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Sample records for science fair experience

  1. Botany: High-School Science Fair Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dashefsky, H. Steven

    This book for high school students presents 20 different science fair projects that provide an opportunity to learn how plants are affected by natural and man-made influences on their environments. Many experiments in the book were adapted from original International Science and Engineering Fair projects. Each project includes in-depth background…

  2. The Science Fair Experience: Profile of Science Fair Winners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellipanni, Lawrence J.

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine if a significant relationship existed between the criterion variable of receiving or not receiving awards at the 1993 International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF) and the predictor variables of resources and facilities, resource personnel, personal costs, time, and personal characteristics.…

  3. Environmental Science: High-School Science Fair Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dashefsky, H. Steven

    This book contains 23 suggestions for experiments involving environmental science that can be used to create a science fair project. Aimed at grades 10-12, a wide range of environmental topics is covered. These topics include soil ecosystems, aquatic ecosystems, applied ecology, global warming and the greenhouse effect, deforestation and…

  4. An Alternative Science Fair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romjue, Mary Kalen; Clementson, John J.

    1992-01-01

    Proposes the organization of noncompetitive science fairs to create a more positive learning experience for children in the elementary grades. Describes methods of organizing and judging the fair, and provides a list of suggested resources for science fair projects. (MDH)

  5. How Are Science Fairs Fairing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schachter, Ron

    2011-01-01

    For more than half a century, the annual science fair has been a fixture in many a school's academic life, both for science teachers, who guide classes through the hands-on experience of researching topics of interest, and for students, who often hectically put the finishing touches on their work the night before it is exhibited in the school gym…

  6. Planning a Science Fair

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebert, Jim

    1976-01-01

    Presented are views, on planning science fairs and science fair projects, of a fair coordinator, a science teacher, and students. Also included are 25 questions which might result in science fair projects. (SL)

  7. Science fair: Is it worth the work? A qualitative study on deaf students' perceptions and experiences regarding science fair in primary and secondary school

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Vivian Lee

    Science fairs have a long history in American education. They play an important role for establishing inquiry-based experiences in a science classroom. Students may be more motivated to learn science content when they are allowed to choose their own science fair topics. The purpose of this study was to examine Deaf college students' perceptions and experiences regarding science fair participation during primary and/or secondary school and determine the influence of science fair involvement on the development of language skills, writing skills, and higher order thinking skills as well as its impact on choice of a STEM major. This study examined responses from Deaf students attending Gallaudet University and National Technical Institute for the Deaf (NTID) majoring in a Science, Technology, Engineering, or Math (STEM) field. An electronic questionnaire and a semi-structured interview were used to collect data. The electronic questionnaire was divided into two strands: demographics and science fair experience. Twenty-one respondents participated in the questionnaire and ten participants were interviewed. A cross-case analysis revealed communication was the key to a successful science fair experience. Findings showed the educational background of participants influenced their perspective regarding the experience of a science fair. When communicating through American Sign Language, the science fair experience was more positive. When communicating through an interpreter or having no interpreter at all, the science fair experience was viewed in a negative light. The use of science fairs to enhance language development, writing skills, and higher order thinking skills was supported. Teachers and parents were strong influences for Deaf students participating in a science fair. Participation in a science fair did influence students to choose a STEM major but there were other considerations as well.

  8. Science Fairs and Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watt, Shirley L., Ed.

    This collection of 20 articles from "The Science Teacher" and "Science and Children" is provided to assist teachers, students, and parents in preparing for science fairs. Four major questions about science fairs are addressed in the articles. They are: (1) Who should participate in a science fair? (2) How should a fair be organized? (3) What makes…

  9. Rethinking the Science Fair

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craven, John; Hogan, Tracy

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the authors reflect on whether the competitiveness of science fairs does anything to enhance the learning environment of schools. The authors narrate how a visit to a local school's gymnasium to witness one of these gala events reminded them of why they so dislike science fairs. The authors mention that they applaud any sincere…

  10. Rethinking the Science Fair

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craven, John; Hogan, Tracy

    2008-01-01

    Spring is the season when thousands of creased cardboard pests can be found lodged under the armpits of students and teachers as they observe the educational rite of spring known as the school science fair. A recent visit to a local school's gymnasium to witness one of these events reminded the authors of why they so dislike science fairs. In this…

  11. Science Fairs for All.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Donna Gail; Cook, Cheryl; Ribelin, Teralyn

    2000-01-01

    Discusses a science fair project with a diverse group of K-2 urban school students. Students experienced the purpose and procedure for a scientific investigation, although they learned in different ways and at different rates. (ASK)

  12. Super Science Fair Sourcebook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iritz, Maxine Haren

    This guide to science fair projects is designed for students and provides clear directions on how to complete a successful science project. Real projects are used as examples and information and advice is provided by teachers, judges, and participants and their families about the process. Topics covered in this book include choosing a science fair…

  13. Science Fair Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Kevin

    2004-01-01

    Sciences fair season is a time when seasoned non-science teachers typically give up all hope of cramming any more knowledge into the heads of their students. It's just too much. However, non-science types might be missing out on a pretty good deal. The science department has got these kids in a pretty tight grip as far as the process and the…

  14. No Stress Science Fair

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Two recurring hurdles seem to reduce the effectiveness of science fairs--finding time in the regular curriculum and excessive parental involvement. The time issue too often manifests itself with the obviously last-minute, overnight project of dubious learning value. The pollution of parental handiwork ruins the student's opportunity to actually…

  15. Putting Science into Elementary Science Fairs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Helen Ross

    In a world where science has become too confined to books and too reliant on technology, and science fairs have been taken over by parents, this paper offers suggestions to help young people have actual hands-on experience with nature. Topics include soil formation; ants; earthworms; temperature; weather predictions; rain acidity; physical science…

  16. Elementary school teachers and successful science fairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Helen Mounce

    The purpose of this research was to examine the knowledge, skills and attitudes of elementary school teachers who have led their students to successful experiences in science fairs. Six research questions guided the study: (1) What knowledge, skills and attitudes do the five selected elementary school teachers draw upon to enable their students to have a successful science fair experience? (2) How do the five selected elementary school teachers enable their students to have a successful science fair experience? (3) Why are the five selected elementary school teachers capable of enabling their students to have a successful science fair experience? (4) How do the knowledge, skills and attitudes of the five selected elementary school teachers compare to the knowledge, skills and attitudes that the National Science Education Standards (National Research Council, 1996) recommend for science teachers? (5) What are the commonalities in the knowledge, skills and attitudes among the five selected elementary school teachers who enable their students to have a successful science fair experience? (6) What are the differences in the knowledge, skills and attitudes among the five selected elementary school teachers who enable their students to have a successful science fair experience? A qualitative multiple-case research design was used to focus on five elementary school teachers who have a history of leading their students to successful experiences in science fairs. Data sources included classroom observations, formal and informal interviews, focus groups, science fair visitations and perusal of documents related to the teachers' science fair preparation of their students. In addition, questionnaires were given to the teachers and their students assessing their views about science and science fairs. A cross-case analysis revealed that the teachers had become knowledgeable about science fairs and science by non-traditional means including attending staff development workshops

  17. Science Fairs for Science Literacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackey, K. R.

    2014-12-01

    Science literacy is imperative for well informed civic and personal decision making, yet only a quarter of American adults are proficient enough in science to understand science stories reported in the popular press. Hands-on research increases confidence in and understanding of science. When guiding students in designing and conducting science fair projects, mentors can foster science literacy by helping students focus on three goals: (1) articulating hypotheses or questions, (2) designing feasible projects, and (3) learning to make and interpret graphs. These objectives introduce students to the methodological nature of scientific research and give them the tools to interpret scientific facts and data in order to make informed decisions for themselves and society.

  18. Science Fair: A Successful Venture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galen, Donald F.

    1993-01-01

    Presents information for teachers on science fairs including international competitions, finding research students, and starting research classes and science clubs. Provides advice for helping students with research. (PR)

  19. Science Fair Project Index 1973-1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akron - Summit County Public Library, OH.

    This supplement to the "Science Fair Project Index 1960-1972" indexes science projects and experiments found in books and magazines published from 1973 through 1980. This index is intended for use by students in grade five through high school and by teachers who are involved in creating science fair projects. Emphasis is on actual projects,…

  20. Science Fair Project Index 1981-1984.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Cynthia, Ed.; Crowe, Deborah, Ed.

    This second supplement to the "Science Fair Project Index 1960-1972" indexes science projects and experiments found in books and magazines published from 1981 through 1984. This index is intended for use by students in grade five through high school and by teachers who are involved in creating science fair projects. Emphasis is on actual projects,…

  1. Science Fair Projects. LC Science Tracer Bullet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Constance, Comp.

    This bibliography assists junior and senior high school students and teachers in planning, preparing, executing, and evaluating science fair projects. A few books with experiments suitable for elementary grade students are listed. This publication is not intended to be a comprehensive bibliography but is designed to put the reader "on target."…

  2. Science Fairs: Step by Step.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gowen, Lorraine F.; Marek, Edmund A.

    1993-01-01

    Science fairs can be used to advance a student's scientific knowledge, sharpen laboratory techniques, practice statistical analysis, and gain a better understanding of the process of science. This article describes an outline for developing a science fair that covers the objectives above and develops library and writing skills as well. (PR)

  3. Environmental Science: 49 Science Fair Projects. Science Fair Projects Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonnet, Robert L.; Keen, G. Daniel

    This book contains 49 science fair projects designed for 6th to 9th grade students. Projects are organized by the topics of soil, ecology (projects in habitat and life cycles), pests and controls (projects in weeds and insects), recycling (projects in resources and conservation), waste products (projects in decomposition), microscopic organisms,…

  4. Astronomy Science Fair Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittichová, J.; Kadooka, M.-A.; Meech, K. J.

    2004-12-01

    ``Extrasolar Planet Transit", ``Lightcurve of a Variable Star", and ``Retrograde Motion of Mars" are some of the titles of high school students' projects entered in the Hawaii State Science Fair. TOPS (Toward Other Planetary Systems) teachers who participated in the University of Hawaii Institute for Astronomy summer outreach program under the direction of professor Karen J. Meech mentored their students. After attending the 3-week National Science Foundation Institute for several summers since 1999, these teachers in the summer of 2003 were trained to do observing plans to obtain images from telescopes, use image processing software MIRA for photometry, and produce light curves of variable stars and extrasolar planet transits. Others used the software ``Astrometrica" to do astrometry of Kuiper Belt Objects. Using Compaq laptop computers on long term loan, our teachers mentored students for astronomy projects during the 2003-2004 school year. These students made observing plans for images from the 31inch Lowell Telescope in Arizona and/or from the 2.2m University of Hawaii Telescope at Mauna Kea Observatory. Learning about filters, exposure time, magnitude, frequency of taking CCD images, and ephemeris required many iterations between students, teachers, and astronomers and graduate students who were assisting. Poor weather conditions and other frustrations exposed the students to the realities of research. However, they were rewarded with projects that impressed the judges and that will be described.

  5. The Complete Handbook of Science Fair Projects, Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bochinski, Julianne Blair

    Science fairs have become an important key to gathering valuable science experience while pursuing independent projects. This book serves as a guide to every aspect of science fairs and science fair projects. It provides information on finding suitable topics, researching them properly, developing experiments, and giving meaning to data results.…

  6. A Kinder-Science Fair

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torres, Angelica; Vitti, Debbye

    2007-01-01

    A science fair might be the last thing you think of when planning a kindergarten science curriculum, but the authors found it to be the perfect avenue for teaching their students science-process skills. Here they share their steps in teaching science-process skills and assembling student projects in a kindergarten classroom throughout the year.…

  7. Science Fairs: The Whys and Hows.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edelman, Phyllis

    1988-01-01

    There has been some evidence that students who develop projects for science fairs continue their interest in science through high school and beyond. Local and regional fairs generally are slated as a prelude to state science fairs and the International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF). Organizing a district science fair requires informed…

  8. Janice VanCleave's Electricity: Mind-Boggling Experiments You Can Turn into Science Fair Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanCleave, Janice

    This book is designed to provide guidance and ideas for science projects to help students learn more about science as they search for answers to specific problems. The 20 topics on electricity in this book suggest many possible problems to solve. Each topic has one detailed experiment followed by a section that provides additional questions about…

  9. Science Fair Projects: The Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonnet, Bob; Keen, Dan

    This book approaches the development of science fair projects from the point of view that science should be enjoyable, interesting, and thought-provoking. The scientific concepts introduced here will later help young students to understand more advanced scientific principles. These projects develop skills such as classification, making measured…

  10. University--Science Fair Partnership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tallman, Erika; Taylor, Karen

    1997-01-01

    Describes a partnership between a fifth-grade teacher and a university methods professor that involved developing an elementary science fair project mentored by university students. Provides opportunities for elementary students to conduct scientific investigations to learn about science, and opportunities for education majors to have firsthand…

  11. A World of Discovery Online: Science Fairs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joseph, Linda C.

    1996-01-01

    K-12 students and teachers can use the Internet for planning science fair activities--for project ideas, resources, and interactive Web sites. Lists 26 science Web sites specializing in question answering, activities, experiments, optics, math, dissection, inventions, physics, space, genetics, cockroaches and worms, and Twinkies (sponge cakes).…

  12. Conservation Science Fair Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soil Conservation Society of America, Ankeny, IA.

    Included are ideas, suggestions, and examples for selecting and designing conservation science projects. Over 70 possible conservation subject areas are presented with suggested projects. References are cited with each of these subject areas, and a separate list of annotated references is included. The references pertain to general subject…

  13. Science Fairs for Science Literacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackey, Katherine; Culbertson, Timothy

    2014-03-01

    Scientific discovery, technological revolutions, and complex global challenges are commonplace in the modern era. People are bombarded with news about climate change, pandemics, and genetically modified organisms, and scientific literacy has never been more important than in the present day. Yet only 29% of American adults have sufficient understanding to be able to read science stories reported in the popular press [Miller, 2010], and American students consistently rank below other nations in math and science [National Center for Education Statistics, 2012].

  14. Dissection & Science Fairs. [Information Packet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Anti-Vivisection Society, Chicago, IL.

    This collection of pamphlets and articles reprinted from other National Anti-Vivisection Society (NAVS) publications was compiled to address the issues of classroom laboratory dissection and the use of animals in science fair projects. Three of the pamphlets contained in this packet are student handbooks designed to help students of elementary,…

  15. The Science Fair: A New Look at an Old Tradition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McComas, William F.

    2011-01-01

    As a science teacher educator and former science teacher, the author has long known that the science fair should be part of his professional experience, but he had not given it much thought until recently. As he worked with his daughter's project, he became convinced that it is time to reconsider the range of activities one calls "science fairs."…

  16. Inside the Science Fair: The Judge's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rillero, Peter; Zambo, Ron

    2011-01-01

    Science fair judges provide secrets to a successful science fair. Whether students are competing in science fairs at the high school, local, district, regional, state, or international level, their success is dependent on the judges' interpretation of their work. In this article, the authors present a series of questions and answers from past…

  17. A Science Fair Companion. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCann, Wendy Sherman

    This digest comments on various aspects of school science fairs. General expectations for science fair projects and participants are discussed, and tips for choosing a topic and completing a project are given. Organizational strategies for teachers charged with conducting science fairs are presented. Guidelines for parents in helping children with…

  18. Science Fair Projects. LC Science Tracer Bullet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howland, Joyce, Comp.

    The sources listed in this document are selected to provide guidance to students, parents, and teachers throughout the process of planning, developing, implementing, and competing in science fair activities. While sources range in suitability from elementary to high school levels, the emphasis is on materials for grades 9-12. This guide updates LC…

  19. A Standards-Based Science Fair

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rillero, Peter

    2011-01-01

    In standards-based science fairs, children learn more about what they are interested in. They deepen understandings of how science works and improve inquiry skills--including the ability to communicate and share research results. Parents learn more about science inquiry and their child's science abilities. The standards-based science fair builds…

  20. North Carolina State Science Fair Handbook. 1988-89.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Board of Education, Raleigh.

    Science fairs represent the culmination of student research efforts under the guidance of teachers and other persons interested in science topics. The total scientific process should be involved in the development of a project which results in a science fair exhibition. The student should learn to recognize problems, plan an experiment, gather and…

  1. A Science Fair Partnership: An Active Learning Experience for Teacher Candidates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Deborah Louise

    2015-01-01

    STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) education is a national instructional priority. As part of Southeastern Louisiana University's STEM Outreach Initiative, funded by a Shell Oil Company Foundation grant to raise interest in STEM-related activities, teacher candidates were given the opportunity to leave their classroom to…

  2. Science Fairs in Elementary School. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balas, Andrea K.

    This digest presents a summary discussion of the value of holding science fairs in the elementary school context. Reasons for conducting science fairs for elementary students are discussed in terms of several learning theories. Developmentally appropriate types of elementary science projects are suggested. Goals for elementary school science fairs…

  3. NEW IDEAS FOR SCIENCE FAIR PROJECTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FARMER, ROBERT A.; SAWYER, ROGER WILLIAMS

    THIS GUIDE FOR THE SCIENCE FAIR PARTICIPANTS BEGINS WITH A CHAPTER ON THE NATURE OF SCIENCE, AND THE SCIENCE FAIR, AND CONTINUES THROUGH THE FIVE CHAPTERS OF PART ONE, PLANNING AND EXECUTING YOUR PROJECT, TO EXPLAIN THE DETAILS INVOLVED IN SELECTING, DEVELOPING, AND EXHIBITING A PROJECT. PART II OF THE VOLUME CONSIDERS THE STRUCTURE OF SCIENCE…

  4. Science Fair Scene: Turning Ideas into Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McQueen, David R.

    1991-01-01

    Outlines the steps necessary to conduct a science fair project and examines two specific examples of how a basic idea for a science fair topic can be followed to its completion. Provides examples of day-to-day operational science in a basic botany project and a lunar geography project. (JJK)

  5. Science Fairs in the Eighth, Seventh, or Sixth Grades?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knapp, John, II

    1975-01-01

    Presents comments on problems voiced by teachers about conducting science fairs with middle school children, also cites some advantages of science fairs. A list of simple experiments is offered that are considered within the interests and intellectual range of middle school children. (Author/EB)

  6. The Road to Stress-Free Science Fairs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrier, Sarah J.

    2006-01-01

    While few disagree that science fair projects have great potential for student learning, the preparation and execution of projects can be stressful for teachers, students, and parents alike. While working as a fourth-grade teacher, the author's goal was to provide students with a science fair experience minus the pressure of trying to figure out…

  7. Astrobiology Student Science Fair Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadooka, M.; Meech, K. J.

    2004-11-01

    Extrasolar Planet Transit and The Light Curve of a Variable Star are some titles of high school student projects entered in the Hawaii State Science Fair. These students were mentored by teachers who participated in the UH Institute for Astronomy Toward Other Planetary Systems summer program under the direction of professor Karen J. Meech. After attending several 3-week TOPS NSF workshops from 1999, these teachers in 2003 were trained to do observing plans to obtain telescope images, use image processing software MIRA for photometry, and produce light curves of variable stars and extrasolar planet transits. Others used the software Astrometrica to do astrometry of Kuiper Belt Objects. Using Compaq laptop computers on long term loan, our teachers mentored their students for astronomy projects during the 2003-2004 school year with the assistance of IfA astronomers and graduate students. Observing plans for images from the 31 inch Lowell Telescope in Arizona and the 2.2 meter UH telescope at Mauna Kea Observatory were followed. Students had to learn about variables such as exposure time, magnitude, frequency requirements, and ephemeris. The many iterations were time consuming and demanded patience and perseverance. Poor weather conditions exposed the students to the realities of astronomy research, so they experienced the highs of successful projects. Future projects will be related to the UH NAI team research using the 2.0 meter Faulkes Telescope located on Haleakala on island of Maui. The TOPS program is funded by National Science Foundation.

  8. Science Fairs: A Primer for Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamrick, Linda; Harty, Harold

    1983-01-01

    Guidelines for parents whose children may be involved in preparing a science fair project are outlined and discussed. Suggests that this article (or a teacher prepared letter) be sent home with students when they are assigned a science project. (JN)

  9. Science Fairs: Promoting Positive Attitudes Towards Science from Student Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Janell D.; Cordry, Sheila; Unline, Carol

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the article is to describe step by step procedures teachers can use to successfully engage their students in the development of science fair projects. The article further explains how the student should prepare their science fair project for science fair competition. It is expected that increasing student participation in science…

  10. The PANDA experiment at FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Destefanis, M.

    2013-12-01

    The PANDA (antiProton ANnihilation at DArmstadt) experiment is one of the major projects in preparation at the upcoming FAIR facility in Darmstadt, Germany. It will study interactions between antiprotons and protons or nuclei in the momentum range from 1.5 GeV/c to 15 GeV/c. The PANDA scientific program will address a wide range of topics, all aiming at improving our understanding of the strong interaction and hadron structure. The PANDA detector is a general-purpose spectrometer that will collect high quality and high statistics data in the fields of meson spectroscopy, baryon-antibaryon production, baryon spectroscopy, hypernuclear physics, hadron properties in the nuclear medium, and nucleon structure. This paper reviews some of the main physics topics of the experiment, together with a presentation of the detector.

  11. Janice VanCleave's Rocks and Minerals: Mind-Boggling Experiments You Can Turn into Science Fair Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanCleave, Janice

    Science projects are a great way for students to learn more about science as they search for the answers to specific problems. This book offers guidance and provides ideas for students as they plan experiments, find and record information related to the problem, and organize data to find answers to the problem. The 20 topics in this book suggest…

  12. The Nuts and Bolts of Science Fairs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanDeman, Barry A.; Parfitt, Philip C.

    1985-01-01

    Presents answers to 11 basic questions for teachers involved in science fairs. Selection of topics, judging criteria, parental cooperation, project safety, state/national competitions, and other topics are addressed. Each answer includes references to other related literature. (DH)

  13. Reverse Your Science Fair with Educational Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Jordan; Zardetto-Smith, Andrea; Mu, Keli; Demetrikopoulos, Melissa K.

