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Sample records for scanning magnetoresistance microscopy

  1. Scanning magnetoresistive microscopy: An advanced characterization tool for magnetic nanosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitin, D.; Grobis, M.; Albrecht, M.

    2016-02-01

    An advanced scanning magnetoresistive microscopy (SMRM) — a robust magnetic imaging and probing technique — will be presented, which utilizes state-of-the-art recording heads of a hard disk drive as sensors. The spatial resolution of modern tunneling magnetoresistive sensors is nowadays comparable to the more commonly used magnetic force microscopes. Important advantages of SMRM are the ability to detect pure magnetic signals directly proportional to the out-of-plane magnetic stray field, negligible sensor stray fields, and the ability to apply local bipolar magnetic field pulses up to 10 kOe with bandwidths from DC up to 1 GHz. Moreover, the SMRM can be further equipped with a heating stage and external magnetic field units. The performance of this method and corresponding best practices are demonstrated by presenting various examples, including a temperature dependent recording study on hard magnetic L10 FeCuPt thin films, imaging of magnetic vortex states in an in-plane magnetic field, and their controlled manipulation by applying local field pulses.

  2. Scanning magnetoresistive microscopy: An advanced characterization tool for magnetic nanosystems.

    PubMed

    Mitin, D; Grobis, M; Albrecht, M

    2016-02-01

    An advanced scanning magnetoresistive microscopy (SMRM) - a robust magnetic imaging and probing technique - will be presented, which utilizes state-of-the-art recording heads of a hard disk drive as sensors. The spatial resolution of modern tunneling magnetoresistive sensors is nowadays comparable to the more commonly used magnetic force microscopes. Important advantages of SMRM are the ability to detect pure magnetic signals directly proportional to the out-of-plane magnetic stray field, negligible sensor stray fields, and the ability to apply local bipolar magnetic field pulses up to 10 kOe with bandwidths from DC up to 1 GHz. Moreover, the SMRM can be further equipped with a heating stage and external magnetic field units. The performance of this method and corresponding best practices are demonstrated by presenting various examples, including a temperature dependent recording study on hard magnetic L1(0) FeCuPt thin films, imaging of magnetic vortex states in an in-plane magnetic field, and their controlled manipulation by applying local field pulses. PMID:26931856

  3. Scanning Magnetoresistance Microscopy Studies of Small Magnetic and Electrical Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Gang

    2004-03-01

    Many physical objects generate microscopic magnetic-field images near their surfaces. Such images reveal important signatures of inherent electrical and magnetic processes within the objects. For example, the image of a magnetic thin film discloses its internal magnetic domain structure. Electrical currents inside an semiconductor chip generate surface magnetic field images, which not only contain information about the electrical current distribution, but also the frequencies with which various components on a chip operates. A type II superconductor also creates an image of threading magnetic flux lines, whose structure and dynamics are fundamental properties. We have developed a sensitive and high-resolution magnetic microscope that is capable of non-invasively imaging, characterizing, and investigating spatial magnetic field patterns. At the heart of the microscope is a miniaturized magnetic-tunnel-junction (MTJ) or giant magnetoresistance (GMR) sensor, capable to work at high speed, under ambient conditions, and over a wide bandwidth. This type of MR microscopy (MRM) offers many advantages over the magnetic force microscopy (MFM) and others. It measures the absolute local magnetic field, and its sensor does not generate invasive field as a magnetic tip would. The MRM can also measure dynamic magnetic images in a time varying external field. We will present results obtained from a wide range of structures using MRM, including small magnetic structures and state-of-the-art integrated circuits. This work supported by NSF is a collaboration with B. Schrag, X.Y. Liu, and G. Singh.

  4. Magnetization reversal of submicrometer Co rings with uniaxial anisotropy via scanning magnetoresistance microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoyong; Mazumdar, D.; Schrag, B. D.; Shen, W.; Xiao, Gang

    2004-07-01

    We have investigated the magnetization reversal mechanism of narrow submicrometer Co rings using scanning magnetoresistance microscopy. Thermal annealing in a magnetic field introduced a uniaxial anisotropy and significant structural changes in the samples. We have observed a complicated multidomain state at intermediate field ranges, and onion states at saturation, for samples annealed in a field. This observation is in contrast to the flux-closed vortex state for unannealed rings. Micromagnetic simulations have shown that the switching occurs through a gradual noncoherent buckling-like reversal process followed by coherent rotation.

  5. Scanning tunneling microscopy for laterally resolved measurements of magnetoresistance through a point contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahlström, Erik; Bručas, Rimantas; Hanson, Maj

    2006-03-01

    Using a scanning tunneling microscope for point contact measurements, we obtained laterally resolved information of the magnetoresistive properties of nanostructured spin-valve elements. A good correlation is found between magnetization and magnetoresistance curves of single-domain elliptical elements (450nm by 150nm), for magnetic fields applied along their long and short axes. In ring-shaped elements (inner and outer diameters 1.8 and 2.2μm), different magnetoresistance curves are acquired as different points around the ring are probed. The observed switching can be related to the onion state of the rings, and it clearly demonstrates a lateral resolution ⩽100nm.

  6. Ultrafast scanning probe microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Botkin, D.; Weiss, S.; Ogletree, D.F.; Salmeron, M.; Chemla, D.S.

    1994-01-01

    The authors have developed a general technique which combines the temporal resolution of ultrafast laser spectroscopy with the spatial resolution of scanned probe microscopy (SPM). Using this technique with scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), they have obtained simultaneous 2 ps time resolution and 50 {angstrom} spatial resolution. This improves the time resolution currently attainable with STM by nine orders of magnitude. The potential of this powerful technique for studying ultrafast dynamical phenomena on surfaces with atomic resolution is discussed.

  7. Scanning Probe Microscopy and Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesendanger, Roland

    1994-09-01

    Preface; List of acronyms; Introduction; Part I. Experimental Methods and Theoretical Background of Scanning Probe Microscopy and Spectroscopy: 1. Scanning tunnelling microscopy; 2. Scanning force microscopy; 3. Related scanning probe techniques; Part II. Applications of Scanning Probe Microscopy and Spectroscopy: 4. Condensed matter physics; 5. Chemistry; 6. Organic materials; 7. Metrology and standards; 8. Nanotechnology; References; Index.

  8. Scanning tomographic acoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hua

    2002-11-01

    This paper provides an overview of the design and development of the scanning tomographic acoustic microscopy (STAM). This research effort spans over a period of more than 12 years, which successfully elevated the acoustic microscopy from the traditional intensity-mapping mode to the level of holographic and tomographic imaging. The tomographic imaging capability of STAM was developed on the platform of the scanning laser acoustic microscope (SLAM), which operates in a coherent transmission mode with plane-wave illumination and scanning laser wavefield detection. The image formation techniques were based on the backward propagation method implemented in the plane-to-plane format. In this paper, the key elements of the design and development, including the modification of the data-acquisition hardware, implementation of image reconstruction algorithms for multiple-frequency and multiple-angle tomography, and the high-precision phase-correction and image registration techniques for the superposition of coherent sub-images, will be discussed. Results of full-scale experiments will also be included to demonstrate the capability of holographic and tomographic image formation in microscopic scale.

  9. Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amemiya, Shigeru; Bard, Allen J.; Fan, Fu-Ren F.; Mirkin, Michael V.; Unwin, Patrick R.

    2008-07-01

    This review describes work done in scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) since 2000 with an emphasis on new applications and important trends, such as nanometer-sized tips. SECM has been adapted to investigate charge transport across liquid/liquid interfaces and to probe charge transport in thin films and membranes. It has been used in biological systems like single cells to study ion transport in channels, as well as cellular and enzyme activity. It is also a powerful and useful tool for the evaluation of the electrocatalytic activities of different materials for useful reactions, such as oxygen reduction and hydrogen oxidation. SECM has also been used as an electrochemical tool for studies of the local properties and reactivity of a wide variety of materials, including metals, insulators, and semiconductors. Finally, SECM has been combined with several other nonelectrochemical techniques, such as atomic force microscopy, to enhance and complement the information available from SECM alone.

  10. Ultrafast scanning probe microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Shimon; Chemla, Daniel S.; Ogletree, D. Frank; Botkin, David

    1995-01-01

    An ultrafast scanning probe microscopy method for achieving subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of an observation sample. In one embodiment of the present claimed invention, a single short optical pulse is generated and is split into first and second pulses. One of the pulses is delayed using variable time delay means. The first pulse is then directed at an observation sample located proximate to the probe of a scanning probe microscope. The scanning probe microscope produces probe-sample signals indicative of the response of the probe to characteristics of the sample. The second pulse is used to modulate the probe of the scanning probe microscope. The time delay between the first and second pulses is then varied. The probe-sample response signal is recorded at each of the various time delays created between the first and second pulses. The probe-sample response signal is then plotted as a function of time delay to produce a cross-correlation of the probe sample response. In so doing, the present invention provides simultaneous subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of the sample.

  11. Ultrafast scanning probe microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, S.; Chemla, D.S.; Ogletree, D.F.; Botkin, D.

    1995-05-16

    An ultrafast scanning probe microscopy method is described for achieving subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of an observation sample. In one embodiment of the present claimed invention, a single short optical pulse is generated and is split into first and second pulses. One of the pulses is delayed using variable time delay means. The first pulse is then directed at an observation sample located proximate to the probe of a scanning probe microscope. The scanning probe microscope produces probe-sample signals indicative of the response of the probe to characteristics of the sample. The second pulse is used to modulate the probe of the scanning probe microscope. The time delay between the first and second pulses is then varied. The probe-sample response signal is recorded at each of the various time delays created between the first and second pulses. The probe-sample response signal is then plotted as a function of time delay to produce a cross-correlation of the probe sample response. In so doing, the present invention provides simultaneous subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of the sample. 6 Figs.

  12. Scanning Tomographic Acoustic Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, G.; Meyyappan, A.

    1988-07-01

    The technology for "seeing" with sound has an important and interesting history. Some of nature's creatures have been using sound waves for many millenia to image otherwise unobservable objects. The human species, lacking this natural ability, have overcome this deficiency by developing several different ultrasonic imaging techniques. acoustic microscopy is one such technique, which produces high resolution images of detailed structure of small objects in a non-destructive fashion. Two types of acoustic microscopes have evolved for industrial exploitation. They are the scanning laser acoustic microscope (SLAM) and the scanning acoustic microscope (SAM). In this paper, we review the principles of SLAM and describe how we use elements of SLAM to realize the scanning tomographic acoustic microscope (STAM). We describe the data acquisition process and the image reconstruction procedure. We also describe techniques to obtain projection data from different angles of wave incidence enabling us to reconstruct different planes of a complex specimen tomo-graphically. Our experimental results show that STAM is capable of producing high-quality high-resolution subsurface images.

  13. Ultrafast scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Botkin, D.A. |

    1995-09-01

    I have developed an ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope (USTM) based on uniting stroboscopic methods of ultrafast optics and scanned probe microscopy to obtain nanometer spatial resolution and sub-picosecond temporal resolution. USTM increases the achievable time resolution of a STM by more than 6 orders of magnitude; this should enable exploration of mesoscopic and nanometer size systems on time scales corresponding to the period or decay of fundamental excitations. USTM consists of a photoconductive switch with subpicosecond response time in series with the tip of a STM. An optical pulse from a modelocked laser activates the switch to create a gate for the tunneling current, while a second laser pulse on the sample initiates a dynamic process which affects the tunneling current. By sending a large sequence of identical pulse pairs and measuring the average tunnel current as a function of the relative time delay between the pulses in each pair, one can map the time evolution of the surface process. USTM was used to measure the broadband response of the STM`s atomic size tunnel barrier in frequencies from tens to hundreds of GHz. The USTM signal amplitude decays linearly with the tunnel junction conductance, so the spatial resolution of the time-resolved signal is comparable to that of a conventional STM. Geometrical capacitance of the junction does not appear to play an important role in the measurement, but a capacitive effect intimately related to tunneling contributes to the measured signals and may limit the ultimate resolution of the USTM.

  14. Adaptive scanning probe microscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Swartzentruber, B.S.; Bouchard, A.M.; Osbourn, G.C.

    1997-02-01

    This work is comprised of two major sections. In the first section the authors develop multivariate image classification techniques to distinguish and identify surface electronic species directly from multiple-bias scanning tunneling microscope (STM) images. Multiple measurements at each site are used to distinguish and categorize inequivalent electronic or atomic species on the surface via a computerized classification algorithm. Then, comparison with theory or other suitably chosen experimental data enables the identification of each class. They demonstrate the technique by analyzing dual-polarity constant-current topographs of the Ge(111) surface. Just two measurements, negative- and positive-bias topography height, permit pixels to be separated into seven different classes. Labeling four of the classes as adatoms, first-layer atoms, and two inequivalent rest-atom sites, they find excellent agreement with the c(2 x 8) structure. The remaining classes are associated with structural defects and contaminants. This work represents a first step toward developing a general electronic/chemical classification and identification tool for multivariate scanning probe microscopy imagery. In the second section they report measurements of the diffusion of Si dimers on the Si(001) surface at temperatures between room temperature and 128 C using a novel atom-tracking technique that can resolve every diffusion event. The atom tracker employs lateral-positioning feedback to lock the STM probe tip into position above selected atoms with sub-Angstrom precision. Once locked the STM tracks the position of the atoms as they migrate over the crystal surface. By tracking individual atoms directly, the ability of the instrument to measure dynamic events is increased by a factor of {approximately} 1,000 over conventional STM imaging techniques.

  15. Virtual slit scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Fiolka, Reto; Stemmer, Andreas; Belyaev, Yury

    2007-12-01

    We present a novel slit scanning confocal microscope with a CCD camera image sensor and a virtual slit aperture for descanning that can be adjusted during post-processing. A very efficient data structure and mathematical criteria for aligning the virtual aperture guarantee the ease of use. We further introduce a method to reduce the anisotropic lateral resolution of slit scanning microscopes. System performance is evaluated against a spinning disk confocal microscope on identical specimens. The virtual slit scanning microscope works as the spinning disk type and outperforms on thick specimens. PMID:17891411

  16. Stochastic scanning multiphoton multifocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jureller, Justin E; Kim, Hee Y; Scherer, Norbert F

    2006-04-17

    Multiparticle tracking with scanning confocal and multiphoton fluorescence imaging is increasingly important for elucidating biological function, as in the transport of intracellular cargo-carrying vesicles. We demonstrate a simple rapid-sampling stochastic scanning multifocal multiphoton microscopy (SS-MMM) fluorescence imaging technique that enables multiparticle tracking without specialized hardware at rates 1,000 times greater than conventional single point raster scanning. Stochastic scanning of a diffractive optic generated 10x10 hexagonal array of foci with a white noise driven galvanometer yields a scan pattern that is random yet space-filling. SS-MMM creates a more uniformly sampled image with fewer spatio-temporal artifacts than obtained by conventional or multibeam raster scanning. SS-MMM is verified by simulation and experimentally demonstrated by tracking microsphere diffusion in solution. PMID:19516485

  17. Aperture scanning Fourier ptychographic microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Xiaoze; Chung, Jaebum; Horstmeyer, Roarke; Yang, Changhuei

    2016-01-01

    Fourier ptychographic microscopy (FPM) is implemented through aperture scanning by an LCOS spatial light modulator at the back focal plane of the objective lens. This FPM configuration enables the capturing of the complex scattered field for a 3D sample both in the transmissive mode and the reflective mode. We further show that by combining with the compressive sensing theory, the reconstructed 2D complex scattered field can be used to recover the 3D sample scattering density. This implementation expands the scope of application for FPM and can be beneficial for areas such as tissue imaging and wafer inspection. PMID:27570705

  18. Thermal radiation scanning tunnelling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Wilde, Yannick; Formanek, Florian; Carminati, Rémi; Gralak, Boris; Lemoine, Paul-Arthur; Joulain, Karl; Mulet, Jean-Philippe; Chen, Yong; Greffet, Jean-Jacques

    2006-12-01

    In standard near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM), a subwavelength probe acts as an optical `stethoscope' to map the near field produced at the sample surface by external illumination. This technique has been applied using visible, infrared, terahertz and gigahertz radiation to illuminate the sample, providing a resolution well beyond the diffraction limit. NSOM is well suited to study surface waves such as surface plasmons or surface-phonon polaritons. Using an aperture NSOM with visible laser illumination, a near-field interference pattern around a corral structure has been observed, whose features were similar to the scanning tunnelling microscope image of the electronic waves in a quantum corral. Here we describe an infrared NSOM that operates without any external illumination: it is a near-field analogue of a night-vision camera, making use of the thermal infrared evanescent fields emitted by the surface, and behaves as an optical scanning tunnelling microscope. We therefore term this instrument a `thermal radiation scanning tunnelling microscope' (TRSTM). We show the first TRSTM images of thermally excited surface plasmons, and demonstrate spatial coherence effects in near-field thermal emission.

  19. Scanning Probe Microscopy of Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tautz, Pamela

    2011-10-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy has been used to study the unusual electronic properties of graphene. In an effort to support the graphene with minimal interaction with the substrate, we used a hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) substrate. To minimize contaminants between the CVD graphene and boron nitride, the graphene samples were cleaned with distilled water and isopropanol prior to transfer to hBN substrate. We have also examined the growth of graphene flakes by chemical vapor deposition. In particular, we examined the relationship between the orientations of the first and second layer of CVD grown graphene. We found the growth mechanism preferentially resulted in rotations of 9^o or less indicating flakes with first and second layers aligned.

  20. Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy in Neuroscience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte, Albert; Nebel, Michaela; Schuhmann, Wolfgang

    2010-07-01

    This article reviews recent work involving the application of scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) to the study of individual cultured living cells, with an emphasis on topographical and functional imaging of neuronal and secretory cells of the nervous and endocrine system. The basic principles of biological SECM and associated negative amperometric-feedback and generator/collector-mode SECM imaging are discussed, and successful use of the methodology for screening soft and fragile membranous objects is outlined. The drawbacks of the constant-height mode of probe movement and the benefits of the constant-distance mode of SECM operation are described. Finally, representative examples of constant-height and constant-distance mode SECM on a variety of live cells are highlighted to demonstrate the current status of single-cell SECM in general and of SECM in neuroscience in particular.

  1. Scanning Tunneling Optical Resonance Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila; Wilt, Dave; Raffaelle, Ryne; Gennett, Tom; Tin, Padetha; Lau, Janice; Castro, Stephanie; Jenkins, Philip; Scheiman, Dave

    2003-01-01

    Scanning tunneling optical resonance microscopy (STORM) is a method, now undergoing development, for measuring optoelectronic properties of materials and devices on the nanoscale by means of a combination of (1) traditional scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) with (2) tunable laser spectroscopy. In STORM, an STM tip probing a semiconductor is illuminated with modulated light at a wavelength in the visible-to-near-infrared range and the resulting photoenhancement of the tunneling current is measured as a function of the illuminating wavelength. The photoenhancement of tunneling current occurs when the laser photon energy is sufficient to excite charge carriers into the conduction band of the semiconductor. Figure 1 schematically depicts a proposed STORM apparatus. The light for illuminating the semiconductor specimen at the STM would be generated by a ring laser that would be tunable across the wavelength range of interest. The laser beam would be chopped by an achromatic liquid-crystal modulator. A polarization-maintaining optical fiber would couple the light to the tip/sample junction of a commercial STM. An STM can be operated in one of two modes: constant height or constant current. A STORM apparatus would be operated in the constant-current mode, in which the height of the tip relative to the specimen would be varied in order to keep the tunneling current constant. In this mode, a feedback control circuit adjusts the voltage applied to a piezoelectric actuator in the STM that adjusts the height of the STM tip to keep the tunneling current constant. The exponential relationship between the tunneling current and tip-to-sample distance makes it relatively easy to implement this mode of operation. The choice of method by which the photoenhanced portion of the tunneling current would be measured depends on choice of the frequency at which the input illumination would be modulated (chopped). If the frequency of modulation were low enough (typically < 10 Hz) that the

  2. Probe microscopy: Scanning below the cell surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahin, Ozgur

    2008-08-01

    Conventional atomic force microscopy probes only the surface of specimens. A related technique called scanning near-field ultrasonic holography can now image nanoparticles buried below the surfaces of cells, which could prove useful in nanotoxicology.

  3. Scanning probe microscopy on new dental alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reusch, B.; Geis-Gerstorfer, J.; Ziegler, C.

    Surface analytical methods such as scanning force microscopy (SFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to determine the surface properties of amalgam substitutes as tooth filling materials. In particular the corrosion and the passivation behavior of new gallium restorative materials were studied. To give relevant practical data, the measurements were performed with and without the alloys being stored in artificial saliva to simulate physiological oral conditions.

  4. Differential Multiphoton Laser Scanning Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Field, Jeffrey J.; Sheetz, Kraig E.; Chandler, Eric V.; Hoover, Erich E.; Young, Michael D.; Ding, Shi-you; Sylvester, Anne W.; Kleinfeld, David; Squier, Jeff A.

    2016-01-01

    Multifocal multiphoton microscopy (MMM) in the biological and medical sciences has become an important tool for obtaining high resolution images at video rates. While current implementations of MMM achieve very high frame rates, they are limited in their applicability to essentially those biological samples that exhibit little or no scattering. In this paper, we report on a method for MMM in which imaging detection is not necessary (single element point detection is implemented), and is therefore fully compatible for use in imaging through scattering media. Further, we demonstrate that this method leads to a new type of MMM wherein it is possible to simultaneously obtain multiple images and view differences in excitation parameters in a single shot. PMID:27390511

  5. Coated tips for scanning thermal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, Nicolás; Eklund, Peter; Tadigadapa, Srinivas

    2007-02-01

    This paper presents a unique solution to the inaccuracies produced when thermally scanning various micro and nano systems with thermistor tip scanning thermal microscopy (SThM). Under dc measurement conditions, thermistor tip heating induces perturbations in the measured system that change with sample properties like material and geometry. As a result, normal SThM scans are affected by errors that make it difficult to interpret the 2D-temperature scans of such systems. By coating the SThM tips with a thermally resistive material (100nm of Si 3N 4) we demonstrate that the temperature dependence on sample material and geometry can be minimized and the tip heating problem can be mitigated to that of a constant temperature offset problem. Included are the first images of coated scanning thermal microscopy (C-SThM) as well as a lumped model that describes the basis of the improvement seen in the thermal images.

  6. Piezoresistive sensors for scanning probe microscopy

    PubMed

    Gotszalk; Grabiec; Rangelow

    2000-02-01

    In this article we summarize the efforts devoted to the realization of our ideas of the development of piezoresistive sensor family used in scanning probe microscopy. All the sensors described here are fabricated based on advanced silicon micromachining and standard CMOS processing. The fabrication scenario presented in this article allows for the production of different sensors with the same tip deflection piezoresistive detection scheme. In this way we designed and fabricated, as a basic sensor, piezoresistive cantilever for atomic force microscopy, which enables surface topography measurements with a resolution of 0.1 nm. Next, by introducing a conductive tip isolated from the beam we obtained a microprobe for scanning capacitance microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy. With this microprobe we measured capacitance between the microtip and the surface in the range of 10(-22) F. Furthermore, a modification of the piezoresistors placement, based on the finite element method (FEM) simulation permits fabrication of the multipurpose sensor for lateral force microscopy, which enables measurements of friction forces with a resolution of 1 nN. Finally, using the same basic device idea and only slightly modified process sequence we manufactured femtocalorimeter for the detection of heat energy in the range of 50 pJ. PMID:10741650

  7. Nanotubes as nanoprobes in scanning probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Hongjie; Hafner, Jason H.; Rinzler, Andrew G.; Colbert, Daniel T.; Smalley, Richard E.

    1996-11-01

    SINCE the invention of the scanning tunnelling microscope1, the value of establishing a physical connection between the macroscopic world and individual nanometre-scale objects has become increasingly evident, both for probing these objects2-4 and for direct manipulation5-7 and fabrication8-10 at the nanometre scale. While good progress has been made in controlling the position of the macroscopic probe of such devices to sub-ångström accuracy, and in designing sensitive detection schemes, less has been done to improve the probe tip itself4. Ideally the tip should be as precisely defined as the object under investigation, and should maintain its integrity after repeated use not only in high vacuum but also in air and water. The best tips currently used for scanning probe microscopy do sometimes achieve sub-nanometre resolution, but they seldom survive a 'tip crash' with the surface, and it is rarely clear what the atomic configuration of the tip is during imaging. Here we show that carbon nanotubes11,12 might constitute well defined tips for scanning probe microscopy. We have attached individual nanotubes several micrometres in length to the silicon cantilevers of conventional atomic force microscopes. Because of their flexibility, the tips are resistant to damage from tip crashes, while their slenderness permits imaging of sharp recesses in surface topography. We have also been able to exploit the electrical conductivity of nanotubes by using them for scanning tunnelling microscopy.

  8. Nanoscale thermometry by scanning thermal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menges, Fabian; Riel, Heike; Stemmer, Andreas; Gotsmann, Bernd

    2016-07-01

    Measuring temperature is a central challenge in nanoscience and technology. Addressing this challenge, we report the development of a high-vacuum scanning thermal microscope and a method for non-equilibrium scanning probe thermometry. The microscope is built inside an electromagnetically shielded, temperature-stabilized laboratory and features nanoscopic spatial resolution at sub-nanoWatt heat flux sensitivity. The method is a dual signal-sensing technique inferring temperature by probing a total steady-state heat flux simultaneously to a temporally modulated heat flux signal between a self-heated scanning probe sensor and a sample. Contact-related artifacts, which so far limit the reliability of nanoscopic temperature measurements by scanning thermal microscopy, are minimized. We characterize the microscope's performance and demonstrate the benefits of the new thermometry approach by studying hot spots near lithographically defined constrictions in a self-heated metal interconnect.

  9. Nanoscale thermometry by scanning thermal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Menges, Fabian; Riel, Heike; Stemmer, Andreas; Gotsmann, Bernd

    2016-07-01

    Measuring temperature is a central challenge in nanoscience and technology. Addressing this challenge, we report the development of a high-vacuum scanning thermal microscope and a method for non-equilibrium scanning probe thermometry. The microscope is built inside an electromagnetically shielded, temperature-stabilized laboratory and features nanoscopic spatial resolution at sub-nanoWatt heat flux sensitivity. The method is a dual signal-sensing technique inferring temperature by probing a total steady-state heat flux simultaneously to a temporally modulated heat flux signal between a self-heated scanning probe sensor and a sample. Contact-related artifacts, which so far limit the reliability of nanoscopic temperature measurements by scanning thermal microscopy, are minimized. We characterize the microscope's performance and demonstrate the benefits of the new thermometry approach by studying hot spots near lithographically defined constrictions in a self-heated metal interconnect. PMID:27475585

  10. [Pili annulati. A scanning electron microscopy study].

    PubMed

    Lalević-Vasić, B; Polić, D

    1988-01-01

    A case of ringed hair studied by light and electron microscopy is reported. The patient, a 20-year old girl, had been presenting with the hair abnormality since birth. At naked eye examination the hairs were dry, 6 to 7 cm long, and they showed dull and shining areas giving the scalp hair a scintillating appearance (fig. 1). Several samples of hair were taken and examined by light microscopy under white and polarized light. Hair shafts and cryo-fractured surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy. RESULTS. 1. Light microscopy. Lesions were found in every hair examined. There were abnormal, opaque and fusiform areas alternating with normal areas all along the hair shaft (fig. 2). The abnormal areas resulted from intracortical air-filled cavities. Fractures similar to those of trichorrhexis nodosa were found in the opaque areas of the distal parts of the hairs. 2. Scanning electron microscopy. A. Hair shaft surface. The abnormal areas showed a longitudinal, "curtain-like" folding of the cuticular cells which had punctiform depressions on their surface and worn free edges (fig. 4, 5, 6); trichorrhexis-type fractures were seen in the distal parts of the hair shafts (fig. 7, 8). Normal areas regularly presented with longitudinal, superficial, short and non-systematized depressions (fig. 9); the cuticular cells were worn, and there were places where the denuded cortex showed dissociated cortical fibres (fig. 10).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3415147

  11. Scanning ion conductance microscopy of living cells.

    PubMed Central

    Korchev, Y E; Bashford, C L; Milovanovic, M; Vodyanoy, I; Lab, M J

    1997-01-01

    Currently there is a great interest in using scanning probe microscopy to study living cells. However, in most cases the contact the probe makes with the soft surface of the cell deforms or damages it. Here we report a scanning ion conductance microscope specially developed for imaging living cells. A key feature of the instrument is its scanning algorithm, which maintains the working distance between the probe and the sample such that they do not make direct physical contact with each other. Numerical simulation of the probe/sample interaction, which closely matches the experimental observations, provides the optimum working distance. The microscope scans highly convoluted surface structures without damaging them and reveals the true topography of cell surfaces. The images resemble those produced by scanning electron microscopy, with the significant difference that the cells remain viable and active. The instrument can monitor small-scale dynamics of cell surfaces as well as whole-cell movement. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 PMID:9251784

  12. Scanning electron microscopy of superficial white onychomycosis.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Hiram Larangeira de; Boabaid, Roberta Oliveira; Timm, Vitor; Silva, Ricardo Marques E; Castro, Luis Antonio Suita de

    2015-01-01

    Superficial white onychomycosis is characterized by opaque, friable, whitish superficial spots on the nail plate. We examined an affected halux nail of a 20-year-old male patient with scanning electron microscopy. The mycological examination isolated Trichophyton mentagrophytes. Abundant hyphae with the formation of arthrospores were found on the nail's surface, forming small fungal colonies. These findings showed the great capacity for dissemination of this form of onychomycosis. PMID:26560225

  13. Scanning electron microscopy of superficial white onychomycosis*

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida Jr., Hiram Larangeira; Boabaid, Roberta Oliveira; Timm, Vitor; Silva, Ricardo Marques e; de Castro, Luis Antonio Suita

    2015-01-01

    Superficial white onychomycosis is characterized by opaque, friable, whitish superficial spots on the nail plate. We examined an affected halux nail of a 20-year-old male patient with scanning electron microscopy. The mycological examination isolated Trichophyton mentagrophytes. Abundant hyphae with the formation of arthrospores were found on the nail's surface, forming small fungal colonies. These findings showed the great capacity for dissemination of this form of onychomycosis. PMID:26560225

  14. Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy of Live Keratinocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegde, V.; Mason, A.; Saliev, T.; Smith, F. J. D.; McLean, W. H. I.; Campbell, P. A.

