Science.gov

Sample records for schamberg disease uncommon

  1. Goodpasture's Disease: An Uncommon Disease With an Atypical Clinical Course.

    PubMed

    Shiferaw, Bethel; Miro, Viktor; Smith, Carroll; Akella, Jagadish; Chua, Walter; Kim, Zae

    2016-01-01

    Goodpasture's disease is an uncommon composite of features including renal failure with pulmonary hemorrhage secondary to an autoimmune response that specifically targets these organ systems. We present a case of particular interest in regards to atypical presentation, and the uncommon treatment that the patient underwent. A 65-year-old Afghani female arrived with complaints of nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite, malaise, decreased urine output, exertional dyspnea, and cough. The patient presented initially with renal failure and unexpectedly developed respiratory failure after hemodialysis. Initial CT of thorax revealed diffuse bilateral pulmonary edema. Subsequently, the patient received a bronchoscopy demonstrating alveolar hemorrhage, which highlights a clinician's need to maintain a differential and reassess patients. Anti-GBM antibody in the serum was detected and the renal biopsy revealed evidence of the antibody on immunofluorescence. In regards to management, the patient could only be treated with plasmapheresis as she had contraindication to initiation of immunosuppression, after which she showed significant clinical improvement. We would like to highlight the benefit of plasmapheresis without concomitant immunosuppression and recommend such an approach to be considered in similar clinical scenarios, where contraindication for immunosuppressant therapy exists. PMID:26668684

  2. Macroscopic Hydatiduria: An Uncommon Pathognomonic Presentation of Renal Hydatid Disease

    PubMed Central

    HAMIDI MADANI, Ali; ENSHAEI, Ahmad; POURREZA, Farshid; ESMAEILI, Samaneh; HAMIDI MADANI, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Isolated renal hydatid disease is a rare endemic infestation caused by larval form of Echinococcus granulosus. Hydatiduria is an uncommon presentation of renal hydatid disease. In 2012 a 34-year-old female referred to Razi Hospital, Rasht, Iran with complaints of right flank pain and grape-like material in urine. Diagnosis was made by ultrasonography and CT scan. The patient was treated surgically with nephrectomy in combination with perioperative chemotherapy with albendazol. PMID:26587504

  3. Uncommon lymphadenopathies of immunopathogenesis can be misinterpreted as malignant diseases.

    PubMed

    Váróczy, László; Illés, Arpád; Gergely, Lajos; Simon, Zsófia; Bassam, Ali; Krenács, László

    2007-06-01

    Lymphadenomegaly is a common sign of benign and malignant disorders. In our practice, only every fifth patient is found to have primary or secondary nodal malignancy. Benign disorders, including banal infections and other non-neoplastic conditions, however, cause most of the cases. Among these, there are some rare entities, resulting in persistent lymphadenopathy that may cause differential diagnostic problems in the daily practice. We report here three patients, having Rosai-Dorfman disease, multicentric Castleman's disease and Kikuchi's lymphadenitis, who exemplify such cases. Our purpose with this presentation is to emphasise importance of vigorous co-operation between clinicians and pathologists. In general, it is imperative to prefer specialised haematopathological laboratories that may facilitate proper diagnosis. PMID:17160684

  4. Recovery of uncommon bacteria from blood: association with neoplastic disease.

    PubMed Central

    Beebe, J L; Koneman, E W

    1995-01-01

    Table 6 is a summary of the organisms discussed with a listing of the environmental source, the endogenous source, the predisposing factors including neoplasms, and the postulated mechanisms by which the organism can gain access to the circulation. The evidence considered indicates that the entrance of one of these microorganisms into the bloodstream of a human being depends on the presence of multiplicity of predisposing factors. In the majority of cases of bacteremia due to one of these unusual organisms, two or more predisposing factors are present. Certain predisposing factors, such as cancer chemotherapy or intravenous catheterization, often provide a barrier break, while others, such as liver disease, may render the host immune system less capable of clearing organisms from the circulation. For organisms such as Campy-lobacter, Listeria, and Salmonella spp., attributes that allow the invasion of a healthy host are present and seem to be enhanced by the simultaneous presence of a predisposing condition, such as liver disease, in the host. Although somewhat fragmentary, a number of individual case reports describe bacteremia due to one of these organisms occurring weeks to years after surgery and after other therapeutic measures had effected a supposed cure of a cancer. It may be speculated that cancer patients, even after a cure, are still susceptible to bloodstream invasion by one of the aforementioned organisms by virtue of the presence of one or more predisposing metabolic, physiologic, or immunologic factors, even though these factors may be cryptic. The predominance of hematologic malignancies among cases of bacteremia due to these unusual organisms is also apparent. Although, as pointed out by Keusch (169), the reduction in the performance of immune function in hematologic malignancies compared with solid tumors is likely to be responsible, other associations of certain organisms with specific neoplasms warrant further examination. The frequency of bloodstream infections of Salmonella typhimurium and Capno-cytophaga canimorsus in Hodgkin's disease patients seems likely due to a particular mechanism which infection by these species is favored. The specific nature of these mechanisms remains to be determined. The recovery of any unusual bacterium from blood should warrant a careful consideration of the possibility of underlying disease, especially cancer. Microbiologists should advise clinicians of the unusual nature of the identified organism and provide the counsel that certain neoplastic processes, often accompanied by neutropenia, render the human host susceptible to invasion by almost any bacterium. The recovery of such organisms as C. septicum or S. bovis should prompt the clinician to aggressively seek to identify an occult neoplasm if one has not yet been diagnosed. PMID:7553569

  5. Drug Induced Steatohepatitis: An Uncommon Culprit of a Common Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rabinowich, Liane; Shibolet, Oren

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a leading cause of liver disease in developed countries. Its frequency is increasing in the general population mostly due to the widespread occurrence of obesity and the metabolic syndrome. Although drugs and dietary supplements are viewed as a major cause of acute liver injury, drug induced steatosis and steatohepatitis are considered a rare form of drug induced liver injury (DILI). The complex mechanism leading to hepatic steatosis caused by commonly used drugs such as amiodarone, methotrexate, tamoxifen, valproic acid, glucocorticoids, and others is not fully understood. It relates not only to induction of the metabolic syndrome by some drugs but also to their impact on important molecular pathways including increased hepatocytes lipogenesis, decreased secretion of fatty acids, and interruption of mitochondrial ?-oxidation as well as altered expression of genes responsible for drug metabolism. Better familiarity with this type of liver injury is important for early recognition of drug hepatotoxicity and crucial for preventing severe forms of liver injury and cirrhosis. Moreover, understanding the mechanisms leading to drug induced hepatic steatosis may provide much needed clues to the mechanism and potential prevention of the more common form of metabolic steatohepatitis. PMID:26273591

  6. Goodpasture’s Disease: An Uncommon Disease With an Atypical Clinical Course

    PubMed Central

    Shiferaw, Bethel; Miro, Viktor; Smith, Carroll; Akella, Jagadish; Chua, Walter; Kim, Zae

    2016-01-01

    Goodpasture’s disease is an uncommon composite of features including renal failure with pulmonary hemorrhage secondary to an autoimmune response that specifically targets these organ systems. We present a case of particular interest in regards to atypical presentation, and the uncommon treatment that the patient underwent. A 65-year-old Afghani female arrived with complaints of nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite, malaise, decreased urine output, exertional dyspnea, and cough. The patient presented initially with renal failure and unexpectedly developed respiratory failure after hemodialysis. Initial CT of thorax revealed diffuse bilateral pulmonary edema. Subsequently, the patient received a bronchoscopy demonstrating alveolar hemorrhage, which highlights a clinician’s need to maintain a differential and reassess patients. Anti-GBM antibody in the serum was detected and the renal biopsy revealed evidence of the antibody on immunofluorescence. In regards to management, the patient could only be treated with plasmapheresis as she had contraindication to initiation of immunosuppression, after which she showed significant clinical improvement. We would like to highlight the benefit of plasmapheresis without concomitant immunosuppression and recommend such an approach to be considered in similar clinical scenarios, where contraindication for immunosuppressant therapy exists. PMID:26668684

  7. Polycystic Thyroid Disease in Pediatric Patients: An Uncommon Cause of Hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Naranjo, Isaac Daimiel; Robinot, David Coca; Rojo, Jaime Cruz; Ponferrada, Miguel Rasero

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic thyroid disease has been described as a rare cause of hypothyroidism. This uncommon entity has been reported in adults within areas with high iodine intake. Sonographic findings of multiple small thin-walled simple thyroid cysts in the context of hypothyroidism without thyroid autoantibodies are highly suggestive of this diagnosis. To our knowledge, we report the first 2 cases of polycystic thyroid disease in pediatric patients in Europe. PMID:26635255

  8. Kimura's disease: an uncommon cause of head and neck masses with potentially serious sequelae

    PubMed Central

    Bobinskas, Alexander M.; Chandu, Arun; Nastri, Alf L.

    2015-01-01

    Kimura's disease (KD) typically presents as a mass in the head and neck region in association with eosinophilia and elevated serum IgE. Excisional biopsy is often required in order to obtain an adequate sample for histological diagnosis and exclude malignancy. If suspected, patients should also be investigated for renal involvement as this may complicate KD. Treatment options include surgical excision and medical therapies such as corticosteroids depending on the extent and severity of disease. PMID:26499315

  9. High Incidence of Invasive Group A Streptococcus Disease Caused by Strains of Uncommon emm Types in Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Athey, Taryn B T; Teatero, Sarah; Sieswerda, Lee E; Gubbay, Jonathan B; Marchand-Austin, Alex; Li, Aimin; Wasserscheid, Jessica; Dewar, Ken; McGeer, Allison; Williams, David; Fittipaldi, Nahuel

    2016-01-01

    An outbreak of type emm59 invasive group A Streptococcus (iGAS) disease was declared in 2008 in Thunder Bay District, Northwestern Ontario, 2 years after a countrywide emm59 epidemic was recognized in Canada. Despite a declining number of emm59 infections since 2010, numerous cases of iGAS disease continue to be reported in the area. We collected clinical information on all iGAS cases recorded in Thunder Bay District from 2008 to 2013. We also emm typed and sequenced the genomes of all available strains isolated from 2011 to 2013 from iGAS infections and from severe cases of soft tissue infections. We used whole-genome sequencing data to investigate the population structure of GAS strains of the most frequently isolated emm types. We report an increased incidence of iGAS in Thunder Bay compared to the metropolitan area of Toronto/Peel and the province of Ontario. Illicit drug use, alcohol abuse, homelessness, and hepatitis C infection were underlying diseases or conditions that might have predisposed patients to iGAS disease. Most cases were caused by clonal strains of skin or generalist emm types (i.e., emm82, emm87, emm101, emm4, emm83, and emm114) uncommonly seen in other areas of the province. We observed rapid waxing and waning of emm types causing disease and their replacement by other emm types associated with the same tissue tropisms. Thus, iGAS disease in Thunder Bay District predominantly affects a select population of disadvantaged persons and is caused by clonally related strains of a few skin and generalist emm types less commonly associated with iGAS in other areas of Ontario. PMID:26491184

  10. IgA-mediated anti-glomerular basement membrane disease: an uncommon mechanism of Goodpasture's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Moulis, Guillaume; Huart, Antoine; Guitard, Joëlle; Fortenfant, Françoise; Chauveau, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    Goodpasture's (GP) disease is usually mediated by IgG autoantibodies. We describe a case of IgA-mediated GP, in a patient presenting with isolated rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. The diagnosis was established on kidney biopsy, since routine enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) targeted at IgG circulating autoantibodies failed to detect the nephritogenic antibodies. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed intense linear deposition of IgA along the glomerular capillary walls. An elevated titre (1:80) of circulating IgA anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) antibodies was retrospectively demonstrated by indirect fluorescence. Despite immunosuppressive regimen, the disease progressed to end-stage renal failure (ESRF). Transplantation was not associated with recurrence in the kidney graft. We reviewed the 11 previously reported cases of IgA-mediated GP. PMID:26069798

  11. Uncommon histiocytic disorders: Rosai-Dorfman, juvenile xanthogranuloma, and Erdheim-Chester disease.

    PubMed

    Haroche, Julien; Abla, Oussama

    2015-12-01

    Rosai-Dorfman disease (RDD), juvenile xanthogranuloma (JXG), and Erdheim-Chester disease (ECD) are non-Langerhans cell (non-LCH) disorders arising from either a dendritic or a macrophage cell. RDD is a benign disorder that presents with massive lymphadenopathy, but can have extranodal involvement. In most cases, RDD is self-limited and observation is the standard approach. Treatment is restricted to patients with life-threatening, multiple-relapsing, or autoimmune-associated disease. JXG is a pediatric histiocytosis characterized by xanthomatous skin lesions that usually resolve spontaneously. In a minority of cases, systemic disease can occur and can be life threatening. Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML), as well as germline mutations in NF1 and NF2, have been reported in children with JXG. Recent whole-exome sequencing of JXG cases did not show the BRAF-V600E mutation, although 1 patient had PI3KCD mutation. ECD is an adult histiocytosis characterized by symmetrical long bone involvement, cardiovascular infiltration, a hairy kidney, and retroperitoneal fibrosis. Central nervous system involvement is a poor prognostic factor. Interferon-? is the standard as front-line therapy, although cladribine and anakinra can be effective in a few refractory cases. More than one-half of ECD patients carry the BRAF-V600E mutation. Currently, >40 patients worldwide with multisystemic, refractory BRAF-V600E(+) ECD have been treated with vemurafenib, a BRAF inhibitor, which was found to be highly effective. Other recurrent mutations of the MAP kinase and PI3K pathways have been described in ECD. These discoveries may redefine ECD, JXG, and LCH as inflammatory myeloid neoplasms, which may lead to new targeted therapies. PMID:26637774

  12. PULMONARY COCCIDIODOMYCOSIS PRESENTING AS A MASS, AN UNCOMMON DISEASE ENTITY IN ETHIOPIA.

    PubMed

    Hagos, Girmay; Esayas, Reiye

    2015-01-01

    Coccidiodomycosis is a disease caused by the spores of the fungi coccidiodes immitis and pulmonary coccidiodomycosis comes after inhalation of the spores which are mainly found in desert areas of the United States, central and South America. Reported cases from outside the endemic areas have always history of travel to these areas. There are no reports so far from Ethiopia or the whole Africa. We report here a case of pulmonary coccidodomycosis with no history of travel to such areas. A 24 years old female patient from Samre, South-Eastern Tigray, presented with right side chest pain and productive cough of yellowish sputum which sometimes is blood streaked. She had completed anti-tuberculosis treatment without any improvement. With a preliminary diagnosis of pulmonary mass, surgical exploration was made and histology of the excised tissue showed appedrances consistent with pulmonary coccidioidomycosis. There was marked clinical and radiological improvement after three weeks of treatment with ketoconazole. Though there are no reported cases from Ethiopia and Africa as a whole, Coccidiodomycosis should be considered as differential diagnosis especially for patients from arid areas like that of our patient before any empirical treatment. PMID:26591290

  13. From past sailors' eras to the present day: scurvy as a surprising manifestation of an uncommon gastrointestinal disease.

    PubMed

    Branquinho, Diogo Ferreira; Pinto-Gouveia, Miguel; Mendes, Sofia; Sofia, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    A 45-year-old man presented with follicular exanthema in his lower limbs, alternating bowel habits and significant weight loss. His medical history included seronegative arthritis, bipolar disease and an inconclusive diagnostic laparoscopy. Diagnostic work up revealed microcytic anaemia and multivitamin deficiency. Skin biopsy of the exanthema suggested scurvy. Owing to these signs of malabsorption, upper endoscopy with duodenal biopsies was performed, exhibiting villous atrophy and extensive periodic acid-Schiff-positive material in the lamina propria, therefore diagnosing Whipple's disease (WD). After starting treatment with ceftriaxone and co-trimoxazole, an impressive recovery was noted, as the wide spectrum of malabsorption signs quickly disappeared. After a year of antibiotics, articular and cutaneous manifestations improved, allowing the patient to stop taking corticosteroids and antidepressants. This truly unusual presentation reflects the multisystemic nature of WD, often leading to misdiagnosis of other entities. Scurvy is a rare finding in developed countries, but its presence should raise suspicion for small bowel disease. PMID:26376699

  14. Diurnal and twenty-four hour patterning of human diseases: acute and chronic common and uncommon medical conditions.

    PubMed

    Smolensky, Michael H; Portaluppi, Francesco; Manfredini, Roberto; Hermida, Ramon C; Tiseo, Ruana; Sackett-Lundeen, Linda L; Haus, Erhard L

    2015-06-01

    The symptom intensity and mortality of human diseases, conditions, and syndromes exhibit diurnal or 24 h patterning, e.g., skin: atopic dermatitis, urticaria, psoriasis, and palmar hyperhidrosis; gastrointestinal: esophageal reflux, peptic ulcer (including perforation and hemorrhage), cyclic vomiting syndrome, biliary colic, hepatic variceal hemorrhage, and proctalgia fugax; infection: susceptibility, fever, and mortality; neural: frontal, parietal, temporal, and occipital lobe seizures, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease, hereditary progressive dystonia, and pain (cancer, post-surgical, diabetic neuropathic and foot ulcer, tooth caries, burning mouth and temporomandibular syndromes, fibromyalgia, sciatica, intervertebral vacuum phenomenon, multiple sclerosis muscle spasm, and migraine, tension, cluster, hypnic, and paroxysmal hemicranial headache); renal: colic and nocturnal enuresis and polyuria; ocular: bulbar conjunctival redness, keratoconjunctivitis sicca, intraocular pressure and anterior ischemic optic neuropathy, and recurrent corneal erosion syndrome; psychiatric/behavioral: major and seasonal affective depressive disorders, bipolar disorder, parasuicide and suicide, dementia-associated agitation, and addictive alcohol, tobacco, and heroin cravings and withdrawal phenomena; plus autoimmune and musculoskeletal: rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, axial spondylarthritis, gout, Sjögren's syndrome, and systemic lupus erythematosus. Knowledge of these and other 24 h patterns of human pathophysiology informs research of their underlying circadian and other endogenous mechanisms, external temporal triggers, and more effective patient care entailing clinical chronopreventive and chronotherapeutic strategies. PMID:25129839

  15. Uncommon Leber "plus" disease associated with mitochondrial mutation m.11778G>A in a premature child.

    PubMed

    Paquay, Stéphanie; Benoit, Valérie; Wetzburger, Catherine; Cordonnier, Monique; Meire, Françoise; Charon, Anne; Roland, Dominique; Van Coster, Rudy; Nassogne, Marie-Cécile; Maystadt, Isabelle

    2014-08-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy is a well-known mitochondrial disorder that leads to bilateral subacute visual failure. Although visual impairment is often the sole clinical feature, additional and severe neurologic abnormalities also have been documented for this disease. We report on a 13-year-old boy who has presented with severe visual failure since early childhood in a context of prematurity. In the first years of his life, clinical features included delayed psychomotor development and ataxia. The clinical presentation, which was initially attributed to prematurity, worsened thereafter, and the child developed acute neurologic degradation with the typical radiological findings of Leigh syndrome. The mitochondrial DNA point mutation 11778G>A was identified in the ND4 gene. The probable influence of environmental background on clinical expression of Leber optic neuropathy, particularly those of prematurity and oxygen therapy, is discussed in our manuscript. PMID:23864591

  16. Cenac, Chauvin, Paccaut, Pouyanne: uncommon suffix tries Uncommon Suffix Tries

    E-print Network

    Petite, Samuel

    C´enac, Chauvin, Paccaut, Pouyanne: uncommon suffix tries Uncommon Suffix Tries Peggy C´enac1 Length Markov Chain) probabilistic sources and are easily extended to families of tries having the same, France. 1 #12;C´enac, Chauvin, Paccaut, Pouyanne: uncommon suffix tries inserted in external nodes

  17. An Uncommon Case of Chronic Tubercular Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Maharjan, Sushna

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a common disease that ranks as the second leading cause of death from an infectious disease worldwide, after the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). However, primary TB of the appendix is rare and may or may not be associated with specific clinical features. Thus, diagnosis is made only after histopathological examination. It suggests that all surgically removed appendices should be subjected to histopathological examination. This reported case is an uncommon case of chronic tubercular appendicitis. PMID:26649216

  18. Common surgery, uncommon complication

    PubMed Central

    Akdeniz, Hande; Ozer, Kadri; Dikmen, Adile; Kocer, Uger

    2015-01-01

    Ingrown nail surgery is the one of the most common surgeries in outpatient clinics that are generally perfomed in response to patient complaints. Still, making simple observations, taking patient histories and conducting further tests are often neglected by outpatient clinics. Consequently, it is important to be aware if ingrown nail is associated with any underlying diseases that can lead to major complications. In this article, we report on two cases ending in amputation that were performed with Winograd’s partial matrix excision procedure for ingrown nails. Such a complication is rare, unexpected, and most unwanted in forefoot surgery. After a detailed analysis of the situation, we discovered that both patients were smokers, and one of them had Buerger’s disease. These conditions led to the ingrown nails in addition to poor wound healing. This case report emphasizes the fact that even when performing minor procedures, obtaining a detailed history and conducting an examination are of paramount importance. Patient selection is also a considerable factor, especially for patients who are smokers, who may experience a worst case surgical scenario. PMID:26693080

  19. Common surgery, uncommon complication.

    PubMed

    Akdeniz, Hande; Ozer, Kadri; Dikmen, Adile; Kocer, Uger

    2015-10-01

    Ingrown nail surgery is the one of the most common surgeries in outpatient clinics that are generally perfomed in response to patient complaints. Still, making simple observations, taking patient histories and conducting further tests are often neglected by outpatient clinics. Consequently, it is important to be aware if ingrown nail is associated with any underlying diseases that can lead to major complications. In this article, we report on two cases ending in amputation that were performed with Winograd's partial matrix excision procedure for ingrown nails. Such a complication is rare, unexpected, and most unwanted in forefoot surgery. After a detailed analysis of the situation, we discovered that both patients were smokers, and one of them had Buerger's disease. These conditions led to the ingrown nails in addition to poor wound healing. This case report emphasizes the fact that even when performing minor procedures, obtaining a detailed history and conducting an examination are of paramount importance. Patient selection is also a considerable factor, especially for patients who are smokers, who may experience a worst case surgical scenario. PMID:26693080

  20. Common and uncommon bilateral adult renal masses

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Anjali; Silverman, Paul M.; Kundra, Vikas

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Masses can involve the kidney unilaterally or bilaterally. The purpose of this article is to review common and uncommon adult renal masses that present bilaterally. Clinical and imaging findings are described. Renal masses that present in a bilateral fashion can have particular clinical and imaging characteristics and knowledge of their presentation enables appropriate diagnosis and management, especially in a multidisciplinary care setting. More commonly found bilateral renal masses that are discussed include metastasis, lymphoproliferative disorders, adult polycystic kidney disease, angiomyolipomas, renal infracts and renal abscesses. Less common bilateral renal masses include transitional cell carcinoma, oncocytoma, and hematomas. PMID:22750134

  1. Uncommon surgical emergencies in neonatology.

    PubMed

    Angotti, R; Bulotta, A L; Ferrara, F; Molinaro, F; Cerchia, E; Meucci, D; Messina, M

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Over the past decade, multiple factors have changed the pattern of neonatal surgical emergencies. An increase in prenatal screenings and the development of neonatal tertiary care centres have changed the clinical approach to these kids. Materials and methods. Between 1995 to 2011 were retrospectively reviewed 34 patients with diagnosis of uncommon rare neonatal surgical emergencies at our institute. We analyzed: sex, gestational age, weight at birth, primary pathology, prenatal diagnosis, associated anomalies, age and weight at surgery, clinical presentation, start of oral feeding and hospitalization. The follow-up was performed at 6,12, 24 and 36 months. Results. There were 21 male and 13 female. The gestational age ranged between 28 and 36 weeks. The weight at birth ranged between 700 and 1400 grams. Oral feeding was started between 4th and 10th postoperative day. The average hospitalization was about 70.47 days. To date, all patients have finished the followup. They are healthy. Conclusion. The outcome of the patients with uncommon surgical emergencies is different based on the etiology. Overall survival is generally good but is influenced by the associated anomalies. PMID:25669890

  2. Secondary Syphilis: Uncommon Manifestations a Common Disease

    PubMed Central

    McPhee, Stephen J.

    1984-01-01

    Reports of cases of primary and secondary syphilis are increasing in the United States, particularly in urban areas and among homosexual men. While primary syphilis poses little diagnostic difficulty, many physicians are unfamiliar with the multisystem nature of secondary lues. Patients who have secondary syphilis commonly present with systemic signs, skin rash, mucous membrane lesions and generalized adenopathy. Less commonly, secondary syphilis may occur as acute meningitis, sensorineural hearing loss, iritis, anterior uveitis, optic neuritis, Bell's palsy, gastropathy, proctitis, hepatitis, pulmonary infiltration, nephrotic syndrome, glomerulonephritis, periostitis, tenosynovitis and polyarthritis. The diagnosis of secondary syphilis is easily confirmed. Its various manifestations are readily treated with penicillin and, if treated early, are entirely reversible. Two recent cases of secondary syphilis, one presenting as nephrotic syndrome and one as chorioretinitis and ptosis, illustrate the usual and unusual features of this common infection. Images PMID:6702190

  3. An uncommon case of hepatopulmonary amoebiasis.

    PubMed

    Patrício, Catarina; Amaral, Patrícia; Lourenço, João

    2014-01-01

    Amoebiasis is an uncommon infection in developed countries caused by the protozoan Entamoeba histolytica. Amoebic liver abscess is the most frequent extraintestinal presentation of the disease; pleuropulmonary involvement is rare, occurring mostly by rupture of the abscess into the pleural space or lung parenchyma. We describe a case of a 48-year-old migrant from São Tomé e Príncipe, with fever, wasting, dry cough and right upper abdominal pain for the past 2?months. The CT scan revealed a voluminous liver abscess with thrombosis of the right suprahepatic and inferior vena cava, right pulmonary lobar abscess and multiple diffuse condensations in both lungs. Aspirated pus resembled anchovy sauce; blood and aspirated material cultures for infectious agents were negative. Serology for E. histolytica was positive, and the diagnosis of hepatopulmonary amoebiasis with infectious phlebitis was confirmed by positive PCR in the liver pus. Treatment with metronidazole+paramomycin led to clinical and radiological resolution. PMID:25155487

  4. Uncommon presentations of tinea versicolor

    PubMed Central

    Varada, Sowmya; Dabade, Tushar; Loo, Daniel S.

    2014-01-01

    Tinea versicolor (TV) is a common cutaneous fungal infection characterized by superficial scaling and a mild disturbance of skin pigmentation. It typically affects the chest, upper back, and shoulders. However, involvement of more unusual regions of the body such as the face and scalp, arms and legs, intertriginous sites, genitalia, areolae, and palms and soles has been reported. This report details two such cases observed at our institution: a 32-year-old woman with involvement of the popliteal fossa and a 16-year-old boy with involvement of the groin. The clinician must be aware of these variations in location and perform the appropriate diagnostic workup when lesions have the characteristic morphology of TV despite an unusual location. The etiology, pathophysiology, and epidemiology of TV are reviewed and current literature describing other instances of TV in uncommon locations is discussed. PMID:25126470

  5. Uncommon Success: A Conversation with Brett Peiser

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Peter

    2014-01-01

    This article introduces a conversation with Brett Peiser, named chief executive officer of "Uncommon Schools" in July of 2012, along with the principal of North Star Academy Vailsburg Middle School, a charter school in Newark, New Jersey's West Ward. There is no doubt that "Uncommon Schools" has given thousands of…

  6. Onychoprotothecosis: An uncommon presentation of protothecosis.

    PubMed

    Gandham, N R; Vyawahare, C R; Chaudhaury, N; Shinde, R A

    2015-01-01

    Onychomycosis is a fairly common condition seen in a dermatology clinic. Dermatophytes Trichophyton and Epidermophyton are the known filamentous fungi implicated. The yeast-like fungi such as Candida less commonly cause Onychomycosis. The genus Prototheca may on preliminary observation resemble yeast-like fungi but a detailed microscopy will reveal the absence of budding and presence of endospores. Onychoprotothecosis is an uncommon presentation of human protothecosis. Of the two Prototheca species (Prototheca zopfii and Prototheca wickerhamii) known to cause the disease, P. wickerhamii has been reported more commonly. We report a culture proven case of this condition caused by P. zopfii. The patient, a 55-year-old housewife presented with discolouration and breaking off of the right thumb and forefinger nails since a period of six months. Samples of nail scrapping sent to the Microbiology Laboratory were culture-positive for Prototheca. Speciation by the automated Vitek-2 system (bioMerieux) identified the isolate as P. zopfii, which was further confirmed at PGI, Chandigarh. PMID:26068353

  7. Culture, Relevance, and Schooling: Exploring Uncommon Ground

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scherff, Lisa, Ed.; Spector, Karen, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    In "Culture, Relevance, and Schooling: Exploring Uncommon Ground," Lisa Scherff, Karen Spector, and the contributing authors conceive of culturally relevant and critically minded pedagogies in terms of opening up new spatial, discursive, and/or embodied learning terrains. Readers will traverse multiple landscapes and look into a variety of spaces…

  8. Pneumatosis coli: an uncommon but treatable cause of faecal incontinence.

    PubMed

    Snape, J; Hulman, G; Reddy, P R; Panto, P N

    1998-10-01

    Pneumatosis intestinalis is defined as the presence of gas within the bowel wall. Small bowel pneumatosis is less commonly reported and more severe than colonic disease in adults. Pneumatosis coli is characterised by multiple collections of encysted gas occurring within the sub-mucosa and subserosa of the colon and rectum. It is an uncommon condition which typically presents in late middle age and has been associated with a number of gastrointestinal (e.g. pyloric stenosis, sigmoid volvulus and ischaemic bowel) and non-gastrointestinal (e.g. chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, depression and multiple sclerosis) diseases. Some cases, however, are idiopathic or primary. Symptoms can include diarrhoea, constipation, mucus per rectum, bleeding, flatus, abdominal pain and, rarely, faecal incontinence. We report on two patients, one of whom presented with faecal incontinence, the other who had troublesome lower gastrointestinal symptoms including faecal incontinence. Both responded well to continuous oxygen therapy. PMID:10622093

  9. Uncommon opportunistic yeast bloodstream infections from Qatar.

    PubMed

    Taj-Aldeen, Saad J; AbdulWahab, Atqah; Kolecka, Anna; Deshmukh, Anand; Meis, Jacques F; Boekhout, Teun

    2014-07-01

    Eleven uncommon yeast species that are associated with high mortality rates irrespective of antifungal therapy were isolated from 17/187 (201 episodes) pediatric and elderly patients with fungemia from Qatar. The samples were taken over a 6-year period (January 2004-December 2010). Isolated species included Kluyveromyces marxianus, Lodderomyces elongisporus, Lindnera fabianii, Candida dubliniensis, Meyerozyma guilliermondii, Candida intermedia, Pichia kudriavzevii, Yarrowia lipolytica, Clavispora lusitaniae, Candida pararugosa, and Wickerhamomyces anomalus. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry provided correct identifications compared with molecular analysis testing of the same isolates. Low minimal inhibitory concentrations were found when isavuconazole and voriconazole were used for all uncommon yeast species evaluated in this study. Resistance to antifungal drugs was low and remained restricted to a few species. PMID:24934803

  10. Uncommon Presentation of Triploidy: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Pata, Özlem; Unlu, Cihat; Tokat, Fatma; Ozdemir, Mucize

    2015-01-01

    A 28-year-old woman presented in her first pregnancy was admitted with severe hyperemesis gravidarium. Increased nuchal translucency with cardiac anomaly and omphalocele at the first trimester was observed at the ultrasound examination. Chorionic villus biopsy confirmed triploidy. The combination of type I and type II triploidy patterns were seen together in the second trimester of the pregnancy. Although the symptoms due to increased human chorionic levels occured, at the pathologic investigation there were no molar changes in the placenta. Here we report a case of uncommon presentation of triploidy. PMID:26557571

  11. Uncommon Sense - The Heretical Nature of Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cromer, Alan

    1995-08-01

    Most people believe that science arose as a natural end-product of our innate intelligence and curiosity, as an inevitable stage in human intellectual development. But physicist and educator Alan Cromer disputes this belief. Cromer argues that science is not the natural unfolding of human potential, but the invention of a particular culture, Greece, in a particular historical period. Indeed, far from being natural, scientific thinking goes so far against the grain of conventional human thought that if it hadn't been discovered in Greece, it might not have been discovered at all.In Uncommon Sense , Alan Cromer develops the argument that science represents a radically new and different way of thinking. Using Piaget's stages of intellectual development, he shows that conventional thinking remains mired in subjective, "egocentric" ways of looking at the world--most people even today still believe in astrology, ESP, UFOs, ghosts and other paranormal phenomena--a mode of thought that science has outgrown. He provides a fascinating explanation of why science began in Greece, contrasting the Greek practice of debate to the Judaic reliance on prophets for acquiring knowledge. Other factors, such as a maritime economy and wandering scholars (both of which prevented parochialism) and an essentially literary religion not dominated by priests, also promoted in Greece an objective, analytical way of thinking not found elsewhere in the ancient world. He examines India and China and explains why science could not develop in either country. In China, for instance, astronomy served only the state, and the private study of astronomy was forbidden. Cromer also provides a perceptive account of science in Renaissance Europe and of figures such as Copernicus, Galileo, and Newton. Along the way, Cromer touches on many intriguing topics, arguing, for instance, that much of science is essential complete; there are no new elements yet to be discovered. He debunks the vaunted SETI (Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) project, which costs taxpayers millions each year, showing that physical limits--such as the melting point of metal--put an absolute limit on the speed of space travel, making trips to even the nearest star all but impossible. Finally, Cromer discusses the deplorable state of science education in America and suggests several provocative innovations to improve high school education, including a radical proposal to give all students an intensive eighth and ninth year program, eliminating the last two years of high school.Uncommon Sense is an illuminating look at science, filled with provocative observations. Whether challenging Thomas Kuhn's theory of scientific revolutions, or extolling the virtues of Euclid's Elements , Alan Cromer is always insightful, outspoken, and refreshingly original.

  12. Extraordinary electronic properties in uncommon structure types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Mazhar Nawaz

    In this thesis I present the results of explorations into several uncommon structure types. In Chapter 1 I go through the underlying idea of how we search for new compounds with exotic properties in solid state chemistry. The ideas of exploring uncommon structure types, building up from the simple to the complex, using chemical intuition and thinking by analogy are discussed. Also, the history and basic concepts of superconductivity, Dirac semimetals, and magnetoresistance are briefly reviewed. In chapter 2, the 1s-InTaS2 structural family is introduced along with the discovery of a new member of the family, Ag0:79VS2; the synthesis, structure, and physical properties of two different polymorphs of the material are detailed. Also in this chapter, we report the observation of superconductivity in another 1s structure, PbTaSe2. This material is especially interesting due to it being very heavy (resulting in very strong spin orbit coulping (SOC)), layered, and noncentrosymmetric. Electronic structure calculations reveal the presence of a bulk 3D Dirac cone (very similar to graphene) that is gapped by SOC originating from the hexagonal Pb layer. In Chapter 3 we show the re-investigation of the crystal structure of the 3D Dirac semimetal, Cd3As2. It is found to be centrosymmetric, rather than noncentrosymmetric, and as such all bands are spin degenerate and there is a 4-fold degenerate bulk Dirac point at the Fermi level, making Cd3As2 a 3D electronic analog to graphene. Also, for the first time, scanning tunneling microscopy experiments identify a 2x2 surface reconstruction in what we identify as the (112) cleavage plane of single crystals; needle crystals grow with a [110] long axis direction. Lastly, in chapter 4 we report the discovery of "titanic" (sadly dubbed ?rge, nonsaturating" by Nature editors and given the acronym XMR) magnetoresistance (MR) in the non-magnetic, noncentrosymmetric, layered transition metal dichalcogenide WTe2; over 13 million% at 0.53 K in a magnetic field of 60 Tesla (the largest positive magnetoresistance ever reported). Unlike what is seen in other known materials, there is no saturation of the magnetoresistance value even at very high applied fields. In semimetals, very high MR may attributed to a balanced hole-electron "resonance" condition; as described here, WTe2 appears to be the first known material where this resonance is nearly perfect.

  13. Uncommon Candida Species Fungemia among Cancer Patients, Houston, Texas, USA

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Dong Sik; Farmakiotis, Dimitrios; Jiang, Ying; Tarrand, Jeffrey J.

    2015-01-01

    Many uncommon Candida species that cause bloodstream infections (BSIs) are not well-characterized. We investigated the epidemiology, antifungal use, susceptibility patterns, and factors associated with all-cause death among cancer patients in whom uncommon Candida spp. BSIs were diagnosed at a cancer treatment center during January 1998–September 2013. Of 1,395 Candida bloodstream isolates, 79 from 68 patients were uncommon Candida spp. The incidence density of uncommon Candida spp. BSIs and their proportion to all candidemia episodes substantively increased during the study period, and the rise was associated with increasing use of echinocandin antifungal drugs. Thirty-seven patients had breakthrough infections during therapy or prophylaxis with various systemic antifungal drugs for >7 consecutive days; 21 were receiving an echinocandin. C. kefyr (82%), and C. lusitaniae (21%) isolates frequently showed caspofungin MICs above the epidemiologic cutoff values. These findings support the need for institutional surveillance for uncommon Candida spp. among cancer patients. PMID:26488845

  14. Imaging of neurosarcoidosis: common, uncommon, and rare.

    PubMed

    Bathla, G; Singh, A K; Policeni, B; Agarwal, A; Case, B

    2016-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is an idiopathic inflammatory disease that may affect any organ system and have protean manifestations. Neurosarcoidosis refers to involvement of the central nervous system and may occur in patients with known sarcoidosis, or be the initial manifestation of the disease. In the latter, it can be a source of considerable confusion, given the non-specific imaging appearance. The aim of this review is to describe the imaging spectrum of neurosarcoidosis, including follow-up imaging and superimposed infections, which may occur secondary to immunosuppression. An increased awareness of this great mimicker could potentially expedite diagnosis and reduce morbidity. PMID:26506463

  15. Solitary Angiokeratoma: Report of Two Uncommon Cases

    PubMed Central

    Chowdappa, Vijaya; Narasimha, Aparna; Masamatti, Smitha S.

    2015-01-01

    Angiokeratomas are rare benign vascular skin lesions arising in isolation or in groups of multiple lesions, as solitary cutaneous forms or generalized systemic forms. They are ectasias of dermal capillaries with an acanthotic and hyperkeratotic epidermis. They can occur in both healthy individuals and in those with underlying systemic disease due to inherited enzyme deficiency or other acquired predisposing factors. The identification and reporting of these lesions is important as patients with these lesions should be evaluated to rule out underlying pathogenic conditions. We report two rare cases of isolated solitary cutaneous angiokeratoma occurring in two patients. PMID:26155544

  16. Uncommon opportunistic fungal infections of oral cavity: A review

    PubMed Central

    Deepa, AG; Nair, Bindu J; Sivakumar, TT; Joseph, Anna P

    2014-01-01

    The majority of opportunistic oral mucosal fungal infections are due to Candida albicans and Aspergillus fumigatus species. Mucor and Cryptococcus also have a major role in causing oral infections, whereas Geotrichum, Fusarium, Rhodotorula, Saccharomyces and Penicillium marneffei are uncommon pathogens in the oral cavity. The broad spectrum of clinical presentation includes pseudo-membranes, abscesses, ulcers, pustules and extensive tissue necrosis involving bone. This review discusses various uncommon opportunistic fungal infections affecting the oral cavity including their morphology, clinical features and diagnostic methods. PMID:25328305

  17. Clinical and radiologic review of uncommon cause of profound iron deficiency anemia: median arcuate ligament syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gunduz, Yasemin; Asil, K?yasettin; Aksoy, Yakup Ersel; Tatl? Ayhan, Laçin

    2014-01-01

    Median arcuate ligament syndrome is an anatomic and clinical entity characterized by dynamic compression of the proximal celiac artery by the median arcuate ligament, which leads to postprandial epigastric pain, vomiting, and weight loss. These symptoms are usually nonspecific and are easily misdiagnosed as functional dyspepsia, peptic ulcer disease, or gastropathy. In this report, we presented a 72-year-old male patient with celiac artery compression syndrome causing recurrent abdominal pain associated with gastric ulcer and iron deficiency anemia. This association is relatively uncommon and therefore not well determined. In addition, we reported the CT angiography findings and three-dimensional reconstructions of this rare case. PMID:25053902

  18. Fulminant infection by uncommon organisms in animal bite wounds.

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, J. K.

    1998-01-01

    In 1995 and 1996, 215 patients exposed to different species of animals were treated at the Amarnath Polyclinic, Balasore, in India. Among them were two children infected by uncommon organisms, i.e., Capnocytophaga canimorsus and Pasteurella multocida; the patients recovered with appropriate antibiotic therapy. PMID:10211359

  19. Catalog of Uncommon Facilities in Western Colleges and Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viehland, Dennis, Comp.

    A list of rare, and often unique, facilities in the western part of the United States is presented that is designed to serve as a resource for researchers. The list of facilities is a guide to what uncommon equipment, centers or institutes, and collections are available at western higher education facilities and what provisions exist for sharing…

  20. Advocacy: Emphasizing the Uncommon about the Common Core State Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Sandra N.