    2004-01-01

    This article suggests several ways teachers can get their students really excited about science by bringing scientists to the science fair in a different role than the traditional "judge." With a bit more effort, scientists can become actively involved as presenters of hands-on activities. This article discusses: what happens when the tables are…

  14. Four Tools for Science Fair Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Sherry Weaver; Messmer, Barbara; Storm, Bill; Weaver, Cheryl

    2007-01-01

    These teacher-tested ideas will guide students in creating true inquiry-based projects. Two of the ideas, the Topic Selection Wizard and Science Project Timeline, are appropriate for all science fair programs, even new ones. For existing programs, the Black Box of Project Improvement and After-School Project Clinic improve project quality and…

  15. Science Fair Scene: How to Conduct a Science-Fair Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McQueen, David R.

    1991-01-01

    Advice on how to transform a practical idea into a first-class science fair project is provided. How to do scientific research, what to include in a science fair report, how to pick a topic, when to begin, writing the report, and making the display are topics of discussion. (KR)

  16. Science Fair Projects: Teaching Science or Something Else?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornell, Elizabeth A.

    1981-01-01

    Frequently, science fair projects have little relevance to the goals of science. Criteria for judging projects are not evident to students, parents, judges, and other participants. Listed are seven steps to a better fair project which emphasize methodology and presentation. Also included are hints for involving parents. (DC)

  17. Teacher Opinions Concerning Science Projects and Science Fairs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grote, Michael

    1995-01-01

    Surveys about science projects and science fairs of (n=191) high school science department chairpersons found strong support for preservice training in structuring independent science research projects, belief that doing science research projects taught lessons that could not be duplicated by classroom instruction, and a slight majority agreement…

  18. BOOK REVIEW: Science Fair Projects: Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Helen

    2000-11-01

    I have often thought that the notion of a Science Fair is intrinsically a good one but have never set one up. With this book such an undertaking is possible, with 47 projects from which you can choose. Each project has a clearly stated purpose with an overview that contains the physics you need to get started. A hypothesis, or sometimes two, and a procedure detailing what the student should do follow this. The materials to be used are those you should be able to find at home, and safety guidelines as well as places the student needs adult help are clearly marked. Every project asks the student to write down the results of their experiment and decide whether or not their hypothesis was correct. There are also suggestions for taking each project further. Some of these projects are standard experiments that you may already do with students in class, for example, making plasticine boats, string telephones and levers. Most are interesting twists on standard experiments such as using a wedge as a simple machine, home-made spinning toys and the experiments with light bulbs. The latter are the only real cause for concern if students were to do these things at home as adult supervision would be essential. This is obviously an American book, though. Teachers in British classrooms would need to work out how to deal with the references to temperature in Fahrenheit and mass in ounces. Length is usually given in centimetres as well as inches. Translations of soda bottles and bobby pins would also be needed. This book is designed to be full of ideas and to give structure to projects students can do at home, not to provide ideas that you can transport into the classroom. It does this very well and I would recommend it to anyone thinking of starting up a Science Fair. Alternatively, this is an excellent resource for more interesting homework assignments that would put more responsibility on the student and give them something fun to do.

  19. White House Science Fair Emphasizes Importance of STEM Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2014-06-01

    "I have a confession to make," U.S. president Barack Obama told the audience of young inventors and their mentors at a 27 May White House Science Fair ceremony in the East Room of the White House. "When I was growing up, my science fair projects were not as successful as the ones here." Recalling that during one of his experiments, "a bunch of mice escaped in my grandmother's apartment," Obama joked, "These experiments did not take me straight to the White House."

  20. Getting a Jump on the Science Fair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fort, Deborah C.

    1985-01-01

    Success of the Murch Elementary School (Washington, DC) science fair is due to many factors which are applicable to other schools. Suggestions, ideas, and hints are given in this description of the school's program. Projects with an electrocardiogram, water weeds, and preserving ice are also discussed. (DH)

  1. The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Virtual Science Fair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolognese, Jeff; Walden, Harvey; Obenschain, Arthur F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This report describes the development of the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Virtual Science Fair, including its history and outgrowth from the traditional regional science fairs supported by NASA. The results of the 1999 Virtual Science Fair pilot program, the mechanics of running the 2000 Virtual Science Fair and its results, and comments and suggestions for future Virtual Science Fairs are provided. The appendices to the report include the original proposal for this project, the judging criteria, the user's guide and the judge's guide to the Virtual Science Fair Web site, the Fair publicity brochure and the Fair award designs, judges' and students' responses to survey questions about the Virtual Science Fair, and lists of student entries to both the 1999 and 2000 Fairs.

  2. The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Virtual Science Fair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolognese, Jeff; Walden, Harvey; Obenschain, Arthur F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This report describes the development of the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Virtual Science Fair, including its history and outgrowth from the traditional regional science fairs supported by NASA. The results of the 1999 Virtual Science Fair pilot program, the mechanics of running the 2000 Virtual Science Fair and its results, and comments and suggestions for future Virtual Science Fairs are provided. The appendices to the report contain supporting documentation, including the original proposal for this project, the judging criteria, the user's guide and the judge's guide to the Virtual Science Fair Web site, the Fair publicity brochure and the Fair award designs, judges' and students' responses to survey questions about the Virtual Science Fair, and lists of student entries to both the 1999 and 2000 Fairs.

  3. Travelling the Road beyond the Curriculum through a Science Fair

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avraamidou, Lucy; Evagorou, Maria

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we describe a model for a science fair, within the context of an elementary science methods course. We first describe the theoretical perspectives from which the idea of science fairs derives and we provide definitions as we sketch the characteristics of commonly used science fairs. We then describe the context and processes of a…

  4. Agricultural Science Fairs: Are Students Truly Learning from This Activity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boleman, C. T.; Burrell, F., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    A pretest/posttest administered to 480 fourth-graders revealed an increase in correct responses for 9 of 10 questions following participation in an agricultural science fair. Significant increases were related to knowledge of how agriculture affects everyday life. A teacher survey (n=89) indicated that it was a positive learning experience but…

  5. Hosting a Successful Science Fair to Boost Interest in Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, James; Cruse, Thomas

    2008-10-01

    Science fairs are a popular way for junior and senior high school students (grades 7 through 12) to display science and engineering projects and participate in a competition for prizes and honors. In the state of Ohio students can advance through their school fairs to district science fairs and then on to the State Science Day in early May. The University of Cincinnati (UC) has hosted one of the Ohio district science fairs since 2005 - the official name is the UC Science and Engineering Expo (UCSEE). The University hosts between 300 and 400 student projects at this event. The day itself includes the training of the 200+ judges, the actual judging, activities for the students' families and friends, tours of the UC campus facilities, and culminates with a guest speaker and an awards ceremony. The students compete for prizes and scholarships worth approximately 50k and over 100 of the UCSEE projects typically advance to participate in State Science Day. Additionally some top projects from the UCSEE are also sent directly to the International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF). The authors have been heavily involved in the planning, organization and production of the UCSEE since UC began offering it in 2005. Much of the planning and background work, as well as memories, from this major project will be discussed in this presentation.

  6. Earth Science: 49 Science Fair Projects Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonnet, Robert L.; Keen, G. Daniel

    This book offers a large collection of Earth science projects and project ideas for students, teachers, and parents. The projects described are complete but can also be used as spring boards to create expanded projects. Overviews, organizational direction, suggested hypotheses, materials, procedures, and controls are provided. The projects…

  7. Science Teachers' Views about the Science Fair at Primary Education Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tortop, Hasan Said

    2013-01-01

    Science fair is an environment where students present their scientific research projects. Opinions of science teachers who participated as a mentor in science fair are important for determining of the science fair quality and its contribution of science education. The aim of study was to determine science teachers' views about the science fair at…

  8. Software Development Infrastructure for the FAIR Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlig, F.; Al-Turany, M.; Bertini, D.; Karabowicz, R.

    2011-12-01

    The proposed project FAIR (Facility for Anti-proton and Ion Research) is an international accelerator facility of the next generation. It builds on top of the experience and technological developments already made at the existing GSI facility, and incorporate new technological concepts. The four scientific pillars of FAIR are NUSTAR (nuclear structure and astrophysics), PANDA (QCD studies with cooled beams of anti-protons), CBM (physics of hadronic matter at highest baryon densities), and APPA (atomic physics, plasma physics, and applications). The FairRoot framework used by all of the big FAIR experiments as a base for their own specific developments, provides basic functionality like IO, geometry handling etc. The challenge is to support all the different experiments with their heterogeneous requirements. Due to the limited manpower, one of the first design decisions was to (re)use as much as possible already available and tested software and to focus on the development of the framework. Beside the framework itself, the FairRoot core team also provides some software development tools. We will describe the complete set of tools in this article. The Makefiles for all projects are generated using CMake. For software testing and the corresponding quality assurance, we use CTest to generate the results and CDash as web front end. The tools are completed by subversion as source code repository and trac as tool for the complete source code management. This set of tools allows us to offer the full functionality we have for FairRoot also to the experiments based on FairRoot.

  9. Can participation in a school science fair improve middle school students' attitudes toward science and interest in science careers?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finnerty, Valerie

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether participation in a school-based science fair affects middle school students' attitudes toward science and interest in science and engineering careers. A quasi-experimental design was used to compare students' pre- and posttest attitudes toward and interest in science. Forty-eight of the 258 participants completed a school-based science fair during the study. In addition, twelve middle school science teachers completed an online survey. Both the Survey of Science Attitudes and Interest I and II (SSAI-I and II) measured students' attitudes toward and interest in science and science and mathematics self-efficacy, asked about classroom inquiry experiences and gathered demographic information. An online survey gathered qualitative data about science teachers' perceptions of school science fairs. The results showed no significant interactions among completion of a science fair project and attitudes toward and interest in science, science and mathematics self-efficacy or gender. There were significant differences at both pre- and posttest in attitudes between the students who did and did not complete a science fair project. All participating teachers believed that participation in science fairs could have a positive effect on students' attitudes and interest, but cited lack of time as a major impediment. There was significant interaction between level of classroom inquiry and attitudes and interest in science; students who reported more experiences had higher scores on these measures. Classroom inquiry also interacted with the effects of a science fair and participants' pre- and posttest attitude scores. Finally, the amount and source of assistance on a science fair project had a significant impact on students' posttest measures. Major limitations which affect the generalization of these findings include the timing of the administration of the pretest, the number of participants in the experimental group and differences

  10. Getting Started in Science Fairs: From Planning to Judging. The Teacher's Science Fair Survival Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Phyllis J.

    This book is provided as a helpful tool in ensuring a successful and satisfying elementary school science fair. The book clarifies the roles of teachers, parents, and students and provides information about types of projects, practical tips, and possible topics for research. Included are short bibliographies, sample forms (which are teacher…

  11. Students' Sources of Motivation for Participating in Science Fairs: An Exploratory Study within the Canada-Wide Science Fair 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dionne, Liliane; Reis, Giuliano; Trudel, Louis; Guillet, Gabriel; Kleine, Leonard; Hancianu, Corina

    2012-01-01

    Science fairs have been for many years a popular school activity in North America. They are a venue for the popularization of science and consequently an important encouragement for the pursuit of careers in science or engineering. However, little is known about students' perceived motives for participating in local or national science fairs and…

  12. Science Fairs: Tired of the Same Old, Same Old?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silver, Debbie

    1994-01-01

    Presents an alternative to the competition fostered through traditional science fairs. The Science Expo is an all-day event meant to show students and the community that science is fascinating and fun. (PR)

  13. From the Science Fair to the NASDAQ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kissinger, Peter T.

    2007-04-01

    Electroanalytical chemistry has been a primary activity in Ph.D.-granting institutions since the 1940s. It has proved to be an excellent tool for research, enabling students to think in time and space and grasp thermodynamics, kinetics, and instrumentation principles as applied to accessible measurements. This personal perspective is an informal review of this dynamic field from the late 1950s to the present. During this period, the capability of instrumentation advanced by six orders of magnitude in many respects. The author began his career in 1960 with a high school science fair project on electrochemistry. This evolved into undergraduate, doctoral, and postdoctoral research, leading to a career in academia and industry.

  14. The 1939-1940 New York World's Fair and the Transformation of the American Science Extracurriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terzian, Sevan G.

    2009-01-01

    At the 1939-1940 New York World's Fair, several thousand boys and girls, all members of a growing national network of high school science and engineering clubs, displayed their science fair projects and conducted live experiments to more than 10 million visitors. Housed in the building sponsored by the Westinghouse Electric and Manufacturing…

  15. Obama Announces Science Education Goal at White House Science Fair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-02-01

    With student participants in the second annual White House Science Fair as a backdrop, President Barack Obama announced on 7 February programs to help prepare new math and science teachers and to meet a new goal of having 1 million more U.S. college graduates in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) over the next decade than there would be at the current graduation rate. That goal is outlined in a report entitled “Engage to excel,” by the President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST), released the same day. Obama also announced several other initiatives, including a $22 million private-sector investment, led by the Carnegie Corporation of New York, to invest in STEM teacher training. After he toured the science fair projects, Obama said the science fair students “inspire” him. “What impresses me so much is not just how smart you are, but it's the fact that you recognize you've got a responsibility to use your talents in service of something bigger than yourselves,” he said. What these young people are doing is “going to make a bigger difference in the life of our country over the long term than just about anything,” adding, “We've got to emphasize how important this is and recognize these incredible young people who are doing that that I couldn't even imagine thinking about at fifth grade or eighth grade or in high school.”

  16. NASA at the 2014 White House Science Fair

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA joined President Obama at the White House for the 2014 White House Science Fair on May 27, recognizing the student winners of a broad range of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) ...

  17. Teaching in Science and Career Fairs: An Application using Dolls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, E. Helen

    2001-01-01

    Focuses on the setting of a science and career fair; and discusses the use of cultural artifacts. Examines the use of folk dolls in a science and career fair. Includes background information and addresses the reasons for using the dolls. Includes references. (CMK)

  18. Development of Teachers' Attitude Scale towards Science Fair

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tortop, Hasan Said

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to develop a new scale for measuring teachers' attitude towards science fair. Teacher Attitude Scale towards Science Fair (TASSF) is an inventory made up of 19 items and five dimensions. The study included such stages as literature review, the preparation of the item pool and the reliability and validity analysis. First of…

  19. Non-Traditional Characteristics of a Successful Science Fair Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sumrall, William; Schillinger, Don

    2004-01-01

    Science fairs offer students the opportunity to develop skills in inquiry, writing research proposals, working with peers, verifying results, and sharing experimental findings. However, the science fair itself does not necessarily translate into a student's attainment of such skills. Project quality and a student's successful achievement of good…

  20. The Chesapeake College Social Sciences Exposition and Fair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregory, Conway

    A Social Sciences Exposition and Fair has been conducted annually by Chesapeake College since 1978 as part of an effort to involve high school students and community organizations in competitive, academic events related to the social sciences and history, and to encourage faculty to participate in student recruitment. The first fair, held in…

  1. The Need to Explore: Nonexperimental Science Fair Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNay, Margaret

    1985-01-01

    For the sake of grade school entrants in particular, nonexperimental science fair projects should be encouraged and accepted for science fairs. Support for this approach is given along with several suggestions for projects. Guidelines for judging nonexperimental projects are also included. (DH)

  2. Science Fairs Plus: Reinventing an Old Favorite. Grades K-8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cusick, Judy, Ed.; Duval, Carol, Ed.; Smith, Betty, Ed.

    This book presents a selection of articles published in "Science and Children", "Science Scope", and "The Science Teacher", all journals published by the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA), that cover all grade levels from elementary through secondary education. It describes how to organize and conduct a successful science fair. Contents…

  3. Bridging a High School Science Fair Experience with First Year Undergraduate Research: Using the E-SPART Analyzer to Determine Electrostatic Charge Properties of Compositionally Varied Rock Dust Particles as Terrestrial Analogues to Mars Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, A. G.; Williams, W. J. W.; Mazumder, M. K.; Biris, A.; Srirama, P. K.

    2005-01-01

    NASA missions to Mars confirm presence of surficial particles, as well as dramatic periods of aeolian reworking. Dust deposition on, or infiltration into, exploration equipment such as spacecraft, robotic explorers, solar panel power supplies, and even spacesuits, can pose significant problems such as diminished power collection, short circuits / discharges, and added weight. We report results conducted initially as a science fair project and a study now part of a first year University undergraduate research experience.

  4. Experiments on extreme states of matter towards HIF at FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharkov, Boris; Varentsov, Dmitry

    2014-01-01

    The Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research in Europe (FAIR) will provide worldwide unique accelerator and experimental facilities allowing for a large variety of unprecedented frontier research in extreme state of matter physics and applied science. Indeed, it is the largest basic research project on the roadmap of the European Strategy Forum of Research Infrastructures (ESFRI), and it is cornerstone of the European Research Area. FAIR offers to scientists from the whole world an abundance of outstanding research opportunities, broader in scope than any other contemporary large-scale facility worldwide. More than 2500 scientists are involved in setting up and exploiting the FAIR facility. They will push the frontiers of our knowledge in plasma, nuclear, atomic, hadron and applied physics far ahead, with important implications also for other fields in science such as cosmology, astro and particle physics, and technology. It includes 14 initial experiments, which form the four scientific pillars of FAIR. The main thrust of intense heavy ion and laser beam-matter interaction research focuses on the structure and evolution of extreme state of matter on both a microscopic and on a cosmic scale.

  5. Experiments on extreme states of matter towards HIF at FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharkov, Boris; Varentsov, Dmitry

    2013-11-01

    The Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research in Europe (FAIR) will provide worldwide unique accelerator and experimental facilities allowing for a large variety of unprecedented frontier research in extreme state of matter physics and applied science. Indeed, it is the largest basic research project on the roadmap of the European Strategy Forum of Research Infrastructures (ESFRI), and it is cornerstone of the European Research Area. FAIR offers to scientists from the whole world an abundance of outstanding research opportunities, broader in scope than any other contemporary large-scale facility worldwide. More than 2500 scientists are involved in setting up and exploiting the FAIR facility. They will push the frontiers of our knowledge in plasma, nuclear, atomic, hadron and applied physics far ahead, with important implications also for other fields in science such as cosmology, astro and particle physics, and technology. It includes 14 initial experiments, which form the four scientific pillars of FAIR. The main thrust of intense heavy ion and laser beam-matter interaction research focuses on the structure and evolution of extreme state of matter on both a microscopic and on a cosmic scale.

  6. Students Inspiring Students: An Online Tool for Science Fair Participants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seeman, Jeffrey I.; Lawrence, Tom

    2011-01-01

    One goal of 21st-century education is to develop mature citizens who can identify issues, solve problems, and communicate solutions. What better way for students to learn these skills than by participating in a science and engineering fair? Fair participants face the same challenges as professional scientists and engineers, even Nobel laureates.…

  7. From science fair to project-based science: A study of the implementation of an innovation through an existing activity system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Lisa Jean

    The implementation process is critical to the success of educational innovations. Project-based science is an innovation designed to support students' science learning. Science fair is a pervasive school practice in which students exhibit science projects. Little is known about how science fair may affect the implementation of reform efforts in science education. This study explores the relationship of science fair and project-based science in the classrooms of three science teachers. Two theories are used to understand science fair as an instructional practice. Cultural historical activity theory supports an analysis of the origins and development of science fair. The idea of communities of practice supports a focus on why and how educational practitioners participate in science fair and what meanings the activity holds for them. The study identifies five historically-based design themes that have shaped science fair: general science, project method, scientific method, extra-curricular activity, and laboratory science. The themes provide a new framework for describing teachers' classroom practices for science fair activities and support analysis of the ways their practices incorporate aspects of project-based science. Three case studies in Chicago present ethnographic descriptions of science fair practices within the context of school communities. One focuses on the scientific method as a linear process for doing science, another on knowledge generation through laboratory experiments, and the third on student ability to engage in open-ended inquiry. One teacher reinvents a project-based science curriculum to strengthen students' laboratory-based science fair projects, while another reinvents science fair to teach science as inquiry. In each case, science fair is part of the school's efforts to improve science instruction. The cases suggest that reform efforts help to perpetuate science fair practice. To support systemic improvements in science education, this

  8. The Compressed Baryonic Matter Experiment at FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senger, Peter

    Substantial experimental and theoretical efforts worldwide are devoted to explore the phase diagram of strongly interacting matter. At top RHIC and LHC energies, the QCD phase diagram is studied at very high temperatures and very low net-baryon densities. These conditions presumably existed in the early universe about a microsecond after the big bang. For larger net-baryon densities and lower temperatures, it is expected that the QCD phase diagram exhibits a rich structure such as a critical point, a first order phase transition between hadronic and partonic matter, or new phases like quarkyonic matter. The experimental discovery of these prominent landmarks of the QCD phase diagram would be a major breakthrough in our understanding of the properties of nuclear matter. The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment will be one of the major scientific pillars of the future Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt. The goal of the CBM research program is to explore the QCD phase diagram in the region of high baryon densities using high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions. This includes the study of the equation-of-state of nuclear matter at neutron star core densities, and the search for the deconfinement and chiral phase transitions. The CBM detector is designed to measure rare diagnostic probes such as multi-strange hyperons, charmed particles and vector mesons decaying into lepton pairs with unprecedented precision and statistics. Most of these particles will be studied for the first time in the FAIR energy range. In order to achieve the required precision, the measurements will be performed at very high reaction rates of 100 kHz to 10 MHz. This requires very fast and radiation-hard detectors, and a novel data read-out and analysis concept based on free streaming front-end electronics and a high-performance computing cluster for online event selection. The layout, the physics performance, and the status of the proposed CBM experimental

  9. A National Science Fair: Exhibiting Support for the Knowledge Economy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bencze, John Lawrence; Bowen, Gervase Michael

    2009-01-01

    Student-directed, open-ended scientific investigations and invention projects may serve to deepen and broaden students' scientific and technological literacy, and, in so doing, enable them to succeed in democracies greatly affected by processes and products of science and technology. Science fairs, events at which student-led projects are…

  10. Physics at the International Science and Engineering Fair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Jearl

    1979-01-01

    A judge for the physics projects for the 1979 International Science and Engineering Fair describes many of the more popular science projects. Projects described include the following: carbon dioxide and helium-neon lasers, reverse flame investigations, holography, construction of a magnetic bottle to confine plasma, and aerodynamic drag. (BT)

  11. Trust, confidence, procedural fairness, outcome fairness, moral conviction, and the acceptance of GM field experiments.