    2012-07-01

    Scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) is perhaps the least well known technique from the scanning probe microscopy (SPM) family of instruments. As with its more familiar counterpart, atomic force microscopy (AFM), the technique provides high-resolution topographic imaging, with the caveat that target structures must be immersed in a conducting solution so that a controllable ion current may be utilised as the basis for feedback. In operation, this non-contact characteristic of SICM makes it ideal for the study of delicate structures, such as live cells. Moreover, the intrinsic architecture of the instrument, incorporating as it does, a scanned micropipette, lends itself to combination approaches with complementary techniques such as patch-clamp electrophysiology: SICM therefore boasts the capability for both structural and functional imaging. For the present observations, an ICnano S system (Ionscope Ltd., Melbourn, UK) operating in 'hopping mode' was used, with the objective of assessing the instrument's utility for imaging live keratinocytes under physiological buffers. In scans employing cultured HaCaT cells (spontaneously immortalised, human keratinocytes), we compared the qualitative differences of live cells imaged with SICM and AFM, and also with their respective counterparts after chemical fixation in 4% paraformaldehyde. Characteristic surface microvilli were particularly prominent in live cell imaging by SICM. Moreover, time lapse SICM imaging on live cells revealed that changes in the pattern of microvilli could be tracked over time. By comparison, AFM imaging on live cells, even at very low contact forces (scanning speed, however, the intrinsic non-obtrusive nature of

  15. Feature Adaptive Sampling for Scanning Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Dahmen, Tim; Engstler, Michael; Pauly, Christoph; Trampert, Patrick; de Jonge, Niels; Mücklich, Frank; Slusallek, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    A new method for the image acquisition in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was introduced. The method used adaptively increased pixel-dwell times to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in areas of high detail. In areas of low detail, the electron dose was reduced on a per pixel basis, and a-posteriori image processing techniques were applied to remove the resulting noise. The technique was realized by scanning the sample twice. The first, quick scan used small pixel-dwell times to generate a first, noisy image using a low electron dose. This image was analyzed automatically, and a software algorithm generated a sparse pattern of regions of the image that require additional sampling. A second scan generated a sparse image of only these regions, but using a highly increased electron dose. By applying a selective low-pass filter and combining both datasets, a single image was generated. The resulting image exhibited a factor of ≈3 better SNR than an image acquired with uniform sampling on a Cartesian grid and the same total acquisition time. This result implies that the required electron dose (or acquisition time) for the adaptive scanning method is a factor of ten lower than for uniform scanning. PMID:27150131

  16. Feature Adaptive Sampling for Scanning Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dahmen, Tim; Engstler, Michael; Pauly, Christoph; Trampert, Patrick; de Jonge, Niels; Mücklich, Frank; Slusallek, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    A new method for the image acquisition in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was introduced. The method used adaptively increased pixel-dwell times to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in areas of high detail. In areas of low detail, the electron dose was reduced on a per pixel basis, and a-posteriori image processing techniques were applied to remove the resulting noise. The technique was realized by scanning the sample twice. The first, quick scan used small pixel-dwell times to generate a first, noisy image using a low electron dose. This image was analyzed automatically, and a software algorithm generated a sparse pattern of regions of the image that require additional sampling. A second scan generated a sparse image of only these regions, but using a highly increased electron dose. By applying a selective low-pass filter and combining both datasets, a single image was generated. The resulting image exhibited a factor of ≈3 better SNR than an image acquired with uniform sampling on a Cartesian grid and the same total acquisition time. This result implies that the required electron dose (or acquisition time) for the adaptive scanning method is a factor of ten lower than for uniform scanning. PMID:27150131

  17. Feature Adaptive Sampling for Scanning Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahmen, Tim; Engstler, Michael; Pauly, Christoph; Trampert, Patrick; de Jonge, Niels; Mücklich, Frank; Slusallek, Philipp

    2016-05-01

    A new method for the image acquisition in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was introduced. The method used adaptively increased pixel-dwell times to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in areas of high detail. In areas of low detail, the electron dose was reduced on a per pixel basis, and a-posteriori image processing techniques were applied to remove the resulting noise. The technique was realized by scanning the sample twice. The first, quick scan used small pixel-dwell times to generate a first, noisy image using a low electron dose. This image was analyzed automatically, and a software algorithm generated a sparse pattern of regions of the image that require additional sampling. A second scan generated a sparse image of only these regions, but using a highly increased electron dose. By applying a selective low-pass filter and combining both datasets, a single image was generated. The resulting image exhibited a factor of ≈3 better SNR than an image acquired with uniform sampling on a Cartesian grid and the same total acquisition time. This result implies that the required electron dose (or acquisition time) for the adaptive scanning method is a factor of ten lower than for uniform scanning.

  18. Near-Field Scanning Optical Microscopy and Raman Microscopy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harootunian, Alec Tate

    1987-09-01

    Both a one dimensional near-field scanning optical microscope and Raman microprobe were constructed. In near -field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) a subwavelength aperture is scanned in the near-field of the object. Radiation transmitted through the aperture is collected to form an image as the aperture scans over the object. The resolution of an NSOM system is essentially wavelength independent and is limited by the diameter of the aperture used to scan the object. NSOM was developed in an effort to provide a nondestructive in situ high spatial resolution probe while still utilizing photons at optical wavelengths. The Raman microprobe constructed provided vibrational Raman information with spatial resolution equivalent that of a conventional diffraction limited microscope. Both transmission studies and near-field diffration studies of subwavelength apertures were performed. Diffraction theories for a small aperture in an infinitely thin conducting screen, a slit in a thick conducting screen, and an aperture in a black screen were examined. All three theories indicate collimation of radiation to the size to the size of the subwavelength aperture or slit in the near-field. Theoretical calculations and experimental results indicate that light transmitted through subwavelength apertures is readily detectable. Light of wavelength 4579 (ANGSTROM) was transmitted through apertures with diameters as small as 300 (ANGSTROM). These studies indicate the feasibility of constructing an NSOM system. One dimensional transmission and fluorescence NSOM systems were constructed. Apertures in the tips of metallized glass pipettes width inner diameters of less than 1000 (ANGSTROM) were used as a light source in the NSOM system. A tunneling current was used to maintain the aperture position in the near-field. Fluorescence NSOM was demonstrated for the first time. Microspectroscopic and Raman microscopic studies of turtle cone oil droplets were performed. Both the Raman vibrational

  19. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Microscopy: Computed Imaging for Scanned Coherent Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Davis, Brynmor J; Marks, Daniel L; Ralston, Tyler S; Carney, P Scott; Boppart, Stephen A

    2008-06-01

    Three-dimensional image formation in microscopy is greatly enhanced by the use of computed imaging techniques. In particular, Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Microscopy (ISAM) allows the removal of out-of-focus blur in broadband, coherent microscopy. Earlier methods, such as optical coherence tomography (OCT), utilize interferometric ranging, but do not apply computed imaging methods and therefore must scan the focal depth to acquire extended volumetric images. ISAM removes the need to scan the focus by allowing volumetric image reconstruction from data collected at a single focal depth. ISAM signal processing techniques are similar to the Fourier migration methods of seismology and the Fourier reconstruction methods of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR). In this article ISAM is described and the close ties between ISAM and SAR are explored. ISAM and a simple strip-map SAR system are placed in a common mathematical framework and compared to OCT and radar respectively. This article is intended to serve as a review of ISAM, and will be especially useful to readers with a background in SAR. PMID:20948975

  20. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Microscopy: Computed Imaging for Scanned Coherent Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Brynmor. J.; Marks, Daniel. L.; Ralston, Tyler. S.; Carney, P. Scott; Boppart, Stephen. A.

    2008-01-01

    Three-dimensional image formation in microscopy is greatly enhanced by the use of computed imaging techniques. In particular, Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Microscopy (ISAM) allows the removal of out-of-focus blur in broadband, coherent microscopy. Earlier methods, such as optical coherence tomography (OCT), utilize interferometric ranging, but do not apply computed imaging methods and therefore must scan the focal depth to acquire extended volumetric images. ISAM removes the need to scan the focus by allowing volumetric image reconstruction from data collected at a single focal depth. ISAM signal processing techniques are similar to the Fourier migration methods of seismology and the Fourier reconstruction methods of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR). In this article ISAM is described and the close ties between ISAM and SAR are explored. ISAM and a simple strip-map SAR system are placed in a common mathematical framework and compared to OCT and radar respectively. This article is intended to serve as a review of ISAM, and will be especially useful to readers with a background in SAR. PMID:20948975

  1. Scanning Probe Microscopy of Organic Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Obadiah G.

    Nanostructured composites of organic semiconductors are a promising class of materials for the manufacture of low-cost solar cells. Understanding how the nanoscale morphology of these materials affects their efficiency as solar energy harvesters is crucial to their eventual potential for large-scale deployment for primary power generation. In this thesis we describe the use of optoelectronic scanning-probe based microscopy methods to study this efficiency-structure relationship with nanoscale resolution. In particular, our objective is to make spatially resolved measurements of each step in the power conversion process from photons to an electric current, including charge generation, transport, and recombination processes, and correlate them with local device structure. We have achieved two aims in this work: first, to develop and apply novel electrically sensitive scanning probe microscopy experiments to study the optoelectronic materials and processes discussed above; and second, to deepen our understanding of the physics underpinning our experimental techniques. In the first case, we have applied conductive-, and photoconductive atomic force (cAFM & pcAFM) microscopy to measure both local photocurrent collection and dark charge transport properties in a variety of model and novel organic solar cell composites, including polymer/fullerene blends, and polymer-nanowire/fullerene blends, finding that local heterogeneity is the rule, and that improvements in the uniformity of specific beneficial nanostructures could lead to large increases in efficiency. We have used scanning Kelvin probe microscopy (SKPM) and time resolved-electrostatic force microscopy (trEFM) to characterize all-polymer blends, quantifying their sensitivity to photochemical degradation and the subsequent formation of local charge traps. We find that while trEFM provides a sensitive measure of local quantum efficiency, SKPM is generally unsuited to measurements of efficiency, less sensitive than tr

  2. Functional Probes for Scanning Probe Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Kotone; Eguchi, Toyoaki; An, Toshu; Fujikawa, Yasunori; Hasegawa, Yukio; Sakurai, Toshio

    2007-03-01

    For superior performance of scanning probe microscopy, we are working to fabricate functional probes. For Kelvin probe force microscopy, we fabricated a metal-tip cantilever by attaching a thin metal wire to a regular Si cantilever and milling it by focused ion beam (FIB)^1. By using the W tip with a curvature radius of 3.5 nm, we obtained the potential profile of Ge/Si(105) surface in atomic resolution with the energy resolution better than 3 meV^2. For synchrotron-radiation-light-irradiated scanning tunneling microscopy which aims at atomically resolved elemental analysis, we fabricated a glass-coated W tip using FIB^3. It is found that the glass coating blocks the unwanted secondary electrons, which come from large area of the sample, by a factor of 40 with respect to the case no coating. Using the tip to detect the electrons emitted just below the tip, we obtained element specific images with a spatial resolution better than 20 nm under the photo irradiation whose energy is just above the adsorption edge of the element^4. 1 K. Akiyama et al., RSI 76, 033705 (2005) 2 T. Eguchi, K. Akiyama et al., PRL 93, 266102 (2004) 3 K. Akiyama et al., RSI 76, 083711 (2005) 4 T. Eguchi, K. Akiyama et al., APL, in press

  3. Functional probes for scanning probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Yukio; Akiyama, Kotone; Hamada, Masayuki; Eguchi, Toyoaki; An, Toshu; Fujikawa, Yasunori; Sakurai, Toshio

    2008-03-01

    Inspite of importance of the probe in scanning probe microscopy (SPM), little attention was paid for the SPM probes for most of the measurements of SPM. We developed sharp metal-tip cantilevers with a typical curvature radius better than 5nm using focused ion beam (FIB) suitable for Kelvin probe force microscopy (KFM)^1. We obtained atomically resolved KFM images with an energy resolution less than 3meV with the probe^2. We also developed a glass-coated tungsten tip for synchrotron radiation-scanning tunneling microscopy with the FIB method^3 and obtained elementally resolved images in a resolution less than 20nm^4. We are now developing a precise atomic force microscope (AFM) lithography^5 with the FIB-milled tip attached to a quartz tuning fork controlled by noncontact AFM. We will present recent results of our AFM lithography, such as an Au line with a width of 20˜30 nm and characters drawn with Au nano dots on a Si surface. 1 K. Akiyama et al., RSI 76, 033705 (2005) 2 T. Eguchi, K. Akiyama et al., PRL 93, 266102 (2004) 3 K. Akiyama et al., RSI 76, 083711 (2005) 4 T. Eguchi, K. Akiyama et al., APL 89, 243119 (2006) 5 K. Akiyama et al., JP 61, 22 (2007).

  4. Intermittent contact hydration scanning probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloisi, G.; Bacci, F.; Carlà, M.; Dolci, D.

    2010-07-01

    Hydration scanning probe microscopy is a technique similar to scanning tunneling microscopy, in which the probe current, sustained by the slight surface conduction of a thin hydration layer covering an insulating support surface, is essentially electrochemical in nature instead of electronic tunneling. Such a technique allows the imaging of a great variety of samples, including insulators, provided that they are hydrophilic, as well as the study of molecular samples of biological interest (such as DNA) fixed on a suitable supporting surface. The main problem to obtain stable and reproducible images comes from the very critical determination of the operating conditions under which the probe-hydration layer interaction does not lead to the formation of a relatively large water meniscus. It has been suggested that this issue can be removed by adding a high frequency oscillation to the probe movement, as in tapping atomic force microscopy. Meniscus formation and breakup have been investigated in order to determine the best values for the amplitude and the frequency of the oscillation. Results obtained in this mode are discussed in comparison with the usual continuous contact mode.

  5. Immunogold Labeling for Scanning Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Martin W; Fišerová, Jindřiška

    2016-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopes are useful biological tools that can be used to image the surface of whole organisms, tissues, cells, cellular components, and macromolecules. Processes and structures that exist at surfaces can be imaged in pseudo, or real 3D at magnifications ranging from about 10× to 1,000,000×. Therefore a whole multicellular organism, such as a fly, or a single protein embedded in one of its cell membranes can be visualized. In order to identify that protein at high resolution, or to see and quantify its distribution at lower magnifications, samples can be labeled with antibodies. Any surface that can be exposed can potentially be studied in this way. Presented here is a generic method for immunogold labeling for scanning electron microscopy, using two examples of specimens: isolated nuclear envelopes and the cytoskeleton of mammalian culture cells. Various parameters for sample preparation, fixation, immunogold labeling, drying, metal coating, and imaging are discussed so that the best immunogold scanning electron microscopy results can be obtained from different types of specimens. PMID:27515090

  6. Optical microscopy versus scanning electron microscopy in urolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Marickar, Y M Fazil; Lekshmi, P R; Varma, Luxmi; Koshy, Peter

    2009-10-01

    Stone analysis is incompletely done in many clinical centers. Identification of the stone component is essential for deciding future prophylaxis. X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) still remains a distant dream for routine hospital work. It is in this context that optical microscopy is suggested as an alternate procedure. The objective of this article was to assess the utility of an optical microscope which gives magnification of up to 40x and gives clear picture of the surface of the stones. In order to authenticate the morphological analysis of urinary stones, SEM and elemental distribution analysis were performed. A total of 250 urinary stones of different compositions were collected from stone clinic, photographed, observed under an optical microscope, and optical photographs were taken at different angles. Twenty-five representative samples among these were gold sputtered to make them conductive and were fed into the SEM machine. Photographs of the samples were taken at different angles at magnifications up to 4,000. Elemental distribution analysis (EDAX) was done to confirm the composition. The observations of the two studies were compared. The different appearances of the stones under optical illuminated microscopy were mostly standardized appearances, namely bosselations of pure whewellite, spiculations of weddellite, bright yellow colored appearance of uric acid, and dirty white amorphous appearance of phosphates. SEM and EDAX gave clearer pictures and gave added confirmation of the stone composition. From the references thus obtained, it was possible to confirm the composition by studying the optical microscopic pictures. Higher magnification capacity of the SEM and the EDAX patterns are useful to give reference support for performing optical microscopy work. After standardization, routine analysis can be performed with optical microscopy. The advantage of the optical microscope is that, it

  7. Silent Sources and Scanning Magnetic Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade Lima, E.; Hardin, D.; Baratchart, L.; Weiss, B. P.; Saff, E.

    2011-12-01

    Analysis of magnetization distributions in geological samples at submillimeter scales can reveal important characteristics of sample formation and possible alteration that are not distinguishable in bulk measurements. This has spurred an increasing interest in instrument development for scanning magnetic microscopy and associated data processing techniques. Virtually all of these instruments record maps of a single component of the magnetic field on a plane at a fixed distance above the sample. Given that they are unable to directly measure the magnetization distribution, an inverse problem must be solved to estimate magnetizations from field maps. Thus, the development of inversion techniques is as critical as the development of the high sensitivity instruments with high spatial resolution. However, an underlying question remains: is it always possible to retrieve the magnetization distribution from the magnetic field data above a finite, thin planar sample, even in the ideal case of a noiseless infinitesimal sensor and in the absence of numerical error? To investigate this issue and determine the ultimate limitations of scanning magnetic microscopy, we examine the operator that maps two-dimensional magnetization distributions into magnetic field maps, as well as at the inverse problem in the Fourier domain. In particular, we focus on magnetization distributions that have known finite dimensions, as in scanning microscopy. We show that magnetically silent sources exist under specific circumstances, which may preclude obtaining the physical magnetization distribution in such cases, regardless of the instrumentation and inversion technique used. In many practical situations, however, regularization methods can be incorporated into the reconstruction so as to yield the correct solution.

  8. Scanning electron microscopy studies of bacterial cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swinger, Tracy; Blust, Brittni; Calabrese, Joseph; Tzolov, Marian

    2012-02-01

    Scanning electron microscopy is a powerful tool to study the morphology of bacteria. We have used conventional scanning electron microscope to follow the modification of the bacterial morphology over the course of the bacterial growth cycle. The bacteria were fixed in vapors of Glutaraldehyde and ruthenium oxide applied in sequence. A gold film of about 5 nm was deposited on top of the samples to avoid charging and to enhance the contrast. We have selected two types of bacteria Alcaligenes faecalis and Kocuria rhizophila. Their development was carefully monitored and samples were taken for imaging in equal time intervals during their cultivation. These studies are supporting our efforts to develop an optical method for identification of the Gram-type of bacterial cultures.

  9. Soft stylus probes for scanning electrochemical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Salazar, Fernando; Träuble, Markus; Li, Fei; Busnel, Jean-Marc; Gassner, Anne-Laure; Hojeij, Mohamad; Wittstock, Gunther; Girault, Hubert H

    2009-08-15

    A soft stylus microelectrode probe has been developed to carry out scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) of rough, tilted, and large substrates in contact mode. It is fabricated by first ablating a microchannel in a polyethylene terephthalate thin film and filling it with a conductive carbon ink. After curing the carbon track and lamination with a polymer film, the V-shaped stylus was cut thereby forming a probe, with the cross section of the carbon track at the tip being exposed either by UV-photoablation machining or by blade cutting followed by polishing to produce a crescent moon-shaped carbon microelectrode. The probe properties have been assessed by cyclic voltammetry, approach curves, and line scans over electrochemically active and inactive substrates of different roughness. The influence of probe bending on contact mode imaging was then characterized using simple patterns. Boundary element method simulations were employed to rationalize the distance-dependent electrochemical response of the soft stylus probes. PMID:19630394

  10. Scanning focused refractive-index microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Teng-Qian; Ye, Qing; Wang, Xiao-Wan; Wang, Jin; Deng, Zhi-Chao; Mei, Jian-Chun; Zhou, Wen-Yuan; Zhang, Chun-Ping; Tian, Jian-Guo

    2014-07-01

    We present a novel scanning focused refractive-index microscopy (SFRIM) technique to obtain the refractive index (RI) profiles of objects. The method uses a focused laser as the light source, and combines the derivative total reflection method (DTRM), projection magnification, and scanning technique together. SFRIM is able to determine RIs with an accuracy of 0.002, and the central spatial resolution achieved is 1 µm, which is smaller than the size of the focal spot. The results of measurements carried out on cedar oil and a gradient-refractive-index (GRIN) lens agree well with theoretical expectations, verifying the accuracy of SFRIM. Furthermore, using SFRIM, to the best of our knowledge we have extracted for the first time the RI profile of a periodically modulated photosensitive gelatin sample. SFRIM is the first RI profile-resolved reflected light microscopy technique that can be applied to scattering and absorbing samples. SFRIM enables the possibility of performing RI profile measurements in a variety of applications, including optical waveguides, photosensitive materials and devices, photorefractive effect studies, and RI imaging in biomedical fields.

  11. Scanning focused refractive-index microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Teng-Qian; Ye, Qing; Wang, Xiao-Wan; Wang, Jin; Deng, Zhi-Chao; Mei, Jian-Chun; Zhou, Wen-Yuan; Zhang, Chun-Ping; Tian, Jian-Guo

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel scanning focused refractive-index microscopy (SFRIM) technique to obtain the refractive index (RI) profiles of objects. The method uses a focused laser as the light source, and combines the derivative total reflection method (DTRM), projection magnification, and scanning technique together. SFRIM is able to determine RIs with an accuracy of 0.002, and the central spatial resolution achieved is 1 µm, which is smaller than the size of the focal spot. The results of measurements carried out on cedar oil and a gradient-refractive-index (GRIN) lens agree well with theoretical expectations, verifying the accuracy of SFRIM. Furthermore, using SFRIM, to the best of our knowledge we have extracted for the first time the RI profile of a periodically modulated photosensitive gelatin sample. SFRIM is the first RI profile-resolved reflected light microscopy technique that can be applied to scattering and absorbing samples. SFRIM enables the possibility of performing RI profile measurements in a variety of applications, including optical waveguides, photosensitive materials and devices, photorefractive effect studies, and RI imaging in biomedical fields. PMID:25008374

  12. Scanning focused refractive-index microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Teng-Qian; Ye, Qing; Wang, Xiao-Wan; Wang, Jin; Deng, Zhi-Chao; Mei, Jian-Chun; Zhou, Wen-Yuan; Zhang, Chun-Ping; Tian, Jian-Guo

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel scanning focused refractive-index microscopy (SFRIM) technique to obtain the refractive index (RI) profiles of objects. The method uses a focused laser as the light source, and combines the derivative total reflection method (DTRM), projection magnification, and scanning technique together. SFRIM is able to determine RIs with an accuracy of 0.002, and the central spatial resolution achieved is 1 µm, which is smaller than the size of the focal spot. The results of measurements carried out on cedar oil and a gradient-refractive-index (GRIN) lens agree well with theoretical expectations, verifying the accuracy of SFRIM. Furthermore, using SFRIM, to the best of our knowledge we have extracted for the first time the RI profile of a periodically modulated photosensitive gelatin sample. SFRIM is the first RI profile-resolved reflected light microscopy technique that can be applied to scattering and absorbing samples. SFRIM enables the possibility of performing RI profile measurements in a variety of applications, including optical waveguides, photosensitive materials and devices, photorefractive effect studies, and RI imaging in biomedical fields. PMID:25008374

  13. Two-Photon Laser Scanning Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimmerjahn, A.; Theer, P.; Helmchen, F.

    Since its inception more than 15 years ago, two-photon laser scanning microscopy (2PLSM) has found widespread use in biological and medical research. Two-photon microscopy is based on simultaneous absorption of two photons by fluorophores and subsequent fluorescence emission, a process which under normal illumination conditions is highly improbable. Theoretically described around 1930 by Maria Göppert-Mayer [1], the first experimental demonstration of two-photon excitation had to await the invention of the laser, which produced sufficiently high light intensities to observe two-photon absorption events [2]. Only after the development of ultrafast lasers providing subpicosecond light pulses with high peak power intensities, however, two-photon-excited fluorescence became practical in a laser-scanning microscope [3]. Since then 2PLSM has developed into the method of choice for high-resolution imaging in living animals (reviewed in [4,5]). One of the main reasons is the low sensitivity of 2PLSM to light scattering, which enables imaging relatively deep inside biological tissue and direct observation of the dynamic behavior of cells in their native environment. In this chapter, we introduce the physical principles governing 2PLSM and briefly describe the key instrument components. We give an overview of fluorescence labeling techniques and how they are combined with 2PLSM for functional imaging and photomanipulation in living tissue. Finally, we discuss limitations and provide some future perspectives.

  14. Video-rate resonant scanning multiphoton microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, Nathaniel D.; Chung, Euiheon; Cook, Daniel C.; Han, Xiaoxing; Gruionu, Gabriel; Liao, Shan; Munn, Lance L.; Padera, Timothy P.; Fukumura, Dai; Jain, Rakesh K.

    2013-01-01

    The abnormal tumor microenvironment fuels tumor progression, metastasis, immune suppression, and treatment resistance. Over last several decades, developments in and applications of intravital microscopy have provided unprecedented insights into the dynamics of the tumor microenvironment. In particular, intravital multiphoton microscopy has revealed the abnormal structure and function of tumor-associated blood and lymphatic vessels, the role of aberrant tumor matrix in drug delivery, invasion and metastasis of tumor cells, the dynamics of immune cell trafficking to and within tumors, and gene expression in tumors. However, traditional multiphoton microscopy suffers from inherently slow imaging rates—only a few frames per second, thus unable to capture more rapid events such as blood flow, lymphatic flow, and cell movement within vessels. Here, we report the development and implementation of a video-rate multiphoton microscope (VR-MPLSM) based on resonant galvanometer mirror scanning that is capable of recording at 30 frames per second and acquiring intravital multispectral images. We show that the design of the system can be readily implemented and is adaptable to various experimental models. As examples, we demonstrate the utility of the system to directly measure flow within tumors, capture metastatic cancer cells moving within the brain vasculature and cells in lymphatic vessels, and image acute responses to changes in a vascular network. VR-MPLSM thus has the potential to further advance intravital imaging and provide new insight into the biology of the tumor microenvironment. PMID:24353926

  15. Self-sensing atomic force microscopy cantilevers based on tunnel magnetoresistance sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavassolizadeh, Ali; Meier, Tobias; Rott, Karsten; Reiss, Günter; Quandt, Eckhard; Hölscher, Hendrik; Meyners, Dirk

    2013-04-01

    Here, we introduce self-sensing cantilevers for atomic force microscopy (AFM) based on tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) sensors. These TMR sensors are integrated into the AFM cantilevers and consist of a magnetically stable layer and a sensing magnetostrictive CoFeB layer separated by a MgO tunneling barrier and can be as small as 10 μm × 10 μm. Their TMR values and resistance-area products are about 121% and 61 kΩμm2, respectively. A comparison of AFM data simultaneously obtained with a self-sensing cantilever with a 37 μm × 37 μm large TMR sensor and the conventional optical beam deflection method revealed the same data quality.

  16. A scanning probe microscope for magnetoresistive cantilevers utilizing a nested scanner design for large-area scans.

    PubMed

    Meier, Tobias; Förste, Alexander; Tavassolizadeh, Ali; Rott, Karsten; Meyners, Dirk; Gröger, Roland; Reiss, Günter; Quandt, Eckhard; Schimmel, Thomas; Hölscher, Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    We describe an atomic force microscope (AFM) for the characterization of self-sensing tunneling magnetoresistive (TMR) cantilevers. Furthermore, we achieve a large scan-range with a nested scanner design of two independent piezo scanners: a small high resolution scanner with a scan range of 5 × 5 × 5 μm(3) is mounted on a large-area scanner with a scan range of 800 × 800 × 35 μm(3). In order to characterize TMR sensors on AFM cantilevers as deflection sensors, the AFM is equipped with a laser beam deflection setup to measure the deflection of the cantilevers independently. The instrument is based on a commercial AFM controller and capable to perform large-area scanning directly without stitching of images. Images obtained on different samples such as calibration standard, optical grating, EPROM chip, self-assembled monolayers and atomic step-edges of gold demonstrate the high stability of the nested scanner design and the performance of self-sensing TMR cantilevers. PMID:25821686

  17. A scanning probe microscope for magnetoresistive cantilevers utilizing a nested scanner design for large-area scans

    PubMed Central

    Förste, Alexander; Tavassolizadeh, Ali; Rott, Karsten; Meyners, Dirk; Gröger, Roland; Reiss, Günter; Quandt, Eckhard; Schimmel, Thomas; Hölscher, Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    Summary We describe an atomic force microscope (AFM) for the characterization of self-sensing tunneling magnetoresistive (TMR) cantilevers. Furthermore, we achieve a large scan-range with a nested scanner design of two independent piezo scanners: a small high resolution scanner with a scan range of 5 × 5 × 5 μm3 is mounted on a large-area scanner with a scan range of 800 × 800 × 35 μm3. In order to characterize TMR sensors on AFM cantilevers as deflection sensors, the AFM is equipped with a laser beam deflection setup to measure the deflection of the cantilevers independently. The instrument is based on a commercial AFM controller and capable to perform large-area scanning directly without stitching of images. Images obtained on different samples such as calibration standard, optical grating, EPROM chip, self-assembled monolayers and atomic step-edges of gold demonstrate the high stability of the nested scanner design and the performance of self-sensing TMR cantilevers. PMID:25821686

  18. Angular Approach Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Shevchuk, Andrew; Tokar, Sergiy; Gopal, Sahana; Sanchez-Alonso, Jose L; Tarasov, Andrei I; Vélez-Ortega, A Catalina; Chiappini, Ciro; Rorsman, Patrik; Stevens, Molly M; Gorelik, Julia; Frolenkov, Gregory I; Klenerman, David; Korchev, Yuri E

    2016-05-24

    Scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) is a super-resolution live imaging technique that uses a glass nanopipette as an imaging probe to produce three-dimensional (3D) images of cell surface. SICM can be used to analyze cell morphology at nanoscale, follow membrane dynamics, precisely position an imaging nanopipette close to a structure of interest, and use it to obtain ion channel recordings or locally apply stimuli or drugs. Practical implementations of these SICM advantages, however, are often complicated due to the limitations of currently available SICM systems that inherited their design from other scanning probe microscopes in which the scan assembly is placed right above the specimen. Such arrangement makes the setting of optimal illumination necessary for phase contrast or the use of high magnification upright optics difficult. Here, we describe the designs that allow mounting SICM scan head on a standard patch-clamp micromanipulator and imaging the sample at an adjustable approach angle. This angle could be as shallow as the approach angle of a patch-clamp pipette between a water immersion objective and the specimen. Using this angular approach SICM, we obtained topographical images of cells grown on nontransparent nanoneedle arrays, of islets of Langerhans, and of hippocampal neurons under upright optical microscope. We also imaged previously inaccessible areas of cells such as the side surfaces of the hair cell stereocilia and the intercalated disks of isolated cardiac myocytes, and performed targeted patch-clamp recordings from the latter. Thus, our new, to our knowledge, angular approach SICM allows imaging of living cells on nontransparent substrates and a seamless integration with most patch-clamp setups on either inverted or upright microscopes, which would facilitate research in cell biophysics and physiology. PMID:27224490

  19. Hexamethyldisilazane for scanning electron microscopy of Gastrotricha.

    PubMed

    Hochberg, R; Litvaitis, M K

    2000-01-01

    We evaluated treatment with hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS) as an alternative to critical-point drying (CPD) for preparing microscopic Gastrotricha for scanning electron microscopy (SEM). We prepared large marine (2 mm) and small freshwater (100 microm) gastrotrichs using HMDS as the primary dehydration solvent and compared the results to earlier investigations using CPD. The results of HMDS dehydration are similar to or better than CPD for resolution of two important taxonomic features: cuticular ornamentation and patterns of ciliation. The body wall of both sculpted (Lepidodermella) and smooth (Dolichodasys) gastrotrichs retained excellent morphology as did the delicate sensory and locomotory cilia. The only unfavorable result of HMDS dehydration was an occasional coagulation of gold residue when the solvent had not fully evaporated before sputter-coating. We consider HMDS an effective alternative for preparing of gastrotrichs for SEM because it saves time and expense compared to CPD. PMID:10810982

  20. Scanning electron microscopy of tinea nigra*

    PubMed Central

    Guarenti, Isabelle Maffei; de Almeida, Hiram Larangeira; Leitão, Aline Hatzenberger; Rocha, Nara Moreira; Silva, Ricardo Marques e

    2014-01-01

    Tinea nigra is a rare superficial mycosis caused by Hortaea werneckii. This infection presents as asymptomatic brown to black maculae mostly in palmo-plantar regions. We performed scanning electron microscopy of a superficial shaving of a tinea nigra lesion. The examination of the outer surface of the sample showed the epidermis with corneocytes and hyphae and elimination of fungal filaments. The inner surface of the sample showed important aggregation of hyphae among keratinocytes, which formed small fungal colonies. The ultrastructural findings correlated with those of dermoscopic examination - the small fungal aggregations may be the dark spicules seen on dermoscopy - and also allowed to document the mode of dissemination of tinea nigra, showing how hyphae are eliminated on the surface of the lesion. PMID:24770516

  1. Electric fields in Scanning Electron Microscopy simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arat, K. T.; Bolten, J.; Klimpel, T.; Unal, N.

    2016-03-01

    The electric field distribution and charging effects in Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) were studied by extending a Monte-Carlo based SEM simulator by a fast and accurate multigrid (MG) based 3D electric field solver. The main focus is on enabling short simulation times with maintaining sufficient accuracy, so that SEM simulation can be used in practical applications. The implementation demonstrates a gain in computation speed, when compared to a Gauss-Seidel based reference solver is roughly factor of 40, with negligible differences in the result (~10-6 𝑉). In addition, the simulations were compared with experimental SEM measurements using also complex 3D sample, showing that i) the modelling of e-fields improves the simulation accuracy, and ii) multigrid method provide a significant benefit in terms of simulation time.

