 studies that examined the influence of stress on PA. Studies varied widely in their theoretical orientation and included perceived stress, distress, life events, job strain, role strain, and work–family conflict but not lifetime cumulative adversity. To more clearly address the question, prospective studies (n = 55) were considered for further review, the majority of which indicated that psychological stress predicts less PA (behavioral inhibition) and/or exercise or more sedentary behavior (76.4 %). Both objective (i.e., life events) and subjective (i.e., distress) measures of stress related to reduced PA. Prospective studies investigating the effects of objective markers of stress nearly all agreed (six of seven studies) that stress has a negative effect on PA. This was true for research examining (a) PA at periods of objectively varying levels of stress (i.e., final examinations vs. a control time point) and (b) chronically stressed populations (e.g., caregivers, parents of children with a cancer diagnosis) that were less likely to be active than controls over time. Studies examining older adults (>50 years), cohorts with both men and women, and larger sample sizes (n > 100) were more likely

  4. Physical modelling of granular flows at multiple-scales and stress levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Take, Andy; Bowman, Elisabeth; Bryant, Sarah

    2015-04-01

    The rheology of dry granular flows is an area of significant focus within the granular physics, geoscience, and geotechnical engineering research communities. Studies performed to better understand granular flows in manufacturing, materials processing or bulk handling applications have typically focused on the behavior of steady, continuous flows. As a result, much of the research on relating the fundamental interaction of particles to the rheological or constitutive behaviour of granular flows has been performed under (usually) steady-state conditions and low stress levels. However, landslides, which are the primary focus of the geoscience and geotechnical engineering communities, are by nature unsteady flows defined by a finite source volume and at flow depths much larger than typically possible in laboratory experiments. The objective of this paper is to report initial findings of experimental studies currently being conducted using a new large-scale landslide flume (8 m long, 2 m wide slope inclined at 30° with a 35 m long horizontal base section) and at elevated particle self-weight in a 10 m diameter geotechnical centrifuge to investigate the granular flow behavior at multiple-scales and stress levels. The transparent sidewalls of the two flumes used in the experimental investigation permit the combination of observations of particle-scale interaction (using high-speed imaging through transparent vertical sidewalls at over 1000 frames per second) with observations of the distal reach of the landslide debris. These observations are used to investigate the applicability of rheological models developed for steady state flows (e.g. the dimensionless inertial number) in landslide applications and the robustness of depth-averaged approaches to modelling dry granular flow at multiple scales. These observations indicate that the dimensionless inertial number calculated for the flow may be of limited utility except perhaps to define a general state (e.g. liquid

  5. Thermal and dissipative effects in Casimir physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Woo-Joong; Brown-Hayes, Michael; Brownell, Hayden; Dalvit, Diego; Lombardo, Fernando; Mazzitelli, Francisco; Onofrio, Roberto

    2007-03-01

    We have developed an apparatus to assess the thermal effects in Casimir force measurement of a cylinder-plane geometry. Preliminary electrostatic calibrations imply sensitivity sufficient to observe the Casimir force with submicron separation between reflecting surfaces. Work is in progress to improve the sensitivity in order to distinguish the thermal contributions up to 3 microns separation. Another project currently underway at Dartmouth addresses an experimental strategy to verify the dynamical Casimir effect, a dissipative feature of motion in quantum vacuum. In this scheme, Casimir photons generated inside a high-Q cavity with one of the walls driven at GHz frequency [2] would stimulate superradiant emission from ultracold sodium atoms injected into the cavity. We are modeling this system in order to identify the signal features distinguishing Casimir induced superradiance from sodium superflourescence. [1] M. Brown-Hayes, D. A. R Dalvit, F. D. Mazzitelli, W. J. Kim, and R. Onofrio, Phys. Rev. A 72, 051102 (2005). [2] W. J. Kim, J. H. Brownell, and R. Onofrio, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 200402 (2006).

  6. The Effect of Physical Activity on Science Competence and Attitude towards Science Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinkenborg, Ann Maria

    This study examines the effect of physical activity on science instruction. To combat the implications of physical inactivity, schools need to be willing to consider all possible opportunities for students to engage in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). Integrating physical activity with traditional classroom content is one instructional method to consider. Researchers have typically focused on integration with English/language arts (ELA) and mathematics. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of physical activity on science competence and attitude towards science. Fifty-three third grade children participated in this investigation; one group received science instruction with a physical activity intervention while the other group received traditional science instruction. Participants in both groups completed a modified version of What I Really Think of Science attitude scale (Pell & Jarvis, 2001) and a physical science test of competence prior to and following the intervention. Children were videotaped during science instruction and their movement coded to measure the proportion of time spent in MVPA. Results revealed that children in the intervention group demonstrated greater MVPA during the instructional period. A moderate to large effect size (partial eta squared = .091) was seen in the intervention group science competence post-test indicating greater understanding of force, motion, work, and simple machines concepts than that of the control group who were less physically active. There was no statistically significant attitude difference between the intervention and control groups post-test, (F(1,51) = .375, p = .543). These results provide evidence that integration can effectively present physical science content and have a positive impact on the number of minutes of health-enhancing physical activity in a school day.

  7. The physics of non-volcanic tremor: insights from laboratory-scale earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Toro, G.; Meredith, P.

    2012-04-01

    Due to his extensive early experience in field structural geology, Luigi Burlini's experimental research was always aimed at using laboratory techniques and simulations to improve our understanding of the physics of natural rock deformation. Here we present an example of collaborative work from the later part of his scientific career in which the main goal was unravelling the physics of non-volcanic tremor in subduction zones. This was achieved by deforming typical source rocks (serpentinites) under conditions (300 MPa and 600oC) that approach those expected in nature (up to 1 GPa and 500oC). The main technical challenge was to capture deformation-induced microseismicity (in the form of acoustic emissions) released under such extreme conditions by means of in-situ transducers designed to work at only modest temperatures (up to 200oC). The main scientific challenges were (1) to link the acoustic emission output to specific physical processes, such as cracking, fluid flow or fluid-crack interactions, by means of waveform and microstructural analysis; and (2) to extrapolate the laboratory acoustic emission signals (kHz to MHz frequency) associated with mm to cm-scale processes, to natural seismicity (0.1-1 Hz frequency) associated with km-scale rock volumes by means of frequency scaling (Aki and Richards, 1980). Episodic tremor and slip (ETS) has been correlated with rupture phenomena in subducting oceanic lithosphere at 30 to 45 km depth, where high Vp/Vs ratios, suggestive of high-fluid pressure, have also been observed. ETS, by accommodating slip in the down-dip portion of the subduction zone, may trigger megathrust earthquakes up-dip in the locked section. In our experiments we measured the output of acoustic emissions during heating of serpentinite samples to beyond their equilibrium dehydration temperature. Experiments were performed on cores samples 15 mm in diameter by 30 mm long under hydrostatic stresses of 200 or 300 MPa in a Paterson high

  8. Effects of Physical (In)activity on Platelet Function

    PubMed Central

    Heber, Stefan; Volf, Ivo

    2015-01-01

    As platelet activation is closely related to the liberation of growth factors and inflammatory mediators, platelets play a central role in the development of CVD. Virtually all cardiovascular risk factors favor platelet hyperreactivity and, accordingly, also physical (in)activity affects platelet function. Within this paper, we will summarize and discuss the current knowledge on the impact of acute and habitual exercise on platelet function. Although there are apparent discrepancies regarding the reported effects of acute, strenuous exercise on platelet activation, a deeper analysis of the available literature reveals that the applied exercise intensity and the subjects' cardiorespiratory fitness represent critical determinants for the observed effects. Consideration of these factors leads to the summary that (i) acute, strenuous exercise can lead to platelet activation, (ii) regular physical activity and/or physical fitness diminish or prevent platelet activation in response to acute exercise, and (iii) habitual physical activity and/or physical fitness also favorably modulate platelet function at physical rest. Notably, these effects of exercise on platelet function show obvious similarities to the well-recognized relation between exercise and the risk for cardiovascular events where vigorous exercise transiently increases the risk for myocardial infarction and a physically active lifestyle dramatically reduces cardiovascular mortality. PMID:26557653

  9. Wavelength dependence of scattering properties in the VIS-NIR and links with grain-scale physical and compositional properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilorget, C.; Fernando, J.; Ehlmann, B. L.; Schmidt, F.; Hiroi, T.

    2016-03-01

    Surface scattered sunlight carries important information about the composition and microtexture of surface materials, thus enabling tracing back the geological and climatic processes that occurred on the planetary body. Here we perform laboratory spectro-goniometric measurements of granular samples (45-75 μ m fraction) with different composition and physical properties over the VIS-NIR spectral range (0.4-2.5 μ m). To quantify the evolution of the scattering properties over the VIS-NIR, we use an inversion procedure based on a Bayesian approach to estimate photometric parameters from the Hapke radiative transfer model. The granular samples are also carefully characterized by optical and SEM techniques in order to link these scattering variations with the grains' physical properties. Results show that the scattering properties are wavelength-dependent and can vary significantly over the VIS-NIR spectral range. In particular, the phase function of a granular material is affected by both the absorptivity and the external and internal structure of the grains, from the millimeter scale down to the wavelength scale. Our results also confirm that the macroscopic roughness parameter, as defined by Hapke, is to first order correlated with the absorptivity of the particles, through multiple scattering effects, and thus mostly corresponds to a measurement of the particles shadowing. Photometric datasets, typically obtained at a given wavelength that can vary from one study to another, should therefore be compared and interpreted with caution when extrapolating across wavelengths. Our results also suggest that multi-wavelength photometry could potentially provide a much richer signature than with single-wavelength photometry, opening new perspectives into the characterization of surface materials.

  10. Moose: An Open-Source Framework to Enable Rapid Development of Collaborative, Multi-Scale, Multi-Physics Simulation Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slaughter, A. E.; Permann, C.; Peterson, J. W.; Gaston, D.; Andrs, D.; Miller, J.

    2014-12-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL)-developed Multiphysics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE; www.mooseframework.org), is an open-source, parallel computational framework for enabling the solution of complex, fully implicit multiphysics systems. MOOSE provides a set of computational tools that scientists and engineers can use to create sophisticated multiphysics simulations. Applications built using MOOSE have computed solutions for chemical reaction and transport equations, computational fluid dynamics, solid mechanics, heat conduction, mesoscale materials modeling, geomechanics, and others. To facilitate the coupling of diverse and highly-coupled physical systems, MOOSE employs the Jacobian-free Newton-Krylov (JFNK) method when solving the coupled nonlinear systems of equations arising in multiphysics applications. The MOOSE framework is written in C++, and leverages other high-quality, open-source scientific software packages such as LibMesh, Hypre, and PETSc. MOOSE uses a "hybrid parallel" model which combines both shared memory (thread-based) and distributed memory (MPI-based) parallelism to ensure efficient resource utilization on a wide range of computational hardware. MOOSE-based applications are inherently modular, which allows for simulation expansion (via coupling of additional physics modules) and the creation of multi-scale simulations. Any application developed with MOOSE supports running (in parallel) any other MOOSE-based application. Each application can be developed independently, yet easily communicate with other applications (e.g., conductivity in a slope-scale model could be a constant input, or a complete phase-field micro-structure simulation) without additional code being written. This method of development has proven effective at INL and expedites the development of sophisticated, sustainable, and collaborative simulation tools.

  11. Issues and perspectives of physically-based ecohydrological modeling: crossing spatial and temporal scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatichi, S.

    2011-12-01

    The coupled, spatially-distributed dynamics of hydrological and vegetation have been extremely difficult to address quantitavely. The analyses are particularly challenging because of the spatially and temporally heterogeneous conditions within watersheds, especially when topographically complex landscapes are considered. Nonetheless, a better understanding of ecosystem functioning, and the improvement of our predictive skills are related to providing consistent simulations of hydrological, energy, and carbon fluxes in heterogeneous landscapes. A mechanistic ecohydrological model Tethys-Chloris is used to investigate these complex dynamics in two ecosystems characterized by cold climate and seasonal snow cover. A range of ecohydrological metrics is presented to highlight the model capabilities in reproducing hydrological and vegetation dynamics across spatial and temporal scales. A diverse set of observations is used to confirm the simulated dynamics. Satisfactory results are obtained without significant calibration efforts despite the large phase-space dimensionality of the model, the uncertainty of imposed boundary conditions, and limited data availability. The background rationale is that the structure of a physically-based/mechanistic model leads to a satisfactory performance with a narrow range of possible outcomes. This is possible because the physically-based (i.e., theoretically measurable) nature of the parameters implies narrower bounds of the values they can assume. The direct consequence is a narrower range of possible model results. Nonetheless, major uncertainties remain in simulating hydrological fluxes in subsurface, such as deep soil horizons as well as at the bedrock interface. While the simulated patterns mimic the outcome of hydrological dynamics with high realism, the lack of spatially distributed data prevents a more rigorous assessment; further community efforts are warranted to address the issue that hampers the development and thorough

  12. Astronomical time-scale for physical property records from Quaternary sediments of the northern North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mienert, Jürgen; Chi, Jian

    1995-02-01

    Deep sea sediment cores taken between 50° and 75°N in the North Atlantic, in water depths varying between 1340 and 3850 m, were examined to provide an astronomically calibrated late Quaternary time-scale based on physical property records. Magnetic susceptibility and gamma ray attenuation porosity evaluator (GRAPE) density changes of these cores revealed significant responses to orbital forcing in the eccentricity (100 kyr), obliquity (41 kyr) and precessional (23, 19 kyr) bands. At 75°N (Greenland Sea), a response to obliquity forcing was weak despite the fact that it should become more pronounced in sediments at high latitudes. Application of bandpass filtering at the obliquity period (41 kyr), however, showed that variance at this period did exist in the magnetic susceptibility record, but at a very low power. At 50°N stacked curves of magnetic susceptibility correlated strongly with the SPECMAP curve for the past 500 ka. Since about 65 ka, dropstone layers are recorded in both magnetic susceptibility and GRAPE data of Rockall Plateau sediments. Although Rockall Plateau sediments show peaks in physical properties that correlate with Heinrich events (H1, H2, H4, H5, H6), such a relationship was not readily observed in Norwegian-Greenland Sea records. Heinrich events at Rockall Plateau sites indicate a northward flow of icebergs in the eastern North Atlantic. This flow pattern and the presence of Heinrich events during the past 65 ka raise the questions of whether similar events occurred before this time period, and to what kind of ice sheet dynamics and climatic-oceanographic conditions favoured major iceberg surges from the Laurentide ice sheet to the North Atlantic at 50°N.

  13. Physical Factors Effecting Cerebral Aneurysm Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Sadasivan, Chander; Fiorella, David J.; Woo, Henry H.; Lieber, Baruch B.

    2013-01-01

    Many factors that are either blood-, wall-, or hemodynamics-borne have been associated with the initiation, growth, and rupture of intracranial aneurysms. The distribution of cerebral aneurysms around the bifurcations of the circle of Willis has provided the impetus for numerous studies trying to link hemodynamic factors (flow impingement, pressure, and/or wall shear stress) to aneurysm pathophysiology. The focus of this review is to provide a broad overview of such hemodynamic associations as well as the subsumed aspects of vascular anatomy and wall structure. Hemodynamic factors seem to be correlated to the distribution of aneurysms on the intracranial arterial tree and complex, slow flow patterns seem to be associated with aneurysm growth and rupture. However, both the prevalence of aneurysms in the general population and the incidence of ruptures in the aneurysm population are extremely low. This suggests that hemodynamic factors and purely mechanical explanations by themselves may serve as necessary, but never as necessary and sufficient conditions of this disease’s causation. The ultimate cause is not yet known, but it is likely an additive or multiplicative effect of a handful of biochemical and biomechanical factors. PMID:23549899

  14. Energy, entropy and mass scaling relations for elliptical galaxies. Towards a physical understanding of their photometric properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Márquez, I.; Lima Neto, G. B.; Capelato, H.; Durret, F.; Lanzoni, B.; Gerbal, D.

    2001-12-01

    In the present paper, we show that elliptical galaxies (Es) obey a scaling relation between potential energy and mass. Since they are relaxed systems in a post violent-relaxation stage, they are quasi-equilibrium gravitational systems and therefore they also have a quasi-constant specific entropy. Assuming that light traces mass, these two laws imply that in the space defined by the three Sérsic law parameters (intensity Sigma0 , scale a and shape nu ), elliptical galaxies are distributed on two intersecting 2-manifolds: the Entropic Surface and the Energy-Mass Surface. Using a sample of 132 galaxies belonging to three nearby clusters, we have verified that ellipticals indeed follow these laws. This also implies that they are distributed along the intersection line (the Energy-Entropy line), thus they constitute a one-parameter family. These two physical laws (separately or combined), allow to find the theoretical origin of several observed photometrical relations, such as the correlation between absolute magnitude and effective surface brightness, and the fact that ellipticals are located on a surface in the [log Reff, -2.5 log Sigma0, log nu ] space. The fact that elliptical galaxies are a one-parameter family has important implications for cosmology and galaxy formation and evolution models. Moreover, the Energy-Entropy line could be used as a distance indicator.

  15. The Teaching Effectiveness of a Relevant Physics Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobson, Art

    1998-04-01

    If America is to achieve the science literacy that is ssential to industrialized democracy, all students must study such topics as scientific methodology, pseudoscience, critical thinking, ozone depletion, technological risk, and global warming. My large-enrollment liberal-arts physics course covers the great principles of physics along with several such philosophical and societal topics. Students find these topics relevant and fascinating, leading to strong course evaluations and large enrollments by non-scientists even in courses labeled physics. I will describe this course and present some evidence indicating that the course is effective in communicating physics and its interdisciplinary connections. A textbook, Physics: Concepts and Connections (Prentice Hall, 1995, 2nd edition to appear in June 1998), is available.

  16. Physics on the smallest scales: an introduction to minimal length phenomenology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprenger, Martin; Nicolini, Piero; Bleicher, Marcus

    2012-07-01

    Many modern theories which try to unify gravity with the Standard Model of particle physics, such as e.g. string theory, propose two key modifications to the commonly known physical theories: the existence of additional space dimensions; the existence of a minimal length distance or maximal resolution. While extra dimensions have received a wide coverage in publications over the last ten years (especially due to the prediction of micro black hole production at the Large Hadron Collider), the phenomenology of models with a minimal length is still less investigated. In a summer study project for bachelor students in 2010, we have explored some phenomenological implications of the potential existence of a minimal length. In this paper, we review the idea and formalism of a quantum gravity-induced minimal length in the generalized uncertainty principle framework as well as in the coherent state approach to non-commutative geometry. These approaches are effective models which can make model-independent predictions for experiments and are ideally suited for phenomenological studies. Pedagogical examples are provided to grasp the effects of a quantum gravity-induced minimal length. This paper is intended for graduate students and non-specialists interested in quantum gravity.

  17. Physical origin of the large-scale conformity in the specific star formation rates of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauffmann, Guinevere

    2015-12-01

    Two explanations have been put forward to explain the observed conformity between the colours and specific star formation rates (SFR/M*) of galaxies on large scales: (1) the formation times of their surrounding dark matter haloes are correlated (commonly referred to as `assembly bias'), (2) gas is heated over large scales at early times, leading to coherent modulation of cooling and star formation between well-separated galaxies (commonly referred to as `pre-heating'). To distinguish between the pre-heating and assembly bias scenarios, we search for relics of energetic feedback events in the neighbourhood of central galaxies with different specific SFRs. We find a significant excess of very high mass (log M* > 11.3) galaxies out to a distance of 2.5 Mpc around low SFR/M* central galaxies compared to control samples of higher SFR/M* central galaxies with the same stellar mass and redshift. We also find that very massive galaxies in the neighbourhood of low-SFR/M* galaxies have much higher probability of hosting radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGN). The radio-loud AGN fraction in neighbours with log M* > 11.3 is four times higher around passive, non star-forming centrals at projected distances of 1 Mpc and two times higher at projected distances of 4 Mpc. Finally, we carry out an investigation of conformity effects in the recently publicly released Illustris cosmological hydrodynamical simulation, which includes energetic input both from quasars and from radio mode accretion on to black holes. We do not find conformity effects of comparable amplitude on large scales in the simulations and we propose that gas needs to be pushed out of dark matter haloes more efficiently at high redshifts.

  18. The IR-resummed Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Senatore, Leonardo; Zaldarriaga, Matias E-mail: matiasz@ias.edu

    2015-02-01

    We present a new method to resum the effect of large scale motions in the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures. Because the linear power spectrum in ΛCDM is not scale free the effects of the large scale flows are enhanced. Although previous EFT calculations of the equal-time density power spectrum at one and two loops showed a remarkable agreement with numerical results, they also showed a 2% residual which appeared related to the BAO oscillations. We show that this was indeed the case, explain the physical origin and show how a Lagrangian based calculation removes this differences. We propose a simple method to upgrade existing Eulerian calculations to effectively make them Lagrangian and compare the new results with existing fits to numerical simulations. Our new two-loop results agrees with numerical results up to k∼ 0.6 h Mpc{sup −1} to within 1% with no oscillatory residuals. We also compute power spectra involving momentum which is significantly more affected by the large scale flows. We show how keeping track of these velocities significantly enhances the UV reach of the momentum power spectrum in addition to removing the BAO related residuals. We compute predictions for the real space correlation function around the BAO scale and investigate its sensitivity to the EFT parameters and the details of the resummation technique.

  19. The effect of expressive physical touch on patients with dementia.

    PubMed

    Kim, E J; Buschmann, M T

    1999-06-01

    This study explored the effect of expressive physical touch with verbalization (EPT/V) on anxiety and dysfunctional behavior in patients with dementia using a one group repeated measures design. The study findings are that (1) anxiety is lower immediately following EPT/V and (2) EPT/V causes decreasing episodes of dysfunctional behavior. Therefore, it behooves caregivers and family members to use expressive physical touch and verbalization when caring for these patients, since it is cost-effective, simple to learn and practice and it is most effective in improving and maintaining patient's high quality of life. PMID:10404293

  20. Physical Mechanisms and Scaling Laws of K-Shell Double Photoionization

    SciTech Connect

    Hoszowska, J.; Dousse, J.-Cl.; Berset, M.; Cao, W.; Fennane, K.; Kayser, Y.; Szlachetko, J.; Szlachetko, M.; Kheifets, A. K.; Bray, I.; Kavcic, M.

    2009-02-20

    We report on the photon energy dependence of the K-shell double photoionization (DPI) of Mg, Al, and Si. The DPI cross sections were derived from high-resolution measurements of x-ray spectra following the radiative decay of the K-shell double vacancy states. Our data evince the relative importance of the final-state electron-electron interaction to the DPI. By comparing the double-to-single K-shell photoionization cross-section ratios for neutral atoms with convergent close-coupling calculations for He-like ions, the effect of outer shell electrons on the K-shell DPI process is assessed. Universal scaling of the DPI cross sections with the effective nuclear charge for neutral atoms is revealed.

  1. Note on scaling arguments in the effective average action formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagani, Carlo

    2016-08-01

    The effective average action (EAA) is a scale-dependent effective action where a scale k is introduced via an infrared regulator. The k dependence of the EAA is governed by an exact flow equation to which one associates a boundary condition at a scale μ . We show that the μ dependence of the EAA is controlled by an equation fully analogous to the Callan-Symanzik equation which allows one to define scaling quantities straightforwardly. Particular attention is paid to composite operators which are introduced along with new sources. We discuss some simple solutions to the flow equation for composite operators and comment on their implications in the case of a local potential approximation.

