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Sample records for scintillating guides screen

  1. Composite scintillator screen

    SciTech Connect

    Zeman, Herbert D.

    1994-01-01

    A scintillator screen for an X-ray system includes a substrate of low-Z material and bodies of a high-Z material embedded within the substrate. By preselecting the size of the bodies embedded within the substrate, the spacial separation of the bodies and the thickness of the screen, the sensitivity of the screen to X-rays within a predetermined energy range can be predicted.

  2. Absolute charge calibration of scintillating screens for relativistic electron detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, A.; Zeil, K.; Popp, A.; Schmid, K.; Jochmann, A.; Kraft, S. D.; Hidding, B.; Kudyakov, T.; Sears, C. M. S.; Veisz, L.; Karsch, S.; Pawelke, J.; Sauerbrey, R.; Cowan, T.; Krausz, F.; Schramm, U.

    2010-03-01

    We report on new charge calibrations and linearity tests with high-dynamic range for eight different scintillating screens typically used for the detection of relativistic electrons from laser-plasma based acceleration schemes. The absolute charge calibration was done with picosecond electron bunches at the ELBE linear accelerator in Dresden. The lower detection limit in our setup for the most sensitive scintillating screen (KODAK Biomax MS) was 10 fC/mm2. The screens showed a linear photon-to-charge dependency over several orders of magnitude. An onset of saturation effects starting around 10-100 pC/mm2 was found for some of the screens. Additionally, a constant light source was employed as a luminosity reference to simplify the transfer of a one-time absolute calibration to different experimental setups.

  3. Screen Study Guides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Barry

    1969-01-01

    This study guide for Arthur Lipsett's film "Very Nice, Very Nice" is in four parts. First, it describes and evaluates the film, discusses Lipsett's unusual juxtapositions, fast cutting, and fragmented speeches as indications of his satirical intent, and suggests that the only meaningful summation of the film's content is through pattern…

  4. Response from inorganic scintillation screens induced by high energetic ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieberwirth, A.; Ensinger, W.; Forck, P.; Lederer, S.

    2015-12-01

    Inorganic scintillation screens were irradiated with swift heavy ion beams at GSI accelator facility, using protons up to Uranium ions as projectiles. Beams were extracted from the synchrotron SIS18 with high energy (≈300 MeV/u) in slow and fast extraction mode. During irradiation the scintillation response of the screens was recorded by two different optical setups simultaneously to investigate the light output, profile characteristics and emission spectra. In principle fast extracted beams induce lower light output than slow extracted beams. The output per deposited energy shows a decreasing dependency with respect of the atomic number. Emission spectra showed no significant defects of the materials, neither at irradiation with increasing beam intensity nor during long time irradiation.

  5. Theory of thin screen scintillations for a spherical wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, L. C.

    1976-01-01

    A thin screen scintillation theory for a spherical wave is presented under the 'quasi-optical' approximation. We calculate the 'scattering angle', the 'observed angle', the intensity correlation function and the temporal pulse broadening for the random wave. It is found that as the wave propagates outward away from the phase screen, the correlation scale of the intensity fluctuation increases linearly while the 'observed angle' decreases linearly. The calculations are carried out for both Gaussian and power-law spectra of the turbulent medium.

  6. Optimization of screening for radioactivity in urine by liquid scintillation.

    SciTech Connect

    Shanks, Sonoya Toyoko; Reese, Robert P.; Preston, Rose T.

    2007-08-01

    Numerous events have or could have resulted in the inadvertent uptake of radionuclides by fairly large populations. Should a population receive an uptake, valuable information could be obtained by using liquid scintillation counting (LSC) techniques to quickly screen urine from a sample of the affected population. This study investigates such LSC parameters as discrimination, quench, volume, and count time to yield guidelines for analyzing urine in an emergency situation. Through analyzing variations of the volume and their relationships to the minimum detectable activity (MDA), the optimum ratio of sample size to scintillating chemical cocktail was found to be 1:3. Using this optimum volume size, the alpha MDA varied from 2100 pCi/L for a 30-second count time to 35 pCi/L for a 1000-minute count time. The typical count time used by the Sandia National Laboratories Radiation Protection Sample Diagnostics program is 30 minutes, which yields an alpha MDA of 200 pCi/L. Because MDA is inversely proportional to the square root of the count time, count time can be reduced in an emergency situation to achieve the desired MDA or response time. Note that approximately 25% of the response time is used to prepare the samples and complete the associated paperwork. It was also found that if the nuclide of interest is an unknown, pregenerated discriminator settings and efficiency calibrations can be used to produce an activity value within a factor of two, which is acceptable for a screening method.

  7. Three to Five Selective Screening Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Dakota State Dept. of Public Instruction, Bismarck. Div. of Special Education.

    This guide outlines the process of screening preschool-age children in North Dakota to determine their need for special education services. As mass screenings were found to lack cost-effectiveness, selective screening is encouraged. A periodic selective screening process, using a coordinated, interagency approach, is recommended for the earliest…

  8. New Beginnings: A Guide to Screening.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maine State Dept. of Educational and Cultural Services, Augusta.

    Providing a comprehensive overview, this guide to kindergarten screening was produced to aid Maine's school districts as they work to increase the effectiveness of their screening programs. Part 1, providing materials related to meeting the requirements of Maine's Education Reform Act of 1984, includes regulations pertaining to screening, a…

  9. High quantum efficiency megavoltage imaging with thick scintillator detectors for image guided radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopal, Arun

    In image guided radiation therapy (IGRT), imaging devices serve as guidance systems to aid patient set-up and tumor volume localization. Traditionally, 2-D megavoltage x-ray imagers, referred to as electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs), have been used for planar target localization, and have recently been extended to perform 3-D volumetric reconstruction via cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). However, current EPIDs utilize thin and inefficient phosphor screen detectors and are subsequently limited by poor soft tissue visualization, which limits their use for CBCT. Therefore, the use of thick scintillation media as megavoltage x-ray detectors for greater x-ray sensitivity and enhanced image quality has recently been of significant interest. In this research, two candidates for thick scintillators: CsI(Tl) and terbium doped scintillation glass were investigated in separate imaging configurations. In the first configuration, a thick scintillation crystal (TSC) consisting of a thick, monolithic slab of CsI(Tl) was coupled to a mirror-lens-camera system. The second configuration is based on a fiber-optic scintillation glass array (FOSGA), wherein the scintillation glass is drawn into long fiber-optic conduits, inserted into a grid-type housing constructed out of polymer-tungsten alloy, and coupled to an array of photodiodes for digital read-out. The imaging prototypes were characterized using theoretical studies and imaging measurements to obtain fundamental metrics of imaging performance. Spatial resolution was measured based on a modulation transfer function (MTF), noise was evaluated in terms of a noise power spectrum (NPS), and overall contrast was characterized in the form of detective quantum efficiency (DQE). The imaging studies were used to optimize the TSC and FOSGA imagers and propose prototype configurations for order-of-magnitude improvements in overall image quality. In addition, a fast and simple technique was developed to measure the MTF, NPS, and DQE metrics for clinical EPID and CBCT systems based on a novel adaptation of a traditional line-pair resolution bar-pattern. This research provides two significant benefits to radiotherapy: the characterization of a new generation of thick scintillator based megavoltage x-ray imagers for CBCT based IGRT, and the novel adaptation of fundamental imaging metrics from imaging research to routine clinical performance monitoring.

  10. Screening Method of New Inorganic Scintillators for Photon Counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritchard, Megan

    2004-10-01

    Inorganic scintillators play an important role in detection and visualization of ionizing radiation. A scintillator with both high light yield and fast response has yet to be found. These methods are useful in detector applications for homeland security and nuclear non-proliferation. New scintillators are necessary to improve radiation detectors for detection of fissile materials specifically when shielded. At ORNL, several new inorganic scintillators including various versions of ZnO, and SnO2 are being evaluated to determine light yield and decay times. Crystals are grown here, doped or painted with metals such as Al, Cd, Sn or Ga and measured. The photons emitted from a scintillator from a single incident alpha or neutron can be counted and graphed, allowing the luminosity and decay constants to be determined. The promising samples are also being evaluated for exact luminosity through spectroscopy.

  11. Screening Method of Inorganic Scintillators for Photon Counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritchard, M.

    2004-10-01

    Inorganic scintillators play an important role in detection and visualization of ionizing radiation. A scintillator with both high light yield and fast response has yet to be found. These methods are useful in detector applications for homeland security and nuclear non-proliferation. New scintillators are necessary to improve radiation detectors for detection of fissile materials specifically when shielded. At ORNL, several new inorganic scintillators including various versions of ZnO, and SnO2 are being evaluated to determine light yield and decay times. Crystals are grown here, doped or painted with metals such as Al, Cd, Sn or Ga and measured. The photons emitted from a scintillator from a single incident alpha or neutron can be counted and graphed, allowing the luminosity and decay constants to be determined

  12. Combinatorial Screening of Advanced Scintillators for High Resolution X-ray Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Shifan; Tao, Dejie; Lynch, Michael; Yuan, Xianglong; Li, Yiqun

    2008-05-12

    The lack of efficient scintillators is a major problem for developing powerful x-ray detectors that are widely used in homeland security, industrial and scientific research. Intematix has developed and applied a high throughput screening process and corresponding crystal growth technology to significantly speed up the discovery process for new efficient scintillators. As a result, Intematix has invented and fabricated three new scintillators both in powder and bulk forms, which possess promising properties such as better radiation hardness and better matching for silicon diode.

  13. Screening and Evaluation Tool (SET) Users Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Layne Pincock

    2014-10-01

    This document is the users guide to using the Screening and Evaluation Tool (SET). SET is a tool for comparing multiple fuel cycle options against a common set of criteria and metrics. It does this using standard multi-attribute utility decision analysis methods.

  14. Measurement and Monte Carlo modeling of the spatial response of scintillation screens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pistrui-Maximean, S. A.; Ltang, J. M.; Freud, N.; Koch, A.; Walenta, A. H.; Montarou, G.; Babot, D.

    2007-11-01

    In this article, we propose a detailed protocol to carry out measurements of the spatial response of scintillation screens and to assess the agreement with simulated results. The experimental measurements have been carried out using a practical implementation of the slit method. A Monte Carlo simulation model of scintillator screens, implemented with the toolkit Geant4, has been used to study the influence of the acquisition setup parameters and to compare with the experimental results. An algorithm of global stochastic optimization based on a localized random search method has been implemented to adjust the optical parameters (optical scattering and absorption coefficients). The algorithm has been tested for different X-ray tube voltages (40, 70 and 100 kV). A satisfactory convergence between the results simulated with the optimized model and the experimental measurements is obtained.

  15. Arrays of Segmented, Tapered Light Guides for Use with Large, Planar Scintillation Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Raylman, Raymond R.; Vaigneur, Keith; Stolin, Alexander V.; Jaliparthi, Gangadhar

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic imaging techniques can potentially improve detection and diagnosis of cancer in women with radiodense and/or fibrocystic breasts. Our group has previously developed a high-resolution positron emission tomography imaging and biopsy device (PEM-PET) to detect and guide the biopsy of suspicious breast lesions. Initial testing revealed that the imaging field-of-view (FOV) of the scanner was smaller than the physical size of the detector’s active area, which could hinder sampling of breast areas close to the chest wall. The purpose of this work was to utilize segmented, tapered light guides for optically coupling the scintillator arrays to arrays of position-sensitive photomultipliers to increase both the active FOV and identification of individual scintillator elements. Testing of the new system revealed that the optics of these structures made it possible to discern detector elements from the complete active area of the detector face. In the previous system the top and bottom rows and left and right columns were not identifiable. Additionally, use of the new light guides increased the contrast of individual detector elements by up to 129%. Improved element identification led to a spatial resolution increase by approximately 12%. Due to attenuation of light in the light guides the detector energy resolution decreased from 18.5% to 19.1%. Overall, these improvements should increase the field-of-view and spatial resolution of the dedicated breast-PET system. PMID:26538685

  16. Energy saving window screen guide device

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, S.L.

    1983-02-22

    The screen or shade for the window is of flexible material so that when in open position it can be pleated. Opposite sides of the screen have tapes sewed on near the edges and male snap fasteners are spaced from each other on the tapes. These fasteners snap into holes in plastic glides which travel along plastic tracks. Either converted by screws or integral with the tracks are angle sealing strips, one flange being on the outside and arranged to prevent air movement from the inside of the screen to the outside, or vice versa, when the screen is closed. Either attached by screws to the track and sealing strip assembly or integral therewith is a mounting rail which is attached by screws to the building or support. A slanting roof is shown having several windows equipped with independently glided screens.

  17. Polycrystalline para-terphenyl scintillator adopted in a β- detecting probe for radio-guided surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Bellini, F.; Bocci, V.; Collamati, F.; De Lucia, E.; Faccini, R.; Marafini, M.; Mattei, I.; Morganti, S.; Paramatti, R.; Patera, V.; Pinci, D.; Recchia, L.; Russomando, A.; Sarti, A.; Sciubba, A.; Senzacqua, M.; Voena, C.

    2015-06-01

    A radio-guided surgery technique exploiting β- emitters is under development. It aims at a higher target-to-background activity ratio implying both a smaller radiopharmaceutical activity and the possibility of extending the technique to cases with a large uptake of surrounding healthy organs. Such technique requires a dedicated intraoperative probe detecting β- radiation. A first prototype has been developed relying on the low density and high light yield of the diphenylbutadiene doped para-therphenyl organic scintillator. The scintillation light produced in a cylindrical crystal, 5 mm in diameter and 3 mm in height, is guided to a photo-multiplier tube by optical fibres. The custom readout electronics is designed to optimize its usage in terms of feedback to the surgeon, portability and remote monitoring of the signal. Tests show that with a radiotracer activity comparable to those administered for diagnostic purposes the developed probe can detect a 0.1 ml cancerous residual of meningioma in a few seconds.

  18. HYDROCARBON SPILL SCREENING MODEL (HSSM) VOLUME 1: USER'S GUIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This users guide describes the Hydrocarbon Spill Screening Model (HSSM). The model is intended for simulation of subsurface releases of light nonaqueous phase liquids (LNAPLs). The model consists of separate modules for LNAPL flow through the vadose zone, spreading in the capil...

  19. Synthesis and Screening of Thin Films in the CeCl3-CeBr3 System for Scintillator Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Matson, Dean W.; Graff, Gordon L.; Male, Jonathan L.; Johnson, Bradley R.; Nie, Zimin; Joly, Alan G.; Olsen, Larry C.

    2010-04-02

    Thin film samples of CeCl3, CeBr3, and combinatorial compositions along the CeCl3-CeBr3 join were produced using thermal evaporation, which is being evaluated as a method for rapid screening of new scintillator materials. The combinatorial thin films were shown to be compositionally reproducible from run-to-run within reasonable limitations. Analytical results suggest a continuous variation in the combinatorial samples in terms of their compositions, crystal structures, and luminescence characteristics.

  20. Scintillation Counters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Zane W.

    Scintillators find wide use in radiation detection as the detecting medium for gamma/X-rays, and charged and neutral particles. Since the first notice in 1895 by Roentgen of the production of light by X-rays on a barium platinocyanide screen, and Thomas Edison's work over the following 2 years resulting in the discovery of calcium tungstate as a superior fluoroscopy screen, much research and experimentation have been undertaken to discover and elucidate the properties of new scintillators. Scintillators with high density and high atomic number are prized for the detection of gamma rays above 1 MeV; lower atomic number, lower-density materials find use for detecting beta particles and heavy charged particles; hydrogenous scintillators find use in fast-neutron detection; and boron-, lithium-, and gadolinium-containing scintillators are used for slow-neutron detection. This chapter provides the practitioner with an overview of the general characteristics of scintillators, including the variation of probability of interaction with density and atomic number, the characteristics of the light pulse, a list and characteristics of commonly available scintillators and their approximate cost, and recommendations regarding the choice of material for a few specific applications. This chapter does not pretend to present an exhaustive list of scintillators and applications.

  1. Imaging properties of cerium doped Yttrium Aluminum Oxide (YAP:Ce) powder scintillating screens under X-ray excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalivas, N.; Valais, I.; Salemis, G.; Karagiannis, C.; Konstantinidis, A.; Nikolopoulos, D.; Loudos, G.; Sakelios, N.; Karakatsanis, N.; Nikita, K.; Gayshan, V. L.; Gektin, A. V.; Sianoudis, I.; Giokaris, N.; Nomicos, C. D.; Dimitropoulos, N.; Cavouras, D.; Panayiotakis, G.; Kandarakis, I.

    2006-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the imaging performance of YAP:Ce powder scintillating screens under exposure conditions employed in diagnostic radiology (50-140 kV). Various screens were prepared in our laboratory from YAP: Ce powder (Phosphor Technology, Ltd.), with coating thickness ranging from 53 to 110 mg/cm 2. The imaging performance of the screens was assessed by experimental determination of the modulation transfer function (MTF) and the noise transfer function (NTF). MTF was determined by the edge spread function (ESF) method while NTF was estimated by noise power spectrum (NPS) measurements after uniform screen irradiation. In addition, parameters related to overall image quality, such as the signal-to-noise ratio transfer (MTF/NTF), were estimated. MTF curves were affected by the beam hardening effects caused by the patient simulating 20 mm thick aluminum phantom. Under these conditions MTF values were found to increase with the mean X-ray photon energy. A similar effect was observed for NTF curves. Results were compared with data obtained on CsI:Tl scintillator. Taking into consideration the very fast response of YAP:Ce, these data may be of interest in designing X-ray imaging detectors.

  2. Modular scintillation camera

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, H. H.

    1985-04-30

    Improved optical coupling modules to be used in coded-aperture-type radiographic imaging systems. In a first system, a rotating slit coded-aperture is employed between the radioactive object and the module. The module consists of one pair of side-by-side photomultipliers receiving light rays from a scintillation crystal exposed to the object via the coded-aperture. The light rays are guided to the photomultipliers by a mask having a central transverse transparent window, or by a cylindrical lens, the mask or lens being mounted in a light-conveying quartz block assembly providing internal reflections at opposite faces of the assembly. This generates output signals from the photomultipliers which can be utilized to compute one-dimensional coordinate values for restoring the image of the radioactive object on a display screen. In another form of optical coupling module, usable with other types of coded-apertures, four square photomultipliers form a substantially square block and receive light rays from scintillations from a scintillation crystal exposed to the radioactive object via the coded-aperture. The light rays are guided to the photomultipliers by a square mask or a centrally transparent square lens configuration mounted in a light-conveying assembly formed by internally reflecting quartz blocks, the optical rays being directed to the respective photomultipliers so as to generate resultant output signals which can be utilized to compute image coordinate values for two-dimensional representation of the radioactive object being examined.

  3. USER'S GUIDE TO CTDMPLUS: VOLUME 2. THE SCREEN MODE (CTSCREEN)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA's Technology-Transfer Workgroup has developed a screening version (denoted as CTSCREEN) of the Complex Terrain Dispersion Model, CTDMPLUS. TSCREEN uses an array of predetermined meteorological conditions to model the user supplied source-terrain configuration. TSCREEN yie...

  4. Evaluation of powder/granular Gd2O2S:Pr scintillator screens in single photon counting mode under 140 keV excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, S.; Georgiou, M.; Loudos, G.; Michail, C.; Fountos, G.; Kandarakis, I.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is the evaluation of an alternative, low cost solution for the gamma detector in planar imaging. It is based on a powder scintillator, well established in X-ray imaging, and could be further exploited in simultaneous bimodal imaging systems. For this purpose, we have examined the performance of Gd2O2S:Pr powder scintillator, in the form of thick granular screens easily produced in the laboratory by commercially available Gd2O2S:Pr powder. The screen was coupled to a round position sensitive photomultiplier tube (R3292 PSPMT). The system's evaluation was performed in photon counting mode under 99mTc excitation. In all measurements, a general purpose hexagonal parallel collimator was used. Different samples of screens with coating thickness varying from 0.1 g/cm2 to 1.2 g/cm2 were tested. The 0.6 g/cm2 screen, corresponding to ~ 2 mm actual thickness, was found most efficient under 140 keV irradiation. The system`s performance with the proposed screen is reported with the modulation transfer function. Moreover sensitivity, spatial and energy resolution as well as the uniformity response using phantoms were measured. The performance of the proposed screen was compared with two CsI:Tl pixellated crystal arrays with 2 × 2 × 3 mm3 and 3 × 3 × 5 mm3pixel size. A spatial resolution, of 3 mm FWHM, for a 99mTc line source, was achieved at zero source to collimator distance. In addition, the Gd2O2S:Pr screen showed a slower degradation of the spatial resolution with increasing source to collimator distance e.g at 20 cm, the Gd2O2S:Pr screen showed aq spatial resolution of 8.4 mm while the spatial resolution of the pixellated crystals was 15 mm. Taking into account its easy production, its flexibility due to powder form, the very low cost and the good spatial resolution properties of the proposed alternative detector, powder scintillators could potentially be used for the construction of flexible detector geometries, such as ring type or gamma probes or as a low cost detector solution in educational photon counting imaging applications, complementary to standard X-ray imaging.

  5. Hazard screening application guide. Safety Analysis Report Update Program

    SciTech Connect

    1992-06-01

    The basic purpose of hazard screening is to group precesses, facilities, and proposed modifications according to the magnitude of their hazards so as to determine the need for and extent of follow on safety analysis. A hazard is defined as a material, energy source, or operation that has the potential to cause injury or illness in human beings. The purpose of this document is to give guidance and provide standard methods for performing hazard screening. Hazard screening is applied to new and existing facilities and processes as well as to proposed modifications to existing facilities and processes. The hazard screening process evaluates an identified hazards in terms of the effects on people, both on-site and off-site. The process uses bounding analyses with no credit given for mitigation of an accident with the exception of certain containers meeting DOT specifications. The process is restricted to human safety issues only. Environmental effects are addressed by the environmental program. Interfaces with environmental organizations will be established in order to share information.

  6. USER S GUIDE FOR THE RANDOM DRUG SCREENING SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    McNeany, Karen I

    2013-12-01

    The Random Drug Screening System (RDSS) is a desktop computing application designed to assign nongameable drug testing dates to each member in a population of employees, within a specific time line. The program includes reporting capabilities, test form generation, unique test ID number assignment, and the ability to flag high-risk employees for a higher frequency of drug testing than the general population.

  7. Protein Ligand Complex Guided Approach for Virtual Screening.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, Muthukumarasamy; Pandit, Deepak; Vyas, Renu

    2015-01-01

    The target ligand association data is a rich source of information which is not exploited enough for drug design efforts in virtual screening. A java based open-source toolkit for Protein Ligand Network Extraction (J-ProLiNE) focused on protein-ligand complex analysis with several features integrated in a distributed computing network has been developed. Sequence alignment and similarity search components have been automated to yield local, global alignment scores along with similarity and distance scores. 10000 proteins with co-crystallized ligands from pdb and MOAD databases were extracted and analyzed for revealing relationships between targets, ligands and scaffolds. Through this analysis, we could generate a protein ligand network to identify the promiscuous and selective scaffolds for multiple classes of proteins targets. Using J-ProLiNE we created a 507 x 507 matrix of protein targets and native ligands belonging to six enzyme classes and analyzed the results to elucidate the protein-protein, protein-ligand and ligand-ligand interactions. In yet another application of the J-ProLiNE software, we were able to process kinase related information stored in US patents to construct disease-gene-ligand-scaffold networks. It is hoped that the studies presented here will enable target ligand knowledge based virtual screening for inhibitor design. PMID:26138572

  8. Simulating the effects of scintillation on transionospheric signals with a two-way phase screen constructed from ALTAIR phase-derived TEC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caton, R. G.; Carrano, C. S.; Alcala, C. M.; Groves, K. M.; Beach, T.; Sponseller, D.

    2009-02-01

    Severe scintillation on transionospheric radio signals caused by small-scale plasma irregularities can greatly disrupt wideband communication, surveillance, and navigation systems. Development of techniques to mitigate the effects of scintillation requires accurate characterization of the ionospheric propagation channel. To achieve this goal, multiple campaigns were conducted as part of the joint U.S. -UK Wideband Ionospheric Distortion Experiment to obtain ionospheric signatures from various instruments located on Kwajalein Atoll. We use tracking data from the VHF/UHF Advanced Research Project Agency Long-Range Tracking and Instrumentation Radar for overflights of passive calibration spheres in low-Earth orbit to demonstrate the validity of a one-dimensional (1-D) phase screen model to represent the propagation channel through a disturbed ionosphere. The 1-D phase screen is constructed from radar phase-derived estimates of the total electron content. We present a detailed comparison of simulated radar cross section after propagation through the phase screen with observed radar returns under both disturbed and quiet ionospheric conditions. Successful reproduction of radar amplitude enhancements and fades adds to our understanding of small-scale plasma irregularities and moves us toward our goal of providing precise predictions of radar system performance. Doing so will allow for the development of better mitigation/compensation algorithms for detrimental ionospheric effects. Result from this study also provide an assessment of the tools required for incorporating in situ density measurements along with phase screen theory into situational awareness products to offer an accurate nowcast/forecast of system impacts to users in the communication, navigation, and surveillance communities.