  2. Imaging Extraterrestrial Rocks with Scanning Magnetic Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade Lima, E.; Weiss, B. P.; Gattacceca, J.

    2013-05-01

    Scanning magnetic microscopes map the magnetic field produced by a geological sample at submillimeter scales. Such magnetic field maps reveal invaluable information about rocks with complex fine-scale structures. In particular, instruments based on high-sensitivity SQUID sensors can detect magnetic moments as weak as 10^-16 Am2, outperforming by four orders of magnitude the detection limit of the best commercial moment magnetometers. This unique combination of high spatial resolution and high moment sensitivity enables paleomagnetic analyses on samples that have not been accessible to standard moment magnetometry. Targets for scanning magnetic microscopy include extended samples (such as thin sections of meteorites, lunar rocks, and earth rocks) and individual particles of small size (< 500 μm) comprising impact melt spherules, zircon and other silicate cristals, chondrules, and cosmic dust. Here we present applications of the technique focusing on extraterrestrial samples and discuss how it can be an important tool in investigating the effects of shock on the magnetic record in rocks.

  3. Scanning Tunneling Optical Resonance Microscopy Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Lau, Janis E.; Jenkins, Phillip P.; Castro, Stephanie L.; Tin, Padetha; Wilt, David M.; Pal, Anna Maria; Fahey, Stephen D.

    2004-01-01

    The ability to determine the in situ optoelectronic properties of semiconductor materials has become especially important as the size of device architectures has decreased and the development of complex microsystems has increased. Scanning Tunneling Optical Resonance Microscopy, or STORM, can interrogate the optical bandgap as a function of its position within a semiconductor micro-structure. This technique uses a tunable solidstate titanium-sapphire laser whose output is "chopped" using a spatial light modulator and is coupled by a fiber-optic connector to a scanning tunneling microscope in order to illuminate the tip-sample junction. The photoenhanced portion of the tunneling current is spectroscopically measured using a lock-in technique. The capabilities of this technique were verified using semiconductor microstructure calibration standards that were grown by organometallic vapor-phase epitaxy. Bandgaps characterized by STORM measurements were found to be in good agreement with the bulk values determined by transmission spectroscopy and photoluminescence and with the theoretical values that were based on x-ray diffraction results.

  4. Radio-frequency scanning tunnelling microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kemiktarak, U; Ndukum, T; Schwab, K C; Ekinci, K L

    2007-11-01

    The scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) relies on localized electron tunnelling between a sharp probe tip and a conducting sample to attain atomic-scale spatial resolution. In the 25-year period since its invention, the STM has helped uncover a wealth of phenomena in diverse physical systems--ranging from semiconductors to superconductors to atomic and molecular nanosystems. A severe limitation in scanning tunnelling microscopy is the low temporal resolution, originating from the diminished high-frequency response of the tunnel current readout circuitry. Here we overcome this limitation by measuring the reflection from a resonant inductor-capacitor circuit in which the tunnel junction is embedded, and demonstrate electronic bandwidths as high as 10 MHz. This approximately 100-fold bandwidth improvement on the state of the art translates into fast surface topography as well as delicate measurements in mesoscopic electronics and mechanics. Broadband noise measurements across the tunnel junction using this radio-frequency STM have allowed us to perform thermometry at the nanometre scale. Furthermore, we have detected high-frequency mechanical motion with a sensitivity approaching approximately 15 fm Hz(-1/2). This sensitivity is on par with the highest available from nanoscale optical and electrical displacement detection techniques, and the radio-frequency STM is expected to be capable of quantum-limited position measurements. PMID:17972882

  5. Possibilities of holographic techniques in laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, Yu.; Muravyeva, M.; Dudenkova, V.; Mukhina, I.; Meglinski, I.

    2015-07-01

    Holographic scanning microscopy - novel technique both in laser scanning microscopy and digital holographic microscopy allow multimodal approach to cell and tissue investigation in biomedical applications promising new advantages (quantitative phase imaging, superresolution, computerized tomography), but regular reconstruction leads to incorrectness. Analysis of light propagation through the schematics allows to offer reconstruction procedures depending on recording conditions.

  6. Complete information acquisition in scanning probe microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Belianinov, Alex; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jesse, Stephen

    2015-03-13

    In the last three decades, scanning probe microscopy (SPM) has emerged as a primary tool for exploring and controlling the nanoworld. A critical part of the SPM measurements is the information transfer from the tip-surface junction to a macroscopic measurement system. This process reduces the many degrees of freedom of a vibrating cantilever to relatively few parameters recorded as images. Similarly, the details of dynamic cantilever response at sub-microsecond time scales of transients, higher-order eigenmodes and harmonics are averaged out by transitioning to millisecond time scale of pixel acquisition. Hence, the amount of information available to the external observer is severely limited, and its selection is biased by the chosen data processing method. Here, we report a fundamentally new approach for SPM imaging based on information theory-type analysis of the data stream from the detector. This approach allows full exploration of complex tip-surface interactions, spatial mapping of multidimensional variability of material s properties and their mutual interactions, and SPM imaging at the information channel capacity limit.

  7. Observing PAH Hydrogenation with Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassidy, A. M.; Nilsson, L.; Balog, R.; Thrower, J.; Jorgensen, B.; Hornekaer, L.

    2011-05-01

    The interaction between thin films of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and atomic H has been studied using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Observational evidence suggests that hydrogenated PAHs are located in regions of the interstellar medium (ISM) where there are high concentrations of molecular hydrogen (H2)1. It has previously been postulated that hydrogenated PAHs act as catalysts for the formation of H22. While many studies have focused on the role of ionic PAHs in the formation of H23, here we consider the role of neutral species. Neutral PAHs are expected to be stable and to condense on grain surfaces present in dense interstellar clouds, in regions of low UV flux4. PAH molecules were deposited in thin films under ultra high vacuum (UHV) conditions. Monolayer films were subsequently characterised using STM, at liquid N2 temperatures. The films were then exposed to thermally-cracked atomic H and were again characterised using STM. Contrast in the STM images showed submolecular changes to the electronic structure of the PAH molecules only after exposure to atomic H. This suggests the formation of superhydrogenated species. DFT calculations have predicted that such superhydrogenated species are stable and can act as catalysts for the formation of H2 through abstraction reactions5. Complimentary thermal desorption experiments support these findings.

  8. Complete information acquisition in scanning probe microscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Belianinov, Alex; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jesse, Stephen

    2015-03-13

    In the last three decades, scanning probe microscopy (SPM) has emerged as a primary tool for exploring and controlling the nanoworld. A critical part of the SPM measurements is the information transfer from the tip-surface junction to a macroscopic measurement system. This process reduces the many degrees of freedom of a vibrating cantilever to relatively few parameters recorded as images. Similarly, the details of dynamic cantilever response at sub-microsecond time scales of transients, higher-order eigenmodes and harmonics are averaged out by transitioning to millisecond time scale of pixel acquisition. Hence, the amount of information available to the external observer ismore » severely limited, and its selection is biased by the chosen data processing method. Here, we report a fundamentally new approach for SPM imaging based on information theory-type analysis of the data stream from the detector. This approach allows full exploration of complex tip-surface interactions, spatial mapping of multidimensional variability of material s properties and their mutual interactions, and SPM imaging at the information channel capacity limit.« less

  9. Scanning tunneling microscopy of sulfide surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Eggleston, C.M.; Hochella, M.F. Jr. )

    1990-05-01

    A fundamental understanding of reactions that occur at mineral surfaces, many of which have bearing on important environmental issues, requires knowledge of atomic surface structures. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) is a new technique which can be used to image atomic surface structures in real space. We briefly review STM theory and interpret STM images of galena (PbS) and pyrite (FeS{sub 2}) surfaces by comparing the bias-voltage dependence of the images to the electronic structures of the materials. This approach amounts to a form of tunneling spectroscopy which may ultimately be used to identify individual atoms on mineral surfaces. STM imaging was accomplished on fresh fracture surfaces as well as on surfaces that had been exposed to air for long periods of time. For galena, the Pb and S sites are distinguishable, and the S sites appear to be imaged preferentially. A galena surface which had been oxidized in air for several months was imaged, suggesting either that oxidation products are very thin, occur in local patches on the surface, or are both non-conductive and not coherently bound to the galena surface. Iron appears to be imaged preferentially on fresh fracture surfaces of pyrite. Atomic positions on a pyrite growth surface were not those expected for a termination of the bulk pyrite structure; it is likely that a surface oxidation product was imaged.

  10. EDITORIAL: Scanning probe microscopy: a visionary development Scanning probe microscopy: a visionary development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2013-07-01

    The development of scanning probe microscopy repositioned modern physics. When Rohrer and Binnig first used electronic tunnelling effects to image atoms and quantum states they did more than pin down theoretical hypotheses to real-world observables; the scanning tunnelling microscope fed imaginations, prompting researchers to consider new directions and possibilities [1]. As Rohrer once commented, 'We could show that you can easily manipulate or position something small in space with an accuracy of 10 pm.... When you can do that, you simply have ideas of what you can do' [2]. The development heralded a cavalry of scanning probe techniques—such as atomic force microscopy (AFM) [3-5], scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM) [6-8] and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) [9, 10]—that still continue to bring nanomaterials and nanoscale phenomena into fresh focus. Not long after the development of scanning tunnelling microscopy, Binnig, Quate and Gerber collaborating in California in the US published work on a new type of microscope also capable of atomic level resolution [3]. The original concept behind scanning tunnelling microscopy uses electrical conductance, which places substantial limitations on the systems that it can image. Binnig, Quate and Gerber developed the AFM to 'feel' the topology of surfaces like the needle of an old fashioned vinyl player. In this way insulators could be imaged as well. The development of a force modulation mode AFM extended the tool's reach to soft materials making images of biological samples accessible with the technique [4]. There have now been a number of demonstrations of image capture at rates that allow dynamics at the nanoscale to be tracked in real time, opening further possibilities in applications of the AFM as described in a recent review by Toshio Ando at Kanazawa University [5]. Researchers also found a way to retrieve optical information at 'super-resolution' [6, 7]. Optical microscopy provides spectral

  11. Scanned probe microscopy for thin film superconductor development

    SciTech Connect

    Moreland, J.

    1996-12-31

    Scanned probe microscopy is a general term encompassing the science of imaging based on piezoelectric driven probes for measuring local changes in nanoscale properties of materials and devices. Techniques like scanning tunneling microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and scanning potentiometry are becoming common tools in the production and development labs in the semiconductor industry. The author presents several examples of applications specific to the development of high temperature superconducting thin films and thin-film devices.

  12. PREFACE: Time-resolved scanning tunnelling microscopy Time-resolved scanning tunnelling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandvliet, Harold J. W.; Lin, Nian

    2010-07-01

    Scanning tunnelling microscopy has revolutionized our ability to image, manipulate, and investigate solid surfaces on the length scale of individual atoms and molecules. The strength of this technique lies in its imaging capabilities, since for many scientists 'seeing is believing'. However, scanning tunnelling microscopy also suffers from a severe limitation, namely its poor time resolution. Recording a scanning tunnelling microscopy image typically requires a few tens of seconds for a conventional scanning tunnelling microscope to a fraction of a second for a specially designed fast scanning tunnelling microscope. Designing and building such a fast scanning tunnelling microscope is a formidable task in itself and therefore, only a limited number of these microscopes have been built [1]. There is, however, another alternative route to significantly enhance the time resolution of a scanning tunnelling microscope. In this alternative method, the tunnelling current is measured as a function of time with the feedback loop switched off. The time resolution is determined by the bandwidth of the IV converter rather than the cut-off frequency of the feedback electronics. Such an approach requires a stable microscope and goes, of course, at the expense of spatial information. In this issue, we have collected a set of papers that gives an impression of the current status of this rapidly emerging field [2]. One of the very first attempts to extract information from tunnel current fluctuations was reported by Tringides' group in the mid-1990s [3]. They showed that the collective diffusion coefficient can be extracted from the autocorrelation of the time-dependent tunnelling current fluctuations produced by atom motion in and out of the tunnelling junction. In general, current-time traces provide direct information on switching/conformation rates and distributions of residence times. In the case where these processes are thermally induced it is rather straightforward to map

  13. Contact magnetoresistance of multilayered cobalt/copper nanostructures measured by scanning tunneling microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrow, Paul-Shane

    Giant magnetoresistance (GMR) is the change in resistance of a series of ferromagnetic/nonmagnetic (F/N) layers in an applied magnetic field. Due to its potential in magnetic sensing and data storage applications, GMR has been a topic of intense research since its discovery 20 years ago. When the source current is passed perpendicular to the planes (CPP geometry) of the F/N layers, wire- or column-shaped nanostructures are preferred over conventional planar films because their reduced lateral dimension results in a larger resistance, allowing measurements at room temperature. F/N nanostructures previously implemented to exhibit CPP-GMR require extensive postdeposition modifications, specialized substrates, or use microfabrication techniques that are not vacuum-based. For the first time oblique angle deposition (OAD) is used to create a new F/N system that exhibits CPP-GMR at room temperature. OAD is a long-known physical vapor deposition technique in which nanostructure growth is achieved through a shadowing effect that occurs when the substrate is tilted to highly glancing angles relative to the incident flux. The samples grown for this study are slanted or vertical multilayered Co/Cu nanocolumns deposited by dual source thermal evaporation. For the vertical columns, the Co and Cu layer thicknesses tl were equal with t l = 4 nm and the bilayer number M = 34, while for the slanted nanocolumns tl = 4, 7, and 16 nm, with bilayer number M = 50, 42, and 21, respectively. The physical structure of these nanocolumns was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). The vertical columns had larger diameter (˜100 nm) and showed more branching on their outer surface due to the substrate rotation. The slanted columns had a smaller diameter (˜50 nm), possessed a smoother exterior surface, and showed a clear multilayered Co/Cu structure from EELS imaging. X-ray diffraction (XRD) pole

  14. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy of Layered Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Xiaorong

    This dissertation describes studies of the surfaces of layered materials, including graphite intercalation compounds, transition-metal-dichalcogenides, and single layers of MoS_2. with scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). In order to understand how tunneling images reflect the atomic nature of sample surfaces, the electronic and structural properties of intercalated graphite surfaces imaged with STM have been investigated theoretically. The corrugation amplitude (CA) and carbon site asymmetry (CSA) are sensitive to the number of graphite layers covering the first intercalate layer, to the amount and distribution of the charge transferred from intercalate to host and to the surface subband structure. The CA and CSA can be used to map the stage domains across a freshly cleaved surface. The STM images of the surfaces of both donor and acceptor graphite intercalation compounds are discussed. The theory successfully explained the available experimental results, and yielded some predictions which have been verified in recent experiments. A STM system for operation in air was assembled. The crystalline surfaces of graphite and three transition-metal -dichalcogenides (2H-MoS_2, WTe _2 and ReSe_2) have been studied with the STM system. Single layers of MoS_2 can be obtained by the exfoliation of lithium-intercalated MoS_2 powder in water and in several alcohols. In the STM observations, the samples were prepared by depositing either an aqueous or butanol suspension of single-layer MoS_2 on graphite substrates to form restacked films with two monolayers of solvent molecules included between the layers of MoS_2 . The real-space images obtained from the films all showed the existence of an approximate 2 x 1 superstructure on the surfaces, although the 2 x 1 pattern can be modulated by the interface interaction between the MoS_2 layer and the solvent molecules. These results, in conjunction with existing x-ray diffraction and Raman results, imply that the single layers of MoS_2

  15. Detection of a magnetic bead by hybrid nanodevices using scanning gate microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corte-León, H.; Krzysteczko, P.; Marchi, F.; Motte, J.-F.; Manzin, A.; Schumacher, H. W.; Antonov, V.; Kazakova, O.

    2016-05-01

    Hybrid ferromagnetic(Py)/non-magnetic metal(Au) junctions with a width of 400 nm are studied by magnetotransport measurements, magnetic scanning gate microscopy (SGM) with a magnetic bead (MB) attached to the probe, and micromagnetic simulations. In the transverse geometry, the devices demonstrate a characteristic magnetoresistive behavior that depends on the direction of the in plane magnetic field, with minimum/maximum variation when the field is applied parallel/perpendicular to the Py wire. The SGM is performed with a NdFeB bead of 1.6 μm diameter attached to the scanning probe. Our results demonstrate that the hybrid junction can be used to detect this type of MB. A rough approximation of the sensing volume of the junction has the shape of elliptical cylinder with the volume of ˜1.51 μm3. Micromagnetic simulations coupled to a magnetotransport model including anisotropic magnetoresistance and planar Hall effects are in good agreement with the experimental findings, enabling the interpretation of the SGM images.

  16. Scanning tunneling microscopy imaging of nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Antonenko, S. V. Malinovskaya, O. S.; Mal'tsev, S. N.

    2007-07-15

    Samples of carbon paper containing multiwalled carbon nanotube films are produced by current annealing. A scanning tunneling microscope is used to examine the structure of the modified carbon paper. X-, Y-, and V-shaped nanotubes are found.

  17. Combined frequency modulated atomic force microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy detection for multi-tip scanning probe microscopy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morawski, Ireneusz; Spiegelberg, Richard; Korte, Stefan; Voigtländer, Bert

    2015-12-01

    A method which allows scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) tip biasing independent of the sample bias during frequency modulated atomic force microscopy (AFM) operation is presented. The AFM sensor is supplied by an electronic circuit combining both a frequency shift signal and a tunneling current signal by means of an inductive coupling. This solution enables a control of the tip potential independent of the sample potential. Individual tip biasing is specifically important in order to implement multi-tip STM/AFM applications. An extensional quartz sensor (needle sensor) with a conductive tip is applied to record simultaneously topography and conductivity of the sample. The high resonance frequency of the needle sensor (1 MHz) allows scanning of a large area of the surface being investigated in a reasonably short time. A recipe for the amplitude calibration which is based only on the frequency shift signal and does not require the tip being in contact is presented. Additionally, we show spectral measurements of the mechanical vibration noise of the scanning system used in the investigations.

  18. Combined frequency modulated atomic force microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy detection for multi-tip scanning probe microscopy applications.

    PubMed

    Morawski, Ireneusz; Spiegelberg, Richard; Korte, Stefan; Voigtländer, Bert

    2015-12-01

    A method which allows scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) tip biasing independent of the sample bias during frequency modulated atomic force microscopy (AFM) operation is presented. The AFM sensor is supplied by an electronic circuit combining both a frequency shift signal and a tunneling current signal by means of an inductive coupling. This solution enables a control of the tip potential independent of the sample potential. Individual tip biasing is specifically important in order to implement multi-tip STM/AFM applications. An extensional quartz sensor (needle sensor) with a conductive tip is applied to record simultaneously topography and conductivity of the sample. The high resonance frequency of the needle sensor (1 MHz) allows scanning of a large area of the surface being investigated in a reasonably short time. A recipe for the amplitude calibration which is based only on the frequency shift signal and does not require the tip being in contact is presented. Additionally, we show spectral measurements of the mechanical vibration noise of the scanning system used in the investigations. PMID:26724038

  19. Combined frequency modulated atomic force microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy detection for multi-tip scanning probe microscopy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Morawski, Ireneusz; Spiegelberg, Richard; Korte, Stefan; Voigtländer, Bert

    2015-12-15

    A method which allows scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) tip biasing independent of the sample bias during frequency modulated atomic force microscopy (AFM) operation is presented. The AFM sensor is supplied by an electronic circuit combining both a frequency shift signal and a tunneling current signal by means of an inductive coupling. This solution enables a control of the tip potential independent of the sample potential. Individual tip biasing is specifically important in order to implement multi-tip STM/AFM applications. An extensional quartz sensor (needle sensor) with a conductive tip is applied to record simultaneously topography and conductivity of the sample. The high resonance frequency of the needle sensor (1 MHz) allows scanning of a large area of the surface being investigated in a reasonably short time. A recipe for the amplitude calibration which is based only on the frequency shift signal and does not require the tip being in contact is presented. Additionally, we show spectral measurements of the mechanical vibration noise of the scanning system used in the investigations.

  20. High-resolution scanning hall probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, Clifford; Luan, Lan; Hendrik Bluhm, J.; Moler, Kathryn; Guikema, Janice; Zeldov, Eli; Shtrikman, Hadas

    2006-03-01

    Scanning hall sensors can be used to directly image magnetic fields at surfaces. They offer high resolution, high sensitivity, operability over a broad temperature range, and linearity. We have fabricated hall sensors on GaAs / Al0.35Ga0.65As and GaAs / Al0.3Ga0.7As heterostructures containing 2D electron gases 40, 39 and 140nm beneath the surface. The sensitive areas of our probes range from microns to 85nm on a side. We report on the field sensitivities of probes of various sizes and their spatial resolution in a scanning configuration.

  1. Scanning tunneling microscopy: Energetics from statistical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Feibelman, P.J.

    1995-10-15

    The attraction between two Fe atoms adsorbed on Fe(100) should be much too weak to produce the 0.5--0.7-eV bond that has been deduced by analyzing scanning tunneling micrographs. The assumption that adatom diffusion proceeds by the same mechanism at high and low temperatures may be the source of the discrepancy.

  2. Scanning tunneling microscopy on graphite and gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guichar, G. M.; Han, B.; Morand, M.; Belkaid, M. S.

    1993-03-01

    A compact, UHV-compatible scanning tunneling microscope has been built together with the necessary controlling electronics. We report on the design, development and evaluation of this setup. Some experimental results performed on highly oriented pyrolitic graphite and gold evaporated on stainless steel samples are presented.

  3. Resonance response of scanning force microscopy cantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, G.Y.; Warmack, R.J.; Thundat, T.; Allison, D.P. ); Huang, A. )

    1994-08-01

    A variational method is used to calculate the deflection and the fundamental and harmonic resonance frequencies of commercial V-shaped and rectangular atomic force microscopy cantilevers. The effective mass of V-shaped cantilevers is roughly half that calculated for the equivalent rectangular cantilevers. Damping by environmental gases, including air, nitrogen, argon, and helium, affects the frequency of maximum response and to a much greater degree the quality factor [ital Q]. Helium has the lowest viscosity, resulting in the highest [ital Q], and thus provides the best sensitivity in noncontact force microscopy. Damping in liquids is dominated by an increase in effective mass of the cantilever due to an added mass of the liquid being dragged with that cantilever.

  4. High-resolution scanning hall probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, C. W.; Guikema, J. W.; Zeldov, E.

    2005-03-01

    Scanning hall sensors can be used to directly image magnetic fields at surfaces. They offer high resolution, high sensitivity, operability from cryogenic to room temperature, and linearity. We have fabricated hall sensors on GaAs / Al0.35Ga0.65As and GaAs / Al0.3Ga0.7As heterostructures, one containing a 2D electron gas 40 nanometers below the surface and another 140nm below the surface, as well as an In0.5Al0.5As / GaSb / AlSb / InAs heterostructure containing a 2DEG 21nm below the surface. The sensitive areas of our probes range from microns to 60nm on a side. We report on the field sensitivities of the probes and their spatial resolution in a scanning configuration.

  5. Plant cell wall characterization using scanning probe microscopy techniques

    PubMed Central

    Yarbrough, John M; Himmel, Michael E; Ding, Shi-You

    2009-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is today considered a promising renewable resource for bioenergy production. A combined chemical and biological process is currently under consideration for the conversion of polysaccharides from plant cell wall materials, mainly cellulose and hemicelluloses, to simple sugars that can be fermented to biofuels. Native plant cellulose forms nanometer-scale microfibrils that are embedded in a polymeric network of hemicelluloses, pectins, and lignins; this explains, in part, the recalcitrance of biomass to deconstruction. The chemical and structural characteristics of these plant cell wall constituents remain largely unknown today. Scanning probe microscopy techniques, particularly atomic force microscopy and its application in characterizing plant cell wall structure, are reviewed here. We also further discuss future developments based on scanning probe microscopy techniques that combine linear and nonlinear optical techniques to characterize plant cell wall nanometer-scale structures, specifically apertureless near-field scanning optical microscopy and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy. PMID:19703302

  6. Laser lithography by photon scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, I.; Warmack, R.J.; Ferrell, T.L.

    1993-06-01

    We have investigated the possibility of using a photon scanning tunneling microscope (PSTM) for laser lithography. A contrast enhancement material (CEM) is coated onto a sample slide and coupled to the prism of a PSTM. The CEM becomes transparent above a laser (HeCd at a wavelength of 442 nm) intensity threshold attained due to the proximity of the probe tip. The same surface can then be inspected using the given experimental configuration by replacing the HeCd laser line with a non-exposing 633-nm HeNe laser line. Direct patterns can be produced by varying the exposure time and the shape of the probe tip.

  7. Scanning tunneling microscopy for ultracold atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Kollath, Corinna; Giamarchi, Thierry; Koehl, Michael

    2007-12-15

    We propose a versatile experimental probe for cold atomic gases analogous to the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) in condensed matter. This probe uses the coherent coupling of a single particle to the system. Depending on the measurement sequence, our probe allows us to obtain either the local density and spatial density correlations, with a resolution on the nanometer scale, or the single particle correlation function in real time. We discuss applications of this scheme to the various possible phases for a two dimensional Hubbard system of fermions in an optical lattice.

  8. Advances in Atomic Force Microscopy and Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, Thomas Robert

    The scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and the more recently developed atomic force microscope (AFM) are high resolution scanning probe microscopes capable of three dimensional atomic-scale surface profiling. In the AFM, minute forces acting between the tip of a flexible cantilever stylus and the surface of the sample cause deflections of the cantilever which are detected by a tunneling or optical sensor with subangstrom sensitivity. The AFM work presented here involves surface profiling via repulsive contact forces between 10^{-6} and 10^{-9} N in magnitude. In this contact profiling (repulsive) mode the AFM is capable of atomic resolution on both electrically conducting and insulating surfaces (unlike the STM). AFM instrumentation for room temperature and low temperature operation is discussed. The critical component of the AFM is the cantilever stylus assembly, which should have a small mass. Several microfabrication processes have been developed to produce thin film SiO_2 and Si_3N_4 microcantilevers with integrated sharp tips. Atomic resolution has been achieved with the AFM in air on a number of samples, including graphite, MoS _2, TaSe_2, WTe_2, TaS_2, and BN (the first insulator imaged with atomic resolution by any means). Various organic and molecular samples have been imaged with nanometer resolution. The difference between STM and AFM response is shown in images of TaS _2 (a charge density wave material), and in simultaneous STM/AFM images of lattice defects and adsorbates on graphite and MoS_2. A number of artifacts make STM and AFM image interpretation subtle, such as tip shape effects, frictional effects, and tracking in atomic grooves. STM images of moire patterns near grain boundaries confirm the importance of tip shape effects. Various surface modification and lithography techniques have been demonstrated with the STM and AFM, including an STM voltage pulse technique which reproducibly creates 40 A diameter holes on the surface of graphite, and a

  9. Energy gaps measured by scanning tunneling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chen; Giambattista, B.; Slough, C. G.; Coleman, R. V.; Subramanian, M. A.

    1990-11-01

    A scanning tunneling microscope (STM) has been used to measure energy gaps in the charge-density-wave (CDW) phases of the layer-structure dichalcogenides and in the high-temperature superconductor Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8. Measured values of ΔCDW at 4.2 K for 2H-TaSe2, 2H-TaS2, and 2H-NbSe2 are 80, 50, and 34 meV giving values of 2ΔCDW/kBTc equal to 15.2, 15.4, and 23.9, indicating strong coupling in these CDW systems. Measured values of ΔCDW at 4.2 K in 1T-TaSe2 and 1T-TaS2 are ~150 meV for both materials giving 2ΔCDW/kBTc~=5.8. STM scans of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 at 4.2 K resolve atoms on the BiOx layer and show possible variations in electronic structure. The energy gap determined from I versus V and dI/dV versus V curves is in the range 30-35 meV giving values of 2Δ/kBTc~=8. Spectroscopy measurements with the STM can exhibit large zero-bias anomalies which complicate the analysis of the energy-gap structure, but adequate separation has been accomplished.

  10. Scanning electrochemical microscopy of individual catalytic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tong; Yu, Yun; Zacher, Brian J; Mirkin, Michael V

    2014-12-15

    Electrochemistry at individual metal nanoparticles (NPs) can provide new insights into their electrocatalytic behavior. Herein, the electrochemical activity of single AuNPs attached to the catalytically inert carbon surface is mapped by using extremely small (≥3 nm radius) polished nanoelectrodes as tips in the scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM). The use of such small probes resulted in the spatial resolution significantly higher than in previously reported electrochemical images. The currents produced by either rapid electron transfer or the electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution reaction at a single 10 or 20 nm NP were measured and quantitatively analyzed. The developed methodology should be useful for studying the effects of nanoparticle size, geometry, and surface attachment on electrocatalytic activity in real-world application environment. PMID:25332196

  11. Combined scanning electrochemical-atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Macpherson, J V; Unwin, P R

    2000-01-15

    A combined scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM)-atomic force microscope (AFM) is described. The instrument permits the first simultaneous topographical and electrochemical measurements at surfaces, under fluid, with high spatial resolution. Simple probe tips suitable for SECM-AFM, have been fabricated by coating flattened and etched Pt microwires with insulating, electrophoretically deposited paint. The flattened portion of the probe provides a flexible cantilever (force sensor), while the coating insulates the probe such that only the tip end (electrode) is exposed to the solution. The SECM-AFM technique is illustrated with simultaneous electrochemical-probe deflection approach curves, simultaneous topographical and electrochemical imaging studies of track-etched polycarbonate ultrafiltration membranes, and etching studies of crystal surfaces. PMID:10658320

  12. Impedance feedback control for scanning electrochemical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Alpuche-Aviles, M A; Wipf, D O

    2001-10-15

    A new constant-distance imaging method based on the relationship between tip impedance and tip-substrate separation has been developed for the scanning electrochemical microscope. The tip impedance is monitored by application of a high-frequency ac voltage bias between the tip and auxiliary electrode. The high-frequency ac current is easily separated from the dc-level faradaic electrochemistry with a simple RC filter, which allows impedance measurements during feedback or generation/collection experiments. By employing a piezo-based feedback controller, we are able to maintain the impedance at a constant value and, thus, maintain a constant tip-substrate separation. Application of the method to feedback and generation/collection experiments with tip electrodes as small as 2 microm is presented. PMID:11681463

  13. C_60 Nanotips for Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halas, N. J.

    1997-03-01

    Individual C_60 molecules are shown to provide stable conductive molecular tunneling sites, or nanotips, on the probe tip of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The chemisorptive attachment and subsequent imaging of discrete single molecules on an STM tip apex have been previously reported.(K. F. Kelly, D. Sarkar, S. Prato, J. S. Resh, G. D. Hale, and N. J. Halas, J. Vac. Sci. Tech. B14), 593 (1996). Functionalizing an STM tip with a C_60 molecular adsorbate alters the density of states near the Fermi energy of the tip tunneling site and modifies its imaging characteristics. These tips have permitted the observation of threefold symmetric electron scattering surrounding point defects on graphite surfaces, an effect which could not be observed using bare metal tips.(K. F. Kelly, D. Sarkar, G. D. Hale, S. J. Oldenburg, and N. J. Halas, Science 273), 1371 (1996).

  14. Scanning He+ Ion Beam Microscopy and Metrology

    SciTech Connect

    Joy, David C.

    2011-11-10

    The CD-SEM has been the tool of choice for the imaging and metrology of semiconductor devices for the past three decades but now, with critical dimensions at the nanometer scale, electron beam instruments can no longer deliver adequate performance. A scanning microscope using a He+ ion beam offers superior resolution and depth of field, and provides enhanced imaging contrast. Device metrology performed using ion beam imaging produces data which is comparable to or better than that from a conventional CD-SEM although there are significant differences in the experimental conditions required and in the details of image formation. The charging generated by a He+ beam, and the sample damage that it can cause, require care in operation but are not major problems.