    PubMed

    Siegrist, Michael; Connor, Melanie; Keller, Carmen

    2012-08-01

    In 2005, Swiss citizens endorsed a moratorium on gene technology, resulting in the prohibition of the commercial cultivation of genetically modified crops and the growth of genetically modified animals until 2013. However, scientific research was not affected by this moratorium, and in 2008, GMO field experiments were conducted that allowed us to examine the factors that influence their acceptance by the public. In this study, trust and confidence items were analyzed using principal component analysis. The analysis revealed the following three factors: "economy/health and environment" (value similarity based trust), "trust and honesty of industry and scientists" (value similarity based trust), and "competence" (confidence). The results of a regression analysis showed that all the three factors significantly influenced the acceptance of GM field experiments. Furthermore, risk communication scholars have suggested that fairness also plays an important role in the acceptance of environmental hazards. We, therefore, included measures for outcome fairness and procedural fairness in our model. However, the impact of fairness may be moderated by moral conviction. That is, fairness may be significant for people for whom GMO is not an important issue, but not for people for whom GMO is an important issue. The regression analysis showed that, in addition to the trust and confidence factors, moral conviction, outcome fairness, and procedural fairness were significant predictors. The results suggest that the influence of procedural fairness is even stronger for persons having high moral convictions compared with persons having low moral convictions. PMID:22150405

  12. Evaluation of constructivist pedagogy: Influence on critical thinking skills, science fair participation and level of performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foxx, Robbie Evelyn

    Science education reform, driven by a rapidly advancing technological society, demands the attention of both elementary and middle school curriculum-developers. Science education training in current standards (National Research Council [NRC] Standards 1996) emphasize inquiry, which is reported to be a basic tenet of the theory known as constructivism (NAASP, 1996; Cohen, 1988; Conley, 1993; Friedman, 1999; Newman, Marks, & Gamoran, 1996; Smerdon & Burkam 1999; Sizer 1992; Talbert & McLaughlin 1993; Tobin & Gallagher, 1987; Yager, 1991, 2000). Pedagogy focusing on the tenets of constructivist theory, at the intermediate level, can address current science standards. Many science educators believe participation in science fairs helps students develop the attitudes, skills, and knowledge that will help them to be comfortable and successful in the scientific and technological society (Czerniak, 1996). Competing in science fairs is one vehicle which allows students to apply science to societal issues, solve problems and model those things scientists do. Moreover, constructing a science fair project is suggested as being an excellent means to foster the development of concepts necessary in promoting scientific literacy (Czerniak, 1996). Research further suggests that through science fairs or other inquiry activities, students construct their knowledge with fewer misconceptions as they explore and discover the nature of science (NRC 1996). Tohn 's study (as cited in Bellipanni, 1994) stated that science fairs are a major campaign to increase student skills and to allow students a chance to have fun with science. The purpose of this research was twofold: (1) to assess science problem solving skills of students instructed using constructivist pedagogy, and (2) to explore the effects of constructivist pedagogy's influence(s) on science fair participation/placement. Students' attitudes resulting from these experiences were examined as well.

  13. The Impact of Involvement in a Science Fair on Seventh Grade Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yasar, Senay; Baker, Dale

    Current research shows that the number of science fairs and science fair participants is increasing. However, other than the growth of participant numbers, there is very little research investigating the benefits of these science fairs and assessing whether science fair projects are worth the time, effort, and money spent on them. The purpose of…

  14. EDGE (Experiential Discoveries in Geoscience Education) Field Course Provides Alaskan High School and Middle School students with Earth Science and GIS Skills for Science Fair Projects and a College Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connor, C. L.; Prakash, A.; Brownlee, M.; Nagorski, S.; Walling, R.

    2006-12-01

    For this outreach project we created watershed scale field activities in the Mendenhall Glacier system in Juneau, Alaska to introduce pre-college students to earth surface processes. These activities were designed to teach field data collection methods and to provide experiences that included exposure to the disciplines of glaciology, hydrology, and geomorphology. Students used their own observations to understand the on-going effects of warming climate in southeastern Alaska. Twenty seven, pre-college students from throughout the state participated in a 5-day, two-credit, introductory college-level course. This course was designed to introduce them to earth science as practiced in the field. Students divided their time between field sessions with data collection and indoor GIS labs. EDGE field excursions enabled students to learn about glacial geomorphology from river rafts, to collect stream discharge and other hydrologic data in local streams, and to integrate glacier recession observations with GPS waypoints collected from observed recessional positions. In labs at the University of Alaska Southeast campus, EDGE students were introduced to the fundamentals of ArcGIS. They downloaded their GPS waypoints onto modern and historic maps. They analyzed their stream flow data and created dynamic maps using their own observations in the field. During Fall 2006 semester, the students will generate earth science projects in their villages and towns that they can complete and present to their peers. EDGE teachers who attended a 10 day workshop in June will mentor their EDGE students. EDGE teachers and students will return to the UAS Juneau campus in March 2007 for a symposium. EGDE students will present their projects to Juneau area undergraduates and Juneau School District K-12 classes. In addition EDGE high school students will have the option to enter and compete in the Southeast Alaska Regional Science Fair held the same weekend. Funding from the National Science

  15. Increasing Student Participation in Science Fair Competitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miles, Rhea

    2012-01-01

    In the summer of 2009, 22 African American middle school students in eastern North Carolina became participants in the Reach Up program to increase the number of underrepresented students participating in science-, technology-, engineering-, and mathematics-related activities. One of the goals of the program was for these students to participate…

  16. Are We Treating Science and Scientists Fairly?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Lyn; Matthews, Brian

    1998-01-01

    Discusses attempts to correct perceptions of scientists and science among fourth-grade students. Efforts to advance the view that girls and people from various ethnic backgrounds could become scientists met with some success. After they were presented with information on a range of scientists, students drew pictures of scientists that were more…

  17. Gender Differences in Science Interests: An Analysis of Science Fair Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawton, Carol A.; Bordens, Kenneth S.

    Gender differences in science interests were examined in two studies of projects entered in a regional science fair in kindergarten through grade 12. A content analysis of 1,319 project topics and materials submitted to the Northeastern Indiana Regional Science and Engineering Fair from 1991 through 1993 showed that girls were more likely than…

  18. [Fair use of tests in health sciences].

    PubMed

    Espelt, Albert; Viladrich, Carme; Doval, Eduardo; Aliaga, Joan; García-Rueda, Rebeca; Tárrega, Salomé

    2014-01-01

    Standardized measurement instruments (tests) have become an essential tool in health sciences. The concept of equity in the development, adaptation and administration of psychometric tests was first introduced in "Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing" published in 1999 by the American Educational Research Association, the American Psychological Association, and the National Council on Measurement in Education. Despite its importance, this concept has been scarcely used in epidemiology and public health. Consequently, this methodological note aims to explain the concept of equity in testing and to provide tools and indications to detect and solve their inequitable use. PMID:24928357

  19. Examining Perceptions of the Science Fair Project: Content or Process?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Jinx Stapleton

    2003-01-01

    Discusses student research, information literacy and research skills, and the role of inquiry in the research process. Presents a case study of a middle school science fair project that examined what students should accomplish in their research and what the role of stakeholders is, including teachers, parents, and school library media specialists.…

  20. Research and Display Attributes of Social Science Fair Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loyless, Bonnie W.

    This study was designed to answer the following questions relative to social science fair projects: (1) To what extent were instructional media techniques utilized in the project display? (2) To what extent did teachers assist students with topic selection for the projects? (3) To what extent were the teachers and media specialists involved with…

  1. How to Judge a Science Fair. Use the Consensus Method.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, Karen Noel; Levin, Robert E.

    1991-01-01

    Discussed is a method for judging science fair projects considered to be more accurate than just an averaging of scores. The use of many categories so that the number of projects in each is relatively small is proposed. The advantages of using the consensus method are described. (KR)

  2. Boulder Experiments: An Environmental Fair. Profiles of Promise 24.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiley, Karen B.

    A group of Boulder, Colorado, high school students and townspeople conducted a two-day community environmental fair in the downtown street of Boulder. The fair, providing various instructive experiments depicting alternatives for Boulder's future social and physical environment, grew out of the Student Assisted Development of Materials for…

  3. Nevada's Climate Change High School Science Fair Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, P.

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this 3 year project funded by NSF (GEO 1035049) is to increase the climate change science content knowledge and teaching effectiveness of in-service high school science teachers and increase the numbers of quality of high school geoscience projects competing in Nevada's three regional Intel ISEF (International Science & Engineering Fair) affiliated science fairs. In year 1 of the project participants consisted of six female and three male high school teachers from across Nevada. Eight of the participants were white and one was Asian. Five participants taught in Clark County, two taught in Owyhee, one taught in Elko and one taught in Spring Creek. Over 20% of the projects were noted (by the teachers) as being submitted by underrepresented students; however, this information is not reliable as most students did not provide this data themselves. Pre-and post- content tests were given. Teachers improved from an average of eight missed on the pre-test to an average of only four items missed on the post-test. Participants were also asked to evaluate their own teaching efficacy. In general, participants had a strong science efficacy. The item on which there was the most discrepancy among participants was on #10, the one stating that "The low achievement of some students cannot generally be blamed on their teachers." Most teachers completed an end of year program evaluation. All but one of the participants felt that the pace of the workshop was comfortable. All participants who used faculty mentors in helping their students rated their faculty mentors very highly. All participants rated the program content very highly in terms of clarity, organization, relevance, helpfulness and usefulness. All participants gave the program a very high rating overall and stated they would likely use the information to mentor future students and in instruction in future classes. The science fairs are the culmination of the program. Teachers were required to have at least one

  4. Obama Boosts Science Education During White House Student Fair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2010-10-01

    With the East Room of the White House flush with Nobel laureates and government officials, including freshly sworn-in U.S. National Science Foundation director Subra Suresh, President Barack Obama honored dozens of students who participated in a White House science fair on 18 October. The fair—many of whose participants have won other science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) competitions—is part of a series of events that culminated 23-24 October in the USA Science and Engineering Festival on the National Mall in Washington, D. C., and at 50 satellite events around the country. “We welcome championship sports teams to the White House to celebrate their victories,” Obama said, noting that the Los Angeles Lakers basketball team, New Orleans Saints football team, and others have been to the White House. “I thought we ought to do the same thing for the winners of science fair and robotic contests and math competitions, because often we don’t give these victories the attention that they deserve. When you win first place at a science fair, nobody is rushing the field or dumping Gatorade over your head [in celebration].”

  5. Development of an instrument to measure student attitudes toward science fairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huddleston, Claudia A.

    Science fairs are woven into the very fabric of science instruction in the United States and in other countries. Even though thousands of students participate in science fairs every year, no instrument to measure student attitudes toward partaking in this hands-on learning experience has been fully developed and available for school administrators and teachers to assess the perceived value that current students attribute to participation in science fairs. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to continue the development and refinement of an instrument that measured student attitudes towards science fairs based on an unpublished instrument created by Michael (2005). The instrument developed and tested using 110 students at two different middle schools in southwest Virginia. The instrument consisted of 45 questions. After applying a principal component factor analysis, the instrument was reduced to two domains, enjoyment and value. The internal consistency of the instrument was calculated using Cronbach's alpha and showed good internal consistency of .89 between the two domains. Further analysis was conducted using a Pearson product-moment test and showed a significant positive correlation between enjoyment and value (r = .78). Demographic information was explored concerning the domains using a series of statistical tests, and results revealed no significant differences among race and science fair category. However, a significant difference was found among gender and students who won awards and those who did not. The conclusion was that further development and refinement of the instrument should be conducted.

  6. The use of animals in national high school student science fair projects in the United States.

    PubMed

    Miller-Spiegel, Crystal

    2004-06-01

    Science fair projects can provide a sound opportunity to teach students the value of scientific methodology without relying on the routine and unnecessary use of animals. Unfortunately, students are often encouraged to use animals in an expendable manner that both duplicates previous experiments and neglects the opportunity to "think outside the box" in order to generate new hypotheses/theories about human health, physiological processes or basic biological concepts. Although at least one national science fair sponsor has changed its policy regarding students' utilisation of vertebrate animals, others continue to encourage the more traditional in vivo experimental projects. This paper will review the guidelines of two major national science fairs in the USA; types of projects conducted that involve animals; numbers of animals involved; interview responses by some student finalists who used vertebrates in their projects; successful initiatives by animal advocates in the USA to eliminate the use of animals in science fairs; and potential areas of outreach to science educators, science fair sponsors, high schools and students. PMID:23581124

  7. International Rules for Precollege Science Research: Guidelines for Science and Engineering Fairs, 2007-2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Service, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This publication presents changes and modifications for 2007-2008 to the "International Rules for Precollege Science Research: Guidelines for Science and Engineering Fairs." It is written to guide fair directors, teachers, scientists, parents, and adult volunteers as they pursue their work of encouraging students to explore and investigate their…

  8. International Rules for Precollege Science Research: Guidelines for Science and Engineering Fairs, 2006-2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Service, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This publication presents changes and modifications for 2006-2007 to the "International Rules for Precollege Science Research: Guidelines for Science and Engineering Fairs." It is written to guide fair directors, teachers, scientists, parents, and adult volunteers as they pursue their work of encouraging students to explore and investigate their…

  9. A hospital/school science fair mentoring program for middle school students.

    PubMed

    Torres, B; Harris, R F; Lockwood, D; Johnson, J; Mirabal, R; Wells, D T; Pacheco, M; Soussou, H; Robb, F; Weissman, G K; Gwosdow, A R

    1997-12-01

    The Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and the James P. Timilty Middle School established a partnership to enhance science education, promote faculty development, and improve the health status and academic performance of all Timilty students. This article describes one of the Partnership's Science Connection programs, the Science Fair Mentoring Program, designed to enhance middle school science education, inform urban early adolescents about professions in the health field, inspire them to pursue postsecondary study in the health sciences, and prepare them for rigorous academic work in high school. In this program, hospital-based clinical and research staff mentor young adolescent students. The authors describe the planning, implementation, and evaluation of the Science Fair Mentoring Program as an innovative learning experience. PMID:9435745

  10. Stimulate High School Science Fair Participation by Connecting with a Nearby College

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Declue, Mary Ellen; Johnson, Kevin; Hendrickson, Howard; Keck, Pamela

    2000-05-01

    High school science fair competition is an underutilized yet highly beneficial experience for students. It requires creativity, practicing the scientific method, conducting and determining appropriate math manipulations, and organizational and writing skills. Because of the time commitment and resources needed for science fair participation, it is often not selected as an activity for high school students. However, the potential exists to increase the number of high school students who participate in science fairs by developing a collegial relationship between university faculty and high school teachers. For the past several years, a local high school chemistry teacher has brought an honors chemistry class to our campus to discuss science fair projects with faculty. This allowed a valuable dialogue where ideas for projects were discussed and meeting times set to use equipment not available at the high school. Past projects have been continued in subsequent years by new students to improve the quality of initial projects and decrease the number of new ideas needed each year. An established collaboration with a local resource, whether it is a university or trained professionals from local industry, can enhance the enthusiasm, resources, and experimental design of science fair projects and thus the scientific thought process of high school students.

  11. Science Fair. It's a Blast! A Guide for Junior High Students. Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riggins, Patricia C., Ed.

    Science fairs have the potential to help students develop new ways of solving problems using a scientific approach. This supplemental guide was developed for those teachers involved with science fairs as well as others who work with students in developing a project. Several reasons for holding a science fair are listed, along with some…

  12. How To Implement the Science Fair Self-Help Development Program in Schools. Sandia Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menicucci, David F.

    Often the burden of promoting science and engineering fairs falls upon science teachers who have to add the organizational activities for the fair to their normal teaching load. This manual is intended to assist in the science fair process by providing information about how to create a team of volunteers to manage the organizational activities.…

  13. So You're Planning a Science Fair: Comments from a Judge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riechard, Donald E.

    1976-01-01

    After judging and evaluating four science fairs during a two week period, the author moved to put down some thoughts and suggestions. His comments fell into three major categories: 1) purposes of science fairs, 2) types of science fair projects, and 3) judging the projects. (Author/RK)

  14. Negotiating Discourses: Sixth-Grade Students' Use of Multiple Science Discourses during a Science Fair Presentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomez, Kimberley

    2007-01-01

    This study offers important insights into the coexistence of multiple discourses and the link between these discourses and science understanding. It offers concrete examples of students' movement between multiple discourses in sixth-grade science fair presentations, and shows how those multiple discourses in science practices illuminate students'…

  15. Plasma Science and Applications at the Intel Science Fair: A Retrospective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Lee

    2009-11-01

    For the past five years, the Coalition for Plasma Science (CPS) has presented an award for a plasma project at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF). Eligible projects have ranged from grape-based plasma production in a microwave oven to observation of the effects of viscosity in a fluid model of quark-gluon plasma. Most projects have been aimed at applications, including fusion, thrusters, lighting, materials processing, and GPS improvements. However diagnostics (spectroscopy), technology (magnets), and theory (quark-gluon plasmas) have also been represented. All of the CPS award-winning projects so far have been based on experiments, with two awards going to women students and three to men. Since the award was initiated, both the number and quality of plasma projects has increased. The CPS expects this trend to continue, and looks forward to continuing its work with students who are excited about the possibilities of plasma. You too can share this excitement by judging at the 2010 fair in San Jose on May 11-12.

  16. Abstracts of the Finalists of the International Science and Engineering Fair (35th, Columbus, Ohio, May 8-13, 1984).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Service, Inc., Washington, DC.

    A science and engineering fair is a competition based on the quality of projects done by students, the results of which are reported through exhibits and oral presentations at the fair. Fairs operate on a step basis. Students who win in small fairs such as a local fair, move to a city fair, then to a regional fair, and may be chosen to represent…

  17. Abstracts of the Finalists of the International Science and Engineering Fair (39th, Knoxville, Tennessee, May 8-14, 1988).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Service, Inc., Washington, DC.

    A science and engineering fair is a competition based on the quality of projects done by students, the results of which are reported through exhibits and oral presentations at the fair. Fairs operate on a step basis. Students who win in small, local fairs, move to a city fair, then to a regional fair, and may be chosen to represent that fair in…

  18. Fairness Perceptions and Experiences of Muslim University Students in Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erkan, Serdar; Walker, Keith D.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to examine the perceptions and experiences of fairness amongst Muslim post-secondary students based on our gathering of data using a web-based survey. The participants, 189 Muslim students, were reached via student organizations, national and local Muslim organizations, and Muslim student groups organized on…

  19. Job prioritization and fair share in the LHCb experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellani, G.; Santinelli, R.

    2008-07-01

    The high demanding computing needs of the LHCb experiment are fulfilled by an extensive use of the Grid resources. Although these are wide and growing, they still remain finite. This paper addresses how all LHCb users can fairly access these resources and execute their tasks in an order determined by identity, group, job type and accounting information.

  20. Student Intern Freed Competes at Intel ISEF, Two Others Awarded at Local Science Fair | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Class of 2014–2015 Werner H. Kirsten (WHK) student intern Rebecca “Natasha” Freed earned a fourth-place award in biochemistry at the 2015 Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF), the largest high school science research competition in the world, according to the Society for Science & the Public’s website. Freed described the event as “transformative experience,” where she was able to present her research to “experts, including Nobel laureates, as well as members of the general community and, of course, to [other students].”

  1. Student Intern Freed Competes at Intel ISEF, Two Others Awarded at Local Science Fair | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Class of 2014–2015 Werner H. Kirsten (WHK) student intern Rebecca “Natasha” Freed earned a fourth-place award in biochemistry at the 2015 Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF), the largest high school science research competition in the world, according to the Society for Science & the Public’s website. Freed described the event as “transformative experience,” where she was able to present her research to “experts, including Nobel laureates, as well as members of the general community and, of course, to [other students].”

  2. "Saturday Night Live" Goes to High School: Conducting and Advising a Political Science Fair Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Meg; Brewer, Paul R.

    2010-01-01

    This article uses a case study to illustrate how science fair projects--which traditionally focus on "hard science" topics--can contribute to political science education. One of the authors, a high school student, conducted an experimental study of politics for her science fair project. The other author, a faculty member, was asked to advise the…

  3. International Rules for Precollege Science Research: Guidelines for Science Fairs. June 1995-May 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Service, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This document presents the international rules for precollege science research. Sections include: (1) Quick Rules Reference; (2) Highlights for 1995-96; (3) International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF) Category Descriptions; (4) Display and Safety Regulations; (5) Eligibility; (6) Requirements; (7) Limitations; (8) Continuation of Projects;…

  4. Science on Display: A Study of the United States Science Exhibit, Seattle World's Fair, 1962.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, James B.; And Others

    Fairgoers, who attended the United States Science Exhibit at the Seattle World's Fair and therefore were exposed to the elaborate attempt at mass education that it represented, were studied as if they were "students." Attitudes towards science and scientists, information retention, and background characteristics were measured. Attendance and crowd…

  5. Science Fair Projects. LC Science Tracer Bullet. TB 07-6

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howland, Joyce, Comp.

    2007-01-01

    Selected sources in this bibliography provide guidance to students, parents, and teachers throughout the process of planning, developing, implementing and competing in science fair activities. Sources range in suitability from elementary to high school levels. This guide updates "Library of Congress Science Tracer Bullet" 01-4. More specialized…

  6. Science Fair Competition Generates Excitement and Promotes Creative Thinking in Japan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, Dana M.; Kanematsu, Hideyuki

    2006-01-01

    Educators in the U.S. and Japan have developed an international program to promote creative thinking in science. Their program includes a science fair component. This paper (which has been presented in both the U.S. and Japan) discusses creativity and describes a science fair activity, that the authors recently carried out in Japan. The special…

  7. Establishing the Goals of a Science Fair Based on Sound Research Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slisz, Jill

    Science fairs are held in many elementary, junior high, and high schools. Typically they are thought of as a competitive event where students display science projects. Publications occasionally print accounts of successful science fairs, but these articles are usually based on opinions rather than on research. The purpose of this study is to…

  8. Thousands of Science Projects. Classified Titles of Exhibits Shown at Science Fairs and/or Produced as Projects for the Westinghouse Science Talent Search. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoshioka, Ruby, Ed.