    2014-01-01

    The author describes key issues and uncommon concerns about the Common Core State Standards that fit within two categories: philosophical and pedagogical. Philosophically, Common Core State K-12 Standards should not be expected to be mastered at a specific grade level but based on developmental readiness. Pedagogically, Common Core State Standards…

  1. 5 CFR 630.210 - Uncommon tours of duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... each firefighter compensated under part 550, subpart M, of this chapter. The uncommon tour of duty shall correspond directly to the firefighter's regular tour of duty, as defined in § 550.1302 of this chapter, so that each firefighter accrues and uses leave on the basis of that tour....

  2. 5 CFR 630.210 - Uncommon tours of duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... each firefighter compensated under part 550, subpart M, of this chapter. The uncommon tour of duty shall correspond directly to the firefighter's regular tour of duty, as defined in § 550.1302 of this chapter, so that each firefighter accrues and uses leave on the basis of that tour....

  3. 5 CFR 630.210 - Uncommon tours of duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... each firefighter compensated under part 550, subpart M, of this chapter. The uncommon tour of duty shall correspond directly to the firefighter's regular tour of duty, as defined in § 550.1302 of this chapter, so that each firefighter accrues and uses leave on the basis of that tour....

  4. 5 CFR 630.210 - Uncommon tours of duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... each firefighter compensated under part 550, subpart M, of this chapter. The uncommon tour of duty shall correspond directly to the firefighter's regular tour of duty, as defined in § 550.1302 of this chapter, so that each firefighter accrues and uses leave on the basis of that tour....

  5. 5 CFR 630.210 - Uncommon tours of duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... each firefighter compensated under part 550, subpart M, of this chapter. The uncommon tour of duty shall correspond directly to the firefighter's regular tour of duty, as defined in § 550.1302 of this chapter, so that each firefighter accrues and uses leave on the basis of that tour....

  6. Fertile Triploid Males--An Uncommon Case Among Hybrid Vertebrates

    E-print Network

    Fertile Triploid Males--An Uncommon Case Among Hybrid Vertebrates CARLA SOUSA-SANTOS1Ã, MARIA JOA described for diploid hybrids. The presence of different types of fertile males (nonhybrid diploids with normal meiosis and both diploid and triploid hybrids) coupled with hybridogenetic meiosis in females

  7. [Peroneal nerve palsy in children: Uncommon diagnosis of a proximal tibiofibular synovial cyst].

    PubMed

    Robin, F; Kuchenbuch, M; Sauleau, P; Marleix, S; Lucas, G; Fraisse, B; Violas, P

    2016-01-01

    Compression of the common peroneal nerve by synovial cysts of the tibiofibular joint is a rare disease. Two macroscopic forms may be encountered: extraneural cysts and intraneural cysts. In a review of the literature, we found only three pediatric cases of common peroneal nerve palsy due to extraneural cysts and about 60 cases reported in adults. Taking advantage of the clinical history of two children operated in our department for this disease, we describe this uncommon entity, which must be diagnosed and treated rapidly. Even in the presence of severe clinical and electrophysiological symptoms, a full clinical recovery is possible, as observed in these two children. However, follow-up is needed because recurrence is possible. PMID:26563724

  8. Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-clefting syndrome associated with p63 mutation and an uncommon phenotype.

    PubMed

    Paranaíba, Lívia Máris Ribeiro; Martelli-Júnior, Hercílio; de Miranda, Roseli Teixeira; Bufalino, Andréia; Abdo Filho, Ruy Camargo; Coletta, Ricardo D

    2010-09-01

    Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-clefting syndrome is an uncommon disorder that includes a clinical spectrum of limb, facial, ocular, internal ear, and urogenital malformations. The disease is caused by heterozygous mutations in the 3q27-29 located p63 gene. In this paper we describe a 17-year-old girl affected by ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-clefting syndrome with a de novo p63 mutation that predicts a heterozygous missense substitution (arginine to tryptophan substitution caused by a cytosine to thymine transition) at the amino acid 304 (R304W) of the p63 DNA-binding domain. Scattered freckles on face, legs, and abdominal region, an uncommon feature associated with this syndrome, were recognized in our patient. The clinical features and genotype-phenotype correlation with previous p63 mutations related to the syndrome are discussed and compared with those observed in our patient. This case expands the phenotypic spectrum of ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-clefting syndrome. PMID:20180707

  9. Cryptococcal laryngitis: An uncommon presentation of a common pathogen.

    PubMed

    Atiya, Y; Masege, S D

    2015-10-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an ubiquitous encapsulated yeast found worldwide, especially in areas with pigeons. The fungus thrives in pigeon droppings and is responsible for primary pulmonary infection, but may disseminate and cause infection of the central nervous system, skin and bone. Most cases are reported in immunocompromised hosts, most commonly those infected with HIV. However, infection has been reported in immunocompetent hosts. Primary infection of the larynx is uncommon, and to date only 12 cases have been reported. We present the first South African report of a young woman with HIV who presented with hoarseness of uncertain aetiology, which was later confirmed to be cryptococcal laryngitis. PMID:26636155

  10. An uncommon cause of back pain in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Vadivelu, R; Green, T; Bhatt, R

    2005-01-01

    Back pain is a major cause of disability worldwide. A case of a 29 year old Caucasian woman with low back pain secondary to an uncommon benign condition called osteitis condensans ilii is presented and the literature is reviewed. Limited information in the literature combined with poor awareness across the specialty and among the primary care physicians leads to an extensive investigation and misdiagnosis of this benign condition. This report emphasis the salient features and the differential diagnosis in diagnosing and managing this rare condition. PMID:15640434

  11. European and German food legislation facing uncommon foodstuffs.

    PubMed

    Grabowski, Nils Th; Klein, Günter; López, Antonio Martínez

    2013-01-01

    In Europe, uncommon foodstuff (UFS, i.e., traditional foods from specific European regions and uncommon ethnic foods from non-EU countries) have been contributing to a diversification of the food supply. E-commerce and specialized retail shops are the main sources for UFS. This article discusses the legal bases for UFS introduction and evaluation. By means of 35 representative UFS, this article analyses the possibilities of trade and veterinary inspection of these products in Germany, comparing European Union and national food legislation with the many idiosyncrasies the UFS presents. Conservatory legislation bans the trade with endangered species (primates, cetaceans, songbirds), but for many other species, this is a complex matter that may ban only subpopulations from trade. Although introduction of legal UFS is regulated (yet complicated), the lack of appropriate definitions, intra-European trade harmonization, and of sufficient scientific knowledge hampers a satisfactory evaluation of many UFSs, for example, reptile meat or terrestrial insects. In these cases, official inspection would only be very basic. PMID:23768143

  12. Venous thromboembolism at uncommon sites in neonates and children.

    PubMed

    Pergantou, Helen; Avgeri, Maria; Komitopoulou, Anna; Xafaki, Panagiota; Kapsimali, Zoey; Mazarakis, Michail; Adamtziki, Eftychia; Platokouki, Helen

    2014-11-01

    We retrospectively analyzed the data of 24 children (whereof 11 neonates), with non-central venous line-related and nonmalignancy-related venous thromboembolism (VTE) at uncommon sites, referred to our Unit from January 1999 to January 2012. Thirty patients who also suffered deep vein thrombosis, but in upper/low extremities, were not included in the analysis. The location of rare site VTE was: portal (n=7), mesenteric (n=2) and left facial vein (n=1), spleen (n=3), lung (n=3), whereas 10 neonates developed renal venous thrombosis. The majority of patients (91.7%) had at least 1 risk factor for thrombosis. Identified thrombophilic factors were: antiphospholipid antibodies (n=2), FV Leiden heterozygosity (n=6), MTHFR C677T homozygosity (n=4), protein S deficiency (n=2), whereas all neonates had age-related low levels of protein C and protein S. All but 6 patients received low-molecular-weight heparin, followed by warfarin in 55% of cases, for 3 to 6 months. Prolonged anticoagulation was applied in selected cases. During a median follow-up period of 6 years, the clinical outcome was: full recovery in 15 patients, evolution to both chronic portal hypertension and esophageal varices in 2 children, and progression to renal failure in 7 of 10 neonates. Neonates are greatly vulnerable to complications after VTE at uncommon sites, particularly renal. Future multicentre long-term studies on neonatal and pediatric VTE at unusual sites are considered worthwhile. PMID:24517966

  13. Giant Cutaneous Horn Overlying A Verruca at an Uncommon Site: Medical Marvel vs Superstitious Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Sanjeeva, Karthik Kathladka; Ali, Puttur Sainuddin Mohammed Ameer; Rao, Srikar; Rai, Arvind Shivram

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous horn has been a matter of discussion to mankind since time immemorial and a subject of fascination for the layman. There have been instances where certain groups saw it with angst and disgust, with a person having a large cutaneous horn on an exposed area getting a dismal look. We present a case of a 64-year-old man with a giant cutaneous horn over his left gluteal region. Cutaneous horns more commonly present in the sun-exposed areas. In our case it has presented in an uncommon site. The patient had delayed and denied medical treatment due to his superstitious beliefs, after having sought advice from faith healers leading to progression of the disease. This case has been presented for its giant size (rare variety), its location being over the gluteal region (photo-protected site) and its benign histopathology suggestive of wart in spite of the giant size. PMID:26023596

  14. Giant Cutaneous Horn Overlying A Verruca at an Uncommon Site: Medical Marvel vs Superstitious Dilemma.

    PubMed

    Sanjeeva, Karthik Kathladka; Ali, Puttur Sainuddin Mohammed Ameer; Pinto, Malcolm; Rao, Srikar; Rai, Arvind Shivram

    2015-04-01

    Cutaneous horn has been a matter of discussion to mankind since time immemorial and a subject of fascination for the layman. There have been instances where certain groups saw it with angst and disgust, with a person having a large cutaneous horn on an exposed area getting a dismal look. We present a case of a 64-year-old man with a giant cutaneous horn over his left gluteal region. Cutaneous horns more commonly present in the sun-exposed areas. In our case it has presented in an uncommon site. The patient had delayed and denied medical treatment due to his superstitious beliefs, after having sought advice from faith healers leading to progression of the disease. This case has been presented for its giant size (rare variety), its location being over the gluteal region (photo-protected site) and its benign histopathology suggestive of wart in spite of the giant size. PMID:26023596

  15. Concurrent Occurrence of Uterovaginal and Rectal Prolapse: An Uncommon Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Umeh, UA; Ugwu, EO; Obi, SN; Nnagbo, JE

    2015-01-01

    Concomitant uterovaginal and rectal prolapse is an uncommon occurrence. Where laparoscopic equipment and skills are lacking, sacrohysteropexy with synthetic mesh and rectopexy can be accomplished by laparotomy, especially in women who desire to retain their uterus for either biological or psychological reasons. A 40-year-old primipara with a history of concomitant mass protruding from both her vagina and anus following a spontaneous unsupervised delivery at home. Following pelvic examination, a diagnosis of uterovaginal and rectal prolapse was made. In view of her parity and desire to retain her reproductive function, she was offered abdominal sacrohysteropexy with synthetic mesh and rectopexy with satisfactory postoperative recovery. In resource-limited settings with concomitant uterine and rectal prolapse, open abdominal sacrohysteropexy with synthetic mesh and rectopexy is an effective and safe alternative to Manchester operation in the absence of laparoscopic equipment and skills. PMID:26500795

  16. Recognizing Uncommon Presentations of Psychogenic (Functional) Movement Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Baizabal-Carvallo, José Fidel; Fekete, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Background Psychogenic or functional movement disorders (PMDs) pose a challenge in clinical diagnosis. There are several clues, including sudden onset, incongruous symptoms, distractibility, suggestibility, entrainment of symptoms, and lack of response to otherwise effective pharmacological therapies, that help identify the most common psychogenic movements such as tremor, dystonia, and myoclonus. Methods In this manuscript, we review the frequency, distinct clinical features, functional imaging, and neurophysiological tests that can help in the diagnosis of uncommon presentations of PMDs, such as psychogenic parkinsonism, tics, and chorea; facial, palatal, and ocular movements are also reviewed. In addition, we discuss PMDs at the extremes of age and mass psychogenic illness. Results Psychogenic parkinsonism (PP) is observed in less than 10% of the case series about PMDs, with a female–male ratio of roughly 1:1. Lack of amplitude decrement in repetitive movements and of cogwheel rigidity help to differentiate PP from true parkinsonism. Dopamine transporter imaging with photon emission tomography can also help in the diagnostic process. Psychogenic movements resembling tics are reported in about 5% of PMD patients. Lack of transient suppressibility of abnormal movements helps to differentiate them from organic tics. Psychogenic facial movements can present with hemifacial spasm, blepharospasm, and other movements. Some patients with essential palatal tremor have been shown to be psychogenic. Convergence ocular spasm has demonstrated a high specificity for psychogenic movements. PMDs can also present in the context of mass psychogenic illness or at the extremes of age. Discussion Clinical features and ancillary studies are helpful in the diagnosis of patients with uncommon presentations of psychogenic movement disorders. PMID:25667816

  17. Delayed osseous metastasis from low-grade endometrial stromal sarcoma: Uncommon occurrence deserving recognition.

    PubMed

    Chow, Louis Tsun Cheung

    2015-10-01

    Despite excellent prognosis, low-grade endometrial stromal sarcoma (ESS) is notorious for late recurrence even in stage I disease. Bone metastases are distinctly rare and only six cases have so far been reported. Two patients presented with back pain due to spinal metastatic low-grade ESS after 15 and 9?years free of disease after resection of the stage 1 primary uterine tumor. Plain radiograph showed an ivory first lumbar vertebra in the first patient and an osteolytic lesion involving the second thoracic vertebra in the second. In both cases, magnetic resonance imaging showed vertebral tumor with intra-spinal extension and spinal cord compression; biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of metastatic low-grade ESS. The first patient received palliative radiotherapy and chemotherapy while the second underwent surgical decompression followed by adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The neurologic symptoms in both patients returned 12?months afterwards and progressed relentlessly despite adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The first patient developed multiple bone and lung metastasis, culminating in death 44?months after recurrence. While surviving at 24?months from recurrent disease, the second became paraplegic with double incontinence and was wheelchair bound. Delayed osseous metastatic low-grade ESS, although uncommon, deserves recognition given the predilection for spine as the site of involvement. In such a location, where complete surgical removal is notoriously difficult, if not impossible, the prognosis of spinal metastatic low-grade ESS appears grave with considerable morbidity and mortality. PMID:26171849

  18. Ewing’s Sarcoma: An Uncommon Breast Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Meddeb, Sawsen; Rhim, Mohamed Salah; Kouira, Mouna; Mestiri, Sarra; Bibi, Mohamed; Yacoubi, Mohamed Tahar

    2014-01-01

    Ewing’s sarcoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumors (EWS/PNET) are rare malignant and aggressive tumors, usually seen in the trunk and lower limbs of children and young adults. They are uncommon in the breast. We report a case of a 43-year-old woman who developed a painless breast mass. An initial core needle biopsy concluded to a fibrocystic dystrophy contrasting with a rapidly growing mass; thus a large lumpectomy was done. Diagnosis of primary PNET of the breast was established, based on both histopathological examination and immunohistochemical findings. Surgical margins were positive, therefore, left modified radical mastectomy with axillary lymph nodes dissection was performed. The patient was given 6 cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy containing cyclophosphamide, adriamycin and vincristine. Twenty months later, she is in life without recurrence or metastasis. EWS/PNET may impose a diagnostic challenge. Indeed, mammography and ultrasonography features are non specific. The histopathological pattern is variable depending on the degree of neuroectodermal differentiation. Immuno-phenotyping is necessary and genetic study is the only confirmatory tool of diagnosis showing a characteristic cytogenetic anomaly; t (11; 22) translocation. PMID:25332765

  19. Dermopathy of Graves’ disease: Clinico-pathological correlation

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Sagili Vijaya Bhaskar; Gupta, Sushil Kumar; Jain, Manoj

    2012-01-01

    Dermopathy of Graves’ disease is a classical, but uncommon extrathyroidal manifestation of Graves’ disease. The images of a typical case of dermopathy of Graves’ disease are presented along with clinico-pathological correlation. PMID:22629522

  20. An uncommon case of Marine-Lenhart syndrome.

    PubMed

    Giuffrida, Giuseppe; Giovinazzo, Salvatore; Certo, Rosaria; Vicchio, Teresa Manuela; Baldari, Sergio; Campennì, Alfredo; Ruggeri, Rosaria Maddalena

    2014-06-01

    The term Marine-Lenhart syndrome describes the association between Graves' disease and autonomously functioning thyroid nodules (AFTN), such as toxic adenoma or toxic multinodular goiter. The two diseases may coexist or may be present at different moments in the same patient. In the literature, there are many reports on the development of Graves' disease after radioiodine treatment for AFTN, but very little information may be found on the occurrence of AFTN after radioiodine therapy for Graves' disease. We describe here the case of a female patient with Graves' disease who was successfully treated with radioiodine for Graves' disease, returning to normal thyroid function. Three years later, biochemical analysis and ultrasound examination identified a thyroid nodule that progressively increased in size. The 99mTc-pertechnetate scintigraphy showed avid uptake in the right lobule, which corresponded to a nodular lesion consistent with AFTN. PMID:24936736

  1. Acromegaly presenting as hirsuitism: Uncommon sinister aetiology of a common clinical sign

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Rajesh; Dutta, Deep; Shivaprasad, KS; Maisnam, Indira; Ghosh, Sujoy; Mukhopadhyay, Satinath; Chowdhury, Subhankar

    2012-01-01

    Hirsuitism though not uncommon (24%), is not considered to be a prominent feature of acromegaly because of its lack of specificity and occurrence. Hirsuitism is very common in women of reproductive age (5-7%) and has been classically associated with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). Twenty-eight year lady with 3 year duration of hirsuitism (Modified Ferriman Gallwey score-24/36), features of insulin resistance (acanthosis), subtle features of acromegaloidism (woody nose and bulbous lips) was diagnosed to have acromegaly in view of elevated IGF-1 (1344 ng/ml; normal: 116-358 ng/ml), basal (45.1 ng/ml) and post glucose growth hormone (39.94 ng/ml) and MRI brain showing pituitary macroadenoma. Very high serum androstenedione (>10 ng/ml; normal 0.5-3.5 ng/ml), elevated testosterone (0.91 ng/ml, normal <0.8) and normal dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS) (284 mcg/dl, normal 35-430 mcg/dl) along with polycystic ovaries on ultrasonography lead to diagnosis of associated PCOS. She was also diagnosed to have diabetes. This case presentation intends to highlight that hirsuitism may rarely be the only prominent feature of acromegaly. A lookout for subtle features of acromegaly in all patients with hirsuitism and going for biochemical evaluation (even at the risk of investigating many patients of insulin resistance and acromegloidism) may help us pick up more patients of acromegaly at an earlier stage thus help in reducing disease morbidity. PMID:23565405

  2. Bartonella spp.: throwing light on uncommon human infections.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Patrick O; Riess, Tanja; O'Rourke, Fiona; Linke, Dirk; Kempf, Volkhard A J

    2011-01-01

    After 2 decades of Bartonella research, knowledge on transmission and pathology of these bacteria is still limited. Bartonella spp. have emerged to be important pathogens in human and veterinary medicine. For humans, B. henselae is considered to represent the most relevant zoonotic Bartonella species and is responsible for cat scratch disease, bacillary angiomatosis, and other disorders. Over the years, many Bartonella species have been isolated from humans, cats, dogs, and other mammals, and infections range from an asymptomatic state (e.g., animal-specific species) to even life-threatening diseases (e.g., Oroya fever). It is obvious that the analysis of pathogenicity mechanisms underlying Bartonella infections is needed to increase our understanding of how these pathogens adapt to their mammalian hosts resulting in acute or chronic diseases. PMID:20833105

  3. Common garden experiments reveal uncommon responses across temperatures, locations, and species of ants

    E-print Network

    Sanders, Nathan J.

    pressures and therefore may be differentially responsive to environmental change. Asystematic responses and spatial variation in responses to warming. Such experiments are useful for deter- mining if geographicallyCommon garden experiments reveal uncommon responses across temperatures, locations, and species

  4. Myxoma of the temporal bone: an uncommon neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Sareen, Deepika; Sethi, Ashwani; Mrig, Sumit; Nigam, Sonu; Agarwal, A K

    2010-03-01

    We report the case of an 11-year-old girl who presented with a soft-tissue mass that filled the left external auditory canal and a discharge that resembled chronic suppurative otitis media. The patient underwent mastoid exploration with complete excision of the mass. Findings on the excision biopsy were consistent with a myxoma of the temporal bone. At follow-up 2 years postoperatively, the patient remained disease-free. To the best of our knowledge, this is only the 12th case of a myxoma of the temporal bone to be reported in the English-language literature. PMID:20229465

  5. Hiccups, eructation, and other uncommon prodromal manifestations of herpes zoster.

    PubMed

    Berlin, Alexander L; Muhn, Channy Y; Billick, Robin C

    2003-12-01

    Although the most frequent presentation of herpes zoster involves sensory neurons, motor and autonomic symptomatology is also known to occur in this disease. An unusual symptom of hiccups is described here. Other infrequent manifestations of this common illness, including the Ramsay Hunt syndrome, herpes zoster ophthalmicus, urinary and fecal retention, sexual dysfunction, and zoster sine herpete, are reviewed. Greater awareness of unusual presentations of herpes zoster is necessary for proper diagnosis and timely management of complications that may otherwise lead to disability and serious long-term sequelae. PMID:14639397

  6. Mini-infarct encephalopathy associated with uncommon microvessel convolute formation presenting with presenile dementia.

    PubMed

    van de Nes, J A P; Zimmer, R; Janzen, R W C; Turowski, B; Hürtle, E; Schlote, W

    2003-01-01

    A female patient started to suffer from transient ischemic attacks when she was 47 years of age, followed by increasing predominantly left-side spastic tetraparesis, generalized seizures and progressive dementia over a period of 11 years. She died when she was 58 years of age. On gross examination the brain showed enlarged ventricles and arteriosclerotic changes of large extracerebral vessels of the circulus arteriosus. Microscopic examination of the atrophic brain showed innumerable incomplete microinfarcts in the white and gray matter throughout all parts of the brain. In the white matter these lesions were characterized by small foci of demyelination and loss of oligodendrocytes while occasionally some scavenger cells were seen. Axons seemed to be unaffected or displayed irregular axonal regeneratory growth. Any inflammatory reaction failed. In the cerebral cortex and subcortical nuclei the lesions showed loss of neurons and decrease in synaptophysin expression. Intracerebral arteries showed fibrosis or fibrohyalinosis of the entire intracerebral small-vessel network. In addition, numerous uncommon clusters of angioma-like telangiectatic vessels were observed. Medium-sized ischemic infarcts were found in the right putamen and adjacent internal capsule region, left-side dorsolateral brain stem and cerebellar hemisphere as well as a left-side pyramidal tract degeneration. Contralateral pseudohypertrophy of the inferior olivary nucleus was seen. The clinical and the neuropathologic observations made in this patient are compatible with small vessel disease characterized by a multicentric special and not yet described type of incomplete mini-infarcts in cerebral cortex and white matter accompanied by some larger ischemic infarcts of the common type in brain stem and cerebellum. PMID:12809352

  7. Streptococcal pharyngitis: an uncommon cause of subdural empyema.

    PubMed

    Walden, Jeffrey Howard; Hess, Bryan; Rigby, Michael

    2015-01-01

    A 7-year-old girl with an unremarkable medical history presented to a local paediatric emergency department with a 7-day history of fever, sore throat and vomiting, and a 1-day history of rash. She was admitted to the hospital, with presumed Kawasaki disease. A few hours after admission, the patient had sudden onset of two witnessed tonic-clonic seizures and subsequent decreased mental status. She was transferred to the paediatric intensive care unit and started on broad-spectrum antibiotics. On hospital day 2, cerebral spinal fluid cultures and blood cultures grew Streptococcus pyogenes, and repeat physical examination was consistent with acute streptococcal pharyngitis. On hospital day 3, the patient developed left-sided hemiparesis and had another witnessed seizure. A CT scan was obtained and revealed a subdural abscess. She was transferred to a tertiary care centre and underwent craniotomy with evacuation of her subdural abscess. Surgical cultures eventually grew S. pyogenes. PMID:26385939

  8. Congenital lobar emphysema and intercostal drainage tube insertion: the common fate of an uncommon disease.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Saurabh; Debata, P K; Gupta, R

    2012-11-01

    Congenital Lobar Emphysema (CLE) is one of the rare cystic malformations of the lung. This malformation is generally confused with pneumothorax of the lung and most often, the placement of an intercostal drainage tube is entertained in an emergency situation, but the non- improvement of the distress and non-expansion of the lung are eye openers for a treating paediatrician. We are describing a case of a 26 days old baby who presented with respiratory distress in the Emergency Department. On the basis of the chest X-ray (CXR), we suspected it to be a case of pneumothorax and an intercostal drainage tube was inserted. But as he did not improve, CT of the chest was done and the baby was diagnosed to have congenital lobar emphysema. In spite of the advanced diagnostic techniques, the diagnosis of CLE may present a diagnostic challenge and a high index of suspicion is needed if the diagnosis has to be made promptly. PMID:23285462

  9. Recurrent anaphylactic reactions: an uncommon debut of lymphocytic hypophysitis.

    PubMed

    Bobolea, Irina; Guillén, Daiana; Barranco, Pilar; Alvarez-Escola, Cristina; Quirce, Santiago

    2012-01-01

    We report on a 24-year-old male, with exercise-induced asthma and intermittent abdominal pain since puberty, who suffered from recurrent anaphylactic reactions. He also complained of occasional headaches. After extensive studies he was eventually diagnosed with idiopathic anaphylaxis, once the following diagnoses had been excluded: allergic origin [foods (including ?5-gliadin), latex and drugs], hydatidosis, carcinoid syndrome, systemic mastocytosis, autonomic epilepsy, hereditary angioedema, pheocromocitoma, Meckel diverticle, medullar thyroid carcinoma, leukemia, hyper-IgE and hypereosinophilic syndromes. Given the frequency and severity of the attacks, we started off-label treatment with omalizumab, initially well tolerated. Some days after the second dose the patient started to develop recurrent urticaria. Because of these new symptoms, blood work was repeated, and elevated TSH, decreased T4, positive antithyroid antibodies and decreased cortisol levels with normal ACTH were found. The antiadrenal autoantibodies were negative. The MRI showed a slight thickening of the infundibulum, without pituitary adenoma. Suspecting an autoimmune hypophysitis, we looked for antipituitary antibodies; the result was positive. A clinical picture of recurrent anaphylactic reactions, the result of complicated adrenal crises in an asthmatic patient, was a manifestation of lymphocytic hypophysitis, a rare chronic inflammatory disease of autoimmune etiology. One year after replacement therapy had been started, the patient remained asymptomatic. PMID:22573101

  10. An uncommon cause of allergic fungal sinusitis: Rhizopus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Devars du Mayne, Marie; Gratacap, Maxime; Malinvaud, David; Grenouillet, Frederic; Bonfils, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    We report what we believe is the first case of allergic fungal rhinosinusitis (AFRS) caused by the fungus Rhizopus oryzae. Our patient was a 32-year-old woman who presented with unilateral nasal polyps and chronic nasal dysfunction. Computed tomography of the sinuses detected left-sided pansinusitis and bone erosion. T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a signal void that suggested the presence of a fungal infection. The patient underwent unilateral ethmoidectomy. Histologic examination of the diseased tissue identified allergic mucin with 70% eosinophils and no fungal hyphae. Mycologic culture detected R oryzae. After a short period of improvement, the patient experienced a recurrence, which was confirmed by radiology. A second surgery was performed, and the same fungal hyphae were found in the mucus and on culture, which led us to suspect AFRS. Since no IgE test for R oryzae was available, we developed a specific immunologic assay that confirmed the presence of specific IgG, which identified a high degree of immunologic reaction against our homemade R oryzae antigens. With a long course of systemic antifungal treatment, the patient's symptoms resolved and no recurrence was noted at 5 years of follow-up. PMID:25606840

  11. Common Presentation with Uncommon Diagnosis: Multifocal Epithelioid Hemangioendothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Kundu, Susmita; Misra, Swapnendu; Biswas, Debabani; Mitra, Ritabrata; Naskar, Bidisha Ghosh

    2015-01-01

    A young female patient presenting with recurrent hemoptysis, neck swelling, and mediastinal mass mimicking lymphadenopathy was admitted to the Institute of Post Graduate Medical Education and Research and SSKM hospital, Kolkata, India. Clinical features, radiological studies, fibre optic bronchoscopy, and fine needle aspiration cytology from the neck swelling created a diagnostic dilemma until surgical resection and immunohistochemistry reports confirmed the diagnosis of multifocal epithelioid hemangioendothelioma, a rare vascular tumor with intermediate malignancy potential. Because it is a slow-progressing disease and due to the non-availability of standard chemotherapy, the patient, and her legal guardian, opted for palliative care only. She was asymptomatic for four years but again presented with hemoptysis, reappearance of the neck swelling on the same side, and a mediastinal mass compressing the superior vena cava and right pulmonary artery. This report describes the diagnostic problems and therapeutic challenges in the management of this rare tumor over a four-year follow-up period. The clinical course emphasizes the highly unpredictable nature of this tumor. PMID:26674363

  12. Hairy cell leukemia: Uncommon clinical features, unusual sites of involvement and some rare associations.

    PubMed

    Tadmor, Tamar; Polliack, Aaron

    2015-12-01

    Unusual clinical manifestations and associations with auto-immunity or other systemic disorders are uncommon clinical features of hairy cell leukemia (HCL). The exact prevalence of these rare associations is difficult to determine as they are mostly published as anecdotal case reports and generally not included in larger published series. This chapter deals with uncommon clinical manifestations and rare sites of involvement in HCL. It also summarizes the association with systemic hemato-oncological disorders as well as second malignancies, based on review of the relevant literature and from personal experience. PMID:26614897

  13. Uncommon breeding birds in North Dakota: Population estimates and frequencies of occurrence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Igl, L.D.; Johnson, D.H.; Kantrud, H.A.

    1999-01-01

    Breeding bird populations were surveyed on 128 randomly selected quarter-sections throughout North Dakota in 1967, 1992, and 1993. Population estimates and frequencies of occurrence are reported for 92 uncommon breeding bird species with statewide frequencies of less than 10%.

  14. Uncommon acute neurologic presentation of canine distemper in 4 adult dogs

    PubMed Central

    Galán, Alba; Gamito, Araceli; Carletti, Beatrice E.; Guisado, Alicia; de las Mulas, Juana Martín; Pérez, José; Martín, Eva M.

    2014-01-01

    Four uncommon cases of canine distemper (CD) were diagnosed in vaccinated adult dogs. All dogs had acute onset of neurologic signs, including seizures, abnormal mentation, ataxia, and proprioceptive deficits. Polymerase chain reaction for CD virus was positive on cerebrospinal fluid in 2 cases. Due to rapid deterioration the dogs were euthanized and CD was confirmed by postmortem examination. PMID:24688139

  15. Languages of South Asia. A Survey of Materials for the Study of the Uncommonly Taught Languages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Dora E.; And Others

    This is an annotated bibliography of basic tools of access for the study of the uncommonly taught languages of South Asia. It is one of eight fascicles which constitute a revision of "A Provisional Survey of Materials for the Study of the Neglected Languages" (CAL 1969). The emphasis is on materials for the adult learner whose native language is…

  16. Lymph node tuberculosis after allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation: an atypical presentation of an uncommon complication

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Sánchez, Guillermo; Drake-Pérez, Marta; Rodriguez, José Luis; Yañez, Lucrecia; Insunza, Andrés; Richard, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections are uncommon complications in the haematopoietic stem cell post-transplant period. Most cases are reactivations of latent infections affecting the lung. We present an atypical case of isolated lymph node tuberculosis after an allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation, which highlights the importance of having a high suspicion index, even in non-endemic countries. PMID:26015804

  17. Insulin Injection Site Dystrophic Calcification with Fat Necrosis: A Case Report of an Uncommon Adverse Effect

    PubMed Central

    Ramdas, Sharad; Ramdas, Anita; Ambroise, Moses

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of an uncommon adverse effect of insulin injection resulting in hard subcutaneous swelling in the lower abdomen of a 47-year-oldfemale with type 1 diabetes. Extensive dystrophic calcification and fat necrosis was revealed on histopathological examination. PMID:25374868

  18. “Unsteady Gait”: An Uncommon Presentation and Course of Malignant Melanoma in Terminal Ileum—A Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Alkimawi, Khalid A.

    2013-01-01

    Malignant melanoma within the gastrointestinal tract is an uncommon neoplasm that is usually metastatic in origin, with primary melanomas being relatively uncommon. Embryologically melanocytes normally exist in the esophagus, stomach, small bowel, and anorectum and this theory supports the primary melanoma of the gastrointestinal tract that has been confirmed for lesions occurring through several published reports. However, most patients with brain metastases from malignant melanoma are diagnosed after treatment for known extracranial metastases and have poor outcomes. Our case is unique in that we discuss an unusual case of 69-year-old female patient presented with unsteady gait as the first symptom of disease and where the presumed primary lesion later was found in the terminal ileum on colonoscopy. Treatment consisted of surgical removal of the terminal ileal lesion with chemotherapy, whole-brain radiotherapy, and cyberknife radiosurgical procedure. Patient was in remission for more than 14 months and later succumbed to disease. Despite the advances in therapeutic options, prognosis for patients with melanoma brain metastases remains poor with a median survival time of six months after diagnosis. PMID:24369513

  19. A rare case of unrecognized and uncommon bladder perforation after transobturator tape procedure.

    PubMed

    K?l?nç, Ercüment; Akpak, Ya?am Kemal

    2015-01-01

    The transobturator tape (TOT) procedure has become practically widespread worldwide. Complications seem to be rare, but recognizing them intraoperatively is the most significant step because some of the complications which may appear in postoperative period can be challenging for both physicians and patients. The purpose of this case, with this patient who was operated on with open surgery, is to evaluate this rarely seen unrecognized and uncommon bladder perforation after TOT procedure and thus make some contribution to the literature. Here, we present a case report about the treatment of a 48-year-old woman patient with unrecognized and uncommon bladder perforation after TOT procedure, 5 months postoperatively. Cystoscopic evaluation is not recommended routinely, but it must be performed if the patient is complicated enough to create doubt and also the surgeon's skill and ability are not sufficient enough to operate decently. PMID:25685154

  20. Distribution Patterns of Ohio Stoneflies, with an Emphasis on Rare and Uncommon Species

    PubMed Central

    Grubbs, Scott A.; Pessimo, Massimo; DeWalt, R. Edward

    2013-01-01

    Presently, 102 stonefly species (Plecoptera) have been reported from Ohio. All 9 Nearctic families are represented. Over 90% of the fauna exhibit a combination of broad Nearctic-widespread, eastern Nearctic-widespread, Appalachian, and eastern Nearctic-unglaciated distributions. In contrast, only 2 species display a central Nearctic-Prairie distribution. Seven species of Perlidae are likely no longer present (Acroneuria evoluta Klapálek, A. perplexa Frison, Attaneuria ruralis (Hagen), and Neoperla mainensis Banks) or have experienced marked range reductions (Acroneuria abnormis (Newman), A. frisoni Stark and Brown, and A. filicis Frison). Another nearly 31% of the fauna (32 species) are rare, uncommon, or have highly-limited distributions within the state. Twelve of these species have Appalachian distributions, and an additional 8 have eastern Nearctic-unglaciated distributions. The distributional status for each of the 32 rare/uncommon species is discussed. PMID:24219390

  1. Uncommon fusion of teeth and lateral periodontal cyst in a Chinese girl: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuan; Xia, Xue; Wang, Wenjun; Qin, Man

    2011-10-01

    Fusion is a developmental anomaly of dental hard tissues. Most cases occur in the anterior region of both the primary and permanent dentitions. Occasionally, fusion of permanent and supernumerary teeth may occur in the maxillary anterior region; however, a supernumerary tooth fused with a premolar is a rare case. Developmental lateral periodontal cyst is also an uncommon developmental odontogenic cyst with no clinical symptoms, and the lesion is often discovered on routine radiographic examination. In the present case, we report the uncommon fusion of teeth and lateral periodontal cyst in a Chinese girl. Using cone beam computed tomography we are able to acquire a better understanding of the complicated root canal morphology of the fused tooth and successfully manage the lateral periodontal cyst. PMID:21621436

  2. Common and uncommon adult unilateral renal masses other than renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Le, Ott; Roy, Anjali; Silverman, Paul M.; Kundra, Vikas

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Many different masses can involve the kidney other than the commonly encountered renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The purpose of this article is to review the characteristic clinical and imaging findings of common and uncommon masses that predominantly present unilaterally in the adult patient, other than RCC. Awareness of such lesions and knowing the clinical scenario is important for appropriate diagnosis and management, especially in a multidisciplinary care setting. PMID:22752221

  3. Temozolomide-related idiosyncratic and other uncommon toxicities: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Sanjay; Baker, Louise; Walmsley, Vicki; Hingorani, Mohan

    2012-11-01

    Temozolomide (TMZ)-related idiosyncratic and other uncommon toxicities have been reported. To better characterize these toxicities and to identify any associated risk factors, we performed a systematic review. We searched the PubMed database, limited to the English language, published between 1999 and December 2011. We selected only those articles in which TMZ was temporally related and was the sole or main contributing chemotherapeutic drug to idiosyncratic drug reactions (IDRs) and other uncommon toxicities. Hematological IDRs are biopsy-proven aplastic anemia or grade V toxicity or grade IV toxicity with slow and incomplete hematological recovery. Seventy-three cases were identified, including 21 hematological IDRs, 31 nonhematological IDRs and uncommon infections, and 21 second primary cancers. With a caveat of publication and reporting bias, the following observations could be made. The hematological IDRs predominantly occurred in female patients (exact binomial two-tailed, P=0.0041) and most patients were receiving TMZ concomitantly with radiotherapy for glioma. The median duration of exposure to TMZ was 30 days and the median cumulative TMZ exposure was 2250 mg/m (range, 500-6900 mg/m). The sex predilection was not evident in nonhematological IDRs and other uncommon toxicities. TMZ-induced pneumonitis and cholestatic hepatitis are emerging as a nonhematological hypersensitive reaction and IDR, respectively. For TMZ-related myelodysplasia or leukemia, the cumulative dose of TMZ ranged from 1400 to 30 000 mg/m. The cumulative dose of TMZ was lower and latency was shorter with a previous exposure to other leukemogenic drugs, suggesting that TMZ may have augmented the leukemogenic potential of other drugs. Early appearance of profound myelosuppression during the course of TMZ and concurrent radiotherapy could be a hematological IDR, which warrants prompt investigations to exclude aplastic anemia. Myelodysplasia or leukemia developed after a median TMZ exposure of 15 g/m. PMID:22850321

  4. Meta-analysis of Dense Genecentric Association Studies Reveals Common and Uncommon Variants Associated with Height

    PubMed Central

    Lanktree, Matthew B.; Guo, Yiran; Murtaza, Muhammed; Glessner, Joseph T.; Bailey, Swneke D.; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; Lettre, Guillaume; Ongen, Halit; Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan; Johnson, Toby; Shen, Haiqing; Nelson, Christopher P.; Klopp, Norman; Baumert, Jens; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Pankratz, Nathan; Pankow, James S.; Shah, Sonia; Taylor, Kira; Barnard, John; Peters, Bas J.; M. Maloney, Cliona; Lobmeyer, Maximilian T.; Stanton, Alice; Zafarmand, M. Hadi; Romaine, Simon P.R.; Mehta, Amar; van Iperen, Erik P.A.; Gong, Yan; Price, Tom S.; Smith, Erin N.; Kim, Cecilia E.; Li, Yun R.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Atwood, Larry D.; Bailey, Kristian M.; Bhatt, Deepak; Bauer, Florianne; Behr, Elijah R.; Bhangale, Tushar; Boer, Jolanda M.A.; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Bradfield, Jonathan P.; Brown, Morris; Braund, Peter S.; Burton, Paul R.; Carty, Cara; Chandrupatla, Hareesh R.; Chen, Wei; Connell, John; Dalgeorgou, Chrysoula; Boer, Anthonius de; Drenos, Fotios; Elbers, Clara C.; Fang, James C.; Fox, Caroline S.; Frackelton, Edward C.; Fuchs, Barry; Furlong, Clement E.; Gibson, Quince; Gieger, Christian; Goel, Anuj; Grobbee, Diederik E.; Hastie, Claire; Howard, Philip J.; Huang, Guan-Hua; Johnson, W. Craig; Li, Qing; Kleber, Marcus E.; Klein, Barbara E.K.; Klein, Ronald; Kooperberg, Charles; Ky, Bonnie; LaCroix, Andrea; Lanken, Paul; Lathrop, Mark; Li, Mingyao; Marshall, Vanessa; Melander, Olle; Mentch, Frank D.; J. Meyer, Nuala; Monda, Keri L.; Montpetit, Alexandre; Murugesan, Gurunathan; Nakayama, Karen; Nondahl, Dave; Onipinla, Abiodun; Rafelt, Suzanne; Newhouse, Stephen J.; Otieno, F. George; Patel, Sanjey R.; Putt, Mary E.; Rodriguez, Santiago; Safa, Radwan N.; Sawyer, Douglas B.; Schreiner, Pamela J.; Simpson, Claire; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Srinivasan, Sathanur R.; Suver, Christine; Swergold, Gary; Sweitzer, Nancy K.; Thomas, Kelly A.; Thorand, Barbara; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Tischfield, Sam; Tobin, Martin; Tomaszweski, Maciej; Verschuren, W.M. Monique; Wallace, Chris; Winkelmann, Bernhard; Zhang, Haitao; Zheng, Dongling; Zhang, Li; Zmuda, Joseph M.; Clarke, Robert; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Danesh, John; Day, Ian N.; Schork, Nicholas J.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Delles, Christian; Duggan, David; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Hofker, Marten H.; Humphries, Steve E.; Kivimaki, Mika; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Kottke-Marchant, Kandice; Mega, Jessica L.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Morrow, David A.; Palmen, Jutta; Redline, Susan; Shields, Denis C.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Sleiman, Patrick M.; Smith, George Davey; Farrall, Martin; Jamshidi, Yalda; Christiani, David C.; Casas, Juan P.; Hall, Alistair S.; Doevendans, Pieter A.; D. Christie, Jason; Berenson, Gerald S.; Murray, Sarah S.; Illig, Thomas; Dorn, Gerald W.; Cappola, Thomas P.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Sever, Peter; Rader, Daniel J.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Caulfield, Mark; Talmud, Philippa J.; Topol, Eric; Engert, James C.; Wang, Kai; Dominiczak, Anna; Hamsten, Anders; Curtis, Sean P.; Silverstein, Roy L.; Lange, Leslie A.; Sabatine, Marc S.; Trip, Mieke; Saleheen, Danish; Peden, John F.; Cruickshanks, Karen J.; März, Winfried; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Klungel, Olaf H.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke Hilse; Schadt, Eric E.; Johnson, Julie A.; Jarvik, Gail P.; Papanicolaou, George J.; Grant, Struan F.A.; Munroe, Patricia B.; North, Kari E.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Koenig, Wolfgang; Gaunt, Tom R.; Anand, Sonia S.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Soranzo, Nicole; FitzGerald, Garret A.; Reiner, Alex; Hegele, Robert A.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Keating, Brendan J.