  15. Forensic document analysis using scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaffer, Douglas K.

    2009-05-01

    The authentication and identification of the source of a printed document(s) can be important in forensic investigations involving a wide range of fraudulent materials, including counterfeit currency, travel and identity documents, business and personal checks, money orders, prescription labels, travelers checks, medical records, financial documents and threatening correspondence. The physical and chemical characterization of document materials - including paper, writing inks and printed media - is becoming increasingly relevant for law enforcement agencies, with the availability of a wide variety of sophisticated commercial printers and copiers which are capable of producing fraudulent documents of extremely high print quality, rendering these difficult to distinguish from genuine documents. This paper describes various applications and analytical methodologies using scanning electron miscoscopy/energy dispersive (x-ray) spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) and related technologies for the characterization of fraudulent documents, and illustrates how their morphological and chemical profiles can be compared to (1) authenticate and (2) link forensic documents with a common source(s) in their production history.

  16. Open Source Scanning Probe Microscopy Control Software Package Gxsm

    SciTech Connect

    Zahl P.; Wagner, T.; Moller, R.; Klust, A.

    2009-08-10

    Gxsm is a full featured and modern scanning probe microscopy (SPM) software. It can be used for powerful multidimensional image/data processing, analysis, and visualization. Connected toan instrument, it is operating many different avors of SPM, e.g., scanning tunneling microscopy(STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) or in general two-dimensional multi channel data acquisition instruments. The Gxsm core can handle different data types, e.g., integer and oating point numbers. An easily extendable plug-in architecture provides many image analysis and manipulation functions. A digital signal processor (DSP) subsystem runs the feedback loop, generates the scanning signals and acquires the data during SPM measurements. The programmable Gxsm vector probe engine performs virtually any thinkable spectroscopy and manipulation task, such as scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) or tip formation. The Gxsm software is released under the GNU general public license (GPL) and can be obtained via the Internet.

  17. System and method for compressive scanning electron microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Reed, Bryan W

    2015-01-13

    A scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) system is disclosed. The system may make use of an electron beam scanning system configured to generate a plurality of electron beam scans over substantially an entire sample, with each scan varying in electron-illumination intensity over a course of the scan. A signal acquisition system may be used for obtaining at least one of an image, a diffraction pattern, or a spectrum from the scans, the image, diffraction pattern, or spectrum representing only information from at least one of a select subplurality or linear combination of all pixel locations comprising the image. A dataset may be produced from the information. A subsystem may be used for mathematically analyzing the dataset to predict actual information that would have been produced by each pixel location of the image.

  18. Menadione metabolism to thiodione in hepatoblastoma by scanning electrochemical microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Mauzeroll, Janine; Bard, Allen J.; Owhadian, Omeed; Monks, Terrence J.

    2004-01-01

    The cytotoxicity of menadione on hepatocytes was studied by using the substrate generation/tip collection mode of scanning electrochemical microscopy by exposing the cells to menadione and detecting the menadione-S-glutathione conjugate (thiodione) that is formed during the cellular detoxication process and is exported from the cell by an ATP-dependent pump. This efflux was electrochemically detected and allowed scanning electrochemical microscopy monitoring and imaging of single cells and groups of highly confluent live cells. Based on a constant flux model, ≈6 × 106 molecules of thiodione per cell per second are exported from monolayer cultures of Hep G2 cells. PMID:15601769

  19. New filtering techniques to restore scanning tunneling microscopy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pancorbo, M.; Aguilar, M.; Anguiano, E.; Diaspro, A.

    1991-07-01

    An asymmetric transfer function — based on the symmetric one used in optical cases to correct blurring and defocusing effects in systems with circular aperture — is presented here to restore STM (scanning tunneling microscopy) images. A Wien filter is implemented that utilize this transfer function. In the STM case, the defocusing has two different origins depending on the scan direction that produce a set of two fitting parameters.

  20. Structural examination of lithium niobate ferroelectric crystals by combining scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efremova, P. V.; Ped'ko, B. B.; Kuznecova, Yu. V.

    2016-02-01

    The structure of lithium niobate single crystals is studied by a complex technique that combines scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. By implementing the piezoresponse force method on an atomic force microscope, the domain structure of lithium niobate crystals, which was not revealed without electron beam irradiation, is visualized

  1. Combined scanning electrochemical atomic force microscopy for tapping mode imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kueng, A.; Kranz, C.; Mizaikoff, B.; Lugstein, A.; Bertagnolli, E.

    2003-03-01

    With the integration of submicro- and nanoelectrodes into atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips using microfabrication techniques, an elegant approach combining scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) with atomic force microscopy has recently been demonstrated. Simultaneous imaging of topography and electrochemistry at a sample surface in AFM tapping mode with integrated SECM-AFM cantilevers oscillated at or near their resonance frequency is shown. In contrast to contact mode AFM imaging frictional forces at the sample surface are minimized. Hence, topographical and electrochemical information of soft surfaces (e.g., biological species) can be obtained.

  2. Evaluation of magnetic flux distribution from magnetic domains in [Co/Pd] nanowires by magnetic domain scope method using contact-scanning of tunneling magnetoresistive sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Okuda, Mitsunobu Miyamoto, Yasuyoshi; Miyashita, Eiichi; Hayashi, Naoto

    2014-05-07

    Current-driven magnetic domain wall motions in magnetic nanowires have attracted great interests for physical studies and engineering applications. The magnetic force microscope (MFM) is widely used for indirect verification of domain locations in nanowires, where relative magnetic force between the local domains and the MFM probe is used for detection. However, there is an occasional problem that the magnetic moments of MFM probe influenced and/or rotated the magnetic states in the low-moment nanowires. To solve this issue, the “magnetic domain scope for wide area with nano-order resolution (nano-MDS)” method has been proposed recently that could detect the magnetic flux distribution from the specimen directly by scanning of tunneling magnetoresistive field sensor. In this study, magnetic domain structure in nanowires was investigated by both MFM and nano-MDS, and the leakage magnetic flux density from the nanowires was measured quantitatively by nano-MDS. Specimen nanowires consisted from [Co (0.3)/Pd (1.2)]{sub 21}/Ru(3) films (units in nm) with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy were fabricated onto Si substrates by dual ion beam sputtering and e-beam lithography. The length and the width of the fabricated nanowires are 20 μm and 150 nm. We have succeeded to obtain not only the remanent domain images with the detection of up and down magnetizations as similar as those by MFM but also magnetic flux density distribution from nanowires directly by nano-MDS. The obtained value of maximum leakage magnetic flux by nano-MDS is in good agreement with that of coercivity by magneto-optical Kerr effect microscopy. By changing the protective diamond-like-carbon film thickness on tunneling magnetoresistive sensor, the three-dimensional spatial distribution of leakage magnetic flux could be evaluated.

  3. Investigation of the depletion layer by scanning capacitance force microscopy with Kelvin probe force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uruma, Takeshi; Satoh, Nobuo; Yamamoto, Hidekazu

    2016-08-01

    We have developed a scanning probe microscope (SPM) that combines atomic force microscopy (AFM) with both Kelvin probe force microscopy (KFM — to measure the surface potential) and scanning capacitance force microscopy (SCFM — to measure the differential capacitance). The surface physical characteristics of a commercial Si Schottky barrier diode (Si-SBD), with and without an applied reverse bias, were measured over the same area by our AFM/KFM/SCFM system. We thus investigated the discrete power device by calculating the depletion-layer width and drawing an energy-band diagram.

  4. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of corrosion degradation on tinplate substrates.

    PubMed

    Zumelzu, E; Cabezas, C; Vera, A

    2003-01-01

    The degradation of electrolytic tinplate used in food containers was analysed and evaluated, using scanning electron microscopy and electrochemical measurements of microcorrosion and ion dissolution by atomic absorption to prevent food contamination caused by metal traces and to increase the durability of such tinplates. PMID:12627896

  5. Band excitation method applicable to scanning probe microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2015-08-04

    Scanning probe microscopy may include a method for generating a band excitation (BE) signal and simultaneously exciting a probe at a plurality of frequencies within a predetermined frequency band based on the excitation signal. A response of the probe is measured across a subset of frequencies of the predetermined frequency band and the excitation signal is adjusted based on the measured response.

  6. FOOD SURFACE TEXTURE MEASUREMENT USING REFLECTIVE CONFOCAL LASER SCANNING MICROSCOPY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) was used in the reflection mode to characterize the surface texture (roughness) of sliced food surfaces. Sandpapers of grit size between 150 and 600 were used as the height reference to standardize the CLSM hardware settings. Sandpaper particle sizes were v...

  7. 'GIARDIA MURIS': SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY OF IN VITRO EXCYSTATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A recently developed in vitro excystation procedure results in almost total excystation of Giardia muris, an intestinal parasite of mice. The present experiment examines the G. muris cyst morphology by scanning electron microscopy and evaluates the efficacy of the excystation pro...

  8. CONFOCAL LASER SCANNING MICROSCOPY OF RAT FOLLICLE DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study used confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) to study follicular development in millimeter pieces of rat ovary. To use this technology, it is essential to stain the tissue before laser excitation with the confocal microscope. Various fluorescent stains (Yo-Pro, Bo-Pr...

  9. 'Oxide-free' tip for scanning tunneling microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colton, R. J.; Baker, S. M.; Baldeschwieler, J. D.; Kaiser, W. J.

    1987-01-01

    A new tip for scanning tunneling microscopy and a tip repair procedure that allows one to reproducibly obtain atomic images of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite with previously inoperable tips are reported. The tips are shown to be relatively oxide-free and highly resistant to oxidation. The tips are fabricated with graphite by two distinct methods.

  10. Scanning ion conductance microscopy studies of amyloid fibrils at nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuai; Cho, Sang-Joon; Busuttil, Katerina; Wang, Chen; Besenbacher, Flemming; Dong, Mingdong

    2012-05-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has developed to become a very versatile nano-scale technique to reveal the three-dimensional (3D) morphology of amyloid aggregates under physiological conditions. However, the imaging principle of AFM is based on measuring the `force' between a sharp tip and a given nanostructure, which may cause mechanical deformation of relatively soft objects. To avoid the deformation, scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) is an alternative scanning probe microscopy technique, operating with alternating current mode. Here we can indeed reveal the 3D morphology of amyloid fibrils and it is capable of exploring proteins with nanoscale resolution. Compared with conventional AFM, we show that SICM can provide precise height measurements of amyloid protein aggregates, a feature that enables us to obtain unique insight into the detailed nucleation and growth mechanisms behind amyloid self-assembly.

  11. Atomic force microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy on the cytoskeleton of permeabilised and embedded cells.

    PubMed

    Meller, Karl; Theiss, Carsten

    2006-03-01

    We describe a technical method of cell permeabilisation and embedding to study the organisation and distribution of intracellular proteins with aid of atomic force microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy in identical areas. While confocal laser scanning microscopy is useful for the identification of certain proteins subsequent labelling with markers or antibodies, atomic force microscopy allows the observation of macromolecular structures in fixed and living cells. To demonstrate the field of application of this preparatory technique, cells were permeabilised, fixed, and the actin cytoskeleton was stained with phalloidin-rhodamine. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to show the organisation of these microfilaments, e.g. geodesic dome structures. Thereafter, cells were embedded in Durcupan water-soluble resin, followed by UV-polymerisation of resin at 4 degrees C. This procedure allowed intracellular visualisation of the cell nucleus or cytoskeletal elements by atomic force microscopy, for instance to analyse the globular organisation of actin filaments. Therefore, this method offers a great potential to combine both microscopy techniques in order to understand and interpret intracellular protein relations, for example, the biochemical and morphological interaction of the cytoskeleton. PMID:16360280

  12. Scanning near field microwave microscopy based on an active resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qureshi, Naser; Kolokoltsev, Oleg; Ordonez-Romero, Cesar Leonardo

    2014-03-01

    A large number of recent implementations of near field scanning microwave microscopy (NFSMM) have been based on the perturbation of a resonant cavity connected to a sharp scanning probe. In this work we present results from an alternative approach: the perturbation of a microwave source connected to a scanning tip. Based on a yittrium iron garnet (YIG) cavity ring resonator this scanning probe system has a quality factor greater than 106, which allows us to detect very small frequency shifts, which translates to a very high sensitivity in sample impedance measurements. Using a selection of representative semiconductor, metal and biological samples we show how this approach leads to unusually high sensitivity and spatial resolution. Work supported by a grant from PAPIIT, UNAM 104513.

  13. Optimal lens design and use in laser-scanning microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Negrean, Adrian; Mansvelder, Huibert D.

    2014-01-01

    In laser-scanning microscopy often an off-the-shelf achromatic doublet is used as a scan lens which can reduce the available diffraction-limited field-of-view (FOV) by a factor of 3 and introduce chromatic aberrations that are scan angle dependent. Here we present several simple lens designs of superior quality that fully make use of high-NA low-magnification objectives, offering diffraction-limited imaging over a large FOV and wavelength range. We constructed a two-photon laser-scanning microscope with optimized custom lenses which had a near diffraction limit point-spread-function (PSF) with less than 3.6% variation over a 400 µm FOV and less than 0.5 µm lateral color between 750 and 1050 nm. PMID:24877017

  14. Study of cellular adhesion with scanning acoustic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tittmann, Bernhard R; Miyasaka, Chiaki; Mastro, Andrea M; Mercer, Robyn R

    2007-08-01

    A mechanical scanning acoustic reflection microscope was applied to living cells (e.g., osteoblasts) to observe their undisguised shapes and to evaluate their adhesive conditions at a substrate interface. A conditioned medium was collected from a bone-metastatic breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231, and cultured with an immature osteoblast cell line, MC3T3-E1. To characterize the cellular adhesion, MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts were cultured with or without MDA-MB-231 conditioned medium for 2 days, then assayed with the scanning acoustic reflection microscope. At 600 MHz the scanning acoustic reflection microscope clearly indicated that MC3T3-E1 cells cultured with MDA-MB-231 conditioned medium had both an abnormal shape and poor adhesion at the substrate interface. The results are compared with those obtained with laser scanning confocal microscopy and are supported by a simple multilayer model. PMID:17703653

  15. Osteoblast Adhesion of Breast Cancer Cells with Scanning Acoustic Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyasaka, C.; Mercer, R. R.; Mastro, A. M.

    Conditioned medium was collected from a bone-metastatic breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231, and cultured with an immature osteoblast cell line, MC3T3-E1. Under these conditions the osteoblasts acquired a changed morphology and appeared to adhere in a different way to the substrate and to each other. To characterize cellular adhesion, MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts were cultured with or without MDA-MB-231 conditioned medium for two days. With mechanical scanning acoustic reflection microscopy, we were able to detect a change in the adhesive condition of the interface between the cell and the substrate, but not with optical microscopy

  16. Surface morphology of Trichinella spiralis by scanning electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, C.W.; Ledbetter, M.C.

    1980-02-01

    The surface morphology of larval and adult Trichinella spiralis was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of fixed, dried, and metal-coated specimens. The results are compared with those found earlier by various investigators using light and transmission electron microscopy. Some morphological features reported here are revealed uniquely by SEM. These include the pores of the cephalic sense organs, the character of secondary cuticular folds, variations of the hypodermal gland cell openings or pores, and the presence of particles on the copulatory bell.

  17. Scanning tunneling microscopy on rough surfaces-quantitative image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiss, G.; Brückl, H.; Vancea, J.; Lecheler, R.; Hastreiter, E.

    1991-07-01

    In this communication, the application of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) for a quantitative evaluation of roughnesses and mean island sizes of polycrystalline thin films is discussed. Provided strong conditions concerning the resolution are satisfied, the results are in good agreement with standard techniques as, for example, transmission electron microscopy. Owing to its high resolution, STM can supply a better characterization of surfaces than established methods, especially concerning the roughness. Microscopic interpretations of surface dependent physical properties thus can be considerably improved by a quantitative analysis of STM images.

  18. Development of an ultralow current amplifier for scanning tunneling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlà, M.; Lanzi, L.; Pallecchi, E.; Aloisi, G.

    2004-02-01

    A transimpedance amplifier for ultralow current scanning tunneling microscopy has been developed. Conditions for maximum signal-to-noise ratio have been explored, showing that best results can be obtained with a simple circuital arrangement. The amplifier associates a very high amplification factor (0.5 V/pA) to a sufficiently wide bandwith (1.6 kHz) and very low noise current (49 fA). Those features enable microscopy studies on an almost insulating surface, such as a freshly cleaved mica surface.

  19. Ultrafast photon counting applied to resonant scanning STED microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xundong; Toro, Ligia; Stefani, Enrico; Wu, Yong

    2015-01-01

    To take full advantage of fast resonant scanning in super-resolution stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy, we have developed an ultrafast photon counting system based on a multigiga sample per second analogue-to-digital conversion chip that delivers an unprecedented 450 MHz pixel clock (2.2 ns pixel dwell time in each scan). The system achieves a large field of view (∼50 × 50 μm) with fast scanning that reduces photobleaching, and advances the time-gated continuous wave STED technology to the usage of resonant scanning with hardware-based time-gating. The assembled system provides superb signal-to-noise ratio and highly linear quantification of light that result in superior image quality. Also, the system design allows great flexibility in processing photon signals to further improve the dynamic range. In conclusion, we have constructed a frontier photon counting image acquisition system with ultrafast readout rate, excellent counting linearity, and with the capacity of realizing resonant-scanning continuous wave STED microscopy with online time-gated detection. PMID:25227160

  20. Ultrafast Photon Counting Applied to Resonant Scanning STED Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xundong; Toro, Ligia; Stefani, Enrico; Wu, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Summary To take full advantage of fast resonant scanning in super-resolution STimulated Emission Depletion (STED) microscopy, we have developed an ultrafast photon counting system based on a multi-giga-sample per second analog-to-digital conversion (ADC) chip that delivers an unprecedented 450 MHz pixel clock (2.2 ns pixel dwell time in each scan). The system achieves a large field of view (~50 × 50 μm) with fast scanning that reduces photobleaching, and advances the time-gated continuous wave (CW) STED technology to the usage of resonant scanning with hardware based time-gating. The assembled system provides superb signal-to-noise ratio and highly linear quantification of light that result in superior image quality. Also, the system design allows great flexibility in processing photon signals to further improve the dynamic range. In conclusion, we have constructed a frontier photon counting image acquisition system with ultrafast readout rate, excellent counting linearity, and with the capacity of realizing resonant-scanning CW-STED microscopy with on-line time-gated detection. PMID:25227160

  1. Laser-scanning optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhixing; Jiao, Shuliang; Zhang, Hao F; Puliafito, Carmen A

    2009-06-15

    We have developed a laser-scanning optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy method that can potentially fuse with existing optical microscopic imaging modalities. To acquire an image, the ultrasonic transducer is kept stationary during data acquisition, and only the laser light is raster scanned by an x-y galvanometer scanner. A lateral resolution of 7.8 microm and a circular field of view with a diameter of 6 mm were achieved in an optically clear medium. Using a laser system working at a pulse repetition rate of 1,024 Hz, the data acquisition time for an image consisting of 256 x 256 pixels was less than 2 min. PMID:19529698

  2. Phase modulation mode of scanning ion conductance microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Peng; Zhang, Changlin; Liu, Lianqing E-mail: gli@engr.pitt.edu; Wang, Yuechao; Yang, Yang; Li, Guangyong E-mail: gli@engr.pitt.edu

    2014-08-04

    This Letter reports a phase modulation (PM) mode of scanning ion conductance microscopy. In this mode, an AC current is directly generated by an AC voltage between the electrodes. The portion of the AC current in phase with the AC voltage, which is the current through the resistance path, is modulated by the tip-sample distance. It can be used as the input of feedback control to drive the scanner in Z direction. The PM mode, taking the advantages of both DC mode and traditional AC mode, is less prone to electronic noise and DC drift but maintains high scanning speed. The effectiveness of the PM mode has been proven by experiments.

  3. Elemental imaging of cartilage by scanning x-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, C.J.; Foster, G.F.; Burge, R.E. ); Ali, S.Y.; Scotchford, C.A. , Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, Stanmore, Middlesex ); Kirz, J. ); Rivers, M.L. )

    1992-01-01

    Elemental imaging via scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) and scanning fluorescence x-ray microscopy (SFXM) has been used to image calcium deposits in cartilage. In the case of STXM, 0.1 {mu}m thick sections were imaged to investigate the proximity of calcium deposits in relation to chondrocyte cells. The resolution available was 0.5 {mu}m, and field widths of up to 25 {mu}m were used at this resolution. The resolution available in SFXM was 10 {mu}m, and field widths of up to 2 mm were used at this resolution on 5-{mu}m thick specimens. Together these techniques were used to map calcium deposits at the cellular level, and at the full tissue size level.

  4. Testing of metal-ceramic joint using scanning acoustic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Könönen, M; Kivilahti, J

    1991-07-01

    The objective of the investigation was to compare the results obtained from examination of titanium-porcelain joints by means of both scanning acoustic microscopy (C-SAM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). A dental porcelain (Ducera, Dental GmbH) mechanically compatible with titanium was fired to sand-blasted or electrolytically polished commercially pure titanium (grade 1) specimens. The firing was carried out in an ordinary dental furnace according to manufacturer's instructions. There was a good correlation between the C-SAM and SEM methods regarding the ability to detect air-filled defects in the porcelain/titanium interface. The results show that the C-SAM method, being non-destructive as well as time-and-money-saving, can be useful in the testing of metal-ceramic joints. PMID:1813346

  5. Transient response of tapping scanning force microscopy in liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, G.Y.; Warmack, R.J. |; Oden, P.I.; Thundat, T.

    1996-03-01

    Tapping-mode scanning force microscopy in liquids is usually accomplished by acoustic excitation of the cantilever because of the strong viscous damping. Contact of the tip with the sample surface results in a damping of the cantilever amplitude with an anharmonic response. This interaction is modeled as a viscous-damped, one-dimensional harmonic oscillator periodically perturbed by an exponential surface potential. Experimental results verify the validity of the model. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Vacuum Society}

  6. Playing peekaboo with graphene oxide: a scanning electrochemical microscopy investigation.

    PubMed

    Rapino, Stefania; Treossi, Emanuele; Palermo, Vincenzo; Marcaccio, Massimo; Paolucci, Francesco; Zerbetto, Francesco

    2014-11-01

    Scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) can image graphene oxide (GO) flakes on insulating and conducting substrates. The contrast between GO and the substrate is controlled by the electrostatic interactions that are established between the charges of the molecular redox mediator and the charges present in the sheet/substrate. SECM also allows quantitative measurement - at the nano/microscale - of the charge transfer kinetics between single monolayer sheets and agent molecules. PMID:25224581

  7. Detecting damage in steel with scanning SQUID microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Tae-Kyu; Clatterbuck, David; Morris Jr., J.W.; Shaw, T.J.; McDermott R.; Clarke, John

    2001-09-04

    A ''Holy Grail'' of NDE research is a non-destructive method for measuring fatigue damage prior to crack initiation. High-Tc scanning SQUID microscopy may be a useful tool. Because of the exceptional magnetic sensitivity of this technique, fatigue damage can be detected well before microcrack initiation, and in the absence of other obvious microstructure or property changes. Given the spatial resolution of the technique, undamaged material can be located and used to set internal standards.

  8. Paleomagnetism on submillimeter scales with scanning magnetic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade Lima, E.; Weiss, B. P.; Fu, R. R.; Suavet, C. R.; Bruno, A. C.

    2013-12-01

    The development of superconducting moment magnetometers three decades ago enabled paleomagnetic studies to be extended to previously inaccessible weakly magnetic samples like sediments, single silicate crystals, and lunar rocks. However, there still are a number of very important questions in geomagnetism and planetary magnetism that have remained unsolved owing to insufficient moment sensitivity and spatial resolution. Examples include retrieving records of magnetic fields in the primitive solar nebula from single meteorite grains, establishing when the geodynamo originated from individual zircon crystals, and understanding the complex magnetostatic interactions in metal grains that plague paleointensity studies of extraterrestrial rocks. Here we describe how we are tackling these problems using two new techniques in scanning magnetic microscopy: SQUID microscopy and magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) microscopy. Scanning SQUID microscopes offer unparalleled moment sensitivity, but spatial resolution is limited to ~100 μm due to cryogenic constraints. On the other hand, scanning MTJ microscopes operate at room temperature and achieve much higher spatial resolutions (< 10 μm) at the expense of decreased field sensitivity. However, because the MTJ sensor can be placed at very close proximity to the sample, the effective magnetic moment sensitivity is often sufficient for many applications. SQUID microscopes can be utilized as ultra-high sensitivity moment magnetometers (better than 10^-15 Am2) and are particularly powerful to analyze unresolved weak sources such as individual chondrules and single-crystal zircons. The high spatial resolution of MTJ microscopes makes them especially suited to identifying the spatial distribution of magnetic minerals in rocks with complex compositions, such as meteorites and lunar rocks. We present recent results from our paleo- and rock magnetic studies of zircon crystals using SQUID microscopy and briefly discuss the fundamental

  9. Correcting nonlinear drift distortion of scanning probe and scanning transmission electron microscopies from image pairs with orthogonal scan directions.

    PubMed

    Ophus, Colin; Ciston, Jim; Nelson, Chris T

    2016-03-01

    Unwanted motion of the probe with respect to the sample is a ubiquitous problem in scanning probe and scanning transmission electron microscopies, causing both linear and nonlinear artifacts in experimental images. We have designed a procedure to correct these artifacts by using orthogonal scan pairs to align each measurement line-by-line along the slow scan direction, by fitting contrast variation along the lines. We demonstrate the accuracy of our algorithm on both synthetic and experimental data and provide an implementation of our method. PMID:26716724

  10. Potentiostatic deposition of DNA for scanning probe microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, S M; Tao, N J; DeRose, J A; Oden, P I; Lyubchenko YuL; Harrington, R E; Shlyakhtenko, L

    1992-01-01

    We describe a procedure for reversible adsorption of DNA onto a gold electrode maintained under potential control. The adsorbate can be imaged by scanning probe microscopy in situ. Quantitative control of a molecular adsorbate for microscopy is now possible. We found a potential window (between 0 and 180 mV versus a silver wire quasi reference) over which a gold (111) surface under phosphate buffer is positively charged, but is not covered with a dense adsorbate. When DNA is present in these conditions, molecules adsorb onto the electrode and remain stable under repeated scanning with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). They become removed when the surface is brought to a negative charge. When operated at tunnel currents below approximately 0.4 nA, the STM yields a resolution of approximately 1 nm, which is better than can be obtained with atomic force microscopy (AFM) at present. We illustrate this procedure by imaging a series of DNA molecules made by ligating a 21 base-pair oligonucleotide. We observed the expected series of fragment lengths but small fragments are adsorbed preferentially. Images FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 PMID:1617139

  11. Optoelectronic Characterization of Narrow Bandgap Nanostructures through Scanning Photocurrent Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Christopher Vincent

    Scanning Photocurrent Microscopy is a powerful technique that studies the carrier transport and dynamics in nanostructures. It is capable of measuring diffusion lengths, drift lengths, electric field distributions, and metal-semiconductor barrier heights. In this dissertation, the carrier dynamics of Lead Sulfide nanowires, Vanadium Dioxide nanobeams, and Lead Selenide quantum dot thin films are investigated through Scanning Photocurrent Microscopy. For the Lead Sulfide nanowires, the minority carrier diffusion length was determined to be around 1 micron. This photocurrent decay length is highly dependant on the applied internal field, indicating a drift dominant carrier transport at high bias. This is explained through an intuitive charge transport simulation that accurately predicts this field dependent photocurrent decay length. For the Vanadium Dioxide nanobeams, a Schottky barrier height of ˜0.3 eV is extracted between the metal and insulator phases of VO2, providing direct evidence of the nearly symmetric bandgap opening upon the phase transition. There was also an unusually long photocurrent decay length in the insulating phase, indicating an unexpectedly long minority carrier lifetimes on the order of microseconds. For the Lead Selenide quantum dot thin films, Scanning Photocurrent Microscopy reveals a long photocurrent decay length of 1.7 microns at moderate positive gate bias. The diffusion of long-lifetime carriers accounts for this long photocurrent decay length via a Shockley-Read-Hall recombination mechanism through charge traps. In addition, the application of gold nanoparticles, acting as a plasmonic resonator, greatly enhances the photocurrent at the contacts.

  12. Abrasion of 6 dentifrices measured by vertical scanning interference microscopy

    PubMed Central

    PASCARETTI-GRIZON, Florence; MABILLEAU, Guillaume; CHAPPARD, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The abrasion of dentifrices is well recognized to eliminate the dental plaque. The aims of this study were to characterize the abrasive powders of 6 dentifrices (3 toothpastes and 3 toothpowders) and to measure the abrasion on a test surface by Vertical Scanning Interference microscopy (VSI). Material and Methods Bright field and polarization microscopy were used to identify the abrasive particles on the crude dentifrices and after prolonged washes. Scanning electron microscopy and microanalysis characterized the shape and nature of the particles. Standardized and polished blocks of poly(methylmethacrylate) were brushed with a commercial electric toothbrush with the dentifrices. VSI quantified the mean roughness (Ra) and illustrated in 3D the abraded areas. Results Toothpastes induced a limited abrasion. Toothpowders induced a significantly higher roughness linked to the size of the abrasive particles. One powder (Gencix® produced a high abrasion when used with a standard testing weight. However, the powder is based on pumice particles covered by a plant homogenate that readily dissolves in water. When used in the same volume, or after dispersion in water, Ra was markedly reduced. Conclusion Light and electron microscopy characterize the abrasive particles and VSI is a new tool allowing the analysis of large surface of abraded materials. PMID:24212995

  13. Three-axis positional drift correction in scanning probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Follin, Nathan D.; Musalo, Christopher J.; Trawick, Matthew L.

    2011-03-01

    Positional drift in scanning probe microscopy can cause image distortion and metrological errors of tens of nanometers or more. It can arise from thermal drift, due to thermal expansion of materials in the sample and microscope while scanning, or from piezo creep, particularly along the z axis. We present a technique for correcting positional drift errors in all three axes. Our method works by comparing each scanned topographical image to a second, partial scan, taken immediately afterwards, on which the fast and slow scan axes have been reversed. We model the positional distortion as a low-order polynomial function in three dimensions, searching for the set of correctional coefficients that minimizes the difference between the two scans. Using this technique we have successfully reduced positional errors from 50 nm to 0.5 nm in the z axis, and from 40 nm to 2 nm (about half of a single pixel) in the xy plane. Supported by an award from Research Corporation for Science Advancement, and by the American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Fund through Grant number 46380-GB7.

  14. Potential Applications of Scanning Probe Microscopy in Forensic Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, G. S.; Watson, J. A.

    2007-04-01

    The forensic community utilises a myriad of techniques to investigate a wide range of materials, from paint flakes to DNA. The various microscopic techniques have provided some of the greatest contributions, e.g., FT-IR (Fourier-transform infrared) microspectroscopy utilised in copy toner discrimination, multi-layer automobile paint fragment examination, etc, SEM-EDA (scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis) used to investigate glass fragments, fibers, and explosives, and SEM in microsampling for elemental analysis, just to name a few. This study demonstrates the ability of the Scanning Probe Microscope (SPM) to analyse human fingerprints on surfaces utilising a step-and-scan feature, enabling analysis of a larger field-of-view. We also extend a line crossings study by incorporating height analysis and surface roughness measurements. The study demonstrates the potential for SPM techniques to be utilised for forensic analysis which could complement the more traditional methodologies used in such investigations.

  15. Imaging ballistic carrier trajectories in graphene using scanning gate microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morikawa, Sei; Dou, Ziwei; Wang, Shu-Wei; Smith, Charles G.; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Masubuchi, Satoru; Machida, Tomoki; Connolly, Malcolm R.

    2015-12-01

    We use scanning gate microscopy to map out the trajectories of ballistic carriers in high-mobility graphene encapsulated by hexagonal boron nitride and subject to a weak magnetic field. We employ a magnetic focusing geometry to image carriers that emerge ballistically from an injector, follow a cyclotron path due to the Lorentz force from an applied magnetic field, and land on an adjacent collector probe. The local electric field generated by the scanning tip in the vicinity of the carriers deflects their trajectories, modifying the proportion of carriers focused into the collector. By measuring the voltage at the collector while scanning the tip, we are able to obtain images with arcs that are consistent with the expected cyclotron motion. We also demonstrate that the tip can be used to redirect misaligned carriers back to the collector.