  9. Large-Scale Single-Guide RNA Library Construction and Use for Genetic Screens

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tim; Lander, Eric S.; Sabatini, David M.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to systematically disrupt genes serves as a powerful tool for understanding their function. The programmable Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (CRISPR/Cas9) system enables efficient targeting of large numbers of genes through the use of single-guide RNA (sgRNA) libraries. In cultured mammalian cells, collections of knockout mutants can be readily generated via transduction of Cas9/sgRNA lentiviral pools, screened for a phenotype of interest, and tracked using high-throughput DNA sequencing. This technique represents the first general method for undertaking systematic loss-of-function genetic screens in mammalian cells. In this chapter, we outline the steps for conducting CRISPR-based screens from the initial library design to final data analysis and provide guidelines for developing an appropriate screening strategy. PMID:26933254

  10. Experimental study of heavy-ion computed tomography using a scintillation screen and an electron-multiplying charged coupled device camera for human head imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muraishi, Hiroshi; Hara, Hidetake; Abe, Shinji; Yokose, Mamoru; Watanabe, Takara; Takeda, Tohoru; Koba, Yusuke; Fukuda, Shigekazu

    2016-03-01

    We have developed a heavy-ion computed tomography (IonCT) system using a scintillation screen and an electron-multiplying charged coupled device (EMCCD) camera that can measure a large object such as a human head. In this study, objective with the development of the system was to investigate the possibility of applying this system to heavy-ion treatment planning from the point of view of spatial resolution in a reconstructed image. Experiments were carried out on a rotation phantom using 12C accelerated up to 430 MeV/u by the Heavy-Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). We demonstrated that the reconstructed image of an object with a water equivalent thickness (WET) of approximately 18 cm was successfully achieved with the spatial resolution of 1 mm, which would make this IonCT system worth applying to the heavy-ion treatment planning for head and neck cancers.

  11. Measurement of transmission efficiency for 400 MeV proton beam through collimator at Fermilab MuCool Test Area using Chromox-6 scintillation screen.

    PubMed

    Jana, M R; Chung, M; Freemire, B; Hanlet, P; Leonova, M; Moretti, A; Palmer, M; Schwarz, T; Tollestrup, A; Torun, Y; Yonehara, K

    2013-06-01

    The MuCool Test Area (MTA) at Fermilab is a facility to develop the technology required for ionization cooling for a future Muon Collider and?or Neutrino Factory. As part of this research program, feasibility studies of various types of RF cavities in a high magnetic field environment are in progress. As a unique approach, we have tested a RF cavity filled with a high pressure hydrogen gas with a 400 MeV proton beam in an external magnetic field (B = 3 T). Quantitative information about the number of protons passing through this cavity is an essential requirement of the beam test. The MTA is a flammable gas (hydrogen) hazard zone. Due to safety reasons, no active (energized) beam diagnostic instrument can be used. Moreover, when the magnetic field is on, current transformers (toroids) used for beam intensity measurements do not work due to the saturation of the ferrite material of the transformer. Based on these requirements, we have developed a passive beam diagnostic instrumentation using a combination of a Chromox-6 scintillation screen and CCD camera. This paper describes details of the beam profile and position obtained from the CCD image with B = 0 T and B = 3 T, and for high and low intensity proton beams. A comparison is made with beam size obtained from multi-wires detector. Beam transmission efficiency through a collimator with a 4 mm diameter hole is measured by the toroids and CCD image of the scintillation screen. Results show that the transmission efficiency estimated from the CCD image is consistent with the toroid measurement, which enables us to monitor the beam transmission efficiency even in a high magnetic field environment. PMID:23822337

  12. Measurement of transmission efficiency for 400 MeV proton beam through collimator at Fermilab MuCool Test Area using Chromox-6 scintillation screen

    SciTech Connect

    Jana, M. R.; Chung, M.; Leonova, M.; Moretti, A.; Palmer, M.; Schwarz, T.; Tollestrup, A.; Yonehara, K.; Freemire, B.; Hanlet, P.; Torun, Y.

    2013-06-15

    The MuCool Test Area (MTA) at Fermilab is a facility to develop the technology required for ionization cooling for a future Muon Collider and/or Neutrino Factory. As part of this research program, feasibility studies of various types of RF cavities in a high magnetic field environment are in progress. As a unique approach, we have tested a RF cavity filled with a high pressure hydrogen gas with a 400 MeV proton beam in an external magnetic field (B = 3 T). Quantitative information about the number of protons passing through this cavity is an essential requirement of the beam test. The MTA is a flammable gas (hydrogen) hazard zone. Due to safety reasons, no active (energized) beam diagnostic instrument can be used. Moreover, when the magnetic field is on, current transformers (toroids) used for beam intensity measurements do not work due to the saturation of the ferrite material of the transformer. Based on these requirements, we have developed a passive beam diagnostic instrumentation using a combination of a Chromox-6 scintillation screen and CCD camera. This paper describes details of the beam profile and position obtained from the CCD image with B = 0 T and B = 3 T, and for high and low intensity proton beams. A comparison is made with beam size obtained from multi-wires detector. Beam transmission efficiency through a collimator with a 4 mm diameter hole is measured by the toroids and CCD image of the scintillation screen. Results show that the transmission efficiency estimated from the CCD image is consistent with the toroid measurement, which enables us to monitor the beam transmission efficiency even in a high magnetic field environment.

  13. Imaging performance of a thin Lu2O3:Eu nanophosphor scintillating screen coupled to a high resolution CMOS sensor under X-ray radiographic conditions: comparison with Gd2O2S:Eu conventional phosphor screen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seferis, I.; Michail, C.; Valais, I.; Zeler, J.; Liaparinos, P.; Kalyvas, N.; Fountos, G.; Zych, E.; Kandarakis, I.; Panayiotakis, G.

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to experimentally evaluate the imaging characteristics of the Lu2O3:Eu nanophosphor thin screen coupled to a high resolution CMOS sensor under radiographic conditions. Parameters such as the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), the Normalized Noise Power Spectrum (NNPS) and the Detective Quantum Efficiency (DQE) were investigated at 70 kVp under three exposure levels (20 mAs, 63 mAs and 90 mAs). Since Lu2O3:Eu emits light in the red wavelength range, the imaging characteristics of a 33.3 mg/cm2 Gd2O2S:Eu conventional phosphor screen were also evaluated for comparison purposes. The Lu2O3:Eu nanophosphor powder was produced by the combustion synthesis, using urea as fuel. A scintillating screen of 30.2 mg/cm2 was prepared by sedimentation of the nanophosphor powder on a fused silica substrate. The CMOS/Lu2O3:Eu detector`s imaging characteristics were evaluated using an experimental method proposed by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) guidelines. It was found that the CMOS/Lu2O3:Eu nanophosphor system has higher MTF values compared to the CMOS/Gd2O2S:Eu sensor/screen combination in the whole frequency range examined. For low frequencies (0 to 2 cycles/mm) NNPS values of the CMOS/Gd2O2S:Eu system were found 90% higher compared to the NNPS values of the CMOS/Lu2O3:Eu nanophosphor system, whereas from medium to high frequencies (2 to 13 cycles/mm) were found 40% higher. In contrast with the CMOS/ Gd2O2S:Eu system, CMOS/Lu2O3:Eu nanophosphor system appears to retain high DQE values in the whole frequency range examined. Our results indicate that Lu2O3:Eu nanophosphor is a promising scintillator for further research in digital X-ray radiography.

  14. Scintillator material

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, D.F.; Kross, B.J.

    1994-06-07

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography. 4 figs.

  15. Scintillator material

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, D.F.; Kross, B.J.

    1992-07-28

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography. 4 figs.

  16. Scintillator material

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.; Kross, Brian J.

    1992-01-01

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography.

  17. Scintillator material

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.; Kross, Brian J.

    1994-01-01

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography.

  18. Taking It to the Pews: A CBPR-Guided HIV Awareness and Screening Project with Black Churches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berkley-Patton, Jannette; Bowe-Thompson, Carole; Bradley-Ewing, Andrea; Hawes, Starlyn; Moore, Erin; Williams, Eric; Martinez, David; Goggin, Kathy

    2010-01-01

    Utilizing a community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach is a potentially effective strategy for exploring the development, implementation, and evaluation of HIV interventions in African American churches. This CBPR-guided study describes a church-based HIV awareness and screening intervention (Taking It to the Pews [TIPS]) that fully…

  19. Incremental Validity Analyses of the Violence Risk Appraisal Guide and the Psychopathy Checklist: Screening Version in a Civil Psychiatric Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edens, John F.; Skeem, Jennifer L.; Douglas, Kevin S.

    2006-01-01

    This study compares two instruments frequently used to assess risk for violence, the Violence Risk Appraisal Guide (VRAG) and the Psychopathy Checklist: Screening Version (PCL:SV), in a large sample of civil psychiatric patients. Despite a strong bivariate relationship with community violence, the VRAG could not improve on the predictive validity…

  20. A Guide to Dental Care for the Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnosis, and Treatment Program (EPSDT) Under Medicaid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindahl, Roy L.; Young, Wesley O.

    This guide has been developed to assist administrators, providers of dental care, and others involved in carrying out the dental care provisions of the EPSDT program (Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnosis, and Treatment Program). It is intended to assist in the development of programs concerned with the unique characteristics of dental diseases…

  1. Shackleton's Antarctic Adventure: The Greatest Survival Story of All Time. Teacher's Guide To Accompany the Giant-Screen Film.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibb, Reen

    This teacher's guide was developed to accompany the giant-screen film, "Shackleton's Antarctic Adventure". The activities featured use a multidisciplinary approach and target students ages 7 through 14. Teacher pages include background information and student pages include instructions and additional information for understanding the activity.…

  2. T & I--Graphic Arts, Silk Screen Printing. Kit No. 60. Instructor's Manual [and] Student Learning Activity Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cope, George

    An instructor's manual and student activity guide on silk screen printing are provided in this set of prevocational education materials which focuses on the vocational area of trade and industry (graphic arts). (This set of materials is one of ninety-two prevocational sets arranged around a cluster of seven vocational offerings: agriculture, home…

  3. Using adverse outcome pathway analysis to guide development of high-throughput screening assays for thyroid-disruptors

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using Adverse Outcome Pathway Analysis to Guide Development of High-Throughput Screening Assays for Thyroid-Disruptors Katie B. Paul1,2, Joan M. Hedge2, Daniel M. Rotroff4, Kevin M. Crofton4, Michael W. Hornung3, Steven O. Simmons2 1Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education Post...

  4. T & I--Graphic Arts, Silk Screen Printing. Kit No. 60. Instructor's Manual [and] Student Learning Activity Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cope, George

    An instructor's manual and student activity guide on silk screen printing are provided in this set of prevocational education materials which focuses on the vocational area of trade and industry (graphic arts). (This set of materials is one of ninety-two prevocational sets arranged around a cluster of seven vocational offerings: agriculture, home

  5. A Guide to Screening for the Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnosis and Treatment Program (EPSDT) Under Medicaid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frankenburg, William K.; North, A. Frederick, Jr.

    The manual was designed to help public officials, physicians, nurses, and others to plan and implement an Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnosis and Treatment (EPSDT) program under Medicaid. Procedures for carrying out components of an EPSDT program are recommended. Part 1 discusses organization and administration of screening, diagnosis, and…

  6. Focused Decision Support: a Data Mining Tool to Query the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial Dataset and Guide Screening Management for the Individual Patient.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Arjun; Hostetter, Jason; Morrison, James; Wang, Kenneth; Siegel, Eliot

    2016-04-01

    The Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer (PLCO) Screening Trial enrolled ~155,000 participants to determine whether certain screening exams reduced mortality from prostate, lung, colorectal, and ovarian cancer. Repurposing the data provides an unparalleled resource for matching patients with the outcomes of demographically or diagnostically comparable patients. A web-based application was developed to query this subset of patient information against a given patient's demographics and risk factors. Analysis of the matched data yields outcome information which can then be used to guide management decisions and imaging software. Prognostic information is also estimated via the proportion of matched patients that progress to cancer. The US Preventative Services Task Force provides screening recommendations for cancers of the breast, colorectal tract, and lungs. There is wide variability in adherence of clinicians to these guidelines and others published by the Fleischner Society and various cancer organizations. Data mining the PLCO dataset for clinical decision support can optimize the use of limited healthcare resources, focusing screening on patients for whom the benefit to risk ratio is the greatest and most efficacious. A data driven, personalized approach to cancer screening maximizes the economic and clinical efficacy and enables early identification of patients in which the course of disease can be improved. Our dynamic decision support system utilizes a subset of the PLCO dataset as a reference model to determine imaging and testing appropriateness while offering prognostic information for various cancers. PMID:26385814

  7. Large-Scale Single Guide RNA Library Construction and Use for CRISPR-Cas9-Based Genetic Screens.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tim; Lander, Eric S; Sabatini, David M

    2016-01-01

    The ability to systematically disrupt genes serves as a powerful tool for understanding their function. The programmable CRISPR-Cas9 system enables efficient targeting of large numbers of genes through the use of single guide RNA (sgRNA) libraries. In cultured mammalian cells, collections of knockout mutants can be readily generated by means of transduction of Cas9-sgRNA lentiviral pools, screened for a phenotype of interest, and counted using high-throughput DNA sequencing. This technique represents the first general method for undertaking systematic loss-of-function genetic screens in mammalian cells. Here, we introduce the methodology and rationale for conducting CRISPR-based screens, focusing on distinguishing positive and negative selection strategies. PMID:26933254

  8. Screening for Usher Syndrome: A Hands-On Guide for School Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houghton, Joan; Coonts, Teresa; Jordan, Beth; Schafer, Jacqueline, Ed.

    This manual was written specifically to help school nurses conduct screenings for Usher syndrome, a genetic condition that involves deafness or hearing loss and the progressive loss of vision. It provides information on the step-by-step process of how to conduct a screening, the actual forms needed for a screening, and resources for referring…

  9. SCINTILLATION SPECTROMETER

    DOEpatents

    Bell, P.R.; Francis, J.E.

    1960-06-21

    A portable scintillation spectrometer is described which is especially useful in radio-biological studies for determining the uptake and distribution of gamma -emitting substances in tissue. The spectrometer includes a collimator having a plurality of apertures that are hexagonal in cross section. Two crystals are provided: one is activated to respond to incident rays from the collimator; the other is not activated and shields the first from external radiation.

  10. Plastic scintillation dosimetry: Optimal selection of scintillating fibers and scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Archambault, Louis; Arsenault, Jean; Gingras, Luc; Sam Beddar, A.; Roy, Rene; Beaulieu, Luc

    2005-07-15

    Scintillation dosimetry is a promising avenue for evaluating dose patterns delivered by intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans or for the small fields involved in stereotactic radiosurgery. However, the increase in signal has been the goal for many authors. In this paper, a comparison is made between plastic scintillating fibers and plastic scintillator. The collection of scintillation light was measured experimentally for four commercial models of scintillating fibers (BCF-12, BCF-60, SCSF-78, SCSF-3HF) and two models of plastic scintillators (BC-400, BC-408). The emission spectra of all six scintillators were obtained by using an optical spectrum analyzer and they were compared with theoretical behavior. For scintillation in the blue region, the signal intensity of a singly clad scintillating fiber (BCF-12) was 120% of that of the plastic scintillator (BC-400). For the multiclad fiber (SCSF-78), the signal reached 144% of that of the plastic scintillator. The intensity of the green scintillating fibers was lower than that of the plastic scintillator: 47% for the singly clad fiber (BCF-60) and 77% for the multiclad fiber (SCSF-3HF). The collected light was studied as a function of the scintillator length and radius for a cylindrical probe. We found that symmetric detectors with nearly the same spatial resolution in each direction (2 mm in diameter by 3 mm in length) could be made with a signal equivalent to those of the more commonly used asymmetric scintillators. With augmentation of the signal-to-noise ratio in consideration, this paper presents a series of comparisons that should provide insight into selection of a scintillator type and volume for development of a medical dosimeter.

  11. Recombinant Pseudorabies Virus (PRV) Expressing Firefly Luciferase Effectively Screened for CRISPR/Cas9 Single Guide RNAs and Antiviral Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yan-Dong; Liu, Ji-Ting; Fang, Qiong-Qiong; Wang, Tong-Yun; Sun, Ming-Xia; An, Tong-Qing; Tian, Zhi-Jun; Cai, Xue-Hui

    2016-01-01

    A Pseudorabies virus (PRV) variant has emerged in China since 2011 that is not protected by commercial vaccines, and has not been well studied. The PRV genome is large and difficult to manipulate, but it is feasible to use clustered, regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 technology. However, identification of single guide RNA (sgRNA) through screening is critical to the CRISPR/Cas9 system, and is traditionally time and labor intensive, and not suitable for rapid and high throughput screening of effective PRV sgRNAs. In this study, we developed a recombinant PRV strain expressing firefly luciferase and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) as a reporter virus for PRV-specific sgRNA screens and rapid evaluation of antiviral compounds. Luciferase activity was apparent as soon as 4 h after infection and was stably expressed through 10 passages. In a proof of the principle screen, we were able to identify several PRV specific sgRNAs and confirmed that they inhibited PRV replication using traditional methods. Using the reporter virus, we also identified PRV variants lacking US3, US2, and US9 gene function, and showed anti-PRV activity for chloroquine. Our results suggest that the reporter PRV strain will be a useful tool for basic virology studies, and for developing PRV control and prevention measures. PMID:27043610

  12. Recombinant Pseudorabies Virus (PRV) Expressing Firefly Luciferase Effectively Screened for CRISPR/Cas9 Single Guide RNAs and Antiviral Compounds.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yan-Dong; Liu, Ji-Ting; Fang, Qiong-Qiong; Wang, Tong-Yun; Sun, Ming-Xia; An, Tong-Qing; Tian, Zhi-Jun; Cai, Xue-Hui

    2016-01-01

    A Pseudorabies virus (PRV) variant has emerged in China since 2011 that is not protected by commercial vaccines, and has not been well studied. The PRV genome is large and difficult to manipulate, but it is feasible to use clustered, regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 technology. However, identification of single guide RNA (sgRNA) through screening is critical to the CRISPR/Cas9 system, and is traditionally time and labor intensive, and not suitable for rapid and high throughput screening of effective PRV sgRNAs. In this study, we developed a recombinant PRV strain expressing firefly luciferase and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) as a reporter virus for PRV-specific sgRNA screens and rapid evaluation of antiviral compounds. Luciferase activity was apparent as soon as 4 h after infection and was stably expressed through 10 passages. In a proof of the principle screen, we were able to identify several PRV specific sgRNAs and confirmed that they inhibited PRV replication using traditional methods. Using the reporter virus, we also identified PRV variants lacking US3, US2, and US9 gene function, and showed anti-PRV activity for chloroquine. Our results suggest that the reporter PRV strain will be a useful tool for basic virology studies, and for developing PRV control and prevention measures. PMID:27043610

  13. Large volume flow-through scintillating detector

    DOEpatents

    Gritzo, Russ E.; Fowler, Malcolm M.

    1995-01-01

    A large volume flow through radiation detector for use in large air flow situations such as incinerator stacks or building air systems comprises a plurality of flat plates made of a scintillating material arranged parallel to the air flow. Each scintillating plate has a light guide attached which transfers light generated inside the scintillating plate to an associated photomultiplier tube. The output of the photomultiplier tubes are connected to electronics which can record any radiation and provide an alarm if appropriate for the application.

  14. Risk assessment to guide cervical screening strategies in a large Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fang-Hui; Hu, Shang-Ying; Zhang, Qian; Zhang, Xun; Pan, Qin-Jing; Zhang, Wen-Hua; Gage, Julia C; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Castle, Philip E; Qiao, You-Lin; Katki, Hormuzd A; Schiffman, Mark

    2016-06-01

    Three different cervical screening methods [cytology, human papillomavirus(HPV) testing and visual inspection with acetic acid(VIA)] are being considered in China for the national cervical screening program. Comparing risks of CIN3 and cervical cancer (CIN3+) for different results can inform test choice and management guidelines. We evaluated the immediate risk of CIN3+ for different screening results generated from individual and combined tests. We compared tests using a novel statistic designed for this purpose called Mean Risk Stratification (MRS), in a pooled analysis of 17 cross sectional population-based studies of 30,371Chinese women screened with all 3 methods and diagnosed by colposcopically-directed biopsies. The 3 tests combined powerfully distinguished CIN3+ risk; triple-negative screening conferred a risk of 0.01%, while HPV-positive HSIL+ that was VIA-positive yielded a risk of 57.8%. Among the three screening tests, HPV status most strongly stratified CIN3+ risk. Among HPV-positive women, cytology was the more useful second test. In HPV-negative women, the immediate risks of CIN3+ ranged from 0.01% (negative cytology), 0.00% (ASC-US), 1.1% (LSIL), to 6.6 (HSIL+). In HPV-positive women, the CIN3+ risks were 0.9% (negative cytology), 3.6% (ASC-US), 6.3% (LSIL) and 38.5% (HSIL+). VIA results did not meaningful stratify CIN3+ risk among HPV-negative women with negative or ASC-US cytology; however, positive VIA substantially elevated CIN3+ risk for all other, more positive combinations of HPV and cytology compared with a negative VIA. Because all 3 screening tests had independent value in defining risk of CIN3+, different combinations can be optimized as pragmatic strategies in different resource settings. PMID:26800481

  15. The DSM Guided Cannabis Screen (DSM-G-CS): description, reliability, factor structure and empirical scoring with a clinical sample.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Dale; Leung, Patrick

    2011-11-01

    Clinicians need cannabis-specific diagnostic screens compatible with DSM-IV-TR and proposed DSM-5. A clinical sample (n=174) completed the DSM-Guided-Cannabis Screen (DSM-G-CS) 21 and 11 criteria versions and three drug comparison measures. DSM-G-CS descriptive statistics, reliabilities, three factor analyses, and eight ROC and discriminant analyses evaluated construct validity and empirical scoring. DSM-G-CS reliabilities are .88 (21-items) and .85 (11-criteria). Factor analyses (FA) with varimax rotation derived six and three factors explaining 62% to 60% of variances for the DSM-G-CS 21 and 11 respectively, with ≥.400 loadings supporting retention of all items. Cannabis withdrawal subscale reliability .952 (10-items) and FA supported one factor composite item. ROC and discriminant analyses supports DSM-G-CS 1.5 to 2.5 scoring cutoffs as empirically sound, based upon sensitivity-specificity maximums, accuracy probabilities, confidence levels and correctly classified percentages, optimal with Marijuana Screening Inventory (MSI) comparisons. Results support DSM-G-CS construct validity, empirical scoring and compatibility with DSM-IV-TR cannabis abuse or dependence and proposed DSM-5 cannabis use disorder diagnostic models. Clinically, DSM-G-CS scores of two to three (or more) suggest probable cannabis-use disorder, deserving assessment to determine diagnostic accuracy. PMID:21741769

  16. Tubulin inhibitor identification by bioactive conformation alignment pharmacophore-guided virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Shanthi; Choi, Min Jeong; Cho, Yong Seo; Min, Sun-Joon; Keum, Gyochang; Kim, Soo Jin; Lee, Chang Sik; Pae, Ae Nim

    2015-11-01

    Microtubules are important cellular component that are critical for proper cellular function. Microtubules are synthesized by polymerization of αβ tubulin heterodimers called protofilaments. Microtubule dynamics facilitate proper cell division during mitosis. Disruption of microtubule dynamics by small-molecule agents inhibits mitosis, resulting in apoptotic cell death and preventing cell cycle progression. To identify a novel small molecule that binds the αβ tubulin interface to affect microtubule dynamics, we developed a bioactive conformation alignment pharmacophore (BCAP) model to screen tubulin inhibitors from a huge database. The application of BCAP model generated based on the known αβ-tubulin interface binders enabled us to identify several small-molecules that cause apoptosis in human promyelocytic leukemia (HL-60) cells. Virtual screening combined with an in vitro assay yielded 15 cytotoxic molecules. In particular, ethyl 2-(4-(5-methyl-3-nitro-1H-pyrazol-1-yl)butanamido)-4-phenylthiophene-3-carboxylate (H05) inhibited tubulin polymerization with an IC50 of 17.6 μm concentration. The virtual screening results suggest that the application of an unbiased BCAP pharmacophore greatly eliminates unlikely compounds from a huge database and maximizes screening success. From the limited compounds tested in the tubulin polymerization inhibitor (TPI) assay, compound H05 was discovered as a tubulin inhibitor. This compound requires further structure activity optimization to identify additional potent inhibitors from the same class of molecules. PMID:25845798

  17. METAL FINISHING FACILITY RISK SCREENING TOOL (MFFRST): TECHNICAL DOCUMENTATION AND USER'S GUIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The model MFFRST, short for Metal Finishing Facility Risk Screening Tool, is a user-friendly pc-based computer tool which allows an individual to evaluate the potential exposures and health risks to workers and nearby residents from emissions from individual metal finishing facil...

  18. Walkthrough screening evaluation field guide. Natural phenomena hazards at Department of Energy facilities: Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Eder, S.J.; Eli, M.W.; Salmon, M.W.

    1993-11-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has a large inventory of existing facilities. Many of these facilities were not designed and constructed to current natural phenomena hazard (NPH) criteria. The NPH events include earthquakes, extreme winds and tornadoes, and floods. DOE Order 5480.28 establishes policy and requirements for NPH mitigation for DOE facilities. DOE is conducting a multiyear project to develop evaluation guidelines for assessing the condition and determining the need for upgrades at DOE facilities. One element of the NPH evaluation guidelines` development involves the existing systems and components at DOE facilities. This effort is described in detail in a cited reference. In the interim period prior to availability of the final guidelines, DOE facilities are encouraged to implement an NPH walk through screening evaluation process by which systems and components that need attention can be rapidly identified. Guidelines for conducting the walk through screening evaluations are contained herein. The result of the NPH walk through screening evaluation should be a prioritized list of systems and components that need further action. Simple and inexpensive fixes for items identified in the walk through as marginal or inadequate should be implemented without further study. By implementing an NPH walk through screening evaluation, DOE facilities may realize significant reduction in risk from NPH in the short term.