    2011-01-01

    Height is a classic complex trait with common variants in a growing list of genes known to contribute to the phenotype. Using a genecentric genotyping array targeted toward cardiovascular-related loci, comprising 49,320 SNPs across approximately 2000 loci, we evaluated the association of common and uncommon SNPs with adult height in 114,223 individuals from 47 studies and six ethnicities. A total of 64 loci contained a SNP associated with height at array-wide significance (p < 2.4 × 10?6), with 42 loci surpassing the conventional genome-wide significance threshold (p < 5 × 10?8). Common variants with minor allele frequencies greater than 5% were observed to be associated with height in 37 previously reported loci. In individuals of European ancestry, uncommon SNPs in IL11 and SMAD3, which would not be genotyped with the use of standard genome-wide genotyping arrays, were strongly associated with height (p < 3 × 10?11). Conditional analysis within associated regions revealed five additional variants associated with height independent of lead SNPs within the locus, suggesting allelic heterogeneity. Although underpowered to replicate findings from individuals of European ancestry, the direction of effect of associated variants was largely consistent in African American, South Asian, and Hispanic populations. Overall, we show that dense coverage of genes for uncommon SNPs, coupled with large-scale meta-analysis, can successfully identify additional variants associated with a common complex trait. PMID:21194676

  5. Uncommon complications of therapeutic endoscopic ultrasonography: What, why, and how to prevent

    PubMed Central

    Chantarojanasiri, Tanyaporn; Aswakul, Pitulak; Prachayakul, Varayu

    2015-01-01

    There is an increasing role for endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided interventions in the treatment of many conditions. Although it has been shown that these types of interventions are effective and safe, they continue to be considered only as alternative treatments in some situations. This is in part due to the occurrence of complications with these techniques, which can occur even when performed by experienced endosonographers. Although common complications have been described for many procedures, it is also crucial to be aware of uncommon complications. This review describes rare complications that have been reported with several EUS-guided interventions. EUS-guided biliary drainage is accepted as an alternative treatment for malignant biliary obstruction. Most of the uncommon complications related to this procedure involve stent malfunction, such as the migration or malposition of stents. Rare complications of EUS-guided pancreatic pseudocyst drainage can result from air embolism and infection. Finally, a range of uncommon complications has been reported for EUS-guided celiac plexus neurolysis, involving neural and vascular injuries that can be fatal. The goal of this review is to identify possible complications and promote an understanding of how they occur in order to increase general awareness of these adverse events with the hope that they can be avoided in the future. PMID:26265989

  6. Uncommon Implantation Sites of Ectopic Pregnancy: Thinking beyond the Complex Adnexal Mass.

    PubMed

    Chukus, Anjeza; Tirada, Nikki; Restrepo, Ricardo; Reddy, Neelima I

    2015-01-01

    Ectopic pregnancy occurs when implantation of the blastocyst takes place in a site other than the endometrium of the uterine cavity. Uncommon implantation sites of ectopic pregnancy include the cervix, interstitial segment of the fallopian tube, scar from a prior cesarean delivery, uterine myometrium, ovary, and peritoneal cavity. Heterotopic and twin ectopic pregnancies are other rare manifestations. Ultrasonography (US) plays a central role in diagnosis of uncommon ectopic pregnancies. US features of an interstitial ectopic pregnancy include an echogenic interstitial line and abnormal bulging of the myometrial contour. A gestational sac that is located below the internal os of the cervix and that contains an embryo with a fetal heartbeat is indicative of a cervical ectopic pregnancy. In a cesarean scar ectopic pregnancy, the gestational sac is implanted in the anterior lower uterine segment at the site of the cesarean scar, with thinning of the myometrium seen anterior to the gestational sac. An intramural gestational sac implants in the uterine myometrium, separate from the uterine cavity and fallopian tubes. In an ovarian ectopic pregnancy, a gestational sac with a thick hyperechoic circumferential rim is located in or on the ovarian parenchyma. An intraperitoneal gestational sac is present in an abdominal ectopic pregnancy. Intra- and extrauterine gestational sacs are seen in a heterotopic pregnancy. Two adnexal heartbeats suggest a live twin ectopic pregnancy. Recognition of the specific US features will help radiologists diagnose these uncommon types of ectopic pregnancy. PMID:25860721

  7. A severe foodborne outbreak of diarrhoea linked to a canteen in Italy caused by enteroinvasive Escherichia coli, an uncommon agent.

    PubMed

    Escher, M; Scavia, G; Morabito, S; Tozzoli, R; Maugliani, A; Cantoni, S; Fracchia, S; Bettati, A; Casa, R; Gesu, G P; Torresani, E; Caprioli, A

    2014-12-01

    We describe a foodborne outbreak in Italy caused by enteroinvasive Escherichia coli (EIEC), an enteric pathogen uncommon in industrialized countries. On 14 April 2012 a number of employees of the city of Milan Fire Brigade (FB) were admitted to hospital with severe diarrhoea after attending their canteen. Thirty-two patients were hospitalized and a total of 109 cases were identified. A case-control study conducted on 83 cases and 32 controls attending the canteen without having symptoms identified cooked vegetables to be significantly associated with the disease. Stool samples collected from 62 subjects were screened for enteric pathogens using PCR-based commercial kits: 17 cases and two asymptomatic kitchen-workers were positive for the Shigella marker gene ipaH; an ipaH-positive EIEC strain O96:H19 was isolated from six cases. EIEC may cause serious dysentery-like outbreaks even in Western European countries. Microbiologists should be aware of microbiological procedures to detect EIEC, to be applied especially when no common enteric pathogens are identified. PMID:24534429

  8. Case series of choroid plexus papilloma in children at uncommon locations and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, G. Lakshmi; Mahapatra, Ashok Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Choroid plexus papillomas (CPPs) comprise around 1% of intracranial neoplasms. The most common location is atrium of the lateral ventricle in children and fourth ventricle in adults. Other rare locations include third ventricle, cerebellopontine (CP) angle and cerebral parenchyma, with only a few cases reported. Authors report three cases of CPP at uncommon locations in pediatric patients. The rarity of these locations, diagnostic dilemma and management aspects are discussed along with an extensive review of the literature. Methods: Retrospective institutional data analysis of histopathologically confirmed pediatric CPPs from 2010 to 2014. Results: Authors noted three cases of CPP in children in uncommon locations-one each in the posterior third ventricle, fourth ventricle, and CP angle. All were males in the first decade. Two cases presented with features of obstructive hydrocephalus while the latter presented with compressive effects. Complete excision was achieved in two cases while subtotal removal was performed in one case (fourth ventricular) because of excess blood loss. Mean follow-up duration was 24.6 months (range 20–30 months). One case (of subtotal removal) had fair recovery while other two had excellent outcomes. Conclusions: Posterior third ventricle, fourth ventricle, and CP angle are uncommon locations for these tumors in children. Complete surgical removal is the treatment of choice and approach needs to be tailored according to the site and size of the lesion. Blood loss is a major concern in young children as they are highly vascular tumors. Complete removal leads to excellent long-term survival rates. Adjuvant treatment is not required. PMID:26500797

  9. Adenofibroma in a Young Patient: A Rare Entity in an Uncommon Age

    PubMed Central

    Maciel, R.; Carvalho, S.; Teixeira, M.; Areias, M. J.

    2013-01-01

    Adenofibroma is an extremely uncommon benign tumor composed of glandular and fibrous tissues. It occurs more often in the endometrium but it can also occur in the cervix and extrauterine sites. We report a case of a 32-year-old asymptomatic woman with cervical adenofibroma, first detected in a routine endovaginal ultrasound, as a cervical mass containing multiple cystic components. Histopathologic findings diagnosed its nature. As adenofibromas are very rare, we present this case with a brief review of the literature. PMID:24459594

  10. An uncommon cause of progressive visual loss in a heavy smoker

    PubMed Central

    Koufakis, Dimitris; Konstantopoulos, Dimitrios; Koufakis, Theocharis

    2015-01-01

    Loss of vision due to eye metastasis is generally uncommon, representing an ophthalmological diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. We here report a case of a smoker patient finally diagnosed with lung cancer, whose initial symptom was visual loss due to choroidal metastasis. Given that the majority of subjects presenting with uveal metastasis have already developed other distant metastases as well, a complete diagnostic work-up of these patients is always required. Despite being rare, eye metastasis from a lung malignancy should always be suspected in smokers presenting with progressive vision deterioration.

  11. Pneumonia by Listeria monocytogenes: A Common Infection by an Uncommon Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Koufakis, Theocharis; Chatzopoulou, Marianneta; Margaritis, Anastasios; Tsiakalou, Maria; Gabranis, Ioannis

    2015-01-01

    Infections by Listeria monocytogenes typically occur in infants, the elderly, pregnant women, and immunosuppressed subjects. Pulmonary infections in adults are extremely uncommon and only few reports can be found in the literature. We here report a case of Listeria pneumonia in an 85-year-old female patient and we discuss our diagnostic and therapeutic approach. Despite being rare and in most cases difficult to be identified, Listeria pneumonia should always be considered in immunosuppressed patients, presenting with fever and symptoms from the lower respiratory system. PMID:25802774

  12. Unruptured Sinus of Valsalva Aneurysm Obstructing the Left Ventricular Outflow Tract: An Uncommon Presentation in Childhood.

    PubMed

    Murli, Lakshmi; Shah, Prashant; Sekar, Prem; Surya, Karthik

    2016-01-01

    Congenital aneurysms of the sinus of Valsalva are uncommon abnormalities that are usually silent and slowly progressive without symptoms of cardiac dysfunction unless catastrophic rupture occurs. However, in rare cases, unruptured aneurysms can produce symptoms resulting from compression of adjacent structures, ventricular outflow tract obstruction, heart block, and coronary and valvular insufficiency. We report a case of a single unruptured sinus of Valsalva aneurysm producing left ventricular outflow tract obstruction in an 8-year-old boy who presented with chest pain on exertion. PMID:26694306

  13. An uncommon case of severe accidental hypothermia in an urban setting

    PubMed Central

    Meytes, Vadim; Schulberg, Steven P.; Amaturo, Michael; Kilaru, Mohan

    2015-01-01

    Accidental hypothermia is an uncommon presentation in urban settings. Here we present a patient admitted with a core temperature of 26.6°C (80°F) and a serum potassium of 8.5 mmol/l who subsequently went into cardiac arrest. After > 90 min of active cardiopulmonary resuscitation and peak serum potassium of >12 mmol/l, the patient had a spontaneous return of circulation. The patient's hospital course was complicated by compartment syndrome of his forearm; however, he was discharged home without any lasting neurological damage. PMID:26664726

  14. Rivaroxaban-Induced Nontraumatic Spinal Subdural Hematoma: An Uncommon Yet Life-Threatening Complication

    PubMed Central

    Zaarour, Mazen; Hassan, Samer; Thumallapally, Nishitha; Dai, Qun

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, the desire for safer oral anticoagulants (OACs) led to the emergence of newer drugs. Available clinical trials demonstrated a lower risk of OACs-associated life-threatening bleeding events, including intracranial hemorrhage, compared to warfarin. Nontraumatic spinal hematoma is an uncommon yet life-threatening neurosurgical emergency that can be associated with the use of these agents. Rivaroxaban, one of the newly approved OACs, is a direct factor Xa inhibitor. To the best of our knowledge, to date, only two published cases report the incidence of rivaroxaban-induced nontraumatic spinal subdural hematoma (SSDH). Our case is the third one described and the first one to involve the cervicothoracic spine. PMID:26543654

  15. Apomictic parthenogenesis in a parasitoid wasp Meteorus pulchricornis, uncommon in the haplodiploid order Hymenoptera.

    PubMed

    Tsutsui, Y; Maeto, K; Hamaguchi, K; Isaki, Y; Takami, Y; Naito, T; Miura, K

    2014-06-01

    Although apomixis is the most common form of parthenogenesis in diplodiploid arthropods, it is uncommon in the haplodiploid insect order Hymenoptera. We found a new type of spontaneous apomixis in the Hymenoptera, completely lacking meiosis and the expulsion of polar bodies in egg maturation division, on the thelytokous strain of a parasitoid wasp Meteorus pulchricornis (Wesmael) (Braconidae, Euphorinae) on pest lepidopteran larvae Spodoptera litura (Fabricius) (Noctuidae). The absence of the meiotic process was consistent with a non-segregation pattern in the offspring of heterozygous females, and no positive evidence was obtained for the induction of thelytoky by any bacterial symbionts. We discuss the conditions that enable the occurrence of such rare cases of apomictic thelytoky in the Hymenoptera, suggesting the significance of fixed heterosis caused by hybridization or polyploidization, symbiosis with bacterial agents, and occasional sex. Our finding will encourage further genetic studies on parasitoid wasps to use asexual lines more wisely for biological control. PMID:24521569

  16. Languages of Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union. A Survey of Materials for the Study of the Uncommonly Taught Languages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Dora E.; And Others

    This is an annotated bibliography of basic tools of access for the study of the uncommonly taught languages of Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union. It is one of eight fascicles which constitute a revision of "A Provisional Survey of Materials for the Study of the Neglected Languages" (CAL 1969). Although the focus is on materials for the…

  17. Polymer Selection Approach for Commonly and Uncommonly Used Natural Fibers Under Uncertainty Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AL-Oqla, Faris M.; Sapuan, S. M.

    2015-07-01

    Factors like awareness of the scarcity of non-renewable natural resources, high petroleum prices, and demands for environmental sustainability, as well as reducing the amount of environmental pollution, have led to a renewed interest in natural fiber reinforced polymer composites as a potential bio-based material type. The best polymer matrix type in view of the wide range of conflicting criteria to form a polymeric-based composite material suitable for sustainable industry under an uncertainty environment has still not been sufficiently determined. This work introduces a selection model to evaluate the available polymers for natural fibers to enhance the industrial sustainability theme. The model built was developed to evaluate various polymer types and to determine their relative merits taking account of various conflicting criteria for both commonly used and uncommonly used natural fibers utilizing the analytical hierarchy process technique. It was found that the choice of the best polymer type for a certain fiber type depends strongly on the polymers' intrinsic desirable conflicting characteristics. Polymers evaluations are illustrated for different technical criteria in order to facilitate the polymer selection process for various industrial applications with high confidence levels.

  18. Tuberculosis of the oral cavity: an uncommon but still a live issue

    PubMed Central

    Szponar, El?bieta

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims at characterizing clinical features, occurrence, diagnostic process and treatment of oral tuberculosis (TB), basing on the available literature. Oral TB manifestations are uncommon and usually secondary to pulmonary changes. They predominantly appear as ulcers. Eruptions are usually single, painful and resistant to conventional treatment. Diagnosis always needs to be confirmed histopathologically. Anti-tubercular systemic therapy is required in every patient diagnosed with oral TB, while topical treatment is only adjuvant. A low incidence of oral TB together with a non-specific clinical picture might pose difficulties in its diagnosis. Oral changes in TB are likely to be overlooked what can result in further spread of Mycobacterium tuberculosis due to a delay in instituting proper treatment. Tuberculosis morbidity has risen recently and more multi-drug resistant strains of TB bacilli are found, what can result in a higher incidence of oral TB. Clinicians should be therefore aware of a possible occurrence of this entity and consider it while making a differential diagnosis of atypical oral changes. PMID:26366156

  19. Situs inversus totalis and abdominal aortic aneurysm: Surgical repair of an extremely uncommon association

    PubMed Central

    Riera Hernández, Claudia; Pérez Ramírez, P.; Esteban Gracia, C.; Jiménez Olivera, M.A.; Llagostera Pujol, S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Situs inversus totalis (SIT) is an uncommon congenital syndrome, which refers to a reversal mirror-image of the normal thoracoabdominal organs position. The coexistence of SIT and abdominal aortic aneurysm has been seldom previously reported. Presentation of the case We report a case of a 69-year-old man with SIT and infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) that underwent open repair with a straight graft through a minilaparatomy without evisceration. Discussion There is no consensus on which should be the optimum approach in cases of open surgical repair of AAA due to the limited number of cases described. The fact of intestinal scrolling to the left abdomen, unlike usual, is due to the anatomical arrangement of the root of the mesentery which is directed obliquely from duodenojejunal on the left side of the vertebra L2 to the ileocecal junction and right sacroiliac joint. Conclusion A minilaparotomy without evisceration and with intestinal scrolling to left hemiabdomen, can be very useful and beneficial on those cases of congenital anatomical abnormalities that may add difficulty during the surgical procedure. PMID:25884612

  20. Uncommon formation of two antiparallel sperm bundles per cyst in tenebrionid beetles (Coleoptera)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Glenda; Yotoko, Karla S. C.; Gomes, Luiz F.; Lino-Neto, José

    2012-09-01

    Several species of Tenebrionidae are stored-grain pests. Since they belong to a specious family, the systematics of these beetles is still in doubt. In insects, spermatogenesis and the spermatozoa exhibit great diversity, and are therefore commonly used in phylogenetic and taxonomic analyses. During the spermatogenetic process in these organisms, the cells originating from a single spermatogonium develop synchronically in groups referred to as cysts. At the end of this process, there is usually only one sperm bundle per cyst, with all the cells in the same orientation. This paper details the spermiogenesis of the tenebrionid beetles Tenebrio molitor, Zophobas confusa, Tribolium castaneum and Palembus dermestoides using whole mount and histological sections of the cysts. In these species, spermatogenesis is similar to that which occurs in most insects. However, during spermiogenesis, the nuclei of the spermatids migrate to two opposite regions at the periphery of the cyst, leading to the uncommon formation of two bundles of spermatozoa per cyst. This feature is possibly an apomorphy for Tenebrionidae.

  1. Coronary Artery Disease in Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Alkhawam, Hassan; Zaiem, Feras; Sogomonian, Robert; El-Hunjul, Mohammed; Al-Kateb, Mohamad; Bakhsh, M Umair; Madanieh, Raef

    2015-12-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) sustains a significant negative impact on hospital admissions and deaths worldwide. The prevalence of CHD in young adults is difficult to establish accurately, as these asymptomatic patients typically do not undergo diagnostic studies. In this article, the authors will focus on young adults with CHD emphasizing common and uncommon risk factors, current management and review of previous studies. PMID:26445306

  2. Uncommon Teaching in Commonsense Times: A Case Study of a Critical Multicultural Educator and the Academic Success of Diverse Student Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camp, Emilie M.; Oesterreich, Heather A.

    2010-01-01

    In an effort to explore the complexity of how teachers develop and sustain the ability to teach uncommonly in commonsense times, the authors conducted a life history case study of Rae, a fifth grade teacher at a local elementary school in the Southwest United States who has practiced and sustained uncommon teaching for four years. Combining…

  3. Serious Adverse Events Are Uncommon with Combination Neonatal Antiretroviral Prophylaxis: A Retrospective Case Review

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Christiana; Forster, Jeri E.; Levin, Myron J.; Davies, Jill; Pappas, Jennifer; Kinzie, Kay; Barr, Emily; Paul, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    Six weeks of zidovudine (ZDV) is recommended for postnatal prophylaxis of HIV-exposed infants, but combination antiretrovirals are indicated if HIV transmission risk is increased. We investigated the frequency and severity of adverse events (AE) in infants receiving multiple drug prophylaxis compared to ZDV alone. In this retrospective review of 148 HIV-exposed uninfected infants born between 1997–2009, we determined clinical and laboratory AE that occurred between days of life 8–42. Thirty-six infants received combination prophylaxis; among those, a three-drug regimen containing ZDV, lamivudine, and nevirapine was most common (53%). Rates of laboratory AE grade ?1 were as follows for the combination prophylaxis and ZDV alone groups, respectively: neutropenia 55% and 39%; anemia 50% and 39%; thrombocytopenia 0 and 3%; elevated aspartate aminotransferase 3% and 3%; elevated alanine aminotransferase 0 and 1%; hyperbilirubinemia 19% and 42%. Anemia occurred more frequently in infants who received three-drug prophylaxis compared to infants who received ZDV alone (63% vs. 39%, p = 0.04); all anemia AE were grade 1 or 2 in the three-drug prophylaxis group. Overall, 75% of infants on combination prophylaxis and 66% of infants on ZDV alone developed grade ?1 AE (p = 0.32), and 17% of infants in either group developed grade ?3 AE. Stavudine was substituted for ZDV in 23 infants due to anemia or neutropenia. After this antiretroviral change, 50% of evaluable infants demonstrated improvement in AE grade, and 25% had no change. In conclusion, low grade anemia, neutropenia, and hyperbilirubinemia occurred frequently regardless of the prophylactic regimen, but serious AE were uncommon. Although most AE were typical of ZDV toxicity, the combination of ZDV with lamivudine and nevirapine resulted in an increased frequency of low-grade anemia. Further studies are needed to identify prophylactic regimens with less toxicity for infants born to HIV-infected mothers. PMID:26000984

  4. An uncommon cause of bifacial weakness and non-length-dependent demyelinating neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Nagappa, Madhu; Taly, Arun B.; Mahadevan, Anita; Pooja, Mailankody; Bindu, Parayil Sankaran; Chickabasaviah, Yasha T.; Gayathri, Narayanappa; Sinha, Sanjib

    2015-01-01

    Tangier disease is a rare metabolic disorder that causes neuropathy in half of the affected individuals. We present the clinical, electrophysiological, and histopathological findings in a middle-aged gentleman of Tangier disease who was initially diagnosed as leprosy and treated with antileprosy drugs. The presence of a demyelinating electrophysiology in a patient with predominant upper limb involvement and facial diplegia should raise the suspicion of Tangier disease. Estimation of serum lipids should form a part of routine evaluation in order to avoid misdiagnosis. PMID:26713019

  5. FMR1 Premutation Is an Uncommon Explanation for Premature Ovarian Failure in Han Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ting; Qin, Yingying; Jiao, Xue; Li, Guangyu; Simpson, Joe Leigh; Chen, Zi-Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Background In premature ovarian failure (POF), cessation of menstruation occurs before the expected age of menopause. Approximately 1% of women are affected. FMR1 premutation was reported to be responsible for up to 3.3%–6.7% of sporadic POF and 13% of familial cases in Caucasians, while the data was absent in Chinese population. Therefore, the impact of FMR1 CGG repeat on ovarian reserve is needed to be investigated in large Chinese cohort. Methods The number of FMR1 CGG repeat was determined in 379 Han Chinese women with well-defined 46, XX non-syndromic sporadic POF and 402 controls. The age of menopause onset in respect to CGG repeats was further analyzed. Results The frequency of FMR1 premutation in Han Chinese POF was only 0.5% (2/379), although it was higher than that in matched controls (0%, 0/402), it was much lower than that reported in Caucasian with POF (3.3%–6.7%). The prevalence of intermediate FMR1 (41–54) was not increased significantly in sporadic POF than that in controls (2.9% vs. 1.7%, P?=?0.343). However, POF patients more often carried a single additional CGG repeat in a single allele than did fertile women (allele-1: 29.7 vs. 28.8, P<0.001; allele-2: 32.6 vs. 31.5, P<0.001). POF patients with both alleles of CGG repeats outside (below or above) the normal range (26–34) showed an earlier age of cessation of menses than those with two alleles within normal range (hom-high/high vs. norm: 20.4±4.8 vs. 24.7±6.4, p<0.01; hom-low/high vs. norm: 18.7±1.7 vs. 24.7±6.4, p<0.01). Conclusions FMR1 premutation seems to be an uncommon explanation for POF in Han Chinese. However, having both alleles with CGG repeats outside the normal range might still adversely affect ovarian aging. PMID:25050920

  6. Right hilar mass with hemoptysis: An unusual presentation of uncommon disorder

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Asmita A.; Jose, Wesley; Balamugesh; Christopher, D. J.

    2011-01-01

    Common differential diagnosis of lung and hilar opacity includes infectious pathology or a mitotic lesion. Behcet's disease (BD) is a rarely diagnosed disease in Indian subcontinent. BD is a multisystem inflammatory disorder that presents with recurrent orogenital ulceration, uveitis, and erythema nodosum. We present here the case of a patient who presented with recurrent hemoptysis with radiological picture of hilar mass, during the evaluation of which the diagnosis of BD was established. PMID:22084550

  7. Use of fludarabine in the treatment of mantle cell lymphoma, Waldenström's macroglobulinemia and other uncommon B- and T-cell lymphoid malignancies.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Stephen A

    2004-01-01

    After initial efforts using fludarabine as a single agent in the treatment of acute leukemia, its activity at lower and safer doses was demonstrated in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients who were refractory or had relapsed from traditional chemotherapies, representing a highly effective therapy for this condition. Fludarabine was also rapidly shown to be beneficial as first-line therapy in CLL. There is now considerable evidence that fludarabine is an effective agent in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and in combination therapy for acute myeloid leukemia. Further, good responses are achieved when fludarabine-based approaches are used as conditioning regimens prior to transplantation procedures. The actions of fludarabine are not restricted to these settings and its potential role in the treatment of a range of uncommon T- and B-cell lymphoid malignancies is slowly emerging. This review will focus on the characteristics and treatment options for two B-cell disorders, mantle cell lymphoma and Waldenström's macroglobulinemia, with emphasis on the clinical activity of fludarabine. Additionally, the advantages of using fludarabine-containing regimens for a range of other lymphoproliferative conditions will also be discussed. These include B-cell neoplasms such as the CLL variant prolymphocytic leukemia, hairy cell leukemia and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue-derived lymphomas; the T-cell disorders cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, angioimmunoblastic lymphadenopathy and other rarer T-cell diseases; and aggressive variants of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma including Richter's syndrome. PMID:15079153

  8. Ocular metastasis of colorectal cancer: An uncommon presentation of a common malignancy.

    PubMed

    Khawaja, Muhammad Rizwan; Minturn, John T; Spittler, A John; Chiorean, E Gabriela

    2015-12-01

    Approximately 20% of patients with colorectal cancer have metastatic disease at time of diagnosis, and another 25-35% develop metastases during the course of their disease. Liver, peritoneum, and lungs are the most common sites of metastases. We report the case of a 60-year-old female who presented with ocular metastasis 4years after her initial curative-intent treatment for T3N1M0 rectal adenocarcinoma. After local eye radiation therapy, she received palliative systemic chemotherapy and enjoyed a good quality of life for 32months before succumbing to progressive disease. Ocular metastasis of colorectal cancer is rare. When present, it usually occurs in the setting of diffuse hematogenous spread. In addition to local therapy, systemic chemotherapy should also be considered. PMID:25784129

  9. Bilateral retiform variant of sertoli leydig cell tumour of ovary: An uncommon tumor with review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Rathi, Monika; Budania, Satish Kumar; Khalid, Mohammad; Mittal, Ankur

    2015-01-01

    Sertoli-leydig cell tumors are the uncommon sex-cord stromal tumors of the ovary. We report a case of 42-year-old female with retiform variant of sertoli-leydig cell tumour. She presented with the complaint of mass in abdomen for 7 years. Ultrasound revealed bilateral ovarian mass suggestive of malignancy. Bilateral salpingo-oopherectomy with surgical staging was done. The tumor was diagnosed as stage I retiform variant of sertoli-leydig cell tumor on histopathology and immunohistochemistry. PMID:25861207

  10. An experimental and theoretical study to relate uncommon rock/fluid properties to oil recovery. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, R.

    1995-07-01

    Waterflooding is the most commonly used secondary oil recovery technique. One of the requirements for understanding waterflood performance is a good knowledge of the basic properties of the reservoir rocks. This study is aimed at correlating rock-pore characteristics to oil recovery from various reservoir rock types and incorporating these properties into empirical models for Predicting oil recovery. For that reason, this report deals with the analyses and interpretation of experimental data collected from core floods and correlated against measurements of absolute permeability, porosity. wettability index, mercury porosimetry properties and irreducible water saturation. The results of the radial-core the radial-core and linear-core flow investigations and the other associated experimental analyses are presented and incorporated into empirical models to improve the predictions of oil recovery resulting from waterflooding, for sandstone and limestone reservoirs. For the radial-core case, the standardized regression model selected, based on a subset of the variables, predicted oil recovery by waterflooding with a standard deviation of 7%. For the linear-core case, separate models are developed using common, uncommon and combination of both types of rock properties. It was observed that residual oil saturation and oil recovery are better predicted with the inclusion of both common and uncommon rock/fluid properties into the predictive models.

  11. Complications Following Surgery for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease and Achalasia.

    PubMed

    Hashimi, Samad; Bremner, Ross M

    2015-11-01

    Surgical procedures to treat reflux disease are common, but good outcomes rely on both a thorough preoperative workup and careful surgical techniques. Although complications are uncommon, surgeons should recognize these and possess the skills to overcome them in clinical practice. PMID:26515948

  12. Changes in Semantic Memory in Early Stage Alzheimer's Disease Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weingartner, Herbert J.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Contrasts changes in semantic memory in elderly normal controls and Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients before patients expressed symptoms. Found that controls generated more uncommon exemplars from closed semantic categories (fruits and vegetables) than did AD patients prior to presumed onset of AD. AD patients were just as productive as controls…

  13. Dengue eye disease.

    PubMed

    Ng, Aaron W; Teoh, Stephen C

    2015-01-01

    Dengue fever, a viral disease epidemic in some parts of the world, is of considerable international concern, with a growing incidence owing to developing urbanization, tourism, and trade. Ocular manifestations of dengue fever are uncommon, but of great significance. Proposed mechanisms include direct viral infection as well as immunologic phenomena. Common manifestations include subconjunctival, vitreous, and retinal hemorrhages; posterior uveitis; optic neuritis; and maculopathies such as foveolitis, hemorrhage, and edema. Main symptoms include blurring of vision, scotomata, metamorphopsia, and floaters. Diagnostic and monitoring investigations described included optical coherence tomography, fundus fluorescein and indocyanine green angiography, visual field analysis, and electrophysiologic tests. Management is based on clinical presentation and includes active surveillance as well as various anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive therapies. There have been no prospective, randomized therapeutic trials, and it is unclear if the disease is self-limiting or if treatment is actually beneficial. Prognosis varies, ranging from full resolution to permanent vision loss despite intervention. PMID:25223497

  14. Skeletal photopenic appearance of Paget's disease with indium-111 white blood cell imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Borin, B.F.; Abghari, R.; Sarkissian, A.

    1987-10-01

    A case of focal decreased skeletal uptake with In-111 labeled white blood cells representing Paget's disease is reported. Although uncommon, other causes for skeletal photon deficient areas using In-111 white blood cells have been described. To the authors' knowledge, this finding representing Paget's disease has not been previously described.

  15. Melanized Fungi in Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Revankar, Sanjay G.; Sutton, Deanna A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Melanized or dematiaceous fungi are associated with a wide variety of infectious syndromes. Many are soil organisms and are generally distributed worldwide, though certain species appear to have restricted geographic ranges. Though they are uncommon causes of disease, melanized fungi have been increasingly recognized as important pathogens, with most reports occurring in the past 20 years. The spectrum of diseases with which they are associated has also broadened and includes allergic disease, superficial and deep local infections, pneumonia, brain abscess, and disseminated infection. For some infections in immunocompetent individuals, such as allergic fungal sinusitis and brain abscess, they are among the most common etiologic fungi. Melanin is a likely virulence factor for these fungi. Diagnosis relies on careful microscopic and pathological examination, as well as clinical assessment of the patient, as these fungi are often considered contaminants. Therapy varies depending upon the clinical syndrome. Local infection may be cured with excision alone, while systemic disease is often refractory to therapy. Triazoles such as voriconazole, posaconazole, and itraconazole have the most consistent in vitro activity. Further studies are needed to better understand the pathogenesis and optimal treatment of these uncommon infections. PMID:20930077

  16. Primary Immunodeficiency Masquerading as Allergic Disease.

    PubMed

    Chan, Sanny K; Gelfand, Erwin W

    2015-11-01

    Primary immune deficiencies (PIDs) are an uncommon heterogeneous group of diseases that result from fundamental defects in the proteins and cells that enable specific immune responses. Common allergic reactions (eczema, allergic rhinitis, asthma, and food allergies) are exaggerated immune responses that may be manifestations of an underlying PID. Early diagnosis and treatment has significant bearing on outcome. Immune suppression with systemic corticosteroids in these immune compromised individuals can lead to life threatening dissemination of infections. PMID:26454318

  17. A Pseudo MS3 Approach for Identification of Disulfide-Bonded Proteins: Uncommon Product Ions and Database Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianzhong; Shiyanov, Pavel; Schlager, John J.; Green, Kari B.

    2012-02-01

    It has previously been reported that disulfide and backbone bonds of native intact proteins can be concurrently cleaved using electrospray ionization (ESI) and collision-induced dissociation (CID) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). However, the cleavages of disulfide bonds result in different cysteine modifications in product ions, making it difficult to identify the disulfide-bonded proteins via database search. To solve this identification problem, we have developed a pseudo MS3 approach by combining nozzle-skimmer dissociation (NSD) and CID on a quadrupole time-of-flight (Q-TOF) mass spectrometer using chicken lysozyme as a model. Although many of the product ions were similar to those typically seen in MS/MS spectra of enzymatically derived peptides, additional uncommon product ions were detected including ci-1 ions (the ith residue being aspartic acid, arginine, lysine and dehydroalanine) as well as those from a scrambled sequence. The formation of these uncommon types of product ions, likely caused by the lack of mobile protons, were proposed to involve bond rearrangements via a six-membered ring transition state and/or salt bridge(s). A search of 20 pseudo MS3 spectra against the Gallus gallus (chicken) database using Batch-Tag, a program originally designed for bottom up MS/MS analysis, identified chicken lysozyme as the only hit with the expectation values less than 0.02 for 12 of the spectra. The pseudo MS3 approach may help to identify disulfide-bonded proteins and determine the associated post-translational modifications (PTMs); the confidence in the identification may be improved by incorporating the fragmentation characteristics into currently available search programs.

  18. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with uncommon clinical manifestations: A case report

    PubMed Central

    CAI, YU-LONG; XIONG, XIAN-ZE; LU, JIONG; LIN, YI-XIN; CHENG, NAN-SHENG

    2015-01-01

    Extranodal lymphoma occurs in ~40% of all patients with lymphoma and has been described in virtually all organs and tissue. However, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), which is the most common histological subtype of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), primarily arising in the retroperitoneal region has been rarely reported. Primary retroperitoneal lymphoma without renal or ureteral involvement affecting the genitourinary system has not been reported until now. In this article, we report the rare case of a young female suffering with primary DLBCL located simultaneously in the retroperitoneal and gastrointestinal region. The first sign of this disease was renal colic. Pathological assessment was performed using immunohistochemistry staining, revealing positivity for CD20 and Ki67. DLBCL was the final confirmed diagnosis. Obtaining a definitive histological diagnosis by surgery and using exactly chemotherapy played an essential role in the treatment of our patient. This case serves as a reminder to include the differential diagnosis of primary retroperitoneal NHL when a patient presents with a retroperitoneal mass and the first symptom is renal colic.

