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Sample records for sciatic neuropathy

  1. Pediatric sciatic neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, M.M.; Escolar, D.M.; Darras, B.; Jones, H.R.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The incidence, cause, and prognosis of sciatic neuropathy in children is not well understood. We report our 30-year experience of 53 patients with pediatric sciatic neuropathies (SN). Methods: Prospective review of the history, physical examination, electrophysiologic findings, and clinical course of children with SN. Results: The etiology of SN injury was varied and included trauma (13), iatrogenic causes (13) (8 orthopedic surgeries and 5 miscellaneous surgeries), prolonged extrinsic compression and immobilization (6), tumors (7), vascular (5), idiopathic and progressive (4), infantile and nonprogressive (2), and unknown, presumed postviral (3). Electrophysiologic studies demonstrated abnormalities in motor conduction studies of the peroneal nerve in 44/53 (83%) or tibial nerve in 35/51 (67%). Sensory conduction studies were abnormal in sural nerve in 34 of 43 cases (79%), and superficial peroneal nerves in 15/25 (60%). Needle EMG was abnormal in peroneal innervated muscles in all subjects, in tibial nerve innervated muscles in 43/51 (84%), and in the hamstrings in 18/29 (62%). Prognosis for recovery was variable and depended on the etiology and the severity of the nerve injury. Conclusions: SN is an uncommon mononeuropathy in children. The causes of SN are varied in children compared to adults. Electrophysiologic studies in children may be limited by poor tolerance but play an important role in establishing the diagnosis. PMID:21403109

  2. Clinical and electrodiagnostic features of sciatic neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Distad, B Jane; Weiss, Michael D

    2013-02-01

    Sciatic neuropathy is the second most common neuropathy of the lower extremity and a common cause of foot drop. This article reviews the anatomy, clinical features, pathophysiology, and electrodiagnostic assessment of sciatic neuropathies. There are multiple potential sites of pathology, determined in part by the mechanism of insult, including trauma, compression, masses, inflammation, and vascular lesions. Diagnosis is augmented by careful electrodiagnostic studies and imaging to help distinguish sciatic neuropathy from other sources of pathology. Electrodiagnostic studies may also help in assessing for early recovery and in determining prognosis. PMID:23177034

  3. Sciatic neuropathy developed after injection during curettage.

    PubMed

    Altıntaş, Ayşe; Gündüz, Ayşegül; Kantarcı, Fatih; Gözübatık Çelik, Gökçen; Koçer, Naci; Kızıltan, Meral E

    2016-01-01

    Intramuscular injections are likely the most common cause of sciatic nerve injury in developing countries. Less common causes include piriformis syndrome, primary tumors of the sciatic nerve, metastatic tumors invading or compressing the nerve, endometriosis, vascular malformations, and prolonged immobilization or positioning. While the most reliable diagnostic and prognostic methods include nerve conduction studies and electromyography, magnetic resonance imaging has been suggested as an alternative method of determining type of lesion, establishing location, and investigating level of nerve involvement. A case of sciatic neuropathy that developed after intramuscular injection, with patient in prolonged lithotomy position and under sedation, is described. PMID:27225613

  4. Postpartum septic sacroiliitis misdiagnosed as sciatic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Qing; Li, Fang-Cai; Wang, Jia-Wei; Wang, Shuang

    2010-03-01

    Early diagnosis of septic sacroiliitis is difficult because symptoms are nonspecific, especially during pregnancy and the postpartum period. We describe a female patient with left buttock pain radiating down the thigh after an uncomplicated induction delivery. She was afebrile and had no apparent abnormality on pelvic x-ray or computed tomography scan. A sensory deficit in the lateral portion of her left lower limb was found, and electromyography showed neurogenic abnormalities in the left lower limb. She was initially misdiagnosed as sciatic neuropathy. As her symptoms worsened, septic sacroiliitis is considered. Bone scintigraphy showed increased Tc-methylene diphosphonate uptake in the left sacroiliac joint, and magnetic resonance imaging scan showed a signal abnormality in the left sacroiliac joint. The diagnosis of septic sacroiliitis was then confirmed by the rapid efficacy of antibiotic therapy. This report suggests that irritation and injury of spinal nerves can be the presenting signs in septic sacroiliitis. PMID:20090512

  5. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies presenting with sciatic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Topakian, Raffi; Wimmer, Sibylle; Pischinger, Barbara; Pichler, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is an autosomal-dominant disorder associated with recurrent mononeuropathies following compression or trivial trauma. Reports on sciatic neuropathy as the presenting manifestation of HNPP are very scarce. We report on a 21-year-old previously healthy man who was admitted with sensorimotor deficits in his left leg. He had no history of preceding transient episodes of weakness or sensory loss. Clinical and electrophysiological examinations were consistent with sciatic neuropathy. Cerebrospinal fluid investigation and MRI of the nerve roots, plexus, and sciatic nerve did not indicate the underlying aetiology. When extended electrophysiological tests revealed multiple subclinical compression neuropathies in the upper limbs, HNPP was contemplated and eventually confirmed by genetic testing. PMID:25326571

  6. [Acute sciatic neuropathy--"post-Saturday palsy"].

    PubMed

    Manigoda, Miodrag; Dujmović-Basuroski, Irena; Trikić, Rajko; Drulović, Jelena

    2005-01-01

    This is a case report of 25-year old, unemployed male, admitted to hospital due to acute onset of the left foot drop, subsequent walking difficulty and numbness of the left calf and foot. Symptoms began after prolonged sleep with previous heroin abuse by sniffing. During neurological examination, mild weakness of knee flexors, moderate weakness of plantar flexors and paralysis of foot dorsiflexors, together with hypesthesia of the left calf, foot and fingers, predominantly in the innervation area of common peroneal nerve on the same side, were observed. The electrophysiologic examination revealed predominant involvement of peroneal division within the sciatic nerve, together with recorded conduction block indicating the compression as possible mechanism of nerve injury. The patient was administered corticosteroid therapy during two months, what resulted in almost complete recovery. The peculiarity of this case report is in the presence of the sciatic nerve "Saturday night palsy" with possible effect of former heroin abuse. PMID:16053177

  7. Sciatic neuropathy secondary to a uterine fibroid: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bodack, M P; Cole, J C; Nagler, W

    1999-01-01

    Lesions of the sciatic nerve outside the pelvis have been well described. Lesions within the pelvis, however, are far less common. We report the case of a 55-yr-old woman with a history of chronic low back pain who presented with progressive right buttock and posterolateral right lower limb pain associated with right foot numbness and tingling. She denied any associated low back or left lower limb pain. The patient was initially treated for a probable right lumbosacral radiculopathy, without improvement. A subsequent magnetic resonance image of the lumbosacral spine revealed multilevel disc degeneration at L3-4 through L5-S1, without disc herniation or canal stenosis. A magnetic resonance image of the pelvis revealed a markedly enlarged uterus, with a large pedunculated myoma impinging on the right sciatic foramen. The patient underwent a subtotal abdominal hysterectomy, with resolution of her right lower limb pain. This case illustrates the importance of considering intrapelvic causes of sciatic neuropathy. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of sciatic neuropathy secondary to a uterine fibroid. PMID:10088591

  8. Diabetic neuropathy increases stimulation threshold during popliteal sciatic nerve block†

    PubMed Central

    Heschl, S.; Hallmann, B.; Zilke, T.; Gemes, G.; Schoerghuber, M.; Auer-Grumbach, M.; Quehenberger, F.; Lirk, P.; Hogan, Q.; Rigaud, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Peripheral nerve stimulation is commonly used for nerve localization in regional anaesthesia, but recommended stimulation currents of 0.3–0.5 mA do not reliably produce motor activity in the absence of intraneural needle placement. As this may be particularly true in patients with diabetic neuropathy, we examined the stimulation threshold in patients with and without diabetes. Methods Preoperative evaluation included a neurological exam and electroneurography. During ultrasound-guided popliteal sciatic nerve block, we measured the current required to produce motor activity for the tibial and common peroneal nerve in diabetic and non-diabetic patients. Proximity to the nerve was evaluated post-hoc using ultrasound imaging. Results Average stimulation currents did not differ between diabetic (n=55) and non-diabetic patients (n=52). Although the planned number of patients was not reached, the power goal for the mean stimulation current was met. Subjects with diminished pressure perception showed increased thresholds for the common peroneal nerve (median 1.30 vs. 0.57 mA in subjects with normal perception, P=0.042), as did subjects with decreased pain sensation (1.60 vs. 0.50 mA in subjects with normal sensation, P=0.038). Slowed ulnar nerve conduction velocity predicted elevated mean stimulation current (r=−0.35, P=0.002). Finally, 15 diabetic patients required more than 0.5 mA to evoke a motor response, despite intraneural needle placement (n=4), or required currents ≥2 mA despite needle-nerve contact, vs three such patients (1 intraneural, 2 with ≥2 mA) among non-diabetic patients (P=0.003). Conclusions These findings suggest that stimulation thresholds of 0.3–0.5 mA may not reliably determine close needle-nerve contact during popliteal sciatic nerve block, particularly in patients with diabetic neuropathy. Clinical trial registration NCT01488474 PMID:26994231

  9. Pediatric sciatic neuropathy presenting as painful leg: A case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Manish; Babiker, Mohamed; Rao, Ganesh; Rittey, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Mononeuropathies, in general, are very uncommon in childhood. Sciatic neuropathy (SN) is probably underappreciated in childhood and likely to represent nearly one quarter of childhood mononeuropathies. Materials and Methods: We present a 7-year-old girl who presented with painful right lower limb and abnormal gait. Detailed investigation revealed transient eosinophilia, abnormal neurophysiology, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) suggestive of isolated sciatic neuropathy. Results: She has responded very well to physiotherapy and has made a complete motor recovery, although she is left with an area of abnormal sensation affecting the lateral border of her right leg and the dorsum of her foot. Discussion: Differential diagnoses for pediatric SN have been discussed including compressive neuropathies in children and various hyper-eosinophilia syndromes. Compressive neuropathies in childhood are very rare and compression of the sciatic nerve is the second most common group after peroneal nerve lesion. PMID:24082941

  10. Cerebrolysin improves sciatic nerve dysfunction in a mouse model of diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Dong, Han-Yu; Jiang, Xin-Mei; Niu, Chun-Bo; Du, Lin; Feng, Jun-Yan; Jia, Fei-Yong

    2016-01-01

    To examine the effects of Cerebrolysin on the treatment of diabetic peripheral neuropathy, we first established a mouse model of type 2 diabetes mellitus by administering a high-glucose, high-fat diet and a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin. Mice defined as diabetic in this model were then treated with 1.80, 5.39 or 8.98 mL/kg of Cerebrolysin via intraperitoneal injections for 10 consecutive days. Our results demonstrated that the number, diameter and area of myelinated nerve fibers increased in the sciatic nerves of these mice after administration of Cerebrolysin. The results of several behavioral tests showed that Cerebrolysin dose-dependently increased the slope angle in the inclined plane test (indicating an improved ability to maintain body position), prolonged tail-flick latency and foot-licking time (indicating enhanced sensitivity to thermal and chemical pain, respectively, and reduced pain thresholds), and increased an index of sciatic nerve function in diabetic mice compared with those behavioral results in untreated diabetic mice. Taken together, the anatomical and functional results suggest that Cerebrolysin ameliorated peripheral neuropathy in a mouse model of type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:26981106

  11. Cerebrolysin improves sciatic nerve dysfunction in a mouse model of diabetic peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Han-yu; Jiang, Xin-mei; Niu, Chun-bo; Du, Lin; Feng, Jun-yan; Jia, Fei-yong

    2016-01-01

    To examine the effects of Cerebrolysin on the treatment of diabetic peripheral neuropathy, we first established a mouse model of type 2 diabetes mellitus by administering a high-glucose, high-fat diet and a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin. Mice defined as diabetic in this model were then treated with 1.80, 5.39 or 8.98 mL/kg of Cerebrolysin via intraperitoneal injections for 10 consecutive days. Our results demonstrated that the number, diameter and area of myelinated nerve fibers increased in the sciatic nerves of these mice after administration of Cerebrolysin. The results of several behavioral tests showed that Cerebrolysin dose-dependently increased the slope angle in the inclined plane test (indicating an improved ability to maintain body position), prolonged tail-flick latency and foot-licking time (indicating enhanced sensitivity to thermal and chemical pain, respectively, and reduced pain thresholds), and increased an index of sciatic nerve function in diabetic mice compared with those behavioral results in untreated diabetic mice. Taken together, the anatomical and functional results suggest that Cerebrolysin ameliorated peripheral neuropathy in a mouse model of type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:26981106

  12. Isolated sciatic neuropathy as an initial manifestation of a high grade B-cell lymphoma: A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    He, Wenzhuan; Wang, Weizhen; Gustas, Cristy; Malysz, Jozef; Kaur, Divpreet

    2016-10-01

    Sciatic nerve neuropathy due to infiltrating of a high grade B-cell lymphoma is a very rare situation and has not often been reported. We report a case with a previous history of indolent lymphoma who presented with isolated sciatic nerve neuropathy and was found to have diffuse large B cell lymphoma involving the sciatic nerve. Although the current case is not a primary sciatic nerve lymphoma given the systematic involvement shown on MRI and PET/CT scan, the case represents a neurolymphomatosis of the sciatic nerve given the direct invasion of the lymphoma cells into the sciatic nerve. Due to the rarity of this condition, we subsequently reviewed related literatures. PMID:27540756

  13. Metabolic Dysfunction Is Restricted to the Sciatic Nerve in Experimental Diabetic Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Oliver J; Unwin, Richard D; Dowsey, Andrew W; Begley, Paul; Ali, Sumia; Hollywood, Katherine A; Rustogi, Nitin; Petersen, Rasmus S; Dunn, Warwick B; Cooper, Garth J S; Gardiner, Natalie J

    2016-01-01

    High glucose levels in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy (DN). However, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that cause the marked distal pathology is incomplete. We performed a comprehensive, system-wide analysis of the PNS of a rodent model of DN. We integrated proteomics and metabolomics from the sciatic nerve (SN), the lumbar 4/5 dorsal root ganglia (DRG), and the trigeminal ganglia (TG) of streptozotocin-diabetic and healthy control rats. Even though all tissues showed a dramatic increase in glucose and polyol pathway intermediates in diabetes, a striking upregulation of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and perturbation of lipid metabolism was found in the distal SN that was not present in the corresponding cell bodies of the DRG or the cranial TG. This finding suggests that the most severe molecular consequences of diabetes in the nervous system present in the SN, the region most affected by neuropathy. Such spatial metabolic dysfunction suggests a failure of energy homeostasis and/or oxidative stress, specifically in the distal axon/Schwann cell-rich SN. These data provide a detailed molecular description of the distinct compartmental effects of diabetes on the PNS that could underlie the distal-proximal distribution of pathology. PMID:26470786

  14. Gene expression microarray analysis of the sciatic nerve of mice with diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Qu, Shen; Liang, Aibin; Jiang, Hong; Wang, Hao

    2015-02-01

    The present study aimed to explore novel target genes that regulate the development of diabetic neuropathy (DN) by analyzing gene expression profiles in the sciatic nerve of infected mice. The GSE11343 microarray dataset, which was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus, included data on 4 control samples and 5 samples from mice with diabetes induced by streptozotocin (STZ), 5 samples from normal mice treated with rosiglitazone (Rosi) and 5 samples from mice with diabetes induced by STZ and treated with Rosi. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between the different groups were identified using the substitution augmentation modification redefinition (SAMR) model. The Gene Ontology (GO) term and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway enrichment analyses were performed using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID). Regulatory and protein‑protein interaction networks were searched using BioCarta and STRING, respectively. The protein structures of potential regulatory genes were predicted using the SYBYL program. Compared with the controls, 1,384 DEGs were identified in the mice with STZ-induced diabetes and 7 DEGs were identified in the mice treated with Rosi. There were 518 DEGs identified between the mice in the STZ + Rosi and STZ groups. We identified 45 GO items, and the calmodulin nerve phosphatase and chemokine signaling pathways were identified as the main pathways. Three genes [myristoylated alanine-rich protein kinase C substrate (Marcks), GLI pathogenesis-related 2 (Glipr2) and centrosomal protein 170 kDa (Cep170)] were found to be co-regulated by both STZ and Rosi, the protein structure of which was predicted and certain binding activity to Rosi was docked. Our study demonstrates that the Marcks, Glipr2 and Cep170 genes may be underlying drug targets in the treatment of DN. PMID:25435094

  15. Gene expression microarray analysis of the sciatic nerve of mice with diabetic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, LEI; QU, SHEN; LIANG, AIBIN; JIANG, HONG; WANG, HAO

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to explore novel target genes that regulate the development of diabetic neuropathy (DN) by analyzing gene expression profiles in the sciatic nerve of infected mice. The GSE11343 microarray dataset, which was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus, included data on 4 control samples and 5 samples from mice with diabetes induced by streptozotocin (STZ), 5 samples from normal mice treated with rosiglitazone (Rosi) and 5 samples from mice with diabetes induced by STZ and treated with Rosi. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between the different groups were identified using the substitution augmentation modification redefinition (SAMR) model. The Gene Ontology (GO) term and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway enrichment analyses were performed using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID). Regulatory and protein-protein interaction networks were searched using BioCarta and STRING, respectively. The protein structures of potential regulatory genes were predicted using the SYBYL program. Compared with the controls, 1,384 DEGs were identified in the mice with STZ-induced diabetes and 7 DEGs were identified in the mice treated with Rosi. There were 518 DEGs identified between the mice in the STZ + Rosi and STZ groups. We identified 45 GO items, and the calmodulin nerve phosphatase and chemokine signaling pathways were identified as the main pathways. Three genes [myristoylated alanine-rich protein kinase C substrate (Marcks), GLI pathogenesis-related 2 (Glipr2) and centrosomal protein 170 kDa (Cep170)] were found to be co-regulated by both STZ and Rosi, the protein structure of which was predicted and certain binding activity to Rosi was docked. Our study demonstrates that the Marcks, Glipr2 and Cep170 genes may be underlying drug targets in the treatment of DN. PMID:25435094

  16. Preventive Effects of the Chinese Herbal Medicine Prescription Tangkuei Decoction for Frigid Extremities on Sciatic Neuropathy in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pengsong; Bian, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Hong; Jia, Aiming

    2016-01-01

    Ischemia and hypoxia are important physiological changes in diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). Chinese herbal medicine prescription Tangkuei Decoction for Frigid Extremities (TDFE) is useful for increasing blood flow. To help determine whether TDFE could protect the peripheral nerves of diabetic patients from the degeneration caused by high blood glucose, TDFE was administered to streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats for 6 or 12 weeks. Plantar thermal stimulation reaction time thresholds, sciatic nerve conduction velocities, and the levels of HIF-1α mRNA, HIF-1α protein, VEGF protein, and the endothelial marker vWF in sciatic nerves were measured at the end of the sixth and twelfth weeks. The thermal thresholds and sciatic nerve conduction velocities of the rats differed after 12 weeks, and the sciatic nerves of the diabetic rats that were given TDFE displayed higher levels of HIF-1α protein, VEGF protein, and HIF-1α mRNA than those of the diabetic model rats. The results at 6 weeks differed from those at 12 weeks. These results suggest that the early preventive application of TDFE effectively delayed the development of DPN and that TDFE increased HIF-1α mRNA levels in the sciatic nerves of diabetic rats through 12 weeks of treatment. PMID:27057201

  17. Effect of levetiracetam versus gabapentin on peripheral neuropathy and sciatic degeneration in streptozotocin-diabetic mice: Influence on spinal microglia and astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Reda, Heba M; Zaitone, Sawsan A; Moustafa, Yasser M

    2016-01-15

    Peripheral diabetic neuropathy develops in diabetic patients. The current study tested the antiallodynic and antihyperalgesic effects of the anticonvulsant drug, levetiracetam compared with the standard drug, gabapentin, in a model of streptozotocin-induced peripheral diabetic neuropathy. Male albino mice were injected intraperitoneally with streptozotocin (40mg/kg) for five consecutive days to induce type 1 diabetes mellitus. After development of peripheral diabetic neuropathy, mice were then treated orally with 10 doses of levetiracetam or gabapentin (or vehicle). The effect of multiple doses of levetiracetam on the histopathology of sciatic nerve and spinal cord was tested. Furthermore, the effect of levetiracetam on the spinal expression of microglia and astrocytes was examined in comparison with gabapentin. Results indicated that the highest dose of levetiracetam and all doses of gabapentin increased the withdrawal threshold in von Frey test. Furthermore, all doses of levetiracetam and gabapentin prolonged the reaction time exhibited by diabetic mice tested in hot plate test. Both drugs provided protection for the sciatic nerve and the spinal cord. In addition, levetiracetam (20 and 40mg/kg) decreased spinal immunostaining for CD11b (microglia marker) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, astrocytes marker) however; the high dose of gabapentin (40mg/kg) reduced the spinal immunostaining for GFAP only. In conclusion, levetiracetam produced antiallodynic and antihyperalgesic effect in diabetic mice with favorable effects on sciatic nerve and spinal cord that were accompanied by downregulation of the spinal expression of microglia and astrocytes. Thus, levetiracetam may have promise in alleviating neuropathic pain in diabetic patients. PMID:26712375

  18. Localization and expression of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) in postmortem sciatic nerve from patients with motor neuron disease and diabetic neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D.A.; Gross, L.; Wittrock, D.A.; Windebank, A.J.

    1996-08-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is thought to play an important role in the maintenance of the mature motor system. The factor is found most abundantly in myelinating Schwann cells in the adult sciatic nerve. Lack of neuronal growth factors has been proposed as one possible etiology of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). Growth factor replacement therapies are currently being evaluated as a treatment for motor neuron disease. In this report we determined whether the expression of CNTF in sciatic nerve differed in patients with motor neuron disease compared to controls or patients with another form of axonopathy. We identified 8 patients (7 with ALS and 1 with SMA) with motor neuron disease and 6 patients with diabetic motor neuropathy who had autopsy material available. Immunoperoxidase staining showed reduced CNTF expression in nerves of patients with motor neuron disease but not in patients with diabetic motor neuropathy. Decreased CNTF appears be associated with primary motor neuron disease rather than a generalized process of axon loss. This result supports suggestions that CNTF deficiency may be an important factor in the development of motor neuron disease. 20 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Deep venous thrombosis and inferior vena cava agenesis causing double crush sciatic neuropathy in Behçet's disease.

    PubMed

    Kara, Murat; Ozçakar, Levent; Eken, Güneş; Ozen, Gülsen; Kiraz, Sedat

    2008-12-01

    We report here the case of a 18-year-old young man with Behçet's disease who had suffered deep venous thrombosis of the right femoral and popliteal veins. Consequently, right sciatic nerve injury, drop foot and tightness of the achilles tendon also ensued. The clinical scenario was further challenged by demonstration of the agenetic inferior vena cava and epidural vein dilatations compressing the lumbar nerve roots. To the best notice of the authors, this is the first patient encompassing all these complications in the literature concerning Behçet's disease. PMID:18848486

  20. The Effect of Angipars on Diabetic Neuropathy in STZ-Induced Diabetic Male Rats: A Study on Behavioral, Electrophysiological, Sciatic Histological and Ultrastructural Indices

    PubMed Central

    Zangiabadi, Nasser; Mohtashami, Hossein; Hojatipour, Mahboobeh; Jafari, Mandana; Asadi-Shekaari, Majid; Shabani, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the most common metabolic disease with a high prevalence rate in human society that eventually leads to the peripheral nervous system complications in a great number of patients. In the present study, the effects of Angipars on nerve conduction velocity, histological alterations, and behavioral indices were investigated. Diabetes was induced in male rats by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ). Six weeks after STZ injection, animals were divided into five groups control, vehicle, and 3 experimental groups. The vehicle group received 1 mL distilled water daily for two weeks and three experimental groups received, respectively, intraperitoneal injection of 5, 10, and 20 mg/kg Angipars daily for two weeks. Intraperitoneal injection of Angipars, in some extent, could significantly improve behavioral indices of the experimental groups as compared to the vehicle group. Furthermore, mean nerve conduction velocity in the vehicle group showed significant difference with that in the control and the 2nd experimental groups; therefore, Angipars could increase nerve conduction velocity in neuropathic rats. Overall, Angipars exerted positive effects on the treatment and reduction of physiologic symptoms and improvement of sciatic morphological injuries in neuropathic rats. PMID:25614895

  1. The effect of Angipars on diabetic neuropathy in STZ-induced diabetic male rats: a study on behavioral, electrophysiological, sciatic histological and ultrastructural indices.

    PubMed

    Zangiabadi, Nasser; Mohtashami, Hossein; Hojatipour, Mahboobeh; Jafari, Mandana; Asadi-Shekaari, Majid; Shabani, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the most common metabolic disease with a high prevalence rate in human society that eventually leads to the peripheral nervous system complications in a great number of patients. In the present study, the effects of Angipars on nerve conduction velocity, histological alterations, and behavioral indices were investigated. Diabetes was induced in male rats by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ). Six weeks after STZ injection, animals were divided into five groups control, vehicle, and 3 experimental groups. The vehicle group received 1 mL distilled water daily for two weeks and three experimental groups received, respectively, intraperitoneal injection of 5, 10, and 20 mg/kg Angipars daily for two weeks. Intraperitoneal injection of Angipars, in some extent, could significantly improve behavioral indices of the experimental groups as compared to the vehicle group. Furthermore, mean nerve conduction velocity in the vehicle group showed significant difference with that in the control and the 2nd experimental groups; therefore, Angipars could increase nerve conduction velocity in neuropathic rats. Overall, Angipars exerted positive effects on the treatment and reduction of physiologic symptoms and improvement of sciatic morphological injuries in neuropathic rats. PMID:25614895

  2. Hereditary Neuropathies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Hereditary Neuropathies Information Page Synonym(s): Neuropathy - Hereditary Table of Contents ( ... and Information Publicaciones en Español What are Hereditary Neuropathies? Hereditary neuropathies are a group of inherited disorders ...

  3. Peripheral Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Peripheral Neuropathy Information Page Condensed from Peripheral Neuropathy Fact Sheet ... Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Peripheral Neuropathy? Peripheral neuropathy describes damage to the peripheral nervous ...

  4. Metabolic neuropathies

    MedlinePlus

    Neuropathy - metabolic ... can be caused by many different things. Metabolic neuropathy may be caused by: A problem with the ... one of the most common causes of metabolic neuropathies. People who are at the highest risk for ...

  5. Diabetic Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Diabetic Neuropathy Information Page Table of Contents (click to jump ... Organizations Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Diabetic Neuropathy? Diabetic neuropathy is a peripheral nerve disorder caused ...

  6. Peripheral neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    Peripheral neuritis; Neuropathy - peripheral; Neuritis - peripheral; Nerve disease; Polyneuropathy ... Neuropathy is very common. There are many types and causes. Often, no cause can be found. Some ...

  7. Sciatic Nerve Injury Caused by a Stretching Exercise in a Trained Dancer

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Ho Yong; Bae, Keun Hwan; Park, Seok Min; Lee, Ju Kang; Park, Ki Deok

    2013-01-01

    Sciatic nerve injury after stretching exercise is uncommon. We report a case of an 18-year-old female trained dancer who developed sciatic neuropathy primarily involving the tibial division after routine stretching exercise. The patient presented with dysesthesia and weakness of the right foot during dorsiflexion and plantarflexion. The mechanism of sciatic nerve injury could be thought as hyperstretching alone, not caused by both hyperstretching and compression. Electrodiagnostic tests and magnetic resonance imaging revealed evidence of the right sciatic neuropathy from the gluteal fold to the distal tibial area, and partial tear of the left hamstring origin and fluid collection between the left hamstring and ischium without left sciatic nerve injury. Recovery of motor weakness was obtained by continuous rehabilitation therapy and some evidence of axonal regeneration was obtained by follow-up electrodiagnostic testing performed at 3, 5, and 12 months after injury. PMID:24466525

  8. Peripheral Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... can be associated with peripheral neuropathy. Metabolic and endocrine disorders impair the body’s ability to transform nutrients into ... to neuropathies as a result of chemical imbalances. Endocrine disorders that lead to hormonal imbalances can disturb normal ...

  9. Alcoholic neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    Neuropathy - alcoholic; Alcoholic polyneuropathy ... The exact cause of alcoholic neuropathy is unknown. It likely includes both a direct poisoning of the nerve by the alcohol and the effect of poor nutrition ...

  10. Neuropathy Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Neuropathy Share this page: Was this page helpful? Overview | ... of testing are: To diagnose the presence of neuropathy and distinguish it from other conditions that may ...

  11. Imaging of neuropathies about the hip.

    PubMed

    Martinoli, Carlo; Miguel-Perez, Maribel; Padua, Luca; Gandolfo, Nicola; Zicca, Anna; Tagliafico, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Neuropathies about the hip may be cause of chronic pain and disability. In most cases, these conditions derive from mechanical or dynamic compression of a segment of a nerve within a narrow osteofibrous tunnel, an opening in a fibrous structure, or a passageway close to a ligament or a muscle. Although the evaluation of nerve disorders primarily relies on neurological examination and electrophysiology, diagnostic imaging is currently used as a complement to help define the site and aetiology of nerve compression and exclude other disease possibly underlying the patient' symptoms. Diagnosis of entrapment neuropathies about the hip with US and MR imaging requires an in-depth knowledge of the normal imaging anatomy and awareness of the anatomic and pathologic factors that may predispose or cause a nerve injury. Accordingly, the aim of this article is to provide a comprehensive review of hip neuropathies with an emphasis on the relevant anatomy, aetiology, clinical presentation, and their imaging appearance. The lateral femoral cutaneous neuropathy (meiralgia paresthetica), femoral neuropathy, sciatic neuropathy, obturator neuropathy, superior and inferior gluteal neuropathies and pudendal neuropathy will be discussed. PMID:21549536

  12. Diabetic Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Russell, James W.; Zilliox, Lindsay A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of Review: This article provides an overview for understanding the diagnosis, pathogenesis, and management of diabetic neuropathy. Recent Findings: New information about the pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy continues to emerge, which will lead to identifying new drug targets. It is clear that the natural history of diabetic neuropathy is changing and the rate of progression is slowing. This is likely because of a combination of earlier diagnosis, improved glycemic management, and improved control of related complications such as hyperlipidemia and hypertension. Early diagnosis is critical, and small fiber neuropathy or subclinical diabetic neuropathy may be reversed or significantly improved with appropriate intervention. The American Academy of Neurology recently published guidelines for the treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy. Summary: Diabetic neuropathy is common and can present with varied clinical presentations discussed in this article. Although treatment currently focuses on pain management, attention should be paid to potential risk factors for neuropathy. For example, glycemic control, hyperlipidemia, and hypertension should be managed with diet, exercise, and medications. Class I or II clinical studies indicate that pregabalin, duloxetine, amitriptyline, gabapentin, and opioids are effective in the management of diabetic neuropathic pain. PMID:25299279

  13. Autonomic neuropathies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Low, P. A.

    1998-01-01

    A limited autonomic neuropathy may underlie some unusual clinical syndromes, including the postural tachycardia syndrome, pseudo-obstruction syndrome, heat intolerance, and perhaps chronic fatigue syndrome. Antibodies to autonomic structures are common in diabetes, but their specificity is unknown. The presence of autonomic failure worsens prognosis in the diabetic state. Some autonomic neuropathies are treatable. Familial amyloid polyneuropathy may respond to liver transplantation. There are anecdotal reports of acute panautonomic neuropathy responding to intravenous gamma globulin. Orthostatic hypotension may respond to erythropoietin or midodrine.

  14. Decompression of the Sciatic Nerve Entrapment Caused by Post-Inflammatory Scarring

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Deog-ryeong; Jeun, Sin Soo; Lee, Sang-won

    2015-01-01

    A rare case of chronic pain of entrapment neuropathy of the sciatic nerve successfully relieved by surgical decompression is presented. A 71-year-old male suffered a chronic right buttock pain of duration of 7 years which radiating to the right distal leg and foot. His pain developed gradually over one year after underwenting drainage for the gluteal abscess seven years ago. A cramping buttock and intermittently radiating pain to his right foot on sitting, walking, and voiding did not respond to conventional treatment. An MRI suggested a post-inflammatory adhesion encroaching the proximal course of the sciatic nerve beneath the piriformis as it emerges from the sciatic notch. Upon exploration of the sciatic nerve, a fibrotic tendinous scar beneath the piriformis was found and released proximally to the sciatic notch. His chronic intractable pain was completely relieved within days after the decompression. However, thigh weakness and hypesthesia of the foot did not improve. This case suggest a need for of more prompt investigation and decompression of the chronic sciatic entrapment neuropathy which does not improve clinically or electrically over several months. PMID:25733994

  15. Alcoholic neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... objects in the shoes Guarding the extremities to prevent injury from pressure Alcohol must be stopped to prevent the damage from ... The only way to prevent alcoholic neuropathy is not to drink excessive amounts of alcohol.

  16. Handcuff neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Stone, D A; Laureno, R

    1991-01-01

    Compressive neuropathy due to tight application of handcuffs occurred in 5 patients. The superficial radial nerve was affected in 8 hands and the median nerve in two. Neurologic deficits persisted as long as 3 years after handcuffing. Nerve conduction studies helped to exclude malingering and other diagnoses. All patients had been intoxicated when handcuffed or had been arrested with force. The handcuff mechanism, which allows accidental overtightening after application, is an unrecognized factor in these neuropathies. PMID:1985280

  17. Sciatic nerve injection injury.

    PubMed

    Jung Kim, Hyun; Hyun Park, Sang

    2014-06-11

    Nerve injury is a common complication following intramuscular injection and the sciatic nerve is the most frequently affected nerve, especially in children, the elderly and underweight patients. The neurological presentation may range from minor transient pain to severe sensory disturbance and motor loss with poor recovery. Management of nerve injection injury includes drug treatment of pain, physiotherapy, use of assistive devices and surgical exploration. Early recognition of nerve injection injury and appropriate management are crucial in order to reduce neurological deficit and to maximize recovery. Sciatic nerve injection injury is a preventable event. Total avoidance of intramuscular injection is recommended if other administration routes can be used. If the injection has to be administered into the gluteal muscle, the ventrogluteal region (gluteal triangle) has a more favourable safety profile than the dorsogluteal region (the upper outer quadrant of the buttock). PMID:24920643

  18. Delayed Presentation of Sciatic Nerve Injury after Total Hip Arthroplasty: Neurosurgical Considerations, Diagnosis, and Management

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Linda W.; Veeravagu, Anand; Azad, Tej D.; Harraher, Ciara; Ratliff, John K.

    2016-01-01

    Background  Total hip arthroplasty (THA) is an established treatment for end-stage arthritis, congenital deformity, and trauma with good long-term clinical and functional outcomes. Delayed sciatic nerve injury is a rare complication after THA that requires prompt diagnosis and management. Methods  We present a case of sciatic nerve motor and sensory deficit in a 52-year-old patient 2 years after index left THA. Electromyography (EMG) results and imaging with radiographs and CT of the affected hip demonstrated an aberrant acetabular cup screw in the posterior-inferior quadrant adjacent to the sciatic nerve. Case Description  The patient underwent surgical exploration that revealed injury to the peroneal division of the sciatic nerve due to direct injury from screw impingement. A literature review identified 11 patients with late-onset neuropathy after THA. Ten patients underwent surgical exploration and pain often resolved after surgery with 56% of patients recovering sensory function and 25% experiencing full recovery of motor function. Conclusions  Delayed neuropathy of the sciatic nerve is a rare complication after THA that is most often due to hardware irritation, component failure, or wear-related pseudotumor formation. Operative intervention is often pursued to explore and directly visualize the nerve with limited results in the literature showing modest relief of pain and sensory symptoms and poor restoration of motor function. PMID:27602309

  19. Inherited neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Chance, P F; Reilly, M

    1994-10-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy (CMT) type 1 is a genetically heterogeneous group of chronic demyelinating polyneuropathies with loci mapping to chromosome 17 (CMT1A), chromosome 1 (CMT1B), the X chromosome (CMTX), and to another unknown autosome (CMT1C). CMT1A is most often associated with a tandem 1.5-Mb duplication in chromosome 17p11.2-12, or in rare patients may result from a point mutation in the peripheral myelin protein-22 (PMP22) gene. CMT1B is associated with point mutations in the myelin protein zero (P0) gene. The molecular defect in CMT1C is unknown. CMTX is associated with mutations in the connexin 32 gene. CMT2 is an axonal neuropathy of undetermined cause. One form of CMT2 maps to chromosome 1p36 (CMT2A). Dejerine-Sottas disease is a severe, infantile-onset demyelinating polyneuropathy that may be associated with point mutations in either the PMP22 gene or the P0 gene. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is a recurrent, episodic demyelinating neuropathy. HNPP is associated with a 1.5-Mb deletion in chromosome 17p11.2-12 and may result from reduced expression of the PMP22 gene. Most examples of CMT1A and HNPP are reciprocal duplication or deletion syndromes originating from unequal crossover during germ cell meiosis. Familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP) is an autosomal dominant disorder that classically presents with a sensory peripheral neuropathy and early autonomic involvement. Transthyretin (TTR) is the most common constituent amyloid fibril protein deposited in FAP, and there are now 28 point mutations in the TTR gene described in TTR-related FAP. Liver transplantation looks promising as a treatment for TTR-related FAP. PMID:7804455

  20. Tadalafil Promotes the Recovery of Peripheral Neuropathy in Type II Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Chopp, Michael; Szalad, Alexandra; Lu, XueRong; Jia, LongFei; Lu, Mei; Zhang, Rui Lan; Zhang, Zheng Gang

    2016-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that treatment of diabetic peripheral neuropathy with the short (4 hours) half-life phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitor, sildenafil, improved functional outcome in diabetic db/db mice. To further examine the effect of PDE5 inhibition on diabetic peripheral neuropathy, we investigated the effect of another potent PDE5 inhibitor, tadalafil, on diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Tadalafil is pharmacokinetically distinct from sildenafil and has a longer half-life (17+hours) than sildenafil. Diabetic mice (BKS.Cg-m+/+Leprdb/J, db/db) at age 20 weeks were treated with tadalafil every 48 hours for 8 consecutive weeks. Compared with diabetic mice treated with saline, tadalafil treatment significantly improved motor and sensory conduction velocities in the sciatic nerve and peripheral thermal sensitivity. Tadalafil treatment also markedly increased local blood flow and the density of FITC-dextran perfused vessels in the sciatic nerve concomitantly with increased intraepidermal nerve fiber density. Moreover, tadalafil reversed the diabetes-induced reductions of axon diameter and myelin thickness and reversed the diabetes-induced increased g-ratio in the sciatic nerve. Furthermore, tadalafil enhanced diabetes-reduced nerve growth factor (NGF) and platelet-derived growth factor-C (PDGF-C) protein levels in diabetic sciatic nerve tissue. The present study demonstrates that tadalafil increases regional blood flow in the sciatic nerve tissue, which may contribute to the improvement of peripheral nerve function and the amelioration of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. PMID:27438594

  1. Sciatic Nerve Injury Related to Hip Replacement Surgery: Imaging Detection by MR Neurography Despite Susceptibility Artifacts

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Marcel; Bäumer, Philipp; Pedro, Maria; Dombert, Thomas; Staub, Frank; Heiland, Sabine; Bendszus, Martin; Pham, Mirko

    2014-01-01

    Sciatic nerve palsy related to hip replacement surgery (HRS) is among the most common causes of sciatic neuropathies. The sciatic nerve may be injured by various different periprocedural mechanisms. The precise localization and extension of the nerve lesion, the determination of nerve continuity, lesion severity, and fascicular lesion distribution are essential for assessing the potential of spontaneous recovery and thereby avoiding delayed or inappropriate therapy. Adequate therapy is in many cases limited to conservative management, but in certain cases early surgical exploration and release of the nerve is indicated. Nerve-conduction-studies and electromyography are essential in the diagnosis of nerve injuries. In postsurgical nerve injuries, additional diagnostic imaging is important as well, in particular to detect or rule out direct mechanical compromise. Especially in the presence of metallic implants, commonly applied diagnostic imaging tests generally fail to adequately visualize nervous tissue. MRI has been deemed problematic due to implant-related artifacts after HRS. In this study, we describe for the first time the spectrum of imaging findings of Magnetic Resonance neurography (MRN) employing pulse sequences relatively insensitive to susceptibility artifacts (susceptibility insensitive MRN, siMRN) in a series of 9 patients with HRS procedure related sciatic nerve palsy. We were able to determine the localization and fascicular distribution of the sciatic nerve lesion in all 9 patients, which clearly showed on imaging predominant involvement of the peroneal more than the tibial division of the sciatic nerve. In 2 patients siMRN revealed direct mechanical compromise of the nerve by surgical material, and in one of these cases indication for surgical release of the sciatic nerve was based on siMRN. Thus, in selected cases of HRS related neuropathies, especially when surgical exploration of the nerve is considered, siMRN, with its potential to largely

  2. Hereditary neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Heidenreich, Wayne F

    2010-01-01

    A 58-year-old male presented with a history of slowly progressive bilateral hand weakness manifested by decreased grip strength and pinch strength associated with some pain in the first metacarpal-carpal joints with atrophy of the muscles of the web space. An evaluation based on history, physical exam, and judicious diagnostic testing yielded a finding of motor and sensory peripheral polyneuropathy and a working diagnosis of hereditary nerve pressure palsy syndrome (HNPP) or hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies. The clinical findings and diagnostic tests for sensory and motor peripheral neuropathy are discussed. The case details over time, hereditary features, and the natural history of this disorder lead to a favorable clinical and insurance medicine prognosis. PMID:21290997

  3. Giant Axonal Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Giant Axonal Neuropathy Information Page Table of Contents (click to jump ... done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Giant Axonal Neuropathy? Giant axonal neuropathy (GAN) is a rare inherited ...

  4. Multifocal Motor Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Multifocal Motor Neuropathy Information Page Table of Contents (click to jump ... done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Multifocal Motor Neuropathy? Multifocal motor neuropathy is a progressive muscle disorder ...

  5. Additional Types of Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... A A Listen En Español Additional Types of Neuropathy Charcot's Joint Charcot's Joint, also called neuropathic arthropathy, ... can stop bone destruction and aid healing. Cranial Neuropathy Cranial neuropathy affects the 12 pairs of nerves ...

  6. Endoscopic Sciatic Neurolysis

    PubMed Central

    Knudsen, Joshua S.; McConkey, Mark O.; Brick, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    Despite remaining a controversial diagnosis, piriformis syndrome continues to affect patients' quality of life with pain, sitting discomfort, and exercise intolerance. Open sciatic neurolysis has been noted by the senior author to often only bring temporary relief of the symptoms, with the recurrence presumably due to postoperative scar tissue. Minimally invasive techniques used to decompress the nerve have met with mixed results. This article describes a step-by-step surgical technique designed to maximize patient safety, as well as surgeon orientation, and achieve a thorough neurolysis. Preoperative findings suggestive of piriformis syndrome are described and include retro-trochanteric pain, sciatica-like leg pain, and paresthesias, as well as a positive response to computed tomography–guided injection of dilute ropivacaine hydrochloride and 40 mg of triamcinolone. The operation is performed with the patient in the lateral decubitus position through 2 portals 6 to 8 cm apart, allowing for good triangulation. Dissection is undertaken with a combination of radiofrequency and a laparoscopic peanut, with the assistance of a vascular sling to control the sciatic nerve. Encouraging results have been achieved, and with increasing interest in this procedure, a step-by-step technical description with an accompanying video may prove useful for other experienced hip arthroscopists. Pearls and pitfalls are discussed. PMID:26759776

  7. Transcriptomic analyses of genes and tissues in inherited sensory neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Sapio, Matthew R; Goswami, Samridhi C; Gross, Jacklyn R; Mannes, Andrew J; Iadarola, Michael J

    2016-09-01

    Inherited sensory neuropathies are caused by mutations in genes affecting either primary afferent neurons, or the Schwann cells that myelinate them. Using RNA-Seq, we analyzed the transcriptome of human and rat DRG and peripheral nerve, which contain sensory neurons and Schwann cells, respectively. We subdivide inherited sensory neuropathies based on expression of the mutated gene in these tissues, as well as in mouse TRPV1 lineage DRG nociceptive neurons, and across 32 human tissues from the Human Protein Atlas. We propose that this comprehensive approach to neuropathy gene expression leads to better understanding of the involved cell types in patients with these disorders. We also characterize the genetic "fingerprint" of both tissues, and present the highly tissue-specific genes in DRG and sciatic nerve that may aid in the development of gene panels to improve diagnostics for genetic neuropathies, and may represent specific drug targets for diseases of these tissues. PMID:27343803

  8. Spectrum of peripheral neuropathies associated with surgical interventions; A neurophysiological assessment

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background We hypothesized that a wide range of surgical procedures may be complicated by neuropathies, not just in close proximity but also remote from procedural sites. The aim of this study was to classify post-operative neuropathies and the procedures associated with them. Methods We retrospectively identified 66 patients diagnosed with post-procedure neuropathies between January 2005 and June 2008. We reviewed their referral cards and medical records for patient demographics, information on procedures, symptoms, as well as clinical and neurophysiological findings. Results Thirty patients (45.4%) had neuropathies remote from procedural sites and 36 patients (54.5%) had neuropathies in close proximity to procedural sites. Half of the remote neuropathies (15/30) developed following relatively short procedures. In 27% of cases (8/30) remote neuropathies were bilateral. Seven patients developed neuropathies remote from operative sites following hip arthroplasties (7/30: 23.3%), making hip arthroplasty the most common procedure associated with remote neuropathies. Sciatic neuropathies due to hip arthroplasty (12/36, 33.3%) accounted for the majority of neuropathies occurring in close proximity to operative sites. Five medial cutaneous nerve of forearm neuropathies occurred following arterio-venous fistula (AVF) formation. Conclusions An array of surgical procedures may be complicated by neuropathy. Almost half of post-procedure neuropathies occur remote from the site of procedure, emphasizing the need to try to prevent not just local, but also remote neuropathies. Mechanical factors and patient positioning should be considered in the prevention of post-operative neuropathies. There is a possible association between AVF formation and medial cutaneous nerve of forearm neuropathy, which requires further study for validation. PMID:20398427

  9. Management of Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Raymond Azman

    2003-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the commonest cause of neuropathy worldwide. Diabetic neuropathy (DN) develops in about 4–10% of diabetic patients after 5 years and in 15% after 20 years. Four main mechanisms have been postulated to underlie the pathogenesis of DN. Diabetic neuropathy can be divided into symmetrical and asymmetrical neuropathies. Diabetic Autonomic Neuropathy (DAN) parallels the severity of DSN, and affects primarily the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, genitourinary and integumentary systems. The cornerstone of treatment of diabetic neuropathy is optimization of glycaemic control. Future treatments for diabetic neuropathy should address the underlying pathogenesis. PMID:23386794

  10. A conduction block in sciatic nerves can be detected by magnetic motor root stimulation.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Hideyuki; Konoma, Yuko; Fujii, Kengo; Hanajima, Ritsuko; Terao, Yasuo; Ugawa, Yoshikazu

    2013-08-15

    Useful diagnostic techniques for the acute phase of sciatic nerve palsy, an entrapment neuropathy, are not well established. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the diagnostic utility of magnetic sacral motor root stimulation for sciatic nerve palsy. We analyzed the peripheral nerves innervating the abductor hallucis muscle using both electrical stimulations at the ankle and knee and magnetic stimulations at the neuro-foramina and conus medullaris levels in a patient with sciatic nerve palsy at the level of the piriformis muscle due to gluteal compression related to alcohol consumption. On the fourth day after onset, magnetic sacral motor root stimulation using a MATS coil (the MATS coil stimulation method) clearly revealed a conduction block between the knee and the sacral neuro-foramina. Two weeks after onset, needle electromyography supported the existence of the focal lesion. The MATS coil stimulation method clearly revealed a conduction block in the sciatic nerve and is therefore a useful diagnostic tool for the abnormal neurophysiological findings associated with sciatic nerve palsy even at the acute phase. PMID:23809191

  11. Intrathecal gene therapy rescues a model of demyelinating peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Kagiava, Alexia; Sargiannidou, Irene; Theophilidis, George; Karaiskos, Christos; Richter, Jan; Bashiardes, Stavros; Schiza, Natasa; Nearchou, Marianna; Christodoulou, Christina; Scherer, Steven S; Kleopa, Kleopas A

    2016-04-26

    Inherited demyelinating peripheral neuropathies are progressive incurable diseases without effective treatment. To develop a gene therapy approach targeting myelinating Schwann cells that can be translatable, we delivered a lentiviral vector using a single lumbar intrathecal injection and a myelin-specific promoter. The human gene of interest, GJB1, which is mutated in X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease (CMT1X), was delivered intrathecally into adult Gjb1-null mice, a genetically authentic model of CMT1X that develops a demyelinating peripheral neuropathy. We obtained widespread, stable, and cell-specific expression of connexin32 in up to 50% of Schwann cells in multiple lumbar spinal roots and peripheral nerves. Behavioral and electrophysiological analysis revealed significantly improved motor performance, quadriceps muscle contractility, and sciatic nerve conduction velocities. Furthermore, treated mice exhibited reduced numbers of demyelinated and remyelinated fibers and fewer inflammatory cells in lumbar motor roots, as well as in the femoral motor and sciatic nerves. This study demonstrates that a single intrathecal lentiviral gene delivery can lead to Schwann cell-specific expression in spinal roots extending to multiple peripheral nerves. This clinically relevant approach improves the phenotype of an inherited neuropathy mouse model and provides proof of principle for treating inherited demyelinating neuropathies. PMID:27035961

  12. Neuropathy secondary to drugs

    MedlinePlus

    Neuropathy secondary to drugs is a loss of sensation or movement in a part of the body ... weakness. Many medicines may affect the development of neuropathy, including: Heart or blood pressure drugs: Amiodarone Hydralazine ...

  13. Neuropathy secondary to drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000700.htm Neuropathy secondary to drugs To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Neuropathy secondary to drugs is a loss of sensation ...

  14. Peripheral neuropathies 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Assal, J.P.; Liniger, C.

    1990-01-01

    The authors present results and experience in sixteen specific disciplines related to the study of nerve physiopathology, diagnosis and treatment. Twenty-two different peripheral neuropathies are presented, and different models related to health care strategies are discussed. The authors report on Inflammatory and autoimmune neuropathies and Genetic neuropathies.

  15. A reversible functional sensory neuropathy model.

    PubMed

    Danigo, Aurore; Magy, Laurent; Richard, Laurence; Sturtz, Franck; Funalot, Benoît; Demiot, Claire

    2014-06-13

    Small-fiber neuropathy was induced in young adult mice by intraperitoneal injection of resiniferatoxin (RTX), a TRPV1 agonist. At day 7, RTX induced significant thermal and mechanical hypoalgesia. At day 28, mechanical and thermal nociception were restored. No nerve degeneration in skin was observed and unmyelinated nerve fiber morphology and density in sciatic nerve were unchanged. At day 7, substance P (SP) was largely depleted in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons, although calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) was only moderately depleted. Three weeks after, SP and CGRP expression was restored in DRG neurons. At the same time, CGRP expression remained low in intraepidermal nerve fibers (IENFs) whereas SP expression had improved. In summary, RTX induced in our model a transient neuropeptide depletion in sensory neurons without nerve degeneration. We think this model is valuable as it brings the opportunity to study functional nerve changes in the very early phase of small fiber neuropathy. Moreover, it may represent a useful tool to study the mechanisms of action of therapeutic strategies to prevent sensory neuropathy of various origins. PMID:24792390

  16. Enhanced synthesis and secretion of apolipoprotein E from sciatic nerves of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats after injury

    SciTech Connect

    Ishibashi, S.; Yamada, N.; Oka, Y.; Shimano, H.; Mori, N.; Yoon, T.H.; Shimada, M.; Kanazawa, Y.; Akanuma, Y.; Murase, T.

    1988-08-30

    To elucidate the pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy, synthesis and secretion of apolipoprotein E (apo E) from sciatic nerves after injury was studied in normal and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Seven, 14, 28, 45 and 59 days after making crush injury on sciatic nerves with concomitant administration of streptozotocin (50 mg/kg body weight), the nerves were taken out and incubated with (/sup 35/S)methionine. The (/sup 35/S)labeled apo E was precipitated with specific antiserum. The amounts of apo E secreted into medium by nerves of diabetic rats were 7 times greater than those of non-diabetic rats 7 days after injury. This enhanced secretion of apo E was relatively selective for this protein, since the ratio of the immunoprecipitable apo E to the TCA preciptitable protein in the medium increased in diabetic rats. Intriguing possibility deduced from these results is that the secretion of apo E is involved in the development of diabetic neuropathy.

  17. The Sciatic Nerve Cuffing Model of Neuropathic Pain in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yalcin, Ipek; Megat, Salim; Barthas, Florent; Waltisperger, Elisabeth; Kremer, Mélanie; Salvat, Eric; Barrot, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathic pain arises as a consequence of a lesion or a disease affecting the somatosensory system. This syndrome results from maladaptive changes in injured sensory neurons and along the entire nociceptive pathway within the central nervous system. It is usually chronic and challenging to treat. In order to study neuropathic pain and its treatments, different models have been developed in rodents. These models derive from known etiologies, thus reproducing peripheral nerve injuries, central injuries, and metabolic-, infectious- or chemotherapy-related neuropathies. Murine models of peripheral nerve injury often target the sciatic nerve which is easy to access and allows nociceptive tests on the hind paw. These models rely on a compression and/or a section. Here, the detailed surgery procedure for the "cuff model" of neuropathic pain in mice is described. In this model, a cuff of PE-20 polyethylene tubing of standardized length (2 mm) is unilaterally implanted around the main branch of the sciatic nerve. It induces a long-lasting mechanical allodynia, i.e., a nociceptive response to a normally non-nociceptive stimulus that can be evaluated by using von Frey filaments. Besides the detailed surgery and testing procedures, the interest of this model for the study of neuropathic pain mechanism, for the study of neuropathic pain sensory and anxiodepressive aspects, and for the study of neuropathic pain treatments are also discussed. PMID:25078668

  18. Tetrahydrocurcumin exerts protective effect on vincristine induced neuropathy: Behavioral, biochemical, neurophysiological and histological evidence.

    PubMed

    Greeshma, N; Prasanth, K G; Balaji, Bhaskar

    2015-08-01

    Hyperalgesia, allodynia, delayed motor nerve conduction velocity, oxidative stress and axonal damage are signs and symptoms of chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN). Present treatment/preventive strategies of CIPN are futile and the neuropathy may even lead to discontinuation of chemotherapy. In this study, we evaluated the protective effect of tetrahydrocurcumin (THC) 40 and 80mg/kg in experimental vincristine induced neuropathy in rats. Hyperalgesia was assessed by hot plate (thermal), Randall-Selitto (mechanical) test, allodynia was assessed by cold plate (thermal) test, functional loss was measured by sciatic function index, nociception was evaluated by formalin test. Neurophysiological recordings were carried out to assess motor nerve conduction velocity. Total calcium levels, oxidative stress and TNF-α was measured in sciatic nerve tissue homogenate to assess neuropathy. Histopathological changes was observed on sciatic nerve to assess the protective effect of THC against the vincristine. Pregabalin was used as a standard in this study. Rats administered with THC at 80mg/kg significantly attenuated the vincristine induced neuropathic pain manifestations which may be due to its multiple actions including anti-nociceptive, anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective, calcium inhibitory and antioxidant effect. This study delineates that THC can be a promising candidate for the prevention of CIPN by chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:26102012

  19. Entrapment neuropathies III: lower limb.

    PubMed

    Beltran, Luis S; Bencardino, Jenny; Ghazikhanian, Varand; Beltran, Javier

    2010-11-01

    Clinicians frequently encounter compressive neuropathies of the lower extremity. The clinical history and physical examination, along with electrodiagnostic testing and imaging studies, lead to the correct diagnosis. The imaging characteristics of the compression neuropathies can include acute and chronic changes in the nerves and the muscles they innervate. We provide a detailed review of compression neuropathies of the lower extremity with an emphasis on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging characteristics. We discuss the clinical presentation, etiology, anatomical location, and MR imaging appearance of these neuropathies, including the piriformis syndrome, iliacus syndrome, saphenous neuropathy, obturator neuropathy, lateral femoral cutaneous neuropathy (meralgia paresthetica), proximal tibial neuropathy, common peroneal neuropathy, deep peroneal neuropathy, superficial peroneal neuropathy, tarsal tunnel syndrome, Baxter's neuropathy, jogger's foot, sural neuropathy, and Morton's neuroma. PMID:21072728

  20. A rare cause of chronic sciatic pain: Schwannoma of the sciatic nerve

    PubMed Central

    Rhanim, Abdelkarim; El Zanati, Rachid; Mahfoud, Mustapha; Berrada, Mohammed Saleh; El Yaacoubi, Moradh

    2013-01-01

    Schwannomas are common, benign tumors of the shelth of peripheral nerves. Sciatic schwannomas are rare. Their symptomatology usually mimics sciatic pain due to a herniated disc, which can delay the diagnosis. If there is no lumbar pain and lumbar MRI is normal, the sciatic nerve must be clinically and radiologically examined all along its course. We report a case of sciatic nerve schwannoma presenting with chronic sciatica which was diagnosed and monitored radiologically for several years before successful surgical resection. PMID:26403631

  1. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediates non-freezing cold injury of rat sciatic nerve

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Zhiwei; Tong, Xiaoyan; Jia, Hongjuan

    2015-01-01

    Non-freezing cold injury is an injury characterized by neuropathy, developing when patients expose to cold environments. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been shown as a contributing factor for the non-freezing cold nerve injury. However, the detailed connections between non-freezing cold nerve injury and ROS have not been described. In order to investigate the relationship between non-freezing cold nerve injury and reactive oxygen species, we study the effects of two cooling methods-the continuous cooling and the intermittent cooling with warming intervals-on rat sciatic nerves. Specifically, we assess the morphological changes and ROS production of the sciatic nerves underwent different cooling treatments. Our data shows both types of cooling methods cause nerve injury and ROS production. However, despite of identical cooling degree and duration, the sciatic nerves processed by intermittent cooling with warming intervals present more ROS production, severer reperfusion injury and pathological destructions than the sciatic nerves processed by continuous cooling. This result indicates reactive oxygen species, as a product of reperfusion, facilitates non-freezing cold nerve injury. PMID:26629065

  2. Retinoic acid reduces solvent-induced neuropathy and promotes neural regeneration in mice.

    PubMed

    Palencia, Guadalupe; Hernández-Pedro, Norma; Saavedra-Perez, David; Peña-Curiel, Omar; Ortiz-Plata, Alma; Ordoñez, Graciela; Flores-Estrada, Diana; Sotelo, Julio; Arrieta, Oscar

    2014-08-01

    In humans, exposure to organic solvents (OS) is frequent in work activities or as a recreational inhalant, inducing severe neuropathy (secondary to demyelization of peripheral nerves). We have previously shown that all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) increases local content of neural growth factor (NGF), improving peripheral neuropathy of diverse origins. In this study, we evaluated the effect of ATRA on OS-induced peripheral neuropathy in experimental mice. Two simultaneous experiments were performed. The first one aimed to evaluate ATRA for the prevention of damage induced by OS, the second to test ATRA as an OS-induced neuropathy treatment. Nociceptive threshold latency and NGF concentration in serum and in peripheral nerves were determined. Morphological changes and evidence of sciatic nerve regeneration were evaluated. Mice exposed to OS developed neuropathy and axonal degeneration. ATRA diminished the effects of OS inhalation on sensorial changes and nerve morphology. Treatment with ATRA reversed sensorial and nerve morphological changes of OS-induced neuropathy, and this was associated with increased contents of NGF. Similar to previous experiences on diabetic and toxic neuropathy, ATRA reduced and partially reversed the peripheral neuropathy caused by OS exposure. These favorable effects apparently are due to local production of NGF induced by neural regeneration in response to the administration of retinoic acid. PMID:24647975

  3. Peripheral Neuropathy: Symptoms and Signs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research News Make a Difference Symptoms of Peripheral Neuropathy Print This Page Peripheral Neuropathy symptoms usually start ... slowly over many years. The symptoms of peripheral neuropathy often include: A sensation of wearing an invisible “ ...

  4. Effects of Dioscoreae Rhizoma (SanYak) on Peripheral Neuropathy and its Safety

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-jung; Sung, Hyunkyung; Hong, Kwon-eui

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the evidence available in the literature for the safety and efficacy of Dioscoreae Rhizoma(DR) for the treatment of peripheral neuropathy. Methods: Literature searches were performed in MEDLINE and three Korean medical databases up to April 2013. All studies evaluating the effects on peripheral neuropathy or the safety of DR monopreparations were considered. Results: Three studies - DR extract per os (po) on diabetic neuropathy in mice, DR extract injection on the peripheral sciatic nerve after crush injury in rats and DR extract injection to patients with peripheral facial paralysis proved that DR treatments were effective for the treatment of nerve injuries. Conclusions: In conclusion, we found the DR has a strong positive potential for the treatment of peripheral neuropathy, but studies addressing direct factors related to the nerve still remain insufficient. PMID:25780670

  5. Inherited mitochondrial neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef

    2011-05-15

    Mitochondrial disorders (MIDs) occasionally manifest as polyneuropathy either as the dominant feature or as one of many other manifestations (inherited mitochondrial neuropathy). MIDs in which polyneuropathy is the dominant feature, include NARP syndrome due to the transition m.8993T>, CMT2A due to MFN2 mutations, CMT2K and CMT4A due to GDAP1 mutations, and axonal/demyelinating neuropathy with external ophthalmoplegia due to POLG1 mutations. MIDs in which polyneuropathy is an inconstant feature among others is the MELAS syndrome, MERRF syndrome, LHON, Mendelian PEO, KSS, Leigh syndrome, MNGIE, SANDO; MIRAS, MEMSA, AHS, MDS (hepato-cerebral form), IOSCA, and ADOA syndrome. In the majority of the cases polyneuropathy presents in a multiplex neuropathy distribution. Nerve conduction studies may reveal either axonal or demyelinated or mixed types of neuropathies. If a hereditary neuropathy is due to mitochondrial dysfunction, the management of these patients is at variance from non-mitochondrial hereditary neuropathies. Patients with mitochondrial hereditary neuropathy need to be carefully investigated for clinical or subclinical involvement of other organs or systems. Supportive treatment with co-factors, antioxidants, alternative energy sources, or lactate lowering agents can be tried. Involvement of other organs may require specific treatment. Mitochondrial neuropathies should be included in the differential diagnosis of hereditary neuropathies. PMID:21402391

  6. Inherited Peripheral Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Saporta, Mario A.; Shy, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Charcot Marie Tooth disease (CMT) is a heterogeneous group of inherited peripheral neuropathies in which the neuropathy is the sole or primary component of the disorder, as opposed to diseases in which the neuropathy is part of a more generalized neurological or multisystem syndrome. Due to the great genetic heterogeneity of this condition, it can be challenging for the general neurologist to diagnose patients with specific types of CMT. Here, we review the biology of the inherited peripheral neuropathies, delineate major phenotypic features of the CMT subtypes and suggest strategies for focusing genetic testing. PMID:23642725

  7. A study of pathology of a bovine primary peripheral myelinopathy with features of tomaculous neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Hill, B D; Prior, H; Blakemore, W F; Black, P F

    1996-01-01

    Cases of a bovine neuropathy are reported in which peripheral nerves show "sausage-shaped" thickenings of the myelin sheaths at different sites of the internode. Clinical signs of dysphagia and chronic rumenal bloat developed after weaning which were attributable to bilateral vagus nerve degeneration. Trunks of the sciatic nerves and brachial plexuses were similarly affected with the animal adopting a weak shuffling gait. Affected animals were the progeny of sire-daughter matings. The lesions are similar to those seen in the tomaculous neuropathies of man. The present study is believed to be the first report of this lesion occurring in domestic animals. PMID:8740237

  8. Treatment of peripheral neuropathies.

    PubMed Central

    Hallett, M; Tandon, D; Berardelli, A

    1985-01-01

    There are three general approaches to treatment of peripheral neuropathy. First, an attempt should be made to reverse the pathophysiological process if its nature can be elucidated. Second, nerve metabolism can be stimulated and regeneration encouraged. Third, even if the neuropathy itself cannot be improved, symptomatic therapy can be employed. This review outlines the options available for each approach. PMID:3003254

  9. Propylthiouracil and peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Van Boekel, V; Godoy, J M; Lamy, L A; Assuf, S; Meyer Neto, J G; Balassiano, S L; Prata, L E

    1992-06-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a rare manifestation in hyperthyroidism. We describe the neurological manifestations of a 38 year old female with Graves' disease who developed peripheral neuropathy in the course of her treatment with propylthiouracil. After the drug was tapered off, the neurological signs disappeared. Therefore, we call attention for a possible toxic effect on peripheral nervous system caused by this drug. PMID:1339201

  10. Painful Traumatic Trigeminal Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Rafael, Benoliel; Sorin, Teich; Eli, Eliav

    2016-08-01

    This article discusses neuropathic pain of traumatic origin affecting the trigeminal nerve. This syndrome has been termed painful traumatic trigeminal neuropathy by the International Headache Society and replaces atypical odontalgia, deafferentation pain, traumatic neuropathy, and phantom toothache. The discussion emphasizes the diagnosis and the early and late management of injuries to the trigeminal nerve and subsequent painful conditions. PMID:27475512

  11. [Immune-mediated neuropathies].

    PubMed

    Stoll, G; Reiners, K

    2016-08-01

    The Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) are the most common immune-mediated polyneuropathies, which can show variable clinical and electrophysiological manifestations. Rarer immune-mediated neuropathies encompass paraproteinemic neuropathies (PPN), multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) and vasculitic neuropathies. The diagnosis usually relies on the history of symptom evolution, distribution of nerve dysfunction and particularly on characteristic features in nerve conduction studies, aided by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination and nerve biopsy findings. The therapeutic toolbox encompasses corticosteroids, immunoglobulins and plasmapheresis often accompanied by long-term immunosuppression. It is important to note that immune-mediated neuropathies selectively respond to treatment and contraindications need to be considered. Despite treatment a considerable number of patients suffer from permanent neurological deficits. PMID:27474733

  12. Immunotherapy in Peripheral Neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Léger, Jean-Marc; Guimarães-Costa, Raquel; Muntean, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy has been investigated in a small subset of peripheral neuropathies, including an acute one, Guillain-Barré syndrome, and 3 chronic forms: chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, multifocal motor neuropathy, and neuropathy associated with IgM anti-myelin-associated glycoprotein. Several experimental studies and clinical data are strongly suggestive of an immune-mediated pathogenesis. Either cell-mediated mechanisms or antibody responses to Schwann cell, compact myelin, or nodal antigens are considered to act together in an aberrant immune response to cause damage to peripheral nerves. Immunomodulatory treatments used in these neuropathies aim to act at various steps of this pathogenic process. However, there are many phenotypic variants and, consequently, there is a significant difference in the response to immunotherapy between these neuropathies, as well as a need to improve our knowledge and long-term management of chronic forms. PMID:26602549

  13. Sonographic evaluation of common peroneal neuropathy in patients with foot drop.

    PubMed

    Grant, Thomas H; Omar, Imran M; Dumanian, Gregory A; Pomeranz, Christy B; Lewis, Vanessa A

    2015-04-01

    The common peroneal nerve arises from the sciatic nerve and is subject to a variety of abnormalities. Although diagnosis is often is based on the clinical findings and electrodiagnostic tests, high-resolution sonography has an increasing role in determining the type and location of common peroneal nerve abnormalities and other peripheral nerve disorders. This article reviews the normal sonographic appearance of the common peroneal nerve and the findings in 21 patients with foot drop related to common peroneal neuropathy. PMID:25792587

  14. Dorsal root ganglia microenvironment of female BB Wistar diabetic rats with mild neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Zochodne, D W; Ho, L T; Allison, J A

    1994-12-01

    Abnormalities in the microenvironment of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) might play a role in the pathogenesis of sensory abnormalities in human diabetic neuropathy. We examined aspects of DRG microenvironment by measuring local blood flow and oxygen tension in the L4 dorsal root ganglia of female BB Wistar (BBW) diabetic rats with mild neuropathy. The findings were compared with concurrent measurements of local sciatic endoneurial blood flow and oxygen tension. Diabetic rats were treated with insulin and underwent electrophysiological, blood flow and oxygen tension measurements at either 7-11 or 17-23 weeks after the development of glycosuria. Nondiabetic female BB Wistar rats from the same colony served as controls. At both ages, BBW diabetic rats had significant abnormalities in sensory, but not motor conduction compared to nondiabetic controls. Sciatic endoneurial blood flow in the diabetic rats of both ages was similar to control values, but the older (17-23 week diabetic) BBW diabetic rats had a selective reduction in DRG blood flow. Sciatic endoneurial oxygen tensions were not significantly altered in the diabetic rats. DRG oxygen tension appeared lowered in younger (7-11 week diabetic) but not older (17-23 week diabetic) BBW rats. Our findings indicate that there are important changes in the DRG microenvironment of diabetic rats with selective sensory neuropathy. PMID:7699389

  15. Blocking mitochondrial calcium release in Schwann cells prevents demyelinating neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Berthelot, Jade; Jiner, Jennifer; Perrin-Tricaud, Claire; Fernando, Ruani; Chrast, Roman; Lenaers, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Schwann cells produce myelin sheath around peripheral nerve axons. Myelination is critical for rapid propagation of action potentials, as illustrated by the large number of acquired and hereditary peripheral neuropathies, such as diabetic neuropathy or Charcot-Marie-Tooth diseases, that are commonly associated with a process of demyelination. However, the early molecular events that trigger the demyelination program in these diseases remain unknown. Here, we used virally delivered fluorescent probes and in vivo time-lapse imaging in a mouse model of demyelination to investigate the underlying mechanisms of the demyelination process. We demonstrated that mitochondrial calcium released by voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1) after sciatic nerve injury triggers Schwann cell demyelination via ERK1/2, p38, JNK, and c-JUN activation. In diabetic mice, VDAC1 activity was altered, resulting in a mitochondrial calcium leak in Schwann cell cytoplasm, thereby priming the cell for demyelination. Moreover, reduction of mitochondrial calcium release, either by shRNA-mediated VDAC1 silencing or pharmacological inhibition, prevented demyelination, leading to nerve conduction and neuromuscular performance recovery in rodent models of diabetic neuropathy and Charcot-Marie-Tooth diseases. Therefore, this study identifies mitochondria as the early key factor in the molecular mechanism of peripheral demyelination and opens a potential opportunity for the treatment of demyelinating peripheral neuropathies. PMID:26878172

  16. Role of A3 adenosine receptor in diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Yan, Heng; Zhang, Enshui; Feng, Chang; Zhao, Xin

    2016-10-01

    Neuropathy is the most common diabetic complication. Although the A1 and A2A adenosine receptors are important pharmacological targets in alleviating diabetic neuropathy, the role of the A3 adenosine receptor remains unknown. Because the A3 adenosine receptor regulates pain induced by chronic constriction injury or chemotherapy, its stimulation might also attenuate diabetic neuropathy. This study examines the effects of systemic treatment with the A3 adenosine receptor agonist 1-deoxy-1-[6-[[(3-iodophenyl)methyl]amino]-9H-purin-9-yl]-N-methyl-β-d-ribofuranuronamide (IB-MECA) on diabetic neuropathy and explores the putative mechanisms underlying its pharmacological effects. We show that IB-MECA alleviated mechanical hyperalgesia and thermal hypoalgesia in mice 2 weeks but not 4 weeks after streptozocin (STZ) treatment. Furthermore, IB-MECA prevented the reduction in sciatic motor nerve conduction velocity and sensory nerve conduction velocity in diabetic mice 2 weeks but not 4 weeks after STZ treatment. Similarly, IB-MECA inhibited the activation of nuclear factor-κB and decreased the generation of tumor necrosis factor-α in the spinal cord of mice 2 weeks but not 4 weeks after STZ treatment. These phenomena were associated with reduction of A3 adenosine receptor expression in the spinal cord after long-term diabetes. Our results suggest that the A3 adenosine receptor plays a critical role in regulating diabetic neuropathy and that reduction in A3 adenosine receptor expression/function might contribute to the progression of diabetic neuropathy. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27319979

  17. [Chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Kolak, Agnieszka; Starosławska, Elzbieta; Kubiatowski, Tomasz; Kieszko, Dariusz; Cisek, Paweł; Patyra, Krzysztof Ireneusz; Surdyka, Dariusz; Mocarska, Agnieszka; Burdan, Franciszek

    2013-11-01

    Modern cancer therapy prolongs patients life but commonly increases incidence of treatment-related complications. One of such adverse effect is a neurotoxicity, which usually manifestates as peripheral neuropathies (CIPN), characterised by various sensory (tingling, numbness, pain), motor (foot and hands drop, fastening buttons difficulties) and autonomic (constipation, arythmia) abnormalities as well as pain. Despite of intensive epidemiological and clinical studies, standardized diagnostic criteria and methods of the neuropathy prevention and treatment have not been fully established. The most commonly used form of treatment is symptomatic therapy, including anticonvulsant and antidepressant drugs. Proper education of patients and their families of symptoms and neuropathy consequences is desirable to reduce anxiety and stress. PMID:24575651

  18. HIV peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Gabbai, Alberto Alain; Castelo, Adauto; Oliveira, Acary Souza Bulle

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathies are the most common neurological manifestations occurring in HIV-infected individuals. Distal symmetrical sensory neuropathy is the most common form encountered today and is one of the few that are specific to HIV infection or its treatment. The wide variety of other neuropathies is akin to the neuropathies seen in the general population and should be managed accordingly. In the pre-ART era, neuropathies were categorized according to the CD4 count and HIV viral load. In the early stages of HIV infection when CD4 count is high, the inflammatory demyelinating neuropathies predominate and in the late stages with the decline of CD4 count opportunistic infection-related neuropathies prevail. That scenario has changed with the present almost universal use of ART (antiretroviral therapy). Hence, HIV-associated peripheral neuropathies are better classified according to their clinical presentations: distal symmetrical polyneuropathy, acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (AIDP) and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP), mononeuropathies, mononeuropathies multiplex and cranial neuropathies, autonomic neuropathy, lumbosacral polyradiculomyelopathy, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)-like motor neuropathy. Treated with ART, HIV-infected individuals are living longer and are at a higher risk of metabolic and age-related complications; moreover they are also prone to the potentially neurotoxic effects of ART. There are no epidemiological data regarding the incidence and prevalence of the peripheral neuropathies. In the pre-ART era, most data were from case reports, series of patients, and pooled autopsy data. At that time the histopathological evidence of neuropathies in autopsy series was almost 100%. In large prospective cohorts presently being evaluated, it has been found that 57% of HIV-infected individuals have distal symmetrical sensory neuropathy and 38% have neuropathic pain. It is now clear that

  19. Temperature sensitive auditory neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiujing; Lan, Lan; Shi, Wei; Yu, Lan; Xie, Lin-Yi; Xiong, Fen; Zhao, Cui; Li, Na; Yin, Zifang; Zong, Liang; Guan, Jing; Wang, Dayong; Sun, Wei; Wang, Qiuju

    2016-05-01

    Temperature sensitive auditory neuropathy is a very rare and puzzling disorder. In the present study, we reported three unrelated 2 to 6 year-old children who were diagnosed as auditory neuropathy patients who complained of severe hearing loss when they had fever. Their hearing thresholds varied from the morning to the afternoon. Two of these patients' hearing improved with age, and one patient received positive results from cochlear implant. Genetic analysis revealed that these three patients had otoferlin (OTOF) homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations with the genotypes c.2975_2978delAG/c.4819C>T, c.4819C>T/c.4819C>T, or c.2382_2383delC/c.1621G>A, respectively. Our study suggests that these gene mutations may be the cause of temperature sensitive auditory neuropathy. The long term follow up results suggest that the hearing loss in this type of auditory neuropathy may recover with age. PMID:26778470

  20. Permanent Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    The health risks and side effects of fluoroquinolone use include the risk of tendon rupture and myasthenia gravis exacerbation, and on August 15, 2013, the Food and Drug Administration updated its warning to include the risk of permanent peripheral neuropathy. We present a case of fluoroquinolone-induced peripheral neuropathy in a patient treated for clinically diagnosed urinary tract infection with ciprofloxacin antibiotic. PMID:26425618

  1. Proximal Sciatic Nerve Intraneural Ganglion Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Swartz, Karin R.; Wilson, Dianne; Boland, Michael; Fee, Dominic B.