  19. Daily targeting of liver tumors: Screening patients with a mock treatment and using a combination of internal and external fiducials for image-guided respiratory-gated radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, Sunil; Briere, Tina Marie; Dong Lei; Murthy, Ravi; Ng, Chaan; Balter, Peter; Mohan, Radhe; Gillin, Michael T.; Beddar, A. Sam

    2007-12-15

    The feasibility and accuracy of using a mock treatment to screen suitable patients for respiratory-gated image-guided radiotherapy was investigated. Radio-opaque fiducials implanted adjacent to the liver tumor were used for online positioning to minimize the systematic error in patient positioning. The consistency in the degree of correlation between the external and internal fiducials was analyzed during a mock treatment. This technique could screen patients for gated therapy, reduce setup inaccuracy, and possibly individualize treatment margins.

  20. Research into the usage of integrated jamming of IR weakening and smoke-screen resisting the IR imaging guided missiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Long-tao; Jiang, Ning; Lv, Ming-shan

    2015-10-01

    With the emergence of the anti-ship missle with the capability of infrared imaging guidance, the traditional single jamming measures, because of the jamming mechanism and technical flaws or unsuitable use, greatly reduced the survival probability of the war-ship in the future naval battle. Intergrated jamming of IR weakening + smoke-screen Can not only make jamming to the search and tracking of IR imaging guidance system , but also has feasibility in conjunction, besides , which also make the best jamming effect. The research conclusion has important realistic meaning for raising the antimissile ability of surface ships. With the development of guidance technology, infrared guidance system has expanded by ir point-source homing guidance to infrared imaging guidance, Infrared imaging guidance has made breakthrough progress, Infrared imaging guidance system can use two-dimensional infrared image information of the target, achieve the precise tracking. Which has Higher guidance precision, better concealment, stronger anti-interference ability and could Target the key parts. The traditional single infrared smoke screen jamming or infrared decoy flare interference cannot be imposed effective interference. So, Research how to effectively fight against infrared imaging guided weapons threat measures and means, improving the surface ship antimissile ability is an urgent need to solve.

  1. Scintillators and applications thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Richard T.

    2015-09-01

    Scintillators of various constructions and methods of making and using the same are provided. In some embodiments, a scintillator comprises at least one radiation absorption region and at least one spatially discrete radiative exciton recombination region.

  2. Scintillators and applications thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Richard T.

    2014-07-15

    Scintillators of various constructions and methods of making and using the same are provided. In some embodiments, a scintillator comprises at least one radiation absorption region and at least one spatially discrete radiative exciton recombination region.

  3. Scintillator efficiency study with MeV x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Stuart; Brown, Kristina; Curtis, Alden; Lutz, Stephen S.; Howe, Russell; Malone, Robert; Mitchell, Stephen; Danielson, Jeremy; Haines, Todd; Kwiatkowski, Kris

    2014-09-01

    We have investigated scintillator efficiency for MeV radiographic imaging. This paper discusses the modeled detection efficiency and measured brightness of a number of scintillator materials. An optical imaging camera records images of scintillator emission excited by a pulsed x-ray machine. The efficiency of various thicknesses of monolithic LYSO:Ce (cerium-doped lutetium yttrium orthosilicate) are being studied to understand brightness and resolution trade-offs compared with a range of micro-columnar CsI:Tl (thallium-doped cesium iodide) scintillator screens. The micro-columnar scintillator structure apparently provides an optical gain mechanism that results in brighter signals from thinner samples. The trade-offs for brightness versus resolution in monolithic scintillators is straightforward. For higher-energy x-rays, thicker materials generally produce brighter signal due to x-ray absorption and the optical emission properties of the material. However, as scintillator thickness is increased, detector blur begins to dominate imaging system resolution due to the volume image generated in the scintillator thickness and the depth of field of the imaging system. We employ a telecentric optical relay lens to image the scintillator onto a recording CCD camera. The telecentric lens helps provide sharp focus through thicker-volume emitting scintillators. Stray light from scintillator emission can also affect the image scene contrast. We have applied an optical light scatter model to the imaging system to minimize scatter sources and maximize scene contrasts.

  4. High latitude scintillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Santimay; Basu, Sunanda

    High-latitude phase and amplitude scintillations have been observed with quasi-geostationary polar beacon satellites, high-altitude orbiting GPS satellites, and low-altitude orbiting HiLat and Polar Bear satellites. The scintillation behavior observed in the polar cap, cusp, and nightside auroral oval is described. Consideration is given to the possible mechanisms for the generation of irregularities that cause scintillations. The importance of coordinated multitechnique measurements for scintillation studies is stressed.

  5. Lead carbonate scintillator materials

    DOEpatents

    Derenzo, Stephen E.; Moses, William W.

    1991-01-01

    Improved radiation detectors containing lead carbonate or basic lead carbonate as the scintillator element are disclosed. Both of these scintillators have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to other known scintillator materials. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in medical uses.

  6. Scintillator materials for calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, M.J.

    1994-09-01

    Requirements for fast, dense scintillator materials for calorimetry in high energy physics and approaches to satisfying these requirements are reviewed with respect to possible hosts and luminescent species. Special attention is given to cerium-activated crystals, core-valence luminescence, and glass scintillators. The present state of the art, limitations, and suggestions for possible new scintillator materials are presented.

  7. Scintillator manufacture at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Mellott, K.; Bross, A.; Pla-Dalmau, A.

    1998-08-01

    A decade of research into plastic scintillation materials at Fermilab is reviewed. Early work with plastic optical fiber fabrication is revisited and recent experiments with large-scale commercial methods for production of bulk scintillator are discussed. Costs for various forms of scintillator are examined and new development goals including cost reduction methods and quality improvement techniques are suggested.

  8. Scintillator reflective layer coextrusion

    DOEpatents

    Yun, Jae-Chul; Para, Adam

    2001-01-01

    A polymeric scintillator has a reflective layer adhered to the exterior surface thereof. The reflective layer comprises a reflective pigment and an adhesive binder. The adhesive binder includes polymeric material from which the scintillator is formed. A method of forming the polymeric scintillator having a reflective layer adhered to the exterior surface thereof is also provided. The method includes the steps of (a) extruding an inner core member from a first amount of polymeric scintillator material, and (b) coextruding an outer reflective layer on the exterior surface of the inner core member. The outer reflective layer comprises a reflective pigment and a second amount of the polymeric scintillator material.

  9. The COMP-Ident Find-Screen Planning Package. A Descriptive Manual And Organizational Guide for Planning and Conducting Child Find/Screen Efforts in Rural Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laub, Karen W.; And Others

    In order to comply with Public Law 94-142, Education for All Handicapped Children Act, procedures for planning and conducting screening (identification) and assessment of preschool handicapped children in rural areas were developed. Screening was accomplished by public awareness campaigns, health screening, or school census analysis. In the HICOMP…

  10. Expression of Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein (TCTP) Gene of Dirofilaria immitis Guided by Transcriptomic Screening

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yan; Lan, Jingchao; Wu, Xuhang; Yang, Deying; Zhang, Zhihe; Nie, Huaming; Hou, Rong; Zhang, Runhui; Zheng, Wanpeng; Xie, Yue; Yan, Ning; Yang, Zhi; Wang, Chengdong; Luo, Li; Liu, Li; Gu, Xiaobin; Wang, Shuxian; Peng, Xuerong

    2014-01-01

    Dirofilaria immitis (heartworm) infections affect domestic dogs, cats, and various wild mammals with increasing incidence in temperate and tropical areas. More sensitive antibody detection methodologies are required to diagnose asymptomatic dirofilariasis with low worm burdens. Applying current transcriptomic technologies would be useful to discover potential diagnostic markers for D. immitis infection. A filarial homologue of the mammalian translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP) was initially identified by screening the assembled transcriptome of D. immitis (DiTCTP). A BLAST analysis suggested that the DiTCTP gene shared the highest similarity with TCTP from Loa loa at protein level (97%). A histidine-tagged recombinant DiTCTP protein (rDiTCTP) of 40 kDa expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) showed immunoreactivity with serum from a dog experimentally infected with heartworms. Localization studies illustrated the ubiquitous presence of rDiTCTP protein in the lateral hypodermal chords, dorsal hypodermal chord, muscle, intestine, and uterus in female adult worms. Further studies on D. immitis-derived TCTP are warranted to assess whether this filarial protein could be used for a diagnostic purpose. PMID:24623877

  11. FEDS user`s guide: Facility energy screening. Release 2.10

    SciTech Connect

    Dirks, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    The Facility Energy Decision Screening (FEDS) Model is under development at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US DOE Federal Energy Management Program (DOE-FEMP) and the US Army Construction Engineering REsearch Laboratory (USA-CERL). FEDS is a multi-level energy analysis software system designed to provide a comprehensive approach to fuel-neutral, technology-independent, integrated (energy) resource planning and acquisition. The FEDS system includes Level-1, which is a top-down, first-pass energy systems analysis and energy resource acquisition decision software model for buildings and facilities, and the Level-2 software model, which allows specific engineering inputs and provides detailed output. The basic intent of the model is to provide an installation with the information necessary to determine the minimum life-cycle cost (LCC) configuration of the installation`s energy generation and consumption infrastructure. The model has no fuel or technology bias; it simply selects the technologies that will provide an equivalent or superior level of service (e.g., heating, cooling, illumination) at the minimum LCC.

  12. Human genetics in rheumatoid arthritis guides a high-throughput drug screen of the CD40 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Diogo, Dorothée; Wu, Di; Spoonamore, Jim; Dancik, Vlado; Franke, Lude; Kurreeman, Fina; Rossin, Elizabeth J; Duclos, Grant; Hartland, Cathy; Zhou, Xuezhong; Li, Kejie; Liu, Jun; De Jager, Philip L; Siminovitch, Katherine A; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Bowes, John; Eyre, Steve; Padyukov, Leonid; Gregersen, Peter K; Worthington, Jane; Gupta, Namrata; Clemons, Paul A; Stahl, Eli; Tolliday, Nicola; Plenge, Robert M

    2013-05-01

    Although genetic and non-genetic studies in mouse and human implicate the CD40 pathway in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), there are no approved drugs that inhibit CD40 signaling for clinical care in RA or any other disease. Here, we sought to understand the biological consequences of a CD40 risk variant in RA discovered by a previous genome-wide association study (GWAS) and to perform a high-throughput drug screen for modulators of CD40 signaling based on human genetic findings. First, we fine-map the CD40 risk locus in 7,222 seropositive RA patients and 15,870 controls, together with deep sequencing of CD40 coding exons in 500 RA cases and 650 controls, to identify a single SNP that explains the entire signal of association (rs4810485, P = 1.4×10(-9)). Second, we demonstrate that subjects homozygous for the RA risk allele have ∼33% more CD40 on the surface of primary human CD19+ B lymphocytes than subjects homozygous for the non-risk allele (P = 10(-9)), a finding corroborated by expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analysis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 1,469 healthy control individuals. Third, we use retroviral shRNA infection to perturb the amount of CD40 on the surface of a human B lymphocyte cell line (BL2) and observe a direct correlation between amount of CD40 protein and phosphorylation of RelA (p65), a subunit of the NF-κB transcription factor. Finally, we develop a high-throughput NF-κB luciferase reporter assay in BL2 cells activated with trimerized CD40 ligand (tCD40L) and conduct an HTS of 1,982 chemical compounds and FDA-approved drugs. After a series of counter-screens and testing in primary human CD19+ B cells, we identify 2 novel chemical inhibitors not previously implicated in inflammation or CD40-mediated NF-κB signaling. Our study demonstrates proof-of-concept that human genetics can be used to guide the development of phenotype-based, high-throughput small-molecule screens to identify potential novel therapies in complex traits such as RA. PMID:23696745

  13. Human Genetics in Rheumatoid Arthritis Guides a High-Throughput Drug Screen of the CD40 Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Diogo, Dorothée; Wu, Di; Spoonamore, Jim; Dancik, Vlado; Franke, Lude; Kurreeman, Fina; Rossin, Elizabeth J.; Duclos, Grant; Hartland, Cathy; Zhou, Xuezhong; Li, Kejie; Liu, Jun; De Jager, Philip L.; Siminovitch, Katherine A.; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Bowes, John; Eyre, Steve; Padyukov, Leonid; Gregersen, Peter K.; Worthington, Jane; Gupta, Namrata; Clemons, Paul A.; Stahl, Eli; Tolliday, Nicola; Plenge, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    Although genetic and non-genetic studies in mouse and human implicate the CD40 pathway in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), there are no approved drugs that inhibit CD40 signaling for clinical care in RA or any other disease. Here, we sought to understand the biological consequences of a CD40 risk variant in RA discovered by a previous genome-wide association study (GWAS) and to perform a high-throughput drug screen for modulators of CD40 signaling based on human genetic findings. First, we fine-map the CD40 risk locus in 7,222 seropositive RA patients and 15,870 controls, together with deep sequencing of CD40 coding exons in 500 RA cases and 650 controls, to identify a single SNP that explains the entire signal of association (rs4810485, P = 1.4×10−9). Second, we demonstrate that subjects homozygous for the RA risk allele have ∼33% more CD40 on the surface of primary human CD19+ B lymphocytes than subjects homozygous for the non-risk allele (P = 10−9), a finding corroborated by expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analysis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 1,469 healthy control individuals. Third, we use retroviral shRNA infection to perturb the amount of CD40 on the surface of a human B lymphocyte cell line (BL2) and observe a direct correlation between amount of CD40 protein and phosphorylation of RelA (p65), a subunit of the NF-κB transcription factor. Finally, we develop a high-throughput NF-κB luciferase reporter assay in BL2 cells activated with trimerized CD40 ligand (tCD40L) and conduct an HTS of 1,982 chemical compounds and FDA–approved drugs. After a series of counter-screens and testing in primary human CD19+ B cells, we identify 2 novel chemical inhibitors not previously implicated in inflammation or CD40-mediated NF-κB signaling. Our study demonstrates proof-of-concept that human genetics can be used to guide the development of phenotype-based, high-throughput small-molecule screens to identify potential novel therapies in complex traits such as RA. PMID:23696745

  14. Multi-PSPMT scintillation camera

    SciTech Connect

    Pani, R.; Pellegrini, R.; Trotta, G.; Scopinaro, F.; Soluri, A.; Vincentis, G. de; Scafe, R.; Pergola, A.

    1999-06-01

    Gamma ray imaging is usually accomplished by the use of a relatively large scintillating crystal coupled to either a number of photomultipliers (PMTs) (Anger Camera) or to a single large Position Sensitive PMT (PSPMT). Recently the development of new diagnostic techniques, such as scintimammography and radio-guided surgery, have highlighted a number of significant limitations of the Anger camera in such imaging procedures. In this paper a dedicated gamma camera is proposed for clinical applications with the aim of improving image quality by utilizing detectors with an appropriate size and shape for the part of the body under examination. This novel scintillation camera is based upon an array of PSPMTs (Hamamatsu R5900-C8). The basic concept of this camera is identical to the Anger Camera with the exception of the substitution of PSPMTs for the PMTs. In this configuration it is possible to use the high resolution of the PSPMTs and still correctly position events lying between PSPMTs. In this work the test configuration is a 2 by 2 array of PSPMTs. Some advantages of this camera are: spatial resolution less than 2 mm FWHM, good linearity, thickness less than 3 cm, light weight, lower cost than equivalent area PSPMT, large detection area when coupled to scintillating arrays, small dead boundary zone (< 3 mm) and flexibility in the shape of the camera.

  15. Shifting scintillator neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Clonts, Lloyd G; Cooper, Ronald G; Crow, Jr., Morris Lowell; Hannah, Bruce W; Hodges, Jason P; Richards, John D; Riedel, Richard A

    2014-03-04

    Provided are sensors and methods for detecting thermal neutrons. Provided is an apparatus having a scintillator for absorbing a neutron, the scintillator having a back side for discharging a scintillation light of a first wavelength in response to the absorbed neutron, an array of wavelength-shifting fibers proximate to the back side of the scintillator for shifting the scintillation light of the first wavelength to light of a second wavelength, the wavelength-shifting fibers being disposed in a two-dimensional pattern and defining a plurality of scattering plane pixels where the wavelength-shifting fibers overlap, a plurality of photomultiplier tubes, in coded optical communication with the wavelength-shifting fibers, for converting the light of the second wavelength to an electronic signal, and a processor for processing the electronic signal to identify one of the plurality of scattering plane pixels as indicative of a position within the scintillator where the neutron was absorbed.

  16. Lead carbonate scintillator materials

    DOEpatents

    Derenzo, S.E.; Moses, W.W.

    1991-05-14

    Improved radiation detectors containing lead carbonate or basic lead carbonate as the scintillator element are disclosed. Both of these scintillators have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to other known scintillator materials. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in medical uses. 3 figures.

  17. User's Guide to the Water-Analysis Screening Tool (WAST): A Tool for Assessing Available Water Resources in Relation to Aquatic-Resource Uses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stuckey, Marla H.; Kiesler, James L.

    2008-01-01

    A water-analysis screening tool (WAST) was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey, in partnership with the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection, to provide an initial screening of areas in the state where potential problems may exist related to the availability of water resources to meet current and future water-use demands. The tool compares water-use information to an initial screening criteria of the 7-day, 10-year low-flow statistic (7Q10) resulting in a screening indicator for influences of net withdrawals (withdrawals minus discharges) on aquatic-resource uses. This report is intended to serve as a guide for using the screening tool. The WAST can display general basin characteristics, water-use information, and screening-indicator information for over 10,000 watersheds in the state. The tool includes 12 primary functions that allow the user to display watershed information, edit water-use and water-supply information, observe effects downstream from edited water-use information, reset edited values to baseline, load new water-use information, save and retrieve scenarios, and save output as a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet.

  18. Bioassay-guided discovery of antibacterial agents: in vitro screening of Peperomia vulcanica, Peperomia fernandopoioana and Scleria striatinux

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The global burden of bacterial infections is high and has been further aggravated by increasing resistance to antibiotics. In the search for novel antibacterials, three medicinal plants: Peperomia vulcanica, Peperomia fernandopoioana (Piperaceae) and Scleria striatinux (Cyperaceae), were investigated for antibacterial activity and toxicity. Methods Crude extracts of these plants were tested by the disc diffusion method against six bacterial test organisms followed by bio-assay guided fractionation, isolation and testing of pure compounds. The minimum inhibitory (MIC) and minimum bactericidal (MBC) concentrations were measured by the microdilution method. The acute toxicity of the active extracts and cytotoxicity of the active compound were performed in mice and mammalian cells, respectively. Results The diameter of the zones of inhibition (DZI) of the extracts ranged from 7–13 mm on Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus of which the methylene chloride:methanol [1:1] extract of Scleria striatinux recorded the highest activity (DZI = 13 mm). Twenty-nine pure compounds were screened and one, Okundoperoxide, isolated from S. striatinux, recorded a DZI ranging from 10–19 mm on S. aureus. The MICs and MBCs indicated that the Peperomias had broad-spectrum bacteriostatic activity. Toxicity tests showed that Okundoperoxide may have a low risk of toxicity with an LC50 of 46.88 μg/mL. Conclusions The antibacterial activity of these plants supports their use in traditional medicine. The pure compound, Okundoperoxide, may yield new antibacterial lead compounds following medicinal chemistry exploration. PMID:22549052

  19. Uterine Fibroids: Correlation of T2 Signal Intensity with Semiquantitative Perfusion MR Parameters in Patients Screened for MR-guided High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Ablation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Sun; Lee, Jeong-Won; Choi, Chel Hun; Kim, Byoung-Gie; Bae, Duk-Soo; Rhim, Hyunchul; Lim, Hyo Keun

    2016-03-01

    Purpose To evaluate the relationships between T2 signal intensity and semiquantitative perfusion magnetic resonance (MR) parameters of uterine fibroids in patients who were screened for MR-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation. Materials and Methods Institutional review board approval was granted, and informed consents were waived. One hundred seventy most symptom-relevant, nondegenerated uterine fibroids (mean diameter, 7.3 cm; range, 3.0-17.2 cm) in 170 women (mean age, 43.5 years; range, 24-56 years) undergoing screening MR examinations for MR-guided HIFU ablation from October 2009 to April 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. Fibroid signal intensity was assessed as the ratio of the fibroid T2 signal intensity to that of skeletal muscle. Parameters of semiquantitative perfusion MR imaging obtained during screening MR examination (peak enhancement, percentage of relative peak enhancement, time to peak [in seconds], wash-in rate [per seconds], and washout rate [per seconds]) were investigated to assess their relationships with T2 signal ratio by using multiple linear regression analysis. Correlations between T2 signal intensity and independently significant perfusion parameters were then evaluated according to fibroid type by using Spearman correlation test. Results Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that relative peak enhancement showed an independently significant correlation with T2 signal ratio (Β = 0.004, P < .001). Submucosal intracavitary (n = 20, ρ = 0.275, P = .240) and type III (n = 18, ρ = 0.082, P = .748) fibroids failed to show significant correlations between perfusion and T2 signal intensity, while significant correlations were found for all other fibroid types (ρ = 0.411-0.629, P < .05). Conclusion In possible candidates for MR-guided HIFU ablation, the T2 signal intensity of nondegenerated uterine fibroids showed an independently significant positive correlation with relative peak enhancement in most cases, except those of submucosal intracavitary or type III fibroids. (©) RSNA, 2015. PMID:26313526

  20. Scintillating fiber tracking techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Ruchti, R.

    1986-02-01

    The current status of the field of scintillating fiber detection and tracking is briefly reviewed, and avenues for further work are suggested. Attention is given to the core material, cladding material, and extra-mural absorber to be used in the scintillating fibers, as well as to the properties of attenuation length, radiation resistance, and fiber profile. Some examples are given of successful recording of tracks and interactions. Current developments are mentioned in relation to plastic and glass fibers and liquid capillaries. (LEW)

  1. Integration of Microfractionation, qNMR and Zebrafish Screening for the In Vivo Bioassay-Guided Isolation and Quantitative Bioactivity Analysis of Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Maes, Jan; Siverio-Mota, Dany; Marcourt, Laurence; Munck, Sebastian; Kamuhabwa, Appolinary R.; Moshi, Mainen J.; Esguerra, Camila V.; de Witte, Peter A. M.; Crawford, Alexander D.; Wolfender, Jean-Luc

    2013-01-01

    Natural products (NPs) are an attractive source of chemical diversity for small-molecule drug discovery. Several challenges nevertheless persist with respect to NP discovery, including the time and effort required for bioassay-guided isolation of bioactive NPs, and the limited biomedical relevance to date of in vitro bioassays used in this context. With regard to bioassays, zebrafish have recently emerged as an effective model system for chemical biology, allowing in vivo high-content screens that are compatible with microgram amounts of compound. For the deconvolution of the complex extracts into their individual constituents, recent progress has been achieved on several fronts as analytical techniques now enable the rapid microfractionation of extracts, and microflow NMR methods have developed to the point of allowing the identification of microgram amounts of NPs. Here we combine advanced analytical methods with high-content screening in zebrafish to create an integrated platform for microgram-scale, in vivo NP discovery. We use this platform for the bioassay-guided fractionation of an East African medicinal plant, Rhynchosia viscosa, resulting in the identification of both known and novel isoflavone derivatives with anti-angiogenic and anti-inflammatory activity. Quantitative microflow NMR is used both to determine the structure of bioactive compounds and to quantify them for direct dose-response experiments at the microgram scale. The key advantages of this approach are (1) the microgram scale at which both biological and analytical experiments can be performed, (2) the speed and the rationality of the bioassay-guided fractionation – generic for NP extracts of diverse origin – that requires only limited sample-specific optimization and (3) the use of microflow NMR for quantification, enabling the identification and dose-response experiments with only tens of micrograms of each compound. This study demonstrates that a complete in vivo bioassay-guided fractionation can be performed with only 20 mg of NP extract within a few days. PMID:23700445

  2. Integration of Microfractionation, qNMR and zebrafish screening for the in vivo bioassay-guided isolation and quantitative bioactivity analysis of natural products.

    PubMed

    Bohni, Nadine; Cordero-Maldonado, María Lorena; Maes, Jan; Siverio-Mota, Dany; Marcourt, Laurence; Munck, Sebastian; Kamuhabwa, Appolinary R; Moshi, Mainen J; Esguerra, Camila V; de Witte, Peter A M; Crawford, Alexander D; Wolfender, Jean-Luc

    2013-01-01

    Natural products (NPs) are an attractive source of chemical diversity for small-molecule drug discovery. Several challenges nevertheless persist with respect to NP discovery, including the time and effort required for bioassay-guided isolation of bioactive NPs, and the limited biomedical relevance to date of in vitro bioassays used in this context. With regard to bioassays, zebrafish have recently emerged as an effective model system for chemical biology, allowing in vivo high-content screens that are compatible with microgram amounts of compound. For the deconvolution of the complex extracts into their individual constituents, recent progress has been achieved on several fronts as analytical techniques now enable the rapid microfractionation of extracts, and microflow NMR methods have developed to the point of allowing the identification of microgram amounts of NPs. Here we combine advanced analytical methods with high-content screening in zebrafish to create an integrated platform for microgram-scale, in vivo NP discovery. We use this platform for the bioassay-guided fractionation of an East African medicinal plant, Rhynchosia viscosa, resulting in the identification of both known and novel isoflavone derivatives with anti-angiogenic and anti-inflammatory activity. Quantitative microflow NMR is used both to determine the structure of bioactive compounds and to quantify them for direct dose-response experiments at the microgram scale. The key advantages of this approach are (1) the microgram scale at which both biological and analytical experiments can be performed, (2) the speed and the rationality of the bioassay-guided fractionation - generic for NP extracts of diverse origin - that requires only limited sample-specific optimization and (3) the use of microflow NMR for quantification, enabling the identification and dose-response experiments with only tens of micrograms of each compound. This study demonstrates that a complete in vivo bioassay-guided fractionation can be performed with only 20 mg of NP extract within a few days. PMID:23700445

  3. Revisiting the Wilson-Jungner criteria: How can supplemental criteria guide public health in the era of genetic screening?