  19. Idiopathic Splenic Artery Pseudoaneurysm Rupture as an Uncommon Cause of Hemorrhagic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Schatz, Richard A.; Schabel, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Splenic artery pseudoaneurysms are infrequently encountered but critical to recognize. Limited literature to date describes associations with pancreatitis, trauma, and rarely peptic ulcer disease. Hemorrhage and abdominal pain are the most common manifestations. There is typically overt gastrointestinal blood loss but bleeding can also extend into the peritoneum, retroperitoneum, adjacent organs, or even a pseudocyst. Most patients with ruptured splenic artery pseudoaneurysms present with hemodynamic instability. Here, we describe a patient recovering from acute illness in the intensive care unit but with otherwise no obvious risk factors or precipitants for visceral pseudoaneurysm. He presented with acute onset altered mental status, nausea, and worsening back and abdominal pain and was found to be in hypovolemic shock. The patient was urgently stabilized until more detailed imaging could be performed, which ultimately revealed the source of blood loss and explained his rapid decompensation. He was successfully treated with arterial coiling and embolization. Thus, we herein emphasize the importance of prompt recognition of hemorrhagic shock and of aggressive hemodynamic stabilization, as well as a focused diagnostic approach to this problem with specific treatment for splenic artery pseudoaneurysm. Finally, we recommend that multidisciplinary management should be the standard approach in all patients with splenic artery pseudoaneurysm. PMID:26425639

  20. Effectiveness of Gefitinib against Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer with the Uncommon EGFR Mutations G719X and L861Q

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Satoshi; Minegishi, Yuji; Maemondo, Makoto; Inoue, Akira; Sugawara, Shunichi; Isobe, Hiroshi; Harada, Masao; Ishii, Yoshiki; Gemma, Akihiko; Hagiwara, Koichi; Kobayashi, Kunihiko

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: In non–small-cell lung cancer, an exon 19 deletion and an L858R point mutation in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are predictors of a response to EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors. However, it is uncertain whether other uncommon EGFR mutations are associated with sensitivity to EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Methods: A post-hoc analysis to assess prognostic factors was performed with the use of patients with EGFR mutations (exon 19 deletion, L858R, G719X, and L861Q) who were treated with gefitinib in the NEJ002 study, which compared gefitinib with carboplatin-paclitaxel as the first-line therapy. Results: In the NEJ002 study, 225 patients with EGFR mutations received gefitinib at any treatment line. The Cox proportional hazards model indicated that performance status, response to chemotherapy, response to gefitinib, and mutation types were significant prognostic factors. Overall survival (OS) was significantly shorter among patients with uncommon EGFR mutations (G719X or L861Q) compared with OS of those with common EGFR mutations (12 versus 28.4 months; p = 0.002). In the gefitinib group (n = 114), patients with uncommon EGFR mutations had a significantly shorter OS (11.9 versus 29.3 months; p < 0.001). By contrast, OS was similar between patients with uncommon mutations and those with common mutations in the carboplatin-paclitaxel group (n = 111; 22.8 versus 28 months; p = 0.358). Conclusions: The post-hoc analyses clearly demonstrated shorter survival for gefitinib-treated patients with uncommon EGFR mutations compared with the survival of those with common mutations and suggest that the first-line chemotherapy may be relatively effective for non–small-cell lung cancer with uncommon EGFR mutations. PMID:24419415

  1. Ovarian seromucinous carcinoma: report of a series of a newly categorized and uncommon neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Jennifer; McCluggage, W Glenn

    2015-07-01

    Seromucinous neoplasms are a new category of ovarian epithelial tumor in the revised World Health Organization Classification of Tumours of the Female Reproductive Organs. Borderline variants are well described, but there have been few reports of seromucinous carcinomas. We report the clinicopathologic features in 19 cases of ovarian seromucinous carcinoma in patients aged 16 to 79 years (mean 47). In 16 cases, the neoplasm was unilateral and in 3 cases bilateral. The tumors ranged in size from 1.8 to 18 cm (mean 10.5 cm). The tumors were stage I (n=15), stage II (n=1), and stage III (n=3). The histologic features were highly variable both within and between individual tumors. The majority of neoplasms (12 cases) exhibited a predominant papillary architecture with lesser components of glandular, microglandular, and solid growth. A predominant glandular architecture was present in 6 cases, whereas 1 had a predominantly solid growth. A characteristic feature was an admixture of cell types. Most of the tumors (15 cases) were mainly composed of endocervical-like mucinous cells, whereas in 4 cases there was predominant endometrioid differentiation. Other cell types, present in varying proportions, included hobnail cells, eosinophilic cells, squamous cells, clear cells, and signet-ring cells. An infiltrate of neutrophil polymorphs was a prominent feature in most cases. Most cases also exhibited areas of microglandular architecture with cytoplasmic clearing and intraluminal polymorphs, the features closely resembling cervical microglandular hyperplasia. Areas of stromal hyalinization, adenofibromatous growth, and psammoma bodies were present in a minority of cases. Endometriosis was identified in the same ovary in 10 cases, and in 10 there was a component of seromucinous borderline tumor. Thirteen, 5, and 1 tumor were of grades 1, 2, and 3, respectively (using the FIGO grading system for endometrioid adenocarcinomas of the uterine corpus). A synchronous uterine endometrioid adenocarcinoma was present in 1 case. Immunohistochemically, there was positive staining with CK7 (17/17 cases), estrogen receptor (16/16 cases), progesterone receptor (6/7 cases), CA125 (15/15 cases), PAX8 (8/8 cases), CEA (8/13 cases), CA19.9 (8/9 cases), and WT1 (2/13 cases). CK20 and CDX2 were negative in all cases tested (16 and 14, respectively). p53 showed "wild-type" staining in 4/4 cases, and p16 was focally positive in 5/5 cases. Follow-up information was available in 8 patients. Seven were alive with no evidence of disease (follow-up 3 to 74 mo), whereas 1 patient who initially presented with a stage IIB tumor died of disease at 192 months. Given the characteristic admixture of cell types and the overlapping morphologic features with low-grade serous, mucinous, and endometrioid neoplasms, the most appropriate categorization of seromucinous carcinomas is uncertain, but we believe they are best regarded as a distinct type of ovarian epithelial malignancy and are most similar to endometrioid adenocarcinomas. We recommend grading them in an analogous manner to ovarian endometrioid adenocarcinomas. PMID:25723110

  2. Paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis, an uncommon presentation of a common cancer: Case report and discussion

    PubMed Central

    Said, Sarmad; Cooper, Chad J.; Reyna, Edgar; Alkhateeb, Haider; Diaz, Jesus; Nahleh, Zeina

    2013-01-01

    Patient: Female, 59 Final Diagnosis: Paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis Symptoms: Seizure • memory changes • decreased concentration Medication: Chemotherapy Clinical Procedure: Cerebral images Specialty: Hematology • Oncology Objective: Challenging differential diagnosis Background: Paraneoplastic neurological disorders (PND) are defined as remote effects on the nervous system that are not caused directly by the tumor, its metastases, or metabolic disruptions. This syndrome occurs in less than 1 per 10,000 patients diagnosed with a malignancy. Many antibodies are found in the central nervous system in PND, the most well known are Anti-Hu, Tr, CV2 Ta, Yo, Ri and amphiphysin. Paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis occurs due to involvement of the limbic system secondary to an autoimmune response to neurons of the brain provoked by the antibodies. Patients, thus, present with seizures, changes in mood, memory, and personality. Case Report: Fifty-nine years-old female patient presented with seizures, decreased concentration and memory changes. Laboratory workup was remarkable for hyponatremia. Further workup included brain computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which suggested a diagnosis of encephalitis for limbic encephalitis. Anti-Hu, anti-Ma and NMDA-receptor antibodies were requested of which Anti Hu antibodies were positive. Transbronchial biopsy was obtained which confirmed the diagnosis of small cell lung cancer. Conclusions: A very high index of suspicion should thus be present when patients present with paraneoplastic abnormalities. It must be emphasized that limbic encephalitis (LE) occurs at an early stage of the disease development and therefore the detection of paraneoplastic LE can lead to a quicker identification of the underlying malignancy and a better outcome. PMID:24116265

  3. An unusual cause of pancytopenia: Whipple's disease

    PubMed Central

    Tun, Nay T.; Shukla, Shwetanshu; Krishnakurup, Jaykrishnan; Pappachen, Binu; Krishnamurthy, Mahesh; Salib, Hayman

    2014-01-01

    Whipple's disease is a systemic infectious disease caused by the bacteria Tropheryma whipplei. The most common clinical manifestations of Whipple's disease are weight loss (92%), hypoalbuminemia and steatorrhea (91%, respectively), diarrhea (72%), arthralgia (67%), and abdominal pain (55%). Neurological signs and symptoms from dementia to oculomasticatory myorhythmia or oculofacioskeletal myorhythmia (pathognomonic of Whipple's disease), lymphadenopathy, and fatigue can also be present. Pancytopenia is a rare and less recognized clinical feature in Whipple's disease patients. We are describing a case where a middle-aged Caucasian male diagnosed with Whipple's disease was found to have pancytopenia. Etiology of pancytopenia is postulated to be due to the invasion of bone marrow by T. whipplei. It is important to recognize that bone marrow involvement by the Whipple bacillus is not uncommon. In the presence of lymphadenopathy and pancytopenia, clinicians should think of Whipple's disease as a differential diagnosis apart from lymphoma or other non-specific granulomatous reticuloendothelial disorders. PMID:24765256

  4. Scheuermann's disease: an update.

    PubMed

    Palazzo, Clémence; Sailhan, Frédéric; Revel, Michel

    2014-05-01

    Scheuermann's disease is a juvenile osteochondrosis of the spine. It is a disease of the growth cartilage endplate, probably due to repetitive strain on the growth cartilage weakened by a genetic background. The radiographic aspects are related to the vertebral endplate lesions and include vertebral wedging, irregularity of the vertebral endplate, and Schmorl's node (intraossous disk herniation). Disc alterations are frequent and may be secondary to dysfunction of the disc-vertebra complex. The definitions of Scheuermann's disease are varied; it can refer to the classical form of juvenile kyphosis, described by Scheuermann as well as asymptomatic radiographic abnormalities. Lumbar involvement is probably as frequent as the thoracic form and might be more painful. The first-line treatment is medical and includes rehabilitation and bracing. The earlier the start of treatment, the better the outcome, which highlights the importance of early diagnosis. Surgery is uncommon and must be limited to severe involvement after failure of conservative treatment. The natural history of Scheuermann's disease is unknown, but it might be associated with increased risk of back pain. The evolution of thoracolumbar and lumbar disease is unknown. PMID:24468666

  5. Language, Literature and Society. Working Papers, 1973 Conference, American Council of Teachers of Uncommonly Taught Asian Languages. Occasional Papers No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dellinger, David W., Ed.

    This volume is a collection of papers presented at the second annual meeting of the American Council of Teachers of Uncommonly-taught Asian Languages (ACTUAL) held in Boston, Massachusetts. The following papers are included: (1) "Passives as Reflections of Thought: A Case in Indonesian" by S. Dardjowidjojo, (2) "Acquainting Language Students with…

  6. Cultural-Linguistic Aspects in Asian Language Teaching. Proceedings of the First Annual Meeting of the American Council of Teachers of Uncommonly-Taught Asian Languages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dardjowidjojo, Soenjono, Comp.

    Problems encountered by teachers of uncommonly-taught Asian languages attempting to teach the culture of the native speakers of the target language are discussed in these articles: (1) "Cultural Context, Linguistic Categories, and Foreign Language Teaching: A Case from Marathi" by Vasant S. Khokle, (2) "The Ethnology of Communication and the…

  7. Sea Anemone Peptide with Uncommon ?-Hairpin Structure Inhibits Acid-sensing Ion Channel 3 (ASIC3) and Reveals Analgesic Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Osmakov, Dmitry I.; Kozlov, Sergey A.; Andreev, Yaroslav A.; Koshelev, Sergey G.; Sanamyan, Nadezhda P.; Sanamyan, Karen E.; Dyachenko, Igor A.; Bondarenko, Dmitry A.; Murashev, Arkadii N.; Mineev, Konstantin S.; Arseniev, Alexander S.; Grishin, Eugene V.

    2013-01-01

    Three novel peptides were isolated from the venom of the sea anemone Urticina grebelnyi. All of them are 29 amino acid peptides cross-linked by two disulfide bridges, with a primary structure similar to other sea anemone peptides belonging to structural group 9a. The structure of the gene encoding the shared precursor protein of the identified peptides was determined. One peptide, ?-AnmTX Ugr 9a-1 (short name Ugr 9-1), produced a reversible inhibition effect on both the transient and the sustained current of human ASIC3 channels expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. It completely blocked the transient component (IC50 10 ± 0.6 ?m) and partially (48 ± 2%) inhibited the amplitude of the sustained component (IC50 1.44 ± 0.19 ?m). Using in vivo tests in mice, Ugr 9-1 significantly reversed inflammatory and acid-induced pain. The other two novel peptides, AnmTX Ugr 9a-2 (Ugr 9-2) and AnmTX Ugr 9a-3 (Ugr 9-3), did not inhibit the ASIC3 current. NMR spectroscopy revealed that Ugr 9-1 has an uncommon spatial structure, stabilized by two S-S bridges, with three classical ?-turns and twisted ?-hairpin without interstrand disulfide bonds. This is a novel peptide spatial structure that we propose to name boundless ?-hairpin. PMID:23801332

  8. Salivary gland diseases in children

    PubMed Central

    Iro, Heinrich; Zenk, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Salivary gland diseases in children are rare, apart from viral-induced diseases. Nevertheless, it is essential for the otolaryngologist to recognize these uncommon findings in children and adolescents and to diagnose and initiate the proper treatment. The present work provides an overview of the entire spectrum of congenital and acquired diseases of the salivary glands in childhood and adolescence. The current literature was reviewed and the results discussed and summarized. Besides congenital diseases of the salivary glands in children, the main etiologies of viral and bacterial infections, autoimmune diseases and tumors of the salivary glands were considered. In addition to the known facts, new developments in diagnostics, imaging and therapy, including sialendoscopy in obstructive diseases and chronic recurrent juvenile sialadenitis were taken into account. In addition, systemic causes of salivary gland swelling and the treatment of sialorrhoea were discussed. Although salivary gland diseases in children are usually included in the pathology of the adult, they differ in their incidence and some­times in their symptoms. Clinical diagnostics and especially the surgical treatment are influenced by a stringent indications and a less invasive strategy. Due to the rarity of tumors of the salivary glands in children, it is recommended to treat them in a specialized center with greater surgical experience. Altogether the knowledge of the differential diagnoses in salivary gland diseases in children is important for otolaryngologists, to indicate the proper therapeutic approach. PMID:25587366

  9. An Uncommon Cottage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Scott

    2008-01-01

    This article features the Cliffs Cottage, a "showcase home" at Furman University which demonstrates the use of green technology in residential building and teaches about sustainability. Custom-built for the shelter-magazine dreams of "Southern Living," a sponsor of the home, the house seems better suited for a tony subdivision. The Cliffs Cottage…

  10. unCommon ground

    E-print Network

    Miranowski, David (David Kelly)

    2015-01-01

    Brooklyn's urban fabric is a redundant array of perimeter residential blocks, built out over the last 200 years as a layered accretion. Within each block is a core that is spatially unified yet distinct from the public ...

  11. The University's Uncommon Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Suzy

    2012-01-01

    In the UK, as elsewhere in the world, the global financial crisis has focused attention on the cost of public services and the need to reduce expenditure, not least in respect of higher education. This, however, raises a set of prior questions: What kind of society do we want? What is important to democratic society? What kind of higher education…

  12. Uncommon presentations in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Mohan, V; Gupta, S K; Sharma, O P; Cherian, J; Katiyar, G P

    1982-01-01

    Two cases of neuroblastoma with unusual presentation are reported. In the first case it presented as a general swelling of the head and in the second case it presented as generalized pains in the bones particularly the pelvis and left leg. PMID:7183653

  13. Radiologically isolated syndrome: an uncommon finding at a university clinic in a high-prevalence region for multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Granberg, Tobias; Martola, Juha; Aspelin, Peter; Kristoffersen-Wiberg, Maria; Fredrikson, Sten

    2013-01-01

    Objective The improved availability of MRI in medicine has led to an increase in incidental findings. Unexpected brain MRI findings suggestive of multiple sclerosis (MS) without typical symptoms of MS were recently defined as radiologically isolated syndrome (RIS). The prevalence of RIS is uncertain. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of RIS at a university hospital in a region with a high prevalence for MS and describe the long-term prognosis of the identified patients. Design Retrospective cohort study conducted in 2012. Setting All brain MRI examinations performed at Karolinska University Hospital in Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden during 2001 were retrospectively screened by a single rater for findings fulfilling the Okuda criteria. The sample year was chosen in order to establish the long-term prognosis of the patients identified. The examinations of interest were re-evaluated according to the Barkhof criteria by a neuroradiologist with long experience in MS. Participants In total 2105 individuals were included in the study. Ages ranged from 0 to 90?years with a median age of 48?years. Only one patient with RIS was identified, equivalent to a prevalence of 0.05% in the studied population, or 0.15% among patients aged 15–40?years. The patient with RIS developed symptoms consistent with MS within 3?months accompanied with radiological progression and was diagnosed with MS. Conclusions RIS, according to present criteria, is an uncommon finding in a tertiary hospital setting in a high-prevalence region for MS where awareness and clinical suspicion of MS is common. In order to study the prognosis of RIS, multicentre studies, or case–control studies are recommended. PMID:24189079

  14. Mitogenomes from Two Uncommon Haplogroups Mark Late Glacial/Postglacial Expansions from the Near East and Neolithic Dispersals within Europe

    PubMed Central

    Olivieri, Anna; Pala, Maria; Gandini, Francesca; Kashani, Baharak Hooshiar; Perego, Ugo A.; Woodward, Scott R.; Grugni, Viola; Battaglia, Vincenza; Semino, Ornella; Achilli, Alessandro; Richards, Martin B.; Torroni, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    The current human mitochondrial (mtDNA) phylogeny does not equally represent all human populations but is biased in favour of representatives originally from north and central Europe. This especially affects the phylogeny of some uncommon West Eurasian haplogroups, including I and W, whose southern European and Near Eastern components are very poorly represented, suggesting that extensive hidden phylogenetic substructure remains to be uncovered. This study expanded and re-analysed the available datasets of I and W complete mtDNA genomes, reaching a comprehensive 419 mitogenomes, and searched for precise correlations between the ages and geographical distributions of their numerous newly identified subclades with events of human dispersal which contributed to the genetic formation of modern Europeans. Our results showed that haplogroups I (within N1a1b) and W originated in the Near East during the Last Glacial Maximum or pre-warming period (the period of gradual warming between the end of the LGM, ?19 ky ago, and the beginning of the first main warming phase, ?15 ky ago) and, like the much more common haplogroups J and T, may have been involved in Late Glacial expansions starting from the Near East. Thus our data contribute to a better definition of the Late and postglacial re-peopling of Europe, providing further evidence for the scenario that major population expansions started after the Last Glacial Maximum but before Neolithic times, but also evidencing traces of diffusion events in several I and W subclades dating to the European Neolithic and restricted to Europe. PMID:23936216

  15. Zygomycetes in Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ribes, Julie A.; Vanover-Sams, Carolyn L.; Baker, Doris J.

    2000-01-01

    The Zygomycetes represent relatively uncommon isolates in the clinical laboratory, reflecting either environmental contaminants or, less commonly, a clinical disease called zygomycosis. There are two orders of Zygomycetes containing organisms that cause human disease, the Mucorales and the Entomophthorales. The majority of human illness is caused by the Mucorales. While disease is most commonly linked to Rhizopus spp., other organisms are also associated with human infection, including Mucor, Rhizomucor, Absidia, Apophysomyces, Saksenaea, Cunninghamella, Cokeromyces, and Syncephalastrum spp. Although Mortierella spp. do cause disease in animals, there is no longer sufficient evidence to suggest that they are true human pathogens. The spores from these molds are transmitted by inhalation, via a variety of percutaneous routes, or by ingestion of spores. Human zygomycosis caused by the Mucorales generally occurs in immunocompromised hosts as opportunistic infections. Host risk factors include diabetes mellitus, neutropenia, sustained immunosuppressive therapy, chronic prednisone use, iron chelation therapy, broad-spectrum antibiotic use, severe malnutrition, and primary breakdown in the integrity of the cutaneous barrier such as trauma, surgical wounds, needle sticks, or burns. Zygomycosis occurs only rarely in immunocompetent hosts. The disease manifestations reflect the mode of transmission, with rhinocerebral and pulmonary diseases being the most common manifestations. Cutaneous, gastrointestinal, and allergic diseases are also seen. The Mucorales are associated with angioinvasive disease, often leading to thrombosis, infarction of involved tissues, and tissue destruction mediated by a number of fungal proteases, lipases, and mycotoxins. If the diagnosis is not made early, dissemination often occurs. Therapy, if it is to be effective, must be started early and requires combinations of antifungal drugs, surgical intervention, and reversal of the underlying risk factors. The Entomophthorales are closely related to the Mucorales on the basis of sexual growth by production of zygospores and by the production of coenocytic hyphae. Despite these similarities, the Entomophthorales and Mucorales have dramatically different gross morphologies, asexual reproductive characteristics, and disease manifestations. In comparison to the floccose aerial mycelium of the Mucorales, the Entomophthorales produce a compact, glabrous mycelium. The asexually produced spores of the Entomophthorales may be passively released or actively expelled into the environment. Human disease with these organisms occurs predominantly in tropical regions, with transmission occurring by implantation of spores via minor trauma such as insect bites or by inhalation of spores into the sinuses. Conidiobolus typically infects mucocutaneous sites to produce sinusitis disease, while Basidiobolus infections occur as subcutaneous mycosis of the trunk and extremities. The Entomophthorales are true pathogens, infecting primarily immunocompetent hosts. They generally do not invade blood vessels and rarely disseminate. Occasional cases of disseminated and angioinvasive disease have recently been described, primarily in immunocompromised patients, suggesting a possible emerging role for this organism as an opportunist. PMID:10756000

  16. Management of a giant inguinoscrotal hernia with an ulcerated base in a patient with cardiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Turner, E Jane H; Malhas, Amar; Chisti, Imran; Oke, Tayo

    2010-01-01

    Giant inguinal herniae pose a surgical challenge, though not uncommon in the developing world they are a rare presentation in the UK. We present a patient with cardiac disease who presented with a giant inguino-scrotal hernia complicated by a bleeding scrotal ulcer. We describe his medical management and the surgical repair of the hernia and refashioning of his scrotum. PMID:24946352

  17. Vitamin B6: a challenging link between nutrition and inflammation in cardiovasular disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of the present review is to highlight the relationship between low vitamin B6 status and cardiovascular disease (CVD) through its link with inflammation. While overt vitamin B6 deficiency is uncommon in clinical practice, increasing evidence suggests that mild vitamin B6 deficiency is ...

  18. Giant Sequoia Insect, Disease, and Ecosystem Interactions1 Douglas D. Piirto2

    E-print Network

    Giant Sequoia Insect, Disease, and Ecosystem Interactions1 Douglas D. Piirto2 Abstract: Individual trees of giant sequoia (Sequoia gigantea [Lindl.] Decne.) have demonstrated a capacity to attain both a long life and very large size. It is not uncommon to find old-growth giant sequoia trees

  19. An experimental and theoretical study to relate uncommon rock/fluid properties to oil recovery. Quarterly report, October 1, 1992--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, R.W.; Ertekin, T.; Owolabi, O.O.

    1992-12-31

    The overall objectives of the project are: To develop a better understanding of some important but not really well investigated rock/pore properties such as: tortuosity, pore-size distribution. surface area, and wettability, and a better insight on capillary pressure variation with respect to wettability and pore geometry of sandstone and limestone. To improve the understanding of fluid flow in porous media under conditions of secondary and tertiary recovery, through the laboratory study of the performance of enhanced recovery methods such as waterflooding. To develop empirical relationships between residual oil saturation and oil recovery at breakthrough and the uncommon rock/pore properties. Develop relationships between residual oil saturation and ultimate-oil recovery at floodout and the uncommon rock/pore properties for the different porous media. Furthermore, variations of irreducible water saturation, porosity and absolute permeability with respect to the uncommon rock/pore properties, residual oil saturation and oil recovery will be investigated. During the current quarter, the mercury porosimetry experiments on limestone core-plug samples were completed. The experimental data were also fully analyzed.

  20. Report of six kidney disease-associated Castleman's disease cases.

    PubMed

    Sui, Yanxia; Zhao, Dongli

    2015-12-01

    Castleman's disease (CD) is an uncommon, benign, non-neoplastic, lymphoproliferative disease of uncertain etiology. Here, we report 6 cases of kidney disease-associated CD in China. All patients exhibited multicentric CD (MCD) with involvement of the mediastinum, neck, bilateral axillary, and bilateral inguinal regions. Clinical manifestations included fever, fatigue, edema, and swollen lymph nodes. Laboratory examinations of all 6 patients found proteinuria or renal insufficiency. Two of the patients were diagnosed with hyaline vascular type MCD, and 4 patients were diagnosed with plasma cell type CD. The case 1 and case 4 patients had mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis, case 3 had type I membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, case 2 and case 5 had interstitial nephritis, and case 6 had AA type amyloidosis nephropathy. Three patients were treated with prednisone plus cyclophosphamide, 1 patient received COP therapy (cyclophosphamide, vincristine and prednisone), and 2 patients received COP therapy supplemented by small doses of radiation therapy delivered to local lymph nodes. In all cases, the clinical manifestations of MCD, including fever, fatigue, edema, swollen lymph nodes, and proteinuria, were alleviated or abolished by treatment. One patient responded to treatment with complete MCD remission, and another 4 patients survived. However, 1 patient died due to renal failure. In conclusion, common diagnosis and treatment techniques are suitable for kidney disease-associated CD. However, treatment efficacy might be difficult to predict, and some cases may have poor prognosis with this treatment strategy. Therefore, additional studies investigating kidney disease-associated CD and treatment outcomes in larger patient populations are needed. PMID:26445003

  1. Paget's Disease of the Vulva in Premenopausal Woman Treated with Only Surgery: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Asmouki, Hamid; Oumouloud, Rachid; Aboulfalah, Abderrahim; Soummani, Abderraouf; Marrat, Abdelouahed

    2012-01-01

    Paget's disease of the vulva remains a rare condition with only a limited number of cases reported in the literature. It is an uncommon neoplasm usually of postmenopausal white women characterized by controversies in its prevalence, clinical features, treatment strategies, and prognostic. We here report a case of a primary Paget's disease of the vulva in premenopausal woman treated by only surgery with a favorable issue. PMID:23024871

  2. Psoriasis with extramammary paget disease in a male: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Junlian; Chen, Wei; Zhou, Jinlian; Liu, Jianjun; Zhang, Jianzhong

    2015-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease that is characterized by erythematous, sharply demarcated papules and plaques covered by scales. Extramammary Paget disease (EMPD) is a uncommon neoplastic condition of apocrine gland-bearing skin and its occurrence in combination with psoriasis is very rare. We report an interesting case of a 61-year-old male with extensive psoriasis presented with penoscrotal EMPD, which was confirmed by histopathological stain. PMID:26339450

  3. An outbreak of salmonella chester infection in Canada: rare serotype, uncommon exposure, and unusual population demographic facilitate rapid identification of food vehicle.

    PubMed

    Taylor, John; Galanis, Eleni; Wilcott, Lynn; Hoang, Linda; Stone, Jason; Ekkert, Judi; Quibell, Doug; Huddleston, Mark; McCormick, Rachel; Whitfield, Yvonne; Adhikari, Bijay; Grant, Christopher C R; Sharma, Davendra

    2012-04-01

    Salmonella Chester infection has rarely been reported in the literature. In 2010, 33 case patients were reported in 2 months in four Canadian provinces. We conducted an outbreak investigation in collaboration with public health agencies, food safety specialists, regulatory agencies, grocery store chains, and the product distributor. We used case patient interviews, customer loyalty cards, and microbiological testing of clinical and food samples to identify nationally distributed head cheese as the food vehicle responsible for the outbreak. The rare serotype, a limited affected demographic group, and an uncommon exposure led to the rapid identification of the source. Control measures were implemented within 9 days of notification of the outbreak. PMID:22488063

  4. Behcet's Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    You are here: Home / Types of Vasculitis / Behcet’s Disease Behcet’s Disease First Description Who gets Behcet’s Disease (the “typical” patients)? Classic symptoms of Behcet’s Disease What causes Behcet’s Disease? ...

  5. Lyme Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Skip Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area Lyme Disease Lyme disease, or borreliosis, is caused by ... designed to increase our understanding of this disease. Lyme Disease A History of Lyme Disease, Symptoms, Diagnosis, ...

  6. Pin Worms Presenting as Suspected Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Al-Saffar, Farah; Najjar, Nimeh; Ibrahim, Saif; Clark, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is well recognized in developed countries and is generally among the differential diagnoses of young patients presenting with refractory diarrhea once other more common etiologies have been excluded. Pinworm infections, on the other hand, are not as common among adults in the United States. CASE REPORT Based on computed tomography features, a 24-year-old female patient with a history of multiple autoimmune disorders presented with abdominal pain and was diagnosed recently with Crohn's disease. Colonoscopy was significant for pinworms seen throughout the colon. Colonic biopsy was negative for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)-related changes. CONCLUSIONS The diagnosis of IBD is a serious label that requires biopsy confirmation before committing to possibly life-long treatment and possible adverse effects. Even in the most typical patient and when the presentation and imaging are classical, uncommon conditions (like Enterobius infection in this case) may preclude appropriate diagnosis and management. PMID:26471462

  7. Sickle cell disease in Britain.

    PubMed Central

    Brozovi?, M; Anionwu, E

    1984-01-01

    Sickel cell disease is common in urban areas of Britain and it is estimated that in London alone there are nearly 2000 patients. One hundred and eighty four patients with sickle cell disease are known to the Central Middlesex Hospital, and 155 of those attend the sickle cell clinic regularly. The commonest cause for admission to hospital is acute painful or vaso-occlusive crisis, which accounts for 80% of all acute admissions; 12% of admissions are for acute chest syndrome. Comparison of clinical features in Brent and in Jamaica shows that the Brent patients with homozygous sickle cell anaemia are admitted with painful crises more frequently than Jamaican patients. However, the frequency of admissions for chest syndrome and priapism, and the incidence of splenomegaly are similar. Leg ulcers are uncommon in Brent. Patients with sickle cell haemoglobin C disease appeared more severely affected in Jamaica than in Brent. During the past two years 3165 newborn babies have been screened for sickle cell disease at the Central Middlesex Hospital: five babies with homozygous sickle cell anaemia and three babies with sickle cell haemoglobin C disease were detected. The overall incidence of sickle cell trait was 3.2% and of haemoglobin C trait 0.8%. A significant number of babies with sickle cell disease are born in London every year. It is essential that such babies are detected at birth and offered prophylaxis against pneumococcal infection, which is one of the major causes of infant mortality. Sickle cell disease is becoming an important blood disease in Britain and firm guidelines for the management of acute and chronic complications are required. PMID:6511979

  8. Sickle cell disease in Britain.

    PubMed

    Brozovi?, M; Anionwu, E

    1984-12-01

    Sickel cell disease is common in urban areas of Britain and it is estimated that in London alone there are nearly 2000 patients. One hundred and eighty four patients with sickle cell disease are known to the Central Middlesex Hospital, and 155 of those attend the sickle cell clinic regularly. The commonest cause for admission to hospital is acute painful or vaso-occlusive crisis, which accounts for 80% of all acute admissions; 12% of admissions are for acute chest syndrome. Comparison of clinical features in Brent and in Jamaica shows that the Brent patients with homozygous sickle cell anaemia are admitted with painful crises more frequently than Jamaican patients. However, the frequency of admissions for chest syndrome and priapism, and the incidence of splenomegaly are similar. Leg ulcers are uncommon in Brent. Patients with sickle cell haemoglobin C disease appeared more severely affected in Jamaica than in Brent. During the past two years 3165 newborn babies have been screened for sickle cell disease at the Central Middlesex Hospital: five babies with homozygous sickle cell anaemia and three babies with sickle cell haemoglobin C disease were detected. The overall incidence of sickle cell trait was 3.2% and of haemoglobin C trait 0.8%. A significant number of babies with sickle cell disease are born in London every year. It is essential that such babies are detected at birth and offered prophylaxis against pneumococcal infection, which is one of the major causes of infant mortality. Sickle cell disease is becoming an important blood disease in Britain and firm guidelines for the management of acute and chronic complications are required. PMID:6511979

  9. Ménétrier's disease. A trivalent gastropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Sundt, T M; Compton, C C; Malt, R A

    1988-01-01

    Current conceptions of Ménétrier's disease only obliquely resemble those originally described. Bona-fide cases are so uncommon that, of 125 cases diagnosed as Ménétier's disease, hypertrophic gastritis, or protein-losing gastropathy treated at the Massachusetts General Hospital during the 26-year period of 1962-1987, only six cases merited an unequivocal anatomic diagnosis. Two other cases previously described proved on review to be nondiagnostic in one instance and Campylobacter pylori gastritis in the other. Because abnormalities in the secretion of gastric acid and in the loss of protein from the stomach may coexist, a representation of each case in semiquantitative terms can be described on triaxial coordinates. Three patients had a hypercoagulable state, one in association with gastric carcinoma. One other case of gastric carcinoma and one of esophageal carcinoma coexistant with Ménétrier's disease were identified. Administration of subcutaneous heparin during the perioperative period to patients with Ménétrier's disease is appropriate regardless of whether or not hypercoagulation or carcinoma is manifest. If treatment with anticholinergic drugs and inhibitors of gastric acid secretion fails, total gastrectomy is the best solution, because it stops protein loss, eliminates hyperchlorhydria, prevents development of gastric carcinoma, and permits anastomotic reconstruction between normal esophagus and normal small bowel. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:3264139

  10. Human adenovirus type 8 epidemic keratoconjunctivitis with large corneal epithelial full-layer detachment: an endemic outbreak with uncommon manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yueh-Chang; Chen, Nancy; Huang, I-Tsong; Yang, Hui-Hua; Huang, Chin-Te; Chen, Li-Kuang; Sheu, Min-Muh

    2015-01-01

    Epidemic viral conjunctivitis is a highly contagious disease that is encountered year-round. The causative agents are mainly adenoviruses and enteroviruses. It occurs most commonly upon infection with subgroup D adenoviruses of types 8, 19, or 37. For common corneal involvement of human adenovirus type 8 epidemic keratoconjunctivitis, full-layer epithelial detachment is rarely seen. Herein, we report three cases of epidemic keratoconjunctivitis during an outbreak which manifested as large corneal epithelial full-layer detachment within a few days. The lesions healed without severe sequelae under proper treatment. The unique manifestation of this outbreak may indicate the evolution of human adenovirus type 8. PMID:26060391

  11. Utility of Noninvasive Markers of Fibrosis in Cholestatic Liver Diseases.

    PubMed

    Corpechot, Christophe

    2016-02-01

    Methods of liver fibrosis assessment have changed considerably in the last 20 years, and noninvasive markers now have been recognized as major first-line tools in the management of patients with chronic viral hepatitis infection. But what about the efficiency and utility of these surrogate indices for the more uncommon chronic cholestatic liver diseases, namely primary biliary cirrhosis and primary sclerosing cholangitis? This article provides clinicians with a global overview of what is currently known in the field. Both diagnostic and prognostic aspects of noninvasive markers of fibrosis in cholestatic liver diseases are presented and discussed. PMID:26593296

  12. Addison's disease as a presentation of metastatic malignant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, B; Patel, M; Ethunandan, M; Ilankovan, V

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma accounts for 5% of all skin cancers. The risk of metastasis is related to the thickness of the tumour, and can affect local, regional and distant sites. Adrenal metastasis from melanoma of the head and neck is uncommon and often asymptomatic. Addison's disease as a presentation of metastatic melanoma is extremely rare and we are unaware of previous reports in the world literature. We report a case of a patient with metastatic melanoma presenting with signs and symptoms of Addison's disease. PMID:26688417

  13. Primary amyloidosis mimicking Crohn’s disease: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ziwei; Huang, Chaoyang; Ji, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Amyloidosis is an uncommon disease that results from the extracellular deposition of abnormal fibrillary protein. This paper reports a case of primary amyloidosis with predominant involvement of the gastrointestinal tract and heart as a mimicker of Crohn’s disease in a sixty-seven years old man admitted with repeated diarrhea and fatigue. This patient poorly responded to 5-aminosalicylic acid and quickly developed dyspnea and hypotension. The further laboratory test revealed a monoclonal protein detected by serum protein electrophoresis. Biopsy of abdominal wall fat pad revealed amyloid substance deposited and positive Congo red staining, which was diagnosed as primary amyloidosis. PMID:26629126

  14. Scrotal involvement in Madelung disease: clinical, ultrasound and MR findings.

    PubMed

    Poggi, G; Moro, G; Teragni, C; Delmonte, A; Saini, G; Bernardo, G

    2006-01-01

    Multiple symmetrical lipomatosis, also known as Madelung disease, Launois-Bensaude syndrome, and benign symmetrical lipomatosis, is an uncommon disease that is characterized by the presence of multiple and symmetrical deposits of nonencapsulated adipose tissue in the neck, upper trunk, arms, and legs. It affects mainly men, with a higher incidence in the Mediterranean area, and is typically associated with high alcohol consumption and a high prevalence of peripheral neuropathy that usually appears long after the development of lipomatous masses. We report the case of a patient with involvement of the scrotum. We present clinical, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance appearances of these scrotal lipomatous masses for the first time. PMID:16447078

  15. Behcet's Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    NINDS Behcet's Disease Information Page Table of Contents (click to jump to sections) What is Behcet's Disease? Is there ... Trials Organizations Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Behcet's Disease? Behcet's disease is a rare, chronic inflammatory ...

  16. Parkinson's Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... NINDS NINDS Parkinson's Disease Information Page Clinical Trials Biomarkers of Risk of Parkinson Disease This study determines if people with biomarkers for Parkinson’s disease actually develop the disease during ...

  17. Lentil Diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Major lentil diseases around the world have been described and reviewed. The major diseases include Ascochyta blight, Fusarium wilt, Botrytis Gray Mold, Lentil rust, Stemphylium blight, Anthracnose, and virus diseases. The management practices for these diseases are also presented....

  18. Meningococcal Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... gets meningococcal disease? Meningococcal disease most often causes meningitis and blood infections. It may start like a ... Science: Putting a Face on Meningococcal Disease National Meningitis Association Facts about Meningococcal Disease for Adults adultvaccination. ...

  19. Alzheimer's disease: an evolutionary approach.

    PubMed

    Bufill, Enric; Blesa, Rafael; Augustí, Jordi

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a complex disease associated with advanced age whose causes are still not fully known. Approaching the disease from an evolutionary standpoint may help in understanding the root cause of human vulnerability to the disease. AD is very common in humans and extremely uncommon in other mammals, which suggests that the genetic changes underlying the alterations in cerebral structure or function that have taken place over the course of the evolution of the genus Homo have left specific neurons in the human brain particularly vulnerable to factors which trigger the disease. Most of the genes whose mutation leads to AD are involved in synaptic plasticity. Evidence has also been found relating AD to neuronal oxidative stress. Neurons in certain association areas of the human brain retain juvenile characteristics into adulthood, such as the increased expression of genes related to synaptic activity and plasticity, incomplete myelination and elevated aerobic metabolism, which can cause an increase in oxidative stress in these neurons. Oxidative stress can cause myelin breakdown and epigenetic changes in the promoter region of genes related to synaptic plasticity, reducing their expression. These changes may in some cases induce hyperphosphorylation of tau and ?-amyloid deposits, which are characteristic of AD. The adaptation of humans to the cognitive niche probably required an increase in synaptic plasticity and activity and neuronal metabolism in neurons in areas related to certain cognitive functions such as autobiographical memory, social interaction and planning. The cost of these changes may have been the brain's increased vulnerability to factors which can trigger AD. This vulnerability may have resulted from the evolutionary legacies that have occurred over the course of the evolution of the human brain, making AD a possible example of antagonistic pleiotropy. The evolutionary approach allows apparently unrelated data from different disciplines to be combined in a manner that may lead to an improved understanding of complex diseases such as Alzheimer's. PMID:23579031

  20. An Atlas of Infectious and Parasitic Diseases of the Central Nervous System. A Cooperative Study of SILAN (Sociedad Iberolatinoamericana de Neurorradiologia).

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Toledo, E; Santos Andrade, C; Da Costa Leite, C; Del Carpio-O'Donovan, R; Fayed, N; Morales, H; Peterson, R; Palacios, E; Previgliano, C H; Rocha, A J; Romero, J M; Rugilo, C; Staut, C C V; Tamer, I; Tavares Lucato, L; Nader, M

    2010-10-01

    Infectious diseases of the central nervous system vary in frequency in different locations in America and Europe. What is common in Brazil can be a sporadic presentation in Europe. Cooperative work gathering experiences from neuroradiologists working in various places can be achieved and will help to identify uncommon cases that can present in our daily practice. PMID:24148677

  1. Commentary: is Alzheimer's disease uniquely human?

    PubMed

    Finch, Caleb E; Austad, Steven N

    2015-02-01

    That Alzheimer's disease (AD) might be a human-specific disease was hypothesized by Rapoport in 1989. Apes and humans share an identical amyloid beta (A?) peptide amino acid sequence and accumulate considerable A? deposits after age 40 years, an age when amyloid plaques are uncommon in humans. Despite their early A? buildup, ape brains have not shown evidence dystrophic neurites near plaques. Aging great ape brains also have few neurofibrillary tangles, with one exception of 1 obese chimpanzee euthanized after a stroke who displayed abundant neurofibrillary tangles, but without the typical AD distribution. We discuss the need for more exacting evaluation of neuron density with age, and note husbandry issues that may allow great apes to live to greater ages. We remain reserved about expectations for fully developed AD-like pathology in the great apes of advanced ages and cautiously support Rapoport's hypothesis. PMID:25533426

  2. Commentary: is Alzheimer's disease uniquely human?

    PubMed Central

    Finch, Caleb E.; Austad, Steven N.

    2015-01-01

    That Alzheimer's disease (AD) might be a human-specific disease was hypothesized by Rapoport in 1989. Apes and humans share an identical amyloid beta (A?) peptide amino acid sequence and accumulate considerable A? deposits after age 40 years, an age when amyloid plaques are uncommon in humans. Despite their early A? buildup, ape brains have not shown evidence dystrophic neurites near plaques. Aging great ape brains also have few neurofibrillary tangles, with one exception of 1 obese chimpanzee euthanized after a stroke who displayed abundant neurofibrillary tangles, but without the typical AD distribution. We discuss the need for more exacting evaluation of neuron density with age, and note husbandry issues that may allow great apes to live to greater ages. We remain reserved about expectations for fully developed AD-like pathology in the great apes of advanced ages and cautiously support Rapoport's hypothesis. PMID:25533426

  3. Kimura’s Disease: A Rare Cause of Chronic Lymphadenopathy in a Child

    PubMed Central

    SNEHA, Latha Magatha; NAGARAJAN, Vinoth Ponnurangam; KARMEGARAJ, Balaganesh; RAO, Shalini; MANIPRIYA, Ravindran; SCOTT, Julius Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Kimura’s disease is an uncommon entity that affects adults, with a predilection for the Asian population. This may rarely be encountered in children, and the knowledge of this fact is essential to rule out the remote possibility of Kimura’s disease in children with a slow-growing painless mass in the head and neck region. In this case report, we document this disease in an 8-year-old boy with a slow-growing swelling in the right posterior auricular region. PMID:26023299

  4. Early Diagnosis and Management of Acute Vertigo from Vestibular Migraine and Ménière's Disease.

    PubMed

    Seemungal, Barry; Kaski, Diego; Lopez-Escamez, Jose Antonio

    2015-08-01

    Vestibular migraine is the most common cause of acute episodic vestibular symptoms after benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. In contrast, Ménière's disease is an uncommon disorder. For both conditions, early and accurate diagnosis (or its exclusion) enables the correct management of patients with acute episodic vestibular symptoms. Long-term management of migraine requires changes in lifestyle to avoid triggers of migraine and/or prophylactic drugs if attacks become too frequent. The long-term management of Ménière's disease also involves lifestyle changes (low salt diet), medications (betahistine, steroids), and ablative therapy applied to the diseased ear (eg, intratympanic gentamicin). PMID:26231275

  5. Pigmented Bowen's disease of the penis and scrotum in a patient with AIDS.

    PubMed

    Al-Dawsari, Najla A; Raslan, Wasim; Dawamneh, M Fawaz

    2014-01-01

    Patients with HIV have higher risk of developing squamous cell carcinoma of the skin given the increased risk of HPV infection, which alters cell proliferation and apoptosis [1]. Pigmented Bowen's disease is an uncommon form of squamous cell carcinoma in-situ characterized by pigmented lesions that can clinically mimic superficial spreading melanoma, pigmented basal cell carcinoma, melanocytic nevus, Bowenoid papulosis, and seborrheic keratosis. PMID:24746300

  6. Anemia resolved by thoracoscopic resection of a mediastinal mass: a case report of unicentric Castleman's disease.

    PubMed

    Suh, Jong Hui; Hong, Sook Hee; Jeong, Seong Cheol; Park, Chan Beom; Choi, Kuk Bin; Shin, Ok Ran; Choi, Si Young

    2015-07-01

    Castleman's disease (CD) is an uncommon benign lymphoproliferative disorder that usually presents as a single or multiple mediastinal mass. In unicentric CD, constitutional symptoms are rare, but are curable with surgical resection. However, serious intraoperative bleeding often requires conversion to thoracotomy. We present a case of unicentric CD in a 25-year-old woman with anemia, who was successfully treated by thoracoscopic resection. We describe the clinical course from the initial presentation to diagnosis and surgical cure. PMID:26380750

  7. Kawasaki Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... treatment helps reduce the risk of Kawasaki disease affecting the coronary arteries and causing serious problems. Outlook Kawasaki disease can't be prevented. However, most children who have the disease usually recover within weeks ...

  8. Huntington's Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an inherited disease that causes certain nerve cells in the brain to waste away. ... express emotions. If one of your parents has Huntington's disease, you have a 50 percent chance of getting ...

  9. Alzheimer's Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia among older people. Dementia is a brain disorder that ... higher if a family member has had the disease. No treatment can stop the disease. However, some ...