  2. Cosmic ray knee and new physics at the TeV scale

    SciTech Connect

    Barceló, Roberto; Masip, Manuel; Mastromatteo, Iacopo E-mail: masip@ugr.es

    2009-06-01

    We analyze the possibility that the cosmic ray knee appears at an energy threshold where the proton-dark matter cross section becomes large due to new TeV physics. It has been shown that such interactions could break the proton and produce a diffuse gamma ray flux consistent with MILAGRO observations. We argue that this hypothesis implies knees that scale with the atomic mass for the different nuclei, as KASKADE data seem to indicate. We find that to explain the change in the spectral index in the flux from E{sup −2.7} to E{sup −3.1} the cross section must grow like E{sup 0.4+β} above the knee, where β = 0.3–0.6 parametrizes the energy dependence of the age (τ∝E{sup −β}) of the cosmic rays reaching the Earth. The hypothesis also requires mbarn cross sections (that could be modelled with TeV gravity) and large densities of dark matter (that could be clumped around the sources of cosmic rays). We argue that neutrinos would also exhibit a threshold at E = (m{sub χ}/m{sub p}) E{sub knee} ≈ 10{sup 8} GeV where their interaction with a nucleon becomes strong. Therefore, the observation at ICECUBE or ANITA of standard neutrino events above this threshold would disprove the scenario.

  3. Effectiveness of School-Initiated Physical Activity Program on Secondary School Students' Physical Activity Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gråstén, Arto; Yli-Piipari, Sami; Watt, Anthony; Jaakkola, Timo; Liukkonen, Jarmo

    2015-01-01

    Background: The promotion of physical activity and health has become a universal challenge. The Sotkamo Physical Activity as Civil Skill Program was implemented to increase students' physical activity by promoting supportive psychological and physical school environment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the…

  4. Effect of Physically Active Academic Lessons on Body Mass Index and Physical Fitness in Primary School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Greeff, Johannes W.; Hartman, Esther; Mullender-Wijnsma, Marijke J.; Bosker, Roel J.; Doolaard, Simone; Visscher, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Background: Preventing overweight and improving physical fitness in primary school children is a worldwide challenge, and physically active intervention programs usually come with the cost of academic instruction time. This study aimed to investigate effects of physically active academic lessons on body mass index (BMI) and physical fitness in…

  5. Effects of School Lighting on Physical Development and School Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hathaway, Warren E.

    1995-01-01

    This study collected data on the physical development, attendance, and school performance effects of four types of school lighting on elementary students over a two-year period. Results indicated that regular exposure to the lights had important nonvisual effects on students. Full-spectrum fluorescent lamps with ultraviolet supplements were found…

  6. Effects of Grading on Achievement in College Physical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mao, Youxiang; Zakrajsek, Dorothy B.

    1994-01-01

    Study examined the effects of three grading systems on college physical education students' outcome measures in table tennis using skill tests, written tests, game play variables, class attendance, student behaviors, and attitudes toward the systems. Positive effects of the three grading systems were demonstrated on most process and outcome…

  7. Optimal Scaling of Interaction Effects in Generalized Linear Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Rosmalen, Joost; Koning, Alex J.; Groenen, Patrick J. F.

    2009-01-01

    Multiplicative interaction models, such as Goodman's (1981) RC(M) association models, can be a useful tool for analyzing the content of interaction effects. However, most models for interaction effects are suitable only for data sets with two or three predictor variables. Here, we discuss an optimal scaling model for analyzing the content of…

  8. Rosenberg's Self-Esteem Scale: Two Factors or Method Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomas, Jose M.; Oliver, Amparo

    1999-01-01

    Results of a study with 640 Spanish high school students suggest the existence of a global self-esteem factor underlying responses to Rosenberg's (M. Rosenberg, 1965) Self-Esteem Scale, although the inclusion of method effects is needed to achieve a good model fit. Method effects are associated with item wording. (SLD)

  9. Integrating Delta Building Physics & Economics: Optimizing the Scale of Engineered Avulsions in the Mississippi River Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenney, M. A.; Mohrig, D.; Hobbs, B. F.; Parker, G.

    2011-12-01

    Land loss in the Mississippi River Delta caused by subsidence and erosion has resulted in habitat loss, interference with human activities, and increased exposure of New Orleans and other settled areas to storm surge risks. Prior to dam and levee building and oil and gas production in the 20th century, the long term rates of land building roughly balanced land loss through subsidence. Now, however, sediment is being deposited at dramatically lower rates in shallow areas in and adjacent to the Delta, with much of the remaining sediment borne by the Mississippi being lost to the deep areas of the Gulf of Mexico. A few projects have been built in order to divert sediment from the river to areas where land can be built, and many more are under consideration as part of State of Louisiana and Federal planning processes. Most are small scale, although there have been some proposals for large engineered avulsions that would divert a significant fraction of the remaining available sediment (W. Kim, et al. 2009, EOS). However, there is debate over whether small or large diversions are the economically optimally and socially most acceptable size of such land building projects. From an economic point of view, the optimal size involves tradeoffs between scale economies in civil work construction, the relationship between depth of diversion and sediment concentration in river water, effects on navigation, and possible diminishing returns to land building at a single location as the edge of built land progresses into deeper waters. Because land building efforts could potentially involve billions of dollars of investment, it is important to gain as much benefit as possible from those expenditures. We present the result of a general analysis of scale economies in land building from engineered avulsions. The analysis addresses the question: how many projects of what size should be built at what time in order to maximize the amount of land built by a particular time? The analysis

  10. Bone repair: Effects of physical exercise and LPS systemic exposition.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Jonatas E; Branco, Luiz G S; Issa, João Paulo M

    2016-08-01

    Bone repair can be facilitated by grafting, biochemical and physical stimulation. Conversely, it may be delayed lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Physical exercise exerts beneficial effects on the bone, but its effect on bone repair is not known. We investigated the effect of exercise on the LPS action on bone healing through bone densitometry, quantitative histological analysis for bone formation rate and immunohistochemical markers in sedentary and exercised animals. Rats ran on the treadmill for four weeks. After training the rats were submitted to a surgical procedure (bone defect in the right tibia) and 24h after the surgery LPS was administered at a dose of 100μg/kg i.p., whereas the control rats received a saline injection (1ml/kg, i.p.). Right tibias were obtained for analysis after 10days during which rats were not submitted to physical training. Physical exercise had a positive effect on bone repair, increasing bone mineral density, bone mineral content, bone formation rate, type I collagen and osteocalcin expression. These parameters were not affected by systemic administration of LPS. Our data indicate that physical exercise has an important osteogenic effect, which is maintained during acute systemic inflammation induced by exposure to a single dose of LPS. PMID:27319388

  11. Effects of Wildfire Disturbances on Multi-scale Connectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkinson, Dan; Wittenberg, Lea

    2013-04-01

    Eco-geomorphic systems are characterized by interactions between system components which operate at various spatial and temporal scales. Many processes in these systems are scale-dependent (point-plot-slope-basin), and vary over different spatial extents. Within any landscape unit the magnitude and nature of interactions between system elements and processes vary, suggesting that variables and processes that are interdependent at one scale may be independent at another. Disturbances can have profound effects on scale-dependent processes, 'reframing' spatial boundaries between the various functional-geomorphic units. Wildfires, for example, result in the removal of woody patches, which might be translated to displacement of patch boundaries, essentially homogenizing land cover and facilitating hydrological connectivity between the burnt patches and consequently among the nested scales (patch-slope-basin). Further, processes such as fire-induced hydrophobicity which have important hydrological implications at the point scale, do not necessarily translate to significant increase in runoff at larger scales. Accordingly, structural and mechanical changes caused by wildfires, might alter both the boundaries as well as the role of scale-dependent processes, resulting in increased connectivity between the spatial units and consequently an overall intensification of post-fire hydrological response of the system. Accordingly we try to statistically identify what are the threshold values at which processes operating at one scale are replaced by processes operating at other scales, in contrast to the arbitrarily defined scales. To identify such thresholds we compiled data from over 60 published studies which addressed sediment yield following fire events at various spatial scales (2 m2 plots - 1660 ha basin). The data were ranked from the smallest scale to the largest, and we incrementally calculated the coefficient determination (R^2) of the data by successively adding each

  12. Web-based assessments of physical activity in youth: considerations for design and scale calibration.

    PubMed

    Saint-Maurice, Pedro F; Welk, Gregory J

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the design and methods involved in calibrating a Web-based self-report instrument to estimate physical activity behavior. The limitations of self-report measures are well known, but calibration methods enable the reported information to be equated to estimates obtained from objective data. This paper summarizes design considerations for effective development and calibration of physical activity self-report measures. Each of the design considerations is put into context and followed by a practical application based on our ongoing calibration research with a promising online self-report tool called the Youth Activity Profile (YAP). We first describe the overall concept of calibration and how this influences the selection of appropriate self-report tools for this population. We point out the advantages and disadvantages of different monitoring devices since the choice of the criterion measure and the strategies used to minimize error in the measure can dramatically improve the quality of the data. We summarize strategies to ensure quality control in data collection and discuss analytical considerations involved in group- vs individual-level inference. For cross-validation procedures, we describe the advantages of equivalence testing procedures that directly test and quantify agreement. Lastly, we introduce the unique challenges encountered when transitioning from paper to a Web-based tool. The Web offers considerable potential for broad adoption but an iterative calibration approach focused on continued refinement is needed to ensure that estimates are generalizable across individuals, regions, seasons and countries. PMID:25448192

  13. Web-Based Assessments of Physical Activity in Youth: Considerations for Design and Scale Calibration

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the design and methods involved in calibrating a Web-based self-report instrument to estimate physical activity behavior. The limitations of self-report measures are well known, but calibration methods enable the reported information to be equated to estimates obtained from objective data. This paper summarizes design considerations for effective development and calibration of physical activity self-report measures. Each of the design considerations is put into context and followed by a practical application based on our ongoing calibration research with a promising online self-report tool called the Youth Activity Profile (YAP). We first describe the overall concept of calibration and how this influences the selection of appropriate self-report tools for this population. We point out the advantages and disadvantages of different monitoring devices since the choice of the criterion measure and the strategies used to minimize error in the measure can dramatically improve the quality of the data. We summarize strategies to ensure quality control in data collection and discuss analytical considerations involved in group- vs individual-level inference. For cross-validation procedures, we describe the advantages of equivalence testing procedures that directly test and quantify agreement. Lastly, we introduce the unique challenges encountered when transitioning from paper to a Web-based tool. The Web offers considerable potential for broad adoption but an iterative calibration approach focused on continued refinement is needed to ensure that estimates are generalizable across individuals, regions, seasons and countries. PMID:25448192

  14. Holographic Scaling and Dynamical Gauge Effects in Disordered Atomic Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemelke, Nathan

    2016-05-01

    Quantum systems with strong disorder, and those far from equilibrium or interacting with a thermal reservior, present unique challenges in a range of physical contexts, from non-relativistic condensed-matter settings, such as in study of localization phenomena, to relativistic cosmology and the study of fundamental interactions. Recently, two related concepts, that of the entropy of entanglement, and the controversial suggestion of entropic emergent gravity, have shed insight on several long-standing questions along these lines, suggesting that strongly disordered systems with causal barriers (either relativistic or those with Lieb-Robinson-like bounds) can be understood using holographic principles in combination with the equivalence between quantum vacuua thermal baths via the Unruh effect. I will discuss a range of experiments performed within a strong, topologically disordered medium for neutral atoms which simultaneously introduces quenched disorder for spin and mass transport, and provides simple mechanisms for open coupling to various types of dissipative baths. Under conditions in which a subset of quantum states are continuously decoupled from the thermal bath, dark state effects lead to slow light phenomena mimicking gravitational lensing in general relativity in a characterizable table-top disordered medium. Non-equilibrium steady-states are observed in direct analogy with the evaporation of gravitational singularities, and we observe scaling behaviors that can be directly connected to holographic measures of the information contained in disorder. Finally, I will show how a dynamic-gauge-field picture of this and similar systems can lead to a natural description of non-equilibrium and disordered phenomena, and how it provides some advantages over the Harris and Luck criteria for describing critical phenomena. Connections between out-of-equilibrium dynamics and some long-unresolved issues concerning the existence of a gauge-boson mass gap in certain Yang

  15. Effects of physical activity on endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs)

    PubMed Central

    De Biase, Chiara; De Rosa, Roberta; Luciano, Rossella; De Luca, Stefania; Capuano, Ernesto; Trimarco, Bruno; Galasso, Gennaro

    2014-01-01

    Physical activity has a therapeutic role in cardiovascular disease (CVD), through its beneficial effects on endothelial function and cardiovascular system. Circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are bone marrow (BM) derived cells that represent a novel therapeutic target in CVD patients, because of their ability to home to sites of ischemic injury and repair the damaged vessels. Several studies show that physical activity results in a significant increase in circulating EPCs, and, in particular, there are some evidence of the beneficial exercise-induced effects on EPCs activity in CVD settings, including coronary artery disease (CAD), heart failure (HF), and peripheral artery disease (PAD). The aim of this paper is to review the current evidence about the beneficial effects of physical exercise on endothelial function and EPCs levels and activity in both healthy subjects and patients with CVD. PMID:24550833

  16. Concurrent estimation of efficiency, effectiveness and returns to scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodakarami, Mohsen; Shabani, Amir; Farzipoor Saen, Reza

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, data envelopment analysis (DEA) has been widely used to assess both efficiency and effectiveness. Accurate measurement of overall performance is a product of concurrent consideration of these measures. There are a couple of well-known methods to assess both efficiency and effectiveness. However, some issues can be found in previous methods. The issues include non-linearity problem, paradoxical improvement solutions, efficiency and effectiveness evaluation in two independent environments: dividing an operating unit into two autonomous departments for performance evaluation and problems associated with determining economies of scale. To overcome these issues, this paper aims to develop a series of linear DEA methods to estimate efficiency, effectiveness, and returns to scale of decision-making units (DMUs), simultaneously. This paper considers the departments of a DMU as a united entity to recommend consistent improvements. We first present a model under constant returns to scale (CRS) assumption, and examine its relationship with one of existing network DEA model. We then extend model under variable returns to scale (VRS) condition, and again its relationship with one of existing network DEA models is discussed. Next, we introduce a new integrated two-stage additive model. Finally, an in-depth analysis of returns to scale is provided. A case study demonstrates applicability of the proposed models.

  17. A Job-Seeking Self-Efficacy Scale for People with Physical Disabilities: Preliminary Development and Psychometric Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barlow, Julie; Wright, Chris; Cullen, Lesley

    2002-01-01

    Study sought to develop and conduct preliminary testing of the psychometric properties of a job-seeking self-efficacy (JSS) scale that reflected the experiences of people with physical disabilities. Greater job seeking self-efficacy and perceived ability to manage disability at interview were associated with more positive psychological well-being.…

  18. Post-16 Physics and Chemistry Uptake: Combining Large-Scale Secondary Analysis with In-Depth Qualitative Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hampden-Thompson, Gillian; Lubben, Fred; Bennett, Judith

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative secondary analysis of large-scale data can be combined with in-depth qualitative methods. In this paper, we discuss the role of this combined methods approach in examining the uptake of physics and chemistry in post compulsory schooling for students in England. The secondary data analysis of the National Pupil Database (NPD) served…

  19. Cohort Profile of the Goals Study: A Large-Scale Research of Physical Activity in Dutch Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Groot, Renate H. M.; van Dijk, Martin L.; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    The GOALS study (Grootschalig Onderzoek naar Activiteiten van Limburgse Scholieren [Large-scale Research of Activities in Dutch Students]) was set up to investigate possible associations between different forms of physical activity and inactivity with cognitive performance, academic achievement and mental well-being. It was conducted at a…

  20. Effects of physical exercise on the female reproductive system.

    PubMed

    Orio, F; Muscogiuri, G; Ascione, A; Marciano, F; Volpe, A; La Sala, G; Savastano, S; Colao, A; Palomba, S

    2013-09-01

    The excess in physical activity could be closely linked to considerable negative consequences on the whole body. These dysfunctions called as "female athlete triad"' by the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) include amenorrhea, osteoporosis and disorder eating. The female athlete triad poses serious health risks, both on the short and on the long term, to the overall well-being of affected individuals. Sustained low energy availability can impair health, causing many medical complications within skeletal, endocrine, cardiovascular, reproductive and central nervous system. On the contrary, several studies have shown, that physical activity improves cardiovascular risk factors, hormonal profile and reproductive function. These improvements include a decrease in abdominal fat, blood glucose, blood lipids and insulin resistance, as well as improvements in menstrual cyclicity, ovulation and fertility, decreases in testosterone levels and Free Androgen Index (FAI) and increases in sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG). Other studies reported that physical activity improved self-esteem, depression and anxiety. Thus, the aim of this review is to elucidate the effect of physical exercise on female reproductive system and viceversa the impact of hormonal status on physical activity and metabolism. In addition this review supports the idea that physical exercise is a helpful tool for the management of obesity, prevention of cardiovascular, metabolic diseases and female reproductive organs related diseases (e.g. breast cancer). When the excess in physical activity leads up to the female athlete triad, it is imperative to treat each component of the triad by employing both pharmacological and non pharmacological treatments. PMID:24126551

  1. Modelling strategies to predict the multi-scale effects of rural land management change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulygina, N.; Ballard, C. E.; Jackson, B. M.; McIntyre, N.; Marshall, M.; Reynolds, B.; Wheater, H. S.

    2011-12-01

    Changes to the rural landscape due to agricultural land management are ubiquitous, yet predicting the multi-scale effects of land management change on hydrological response remains an important scientific challenge. Much empirical research has been of little generic value due to inadequate design and funding of monitoring programmes, while the modelling issues challenge the capability of data-based, conceptual and physics-based modelling approaches. In this paper we report on a major UK research programme, motivated by a national need to quantify effects of agricultural intensification on flood risk. Working with a consortium of farmers in upland Wales, a multi-scale experimental programme (from experimental plots to 2nd order catchments) was developed to address issues of upland agricultural intensification. This provided data support for a multi-scale modelling programme, in which highly detailed physics-based models were conditioned on the experimental data and used to explore effects of potential field-scale interventions. A meta-modelling strategy was developed to represent detailed modelling in a computationally-efficient manner for catchment-scale simulation; this allowed catchment-scale quantification of potential management options. For more general application to data-sparse areas, alternative approaches were needed. Physics-based models were developed for a range of upland management problems, including the restoration of drained peatlands, afforestation, and changing grazing practices. Their performance was explored using literature and surrogate data; although subject to high levels of uncertainty, important insights were obtained, of practical relevance to management decisions. In parallel, regionalised conceptual modelling was used to explore the potential of indices of catchment response, conditioned on readily-available catchment characteristics, to represent ungauged catchments subject to land management change. Although based in part on

  2. Analysis of small scale turbulent structures and the effect of spatial scales on gas transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnieders, Jana; Garbe, Christoph

    2014-05-01

    The exchange of gases through the air-sea interface strongly depends on environmental conditions such as wind stress and waves which in turn generate near surface turbulence. Near surface turbulence is a main driver of surface divergence which has been shown to cause highly variable transfer rates on relatively small spatial scales. Due to the cool skin of the ocean, heat can be used as a tracer to detect areas of surface convergence and thus gather information about size and intensity of a turbulent process. We use infrared imagery to visualize near surface aqueous turbulence and determine the impact of turbulent scales on exchange rates. Through the high temporal and spatial resolution of these types of measurements spatial scales as well as surface dynamics can be captured. The surface heat pattern is formed by distinct structures on two scales - small-scale short lived structures termed fish scales and larger scale cold streaks that are consistent with the footprints of Langmuir Circulations. There are two key characteristics of the observed surface heat patterns: 1. The surface heat patterns show characteristic features of scales. 2. The structure of these patterns change with increasing wind stress and surface conditions. In [2] turbulent cell sizes have been shown to systematically decrease with increasing wind speed until a saturation at u* = 0.7 cm/s is reached. Results suggest a saturation in the tangential stress. Similar behaviour has been observed by [1] for gas transfer measurements at higher wind speeds. In this contribution a new model to estimate the heat flux is applied which is based on the measured turbulent cell size und surface velocities. This approach allows the direct comparison of the net effect on heat flux of eddies of different sizes and a comparison to gas transfer measurements. Linking transport models with thermographic measurements, transfer velocities can be computed. In this contribution, we will quantify the effect of small scale

  3. Scaling up of physical activity interventions in Brazil: how partnerships and research evidence contributed to policy action

    PubMed Central

    Hoehner, Christine M.; Hallal, Pedro C.; Reis, Rodrigo S.; Simoes, Eduardo J.; Malta, Deborah C.; Pratt, Michael; Brownson, Ross C.

    2013-01-01

    The global health burden due to physical inactivity is enormous and growing. There is a need to consider new ways of generating evidence and to identify the role of government in promoting physical activity at the population level. In this paper, we summarize key findings from a large-scale cross-national collaboration to understand physical activity promotion in Brazil. We describe the main aspects of the partnership of Project GUIA (Guide for Useful Interventions for Activity in Brazil and Latin America) that sustained the collaborative effort for eight years and describe how the evidence gathered from the collaboration triggered political action in Brazil to scale up a physical activity intervention at the national level. Project GUIA is a cross-national multidisciplinary research partnership designed to understand and evaluate current efforts for physical activity promotion at the community level in Latin America. This example of scaling up is unprecedented for promoting health in the region and is an example that must be followed and evaluated. PMID:24323944

  4. Comparing Scales of Environmental Effects from Gasoline and Ethanol Production

    SciTech Connect

    Parish, Esther S; Kline, Keith L; Dale, Virginia H; Efroymson, Rebecca Ann; McBride, Allen; Johnson, Timothy L; Hilliard, Michael R; Bielicki, Dr Jeffrey M

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the environmental effects of alternative fuel production is critical to characterizing the sustainability of energy resources to inform policy and regulatory decisions. The magnitudes of these environmental effects vary according to the intensity and scale of fuel production along each step of the supply chain. We compare the scales (i.e., spatial extent and temporal duration) of ethanol and gasoline production processes and environmental effects based on a literature review, and then synthesize the scale differences on space-time diagrams. Comprehensive assessment of any fuel-production system is a moving target, and our analysis shows that decisions regarding the selection of spatial and temporal boundaries of analysis have tremendous influences on the comparisons. Effects that strongly differentiate gasoline and ethanol supply chains in terms of scale are associated with when and where energy resources are formed and how they are extracted. Although both gasoline and ethanol production may result in negative environmental effects, this study indicates that ethanol production traced through a supply chain may impact less area and result in more easily reversed effects of a shorter duration than gasoline production.

  5. The Effects of a Model-Based Physics Curriculum Program with a Physics First Approach: A Causal-Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liang, Ling L.; Fulmer, Gavin W.; Majerich, David M.; Clevenstine, Richard; Howanski, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of a model-based introductory physics curriculum on conceptual learning in a Physics First (PF) Initiative. This is the first comparative study in physics education that applies the Rasch modeling approach to examine the effects of a model-based curriculum program combined with PF in the United…

  6. Perturbed Physics Ensemble Simulations of Cirrus on the Cloud System-resolving Scale

    SciTech Connect

    Muhlbauer, Andreas; Berry, Elizabeth; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Mace, Gerald G.