    Designed to serve as a source of ideas for students of all age levels for science fair projects, this publication lists titles of projects by young people who participated in fairs leading to the International Science and Engineering Fair or competed in the Science Talent Search for the Westinghouse Science Scholarship and Award. The titles have…

  9. Researching the Real: Transforming the Science Fair through Relevant and Authentic Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Rosemary McBryan

    This teacher research study documents the processes used to help students in an all-female, religious-based high school create science fair projects that are personally meaningful, scientifically sophisticated and up-to date in terms of science content. One-hundred sixteen young women in an honors chemistry class were introduced by their teacher to the methods used by science journalists when researching and crafting articles. The students then integrated these strategies into their science fair research through collaborative classroom activities designed by their teacher. Data collected during the process included audio and video tapes of classroom activities, student interviews, process work, finished projects, email conversations and the reflective journaling, annotated lesson plans, and memories of the lived experience by the teacher. The pedagogical changes which resulted from this project included the use of Read Aloud-Think Alouds (RATA) to introduce content and provide relevance, a discussion based topic selection process, the encouragement of relevant topic choices, the increased use of technology for learning activities and for sharing research, and an experimental design process driven by the student's personally relevant, topic choice. Built in feedback loops, provided by the teacher, peer editors and an outside editor, resulted in multiple revisions and expanded opportunities for communicating results to the community-at-large. Greater student engagement in science fair projects was evident: questioning for understanding, active involvement in decision making, collaboration within the classroom community, experience and expertise with reading, writing and the use of technology, sense of agency and interest in science related activities and careers all increased. Students communicated their evolving practices within the school community and became leaders who promoted the increased use of technology in all of their classes. Integrating journalistic

  10. The Effectiveness of Science Fairs for Increasing Native American Success in Pursuing STEM Careers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellerin, H.; Jackson, C.

    2008-12-01

    As program director of the gidakiimanaaniwigamig (Our Earth Lodge) program, native elder Holly Pellerin has worked to increase participation by Native American middle- and high-school students in local and national science fairs. Courtney Jackson, an award-winning science fair participant, joins Pellerin to discuss the impact of science fairs on her future academic plans. Pellerin will give an overview of how science fairs have become an integral part of the gidakiimanaaniwigamig program and discuss the effectiveness of informal and out-of-school learning for advancing STEM careers among Native youths.

  11. The role of the computer in science fair projects: Current status and potential

    SciTech Connect

    Trainor, M.S.

    1991-01-01

    The need for more students to enter the field of science is acute in the nation, and science fair projects provide a motivational mechanism to entice students into pursuing scientific careers. Computers play a major role in science today. Because computers are a major source of entertainment for our children, one would expect them to play a significant role in many science fair projects. This study investigated current and potential uses of computers in science fair projects and incorporated an informal case study of scientists, teachers, and students involved in science fair projects from a highly scientific community. Interviews, a survey, and observations were conducted. Results indicated that most projects either do not use or inadequately use computers and that a significant potential for more effective use of computers for science fair projects exists.

  12. Science fairs and Science Olympiad: Influence on student science inquiry learning and attitudes toward STEM careers and coursework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Kathleen M.

    Thousands of middle school students participate in science competitions such as science fairs and Science Olympiad yearly, but little is known about the effects of their participation on their attitudes toward science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) coursework and careers. Even less is known about whether they increase students' understanding of the practices of scientific inquiry. In this study, 86 seventh-grade students from eight schools who participated in either science fair or Science Olympiad competitions were assessed regarding their attitudes toward STEM coursework and careers and the extent of their science inquiry skills. Quantitative data were collected through pre- and post- competition written assessments. Qualitative data were collected through post-competition focus groups. Both groups increased their understanding of science inquiry as a result of their participation in science competitions. Student attitudes toward STEM coursework and careers were generally positively influenced by their participation in science competitions. However, there was a subgroup of science fair participants for which the opposite was true. The strengths of Science Olympiad programs were the opportunities to study science topics on a deep level, to work with teammates, and to compete. However, there was little student choice at the schools studied because the coaches chose the teams and generally assigned students to particular Science Olympiad events. The level of science inquiry varied according to event. Strengths of the science fair programs were student choice regarding topics and a focus on science inquiry. However, the level of stress experienced by some students, and the negative attitudes toward science that resulted, called into question the appropriateness of engaging in a project of the length and complexity of a typical science fair project with this age group. Recommendations for Science Olympiad competitions are adding events that allow more

  13. A descriptive study of the middle school science teacher behavior for required student participation in science fair competitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisanick, Laura M.

    This descriptive study explores three aspects of teacher behavior related to student participation in science fair competitions: teacher attitudes, teacher preference for different student-learning modes, and teacher motives for required student participation. Teacher motives for required student participation may stem from curriculum and standardized test requirements, school administrators' expectations, teacher preference for a competitive student-learning mode, and teacher attitudes towards science fair competitions. Survey data collected for this study included teacher attitudes about science fair competitions, teacher preference for different student-learning modes, and demographic data about middle school teachers who sponsor students in PJAS science fair competitions. The theoretical framework in this study is the theory of planned behavior proposed by Ajzen. The results from the analysis of data in this study showed that the majority of the teachers in this sample held positive attitudes towards science fair competitions and required their students to conduct science fair projects but did not require their students to participate in science fair competitions. The middle school science teachers in the sample would involve their students in PJAS competitions even if their districts did not require them to participate. The teachers in this study preferred the cooperative and individualistic student-learning modes. Teacher gender did not influence a preference for a particular student-learning mode. Using the theoretical framework from this study revealed teachers who required their students to participate in science fair competitions also required their students to conduct science fair projects.

  14. Making science education meaningful for American Indian students: The effect of science fair participation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, Cynthia Ann

    Creating opportunities for all learners has not been common practice in the United States, especially when the history of Native American educational practice is examined (Bull, 2006; Chenoweth, 1999; Starnes, 2006a). The American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES) is an organization working to increase educational opportunity for American Indian students in science, engineering, and technology related fields (AISES, 2005). AISES provides pre-college support in science by promoting student science fair participation. The purpose of this qualitative research is to describe how American Indian student participation in science fairs and the relationship formed with their teacher affects academic achievement and the likelihood of continued education beyond high school. Two former American Indian students mentored by the principal investigator participated in this study. Four ethnographic research methods were incorporated: participant observation, ethnographic interviewing, search for artifacts, and auto-ethnographic researcher introspection (Eisenhart, 1988). After the interview transcripts, photos documenting past science fair participation, and researcher field notes were analyzed, patterns and themes emerged from the interviews that were supported in literature. American Indian academic success and life long learning are impacted by: (a) the effects of racism and oppression result in creating incredible obstacles to successful learning, (b) positive identity formation and the importance of family and community are essential in student learning, (c) the use of best practice in science education, including the use of curricular cultural integration for American Indian learners, supports student success, (d) the motivational need for student-directed educational opportunities (science fair/inquiry based research) is evident, (e) supportive teacher-student relationships in high school positively influences successful transitions into higher education. An

  15. Science Fairs and Projects K-8. A Collection of Articles Reprinted from "Science and Children,""Science Scope," and "The Science Teacher."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watt, Shirley, Ed.; And Others

    The National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) has assembled this collection of reprints to assist teachers in organizing a science fair, working with students and establishing equitable judging procedures. The NSTA position statement on science fairs is included. The 24 reprints in this volume are geared toward elementary and middle school…

  16. Hadron physics with the PANDA experiment at the FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettoni, Diego

    2012-04-01

    The physics program of the future FAIR facility covers a wide range of topics that address central issues of strong interactions and QCD. The antiproton beam of unprecedented quality in the momentum range from 1 to 15 GeV/c will allow to make high precision, high statistics measurements, from charmonium spectroscopy to the search for exotic hadrons and the study of nucleon structure, from the study of in-medium modifications of hadron masses to the physics of hypernuclei. These topics form the scientific program of the PANDA experiment.

  17. Stimulate High School Science Fair Participation by Connecting with a Nearby College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeClue, Mary Ellen; Johnson, Kevin; Hendrickson, Howard; Keck, Pamela

    2000-01-01

    Contends that an established collaboration with a local resource--whether it be a university or trained professionals from local industry--can enhance the enthusiasm, resources, and experimental design of science fair projects. Describes the nature of some interactions related to a high school science fair and details some successful student…

  18. The Complete Science Fair Handbook. For Teachers and Parents of Students in Grades 4-8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fredericks, Anthony D.; Asimov, Isaac

    Interest in a science fair is low when students feel undirected and lack the information they need to produce a successful project. For many students, parents, and teachers, planning and carrying out a science fair project may be very frustrating. This book is designed to be a reference that helps teachers guide students through this process. The…

  19. Improving Fifth Grade Students' Participation in and Attitudes toward the Science Fair through Guided Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daab, Marcia J.

    This practicum addressed the problem of decreased participation of fifth-grade students in the science fair. At this grade level, the science fair guidelines mandate that students enter a research-type project. For many fifth-grade students the desire to tackle this monumental task does not match their developing cognitive skills. The literature…

  20. Relationship Between Performance on a Scientific Creativity Test and Participation in a Science Fair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kobes, Katherine Ellen

    Determined was the relationship between performance on a test devised to measure scientific creativity and participation in a science fair. The sample was drawn from three junior high schools and two senior high schools. The experimental group was composed of 311 students who were developing a project for a science fair. The comparison group…

  1. Predictors of Science Fair Participation Using the Theory of Planned Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Czerniak, Charlene M.; Lumpe, Andrew T.

    1996-01-01

    Uses the Theory of Planned Behavior to examine factors that predict junior high and secondary students' (n=303) attitudes toward participating in district science fair competitions, beliefs about who would approve or disapprove of participation, and perceptions of control. Results indicate that science fair entry appears to be involuntary and that…

  2. Science Fair. It's a Blast! A Guide for Junior High Students. Student Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riggins, Patricia C., Ed.

    Science fairs have the potential to help students develop new ways of solving problems using a scientific approach. This document is intended to be used by junior high students in planning and developing a science fair project. Several suggestions are offered to help students decide on a project, with a listing of 60 topical areas in science…

  3. Bilingual communication methods, text versus video, to increase parent involvement and science fair project student achievement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clevenson, Rhonda Suzanne

    This research examined the responses of families to bilingual communication methods, text versus video, designed to facilitate school to home communication to increase parent involvement and seventh grade student achievement in the science fair project. Using an experimental design, 161 families were randomly selected to receive either a two part informational text or video series during the science fair unit taught at a culturally diverse urban middle school. The bilingual informational materials were created and produced by the staff at the research site. Measures were taken to make sure all families could access the informational materials and innovations such as a special travel envelope and reminding procedures aided data collection. Surveys measuring variables on a Likert scale with spaces for comments were collected from the parents and students. An interrater reliability study was completed to measure the agreement of the two teachers who used a grading checklist to score science fair project achievement. Quantitative methods including ANOVA and MLR were used to examine the data in terms of student achievement and the communication method (text or video), audience (students and parents), and the anticipated outcome (parent help). Nonparametric and qualitative data analyses were used to explore how families used and responded to the informational materials. Significant results were that the video communication method was positively associated with student achievement on the science fair project. Significant main effects were observed for the student characteristics, educational services (general and special education, and English as a Second Language), and previous achievement in science, and the parent characteristics, previous experience with science fair projects, primary viewing language (English or Spanish), and expectations for student achievement. Student achievement was not significantly related to the amount or usefulness of parent help. The amount

  4. A Report on Stochastic Fairness Queueing (SFQ) Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denny, Barbara A.

    1993-01-01

    SRI International (SRI) has developed an improved queueing algorithm, known as Stochastic Fairness Queueing (SFQ), for best-effort traffic (i.e., traffic that does not require any guaranteed service). SFQ is a probablistic variant of strict fair queueing where instead of a single queue being allocated per flow, a fixed number of queues are used and a hash function maps the IP source and destination to a particular queue. A seed to the hash function is also perturbed occasionally to help distribute the flows amongst different queues when more than one flow maps to the same queue during the lifetime of the flow. SFQ provides 'fair' access by trying to ensure that each flow from source to destination host obtains equal access to the available bandwidth. This report covers a series of experiments performed on DARTnet evaluating the behavior and performance of SFQ against a FIFO queueing discipline. These experiments were designed to show SFQ's advantages and performance, and include tests demonstrating: Fair utilization of available resources; Starvation prevention; Graceful degradation under overload conditions; and Resource usage. In general, the experiments do show that SFQ is better than FIFO queueing at allocating bandwidth equally among a set of flows. SFQ also prevents a stream from dominating the available bandwidth, which seems to be a tendency with FIFO queueing (i.e., if a flow demands more than its share of the available bandwidth, with FIFO queueing that stream receives a disproportionate amount when compared to flows demanding less than their share). Furthermore, SFQ seems to reward 'nice' users of the network by providing a lower variance in delay and more throughput when their resource demand is less than their available share. Both SFQ and FIFO queueing seem to degrade fairly well as the network becomes saturated and to recover well as the network becomes less congested. Not unexpectedly, FIFO queueing is a little more efficient than SFQ-the delays are

  5. Cryogenic supply for accelerators and experiments at FAIR

    SciTech Connect

    Kauschke, M.; Xiang, Y.; Schroeder, C. H.; Streicher, B.; Kollmus, H.

    2014-01-29

    In the coming years the new international accelerator facility FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research), one of the largest research projects worldwide, will be built at GSI. In the final construction FAIR consists of synchrotrons and storage rings with up to 1,100 meters in circumference, two linear accelerators and about 3.5 kilometers beam transfer lines. The existing GSI accelerators serve as pre-accelerators. Partly the new machines will consist of superconducting magnets and therefore require a reliable supply with liquid helium. As the requirements for the magnets is depending on the machine and have a high variety, the cooling system is different for each machine; two phase cooling, forced flow cooling and bath cooling respectively. In addition the cold mass of the individual magnets varies between less than 1t up to 80t and some magnets will cause a dynamic heat load due to ramping that is higher than the static loads. The full cryogenic system will be operated above atmospheric pressure. The refrigeration and liquefaction power will be provided by two main cryogenic plants of 8 and 25 kW at 4K and two smaller plants next to the experiments.

  6. Science and Human Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Leon N.

    2014-12-01

    Part I. Science and Society: 1. Science and human experience; 2. Does science undermine our values?; 3. Can science serve mankind?; 4. Modern science and contemporary discomfort: metaphor and reality; 5. Faith and science; 6. Art and science; 7. Fraud in science; 8. Why study science? The keys to the cathedral; 9. Is evolution a theory? A modest proposal; 10. The silence of the second; 11. Introduction to Copenhagen; 12. The unpaid debt; Part II. Thought and Consciousness: 13. Source and limits of human intellect; 14. Neural networks; 15. Thought and mental experience: the Turing test; 16. Mind as machine: will we rubbish human experience?; 17. Memory and memories: a physicist's approach to the brain; 18. On the problem of consciousness; Part III. On the Nature and Limits of Science: 19. What is a good theory?; 20. Shall we deconstruct science?; 21. Visible and invisible in physical theory; 22. Experience and order; 23. The language of physics; 24. The structure of space; 25. Superconductivity and other insoluble problems; 26. From gravity to light and consciousness: does science have limits?

  7. Science and Human Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Leon N.

    2015-01-01

    Part I. Science and Society: 1. Science and human experience; 2. Does science undermine our values?; 3. Can science serve mankind?; 4. Modern science and contemporary discomfort: metaphor and reality; 5. Faith and science; 6. Art and science; 7. Fraud in science; 8. Why study science? The keys to the cathedral; 9. Is evolution a theory? A modest proposal; 10. The silence of the second; 11. Introduction to Copenhagen; 12. The unpaid debt; Part II. Thought and Consciousness: 13. Source and limits of human intellect; 14. Neural networks; 15. Thought and mental experience: the Turing test; 16. Mind as machine: will we rubbish human experience?; 17. Memory and memories: a physicist's approach to the brain; 18. On the problem of consciousness; Part III. On the Nature and Limits of Science: 19. What is a good theory?; 20. Shall we deconstruct science?; 21. Visible and invisible in physical theory; 22. Experience and order; 23. The language of physics; 24. The structure of space; 25. Superconductivity and other insoluble problems; 26. From gravity to light and consciousness: does science have limits?

  8. TRB for HADES and FAIR experiments at GSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fröhlich, I.; Schrader, C.; Stroeble, H.; Stroth, J.; Tarantrola, A.; Kajetanowicz, M.; Korcyl, K.; Krzemień, W.; Palka, M.; Salabura, P.; TrȨBACZ, R.; Skott, P.; Traxler, M.

    2008-06-01

    TRB module is a multi-purpose Trigger and Readout Board with on-board DAQ functionality developed for the upgrade of the HADES experiment. It contains single computer chip (Etrax) running Linux and the 100 Mbit/s Ethernet interface. It has been orginally designed as the 128-channel Time to Digital Converter based on the HPTDC chip from CERN. The new version of TRB contains 2 Gbit/s optical link and interface connector (15 Gbit/s) implementing the add-on card concept and making the board more flexible. Moreover, FPGA chip (Xilinx, Virtex 4 LX 40) and TigerSharc DSP provide new computing resources which can be used to run on-line analysis algorithms. The TRB is proposed as a prototype of base readout module for the planned detector systems PANDA and CBM at the future FAIR facility at GSI-Darmstadt.

  9. The P-bar ANDA Experiment at FAIR

    SciTech Connect

    Sfienti, C.; Peters, K.

    2010-08-05

    The P-bar ANDA experiment (Pbar ANnihilations at DArmstadt) is a next generation hadron physics detector under design for the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at Darmstadt, Germany. It will be using cooled antiproton beams with an energy between 1.5 GeV and 15 GeV interacting with various internal targets.The experiment is focusing on hadron spectroscopy, in particular the search for exotic states in the charmonium region, on the interaction of charm hadrons with the nuclear medium and on double-hypernuclei.With physics requiring precise partial wave analysis the experiment has almost 4{pi} acceptance, a solenoid magnet for high p{sub T} tracks and a dipole magnet for the forward part of reaction products. A silicon vertex detector surrounds the interaction point. In both spectrometer parts tracking, charged particle identification, electromagnetic calorimetry and muon identification are available.The experiment is being designed to fully exploit the extraordinary physics potential arising from the availability of high-intensity, cooled antiproton beams.Significant progress beyond the present understanding of the field is expected thanks to improvements in statistics and precision of the data.

  10. Science Fairs: What Are the Sources of Help for Students and How Prevalent Is Cheating?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Syer, Cassidy A.; Shore, Bruce M.

    2001-01-01

    Examines the sources and kinds of help that students who were required to participate in science fairs considered fair and reasonable, and the kinds of help they actually received for their projects. Confirms the previously reported gap between potential and actual sources and kinds of help. Indicates that pressure of time was the most highly…

  11. The North Dakota Science and Engineering Fair--Its History and a Survey of Participants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Linda Sue

    An assessment of the North Dakota Science and Engineering Fair and an analysis of the background and careers of its finalists from 1951 to 1985 are contained in this report. The project's objectives were to: (1) compile a complete list of international fair participants (1951-1985); (2) study the subsequent geographic distribution of the…

  12. The CPS Plasma Award at the Intel Science and Engineering Fair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Lee

    2012-10-01

    For the past eight years, the Coalition for Plasma Science (CPS) has presented an award for a plasma project at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF). We reported on the first five years of this award at the 2009 DPP Symposium. Pulsed neutron-producing experiments are a recurring topic, with the efforts now turning to applications. The most recent award at the Pittsburgh ISEF this past May was given for analysis of data from Brookhaven's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The effort had the goal of understanding the fluid properties of the quark-gluon plasma. All of the CPS award-winning projects so far have been based on experiments, with four awards going to women students and four to men. In 2009 we noted that the number and quality of projects was improving. Since then, as we we predicted (hoped for), that trend has continued. The CPS looks forward to continuing its work with students who are excited about the possibilities of plasma. You too can share this excitement by judging at the 2013 fair in Phoenix on May 12-17. Information may be obtained by emailing cps@plasmacoalition.org.

  13. Bringing Science to the Public through City-wide Science Festivals and Street Fairs/Supported in part by the National Science Foundation and the Lounsbery Foundation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Brian

    2007-04-01

    Many organizations make an effort to reach the general public and children in the area of science understanding and appreciation. These include museums, universities, professional societies, government agencies, corporations and television networks. When studies are made of the composition of the audiences for many of these outreach programs one finds a great overlap. For example, those who like to go to science museums often enjoy viewing NOVA programs. The challenge is to bring Science to the People in places, times and venues not usual associated with science. For the past six years the Science & the Arts program at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York has made use of the performing arts to bring science to old and new audiences. See http://web.gc.cuny.edu/sciart. While this program has been effective, we have tried additional approaches in new modes and novel sites. In this paper we relate our experience with a citywide science festival, which we operated in New York City in November 2006. This idea was based on the science festival held in Atlanta in conjunction with the APS Centennial in 1999. We will review the history, effectiveness and various styles of Science Festivals in the United States and worldwide. In an even more adventurous outreach effort, in June 2006 our program rented booths at a conventional New York City weekend street fair, offering hands-on science experiences amidst the typical street fair food and wares. Adults and children were delighted to find science in this setting and welcomed the fact that they could get science with their tasty kielbasa sandwiches as well as a bargain on tube sox. Their responses were documented in a video. We will present parts of this video and offer suggestions for adapting this project to other locations

  14. A Hospital/School Science Fair Mentoring Program for Middle School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torres, B.; Harris, R. F.; Lockwood, D.; Johnson, J.; Mirabal, R.; Wells, D. T.; Pacheco, M.; Soussou, H.; Robb, F.; Weissman, G. Kuhn; Gwosdow, A. R.