  10. Infectious Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    Infectious diseases kill more people worldwide than any other single cause. Infectious diseases are caused by germs. Germs are tiny living ... live NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

  11. Bone Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... break Osteogenesis imperfecta makes your bones brittle Paget's disease of bone makes them weak Bone disease can make bones easy to break Bones can also develop cancer and infections Other bone diseases are caused by poor nutrition, genetic factors or ...

  12. Wilson Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Share External Link Disclaimer Digestive Diseases Wilson Disease Alternate Versions Wilson Disease (444 KB) You can also ... things psychosis—when a person loses contact with reality Other Signs and Symptoms Other signs and symptoms ...

  13. Binswanger's Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Binswanger's Disease? Binswanger's disease (BD), also called subcortical vascular dementia , is a type of dementia caused by widespread, ... Hope Through Research Information booklet about Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia, and other types of dementia compiled by the ...

  14. Parkinson's Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Digestive System How the Body Works Main Page Parkinson's Disease KidsHealth > Kids > Health Problems of Grown-Ups > ... symptoms of something called Parkinson's disease. What Is Parkinson's Disease? You may have seen the actor Michael ...

  15. Lyme Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Your Best Self Smart Snacking Losing Weight Safely Lyme Disease KidsHealth > Teens > Infections > Skin Infections & Rashes > Lyme ... Northwest, and the northern midwestern states. What Is Lyme Disease? People get Lyme disease through tick bites. ...

  16. Lyme Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    newsletter | contact Share | Lyme Disease Information for adults A A A Lyme disease frequently presents as a red or pink circle that is ... rash is noticed by the person affected. Overview Lyme disease is the result of infection with the ...

  17. Menkes Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... link in the menu on the left. Common Names Kinky hair disease Menkes disease Menkes syndrome Steely hair disease Medical or Scientific Names Congenital hypocupremia (pronounced kuhn-JEN-i-tl hahy- ...

  18. Myxomatous mitral valve disease in dogs: Does size matter?

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Heidi G.; Kilroy-Glynn, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD) is the most commonly diagnosed cardiovascular disease in the dog accounting for more than 70% of all cardiovascular disease in dogs. As are most canine diseases with genetic underpinnings, risk of MMVD is greatly increased in a subset of breeds. What is uncommon is that the vast majority of the breeds at elevated risk for MMVD are small or toy breeds with average adult weights under 9 kg. These breeds appear to have little in common other than their diminutive size. In the following review we propose a number of mechanisms by which relatively unrelated small breeds may have developed a predisposition for chronic valvular disorders. Although factors such as age are key in the expression of MMVD, taking a comprehensive look at the commonalities, as well as the differences, between the susceptible breeds may assist in finding the causal variants responsible for MMVD and translating them to improved treatments for both dogs and humans. PMID:22356836

  19. Current Status of Therapy in Autoimmune Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Al-Harthi, Nadya; Heathcote, E. Jenny

    2009-01-01

    Therapeutic strategies for autoimmune liver diseases are increasingly established. Although proportionately uncommon, specialist centers have with time refined the best approaches for each disease, based on an improved understanding of the spectrum of presentation. The major treatment aims are to prevent end-stage liver disease and its associated complications. As a result of drugs such as ursodeoxycholic acid, predniso(lo)ne and azathioprine, both primary biliary cirrhosis and autoimmune hepatitis are now less commonly indications for liver transplantation. Unfortunately, the same inroads in treatment efficacy have as yet not been made for primary sclerosing cholangitis, although the recognition that a subset of patients may have a treatable secondary sclerosing cholangitis (IgG4 related) is helping a proportion. With better biological understanding, more specific interventions are expected that will benefit all those with autoimmune liver diseases. PMID:21180531

  20. Bladder Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... frequent, urgent urination Bladder cancer Doctors diagnose bladder diseases using different tests. These include urine tests, x- ... National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  1. A Case of Extensive IgG4-Related Disease Presenting as Massive Pleural Effusion, Mediastinal Mass, and Mesenteric Lymphadenopathy in a 16-Year-Old Male

    PubMed Central

    Goag, Eun Kyong; Park, Ji Eun; Lee, Eun Hye; Park, Young Mok; Kim, Chi Young; Lee, Jung Mo; Kim, Young Joo; Kim, Young Sam; Kim, Se Kyu; Chang, Joon; Park, Moo Suk

    2015-01-01

    IgG4-related disease is an immune-mediated fibro-inflammatory disease, characterized by lymphoplasmacytic infiltration composed of IgG4-positive plasma cells of various organs with elevated circulating levels of IgG4. This disease is now reported with increasing frequency and usually affects middle-aged men. Massive pleural effusion in children is an uncommon feature in IgG4-related disease. Here, we report a case of a 16-year-old male patient with extensive IgG4-related disease presenting with massive pleural effusion, mediastinal mass, and mesenteric lymphadenopathy. PMID:26508932

  2. Heart Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... you're like most people, you think that heart disease is a problem for others. But heart disease is the number one killer in the ... of disability. There are many different forms of heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease ...

  3. Newcastle disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Newcastle disease (ND), referred to as Exotic Newcastle disease (END) in the U. S., is an acute viral disease of domestic poultry and many other bird species and a recognized worldwide problem. Occurrence of END is due to an infection with virulent strains of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) and is a ...

  4. Cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    2015-10-21

    Essential facts Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is an umbrella term for all diseases of the heart and blood vessels. It includes coronary heart disease, peripheral arterial disease, stroke and transient ischaemic attack. CVD is the leading cause of death in England and Wales, accounting for almost one third of all deaths. PMID:26488967

  5. Chronic Granulomatous Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bortoletto, Pietro; Lyman, Kyle; Camacho, Andres; Fricchione, Marielle; Khanolkar, Aaruni

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is an uncommon primary immunodeficiency that can be inherited in an X-linked (XL) or an autosomal recessive (AR) manner. We reviewed our large, single-center US experience with CGD. Methods: We reviewed 27 patients at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago from March 1985 to November 2013. Fisher exact test was used to compare differences in categorical variables, and Student t test was used to compare means for continuous variables. Serious infections were defined as those requiring intravenous antibiotics or hospitalization. Results: There were 23 males and 4 females; 19 were XL and 8 were AR. The average age at diagnosis was 3.0 years; 2.1 years for XL and 5.3 years for AR inheritance (P = 0.02). There were 128 serious infections. The most frequent infectious agents were Staphylococcus aureus (n = 13), Serratia (n = 11), Klebsiella (n = 7), Aspergillus (n = 6) and Burkholderia (n = 4). The most common serious infections were pneumonia (n = 38), abscess (n = 32) and lymphadenitis (n = 29). Thirteen patients had granulomatous complications. Five patients were below the 5th percentile for height and 4 were below the 5th percentile for weight. Average length of follow-up after diagnosis was 10.1 years. Twenty-four patients were compliant and maintained on interferon-?, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and an azole. The serious infection rate was 0.62 per patient-year. Twenty-three patients are alive (1 was lost to follow-up). Conclusions: We present a large, single-center US experience with CGD. Twenty-three of 27 patients are alive after 3276 patient-months of follow-up (1 has been lost to follow-up), and our serious infection rate was 0.62 per patient-year. PMID:26181896

  6. Chronic liver disease in the human immunodeficiency virus patient.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Chathur; Dharel, Narayan; Sterling, Richard K

    2015-02-01

    There are an estimated 40 million HIV infected individuals worldwide, with chronic liver disease being the 2nd leading cause of mortality in this population. Elevated liver functions are commonly noted in HIV patients and the etiologies are varied. Viral hepatitis B and C, fatty liver and drug induced liver injury are more common. Treatment options for viral hepatitis C are rapidly evolving and are promising, but treatments are limited for the other conditions and is primarily supportive. Opportunistic infections of the liver are now uncommon. Irrespective of etiology, management requires referral to specialized centers and with due diligence mortality can be reduced. PMID:25454294

  7. Acute graft versus host disease after orthotopic liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Graft versus host disease (GVHD) is an uncommon complication after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) with an incidence of 0.1–2%, but an 80–100% mortality rate. Patients can present with skin rashes, diarrhea, and bone marrow aplasia between two to eight weeks after OLT. Diagnosis of GVHD is made based on clinical and histologic evidence, supported by chimerism studies showing donor HLA alleles in the recipient bone marrow or blood. Several therapeutic approaches have been used for the management of GVHD after OLT including increased immunosuppression, decreased immunosuppression, and cellular therapies. However, success rates have been low, and new approaches are needed. PMID:22889203

  8. An uncommonly serious case of an uncommon sport injury

    PubMed Central

    Abedin, A; Chen, H; Carson, J

    2005-01-01

    Methods: A suprachoroidal haemorrhage was drained and dense intravitreal blood was removed. An inferior buckle was applied with the use of intraocular gas. A macular haemorrhage resolved slowly. Results: Despite several surgical procedures over 1.5 years, the final visual acuity of the patient was only 6/60 because of a dense macular scar. Conclusions: Helmets worn as protection when playing cricket need to be designed better and be of better material. Eye protection should be worn at all levels of play. PMID:16046321

  9. Uncommon commentaries [on energy subjects

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    Comments from several individuals are given on cogeneration expansion (Lindsay Audin); electric power system reliability in a deregulated market (Marija D. Ilic, MIT and Leonard S. Hyman, Salomon Smith Barney); demand size management (Robert J. Bradley, Jr., Cato Institute); and new questions about the competitive electric power market (Mike Sherman, Peregrine Energy Group).

  10. Uncommon Infant and Newborn Problems

    MedlinePLUS

    It can be scary when your baby is sick, especially when it is not an everyday problem like a cold or a fever. You may not know whether the ... treat it. If you have concerns about your baby's health, call your health care provider right away. ...

  11. Uncommon Connections with Common Numerators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lesser, Lawrence M.; Guthrie, Joe A.

    2012-01-01

    Undergraduate students who are pre-service teachers need to make connections between the college mathematics they are learning and the pre-college mathematics they will be teaching. Spanning a broad range of undergraduate curricula, this article describes useful lesser-known connections, explorations, and original proofs involving fractions. In…

  12. Uncommon ectomycorrhizal networks: richness and

    E-print Network

    Taylor, Lee

    ) plants and fungi typically associate with many symbionts both as individuals and across a species' range. Trappe (1977) estimated that Pseudotsuga menziesii is compatible with some 2000 species of EM fungi autotrophic plants is the genus Alnus. Although it is known that the EM fungi associated with Alnus

  13. Rare species occupy uncommon niches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markham, John

    2014-08-01

    The fact that temperate grasslands often contain upwards of 30 vascular plant species per m2 yet these species seem to have relatively similar life histories and resource requirements has made explaining species coexistence in these communities a major focus of research. While the reduction of competition by disturbance has been a popular explanation for species coexistence, in tallgrass prairies any level of disturbance either has no effect, or decreases diversity, since it favors the dominant plants. Although there has long been speculation that grassland species could coexist by niche partitioning the concept received renewed interest when it was shown that soil hydrology could explain species coexistence. One aspect of community structure that has not been explained by niche partitioning is the rareness and commonness of species within communities. There are three classes of explanations for rareness: narrow habitat requirements, low competitive ability combined with frequency dependent fitness and, dispersal ability. However, evidence for these explanations tend to be anecdotal, focusing on particular species. Here I show that in tallgrass prairies common and rare species consistently occupy different parts of niche space, with rare species being restricted by the cover of common species and occupying the rare available niches.

  14. Eosinophil-Associated Lung Diseases. A Cry for Surfactant Proteins A and D Help?

    PubMed Central

    Ledford, Julie G.; Addison, Kenneth J.; Foster, Matthew W.

    2014-01-01

    Surfactant proteins (SP)-A and SP-D (SP-A/-D) play important roles in numerous eosinophil-dominated diseases, including asthma, allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, and allergic rhinitis. In these settings, SP-A/-D have been shown to modulate eosinophil chemotaxis, inhibit eosinophil mediator release, and mediate macrophage clearance of apoptotic eosinophils. Dysregulation of SP-A/-D function in eosinophil-dominated diseases is also not uncommon. Alterations in serum SP-A/-D levels are associated with disease severity in allergic rhinitis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Furthermore, oligimerization of SP-A/-D, necessary for their proper function, can be perturbed by reactive nitrogen species, which are increased in eosinophilic disease. In this review, we highlight the associations of eosinophilic lung diseases with SP-A and SP-D levels and functions. PMID:24960334

  15. Detection of Common, Emerging and Uncommon VP4, and VP7 Human Group A Rotavirus Genotypes from Urban Sewage Samples in Uruguay.

    PubMed

    Tort, Luis Fernando Lopez; Victoria, Matías; Lizasoain, Andrés; García, Mariana; Berois, Mabel; Cristina, Juan; Leite, José Paulo Gagliardi; Gómez, Mariela Martínez; Miagostovich, Marize Pereira; Colina, Rodney

    2015-12-01

    Environmental approach has proven to be a useful tool for epidemiological studies demonstrating through environmental studies the diversity of viruses circulating in a given population. The aim of this study was to perform a phylogenetic characterization of the group A rotavirus (RVA) glycoprotein (G)- and protease-sensitive (P)-genotypes obtained from sewage samples (n = 116) collected in six cities of Uruguay during March 2011 to April 2013. A worldwide standardized semi-nested multiplex RT-PCR (SNM RT-PCR) protocol directed against VP4 and VP7 genes were conducted for RVA detection and consensual DNA fragments were submitted to nucleotide sequencing. P and/or G genotype was successfully determined by phylogenetic analysis in 61 % (n = 37) of the positive samples obtained by SNM RT-PCR (n = 61). The RVA genotypes were as follow: G1 (n = 2), G2 (n = 14), G3 (n = 5), G12 (n = 2), P[4] (n = 4), P[8] (n = 16), and P[3] (n = 2). Interestingly, through phylogenetic analysis, emerging, and uncommon human genotypes could be detected. Results obtained from the comparison of RVA genotypes detected in the current study and Uruguayan RVA strains previously described for contemporary clinical pediatric cases showed that monitoring sewage may be a good screening option for a rapid and economical overview of the circulating genotypes in the surrounding human population and a useful approximation to study RVA epidemiology in a future vaccine monitoring program. The present study represents the first report in Uruguay that describes the phylogenetic diversity of RVA from urban sewage samples. PMID:26267835

  16. Zoonotic Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Publications Presentations and Podcasts Training Related Links Related Links One Health Office One Health Office Mission Zoonotic ... discussions about zoonotic diseases and One Health. Related Links Gastrointestinal (Enteric) Diseases from Animals Related Links One ...

  17. Heart Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention ...

  18. Kidney Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Your Best Self Smart Snacking Losing Weight Safely Kidney Disease KidsHealth > Teens > Diseases & Conditions > Kidneys & Urinary System > ... Syndrome Coping With Kidney Conditions What Do the Kidneys Do? You might never think much about some ...

  19. Colonic Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... where your body makes and stores stool. Many disorders affect the colon's ability to work properly. Some ... abdominal cramping and other symptoms Treatment for colonic diseases varies greatly depending on the disease and its ...

  20. Huntington's Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... is Huntington's Disease? Huntington's disease (HD) results from genetically programmed degeneration of brain cells, called neurons, in ... the NINDS or the NIH is appreciated. Last Modified April 19, 2015 National Institute of Neurological Disorders ...

  1. Wilson Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Share External Link Disclaimer Digestive Diseases Wilson Disease Alternate Versions PDF Version? (444 KB) You can also ... things psychosis—when a person loses contact with reality Other Signs and Symptoms Other signs and symptoms ...

  2. Heart Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Digestive System How the Body Works Main Page Heart Disease KidsHealth > Kids > Health Problems of Grown-Ups > ... chest pain, heart attacks, and strokes . What Is Heart Disease? The heart is the center of the ...

  3. Mycobacterial Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... NIAID clinical studies on ClinicalTrials.gov . ? Related Links Tuberculosis Leprosy (Hansen's Disease) National Library of Medicine, MedlinePlus ... coats that can be found throughout the world. Tuberculosis and leprosy (Hansen’s disease) are the best known ...

  4. Chagas disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Chagas disease is an illness spread by insects. It is common in South and Central America. ... Chagas disease is caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. It is spread by the bite of reduviid bugs ...

  5. Hashimoto's Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... print versions from our online catalog. ? Additional Links Hypothyroidism Pregnancy and Thyroid Disease Thyroid Tests Find a ... disease often leads to reduced thyroid function, or hypothyroidism. Hypothyroidism is a disorder that occurs when the ...

  6. Huntington disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Huntington disease is a disorder in which nerve cells in certain parts of the brain waste away, or ... Huntington disease is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 4. The defect causes a part of DNA, ...

  7. Lyme Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Lyme disease is a bacterial infection you get from the bite of an infected tick. The first symptom ... Muscle and joint aches A stiff neck Fatigue Lyme disease can be hard to diagnose because you may ...

  8. Tickborne Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... on a blade of grass. Credit: CDC. Rocky Mountain spotted fever, a bacterial disease transmitted by the ... Ehrlichiosis and Anaplasmosis Lyme Disease Relapsing Fever Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever Tularemia back to top ???? Last Updated ...

  9. Graves' Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... our online catalog. ? Additional Links Hashimoto's Disease Hyperthyroidism Hypothyroidism Pregnancy & Thyroid Disease Thyroid Tests Find a Specialist ... everyone who receives radioactive iodine treatment eventually develops hypothyroidism, which occurs when the thyroid does not make ...

  10. Hashimoto's Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... disease often leads to reduced thyroid function, or hypothyroidism. Hypothyroidism is a disorder that occurs when the thyroid ... Hashimoto’s disease is the most common cause of hypothyroidism in the United States. 1 Read more in ...

  11. Parkinson's Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a type of movement disorder. It happens when nerve cells in the brain don't ... coordination As symptoms get worse, people with the disease may have trouble walking, talking, or doing simple ...

  12. Raynaud's Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Raynaud's disease is a rare disorder of the blood vessels, usually in the fingers and toes. It causes the ... secondary Raynaud's, which is caused by injuries, other diseases, or certain medicines. People in colder climates are ...

  13. Meniere's Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Meniere's disease is a disorder of the inner ear. It can cause severe dizziness, a roaring sound in your ... together over several days. Some people with Meniere's disease have "drop attacks" during which the dizziness is ...

  14. Fifth Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Fifth disease is a viral infection caused by parvovirus B19. The virus only infects humans; it's not the same parvovirus that dogs and cats can get. Fifth disease mostly affects children. Symptoms can include a low ...

  15. Legionnaires' Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Legionnaires' disease is a type of pneumonia caused by bacteria. You usually get it by breathing in mist from ... spread from person to person. Symptoms of Legionnaires' disease include high fever, chills, a cough, and sometimes ...

  16. Chagas Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Chagas disease is caused by a parasite. It is common in Latin America but not in the United States. ... nose, the bite wound or a cut. The disease can also spread through contaminated food, a blood ...

  17. Addison Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... blood pressure and water and salt balance. Addison disease happens if the adrenal glands don't make ... problem with your immune system usually causes Addison disease. The immune system mistakenly attacks your own tissues, ...

  18. Eye Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the back of the eye Macular degeneration - a disease that destroys sharp, central vision Diabetic eye problems ... defense is to have regular checkups, because eye diseases do not always have symptoms. Early detection and ...

  19. Endocrine Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... low, you may have a hormone disorder. Hormone diseases also occur if your body does not respond ... In the United States, the most common endocrine disease is diabetes. There are many others. They are ...

  20. Parasitic Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... a bug bite, or sexual contact. Some parasitic diseases are easily treated and some are not. Parasites ... be seen with the naked eye. Some parasitic diseases occur in the United States. Contaminated water supplies ...

  1. Gaucher Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Gaucher disease is a rare, inherited disorder in which you do not have enough of an enzyme called glucocerebrosidase. ... It usually starts in childhood or adolescence. Gaucher disease has no cure. Treatment options for types 1 ...

  2. Liver Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... remove poisons. There are many kinds of liver diseases. Viruses cause some of them, like hepatitis A, ... the skin, can be one sign of liver disease. Cancer can affect the liver. You could also ...

  3. Wilson Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Wilson disease is a rare inherited disorder that prevents your body from getting rid of extra copper. You need ... copper into bile, a digestive fluid. With Wilson disease, the copper builds up in your liver, and ...

  4. Leigh's Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Leigh's disease can be caused by mutations in mitochondrial DNA or by deficiencies of an enzyme called pyruvate ... kidney function. In Leigh’s disease, genetic mutations in mitochondrial DNA interfere with the energy sources that run cells ...

  5. Fifth Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Parvovirus B19 and Fifth Disease Note: Javascript is disabled ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Parvovirus Home About Parvovirus B19 Fifth Disease Pregnancy and ...

  6. Fifth disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Parvovirus B19; Erythema infectiosum; Slapped cheek rash ... Fifth disease is caused by human parvovirus B19. It often affects preschoolers or school-age children during the spring. The disease spreads through the fluids in the nose and ...

  7. Celiac Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... problems in your small intestine when you eat gluten, a protein found in wheat, rye, and barley. Gluten is poison to people who have celiac disease. What does gluten do to people who have celiac disease? In ...

  8. Celiac Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the disease over time. Long-term complications include malnutrition liver diseases intestinal cancer lymphoma [ Top ] What other ... care provider usually examines the patient's body for malnutrition or a rash uses a stethoscope to listen ...

  9. Hirschsprung Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Digestive System Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) Inflammatory Bowel Disease X-Ray Exam: Upper Gastrointestinal Tract (Upper GI) Irritable Bowel Syndrome Inflammatory Bowel Disease Your Digestive System Constipation ...

  10. Wildlife Diseases 

    E-print Network

    Texas Wildlife Services

    2007-03-13

    Some wildlife diseases can be transmitted to humans. This leaflet explains the causes and symptoms of rabies, giardiasis, bubonic plague, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, Lyme disease, tularemia, leptospirosis and histoplasmosis....

  11. Fungal Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... flu or tuberculosis. Some fungal diseases like fungal meningitis and bloodstream infections are less common than skin and lung infections but can be deadly. Types of fungal diseases Read about different types of ...

  12. Gaucher Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... common of the inherited metabolic disorder known as lipid storage diseases. Lipids are fatty materials that include oils, fatty acids, ... research to find ways to treat and prevent lipid storage disorders such as Gaucher disease. For example, ...

  13. Sandhoff Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Sandhoff Disease? Sandhoff disease is a rare, inherited lipid storage disorder that progressively destroys nerve cells in ... results in the harmful accumulation of certain fats (lipids) in the brain and other organs of the ...

  14. Meniere's Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schessel, David A.

    1997-01-01

    Meniere's disease is characterized by unpredictable spells of severe vertigo and fluctuations in hearing and tinnitus. This article discusses the incidence of Meniere's disease, the present status of our understanding of this disease, controversies in its diagnosis, and the multiple therapeutic modalities recruited in its treatment. (Contains…

  15. Canavan Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... prognosis? What research is being done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Canavan Disease? Canavan disease is a gene-linked neurological disorder in which the brain degenerates into spongy tissue riddled with microscopic fluid-filled spaces. Canavan disease has been classified as one of ...

  16. Prostate Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    Aging & Health A to Z Prostate Diseases Basic Facts & Information What are Prostate Diseases? The prostate—one of the components of a man's sex organs—is a ... out anything serious. The Most Common Types of Prostate Diseases Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) Prostatitis Prostate cancer ...

  17. Meniere's Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Overview What is Meniere's disease? Meniere's (say: "men-ears") disease is a problem with your inner ear. No ... a build up of fluid in the inner ear. Although it can be troublesome, Meniere's disease is not contagious, and it isn't fatal. ...

  18. Lyme Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    newsletter | contact Share | Lyme Disease A parent's guide to condition and treatment information A A A Lyme disease may simply be displayed as a subtle ... rather than the classic bull's-eye rash. Overview Lyme disease is the result of infection with the ...

  19. Lyme Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, George C.

    1991-01-01

    This overview of the public health significance of Lyme disease includes the microbiological specifics of the infectious spirochete, the entomology and ecology of the ticks which are the primary disease carrier, the clinical aspects and treatment stages, the known epidemiological patterns, and strategies for disease control and for expanded public…

  20. Celiac Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... symptoms in children. Some people have no symptoms. Celiac disease is genetic. Blood tests can help your doctor diagnose the disease. Your doctor may also need to examine a small piece of tissue from your small ... National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  1. Diffuse aneurysmal and obstructive coronary artery disease: a do-not-intervene patient.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Eulália; Melica, Bruno; Primo, João; Mota, João C; Ferreira, Nuno; P Morais, Gustavo; Ponte, Marta; Caeiro, Daniel; Carvalho, Mónica; Bettencourt, Nuno; Vouga, Luís; Gama, Vasco

    2013-01-01

    Coronary artery aneurysms are uncommon but potentially hazardous entities found on a small percentage of coronary angiograms. The best management strategy remains to be determined; the coexistence of obstructive coronary artery disease is the main determinant of prognosis. We report the case of a middle-aged woman with mixed aneurysmal and obstructive coronary artery disease presenting as an acute myocardial infarction, probably due to atherosclerosis. The unusual severity and complexity of the angiographic presentation of this case, with involvement of all major coronary arteries, raises important issues in terms of the patient's treatment options. PMID:23890759

  2. Addison's disease.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Soumya Brata; Sarkar, Subrata; Ghosh, Supratim; Bandyopadhyay, Subhankar

    2012-10-01

    Addison's disease is a rare endocrinal disorder, with several oral and systemic manifestations. A variety of pathological processes may cause Addison's disease. Classically, hyperpigmentation is associated with the disease, and intraoral pigmentation is perceived as the initial sign and develops earlier than the dermatological pigmentation. The symptoms of the disease usually progress slowly and an event of illness or accident can make the condition worse and may lead to a life-threatening crisis. In this case, several oral as well as systemic manifestation of the Addison's disease was encountered. PMID:23633816

  3. DiseasesWorld DiseasesWorld

    E-print Network

    MacDonald, Andrew

    : Mosquito bite. Around half of the world's population are at risk of malaria (3.3 billion people). #12World DiseasesWorld DiseasesWorld World World Diseases Diseases Diseases Diseases Diseases DiseasesWorld Diseases #12;Prevalence (people) 8.6million Deathsperyear 1.3million Geographicaldistribution worldwide

  4. [Social diseases, civilization diseases or lifestyle diseases?].

    PubMed

    Betlejewski, Stans?aw

    2007-01-01

    In general, the development of civilization is viewed as a positive step for the well-being of the human species, leading to an increased duration and quality of life. The accelerated progress of civilization (mainly industrialization, urbanization and nutrition) has lead to new possibilities for adverse effects on human health. In former high civilization--like old Egypt, Greece, Roman, Chinese, Indian, Maya civilizations--the "modem civilization diseases" were unknown. Modem science through improved sanitation, vaccination and antibiotics as well as improved social and economical conditions, has eliminated the threat of death from most infectious diseases. In the years after World War II the social, economic and health conditions changed. Most deaths have resulted from heart disease, stroke, cancer and other diseases as a result of an inappropriate relationship of people with their environment and changed lifestyle. Lifestyle diseases are different from other diseases because they are potentially preventable and can be lowered with changes in diet, lifestyle and environment. PMID:18350729

  5. Comprehensive carrier screening and molecular diagnostic testing for recessive childhood diseases.

    PubMed

    Kingsmore, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Of 7,028 disorders with suspected Mendelian inheritance, 1,139 are recessive and have an established molecular basis. Although individually uncommon, Mendelian diseases collectively account for ~20% of infant mortality and ~18% of pediatric hospitalizations. Molecular diagnostic testing is currently available for only ~300 recessive disorders. Preconception screening, together with genetic counseling of carriers, has resulted in remarkable declines in the incidence of several severe recessive diseases including Tay-Sachs disease and cystic fibrosis. However, extension of preconception screening and molecular diagnostic testing to most recessive disease genes has hitherto been impractical. Recently, we reported a preconception carrier screen / molecular diagnostic test for 448 recessive childhood diseases. The current status of this test is reviewed here. Currently, this reports analytical validity of the comprehensive carrier test. As the clinical validity and clinical utility in the contexts described is ascertained, this article will be updated. PMID:22872815

  6. Comprehensive Carrier Screening and Molecular Diagnostic Testing for Recessive Childhood Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kingsmore, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Of 7,028 disorders with suspected Mendelian inheritance, 1,139 are recessive and have an established molecular basis. Although individually uncommon, Mendelian diseases collectively account for ~20% of infant mortality and ~18% of pediatric hospitalizations. Molecular diagnostic testing is currently available for only ~300 recessive disorders. Preconception screening, together with genetic counseling of carriers, has resulted in remarkable declines in the incidence of several severe recessive diseases including Tay-Sachs disease and cystic fibrosis. However, extension of preconception screening and molecular diagnostic testing to most recessive disease genes has hitherto been impractical. Recently, we reported a preconception carrier screen / molecular diagnostic test for 448 recessive childhood diseases. The current status of this test is reviewed here. Currently, this reports analytical validity of the comprehensive carrier test. As the clinical validity and clinical utility in the contexts described is ascertained, this article will be updated. PMID:22872815

  7. Lyme Disease

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Thomas S.; Shapiro, Eugene D.

    2013-01-01

    Synopsis Lyme disease, caused by spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, is the most common vector-borne disease in the United States. The clinical presentation varies depending on the stage of the illness: early disease includes erthyma migrans, early disseminated disease includes multiple erythema migrans, meningitis, cranial nerve palsies and carditis; late disease is primarily arthritis. The symptoms and signs of infection resolve in the vast majority of patients after appropriate treatment with antimicrobials for from 2-4 weeks. Serologic testing should be used judiciously as it often results in misdiagnosis when performed on blood from patients with a low prior probability of disease and those with non-specific symptoms such as fatigue or arthralgia without signs of infection. PMID:20513553

  8. Gaucher Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nagral, Aabha

    2014-01-01

    Gaucher disease is the commonest lysosomal storage disease seen in India and worldwide. It should be considered in any child or adult with an unexplained splenohepatomegaly and cytopenia which are seen in the three types of Gaucher disease. Type 1 is the non-neuronopathic form and type 2 and 3 are the neuronopathic forms. Type 2 is a more severe neuronopathic form leading to mortality by 2 years of age. Definitive diagnosis is made by a blood test–the glucocerebrosidase assay. There is no role for histological examination of the bone marrow, liver or spleen for diagnosis of the disease. Molecular studies for mutations are useful for confirming diagnosis, screening family members and prognosticating the disease. A splenectomy should not be performed except for palliation or when there is no response to enzyme replacement treatment or no possibility of getting any definitive treatment. Splenectomy may worsen skeletal and lung manifestations in Gaucher disease. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) has completely revolutionized the prognosis and is now the standard of care for patients with this disease. Best results are seen in type 1 disease with good resolution of splenohepatomegaly, cytopenia and bone symptoms. Neurological symptoms in type 3 disease need supportive care. ERT is of no benefit in type 2 disease. Monitoring of patients on ERT involves evaluation of growth, blood counts, liver and spleen size and biomarkers such as chitotriosidase which reflect the disease burden. Therapy with ERT is very expensive and though patients in India have so far got the drug through a charitable access programme, there is a need for the government to facilitate access to treatment for this potentially curable disease. Bone marrow transplantation is an inferior option but may be considered when access to expensive ERT is not possible. PMID:25755533

  9. Heart Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Truth National Awareness Campaign for Women about Heart Disease National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) National Cholesterol Education Program National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) ...

  10. A case of multiple sclerosis and celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Batur-Caglayan, H Z; Irkec, C; Yildirim-Capraz, I; Atalay-Akyurek, N; Dumlu, S

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory autoimmune disorder of the central nervous system (CNS). Since a correlation between gluten intake and incidence of MS had been reported, the relationship of antigliadin antibodies and MS was debated. Case Report. We report the case of a 45-year-old female MS patient who is under interferon treatment. After seven years of monitoring, during her routine gastroenterological assessment, she was diagnosed with celiac disease. Conclusion. Beside the neurological manifestations that have been demonstrated in about 10% of celiac disease (CD) patients, white-matter abnormalities in brain MRI are uncommon and controversial. But in the literature, MS seems to be associated with CD as in our patient. We suggest that MS patients with gastroenterological complaints should undergo an assessment for CD. PMID:23365772

  11. Alpers' Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... by mutation in the gene for the mitochondrial DNA polymerase POLG. The disease occurs in about one in 100,000 persons. Most individuals with Alpers' disease do not show ... the mitochondrial DNA depletion, so that these depletion studies cannot be ...

  12. Kidney Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Kidney Disease What is Kidney Disease? What the Kidneys Do Click for more information You have two ... damaged, wastes can build up in the body. Kidney Function and Aging Kidney function may be reduced ...

  13. Kawasaki Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to keep your child home from school or day care until he or she feels strong enough to return. Symptoms What are the symptoms of Kawasaki disease? Children who have Kawasaki disease have a fever (sometimes as high as 104°F) for 5 days or longer. Usually, they also have at least ...

  14. Newcastle disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The focus of this chapter, are viruses of avian paramyxovirus serotype-1 (APMV-1). All isolates of APMV-1 are of one serotype and are referred to as Newcastle disease viruses (NDV). Newcastle disease (ND) is caused only by infections with virulent isolates of APMV-1 (virulent NDV or vNDV). Virulent ...

  15. Cardiovascular Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD), particularly CHD (coronary heart disease) and stroke, remain the leading causes of death of women in America and most developed countries. In recent years the rate of CVD has declined in men but not in women. This is contributed to by an under-recognition of women’s C...

  16. Liver disease.

    PubMed

    2015-11-01

    Essential facts Liver disease is the fifth biggest killer in the UK and, according to the British Liver Trust, the only major cause of death still increasing year on year. NHS Choices says there are more than 100 different types of liver disease affecting at least two million people in the UK at any one time. PMID:26530565

  17. Models of marine molluscan diseases: Trends and challenges.

    PubMed

    Powell, Eric N; Hofmann, Eileen E

    2015-10-01

    Disease effects on host population dynamics and the transmission of pathogens between hosts are two important challenges for understanding how epizootics wax and wane and how disease influences host population dynamics. For the management of marine shellfish resources, marine diseases pose additional challenges in early intervention after the appearance of disease, management of the diseased population to limit a decline in host abundance, and application of measures to restrain that decline once it occurs. Mathematical models provide one approach for quantifying these effects and addressing the competing goals of managing the diseased population versus managing the disease. The majority of models for molluscan diseases fall into three categories distinguished by these competing goals. (1) Models that consider disease effects on the host population tend to focus on pathogen proliferation within the host. Many of the well-known molluscan diseases are pandemic, in that they routinely reach high prevalence rapidly over large geographic expanses, are characterized by transmission that does not depend upon a local source, and exert a significant influence on host population dynamics. Models focused on disease proliferation examine the influence of environmental change on host population metrics and provide a basis to better manage diseased stocks. Such models are readily adapted to questions of fishery management and habitat restoration. (2) Transmission models are designed to understand the mechanisms triggering epizootics, identify factors impeding epizootic development, and evaluate controls on the rate of disease spread over the host's range. Transmission models have been used extensively to study terrestrial diseases, yet little attention has been given to their potential for understanding the epidemiology of marine molluscan diseases. For management of diseases of wild stocks, transmission models open up a range of options, including the application of area management, manipulation of host abundance, and use of scavengers and filter feeders to limit the concentration of infective particles. (3) The details of host population processes and pathogen transmission dynamics are blended in models that evaluate the effects of natural selection and/or genetic modification in developing disease resistance in the host population. Application of gene-based models to marine diseases is only now beginning and represents a promising approach that may provide a mechanistic basis for managing marine diseases and their host populations. Overall disease models remain both uncommon and underutilized in addressing the needs for managing molluscan diseases and their host populations. PMID:26239016

  18. Beryllium disease.

    PubMed Central

    Jones Williams, W.

    1988-01-01

    The increasing use of beryllium in a variety of industries continues to be a hazard. New cases are still being reported to the UK Beryllium Case Registry, now numbering 60 in the period 1945-1988. The majority of cases follow inhalation which results in acute beryllium disease (chemical pneumonitis) or more commonly chronic beryllium disease--a granulomatous pneumonitis. Granulomatous skin nodules also occur following local implantation. The clinical and radiological features are briefly described with the emphasis on pathology and immunology. Laser microprobe mass spectrometry analysis of tissue sections is a major advance in diagnosis. Detection of beryllium distinguishes the granulomas of chronic beryllium disease from other diseases, in particular sarcoidosis. The role of beryllium lymphocyte transformation tests is discussed. Chronic beryllium disease is steroid dependent and local excision of skin lesions appears to be curative. There is no evidence that beryllium is carcinogenic. Images Figure 1 PMID:3074283

  19. Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Nat, Laura Bogdana; Simiti, Adriana Liana; Poanta, Laura Irina

    2014-01-01

    Lyme disease (Borreliosis), also called the "disease of 1000 faces", is produced by a bacterium called Borrelia burgdorferi, transmitted by the Ixodes tick. The clinical picture is non-specific and polymorph, with multisystemic involvement. Diagnosis is most often one of exclusion, and certain diagnosis is based on the presence of Borellia antibodies. The treatment is done differently depending on the stage of the disease and the severity of injuries, being used antibiotics like Doxycycline, Amoxicillin, Erythromycin or Penicillin. Under treatment the disease quickly heals without sequel, in the early stages, but advanced stages are usually resistant to treatment and chronic injuries can occur. Symptoms get worse without treatment and become chronic. We present the case of a woman of 66-year-old with a complex history of disease, which began one year prior to admission, through multiple and nonspecific symptoms; she presented herself in numerous medical services (gastroenterology, rheumatology--where an immunosuppressive treatment was initiated, hematology) without determining a final diagnosis. She was admitted in our service with altered general state and worsening symptoms, predominantly fever, muscle pain, joint pain, the patient being immobilized in bed. After multiple investigations and the problem of differential diagnosis with multiple pathologies, we finally established the diagnosis of Lyme disease. The peculiarities of the case are represented by the severity of the clinical manifestations and fulminant disease evolution under the unjustified administration of immunosuppressive treatment, and atypical joint involvement regarding localization and evolution that raised the issue of differential diagnosis with osteosarcoma or bone tuberculosis. PMID:25726630

  20. Whipworm Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... ClinicalTrials.gov . Related Links Parasitic Roundworm Diseases National Library of Medicine, MedlinePlus ?? Skip Content Marketing Share this: JavaScript is disabled in your browser. To view this content, please ...

  1. Graves' Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... uses iodine to make thyroid hormone. Radioactive iodine uptake test. This test measures the amount of iodine ... collects from the bloodstream. High levels of iodine uptake can indicate Graves’ disease. Thyroid scan. This scan ...

  2. Autoimmune Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of CAM are herbal products, chiropractic , acupuncture , and hypnosis . If you have an autoimmune disease, you might ... help you to feel your best. Meditation, self-hypnosis, and guided imagery, are simple relaxation techniques that ...

  3. Alexander Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... leukodystrophies). One clinical study is underway to identify biomarkers of disease severity or progression in samples of blood or cerebrospinal fluid. Such biomarkers, if found, would be a major advantage for ...

  4. Meniere's Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... vertigo (attacks of a spinning sensation), hearing loss, tinnitus (a roaring, buzzing, or ringing sound in the ... of the disease, hearing loss often becomes permanent. Tinnitus and fullness of the ear may come and ...

  5. Vascular Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... network of blood vessels. It includes the arteries, veins and capillaries that carry blood to and from ... the body. You are more likely to have vascular disease as you get older. Other factors that make ...

  6. Hirschsprung's disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Muscle contractions in the gut help digested foods and liquids move through the intestine. This is called peristalsis. Nerves between the muscle layers trigger the contractions. In Hirschsprung's disease, the nerves are missing from ...

  7. Pilonidal Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... if indicated to do so. DISCLAIMER The American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons is dedicated to ensuring high-quality patient care by advancing the science, prevention, and management of disorders and diseases of ...

  8. Graves' Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... women, untreated disease can threaten the mother and unborn baby's health. Return to top Does pregnancy affect the ... These changes do not affect the pregnancy or unborn baby. Yet, untreated thyroid problems can threaten pregnancy and ...

  9. Rh Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Fighting premature birth About us Annual report Our work Community impact Global programs Research Need help? Local ... at risk of Rh disease. How does RhIg work? It is not known exactly how RhIg works. ...

  10. Parkinson disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Nerve cells use a brain chemical called dopamine to help control muscle movement. With Parkinson disease, the brain cells that make dopamine slowly die. Without dopamine, the cells that control movement ...

  11. Lyme Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... ticks can spread the disease to animals and humans through tick bites. These ticks are typically about ... in mood Changes in sleep habits Loss of memory Muscle weakness Causes & Risk Factors Who gets Lyme ...

  12. Parkinson's Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... picture of how individual cells and complex neural circuits interact. The ultimate goal is to enhance understanding ... Parkinson’s disease (December 2014) Australian researcher outlines an integrated approach for studying Parkinson’s (December 2014) Research on ...

  13. Graves disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... is called hyperthyroidism. (An underactive thyroid leads to hypothyroidism .) Graves disease is the most common cause of ... radioactive iodine usually will cause an underactive thyroid (hypothyroidism). Without getting the correct dosage of thyroid hormone ...

  14. Cushing disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... system . Cushing disease is a form of Cushing syndrome . ... McGee S. Cushing syndrome. In: Evidence-Based Physical Diagnosis. 3rd ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Elsevier Saunders. 2012:chap 13. Molitch M. Anterior ...

  15. Autoinflammatory Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... ages can develop it. The exact cause of Behçet’s disease is unknown. Most symptoms of the disorder are caused by inflammation of the blood vessels. Doctors think that an autoinflammatory reaction may cause ...

  16. Blount Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... returning to all their normal activities, even competitive sports. One lesson many people take away from dealing with Blount disease is the importance of keeping weight in a healthy range. Staying ...