    2014-04-16

    In this study, the effect of uncertainties in the parameterization of ice microphysical processes and initial conditions on the variability of cirrus microphysical and radiative properties are investigated in a series of cloud system-resolving perturbed physics ensemble (PPE) and initial condition ensemble (ICE) simulations. Three cirrus cases representative of mid-latitude, subtropical and tropical cirrus are examined. It is found that the variability in cirrus properties induced by perturbing uncertain parameters in ice microphysics parameterizations outweighs the variability induced by perturbing the initial conditions in midlatitude and subtropical cirrus. However, in tropical anvil cirrus the variability in the PPE and ICE simulations is about the same order of magnitude. The cirrus properties showing the largest sensitivity are ice water content (IWC) and cloud thickness whereas the averaged high cloud cover is only marginally affected. Changes in cirrus ice water path and outgoing longwave radiation are controlled primarily by changes in IWC and cloud thickness but not by changes is the averaged high cloud cover. The change in the vertical distribution of cloud fraction and cloud thickness is caused by changes in cirrus cloud base whereas cloud top is not sensitive to either perturbed physics or perturbed initial conditions. In all cirrus cases, the top three parameters controlling the microphysical variability and radiative impact of cirrus clouds are ice fall speeds, ice autoconversion size thresholds and heterogeneous ice nucleation. Changes in the ice deposition coefficient do not affect the ice water path and outgoing longwave radiation. Similarly, changes in the number concentration of aerosols available for homogeneous freezing have virtually no effect on the microphysical and radiative properties of midlatitude and subtropical cirrus but only little impact on tropical anvil cirrus. Overall, the sensitivity of cirrus microphysical and radiative

  7. Effects of Thai massage on physical fitness in soccer players.

    PubMed

    Hongsuwan, Chanawong; Eungpinichpong, Wichai; Chatchawan, Uraiwan; Yamauchi, Junichiro

    2015-02-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to determine the effects of Thai massage on physical fitness in soccer players. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-four soccer players were randomly assigned to receive either rest (the control group) or three 30-minute sessions of Thai massage over a period of 10 days. Seven physical fitness tests consisting of sit and reach, hand grip strength, 40 yards technical agility, 50-meter sprint, sit-ups, push-ups, and VO2, max were measured before and after Thai massage or rest. [Results] All the physical fitness tests were significantly improved after a single session of Thai massage, whereas only the sit and reach, and the sit-ups tests were improved in the control group. [Conclusion] Thai massage could provide an improvement in physical performance in soccer players. PMID:25729203

  8. Effects of Thai massage on physical fitness in soccer players

    PubMed Central

    Hongsuwan, Chanawong; Eungpinichpong, Wichai; Chatchawan, Uraiwan; Yamauchi, Junichiro

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to determine the effects of Thai massage on physical fitness in soccer players. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-four soccer players were randomly assigned to receive either rest (the control group) or three 30-minute sessions of Thai massage over a period of 10 days. Seven physical fitness tests consisting of sit and reach, hand grip strength, 40 yards technical agility, 50-meter sprint, sit-ups, push-ups, and VO2, max were measured before and after Thai massage or rest. [Results] All the physical fitness tests were significantly improved after a single session of Thai massage, whereas only the sit and reach, and the sit-ups tests were improved in the control group. [Conclusion] Thai massage could provide an improvement in physical performance in soccer players. PMID:25729203

  9. Optical and physical effects of iodine in chalcohalide glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKinnon, Robin J.; Heo, Jong; Sigel, George H., Jr.

    1990-05-01

    Tellurium and iodine were added to a base chalcogenide glass composition (Ge33Asl2Se5S) to compare their effects on physical and optical properties. Iodine decreased the glass transition temperature and increased thermal expansion to a greater extent than tellurium. However, density was lowered by the presence of iodine and increased by tellurium. Examination of the multiphonon absorption edge in the 300-900 cm1 range revealed that iodine and tellurium occupy different structural sites which accounts for their varied effect on physical properties. There appears to be no advantage of iodine versus tellurium additions with regard to optical fiber applications based on the results obtained.

  10. Scales

    MedlinePlus

    Scales are a visible peeling or flaking of outer skin layers. These layers are called the stratum ... Scales may be caused by dry skin, certain inflammatory skin conditions, or infections. Eczema , ringworm , and psoriasis ...

  11. Workshop on Scaling Effects in Composite Materials and Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E. (Compiler)

    1994-01-01

    This document contains presentations and abstracts from the Workshop on Scaling Effects in Composite Materials and Structures jointly sponsored by NASA Langley Research Center, Virginia Tech, and the Institute for Mechanics and Materials at the University of California, San Diego, and held at NASA Langley on November 15-16, 1993. Workshop attendees represented NASA, other government research labs, the aircraft/rotorcraft industry, and academia. The workshop objectives were to assess the state-of-technology in scaling effects in composite materials and to provide guidelines for future research.

  12. Physics of the interaction of ultra intense laser pulses with cold collisional plasma using large scale kinetic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Héron, A.; Adam, J. C.

    2015-07-15

    We present a set of 2D collisional particle-in-cell simulations of the interaction of ultra-intense laser pulses with over-dense cold collisional plasmas. The size of these simulations is about 100 times as large as those previously published. This allows studying the transport of energetic particles on time scale of the order of 400 fs without perturbations due to the influence of boundary effects and performing a very detailed analysis of the physics of the transport. We confirm the existence of a threshold in intensity close to the relativistic threshold above which the beam of energetic particles diverges when it penetrates the cold plasma. We also study the applicability of Ohm's law to compute the electric field, which is the method commonly used in hybrid codes. The heating of the cold plasma is then studied and we show that half of the heating is anomalous, i.e., not given by standard Joule effect. We discuss the previously published results in the light of these new simulations.

  13. Physics of the interaction of ultra intense laser pulses with cold collisional plasma using large scale kinetic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Héron, A.; Adam, J. C.

    2015-07-01

    We present a set of 2D collisional particle-in-cell simulations of the interaction of ultra-intense laser pulses with over-dense cold collisional plasmas. The size of these simulations is about 100 times as large as those previously published. This allows studying the transport of energetic particles on time scale of the order of 400 fs without perturbations due to the influence of boundary effects and performing a very detailed analysis of the physics of the transport. We confirm the existence of a threshold in intensity close to the relativistic threshold above which the beam of energetic particles diverges when it penetrates the cold plasma. We also study the applicability of Ohm's law to compute the electric field, which is the method commonly used in hybrid codes. The heating of the cold plasma is then studied and we show that half of the heating is anomalous, i.e., not given by standard Joule effect. We discuss the previously published results in the light of these new simulations.

  14. The Development and Validation of the Physical Self-Concept Scale for Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Ya-Wen; Lu, Frank Jing-Horng

    2013-01-01

    Physical self-concept plays a central role in older adults' physical health, mental health and psychological well-being; however, little attention has been paid to the underlying dimensions of physical self-concept in the elderly. The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a new measurement for older adults. First, a qualitative…

  15. Physical mechanisms that lead to large-scale gas accumulation in a volcanic conduit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collombet, Marielle; Burgisser, Alain

    2016-04-01

    The eruption of viscous magma at the Earth's surface often gives rise to abrupt regime changes. The transition from the gentle effusion of a lava dome to brief but powerful explosions is a common regime change. This transition is often preceded by the sealing of the shallow part of the volcanic conduit and the accumulation of volatile-rich magma underneath, a situation that collects the energy to be brutally released during the subsequent explosion. While conduit sealing is well-documented, volatile accumulation has proven harder to characterize. We use a 2D conduit flow model including gas loss within the magma and into the wallrock to find steady-state magma flow configurations in the effusive regime. Model outputs yield a strongly heterogeneous distribution of the gas volume fraction underneath a dense, impermeable magma cap. Gas accumulates in inclined structures hundredths of meters long and several meters thick. These structures probably constitute the gas pockets that accumulate explosive energy and that were intuited by previous studies. We tested the numerical robustness of our results by simulating the fragmented state of the magma contained within the pockets, by testing various fragmentation criteria, and by varying computational gird size. These gas pockets are robust features that occur regardless of wallrock permeability (from very permeable at 10-12 m2 to quasi impermeable at 10-16 m2) but that are sensitive to the volume to surface ratio of the volcanic conduit. One implication is that the formation of these large degassing structures probably plays an essential role in the triggering of violent explosions. Such large scale outgassing feature may also bring a partial answer to the long standing issue of the observed gas transfer across entire magmatic systems despite high magma viscosity and no obvious physical mechanism of transfer.

  16. Evolution of large-scale plasma structures in comets: Kinematics and physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, John C.

    1993-01-01

    Cometary and solar wind data from December 1985 through April 1986 are presented for the purpose of determining the solar wind conditions associated with comet plasma tail disconnection events (DE's). The cometary data are from The International Halley Watch Atlas of Large-Scale Phenomena (Brandt, Niedner, and Rahe, 1992). In addition, we present the kinematic analysis of 4 DE's, those of Dec. 13.5 and 31.2, 1985, and Feb. 21.7 and 28.7, 1986. The circumstances of these DE's clearly illustrate the need to analyze DE's in groups. In situ solar wind measurements from IMP-8, ICE, and PVO were used to construct the variation of solar wind speed, density, and dynamic pressure during this interval. Data from these same spacecraft plus Vega-1 were used to determine the time of 48 current sheet crossings. These data were fitted to heliospheric current sheet curves extrapolated from the corona into the heliosphere in order to determine the best-fit source surface radius for each Carrington rotation. Comparison of the solar wind conditions and 16 DE's in Halley's comet (the four DE's discussed in this paper and 12 DE's in the literature) leaves little doubt that DE's are associated primarily with crossings of the heliospheric current sheet and apparently not with any other property of the solar wind. If we assume that there is a single or primary physical mechanism and that Halley's DE's are representative, efforts at simulation should concentrate on conditions at current sheet crossings. The mechanisms consistent with this result are sunward magnetic reconnection and tailward magnetic reconnection, if tailward reconnection can be triggered by the sector boundary crossing.

  17. Scaling Effects in Perovskite Ferroelectrics: Fundamental Limits and Process-Structure-Property Relations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ihlefeld, Jon F.; Harris, David T.; Keech, Ryan; Jones, Jacob L.; Maria, Jon-Paul; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan

    2016-07-05

    Ferroelectric materials are well-suited for a variety of applications because they can offer a combination of high performance and scaled integration. Examples of note include piezoelectrics to transform between electrical and mechanical energies, capacitors used to store charge, electro-optic devices, and non-volatile memory storage. Accordingly, they are widely used as sensors, actuators, energy storage, and memory components, ultrasonic devices, and in consumer electronics products. Because these functional properties arise from a non-centrosymmetric crystal structure with spontaneous strain and a permanent electric dipole, the properties depend upon physical and electrical boundary conditions, and consequently, physical dimension. The change of properties withmore » decreasing physical dimension is commonly referred to as a size effect. In thin films, size effects are widely observed, while in bulk ceramics, changes in properties from the values of large-grained specimens is most notable in samples with grain sizes below several microns. It is important to note that ferroelectricity typically persists to length scales of about 10 nm, but below this point is often absent. Despite the stability of ferroelectricity for dimensions greater than ~10 nm, the dielectric and piezoelectric coefficients of scaled ferroelectrics are suppressed relative to their bulk counterparts, in some cases by changes up to 80%. The loss of extrinsic contributions (domain and phase boundary motion) to the electromechanical response accounts for much of this suppression. In this article the current understanding of the underlying mechanisms for this behavior in perovskite ferroelectrics are reviewed. We focus on the intrinsic limits of ferroelectric response, the roles of electrical and mechanical boundary conditions, grain size and thickness effects, and extraneous effects related to processing. Ultimately, in many cases, multiple mechanisms combine to produce the observed scaling

  18. End-effects-regime in full scale and lab scale rocket nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojo, Raymundo; Tinney, Charles; Baars, Woutijn; Ruf, Joseph

    2014-11-01

    Modern rockets utilize a thrust-optimized parabolic-contour design for their nozzles for its high performance and reliability. However, the evolving internal flow structures within these high area ratio rocket nozzles during start up generate a powerful amount of vibro-acoustic loads that act on the launch vehicle. Modern rockets must be designed to accommodate for these heavy loads or else risk a catastrophic failure. This study quantifies a particular moment referred to as the ``end-effects regime,'' or the largest source of vibro-acoustic loading during start-up [Nave & Coffey, AIAA Paper 1973-1284]. Measurements from full scale ignitions are compared with aerodynamically scaled representations in a fully anechoic chamber. Laboratory scale data is then matched with both static and dynamic wall pressure measurements to capture the associating shock structures within the nozzle. The event generated during the ``end-effects regime'' was successfully reproduced in the both the lab-scale models, and was characterized in terms of its mean, variance and skewness, as well as the spectral properties of the signal obtained by way of time-frequency analyses.

  19. Scaled physical model studies of the steam drive process. First annual report, September 1977-September 1978

    SciTech Connect

    Doscher, T M

    1980-12-01

    Scaling laws of the heat transport mechanism in steam displacement processes are developed based upon an integral energy balance equation. Unlike the differential approach adopted by previous workers, the above scaling laws do not necessitate the use of any empirical correction factor as has been done in previous scaling calculations. The results provide a complete and consistent scale-down of the energy transport behavior, which is the critical mechanism for the success of a steam injection process. In the course of the study, the scaling problems associated with relative permeability and capillary pressure are also discussed. A method which has often been used in scaling nonthermal displacement processes is applied to reduce errors due to scaling in relative permeability. Both dimensional and inspectional analyses are applied to illustrate their use in steam processes. Scale-up laws appeared in the literature and those used in this study are compared and numerical examples are given.

  20. Combination effect of physical and gustatory taste masking for propiverine hydrochloride orally disintegrating tablets on palatability.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Rakan; Uchida, Shinya; Namiki, Noriyuki

    2015-01-01

    Orally disintegrating tablets (ODTs) containing propiverine hydrochloride (which is extremely bitter and leaves a feeling of numbness in the mouth) were prepared with a combined use of physical and organoleptic taste masking. Propiverine-loaded masking particles (PLMPs) were prepared with different amounts of gastric-soluble coatings as physical masking. ODTs without organoleptic masking were prepared by mixing each group of PLMPs with Ludiflash®, crospovidone, and magnesium stearate. ODTs with organoleptic masking were also prepared by addition of L-menthol, aspartame, thaumatin, and cinnamon. Fifteen-minute dissolution of propiverine in solutions with pH 1.2 was ≥ 85% for all ODTs, whereas that in pH 6.8 solutions was ≤ 85% and increased with physical masking. A single blind randomized crossover trial was conducted. Ten healthy volunteers were asked to quantify the bitterness, numbness, and overall palatability using a 100-mm visual analog scale (VAS) at the period of disintegration as well as 1 and 5 min later. VAS scores of bitterness, numbness, and overall palatability improved along with increasing amounts of physical masking, and the effects persisted for 5 min. VAS scores for numbness increased over time regardless of the amount of physical masking. Bitterness, numbness, and overall palatability were significantly improved by organoleptic masking if the amount of physical masking was small. Combined use of physical and organoleptic masking is useful for improving palatability of ODTs containing propiverine. PMID:25744453

  1. Heterogeneity, permeability patterns, and permeability upscaling: Physical characterization of a block of Massillon sandstone exhibiting nested scales of heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    TIDWELL,VINCENT C.; WILSON,JOHN L.

    2000-04-20

    Over 75,000 permeability measurements were collected from a meter-scale block of Massillon sandstone, characterized by conspicuous cross bedding that forms two distinct nested-scales of heterogeneity. With the aid of a gas minipermeameter, spatially exhaustive fields of permeability data were acquired at each of five different sample supports (i.e. sample volumes) from each block face. These data provide a unique opportunity to physically investigate the relationship between the multi-scale cross-stratified attributes of the sandstone and the corresponding statistical characteristics of the permeability. These data also provide quantitative physical information concerning the permeability upscaling of a complex heterogeneous medium. Here, a portion of the data taken from a single block face cut normal to stratification is analyzed. Results indicate a strong relationship between the calculated summary statistics and the cross-stratified structural features visible evident in the sandstone sample. Specifically, the permeability fields and semivariograms are characterized by two nested scales of heterogeneity, including a large-scale structure defined by the cross-stratified sets (delineated by distinct bounding surfaces) and a small-scale structure defined by the low-angle cross-stratification within each set. The permeability data also provide clear evidence of upscaling. That is, each calculated summary statistic exhibits distinct and consistent trends with increasing sample support. Among these trends are an increasing mean, decreasing variance, and an increasing semivariogram range. Results also clearly indicate that the different scales of heterogeneity upscale differently, with the small-scale structure being preferentially filtered from the data while the large-scale structure is preserved. Finally, the statistical and upscaling characteristics of individual cross-stratified sets were found to be very similar owing to their shared depositional environment

  2. Physical properties of simulated galaxy populations at z = 2 - II. Effects of cosmology, reionization and ISM physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, Marcel R.; Schaye, Joop; Booth, C. M.; Dalla Vecchia, Claudio; Springel, Volker; Theuns, Tom; Wiersma, Robert P. C.

    2013-11-01

    We use hydrodynamical simulations from the OverWhelmingly Large Simulations project to investigate the dependence of the physical properties of galaxy populations at redshift 2 on the assumed star formation law, the equation of state imposed on the unresolved interstellar medium, the stellar initial mass function, the reionization history and the assumed cosmology. This work complements that of Paper I, where we studied the effects of varying models for galactic winds driven by star formation and active galactic nucleus. The normalization of the matter power spectrum strongly affects the galaxy mass function, but has a relatively small effect on the physical properties of galaxies residing in haloes of a fixed mass. Reionization suppresses the stellar masses and gas fractions of low-mass galaxies, but by z = 2 the results are insensitive to the timing of reionization. The stellar initial mass function mainly determines the physical properties of galaxies through its effect on the efficiency of the feedback, while changes in the recycled mass and metal fractions play a smaller role. If we use a recipe for star formation that reproduces the observed star formation law independently of the assumed equation of state of the unresolved interstellar medium, then the latter is unimportant. The star formation law, i.e. the gas consumption time-scale as a function of surface density, determines the mass of dense, star-forming gas in galaxies, but affects neither the star formation rate nor the stellar mass. This can be understood in terms of self-regulation: the gas fraction adjusts until the outflow rate balances the inflow rate.

  3. The Effects of Resistance Training on Physical Function and Quality of Life in Breast Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Simonavice, Emily; Liu, Pei-Yang; Ilich, Jasminka Z.; Kim, Jeong-Su; Arjmandi, Bahram H.; Panton, Lynn B.

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer survivors (BCS) exhibit decreased physical function and quality of life (QOL) following cancer treatments. Resistance training (RT) may elicit positive changes in physical and mental well-being. This study assessed 27 BCS, pre-and post-intervention (six months) on the following variables: muscular strength (via one repetition maximum (1RM) of chest press and leg extension), physical function (via the Continuous Scale-Physical Functional Performance test) and QOL (via the Short Form-36 survey). RT consisted of two days/week of ten exercises including two sets of 8–12 repetitions at 52%–69% of their 1RM. A repeated measures analysis of variance revealed BCS significantly (p < 0.05) increased upper (71 ± 22 to 89 ± 22 kg) and lower body (74 ± 18 to 93 ± 24 kg) strength, total physical function (65.5 ± 12.1 to 73.6 ± 12.2 units) and the subcomponents of physical function: upper body strength (63.5 ± 16.3 to 71.2 ± 16.8 units), lower body strength (58.5 ± 14.9 to 68.6 ± 16.3 units), balance and coordination (66.5 ± 12.2 to 74.6 ± 11.6 units), and endurance (67.2 ± 12.0 to 75.0 ± 11.6 units). No changes were observed over time for subjective measures of physical function and QOL. Results showed RT could be an effective means to improve objective physical function in BCS. Further research is needed to clarify the effects of RT on subjective physical function and QOL.

  4. Effect of Cooperative Learning on Academic Achievement of Physics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keramati, Mohammadreza

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports the results of an investigation on the effect of cooperative learning on academic achievement of physics course. Cooperative learning was employed to experimental group and conventional teaching method was used for control group. Sampling of the study consists of 15-16 years old 220 students at high school in Iran. The progress…

  5. The Effects of Physical Manipulatives on Children's Numerical Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manches, Andrew; O'Malley, Claire

    2016-01-01

    This article focuses on how the representational properties of manipulatives affect the strategies children employ in problem solving. Two studies examined the effect of physical materials on 4-7-year-old children's problem solving strategies in a numerical (i.e., additive composition) task. The first study showed how children not only identified…

  6. Effects of age and gender on physical performance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our purpose was to assess the effects of age and gender on physical performance using one-hour swimming performance and participation in 2,173 man and 2,098 women, aged 19 – 91 years from a long distance (one-hour) national competition. Decline in performance with aging was found to be quadratic rat...

  7. Tillage effects on soil physical properties, sugarbeet yield and quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tillage influences the soil-water-plant ecosystem thereby affecting crop yield and quality. The effects of tillage on soil physical properties, sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L.) yield and quality were evaluated. A field study comprises of three tillage practices: no tillage (NT) shallow (ST) of 10-cm and...

  8. Effect of adjuvant physical properties on spray characteristics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of adjuvant physical properties on spray characteristics were studied. Dynamic surface tension was measured with a Sensa Dyne surface tensiometer 6000 using the maximum bubble pressure method. Viscosity was measured with a Brookfield synchro-lectric viscometer model LVT using a UL adap...

  9. A PROJECT TO STUDY THE NATURE OF EFFECTIVE PHYSICS TEACHING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SNIDER, RAY M.

    THE FLANDERS METHOD OF INTERACTION ANALYSIS WAS EMPLOYED IN AN ANALYTICAL STUDY OF HIGH SCHOOL PHYSICS TEACHING. THE STUDY OBJECTIVES WERE (1) TO DESCRIBE THE CHARACTERISTICS AND PATTERNS OF TEACHER-STUDENT VERBAL INTERACTION IN HIGH SCHOOL CLASSROOMS, (2) TO DETERMINE RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN TEACHER EFFECTIVENESS, AS MEASURED BY SELECTED ASPECTS OF…

  10. Effects of Lab Group Sex Composition on Physics Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shi, Wei-Zhao; He, Xiqin; Wang, Yan; Huan, Weiliang

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of the gender composition of university physics laboratory groups on student self-efficacy and quiz performance. Students from a Chinese university was chosen and subdivided into two groups, which were assigned either same-sex or coed laboratory teams while executing identical laboratory…

  11. Exploring the Greenhouse Effect through Physics-Oriented Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browne, Kerry P.; Laws, Priscilla W.

    2003-01-01

    We are developing a new activity-based unit on global warming and the environment as part of the "Explorations in Physics Curriculum." We describe the current status of this unit, which focuses on helping students understand the greenhouse effect and its relationship to global warming. We outline several problems encountered in testing the unit…

  12. Using Triage Figuratively to Describe Effective Teaching in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henkel, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    This article presents critical outcomes for physical education in a "triage" framework by comparing the process of determining the severity of injuries at the scene of an accident to the process of prioritizing decisions in the classroom. The intent is to reduce all possible outcomes of effective teaching to six nonnegotiable outcomes…

  13. Virtual effects of physics beyond the standard model

    SciTech Connect

    Hewett, J.L.

    1995-04-01

    The author examines the indirect effect of new physics on a variety of processes in the B system, such as the Z {yields} b{bar b} vertex, the decays B {yields} X{sub s}{gamma} and B {yields} X{sub s}l{sup +}l{sup {minus}}, and CP violation.

  14. Effects of axisymmetric contractions on turbulence of various scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan-Atichat, J.; Nagib, H. M.; Drubka, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    Digitally acquired and processed results from an experimental investigation of grid generated turbulence of various scales through and downstream of nine matched cubic contour contractions ranging in area ratio from 2 to 36, and in length to inlet diameter ratio from 0.25 to 1.50 are reported. An additional contraction with a fifth order contour was also utilized for studying the shape effect. Thirteen homogeneous and nearly isotropic test flow conditions with a range of turbulence intensities, length scales and Reynolds numbers were generated and used to examine the sensitivity of the contractions to upstream turbulence. The extent to which the turbulence is altered by the contraction depends on the incoming turbulence scales, the total strain experienced by the fluid, as well as the contraction ratio and the strain rate. Varying the turbulence integral scale influences the transverse turbulence components more than the streamwise component. In general, the larger the turbulence scale, the lesser the reduction in the turbulence intensity of the transverse components. Best agreement with rapid distortion theory was obtained for large scale turbulence, where viscous decay over the contraction length was negligible, or when a first order correction for viscous decay was applied to the results.