    1997-01-01

    Describes the Science Fair Mentoring Program, one of the Science Connection programs of the Massachusetts General Hospital/James P. Timilty Middle School Partnership. This program is designed to enhance middle school science education, inform urban early adolescents about professions in the health field, and encourage them to pursue postsecondary…

  15. Plasma Science and Applications at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Lee

    2007-11-01

    Three years ago, the Coalition for Plasma Science (CPS) established a plasma prize at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair. The APS/DPP and the IEEE/PSAC have helped make this effort a success by helping to identify judges. Each year since then, the number of plasma-related projects has increased. This year's prize was awarded for an instrument that, based on the ratio of spectral emission in two bands, detects when a high-pressure street light is about to fail. This allows time for an, efficient, scheduled replacement rather that an emergency service call. The CPS is a broadly-based group of institutions and individuals whose goal is to increase the understanding of plasmas for non-technical audiences. CPS activities include maintaining a website, http://www.plasmacoalition.org, developing educational literature, organizing educational luncheon presentations for Members of Congress and their staffs, and responding to questions about plasmas that are received by the CPS e-mail or toll-free number. The science fair prize and other CPS activities depend on the voluntary labor of CPS members and associates. New participants are needed to expand CPS activities and reach a larger audience. Send an e-mail to the CPS at CPS@plasmacoalition.org for information.

  16. Science Fairs and Observational Science: A Case History from Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowman, Paul D., Jr.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Having judged dozens of science fairs over the years, I am repeatedly disturbed by the ground rules under which students must prepare their entries. They are almost invariably required to follow the "scientific method," involving formulating a hypothesis, a test of the hypothesis, and then a project in which this test is carried out. As a research scientist for over 40 years, I consider this approach to science fairs fundamentally unsound. It is not only too restrictive, but actually avoids the most important (and difficult) part of scientific research: recognizing a scientific problem in the first place. A well-known example is one of the problems that, by his own account, stimulated Einstein's theory of special relativity: the obvious fact that when an electric current is induced in a conductor by a magnetic field , it makes no difference whether the field or the conductor is actually (so to speak) moving. There is in other words no such thing as absolute motion. Physics was transformed by Einstein's recognition of a problem. Most competent scientists can solve problems after they have been recognized and a hypothesis properly formulated, but the ability to find problems in the first Place is much rarer. Getting down to specifics, the "scientific method" under which almost all students must operate is actually the experimental method, involving controlled variables, one of which, ideally, is changed at a time. However, there is another type of science that can be called observational science. As it happens, almost all the space research I have carried out since 1959 has been this type, not experimental science.

  17. Abstracts of the Finalists of the International Science and Engineering Fair (34th, Albuquerque, New Mexico, May 9-14, 1983).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Service, Inc., Washington, DC.

    A science and engineering fair is a competition based on the quality of projects done by students, the results of which are reported through exhibits and oral presentations at the fair. Fairs operate on a step basis. Students who win in small fairs such as a local fair, move to a city fair, then to a regional fair, and may be chosen to represent…

  18. Abstracts of the Finalists of the International Science and Engineering Fair (37th, Ft. Worth, Texas, May 11-17, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Service, Inc., Washington, DC.

    A science and engineering fair is a competition based on the quality of projects done by students, the results of which are reported through exhibits and oral presentations at the fair. Fairs operate on a step basis. Students who win in small, local fairs, move to a city fair, then to a regional fair, and may be chosen to represent that fair in…

  19. Abstracts of the Finalists of the International Science and Engineering Fair (36th, Shreverport/Bossier City, Louisiana, May 12-18, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Service, Inc., Washington, DC.

    A science and engineering fair is a competition based on the quality of projects done by students, the results of which are reported through exhibits and oral presentations at the fair. Fairs operate on a step basis. Students who win in small fairs such as a local fair, move to a city fair, then to a regional fair, and may be chosen to represent…

  20. Abstracts of the Finalists of the International Science and Engineering Fair (38th, San Juan, Puerto Rico, May 10-16, 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Service, Inc., Washington, DC.

    A science and engineering fair is a competition based on the quality of projects done by students, the results of which are reported through exhibits and oral presentations at the fair. Fairs operate on a step basis. Students who win in small, local fairs, move to a city fair, then to a regional fair, and may be chosen to represent that fair in…

  1. How to implement the Science Fair Self-Help Development Program in schools

    SciTech Connect

    Menicucci, D.

    1994-01-01

    This manual is intended to act as a working guide for setting up a Science Fair Volunteer Support Committee at your school. The Science Fair Volunteer Support Committee, or SFVSC, is the key component of the Science Fair Self-Help program, which was developed by Sandia National Laboratories and is designed to support a school`s science activities. The SFVSC is a team of parents and community volunteers who work in concert with a school`s teaching staff to assist and manage all areas of a school Science and Engineering Fair. The main advantage of creating such a committee is that it frees the science teachers from the organizational aspects of the fair and lets them concentrate on their job of teaching science. This manual is based on information gained through a Self-Help Development pilot program that was developed by Sandia National Laboratories during the 1991--92 school year at three Albuquerque, NM, middle schools. The manual describes the techniques that were successful in the pilot program and discusses how these techniques might be implemented in other schools. This manual also discusses problems that may be encountered, including suggestions for how they might be resolved.

  2. The experiment PANDA: physics with antiprotons at FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boca, Gianluigi

    2015-05-01

    PANDA is an experiment that will run at the future facility FAIR, Darmstadt, Germany. A high intensity and cooled antiproton beam will collide on a fixed hydrogen or nuclear target covering center-of-mass energies between 2.2 and 5.5 GeV. PANDA addresses various physics aspects from the low energy non-perturbative region towards the perturbative regime of QCD. With the impressive theoretical developments in this field, e.g. lattice QCD, the predictions are becoming more accurate in the course of time. The data harvest with PANDA will, therefore, be an ideal test bench with the aim to provide a deeper understanding of hadronic phenomena such as confinement and the generation of hadron masses. A variety of physics topics will be covered with PANDA, for example: the formation or production of exotic non-qqbar charm meson states connected to the recently observed XYZ spectrum; the study of gluon-rich matter, such as glueballs and hybrids; the spectroscopy of the excited states of strange and charm baryons, their production cross section and their spin correlations; the behaviour of hadrons in nuclear matter; the hypernuclear physics; the electromagnetic proton form factors in the timelike region. The PANDA experiment is designed to achieve the above mentioned physics goals with a setup with the following characteristics: an almost full solid angle acceptance; excellent tracking capabilities with high resolution (1-2 % at 1 GeV/c in the central region); secondary vertex detection with resolution ≈ 100 microns or better; electromagnetic calorimetry for detections of gammas and electrons up to 10 GeV; good particle identification of charge tracks (electrons, muons, pions, kaons, protons); a dedicated interchangeable central apparatus for the hypernuclear physics; detector and data acquisition system capable of working at 20 MHz interaction rate with an intelligent software trigger that can provide maximum flexibility.

  3. Sources of Anxiety and the Meaning of Participation in/for Science Fairs: A Canadian Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reis, Giuliano; Dionne, Liliane; Trudel, Louis

    2015-01-01

    Although anxiety is a significant emotional element of formal school science, little is known about how anxiety is originated and managed in the context of science fairs. The purpose of the present study was to investigate how a group of students in Grades 7 to 12 discursively (re)produce anxiety and its management from the perspective of their…

  4. Gender Aspects of Participation, Support, and Success in a State Science Fair

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sonnert, Gerhard; Sadler, Philip; Michaels, Mish

    2013-01-01

    This study of students competing in the 2009 Massachusetts State Science & Engineering Fair investigates the role gender played in students' participation, choice of science field, award of prizes, and mentioning inspiring teachers. Females made up 62 percent of the participants and were more likely to enter projects in biology and in…

  5. Animals in Education: Use of Animals in High School Biology Classes and Science Fairs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGiffin, Heather, Ed.; Brownley, Nancie, Ed.

    Proceedings of the conference, "The Use of Animals in High School Biology Classes and Science Fairs," held in September of 1979 are presented. Sixteen articles reflect the views of educators, psychologists, and veterinarians on various perspectives of the controversial topic of using animals in elementary and secondary school science classrooms.…

  6. How Can I Help My Child with a Science Fair Project?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeBruin, Jerome E.

    1980-01-01

    Sixteen different suggestions are given to parents for helping their children with science fair projects. Among the 16 suggestions included are contacting people who have expertise in science, helping the child obtain pertinent information, keeping a daily log of research activities. (DS)

  7. Ageism in science: fair-play between generations.

    PubMed

    Schroots, Johannes J

    2003-10-01

    This paper discusses the role of age in scientific practice from an ethical perspective. In social perception, people tend to categorise others rather automatically along three major dimensions: race, sex, and age. Much empirical and theoretical attention has been devoted to the study of racism and sexism, but comparatively little research in the social and behavioural sciences has been directed at understanding what some refer to as the third '-ism': ageism. For a serious understanding of the implications of ageism in science, it is necessary to discuss, first, the conflicting relationships between classical and modern concepts of time and calendar age, and thereafter the concept of ageism. PMID:14652898

  8. WHK Interns Win Big at Frederick County Science Fair | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Three Werner H. Kirsten student interns claimed awards at the 35th Annual Frederick County Science and Engineering Fair—and got a shot at the national competition—for imaginative projects that reached out to the rings of Saturn and down to the details of advanced cancer diagnostics.

  9. The Silicon Tracking System of the CBM Experiment at FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heuser, Johann M.

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at FAIR will conduct a systematic research program to explore the phase diagram of strongly interacting matter at highest net baryon densities and moderate temperatures. These conditions are to be created in collisions of heavy-ion beams with nuclear targets in the projectile beam energy range of 2 to 45 GeV/nucleon, initially coming from the SIS 100 synchrotron (up to 14 GeV/nucleon) and in a next step from SIS 300 enabling studies at the highest net baryon densities. Collision rates up to 107 per second are required to produce very rare probes with unprecedented statistics in this energy range. Their signatures are complex. These conditions call for detector systems designed to meet the extreme requirements in terms of rate capability, momentum and spatial resolution, and a novel data acquisition and trigger concept which is not limited by latency but by throughput. In the paper we describe the concept and development status of CBM's central detector, the Silicon Tracking System (STS). The detector realizes a large, highly granular and redundant detector system with fast read-out, and lays specific emphasis on low material budget in its physics aperture to achieve for charged particle tracks a momentum resolution of δp/p ≈ 1% at p > 1 GeV/c, at >95% track reconstruction efficiency. The detector employs 1220 highly segmented double-sided silicon micro-strip sensors of 300 µm thickness, mounted into 896 modular structures of various types that are aggregated on 106 low-mass carbon fiber ladders of different sizes that build up the tracking stations. The read-out electronics with its supply and cooling infrastructure is arranged at the periphery of the ladders, and provides a total channel count of 1.8 million. The signal transmission from the silicon sensors to the electronics is realized through ultra-thin multi-line aluminum-polyimide cables of up to half a meter length. The electronics generates a free

  10. Plasma Science and Applications at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Lee

    2005-10-01

    The Coalition for Plasma Science (CPS) has established a plasma prize at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF). This year's prize was awarded for projects in simulated ball lightning and plasma thrusters. The CPS is a broadly-based group of institutions and individuals whose goal is to increase the understanding of plasmas for non-technical audiences. In addition to the ISEF plasma award, CPS activities include maintaining a website, http://www.plasmacoalition.org; developing educational literature; organizing educational luncheon presentations for Members of Congress and their staffs; and responding to questions about plasmas that are received by the CPS e-mail or toll-free number. The success of these activities depend on the voluntary labor of CPS members and associates. These volunteers include the ISEF judges, whom the APS/DPP and the IEEE/PSAC helped identify. Please send an e-mail to the CPS at CPS@plasmacoalition.org for information if you would like to become involved in spreading the good word about plasmas.

  11. Can Participation in a School Science Fair Improve Middle School Students' Attitudes toward Science and Interest in Science Careers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finnerty, Valerie

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether participation in a school-based science fair affects middle school students' attitudes toward science and interest in science and engineering careers. A quasi-experimental design was used to compare students' pre- and posttest attitudes toward and interest in science. Forty-eight of…

  12. Science Fair Report: Flight of the Split-Fingered Fastball.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Richard J.

    1991-01-01

    Reports on the results of an eighth grade student's experiments, conducted with a moving car, concerning the aerodynamics of a baseball in flight. Describes the peculiar diving ability of the split-fingered fastball, as well as the dancing and weaving effect of the knuckleball. (JJK)

  13. Science Fair Report: Detection of Solar X-Ray Flares with a Geiger Counter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mims, Vicki Rae

    1991-01-01

    Described is a science fair project in which M- and X-class x-ray flares on the surface of the earth were detected using a Geiger counter. Background information, the problem, hypothesis, a list of needed materials, the procedure, observations, conclusions, and a critique are included. (KR)

  14. Explore Elementary Teachers' Professional Knowledge of Guiding Science Fair Product by Using Different Instruction Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Chow-Chin

    2013-01-01

    This research is about using two different instruction models, "theory course combined with sample introduction" and "theory course combined with case method teaching", to instruct elementary teachers on how to guide the science fair product in two courses (16 and 12 teachers in each class) and observe their guiding tactics after the instructed…

  15. Implications of Teachers' Recollections of Topics Selected by Boys and Girls for Science Fair Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunderson, Eileen D.; Bunderson, C. Victor

    1996-01-01

    Analyzes science fair choices of 2149 students for diversity of topics and scientific merit and matches them with teachers' recollections of topics thought most likely to be chosen. Reports that teachers recollections of topics seldom matched students' choices and teachers assumed more gender-based diversity in students' choice of topics than…

  16. Science Fair Projects Bring It All Together: Collaboration, Information Literacy, and Public Relations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Terrence E., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the role of school library media specialists in helping students with science fair projects. Topics include selecting a topic; reviewing basic library resources, including print and electronic; remote access to databases; locating information on the Web; word processing and presentation software; and relevant Web sites. (LRW)

  17. Information sciences experiment system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katzberg, Stephen J.; Murray, Nicholas D.; Benz, Harry F.; Bowker, David E.; Hendricks, Herbert D.

    1990-01-01

    The rapid expansion of remote sensing capability over the last two decades will take another major leap forward with the advent of the Earth Observing System (Eos). An approach is presented that will permit experiments and demonstrations in onboard information extraction. The approach is a non-intrusive, eavesdropping mode in which a small amount of spacecraft real estate is allocated to an onboard computation resource. How such an approach allows the evaluation of advanced technology in the space environment, advanced techniques in information extraction for both Earth science and information science studies, direct to user data products, and real-time response to events, all without affecting other on-board instrumentation is discussed.

  18. The Effect of the Use of Outside Facilities and Resources on Success in Secondary School Science Fairs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiygul, Sherrill M.; Gifford, Vernon

    To investigate the effect of outside help in executing a successful science fair project, surveys were distributed to 356 participants in the 1987 Mississippi Region V Science Fair. Of this number, 147 students were in grades 7 and 8, 136 in grades 9 and 10, and 73 in grades 11 and 12. Students listed the number of hours they spent using outside…

  19. Analyzing the technical quality of a rubric used to assess science fair projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, Melissa C.

    2009-12-01

    Presenting science fair projects gave students an opportunity to complete a performance assessment that comprised a meaningful task focused on process and subject to standards-based assessment. Students presented science inquiry and engineering design projects to judges at a regional science fair. The judges used the domains of the Potter Rubrics to assess the students' work and assigned a Quality score to each project. Using multiple regression, this study found that the mean scores on the Methods and Analysis domains predicted the mean Quality scores. Analyzing the technical quality of the Potter Rubrics addressed some of the measurement and generalizability concerns about performance assessments. Recommendations for future research and implications for practice were examined.

  20. A Descriptive Study of the Middle School Science Teacher Behavior for Required Student Participation in Science Fair Competitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisanick, Laura M.

    2010-01-01

    This descriptive study explores three aspects of teacher behavior related to student participation in science fair competitions: teacher attitudes, teacher preference for different student-learning modes, and teacher motives for required student participation. Teacher motives for required student participation may stem from curriculum and…

  1. International Rules for Pre-College Science Research: Guidelines for Science and Engineering Fairs, 2010-2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Society for Science & the Public, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the rules and guidelines of the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair 2011 to be held in Los Angeles, California in May 8-13, 2011. In addition to providing the rules of competition, these rules and guidelines for conducting research were developed to facilitate the following: (1) protect the rights and welfare of…

  2. WHK Interns Sweep Entire Category at Frederick County Science Fair | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer The competitors in the cellular and molecular biology category of the Frederick County Science and Engineering Fair on March 22–23 didn’t stand a chance against the Werner H. Kirsten student interns at the National Cancer Institute at Frederick. These interns swept the entire category, with Madelyne Xiao, a rising intern, winning first place; Maria Hamscher, second place; Ashley Babyak and Dahlia Kronfli tying for third place; and Maham Ahmed receiving an honorable mention.

  3. Innovative Science Experiments Using Phoenix

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, B. P. Ajith; Satyanarayana, V. V. V.; Singh, Kundan; Singh, Parmanand

    2009-01-01

    A simple, flexible and very low cost hardware plus software framework for developing computer-interfaced science experiments is presented. It can be used for developing computer-interfaced science experiments without getting into the details of electronics or computer programming. For developing experiments this is a middle path between…

  4. Integrating Science with Local Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Kathie

    2004-01-01

    Science exists in many forms, but an appreciation of science as an integral part of every day does not occur in the vacuum of laboratory experience or through classroom activities. Throughout the communities, a plethora of places exist to see science at work, from the usually recommended museums and parks to the less thought of factories and…

  5. A Creative Science Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Overton, Dave

    2004-01-01

    As a Teaching Awards Regional Winner in 2002, the author was recently awarded funding by Planet Science (NESTA) for projects to disseminate best practice. One of the things he had in mind was to organise a "creative science event." So last July year 4 children from Chiltern Primary School, Hull, joined a class of year 5 children from Whitehill…

  6. "It Wasn't Fair!" Educators' Recollections of Their Experiences as Students with Grading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guskey, Thomas R.

    2006-01-01

    Few educators receive any formal training in assigning marks to students' work or in grading students' performance and achievement. As a result, when required to do so, most simply reflect back on what was done to them and then, based on those experiences, try to develop policies and practices that they believe are fair, equitable, defensible, and…

  7. Educative Experiences of Rural Junior High History Fair Participants Seeking and Evaluating Online Primary Sources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Riley Todd

    2012-01-01

    This phenomenological ethnographic multi-case study's purpose was to gain insight into experiences of rural junior high History Fair participants as they searched for and evaluated online primary sources. Drawing on the theories of Dewey and Kuhlthau, the study examined how the participants searched the Internet, what strategies they used to…

  8. Experiences in Space Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC. Educational Programs Div.

    This publication contains descriptions of space science activities that can be conducted with simple equipment. There are activities suitable for both elementary and secondary school children. Activities are placed under the headings: Astronomy, Atmosphere, Universal Gravitation, Aerodynamics, Guidance and Propulsion, Tracking and Communications,…

  9. The Bok Award Presented for High School Astronomy Research at the Intel Science Fair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garmany, Catharine D.

    2013-01-01

    The Priscilla and Bart Bok award, presented jointly by the Astronomical Society of the Pacific (ASP) and the American Astronomical Society (AAS) at the annual Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF), recognizes excellent research in astronomy conducted by high school students. The award is named in honor of two well-known astronomers. Bart Bok was an outstanding research astronomer: much of his research was done with his wife, Priscilla Fairfield Bok. Since 1992, the ASP and the AAS have shared the responsibility of sending three judges to the annual Intel ISEF to select two Bok awardees. Funds for the prizes themselves are derived from an endowment in Bart Bok’s honor held at the ASP. The Intel ISEF is a massive event. In order to become a finalist and attend ISEF, a student must first compete, and win one of the top awards, in both their local and regional science fairs. In recent years, about 1,500 high-school students have attended. About 100 of these students present projects in the category physics: of these, less than 20 are astronomy projects. Winners of the award are invited to attend the winter AAS meeting, and this year both of the 2012 winners are expected to be in attendance. There are also previous winners who are actively in our midst. But there is an unanswered question: why are there so few student projects in astronomy?

  10. Examining of the Predictors of Pre-Service Teachers' Perceptions of the Quality of the Science Fair Projects in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tortop, Hasan Said

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed at examining the predictors of quality of science fair (SF) projects in the light of pre-service teachers' evaluation of SF rubric' domains. These projects were selected by judges in A city for the A Regional Exhibition of Science and Mathematics Project Study for Primary School Students: The SF projects were evaluated by thirty…

  11. Materials science experiments in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelles, S. H.; Giessen, B. C.; Glicksman, M. E.; Margrave, J. L.; Markovitz, H.; Nowick, A. S.; Verhoeven, J. D.; Witt, A. F.

    1978-01-01

    The criteria for the selection of the experimental areas and individual experiments were that the experiment or area must make a meaningful contribution to the field of material science and that the space environment was either an absolute requirement for the successful execution of the experiment or that the experiment can be more economically or more conveniently performed in space. A number of experimental areas and individual experiments were recommended for further consideration as space experiments. Areas not considered to be fruitful and others needing additional analysis in order to determine their suitability for conduct in space are also listed. Recommendations were made concerning the manner in which these materials science experiments are carried out and the related studies that should be pursued.

  12. Innovative science experiments using Phoenix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, B. P. Ajith; Satyanarayana, V. V. V.; Singh, Kundan; Singh, Parmanand

    2009-09-01

    A simple, flexible and very low cost hardware plus software framework for developing computer-interfaced science experiments is presented. It can be used for developing computer-interfaced science experiments without getting into the details of electronics or computer programming. For developing experiments this is a middle path between push-button systems and the develop-from-scratch approach. Emphasis is on leveraging the power of personal computers for experiment control, data acquisition and the mathematical analysis of data. The language 'Python' is chosen for data acquisition and analysis. This article explains the architecture of Phoenix (Physics with Home-made Equipment and Innovative Experiments) along with some sample experiments. The hardware design is open and the project is totally based on free software.