  17. Alzheimer Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Puberty Video: Am I Normal? (Girls and Puberty) Movie: Digestive System How the Body Works Main Page ... picture of the brain. They can study these images and look for signs of Alzheimer disease. Once ...

  18. Alzheimer's Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... risk of urinary tract and other serious infections. Malnutrition or dehydration: People who have Alzheimer’s disease may ... swallow. It’s important to watch for signs of malnutrition. If you think that a loved one might ...

  19. Crohn's Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and may include medicines, nutrition supplements, and/or surgery. Some people have long periods of remission, when they are free of symptoms. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  20. Prion Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... trying to access this site from a secured browser on the server. Please enable scripts and reload ... the human prion disease CJD ?? Javascript Error Your browser JavaScript is turned off causing certain features of ...

  1. Leishmaniasis Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Parasites - Leishmaniasis Parasites Home Share Compartir Disease Ulcerative skin lesion, with ... with some of the species (types) of the parasite that cause cutaneous leishmaniasis in parts of Latin ...

  2. Lung disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the lungs to take in oxygen and release carbon dioxide. People with this type of lung disorder often ... the lungs to take up oxygen and release carbon dioxide. These diseases may also affect heart function. An ...

  3. Menkes Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... The neurology of STPAT copper transporter disease: emerging concepts and future trends. Nature Reviews Neurology , 2001:7: ... Fax: 203-798-2291 Prepared by: Office of Communications and Public Liaison National Institute of Neurological Disorders ...

  4. Krabbe Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... NINDS Krabbe Disease Information Page Synonym(s): Globoid Cell Leukodystrophy Table of Contents (click to jump to sections) ... of a group of genetic disorders called the leukodystrophies . These disorders impair the growth or development of ...

  5. Crohn disease

    PubMed Central

    Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S.; Rioux, John D.; Mizoguchi, Atsushi; Saitoh, Tatsuya; Huett, Alan; Darfeuille-Michaud, Arlette; Wileman, Tom; Mizushima, Noboru; Carding, Simon; Akira, Shizuo; Parkes, Miles; Xavier, Ramnik J.

    2011-01-01

    Crohn disease (CD) is a chronic and debilitating inflammatory condition of the gastrointestinal tract.1 Prevalence in western populations is 100–150/100,000 and somewhat higher in Ashkenazi Jews. Peak incidence is in early adult life, although any age can be affected and a majority of affected individuals progress to relapsing and chronic disease. Medical treatments rely significantly on empirical corticosteroid therapy and immunosuppression, and intestinal resectional surgery is frequently required. Thus, 80% of patients with CD come to surgery for refractory disease or complications. It is hoped that an improved understanding of pathogenic mechanisms, for example by studying the genetic basis of CD and other forms of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), will lead to improved therapies and possibly preventative strategies in individuals identified as being at risk. PMID:20729636

  6. Pneumococcal Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... from relatively mild ear infections to fatal pneumonia, meningitis, and sepsis. Serious pneumococcal infections can occur throughout ... deaths occur in the world’s poorest countries. Pneumococcal meningitis is the most severe form of pneumococcal disease ...

  7. Gum Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... disease. It ranges from simple gum inflammation, called gingivitis, to serious damage to the tissue and bone ... the worst cases, you can lose teeth. In gingivitis, the gums become red and swollen. They can ...

  8. Information Regarding MENINGOCOCCAL DISEASE

    E-print Network

    Information Regarding MENINGOCOCCAL DISEASE Student Name. Meningococcal disease is a serious disease, caused by bacteria. Meningococcal disease is a contagious. Meningococcal disease can also cause blood infections. About 2,600 people get meningococcal disease each year

  9. Diffuse parenchymal diseases associated with aluminum use and primary aluminum production.

    PubMed

    Taiwo, Oyebode A

    2014-05-01

    Aluminum use and primary aluminum production results in the generation of various particles, fumes, gases, and airborne materials with the potential for inducing a wide range of lung pathology. Nevertheless, the presence of diffuse parenchymal or interstitial lung disease related to these processes remains controversial. The relatively uncommon occurrence of interstitial lung diseases in aluminum-exposed workers--despite the extensive industrial use of aluminum--the potential for concurrent exposure to other fibrogenic fibers, and the previous use of inhaled aluminum powder for the prevention of silicosis without apparent adverse respiratory effects are some of the reasons for this continuing controversy. Specific aluminum-induced parenchymal diseases described in the literature, including existing evidence of interstitial lung diseases, associated with primary aluminum production are reviewed. PMID:24806728

  10. Diffuse Parenchymal Diseases Associated With Aluminum Use and Primary Aluminum Production

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Aluminum use and primary aluminum production results in the generation of various particles, fumes, gases, and airborne materials with the potential for inducing a wide range of lung pathology. Nevertheless, the presence of diffuse parenchymal or interstitial lung disease related to these processes remains controversial. The relatively uncommon occurrence of interstitial lung diseases in aluminum-exposed workers—despite the extensive industrial use of aluminum—the potential for concurrent exposure to other fibrogenic fibers, and the previous use of inhaled aluminum powder for the prevention of silicosis without apparent adverse respiratory effects are some of the reasons for this continuing controversy. Specific aluminum-induced parenchymal diseases described in the literature, including existing evidence of interstitial lung diseases, associated with primary aluminum production are reviewed. PMID:24806728

  11. Unusual Manifestations of Monoclonal Gammopathy: I. Ocular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Balderman, Sophia R.; Lichtman, Marshall A.

    2015-01-01

    Essential monoclonal gammopathy is usually an asymptomatic condition, the characteristics of which have been defined over approximately 70 years of study. It has a known population-attributable risk of undergoing clonal evolution to a progressive, symptomatic B-cell neoplasm. In a very small fraction of patients, the monoclonal immunoglobulin has biophysical characteristics that can lead to tissue deposition syndrome (e.g. Fanconi renal syndrome) or, by chance, have characteristics of an autoantibody that may inactivate critical proteins (e.g. acquired von Willebrand disease). In this report, we describe the very uncommon forms of ocular injury that may accompany essential monoclonal gammopathy, which include crystalline keratopathy, crystal-storing histiocytosis, hypercupremic keratopathy, and maculopathy. The first three syndromes result from uncommon physicochemical alterations of the monoclonal immunoglobulin that favor crystallization or exaggerated copper binding. The last-mentioned syndrome is of uncertain pathogenesis. These syndromes may result in decreased visual acuity. These ocular findings may lead, also, to the diagnosis of monoclonal gammopathy. PMID:26241228

  12. [Menière's Disease].

    PubMed

    Plontke, S K; Gürkov, R

    2015-08-01

    Menière`s disease is one of the most common inner ear and vestibular disorders. It is defined as the idiopathic syndrome of endolymphatic hydrops (ELH). Despite the development of several different animal models of ELH, its etiology and pathogenesis is still unresolved. In humans, endolymphatic hydrops may occur spontaneously or as a consequence of specific disorders with distinct inner ear pathologies, e.?g., infectious labyrinthitis, noise induced hearing loss or vestibular schwannoma. Recent imaging studies using MRI have shown that hydropic ear disease is associated not only with the full triad of vertigo, hearing, loss and tinnitus/aural pressure, but also with inner ear symptoms that do not fulfill the clinical criteria of definite Menière's disease as set forth by the AAO-HNS. Therefore, terms like "atypical" or "cochlear"/"vestibular" Menière's disease or "forme fruste" should be avoided and the term "Menière's disease" should universally be applied according only to these guidelines. Besides that, the recent possibility of visualizing endolymphatic hydrops on MRI and thereby ascertaining the diagnosis in difficult cases and new audiovestibular function tests for the indirect detection of endolymphatic hydrops show promising results. Evidenced based reviews of currently available therapeutic options still reveal many uncertainties with regard to efficacy, with the exception of the ablative therapies, e.?g., intratympanic gentamicin application. PMID:26243634

  13. Weight stability in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Lindskov, Susanne; Sjöberg, Klas; Hagell, Peter; Westergren, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Parkinson's disease (PD) has traditionally been associated with weight loss. However, recent studies have not found any evidence of underweight in PD. Nevertheless, few studies have addressed nutritional status changes over time in relation to other clinical PD features. Here, we explore changes in nutritional status and motor and non-motor PD features (including dopaminergic drug therapy) in PD patients after 1 year. Methods Motor and non-motor PD features, dopaminergic drug therapy, under-nutrition and malnutrition risk, and anthropometric measures (BMI, handgrip strength, triceps skin-fold, mid-arm circumference, and mid-upper arm muscle circumference) were assessed at baseline and 1 year later among 65 people with PD. Results Disability, PD motor symptoms, dysautonomia, and dopaminergic drug therapy increased. Underweight was uncommon both at baseline (n = 3) and follow-up (n = 2); malnutrition risk was common but stable (88 and 92%), whereas triceps skin-fold increased (P = 0.030); mid-upper arm muscle circumference decreased (P = 0.002); and the proportion of people with low handgrip strength (P = 0.012) increased. Correlations between nutritional variables and motor and non-motor PD features were absent to modest. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that baseline pupillomotor functioning was associated with decreased weight and BMI, and sleep with increased weight and BMI. In addition, increases in anxiety were associated with decreased weight, BMI, and triceps skin-fold. Discussion During the PD course, there seems to be redistribution in body composition from muscle to fat. Studies are needed to identify possible explanations for the findings. This implies that malnutrition should be regularly screened to identify those at risk of developing reduced muscle mass and increased morbidity. PMID:26339843

  14. More Than Just the Heart: Transition and Psychosocial Issues in Adult Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Adrienne H; Utens, Elisabeth M

    2015-11-01

    Most infants born with congenital heart disease (CHD) are now expected to reach adulthood. However, adults with CHD of moderate or great complexity remain at elevated risk of heart failure, arrhythmias, additional surgeries and interventional procedures, and premature mortality. This creates a need for lifelong specialized cardiac care and leads to 2 sets of potential challenges: (1) the transition from pediatric to adult care and (2) the psychosocial implications of coping with a chronic and often life-shortening medical condition. Many adolescents struggle with the transition to adult care, and mood and anxiety disorders are not uncommon in the adult setting. PMID:26471825

  15. A rare case of Behçet disease with generalised myositis, cardiomyositis and necrotising fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Ng, Felix; Chiong, Fabian Joon Kiong; Buchanan, Russell; Burrell, Louise M

    2016-01-01

    Behçet disease (BD) is a rare relapsing, multisystem vasculitis characterised by recurrent oral and genital ulcers, and uveitis. As an autoimmune small vessel vasculitis, BD can involve other organs including the skin, joints, nervous system, kidney and the gastrointestinal tract. This report describes a 40-year-old woman who presented with an uncommon feature of BD, namely myositis, and who went on to develop myocarditis and polymicrobial necrotising fasciitis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an immunocompromised-associated infection occurring in BD without concurrent immunosuppressive therapy. PMID:26740268

  16. Febrile cholestatic disease as an initial presentation of nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Mrzljak, Anna; Gasparov, Slavko; Kardum-Skelin, Ika; Colic-Cvrlje, Vesna; Ostojic-Kolonic, Slobodanka

    2010-01-01

    Febrile cholestatic liver disease is an extremely unusual presentation of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). The liver biopsy of a 40-year-old man with febrile episodes and cholestatic laboratory pattern disclosed an uncommon subtype of HL, a nodular lymphocyte-predominant HL (NLPHL). Liver involvement in the early stage of the usually indolent NLPHL’s clinical course suggests an aggressiveness and unfavorable outcome. Emphasizing a liver biopsy early in the diagnostic algorithm enables accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment. Although rare, HL should be considered in the differential diagnosis of cholestasis. PMID:20845519

  17. Invasive pneumococcal disease complicated by cerebral vasculitis, transient diabetes insipidus and spondylodiscitis

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Sofia; Domingues, Vital; Faria, Raquel M; Mendonça, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) is a potential life-threatening situation that requires immediate recognition and treatment. Cerebrovascular complications are uncommon and have been reported less frequently in adults than in children. We report a case of 59-year-old man with IPD complicated by cerebral vasculitis, transient central diabetes insipidus and spondylodiscitis. Each of these complications is rare and needs specific approach. Their association is even rarer and to the best of our knowledge this is the first case reported. PMID:23960149

  18. Sarcoid tenosynovitis, rare presentation of a common disease. Case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ani, Zeid; Oh, Teik Chooi; Macphie, Elizabeth; Woodruff, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is an idiopathic inflammatory disorder characterized by the presence of non-caseating tissue granulomas most commonly affecting lungs, lymph nodes and skin. Sarcoid skeletal involvement is relatively uncommon and in particular tenosynovitis. We describe an unusual case of sarcoidosis presenting with granulomatous tenosynovitis as the only manifestation of the disease, illustrating the radiological findings on different modalities followed by a review of the literature. Radiologists and clinicians should be aware of tenosynovitis as a manifestation of sarcoidosis as early and therefore appropriate treatment significantly alters patient’s outcome and prognosis.

  19. Primary Ectopic Mediastinal Goiter in a Patient With Crohn's Disease Presenting as Myasthenia Gravis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sunil; Sultania, Mahesh; Vatsal, Shivam; Sharma, M C

    2015-12-01

    Mediastinum is an uncommon location for ectopic goiter. Primary ectopic mediastinal goiter has been reported to present mostly with compressive symptoms. We report a case of a 62-year-old man with history of Crohn's disease, who presented with symptoms of myasthenia gravis and was found to have an anterior mediastinal mass. The mass was resected completely with successful outcome. On histopathologic examination this mass turned out to be colloid goiter. This is an extremely rare presentation of a primary ectopic mediastinal goiter. PMID:26652525

  20. Behçet's disease

    PubMed Central

    Kontogiannis, V; Powell, R

    2000-01-01

    Behçet's disease is a systemic vasculitis of unknown aetiology characteristically affecting venules. Onset is typically in young adults with recurrent oral and genital ulceration, uveitis, skin manifestations, arthritis, neurological involvement, and a tendency to thrombosis. It has a worldwide distribution but is prevalent in Japan, the Middle East, and some Mediterranean countries. International diagnostic criteria have been proposed, however diagnosis can be problematical, particularly if the typical ulcers are not obvious at presentation. Treatment is challenging, must be tailored to the pattern of organ involvement for each patient and often requires combination therapies.???Keywords: Behçet's disease; oral ulcers; uveitis; immunosuppressants PMID:11009577

  1. Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Children, an Evolving Problem in Kuwait

    PubMed Central

    Al-Qabandi, Wafa’a A.; Buhamrah, Eman K.; Hamadi, Khaled A.; Al-Osaimi, Suad A.; Al-Ruwayeh, Ahlam A.; Madda, JohnPatrick

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aims: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) was previously thought a rare disease among children in Kuwait since most diarrhea cases were attributed to infections. In the past few years we observed an increase in the number of patients presenting with IBD. In this study we aimed to determine the epidemiology of IBD among children in the State of Kuwait. Patients and Methods: The charts of all children with IBD who were referred to the pediatric gastroenterology unit during the period February 1998 to January 2008 were retrospectively reviewed. Results: Out of a total of 130 children with IBD, 92 (71%) had Crohn's disease, 36 (28%) had ulcerative colitis and two (1%) had indeterminate colitis. The estimated annual incidence for IBD was 2.16/105 /year. The age range was nine months-15 years (median: 11 years). Fifty-three percent of all patients were females and 77% were Kuwaiti nationals. Positive family history was found in 23%. The commonest presenting symptoms were abdominal pain (87%) and diarrhea (82%). Failure to thrive was detected in 35% and short stature in 20% at presentation. The ileocolonic region was the most common presentation site affected in Crohn's patients and pancolitis was the commonest in ulcerative colitis. Conclusion: Inflammatory bowel disease is not uncommon in our children. We found no differences regarding disease presentation and clinical features compared to the Western world. PMID:21912059

  2. Ostrich diseases.

    PubMed

    Verwoerd, D J

    2000-08-01

    Scientific knowledge of ostrich diseases is incomplete and very fragmented, with specific details on technical aspects of diagnostic and/or screening tests completely absent in most cases. Salmonella Typhimurium is common in multispecies collections and causes mortality in chicks younger than three months on commercial farms, but is rarely found in chicks older than six months, or slaughter birds of twelve to fourteen months in southern Africa. Campylobacter jejuni and Chlamydia psittaci are occasionally reported, mainly in young ostriches, but both remain a diagnostic challenge. Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever is transmitted to domestic animals including ostriches, principally by ticks of the genus Hyalomma. In the ostrich, the disease causes no clinical symptoms during a viraemia of approximately four days. Spongiform encephalopathy has not been reliably reported in ostriches, while anthrax has occurred rarely in modern times but was reportedly an important cause of death approximately 100 years ago in South Africa. Salmonella Gallinarum and S. Pullorum are unknown in ostriches. Pasteurella multocida occurs but is easily contained with antibiotics. Mycoplasma spp. are regularly found in an upper respiratory disease syndrome complicated by opportunistic bacterial pathogens. Ostriches of all ages are susceptible to challenge by velogenic Newcastle disease virus (NDV), but standard inactivated La Sota poultry vaccines can stimulate protective immunity lasting over six months. The viraemic period in vaccinated slaughter ostriches is between nine and eleven days and there are no indications of a carrier state or presence of the virus in the meat or any other tissues after this period, with peak immunoglobulin G response reached on day fourteen post infection. Haemagglutination inhibition tests are significantly less sensitive and less specific than enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Cloacal and choanal swabs used for direct virological screening in clinically affected cases (field and experimental) could not detect NDV. All avian influenza isolates reported from ostriches have been non-pathogenic to poultry, even the H5 and H7 subtypes. Some of the latter have been associated with mortality of ostrich chicks in localised outbreaks during periods of inclement weather and with significant wild bird (waterfowl) contact. Borna disease causes a nervous syndrome in ostrich chicks, but to date, has only been reported in Israel. Eastern and Western equine encephalomyelitides cause fatal disease in ostriches and other ratites, with mortality ranging from less than 20% to over 80% in affected flocks. These diseases are present in North, Central and South America where the associated ornithophilic mosquito vectors occur. Equine and human vaccines are apparently safe and efficacious in ratites. Wesselsbron disease, infectious bursal disease (type 2), adenovirus and coronavirus infections have been reported from ostriches but the significance of these diseases is unclear. Due to the paucity of data regarding ostrich diseases and the unvalidated state of most poultry tests in this unique group of birds, strict observation of a pre-slaughter quarantine of thirty days is strongly advised, whilst live exports and fertile eggs should be screened through the additional use of sentinel chickens and/or young ostriches. PMID:10935285

  3. Atypical radiological findings in achondroplasia with uncommon mutation of the fibroblast growth factor receptor-3 (FGFR-3) gene (Gly to Cys transition at codon 375)

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimuri, Gen; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Ikegawa, Shiro

    1995-11-20

    The recent discovery of mutations in the FGFR-3 (fibroblast growth factor receptor-3) gene (FGFR3) as the cause of achondroplasia has provided new insight into understanding genetic diseases. It was surprising from the viewpoint of molecular genetics that most patients with achondroplasia showed the same mutation at nucleotide 1138, leading to a single amino acid substitution from glycine to arginine at codon 380 (Gly380Arg). All 39 patients examined by two groups had the Gly380Arg; 38 patients and the other demonstrated a G to A and a G to C transition at nucleotide 1138, respectively. Subsequently another group disclosed a G to A transition at the same nucleotide 1138 in 21/23 patients of diverse ethnic origin, although mutations were not identified in two patients. To date, a total of 193 patients with the mutation of the G380Arg have been reported; a single patient with another mutation resulting in a substitution from glycine to cysteine at codon 375 (Gly375Cys) has been described. The presence of this common mutation is consistent with the clinical fact that achondroplastic individuals show less phenotypic variability than is unusual for autosomal dominant diseases. We encountered a Japanese boy with the Gly375Cys. His mother with achondroplasia has the same mutation. The molecular investigation of these patients was reported elsewhere. Here we report the clinical and radiological findings in this boy who demonstrated some atypical manifestations from those of typical achondroplasia. 8 refs., 1 fig.

  4. Lung Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    When you breathe, your lungs take in oxygen from the air and deliver it to the bloodstream. The cells in your body need oxygen to ... you breathe nearly 25,000 times. People with lung disease have difficulty breathing. Millions of people in ...

  5. Alzheimer disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... It tends to get worse quickly. Early onset disease can run in families. Several genes have been identified. Late onset AD: This is the most common type. It occurs in people age 60 and older. It may run in some families, but the role of genes is less clear.

  6. SMUT DISEASES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A COMPREHENSIVE REVIEW OF MOST ASPECTS OF COMMON BUNT AND DWARF BUNT DISEASES OF WHEAT IS PRESENTED. INCLUDED ARE SECTIONS ON HISTORY, DISTRIBUTION AND ECONOMIC IMPORTANCE, TAXONOMY, MORPHOLOGY, SPORE GERMINATION, CULTURE, AND PHYSIOLOGY. EXTENSIVE SECTIONS DEAL WITH RESEARCH METHODOLOGY AND DISEA...

  7. Sever's Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... after activity. If the child has a pronated foot, a flat or high arch, or another condition that increases the risk of Sever's disease, the doctor might recommend special shoe inserts, called ... goes away on its own when foot growth is complete and the growth plate has ...

  8. Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Chomel, B

    2015-08-01

    Lyme disease is among the most frequently diagnosed zoonotic tick-borne diseases worldwide. The number of human cases has been on the increase since the first recognition of its aetiological agent. Lyme disease is caused by spirochete bacteria belonging to the genus Borrelia, with B. burgdorferi sensu stricto (s.s.) found in the Americas, and B. afzelii and B. garinii, in addition to B. burgdorferi s.s., in Europe and Asia. Environmental factors, such as human encroachment onto habitats favourable to ticks and their hosts, reduced deforestation, increased human outdoor activities, and climatic factors favouring a wider distribution of tick vectors, have enhanced the impact of the disease on both humans and animals. Clinical manifestations in humans include, in the early phases, erythema migrans, followed several weeks later by neuro-borreliosis (meningo-radiculitis, meningitis or meningo-encephalitis), Lyme arthritis and/or Borrelia lymphocytoma. In dogs, acute signs include fever, general malaise, lameness, lymph node enlargement and polyarthritis, as well as neuro-borreliosis in the chronic form. Diagnosis is mainly serological in both humans and animals, based on either a two-tier approach (an immunoenzymatic test followed by a Western blot confirmatory test) in humans or C(6) peptide, only in dogs. Early treatment with antibiotics, such as doxycycline or amoxicillin, for three weeks usually reduces the risk of chronic disease. Tick control, including the use of tick repellents for both humans and animals, particularly dogs, is highly reliable in preventing transmission. Vaccines are not available to prevent human infection, whereas several vaccines are available to reduce transmission and the clinical manifestations of infection in dogs. PMID:26601457

  9. Coronary heart disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Heart disease, Coronary heart disease, Coronary artery disease; Arteriosclerotic heart disease; CHD; CAD ... Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the leading cause of death in the United States for men and women. Coronary ...

  10. Diabetic Heart Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Diabetic Heart Disease? The term "diabetic heart disease" (DHD) refers ... Kidney Diseases' Introduction to Diabetes Web page. What Heart Diseases Are Involved in Diabetic Heart Disease? DHD ...

  11. Peripheral Artery Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) Peripheral artery disease (PAD) refers to ... is peripheral artery disease treated? What is peripheral artery disease (PAD)? Peripheral artery disease, or PAD, refers ...

  12. Digestive Diseases Materials

    MedlinePLUS

    ... NIDDK INFORMATION CLEARINGHOUSES Diabetes Digestive Diseases Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases Hematologic Diseases Kidney and Urologic Diseases Weight-control Information Network EDUCATION PROGRAMS National Diabetes Education Program National Kidney Disease ...

  13. A Case of Bordetella brochiseptica at a Military Medical Facility in Hawai‘i: Phenotypic and Molecular Testing of an Uncommon Human Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Agee, Willie A; Kajiura, Lauren; Hawley-Molloy, Joshua S; Staege, Catherine M; Barnhill, Jason C

    2015-01-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica (B. bronchiseptica) is rarely implicated in human disease. Human infections typically occur in the context of immunosuppression and while human infection has been sporadically reported in the literature, the majority of these reports are largely descriptive and do not explore the molecular and phenotypic properties of the isolates in question. Here we report the isolation and characterization of a B. bronchiseptica isolate derived from an HIV positive patient at Tripler Army Medical Center on O‘ahu. This case represents the first published report of human infection of B. bronchiseptica in the state of Hawai‘i and the most detailed description of the biochemical and molecular features of a Hawaiian isolate to date. PMID:26225268

  14. A child with a long-standing, intensely itching subcutaneous nodule on a thigh: an uncommon (?) reaction to commonly used vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Bergfors, Elisabet; Lundmark, Katarzyna; Nyström Kronander, Ulla

    2013-01-01

    A 2-year-old girl presented with an intensely itching subcutaneous nodule on the front of a thigh. The nodule persisted for 10?months until it was excised. Subsequent investigation for malignancy and systemic disease showed no pathological findings. The diagnosis, persistent itching vaccination granuloma, was revealed by hazard almost 2?years after the onset of symptoms. Persistent itching subcutaneous nodules at the injection site for aluminium containing vaccines (mostly diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis combination vaccines for primary immunisation of infants) may appear with a long delay after the vaccination (months), cause prolonged itching (years) and are often associated with contact allergy to aluminium. The condition is poorly recognised in Health Care which may lead to prolonged symptoms and unnecessary investigations. PMID:23354861

  15. Invasive amebiasis and ameboma formation presenting as a rectal mass: An uncommon case of malignant masquerade at a western medical center.

    PubMed

    Hardin, Rosemarie-E; Ferzli, George-S; Zenilman, Michael-E; Gadangi, Pratap-K; Bowne, Wilbur-B

    2007-11-14

    A 54-year-old man presented with rectal pain and bleeding secondary to ulcerated, necrotic rectal and cecal masses that resembled colorectal carcinoma upon colonoscopy. These masses were later determined to be benign amebomas caused by invasive Entamoeba histolytica, which regressed completely with medical therapy. In Western countries, the occurrence of invasive protozoan infection with formation of amebomas is very rare and can mistakenly masquerade as a neoplasm. Not surprisingly, there have been very few cases reported of this clinical entity within the United States. Moreover, we report a patient that had an extremely rare occurrence of two synchronous lesions, one involving the rectum and the other situated in the cecum. We review the current literature on the pathogenesis of invasive E. histolytica infection and ameboma formation, as well as management of this rare disease entity at a western medical center. PMID:17948943

  16. Fabry disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is a progressive, X-linked inherited disorder of glycosphingolipid metabolism due to deficient or absent lysosomal ?-galactosidase A activity. FD is pan-ethnic and the reported annual incidence of 1 in 100,000 may underestimate the true prevalence of the disease. Classically affected hemizygous males, with no residual ?-galactosidase A activity may display all the characteristic neurological (pain), cutaneous (angiokeratoma), renal (proteinuria, kidney failure), cardiovascular (cardiomyopathy, arrhythmia), cochleo-vestibular and cerebrovascular (transient ischemic attacks, strokes) signs of the disease while heterozygous females have symptoms ranging from very mild to severe. Deficient activity of lysosomal ?-galactosidase A results in progressive accumulation of globotriaosylceramide within lysosomes, believed to trigger a cascade of cellular events. Demonstration of marked ?-galactosidase A deficiency is the definitive method for the diagnosis of hemizygous males. Enzyme analysis may occasionnally help to detect heterozygotes but is often inconclusive due to random X-chromosomal inactivation so that molecular testing (genotyping) of females is mandatory. In childhood, other possible causes of pain such as rheumatoid arthritis and 'growing pains' must be ruled out. In adulthood, multiple sclerosis is sometimes considered. Prenatal diagnosis, available by determination of enzyme activity or DNA testing in chorionic villi or cultured amniotic cells is, for ethical reasons, only considered in male fetuses. Pre-implantation diagnosis is possible. The existence of atypical variants and the availability of a specific therapy singularly complicate genetic counseling. A disease-specific therapeutic option - enzyme replacement therapy using recombinant human ?-galactosidase A - has been recently introduced and its long term outcome is currently still being investigated. Conventional management consists of pain relief with analgesic drugs, nephroprotection (angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptors blockers) and antiarrhythmic agents, whereas dialysis or renal transplantation are available for patients experiencing end-stage renal failure. With age, progressive damage to vital organ systems develops and at some point, organs may start to fail in functioning. End-stage renal disease and life-threatening cardiovascular or cerebrovascular complications limit life-expectancy of untreated males and females with reductions of 20 and 10 years, respectively, as compared to the general population. While there is increasing evidence that long-term enzyme therapy can halt disease progression, the importance of adjunctive therapies should be emphasized and the possibility of developing an oral therapy drives research forward into active site specific chaperones. PMID:21092187

  17. Role of toxoplasmosis in the aetiology of some cardiac diseases: an immunobiological investigation.

    PubMed Central

    Sibali?, D; Djurkovi?-Djakovi?, O

    1986-01-01

    The Sabin-Feldman dye test was used to show the presence of toxoplasma antibodies in 183 patients with cardiac disease, as well as in two control groups (A and B), comprising 183 and 2186 healthy subjects, respectively. Toxoplasma specific antibodies were found in 157 (86%) patients with cardiac disease, 39 (21%) of whom had high titres. The prevalence of toxoplasma antibodies was considerably lower than that of control groups: 94 (51%) in group A and 1276 (58%) in group B. High titres were present in 8 (4%) and 83 (4%), respectively. Immunofluorescence antibody testing showed IgM antibodies in five patients, three of whom had the organism itself recovered from the blood or lymph nodes. Chronic or latent toxoplasma infection as a cause of cardiac disease is not as uncommon as is generally thought. PMID:3950043

  18. Real-Time Assessment of Wellness and Disease in Daily Life

    PubMed Central

    Ausiello, Dennis; Lipnick, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The next frontier in medicine involves better quantifying human traits, known as “phenotypes.” Biological markers have been directly associated with disease risks, but poor measurement of behaviors such as diet and exercise limits our understanding of preventive measures. By joining together an uncommonly wide range of disciplines and expertise, the Kavli HUMAN Project will advance measurement of behavioral phenotypes, as well as environmental factors that impact behavior. By following the same individuals over time, KHP will liberate new understanding of dynamic links between behavioral phenotypes, disease, and the broader environment. As KHP advances understanding of the bio-behavioral complex, it will seed new approaches to the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of human disease. PMID:26487991

  19. Morgellons disease?

    PubMed

    Accordino, Robert E; Engler, Danielle; Ginsburg, Iona H; Koo, John

    2008-01-01

    Morgellons disease, a pattern of dermatologic symptoms very similar, if not identical, to those of delusions of parasitosis, was first described many centuries ago, but has recently been given much attention on the internet and in the mass media. The present authors present a history of Morgellons disease, in addition to which they discuss the potential benefit of using this diagnostic term as a means of building trust and rapport with patients to maximize treatment benefit. The present authors also suggest "meeting the patient halfway" and creating a therapeutic alliance when providing dermatologic treatment by taking their cutaneous symptoms seriously enough to provide both topical ointments as well as antipsychotic medications, which can be therapeutic in these patients. PMID:18318880

  20. Beryllium disease

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-20

    After two workers at the nuclear weapons plant at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee were diagnosed earlier this year with chronic beryllium disease (CBD), a rare and sometimes fatal scarring of the lungs, the Department of Energy ordered up a 4-year probe. Now, part of that probe has begun - tests conducted by the Oak Ridge Associated Universities' Center for Epidemiological Research measuring beryllium sensitivity in 3,000 people who've been exposed to the metal's dust since Manhattan Project managers opened the Y-12 plant at Oak Ridge in 1943. Currently, 119 Y-12 employees process beryllium, which has a number of industrial uses, including rocket heat shields and nuclear weapon and electrical components. The disease often takes 20 to 25 years to develop, and the stricken employees haven't worked with beryllium for years. There is no cure for CBD, estimated to strike 2% of people exposed to the metal. Anti-inflammatory steroids alleviate such symptoms as a dry cough, weight loss, and fatigue. Like other lung-fibrosis diseases that are linked to lung cancer, some people suspect CBD might cause some lung cancer. While difficult to diagnose, about 900 cases of CBD have been reported since a Beryllium Case Registry was established in 1952. The Department of Energy (DOE) estimates that about 10,000 DOE employees and 800,000 people in private industry have worked with beryllium.

  1. Doug Brutlag 2015 Diseases and Disease Databases

    E-print Network

    Brutlag, Doug

    © Doug Brutlag 2015 Diseases and Disease Databases http://biochem158.stanford.edu/ Doug Brutlag Huntington Disease · Autosomal Dominant ­ On the tip of the short arm of chromosome 4 ­ One bad gene causes disease (dominant) ­ Brain degeneration over 10-15 years until death · Neurodegenerative disease ­ Loss

  2. Doug Brutlag 2015 Diseases and Disease Databases

    E-print Network

    Brutlag, Doug

    © Doug Brutlag 2015 Diseases and Disease Databases Doug Brutlag, Professor Emeritus Biochemistry an inherited disease · And we know the function of that gene · Then we can understand the cause of the disease and other interventions to cure the disease. #12;© Doug Brutlag 2015 Stanford at The Tech: Understanding

  3. Actinomyces in Chronic Granulomatous Disease: An Emerging and Unanticipated Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Reichenbach, Janine; Lopatin, Uri; Mahlaoui, Nizar; Beovic, Bojana; Siler, Ulrich; Zbinden, Reinhard; Seger, Reinhard A.; Galmiche, Louise; Brousse, Nicole; Kayal, Samer; Güngör, Tayfun; Blanche, Stéphane; Holland, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a rare inherited disease of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase system that causes defective production of toxic oxygen metabolites, impaired bacterial and fungal killing, and recurrent life-threatening infections, mostly by catalase-producing organisms. We report for the first time, to our knowledge, chronic infections with Actinomyces species in 10 patients with CGD. Actinomycosis is a chronic granulomatous condition that commonly manifests as cervicofacial, pulmonary, or abdominal disease, caused by slowly progressive infection with oral and gastrointestinal commensal Actinomyces species. Treatment of actinomycosis is usually simple in immunocompetent individuals, requiring long-term, high-dose intravenous penicillin, but is more complicated in those with CGD because of delayed diagnosis and an increased risk of chronic invasive or debilitating disease. Methods Actinomyces was identified by culture, staining, 16S ribosomal DNA polymerase chain reaction, and/ or a complement fixation test in 10 patients with CGD. Results All 10 patients presented with a history of fever and elevated inflammatory signs without evident focus. Diagnosis was delayed and clinical course severe and protracted despite high-dose intravenous antibiotic therapy and/or surgery. These results suggest an unrecognized and unanticipated susceptibility to weakly pathogenic Actinomyces species in patients with CGD because these are catalase-negative organisms previously thought to be nonpathogenic in CGD. Conclusions Actinomycosis should be vigorously sought and promptly treated in patients with CGD presenting with uncommon and prolonged clinical signs of infection. Actinomycosis is a catalase-negative infection important to consider in CGD. PMID:19874205

  4. Vestibular disease: diseases causing vestibular signs.

    PubMed

    Lowrie, Mark

    2012-07-01

    Having determined whether a patient has central or peripheral vestibular disease, clinicians must then determine what diseases are likely to result in such a presentation. This article describes the more common diseases causing vestibular disease in dogs and cats. Having formulated a list of potential causes of vestibular disease, clinicians should proceed through a systematic investigation to diagnose the underlying condition. A companion article describes the anatomy, physiology, and clinical signs associated with vestibular disease. PMID:22847321

  5. Protein aggregates in Huntington's disease

    E-print Network

    Arrasate, M; Finkbeiner, S; Finkbeiner, S

    2011-01-01

    Huntington's disease . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Huntington's disease? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.M. , 1999. Huntington's disease intranuclear inclusions

  6. Riga-Fede disease and neonatal teeth

    PubMed Central

    COSTACURTA, M.; MATURO, P.; DOCIMO, R.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Aim The aim of this study is to present a case of Riga-Fede disease (RFD). RFD is a benign and uncommon mucosal disorder, characterized by an ulceration of the tongue, often caused by repetitive traumatic injuries due to backward and forward movements of the tongue over the mandibular anterior incisors. RFD is most commonly associated with the eruption of primary lower incisor in older infants or natal-neonatal teeth in newborns. Methods A 2-month-old female infant was referred to our Paediatric Dentistry Unit for ulceration (13 mm diameter) on the ventral surface of the tongue and neonatal teeth. The extraction of neonatal teeth was selected as treatment of choice, over more conservative treatments, for the rapid resolution of the lesion and for the limited risk of inadequate nutrients intake. The extracted teeth underwent a macroscopic/microscopic examination. The complete healing of the lesion took 4 weeks; subsequently, the infant, revised at the 1-year follow-up visit. Conclusion Early detection of RFD is recommended because such lesions properly may induce deformity or mutilation of tongue, dehydration, inadequate nutrients intake by the infant and growth retardation. PMID:23285403

  7. Chagas' disease.

    PubMed Central

    Tanowitz, H B; Kirchhoff, L V; Simon, D; Morris, S A; Weiss, L M; Wittner, M

    1992-01-01

    Chagas' disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, is an important cause of morbidity in many countries in Latin America. The important modes of transmission are by the bite of the reduviid bug and blood transfusion. The organism exists in three morphological forms: trypomastigotes, amastigotes, and epimastigotes. The mechanism of transformation and differentiation is currently being explored, and signal transduction pathways of the parasites may be involved in this process. Parasite adherence to and invasion of host cells is a complex process involving complement, phospholipase, penetrin, neuraminidase, and hemolysin. Two clinical forms of the disease are recognized, acute and chronic. During the acute stage pathological damage is related to the presence of the parasite, whereas in the chronic stage few parasites are found. In recent years the roles of tumor necrosis factor, gamma interferon, and the interleukins in the pathogenesis of this infection have been reported. The common manifestations of chronic cardiomyopathy are arrhythmias and thromboembolic events. Autoimmune, neurogenic, and microvascular factors may be important in the pathogenesis of the cardiomyopathy. The gastrointestinal tract is another important target, and "mega syndromes" are common manifestations. The diagnosis and treatment of this infection are active areas of investigation. New serological and molecular biological techniques have improved the diagnosis of chronic infection. Exacerbations of T. cruzi infection have been reported for patients receiving immuno-suppressive therapy and for those with AIDS. Images PMID:1423218

  8. About Alzheimer's Disease: Treatment

    MedlinePLUS

    ... National Alzheimer's Project Act (NAPA) About ADEAR About Alzheimer's Disease: Treatment How is Alzheimer's disease treated? What ... being researched? What are clinical trials? How is Alzheimer's disease treated? Alzheimer's disease is complex, and it ...

  9. Interstitial Lung Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    Interstitial lung disease is the name for a large group of diseases that inflame or scar the lungs. The inflammation and ... is responsible for some types of interstitial lung diseases. Specific types include Black lung disease among coal ...

  10. Depression and Heart Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information on Heart Disease Citations Reprints Depression and Heart Disease Order a free hardcopy En Español Introduction ... see the NIMH booklet on Depression . What is heart disease? Heart disease refers to a number of ...

  11. HIV and Cardiovascular Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Select a Language: Fact Sheet 652 HIV and Cardiovascular Disease HIV AND CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE WHY SHOULD PEOPLE WITH HIV CARE ABOUT CVD? ... OF CVD? WHAT ABOUT CHANGING MEDICATIONS? HIV AND CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE Cardiovascular disease (CVD) includes a group of problems ...

  12. Polycystic Kidney Disease (PKD)

    MedlinePLUS

    MENU Return to Web version Polycystic Kidney Disease Overview What is polycystic kidney disease? Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) is an inherited disease that affects the kidneys. Sacs of fluid (called ...

  13. Vanishing White Matter Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Vanishing White Matter Disease What is Vanishing White Matter Disease? Vanishing White Matter Disease (VWM) is inherited ... about this). Other Clinical Names for Vanishing White Matter Disease Other clinical names of Vanishing White Matter ...

  14. [Prurigo diseases].