  15. Correlates of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale Method Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quilty, Lena C.; Oakman, Jonathan M.; Risko, Evan

    2006-01-01

    Investigators of personality assessment are becoming aware that using positively and negatively worded items in questionnaires to prevent acquiescence may negatively impact construct validity. The Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) has demonstrated a bifactorial structure typically proposed to result from these method effects. Recent work suggests…

  16. Physics of active flow control around a pillar at the micro scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Junkyu

    2011-12-01

    The use of microchannels for heat transfer enhancement has been studied for the last few decades. To take full advantage of a microchannel, various approaches such as two-phase flow, enhanced heat transfer surface, and flow boiling across pin fins entrenched inside a microchannel have been studied. Among them, micro pin fins heat exchangers, similar to their conventional counterparts have been seriously considered due to their superior heat removal performance throughout the extended surface area. In addition, an early transition to turbulent flow via micro pin fins is believed to improve heat transfer at the micro scale. Therefore, the aim of this study is to extend fundamental knowledge of flow around a micro pin fin with and without active flow. The flow field around a micro pillar was measured using micro particle image velocimetry (muPIV), and the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE ) of the flow was measured to quantify flow mixing around the micro pillar. It was found that an early transition to an unsteady flow was not achieved through the micro pillar due to the inherently small height-to-diameter ratio of the pillar, and the corresponding TKE around the micro pillar was not significant in a quasi-steady flow regime. Active flow control via a steady jet was employed through the slit on the micro pillar surface, where the circumferential location of the slit was varied. The velocity field as well as the TKE of the controlled flow was measured to determine the effect of active flow control at the micro scale. Parametric studies were performed and comparison of the various momentum coefficient, flow regime, and the azimuthal location of the control jet were conducted. Suction was introduced as alternative control scheme, and compared to a steady jet. It was found that mixing was significantly enhanced through the steady jet whereas suction was not successful with same momentum coefficients.

  17. A REVISED EFFECTIVE TEMPERATURE SCALE FOR THE KEPLER INPUT CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Pinsonneault, Marc H.; An, Deokkeun; Molenda-Zakowicz, Joanna; Chaplin, William J.; Metcalfe, Travis S.; Bruntt, Hans

    2012-04-01

    We present a catalog of revised effective temperatures for stars observed in long-cadence mode in the Kepler Input Catalog (KIC). We use Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) griz filters tied to the fundamental temperature scale. Polynomials for griz color-temperature relations are presented, along with correction terms for surface gravity effects, metallicity, and statistical corrections for binary companions or blending. We compare our temperature scale to the published infrared flux method (IRFM) scale for V{sub T}JK{sub s} in both open clusters and the Kepler fields. We find good agreement overall, with some deviations between (J - K{sub s} )-based temperatures from the IRFM and both SDSS filter and other diagnostic IRFM color-temperature relationships above 6000 K. For field dwarfs, we find a mean shift toward hotter temperatures relative to the KIC, of order 215 K, in the regime where the IRFM scale is well defined (4000 K to 6500 K). This change is of comparable magnitude in both color systems and in spectroscopy for stars with T{sub eff} below 6000 K. Systematic differences between temperature estimators appear for hotter stars, and we define corrections to put the SDSS temperatures on the IRFM scale for them. When the theoretical dependence on gravity is accounted for, we find a similar temperature scale offset between the fundamental and KIC scales for giants. We demonstrate that statistical corrections to color-based temperatures from binaries are significant. Typical errors, mostly from uncertainties in extinction, are of order 100 K. Implications for other applications of the KIC are discussed.

  18. COOLING COIL EFFECTS ON BLENDING IN A PILOT SCALE TANK

    SciTech Connect

    Leishear, R.; Poirier, M.; Fowley, M.; Steeper, T.

    2010-08-26

    Blending, or mixing, processes in 1.3 million gallon nuclear waste tanks are complicated by the fact that miles of serpentine, vertical, cooling coils are installed in the tanks. As a step toward investigating blending interference due to coils in this type of tank, a 1/10.85 scale tank and pump model were constructed for pilot scale testing. A series of tests were performed in this scaled tank by adding blue dye to visualize blending, and by adding acid or base tracers to solution to quantify the time required to effectively blend the tank contents. The acid and base tests were monitored with pH probes, which were located in the pilot scale tank to ensure that representative samples were obtained. Using the probes, the hydronium ion concentration [H{sup +}] was measured to ensure that a uniform concentration was obtained throughout the tank. As a result of pilot scale testing, a significantly improved understanding of mixing, or blending, in nuclear waste tanks has been achieved. Evaluation of test data showed that cooling coils in the waste tank model increased pilot scale blending times by 200% in the recommended operating range, compared to previous theoretical estimates of a 10-50% increase. Below the planned operating range, pilot scale blending times were increased by as much as 700% in a tank with coils installed. One pump, rather than two or more, was shown to effectively blend the tank contents, and dual pump nozzles installed parallel to the tank wall were shown to provide optimal blending. In short, experimental results varied significantly from expectations.

  19. Effects of spatial scale of sampling on food web structure

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Spencer A; Russell, Roly; Hanson, Dieta; Williams, Richard J; Dunne, Jennifer A

    2015-01-01

    This study asks whether the spatial scale of sampling alters structural properties of food webs and whether any differences are attributable to changes in species richness and connectance with scale. Understanding how different aspects of sampling effort affect ecological network structure is important for both fundamental ecological knowledge and the application of network analysis in conservation and management. Using a highly resolved food web for the marine intertidal ecosystem of the Sanak Archipelago in the Eastern Aleutian Islands, Alaska, we assess how commonly studied properties of network structure differ for 281 versions of the food web sampled at five levels of spatial scale representing six orders of magnitude in area spread across the archipelago. Species (S) and link (L) richness both increased by approximately one order of magnitude across the five spatial scales. Links per species (L/S) more than doubled, while connectance (C) decreased by approximately two-thirds. Fourteen commonly studied properties of network structure varied systematically with spatial scale of sampling, some increasing and others decreasing. While ecological network properties varied systematically with sampling extent, analyses using the niche model and a power-law scaling relationship indicate that for many properties, this apparent sensitivity is attributable to the increasing S and decreasing C of webs with increasing spatial scale. As long as effects of S and C are accounted for, areal sampling bias does not have a special impact on our understanding of many aspects of network structure. However, attention does need be paid to some properties such as the fraction of species in loops, which increases more than expected with greater spatial scales of sampling. PMID:26380704

  20. Improving the Rapid Refresh and High Resolution Rapid Refresh physics to better perform across a wide range of spatial scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Joseph; Grell, Georg

    2014-05-01

    Model development at NOAA/GSD spans a wide range of spatial scales: global scale (Flow-following finite-volume Icosohedral Model, FIM; 10-250 km grid spacing), continental scale (RAP; 13 km grid spacing), CONUS scale (HRRR; 3 km grid spacing), and regional modeling (experimental nesting at 1 km grid spacing over complex terrain). As the model resolution changes, the proportion of resolved vs unresolved physical processes changes; therefore, physical parameterizations need to adapt to different model resolutions to more accurately handle the unresolved processes. The Limited Area Model (LAM) component of the Grey Zone Experiment was designed to assess the change in behavior of numerical weather prediction models between 16 and 1 km by simulating a cold-air outbreak over the North Atlantic and North Sea. The RAP and HRRR model physics were tested in this case study in order to examine the change in behavior of the model physics at 16, 8, 4, 2, and 1 km grid spacings with and without the use a convective parameterization. The primary purpose of these tests is to better understand the change in behavior of the boundary layer and convective schemes across the grey zone, such that further targeted modifications can then help improve general performance at various scales. The RAP currently employs a modified form of the Mellor-Yamada-Nakanishi-Niino (MYNN) PBL scheme, which is an improved TKE-based scheme tuned to match large-eddy simulations. Modifications have been performed to better match observations at 13 km (RAP) grid spacing but more multi-scale testing is required before modifications are introduced to make it scale-aware. A scale-aware convective parameterization, the Grell-Freitas scheme (both deep- and shallow-cumulus scheme), has been developed to better handle the transition in behavior of the sub-grid scale convective processes through the grey zone. This study examines the change in behavior of both schemes across the grey zone. Their transitional behavior

  1. Comparing Scales of Environmental Effects from Gasoline and Ethanol Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parish, Esther S.; Kline, Keith L.; Dale, Virginia H.; Efroymson, Rebecca A.; McBride, Allen C.; Johnson, Timothy L.; Hilliard, Michael R.; Bielicki, Jeffrey M.

    2013-02-01

    Understanding the environmental effects of alternative fuel production is critical to characterizing the sustainability of energy resources to inform policy and regulatory decisions. The magnitudes of these environmental effects vary according to the intensity and scale of fuel production along each step of the supply chain. We compare the spatial extent and temporal duration of ethanol and gasoline production processes and environmental effects based on a literature review and then synthesize the scale differences on space-time diagrams. Comprehensive assessment of any fuel-production system is a moving target, and our analysis shows that decisions regarding the selection of spatial and temporal boundaries of analysis have tremendous influences on the comparisons. Effects that strongly differentiate gasoline and ethanol-supply chains in terms of scale are associated with when and where energy resources are formed and how they are extracted. Although both gasoline and ethanol production may result in negative environmental effects, this study indicates that ethanol production traced through a supply chain may impact less area and result in more easily reversed effects of a shorter duration than gasoline production.

  2. Micro-CT Pore Scale Study Of Flow In Porous Media: Effect Of Voxel Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, S.; Gray, F.; Crawshaw, J.; Boek, E.

    2014-12-01

    In the last few years, pore scale studies have become the key to understanding the complex fluid flow processes in the fields of groundwater remediation, hydrocarbon recovery and environmental issues related to carbon storage and capture. A pore scale study is often comprised of two key procedures: 3D pore scale imaging and numerical modelling techniques. The essence of a pore scale study is to test the physics implemented in a model of complicated fluid flow processes at one scale (microscopic) and then apply the model to solve the problems associated with water resources and oil recovery at other scales (macroscopic and field). However, the process of up-scaling from the pore scale to the macroscopic scale has encountered many challenges due to both pore scale imaging and modelling techniques. Due to the technical limitations in the imaging method, there is always a compromise between the spatial (voxel) resolution and the physical volume of the sample (field of view, FOV) to be scanned by the imaging methods, specifically X-ray micro-CT (XMT) in our case In this study, a careful analysis was done to understand the effect of voxel size, using XMT to image the 3D pore space of a variety of porous media from sandstones to carbonates scanned at different voxel resolution (4.5 μm, 6.2 μm, 8.3 μm and 10.2 μm) but keeping the scanned FOV constant for all the samples. We systematically segment the micro-CT images into three phases, the macro-pore phase, an intermediate phase (unresolved micro-pores + grains) and the grain phase and then study the effect of voxel size on the structure of the macro-pore and the intermediate phases and the fluid flow properties using lattice-Boltzmann (LB) and pore network (PN) modelling methods. We have also applied a numerical coarsening algorithm (up-scale method) to reduce the computational power and time required to accurately predict the flow properties using the LB and PN method.

  3. The Relative Effectiveness of Integrated Reading Study Strategy and Conceptual Physics Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taslidere, Erdal; Eryilmaz, Ali

    2012-04-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to investigate the combined and partial effects of the Integrated Reading/Study Strategy and Conceptual Physics Approach on ninth grade private high school students' achievement in and attitudes toward optics. The Integrated Reading/Study Strategy is a new strategy which was developed by integrating previously existing reading strategies of the KWL and SQ3R with classroom lecturing. The Conceptual Physics Approach is an instructional strategy developed on the basis of Conceptual Physics suggested by Paul G. Hewitt. To investigate the partial and combined effects of methods, factorial design was used. The study was conducted with 124 students from two private high schools in the Çankaya district region of Ankara, Turkey. Various teaching/learning materials were developed and used for the study. Two measuring tools, Achievement Test about Optics and Attitude Scale about Optics were used as pre and post tests before and after instruction. The study continued for a two-month treatment period. The results of the study showed that the combined effect of the Integrated Reading/Study Strategy and Conceptual Physics Approach improved students' achievement significantly compared to the separate individual methods. Although the product of the Integrated Reading/Study Strategy and Conceptual Physics Approach increased students' attitudes more compared to the remaining methods, the result is not statistically significant.

  4. Multi-Scale Multi-physics Methods Development for the Calculation of Hot-Spots in the NGNP

    SciTech Connect

    Downar, Thomas; Seker, Volkan

    2013-04-30

    Radioactive gaseous fission products are released out of the fuel element at a significantly higher rate when the fuel temperature exceeds 1600°C in high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). Therefore, it is of paramount importance to accurately predict the peak fuel temperature during all operational and design-basis accident conditions. The current methods used to predict the peak fuel temperature in HTGRs, such as the Next-Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), estimate the average fuel temperature in a computational mesh modeling hundreds of fuel pebbles or a fuel assembly in a pebble-bed reactor (PBR) or prismatic block type reactor (PMR), respectively. Experiments conducted in operating HTGRs indicate considerable uncertainty in the current methods and correlations used to predict actual temperatures. The objective of this project is to improve the accuracy in the prediction of local "hot" spots by developing multi-scale, multi-physics methods and implementing them within the framework of established codes used for NGNP analysis.The multi-scale approach which this project will implement begins with defining suitable scales for a physical and mathematical model and then deriving and applying the appropriate boundary conditions between scales. The macro scale is the greatest length that describes the entire reactor, whereas the meso scale models only a fuel block in a prismatic reactor and ten to hundreds of pebbles in a pebble bed reactor. The smallest scale is the micro scale--the level of a fuel kernel of the pebble in a PBR and fuel compact in a PMR--which needs to be resolved in order to calculate the peak temperature in a fuel kernel.

  5. BSM primaries: the physics of the SM effective field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riva, Francesco

    2016-07-01

    The phenomenological implications of the Standard Model (SM) are governed by the accidental symmetry structure of the dimension-4 Lagrangian. In this talk I discuss the next order in an expansion in fields and in derivatives, that parametrize the largest effects of heavy physics beyond the SM. The remaining symmetries of this dimension-6 Lagrangian imply relations between experimental observables that should be used to test the consistency of deviations from the SM, to design new physics searches and to make them more sensitive.

  6. Scale effects impeding palaeoclimate reconstructions from mountain glaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prinz, Rainer; Nicholson, Lindsey; Mölg, Thomas; Kaser, Georg

    2016-04-01

    Lewis Glacier on Mt. Kenya lost more than 80% of its area since its last stadial in the late 19th century (L19). Can we reconstruct climate conditions sustaining Lewis Glacier in its L19 extent? First, we optimized a physical based energy and mass balance model to the modern-day glacier extent with in situ observed climate observations. Second, from this record we constructed synthetic climate scenarios (based on coupled parameter perturbation applying a simple weather generator concept) as input for the mass balance model. These scenarios reflect the observed variability in precipitation and air temperature over recent decades, reproduce the observed mass balance variability for the modern-day glacier extent, and quantify the glacier's sensitivity to climate. Using the mass balance model as optimized for the modern-day glacier on the L19 extent, driven by climate perturbations most favourable to glaciation, results in negative mass balances. This would traditionally be interpreted to mean that even the extremes of the present-day climate are incapable of reproducing the L19 conditions. Alternatively or additionally, the modelling suggests that the L19 Lewis Glacier could be sustained if a favourable climate perturbation is applied in conjunction with a modification of the gradients used to extrapolate the climate observations over the glacier surface from those optimized for the very small modern-day glacier. Such a modification might be justifiable, where the modern-day glacier is so small that it is unlikely to generate significant microclimatological effects that would be expected for the larger L19 extent, when e.g. the glacier filled its cirque reducing long-wave emissions from surrounding terrain drastically. In a general sense this finding indicates that extracting proxy climate conditions from a particular glacier geometry, using a modelling system optimized on a dramatically different geometry, may invalidate the approach, particularly if changes in

  7. Levels of processing and picture memory: the physical superiority effect.

    PubMed

    Intraub, H; Nicklos, S

    1985-04-01

    Six experiments studied the effect of physical orienting questions (e.g., "Is this angular?") and semantic orienting questions (e.g., "Is this edible?") on memory for unrelated pictures at stimulus durations ranging from 125-2,000 ms. Results ran contrary to the semantic superiority "rule of thumb," which is based primarily on verbal memory experiments. Physical questions were associated with better free recall and cued recall of a diverse set of visual scenes (Experiments 1, 2, and 4). This occurred both when general and highly specific semantic questions were used (Experiments 1 and 2). Similar results were obtained when more simplistic visual stimuli--photographs of single objects--were used (Experiments 5 and 6). As in the case of the semantic superiority effect with words, the physical superiority effect for pictures was eliminated or reversed when the same physical questions were repeated throughout the session (Experiments 4 and 6). Conflicts with results of previous levels of processing experiments with words and nonverbal stimuli (e.g., faces) are explained in terms of the sensory-semantic model (Nelson, Reed, & McEvoy, 1977). Implications for picture memory research and the levels of processing viewpoint are discussed. PMID:3157769

  8. Geant4 electromagnetic physics updates for space radiation effects simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivantchenko, Anton; Nieminen, Petteri; Incerti, Sebastien; Santin, Giovanni; Ivantchenko, Vladimir; Grichine, Vladimir; Allison, John; Karamitos, Mathiew

    The Geant4 toolkit is used in many applications including space science studies. The new Geant4 version 10.0 released in December 2013 includes a major revision of the toolkit and offers multi-threaded mode for event level parallelism. At the same time, Geant4 electromagnetic and hadronic physics sub-libraries have been significantly updated. In order to validate the new and updated models Geant4 verification tests and benchmarks were extended. Part of these developments was sponsored by the European Space Agency in the context of research aimed at modelling radiation biological end effects. In this work, we present an overview of results of several benchmarks for electromagnetic physics models relevant to space science. For electromagnetic physics, recently Compton scattering, photoelectric effect, and Rayleigh scattering models have been improved and extended down to lower energies. Models of ionization and fluctuations have also been improved; special micro-dosimetry models for Silicon and liquid water were introduced; the main multiple scattering model was consolidated; and the atomic de-excitation module has been made available to all models. As a result, Geant4 predictions for space radiation effects obtained with different Physics Lists are in better agreement with the benchmark data than previous Geant4 versions. Here we present results of electromagnetic tests and models comparison in the energy interval 10 eV - 10 MeV.

  9. Systematic renormalization of the effective theory of Large Scale Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbar Abolhasani, Ali; Mirbabayi, Mehrdad; Pajer, Enrico

    2016-05-01

    A perturbative description of Large Scale Structure is a cornerstone of our understanding of the observed distribution of matter in the universe. Renormalization is an essential and defining step to make this description physical and predictive. Here we introduce a systematic renormalization procedure, which neatly associates counterterms to the UV-sensitive diagrams order by order, as it is commonly done in quantum field theory. As a concrete example, we renormalize the one-loop power spectrum and bispectrum of both density and velocity. In addition, we present a series of results that are valid to all orders in perturbation theory. First, we show that while systematic renormalization requires temporally non-local counterterms, in practice one can use an equivalent basis made of local operators. We give an explicit prescription to generate all counterterms allowed by the symmetries. Second, we present a formal proof of the well-known general argument that the contribution of short distance perturbations to large scale density contrast δ and momentum density π(k) scale as k2 and k, respectively. Third, we demonstrate that the common practice of introducing counterterms only in the Euler equation when one is interested in correlators of δ is indeed valid to all orders.

  10. A study of the effect of synoptic scale processes in GCM modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, Gerald F.

    1989-01-01

    Research was conducted to help modeling groups at NASA to develop better weather forecasting and general circulation models (GCM) for activities relating to the meteorological uses of satellite data. The focus was on the physical processes that were being simulated by models: radiative effects and latent heat release associated with clouds; orographic influences; and heat transfer at the ocean and ice surfaces. An attempt was made to deduce the role of diabatic heating in North Atlantic cyclogenesis and in the global heat budget. Inferences were made in four studies: heat budget statistics from GCM assimilations; dynamics of north Atlantic cyclones; Cage-type energy budget calculations; and grid scale cloud formation. Mechanisms that were responsible for the variability and structure of the atmospheric on a hemispheric scale were studied by a hybrid of statistical analysis and theoretical modeling. Variability and structure are both related to synoptic scale processes through baroclinic and barotropic energy transformations.

  11. Investigation of the Physical Processes Governing Large-Scale Tracer Transport in the Stratosphere and Troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selkirk, Henry B.

    2001-01-01

    This report summarizes work conducted from January 1996 through April 1999 on a program of research to investigate the physical mechanisms that underlie the transport of trace constituents in the stratosphere-troposphere system. The primary scientific goal of the research has been to identify the processes which transport air masses within the lower stratosphere, particularly between the tropics and middle latitudes. This research was conducted in collaboration with the Subsonic Assessment (SASS) of the NASA Atmospheric Effects of Radiation Program (AEAP) and the Upper Atmospheric Research Program (UARP). The SASS program sought to understand the impact of the present and future fleets of conventional jet traffic on the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, while complementary airborne observations under UARP seek to understand the complex interactions of dynamical and chemical processes that affect the ozone layer. The present investigation contributed to the goals of each of these by diagnosing the history of air parcels intercepted by NASA research aircraft in UARP and AEAP campaigns. This was done by means of a blend of trajectory analyses and tracer correlation techniques.

  12. Large-scale Topographical Screen for Investigation of Physical Neural-Guidance Cues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Tang, Qing Yuan; Jadhav, Amol D.; Narang, Ankit; Qian, Wei Xian; Shi, Peng; Pang, Stella W.

    2015-03-01

    A combinatorial approach was used to present primary neurons with a large library of topographical features in the form of micropatterned substrate for high-throughput screening of physical neural-guidance cues that can effectively promote different aspects of neuronal development, including axon and dendritic outgrowth. Notably, the neuronal-guidance capability of specific features was automatically identified using a customized image processing software, thus significantly increasing the screening throughput with minimal subjective bias. Our results indicate that the anisotropic topographies promote axonal and in some cases dendritic extension relative to the isotropic topographies, while dendritic branching showed preference to plain substrates over the microscale features. The results from this work can be readily applied towards engineering novel biomaterials with precise surface topography that can serve as guidance conduits for neuro-regenerative applications. This novel topographical screening strategy combined with the automated processing capability can also be used for high-throughput screening of chemical or genetic regulatory factors in primary neurons.