    PubMed

    Petros, Michael

    2011-10-01

    PURPOSE:: Advances in technology have made newborn screening for more than 50 inborn errors of metabolism possible using a dried blood sample. A framework is proposed that public health practitioners may use when considering candidate disorders for newborn screening panels. METHODS:: The framework expands on the 10 Wilson-Jungner criteria with the addition of 11 criteria specific to newborn screening. A calculation, the "pNBS Decision Score," is used to quantify results and rank candidate disorders. RESULTS:: The pNBS Decision Scores that were calculated for phenylketonuria (OMIM# 261600), cystic fibrosis (OMIM# 219700), Pompe disease (OMIM# 232300), and severe combined immunodeficiency (OMIM# 102700) support their inclusion as newborn screening disorders. The pNBS Decision Score suggests that Krabbe disease (OMIM# 245200) is not a candidate disorder for inclusion at this time. CONCLUSION:: The proposed framework adds to the ability of policy makers to quantify an essential portion of the process for adding disorders to newborn screening panels. Other factors such as ethical, legal, and social issues, clinical utility, and advocacy are also part of the policy process. The framework is not intended to replace existing nomination processes but rather to enhance those processes by encouraging iterative review of newborn screening-specific criteria. The use of the framework will provide consistency across a portion of the decision process. The public health community should take the opportunity to revisit the screening determinants of the Wilson-Jungner criteria from a 21st century perspective. The results suggest that this framework provides the public health practitioner with a consistent process for making an evidence-based decision. PMID:21983595

  4. Monte Carlo simulation of a novel water-equivalent electronic portal imaging device using plastic scintillating fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Teymurazyan, A.; Pang, G.

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: Most electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) developed so far use a thin Cu plate/phosphor screen to convert x-ray energies into light photons, while maintaining a high spatial resolution. This results in a low x-ray absorption and thus a low quantum efficiency (QE) of approximately 2-4% for megavoltage (MV) x-rays. A significant increase of QE is desirable for applications such as MV cone-beam computed tomography (MV-CBCT). Furthermore, the Cu plate/phosphor screen contains high atomic number (high-Z) materials, resulting in an undesirable over-response to low energy x-rays (due to photoelectric effect) as well as high energy x-rays (due to pair production) when used for dosimetric verification. Our goal is to develop a new MV x-ray detector that has a high QE and uses low-Z materials to overcome the obstacles faced by current MV x-ray imaging technologies. Methods: A new high QE and low-Z EPID is proposed. It consists of a matrix of plastic scintillating fibers embedded in a water-equivalent medium and coupled to an optically sensitive 2D active matrix flat panel imager (AMFPI) for image readout. It differs from the previous approach that uses segmented crystalline scintillators made of higher density and higher atomic number materials to detect MV x-rays. The plastic scintillating fibers are focused toward the x-ray source to avoid image blurring due to oblique incidence of off-axis x-rays. When MV x-rays interact with the scintillating fibers in the detector, scintillation light will be produced. The light photons produced in a fiber core and emitted within the acceptance angle of the fiber will be guided toward the AMFPI by total internal reflection. A Monte Carlo simulation has been used to investigate imaging and dosimetric characteristics of the proposed detector under irradiation of MV x-rays. Results: Properties, such as detection efficiency, modulation transfer function, detective quantum efficiency (DQE), energy dependence of detector response, and water-equivalence of dose response have been investigated. It has been found that the zero frequency DQE of the proposed detector can be up to 37% at 6 MV. The detector, also, is water-equivalent with a relatively uniform response to different energy x-rays as compared to current EPIDs. Conclusions: The results of our simulations show that, using plastic scintillating fibers, it is possible to construct a water-equivalent EPID that has a better energy response and a higher detection efficiency than current flat panel based EPIDs.

  5. Optimum design calculations for detectors based on ZnSe(Те,О) scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katrunov, K.; Ryzhikov, V.; Gavrilyuk, V.; Naydenov, S.; Lysetska, O.; Litichevskyi, V.

    2013-06-01

    Light collection in scintillators ZnSe(X), where X is an isovalent dopant, was studied using Monte Carlo calculations. Optimum design was determined for detectors of "scintillator—Si-photodiode" type, which can involve either one scintillation element or scintillation layers of large area made of small-crystalline grains. The calculations were carried out both for determination of the optimum scintillator shape and for design optimization of light guides, on the surface of which the layer of small-crystalline grains is formed.

  6. OPTIMAL WELL LOCATOR (OWL): A SCREENING TOOL FOR EVALUATING LOCATIONS OF MONITORING WELLS: USER'S GUIDE VERSION 1.2

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Optimal Well Locator ( OWL) program was designed and developed by USEPA to be a screening tool to evaluate and optimize the placement of wells in long term monitoring networks at small sites. The first objective of the OWL program is to allow the user to visualize the change ...

  7. Patent foramen ovale and scuba diving: a practical guide for physicians on when to refer for screening.

    PubMed

    Sykes, Oliver; Clark, James E

    2013-01-01

    Divers are taught some basic physiology during their training. There is therefore some underlying knowledge and understandable concern in the diving community about the presence of a patent foramen ovale (PFO) as a cause of decompression illness (DCI). There is an agreement that PFO screening should not be done routinely on all divers; however, when to screen selected divers is not clear. We present the basic physiology and current existing guidelines for doctors, advice on the management and identify which groups of divers should be referred for consideration of PFO screening. Venous bubbles after diving and right to left shunts are common, but DCI is rare. Why this is the case is not clear, but the divers look to doctors for guidance on PFO screening and closure; both of which are not without risks. Ideally, we should advise and apply guidelines that are consistent and based on best available evidence. We hope this guideline and flow chart helps address these issues with regard to PFOs and diving. PMID:23849539

  8. What ethical and legal principles should guide the genotyping of children as part of a personalised screening programme for common cancer?

    PubMed

    Hall, Alison Elizabeth; Chowdhury, Susmita; Pashayan, Nora; Hallowell, Nina; Pharoah, Paul; Burton, Hilary

    2014-03-01

    Increased knowledge of the gene-disease associations contributing to common cancer development raises the prospect of population stratification by genotype and other risk factors. Individual risk assessments could be used to target interventions such as screening, treatment and health education. Genotyping neonates, infants or young children as part of a systematic programme would improve coverage and uptake, and facilitate a screening package that maximises potential benefits and minimises harms including overdiagnosis. This paper explores the potential justifications and risks of genotyping children for genetic variants associated with common cancer development within a personalised screening programme. It identifies the ethical and legal principles that might guide population genotyping where the predictive value of the testing is modest and associated risks might arise in the future, and considers the standards required by population screening programme validity measures (such as the Wilson and Jungner criteria including cost-effectiveness and equitable access). These are distinguished from the normative principles underpinning predictive genetic testing of children for adult-onset diseases-namely, to make best-interests judgements and to preserve autonomy. While the case for population-based genotyping of neonates or young children has not yet been made, the justifications for this approach are likely to become increasingly compelling. A modified evaluative and normative framework should be developed, capturing elements from individualistic and population-based approaches. This should emphasise proper communication and genuine parental consent or informed choice, while recognising the challenges associated with making unsolicited approaches to an asymptomatic group. Such a framework would be strengthened by complementary empirical research. PMID:23454719

  9. Polysiloxane scintillator composition

    DOEpatents

    Walker, J.K.

    1992-05-05

    A plastic scintillator useful for detecting ionizing radiation comprising a matrix which comprises an optically transparent polysiloxane having incorporated therein at least one ionizing radiation-hard fluor capable of converting electromagnetic energy produced in the polysiloxane upon absorption of ionizing radiation to detectable light.

  10. Polysiloxane scintillator composition

    DOEpatents

    Walker, James K.

    1992-01-01

    A plastic scintillator useful for detecting ionizing radiation comprising a matrix which comprises an optically transparent polysiloxane having incorporated therein at least one ionizing radiation-hard fluor capable of converting electromagnetic energy produced in the polysiloxane upon absorption of ionizing radiation to detectable light.

  11. SCINTILLATION EXPOSURE RATE DETECTOR

    DOEpatents

    Spears, W.G.

    1960-11-01

    A radiation detector for gamma and x rays is described. The detector comprises a scintillation crystal disposed between a tantalum shield and the input of a photomultiplier tube, the crystal and the shield cooperating so that their combined response to a given quantity of radiation at various energy levels is substantially constant.

  12. Boron loaded scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Zane William; Brown, Gilbert Morris; Maya, Leon; Sloop, Jr., Frederick Victor; Sloop, Jr., Frederick Victor

    2009-10-20

    A scintillating composition for detecting neutrons and other radiation comprises a phenyl containing silicone rubber with carborane units and at least one phosphor molecule. The carbonate units can either be a carborane molecule dispersed in the rubber with the aid of a compatibilization agent or can be covalently bound to the silicone.

  13. Scintillator Waveguide For Sensing Radiation

    DOEpatents

    Bliss, Mary; Craig, Richard A.; Reeder; Paul L.

    2003-04-22

    The present invention is an apparatus for detecting ionizing radiation, having: a waveguide having a first end and a second end, the waveguide formed of a scintillator material wherein the therapeutic ionizing radiation isotropically generates scintillation light signals within the waveguide. This apparatus provides a measure of radiation dose. The apparatus may be modified to permit making a measure of location of radiation dose. Specifically, the scintillation material is segmented into a plurality of segments; and a connecting cable for each of the plurality of segments is used for conducting scintillation signals to a scintillation detector.

  14. A screening algorithm for diagnosing bacterial gastroenteritis by real-time PCR in combination with guided culture.

    PubMed

    Van Lint, P; De Witte, E; Ursi, J P; Van Herendael, B; Van Schaeren, J

    2016-06-01

    We have introduced a real-time PCR for the simultaneous detection of Campylobacter jejuni, Salmonella spp., Shigella spp./enteroinvasive Escherichia coli and Yersinia enterocolitica in fecal samples in our routine laboratory. This new approach showed consistent results, with minimal inter-sample variation. When compared to conventional culture, the hands-on time decreased by 13 h/wk, and the median turnaround time drastically shortened from 73 to 29 h (P < .0001). Moreover, the detection rate of the targeted pathogens seemed to increase: the positivity rate registered over a twelve month period increased from 4.98% when using bacterial culture, compared to 8.56% when using real-time PCR (P < .0001). For antimicrobial susceptibility testing, samples that are found to be PCR positive are additionally cultured after the PCR result is known. Using this algorithm, we got a positive culture for 71.0% of the PCR positive samples. The samples missed by guided culture had significantly higher quantification cycle (Cq) values compared to the samples picked up by guided culture (P = .0003). Finally; we also tested the effect of extended sample storage on the performance of guided culture. Storage time prior to inoculation did have an effect on the positivity rate of culture; interestingly, these effects were clearly species-dependent. PMID:27107537

  15. Laser beam scintillation beyond the turbulent atmosphere A numerical computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bufton, J. L.; Taylor, L. S.

    1976-01-01

    The extended Huygens-Fresnel formulation for propagation through turbulence is used to examine scintillation of a finite laser beam. The method is demonstrated analytically for propagation beyond a weak Gaussian phase screen. A numerical integration technique is used to extend the results to a more realistic turbulence model. Results are compared with existing Gaussian beam propagation theory.

  16. Scintillation detectors based on silicon microfluidic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maoddi, P.; Mapelli, A.; Bagiacchi, P.; Gorini, B.; Haguenauer, M.; Lehmann Miotto, G.; Murillo Garcia, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Veneziano, S.; Renaud, P.

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic channels obtained by SU-8 photolithography and filled with liquid scintillators were recently demonstrated to be an interesting technology for the implementation of novel particle detectors. The main advantages of this approach are the intrinsic radiation resistance resulting from the simple microfluidic circulation of the active medium and the possibility to manufacture devices with high spatial resolution and low material budget using microfabrication techniques. Here we explore a different technological implementation of this concept, reporting on scintillating detectors based on silicon microfluidic channels. A process for manufacturing microfluidic devices on silicon substrates, featuring microchannel arrays suitable for light guiding, was developed. Such process can be in principle combined with standard CMOS processing and lead to a tight integration with the readout photodetectors and electronics in the future. Several devices were manufactured, featuring microchannel geometries differing in depth, width and pitch. A preliminary characterization of the prototypes was performed by means of a photomultiplier tube coupled to the microchannel ends, in order to detect the scintillation light produced upon irradiation with beta particles from a 90Sr source. The photoelectron spectra thus obtained were fitted with the expected output function in order to extract the light yield.

  17. Screening for Social Determinants of Health Among Children and Families Living in Poverty: A Guide for Clinicians.

    PubMed

    Chung, Esther K; Siegel, Benjamin S; Garg, Arvin; Conroy, Kathleen; Gross, Rachel S; Long, Dayna A; Lewis, Gena; Osman, Cynthia J; Jo Messito, Mary; Wade, Roy; Shonna Yin, H; Cox, Joanne; Fierman, Arthur H

    2016-05-01

    Approximately 20% of all children in the United States live in poverty, which exists in rural, urban, and suburban areas. Thus, all child health clinicians need to be familiar with the effects of poverty on health and to understand associated, preventable, and modifiable social factors that impact health. Social determinants of health are identifiable root causes of medical problems. For children living in poverty, social determinants of health for which clinicians may play a role include the following: child maltreatment, child care and education, family financial support, physical environment, family social support, intimate partner violence, maternal depression and family mental illness, household substance abuse, firearm exposure, and parental health literacy. Children, particularly those living in poverty, exposed to adverse childhood experiences are susceptible to toxic stress and a variety of child and adult health problems, including developmental delay, asthma and heart disease. Despite the detrimental effects of social determinants on health, few child health clinicians routinely address the unmet social and psychosocial factors impacting children and their families during routine primary care visits. Clinicians need tools to screen for social determinants of health and to be familiar with available local and national resources to address these issues. These guidelines provide an overview of social determinants of health impacting children living in poverty and provide clinicians with practical screening tools and resources. PMID:27101890

  18. Scintillators for well logging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melcher, C. L.

    1989-04-01

    The hostile environmental conditions and limited space in the borehole requires gamma-ray detectors with special properties which are not usually important in laboratory applications. Since the borehole temperature can exceed 200° C, scintillators with inherently good temperature responses are desirable. Lower scintillation output at high temperature affects signal-to-noise, energy resolution and gain control. The scintillation decay time also usually depends on temperature, thus affecting pulse shaping and counting rate. Due to the shock and vibration encountered in the borehole, mechanically rugged and nonhygroscopic scintillators are preferred to avoid the need for special packaging that reduces crystal size and performance. Most well logging applications benefit from scintillators with high gamma-ray detection efficiency which results from high atomic number and high density. In order to take advantage of high detection efficiencies and the resulting high counting rates, a short scintillation decay time is necessary to minimize pulse pileup.

  19. A computer model of high-latitude scintillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fremouw, E. J.

    1982-01-01

    The DNA Wideband satellite experiment provided extensive data on scintillation produced in high-altitude structured plasmas. A computer program, WBMOD, is being developed to summarize those data in an applications-oriented way. The program contains the phase-screen scattering theory of Rino and a morphological description of ionospheric irregularities (thus far only at auroral latitudes) based on Wideband observations. It permits a user to compute scintillation indices for both phase and intensity as a function of system operating parameters and solar-ionospheric disturbance level. Correction is made for multiple scatter, and the user may choose either one-way (communication) or two-way (radar) propagation.

  20. Neutron crosstalk between liquid scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbeke, J. M.; Prasad, M. K.; Snyderman, N. J.

    2015-09-01

    A method is proposed to quantify the fractions of neutrons scattering between liquid scintillators. Using a spontaneous fission source, this method can be utilized to quickly characterize an array of liquid scintillators in terms of crosstalk. The point model theory due to Feynman is corrected to account for these multiple scatterings. Using spectral information measured by the liquid scintillators, fractions of multiple scattering can be estimated, and mass reconstruction of fissile materials under investigation can be improved. Monte Carlo simulations of mono-energetic neutron sources were performed to estimate neutron crosstalk. A californium source in an array of liquid scintillators was modeled to illustrate the improvement of the mass reconstruction.

  1. A plastic scintillation counter prototype.

    PubMed

    Furuta, Etsuko; Kawano, Takao

    2015-10-01

    A new prototype device for beta-ray measurement, a plastic scintillation counter, was assembled as an alternative device to liquid scintillation counters. This device uses plastic scintillation sheets (PS sheets) as a sample applicator without the use of a liquid scintillator. The performance was evaluated using tritium labeled compounds, and good linearity was observed between the activity and net count rate. The calculated detection limit of the device was 0.01 Bq mL(-1) after 10 h measurement for 2 mL sample. PMID:26164628

  2. Extruding plastic scintillator at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Anna Pla-Dalmau; Alan D. Bross; Victor V. Rykalin

    2003-10-31

    An understanding of the costs involved in the production of plastic scintillators and the development of a less expensive material have become necessary with the prospects of building very large plastic scintillation detectors. Several factors contribute to the high cost of plastic scintillating sheets, but the principal reason is the labor-intensive nature of the manufacturing process. In order to significantly lower the costs, the current casting procedures had to be abandoned. Since polystyrene is widely used in the consumer industry, the logical path was to investigate the extrusion of commercial-grade polystyrene pellets with dopants to yield high quality plastic scintillator. This concept was tested and high quality extruded plastic scintillator was produced. The D0 and MINOS experiments are already using extruded scintillator strips in their detectors. An extrusion line has recently been installed at Fermilab in collaboration with NICADD (Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator and Detector Development). This new facility will serve to further develop and improve extruded plastic scintillator. This paper will discuss the characteristics of extruded plastic scintillator and its raw materials, the different manufacturing techniques and the current R&D program at Fermilab.

  3. Hybrid scintillators for neutron discrimination

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Patrick L; Cordaro, Joseph G; Anstey, Mitchell R; Morales, Alfredo M

    2015-05-12

    A composition capable of producing a unique scintillation response to neutrons and gamma rays, comprising (i) at least one surfactant; (ii) a polar hydrogen-bonding solvent; and (iii) at least one luminophore. A method including combining at least one surfactant, a polar hydrogen-bonding solvent and at least one luminophore in a scintillation cell under vacuum or an inert atmosphere.

  4. Scintillation detector for carbon-14

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knoll, G. F.; Rogers, W. L.

    1971-01-01

    Detector consists of plastic, cylindrical double-wall scintillation cell, which is filled with gas to be analyzed. Thin, inner cell wall is isolated optically from outer (guard) scintillator wall by evaporated-aluminum coating. Bonding technique provides mechanical support to cell wall when device is exposed to high temperatures.

  5. Lithium-loaded liquid scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Dai, Sheng; Kesanli, Banu; Neal, John S.

    2012-05-15

    The invention is directed to a liquid scintillating composition containing (i) one or more non-polar organic solvents; (ii) (lithium-6)-containing nanoparticles having a size of up to 10 nm and surface-capped by hydrophobic molecules; and (iii) one or more fluorophores. The invention is also directed to a liquid scintillator containing the above composition.

  6. Free liquid scintillation counting bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    Packard Instrument Company announces the availability of its newly updated Bibliography of Packard Tri-Carb Liquid Scintillation Analyzers. This unique new booklet lists 628 references in which Packard Tri-Carb{reg_sign} liquid scintillation analyzers have been used in life science, environmental, nuclear power and archaeological measurements. All listings are cross-referenced by radionuclide, specific field of study and author.

  7. Development of intrinsic IPT scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Bross, A.D.

    1989-07-31

    We report on the development of a new polystyrene based plastic scintillator. Optical absorption, fluorescence and light output measurements are presented. Preliminary results of radiation damage effects are also given and compared to the effects on a commercial plastic scintillator, NE 110. 6 refs., 12 figs.

  8. Scintillation light transport and detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriel, T. A.; Lillie, R. A.

    1987-08-01

    The MORSE neutron gamma-ray transport code has been modified to allow for the transport of scintillation light. This modified code is used to analyze the light collection characteristics of a large liquid scintillator module (18 × 18 × 350 cm 3).

  9. Scintillator based beta batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rensing, Noa M.; Tiernan, Timothy C.; Shirwadkar, Urmila; O'Dougherty, Patrick; Freed, Sara; Hawrami, Rastgo; Squillante, Michael R.

    2013-05-01

    Some long-term, remote applications do not have access to conventional harvestable energy in the form of solar radiation (or other ambient light), wind, environmental vibration, or wave motion. Radiation Monitoring Devices, Inc. (RMD) is carrying out research to address the most challenging applications that need power for many months or years and which have undependable or no access to environmental energy. Radioisotopes are an attractive candidate for this energy source, as they can offer a very high energy density combined with a long lifetime. Both large scale nuclear power plants and radiothermal generators are based on converting nuclear energy to heat, but do not scale well to small sizes. Furthermore, thermo-mechanical power plants depend on moving parts, and RTG's suffer from low efficiency. To address the need for compact nuclear power devices, RMD is developing a novel beta battery, in which the beta emissions from a radioisotope are converted to visible light in a scintillator and then the visible light is converted to electrical power in a photodiode. By incorporating 90Sr into the scintillator SrI2 and coupling the material to a wavelength-matched solar cell, we will create a scalable, compact power source capable of supplying milliwatts to several watts of power over a period of up to 30 years. We will present the latest results of radiation damage studies and materials processing development efforts, and discuss how these factors interact to set the operating life and energy density of the device.

  10. Perils of the GPS phase scintillation index (?$\\phi$)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beach, Theodore L.

    2006-10-01

    The phase scintillation index (??), equal to the standard deviation of measured phase, is often used to characterize Global Positioning System (GPS) observations in ionospheric environments that may be scintillated. Since ?? is dominated by large-scale fluctuations, questions of usage and interpretation exist as will be illustrated here. Beyond traditional concerns with detrending, multipath and receiver phase noise, there are at least two issues to be considered. The first is the marginal suitability of ?? to characterize a power law phase screen with a poorly defined low-frequency component (e.g., outer scale). Second, observed ?? parameters may not be relevant to GPS receiver tracking impacts. These arguments are outlined here in greater detail and are illustrated with simple one-dimensional phase screen propagation modeling results. The conclusion is that GPS ?? values depend critically on the circumstances of measurement and are difficult to compare among observations without additional knowledge, particularly of relative ionospheric drift and irregularity orientation, that may not be available from an isolated GPS receiver. The development of suitable alternative measures requires careful consideration of the elements of GPS scintillation and its impacts. The broader GPS scintillation community should take an active role in developing suitable replacement measures for ??.

  11. A fast microchannel plate-scintillator detector for velocity map imaging and imaging mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, B.; King, S. J.; Vallance, C.; Brouard, M.

    2014-02-15

    The time resolution achievable using standard position-sensitive ion detectors, consisting of a chevron pair of microchannel plates coupled to a phosphor screen, is primarily limited by the emission lifetime of the phosphor, around 70 ns for the most commonly used P47 phosphor. We demonstrate that poly-para-phenylene laser dyes may be employed extremely effectively as scintillators, exhibiting higher brightness and much shorter decay lifetimes than P47. We provide an extensive characterisation of the properties of such scintillators, with a particular emphasis on applications in velocity-map imaging and microscope-mode imaging mass spectrometry. The most promising of the new scintillators exhibits an electron-to-photon conversion efficiency double that of P47, with an emission lifetime an order of magnitude shorter. The new scintillator screens are vacuum stable and show no signs of signal degradation even over longer periods of operation.

  12. Evaluation of the imaging performance of LSO powder scintillator for use in X-ray mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michail, C.; David, S.; Liaparinos, P.; Valais, I.; Nikolopoulos, D.; Kalivas, N.; Toutountzis, A.; Cavouras, D.; Kandarakis, I.; Panayiotakis, G.

    2007-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the imaging performance of Lu 2SiO 5:Ce (LSO:Ce) powder scintillator for use in X-ray detectors used in mammography. LSO:Ce scintillator is a high efficiency, fast emitting material, which in single-crystal form is used in positron emission tomography detectors. A scintillating screen, with a coating thickness of 25 mg/cm 2, was prepared in our laboratory from commercially available LSO:Ce powder (Phosphor Technology Ltd.). The imaging performance of the screen was assessed by experimental determination of the modulation transfer function (MTF) and the noise transfer function (NTF). Experimental MTF values were compared to data obtained by a custom Monte Carlo simulation program. Screen irradiation was performed under exposure conditions employed in mammographic applications (27 kV p, 63 mA s). MTF was determined by the Square Wave Response Function (SWRF) method whereas NTF was estimated by Noise Power Spectrum (NPS) measurements, under uniform screen irradiation. Our results showed that LSO:Ce exhibits high MTF, which is comparable to that of the commercially used Gd 2O 2S:Tb powder scintillator. Considering our MTF results and the fast response of LSO:Ce scintillator screen (40 ns), this material can be considered for use in X-ray mammographic detectors.