    2009-01-01

    Intraneural ganglion cysts are nonneoplastic, mucinous cysts within the epineurium of peripheral nerves which usually involve the peroneal nerve at the knee. A 37-year-old female presented with progressive left buttock and posterior thigh pain. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a sciatic nerve mass at the sacral notch which was subsequently revealed to be an intraneural ganglion cyst. An intraneural ganglion cyst confined to the proximal sciatic nerve has only been reported once prior to 2009. PMID:20069041

  2. Traditional Chinese Medicine Tang-Luo-Ning Ameliorates Sciatic Nerve Injuries in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Da-Wei; Gao, Yan-Bin; Zhu, Zhi-Yao; Zhou, Hui; Zhang, Tao-Jing; Li, Bu-Man; Wang, Jin-Yang; Li, Min-Zhou; Ma, Ming-Fei; Zhang, Na

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is a common microvascular complication of diabetes associated with high disability rate and low quality of life. Tang-Luo-Ning (TLN) is an effective traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of DPN. To illustrate the underlying neural protection mechanisms of TLN, the effect of TLN on electrophysiology and sciatic nerve morphology was investigated in a model of streptozotocin-induced DPN, as well as the underlying mechanism. Sciatic motor nerve conduction velocity and digital sensory nerve conduction velocity were reduced in DPN and were significantly improved by TLN or α-lipoic acid at 10 and 20 weeks after streptozotocin injection. It was demonstrated that TLN intervention for 20 weeks significantly alleviated pathological injury as well as increased the phosphorylation of ErbB2, Erk, Bad (Ser112), and the mRNA expression of neuregulin 1 (Nrg1), GRB2-associated binding protein 1 (Gab1), and mammalian target of rapamycin (Mtor) in injured sciatic nerve. These novel therapeutic properties of TLN to promote Schwann cell survival may offer a promising alternative medicine for the patients to delay the progression of DPN. The underlying mechanism may be that TLN exerts neural protection effect after sciatic nerve injury through Nrg1/ErbB2→Erk/Bad Schwann cell survival signaling pathway. PMID:24288572

  3. [Ultrasonographic diagnosis of inflammatory neuropathies].

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Takamichi; Ochi, Kazuhide; Hosomi, Naohisa; Matsumoto, Masayasu

    2014-03-01

    Ultrasonographic nerve enlargement has primarily been reported in patients with inflammatory neuropathies such as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), multifocal motor neuropathy, Guillain-Barre syndrome, vasculitic neuropathy and leprosy. Nerve ultrasonography is a promising diagnostic supportive tool for inflammatory neuropathies. The ultrasonographic findings that are currently useful are 1) nerve enlargement primarily suggests the existence of inflammatory or demyelinating neuropathies and 2) for patients with CIDP or demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, the pattern of nerve enlargement is noted, and this pattern is useful for discriminating between these diseases. More precise evidence of ultrasonographic findings for inflammatory neuropathies should be established in the future. PMID:24607946

  4. Neuroprotective effects of folic acid on experimental diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Mustafa; Aktug, Huseyin; Oltulu, Fatih; Erbas, Oytun

    2016-05-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is widely considered as a degenerative complication of diabetic patients. The clinical effectiveness of folic acid (FA) on DPN is uncertain. The objective of the present study was to determine the effect of FA in DPN using electromyography (EMG), histopathological examination, immunohistochemistry, inclined plane test, and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels as a marker for lipid peroxidation in experimental diabetic rats. A total of 21 Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into 3 groups: control group, diabetes group, and FA-treated group. In EMG, compound muscle action potential (CMAP) amplitude in the sciatic nerve was lower in the diabetes group compared with the control group. CMAP amplitude in the sciatic nerve was higher in the FA-treated group when compared with the diabetes group. Distal latency and CMAP duration in the sciatic nerve were lower in the FA-treated group when compared with the diabetes group. In histopathological examination of the sciatic nerve, peripheral fibrosis was present in the diabetic group; the fibrosis was lower in the FA-treated group. In comparison with the diabetes group, the expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) was higher in the FA-treated group. The scores for the inclined plane test were lower in the diabetes group and higher in the FA-treated group than the control group. The MDA levels were significantly lower in the FA-treated group when compared with the diabetes group.The study suggests that FA can protect diabetic rats against DPN and that the underlying mechanism for this may be related to improvement of the expression of NGF and lower MDA levels. PMID:24311627

  5. Goshajinkigan reduces oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy without affecting anti-tumour efficacy in rodents.

    PubMed

    Ushio, Soichiro; Egashira, Nobuaki; Sada, Hikaru; Kawashiri, Takehiro; Shirahama, Masafumi; Masuguchi, Ken; Oishi, Ryozo

    2012-06-01

    Oxaliplatin is a key drug in the treatment of colorectal cancer, but it causes acute and chronic neuropathies in patients. Goshajinkigan (GJG) is a Kampo medicine that is used for the treatments of several neurological symptoms including pain and numbness. More recently, GJG has been reported to prevent the oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy in clinical studies. No experimental study, however, has been conducted to date to determine the effect of GJG on pain behaviour in a rat model of oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy. Moreover, the impact on the anti-tumour effect of oxaliplatin remains unknown. In the present study, we examined the effects of GJG on the peripheral neuropathy and anti-tumour activity of oxaliplatin in rodents. Repeated administration of oxaliplatin caused cold hyperalgesia from days 3 to 37 and mechanical allodynia from days 21 to 28. Repeated administration of GJG prevented the oxaliplatin-induced cold hyperalgesia but not mechanical allodynia and axonal degeneration in rat sciatic nerve. Single administration of GJG reduced both cold hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia after the development of neuropathy. In addition, GJG did not affect the anti-tumour effect of oxaliplatin in the tumour cells or tumour cells-implanted mice. These results suggest that GJG relieves the oxaliplatin-induced cold hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia without affecting anti-tumour activity of oxaliplatin, and, therefore, may be useful for the oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy in clinical practice. PMID:21907570

  6. Peripheral neuropathies during biologic therapies.

    PubMed

    Yagita, Masato; Hamano, Toshiaki; Hatachi, Saori; Fujita, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathies should be recognized as the adverse effects of biological agents, especially anti-TNF agents. However, no solid clinical databases for biological agent-associated peripheral neuropathies (BAPN) have been established in Japan. Here we report two cases of peripheral neuropathy associated with anti-TNF agents. One was peroneal motor neuropathy. The other case was chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy. In addition, we summarize the previous reports on BAPN and discuss their prevalence rate, pathogenesis and management. PMID:24313920

  7. Multifocal motor neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Muley, Suraj Ashok; Parry, Gareth J

    2012-09-01

    Multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) was first described in 1988 as a purely motor neuropathy affecting multiple motor nerves. The diagnosis was based entirely on demonstrating electrophysiological evidence of a conduction block (CB) that selectively affected motor axons, with sparing of sensory axons even through the site of motor CB. Subsequently, a similar disorder was reported but with absence of demonstrable CB on routine nerve conduction studies and there is still some debate as to whether MMN without CB is related to MMN. MMN is thought to be an inflammatory neuropathy related to an immune attack on motor nerves. The conventional hypothesis is that the primary pathology is segmental demyelination, but recent research raises the possibility of a primary axonopathy. Anti-GM1 antibodies can be found in some patients but it is unclear whether these antibodies are pathogenic. Intravenous immunoglobulin is the mainstay of treatment but other immunosuppressive treatments can also be effective. PMID:22743043

  8. Insulin influenced expression of myelin proteins in diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Rachana, Kuruvanthe S; Manu, Mallahalli S; Advirao, Gopal M

    2016-08-26

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is one of the downstream complications of diabetes. This complication is caused by the deficiency of insulin action and subsequent hyperglycemia, but the details of their pathogenesis remain unclear. Hence, it is of critical importance to understand how such hormonal variation affects the expression of myelin proteins such as myelin basic protein (MBP) and myelin associated glycoprotein (MAG) in the peripheral nerve. An earlier report from our lab has demonstrated the expression of insulin receptors (IR) in Schwann cells (SCs) of sciatic nerve. To assess the neurotrophic role of insulin in diabetic neuropathy, we studied the expression of these myelin proteins under control, DPN and insulin treated DPN subjects at developmental stages. Further, the expression of these myelin proteins was correlated with the expression of insulin receptor. Expression of myelin proteins was significantly reduced in the diabetic model compared to normal, and upregulated in insulin treated diabetic rats. Similarly, an in vitro study was also carried out in SCs grown at high glucose and insulin treated conditions. The expression pattern of myelin proteins in SCs was comparable to that of in vivo samples. In addition, quantitative study of myelin genes by real time PCR has also showed the significant expression pattern change in the insulin treated and non-treated DPN subjects. Taken together, these results corroborate the critical importance of insulin as a neurotrophic factor in demyelinized neurons in diabetic neuropathy. PMID:27373589

  9. Na+/H+ exchanger 1 inhibition reverses manifestation of peripheral diabetic neuropathy in type 1 diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Lupachyk, Sergey; Watcho, Pierre; Shevalye, Hanna; Vareniuk, Igor; Obrosov, Alexander; Obrosova, Irina G.

    2013-01-01

    Evidence for an important role for Na+/H+ exchangers in diabetic complications is emerging. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether Na+/H+ exchanger 1 inhibition reverses experimental peripheral diabetic neuropathy. Control and streptozotocin-diabetic rats were treated with the specific Na+/H+ exchanger 1 inhibitor cariporide for 4 wk after 12 wk without treatment. Neuropathy end points included sciatic motor and sensory nerve conduction velocities, endoneurial nutritive blood flow, vascular reactivity of epineurial arterioles, thermal nociception, tactile allodynia, and intraepidermal nerve fiber density. Advanced glycation end product and markers of oxidative stress, including nitrated protein levels in sciatic nerve, were evaluated by Western blot. Rats with 12-wk duration of diabetes developed motor and sensory nerve conduction deficits, thermal hypoalgesia, tactile allodynia, and intraepidermal nerve fiber loss. All these changes, including impairment of nerve blood flow and vascular reactivity of epineurial arterioles, were partially reversed by 4 wk of cariporide treatment. Na+/H+ exchanger 1 inhibition was also associated with reduction of diabetes-induced accumulation of advanced glycation endproduct, oxidative stress, and nitrated proteins in sciatic nerve. In conclusion, these findings support an important role for Na+/H+ exchanger 1 in functional, structural, and biochemical manifestations of peripheral diabetic neuropathy and provide the rationale for development of Na+/H+ exchanger 1 inhibitors for treatment of diabetic vascular and neural complications. PMID:23736542

  10. Na+/H+ exchanger 1 inhibition reverses manifestation of peripheral diabetic neuropathy in type 1 diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Lupachyk, Sergey; Watcho, Pierre; Shevalye, Hanna; Vareniuk, Igor; Obrosov, Alexander; Obrosova, Irina G; Yorek, Mark A

    2013-08-01

    Evidence for an important role for Na(+)/H(+) exchangers in diabetic complications is emerging. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 1 inhibition reverses experimental peripheral diabetic neuropathy. Control and streptozotocin-diabetic rats were treated with the specific Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 1 inhibitor cariporide for 4 wk after 12 wk without treatment. Neuropathy end points included sciatic motor and sensory nerve conduction velocities, endoneurial nutritive blood flow, vascular reactivity of epineurial arterioles, thermal nociception, tactile allodynia, and intraepidermal nerve fiber density. Advanced glycation end product and markers of oxidative stress, including nitrated protein levels in sciatic nerve, were evaluated by Western blot. Rats with 12-wk duration of diabetes developed motor and sensory nerve conduction deficits, thermal hypoalgesia, tactile allodynia, and intraepidermal nerve fiber loss. All these changes, including impairment of nerve blood flow and vascular reactivity of epineurial arterioles, were partially reversed by 4 wk of cariporide treatment. Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 1 inhibition was also associated with reduction of diabetes-induced accumulation of advanced glycation endproduct, oxidative stress, and nitrated proteins in sciatic nerve. In conclusion, these findings support an important role for Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 1 in functional, structural, and biochemical manifestations of peripheral diabetic neuropathy and provide the rationale for development of Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 1 inhibitors for treatment of diabetic vascular and neural complications. PMID:23736542

  11. Non-invasive assessment of sciatic nerve stiffness during human ankle motion using ultrasound shear wave elastography.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Ricardo J; Nordez, Antoine; Hug, François; Ates, Filiz; Coppieters, Michel W; Pezarat-Correia, Pedro; Freitas, Sandro R

    2016-02-01

    Peripheral nerves are exposed to mechanical stress during movement. However the in vivo mechanical properties of nerves remain largely unexplored. The primary aim of this study was to characterize the effect of passive dorsiflexion on sciatic nerve shear wave velocity (an index of stiffness) when the knee was in 90° flexion (knee 90°) or extended (knee 180°). The secondary aim was to determine the effect of five repeated dorsiflexions on the nerve shear wave velocity. Nine healthy participants were tested. The repeatability of sciatic nerve shear wave velocity was good for both knee 90° and knee 180° (ICCs≥0.92, CVs≤8.1%). The shear wave velocity of the sciatic nerve significantly increased (p<0.0001) during dorsiflexion when the knee was extended (knee 180°), but no changes were observed when the knee was flexed (90°). The shear wave velocity-angle relationship displayed a hysteresis for knee 180°. Although there was a tendency for the nerve shear wave velocity to decrease throughout the repetition of the five ankle dorsiflexions, the level of significance was not reached (p=0.055). These results demonstrate that the sciatic nerve stiffness can be non-invasively assessed during passive movements. In addition, the results highlight the importance of considering both the knee and the ankle position for clinical and biomechanical assessment of the sciatic nerve. This non-invasive technique offers new perspectives to provide new insights into nerve mechanics in both healthy and clinical populations (e.g., specific peripheral neuropathies). PMID:26725218

  12. Comparative study of peripheral neuropathy and nerve regeneration in NOD and ICR diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Homs, Judit; Ariza, Lorena; Pagès, Gemma; Verdú, Enrique; Casals, Laura; Udina, Esther; Chillón, Miguel; Bosch, Assumpció; Navarro, Xavier

    2011-09-01

    The non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse was suggested as an adequate model for diabetic autonomic neuropathy. We evaluated sensory-motor neuropathy and nerve regeneration following sciatic nerve crush in NOD males rendered diabetic by multiple low doses of streptozotocin, in comparison with similarly treated Institute for Cancer Research (ICR) mice, a widely used model for type I diabetes. Neurophysiological values for both strains showed a decline in motor and sensory nerve conduction velocity at 7 and 8 weeks after induction of diabetes in the intact hindlimb. However, amplitudes of compound muscle and sensory action potentials (CMAPs and CNAPs) were significantly reduced in NOD but not in ICR diabetic mice. Morphometrical analysis showed myelinated fiber loss in highly hyperglycemic NOD mice, but no significant changes in fiber size. There was a reduction of intraepidermal nerve fibers, more pronounced in NOD than in ICR diabetic mice. Interestingly, aldose reductase and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activities were increased already at 1 week of hyperglycemia, persisting until the end of the experiment in both strains. Muscle and nerve reinnervation was delayed in diabetic mice following sciatic nerve crush, being more marked in NOD mice. Thus, diabetes of mid-duration induces more severe peripheral neuropathy and slower nerve regeneration in NOD than in ICR mice. PMID:22003936

  13. Oxaliplatin-induced hyperexcitation of rat sciatic nerve fibers: an intra-axonal study.

    PubMed

    Kagiava, Alexia; Kosmidis, Efstratios K; Theophilidis, George

    2013-02-01

    Oxaliplatin is an agent that is used extensively in gastrointestinal cancer chemotherapy. The agent's major dose-limiting toxicity is peripheral neuropathy that can manifest as a chronic or an acute syndrome. Oxaliplatin-induced acute neuropathy is purportedly caused by an alteration of the biophysical properties of voltage-gated sodium channels. However, sodium channel blockers have not been successful at preventing acute neuropathy in the clinical setting. We report intra-axonal recordings from the isolated rat sciatic nerve preparation under the effect of oxaliplatin. The depolarization phase of single action potentials remains intact with a duration of 0.52 ± 0.02 ms (n=68) before and 0.55 ± 0.01 ms (n=68) after 1-5 h of exposure to 150 μM oxaliplatin (unpaired t-test, P > 0.05) whereas there is a significant broadening of the repolarization phase (2.16 ± 0.10 ms, n=68, before and 5.90 ± 0.32 ms after, n=68, unpaired t-test, P < 0.05). Apart from changes in spike shape, oxaliplatin also had drastic concentration- and time-dependent effects on the firing responses of fibers to short stimuli. In the intra-axonal recordings, three groups of firing patterns were indentified. The first group shows bursting (internal frequency 90 - 130 Hz, n=88), the second shows a characteristic plateau (at -19.27�2.84 mV, n=31, with durations ranging from 45 - 140 ms depending on the exposure time), and the third combines a plateau and a bursting period. Our results implicate the voltage-gated potassium channels as additional oxaliplatin targets, opening up new perspectives for the pharmacological prevention of peripheral neuropathy. PMID:22721389

  14. Diabetic Neuropathy: Mechanisms to Management

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, James L.; Vincent, Andrea; Cheng, Thomas; Feldman, Eva L.

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathy is the most common and debilitating complication of diabetes and results in pain, decreased motility, and amputation. Diabetic neuropathy encompasses a variety of forms whose impact ranges from discomfort to death. Hyperglycemia induces oxidative stress in diabetic neurons and results in activation of multiple biochemical pathways. These activated pathways are a major source of damage and are potential therapeutic targets in diabetic neuropathy. Though therapies are available to alleviate the symptoms of diabetic neuropathy, few options are available to eliminate the root causes. The immense physical, psychological, and economic cost of diabetic neuropathy underscores the need for causally targeted therapies. This review covers the pathology, epidemiology, biochemical pathways, and prevention of diabetic neuropathy, as well as discusses current symptomatic and causal therapies and novel approaches to identify therapeutic targets. PMID:18616962

  15. Dysthyroid optic neuropathy (DON).

    PubMed

    Ebner, Roberto

    2002-03-01

    Dysthyroid Optic Neuropathy (DON) affects a small percentage of patients with Graves disease, but, when it occurs, it can cause significant and permanent loss of vision. DON is treatable if recognized early. Systemic steroids can be effective, but may cause side affects. Orbital injection of steroids may play a role in selected patients. Orbital radiation has a more permanent effect and has gained wide acceptance as a relatively non-invasive method of reversing DON. Surgery to decompress crowded orbits has been used for years and continues to be a viable approach for those patients with optic neuropathy, especially when there is significant proptosis. Optic nerve decompression can also be achieved through a transethmoidal approach. PMID:15513451

  16. Genetics Home Reference: Leber hereditary optic neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions Leber hereditary optic neuropathy Leber hereditary optic neuropathy Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... Open All Close All Description Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is an inherited form of vision loss. ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: ataxia neuropathy spectrum

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions ataxia neuropathy spectrum ataxia neuropathy spectrum Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Ataxia neuropathy spectrum is part of a group of conditions ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: small fiber neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions small fiber neuropathy small fiber neuropathy Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Small fiber neuropathy is a condition characterized by severe pain attacks ...

  19. Infectious optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Golnik, Karl C

    2002-03-01

    A wide variety of infectious agents are known to cause optic neuropathy. This article will consider the bacteria, spirochetes, fungi, and viruses that most commonly affect the optic nerve. Clinical presentation is variable, but some pathogens often produce a characteristic funduscopic pattern. Diagnosis is usually made on the basis of clinical suspicion and serologic testing. Polymerase chain reaction is also increasingly utilized. Most infectious agents can be effectively treated but visual recovery is highly variable. PMID:15513450

  20. Autoimmune peripheral neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Bourque, Pierre R; Chardon, Jodi Warman; Massie, Rami

    2015-09-20

    Peripheral nervous system axons and myelin have unique potential protein, proteolipid, and ganglioside antigenic determinants. Despite the existence of a blood-nerve barrier, both humoral and cellular immunity can be directed against peripheral axons and myelin. Molecular mimicry may be triggered at the systemic level, as was best demonstrated in the case of bacterial oligosaccharides. The classification of immune neuropathy has been expanded to take into account specific syndromes that share unique clinical, electrophysiological, prognostic and serological features. Guillain-Barré syndrome encompasses a classical syndrome of acute demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy and many variants: axonal motor and sensory, axonal motor, Miller-Fisher, autonomic, and sensory. Similarly, chronic immune neuropathy is composed of classic chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy and variants characterized as multifocal (motor or sensorimotor), sensory, distal symmetric, and syndromes associated with monoclonal gammopathy. Among putative biomarkers, myelin associated glycoprotein and several anti-ganglioside autoantibodies have shown statistically significant associations with specific neuropathic syndromes. Currently, the strongest biomarker associations are those linking Miller-Fisher syndrome with anti-GQ1b, multifocal motor neuropathy with anti-GM1, and distal acquired symmetric neuropathy with anti-MAG antibodies. Many other autoantibody associations have been proposed, but presently lack sufficient specificity and sensitivity to qualify as biomarkers. This field of research has contributed to the antigenic characterization of motor and sensory functional systems, as well as helping to define immune neuropathic syndromes with widely different clinical presentation, prognosis and response to therapy. Serologic biomarkers are likely to become even more relevant with the advent of new targeted forms of immunotherapy, such as monoclonal antibodies. PMID:25748038

  1. Neuroprotective effects of Gymnema sylvestre on streptozotocin-induced diabetic neuropathy in rats

    PubMed Central

    FATANI, AMAL JAMIL; AL-REJAIE, SALIM SALIH; ABUOHASHISH, HATEM MUSTAFA; AL-ASSAF, ABDULLAH; PARMAR, MIHIR YOGESHKUMAR; OLA, MOHAMMAD SHAMSUL; AHMED, MOHAMMED MAHBOOBUDDIN

    2015-01-01

    The application of traditional medicine for diabetes and associated complications, such as diabetic neuropathy (DN), has received increasing attention. The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential ameliorative effect of Gymnema sylvestre (Gs) in a rat model of DN. Diabetes was induced via a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ; 60 mg/kg). Treatment with Gs extract (50 or 100 mg/kg/day) began two weeks following the administration of STZ and was continued for five weeks. Pain threshold behavior tests were performed subsequent to the five-week Gs treatment period. In addition, the serum levels of glucose, insulin and proinflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6, were determined. Furthermore, the sciatic tissue levels of nitric oxide, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and reduced glutathione were determined, as well as the activity levels of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase. Levels of insulin-like growth factor (IGF), nerve growth factor (NGF), TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 were also assessed in the sciatic tissue. In addition, the sciatic nerve tissue samples were analyzed for histopathological alterations. The diabetic rats exhibited apparent reductions in the paw-withdrawal (31%; P<0.01) and tail-flick latencies (38%; P<0.05). Furthermore, the diabetic rats demonstrated an evident elevation in serum and sciatic levels of proinflammatory cytokines. Measured oxidative stress biomarkers were significantly altered in the sciatic nerve tissue of the diabetic rats. Treatment with Gs attenuated diabetes-induced modifications with regard to the levels of serum glucose, insulin and proinflammatory cytokines. In the sciatic nerve tissue, the diabetes-induced alterations in IL levels and oxidative stress biomarkers were significantly improved in the Gs-treated rats. Furthermore, the reduction in the sciatic tissue expression levels of IGF

  2. Diabetic autonomic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Clarke, B F; Ewing, D J; Campbell, I W

    1979-10-01

    This review attempts to outline the present understanding of diabetic autonomic neuropathy. The clinical features have been increasinly recognised but knowledge of the localization and morphology of the lesions and their pathogenesis remains fragmentary. A metabolic causation as postulated in somatic nerves accords best with clinical observations. Most bodily systems, particularly the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal and urogenital, are involved with added disturbances of thermoregulatory function and pupillary reflexes. Possible effects on neuroendocrine and peptidergic secretion and respiratory control await definition. Current interest centres around the development of a new generation of tests of autonomic nerve function that are simple, non-invasive, reproducible and allow precision in diagnosis and accurate quantitation. Most are based on cardiovascular reflexes and abnormality in them is assumed to reflect autonomic damage elsewhere. Probably no single test suffices and a battery of tests reflecting both parasympathetic and sympathetic function is preferable. Little is known of the natural history. The prevalence may be greater than previously suspected and although symptoms are mild in the majority, a few develop florid features. The relation of control and duration of diabetes to the onset and progression of autonomic neuropathy is not clearly established. Once tests of autonomic function become abnormal they usually remain abnormal. Symptomatic autonomic neuropathy carries a greatly increased mortality rate possibly due to indirect mechanisms such as renal failure and direct mechanisms such as cardio-resiratory arrest. Improved treatment of some of the more disabling symptoms has been possible in recent years. PMID:387501

  3. [Radiation-induced neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Kolak, Agnieszka; Starosławska, Elzbieta; Kieszko, Dariusz; Cisek, Paweł; Patyra, Krzysztof Ireneusz; Surdyka, Dariusz; Dobrzyńska-Rutkowska, Aneta; Łopacka-Szatan, Karolina; Burdan, Franciszek

    2013-12-01

    Radiation-induced neuropathy is commonly observed among oncological patients. Radiation can affect the nervous tissue directly or indirectly by inducing vasculopathy or dysfunction of internal organs. Symptoms may be mild and reversible (e.g., pain, nausea, vomiting, fever, drowsiness, fatigue, paresthesia) or life-threatening (cerebral oedema, increased intracranial pressure, seizures). Such complications are clinically divided into peripheral (plexopathies, neuropathies of spinal and cranial nerves) and central neuropathy (myelopathy, encephalopathy, cognitive impairment). The degree of neuronal damages primarily depends on the total and fractional radiation dose and applied therapeutic methods. The conformal and megavoltage radiotherapy seems to be the safeties ones. Diagnostic protocol includes physical examination, imaging (in particular magnetic resonance), electromyography, nerve conduction study and sometimes histological examination. Prevention and early detection of neurological complications are necessary in order to prevent a permanent dysfunction of the nervous system. Presently their treatment is mostly symptomatic, but in same cases a surgical intervention is required. An experimental and clinical data indicates some effectiveness of different neuroprotective agents (e.g. anticoagulants, vitamin E, hyperbaric oxygen, pentoxifylline, bevacizumab, methylphenidate, donepezil), which should be administered before and/or during radiotherapy. PMID:24490474

  4. Sciatica due to Schwannoma at the Sciatic Notch.

    PubMed

    Haspolat, Yavuz; Ozkan, Feyza Unlu; Turkmen, Ismail; Kemah, Bahattin; Turhan, Yalcin; Sarar, Serhan; Ozkan, Korhan

    2013-01-01

    Schwannomas are rarely seen on the sciatic nerve and can cause sciatica. In this case report we aimed to present an unusual location of schwannoma along sciatic nerve that causes sciatica. A 60-years-old-man was admitted to us with complaints of pain on his thigh and paresthesia on his foot. Radiography of the patient revealed a solitary lesion on the sciatic nerve. The lesion was excised and the symptoms resolved after surgery. PMID:23762699

  5. Painful Peripheral Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Marchettini, P; Lacerenza, M; Mauri, E; Marangoni, C

    2006-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathies are a heterogeneous group of diseases affecting peripheral nerves. The causes are multiple: hereditary, metabolic, infectious, inflammatory, toxic, traumatic. The temporal profile includes acute, subacute and chronic conditions. The majority of peripheral neuropathies cause mainly muscle weakness and sensory loss, positive sensory symptoms and sometimes pain. When pain is present, however, it is usually extremely intense and among the most disabling symptoms for the patients. In addition, the neurological origin of the pain is often missed and patients receive inadequate or delayed specific treatment. Independently of the disease causing the peripheral nerve injury, pain originating from axonal pathology or ganglionopathy privileges neuropathies affecting smaller fibres, a clinical observation that points towards abnormal activity within nociceptive afferents as a main generator of pain. Natural activation of blood vessels or perineurial nociceptive network by pathology also causes intense pain. Pain of this kind, i.e. nerve trunk pain, is among the heralding symptoms of inflammatory or ischemic mononeuropathy and for its intensity represents itself a medical emergency. Neuropathic pain quality rekindles the psychophysical experience of peripheral nerves intraneural microstimulation i.e. a combination of large and small fibres sensation temporally distorted compared to physiological perception evoked by natural stimuli. Pins and needles, burning, cramping mixed with numbness, and tingling are the wording most used by patients. Nociceptive pain instead is most often described as aching, deep and dull. Good command of peripheral nerve anatomy and pathophysiology allows timely recognition of the different pain components and targeted treatment, selected according to intensity, type and temporal profile of the pain. PMID:18615140

  6. Subacute diabetic proximal neuropathy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pascoe, M. K.; Low, P. A.; Windebank, A. J.; Litchy, W. J.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical, electrophysiologic, autonomic, and neuropathologic characteristics and the natural history of subacute diabetic proximal neuropathy and its response to immunotherapy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: For the 12-year period from 1983 to 1995, we conducted a retrospective review of medical records of Mayo Clinic patients with diabetes who had subacute onset and progression of proximal weakness. The responses of treated versus untreated patients were compared statistically. RESULTS: During the designated study period, 44 patients with subacute diabetic proximal neuropathy were encountered. Most patients were middle-aged or elderly, and no sex preponderance was noted. The proximal muscle weakness often was associated with reduced or absent lower extremity reflexes. Associated weight loss was a common finding. Frequently, patients had some evidence of demyelination on nerve conduction studies, but it invariably was accompanied by concomitant axonal degeneration. The cerebrospinal fluid protein concentration was usually increased. Diffuse and substantial autonomic failure was generally present. In most cases, a sural nerve biopsy specimen suggested demyelination, although evidence of an inflammatory infiltrate was less common. Of 12 patients who received treatment (with prednisone, intravenous immune globulin, or plasma exchange), 9 had improvement of their conditions, but 17 of 29 untreated patients (59%) with follow-up also eventually had improvement, albeit at a much slower rate. Improvement was usually incomplete. CONCLUSION: We suggest that the entity of subacute diabetic proximal neuropathy is an extensive and severe variant of bilateral lumbosacral radiculoplexopathy, with some features suggestive of an immune-mediated cause. It differs from chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy in that most cases have a more restricted distribution and seem to be monophasic and self-limiting. The efficacy of immunotherapy is unproved

  7. A prospective study of acute idiopathic neuropathy. III. Immunological studies.

    PubMed Central

    Winer, J B; Gray, I A; Gregson, N A; Hughes, R A; Leibowitz, S; Shepherd, P; Taylor, W A; Yewdall, V

    1988-01-01

    The immune responses of 100 patients who presented with an acute idiopathic neuropathy were compared with those of age and sex matched controls. Blood lymphocytes and their subsets were counted with a fluorescent activated cell sorter. CD8+ (putative suppressor) lymphocytes were significantly reduced in the first week of the disease but total lymphocytes, total T and CD4+ (putative helper) cells were not altered. This reduction depended on the nature of the preceding infection. Serum complement C3 and C4 concentrations remained normal and immune complexes were rarely detected with a C1q binding assay. Complement-fixing antibodies to human peripheral nerve antigens were discovered in the serum of 7% of patients but only 1% of controls. Complement-fixing antibodies to galactocerebroside were not discovered in any sera. Enzyme-linked immunoassays detected increased antibody responses to galactocerebroside but none at all to human P2 myelin protein in the patient sera. Forty microliter of serum from five patients injected into the sciatic nerves of rats did not induce significantly more demyelination than the serum from control patients. It is concluded that auto-immune responses can only be detected by these techniques in a small minority of patients with acute idiopathic neuropathy. PMID:2969956

  8. Animal Models of Diabetic Neuropathy: Progress Since 1960s

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Md. Shahidul

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic or peripheral diabetic neuropathy (PDN) is one of the major complications among some other diabetic complications such as diabetic nephropathy, diabetic retinopathy, and diabetic cardiomyopathy. The use of animal models in the research of diabetes and diabetic complications is very common when rats and mice are most commonly used for many reasons. A numbers of animal models of diabetic and PDN have been developed in the last several decades such as streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat models, conventional or genetically modified or high-fat diet-fed C57BL/Ks (db/db) mice models, streptozotocin-induced C57BL6/J and ddY mice models, Chinese hamster neuropathic model, rhesus monkey PDN model, spontaneously diabetic WBN/Kob rat model, L-fucose-induced neropathic rat model, partial sciatic nerve ligated rat model, nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice model, spontaneously induced Ins2 Akita mice model, leptin-deficient (ob/ob) mice model, Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rat model, surgically-induced neuropathic model, and genetically modified Spontaneously Diabetic Torii (SDT) rat model, none of which are without limitations. An animal model of diabetic or PDN should mimic the all major pathogeneses of human diabetic neuropathy. Hence, this review comparatively evaluates the animal models of diabetic and PDN which are developed since 1960s with their advantages and disadvantages to help diabetic research groups in order to more accurately choose an appropriate model to meet their specific research objectives. PMID:23984428

  9. Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    McCarty, Niamh

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy often goes unrecognized. We present a case of a 22-year-old man with multiple manifestations of this disease, including weakness, dizziness, fatigue, tachycardia, abnormal QTc, and orthostasis, which occurred 2 years after his type 1 diabetes diagnosis. He exhibited parasympathetic denervation with resting tachycardia and exercise intolerance but also had evidence of orthostatic hypotension, which suggests sympathetic denervation. He did not have complete cardiovascular autonomic reflex testing, which would have been helpful, but improved with aggressive diabetes treatment and the increase of beta-blockade. It is important to identify these patients to understand their signs and symptoms and consider appropriate therapies. PMID:27034552

  10. Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Niamh; Silverman, Barry

    2016-04-01

    Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy often goes unrecognized. We present a case of a 22-year-old man with multiple manifestations of this disease, including weakness, dizziness, fatigue, tachycardia, abnormal QTc, and orthostasis, which occurred 2 years after his type 1 diabetes diagnosis. He exhibited parasympathetic denervation with resting tachycardia and exercise intolerance but also had evidence of orthostatic hypotension, which suggests sympathetic denervation. He did not have complete cardiovascular autonomic reflex testing, which would have been helpful, but improved with aggressive diabetes treatment and the increase of beta-blockade. It is important to identify these patients to understand their signs and symptoms and consider appropriate therapies. PMID:27034552

  11. Effects of adenosine and adenosine A2A receptor agonist on motor nerve conduction velocity and nerve blood flow in experimental diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sokindra; Arun, K H S; Kaul, Chaman L; Sharma, Shyam S

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the effects of chronic administration of adenosine and CGS 21680 hydrochloride (adenosine A(2A) receptor agonist) on motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV), nerve blood flow (NBF) and histology of sciatic nerve in animal model of diabetic neuropathy. Adenosinergic agents were administered for 2 weeks after 6 weeks of streptozotocin-induced (50 mg/kg i.p.) diabetes in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Significant reduction in sciatic MNCV and NBF were observed after 8 weeks in diabetic animals in comparison with control (non diabetic) rats. Adenosine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly improved sciatic MNCV and NBF in diabetic rats. The protective effect of adenosine on MNCV and NBF was completely reversed by theophylline (50 mg/kg, i.p.), a non-selective adenosine receptor antagonist, suggesting that the adenosine effect was mediated via adenosinergic receptors. CGS 21680 (0.1 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly improved NBF; however, MNCV was not significantly improved in diabetic rats. At a dose of 1 mg/kg, neither MNCV nor NBF was improved by CGS 21680 in diabetic rats. ZM 241385 (adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonist) prevented the effect of CGS 21680 (0.1 mg/kg, i.p.). Histological changes observed in sciatic nerve were partially improved by the adenosinergic agents in diabetic rats. Results of the present study, suggest the potential of adenosinergic agents in the therapy of diabetic neuropathy. PMID:15829161

  12. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 is downregulated in sciatic nerve by streptozotocin induced diabetes and/or treatment with minocycline: Implications for nerve regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Sumia; Driscoll, Heather E.; Newton, Victoria L.; Gardiner, Natalie J.

    2014-01-01

    Minocycline is an inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and has been shown to have analgesic effects. Whilst increased expression of MMPs is associated with neuropathic pain, MMPs also play crucial roles in Wallerian degeneration and nerve regeneration. In this study we examined the expression of MMP-2, MMP-9 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1/-2 in the sciatic nerve of control and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats treated with either vehicle or minocycline by quantitative PCR and gelatin zymography. We assessed the effects of minocycline on nerve conduction velocity and intraepidermal nerve fibre (IENF) deficits in diabetic neuropathy and investigated the effects of minocycline or MMP-2 on neurite outgrowth from primary cultures of dissociated adult rat sensory neurons. We show that MMP-2 is expressed constitutively in the sciatic nerve in vivo and treatment with minocycline or diabetes leads to downregulation of MMP-2 expression and activity. The functional consequence of this is IENF deficits in minocycline-treated nondiabetic rats and an unsupportive microenvironment for regeneration in diabetes. Minocycline reduces levels of MMP-2 mRNA and nerve growth factor-induced neurite outgrowth. Furthermore, in vivo minocycline treatment reduces preconditioning-induced in vitro neurite outgrowth following a sciatic nerve crush. In contrast, the addition of active MMP-2 facilitates neurite outgrowth in the absence of neurotrophic support and pre-treatment of diabetic sciatic nerve substrata with active MMP-2 promotes a permissive environment for neurite outgrowth. In conclusion we suggest that MMP-2 downregulation may contribute to the regenerative deficits in diabetes. Minocycline treatment also downregulates MMP-2 activity and is associated with inhibitory effects on sensory neurons. Thus, caution should be exhibited with its use as the balance between beneficial and detrimental outcomes may be critical in assessing the benefits of using

  13. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 is downregulated in sciatic nerve by streptozotocin induced diabetes and/or treatment with minocycline: Implications for nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ali, Sumia; Driscoll, Heather E; Newton, Victoria L; Gardiner, Natalie J

    2014-11-01

    Minocycline is an inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and has been shown to have analgesic effects. Whilst increased expression of MMPs is associated with neuropathic pain, MMPs also play crucial roles in Wallerian degeneration and nerve regeneration. In this study we examined the expression of MMP-2, MMP-9 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1/-2 in the sciatic nerve of control and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats treated with either vehicle or minocycline by quantitative PCR and gelatin zymography. We assessed the effects of minocycline on nerve conduction velocity and intraepidermal nerve fibre (IENF) deficits in diabetic neuropathy and investigated the effects of minocycline or MMP-2 on neurite outgrowth from primary cultures of dissociated adult rat sensory neurons. We show that MMP-2 is expressed constitutively in the sciatic nerve in vivo and treatment with minocycline or diabetes leads to downregulation of MMP-2 expression and activity. The functional consequence of this is IENF deficits in minocycline-treated nondiabetic rats and an unsupportive microenvironment for regeneration in diabetes. Minocycline reduces levels of MMP-2 mRNA and nerve growth factor-induced neurite outgrowth. Furthermore, in vivo minocycline treatment reduces preconditioning-induced in vitro neurite outgrowth following a sciatic nerve crush. In contrast, the addition of active MMP-2 facilitates neurite outgrowth in the absence of neurotrophic support and pre-treatment of diabetic sciatic nerve substrata with active MMP-2 promotes a permissive environment for neurite outgrowth. In conclusion we suggest that MMP-2 downregulation may contribute to the regenerative deficits in diabetes. Minocycline treatment also downregulates MMP-2 activity and is associated with inhibitory effects on sensory neurons. Thus, caution should be exhibited with its use as the balance between beneficial and detrimental outcomes may be critical in assessing the benefits of using

  14. Metabolic neuropathies and myopathies.

    PubMed

    D'Amico, Adele; Bertini, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Inborn errors of metabolism may impact on muscle and peripheral nerve. Abnormalities involve mitochondria and other subcellular organelles such as peroxisomes and lysosomes related to the turnover and recycling of cellular compartments. Treatable causes are β-oxidation defects producing progressive neuropathy; pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency, porphyria, or vitamin B12 deficiency causing recurrent episodes of neuropathy or acute motor deficit mimicking Guillain-Barré syndrome. On the other hand, lysosomal (mucopolysaccharidosis, Gaucher and Fabry diseases), mitochondriopathic (mitochondrial or nuclear mutations or mDNA depletion), peroxisomal (adrenomyeloneuropathy, Refsum disease, sterol carrier protein-2 deficiency, cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis, α-methylacyl racemase deficiency) diseases are multisystemic disorders involving also the heart, liver, brain, retina, and kidney. Pathophysiology of most metabolic myopathies is related to the impairment of energy production or to abnormal production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Main symptoms are exercise intolerance with myalgias, cramps and recurrent myoglobinuria or limb weakness associated with elevation of serum creatine kinase. Carnitine palmitoyl transferase deficiency, followed by acid maltase deficiency, and lipin deficiency, are the most common cause of isolated rhabdomyolysis. Metabolic myopathies are frequently associated to extra-neuromuscular disorders particularly involving the heart, liver, brain, retina, skin, and kidney. PMID:23622366

  15. Diabetic corneal neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, R O; Peters, M A; Sobocinski, K; Nassif, K; Schultz, K J

    1983-01-01

    Corneal epithelial lesions can be found in approximately one-half of asymptomatic patients with diabetes mellitus. These lesions are transient and clinically resemble the keratopathy seen in staphylococcal keratoconjunctivitis. Staphylococcal organisms, however, can be isolated in equal percentages from diabetic patients without keratopathy. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy was found to be related to the presence of diabetic keratopathy after adjusting for age with analysis of covariance. The strongest predictor of both keratopathy and corneal fluorescein staining was vibration perception threshold in the toes (P less than 0.01); and the severity of keratopathy was directly related to the degree of diminution of peripheral sensation. Other predictors of keratopathy were: reduced tear breakup time (P less than 0.03), type of diabetes (P less than 0.01), and metabolic status as indicated by c-peptide fasting (P less than 0.01). No significant relationships were found between the presence of keratopathy and tear glucose levels, endothelial cell densities, corneal thickness measurements, the presence of S epidermidis, or with duration of disease. It is our conclusion that asymptomatic epithelial lesions in the nontraumatized diabetic cornea can occur as a manifestation of generalized polyneuropathy and probably represent a specific form of corneal neuropathy. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 PMID:6676964

  16. Nerve Wrapping of the Sciatic Nerve With Acellular Dermal Matrix in Chronic Complete Proximal Hamstring Ruptures and Ischial Apophyseal Avulsion Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Haus, Brian M.; Arora, Danny; Upton, Joseph; Micheli, Lyle J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with chronic injuries of the proximal hamstring can develop significant impairment because of weakness of the hamstring muscles, sciatic nerve compression from scar formation, or myositis ossificans. Purpose: To describe the surgical outcomes of patients with chronic injury of the proximal hamstrings who were treated with hamstring repair and sciatic neurolysis supplemented with nerve wrapping with acellular dermal matrix. Study Design: Retrospective case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: Fifteen consecutive patients with a diagnosis of chronic complete proximal hamstring rupture or chronic ischial tuberosity apophyseal avulsion fracture (mean age, 39.67 years; range, 14-69 years) were treated with proximal hamstring repair and sciatic neurolysis supplemented with nerve wrapping with acellular dermal matrix. Nine patients had preoperative sciatica, and 6 did not. Retrospective chart review recorded clinical outcomes measured by the degree of pain relief, the rate of return to activities, and associated postoperative complications. Results: All 15 patients were followed in the postoperative period for an average of 16.6 months. Postoperatively, there were 4 cases of transient sciatic nerve neurapraxia. Four patients (26%) required postoperative betamethasone sodium phosphate (Celestone Soluspan) injectable suspension USP 6 mg/mL. Among the 9 patients with preoperative sciatica, 6 (66%) had a good or excellent outcome and were able to return to their respective activities/sports; 3 (33%) had persistent chronic pain. One of these had persistent sciatic neuropathy that required 2 surgical reexplorations and scar excision after development of recurrent extraneural scar formation. Among the 6 without preoperative sciatica, 100% had a good or excellent outcomes and 83% returned to their respective activities/sports. Better outcomes were observed in younger patients, as the 3 cases of persistent chronic sciatic pain were in patients older than 45

  17. Exacerbation of Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2E neuropathy following traumatic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Villalón, Eric; Dale, Jeffrey M; Jones, Maria; Shen, Hailian; Garcia, Michael L

    2015-11-19

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. CMT disease signs include distal limb neuropathy, abnormal gait, sensory defects, and deafness. We generated a novel line of CMT2E mice expressing hNF-L(E397K), which displayed muscle atrophy of the lower limbs without denervation, proximal reduction in large caliber axons, and decreased nerve conduction velocity. In this study, we challenged wild type, hNF-L and hNF-L(E397K) mice with crush injury to the sciatic nerve. We analyzed functional recovery by measuring toe spread and analyzed gait using the Catwalk system. hNF-L(E397K) mice demonstrated reduced recovery from nerve injury consistent with increased susceptibility to neuropathy observed in CMT patients. In addition, hNF-L(E397K) developed a permanent reduction in their ability to weight bear, increased mechanical allodynia, and premature gait shift in the injured limb, which led to increasingly disrupted interlimb coordination in hNF-L(E397K). Exacerbation of neuropathy after injury and identification of gait alterations in combination with previously described pathology suggests that hNF-L(E397K) mice recapitulate many of clinical signs associated with CMT2. Therefore, hNF-L(E397K) mice provide a model for determining the efficacy of novel therapies. PMID:26423936

  18. Diagnostic approach to peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Usha Kant; Kalita, Jayantee; Nair, Pradeep P.

    2008-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy refers to disorders of the peripheral nervous system. They have numerous causes and diverse presentations; hence, a systematic and logical approach is needed for cost-effective diagnosis, especially of treatable neuropathies. A detailed history of symptoms, family and occupational history should be obtained. General and systemic examinations provide valuable clues. Neurological examinations investigating sensory, motor and autonomic signs help to define the topography and nature of neuropathy. Large fiber neuropathy manifests with the loss of joint position and vibration sense and sensory ataxia, whereas small fiber neuropathy manifests with the impairment of pain, temperature and autonomic functions. Electrodiagnostic (EDx) tests include sensory, motor nerve conduction, F response, H reflex and needle electromyography (EMG). EDx helps in documenting the extent of sensory motor deficits, categorizing demyelinating (prolonged terminal latency, slowing of nerve conduction velocity, dispersion and conduction block) and axonal (marginal slowing of nerve conduction and small compound muscle or sensory action potential and dennervation on EMG). Uniform demyelinating features are suggestive of hereditary demyelination, whereas difference between nerves and segments of the same nerve favor acquired demyelination. Finally, neuropathy is classified into mononeuropathy commonly due to entrapment or trauma; mononeuropathy multiplex commonly due to leprosy and vasculitis; and polyneuropathy due to systemic, metabolic or toxic etiology. Laboratory investigations are carried out as indicated and specialized tests such as biochemical, immunological, genetic studies, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination and nerve biopsy are carried out in selected patients. Approximately 20% patients with neuropathy remain undiagnosed but the prognosis is not bad in them. PMID:19893645

  19. Fisetin Imparts Neuroprotection in Experimental Diabetic Neuropathy by Modulating Nrf2 and NF-κB Pathways.

    PubMed

    Sandireddy, Reddemma; Yerra, Veera Ganesh; Komirishetti, Prashanth; Areti, Aparna; Kumar, Ashutosh

    2016-08-01

    The current study is aimed to assess the therapeutic potential of fisetin, a phytoflavonoid in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced experimental diabetic neuropathy (DN) in rats. Fisetin was administered (5 and 10 mg/kg) for 2 weeks (7th and 8th week) post STZ administration. Thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia were assessed by measuring tactile sensitivity to thermal and mechanical stimuli, respectively. Motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV) was determined using power lab system and sciatic nerve blood flow (NBF) was determined using laser Doppler system. Nerve sections were processed for TUNEL assay and NF-κB, COX-2 immunohistochemical staining. Sciatic nerve homogenate was used for biochemical and Western blotting analysis. MNCV and sciatic NBF deficits associated with DN were ameliorated in fisetin administered rats. Fisetin treatment reduced the interleukin-6 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha in sciatic nerves of diabetic rats (p < 0.001). Protein expression studies have identified that the therapeutic benefit of fisetin might be through regulation of redox sensitive transcription factors such as nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB). Our study provides an evidence for the therapeutic potential of fisetin in DN through simultaneous targeting of NF-κB and Nrf2. PMID:26399251

  20. Therapeutic Benefit of Extended Thymosin β4 Treatment Is Independent of Blood Glucose Level in Mice with Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Chopp, Michael; Jia, Longfei; Lu, Xuerong; Szalad, Alexandra; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, RuiLan; Zhang, Zheng Gang

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a chronic complication of diabetes mellitus. To investigated the efficacy and safety of the extended treatment of diabetic peripheral neuropathy with thymosin β4 (Tβ4), male diabetic mice (db/db) at the age of 24 weeks were treated with Tβ4 or saline for 16 consecutive weeks. Treatment of diabetic mice with Tβ4 significantly improved motor (MCV) and sensory (SCV) conduction velocity in the sciatic nerve and the thermal and mechanical latency. However, Tβ4 treatment did not significantly alter blood glucose levels. Treatment with Tβ4 significantly increased intraepidermal nerve fiber density. Furthermore, Tβ4 counteracted the diabetes-induced axon diameter and myelin thickness reductions and the g-ratio increase in sciatic nerve. In vitro, compared with dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons derived from nondiabetic mice, DRG neurons derived from diabetic mice exhibited significantly decreased neurite outgrowth, whereas Tβ4 promoted neurite growth in these diabetic DRG neurons. Blockage of the Ang1/Tie2 signaling pathway with a neutralized antibody against Tie2 abolished Tβ4-increased neurite outgrowth. Our data demonstrate that extended Tβ4 treatment ameliorates diabetic-induced axonal degeneration and demyelination, which likely contribute to therapeutic effect of Tβ4 on diabetic neuropathy. The Ang1/Tie2 pathway may mediate Tβ4-induced axonal remodeling. PMID:25945352

  1. Concurrent targeting of nitrosative stress-PARP pathway corrects functional, behavioral and biochemical deficits in experimental diabetic neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Negi, Geeta; Kumar, Ashutosh; Sharma, Shyam S.

    2010-01-01

    Peroxynitrite mediated nitrosative stress, an indisputable initiator of DNA damage and overactivation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), a nuclear enzyme activated after sensing DNA damage, are two crucial pathogenetic mechanisms in diabetic neuropathy. The intent of the present study was to investigate the effect of combination of a peroxynitrite decomposition catalyst (PDC), FeTMPyP and a PARP inhibitor, 4-ANI against diabetic peripheral neuropathy. The end points of evaluation of the study included motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV) and nerve blood flow (NBF) for evaluating nerve functions; thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia for assessing nociceptive alterations, malondialdehyde and peroxynitrite levels to detect oxidative stress-nitrosative stress; NAD concentration in sciatic nerve to assess overactivation of PARP. Additionally immunohistochemical studies for nitrotyrosine and Poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) was also performed. Treatment with the combination of FeTMPyP and 4-ANI led to significant improvement in nerve functions and pain parameters and also attenuated the oxidative-nitrosative stress markers. Further, the combination also reduced the overactivation of PARP as evident from increased NAD levels and decreased PAR immunopositivity in sciatic nerve microsections. Thus, it can be concluded that treatment with the combination of a PDC and PARP inhibitor attenuates alteration in peripheral nerves in diabetic neuropathy (DN).

  2. Anti-allodynic and neuroprotective effects of koumine, a Benth alkaloid, in a rat model of diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Ling, Qian; Liu, Ming; Wu, Min-Xia; Xu, Ying; Yang, Jian; Huang, Hui-Hui; Yu, Chang-Xi

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is characterized by progressive degeneration of nerve fibers associated with diabetes mellitus. Antidepressants and anticonvulsants are the mainstay of pharmacological treatment, but are often limited in effectiveness against the core clinical feature of pain. In the current study, we examined the potential effects of koumine, a Gelsemium elegans Benth alkaloid, using a rat model of diabetic neuropathy. Rats were administered intraperitoneally a single dose of streptozocin (60 mg/kg) to induce type 1 diabetes. Koumine was given at a dose range of 0.056-7 mg/kg subcutaneously for one week starting 3 weeks after streptozocin adminstration. Behavioral responses to mechanical stimuli were evaluated every day after streptozocin injection. At 4 weeks after streptozocin injection, sensory nerve conduction velocity (SNCV) and morphological alternation of sciatic nerves were assessed by electron microscopy. Diabetic rats developed mechanical hyperalgesia within 3 weeks after streptozocin injection and exhibited reduced SNCV and impaired myelin/axonal structure. Koumine treatment of diabetic rats decreased neuropathic pain behavior as early as after the first administration. At a dose of 7 mg/kg, koumine was more effective than gabapentin (100 mg/kg), and decreased mechanical sensitivity threshold to a level comparable to healthy control. Repeated treatment of koumine significantly reduced the damage to axon and myelin sheath of the sciatic nerve and increased SNCV, without affecting body weight and blood glucose. These findings encourage the use of koumine in the treatment of diabetic neuropathy. PMID:24790009

  3. Radiation optic neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Kline, L.B.; Kim, J.Y.; Ceballos, R.

    1985-08-01

    Following surgery for pituitary adenoma, radiation therapy is an accepted treatment in reducing tumor recurrence. However, a potential therapeutic complication is delayed radionecrosis of perisellar neural structures, including the optic nerves and chiasm. This particular cause of visual loss, radiation optic neuropathy (RON), has not been emphasized in the ophthalmologic literature. Four cases of RON seen in the past five years are reported. Diagnostic criteria include: (1) acute visual loss (monocular or binocular), (2) visual field defects indicating optic nerve or chiasmal dysfunction, (3) absence of optic disc edema, (4) onset usually within three years of therapy (peak: 1-1 1/2 years), and (5) no computed tomographic evidence of visual pathway compression. Pathologic findings, differential diagnosis and therapy will be discussed in outlining the clinical profile of RON.

  4. Thymoquinone Alleviates the Experimental Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy by Modulation of Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Long; Li, Bing; Chen, Biqin; Shao, Yiye; Luo, Qiong; Shi, Xiaohong; Chen, Yinghui

    2016-01-01

    Thymoquinone has been reported to exhibit antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. Inflammation plays an important role in pathogenesis of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. This study investigated the effects of TQ on proliferation and apoptosis of Schwann cells exposed to high glucose conditions and electrophysiological and morphological changes of the sciatic nerve in a DPN rat model as well as relevant inflammatory mechanism. Cell proliferation and apoptosis of Schwann cells were measured using the Cell Counting Kit-8 and flow cytometry. DPN model was established in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Nerve conduction velocity was measured before and after treatment. Morphologic changes were observed by H&E staining and transmission electron microscopy. COX-2, IL-1β, IL-6, and Caspase-3 expression was investigated by western blotting and Bio-Plex ProTM Assays. Finally, TQ alleviated the inhibition of Schwann cell proliferation and protected against Schwann cell apoptosis. It improved nerve conduction velocity, and alleviated the DPN-induced morphological changes and demyelination of the sciatic nerve. COX-2, IL-1β, IL-6 and Caspase-3 expression in sciatic nerve or isolated cultured Schwann cells, were also decreased by TQ. These results indicate TQ has a protective effect on peripheral nerves in a DPN rat model. The mechanism may be mediated partly by the modulation of the inflammatory reaction. PMID:27545310

  5. Thymoquinone Alleviates the Experimental Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy by Modulation of Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Long; Li, Bing; Chen, Biqin; Shao, Yiye; Luo, Qiong; Shi, Xiaohong; Chen, Yinghui

    2016-01-01

    Thymoquinone has been reported to exhibit antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. Inflammation plays an important role in pathogenesis of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. This study investigated the effects of TQ on proliferation and apoptosis of Schwann cells exposed to high glucose conditions and electrophysiological and morphological changes of the sciatic nerve in a DPN rat model as well as relevant inflammatory mechanism. Cell proliferation and apoptosis of Schwann cells were measured using the Cell Counting Kit-8 and flow cytometry. DPN model was established in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Nerve conduction velocity was measured before and after treatment. Morphologic changes were observed by H&E staining and transmission electron microscopy. COX-2, IL-1β, IL-6, and Caspase-3 expression was investigated by western blotting and Bio-Plex Pro(TM) Assays. Finally, TQ alleviated the inhibition of Schwann cell proliferation and protected against Schwann cell apoptosis. It improved nerve conduction velocity, and alleviated the DPN-induced morphological changes and demyelination of the sciatic nerve. COX-2, IL-1β, IL-6 and Caspase-3 expression in sciatic nerve or isolated cultured Schwann cells, were also decreased by TQ. These results indicate TQ has a protective effect on peripheral nerves in a DPN rat model. The mechanism may be mediated partly by the modulation of the inflammatory reaction. PMID:27545310

  6. Inflammatory demyelinating neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Muley, Suraj Ashok; Parry, Gareth J

    2009-05-01

    Early and effective treatment of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is important to minimize axonal degeneration that occurs secondary to demyelination. The disease course is invariably chronic, so long-term treatment is often required, and adverse effects and costs are important considerations in devising a treatment plan. CIDP responds to prednisone, but long-term treatment can result in significant adverse effects. Azathioprine, mycophenolate mofetil, and cyclosporine can be used as steroid-sparing agents and may facilitate more rapid and successful tapering of prednisone. Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) and plasma exchange are also effective in the treatment of CIDP and can be used in patients who are unresponsive to prednisone or develop steroid-related adverse effects. IVIg may also be used as a first-line treatment, but its cost can be a limiting factor. A few uncontrolled studies have suggested that pulsed weekly methylprednisolone is both effective and well tolerated in the long-term treatment of CIDP. Treatments based on rituximab or cyclophosphamide have also been used in resistant disease. Variants of CIDP have been described on the basis of their association with specific antibodies or immunoglobulins and their response to specific immunomodulatory treatments. Multifocal motor neuropathy with conduction block responds to IVIg in the majority of patients. However, weakness may slowly worsen over time, and some patients become unresponsive. Anecdotal reports suggest that rituximab may be useful in patients who develop progressive disease. Placebo-controlled trials in anti-myelin-associated glycoprotein neuropathy suggest that rituximab is effective and, with a combination of prednisone and cyclophosphamide, numbness and strength may improve. Other treatments that may be effective include plasma exchange and IVIg. Treatment is generally started with prednisone, IVIg, or plasma exchange. Rituximab and cyclophosphamide are used only

  7. Peripheral Neuropathy and Agent Orange

    MedlinePlus

    ... registry health exam . Research on peripheral neuropathy and herbicides The Health and Medicine Division (HMD) (formally known ... acute or subacute onset may be associated with herbicide exposure. Based on this evidence, VA presumed an ...

  8. Rutin ameliorates diabetic neuropathy by lowering plasma glucose and decreasing oxidative stress via Nrf2 signaling pathway in rats.

    PubMed

    Tian, Ruifeng; Yang, Wenqing; Xue, Qiang; Gao, Liang; Huo, Junli; Ren, Dongqing; Chen, Xiaoyan

    2016-01-15

    Rutin exhibits antidiabetic, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, which makes rutin an attractive candidate for diabetic complications. The present study was designed to investigate the potential effect of rutin on diabetic neuropathy. After induction of diabetic neuropathy, rutin (5mg/kg, 25mg/kg and 50mg/kg) were daily given to the diabetic rats for 2 weeks. At the end of rutin administration, rutin produced a significant inhibition of mechanical hyperalgesia, thermal hyperalgesia and cold allodynia, as well as partial restoration of nerve conduction velocities in diabetic rats. Furthermore, rutin significantly increased Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activities in sciatic nerves and decreased caspase-3 expression in dorsal root ganglions (DRG). In addition, rutin significantly decreased plasma glucose, attenuated oxidative stress and neuroinflammation. Further studies showed that rutin significantly increased hydrogen sulfide (H2S) level, up-regulated the expression of nuclear factor-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in DRG. The evidences suggest the beneficial effect of rutin on diabetic neuropathy. Additionally, insulin (2 IU) and BG-12 (15mg/kg) were used to investigate the mechanisms underlying the beneficial effect of rutin on diabetic neuropathy. Insulin achieved lower plasma glucose and BG-12 achieved comparable Nrf2 expression than/to rutin (50mg/kg), respectively. In contrast, the beneficial effect of insulin and BG-12 was inferior to that of rutin (50mg/kg), suggesting that both lowered plasma glucose and Nrf2 signaling contribute to the beneficial effect of rutin on diabetic neuropathy. In conclusion, rutin produces significant protection in diabetic neuropathy, which makes it an attractive candidate for the treatment of diabetic neuropathy. PMID:26688570

  9. Diabetic neuropathy: electrophysiological and morphological study of peripheral nerve degeneration and regeneration in transgenic mice that express IFNbeta in beta cells.

    PubMed

    Serafín, Anna; Molín, Jessica; Márquez, Merce; Blasco, Ester; Vidal, Enric; Foradada, Laia; Añor, Sonia; Rabanal, Rosa M; Fondevila, Dolors; Bosch, Fàtima; Pumarola, Martí

    2010-05-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is one of the most frequent complications in diabetes but there are no treatments beyond glucose control, due in part to the lack of an appropriate animal model to assess an effective therapy. This study was undertaken to characterize the degenerative and regenerative responses of peripheral nerves after induced sciatic nerve damage in transgenic rat insulin I promoter / human interferon beta (RIP/IFNbeta) mice made diabetic with a low dose of streptozotocin (STZ) as an animal model of diabetic complications. In vivo, histological and immunohistological studies of cutaneous and sciatic nerves were performed after left sciatic crush. Functional tests, cutaneous innervation, and sciatic nerve evaluation showed pronounced neurological reduction in all groups 2 weeks after crush. All animals showed a gradual recovery but this was markedly slower in diabetic animals in comparison with normoglycemic animals. The delay in regeneration in diabetic RIP/IFNbeta mice resulted in an increase in active Schwann cells and regenerating neurites 8 weeks after surgery. These findings indicate that diabetic-RIP/IFNbeta animals mimic human diabetic neuropathy. Moreover, when these animals are submitted to nerve crush they have substantial deficits in nerve regrowth, similar to that observed in diabetic patients. When wildtype animals were treated with the same dose of STZ, no differences were observed with respect to nontreated animals, indicating that low doses of STZ and the transgene are not implicated in development of the degenerative and regenerative events observed in our study. All these findings indicate that RIP/IFNbeta transgenic mice are a good model for diabetic neuropathy. PMID:19918773

  10. Correlative CT and anatomic study of the sciatic nerve

    SciTech Connect

    Pech, P.; Haughton, V.

    1985-05-01

    Sciatica can be caused by numerous processes affecting the sciatic nerve or its components within the pelvis including tumors, infectious diseases, aneurysms, fractures, and endometriosis. The CT diagnosis of these causes of sciatica has not been emphasized. This study identified the course and appearance of the normal sciatic nerve in the pelvis by correlating CT and anatomic slices in cadavers. For purposes of discussion, the sciatic nerve complex is conveniently divided into three parts: presacral, muscular, and ischial. Each part is illustrated here by two cryosections with corresponding CT images.

  11. Choice of imaging modality in the diagnosis of sciatic hernia

    PubMed Central

    Labib, Peter L. Z.; Malik, Sohail N.

    2013-01-01

    Sciatic hernias are one of the rarest types of hernia and often pose diagnostic difficulty to clinicians. We report a case of an 80-year-old lady with a sciatic hernia who had a falsely negative computed tomography (CT) but was found to have a colonic hernia on ultrasonography. The authors recommend that for patients in which there is a high degree of clinical suspicion for a sciatic hernia and a negative CT, ultrasonography may be considered as a useful imaging modality to confirm the diagnosis. PMID:24968433

  12. Crucifixion and median neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Regan, Jacqueline M; Shahlaie, Kiarash; Watson, Joseph C

    2013-01-01

    Crucifixion as a means of torture and execution was first developed in the 6th century B.C. and remained popular for over 1000 years. Details of the practice, which claimed hundreds of thousands of lives, have intrigued scholars as historical records and archaeological findings from the era are limited. As a result, various aspects of crucifixion, including the type of crosses used, methods of securing victims to crosses, the length of time victims survived on the cross, and the exact mechanisms of death, remain topics of debate. One aspect of crucifixion not previously explored in detail is the characteristic hand posture often depicted in artistic renditions of crucifixion. In this posture, the hand is clenched in a peculiar and characteristic fashion: there is complete failure of flexion of the thumb and index finger with partial failure of flexion of the middle finger. Such a “crucified clench” is depicted across different cultures and from different eras. A review of crucifixion history and techniques, median nerve anatomy and function, and the historical artistic depiction of crucifixion was performed to support the hypothesis that the “crucified clench” results from proximal median neuropathy due to positioning on the cross, rather than from direct trauma of impalement of the hand or wrist. PMID:23785656

  13. Ultrasound assessment of selected peripheral nerves pathologies. Part II: Entrapment neuropathies of the lower limb

    PubMed Central

    Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona

    2012-01-01

    Similarly to entrapment neuropathies of upper extremities, the ultrasound constitutes a valuable supplementation of diagnostic examinations performed in patients with suspicions of nerve entrapment syndromes of the lower limb. For many years, it was claimed that such pathologies were rare. This probably resulted from the lack of proper diagnostic tools (including high frequency ultrasound transducers) as well as the lack of sufficient knowledge in this area. In relation to the above, the symptoms of compression neuropathies were frequently interpreted as a manifestation of pathologies of the lumbar part of the spine or a other orthopedic disease (degenerative or overuse one). Consequently, many patients were treated ineffectively for many months and even, years which led to irreparable neurological changes and changes in the motor organ. Apart from a clinical examination, the diagnostics of entrapment neuropathies of lower limb is currently based on imaging tests (ultrasound, magnetic resonance) as well as functional assessments (electromyography). Magnetic resonance imaging is characterized by a relatively low resolution (as compared to ultrasound) which results in limited possibilities of morphological evaluation of the visualized pathology. Electromyography allows for the assessment of nerve function, but does not precisely determine the type and degree of change. This article presents examples of the most common entrapment neuropathies of the lower limb concerning the following nerves: sciatic, femoral, lateral femoral cutaneous, obturator, fibular and its branches, tibial and its branches as well as sural. The pathomorphological basis of the neuropathies as well as corresponding ultrasound images are presented in this paper. Attention has been drawn to echogenicity, degree of vascularization and bundle presentation of the trunk of a pathological peripheral nerve. PMID:26673938

  14. Gosha-jinki-gan (herbal medicine) in streptozocin-induced diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Nishizawa, M; Sutherland, W H; Nukada, H

    1995-10-01

    Long-established systems of traditional medicine have evolved from systematic recordings of human experience over several millennia. Although not strictly based on concepts of modern science, they nevertheless are founded on a corpus of organised knowledge written in documents, and the evident conclusion is that the alleged "trial and error" methodology has provided useful drugs for humans. Herbal medicine should be investigated as a potential regimen for diabetic neuropathy for the following reasons: (1) diabetic neuropathy remains an important clinical problem affecting a significant proportion of diabetic subjects without satisfactory treatment; (2) there are multiple pathogenetic mechanisms in diabetic neuropathy; and (3) herbal medicine which is a combination prescription has unique synergistic and synthetic effects that result from interactions between individual herbal components, and may induce a wide range of therapeutic potential and utility. Gosha-jinki-gan (GJK), consisting of 10 herbs, has been widely used for a regimen of diabetic complications, including neuropathy, in Japan. However, the effect of GJK on experimental diabetic neuropathy has never been previously evaluated. We examined nerve conduction velocity (NCV) and nerve glucose, sorbitol, fructose and myo-inositol levels in streptozocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats that were treated with GJK. After 1 week of the STZ injection in 7-9-week-old rats, GJK treatment (100 mg/100 g body weight/day) was started orally. At 16 weeks after the STZ injection, the sciatic NCV of GJK-treated diabetic rats improved significantly when compared to non-treated diabetic rats, although they were not yet normalised.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8543945

  15. Evaluation and prevention of diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Aring, Ann M; Jones, David E; Falko, James M

    2005-06-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is a debilitating disorder that occurs in nearly 50 percent of patients with diabetes. It is a late finding in type 1 diabetes but can be an early finding in type 2 diabetes. The primary types of diabetic neuropathy are sensorimotor and autonomic. Patients may present with only one type of diabetic neuropathy or may develop combinations of neuropathies (e.g., distal symmetric polyneuropathy and autonomic neuropathy). Distal symmetric polyneuropathy is the most common form of diabetic neuropathy. Diabetic neuropathy also can cause motor deficits, silent cardiac ischemia, orthostatic hypotension, vasomotor instability, hyperhidrosis, gastroparesis, bladder dysfunction, and sexual dysfunction. Strict glycemic control and good daily foot care are key to preventing complications of diabetic neuropathy. PMID:15952441

  16. Post-evaluation of the neurophaties treatment post-trauma with therapeutic laser. Model in sciatic nerve of frog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobar, Antonio S.; Ocampo, Arcelia F. M.; Hernández, María G. H.; Jasso, José L. C.; Lira, Maricela O. F.; Flores, Mariana A.; Balderrama, Vicente L.