  13. The effect of geographical scale of sampling on DNA barcoding.

    PubMed

    Bergsten, Johannes; Bilton, David T; Fujisawa, Tomochika; Elliott, Miranda; Monaghan, Michael T; Balke, Michael; Hendrich, Lars; Geijer, Joja; Herrmann, Jan; Foster, Garth N; Ribera, Ignacio; Nilsson, Anders N; Barraclough, Timothy G; Vogler, Alfried P

    2012-10-01

    Eight years after DNA barcoding was formally proposed on a large scale, CO1 sequences are rapidly accumulating from around the world. While studies to date have mostly targeted local or regional species assemblages, the recent launch of the global iBOL project (International Barcode of Life), highlights the need to understand the effects of geographical scale on Barcoding's goals. Sampling has been central in the debate on DNA Barcoding, but the effect of the geographical scale of sampling has not yet been thoroughly and explicitly tested with empirical data. Here, we present a CO1 data set of aquatic predaceous diving beetles of the tribe Agabini, sampled throughout Europe, and use it to investigate how the geographic scale of sampling affects 1) the estimated intraspecific variation of species, 2) the genetic distance to the most closely related heterospecific, 3) the ratio of intraspecific and interspecific variation, 4) the frequency of taxonomically recognized species found to be monophyletic, and 5) query identification performance based on 6 different species assignment methods. Intraspecific variation was significantly correlated with the geographical scale of sampling (R-square = 0.7), and more than half of the species with 10 or more sampled individuals (N = 29) showed higher intraspecific variation than 1% sequence divergence. In contrast, the distance to the closest heterospecific showed a significant decrease with increasing geographical scale of sampling. The average genetic distance dropped from > 7% for samples within 1 km, to < 3.5% for samples up to > 6000 km apart. Over a third of the species were not monophyletic, and the proportion increased through locally, nationally, regionally, and continentally restricted subsets of the data. The success of identifying queries decreased with increasing spatial scale of sampling; liberal methods declined from 100% to around 90%, whereas strict methods dropped to below 50% at continental scales. The

  14. The Effect of Geographical Scale of Sampling on DNA Barcoding

    PubMed Central

    Bergsten, Johannes; Bilton, David T.; Fujisawa, Tomochika; Elliott, Miranda; Monaghan, Michael T.; Balke, Michael; Hendrich, Lars; Geijer, Joja; Herrmann, Jan; Foster, Garth N.; Ribera, Ignacio; Nilsson, Anders N.; Barraclough, Timothy G.; Vogler, Alfried P.

    2012-01-01

    Eight years after DNA barcoding was formally proposed on a large scale, CO1 sequences are rapidly accumulating from around the world. While studies to date have mostly targeted local or regional species assemblages, the recent launch of the global iBOL project (International Barcode of Life), highlights the need to understand the effects of geographical scale on Barcoding's goals. Sampling has been central in the debate on DNA Barcoding, but the effect of the geographical scale of sampling has not yet been thoroughly and explicitly tested with empirical data. Here, we present a CO1 data set of aquatic predaceous diving beetles of the tribe Agabini, sampled throughout Europe, and use it to investigate how the geographic scale of sampling affects 1) the estimated intraspecific variation of species, 2) the genetic distance to the most closely related heterospecific, 3) the ratio of intraspecific and interspecific variation, 4) the frequency of taxonomically recognized species found to be monophyletic, and 5) query identification performance based on 6 different species assignment methods. Intraspecific variation was significantly correlated with the geographical scale of sampling (R-square = 0.7), and more than half of the species with 10 or more sampled individuals (N = 29) showed higher intraspecific variation than 1% sequence divergence. In contrast, the distance to the closest heterospecific showed a significant decrease with increasing geographical scale of sampling. The average genetic distance dropped from > 7% for samples within 1 km, to < 3.5% for samples up to > 6000 km apart. Over a third of the species were not monophyletic, and the proportion increased through locally, nationally, regionally, and continentally restricted subsets of the data. The success of identifying queries decreased with increasing spatial scale of sampling; liberal methods declined from 100% to around 90%, whereas strict methods dropped to below 50% at continental scales. The

  15. A Systematic Review of the Effectiveness of Physical Education and School Sport Interventions Targeting Physical Activity, Movement Skills and Enjoyment of Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dudley, Dean; Okely, Anthony; Pearson, Philip; Cotton, Wayne

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a systematic review of published literature on the effectiveness of physical education in promoting participation in physical activity, enjoyment of physical activity and movement skill proficiency in children and adolescents. The review utilized a literature search, specifically publications listed in Ovid, A+ Education,…

  16. Neutrino mass, dark matter, and Baryon asymmetry via TeV-scale physics without fine-tuning.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Mayumi; Kanemura, Shinya; Seto, Osamu

    2009-02-01

    We propose an extended version of the standard model, in which neutrino oscillation, dark matter, and the baryon asymmetry of the Universe can be simultaneously explained by the TeV-scale physics without assuming a large hierarchy among the mass scales. Tiny neutrino masses are generated at the three-loop level due to the exact Z2 symmetry, by which the stability of the dark matter candidate is guaranteed. The extra Higgs doublet is required not only for the tiny neutrino masses but also for successful electroweak baryogenesis. The model provides discriminative predictions especially in Higgs phenomenology, so that it is testable at current and future collider experiments. PMID:19257506

  17. Effect of a Sport Education Program on Motivation for Physical Education and Leisure-Time Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallhead, Tristan L.; Garn, Alex C.; Vidoni, Carla

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of a high school sport education curriculum program on students' motivation for physical education and leisure-time physical activity. Method: Participants were 568 high school students enrolled in the required physical education programs at 2 schools, 1 taught using sport education…

  18. Factorial Validity and Gender Invariance of the Physical Activity Enjoyment Scale (PACES) in Older Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunton, Genevieve Fridlund; Tscherne, James; Rodriguez, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Documented gender differences in physical activity rates during adolescence (Grunbaum et al., 2004) pose the question of whether physical activity enjoyment similarly differs between boys and girls. However, a necessary precursor to research on this topic is that the factor structure of the PACES be equivalent across gender. Although gender…

  19. Physics on the Smallest Scales: An Introduction to Minimal Length Phenomenology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sprenger, Martin; Nicolini, Piero; Bleicher, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    Many modern theories which try to unify gravity with the Standard Model of particle physics, such as e.g. string theory, propose two key modifications to the commonly known physical theories: the existence of additional space dimensions; the existence of a minimal length distance or maximal resolution. While extra dimensions have received a wide…

  20. Relationship between Physical Attractiveness, Physical Effectiveness, and Self-Esteem: A Cross-Sectional Analysis among Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, Bill; Ryckman, Richard M.

    1991-01-01

    Examined contributions of physical attractiveness and physical effectiveness to self-esteem among adolescents in grades 7, 9, and 11, and college freshmen. Both attractiveness and effectiveness were significantly related to self-esteem of males and females. Attractiveness and effectiveness did not appear to be differentially important to…

  1. A Physically-based Model For Rainfall-triggered Landslides At A Regional Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teles, V.; Capolongo, D.; Bras, R. L.

    Rainfall has long been recognized as a major cause of landslides. Historical records have shown that large rainfall can generate hundreds of landslides over hundreds of square kilometers. Although a great body of work has documented the morphology and mechanics of individual slope failure, few studies have considered the process at basin and regional scale. A landslide model is integrated in the landscape evolution model CHILD and simulates rainfall-triggered events based on a geotechnical index, the factor of safety, which takes into account the slope, the soil effective cohesion and weight, the friction angle, the regolith thickness and the saturated thickness. The stat- urated thickness is represented by the wetness index developed in the TOPMODEL. The topography is represented by a Triangulated Irregular Network (TIN). The factor of safety is computed at each node of the TIN. If the factor of safety is lower than 1, a landslide is intiated at this node. The regolith is then moved downstream. We applied the model to the Fortore basin whose valley cuts the flysch terrain that constitute the framework of the so called "sub-Apennines" chain that is the most eastern part of the Southern Apennines (Italy). We will discuss its value according to its sensitivity to the used parameters and compare it to the actual data available for this basin.

  2. Reco level Smin and subsystem Smin: improved global inclusive variables for measuring the new physics mass scale in MET events at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Konar, Partha; Kong, Kyoungchul; Matchev, Konstantin T.; Park, Myeonghun; /Florida U.

    2011-08-11

    The variable {radical}s{sub min} was originally proposed in [1] as a model-independent, global and fully inclusive measure of the new physics mass scale in missing energy events at hadron colliders. In the original incarnation of {radical}s{sub min}, however, the connection to the new physics mass scale was blurred by the effects of the underlying event, most notably initial state radiation and multiple parton interactions. In this paper we advertize two improved variants of the {radical}s{sub min} variable, which overcome this problem. First we show that by evaluating the {radical}s{sub min} variable at the RECO level, in terms of the reconstructed objects in the event, the effects from the underlying event are significantly diminished and the nice correlation between the peak in the {radical}s{sub min}{sup (reco)} distribution and the new physics mass scale is restored. Secondly, the underlying event problem can be avoided altogether when the {radical}s{sub min} concept is applied to a subsystem of the event which does not involve any QCD jets. We supply an analytic formula for the resulting subsystem {radical}s{sub min}{sup (sub)} variable and show that its peak exhibits the usual correlation with the mass scale of the particles produced in the subsystem. Finally, we contrast {radical}s{sub min} to other popular inclusive variables such as H{sub T}, M{sub Tgen} and M{sub TTgen}. We illustrate our discussion with several examples from supersymmetry, and with dilepton events from top quark pair production.

  3. Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bromley, D. Allan

    1980-01-01

    The author presents the argument that the past few years, in terms of new discoveries, insights, and questions raised, have been among the most productive in the history of physics. Selected for discussion are some of the most important new developments in physics research. (Author/SA)

  4. Large scale obscuration and related climate effects open literature bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, N.A.; Geitgey, J.; Behl, Y.K.; Zak, B.D.

    1994-05-01

    Large scale obscuration and related climate effects of nuclear detonations first became a matter of concern in connection with the so-called ``Nuclear Winter Controversy`` in the early 1980`s. Since then, the world has changed. Nevertheless, concern remains about the atmospheric effects of nuclear detonations, but the source of concern has shifted. Now it focuses less on global, and more on regional effects and their resulting impacts on the performance of electro-optical and other defense-related systems. This bibliography reflects the modified interest.

  5. Effect of physical intimate partner violence on body mass index in low-income adult women.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Marcela de Freitas; Moraes, Claudia Leite de; Reichenheim, Michael Eduardo; Verly Junior, Eliseu; Marques, Emanuele Souza; Salles-Costa, Rosana

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to assess whether physical intimate partner violence affects the nutritional status of adult women with different levels of body mass index (BMI). This was a population-based cross-sectional study with 625 women selected through complex multistage cluster sampling. Information on physical intimate partner violence was obtained with the Revised Conflict Tactics Scales, and nutritional status was measured as BMI (kg/m2). A quantile regression model was used to assess the effect of physical intimate partner violence at all percentiles of BMI distribution. Physical intimate partner violence occurred in 27.6% of the women (95%CI: 20.0; 35.2). Mean BMI was 27.9kg/m2 (95%CI: 27.1; 28.7). The results showed that physical intimate partner violence was negatively associated with BMI between the 25th and 85th percentiles, corresponding to 22.9 and 31.2kg/m2. The findings support previous studies indicating that physical intimate partner violence can reduce BMI in low-income women. PMID:25715300

  6. Self-healing of unitarity in effective field theories and the onset of new physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydemir, Ufuk; Anber, Mohamed M.; Donoghue, John F.

    2012-07-01

    In effective field theories it is common to identify the onset of new physics with the violation of tree-level unitarity. However, we show that this is parametrically incorrect in the case of chiral perturbation theory, and is probably theoretically incorrect in general. In the chiral theory, we explore perturbative unitarity violation as a function of the number of colors and the number of flavors, holding the scale of the “new physics” (i.e. QCD) fixed. This demonstrates that the onset of new physics is parametrically uncorrelated with tree-unitarity violation. When the latter scale is lower than that of new physics, the effective theory must heal its unitarity violation itself, which is expected because the field theory satisfies the requirements of unitarity. In the chiral theory, the self-healing results in a resonant structure with scalar quantum numbers. In the electroweak variant of this argument, the structure must have the properties of the Higgs and must couple proportional to the mass in both gauge boson and fermion scattering. A similar example can be seen in the case of general relativity coupled to multiple matter fields, where iteration of the vacuum polarization diagram restores unitarity. We present arguments that suggest the correct identification should be connected to the onset of inelasticity rather than unitarity violation. We describe how the onset of inelasticity can occur in the effective theory, although it does not appear possible to predict the onset reliably.

  7. Gravitational effects on vanishing Higgs potential at the Planck scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haba, Naoyuki; Kaneta, Kunio; Takahashi, Ryo; Yamaguchi, Yuya

    2015-01-01

    We investigate gravitational effects on the so-called multiple point criticality principle (MPCP) at the Planck scale. The MPCP requires two degenerate vacua, whose necessary conditions are expressed by vanishing Higgs quartic coupling [λ (MPl)=0 ] and vanishing its β function [βλ(MPl)=0 ]. We discuss a case that a specific form of gravitational corrections are assumed to contribute to β functions of coupling constants [although it is accepted that gravitational corrections do not alter the running of the standard model (SM) couplings]. To satisfy the above two boundary conditions at the Planck scale, we find that the top pole mass and the Higgs mass should be 170.8 GeV ≲Mt≲171.7 GeV and Mh=125.7 ±0.4 GeV , respectively, as well as include suitable magnitude of gravitational effects (a coefficient of gravitational contribution as |aλ|>2 ). In this case, however, since the Higgs quartic coupling λ becomes negative below the Planck scale, two vacua are not degenerate. We find that Mh≳131.5 GeV with Mt≳174 GeV is required by the realization of the MPCP. Therefore, the MPCP at the Planck scale cannot be realized in the SM, and also the SM with gravity since Mh≳131.5 GeV is experimentally ruled out.

  8. Effective physical treatment for chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Maher, C G

    2004-01-01

    It is now feasible to adopt an evidence-based approach when providing physical treatment for patients with chronic LBP. A summary of the efficacy of a range of physical treatments is provided in Table 1. The evidence-based primary care options are exercise, laser, massage, and spinal manipulation; however, the latter three have small or transient effects that limit their value as therapies for chronic LBP. In contrast, exercise produces large reductions in pain and disability, a feature that suggests that exercise should play a major role in the management of chronic LBP. Physical treatments, such as acupuncture, backschool, hydrotherapy, lumbar supports, magnets, TENS, traction, ultrasound, Pilates therapy, Feldenkrais therapy, Alexander technique, and craniosacral therapy are either of unknown value or ineffective and so should not be considered. Outside of primary care, multidisciplinary treatment or functional restoration is effective; however, the high cost probably means that these programs should be reserved for patients who do not respond to cheaper treatment options for chronic LBP. Although there are now effective treatment options for chronic LBP, it needs to be acknowledged that the problem of chronic LBP is far from solved. Though treatments can provide marked improvements in the patient's condition, the available evidence suggests that the typical chronic LBP patient is left with some residual pain and disability. Developing new, more powerful treatments and refining the current group of known effective treatments is the challenge for the future. PMID:15062718

  9. PREFACE: Conference of Theoretical Physics and Nonlinear Phenomena (CTPNP) 2014: ''From Universe to String's Scale''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-10-01

    Theoretical physics is the first step for the development of science and technology. For more than 100 years it has delivered new and sophisticated discoveries which have changed human views of their surroundings and universe. Theoretical physics has also revealed that the governing law in our universe is not deterministic, and it is undoubtedly the foundation of our modern civilization. Contrary to its importance, research in theoretical physics is not well advanced in some developing countries such as Indonesia. This workshop provides the formal meeting in Indonesia devoted to the field of theoretical physics and is organized to cover all subjects of theoretical physics as well as nonlinear phenomena in order to create a gathering place for the theorists in Indonesia and surrounding countries, to motivate young physicists to keep doing active researches in the field and to encourage constructive communication among the community members. Following the success of the tenth previous meetings in this conference series, the eleventh conference was held in Sebelas Maret University (UNS), Surakarta, Indonesia on 15 February 2014. In addition, the conference was proceeded by School of Advance Physics at Gadjah Mada University (UGM), Yogyakarta, on 16-17 February 2014. The conference is expected to provide distinguished experts and students from various research fields of theoretical physics and nonlinear phenomena in Indonesia as well as from other continents the opportunities to present their works and to enhance contacts among them. The introduction to the conference is continued in the pdf.

  10. The Effect of Physical Attractiveness of Models on Advertising Effectiveness for Male and Female Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Chia-Ching; Chang, Chih-Hsiang

    2007-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of advertising with physically attractive models on male and female adolescents. The findings suggest that highly attractive models are less effective than those who are normally attractive. Implications of social comparison are discussed.

  11. Effects of Citric Acid and l-Carnitine on Physical Fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Sugino, Tomohiro; Aoyagi, Sayaka; Shirai, Tomoko; Kajimoto, Yoshitaka; Kajimoto, Osami

    2007-01-01

    We examined the effects of citric acid and l-carnitine administration on physical fatigue. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, 3-way crossover study, 18 healthy volunteers were randomized to oral citric acid (2,700 mg/day), l-carnitine (1,000 mg/day), or placebo for 8 days. The fatigue-inducing physical task consisted of workload trials on a cycle ergometer at fixed workloads for 2 h on 2 occasions. Before the physical load, salivary chromogranin A, measured as a physiological stress marker, was lower in the group given citric acid than in the group given placebo. Also, after the physical load, the subjective feeling of fatigue assessed with a visual analogue scale was lower in the citric acid group than in the placebo group. In contrast, l-carnitine had no effect on chromogranin A or subjective fatigue. These results suggest that citric acid reduces physiological stress and attenuates physical fatigue, whereas l-carnitine does not. PMID:18299720

  12. Initial condition effects on large scale structure in numerical simulations of plane mixing layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMullan, W. A.; Garrett, S. J.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, Large Eddy Simulations are performed on the spatially developing plane turbulent mixing layer. The simulated mixing layers originate from initially laminar conditions. The focus of this research is on the effect of the nature of the imposed fluctuations on the large-scale spanwise and streamwise structures in the flow. Two simulations are performed; one with low-level three-dimensional inflow fluctuations obtained from pseudo-random numbers, the other with physically correlated fluctuations of the same magnitude obtained from an inflow generation technique. Where white-noise fluctuations provide the inflow disturbances, no spatially stationary streamwise vortex structure is observed, and the large-scale spanwise turbulent vortical structures grow continuously and linearly. These structures are observed to have a three-dimensional internal geometry with branches and dislocations. Where physically correlated provide the inflow disturbances a "streaky" streamwise structure that is spatially stationary is observed, with the large-scale turbulent vortical structures growing with the square-root of time. These large-scale structures are quasi-two-dimensional, on top of which the secondary structure rides. The simulation results are discussed in the context of the varying interpretations of mixing layer growth that have been postulated. Recommendations are made concerning the data required from experiments in order to produce accurate numerical simulation recreations of real flows.

  13. High-energy physics strategies and future large-scale projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, F.

    2015-07-01

    We sketch the actual European and international strategies and possible future facilities. In the near term the High Energy Physics (HEP) community will fully exploit the physics potential of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) through its high-luminosity upgrade (HL-LHC). Post-LHC options include a linear e+e- collider in Japan (ILC) or at CERN (CLIC), as well as circular lepton or hadron colliders in China (CepC/SppC) and Europe (FCC). We conclude with linear and circular acceleration approaches based on crystals, and some perspectives for the far future of accelerator-based particle physics.

  14. Influence of basin-scale physical variables on life history characteristics of cutthroat trout in Yellowstone Lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gresswell, Robert E.; Liss, W.J.; Larson, Gary L.; Bartlein, P.J.

    1997-01-01

    Individual spawning populations of Yellowstone cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarki bouvieri differ in life history characteristics associated with broad spatial and temporal environmental patterns, but relationships between specific life history characteristics of Yellowstone cutthroat trout and physical aspects of the environment are poorly understood. We examined basin-scale physical characteristics of tributary drainages and subbasins of Yellowstone Lake in relation to timing (peak and duration) of lacustrinea??adfluvial Yellowstone cutthroat trout spawning migrations and mean length of cutthroat trout spawners in 27 tributaries to the lake. Stream drainages varied along gradients that can be described by mean aspect, mean elevation, and drainage and stream size. Approximately two-thirds of the variation in the timing of the peak of the annual cutthroat trout spawning migrations and average length of spawners was explained by third-order polynomial regressions with mean aspect and basin area as predictor variables. Because most cutthroat trout ascend tributaries soon after peak runoff, it appears that the influence of basin-scale physical variables on the date of the migration peak is manifested by the pattern of stream discharge. Spawner length does not seem to be a direct function of stream size in the Yellowstone Lake watershed, and aspect of the tributary basin seems to have a greater influence on the body length of cutthroat trout spawners than does stream size. Mechanisms that explain how the interaction of basin-scale physical variables influence spawner length were not investigated directly; however, we found evidence of distinct aggregations of cutthroat trout that are related to physical and limnological characteristics of the lake subbasins, and there is some indication that lake residence may be related to tributary location.

  15. Physical Activity Effects on Depressive Symptoms in Black Adults

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Elisa R.; Sampselle, Carolyn M.; Gretebeck, Kimberlee A.; Ronis, David L.; Neighbors, Harold W.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Randomized trials found physical activity (PA) effective in decreasing depressive symptoms. Few studies included Black participants. The purpose of this systematic literature review was to determine the effects of PA on depressive symptoms in Black adults. Methods Articles were abstracted by conducting a computer and hand search of eligible studies. Results Eight of 13 studies found a significant inverse relationship between PA and depressive symptoms in Black adults. Sources for the heterogeneity were explored. Conclusion Future studies should include representative samples of Black adults, incorporate a theory which considers multiple levels of influence, account for genetic factors in the etiology of depressive symptoms, include individuals diagnosed with depression and with health conditions which may increase the risk of depressive symptoms, account for intra-group ethnic heterogeneity, measure and differentiate between social support and social network, consider aspects of the physical environment and use standardized measurements of PA. PMID:22984655

  16. Effects of scale-free avalanche walks on anomalous diffusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun-Joo

    2016-07-01

    Effects of scale-free avalanche walks on anomalous diffusions have been studied by introducing simple non-Markovian walk models. The scale-free avalanche walk is realized as a walker goes to one direction consistently in a time interval, the distribution of which follows a power-law. And it is applied to the memory models, in which the entire history of a walk process is memorized or the memory for the latest step is enhanced with time. The power-law avalanche walk with memory effects strengthens the persistence between steps and thus makes the Hurst exponent be larger than the cases without avalanche walks, while does not affect the anti-persistent nature.

  17. The effect of scale on the applicability of Taylor's hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parlange, Marc; Higgins, Chad; Froidevaux, Martin; Simeonov, Valentin

    2010-05-01

    Taylor's frozen flow hypothesis is a central assumption in most fluid mechanics experiments with stationary sensors, and many statistical theories of turbulence where links between the Lagrangian and Eulerian nature of turbulence are made. In this work we seek to quantify the effectiveness of Taylor's hypothesis at the field scale using water vapor as a passive tracer. A horizontal Raman Lidar is used to capture the humidity field in space and time above a small lake in Switzerland. High resolution wind speed and direction measurements are conducted simultaneously allowing for a direct test of Taylor's hypothesis. Through a wavelet decomposition of the data we show that scale has a strong influence on the applicability of Taylor's hypothesis. This effect is explained through the use of dimensional analysis and turbulent structure functions, which ultimately leads to the definition of a nondimensional parameter describing the ‘persistency' of the turbulence.

  18. Kilometer-scale Kaiser effect identified in Krafla volcano, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimisson, Elías Rafn; Einarsson, Páll; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Brandsdóttir, Bryndís.

    2015-10-01

    The Krafla rifting episode in 1975-1984, consisted of around 20 inflation-deflation events within the Krafla caldera, where magma accumulated during inflation periods and was intruded into the transecting fissure swarm during brief periods of deflation. We reanalyze geodetic and seismic data from the rifting episode and perform a time-dependent inversion of a leveling time series for a spherical point source in an elastic half-space. Using the volume change as a proxy for stress shows that during inflation periods the seismicity rate remains low until the maximum inflation of previous cycles is exceeded thus exhibiting the Kaiser effect. Our observations demonstrate that this phenomenon, commonly observed in small-scale experiments, is also produced in kilometer-scale volcanic deformation. This behavior sheds new light on the relationship between deformation and seismicity of a deforming volcano. As a consequence of the Kaiser effect, a volcano may inflate rapidly without significant changes in seismicity rate.