    PubMed

    Hundeiker, M

    1987-08-15

    The term "prurigo" is universally used in dermatology. But, up to now, no definition of this term has been generally accepted. The "classic" description of the "urticarial papules" as the primary skin eruptions of prurigo is not correct, for these papules do not show any momentary edema but a persistent cellular infiltration. In the past, some authors already pointed out that the histologic structure of such papules looks very much like that of the characteristic papulovesicles in eczema--especially those in atopic dermatitis. The various forms of the prurigo nodes secondarily develop in case of the coincidence of three main factors: (1) the particular cutaneous response to repeated irritation (especially in autosomally dominant ichthyosis simplex), (2) reduced threshold for or constitutional disposition to pruritus (especially in atopy), and (3) internal (e.g. intestinal disorders) or external (e.g. insect bites) triggers. Probably none of the prurigo diseases represents a nosologic entity. PMID:3673156

  15. Vibroacoustic disease.

    PubMed

    Branco, N A A Castelo; Alves-Pereira, M

    2004-01-01

    Vibroacoustic disease (VAD) is a whole-body, systemic pathology, characterized by the abnormal proliferation of extra-cellular matrices, and caused by excessive exposure to low frequency noise (LFN). VAD has been observed in LFN-exposed professionals, such as, aircraft technicians, commercial and military pilots and cabin crewmembers, ship machinists, restaurant workers, and disk-jockeys. VAD has also been observed in several populations exposed to environmental LFN. This report summarizes what is known to date on VAD, LFN-induced pathology, and related issues. In 1987, the first autopsy of a deceased VAD patient was performed. The extent of LFN induced damage was overwhelming, and the information obtained is, still today, guiding many of the associated and ongoing research projects. In 1992, LFN-exposed animal models began to be studied in order to gain a deeper knowledge of how tissues respond to this acoustic stressor. In both human and animal models, LFN exposure causes thickening of cardiovascular structures. Indeed, pericardial thickening with no inflammatory process, and in the absence of diastolic dysfunction, is the hallmark of VAD. Depressions, increased irritability and aggressiveness, a tendency for isolation, and decreased cognitive skills are all part of the clinical picture of VAD. LFN is a demonstrated genotoxic agent, inducing an increased frequency of sister chromatid exchanges in both human and animal models. The occurrence of malignancies among LFN-exposed humans, and of metaplastic and displastic appearances in LFN-exposed animals, clearly corroborates the mutagenic outcome of LFN exposure. The inadequacy of currently established legislation regarding noise assessments is a powerful hindrance to scientific advancement. VAD can never be fully recognized as an occupational and environmental pathology unless the agent of disease--LFN--is acknowledged and properly evaluated. The worldwide suffering of LFN-exposed individuals is staggering and it is unethical to maintain this status quo. PMID:15273020

  16. The global burden of chronic respiratory disease in adults.

    PubMed

    Burney, P; Jarvis, D; Perez-Padilla, R

    2015-01-01

    With an aging global population, chronic respiratory diseases are becoming a more prominent cause of death and disability. Age-standardised death rates from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are highest in low-income regions of the world, particularly South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa, although airflow obstruction is relatively uncommon in these areas. Airflow obstruction is, by contrast, more common in regions with a high prevalence of cigarette smoking. COPD mortality is much more closely related to the prevalence of a low forced vital capacity which is, in turn, associated with poverty. Mortality from asthma is less common than mortality from COPD, but it is also relatively more common in poorer areas, particularly Oceania, South and South-East Asia, the Middle East and Africa. Again this contrasts with the asthma prevalence among adults, which is highest in high-income regions. In high-income areas, mortality due to asthma, which is predominantly an adult problem, has fallen substantially in recent decades with the spread of new guidelines for treatment that emphasise the use of inhaled steroids to control the disease. Although mortality rates have been falling, the prevalence of atopy has been increasing between generations in Western Europe. Changes in the prevalence of wheeze among adults has been more varied and may have been influenced by the reduction in smoking and the increase in the use of inhaled steroids. PMID:25519785

  17. Autoimmune Thyroid Disease in Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Global Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Cárdenas Roldán, Jorge; Amaya-Amaya, Jenny; Castellanos-de la Hoz, Juan; Giraldo-Villamil, Juliana; Montoya-Ortiz, Gladys; Cruz-Tapias, Paola; Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana; Mantilla, Rubén D.; Anaya, Juan-Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To determine the prevalence and impact of autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods. Eight-hundred patients were included. The association between AITD and RA was analyzed was analyzed by bivariate and multivariate analysis. In addition, a literature review was done focusing on geographical variations. Results. In our cohort the prevalence of AITD was 9.8% while the presence of antibodies was 37.8% for antithyroperoxidase enzyme (TPOAb) and 20.8% for antithyroglobulin protein (TgAb). The presence of type 2 diabetes, thrombosis, abnormal body mass index, and a high educational level was positively associated with AITD. The literature review disclosed a geographical variation of AITD in RA ranging from 0.5% to 27%. Autoantibody prevalence ranges from 6% to 31% for TgAb, 5% to 37% for TPOAb, and from 11.4% to 32% for the presence of either of the two. Conclusion. AITD is not uncommon in RA and should be systematically assessed since it is a risk factor for developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease. These results may help to further study the common mechanisms of autoimmune diseases, to improve patients' outcome, and to define public health policies. An international consensus to accurately diagnose AITD is warranted. PMID:23209899

  18. Biological therapy for dermatological manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Zippi, Maddalena; Pica, Roberta; De Nitto, Daniela; Paoluzi, Paolo

    2013-05-16

    Ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease are the two forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The advent of biological drugs has significantly changed the management of these conditions. Skin manifestations are not uncommon in IBD. Among the reactive lesions (immune-mediated extraintestinal manifestations), erythema nodosum (EN) and pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) are the two major cutaneous ills associated with IBD, while psoriasis is the dermatological comorbidity disease observed more often. In particular, in the last few years, anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-? agents have been successfully used to treat psoriasis, especially these kinds of lesions that may occur during the treatment with biological therapies. The entity of the paradoxical manifestations has been relatively under reported as most lesions are limited and a causal relationship with the treatment is often poorly understood. The reason for this apparent side-effect of the therapy still remains unclear. Although side effects may occur, their clinical benefits are undoubted. This article reviews the therapeutic effects of the two most widely used anti-TNF-? molecules, infliximab (a fusion protein dimer of the human TNF-? receptor) and adalimumab (a fully human monoclonal antibody to TNF-?), for the treatment of the major cutaneous manifestations associated with IBD (EN, PG and psoriasis). PMID:24303470

  19. `Silk Route Disease' (Behçet's Disease)

    PubMed Central

    James, D. Geraint

    1988-01-01

    Behçet's disease is a multisystem disorder in which orogenital ulceration is associated with troublesome generalized uveitis, erythema nodosum, pyoderma, dermatographism, seronegative arthritis, and neurologic and cardiovascular symptoms. There is no diagnostic laboratory test; the diagnosis is based on the disorder's multisystem clinical features. A points scoring system is helpful in distinguishing it from other multisystem disorders that mimic it. It occurs most frequently in an area coinciding with the old Silk Route, between latitudes 30° and 45° north, in Asian and Eurasian populations, and it has an HLA-B51 affinity. The cause remains unknown, but a postulated trigger factor is a herpesvirus with cofactors that include ethnic group, human leukocyte antigen affinities, T-cell and autonomic imbalance, circulating immune complexes, autoimmunity, blood viscosity, decreased fibrinolysis, and zinc deficiency. Treatment includes administering corticosteroids, azathioprine, chlorambucil, cyclosporine, and colchicine, and fibrinolytic therapy. PMID:3291395

  20. Membranous Nephropathy Associated With Immunological Disorder-Related Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dauvergne, Maxime; Moktefi, Anissa; Rabant, Marion; Vigneau, Cécile; Kofman, Tomek; Burtey, Stephane; Corpechot, Christophe; Stehlé, Thomas; Desvaux, Dominique; Rioux-Leclercq, Nathalie; Rouvier, Philippe; Knebelmann, Bertrand; Boffa, Jean-Jacques; Frouget, Thierry; Daugas, Eric; Jablonski, Mathieu; Dahan, Karine; Brocheriou, Isabelle; Remy, Philippe; Grimbert, Philippe; Lang, Philippe; Chazouilleres, Oliver; Sahali, Dil; Audard, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The association between membranous nephropathy (MN) and immunological disorder-related liver disease has not been extensively investigated, and the specific features of this uncommon association, if any, remain to be determined. We retrospectively identified 10 patients with this association. We aimed to describe the clinical, biological, and pathological characteristics of these patients and their therapeutic management. The possible involvement of the phospholipase A2 receptor (PLA2R) in these apparent secondary forms of MN was assessed by immunohistochemistry with renal and liver biopsy specimens. The mean delay between MN and liver disease diagnoses was 3.9 years and the interval between the diagnosis of the glomerular and liver diseases was <1.5 years in 5 patients. MN was associated with a broad spectrum of liver diseases including primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). AIH whether isolated (n?=?3) or associated with PBC (n?=?2) or PSC (n?=?2) was the most frequent autoimmune liver disease. Circulating PLA2R antibodies were detected in 4 out of 9 patients but the test was performed under specific immunosuppressive treatment in 3 out of 9 patients. Seven of the 9 patients with available renal tissue specimens displayed enhanced expression of PLA2R in glomeruli whereas PLA2R was not expressed in liver parenchyma from these patients or in normal liver tissue. The study of immunoglobulin (Ig) subclasses of deposits in glomeruli revealed that the most frequent pattern was the coexistence of IgG1 and IgG4 immune deposits with IgG4 predominating. Detection of PLA2R antibodies in glomeruli but not in liver parenchyma is a common finding in patients with MN associated with autoimmune liver disease, suggesting that these autoantibodies are not exclusively detected in idiopathic MN. PMID:26222864

  1. Lyme disease: a case report of a 17-year-old male with fatal Lyme carditis.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Esther C; Vail, Eric; Kleinman, George; Lento, Patrick A; Li, Simon; Wang, Guiqing; Limberger, Ronald; Fallon, John T

    2015-01-01

    Lyme disease is a systemic infection commonly found in the northeastern, mid-Atlantic, and north-central regions of the United States. Of the many systemic manifestations of Lyme disease, cardiac involvement is uncommon and rarely causes mortality. We describe a case of a 17-year-old adolescent who died unexpectedly after a 3-week viral-like syndrome. Postmortem examination was remarkable for diffuse pancarditis characterized by extensive infiltrates of lymphocytes and focal interstitial fibrosis. In the cardiac tissue, Borrelia burgdorferi was identified via special stains, immunohistochemistry, and polymerase chain reaction. The findings support B. burgdorferi as the causative agent for his fulminant carditis and that the patient suffered fatal Lyme carditis. Usually, Lyme carditis is associated with conduction disturbances and is a treatable condition. Nevertheless, few cases of mortality have been reported in the literature. Here, we report a rare example of fatal Lyme carditis in an unsuspected patient. PMID:25864163

  2. A case of multiple sclerosis with atypical onset associated with autoimmune hepatitis and silent coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Ferrò, Maria Teresa; Franciotta, Diego; Riccardi, Tommaso; D'Adda, Elisabetta; Mainardi, Elsa; Montanelli, Alessandro

    2008-02-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) and coeliac disease (CD) are an uncommon association. Recently "MS-like illness and CNS white-matter abnormalities" have been demonstrated in patients with CD. We report the case of a 19-year-old female with MS, who presented an episode of headache at onset of disease and developed acute hepatitis (AH) 14 months later. After the diagnosis of AH, an occult CD, confirmed by jejunal biopsy, was disclosed. Constipation was the only gastrointestinal symptom. A serum sample collected before onset of MS was positive for CD. Anti-central nervous system antibodies were negative in both retrospective and current serum samples. Conclusions The concomitant presence of MS with atypical onset, AH and CD likely represents an unusual chance association in our patient but inflammatory immune-mediated damage of the central nervous system triggered by gluten could not be excluded. PMID:18379737

  3. Clinically silent idiopathic Parkinson's disease unmasked by valproate use: a brief report.

    PubMed

    Athauda, Dilan; Batley, Robert; Ellis, Catherine

    2015-06-01

    Valproate is an important but uncommon cause of drug induced parkinsonism in the elderly. The development of symptoms after valproate onset is unpredictable, and severity of symptoms is unrelated to plasma levels. However, though the majority of cases improve after drug cessation, parkinsonian symptoms can persist and should prompt investigation into underlying degenerative parkinsonism, as valproate can unmask idiopathic Parkinson's disease in susceptible individuals. This case describes a patient on chronic valproate therapy developing a severely disabling akinetic-rigid syndrome, only partially reversed on stopping valproate. We hypothesise that an increase in valproate dosage unmasked clinically silent Parkinson's disease. The patient made an excellent recovery following cessation of valproate and commencement of dopaminergic therapy. PMID:25365950

  4. A Case of Autoimmune Polyglandular Syndrome (APS) Type II with Hypothyroidism, Hypoadrenalism, and Celiac Disease - A Rare Combination

    PubMed Central

    Pahadia, Hans Raj; Kumar, Harish; Singh, Jagdish; Tak, Sandeep

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune Polyglandular syndrome (APS) are rare condition characterised by presence of immune dysfunction of two or more endocrine glands and other non-endocrine organs. APS is divided into 2 major subtypes based on age of presentation, pattern of disease combinations and mode of inheritance. APS 1(juvenile) usually manifest in early adolescence or in infancy. It is characterised by multiple endocrinal deficiency with mucocutaneous candidiasis and ectodermal dystrophy. Of the endocrine diseases, hypoparathyroidism form an important component followed by Addison’s disease, type 1A diabetes, hypogonadism and thyroid disease. On the other hand APS II usually manifest in 3rd or 4th decade of life with female preponderance. Endocrine diseases commonly include autoimmune thyroid disease (graves or autoimmune thyroiditis), type 1A diabetes, and Addison’s disease. Hypoparathyroidism is of rare occurrence and there is no mucocutaneous candidiasis. We report here a case of APS type II in a 29-year-old male who initially presented with hypothyroidism, which was soon followed by Addison’s disease. The involvement of thyroid gland preceding the involvement of adrenal is of rare occurrence. The patient also had celiac disease which makes the combination further uncommon. PMID:26023582

  5. Coronary Artery Disease - Coronary Heart Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Coronary Artery Disease - Coronary Heart Disease Updated:Aug 7,2015 ... for the buildup of plaque in the heart’s arteries that could lead to heart attack. But what ...

  6. Jorge Lobo's disease: a case of keloidal blastomycosis (lobomycosis) in a nonendemic area.

    PubMed

    Arju, Rezina; Kothadia, Jiten P; Kaminski, Monica; Abraham, Sherly; Giashuddin, Shah

    2014-06-01

    Lobomycosis or lacaziosis is a chronic subcutaneous fungal infection, caused by the fungus Lacazia loboi, which is phylogenetically related to Coccidioides, Blastomyces, Histoplasma, and Paracoccidioides. The disease was first recognized in 1931 by Jorge Lobo, who found the disease to be a keloidal blastomycosis and named it Jorge Lobo's disease. This case was perplexing initially as this fungal infection is very uncommon in the USA. However, with the ever-increasing frequency of international travel, many more cases of lobomycosis have been diagnosed in areas of nonendemicity, such as the USA, Europe, and South Africa. The clinical histories of such imported fungal infections often illustrate their long latency periods. In lobomycosis, the onset of the disease is usually insidious and often difficult to document. We describe a case of a New York resident who presented with multiple skin nodules over both his arms and forearms, and was subsequently diagnosed with Jorge Lobo's disease. The case, diagnosis, histopathologic findings, complication, and management of this rare clinical disease are discussed. PMID:25469235

  7. Atypical presentation of acute and chronic coronary artery disease in diabetics

    PubMed Central

    Khafaji, Hadi AR Hadi; Suwaidi, Jassim M Al

    2014-01-01

    In patients with diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease is the principal cause of mortality and chest pain is the most frequent symptom in patients with stable and acute coronary artery disease. However, there is little knowledge concerning the pervasiveness of uncommon presentations in diabetics. The symptomatology of acute coronary syndrome, which comprises both pain and non-pain symptoms, may be affected by traditional risk factors such as age, gender, smoking, hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia. Such atypical symptoms may range from silent myocardial ischemia to a wide spectrum of non-chest pain symptoms. Worldwide, few studies have highlighted this under-investigated subject, and this aspect of ischemic heart disease has also been under-evaluated in the major clinical trials. The results of these studies are highly diverse which makes definitive conclusions regarding the spectrum of atypical presentation of acute and even stable chronic coronay artery disease difficult to confirm. This may have a significant impact on the morbidity and mortality of coronary artery disease in diabetics. In this up-to-date review we will try to analyze the most recent studies on the atypical presentations in both acute and chronic ischemic heart disease which may give some emphasis to this under-investigated topic. PMID:25228959

  8. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Associated with Congenital Heart Disease and Eisenmenger Syndrome: Current Practice in Pediatrics

    PubMed Central

    Frank, David B.; Hanna, Brian D.

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is an uncommon but serious disease characterized by severe pulmonary vascular disease and significant morbidity and mortality. PAH associated with congenital heart disease (APAH-CHD) is one etiology of PAH that has innate characteristics delineating it from other forms of PAH. The patient with APAH-CHD presents with unique challenges consisting of not only pulmonary vascular disease but also the complexity of the cardiac lesion. Eisenmenger syndrome (ES) represents the severe end of the spectrum for disease in APAH-CHD. Over time, systemic-to-pulmonary shunting through cardiac defects increases pulmonary vascular resistance to levels significant enough to reverse shunting across the defect. Historically, ES patients have been reported to have better outcomes than IPAH despite similarities in pulmonary vascular disease. However, recent studies are challenging this notion. Nonetheless, APAH-CHD survival has improved with the advent of modern PAH targeted therapies. New therapeutic options have allowed us to reconsider the dogma of inoperability in APAH-CHD patients with unrepaired defects. Certainly advances have been made, however, investigators must continue to advance the field through controlled clinical trials in both adult and pediatric APAH-CHD patients. PMID:25604592

  9. Role of minimally invasive surgery in the treatment of diverticular disease: an evidence-based analysis.

    PubMed

    Bissolati, Massimiliano; Orsenigo, Elena; Staudacher, Carlo

    2015-12-01

    The clinical spectrum of diverticular disease varies from asymptomatic diverticulosis to symptomatic disease with potentially fatal complications, such as perforation or bleeding. While the presence of diverticula is common, symptomatic diverticulitis is relatively uncommon, occurring in an estimated 10-30 % of patients. There is continued debate as to whether patients should undergo elective resection for diverticular disease and regarding the role of minimally invasive surgery. Since the first publication on laparoscopic colorectal procedures, the interest in minimally invasive surgery has kept growing. Laparoscopic sigmoid resection with restoration of continuity is currently the prevailing modality for treating acute and recurrent sigmoid diverticulitis. However, it still remains unclear whether laparoscopy should be recommended also for complicated sigmoid diverticulitis. The potential benefits of reduced pain and analgesic requirements, smaller scars, and shorter hospital stay but longer operative times are appealing to both patients and surgeons. Nevertheless, there many concerns regarding the time and the type of surgery. Although the role of minimally invasive surgery in the treatment of colonic diseases is progressively increased, current randomized controlled trials should demonstrate whether laparoscopic lavage, Hartmann's procedure or resection and anastomosis achieve the best results for patients. This review aimed to analyze the results of laparoscopic colonic resection for patients with uncomplicated and complicated forms of sigmoid diverticular disease and to determine what stages profit from a laparoscopic procedure and whether the approach can be performed with a low complication rate even for patients with complicated forms of the disease. PMID:26449963

  10. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID)

    MedlinePLUS

    MENU Return to Web version Pelvic Inflammatory Disease Overview What is pelvic inflammatory disease (PID)? Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is an infection of the female reproductive organs (the uterus, ...

  11. Anemia of chronic disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... There are many types of anemia. Anemia of chronic disease is anemia that is found in people with ... blood. Some conditions can lead to anemia of chronic disease include: Autoimmune disorders , such as Crohn disease , systemic ...

  12. Acid Lipase Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Acid Lipase Disease Information Page Synonym(s): Cholesterol Ester Storage ... Trials Related NINDS Publications and Information What is Acid Lipase Disease ? Acid lipase disease or deficiency occurs ...

  13. Kidney Disease (Nephropathy)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Text Size: A A A Listen En Español Kidney Disease (Nephropathy) Kidneys are remarkable organs. Inside them ... resulting in kidney disease. How Does Diabetes Cause Kidney Disease? When our bodies digest the protein we ...

  14. Amyloidosis and Kidney Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Foundation Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center MedlinePlus Kidney and Urologic Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support ... PDF, 345 KB)????? Alternate Language URL Amyloidosis and Kidney Disease Page Content On this page: What is ...

  15. Tay-Sachs disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Tay-Sachs disease is a life-threatening disease of the nervous system passed down through families. ... Tay-Sachs disease occurs when the body lacks hexosaminidase A. This is a protein that helps break down ...

  16. Lyme disease blood test

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to the bacterium that causes Lyme disease . The test is used to help diagnose Lyme disease. ... Western blot test can confirm the diagnosis of Lyme disease. For many people, the ELISA test remains positive, even after they have been treated ...

  17. Hypothyroidism and Heart Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and Heart Disease Share: Fact Sheet Hypothyroidism and Heart Disease January 2014 Download PDFs English Espanol Editors ... hormone. Why does hypothyroidism increase your risk for heart disease? Both thyroid hormones (T4 and T3) are ...

  18. Carotid Artery Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Carotid Artery Disease? Carotid artery disease is a disease in ... blood to your face, scalp, and neck. Carotid Arteries Figure A shows the location of the right ...

  19. Travelers' Health: Meningococcal Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... July 10, 2015 Content source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases ( ... General USA.gov Contact CDC Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 1600 Clifton Road Atlanta , GA 30329-4027 USA ...

  20. Sickle Cell Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Sickle Cell Disease? Español The term sickle cell disease (SCD) ... common forms of SCD. Some Forms of Sickle Cell Disease Hemoglobin SS Hemoglobin SC Hemoglobin S? 0 thalassemia ...

  1. Autoimmune liver disease panel

    MedlinePLUS

    Liver disease test panel - autoimmune ... Autoimmune disorders are a possible cause of liver disease. The most common of these diseases are autoimmune hepatitis and primary biliary cirrhosis. This group of tests helps your health care provider ...

  2. Understanding Autoimmune Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... This is called an autoimmune disease. (“Autoimmune” means immunity against the self.) The Immune System Autoimmune Diseases ... disease. Unfortunately, because these drugs also suppress normal immunity, they leave the body at risk for infection. ...

  3. Learning about Parkinson's Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... affect many things about us: our height, eye color, why we respond to some medications better than ... diseases including Parkinson's disease. Top of page What determines who gets Parkinson's disease? In most cases inheriting ...

  4. Understanding Alzheimer's Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Referral Center Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center Home About Alzheimer’s ... National Alzheimer's Project Act (NAPA) About ADEAR Understanding Alzheimer's Disease: What You Need to Know Introduction Many ...

  5. Peripheral Vascular Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Arterial blockage including peripheral artery disease or PAD Aortic aneurysms Buerger's Disease Raynaud's Phenomenon Disease of the veins ... blood to flow around, or "bypass," the blockage. Aortic Aneurysms An aneurysm is a balloon-like bulge in ...

  6. Heart disease - resources

    MedlinePLUS

    Resources - heart disease ... The following organizations are good resources for information on heart disease: American Heart Association -- www.heart.org Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- www.cdc.gov/heartdisease/

  7. Kidney disease - resources

    MedlinePLUS

    Resources - kidney disease ... The following organizations are good resources for information on kidney disease: National Kidney Disease Education Program - www.nkdep.nih.gov National Kidney Foundation - www.kidney.org National ...

  8. Fibrocystic breast disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Fibrocystic breast disease; Mammary dysplasia; Diffuse cystic mastopathy; Benign breast disease; Glandular breast changes ... Ferri FF, Fort GG, et al, eds. Fibrocystic breast disease. In: Ferri FF, ed. Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2015 . ...

  9. Interstitial Lung Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... MD Dept. of Medicine View full profile Interstitial Lung Disease (ILD): Overview Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is ... they may make informed decisions Learn more. Interstitial Lung Disease Program As a center specializing in the ...

  10. Von Willebrand Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... get the proper diagnosis and treatment. What Is von Willebrand Disease? When people have von Willebrand disease ( ... guys can have vWD. Continue The Types of von Willebrand Disease There are different kinds of vWD: ...

  11. Parkinson disease - discharge

    MedlinePLUS

    Your doctor has told you that you have Parkinson disease . This disease affects the brain and leads ... have you take different medicines to treat your Parkinson disease and many of the problems that may ...

  12. Thyroid Disease Definitions

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Eating Well While Eating Out Melanoma Thyroid Disease Definitions KidsHealth > Teens > Diseases & Conditions > Growth, Hormones & Diabetes > Thyroid Disease Definitions Print A A A Text Size amino acids: ...

  13. Sleep and Chronic Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... control in persons with Type 2 diabetes. 1 Cardiovascular Disease Persons with sleep apnea have been found to be at increased risk for a number of cardiovascular diseases. Notably, hypertension, stroke, coronary heart disease and irregular ...

  14. Lyme Disease (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... A With Robert Irvine Pregnant? What to Expect Lyme Disease KidsHealth > Parents > Infections > Bacterial & Viral Infections > Lyme ... Pacific Northwest, and the northern Midwest states. About Lyme Disease Lyme disease is caused by the bacterium ...

  15. Lyme disease (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    Lyme disease is an acute inflammatory disease characterized by skin changes, joint inflammation and symptoms similar to ... that is caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi . Lyme disease is transmitted by the bite of a ...

  16. Carotid Artery Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... cerebrovascular disease, stroke, transient ischemic attacks (TIA) Carotid artery disease is a form of disease that affects ... to the brain by the 2 large carotid arteries in the front of your neck and by ...

  17. Lipid Storage Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Lipid Storage Diseases Information Page Condensed from Lipid Storage ... en Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What are Lipid Storage Diseases? Lipid storage diseases are a group ...

  18. Cane to Molasses: An Uncommon Sweetener

    E-print Network

    Wolz, Lyn A.

    1979-01-01

    stream_size 6 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Molasses-An-UnCommon-Sweetener.pdf.txt stream_source_info Molasses-An-UnCommon-Sweetener.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 ...

  19. Uncommon Indications for Reverse Total Shoulder Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Yoon Suk; Huri, Gazi; Garbis, Nickolas G.

    2013-01-01

    Total shoulder arthroplasty and shoulder hemiarthroplasty have been the traditional method for treating a variety of shoulder conditions, including arthritis, cuff tear arthropathy, and some fracture types. However, these procedures did not provide consistently good results for patients with torn rotator cuffs. The development of the reverse prosthesis by Grammont in the late 20th century revolutionized the treatment of the rotator-cuff-deficient shoulder with arthritis. The main indication for the reverse prosthesis remains the patient with cuff tear arthropathy who has pain and loss of motion. Because the reverse total shoulder arthroplasty produced such good results in these patients, the indications for the reverse prosthesis have expanded to include other shoulder conditions that have previously been difficult to treat successfully and predictably. This review discusses and critically reviews these newer indications for the reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. PMID:24340143

  20. Retroperitoneal Cyst: An Uncommon Presentation of Filariasis

    PubMed Central

    Ganesan, Senthil; Galodha, Saurabh; Saxena, Rajan

    2015-01-01

    Primary retroperitoneal parasitic cysts are rare. Here we report about a middle aged male patient from rural north India with a recent onset of central abdominal retroperitoneal lump, pain, and fever. After surgical resection due to diagnostic uncertainty, at histopathology, it turned out be a filarial cyst. After receiving a course of diethylcarbamazine, the patient is asymptomatic at 4 months' follow-up.

  1. Uncommon Sense for Parents with Teenagers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riera, Michael

    This guide to parenting high school-age adolescents is intended to help parents restructure the typically adversarial relationship between parent and teenager by replacing the "parent as manager" role with the "parent as consultant" role. The text is question-driven, comprised of a series of responses to questions commonly asked by parents and…

  2. Critical illness at mass gatherings is uncommon.

    PubMed

    Varon, Joseph; Fromm, Robert E; Chanin, Katia; Filbin, Michael; Vutpakdi, Kris

    2003-11-01

    Gatherings of large numbers of people at concerts, sporting events, and other occasions lead to an assembled population with a potential for a wide variety of illnesses and injuries. The collection of large numbers of people in a single location has led some authors to recommend the placement of resuscitation equipment or other medical services in close proximity to these activities. These recommendations not withstanding, data on the frequency of critical illness at mass gatherings (a group exceeding 1000 persons) are difficult to ascertain. Therefore, it was the purpose of this study to describe the incidence of critical illnesses among assembled populations at mass gatherings. An observational prospective study was conducted involving patient encounters at a large, multipurpose, indoor mass-gathering complex in Houston, Texas occurring between September 1, 1996 and June 30, 1997. Demographic, treatment, disposition and diagnostic data were analyzed in a computerized database. Of the 3.3 million attendants to the 253 events analyzed during the 10-month study period, there were 2762 (0.08%) patient encounters. Fifty-two percent were women. Mean age was 32 +/- 15.6 years. Of these patients, 51.1% were patrons and the remaining patients were employees or contractors of the facility. A wide variety of illness was seen with trauma (39.5%), headache (31%), and other medical complaints (29.5%) being most frequent. Disposition of the patients included 95.3% being discharged to go back to the event and 2.2% being counseled to seek other medical attention. One hundred twenty-nine patients (4.7%) were referred to the Emergency Department (ED); of these, 70 were transferred for abrasions, lacerations, or skeletal injuries and 13 for chest pain. Of those referred to the ED, 50 (38.7%) patients were transported by ambulance and only 17.4% were admitted to telemetry, with none admitted to an ICU. It is concluded that critical illness at mass gatherings is infrequent, as seen in this study, with very few being admitted to telemetry and none to an ICU. Careful consideration of cost-benefit should occur when determining allocation of resources for these activities. PMID:14654182

  3. Ureteral Metastasis: Uncommon Manifestation in Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Schallier, Denis; Rappe, Bernard; Carprieaux, Marilyn; Vandenbroucke, Frederik

    2015-11-01

    Ureteral metastasis from a primary prostate cancer is a rare event in the initial diagnosis and progression of prostate cancer. We report here the case of a 72- year-old patient who was treated for castration-resistant metastatic prostate cancer involving bone, intra-abdominal lymph nodes, bilateral adrenal glands, and a small distal ureteral lesion with left hydronephrosis considered in remission, with a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone analog plus abiraterone acetate (AA) and prednisone after initial docetaxel plus prednisone chemotherapy. After an episode of acute left flank pain, the previous left distal intraluminal ureteral mass appeared increased in volume on computed tomographic scan and was compatible with either a metastasis from prostate cancer, transitional cell carcinoma of the ureter, or a collision tumor. After left nephroureterectomy (NU), the mass was confirmed to be of prostatic origin on histopathological examination and the only site of metastatic progression of prostate cancer. Abdominal CT-scan and the operative specimen of the NU showed no direct extension of the abdominal lymph nodes into the ureteral lesion. We speculate that this unique ureteral prostate cancer metastasis was the result of hematogenic spread of prostate cancer, although microscopic spread through the lymphatic system could not be excluded. The transient anti-tumor effect of AA plus prednisone at the level of ureteral metastasis, as far as we are aware of, has never been documented before. PMID:26504069

  4. Peripheral odontogenic fibroma: an uncommonly overviewed lesion.

    PubMed

    Silva, Carolina Amália Barcellos; Passador-Santos, Fabrício; Moraes, Paulo de Camargo; Soares, Andresa Borges; de Araújo, Vera Cavalcanti

    2013-05-01

    Peripheral odontogenic fibroma is considered a gingival tumor characterized by a proliferation of relatively cellular fibrous or fibromyxomatous connective tissue which exhibits variable amounts of odontogenic epithelium and sometimes foci of calcification in the form of dentinoid, cementicles, or bone. It is considered the extraosseous counterpart of central odontogenic fibroma. This lesion usually is presented as a focal swelling in the gingiva, occurring in a wide age range, and the anterior region of the gingiva is the most frequent anatomic site. Conservative local excision is the treatment frequently adopted and its recurrence rate varies widely, and its biologic behavior is still unknown. In this study, the authors discuss 3 cases of peripheral odontogenic fibroma, and present their clinical and histopathological features and management. PMID:23714966

  5. Large abdominoscrotal hydrocele: Uncommon surgical entity

    PubMed Central

    Kamble, Pramod M.; Deshpande, Aparna A.; Thapar, Vinaykumar B.; Das, Krishanu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction An abdominoscrotal hydrocele (ASH) consists of a large inguinoscrotal hydrocele which communicates in an hour glass fashion with a large “intraabdominal component”. Mostly affects single testis but very rarely can present bilaterally. Presentation of case We are presenting here a young 25 year old patient with large right sided scrotal swelling encroaching over lower abdomen. Clinically it was abdominoscrotal hydrocele which was confirmed with CT abdomen and later on subjected for surgery. Discussion Abdominoscrotal hydrocele is rarest type of hydrocele; first described by Dupuytren. The etiology of ASH is unknown; however, different theories have been described in literature to explain the pathogenesis. Diagnosis of ASH is done by clinical examination and is confirmed by radiological examination. Though ultrasonography is the first choice, in few selected cases contrast enhanced computerized tomography or magnetic resonant imaging may be helpful for more anatomical delineation. It may present with various complications secondary to pressure exerted by the components of the ASH. Surgical excision of the sac is the only definitive treatment option. There is no role of conservative treatment. Sometimes, decompression of the cyst needed to ease the dissection of the sac. Conclusion Abdominoscrotal hydrocele differential should be considered while dealing with large lower abdominal swelling along with scrotal swelling. PMID:26363104

  6. An Uncommon Guide to College Union Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sturgell, J. S.

    This guide is an attempt to identify generally the kinds of programs planned by college unions for the spring semester of 1973. The programs are classified by types of events: theater, concerts and artists series, films, recreation, theme series, short courses, food, travel, art exhibitions, outdoor programs, craft shops, building services and…

  7. Actinomyces naeslundii: An Uncommon Cause of Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Cortes, Christopher D.; Urban, Carl; Turett, Glenn

    2015-01-01

    Actinomyces rarely causes endocarditis with 25 well-described cases reported in the literature in the past 75 years. We present a case of prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) caused by Actinomyces naeslundii. To our knowledge, this is the first report in the literature of endocarditis due to this organism and the second report of PVE caused by Actinomyces. PMID:26697243

  8. Malignancy of parathyroid: An uncommon clinical entity

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Kamran; Sarangi, Rathindra; Dhawan, Shashi; Agarwal, Brij B.; Gupta, Manish K.

    2013-01-01

    Parathyroid carcinoma is a very rare cause of hyperparathyroidism. The diagnosis is usually established on histopathological grounds of capsular and vascular invasion, but a potential clue to the diagnosis is also offered by the severity of clinical profile, abrupt onset of symptoms, and a high degree of hypercalcemia and raised serum parathyroid hormone (PTH). We report a case of an elderly female with a prolonged history of generalized weakness and bone pain along with bilateral renal calculi, classical bony lesions, and a high serum calcium and PTH level who underwent a right inferior parathyroidectomy considering a parathyroid adenoma as our diagnosis. However, the biopsy report was consistent with a parathyroid carcinoma, and so, she was further subjected to an ipsilateral hemithyroidectomy as a completion procedure. So, we would like to emphasize that its preferable to have a high index of suspicion for parathyroid carcinoma when these clues are present, than to miss the opportunity for surgical cure in the first go by failing to consider it in the differential diagnosis. PMID:23776914

  9. Methylation – an uncommon modification of glycans*

    PubMed Central

    Staudacher, Erika

    2013-01-01

    A methyl group on a sugar residue is a rarely reported event. Until now this kind of modification has been found in the kingdom of animals only in worms and molluscs, whereas it is more frequently present in some species of bacteria, fungi, algae and plants, but not in mammals. The monosaccharides involved as well as the positions of the methyl groups on the sugar vary with the species. Methylation seems to play a role in some recognition events but details are still unknown. This review summarises the current knowledge on methylation of sugars in all kinds of organism. PMID:22944672

  10. Uncommon Caring: Primary Males and Implicit Judgments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, James R.

    The caring and nurturing of children, which characterize primary education culture, have tended to shape a public perception of primary teaching as "women's work." Several social factors influence men's underrepresentation in the profession of primary education, such as parents not wanting their children exposed to "soft" males. Male primary…

  11. Genetic of addiction: common and uncommon factors.

    PubMed

    Juli, Giada; Juli, Luigi

    2015-09-01

    Epidemiological studies strongly suggest that genetic factors operate at all steps of addictions, including vulnerability to initiation, continued use, and propensity to become dependent. Several studies have been popular to investigate the relative contributions of genetic and environmental factors, including the availability of and exposure to a substance, and shared and unique environments. The genetic influence on addiction has proved to be substantial, and heritabilities for most addictive disorders are moderate to high. In this work we evaluate the current status of data that analyzed genetic contribution in addictions. PMID:26417801

  12. Pott's Puffy Tumor: An Uncommon Clinical Entity

    PubMed Central

    Suwan, Phillip T.; Mogal, Suvarna; Chaudhary, Subhash

    2012-01-01

    Although first described in 1760, Pott's puffy tumor is a lesser known clinical entity. Often seen as a complication of frontal sinusitis, Pott's is a frontal bone osteomyelitis with an associated subperiosteal abscess. Patients present with a fluctuant swelling of the scalp. The diagnosis is often confirmed with computed tomography (CT). Prompt surgical and medical treatments are the rule as there is the potential for significant morbidity if not quickly diagnosed and treated. Herein, we describe the presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of an 8-year-old female presenting with Pott's puffy tumor. PMID:23091765

  13. Sexsomnia: an uncommon variety of parasomnia.

    PubMed

    Béjot, Yannick; Juenet, Nicolas; Garrouty, Romain; Maltaverne, Didier; Nicolleau, Laurent; Giroud, Maurice; Didi-Roy, Rudy

    2010-01-01

    Sexsomnia is considered a particular form of parasomnia characterized by atypical sexual behaviour during sleep. Only a few cases have been reported in the literature. We describe here two cases of sexsomnia that took place in adult women whose personal history was remarkable for traumatic sexual psychological stress during childhood. In addition, the first patient had a medical history of alcoholism during adolescence and current sleepwalking. In the second patient, drug consumption was reported during adolescence, and psychiatric assessment found a major depressive disorder. Neurological examination was normal for both patients. The sexual behaviour was reported by the bed partner because of total amnesia of the event by the patients. Events included moaning, vocalizations with dirty talk, masturbation, sexual assault, and sexual intercourse. The behaviour was harmful for the bed partner in the second case. For both patients, electroencephalogram and brain magnetic resonance imaging were normal whereas nocturnal polysomnography recordings revealed several abrupt and spontaneous arousals from slow-wave sleep. Patients were successfully treated by serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Our observations underline the fact that efforts need to be made to increase awareness of the issue of sexsomnia, in order to identify patients suffering from this atypical parasomnia, which can be associated with adverse psychological consequences and serious medico-legal issues. PMID:19765888

  14. Uncommon Teaching in an Unexpected Place

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shore, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Continued physical well-being is important, especially within the aging teacher ranks. The story of one veteran exercise instructor emphasizes fitness and weaves best classroom practices throughout the narrative.

  15. Parkinson's Disease Dementia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... An Interactive Tour Risk Factors Diagnosis Treatments Myths Clinical ... Parkinson's disease dementia is an impairment in thinking and reasoning that eventually affects many people with Parkinson's disease. ...

  16. Atheroembolic renal disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Renal disease - atheroembolic; Cholesterol embolization syndrome; Atheroemboli - renal; Atherosclerotic disease - renal ... disorder of the arteries. It occurs when fat, cholesterol, and other substances build up in the walls ...

  17. Biomarker for Glycogen Storage Diseases

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-12

    Fructose Metabolism, Inborn Errors; Glycogen Storage Disease; Glycogen Storage Disease Type I; Glycogen Storage Disease Type II; Glycogen Storage Disease Type III; Glycogen Storage Disease Type IV; Glycogen Storage Disease Type V; Glycogen Storage Disease Type VI; Glycogen Storage Disease Type VII; Glycogen Storage Disease Type VIII

  18. Current and emerging treatment options for Peyronie’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Gokce, Ahmet; Wang, Julie C; Powers, Mary K; Hellstrom, Wayne JG

    2013-01-01

    Peyronie’s disease (PD) is a condition of the penis, characterized by the presence of localized fibrotic plaque in the tunica albuginea. PD is not an uncommon disorder, with recent epidemiologic studies documenting a prevalence of 3–9% of adult men affected. The actual prevalence of PD may be even higher. It is often associated with penile pain, anatomical deformities in the erect penis, and difficulty with intromission. As the definitive pathophysiology of PD has not been completely elucidated, further basic research is required to make progress in the understanding of this enigmatic condition. Similarly, research on effective therapies is limited. Currently, nonsurgical treatments are used for those men who are in the acute stage of PD, whereas surgical options are reserved for men with established PD who cannot successfully penetrate. Intralesional treatments are growing in clinical popularity as a minimally invasive approach in the initial treatment of PD. A surgical approach should be considered when men with PD do not respond to conservative, medical, or minimally invasive therapies for approximately 1 year and cannot have satisfactory sexual intercourse. As scientific breakthroughs in the understanding of the mechanisms of this disease process evolve, novel treatments for the many men suffering with PD are anticipated. PMID:24400231

  19. Connective tissue disease-associated pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Luke S.

    2015-01-01

    Although rare in its idiopathic form, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is not uncommon in association with various associated medical conditions, most notably connective tissue disease (CTD). In particular, it develops in approximately 10% of patients with systemic sclerosis and so these patients are increasingly screened to enable early detection. The response of patients with systemic sclerosis to PAH-specific therapy appears to be worse than in other forms of PAH. Survival in systemic sclerosis-associated PAH is inferior to that observed in idiopathic PAH. Potential reasons for this include differences in age, the nature of the underlying pulmonary vasculopathy and the ability of the right ventricle to cope with increased afterload between patients with systemic sclerosis-associated PAH and idiopathic PAH, while coexisting cardiac and pulmonary disease is common in systemic sclerosis-associated PAH. Other forms of connective tissue-associated PAH have been less well studied, however PAH associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has a better prognosis than systemic sclerosis-associated PAH and likely responds to immunosuppression. PMID:25705389

  20. Management of Malassezia-related diseases in the dog.

    PubMed

    Peano, A; Gallo, M G

    2008-06-01

    Most cases of Malassezia dermatitis/otitis in the dog are associated with concurrent dermatoses or systemic diseases and recurrences are not uncommon. Recognition and control of the predisposing factors are therefore key factors for successful therapy and prevention of recurrent infections. Currently, Malassezia dermatitis/otitis is managed by the use of antifungal drugs. Systemic therapy is often necessary, in particular when clinical signs are severe and widespread. Ketoconazole and Itraconazole are the most commonly used drugs. Topical therapy is an alternative in case of localized lesions and external ear localizations. Different commercial formulations, available in clinical practice in form of creams, gels, lotions, sprays and ear drops are often used as adiuvants to systemic therapy. Topicals more frequently used are represented by imidazolic antifungals, chlorhexydine and lime sulphur. The presentation deals with more recent advances about the protocols for treatment of Malassezia-related diseases in the dog. New perspectives, as the use of natural compounds, immunotherapy and inhibitors of yeast adherence factors, are also discussed. PMID:18693565

  1. Heart failure and chronic kidney disease: should we use spironolactone?

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Sahil; Agrawal, Nikhil; Garg, Jalaj; Mohandas, Rajesh; Gupta, Tanush; Segal, Mark

    2015-08-01

    Half of all deaths in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) arise from cardiovascular causes. Congestive heart failure (CHF) is specifically more frequent with CKD. Cardiovascular therapies with proven benefit are often withheld from patients with renal disease for fear of adverse events. The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) has been implicated as an important maladaptive neurohormonal pathway in heart failure. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers have been shown to suppress it ineffectively. Current guidelines support the use of spironolactone for more comprehensive suppression of the RAAS in heart failure patients. Most supporting trials have however excluded patients with renal dysfunction resulting in a dearth of data to support use of spironolactone in CKD patients with CHF. Several small studies that prospectively interrogated the benefits of augmented RAAS blockade with spironolactone in CKD patients have shown improvement in predictors of cardiovascular mortality. More recently, improved mortality outcomes were demonstrated with the use of spironolactone in hemodialysis patients. Although reduction in glomerular filtration rate and hyperkalemia are potential adverse effects with its use, the available evidence suggests that it is uncommon and serious consequences can be avoided with close monitoring. Studies investigating the optimal spironolactone dosage in such a setting recommend starting with a low dose and careful uptitration. This review attempts to provide a comprehensive insight into the issues associated with the use of spironolactone in the setting of concomitant CHF and CKD. PMID:26086152

  2. Chronic Liver Diseases in Children: Clinical Profile and Histology

    PubMed Central

    Kher, Archana S.; Ghildiyal, Radha G.; Tambse, Manjusha P.