  16. Imaging ballistic carrier trajectories in graphene using scanning gate microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Morikawa, Sei; Masubuchi, Satoru; Dou, Ziwei; Wang, Shu-Wei; Smith, Charles G.; Connolly, Malcolm R.; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Machida, Tomoki

    2015-12-14

    We use scanning gate microscopy to map out the trajectories of ballistic carriers in high-mobility graphene encapsulated by hexagonal boron nitride and subject to a weak magnetic field. We employ a magnetic focusing geometry to image carriers that emerge ballistically from an injector, follow a cyclotron path due to the Lorentz force from an applied magnetic field, and land on an adjacent collector probe. The local electric field generated by the scanning tip in the vicinity of the carriers deflects their trajectories, modifying the proportion of carriers focused into the collector. By measuring the voltage at the collector while scanning the tip, we are able to obtain images with arcs that are consistent with the expected cyclotron motion. We also demonstrate that the tip can be used to redirect misaligned carriers back to the collector.

  17. Tip Based Nanofabrication Using Multi-mode Scanning Probe Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Weihua

    Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) based nanotechnology is a promising technology in nano-device fabrication. It is able to both manipulate nanostructures and characterize the created nanopatterns using the nano-tip of the scanning probe on a mechanical basis or electrical basis. With the tip and device on similar scales, nano-tip based fabrication permits accurate control over the device geometry through tip manipulation with nanometer (or better) accuracy. However, SPM based nanofabrication is a slow process because the scanning velocity of the microscopy is low. Large, multi-tip arrays offer the possibility for parallel device fabrication, allowing mass fabrication with nanometer control. The goal of Tip-directed Field-emission Assisted Nanofabrication (TFAN) project was to realize parallel fabrication using our probe arrays. We started by fabricating nanodevice using one single probe. In this work, we investigated the study of fabricating single electron transistor (SET) using one single SPM probe. There were four stages we went through toward fabricating a SET. The first stage was to accomplish atomic-precision lithography in TFAN system. Atomic level lithography was achieved by desorbing hydrogen atoms, which were previously adsorbed to the Si(100)-2 × 1 surface, in ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy (UHV-STM). The second stage was to develop method for fabricating SET. SPM based local oxidation was chosen as the method to fabricate a SET on a thin titanium (Ti) film. A multi-mode SPM oxidation method was developed, in which both scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) mode and atomic microscopy (AFM) mode local oxidation were used to fabricated Ti-TiOx-Ti structures with the same conductive AFM probe. This multi-mode method enabled significantly fine feature size control by STM mode, working on insulating SiO2 substrates needed to isolate the device by AFM mode and in situ electrical characterization with conductive AFM mode. After developing the multi

  18. Feedback Effects in Combined Fast-Scan Cyclic Voltammetry-Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Schrock, Daniel S.; Wipf, David O.; Baur, John E.

    2008-01-01

    Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry at scan rates between 5 and 1000 Vs−1 was performed at the tip of a scanning electrochemical microscope immersed in a solution of redox mediator. The effect of conducting and insulating substrates on the voltammetric signal was investigated as a function of scan rate and tip-substrate distance. It was found that diffusional interactions between the tip and the substrate are greatest at lower scan rates and on the reverse sweep of the voltammogram. At the fastest scan rates used, the tip could be brought to with 1 μm of the substrate without appreciable perturbation of the voltammogram. By selecting scan rates and tip-substrate distances such that feedback effects were negligible, it was possible to image the diffusion layer of a 10 μm Pt substrate electrode. With the tip placed 1 μm above a biological cell, tip-substrate diffusional interactions were greatly diminished at a scan rate of 100 Vs−1, and absent at a scan rate of 1000 Vs−1. These results suggest conditions can be selected that allow chemical imaging of substrates without the feedback interactions typically encountered in scanning electrochemical microscopy. PMID:17550230

  19. Feedback effects in combined fast-scan cyclic voltammetry-scanning electrochemical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Schrock, Daniel S; Wipf, David O; Baur, John E

    2007-07-01

    Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry at scan rates between 5 and 1000 V s(-1) was performed at the tip of a scanning electrochemical microscope immersed in a solution of redox mediator. The effect of conducting and insulating substrates on the voltammetric signal was investigated as a function of scan rate and tip-substrate distance. It was found that diffusional interactions between the tip and the substrate are greatest at lower scan rates and on the reverse sweep of the voltammogram. At the fastest scan rates used, the tip could be brought to with 1 microm of the substrate without appreciable perturbation of the voltammogram. By selecting scan rates and tip-substrate distances such that feedback effects were negligible, it was possible to image the diffusion layer of a 10 microm Pt substrate electrode. With the tip placed 1 microm above a biological cell, tip-substrate diffusional interactions were greatly diminished at a scan rate of 100 V s(-1) and absent at a scan rate of 1000 V s(-1). These results suggest conditions can be selected that allow chemical imaging of substrates without the feedback interactions typically encountered in scanning electrochemical microscopy. PMID:17550230

  20. Simultaneous Correlative Scanning Electron and High-NA Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Liv, Nalan; Zonnevylle, A. Christiaan; Narvaez, Angela C.; Effting, Andries P. J.; Voorneveld, Philip W.; Lucas, Miriam S.; Hardwick, James C.; Wepf, Roger A.; Kruit, Pieter; Hoogenboom, Jacob P.

    2013-01-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) is a unique method for investigating biological structure-function relations. With CLEM protein distributions visualized in fluorescence can be mapped onto the cellular ultrastructure measured with electron microscopy. Widespread application of correlative microscopy is hampered by elaborate experimental procedures related foremost to retrieving regions of interest in both modalities and/or compromises in integrated approaches. We present a novel approach to correlative microscopy, in which a high numerical aperture epi-fluorescence microscope and a scanning electron microscope illuminate the same area of a sample at the same time. This removes the need for retrieval of regions of interest leading to a drastic reduction of inspection times and the possibility for quantitative investigations of large areas and datasets with correlative microscopy. We demonstrate Simultaneous CLEM (SCLEM) analyzing cell-cell connections and membrane protrusions in whole uncoated colon adenocarcinoma cell line cells stained for actin and cortactin with AlexaFluor488. SCLEM imaging of coverglass-mounted tissue sections with both electron-dense and fluorescence staining is also shown. PMID:23409024

  1. A diffraction-limited scanning system providing broad spectral range for laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jiun-Yann; Liao, Chien-Sheng; Zhuo, Zong-Yan; Huang, Chen-Han; Chui, Hsiang-Chen; Chu, Shi-Wei

    2009-11-01

    Diversified research interests in scanning laser microscopy nowadays require broadband capability of the optical system. Although an all-mirror-based optical design with a suitable metallic coating is appropriate for broad-spectrum applications from ultraviolet to terahertz, most researchers prefer lens-based scanning systems despite the drawbacks of a limited spectral range, ghost reflection, and chromatic aberration. One of the main concerns is that the geometrical aberration induced by off-axis incidence on spherical mirrors significantly deteriorates image resolution. Here, we demonstrate a novel geometrical design of a spherical-mirror-based scanning system in which off-axis aberrations, both astigmatism and coma, are compensated to reach diffraction-limited performance. We have numerically simulated and experimentally verified that this scanning system meets the Marechà l condition and provides high Strehl ratio within a 3°×3° scanning area. Moreover, we demonstrate second-harmonic-generation imaging from starch with our new design. A greatly improved resolution compared to the conventional mirror-based system is confirmed. This scanning system will be ideal for high-resolution linear/nonlinear laser scanning microscopy, ophthalmoscopic applications, and precision fabrications.

  2. Scanning tunneling microscopy studies of diamond films and optoelectronic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez, Jose M.

    1993-01-01

    In this report, we report on progress achieved from 12/1/92 to 10/1/93 under the grant entitled 'Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Studies of Diamond Films and Optoelectronic Materials'. We have set-up a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond film growth system and a Raman spectroscopy system to study the nucleation and growth of diamond films with atomic resolution using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). A unique feature of the diamond film growth system is that diamond films can be transferred directly to the ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) chamber of a scanning tunneling microscope without contaminating the films by exposure to air. The University of North Texas (UNT) provided $20,000 this year as matching funds for the NASA grant to purchase the diamond growth system. In addition, UNT provided a Coherent Innova 90S Argon ion laser, a Spex 1404 double spectrometer, and a Newport optical table costing $90,000 to set-up the Raman spectroscopy system. The CVD diamond growth system and Raman spectroscopy system will be used to grow and characterize diamond films with atomic resolution using STM as described in our proposal. One full-time graduate student and one full-time undergraduate student are supported under this grant. In addition, several graduate and undergraduate students were supported during the summer to assist in setting-up the diamond growth and Raman spectroscopy systems. We have obtained research results concerning STM of the structural and electronic properties of CVD grown diamond films, and STM and scanning tunneling spectroscopy of carbon nanotubes. In collaboration with the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) group at UNT, we have also obtained results concerning the optoelectronic material siloxene. These results were published in refereed scientific journals, submitted for publication, and presented as invited and contributed talks at scientific conferences.

  3. Environmental scanning electron microscopy gold immunolabeling in cell biology.

    PubMed

    Rosso, Francesco; Papale, Ferdinando; Barbarisi, Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    Immunogold labeling (IGL) technique has been utilized by many authors in combination with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to obtain the identification/localization of receptors and antigens, both in cells and tissues. Environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) represents an important tool in biomedical research, since it does not require any severe processing of the sample, lowering the risk of generating artifacts and interfere with the IGL procedure. The absence of metal coating could yield further advantages for our purpose as the labeling detection is based on the atomic number difference between nanogold spheres and the biological material. Using the gaseous secondary electron detector, compositional contrast is easily revealed by the backscattered electron component of the signal. In spite of this fact, only few published papers present a combination of ESEM and IGL. Hereby we present our method, optimized to improve the intensity and the specificity of the labeling signal, in order to obtain a semiquantitative evaluation of the labeling signal.In particular, we used a combination of IGL and ESEM to detect the presence of a protein on the cell surface. To achieve this purpose, we chose as an experimental system 3T3 Swiss albino mouse fibroblasts and galectin-3. PMID:23027021

  4. Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy for Studying Biological Samples

    PubMed Central

    Happel, Patrick; Thatenhorst, Denis; Dietzel, Irmgard D.

    2012-01-01

    Scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) is a scanning probe technique that utilizes the increase in access resistance that occurs if an electrolyte filled glass micro-pipette is approached towards a poorly conducting surface. Since an increase in resistance can be monitored before the physical contact between scanning probe tip and sample, this technique is particularly useful to investigate the topography of delicate samples such as living cells. SICM has shown its potential in various applications such as high resolution and long-time imaging of living cells or the determination of local changes in cellular volume. Furthermore, SICM has been combined with various techniques such as fluorescence microscopy or patch clamping to reveal localized information about proteins or protein functions. This review details the various advantages and pitfalls of SICM and provides an overview of the recent developments and applications of SICM in biological imaging. Furthermore, we show that in principle, a combination of SICM and ion selective micro-electrodes enables one to monitor the local ion activity surrounding a living cell. PMID:23202197

  5. Microvascular quantification based on contour-scanning photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Chenghung; Soetikno, Brian; Hu, Song; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-09-01

    Accurate quantification of microvasculature remains of interest in fundamental pathophysiological studies and clinical trials. Current photoacoustic microscopy can noninvasively quantify properties of the microvasculature, including vessel density and diameter, with a high spatial resolution. However, the depth range of focus (i.e., focal zone) of optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) is often insufficient to encompass the depth variations of features of interest-such as blood vessels-due to uneven tissue surfaces. Thus, time-consuming image acquisitions at multiple different focal planes are required to maintain the region of interest in the focal zone. We have developed continuous three-dimensional motorized contour-scanning OR-PAM, which enables real-time adjustment of the focal plane to track the vessels' profile. We have experimentally demonstrated that contour scanning improves the signal-to-noise ratio of conventional OR-PAM by as much as 41% and shortens the image acquisition time by 3.2 times. Moreover, contour-scanning OR-PAM more accurately quantifies vessel density and diameter, and has been applied to studying tumors with uneven surfaces.

  6. Atomic-scale electrochemistry on the surface of a manganite by scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Vasudevan, Rama K. Tselev, Alexander; Baddorf, Arthur P.; Gianfrancesco, Anthony G.

    2015-04-06

    The doped manganese oxides (manganites) have been widely studied for their colossal magnetoresistive effects, for potential applications in oxide spintronics, electroforming in resistive switching devices, and are materials of choice as cathodes in modern solid oxide fuel cells. However, little experimental knowledge of the dynamics of the surfaces of perovskite manganites at the atomic scale exists. Here, through in-situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), we demonstrate atomic resolution on samples of La{sub 0.625}Ca{sub 0.375}MnO{sub 3} grown on (001) SrTiO{sub 3} by pulsed laser deposition. Furthermore, by applying triangular DC waveforms of increasing amplitude to the STM tip, and measuring the tunneling current, we demonstrate the ability to both perform and monitor surface electrochemical processes at the atomic level, including formation of oxygen vacancies and removal and deposition of individual atomic units or clusters. Our work paves the way for better understanding of surface oxygen reactions in these systems.

  7. Scanning electron microscopy: preparation and imaging for SEM.

    PubMed

    Jones, Chris G

    2012-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) has been almost universally applied for the surface examination and characterization of both natural and man-made objects. Although an invasive technique, developments in electron microscopy over the years has given the microscopist a much clearer choice in how invasive the technique will be. With the advent of low vacuum SEM in the 1970s (The environmental cold stage, 1970) and environmental SEM in the late 1980s (J Microsc 160(pt. 1):9-19, 1989), it is now possible in some circumstances to examine samples without preparation. However, for the examination of biological tissue and cells it is still advisable to chemically fix, dehydrate, and coat samples for SEM imaging and analysis. This chapter aims to provide an overview of SEM as an imaging tool, and a general introduction to some of the methods applied for the preparation of samples. PMID:22907399

  8. Scanning electron microscopy of Purkinje fibres of the pig heart.

    PubMed

    Bytzer, P

    1979-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of Purkinje fibres (P-fibres) from the septal walls and the septomarginal trabecula was performed on deparaffinized sections, the identification in SEM made possible by comparative light microscopy. The myofibrils in P-fibres from the septal walls were arranged in a cart-wheel fashion, whereas P-fibres from the septomarginal trabecula showed a nearly parallel alignment of the contractile material. Z-line ridges resembling the T-tubules of the myocardial fibres were observed in both kinds of P-fibres. The myofibrillar arrangements are discussed in relation to the expected mechanical stress put upon P-fibres in the 2 locations during systolic-diastolic activity. An adaptive function of the contractile material to the mechanical stress is suggested and the possible need of a T-tubular system is discussed. PMID:507370

  9. Application of Scanning Probe Microscopy to Genetic Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, Shigeru; Yoshino, Tomoyuki; Tsukamoto, Kazumi; Sasou, Megumi; Kuwazaki, Seigo; Takahashi, Hirokazu; Suetsugu, Yoshitaka; Narukawa, Junko; Yamamoto, Kimiko; Ohtani, Toshio

    2006-03-01

    We are developing an integrated technique involving of nanometer-size dissection of chromosome fragments by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and direct detection of the location of genome library clones by scanning near-field optical/atomic force microscopy (SNOM/AFM). The locations of nucleus organizer regions (NORs) on barley chromosomes and a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clone were successfully detected by SNOM/AFM. Nanometer-scale dissection of silkworm pachytene chromosomes was also performed by AFM, and we succeeded in three successive dissection events of the chromosome region approximately 250 nm apart from each other. If this type of integrated method can be established in the near future, we will easily obtain the nucleotide sequences with positional information on chromosomes, which lead to a time- and cost-saving genome analysis technique.

  10. Unlocking the spatial inversion of large scanning magnetic microscopy datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myre, J. M.; Lascu, I.; Andrade Lima, E.; Feinberg, J. M.; Saar, M. O.; Weiss, B. P.

    2013-12-01

    Modern scanning magnetic microscopy provides the ability to perform high-resolution, ultra-high sensitivity moment magnetometry, with spatial resolutions better than 10^-4 m and magnetic moments as weak as 10^-16 Am^2. These microscopy capabilities have enhanced numerous magnetic studies, including investigations of the paleointensity of the Earth's magnetic field, shock magnetization and demagnetization of impacts, magnetostratigraphy, the magnetic record in speleothems, and the records of ancient core dynamos of planetary bodies. A common component among many studies utilizing scanning magnetic microscopy is solving an inverse problem to determine the non-negative magnitude of the magnetic moments that produce the measured component of the magnetic field. The two most frequently used methods to solve this inverse problem are classic fast Fourier techniques in the frequency domain and non-negative least squares (NNLS) methods in the spatial domain. Although Fourier techniques are extremely fast, they typically violate non-negativity and it is difficult to implement constraints associated with the space domain. NNLS methods do not violate non-negativity, but have typically been computation time prohibitive for samples of practical size or resolution. Existing NNLS methods use multiple techniques to attain tractable computation. To reduce computation time in the past, typically sample size or scan resolution would have to be reduced. Similarly, multiple inversions of smaller sample subdivisions can be performed, although this frequently results in undesirable artifacts at subdivision boundaries. Dipole interactions can also be filtered to only compute interactions above a threshold which enables the use of sparse methods through artificial sparsity. To improve upon existing spatial domain techniques, we present the application of the TNT algorithm, named TNT as it is a "dynamite" non-negative least squares algorithm which enhances the performance and accuracy of

  11. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy analysis of space-exposed polymer films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalil, Carol R.; Young, Philip R.

    1993-01-01

    The characterization of the surface of selected space-exposed polymer films by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) is reported. Principles of STM, an emerging new technique for materials analysis, are reviewed. The analysis of several films which received up to 5.8 years of low Earth orbital (LEO) exposure onboard the NASA Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) is discussed. Specimens included FEP Teflon thermal blanket material, Kapton film, and several experimental polymer films. Ultraviolet and atomic oxygen-induced crazing and erosion are described. The intent of this paper is to demonstrate how STM is enhancing the understanding of LEO space environmental effects on polymer films.

  12. Scanning acoustic microscopy of SCS-6 silicon carbide fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Sathish, S.; Cantrell, J.H.; Yost, W.T.

    1996-01-01

    Scanning acoustic microscopy of SCS-6 silicon carbide fiber reveals large radial variations in acoustic reflectivity associated with the chemical composition and microstructure of a given fiber region. Rayleigh wave fringe patterns observed in each of five subregions are used to calculate the average Young modulus of that subregion. The Young modulus is found to increase monotonically from 40 GPa in the carbon core to a value of 413 GPa in the stoichiometric SiC region. The effective Young modulus of the fiber as a whole is estimated from the moduli of the individual regions and it is compared with mechanical measurements reported in the literature.

  13. Reprint of : Scattering approach to scanning gate microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalabert, Rodolfo A.; Weinmann, Dietmar

    2016-08-01

    We present a perturbative approach to the conductance change caused by a weakly invasive scattering potential in a two-dimensional electron gas. The resulting expressions are used to investigate the relationship between the conductance change measured in scanning gate microscopy as a function of the position of a scattering tip and local electronic quantities like the current density. We use a semiclassical approach to treat the case of a strong hard-wall scatterer in a half-plane facing a reflectionless channel. The resulting conductance change is consistent with the numerically calculated quantum conductance.

  14. Imaging Nanobubbles in Water with Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Edward R.; Mecklenburg, Matthew; Singer, Scott B.; Aloni, Shaul; Regan, Brian Christopher

    2011-05-01

    We present a technique based on scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) that is capable of probing nanobubble dynamics with nanometer spatial resolution. A vacuum-tight vessel holds a sub-micrometer layer of water between two electron-transparent dielectric membranes. Electrical current pulses passing through a platinum wire on one of the membranes inject sufficient heat locally to initiate single bubble formation. In the absence of power input, all bubbles are observed to be unstable against collapse, but the STEM beam alone can cause a shrinking bubble to grow.

  15. Micromachined photoplastic probe for scanning near-field optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genolet, G.; Despont, M.; Vettiger, P.; Staufer, U.; Noell, W.; de Rooij, N. F.; Cueni, T.; Bernal, M.-P.; Marquis-Weible, F.

    2001-10-01

    We present a hybrid probe for scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM), which consists of a micromachined photoplastic tip with a metallic aperture at the apex that is attached to an optical fiber, thus combining the advantages of optical fiber probes and micromachined tips. The tip and aperture are batch fabricated and assembled to a preetched optical fiber with micrometer centering precision. Rectangular apertures of 50 nm×130 nm have been produced without the need of any postprocessing. Topographical and optical imaging with a probe having an aperture of 300 nm demonstrate the great potential of the photoplastic probe for SNOM applications.

  16. Double micropipettes configuration method of scanning ion conductance microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Jian; Li, Zeqing; Jiao, Yangbohan

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, a new double micropipettes configuration mode of scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) is presented to better overcome ionic current drift and further improve the performance of SICM, which is based on a balance bridge circuit. The article verifies the feasibility of this new configuration mode from theoretical and experimental analyses, respectively, and compares the quality of scanning images in the conventional single micropipette configuration mode and the new double micropipettes configuration mode. The experimental results show that the double micropipettes configuration mode of SICM has better effect on restraining ionic current drift and better performance of imaging. Therefore, this article not only proposes a new direction of overcoming the ionic current drift but also develops a new method of SICM stable imaging.

  17. Multifrequency scanning probe microscopy study of nanodiamond agglomerates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aravind, Vasudeva; Lippold, Stephen; Li, Qian; Strelcov, Evgheny; Okatan, Baris; Legum, Benjamin; Kalinin, Sergei; Clarion University Team; Oak Ridge National Laboratory Team

    Due to their rich surface chemistry and excellent mechanical properties and non-toxic nature, nanodiamond particles have found applications such as biomedicine, tribology and lubrication, targeted drug delivery systems, tissue scaffolds and surgical implants. Although single nanodiamond particles have diameters about 4-5nm, they tend to form agglomerates. While these agglomerates can be useful for some purposes, many applications of nanodiamonds require single particle, disaggregated nanodiamonds. This work is oriented towards studying forces and interactions that contribute to agglomeration in nanodiamonds. In this work, using multifrequency scanning probe microscopy techniques, we show that agglomerate sizes can vary between 50-100nm in raw nanodiamonds. Extremeties of particles and Interfaces between agglomerates show dissipative forces with scanning probe microscope tip, indicating agglomerates could act as points of increased adhesion, thus reducing lubricating efficiency when nanodiamonds are used as lubricant additives. This research was conducted at the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, which is a DOE Office of Science User Facility.

  18. Fast frame scanning camera system for light-sheet microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Di; Zhou, Xing; Yao, Baoli; Li, Runze; Yang, Yanlong; Peng, Tong; Lei, Ming; Dan, Dan; Ye, Tong

    2015-10-10

    In the interest of improving the temporal resolution for light-sheet microscopy, we designed a fast frame scanning camera system that incorporated a galvanometer scanning mirror into the imaging path of a home-built light-sheet microscope. This system transformed a temporal image sequence to a spatial one so that multiple images could be acquired during one exposure period. The improvement factor of the frame rate was dependent on the number of sub-images that could be tiled on the sensor without overlapping each other and was therefore a trade-off with the image size. As a demonstration, we achieved 960 frames/s (fps) on a CCD camera that was originally capable of recording images at only 30 fps (full frame). This allowed us to observe millisecond or sub-millisecond events with ordinary CCD cameras. PMID:26479797

  19. Plasma etching of superconducting Niobium tips for scanning tunneling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roychowdhury, A.; Dana, R.; Dreyer, M.; Anderson, J. R.; Lobb, C. J.; Wellstood, F. C.

    2014-07-01

    We have developed a reproducible technique for the fabrication of sharp superconducting Nb tips for scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and scanning tunneling spectroscopy. Sections of Nb wire with 250 μm diameter are dry etched in an SF6 plasma in a Reactive Ion Etcher. The gas pressure, etching time, and applied power are chosen to control the ratio of isotropic to anisotropic etch rates and produce the desired tip shape. The resulting tips are atomically sharp, with radii of less than 100 nm, mechanically stable, and superconducting. They generate good STM images and spectroscopy on single crystal samples of Au(111), Au(100), and Nb(100), as well as a doped topological insulator Bi2Se3 at temperatures ranging from 30 mK to 9 K.

  20. A computer program for scanning transmission ion microscopy simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, R.; Shen, H.; Mi, Y.; Sun, M. D.; Yang, M. J.

    2005-04-01

    With the installation of the Scanning Proton Microprobe system at Fudan University, we are in the process of developing a three-dimension reconstruction technique based on scanning transmission ion microscopy-computed tomography (STIM-CT). As the first step, a related computer program of STIM simulation has been established. This program is written in the Visual C++®, using the technique of OOP (Object Oriented Programming) and it is a standard multiple-document Windows® program. It can be run with all MS Windows® operating systems. The operating mode is the menu mode, using a multiple process technique. The stopping power theory is based on the Bethe-Bloch formula. In order to simplify the calculation, the improved cylindrical coordinate model was introduced in the program instead of a usual spherical or cylindrical coordinate model. The simulated results of a sample at several rotation angles are presented.

  1. Imaging ballistic carrier trajectories in graphene using scanning gate microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Ziwei; Morikawa, Sei; Wang, Shu-Wei; Smith, Charles; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Masubuchi, Satoru; Machida, Tomoki; Connolly, Malcolm

    Graphene layers encapsulated by hexagon boron-nitride enable charge carriers to travel ballistically over several microns and provide an opportunity to realise electron optics with Dirac fermions. Scanning gate microscopy is a valuable tool for directly imaging such effects and has recently been applied to investigate coherent scattering in graphene pnp junctions. In this work we use SGM to image magnetic focusing of ballistic carriers in a graphene device. By locally varying the carrier concentration and electrostatic potential with the tip we are able to image electrons bouncing from the graphene edges. Moreover, by refocusing misaligned electrons back to collector, our results show how scanning probe tips can be used as mobile lenses for manipulating Dirac fermions in novel device concepts Supported by EPSRC.

  2. Plasma etching of superconducting Niobium tips for scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Roychowdhury, A.; Dana, R.; Dreyer, M.; Anderson, J. R.; Lobb, C. J.; Wellstood, F. C.

    2014-07-07

    We have developed a reproducible technique for the fabrication of sharp superconducting Nb tips for scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and scanning tunneling spectroscopy. Sections of Nb wire with 250 μm diameter are dry etched in an SF₆ plasma in a Reactive Ion Etcher. The gas pressure, etching time, and applied power are chosen to control the ratio of isotropic to anisotropic etch rates and produce the desired tip shape. The resulting tips are atomically sharp, with radii of less than 100 nm, mechanically stable, and superconducting. They generate good STM images and spectroscopy on single crystal samples of Au(111), Au(100), and Nb(100), as well as a doped topological insulator Bi₂Se₃ at temperatures ranging from 30 mK to 9 K.

  3. Double micropipettes configuration method of scanning ion conductance microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Jian; Li, Zeqing; Jiao, Yangbohan

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, a new double micropipettes configuration mode of scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) is presented to better overcome ionic current drift and further improve the performance of SICM, which is based on a balance bridge circuit. The article verifies the feasibility of this new configuration mode from theoretical and experimental analyses, respectively, and compares the quality of scanning images in the conventional single micropipette configuration mode and the new double micropipettes configuration mode. The experimental results show that the double micropipettes configuration mode of SICM has better effect on restraining ionic current drift and better performance of imaging. Therefore, this article not only proposes a new direction of overcoming the ionic current drift but also develops a new method of SICM stable imaging. PMID:27475561

  4. Photobleaching property of confocal laser scanning microscopy with masked illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, DongUk; Moon, Sucbei; Song, Hoseong; Yang, Wenzhong; Kim, Dug Y.

    2010-02-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) has become the tool of choice for high-contrast fluorescence imaging in the study of the three-dimensional and dynamic properties of biological system. However, the high cost and complexity of commercial CLSMs urges many researchers to individually develop low cost and flexible confocal microscopy systems. The high speed scanner is an influential factor in terms of cost and system complexity. Resonant galvo scanners at several kHz have been commonly used in custom-built CLSMs. However, during the repeated illumination for live cell imaging or 3D image formation, photobleaching and image distortion occurred at the edges of the scan field may be more serious than the center due to an inherent property (e.g. sinusoidal angular velocity) of the scan mirror. Usually, no data is acquired at the edges due to large image distortion but the excitation beam is still illuminated. Here, we present the photobleaching property of CLSM with masked illumination, a simple and low cost method, to exclude the unintended excitation illumination at the edges. The mask with a square hole in its center is disposed at the image plane between the scan lens and the tube lens in order to decrease photobleaching and image distortion at the edges. The excluded illumination section is used as the black level of the detected signals for a signal quantizing step. Finally, we demonstrated the reduced photobleaching at the edges on a single layer of fluorescent beads and real-time image acquisition without a standard composite video signal by using a frame grabber.

  5. Simultaneous Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy with Microchanneled Cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Ossola, Dario; Dorwling-Carter, Livie; Dermutz, Harald; Behr, Pascal; Vörös, János; Zambelli, Tomaso

    2015-12-01

    We combined scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) into a single tool using AFM cantilevers with an embedded microchannel flowing into the nanosized aperture at the apex of the hollow pyramid. An electrode was positioned in the AFM fluidic circuit connected to a second electrode in the bath. We could thus simultaneously measure the ionic current and the cantilever bending (in optical beam deflection mode). First, we quantitatively compared the SICM and AFM contact points on the approach curves. Second, we estimated where the probe in SICM mode touches the sample during scanning on a calibration grid and applied the finding to image a network of neurites on a Petri dish. Finally, we assessed the feasibility of a double controller using both the ionic current and the deflection as input signals of the piezofeedback. The experimental data were rationalized in the framework of finite elements simulations. PMID:26684144

  6. Simultaneous Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy with Microchanneled Cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ossola, Dario; Dorwling-Carter, Livie; Dermutz, Harald; Behr, Pascal; Vörös, János; Zambelli, Tomaso

    2015-12-01

    We combined scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) into a single tool using AFM cantilevers with an embedded microchannel flowing into the nanosized aperture at the apex of the hollow pyramid. An electrode was positioned in the AFM fluidic circuit connected to a second electrode in the bath. We could thus simultaneously measure the ionic current and the cantilever bending (in optical beam deflection mode). First, we quantitatively compared the SICM and AFM contact points on the approach curves. Second, we estimated where the probe in SICM mode touches the sample during scanning on a calibration grid and applied the finding to image a network of neurites on a Petri dish. Finally, we assessed the feasibility of a double controller using both the ionic current and the deflection as input signals of the piezofeedback. The experimental data were rationalized in the framework of finite elements simulations.

  7. Scanning tomographic acoustic microscopy: principles and recent developments (Invited Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, G.; Meyyappan, A.

    1987-09-01

    Acoustic Microscopy is an important branch of non-destructive evaluation which provides high resolution for imaging the detailed structure of a small object. When an acoustic microscope operates in the transmission mode, the micrograph is simply a shadowgraph of all the structures encountered by the acoustic wave passing through the object. Because of diffraction and overlapping, the resultant images are difficult to comprehend in the case of specimens of substantial thickness and structural complexity. We used the principles of diffraction tomography and acoustical holography along with digital calcuations of wavefield propagation to overcome this problem. We have described in previously-published work how a scanning laser acoustic microscope (SLAM) can be modified to obtain data for subsurface tomographic imaging. In this paper, we review the principles of scanning tomographic acoustic microscopy (STAM). The required modification of SLAM to obtain STAM and the reconstruction process are described. We show how we are able to accurately acquire the complex-amplitude information necessary for image reconstruction. We demonstrate the power of this technique by comparing digitally-computed images thus obtained with analogue images of a conventional SLAM. The results show that high-quality, high-resolution subsurface images can be obtained from experimentally acquired data. We also describe techniques to obtain projection data from different angles of wave incidence enabling us to tomographically reconstruct different planes of a complex specimen in microscopic detail. With these modifications in place, STAM should shortly become a powerful tool in non-destructive evaluation.