  19. High-resolution coupled physics solvers for analysing fine-scale nuclear reactor design problems

    PubMed Central

    Mahadevan, Vijay S.; Merzari, Elia; Tautges, Timothy; Jain, Rajeev; Obabko, Aleksandr; Smith, Michael; Fischer, Paul

    2014-01-01

    An integrated multi-physics simulation capability for the design and analysis of current and future nuclear reactor models is being investigated, to tightly couple neutron transport and thermal-hydraulics physics under the SHARP framework. Over several years, high-fidelity, validated mono-physics solvers with proven scalability on petascale architectures have been developed independently. Based on a unified component-based architecture, these existing codes can be coupled with a mesh-data backplane and a flexible coupling-strategy-based driver suite to produce a viable tool for analysts. The goal of the SHARP framework is to perform fully resolved coupled physics analysis of a reactor on heterogeneous geometry, in order to reduce the overall numerical uncertainty while leveraging available computational resources. The coupling methodology and software interfaces of the framework are presented, along with verification studies on two representative fast sodium-cooled reactor demonstration problems to prove the usability of the SHARP framework. PMID:24982250

  20. High-resolution coupled physics solvers for analysing fine-scale nuclear reactor design problems.

    PubMed

    Mahadevan, Vijay S; Merzari, Elia; Tautges, Timothy; Jain, Rajeev; Obabko, Aleksandr; Smith, Michael; Fischer, Paul

    2014-08-01

    An integrated multi-physics simulation capability for the design and analysis of current and future nuclear reactor models is being investigated, to tightly couple neutron transport and thermal-hydraulics physics under the SHARP framework. Over several years, high-fidelity, validated mono-physics solvers with proven scalability on petascale architectures have been developed independently. Based on a unified component-based architecture, these existing codes can be coupled with a mesh-data backplane and a flexible coupling-strategy-based driver suite to produce a viable tool for analysts. The goal of the SHARP framework is to perform fully resolved coupled physics analysis of a reactor on heterogeneous geometry, in order to reduce the overall numerical uncertainty while leveraging available computational resources. The coupling methodology and software interfaces of the framework are presented, along with verification studies on two representative fast sodium-cooled reactor demonstration problems to prove the usability of the SHARP framework. PMID:24982250

  1. The effects of physical exercises to mental state and quality of life in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Acil, A A; Dogan, S; Dogan, O

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of 10 weeks of physical exercises programme on mental states and quality of life (QOL) of individuals with schizophrenia. The study involved 30 inpatients or outpatients with schizophrenia who were assigned randomly into aerobic exercise (n = 15) group and control (n = 15) group, participated to the study voluntarily. There were no personal differences such as age, gender, disorder duration, medication use between the both groups. An aerobic exercise programme was applied to the subject group, the periods of 10 weeks as 3 days in a week. Data were collected by using the Brief Symptom Inventory, the Scale for the Assessment of Positive Symptoms, the Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms and to the both group before and after the exercise programme. After the 10-week aerobic exercise programmes the subjects in the exercise programme showed significantly decreases in the Scale for the Assessment of Positive Symptoms, the Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms and the Brief Symptom Inventory points and their World Health Organization Quality of Life Scale-Turkish Version points were increased than controls. These results suggest that mild to moderate aerobic exercise is an effective programme for decreasing psychiatric symptoms and for increasing QOL in patients with schizophrenia. PMID:19012672

  2. On the Effects of Scale for Ecosystem Services Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Grêt-Regamey, Adrienne; Weibel, Bettina; Bagstad, Kenneth J.; Ferrari, Marika; Geneletti, Davide; Klug, Hermann; Schirpke, Uta; Tappeiner, Ulrike

    2014-01-01

    Ecosystems provide life-sustaining services upon which human civilization depends, but their degradation largely continues unabated. Spatially explicit information on ecosystem services (ES) provision is required to better guide decision making, particularly for mountain systems, which are characterized by vertical gradients and isolation with high topographic complexity, making them particularly sensitive to global change. But while spatially explicit ES quantification and valuation allows the identification of areas of abundant or limited supply of and demand for ES, the accuracy and usefulness of the information varies considerably depending on the scale and methods used. Using four case studies from mountainous regions in Europe and the U.S., we quantify information gains and losses when mapping five ES - carbon sequestration, flood regulation, agricultural production, timber harvest, and scenic beauty - at coarse and fine resolution (250 m vs. 25 m in Europe and 300 m vs. 30 m in the U.S.). We analyze the effects of scale on ES estimates and their spatial pattern and show how these effects are related to different ES, terrain structure and model properties. ES estimates differ substantially between the fine and coarse resolution analyses in all case studies and across all services. This scale effect is not equally strong for all ES. We show that spatially explicit information about non-clustered, isolated ES tends to be lost at coarse resolution and against expectation, mainly in less rugged terrain, which calls for finer resolution assessments in such contexts. The effect of terrain ruggedness is also related to model properties such as dependency on land use-land cover data. We close with recommendations for mapping ES to make the resulting maps more comparable, and suggest a four-step approach to address the issue of scale when mapping ES that can deliver information to support ES-based decision making with greater accuracy and reliability. PMID:25549256

  3. On the effects of scale for ecosystem services mapping.

    PubMed

    Grêt-Regamey, Adrienne; Weibel, Bettina; Bagstad, Kenneth J; Ferrari, Marika; Geneletti, Davide; Klug, Hermann; Schirpke, Uta; Tappeiner, Ulrike

    2014-01-01

    Ecosystems provide life-sustaining services upon which human civilization depends, but their degradation largely continues unabated. Spatially explicit information on ecosystem services (ES) provision is required to better guide decision making, particularly for mountain systems, which are characterized by vertical gradients and isolation with high topographic complexity, making them particularly sensitive to global change. But while spatially explicit ES quantification and valuation allows the identification of areas of abundant or limited supply of and demand for ES, the accuracy and usefulness of the information varies considerably depending on the scale and methods used. Using four case studies from mountainous regions in Europe and the U.S., we quantify information gains and losses when mapping five ES - carbon sequestration, flood regulation, agricultural production, timber harvest, and scenic beauty - at coarse and fine resolution (250 m vs. 25 m in Europe and 300 m vs. 30 m in the U.S.). We analyze the effects of scale on ES estimates and their spatial pattern and show how these effects are related to different ES, terrain structure and model properties. ES estimates differ substantially between the fine and coarse resolution analyses in all case studies and across all services. This scale effect is not equally strong for all ES. We show that spatially explicit information about non-clustered, isolated ES tends to be lost at coarse resolution and against expectation, mainly in less rugged terrain, which calls for finer resolution assessments in such contexts. The effect of terrain ruggedness is also related to model properties such as dependency on land use-land cover data. We close with recommendations for mapping ES to make the resulting maps more comparable, and suggest a four-step approach to address the issue of scale when mapping ES that can deliver information to support ES-based decision making with greater accuracy and reliability. PMID:25549256

  4. Rheological and physical characteristics of crustal-scaled materials for centrifuge analogue modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waffle, Lindsay; Godin, Laurent; Harris, Lyal B.; Kontopoulou, M.

    2016-05-01

    We characterize a set of analogue materials used for centrifuge analogue modelling simulating deformation at different levels in the crust simultaneously. Specifically, we improve the rheological characterization in the linear viscoelastic region of materials for the lower and middle crust, and cohesive synthetic sands without petroleum-binding agents for the upper crust. Viscoelastic materials used in centrifuge analogue modelling demonstrate complex dynamic behaviour, so viscosity alone is insufficient to determine if a material will be an effective analogue. Two series of experiments were conducted using an oscillating bi-conical plate rheometer to measure the storage and loss moduli and complex viscosities of several modelling clays and silicone putties. Tested materials exhibited viscoelastic and shear-thinning behaviour. The silicone putties and some modelling clays demonstrated viscous-dominant behaviour and reached Newtonian plateaus at strain rates < 0.5 × 10-2 s-1, while other modelling clays demonstrated elastic-dominant power-law relationships. Based on these results, the elastic-dominant modelling clay is recommended as an analogue for basement cratons. Inherently cohesive synthetic sands produce fine-detailed fault and fracture patterns, and developed thrust, strike-slip, and extensional faults in simple centrifuge test models. These synthetic sands are recommended as analogues for the brittle upper crust. These new results increase the accuracy of scaling analogue models to prototype. Additionally, with the characterization of three new materials, we propose a complete lithospheric profile of analogue materials for centrifuge modelling, allowing future studies to replicate a broader range of crustal deformation behaviours.

  5. Effects of physical conditioning on children and adolescents with asthma.

    PubMed

    Welsh, Liam; Kemp, Justin G; Roberts, Richard G D

    2005-01-01

    More than 40 years ago, the effects of exertional dyspnoea and the associated fear of an asthma attack usually lead to an avoidance of physical activity amongst asthmatic children. This issue still exists today, particularly in children with severe asthma. This article presents a comprehensive review of published information concerning the effects of training programmes on children and adolescents with asthma. The primary focus of these investigations was to examine the effects of physical conditioning on aerobic fitness, the severity and incidence of exercise-induced asthma (EIA) and asthma symptoms. The large majority of training studies of asthmatic children and adolescents demonstrate significant increases in aerobic fitness post-training or the achievement of normal levels of aerobic fitness. While there are a few reports of a reduced severity in EIA symptoms post-training, the majority of studies demonstrate no change in the occurrence or degree of EIA. However, a number of these studies have reported some reductions in hospitalisations, wheeze frequency, school absenteeism, doctor consultations and medication usage. It is, therefore, recommended that children and adolescents with asthma should participate in regular physical activity. This may improve asthma management and associated general health benefits, whilst minimising inactivity-related health risks. PMID:15707377

  6. Effect of physical disturbance on the structure of needle coke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shi-Gui; Wang, Bao-Cheng; Sun, Quan

    2010-10-01

    Through different preparation technology, this paper reports that the needle coke is prepared with coal-tar pitch under the effect of magnetic field and ultrasonic cavitation. It studies the effect of physical disturbance on the structure of needle coke. The structure of needle coke is characterized by scanning electron microscope and x-ray diffractometer, and the influence mechanism is analysed. Results showed that the structure and property of needle coke could be effectively improved by magnetic field and ultrasonic cavitations, such as degree of order, degree of graphitization and crystallization. Comparatively speaking, the effect of magnetic field was greater. The graphitization degree of needle coke prepared under the effect of magnetic field is up to 45.35%.

  7. Vitamin and mineral status: effects on physical performance.

    PubMed

    Lukaski, Henry C

    2004-01-01

    Public health recommendations encourage the selection of a balanced diet and increasing physical activity to foster health and well-being. Whereas the adverse effects of restricted intakes of protein, fat, and carbohydrate on physical performance are well known, there is limited information about the impact of low intakes of vitamins and minerals on the exercise capacity and performance of humans. Physically active people generally consume amounts of vitamins and minerals consistent with the recommendations for the general public. However, when intakes are less than recommendations, some noticeable functional impairments occur. Acute or short-term marginal deficiencies, identified by blood biochemical measures of vitamin B status, had no impacts on performance measures. Severe deprivation of folate and vitamin B12 result in anemia and reduce endurance work performance. Evidence of vitamin A and E deficiencies in athletic individuals is lacking apparently because body storage is appreciable. In contrast to vitamins, marginal mineral deficiencies impair performance. Iron deficiency, with or without anemia, impairs muscle function and limits work capacity. Magnesium deprivation increases oxygen requirements to complete submaximal exercise and reduces endurance performance. Use of vitamin and mineral supplements does not improve measures of performance in people consuming adequate diets. Young girls and individuals participating in activities with weight classifications or aesthetic components are prone to nutrient deficiencies because they restrict food intake and specific micronutrient-rich foods. This information will be useful to professionals who counsel physically active people and scientific groups who make dietary recommendations to improve health and optimize genetic potential. PMID:15212745

  8. Physical activity interventions: effects of duration and intensity.

    PubMed

    Buchan, D S; Ollis, S; Thomas, N E; Buchanan, N; Cooper, S-M; Malina, R M; Baker, J S

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of exercising at different intensities over 7 weeks on components of physical fitness and CVD risk factors. Forty-seven boys and 10 girls, (16.4±0.7 years of age) were divided into a moderate, high intensity, or a control group. All participants had indices of obesity and blood pressure recorded in addition to four physical performance measures pre- and post-intervention. In addition, the intervention groups repeated the physical performance measures at the 4th week phase of the intervention. Following the intervention, significant improvements (P<0.05) in the high-intensity group were found in the 20 MSFT, agility, CMJ and 10 m sprint post-intervention. Participants in the moderate intensity group displayed significant improvements (P<0.05) in both the CMJ and 20 MSFT post-intervention. Body fat % significantly improved (P<0.01) in the moderate group only post-intervention. Interestingly, Systolic blood pressure significantly improved post-intervention (112±10 vs 106±11 mmHg) (P=0.017) in the high intensity group. In conclusion, high-intensity exercise over 7 weeks is a very time efficient means of improving important components of physical fitness in adolescents. PMID:21518010

  9. Low-Q scaling, duality, and the EMC effect

    SciTech Connect

    J. Arrington; R. Ent; C. E. Keppel; J. Mammei; I. Niculescu

    2003-07-01

    High energy lepton scattering has been the primary tool for mapping out the quark distributions of nucleons and nuclei. Data on the proton and deuteron have shown that there is a fundamental connection between the low and high energy regimes, referred to as quark-hadron duality. We present the results of similar studies to more carefully examine scaling, duality, and in particular the EMC effect in nuclei. We extract nuclear modifications to the structure function in the resonance region, and for the first time demonstrate that nuclear effects in the resonance region are identical to those measured in deep inelastic scattering.

  10. Scaled control moment gyroscope dynamics effects on performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leve, Frederick A.

    2015-05-01

    The majority of the literature that discusses the dynamics of control moment gyroscopes (CMG) contains formulations that are not derived from first principles and make simplifying assumptions early in the derivation, possibly neglecting important contributions. For small satellites, additional dynamics that are no longer negligible are shown to cause an increase in torque error and loss of torque amplification. The goal of the analysis presented here is to provide the reader with a complete and general analytical derivation of the equations for dynamics of a spacecraft with n-CMG and to discuss the performance degradation imposed to CMG actuators when scaling them for small satellites. The paper first derives the equations of motion from first principles for a very general case of a spacecraft with n-CMG. Each contribution of the dynamics is described with its effect on the performance of CMG and its significance on scaled CMG performance is addressed. It is shown analytically and verified numerically, that CMG do not scale properly with performance and care must be taken in their design to trade performance, size, mass, and power when reducing their scale.

  11. Atomic physics effects on dissipative toroidal drift wave stability

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, M.A.; Hahm, T.S.

    1992-02-01

    The effects of atomic physics processes such as ionization, charge exchange, and radiation on the linear stability of dissipative drift waves are investigated in toroidal geometry both numerically and analytically. For typical TFTR and TEXT edge parameters, overall linear stability is determined by the competition between the destabilizing influence of ionization and the stabilizing effect due to the electron temperature gradient. An analytical expression for the linear marginal stability condition, {eta}{sub e}{sup crit}, is derived. The instability is most likely to occur at the extreme edge of tokamaks with a significant ionization source and a steep electron density gradient.

  12. The Effects of Spatial Scale on Breakdown of Leaves in a Tropical Watershed

    PubMed Central

    Rezende, Renan S.; Petrucio, Mauricio M.; Gonçalves, José F.

    2014-01-01

    The objective was to assess the effects of natural variation in the physical structure of the environment on biological communities and on the processing of Eucalyptus cloeziana and Inga laurina and to identify the controlling factors at different scales along stream order gradients. The study area consisted of 14 sampling sites distributed within a tropical watershed (1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th order streams replicated in 4 sub-basins). Our samples consisted of 3 g of leaves of E. cloeziana (high-quality) and I. laurina (low-quality) placed in 252 bags with 10mm mesh (measured by the chemical composition of the detritus). Four samples of each leaf type were collected periodically (three times) over a period of 75–125 days and washed on a sieve to separate the invertebrates. A series of leaf disks were cut to determine ash-free dry mass, polyphenol, lignin, cellulose, total microbial biomass and fungal biomass, and the remaining material was oven-dried to determine the dry weight. We performed analyses within and between spatial scales (regional and local) to assess which watershed scale was the more import determinant of the leaf breakdown rate (k). The microbial and shredder were most influenced at the local scale (stream order). Shredders were influenced by microorganisms, with stronger interactions between them than were found to drive the k at the local scale. Moreover, differences in the overall k and abiotic variables were more strongly influenced at the regional scale (sub-basin), showing that the study scale alters the response of the studied variables. We found higher k values at higher values of water velocity, dissolved oxygen and temperature, all of which accelerate biological metabolism in response to variations on the regional scale. Watersheds with warmer microclimates and streams with higher nutrient levels and oxygen could be accelerating the ecosystem metabolism, independent of the detritus quality. PMID:24810918

  13. The effects of spatial scale on breakdown of leaves in a tropical watershed.

    PubMed

    Rezende, Renan S; Petrucio, Mauricio M; Gonçalves, José F

    2014-01-01

    The objective was to assess the effects of natural variation in the physical structure of the environment on biological communities and on the processing of Eucalyptus cloeziana and Inga laurina and to identify the controlling factors at different scales along stream order gradients. The study area consisted of 14 sampling sites distributed within a tropical watershed (1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th order streams replicated in 4 sub-basins). Our samples consisted of 3 g of leaves of E. cloeziana (high-quality) and I. laurina (low-quality) placed in 252 bags with 10mm mesh (measured by the chemical composition of the detritus). Four samples of each leaf type were collected periodically (three times) over a period of 75-125 days and washed on a sieve to separate the invertebrates. A series of leaf disks were cut to determine ash-free dry mass, polyphenol, lignin, cellulose, total microbial biomass and fungal biomass, and the remaining material was oven-dried to determine the dry weight. We performed analyses within and between spatial scales (regional and local) to assess which watershed scale was the more import determinant of the leaf breakdown rate (k). The microbial and shredder were most influenced at the local scale (stream order). Shredders were influenced by microorganisms, with stronger interactions between them than were found to drive the k at the local scale. Moreover, differences in the overall k and abiotic variables were more strongly influenced at the regional scale (sub-basin), showing that the study scale alters the response of the studied variables. We found higher k values at higher values of water velocity, dissolved oxygen and temperature, all of which accelerate biological metabolism in response to variations on the regional scale. Watersheds with warmer microclimates and streams with higher nutrient levels and oxygen could be accelerating the ecosystem metabolism, independent of the detritus quality. PMID:24810918

  14. Effect of Violating Unidimensional Item Response Theory Vertical Scaling Assumptions on Developmental Score Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Topczewski, Anna Marie

    2013-01-01

    Developmental score scales represent the performance of students along a continuum, where as students learn more they move higher along that continuum. Unidimensional item response theory (UIRT) vertical scaling has become a commonly used method to create developmental score scales. Research has shown that UIRT vertical scaling methods can be…

  15. Connecting the power-law scaling structure of peak-discharges to spatially variable rainfall and catchment physical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayalew, Tibebu B.; Krajewski, Witold F.; Mantilla, Ricardo

    2014-09-01

    We have conducted extensive hydrologic simulation experiments in order to investigate how the flood scaling parameters in the power-law relationship Q(A)=αAθ, between peak-discharges resulting from a single rainfall-runoff event Q(A) and upstream area A, change as a function of rainfall, runoff coefficient (Cr) that we use as a proxy for catchment antecedent moisture state, hillslope overland flow velocity (vh), and channel flow velocity (vc), all of which are variable in space. We use a physically-based distributed numerical framework that is based on an accurate representation of the drainage network and apply it to the Cedar River basin (A=16,861 km), which is located in Eastern Iowa, USA. Our work is motivated by seminal empirical studies that show that the flood scaling parameters α and θ change from event to event. Uncovering the underlying physical mechanism behind the event-to-event variability of α and θ in terms of catchment physical processes and rainfall properties would significantly improve our ability to predict peak-discharge in ungauged basins (PUB). The simulation results demonstrate how both α and θ are systematically controlled by the interplay among rainfall duration T, spatially averaged rainfall intensity E[I], as well as E[Cr], E[vh], and vc. Specifically, we found that the value of θ generally decreases with increasing values of E[I], E[Cr], and E[vh], whereas its value generally increases with increasing T. Moreover, while α is primarily controlled by E[I], it increases with increasing E[Cr] and E[vh]. These results highlight the fact that the flood scaling parameters are able to be estimated from the aforementioned catchment rainfall and physical variables, which can be measured either directly or indirectly.

  16. Edge effect on resistance scaling rules in graphene nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guangyu; Torres, Carlos M; Tang, Jianshi; Bai, Jingwei; Song, Emil B; Huang, Yu; Duan, Xiangfeng; Zhang, Yuegang; Wang, Kang L

    2011-03-01

    We report an experimental investigation of the edge effect on the room-temperature transport in graphene nanoribbon and graphene sheet (both single-layer and bilayer). By measuring the resistance scaling behaviors at both low- and high-carrier densities, we show that the transport of single-layer nanoribbons lies in a strong localization regime, which can be attributed to an edge effect. We find that this edge effect can be weakened by enlarging the width, decreasing the carrier densities, or adding an extra layer. From graphene nanoribbon to graphene sheet, the data show a dimensional crossover of the transport regimes possibly due to the drastic change of the edge effect. PMID:21322591

  17. Zebra mussel effects on benthic invertebrates: physical or biotic?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Botts, P. Silver; Patterson, Benjamin A.; Schloesser, Don W.

    1996-01-01

    In soft sediments, Dreissena spp. create firm substrate in the form of aggregates of living mussels (druses) that roll free on the sediments. Druses provide physical structure which increases habitat heterogeneity, and the mussels increase benthic organic matter through the production of pseudofeces and feces. Descriptive and experimental studies were used to determine: 1) whether the density of benthic invertebrates in soft sediments increased in the presence of druses, and 2) whether the invertebrate assemblage responded to the physical structure provided by a druse or to some biotic effect associated with the presence of living mussels. In core samples collected biweekly during summer in Presque Isle Bay, Erie, Pennsylvania, amphipods, chironomids, oligochaetes, turbellarians, and hydrozoans were significantly more abundant in sand with druses than in bare sand. When mesh bags containing either a living druse, non-living druse, or no druse were incubated in the bay for 33 d, we found that chironomids were significantly more abundant in treatments with living druses than with non-living druses, and in treatments with non-living druses than with no druse; turbellarians, amphipods, and hydrozoans were significantly more abundant in treatments with living or non-living druses than with no druse; oligochaetes showed no significant differences among treatments. This study demonstrates that most taxa of benthic invertebrates in soft substrate respond specifically to the physical structure associated with aggregates of mussel shells, but further study is needed to examine chironomid responses to some biotic effect dependent on the presence of living mussels.

  18. High-Resiliency and Auto-Scaling of Large-Scale Cloud Computing for OCO-2 L2 Full Physics Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, H.; Manipon, G.; Starch, M.; Dang, L. B.; Southam, P.; Wilson, B. D.; Avis, C.; Chang, A.; Cheng, C.; Smyth, M.; McDuffie, J. L.; Ramirez, P.