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the compound nerve action potential amplitude and latency measured to determine the degree of myelination and the number of fibers stimulated in a model of stimulated frog sciatic nerve laser at 810 nm as perioperative treatment after injury. It used 30 bullfrogs (Rana catesbeiana) to obtain 60 sciatic nerves forming four groups, groups 1 and 2 worked with nerves in vitro, were dissected in humid chambers for placing isolated organ, was recorded on compound nerve action potential, the second group laser was applied at 24, 48, 72, 96 and 120 hours and at the same time were placed in 10% formalin. Groups 3 and 4 are worked in vivo localizing the nerve and causing damage through compression, occurred over the compound nerve action potential to assess the degree of myelination and the number of fibers stimulated, the group 4 was applied to 810 nm laser (500 Hz, 10 J, 200 mW) after injury, after 48 hours, three frogs were sacrificed by introducing the nerves in 10% formalin. The latency recorded by stimulating the sciatic nerve of frog to 0.5 mA and 100 ms in groups 1 and 2 show significant differences (p<0.001 and p<000) as in the amplitude (p<000 and p<000). Groups 3 and 4, which was stimulated at 100 mA and 100 ms latency showed no statistically significant difference (p>000), as to the extent, if any statistically significant difference. (p<0.001 and p<0.000). The laser produces a favorable response in the treatment of paresthesia (post-traumatic neuropathy).

  17. Post-evaluation of the neurophaties treatment post-trauma with therapeutic laser. Model in sciatic nerve of frog

    SciTech Connect

    Escobar, Antonio S.; Ocampo, Arcelia F. M.; Hernandez, Maria G. H.; Jasso, Jose L. C.

    2010-05-31

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the compound nerve action potential amplitude and latency measured to determine the degree of myelination and the number of fibers stimulated in a model of stimulated frog sciatic nerve laser at 810 nm as perioperative treatment after injury. It used 30 bullfrogs (Rana catesbeiana) to obtain 60 sciatic nerves forming four groups, groups 1 and 2 worked with nerves in vitro, were dissected in humid chambers for placing isolated organ, was recorded on compound nerve action potential, the second group laser was applied at 24, 48, 72, 96 and 120 hours and at the same time were placed in 10% formalin. Groups 3 and 4 are worked in vivo localizing the nerve and causing damage through compression, occurred over the compound nerve action potential to assess the degree of myelination and the number of fibers stimulated, the group 4 was applied to 810 nm laser (500 Hz, 10 J, 200 mW) after injury, after 48 hours, three frogs were sacrificed by introducing the nerves in 10% formalin. The latency recorded by stimulating the sciatic nerve of frog to 0.5 mA and 100 ms in groups 1 and 2 show significant differences (p<0.001 and p<000) as in the amplitude (p<000 and p<000). Groups 3 and 4, which was stimulated at 100 mA and 100 ms latency showed no statistically significant difference (p>000), as to the extent, if any statistically significant difference. (p<0.001 and p<0.000). The laser produces a favorable response in the treatment of paresthesia (post-traumatic neuropathy).

  18. Does glioblastoma cyst fluid promote sciatic nerve regeneration?

    PubMed Central

    Özay, Rafet; Aktaş, Abit; Taşkapılıoğlu, Mevlüt Özgür; Gürer, Bora; Erdoğan, Bülent; Çağlar, Yusuf Şükrü

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma cyst fluid contains growth factors and extracellular matrix proteins which are known as neurotrophic and neurite-promoting agents. Therefore, we hypothesized that glioblastoma cyst fluid can promote the regeneration of injured peripheral nerves. To validate this hypothesis, we transected rat sciatic nerve, performed epineural anastomosis, and wrapped the injured sciatic nerve with glioblastoma cyst fluid- or saline-soaked gelatin sponges. Neurological function and histomorphological examinations showed that compared with the rats receiving local saline treatment, those receiving local glioblastoma cyst fluid treatment had better sciatic nerve function, fewer scars, greater axon area, counts and diameter as well as fiber diameter. These findings suggest that glioblastoma cyst fluid can promote the regeneration of injured sciatic nerve and has the potential for future clinical application in patients with peripheral nerve injury. PMID:26692863

  19. Paraproteinemic neuropathy: a practical review.

    PubMed

    Rison, Richard A; Beydoun, Said R

    2016-01-01

    The term paraproteinemic neuropathy describes a heterogeneous set of neuropathies characterized by the presence of homogeneous immunoglobulin in the serum. An abnormal clonal proliferation of B-lymphocytes or plasma cells, which may or may not occur in the context of a hematologic malignancy, produces the immunoglobulins in excess. If malignancy is identified, treatment should be targeted to the neoplasm. Most cases, however, occur as monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance. Few prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled trials are available to inform the management of paraproteinemic neuropathies. Clinical experience combined with data from smaller, uncontrolled studies provide a basis for recommendations, which depend on the specific clinical setting in which the paraprotein occurs. In this review, we provide a clinically practical approach to diagnosis and management of such patients. PMID:26821540

  20. Generalized pruritus preceding paraneoplastic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Hébant, Benjamin; Miret, Nicolas; Berthelot, Lucile; Jaafar, Mohamad; Maltête, David; Lefaucheur, Romain

    2016-04-01

    Paraneoplastic syndromes are a group of rare disorders involving non-metastatic systemic effects accompanying malignancies, and occur remotely from the tumor itself. Chronic pruritus lasting more than 6 weeks can be from paraneoplastic origin. A 65-year-old woman was admitted for generalized pruritus lasting for 1 month, despite treatment with prednisolone, levocetirizine and hydroxyzine. General examination was normal. Biological data and gastroscopy were normal. One month later, the patient was readmitted for worsening of her pruritus and walking impairment, revealing a severe sensory neuropathy. Blood anti-Hu antibodies returned positive at a level of 400 (normal <100). Bronchoscopy and bronchial biopsies revealed small-cell lung carcinoma. To our knowledge, the association of generalized pruritus and paraneoplastic neuropathy has been rarely reported. Our observation raises the question of a pathophysiological continuum between pruritus and neuropathy in a paraneoplastic context. PMID:26633089

  1. Ulnar neuropathy: evaluation and management.

    PubMed

    Dy, Christopher J; Mackinnon, Susan E

    2016-06-01

    Ulnar neuropathy is commonly encountered, both acutely after elbow trauma and in the setting of chronic compression neuropathy. Careful clinical evaluation and discerning evaluation of electrodiagnostic studies are helpful in determining the prognosis of recovery with nonoperative and operative management. Appreciation of the subtleties in clinical presentation and thoughtful consideration of the timing and type of surgical intervention are critical to optimizing outcomes after treatment of ulnar neuropathy. The potential need for decompression at both the cubital tunnel and Guyon's canal must be appreciated. Supplementation of decompression with supercharged end-to-side nerve transfer can expedite motor recovery of the ulnar intrinsic muscles in the appropriately selected patient. The emergence of nerve transfer techniques has also changed the management of acute ulnar nerve injuries. PMID:27080868

  2. Parthenolide Relieves Pain and Promotes M2 Microglia/Macrophage Polarization in Rat Model of Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Popiolek-Barczyk, Katarzyna; Kolosowska, Natalia; Makuch, Wioletta; Rojewska, Ewelina; Jurga, Agnieszka M.; Pilat, Dominika

    2015-01-01

    Neuropathic pain treatment remains a challenge because pathomechanism is not fully understood. It is believed that glial activation and increased spinal nociceptive factors are crucial for neuropathy. We investigated the effect of parthenolide (PTL) on the chronic constriction injury to the sciatic nerve (CCI)-induced neuropathy in rat. We analyzed spinal changes in glial markers and M1 and M2 polarization factors, as well as intracellular signaling pathways. PTL (5 µg; i.t.) was preemptively and then daily administered for 7 days after CCI. PTL attenuated the allodynia and hyperalgesia and increased the protein level of IBA1 (a microglial/macrophage marker) but did not change GFAP (an astrocyte marker) on day 7 after CCI. PTL reduced the protein level of M1 (IL-1β, IL-18, and iNOS) and enhanced M2 (IL-10, TIMP1) factors. In addition, it downregulated the phosphorylated form of NF-κB, p38MAPK, and ERK1/2 protein level and upregulated STAT3. In primary microglial cell culture we have shown that IL-1β, IL-18, iNOS, IL-6, IL-10, and TIMP1 are of microglial origin. Summing up, PTL directly or indirectly attenuates neuropathy symptoms and promotes M2 microglia/macrophages polarization. We suggest that neuropathic pain therapies should be shifted from blanketed microglia/macrophage suppression toward maintenance of the balance between neuroprotective and neurotoxic microglia/macrophage phenotypes. PMID:26090236

  3. Fenugreek seed extract treats peripheral neuropathy in pyridoxine induced neuropathic mice

    PubMed Central

    Moghadam, Farshad Homayouni; Vakili-Zarch, Behzad; Shafiee, Mohammad; Mirjalili, Azam

    2013-01-01

    Trigonella foenum graecum commonly known as Fenugreek exerts normoglycemic and insulinotropic effects in humans by compounds from its seed and leaf extracts. Some studies reported that treating pregnant mice with fenugreek seed could cause toxic effects on the nervous system of its pubs during developmental growth, while in some other studies neuroprotective properties were considered for it. Safety of anti-diabetic drugs for nervous system is very important because peripheral neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes and hazardous drugs could worsen it. In this study, the effect of treatment with fenugreek seed extract on the function of sciatic nerves of neuropathic mice was evaluated. Neuropathy was induced in male mice by pyridoxine intoxication. After that, animals were treated with 0.2, 2 and 20 mg/kg of hydro-alcoholic extract of fenugreek seeds for 10 days, tail flick, electrophysiological and histological assays were performed to evaluate the effect of fenugreek seed extract on function of the peripheral nerves. Our data showed that fenugreek has anti neuropathic effect and restores the function of nerve fibers. Results of electrophysiological recordings stated that the highest rate of healing was occurred in 20 mg/kg fenugreek extract treated animals. In conclusion, findings of the present study demonstrate that treatment with fenugreek seed extract can potentially facilitate healing from pyridoxine induced peripheral neuropathy in mice. PMID:26417231

  4. Epalrestat protects against diabetic peripheral neuropathy by alleviating oxidative stress and inhibiting polyol pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qing-rong; Wang, Zhuo; Zhou, Wei; Fan, Shou-rui; Ma, Run; Xue, Li; Yang, Lu; Li, Ya-shan; Tan, Hong-li; Shao, Qing-hua; Yang, Hong-ying

    2016-01-01

    Epalrestat is a noncompetitive and reversible aldose reductase inhibitor used for the treatment of diabetic neuropathy. This study assumed that epalrestat had a protective effect on diabetic peripheral nerve injury by suppressing the expression of aldose reductase in peripheral nerves of diabetes mellitus rats. The high-fat and high-carbohydrate model rats were established by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin. Peripheral neuropathy occurred in these rats after sustaining high blood glucose for 8 weeks. At 12 weeks after streptozotocin injection, rats were intragastrically administered epalrestat 100 mg/kg daily for 6 weeks. Transmission electron microscope revealed that the injuries to myelinated nerve fibers, non-myelinated nerve fibers and Schwann cells of rat sciatic nerves had reduced compared to rats without epalrestat administuation. Western blot assay and immunohistochemical results demonstrated that after intervention with epalrestat, the activities of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase gradually increased, but aldose reductase protein expression gradually diminished. Results confirmed that epalrestat could protect against diabetic peripheral neuropathy by relieving oxidative stress and suppressing the polyol pathway. PMID:27073391

  5. Involvement of high mobility group box 1 in the development and maintenance of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy in rats.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Takeshi; Tsubota, Maho; Kawaishi, Yudai; Yamanishi, Hiroki; Kamitani, Natsuki; Sekiguchi, Fumiko; Ishikura, Hiroyasu; Liu, Keyue; Nishibori, Masahiro; Kawabata, Atsufumi

    2016-07-15

    Given that high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), a nuclear protein, once released to the extracellular space, promotes nociception, we asked if inactivation of HMGB1 prevents or reverses chemotherapy-induced painful neuropathy in rats and also examined possible involvement of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and the receptor for advanced glycation endproduct (RAGE), known as targets for HMGB1. Painful neuropathy was produced by repeated i.p. administration of paclitaxel or vincristine in rats. Nociceptive threshold was determined by the paw pressure method and/or von Frey test in the hindpaw. Tissue protein levels were determined by immunoblotting. Repeated i.p. administration of the anti-HMGB1-neutralizing antibody or recombinant human soluble thrombomodulin (rhsTM), known to inactivate HMGB1, prevented the development of hyperalgesia and/or allodynia induced by paclitaxel or vincristine in rats. A single i.p. or intraplantar (i.pl.) administration of the antibody or rhsTM reversed the chemotherapy-induced neuropathy. A single i.pl. administration of a TLR4 antagonist or low molecular weight heparin, known to inhibit RAGE, attenuated the hyperalgesia caused by i.pl. HMGB1 and also the chemotherapy-induced painful neuropathy. Paclitaxel or vincristine treatment significantly decreased protein levels of HMGB1 in the dorsal root ganglia, but not sciatic nerves. HMGB1 thus participates in both development and maintenance of chemotherapy-induced painful neuropathy, in part through RAGE and TLR4. HMGB1 inactivation is considered useful to prevent and treat the chemotherapy-induced painful neuropathy. PMID:27474498

  6. Neuroprotective efficacy of eugenol and isoeugenol in acrylamide-induced neuropathy in rats: behavioral and biochemical evidence.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Sathya N; Muralidhara

    2013-02-01

    The primary objective of this investigation was to assess the neuroprotective efficacy of spice active principles namely Eugenol (Eug) and isoeugenol (IE) in an acrylamide (ACR) neuropathy model in rats. In the present study, ACR administration (50 mg/kg bw, i.p. 3 times/week) for 5 weeks to growing rats caused typical symptoms of neuropathy. We found that treatment of ACR rats with spice active principles (10 mg/kg bw, for 5 weeks) caused marked improvement in gait score and responses in a battery of behavioral tests. Terminally, both spice active principles markedly attenuated ACR-induced markers of oxidative stress viz., reactive oxygen species (ROS), malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitric oxide (NO) in sciatic nerve (SN) as well as brain regions (cortex Ct, cerebellum Cb). Treatment with Eug restored the reduced glutathione levels in SN and brain regions. Interestingly, both spice active principles effectively diminished ACR-induced elevation in cytosolic calcium levels and acetylcholinesterase activity in SN and Ct. Further, the diminished activity of ATPase among ACR rats was enhanced in SN and restored in brain regions. Furthermore, Eug treatment significantly offset ACR-induced depletion in dopamine levels in brain regions. Collectively our findings suggest the propensity of these spice active principles to attenuate ACR-induced neuropathy. Further studies are necessary to understand the precise molecular mechanism/s by which these spice active principles attenuate neuropathy. Nevertheless, our data clearly demonstrate the beneficial effects of spice active principles in ACR-induced neuropathy in rats and suggest their possible therapeutic usage as an adjuvant in the management of other forms of neuropathy in humans. PMID:23161090

  7. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Fehrenbacher, Jill C

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is common in patients receiving anticancer treatment and can affect survivability and long-term quality of life of the patient following treatment. The symptoms of CIPN primarily include abnormal sensory discrimination of touch, vibration, thermal information, and pain. There is currently a paucity of pharmacological agents to prevent or treat CIPN. The lack of efficacious therapeutics is due, at least in part, to an incomplete understanding of the mechanisms by which chemotherapies alter the sensitivity of sensory neurons. Although the clinical presentation of CIPN can be similar with the various classes of chemotherapeutic agents, there are subtle differences, suggesting that each class of drugs might induce neuropathy via different mechanisms. Multiple mechanisms have been proposed to underlie the development and maintenance of neuropathy; however, most pharmacological agents generated from preclinical experiments have failed to alleviate the symptoms of CIPN in the clinic. Further research is necessary to identify the specific mechanisms by which each class of chemotherapeutics induces neuropathy. PMID:25744683

  8. Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I

    PubMed Central

    Auer-Grumbach, Michaela

    2008-01-01

    Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I (HSN I) is a slowly progressive neurological disorder characterised by prominent predominantly distal sensory loss, autonomic disturbances, autosomal dominant inheritance, and juvenile or adulthood disease onset. The exact prevalence is unknown, but is estimated as very low. Disease onset varies between the 2nd and 5th decade of life. The main clinical feature of HSN I is the reduction of sensation sense mainly distributed to the distal parts of the upper and lower limbs. Variable distal muscle weakness and wasting, and chronic skin ulcers are characteristic. Autonomic features (usually sweating disturbances) are invariably observed. Serious and common complications are spontaneous fractures, osteomyelitis and necrosis, as well as neuropathic arthropathy which may even necessitate amputations. Some patients suffer from severe pain attacks. Hypacusis or deafness, or cough and gastrooesophageal reflux have been observed in rare cases. HSN I is a genetically heterogenous condition with three loci and mutations in two genes (SPTLC1 and RAB7) identified so far. Diagnosis is based on the clinical observation and is supported by a family history. Nerve conduction studies confirm a sensory and motor neuropathy predominantly affecting the lower limbs. Radiological studies, including magnetic resonance imaging, are useful when bone infections or necrosis are suspected. Definitive diagnosis is based on the detection of mutations by direct sequencing of the SPTLC1 and RAB7 genes. Correct clinical assessment and genetic confirmation of the diagnosis are important for appropriate genetic counselling and prognosis. Differential diagnosis includes the other hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN), especially HSAN II, as well as diabetic foot syndrome, alcoholic neuropathy, neuropathies caused by other neurotoxins/drugs, immune mediated neuropathy, amyloidosis, spinal cord diseases, tabes dorsalis, lepra neuropathy, or decaying skin

  9. Effects of Alcohol Injection in Rat Sciatic Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Mazoch, Mathew J.; Cheema, Gulraiz A.; Suva, Larry J.; Thomas, Ruth L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown that the injection of dehydrated alcohol has been successful for the treatment of Morton's neuroma in the foot. In this study, we determined the cellular effect of injection of alcohol into and around the sciatic nerve of rats, and measured the extent of cell necrosis and/or any associated histologic or inflammatory changes. Methods Twenty-two male (~375g) Wistar rats were randomized into two groups each receiving alcohol injections into or around the sciatic nerve after nerve exposure under sterile technique. Group 1 rats were injected with a 0.5ml solution of 0.5% Marcaine in the left sciatic nerve as a control group. In the right sciatic nerve a 0.5ml solution of 4% ethanol with 0.5% Marcaine was injected. Group 2 rats received 0.5ml of 20%ethanol with 0.5% Marcaine injected into the left sciatic nerve and 0.5 ml of 30% ethanol with 0.5% Marcaine injected into the right sciatic nerve. In each group, the rats were placed in 3 subgroups: intraneural, perineural, perimuscular injections. All rats were sacrificed and tissue harvested for histologic evaluation at day 10 post injection. Results No evidence of alcohol-associated cell necrosis, apoptosis or apparent inflammation was observed in histologic specimens of any injected nerves, perineural tissue, or muscles in controls or experimental groups regardless of concentration of ethanol injected on day 10. Conclusion We concluded that alcohol injection (≤30% ethanol) into and/or around the sciatic nerve or the adjacent muscle of rats has no histologic evidence of necrosis or inflammation to the nerve or surrounding tissue. There was no observable histological change in apoptosis, or cell number, in response to the alcohol injection. PMID:25097192

  10. Altered protein phosphorylation in sciatic nerve from rats with streptozocin-induced diabetes

    SciTech Connect

    Schrama, L.H.; Berti-Mattera, L.N.; Eichberg, J.

    1987-11-01

    The effect of experimental diabetes on the phosphorylation of proteins in the rat sciatic nerve was studied. Nerves from animals made diabetic with streptozocin were incubated in vitro with (/sup 32/P)orthophosphate and divided into segments from the proximal to the distal end, and proteins from each segment were then separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The principal labeled species were the major myelin proteins, P0, and the basic proteins. After 6 wk of diabetes, the incorporation of isotope into these proteins rose as a function of distance along the nerve in a proximal to distal direction and was significantly higher at the distal end compared with incorporation into nerves from age-matched controls. The overall level of isotope uptake was similar in nerves from diabetic animals and weight-matched controls. The distribution of /sup 32/P among proteins also differed in diabetic nerve compared with both control groups in that P0 and the small basic protein accounted for a greater proportion of total label incorporated along the entire length of nerve. In contrast to intact nerve, there was no significant difference in protein phosphorylation when homogenates from normal and diabetic nerve were incubated with (/sup 32/P)-gamma-ATP. The results suggest that abnormal protein phosphorylation, particularly of myelin proteins, is a feature of experimental diabetic neuropathy and that the changes are most pronounced in the distal portion of the nerve.

  11. Effects of pulsed electromagnetic field and swimming exercise on rats with experimental sciatic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Kavlak, Erdoğan; Belge, Ferda; Unsal, Cengiz; Uner, Aykut Göktürk; Cavlak, Uğur; Cömlekçi, Selçuk

    2014-09-01

    [Purpose] The current study aimed to reveal the therapeutic effects of a pulsed electromagnetic field and swimming exercises on rats with experimental sciatic nerve injury, which was induced with crush-type neuropathy model damage, using electrophysiological methods. [Subjects] In the current study, the sample consisted of 28 adult male Wistar albino rats. [Methods] The rats were randomized into four groups (n=7). Swimming exercise and PEMF (2 Hz and 0.3 MT) were applied one hour a day, five days a week, for four weeks. Electroneuromyographic (ENMG) measurements were taken on day 7. [Results] When the data were evaluated, it was found that the 4 weeks of PEMF and swimming exercises led to an increase in motor conduction rates and a decrease in latency values, but the changes were not significant in comparison with the control and injury groups. The compound muscle action potential (CMAP) values of the left leg were lower in weeks 2, 3, and 4 in the swimming exercise group in comparison with the control group, although for the PEMF group, the CMAP values of the left leg reached the level observed in the control group beginning in week 3. [Conclusion] PEMF and swimming exercise made positive contributions to nerve regeneration after week 1, and regeneration was enhanced. PMID:25276015

  12. Effects of Pulsed Electromagnetic Field and Swimming Exercise on Rats with Experimental Sciatic Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kavlak, Erdoğan; Belge, Ferda; Ünsal, Cengiz; Üner, Aykut Göktürk; Cavlak, Uğur; Çömlekçi, Selçuk

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The current study aimed to reveal the therapeutic effects of a pulsed electromagnetic field and swimming exercises on rats with experimental sciatic nerve injury, which was induced with crush-type neuropathy model damage, using electrophysiological methods. [Subjects] In the current study, the sample consisted of 28 adult male Wistar albino rats. [Methods] The rats were randomized into four groups (n=7). Swimming exercise and PEMF (2 Hz and 0.3 MT) were applied one hour a day, five days a week, for four weeks. Electroneuromyographic (ENMG) measurements were taken on day 7. [Results] When the data were evaluated, it was found that the 4 weeks of PEMF and swimming exercises led to an increase in motor conduction rates and a decrease in latency values, but the changes were not significant in comparison with the control and injury groups. The compound muscle action potential (CMAP) values of the left leg were lower in weeks 2, 3, and 4 in the swimming exercise group in comparison with the control group, although for the PEMF group, the CMAP values of the left leg reached the level observed in the control group beginning in week 3. [Conclusion] PEMF and swimming exercise made positive contributions to nerve regeneration after week 1, and regeneration was enhanced. PMID:25276015

  13. Exenatide Facilitates Recovery from Oxaliplatin-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Shunsuke; Ushio, Soichiro; Ozawa, Nana; Masuguchi, Ken; Kawashiri, Takehiro; Oishi, Ryozo; Egashira, Nobuaki

    2015-01-01

    Background Oxaliplatin has widely been used as a key drug in the treatment of colorectal cancer; however, it causes peripheral neuropathy. Exenatide, a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) agonist, is an incretin mimetic secreted from ileal L cells, which is clinically used to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus. GLP-1 receptor agonists have been reported to exhibit neuroprotective effects on the central and peripheral nervous systems. In this study, we investigated the effects of exenatide on oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy in rats and cultured cells. Methods Oxaliplatin (4 mg/kg) was administered intravenously twice per week for 4 weeks, and mechanical allodynia was evaluated using the von Frey test in rats. Axonal degeneration was assessed by toluidine blue staining of sciatic nerves. Results Repeated administration of oxaliplatin caused mechanical allodynia from day 14 to 49. Although the co-administration of extended-release exenatide (100 μg/kg) could not inhibit the incidence of oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia, it facilitated recovery from the oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy with reparation of axonal degeneration. Inhibition of neurite outgrowth was evaluated in cultured pheochromocytoma 12 (PC12) cells. Exenatide inhibited oxaliplatin-induced neurite degeneration, but did not affect oxaliplatin-induced cell injury in cultured PC12 cells. Additionally, extended-release exenatide had no effect on the anti-tumor activity of oxaliplatin in cultured murine colon adenocarcinoma 26 (C-26) cells or C-26 cell-implanted mice. Conclusion These results suggest that exenatide may be useful for treating peripheral neuropathy induced by oxaliplatin in colorectal cancer patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:26536615

  14. Entrapment Neuropathies in the Upper and Lower Limbs: Anatomy and MRI Features

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Qian; Jacobson, Jon A.; Jamadar, David A.; Gandikota, Girish; Brandon, Catherine; Morag, Yoav; Fessell, David P.; Kim, Sung-Moon

    2012-01-01

    Peripheral nerve entrapment occurs at specific anatomic locations. Familiarity with the anatomy and the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of nerve entrapment syndromes is important for accurate diagnosis and early treatment of entrapment neuropathies. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the normal anatomy of peripheral nerves in the upper and lower limbs and to review the MRI features of common disorders affecting the peripheral nerves, both compressive/entrapment and noncompressive, involving the suprascapular nerve, the axillary nerve, the radial nerve, the ulnar nerve, and the median verve in the upper limb and the sciatic nerve, the common peroneal nerve, the tibial nerve, and the interdigital nerves in the lower limb. PMID:23125929

  15. Animal Models of Autoimmune Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Soliven, Betty

    2014-01-01

    The peripheral nervous system (PNS) comprises the cranial nerves, the spinal nerves with their roots and rami, dorsal root ganglia neurons, the peripheral nerves, and peripheral components of the autonomic nervous system. Cell-mediated or antibody-mediated immune attack on the PNS results in distinct clinical syndromes, which are classified based on the tempo of illness, PNS component(s) involved, and the culprit antigen(s) identified. Insights into the pathogenesis of autoimmune neuropathy have been provided by ex vivo immunologic studies, biopsy materials, electrophysiologic studies, and experimental models. This review article summarizes earlier seminal observations and highlights the recent progress in our understanding of immunopathogenesis of autoimmune neuropathies based on data from animal models. PMID:24615441

  16. Electrophysiological investigation of toxic neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Le Quesne, P M

    1982-01-01

    Electrophysiological changes are correlated with pathological processes. Marked slowing of conduction is found in segmental demyelination due to delayed nodal excitation or short lengths of continuous conduction. Secondary demyelination causes slow conduction in hexacarbon neuropathy. Slight reduction in maximal conduction velocity is attributable to selective damage to large fibres in acrylamide neuropathy. Sensory nerve action potential amplitude is a sensitive measure of peripheral nerve function and comparison of abnormalities in different nerve segments may indicate the nature of the underlying pathological change. Other abnormalities may be elucidated by double stimuli; eg repetitive activity due to cholinesterase inhibition only occurs after the first of two closely spaced stimuli. Activity-related excitability changes may be detected by measuring the amplitude of the response to a submaximal stimulus at varying times after a maximal shock and is increased and prolonged by the pyrethroid deltamethrin. PMID:6962658

  17. Treatment of gastrointestinal autonomic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Törnblom, Hans

    2016-03-01

    The symptoms caused by gastrointestinal autonomic neuropathy in diabetes mellitus is important to highlight since it affects a large proportion of people with diabetes, regardless of whether this is type 1 or type 2. Gastroparesis and general signs of bowel dysfunction, such as constipation, diarrhoea and abdominal pain are most often encountered and involve both pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment options. This mini-review summarises a presentation given at the 'Diagnosis and treatment of autonomic diabetic neuropathy in the gut' symposium at the 2015 annual meeting of the EASD. It is accompanied by another mini-review on a topic from this symposium (by Azpiroz and Malagelada, DOI: 10.1007/s00125-015-3831-1 ) and a commentary by the Session Chair, Péter Kempler (DOI: 10.1007/s00125-015-3826-y ). PMID:26634570

  18. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies

    MedlinePlus

    ... hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies Enable Javascript to ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies is a disorder ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type II

    MedlinePlus

    ... hereditary motor neuropathy, type II distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type II Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Open All Close All Description Distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type II is a progressive disorder that affects ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type V

    MedlinePlus

    ... hereditary motor neuropathy, type V distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type V Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Open All Close All Description Distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type V is a progressive disorder that affects ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary sensory neuropathy type IA

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions hereditary sensory neuropathy type IA hereditary sensory neuropathy type IA Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... PDF Open All Close All Description Hereditary sensory neuropathy type IA is a condition characterized by nerve ...

  2. Threshold dose for peripheral neuropathy following intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) in a large animal model

    SciTech Connect

    Kinsella, T.J.; DeLuca, A.M.; Barnes, M.; Anderson, W.; Terrill, R.; Sindelar, W.F. )

    1991-04-01

    Radiation injury to peripheral nerve is a dose-limiting toxicity in the clinical application of intraoperative radiotherapy, particularly for pelvic and retroperitoneal tumors. Intraoperative radiotherapy-related peripheral neuropathy in humans receiving doses of 20-25 Gy is manifested as a mixed motor-sensory deficit beginning 6-9 months following treatment. In a previous experimental study of intraoperative radiotherapy-related neuropathy of the lumbro-sacral plexus, an approximate inverse linear relationship was reported between the intraoperative dose (20-75 Gy range) and the time to onset of hind limb paresis (1-12 mos following intraoperative radiotherapy). The principal histological lesion in irradiated nerve was loss of large nerve fibers and perineural fibrosis without significant vascular injury. Similar histological changes in irradiated nerves were found in humans. To assess peripheral nerve injury to lower doses of intraoperative radiotherapy in this same large animal model, groups of four adult American Foxhounds received doses of 10, 15, or 20 Gy to the right lumbro-sacral plexus and sciatic nerve using 9 MeV electrons. The left lumbro-sacral plexus and sciatic nerve were excluded from the intraoperative field to allow each animal to serve as its own control. Following treatment, a complete neurological exam, electromyogram, and nerve conduction studies were performed monthly for 1 year. Monthly neurological exams were performed in years 2 and 3 whereas electromyogram and nerve conduction studies were performed every 3 months during this follow-up period. With follow-up of greater than or equal to 42 months, no dog receiving 10 or 15 Gy IORT shows any clinical or laboratory evidence of peripheral nerve injury. However, all four dogs receiving 20 Gy developed right hind limb paresis at 8, 9, 9, and 12 mos following intraoperative radiotherapy.

  3. Neuromyotonia in hereditary motor neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, A F; Parkes, A W; Bolton, C F; Stewart, S A

    1991-01-01

    Two siblings with a distal motor neuropathy experienced cramping and difficulty in relaxing their muscles after voluntary contraction. Electromyographic recordings at rest revealed repetitive high voltage spontaneous electrical discharges that were accentuated after voluntary contraction and during ischaemia. Regional neuromuscular blockage with curare indicated hyperexcitability of peripheral nerve fibres and nerve block suggested that the ectopic activity originated in proximal segments of the nerve. Symptoms were improved with diphenylhydantoin, carbamazepine and tocainide. Images PMID:1851512

  4. Peripheral Neuropathy Associated withHypereosinophilic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung Ho; Kim, Jung Eun

    2008-01-01

    The idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) represents a leukoproliferative disorder, characterized by unexplained prolonged eosinophilia (>6 months) and evidence of specific organ damage. So far, the peripheral neuropathy associated with skin manifestations of HES has not been reported in the dermatologic literature although the incidence of peripheral neuropathy after HES ranges from 6~52%. Herein, we report the peripheral neuropathy associated with HES, documented by clinical, histopathological, and electrodiagnostic criteria. PMID:27303181

  5. Structural Basis for Induction of Peripheral Neuropathy by Microtubule-Targeting Cancer Drugs.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jennifer A; Slusher, Barbara S; Wozniak, Krystyna M; Farah, Mohamed H; Smiyun, Gregoriy; Wilson, Leslie; Feinstein, Stuart; Jordan, Mary Ann

    2016-09-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a serious, dose-limiting side effect of cancer treatment with microtubule-targeting drugs. Symptoms present in a "stocking-glove" distribution, with longest nerves affected most acutely, suggesting a length-dependent component to the toxicity. Axonal transport of ATP-producing mitochondria along neuronal microtubules from cell body to synapse is crucial to neuronal function. We compared the effects of the drugs paclitaxel and ixabepilone that bind along the lengths of microtubules and the drugs eribulin and vincristine that bind at microtubule ends, on mitochondrial trafficking in cultured human neuronal SK-N-SH cells and on axonal transport in mouse sciatic nerves. Antiproliferative concentrations of paclitaxel and ixabepilone significantly inhibited the anterograde transport velocity of mitochondria in neuronal cells, whereas eribulin and vincristine inhibited transport only at significantly higher concentrations. Confirming these observations, anterogradely transported amyloid precursor protein accumulated in ligated sciatic nerves of control and eribulin-treated mice, but not in paclitaxel-treated mice, indicating that paclitaxel inhibited anterograde axonal transport, whereas eribulin did not. Electron microscopy of sciatic nerves of paclitaxel-treated mice showed reduced organelle accumulation proximal to the ligation consistent with inhibition of anterograde (kinesin based) transport by paclitaxel. In contrast, none of the drugs significantly affected retrograde (dynein based) transport in neuronal cells or mouse nerves. Collectively, these results suggest that paclitaxel and ixabepilone, which bind along the lengths and stabilize microtubules, inhibit kinesin-based axonal transport, but not dynein-based transport, whereas the microtubule-destabilizing drugs, eribulin and vincristine, which bind preferentially to microtubule ends, have significantly less effect on all microtubule-based axonal transport. Cancer Res; 76(17); 5115-23.

  6. Deregulation of NF-кB-miR-146a negative feedback loop may be involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Yousefzadeh, Nasibeh; Alipour, Mohammad Reza; Soufi, Farhad Ghadiri

    2015-03-01

    The current study was designed to explore whether microRNA-146a and its adapter proteins (tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) and interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 1 (IRAK1)) are involved in the pathogenesis of diabetes neuropathy. Twelve male Sprague Dawley rats were randomized into control and diabetic groups (n = 6). Diabetes was induced by a single-dose injection of nicotinamide (110 mg/kg; i.p.), 15 min before injection of streptozotocin (50 mg/kg; i.p.) in 12-h-fasted rats. Diabetic neuropathy was evaluated by hot plate and tail emersion tests, 2 months after the injection of streptozotocin. The gene expression level of microRNA-146a (miR-146a), IRAK1, TRAF6, and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) was measured in the sciatic nerve of rats using the real time-PCR method. Moreover, the activity of NF-κB and the concentration of pro-inflammatory cytokines were determined by the ELISA method. In comparison with the control group, a threefold increase in the expression of miR-146a and NF-κB, and a twofold decrease in the expression of TRAF6 were observed in the sciatic nerve of diabetic rats. Furthermore, the NF-κB activity and the concentration of TNF-α, interleukin 6 (IL-6), and interleukin 1β (IL-1β) in the sciatic nerve of diabetic rats were higher than in those of control counterparts. These results suggest that a defect in the NF-кB-miR-146a negative feedback loop may be involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy. PMID:25567745

  7. Tang-Tong-Fang Confers Protection against Experimental Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy by Reducing Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mingdi; Huang, Da; Liu, Xiaoxing; Lin, Lan

    2015-01-01

    Tang-tong-fang (TTF) is a Chinese herbal formula that has been shown to be beneficial in diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN), a common complication secondary to diabetic microvascular injury. However, the underlying mechanism of protection in nerve ischemia provided by TTF is still unclear. We hypothesized that TTF alleviates DPN via inhibition of ICAM-1 expression. Therefore, we tested the effect of TTF in a previously established DPN model, in which nerve injury was induced by ischemia/reperfusion in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. We found that the conduction velocity and amplitude of action potentials of sciatic nerve conduction were reduced in the DPN model group but were rescued by TTF treatment. In addition, TTF treatment also attenuated the effect of DPN on other parameters including histology and ultrastructural changes, expression of ICAM-1, MPO, and TNF-α in rat sciatic nerves, and plasma sICAM-1 and MPO levels. Together, our data suggest that TTF treatment may alleviate DPN via ICAM-1 inhibition. PMID:26539228

  8. Mice lacking glutamate carboxypeptidase II are protected from peripheral neuropathy and ischemic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Bacich, Dean J; Wozniak, Krystyna M; Lu, X-C May; O'Keefe, Denize S; Callizot, Noelle; Heston, Warren D W; Slusher, Barbara S

    2005-10-01

    Excessive glutamate release is associated with neuronal damage. A new strategy for the treatment of neuronal injury involves inhibition of the neuropeptidase glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCP II), also known as N-acetylated alpha-linked acidic dipeptidase. GCP II is believed to mediate the hydrolysis of N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate (NAAG) to glutamate and N-acetyl-aspartate, and inhibition of NAAG peptidase activity (by GCP II and other peptidases) is neuroprotective. Mice were generated in which the Folh1 gene encoding GCP II was disrupted (Folh1-/- mice). No overt behavioral differences were apparent between Folh1-/- mice and wild-type littermates, with respect to their overall performance in locomotion, coordination, pain threshold, cognition and psychiatric behavioral paradigms. Morphological analysis of peripheral nerves, however, showed significantly smaller axons (reduced myelin sheaths and axon diameters) in sciatic nerves from Folh1-/- mice. Following sciatic nerve crush, Folh1-/- mice suffered less injury and recovered faster than wild-type littermates. In a model of ischemic injury, the Folh1-/- mice exhibited a significant reduction (p < 0.05) in infarct volume compared with their wild-type littermates when subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion, a model of stroke. These findings support the hypothesis that GCP II inhibitors may represent a novel treatment for peripheral neuropathies as well as stroke. PMID:16190866

  9. Delayed Sciatic Nerve Injury Resulting From Myositis Ossificans Traumatica.

    PubMed

    Guan, Zhe; Wilson, Thomas J; Jacobson, Jon A; Hollon, Todd C; Yang, Lynda J-S

    2016-05-01

    A motorcyclist sustained multiple-system trauma, including a left buttock hematoma requiring decompression and evacuation. Presentation for severe hip pain and lower extremity weakness was delayed. Imaging revealed myositis ossificans traumatica compressing the sciatic nerve in the buttock. The patient underwent sciatic nerve decompression with resection of heterotopic calcification, resulting in improvement in pain and left lower extremity function. This case illustrates the contrast in differential diagnosis of peripheral nerve injury immediately posttrauma and that occurring in a slow, delayed fashion posttrauma. Myositis ossificans may be an underrecognized complication of trauma but should be considered in cases of delayed peripheral nerve injury after trauma. PMID:26548968

  10. Sensory neuropathy in two Border collie puppies.

    PubMed

    Vermeersch, K; Van Ham, L; Braund, K G; Bhatti, S; Tshamala, M; Chiers, K; Schrauwen, E

    2005-06-01

    A peripheral sensory neuropathy was diagnosed in two Border collie puppies. Neurological, electrophysiological and histopathological examinations suggested a purely sensory neuropathy with mainly distal involvement. Urinary incontinence was observed in one of the puppies and histological examination of the vagus nerve revealed degenerative changes. An inherited disorder was suspected. PMID:15971901

  11. Peripheral Neuropathy – Clinical and Electrophysiological Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Tae; Prasad, Kalpana; Lloyd, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    This article is a primer on the pathophysiology and clinical evaluation of peripheral neuropathy for the radiologist. Magnetic resonance neurography (MRN) has utility in the diagnosis of many focal peripheral nerve lesions. When combined with history, examination, electrophysiology, and laboratory data, future advancements in high-field MRN may play an increasingly important role in the evaluation of patients with peripheral neuropathy. PMID:24210312

  12. Management of ischemic optic neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Hayreh, Sohan Singh

    2011-01-01

    Ischemic optic neuropathies (IONs) consist primarily of two types: anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (AION) and posterior ischemic optic neuropathy (PION). AION comprises arteritic AION (A-AION: due to giant cell arteritis) and non-arteritic AION (NA-AION: due to other causes). PION consists of arteritic PION (A-PION: due to giant cell arteritis), non-arteritic PION (NA-PION: due to other causes), and surgical PION (a complication of several systemic surgical procedures). These five types of ION are distinct clinical entities etiologically, pathogenetically, clinically and from the management point of view. In the management of AION, the first crucial step with patients aged 50 and over is to identify immediately whether it is arteritic or not because A-AION is an ophthalmic emergency and requires urgent treatment with high-dose steroid therapy to prevent any further visual loss in one or both eyes. Patients with NA-AION, when treated with systemic corticosteroid therapy within first 2 weeks of onset, had significantly better visual outcome than untreated ones. Systemic risk factors, particularly nocturnal arterial hypotension, play major roles in the development of NA-AION; management of them is essential in its prevention and management. NA-PION patients, when treated with high-dose systemic steroid therapy during the very early stages of the disease, showed significant improvement in visual acuity and visual fields, compared to untreated eyes. A-PION, like A-AION, requires urgent treatment with high-dose steroid therapy to prevent any further visual loss in one or both eyes. There is no satisfactory treatment for surgical PION, except to take prophylactic measures to prevent its development. PMID:21350282

  13. Animal models of HIV peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Burdo, Tricia H; Miller, Andrew D

    2014-01-01

    The use of animal models in the study of HIV and AIDS has advanced our understanding of the underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms of infection. Of the multitude of HIV disease manifestations, peripheral neuropathy remains one of the most common long-term side effects. Several of the most important causes of peripheral neuropathy in AIDS patients include direct association with HIV infection with or without antiretroviral medication and infection with opportunistic agents. Because the pathogeneses of these diseases are difficult to study in human patients, animal models have allowed for significant advancement in the understanding of the role of viral infection and the immune system in disease genesis. This review focuses on rodent, rabbit, feline and rhesus models used to study HIV-associated peripheral neuropathies, focusing specifically on sensory neuropathy and antiretroviral-associated neuropathies. PMID:25214880

  14. N-hexane neuropathy in offset printers.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, C M; Yu, C W; Fong, K Y; Leung, S Y; Tsin, T W; Yu, Y L; Cheung, T F; Chan, S Y

    1993-01-01

    In an offset printing factory with 56 workers, 20 (36%) developed symptomatic peripheral neuropathy due to exposure to n-hexane. Another 26 workers (46%) were found to have subclinical neuropathy. The initial change in the nerve conduction study was reduced amplitude of the sensory action potentials, followed by reduced amplitude of the motor action potentials, reduction in motor conduction velocities and increase in distal latencies. These changes indicate primary axonal degeneration with secondary demyelination. Sural nerve biopsy in a severe case showed giant axonal swellings due to accumulation of 10nm neurofilaments, myelin sheath attenuation and widening of nodal gaps. The development of neuropathy bore no direct relationship to the duration of exposure, hence factors such as individual susceptibility may be important. Optic neuropathy and CNS involvement were uncommon and autonomic neuropathy was not encountered. Images PMID:8505647

  15. Neuroactive steroid treatment modulates myelin lipid profile in diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Mitro, Nico; Cermenati, Gaia; Brioschi, Elisabetta; Abbiati, Federico; Audano, Matteo; Giatti, Silvia; Crestani, Maurizio; De Fabiani, Emma; Azcoitia, Inigo; Garcia-Segura, Luis Miguel; Caruso, Donatella; Melcangi, Roberto Cosimo

    2014-09-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy causes a decrease in the levels of dihydroprogesterone and 5α-androstane-3α,17β-diol (3α-diol) in the peripheral nerves. These two neuroactive steroids exert protective effects, by mechanisms that still remain elusive. We have previously shown that the activation of Liver X Receptors improves the peripheral neuropathic phenotype in diabetic rats. This protective effect is accompanied by the restoration to control values of the levels of dihydroprogesterone and 3α-diol in peripheral nerves. In addition, activation of these receptors decreases peripheral myelin abnormalities by improving the lipid desaturation capacity, which is strongly blunted by diabetes, and ultimately restores the myelin lipid profile to non-diabetic values. On this basis, we here investigate whether dihydroprogesterone or 3α-diol may exert their protective effects by modulating the myelin lipid profile. We report that both neuroactive steroids act on the lipogenic gene expression profile in the sciatic nerve of diabetic rats, reducing the accumulation of myelin saturated fatty acids and promoting desaturation. These changes were associated with a reduction in myelin structural alterations. These findings provide evidence that dihydroprogesterone and 3α-diol are protective agents against diabetic peripheral neuropathy by regulating the de novo lipogenesis pathway, which positively influences myelin lipid profile. PMID:24607810

  16. Giant axonal neuropathy: MRS findings.

    PubMed

    Alkan, Alpay; Kutlu, Ramazan; Sigirci, Ahmet; Baysal, Tamer; Altinok, Tayfun; Yakinci, Cengiz

    2003-10-01

    Giant axonal neuropathy (GAN) is a rare genetic disease of childhood involving the central and peripheral nervous systems. Axonal loss with several giant axons filled with neurofilaments is the main histopathological feature of peripheral nerve biopsies in this disease. Routine neuroimaging studies reveal diffuse hyperintensities in cerebral and cerebellar white matter. In this case report, the authors present the brain magnetic resonance spectroscopic features (normal N-acetylaspartate/creatine and increased choline/creatine and myoinositol/creatine ratios), which might indicate the absence of neuroaxonal loss and the presence of significant demyelination and glial proliferation in white matter, of an 11-year-old boy diagnosed with GAN. PMID:14569833

  17. Dioscorea Extract (DA-9801) Modulates Markers of Peripheral Neuropathy in Type 2 Diabetic db/db Mice

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Eunjung; Lee, Sung Ok; Kang, Tong Ho; Kim, Hye Ju; Choi, Sang Zin; Son, Mi-Won; Kim, Sun Yeou

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the therapeutic effects of DA-9801, an optimized extract of Dioscorea species, on diabetic peripheral neuropathy in a type 2 diabetic animal model. In this study, db/db mice were treated with DA-9801 (30 and 100 mg/kg, daily, p.o.) for 12 weeks. DA-9801 reduced the blood glucose levels and increased the withdrawal latencies in hot plate tests. Moreover, it prevented nerve damage based on increased nerve conduction velocity and ultrastructural changes. Decrease of nerve growth factor (NGF) may have a detrimental effect on diabetic neuropathy. We previously reported NGF regulatory properties of the Dioscorea genus. In this study, DA-9801 induced NGF production in rat primary astrocytes. In addition, it increased NGF levels in the sciatic nerve and the plasma of type 2 diabetic animals. DA-9801 also increased neurite outgrowth and mRNA expression of Tieg1/Klf10, an NGF target gene, in PC12 cells. These results demonstrated the attenuation of diabetic peripheral neuropathy by oral treatment with DA-9801 via NGF regulation. DA-9801 is currently being evaluated in a phase II clinical study. PMID:25414776

  18. [Delayed paresis of the femoral nerve after total hip arthroplasty associated with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP)].

    PubMed

    Schuh, A; Dürr, V; Weier, H; Zeiler, G; Winterholler, M

    2004-07-01

    Delayed lesions of the femoral or sciatic nerve are a rare complication after total hip arthroplasty. Several cases in association with cement edges, scar tissue, broken cerclages, deep hematoma, or reinforcement rings have been published. We report about a 62-year-old female who developed a pure motor paresis of the quadriceps muscle 2 weeks after total hip arthroplasty. After electrophysiological evaluation had revealed an isolated femoral nerve lesion, revision of the femoral nerve was performed. During operative revision no pathologic findings could be seen. One week later the patient developed paralysis of the left wrist and finger extensors after using crutches. Electrophysiological evaluation revealed several nerve conduction blocks in physiological entrapments and the diagnosis of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) was established. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is a rare disease with increased vulnerability of the peripheral nerve system with mostly reversible sensorimotor deficits. It should be taken into consideration in cases of atypical findings of compression syndromes of peripheral nerves or delayed neuropathy, e. g., after total hip arthroplasty. PMID:15083272

  19. Chronic sciatic nerve compression induces fibrosis in dorsal root ganglia.

    PubMed

    Li, Qinwen; Chen, Jianghai; Chen, Yanhua; Cong, Xiaobin; Chen, Zhenbing

    2016-03-01

    In the present study, pathological alterations in neurons of the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) were investigated in a rat model of chronic sciatic nerve compression. The rat model of chronic sciatic nerve compression was established by placing a 1 cm Silastic tube around the right sciatic nerve. Histological examination was performed via Masson's trichrome staining. DRG injury was assessed using Fluoro Ruby (FR) or Fluoro Gold (FG). The expression levels of target genes were examined using reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction, western blot and immunohistochemical analyses. At 3 weeks post‑compression, collagen fiber accumulation was observed in the ipsilateral area and, at 8 weeks, excessive collagen formation with muscle atrophy was observed. The collagen volume fraction gradually and significantly increased following sciatic nerve compression. In the model rats, the numbers of FR‑labeled DRG neurons were significantly higher, relative to the sham‑operated group, however, the numbers of FG‑labeled neurons were similar. In the ipsilateral DRG neurons of the model group, the levels of transforming growth factor‑β1 (TGF‑β1) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) were elevated and, surrounding the neurons, the levels of collagen type I were increased, compared with those in the contralateral DRG. In the ipsilateral DRG, chronic nerve compression was associated with significantly higher levels of phosphorylated (p)‑extracellular signal‑regulated kinase 1/2, and significantly lower levels of p‑c‑Jun N‑terminal kinase and p‑p38, compared with those in the contralateral DRGs. Chronic sciatic nerve compression likely induced DRG pathology by upregulating the expression levels of TGF‑β1, CTGF and collagen type I, with involvement of the mitogen‑activated protein kinase signaling pathway. PMID:26820076

  20. Chronic sciatic nerve compression induces fibrosis in dorsal root ganglia

    PubMed Central

    LI, QINWEN; CHEN, JIANGHAI; CHEN, YANHUA; CONG, XIAOBIN; CHEN, ZHENBING

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, pathological alterations in neurons of the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) were investigated in a rat model of chronic sciatic nerve compression. The rat model of chronic sciatic nerve compression was established by placing a 1 cm Silastic tube around the right sciatic nerve. Histological examination was performed via Masson's trichrome staining. DRG injury was assessed using Fluoro Ruby (FR) or Fluoro Gold (FG). The expression levels of target genes were examined using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, western blot and immunohistochemical analyses. At 3 weeks post-compression, collagen fiber accumulation was observed in the ipsilateral area and, at 8 weeks, excessive collagen formation with muscle atrophy was observed. The collagen volume fraction gradually and significantly increased following sciatic nerve compression. In the model rats, the numbers of FR-labeled DRG neurons were significantly higher, relative to the sham-operated group, however, the numbers of FG-labeled neurons were similar. In the ipsilateral DRG neurons of the model group, the levels of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) were elevated and, surrounding the neurons, the levels of collagen type I were increased, compared with those in the contralateral DRG. In the ipsilateral DRG, chronic nerve compression was associated with significantly higher levels of phosphorylated (p)-extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, and significantly lower levels of p-c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p-p38, compared with those in the contralateral DRGs. Chronic sciatic nerve compression likely induced DRG pathology by upregulating the expression levels of TGF-β1, CTGF and collagen type I, with involvement of the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway. PMID:26820076

  1. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy effectively prevented diabetic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Ling; Chen, Kuan-Hung; Yin, Tsung-Cheng; Huang, Tien-Hung; Yuen, Chun-Man; Chung, Sheng-Ying; Sung, Pei-Hsun; Tong, Meng-Shen; Chen, Chih-Hung; Chang, Hsueh-Wen; Lin, Kun-Chen; Ko, Sheung-Fat; Yip, Hon-Kan

    2015-01-01

    Background: We tested the hypothesis that extracorporeal shock wave (ECSW) therapy can effectively protect sciatic nerve (SN) from diabetes mellitus (DM)-induced neuropathy in leptin-deficient (ob/ob) mice. Methods and results: Eighteen-week C57BL/6 mice (n=8) served as age-matched controls (group 1) and ob/ob mice (n=16) were categorized into DM (group 2) and DM + ECSW (0.12 mJ/mm2 for 4 times of 200 impulses at 3-week intervals) (group 3). The animals were sacrificed two weeks post-ECSW. In vitro results showed that the protein expressions of oxidative stress (NOX-1, NOX-2, oxidized protein), inflammation (MMP-9, TNF-α, iNOS), apoptosis (Bax, cleaved caspase-3, & PARP), and DNA-damage marker (γ-H2AX) were significantly higher in RT4-D6P2T (schwannoma cell line) treated by menadione (25 µM) compared with control group and were significantly reversed after ECSW (0.12 mJ/mm2, 200 impulses) (all p<0.001). mRNA expressions of inflammation (MMP-9, TNF-α, iNOS), oxidative stress (NOX-1, NOX-2) and apoptosis (Bax, caspase-3) in SN were significantly higher in group 2 than in group 1 and were significantly reversed in group 3, whereas the mRNA expressions of anti-oxidants (HO-1, NQO1) progressively increased from group 1 to group 3 (all p<0.001). Cellular expressions of F4/80+, CD14+, γ-H2AX+ cells, and number of vacuolar formation in SN showed a pattern identical to that of inflammation markers among all groups (all p<0.001). Microscopic findings of Schwann cells and myelin-sheath scores, and number of eNOS+ cells in SN showed a reversed pattern compared to that of inflammation among all groups (all p<0.001). Conclusions: ECSW therapy protected SN against DM-induced neuropathy. PMID:26885256

  2. Current understanding of auditory neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Boo, Nem-Yun

    2008-12-01

    Auditory neuropathy is defined by the presence of normal evoked otoacoustic emissions (OAE) and absent or abnormal auditory brainstem responses (ABR). The sites of lesion could be at the cochlear inner hair cells, spiral ganglion cells of the cochlea, synapse between the inner hair cells and auditory nerve, or the auditory nerve itself. Genetic, infectious or neonatal/perinatal insults are the 3 most commonly identified underlying causes. Children usually present with delay in speech and language development while adult patients present with hearing loss and disproportionately poor speech discrimination for the degree of hearing loss. Although cochlear implant is the treatment of choice, current evidence show that it benefits only those patients with endocochlear lesions, but not those with cochlear nerve deficiency or central nervous system disorders. As auditory neuropathy is a disorder with potential long-term impact on a child's development, early hearing screen using both OAE and ABR should be carried out on all newborns and infants to allow early detection and intervention. PMID:19904452

  3. Traumatic Optic Neuropathy: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Kumaran, Arjunan Muthu; Sundar, Gangadhara; Chye, Lim Thiam

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this article is to evaluate current literature on investigation and management of traumatic optic neuropathy (TON), propose recommendations for diagnosis and management, and explore novel future treatments. TON, though uncommon, causes substantial visual loss. Without clear guidelines, there is much ambiguity regarding its diagnosis and management. Investigation and treatment (conservative, medical, surgical, and combined) vary widely between centers. Electronic databases PubMed, MEDLINE, PROSPERO, CENTRAL, and EMBASE were searched for content that matched “Traumatic optic neuropathy.” Articles with abstracts and full text available, published in the past 10 years, written English and limited to human adults, were selected. All study designs were acceptable except case reports and case series with fewer 10 patients. All abstracts were then evaluated for relevance. References of these studies were evaluated and if also relevant, included. A total of 2,686 articles were retrieved and 43 examined for relevance. Of these, 23 articles were included. TON is a clinical diagnosis. Visual-evoked potential is useful in diagnosis and prognosis. Computed tomography demonstrates canal fractures and concomitant injuries. Magnetic resonance images should be reserved for select and stable patients. Conservative treatment is appropriate in mild TON. Steroids are of questionable benefit and may be harmful. Surgery should be reserved for patients with radiological evidence of compression and individualized. PMID:25709751

  4. Autonomic Neuropathy in Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Verrotti, Alberto; Prezioso, Giovanni; Scattoni, Raffaella; Chiarelli, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN) is a serious and common complication of diabetes, often overlooked and misdiagnosed. It is a systemic-wide disorder that may be asymptomatic in the early stages. The most studied and clinically important form of DAN is cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy defined as the impairment of autonomic control of the cardiovascular system in patients with diabetes after exclusion of other causes. The reported prevalence of DAN varies widely depending on inconsistent definition, different diagnostic method, different patient cohorts studied. The pathogenesis is still unclear and probably multifactorial. Once DAN becomes clinically evident, no form of therapy has been identified, which can effectively stop or reverse it. Prevention strategies are based on strict glycemic control with intensive insulin treatment, multifactorial intervention, and lifestyle modification including control of hypertension, dyslipidemia, stop smoking, weight loss, and adequate physical exercise. The present review summarizes the latest knowledge regarding clinical presentation, epidemiology, pathogenesis, and management of DAN, with some mention to childhood and adolescent population. PMID:25520703

  5. Peroneal neuropathy after weight loss.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Martinez, A; Arpa, J; Palau, F

    2000-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the clinical and electrophysiological findings in peroneal mononeuropathies following a weight-reduction diet. Thirty patients with acute peroneal palsy and weight loss were studied. Complete nerve conduction studies (NCS) were performed in upper and lower limbs. NCS showed conduction block (CB) of the peroneal nerve at the fibular head that recovered in 29 patients within 3 weeks to 3 months. Severity of CB was correlated with clinical weakness. Three patients had abnormalities consistent with polyneuropathy (PNP). NCS in asymptomatic relatives confirmed familial neuropathy. Nerve biopsy and molecular study were consistent with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP). One of these peroneal palsies (6 months) recovered after neurolysis. Weight loss might be a risk factor in peroneal mononeuropathies. NCS is a tool in the diagnosis of the site and severity of the nerve injury. Testing should be considered for relatives of patients with PNP because peroneal mononeuropathies may be the first expression of HNPP. PMID:10905469

  6. Collateral sprouting of uninjured primary afferent A-fibers into the superficial dorsal horn of the adult rat spinal cord after topical capsaicin treatment to the sciatic nerve.

    PubMed

    Mannion, R J; Doubell, T P; Coggeshall, R E; Woolf, C J

    1996-08-15

    That terminals of uninjured primary sensory neurons terminating in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord can collaterally sprout was first suggested by Liu and Chambers (1958), but this has since been disputed. Recently, horseradish peroxidase conjugated to the B subunit of cholera toxin (B-HRP) and intracellular HRP injections have shown that sciatic nerve section or crush produces a long-lasting rearrangement in the organization of primary afferent central terminals, with A-fibers sprouting into lamina II, a region that normally receives only C-fiber input (Woolf et al., 1992). The mechanism of this A-fiber sprouting has been thought to involve injury-induced C-fiber transganglionic degeneration combined with myelinated A-fibers being conditioned into a regenerative growth state. In this study, we ask whether C-fiber degeneration and A-fiber conditioning are both necessary for the sprouting of A-fibers into lamina II. Local application of the C-fiber-specific neurotoxin capsaicin to the sciatic nerve has previously been shown to result in C-fiber damage and degenerative atrophy in lamina II. We have used B-HRP to transganglionically label A-fiber central terminals and have shown that 2 weeks after topical capsaicin treatment to the sciatic nerve, the pattern of B-HRP staining in the dorsal horn is indistinguishable from that seen after axotomy, with lamina II displaying novel staining in the identical region containing capsaicin-treated C-fiber central terminals. These results suggest that after C-fiber injury, uninjured A-fiber central terminals can collaterally sprout into lamina II of the dorsal horn. This phenomenon may help to explain the pain associated with C-fiber neuropathy. PMID:8756447

  7. Involvement of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 in 2,5-hexanedione-induced neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing-Shan; Zhang, Cui-Li; Hou, Li-Yan; Zhao, Xiu-Lan; Yang, Xi-Wei; Xie, Ke-Qin

    2008-06-01

    Occupational exposure to n-hexane produces a neuropathy characterized as a central-peripheral distal axonopathy, which is mediated by 2,5-hexanedione (HD). To investigate the mechanisms of the neuropathy induced by HD, the contents and activities of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) and activators (p35 precursor, p35 and p25) in rats' cerebrum cortex (CC), spinal cord (SC) and sciatic nerve (SN) were determined. The results showed that the levels and activities of CDK5 in CC of 200 or 400mg/kg HD-treated rats were significantly decreased in both the cytosolic and membrane fractions and negatively correlated with gait abnormality in the cytosolic fraction. However, CDK5 contents and activities in SN of rats treated with 200 or 400mg/kg HD were significantly increased and positively correlated with gait abnormality in both the cytosolic and membrane fractions. Although increases of CDK5 contents in both the cytosolic and membrane fractions of SC in 200 and 400mg/kg HD-treated rats were also observed, CDK5 activities were significantly decreased in the cytosolic fraction and negatively correlated with gait abnormality. The changes of p35 precursor, p35 and p25 contents in CC, SC and SN showed the same pattern with that of CDK5 activities. Thus, HD intoxication was associated with deregulation of CDK5 and its activator p35 or p25 in nerve tissues. The inconsistent changes of CDK5 activities in CNS and PNS might delegate the different mechanisms of HD-induced peripheral neuropathy. PMID:18423835

  8. Decrease in neuroimmune activation by HSV-mediated gene transfer of TNFα soluble receptor alleviates pain in rats with diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Ortmann, Kathryn L Maier; Chattopadhyay, Munmun

    2014-10-01

    The mechanisms of diabetic painful neuropathy are complicated and comprise of peripheral and central pathophysiological phenomena. A number of proinflammatory cytokines are involved in this process. Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) is considered to be one of the major contributors of neuropathic pain. In order to explore the potential role of inflammation in the peripheral nervous system of Type 1 diabetic animals with painful neuropathy, we investigated whether TNF-α is a key inflammatory mediator to the diabetic neuropathic pain and whether continuous delivery of TNFα soluble receptor from damaged axons achieved by HSV vector mediated transduction of DRG would block or alter the pain perception in animals with diabetic neuropathy. Diabetic animals exhibited changes in threshold of mechanical and thermal pain perception compared to control rats and also demonstrated increases in TNFα in the DRG, spinal cord dorsal horn, sciatic nerve and in the foot skin, 6 weeks after the onset of diabetes. Therapeutic approaches by HSV mediated expression of p55 TNF soluble receptor significantly attenuated the diabetes-induced hyperalgesia and decreased the expression of TNFα with reduction in the phosphorylation of p38MAPK in the spinal cord dorsal horn and DRG. The overall outcome of this study suggests that neuroinflammatory activation in the peripheral nervous system may be involved in the pathogenesis of painful neuropathy in Type 1 diabetes which can be alleviated by local expression of HSV vector expressing p55 TNF soluble receptor. PMID:24880032

  9. Toxicity studies on agents Gb and Gd (Phase 2): Delayed neuropathy study of soman in SPF white leghorn chickens. Final technical report, July 1985-August 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Bucci, T.J.; Parker, R.M.; Gosnell, P.A.

    1992-05-01

    A dose rangefinding study, a delayed neuropathy study, and a neurotoxic esterase study, were performed in White Leghorn chickens using the organophosphate ester Soman. The hens used for the Rangefinding study were dosed once orally with 500, 250, 100, 50, 25, or 0 microns g/Kg GD, on Day 1. They were pretreated and protected daily through Day 7 with atropine. Surviving hens were euthanized with sodium pentobarbital on Day 21. The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) to be used in the Delayed Neuropathy Study was chosen based upon the rangefinding data. Fifty hens were assigned to a Single Dose Delayed Neuropathy study. Groups of ten hens were given 14.2 (MTD), 7.1 (MTD/2), 3.5 (MTD/4), 0 (negative control) microns/Kg GD or 51 0 mg/Kg tri-ortho-cresyl phosphate (TOCP) (positive control). Rangefinding study. They were evaluated for signs of neurologic toxicity/ataxia. Necropsy examination was performed on all animals. Sections of cerebellum, medulla, spinal cord (cervical, thoracic, and lumbar), both sciatic nerves and their tibial branch were examined microscopically.... Delayed neuropathy; Agents; Soman; Chickens.

  10. Drugs for the treatment of peripheral neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Marmiroli, Paola; Cavaletti, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathies are frequent in association with systemic diseases as well as isolated disorders. Recent advances in the therapy of specific neuropathies led to the approval of new drugs/treatments. This review selected those peripheral neuropathies where the most recent approvals were provided and revised the potential future developments in diabetic and toxic-induced neuropathies, although they do not have a currently available causal therapy in view of their epidemiological and social relevance. Data have been extracted from the most important published trials and from clinical experience. In addition, data from the Food and Drug Administration and European Medicine Agency indications on the treatment of the selected peripheral neuropathies and from recently updated international guidelines have also been included. The website of the U.S. National Institutes of Health www.clinicaltrials.gov registry has been used as the reference database for phase III clinical trials not yet published or ongoing. This review gives a general overview of the most recent advances in the treatment of amyloid, inflammatory, and paraproteinemic peripheral neuropathies. Moreover, it briefly describes the unmet medical need in disabling and frequent conditions, such as diabetic and chemotherapy-induced neuropathy, highlighting the most promising therapeutic approaches to their treatment. PMID:26567516

  11. Optic neuropathy associated with systemic sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Ben J.; Graham, Elizabeth M.; Plant, Gordon T.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify and follow a series of 52 patients with optic neuropathy related to sarcoidosis. Methods: Prospective observational cohort study. Results: The disorder was more common in women and affected a wide age range. It was proportionately more common in African and Caribbean ethnic groups. Two clinical subtypes were identified: the more common was a subacute optic neuropathy resembling optic neuritis; a more slowly progressive optic neuropathy arose in the remaining 17%. Sixteen (31%) were bilateral. Concurrent intraocular inflammation was seen in 36%. Pain arose in only 27% of cases. An optic perineuritis was seen in 2 cases, and predominate involvement of the chiasm in one. MRI findings showed optic nerve involvement in 75% of cases, with adjacent and more widespread inflammation in 31%. Treatment with corticosteroids was helpful in those with an inflammatory optic neuropathy, but not those with mass lesions. Relapse of visual signs arose in 25% of cases, necessitating an increase or escalation of treatment, but relapse was not a poor prognostic factor. Conclusions: This is a large prospective study of the clinical characteristics and outcome of treatment in optic neuropathy associated with sarcoidosis. Patients who experience an inflammatory optic neuropathy respond to treatment but may relapse. Those with infiltrative or progressive optic neuropathies improve less well even though the inflammatory disorder responds to therapy. PMID:27536707

  12. Compressive neuropathy in the upper limb

    PubMed Central

    Thatte, Mukund R.; Mansukhani, Khushnuma A.