  8. From Graphite to Graphene via Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Dejun

    The primary objective of this dissertation is to study both graphene on graphite and pristine freestanding grapheme using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and density functional theory (DFT) simulation technique. In the experiment part, good quality tungsten metalic tips for experiment were fabricated using our newly developed tip making setup. Then a series of measurements using a technique called electrostatic-manipulation scanning tunneling microscopy (EM-STM) of our own development were performed on a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surface. The electrostatic interaction between the STM tip and the sample can be tuned to produce both reversible and irreversible large-scale movement of the graphite surface. Under this influence, atomic-resolution STM images reveal that a continuous electronic transition between two distinct patterns can be systematically controlled. DFT calculations reveal that this transition can be related to vertical displacements of the top layer of graphite relative to the bulk. Evidence for horizontal shifts in the top layer of graphite is also presented. Excellent agreement is found between experimental STM images and those simulated using DFT. In addition, the EM-STM technique was also used to controllably and reversibly pull freestanding graphene membranes up to 35 nm from their equilibrium height. Atomic-scale corrugation amplitudes 20 times larger than the STM electronic corrugation for graphene on a substrate were observed. The freestanding graphene membrane responds to a local attractive force created at the STM tip as a highly conductive yet flexible grounding plane with an elastic restoring force.

  9. High-resolution imaging by scanning electron microscopy of semithin sections in correlation with light microscopy.

    PubMed

    Koga, Daisuke; Kusumi, Satoshi; Shodo, Ryusuke; Dan, Yukari; Ushiki, Tatsuo

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we introduce scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of semithin resin sections. In this technique, semithin sections were adhered on glass slides, stained with both uranyl acetate and lead citrate, and observed with a backscattered electron detector at a low accelerating voltage. As the specimens are stained in the same manner as conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the contrast of SEM images of semithin sections was similar to TEM images of ultrathin sections. Using this technique, wide areas of semithin sections were also observed by SEM, without the obstruction of grids, which was inevitable for traditional TEM. This study also applied semithin section SEM to correlative light and electron microscopy. Correlative immunofluorescence microscopy and immune-SEM were performed in semithin sections of LR white resin-embedded specimens using a FluoroNanogold-labeled secondary antibody. Because LR white resin is hydrophilic and electron stable, this resin is suitable for immunostaining and SEM observation. Using correlative microscopy, the precise localization of the primary antibody was demonstrated by fluorescence microscopy and SEM. This method has great potential for studies examining the precise localization of molecules, including Golgi- and ER-associated proteins, in correlation with LM and SEM. PMID:26206941

  10. Scanning probe microscope simulator for the assessment of noise in scanning probe microscopy controllers

    SciTech Connect

    Wutscher, T.; Niebauer, J.; Giessibl, F. J.

    2013-07-15

    We present an electronic circuit that allows to calibrate and troubleshoot scanning probe microscopy (SPM) controllers with respect to their noise performance. The control signal in an SPM is typically highly nonlinear—the tunneling current in scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) varies exponentially with distance. The exponential current-versus-voltage characteristics of diodes allow to model the current dependence in STM. Additional inputs allow to simulate the effects of external perturbations and the reactions of the control electronics. We characterized the noise performance of the feedback controller using the apparent topography roughness of recorded images. For a comparison of different STM controllers, an optimal gain parameter was determined by exploring settling times through a rectangular perturbation signal. We used the circuit to directly compare the performance of two types of SPM controllers used in our laboratory.

  11. Scanning probe microscope simulator for the assessment of noise in scanning probe microscopy controllers.

    PubMed

    Wutscher, T; Niebauer, J; Giessibl, F J

    2013-07-01

    We present an electronic circuit that allows to calibrate and troubleshoot scanning probe microscopy (SPM) controllers with respect to their noise performance. The control signal in an SPM is typically highly nonlinear-the tunneling current in scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) varies exponentially with distance. The exponential current-versus-voltage characteristics of diodes allow to model the current dependence in STM. Additional inputs allow to simulate the effects of external perturbations and the reactions of the control electronics. We characterized the noise performance of the feedback controller using the apparent topography roughness of recorded images. For a comparison of different STM controllers, an optimal gain parameter was determined by exploring settling times through a rectangular perturbation signal. We used the circuit to directly compare the performance of two types of SPM controllers used in our laboratory. PMID:23902073

  12. Confocal laser scanning microscopy in study of bone calcification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, Tetsunari; Kokubu, Mayu; Kato, Hirohito; Imai, Koichi; Tanaka, Akio

    2012-12-01

    Bone regeneration in mandible and maxillae after extraction of teeth or tumor resection and the use of rough surface implants in bone induction must be investigated to elucidate the mechanism of calcification. The calcified tissues are subjected to chemical decalcification or physical grinding to observe their microscopic features with light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy where the microscopic tissue morphology is significantly altered. We investigated the usefulness of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) for this purpose. After staggering the time of administration of calcein and alizarin red to experimental rats and dogs, rat alveolar bone and dog femur grafted with coral as scaffold or dental implants were observed with CLSM. In rat alveolar bone, the calcification of newly-formed bone and net-like canaliculi was observed at the mesial bone from the roots progressed at the rate of 15 μm/day. In dog femur grafted with coral, newly-formed bones along the space of coral were observed in an orderly manner. In dog femur with dental implants, after 8 weeks, newly-formed bone proceeded along the rough surface of the implants. CLSM produced high-magnification images of newly-formed bone and thin sections were not needed.

  13. Resolving 2D Amorphous Materials with Scanning Probe Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burson, Kristen M.; Buechner, Christin; Lewandowski, Adrian; Heyde, Markus; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    Novel two-dimensional (2D) materials have garnered significant scientific interest due to their potential technological applications. Alongside the emphasis on crystalline materials, such as graphene and hexagonal BN, a new class of 2D amorphous materials must be pursued. For amorphous materials, a detailed understanding of the complex structure is necessary. Here we present a structural study of 2D bilayer silica on Ru(0001), an insulating material which is weakly coupled to the substrate. Atomic structure has been determined with a dual mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) sensor in ultra-high vacuum (UHV) at low temperatures, revealing a network of different ring sizes. Liquid AFM measurements with sub-nanometer resolution bridge the gap between clean UHV conditions and the environments that many material applications demand. Samples are grown and characterized in vacuum and subsequently transferred to the liquid AFM. Notably, the key structural features observed, namely nanoscale ring networks and larger holes to the substrate, show strong quantitative agreement between the liquid and UHV microscopy measurements. This provides direct evidence for the structural stability of these silica films for nanoelectronics and other applications. KMB acknowledges support from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation.

  14. Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy Imaging during Respiratory Burst in Human Cell

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Hiroyuki; Prasad, Ankush; Matsuoka, Ryo; Aoyagi, Shigeo; Matsue, Tomokazu; Kasai, Shigenobu

    2016-01-01

    Phagocytic cells, such as neutrophils and monocytes, consume oxygen and generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) in response to external stimuli. Among the various ROS, the superoxide anion radical is known to be primarily produced by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate hydrogen (NADPH) oxidase. In the current study, we attempt to evaluate the respiratory burst by monitoring the rapid consumption of oxygen by using scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) imaging. The respiratory burst was measured in a human monocytic cell line (THP-1 cells) derived from an acute monocytic leukemia patient under the effect of the exogenous addition of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, which acts as a differentiation inducer. SECM imaging composed of a microelectrode was used to compare oxygen consumption between normal cellular respiration and during respiratory burst in THP-1 cells. Two-dimensional respiratory activity imaging was performed using XY-scan. In addition, the quantitative evaluation of oxygen consumption in THP-1 cells was performed using a Z-scan. The results obtained show higher consumption of oxygen in cells undergoing respiratory burst. SECM imaging is thus claimed to be a highly sensitive and appropriate technique compared to other existing techniques available for evaluating oxidative stress in human cells, making it potentially useful for widespread applications in biomedical research and clinical trials. PMID:26903876

  15. Extracting twins from orientation imaging microscopy scan data.

    PubMed

    Wright, S I; Larsen, R J

    2002-03-01

    Automated electron backscatter diffraction or orientation imaging microscopy (OIM) provides spatially specific measurements of crystallographic orientation. These measurements are typically collected on regular grids. By inspecting the misorientation between neighbouring measurements on the grid, potential twin boundaries can be identified. If the misorientation is within some given tolerance of a specified twin misorientation, the boundary separating the two measurements may be identified as a potential twin boundary. In addition, for a coherent twin, the twinning planes must be coincident with the grain boundary plane. As OIM scans are inherently two-dimensional, the scan data provide only limited information on the boundary plane. Thus, it is not possible to ascertain definitively whether the twinning planes are coincident with the boundary plane. Nonetheless, the alignment of the surface traces of the twinning planes with the trace of the boundary provides a partial indication of coincidence. An automated approach has been developed that allows data concerning both twin criterion to be extracted from OIM scans. Application of the methodology to deformed zirconium suggests that the twinning planes remain coherent during deformation. The methodology was also used to improve grain size distributions measured by OIM. These results more closely match those obtained by conventional metallography. PMID:11996188

  16. Amplitude Modulation Mode of Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Liu, Lianqing; Yang, Yang; Zhou, Lei; Wang, Dong; Wang, Yuechao; Li, Guangyong

    2015-08-01

    Live-cell imaging at the nanoscale resolution is a hot research topic in the field of life sciences for the direct observation of cellular biological activity. Scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) is one of the few effective imaging tools for live-cell imaging at the nanoscale resolution. However, there are various problems in existing scanning modes. The hopping and AC modes suffer from low speed, whereas the DC mode is prone to instability because of the DC drift and external electrical interference. In this article, we propose an amplitude modulation (AM) mode of SICM, which employs an AC voltage to enhance the stability and improve the scanning speed. In this AM mode, we introduce a capacitance compensation method to eliminate capacitance effect and use the amplitude of the AC current component to control the tip movement. Experimental results on polydimethylsiloxane samples verify the validity of the AM mode and demonstrate an improved performance of both speed and stability of this new mode. PMID:25759185

  17. Scanning scattering contrast microscopy for actinic EUV mask inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohacsi, I.; Helfenstein, P.; Rajendran, R.; Ekinci, Y.

    2016-03-01

    Actinic mask inspection for EUV lithography with targeted specification of sensitivity and throughput is a big challenge and effective solutions are needed. We present a novel method for actinic mask inspection, i.e. scanning scattering contrast microscopy. In this method the EUV mask is scanned with a beam of relatively small spot size and the scattered light is recorded with a pixel detector. Since the mask layout is known, the scattering profile of a defect-free mask at the detector can be calculated. The signal between the measured and calculated signal provides the deviation between the real mask and its ideal counterpart and a signal above a certain threshold indicates the existence of a defect within the illumination area. Dynamic software filtering helps to suppress strong diffraction from defect free structures and allows registration of faint defects with high sensitivity. With the continuous scan of the whole mask area, a defect map can be obtained with high throughput. Therefore, we believe that this method has the potential of providing an effective solution for actinic mask inspection. Here we discuss the basic principles of the method, present proof-of-principle experiments, describe the basic components of a feasible stand-alone tool and present early results of the performance estimations of such a tool.

  18. Helium ion microscopy and energy selective scanning electron microscopy - two advanced microscopy techniques with complementary applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodenburg, C.; Jepson, M. A. E.; Boden, Stuart A.; Bagnall, Darren M.

    2014-06-01

    Both scanning electron microscopes (SEM) and helium ion microscopes (HeIM) are based on the same principle of a charged particle beam scanning across the surface and generating secondary electrons (SEs) to form images. However, there is a pronounced difference in the energy spectra of the emitted secondary electrons emitted as result of electron or helium ion impact. We have previously presented evidence that this also translates to differences in the information depth through the analysis of dopant contrast in doped silicon structures in both SEM and HeIM. Here, it is now shown how secondary electron emission spectra (SES) and their relation to depth of origin of SE can be experimentally exploited through the use of energy filtering (EF) in low voltage SEM (LV-SEM) to access bulk information from surfaces covered by damage or contamination layers. From the current understanding of the SES in HeIM it is not expected that EF will be as effective in HeIM but an alternative that can be used for some materials to access bulk information is presented.

  19. Cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy of fractured oxide surfaces and heterostructure interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, Teyu

    2011-03-01

    Recently, interfaces between novel oxide materials have become a playground for manipulation of new functionalities. At interfaces, the broken symmetry and the spatially confined environment have been shown to modify the local interactions and generate wholly new electronic phases (e.g. magnetism, metallicity, superconductivity etc.) distinct from the composite bulk materials. However, to date our understanding of these interface driven phases is still limited. While there exists powerful spatially resolved tools for visualizing the chemical and magnetic structure of an interface, a direct observation of electronic behavior across the interface presents a major experimental challenge. After the success of creating flat fractured surfaces on Nb-doped SrTi O3 (Nb:STO) accessible to scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) [1-3], we have further harnessed the high-sensitivity to electronic local density of states (LDOS) of the scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) in cross-sectional geometry to visualize complex oxide interface electronic properties. By extending XSTM/S to the interface between colossal magnetoresistant manganite La 2/3 Ca 1/3 Mn O3 (LCMO) and semiconducting Nb:STO, we were able to map the LDOS across the boundary to unambiguously visualize the interface by the location of the valence band and elucidate the fundamental issue of band alignment at a complex oxide heterointerface. Use of the Center for Nanoscale Materials was supported by the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  20. Cantilevers with integrated organic LEDs for scanning probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Kwang Hyup; O'Connor, Brendan; Zhao, Yiying; Loh, William; Pipe, Kevin P.; Shtein, Max

    2007-02-01

    Organic thin films which are based on Van der Waals-bonded molecular organic compounds can be deposited onto a variety of substrates including scanning probe cantilevers without the lattice-matching constraints of conventional covalently-bonded semiconductors. Here we demonstrate organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) fabricated on scanning probe cantilevers using thermal evaporation of molecular organic compounds and metallic electrodes. Ion beam lithography was used to define the emissive region in the shape of a ring having a diameter of 5 micrometers. The width of the ring emission was less than a micron as measured in the far field. Stable light emission was observed from the device at forward bias, with a current-voltage response similar to that of archetypal OLEDs. Such a probe can enable a new form of electrically-pumped SNOM compatible with existing atomic force microscopy tools and techniques. The emission wavelength can be tuned across the entire visible spectrum, including white light emission, by altering the composition of the emissive layer with a wide range of luminescent dyes. Should the ring-shaped light emission be used for imaging, the sample image can be deconvolved using a ring filter to achieve high resolution. The OLED probe can also be used to transfer excitons through the cathode to a sample via plasmon-assisted energy transfer; such a probe would be valuable for studying exciton dynamics in organic or organic/inorganic hybrid photovoltaic devices. By demonstrating the first active organic device on a scanning probe cantilever, this work opens the door to a wide range of new scanning probe techniques based on this class of materials for areas such as biological imaging.

  1. Effects of instrument imperfections on quantitative scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Krause, Florian F; Schowalter, Marco; Grieb, Tim; Müller-Caspary, Knut; Mehrtens, Thorsten; Rosenauer, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    Several instrumental imperfections of transmission electron microscopes are characterized and their effects on the results of quantitative scanning electron microscopy (STEM) are investigated and quantified using simulations. Methods to either avoid influences of these imperfections during acquisition or to include them in reference calculations are proposed. Particularly, distortions inflicted on the diffraction pattern by an image-aberration corrector can cause severe errors of more than 20% if not accounted for. A procedure for their measurement is proposed here. Furthermore, afterglow phenomena and nonlinear behavior of the detector itself can lead to incorrect normalization of measured intensities. Single electrons accidentally impinging on the detector are another source of error but can also be exploited for threshold-less calibration of STEM images to absolute dose, incident beam current determination and measurement of the detector sensitivity. PMID:26686661

  2. Ultramicrosensors based on transition metal hexacyanoferrates for scanning electrochemical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Komkova, Maria A; Holzinger, Angelika; Hartmann, Andreas; Khokhlov, Alexei R; Kranz, Christine; Karyakin, Arkady A; Voronin, Oleg G

    2013-01-01

    We report here a way for improving the stability of ultramicroelectrodes (UME) based on hexacyanoferrate-modified metals for the detection of hydrogen peroxide. The most stable sensors were obtained by electrochemical deposition of six layers of hexacyanoferrates (HCF), more specifically, an alternating pattern of three layers of Prussian Blue and three layers of Ni-HCF. The microelectrodes modified with mixed layers were continuously monitored in 1 mM hydrogen peroxide and proved to be stable for more than 5 h under these conditions. The mixed layer microelectrodes exhibited a stability which is five times as high as the stability of conventional Prussian Blue-modified UMEs. The sensitivity of the mixed layer sensor was 0.32 A·M(-1)·cm(-2), and the detection limit was 10 µM. The mixed layer-based UMEs were used as sensors in scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) experiments for imaging of hydrogen peroxide evolution. PMID:24205459

  3. Imaging nonlocal transport in graphene using scanning gate microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connolly, Malcolm; Dou, Ziwei; Morikawa, Sei; Wang, Shu-Wei; Smith, Charles; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Masubuchi, Satoru; Machida, Tomoki

    Nonlocal transport measurements are designed to detect when charge injected by a current probe induces voltages far from the classical current path. While a range of exotic forces can induce nonlocal transport of Dirac fermions in graphene such as bandstructure topology, Zeeman spin Hall, and many-body interactions, it is important to understand the role of density fluctuations around the Dirac point where nonlocality can be most pronounced. We use scanning gate microscopy to image current flow and nonlocal signals directly in high-mobility graphene encapsulated by hexagonal boron nitride. Despite being located several mean-free paths from the current injector, Hall voltage probes parallel with current path display an order of magnitude larger nonlocal signal than expected around the Dirac point. SGM images captured at different carrier density are consistent with current spreading due to percolation. Such long range charge transport should be considered when designing devices and calculating the relaxation length of nonlocal currents. Supported by EPSRC.

  4. Confocal laser scanning microscopy with spatiotemporal structured illumination.

    PubMed

    Gao, Peng; Nienhaus, G Ulrich

    2016-03-15

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), which is widely utilized in the biological and biomedical sciences, is limited in spatial resolution due to diffraction to about half the light wavelength. Here we have combined structured illumination with CLSM to enhance its spatial resolution. To this end, we have used a spatial light modulator (SLM) to generate fringe patterns of different orientations and phase shifts in the excitation spot without any mechanical movement. We have achieved 1.8 and 1.7 times enhanced lateral and axial resolutions, respectively, by synthesizing the object spectrum along different illumination directions. This technique is thus a promising tool for high-resolution morphological or fluorescence imaging, especially in deep tissue. PMID:26977667

  5. Parameter optimization for through-focus scanning optical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Attota, Ravi Kiran; Kang, Hyeonggon

    2016-06-27

    It is important to economically and non-destructively analyze three-dimensional (3-D) shapes of nanometer to micrometer scale objects with sub-nanometer measurement resolution for emerging high-volume nanomanufacturing, especially for process control. High-throughput through-focus scanning optical microscopy (TSOM) demonstrates promise for such applications. TSOM uses a conventional optical microscope for 3-D shape metrology by making use of the complete set of through-focus, four-dimensional optical data. However, a systematic study showing the effect of various parameters on the TSOM method is lacking. Here we present the optimization of the basic parameters such as illumination numerical aperture (NA), collection NA, focus step height, digital camera pixel size, illumination polarization, and illumination wavelength to achieve peak performance of the TSOM method. PMID:27410642

  6. Sample heating system for spin-polarized scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kohashi, Teruo; Motai, Kumi

    2013-08-01

    A sample-heating system for spin-polarized scanning electron microscopy (spin SEM) has been developed and used for microscopic magnetization analysis at temperatures up to 500°C. In this system, a compact ceramic heater and a preheating operation keep the ultra-high vacuum conditions while the sample is heated during spin SEM measurement. Moreover, the secondary-electron collector, which is arranged close to the sample, was modified so that it is not damaged at high temperatures. The system was used to heat a Co(1000) single-crystal sample from room temperature up to 500°C, and the magnetic-domain structures were observed. Changes of the domain structures were observed around 220 and 400°C, and these changes are considered to be due to phase transitions of this sample. PMID:23349241

  7. Quantitative flaw characterization with scanning laser acoustic microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Generazio, E. R.; Roth, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    Surface roughness and diffraction are two factors that have been observed to affect the accuracy of flaw characterization with scanning laser acoustic microscopy. In accuracies can arise when the surface of the test sample is acoustically rough. It is shown that, in this case, Snell's law is no longer valid for determining the direction of sound propagation within the sample. The relationship between the direction of sound propagation within the sample, the apparent flaw depth, and the sample's surface roughness is investigated. Diffraction effects can mask the acoustic images of minute flaws and make it difficult to establish their size, depth, and other characteristics. It is shown that for Fraunhofer diffraction conditions the acoustic image of a subsurface defect corresponds to a two-dimensional Fourier transform. Transforms based on simulated flaws are used to infer the size and shape of the actual flaw.

  8. Adaptive optics two-photon scanning laser fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yaopeng; Bifano, Thomas; Lin, Charles

    2011-03-01

    Two-photon fluorescence microscopy provides a powerful tool for deep tissue imaging. However, optical aberrations from illumination beam path limit imaging depth and resolution. Adaptive Optics (AO) is found to be useful to compensate for optical aberrations and improve image resolution and contrast from two-photon excitation. We have developed an AO system relying on a MEMS Deformable Mirror (DM) to compensate the optical aberrations in a two-photon scanning laser fluorescence microscope. The AO system utilized a Zernike polynomial based stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) algorithm to optimize the DM shape for wavefront correction. The developed microscope is applied for subsurface imaging of mouse bone marrow. It was demonstrated that AO allows 80% increase in fluorescence signal intensity from bone cavities 145um below the surface. The AO-enhanced microscope provides cellular level images of mouse bone marrow at depths exceeding those achievable without AO.

  9. Scanning electron microscopy of a liver cavernous hemangioma.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, K; Itoshima, T; Ito, T; Ukida, M; Ogawa, H; Kitadai, M; Hattori, S; Mizutani, S; Nagashima, H

    1983-02-01

    A 39-year-old female with a large cavernous hemangioma of the liver was successfully treated by ligation of the left hepatic artery. A wedge biopsy specimen of the hemangioma was obtained after the ligation and was examined by scanning electron microscopy. The hemangioma was demarcated from the surrounding normal liver parenchyma and had a labyrinth of caves 50-150 microns in diameter. The caves were separated by fibrous septa 20-40 microns in width. Endothelial cells of the caves were spindle-shaped and arranged in parallel. The surface property of the caves resembled that of the hepatic artery and differed from that of the portal vein or hepatic vein. These findings support that the cavernous hemangioma of the liver was supplied by the hepatic artery. The labyrinthine structure of the cavernous hemangioma may explain the long standing contrast enhancement of the hemangioma after hepatic arteriography. PMID:6832546

  10. Characterization of Talbot pattern illumination for scanning optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guangshuo; Yang, Changhuei; Wu, Jigang

    2013-09-01

    We studied the use of Talbot pattern illumination in scanning optical microscopy (SOM). Unlike conventional illumination spots used in SOM, the focal spots in Talbot pattern are more complicated and do not have a simple Gaussian intensity distribution. To find out the resolution of SOM using Talbot pattern, we characterized the evolution of the full-width-at-half-maximum spot size of the Talbot focal spots by computer simulation. We then simulated the SOM imaging under Talbot pattern illumination using the razor blade and the U.S. Air Force target as the sample objects, and compared the results with those performed with Gaussian spots as illumination. Using several foci searching algorithms, the optimal focal distances were found to be shorter than the theoretical Talbot distances. The simulation results were consistent with the experiment results published previously. We then provide a practical guidance for searching for optimal focal distances in the SOM based on these studies.

  11. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Spectroscopy of Compound Semiconductor Heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwo, Shang-, Jr.

    Scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM/S) were used to investigate the structural and electronic properties of III-V compound semiconductor heterojunctions in cross section. The most important properties of heterostructures can now be measured in real space with unprecedented resolution. By using prototypical Al_{0.3}Ga _{0.7}As/GaAs heterojunction and GaAs pn-junction systems, we demonstrate the unique capability of STM/S to precisely map out the detailed band structure across semiconductor junctions with nanometer resolution. An ultra-high vacuum STM system was designed and constructed in our laboratory for this work. The details of this system as well as the methodology used for the cross-sectional study are presented here. Because of its capability to provide valuable information on solid/solid interfaces, the cross-sectional STM/S characterization method reported here may have an important technological impact as device miniaturization continues.

  12. Scanning acoustic microscopy study of human cortical and trabecular bone.

    PubMed

    Bumrerraj, S; Katz, J L

    2001-12-01

    Scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM) has been used in the burst mode to study the properties of human cortical and trabecular bone. An Olympus UH3 SAM (Olympus Co., Tokyo, Japan) was used with a 400 MHz burst mode lens (120 degrees aperture, nominal lateral resolution 2.5 microm). The human cortical bone was from the midshaft of a femur from a 60+ male cadaver; the trabecular bone specimens were obtained from the distal femoral condyles of another 60+ human male cadaver. Elastic moduli for both trabecular and cortical bone were obtained by means of a series of calibration curves correlating SAM gray levels of known materials with their elastic moduli; specimens included: polypropylene, PMMA, Teflon, aluminum, Pyrex glass, titanium, and stainless steel. Values obtained by this method are in good agreement with those obtained by nanoindentation techniques. The three critical findings earlier by Katz and Meunier were observed here as well in both the cortical and trabecular bone samples. PMID:11853252

  13. Combined Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Tilt- and Focal Series

    SciTech Connect

    Dahmen, Tim; Baudoin, Jean-Pierre G; Lupini, Andrew R; Kubel, Christian; Slusallek, Phillip; De Jonge, Niels

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a combined tilt- and focal series is proposed as a new recording scheme for high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) tomography. Three-dimensional (3D) data were acquired by mechanically tilting the specimen, and recording a through-focal series at each tilt direction. The sample was a whole-mount macrophage cell with embedded gold nanoparticles. The tilt focal algebraic reconstruction technique (TF-ART) is introduced as a new algorithm to reconstruct tomograms from such combined tilt- and focal series. The feasibility of TF-ART was demonstrated by 3D reconstruction of the experimental 3D data. The results were compared with a conventional STEM tilt series of a similar sample. The combined tilt- and focal series led to smaller missing wedge artifacts, and a higher axial resolution than obtained for the STEM tilt series, thus improving on one of the main issues of tilt series-based electron tomography.

  14. Cleaved thin-film probes for scanning tunneling microscopy.

    PubMed

    Siahaan, T; Kurnosikov, O; Barcones, B; Swagten, H J M; Koopmans, B

    2016-01-22

    We introduce an alternative type of probe for scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Instead of using a needle-like tip made from a piece of metallic wire, a sharp-edged cleaved insulating substrate, which is initially covered by a thin conductive film, is used. The sharp tip is formed at the intersection of the two cleaved sides. Using this approach a variety of materials for STM probes can be used, and functionalization of STM probes is possible. The working principle of different probes made of metallic (Pt, Co, and CoB), indium-tin oxide, as well as Cu/Pt and Co/Pt multilayer films are demonstrated by STM imaging of clean Cu(001) and Cu(111) surfaces as well as the epitaxial Co clusters on Cu(111). PMID:26636763

  15. Video-rate scanning confocal microscopy and microendoscopy.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Alexander J; Evans, Conor L

    2011-01-01

    Confocal microscopy has become an invaluable tool in biology and the biomedical sciences, enabling rapid, high-sensitivity, and high-resolution optical sectioning of complex systems. Confocal microscopy is routinely used, for example, to study specific cellular targets, monitor dynamics in living cells, and visualize the three dimensional evolution of entire organisms. Extensions of confocal imaging systems, such as confocal microendoscopes, allow for high-resolution imaging in vivo and are currently being applied to disease imaging and diagnosis in clinical settings. Confocal microscopy provides three-dimensional resolution by creating so-called "optical sections" using straightforward geometrical optics. In a standard wide-field microscope, fluorescence generated from a sample is collected by an objective lens and relayed directly to a detector. While acceptable for imaging thin samples, thick samples become blurred by fluorescence generated above and below the objective focal plane. In contrast, confocal microscopy enables virtual, optical sectioning of samples, rejecting out-of-focus light to build high resolution three-dimensional representations of samples. Confocal microscopes achieve this feat by using a confocal aperture in the detection beam path. The fluorescence collected from a sample by the objective is relayed back through the scanning mirrors and through the primary dichroic mirror, a mirror carefully selected to reflect shorter wavelengths such as the laser excitation beam while passing the longer, Stokes-shifted fluorescence emission. This long-wavelength fluorescence signal is then passed to a pair of lenses on either side of a pinhole that is positioned at a plane exactly conjugate with the focal plane of the objective lens. Photons collected from the focal volume of the object are collimated by the objective lens and are focused by the confocal lenses through the pinhole. Fluorescence generated above or below the focal plane will therefore not

  16. High Resolution Scanning Electron Microscopy of Cells Using Dielectrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shi-Yang; Zhang, Wei; Soffe, Rebecca; Nahavandi, Sofia; Shukla, Ravi; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar

    2014-01-01

    Ultrastructural analysis of cells can reveal valuable information about their morphological, physiological, and biochemical characteristics. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) has been widely used to provide high-resolution images from the surface of biological samples. However, samples need to be dehydrated and coated with conductive materials for SEM imaging. Besides, immobilizing non-adherent cells during processing and analysis is challenging and requires complex fixation protocols. In this work, we developed a novel dielectrophoresis based microfluidic platform for interfacing non-adherent cells with high-resolution SEM at low vacuum mode. The system enables rapid immobilization and dehydration of samples without deposition of chemical residues over the cell surface. Moreover, it enables the on-chip chemical stimulation and fixation of immobilized cells with minimum dislodgement. These advantages were demonstrated for comparing the morphological changes of non-budding and budding yeast cells following Lyticase treatment. PMID:25089528

  17. Scanning electrochemical microscopy of Li-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Ventosa, E; Schuhmann, W

    2015-11-21

    Li-ion batteries (LIBs) are receiving increasing attention over the past decade due to their high energy density. This energy storage technology is expected to continue improving the performance, especially for its large-scale deployment in plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) and full electric vehicles (EVs). Such improvement requires having a large variety of analytical techniques at scientists' disposal in order to understand and address the multiple mechanisms and processes occurring simultaneously in this complex system. This perspective article aims to highlight the strength and potential of scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) in this field. After a brief description of a LIB system and the most commonly used techniques in this field, the unique information provided by SECM is illustrated by discussing several recent examples from the literature. PMID:26076998

  18. Video-rate Scanning Confocal Microscopy and Microendoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Alexander J.; Evans, Conor L.

    2011-01-01

    Confocal microscopy has become an invaluable tool in biology and the biomedical sciences, enabling rapid, high-sensitivity, and high-resolution optical sectioning of complex systems. Confocal microscopy is routinely used, for example, to study specific cellular targets1, monitor dynamics in living cells2-4, and visualize the three dimensional evolution of entire organisms5,6. Extensions of confocal imaging systems, such as confocal microendoscopes, allow for high-resolution imaging in vivo7 and are currently being applied to disease imaging and diagnosis in clinical settings8,9. Confocal microscopy provides three-dimensional resolution by creating so-called "optical sections" using straightforward geometrical optics. In a standard wide-field microscope, fluorescence generated from a sample is collected by an objective lens and relayed directly to a detector. While acceptable for imaging thin samples, thick samples become blurred by fluorescence generated above and below the objective focal plane. In contrast, confocal microscopy enables virtual, optical sectioning of samples, rejecting out-of-focus light to build high resolution three-dimensional representations of samples. Confocal microscopes achieve this feat by using a confocal aperture in the detection beam path. The fluorescence collected from a sample by the objective is relayed back through the scanning mirrors and through the primary dichroic mirror, a mirror carefully selected to reflect shorter wavelengths such as the laser excitation beam while passing the longer, Stokes-shifted fluorescence emission. This long-wavelength fluorescence signal is then passed to a pair of lenses on either side of a pinhole that is positioned at a plane exactly conjugate with the focal plane of the objective lens. Photons collected from the focal volume of the object are collimated by the objective lens and are focused by the confocal lenses through the pinhole. Fluorescence generated above or below the focal plane will

  19. Thermal expansion of scanning tunneling microscopy tips under laser illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grafström, S.; Schuller, P.; Kowalski, J.; Neumann, R.