  13. Authorship and responsibility in health sciences research: a review of procedures for fairly allocating authorship in multi-author studies.

    PubMed

    Smith, Elise; Williams-Jones, Bryn

    2012-06-01

    While there has been significant discussion in the health sciences and ethics literatures about problems associated with publication practices (e.g., ghost- and gift-authorship, conflicts of interest), there has been relatively little practical guidance developed to help researchers determine how they should fairly allocate credit for multi-authored publications. Fair allocation of credit requires that participating authors be acknowledged for their contribution and responsibilities, but it is not obvious what contributions should warrant authorship, nor who should be responsible for the quality and content of the scientific research findings presented in a publication. In this paper, we review arguments presented in the ethics and health science literatures, and the policies or guidelines proposed by learned societies and journals, in order to explore the link between author contribution and responsibility in multi-author multidisciplinary health science publications. We then critically examine the various procedures used in the field to help researchers fairly allocate authorship. PMID:21312000

  14. South Australian Science Teachers Association Conference and Science Fair, Salisbury Teachers College, July 1971.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1971

    The major papers presented at the 1971 conference of the South Australian Science Teachers Association are included in this pamphlet. Scientists from industry, research institutions, and the police forensic laboratory, and practicing teachers presented papers which included descriptions of modern scientific techniques, discussions of the role of…

  15. The Effect of the Use of Outside Facilities and Resources on Success in Secondary School Science Fairs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gifford, Vernon D.

    1992-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine whether their were significant differences in effects of outside facilities and resources of winners (n=69) versus nonwinners (n=169) in high school science fairs in the state of Mississippi. Results indicate that access to a university and resource dollars positively enhances chances of winning. (MDH)

  16. A High-Performance Silicon Tracker for the CBM Experiment at FAIR

    SciTech Connect

    Heuser, Johann M.; Mueller, Walter F. J.; Senger, Peter; Muentz, Christian; Stroth, Joachim

    2006-07-11

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at GSI's future international Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) will study strongly interacting matter at high baryon densities. The central component of the fixed-target heavy-ion spectrometer is a high-performance silicon vertex tracker. It applies most advanced pixel and microstrip detectors to track exclusively the charged particles created in the collisions and to reconstruct decay vertices from 'open charm'. The development of the silicon tracker is challenging and includes R and D on ultra low-mass sensors and support structures, extreme radiation hardness, and fast self-triggered readout.

  17. A Fair Proposition?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grobman, Arnold

    1993-01-01

    Describes problems with school science fairs including poor judging and a lack of understanding by the students of their own projects. Suggests improvements to the system. One suggestion is for science fair projects to be displayed only in classrooms and not district or regional fairs. (PR)

  18. Online / Offline reconstruction of trigger-less readout in the R3B experiment at FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kresan, Dmytro; Al-Turany, Mohammad; Uhlig, Florian

    2015-12-01

    The R3B (Reactions with Rare Radioactive Beams) experiment is one of the planned experiments at the future FAIR facility at GSI Darmstadt. R3B will cover experimental reaction studies with exotic nuclei far off stability, thus enabling a broad physics program with rare-isotope beams with emphasis on nuclear structure and dynamics. Several different detection subsystems as well as sophisticated DAQ system and data-analysis software are being developed for this purpose. The data analysis software for R3B is based on FairRoot framework and called R3BRoot. R3BRoot is being used for simulation and detector design studies for the last few years. Recently, it was successfully used directly with the data acquisition and for the analysis of the R3B test beam-time in April 2014. For the future beam times the framework has to deal with the free streaming readout of the detectors. The implementation within R3BRoot to fulfil this trigger-less run mode will be discussed in this paper, as well as the set of tools developed for the online reconstruction and quality assurance of the data during the run.

  19. FAIR project at GSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kester, Oliver; Spiller, Peter; Stoecker, Horst

    FAIR -- the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research in Europe -- constructed at GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH in Darmstadt comprises an international centre of heavy ion accelerators that will drive heavy ion and antimatter research (FBTR, 2006). FAIR will provide worldwide unique accelerator and experimental facilities allowing a large variety of fore-front research in physics and applied science. FAIR will deliver antiproton and ion beams of unprecedented intensities and qualities. The main part of the FAIR facility is a sophisticated and cost efficient accelerator system, which delivers parallel beams to different experiments of the FAIR experimental collaborations -- APPA, NuSTAR, CBM and PANDA. The accelerated primary beams will then be employed to create new, often highly exotic particles in a series of parallel experimental programs. Experiments with exotic particles will explore fundamental processes which are expected to have taken place in the early phases and still happen in the on-going evolution of the Universe. These processes produced the basic constituents of matter and overall structure we observe today...

  20. Online Tracking Algorithms on GPUs for the P̅ANDA Experiment at FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, L.; Herten, A.; Ritman, J.; Stockmanns, T.; Adinetz, A.; Kraus, J.; Pleiter, D.

    2015-12-01

    P̅ANDA is a future hadron and nuclear physics experiment at the FAIR facility in construction in Darmstadt, Germany. In contrast to the majority of current experiments, PANDA's strategy for data acquisition is based on event reconstruction from free-streaming data, performed in real time entirely by software algorithms using global detector information. This paper reports the status of the development of algorithms for the reconstruction of charged particle tracks, optimized online data processing applications, using General-Purpose Graphic Processing Units (GPU). Two algorithms for trackfinding, the Triplet Finder and the Circle Hough, are described, and details of their GPU implementations are highlighted. Average track reconstruction times of less than 100 ns are obtained running the Triplet Finder on state-of- the-art GPU cards. In addition, a proof-of-concept system for the dispatch of data to tracking algorithms using Message Queues is presented.

  1. More Fair Play in an Ultimatum Game after Resettlement in Zimbabwe: A Field Experiment and a Structural Model

    PubMed Central

    Kohler, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Zimbabwean villagers of distinct background have resettled in government-organized land reforms for more than three decades. Against this backdrop, I assess the level of social cohesion in some of the newly established communities by estimating the average preferences for fairness in a structural model of bounded rationality. The estimations are based on behavioral data from an ultimatum game field experiment played by 234 randomly selected households in 6 traditional and 14 resettled villages almost two decades after resettlement. Equal or higher degrees of fairness are estimated in all resettlement schemes. In one, or arguably two, out of three distinct resettlement schemes studied, the resettled villagers exhibit significantly higher degrees of fairness ( ) and rationality ( ) than those who live in traditional villages. Overall, villagers appear similarly rational, but the attitude toward fairness is significantly stronger in resettled communities ( ). These findings are consistent with the idea of an increased need for cooperation required in recommencement. PMID:23724095

  2. The barrel DIRC detector for the P¯ ANDA experiment at FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwiening, J.; P¯ Group; ANDA Cherenkov Group

    2011-05-01

    The P¯ANDA experiment at FAIR will perform high precision experiments in the charmed quark sector using cooled antiproton beams of unprecedented intensities of L=2×10 32 cm -2 s -1 in the momentum range of 1-15 GeV/ c. The charged particle identification in the barrel region needs a thin detector operating in a strong magnetic field. A ring imaging Cherenkov detector using the DIRC principle is an excellent match to those requirements. This article describes aspects of the design and R&D for the P¯ANDA barrel DIRC detector. The availability of highly pixelated fast photon detectors allows several key improvements compared to the successful BaBar-DIRC detector, some of which were tested in a proton beam at GSI. The optical properties of the radiator bars, made from synthetic fused silica, are critical to the success of the DIRC. Measurements of the attenuation length and reflection coefficient allow the determination of the surface roughness of prototype radiator bars.

  3. NEPTUNE Canada Community Science Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juniper, S.; Bornhold, B.; Barnes, C.; Phibbs, P.; Pirenne, B.

    2006-05-01

    In 2007 NEPTUNE Canada will install the first stage of a regional cabled observatory (RCO) in the northeast Pacific Ocean. Stage 2 of the RCO is being developed by the US-based ORION Project Office, through the National Science Foundation's Ocean Observatory Initiative (OOI). For Stage 1, a 800km fiber-optic cable will loop out from a shore station on Vancouver Island to the Juan de Fuca volcanic spreading ridge. Two seafloor nodes are planned, one to support studies of tectonic and hydrothermal activity on the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, and the other for investigation of a broad range of processes in Barkley Canyon, on the continental slope of Vancouver Island. Each node will provide power and Ethernet communications to instruments that comprise multi-disciplinary community science experiments. These experiments were developed through a 2-year series of workshops and a final competition. Data from all instruments will be available on-line, through the NEPTUNE data management and archive system. Investigations at the Endeavour node will focus on links between seismic activity and hydrothermal emissions and their resulting impact on hydrothermal vent organisms and regional oceanic circulation and geochemical fluxes. This area provides a number of technical challenges, including the laying of the backbone cable over a volcanic terrain, and the placement of instruments and extension cables in areas of abundant high-temperature venting. Planned instruments include broad-band seismometers, acoustic Doppler current meters, video and digital still cameras and chemical sensors. Experiments at the Barkley Canyon site will emphasis the effects of water currents passing through the canyon, and seismic activity. Combined biological and physical oceanographic instruments will monitor the interaction between sediment transport along the axis of the canyon and the bioturbation activity of the fauna. A combined physical/biological experiment in the water column

  4. Course Outlines in Science of the Rumson-Fair Haven Senior Elective Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1976

    The Rumson-Fair Haven Senior Elective Program was developed and implemented by students, faculty, and administrators over the three-year period from 1971 to 1974. The program offers high school students who complete graduation requirements in the first three years of the four-year program a combination of the following options for the senior year:…

  5. Analysis of a teaching experiment on fair distribution with secondary school students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antequera, A. T.; Espinel, M. C.

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study is twofold. The first is to investigate the ability of secondary school students to understand the different distribution schemes and thus, indirectly, to contribute to the educational discussion and approach to be used for distribution problems so as to lessen reliance on the ubiquitous cross-multiplication rule in proportional distribution. The experiment was conducted with secondary school students using a specifically devised scenario involving a distribution problem. We present an analysis of the students' performance with respect to their concept of fair distribution in a given situation. Their ability to apply the various rules in a new situation is determined. The results provide an insight into the possibilities offered by teaching different distribution methods, especially with mathematically gifted students. The second aim is for instructors to appreciate the value of teaching other distribution methods that apply in real life in addition to a proportional distribution so that they may include in the mathematics classes some recently developed concepts from the field of cooperative game theory.

  6. Fast parallel tracking algorithm for the muon detector of the CBM experiment at fair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, A.; Höhne, C.; Kisel, I.; Ososkov, G.

    2010-07-01

    Particle trajectory recognition is an important and challenging task in the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at the future FAIR accelerator at Darmstadt. The tracking algorithms have to process terabytes of input data produced in particle collisions. Therefore, the speed of the tracking software is extremely important for data analysis. In this contribution, a fast parallel track reconstruction algorithm which uses available features of modern processors is presented. These features comprise a SIMD instruction set (SSE) and multithreading. The first allows one to pack several data items into one register and to operate on all of them in parallel thus achieving more operations per cycle. The second feature enables the routines to exploit all available CPU cores and hardware threads. This parallel version of the tracking algorithm has been compared to the initial serial scalar version which uses a similar approach for tracking. A speed-up factor of 487 was achieved (from 730 to 1.5 ms/event) for a computer with 2 × Intel Core i7 processors at 2.66 GHz.

  7. Barrel time-of-flight detector for the PANDA experiment at FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, L.; Brunner, S. E.; Marton, J.; Orth, H.; Suzuki, K.

    2016-07-01

    The barrel time-of-flight detector for the PANDA experiment at FAIR is foreseen as a Scintillator Tile (SciTil) Hodoscope based on several thousand small plastic scintillator tiles read-out with directly attached Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs). The main tasks of the system are an accurate determination of the time origin of particle tracks to avoid event mixing at high collision rates, relative time-of-flight measurements as well as particle identification in the low momentum regime. The main requirements are the use of a minimum material amount and a time resolution of σ < 100 ps. We have performed extensive optimization studies and prototype tests to prove the feasibility of the SciTil design and finalize the R&D phase. In a 2.7 GeV/c proton beam at Forschungszentrum Jülich a time resolution of about 80 ps has been achieved using SiPMs from KETEK and Hamamatsu with an active area of 3 × 3mm2. Employing the Digital Photon Counter from Philips a time resolution of about 30 ps has been reached.

  8. Becoming Science "Experi-mentors"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Counsell, Shelly Lynn

    2011-01-01

    According to the National Research Council (NRC 2007), three critical components significantly influence students' science learning: teacher knowledge, teachers' opportunities to learn, and instructional systems. If students' science achievement is strongly correlated with teachers' science competence, and core competencies are central to…

  9. Hypernuclear physics studies of the P̅ANDA experiment at FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez Lorente, Alicia

    2015-05-01

    Hypernuclear research will be one of the main topics addressed by the PANDA experiment at the planned Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research FAIR at Darmstadt (Germany). [1, 2] Thanks to the use of stored p̅ beams, copious production of double Λ hypernuclei is expected at the PANDA experiment, which will enable high precision γ spectroscopy of such nuclei for the first time, and consequently a unique chance to explore the hyperon-hyperon interaction. In particular, ambiguities of past experiments in determining the strength of the ΛΛ interaction will be avoided thanks to the excellent energy precision of a few keV (FWHM) achieved by germanium detectors. Such a resolution capability is particularly needed to resolve the small energy spacing of the order of (10-100) keV, which is characteristic from the spin doublet in hypernuclei the so -called "hypernuclear fine structure". In comparison to previous experiments, PANDA will benefit from a novel technique to assign the various observable γ-transitions in a unique way to specific double hypernuclei by exploring various light targets. Nevertheless, the ability to carry out unique assignments requires a devoted hypernuclear detector setup. This consists of a primary nuclear target for the production of Ξ- + overline Xi pairs, a secondary active target for the hypernuclei formation and the identification of associated decay products and a germanium array detector to perform γ spectroscopy. Moreover, one of the most challenging issues of this project is the fact that all detector systems need to operate in the presence of a high magnetic field and a large hadronic background. Accordingly, the need of an innovative detector concept will require dramatic improvements to fulfil these conditions and that will likely lead to a new generation of detectors. In the present work details concerning the current status of the activities related to the detector developments for this challenging programme will be given. Among

  10. News Competition: School team launches a rocket Conference: Norway focuses on physics teaching Science on Stage: Canadian science acts take to the stage Particle Physics: Teachers get a surprise at CERN Teaching: Exploring how students learn physics University: Oxford opens doors to science teachers Lasers: Lasers shine light on meeting Science Fair: Malawi promotes science education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-11-01

    Competition: School team launches a rocket Conference: Norway focuses on physics teaching Science on Stage: Canadian science acts take to the stage Particle Physics: Teachers get a surprise at CERN Teaching: Exploring how students learn physics University: Oxford opens doors to science teachers Lasers: Lasers shine light on meeting Science Fair: Malawi promotes science education

  11. Teacher learning from girls' informal science experiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birmingham, Daniel J.

    School science continues to fail to engage youth from non-dominant communities (Carlone, Huan-Frank & Webb, 2011). However, recent research demonstrates that informal science learning settings support both knowledge gains and increased participation in science among youth from non-dominant communities (Dierking, 2007; Falk et al., 2007; HFRP, 2010). Despite the success, little is known about how teachers can learn from informal science practices to support student engagement in science. In this study, I examine the impact informal science experiences has for the teaching and learning of science in school contexts. This study is focused on eliciting girls' stories of informal science learning experiences and sharing these stories with science teachers to examine what they notice and make meaning of in connection with their classroom practices (van Es & Sherin, 2002). I co-constructed cases of informal science experiences with middle school females who participate in an after school science program in an urban area. These cases consisted of the girls' written stories, their explicit messages to science teachers, examples of actions taken when investigating community based science issues and transcripts of conversations between the girls and researchers. These cases were shared with local science teachers in order to investigate what they "notice" (van Es & Sherin, 2002) regarding girls' participation in informal science learning, how they make meaning of youths' stories and whether the stories influence their classroom practices. I found that the girls' use their cases to share experiences of how, where and why science matters, to express hope for school science and to critique stereotypical views that young, female, students of color from lower SES backgrounds are not interested or capable of making contributions to scientific investigations. Additionally, I found that teachers noticed powerful messages within and across the girls' cases. The messages include; 1

  12. Physical Science Experiments for Scientific Glassblowing Technicians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tillis, Samuel E.; Donaghay, Herbert C.

    The twenty experiments in this text have been designed to give the scientific glassblowing technician the opportunity to use scientific glass apparatus in the study of physical science. Primary emphasis of these experiments is on the practical application of the physical science program as a working tool for the scientific glassblowing technician.…

  13. Science Fair Spelled W-I-N. First Place Tips for Students, Teachers, & Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tant, Carl

    A proliferation of new government regulations and other events in recent years has made it more and more difficult to teach science and engage in science activities. Rapid advances in biotechnology have made it difficult for both students and teachers to stay abreast of current events. These difficulties along with others have turned some teachers…

  14. Development and testing of a Science and Engineering Fair Self-Help Development Program: Results of the pilot program in three middle schools

    SciTech Connect

    Menicucci, D.F.

    1992-10-01

    This report details the Science Fair Self-Help Development Program, which was initiated in a pilot project at three middle schools in Albuquerque, NM, during school year 1991-1992. The purpose of the program was to provide guidance to schools in developing their own parental and community resources into a sustainable support group whose major function would be to assist the school`s science teachers and administration in all aspects of the science fair. The report documents the development of the Self-Help Program and the results of the pilot testing.

  15. Development and testing of a Science and Engineering Fair Self-Help Development Program: Results of the pilot program in three middle schools

    SciTech Connect

    Menicucci, D.F.

    1992-10-01

    This report details the Science Fair Self-Help Development Program, which was initiated in a pilot project at three middle schools in Albuquerque, NM, during school year 1991-1992. The purpose of the program was to provide guidance to schools in developing their own parental and community resources into a sustainable support group whose major function would be to assist the school's science teachers and administration in all aspects of the science fair. The report documents the development of the Self-Help Program and the results of the pilot testing.

  16. LANL MTI science team experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balick, Lee K.; Borel, Christopher C.; Chylek, Petr; Clodius, William B.; Davis, Anthony B.; Henderson, Bradley G.; Galbraith, Amy E.; Lawson, Stefanie L.; Pope, Paul A.; Rodger, Andrew P.; Theiler, James P.

    2003-12-01

    The Multispectral Thermal Imager (MTI) is a technology test and demonstration satellite whose primary mission involved a finite number of technical objectives. MTI was not designed, or supported, to become a general purpose operational satellite. The role of the MTI science team is to provide a core group of system-expert scientists who perform the scientific development and technical evaluations needed to meet programmatic objectives. Another mission for the team is to develop algorithms to provide atmospheric compensation and quantitative retrieval of surface parameters to a relatively small community of MTI users. Finally, the science team responds and adjusts to unanticipated events in the life of the satellite. Broad or general lessons learned include the value of working closely with the people who perform the calibration of the data as well as those providing archived image and retrieval products. Close interaction between the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) teams was very beneficial to the overall effort as well as the science effort. Secondly, as time goes on we make increasing use of gridded global atmospheric data sets which are products of global weather model data assimilation schemes. The Global Data Assimilation System information is available globally every six hours and the Rapid Update Cycle products are available over much of the North America and its coastal regions every hour. Additionally, we did not anticipate the quantity of validation data or time needed for thorough algorithm validation. Original validation plans called for a small number of intensive validation campaigns soon after launch. One or two intense validation campaigns are needed but are not sufficient to define performance over a range of conditions or for diagnosis of deviations between ground and satellite products. It took more than a year to accumulate a good set of validation data. With regard to the specific programmatic objectives, we feel that we can do a

  17. LANL MTI science team experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balick, Lee K.; Borel, Christopher C.; Chylek, Petr; Clodius, William B.; Davis, Anthony B.; Henderson, Bradley G.; Galbraith, Amy E.; Lawson, Stefanie L.; Pope, Paul A.; Rodger, Andrew P.; Theiler, James P.

    2004-01-01

    The Multispectral Thermal Imager (MTI) is a technology test and demonstration satellite whose primary mission involved a finite number of technical objectives. MTI was not designed, or supported, to become a general purpose operational satellite. The role of the MTI science team is to provide a core group of system-expert scientists who perform the scientific development and technical evaluations needed to meet programmatic objectives. Another mission for the team is to develop algorithms to provide atmospheric compensation and quantitative retrieval of surface parameters to a relatively small community of MTI users. Finally, the science team responds and adjusts to unanticipated events in the life of the satellite. Broad or general lessons learned include the value of working closely with the people who perform the calibration of the data as well as those providing archived image and retrieval products. Close interaction between the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) teams was very beneficial to the overall effort as well as the science effort. Secondly, as time goes on we make increasing use of gridded global atmospheric data sets which are products of global weather model data assimilation schemes. The Global Data Assimilation System information is available globally every six hours and the Rapid Update Cycle products are available over much of the North America and its coastal regions every hour. Additionally, we did not anticipate the quantity of validation data or time needed for thorough algorithm validation. Original validation plans called for a small number of intensive validation campaigns soon after launch. One or two intense validation campaigns are needed but are not sufficient to define performance over a range of conditions or for diagnosis of deviations between ground and satellite products. It took more than a year to accumulate a good set of validation data. With regard to the specific programmatic objectives, we feel that we can do a

  18. Putting Science FIRST: Memories of Family Science Experiences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science and Children, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Presents anecdotes from prominent citizens including Bill Clinton, Alan Alda, Carl Sagan, Gerald Wheeler, JoAnne Vasquez, and Lynn Margulis in which they reminisce about interesting science experiences with their families. (JRH)

  19. More fair play in an ultimatum game after resettlement in Zimbabwe: a field experiment and a structural model.

    PubMed

    Kohler, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Zimbabwean villagers of distinct background have resettled in government-organized land reforms for more than three decades. Against this backdrop, I assess the level of social cohesion in some of the newly established communities by estimating the average preferences for fairness in a structural model of bounded rationality. The estimations are based on behavioral data from an ultimatum game field experiment played by 234 randomly selected households in 6 traditional and 14 resettled villages almost two decades after resettlement. Equal or higher degrees of fairness are estimated in all resettlement schemes. In one, or arguably two, out of three distinct resettlement schemes studied, the resettled villagers exhibit significantly higher degrees of fairness (p ≤ 0.11) and rationality (p ≤ 0.04) than those who live in traditional villages. Overall, villagers appear similarly rational, but the attitude toward fairness is significantly stronger in resettled communities (p ≤ 0.01). These findings are consistent with the idea of an increased need for cooperation required in recommencement. PMID:23724095

  20. Skylab experiments. Volume 4: Life sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The life sciences experiments conducted during Skylab missions are discussed. The general categories of the experiments are as follows: (1) mineral and hormonal balance, (2) hematology and immunology, (3) cardiovascular status, (4) energy expenditure, (5) neurophysiology, and (7) biology. Each experiment within the general category is further identified with respect to the scientific objectives, equipment used, performance, and data to be obtained.