    2011-01-01

    Entrampment neuropathy or compression neuropathy is a fairly common problem in the upper limb. Carpal tunnel syndrome is the commonest, followed by Cubital tunnel compression or Ulnar Neuropathy at Elbow. There are rarer entities like supinator syndrome and pronator syndrome affecting the Radial and Median nerves respectively. This article seeks to review comprehensively the pathophysiology, Anatomy and treatment of these conditions in a way that is intended for the practicing Hand Surgeon as well as postgraduates in training. It is generally a rewarding exercise to treat these conditions because they generally do well after corrective surgery. Diagnostic guidelines, treatment protocols and surgical technique has been discussed. PMID:22022039

  13. Chronic demyelinating peripheral neuropathy in cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis.

    PubMed

    Argov, Z; Soffer, D; Eisenberg, S; Zimmerman, Y

    1986-07-01

    Three siblings with chemically proved cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis presented with typical neurological manifestations of dementia and spinocerebellar disorder. Electrodiagnostic tests revealed demyelinating neuropathy in all three. Sural nerve biopsies showed loss of myelinated large fibers, marked Schwann cell proliferation, and onion bulb formation. Teased-fiber preparations confirmed the occurrence of segmental demyelination and remyelination. We suggest that demyelinating neuropathy is part of the neurological spectrum of cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a recessively inherited motor and sensory neuropathy. PMID:3017187

  14. Familial multiple symmetric lipomatosis with peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Chalk, C H; Mills, K R; Jacobs, J M; Donaghy, M

    1990-08-01

    We describe coexisting peripheral neuropathy and multiple symmetric lipomatosis in 4 of 7 siblings. The absence of either condition in 3 other generations of this family suggests autosomal recessive inheritance. None of the affected siblings were alcoholic, a factor some have proposed to explain the frequent occurrence of peripheral neuropathy in sporadic multiple symmetric lipomatosis. Serum lipid studies, including apoprotein A levels, were normal. Sural nerve biopsy from 1 patient showed nerve fiber loss, predominantly affecting large myelinated fibers. The relationship between myelin sheath thickness and axon diameter was normal, arguing that this neuropathy is not due to primary axonal atrophy. PMID:2166247

  15. L-carnitine alleviates sciatic nerve crush injury in rats: functional and electron microscopy assessments

    PubMed Central

    Avsar, Ümmü Zeynep; Avsar, Umit; Aydin, Ali; Yayla, Muhammed; Ozturkkaragoz, Berna; Un, Harun; Saritemur, Murat; Mercantepe, Tolga

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that L-carnitine exhibits neuroprotective effects on injured sciatic nerve of rats with diabetes mellitus. It is hypothesized that L-carnitine exhibits neuroprotective effects on injured sciatic nerve of rats. Rat sciatic nerve was crush injured by a forceps and exhibited degenerative changes. After intragastric administration of 50 and 100 mg/kg L-carnitine for 30 days, axon area, myelin sheath area, axon diameter, myelin sheath diameter, and numerical density of the myelinated axons of injured sciatic nerve were similar to normal, and the function of injured sciatic nerve also improved significantly. These findings suggest that L-carnitine exhibits neuroprotective effects on sciatic nerve crush injury in rats. PMID:25206754

  16. Efficacy of nanofibrous conduits in repair of long-segment sciatic nerve defects

    PubMed Central

    Biazar, Esmaeil; Keshel, Saeed Heidari; Pouya, Majid

    2013-01-01

    Our previous studies have histomorphologically confirmed that nanofibrous poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) conduit can be used to repair 30-mm-long sciatic nerve defects. However, the repair effects on rat behaviors remain poorly understood. In this study, we used nanofibrous poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) conduit and autologous sciatic nerve to bridge 30-mm-long rat sciatic nerve gaps. Within 4 months after surgery, rat sciatic nerve functional recovery was evaluated per month by behavioral analyses, including toe out angle, toe spread analysis, walking track analysis, extensor postural thrust, swimming test, open-field analysis and nociceptive function. Results showed that rat sciatic nerve functional recovery was similar after nanofibrous poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) conduit and autologous nerve grafting. These findings suggest that nanofibrous poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) conduit is suitable in use for repair of long-segment sciatic nerve defects. PMID:25206560

  17. A new approach to assess function after sciatic nerve lesion in the mouse - adaptation of the sciatic static index.

    PubMed

    Baptista, Abrahão Fontes; Gomes, Joyce Rios de Souza; Oliveira, Júlia Teixeria; Santos, Soraia Moreira Garzedim; Vannier-Santos, Marcos André; Martinez, Ana Maria Blanco

    2007-04-15

    Among the numerous ways of assessing regeneration after peripheral nerve lesions, the analysis of gait is one of the most important, because it shows the recovery of function, which is the ultimate goal of the repair machinery. The sciatic function index was introduced as a method to assess reinnervation after an experimental sciatic nerve lesion, and was adapted to the mouse model. The sciatic static index (SSI), is more simple and practical to perform, and is not so influenced by gait's velocity, but this method has not yet been adapted to the mouse model of sciatic lesion. We used 63 male Swiss mice (Mus musculus) to develop a formula to the sciatic static index in mice (SSIm). The animals were divided on three groups (control, transection and crush). They were evaluated at the preoperative and 7th, 14th, 21st, 28th, 35th and 42nd days postoperative by the ink track method (SFI), and by the acquisition of photographs of the plantar aspects of the injured and uninjured hind paws. The parameters evaluated were the 1-5 toe spread (TS), the 2-4 toe spread (ITS) and the distance between the tip of the third toe and the most posterior aspect of the paw (PL), on both methods. After verifying the temporal pattern of function, correlation and reproducibility of the measurements, we performed a multiple regression analysis using SFI values as dependent variable, and the TS, ITS and PL measured with the photo method as independent variables, and found the formula of the SSI for mice (SSIm). The three groups (control, transection and crush) had a characteristic pattern of dysfunction. The parameters measured in the ink and photo method had variable but significant correlations between them (P<0.000), but photo method of measurement showed a better reproducibility. The correlation between SFI and SSIm showed a high correlation coefficient (r=0.892, P<0.000), and demonstrates that SSIm can be used as an alternative method to assess the functional status relative of sciatic

  18. Updates in diabetic peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Juster-Switlyk, Kelsey; Smith, A. Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes has become one of the largest global health-care problems of the 21 st century. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the population prevalence of diabetes in the US is approaching 10% and is increasing by 5% each year. Diabetic neuropathy is the most common complication associated with diabetes mellitus. Diabetes causes a broad spectrum of neuropathic complications, including acute and chronic forms affecting each level of the peripheral nerve, from the root to the distal axon. This review will focus on the most common form, distal symmetric diabetic polyneuropathy. There has been an evolution in our understanding of the pathophysiology and the management of diabetic polyneuropathy over the past decade. We highlight these new perspectives and provide updates from the past decade of research. PMID:27158461

  19. Piriformis Syndrome With Variant Sciatic Nerve Anatomy: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Emily; Tenforde, Adam S; Beaulieu, Christopher F; Ratliff, John; Fredericson, Michael

    2016-02-01

    A 68-year-old male long distance runner presented with low back and left buttock pain, which eventually progressed to severe and debilitating pain, intermittently radiating to the posterior thigh and foot. A comprehensive workup ruled out possible spine or hip causes of his symptoms. A pelvic magnetic resonance imaging neurogram with complex oblique planes through the piriformis demonstrated variant anatomy of the left sciatic nerve consistent with the clinical diagnosis of piriformis syndrome. The patient ultimately underwent neurolysis with release of the sciatic nerve and partial resection of the piriformis muscle. After surgery the patient reported significant pain reduction and resumed running 3 months later. Piriformis syndrome is uncommon but should be considered in the differential diagnosis for buttock pain. Advanced imaging was essential to guide management. PMID:26377629

  20. Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Improve Diabetic Neuropathy by Direct Modulation of Both Angiogenesis and Myelination in Peripheral Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ji Woong; Choi, Dabin; Lee, Min Young; Huh, Yang Hoon; Yoon, Young-sup

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence has suggested that diabetic neuropathy (DN) is pathophysiologically related to both impaired angiogenesis and a deficiency of neurotrophic factors in the nerves. It is widely known that vascular and neural growths are intimately associated. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) promote angiogenesis in ischemic diseases and have neuroprotective effects, particularly on Schwann cells. Accordingly, we investigated whether DN could be improved by local transplantation of MSCs by augmenting angiogenesis and neural regeneration such as remyelination. In sciatic nerves of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats, motor and sensory nerve conduction velocities (NCVs) and capillary density were reduced, and axonal atrophy and demyelination were observed. After injection of bone marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSCs) into hindlimb muscles, NCVs were restored to near-normal levels. Histological examination demonstrated that injected MSCs were preferentially and durably engrafted in the sciatic nerves, and a portion of the engrafted MSCs were distinctively localized close to vasa nervora of sciatic nerves. Furthermore, vasa nervora increased in density, and the ultrastructure of myelinated fibers in nerves was observed to be restored. Real-time RT-PCR experiments showed that gene expression of multiple factors involved in angiogenesis, neural function, and myelination were increased in the MSC-injected nerves. These findings suggest that MSC transplantation improved DN through direct peripheral nerve angiogenesis, neurotrophic effects, and restoration of myelination. PMID:25975801

  1. The neuropathy of erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Bleustein, C B; Arezzo, J C; Eckholdt, H; Melman, A

    2002-12-01

    These studies were intended to explore the relationship between autonomic neuropathy and erectile dysfunction (ED). Sensory thresholds reflecting the integrity of both large diameter, myelinated neurons (ie pressure, touch, vibration) and small diameter axons (ie hot and cold thermal sensation) were determined on the penis and finger. Data were compared across subjects with and without ED, controlling for age, hypertension and diabetes. The correlation of specific thresholds scores and IIEF values were also examined. Seventy-three patients who visited the academic urology clinics at Montefiore hospital were evaluated. All patients were required to complete the erectile function domain of the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) questionnaire: 20 subjects had no complaints of ED and scored within the 'normal' range on the IIEF. Patients were subsequently tested on their index finger and glans penis for vibration (Biothesiometer), pressure (Semmes-Weinstein monofilaments), spatial perception (Tactile Circumferential Discriminator), and warm and cold thermal thresholds (Physitemp NTE-2). Sensation of the glans penis, as defined by the examined sensory thresholds, was significantly diminished in patients with ED and these differences remained significant when controlling for age, diabetes and hypertension. In contrast, thresholds on the index finger were equivalent in the ED and non-ED groups. Threshold and IIEF scores were highly correlated, consistent with an association between diminished sensation and decreasing IIEF score (worse erectile functioning). These relations also remained significant when controlling for age, diabetes and hypertension. The findings demonstrate dysfunction of large and small diameter nerve fibers in patients with ED of all etiologies. Further, the neurophysiologic measures validate the use of the IIEF as an index of ED, as objective findings of sensory neuropathy were highly correlated with worse IIEF scores. The sensory

  2. Common iliac artery aneurysm presenting as acute sciatic nerve compression.

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, S. R.; Grimley, R. P.

    1987-01-01

    Aneurysms of the iliac arteries usually remain silent, but when they rupture the consequences can be dramatic. They produce few clinical signs suggestive of their presence. However, such aneurysms have been found to be the cause of non-vascular clinical situations. Often they present with features of compression on adjacent viscera. We present a case in which a large common iliac artery aneurysm was found to be causing symptoms of acute sciatic nerve compression. PMID:3447118

  3. A rare case of segmental neurofibromatosis involving the sciatic nerve.

    PubMed

    Trocchia, Aron; Reyes, Alma; Wilson, Jon; Les, Kimberly

    2010-05-01

    Segmental neurofibromatosis (NF-5) is an extremely rare variant of neurofibromatosis involving a single extremity without pathologic features beyond the midline. A case of segmental neurofibromatosis involving the sciatic nerve and its branches is presented with a detailed description of the patient's preoperative findings plus postoperative course through 1-year follow-up. Clinical, histologic, and genetic findings are given along with a brief review of the literature on segmental neurofibromatosis. Last, treatment options and postoperative care recommendations are provided. PMID:20567746

  4. Hereditary Neuropathy with Liability to Pressure Palsies.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyoung Won; Kuntz, Nancy L

    2015-11-01

    Investigators from 4 pediatric hospitals in Canada analyzed the clinical presentation and electrophysiological data of 12 children with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP), caused by PMP22 gene deletion. PMID:26933540

  5. Giant axonal neuropathy: visual and oculomotor deficits.

    PubMed

    Kirkham, T H; Guitton, D; Coupland, S G

    1980-08-01

    Giant axonal neuropathy, a generalised disorder or neurofilaments, presents as a chronic, progressive peripheral neuropathy in childhood. Evidence for central nervous system involvement is demonstrated in this study of four male patients with giant axonal neuropathy who had defective visual function and abnormal ocular motility. The visual system was studied by electroretinography, which showed normal retinal function, and by visual evoked potentials, which showed disease of both optic nerves and retrochiasmal visual pathways. The ocular motility disorder, studied by electrooculography, comprised defective pursuit, inability to maintain eccentric gaze with gaze paretic and rebound nystagmus, abnormal optokinetic responses and failure of suppression of the vestibulo-ocular reflex by fixation. These findings suggested involvement by giant axonal neuropathy of the cerebellar and brain stem pathways important in the control of ocular motility. PMID:7192592

  6. Pegylated Interferon Alpha–Associated Optic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Kathleen T.; Nelson, Bruce; Harrison, Andrew R.; McLoon, Linda K.; Lee, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    A 52-year-old man with chronic hepatitis C presented with painless, bilateral, simultaneous non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) and peripheral neuropathy. Symptoms began 19 weeks after starting peginterferon alpha-2a. The peripheral neuropathy and vision of the right eye improved, but the vision of the left eye worsened after stopping interferon. We identified 23 additional cases of NAION during interferon alpha therapy. At least 12 of these patients suffered bilateral NAION. Patients lost vision 1–40 weeks after initiating therapy. Of 21 eyes that had documented initial and follow-up acuities, 8 improved, 1 worsened, and the rest remained stable. One patient had a painful peripheral neuropathy. Treatment with interferon alpha may result in NAION. Discontinuation of therapy deserves consideration after weighing individual risks and benefits. PMID:20351572

  7. Vitamin B supplementation for diabetic peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Jayabalan, Bhavani; Low, Lian Leng

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency has been associated with significant neurological pathology, especially peripheral neuropathy. This review aims to examine the existing evidence on the effectiveness of vitamin B12 supplementation for the treatment of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. A search of PubMed and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials for all relevant randomised controlled trials was conducted in December 2014. Any type of therapy using vitamin B12 or its coenzyme forms was assessed for efficacy and safety in diabetics with peripheral neuropathy. Changes in vibration perception thresholds, neuropathic symptoms and nerve conduction velocities, as well as the adverse effects of vitamin B12 therapy, were assessed. Four studies comprising 363 patients met the inclusion criteria. This review found no evidence that the use of oral vitamin B12 supplements is associated with improvement in the clinical symptoms of diabetic neuropathy. Furthermore, the majority of studies reported no improvement in the electrophysiological markers of nerve conduction. PMID:26892473

  8. INHERITED NEUROPATHIES: CLINICAL OVERVIEW AND UPDATE

    PubMed Central

    KLEIN, CHRISTOPHER J.; DUAN, XIAOHUI; SHY, MICHAEL E.

    2014-01-01

    Inherited neuropathy is a group of common neurologic disorders with heterogeneous clinical presentations and genetic causes. Detailed neuromuscular evaluations, including nerve conduction studies, laboratory testing, and histopathologic examination, can assist in identification of the inherited component beyond family history. Genetic testing increasingly enables definitive diagnosis of specific inherited neuropathies. Diagnosis, however, is often complex, and neurologic disability may have both genetic and acquired components in individual patients. The decision of which genetic test to order or whether to order genetic tests is often complicated, and the strategies to maximize the value of testing are evolving. Apart from rare inherited metabolic neuropathies, treatment approaches remain largely supportive. We provide a clinical update of the various types of inherited neuropathies, their differential diagnoses, and distinguishing clinical features (where available). A framework is provided for clinical evaluations, including the inheritance assessment, electrophysiologic examinations, and specific genetic tests. PMID:23801417

  9. Surgical treatment of a tomaculous neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Taggart, T F; Allen, T R

    2001-08-01

    Compressive neuropathy of the ulnar nerve at the elbow is the second most common nerve entrapment in the upper limb. Eight possible anatomical points of constriction have been identified. The most common constriction being the intermuscular septum proximally or between the two heads of the flexor carpi ulnaris in the cubital canal distally. Surgical release is successful in 80-90% of cases. Certain rare genetic conditions can predispose susceptible peripheral nerves to similar compressive neuropathies but there is no literature on surgical treatment of such patients. We present a case of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy (HNPP) often known as 'tomaculous' neuropathy, in a patient with ulnar nerve symptoms who underwent a surgical release. PMID:11523718

  10. Bicycling induced pudendal nerve pressure neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Silbert, P L; Dunne, J W; Edis, R H; Stewart-Wynne, E G

    1991-01-01

    Pudendal neuropathies are well recognised as part of more generalised peripheral neuropathies; however, focal abnormalities of the pudendal nerve due to cycling-related injuries have been infrequently reported. We describe two patients who developed pudendal neuropathies secondary to pressure effects on the perineum from racing-bicycle saddles. Both were male competitive athletes, one of whom developed recurrent numbness of the penis and scrotum after prolonged cycling; the other developed numbness of the penis, an altered sensation of ejaculation, with disturbance of micturition and reduced awareness of defecation. Both patients improved with alterations in saddle position and riding techniques. We conclude that pudendal nerve pressure neuropathy can result from prolonged cycling, particularly when using a poor riding technique. PMID:1821826

  11. Peripheral Neuropathy in Mouse Models of Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Jolivalt, Corinne G; Frizzi, Katie E; Guernsey, Lucie; Marquez, Alex; Ochoa, Joseline; Rodriguez, Maria; Calcutt, Nigel A

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a frequent complication of chronic diabetes that most commonly presents as a distal degenerative polyneuropathy with sensory loss. Around 20% to 30% of such patients may also experience neuropathic pain. The underlying pathogenic mechanisms are uncertain, and therapeutic options are limited. Rodent models of diabetes have been used for more than 40 years to study neuropathy and evaluate potential therapies. For much of this period, streptozotocin-diabetic rats were the model of choice. The emergence of new technologies that allow relatively cheap and routine manipulations of the mouse genome has prompted increased use of mouse models of diabetes to study neuropathy. In this article, we describe the commonly used mouse models of type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and provide protocols to phenotype the structural, functional, and behavioral indices of peripheral neuropathy, with a particular emphasis on assays pertinent to the human condition. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27584552

  12. Immune cell distribution and immunoglobulin levels change following sciatic nerve injury in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Wei; Feng, Xinhong

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): To investigate the systemic and local immune status of two surgical rat models of sciatic nerve injury, a crushed sciatic nerve, and a sciatic nerve transection Materials and Methods: Twenty-four adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups: sham-operation (control group), sciatic nerve crush, and sciatic nerve transaction. Sciatic nerve surgery was performed. The percentage of CD4+ cells and the CD4+/CD8+ratio were determined by flow cytometry. Serum IgM and IgG levels were analyzed by ELISA. T-cells (CD3) and macrophages (CD68) in sciatic nerve tissue sections were identified through immunohistochemistry. Results: Compared to sham-operated controls, in rats that underwent nerve injury, the percentage of CD4+ cells and the CD4+/CD8+ ratio in the peripheral blood were significantly decreased 7 days after surgery, serum IgM levels were increased 14 days after surgery, and serum IgG levels were increased 21 days after surgery. There were a large number of CD3+ cells and a small number of CD68+ cells in sciatic nerve tissue sections 21 days after surgery, indicating T-cell and macrophage activation and infiltration. Local IgG deposition was also detected at the nerve injury site 21 days after surgery. Conclusion: Rat humoral and cellular immune status changed following sciatic nerve injury, particularly with regard to the cellular immune response at the nerve injury site.

  13. A persistent sciatic artery aneurysm containing a free-floating thrombus: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Unosawa, Satoshi; Ishii, Yusuke; Niino, Tetsuya

    2015-08-01

    A persistent sciatic artery is a rare vascular anomaly in which the sciatic artery, which involutes in the embryonic stage, persists as the blood supply to the lower limb. This vascular anomaly is often associated with aneurysm formation. A persistent sciatic artery aneurysm is a rare cause of peripheral arterial embolic disease. We herein describe the case of a 72-year-old female with a free-floating thrombus in a persistent sciatic artery aneurysm. She underwent iliac-popliteal artery bypass and exclusion of the aneurysm to prevent an embolic event. PMID:25016369

  14. Limb immobilization alters functional electrophysiological parameters of sciatic nerve.

    PubMed

    Alves, J S M; Leal-Cardoso, J H; Santos-Júnior, F F U; Carlos, P S; Silva, R C; Lucci, C M; Báo, S N; Ceccatto, V M; Barbosa, R

    2013-08-01

    Immobilization, used in clinical practice to treat traumatologic problems, causes changes in muscle, but it is not known whether changes also occur in nerves. We investigated the effects of immobilization on excitability and compound action potential (CAP) and the ultrastructure of the rat sciatic nerve. Fourteen days after immobilization of the right leg of adult male Wistar rats (n=34), animals were killed and the right sciatic nerve was dissected and mounted in a moist chamber. Nerves were stimulated at a baseline frequency of 0.2 Hz and tested for 2 min at 20, 50, and 100 Hz. Immobilization altered nerve excitability. Rheobase and chronaxy changed from 3.13 ± 0.05 V and 52.31 ± 1.95 µs (control group, n=13) to 2.84 ± 0.06 V and 59.71 ± 2.79 µs (immobilized group, n=15), respectively. Immobilization altered the amplitude of CAP waves and decreased the conduction velocity of the first CAP wave (from 93.63 ± 7.49 to 79.14 ± 5.59 m/s) but not of the second wave. Transmission electron microscopy showed fragmentation of the myelin sheath of the sciatic nerve of immobilized limbs and degeneration of the axon. In conclusion, we demonstrated that long-lasting leg immobilization can induce alterations in nerve function. PMID:23969978

  15. Limb immobilization alters functional electrophysiological parameters of sciatic nerve

    PubMed Central

    Alves, J.S.M.; Leal-Cardoso, J.H.; Santos-Júnior, F.F.U.; Carlos, P.S.; Silva, R.C.; Lucci, C.M.; Báo, S.N.; Ceccatto, V.M.; Barbosa, R.

    2013-01-01

    Immobilization, used in clinical practice to treat traumatologic problems, causes changes in muscle, but it is not known whether changes also occur in nerves. We investigated the effects of immobilization on excitability and compound action potential (CAP) and the ultrastructure of the rat sciatic nerve. Fourteen days after immobilization of the right leg of adult male Wistar rats (n=34), animals were killed and the right sciatic nerve was dissected and mounted in a moist chamber. Nerves were stimulated at a baseline frequency of 0.2 Hz and tested for 2 min at 20, 50, and 100 Hz. Immobilization altered nerve excitability. Rheobase and chronaxy changed from 3.13±0.05 V and 52.31±1.95 µs (control group, n=13) to 2.84±0.06 V and 59.71±2.79 µs (immobilized group, n=15), respectively. Immobilization altered the amplitude of CAP waves and decreased the conduction velocity of the first CAP wave (from 93.63±7.49 to 79.14±5.59 m/s) but not of the second wave. Transmission electron microscopy showed fragmentation of the myelin sheath of the sciatic nerve of immobilized limbs and degeneration of the axon. In conclusion, we demonstrated that long-lasting leg immobilization can induce alterations in nerve function. PMID:23969978

  16. Multiple cranial neuropathies following etanercept administration.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Jacob B; Rivas, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    There have been recent reports of sarcoid-like granulomatosis development following the administration of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors. To date, only four cases of neurosarcoidosis have been reported in association with TNF inhibitors, two of which were attributed to etanercept. We present the first case of etanercept-induced neurosarcoidosis involving multiple cranial neuropathies, including the trigeminal, facial, and vestibulocochlear nerves, while also highlighting the differential diagnoses of multiple cranial neuropathies and the association of TNF inhibitors and neurosarcoidosis. PMID:27178520

  17. Pattern Recognition Approach to Neuropathy and Neuronopathy

    PubMed Central

    Barohn, Richard J; Amato, Anthony A.

    2014-01-01

    Synopsis Neuropathic disorders encompass those that affect the neuron’s cell body or neuronopathies, those affecting the peripheral process, or peripheral neuropathies. The peripheral neuropathies can be broadly subdivided into the myelinopathies and axonopathies. These conditions can be hereditary or acquired. Each of these disorders has distinct clinical features that enable neurologists to recognize the various patterns of presentation. Once a particular pattern is established, further laboratory studies can be performed to confirm the clinical impression. PMID:23642713

  18. Emerging Mitochondrial Therapeutic Targets in Optic Neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Lopez Sanchez, M I G; Crowston, J G; Mackey, D A; Trounce, I A

    2016-09-01

    Optic neuropathies are an important cause of blindness worldwide. The study of the most common inherited mitochondrial optic neuropathies, Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA) has highlighted a fundamental role for mitochondrial function in the survival of the affected neuron-the retinal ganglion cell. A picture is now emerging that links mitochondrial dysfunction to optic nerve disease and other neurodegenerative processes. Insights gained from the peculiar susceptibility of retinal ganglion cells to mitochondrial dysfunction are likely to inform therapeutic development for glaucoma and other common neurodegenerative diseases of aging. Despite it being a fast-evolving field of research, a lack of access to human ocular tissues and limited animal models of mitochondrial disease have prevented direct retinal ganglion cell experimentation and delayed the development of efficient therapeutic strategies to prevent vision loss. Currently, there are no approved treatments for mitochondrial disease, including optic neuropathies caused by primary or secondary mitochondrial dysfunction. Recent advances in eye research have provided important insights into the molecular mechanisms that mediate pathogenesis, and new therapeutic strategies including gene correction approaches are currently being investigated. Here, we review the general principles of mitochondrial biology relevant to retinal ganglion cell function and provide an overview of the major optic neuropathies with mitochondrial involvement, LHON and ADOA, whilst highlighting the emerging link between mitochondrial dysfunction and glaucoma. The pharmacological strategies currently being trialed to improve mitochondrial dysfunction in these optic neuropathies are discussed in addition to emerging therapeutic approaches to preserve retinal ganglion cell function. PMID:27288727

  19. Beneficial effect of TNF-α inhibition on diabetic peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is an important inflammatory factor produced by activated macrophages and monocytes and plays an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). To evaluate the effect of TNF-α signaling suppression and the potential of TNF-α in the treatment of DPN, a recombinant human TNF-α receptor-antibody fusion protein (rhTNFR:Fc) was used. We focused on the pathophysiology of the sciatic nerve and examined the expression of myelin basic protein (MBP) under DPN status with or without TNF-α inhibition. Methods The DPN rat model was generated by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin and by feeding with a high-fat, high-sugar diet. The nerve conduction velocity (NCV) in sciatic nerve of rat was monitored over a period of four weeks. The histopathological changes in nerve tissue were examined through traditional tissue histology and ultrastructure transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The expression of MBP was examined through western blot analysis. Results The DPN induced rats showed significant signs of nerve damage including lower NCV, demyelination of nerve fibers, disorganization of lamellar and axonal structures, and decreased expression of MBP in the nerve tissue. The inhibition of TNF-α in the DPN rats resulted in a significant recovery from those symptoms compared to the DPN rats. Conclusions Our study demonstrates that TNF-α plays a key role in the pathogenesis of DPN and its inhibition by rhTNFR:Fc can prove to be a useful therapeutic strategy for the treatment of and/or prevention from DPN symptoms. PMID:23735240

  20. Mouse Models of Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Kelli A.; Hayes, John M.; Wiggin, Timothy D.; Backus, Carey; Oh, Sang Su; Lentz, Stephen I.; Brosius, Frank; Feldman, Eva L.

    2007-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy (DN) is a debilitating complication of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Rodent models of DN do not fully replicate the pathology observed in human patients. We examined DN in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced [B6] and spontaneous type 1 diabetes [B6Ins2Akita] and spontaneous type 2 diabetes [B6-db/db, BKS-db/db]. DN was defined using the criteria of the Animal Models of Diabetic Complications Consortium (http://www.amdcc.org). Despite persistent hyperglycemia, the STZ-treated B6 and B6Ins2Akita mice were resistant to the development of DN. In contrast, DN developed in both type 2 diabetes models: the B6-db/db and BKS-db/db mice. The persistence of hyperglycemia and development of DN in the B6-db/db mice required an increased fat diet while the BKS-db/db mice developed severe DN and remained hyperglycemic on standard mouse chow. Our data support the hypothesis that genetic background and diet influence the development of DN and should be considered when developing new models of DN. PMID:17804249

  1. Treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Javed, Saad; Petropoulos, Ioannis N; Alam, Uazman; Malik, Rayaz A

    2015-01-01

    Painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN) is a debilitating consequence of diabetes that may be present in as many as one in five patients with diabetes. The objective assessment of PDN is difficult, making it challenging to diagnose and assess in both clinical practice and clinical trials. No single treatment exists to prevent or reverse neuropathic changes or to provide total pain relief. Treatment of PDN is based on three major approaches: intensive glycaemic control and risk factor management, treatments based on pathogenetic mechanisms, and symptomatic pain management. Clinical guidelines recommend pain relief in PDN through the use of antidepressants such as amitriptyline and duloxetine, the γ-aminobutyric acid analogues gabapentin and pregabalin, opioids and topical agents such as capsaicin. Of these medications, duloxetine and pregabalin were approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2004 and tapentadol extended release was approved in 2012 for the treatment of PDN. Proposed pathogenetic treatments include α-lipoic acid (stems reactive oxygen species formation), benfotiamine (prevents vascular damage in diabetes) and aldose-reductase inhibitors (reduces flux through the polyol pathway). There is a growing need for studies to evaluate the most potent drugs or combinations for the management of PDN to maximize pain relief and improve quality of life. A number of agents are potential candidates for future use in PDN therapy, including Nav 1.7 antagonists, N-type calcium channel blockers, NGF antibodies and angiotensin II type 2 receptor antagonists. PMID:25553239

  2. Small fiber neuropathy: Getting bigger!

    PubMed

    Chan, Amanda C Y; Wilder-Smith, Einar P

    2016-05-01

    Etiological and clinical heterogeneity of small fiber neuropathy (SFN) precludes a unifying approach and necessitates reliance on recognizable clinical syndromes. Symptoms of SFN arise from dysfunction in nociception, temperature, and autonomic modalities. This review focuses on SFN involving nociception and temperature, examining epidemiology, etiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, pathophysiology, and management. Prevalence of SFN is 52.95 per 100,000 population, and diabetes and idiopathic are the most common etiologies. Dysesthesia, allodynia, pain, burning, and coldness sensations frequently present in a length-dependent pattern. Additional autonomic features in gastrointestinal, urinary, or cardiovascular systems are frequent but poorly objectified. SFN is diagnosed by intraepidermal nerve fiber density and quantitative sensory and autonomic tests in combination with normal nerve conduction. Pathophysiological understanding centers on sodium channel dysfunction, and genetic forms are beginning to be understood. Treatment is directed at the underlying etiology supported by symptomatic treatment using antidepressants and anticonvulsants. Little is known about long-term outcomes, and systematic cohort studies are needed. PMID:26872938

  3. Traumatic Optic Neuropathy - A Conundrum.

    PubMed

    Selvaraj, Vinoth Kanna; Viswanathan, Ramachandran; Devanathan, Vasudevan

    2016-03-01

    Visual impairment following head injury may be an enigma especially if the onset of symptoms were to be few days after the actual trauma and the bias arising out of the initial normal ophthalmological examination is not neutralised by unbiased repeated formal clinical evaluation aided with electrophysiology. We report and discuss here a 32-year-old lady with delayed onset of indirect traumatic visual loss with anaemia who failed to improve after blood transfusion but improved immediately following steroid therapy seven days after trauma. Though steroids have not been shown to have a significant contribution on outcomes following Traumatic optic neuropathy, this report rekindles its role in delayed progressive visual loss following head trauma and the need to re-analyse the role of steroids in patients with delayed progressive visual disturbance following head injury excluding those with acute onset symptoms in view of different pathologies in both these presentations. This paper also highlights potential mechanisms for the two major types of presentation. PMID:27134913

  4. Treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Petropoulos, Ioannis N.; Alam, Uazman; Malik, Rayaz A.

    2015-01-01

    Painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN) is a debilitating consequence of diabetes that may be present in as many as one in five patients with diabetes. The objective assessment of PDN is difficult, making it challenging to diagnose and assess in both clinical practice and clinical trials. No single treatment exists to prevent or reverse neuropathic changes or to provide total pain relief. Treatment of PDN is based on three major approaches: intensive glycaemic control and risk factor management, treatments based on pathogenetic mechanisms, and symptomatic pain management. Clinical guidelines recommend pain relief in PDN through the use of antidepressants such as amitriptyline and duloxetine, the γ-aminobutyric acid analogues gabapentin and pregabalin, opioids and topical agents such as capsaicin. Of these medications, duloxetine and pregabalin were approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2004 and tapentadol extended release was approved in 2012 for the treatment of PDN. Proposed pathogenetic treatments include α-lipoic acid (stems reactive oxygen species formation), benfotiamine (prevents vascular damage in diabetes) and aldose-reductase inhibitors (reduces flux through the polyol pathway). There is a growing need for studies to evaluate the most potent drugs or combinations for the management of PDN to maximize pain relief and improve quality of life. A number of agents are potential candidates for future use in PDN therapy, including Nav 1.7 antagonists, N-type calcium channel blockers, NGF antibodies and angiotensin II type 2 receptor antagonists. PMID:25553239

  5. LOCALLY SYNTHESIZED PHOSPHATIDYCHOLINE, BUT NOT PROTEIN, UNDERGOES RAPID RETROGRADE AXONAL TRANSPORT IN THE RAT SCIATIC NERVE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Retrograde axonal transport of phosphatidylcholine (PC) in the sciatic nerve has been demonstrated only after injection of lipid precursors into the cell body regions (Armstrong et al. 1985). icroinjection of [methyl-3H]choline into the sciatic nerve results in extensive incorpor...

  6. Molecular study of patients with auditory neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Guilherme Machado De; Ramos, Priscila Zonzini; Castilho, Arthur Menino; Guimarães, Alexandre Caixeta; Sartorato, Edi Lúcia

    2016-07-01

    Auditory neuropathy is a type of hearing loss that constitutes a change in the conduct of the auditory stimulus by the involvement of inner hair cells or auditory nerve synapses. It is characterized by the absence or alteration of waves in the examination of brainstem auditory evoked potentials, with otoacoustic and/or cochlear microphonic issues. At present, four loci associated with non‑syndromic auditory neuropathy have been mapped: Autosomal recessive deafness‑9 [DFNB9; the otoferlin (OTOF) gene] and autosomal recessive deafness‑59 [DFNB59; the pejvakin (PJVK) gene], associated with autosomal recessive inheritance; the autosomal dominant auditory neuropathy gene [AUNA1; the diaphanous‑3 (DIAPH3) gene]; and AUNX1, linked to chromosome X. Furthermore, mutations of connexin 26 [the gap junction β2 (GJB2) gene] have also been associated with the disease. OTOF gene mutations exert a significant role in auditory neuropathy. In excess of 80 pathogenic mutations have been identified in individuals with non‑syndromic deafness in populations of different origins, with an emphasis on the p.Q829X mutation, which was found in ~3% of cases of deafness in the Spanish population. The identification of genetic alterations responsible for auditory neuropathy is one of the challenges contributing to understand the molecular bases of the different phenotypes of hearing loss. Thus, the present study aimed to investigate molecular changes in the OTOF gene in patients with auditory neuropathy, and to develop a DNA chip for the molecular diagnosis of auditory neuropathy using mass spectrometry for genotyping. Genetic alterations were investigated in 47 patients with hearing loss and clinical diagnosis of auditory neuropathy, and the c.35delG mutation in the GJB2 gene was identified in three homozygous patients, and the heterozygous parents of one of these cases. Additionally, OTOF gene mutations were tracked by complete sequencing of 48 exons, although these results

  7. PHENYLMETHYLSULFONYL FLUORIDE PROTECTS RATS FROM MIPAFOX-INDUCED DELAYED NEUROPATHY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Initiation of organophosphorus-induced delayed neuropathy (OPIDN) is thought to consist of two molecular events involving the phosphorylation of the target enzyme, neurotoxic esterase or neuropathy target enzyme (NTE), and a subsequent 'aging' reaction which transforms the inhibi...

  8. Pathogenesis of immune-mediated neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Dalakas, Marinos C

    2015-04-01

    Autoimmune neuropathies occur when immunologic tolerance to myelin or axonal antigens is lost. Even though the triggering factors and the underling immunopathology have not been fully elucidated in all neuropathy subsets, immunological studies on the patients' nerves, transfer experiments with the patients' serum or intraneural injections, and molecular fingerprinting on circulating autoantibodies or autoreactive T cells, indicate that cellular and humoral factors, either independently or in concert with each other, play a fundamental role in their cause. The review is focused on the main subtypes of autoimmune neuropathies, mainly the Guillain-Barré syndrome(s), the Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy (CIDP), the Multifocal Motor Neuropathy (MMN), and the IgM anti-MAG-antibody mediated neuropathy. It addresses the factors associated with breaking tolerance, examines the T cell activation process including co-stimulatory molecules and key cytokines, and discusses the role of antibodies against peripheral nerve glycolipids or glycoproteins. Special attention is given to the newly identified proteins in the nodal, paranodal and juxtaparanodal regions as potential antigenic targets that could best explain conduction failure and rapid recovery. New biological agents against T cells, cytokines, B cells, transmigration and transduction molecules involved in their immunopathologic network, are discussed as future therapeutic options in difficult cases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuromuscular Diseases: Pathology and Molecular Pathogenesis. PMID:24949885

  9. Peripheral Neuropathy in Rats Exposed to Dichloroacetate

    PubMed Central

    Calcutt, Nigel A.; Lopez, Veronica L.; Bautista, Arjel D.; Mizisin, Leah M.; Torres, Brenda R.; Shroads, Albert L.; Mizisin, Andrew P.; Stacpoole, Peter W.

    2009-01-01

    The use of dichloroacetate (DCA) for treating patients with mitochondrial diseases is limited by the induction of peripheral neuropathy. The mechanisms of DCA-induced neuropathy are not known. Oral DCA treatment (50–500 mg/kg/day for up to 16 weeks) induced tactile allodynia in both juvenile and adult rats; concurrent thermal hypoalgesia developed at higher doses. Both juvenile and adult rats treated with DCA developed nerve conduction slowing that was more pronounced in adult rats. No overt axonal or glial cell abnormalities were identified in peripheral nerves or spinal cord of any DCA-treated rats but morphometric analysis identified a reduction of mean axonal caliber of peripheral nerve myelinated fibers. DCA treatment also caused accumulation of oxidative stress markers in the nerves. These data indicate that behavioral, functional and structural indices of peripheral neuropathy may be induced in both juvenile and adult rats treated with DCA at doses similar to those in clinical use. DCA-induced peripheral neuropathy primarily afflicts axons and involves both metabolic and structural disorders. The DCA-treated rat may provide insight into the pathogenesis of peripheral neuropathy and facilitate development of adjuvant therapeutics to prevent this disorder that currently restricts the clinical use of DCA. PMID:19680144

  10. Abnormal calcium homeostasis in peripheral neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Fernyhough, Paul; Calcutt, Nigel A.

    2010-01-01

    Abnormal neuronal calcium (Ca2+) homeostasis has been implicated in numerous diseases of the nervous system. The pathogenesis of two increasingly common disorders of the peripheral nervous system, namely neuropathic pain and diabetic polyneuropathy, has been associated with aberrant Ca2+ channel expression and function. Here we review the current state of knowledge regarding the role of Ca2+ dyshomeostasis and associated mitochondrial dysfunction in painful and diabetic neuropathies. The central impact of both alterations of Ca2+ signalling at the plasma membrane and also intracellular Ca2+ handling on sensory neuron function is discussed and related to abnormal endoplasmic reticulum performance. We also present new data highlighting sub-optimal axonal Ca 2+ signalling in diabetic neuropathy and discuss the putative role for this abnormality in the induction of axonal degeneration in peripheral neuropathies. The accumulating evidence implicating Ca2+ dysregulation with both painful and degenerative neuropathies, along with recent advances in understanding of regional variations in Ca2+ channel and pump structures, makes modulation of neuronal Ca2+ handling an increasingly viable approach for therapeutic interventions against the painful and degenerative aspects of many peripheral neuropathies. PMID:20034667

  11. Auditory Neuropathy Spectrum Disorder Masquerading as Social Anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Mukund G.; Mishra, Shree; Varambally, Shivarama; Nagarajarao, Shivashankar; Gangadhar, Bangalore N.

    2015-01-01

    The authors report a case of a 47-year-old man who presented with treatment-resistant anxiety disorder. Behavioral observation raised clinical suspicion of auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder. The presence of auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder was confirmed on audiological investigations. The patient was experiencing extreme symptoms of anxiety, which initially masked the underlying diagnosis of auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder. Challenges in diagnosis and treatment of auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder are discussed. PMID:26351622

  12. Sciatic Nerve Block in Tetanus: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Beigmohammadi, Mohammad Taghi; Tavakoli, Farhad; Safari, Saeid; Amiri, Hamid Reza

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Muscle rigidity and generalized spasm can cause severe pain in patients with tetanus. Administration of high dose sedative or narcotic agents can increase respiratory failure and prolong mechanical ventilation support. Case Presentation: In this report, ultrasound-guided sciatic nerve block was performed in a 25-year-old patient with tetanus to progress his respiratory drive which was decreased due to high dose sedative administration. This procedure accelerates the weaning process and extubation. Conclusions: Nerve blocks may be appropriate for the particular patient with tetanus to tolerate the pain, reduce depth of sedation, accelerate extubation and subsequently decrease complications of tetanus relating to long time intubation. PMID:26705523

  13. Bilateral traumatic hip dislocation with sciatic nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ka Yuk; Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-01-01

    Bilateral hip dislocation is a rare condition. We report a case of traumatic bilateral hip dislocation and unilateral sciatic nerve palsy in a young woman with known idiopathic scoliosis. With prompt reduction of the dislocated hips, there was reasonable neurological recovery. There was no avascular necrosis of the femoral head or post-traumatic arthritis up to 3-year follow-up. The gender difference in incidence, as well as the predisposition of hip dislocation in scoliosis is discussed. In our case, the decreased femoral anteversion was the culprit. PMID:25809426

  14. Sciatic nerve enlargement in the Klippel-Trenaunay-Weber syndrome.

    PubMed

    Meirer, Romed; Huemer, Georg M; Shafighi, Maziar; Kamelger, Florian S; Hussl, Heribert; Piza-Katzer, Hildegunde

    2005-06-01

    The case of a 35-year-old woman with Klippel-Trenaunay-Weber syndrome (KTWS) showing clinical symptoms of a peroneal nerve lesion is presented. An immense nerve enlargement along most of the sciatic, peroneal and tibial nerve was found to be due to a lipoma arising from the epi- and perineurium. Treatment consisted of extensive microsurgical neurolysis and excision of the tumor resulting in decompression of the affected nerves. Although rare, a perineural lipoma should be kept in mind in patients with KTWS showing neurological abnormalities. PMID:15897045

  15. Inadvertent Embolization of a Persistent Sciatic Artery in Pelvis Trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, W.-C. Lim, K.-E.; Hsu, Y.-Y.

    2005-05-15

    We describe a case of unilateral persistent sciatic artery (PSA), a rare vascular anomaly, in a 43-year-old woman with severe multiple trauma. A small amount of diluted embolization particles went into this vessel during emergent endovascular therapy under fluoroscopic monitoring. The procedure was immediately stopped when the true nature of the anatomic variant was recognized. Fortunately, an ischemic event of the lower leg did not occur. The imaging findings of computed tomography and digital subtraction angiography are presented and the relevant literature is reviewed.

  16. Sciatic Neuroma Presenting Forty Years After Above-Knee Amputation

    PubMed Central

    Kitcat, M; Hunter, J.E; Malata, C.M

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of a sciatic neuroma presenting forty years after above knee amputation. Patients developing neuroma following a limb amputation can present with stump pain which is commonly resistant to medical intervention. The length of interval from the initial injury to presentation is widely variable. Diagnosis relies on clinical suspicion and accurate assessment, radiological imaging and, if indicated, surgical exploration. MRI provides a better soft tissue definition than CT and is more accurate in identifying small lesions than ultrasound. The aim of treatment for symptomatic neuroma is pain relief and improvement of function. This is often achieved by surgical excision. PMID:20224738

  17. Rheumatoid neuropathy: a histological and electrophysiological study

    PubMed Central

    Weller, R. O.; Bruckner, F. E.; Chamberlain, M. Anne

    1970-01-01

    Peripheral nerves in five patients with rheumatoid neuropathy were examined electrophysiologically and by sural nerve biopsy. There was close correlation between the clinical severity of the disease and the degree of nerve damage found histologically and by EMG. Group 1 patients with a mild distal sensory neuropathy showed varying degrees of axonal degeneration in the large myelinated fibres and some segmental demyelination. Group 2 patients with a severe, rapidly progressive sensori-motor neuropathy had extensive loss of myelinated fibres. In one case all the large fibres had degenerated. The second case had lost both large and small myelinated fibres together with many of the non-myelinated axons. The major nerve damage in both groups appeared to be axonal degeneration but some segmental demyelination was detected. Occlusive vascular disease in the vasa nervorum was considered to be the major cause of the nerve damage. Images PMID:4320255

  18. Expenditures in the elderly with peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Callaghan, Brian C.; Burke, James F.; Rodgers, Ann; McCammon, Ryan; Langa, Kenneth M.; Feldman, Eva L.; Kerber, Kevin A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary To optimize care in the evaluation of peripheral neuropathy, we sought to define which tests drive expenditures and the role of the provider type. We investigated test utilization and expenditures by provider type in those with incident neuropathy in a nationally representative elderly, Medicare population. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine predictors of MRI and electrodiagnostic utilization. MRIs of the neuroaxis and electrodiagnostic tests accounted for 88% of total expenditures. Mean and aggregate diagnostic expenditures were higher in those who saw a neurologist. Patients who saw a neurologist were more likely to receive an MRI and an electrodiagnostic test. MRIs and electrodiagnostic tests are the main contributors to expenditures in the evaluation of peripheral neuropathy, and should be the focus of future efficiency efforts. PMID:24175158

  19. Metanx alleviates multiple manifestations of peripheral neuropathy and increases intraepidermal nerve fiber density in Zucker diabetic fatty rats.

    PubMed

    Shevalye, Hanna; Watcho, Pierre; Stavniichuk, Roman; Dyukova, Elena; Lupachyk, Sergey; Obrosova, Irina G

    2012-08-01

    Metanx is a product containing L-methylfolate, pyridoxal 5'-phosphate, and methylcobalamin for management of endothelial dysfunction. Metanx ingredients counteract endothelial nitric oxide synthase uncoupling and oxidative stress in vascular endothelium and peripheral nerve. This study evaluates Metanx on diabetic peripheral neuropathy in ZDF rats, a model of type 2 diabetes. Metanx was administered to 15-week-old ZDF and ZDF lean rats at either 4.87 mg ⋅ kg(-1) ⋅ day(-1) (a body weight-based equivalent of human dose) or 24.35 mg ⋅ kg(-1) ⋅ day(-1) by oral gavage two times a day for 4 weeks. Both doses alleviated hind limb digital sensory, but not sciatic motor, nerve conduction slowing and thermal and mechanical hypoalgesia in the absence of any reduction of hyperglycemia. Low-dose Metanx increased intraepidermal nerve fiber density but did not prevent morphometric changes in distal tibial nerve myelinated fibers. Metanx treatment counteracted endothelial nitric oxide synthase uncoupling, inducible nitric oxide synthase upregulation, and methylglyoxal-derived advanced glycation end product, nitrotyrosine, and nitrite/nitrate accumulation in the peripheral nerve. In conclusion, Metanx, at a body weight-based equivalent of human dose, increased intraepidermal nerve fiber density and improved multiple parameters of peripheral nerve function in ZDF rats. Clinical studies are needed to determine if Metanx finds use in management of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. PMID:22751692

  20. CX3CL1-mediated macrophage activation contributed to paclitaxel-induced DRG neuronal apoptosis and painful peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhen-Zhen; Li, Dai; Liu, Cui-Cui; Cui, Yu; Zhu, He-Quan; Zhang, Wen-Wen; Li, Yong-Yong; Xin, Wen-Jun

    2014-08-01

    Painful peripheral neuropathy is a dose-limiting side effect of paclitaxel therapy, which hampers the optimal clinical management of chemotherapy in cancer patients. Currently the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here we showed that the clinically relevant dose of paclitaxel (3×8mg/kg, cumulative dose 24mg/kg) induced significant upregulation of the chemokine CX3CL1 in the A-fiber primary sensory neurons in vivo and in vitro and infiltration of macrophages into the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) in rats. Paclitaxel treatment also increased cleaved caspase-3 expression, induced the loss of primary afferent terminal fibers and decreased sciatic-evoked A-fiber responses in the spinal dorsal horn, indicating DRG neuronal apoptosis induced by paclitaxel. In addition, the paclitaxel-induced DRG neuronal apoptosis occurred exclusively in the presence of macrophage in vitro study. Intrathecal or systemic injection of CX3CL1 neutralizing antibody blocked paclitaxel-induced macrophage recruitment and neuronal apoptosis in the DRG, and also attenuated paclitaxel-induced allodynia. Furthermore, depletion of macrophage by systemic administration of clodronate inhibited paclitaxel-induced allodynia. Blocking CX3CL1 decreased activation of p38 MAPK in the macrophage, and inhibition of p38 MAPK activity blocked the neuronal apoptosis and development of mechanical allodynia induced by paclitaxel. These findings provide novel evidence that CX3CL1-recruited macrophage contributed to paclitaxel-induced DRG neuronal apoptosis and painful peripheral neuropathy. PMID:24681252

  1. Distinct roles of exogenous opioid agonists and endogenous opioid peptides in the peripheral control of neuropathy-triggered heat pain

    PubMed Central

    Labuz, Dominika; Celik, Melih Ö.; Zimmer, Andreas; Machelska, Halina

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain often results from peripheral nerve damage, which can involve immune response. Local leukocyte-derived opioid peptides or exogenous opioid agonists inhibit neuropathy-induced mechanical hypersensitivity in animal models. Since neuropathic pain can also be augmented by heat, in this study we investigated the role of opioids in the modulation of neuropathy-evoked heat hypersensitivity. We used a chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve in wild-type and opioid peptide-knockout mice, and tested opioid effects in heat and mechanical hypersensitivity using Hargreaves and von Frey tests, respectively. We found that although perineural exogenous opioid agonists, including peptidergic ligands, were effective, the endogenous opioid peptides β-endorphin, Met-enkephalin and dynorphin A did not alleviate heat hypersensitivity. Specifically, corticotropin-releasing factor, an agent triggering opioid peptide secretion from leukocytes, applied perineurally did not attenuate heat hypersensitivity in wild-type mice. Exogenous opioids, also shown to release opioid peptides via activation of leukocyte opioid receptors, were equally analgesic in wild-type and opioid peptide-knockout mice, indicating that endogenous opioids do not contribute to exogenous opioid analgesia in heat hypersensitivity. Furthermore, exogenously applied opioid peptides were ineffective as well. Conversely, opioid peptides relieved mechanical hypersensitivity. Thus, both opioid type and sensory modality may determine the outcome of neuropathic pain treatment. PMID:27605249

  2. Distinct roles of exogenous opioid agonists and endogenous opioid peptides in the peripheral control of neuropathy-triggered heat pain.

    PubMed

    Labuz, Dominika; Celik, Melih Ö; Zimmer, Andreas; Machelska, Halina

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain often results from peripheral nerve damage, which can involve immune response. Local leukocyte-derived opioid peptides or exogenous opioid agonists inhibit neuropathy-induced mechanical hypersensitivity in animal models. Since neuropathic pain can also be augmented by heat, in this study we investigated the role of opioids in the modulation of neuropathy-evoked heat hypersensitivity. We used a chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve in wild-type and opioid peptide-knockout mice, and tested opioid effects in heat and mechanical hypersensitivity using Hargreaves and von Frey tests, respectively. We found that although perineural exogenous opioid agonists, including peptidergic ligands, were effective, the endogenous opioid peptides β-endorphin, Met-enkephalin and dynorphin A did not alleviate heat hypersensitivity. Specifically, corticotropin-releasing factor, an agent triggering opioid peptide secretion from leukocytes, applied perineurally did not attenuate heat hypersensitivity in wild-type mice. Exogenous opioids, also shown to release opioid peptides via activation of leukocyte opioid receptors, were equally analgesic in wild-type and opioid peptide-knockout mice, indicating that endogenous opioids do not contribute to exogenous opioid analgesia in heat hypersensitivity. Furthermore, exogenously applied opioid peptides were ineffective as well. Conversely, opioid peptides relieved mechanical hypersensitivity. Thus, both opioid type and sensory modality may determine the outcome of neuropathic pain treatment. PMID:27605249

  3. Early Electrophysiological Abnormalities and Clinical Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Hyllienmark, Lars; Alstrand, Nils; Jonsson, Björn; Ludvigsson, Johnny; Cooray, Gerald; Wahlberg-Topp, Jeanette

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to elucidate whether subclinical nerve dysfunction as reflected by neurophysiological testing predicts the development of clinical neuropathy in patients with type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Fifty-nine patients were studied twice with neurophysiological measurements at baseline and at follow-up. At baseline, patients were 15.5 ± 3.22 years (range 7–22 years) of age, and duration of diabetes was 6.8 ± 3.3 years. At follow-up, patients were 20–35 years of age, and disease duration was 20 ± 5.3 years (range 10–31 years). RESULTS At baseline, patients showed modestly reduced nerve conduction velocities and amplitudes compared with healthy subjects, but all were free of clinical neuropathy. At follow-up, clinical neuropathy was present in nine (15%) patients. These patients had a more pronounced reduction in peroneal motor nerve conduction velocity (MCV), median MCV, and sural sensory nerve action potential at baseline (P < 0.010–0.003). In simple logistic regression analyses, the predictor with the strongest association with clinical neuropathy was baseline HbA1c (R2 = 48%, odds ratio 7.9, P < 0.002) followed by peroneal MCV at baseline (R2 = 38%, odds ratio 0.6, P < 0.006). With the use of a stepwise forward analysis that included all predictors, first baseline HbA1c and then only peroneal MCV at baseline entered significantly (R2 = 61%). Neuropathy impairment assessment showed a stronger correlation with baseline HbA1c (ρ = 0.40, P < 0.002) than with follow-up HbA1c (ρ = 0.034, P < 0.007). CONCLUSIONS Early defects in nerve conduction velocity predict the development of diabetic neuropathy. However, the strongest predictor was HbA1c during the first years of the disease. PMID:23723354

  4. Toxic optic neuropathies: an updated review.

    PubMed

    Grzybowski, Andrzej; Zülsdorff, Magdalena; Wilhelm, Helmut; Tonagel, Felix

    2015-08-01

    Toxic optic neuropathy (TON) is caused by the damage to the optic nerve through different toxins, including drugs, metals, organic solvents, methanol and carbon dioxide. A similar clinical picture may also be caused by nutritional deficits, including B vitamins, folic acid and proteins with sulphur-containing amino acids. This review summarizes the present knowledge on disease-causing factors, clinical presentation, diagnostics and treatment in TON. It discusses in detail known and hypothesized relations between drugs, including tuberculostatic drugs, antimicrobial agents, antiepileptic drugs, antiarrhythmic drugs, disulfiram, halogenated hydroquinolones, antimetabolites, tamoxifen and phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors and optic neuropathy. PMID:25159832

  5. [Ischemic optic neuropathy after lumbar spine surgery].

    PubMed

    Bermejo-Alvarez, M A; Carpintero, M; García-Carro, G; Acebal, G; Fervienza, P; Cosío, F

    2007-12-01

    Ischemic optic neuropathy is the most common cause of visual complications after non-ophthalmic surgery. The incidence has varied in different case series, but prone-position spine surgery appears to be involved in most of the reports. We present the case of a 47-year-old woman who developed near total blindness in the left eye following lumbar spine fusion surgery involving the loss of 900 mL of blood. An ophthalmic examination including inspection of the ocular fundus, fluorescein angiography, and visual evoked potentials returned a diagnosis of retrolaminar optic neuropathy. Outcome was poor. PMID:18200998

  6. Sciatic nerve palsy associated with total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Dhillon, M S; Nagi, O N

    1992-01-01

    Six cases of clinically evident sciatic or peroneal nerve palsy occurred in a consecutive series of 380 total hip arthroplasties (THA). An additional eight cases of peroneal nerve palsy due to pressure from Thomas splint or tight bandages were seen. Factors apparently causing nerve palsy were significant lateralization and lengthening in four cases and dislocation of the hip in one case. The cases with neuroapraxia of the peroneal nerve were seen from the third to the fifth day of Thomas splint immobilization. EMG studies were conducted in all six group 1 patients; at the end of one year the results were good in two cases, fair in three cases, and poor in one case. The results suggest that limb lengthening should be limited to 4 cm to minimize this complication. It was also seen that patients with peroneal nerve palsy due to local compression do well, though some are bothered by mild residual dysesthesia over the dorsum of the foot. In contrast, patients with sciatic nerve palsy do not have such a good outlook. PMID:1345646

  7. Changes in contralateral protein metabolism following unilateral sciatic nerve section

    SciTech Connect

    Menendez, J.A.; Cubas, S.C.

    1990-03-01

    Changes in nerve biochemistry, anatomy, and function following injuries to the contralateral nerve have been repeatedly reported, though their significance is unknown. The most likely mechanisms for their development are either substances carried by axoplasmic flow or electrically transmitted signals. This study analyzes which mechanism underlies the development of a contralateral change in protein metabolism. The incorporation of labelled amino acids (AA) into proteins of both sciatic nerves was assessed by liquid scintillation after an unilateral section. AA were offered locally for 30 min to the distal stump of the sectioned nerves and at homologous levels of the intact contralateral nerves. At various times, from 1 to 24 h, both sciatic nerves were removed and the proteins extracted with trichloroacetic acid (TCA). An increase in incorporation was found in both nerves 14-24 h after section. No difference existed between sectioned and intact nerves, which is consistent with the contralateral effect. Lidocaine, but not colchicine, when applied previously to the nerves midway between the sectioning site and the spinal cord, inhibited the contralateral increase in AA incorporation. It is concluded that electrical signals, crossing through the spinal cord, are responsible for the development of the contralateral effect. Both the nature of the proteins and the significance of the contralateral effect are matters for speculation.

  8. Sciatic nerve repair using adhesive bonding and a modified conduit

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xiangdang; Cai, Hongfei; Hao, Yongyu; Sun, Geng; Song, Yaoyao; Chen, Wen

    2014-01-01

    When repairing nerves with adhesives, most researchers place glue directly on the nerve stumps, but this method does not fix the nerve ends well and allows glue to easily invade the nerve ends. In this study, we established a rat model of completely transected sciatic nerve injury and repaired it using a modified 1 cm-length conduit with inner diameter of 1.5 mm. Each end of the cylindrical conduit contains a short linear channel, while the enclosed central tube protects the nerve ends well. Nerves were repaired with 2-octyl-cyanoacrylate and suture, which complement the function of the modified conduit. The results demonstrated that for the same conduit, the average operation time using the adhesive method was much shorter than with the suture method. No significant differences were found between the two groups in sciatic function index, motor evoked potential latency, motor evoked potential amplitude, muscular recovery rate, number of medullated nerve fibers, axon diameter, or medullary sheath thickness. Thus, the adhesive method for repairing nerves using a modified conduit is feasible and effective, and reduces the operation time while providing an equivalent repair effect. PMID:25206861

  9. Diagnosis and therapeutic options for peripheral vasculitic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Blaes, Franz

    2015-04-01

    Vasculitis can affect the peripheral nervous system alone (nonsystemic vasculitic neuropathy) or can be a part of primary or secondary systemic vasculitis. In cases of pre-existing systemic vasculitis, the diagnosis can easily be made, whereas suspected vasculitic neuropathy as initial or only manifestation of vasculitis requires careful clinical, neurophysiological, laboratory and histopathological workout. The typical clinical syndrome is mononeuropathia multiplex or asymmetric neuropathy, but distal-symmetric neuropathy can frequently be seen. Standard treatments include steroids, azathioprine, methotrexate and cyclophosphamide. More recently the B-cell antibody rituximab and intravenous immunoglobulins have shown to be effective in some vasculitic neuropathy types. PMID:25829955

  10. Diagnosis and therapeutic options for peripheral vasculitic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Vasculitis can affect the peripheral nervous system alone (nonsystemic vasculitic neuropathy) or can be a part of primary or secondary systemic vasculitis. In cases of pre-existing systemic vasculitis, the diagnosis can easily be made, whereas suspected vasculitic neuropathy as initial or only manifestation of vasculitis requires careful clinical, neurophysiological, laboratory and histopathological workout. The typical clinical syndrome is mononeuropathia multiplex or asymmetric neuropathy, but distal-symmetric neuropathy can frequently be seen. Standard treatments include steroids, azathioprine, methotrexate and cyclophosphamide. More recently the B-cell antibody rituximab and intravenous immunoglobulins have shown to be effective in some vasculitic neuropathy types. PMID:25829955

  11. DIABETIC NEUROPATHY PART 2: PROXIMAL AND ASSYMMETRIC PHENOTYPES

    PubMed Central

    Pasnoor, Mamatha; Dimachkie, Mazen M.; Barohn, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathies consist of a variety of syndromes resulting from different types of damage to peripheral or cranial nerves. Although distal symmetric polyneuropathy is most common type of diabetic neuropathy, there are many other subtypes of diabetic neuropathies which have been defined since the 1800’s. Included in these descriptions are patients with proximal diabetic, truncal, cranial, median, and ulnar neuropathies. Various theories have been proposed for the pathogenesis of these neuropathies. The treatment of most of these requires tight and stable glycemic control. Spontaneous recovery is seen in most of these conditions with diabetic control Immunotherapies have been tried in some of these conditions but are quite controversial. PMID:23642718

  12. Targeting Apoptosis Signalling Kinase-1 (ASK-1) Does Not Prevent the Development of Neuropathy in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Victoria L.; Ali, Sumia; Duddy, Graham; Whitmarsh, Alan J.; Gardiner, Natalie J.

    2014-01-01

    Apoptosis signal-regulating kinase-1 (ASK1) is a mitogen-activated protein 3 kinase (MAPKKK/MAP3K) which lies upstream of the stress-activated MAPKs, JNK and p38. ASK1 may be activated by a variety of extracellular and intracellular stimuli. MAP kinase activation in the sensory nervous system as a result of diabetes has been shown in numerous preclinical and clinical studies. As a common upstream activator of both p38 and JNK, we hypothesised that activation of ASK1 contributes to nerve dysfunction in diabetic neuropathy. We therefore wanted to characterize the expression of ASK1 in sensory neurons, and determine whether the absence of functional ASK1 would protect against the development of neuropathy in a mouse model of experimental diabetes. ASK1 mRNA and protein is constitutively expressed by multiple populations of sensory neurons of the adult mouse lumbar DRG. Diabetes was induced in male C57BL/6 and transgenic ASK1 kinase-inactive (ASK1n) mice using streptozotocin. Levels of ASK1 do not change in the DRG, spinal cord, or sciatic nerve following induction of diabetes. However, levels of ASK2 mRNA increase in the spinal cord at 4 weeks of diabetes, which could represent a future target for this field. Neither motor nerve conduction velocity deficits, nor thermal or mechanical hypoalgesia were prevented or ameliorated in diabetic ASK1n mice. These results suggest that activation of ASK1 is not responsible for the nerve deficits observed in this mouse model of diabetic neuropathy. PMID:25329046

  13. Late onset Leber's optic neuropathy: a case confused with ischaemic optic neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Borruat, F X; Green, W T; Graham, E M; Sweeney, M G; Morgan-Hughes, J A; Sanders, M D

    1992-01-01

    A case is reported of a 63-year-old man with progressive central visual loss in one eye followed 11 months later by involvement of the fellow eye. A diagnosis of chronic ischaemic optic neuropathy was considered. However, despite a negative family history, the absence of electrocardiographic abnormalities, and minimal fundus changes a diagnosis of Leber's optic neuropathy was made on the basis of magnetic resonance imaging findings and the mitochondrial DNA mutation at base pair 11778. Images PMID:1420066

  14. [Optic neuropathy in acute poisoning with methanol].

    PubMed

    Sekkat, A; Maillard, P; Dupeyron, G; Bensouda, J; Arne, J L; Bec, P

    1982-01-01

    The authors report four cases of methanol poisoning, two of which suffering acute bilateral optic neuropathy which secondarily leads to optic atrophy. The report the main clinical features of such a poisoning and the actual basis of its physiopathology and treatment. According to the four cases reported, they underline the importance of early diagnosis and specific treatment. PMID:7169508

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of radiation optic neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, C.F.; Schatz, N.J.; Glaser, J.S. )

    1990-10-15

    Three patients with delayed radiation optic neuropathy after radiation therapy for parasellar neoplasms underwent magnetic resonance imaging. The affected optic nerves and chiasms showed enlargement and focal gadopentetate dimeglumine enhancement. The magnetic resonance imaging technique effectively detected and defined anterior visual pathway changes of radionecrosis and excluded the clinical possibility of visual loss because of tumor recurrence.

  16. [Colonic Crohn's disease complicated with peripheral neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Chaoui, F; Hellal, H; Balamane, M; Boudhane, M; Mikol, J; Masmoudi, A

    1990-01-01

    The association of Crohn's disease and peripheral neuropathy is a rare event and the pathogenic factors often implicated are vitamin B12 deficiency or metronidazole treatment. We report a case of severe axonal polyneuropathy associated with Crohn's disease and unrelated to vitamin deficiency or metronidazole treatment. This represents a very rare extra-digestive manifestation of Crohn's disease. PMID:2125951

  17. Diabetic Neuropathies: The Nerve Damage of Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... falling in response to normal body functions and physical activity. Digestive System Nerve damage to the digestive system most commonly ... neuropathy on the basis of symptoms and a physical exam. During the exam, the doctor ... temperature, or light touch. Foot Exams Experts recommend ...

  18. Systemic corticosteroids in nonarteritic ischemic optic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Al-Zubidi, Nagham; Zhang, Jason; Spitze, Arielle; Lee, Andrew G

    2014-01-01

    Nonarteritic ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) is one of the most prevalent optic nerve disorders seen in ophthalmic practice. The role of corticosteroid therapy in NAION remains a highly controversial area of debate in ophthalmology. This brief review will provide an overview of the current clinical evidence on this topic as well as some comment on the medical debate. PMID:25449939

  19. Auditory Neuropathy Spectrum Disorder: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norrix, Linda W.; Velenovsky, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder, or ANSD, can be a confusing diagnosis to physicians, clinicians, those diagnosed, and parents of children diagnosed with the condition. The purpose of this review is to provide the reader with an understanding of the disorder, the limitations in current tools to determine site(s) of lesion, and…

  20. Speech Perception in Individuals with Auditory Neuropathy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeng, Fan-Gang; Liu, Sheng

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Speech perception in participants with auditory neuropathy (AN) was systematically studied to answer the following 2 questions: Does noise present a particular problem for people with AN: Can clear speech and cochlear implants alleviate this problem? Method: The researchers evaluated the advantage in intelligibility of clear speech over…

  1. Immediate versus delayed primary nerve repair in the rabbit sciatic nerve.

    PubMed

    Piskin, Ahmet; Altunkaynak, Berrin Zühal; Çitlak, Atilla; Sezgin, Hicabi; Yazιcι, Ozgür; Kaplan, Süleyman

    2013-12-25

    It is well known that peripheral nerve injury should be treated immediately in the clinic, but in some instances, repair can be delayed. This study investigated the effects of immediate versus delayed (3 days after injury) neurorrhaphy on repair of transected sciatic nerve in New Zealand rabbits using stereological, histomorphological and biomechanical methods. At 8 weeks after immediate and delayed neurorrhaphy, axon number and area in the sciatic nerve, myelin sheath and epineurium thickness, Schwann cell morphology, and the mechanical property of nerve fibers did not differ obviously. These results indicate that delayed neurorrhaphy do not produce any deleterious effect on sciatic nerve repair. PMID:25206663

  2. The Rehabilitation of Oncological Patients Presenting Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    MICU, ELENA CLAUDIA; IRSAY, LASZLO

    2014-01-01

    The International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP 2011) defines neuropathic pain as “the pain caused by an injury or disease of the somatosensory portion of the nervous system”. The central neuropathic pain is defined as “the pain caused by an injury or disease of the central somatosensory central nervous system”, whereas the peripheral neuropathic pain is defined as “the pain caused by an injury or disease of the peripheral somatosensory nervous system” [1]. The peripheral neuropathy describes any affection of the peripheral nervous system. The etiology is vast, there being a number of over 100 possible causes, which causes the global morbidity rate to reach approximately 2.4%. The chronic nature of the pain superposes the everyday routine and leads to the high intake of medication for pain alleviation. The number of cases of neuroplasia has always increased today. This disturbing diagnosis which can potentiate the signs and symptoms of peripheral neuropathy as well as reduce and limit the treatment options associated with neuropathies. The treatment presupposes a multidisciplinary approach, while the solution to prevent complications involves the control of risk factors and pathophysiological treatment. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CPIN) is a significant disabling symptom that is tightly connected to the administration of neurotoxic cytostatic agents used for the treatment of neoplasia. CPIN compromises the quality of life and produces pain or discomfort [2]. I have sought to produce a presentation of the medicated and physical-kinetic treatment options that have proved their effectiveness during clinical studies or random trials and can be applied to cancer patients presenting with symptoms associated with peripheral neuropathy, namely with neuropathic pain, and support it with arguments. PMID:26528000

  3. Central recruitment in individual with auditory neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Preeti; Mishra, Rajkishor; Mahallik, Debadatta; Ansari, Imran; Mungutwar, Varsha

    2014-12-01

    Auditory neuropathy (AN) describes patients with dysfunction of the auditory nerve in the presence of preserved cochlear outer hair-cell receptor functions in presence of normal otoacoustic emissions and/or cochlear microphonics. In individuals with auditory neuropathy speech are disproportionate to their hearing sensitivity and reported to be dependent on cortical evoked potentials. In individuals with AN, who have normal cortical potentials have better speech identification scores when compared to those with abnormal cortical potentials reflect relation between the cortical potentials and the speech identification scores. One group comparison research design was used for present study. The purpose of the study was to compare shift in latency of LLR peaks at different sensation level in subjects with auditory neuropathy and age matched normal individuals. 6 subjects (11 ears) diagnosed as having auditory neuropathy and 6 subjects (12 ears) with normal hearing Sensitivity participated for the study. Pure tone audiometry, immittance, reflexometry and otoacoustic emissions were administered. ABR was recorded for all the subjects at a repetition rate of 11.1 at an intensity of 90 dB nHL. LLR was carried out at different intensity levels for/da/speech stimulus at an intensity of 90 dB nHL. Latency of N1 and P2 of LLR was calculated at different sensation levels for both the groups. Descriptive analysis was carried out to find out the mean and standard deviation for latency of N1 and P2 for both, AN and normal hearing group. There was delay in latency of N1 and P2 for individuals with auditory neuropathy. PMID:26396961

  4. Erythromycin induces supranormal gall bladder contraction in diabetic autonomic neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Catnach, S M; Ballinger, A B; Stevens, M; Fairclough, P D; Trembath, R C; Drury, P L; Watkins, P J

    1993-01-01

    Gall bladder motor function is impaired in some patients with diabetes. It has been suggested that the abnormalities of gall bladder motility are confined to those patients with autonomic neuropathy. Erythromycin, a motilin receptor agonist, causes gall bladder contraction in both normal subjects and patients with gall stones with impaired gall bladder emptying. The effect of erythromycin on gall bladder motility in seven patients with diabetes with an autonomic neuropathy, six patients with diabetes without autonomic neuropathy, and 17 normal subjects was studied using ultrasound. There was no significant difference in gall bladder fasting volume between the three groups, but the patients with diabetes with autonomic neuropathy had impaired postprandial gall bladder emptying compared with normal subjects (percentage emptied (SEM) 40 (10.3)% v 64 (2.8)%, p < 0.01) and those with autonomic neuropathy (48 (7.7)%, NS). Erythromycin produced a dramatic reduction in gall bladder fasting volume in patients with diabetes with an autonomic neuropathy, compared with either normal subjects or patients with diabetes without autonomic neuropathy (percentage reduction 62 (4.6)% in patients with autonomic neuropathy, v 37 (17.6)% in those without autonomic neuropathy, and 26 (7.3)% in the normal subjects, (p < 0.02) and returned gall bladder emptying to normal in all patients with impaired emptying. The pronounced effect of erythromycin in diabetic autonomic neuropathy suggests denervation supersensitivity and that the action of erythromycin on the gall bladder is neurally modulated. PMID:8174966

  5. Osteoprotegerin ameliorates sciatic nerve crush induced bone loss.

    PubMed

    Bateman, T A; Dunstan, C R; Lacey, D L; Ferguson, V L; Ayers, R A; Simske, S J

    2001-07-01

    This study examines the ability of osteoprotegerin (OPG) to prevent the local bone resorption caused by sciatic nerve damage. Sixty-five 18-week-old male mice were assigned to one of six groups (n = 10-11/group). A baseline control group was sacrificed on day zero of the 10-day study. The remaining groups were placebo sham operated, placebo nerve crush (Plac NC) operated, 0.1 mg/kg/day OPG + nerve crush (LOW), 0.3 mg/kg/day OPG + nerve crush (MED), and 1.0 mg/kg/day OPG + nerve crush (HI). Nerve crush or sham operations were performed on the right leg. The left leg served as a contralateral control to the nerve crushed (ipsilateral) leg. The difference in mass between the right and left femur and tibia was examined. Additionally, quantitative histomorphometry was performed on the right and left femur and tibia diaphyses. Nerve crush resulted in a significant loss of bone mass in the ipsilateral side compared to the contralateral side. Bone mass for the ipsilateral bones of the Plac NC group were significantly reduced by 3.8% in the femur and 3.5% in the tibia compared to the contralateral limb. The percent diminution was reduced for OPG treated mice compared to the Plac NC group for both the femur and tibia. In the femur, the percent reduction of ipsilateral bone mass was reduced to 1.0% (LOW), 1.3% (MED) and 1.6% (HI) compared to the contralateral limb. In the tibia, loss of bone mass in the ipsilateral limb was reduced to 1.4% (LOW), 1.4% (MED), and 2.4% (HI) compared to the contralateral. OPG also decreased the amount of tibial endocortical resorption compared to the Plac NC group. In summary, OPG mitigated bone loss caused by damage to the sciatic nerve. PMID:11518255

  6. Renaut bodies in the sciatic nerve of beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Elcock, L E; Stuart, B P; Hoss, H E; Crabb, K; Millard, D M; Bopp BILL; Mueller, R E; Hastings, T F; Lake, S G

    2001-04-01

    182 control Beagle dogs from 23 historical studies (14 chronic, 9 subchronic) were reviewed histologically for the presence of Renaut bodies in the sciatic nerve. Renaut bodies were found in 36.1 percent of the subchronic-study dogs and in 46.4 percent of the chronic-study dogs. The Renaut bodies most often resided in the distal sections of the sciatic nerve, specifically in the tibial branch as it traversed the knee joint in situ. There was no sex predilection. Renaut bodies were located predominately in the endoneurium, in the center of the nerve sections. There was no associated axonal degeneration, reactive gliosis, or encapsulation. The Renaut bodies were characterized as large (20 to 500 microns diameter in cross section), well-demarcated elliptical structures with an onion-skin arrangement of loosely textured, filamentous strands intermixed with sparse numbers of dark spindle-shaped nuclei. Occasionally the core displayed a more dense, intensely eosinophilic arrangement of fibers. Histochemical results included: positive acidic alcian blue, Gomori's trichrome, and Verhoeff Van Gieson's; and negative Periodic-acid Schiff, Congo Red, and Luxol fast blue/cresyl violet. Immunohistochemical results included: positive vimentin and collagen (subtypes I, II, and VI); and negative NSE, S-100, GFAP, amyloid A component, desmin, alpha-sarcomeric actin, pancytokeratin, EMA, and von Willebrand factor. Transmission electron microscopy revealed loosely arrayed, circumferentially oriented collagen fibers intermixed with varying amounts of amorphous substance and finely fibrillar material. Most of the cells comprising the Renaut body were identified as fibroblasts. No nerve fibers entered or left the Renaut body, and nearby nerves appeared to be normal structurally. Based on this characterization of Renaut bodies and in conjunction with the past literature, Renaut bodies appear to have little or no pathological significance, but rather are suggestive of a physiological

  7. Bilateral Persistent Sciatic Artery Aneurysm Discovered by Atypical Sciatica: A Case Report

    SciTech Connect

    Mazet, Nathalie; Soulier-Guerin, Karine; Ruivard, Marc; Garcier, Jean-Marc; Boyer, Louis

    2006-12-15

    We report a case of a bilateral persistent sciatic artery aneurysm, diagnosed by atypical sciatica on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. The different variants, the revealing features, and possible treatment are discussed.