    1998-04-01

    The periodic thermal expansion of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) tips arising under irradiation with power-modulated laser light has been investigated. The expansion was determined by comparison with a calibrated piezomotion measured in an STM, which was operated in the constant-current mode, and instrumental effects were corrected for. The experimental data concerning the frequency response of the thermal expansion for various geometries of the tip and for different positions of the laser focus are compared with theoretical results which were derived from a numerical solution of the equation of heat conduction. A very good agreement is found. The results are also interpreted in terms of simplified analytical expressions. Furthermore, the theoretical data are used to derive the response of the tip to fast transients of the light power as in the case of pulsed irradiation.

  20. Probing Individual Ice Nucleation Events with Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bingbing; China, Swarup; Knopf, Daniel; Gilles, Mary; Laskin, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation is one of the processes of critical relevance to a range of topics in the fundamental and the applied science and technologies. Heterogeneous ice nucleation initiated by particles proceeds where microscopic properties of particle surfaces essentially control nucleation mechanisms. Ice nucleation in the atmosphere on particles governs the formation of ice and mixed phase clouds, which in turn influence the Earth's radiative budget and climate. Heterogeneous ice nucleation is still insufficiently understood and poses significant challenges in predictive understanding of climate change. We present a novel microscopy platform allowing observation of individual ice nucleation events at temperature range of 193-273 K and relative humidity relevant for ice formation in the atmospheric clouds. The approach utilizes a home built novel ice nucleation cell interfaced with Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (IN-ESEM system). The IN-ESEM system is applied for direct observation of individual ice formation events, determining ice nucleation mechanisms, freezing temperatures, and relative humidity onsets. Reported microanalysis of the ice nucleating particles (INP) include elemental composition detected by the energy dispersed analysis of X-rays (EDX), and advanced speciation of the organic content in particles using scanning transmission x-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). The performance of the IN-ESEM system is validated through a set of experiments with kaolinite particles with known ice nucleation propensity. We demonstrate an application of the IN-ESEM system to identify and characterize individual INP within a complex mixture of ambient particles.

  1. Scanning electron microscopy of Strongylus spp. in zebra.

    PubMed

    Els, H J; Malan, F S; Scialdo-Krecek, R C

    1983-12-01

    The external ultrastructure of the anterior and posterior extremities of the nematodes, Strongylus asini , Strongylus vulgaris, Strongylus equinus and Strongylus edentatus, was studied with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Fresh specimens of S. asini were collected from the caecum, ventral colon and vena portae of Equus burchelli and Equus zebra hartmannae ; S. vulgaris from the caecum, colon and arteria ileocolica of E. burchelli ; S. equinus from the ventral colon of E. z. hartmannae and S. edentatus from the caecum and ventral colon of both zebras , during surveys of parasites in zebras in the Etosha Game Reserve, South West Africa/Namibia, and the Kruger National Park, Republic of South Africa. The worms were cleaned, fixed and mounted by standard methods and photographed in a JEOL JSM - 35C scanning electron microscope (SEM) operating at 12kV . The SEM showed the following differences: the tips of the external leaf-crowns varied and were fine and delicate in S. asini , coarse and broad in S. vulgaris and, in S. equinus and S. edentatus, closely adherent, separating into single elements for half their length. The excretory pores showed only slight variation, and the morphology of the copulatory bursae did not differ from those seen with light microscopy. The genital cones differed markedly: S. asini had a ventral triangular projection and laterally 2 finger-like projections: in S. vulgaris there were numerous bosses on the lateral and ventral aspects of the cone; in S. equinus 2 finger-like processes projected laterocaudally ; and in S. edentatus 2 pairs of papilla-like processes projected laterally on the ventral aspects, and a pair of rounded projections and a pair of hair-like structures adorned the dorsal aspects.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6676687

  2. Improved optical fiber probes for scanning near field optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheaton, Bryan R.

    2004-12-01

    The motivation behind this work stems from a combination of my interest in atomic force microscopy (AFM) and the need to apply AFM to several areas of glass research. AFM was used as the main characterization tool in the study of near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) tip formation, evaluation of phase separation in glasses and copper oxide semiconductor film formation. The use of atomic force microscopy (AFM) to evaluate the evolving tip structure of an optical fiber probe for NSOM was studied. This study demonstrates the feasibility of predicting the final tip cone angle, without taking the etching process to completion. Cone angles reported in this study ranged from 58 to 152 degrees, depending on the fiber type and etch conditions. The ability to vary the probe cone angle, and utilize AFM to evaluate the cone angle that results from a set of etch conditions, are valuable additions to the development of NSOM fiber tips. The chemical and spatial variation of phase separated morphologies in glasses can range from a few angstroms to microns, often requiring very high magnification for detection. Historically phase separated glasses have been characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), a time consuming and costly technique. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) provides an inexpensive alternative to TEM and has proven to be a powerful tool in the evaluation of type, degree and scale of phase separation in glasses down to the nanometer level. AFM was used to show that the thickness and uniformity of the CuO films grown in-situ on the surface of copper containing alkali borosilicate glasses increased with time and temperature, however an upper time limit was reached in which no further thickness increases were realized. Tenorite, cuprite and copper metal films were produced depending on the heat treatment environment. XPS was utilized to confirm that copper oxide film formation during heat treatments of glasses near Tg results from the oxidation of copper

  3. Electrical Measurements and Nanomechanics Using Scanning Probe Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yong

    2002-10-01

    In the early 1980s, G. Binnig et al. invented the Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) [1], making it possible to obtain atomic resolution images of conducting surfaces. After that, many different types of Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM) were invented and some of the most useful representatives are Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) [2], Electrostatic Force Microscopy (EFM) [3] and Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy (KPFM) [4,5]. In 1985, G. Binnig et al. [2] invented the AFM, which now is used as a fundamental tool in many fields of research. Developed from AFM, Y. Martin et al. [3] invented EFM in 1987. The development of AC mode AFM allows the detection of weak long-range forces. EFM has also been used to study other systems and phenomena, such as thin liquid films on solid surfaces [6], electrically stressed gold nanowires [7], and spatial charge distribution in quantum wires [8]. In 1991, M. Nonnenmacher et al. [5] invented Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy. KPFM is used to study any property that affects the tip-surface Contact Potential Difference (CPD), such as voltage signals in integrated circuits (IC) [9], charged grain boundaries in polycrystalline silicon [10] and surface potential variations in multilayer semiconductor devices [11]. The aim of this poster is to discuss the application of SPM to electrical measurements. The theory of SPM was presented. The AFM was firstly introduced as it was developed before the other two. The design and theory were discussed. The force-distance curve was introduced. After this EFM was presented. EFM was developed from AC mode AFM. The technique was achieved by applying a DC voltage between the tip and the sample. The design, theory and features of it were surveyed. KPFM was also discussed. KPFM was developed from EFM. The central part of this technique is to measure the CPD. Experimental measurements of SPM were described after theory part. Research work using AFM was presented. The newest technique of AFM, UHV-AFM has been used in

  4. Water-Immersible MEMS scanning mirror designed for wide-field fast-scanning photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Junjie; Huang, Chih-Hsien; Martel, Catherine; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Wang, Lidai; Yang, Joon-Mo; Gao, Liang; Randolph, Gwendalyn; Zou, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2013-03-01

    By offering images with high spatial resolution and unique optical absorption contrast, optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) has gained increasing attention in biomedical research. Recent developments in OR-PAM have improved its imaging speed, but have sacrificed either the detection sensitivity or field of view or both. We have developed a wide-field fast-scanning OR-PAM by using a water-immersible MEMS scanning mirror (MEMS-ORPAM). Made of silicon with a gold coating, the MEMS mirror plate can reflect both optical and acoustic beams. Because it uses an electromagnetic driving force, the whole MEMS scanning system can be submerged in water. In MEMS-ORPAM, the optical and acoustic beams are confocally configured and simultaneously steered, which ensures uniform detection sensitivity. A B-scan imaging speed as high as 400 Hz can be achieved over a 3 mm scanning range. A diffraction-limited lateral resolution of 2.4 μm in water and a maximum imaging depth of 1.1 mm in soft tissue have been experimentally determined. Using the system, we imaged the flow dynamics of both red blood cells and carbon particles in a mouse ear in vivo. By using Evans blue dye as the contrast agent, we also imaged the flow dynamics of lymphatic vessels in a mouse tail in vivo. The results show that MEMS-OR-PAM could be a powerful tool for studying highly dynamic and time-sensitive biological phenomena.

  5. Amyloid Structure and Assembly: Insights from Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsbury, C.; Wall, J.; Baxa, U.; Simon, M. N.; Steven, A. C.; Engel, A.; Aebi, U.; Muller, S. A.

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are filamentous protein aggregates implicated in several common diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and type II diabetes. Similar structures are also the molecular principle of the infectious spongiform encephalopathies such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans, scrapie in sheep, and of the so-called yeast prions, inherited non-chromosomal elements found in yeast and fungi. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is often used to delineate the assembly mechanism and structural properties of amyloid aggregates. In this review we consider specifically contributions and limitations of STEM for the investigation of amyloid assembly pathways, fibril polymorphisms and structural models of amyloid fibrils. This type of microscopy provides the only method to directly measure the mass-per-length (MPL) of individual filaments. Made on both in vitro assembled and ex vivo samples, STEM mass measurements have illuminated the hierarchical relationships between amyloid fibrils and revealed that polymorphic fibrils and various globular oligomers can assemble simultaneously from a single polypeptide. The MPLs also impose strong constraints on possible packing schemes, assisting in molecular model building when combined with high-resolution methods like solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR).

  6. Synchrotron X-ray Enhanced Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Volker; Freeland, John

    2011-03-01

    Proper understanding of complex phenomena occurring in nanostructures requires tools with both the ability to resolve the nanometer scale as well as provide detailed information about chemical, electronic, and magnetic structure. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) achieves the requisite high spatial resolution; however, direct elemental determination is not easily accomplished. X-ray microscopies, on the other hand, provide elemental selectivity, but currently have spatial resolution only of tens of nanometers. We present a novel and radically different concept that employs detection of local synchrotron x-ray interactions utilizing a STM that provides spatial resolution, and x-ray absorption directly yields chemical, electronic, and magnetic sensitivity. If during tunneling the sample is simultaneously illuminated with monochromatic x-rays, characteristic absorption will arise. Electrons that are excited into unoccupied levels close to the Fermi level modulate the tunneling current giving rise to elemental contrast. This work was supported by the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under contract DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  7. Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy for living cell membrane potential measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panday, Namuna

    Recently, the existence of multiple micro-domains of extracellular potential around individual cells have been revealed by voltage reporter dye using fluorescence microscopy. One hypothesis is that these long lasting potential patterns play a vital role in regulating important cell activities such as embryonic patterning, regenerative repair and reduction of cancerous disorganization. We used multifunctional Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy (SICM) to study these extracellular potential patterns of single cell with higher spatial resolution. To validate this novel technique, we compared the extracellular potential distribution on the fixed HeLa cell surface and Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surface and found significant difference. We then measured the extracellular potential distributions of living melanocytes and melanoma cells and found both the mean magnitude and spatial variation of extracellular potential of the melanoma cells are bigger than those of melanocytes. As compared to the voltage reporter dye based fluorescence microscope method, SICM can achieve quantitative potential measurements of non-labeled living cell membranes with higher spatial resolution.

  8. Scanning Surface Potential Microscopy of Spore Adhesion on Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ida; Chung, Eunhyea; Kweon, Hyojin; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Tsouris, Costas

    2012-01-01

    The adhesion of spores of Bacillus anthracis - the cause of anthrax and a likely biological threat - to solid surfaces is an important consideration in cleanup after an accidental or deliberate release. However, because of safety concerns, directly studying B. anthracis spores with advanced instrumentation is problematic. As a first step, we are examining the electrostatic potential of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), which is a closely related species that is often used as a simulant to study B. anthracis. Scanning surface potential microscopy (SSPM), also known as Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM), was used to investigate the influence of relative humidity (RH) on the surface electrostatic potential of Bt that had adhered to silica, mica, or gold substrates. AFM/SSPM side-by-side images were obtained separately in air, at various values of RH, after an aqueous droplet with spores was applied on each surface and allowed to dry before measurements. In the SSPM images, a negative potential on the surface of the spores was observed compared with that of the substrates. The surface potential decreased as the humidity increased. Spores were unable to adhere to a surface with an extremely negative potential, such as mica.

  9. All-optical photoacoustic microscopy using a MEMS scanning mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sung-Liang; Xie, Zhixing; Ling, Tao; Wei, Xunbin; Guo, L. Jay; Wang, Xueding

    2013-03-01

    It has been studied that a potential marker to obtain prognostic information about bladder cancer is tumor neoangiogenesis, which can be quantified by morphometric characteristics such as microvascular density. Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) can render sensitive three-dimensional (3D) mapping of microvasculature, providing promise to evaluate the neoangiogenesis that is closely related to the diagnosis of bladder cancer. To ensure good image quality, it is desired to acquire bladder PAM images from its inside via the urethra, like conventional cystoscope. Previously, we demonstrated all-optical PAM systems using polymer microring resonators to detect photoacoustic signals and galvanometer mirrors for laser scanning. In this work, we build a miniature PAM system using a microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) scanning mirror, demonstrating a prototype of an endoscopic PAM head capable of high imaging quality of the bladder. The system has high resolutions of 17.5 μm in lateral direction and 19 μm in the axial direction at a distance of 5.4 mm. Images of printed grids and the 3D structure of microvasculature in animal bladders ex vivo by the system are demonstrated.

  10. A Modified Algorithm For Scanning Tomographic Acoustic Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyyappan, A.; Wade, G.

    1988-07-01

    Acoustic microscopy is an invaluable tool in non-destructive evaluation because of its ability to provide high-resolution images of microscopic structure in small objects. When such a microscope operates in the transmission mode, the micrograph produced is simply a shadowgraph of all the struc-tures encountered by the acoustic wave passing through the object. Because of diffraction and over-lapping, the resultant images are difficult to comprehend, especially in the case of objects of sub-stantial thickness with complex structures. To over-come these problems, we have developed a scanning tomographic acoustic microscope (STAM) which is capable of producing unambiguous high-resolution tomograms. We have described in previously-published work how a scanning laser acoustic micro-scope can be employed to realize STAM. We use an algorithm based on "back-and-forth propagation" to reconstruct tomograms of the various layers to be imaged. When these layers are physically close to one another, we see ambiguities in the reconstructions. In this paper we describe a modified algorithm which removes these ambiguities. With the new algorithm, we can resolve layers that are only two wavelengths apart.

  11. Morphological classification of bioaerosols from composting using scanning electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tamer Vestlund, A.; Al-Ashaab, R.; Tyrrel, S.F.; Longhurst, P.J.; Pollard, S.J.T.; Drew, G.H.

    2014-07-15

    Highlights: • Bioaerosols were captured using the filter method. • Bioaerosols were analysed using scanning electron microscope. • Bioaerosols were classified on the basis of morphology. • Single small cells were found more frequently than aggregates and larger cells. • Smaller cells may disperse further than heavier aggregate structures. - Abstract: This research classifies the physical morphology (form and structure) of bioaerosols emitted from open windrow composting. Aggregation state, shape and size of the particles captured are reported alongside the implications for bioaerosol dispersal after release. Bioaerosol sampling took place at a composting facility using personal air filter samplers. Samples were analysed using scanning electron microscopy. Particles were released mainly as small (<1 μm) single, spherical cells, followed by larger (>1 μm) single cells, with aggregates occurring in smaller proportions. Most aggregates consisted of clusters of 2–3 particles as opposed to chains, and were <10 μm in size. No cells were attached to soil debris or wood particles. These small single cells or small aggregates are more likely to disperse further downwind from source, and cell viability may be reduced due to increased exposure to environmental factors.

  12. Post-processing strategies in image scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    McGregor, J E; Mitchell, C A; Hartell, N A

    2015-10-15

    Image scanning microscopy (ISM) coupled with pixel reassignment offers a resolution improvement of √2 over standard widefield imaging. By scanning point-wise across the specimen and capturing an image of the fluorescent signal generated at each scan position, additional information about specimen structure is recorded and the highest accessible spatial frequency is doubled. Pixel reassignment can be achieved optically in real time or computationally a posteriori and is frequently combined with the use of a physical or digital pinhole to reject out of focus light. Here, we simulate an ISM dataset using a test image and apply standard and non-standard processing methods to address problems typically encountered in computational pixel reassignment and pinholing. We demonstrate that the predicted improvement in resolution is achieved by applying standard pixel reassignment to a simulated dataset and explore the effect of realistic displacements between the reference and true excitation positions. By identifying the position of the detected fluorescence maximum using localisation software and centring the digital pinhole on this co-ordinate before scaling around translated excitation positions, we can recover signal that would otherwise be degraded by the use of a pinhole aligned to an inaccurate excitation reference. This strategy is demonstrated using experimental data from a multiphoton ISM instrument. Finally we investigate the effect that imaging through tissue has on the positions of excitation foci at depth and observe a global scaling with respect to the applied reference grid. Using simulated and experimental data we explore the impact of a globally scaled reference on the ISM image and, by pinholing around the detected maxima, recover the signal across the whole field of view. PMID:25962644

  13. Investigation of Nematode Diversity using Scanning Electron Microscopy and Fluorescent Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seacor, Taylor; Howell, Carina

    2013-03-01

    Nematode worms account for the vast majority of the animals in the biosphere. They are colossally important to global public health as parasites, and to agriculture both as pests and as beneficial inhabitants of healthy soil. Amphid neurons are the anterior chemosensory neurons in nematodes, mediating critical behaviors including chemotaxis and mating. We are examining the cellular morphology and external anatomy of amphid neurons, using fluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, respectively, of a wide range of soil nematodes isolated in the wild. We use both classical systematics (e.g. diagnostic keys) and molecular markers (e.g. ribosomal RNA) to classify these wild isolates. Our ultimate aim is to build a detailed anatomical database in order to dissect genetic pathways of neuronal development and function across phylogeny and ecology. Research supported by NSF grants 092304, 0806660, 1058829 and Lock Haven University FPDC grants

  14. Scanning probe microscopy investigation of complex-oxide heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Feng

    Advances in the growth of precisely tailored complex-oxide heterostructures have led to new emergent behavior and associated discoveries. One of the most successful examples consists of an ultrathin layer of LaAlO 3 (LAO) deposited on TiO2-terminated SrTiO3 (STO), where a high mobility quasi-two dimensional electron liquid (2DEL) is formed at the interface. Such 2DEL demonstrates a variety of novel properties, including field tunable metal-insulator transition, superconductivity, strong spin-orbit coupling, magnetic and ferroelectric like behavior. Particularly, for 3-unit-cell (3 u.c.) LAO/STO heterostructures, it was demonstrated that a conductive atomic force microscope (c-AFM) tip can be used to "write" or "erase" nanoscale conducting channels at the interface, making LAO/STO a highly flexible platform to fabricate novel nanoelectronics. This thesis is focused on scanning probe microscopy studies of LAO/STO properties. We investigate the mechanism of c-AFM lithography over 3 u.c. LAO/STO in controlled ambient conditions by using a vacuum AFM, and find that the water molecules dissociated on the LAO surface play a critical role during the c-AFM lithography process. We also perform electro-mechanical response measurements over top-gated LAO/STO devices. Simultaneous piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) and capacitance measurements reveal a correlation between LAO lattice distortion and interfacial carrier density, which suggests that PFM could not only serve as a powerful tool to map the carrier density at the interface but also provide insight into previously reported frequency dependence of capacitance enhancement of top-gated LAO/STO structures. To study magnetism at the LAO/STO interface, magnetic force microscopy (MFM) and magnetoelectric force microscopy (MeFM) are carried out to search for magnetic signatures that depend on the carrier density at the interface. Results demonstrate an electronicallycontrolled ferromagnetic phase on top-gated LAO

  15. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy for complex transition metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qing-Hua, Zhang; Dong-Dong, Xiao; Lin, Gu

    2016-06-01

    Lattice, charge, orbital, and spin are the four fundamental degrees of freedom in condensed matter, of which the interactive coupling derives tremendous novel physical phenomena, such as high-temperature superconductivity (high-T c SC) and colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) in strongly correlated electronic system. Direct experimental observation of these freedoms is essential to understanding the structure-property relationship and the physics behind it, and also indispensable for designing new materials and devices. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) integrating multiple techniques of structure imaging and spectrum analysis, is a comprehensive platform for providing structural, chemical and electronic information of materials with a high spatial resolution. Benefiting from the development of aberration correctors, STEM has taken a big breakthrough towards sub-angstrom resolution in last decade and always steps forward to improve the capability of material characterization; many improvements have been achieved in recent years, thereby giving an in-depth insight into material research. Here, we present a brief review of the recent advances of STEM by some representative examples of perovskite transition metal oxides; atomic-scale mapping of ferroelectric polarization, octahedral distortions and rotations, valence state, coordination and spin ordering are presented. We expect that this brief introduction about the current capability of STEM could facilitate the understanding of the relationship between functional properties and these fundamental degrees of freedom in complex oxides. Project supported by the National Key Basic Research Project, China (Grant No. 2014CB921002), the Strategic Priority Research Program of Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. XDB07030200), and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51522212 and 51421002).

  16. Simultaneous Nanomechanical and Electrochemical Mapping: Combining Peak Force Tapping Atomic Force Microscopy with Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Knittel, Peter; Mizaikoff, Boris; Kranz, Christine

    2016-06-21

    Soft electronic devices play a crucial role in, e.g., neural implants as stimulating electrodes, transducers for biosensors, or selective drug-delivery. Because of their elasticity, they can easily adapt to their environment and prevent immunoreactions leading to an overall improved long-term performance. In addition, flexible electronic devices such as stretchable displays will be increasingly used in everyday life, e.g., for so-called electronic wearables. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a versatile tool to characterize these micro- and nanostructured devices in terms of their topography. Using advanced imaging techniques such as peak force tapping (PFT), nanomechanical properties including adhesion, deformation, and Young's modulus can be simultaneously mapped along with surface features. However, conventional AFM provides limited laterally resolved information on electrical or electrochemical properties such as the activity of an electrode array. In this study, we present the first combination of AFM with scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) in PFT mode, thereby offering spatially correlated electrochemical and nanomechanical information paired with high-resolution topographical data under force control (QNM-AFM-SECM). The versatility of this combined scanning probe approach is demonstrated by mapping topographical, electrochemical, and nanomechanical properties of gold microelectrodes and of gold electrodes patterned onto polydimethylsiloxane. PMID:27203837

  17. Carrier density distribution in silicon nanowires investigated by scanning thermal microscopy and Kelvin probe force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wielgoszewski, Grzegorz; Pałetko, Piotr; Tomaszewski, Daniel; Zaborowski, Michał; Jóźwiak, Grzegorz; Kopiec, Daniel; Gotszalk, Teodor; Grabiec, Piotr

    2015-12-01

    The use of scanning thermal microscopy (SThM) and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) to investigate silicon nanowires (SiNWs) is presented. SThM allows imaging of temperature distribution at the nanoscale, while KPFM images the potential distribution with AFM-related ultra-high spatial resolution. Both techniques are therefore suitable for imaging the resistance distribution. We show results of experimental examination of dual channel n-type SiNWs with channel width of 100 nm, while the channel was open and current was flowing through the SiNW. To investigate the carrier distribution in the SiNWs we performed SThM and KPFM scans. The SThM results showed non-symmetrical temperature distribution along the SiNWs with temperature maximum shifted towards the contact of higher potential. These results corresponded to those expressed by the distribution of potential gradient along the SiNWs, obtained using the KPFM method. Consequently, non-uniform distribution of resistance was shown, being a result of non-uniform carrier density distribution in the structure and showing the pinch-off effect. Last but not least, the results were also compared with results of finite-element method modeling. PMID:26381074

  18. Microscopic techniques bridging between nanoscale and microscale with an atomically sharpened tip - field ion microscopy/scanning probe microscopy/ scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tomitori, Masahiko; Sasahara, Akira

    2014-11-01

    Over a hundred years an atomistic point of view has been indispensable to explore fascinating properties of various materials and to develop novel functional materials. High-resolution microscopies, rapidly developed during the period, have taken central roles in promoting materials science and related techniques to observe and analyze the materials. As microscopies with the capability of atom-imaging, field ion microscopy (FIM), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) can be cited, which have been highly evaluated as methods to ultimately bring forward the viewpoint of reductionism in materials science. On one hand, there have been difficulties to derive useful and practical information on large (micro) scale unique properties of materials using these excellent microscopies and to directly advance the engineering for practical materials. To make bridges over the gap between an atomic scale and an industrial engineering scale, we have to develop emergence science step-by-step as a discipline having hierarchical structures for future prospects by combining nanoscale and microscale techniques; as promising ways, the combined microscopic instruments covering the scale gap and the extremely sophisticated methods for sample preparation seem to be required. In addition, it is noted that spectroscopic and theoretical methods should implement the emergence science.Fundamentally, the function of microscope is to determine the spatial positions of a finite piece of material, that is, ultimately individual atoms, at an extremely high resolution with a high stability. To define and control the atomic positions, the STM and AFM as scanning probe microscopy (SPM) have successfully demonstrated their power; the technological heart of SPM lies in an atomically sharpened tip, which can be observed by FIM and TEM. For emergence science we would like to set sail using the tip as a base. Meanwhile, it is significant

  19. Interpretation of Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Images of Graphite.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizes, Howard Albert

    This dissertation analyzes scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images of graphite. Graphite is an important substrate for molecular imaging and nanometer lithography. Because it is a layered structure with a simple unit cell, its electronic structure can be described simply using tight binding theory. More interestingly, the charge density at the Fermi level, which is the quantity that the STM probes, is well approximated by the six leading Fourier components. The effect of multiple atomic tips on the STM images of graphite can be predicted using the three sine wave description. Both the varying asymmetry between the two inequivalent atoms, and the loss of three fold symmetry observed in experimental images, can be attributed to differing tip configurations. The existence of multiple atomic tips is directly confirmed by the observation of moire patterns occurring near grain boundaries. Physisorbed and intercalated atoms and molecules will produce weak perturbations in the electronic structure of the graphite. These perturbations can be measured with the STM as localized changes in the tunneling current, and appear as bright areas in STM gray-scale images. The dependence of the brightness with scanning height is calculated and can be used as a measure to help identify the atom or molecule. Chemisorbed atoms and molecules will produce a stronger long-range perturbation in the electronic structure of the graphite. It is shown that any strong perturbation should give rise to oscillations in the Fermi level charge density with a wavelength surd{3} times that of the graphite lattice. The intensity of the oscillations and their symmetry about the defect is shown to be a probe of the geometry of the bonding to the surface. Predicted images that arise from multiple tips, along with those arising from physisorbed and chemisorbed atoms, are compared with available experiments.

  20. Comparison between optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy for turbid sample imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    U-Thainual, Paweena; Kim, Do-Hyun

    2015-12-01

    Optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (ORPAM) in theory provides lateral resolution equivalent to the optical diffraction limit. Scattering media, such as biological turbid media, attenuates the optical signal and also alters the diffraction-limited spot size of the focused beam. The ORPAM signal is generated only from a small voxel in scattering media with dimensions equivalent to the laser spot size after passing through scattering layers and is detected by an acoustic transducer, which is not affected by optical scattering. Thus, both ORPAM and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) reject scattered light. A multimodal optical microscopy platform that includes ORPAM and CLSM was constructed, and the lateral resolution of both modes was measured using patterned thin metal film with and without a scattering barrier. The effect of scattering media on the lateral resolution was studied using different scattering coefficients and was compared to computational results based on Monte Carlo simulations. It was found that degradation of lateral resolution due to optical scattering was not significant for either ORPAM or CLSM. The depth discrimination capability of ORPAM and CLSM was measured using microfiber embedded in a light scattering phantom material. ORPAM images demonstrated higher contrast compared to CLSM images partly due to reduced acoustic signal scattering.

  1. Comparison between optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy for turbid sample imaging.

    PubMed

    U-Thainual, Paweena; Kim, Do-Hyun

    2015-12-01

    Optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (ORPAM) in theory provides lateral resolution equivalent to the optical diffraction limit. Scattering media, such as biological turbid media, attenuates the optical signal and also alters the diffraction-limited spot size of the focused beam. The ORPAM signal is generated only from a small voxel in scattering media with dimensions equivalent to the laser spot size after passing through scattering layers and is detected by an acoustic transducer, which is not affected by optical scattering. Thus, both ORPAM and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) reject scattered light. A multimodal optical microscopy platform that includes ORPAM and CLSM was constructed, and the lateral resolution of both modes was measured using patterned thin metal film with and without a scattering barrier. The effect of scattering media on the lateral resolution was studied using different scattering coefficients and was compared to computational results based on Monte Carlo simulations. It was found that degradation of lateral resolution due to optical scattering was not significant for either ORPAM or CLSM. The depth discrimination capability of ORPAM and CLSM was measured using microfiber embedded in a light scattering phantom material. ORPAM images demonstrated higher contrast compared to CLSM images partly due to reduced acoustic signal scattering. PMID:26256640

  2. Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy of DNA Monolayers Modified with Nile Blue

    PubMed Central

    Gorodetsky, Alon A.; Hammond, William J.; Hill, Michael G.; Slowinski, Krzysztof; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2009-01-01

    Scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) is used to probe long-range charge transport (CT) through DNA monolayers containing the redox-active Nile Blue (NB) intercalator covalently affixed at a specific location in the DNA film. At substrate potentials negative of the formal potential of covalently attached NB, the electrocatalytic reduction of Fe(CN)63− generated at the SECM tip is observed only when NB is located at the DNA/solution interface; for DNA films containing NB in close proximity to the DNA/electrode interface, the electrocatalytic effect is absent. This behavior is consistent with both rapid DNA-mediated CT between the NB intercalator and the gold electrode as well as a rate-limiting electron transfer between NB and the solution phase Fe(CN)63−. The DNA-mediated nature of the catalytic cycle is confirmed through sequence-specific and localized detection of attomoles of TATA-binding protein, a transcription factor that severely distorts DNA upon binding. Importantly, the strategy outlined here is general and allows for the local investigation of the surface characteristics of DNA monolayers both in the absence and in the presence of DNA binding proteins. These experiments highlight the utility of DNA-modified electrodes as versatile platforms for SECM detection schemes that take advantage of CT mediated by the DNA base pair stack. PMID:19053641

  3. Histological preparation of developing vestibular otoconia for scanning electron microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huss, D.; Dickman, J. D.

    2003-01-01

    The unique nature of vestibular otoconia as calcium carbonate biominerals makes them particularly susceptible to chemical deformation during histological processing. We fixed and stored otoconia from all three otolith endorgans of embryonic, hatchling and adult Japanese quail in glutaraldehyde containing either phosphate or non-phosphate buffers for varying lengths of time and processed them for scanning electron microscopy. Otoconia from all age groups and otolith endorgans processed in 0.1 M phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) showed abnormal surface morphology when compared to acetone fixed controls. Otoconia processed in 0.1 M sodium cacodylate or HEPES buffered artificial endolymph (pH 7.4) showed normal morphology that was similar to controls. The degree of otoconial deformation was directly related to the time exposed to phosphate buffer. Short duration exposure produced particulate deformations while longer exposures resulted in fused otoconia that formed solid sheets. Otoconial surface deformation and fusing was independent of the glutaraldehyde component of the histological processing. These findings should help vestibular researchers to develop appropriate histological processing protocols in future studies of otoconia.