  13. Ionospheric scintillation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rino, C. L.; Freemouw, E. J.

    1973-01-01

    The diffracted field of a monochromatic plane wave was characterized by two complex correlation functions. For a Gaussian complex field, these quantities suffice to completely define the statistics of the field. Thus, one can in principle calculate the statistics of any measurable quantity in terms of the model parameters. The best data fits were achieved for intensity statistics derived under the Gaussian statistics hypothesis. The signal structure that achieved the best fit was nearly invariant with scintillation level and irregularity source (ionosphere or solar wind). It was characterized by the fact that more than 80% of the scattered signal power is in phase quadrature with the undeviated or coherent signal component. Thus, the Gaussian-statistics hypothesis is both convenient and accurate for channel modeling work.

  14. Proton recoil scintillator neutron rem meter

    DOEpatents

    Olsher, Richard H.; Seagraves, David T.

    2003-01-01

    A neutron rem meter utilizing proton recoil and thermal neutron scintillators to provide neutron detection and dose measurement. In using both fast scintillators and a thermal neutron scintillator the meter provides a wide range of sensitivity, uniform directional response, and uniform dose response. The scintillators output light to a photomultiplier tube that produces an electrical signal to an external neutron counter.

  15. Properties of scintillator solutes

    SciTech Connect

    Fluornoy, J.M.

    1998-06-01

    This special report summarizes measurements of the spectroscopic and other properties of the solutes that were used in the preparation of several new liquid scintillators developed at EG and G/Energy Measurements/Santa Barbara Operations (the precursor to Bechtel Nevada/Special Technologies Laboratory) on the radiation-to-light converter program. The data on the individual compounds are presented in a form similar to that used by Prof. Isadore Berlman in his classic handbook of fluorescence spectra. The temporal properties and relative efficiencies of the new scintillators are presented in Table 1, and the efficiencies as a function of wavelength are presented graphically in Figure 1. In addition, there is a descriptive glossary of the abbreviations used herein. Figure 2 illustrates the basic structures of some of the compounds and of the four solvents reported in this summary. The emission spectra generally exhibit more structure than the absorption spectra, with the result that the peak emission wavelength for a given compound may lie several nm away from the wavelength, {lambda}{sub avg}, at the geometric center of the emission spectrum. Therefore, the author has chosen to list absorption peaks, {lambda}{sub max}, and emission {lambda}{sub avg} values in Figures 3--30, as being most illustrative of the differences between the compounds. The compounds, BHTP, BTPB, ADBT, and DPTPB were all developed on this program. P-terphenyl, PBD, and TPB are commercially available blue emitters. C-480 and the other longer-wavelength emitters are laser dyes available commercially from Exciton Corporation. 1 ref., 30 figs.

  16. Scintillator materials containing lanthanum fluorides

    DOEpatents

    Moses, W.W.

    1991-05-14

    An improved radiation detector containing a crystalline mixture of LaF[sub 3] and CeF[sub 3] as the scintillator element is disclosed. Scintillators made with from 25% to 99.5% LaF[sub 3] and the remainder CeF[sub 3] have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is equal to or superior to other known scintillator materials, and which may be processed from natural starting materials containing both rare earth elements. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in positron emission tomography. 2 figures.

  17. Scintillator materials containing lanthanum fluorides

    DOEpatents

    Moses, William W.

    1991-01-01

    An improved radiation detector containing a crystalline mixture of LaF.sub.3 and CeF.sub.3 as the scintillator element is disclosed. Scintillators made with from 25% to 99.5% LaF.sub.3 and the remainder CeF.sub.3 have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is equal to or superior to other known scintillator materials, and which may be processed from natural starting materials containing both rare earth elements. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in positron emission tomography.

  18. Scintillator fiber optic long counter

    DOEpatents

    McCollum, Tom (Sterling, VA); Spector, Garry B. (Fairfax, VA)

    1994-01-01

    A flat response position sensitive neutron detector capable of providing neutron spectroscopic data utilizing scintillator fiber optic filaments embedded in a neutron moderating housing having an open end through which neutrons enter to be detected.

  19. Scintillator fiber optic long counter

    DOEpatents

    McCollum, T.; Spector, G.B.

    1994-03-29

    A flat response position sensitive neutron detector capable of providing neutron spectroscopic data utilizing scintillator fiber optic filaments embedded in a neutron moderating housing having an open end through which neutrons enter to be detected is described. 11 figures.

  20. About NICADD extruded scintillating strips

    SciTech Connect

    Dyshkant, A.; Beznosko, D.; Blazey, G.; Chakraborty, D.; Francis, K.; Kubik, D.; Lima, J.G.; Rykalin, V.; Zutshi, v.; Baldina, E.; Bross, A.; Deering, P.; Nebel, T.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Schellpfeffer, J.; Serritella, C.; Zimmerman, J.; /Fermilab

    2005-04-01

    The results of control measurements of extruded scintillating strip responses to a radioactive source Sr-90 are provided, and details of strip choice, preparation, and method of measurement are included. About four hundred one meter long extruded scintillating strips were measured at four different points. These results were essential for prototyping a tail catcher and muon tracker for a future international electron positron linear collider detector.

  1. Ionospheric Scintillation Effects on GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steenburgh, R. A.; Smithtro, C.; Groves, K.

    2007-12-01

    . Ionospheric scintillation of Global Positioning System (GPS) signals threatens navigation and military operations by degrading performance or making GPS unavailable. Scintillation is particularly active, although not limited to, a belt encircling the earth within 20 degrees of the geomagnetic equator. As GPS applications and users increases, so does the potential for detrimental impacts from scintillation. We examined amplitude scintillation data spanning seven years from Ascension Island, U.K.; Ancon, Peru; and Antofagasta, Chile in the Atlantic/Americas longitudinal sector at as well as data from Parepare, Indonesia; Marak Parak, Malaysia; Pontianak, Indonesia; Guam; and Diego Garcia, U.K.; in the Pacific longitudinal sector. From these data, we calculate percent probability of occurrence of scintillation at various intensities described by the S4 index. Additionally, we determine Dilution of Precision at one minute resolution. We examine diurnal, seasonal and solar cycle characteristics and make spatial comparisons. In general, activity was greatest during the equinoxes and solar maximum, although scintillation at Antofagasta, Chile was higher during 1998 rather than at solar maximum.

  2. Thermal neutron scintillators using unenriched boron nitride and zinc sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, J. E.; Cole, A. J.; Kirby, A.; Marsden, E.

    2015-06-01

    Thermal neutron detectors based on powdered zinc sulfide intimately mixed with a neutron capture compound have a history as long as scintillation technique itself. We show that using unenriched boron nitride powder, rather than the more commonly used enriched lithium fluoride, results in detection screens which produce less light but which are very considerably cheaper. Methods of fabricating large areas of this material are presented. The screens are intended for the production of large area low cost neutron detectors as a replacement for helium-3 proportional tubes.

  3. Comparative Accuracy of Anal and Cervical Cytology in Screening for Moderate to Severe Dysplasia by Magnification Guided Punch Biopsy: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, Wm. Christopher; Agmas, Wollelaw; Cachay, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Background The accuracy of screening for anal cancer precursors relative to screening for cervical cancer precursors has not been systematically examined. The aim of the current meta-analysis was to compare the relative accuracy of anal cytology to cervical cytology in discriminating between histopathologic high grade and lesser grades of dysplasia when the reference standard biopsy is obtained using colposcope magnification. Methods and Findings The outcome metric of discrimination was the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve area. Random effects meta-analysis of eligible studies was performed with examination of sources of heterogeneity that included QUADAS criteria and selected covariates, in meta-regression models. Thirty three cervical and eleven anal screening studies were found to be eligible. The primary meta-analytic comparison suggested that anal cytologic screening is somewhat less discriminating than cervical cytologic screening (ROC area [95% confidence interval (C.I.)]: 0.834 [0.809–0.859] vs. 0.700 [0.664–0.735] for cervical and anal screening, respectively). This finding was robust when examined in meta-regression models of covariates differentially distributed by screening setting (anal, cervical). Conclusions Anal cytologic screening is somewhat less discriminating than cervical cytologic screening. Heterogeneity of estimates within each screening setting suggests that other factors influence estimates of screening accuracy. Among these are sampling and interpretation errors involving both cytology and biopsy as well as operator skill and experience. PMID:21949801

  4. Development of the dual scintillator sheet and Phoswich detector for simultaneous Alpha- and Beta-rays measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, B.K.; Kim, G.H.; Park, C.H.; Jung, Y.H.; Jung, C.H.; Lee, K.W.; Han, M.J.

    2007-07-01

    Thin sheet type of ZnS(Ag)/plastic dual scintillator for simultaneous counting of alpha- and beta-particles using a organic and inorganic scintillator widely used in the radiation measurement was manufactured, which could be applicable in the contamination monitoring systems. Counting materials were manufactured by solidification of the scintillator solution which mixed scintillator, solvent, and polymer. Prepared dual scintillator is a counting material which can simultaneously measure the alpha- and beta-particles. It was divided into two parts : an inorganic scintillator layer for alpha-particle detection and an organic one for beta-particle detection. The organic layer was composed of 2,5-diphenyloxazole [PPO] and 1,4,-bis[5-phenyl(oxazolyl)benzene] [POPOP] acting as the scintillator and polysulfone acting as the polymer. The inorganic layer was composed of ZnS(Ag) as scintillator and polysulfone as paste. The ZnS(Ag) scintillator layer was printed onto the organic layer using screen printing method. To estimate the detection ability of the prepared counting materials, alpha-particle emitting nuclide, Am-241, and beta emitting nuclide, Sr/Y-90, were used. The scintillations produced by interaction between radiation and scintillator were measured by photomultiplier tube. The overall counting results reveal that the developed detector is efficient for simultaneous counting of alpha- and beta-particles. For application test, the dual scintillator was fabricated with a Phoswich detector for monitoring the in-pipe alpha and beta contamination. To deploy inside a pipe, two types of Phoswich detectors, sheets and cylinders, were prepared. For in-pipe monitoring, it was found that the cylindrical type was excellent. In the study, polymer composite counting material and Phoswich detectors were prepared using organic and inorganic scintillator for detecting different radiations. In the future, it will be applied to the contamination monitoring system for nuclear decommissioning sites, waste treatment sites, and similar areas. (authors)

  5. Extruded plastic scintillator including inorganic powders

    DOEpatents

    Bross, Alan D.; Mellott, Kerry L.; Pla-Dalmau, Anna

    2006-06-27

    A method for producing a plastic scintillator is disclosed. A plurality of nano-sized particles and one or more dopants can be combined with a plastic material for the formation of a plastic scintillator thereof. The nano-sized particles, the dopant and the plastic material can be combined within the dry inert atmosphere of an extruder to produce a reaction that results in the formation of a plastic scintillator thereof and the deposition of energy within the plastic scintillator, such that the plastic scintillator produces light signifying the detection of a radiative element. The nano-sized particles can be treated with an inert gas prior to processing the nano-sized particles, the dopant and the plastic material utilizing the extruder. The plastic scintillator can be a neutron-sensitive scintillator, x-ray sensitive scintillator and/or a scintillator for the detection of minimum ionizing particles.

  6. PMT calibration of a scintillation detector using primary scintillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, E. D. C.; Fernandes, L. M. P.; Yahlali, N.; Pérez, J.; Álvarez, V.; Borges, F. I. G.; Camargo, M.; Cárcel, S.; Cebrián, S.; Cervera, A.; Conde, C. A. N.; Dafni, T.; Díaz, J.; Esteve, R.; Ferrario, P.; Ferreira, A. L.; Gehman, V. M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gómez, H.; Gómez-Cadenas, J. J.; González Díaz, D.; Gutiérrez, R. M.; Hauptman, J.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; Herrera, D. C.; Irastorza, I. G.; Labarga, L.; Laing, A.; Liubarsky, I.; Lopez-March, N.; Lorca, D.; Losada, M.; Luzón, G.; Marí, A.; Martín-Albo, J.; Martínez, A.; Martínez Lema, G.; Miller, T.; Monrabal, F.; Monserrate, M.; Mora, F. J.; Moutinho, L. M.; Muñoz Vidal, J.; Nebot Guinot, M.; Nygren, D.; Oliveira, C. A. B.; Pérez, J.; Pérez Aparicio, J. L.; Querol, M.; Renner, J.; Ripoll, L.; Rodríguez, A.; Rodríguez, J.; Santos, F. P.; Dos Santos, J. M. F.; Seguí, L.; Serra, L.; Shuman, D.; Simón, A.; Sofka, C.; Sorel, M.; Toledo, J. F.; Torrent, J.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.; Villar, J. A.; Webb, R.; White, J.; Monteiro, C. M. B.

    2015-02-01

    We have studied the calibration of PMTs in scintillation detectors, inducing single electron response on the PMT from primary scintillation produced by x-ray interaction. The results agree with those obtained by the commonly used single electron response (SER) method, which uses LED light pulses to induce the PMT SER. The use of the primary scintillation for PMT calibration will be convenient in situations where the PMT is already in situ, when it becomes difficult or even impossible to apply the SER method, e.g. in commercial sealed scintillator/PMT devices. Furthermore, we have experimentally investigated the possibility of fitting the high-charge tail of the PMT SER pulse-height distribution to an exponential function, inferring the PMT gain from the inverse of the exponent. The results of the exponential fit method agree with those obtained by the SER method for pulse-height distributions resulting from an average number of around 1.0 photoelectrons reaching the first dynode per light/scintillation pulse. The SER method has higher precision and, therefore, is used in a larger number of applications. Nevertheless, the exponential fit method will be useful in situations where the single photoelectron peak is under the background or noise peak and it may present an alternative, simple way, for relative gain calibration of PMT arrays as well as for monitoring the PMT gain variations.

  7. Rare earth phosphors and phosphor screens

    DOEpatents

    Buchanan, Robert A.; Maple, T. Grant; Sklensky, Alden F.

    1981-01-01

    This invention relates to rare earth phosphor screens for converting image carrying incident radiation to image carrying visible or near-visible radiation and to the rare earth phosphor materials utilized in such screens. The invention further relates to methods for converting image carrying charged particles to image carrying radiation principally in the blue and near-ultraviolet region of the spectrum and to stabilized rare earth phosphors characterized by having a continuous surface layer of the phosphors of the invention. More particularly, the phosphors of the invention are oxychlorides and oxybromides of yttrium, lanthanum and gadolinium activated with trivalent cerium and the conversion screens are of the type illustratively including x-ray conversion screens, image amplifier tube screens, neutron imaging screens, cathode ray tube screens, high energy gamma ray screens, scintillation detector screens and screens for real-time translation of image carrying high energy radiation to image carrying visible or near-visible radiation.

  8. Optimisation of nasal swab analysis by liquid scintillation counting.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xiongxin; Liblong, Aaron; Kramer-Tremblay, Sheila; Priest, Nicholas; Li, Chunsheng

    2012-06-01

    When responding to an emergency radiological incident, rapid methods are needed to provide the physicians and radiation protection personnel with an early estimation of possible internal dose resulting from the inhalation of radionuclides. This information is needed so that appropriate medical treatment and radiological protection control procedures can be implemented. Nasal swab analysis, which employs swabs swiped inside a nostril followed by liquid scintillation counting of alpha and beta activity on the swab, could provide valuable information to quickly identify contamination of the affected population. In this study, various parameters (such as alpha/beta discrimination, swab materials, counting time and volume of scintillation cocktail etc) were evaluated in order to optimise the effectiveness of the nasal swab analysis method. An improved nasal swab procedure was developed by replacing cotton swabs with polyurethane-tipped swabs. Liquid scintillation counting was performed using a Hidex 300SL counter with alpha/beta pulse shape discrimination capability. Results show that the new method is more reliable than existing methods using cotton swabs and effectively meets the analysis requirements for screening personnel in an emergency situation. This swab analysis procedure is also applicable to wipe tests of surface contamination to minimise the source self-absorption effect on liquid scintillation counting. PMID:22562962

  9. Structural design of a high energy particle detector using liquid scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, Timothy John; /Minnesota U.

    1997-02-01

    This thesis presents a design for a 10,000 ton liquid scintillator neutrino detector being considered for the MINOS project at Fermilab. Details of designing, manufacturing, and assembling the active detector components are presented. The detector consists of 1080 magnetized steel absorber planes alternating with 1080 active detector planes. Each active plane is made up of plastic extrusions divided into nearly 400 cells for positional resolution. Life tests on the plastic extrusions determine their feasibility for containing the scintillator. The extrusions are sealed at the bottom, filled with liquid scintillator, and have an optical fiber running the entire length of each cell. The fibers terminate at the top of each extrusion in a manifold. An optical-fiber-light-guide connects the fibers in each manifold to a photo-detector. The photo-detector converts the light signals from the scintillator and optical fibers into electrical impulses for computer analysis.

  10. VHF scintillations as a diagnostic tool for the study of ionospheric irregularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Altaf; Ahmad, M. M.; Pathan, B. M.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we present the results of observations of the scintillations of radio beacon on 250.351 MHz from geostationary satellite FLEETSAT (73 deg E) recorded at Bombay on April 9-10, 1992 during night hours. The scintillation index, S(sub 4), is used to describe the strength of the scintillations. The variation of scintillation index with local time shows a maxima of 0.589 at 02:55 India Standard Time (IST). This scintillation activity is linked with the spread F-irregularities. A brief description of the scintillation theories like phase screen theory and theory for weak scintillations -- Rytov solution is given. These theories provide an integral measure of the fluctuations in terms of phase and amplitude fluctuations imposed on VHF signals while traversing through the ionosphere. Power spectrum analysis for the log-amplitude and phase departure and cross spectrum between them have also been carried out. Using spectral index p = 1, we have shown that the scale sizes for the ionospheric irregularities are greater than 1 km.

  11. Scintillating glass fiber neutron senors

    SciTech Connect

    Abel, K.H.; Arthur, R.J.; Bliss, M.

    1994-04-01

    Cerium-doped lithium-silicate glass fibers have been developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for use as thermal neutron detectors. By using highly-enriched {sup 6} Li , these fibers efficiently capture thermal neutrons and produce scintillation light that can be detected at the ends of the fibers. Advantages of scintillating fibers over {sup 3}He or BF{sub 3} proportional tubes include flexibility in geometric configuration, ruggedness in high-vibration environments, and less detector weight for the same neutron sensitivity. This paper describes the performance of these scintillating fibers with regard to count rates, pulse height spectra, absolute efficiencies, and neutron/gamma discrimination. Fibers with light transmission lengths (1/e) of greater than 2 m have been produced at PNL. Neutron sensors in fiber form allow development of a variety of neutron detectors packaged in previously unavailable configurations. Brief descriptions of some of the devices already produced are included to illustrate these possibilities.

  12. Scintillation-Hardened GPS Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Donald R.

    2015-01-01

    CommLargo, Inc., has developed a scintillation-hardened Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver that improves reliability for low-orbit missions and complies with NASA's Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) architecture standards. A software-defined radio (SDR) implementation allows a single hardware element to function as either a conventional radio or as a GPS receiver, providing backup and redundancy for platforms such as the International Space Station (ISS) and high-value remote sensing platforms. The innovation's flexible SDR implementation reduces cost, weight, and power requirements. Scintillation hardening improves mission reliability and variability. In Phase I, CommLargo refactored an open-source GPS software package with Kalman filter-based tracking loops to improve performance during scintillation and also demonstrated improved navigation during a geomagnetic storm. In Phase II, the company generated a new field-programmable gate array (FPGA)-based GPS waveform to demonstrate on NASA's Space Communication and Navigation (SCaN) test bed.

  13. Development of radiation hard scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Markley, F.; Woods, D.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Foster, G. ); Blackburn, R. )

    1992-05-01

    Substantial improvements have been made in the radiation hardness of plastic scintillators. Cylinders of scintillating materials 2.2 cm in diameter and 1 cm thick have been exposed to 10 Mrads of gamma rays at a dose rate of 1 Mrad/h in a nitrogen atmosphere. One of the formulations tested showed an immediate decrease in pulse height of only 4% and has remained stable for 12 days while annealing in air. By comparison a commercial PVT scintillator showed an immediate decrease of 58% and after 43 days of annealing in air it improved to a 14% loss. The formulated sample consisted of 70 parts by weight of Dow polystyrene, 30 pbw of pentaphenyltrimethyltrisiloxane (Dow Corning DC 705 oil), 2 pbw of p-terphenyl, 0.2 pbw of tetraphenylbutadiene, and 0.5 pbw of UVASIL299LM from Ferro.

  14. Scintillation at two optical frequencies.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, W B; Reitsema, H J

    1981-09-15

    Stellar scintillation data were obtained on a single night at a variety of zenith distances and azimuths, using a photon-counting photometer recording at 100 Hz simultaneously at wavelengths of 0.475 microm and 0.870 microm. Orientable apertures of 42-cm diam separated by 1 m were used to establish the average upper atmosphere wind direction and velocity. Dispersion in the earth's atmosphere separate the average optical paths at the two wavelengths, permitting a reconstruction of the spatial cross-correlation function for scintillations, independent of assumptions about differential fluid motions. Although there is clear evidence of a complicated velocity field, scintillation power was predominantly produced by levels at pressures of 130 +/- 30 mbar. The data are not grossly inconsistent with layers of isotropic Kolmogorov turbulence, but there is some evidence for deviation from the Kolmogorov spectral index and/or anisotropy. PMID:20333125

  15. Fracture-resistant lanthanide scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Doty, F. Patrick

    2011-01-04

    Lanthanide halide alloys have recently enabled scintillating gamma ray spectrometers comparable to room temperature semiconductors (<3% FWHM energy resolutions at 662 keV). However brittle fracture of these materials upon cooling hinders the growth of large volume crystals. Efforts to improve the strength through non-lanthanide alloy substitution, while preserving scintillation, have been demonstrated. Isovalent alloys having nominal compositions of comprising Al, Ga, Sc, Y, and In dopants as well as aliovalent alloys comprising Ca, Sr, Zr, Hf, Zn, and Pb dopants were prepared. All of these alloys exhibit bright fluorescence under UV excitation, with varying shifts in the spectral peaks and intensities relative to pure CeBr.sub.3. Further, these alloys scintillate when coupled to a photomultiplier tube (PMT) and exposed to .sup.137Cs gamma rays.

  16. Unitary scintillation detector and system

    DOEpatents

    McElhaney, S.A.; Chiles, M.M.

    1994-05-31

    The invention is a unitary alpha, beta, and gamma scintillation detector and system for sensing the presence of alpha, beta, and gamma radiations selectively or simultaneously. The scintillators are mounted in a light-tight housing provided with an entrance window for admitting alpha, beta, and gamma radiation and excluding ambient light from the housing. Light pulses from each scintillator have different decay constants that are converted by a photosensitive device into corresponding differently shaped electrical pulses. A pulse discrimination system identifies the electrical pulses by their respective pulse shapes which are determined by decay time. The identified electrical pulses are counted in separate channel analyzers to indicate the respective levels of sensed alpha, beta, and gamma radiations. 10 figs.

  17. Unitary scintillation detector and system

    DOEpatents

    McElhaney, Stephanie A.; Chiles, Marion M.

    1994-01-01

    The invention is a unitary alpha, beta, and gamma scintillation detector and system for sensing the presence of alpha, beta, and gamma radiations selectively or simultaneously. The scintillators are mounted in a light-tight housing provided with an entrance window for admitting alpha, beta, and gamma radiation and excluding ambient light from the housing. Light pulses from each scintillator have different decay constants that are converted by a photosensitive device into corresponding differently shaped electrical pulses. A pulse discrimination system identifies the electrical pulses by their respective pulse shapes which are determined by decay time. The identified electrical pulses are counted in separate channel analyzers to indicate the respective levels of sensed alpha, beta, and gamma radiations.

  18. Comprehensive renal scintillation procedures in spinal cord injury: comparison with excretory urography

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, L.K.; Dubovsky, E.V.; Bueschen, A.J.; Witten, D.M.; Scott, J.W.; Kuhlemeier, K.; Stover, S.L.

    1981-07-01

    A /sup 131/iodine orthoiodohippurate comprehensive renal scintillation procedure was performed and compared to results of excretory urography in 200 spinal cord injury patients. No severe urographic abnormalities were undetected by the comprehensive renal scintillation procedure. Only 1.4 per cent of renal units had greater than minimal pyelocaliectasis or ureterectasis in the presence of a normal radionuclide examination. A relatively large number of abnormalities were detected on the renal scintillation procedure when the excretory urogram was normal. Serial followup will be required to determine the significance of these findings but present data suggest that a comprehensive renal scintillation procedure and a plain film of the kidneys, ureters and bladder may be used for screening upper urinary tract abnormalities in lieu of an excretory urogram. This is particularly advantageous for the spinal cord injury population, since there have been no toxic or allergic reactions reported, no bowel preparation or dehydration is required and there is relatively low radiation exposure.

  19. An imaging technique for detection and absolute calibration of scintillation light

    SciTech Connect

    Pappalardo, Alfio; Cosentino, Luigi; Finocchiaro, Paolo

    2010-03-15

    Triggered by the need of a detection system to be used in experiments of nuclear fusion in laser-generated plasmas, we developed an imaging technique for the measurement and calibration of the scintillation light yield of scintillating materials. As in such experiments, all the reaction products are generated in an ultrashort time frame, the event-by-event data acquisition scheme is not feasible. As an alternative to the emulsion technique (or the equivalent CR39 sheets) we propose a scintillating screen readout by means of a high performance charge coupled device camera. Even though it is not strictly required in the particular application, this technique allows the absolute calibration of the scintillation light yield.

  20. Radiopure Metal-Loaded Liquid Scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Rosero, Richard; Yeh, Minfang

    2015-03-18

    Metal-loaded liquid scintillator plays a key role in particle and nuclear physics experiments. The applications of metal ions in various neutrino experiments and the purification methods for different scintillator components are discussed in this paper.