  8. Morphological changes in the sciatic nerve, skeletal muscle, heart and brain of rabbits receiving continuous sciatic nerve block with 0.2% ropivacaine

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yangning; He, Miao; Zou, Tianxiao; Yu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the morphological changes in various tissues of rabbits receiving sciatic nerve block with 0.2% ropivacaine for 48 h. Methods: Twenty healthy were randomly assigned to normal saline group (N group) and ropivacaine group (R group). The right sciatic nerve was exposed, and a nerve-blocking trocar cannula embedded. Animals received an injection of 0.5% ropivacaine hydrochloride at a dose of 0.75 ml/kg. Rabbit was then connected to an infusion pump containing 50 ml of normal saline in N group, or to a infusion pump containing 0.2% ropivacaine hydrochloride in R group at 0.25 ml/kg•h-1. Results: In both R group and N group, a small number of nerve cells exhibited pyknotic degeneration. More nerve cells with pyknotic degeneration were found in R group than in N group (P<0.001). At 48 h after surgery, there was a significant correlation between the abnormality of right hind limb and the degree of edema in sciatic nerve (P<0.01). Conclusion: Pyknotic degeneration of sciatic nerve increased after an infusion of 0.2% ropivacaine hydrochloride for 48 h, suggesting the neurotoxicity of ropivacaine. An infusion of 0.2% ropivacaine hydrochloride for 48 h may cause necrosis of skeletal muscle cells. The sciatic nerve edema would greatly affect the hindlimb motor while both pyknotic degeneration of sciatic nerve and skeletal muscle have little influence on the hindlimb movement. After an infusion of 0.2% ropivacaine hydrochloride for 48 h, the morphology of right atrium and brain tissues around the ventriculus tertius and medulla oblongata remained unchanged. PMID:26823703

  9. Effects of sciatic nerve stimulation on the propagation of cortical spreading depression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaoli; Yu, Zhidong; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Qingming; Li, Pengcheng

    2008-02-01

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD) is an important pathological model of migraine and is related to other neural disorders, such as cerebral ischemia and epilepsy. It has been reported that brain stimulation is a quite effective way to treat neural diseases. However, direct stimulation could cause harm to brain. If peripheral nerve stimulation could have the same treatment, it would be essential to investigate the mechanisms of peripheral nerve and the study of sciatic nerve stimulation would have profound clinical meaning. In this paper, we used optical intrinsic signal imaging (OISI) and extracellular electrophysiologic recording techniques to study the effects of sciatic nerve stimulation on the propagation of CSD. We found that: (1) continuous sciatic nerve stimulation on rats caused a decrease in light intensity on the whole cortex, which meant an increase in cerebral blood volume(CBV); (2) the spreading velocity of CSD declined from 3.63+/- 0.272 mm/min to 3.06+/-0.260 mm/min during sciatic nerve stimulation, compared with that without sciatic nerve stimulation. In summary, data suggests that sciatic nerve stimulation elicits a response of cortex and causes a slowdown in the propagation of CSD.

  10. Mutations for Leber hereditary optic neuropathy in patients with alcohol and tobacco optic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Amaral-Fernandes, Marcela Scabello; Marcondes, Ana Maria; Miranda, Paulo Maurício do Amor Divino; Maciel-Guerra, Andréa Trevas

    2011-01-01

    Purpose There are many similarities in the clinical presentation of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and in patients who have optic neuropathy and a history of heavy tobacco and alcohol consumption. The main objective of this study is to investigate the frequency of primary and secondary mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations for LHON in patients diagnosed as having alcohol and tobacco optic neuropathy (ATON). Methods Twenty-six patients who had a history of heavy alcohol and tobacco consumption and who developed bilateral optic neuropathy were tested for primary mutations (G11778A, T14484C, and G3460A) by restriction analysis, and 14 secondary mutations in the genes mitochondrially encoded NADH dehydrogenase 1 (MT-ND1), mitochondrially encoded NADH dehydrogenase 4 (MT-ND4), mitochondrially encoded NADH dehydrogenase 4L (MT-ND4L), mitochondrially encoded NADH dehydrogenase 5 (MT-ND5), mitochondrially encoded NADH dehydrogenase 6 (MT-ND6), and mitochondrially encoded cytochrome B (MT-CYB) by direct sequencing. Results Four (15.4%) of 26 patients tested positive for LHON primary mutations, two for the G11778A mutation, and two for the T14484C mutation. No patient tested positive for any of the 14 secondary mutations. Familial recurrence was present in four patients, and only three of these patients have presented the LHON mutation. Conclusions The diagnosis of LHON should be considered in all patients diagnosed as having optic neuropathy, particularly those with familial recurrence of vision loss. PMID:22194643

  11. Novel insights on diagnosis, cause and treatment of diabetic neuropathy: focus on painful diabetic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Tavakoli, Mitra; Asghar, Omar; Alam, Uazman; Petropoulos, Ioannis N.; Fadavi, Hassan; Malik, Rayaz A.

    2010-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is common, under or misdiagnosed, and causes substantial morbidity with increased mortality. Defining and developing sensitive diagnostic tests for diabetic neuropathy is not only key to implementing earlier interventions but also to ensure that the most appropriate endpoints are employed in clinical intervention trials. This is critical as many potentially effective therapies may never progress to the clinic, not due to a lack of therapeutic effect, but because the endpoints were not sufficiently sensitive or robust to identify benefit. Apart from improving glycaemic control, there is no licensed treatment for diabetic neuropathy, however, a number of pathogenetic pathways remain under active study. Painful diabetic neuropathy is a cause of considerable morbidity and whilst many pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions are currently used, only two are approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. We address the important issue of the ‘placebo effect’ and also consider potential new pharmacological therapies as well as nonpharmacological interventions in the treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy. PMID:23148152

  12. [2013: what's new in inflammatory neuropathies].

    PubMed

    Kuntzer, T

    2014-12-01

    Several high-quality publications were published in 2013 and some major trials studies were started. In Guillain-Barré syndrome, events included the launch of IGOS and a better understanding of diagnostic limits, the effect of influenza vaccination, and better care, but uncertainty remains about analgesics. A new mouse model was also described. In chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP), diagnostic pitfalls can be recalled. Our knowledge of underlying pathophysiological processes has improved, and the value of monitoring with function and deficit scores has been demonstrated. IVIG can sometimes be effective longer than expected, but CIDP remains sensitive to corticosteroids, particularly with the long-term beneficial effects of megadose dexamethasone. The impact of fingolimod remains to be demonstrated in an ongoing trial. Advances concerning multifocal motor neuropathy, inflammatory plexopathy, and neuropathy with anti -MAG activity are discussed but treatments already recognized as effective should not be changed. Imaging of peripheral nerve progresses. PMID:25459118

  13. 77 FR 47795 - Disease Associated With Exposure to Certain Herbicide Agents: Peripheral Neuropathy

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-10

    ... herbicide exposure and the occurrence of ``acute and subacute transient peripheral neuropathy.'' In... established a regulatory presumption of service connection for ``acute and subacute peripheral neuropathy...'s current regulation presumes service connection for ``acute and subacute peripheral...

  14. Peptide Mimetic of the S100A4 Protein Modulates Peripheral Nerve Regeneration and Attenuates the Progression of Neuropathy in Myelin Protein P0 Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Moldovan, Mihai; Pinchenko, Volodymyr; Dmytriyeva, Oksana; Pankratova, Stanislava; Fugleholm, Kåre; Klingelhofer, Jorg; Bock, Elisabeth; Berezin, Vladimir; Krarup, Christian; Kiryushko, Darya

    2013-01-01

    We recently found that S100A4, a member of the multifunctional S100 protein family, protects neurons in the injured brain and identified two sequence motifs in S100A4 mediating its neurotrophic effect. Synthetic peptides encompassing these motifs stimulated neuritogenesis and survival in vitro and mimicked the S100A4-induced neuroprotection in brain trauma. Here, we investigated a possible function of S100A4 and its mimetics in the pathologies of the peripheral nervous system (PNS). We found that S100A4 was expressed in the injured PNS and that its peptide mimetic (H3) affected the regeneration and survival of myelinated axons. H3 accelerated electrophysiological, behavioral and morphological recovery after sciatic nerve crush while transiently delaying regeneration after sciatic nerve transection and repair. On the basis of the finding that both S100A4 and H3 increased neurite branching in vitro, these effects were attributed to the modulatory effect of H3 on initial axonal sprouting. In contrast to the modest effect of H3 on the time course of regeneration, H3 had a long-term neuroprotective effect in the myelin protein P0 null mice, a model of dysmyelinating neuropathy (Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1 disease), where the peptide attenuated the deterioration of nerve conduction, demyelination and axonal loss. From these results, S100A4 mimetics emerge as a possible means to enhance axonal sprouting and survival, especially in the context of demyelinating neuropathies with secondary axonal loss, such as Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1 disease. Moreover, our data suggest that S100A4 is a neuroprotectant in PNS and that other S100 proteins, sharing high homology in the H3 motif, may have important functions in PNS pathologies. PMID:23508572

  15. Animal models for inherited peripheral neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    MARTINI, RUDOLF

    1997-01-01

    Recent progress in human genetics and neurobiology has led to the identification of various mutations in particular myelin genes as the cause for many of the known inherited demyelinating peripheral neuropathies. Mutations in 3 distinct myelin genes, PMP22, P0, and connexin 32 cause the 3 major demyelinating subtypes of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease, CMT1A, CMT1B and CMTX, respectively. In addition, a reduction in the gene dosage of PMP22 causes hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP), while particular point mutations in PMP22 and P0 cause the severe Dejerine-Sottas (DS) neuropathy. A series of spontaneous and genetically engineered rodent mutants for genes for the above-mentioned myelin constituents are now available and their suitability to serve as models for these still untreatable diseases is an issue of particular interest. The spontaneous mutants Trembler-J and Trembler, with point mutations in PMP22, reflect some of the pathological alterations seen in CMT1A and DS patients, respectively. Furthermore, engineered mutants that either over or underexpress particular myelin genes are suitable models for patients who are similarly compromised in the gene dosage of the corresponding genes. In addition, engineered mutants heterozygously or homozygously deficient in the myelin component P0 show the pathology of distinct CMT1B and DS patients, respectively, while Cx32 deficient mice develop pathological abnormalities similar to those of CMTX patients. Mutants that mimic human peripheral neuropathies might allow the development of strategies to alleviate the symptoms of the diseases, and help to define environmental risk factors for aggravation of the disease. In addition, such mutants might be instrumental in the development of strategies to cure the diseases by gene therapy. PMID:9418989

  16. Postirradiation optic neuropathy in antral carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, J.; Vashist, S.

    1984-06-01

    A case is described of a patient who developed radiation-induced optic neuropathy 18 months following cobalt-60 irradiation for carcinoma of the left maxillary antrum and ethmoid sinus. This case is unusual because of the early onset of the optic nerve damage following radiation therapy and the ultimate emergence of the eye involved by tumor compression as the better eye in terms of visual acuity.

  17. Animal models for inherited peripheral neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Martini, R

    1997-10-01

    Recent progress in human genetics and neurobiology has led to the identification of various mutations in particular myelin genes as the cause for many of the known inherited demyelinating peripheral neuropathies. Mutations in 3 distinct myelin genes, PMP22, P0, and connexin 32 cause the 3 major demyelinating subtypes of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease, CMT1A, CMT1B and CMTX, respectively. In addition, a reduction in the gene dosage of PMP22 causes hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP), while particular point mutations in PMP22 and P0 cause the severe Dejerine-Sottas (DS) neuropathy. A series of spontaneous and genetically engineered rodent mutants for genes for the above-mentioned myelin constituents are now available and their suitability to serve as models for these still untreatable diseases is an issue of particular interest. The spontaneous mutants Trembler-J and Trembler, with point mutations in PMP22, reflect some of the pathological alterations seen in CMT1A and DS patients, respectively. Furthermore, engineered mutants that either over or underexpress particular myelin genes are suitable models for patients who are similarly compromised in the gene dosage of the corresponding genes. In addition, engineered mutants heterozygously or homozygously deficient in the myelin component P0 show the pathology of distinct CMT1B and DS patients, respectively, while Cx32 deficient mice develop pathological abnormalities similar to those of CMTX patients. Mutants that mimic human peripheral neuropathies might allow the development of strategies to alleviate the symptoms of the diseases, and help to define environmental risk factors for aggravation of the disease. In addition, such mutants might be instrumental in the development of strategies to cure the diseases by gene therapy. PMID:9418989

  18. Nerve Growth Factor and Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Vinik, Aaron

    2003-01-01

    Neuropathy is one of the most debilitating complications of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, with estimates of prevalence between 50–90% depending on the means of detection. Diabetic neuropathies are heterogeneous and there is variable involvement of large myelinated fibers and small, thinly myelinated fibers. Many of the neuronal abnormalities in diabetes can be duplicated by experimental depletion of specific neurotrophic factors, their receptors or their binding proteins. In experimental models of diabetes there is a reduction in the availability of these growth factors, which may be a consequence of metabolic abnormalities, or may be independent of glycemic control. These neurotrophic factors are required for the maintenance of the neurons, the ability to resist apoptosis and regenerative capacity. The best studied of the neurotrophic factors is nerve growth factor (NGF) and the related members of the neurotrophin family of peptides. There is increasing evidence that there is a deficiency of NGF in diabetes, as well as the dependent neuropeptides substance P (SP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) that may also contribute to the clinical symptoms resulting from small fiber dysfunction. Similarly, NT3 appears to be important for large fiber and IGFs for autonomic neuropathy. Whether the observed growth factor deficiencies are due to decreased synthesis, or functional, e.g. an inability to bind to their receptor, and/or abnormalities in nerve transport and processing, remains to be established. Although early studies in humans on the role of neurotrophic factors as a therapy for diabetic neuropathy have been unsuccessful, newer agents and the possibilities uncovered by further studies should fuel clinical trials for several generations. It seems reasonable to anticipate that neurotrophic factor therapy, specifically targeted at different nerve fiber populations, might enter the therapeutic armamentarium. PMID:14668049

  19. Sciatic Nerve Palsy Caused by Ruptured and Contracted Short External Rotator Muscles after Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong-Seok; Hong, Chang-Hwa; Soh, Jae-Wan; Nho, Jae-Hwi; Suh, You-Sung; Lee, Hwan-Woong

    2015-01-01

    Although the incidence of sciatic nerve palsy following total hip arthroplasty is low, this complication can cause devastating permanent nerve palsy. The authors experienced a case of sciatic nerve palsy caused by ruptured and contracted external rotator muscles following total hip arthroplasty in a patient suffering from osteonecrosis of the femoral head. We report this unusual case of sciatic nerve palsy with a review of the literature.

  20. Inherited peripheral neuropathies due to mitochondrial disorders.

    PubMed

    Cassereau, J; Codron, P; Funalot, B

    2014-05-01

    Mitochondrial disorders (MIDs) are frequently responsible for neuropathies with variable severity. Mitochondrial diseases causing peripheral neuropathies (PNP) may be due to mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), as is the case in MERRF and MELAS syndromes, or to mutations of nuclear genes. Secondary abnormalities of mtDNA (such as multiple deletions of muscle mtDNA) may result from mitochondrial disorders due to mutations in nuclear genes involved in mtDNA maintenance. This is the case in several syndromes caused by impaired mtDNA maintenance, such as Sensory Ataxic Neuropathy, Dysarthria and Ophthalmoplegia (SANDO) due to recessive mutations in the POLG gene, which encodes the catalytic subunit of mtDNA polymerase (DNA polymerase gamma), or Mitochondrial Neuro-Gastro-Intestinal Encephalomyopathy (MNGIE), due to recessive mutations in the TYMP gene, which encodes thymidine phosphorylase. The last years have seen a growing list of evidence demonstrating that mitochondrial bioenergetics and dynamics might be dysfunctional in axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT2), and these mechanisms might present a common link between dissimilar CMT2-causing genes. PMID:24768438

  1. Relapsing sensorimotor neuropathy with ophthalmoplegia, antidisialosyl antibodies, and extramembranous glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Delval, Arnaud; Stojkovic, Tanya; Vermersch, Patrick

    2006-02-01

    A 72-year-old man presented with oculomotor dysfunction, subacute relapsing sensorimotor neuropathy, elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate, IgM monoclonal paraprotein, cold agglutinins, and antidisialosyl IgM antibodies, features previously described by the acronym CANOMAD (chronic ataxic neuropathy with ophthalmoplegia, M protein, agglutination, and disialosyl antibodies). The patient also had extramembranous glomerulopathy associated with this syndrome. Treatment with corticosteroids improved both the neuropathy and glomerulopathy. This case suggests that the spectrum of neuropathy associated with monoclonal gammopathy may be broader than originally believed. PMID:16258949

  2. Abnormal Nutritional Factors in Patients Evaluated at a Neuropathy Center.

    PubMed

    Latov, Norman; Vo, Mary L; Chin, Russell L; Carey, Bridget T; Langsdorf, Jennifer A; Feuer, Naomi T

    2016-06-01

    Abnormal concentrations of nutritional factors were found in 24.1% of 187 patients with neuropathy who were newly seen at our academic neuropathy referral center over a 1-year period. All patients presented with sensory axonal or small fiber neuropathy. In 7.3%, they were present in association with at least one other identifiable cause for neuropathy. Elevated levels of pyridoxal phosphate or mercury occurred more frequently than deficiencies in vitamins B1, B12, or B6. The nutritional abnormalities are amenable to correction by dietary intervention. PMID:27224436

  3. Therapeutic Effects of 15 Hz Pulsed Electromagnetic Field on Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy in Streptozotocin-Treated Rats

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Maogang; Li, Feijiang; Cai, Jing; Wu, Xiaoming; Tang, Chi; Xu, Qiaoling; Liu, Juan; Guo, Wei; Shen, Guanghao; Luo, Erping

    2013-01-01

    Although numerous clinical studies have reported that pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF) have a neuroprotective role in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN), the application of PEMF for clinic is still controversial. The present study was designed to investigate whether PEMF has therapeutic potential in relieving peripheral neuropathic symptoms in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Adult male Sprague–Dawley rats were randomly divided into three weight-matched groups (eight in each group): the non-diabetic control group (Control), diabetes mellitus with 15 Hz PEMF exposure group (DM+PEMF) which were subjected to daily 8-h PEMF exposure for 7 weeks and diabetes mellitus with sham PEMF exposure group (DM). Signs and symptoms of DPN in STZ-treated rats were investigated by using behavioral assays. Meanwhile, ultrastructural examination and immunohistochemical study for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) of sciatic nerve were also performed. During a 7-week experimental observation, we found that PEMF stimulation did not alter hyperglycemia and weight loss in STZ-treated rats with DPN. However, PEMF stimulation attenuated the development of the abnormalities observed in STZ-treated rats with DPN, which were demonstrated by increased hind paw withdrawal threshold to mechanical and thermal stimuli, slighter demyelination and axon enlargement and less VEGF immunostaining of sciatic nerve compared to those of the DM group. The current study demonstrates that treatment with PEMF might prevent the development of abnormalities observed in animal models for DPN. It is suggested that PEMF might have direct corrective effects on injured nerves and would be a potentially promising non-invasive therapeutic tool for the treatment of DPN. PMID:23637830

  4. Myelin Abnormalities in the Optic and Sciatic Nerves in Mice With GM1-Gangliosidosis

    PubMed Central

    Heinecke, Karie A.; Luoma, Adrienne; d’Azzo, Alessandra; Kirschner, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    GM1-gangliosidosis is a glycosphingolipid lysosomal storage disease involving accumulation of GM1 and its asialo form (GA1) primarily in the brain. Thin-layer chromatography and X-ray diffraction were used to analyze the lipid content/composition and the myelin structure of the optic and sciatic nerves from 7- and 10-month old β-galactosidase (β-gal) +/? and β-gal −/− mice, a model of GM1gangliosidosis. Optic nerve weight was lower in the β-gal −/− mice than in unaffected β-gal +/? mice, but no difference was seen in sciatic nerve weight. The levels of GM1 and GA1 were significantly increased in both the optic nerve and sciatic nerve of the β-gal −/− mice. The content of myelin-enriched cerebrosides, sulfatides, and plasmalogen ethanolamines was significantly lower in optic nerve of β-gal −/− mice than in β-gal +/? mice; however, cholesteryl esters were enriched in the β-gal −/− mice. No major abnormalities in these lipids were detected in the sciatic nerve of the β-gal −/− mice. The abnormalities in GM1 and myelin lipids in optic nerve of β-gal −/− mice correlated with a reduction in the relative amount of myelin and periodicity in fresh nerve. By contrast, the relative amount of myelin and periodicity in the sciatic nerves from control and β-gal −/− mice were indistinguishable, suggesting minimal pathological involvement in sciatic nerve. Our results indicate that the greater neurochemical pathology observed in the optic nerve than in the sciatic nerve of β-gal −/− mice is likely due to the greater glycolipid storage in optic nerve. PMID:25694553

  5. Different dose-dependent effects of ebselen in -sciatic nerve ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Ozyigit, Filiz; Kucuk, Aysegul; Akcer, Sezer; Tosun, Murat; Kocak, Fatma Emel; Kocak, Cengiz; Kocak, Ahmet; Metineren, Hasan; Genc, Osman

    2015-01-01

    Ebselen is an organoselenium compound which has strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. We investigated the neuroprotective role of ebselen pretreatment in rats with experimental sciatic nerve ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury. Adult male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into four groups (N = 7 in each group). Before sciatic nerve I/R was induced, ebselen was injected intraperitoneally at doses of 15 and 30 mg/kg. After a 2 h ischemia and a 3 h reperfusion period, sciatic nerve tissues were excised. Tissue levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitric oxide (NO), and activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and catalase (CAT) were measured. Sciatic nerve tissues were also examined histopathologically. The 15 mg/kg dose of ebselen reduced sciatic nerve damage and apoptosis (P < 0.01), levels of MDA, NO, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) positive cells (P < 0.01, P < 0.05, respectively), and increased SOD, GPx, and CAT activities (P < 0.001, P < 0.01, P < 0.05, respectively) compared with the I/R group that did not receive ebselen. Conversely, the 30 mg/kg dose of ebselen increased sciatic nerve damage, apoptosis, iNOS positive cells (P < 0.01, P < 0.05, P < 0.001) and MDA and NO levels (P < 0.05, P < 0.01) and decreased SOD, GPx, and CAT activities (P < 0.05) compared with the sham group. The results of this study suggest that ebselen may cause different effects depending on the dose employed. Ebselen may be protective against sciatic nerve I/R injury via antioxidant and antiapoptotic activities at a 15 mg/kg dose, conversely higher doses may cause detrimental effects. PMID:26614850

  6. Bortezomib Treatment Produces Nocifensive Behavior and Changes in the Expression of TRPV1, CGRP, and Substance P in the Rat DRG, Spinal Cord, and Sciatic Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Quartu, M.; Carozzi, V. A.; Dorsey, S. G.; Serra, M. P.; Poddighe, L.; Picci, C.; Boi, M.; Melis, T.; Del Fiacco, M.; Meregalli, C.; Chiorazzi, A.; Renn, C. L.; Cavaletti, G.; Marmiroli, P.

    2014-01-01

    To investigate neurochemical changes associated with bortezomib-induced painful peripheral neuropathy (PN), we examined the effects of a single-dose intravenous administration of bortezomib and a well-established “chronic” schedule in a rat model of bortezomib-induced PN. The TRPV1 channel and sensory neuropeptides CGRP and substance P (SP) were studied in L4-L5 dorsal root ganglia (DRGs), spinal cord, and sciatic nerve. Behavioral measures, performed at the end of the chronic bortezomib treatment, confirmed a reduction of mechanical nociceptive threshold, whereas no difference occurred in thermal withdrawal latency. Western blot analysis showed a relative increase of TRPV1 in DRG and spinal cord after both acute and chronic bortezomib administration. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction revealed a decrease of TRPV1 and CGRP mRNA relative levels after chronic treatment. Immunohistochemistry showed that in the DRGs, TRPV1-, CGRP-, and SP-immunoreactive neurons were mostly small- and medium-sized and the proportion of TRPV1- and CGRP-labeled neurons increased after treatment. A bortezomib-induced increase in density of TRPV1- and CGRP-immunoreactive innervation in the dorsal horn was also observed. Our findings show that bortezomib-treatment selectively affects subsets of DRG neurons likely involved in the processing of nociceptive stimuli and that neurochemical changes may contribute to development and persistence of pain in bortezomib-induced PN. PMID:24877063

  7. Differential temporal expression of matrix metalloproteinases following sciatic nerve crush

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Jing; Zha, Guang-bin; Yu, Jun; Zhang, Hong-hong; Yi, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    We previously performed transcriptome sequencing and found that genes for matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), such as MMP7 and 12, seem to be highly upregulated following peripheral nerve injury, and may be involved in nerve repair. In the present study, we systematically determined the expression levels of MMPs and their regulators at 1, 4, 7 and 14 days after sciatic nerve crush injury. The number of differentially expressed genes was elevated at 4 and 7 days after injury, but decreased at 14 days after injury. Among the differentially expressed genes, those most up-regulated showed fold changes of more than 214, while those most down-regulated exhibited fold changes of more than 2−10. Gene sequencing showed that, at all time points after injury, a variety of MMP genes in the “Inhibition of MMPs” pathway were up-regulated, and their inhibitor genes were down-regulated. Expression of key up- and down-regulated genes was verified by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis and found to be consistent with transcriptome sequencing. These results suggest that MMP-related genes are strongly involved in the process of peripheral nerve regeneration.

  8. Motor neuropathy in porphobilinogen deaminase–deficient mice imitates the peripheral neuropathy of human acute porphyria

    PubMed Central

    Lindberg, Raija L.P.; Martini, Rudolf; Baumgartner, Matthias; Erne, Beat; Borg, Jacques; Zielasek, Jürgen; Ricker, Kenneth; Steck, Andreas; Toyka, Klaus V.; Meyer, Urs A.

    1999-01-01

    Acute porphyrias are inherited disorders caused by partial deficiency of specific heme biosynthesis enzymes. Clinically, porphyrias are manifested by a neuropsychiatric syndrome that includes peripheral neuropathy. Although much is known about the porphyrias’ enzyme defects and their biochemical consequences, the cause of the neurological manifestations remains unresolved. We have studied porphyric neuropathy in mice with a partial deficiency of porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD). PBGD-deficient mice (PBGD–/–) imitate acute porphyria through massive induction of hepatic δ-aminolevulinic acid synthase by drugs such as phenobarbital. Here we show that PBGD–/– mice develop impairment of motor coordination and muscle weakness. Histologically femoral nerves of PBGD–/– mice exhibit a marked decrease in large-caliber (>8 μm) axons and ultrastructural changes consistent with primary motor axon degeneration, secondary Schwann cell reactions, and axonal regeneration. These findings resemble those found in studies of affected nerves of patients with acute porphyria and thus provide strong evidence that PBGD deficiency causes degeneration of motor axons without signs of primary demyelination, thereby resolving a long-standing controversy. Interestingly, the neuropathy in PBGD–/– mice developed chronically and progressively and in the presence of normal or only slightly (twofold) increased plasma and urinary levels of the putative neurotoxic heme precursor δ-aminolevulinic acid. These data suggest that heme deficiency and consequent dysfunction of hemeproteins can cause porphyric neuropathy. PMID:10207164

  9. Time responses of cancellous and cortical bones to sciatic neurectomy in growing female rats.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Q Q; Jee, W S; Bigornia, A E; King, J G; D'Souza, S M; Li, X J; Ma, Y F; Wechter, W J

    1996-07-01

    Effects of unilateral sciatic neurectomy on the responses of both cancellous and cortical bones were studied in growing female rats at 0, 1, 4, 8, and 12 weeks after operation. Using double-fluorescent labeling techniques, histomorphometric analyses were performed on longitudinal sections of proximal tibial metaphyseal secondary spongiosa (PTM) and on cross sections of tibial shaft (TX). In PTM, sciatic neurectomy not only inhibited the age-related bone gain, but also reduced the trabecular bone mass by 46%, which was accompanied by decreases in trabecular number, thickness, and node to node density, and an increase in trabecular separation and free end to free end density. The bone loss occurred mainly between 1 and 4 weeks after operation. A sharp increase in bone formation indices was observed during the first week after nerve section. However, these endpoints quickly dropped to levels lower than those of sham-operated controls at 4 weeks, and were not different from the control levels at 8 weeks after operation. Eroded surface increased progressively after sciatic neurectomy during the 12 weeks experimental period. In TX, sciatic neurectomy inhibited the age-related increase in total tissue area that maintained it at the basal control level. However, the cortical bone area in neurectomized legs was lower than that in sham-operated controls. Sciatic neurectomy also stimulated the bone formation indices on both periosteal and endocortical surfaces during the first week after operation. These endpoints declined sharply between 1 and 4 weeks and then maintained at control levels between 8 and 12 weeks post surgery. Endocortical eroded surface increased 1 week after neurectomy, reached the peak at 8 weeks, and then decreased thereafter. These findings suggest that (1) sciatic neurectomy not only inhibited age-related bone gain but also induced marked bone loss in cancellous bone site and inhibited age-related bone gain in cortical bone site, which mainly resulted

  10. MNGIE neuropathy: five cases mimicking chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Bedlack, Richard S; Vu, Tuan; Hammans, Simon; Sparr, Steven A; Myers, Bennett; Morgenlander, Joel; Hirano, Michio

    2004-03-01

    We report five patients with mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE) who had demyelinating peripheral neuropathy. The MNGIE neuropathy had clinical and electrodiagnostic features typical of acquired, rather than inherited, etiologies. In fact, three patients were actually treated for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). We discuss findings that may help distinguish patients with MNGIE from those with CIDP. PMID:14981734

  11. Lithium-Induced Motor Neuropathy: An Unusual Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Mohapatra, Satyakam; Sahoo, Manas Ranjan; Rath, Neelmadhav

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy secondary to lithium is under-recognized. Most cases of polyneuropathy were reported with lithium intoxication. However, very few cases were reported without lithium toxicity. We present a case of motor neuropathy due to the use of lithium in a 26-year-old male with a therapeutic lithium level. PMID:27335523

  12. Peripheral neuropathies of rheumatologic disease and gluten-related disorders.

    PubMed

    Reda, Haatem; Chin, Russell L

    2014-09-01

    Peripheral nervous system disease is a common and often debilitating feature of many systemic rheumatologic disorders. Such involvement takes many forms, reflecting the variety of underlying pathophysiology, though most patients present with painful multifocal neuropathy (usually vasculitic) or a distal sensory more than motor peripheral neuropathy (sometimes vasculitic and nearly always axonal). The presence of peripheral nervous system involvement is often an early signal of the generalization of inflammatory disease in blood vessels or extravascular tissues, though peripheral neuropathy is not itself an independent predictor of mortality. Nonetheless, progressive multifocal neuropathy, motor neuropathy, small fiber neuropathy, and sensory neuronopathy should be treated early and aggressively with immunosuppression (or the gluten-free diet in appropriate situations) to limit morbidity. Given the rapidly evolving therapeutic landscape, partnership with a rheumatologist is essential. Treatment is usually sustained for 1 to 2 years, and remission is possible in many cases within 6 to 12 months, with variable rates of relapse and treatment resistance. Patients should be meticulously monitored for relapse with serial laboratory testing, electrodiagnostic studies, and clinical examination. Functional rating scores, such as the neuropathy impairment scale and the total neuropathy score are useful for longitudinal assessment. PMID:25369437

  13. Polyethylene Glycol-Fused Allografts Produce Rapid Behavioral Recovery After Ablation of Sciatic Nerve Segments

    PubMed Central

    Riley, D.C.; Bittner, G.D.; Mikesh, M.A.; Cardwell, N.L.; Pollins, A.C.; Ghergherehchi, C.L.; Sunkesula, S.R. Bhupanapadu; Ha, T.N.; Hall, B.T.D.; Poon, A.D.; Pyarali, M.; Boyer, R.B.; Mazal, A.T.; Munoz, N.; Trevino, R.C.; Schallert, T.; Thayer, W.P.

    2014-01-01

    Restoration of neuronal functions by outgrowths regenerating at ~1mm/d from the proximal stumps of severed peripheral nerves takes many weeks or months, if it occurs at all, especially after ablation of nerve segments. Distal segments of severed axons typically degenerate in 1–3 days. The purpose of this study was to show that Wallerian degeneration could be prevented or retarded and lost behavioral function restored following ablation of 0.5 – 1 cm segments of rat sciatic nerves in host animals. This is achieved using 0.8 – 1.1cm microsutured donor allografts treated with bioengineered solutions varying in ionic and polyethylene glycol (PEG) concentrations (modified PEG-fusion procedure), being careful not to stretch any portion of donor or host sciatic nerves. Our data show that PEG-fusion permanently restores axonal continuity within minutes as initially assessed by action potential conduction and intracellular diffusion of dye. Behavioral functions mediated by the sciatic nerve are largely restored within 2 – 4 wk as measured by the Sciatic Functional Index (SFI). Increased restoration of sciatic behavioral functions after ablating 0.5 – 1 cm segments is associated with greater numbers of viable myelinated axons within, and distal to, PEG-fused allografts. Many such viable myelinated axons are almost-certainly spared from Wallerian degeneration by PEG-fusion. PEG-fusion of donor allografts may produce a paradigm-shift in the treatment of peripheral nerve injuries. PMID:25425242

  14. Morphological and functional aspects of sciatic nerve regeneration after crush injury.

    PubMed

    Răducan, Andreea; Mirică, Silvia; Duicu, Oana; Răducan, S; Muntean, Danina; Fira-Mlădinescu, O; Lighezan, Rodica

    2013-01-01

    Experimental models for the investigation of nerve regeneration are critical in studying new strategies able to promote the repair process. The aim of the present work was to characterize morphological and functional aspects of sciatic nerve regeneration after mechanical crush injury in rodents. Morphological changes were assessed after a four minutes sciatic nerve injury induced by means of a standardized compression clip. Rat nerve samples were collected before injury and after 24 hours, four days, two weeks, and four weeks after injury, respectively. In an additional group with unilateral sciatic nerve injury, animals were evaluated for four weeks using walking track analysis and the sciatic static index (SSI) measured in both rearing and normal standing position. Histological study showed important axonal degeneration at four days and axonal regeneration at four weeks after injury. We observed no significant differences between SSI in rearing and normal standing stance and a strong correlation between SSI values measured in the two positions during the evaluation period. Positive correlations were also found for the footprint parameters. Our data provide a baseline characterization of the sciatic nerve crush injury that will further allow the investigation of peripheral nerve regeneration in the presence of potential neuroprotective agents in post-traumatic nerve repair. PMID:24322020

  15. The longitudinal epineural incision and complete nerve transection method for modeling sciatic nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xing-long; Wang, Pei; Sun, Bo; Liu, Shi-bo; Gao, Yun-feng; He, Xin-ze; Yu, Chang-yu

    2015-01-01

    Injury severity, operative technique and nerve regeneration are important factors to consider when constructing a model of peripheral nerve injury. Here, we present a novel peripheral nerve injury model and compare it with the complete sciatic nerve transection method. In the experimental group, under a microscope, a 3-mm longitudinal incision was made in the epineurium of the sciatic nerve to reveal the nerve fibers, which were then transected. The small, longitudinal incision in the epineurium was then sutured closed, requiring no stump anastomosis. In the control group, the sciatic nerve was completely transected, and the epineurium was repaired by anastomosis. At 2 and 4 weeks after surgery, Wallerian degeneration was observed in both groups. In the experimental group, at 8 and 12 weeks after surgery, distinct medullary nerve fibers and axons were observed in the injured sciatic nerve. Regular, dense myelin sheaths were visible, as well as some scarring. By 12 weeks, the myelin sheaths were normal and intact, and a tight lamellar structure was observed. Functionally, limb movement and nerve conduction recovered in the injured region between 4 and 12 weeks. The present results demonstrate that longitudinal epineural incision with nerve transection can stably replicate a model of Sunderland grade IV peripheral nerve injury. Compared with the complete sciatic nerve transection model, our method reduced the difficulties of micromanipulation and surgery time, and resulted in good stump restoration, nerve regeneration, and functional recovery. PMID:26692866

  16. Polyethylene glycol-fused allografts produce rapid behavioral recovery after ablation of sciatic nerve segments.

    PubMed

    Riley, D C; Bittner, G D; Mikesh, M; Cardwell, N L; Pollins, A C; Ghergherehchi, C L; Bhupanapadu Sunkesula, S R; Ha, T N; Hall, B T D; Poon, A D; Pyarali, M; Boyer, R B; Mazal, A T; Munoz, N; Trevino, R C; Schallert, T; Thayer, W P

    2015-04-01

    Restoration of neuronal functions by outgrowths regenerating at ∼1 mm/day from the proximal stumps of severed peripheral nerves takes many weeks or months, if it occurs at all, especially after ablation of nerve segments. Distal segments of severed axons typically degenerate in 1-3 days. This study shows that Wallerian degeneration can be prevented or retarded, and lost behavioral function can be restored, following ablation of 0.5-1-cm segments of rat sciatic nerves in host animals. This is achieved by using 0.8-1.1-cm microsutured donor allografts treated with bioengineered solutions varying in ionic and polyethylene glycol (PEG) concentrations (modified PEG-fusion procedure), being careful not to stretch any portion of donor or host sciatic nerves. The data show that PEG fusion permanently restores axonal continuity within minutes, as initially assessed by action potential conduction and intracellular diffusion of dye. Behavioral functions mediated by the sciatic nerve are largely restored within 2-4 weeks, as measured by the sciatic functional index. Increased restoration of sciatic behavioral functions after ablating 0.5-1-cm segments is associated with greater numbers of viable myelinated axons within and distal to PEG-fused allografts. Many such viable myelinated axons are almost certainly spared from Wallerian degeneration by PEG fusion. PEG fusion of donor allografts may produce a paradigm shift in the treatment of peripheral nerve injuries. PMID:25425242

  17. Solitary ischial osteochondroma: an unusual cause of sciatic pain: case report☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    de Moraes, Frederico Barra; Silva, Paulo; do Amaral, Rogério Andrade; Ramos, Frederico Faleiro; Silva, Rômulo Orlando; de Freitas, Diogo Azevedo

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to report on a rare case of osteochondroma of the left ischium, which evolved with compression of the sciatic nerve, thus causing sciatic pain in the homolateral lower limb. The patient was female and presented sciatic pain that was treated clinically for one year. However, the pain evolved with increasing intensity and worsened with hip movement. This was associated with diminished motor force and paresthesia of the homolateral lower limb. Radiological investigation of the region showed a bone lesion in the external portion of the left ischium, in the path of the sciatic nerve. Tomographic reconstruction showed cortical continuity with the bone of origin, i.e., a pattern characteristic of osteochondroma. En-bloc resection of the lesion was performed using the Kocher-Langerbeck route, and the anatomopathological analysis proved that it was an osteochondroma. The patient's neurological symptoms improved and, after two months of follow-up, she remained asymptomatic and without any signs of recurrence. Since osteochondroma is the commonest benign bone tumor, it should be taken into consideration in the diagnostic investigation of compressive tumor lesions that could affect the sciatic nerve. PMID:26229819

  18. Recommendations to enable drug development for inherited neuropathies: Charcot-Marie-Tooth and Giant Axonal Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Sames, Lori; Moore, Allison; Arnold, Renee; Ekins, Sean

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 1 in 2500 Americans suffer from Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease. The underlying disease mechanisms are unique in most forms of CMT, with many point mutations on various genes causing a toxic accumulation of misfolded proteins. Symptoms of the disease often present within the first two decades of life, with CMT1A patients having reduced compound muscle and sensory action potentials, slow nerve conduction velocities, sensory loss, progressive distal weakness, foot and hand deformities, decreased reflexes, bilateral foot drop and about 5% become wheelchair bound. In contrast, the ultra-rare disease Giant Axonal Neuropathy (GAN) is frequently described as a recessively inherited condition that results in progressive nerve death. GAN usually appears in early childhood and progresses slowly as neuronal injury becomes more severe and leads to death in the second or third decade. There are currently no treatments for any of the forms of CMTs or GAN. We suggest that further clinical studies should analyse electrical impedance myography as an outcome measure for CMT. Further, additional quality of life (QoL) assessments for these CMTs are required, and we need to identify GAN biomarkers as well as develop new genetic testing panels for both diseases. We propose that using the Global Registry of Inherited Neuropathy (GRIN) could be useful for many of these studies. Patient advocacy groups and professional organizations (such as the Hereditary Neuropathy Foundation (HNF), Hannah's Hope Fund (HHF), The Neuropathy Association (TNA) and the American Association of Neuromuscular and Electrodiagnostic Medicine (AANEM) can play a central role in educating clinicians and patients. Undertaking these studies will assist in the correct diagnosis of disease recruiting patients for clinical studies, and will ultimately improve the endpoints for clinical trials. By addressing obstacles that prevent industry investment in various forms of inherited neuropathies, we can

  19. Purple pigments: the pathophysiology of acute porphyric neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cindy S-Y; Lee, Ming-Jen; Park, Susanna B; Kiernan, Matthew C

    2011-12-01

    The porphyrias are inherited metabolic disorders arising from disturbance in the haem biosynthesis pathway. The neuropathy associated with acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) occurs due to mutation involving the enzyme porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD) and is characterised by motor-predominant features. Definitive diagnosis often encompasses a combination of biochemical, enzyme analysis and genetic testing, with clinical neurophysiological findings of a predominantly motor axonal neuropathy. Symptomatic and supportive treatment are the mainstays during an acute attack. If administered early, intravenous haemin may prevent progression of neuropathy. While the pathophysiology of AIP neuropathy remains unclear, axonal dysfunction appears intrinsically linked to the effects of neural energy deficits acquired through haem deficiency coupled to the neurotoxic effects of porphyrin precursors. The present review will provide an overview of AIP neuropathy, including discussion of recent advances in understanding developed through neurophysiological approaches that have further delineated the pathophysiology of axonal degeneration. PMID:21855406

  20. Diagnosis and Treatment of Pain in Small Fiber Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Hovaguimian, Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    Small fiber neuropathy manifests in a variety of different diseases and often results in symptoms of burning pain, shooting pain, allodynia, and hyperesthesia. Diagnosis of small fiber neuropathy is determined primarily by the history and physical exam, but functional neurophysiologic testing and skin biopsy evaluation of intraepidermal nerve fiber density can provide diagnostic confirmation. Management of small fiber neuropathy depends on the underlying etiology with concurrent treatment of associated neuropathic pain. A variety of recent guidelines propose the use of antidepressants, anticonvulsants, opioids, topical therapies, and nonpharmacologic treatments as part of the overall management of neuropathic pain. Unfortunately, little data about the treatment of pain specifically in small fiber neuropathy exist because most studies combine mixed neuropathic pain syndromes in the analysis. Additional studies targeting the treatment of pain in small fiber neuropathy are needed to guide decision making. PMID:21286866

  1. Surgical decompression in lower-extremity diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Rader, Andrew J

    2005-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy can be a devastating complication of diabetes mellitus. This article describes surgical decompression as a means of restoring sensation and relieving painful neuropathy symptoms. A prospective study was performed involving patients diagnosed as having type 1 or type 2 diabetes with lower-extremity peripheral neuropathy. The neuropathy diagnosis was confirmed using quantitative sensory testing. Visual analog scales were used for subjective assessment before and after surgery. Treatment consisted of external and as-needed internal neurolysis of the common peroneal, deep peroneal, tibial, medial plantar, lateral plantar, and calcaneal nerves. Subjective pain perception and objective sensibility were significantly improved in most patients who underwent the described decompression. Surgical decompression of multiple peripheral nerves in the lower extremities is a valid and effective method of providing symptomatic relief of neuropathy pain and restoring sensation. PMID:16166461

  2. Peripheral Neuropathy Due to Vitamin Deficiency, Toxins, and Medications

    PubMed Central

    Staff, Nathan P.; Windebank, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of Review: Peripheral neuropathies secondary to vitamin deficiencies, medications, or toxins are frequently considered but can be difficult to definitively diagnose. Accurate diagnosis is important since these conditions are often treatable and preventable. This article reviews the key features of different types of neuropathies caused by these etiologies and provides a comprehensive list of specific agents that must be kept in mind. Recent Findings: While most agents that cause peripheral neuropathy have been known for years, newly developed medications that cause peripheral neuropathy are discussed. Summary: Peripheral nerves are susceptible to damage by a wide array of toxins, medications, and vitamin deficiencies. It is important to consider these etiologies when approaching patients with a variety of neuropathic presentations; additionally, etiologic clues may be provided by other systemic symptoms. While length-dependent sensorimotor axonal peripheral neuropathy is the most common presentation, several examples present in a subacute severe fashion, mimicking Guillain-Barré syndrome. PMID:25299283

  3. Auditory Neuropathy/Dyssynchrony in Biotinidase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Yaghini, Omid

    2016-01-01

    Biotinidase deficiency is a disorder inherited autosomal recessively showing evidence of hearing loss and optic atrophy in addition to seizures, hypotonia, and ataxia. In the present study, a 2-year-old boy with Biotinidase deficiency is presented in which clinical symptoms have been reported with auditory neuropathy/auditory dyssynchrony (AN/AD). In this case, transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions showed bilaterally normal responses representing normal function of outer hair cells. In contrast, acoustic reflex test showed absent reflexes bilaterally, and visual reinforcement audiometry and auditory brainstem responses indicated severe to profound hearing loss in both ears. These results suggest AN/AD in patients with Biotinidase deficiency. PMID:27144235

  4. Molecular Mechanisms of Inherited Demyelinating Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    SCHERER, STEVEN S.; WRABETZ, LAWRENCE

    2008-01-01

    The past 15 years have witnessed the identification of more than 25 genes responsible for inherited neuropathies in humans, many associated with primary alterations of the myelin sheath. A remarkable body of work in patients, as well as animal and cellular models, has defined the clinical and molecular genetics of these illnesses and shed light on how mutations in associated genes produce the heterogeneity of dysmyelinating and demyelinating phenotypes. Here, we review selected recent developments from work on the molecular mechanisms of these disorders and their implications for treatment strategies. PMID:18803325

  5. [Diabetic Retinopathy and Neuropathy: New in 2015].

    PubMed

    Henzen, Christoph

    2015-06-01

    In 2014 interesting new results were published in the field of diabetic microangiopathy: (1) In tensive treatment of type 1 diabetes for a mean of 6,5 years confers a lifelong reduction of the risk of diabetic retinopathy; (2) although the rates of diabetes-related complication have declined since 1990, the burden of disease persists because the prevalence of diabetes tripled during the same time; (3) subjects with diabetic neuropathy have structural brain changes, i.e. gray matter loss, findings with possible implications for the prognosis; (4) over 80% of type 2 diabetics who consider their feet to be normal have serious foot pathology. PMID:26098239

  6. Methanol optic neuropathy: a histopathological study.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, J A; Hostovsky, M; Bilbao, J M; Rewcastle, N B

    1982-10-01

    The histopathologic effects of methanol on the optic nerve were studied in four patients. Circumscribed myelin damage occurred behind the lamina cribrosa in each nerve. Axons were preserved. Demyelination also occurred in cerebral hemispheric white matter in one patient. This selective myelinoclastic effect of methanol metabolism is probably caused by histotoxic anoxia in watershed areas of the cerebral and distal optic nerve circulations. Juxtabulbar demyelination may cause optic disk edema in methanol poisoning by compressive obstruction of orthograde axoplasmic flow. Visual loss may be due to disruption of saltatory conduction. Retrolaminar demyelinating optic neuropathy is an early morphologic correlate of visual loss in methanol intoxication. PMID:6889696

  7. Molecular alterations underlie nodal and paranodal degeneration in type 1 diabetic neuropathy and are prevented by C-peptide.

    PubMed

    Sima, Anders A F; Zhang, Weixian; Li, Zhen-Guo; Murakawa, Yuichi; Pierson, Christopher R

    2004-06-01

    To explore the molecular abnormalities underlying the degeneration of the node of Ranvier, a characteristic aberration of type 1 diabetic neuropathy, we examined in type 1 BB/Wor and type 2 BBZDR/Wor rats changes in expression of key molecules that make up the nodal and paranodal apparatus of peripheral nerve. Their posttranslational modifications were examined in vitro. Their responsiveness to restored insulin action was examined in type 1 animals replenished with proinsulin C-peptide. In sciatic nerve, the expression of contactin, receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase beta, and the Na(+)-channel beta(1) subunit, paranodal caspr and nodal ankyrin(G) was unaltered in 2-month type 1 diabetic BB/Wor rats but significantly decreased after 8 months of diabetes. These abnormalities were prevented by C-peptide administered to type 1 BB/Wor rats and did not occur in duration- and hyperglycemia-matched type 2 BBZDR/Wor rats. The expression of the alpha-Na(+)-channel subunit was unaltered. In SH-SY5Y cells, only the combination of insulin and C-peptide normalized posttranslational O-linked N-acetylglucosamine modifications and maximized serine phosphorylation of ankyrin(G) and p85 binding to caspr. The beneficial effects of C-peptide resulted in significant normalization of the nerve conduction deficits. These data describe for the first time the progressive molecular aberrations underlying nodal and paranodal degenerative changes in type 1 diabetic neuropathy and demonstrate that they are preventable by insulinomimetic C-peptide. PMID:15161761

  8. Disrupted Sleep and Delayed Recovery from Chronic Peripheral Neuropathy are Distinct Phenotypes in a Rat Model of Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Muncey, Aaron R.; Saulles, Adam R.; Koch, Lauren G.; Britton, Steven L.; Baghdoyan, Helen A.; Lydic, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    Background Sleep apnea, hypertension, atherosclerosis, and obesity are features of metabolic syndrome associated with decreased restorative sleep and increased pain. These traits are relevant for anesthesiology because they confer increased risks of a negative anesthetic outcome. This study tested the one-tailed hypothesis that rats bred for low intrinsic aerobic capacity have enhanced nociception and disordered sleep. Methods Rats were from a breeding strategy that selected for low aerobic capacity runners (LCR) and high aerobic capacity runners (HCR). Four different phenotypes were quantified. Rats (n=12) underwent von Frey sensory testing, thermal nociceptive testing (n=12), electrographic recordings of sleep and wakefulness (n=16), and thermal nociceptive testing before and for six weeks after a unilateral chronic neuropathy of the sciatic nerve (n=14). Results Paw withdrawal latency to a thermal nociceptive stimulus was significantly (P<0.01) less in LCR than HCR rats. There were significant differences in sleep. LCR rats spent significantly (P<0.01) more time awake (18%) and less time in non-rapid eye movement sleep (−19%) than HCR rats. Non-rapid eye movement sleep episodes were of shorter duration (−34%) in LCR than HCR rats. Rapid eye movement sleep of LCR rats was significantly more fragmented than Rapid eye movement sleep of HCR rats. LCR rats required two weeks longer than HCR rats to recover from peripheral neuropathy. Conclusions Rodents with low aerobic capacity exhibit features homologous to human metabolic syndrome. This rodent model offers a novel tool for characterizing the mechanisms through which low aerobic function and obesity might confer increased risks for anesthesia. PMID:20938334

  9. Curcumin derivatives promote Schwann cell differentiation and improve neuropathy in R98C CMT1B mice.

    PubMed

    Patzkó, Agnes; Bai, Yunhong; Saporta, Mario A; Katona, István; Wu, Xingyao; Vizzuso, Domenica; Feltri, M Laura; Wang, Suola; Dillon, Lisa M; Kamholz, John; Kirschner, Daniel; Sarkar, Fazlul H; Wrabetz, Lawrence; Shy, Michael E

    2012-12-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1B is caused by mutations in myelin protein zero. R98C mice, an authentic model of early onset Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1B, develop neuropathy in part because the misfolded mutant myelin protein zero is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum where it activates the unfolded protein response. Because oral curcumin, a component of the spice turmeric, has been shown to relieve endoplasmic reticulum stress and decrease the activation of the unfolded protein response, we treated R98C mutant mice with daily gastric lavage of curcumin or curcumin derivatives starting at 4 days of age and analysed them for clinical disability, electrophysiological parameters and peripheral nerve morphology. Heterozygous R98C mice treated with curcumin dissolved in sesame oil or phosphatidylcholine curcumin performed as well as wild-type littermates on a rotarod test and had increased numbers of large-diameter axons in their sciatic nerves. Treatment with the latter two compounds also increased compound muscle action potential amplitudes and the innervation of neuromuscular junctions in both heterozygous and homozygous R98C animals, but it did not improve nerve conduction velocity, myelin thickness, G-ratios or myelin period. The expression of c-Jun and suppressed cAMP-inducible POU (SCIP)-transcription factors that inhibit myelination when overexpressed-was also decreased by treatment. Consistent with its role in reducing endoplasmic reticulum stress, treatment with curcumin dissolved in sesame oil or phosphatidylcholine curcumin was associated with decreased X-box binding protein (XBP1) splicing. Taken together, these data demonstrate that treatment with curcumin dissolved in sesame oil or phosphatidylcholine curcumin improves the peripheral neuropathy of R98C mice by alleviating endoplasmic reticulum stress, by reducing the activation of unfolded protein response and by promoting Schwann cell differentiation. PMID:23250879

  10. Sciatic Nerve Injection Palsy in Children, Electrophysiologic Pattern and Outcome: A Case Series Study.

    PubMed

    Toopchizadeh, Vahideh; Barzegar, Mohammad; Habibzadeh, Afshin

    2015-01-01

    Sciatic nerve injury is one of the frequent mononeuropathies in children that occurs due to different causes such as nerve compression, trauma and stretch during surgery. Gluteal injection is an uncommon cause of sciatic injury in developed countries. Poor techniques and frequent injections are the common cause of injection palsy. Proneal division of the sciatic nerve is more prone to injury due to anatomic and structural characteristics. The diagnosis is based on electrophysiological studies and the recovery rate is poor. In this study, in a period of 2 years between 2012 and 2013, we report seven children under 6 years old (three females and four males) with abnormal gait and foot pain following gluteal injection in pediatric electrodiagnostic center. Five children had proneal component and two with tibial component injuries. Five children were followed for one year and only one showed good recovery. PMID:26401156

  11. Function electrical stimulation signals generator circuits for the central nerve and the sciatic nerve.

    PubMed

    Wenyuan, Li; Zhenyu, Zhang; Zhi-Gong, Wang

    2005-01-01

    Circuits for the signal generation of the FES (functional electrical stimulation) of the central nerve and the sciatic nerve have been designed. The circuits were implemented by using discrete devices. The FES circuits consist of two or three operational amplifiers. The bandwidths of the circuits are more than 10 kHz and their gains are variable from 20 dB to 60 dB. To a load of several kilo-ohms, according to the microelectrode with the nerve, the circuit for stimulating central nerve can provide a current signal, and the signal value is more than 1mA. The circuit for stimulating sciatic nerve can provide a stimulating voltage signal of more than 10 Vs. The loads of the circuits are microelectrodes contacted with nerves. The circuits can be used with two kinds of microelectrodes: cuff microelectrodes which for stimulating sciatic nerve and shaft microelectrodes which for stimulating central nerve. PMID:17281443

  12. Effect of a high-intensity static magnetic field on sciatic nerve regeneration in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Cordeiro, P.G.; Seckel, B.R.; Miller, C.D.; Gross, P.T.; Wise, R.E.

    1989-02-01

    The effect of a high-intensity static magnetic field on peripheral nerve regeneration is evaluated in rat sciatic nerve. Forty-four rats underwent sciatic nerve repair using polyethylene nerve guides. Postoperatively, the animals were exposed to a 1-tesla magnetic field for 12 hours per day for 4 weeks with appropriate controls. Our results demonstrate that a 1-tesla static magnetic field has no statistically significant effect on nerve regeneration as determined by myelinated axon counts and electrophysiologic studies. Also, the specific orientation of the sciatic nerve with respect to the magnetic field has no influence on axonal growth or nerve conduction. Periods of restraint of 12 hours per day for 4 weeks significantly inhibit weight gain but have no effect on peripheral nerve regeneration.

  13. An alternative video footprint analysis to assess functional loss following injury to the rat sciatic nerve.

    PubMed

    Bervar, M

    2002-01-01

    The rat sciatic nerve is a well-established animal model for the study of recovery from peripheral nerve injuries. Footprint analysis is the most widely used non-invasive method of measuring functional recovery after injury in this model. We describe a new, alternative video analysis of standing (or static footprint video analysis) to assess functional loss following injury to the rat sciatic nerve, while the animal is standing or at periodic rest on a flat transparent surface. We found that this alternative video analysis is technically easier to perform than the corresponding footprint video analysis while walking, but still preserves all advantages of video versus conventional ink track method: i.e. few non-measurable footprints, better repeatability, high accuracy and more precise quantification of the degree of functional loss after sciatic nerve injury in the rat. PMID:12514995

  14. Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging of regeneration/degeneration after rat sciatic nerve injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sig Hwang, Min; Perrin, George; Muir, David; Mareci, Thomas

    2005-11-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging was performed to investigate myelination and demyelination spatiotemporally in cut or crushed excised rat sciatic nerves in a 17.6 T magnet with a solenoid RF coil. Orientation independent measures of water diffusion, fractional anisotropy (FA) and averaged diffusivity (), were examined as MR parameters for the quantification of the myelin within the major peripheral nerve. Crushed nerves initially demonstrated decreased FA, followed by increase to FA of normal nerve with time. At 14 days post injury, FA of the nerve is high, 0.85, at the site proximal to the injury then FA decreases in a proximodistal gradient because the nerve remains more demyelinated toward the distal area. Cut sciatic nerves displayed a prolonged decrease of FA with time after injury. Also FA correlates with in these nerves. Therefore FA or may be a good indicator of myelination and demyelination in rat sciatic nerves and FA appears to be a more sensitive indicator of myelin.

  15. Leber hereditary optic neuropathy: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Meyerson, Cherise; Van Stavern, Greg; McClelland, Collin

    2015-01-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is one of the most common inherited optic neuropathies causing bilateral central vision loss. The disorder results from point mutations in mitochondrial DNA and subsequent mitochondrial dysfunction. The primary cell type that is lost in LHON is the retinal ganglion cell, which is highly susceptible to disrupted ATP production and oxidative stress. Inheritance of LHON follows that of mitochondrial genetics, and it has a highly variable clinical phenotype, as other genetic and environmental factors also play a role. Although LHON usually presents with isolated vision loss, some patients suffer other neurological sequelae. For ill-defined reasons, male LHON mutation carriers are more affected than females. Most LHON patients remain legally blind, but a small proportion can experience spontaneous partial recovery, often within the first year of symptom onset. Unfortunately, at this time there are no established curative interventions and treatment is largely supportive. Patients should be offered low vision services and counseled on mitigating risk factors for additional vision loss, such as smoking and consuming alcohol. Encouraging treatments currently undergoing investigation includes ubiquinone analogs, such as idebenone, as well as gene therapy and stem cells to restore ATP synthesis and provide neuroprotection to surviving retinal ganglion cells. PMID:26170609

  16. [Peripheral neuropathies due to mitochondrial disorders].

    PubMed

    Funalot, B

    2009-12-01

    Involvement of peripheral nerves is frequent in mitochondrial disorders but with variable severity. Mitochondrial diseases causing peripheral neuropathies (PN) may be due to mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), as is the case in MERRF and MELAS syndromes, or to mutations of nuclear genes. Secondary abnormalities of mtDNA (such as multiple deletions of muscle mtDNA) may result from mitochondrial disorders due to mutations in nuclear genes involved in mtDNA maintenance. This is the case in several syndromes caused by impaired mtDNA maintenance, such as Sensory Ataxic Neuropathy, Dysarthria and Ophthalmoplegia (SANDO) due to recessive mutations in the POLG gene, which encodes the catalytic subunit of mtDNA polymerase (DNA polymerase gamma), or Mitochondrial Neuro-Gastro-Intestinal Encephalomyopathy (MNGIE), due to recessive mutations in the TYMP gene, which encodes thymidine phosphorylase. Genetically-determined PN due to mutations of mitofusin 2, a GTPase involved in the fusion of external mitochondrial membranes, were identified during the last few years. Characteristic ultrastructural lesions (abnormalities of axonal mitochondria) are observed on longitudinal sections of nerve biopsies in patients with PN due to mitofusin 2 mutations. PMID:19942242

  17. Treating Painful Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy: An Update.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Matthew J; Gibbs, Lawrence M; Lindsay, Tammy J

    2016-08-01

    Painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy occurs in approximately 25% of patients with diabetes mellitus who are treated in the office setting and significantly affects quality of life. It typically causes burning pain, paresthesias, and numbness in a stocking-glove pattern that progresses proximally from the feet and hands. Clinicians should carefully consider the patient's goals and functional status and potential adverse effects of medication when choosing a treatment for painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Pregabalin and duloxetine are the only medications approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for treating this disorder. Based on current practice guidelines, these medications, with gabapentin and amitriptyline, should be considered for the initial treatment. Second-line therapy includes opioid-like medications (tramadol and tapentadol), venlafaxine, desvenlafaxine, and topical agents (lidocaine patches and capsaicin cream). Isosorbide dinitrate spray and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation may provide relief in some patients and can be considered at any point during therapy. Opioids and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are optional third-line medications. Acupuncture, traditional Chinese medicine, alpha lipoic acid, acetyl-l-carnitine, primrose oil, and electromagnetic field application lack high-quality evidence to support their use. PMID:27479625

  18. Microsurgical Decompression for Peroneal Nerve Entrapment Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    MORIMOTO, Daijiro; ISU, Toyohiko; KIM, Kyongsong; SUGAWARA, Atsushi; YAMAZAKI, Kazuyoshi; CHIBA, Yasuhiro; IWAMOTO, Naotaka; ISOBE, Masanori; MORITA, Akio

    2015-01-01

    Peroneal nerve entrapment neuropathy (PNEN) is one cause of numbness and pain in the lateral lower thigh and instep, and of motor weakness of the extensors of the toes and ankle. We report a less invasive surgical procedure performed under local anesthesia to treat PNEN and our preliminary outcomes. We treated 22 patients (33 legs), 7 men and 15 women, whose average age was 66 years. The mean postoperative follow-up period was 40 months. All patients complained of pain or paresthesia of the lateral aspect of affected lower thigh and instep; all manifested a Tinel-like sign at the entrapment point. As all had undergone unsuccessful conservative treatment, we performed microsurgical decompression under local anesthesia. Of 19 patients who had undergone lumbar spinal surgery (LSS), 9 suffered residual symptoms attributable to PNEN. While complete symptom abatement was obtained in the other 10 they later developed PNEN-induced new symptoms. Motor weakness of the extensors of the toes and ankle [manual muscle testing (MMT) 4/5] was observed preoperatively in 8 patients; it was relieved by microsurgical decompression. Based on self-assessments, all 22 patients were satisfied with the results of surgery. PNEN should be considered as a possible differential diagnosis in patients with L5 neuropathy due to lumbar degenerative disease, and as a causative factor of residual symptoms after LSS. PNEN can be successfully addressed by less-invasive surgery performed under local anesthesia. PMID:26227056

  19. Microsurgical Decompression for Peroneal Nerve Entrapment Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Daijiro; Isu, Toyohiko; Kim, Kyongsong; Sugawara, Atsushi; Yamazaki, Kazuyoshi; Chiba, Yasuhiro; Iwamoto, Naotaka; Isobe, Masanori; Morita, Akio

    2015-01-01

    Peroneal nerve entrapment neuropathy (PNEN) is one cause of numbness and pain in the lateral lower thigh and instep, and of motor weakness of the extensors of the toes and ankle. We report a less invasive surgical procedure performed under local anesthesia to treat PNEN and our preliminary outcomes. We treated 22 patients (33 legs), 7 men and 15 women, whose average age was 66 years. The mean postoperative follow-up period was 40 months. All patients complained of pain or paresthesia of the lateral aspect of affected lower thigh and instep; all manifested a Tinel-like sign at the entrapment point. As all had undergone unsuccessful conservative treatment, we performed microsurgical decompression under local anesthesia. Of 19 patients who had undergone lumbar spinal surgery (LSS), 9 suffered residual symptoms attributable to PNEN. While complete symptom abatement was obtained in the other 10 they later developed PNEN-induced new symptoms. Motor weakness of the extensors of the toes and ankle [manual muscle testing (MMT) 4/5] was observed preoperatively in 8 patients; it was relieved by microsurgical decompression. Based on self-assessments, all 22 patients were satisfied with the results of surgery. PNEN should be considered as a possible differential diagnosis in patients with L5 neuropathy due to lumbar degenerative disease, and as a causative factor of residual symptoms after LSS. PNEN can be successfully addressed by less-invasive surgery performed under local anesthesia. PMID:26227056

  20. Mitotoxicity in distal symmetrical sensory peripheral neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Gary J.; Doyle, Timothy; Salvemini, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Chronic distal symmetrical sensory peripheral neuropathy is a common neurological complication of cancer chemotherapy, HIV treatment and diabetes. Although aetiology-specific differences in presentation are evident, the clinical signs and symptoms of these neuropathies are clearly similar. Data from animal models of neuropathic pain suggest that the similarities have a common cause: mitochondrial dysfunction in primary afferent sensory neurons. Mitochondrial dysfunction is caused by mitotoxic effects of cancer chemotherapeutic drugs of several chemical classes, HIV-associated viral proteins, and nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor treatment, as well as the (possibly both direct and indirect) effects of excess glucose. The mitochondrial injury results in a chronic neuronal energy deficit, which gives rise to spontaneous nerve impulses and a compartmental neuronal degeneration that is first apparent in the terminal receptor arbor—that is, intraepidermal nerve fibres—of cutaneous afferent neurons. Preliminary data suggest that drugs that prevent mitochondrial injury or improve mitochondrial function could be useful in the treatment of these conditions. PMID:24840972

  1. Early diabetic neuropathy: Triggers and mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Dobretsov, Maxim; Romanovsky, Dmitry; Stimers, Joseph R

    2007-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy, and specifically distal peripheral neuropathy (DPN), is one of the most frequent and troublesome complications of diabetes mellitus. It is the major reason for morbidity and mortality among diabetic patients. It is also frequently associated with debilitating pain. Unfortunately, our knowledge of the natural history and pathogenesis of this disease remains limited. For a long time hyperglycemia was viewed as a major, if not the sole factor, responsible for all symptomatic presentations of DPN. Multiple clinical observations and animal studies supported this view. The control of blood glucose as an obligatory step of therapy to delay or reverse DPN is no longer an arguable issue. However, while supporting evidence for the glycemic hypothesis has accumulated, multiple controversies accumulated as well. It is obvious now that DPN cannot be fully understood without considering factors besides hyperglycemia. Some symptoms of DPN may develop with little, if any, correlation with the glycemic status of a patient. It is also clear that identification of these putative non-glycemic mechanisms of DPN is of utmost importance for our understanding of failures with existing treatments and for the development of new approaches for diagnosis and therapy of DPN. In this work we will review the strengths and weaknesses of the glycemic hypothesis, focusing on clinical and animal data and on the pathogenesis of early stages and triggers of DPN other than hyperglycemia. PMID:17226897

  2. [Antalgic radiotherapy in lumbosacral carcinomatous neuropathies].

    PubMed

    Russi, E G; Gaeta, M; Pergolizzi, S; Settineri, N; Frosina, P; De Renzis, C

    1994-06-01

    Lumbosacral carcinomatous neuropathy (LCN) may be caused by infiltration or compression of the lumbosacral plexi and nerves from intrapelvic or paraaortic neoplasms. The authors submitted 23 patients complaining of LCN with CT documented intrapelvic or paraaortic tumors to palliative radiotherapy. Megavoltage external beam irradiation was administered using a 6-MV linear accelerator. Treatment field sizes ranged from 56 cm2 to 235 cm2 (mean: 150.54 cm2) and encompassed only the site where the disease involved the lumbosacral plexus or its branches. > or = 3 Gy/day fractions were used. Twenty-one of 22 assessable patients (95.4%) obtained LCN pain relief; 19 (86.3%) obtained complete LCN pain relief. The median time to pain progression (TPP) was 150 days (range: 39-510 days). The median survival was 165 days. Seven patients were LCN pain-free at death. Two patients are alive and LCN pain-free. The remaining 12 patients had recurrent LCN pain: four of them were reirradiated at the site of previous neuropathy and only two had partial relief again. The authors conclude that it is advisable to submit to palliative radiotherapy the inoperable disseminated and/or recurrent cancer patients complaining of LCN, to use large fractions not to occupy the extant time of their already short life-expectancy, and to design small fields to avoid acute side-effects. PMID:7518934

  3. Episodic neurological dysfunction in hereditary peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Girish Baburao; Mailankody, Pooja; Isnwara, Pawanraj Palu; Prasad, Chandrajit; Mustare, Veerendrakumar

    2015-01-01

    Episodic transient neurological symptoms are an important set of problems presenting to a neurologist in his routine practice. Occasionally, detailed clinical history including past and family history supplemented with focused examination can bring out a rare cause for such symptoms. We describe in this report in a young male presenting with episodic focal neurological dysfunction, with family history of similar episodes in mother and brother. Examination showed features of pes cavus and peripheral neuropathy for which patient was asymptomatic. Mother and brother were established cases of hereditary neuropathy. Imaging on multiple occasions showed reversible white matter abnormalities. Clinical suspicion of X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1 (CMT1X) was confirmed with detection of mutation in Gap Junction B1 (GJB1) gene, which codes for connexin 32 protein (c.425G>A; p.R142Q hemizygous mutation). Though this mutation has been already reported in CMTX patients, it has not been associated with transient neurological dysfunctions. This is probably the first reported case of CMTX patient with transient neurological dysfunction from India, whose family members had similar episodes. PMID:25745327

  4. Computer aided diagnosis of diabetic peripheral neuropathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chekh, Viktor; Soliz, Peter; McGrew, Elizabeth; Barriga, Simon; Burge, Mark; Luan, Shuang

    2014-03-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) refers to the nerve damage that can occur in diabetes patients. It most often affects the extremities, such as the feet, and can lead to peripheral vascular disease, deformity, infection, ulceration, and even amputation. The key to managing diabetic foot is prevention and early detection. Unfortunately, current existing diagnostic techniques are mostly based on patient sensations and exhibit significant inter- and intra-observer differences. We have developed a computer aided diagnostic (CAD) system for diabetic peripheral neuropathy. The thermal response of the feet of diabetic patients following cold stimulus is captured using an infrared camera. The plantar foot in the images from a thermal video are segmented and registered for tracking points or specific regions. The temperature recovery of each point on the plantar foot is extracted using our bio-thermal model and analyzed. The regions that exhibit abnormal ability to recover are automatically identified to aid the physicians to recognize problematic areas. The key to our CAD system is the segmentation of infrared video. The main challenges for segmenting infrared video compared to normal digital video are (1) as the foot warms up, it also warms up the surrounding, creating an ever changing contrast; and (2) there may be significant motion during imaging. To overcome this, a hybrid segmentation algorithm was developed based on a number of techniques such as continuous max-flow, model based segmentation, shape preservation, convex hull, and temperature normalization. Verifications of the automatic segmentation and registration using manual segmentation and markers show good agreement.