    2015-01-01

    Aim The main aim of the study is to study the clinical profile of disorders of the liver and hepatobiliary system in paediatric patients and to correlate the histopathology findings of liver biopsy in chronic liver disease. Another aim being to assess the prognosis and to know the outcome and the effects of treatment in chronic liver diseases in paediatric age group. Materials and Methods It was a prospective study, included the clinical profile of Chronic Liver Diseases (CLD) in children and the histopathological correlation. A total of 55 children were thoroughly investigated by doing relevant investigations and liver biopsy. Results A male predominance (60%) was noted with maximum incidence in the age group of 6-12 years. The incidence of CLD was 1.1% of total admissions. The most common presenting complaint was jaundice and abdominal distension. Hepatic encephalopathy was noted in 29% patients. Hepatomegaly was seen in 63% patients and spleenomegaly was seen in 60% patients. The incidence of cirrhosis on liver biopsy was 42% (23cases) in CLD patients. The most common diagnosis on histopathology was Wilson’s disease (22%), followed by hepatitis and autoimmune hepatitis. The predominant spectrum of CLD was metabolic liver disease and also the predominant cause of death. Conclusion As the incidence of CLD is quite low, a very high index of suspicion is required for its diagnosis. Some uncommon causes of CLD in children were seen in our study like neutral lipid storage disease, ?1-Antitrypsin deficiency disease, lupus hepatitis, Alagille syndrome and Budd-Chiari syndrome. A patient of CLD with jaundice and hepatomegaly should be treated aggressively as those are the poor prognostic indicators of the disease. Hepatic encephalopathy and cirrhosis are also associated with poor outcome in patients with CLD. Liver biopsy histopathology by an expert and its correlation with laboratory investigations plays an important role in the diagnosis of CLD. The major cause of deaths in patients with CLD is due to end stage liver disease and fulminant hepatic failure and the only way to prevent and treat these patients is by liver transplantation. PMID:26393179

  3. Diseases of Dairy Animals: Infectious Diseases: Johne's Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Johne's disease is a chronic, debilitating intestinal disorder in cattle, sheep and wild ruminants, characterized by diarrhea, weight loss and death. Animals usually become infected when they are young by ingesting feces or milk containing the causative bacteria. However, clinical signs of disease...

  4. Understanding Heart Disease

    E-print Network

    Shen, Jun

    1 Understanding Heart Disease Vietnamese Aspire For Healthy Hearts What Is Heart Disease? Heart disease is the leading cause of death for Vietnamese. It develops over many years. It happens when arteries. When arteries become clogged, it increases the risk of developing heart disease. When the heart

  5. Renal cystic disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, D.S.

    1988-01-01

    The book begins with an overview of renal cystic disease and a presentation of simple renal cysts. Subsequent chapters cover cystic disease in association with renal neoplasms and medullary sponge kidney. The chapters addressing autosomal-dominant and autosomal-recessive polycystic kidney disease discuss and differentiate the infantile and adult forms of the disease. There are also separate discussions of medullary cystic disease, multicystic dysplastic kidney, and cysts of the renarenal sinus.

  6. Spectrum of high-resolution computed tomography imaging in occupational lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Satija, Bhawna; Kumar, Sanyal; Ojha, Umesh Chandra; Gothi, Dipti

    2013-01-01

    Damage to the lungs caused by dusts or fumes or noxious substances inhaled by workers in certain specific occupation is known as occupational lung disease. Recognition of occupational lung disease is especially important not only for the primary worker, but also because of the implications with regard to primary and secondary disease prevention in the exposed co-workers. Although many of the disorders can be detected on chest radiography, high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) is superior in delineating the lung architecture and depicting pathology. The characteristic radiological features suggest the correct diagnosis in some, whereas a combination of clinical features, occupational history, and radiological findings is essential in establishing the diagnosis in others. In the presence of a history of exposure and consistent clinical features, the diagnosis of even an uncommon occupational lung disease can be suggested by the characteristic described HRCT findings. In this article, we briefly review the HRCT appearance of a wide spectrum of occupational lung diseases. PMID:24604929

  7. Kidney Disease: A Silent Problem

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Kidney Disease: A Silent Problem Heath and Aging Kidney Disease: A Silent Problem Kidney Disease Who Is ... hormones that your body needs to stay healthy. Kidney Disease Kidney disease can sometimes develop very quickly, ...

  8. [Undifferentiated connective tissue disease].

    PubMed

    Bodolay, Edit; Szegedi, Gyula

    2009-05-10

    Evolution of immunopathological diseases is usually slow and progressive. Non-differentiated collagen disease (NDC) or the term "undifferentiated connective tissue disease" (UCTD) represents a stage of disease where clinical symptoms and serological abnormalities suggest autoimmune disease, but they are not sufficient to fulfill the diagnostic criteria of any well-established connective tissue disease (CTD) such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), Sjögren's syndrome, mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD), systemic sclerosis (SSc), polymyositis/ dermatomyositis (PM/DM) or rheumatoid arthritis (RA). 30-40 percent of patients presenting undifferentiated profile develops and reaches the stage of a well defined systemic autoimmune disease during five years follow up, while 60 percent remains in an undifferentiated stage.In the stage of NDC, immunoregulatory abnormalities and endothelial dysfunction are present. In conclusion, NDC represents a dynamic state, and it is important to recognize the possibility of a progression to a definite systemic autoimmune disease. PMID:19403430

  9. Obesity and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Jokinen, E

    2015-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the most common cause of mortality in rich countries and today it has the same meaning for health care as the epidemics of past centuries had for medicine in earlier times: 50% of the population in these countries die of cardiovascular disease. The amount of cardiovascular disease is also increasing in the developing countries together with economic growth. By 2015 one in three deaths will globally be due to cardiovascular diseases. Coronary heart disease is a chronic disease that starts in childhood, even if the symptoms first occur in the middle age. The risks for coronary heart disease are well-known: lipid disorders, especially high serum LDL-cholesterol concentration, high blood pressure, tobacco smoking, obesity, diabetes, male gender and physical inactivity. Obesity is both an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease but is also closely connected with several other risk factors. This review focuses on the connection between overweight or obesity and cardiovascular disease. PMID:25387321

  10. A case of hypertrophic cranial pachymeningitis presenting with scleritis in a patient with undifferentiated connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Hyeon; Joo, Young-Bin; Kim, Jeana; Min, Jun-Ki

    2010-06-01

    Hypertrophic cranial pachymeningitis (HCP) is an uncommon disorder that causes a localized or diffuse thickening of the dura mater and has been reported to be infrequently associated with systemic autoimmune disorders such as Wegener's granulomatosis, rheumatoid arthritis, sarcoidosis, Behçet's disease, Sjögren syndrome, and temporal arteritis. Here, we report a case of HCP initially presented with scleritis and headache in a patient with undifferentiated connective tissue disease (UCTD). HCP was initially suspected on brain magnetic resonance imaging and defined pathologically on meningial biopsy. Immunologic studies showed the presence of anti-RNP antibody. After high dose corticosteroid therapy, the patient's symptoms and radiologic abnormalities of brain were improved. Our case suggested that HCP should be considered in the differential diagnosis of headache in a patient with UCTD presenting with scleritis. PMID:20514324

  11. Prion diseases as transmissible zoonotic diseases.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeongmin; Kim, Su Yeon; Hwang, Kyu Jam; Ju, Young Ran; Woo, Hee-Jong

    2013-02-01

    Prion diseases, also called transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), lead to neurological dysfunction in animals and are fatal. Infectious prion proteins are causative agents of many mammalian TSEs, including scrapie (in sheep), chronic wasting disease (in deer and elk), bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE; in cattle), and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD; in humans). BSE, better known as mad cow disease, is among the many recently discovered zoonotic diseases. BSE cases were first reported in the United Kingdom in 1986. Variant CJD (vCJD) is a disease that was first detected in 1996, which affects humans and is linked to the BSE epidemic in cattle. vCJD is presumed to be caused by consumption of contaminated meat and other food products derived from affected cattle. The BSE epidemic peaked in 1992 and decreased thereafter; this decline is continuing sharply owing to intensive surveillance and screening programs in the Western world. However, there are still new outbreaks and/or progression of prion diseases, including atypical BSE, and iatrogenic CJD and vCJD via organ transplantation and blood transfusion. This paper summarizes studies on prions, particularly on prion molecular mechanisms, BSE, vCJD, and diagnostic procedures. Risk perception and communication policies of the European Union for the prevention of prion diseases are also addressed to provide recommendations for appropriate government policies in Korea. PMID:24159531

  12. TPCP: Rhizina Root Disease RHIZINA ROOT DISEASE

    E-print Network

    TPCP: Rhizina Root Disease RHIZINA ROOT DISEASE INTRODUCTION Rhizina root rot was first recorded roots of the previous tree stand. When roots of newly planted seedlings come into contact with infested roots, they become infected and the seedlings dies. Where larger trees are subjected to burning

  13. Lung Disease and Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Imaizumi, Yuki; Eguchi, Kazuo; Kario, Kazuomi

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients are at a high risk of developing cardiovascular diseases. Airflow limitation is a predictor of future risks of hypertension and cardiovascular events. COPD is now understood as a systemic inflammatory disease, with the focus on inflammation of the lungs. An association between inflammation and sympathetic overactivity has also been reported. In this article, we review the association between chronic lung disease and the risks of hypertension, cardiovascular morbidity, the underlying mechanisms, and the therapeutic approach to hypertension and cardiovascular diseases in patients with lung diseases.

  14. Recurrent neonatal herpes simplex virus infection with central nervous system disease after completion of a 6-month course of suppressive therapy: Case report.

    PubMed

    Kato, Koji; Hara, Shinya; Kawada, Jun-Ichi; Ito, Yoshinori

    2015-12-01

    A boy at 12 days of age developed neonatal herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 2 infection with central nervous system (CNS) disease. After a 21-day course of high-dose intravenous acyclovir, the patient recovered with negative results for HSV DNA in serum and cerebrospinal fluid. Two weeks after a 6-month course of oral valacyclovir suppressive therapy with negative virological assessment, the disease recurred. Another 21-day course of intravenous acyclovir and subsequent 1-year course of oral suppressive therapy were completed. He showed mild developmental delay in language-social skills at 18 months of age. Although recurrences of neonatal HSV infection with CNS disease after suppressive therapy are uncommon, both clinical and virological assessments at the end of the suppressive therapy may be required. Administration of extended long-term suppressive ACV therapy should be considered to reduce the rate of recurrence. PMID:26390826

  15. Distinguishing Malaria from Severe Pneumonia among Hospitalized Children who Fulfilled Integrated Management of Childhood Illness Criteria for Both Diseases: A Hospital-Based Study in Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    Bassat, Quique; Machevo, Sónia; O'Callaghan-Gordo, Cristina; Sigaúque, Betuel; Morais, Luís; Díez-Padrisa, Núria; Ribó, Josep L.; Mandomando, Inácio; Nhampossa, Tacilta; Ayala, Edgar; Sanz, Sergi; Weber, Martin; Roca, Anna; Alonso, Pedro L.

    2011-01-01

    Malaria and severe pneumonia in hospitalized young children may show striking clinical similarities, making differential diagnosis challenging. We investigated ways to increase diagnostic accuracy in patients hospitalized with clinical symptoms compatible with malaria and severe pneumonia, in an area with high a prevalence of infection with human immunodeficiency virus. A total of 646 children admitted at the Manhiça District Hospital in Manhiça, Mozambique who met the World Health Organization clinical criteria for severe pneumonia and malaria were recruited for 12 months and thoroughly investigated to ascertain an accurate diagnosis. Although symptom overlap between malaria and severe pneumonia was frequent among hospitalized children, true disease overlap was uncommon. Clinical presentation and laboratory determinations were ineffective in reliably distinguishing between the two diseases. Infection with human immunodeficiency virus differentially influenced the epidemiology and clinical presentation of these two infectious diseases, further challenging their discrimination on clinical grounds, and having a greater impact on the current burden and prognosis of severe pneumonia. PMID:21976562

  16. Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1 Complicated With Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Hun; Park, Dong Sik; Kim, Dong Hyun; Lee, Sang Hun; Cho, Hee Mun

    2015-08-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (MD) is the most common adult muscular dystrophy characterized by multi-systemic clinical manifestations involving the brain, smooth muscle, cardiovascular and endocrine systems. However, peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) is an uncommon presentation of MD type 1 (DM1), which has not been reported in recent literature. A 53-year-old female, previously confirmed as DM1, presented with vague claudication of both lower limbs. The diagnosis of PAOD based on results of ankle-brachial index, ultrasonography, and abdominal computed tomography angiography studies was followed by aortobifemoral artery bypass surgery. Although the arterial patency was restored after the operation, she did not recover from post-operative respiratory complications. Screening of PAOD is necessary for DM1 with general risk factors of occlusive arteriopathy. However, surgery should be reserved for the most severe cases. PMID:26361604

  17. An unusually long-lasting outbreak of community-acquired Legionnaires' disease, 2005-2008, Italy.

    PubMed

    Scaturro, M; Fontana, S; Crippa, S; Caporali, M G; Seyler, T; Veschetti, E; Villa, G; Rota, M C; Ricci, M L

    2015-08-01

    An unusually long-lasting community-acquired outbreak of Legionnaires' disease (LD) occurred in the inhabitants of a town in northern Italy from 2005 to 2008. Overall, 43 cases were diagnosed including five deaths. Hundreds of water samples were collected for Legionella isolation but only two clinical samples were obtained. Clinical strains were ST23 as were environmental isolates detected in most Legionella-positive patients' homes and those from a public fountain. Although no Legionella was found in the municipal water mains, a continuous chlorination was applied in 2008. This action resulted in a halving of cases, although incidence remained tenfold higher than the Italian average incidence until the end of 2013, when it dropped to the expected rate. Retrospective analyses of prevalent wind direction suggested that a hidden cooling tower could have been the main cause of this uncommon outbreak, highlighting the importance of implementation of cooling tower registers in supporting LD investigations. PMID:25427871

  18. Mycobacterium chelonae cutaneous infection in a patient with mixed connective tissue disease*

    PubMed Central

    Lage, Renan; Biccigo, Danilo Guerreiro Zeolo; Santos, Felipe Borba Calixto; Chimara, Erica; Pereira, Elisangela Samartin Pegas; da Costa, Adilson

    2015-01-01

    Around 50 mycobacteria species cause human disease. Immunosuppressive states predispose to non-tuberculous mycobaterium infection, such as Mycobacterium chelonae: AFB, non-tuberculous, fast growth of low virulence and uncommon as a human pathogen. It may compromise the skin and soft tissues, lungs, lymph nodes and there is also a disseminated presentation. The diagnosis involves AFB identification and culture on Agar and Lowenstein-Jensen medium base. A 41-year-old female with MCTD (LES predominance) is reported, presenting painless nodules in the right forearm. She denied local trauma. Immunosuppressed with prednisone and cyclophosphamide for 24 months. Lesion biopsy has demonstrated positive bacilloscopy (Ziehl-Neelsen stain) and M.chelonae in culture (Lowenstein-Jensen medium base), therefore clarithromycin treatment has been started (best therapy choice in the literature). PMID:25672306

  19. Mycobacterium chelonae cutaneous infection in a patient with mixed connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Lage, Renan; Biccigo, Danilo Guerreiro Zeolo; Santos, Felipe Borba Calixto; Chimara, Erica; Pereira, Elisangela Samartin Pegas; Costa, Adilson da

    2015-01-01

    Around 50 mycobacteria species cause human disease. Immunosuppressive states predispose to non-tuberculous mycobaterium infection, such as Mycobacterium chelonae: AFB, non-tuberculous, fast growth of low virulence and uncommon as a human pathogen. It may compromise the skin and soft tissues, lungs, lymph nodes and there is also a disseminated presentation. The diagnosis involves AFB identification and culture on Agar and Lowenstein-Jensen medium base. A 41-year-old female with MCTD (LES predominance) is reported, presenting painless nodules in the right forearm. She denied local trauma. Immunosuppressed with prednisone and cyclophosphamide for 24 months. Lesion biopsy has demonstrated positive bacilloscopy (Ziehl-Neelsen stain) and M.chelonae in culture (Lowenstein-Jensen medium base), therefore clarithromycin treatment has been started (best therapy choice in the literature). PMID:25672306

  20. Cat scratch disease presenting as breast cancer: a report of an unusual case.

    PubMed

    Iannace, Carlo; Lo Conte, Domenico; Di Libero, Lorenzo; Varricchio, Antonio; Testa, Antonio; Vigorito, Raffaella; Gagliardi, Giuliano; Lepore, Maria; Caracciolo, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Benign lymphoreticulosis (cat scratch disease, CSD) may have a clinical course that varies from the most common lymphadenitis localized in the site of inoculation, preceded by the typical "primary lesion," to a context of severe systemic involvement. Among these uncommon clinical aspects, there is mammarian granulomatous lymphadenitis which may appear as a mastitis or a solitary intraparenchymal mass, giving the impression of a breast tumor. In these cases, intensive clinical, instrumental, and laboratory investigations are necessary to exclude malignancy. Because of its rarity, in equivocal cases, it is reasonable to use surgical excision for accurate histological examination. We report a case of CSD of the breast in a 59-year-old woman, analyzing the clinical, histopathological, and instrumental appearance and also performing a literature review. PMID:23573436

  1. Cat Scratch Disease Presenting as Breast Cancer: A Report of an Unusual Case

    PubMed Central

    Iannace, Carlo; Lo Conte, Domenico; Di Libero, Lorenzo; Varricchio, Antonio; Vigorito, Raffaella; Gagliardi, Giuliano; Lepore, Maria; Caracciolo, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Benign lymphoreticulosis (cat scratch disease, CSD) may have a clinical course that varies from the most common lymphadenitis localized in the site of inoculation, preceded by the typical “primary lesion,” to a context of severe systemic involvement. Among these uncommon clinical aspects, there is mammarian granulomatous lymphadenitis which may appear as a mastitis or a solitary intraparenchymal mass, giving the impression of a breast tumor. In these cases, intensive clinical, instrumental, and laboratory investigations are necessary to exclude malignancy. Because of its rarity, in equivocal cases, it is reasonable to use surgical excision for accurate histological examination. We report a case of CSD of the breast in a 59-year-old woman, analyzing the clinical, histopathological, and instrumental appearance and also performing a literature review. PMID:23573436

  2. Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1 Complicated With Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong Hun; Park, Dong Sik; Lee, Sang Hun; Cho, Hee Mun

    2015-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (MD) is the most common adult muscular dystrophy characterized by multi-systemic clinical manifestations involving the brain, smooth muscle, cardiovascular and endocrine systems. However, peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) is an uncommon presentation of MD type 1 (DM1), which has not been reported in recent literature. A 53-year-old female, previously confirmed as DM1, presented with vague claudication of both lower limbs. The diagnosis of PAOD based on results of ankle-brachial index, ultrasonography, and abdominal computed tomography angiography studies was followed by aortobifemoral artery bypass surgery. Although the arterial patency was restored after the operation, she did not recover from post-operative respiratory complications. Screening of PAOD is necessary for DM1 with general risk factors of occlusive arteriopathy. However, surgery should be reserved for the most severe cases. PMID:26361604

  3. Working Memory in Mild Alzheimer's Disease and Early Parkinson's Disease

    E-print Network

    Corkin, Suzanne

    Working Memory in Mild Alzheimer's Disease and Early Parkinson's Disease Elizabeth A. Kensinger of Technology Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD) impair working memory (WM). It is unclear an expanding interest in how neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD

  4. Familial ulcerative colitis in Israeli Jews: its prevalence and clinical severity compared to sporadic disease

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Horin, Shomron; Tamir, Shira; Kopylov, Uri; Katz, Lion; Nadler, Moshe; Lang, Alon; Avidan, Benjamin; Chowers, Yehuda

    2011-01-01

    Background A family history of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is present in some ulcerative colitis (UC) patients. We aimed to investigate the familial occurrence of UC and its impact on disease severity. Methods A structured questionnaire was distributed to patients with UC. Parameters pertaining to disease severity were compared for patients with or without positive family history of IBD. Results The study group consisted of 168 UC patients with a total of 952 first degree relatives. Positive family history for IBD in a first degree relative was reported in 24 patients (14%). Six of the 336 parents (1.8%) had IBD (all with UC). There were 13 siblings with IBD (4 CD, 9 UC) out of 249 (5.4%). Seven of 376 (1.9%) offsprings had IBD (4 CD, 3 UC). Familial patients were more commonly females and have reported significantly more disease exacerbations than the sporadic group (17.7±15 versus 6.8±11, respectively, p=0.006). On multivariate analysis, familial disease was significantly and independently associated with both female sex (OR 4.1, 95% CI 1.1-14.9, p=0.04) and more exacerbations per year (annual OR 1.05, 95% CI 1.01-1.1, p=0.02). However, similar proportions of sporadic and familial patients wherever hospitalized, underwent colectomy or were treated by immune-suppressors. Conclusions Familial occurrence of UC is not uncommon among Jewish patients in Israel. The familial-genetic component may preferentially influence disease occurrence among females, and is possibly associated with more disease flares although other parameters of disease severity do not seem to be impacted. PMID:24713724

  5. Men and Heart Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Salt ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Salt ...

  6. Heart Disease Risk Factors

    MedlinePLUS

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention ...

  7. Women and Heart Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Salt ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Salt ...

  8. Polycystic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and requires immediate medical attention. [ Top ] How do health care providers diagnose autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease? Health ... when test results are available. [ Top ] How do health care providers treat autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease? Although ...

  9. Polycystic kidney disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Cysts - kidneys; Kidney - polycystic; Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease; ADPKD ... Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) is passed down through families (inherited), usually as an autosomal dominant trait. If one parent ...

  10. Acquired Cystic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Kidney Patients Life Options National Kidney Foundation MedlinePlus Kidney and Urologic Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support ... PDF, 345 KB)????? Alternate Language URL Acquired Cystic Kidney Disease Page Content On this page: What is ...

  11. Rheumatoid lung disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Lung disease - rheumatoid arthritis; Rheumatoid nodules ... Lung problems are common in rheumatoid arthritis. They often cause no symptoms. The causes of lung disease associated with rheumatoid arthritis are unknown. Sometimes the medicines used to ...

  12. About Alzheimer's Disease: Diagnosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... area of diagnostic research is the analysis of biomarkers—biological signs of disease found in brain images, ... medical practice. Watch a video about Alzheimer’s disease biomarkers: Learn more For information on new changes to ...

  13. Mad Cow Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... is an incurable, fatal brain disease that affects cattle. Different versions of the disease can affect certain ... These prohibit the use of any high-risk cattle materials in the feed of any animal. In ...

  14. Coronary Heart Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Coronary Heart Disease? Español Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a ... the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Celebrating American Heart Month: NIH Advancing Heart Research 02/07/2014 ...

  15. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) STDs & Infertility STDs & Pregnancy Syphilis Trichomoniasis Other STDs See Also Pregnancy Reproductive Health ... Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) STDs & Infertility STDs & Pregnancy Syphilis Trichomoniasis Other STDs See Also Pregnancy Reproductive Health ...

  16. Coronary Artery Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most common type of heart disease. It is the leading cause of death ... both men and women. CAD happens when the arteries that supply blood to heart muscle become hardened ...

  17. Progression of Liver Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Handouts Education Resources Support Services Helpful Links For Liver Health Information Call 1-800-GO-LIVER (1- ... The Progression of Liver Disease The Progression of Liver Disease There are many different types of liver ...

  18. Alcoholic liver disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Liver disease due to alcohol; Cirrhosis or hepatitis - alcoholic; Laennec's cirrhosis ... Alcoholic liver disease occurs after years of heavy drinking. The heavy drinking could be every day, or just a ...

  19. Head Lice: Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Treatment FAQs Malathion FAQs Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals ... Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals ...

  20. Childhood Contagious Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... many childhood diseases, once contracted, result in lifelong immunity in the infected child. However, this is not always the case. Vaccinations also provide immunity to some of the below diseases. Chickenpox, for ...

  1. von Willebrand Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Willebrand Disease? Von Willebrand disease (VWD) is a bleeding disorder. It affects your blood's ability to clot. If ... work well in people who have hemophilia , another bleeding disorder. VWD is more common and usually milder than ...

  2. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    MedlinePLUS

    COPD; Chronic obstructive airways disease; Chronic obstructive lung disease; Chronic bronchitis; Emphysema; Bronchitis - chronic ... Smoking is the main cause of COPD. The more a person smokes, the ... develop COPD. But some people smoke for years and never get ...

  3. Lipid Storage Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Considerable progress has been made with regard to gene therapies in animal models of MLD. Wolman’s disease , also ... researchers developed a mouse model of Fabry disease. Gene therapy in this model appears to be especially encouraging. ...

  4. PI3 Kinase Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Diseases (PIDDs) Immune System National Library of Medicine, Genetics Home Reference ?? Javascript Error Your browser JavaScript is turned off causing certain features of the NIAID Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases web site to work incorrectly. ...

  5. Sickle Cell Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Form Controls NCBDDD Cancel Submit Search The CDC Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a group of inherited red blood ...

  6. Depression and Parkinson's Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... For More Information on Parkinson's Disease Citations Reprints Depression and Parkinson's Disease Order a free hardcopy En ... difficult, so proper treatment is important. What is depression? Major depressive disorder, or depression, is a serious ...

  7. Parkinson disease - resources

    MedlinePLUS

    Resources - Parkinson disease ... The following organizations are good resources for information on Parkinson disease : The Michael J. Fox Foundation -- www.michaeljfox.org National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke -- www. ...

  8. Liver disease - resources

    MedlinePLUS

    Resources - liver disease ... The following organizations are good resources for information on liver disease : American Liver Foundation - www.liverfoundation.org Children's Liver Association for Support Services - www.classkids.org Hepatitis ...

  9. Lung disease - resources

    MedlinePLUS

    Resources - lung disease ... The following organizations are good resources for information on lung disease : American Lung Association -- www.lung.org National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute -- www.nhlbi.nih.gov ...

  10. Pregnancy and Thyroid Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Disease Organizations (PDF, 269 KB). Alternate Language URL Pregnancy and Thyroid Disease Page Content On this page: ... responds by decreasing TSH production. [ Top ] How does pregnancy normally affect thyroid function? Two pregnancy-related hormones— ...

  11. Collagen vascular disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... developed these disorders were previously said to have "connective tissue" or "collagen vascular" disease. We now have names ... be used. These include as undifferentiated systemic rheumatic (connective tissue) diseases or overlap syndromes.

  12. About Kennedy's Disease: Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... What is Kennedy's Disease Symptoms Common Misdiagnosis Treatments DNA Testing and Labs Genetic Counseling and Inheritance Issues Doctors ... Counter Frequently Used Links What is Kennedy's Disease DNA Testing for KD Frequently Asked Questions Doctors familiar with ...

  13. Bone Marrow Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... blood clotting. If you have a bone marrow disease, there are problems with the stem cells or ... marrow doesn't make red blood cells. Other diseases, such as lymphoma, can spread into the bone ...

  14. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is an infection and inflammation of the uterus, ovaries, and other female reproductive organs. It causes scarring ... United States. Gonorrhea and chlamydia, two sexually transmitted diseases, are the most common causes of PID. Other ...

  15. Tay-Sachs Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Tay-Sachs disease is a rare, inherited disorder. It causes too much of a fatty substance to build up in the ... mental and physical problems. Infants with Tay-Sachs disease appear to develop normally for the first few ...

  16. Cat Scratch Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Cat scratch disease (CSD) is an illness caused by the bacterium Bartonella henselae. Almost half of all cats carry the infection ... symptoms of CSD, call your doctor. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  17. Bile Duct Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... carry the bile to your small intestine. Different diseases can block the bile ducts and cause a ... liver failure. A rare form of bile duct disease called biliary atresia occurs in infants. It is ...

  18. Lewy Body Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Lewy body disease is one of the most common causes of dementia in the elderly. Dementia is the loss of mental ... to affect normal activities and relationships. Lewy body disease happens when abnormal structures, called Lewy bodies, build ...

  19. Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is a rare, degenerative brain disorder. Symptoms usually start around age 60. Memory problems, behavior changes, vision ... during a medical procedure Cattle can get a disease related to CJD called bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) ...

  20. Peripheral Arterial Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) happens when there is a narrowing of the blood vessels outside of your heart. The cause of ... smoking. Other risk factors include older age and diseases like diabetes, high blood cholesterol, high blood pressure, ...

  1. Degenerative Nerve Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    Degenerative nerve diseases affect many of your body's activities, such as balance, movement, talking, breathing, and heart function. Many of these diseases are genetic. Sometimes the cause is a medical ...

  2. Sexually Transmitted Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) are infections that you can get from having sex with someone who has the infection. The causes ... is no cure. Sometimes medicines can keep the disease under control. Correct usage of latex condoms greatly ...

  3. Carotid Artery Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... brain with blood. If you have carotid artery disease, the arteries become narrow, usually because of atherosclerosis. ... one of the causes of stroke. Carotid artery disease often does not cause symptoms, but there are ...

  4. Modeling Infectious Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Linked to Dengue Epidemics Now Trending: Mining Historical Data on Infectious Diseases Computing Diseases from Computing Life Forecasting Flu Solving the Sleeping Sickness 'Mystery' Social Studies: Profile of Stephen Eubank Related Links Up to top ...

  5. Minimal change disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... microscope. It can only be seen under an electron microscope. Minimal change disease is the most common ... biopsy and examination of the tissue with an electron microscope can show signs of minimal change disease. ...

  6. Cat scratch disease (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    Cat scratch disease is an infectious illness associated with cat scratches, bites, or exposure to cat saliva, causing chronic swelling of the lymph nodes. Cat scratch disease is possibly the most common cause of ...

  7. About Alzheimer's Disease: Causes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... a role in the development and course of Alzheimer’s disease. There is a great deal of interest, for example, in the relationship between cognitive decline and vascular conditions such as heart disease, stroke, and high ...

  8. Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID)

    MedlinePLUS

    Pelvic inflammatory disease is an infection of a woman's womb (uterus), ovaries, or fallopian tubes. ... Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is an infection caused by bacteria. When bacteria from the vagina or cervix travel to your ...

  9. Cardiovascular Disease and Diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Cardiovascular Disease & Diabetes Updated:Nov 10,2015 The following statistics speak ... disease. This content was last reviewed August 2015. Diabetes • Home • About Diabetes • Why Diabetes Matters Introduction Cardiovascular ...

  10. Kidney Disease and Diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Kidney Disease & Diabetes Updated:Nov 10,2015 One of the more ... disease. This content was last reviewed August 2015. Diabetes • Home • About Diabetes • Why Diabetes Matters Introduction Cardiovascular ...

  11. Liver Disease and IBD

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 34% of Crohn’s patients with disease of the terminal ileum (the last segment of the small intestine). ... increased risk for developing gallstones because the diseased terminal ileum cannot absorb bile salts, which are necessary ...

  12. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... be the same one that causes vCJD in humans. Varient CJD causes less than 1% of all ... Scrapie (found in sheep) Other very rare inherited human diseases, such as Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker disease and ...

  13. Pediatric Celiac Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Z Celiac Disease Symptoms & Diagnosis Treatment & Management Coping Gluten Free Diet Guide Eosinophilic Esophagitis Inflammatory Bowel Disease ... serious condition caused by a permanent intolerance for gluten--a protein found in wheat, rye, and barley. ...

  14. What Is Parkinson's Disease?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... National HelpLine Educational Publications Online Seminars Parkinson's News Parkinson's HelpLine Learn More Educational Materials Do you want ... resources & more. Order Free Materials Today What is Parkinson’s Disease? Parkinson's disease (PD) is a chronic and ...

  15. Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Find an ENT Doctor Near You Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease Patient Health Information ... with a hearing loss. How Does the Healthy Ear Work? The ear has three main parts: the ...

  16. Waterborne Diseases & Illnesses

    MedlinePLUS

    ... lead to disease outbreaks in a local area, country, or across the world. Did you know ? The largest waterborne disease outbreak in United States history happened in Milwaukee, Wisconsin in 1993. Over 400, ...

  17. Gaucher Disease Inherited disorder

    E-print Network

    Brutlag, Doug

    does not appear to be sustained ¡ Genetic counseling § Targeted Mutation Analysis Used to detect/> ¡ "Gaucher Disease." Genetics Home Reference ­ Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions. US National Disease." Gene Review. Web 2 Oct. 2012. Genetics

  18. Genetics of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ridge, Perry G.; Ebbert, Mark T. W.; Kauwe, John S. K.

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of dementia and is the only top 10 cause of death in the United States that lacks disease-altering treatments. It is a complex disorder with environmental and genetic components. There are two major types of Alzheimer's disease, early onset and the more common late onset. The genetics of early-onset Alzheimer's disease are largely understood with variants in three different genes leading to disease. In contrast, while several common alleles associated with late-onset Alzheimer's disease, including APOE, have been identified using association studies, the genetics of late-onset Alzheimer's disease are not fully understood. Here we review the known genetics of early- and late-onset Alzheimer's disease. PMID:23984328

  19. Chagas Disease (American trypanosomiasis)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... vector is a triatomine bug that carries the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi which causes the disease. Chagas disease ... potentially life-threatening illness caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi) . It is found mainly ...

  20. Von Gierke disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... may be signs of: Delayed puberty Enlarged liver Gout Inflammatory bowel disease Liver tumors Severe low blood ... blood uric acid and decrease the risk for gout. Other medications may include those for kidney disease, ...

  1. Neuromuscular Disease Descriptions

    MedlinePLUS

    ... disease. Muscular dystrophies (involving the structure of the muscle cells) Becker (BMD) • Age of onset: 2 to ... or heart problems. Peripheral motor neuron diseases (involving muscle-controlling nerve cells of the arms, legs, neck, ...

  2. Blood and Lymph Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Medicine, National Institutes of Health. National Center for Biotechnology Information (US). Genes and Disease [Internet]. Bethesda (MD): National Center for Biotechnology Information (US); 1998-. Genes and Disease [Internet]. Show ...

  3. Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... link in the menu on the left. Common Names Sexually transmitted diseases STDs Sexually transmitted infections STIs Medical or Scientific Names Sexually transmitted diseases Sexually transmitted infections Last Reviewed: ...

  4. Medullary cystic kidney disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... kidney disease between ages 30 and 50. Lifelong treatment may control the symptoms of chronic kidney disease. The cysts that occur with MCKD may be very small, but large numbers of them can lead to kidney problems.

  5. Diabetes and kidney disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Kidney disease or kidney damage that occurs in people with diabetes is called diabetic nephropathy. This condition is ... who have more severe and long-term (chronic) kidney disease may have symptoms such as: Fatigue most of ...

  6. Gum Disease in Children

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Find a Periodontist Gum Disease In Children Chronic gingivitis. aggressive periodontitis and generalized aggressive periodontitis are types ... children. Types of periodontal diseases in children Chronic gingivitis is common in children. It usually causes gum ...

  7. Niemann-Pick Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... a group of inherited metabolic disorders known as lipid storage diseases. Lipids (fatty materials such as waxes, fatty acids, oils, ... body. In Niemann-Pick disease, harmful quantities of lipids accumulate in the brain, spleen, liver, lungs, and ...

  8. Whipple's disease revisited

    PubMed Central

    Misbah, S; Mapstone, N

    2000-01-01

    Whipple's disease has traditionally been considered to be a rare multisystem disorder dominated by malabsorption. The recent identification of the Whipple's disease bacillus has, using polymerase chain reaction based assays, fuelled advances in the investigation, diagnosis, and management of this disease. This leader reviews the aetiology, clinical manifestations, investigation, and treatment of Whipple's disease in the light of this new information. Key Words: Tropheryma whippelii • immune system • polymerase chain reaction PMID:11064667

  9. Telomeres in disease

    PubMed Central

    Calado, Rodrigo

    2012-01-01

    Telomeres and telomere repair are basic molecular features of cells possessing linear DNA chromosomes and defects in them result in various diseases. This review examines recent advances in understanding these diseases, particularly at a molecular level, and in relating telomere dysfunction to clinical diseases. We also discuss the potential role of telomere elongation as a therapy in diseases, and more controversially, the prevention/reversal of aging. PMID:22500192

  10. [Bluetongue disease reaches Switzerland].

    PubMed

    Hofmann, M; Griot, C; Chaignat, V; Perler, L; Thür, B

    2008-02-01

    Since 2006 bluetongue disease is rapidly spreading across Europe and reached Switzerland in October 2007. In the present article a short overview about the disease and the virus is given, and the first three clinical bluetongue disease cases in cattle, and the respective laboratory findings are presented. PMID:18369049

  11. Tay-Sachs Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Tay-Sachs Disease Information Page Table of Contents (click to ... Trials Organizations Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Tay-Sachs Disease? Tay-Sachs disease is a fatal genetic ...

  12. Heart Disease in Women

    MedlinePLUS

    ... United States, 1 in 4 women dies from heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease in both men and women is narrowing ... the blood vessels that supply blood to the heart itself. This is called coronary artery disease, and ...

  13. Vascular Disease Foundation

    MedlinePLUS

    The Faces of Vascular Disease Kipp had an abdominal aortic aneurysm. Learn how vascular research saved his life here . Project Voice Patients deserve to ... nonprofit organization representing the millions of patients with vascular disease. To learn about vascular disease click here . @ 2014 ...

  14. [Pancreatitis in intestinal diseases].

    PubMed

    Gubergrits, N B; Lukashevich, G M; Golubova, O A; Fomenko, P G

    2010-01-01

    In article review of the literature and own data about pathogenesis of pancreatitis and secondary pancreatic insufficiency in various diseases of small and large intestines is presented. The special attention is given to pancreatic insufficiency in celiac disease and in inflammatory bowel disease. The main directions of pancreatitis and exocrine pancreatic insufficiency therapy are grounded. PMID:21268323

  15. Chronic wasting disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is an emerging prion disease of deer, elk, and moose in North America. This fatal neurodegenerative disease was first recognized 50 years ago and its distribution was limited to the Rocky Mountains for several decades. In the past few years, CWD has been found in the ea...

  16. Creutzfeldt Jakob Disease (CJD)

    E-print Network

    Brutlag, Doug

    Creutzfeldt Jakob Disease (CJD) By Maia Mosse Biochem 118Q Fall Quarter #12;Overview of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Neurological #12;Diagnostics of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Only way to confirm a diagnosis of CJD is brain different mutation than others with CJD #12;Treatment of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Because scientists

  17. Major Histocompatibility Complex: Disease

    E-print Network

    Alper, Chester A.

    Major Histocompatibility Complex: Disease Associations Chester A Alper, Harvard Medical School at least a third of normal European Caucasian MHC haplotypes and contribute most of the MHC disease susceptibility genetic markers. Whereas this has facilitated the detection of MHC gene-disease association

  18. Diseases of Crustaceans

    E-print Network

    Diseases of Crustaceans Papers presented at the American Institute of Biological Sciences meeting #12;MFR PAPER 1139 Introductory Remarks on Diseases of Crustaceans GILBERT B. PAULEY Figure 1.-lnteractlon of host, environment, and pathogen to produce a disease (Snleszko, 1973). Potential Pathogen son

  19. Gaucher Disease in Pregnancy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... have Gaucher disease, you have two non-working genes for Gaucher disease, one from your mother and one from your ... You will always pass on one non-working gene for Gaucher disease to your children. A person who has only ...

  20. Venereal Disease. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bender, Stephen J.

    This book is one in a series of contemporary topics in health science for students. The first chapter deals with the behavioral aspects of venereal disease and how the disease has been affected by our changing society. Chapter 2 discusses the magnitude of the problem, presenting various maps and charts. The history of venereal disease and the…