  1. Low-Dose Megavoltage Cone-Beam CT imaging using Thick, Segmented Scintillators

    PubMed Central

    El-Mohri, Youcef; Antonuk, Larry E.; Zhao, Qihua; Choroszucha, Richard B.; Jiang, Hao; Liu, Langechuan

    2011-01-01

    Megavoltage, cone-beam computed tomography (MV CBCT) employing an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) is a highly promising technique for providing soft-tissue visualization in image-guided radiotherapy. However, current EPIDs based on active matrix flat-panel imagers (AMFPIs), which are regarded as the gold standard for portal imaging and referred to as conventional MV AMFPIs, require high radiation doses to achieve this goal due to poor x-ray detection efficiency (~2% at 6 MV). To overcome this limitation, the incorporation of thick, segmented, crystalline scintillators, as a replacement for the phosphor screens used in these AMFPIs, has been shown to significantly improve the DQE performance, leading to improved image quality for projection imaging at low dose. Toward the realization of practical AMFPIs capable of low dose, soft-tissue visualization using MV CBCT imaging, two prototype AMFPIs incorporating segmented scintillators with ~11 mm thick CsI:Tl and BGO crystals were evaluated. Each scintillator consists of 120 × 60 crystalline elements separated by reflective septal walls, with an element-to-element pitch of 1.016 mm. The prototypes were evaluated using a bench-top CBCT system, allowing the acquisition of 180 projection, 360° tomographic scans with a 6 MV radiotherapy photon beam. Reconstructed images of a spatial resolution phantom, as well as of a water-equivalent phantom, embedded with tissue equivalent objects having electron densities (relative to water) varying from ~0.28 to ~1.70, were obtained down to one beam pulse per projection image, corresponding to a scan dose of ~4 cGy – a dose similar to that required for a single portal image obtained from a conventional MV AMFPI. By virtue of their significantly improved DQE, the prototypes provided low contrast visualization, allowing clear delineation of an object with an electron density difference of ~2.76%. Results of contrast, noise and contrast-to-noise ratio are presented as a function of dose and compared to those from a conventional MV AMFPI. PMID:21325709

  2. Three-dimensional printing of scintillating materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishnayot, Y.; Layani, M.; Cooperstein, I.; Magdassi, S.; Ron, G.

    2014-08-01

    We demonstrate, for the first time, the applicability of three-dimensional printing techniques to the manufacture of scintillation detectors. We report on the development of a formulation, usable in stereolithographic printing, that exhibits scintillation efficiency on the order of 30% of that of commercial polystyrene based scintillators. We discuss the applicability of these techniques and propose future enhancements that will allow tailoring the printed scintillation detectors to various applications.

  3. Nanophosphor composite scintillator with a liquid matrix

    DOEpatents

    McKigney, Edward Allen; Burrell, Anthony Keiran; Bennett, Bryan L.; Cooke, David Wayne; Ott, Kevin Curtis; Bacrania, Minesh Kantilal; Del Sesto, Rico Emilio; Gilbertson, Robert David; Muenchausen, Ross Edward; McCleskey, Thomas Mark

    2010-03-16

    An improved nanophosphor scintillator liquid comprises nanophosphor particles in a liquid matrix. The nanophosphor particles are optionally surface modified with an organic ligand. The surface modified nanophosphor particle is essentially surface charge neutral, thereby preventing agglomeration of the nanophosphor particles during dispersion in a liquid scintillator matrix. The improved nanophosphor scintillator liquid may be used in any conventional liquid scintillator application, including in a radiation detector.

  4. Scintillator Cosmic Ray Super Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, L. X.; Valdés-Galicia, J. F.; Matsubara, Y.; Nagai, Y.; Itow, Y.; Sako, T.; López, D.; Mitsuka, G.; Munakata, K.; Kato, C.; Yasue, S.; Kosai, M.; Tsurusashi, M.; Nakamo, Y.; Shibata, S.; Takamaru, H.; Kojima, H.; Tsuchiya, H.; Watanabe, K.; Koi, T.; Fragoso, E.; Hurtado, A.; Musalem, O.

    2013-04-01

    The Scintillator Cosmic Ray Super Telescope (SciCRST) is a new experiment to detect solar neutrons, and also it is expected to work as a muon and cosmic ray detector. The SciCRST consist of 14,848 plastic scintillator bars, and it will be installed at the top of Sierra Negra volcano, Mexico, 4580 m.a.s.l. We use a prototype, called as miniSciBar, to test the hardware and software of the final experiment. In this paper, we present the status and details of the experiment, and results of the prototype.

  5. Hygroscopicity Evaluation of Halide Scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuravleva, M; Stand, L; Wei, H; Hobbs, C. L.; Boatner, Lynn A; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine; Burger, Arnold; Rowe, E; Bhattacharya, P.; Tupitsyn, E; Melcher, Charles L

    2014-01-01

    A collaborative study of relative hygroscopicity of anhydrous halide scintillators grown at various laboratories is presented. We have developed a technique to evaluate moisture sensitivity of both raw materials and grown crystals, in which the moisture absorption rate is measured using a gravimetric analysis. Degradation of the scintillation performance was investigated by recording gamma-ray spectra and monitoring the photopeak position, count rate and energy resolution. The accompanying physical degradation of the samples exposed to ambient atmosphere was photographically recorded as well. The results were compared with ben

  6. Photonic crystal scintillators and methods of manufacture

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, Ricardo D.; Sexton, Lindsay T.; Fuentes, Roderick E.; Cortes-Concepcion, Jose

    2015-08-11

    Photonic crystal scintillators and their methods of manufacture are provided. Exemplary methods of manufacture include using a highly-ordered porous anodic alumina membrane as a pattern transfer mask for either the etching of underlying material or for the deposition of additional material onto the surface of a scintillator. Exemplary detectors utilizing such photonic crystal scintillators are also provided.

  7. Composite scintillators for detection of ionizing radiation

    DOEpatents

    Dai, Sheng [Knoxville, TN; Stephan, Andrew Curtis [Knoxville, TN; Brown, Suree S. [Knoxville, TN; Wallace, Steven A. [Knoxville, TN; Rondinone, Adam J [Knoxville, TN

    2010-12-28

    Applicant's present invention is a composite scintillator having enhanced transparency for detecting ionizing radiation comprising a material having optical transparency wherein said material comprises nano-sized objects having a size in at least one dimension that is less than the wavelength of light emitted by the composite scintillator wherein the composite scintillator is designed to have selected properties suitable for a particular application.

  8. Characteristics of High Latitude Ionosphere Scintillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Y.

    2012-12-01

    As we enter a new solar maximum period, global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) receivers, especially the ones operating in high latitude and equatorial regions, are facing an increasing threat from ionosphere scintillations. The increased solar activities, however, also offer a great opportunity to collect scintillation data to characterize scintillation signal parameters and ionosphere irregularities. While there are numerous GPS receivers deployed around the globe to monitor ionosphere scintillations, most of them are commercial receivers whose signal processing mechanisms are not designed to operate under ionosphere scintillation. As a result, they may distort scintillation signal parameters or lose lock of satellite signals under strong scintillations. Since 2008, we have established and continuously improved a unique GNSS receiver array at HAARP, Alaska. The array contains high ends commercial receivers and custom RF front ends which can be automatically triggered to collect high quality GPS and GLONASS satellite signals during controlled heating experiments and natural scintillation events. Custom designed receiver signal tracking algorithms aim to preserve true scintillation signatures are used to process the raw RF samples. Signal strength, carrier phase, and relative TEC measurements generated by the receiver array since its inception have been analyzed to characterize high latitude scintillation phenomena. Daily, seasonal, and solar events dependency of scintillation occurrence, spectral contents of scintillation activities, and plasma drifts derived from these measurements will be presented. These interesting results demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of our experimental data collection system in providing insightful details of ionosphere responses to active perturbations and natural disturbances.

  9. Synthesis of plastic scintillation microspheres: Evaluation of scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiago, L. M.; Bagán, H.; Tarancón, A.; Garcia, J. F.

    2013-01-01

    The use of plastic scintillation microspheres (PSm) appear to be an alternative to liquid scintillation for the quantification of alpha and beta emitters because it does not generate mixed wastes after the measurement (organic and radioactive). In addition to routine radionuclide determinations, PSm can be used for further applications, e.g. for usage in a continuous monitoring equipment, for measurements of samples with a high salt concentration and for an extractive scintillation support which permits the separation, pre-concentration and measurement of the radionuclides without additional steps of elution and sample preparation. However, only a few manufacturers provide PSm, and the low number of regular suppliers reduces its availability and restricts the compositions and sizes available. In this article, a synthesis method based on the extraction/evaporation methodology has been developed and successfully used for the synthesis of plastic scintillation microspheres. Seven different compositions of plastic scintillation microspheres have been synthesised; PSm1 with polystyrene, PSm2 with 2,5-Diphenyloxazol(PPO), PSm3 with p-terphenyl (pT), PSm4 with PPO and 1,4-bis(5-phenyloxazol-2-yl) (POPOP), PSm5 pT and (1,4-bis [2-methylstyryl] benzene) (Bis-MSB), PSm6 with PPO, POPOP and naphthalene and PSm7 with pT, Bis-MSB and naphthalene. The synthesised plastic scintillation microspheres have been characterised in terms of their morphology, detection capabilities and alpha/beta separation capacity. The microspheres had a median diameter of approximately 130 μm. Maximum detection efficiency values were obtained for the PSm4 composition as follows 1.18% for 3H, 51.2% for 14C, 180.6% for 90Sr/90Y and 76.7% for 241Am. Values of the SQP(E) parameter were approximately 790 for PSm4 and PSm5. These values show that the synthesised PSm exhibit good scintillation properties and that the spectra are at channel numbers higher than in commercial PSm. Finally, the addition of naphthalene modifies the shape of the pulses produced by alpha and beta particles leading to better alpha/beta separation.

  10. SNO+ Scintillator Purification and Assay

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, R.; Vazquez-Jauregui, E.; Chen, M.; Chkvorets, O.; Hallman, D.

    2011-04-27

    We describe the R and D on the scintillator purification and assay methods and technology for the SNO+ neutrino and double-beta decay experiment. The SNO+ experiment is a replacement of the SNO heavy water with liquid scintillator comprised of 2 g/L PPO in linear alkylbenzene (LAB). During filling the LAB will be transported underground by rail car and purified by multi-stage distillation and steam stripping at a flow rate of 19 LPM. While the detector is operational the scintillator can be recirculated at 150 LPM (full detector volume in 4 days) to provide repurification as necessary by either water extraction (for Ra, K, Bi) or by functional metal scavenger columns (for Pb, Ra, Bi, Ac, Th) followed by steam stripping to remove noble gases and oxygen (Rn, O{sub 2}, Kr, Ar). The metal scavenger columns also provide a method for scintillator assay for ex-situ measurement of the U and Th chain radioactivity. We have developed ''natural'' radioactive spikes of Pb and Ra in LAB and use these for purification testing. Lastly, we present the planned operating modes and purification strategies and the plant specifications and design.

  11. Scintillating fiber ribbon --- tungsten calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Bross, A.; Crisler, M.; Kross, B.; Wrbanek, J.

    1989-07-14

    We describe an ultra-high density scintillating fiber and tungsten calorimeter used as an active beam-dump for electrons. Data showing the calorimeter response to electrons with momenta between 50 and 350 GeV/c are presented. 9 figs.

  12. Boron Doped Plastic Scintillator Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahl, Adam; Chouinard-Dussault, Pascale; Pecinovsky, Cory; Potter, Andrew; Remedes, Tyler; Dorgan, John; Greife, Uwe

    2013-04-01

    This talk will describe the progress made in an interdisciplinary development project aimed at cost-effective, neutron sensitive, plastic scintillator. Colorado School of Mines researchers with backgrounds in Physics, Chemistry, and Chemical Engineering have worked on the incorporation of ^10B in plastics through extrusion. First results on transparent samples using fluorescent spectroscopy and beta excitation will be presented.

  13. Inexpensive scintillation camera study device.

    PubMed

    Brandt, H M; Baard, W P; Heerden, P D

    1977-05-01

    A commerically available inexpensive calculator was modified and mounted next to one of the display oscilloscopes on a scintillation-camera console. This enabled the technologist to dial in each patient's identification number, which then appeared on every frame of the 35-mm film used. By using this device, labeling errors have been reduced to a minimum. PMID:870639

  14. Method of making a scintillator waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Bliss, Mary (West Richland, WA); Craig, Richard A. (West Richland, WA); Reeder, Paul L. (Richland, WA)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is an apparatus for detecting ionizing radiation, having: a waveguide having a first end and a second end, the waveguide formed of a scintillator material wherein the therapeutic ionizing radiation isotropically generates scintillation light signals within the waveguide. This apparatus provides a measure of radiation dose. The apparatus may be modified to permit making a measure of location of radiation dose. Specifically, the scintillation material is segmented into a plurality of segments; and a connecting cable for each of the plurality of segments is used for conducting scintillation signals to a scintillation detector.

  15. Extruded plastic scintillator for MINERvA

    SciTech Connect

    Pla-Dalmau, Anna; Bross, Alan D.; Rykalin, Victor V.; Wood, Brian M.; /NICADD, DeKalb

    2005-11-01

    An extrusion line has recently been installed at Fermilab in collaboration with NICADD (Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator and Detector Development). This new facility will serve to further develop and improve extruded plastic scintillator. Since polystyrene is widely used in the consumer industry, the logical path was to investigate the extrusion of commercial-grade polystyrene pellets with dopants to yield high quality plastic scintillator. The D0 and MINOS experiments are already using extruded scintillator strips in their detectors. A new experiment at Fermilab is pursuing the use of extruded plastic scintillator. A new plastic scintillator strip is being tested and its properties characterized. The initial results are presented here.

  16. Energy resolution of scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moszyński, M.; Syntfeld-Każuch, A.; Swiderski, L.; Grodzicka, M.; Iwanowska, J.; Sibczyński, P.; Szczęśniak, T.

    2016-01-01

    According to current knowledge, the non-proportionality of the light yield of scintillators appears to be a fundamental limitation of energy resolution. A good energy resolution is of great importance for most applications of scintillation detectors. Thus, its limitations are discussed below; which arise from the non-proportional response of scintillators to gamma rays and electrons, being of crucial importance to the intrinsic energy resolution of crystals. The important influence of Landau fluctuations and the scattering of secondary electrons (δ-rays) on intrinsic resolution is pointed out here. The study on undoped NaI and CsI at liquid nitrogen temperature with a light readout by avalanche photodiodes strongly suggests that the non-proportionality of many crystals is not their intrinsic property and may be improved by selective co-doping. Finally, several observations that have been collected in the last 15 years on the influence of the slow components of light pulses on energy resolution suggest that more complex processes are taking place in the scintillators. This was observed with CsI(Tl), CsI(Na), ZnSe(Te), and undoped NaI at liquid nitrogen temperature and, finally, for NaI(Tl) at temperatures reduced below 0 °C. A common conclusion of these observations is that the highest energy resolution, and particularly intrinsic resolution measured with the scintillators, characterized by two or more components of the light pulse decay, is obtainable when the spectrometry equipment integrates the whole light of the components. In contrast, the slow components observed in many other crystals degrade the intrinsic resolution. In the limiting case, afterglow could also be considered as a very slow component that spoils the energy resolution. The aim of this work is to summarize all of the above observations by looking for their origin.

  17. Impact of equatorial ionospheric irregularities on GNSS receivers using real and synthetic scintillation signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghafoori, F.; Skone, S.

    2015-04-01

    The impact of L-band equatorial ionospheric scintillation on Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) receivers is investigated in this paper using both real and synthetic scintillation data. To this end, various low-latitude data sets, recorded during the most recent solar maximum, are exploited in post-processing to develop and verify realistic simulation tools and evaluate GNSS receiver performance. A scintillation simulation model is implemented based on the phase screen formulation of Dr. Charles Rino (1979, 1982, and 2011) which allows oblique signal propagation in an anisotropic propagation medium with multiple irregularity layers (or phase screens) for multiple GNSS frequencies. The observed real scintillation parameters are used to drive GNSS signal simulations. The subsequent simulated GNSS signal time series are verified through comparison with real data for different signal tracking states including the most severe and challenging tracking scenarios. Using both real and synthetic data sets, the impact of scintillation on observation quality and receiver performance is evaluated in terms of probability of loss of phase and frequency lock, as well as the correlation of disturbed L-band signals transmitted by GNSS satellites on the same transionsopheric path.

  18. Fast response neutron scintillation detector for FIRE-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arikawa, Y.; Nakai, M.; Watari, T.; Hosoda, H.; Takeda, K.; Fujiwara, T.; Furukawa, Y.; Norimatsu, T.; Shiraga, H.; Sarukura, N.; Azechi, H.

    2008-05-01

    We have been developing fast responding neutron detectors with a view to revealing the effect of additional laser heating in FIREX-I (Fast Ignition Realization Experiment) by measuring the burn time with a time resolution under 100 ps at the relatively low neutron yield (about 106). The detector is constructed with a thin plastic-scintillaotor (BC-422), a micro-channel-plate photomultiplier tube (MCP-PMT) and a bundle optical fiber as a light-guide. The rise time of a neutron signal from the detector is measured to be 220 ps. The time-determination error for measuring burn time is estimated to be less than ± 46 ps from the data of characterization experiments measuring the transit time distribution of signals, and calculated values of Doppler broadening and the uncertainty of the scintillation time due to the thickness of the scintillator. In the future with more neutron yield, we will construct a scintillation-fiber-streak camera to detect burn history.

  19. Radioluminescence dosimetry by scintillating fiber optics: the open challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veronese, Ivan; Cantone, Marie Claire; Chiodini, Norberto; De Mattia, Cristina; Fasoli, Mauro; Mones, Eleonora; Vedda, Anna

    2013-09-01

    In the last decade, the interest in scintillating fiber optics for ionizing radiation monitoring is constantly increasing. Among the fields of possible applications of these sensors, radiation therapy represents a driving force for the research and development of new devices. In fact, the small dimensions of fiber optics based detectors, together with their realtime response, make these systems extremely promising both in quality assurance measurements of intensity modulated radiotherapy beams, and in in-vivo dosimetry. On the other hand, two specific aspects might represent limiting factors: (i) the "stem effect", that is the spurious luminescence originating as a consequence of the irradiation of the light guide, and (ii) the "memory effect", that is the radioluminescence sensitivity increase during prolonged exposition to ionizing radiation, typical of many scintillating materials. These two issues, representing the main challenges to face for the effective use of scintillating fiber as dosimeters in radiotherapy, were studied considering amorphous silica matrices prepared by sol-gel method and doped with europium. The origin of the stem effect was investigated by means of spectral measurements of the doped fibers irradiated with Xrays and electrons of different energies, field sizes and orientations. New approaches for removing the stem effect on the basis of the radioluminescent spectral analysis are presented and discussed. Furthermore, the causes and phenomenology of the memory effect are described, considering also the effect of dose accumulation with different dose rates and energies of ionizing radiation.

  20. Silicon photomultipliers for scintillating trackers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabaioli, S.; Berra, A.; Bolognini, D.; Bonvicini, V.; Bosisio, L.; Ciano, S.; Iugovaz, D.; Lietti, D.; Penzo, A.; Prest, M.; Rashevskaya, I.; Reia, S.; Stoppani, L.; Vallazza, E.

    2012-12-01

    In recent years, silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) have been proposed as a new kind of readout device for scintillating detectors in many experiments. A SiPM consists of a matrix of parallel-connected pixels, which are independent photon counters working in Geiger mode with very high gain (∼106). This contribution presents the use of an array of eight SiPMs (manufactured by FBK-irst) for the readout of a scintillating bar tracker (a small size prototype of the Electron Muon Ranger detector for the MICE experiment). The performances of the SiPMs in terms of signal to noise ratio, efficiency and time resolution will be compared to the ones of a multi-anode photomultiplier tube (MAPMT) connected to the same bars. Both the SiPMs and the MAPMT are interfaced to a VME system through a 64 channel MAROC ASIC.

  1. Scintillation Monitoring Using Asymmetry Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaikh, Muhammad Mubasshir; Mahrous, Ayman; Abdallah, Amr; Notarpietro, Riccardo

    Variation in electron density can have significant effect on GNSS signals in terms of propagation delay. Ionospheric scintillation can be caused by rapid change of such delay, specifically, when they last for a longer period of time. Ionospheric irregularities that account for scintillation may vary significantly in spatial range and drift with the background plasma at speeds of 45 to 130 m/sec. These patchy irregularities may occur several times during night, e.g. in equatorial region, with the patches move through the ray paths of the GNSS satellite signals. These irregularities are often characterized as either ‘large scale’ (which can be as large as several hundred km in East-West direction and many times that in the North-South direction) or ‘small scale’ (which can be as small as 1m). These small scale irregularities are regarded as the main cause of scintillation [1,2]. In normal solar activity conditions, the mid-latitude ionosphere is not much disturbed. However, during severe magnetic storms, the aurora oval extends towards the equator and the equator anomaly region may stretched towards poles extending the scintillation phenomena more typically associated with those regions into mid-latitudes. In such stormy conditions, the predicted TEC may deviate largely from the true value of the TEC both at low and mid-latitudes due to which GNSS applications may be strongly degraded. This work is an attempt to analyze ionospheric scintillation (S4 index) using ionospheric asymmetry index [3]. The asymmetry index is based on trans-ionospheric propagation between GPS and LEO satellites in a radio occultation (RO) scenario, using background ionospheric data provided by MIDAS [4]. We attempted to simulate one of the recent geomagnetic storms (NOAA scale G4) occurred over low/mid-latitudes. The storm started on 26 September 2011 at UT 18:00 and lasted until early hours of 27 September 2011. The scintillation data for the storm was taken from an ionospheric station in Cairo, Egypt (lat= 29.8641 °, long= 31.3172 °). It was observed that the level of asymmetry was significantly increased during the main phase of the geomagnetic storm. This was due to the changes in ionization, which in turn produced large gradients along occulted ray path in the ionosphere. A very good correlation was found between the evaluated ionospheric asymmetry index and the S4 scintillation index. Additionally, the correlation between evaluated ionospheric asymmetry and errors related to the RO inversion products such as peak electron density (delta NmF2) and Vertical TEC (delta VTEC) estimates also showed promising results. This work is carried out under the framework of the TRANSMIT project (Training Research and Applications Network to Support the Mitigation of Ionospheric Threats - www.transmit-ionosphere.net). [1]Basu Sa. and Basu Su., (1981), ‘Equatorial Scintillation - A Review’, Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics, 43, p. 473. [2]Davies K., (1990), ‘Ionospheric Radio’, IEEE Electromagnetic Waves Series 31, Peter Peregrinus Ltd. [3]Spencer, P., Mitchell, C.N., (2007) ‘Imaging of fast moving electron-density structures in the polar cap’, Annals of Geophysics, vol. 50, no. 3, pp. 427-434. [4]Shaikh, M.M., Notarpietro, R., Nava, B., (2013) ‘The Impact of Spherical Symmetry Assumption on Radio Occultation Data Inversion in the Ionosphere: An Assessment Study’, Advances in Space Research, doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.asr.2013.10.025.

  2. Detecting scintillations in liquid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffman, P. R.; McKinsey, D. N.

    2013-09-01

    We review our work in developing a tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB)-based detection system for a measurement of the neutron lifetime using magnetically confined ultracold neutrons (UCN). As part of the development of the detection system for this experiment, we studied the scintillation properties of liquid helium itself, characterized the fluorescent efficiencies of different fluors, and built and tested three detector geometries. We provide an overview of the results from these studies as well as references for additional information.

  3. Scintillator diagnostics for the detection of laser accelerated ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, N.; Tresca, O.; Lefferts, R.

    2014-09-01

    Laser plasma interaction with ultraintense pulses present exciting schemes for accelerating ions. One of the advantages conferred by using a gaseous laser and target is the potential for a fast (several Hz) repetition rate. This requires diagnostics which are not only suited for a single shot configuration, but also for repeated use. We consider several scintillators as candidates for an imaging diagnostic for protons accelerated to MeV energies by a CO2 laser focused on a gas jet target. We have measured the response of chromium-doped alumina (chromox) and polyvinyl toluene (PVT) screens to protons in the 2-8 MeV range. We have calibrated the luminescent yield in terms of photons emitted per incident proton for each scintillator. We also discuss how light scattering and material properties affect detector resolution. Furthermore, we consider material damage and the presence of an afterglow under intense exposures. Our analysis reveals a near order of magnitude greater yield from chromox in response to proton beams at > 8 MeV energies, while scattering effects favor PVT-based scintillators at lower energies.

  4. Newborn Hearing Screening: Present Scenario

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vishwambhar

    2015-01-01

    In 2009 many countries of the world met to discuss newborn and infant hearing screening current issues and guiding principles for action under World Health Organization (WHO) banner, though most of the countries who had begun this work as universal program or high risk screen do not have exact data and protocol. The developing countries also decided to become part of it and common guideline was proposed. India being part of it included hearing screening as one of the 30 diseases to be screened under Rashtriya Bal Swasthya Karyakram (RBSK). This article discusses all these issues of newborn hearing screening in the world and India. PMID:25657515

  5. Recording of relativistic particles in thin scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Tolstukhin, I A.; Somov, Alexander S.; Somov, S. V.; Bolozdynya, A. I.