  5. Optic neuropathy following an altitude exposure.

    PubMed

    Steigleman, Allan; Butler, Frank; Chhoeu, Austin; O'Malley, Timothy; Bower, Eric; Giebner, Stephen

    2003-09-01

    This case report describes a 20-yr-old man who presented with retro-orbital pain and blurred vision in his left eye 3 wk after an altitude exposure in a hypobaric chamber. He was found to have significant deficits in color vision and visual fields consistent with an optic neuropathy in his left eye. The patient was diagnosed with decompression sickness and treated with hyperbaric oxygen with a U.S. Navy Treatment Table VI. All signs and symptoms resolved with a single hyperbaric oxygen treatment but recurred. A head MRI revealed a left frontoethmoid sinus opacity. A concomitant sinusitis was diagnosed. The patient had full resolution of symptoms after a total of four hyperbaric oxygen treatments and antibiotic therapy at 6-wk follow-up. Although a para-infectious etiology for this patient's optic neuropathy cannot be excluded, his history of altitude exposure and significant, rapid response to hyperbaric oxygen treatment strongly implies decompression sickness in this case. PMID:14503679

  6. Anthropometric Study of the Piriformis Muscle and Sciatic Nerve: A Morphological Analysis in a Polish Population

    PubMed Central

    Haładaj, Robert; Pingot, Mariusz; Polguj, Michał; Wysiadecki, Grzegorz; Topol, Mirosław

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to determine relationships between piriformis muscle (PM) and sciatic nerve (SN) with reference to sex and anatomical variations. Material/Methods Deep dissection of the gluteal region was performed on 30 randomized, formalin-fixed human lower limbs of adults of both sexes of the Polish population. Anthropometric measurements were taken and then statistically analyzed. Results The conducted research revealed that, apart from the typical structure of the piriformis muscle, the most common variation was division of the piriformis muscle into two heads, with the common peroneal nerve running between them (20%). The group with anatomical variations of the sciatic nerve course displayed greater diversity of morphometric measurement results. There was a statistically significant correlation between the lower limb length and the distance from the sciatic nerve to the greater trochanter in the male specimens. On the other hand, in the female specimens, a statistically significant correlation was observed between the lower limb length and the distance from the sciatic nerve to the ischial tuberosity. The shortest distance from the sciatic nerve to the greater trochanter measured at the level of the inferior edge of the piriformis was 21 mm, while the shortest distance to the ischial tuberosity was 63 mm. Such correlations should be taken into account during invasive medical procedures performed in the gluteal region. Conclusions It is possible to distinguish several anatomical variations of the sciatic nerve course within the deep gluteal region. The statistically significant correlations between some anthropometric measurements were only present within particular groups of male and female limbs. PMID:26629744

  7. Inherited focal, episodic neuropathies: hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies and hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy.

    PubMed

    Chance, Phillip F

    2006-01-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP; also called tomaculous neuropathy) is an autosomal-dominant disorder that produces a painless episodic, recurrent, focal demyelinating neuropathy. HNPP generally develops during adolescence, and may cause attacks of numbness, muscular weakness, and atrophy. Peroneal palsies, carpal tunnel syndrome, and other entrapment neuropathies may be frequent manifestations of HNPP. Motor and sensory nerve conduction velocities may be reduced in clinically affected patients, as well as in asymptomatic gene carriers. The histopathological changes observed in peripheral nerves of HNPP patients include segmental demyelination and tomaculous or "sausage-like" formations. Mild overlap of clinical features with Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease type 1 (CMT1) may lead patients with HNPP to be misdiagnosed as having CMT1. HNPP and CMT1 are both demyelinating neuropathies, however, their clinical, pathological, and electrophysiological features are quite distinct. HNPP is most frequently associated with a 1.4-Mb pair deletion on chromosome 17p12. A duplication of the identical region leads to CMT1A. Both HNPP and CMT1A result from a dosage effect of the PMP22 gene, which is contained within the deleted/duplicated region. This is reflected in reduced mRNA and protein levels in sural nerve biopsy samples from HNPP patients. Treatment for HNPP consists of preventative and symptom-easing measures. Hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy (HNA; also called familial brachial plexus neuropathy) is an autosomal-dominant disorder causing episodes of paralysis and muscle weakness initiated by severe pain. Individuals with HNA may suffer repeated episodes of intense pain, paralysis, and sensory disturbances in an affected limb. The onset of HNA is at birth or later in childhood with prognosis for recovery usually favorable; however, persons with HNA may have permanent residual neurological dysfunction following attack(s). Episodes are often

  8. Identifying Common Genetic Risk Factors of Diabetic Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Witzel, Ini-Isabée; Jelinek, Herbert F.; Khalaf, Kinda; Lee, Sungmun; Khandoker, Ahsan H.; Alsafar, Habiba

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a global public health problem of epidemic proportions, with 60–70% of affected individuals suffering from associated neurovascular complications that act on multiple organ systems. The most common and clinically significant neuropathies of T2DM include uremic neuropathy, peripheral neuropathy, and cardiac autonomic neuropathy. These conditions seriously impact an individual’s quality of life and significantly increase the risk of morbidity and mortality. Although advances in gene sequencing technologies have identified several genetic variants that may regulate the development and progression of T2DM, little is known about whether or not the variants are involved in disease progression and how these genetic variants are associated with diabetic neuropathy specifically. Significant missing heritability data and complex disease etiologies remain to be explained. This article is the first to provide a review of the genetic risk variants implicated in the diabetic neuropathies and to highlight potential commonalities. We thereby aim to contribute to the creation of a genetic-metabolic model that will help to elucidate the cause of diabetic neuropathies, evaluate a patient’s risk profile, and ultimately facilitate preventative and targeted treatment for the individual. PMID:26074879

  9. Spheniodal mucocele causing bilateral optic neuropathy and ophthalmoplegia

    PubMed Central

    Selvakumar, Ambika; Mahalaxmi, Balasubramanyam; Ananth, V; Gautam, Cugati

    2014-01-01

    Sphenoid sinus mucocele comprises only 2% of all paranasal sinus mucoceles. In literature, there is a case report on sphenoidal mucocele causing bilateral optic neuropathy, with unilateral partial recovery and cranial nerve palsy, but we did not come across any literature with bilateral optic neuropathy and ophthalmoplegia together caused by spheno-ethmoidal mucocele. We present such a rare case of spheno-ethmoidal mucocele causing bilateral optic neuropathy and unilateral sixth nerve palsy who had postsurgery, unilateral good vision recovery, and complete resolution of sixth nerve palsy. PMID:23571243

  10. Neuropathy of nitroimidazole radiosensitizers: clinical and pathological description

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserman, T.H.; Nelson, J.S.; VonGerichten, D.

    1984-09-01

    The dose limiting toxicity of the nitroimidazole radiosensitizers is peripherial neuropathy. Improved pharmacology of newer drugs has eliminated the encephalopathy. Peripheral neuropathies are predominently mild to moderate paresthesias of both hands and feet. Subjective changes occur with or without minimal objective changes on neurologic exam. All of the neuropathies occurred within 30 days of the last drug dose and are of varible duration. Sural nerve biopsies from patients indicate progressive axonal degeneration affecting both large and small caliber myelinated fibers. Axonal damage appears to be more severe in the distal portion of the nerves. More data are needed for correlation of clinical and pathological changes.

  11. The Induction of Heme Oxygenase 1 Decreases Painful Diabetic Neuropathy and Enhances the Antinociceptive Effects of Morphine in Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Castany, Sílvia; Carcolé, Mireia; Leánez, Sergi; Pol, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Painful diabetic neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes mellitus which is poorly controlled by conventional analgesics. This study investigates if treatment with an heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) inducer, cobalt protoporphyrin IX (CoPP), could modulate the allodynia and hyperalgesia induced by diabetes and enhanced the antinociceptive effects of morphine. In a diabetic mice model induced by the injection of streptozotocin (STZ), we evaluated the antiallodynic and antihyperalgesic effects produced by the intraperitoneal administration of 5 and 10 mg/kg of CoPP at several days after its administration. The antinociceptive actions produced by the systemic administration of morphine alone or combined with CoPP were also evaluated. In addition, the effects of CoPP treatment on the expression of HO-1, the microglial activation marker (CD11b/c), the inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2) and μ-opioid receptors (MOR), were also assessed. Our results showed that the administration of 10 mg/kg of CoPP during 5 consecutive days completely blocked the mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity induced by diabetes. These effects are accompanied by the increased spinal cord, dorsal root ganglia and sciatic nerve protein levels of HO-1. In addition, the STZ-induced activation of microglia and overexpression of NOS2 in the spinal cord were inhibited by CoPP treatment. Furthermore, the antinociceptive effects of morphine were enhanced by CoPP treatment and reversed by the administration of an HO-1 inhibitor, tin protoporphyrin IX (SnPP). The spinal cord expression of MOR was also increased by CoPP treatment in diabetic mice. In conclusion, our data provide the first evidence that the induction of HO-1 attenuated STZ-induced painful diabetic neuropathy and enhanced the antinociceptive effects of morphine via inhibition of microglia activation and NOS2 overexpression as well as by increasing the spinal cord levels of MOR. This study proposes the administration of CoPP alone or

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging in Leber's optic neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Kermode, A G; Moseley, I F; Kendall, B E; Miller, D H; MacManus, D G; McDonald, W I

    1989-01-01

    Thirteen males with Leber's optic neuropathy had magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain, and in eight the optic nerves were imaged using STIR (Short Time Inversion Recovery) sequences. All optic nerve scans were abnormal. In seven with bilateral visual loss four showed bilateral increased optic nerve signal and three unilateral increase. The involvement was of the mid and posterior intra-orbital sections over three 5 mm slices or more with sparing of the anterior portion. One patient with unilateral visual loss had increased signal only on the affected side. Brain MRI was normal, in marked contrast to the findings in clinically isolated optic neuritis in which multiple white matter lesions are seen in the majority. Images PMID:2732742

  13. Idebenone for Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Gueven, N

    2016-03-01

    Idebenone is a rapidly absorbed, safe and well-tolerated drug and is currently the only clinically proven treatment option for Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) patients. Idebenone (Raxone®) is approved by the European Medicines Agency for the treatment of LHON and has been available on the European market since 2015. Due to its molecular mode of action of bypassing the defective mitochondrial complex I, idebenone leads to improved energy supply and a functional recovery of retinal ganglion cells during the acute stage of the disease, thereby preventing further vision loss and promoting recovery of vision. Thus, commencing treatment shortly after the onset of symptoms is likely to have the best therapeutic effect, a hypothesis that is supported by the available clinical data. PMID:27186591

  14. Vasculitic neuropathy following exposure to minocycline

    PubMed Central

    Baratta, John M.; Dyck, P. James B.; Brand, Patricio; Thaisetthawatkul, Pariwat; Dyck, Peter J.; Engelstad, JaNean K.; Goodman, Brent

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To report 3 patients with minocycline-induced autoimmunity resulting in peripheral nerve vasculitis. Methods: We report 3 patients who, during minocycline treatment for acne vulgaris, developed subacute onset of pain and weakness caused by vasculitis in single and multiple mononeuropathy patterns. Results: Each patient underwent either a nerve or muscle biopsy that confirmed vasculitis. One patient additionally developed systemic symptoms (including fever, fatigue, and night sweats) and another had a posterior circulation stroke. Symptoms developed with either early or prolonged use of minocycline. Despite withdrawal of minocycline, patients needed long-term immunotherapy to gain neurologic improvement. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that the typical neuropathy associated with minocycline use is painful single or multiple mononeuropathy due to peripheral nerve vasculitis, which may also be accompanied by presumed CNS vasculitis (presenting as stroke). PMID:26601119

  15. Isoniazid induced motor-dominant neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Arsalan, Rabeeya; Sabzwari, Saniya

    2015-10-01

    Isoniazid though a very effective treatment for tuberculosis can cause severe motor-dominant neuropathy which can be reversible with pyridoxine supplementation. A 45-year-old female diagnosed with psoas abscess, culture positive for mycobacterium tuberculosis, was started on anti- tuberculous treatment with four drugs, including isoniazid at a dose of 5 mg/kg/day. Three months later she developed severe motor weakness of lower limbs with loss of ankle and knee reflexes. She was treated with vitamin B6 injections and isoniazid treatment was continued. Her motor weakness gradually improved in a few months, but mild sensory impairment persisted even after two years. There is need for vigilance regarding neurological effects of isoniazid in seemingly low-risk individuals in whom development of symptoms should raise the suspicion about slow acetylator status. Timely therapeutic intervention with high-dose vitamin B6 can reduce the long-term morbidity associated with this easily reversible condition. PMID:26440850

  16. The Spatial Relationship and Surface Projection of Canine Sciatic Nerve and Sacrotuberous Ligament: A Perineal Hernia Repair Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Khatri-Chhetri, Nabin; Khatri-Chhetri, Rupak; Chung, Cheng-Shu; Chern, Rey-Shyong; Chien, Chi-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    Sciatic nerve entrapment can occur as post-operative complication of perineal hernia repair when sacrotuberous ligament is incorporated during hernia deficit closure. This results in sciatic sensory loss and paralysis of the hind leg. This study investigated the spatial relationship of sciatic nerve and sacrotuberous ligament and their surface topographic projection of 68 cadavers (29 Beagles and 39 Taiwanese mongrels) with various heights (25–56 cm). By gross dissection, the sacrotuberous ligament and sciatic nerve were exposed and their distance in between was measured along four parts (A, B, C, D) of sacrotuberous ligament. The present study revealed that the C was the section of sacrotuberous ligament where the sciatic nerve and the sacrotuberous ligament are closest to each other. Furthermore, a positive correlation was observed between C and height of the dogs. From the present study, we found that the C in smaller dogs has the shortest distance between the sciatic nerve and the sacrotuberous ligament, and thus the most vulnerable to sciatic nerve entrapment, and needs to be avoided or approached cautiously during perineal hernia repair. PMID:27003911

  17. Endoneurial Microvascular Pathology in Feline Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Estrella, Jeannelyn S.; Nelson, Richard N.; Sturges, B.K.; Vernau, Karen M.; Williams, D. Collette; LeCouteur, Richard A.; Shelton, G. Diane; Mizisin, Andrew P.

    2008-01-01

    Endoneurial capillaries in nerve biopsies from 12 adult diabetic cats with varying degrees of neurological dysfunction were examined for evidence of microvascular pathology and compared to nerves obtained at autopsy from 7 adult non-diabetic cats without clinical evidence of neurological dysfunction. As reported previously (Mizisin et al., 2007), the diabetic cats had elevated glycosylated hemoglobin and serum fructosamine levels, decreased motor nerve conduction velocity and compound muscle action potentials (CMAP), and markedly decreased myelinated nerve fiber densities. Compared to non-diabetic cats, there was a non-significant 26% increase in capillary density and a significant (P<0.009) 45% increase in capillary size in diabetic cats. Capillary luminal size was also significantly (P<0.001) increased, while an index of vasoconstriction was significantly decreased (P<0.001) in diabetic cats compared to non-diabetic controls. No differences in endothelial cell size, endothelial cell number or pericyte size were detected between non-diabetic and diabetic cats. In diabetic cats, basement membrane thickening, seen as a reduplication of the basal lamina, was significantly (P<0.0002) increased by 73% compared to non-diabetic controls. Regression analysis of either myelinated nerve fiber density or CMAP amplitude against basement membrane size demonstrated a negative correlation with significant slopes (P<0.03 and P<0.04, respectively). These data demonstrate that myelinated nerve fiber injury in feline diabetic neuropathy is associated with microvascular pathology and that some of these changes parallel those documented in experimental rodent and human diabetic neuropathy. PMID:18207200

  18. Expression and regulation of redoxins at nociceptive signaling sites after sciatic nerve injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Valek, Lucie; Kanngießer, Maike; Tegeder, Irmgard

    2015-01-01

    Injury of the sciatic nerve results in regulations of pro- and anti-oxidative enzymes at sites of nociceptive signaling including the injured nerve, dorsal root ganglia (DRGs), dorsal horn of the spinal cord, thalamus and somatosensory cortex (Valek et al., 2015) [1]. The present DiB paper shows immunohistochemistry of redoxins including peroxiredoxins (Prdx1–6), glutaredoxins (Glrx1, 2, 3, 5), thioredoxins (Txn1, 2) and thioredoxin reductases (Txnrd1, 2) in the DRGs, spinal cord and sciatic nerve and thalamus in naïve mice and 7 days after Spared sciatic Nerve Injury (SNI) in control mice (Hif1α-flfl) and in mice with a specific deletion of hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha (SNS-HIF1α−/−) in DRG neurons. The sciatic nerves were immunostained for the respective redoxins and counterstained with hematoxylin. The redoxin immunoreactivity was quantified with ImageJ. For the DRGs and spinal cord the data show the quantitative assessment of the intensity of redoxin immunoreactivity transformed to rainbow pseudocolors. In addition, some redoxin examples of the ipsi and contralateral dorsal and ventral horns of the lumbar spinal cord and some redoxin examples of the thalamus are presented. PMID:26693520

  19. Alpha-lipoic acid loaded in chitosan conduit enhances sciatic nerve regeneration in rat

    PubMed Central

    Azizi, Saeed; Heshmatian, Behnam; Amini, Keyvan; Raisi, Abbas; Azimzadeh, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): To investigate the effect of topical administration of alpha-lipoic acid into chitosan conduit on peripheral nerve regeneration using a rat sciatic nerve transection model. Materials and Methods: Forty five Wistar rats were divided into three experimental groups randomly. A 10-mm gap of sciatic nerve was bridged with a chitosan conduit following surgical preparation and anesthesia. In treatment group, the conduit was filled with 30 µl alpha-lipoic acid (10 mg/kg/bw).It was filled with 30 µl phosphate buffered saline solution in control group. In Sham group sciatic nerve was just exposed. Results: The recovery of nerve function was faster in treatment group than in control, at 4 and 8 weeks after surgery (P-value<0.05). Conduction velocity was better in treatment group than in control group at 4 and 12 weeks (P-value<0.05). Recovery index was higher in treatment group than the control group, 8 weeks after surgery (P-value <0.05). Greater nerve fiber diameter, axon diameter, and myelin sheath thickness were observed in treatment group compared to control group at 8 and 12 weeks after surgery (P-value<0.05). The immunoreactivity of regenerated axons and myelin sheath in treatment group were far more similar to sham group. Conclusion: Alpha-lipoic acid when loaded in a chitosan conduit could improve transected sciatic nerve regeneration in rat. PMID:25945234

  20. Nanofibrous nerve conduits for repair of 30-mm-long sciatic nerve defects

    PubMed Central

    Biazar, Esmaeil; Keshel, Saeed Heidari; Pouya, Majid; Rad, Hadi; Nava, Melody Omrani; Azarbakhsh, Mohammad; Hooshmand, Shirin

    2013-01-01

    It has been confirmed that nanofibrous poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) nerve conduit can promote peripheral nerve regeneration in rats. However, its efficiency in repair of over 30-mm-long sciatic nerve defects needs to be assessed. In this study, we used a nanofibrous poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) nerve conduit to bridge a 30-mm-long gap in the rat sciatic nerve. At 4 months after nerve conduit implantation, regenerated nerves were cally observed and histologically assessed. In the nanofibrous graft, the rat sciatic nerve trunk had been reconstructed by restoration of nerve continuity and formation of myelinated nerve fiber. There were Schwann cells and glial cells in the regenerated nerves. Masson's trichrome staining showed that there were no pathological changes in the size and structure of gastrocnemius muscle cells on the operated side of rats. These findings suggest that nanofibrous poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) nerve conduit is suitable for repair of long-segment sciatic nerve defects. PMID:25206536

  1. Polylactic-co-glycolic acid microspheres containing three neurotrophic factors promote sciatic nerve repair after injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qun; Li, Zhi-yue; Zhang, Ze-peng; Mo, Zhou-yun; Chen, Shi-jie; Xiang, Si-yu; Zhang, Qing-shan; Xue, Min

    2015-01-01

    A variety of neurotrophic factors have been shown to repair the damaged peripheral nerve. However, in clinical practice, nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor are all peptides or proteins that may be rapidly deactivated at the focal injury site; their local effective concentration time following a single medication cannot meet the required time for spinal axons to regenerate and cross the glial scar. In this study, we produced polymer sustained-release microspheres based on the polylactic-co-glycolic acid copolymer; the microspheres at 300-μm diameter contained nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Six microspheres were longitudinally implanted into the sciatic nerve at the anastomosis site, serving as the experimental group; while the sciatic nerve in the control group was subjected to the end-to-end anastomosis using 10/0 suture thread. At 6 weeks after implantation, the lower limb activity, weight of triceps surae muscle, sciatic nerve conduction velocity and the maximum amplitude were obviously better in the experimental group than in the control group. Compared with the control group, more regenerating nerve fibers were observed and distributed in a dense and ordered manner with thicker myelin sheaths in the experimental group. More angiogenesis was also visible. Experimental findings indicate that polylactic-co-glycolic acid composite microspheres containing nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor can promote the restoration of sciatic nerve in rats after injury. PMID:26604912

  2. DETERMINATION OF ACRYLAMIDE IN RAT SERUM AND SCIATIC NERVE BY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY-ELECTRON-CAPTURE DETECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A modified method for the derivatization and analysis of acrylamide as 2-bromopropenamide by gas chromatography/electron capture detection was validated in serum and sciatic nerve from rats. he method was accurate and precise over the concentration range of 2240 to 74700 ppm (w/v...

  3. Dexamethasone enhanced functional recovery after sciatic nerve crush injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xinhong; Yuan, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Dexamethasone is currently used for the treatment of peripheral nerve injury, but its mechanisms of action are not completely understood. Inflammation/immune response at the site of nerve lesion is known to be an essential trigger of the pathological changes that have a critical impact on nerve repair and regeneration. In this study, we observed the effects of various doses of dexamethasone on the functional recovery after sciatic nerve crush injury in a rat model. Motor functional recovery was monitored by walking track analysis and gastrocnemius muscle mass ratio. The myelinated axon number was counted by morphometric analysis. Rats administered dexamethasone by local intramuscular injection had a higher nerve function index value, increased gastrocnemius muscle mass ratio, reduced Wallerian degeneration severity, and enhanced regenerated myelinated nerve fibers. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed for CD3 expression, which is a marker for T-cell activation, and infiltration in the sciatic nerve. Dexamethasone-injected rats had fewer CD3-positive cells compared to controls. Furthermore, we found increased expression of GAP-43, which is a factor associated with development and plasticity of the nervous system, in rat nerves receiving dexamethasone. These results provide strong evidence that dexamethasone enhances sciatic nerve regeneration and function recovery in a rat model of sciatic nerve injury through immunosuppressive and potential neurotrophic effects. PMID:25839037

  4. Dexamethasone Enhanced Functional Recovery after Sciatic Nerve Crush Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xinhong; Yuan, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Dexamethasone is currently used for the treatment of peripheral nerve injury, but its mechanisms of action are not completely understood. Inflammation/immune response at the site of nerve lesion is known to be an essential trigger of the pathological changes that have a critical impact on nerve repair and regeneration. In this study, we observed the effects of various doses of dexamethasone on the functional recovery after sciatic nerve crush injury in a rat model. Motor functional recovery was monitored by walking track analysis and gastrocnemius muscle mass ratio. The myelinated axon number was counted by morphometric analysis. Rats administered dexamethasone by local intramuscular injection had a higher nerve function index value, increased gastrocnemius muscle mass ratio, reduced Wallerian degeneration severity, and enhanced regenerated myelinated nerve fibers. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed for CD3 expression, which is a marker for T-cell activation, and infiltration in the sciatic nerve. Dexamethasone-injected rats had fewer CD3-positive cells compared to controls. Furthermore, we found increased expression of GAP-43, which is a factor associated with development and plasticity of the nervous system, in rat nerves receiving dexamethasone. These results provide strong evidence that dexamethasone enhances sciatic nerve regeneration and function recovery in a rat model of sciatic nerve injury through immunosuppressive and potential neurotrophic effects. PMID:25839037

  5. Recovery from rat sciatic nerve injury in vivo through the use of differentiated MDSCs in vitro

    PubMed Central

    ZENG, XIANGYI; ZHANG, LI; SUN, LIANG; ZHANG, DAI; ZHAO, HENGWU; JIA, JUN; WANG, WEI

    2013-01-01

    In this study, muscle-derived stem cells (MDSCs) whose differentiation into neuron-like cells was induced by ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and Salvia (Salvia miltiorrhiza) in vitro were used to repair rat sciatic nerve injuries in vivo, in order to investigate their multifunctional characteristics as pluripotent stem cells. The sciatic nerve in the right side of the lower limb was exposed under the anesthetized condition of 10% chloral hydrate (0.3 ml/100 g) injection into the abdominal cavity. The tissue which was 0.5 cm above the sciatic nerve bifurcation was broken using a hemostat. After induction, MDSCs were transferred in sodium hyaluronate gel and were placed into the damaged area. An untreated control group was also included in this study. The surgical area was sutured after washing with gentamycin sulfate solution. Sciatic nerve function index (SFI) was calculated, electrophysiological tests were performed and the recovery rate of gastrocnemius muscle wet weight was also calculated. Four weeks post-surgery, the SFI and the recovery rate of gastrocnemius muscle wet weight in the MDSC group were significantly higher than those in the control group (P<0.05). MDSCs whose differentiation is induced by CNTF and Salvia play an active role in the repair of peripheral nerve injury. PMID:23251266

  6. Normative sciatic nerve excursion during a modified straight leg raise test.

    PubMed

    Ridehalgh, Colette; Moore, Ann; Hough, Alan

    2014-02-01

    Minimal data exists on how much sciatic nerve motion occurs during straight leg raise (SLR). The purpose of this study was to report preliminary normative ranges of sciatic nerve excursion using real time ultrasound during a modified SLR. The sciatic nerve was scanned in the posterior thigh in sixteen asymptomatic participants (age range 19-68 years). Nerve excursion was measured in transverse and longitudinal planes during knee extension from 90° to 0°, with the hip flexed to 30° and 60°. The ultrasound data was analysed off-line using cross correlation software. Results demonstrated that most nerves moved superficially during knee extension, a large proportion (10/16) moved laterally. Longitudinal excursion ranged from 6.4 to 14.7 mm (mean (SD) 9.92 mm (2.2)) in 30° hip flexion, and 5.1-20.2 mm (mean (SD) 12.4 mm (4.4)) in 60° hip flexion. Mean nerve excursion was significantly greater in 60° hip flexion (p = 0.02). There is a large between-subject variation in sciatic nerve excursion during this modified SLR in asymptomatic subjects. Mean nerve excursion was found to be higher with the hip pre-positioned in greater flexion, suggesting that pre-loading may not consistently reduce excursion. PMID:24034944

  7. Antioxidant Strategies in the Management of Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Oyenihi, Ayodeji Babatunde; Ayeleso, Ademola Olabode; Masola, Bubuya

    2015-01-01

    Chronic hyperglycaemia (an abnormally high glucose concentration in the blood) resulting from defects in insulin secretion/action, or both, is the major hallmark of diabetes in which it is known to be involved in the progression of the condition to different complications that include diabetic neuropathy. Diabetic neuropathy (diabetes-induced nerve damage) is the most common diabetic complication and can be devastating because it can lead to disability. There is an increasing body of evidence associating diabetic neuropathy with oxidative stress. Oxidative stress results from the production of oxygen free radicals in the body in excess of its ability to eliminate them by antioxidant activity. Antioxidants have different mechanisms and sites of actions by which they exert their biochemical effects and ameliorate nerve dysfunction in diabetes by acting directly against oxidative damage. This review will examine different strategies for managing diabetic neuropathy which rely on exogenous antioxidants. PMID:25821809

  8. Familial Idiopathic Cranial Neuropathy in a Chinese Family.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Liang, Jianfeng; Yu, Yanbing

    2016-01-01

    Cranial neuropathy is usually idiopathic and familial cases are uncommon. We describe a family with 5 members with cranial neuropathy over 3 generations. All affected patients were women, indicating an X-linked dominant or an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. Our cases and a review of the literature suggest that familial idiopathic cranial neuropathy is a rare condition which may be related to autosomal dominant vascular disorders (e.g. vascular tortuosity, sclerosis, elongation or extension), small posterior cranial fossas, anatomical variations of the posterior circulation, hypersensitivity of cranial nerves and other abnormalities. Moreover, microvascular decompression is the treatment of choice because vascular compression is the main factor in the pathogenesis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of familial cranial neuropathy in China. PMID:27161475

  9. Pathogenesis and treatment of immune-mediated neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Helmar C; Meyer Zu Horste, Gerd; Kieseier, Bernd C; Hartung, Hans-Peter

    2009-07-01

    Immune-mediated neuropathies represent a heterogeneous spectrum of peripheral nerve disorders that can be classified according to time course, predominant involvement of motor/sensory fibers, distribution of deficits and paraclinical parameters such as electrophysiology and serum antibodies. In the last few years, significant advances have been achieved in elucidating underlying pathomechanisms, which made it possible to identify potential therapeutic targets. In this review, we discuss the latest development in pathogenesis and treatment of immune-mediated neuropathies. PMID:21179533

  10. An unusual demyelinating neuropathy in a patient with Waardenburg's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, J M; Wilson, J

    1992-01-01

    We present clinical and laboratory data from a patient with Waardenburg's syndrome type II comprising iris heterochromia and deafness, complicated by Hirschsprung's disease--a known association--and an unusual demyelinating peripheral neuropathy--a unique association. The neuropathy is characterised by excessive focal folding of myelin sheaths. It is our view that, although both disorders could represent the consequences of neural crest embryopathy, it is more likely that they are associated by chance. PMID:1636383

  11. Variations of the sciatic nerve anatomy and blood supply in the gluteal region: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kanawati, Andrew James

    2014-11-01

    Variations of the sciatic nerve anatomy and blood supply are complex and largely not dealt with in common anatomy texts. Variations of the sciatic nerve anatomy can be divided into the height of division of its branches, relation of the branches to the piriformis muscle, and its blood supply. These variations should be well known to any surgeon operating in this anatomical region. It is unknown whether these variations increase the risk of surgical injury and consequent morbidity. This paper will review the current knowledge regarding anatomical variations of the sciatic nerve and its blood supply. PMID:24842563

  12. Peripheral neuropathy in HIV: an analysis of evidence-based approaches.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, Patrice K; Corless, Inge B; Evans, Linda A

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a common and vexing symptom for people living with HIV infection (PLWH). Neuropathy occurs in several different syndromes and is identified in the literature as distal sensory polyneuropathy or distal sensory peripheral neuropathy. More recently, the HIV literature has focused on the syndrome as painful HIV-associated sensory neuropathy, addressing the symptom rather than the underlying pathophysiology. Assessment of neuropathy in PLWH is critical and must be incorporated into nursing practice for each visit. Neuropathy has been attributed to the direct effects of HIV, exposure to antiretroviral medications (particularly the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors), advanced immune suppression, and comorbid tuberculosis infection and exposure to antituberculosis medications. Evidence supports the importance of addressing neuropathy in PLWH with pharmacologic treatment regimens and complementary/alternative approaches. This paper examines the pathophysiology, evidence, and approaches to managing peripheral neuropathy. A case study has been included to illustrate a patient's experience with neuropathy symptoms. PMID:24698331

  13. US-Guided Femoral and Sciatic Nerve Blocks for Analgesia During Endovenous Laser Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Yilmaz, Saim Ceken, Kagan; Alimoglu, Emel; Sindel, Timur

    2013-02-15

    Endovenous laser ablation may be associated with significant pain when performed under standard local tumescent anesthesia. The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of femoral and sciatic nerve blocks for analgesia during endovenous ablation in patients with lower extremity venous insufficiency. During a 28-month period, ultrasound-guided femoral or sciatic nerve blocks were performed to provide analgesia during endovenous laser ablation in 506 legs and 307 patients. The femoral block (n = 402) was performed at the level of the inguinal ligament, and the sciatic block at the posterior midthigh (n = 124), by injecting a diluted lidocaine solution under ultrasound guidance. After the blocks, endovenous laser ablations and other treatments (phlebectomy or foam sclerotherapy) were performed in the standard fashion. After the procedures, a visual analogue pain scale (1-10) was used for pain assessment. After the blocks, pain scores were 0 or 1 (no pain) in 240 legs, 2 or 3 (uncomfortable) in 225 legs, and 4 or 5 (annoying) in 41 legs. Patients never experienced any pain higher than score 5. The statistical analysis revealed no significant difference between the pain scores of the right leg versus the left leg (p = 0.321) and between the pain scores after the femoral versus sciatic block (p = 0.7). Ultrasound-guided femoral and sciatic nerve blocks may provide considerable reduction of pain during endovenous laser and other treatments, such as ambulatory phlebectomy and foam sclerotherapy. They may make these procedures more comfortable for the patient and easier for the operator.

  14. Androgen induced acceleration of functional recovery after rat sciatic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Brown, Todd J.; Khan, Talat; Jones, Kathryn J.

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE: Testosterone (T) treatment accelerates recovery from facial paralysis after facial nerve crush in hamsters. In this study, we extended those studies to another injury model and asked the following question: Will T treatment accelerate recovery from lower limb paralysis following sciatic nerve crush in the rat? METHODS: Castrated adult male rats received a right side sciatic nerve crush at the level of the sciatic notch, with the left side serving as control. Half the animals received a subcutaneous implant of a propionated form of T (TP), the others were sham-implanted. Weekly testing using the Sciatic Functional Index (SFI), a quantitative measure of locomotion, was done for 7 weeks postoperative (wpo). RESULTS: Between 3 and 5 weeks post-op, the average SFI score of the TP-treated group was higher than controls. This difference was significant at 4 wpo, indicating an accelerated degree of functional recovery. At these timepoints, the differences were attributable to the footprint or paw length and associated with calf muscle reinnervation rather than the toespreading component associated with intrinsic foot muscle rein-nervation. Beyond 5 wpo, there were no differences in the SFI scores. CONCLUSION: The results indicate that, as with facial nerve regeneration in the hamster, testosterone accelerates functional recovery from hind limb paralysis following sciatic nerve injury in the rat. While the responses of spinal motoneurons to injury can differ from those of cranial motoneurons, in this case it appears that they share a similar response to the trophic actions of androgen. This is important in the context of designing therapeutic strategies for dealing with direct trauma to motoneurons resulting from both peripheral and central nervous system trauma, such as spinal cord injury. PMID:12671219

  15. CatWalk gait analysis in assessment of functional recovery after sciatic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Bozkurt, A; Deumens, R; Scheffel, J; O'Dey, D M; Weis, J; Joosten, E A; Führmann, T; Brook, G A; Pallua, N

    2008-08-15

    Following peripheral nerve injury repair, improved behavioural outcome may be the most important evidence of functionality of axon regeneration after any repair strategy. A range of behavioural testing paradigms have been developed for peripheral nerve injury research. Complete injury of the adult rat sciatic nerve is frequently used in combination with walking track analysis. Despite its wide-spread use, these walking track analyses are unsuitable for the simultaneous assessment of both dynamic and static gait parameters. Conversely, a novel automated gait analysis system, i.e. CatWalk can simultaneously measure dynamic as well as static gait parameters and, importantly, it's easy to control for the speed of locomotion which can strongly affect gait parameters. In a previous study, CatWalk was already successfully used to examine deficits in both dynamic and static gait parameters using the sciatic nerve lesion model with a 1cm gap characterized by absence of recovery [Deumens R, Jaken RJ, Marcus MA, Joosten EA. The CatWalk gait analysis in assessment of both dynamic and static gait changes after adult rat sciatic nerve resection. J Neurosci Methods 2007;164:120-30]. Using the sciatic nerve crush injury model (validated with the static sciatic index) and a follow-up period of 12 weeks, we now show that CatWalk can also measure behavioural recovery. In particular dynamic gait parameters, coordination measures, and the intensity of paw prints are of interest in detecting recovery as far as these parameters completely return to pre-operative values after crush injury. We conclude that CatWalk can be used as a complementary approach to other behavioural testing paradigms to assess clinically relevant behavioural benefits, with a main advantage that CatWalk demonstrates both static and dynamic gait parameters at the same time. PMID:18577402

  16. Acrylamide administration alters protein phosphorylation and phospholipid metabolism in rat sciatic nerve

    SciTech Connect

    Berti-Mattera, L.N.; Eichberg, J.; Schrama, L.; LoPachin, R.M. )

    1990-05-01

    The effects of ACR on protein phosphorylation and phospholipid metabolism were assessed in rat sciatic nerve. After 5 days of ACR administration (50 mg/kg/day) an increase in the incorporation of 32P into phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate, phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate, and phosphatidylcholine was detected in proximal sciatic nerve segments. In contrast, no changes in phospholipid metabolism were observed in distal segments. After 9 days of ACR treatment when neurotoxicological symptoms were clearly apparent, a generalized increase in radiolabel uptake into phospholipids was noted exclusively in proximal nerve regions. ACR-induced increases in phospholipid metabolism were toxicologically specific since comparable administration of MBA (108 mg/kg/day X 5 or 9 days) produced only minor changes. ACR intoxication was also associated with a rise in sciatic nerve protein phosphorylation. After 9 days of ACR treatment, phosphorylation of beta-tubulin, P0, and several unidentified proteins (38 and 180 kDa) was increased in distal segments. In contrast, chronic administration of MBA caused increases in phosphorylation of beta-tubulin and the major myelin proteins of proximal nerve segments. In cell free homogenates prepared from sciatic nerves of treated and control rats, MBA caused an increase in phosphorylation of major myelin proteins similar to its effect in intact proximal nerve segments. The most striking effect observed in nerve homogenates of ACR-treated rats was a marked decrease in phosphorylation of an 80-kDa protein. Addition of ACR (1 mM) to homogenates of normal nerve had no effect on protein phosphorylation. Our results indicate that changes in the phosphorylation of phospholipids and proteins in sciatic nerve might be a component of the neurotoxic mechanism of ACR.

  17. Entrapment in anti myelin-associated glycoprotein neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Faber, Catharina G; Notermans, Nicolette C; Wokke, John H J; Franssen, Hessel

    2009-04-01

    Anti-myelin associated glycoprotein (MAG) neuropathy is a chronic disorder in which IgM antibodies react with Schwann cell glycoproteins, including MAG and peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22). Nerve conduction studies show features of axon loss and predominantly distal slowing consistent with demyelination. Because a genetic loss of PMP22 function yields hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP), loss of PMP22 function due to anti- MAG antibodies may result in increased sensitivity to entrapment. We investigated this by performing standardized electrophysiological studies in 16 patients with anti-MAG neuropathy and 16 disease controls with genetically confirmed HNPP. Disproportionate slowing relative to adjacent segments occurred in similar proportions of patients with anti-MAG neuropathy and HNPP, and was of the same magnitude in each group. Affected were the elbow, carpal tunnel and the wrist-hand segments of the median and ulnar nerves. However, in anti-MAG neuropathy as compared to HNPP, absolute values of distal motor latencies and conduction velocities outside entrapment sites were slower and amplitudes were lower. In conclusion, increased sensitivity for entrapment may occur in anti-MAG neuropathy and contribute to part of the nerve damage. PMID:19306083

  18. The clinical spectrum of amiodarone-associated optic neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Lenworth N.; Krohel, Gregory B.; Thomas, Eric R.

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE: To describe the clinical spectrum of amiodarone-associated optic neuropathy. METHODS: Observational cases series and review. RESULTS: Of 55 cases, the median interval for onset of optic neuropathy was four months after initiating amiodarone; 88% occurred within 12 months. Seven (13%) patients were asymptomatic. Twenty-two (40%) patients presented with sudden visual loss, while 26 (47%) had insidious loss of vision. Visual acuity ranged from 20/15 to light perception; 10 (18%) patients had legal blindness with visual acuity of 20/200 or worse. Visual field loss was present in 91% of cases. Color vision loss was present in eight (40%) of 20 cases. Optic disc edema was present in 85% of cases, while eight (15%) patients had retrobulbar optic neuropathy, without evidence of disc edema. Optic disc edema resolved over a median time of three months. Five patients had raised intracranial pressure on lumbar puncture. CONCLUSION: We were able to classify amiodarone-associated optic neuropathy into five clinical categories with respect to temporal characteristics and optic nerve appearance: insidious-onset (43%), acute-onset (28%), retrobulbar (13%), increased intracranial pressure (8%), and delayed-progressive onset (8%). Most cases of optic neuropathy commenced within 12 months of initiating amiodarone, with the median onset being four months. Over 10% of patients will have no visual symptoms at the onset. Ophthalmologic examinations within the first 12 months--and particularly within four months of initiating amiodarone--should improve early detection of amiodarone-associated optic neuropathy. PMID:15586652

  19. Morphologic Changes in Autonomic Nerves in Diabetic Autonomic Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Jin, Heung Yong; Baek, Hong Sun; Park, Tae Sun

    2015-12-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is one of the major complications of diabetes, and it increases morbidity and mortality in patients with both type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Because the autonomic nervous system, for example, parasympathetic axons, has a diffuse and wide distribution, we do not know the morphological changes that occur in autonomic neural control and their exact mechanisms in diabetic patients with diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN). Although the prevalence of sympathetic and parasympathetic neuropathy is similar in T1DM versus T2DM patients, sympathetic nerve function correlates with parasympathetic neuropathy only in T1DM patients. The explanation for these discrepancies might be that parasympathetic nerve function was more severely affected among T2DM patients. As parasympathetic nerve damage seems to be more advanced than sympathetic nerve damage, it might be that parasympathetic neuropathy precedes sympathetic neuropathy in T2DM, which was Ewing's concept. This could be explained by the intrinsic morphologic difference. Therefore, the morphological changes in the sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves of involved organs in T1DM and T2DM patients who have DAN should be evaluated. In this review, evaluation methods for morphological changes in the epidermal nerves of skin, and the intrinsic nerves of the stomach will be discussed. PMID:26706915

  20. Dysthyroid optic neuropathy. The crowded orbital apex syndrome.

    PubMed

    Neigel, J M; Rootman, J; Belkin, R I; Nugent, R A; Drance, S M; Beattie, C W; Spinelli, J A

    1988-11-01

    The authors have reviewed the clinical presentation, visual fields, color vision testing, visual-evoked potentials, and computed tomographic (CT) findings of 58 patients (95 eyes) with dysthyroid optic neuropathy. The authors compared these findings to a control group of 60 patients (119 eyes) with thyroid eye disease who underwent CT scanning and did not exhibit evidence of optic neuropathy. Clinically, dysthyroid optic neuropathy is an insidious disease; when compared with the usual Graves' orbitopathy patient, the optic neuropathy group presented at a later age and with a later onset of thyroid eye disease. The patients in this group were more likely to be male and/or diabetic, and often presented with desaturation of color vision. Asymmetrical extraocular muscle restriction and vertical tropias were more frequent in the optic neuropathy group. The most sensitive indicators of optic nerve dysfunction appeared to be visual-evoked potentials and color vision. Computed tomographic studies confirmed that apical orbital crowding was a characteristic feature of optic neuropathy. These findings should alert the clinician to a more aggressive approach to these patients. PMID:3211460

  1. Animal models of peripheral neuropathy due to environmental toxicants.

    PubMed

    Rao, Deepa B; Jortner, Bernard S; Sills, Robert C

    2014-01-01

    Despite the progress in our understanding of pathogeneses and the identification of etiologies of peripheral neuropathy, idiopathic neuropathy remains common. Typically, attention to peripheral neuropathies resulting from exposure to environmental agents is limited relative to more commonly diagnosed causes of peripheral neuropathy (diabetes and chemotherapeutic agents). Given that there are more than 80,000 chemicals in commerce registered with the Environmental Protection Agency and that at least 1000 chemicals are known to have neurotoxic potential, very few chemicals have been established to affect the peripheral nervous system (mainly after occupational exposures). A wide spectrum of exposures, including pesticides, metals, solvents, nutritional sources, and pharmaceutical agents, has been related, both historically and recently, to environmental toxicant-induced peripheral neuropathy. A review of the literature shows that the toxicity and pathogeneses of chemicals adversely affecting the peripheral nervous system have been studied using animal models. This article includes an overview of five prototypical environmental agents known to cause peripheral neuropathy--namely, organophosphates, carbon disulfide, pyridoxine (Vitamin B6), acrylamide, and hexacarbons (mainly n-hexane, 2,5-hexanedione, methyl n-butyl ketone). Also included is a brief introduction to the structural components of the peripheral nervous system and pointers on common methodologies for histopathologic evaluation of the peripheral nerves. PMID:24615445

  2. Late Onset Neuropathy with Spontaneous Clinical Remission in Mice Lacking the POZ Domain of the Transcription Factor Myc-interacting Zinc Finger Protein 1 (Miz1) in Schwann Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Sanz-Moreno, Adrián; Fuhrmann, David; Zankel, Armin; Reingruber, Herbert; Kern, Lara; Meijer, Dies; Niemann, Axel; Elsässer, Hans-Peter

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor Miz1 (Myc-interacting zinc finger 1) is a known regulator of the cell cycle but also has cell cycle-independent functions. Here we analyzed the role of Miz1 in the peripheral nervous system, using an early embryonic conditional knock-out model in which the Miz1 POZ domain is ablated in Schwann cells. Although the development of myelinated nerve fibers was not impaired, Miz1ΔPOZ mice acquired behavioral signs of a peripheral neuropathy at the age of 3 months. At this time, ultrastructural analysis of the sciatic nerve showed de- and dysmyelination of fibers, with massive outfoldings and a focal infiltration of macrophages. Although the expression of genes encoding structural myelin proteins, such as periaxin, myelin basic protein, and myelin protein zero, was decreased, genes associated with a negative regulation of myelination, including c-Jun, Sox2, and Id2, were up-regulated in Miz1ΔPOZ mice compared with controls. In animals older than 4 months, the motor disabilities vanished, and the ultrastructure of the sciatic nerve exhibited numerous tomacula and remyelinated fibers, as indicated by thinner myelin. No second acute attack was observed up to the age of 1 year. Thus, the deletion of the Miz1 POZ domain in Schwann cells induces an acute neuropathy with a subsequent regeneration in which there is ongoing balancing between de- and remyelination. Miz1ΔPOZ mice are impaired in the maintenance of myelinated fibers and are a promising model for studying remyelination in adult peripheral nerves. PMID:25416780

  3. A refined technique for sciatic denervation in a golden-mantled ground squirrel (Callospermophilus lateralis) model of disuse atrophy.

    PubMed

    Sarukhanov, Valeri; Van Andel, Roger; Treat, Michael D; Utz, Jenifer C; van Breukelen, Frank

    2014-06-01

    Disuse atrophy of both muscle and bone can occur rapidly during periods of inactivity. In several rodent models developed for the study of disuse atrophy, immobilization is induced by prolonged cage restraint, hind limb unloading, tenotomy, sciatic nerve block or sciatic denervation. In less tractable species such as wild-caught hibernating rodents, the sciatic denervation model is superior in terms of both animal welfare and applicability to the characteristics of natural cases of disuse atrophy. The authors describe a refined surgical approach to sciatic denervation in golden-mantled ground squirrels (Callospermophilus lateralis), a hibernating species, that improves animal welfare and reduces the incidence of post-operative complications such as autotomy. PMID:24845006

  4. Ultrasound Guided Obturator Versus Sciatic Nerve Block in Addition to Continuous Femoral Nerve Block for Analgesia After Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Keita; Sai, Seijyu; Shirai, Naoto; Adachi, Takehiko

    2011-01-01

    Both obturator and sciatic nerve block in combination with femoral nerve block (FNB) have been suggested to be useful in relieving pain after total knee arthroplasty (TKA), compared with FNB alone. We compared their efficacy in this retrospective study. For six consecutive months, patients undergoing unilateral TKA under general anesthesia with continuous FNB plus obturator nerve block (n = 8) or continuous FNB plus sciatic nerve block (n = 8) were investigated. Knee pain was assessed using visual analogue scale (VAS) on the day of surgery and on postoperative days one to three. In addition, we also investigated intraoperative and postoperative morphine consumption. VAS scores and total morphine consumption were not different between the two groups, although patients in the FNB plus sciatic nerve block group were administered less morphine during surgery. Sciatic nerve block with continuous FNB may be superior to obturator nerve block with continuous FNB for analgesia during surgery for TKA. PMID:23885188

  5. Giant axonal neuropathy: a rare inherited neuropathy with simple clinical clues

    PubMed Central

    Kamate, Mahesh; Ramakrishna, Shashikala; Kambali, Shweta; Mahadevan, Anita

    2014-01-01

    Giant axonal neuropathy (GAN) is a rare hereditary neurodegenerative disorder characterised by accumulation of excess neurofilaments in the axons of peripheral and central nervous systems, which hampers signal transmission. It usually manifests in infancy and early childhood and is slowly progressive. Those affected with GAN have characteristic curly kinky hair, everted feet and a crouched gait, which suggest the diagnosis in most cases. We describe twin children who presented with difficulty in walking and an abnormal gait since they began walking; clinical clues such as hair changes led us to the final diagnosis. PMID:25216920

  6. [Auditory neuropathy (auditory neuropathy spectrum disorders): the approaches to diagnostics and rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Tavartkiladze, G A

    2014-01-01

    Auditory neuropathies (auditory neuropathy spectrum disorders, ANSD) may be a consequence of dysfunction of inner hair cells and/or of synapses between these cells and auditory nerve fibers. Another cause of these disorders is supposed to be pathological changes in the auditory nerve itself. The outcome of the rehabilitative treatment of the patients presenting with this disorder depends on the quality of diagnosis and precise location of the pathological process. The present study involved 82 patients with auditory neuropathies. The audiological data obtained in the course of this work were compared with the results of other authors published during the recent years. The objective audiological examination included electrocochleography, registration of auditory brainstem response (ABR) and otoacoustic emission of short-latency and long-latency evoked auditory nerve action potentials. High-amplitude cochlear microphonic and transient evoked otoacoustic emission (TEOAE) potentials were recorded in 82 patients. In 17 (20.7%) patients, otoacoustic emission disappeared in the course of time even though the microphonic potential remained stable. It was shown that the results of electrical acoustic correction in the patients exhibiting long-latency evoked auditory action potentials and positive ABR to electrical stimulation (positive promontory test) were better than in the remaining cases. The outcome of cochlear implantation to a large extent depended on the localization of the pathological process. Specifically, the results of the treatment of the patients with high-amplitude summation potentials, prolonged latency, and positive auditory action potentials in response to electrical stimulation (typical of pre-synaptic localization of the pathological process) were better than in the patients with normal summation potentials, pathological auditory nerve action potentials, TEOAE, and negative ABR to electrical stimulation (indicative of post-synaptic localization of the

  7. Morin Mitigates Chronic Constriction Injury (CCI)-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy by Inhibiting Oxidative Stress Induced PARP Over-Activation and Neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Komirishetty, Prashanth; Areti, Aparna; Sistla, Ramakrishna; Kumar, Ashutosh

    2016-08-01

    Neuropathic pain is initiated or caused due to the primary lesion or dysfunction in the nervous system and is proposed to be linked to a cascade of events including excitotoxicity, oxidative stress, neuroinflammation and apoptosis. Oxidative/nitrosative stress aggravates the neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration through poly (ADP) ribose polymerase (PARP) overactivation. Hence, the present study investigated the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of the phytoconstituent; morin in chronic constriction injury (CCI) induced neuropathy. Neuropathic pain was induced by chronic constriction of the left sciatic nerve in rats, and the effect of morin (15 and 30 mg/kg, p.o.) was evaluated by measuring behavioural and biochemical changes. Mechanical, chemical and thermal stimuli confirmed the CCI-induced neuropathic pain and treatment with morin significantly improved these behavioural deficits and improved the sciatic functional index by the 14th day after CCI induction. After 14 days of CCI induction, oxidative/nitrosative stress and inflammatory markers were elevated in rat lumbar spinal cord. Oxidative stress induced PARP overactivation resulted in depleted levels of ATP and elevated levels of poly (ADP) ribose (PAR). Treatment with morin reduced the levels of nitrites, restored glutathione levels and abrogated the oxidant induced DNA damage. It also mitigated the increased levels of TNF-α and IL-6. Protein expression studies confirmed the PARP inhibition and anti-inflammatory activity of morin. Findings of this study suggest that morin, by virtue of its antioxidant properties, limited PARP overactivation and neuroinflammation and protected against CCI induced functional, behavioural and biochemical deficits. PMID:27084773

  8. The effect of loco-regional anaesthesia on motor activity induced by direct stimulation of the sciatic nerve in dogs.

    PubMed

    Murdoch, A P; Michou, J N

    2016-03-01

    A prospective, randomised, blinded, case-controlled clinical study was designed using client-owned dogs undergoing unilateral pelvic limb orthopaedic surgery, to determine the effect on induced motor activity by electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve distal to the site of local anaesthetic administration. Dogs were administered 0.5% bupivacaine either extradurally or via a femoral and transgluteal sciatic electrolocation-guided nerve block prior to pelvic limb surgery. Motor response to electrical stimulation of branches of the sciatic nerve was tested and the minimum current required to induce muscle twitch was recorded prior to bupivacaine administration. Provided sensory blockade had been deemed successful intraoperatively, testing was repeated postoperatively, with each dog acting as its own control. Paired t-tests were performed to compare pre- and postoperative minimum currents. Eleven dogs administered extradural and 11 dogs administered femoral and sciatic perineural bupivacaine were eligible for post-operative testing. All dogs displayed normal motor response to electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve at both sites tested before and after bupivacaine administration. There was no significant difference in the minimum current required to induce muscle twitch between pre- and post-operative testing (P = 0.31 sciatic site, P = 0.36 peroneal site), nor between the two groups using different loco-regional anaesthetic techniques (minimum P = 0.13). This study shows that stimulation of the sciatic nerve distal to the site of bupivacaine administration induces motor activity, despite adequate sensory blockade. This is relevant in surgical cases where mechanical stimulation of the sciatic nerve might be expected and needs to be recognised to avoid postoperative neurapraxia. PMID:26831173

  9. Low-level laser irradiation improves functional recovery and nerve regeneration in sciatic nerve crush rat injury model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chau-Zen; Chen, Yi-Jen; Wang, Yan-Hsiung; Yeh, Ming-Long; Huang, Mao-Hsiung; Ho, Mei-Ling; Liang, Jen-I; Chen, Chia-Hsin

    2014-01-01

    The development of noninvasive approaches to facilitate the regeneration of post-traumatic nerve injury is important for clinical rehabilitation. In this study, we investigated the effective dose of noninvasive 808-nm low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on sciatic nerve crush rat injury model. Thirty-six male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into 6 experimental groups: a normal group with or without 808-nm LLLT at 8 J/cm(2) and a sciatic nerve crush injury group with or without 808-nm LLLT at 3, 8 or 15 J/cm(2). Rats were given consecutive transcutaneous LLLT at the crush site and sacrificed 20 days after the crush injury. Functional assessments of nerve regeneration were analyzed using the sciatic functional index (SFI) and hindlimb range of motion (ROM). Nerve regeneration was investigated by measuring the myelin sheath thickness of the sciatic nerve using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and by analyzing the expression of growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43) in sciatic nerve using western blot and immunofluorescence staining. We found that sciatic-injured rats that were irradiated with LLLT at both 3 and 8 J/cm(2) had significantly improved SFI but that a significant improvement of ROM was only found in rats with LLLT at 8 J/cm(2). Furthermore, the myelin sheath thickness and GAP43 expression levels were significantly enhanced in sciatic nerve-crushed rats receiving 808-nm LLLT at 3 and 8 J/cm(2). Taken together, these results suggest that 808-nm LLLT at a low energy density (3 J/cm(2) and 8 J/cm(2)) is capable of enhancing sciatic nerve regeneration following a crush injury. PMID:25119457

  10. Lentiviral-mediated transfer of CDNF promotes nerve regeneration and functional recovery after sciatic nerve injury in adult rats

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Lei; Liu, Yi; Zhao, Hua; Zhang, Wen; Guo, Ying-Jun; Nie, Lin

    2013-10-18

    Highlights: •CDNF was successfully transfected by a lentiviral vector into the distal sciatic nerve. •CDNF improved S-100, NF200 expression and nerve regeneration after sciatic injury. •CDNF improved the remyelination and thickness of the regenerated sciatic nerve. •CDNF improved gastrocnemius muscle weight and sciatic functional recovery. -- Abstract: Peripheral nerve injury is often followed by incomplete and unsatisfactory functional recovery and may be associated with sensory and motor impairment of the affected limb. Therefore, a novel method is needed to improve the speed of recovery and the final functional outcome after peripheral nerve injuries. This report investigates the effect of lentiviral-mediated transfer of conserved dopamine neurotrophic factor (CDNF) on regeneration of the rat peripheral nerve in a transection model in vivo. We observed notable overexpression of CDNF protein in the distal sciatic nerve after recombinant CDNF lentiviral vector application. We evaluated sciatic nerve regeneration after surgery using light and electron microscopy and the functional recovery using the sciatic functional index and target muscle weight. HE staining revealed better ordered structured in the CDNF-treated group at 8 weeks post-surgery. Quantitative analysis of immunohistochemistry of NF200 and S-100 in the CDNF group revealed significant improvement of axonal and Schwann cell regeneration compared with the control groups at 4 weeks and 8 weeks after injury. The thickness of the myelination around the axons in the CDNF group was significantly higher than in the control groups at 8 weeks post-surgery. The CDNF group displayed higher muscle weights and significantly increased sciatic nerve index values. Our findings suggest that CDNF gene therapy could provide durable and stable CDNF protein concentration and has the potential to enhance peripheral nerve regeneration, morphological and functional recovery following nerve injury, which suggests a

  11. Painful Diabetic Neuropathy: Prevention or Suppression?

    PubMed

    Todorovic, S M

    2016-01-01

    Pain-sensing sensory neurons (nociceptors) of the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and dorsal horn (DH) can become sensitized (hyperexcitable) in response to pathological conditions such as diabetes, which in turn may lead to the development of painful peripheral diabetic neuropathy (PDN). Because of incomplete knowledge about the mechanisms underlying painful PDN, current treatment for painful PDN has been limited to somewhat nonspecific systemic drugs that have significant side effects or potential for abuse. Recent studies have established that several ion channels in DRG and DH neurons are dysregulated and make a previously unrecognized contribution to sensitization of pain responses by enhancing excitability of nociceptors in animal models of type 1 and type 2 PDN. Furthermore, it has been reported that targeting posttranslational modification of nociceptive ion channels such as glycosylation and methylglyoxal metabolism can completely reverse mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in diabetic animals with PDN in vivo. Understanding details of posttranslational regulation of nociceptive channel activity may facilitate development of novel therapies for treatment of painful PDN. We argue that pharmacological targeting of the specific pathogenic mechanism rather than of the channel per se may cause fewer side effects and reduce the potential for drug abuse in patients with diabetes. PMID:27133151

  12. Auditory neuropathy--neural and synaptic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Moser, Tobias; Starr, Arnold

    2016-03-01

    Sensorineural hearing impairment is the most common form of hearing loss, and encompasses pathologies of the cochlea and the auditory nerve. Hearing impairment caused by abnormal neural encoding of sound stimuli despite preservation of sensory transduction and amplification by outer hair cells is known as 'auditory neuropathy'. This term was originally coined for a specific type of hearing impairment affecting speech comprehension beyond changes in audibility: patients with this condition report that they "can hear but cannot understand". This type of hearing impairment can be caused by damage to the sensory inner hair cells (IHCs), IHC ribbon synapses or spiral ganglion neurons. Human genetic and physiological studies, as well as research on animal models, have recently shown that disrupted IHC ribbon synapse function--resulting from genetic alterations that affect presynaptic glutamate loading of synaptic vesicles, Ca(2+) influx, or synaptic vesicle exocytosis--leads to hearing impairment termed 'auditory synaptopathy'. Moreover, animal studies have demonstrated that sound overexposure causes excitotoxic loss of IHC ribbon synapses. This mechanism probably contributes to hearing disorders caused by noise exposure or age-related hearing loss. This Review provides an update on recently elucidated sensory, synaptic and neural mechanisms of hearing impairment, their corresponding clinical findings, and discusses current rehabilitation strategies as well as future therapies. PMID:26891769

  13. Phenotypic variability of TRPV4 related neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Evangelista, Teresinha; Bansagi, Boglarka; Pyle, Angela; Griffin, Helen; Douroudis, Konstantinos; Polvikoski, Tuomo; Antoniadi, Thalia; Bushby, Kate; Straub, Volker; Chinnery, Patrick F; Lochmüller, Hanns; Horvath, Rita

    2015-06-01

    Mutations in the transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) gene have been associated with autosomal dominant skeletal dysplasias and peripheral nervous system syndromes (PNSS). PNSS include Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) type 2C, congenital spinal muscular atrophy and arthrogryposis and scapuloperoneal spinal muscular atrophy. We report the clinical, electrophysiological and muscle biopsy findings in two unrelated patients with two novel heterozygous missense mutations in the TRPV4 gene. Whole exome sequencing was carried out on genomic DNA using Illumina Truseq(TM) 62Mb exome capture. Patient 1 harbours a de novo c.805C > T (p.Arg269Cys) mutation. Clinically, this patient shows signs of both scapuloperoneal spinal muscular atrophy and skeletal dysplasia. Patient 2 harbours a novel c.184G > A (p.Asp62Asn) mutation. While the clinical phenotype is compatible with CMT type 2C with the patient's muscle harbours basophilic inclusions. Mutations in the TRPV4 gene have a broad phenotypic variability and disease severity and may share a similar pathogenic mechanism with Heat Shock Protein related neuropathies. PMID:25900305

  14. Management of oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Saif, M Wasif; Reardon, John

    2005-01-01

    Neurotoxicity is the most frequent dose-limiting toxicity of oxaliplatin. Acute sensory neurotoxicity manifests as rapid onset of cold-induced distal dysesthesia and/or paresthesia, sometimes accompanied by cold-dependent muscular contractions of the extremities or the jaw. The symptoms, often occurring during or shortly after infusion, are usually transient and mild. A cumulative sensory peripheral neuropathy may also develop with prolonged treatment with oxaliplatin, eventually causing superficial and deep sensory loss, sensory ataxia, and functional impairment. Studies have shown patients with acute sensory symptoms to display little or no axonal degeneration. The similarity of acute symptoms induced by oxaliplatin to those caused by several drugs or toxins acting on neuronal or muscular ion channels suggests that these symptoms may result from a specific interaction of oxaliplatin with voltage-gated sodium (Na+) channels. The current recommendations for the management of the acute and cumulative neurotoxicity from oxaliplatin include education about exposure to cold, dose modification, “stop and go”, and use of neuromodulatory agents, in particular, intravenous calcium and magnesium infusion. Upon the approval of oxaliplatin-based regimens both for adjuvant and metastatic treatment of colon cancer, it is crucial to compile knowledge about the recognition and management of neurotoxicity from oxaliplatin. PMID:18360567

  15. Diabetic neuropathy: mechanisms, emerging treatments, and subtypes.

    PubMed

    Albers, James W; Pop-Busui, Rodica

    2014-08-01

    Diabetic neuropathies (DNs) differ in clinical course, distribution, fiber involvement (type and size), and pathophysiology, the most typical type being a length-dependent distal symmetric polyneuropathy (DSP) with differing degrees of autonomic involvement. The pathogenesis of diabetic DSP is multifactorial, including increased mitochondrial production of free radicals due to hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress. Mechanisms that impact neuronal activity, mitochondrial function, membrane permeability, and endothelial function include formation of advanced glycosylation end products, activation of polyol aldose reductase signaling, activation of poly(ADP ribose) polymerase, and altered function of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase pump. Hyperglycemia-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress triggers several neuronal apoptotic processes. Additional mechanisms include impaired nerve perfusion, dyslipidemia, altered redox status, low-grade inflammation, and perturbation of calcium balance. Successful therapies require an integrated approach targeting these mechanisms. Intensive glycemic control is essential but is insufficient to prevent onset or progression of DSP, and disease-modifying treatments for DSP have been disappointing. Atypical forms of DN include subacute-onset sensory (symmetric) or motor (asymmetric) predominant conditions that are frequently painful but generally self-limited. DNs are a major cause of disability, associated with reduced quality of life and increased mortality. PMID:24954624

  16. Toxic optic neuropathy: an unusual cause.

    PubMed

    Ramkumar, Hema L; Savino, Peter J

    2014-10-01

    A 60-year-old woman with a history of chronic alcoholism and tobacco use presented with the complaint of a painless decrease in vision in both eyes. She lost vision first in the left eye then in the right eye. She admitted consuming at least one 16 ounce bottle of over the counter mouthwash daily and denied consumption of any other alcohols, methanol, or antifreeze. She stated that her vision had been continuing to deteriorate in both eyes. Her best-corrected visual acuity was 4/200 in each eye. Color vision was nil in each eye. Her pupils were sluggish bilaterally, and her optic discs were flat and hyperemic with peripapillary hemorrhages. Her visual fields revealed central scotomas bilaterally. The magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and lumbar puncture were within normal limits. Antinuclear antibody, human leukocyte antigen-B27 genotyping, and B12 were normal; serum thiamine was low. While continuing to ingest mouthwash, her vision decreased to count fingers at 2 feet, and maculopapillary bundle pallor developed. She was started on folate and thiamine supplementation. Once she discontinued mouthwash, her vision improved to 20/400 bilaterally, and her central scotomas improved. This case demonstrates an alcohol-induced toxic optic neuropathy from mouthwash ingestion with some visual recovery after discontinuation of the offending agent. PMID:25449946

  17. Traumatic Optic Neuropathy – A Conundrum

    PubMed Central

    Selvaraj, Vinoth Kanna; Devanathan, Vasudevan

    2016-01-01

    Visual impairment following head injury may be an enigma especially if the onset of symptoms were to be few days after the actual trauma and the bias arising out of the initial normal ophthalmological examination is not neutralised by unbiased repeated formal clinical evaluation aided with electrophysiology. We report and discuss here a 32-year-old lady with delayed onset of indirect traumatic visual loss with anaemia who failed to improve after blood transfusion but improved immediately following steroid therapy seven days after trauma. Though steroids have not been shown to have a significant contribution on outcomes following Traumatic optic neuropathy, this report rekindles its role in delayed progressive visual loss following head trauma and the need to re-analyse the role of steroids in patients with delayed progressive visual disturbance following head injury excluding those with acute onset symptoms in view of different pathologies in both these presentations. This paper also highlights potential mechanisms for the two major types of presentation. PMID:27134913

  18. Diabetic neuropathy and plasma glucose control.

    PubMed

    Porte, D; Graf, R J; Halter, J B; Pfeifer, M A; Halar, E

    1981-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is defined, and theories of its pathogenesis are reviewed. Recent studies designed to investigate the influence of plasma glucose on nerve function in noninsulin-dependent diabetic patients are summarized. Motor nerve conduction velocities in the median and peroneal nerves were measured using a double-stimulus technique, and sensory conduction velocity was measured by conventional methods before and after therapy with oral agents or insulin. The degree of hyperglycemia was assessed by measurement of fasting plasma glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin concentrations. The degree of slowing in motor nerve conduction velocity in untreated patients was found to correlate with the fasting plasma glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin concentrations, but sensory nerve function, although abnormal, did not show such correlation. Reduction of hyperglycemia was associated with improvement in motor nerve conduction velocity in the peroneal and median motor nerves of these patients, but sensory nerve conduction velocity showed no such improvement. Improvement in median motor nerve conduction velocity was directly related to the degree of reduction in fasting plasma glucose concentration. These findings suggest that metabolic factors related to hyperglycemia are important in the impaired motor nerve function seen in noninsulin-dependent patients with maturity-onset diabetes. PMID:7457487

  19. Diabetic Neuropathy and Oxidative Stress: Therapeutic Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Asieh; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy (DN) is a widespread disabling disorder comprising peripheral nerves' damage. DN develops on a background of hyperglycemia and an entangled metabolic imbalance, mainly oxidative stress. The majority of related pathways like polyol, advanced glycation end products, poly-ADP-ribose polymerase, hexosamine, and protein kinase c all originated from initial oxidative stress. To date, no absolute cure for DN has been defined; although some drugs are conventionally used, much more can be found if all pathophysiological links with oxidative stress would be taken into account. In this paper, although current therapies for DN have been reviewed, we have mainly focused on the links between DN and oxidative stress and therapies on the horizon, such as inhibitors of protein kinase C, aldose reductase, and advanced glycation. With reference to oxidative stress and the related pathways, the following new drugs are under study such as taurine, acetyl-L-carnitine, alpha lipoic acid, protein kinase C inhibitor (ruboxistaurin), aldose reductase inhibitors (fidarestat, epalrestat, ranirestat), advanced glycation end product inhibitors (benfotiamine, aspirin, aminoguanidine), the hexosamine pathway inhibitor (benfotiamine), inhibitor of poly ADP-ribose polymerase (nicotinamide), and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (trandolapril). The development of modern drugs to treat DN is a real challenge and needs intensive long-term comparative trials. PMID:23738033

  20. Phenotypic variability of TRPV4 related neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Evangelista, Teresinha; Bansagi, Boglarka; Pyle, Angela; Griffin, Helen; Douroudis, Konstantinos; Polvikoski, Tuomo; Antoniadi, Thalia; Bushby, Kate; Straub, Volker; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Lochmüller, Hanns; Horvath, Rita

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) gene have been associated with autosomal dominant skeletal dysplasias and peripheral nervous system syndromes (PNSS). PNSS include Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease (CMT) type 2C, congenital spinal muscular atrophy and arthrogryposis and scapuloperoneal spinal muscular atrophy. We report the clinical, electrophysiological and muscle biopsy findings in two unrelated patients with two novel heterozygous missense mutations in the TRPV4 gene. Whole exome sequencing was carried out on genomic DNA using Illumina TruseqTM 62Mb exome capture. Patient 1 harbours a de novo c.805C > T (p.Arg269Cys) mutation. Clinically, this patient shows signs of both scapuloperoneal spinal muscular atrophy and skeletal dysplasia. Patient 2 harbours a novel c.184G > A (p.Asp62Asn) mutation. While the clinical phenotype is compatible with CMT type 2C with the patient's muscle harbours basophilic inclusions. Mutations in the TRPV4 gene have a broad phenotypic variability and disease severity and may share a similar pathogenic mechanism with Heat Shock Protein related neuropathies. PMID:25900305

  1. Reinnervation of the Tibialis Anterior Following Sciatic Nerve Crush Injury: A Confocal Microscopic Study in Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Magill, Christina K.; Tong, Alice; Kawamura, David; Hayashi, Ayato; Hunter, Daniel A.; Parsadanian, Alexander; Mackinnon, Susan E.; Myckatyn, Terence M.