  1. Memorable Experiences of a Science Field Trip.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knapp, Doug

    2000-01-01

    Attempts to learn more about memorable experiences associated with science field trips by conducting a 1-month and an 18-month evaluation of elementary school students who had participated in an environmental science program at a community park in a Midwestern city. Concludes that students' memories were nonspecific and disassociated from…

  2. It's Not Fair

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Jane

    2012-01-01

    Is a "fair test" the only way to carry out science investigations? Many children (and primary teachers) following the National Curriculum in England and Wales would answer "yes" to this question. This is because fair test investigations have historically been promoted in national assessment, published curricula, schemes of work and assessment…

  3. More Life-Science Experiments For Spacelab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, P. D., Jr.; Dalton, B.; Hogan, R.; Leon, H.

    1991-01-01

    Report describes experiments done as part of Spacelab Life Sciences 2 mission (SLS-2). Research planned on cardiovascular, vestibular, metabolic, and thermal responses of animals in weightlessness. Expected to shed light on effects of prolonged weightlessness on humans.

  4. STEM Clubs and Science Fair Competitions: Effects on Post-Secondary Matriculation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahin, Alpaslan

    2013-01-01

    As the global economic competition gets tougher, American policymakers and researchers are interested in finding ways to increase the number of students pursuing STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics)-related majors in order for the United States to continue its role as an economic powerhouse. A survey study was employed to…

  5. The Student Biotechnology Expo: A New Model for a Science Fair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chowning, Jeanne Ting

    2002-01-01

    Describes the first Student Biotechnology Expo which came about through the cooperation of high schools, universities, local biotechnology and biomedical companies, and research institutions with the purpose of providing opportunities to high school students to explore science related careers. (Contains 13 references.) (YDS)

  6. Material Science Experiments on Mir

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroes, Roger L.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the microgravity materials experiments carried out on the Shuttle/Mir program. There were six experiments, all of which investigated some aspect of diffusivity in liquid melts. The Liquid Metal Diffusion (LMD) experiment investigated the diffusivity of molten Indium samples at 185 C using a radioactive tracer, In-114m. By monitoring two different gamma ray energies (190 keV and 24 keV) emitted by the samples it was possible to measure independently the diffusion rates in the bulk and at the surface of the samples. The Queens University Experiment in Liquid Diffusion (QUELD) was the furnace facility used to process 213 samples for the five other experiments. These experiments investigated the diffusion, ripening, crystal growth, and glass formation in metal, semiconductor, and glass samples. This facility had the capability to process samples in an isothermal or gradient configuration for varying periods of time at temperatures up to 900 C. Both the LMD and the QUELD furnaces were mounted on the Microgravity Isolation Mount (MIM) which provided isolation from g-jitter. All the microgravity experiments were supported by the Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS); a three head three axes acceleration monitoring system which measured and recorded the acceleration environment.

  7. Biotechnology Science Experiments on Mir

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroes, Roger L.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the microgravity biotechnology experiments carried out on the Shuttle/Mir program. Four experiments investigated the growth of protein crystals, and three investigated cellular growth. Many hundreds of protein samples were processed using four different techniques. The objective of these experiments was to determine optimum conditions for the growth of very high quality single crystals to be used for structure determination. The Biotechnology System (BTS) was used to process the three cell growth investigations. The samples processed by these experiments were: bovine chondrocytes, human renal epithelial cells, and human breast cancer cells and endothelial cells. The objective was to determine the unique properties of cell aggregates produced in the microgravity environment.

  8. The Demonstration and Science Experiments (DSX) Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCollough, J. P., II; Johnston, W. R.; Starks, M. J.; Albert, J.

    2015-12-01

    In 2016, the Air Force Research Laboratory will launch its Demonstration and Science Experiments mission to investigate wave-particle interactions and the particle and space environment in medium Earth orbit (MEO). The DSX spacecraft includes three experiment packages. The Wave Particle Interaction Experiment (WPIx) will perform active and passive investigations involving VLF waves and their interaction with plasma and energetic electrons in MEO. The Space Weather Experiment (SWx) includes five particle instruments to survey the MEO electron and proton environment. The Space Environmental Effects Experiment (SFx) will investigate effects of the MEO environment on electronics and materials. We will describe the capabilities of the DSX science payloads, science plans, and opportunities for collaborative studies such as conjunction observations and far-field measurements.

  9. Experiences of racism, racial/ethnic attitudes, motivated fairness and mental health outcomes among primary and secondary school students.

    PubMed

    Priest, Naomi; Perry, Ryan; Ferdinand, Angeline; Paradies, Yin; Kelaher, Margaret

    2014-10-01

    While studies investigating the health effects of racial discrimination for children and youth have examined a range of effect modifiers, to date, relationships between experiences of racial discrimination, student attitudes, and health outcomes remain unexplored. This study uniquely demonstrates the moderating effects of vicarious racism and motivated fairness on the association between direct experiences of racism and mental health outcomes, specifically depressive symptoms and loneliness, among primary and secondary school students. Across seven schools, 263 students (54.4% female), ranging from 8 to 17 years old (M = 11.2, SD = 2.2) reported attitudes about other racial/ethnic groups and experiences of racism. Students from minority ethnic groups (determined by country of birth) reported higher levels of loneliness and more racist experiences relative to the majority group students. Students from the majority racial/ethnic group reported higher levels of loneliness and depressive symptoms if they had more friends from different racial/ethnic groups, whereas the number of friends from different groups had no effect on minority students' loneliness or depressive symptoms. Direct experiences of racism were robustly related to higher loneliness and depressive symptoms in multivariate regression models. However, the association with depressive symptoms was reduced to marginal significance when students reported low motivated fairness. Elaborating on the negative health effects of racism in primary and secondary school students provides an impetus for future research and the development of appropriate interventions. PMID:24903675

  10. Earth Sciences Requirements for the Information Sciences Experiment System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowker, David E. (Editor); Katzberg, Steve J. (Editor); Wilson, R. Gale (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of the workshop was to further explore and define the earth sciences requirements for the Information Sciences Experiment System (ISES), a proposed onboard data processor with real-time communications capability intended to support the Earth Observing System (Eos). A review of representative Eos instrument types is given and a preliminary set of real-time data needs has been established. An executive summary is included.

  11. Life sciences flight experiments microcomputer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartram, Peter N.

    1987-01-01

    A promising microcomputer configuration for the Spacelab Life Sciences Lab. Equipment inventory consists of multiple processors. One processor's use is reserved, with additional processors dedicated to real time input and output operations. A simple form of such a configuration, with a processor board for analog to digital conversion and another processor board for digital to analog conversion, was studied. The system used digital parallel data lines between the boards, operating independently of the system bus. Good performance of individual components was demonstrated: the analog to digital converter was at over 10,000 samples per second. The combination of the data transfer between boards with the input or output functions on each board slowed performance, with a maximum throughput of 2800 to 2900 analog samples per second. Any of several techniques, such as use of the system bus for data transfer or the addition of direct memory access hardware to the processor boards, should give significantly improved performance.

  12. An experience of science theatre: Earth Science for children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musacchio, Gemma; Lanza, Tiziana; D'Addezio, Giuliana

    2015-04-01

    The present paper describes an experience of science theatre addressed to children of primary and secondary school, with the main purpose of explaining the Earth interior while raising awareness about natural hazard. We conducted the experience with the help of a theatrical company specialized in shows for children. Several performances have been reiterated in different context, giving us the opportunity of conducting a preliminary survey with public of different ages, even if the show was conceived for children. Results suggest that science theatre while relying on creativity and emotional learning in transmitting knowledge about the Earth and its hazard has the potential to induce in children a positive attitude towards the risks

  13. First experiment with the NUSTAR/FAIR Decay Total Absorption γ -Ray Spectrometer (DTAS) at the IGISOL IV facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guadilla, V.; Algora, A.; Tain, J. L.; Agramunt, J.; Äystö, J.; Briz, J. A.; Cano-Ott, D.; Cucoanes, A.; Eronen, T.; Estienne, M.; Fallot, M.; Fraile, L. M.; Ganioglu, E.; Gelletly, W.; Gorelov, D.; Hakala, J.; Jokinen, A.; Jordan, D.; Kankainen, A.; Kolhinen, V.; Koponen, J.; Lebois, M.; Martinez, T.; Monserrate, M.; Montaner-Pizá, A.; Moore, I.; Nácher, E.; Orrigo, S.; Penttilä, H.; Podolyak, Zs.; Pohjalainen, I.; Porta, A.; Regan, P.; Reinikainen, J.; Reponen, M.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Rubio, B.; Rytkönen, K.; Shiba, T.; Sonnenschein, V.; Sonzogni, A. A.; Valencia, E.; Vedia, V.; Voss, A.; Wilson, J. N.; Zakari-Issoufou, A.-A.

    2016-06-01

    The new Decay Total Absorption Spectrometer (DTAS) has been commissioned with low energy radioactive beams at the upgraded IGISOL IV facility. The DTAS is a segmented detector composed of up to 18 NaI(Tl) crystals and it will be a key instrument in the DESPEC experiment at FAIR. In this document we report on the experimental setup and the first measurements performed with DTAS at IGISOL. The detector was characterized by means of MC simulations, and this allowed us to calculate the response function of the spectrometer and analyse the first cases of interest.

  14. How high school science-related experiences influenced science career persistence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Andrew D.

    The events of 9/11 brought into focus two ongoing trends that were present before this tragedy and have continued since: (1) The United States needs more scientists if it is to ensure its freedoms and maintain its economy. (2) The number of scientists in the "pipeline" is declining because of the diminished presence of foreign scientists (they are wanted in their own countries), the under-representation of minorities and women, and the reduced numbers of students able and willing to take on the scholastic rigors necessary for a science or engineering degree. Though much has been written about improving science education, and numerous projects have been conducted to promote it, few education researchers have questioned the scientists themselves about the experiences, practices, and people that positively influenced them, particularly during their pre-college years. Towards this end, thirty-two scientists were interviewed in order to address four research questions: (1) How did practicing scientists' personal relationships with their science teachers influence their decision to pursue a career in science? (2) What pedagogical methods (e.g. lectures, demonstrations, "hands-on" work, problem solving, small groups) used in their high school science courses, if any, played a significant role in propelling certain students towards a career as a practicing scientist? (3) What high school science-related support structures (e.g. labs, equipment, textbooks, technology), if any, played a significant role in propelling certain students towards a career as a practicing scientist? (4) What high school science-related educational activities (e.g. science fairs, clubs, summer internships), if any, played a significant role in propelling certain students towards a career as a practicing scientist? Some of the scientists reported that they knew they were headed towards a career in science before they even entered high school, while others did not make a decision about a science

  15. Development and Testing of a Science and Engineering Fair Self-Help Development Program: Results of the Pilot Program in Three Middle Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menicucci, David F.

    In seven chapters, this report details the Science Fair Self-Help Development Program, which was initiated in a pilot project at three middles schools in Albuquerque, New Mexico, during school year 1991-1992. The purpose of the program was to provide guidance to schools in developing their own parental and community resources into a sustainable…

  16. The Information Science Experiment System - The computer for science experiments in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foudriat, Edwin C.; Husson, Charles

    1989-01-01

    The concept of the Information Science Experiment System (ISES), potential experiments, and system requirements are reviewed. The ISES is conceived as a computer resource in space whose aim is to assist computer, earth, and space science experiments, to develop and demonstrate new information processing concepts, and to provide an experiment base for developing new information technology for use in space systems. The discussion covers system hardware and architecture, operating system software, the user interface, and the ground communication link.

  17. School Teachers' Experiences of Science Curriculum Reform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryder, Jim; Banner, Indira

    2013-02-01

    We examine teachers' experiences of a major reform of the school science curriculum for 14-16-year olds in England. This statutory reform enhances the range of available science courses and emphasises the teaching of socio-scientific issues and the nature of science, alongside the teaching of canonical science knowledge. This paper examines teachers' experiences of the reform and the factors that condition these experiences. A designed sample of 22 teachers discussed their experiences of the reform within a semi-structured interview. Our analysis considers how the external and internal structures within which teachers work interact with the personal characteristics of teachers to condition their experiences of the curriculum reform. In many cases, personal/internal/external contexts of teachers' work align, resulting in an overall working context that is supportive of teacher change. However, in other cases, tensions within these contexts result in barriers to change. We also explore cases in which external curriculum reform has stimulated the development of new contexts for teachers' work. We argue that curriculum reformers need to recognise the inevitability of multiple teaching goals within a highly differentiated department and school workplace. We also show how experiences of curriculum reform can extend beyond the learning of new knowledge and associated pedagogies to involve challenges to teachers' professional identities. We argue for the extended use of teacher role models within local communities of practice to support such 'identity work'.

  18. Computational Experiments for Science and Engineering Education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xie, Charles

    2011-01-01

    How to integrate simulation-based engineering and science (SBES) into the science curriculum smoothly is a challenging question. For the importance of SBES to be appreciated, the core value of simulations-that they help people understand natural phenomena and solve engineering problems-must be taught. A strategy to achieve this goal is to introduce computational experiments to the science curriculum to replace or supplement textbook illustrations and exercises and to complement or frame hands-on or wet lab experiments. In this way, students will have an opportunity to learn about SBES without compromising other learning goals required by the standards and teachers will welcome these tools as they strengthen what they are already teaching. This paper demonstrates this idea using a number of examples in physics, chemistry, and engineering. These exemplary computational experiments show that it is possible to create a curriculum that is both deeper and wider.

  19. Continuous-Readout Simulation with FairRoot on the Example of the P̅ANDA Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockmanns, Tobias

    2015-12-01

    Future particle physics experiments are searching more and more for rare decays which have similar signatures in the detector as the huge background. For those events usually simple selection criteria do not exist, which makes it impossible to implement a hardware- trigger based on a small subset of detector data. Therefore, all the detector data is read out continuously and processed on-the-fly to achieve a data reduction suitable for permanent storage and detailed analysis. To cope with these requirements of a triggerless readout, also the simulation software has to be adopted to add a continuous data production with pile-up effects and event overlapping in addition to the event-wise simulation. This simulated data is of utmost importance to get a realistic detector simulation, to develop event-building algorithms and to determine the hardware requirements for the DAQ system of the experiments. The possibility to simulate a continuous data stream was integrated into the FairRoot simulation framework. This running mode is called time-based simulation and a lot of effort was taken that one can switch seamlessly between the event-based and the time-based simulation mode. One experiment, which is using this new feature, is the PANDA experiment. It utilizes a quasicontinuous antiproton beam with a mean time between interactions of 50 ns. Because of the unbunched structure of the beam the interaction time follows a Poisson statistic with a high probability of events with short time distances. Depending on the time resolution of the subdetectors this leads to an overlap of up to 20 events inside a sub-detector. This makes it an ideal test candidate for the time-based simulation. In the following text an overview of the implementation of the time-based simulation mode in FairRoot is given and some examples for the P̅ANDA experiment are shown.

  20. Implementing planetary protection on the Atlas V fairing and ground systems used to launch the Mars Science Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Benardini, James N; La Duc, Myron T; Ballou, David; Koukol, Robert

    2014-01-01

    On November 26, 2011, the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) launched from Florida's Cape Canaveral Air Force Station aboard an Atlas V 541 rocket, taking its first step toward exploring the past habitability of Mars' Gale Crater. Because microbial contamination could profoundly impact the integrity of the mission, and compliance with international treaty was a necessity, planetary protection measures were implemented on all MSL hardware to verify that bioburden levels complied with NASA regulations. The cleanliness of the Atlas V payload fairing (PLF) and associated ground support systems used to launch MSL were also evaluated. By applying proper recontamination countermeasures early and often in the encapsulation process, the PLF was kept extremely clean and was shown to pose little threat of recontaminating the enclosed MSL flight system upon launch. Contrary to prelaunch estimates that assumed that the interior PLF spore burden ranged from 500 to 1000 spores/m², the interior surfaces of the Atlas V PLF were extremely clean, housing a mere 4.65 spores/m². Reported here are the practices and results of the campaign to implement and verify planetary protection measures on the Atlas V launch vehicle and associated ground support systems used to launch MSL. All these facilities and systems were very well kept and exceeded the levels of cleanliness and rigor required in launching the MSL payload. PMID:24432777

  1. Screening for Hepatitis B Virus and Hepatitis C Virus at a Community Fair: A Single-Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Garmen A.; Hill, Mary A.; de Medina, Maria D.

    2013-01-01

    Despite recommendations for screening for hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV), most individuals are still unaware of their infection status. The disparities in screening for HBV and HCV can be attributed to lack of awareness, language barriers, and difficulty in accessing healthcare. To address these issues, an exhibit booth was set up at an annual cultural festival to promote awareness about HBV and HCV and also provide free screening for a local Floridian community. Recruitment was conducted in various languages by physicians and nurses who specialize in hepatology. All materials associated with the screening process were sponsored by the Schiff Center for Liver Diseases, which is located at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine in Florida. In the first year of the screening initiative, 173 of 11,000 fair attendees were screened for HBV. Twenty-nine (17%) of those screened tested positive for antibodies to hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc), and only 1 individual tested positive for chronic HBV, with positive hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). Screening for HCV and an extended patient questionnaire were added to the screening program in the second year of the initiative. A total 231 of 9,000 fair attendees volunteered to be screened for both HBV and HCV. Twenty-nine (13%) of these people tested positive for anti-HBc, and 3 tested positive for HBsAg. Only 1 person tested positive for anti-HCV, but this individual had undetectable HCV RNA levels. Our single-center experience illustrates that, despite efforts to improve access to screening, only 2-3% of attendees at a cultural fair embraced the screening efforts. Other strategies will be required to enhance participation in screening programs for viral hepatitis. PMID:23943664

  2. ATM traffic experiments: A laboratory study of service interaction, loss fairness and loss characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helvik, B. E.; Stol, N.

    1995-04-01

    A reference measurement scenario is defined, where an ATM switch (OCTOPUS) is offered traffic from three source types representing the traffic resulting from typical services to be carried by an ATM network. These are high quality video (HQTV), high speed data (HSD) and constant bitrate transfer (CBR). In addition to be typical, these have widely different characteristics. Detailed definitions for these, and other actual source types, are made and entered into the Synthetic Traffic Generator (STG) database. Recommended traffic mixes of these sources are also made. Based on the above, laboratory measurements are carried out to study how the various kinds of traffic influence each other, how fairly the loss is distributed over services and connections, and what are the loss characteristics experienced. (Due to a software error detected in the measurement equipment after the work was concluded, the measurements are carried out with a HSD source with a load less 'aggressive' than intended.) The main findings are: Cell loss is very unfairly distributed among the various connections. During a loss burst, which occurs less frequently than the duration of a typical connection, affects mainly one or a few connections; Cell loss is unfairly distributed among the services. The ratios in the range from HSD: HQTV: CBR = 5 : 1 : 0.85 are observed, and unfairness increases with decreasing load burstiness; The loss characteristics vary during a loss burst, from one burst to the next and between services. Hence, it does not seem feasible to use 'typical-loss-statistics' to study the impairments on various services. In addition some supplementing work is reported.

  3. MATS and LaSpec: High-precision experiments using ion traps and lasers at FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, D.; Blaum, K.; Nörtershäuser, W.; Ahammed, M.; Algora, A.; Audi, G.; Äystö, J.; Beck, D.; Bender, M.; Billowes, J.; Block, M.; Böhm, C.; Bollen, G.; Brodeur, M.; Brunner, T.; Bushaw, B. A.; Cakirli, R. B.; Campbell, P.; Cano-Ott, D.; Cortés, G.; Crespo López-Urrutia, J. R.; Das, P.; Dax, A.; de, A.; Delheij, P.; Dickel, T.; Dilling, J.; Eberhardt, K.; Eliseev, S.; Ettenauer, S.; Flanagan, K. T.; Ferrer, R.; García-Ramos, J.-E.; Gartzke, E.; Geissel, H.; George, S.; Geppert, C.; Gómez-Hornillos, M. B.; Gusev, Y.; Habs, D.; Heenen, P.-H.; Heinz, S.; Herfurth, F.; Herlert, A.; Hobein, M.; Huber, G.; Huyse, M.; Jesch, C.; Jokinen, A.; Kester, O.; Ketelaer, J.; Kolhinen, V.; Koudriavtsev, I.; Kowalska, M.; Krämer, J.; Kreim, S.; Krieger, A.; Kühl, T.; Lallena, A. M.; Lapierre, A.; Le Blanc, F.; Litvinov, Y. A.; Lunney, D.; Martínez, T.; Marx, G.; Matos, M.; Minaya-Ramirez, E.; Moore, I.; Nagy, S.; Naimi, S.; Neidherr, D.; Nesterenko, D.; Neyens, G.; Novikov, Y. N.; Petrick, M.; Plaß, W. R.; Popov, A.; Quint, W.; Ray, A.; Reinhard, P.-G.; Repp, J.; Roux, C.; Rubio, B.; Sánchez, R.; Schabinger, B.; Scheidenberger, C.; Schneider, D.; Schuch, R.; Schwarz, S.; Schweikhard, L.; Seliverstov, M.; Solders, A.; Suhonen, M.; Szerypo, J.; Taín, J. L.; Thirolf, P. G.; Ullrich, J.; van Duppen, P.; Vasiliev, A.; Vorobjev, G.; Weber, C.; Wendt, K.; Winkler, M.; Yordanov, D.; Ziegler, F.