    2014-11-01

    Results of investigating an assembly of thin scintillators and silicon photomultipliers for registering relativistic particles with the minimum ionization are presented. A high efficiency of registering relativistic particles using an Ej-212 plastic scintillator, BSF-91A wavelength-shifting fiber (Saint-Gobain), and a silicon photomultiplier (Hamamtsu) is shown. The measurement results are used for creating a scintillation hodoscope of the magnetic spectrometer for registering ? quanta in the GlueX experiment.

  6. Neutron position-sensitive scintillation detector

    DOEpatents

    Strauss, Michael G.; Brenner, Raul

    1984-01-01

    A device is provided for mapping one- and two-dimensional distributions of neutron-positions in a scintillation detector. The device consists of a lithium glass scintillator coupled by an air gap and a light coupler to an array of photomultipliers. The air gap concentrates light flashes from the scintillator, whereas the light coupler disperses this concentrated light to a predetermined fraction of the photomultiplier tube array.

  7. Scintillator tiles read out with silicon photomultipliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pooth, O.; Radermacher, T.; Weingarten, S.; Weinstock, L.

    2015-10-01

    A detector prototype based on a fast plastic scintillator read out with silicon photomultipliers is presented. All studies have been done with cosmic muons and focus on parameter optimization such as coupling the SiPM to the scintillator or wrapping the scintillator with reflective material. The prototype shows excellent results regarding the light-yield and offers a detection efficiency of 99.5% with a signal purity of 99.9% for cosmic muons.

  8. Scintillating Fibre Tracking at High Luminosity Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joram, C.; Haefeli, G.; Leverington, B.

    2015-08-01

    The combination of small diameter scintillating plastic fibres with arrays of SiPM photodetectors has led to a new class of SciFi trackers usable at high luminosity collider experiments. After a short review of the main principles and history of the scintillating fibre technology, we describe the challenges and developments of the large area Scintillating Fibre Tracker currently under development for the upgraded LHCb experiment.

  9. Radio wave scintillations at equatorial regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poularikas, A. D.

    1972-01-01

    Radio waves, passing through the atmosphere, experience amplitude and phase fluctuations know as scintillations. A characterization of equatorial scintillation, which has resulted from studies of data recorded primarily in South America and equatorial Africa, is presented. Equatorial scintillation phenomena are complex because they appear to vary with time of day (pre-and postmidnight), season (equinoxes), and magnetic activity. A wider and more systematic geographical coverage is needed for both scientific and engineering purposes; therefore, it is recommended that more observations should be made at earth stations (at low-geomagnetic latitudes) to record equatorial scintillation phenomena.

  10. Waveshifters and Scintillators for Ionizing Radiation Detection

    SciTech Connect

    B.Baumgaugh; J.Bishop; D.Karmgard; J.Marchant; M.McKenna; R.Ruchti; M.Vigneault; L.Hernandez; C.Hurlbut

    2007-12-11

    Scintillation and waveshifter materials have been developed for the detection of ionizing radiation in an STTR program between Ludlum Measurements, Inc. and the University of Notre Dame. Several new waveshifter materials have been developed which are comparable in efficiency and faster in fluorescence decay than the standard material Y11 (K27) used in particle physics for several decades. Additionally, new scintillation materials useful for fiber tracking have been developed which have been compared to 3HF. Lastly, work was done on developing liquid scintillators and paint-on scintillators and waveshifters for high radiation environments.

  11. Divalent fluoride doped cerium fluoride scintillator

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.; Sparrow, Robert W.

    1991-01-01

    The use of divalent fluoride dopants in scintillator materials comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. The preferred divalent fluoride dopants are calcium fluoride, strontium fluoride, and barium fluoride. The preferred amount of divalent fluoride dopant is less than about two percent by weight of the total scintillator. Cerium fluoride scintillator crystals grown with the addition of a divalent fluoride have exhibited better transmissions and higher light outputs than crystals grown without the addition of such dopants. These scintillators are useful in radiation detection and monitoring applications, and are particularly well suited for high-rate applications such as positron emission tomography (PET).

  12. Scintillation properties of lead sulfate

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, W.W.; Derenzo, S.E. ); Shlichta, P.J. )

    1991-11-01

    We report on the scintillation properties of lead sulfate (PbSO{sub 4}), a scintillator that show promise as a high energy photon detector. It physical properties are well suited for gamma detection, as its has a density of 6.4 gm/cm{sup 3}, a 1/e attenuation length for 511 keV photons of 1.2 cm, is not affected by air or moisture, and is cut and polished easily. In 99.998% pure PbSO{sub 4} crystals at room temperature excited by 511 keV annihilation photons, the fluorescence decay lifetime contains significant fast components having 1.8 ns (5%) and 19 ns (36%) decay times, but with longer components having 95 ns (36%) and 425 ns (23%) decays times. The peak emission wavelength is 335 nm, which is transmitted by borosilicate glass windowed photomultiplier tubes. The total scintillation light output increases with decreasing temperature fro 3,200 photons/MeV at +45{degrees}C to 4, 900 photons/MeV at room temperature (+25{degrees}C) and 68,500 photons/MeV at {minus}145{degrees}C. In an imperfect, 3 mm cube of a naturally occurring mineral form of PbSO{sub 4} (anglesite) at room temperature, a 511 keV photopeak is seen with a total light output of 60% that BGO. There are significant sample to sample variations of the light output among anglesite samples, so the light output of lead sulfate may improve when large synthetic crystals become available. 10 refs.

  13. Photodetectors for Scintillator Proportionality Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, William W.; Choong, Woon-Seng; Hull, Giulia; Payne, Steve; Cherepy, Nerine; Valentine, J.D.

    2010-10-18

    We evaluate photodetectors for use in a Compton Coincidence apparatus designed for measuring scintillator proportionality. There are many requirements placed on the photodetector in these systems, including active area, linearity, and the ability to accurately measure low light levels (which implies high quantum efficiency and high signal-to-noise ratio). Through a combination of measurement and Monte Carlo simulation, we evaluate a number of potential photodetectors, especially photomultiplier tubes and hybrid photodetectors. Of these, we find that the most promising devices available are photomultiplier tubes with high ({approx}50%) quantum efficiency, although hybrid photodetectors with high quantum efficiency would be preferable.

  14. 4/6-GHz ionospheric scintillation measurements during the peak of sunspot cycle 21

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, D.J.; Pontes, M.S.

    1981-01-01

    Analyses of power spectral density confirm an f to the -3 dependence for weak scintillations, which, it is noted, can be explained by the conventional weak scattering theory for a thick screen with a power law electron density fluctuation spectrum of p equals 4. Data gathered from 1977 to 1980 at the Hong Kong Earth Station provide further insight into 4- and 6-GHz scintillations during maximum solar activity. Such characteristics as occurrence frequencies, durations, global scales, and spectral roll-off slopes are unique in that they had not been observed in previous years. Peak-to-peak fluctuations of up to 14-dB magnitude are observed for which the f to the -3 power spectrum dependence is no longer valid. In terms of cumulative statistics, a model of scintillation increase as a function of solar activities is developed for engineering applications.

  15. Scintillator handbook with emphasis on cesium iodide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tidd, J. L.; Dabbs, J. R.; Levine, N.

    1973-01-01

    This report provides a background of reasonable depth and reference material on scintillators in general. Particular attention is paid to the cesium iodide scintillators as used in the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO) experiments. It is intended especially for use by persons such as laboratory test personnel who need to obtain a working knowledge of these materials and their characteristics in a short time.

  16. Epoxy resins produce improved plastic scintillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markley, F. W.

    1967-01-01

    Plastic scintillator produced by the substitution of epoxy resins for the commonly used polystyrene is easy to cast, stable at room temperature, and has the desirable properties of a thermoset or cross-linked system. Such scintillators can be immersed directly in strong solvents, an advantage in many chemical and biological experiments.

  17. Formula optimization of the Jiashitang scar removal ointment and antiinflammatory compounds screening by NF-κB bioactivity-guided dual-luciferase reporter assay system.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jie; Tao, Jin; Zhang, Nannan; Liu, Yanjie; Jiang, Min; Hou, Yuanyuan; Wang, Qian; Bai, Gang

    2015-02-01

    Inflammation plays a role in scar formation; therefore, decreasing inflammation benefits scar removal. Jiashitang scar removal ointment (JST) is a commercially available traditional Chinese medicinal formulation. It is composed of extracts from Carthamus tinctorius L. (Car), Rheum officinale Baill. (Rhe), Salvia miltiorrhiza Beg. (Sal), and Panax notoginseng (Burk.) F. H. Chen (Pan), which are all herbs with potent antiinflammatory activities. Our aims are to optimize the formula of JST and to elucidate its antiinflammatory active components. Response surface methodology was applied to optimize proportions of the four herb extracts. The antiinflammatory effects were evaluated using in vitro and in vivo models. To screen for active components in this formula, a bioactivity-based ultra-performance liquid chromatography/quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis was performed. After optimization, the antiinflammatory effects of the new formula were significantly superior to the original one. Screening identified 13 active ingredients: a series of saffiomin, emodin, salvianolic acid, tanshinone, and triterpenoid saponin derivatives. These active ingredients were predicted to exert nuclear factor-κB inhibiting effects through MAPK, PI3K/AKT, and NIK-IKK pathways. In conclusion, the original formula was successfully optimized with more potent antiinflammatory activity. These methods can be applied to researches of other formulas. PMID:25363818

  18. Development of scintillation materials for PET scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korzhik, Mikhail; Fedorov, Andrei; Annenkov, Alexander; Borissevitch, Andrei; Dossovitski, Alexei; Missevitch, Oleg; Lecoq, Paul

    2007-02-01

    The growing demand on PET methodology for a variety of applications ranging from clinical use to fundamental studies triggers research and development of PET scanners providing better spatial resolution and sensitivity. These efforts are primarily focused on the development of advanced PET detector solutions and on the developments of new scintillation materials as well. However Lu containing scintillation materials introduced in the last century such as LSO, LYSO, LuAP, LuYAP crystals still remain the best PET species in spite of the recent developments of bright, fast but relatively low density lanthanum bromide scintillators. At the same time Lu based materials have several drawbacks which are high temperature of crystallization and relatively high cost compared to alkali-halide scintillation materials. Here we describe recent results in the development of new scintillation materials for PET application.

  19. Empirical modelling of equatorial ionospheric scintillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasricha, P. K.; Reddy, B. M.

    1986-06-01

    A computer-based model of ionospheric scintillations has been developed by Fremouw (socalled the WBMOD model) to give a mean scintillation index for a given set of observing conditions. The WBMOD model incorporates some of the scintillation observations made with the DNA wideband satellite. A comparison is made between the scintillation morphology observed at an equatorial station Ooty with the one evolved with the WBMOD model. Morphological features at other stations in the equatorial region are briefly described. The WBMOD model predicts the pre-midnight maximum seen at the Indian longitudes. The seasonal pattern reproduced by the model incorporates longitudinal variability. The solar activity dependence in the model seems to be rather high. Empirical expressions giving the dependence of scintillation index on morphological parameters are obtained

  20. Simulation of optical interstellar scintillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habibi, F.; Moniez, M.; Ansari, R.; Rahvar, S.

    2013-04-01

    Aims: Stars twinkle because their light propagates through the atmosphere. The same phenomenon is expected on a longer time scale when the light of remote stars crosses an interstellar turbulent molecular cloud, but it has never been observed at optical wavelengths. The aim of the study described in this paper is to fully simulate the scintillation process, starting from the molecular cloud description as a fractal object, ending with the simulations of fluctuating stellar light curves. Methods: Fast Fourier transforms are first used to simulate fractal clouds. Then, the illumination pattern resulting from the crossing of background star light through these refractive clouds is calculated from a Fresnel integral that also uses fast Fourier transform techniques. Regularisation procedure and computing limitations are discussed, along with the effect of spatial and temporal coherency (source size and wavelength passband). Results: We quantify the expected modulation index of stellar light curves as a function of the turbulence strength - characterised by the diffraction radius Rdiff - and the projected source size, introduce the timing aspects, and establish connections between the light curve observables and the refractive cloud. We extend our discussion to clouds with different structure functions from Kolmogorov-type turbulence. Conclusions: Our study confirms that current telescopes of ~4 m with fast-readout, wide-field detectors have the capability of discovering the first interstellar optical scintillation effects. We also show that this effect should be unambiguously distinguished from any other type of variability through the observation of desynchronised light curves, simultaneously measured by two distant telescopes.

  1. Optimizing light collection from thin scintillators used in a beta-ray camera for surgical use

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, C.S.; MacDonald, L.R.; Tornai, M.P.; Hoffman, E.J.; Park, J.

    1996-06-01

    The authors are developing a 1--2 cm{sup 2} area camera for imaging the distribution of beta-emitting radiopharmaceuticals at the surface of tissue exposed during surgery. The front end consists of a very thin continuous or segmented scintillator sensitive to betas (positrons or electrons) of a few hundred keV, yet insensitive to gamma rays. The light from the scintillator is piped through clear fibers to the photon detector (PD). This approach requires that a sufficient number of scintillation photons be transported from the scintillator, through the fibers to the PD. The scintillator, reflector, surface treatments, geometry, fiber light guides, and optical couplings must be optimized. The authors report here on efforts made to optimize the light collection from <3 mm thick plastic and CaF{sub 2}(Eu) disk coupled to a 5 cm long bundle of clear optical fibers, on average, {approximately}250 photoelectrons are produced at a PMT photocathode for a {sup 204}Tl beta flood source (E{sub max} = 763 keV). This corresponds to a sufficient number of photoelectrons for <1 mm resolution imaging capabilities for the proposed camera.

  2. The improved scintillation crystal lead tungstate scintillation for PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Youbao; WU, Rurong; Xiao, Linrong; Zhang, Jianxin; Yang, Peizhi; Yan, Hui

    2009-07-01

    As a valuable material for the detecting of γ-ray, PbWO4 and BaF2:PbWO4 crystals were grown by a novel multi-crucible temperature gradient system developed by ourselves. Utilizing a topical partial heating method, this system can form a topical partial high temperature in its hearth. Thus this system could melt raw materials in step by step as requirement. The advantage of this method is that there would be solid obstruct left on the melt in the procedure of the crystal growing up. The left obstruct could prevent the volatilization of the component in the melt. Hence it is helpful for the composition homogenization in the crystal. The system also offers a sustaining device for multi-crucibles and thus it can grow many crystals simultaneity. The optical properties and scintillation properties of the crystals were studied. The results reveal that the ions doping improves the scintillation properties of the crystal. The transmittance spectra show that the transmittance of BaF2:PbWO4 crystals are better than that of PbWO4 crystals. For the PbWO4 crystals, their absorption edge is at 325nm, and their maximum transmittance is 68%. For the BaF2:PbWO4 crystals, their absorption edge is at 325nm and their maximum transmittance is upto76%. The X-ray excited luminescence spectra shows that the luminescence peak is at 420nm for the samples of PbWO4 crystal while the peak is at 430nm for the samples of BaF2:PbWO4 crystal respectively. The luminescence intensity of the samples of BaF2:PbWO4 crystal is about two times than that of PbWO4 crystal. And their peak shape is different for the two kind of crystal. The light yield of BaF2:PbWO4 crystals is about 2.9 times than that of PbWO4 crystal Analyzing these scintillation properties, we find that the VPb 3+ and VO- defects do harm for the optical properties of the crystal. Ions doping method could reduce the defect concentration and improving its illumination performance of the crystal. Specially, the doped F- ions in O2- site can induce the aberrance of the [WO4]2- tetrahedron and form [WO3F]- tetrahedron which has more active blue light yield, thus improve the light yield of the crystal. The improved light yield of BaF2:PbWO4 crystals is valuable for the medical diagnosing instrument PET and CT with high resolving power

  3. Scintillation proximity assay using polymeric membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Mansfield, R.K.

    1992-01-01

    Liquid scintillation counting (LSC) is typically used to quantify electron emitting isotopes. In LSC, radioactive samples are dissolved in an organic fluor solution (scintillation cocktail) to ensure that the label is close enough to the fluor molecules to be detected. Although efficient, scintillation cocktail is neither specific or selective for samples labeled with the same radioisotope. Scintillation cocktail is flammable posing significant health risks to the user and is expensive to purchase and discard. Scintillation Proximity Assay (SPA) is a radioanalytical technique where only those radiochemical entities (RCE's) bound to fluor containing matrices are detected. Only bound RCE's are in close enough proximity the entrapped fluor molecules to induce scintillations. Unbound radioligands are too far removed from the fluor molecules to be detected. The research in this dissertation focused on the development and evaluation of fluor-containing membranes (scintillation proximity membranes, SP membranes) to be used for specific radioanalytical techniques without using scintillation cocktail. Polysulfone and PVC SP membranes prepared in our laboratory were investigated for radioimmunossay (RIA) where only bound radioligand is detected, thereby eliminating the separation step impeding the automation of RIA. These SP membranes performed RIA where the results were nearly identical to commercial SP microbeads. SP membranes functionalized with quaternary ammonium hydroxide moieties were able to trap and quantify [sup 14]CO[sub 2] without using liquid scintillation cocktail. RCE's bound in the pore structure of SP membranes are intimate with the entrapped fluor providing the geometry needed for high detection efficiencies. Absorbent SP membranes were used in radiation surveys and were shown to be as effective as conventional survey techniques using filter paper and scintillation cocktail.

  4. Scintillation Effects on Space Shuttle GPS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, John L.; Kramer, Leonard

    2001-01-01

    Irregularities in ionospheric electron density result in variation in amplitude and phase of Global Positioning System (GPS) signals, or scintillation. GPS receivers tracking scintillated signals may lose carrier phase or frequency lock in the case of phase sc intillation. Amplitude scintillation can cause "enhancement" or "fading" of GPS signals and result in loss of lock. Scintillation can occur over the equatorial and polar regions and is a function of location, time of day, season, and solar and geomagnetic activity. Mid latitude regions are affected only very rarely, resulting from highly disturbed auroral events. In the spring of 1998, due to increasing concern about scintillation of GPS signals during the upcoming solar maximum, the Space Shuttle Program began to assess the impact of scintillation on Collins Miniaturized Airborne GPS Receiver (MAGR) units that are to replace Tactical Air Control and Navigation (TACAN) units on the Space Shuttle orbiters. The Shuttle Program must determine if scintillation effects pose a threat to safety of flight and mission success or require procedural and flight rule changes. Flight controllers in Mission Control must understand scintillation effects on GPS to properly diagnose "off nominal" GPS receiver performance. GPS data from recent Space Shuttle missions indicate that the signals tracked by the Shuttle MAGR manifest scintillation. Scintillation is observed as anomalous noise in velocity measurements lasting for up to 20 minutes on Shuttle orbit passes and are not accounted for in the error budget of the MAGR accuracy parameters. These events are typically coincident with latitude and local time occurrence of previously identified equatorial spread F within about 20 degrees of the magnetic equator. The geographic and seasonal history of these events from ground-based observations and a simple theoretical model, which have potential for predicting events for operational purposes, are reviewed.

  5. Measurement of radiation damage of water-based liquid scintillator and liquid scintillator

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bignell, L. J.; Diwan, M. V.; Hans, S.; Jaffe, D. E.; Rosero, R.; Vigdor, S.; Viren, B.; Worcester, E.; Yeh, M.; Zhang, C.

    2015-10-19

    Liquid scintillating phantoms have been proposed as a means to perform real-time 3D dosimetry for proton therapy treatment plan verification. We have studied what effect radiation damage to the scintillator will have upon this application. We have performed measurements of the degradation of the light yield and optical attenuation length of liquid scintillator and water-based liquid scintillator after irradiation by 201 MeV proton beams that deposited doses of approximately 52 Gy, 300 Gy, and 800 Gy in the scintillator. Liquid scintillator and water-based liquid scintillator (composed of 5% scintillating phase) exhibit light yield reductions of 1.74 ± 0.55 % andmore » 1.31 ± 0.59 % after ≈ 800 Gy of proton dose, respectively. Some increased optical attenuation was observed in the irradiated samples, the measured reduction to the light yield is also due to damage to the scintillation light production. Based on our results and conservative estimates of the expected dose in a clinical context, a scintillating phantom used for proton therapy treatment plan verification would exhibit a systematic light yield reduction of approximately 0.1% after a year of operation.« less

  6. Measurement of radiation damage of water-based liquid scintillator and liquid scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bignell, L. J.; Diwan, M. V.; Hans, S.; Jaffe, D. E.; Rosero, R.; Vigdor, S.; Viren, B.; Worcester, E.; Yeh, M.; Zhang, C.

    2015-10-01

    Liquid scintillating phantoms have been proposed as a means to perform real-time 3D dosimetry for proton therapy treatment plan verification. We have studied what effect radiation damage to the scintillator will have upon this application. We have performed measurements of the degradation of the light yield and optical attenuation length of liquid scintillator and water-based liquid scintillator after irradiation by 201 MeV proton beams that deposited doses of approximately 52 Gy, 300 Gy, and 800 Gy in the scintillator. Liquid scintillator and water-based liquid scintillator (composed of 5% scintillating phase) exhibit light yield reductions of 1.74 ± 0.55 % and 1.31 ± 0.59 % after 0≈ 80 Gy of proton dose, respectively. Whilst some increased optical attenuation was observed in the irradiated samples, the measured reduction to the light yield is also due to damage to the scintillation light production. Based on our results and conservative estimates of the expected dose in a clinical context, a scintillating phantom used for proton therapy treatment plan verification would exhibit a systematic light yield reduction of approximately 0.1% after a year of operation.

  7. Measurement of radiation damage of water-based liquid scintillator and liquid scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Bignell, L. J.; Diwan, M. V.; Hans, S.; Jaffe, D. E.; Rosero, R.; Vigdor, S.; Viren, B.; Worcester, E.; Yeh, M.; Zhang, C.

    2015-10-19

    Liquid scintillating phantoms have been proposed as a means to perform real-time 3D dosimetry for proton therapy treatment plan verification. We have studied what effect radiation damage to the scintillator will have upon this application. We have performed measurements of the degradation of the light yield and optical attenuation length of liquid scintillator and water-based liquid scintillator after irradiation by 201 MeV proton beams that deposited doses of approximately 52 Gy, 300 Gy, and 800 Gy in the scintillator. Liquid scintillator and water-based liquid scintillator (composed of 5% scintillating phase) exhibit light yield reductions of 1.74 ± 0.55 % and 1.31 ± 0.59 % after ≈ 800 Gy of proton dose, respectively. Some increased optical attenuation was observed in the irradiated samples, the measured reduction to the light yield is also due to damage to the scintillation light production. Based on our results and conservative estimates of the expected dose in a clinical context, a scintillating phantom used for proton therapy treatment plan verification would exhibit a systematic light yield reduction of approximately 0.1% after a year of operation.

  8. Ball valve safety screen

    SciTech Connect

    Bolding, B.H.

    1981-09-01

    A device for preventing unwanted objects from entering the ball assembly of a float collar or float shoe and otherwise damaging or plugging the valve mechanism therein is disclosed. The device comprises a screen constructed of expanded metal and rigidly affixed to the interior of the float collar or float shoe above the ball valve assembly. The screen portion is either mounted to the interior surface of the float collar sleeve by an annular structural member or mounted to a structural band which is partially embedded in the concrete portion of the float collar or casing guide shoe.

  9. Estimation of Fano factor in inorganic scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bora, Vaibhav; Barrett, Harrison H.; Fastje, David; Clarkson, Eric; Furenlid, Lars; Bousselham, Abdelkader; Shah, Kanai S.; Glodo, Jarek

    2016-01-01

    The Fano factor of an integer-valued random variable is defined as the ratio of its variance to its mean. Correlation between the outputs of two photomultiplier tubes on opposite faces of a scintillation crystal was used to estimate the Fano factor of photoelectrons and scintillation photons. Correlations between the integrals of the detector outputs were used to estimate the photoelectron and photon Fano factor for YAP:Ce, SrI2:Eu and CsI:Na scintillator crystals. At 662 keV, SrI2:Eu was found to be sub-Poisson, while CsI:Na and YAP:Ce were found to be super-Poisson. An experiment setup inspired from the Hanbury Brown and Twiss experiment was used to measure the correlations as a function of time between the outputs of two photomultiplier tubes looking at the same scintillation event. A model of the scintillation and the detection processes was used to generate simulated detector outputs as a function of time for different values of Fano factor. The simulated outputs from the model for different Fano factors was compared to the experimentally measured detector outputs to estimate the Fano factor of the scintillation photons for YAP:Ce, LaBr3:Ce scintillator crystals. At 662 keV, LaBr3:Ce was found to be sub-Poisson, while YAP:Ce was found to be close to Poisson.

  10. Scintillation Breakdowns in Chip Tantalum Capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teverovsky, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    Scintillations in solid tantalum capacitors are momentarily local breakdowns terminated by a self-healing or conversion to a high-resistive state of the manganese oxide cathode. This conversion effectively caps the defective area of the tantalum pentoxide dielectric and prevents short-circuit failures. Typically, this type of breakdown has no immediate catastrophic consequences and is often considered as nuisance rather than a failure. Scintillation breakdowns likely do not affect failures of parts under surge current conditions, and so-called "proofing" of tantalum chip capacitors, which is a controllable exposure of the part after soldering to voltages slightly higher than the operating voltage to verify that possible scintillations are self-healed, has been shown to improve the quality of the parts. However, no in-depth studies of the effect of scintillations on reliability of tantalum capacitors have been performed so far. KEMET is using scintillation breakdown testing as a tool for assessing process improvements and to compare quality of different manufacturing lots. Nevertheless, the relationship between failures and scintillation breakdowns is not clear, and this test is not considered as suitable for lot acceptance testing. In this work, scintillation breakdowns in different military-graded and commercial tantalum capacitors were characterized and related to the rated voltages and to life test failures. A model for assessment of times to failure, based on distributions of breakdown voltages, and accelerating factors of life testing are discussed.