    2007-01-01

    Transgenic mice whose axons and Schwann cells express fluorescent chromophores enable new imaging techniques and augment concepts in developmental neurobiology. The utility of these tools in the study of traumatic nerve injury depends on employing nerve models that are amenable to microsurgical manipulation and gauging functional recovery. Motor recovery from sciatic nerve crush injury is studied here by evaluating motor endplates of the tibialis anterior muscle, which is innervated by the deep peroneal branch of the sciatic nerve. Following sciatic nerve crush, the deep surface of the tibialis anterior muscle is examined using whole mount confocal microscopy, and reinnervation is characterized by imaging fluorescent axons or Schwann cells (SCs). One week following sciatic crush injury, 100% of motor endplates are denervated with partial reinnervation at two weeks, hyperinnervation at three and four weeks, and restoration of a 1:1 axon to motor endplate relationship six weeks after injury. Walking track analysis reveals progressive recovery of sciatic nerve function by six weeks. SCs reveal reduced S100 expression within two weeks of denervation, correlating with regression to a more immature phenotype. Reinnervation of SCs restores S100 expression and a fully differentiated phenotype. Following denervation, there is altered morphology of circumscribed terminal Schwann cells demonstrating extensive process formation between adjacent motor endplates. The thin, uniformly innervated tibialis anterior muscle is well suited for studying motor reinnervation following sciatic nerve injury. Confocal microscopy may be performed coincident with other techniques of assessing nerve regeneration and functional recovery. PMID:17628540

  2. Apelin-13 Prevents the Delayed Neuropathy Induced by Tri-ortho-cresyl Phosphate Through Regulation the Autophagy Flux in Hens.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shou-Hong; Ouyang, Xin-Ping; Tian, Shao-Wen; Yin, Wei-Lan; Hu, Bi

    2015-11-01

    Organophosphate-induced delayed neuropathy (OPIDN) is pathologically characterized by the swollen axon containing aggregations of microtubules, neurofilaments, smooth endoplasmic reticulum and multivesicular vesicles. At present, the exact mechanism of OPIDN is unclear and the effective therapeutic methods is not available to counter this syndrome. Recent studies had shown that the autophagy was involved in OPIDN. The adipocytokine Apelin is a peptide, Apelin and its receptor are abundantly expressed in the nervous system. Recent researches illuminated that Apelin was neuroprotective factor and Apelin could regulate the autophagy in vivo and vitro model. So we investigated the effect of Apelin-13 on the OPIDN induced by Tri-ortho-cresyl phosphate (TOCP) in hens and explored the role of autophagy in Apelin-13 preventing OPIDN. Adult Roman hens were given a single dose of 750 mg/kg TOCP by gavage for 21 days to induce OPIDN, and neural dysfunction were detected, and the formation of autophagosomes in spinal cord neurons was observed by transmission electron microscopy, and the molecular markers of autophagy microtubule-associated protein light chain-3 (LC3) and the autophagy substrates p62/SQSTM1 were determined by Western blot analysis. The results demonstrated that the obvious neurological dysfunction such as hindlimb paralysis and paralysis of gait was present, the number of autophagosomes in the neurons of spinal cords was significantly increased, the level of LC3-II and p62 expressions and the ratio of LC3-II/LC3-I in spinal cords and sciatic nerve were significantly increased in the OPIDN model group compared with the control group. Compared with the OPIDN model group, the neurological dysfunction of tens was obviously reduced, the clinical signs scores was significantly decreased, the number of autophagosomes in the neurons of hen spinal cords was significantly decreased, the level of LC3-II and p62 expressions and the ratio of LC3-II/LC3-I in spinal cords and

  3. Prevalence of peripheral neuropathy and painful peripheral neuropathy in Turkish diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Erbas, Tomris; Ertas, Mustafa; Yucel, Aysen; Keskinaslan, Abdulkadir; Senocak, Mustafa

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) and neuropathic pain in diabetic patients attending university outpatient clinics in Turkey. In this multicenter cross-sectional study, neurologic examinations and nerve conduction studies along with clinical diabetic neuropathy score, and Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs pain scale were performed on 1,113 patients (46.2% male) from 14 centers. Prevalence of DPN determined only by clinical examination was 40.4% and increased to 62.2%, by combining nerve conduction studies with clinical examination. According to Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs scores, neuropathic pain prevalence was 16.0% in those who reported pain. Poor glycemic control, retinopathy, microalbuminuria, hyperlipidemia, diabetic foot, and foot amputation were more commonly observed in patients with DPN. Clinical DPN affected 40.4% of diabetic patients, and neuropathic pain prevalence in diabetic patient population was 14.0%. Clinical examinations and nerve conduction studies are important components for early detection and accurate diagnosis of DPN and painful DPN. PMID:21221008

  4. Myanmarese Neuropathy: Clinical Description of Acute Peripheral Neuropathy Detected among Myanmarese Refugees in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Fu Liong, Hiew; Santhi, Datuk Puvanarajah; Shanthi, Viswanathan; Mohd Hanip, Rafia

    2014-01-01

    Background. Since 2008, we have observed an increasing number of Myanmarese refugees in Malaysia being admitted for acute/subacute onset peripheral neuropathy. Most of them had a preceding history of starvation. Methods. We retrospectively studied the clinical features of all Myanmarese patients admitted with peripheral neuropathy from September 2008 to January 2014. Results. A total of 24 patients from the Chin, Rohingya, and Rakhine ethnicities (mean age, 23.8 years; male, 96%) had symmetrical, ascending areflexic weakness with at least one additional presenting symptom of fever, lower limb swelling, vomiting, abdominal pain, or difficulty in breathing. Twenty (83.3%) had sensory symptoms. Ten (41.6%) had cranial nerve involvement. Nineteen patients had cerebrospinal fluid examinations but none with evidence of albuminocytological dissociation. Neurophysiological assessment revealed axonal polyneuropathy, predominantly a motor-sensory subtype. Folate and vitamin B12 deficiencies were detected in 31.5% of them. These findings suggested the presence of a polyneuropathy related to nutrition against a backdrop of other possible environmental factors such as infections, metabolic disorders, or exposure to unknown toxin. Supportive treatment with appropriate vitamins supplementation improved functional outcome in most patients. Conclusion. We report a spectrum of acquired reversible neurological manifestations among Myanmarese refugees likely to be multifactorial with micronutrient deficiencies playing an important role in the pathogenesis. PMID:27350989

  5. Myanmarese Neuropathy: Clinical Description of Acute Peripheral Neuropathy Detected among Myanmarese Refugees in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Santhi, Datuk Puvanarajah; Mohd Hanip, Rafia

    2014-01-01

    Background. Since 2008, we have observed an increasing number of Myanmarese refugees in Malaysia being admitted for acute/subacute onset peripheral neuropathy. Most of them had a preceding history of starvation. Methods. We retrospectively studied the clinical features of all Myanmarese patients admitted with peripheral neuropathy from September 2008 to January 2014. Results. A total of 24 patients from the Chin, Rohingya, and Rakhine ethnicities (mean age, 23.8 years; male, 96%) had symmetrical, ascending areflexic weakness with at least one additional presenting symptom of fever, lower limb swelling, vomiting, abdominal pain, or difficulty in breathing. Twenty (83.3%) had sensory symptoms. Ten (41.6%) had cranial nerve involvement. Nineteen patients had cerebrospinal fluid examinations but none with evidence of albuminocytological dissociation. Neurophysiological assessment revealed axonal polyneuropathy, predominantly a motor-sensory subtype. Folate and vitamin B12 deficiencies were detected in 31.5% of them. These findings suggested the presence of a polyneuropathy related to nutrition against a backdrop of other possible environmental factors such as infections, metabolic disorders, or exposure to unknown toxin. Supportive treatment with appropriate vitamins supplementation improved functional outcome in most patients. Conclusion. We report a spectrum of acquired reversible neurological manifestations among Myanmarese refugees likely to be multifactorial with micronutrient deficiencies playing an important role in the pathogenesis. PMID:27350989

  6. NEUROPATHY TARGET ESTERASE INHIBITION BY ORGANOPHOSPHORUS ESTERS IN HUMAN NEUROBLASTOMA CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Certain organophosphorus compounds (OPs) produce a delayed neuropathy (OPIDN) in man and some animal species. apability to cause OPIDN is generally predicted in animal models by early and irreversible inhibition of neuropathy target esterase (NTE, neurotoxic esterase) . In this s...

  7. Painless Ulcers and Fissures of Toes: Hereditary Sensory Neuropathy, Not Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Angoori Gnaneshwar

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary sensory neuropathies (HSN) are rare genetically determined neuropathies. They often manifest as painless injuries in children. We present HSN in a 5-year-old boy who presented with recurrent fissuring and ulceration involving both great toes. PMID:26955138

  8. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha antagonists and neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Stübgen, Joerg-Patrick

    2008-03-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha plays an important role in many aspects of immune system development, immune-response regulation, and T-cell-mediated tissue injury. The evidence that TNF-alpha, released by autoreactive T cells and macrophages, may contribute to the pathogenesis of immune-mediated demyelinating neuropathies is reviewed. TNF-alpha antagonists (infliximab, etanercept, adalimumab) are indicated for the treatment of advanced inflammatory rheumatic and bowel disease, but these drugs can induce a range of autoimmune diseases that also attack the central and peripheral nervous systems. Case histories and series report on the association between anti-TNF-alpha treatment and various disorders of peripheral nerve such as Guillain-Barré syndrome, Miller Fisher syndrome, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, multifocal motor neuropathy with conduction block, mononeuropathy multiplex, and axonal sensorimotor polyneuropathies. The proposed pathogeneses of TNF-alpha-associated neuropathies include both a T-cell and humoral immune attack against peripheral nerve myelin, vasculitis-induced nerve ischemia, and inhibition of signaling support for axons. Most neuropathies improve over a period of months by withdrawal of the TNF-alpha antagonist, with or without additional immune-modulating treatment. Preliminary observations suggest that TNF-alpha antagonists may be useful as an antigen-nonspecific treatment approach to immune-mediated neuropathies in patients with a poor response to, or intolerance of, standard therapies, but further studies are required. PMID:18041052

  9. Clinical Approach to the Treatment of Painful Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Hovaguimian, Alexandra; Gibbons, Christopher H.

    2011-01-01

    Painful neuropathy is a common and often progressive complication of diabetes. Patients frequently report symptoms of tingling, burning, lancinating pain, hyperesthesia, and allodynia. The natural history of the disease may vary from intermittent mild symptoms to severe chronic daily pain; the latter is often associated with diminished quality of life. There are a variety of pharmaceutical agents from different medicinal categories available for the symptomatic treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy, however selecting an agent is often challenging given the breadth of choices and lack of consistent guidelines. As a result, many patients remain untreated or undertreated. This article presents a practical clinical approach to the treatment of pain in diabetic neuropathy. Recommendations for first-, second-, and third-line medications are based on specific evidence for the treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy as well as safety, tolerability, drug interactions, and cost. Additional topics of discussion include breakthrough pain, opioid use, and topical therapies. This review does not comprehensively discuss all possible treatments for painful neuropathy, but provides a systematic approach designed to guide clinicians in tailoring therapies to the individual patient. PMID:21709806

  10. Decreased gastric secretory functions in diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, T; Takebe, K; Imamura, K; Miyazawa, T; Ishii, M; Kudoh, K; Terada, A; Machida, K; Kikuchi, H; Kasai, F

    1994-06-01

    A total of 37 subjects consisted of 10 healthy subjects (Group III), 15 diabetic patients without autonomic neuropathy (Group II), and 12 diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy including gastroparesis in 6 cases (Group I). All three groups were comparable in age. In order to clarify the gastric function in diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy, secretion of serum gastrin, gastric secretory function, endoscopic Congo red test of fundic glands, and coefficiency of variance of electrocardiographic beat-to-beat intervals (C.V. R-R) were examined. In Group I, 5 patients had hypergastrinemia, but its elevation was inhibited when an acid solution was injected into the stomach. Gastric secretion and C.V. R-R were markedly lower in Group I, compared with Groups II and III. In Group I, the area of fundic glands (parietal cells) was reduced considerably. The C.V. R-R was significantly correlated with fasting serum gastrin concentration and with maximal acid output. From these results, in diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy (vagal neuropathy), gastric acid secretion in response to tetragastrin stimulation was lowered with a reduction in area of fundic gland distribution. Hypergastrinemia may reflect a negative feedback mechanism responding to decreased acidity of gastric content in the antrum. PMID:7817384

  11. Nicotinamide Riboside Opposes Type 2 Diabetes and Neuropathy in Mice.

    PubMed

    Trammell, Samuel A J; Weidemann, Benjamin J; Chadda, Ankita; Yorek, Matthew S; Holmes, Amey; Coppey, Lawrence J; Obrosov, Alexander; Kardon, Randy H; Yorek, Mark A; Brenner, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Male C57BL/6J mice raised on high fat diet (HFD) become prediabetic and develop insulin resistance and sensory neuropathy. The same mice given low doses of streptozotocin are a model of type 2 diabetes (T2D), developing hyperglycemia, severe insulin resistance and diabetic peripheral neuropathy involving sensory and motor neurons. Because of suggestions that increased NAD(+) metabolism might address glycemic control and be neuroprotective, we treated prediabetic and T2D mice with nicotinamide riboside (NR) added to HFD. NR improved glucose tolerance, reduced weight gain, liver damage and the development of hepatic steatosis in prediabetic mice while protecting against sensory neuropathy. In T2D mice, NR greatly reduced non-fasting and fasting blood glucose, weight gain and hepatic steatosis while protecting against diabetic neuropathy. The neuroprotective effect of NR could not be explained by glycemic control alone. Corneal confocal microscopy was the most sensitive measure of neurodegeneration. This assay allowed detection of the protective effect of NR on small nerve structures in living mice. Quantitative metabolomics established that hepatic NADP(+) and NADPH levels were significantly degraded in prediabetes and T2D but were largely protected when mice were supplemented with NR. The data justify testing of NR in human models of obesity, T2D and associated neuropathies. PMID:27230286

  12. Animal Models of Peripheral Neuropathy Due to Environmental Toxicants

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Deepa B.; Jortner, Bernard S.; Sills, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the progress in our understanding of pathogeneses and the identification of etiologies of peripheral neuropathy, idiopathic neuropathy remains common. Typically, attention to peripheral neuropathies resulting from exposure to environmental agents is limited relative to more commonly diagnosed causes of peripheral neuropathy (diabetes and chemotherapeutic agents). Given that there are more than 80,000 chemicals in commerce registered with the Environmental Protection Agency and that at least 1000 chemicals are known to have neurotoxic potential, very few chemicals have been established to affect the peripheral nervous system (mainly after occupational exposures). A wide spectrum of exposures, including pesticides, metals, solvents, nutritional sources, and pharmaceutical agents, has been related, both historically and recently, to environmental toxicant-induced peripheral neuropathy. A review of the literature shows that the toxicity and pathogeneses of chemicals adversely affecting the peripheral nervous system have been studied using animal models. This article includes an overview of five prototypical environmental agents known to cause peripheral neuropathy—namely, organophosphates, carbon disulfide, pyridoxine (Vitamin B6), acrylamide, and hexacarbons (mainly n-hexane, 2,5-hexanedione, methyl n-butyl ketone). Also included is a brief introduction to the structural components of the peripheral nervous system and pointers on common methodologies for histopathologic evaluation of the peripheral nerves. PMID:24615445

  13. An Early Diagnostic Tool for Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kambiz, Shoista; van Neck, Johan W.; Cosgun, Saniye G.; van Velzen, Marit H. N.; Janssen, Joop A. M. J. L.; Avazverdi, Naim; Hovius, Steven E. R.; Walbeehm, Erik T.

    2015-01-01

    The skin’s rewarming rate of diabetic patients is used as a diagnostic tool for early diagnosis of diabetic neuropathy. At present, the relationship between microvascular changes in the skin and diabetic neuropathy is unclear in streptozotocin (STZ) diabetic rats. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the skin rewarming rate in diabetic rats is related to microvascular changes and whether this is accompanied by changes observed in classical diagnostic methods for diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Computer-assisted infrared thermography was used to assess the rewarming rate after cold exposure on the plantar skin of STZ diabetic rats’ hind paws. Peripheral neuropathy was determined by the density of intra-epidermal nerve fibers (IENFs), mechanical sensitivity, and electrophysiological recordings. Data were obtained in diabetic rats at four, six, and eight weeks after the induction of diabetes and in controls. Four weeks after the induction of diabetes, a delayed rewarming rate, decreased skin blood flow and decreased density of IENFs were observed. However, the mechanical hyposensitivity and decreased motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV) developed 6 and 8 weeks after the induction of diabetes. Our study shows that the skin rewarming rate is related to microvascular changes in diabetic rats. Moreover, the skin rewarming rate is a non-invasive method that provides more information for an earlier diagnosis of peripheral neuropathy than the classical monofilament test and MNCV in STZ induced diabetic rats. PMID:25984949

  14. Nicotinamide Riboside Opposes Type 2 Diabetes and Neuropathy in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Trammell, Samuel A.J.; Weidemann, Benjamin J.; Chadda, Ankita; Yorek, Matthew S.; Holmes, Amey; Coppey, Lawrence J.; Obrosov, Alexander; Kardon, Randy H.; Yorek, Mark A.; Brenner, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Male C57BL/6J mice raised on high fat diet (HFD) become prediabetic and develop insulin resistance and sensory neuropathy. The same mice given low doses of streptozotocin are a model of type 2 diabetes (T2D), developing hyperglycemia, severe insulin resistance and diabetic peripheral neuropathy involving sensory and motor neurons. Because of suggestions that increased NAD+ metabolism might address glycemic control and be neuroprotective, we treated prediabetic and T2D mice with nicotinamide riboside (NR) added to HFD. NR improved glucose tolerance, reduced weight gain, liver damage and the development of hepatic steatosis in prediabetic mice while protecting against sensory neuropathy. In T2D mice, NR greatly reduced non-fasting and fasting blood glucose, weight gain and hepatic steatosis while protecting against diabetic neuropathy. The neuroprotective effect of NR could not be explained by glycemic control alone. Corneal confocal microscopy was the most sensitive measure of neurodegeneration. This assay allowed detection of the protective effect of NR on small nerve structures in living mice. Quantitative metabolomics established that hepatic NADP+ and NADPH levels were significantly degraded in prediabetes and T2D but were largely protected when mice were supplemented with NR. The data justify testing of NR in human models of obesity, T2D and associated neuropathies. PMID:27230286

  15. Cisplatin neuropathy. Risk factors, prognosis, and protection by WR-2721

    SciTech Connect

    Mollman, J.E.; Glover, D.J.; Hogan, W.M.; Furman, R.E.

    1988-06-01

    A prospective study of patients receiving cis-diaminedichloroplatin II (DDP) was carried out to determine if risk factors could be identified related to the patient's living habits or past medical history that would predict in which patients DDP neuropathy might develop. Sixty-nine patients receiving six different combinations of chemotherapeutic agents, including DDP were examined. Twenty-eight of these patients received DDP in combination with the radioprotective agent S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)-ethylphosporothioic acid (WR 2721). No risk factors were identified relating to personal habits or past medical history of the patients. However, patients receiving DDP (40 mg/m2) on 5 consecutive days had a significantly higher incidence of neuropathy. Patients receiving DDP in combination with WR 2721 had a significantly lower incidence of neuropathy, and the mean dose at onset was significantly higher than the mean dose at onset of neuropathy for all other groups. In addition, five of six patients who were available for long-term follow-up demonstrated nearly complete reversal of the signs and symptoms of neuropathy.

  16. Contralateral ulnar neuropathy following total hip replacement and intraoperative positioning.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, S; Bennett, D; Spence, D J; Mawhinney, I; Beverland, D E

    2016-05-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a rare but important complication of total hip arthroplasty (THA) and has previously been reported in the ipsilateral arm and associated with inflammatory arthritis. The results of 7004 primary hip arthroplasties performed between January 1993 and February 2009 were retrospectively reviewed to identify patients who reported ulnar neuropathy symptoms, with ten patients identified at mean follow-up of 57 months (range = 3-195 months). Eight patients experienced unilateral ulnar nerve symptoms in the contralateral upper limb post-surgery, one patient experienced symptoms in the ipsilateral upper limb and one patient experienced symptoms in both upper limbs. The incidence of post-THA ulnar neuropathy was 0.14%. All patients had a pre-operative diagnosis of osteoarthritis and none had diabetes, a previous history of neuropathy or inflammatory arthritis. All operations were primary arthroplasties and were performed under the care of a single surgeon in a single centre. Two of the ten patients (20%) had a general anaesthetic. The pattern of symptoms reported, i.e. mainly unilateral affecting the contralateral side with variable resolution, contrasts with previous studies and suggests that intraoperative patient positioning may be an important factor influencing ulnar neuropathy following THA. Attention to support and positioning of the contralateral arm may help reduce the incidence of this complication. PMID:26589446

  17. Peripheral neuropathy induced by combination chemotherapy of docetaxel and cisplatin.

    PubMed Central

    Hilkens, P. H.; Pronk, L. C.; Verweij, J.; Vecht, C. J.; van Putten, W. L.; van den Bent, M. J.

    1997-01-01

    Docetaxel, a new semisynthetic taxoid that has demonstrated promising activity as an antineoplastic agent, was administered in combination with cisplatin to 63 patients in a dose-escalating study. As both drugs were known to be potentially neurotoxic, peripheral neurotoxicity was prospectively assessed in detail. Neuropathy was evaluated by clinical sum-score for signs and symptoms and by measurement of the vibration perception threshold (VPT). The severity of neuropathy was graded according to the National Cancer Institute's 'Common Toxicity Criteria'. The docetaxel-cisplatin combination chemotherapy induced a predominantly sensory neuropathy in 29 (53%) out of 55 evaluable patients. At cumulative doses of both cisplatin and docetaxel above 200 mg m(-2), 26 (74%) out of 35 patients developed a neuropathy which was mild in 15, moderate in ten and severe in one patient. Significant correlations were present between both the cumulative dose of docetaxel and cisplatin and the post-treatment sum-score of neuropathy (P < 0.01) as well as the post-treatment VPT (P < 0.01). The neurotoxic effects of this combination were more severe than either cisplatin or docetaxel as single agent at similar doses. PMID:9020489

  18. [Histotopography and composition of the microcirculatory bed of the sciatic nerve in the rat].

    PubMed

    Gasymov, E K

    1989-11-01

    By means of macro-microscopical preparation methods, horseradish peroxidase injection, semithin sections, electron microscopy histotopography and composition of microvessels of the sciatic nerve have been studied in 20 mature male white rats. The perineural membrane has been stated to have no its own vascular network. In composition of the sciatic nerve and its large branches muscular venules are revealed; they run longitudinally along the whole length of the endoneural space and are tributaries of the epineural veins. A suggestion is made that presence of the contractile apparatus in the venular wall can play an important role in formation of the postcapillary resistance, regulating the hydrostatic pressure value in the lumen of endoneural capillaries ad intensity of liquor filtration into the interstitial space. PMID:2483607

  19. Does antidromic activation of nociceptors play a role in sciatic radicular pain?

    PubMed

    Xavier, A V; Farrell, C E; McDanal, J; Kissin, I

    1990-01-01

    We describe a case where transcutaneous electrical stimulation of the right sciatic nerve in a patient with right L5 radiculopathy reproduced the patient's pathological pain in the leg. Following a right ankle block with 0.5% bupivacaine, the sciatic nerve stimulation induced pain in the thigh and the calf but not in the foot. Despite an increase in the magnitude of stimulation by 50% (compared with the stimulation before the block) the pain was not perceived below the level of blockade. We suggest that in this case the electrical stimulation generated impulses propagated antidromically into the leg and activated nociceptors in it. The bupivacaine blockade prevented antidromic propagation of impulses into the foot, therefore pain in this region was not perceived. PMID:2339019

  20. Berberine Ameliorates Allodynia Induced by Chronic Constriction Injury of the Sciatic Nerve in Rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Jee

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether berberine could ameliorate allodynia induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve in rats. After inducement of CCI, significant increases in the number of paw lifts from a cold plate test (cold allodynia) and decreased paw withdrawal threshold in the von Frey hair stimulation test (mechanical allodynia) were observed. However, these cold and mechanical allodynia were markedly alleviated by berberine administration in a dose-dependent manner. Sciatic nerve myeloperoxidase and malondialdehyde activities were also attenuated by berberine administration. Continuous injection for 7 days induced no development of tolerance. The antiallodynic effect of 20 mg/kg berberine was comparable to that of amitriptyline 10 mg/kg. This study demonstrated that berberine could mitigate allodynia induced by CCI, a neuropathic pain model, and it suggested that the anti-inflammatory and antioxidative properties of berberine contributed to the antiallodynic effect in the CCI model. PMID:25674823

  1. Nanoparticles carrying neurotrophin-3-modified Schwann cells promote repair of sciatic nerve defects

    PubMed Central

    Zong, Haibin; Zhao, Hongxing; Zhao, Yilei; Jia, Jingling; Yang, Libin; Ma, Chao; Zhang, Yang; Dong, Yuzhen

    2013-01-01

    Schwann cells and neurotrophin-3 play an important role in neural regeneration, but the secretion of neurotrophin-3 from Schwann cells is limited, and exogenous neurotrophin-3 is inactived easily in vivo. In this study, we have transfected neurotrophin-3 into Schwann cells cultured in vitro using nanoparticle liposomes. Results showed that neurotrophin-3 was successfully transfected into Schwann cells, where it was expressed effectively and steadily. A composite of Schwann cells transfected with neurotrophin-3 and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) biodegradable conduits was transplanted into rats to repair 10-mm sciatic nerve defects. Transplantation of the composite scaffold could restore the myoelectricity and wave amplitude of the sciatic nerve by electrophysiological examination, promote nerve axonal and myelin regeneration, and delay apoptosis of spinal motor neurons. Experimental findings indicate that neurotrophin-3 transfected Schwann cells combined with bridge grafting can promote neural regeneration and functional recovery after nerve injury. PMID:25206420

  2. Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell and Vein Conduit on Sciatic Nerve Repair in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Seyed Foroutan, Kamal; Khodarahmi, Ali; Alavi, Hootan; Pedram, Sepehr; Baghaban Eslaminejad, Mohamad Reza; Bordbar, Sima

    2015-01-01

    Background: Peripheral nerve repair with sufficient functional recovery is an important issue in reconstructive surgery. Stem cells have attracted extensive research interest in recent years. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare the vein conduit technique, with and without the addition of mesenchymal stem cells in gap-less nerve injury repair in rats. Materials and Methods: In this study, 36 Wistar rats were randomly allocated to three groups: In the first group, nerve repair was performed with simple neurorrhaphy (control group), in the second group, nerve repair was done with vein conduit over site (vein conduit group) and in the third group, bone marrow stem cells were instilled into the vein conduit (stem cell group) after nerve repair with vein conduit over site. Six weeks after the intervention, the sciatic function index, electrophysiological study and histological examination were performed. Results: All animals tolerated the surgical procedures and survived well. The sciatic function index and latency were significantly improved in the vein conduit (P = 0.04 and 0.03, respectively) and stem cell group (P = 0.02 and 0.03, respectively) compared with the control group. No significant difference was observed in sciatic function and latency between the vein conduit and stem-cell groups. Moreover, histological analysis showed no significant difference in regenerative density between these two groups. Conclusions: The results of this study showed that the meticulous microsurgical nerve repair, which was performed using the vein tubulization induced significantly better sciatic nerve regeneration. However, the addition of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell to vein conduit failed to promote any significant changes in regeneration outcome. PMID:25825699

  3. Reduced Renshaw Recurrent Inhibition after Neonatal Sciatic Nerve Crush in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Liang; Su, Jingjing; Jing, Lingyan; Huang, Ying; Di, Yu; Peng, Lichao; Liu, Jianren

    2014-01-01

    Renshaw recurrent inhibition (RI) plays an important gated role in spinal motion circuit. Peripheral nerve injury is a common disease in clinic. Our current research was designed to investigate the change of the recurrent inhibitory function in the spinal cord after the peripheral nerve crush injury in neonatal rat. Sciatic nerve crush was performed on 5-day-old rat puppies and the recurrent inhibition between lateral gastrocnemius-soleus (LG-S) and medial gastrocnemius (MG) motor pools was assessed by conditioning monosynaptic reflexes (MSR) elicited from the sectioned dorsal roots and recorded either from the LG-S and MG nerves by antidromic stimulation of the synergist muscle nerve. Our results demonstrated that the MSR recorded from both LG-S or MG nerves had larger amplitude and longer latency after neonatal sciatic nerve crush. The RI in both LG-S and MG motoneuron pools was significantly reduced to virtual loss (15–20% of the normal RI size) even after a long recovery period upto 30 weeks after nerve crush. Further, the degree of the RI reduction after tibial nerve crush was much less than that after sciatic nerve crush indicatig that the neuron-muscle disconnection time is vital to the recovery of the spinal neuronal circuit function during reinnervation. In addition, sciatic nerve crush injury did not cause any spinal motor neuron loss but severally damaged peripheral muscle structure and function. In conclusion, our results suggest that peripheral nerve injury during neonatal early development period would cause a more sever spinal cord inhibitory circuit damage, particularly to the Renshaw recurrent inhibition pathway, which might be the target of neuroregeneration therapy. PMID:24778886

  4. The adductor part of the adductor magnus is innervated by both obturator and sciatic nerves.

    PubMed

    Takizawa, Megumi; Suzuki, Daisuke; Ito, Hajime; Fujimiya, Mineko; Uchiyama, Eiichi

    2014-07-01

    The hip adductor group, innervated predominantly by the obturator nerve, occupies a large volume of the lower limb. However, case reports of patients with obturator nerve palsy or denervation have described no more than minimal gait disturbance. Those facts are surprising, given the architectural characteristics of the hip adductors. Our aim was to investigate which regions of the adductor magnus are innervated by the obturator nerve and by which sciatic nerve and to consider the clinical implications. Twenty-one lower limbs were examined from 21 formalin-fixed cadavers, 18 males and 3 females. The adductor magnus was dissected and was divided into four parts (AM1-AM4) based on the locations of the perforating arteries and the adductor hiatus. AM1 was supplied solely by the obturator nerve. AM2, AM3, and AM4 received innervation from both the posterior branch of the obturator nerve and the tibial nerve portion of the sciatic nerve in 2 (9.5%), 20 (95.2%), and 6 (28.6%) of the cadavers, respectively. The double innervation in more than 90% of the AM3s is especially noteworthy. Generally, AM1-AM3 corresponds to the adductor part, traditionally characterized as innervated by the obturator nerve, and AM4 corresponds to the hamstrings part, innervated by the sciatic nerve. Here, we showed that the sciatic nerve supplies not only the hamstrings part but also the adductor part. These two nerves spread more widely than has generally been believed, which could have practical implications for the assessment and treatment of motor disability. PMID:23813615

  5. Facial neuropathy with imaging enhancement of the facial nerve: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Mumtaz, Sehreen; Jensen, Matthew B

    2014-01-01

    A young women developed unilateral facial neuropathy 2 weeks after a motor vehicle collision involving fractures of the skull and mandible. MRI showed contrast enhancement of the facial nerve. We review the literature describing facial neuropathy after trauma and facial nerve enhancement patterns with different causes of facial neuropathy. PMID:25574155

  6. [Acro-osteolysis with hereditary sensory ulcero-mutilating neuropathy. Apropos of an atypical case].

    PubMed

    Carabelli, A; Ruggeri, R; Pessina, R; Cerri, D; Bertani, E

    1989-01-01

    The authors report an acroosteolysis case with sensory radicular ulcero-mutilating neuropathy. The differential diagnosis are discussed and the case is presented as an intermediate form between the congenital sensory neuropathy, type II, according to Otha classification, and the non-progressive, sporadical sensory neuropathy. PMID:2638645

  7. Restorative effect and mechanism of mecobalamin on sciatic nerve crush injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Gan, Lin; Qian, Minquan; Shi, Keqin; Chen, Gang; Gu, Yanglin; Du, Wei; Zhu, Guoxing

    2014-11-15

    Mecobalamin, a form of vitamin B12 containing a central metal element (cobalt), is one of the most important mediators of nervous system function. In the clinic, it is often used to accelerate recovery of peripheral nerves, but its molecular mechanism remains unclear. In the present study, we performed sciatic nerve crush injury in mice, followed by daily intraperitoneal administration of mecobalamin (65 μg/kg or 130 μg/kg) or saline (negative control). Walking track analysis, histomorphological examination, and quantitative real-time PCR showed that mecobalamin significantly improved functional recovery of the sciatic nerve, thickened the myelin sheath in myelinated nerve fibers, and increased the cross-sectional area of target muscle cells. Furthermore, mecobalamin upregulated mRNA expression of growth associated protein 43 in nerve tissue ipsilateral to the injury, and of neurotrophic factors (nerve growth factor, brain-derived nerve growth factor and ciliary neurotrophic factor) in the L4-6 dorsal root ganglia. Our findings indicate that the molecular mechanism underlying the therapeutic effect of mecobalamin after sciatic nerve injury involves the upregulation of multiple neurotrophic factor genes. PMID:25598780

  8. Restorative effect and mechanism of mecobalamin on sciatic nerve crush injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Lin; Qian, Minquan; Shi, Keqin; Chen, Gang; Gu, Yanglin; Du, Wei; Zhu, Guoxing

    2014-01-01

    Mecobalamin, a form of vitamin B12 containing a central metal element (cobalt), is one of the most important mediators of nervous system function. In the clinic, it is often used to accelerate recovery of peripheral nerves, but its molecular mechanism remains unclear. In the present study, we performed sciatic nerve crush injury in mice, followed by daily intraperitoneal administration of mecobalamin (65 μg/kg or 130 μg/kg) or saline (negative control). Walking track analysis, histomorphological examination, and quantitative real-time PCR showed that mecobalamin significantly improved functional recovery of the sciatic nerve, thickened the myelin sheath in myelinated nerve fibers, and increased the cross-sectional area of target muscle cells. Furthermore, mecobalamin upregulated mRNA expression of growth associated protein 43 in nerve tissue ipsilateral to the injury, and of neurotrophic factors (nerve growth factor, brain-derived nerve growth factor and ciliary neurotrophic factor) in the L4–6 dorsal root ganglia. Our findings indicate that the molecular mechanism underlying the therapeutic effect of mecobalamin after sciatic nerve injury involves the upregulation of multiple neurotrophic factor genes. PMID:25598780

  9. Menatetrenone ameliorates reduction in bone mineral density and bone strength in sciatic neurectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki-Ishizuka, Yoshiko; Yamato, Hideyuki; Murayama, Hisashi; Abe, Masako; Takahashi, Kei; Kurokawa, Kiyoshi; Fukagawa, Masafumi; Ezawa, Ikuko

    2003-08-01

    Vitamin K2 (menaquinone) acts on the bone metabolism. Menatetrenon (MK-4) is a vitamin K2 homologue that has been used as a therapeutic agent for osteoporosis in Japan. Rat models of immobilization induced by sciatic neurectomy are characterized by transiently increased bone resorption and sustained reduction in bone formation. Using such a rat model, we investigated the efficacy of MK-4 on bone loss. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to unilateral sciatic neurectomy and administered MK-4 for 28 d beginning day 21 after operation. The effect of MK-4 on the immobilized bone was assessed by measuring the bone mineral density of the femur, breaking force of the femoral diaphysis, and bone histomorphometry in tibial diaphysis. The BMD on both the femoral distal metaphysis and diaphysis was reduced by sciatic neurectomy. The administration of MK-4 ameliorated this reduction in a dose-dependent manner. The administration of 30 mg/kg MK-4 ameliorated the reduction in bone strength. An improvement in bone formation was observed following the administration of MK-4. These results suggest that MK-4 has a therapeutic potential for immobilization-induced osteopenia. PMID:14598912

  10. Dynamic observation of biomechanic properties of sciatic nerve at the suture site in rats following repairing.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Baoguo; Zhang, Peixun; Yan, Jiazhi; Zhang, Hongbo

    2008-01-01

    To observe the biomechanic properties of the sciatic nerve at the suture site following repairing in rats. The right sciatic nerves of 40 white Sprague-Dawley 300~350 gm rats were exposed, cut and then repaired with 10-0 nylon sutures with four stitches, laced in the epineurium 0, 1, 3, and 6 weeks after operation, the tensile strength of the sciatic nerves were measured, and the data analyzed statistically. The load elongation curves for both the normal unoperated and operated nerves had similar shape. There were significant differences between the tensile strength of the 0th and the 1st, 3rd, and 6th weeks (P < 0.01). No significant difference was found among the 1st, 3rd, and 6th weeks. The tensile strength of the injured nerves recovered 48% of the normal nerve in the 1st week and 54% in 6 weeks after repairing. It may be concluded that the injured nerves can acquire mostly tensile strength stability in 1 week quickly and can maintain this relative tensile strength stability in 6 weeks. PMID:18293160

  11. Histopathological changes in the periphery of the sciatic nerve of rats after knee joint immobilization.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Shinya; Matsuzaki, Taro; Kamijo, Akio; Araki, Yoshitaka; Sakamoto, Makoto; Moriyama, Shigenori; Hoso, Masahiro

    2013-05-01

    [Purpose] This study was performed to investigate the histological changes that occur in the periphery of the sciatic nerve in rats undergoing knee immobilization. [Subjects and Methods] 29 male 9-week-old Wistar rats were divided randomly into a control group (C group, n = 7) and an immobilized group (I group, n = 22). The animals in the I group had the left knee joint immobilized in maximal flexion with plaster casts for two weeks. After the experimental period, we obtained cross-sections of tissues from the center of the left thigh, and the periphery of the sciatic nerve was observed under an optical microscope after hematoxylin-eosin staining. [Results] In contrast to the rats of C group, the rats in I group showed adherence between the bundle of nerve fibers and perineurium, as well as thickening of the perineurium. These histological changes were statistically significant. [Conclusions] Immobilization of the knee joints of rats resulted in characteristic histological changes in the connective tissue around the sciatic nerve. PMID:24259816

  12. Effect of Frankincense Extract on Nerve Recovery in the Rat Sciatic Nerve Damage Model

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xiaowen; Ma, Jun; Wei, Qingwei; Feng, Xinxin; Qiao, Lu; Liu, Lin; Zhang, Binqing; Yu, Wenhui

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of frankincense extract on peripheral nerve regeneration in a crush injury rat model. Forty-eight Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups: control and frankincense extract low-, medium-, and high-dose groups. At days 7, 14, 21, and 28 following the surgery, nerve regeneration and functional recovery were evaluated using the sciatic functional index (SFI), expression of GAP-43, and the proliferation of Schwann cells (SCs) in vivo and in vitro. At day 7, the SFI in the frankincense extract high-dose group was significantly improved compared with the control group. After day 14, SFI was significantly improved in the medium- and high-dose groups. There was no significant difference in GAP-43 expression among the groups at day 7. However, after day 14, expression of GAP-43 in the high-dose group was higher than that in the control group. Histological evaluation showed that the injured nerve of frankincense extract high-dose group recovered better than the other groups 28 days after surgery. Further, S100 immunohistochemical staining, MTT colorimetry, and flow cytometry assays all showed that frankincense extract could promote the proliferation of SCs. In conclusion, frankincense extract is able to promote sciatic nerve regeneration and improve the function of a crushed sciatic nerve. This study provides a new direction for the repair of peripheral nerve injury. PMID:27143985

  13. Synergistic effects of micropatterned biodegradable conduits and Schwann cells on sciatic nerve regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutkowski, Gregory E.; Miller, Cheryl A.; Jeftinija, Srdija; Mallapragada, Surya K.

    2004-09-01

    This paper describes a novel biodegradable conduit that provides a combination of physical, chemical and biological cues at the cellular level to facilitate peripheral nerve regeneration. The conduit consists of a porous poly(D,L-lactic acid) (PDLLA) tubular support structure with a micropatterned inner lumen. Schwann cells were pre-seeded into the lumen to provide additional trophic support. Conduits with micropatterned inner lumens pre-seeded with Schwann cells (MS) were fabricated and compared with three types of conduits used as controls: M (conduits with micropatterned inner lumens without pre-seeded Schwann cells), NS (conduits without micropatterned inner lumens pre-seeded with Schwann cells) and N (conduits without micropatterned inner lumens, without pre-seeded Schwann cells). The conduits were implanted in rats with 1 cm sciatic nerve transections and the regeneration and functional recovery were compared in the four different cases. The number or size of regenerated axons did not vary significantly among the different conduits. The time of recovery, and the sciatic function index, however, were significantly enhanced using the MS conduits, based on qualitative observations as well as quantitative measurements using walking track analysis. This demonstrates that biodegradable micropatterned conduits pre-seeded with Schwann cells that provide a combination of physical, chemical and biological guidance cues for regenerating axons at the cellular level offer a better alternative for repairing sciatic nerve transactions than conventional biodegradable conduits.

  14. High voltage pulsed current stimulation of the sciatic nerve in rats: analysis by the SFI

    PubMed Central

    Leoni, Anita Sofia Leite; Mazzer, Nilton; Guirro, Rinaldo Roberto de Jesus; Jatte, Fernanda Guadallini; Chereguini, Paulo Augusto Costa; Monte-Raso, Vanessa Vilela

    2012-01-01

    Objective To analyze the efficiency of high voltage pulsed current (HVPC) with early application in three different sites, in the regeneration of the sciatic nerve in rats submitted to crush injury, the sciatic functional index (SFI) was used to assess the functional recovery. Methods After crushing of the nerve, 57 animals were submitted to cathodal HVPC at frequency of 50Hz and voltage of 100V, 20 minutes per day, 5 days per week. The rats were divided into five groups: control group; ganglion group; ganglion + muscle group; muscle group; and sham group. The SFI was determined weekly for seven weeks, from the preoperative period to the 6th postoperative week. Results Compared with the control group, the results showed a significantly better performance of group 2 for the first 3 weeks; group 3 showed significantly better performance in the third week; and group 4 showed a significantly negative performance during the 4th and 6th weeks. Conclusion Early application of HVPC had a positive effect in the treatment of the spinal cord region and the sciatic nerve root ganglion with a dispersive electrode on the contralateral lumbar region or on the gastrocnemius. However, HVPC had a negative effect in the treatment with an active electrode on the gastrocnemius and a dispersive electrode on the contralateral thigh. Level of evidence II, Prospective comparative study. PMID:24453588

  15. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Enhance Nerve Regeneration in a Rat Sciatic Nerve Repair and Hindlimb Transplant Model

    PubMed Central

    Cooney, Damon S.; Wimmers, Eric G.; Ibrahim, Zuhaib; Grahammer, Johanna; Christensen, Joani M.; Brat, Gabriel A.; Wu, Lehao W.; Sarhane, Karim A.; Lopez, Joseph; Wallner, Christoph; Furtmüller, Georg J.; Yuan, Nance; Pang, John; Sarkar, Kakali; Lee, W. P. Andrew; Brandacher, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the efficacy of local and intravenous mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) administration to augment neuroregeneration in both a sciatic nerve cut-and-repair and rat hindlimb transplant model. Bone marrow-derived MSCs were harvested and purified from Brown-Norway (BN) rats. Sciatic nerve transections and repairs were performed in three groups of Lewis (LEW) rats: negative controls (n = 4), local MSCs (epineural) injection (n = 4), and systemic MSCs (intravenous) injection (n = 4). Syngeneic (LEW-LEW) (n = 4) and allogeneic (BN-LEW) (n = 4) hindlimb transplants were performed and assessed for neuroregeneration after local or systemic MSC treatment. Rats undergoing sciatic nerve cut-and-repair and treated with either local or systemic injection of MSCs had significant improvement in the speed of recovery of compound muscle action potential amplitudes and axon counts when compared with negative controls. Similarly, rats undergoing allogeneic hindlimb transplants treated with local injection of MSCs exhibited significantly increased axon counts. Similarly, systemic MSC treatment resulted in improved nerve regeneration following allogeneic hindlimb transplants. Systemic administration had a more pronounced effect on electromotor recovery while local injection was more effective at increasing fiber counts, suggesting different targets of action. Local and systemic MSC injections significantly improve the pace and degree of nerve regeneration after nerve injury and hindlimb transplantation. PMID:27510321

  16. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Enhance Nerve Regeneration in a Rat Sciatic Nerve Repair and Hindlimb Transplant Model.

    PubMed

    Cooney, Damon S; Wimmers, Eric G; Ibrahim, Zuhaib; Grahammer, Johanna; Christensen, Joani M; Brat, Gabriel A; Wu, Lehao W; Sarhane, Karim A; Lopez, Joseph; Wallner, Christoph; Furtmüller, Georg J; Yuan, Nance; Pang, John; Sarkar, Kakali; Lee, W P Andrew; Brandacher, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the efficacy of local and intravenous mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) administration to augment neuroregeneration in both a sciatic nerve cut-and-repair and rat hindlimb transplant model. Bone marrow-derived MSCs were harvested and purified from Brown-Norway (BN) rats. Sciatic nerve transections and repairs were performed in three groups of Lewis (LEW) rats: negative controls (n = 4), local MSCs (epineural) injection (n = 4), and systemic MSCs (intravenous) injection (n = 4). Syngeneic (LEW-LEW) (n = 4) and allogeneic (BN-LEW) (n = 4) hindlimb transplants were performed and assessed for neuroregeneration after local or systemic MSC treatment. Rats undergoing sciatic nerve cut-and-repair and treated with either local or systemic injection of MSCs had significant improvement in the speed of recovery of compound muscle action potential amplitudes and axon counts when compared with negative controls. Similarly, rats undergoing allogeneic hindlimb transplants treated with local injection of MSCs exhibited significantly increased axon counts. Similarly, systemic MSC treatment resulted in improved nerve regeneration following allogeneic hindlimb transplants. Systemic administration had a more pronounced effect on electromotor recovery while local injection was more effective at increasing fiber counts, suggesting different targets of action. Local and systemic MSC injections significantly improve the pace and degree of nerve regeneration after nerve injury and hindlimb transplantation. PMID:27510321

  17. Chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor promotes sciatic nerve repair

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanru; Zhang, Hui; Katiella, Kaka; Huang, Wenhua

    2014-01-01

    A chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft can reduce postoperative immune rejection, similar to an autologous nerve graft, and can guide neural regeneration. However, it remains poorly understood whether a chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with neurotrophic factors provides a good local environment for neural regeneration. This study investigated the repair of injured rat sciatic nerve using a chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor. An autologous nerve anastomosis group and a chemical acellular allogeneic nerve bridging group were prepared as controls. At 8 weeks after repair, sciatic functional index, evoked potential amplitude of the soleus muscle, triceps wet weight recovery rate, total number of myelinated nerve fibers and myelin sheath thickness were measured. For these indices, values in the three groups showed the autologous nerve anastomosis group > chemically extracted acellular nerve graft + ciliary neurotrophic factor group > chemical acellular allogeneic nerve bridging group. These results suggest that chemically extracted acellular nerve grafts combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor can repair sciatic nerve defects, and that this repair is inferior to autologous nerve anastomosis, but superior to chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve bridging alone. PMID:25221592

  18. Schisandrae Fructus Supplementation Ameliorates Sciatic Neurectomy-Induced Muscle Atrophy in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joo Wan; Ku, Sae-Kwang; Kim, Ki Young; Kim, Sung Goo; Han, Min Ho; Kim, Gi-Young; Hwang, Hye Jin; Kim, Byung Woo; Kim, Cheol Min

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the possible beneficial skeletal muscle preserving effects of ethanol extract of Schisandrae Fructus (EESF) on sciatic neurectomy- (NTX-) induced hindlimb muscle atrophy in mice. Here, calf muscle atrophy was induced by unilateral right sciatic NTX. In order to investigate whether administration of EESF prevents or improves sciatic NTX-induced muscle atrophy, EESF was administered orally. Our results indicated that EESF dose-dependently diminished the decreases in markers of muscle mass and activity levels, and the increases in markers of muscle damage and fibrosis, inflammatory cell infiltration, cytokines, and apoptotic events in the gastrocnemius muscle bundles are induced by NTX. Additionally, destruction of gastrocnemius antioxidant defense systems after NTX was dose-dependently protected by treatment with EESF. EESF also upregulated muscle-specific mRNAs involved in muscle protein synthesis but downregulated those involved in protein degradation. The overall effects of 500 mg/kg EESF were similar to those of 50 mg/kg oxymetholone, but it showed more favorable antioxidant effects. The present results suggested that EESF exerts a favorable ameliorating effect on muscle atrophy induced by NTX, through anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects related to muscle fiber protective effects and via an increase in protein synthesis and a decrease in protein degradation. PMID:26064425

  19. Effect of MSH/ACTH peptides on fast axonal transport in intact and regenerating sciatic nerves

    SciTech Connect

    Crescitelli, L.A.

    1985-01-01

    Fast axonal transport was examined in intact rats treated with ACTH 4-10 or ACTH 4-9 (ORG 2766), hypophysectomized rats, adrenalectomized rats, and in ACTH 4-10 treated rats with crushed regenerating sciatic nerves by injecting /sup 3/H-leucine into the ventral horn region of the spinal cord. The distance traveled by the transported activity along the sciatic nerve and the rate of fast axonal transport were not significantly altered as a result of treatment with ACTH 4-10, ACTH 4-9 (ORG 2766), hypophysectomy, or adrenalectomy. Treatment with ACTH 4-9 (ORG 2766) at concentrations of 1 ..mu..g/Kg /day and 10 ..mu..g/Kg/day caused significant reductions (62% and 64% respectively) in the crest height of the fast axonal transport curve as compared to 0.9% saline treated control animals. No significant differences were found in comparing the distance, rate, slope, or crest height of ACTH 4-10 treated animals with crushed regenerating (7 or 14d) sciatic nerves to control animals. In the group of animals in days, the amount of radiolabeled activity was significantly increased in the ACTH 4-10 treated animals as compared to control animals. The results indicate that during regeneration the peptide acts to prolong the initially high levels of synthetic activity which occur in regenerating axons.

  20. Changes in the cholinergic system of rat sciatic nerve and skeletal muscle following suspension induced disuse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, R. C.; Misulis, K. E.; Dettbarn, W. D.

    1984-01-01

    Muscle disused induced changes in the cholinergic system of sciatic nerve, slow twitch soleus (SOL) and fast twitch extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle were studied in rats. Rats with hindlimbs suspended for 2 to 3 weeks showed marked elevation in the activity of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) in sciatic nerve (38%), in SOL (108%) and in EDL (67%). Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in SOL increased by 163% without changing the molecular forms pattern of 4S, 10S, 12S, and 16S. No significant changes in activity and molecular forms pattern of AChE were seen in EDL or in AChE activity of sciatic nerve. Nicotinic receptor binding of 3H-acetylcholine was increased in both muscles. When measured after 3 weeks of hindlimb suspension the normal distribution of type 1 fibers in SOL was reduced and a corresponding increase in type IIa and IIb fibers is seen. In EDL no significant change in fiber proportion is observed. Muscle activity, such as loadbearing, appears to have a greater controlling influence on the characteristics of the slow twitch SOL muscle than upon the fast twitch EDL muscle.

  1. Periodical assessment of electrophysiological recovery following sciatic nerve crush via surface stimulation in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yaxian; Wang, Hongkui; Mi, Daguo; Gu, Xiaosong; Hu, Wen

    2015-03-01

    When evaluating peripheral nerve regeneration, electrophysiological test is recognized as an optimal assessment, which is a quantitative, objective, and direct evidence reflecting function as compared to morphological examinations. In murine models of nerve regeneration, however, it remains a challenge to record compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs) periodically and non-invasively, i.e., with no insult to the nerve. In the present study, we recorded CMAPs in the gastrocnemius muscle weekly until 8 weeks after sciatic nerve crush by stimulating the nerve in a surface manner, and the electric stimuli were delivered to the skin between ischial tuberosity and major trochanter using bipolar hook electrodes. The CMAPs were reproducibly recorded in this way from 3 weeks post-injury, and both amplitude and latency were well correlated to post-operative time. Furthermore, a strong positive correlation was observed between CMAP amplitude and sciatic function index (SFI), a well-recognized assessment for sciatic nerve function. CMAP recordings by direct nerve stimulation at 8 weeks post-injury showed no significant difference in amplitude compared to surface stimulation, but the peak latency was relatively longer than the latter. This study indicated that non-invasive surface stimulation-based periodical recording of CMAPs was a practical electrophysiological approach to monitor the progression of peripheral nerve regeneration in murine models. PMID:25394740

  2. The effect of chick embryo amniotic fluid on sciatic nerve regeneration of rats

    PubMed Central

    Farjah, Gh. H.; Fazli, F.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this experimental study was to evaluate the effect of chicken amniotic fluid (AF) on a cross section of rat sciatic nerves. Thirty adult male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 275 to 300 g, were randomized into three groups treated with (1) amniotic fluid or AF (n=10), (2) normal saline or NS (n=10), and (3) sham surgery (n=10). The AF was aspirated from the amniotic cavity of incubating chick embryos at day 14. The sciatic nerve was exposed and sharply transected. Immediate epineurial repair was then performed. AF treated animals were given 2 ml/kg of the chick embryo AF subcutaneously, once daily, five times a week for up to 2 weeks. All animals were evaluated by sciatic functional index (SFI), electrophysiology, histology, and immunohistochemistry at days 28 and 56 after surgery. The SFI difference between AF and NS groups at days 21 and 28 after operation was statistically significant (P<0.05). The number of myelinated fibers in the AF group was significantly greater than that of the NS group at day 28 (P<0.05). At days 28 and 56 after operation, the nerve conduction velocity (NCV) mean of the AF group was faster than that of the NS group, but the difference was not statistically significant (P>0.05). The results of this study demonstrate that chick AF can enhance peripheral nerve regeneration. PMID:27175170

  3. Human distal sciatic nerve fascicular anatomy: implications for ankle control using nerve-cuff electrodes.

    PubMed

    Gustafson, Kenneth J; Grinberg, Yanina; Joseph, Sheeba; Triolo, Ronald J

    2012-01-01

    The design of neural prostheses to restore standing balance, prevent foot drop, or provide active propulsion during ambulation requires detailed knowledge of the distal sciatic nerve anatomy. Three complete sciatic nerves and branches were dissected from the piriformis to each muscle entry point to characterize the branching patterns and diameters. Fascicle maps were created from serial sections of each distal terminus below the knee through the anastomosis of the tibial and common fibular nerves above the knee. Similar branching patterns and fascicle maps were observed across specimens. Fascicles innervating primary plantar flexors, dorsiflexors, invertors, and evertors were distinctly separate and functionally organized in the proximal tibial, common fibular, and distal sciatic nerves; however, fascicles from individual muscles were not apparent at these levels. The fascicular organization is conducive to selective stimulation for isolated and/or balanced dorsiflexion, plantar flexion, eversion, and inversion through a single multicontact nerve-cuff electrode. These neuroanatomical data are being used to design nerve-cuff electrodes for selective control of ankle movement and improve current lower-limb neural prostheses. PMID:22773531

  4. Chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor promotes sciatic nerve repair.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanru; Zhang, Hui; Katiella, Kaka; Huang, Wenhua

    2014-07-15

    A chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft can reduce postoperative immune rejection, similar to an autologous nerve graft, and can guide neural regeneration. However, it remains poorly understood whether a chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with neurotrophic factors provides a good local environment for neural regeneration. This study investigated the repair of injured rat sciatic nerve using a chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor. An autologous nerve anastomosis group and a chemical acellular allogeneic nerve bridging group were prepared as controls. At 8 weeks after repair, sciatic functional index, evoked potential amplitude of the soleus muscle, triceps wet weight recovery rate, total number of myelinated nerve fibers and myelin sheath thickness were measured. For these indices, values in the three groups showed the autologous nerve anastomosis group > chemically extracted acellular nerve graft + ciliary neurotrophic factor group > chemical acellular allogeneic nerve bridging group. These results suggest that chemically extracted acellular nerve grafts combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor can repair sciatic nerve defects, and that this repair is inferior to autologous nerve anastomosis, but superior to chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve bridging alone. PMID:25221592

  5. Atorvastatin is beneficial for muscle reinnervation after complete sciatic nerve section in rats.

    PubMed

    Cloutier, Frédéric-Charles; Rouleau, Dominique M; Hébert-Davies, Jonah; Beaumont, Pierre H; Beaumont, Eric

    2013-12-01

    Nerve regeneration and functional recovery are often incomplete after peripheral neurotmetic lesion. Atorvastatin has been shown to be neuroprotective after transient ischaemia or traumatic injury. The aim of this study was to establish if systemic administration of Atorvastatin could improve functional muscle reinnervation after complete sciatic nerve section. Sixteen female Sprague-Dawley rats were used in this study. After a complete right sciatic nerve section, end-to-end microsuture repair was performed and fibrin glue was added. Three groups were studied: (1) sutures (S) + fibrin glue (F) only + saline administration for 14 days; (2) S+F+Atorvastatin administration for 14 days; and (3) uninjured nerve. Five months later, the sciatic nerve and the gastrocnemius muscle were isolated to perform in vivo electrophysiological measurements. Better kinematics was observed in atorvastatin-treated rats 5 months after its administration. Indeed, a larger excursion of the hip-ankle-toe angle during walking was observed. This effect was associated with the preservation of electromyographic activity (2.91 mV vs 0.77 mV) and maximal muscle force (85.1 g vs 28.6 g) on stimulation of the proximal nerve section. Five months after a neurotmetic lesion, the recovery is incomplete when using suture and fibrin glue only. Furthermore, the systemic administration of Atorvastatin for 14 days after lesion was beneficial in improving locomotion capability associated with the re-establishment of muscle strength and EMG activity. PMID:23848426

  6. Image analysis software for following progression of peripheral neuropathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epplin-Zapf, Thomas; Miller, Clayton; Larkin, Sean; Hermesmeyer, Eduardo; Macy, Jenny; Pellegrini, Marco; Luccarelli, Saverio; Staurenghi, Giovanni; Holmes, Timothy

    2009-02-01

    A relationship has been reported by several research groups [1 - 4] between the density and shapes of nerve fibers in the cornea and the existence and severity of peripheral neuropathy. Peripheral neuropathy is a complication of several prevalent diseases or conditions, which include diabetes, HIV, prolonged alcohol overconsumption and aging. A common clinical technique for confirming the condition is intramuscular electromyography (EMG), which is invasive, so a noninvasive technique like the one proposed here carries important potential advantages for the physician and patient. A software program that automatically detects the nerve fibers, counts them and measures their shapes is being developed and tested. Tests were carried out with a database of subjects with levels of severity of diabetic neuropathy as determined by EMG testing. Results from this testing, that include a linear regression analysis are shown.

  7. Epidermal Nerve Fiber Quantification in the Assessment of Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Beiswenger, Kristina K.; Calcutt, Nigel A.; Mizisin, Andrew P.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Assessment of cutaneous innervation in skin biopsies is emerging as a valuable means of both diagnosing and staging diabetic neuropathy. Immunolabeling, using antibodies to neuronal proteins such as protein gene product 9.5, allows for the visualization and quantification of intraepidermal nerve fibers. Multiple studies have shown reductions in intraepidermal nerve fiber density in skin biopsies from patients with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. More recent studies have focused on correlating these changes with other measures of diabetic neuropathy. A loss of epidermal innervation similar to that observed in diabetic patients has been observed in rodent models of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes and several therapeutics have been reported to prevent reductions in intraepidermal nerve fiber density in these models. This review discusses the current literature describing diabetes-induced changes in cutaneous innervation in both human and animal models of diabetic neuropathy. PMID:18384843

  8. Clinical and pathological features of an autosomal recessive neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Bouldin, T W; Riley, E; Hall, C D; Swift, M

    1980-06-01

    Two siblings are described, ages 49 and 45 years, having a distinct hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN) with severe peroneal nerve involvement. The neuropathic symptoms began in childhood. Both patients have sensorineural deafness. The proband was found to have a cardiac conduction abnormality in the absence of known ischemic heart disease. Electrodiagnostic studies were consistent with a demyelinating peripheral neuropathy. The presence of parental consanguinity and absence of affected individuals in succeeding or preceding generations suggested that the sensorimotor neuropathy in this family is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. The sural nerve of the proband had significant loss of myelinated fibers and demyelination but few regenerating myelinated fibers and no onion-bulbs. The pathological findings, while nonspecific, are not characteristic of the hypertrophic, neuronal or intermediate types of HMSN. PMID:6247456

  9. Precise correlation between structural and electrophysiological disturbances in MADSAM neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Simon, Neil G; Kiernan, Matthew C

    2015-11-01

    Multifocal acquired demyelinating sensory and motor neuropathy is characterised by multifocal clinical deficits. Imaging studies have identified multifocal enlargements of nerve trunks, but a precise correlation between structural abnormalities and electrophysiological dysfunction has not been elucidated. Two patients diagnosed with multifocal acquired demyelinating sensory and motor neuropathy were evaluated with nerve conduction studies, including short segment nerve conduction studies to precisely localise motor conduction block, and ultrasound studies of corresponding nerve trunks. Motor conduction block was identified in each patient (upper limb nerves in two patients), superimposed on additional demyelinating neurophysiological features. Upper limb ultrasound studies demonstrated focal nerve enlargement that precisely correlated with neurophysiological conduction block. The results of this study suggest that factors contributing to focal structural abnormalities in multifocal acquired demyelinating sensory and motor neuropathy are also those that produce conduction block. PMID:26314279

  10. Auditory Neuropathy/Dys-synchrony and Its Perceptual Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Rance, Gary

    2005-01-01

    Auditory neuropathy/dys-synchrony is a form of hearing impairment in which cochlear outer hair cell function is spared but neural transmission in the auditory pathway is disordered. This condition, or group of conditions with a common physiologic profile, accounts for approximately 7% of permanent childhood hearing loss and a significant (but as yet undetermined) proportion of adult impairment. This paper presents an overview of the mechanisms underlying auditory neuropathy/dys-synchrony-type hearing loss and the clinical profile for affected patients. In particular it examines the perceptual consequences of auditory neuropathy/dys-synchrony, which are quite different from those associated with sensorineural hearing loss, and considers currently available, and future management options. PMID:15920648

  11. [Electron microscopy as a tool for the diagnosis of neuropathies].

    PubMed

    Vallat, Jean-Michel; Richard, Laurence; Sindou, Philippe; Magy, Laurent

    2008-12-01

    Ultrastructural examination of a peripheral nerve biopsy may be particularly useful and sometimes indispensable for identification of the type of nerve lesion and of the aetiologies of peripheral neuropathies. The ultrastructural findings have, anyway, to be correlated with the clinical findings, the electrophysiological examination and the laboratory investigations. In this presentation, the various causes of peripheral neuropathies for which nerve biopsy study by electron microscope can provide diagnostic information are discussed. The principal aetiologies that will benefit from such an ultrastructural study are toxic, infectious, haemopathic and storage disorders. Chiefly for Charcot-Marie-Tooth sporadic cases, there are still indications for nerve biopsy to orientate diagnostic research in molecular biology. Sometimes, the electron microscopic examination will help to determine not only the cause of the peripheral neuropathy, but also the mechanism of nerve lesions which may induce specific and efficient treatments. PMID:19084717

  12. Retinal Failure in Diabetes: a Feature of Retinal Sensory Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Gray, Ellyn J; Gardner, Thomas W

    2015-12-01

    Physiologic adaptations mediate normal responses to short-term and long-term stresses to ensure organ function. Organ failure results if adaptive responses fail to resolve persistent stresses or maladaptive reactions develop. The retinal neurovascular unit likewise undergoes adaptive responses to diabetes resulting in a retinal sensory neuropathy analogous to other sensory neuropathies. Vision-threatening diabetic retinal neuropathy results from unremitting metabolic and inflammatory stresses, leading to macular edema and proliferative diabetic retinopathy, states of "retinal failure." Current regulatory strategies focus primarily on the retinal failure stages, but new diagnostic modalities and understanding of the pathophysiology of diabetic retinopathy may facilitate earlier treatment to maintain vision in persons with diabetes. PMID:26458378

  13. Is there a relationship between oral health and diabetic neuropathy?

    PubMed

    Borgnakke, Wenche S; Anderson, Patricia F; Shannon, Carol; Jivanescu, Anca

    2015-11-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is the most common microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus with high morbidity and mortality, and low quality of life. It has a broad spectrum of clinical forms, although distal symmetrical polyneuropathy is the most prevalent. Several oral complications including burning mouth syndrome, dry mouth, and impairment of the senses taste and smell are less-known manifestations of diabetic neuropathy and often overlooked. Periodontitis, tooth loss, and temporomandibular joint dysfunction may be also present in these patients and are equally debilitating. Periodontitis was declared the sixth complication of diabetes in 1993 and may contribute to poor glucose control. Hence, periodontitis and diabetes mutually and adversely affect each other. This review summarizes the available body of scientific literature that discusses oral manifestations in patients with diabetic neuropathy and identifies important areas where more research is needed. PMID:26374570

  14. Towards a Diagnosis of Cochlear Neuropathy with Envelope Following Responses.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, Luke A; Valero, Michelle D; Liberman, M Charles

    2015-12-01

    Listeners with normal audiometric thresholds can still have suprathreshold deficits, for example, in the ability to discriminate sounds in complex acoustic scenes. One likely source of these deficits is cochlear neuropathy, a loss of auditory nerve (AN) fibers without hair cell damage, which can occur due to both aging and moderate acoustic overexposure. Since neuropathy can affect up to 50 % of AN fibers, its impact on suprathreshold hearing is likely profound, but progress is hindered by lack of a robust non-invasive test of neuropathy in humans. Reduction of suprathreshold auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) can be used to quantify neuropathy in inbred mice. However, ABR amplitudes are highly variable in humans, and thus more challenging to use. Since noise-induced neuropathy is selective for AN fibers with high thresholds, and because phase locking to temporal envelopes is particularly strong in these fibers, the envelope following response (EFR) might be a more robust measure. We compared EFRs to sinusoidally amplitude-modulated tones and ABRs to tone-pips in mice following a neuropathic noise exposure. EFR amplitude, EFR phase-locking value, and ABR amplitude were all reduced in noise-exposed mice. However, the changes in EFRs were more robust: the variance was smaller, thus inter-group differences were clearer. Optimum detection of neuropathy was achieved with high modulation frequencies and moderate levels. Analysis of group delays was used to confirm that the AN population was dominating the responses at these high modulation frequencies. Application of these principles in clinical testing can improve the differential diagnosis of sensorineural hearing loss. PMID:26323349

  15. Painful neuropathies: the emerging role of sodium channelopathies.

    PubMed

    Brouwer, Brigitte A; Merkies, Ingemar S J; Gerrits, Monique M; Waxman, Stephen G; Hoeijmakers, Janneke G J; Faber, Catharina G

    2014-06-01

    Pain is a frequent debilitating feature reported in peripheral neuropathies with involvement of small nerve (Aδ and C) fibers. Voltage-gated sodium channels are responsible for the generation and conduction of action potentials in the peripheral nociceptive neuronal pathway where NaV 1.7, NaV 1.8, and NaV 1.9 sodium channels (encoded by SCN9A, SCN10A, and SCN11A) are preferentially expressed. The human genetic pain conditions inherited erythromelalgia and paroxysmal extreme pain disorder were the first to be linked to gain-of-function SCN9A mutations. Recent studies have expanded this spectrum with gain-of-function SCN9A mutations in patients with small fiber neuropathy and in a new syndrome of pain, dysautonomia, and small hands and small feet (acromesomelia). In addition, painful neuropathies have been recently linked to SCN10A mutations. Patch-clamp studies have shown that the effect of SCN9A mutations is dependent upon the cell-type background. The functional effects of a mutation in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and sympathetic neuron cells may differ per mutation, reflecting the pattern of expression of autonomic symptoms in patients with painful neuropathies who carry the mutation in question. Peripheral neuropathies may not always be length-dependent, as demonstrated in patients with initial facial and scalp pain symptoms with SCN9A mutations showing hyperexcitability in both trigeminal ganglion and DRG neurons. There is some evidence suggesting that gain-of-function SCN9A mutations can lead to degeneration of peripheral axons. This review will focus on the emerging role of sodium channelopathies in painful peripheral neuropathies, which could serve as a basis for novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:25250524

  16. Coenzyme Q10 prevents peripheral neuropathy and attenuates neuron loss in the db-/db- mouse, a type 2 diabetes model.

    PubMed

    Shi, Tie-Jun Sten; Zhang, Ming-Dong; Zeberg, Hugo; Nilsson, Johanna; Grünler, Jacob; Liu, Su-Xing; Xiang, Qiong; Persson, Jonas; Fried, Kaj J; Catrina, Sergiu Bogdan; Watanabe, Masahiko; Arhem, Peter; Brismar, Kerstin; Hökfelt, Tomas G M

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is the most common complication in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Here we studied some phenotypic features of a well-established animal model of type 2 diabetes, the leptin receptor-deficient db(-)/db(-) mouse, and also the effect of long-term (6 mo) treatment with coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), an endogenous antioxidant. Diabetic mice at 8 mo of age exhibited loss of sensation, hypoalgesia (an increase in mechanical threshold), and decreases in mechanical hyperalgesia, cold allodynia, and sciatic nerve conduction velocity. All these changes were virtually completely absent after the 6-mo, daily CoQ10 treatment in db(-)/db(-) mice when started at 7 wk of age. There was a 33% neuronal loss in the lumbar 5 dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) of the db(-)/db(-) mouse versus controls at 8 mo of age, which was significantly attenuated by CoQ10. There was no difference in neuron number in 5/6-wk-old mice between diabetic and control mice. We observed a strong down-regulation of phospholipase C (PLC) β3 in the DRGs of diabetic mice at 8 mo of age, a key molecule in pain signaling, and this effect was also blocked by the 6-mo CoQ10 treatment. Many of the phenotypic, neurochemical regulations encountered in lumbar DRGs in standard models of peripheral nerve injury were not observed in diabetic mice at 8 mo of age. These results suggest that reactive oxygen species and reduced PLCβ3 expression may contribute to the sensory deficits in the late-stage diabetic db(-)/db(-) mouse, and that early long-term administration of the antioxidant CoQ10 may represent a promising therapeutic strategy for type 2 diabetes neuropathy. PMID:23267110

  17. Deficiency of thiosulphate sulphurtransferase (rhodanese) in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Poole, C J; Kind, P R

    1986-01-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is a rare cause of progressive visual failure. Its cause is unknown, but one hypothesis is that patients have a defect in the detoxication of cyanide. One of the enzymes used in this detoxication is thiosulphate sulphurtransferase (rhodanese). The activity of this enzyme was measured in the rectal mucosa of a group of subjects with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy, and it was found to be considerably reduced compared with that in a group of controls (p less than 0.001). This finding supports the hypothesis of an inborn error of cyanide detoxication in this condition. PMID:3085790

  18. Multiple Crush Concept Applied to Multiple Nerves in Leprous Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Dellon, A Lee

    2016-04-01

    There is a large reservoir of leprosy patients, no longer contagious, due to multidrug therapy, who are considered cured and are becoming increasingly disabled due to progressive chronic nerve entrapment in the upper and lower extremities. After a review of the history of understanding leprous neuropathy, an approach is outlined based on the approach taken to relieve pain and restore sensation that prevents ulcers and amputations in diabetics with neuropathy and superimposed nerve compressions. The results of the first application of this approach in an indigenous area for leprosy, Guayaquil, Ecuador, is discussed with implications for international care of this neglected patient population. PMID:27013412

  19. [Diagnosis and therapy of auditory synaptopathy/neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Moser, T; Strenzke, N; Meyer, A; Lesinski-Schiedat, A; Lenarz, T; Beutner, D; Foerst, A; Lang-Roth, R; von Wedel, H; Walger, M; Gross, M; Keilmann, A; Limberger, A; Steffens, T; Strutz, J

    2006-11-01

    Pathological auditory brainstem responses (lack of responses, elevated thresholds and perturbed waveforms) in combination with present otoacoustic emissions are typical audiometric findings in patients with a hearing impairment that particularly affects speech comprehension or complete deafness. This heterogenous group of disorders first described as "auditory neuropathy" includes dysfunction of peripheral synaptic coding of sound by inner hair cells (synaptopathy) and/or of the generation and propagation of action potentials in the auditory nerve (neuropathy). This joint statement provides prevailing background information as well as recommendations on diagnosis and treatment. The statement focuses on the handling in the german language area but also refers to current international statements. PMID:17041780

  20. The variable clinical manifestations of ulnar neuropathies at the elbow.

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, J D

    1987-01-01

    In twenty-five cases of ulnar neuropathy at the elbow, the involvement of the fibres from three sensory and to four motor branches were examined clinically and, where possible, electrophysiologically. Of the sensory fibres, those from the terminal digital nerves were most commonly involved. The fibres to the hand muscles were much more frequently involved than those to the forearm muscles. These findings suggest that in ulnar neuropathies at the elbow there is variable damage to the fascicles within the nerve. PMID:3031220

  1. Methylprednisolone pulse therapy in severe dysthyroid optic neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Guy, J.R.; Fagien, S.; Donovan, J.P.; Rubin, M.L. )

    1989-07-01

    Five patients with severe dysthyroid optic neuropathy were treated with intravenous methylprednisolone (1 g daily for 3 consecutive days). Before administration, visual acuity of the more severely affected eyes of each patient was counting fingers at 5 feet, 8/200, 20/400, 20/200, and 20/80. Immediately after completion of pulse therapy, visual acuity improved to 20/25 in four patients and 20/30 in one. Remissions were maintained with oral prednisone and external beam irradiation of the orbit. Pulse methylprednisolone therapy appears to be beneficial in the initial management of severe dysthyroid optic neuropathy.