    2010-05-01

    Nuclear ground state properties including mass, charge radii, spins and moments can be determined by applying atomic physics techniques such as Penning-trap based mass spectrometry and laser spectroscopy. The MATS and LaSpec setups at the low-energy beamline at FAIR will allow us to extend the knowledge of these properties further into the region far from stability. The mass and its inherent connection with the nuclear binding energy is a fundamental property of a nuclide, a unique “fingerprint”. Thus, precise mass values are important for a variety of applications, ranging from nuclear-structure studies like the investigation of shell closures and the onset of deformation, tests of nuclear mass models and mass formulas, to tests of the weak interaction and of the Standard Model. The required relative accuracy ranges from 10-5 to below 10-8 for radionuclides, which most often have half-lives well below 1 s. Substantial progress in Penning trap mass spectrometry has made this method a prime choice for precision measurements on rare isotopes. The technique has the potential to provide high accuracy and sensitivity even for very short-lived nuclides. Furthermore, ion traps can be used for precision decay studies and offer advantages over existing methods. With MATS (Precision Measurements of very short-lived nuclei using an A_dvanced Trapping System for highly-charged ions) at FAIR we aim to apply several techniques to very short-lived radionuclides: High-accuracy mass measurements, in-trap conversion electron and alpha spectroscopy, and trap-assisted spectroscopy. The experimental setup of MATS is a unique combination of an electron beam ion trap for charge breeding, ion traps for beam preparation, and a high-precision Penning trap system for mass measurements and decay studies. For the mass measurements, MATS offers both a high accuracy and a high sensitivity. A relative mass uncertainty of 10-9 can be reached by employing highly-charged ions and a non

  4. To touch the science through the experiment!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Słowik, Grzegorz

    2016-04-01

    To touch the science through the experiment! Grzegorz P. Slowik, Gymnasium No. 2 in Zielona Gora, Poland Our School - Gymnasium No. 2 in Zielona Gora - where pupils' age is 13 -16, has for many years organized a lot of exciting events popularizing science among Zielona Gora children and young people, in particular experimental physics and astronomy. The best known in our town is the regular event on physics, - called the physical Festival of Zielona Gora, of which I am the main initiator and organizer. The Festival is directed to students of the last classes of Zielona Góra primary schools. During the Festivities their shows have also physicists and astronomers, from cooperating with us in popularization of science Zielona Gora University. At the festival the students from our Experimental School Group "Archimedes". Presented their own prepared themselves physical experience. With considerable help of students of Gymnasium No. 2 interested in astronomy, we organize the cyclical event, named "Cosmic Santa Claus," where I share with the students the knowledge gained through my active annual participation in the Space Workshop organized by the Science Centre in Warsaw. We all have fun and learn in a great way and with a smile, we touch real science that reveals its secrets!

  5. Experimental access to Transition Distribution Amplitudes with the P¯ANDA experiment at FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, B. P.; Erni, W.; Keshelashvili, I.; Krusche, B.; Steinacher, M.; Liu, B.; Liu, H.; Liu, Z.; Shen, X.; Wang, C.; Zhao, J.; Albrecht, M.; Fink, M.; Heinsius, F. H.; Held, T.; Holtmann, T.; Koch, H.; Kopf, B.; Kümmel, M.; Kuhl, G.; Kuhlmann, M.; Leyhe, M.; Mikirtychyants, M.; Musiol, P.; Mustafa, A.; Pelizäus, M.; Pychy, J.; Richter, M.; Schnier, C.; Schröder, T.; Sowa, C.; Steinke, M.; Triffterer, T.; Wiedner, U.; Beck, R.; Hammann, C.; Kaiser, D.; Ketzer, B.; Kube, M.; Mahlberg, P.; Rossbach, M.; Schmidt, C.; Schmitz, R.; Thoma, U.; Walther, D.; Wendel, C.; Wilson, A.; Bianconi, A.; Bragadireanu, M.; Caprini, M.; Pantea, D.; Pietreanu, D.; Vasile, M. E.; Patel, B.; Kaplan, D.; Brandys, P.; Czyzewski, T.; Czyzycki, W.; Domagala, M.; Hawryluk, M.; Filo, G.; Krawczyk, M.; Kwiatkowski, D.; Lisowski, E.; Lisowski, F.; Fiutowski, T.; Idzik, M.; Mindur, B.; Przyborowski, D.; Swientek, K.; Czech, B.; Kliczewski, S.; Korcyl, K.; Kozela, A.; Kulessa, P.; Lebiedowicz, P.; Malgorzata, K.; Pysz, K.; Schäfer, W.; Siudak, R.; Szczurek, A.; Biernat, J.; Jowzaee, S.; Kamys, B.; Kistryn, S.; Korcyl, G.; Krzemien, W.; Magiera, A.; Moskal, P.; Palka, M.; Psyzniak, A.; Rudy, Z.; Salabura, P.; Smyrski, J.; Strzempek, P.; Wrońska, A.; Augustin, I.; Lehmann, I.; Nicmorus, D.; Schepers, G.; Schmitt, L.; Al-Turany, M.; Cahit, U.; Capozza, L.; Dbeyssi, A.; Deppe, H.; Dzhygadlo, R.; Ehret, A.; Flemming, H.; Gerhardt, A.; Götzen, K.; Karabowicz, R.; Kliemt, R.; Kunkel, J.; Kurilla, U.; Lehmann, D.; Lühning, J.; Maas, F.; Morales Morales, C.; Mora Espí, M. C.; Nerling, F.; Orth, H.; Peters, K.; Rodríguez Piñeiro, D.; Saito, N.; Saito, T.; Sánchez Lorente, A.; Schmidt, C. J.; Schwarz, C.; Schwiening, J.; Traxler, M.; Valente, R.; Voss, B.; Wieczorek, P.; Wilms, A.; Zühlsdorf, M.; Abazov, V. M.; Alexeev, G.; Arefiev, A.; Astakhov, V. I.; Barabanov, M. Yu.; Batyunya, B. V.; Davydov, Yu. I.; Dodokhov, V. Kh.; Efremov, A. A.; Fedunov, A. G.; Festchenko, A. A.; Galoyan, A. S.; Grigoryan, S.; Karmokov, A.; Koshurnikov, E. K.; Lobanov, V. I.; Lobanov, Yu. Yu.; Makarov, A. F.; Malinina, L. V.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mustafaev, G. A.; Olshevskiy, A.; Pasyuk, M. A.; Perevalova, E. A.; Piskun, A. A.; Pocheptsov, T. A.; Pontecorvo, G.; Rodionov, V. K.; Rogov, Yu. N.; Salmin, R. A.; Samartsev, A. G.; Sapozhnikov, M. G.; Shabratova, G. S.; Skachkov, N. B.; Skachkova, A. N.; Strokovsky, E. A.; Suleimanov, M. K.; Teshev, R. Sh.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Uzhinsky, V. V.; Vodopyanov, A. S.; Zaporozhets, S. A.; Zhuravlev, N. I.; Zorin, A. G.; Branford, D.; Glazier, D.; Watts, D.; Woods, P.; Britting, A.; Eyrich, W.; Lehmann, A.; Uhlig, F.; Dobbs, S.; Seth, K.; Tomaradze, A.; Xiao, T.; Bettoni, D.; Carassiti, V.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Dalpiaz, P.; Drago, A.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Savriè, M.; Stancari, G.; Akishina, V.; Kisel, I.; Kulakov, I.; Zyzak, M.; Arora, R.; Bel, T.; Gromliuk, A.; Kalicy, G.; Krebs, M.; Patsyuk, M.; Zuehlsdorf, M.; Bianchi, N.; Gianotti, P.; Guaraldo, C.; Lucherini, V.; Pace, E.; Bersani, A.; Bracco, G.; Macri, M.; Parodi, R. F.; Bianco, S.; Bremer, D.; Brinkmann, K. T.; Diehl, S.; Dormenev, V.; Drexler, P.; Düren, M.; Eissner, T.; Etzelmüller, E.; Föhl, K.; Galuska, M.; Gessler, T.; Gutz, E.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Hu, J.; Kröck, B.; Kühn, W.; Kuske, T.; Lange, S.; Liang, Y.; Merle, O.; Metag, V.; Mülhheim, D.; Münchow, D.; Nanova, M.; Novotny, R.; Pitka, A.; Quagli, T.; Rieke, J.; Rosenbaum, C.; Schnell, R.; Spruck, B.; Stenzel, H.; Thöring, U.; Ullrich, M.; Wasem, T.; Werner, M.; Zaunick, H. G.; Ireland, D.; Rosner, G.; Seitz, B.; Deepak, P. N.; Kulkarni, A. V.; Apostolou, A.; Babai, M.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Lemmens, P.; Lindemulder, M.; Löhner, H.; Messchendorp, J.; Schakel, P.; Smit, H.; van der Weele, J. C.; Tiemens, M.; Veenstra, R.; Vejdani, S.; Kalita, K.; Mohanta, D. P.; Kumar, A.; Roy, A.; Sahoo, R.; Sohlbach, H.; Büscher, M.; Cao, L.; Cebulla, A.; Deermann, D.; Dosdall, R.; Esch, S.; Georgadze, I.; Gillitzer, A.; Goerres, A.; Goldenbaum, F.; Grunwald, D.; Herten, A.; Hu, Q.; Kemmerling, G.; Kleines, H.; Kozlov, V.; Lehrach, A.; Leiber, S.; Maier, R.; Nellen, R.; Ohm, H.; Orfanitski, S.; Prasuhn, D.; Prencipe, E.; Ritman, J.; Schadmand, S.; Schumann, J.; Sefzick, T.; Serdyuk, V.; Sterzenbach, G.; Stockmanns, T.; Wintz, P.; Wüstner, P.; Xu, H.; Li, S.; Li, Z.; Sun, Z.; Xu, H.; Rigato, V.; Fissum, S.; Hansen, K.; Isaksson, L.; Lundin, M.; Schröder, B.; Achenbach, P.; Bleser, S.; Cardinali, M.; Corell, O.; Deiseroth, M.; Denig, A.; Distler, M.; Feldbauer, F.; Fritsch, M.; Jasinski, P.; Hoek, M.; Kangh, D.; Karavdina, A.; Lauth, W.; Leithoff, H.; Merkel, H.; Michel, M.; Motzko, C.; Müller, U.; Noll, O.; Plueger, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Sanchez, S.; Schlimme, S.; Sfienti, C.; Steinen, M.; Thiel, M.; Weber, T.; Zambrana, M.; Dormenev, V. I.; Fedorov, A. A.; Korzihik, M. V.; Missevitch, O. V.; Balanutsa, P.; Balanutsa, V.; Chernetsky, V.; Demekhin, A.; Dolgolenko, A.; Fedorets, P.; Gerasimov, A.; Goryachev, V.; Varentsov, V.; Boukharov, A.; Malyshev, O.; Marishev, I.; Semenov, A.; Konorov, I.; Paul, S.; Grieser, S.; Hergemöller, A. K.; Khoukaz, A.; Köhler, E.; Täschner, A.; Wessels, J.; Dash, S.; Jadhav, M.; Kumar, S.; Sarin, P.; Varma, R.; Chandratre, V. B.; Datar, V.; Dutta, D.; Jha, V.; Kumawat, H.; Mohanty, A. K.; Roy, B.; Yan, Y.; Chinorat, K.; Khanchai, K.; Ayut, L.; Pornrad, S.; Barnyakov, A. Y.; Blinov, A. E.; Blinov, V. E.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Kononov, S. A.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Kuyanov, I. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Sokolov, A. A.; Tikhonov, Y. A.; Atomssa, E.; Hennino, T.; Imre, M.; Kunne, R.; Le Galliard, C.; Ma, B.; Marchand, D.; Ong, S.; Ramstein, B.; Rosier, P.; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E.; Van de Wiele, J.; Boca, G.; Costanza, S.; Genova, P.; Lavezzi, L.; Montagna, P.; Rotondi, A.; Abramov, V.; Belikov, N.; Bukreeva, S.; Davidenko, A.; Derevschikov, A.; Goncharenko, Y.; Grishin, V.; Kachanov, V.; Kormilitsin, V.; Melnik, Y.; Levin, A.; Minaev, N.; Mochalov, V.; Morozov, D.; Nogach, L.; Poslavskiy, S.; Ryazantsev, A.; Ryzhikov, S.; Semenov, P.; Shein, I.; Uzunian, A.; Vasiliev, A.; Yakutin, A.; Yabsley, B.; Bäck, T.; Cederwall, B.; Makónyi, K.; Tegnér, P. E.; von Würtemberg, K. M.; Belostotski, S.; Gavrilov, G.; Izotov, A.; Kashchuk, A.; Levitskaya, O.; Manaenkov, S.; Miklukho, O.; Naryshkin, Y.; Suvorov, K.; Veretennikov, D.; Zhadanov, A.; Rai, A. K.; Godre, S. S.; Duchat, R.; Amoroso, A.; Bussa, M. P.; Busso, L.; De Mori, F.; Destefanis, M.; Fava, L.; Ferrero, L.; Greco, M.; Maggiora, M.; Maniscalco, G.; Marcello, S.; Sosio, S.; Spataro, S.; Zotti, L.; Calvo, D.; Coli, S.; De Remigis, P.; Filippi, A.; Giraudo, G.; Lusso, S.; Mazza, G.; Mingnore, M.; Rivetti, A.; Wheadon, R.; Balestra, F.; Iazzi, F.; Introzzi, R.; Lavagno, A.; Younis, H.; Birsa, R.; Bradamante, F.; Bressan, A.; Martin, A.; Clement, H.; Gålnander, B.; Caldeira Balkeståhl, L.; Calén, H.; Fransson, K.; Johansson, T.; Kupsc, A.; Marciniewski, P.; Pettersson, J.; Schönning, K.; Wolke, M.; Zlomanczuk, J.; Díaz, J.; Ortiz, A.; Vinodkumar, P. C.; Parmar, A.; Chlopik, A.; Melnychuk, D.; Slowinski, B.; Trzcinski, A.; Wojciechowski, M.; Wronka, S.; Zwieglinski, B.; Bühler, P.; Marton, J.; Suzuki, K.; Widmann, E.; Zmeskal, J.; Fröhlich, B.; Khaneft, D.; Lin, D.; Zimmermann, I.; Semenov-Tian-Shansky, K.

    2015-08-01

    Baryon-to-meson Transition Distribution Amplitudes (TDAs) encoding valuable new information on hadron structure appear as building blocks in the collinear factorized description for several types of hard exclusive reactions. In this paper, we address the possibility of accessing nucleon-to-pion ( πN) TDAs from reaction with the future P¯ANDA detector at the FAIR facility. At high center-of-mass energy and high invariant mass squared of the lepton pair q 2, the amplitude of the signal channel admits a QCD factorized description in terms of πN TDAs and nucleon Distribution Amplitudes (DAs) in the forward and backward kinematic regimes. Assuming the validity of this factorized description, we perform feasibility studies for measuring with the P¯ANDA detector. Detailed simulations on signal reconstruction efficiency as well as on rejection of the most severe background channel, i.e. were performed for the center-of-mass energy squared s = 5 GeV2 and s = 10 GeV2, in the kinematic regions 3.0 < q 2 < 4.3 GeV2 and 5 < q 2 GeV2, respectively, with a neutral pion scattered in the forward or backward cone in the proton-antiproton center-of-mass frame. Results of the simulation show that the particle identification capabilities of the P¯ANDA detector will allow to achieve a background rejection factor of 5 · 107 (1 · 107) at low (high) q 2 for s = 5 GeV2, and of 1 · 108 (6 · 106) at low (high) q 2 for s = 10 GeV2, while keeping the signal reconstruction efficiency at around 40%. At both energies, a clean lepton signal can be reconstructed with the expected statistics corresponding to 2 fb-1 of integrated luminosity. The cross sections obtained from the simulations are used to show that a test of QCD collinear factorization can be done at the lowest order by measuring scaling laws and angular distributions. The future measurement of the signal channel cross section with P¯ANDA will provide a new test of the perturbative QCD description of a novel class of hard

  6. Meet Me at the Fair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, William G.; Brown, Peter

    1984-01-01

    Describes a student science exposition which includes individual research and team competitions, noncompetitive student exhibits, films, tours, workshops, and social events. Indicates that this combination of activities makes the exposition a real science "fair." (JN)

  7. Black Experiences Versus Black Expectations. (A Case for Fair-Share Employment.) Research Report No. 53.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphrey, Melvin

    Providing an account of black employment in the private sector between 1969 and 1975, the objectives of this study were designed to develop statistical models for estimating the employment gap between black employment experiences and black employment expectations; projecting employment gap closures; estimating the economic impact of employment…

  8. Experiment Prevails Over Observation in Geophysical Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvin, C.

    2006-05-01

    Thomson and Tait gave their name to a text (T and T') that sums up nineteenth century mechanics. T and T' says that scientists gain knowledge of the natural universe and the laws that regulate it through Experience. T and T' divides Experience into Observation and Experiment. The posthumous (1912) edition of T and T' appeared seven years before Eddington's expeditions to observe the eclipse of 29 May 1919 that demonstrated the bending of starlight predicted by Einstein's general theory of relativity. During the 2005 centenary of young Einstein's remarkably productive year, Eddington's (1919) result was frequently remembered, but the description in 2005 of what Eddington did in 1919 often differed from what Eddington said that he did. In his words then, Eddington observed; in words from scientists, historians of science, and philosophers of science during 2005, Eddington often experimented. In 1912, T and T' had distinguished Observation from Experiment with an apt contrast: ""When, as in astronomy, we endeavour to ascertain these causes by simply watching, we observe; when, as in our laboratories, we interfere arbitrarily with the causes or circumstances of a phenomenon, we are said to experiment"". (italics in T and T'). Eddington himself conformed to this distinction in his report (Physical Society of London, 1920). In its Preface, he states that observations were made at each of two stations, and concludes that ""I think it may now be stated that Einstein's law of gravitation is definitely established by observation..."". Chapter V of that report deals with The Crucial Phenomena. In this chapter, some form of the word observe (noun, verb, adjective, adverb) appears 13 times. In this chapter, experiment appears only as experimental, and then only twice. Einstein's prediction, with Eddington's observations, profoundly impressed contemporary philosophers of science. Karl Popper, then aged 17, considered Eddington's findings to effect a turning point in his career

  9. Recent Precision Experiments with Exotic Nuclei Produced with Uranium Projectiles and Experimental Prospects at Fair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geissel, H.; Chen, L.; Dickel, T.; Farinon, F.; Dillmann, I.; Knöbel, R.; Kurcewicz, J.; Mukha, I.; Münzenberg, G.; Nociforo, C.; Patyk, Z.; Pietri, S.; Plass, W. R.; Prochazka, A.; Scheidenberger, C.; Takechi, M.; Weick, H.; Winfield, J. S.; Winkler, M.

    2014-03-01

    Precision experiments with relativistic fragments separated in-flight require special experimentalmethods to overcome the inherent large emittance from the creation in nuclear reactions and atomic interactions in matter. At GSI relativistic exotic nuclei have been produced via uranium projectile fragmentation and fission and investigated with the inflight separator FRS directly, or in combination with either the storage-cooler ring ESR or the FRS Ion Catcher. 1000 A·MeV 238U ions were used to create 60 new neutron-rich isotopes separated and identified with the FRS to measure their production cross sections. In another experimental campaign the fragments were separated in flight and injected into the storage-cooler ring ESR for accurate mass and lifetime measurements. In these experimentswe have obtained accurate new mass values analyzed via a novel method which has reduced the systematic errors for both Schottky Mass Spectrometry (SMS) and for Isochronous Mass Spectrometry (IMS). Pioneering experiments have been carried out with the FRS Ion Catcher consisting of three experimental components, the dispersive magnetic system of the FRS with a monoenergetic and a homogeneous degrader, a cryogenic stopping cell filled with pure helium and a multiple-reflection time-of flight mass separator. The FRS Ion Catcher enables high precision spectroscopy experiments with eV to keV exotic nuclides. Results from these different FRS experiments are presented in this overview together with prospects for the next-generation facility Super-FRS. The novel features of the Super-FRS compared with the present FRS will be discussed in addition.

  10. Public Science with Real-Time Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenardic, A.

    2013-12-01

    One of the best ways for professional scientists to engage in public outreach is to get outside of the university and/or lab walls and go out into the public. That is, go to public spaces to do some science experiments with the public - this includes students of all ages that constitute that public. Technological advance in portable measurement gear now allow one to do real, or near real, time experiments in outdoor, public spaces. We have been running a meta-experiment of this sort, aimed at the public display of science, for about a year now in Houston TX at the Lee and Joe Jamail Skatepark. The project goes under the title of Sk8Lab Houston and has introduced students of all ages to the power of scientific experimentation. We bring a portable science pack with us to the park. The pack has a range of wireless measurement gear that allow experiments to be done on the spot. Some of the experiments are designed by us but many are designed on by whoever suggests them to us that day. Over time the Sk8Lab scientists have built up a level of "trust" with the people who frequent the park (no one feels like we are gonna grade them at the park and they know that the learning is not on some regimented clock). This has broken down some learning walls and allowed for a more informal mode of exploration and a more genuine mode of experimentation (as compared to what often happens in class labs when students feel like they are just being forced to reproduce some known result). We will describe some of the test case experiments we have run and also discuss some of the trials, tribulations, and happy successes (many unplanned) along the way.