    2015-12-01

    Next generation science data systems are needed to address the incoming flood of data from new missions such as SWOT and NISAR where data volumes and data throughput rates are order of magnitude larger than present day missions. Additionally, traditional means of procuring hardware on-premise are already limited due to facilities capacity constraints for these new missions. Existing missions, such as OCO-2, may also require high turn-around time for processing different science scenarios where on-premise and even traditional HPC computing environments may not meet the high processing needs. We present our experiences on deploying a hybrid-cloud computing science data system (HySDS) for the OCO-2 Science Computing Facility to support large-scale processing of their Level-2 full physics data products. We will explore optimization approaches to getting best performance out of hybrid-cloud computing as well as common issues that will arise when dealing with large-scale computing. Novel approaches were utilized to do processing on Amazon's spot market, which can potentially offer ~10X costs savings but with an unpredictable computing environment based on market forces. We will present how we enabled high-tolerance computing in order to achieve large-scale computing as well as operational cost savings.

  19. Construction of large-scale simulation codes using ALPAL (A Livermore Physics Applications Language)

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, G.

    1990-10-01

    A Livermore Physics Applications Language (ALPAL) is a new computer tool that is designed to leverage the abilities and creativity of computational scientist. Some of the ways that ALPAL provides this leverage are: first, it eliminates many sources of errors; second, it permits building code modules with far greater speed than is otherwise possible; third, it provides a means of specifying almost any numerical algorithm; and fourth, it is a language that is close to a journal-style presentation of physics models and numerical methods for solving them. 13 refs., 9 figs.

  20. EFFECT OF STRUCTURED PHYSICAL ACTIVITY ON SLEEP-WAKE BEHAVIORS IN SEDENTARY ELDERS WITH MOBILITY LIMITATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Vaz Fragoso, Carlos A.; Miller, Michael E.; King, Abby C.; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Liu, Christine K.; Myers, Valerie H.; Nadkarni, Neelesh K.; Pahor, Marco; Spring, Bonnie J.; Gill, Thomas M.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effect of structured physical activity on sleep-wake behaviors in sedentary community-dwelling elders with mobility limitations. DESIGN Multicenter, randomized trial of moderate-intensity physical activity versus health education, with sleep-wake behaviors pre-specified as a tertiary outcome over a planned intervention period ranging between 24 and 30 months. SETTING Lifestyle Interventions and Independence in Elder (LIFE) Study. PARTICIPANTS 1635 community-dwelling persons, aged 70–89 years, who were initially sedentary with a Short Physical Performance Battery score <10. MEASUREMENTS Sleep-wake behaviors were evaluated by the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI) (≥8 defined insomnia), Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) (≥10 defined daytime drowsiness), and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) (> 5 defined poor sleep quality) — administered at baseline and subsequently at 6, 18, and 30 months. RESULTS The randomized groups were similar on baseline demographic variables, including mean age (79 years) and sex (67% female). Relative to health education, structured physical activity significantly reduced the likelihood of having poor sleep quality (adjusted odds ratios [adjOR] for PSQI >5 of 0.80 [0.68, 0.94]), including a reduction in new cases (adjOR for PSQI >5 of 0.70 [0.54, 0.89]) but not in resolution of prevalent cases (adjOR for PSQI ≤5 of 1.13 [0.90, 1.43]). No significant intervention effects were observed for ISI or ESS. CONCLUSION Structured physical activity reduced the likelihood of developing poor sleep quality (PSQI >5) over the intervention period, when compared with health education, but had no effect on prevalent cases of poor sleep quality, or on sleep-wake behaviors evaluated by the ISI or ESS. These results suggest that the benefit of physical activity in this sample was preventive and limited to sleep-wake behaviors evaluated by the PSQI. PMID:26115386

  1. Pore-Scale Simulation of Intragranular Diffusion: Effects of Incomplete Mixing on Macroscopic Manifestations

    SciTech Connect

    Scheibe, Timothy D.; Hou, Zhangshuan; Palmer, Bruce J.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2013-07-01

    Diffusive mass transfer into and out of intragranular micropores ("intragranular diffusion") plays an important role in the large-scale transport of some groundwater contaminants. We are interested in understanding the combined effect of pore-scale advection and intragranular diffusion on solute transport at the effective porous medium scale. To study this problem, we have developed a three-dimensional pore-scale model of fluid flow and solute transport that incorporates diffusion into and out of intragranular pore spaces. Our model is based on the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) simulation method, which represents fluid and solid phases by a mesh-free particle discretization. In the pore spaces, fluid flow is simulated by discretizing the Navier-Stokes equations using the SPH approach. Solute transport is represented by advection, diffusion within the fluid phase, and diffusion between the fluid and solid phases. Our model is implemented on large-scale parallel computing hardware, allowing us to simulate millions of computational particles and represent fully three-dimensional systems of pores and grains with arbitrarily complex physical geometry. We have used this model system to perform numerical experiments using various model porous media systems, which allows us to draw comparisons between macroscopic measures computed from the pore-scale simulations (such as breakthrough curves) and those predicted by macroscopic formulations that assume complete mixing over the representative volume. In this paper we present results of 3D simulations of pore-scale flow and transport, including cases with and without intragranular diffusion, in two model porous media, one with randomly-packed uniform spherical grains and a second with randomly-packed spheres drawn from a binary grain size distribution. Breakthrough curves were computed from the 3D simulations at various transport distances. Comparable breakthrough curves were computed using 1D macroscopic models with

  2. Constraints on energy release in solar flares from RHESSI and GOES X-ray observations. I. Physical parameters and scalings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warmuth, A.; Mann, G.

    2016-04-01

    Aims: We constrain energy release and particle acceleration processes in solar flares by means of comprehensively characterizing the physical parameters of both the thermal plasma and the accelerated nonthermal particles using X-ray data. Our aim is to bridge the gap between detailed case studies and large statistical studies. Methods: We obtained time series of spectral fits and images for 24 flares ranging from GOES class C3.4 to X17.2 using RHESSI hard X-ray observations. These data were used to derive basic physical parameters for the thermal plasma (using the isothermal approximation) and the injected nonthermal electrons (assuming the thick-target model). For the thermal component, this was supplemented by GOES soft X-ray data. We derived the ranges and distributions of the various parameters, the scaling with flare importance, and the relation between thermal parameters derived from RHESSI and GOES. Finally, we investigated the relation between thermal and nonthermal parameters. Results: Temperature and emission measure of the thermal plasma are strongly correlated with the peak GOES X-ray flux. Higher emission measures result both from a larger source volume and a higher density, with the latter effect being more important. RHESSI consistently gives higher temperatures and lower emission measures than GOES does, which is a signature of a multithermal plasma. The discrepancy between RHESSI and GOES is particularly pronounced in the early flare phase, when the thermal X-ray sources tend to be large and located higher in the corona. The energy input rate by nonthermal electrons is correlated with temperature and with the increase rate of emission measure and thermal energy. Conclusions: The derived relations between RHESSI- and GOES-derived thermal parameters and the relation between thermal parameters and energy input by nonthermal electrons are consistent with a two-component model of the thermal flare plasma. Both RHESSI and GOES observe a cooler plasma

  3. Physical parameter effects on radar backscatter using principal component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuah, Hean T.; Teh, K. B.

    1994-12-01

    This paper contains a sensitivity analysis of the effects of physical parameters on radar backscatter coefficients from a vegetation canopy using the method of principal component analysis. A Monte Carlo forward scattering model is used to generate the necessary data set for such analysis. The vegetation canopy is modeled as a layer of randomly distributed circular disks bounded below by a Kirchhoff rough surface. Data reduction is accomplished by the statistical principal component analysis technique in which only three principal components are found to be sufficient, containing 97% of the information in the original set. The first principal component can be interpreted as volume-volume backscatter, while the second and the third as surface backscatter and surface-volume backscatter, respectively. From the correlation matrix obtained, the sensitivity of radar backscatter due to various physical parameters is investigated. These include wave frequency, moisture content, scatterer's size, volume fraction, ground permittivity and surface roughness.

  4. Large-scale quantum effects in biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesquita, Marcus V.; Vasconcellos, Áurea R.; Luzzi, Roberto; Mascarenhas, Sergio

    Particular aspects of large-scale quantum effects in biological systems, such as biopolymers and also microtubules in the cytoskeleton of neurons which can have relevance in brain functioning, are discussed. The microscopic (quantum mechanical) and macroscopic (quantum statistical mechanical) aspects, and the emergence of complex behavior, are described. This phenomena consists of the large-scale coherent process of Fröhlich-Bose-Einstein condensation in open and sufficiently far-from-equilibrium biopolymers. Associated with this phenomenon is the presence of Schrödinger-Davydov solitons, which propagate, undistorted and undamped, when embedded in the Fröhlich-Bose-Einstein condensate, thus allowing for the transmission of signals at long distances, involving a question relevant to bioenergetics.

  5. Scaling of the anomalous Hall effect in lower conductivity regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karel, J.; Bordel, C.; Bouma, D. S.; de Lorimier-Farmer, A.; Lee, H. J.; Hellman, F.

    2016-06-01

    The scaling of the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) was investigated using amorphous and epitaxial Fe x Si1‑x (0.43 < x < 0.71) magnetic thin films by varying the longitudinal conductivity (σxx) using two different approaches: modifying the carrier mean free path (l) with chemical or structural disorder while holding the carrier concentration (nh) constant or varying n h and keeping l constant. The anomalous Hall conductivity (σxy) , when suitably normalized by magnetization and n h , is shown to be independent of σxx for all samples. This observation suggests a primary dependence on an intrinsic mechanism, unsurprising for the epitaxial high conductivity films where the Berry phase curvature mechanism is expected, but remarkable for the amorphous samples. That the amorphous samples show this scaling indicates a local atomic level description of a Berry phase, resulting in an intrinsic AHE in a system that lacks lattice periodicity.

  6. The effect of background turbulence on the propagation of large-scale flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matalon, Moshe

    2008-12-01

    This paper is based on an invited presentation at the Conference on Turbulent Mixing and Beyond held in the Abdus Salam International Center for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, Italy (August 2007). It consists of a summary of recent investigations aimed at understanding the nature and consequences of the Darrieus-Landau instability that is prominent in premixed combustion. It describes rigorous asymptotic methodologies used to simplify the propagation problem of multi-dimensional and time-dependent premixed flames in order to understand the nonlinear evolution of hydrodynamically unstable flames. In particular, it addresses the effect of background turbulent noise on the structure and propagation of large-scale flames.

  7. Diet and Physical Activity Apps: Perceived Effectiveness by App Users

    PubMed Central

    Egelandsdal, Bjørg; Amdam, Gro V; Almli, Valerie L; Oostindjer, Marije

    2016-01-01

    Background Diet and physical activity apps are two types of health apps that aim to promote healthy eating and energy expenditure through monitoring of dietary intake and physical activity. No clear evidence showing the effectiveness of using these apps to promote healthy eating and physical activity has been previously reported. Objective This study aimed to identify how diet and physical activity (PA) apps affected their users. It also investigated if using apps was associated with changes in diet and PA. Methods First, 3 semi-structured focus group discussions concerning app usability were conducted (15 app users and 8 nonusers; mean age 24.2 years, SD 6.4), including outcome measures such as motivations, experiences, opinions, and adherence. Results from the discussions were used to develop a questionnaire. The questionnaire, which contained questions about behavior changes, app usage, perceived effectiveness, and opinions of app usability, was answered by 500 Norwegians, with a mean age of 25.8 years (SD 5.1). Results App users found diet and PA apps effective in promoting healthy eating and exercising. These apps affected their actions, health consciousness, and self-education about nutrition and PA; and were also a part of their social lives. Over half of the users perceived that apps were effective in assisting them to eat healthily and to exercise more. Diet apps were more effective when they were frequently used and over a long period of time, compared to infrequent or short-term use (P=.01 and P=.02, respectively). Users who used diet and PA apps, perceived apps as more effective than users who only used one type of app (all P<.05). App users were better at maintaining diet and PA behaviors than nonusers (all P<.05). Young adults found apps fun to use, but sometimes time consuming. They wanted apps to be designed to meet their personal expectations. Conclusions App usage influenced action, consciousness, self-education about nutrition and PA, and social

  8. On scale-dependent cosmic shear systematic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitching, T. D.; Taylor, A. N.; Cropper, M.; Hoekstra, H.; Hood, R. K. E.; Massey, R.; Niemi, S.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the impact that realistic scale-dependent systematic effects may have on cosmic shear tomography. We model spatially varying residual galaxy ellipticity and galaxy size variations in weak lensing measurements and propagate these through to predicted changes in the uncertainty and bias of cosmological parameters. We show that the survey strategy - whether it is regular or randomized - is an important factor in determining the impact of a systematic effect: a purely randomized survey strategy produces the smallest biases, at the expense of larger parameter uncertainties, and a very regularized survey strategy produces large biases, but unaffected uncertainties. However, by removing, or modelling, the affected scales (ℓ-modes) in the regular cases the biases are reduced to negligible levels. We find that the integral of the systematic power spectrum is not a good metric for dark energy performance, and we advocate that systematic effects should be modelled accurately in real space, where they enter the measurement process, and their effect subsequently propagated into power spectrum contributions.

  9. Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffhauser, Dian

    2009-01-01

    The common approach to scaling, according to Christopher Dede, a professor of learning technologies at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, is to jump in and say, "Let's go out and find more money, recruit more participants, hire more people. Let's just keep doing the same thing, bigger and bigger." That, he observes, "tends to fail, and fail…

  10. Scale-dependent neighborhood effects: shared doom and associational refuge.

    PubMed

    Emerson, Sara E; Brown, Joel S; Whelan, Christopher J; Schmidt, Kenneth A

    2012-03-01

    A resource's susceptibility to predation may be influenced by its own palatability and the palatability of its neighbors. We tested for effects of plant chemical defenses on seed survival by manipulating the frequency of palatable and less palatable sunflower seeds in food patches subject to harvest by fox squirrels (Sciurus niger) and gray squirrels (Sciurus carolinensis). We varied resource distributions at three scales: among stations (aggregates of patches ca. 50 m apart), among patches immediately adjacent to each other, and within patches. When food patches were segregated into high-palatability and low-palatability stations (Experiment 1), seeds suffered greater mortality at stations with high levels of palatable seeds. In the same experiment, within patches, squirrels selected strongly for palatable seeds over less palatable seeds. When high- and low-palatability food patches were placed together at the same stations (Experiment 2), increasing densities of co-occurring palatable seeds amplified the mortality of less palatable seeds, indicating "shared doom." When palatable and less palatable seeds were partitioned into micropatches (Experiment 3), associational effects disappeared, as predicted. Furthermore, selectivity in less palatable patches increased as the initial densities of palatable seeds increased, and selectivity in palatable patches decreased as the initial densities of less palatable seeds increased. Foraging theory predicts associational effects among prey that vary in palatability. Our results show how the type and magnitude of associational effects emerge from the interplay among the spatial scale of prey heterogeneity, the diet selection strategy, and the scale-dependent foraging responses of the consumer. PMID:21987268

  11. Highly physical penumbra solar radiation pressure modeling with atmospheric effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Robert; Flury, Jakob; Bandikova, Tamara; Schilling, Manuel

    2015-10-01

    We present a new method for highly physical solar radiation pressure (SRP) modeling in Earth's penumbra. The fundamental geometry and approach mirrors past work, where the solar radiation field is modeled using a number of light rays, rather than treating the Sun as a single point source. However, we aim to clarify this approach, simplify its implementation, and model previously overlooked factors. The complex geometries involved in modeling penumbra solar radiation fields are described in a more intuitive and complete way to simplify implementation. Atmospheric effects are tabulated to significantly reduce computational cost. We present new, more efficient and accurate approaches to modeling atmospheric effects which allow us to consider the high spatial and temporal variability in lower atmospheric conditions. Modeled penumbra SRP accelerations for the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites are compared to the sub-nm/s2 precision GRACE accelerometer data. Comparisons to accelerometer data and a traditional penumbra SRP model illustrate the improved accuracy which our methods provide. Sensitivity analyses illustrate the significance of various atmospheric parameters and modeled effects on penumbra SRP. While this model is more complex than a traditional penumbra SRP model, we demonstrate its utility and propose that a highly physical model which considers atmospheric effects should be the basis for any simplified approach to penumbra SRP modeling.

  12. Theobroma cacao: A genetically integrated physical map and genome-scale comparative synteny analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A comprehensive integrated genomic framework is considered a centerpiece of genomic research. In collaboration with the USDA-ARS (SHRS) and Mars Inc., the Clemson University Genomics Institute (CUGI) has developed a genetically anchored physical map of the T. cacao genome. Three BAC libraries contai...

  13. Using the RPE-Talk Scale to Individualize Physical Activity for Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nye, Susan B.; Todd, M. Kent

    2013-01-01

    For some students, self-selecting a pace during exercise may not provide enough of a physical challenge. Others push themselves so hard that they tire out before they can experience the benefits of exercise. In order to improve self-monitoring of exercise intensity, a variety of tools using the perception of effort and the ability to talk while…

  14. Adolescents' Self-Efficacy to Overcome Barriers to Physical Activity Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dwyer, John J. M.; Chulak, Tala; Maitland, Scott; Allison, Kenneth R.; Lysy, Daria C.; Faulkner, Guy E. J.; Sheeshka, Judy

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a revised measure of self-efficacy to overcome barriers to moderate and vigorous physical activity in a sample of 484 high school students in Toronto, Ontario. The students had a mean age of 15.3 years. Principal axis factoring with oblique rotation yielded five factors: self-efficacy to overcome internal, harassment, physical…

  15. Large-scale de novo prediction of physical protein-protein association.

    PubMed

    Elefsinioti, Antigoni; Saraç, Ömer Sinan; Hegele, Anna; Plake, Conrad; Hubner, Nina C; Poser, Ina; Sarov, Mihail; Hyman, Anthony; Mann, Matthias; Schroeder, Michael; Stelzl, Ulrich; Beyer, Andreas

    2011-11-01

    Information about the physical association of proteins is extensively used for studying cellular processes and disease mechanisms. However, complete experimental mapping of the human interactome will remain prohibitively difficult in the near future. Here we present a map of predicted human protein interactions that distinguishes functional association from physical binding. Our network classifies more than 5 million protein pairs predicting 94,009 new interactions with high confidence. We experimentally tested a subset of these predictions using yeast two-hybrid analysis and affinity purification followed by quantitative mass spectrometry. Thus we identified 462 new protein-protein interactions and confirmed the predictive power of the network. These independent experiments address potential issues of circular reasoning and are a distinctive feature of this work. Analysis of the physical interactome unravels subnetworks mediating between different functional and physical subunits of the cell. Finally, we demonstrate the utility of the network for the analysis of molecular mechanisms of complex diseases by applying it to genome-wide association studies of neurodegenerative diseases. This analysis provides new evidence implying TOMM40 as a factor involved in Alzheimer's disease. The network provides a high-quality resource for the analysis of genomic data sets and genetic association studies in particular. Our interactome is available via the hPRINT web server at: www.print-db.org. PMID:21836163

  16. Large-scale De Novo Prediction of Physical Protein-Protein Association*

    PubMed Central

    Elefsinioti, Antigoni; Saraç, Ömer Sinan; Hegele, Anna; Plake, Conrad; Hubner, Nina C.; Poser, Ina; Sarov, Mihail; Hyman, Anthony; Mann, Matthias; Schroeder, Michael; Stelzl, Ulrich; Beyer, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Information about the physical association of proteins is extensively used for studying cellular processes and disease mechanisms. However, complete experimental mapping of the human interactome will remain prohibitively difficult in the near future. Here we present a map of predicted human protein interactions that distinguishes functional association from physical binding. Our network classifies more than 5 million protein pairs predicting 94,009 new interactions with high confidence. We experimentally tested a subset of these predictions using yeast two-hybrid analysis and affinity purification followed by quantitative mass spectrometry. Thus we identified 462 new protein-protein interactions and confirmed the predictive power of the network. These independent experiments address potential issues of circular reasoning and are a distinctive feature of this work. Analysis of the physical interactome unravels subnetworks mediating between different functional and physical subunits of the cell. Finally, we demonstrate the utility of the network for the analysis of molecular mechanisms of complex diseases by applying it to genome-wide association studies of neurodegenerative diseases. This analysis provides new evidence implying TOMM40 as a factor involved in Alzheimer's disease. The network provides a high-quality resource for the analysis of genomic data sets and genetic association studies in particular. Our interactome is available via the hPRINT web server at: www.print-db.org. PMID:21836163

  17. Physics career intentions: The effect of physics identity, math identity, and gender

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lock, Robynne M.; Hazari, Zahra; Potvin, Geoff

    2013-01-01

    Although nearly half of high school physics students are female, only 21% of physics bachelor's degrees are earned by women. Using data from a national survey of college students in introductory English courses (on science-related experiences, particularly in high school), we examine the influence of students' physics and math identities on their choice to pursue a physics career. Males have higher math and physics identities than females in all three dimensions of our identity framework. These dimensions include: performance/competence (perceptions of ability to perform/understand), recognition (perception of recognition by others), and interest (desire to learn more). A regression model predicting students' intentions to pursue physics careers shows, as expected, that males are significantly more likely to choose physics than females. Surprisingly, however, when physics and math identity are included in the model, females are shown to be equally likely to choose physics careers as compared to males.

  18. A Cross-Cultural Validation of Perceived Locus of Causality Scale in Physical Education Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, C. K. John; Hagger, Martin; Liu, Woon Chia

    2009-01-01

    We examined the validity of the factor structure and invariance of the Perceived Locus of Causality (PLOC) scale instrument scores across two nations endorsing collectivist (Singapore) and individualist (Great Britain) cultural values. Results indicated that confirmatory factor analytic models of the PLOC exhibited adequate ft according to…

  19. Systematic study of the effects of scaling techniques in numerical simulations with application to enhanced geothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinze, Thomas; Jansen, Gunnar; Galvan, Boris; Miller, Stephen A.

    2016-04-01

    Numerical modeling is a well established tool in rock mechanics studies investigating a wide range of problems. Especially for estimating seismic risk of a geothermal energy plants a realistic rock mechanical model is needed. To simulate a time evolving system, two different approaches need to be separated: Implicit methods for solving linear equations are unconditionally stable, while explicit methods are limited by the time step. However, explicit methods are often preferred because of their limited memory demand, their scalability in parallel computing, and simple implementation of complex boundary conditions. In numerical modeling of explicit elastoplastic dynamics the time step is limited by the rock density. Mass scaling techniques, which increase the rock density artificially by several orders, can be used to overcome this limit and significantly reduce computation time. In the context of geothermal energy this is of great interest because in a coupled hydro-mechanical model the time step of the mechanical part is significantly smaller than for the fluid flow. Mass scaling can also be combined with time scaling, which increases the rate of physical processes, assuming that processes are rate independent. While often used, the effect of mass and time scaling and how it may influence the numerical results is rarely-mentioned in publications, and choosing the right scaling technique is typically performed by trial and error. Also often scaling techniques are used in commercial software packages, hidden from the untrained user. To our knowledge, no systematic studies have addressed how mass scaling might affect the numerical results. In this work, we present results from an extensive and systematic study of the influence of mass and time scaling on the behavior of a variety of rock-mechanical models. We employ a finite difference scheme to model uniaxial and biaxial compression experiments using different mass and time scaling factors, and with physical models

  20. Scale effects on strength of geomaterials, case study: Coal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholtès, Luc; Donzé, Frédéric-Victor; Khanal, Manoj

    2011-05-01

    Scale effects on the strength of coal are studied using a discrete element model. The key point of the model is its capability to discriminate between the "strictly sample size" effect and the "Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) density" effect on the mechanical response. Simulations of true triaxial compression tests are carried out to identify their respective roles. The possible bias due to the discretization size distribution of the discrete element model is investigated in detail by considering low-resolution configurations. The model is shown to be capable of quantitatively reproducing the dependency of the maximum strength on the size of the sample. This relationship mainly relies on the DFN density. For all given sizes, as long as the DFN density remains constant with a uniform distribution or if discontinuities are absent in the considered medium, the maximum strength of the material remains constant.