  2. Progress in inflammatory neuropathy -the legacy of Dr Jack Griffin.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Eva L; Hughes, Richard A C; Willison, Hugh J

    2015-11-01

    The past quarter of a century has brought incredible advances in our understanding of inflammatory neuropathies, and the insights into Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) began in the 1990s with the seminal work of Dr Jack Griffin and his colleagues. In this essay, we provide a tribute to Jack, and review the recent progress in a field that he termed his personal favourite. In particular, we discuss the new developments in our understanding and diagnosis of inflammatory neuropathies, the recent emergence of the node of Ranvier and the paranode as sites of intensive investigation, and the mechanistic evidence that is providing a platform for therapeutic development studies. PMID:26458287

  3. Biological conduits combining bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and extracellular matrix to treat long-segment sciatic nerve defects

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Li, Zheng-wei; Luo, Min; Li, Ya-jun; Zhang, Ke-qiang

    2015-01-01

    The transplantation of polylactic glycolic acid conduits combining bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and extracellular matrix gel for the repair of sciatic nerve injury is effective in some respects, but few data comparing the biomechanical factors related to the sciatic nerve are available. In the present study, rabbit models of 10-mm sciatic nerve defects were prepared. The rabbit models were repaired with autologous nerve, a polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, or a polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells + extracellular matrix gel. After 24 weeks, mechanical testing was performed to determine the stress relaxation and creep parameters. Following sciatic nerve injury, the magnitudes of the stress decrease and strain increase at 7,200 seconds were largest in the polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells + extracellular matrix gel group, followed by the polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells group, and then the autologous nerve group. Hematoxylin-eosin staining demonstrated that compared with the polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells group and the autologous nerve group, a more complete sciatic nerve regeneration was found, including good myelination, regularly arranged nerve fibers, and a completely degraded and resorbed conduit, in the polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells + extracellular matrix gel group. These results indicate that bridging 10-mm sciatic nerve defects with a polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells + extracellular matrix gel construct increases the stress relaxation under a constant strain, reducing anastomotic tension. Large elongations under a constant physiological load can limit the anastomotic opening and shift, which is beneficial for the regeneration and functional reconstruction of sciatic nerve. Better regeneration was

  4. The Effect of Sildenafil on Recuperation from Sciatic Nerve Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Korkmaz, Mehmet Fatih; Parlakpınar, Hakan; Ceylan, Mehmet Fethi; Ediz, Levent; Şamdancı, Emine; Kekilli, Ersoy; Sağır, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Background: Severe functional and anatomical defects can be detected after the peripheral nerve injury. Pharmacological approaches are preferred rather than surgical treatment in the treatment of nerve injuries. Aims: The aim of this study is to perform histopathological, functional and bone densitometry examinations of the effects of sildenafil on nerve regeneration in a rat model of peripheral nerve crush injury. Study Design: Animal experiment. Methods: The study included a total of thirty adult Sprague-Dawley rats that were divided into three groups of ten rats each. In all rats, a crush injury was created by clamping the right sciatic nerve for one minute. One day before the procedure, rats in group 1 were started on a 28-day treatment consisting of a daily dose of 20 mg/kg body weight sildenafil citrate given orally via a nasogastric tube, while the rats in group 2 were started on an every-other-day dose of 10 mg/kg body weight sildenafil citrate. Rats from group 3 were not administered any drugs. Forty-two days after the nerve damage was created, functional and histopathological examination of both sciatic nerves and bone densitometric evaluation of the extremities were conducted. Results: During the rotarod test, rats from group 3 spent the least amount of time on the rod compared to the drug treatment groups at speeds of 20 rpm, 30 rpm and 40 rpm. In addition, the duration for which each animal could stay on the rod throughout the accelerod test significantly reduced in rats from group 3 compared to rats from groups 1 and 2 in the 4-min test. For the hot-plate latency time, there were no differences among the groups in either the basal level or after sciatic nerve injury. Moreover, there was no significant difference between the groups in terms of the static sciatic index (SSI) on the 42nd day (p=0.147). The amplitude was better evaluated in group 1 compared to the other two groups (p<0.05). Under microscopic evaluation, we observed the greatest amount of

  5. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies: case report and discussion.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Marc J; Feinberg, Joseph; DiCarlo, Edward F; Birchansky, Sherri B; Wolfe, Scott W

    2007-09-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is an uncommon diagnosis that should be considered in patients with multiple compressive neuropathies. We present the case of a woman who presented with bilateral hand numbness and weakness. Electrodiagnostic testing revealed bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome, bilateral ulnar neuropathy at the elbow, left peroneal neuropathy at the fibular head, and a primarily demyelinating generalized sensorimotor neuropathy. Subsequent genetic testing identified a deletion at chromosome 17p11.2 to confirm the diagnosis of HNPP. Treatment of this largely self-limiting disease is controversial, and this patient suffered minimal disability with treatment including splinting and surgical releases. PMID:18751796

  6. Generalized peripheral neuropathy in a dental technician exposed to methyl methacrylate monomer

    SciTech Connect

    Donaghy, M.; Rushworth, G.; Jacobs, J.M. )

    1991-07-01

    A 58-year-old dental prosthetic technician developed generalized sensorimotor peripheral neuropathy. Neurophysiologic studies showed a generalized sensorimotor neuropathy of axonal degeneration type. Examination of a sural nerve biopsy showed a moderately severe axonal neuropathy with loss of large myelinated fibers and unmyelinated axons. There was evidence of slow ongoing degeneration and considerable fiber regeneration. Electron microscopy showed increased numbers of filaments in a few fibers. These findings show resemblances to the nerve changes caused by another acrylic resin, acrylamide. They suggest that the neuropathy may have been caused by 30 years of occupational cutaneous and inhalational exposure to methyl methacrylate monomer since they excluded other recognized causes of neuropathy.

  7. Protective effects of geraniol (a monoterpene) in a diabetic neuropathy rat model: attenuation of behavioral impairments and biochemical perturbations.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Sathya N; Muralidhara

    2014-09-01

    Involvement of oxidative stress, inflammatory response, and mitochondrial dysfunction in the development of diabetic neuropathy (DN) is well appreciated. The present study examines the potential of geraniol (GE), a well-known phytoconstituent commonly found in lemon, spices, rose oil, etc., to attenuate DN-associated oxidative/nitrosative stress by employing a streptozotocin (STZ) diabetic rat model. STZ-induced diabetic rats provided with oral supplements of GE (100 mg/kg bw/day, 8 weeks) exhibited significant improvement in tail-flick latency (sensory function) and the narrow beam test (motor function). Terminally, elevated levels of oxidative markers (reactive oxygen species, malondialdehyde, hydroperoxides) in cytosol of the sciatic nerve (SN) and in selected regions of the brain of diabetic rats were markedly reduced by GE supplements. Furthermore, GE significantly diminished the levels of protein carbonyls (a measure of protein oxidation) and nitrites in diabetic rats. In addition, in mitochondria, GE supplements restored the activities of enzymes, such as complexes I-III, succinate dehydrogenase, and citrate synthase, in brain regions of diabetic rats, with a concomitant reduction in the levels of oxidative markers. GE significantly lowered the enhanced cytosolic calcium levels and acetylcholinesterase activity in the SN and the brain regions of diabetic rats. Depleted dopamine levels evident in the SN and the cortex/striatum among diabetic rats were restored by GE. From our data, we hypothesize that GE may be a promising therapeutic candidate in the management of DN in humans. Further understanding of the molecular mechanisms of its neuromodulatory effects is essential in order to exploit its therapeutic efficacy. PMID:24752916

  8. Ischemic-reperfusion of unilateral external iliac artery in rat: A new model for vasculitic femoral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Muthuraman, Arunachalam; Ramesh, Muthusamy

    2016-08-15

    Clinically, ischemic environment during gynecological surgery at lithotomy position is most common causative factor for the development of vasculitic femoral neuropathy (VFN). The present study was designed to induce the clinically relevant rat model of VFN by ischemic-reperfusion (I/R) injury of unilateral external iliac artery (uEIA). The VFN was induced by 3, 4 and 5h occlusion of uEIA followed by reperfusion. The I/R of uEIA induced VFN was evaluated by (i) behavioral parameters i.e., hind limb temperature; weight bearing capacity; (ii) kinematic analysis i.e., paw posture, splay angle, static sciatic index (SSI), and ankle-angle tests; (iii) evaluation of pain perception i.e., plantar and pin prick; (iv) serum biochemical estimation i.e., nitrate, lipid peroxidation, TNF-α and calcium level; (v) evaluation of motor and sensory nerve conduction velocity; and (vi) measurement of nerve fiber density. The 4 and 5h occlusion of uEIA has produced the potential changes in behavioral, functional, electrophysiological, biochemical and histopathological assessment. The 5h occlusion of uEIA has shown to produce the mortality. Whereas, 3h occlusion does not produce the significant changes in the development of VFN. The 4h ischemic occlusion of uEIA has shown potential rat model of VFN due to its close mimicking capacity of VFN in human. Therefore, it can be useful to explore the newer anti-neuralgic medicine and with their pharmacodynamic action in the field of various neurovascular disorders. PMID:27288016

  9. Progression in idiopathic, diabetic, paraproteinemic, alcoholic, and B12 deficiency neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Sachedina, Shafina; Toth, Cory

    2013-09-01

    We determined prospectively the clinical and electrophysiological progression of idiopathic, diabetic, paraproteinemic, alcoholic, and B12 deficiency neuropathy in 606 subjects over 3 years. We hypothesized that idiopathic peripheral neuropathy would demonstrate slower progression when compared with other etiologies. Laboratory assessments were used to determine the etiology of peripheral neuropathy at baseline and after 3 years. When compared with peripheral neuropathy related to type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus, subjects with idiopathic peripheral neuropathy progressed much slower, but demonstrated similar rates of progression to that of the other groups. Overall, detectable progression was minimal over 3 years. After 3 years, only 3% of cases of idiopathic peripheral neuropathy had any potentially identifiable causes discovered. Clinical and electrophysiological detection of very slow progression for these five types of peripheral neuropathy is possible using currently established clinical scales and standard electrophysiological techniques. PMID:24028193

  10. Blockade of transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 promotes regeneration after sciatic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Ren, Fei; Zhang, Hong; Qi, Chao; Gao, Mei-Ling; Wang, Hong; Li, Xia-Qing

    2015-08-01

    The transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1) provides the sensation of pain (nociception). However, it remains unknown whether TRPV1 is activated after peripheral nerve injury, or whether activation of TRPV1 affects neural regeneration. In the present study, we established rat models of unilateral sciatic nerve crush injury, with or without pretreatment with AMG517 (300 mg/kg), a TRPV1 antagonist, injected subcutaneously into the ipsilateral paw 60 minutes before injury. At 1 and 2 weeks after injury, we performed immunofluorescence staining of the sciatic nerve at the center of injury, at 0.3 cm proximal and distal to the injury site, and in the dorsal root ganglia. Our results showed that Wallerian degeneration occurred distal to the injury site, and neurite outgrowth and Schwann cell regeneration occurred proximal to the injury. The number of regenerating myelinated and unmyelinated nerve clusters was greater in the AMG517-pretreated rats than in the vehicle-treated group, most notably 2 weeks after injury. TRPV1 expression in the injured sciatic nerve and ipsilateral dorsal root ganglia was markedly greater than on the contralateral side. Pretreatment with AMG517 blocked this effect. These data indicate that TRPV1 is activated or overexpressed after sciatic nerve crush injury, and that blockade of TRPV1 may accelerate regeneration of the injured sciatic nerve. PMID:26487864

  11. Blockade of transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 promotes regeneration after sciatic nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Fei; Zhang, Hong; Qi, Chao; Gao, Mei-ling; Wang, Hong; Li, Xia-qing

    2015-01-01

    The transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1) provides the sensation of pain (nociception). However, it remains unknown whether TRPV1 is activated after peripheral nerve injury, or whether activation of TRPV1 affects neural regeneration. In the present study, we established rat models of unilateral sciatic nerve crush injury, with or without pretreatment with AMG517 (300 mg/kg), a TRPV1 antagonist, injected subcutaneously into the ipsilateral paw 60 minutes before injury. At 1 and 2 weeks after injury, we performed immunofluorescence staining of the sciatic nerve at the center of injury, at 0.3 cm proximal and distal to the injury site, and in the dorsal root ganglia. Our results showed that Wallerian degeneration occurred distal to the injury site, and neurite outgrowth and Schwann cell regeneration occurred proximal to the injury. The number of regenerating myelinated and unmyelinated nerve clusters was greater in the AMG517-pretreated rats than in the vehicle-treated group, most notably 2 weeks after injury. TRPV1 expression in the injured sciatic nerve and ipsilateral dorsal root ganglia was markedly greater than on the contralateral side. Pretreatment with AMG517 blocked this effect. These data indicate that TRPV1 is activated or overexpressed after sciatic nerve crush injury, and that blockade of TRPV1 may accelerate regeneration of the injured sciatic nerve. PMID:26487864

  12. Local Effect of Heparin Binding Neurotrophic Factor Combined With Chitosan Entubulization on Sciatic Nerve Repair in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mehrshad, Ali; Seddighnia, Ashkan; Shadabi, Mohammadreza; Najafpour, Alireza; Mohammadi, Rahim

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess the effect of on sciatic nerve regeneration in animal model of rat. Methods: Seventy-five male Wistar rats were divided into five experimental groups randomly (each group containing 15 animals): Sham operation group (SHAM), autograft group (AUTO), transected control (TC), chitosan conduit (CHIT) and heparin binding neurotrophic factor treated group (CHIT/HBNF). In AUTO group a segment of sciatic nerve was transected and reimplanted reversely. In SHAM group sciatic nerve was exposed and manipulated. In transected group left sciatic nerve was transected and stumps were fixed in adjacent muscle (TC). In treatment group defect was bridged using a chitosan conduit (CHIT) filled with 10 µL HBNF (CHIT/HBNF). Each group was subdivided into four subgroups of five animals each and nerve fibers were studied in a 12-week period. Results: Behavioral, functional, biomechanical, electrophysiological and gastrocnemius muscle mass findings and morphometric indices confirmed faster recovery of regenerated axons in treatment group than in CHIT group (P=0.001). Immunohistochemical reactions to S-100 in treatment group were more positive than that in CHIT group. Conclusion: Local administration of improved functional recovery and morphometric indices of sciatic nerve. It could be considered as an effective treatment for peripheral nerve repair in practice. PMID:27331064

  13. Dexamethasone prevents vascular damage in early-stage non-freezing cold injury of the sciatic nerve

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hao; Zhang, Lei; Xu, Min

    2016-01-01

    Non-freezing cold injury is a prevalent cause of peripheral nerve damage, but its pathogenic mechanism is poorly understood, and treatment remains inadequate. Glucocorticoids have anti-inflammatory and lipid peroxidation-inhibiting properties. We therefore examined whether dexamethasone, a synthetic glucocorticoid compound, would alleviate early-stage non-freezing cold injury of the sciatic nerve. We established Wistar rat models of non-freezing cold injury by exposing the left sciatic nerve to cold (3–5°C) for 2 hours, then administered dexamethasone (3 mg/kg intraperitoneally) to half of the models. One day after injury, the concentration of Evans blue tracer in the injured sciatic nerve of rats that received dexamethasone was notably lower than that in the injured sciatic nerve of rats that did not receive dexamethasone; neither Evans blue dye nor capillary stenosis was observed in the endoneurium, but myelinated nerve fibers were markedly degenerated in the injured sciatic nerve of animals that received dexamethasone. After dexamethasone administration, however, endoneurial vasculopathy was markedly improved, although damage to the myelinated nerve fiber was not alleviated. These findings suggest that dexamethasone protects the blood-nerve barrier, but its benefit in non-freezing cold injury is limited to the vascular system. PMID:26981107

  14. Post-traumatic trigeminal neuropathy. A study of 63 cases

    PubMed Central

    Peñarrocha, David; Bagán, José V.; Peñarrocha, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Trigeminal neuropathy is most often secondary to trauma. The present study explores the underlying causes and the factors that influence recovery. Material and methods. A retrospective case study was made involving 63 patients with trigeminal neuropathy of traumatologic origin, subjected to follow-up for at least 12 months. Results. Fifty-four percent of all cases were diagnosed after mandibular third molar surgery. In 37 and 19 patients the sensory defect was located in the territory innervated by the mental and lingual nerve, respectively. Pain was reported in 57% of the cases, and particularly among the older patients. Regarding patient disability, quality of life was not affected in three cases, while mild alterations were recorded in 25 subjects and severe alterations in 8. Partial or complete recovery was observed in 25 cases after 6 months, and in 32 after one year. There were few recoveries after this period of time. Recovery proved faster in the youngest patients, who moreover were the individuals with the least pain. Conclusion. Our patients with trigeminal neuropathy recovered particularly in the first 6 months and up to one year after injury. The older patients more often suffered pain associated to the sensory defect. On the other hand, their discomfort was more intense, and the patients with most pain and the poorest clinical scores also showed a comparatively poorer course. Key words:Post-traumatic trigeminal neuropathy. PMID:22143689

  15. Investigation-Directed Approach to Inflammatory Optic Neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Boudreault, Katherine; Durand, Marlene L; Rizzo, Joseph F

    2016-01-01

    Any presentation of an optic neuropathy with features that suggest inflammation should be addressed promptly because of blindness and the potential for effective treatment in some cases. A step-wise approach, including laboratory testing and imaging, is often informative, although the diagnosis may remain elusive despite detailed investigation. PMID:26959137

  16. Periaxin mutations cause a broad spectrum of demyelinating neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Takashima, Hiroshi; Boerkoel, Cornelius F; De Jonghe, Peter; Ceuterick, Chantal; Martin, Jean-Jacques; Voit, Thomas; Schröder, J-Michael; Williams, Anna; Brophy, Peter J; Timmerman, Vincent; Lupski, James R

    2002-06-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that apparent loss-of-function mutations in the periaxin gene cause autosomal recessive Dejerine-Sottas neuropathy or severe demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. In this report, we extend the associated phenotypes with the identification of two additional families with novel periaxin gene mutations (C715X and R82fsX96) and provide detailed neuropathology. Each patient had marked sensory involvement; two siblings with a homozygous C715X mutation had much worse sensory impairment than motor impairment. Despite early disease onset, these siblings with the C715X mutation had relatively slow disease progression and adult motor impairment typical of classic demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy. In contrast, a patient with the homozygous R82fsX96 mutation had a disease course consistent with Dejerine-Sottas neuropathy. The neuropathology of patients in both families was remarkable for demyelination, onion bulb and occasional tomacula formation with focal myelin thickening, abnormalities of the paranodal myelin loops, and focal absence of paranodal septate-like junctions between the terminal loops and axon. Our study indicates a prominent sensory neuropathy resulting from periaxin gene mutations and suggests a role for the carboxyl terminal domain of the periaxin protein. PMID:12112076

  17. Diabetic Neuropathy: What is a Total Contact Cast?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Web version Diabetic Neuropathy | What is a Total Contact Cast? What is a total contact cast? A total contact cast is a cast used to treat ulcers ( ... foot--that's why it is called a total contact cast. The cast helps to protect the skin ...

  18. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathies in hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Jongen, Joost Louis Marie; Broijl, Annemiek; Sonneveld, Pieter

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in the treatment of hematological malignancies, especially with the advent of proteasome inhibitors and immunomodulatory drugs in plasma cell dyscrasias, call for an increased collaboration between hematologists and neurologists. This collaboration involves differentiating chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathies (CiPN) from disease-related neurologic complications, early recognition of CiPN and treatment of neuropathic pain. Multiple myeloma, Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia and light-chain amyloidosis frequently present with peripheral neuropathy. In addition, multiple myeloma, non-Hodgkin lymphomas and leukemia's may mimic peripheral neuropathy by compression or invasion of the extra/intradural space. Platinum compounds, vinca alkaloids, proteasome inhibitors and immunomodulatory drugs may all cause CiPN, each with different and often specific clinical characteristics. Early recognition, by identifying the distinct clinical phenotype of CiPN, is of crucial importance to prevent irreversible neurological damage. No recommendations can be given on the use of neuroprotective strategies because of a lack of convincing clinical evidence. Finally, CiPN caused by vinca-alkaloids, proteasome inhibitors and immunomodulatory drugs is often painful and neurologists are best equipped to treat this kind of painful neuropathy. PMID:25326770

  19. [An Undeniable Case of Optic Neuropathy Due to Cabazitaxel].

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Yusuke; Kawashima, Yugo; Kawara, Hiroko; Kaneko, Masatomo; Nakauchi, Hiroo; Tokuyama, Yoko

    2016-06-01

    Cabazitaxelis a taxane-type antineoplastic agent used for treating prostate cancer. Although typical side effects include neutropenia and fatigue, no studies have investigated eye disorders as a possible side effect, and the details are not clear. Herein, we report our experience of an undeniable case of optic neuropathy caused by cabazitaxel. A 78-year-old man had been diagnosed with prostate cancer (cT3aN1M1b, stage IV) 3 years previously, with a treatment history of bicalutamide, leuprorelin, flutamide, docetaxel, abiraterone, and enzalutamide. Because of a decline in vision during the second and third administration cycles of cabazitaxel, the patient visited an ophthalmologist. He was found to have reduced visual acuity, reduced central critical flicker frequency, narrowed field of vision, and impaired color vision, and was diagnosed with optic neuropathy. Although cabazitaxel administration was continued through 6 cycles, the symptoms were unchanged, and no drastic exacerbation was seen. This patient undeniably developed optic neuropathy due to cabazitaxel. Optic neuropathy due to taxane-type antineoplastic agents has also been reported with paclitaxel or docetaxel, and all precautions should be taken when administering such drugs. Detailed studies that include data from a larger number of facilities should be conducted in the future. PMID:27306820

  20. Experimental diabetes in neonatal mice induces early peripheral sensorimotor neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Ariza, L; Pagès, G; García-Lareu, B; Cobianchi, S; Otaegui, P J; Ruberte, J; Chillón, M; Navarro, X; Bosch, A

    2014-08-22

    Animal models of diabetes do not reach the severity of human diabetic neuropathy but relatively mild neurophysiological deficits and minor morphometric changes. The lack of degenerative neuropathy in diabetic rodent models seems to be a consequence of the shorter length of the axons or the shorter animal life span. Diabetes-induced demyelination needs many weeks or even months before it can be evident by morphometrical analysis. In mice myelination of the peripheral nervous system starts at the prenatal period and it is complete several days after birth. Here we induced experimental diabetes to neonatal mice and we evaluated its effect on the peripheral nerve 4 and 8 weeks after diabetes induction. Neurophysiological values showed a decline in sensory nerve conduction velocity at both time-points. Morphometrical analysis of the tibial nerve demonstrated a decrease in the number of myelinated fibers, fiber size and myelin thickness at both time-points studied. Moreover, aldose reductase and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase activities were increased even if the amount of the enzyme was not affected. Thus, type 1 diabetes in newborn mice induces early peripheral neuropathy and may be a good model to assay pharmacological or gene therapy strategies to treat diabetic neuropathy. PMID:24846610

  1. Reappraising entrapment neuropathies--mechanisms, diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Annina B; Nee, Robert J; Coppieters, Michel W

    2013-12-01

    The diagnosis of entrapment neuropathies can be difficult because symptoms and signs often do not follow textbook descriptions and vary significantly between patients with the same diagnosis. Signs and symptoms which spread outside of the innervation territory of the affected nerve or nerve root are common. This Masterclass provides insight into relevant mechanisms that may account for this extraterritorial spread in patients with entrapment neuropathies, with an emphasis on neuroinflammation at the level of the dorsal root ganglia and spinal cord, as well as changes in subcortical and cortical regions. Furthermore, we describe how clinical tests and technical investigations may identify these mechanisms if interpreted in the context of gain or loss of function. The management of neuropathies also remains challenging. Common treatment strategies such as joint mobilisation, neurodynamic exercises, education, and medications are discussed in terms of their potential to influence certain mechanisms at the site of nerve injury or in the central nervous system. The mechanism-oriented approach for this Masterclass seems warranted given the limitations in the current evidence for the diagnosis and management of entrapment neuropathies. PMID:24008054

  2. Effects of vibrating insoles on standing balance in diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Hijmans, Juha M; Geertzen, Jan H B; Zijlstra, Wiebren; Hof, At L; Postema, Klaas

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the effects on standing balance of random vibrations applied to the plantar side of the feet by vibrating insoles in subjects with neuropathy and nondisabled subjects. In four different conditions (eyes open or closed and with or without an attention-demanding task [ATD]), subjects with neuropathy secondary to diabetes mellitus (n = 17) and nondisabled subjects (n = 15) stood for 60 s on vibrating insoles placed on a force plate. During each condition, the insoles were turned on for 30 s and off for 30 s (random order). The calculated balance measures were mean velocity of the center of pressure displacements and root-mean-square of the velocity of these displacements in the anteroposterior and mediolateral directions. In subjects with neuropathy, an interaction effect between vibration and an ADT was found for balance. No effects of vibration on balance were found in nondisabled subjects. Vibrating insoles improved standing balance in subjects with neuropathy only when attention was distracted. Improvement of the insoles and their activation is needed to make their implementation in daily living possible and effective. PMID:19319766

  3. Visual Rehabilitation of Persons with Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudanko, S.-L.

    1995-01-01

    This article presents results of a noncontrolled clinical study of 20 persons with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy who were treated from 1976 to 1990 at the Low Vision Centre of the Finnish Federation of the Visually Handicapped. The importance of early functional visual rehabilitation is emphasized, as is the use of low vision aids to help…

  4. Progress in the treatment of small fiber peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Ming-Chang; Tseng, Ming-Tsung; Pan, Chun-Liang; Chao, Chi-Chao; Hsieh, Sung-Tsang

    2015-03-01

    Small fiber neuropathy is a syndrome of diverse disease etiology because of multiple pathophysiologic mechanisms with major presentations of neuropathic pain and autonomic symptoms. Over the past decade, there has been substantial progress in the treatments for neuropathic pain, dysautonomia and disease-modifying strategy. In particular, anticonvulsants and antidepressants alleviate neuropathic pain based on randomized clinical trials. PMID:25664678

  5. Neurotrophic factors and their receptors in human sensory neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Anand, Praveen

    2004-01-01

    Neurotrophic factors may play key roles in pathophysiological mechanisms of human neuropathies. Nerve growth factor (NGF) is trophic to small-diameter sensory fibers and regulates nociception. This review focuses on sensory dysfunction and the potential of neurotrophic treatments. Genetic neuropathy. Mutations of the NGF high-affinity receptor tyrosine kinase A (Trk A) have been found in congenital insensitivity to pain and anhidrosis; these are likely to be partial loss-of-function mutations, as axon-reflex vasodilatation and sweating can be elicited albeit reduced, suggesting rhNGF could restore nociception in some patients. Leprous neuropathy. Decreased NGF in leprosy skin may explain cutaneous hypoalgesia even with inflammation and rhNGF may restore sensation, as spared nerve fibers show Trk A-staining. Diabetic neuropathy. NGF is depleted in early human diabetic neuropathy skin, in correlation with dysfunction of nociceptor fibers. We proposed rhNGF prophylaxis may prevent diabetic foot ulceration. Clinical trials have been disappointed, probably related to difficulty delivering adequate doses and need for multiple trophic factors. NGF and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) are both produced by basal keratinocytes and neurotrophin (NT-3) by suprabasal keratinocytes: relative mRNA expression was significantly lower in early diabetic neuropathy skin compared to controls, for NGF (P < 0.02), BDNF (P < 0.05), NT-3 (P < 0.05), GDNF (< 0.02), but not NT4/5, Trk A or p75 neurotrophin receptor (all P > 0.05). Posttranslational modifications of mature and pro-NGF may also affect bioactivity and immunoreactivity. A 53 kD band that could correspond to a prepro-NGF-like molecule was reduced in diabetic skin. Traumatic neuropathy and pain. While NGF levels are acutely reduced in injured nerve trunks, neuropathic patients with chronic skin hyperalgesia and allodynia show marked local increases of NGF levels; here anti-NGF agents may provide analgesia

  6. Enhanced glucose control for preventing and treating diabetic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Callaghan, Brian C; Little, Ann A; Feldman, Eva L; Hughes, Richard AC

    2014-01-01

    Background There are two types of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes affects younger people and needs treatment with insulin injections. Type 2 diabetes affects older people and can usually be treated by diet and oral drugs. Diabetic neuropathy affects 10% of patients with diabetes mellitus at diagnosis and 40% to 50% after 10 years. Enhanced glucose control is the best studied intervention for the prevention of this disabling condition but there have been no systematic reviews of the evidence. Objectives To examine the evidence for enhanced glucose control in the prevention of distal symmetric polyneuropathy in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Specialized Register (30 January 2012), CENTRAL (2012, Issue 1), MED-LINE (1966 to January 2012) and EMBASE (1980 to January 2012) for randomized controlled trials of enhanced glucose control in diabetes mellitus. Selection criteria We included all randomized, controlled studies investigating enhanced glycemic control that reported neuropathy outcomes after at least one year of intervention. Our primary outcome measure was annual development of clinical neuropathy defined by a clinical scale. Secondary outcomes included motor nerve conduction velocity and quantitative vibration testing. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently reviewed all titles and abstracts identified by the database searches for inclusion. Two authors abstracted data from all included studies with a standardized form. A third author mediated conflicts. We analyzed the presence of clinical neuropathy with annualized risk differences (RDs), and conduction velocity and quantitative velocity measurements with mean differences per year. Main results This review identified 17 randomized studies that addressed whether enhanced glucose control prevents the development of neuropathy. Seven of these studies were conducted in people with type 1 diabetes, eight in type 2 diabetes, and

  7. Effect of deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt-induced hypertension on diabetic peripheral neuropathy in alloxan-induced diabetic WBN/Kob rats.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Kiyokazu; Hamano, Hiroko; Matsuura, Tetsuro; Narama, Isao

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between hypertension and diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) has recently been reported in clinical research, but it remains unclear whether hypertension is a risk factor for DPN. To investigate the effects of hypertension on DPN, we analyzed morphological features of peripheral nerves in diabetic rats with hypertension. Male WBN/Kob rats were divided into 2 groups: alloxan-induced diabetic rats with deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt (DOCA-salt) treatment (ADN group) and nondiabetic rats with DOCA-salt treatment (DN group). Sciatic, tibial (motor) and sural (sensory) nerves were subjected to qualitative and quantitative histomorphological analysis. Systolic blood pressure in the two groups exhibited a higher value (>140 mmHg), but there was no significant difference between the two groups. Endoneurial blood vessels in both groups presented endothelial hypertrophy and narrowing of the vascular lumen. Electron microscopically, duplication of basal lamina surrounding the endothelium and pericyte of the endoneurial vessels was observed, and this lesion appeared to be more frequent and severe in the ADN group than the DN group. Many nerve fibers of the ADN and DN groups showed an almost normal appearance, whereas morphometrical analysis of the tibial nerve showed a significant shift to smaller fiber and myelin sizes in the ADN group compared with DN group. In sural nerve, the fiber and axon-size significantly shifted to a smaller size in ADN group compared with the DN group. These results suggest that combined diabetes and hypertension could induce mild peripheral nerve lesions with vascular changes. PMID:26989296

  8. Effect of deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt-induced hypertension on diabetic peripheral neuropathy in alloxan-induced diabetic WBN/Kob rats

    PubMed Central

    Ozaki, Kiyokazu; Hamano, Hiroko; Matsuura, Tetsuro; Narama, Isao

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between hypertension and diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) has recently been reported in clinical research, but it remains unclear whether hypertension is a risk factor for DPN. To investigate the effects of hypertension on DPN, we analyzed morphological features of peripheral nerves in diabetic rats with hypertension. Male WBN/Kob rats were divided into 2 groups: alloxan-induced diabetic rats with deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt (DOCA-salt) treatment (ADN group) and nondiabetic rats with DOCA-salt treatment (DN group). Sciatic, tibial (motor) and sural (sensory) nerves were subjected to qualitative and quantitative histomorphological analysis. Systolic blood pressure in the two groups exhibited a higher value (>140 mmHg), but there was no significant difference between the two groups. Endoneurial blood vessels in both groups presented endothelial hypertrophy and narrowing of the vascular lumen. Electron microscopically, duplication of basal lamina surrounding the endothelium and pericyte of the endoneurial vessels was observed, and this lesion appeared to be more frequent and severe in the ADN group than the DN group. Many nerve fibers of the ADN and DN groups showed an almost normal appearance, whereas morphometrical analysis of the tibial nerve showed a significant shift to smaller fiber and myelin sizes in the ADN group compared with DN group. In sural nerve, the fiber and axon-size significantly shifted to a smaller size in ADN group compared with the DN group. These results suggest that combined diabetes and hypertension could induce mild peripheral nerve lesions with vascular changes. PMID:26989296

  9. An inside-out vein graft filled with platelet-rich plasma for repair of a short sciatic nerve defect in rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Yeong; Jeon, Woo Joo; Kim, Dong Hwee; Rhyu, Im Joo; Kim, Young Hwan; Youn, Inchan; Park, Jong Woong

    2014-07-15

    Platelet-rich plasma containing various growth factors can promote nerve regeneration. An inside-out vein graft can substitute nerve autograft to repair short nerve defects. It is hypothesized that an inside-out vein graft filled with platelet-rich plasma shows better effects in the repair of short sciatic nerve defects. In this study, an inside-out vein autograft filled with platelet-rich plasma was used to bridge a 10 mm-long sciatic nerve defect in rats. The sciatic nerve function of rats with an inside-out vein autograft filled with platelet-rich plasma was better improved than that of rats with a simple inside-out vein autograft. At 6 and 8 weeks, the sciatic nerve function of rats with an inside-out vein autograft filled with platelet-rich plasma was better than that of rats undergoing nerve autografting. Compared with the sciatic nerve repaired with a simple inside-out vein autograft, the number of myelinated axons was higher, axon diameter and myelin sheath were greater in the sciatic nerve repaired with an inside-out vein autograft filled with platelet-rich plasma and they were similar to those in the sciatic nerve repaired with nerve autograft. These findings suggest that an inside-out vein graft filled with platelet-rich plasma can substitute nerve autograft to repair short sciatic nerve defects. PMID:25221591

  10. Diabetic neuropathy in the gut: pathogenesis and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Azpiroz, Fernando; Malagelada, Carolina

    2016-03-01

    The activity of the digestive tract is usually regulated to match its content: physiological stimuli in the gut induce modulatory reflexes that control digestive function so that digestion is normally not perceived. However, under certain circumstances, digestive stimuli may activate sensory afferents and give rise to conscious sensations. Both reflex and sensory signals are modulated by a balance of excitatory and inhibitory mechanisms. Patients with diabetes may develop a neuropathy affecting the control of gastric and/or intestinal motor function and the sensory innervation as well. During fasting the stomach is contracted and relaxes to accommodate a meal. After ingestion the stomach progressively recontracts and this contraction gently produces gastric emptying. Impairment of excitatory pathways affects the contraction of the stomach, which may result in delayed gastric emptying and vomiting of retained food. Conversely, alteration of the inhibitory neural pathways results in impaired relaxation of the stomach in response to a meal; in this case increased wall tension may produce early satiation, fullness and nausea. Diabetic neuropathy may distort the control of intestinal motility, which can lead to diverse symptoms such as diarrhoea, constipation, intestinal distension and abdominal pain. Neuropathy in diabetes may also affect the sensory nerves of the gut, and depending on which pathways are involved, perception may be increased or reduced. In summary, in patients with diabetic neuropathy, disorders of gut motor function are associated with sensory abnormalities, and the combination of impaired pathways determines the clinical consequences. This review summarises a presentation given at the 'Diagnosis and treatment of autonomic diabetic neuropathy in the gut' symposium at the 2015 annual meeting of the EASD. It is accompanied by another mini-review on a topic from this symposium (by Hans Törnblom, DOI: 10.1007/s00125-015-3829-9 ) and a commentary by the

  11. Sciatica

    MedlinePlus

    Neuropathy - sciatic nerve; Sciatic nerve dysfunction; Low back pain - sciatica ... your abdomen and improve flexibility of your spine. Physical therapy may also be recommended. Additional treatments depend on ...

  12. Treatment with analgesics after mouse sciatic nerve injury does not alter expression of wound healing-associated genes

    PubMed Central

    Danzi, Matt C.; Motti, Dario; Avison, Donna L.; Bixby, John L.; Lemmon, Vance P.

    2016-01-01

    Animal models of sciatic nerve injury are commonly used to study neuropathic pain as well as axon regeneration. Administration of post-surgical analgesics is an important consideration for animal welfare, but the actions of the analgesic must not interfere with the scientific goals of the experiment. In this study, we show that treatment with either buprenorphine or acetaminophen following a bilateral sciatic nerve crush surgery does not alter the expression in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) sensory neurons of a panel of genes associated with wound healing. These findings indicate that the post-operative use of buprenorphine or acetaminophen at doses commonly suggested by Institutional Animal Care and Use Committees does not change the intrinsic gene expression response of DRG neurons to a sciatic nerve crush injury, for many wound healing-associated genes. Therefore, administration of post-operative analgesics may not confound the results of transcriptomic studies employing this injury model. PMID:26981104

  13. Neurotoxicity of perineural vs intraneural-extrafascicular injection of liposomal bupivacaine in the porcine model of sciatic nerve block.

    PubMed

    Damjanovska, M; Cvetko, E; Hadzic, A; Seliskar, A; Plavec, T; Mis, K; Vuckovic Hasanbegovic, I; Stopar Pintaric, T

    2015-12-01

    Liposomal bupivacaine is a prolonged-release local anaesthetic, the neurotoxicity of which has not yet been determined. We used quantitative histomorphometric and immunohistochemical analyses to evaluate the neurotoxic effect of liposomal bupivacaine after perineural and intraneural (extrafascicular) injection of the sciatic nerve in pigs. In this double-blind prospective randomised trial, 4 ml liposomal bupivacaine 1.3% was injected either perineurally (n = 5) or intraneurally extrafascicularly (n = 5). Intraneural-extrafascicular injection of saline (n = 5) was used as a control. After emergence from anaesthesia, neurological examinations were conducted over two weeks. After harvesting the sciatic nerves, no changes in nerve fibre density or myelin width indicative of nerve injury were observed in any of the groups. Intraneural injections resulted in longer sensory blockade than perineural (p < 0.003) without persistent motor or sensory deficit. Sciatic nerve block with liposomal bupivacaine in pigs did not result in histological evidence of nerve injury. PMID:26338496

  14. Population pharmacokinetics of bupivacaine in combined lumbar and sciatic nerve block

    PubMed Central

    Eljebari, Hanene; Jebabli, Nadia; Salouage, Issam; Gaies, Emna; Lakhal, Mohamed; Boussofara, Mehdi; Klouz, Anis

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The primary aim of this study was to establish the population pharmacokinetic (PPK) model of bupivacaine after combined lumbar plexus and sciatic nerve blocks and secondary aim is to assess the effect of patient's characteristics including age, body weight and sex on pharmacokinetic parameters. Materials and Methods: A total of 31 patients scheduled for elective lower extremity surgery with combined lumbar and sciatic nerve block using plain bupivacaine 0.5% were included. The total bupivacaine plasma concentrations were measured before injection and after two blocks placement and at selected time points. Monitoring of bupivacaine was made by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with ultraviolet detection. Non-linear mixed effects modeling was used to analyze the PPK of bupivacaine. Results: One compartment model with first order absorption, two input compartments and a central elimination was selected. The Shapiro-Wilks test of normality for normalized prediction distribution errors for this model (P = 0.156) showed this as a valid model. The selected model predicts a population clearance of 930 ml/min (residual standard error [RSE] = 15.48%, IC 95% = 930 ± 282.24) with inter individual variability of 75.29%. The central volume of distribution was 134 l (RSE = 12.76%, IC = 134 ± 33.51 L) with inter individual variability of 63.40%. The absorption of bupivacaine in two sites Ka1 and Ka2 were 0.00462/min for the lumbar site and 0.292/min for the sciatic site. Age, body weight and sex have no effect on the bupivacaine pharmacokinetics in this studied population. Conclusion: The developed model helps us to assess the systemic absorption of bupivacaine at two injections sites. PMID:24741194

  15. (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) attenuates peripheral nerve degeneration in rat sciatic nerve crush injury.

    PubMed

    Renno, Waleed M; Al-Maghrebi, May; Alshammari, Ahmad; George, Preethi

    2013-02-01

    Recently, we have shown that green tea (GT) consumption improves both reflexes and sensation in unilateral chronic constriction injury to the sciatic nerve. Considering the substantial neuroprotective properties of GT polyphenols, we sought to investigate whether (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) could protect the sciatic nerve and improve functional impairments induced by a crushing injury. We also examined whether neuronal cell apoptosis induced by the crushing injury is affected by EGCG treatment. Histological examination of sciatic nerves from EGCG-treated (50mg/kg; i.p.) showed that axonotmized rats had a remarkable axonal and myelin regeneration with significant decrease in the number of myelinated axonal fibers compared to vehicle-treated crush group. Similarly, ultrastructural evaluation of EGCG-treated nerves displayed normal unmyelinated and myelinated axons with regular myelin sheath thickness and normalized appearance of Schmidt-Lantermann clefts. Extracellular matrix displayed normal collagen fibers appearance with distinctively organized distribution similar to sham animals. Analysis of foot position and extensor postural thrust test showed a progressive and faster recovery in the EGCG-treated group compared to vehicle-treated animals. EGCG-treated rats showed significant increase in paw withdrawal thresholds to mechanical stimulation compared to vehicle-treated crush group. EGCG treatment also restored the mRNA expression of Bax, Bcl-2 and survivin but not that of p53 to sham levels on days 3 and 7 post-injury. Our results demonstrate that EGCG treatment enhanced functional recovery, advanced morphological nerve rescue and accelerated nerve regeneration following crush injury partly due to the down regulation of apoptosis related genes. PMID:23313191

  16. Acetyl salicylic acid locally enhances functional recovery after sciatic nerve transection in rat.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Rahim; Amini, Keyvan; Abdollahi-Pirbazari, Mehdi; Yousefi, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    Local effect of acetyl salicylic acid (ASA) on peripheral nerve regeneration was studied using a rat sciatic nerve transection model. Forty-five male healthy White Wistar rats were divided into three experimental groups (n = 15), randomly: Sham-operation (SHAM), control (SIL), and ASA-treated (SIL/ASA) groups. In SHAM group after anesthesia left sciatic nerve was exposed through a gluteal muscle incision and after homeostasis the muscle was sutured. In SIL group the left sciatic nerve was exposed the same way and transected proximal to tibio-peroneal bifurcation leaving a 10-mm gap. Proximal and distal stumps were each inserted into a silicone tube and filled with 10 μl phosphate buffered solution. In SIL/ASA group defect was bridged using a silicone tube filled with 10 μl acetyl salisylic acid (0.1 mg/ml). Each group was subdivided into three subgroups of five animals each and were studied 4, 8, and 12 weeks after surgery. Data were analyzed statistically by factorial analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Bonferroni test for pair-wise comparisons. Functional study confirmed faster and better recovery of regenerated axons in SIL/ASA than in SIL group (p < 0.05). Gastrocnemius muscle mass in SIL/ASA was significantly more than in SIL group. Morphometric indices of regenerated fibers showed that the number and diameter of the myelinated fibers in SIL/ASA were significantly higher than in control group. In immuohistochemistry, location of reactions to S-100 in SIL/ASA was clearly more positive than in SIL group. Response to local treatment of ASA demonstrates that it influences and improves functional recovery of peripheral nerve regeneration. PMID:24140781

  17. Multifocal Motor Neuropathy, Multifocal Acquired Demyelinating Sensory and Motor Neuropathy and Other Chronic Acquired Demyelinating Polyneuropathy Variants

    PubMed Central

    Barohn, Richard J.; Katz, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Chronic acquired demyelinating neuropathies (CADP) are an important group of immune neuromuscular disorders affecting myelin. These are distinct from chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). Classically, CIDP is characterized by proximal and distal weakness, large fiber sensory loss, elevated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) protein content, demyelinating changes nerve conduction studies or nerve biopsy, and response to immunomodulating treatment. In this chapter we discuss CADP with emphasis on multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN), multifocal acquired demyelinating sensory and motor neuropathy (MADSAM), distal acquired demyelinating symmetric (DADS) neuropathy and conclude with less common variants. While each of these entities has distinctive laboratory and electrodiagnostic features that aid in their diagnosis, clinical characteristics are of paramount importance in diagnosing specific conditions and determining the most appropriate therapies. Unlike CIDP, MMN is typically asymmetric and affects only the motor nerve fibers. MMN is a rare disease that presents chronically, over several years of progression affecting the arms are more commonly than the legs. Men are more likely than women to develop MMN. MADSAM should be suspected in patients who have weakness and loss of sensation in primarily one arm or leg which progresses slowly over several months to years. It is important in patient with multifocal demyelinating clinical presentation to distinguish MMN from MADSAM since corticosteroids are not effective in MMN where the mainstay of therapy is intravenous gammaglobulin (IVIg). DADS can be subdivided into DADS-M (associated woth M-protein) and DADS-I which is idioapthic. While DADS-I patients respond somewhat to immunotherapy, DADS-M patients present with distal predominant sensorimotor demyelinating neuropathy phenotype and are notoriously refractory to immunotherapies regardless of antibodies to myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG). Our knowledge

  18. [Effect of stress on the development of deafferentation pain syndrome in rats after sciatic nerve transection].

    PubMed

    Osipov, A V; Kukushkin, M L

    1993-05-01

    Effect of immobilization and painful stress on the development of deafferentation pain syndrome, appeared after sciatic nerve section, has been studied in Wistar rats. It has been determined that both immobilization and painful stress favour the appearance of pain syndrome in rats without clinical signs of pain syndrome up to the moment of stress influence. There has been made a conclusion that both immobilization and painful stress favour the appearance of pathologic algic system, which is the basis of pain syndrome. The fact that stress can cause analgesia in normal animals in contrast to those with potential pain syndrome is explained to different mechanisms of physiological and pathological pain. PMID:8043822

  19. Detrimental effects of immobilization on functional recovery after sciatic nerve crush.

    PubMed

    Sarikcioglu, Levent; Ozkan, Olcay; Gurer, Elif Inanc

    2005-07-01

    Peripheral-nerve trauma has been a challenge to surgeons, with significant advances in the surgery of repair. Immobilization of the injured limb after repair has been the traditional method of treatment. Although peripheral-nerve regeneration has been studied extensively, the correlation between functional recovery and the immobilization period has not been well-documented. In the present study, the authors studied the effects of immobilization on axonal regeneration after sciatic crush injury. They found a detrimental effect of immobilization on the functional recovery. PMID:15971165

  20. Epidermal laser stimulation of action potentials in the frog sciatic nerve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jindra, Nichole M.; Goddard, Douglas; Imholte, Michelle; Thomas, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Measurements of laser-stimulated action potentials in the sciatic nerve of leopard frogs (Rana pipiens) are made using two infrared lasers. The dorsal sides of the frog's hind limbs are exposed to short-pulsed 1540- and 1064-nm wavelengths at three separate spot sizes: 2, 3, and 4 mm. Energy density thresholds are determined for eliciting an action potential at each experimental condition. Results from these exposures show similar evoked potential thresholds for both wavelengths. The 2-mm-diam spot sizes yield action potentials at radiant exposure levels almost double that seen with larger beam sizes.

  1. Technique for injection into the sciatic nerve of the mouse for quantitative in vivo metabolic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Heape, A.M.; Boiron, F.; Cassagne, C.

    1986-05-15

    In this paper we describe a technique for intraneural injections, applicable to mouse peripheral nerves, which, compared with previous techniques, reduces trauma to the nerves and increases the level and reduces the variability of label recovery. Our technique employs glass needles (tip diameter, 50 micron) linked to a peristaltic pump by polyethylene tubing to inject small volumes (in the microliter range) of radiolabeled substrate solutions into mouse sciatic nerves, and allows the recovery of 20.9 +/- 1.9% (mean +/- standard deviation) and 30.5 +/- 4.8% of the injected radioactivity for 2 microliter (3H)acetate and 0.5 microliter of (3H)stearate, respectively.

  2. Acute pressure on the sciatic nerve results in rapid inhibition of the wide dynamic range neuronal response

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Acute pressure on the sciatic nerve has recently been reported to provide rapid short-term relief of pain in patients with various pathologies. Wide dynamic range (WDR) neurons transmit nociceptive information from the dorsal horn to higher brain centers. In the present study, we examined the effect of a 2-min application of sciatic nerve pressure on WDR neuronal activity in anesthetized male Sprague–Dawley rats. Results Experiments were carried out on 41 male Sprague–Dawley albino rats weighing 160–280 grams. Dorsal horn WDR neurons were identified on the basis of characteristic responses to mechanical stimuli applied to the cutaneous receptive field. Acute pressure was applied for 2 min to the sciatic nerve using a small vascular clip. The responses of WDR neurons to three mechanical stimuli applied to the cutaneous receptive field were recorded before, and 2, 5 and 20 min after cessation of the 2-min pressure application on the sciatic nerve. Two-min pressure applied to the sciatic nerve caused rapid attenuation of the WDR response to pinching, pressure and brushing stimuli applied to the cutaneous receptive field. Maximal attenuation of the WDR response to pinching and pressure was noted 5 min after release of the 2-min pressure on the sciatic nerve. The mean firing rate decreased from 31.7±1.7 Hz to 13±1.4 Hz upon pinching (p < 0.001), from 31.2±2.3 Hz to 10.9±1.4 Hz (p < 0.001) when pressure was applied, and from 18.9±1.2 Hz to 7.6±1.1 Hz (p < 0.001) upon brushing. Thereafter, the mean firing rates gradually recovered. Conclusions Our results indicate that acute pressure applied to the sciatic nerve exerts a rapid inhibitory effect on the WDR response to both noxious and innocuous stimuli. Our results may partially explain the rapid analgesic effect of acute sciatic nerve pressure noted in clinical studies, and also suggest a new model for the study of pain. PMID:23211003

  3. Somatostatin and counterregulatory hormone responses to hypoglycaemia in diabetics with and without autonomic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Castaner, M; Webb, S; Levy, I; Rios, M; Casamitjana, R; Bergua, M; Figuerola, D; Rivera, F

    1985-04-01

    Blood glucose, somatostatin and counterregulatory hormone responses to an i.v. bolus of insulin were studied in insulin-dependent diabetics with different degrees of autonomic neuropathy, after 24 hours of optimised control with an artificial pancreas. There was no plasma catecholamine response in patients with a sympathetic autonomic neuropathy. A normal somatostatin response to hypoglycemia was absent in patients with autonomic neuropathy. Glucagon did not respond in diabetics, independently of the degree of neuropathy. In all diabetics, cortisol and GH were stimulated. Absence of warning symptoms was observed in patients with catecholamine deficiency. Despite different hormone behaviour, blood glucose fall and recovery were similar in all diabetic groups. It is concluded that the glucagon response to insulin hypoglycaemia is reduced in all type 1 longstanding diabetics, whereas catecholamine and somatostatin responses are only abolished in those with autonomic neuropathy. Patients with sympathetic neuropathy would be considered at increased risk severe hypoglycaemia. PMID:2861121

  4. The neuroprotective effects of aspirin following crush injury to rat sciatic nerve

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yi; Li, Jun; Zhu, Yueliang; Tang, Hui; He, Xiaoqing; Xu, Yongqing

    2015-01-01

    Aspirin has been reported to be neuroprotective and produce some benefits for central nervous system diseases. However, the possibility of using aspirin as a neuroprotective agent for peripheral nerve injuries has rarely been reported thus far. The aim of the present study was to investigate the possibly beneficial effects of aspirin on sciatic nerve crush injury therapy in rats. Crush injury animal model was prepared with Sprague-Dawley rats. The animals were evenly divided into high-dose aspirin group, low-dose aspirin group, and vehicle group. Aspirin solution or normal saline were intraperitoneally injected once a day for 28 days after sciatic nerve crush injury. A sham-operative group was also added as normal control. The results from walking track analysis and electrophysiological assessment indicated that motor functional recovery in the aspirin groups were better than that in the vehicle group. Morphometric analysis of regenerated nerves and Fluoro-Gold retrograde tracing demonstrated that axonal regeneration in the aspirin groups was superior to that in the vehicle group. Our findings suggest that aspirin might be used as a neuroprotective agent for treating peripheral nerve injuries. PMID:26770418

  5. An immunohistochemical study of the sciatic nerve in a rat knee immobilization model.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Shinya; Matsuzaki, Taro; Hoso, Masahiro

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] This study was performed to immunohistochemically evaluate changes in the periphery of the sciatic nerve in a rat model of knee immobilization, and to assess the effects of range of motion exercise. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-one male rats were divided randomly into three groups: control (C), immobilized (I), and exercise (E group). Rats in the I and E groups had the right knee joint immobilized for 2 weeks. In the E group, range of motion exercise was also performed. After the experimental period, the periphery of the sciatic nerve was immunohistochemically observed. [Results] Immunohistochemical staining revealed that the myelin sheath and the perineurium in all groups were laminin positive. In the C and E groups, all rats showed normal staining. In contrast, 4 rats in the I group exhibited weak labeling. [Conclusion] Our results suggest that immobilization alters the perineurium at a molecular level and the range of motion exercise is essential for maintaining the environment of the perineurium. PMID:27190437

  6. Menatetrenone rescues bone loss by improving osteoblast dysfunction in rats immobilized by sciatic neurectomy.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki-Ishizuka, Yoshiko; Yamato, Hideyuki; Murayama, Hisashi; Ezawa, Ikuko; Kurokawa, Kiyoshi; Fukagawa, Masafumi

    2005-02-25

    Menatetrenone (MK-4) is a vitamin K2 homologue that has been used as a therapeutic agent for osteoporosis in Japan. However, there is no far any reported evidence that MK-4 ameliorates a pre-existing condition of reduced bone mineral density (BMD) in vivo. In this study, we evaluated the effect of MK-4 in a rat model of established bone loss through immobilization caused by sciatic neurectomy. Unilateral sciatic neurectomy (SNx) was performed in rats, and 10 or 30 mg/kg of MK-4 or vehicle was administered to the rats three weeks after operation. Seven weeks after operation, the rats were sacrificed and BMD and bone histomorphometric parameters were measured to assess the effects of MK-4. While BMD of the distal femoral metaphysis was significantly decreased after SNx, MK-4 administration increased BMD in the neurectomized rats. Bone formation was decreased continuously and bone resorption was initially increased in SNx rats. Four weeks treatment of MK-4 increased bone formation and suppressed bone resorption. In addition, increased carboxylated osteocalcin and decreased undercarboxylated osteocalcin in serum were observed in MK-4-administered rats. These results indicated that MK-4 rescued bone volume by improving osteoblast dysfunction and accelerating gamma carboxylation of osteocalcin. MK-4 may be useful for treating disuse osteopenia. PMID:15698851

  7. Deciphering the Lipid Architecture of the Rat Sciatic Nerve Using Imaging Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Roberto; Carriel, Víctor; Lage, Sergio; Garate, Jone; Díez-García, Javier; Ochoa, Begoña; Castro, Begoña; Alaminos, Miguel; Fernández, José A

    2016-05-18

    Knowledge on the normal structure and molecular composition of the peripheral nerves is essential to understand their pathophysiology and to select the regeneration strategies after injury. However, the precise lipid composition of the normal peripheral nerve is still poorly known. Here, we present the first study of distribution of individual lipids in the mature sciatic nerve of rats by imaging mass spectrometry. Both positive and negative ion modes were used to detect, identify and in situ map 166 molecular species of mainly glycerophospholipids, sphingomyelins, sulfatides, and diacyl and triacylglycerols. In parallel, lipid extracts were analyzed by LC-MS/MS to verify and complement the identification of lipids directly from the whole tissue. Three anatomical regions were clearly identified by its differential lipid composition: the nerve fibers, the connective tissue and the adipose tissue that surrounds the nerve. Unexpectedly, very little variety of phosphatidylcholine (PC) species was found, being by far PC 34:1 the most abundant species. Also, a rich composition on sulfatides was detected in fibers, probably due to the important role they play in the myelin cover around axons, as well as an abundance of storage lipids in the adipose and connective tissues. The database of lipids here presented for each region and for the whole sciatic nerve is a first step toward understanding the variety of the peripheral nerves' lipidome and its changes associated with different diseases and mechanical injuries. PMID:27043994

  8. TGF-β1 is critical for Wallerian degeneration after rat sciatic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Li, M; Zhang, P; Li, H; Zhu, Y; Cui, S; Yao, D

    2015-01-22

    Wallerian degeneration (WD) is a process of axonal degeneration distal to the injury site followed by a robust regenerative response. It involves degeneration and regeneration which can be directly induced by nerve injury and activated by transcription factors. Although WD has been studied extensively, the precise mechanisms of transcription factors regulating WD are still elusive. In this study, we reported the effect of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) on WD after rat sciatic nerve injury. The data showed that TGF-β1 may express in injured rat sciatic nerve and cultured Schwann cells (SCs). Knock down of TGF-β1 expressions resulted in the reduction of SC proliferation and apoptosis, up regulation of cytokines and Smad2, 4. Enhanced expression of TGF-β1 could promote SC proliferation and apoptosis, down regulation of cytokines and Smad2, 4. Altered expressions of TGF-β1 may affect Smad and AKT but not c-Jun and extracellular regulated protein kinase (ERK) pathways. Our results revealed the role of TGF-β1 on WD and provided the basis for the molecular mechanisms of TGF-β1-regulated nerve degeneration and/or regeneration. PMID:25451291

  9. An immunohistochemical study of the sciatic nerve in a rat knee immobilization model

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Shinya; Matsuzaki, Taro; Hoso, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was performed to immunohistochemically evaluate changes in the periphery of the sciatic nerve in a rat model of knee immobilization, and to assess the effects of range of motion exercise. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-one male rats were divided randomly into three groups: control (C), immobilized (I), and exercise (E group). Rats in the I and E groups had the right knee joint immobilized for 2 weeks. In the E group, range of motion exercise was also performed. After the experimental period, the periphery of the sciatic nerve was immunohistochemically observed. [Results] Immunohistochemical staining revealed that the myelin sheath and the perineurium in all groups were laminin positive. In the C and E groups, all rats showed normal staining. In contrast, 4 rats in the I group exhibited weak labeling. [Conclusion] Our results suggest that immobilization alters the perineurium at a molecular level and the range of motion exercise is essential for maintaining the environment of the perineurium. PMID:27190437

  10. The effect of ubiquinone on functional recovery and morphometric indices of sciatic nerve regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Moradi, Z; Azizi, S; Hobbenaghi, R

    2014-01-01

    A common cause of peripheral nerve injury is trauma. The positive effect of antioxidants on the improvement of nerve regeneration has currently become a focus of attention. In this experiment, the effect of intraperitoneal administration of ubiquinone (CoQ10) on an acute experimentally sciatic nerve crush was studied in a rat model. Forty-five male Wistar rats, weighing between 160-180 g were used. The rats were randomly divided into two experimental groups (n=20). Each group was further subdivided into four subgroups of five animals each. Functional studies confirmed the faster recovery of regenerated axons in the treatment group compared to the un-treated group (P<0.05). Morphometric indices of the regenerated fibers showed the number and diameter of the myelinated fibers to be significantly higher in the treatment group than the un-treated group (P<0.05). Intraperitoneal administration of CoQ10 (10 mg/kg/day) in the early inflammatory stage of sciatic nerve crush was found to improve nerve regeneration. PMID:27175137

  11. Extracting structural features of rat sciatic nerve using polarization-sensitive spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, M. Shahidul; Oliveira, Michael C.; Wang, Yan; Henry, Francis P.; Randolph, Mark A.; Park, B. Hyle; de Boer, Johannes F.

    2012-05-01

    We present spectral domain polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (SD PS-OCT) imaging of peripheral nerves. Structural and polarization-sensitive OCT imaging of uninjured rat sciatic nerves was evaluated both qualitatively and quantitatively. OCT and its functional extension, PS-OCT, were used to image sciatic nerve structure with clear delineation of the nerve boundaries to muscle and adipose tissues. A long-known optical effect, bands of Fontana, was also observed. Postprocessing analysis of these images provided significant quantitative information, such as epineurium thickness, estimates of extinction coefficient and birefringence of nerve and muscle tissue, frequency of bands of Fontana at different stretch levels of nerve, and change in average birefringence of nerve under stretched condition. We demonstrate that PS-OCT combined with regular-intensity OCT (compared with OCT alone) allows for a clearer determination of the inner and outer boundaries of the epineurium and distinction of nerve and muscle based on their birefringence pattern. PS-OCT measurements on normal nerves show that the technique is promising for studies on peripheral nerve injury.

  12. A Neurogenic Perspective of Sarcopenia: Time Course Study of Sciatic Nerves From Aging Mice.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Vidya S; White, Zoe; McMahon, Chris D; Hodgetts, Stuart I; Fitzgerald, Melinda; Shavlakadze, Tea; Harvey, Alan R; Grounds, Miranda D

    2016-05-01

    To elucidate the neural basis for age-related sarcopenia, we quantified morphologic and molecular changes within sciatic nerves of aging male and female C57BL/6J mice aged between 3 and 27 months using immunoblotting, immunohistochemistry, and electron microscopy. Protein analyses by immunoblotting of nerves of male mice aged 4, 15, 18, 22, and 24 months showed increased levels of heavy chain SMI-32-positive neurofilaments, vimentin, tau5, choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), and p62 by 18-22 months. Similar protein increases were seen in 26-month-old compared with 3-month-old female mice. Immunostaining of longitudinal sections of old (27-month-old) male sciatic nerves revealed intense staining for tau5 and p62 that was increased compared with that at 3 months, but there were decreased numbers of axon profiles stained for ChAT or isolectin B4 (motor and sensory axons, respectively). Ultrastructural analysis revealed electron-dense aggregates within axons in peripheral nerves of old male mice; the proportion of axons that contained aggregates more than doubled between 15 and 27 months. Overall, the observed age-related accumulation of many proteins from about 18 months of age onward suggests impaired mechanisms for axonal transport and protein turnover. These peripheral nerve changes may contribute to the morphological and functional muscle deficits associated with sarcopenia. PMID:27030741

  13. Proteomics of the injured rat sciatic nerve reveals protein expression dynamics during regeneration.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Connie R; Stam, Floor J; Li, Ka Wan; Gouwenberg, Yvonne; Hornshaw, Martin P; De Winter, Fred; Verhaagen, Joost; Smit, August B

    2005-02-01

    Using proteomics, we investigated the temporal expression profiles of proteins in rat sciatic nerve after experimental crush. Extracts of sciatic nerves collected at 5, 10, and 35 days after injury were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and quantitative image analysis. Of the approximately 1,500 protein spots resolved on each gel, 121 showed significant regulation during at least one time point. Using cluster analysis, these proteins were grouped into two expression profiles of down-regulation and four of up-regulation. These profiles mainly reflected differences in cellular origins in addition to different functional roles. Mass spectrometric analysis identified 82 proteins pertaining to several functional classes, i.e. acute-phase proteins, antioxidant proteins, and proteins involved in protein synthesis/maturation/degradation, cytoskeletal (re)organization, and in lipid metabolism. Several proteins not previously implicated in nerve regeneration were identified, e.g. translationally controlled tumor protein, annexin A9/31, vitamin D-binding protein, alpha-crystallin B, alpha-synuclein, dimethylargininases, and reticulocalbin. Real-time PCR analysis of selected genes showed which were expressed in the nerve versus the dorsal root ganglion neurons. In conclusion, this study highlights the complexity and temporal aspect of the molecular process underlying nerve regeneration and points to the importance of glial and inflammatory determinants. PMID:15509515

  14. Sensory and motor neuropathy in a Border Collie.

    PubMed

    Harkin, Kenneth R; Cash, Walter C; Shelton, G Diane

    2005-10-15

    A 5-month-old female Border Collie was evaluated because of progressive hind limb ataxia. The predominant clinical findings suggested a sensory neuropathy. Sensory nerve conduction velocity was absent in the tibial, common peroneal, and radial nerves and was decreased in the ulnar nerve; motor nerve conduction velocity was decreased in the tibial, common peroneal, and ulnar nerves. Histologic examination of nerve biopsy specimens revealed considerable nerve fiber depletion; some tissue sections had myelin ovoids, foamy macrophages, and axonal degeneration in remaining fibers. Marked depletion of most myelinated fibers within the peroneal nerve (a mixed sensory and motor nerve) supported the electrodiagnostic findings indicative of sensorimotor neuropathy. Progressive deterioration in motor function occurred over the following 19 months until the dog was euthanatized. A hereditary link was not established, but a littermate was similarly affected. The hereditary characteristic of this disease requires further investigation. PMID:16266014

  15. Suspected hypothyroid-associated neuropathy in a female rottweiler dog

    PubMed Central

    Rushton, James Oliver; Leschnik, Michael; Nell, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    A 7-year-old, 46-kg spayed female rottweiler dog was presented with sudden onset of disorientation, bilateral convergent strabismus, and enophthalmos. Diagnostic workup revealed hypothyroid-associated cranial neuropathy. Symptoms abated considerably upon treatment with levothyroxine-sodium (T4) at an initial dose of 800 μg/kg body weight (BW), PO, q12h, which was reduced 3 days later to 600 μg/kg BW, q12h due to severe agitation and panting. Two weeks later the dosage of the levothyroxine-sodium (T4) was reduced to 400 μg/kg BW in the morning and 600 μg/kg BW in the evening. Eight weeks after the initial presentation, the dog had recovered with only mild convergent strabismus in the right eye. This is the first case report of suspected hypothyroid-associated neuropathy resulting in these symptoms. PMID:24082164

  16. Peripheral neuropathy after hair dye exposure: a case report.

    PubMed

    Deeb, Wissam; Cachia, David; Quinn, Colin; Salameh, Johnny

    2014-06-01

    We present a case of length-dependent sensory axonal polyneuropathy due to lead exposure from a cosmetic product. Serial follow-ups showed a direct relationship between the lead level, clinical symptoms, and the polyneuropathy. Our patient had a relatively short-term exposure to lead after misusing a hair dye on his beard. Nerve conduction studies showed a predominantly axonal sensory neuropathy that correlated with lead blood levels and reached 3 times the upper limit of normal. The patient had an unexpected sensory predominant neuropathy. He had a full recovery after stopping the lead-containing product. Blood lead levels were noted to be below previously reported toxic levels. No other systemic signs of lead toxicity were noted. This could be related to the mucosal route of absorption inducing a reversible injury at lower than previously reported lead levels and after a shorter duration of exposure. PMID:24872215

  17. Ulnar neuropathy with prominent proximal Martin-Gruber anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Burakgazi, Ahmet Z; Russo, Mary; Bayat, Elham; Richardson, Perry K

    2014-07-01

    Martin-Gruber anastomosis (MGA) is the most common nerve anastomosis in the upper extremities and it crosses from the median nerve to the ulnar nerve. Proximal MGA is an under recognized anastomosis between the ulnar and median nerves at or above the elbow and should not be missed during nerve conduction studies. We presented two patients with ulnar neuropathy mimicking findings including numbness and tingling of the 4th and 5th digits and mild weakness of intrinsic hand muscles. However, both cases had an apparently remarkable conduction block between the below- and above-elbow sites that was disproportionate to their clinical findings. To explain this discrepancy, a large MGA was detected with stimulation of the median nerve at the elbow. Thus, proximal MGA should be considered in ulnar neuropathy at the elbow when apparent conduction block or/and discrepancy between clinical and electrodiagnostic findings is found. PMID:24147570

  18. Antiretroviral therapy-associated acute motor and sensory axonal neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Capers, Kimberly N; Turnacioglu, Sinan; Leshner, Robert T; Crawford, John R

    2011-01-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) has been reported in HIV-infected patients in association with the immune reconstitution syndrome whose symptoms can be mimicked by highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART)-mediated mitochondrial toxicity. We report a case of a 17-year-old, HIV-infected patient on HAART with a normal CD4 count and undetectable viral load, presenting with acute lower extremity weakness associated with lactatemia. Electromyography/nerve conduction studies revealed absent sensory potentials and decreased compound muscle action potentials, consistent with a diagnosis of acute motor and sensory axonal neuropathy. Lactatemia resolved following cessation of HAART; however, neurological deficits minimally improved over several months in spite of immune modulatory therapy. This case highlights the potential association between HAART, mitochondrial toxicity and acute axonal neuropathies in HIV-infected patients, distinct from the immune reconstitution syndrome. PMID:21327178

  19. Three-dimensional imaging of lower limb neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Ahlawat, Shivani; Carrino, John A

    2015-04-01

    Peripheral nerve pathology can be detected on high-resolution MRI on the basis of primary or secondary findings. Primary findings of nerve pathology include alterations in signal, course, and caliber; secondary findings include skeletal muscle denervation. Although two-dimensional (2D) MRI sequences comprised of a combination of fluid-sensitive and non-fat-suppressed anatomical sequences can detect changes in nerve size, signal, course, and architecture, three-dimensional (3D) imaging can play an important role in the detection and characterization of nerve pathology including caliber changes at typical compression sites, anomalous course, and nerve discontinuity. This article discusses the benefits of 3D MRI with respect to lower limb neuropathies. The article also reviews the normal anatomy of the nerves in the lower extremity from the hip joint to the foot, and it illustrates common causes and the imaging appearance of lower limb peripheral neuropathy. PMID:25764241

  20. Practical rules for electrodiagnosis in suspected multifocal motor neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Bromberg, Mark B; Franssen, Hessel

    2015-03-01

    Multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) with conduction block (CB) is a rare chronic immune-mediated neuropathy, but important to diagnose as it is treatable. The key features in prototypic MMN are electrodiagnostic demonstration of focal CB away from common sites of entrapment and normal sensory conduction across these sites. However, there are challenges in distinguishing CB from the effects of abnormal temporal dispersion. Consensus electrodiagnostic criteria, reinforced by modeling studies, are available to support definite or probable CB. In addition, consideration of technical issues can guard against false-positive and false-negative conclusions. These include limb temperature, stimulus site, inadvertent stimulating electrode movement, and supramaximal and submaximal responses, as well as the possibility of Martin-Gruber anastamosis. Robust evidence supports the treatment of MMN with intravenous immunoglobulin, and guidelines have been developed. Application of practical and simple rules including a 4-step diagnostic algorithm can help practitioners correctly diagnose this treatable condition and improve patient outcomes. PMID:25695919