  4. Bifurcation, chaos, and scan instability in dynamic atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Cantrell, Sean A.

    2016-03-01

    The dynamical motion at any point on the cantilever of an atomic force microscope can be expressed quite generally as a superposition of simple harmonic oscillators corresponding to the vibrational modes allowed by the cantilever shape. Central to the dynamical equations is the representation of the cantilever-sample interaction force as a polynomial expansion with coefficients that account for the interaction force "stiffness," the cantilever-to-sample energy transfer, and the displacement amplitude of cantilever oscillation. Renormalization of the cantilever beam model shows that for a given cantilever drive frequency cantilever dynamics can be accurately represented by a single nonlinear mass-spring model with frequency-dependent stiffness and damping coefficients [S. A. Cantrell and J. H. Cantrell, J. Appl. Phys. 110, 094314 (2011)]. Application of the Melnikov method to the renormalized dynamical equation is shown to predict a cascade of period doubling bifurcations with increasing cantilever drive force that terminates in chaos. The threshold value of the drive force necessary to initiate bifurcation is shown to depend strongly on the cantilever setpoint and drive frequency, effective damping coefficient, nonlinearity of the cantilever-sample interaction force, and the displacement amplitude of cantilever oscillation. The model predicts the experimentally observed interruptions of the bifurcation cascade for cantilevers of sufficiently large stiffness. Operational factors leading to the loss of image quality in dynamic atomic force microscopy are addressed, and guidelines for optimizing scan stability are proposed using a quantitative analysis based on system dynamical parameters and choice of feedback loop parameter.

  5. Managing multiple image stacks from confocal laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerbe, Joerg; Goetze, Christian H.; Zuschratter, Werner

    1999-05-01

    A major goal in neuroanatomy is to obtain precise information about the functional organization of neuronal assemblies and their interconnections. Therefore, the analysis of histological sections frequently requires high resolution images in combination with an overview about the structure. To overcome this conflict we have previously introduced a software for the automatic acquisition of multiple image stacks (3D-MISA) in confocal laser scanning microscopy. Here, we describe a Windows NT based software for fast and easy navigation through the multiple images stacks (MIS-browser), the visualization of individual channels and layers and the selection of user defined subregions. In addition, the MIS browser provides useful tools for the visualization and evaluation of the datavolume, as for instance brightness and contrast corrections of individual layers and channels. Moreover, it includes a maximum intensity projection, panning and zoom in/out functions within selected channels or focal planes (x/y) and tracking along the z-axis. The import module accepts any tiff-format and reconstructs the original image arrangement after the user has defined the sequence of images in x/y and z and the number of channels. The implemented export module allows storage of user defined subregions (new single image stacks) for further 3D-reconstruction and evaluation.

  6. Heat transfer at nanoscale contacts investigated with scanning thermal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assy, Ali; Gomès, Séverine

    2015-07-01

    This article investigates heat transfer at nanoscale contacts through scanning thermal microscopy (SThM) under vacuum conditions. Measurements were performed using two types of resistive SThM probes operating in active mode on germanium and silicon samples. The experiments measure the heat transfer through the nanoscale point contacts formed between the probe apex, platinum-rhodium alloy, or silicon nitride depending on the probe used, and the samples. The thermal resistance at the probe apex-sample interface becomes extremely important as the contact size becomes smaller or comparable to the phonon mean free path within the materials in contact. This resistance is derived from the measurements using a nanoconstriction model. Consistent to what is expected, the interfacial thermal resistance is found to be dependent on the tip and sample. Assuming perfect interfaces, the thermal boundary resistance Rb is determined for the different contacts. Results obtained for Rb range from 10-9 m2 K W-1 up to 14 × 10-9 m2 K W-1 and have the same order of magnitude of values previously published for other materials. The determination of the averaged phonon transmission coefficient t from the data is discussed, and coefficients t for the Si3N4/Ge and Si3N4/Si contacts are estimated based on the diffuse mismatch model (tSi3N4/Ge = 0.5 and tSi3N4/Si = 0.9).

  7. Outwitting the series resistance in scanning spreading resistance microscopy.

    PubMed

    Schulze, A; Cao, R; Eyben, P; Hantschel, T; Vandervorst, W

    2016-02-01

    The performance of nanoelectronics devices critically depends on the distribution of active dopants inside these structures. For this reason, dopant profiling has been defined as one of the major metrology challenges by the international technology roadmap of semiconductors. Scanning spreading resistance microscopy (SSRM) has evolved as one of the most viable approaches over the last decade due to its excellent spatial resolution, sensitivity and quantification accuracy. However, in case of advanced device architectures like fins and nanowires a proper measurement of the spreading resistance is often hampered by the increasing impact of parasitic series resistances (e.g. bulk series resistance) arising from the confined nature of the aforementioned structures. In order to overcome this limitation we report in this paper the development and implementation of a novel SSRM mode (fast Fourier transform-SSRM: FFT-SSRM) which essentially decouples the spreading resistance from parasitic series resistance components. We show that this can be achieved by a force modulation (leading to a modulated spreading resistance signal) in combination with a lock-in deconvolution concept. In this paper we first introduce the principle of operation of the technique. We discuss in detail the underlying physical mechanisms as well as the technical implementation on a state-of-the-art atomic force microscope (AFM). We demonstrate the performance of FFT-SSRM and its ability to remove substantial series resistance components in practice. Eventually, the possibility of decoupling the spreading resistance from the intrinsic probe resistance will be demonstrated and discussed. PMID:26624516

  8. Life Cycle of Neurospora crassa Viewed by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Seale, Thomas

    1973-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy was used to examine the major stages of the life cycle of two wild-type strains of Neurospora crassa Shear and Dodge (St. Lawrence 3.1a and 74A): mycelia, protoperithecium formation, perithecia, ascospores, ascospore germination and outgrowth, macro and microconidia, and germination and outgrowth of macroconidia. Structures seen at the limit of resolution of bright-field and phase-contrast microscopes, e.g., the ribbed surface of ascospores, are well resolved. New details of conidial development and surface structure are revealed. There appears to be only one distinguishable morphological difference between the two strains. The pattern of germination and outgrowth which seems relatively constant for strain 74A or strain 3.1a, appears to be different for each. Conidia from strain 3.1a almost always germinate from a site between interconidial attachment points; whereas the germ tubes of strain 74A usually emerge from or very near the interconidial attachment site. These germination patterns usually do not segregate 2:2 in asci dissected in order. This observation suggests that conidial germination pattern is not under the control of a single gene. Images PMID:4266170

  9. Scanning gate transconductance microscopy and spectroscopy of a mesoscopic ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackens, Benoit; Martins, Frederico; Faniel, Sebastien; Bayot, Vincent; Pala, Marco; Sellier, Hermann; Huant, Serge; Desplanque, Ludovic; Wallart, Xavier

    2011-03-01

    In scanning gate microscopy (SGM), a dc voltage is applied to a sharp tip moving in the vicinity of a device. This alters the electrostatic potential seen by electrons inside the device, and consequently changes the device conductance. Here, we superimpose a small ac voltage to the dc bias applied on the tip, and record the change of device conductance at the tip bias modulation frequency, i.e. the local transconductance. We first image the low temperature transconductance of a mesoscopic ring patterned in a two-dimensional electron system (2DES) hosted in an InGaAs/InAlAs heterostructure. The tranconductance images are decorated by concentric features that we associate with charging of electron traps located close to the 2DES. We perform spectroscopy of these traps by positioning the tip close to them, and recording the ring transconductance as a function of the tip dc voltage and the bias accross the quantum ring. We observe Coulomb diamonds in our spectroscopic data, which confirms that Coulomb blockade is at play.

  10. Mechanical property quantification of endothelial cells using scanning acoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelke, A.; Brand, S.; Kundu, T.; Bereiter-Hahn, J.; Blase, C.

    2012-04-01

    The mechanical properties of cells reflect dynamic changes of cellular organization which occur during physiologic activities like cell movement, cell volume regulation or cell division. Thus the study of cell mechanical properties can yield important information for understanding these physiologic activities. Endothelial cells form the thin inner lining of blood vessels in the cardiovascular system and are thus exposed to shear stress as well as tensile stress caused by the pulsatile blood flow. Endothelial dysfunction might occur due to reduced resistance to mechanical stress and is an initial step in the development of cardiovascular disease like, e.g., atherosclerosis. Therefore we investigated the mechanical properties of primary human endothelial cells (HUVEC) of different age using scanning acoustic microscopy at 1.2 GHz. The HUVECs are classified as young (tD < 90 h) and old (tD > 90 h) cells depending upon the generation time for the population doubling of the culture (tD). Longitudinal sound velocity and geometrical properties of cells (thickness) were determined using the material signature curve V(z) method for variable culture condition along spatial coordinates. The plane wave technique with normal incidence is assumed to solve two-dimensional wave equation. The size of the cells is modeled using multilayered (solid-fluid) system. The propagation of transversal wave and surface acoustic wave are neglected in soft matter analysis. The biomechanical properties of HUVEC cells are quantified in an age dependent manner.

  11. In-vivo Candida biofilms in scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Paulitsch, Astrid Helga; Willinger, Birgit; Zsalatz, Benedikt; Stabentheiner, Edith; Marth, Egon; Buzina, Walter

    2009-11-01

    Candida biofilms on indwelling devices are an increasing problem in patients treated at intensive care units. The goal of this study was to examine the occurrence and frequency of these biofilms. A total of 172 catheters were collected from 105 male and 67 female patients (the age range of both patient groups was from 3 weeks to 98 years old). The catheters were incubated on blood agar plates and the resulting yeast colonies were subsequently identified. Furthermore, pieces of catheters were fixed, dried and sputter coated with gold for investigation with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Yeasts were recovered from significantly more catheters obtained from men than from women (chi(2): n = 67; P < 0.01). In SEM, 56.4% catheters turned out to be positive for biofilm formation. Again catheters from male patients were statistically significant (chi(2): n = 40; P < 0.01) more often positive than those from women. Candida albicans (71.1%) was the most common species isolated from the catheters, followed by C. glabrata (10.3%), C. parapsilosis (8.2%) and C. tropicalis (5.2%). Based on the results of this investigation, the epidemiology of Candida biofilms on indwelling devices seems to be a promising target for future investigations. PMID:19888801

  12. Non-thermal plasma mills bacteria: Scanning electron microscopy observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunov, O.; Churpita, O.; Zablotskii, V.; Deyneka, I. G.; Meshkovskii, I. K.; Jäger, A.; Syková, E.; Kubinová, Š.; Dejneka, A.

    2015-02-01

    Non-thermal plasmas hold great promise for a variety of biomedical applications. To ensure safe clinical application of plasma, a rigorous analysis of plasma-induced effects on cell functions is required. Yet mechanisms of bacteria deactivation by non-thermal plasma remain largely unknown. We therefore analyzed the influence of low-temperature atmospheric plasma on Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Using scanning electron microscopy, we demonstrate that both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria strains in a minute were completely destroyed by helium plasma. In contrast, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were not affected by the same treatment. Furthermore, histopathological analysis of hematoxylin and eosin-stained rat skin sections from plasma-treated animals did not reveal any abnormalities in comparison to control ones. We discuss possible physical mechanisms leading to the shred of bacteria under non-thermal plasma irradiation. Our findings disclose how helium plasma destroys bacteria and demonstrates the safe use of plasma treatment for MSCs and skin cells, highlighting the favorability of plasma applications for chronic wound therapy.

  13. Spectroscopic scanning tunneling microscopy insights into Fe-based superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Jennifer E.

    2011-12-01

    In the first three years since the discovery of Fe-based high Tc superconductors, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and spectroscopy have shed light on three important questions. First, STM has demonstrated the complexity of the pairing symmetry in Fe-based materials. Phase-sensitive quasiparticle interference (QPI) imaging and low temperature spectroscopy have shown that the pairing order parameter varies from nodal to nodeless s± within a single family, FeTe1-xSex. Second, STM has imaged C4 → C2 symmetry breaking in the electronic states of both parent and superconducting materials. As a local probe, STM is in a strong position to understand the interactions between these broken symmetry states and superconductivity. Finally, STM has been used to image the vortex state, giving insights into the technical problem of vortex pinning, and the fundamental problem of the competing states introduced when superconductivity is locally quenched by a magnetic field. Here we give a pedagogical introduction to STM and QPI imaging, discuss the specific challenges associated with extracting bulk properties from the study of surfaces, and report on progress made in understanding Fe-based superconductors using STM techniques.

  14. Band excitation method applicable to scanning probe microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Jesse, Stephen [Knoxville, TN; Kalinin, Sergei V [Knoxville, TN

    2010-08-17

    Methods and apparatus are described for scanning probe microscopy. A method includes generating a band excitation (BE) signal having finite and predefined amplitude and phase spectrum in at least a first predefined frequency band; exciting a probe using the band excitation signal; obtaining data by measuring a response of the probe in at least a second predefined frequency band; and extracting at least one relevant dynamic parameter of the response of the probe in a predefined range including analyzing the obtained data. The BE signal can be synthesized prior to imaging (static band excitation), or adjusted at each pixel or spectroscopy step to accommodate changes in sample properties (adaptive band excitation). An apparatus includes a band excitation signal generator; a probe coupled to the band excitation signal generator; a detector coupled to the probe; and a relevant dynamic parameter extractor component coupled to the detector, the relevant dynamic parameter extractor including a processor that performs a mathematical transform selected from the group consisting of an integral transform and a discrete transform.

  15. Band excitation method applicable to scanning probe microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2013-05-28

    Methods and apparatus are described for scanning probe microscopy. A method includes generating a band excitation (BE) signal having finite and predefined amplitude and phase spectrum in at least a first predefined frequency band; exciting a probe using the band excitation signal; obtaining data by measuring a response of the probe in at least a second predefined frequency band; and extracting at least one relevant dynamic parameter of the response of the probe in a predefined range including analyzing the obtained data. The BE signal can be synthesized prior to imaging (static band excitation), or adjusted at each pixel or spectroscopy step to accommodate changes in sample properties (adaptive band excitation). An apparatus includes a band excitation signal generator; a probe coupled to the band excitation signal generator; a detector coupled to the probe; and a relevant dynamic parameter extractor component coupled to the detector, the relevant dynamic parameter extractor including a processor that performs a mathematical transform selected from the group consisting of an integral transform and a discrete transform.

  16. Thermal scanning probe microscopy in the development of pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xuan; Moffat, Jonathan G; Wood, John; Reading, Mike

    2012-04-01

    The ability to characterize the physical and chemical properties of dosage forms is crucial to a more complete understanding of how vehicles for drug delivery behave and therefore how effective they are. Spatially resolved characterization that enables the visualization of properties on the nanoscale is particularly powerful. The usefulness of scanning probe microscopy (SPM) in the field of drug delivery is becoming increasingly well established and the use of thermal probes offers new capabilities thus enabling SPM to provide more and sometimes unique information. One type of measurement enabled by thermal probes is determining transition temperatures by means of local thermal analysis. The ability to identify and characterize materials in this way has found applications in characterizing a wide range of dosage forms. A complimentary thermal probe technique is photothermal infrared microspectroscopy (PTMS). PTMS offers a variety of advantages over more conventional approaches including the ability analyze compacts without the need for thin sections. It is also able to achieve sub-micron spatial resolution. Thermal probe techniques can characterize pharmaceutical dosage forms in terms of their physical properties and their chemical composition. PMID:21856345

  17. Sample heating in near-field scanning optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Elizabeth S.; Dunn, Robert C.

    2005-11-01

    Heating near the aperture of aluminum coated, fiber optic near-field scanning optical microscopy probes was studied as a function of input and output powers. Using the shear-force feedback method, near-field probes were positioned nanometers above a thermochromic polymer and spectra were recorded as the input power was varied. Excitation at 405 nm of a thin polymer film incorporating perylene and N-allyl-N-methylaniline leads to dual emission peaks in the spectra. The relative peak intensity is temperature sensitive leading to a ratiometric measurement, which avoids complications based solely on intensity. Using this method, we find that the proximal end of typical near-field probes modestly increase in temperature to 40-45 °C at output powers of a few nanowatts (input power of ˜0.15mW). This increases to 55-65 °C at higher output powers of 50 nW or greater (input power of ˜2-4mW). Thermal heating of the probe at higher powers leads to probe elongation, which limits the heating experienced by the sample.

  18. Improved Detection Sensitivity of Line-Scanning Optical Coherence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu; Huang, Shu-Wei; Zhou, Chao; Potsaid, Benjamin; Fujimoto, James G.

    2012-01-01

    Optical coherence microscopy (OCM) is a promising technology for high-resolution cellular-level imaging in human tissues. Line-scanning OCM is a new form of OCM that utilizes line-field illumination for parallel detection. In this study, we demonstrate improved detection sensitivity by using an achromatic design for line-field generation. This system operates at 830-nm wavelength with 82-nm bandwidth. The measured axial resolution is 3.9 μm in air (corresponding to ~2.9 μm in tissue), and the transverse resolutions are 2.1 μm along the line-field illumination direction and 1.7 μm perpendicular to line illumination direction. The measured sensitivity is 98 dB with 25 line averages, resulting in an imaging speed of ~2 frames/s (516 lines/s). Real-time, cellular-level imaging of scattering tissues is demonstrated using human-colon specimens. PMID:22685379

  19. Non-thermal plasma mills bacteria: Scanning electron microscopy observations

    SciTech Connect

    Lunov, O. Churpita, O.; Zablotskii, V.; Jäger, A.; Dejneka, A.; Deyneka, I. G.; Meshkovskii, I. K.; Syková, E.; Kubinová, Š.

    2015-02-02

    Non-thermal plasmas hold great promise for a variety of biomedical applications. To ensure safe clinical application of plasma, a rigorous analysis of plasma-induced effects on cell functions is required. Yet mechanisms of bacteria deactivation by non-thermal plasma remain largely unknown. We therefore analyzed the influence of low-temperature atmospheric plasma on Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Using scanning electron microscopy, we demonstrate that both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria strains in a minute were completely destroyed by helium plasma. In contrast, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were not affected by the same treatment. Furthermore, histopathological analysis of hematoxylin and eosin–stained rat skin sections from plasma–treated animals did not reveal any abnormalities in comparison to control ones. We discuss possible physical mechanisms leading to the shred of bacteria under non-thermal plasma irradiation. Our findings disclose how helium plasma destroys bacteria and demonstrates the safe use of plasma treatment for MSCs and skin cells, highlighting the favorability of plasma applications for chronic wound therapy.

  20. Scanning electron microscopy of lung following alpha irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, C.L.; Lauhala, K.E.; McDonald, K.E. )

    1989-09-01

    Pulmonary aggregation of inhaled {sup 239}PuO{sub 2} particles leads to a cellular evolution of focal inflammation, fibrosis, epithelial dysplasia and lung tumor formation. Female Wistar rats were exposed to an aerosol of high-fired {sup 239}PuO{sub 2} (initial lung burden, 3.9 kBq) and the lungs examined at intervals from 1 day to 700 days after exposure by light and scanning electron microscopy and autoradiography. Peribronchiolar Pu particle aggregation increased with time, resulting in well-defined focal inflammatory lesions after 120 days and fibrotic lesions after 180 days. A generalized hypertrophy and hyperplasia of nonciliated bronchiolar cells was seen at 15 days and type II cell hyperplasia by 30 days after exposure. Focal dysplastic changes in type II alveolar epithelium and terminal nonciliated bronchiolar epithelium preceded carcinoma formation. Alveolar bronchiolarization was first noted at 120 days, squamous metaplasia at 210 days, squamous carcinoma at 270 days and adenocarcinoma at 600 days after exposure.

  1. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Studies of Diamond Films and Optoelectronic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez, Jose M.

    1996-01-01

    We present a summary of the research, citations of publications resulting from the research and abstracts of such publications. We have made no inventions in the performance of the work in this project. The main goals of the project were to set up a Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamond growth system attached to an UltraHigh Vacuum (UHV) atomic resolution Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) system and carry out experiments aimed at studying the properties and growth of diamond films using atomic resolution UHV STM. We successfully achieved these goals. We observed, for the first time, the atomic structure of the surface of CVD grown epitaxial diamond (100) films using UHV STM. We studied the effects of atomic hydrogen on the CVD diamond growth process. We studied the electronic properties of the diamond (100) (2x1) surface, and the effect of alkali metal adsorbates such as Cs on the work function of this surface using UHV STM spectroscopy techniques. We also studied, using STM, new electronic materials such as carbon nanotubes and gold nanostructures. This work resulted in four publications in refereed scientific journals and five publications in refereed conference proceedings.

  2. Quantifying mineral surface energy by scanning force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sauerer, Bastian; Stukan, Mikhail; Abdallah, Wael; Derkani, Maryam H; Fedorov, Maxim; Buiting, Jan; Zhang, Zhenyu J

    2016-06-15

    Fundamental understanding of the wettability of carbonate formations can potentially be applied to the development of oil recovery strategies in a complex carbonate reservoir. In the present study, surface energies of representative carbonate samples were evaluated by direct quantitative force measurements, using scanning force microscopy (SFM) at sub-micron scale, to develop a reliable method to predict reservoir wettability. Local adhesion force measurements were conducted on appropriate calcite and dolomite samples and performed in air as well as in the presence of polar and nonpolar fluids. This study demonstrated that, by comparing measurements of adhesion forces between samples of the same mineral in different fluids, it is feasible to determine the surface energy of a given mineral as well as its polar and nonpolar components. The derived values are in agreement with literature. A proof-of-principle protocol has been established to quantify surface energy using SFM-based adhesion measurements. This novel methodology complements the conventional contact angle measurement technique, where surface energy can only be examined at large length scale. The reported methodology has great potential for further optimization into a new standard method for fast and accurate surface energy determination, and hence provides a new tool for reservoir rock wettability characterization. PMID:27054773

  3. Metal-silicene interaction studied by scanning tunneling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi; Feng, Haifeng; Zhuang, Jincheng; Pu, Na; Wang, Li; Xu, Xun; Hao, Weichang; Du, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Ag atoms have been deposited on 3  ×  3 silicene and  √3  ×  √3 silicene films by molecular beam epitaxy method in ultrahigh vacuum. Using scanning tunneling microscopy and Raman spectroscopy, we found that Ag atoms do not form chemical bonds with both 3  ×  3 silicene and  √3  ×  √3 silicene films, which is due to the chemically inert surface of silicene. On 3  ×  3 silicene films, Ag atoms mostly form into stable flat-top Ag islands. In contrast, Ag atoms form nanoclusters and glide on silicene films, suggesting a more inert nature. Raman spectroscopy suggests that there is more sp 2 hybridization in  √3  ×  √3 than in  √7  ×  √7/3  ×  3 silicene films.

  4. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy of DNA-Carbon Nanotube Hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarotski, Dzmitry; Kilina, Svetlana; Talin, Alec; Balatsky, Alexander; Tretiak, Sergei; Taylor, Antoinette

    2009-03-01

    Production of carbon nanotube-based (CNT) devices holds a great promise for bringing the size of electronic circuits down to molecular scales. Recently, yet another step has been made towards achieving this goal by developing a new method for metal-semiconductor CNT separation, which relies on wrapping the CNT with ssDNA molecule[1]. Though it was shown that the outcome of the separation process strongly depends on the DNA sequence, further investigations have to be conducted to determine detailed structure of the hybrids and their electronic properties. Here, we use STM to characterize structural and electronic properties of the CNT-DNA hybrids and compare experimental results to theoretical calculations. STM images reveal 3.3 nm DNA coiling period, which agrees very well with the theoretical predictions. Additional width modulations with characteristic lengths of 1.9 and 2.6 nm are observed along the molecule itself. Although scanning tunneling microscopy confirms the presence of DNA in the hybrid and visualizes its structure, further experimental work is required to reveal the dependence of electronic properties of hybrids on their internal structure. [1] M. Zheng et al., Science 302, 1545 (2004).

  5. Measuring electron-phonon coupling with Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhavan, Vidya

    Electron-boson interactions are ubiquitous in systems ranging from simple metals to novel materials such as graphene, high-temperature superconductors and topological insulators. Of particular interest is the coupling between electrons and phonons. In general, electron-phonon coupling gives rise to quasiparticles of decreased mobility and increased effective mass. Nearly all information about electron-phonon coupling is contained in the Eliashberg function (α2 F (ω k , E)) of the material. In this talk I discuss the various methods by which the effects of electron-phonon coupling can be measured by scanning tunneling microscopy. I will present STM data on a variety of systems ranging from metals to topological insulators and discuss the signatures of electron-phonon interactions in different types of STM data. In particular I discuss how high resolution measurements allow us to measure the dispersion and obtain the real part of the self-energy, which can in principle be inverted to obtain the Eliashberg function.

  6. Three-Dimensional Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy of Biological Specimens

    PubMed Central

    de Jonge, Niels; Sougrat, Rachid; Northan, Brian M.; Pennycook, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of the cytoskeleton and a clathrin-coated pit in mammalian cells has been achieved from a focal-series of images recorded in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). The specimen was a metallic replica of the biological structure comprising Pt nanoparticles 2–3 nm in diameter, with a high stability under electron beam radiation. The 3D dataset was processed by an automated deconvolution procedure. The lateral resolution was 1.1 nm, set by pixel size. Particles differing by only 10 nm in vertical position were identified as separate objects with greater than 20% dip in contrast between them. We refer to this value as the axial resolution of the deconvolution or reconstruction, the ability to recognize two objects, which were unresolved in the original dataset. The resolution of the reconstruction is comparable to that achieved by tilt-series transmission electron microscopy. However, the focal-series method does not require mechanical tilting and is therefore much faster. 3D STEM images were also recorded of the Golgi ribbon in conventional thin sections containing 3T3 cells with a comparable axial resolution in the deconvolved dataset. PMID:20082729

  7. Majorana fermion fingerprints in spin-polarised scanning tunnelling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotetes, Panagiotis; Mendler, Daniel; Heimes, Andreas; Schön, Gerd

    2015-11-01

    We calculate the spatially resolved tunnelling conductance of topological superconductors (TSCs) based on ferromagnetic chains, measured by means of spin-polarised scanning tunnelling microscopy (SPSTM). Our analysis reveals novel signatures of MFs arising from the interplay of their strongly anisotropic spin-polarisation and the magnetisation content of the tip. We focus on the deep Yu-Shiba-Rusinov (YSR) limit where only YSR bound states localised in the vicinity of the adatoms govern the low-energy as also the topological properties of the system. Under these conditions, we investigate the occurrence of zero/finite bias peaks (ZBPs/FBPs) for a single or two coupled TSC chains forming a Josephson junction. Each TSC can host up to two Majorana fermions (MFs) per edge if chiral symmetry is preserved. Here we retrieve the conductance for all the accessible configurations of the MF number of each chain. Our results illustrate innovative spin-polarisation-sensitive experimental routes for arresting the MFs by either restoring or splitting the ZBP in a predictable fashion via: (i) weakly breaking chiral symmetry, e.g. by the SPSTM tip itself or by an external Zeeman field and (ii) tuning the superconducting phase difference of the TSCs, which is encoded in the 4π-Josephson coupling of neighbouring MFs.

  8. Surface treatment of feldspathic porcelain: scanning electron microscopy analysis

    PubMed Central

    Valian, Azam

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Topographic analysis of treated ceramics provides qualitative information regarding the surface texture affecting the micromechanical retention and locking of resin-ceramics. This study aims to compare the surface microstructure following different surface treatments of feldspathic porcelain. MATERIALS AND METHODS This in-vitro study was conducted on 72 porcelain discs randomly divided into 12 groups (n=6). In 9 groups, feldspathic surfaces were subjected to sandblasting at 2, 3 or 4 bar pressure for 5, 10 or 15 seconds with 50 µm alumina particles at a 5 mm distance. In group 10, 9.5% hydrofluoric acid (HF) gel was applied for 120 seconds. In group 11, specimens were sandblasted at 3 bar pressure for 10 seconds and then conditioned with HF. In group 12, specimens were first treated with HF and then sandblasted at 3 bar pressure for 10 seconds. All specimens were then evaluated under scanning electron microscopy (SEM) at different magnifications. RESULTS SEM images of HF treated specimens revealed deep porosities of variable sizes; whereas, the sandblasted surfaces were more homogenous and had sharper peaks. Increasing the pressure and duration of sandblasting increased the surface roughness. SEM images of the two combined techniques showed that in group 11 (sandblasted first), HF caused deeper porosities; whereas in group 12 (treated with HF first) sandblasting caused irregularities with less homogeneity. CONCLUSION All surface treatments increased the surface area and caused porous surfaces. In groups subjected to HF, the porosities were deeper than those in sandblasted only groups. PMID:25352961

  9. Diffusion of photoacid generators by laser scanning confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ping L.; Webber, Stephen E.; Mendenhall, J.; Byers, Jeffrey D.; Chao, Keith K.

    1998-06-01

    Diffusion of the photogenerated acid during the period of time between exposure and development can cause contrast loss and ultimately loss of the latent image. This is especially relevant for chemically amplified photoresists that require a post-exposure baking step, which in turn facilitates acid diffusion due to the high temperature normally employed. It is thus important to develop techniques with good spatial resolution to monitor the photogeneration of acid. More precisely, we need techniques that provide two distinct types of information: spatial resolution on various length scales within the surface layer and also sufficient depth resolution so that one can observe the transition from very surface layer to bulk structure in the polymer blend coated on silicon substrate. Herein laser scanning confocal microscopy is used to evaluate the resist for the first time. We report the use of the confocal microscopy to map the pag/dye distribution in PHS matrices, with both reflectance images and fluorescence images. A laser beam is focused onto a small 3D volume element, termed a voxel. It is typically 200 nm X 200 nm laterally and 800 nm axially. The illuminated voxel is viewed such that only signals emanating from this voxel are detected, i.e., signal from outside the probed voxel is not detected. By adjusting the vertical position of the laser focal point, the voxel can be moved to the designated lateral plane to produce an image. Contrast caused by topology difference between the exposed and unexposed area can be eliminated. Bis-p-butylphenyl iodonium triflat (7% of polyhydroxystyrene) is used as photoacid generators. 5% - 18% (by weight, PHS Mn equals 13 k) resist in PGMEA solution is spin cast onto the treated quartz disk with thickness of 1.4 micrometers , 5 micrometers space/10 micrometers pitch chrome mask is used to generate the pattern with mercury DUV illumination. Fluoresceinamine, the pH-sensitive dye, is also used to enhance the contrast of

  10. Quantitative Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy of Electronic and Nanostructured Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yankovich, Andrew B.

    Electronic and nanostructured materials have been investigated using advanced scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) techniques. The first topic is the microstructure of Ga and Sb-doped ZnO. Ga-doped ZnO is a candidate transparent conducting oxide material. The microstructure of GZO thin films grown by MBE under different growth conditions and different substrates were examined using various electron microscopy (EM) techniques. The microstructure, prevalent defects, and polarity in these films strongly depend on the growth conditions and substrate. Sb-doped ZnO nanowires have been shown to be the first route to stable p-type ZnO. Using Z-contrast STEM, I have showed that an unusual microstructure of Sb-decorated head-to-head inversion domain boundaries and internal voids contain all the Sb in the nanowires and cause the p-type conduction. InGaN thin films and InGaN / GaN quantum wells (QW) for light emitting diodes are the second topic. Low-dose Z-contrast STEM, PACBED, and EDS on InGaN QW LED structures grown by MOCVD show no evidence for nanoscale composition variations, contradicting previous reports. In addition, a new extended defect in GaN and InGaN was discovered. The defect consists of a faceted pyramid-shaped void that produces a threading dislocation along the [0001] growth direction, and is likely caused by carbon contamination during growth. Non-rigid registration (NRR) and high-precision STEM of nanoparticles is the final topic. NRR is a new image processing technique that corrects distortions arising from the serial nature of STEM acquisition that previously limited the precision of locating atomic columns and counting the number of atoms in images. NRR was used to demonstrate sub-picometer precision in STEM images of single crystal Si and GaN, the best achieved in EM. NRR was used to measure the atomic surface structure of Pt nanoacatalysts and Au nanoparticles, which revealed new bond length variation phenomenon of surface atoms. In