  1. Age and Gender Effects on Global Self-Esteem and Physical Self-Perception in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maiano, Christophe; Ninot, Gregory; Bilard, Jean

    2004-01-01

    This study measured the effects of gender, age and their interaction on global self-esteem and physical self-perceptions (physical self-worth, PSW; physical condition, PC; physical strength, PS; attractive body, AB; sport competence, SC) of French adolescents. Global self-esteem (GSE) and physical self-perceptions were measured by the Physical…

  2. A New Effective Temperature Scale for M Giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, R. A.; Houdashelt, M. L.

    1997-12-01

    M giants play a significant role in determining the shape of the spectral energy distribution of elliptical galaxies, producing the TiO bands seen at optical wavelengths and contributing the majority of the flux in the infrared. However, these stars have proven to be notoriously difficult to model. Previous measurements of angular diameters by Ridgway et al. (1980), Dyck et al. (1996) and di Benedetto & Rabbia (1987) have produced very similar relations between spectral type and effective temperature for K and M giants. We present here an alternative temperature scale for these stars which is based upon recent angular diameter measurements of Mozurkewich. This new relation is in reasonable agreement with the older ones for K giants but differs from them in being sytematically cooler at a given spectral type for the M giants. In this poster, we contrast models based upon this new effective temperature scale and that of Dyck et al. (1996). We examine the effects on the synthetic spectra which we use in our galaxy population synthesis program, concentrating upon the TiO and CO molecular absorption features. We estimate the spectral types of our synthetic spectra using three methods - the strengths of the TiO bands, the equivalent width of the CO bandhead near 2.3 mu m and the eight-color photometric system of Wing - and check the agreement of the three.

  3. A field effect spacecraft neutraliser for fundamental physics missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, B. J.; Aplin, K. L.; Feep Neutraliser Team

    Tests of fundamental physics in space make use of the gravitationally quiet environment of a free falling spacecraft. However non-gravitational disturbances can still influence measurements at the highest precision. These disturbances, which include drag from the residual atmosphere in low Earth orbit or solar radiation pressure for heliospheric missions, may be compensated, or nulled by means of a system of sensors and thrusters. The disturbance compensation system, often described as drag free control, achieves the pico-gravity environment required for fundamental physics missions. In drag free systems, disturbances are sensed by the position of a free-floating test mass with respect to the spacecraft. Micropropulsion thrusters, providing thrust in the micro to milli Newton range, are then used to counteract the disturbance and return the test mass to its reference position. In the European context the preferred microthrusters are field effect electric propulsion devices or FEEPs. FEEPs use the field effect process to extract ions from a liquid metal, and then eject them at high velocity using electrostatics. The act of ejecting ions causes the spacecraft to quickly become charged to very high potentials, and thus a neutralising source of electrons is required to maintain spacecraft neutrality. We describe the design, construction and testing of a field effect emitter array, which provides a low power source of electrons providing up to 6mA, for spacecraft neutralisation. The emitter array has been designed and engineered to be suitable for integration into the micro propulsion system of fundamental physics mission such as LISA Pathfinder. The Field Emitter Array uses silicon emitters constructed using microfabrication techniques. Electron beam lithography is used to ensure uniformity and precise control of emitter location on each array. Process control of the remaining techniques including plasma enhanced vapour deposition, wet and dry plasma etch, and various

  4. Biological vs. physical mixing effects on benthic food web dynamics.

    PubMed

    Braeckman, Ulrike; Provoost, Pieter; Moens, Tom; Soetaert, Karline; Middelburg, Jack J; Vincx, Magda; Vanaverbeke, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Biological particle mixing (bioturbation) and solute transfer (bio-irrigation) contribute extensively to ecosystem functioning in sediments where physical mixing is low. Macrobenthos transports oxygen and organic matter deeper into the sediment, thereby likely providing favourable niches to lower trophic levels (i.e., smaller benthic animals such as meiofauna and bacteria) and thus stimulating mineralisation. Whether this biological transport facilitates fresh organic matter assimilation by the metazoan lower part of the food web through niche establishment (i.e., ecosystem engineering) or rather deprives them from food sources, is so far unclear. We investigated the effects of the ecosystem engineers Lanice conchilega (bio-irrigator) and Abra alba (bioturbator) compared to abiotic physical mixing events on survival and food uptake of nematodes after a simulated phytoplankton bloom. The (13)C labelled diatom Skeletonema costatum was added to 4 treatments: (1) microcosms containing the bioturbator, (2) microcosms containing the bio-irrigator, (3) control microcosms and (4) microcosms with abiotic manual surface mixing. Nematode survival and subsurface peaks in nematode density profiles were most pronounced in the bio-irrigator treatment. However, nematode specific uptake (Δδ(13)C) of the added diatoms was highest in the physical mixing treatment, where macrobenthos was absent and the diatom (13)C was homogenised. Overall, nematodes fed preferentially on bulk sedimentary organic material rather than the added diatoms. The total C budget (µg C m(-2)), which included TO(13)C remaining in the sediment, respiration, nematode and macrobenthic uptake, highlighted the limited assimilation by the metazoan benthos and the major role of bacterial respiration. In summary, bioturbation and especially bio-irrigation facilitated the lower trophic levels mainly over the long-term through niche establishment. Since the freshly added diatoms represented only a limited food source

  5. Effect of postpartum practices of doing the month on Chinese women's physical and psychological health.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan Qun; Maloni, Judith A; Petrini, Marcia A

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to describe Chinese women's postpartum physiological and psychological health and adherence to "doing-the-month" practices. A descriptive repeated measures design was used, with data collected at 3 days and 6 weeks postpartum. The convenience sample consisted of 198 healthy childbearing women with a term birth. Maternal physical health was measured by the Six-Minute Walk (endurance), Chair Stand test (muscle strength), severity of physical symptoms, and physical health subscales of SF36v2. Maternal psychological health was measured by the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression scale. Adherence was measured by the Adherence to Doing-the-Month Practices questionnaire. Aerobic endurance and lower-body muscle strength improved significantly across time (p < .001) but remained suboptimal for maternal age. Women who delivered by Cesarean section had significantly poorer physical health than those who had a vaginal delivery. Physical functioning significantly increased, but general health and role limitations due to physical health significantly decreased over time. Postpartum physical symptoms decreased in number and severity. Depression increased over time (p < .001). Adherence to doing the month was negatively correlated with aerobic endurance and positively correlated with depression at 6 weeks (p < .05). These findings challenge the assumption that practices of doing the month are healthy for Chinese women's recovery after childbirth. Research-based evidence needs to be integrated into doing-the-month practices. Education of Chinese women and families, whether living at home or abroad, is needed about the adverse health effects of doing the month. Routine screening for postpartum depression is also advised. PMID:23132403

  6. Texercise Effectiveness: Impacts on Physical Functioning and Quality of Life.

    PubMed

    Ory, Marcia G; Smith, Matthew Lee; Jiang, Luohua; Howell, Doris; Chen, Shuai; Pulczinski, Jairus C; Stevens, Alan B

    2015-10-01

    This study examines the effectiveness of Texercise Select, a 12-week lifestyle program to improve physical functioning (as measured by gait speed) and quality of life. Baseline and 12-week follow-up assessments were collected from 220 enrollees who were older (mean = 75 years), predominantly female (85%), White (82%), and experiencing multiple comorbidities (mean = 2.4). Linear mixed-models were fitted for continuous outcome variables and GEE models with logit link function for binary outcome variables. At baseline, over 52% of participants had Timed Up-and-Go (TUG) test times of 12 s or more, which indicates below-normal performance. On average, participants showed significant reductions in TUG test scores at the postintervention (11% reduction, p < .001). Participants also showed significant improvements in general health status (p = .002), unhealthy physical days (p = .032), combined unhealthy physical and mental days (p = .006), and days limited from usual activity (p = .045). Findings suggest that performance indicators can be objectively collected and integrated into evaluation designs of community-based, activity-rich lifestyle programs. PMID:25594364

  7. A chip scale electrocaloric effect based cooling device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Haiming; Qian, Xiaoshi; Li, Xinyu; Craven, Brent; Zhu, Wenyi; Cheng, Ailan; Yao, S. C.; Zhang, Q. M.

    2013-03-01

    The recent finding of large electrocaloric effect in several ferroelectric polymers creates unique opportunity for developing compact size solid state cooling cycles beyond the traditional mechanical vapor compression cycles. Here, we show that, by employing regeneration process with solid state regenerators, a chip scale Electrocaloric Oscillatory Refrigeration (ECOR) can be realized. A prototype ECOR is fabricated and characterized. More than 6 K temperature span is obtained near room temperature between the hot and cold sides of a 2 cm long device. Finite volume simulation validates the test results and shows the potential high performance of the ECOR.

  8. Phase field modelling of stressed grain growth: Analytical study and the effect of microstructural length scale

    SciTech Connect

    Jamshidian, M.; Rabczuk, T.

    2014-03-15

    We establish the correlation between the diffuse interface and sharp interface descriptions for stressed grain boundary migration by presenting analytical solutions for stressed migration of a circular grain boundary in a bicrystalline phase field domain. The validity and accuracy of the phase field model is investigated by comparing the phase field simulation results against analytical solutions. The phase field model can reproduce precise boundary kinetics and stress evolution provided that a thermodynamically consistent theory and proper expressions for model parameters in terms of physical material properties are employed. Quantitative phase field simulations are then employed to investigate the effect of microstructural length scale on microstructure and texture evolution by stressed grain growth in an elastically deformed polycrystalline aggregate. The simulation results reveal a transitional behaviour from normal to abnormal grain growth by increasing the microstructural length scale.

  9. Effects of different sources of physically effective fiber on rumen microbial populations.

    PubMed

    Shaw, C N; Kim, M; Eastridge, M L; Yu, Z

    2016-03-01

    Physically effective fiber is needed by dairy cattle to prevent ruminal acidosis. This study aimed to examine the effects of different sources of physically effective fiber on the populations of fibrolytic bacteria and methanogens. Five ruminally cannulated Holstein cows were each fed five diets differing in physically effective fiber sources over 15 weeks (21 days/period) in a Latin Square design: (1) 44.1% corn silage, (2) 34.0% corn silage plus 11.5% alfalfa hay, (3) 34.0% corn silage plus 5.1% wheat straw, (4) 36.1% corn silage plus 10.1% wheat straw, and (5) 34.0% corn silage plus 5.5% corn stover. The impact of the physically effective fiber sources on total bacteria and archaea were examined using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Specific real-time PCR assays were used to quantify total bacteria, total archaea, the genus Butyrivibrio, Fibrobacter succinogenes, Ruminococcus albus, Ruminococcus flavefaciens and three uncultured rumen bacteria that were identified from adhering ruminal fractions in a previous study. No significant differences were observed among the different sources of physical effective fiber with respect to the microbial populations quantified. Any of the physically effective fiber sources may be fed to dairy cattle without negative impact on the ruminal microbial community. PMID:26365790

  10. [Effectiveness of physical exercise programs in patients with diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Cano-De La Cuerda, Roberto; Aguila-Maturana, Ana María; Miangolarra-Page, Juan Carlos

    2009-02-14

    Clinical studies with methodological rigor have shown that the strategies for lifestyle modification and drug therapies can prevent or at least delay the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) in individuals at high risk. Combination of regular physical exercise and diet is more effective than each one separately to achieve modest weight loss and improve metabolic control in patients with DM. Our objective is to describe the role of exercise in patients with DM and the exercise programs in relation to the previous considerations, taking into account the intensity of the exercise, components of the program, duration, frequency and precautions. PMID:19211086

  11. Example Applications of A Physically-Based 3D Surface-Subsurface Hydrologic Model Over Multiple Spatial and Temporal Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudicky, E. A.; Park, Y. J.; Hwang, H. T.; Berg, S.; Frey, S.

    2014-12-01

    It is now generally accepted within the scientific community that the climate is changing, and that future climate change may have significant impact on water resources in both quantity and quality. Alterations of base flow to rivers due to changing subsurface flow patterns, fluctuations in soil moisture and in the depth of the groundwater table, water levels in lakes and wetlands, and altered groundwater recharge/discharge patterns are examples of possible consequences of future climate change. In this presentation, our physically-based model, HydroGeoSphere (HGS), is first briefly described. It is a physically-based 3D control-volume finite element model representing 2D surface water flow and transport on the land surface together with 3D variably-saturated flow and transport in the subsurface. A globally implicit scheme used to solve the nonlinear surface and subsurface flow and transport equations simultaneously. The model can explicitly account for the hydrologic, solute and thermal interactions between surface and subsurface flow regimes as well as the atmospheric inputs in terms of air temperature, solar radiation and sensible/latent heat fluxes. A parallel computational framework has been implemented to facilitate model applications in high performance computing environments. The applicability of the model is demonstrated for a variety of problems, covering the hill slope scale to improve the understanding of the physical and chemical processes in the water cycle, to the assessment of the impact of climate change on water resources over the Canadian landmass in three dimensions. The climate-driven 3D basin-scale examples range from that of a highly characterized watershed in Southern Ontario having an area of about 7000 km2 to a large basin in Western Canada that covers an area of about 120,000 km2. The continental scale simulations explore the impacts of global climate change on Canada's surface and groundwater resources.

  12. Scaling of The Tropospheric Ozone Concentrations and Anthropogenic Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audiffren, N.; Duroure, C.

    The statistical characteristics of long time series of ozone mixing ratios in free tro- posphere and in urban environment are compared.We use a five year dataset with 15 minute resolution of ozone concentrations in a free tropospheric condition (Puy de Dôme) and in four different towns in the mesoscale vicinity (Auvergne region), (data from Atmo-Auvergne) The free tropospheric ozone field have the same scaling behaviour (Fourier spectrum, structure functions and intermittency measure) than a passive scalar in a 3D higthly turbulent dynamic field. We don't observe a mesoscale gap and the inertial range is ranging from (at least) one minute to a few days for eule- rian measurements (from hundred meters to hundreds of kilometers for the lagrangian space scale). The probability density functions (PDF) of the ozone mixing ratio incre- ments are higthly non gaussian, with tails decreasing slower than negative exponential, indicating an "intermittent" behaviour. The scale evolution of the intermittency is esti- mated using the normalized fourth moment of the discrete laplacian and is compared with other turbulent geophysical fields (mesoscale cloud coverage, updraft velocity, rainfall serie). On the opposite, for the urban measurements, the modifications of the statistical properties not only affect the mean but also the scaling exponent (Fourier slope closer to -1) and the intermittency structure function. The one day periodic peak is more pronounced than for the free troposphere measurements and appears a (purely anthropogenic) peak of seven days. For large towns ,the PDF of gradient are close to a Levy-stable PDF with a characteristic exponent close to 2 (the Gaussian limit). The anthropogenic effects on ozone concentration make the statistical characteristics closer to those observed for the web flux, the traffic jams, or the properties of speach and music.

  13. Turbulent large-scale structure effects on wake meandering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Y.-A.; Masson, C.; Aubrun, S.

    2015-06-01

    This work studies effects of large-scale turbulent structures on wake meandering using Large Eddy Simulations (LES) over an actuator disk. Other potential source of wake meandering such as the instablility mechanisms associated with tip vortices are not treated in this study. A crucial element of the efficient, pragmatic and successful simulations of large-scale turbulent structures in Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) is the generation of the stochastic turbulent atmospheric flow. This is an essential capability since one source of wake meandering is these large - larger than the turbine diameter - turbulent structures. The unsteady wind turbine wake in ABL is simulated using a combination of LES and actuator disk approaches. In order to dedicate the large majority of the available computing power in the wake, the ABL ground region of the flow is not part of the computational domain. Instead, mixed Dirichlet/Neumann boundary conditions are applied at all the computational surfaces except at the outlet. Prescribed values for Dirichlet contribution of these boundary conditions are provided by a stochastic turbulent wind generator. This allows to simulate large-scale turbulent structures - larger than the computational domain - leading to an efficient simulation technique of wake meandering. Since the stochastic wind generator includes shear, the turbulence production is included in the analysis without the necessity of resolving the flow near the ground. The classical Smagorinsky sub-grid model is used. The resulting numerical methodology has been implemented in OpenFOAM. Comparisons with experimental measurements in porous-disk wakes have been undertaken, and the agreements are good. While temporal resolution in experimental measurements is high, the spatial resolution is often too low. LES numerical results provide a more complete spatial description of the flow. They tend to demonstrate that inflow low frequency content - or large- scale turbulent structures - is

  14. Effective Hydraulic Conductivity Scaling in a 2-Dimensional Geometrical Multifractal Model for Aquifer Heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentry, R. W.; Perfect, E.; Sukop, M. C.

    2005-12-01

    Recent analyses of field data suggest that the spatial variation of hydraulic conductivity, K, within an aquifer may be multifractal. We investigated the implications of this finding for the scaling of effective hydraulic conductivity, , by performing numerical simulations of flow in 2-dimensional geometrical multifractal K fields. A theoretical framework for generating such fields is presented based on the parameters of the truncated binomial distribution, TBD. This leads to an approximate analytical expression showing that increases with increasing length scale as a power law, whose exponent, α, is determined by the TBD parameters. Five geometrical multifractal K fields were generated with different minimum length scales. Each domain was discretized using a block center grid consisting of 59,049 uniformly-spaced nodes. A unit cube aquifer was used for the numerical simulations. The boundary conditions were implemented with constant head (unit gradient) parallel planes, and corresponding zero flux planes on the normal axes. A finite difference simulation model based on MODFLOW 2000 was used, and "zone budget" was employed to calculate the flow balance. The discharge into and out of the unit cube was then used to calculate based on Darcy's law. The numerical simulations produced similar increases in with increasing length scale to those predicted by the analytical model. Nonlinear regression analyses yielded estimates of α from the numerical simulations that were within 10% of the analytical value for these fields. These simulations provide a theoretical explanation for effective hydraulic conductivity scaling in terms of multifractals. The advantage of such an approach is that the α-parameter, which controls the degree of scaling, is physically-based and can potentially be estimated from independent measurements.

  15. Conceptual and methodological frameworks for large scale and high resolution analysis of the physical flood susceptibility of buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco-Vogt, A.; Schanze, J.

    2013-10-01

    There are some approaches available for assessing flood damage to buildings and critical infrastructure. However, these methods up to now can hardly be adapted to a large scale because of lacking high resolution classification and characterisation approaches for the built structures. To overcome this obstacle, the paper presents, first, a conceptual framework for understanding physical flood susceptibility of buildings; and second, a methodological framework for its analysis. The latter ranges from automatic extraction of buildings mainly from remote sensing with their subsequent classification and characterisation to a systematic physical flood susceptibility assessment. The work shows the results of implementation and testing a respective methodology in a district of the city of Magangué, Magdalena River Colombia.

  16. Physical and biogeochemical spatial scales of variability in the East Australian Current separation zone from shelf glider measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeffer, A.; Roughan, M.; Jones, E.; White, D.

    2015-12-01

    In contrast to physical processes, biogeochemical processes are inherently patchy in the ocean, which affects both the observational sampling strategy and the representativeness of sparse measurements in data assimilating models. In situ observations from multiple glider deployments are analyzed to characterize spatial scales of variability in both physical and biogeochemical properties, using an empirical statistical model. We find that decorrelation ranges are strongly dependent on the balance between local dynamics and mesoscale forcing. The shortest horizontal (5-10 km) and vertical (45 m) decorrelation ranges are for chlorophyll a fluorescence. Whereas those variables that are a function of regional ocean and atmosphere dynamics (temperature and dissolved oxygen) result in anisotropic patterns with longer ranges along (28-37 km) than across the shelf (8-19 km). Variables affected by coastal processes (salinity and colored dissolved organic matter) have an isotropic range similar to the baroclinic Rossby radius (10-15 km).

  17. Physical and biogeochemical spatial scales of variability in the East Australian Current separation from shelf glider measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeffer, Amandine; Roughan, Moninya; Jones, Emlyn M.; White, Dana

    2016-03-01

    In contrast to physical processes, biogeochemical processes are inherently patchy in the ocean, which affects both the observational sampling strategy and the representativeness of sparse measurements in data assimilating models. In situ observations from multiple glider deployments are analysed to characterize spatial scales of variability in both physical and biogeochemical properties, using an empirical statistical model. We find that decorrelation ranges are strongly dependent on the balance between local dynamics and mesoscale forcing. The shortest horizontal (5-10 km) and vertical (45 m) decorrelation ranges are for chlorophyll a fluorescence, whereas those variables that are a function of regional ocean and atmosphere dynamics (temperature and dissolved oxygen) result in anisotropic patterns with longer ranges along (28-37 km) than across the shelf (8-19 km). Variables affected by coastal processes (salinity and coloured dissolved organic matter) have an isotropic range similar to the baroclinic Rossby radius (10-15 km).

  18. Scaling Educational Transformation in a Physics Department (part 2 of 2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollock, Steven; Finkelstein, Noah; Beale, Paul; Chasteen, Stephanie; Dubson, Michael; Goldhaber, Steven; Perkins, Katherine; Turpen, Chandra

    2009-10-01

    We report on two interrelated research threads, sustaining and scaling of educational innovations. In this second of two talks, we examine the scaling of educational innovations into the upper division. We have begun course transformation of Quantum Mechanics and E&M, which employ the practices and findings from educational research at the lower division. Related, we examine the spread of clicker-based approaches into the upper division and graduate level courses. We have studied faculty choices about how they come to adopt these reforms, and what choices they make as they adopt new materials and pedagogical approaches. We identify critical components of success: resources (whether undergraduate learning assistants or post-doctoral science teaching fellows), faculty buy-in and inclusion (from the earliest stages), and institutional support.

  19. Dynamic scaling and large scale effects in turbulence in compressible stratified fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pharasi, Hirdesh K.; Bhattacharjee, Jayanta K.

    2016-01-01

    We consider the propagation of sound in a turbulent fluid which is confined between two horizontal parallel plates, maintained at different temperatures. In the homogeneous fluid, Staroselsky et al. had predicted a divergent sound speed at large length scales. Here we find a divergent sound speed and a vanishing expansion coefficient at large length scales. Dispersion relation and the question of scale invariance at large distance scales lead to these results.

  20. Physical properties of type I collagen extracted from fish scales of Pagrus major and Oreochromis niloticas.

    PubMed

    Ikoma, Toshiyuki; Kobayashi, Hisatoshi; Tanaka, Junzo; Walsh, Dominic; Mann, Stephen

    2003-09-01

    Type I collagens were extracted from fish scales of Pagrus major and Oreochromis niloticas as a possible underutilized resource for medical materials. The fish scales were demineralized with EDTA and digested by pepsin. The resultant type I collagens contained more than 33.6% of glycine as the most abundant amino acid. The denaturation temperatures of the collagens from P. major and O. niloticas were 303 and 308K, respectively, both of which were relatively lower than that of porcine dermis collagen (314K). CD spectra indicated that the denaturation temperatures were dependent on the amount of hydroxyproline, rather than proline residues. Raman spectra also indicated that the relative intensities of Raman lines at 879 and 855cm(-1) assigned to Hyp and Pro rings were changed due to the contents of the imino acids. Significantly, the content of sulphur-containing methionine was higher in the fish scales than in porcine dermis. The enthalpy and entropy estimated from thermal analyses could be correlated to amino acid sequences (Gly-Pro-Hyp) of type I collagens and the number of methionine amino acid residues. PMID:12957317