  11. Measurement of light emission in scintillation vials

    SciTech Connect

    Duran Ramiro, M. Teresa; Garcia-Torano, Eduardo

    2005-09-15

    The efficiency and energy resolution of liquid scintillation counting (LSC) systems are strongly dependent on the optical characteristics of scintillators, vials, and reflectors. This article presents the results of measurements of the light-emission profile of scintillation vials. Two measurement techniques, autoradiographs and direct measurements with a photomultiplier tube, have been used to obtain light-emission distribution for standard vials of glass, etched glass and polyethylene. Results obtained with both techniques are in good agreement. For the first time, the effect of the meniscus in terms of light contribution has been numerically estimated. These results can help design LSC systems that are more efficient in terms of light collection.

  12. New Organic Scintillators for Neutron Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Iwanowska, Joanna; Szczeniak, Tomasz

    2010-01-05

    This paper present the current work on neutron detection in Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies. Lately, we have focused our research on the development of new organic scintillators including liquid scintillators for neutron detection and associated measurements. We measured liquid scintillators (also {sup 10}B-doped for thermal neutron detection){sup 3}He tubes, composites, etc. Response of the following detectors on thermal neutrons, fast neutrons and gamma radiation - the pulse shape discrimination (PSD)- has been mainly performed by means of a zero-crossing (ZC) method.

  13. Scintillation of rare earth doped fluoride nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobsohn, L. G.; McPherson, C. L.; Sprinkle, K. B.; Ballato, J.; Yukihara, E. G.; DeVol, T. A.

    2011-09-12

    The scintillation response of rare earth (RE) doped core/undoped (multi-)shell fluoride nanoparticles was investigated under x-ray and alpha particle irradiation. A significant enhancement of the scintillation response was observed with increasing shells due: (i) to the passivation of surface quenching defects together with the activation of the REs on the surface of the core nanoparticle after the growth of a shell, and (ii) to the increase of the volume of the nanoparticles. These results are expected to reflect a general aspect of the scintillation process in nanoparticles, and to impact radiation sensing technologies that make use of nanoparticles.

  14. High-Throughput Screening (HTS) by NMR Guided Identification of Novel Agents Targeting the Protein Docking Domain of YopH.

    PubMed

    Bottini, Angel; Wu, Bainan; Barile, Elisa; De, Surya K; Leone, Marilisa; Pellecchia, Maurizio

    2016-04-19

    Recently we described a novel approach, named high-throughput screening (HTS) by NMR that allows the identification, from large combinatorial peptide libraries, of potent and selective peptide mimetics against a given target. Here, we deployed the "HTS by NMR" approach for the design of novel peptoid sequences targeting the N-terminal domain of Yersinia outer protein H (YopH-NT), a bacterial toxin essential for the virulence of Yersinia pestis. We aimed at disrupting the protein-protein interactions between YopH-NT and its cellular substrates, with the goal of inhibiting indirectly YopH enzymatic function. These studies resulted in a novel agent of sequence Ac-F-pY-cPG-d-P-NH2 (pY=phosphotyrosine; cPG=cyclopentyl glycine) with a Kd value against YopH-NT of 310 nm. We demonstrated that such a pharmacological inhibitor of YopH-NT results in the inhibition of the dephosphorylation by full-length YopH of a cellular substrate. Hence, potentially this agent represents a valuable stepping stone for the development of novel therapeutics against Yersinia infections. The data reported further demonstrate the utility of the HTS by NMR approach in deriving novel peptide mimetics targeting protein-protein interactions. PMID:26592695

  15. Scintillation Light from Cosmic-Ray Muons in Liquid Argon

    SciTech Connect

    Whittington, Denver Wade; Mufson, S.; Howard, B.

    2015-11-13

    This paper reports the results of an experiment to directly measure the time-resolved scintillation signal from the passage of cosmic-ray muons through liquid argon. Scintillation light from these muons is of value to studies of weakly-interacting particles in neutrino experiments and dark matter searches. The experiment was carried out at the TallBo dewar facility at Fermilab using prototype light guide detectors and electronics developed for the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment. Two models are presented for the time structure of the scintillation light, a phenomenological model and a physically-motivated model. Both models find tT = 1:52 ms for the decay time constant of the Ar 2 triplet state. These models also show that the identification of the “early” light fraction in the phenomenological model, FE 25% of the signal, with the total light from singlet decays is an underestimate. The total fraction of singlet light is FS 36%, where the increase over FE is from singlet light emitted by the wavelength shifter through processes with long decay constants. The models were further used to compute the experimental particle identification parameter Fprompt, the fraction of light coming in a short time window after the trigger compared with the light in the total recorded waveform. The models reproduce quite well the typical experimental value 0.3 found by dark matter and double b-decay experiments, which suggests this parameter provides a robust metric for discriminating electrons and muons from more heavily ionizing particles.

  16. Screening for drug-induced hepatotoxicity in primary mouse hepatocytes using acetaminophen, amiodarone, and cyclosporin a as model compounds: an omics-guided approach.

    PubMed

    Van Summeren, Anke; Renes, Johan; Lizarraga, Daneida; Bouwman, Freek G; Noben, Jean-Paul; van Delft, Joost H M; Kleinjans, Jos C S; Mariman, Edwin C M

    2013-02-01

    Drug-induced hepatotoxicity is a leading cause of attrition for candidate pharmaceuticals in development. New preclinical screening methods are crucial to predict drug toxicity prior to human studies. Of all in vitro hepatotoxicity models, primary human hepatocytes are considered as 'the gold standard.' However, their use is hindered by limited availability and inter-individual variation. These barriers may be overcome by using primary mouse hepatocytes. We used differential in gel electrophoresis (DIGE) to study large-scale protein expression of primary mouse hepatocytes. These hepatocytes were exposed to three well-defined hepatotoxicants: acetaminophen, amiodarone, and cyclosporin A. Each hepatotoxicant induces a different hepatotoxic phenotype. Based on the DIGE results, the mRNA expression levels of deregulated proteins from cyclosporin A-treated cells were also analyzed. We were able to distinguish cyclosporin A from controls, as well as acetaminophen and amiodarone-treated samples. Cyclosporin A induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and altered the ER-Golgi transport. Moreover, liver carboxylesterase and bile salt sulfotransferase were differentially expressed. These proteins were associated with a protective adaptive response against cyclosporin A-induced cholestasis. The results of this study are comparable with effects in HepG2 cells. Therefore, we suggest both models can be used to analyze the cholestatic properties of cyclosporin A. Furthermore, this study showed a conserved response between primary mouse hepatocytes and HepG2 cells. These findings collectively lend support for use of omics strategies in preclinical toxicology, and might inform future efforts to better link preclinical and clinical research in rational drug development. PMID:23308384

  17. Screening for Drug-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Primary Mouse Hepatocytes Using Acetaminophen, Amiodarone, and Cyclosporin A as Model Compounds: An Omics-Guided Approach

    PubMed Central

    Van Summeren, Anke; Renes, Johan; Lizarraga, Daneida; Bouwman, Freek G.; Noben, Jean-Paul; van Delft, Joost H. M.; Kleinjans, Jos C. S.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Drug-induced hepatotoxicity is a leading cause of attrition for candidate pharmaceuticals in development. New preclinical screening methods are crucial to predict drug toxicity prior to human studies. Of all in vitro hepatotoxicity models, primary human hepatocytes are considered as the gold standard. However, their use is hindered by limited availability and inter-individual variation. These barriers may be overcome by using primary mouse hepatocytes. We used differential in gel electrophoresis (DIGE) to study large-scale protein expression of primary mouse hepatocytes. These hepatocytes were exposed to three well-defined hepatotoxicants: acetaminophen, amiodarone, and cyclosporin A. Each hepatotoxicant induces a different hepatotoxic phenotype. Based on the DIGE results, the mRNA expression levels of deregulated proteins from cyclosporin A-treated cells were also analyzed. We were able to distinguish cyclosporin A from controls, as well as acetaminophen and amiodarone-treated samples. Cyclosporin A induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and altered the ER-Golgi transport. Moreover, liver carboxylesterase and bile salt sulfotransferase were differentially expressed. These proteins were associated with a protective adaptive response against cyclosporin A-induced cholestasis. The results of this study are comparable with effects in HepG2 cells. Therefore, we suggest both models can be used to analyze the cholestatic properties of cyclosporin A. Furthermore, this study showed a conserved response between primary mouse hepatocytes and HepG2 cells. These findings collectively lend support for use of omics strategies in preclinical toxicology, and might inform future efforts to better link preclinical and clinical research in rational drug development. PMID:23308384

  18. Clinical Neuropathology practice guide 6-2013: morphology and an appropriate immunohistochemical screening panel aid in the identification of synovial sarcoma by neuropathologists

    PubMed Central

    Keith, Julia Lee; Bilbao, Juan; Croul, Sidney; Ang, Lee Cyn; Guiot, Marie-Christine; Rossiter, John; Ghorab, Zeina; Hawkins, Cynthia; Karamchandani, Jason

    2013-01-01

    Aims: Pathologists are under increasing pressure to accurately subclassify sarcomas, yet neuropathologists have limited collective experience with rare sarcoma types such as synovial sarcoma. We reviewed 9 synovial sarcomas affecting peripheral nerve diagnosed by neuropathologists and explored the morphologic and immunohistochemical differences between these and MPNST. Our goal was to make practical recommendations for neuropathologists regarding which spindle cell tumors affecting nerve should be sent for SYT-SSX testing. Methods: Clinical records and genetics were reviewed retrospectively and central pathology review of 9 synovial sarcomas and 6 MPNST included immunohistochemistry for SOX10, S100, BAF47, CK (lmw, pan, CK7, CK19), EMA, CD34, bcl2, CD99, and neurofilament. Results: Common synovial sarcoma sites were brachial plexus, spinal and femoral nerve, none were “intra-neural”, all had the SYT-SSX1 translocation, and 6/9 were monophasic with myxoid stroma and distinct collagen. Half of the monophasic synovial sarcomas expressed CK7, CK19 or panCK in a “rare positive cells pattern”, 8/9 (89%) expressed EMA, and all were SOX10 immunonegative with reduced but variable BAF47 expression. Conclusions: We recommend that upon encountering a cellular spindle cell tumor affecting nerve neuropathologists consider the following: 1) SYT-SSX testing should be performed on any case with morphology suspicious for monophasic synovial sarcoma including wiry or thick bands of collagen and relatively monomorphous nuclei; 2) neuropathologists should employ a screening immunohistochemical panel including one of CK7, panCK or CK19, plus EMA, S100 and SOX10, and 3) SYT-SSX testing should be performed on any spindle cell tumor with CK and/or EMA immunopositivity if SOX10 immunostaining is negative or only labels entrapped nerve elements. PMID:24131748

  19. Screening for Specific Phobias

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ask and Learn Screening Tools Screening for Specific Phobias Main navigation FAQs Screen Yourself Screening for Depression ... Screening for Social Anxiety Disorder Screening for Specific Phobias Screening for an Anxiety Disorder: Children Screening for ...

  20. Probability density function of amplitude scintillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortgies, G.

    1985-02-01

    The letter reports on amplitude scintillation measurements of the orbital test satellite (OTS) BO carrier beacon carried out from June to December 1983. The scintillations are here characterized by standard deviations of the amplitude fluctuations and by the distribution of amplitude deviations from their mean. It is known that during scintillations log-amplitudes are normally distributed for short time intervals (1 min). The long-term probability density of amplitude scintillations can be calculated using recorded 1 min standard deviations sigma. The probability density function of log (/sigma - sigma-N//dB) can be well approximated by a Gaussian distribution, where sigma-N is the 1 min standard deviation due to thermal noise alone.

  1. The Scintillating Optical Fiber Isotope Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binns, W. Robert

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the Scintillating Optical Fiber Isotope Experiment (SOFIE) which is being developed by Washington University and the University of New Hampshire to study the abundances of cosmic ray isotopes in the iron charge region. This detector system is a Cerenkov-Range-dE/dx experiment and utilizes range and trajectory detectors made of scintillating optical fibers, a fused silica Cerenkov counter, and plastic scintillator dE/dx counters to determine the charge and mass of cosmic ray nuclei. A brief description of the balloon flight instrument presently being developed will be given followed by initial results of an engineering model calibration at the LBL Bevalac heavy ion accelerator. In addition a brief discussion of the potential of scintillating fiber trajectory detectors for use in experiments requiring precise trajectory determination such as those being planned for the NASA Particle Astrophysics Magnet Facility (Astromag) program is presented.

  2. Using handheld plastic scintillator detectors to triage individuals exposed to a radiological dispersal device

    SciTech Connect

    Manger, Ryan P; Hertel, Nolan; Burgett, E.; Ansari, A.

    2011-01-01

    After a radiological dispersal device (RDD) event, people could become internally contaminated by inhaling dispersed radioactive particles. A rapid method to screen individuals who are internally contaminated is desirable. Such initial screening can help in prompt identification of those who are highly contaminated and in prioritizing individuals for further and more definitive evaluation such as laboratory testing. The use of handheld plastic scintillators to rapidly screen those exposed to an RDD with gamma-emitting radionuclides was investigated in this study. The Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code was used to model two commercially available plastic scintillation detectors in conjunction with anthropomorphic phantom models to determine the detector response to inhaled radionuclides. Biokinetic models were used to simulate an inhaled radionuclide and its progression through the anthropomorphic phantoms up to 30 d after intake. The objective of the study was to see if internal contamination levels equivalent to 250 mSv committed effective dose equivalent could be detected using these instruments. Five radionuclides were examined: {sup 60}Co, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 192}Ir, {sup 131}I and {sup 241}Am. The results demonstrate that all of the radionuclides except {sup 241}Am could be detected when placing either one of the two plastic scintillator detector systems on the posterior right torso of the contaminated individuals.

  3. Characterization of indirect X-ray imaging detector based on nanocrystalline gadolinium oxide scintillators for high-resolution imaging application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Chang-Woo; Kyung Cha, Bo; Jeon, Sungchae; Kyung Kim, Ryun; Huh, Young

    2013-01-01

    Nanocrystalline Gd2O3:Eu scintillating powders were successfully synthesized through a co-precipitation process for X-ray imaging detector applications. In this work, as-synthesized sample was further calcinated at different temperature, time with 1-10 h and doped-Eu3+ concentration with 1-10 mol% in the electrical furnace. The characterization such as the crystal structures and microstructure of Gd2O3:Eu scintillator were measured by XRD and SEM experiment. The phase transition from cubic to monoclinic structure was observed at 1300 °C calcination temperature. Dominant emission peak of sample with cubic structure was appeared at 611 nm under 266 nm UV light excitation. After scintillation properties of synthesized Gd2O3:Eu scintillator were investigated, Gd2O3:Eu scintillating films with different thickness was fabricated onto glass substrate by a screen printing method. And then X-ray imaging performance in terms of the light response to X-ray exposure dose, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spatial resolution were measured by combining the fabricated Gd2O3:Eu screen films with a lens-coupled CCD imaging detector under radiographic system conditions.

  4. Separation and purification of α-glucosidase inhibitors from Polygonatum odoratum by stepwise high-speed counter-current chromatography combined with Sephadex LH-20 chromatography target-guided by ultrafiltration-HPLC screening.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoling; Liang, Junsheng; Zhang, Yi; Zhao, Huading; Guo, Ying; Shi, Shuyun

    2015-03-15

    Although Polygonatum odoratum has been widely used as medicinal plant and food supplement for treating diabetes, little is known regarding its bioactive components. In this study, ultrafiltration-HPLC based ligand screening was developed to screen α-glucosidase inhibitors from P. odoratum for the first time. Then bioactive components were target-guided separated by combining stepwise high-speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC) using petroleum ether-ethyl acetate-methanol-water (1:4:0.8:4.2, v/v/v/v), (1:4:1.8:3.2, v/v/v/v) and (1:4:2.3:2.7, v/v/v/v) as solvent systems with Sephadex LH-20 chromatography eluted by MeCN-MeOH (1:1, v/v). Five phenethyl cinnamides, N-cis-feruloyloctopamine (1); N-trans-p-coumaroyloctopamine (2), N-trans-feruloyloctopamine (3), N-trans-p-coumaroyltyramine (4) and N-trans-feruloyltyramine (5), and four homoisoflavanones, (3R)-5,7-dihydroxyl-3-(2',4'-dihydroxylbenzyl)-chroman-4-one (6), (3R)-5,7-dihydroxyl-6-methyl-3-(4'-hydroxylbenzyl)-chroman-4-one (7), (3R)-5,7-dihydroxyl-6-methyl-8-methoxyl-3-(4'-hydroxylbenzyl)-chroman-4-one (8); and (3R)-5,7-dihydroxyl-6,8-dimethyl-3-(4'-hydroxylbenzyl)-chroman-4-one) (9), with purity over 98.5% were purified, and their structures were identified by UV, MS, and (1)H NMR. Notably, compounds 2 and 4 were first reported in genus Polygonatum, while compound 1 was first obtained from family Liliaceae. In addition, α-glucosidase inhibitory activities of compounds 1-9 were evaluated, and compounds 2 and 4 exhibited stronger α-glucosidase inhibitory activity with IC50 values of 2.3 and 2.7μM. The results suggested the potential medicinal use of P. odoratum, and the technology could be widely applied for rapid screening and preparative separation of a group of bioactive compounds from complex matrix. PMID:25682336

  5. A computer model for high-latitude phase scintillation based on wideband satellite data from Poker Flat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fremouw, E. J.; Lansinger, J. M.

    1981-02-01

    A mathematical model has been developed for describing plasma-density irregularities responsible for radiowave scintillation produced in the auroral ionosphere, and the model has been committed to an applications-oriented computer code, WBMOD. The model characterizes the three-dimensional configuration, gradient sharpness, and height-integrated strength of irregularities represented by a power-law spatial spectrum as functions of geomagnetic latitude, time of day, sunspot number, and planetary geomagnetic activity index. Program WBMOD permits calculation of the power-law index and spectral strength (at a fluctuation frequency of 1 Hz) of phase scintillation, together with scintillation indices (variances) for phase and intensity, using a phase-screen scattering theory. The model has been calibrated and iteratively tested against phase-scintillation data from the DNA Wideband Satellite Experiment, collected at Poker Flat, Alaska. It does not account for seasonal variations in high-latitude scintillation observed in other longitude sectors. The program contains a model for middle-latitude and equatorial irregularities as well as for auroral latitudes, but only the latter has been tested extensively against high-quality scintillation data.

  6. Crystal growth and scintillation properties of strontium iodide scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    van Loef, Edgar; Wilson, Cody; Cherepy, Nerine; Payne, Steven; Choong, Woon-Seng; Moses, William W.; Shah, Kanai

    2009-06-01

    Single crystals of SrI{sub 2}:Eu and SrI{sub 2}:Ce/Na were grown from anhydrous iodides by the vertical Bridgman technique in evacuated silica ampoules. Growth rates were of the order of 5-30 mm/day. Radioluminescence spectra of SrI{sub 2}:Eu and SrI{sub 2}:Ce/Na exhibit a broad band due to Eu{sup 2+} and Ce{sup 3+} emission, respectively. The maximum in the luminescence spectrum of SrI{sub 2}:Eu is found at 435 nm. The spectrum of SrI{sub 2}:Ce/Na exhibits a doublet peaking at 404 and 435 nm attributed to Ce{sup 3+} emission, while additional impurity - or defected - related emission is present at approximately 525 nm. The strontium iodide scintillators show very high light yields of up to 120,000 photons/MeV, have energy resolutions down to 3% at 662 keV (Full Width Half Maximum) and exhibit excellent light yield proportionality with a standard deviation of less than 5% between 6 and 460 keV.

  7. Evaluation of clad scintillating light pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Arrays of fibers made of scintillating material were used as position-sensitive detectors or hodoscopes for beam-finding at ion accelerators. Experiments were made with alpha's from an Am241 source incident upon one end of the fiber, the other end being viewed with a photomultiplier tube. The scintillation light was not detected in any of the fibers tested beyond about 5 cm. The effective useful lengths for detection of relativistic heavy ions were given.

  8. Inorganic scintillators in direct dark matter investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belli, P.; Incicchitti, A.; Cappella, F.

    2014-07-01

    The discoveries, the developments and the studies that have been performed in the research of new materials and purification techniques, nowadays allow us a wide choice among inorganic scintillators for a variety of uses. In this paper the application of the inorganic crystal scintillators to direct dark matter investigation will be considered in more detail. The present framework of the detectors used at low energy for direct dark matter investigation also offers useful hints for further corollary developments.

  9. Real-time volumetric scintillation dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beddar, S.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this brief review is to review the current status of real-time 3D scintillation dosimetry and what has been done so far in this area. The basic concept is to use a large volume of a scintillator material (liquid or solid) to measure or image the dose distributions from external radiation therapy (RT) beams in three dimensions. In this configuration, the scintillator material fulfills the dual role of being the detector and the phantom material in which the measurements are being performed. In this case, dose perturbations caused by the introduction of a detector within a phantom will not be at issue. All the detector configurations that have been conceived to date used a Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) camera to measure the light produced within the scintillator. In order to accurately measure the scintillation light, one must correct for various optical artefacts that arise as the light propagates from the scintillating centers through the optical chain to the CCD chip. Quenching, defined in its simplest form as a nonlinear response to high-linear energy transfer (LET) charged particles, is one of the disadvantages when such systems are used to measure the absorbed dose from high-LET particles such protons. However, correction methods that restore the linear dose response through the whole proton range have been proven to be effective for both liquid and plastic scintillators. Volumetric scintillation dosimetry has the potential to provide fast, high-resolution and accurate 3D imaging of RT dose distributions. Further research is warranted to optimize the necessary image reconstruction methods and optical corrections needed to achieve its full potential.

  10. Liquid scintillators for optical fiber applications

    DOEpatents

    Franks, Larry A.; Lutz, Stephen S.

    1982-01-01

    A multicomponent liquid scintillator solution for use as a radiation-to-light converter in conjunction with a fiber optic transmission system. The scintillator includes a quantity of 1, 2, 4, 5, 3H, 6H, 1 OH, tetrahydro-8-trifluoromethyl (1) benzopyrano (9, 9a, 1-gh) quinolizin-10-one (Coumarin) as a solute in a fluor solvent such as benzyl alcohol or pseudo-cumene. The use of BIBUQ as an additional or primary solute is also disclosed.

  11. Liquid scintillators for optical fiber applications

    SciTech Connect

    Franks, L.A.; Lutz, S.S.

    1982-11-16

    A multicomponent liquid scintillator solution for use as a radiation-to-light converter in conjunction with a fiber optic transmission system. The scintillator includes a quantity of 1, 2 , 4, 5, 3H, 6H, 1 OH, tetrahydro-8-trifluoromethyl (1) benzopyrano (9, 9a, 1-gh) quinolizin-10-one (Coumarin) as a solute in a fluor solvent such as benzyl alcohol or pseudocumene. The use of bibuq as an additional or primary solute is also disclosed.

  12. Elastic scintillation materials based on polyorganosiloxane

    SciTech Connect

    Grinev, B.V.; Andryushchenko, L.A.; Shershukov, V.M.; Ulanenko, K.B.; Minakova, R.A.; Sevastjanova, I.V.

    1994-12-31

    The developed elastic scintillators based on polymethyl-phenylsiloxane rubber are characterized by an elevated light output and a low toxicity. The increase of their light output is achieved by raising the content of phenyl chains, varying the chemical structure of luminescent additions and using isopropylnaphthalene. This high-boiling solvent introduced into the scintillation siloxane compositions is confined within siloxane matrix after the hardening of the rubber.

  13. Ternary liquid scintillator for optical fiber applications

    DOEpatents

    Franks, Larry A.; Lutz, Stephen S.

    1982-01-01

    A multicomponent liquid scintillator solution for use as a radiation-to-light converter in conjunction with a fiber optic transmission system. The scintillator includes a quantity of 5-amino-9-diethylaminobenz (a) phenoxazonium nitrate (Nile Blue Nitrate) as a solute in a fluor solvent such as benzyl alcohol. The use of PPD as an additional solute is also disclosed. The system is controllable by addition of a suitable quenching agent, such as phenol.

  14. MRSA Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page helpful? Formal name: Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus Screening Related tests: Wound Culture At a Glance ... How is it used? A methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) screen is a test that looks solely ...

  15. Health Screening

    MedlinePlus

    Screenings are tests that look for diseases before you have symptoms. Screening tests can find diseases early, when they're easier ... Overweight and obesity Prostate cancer in men Which tests you need depends on your age, your sex, ...

  16. Neuroblastoma Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... have serious risks, including physical and emotional problems. False-negative test results can occur. Screening test results ... seeking medical care even if there are symptoms. False-positive test results can occur. Screening test results ...

  17. Airport Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2011 Photo courtesy of Dan Paluska/Flickr Denver Airport Security Screening Introduction With air travel regaining popularity and increased secu- rity measures, airport security screening has become an area of interest for ...

  18. Chemical compatibility screening test results

    SciTech Connect

    Nigrey, P.J.; Dickens, T.G.

    1997-12-01

    A program for evaluating packaging components that may be used in transporting mixed-waste forms has been developed and the first phase has been completed. This effort involved the screening of ten plastic materials in four simulant mixed-waste types. These plastics were butadiene-acrylonitrile copolymer rubber, cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE), epichlorohydrin rubber, ethylene-propylene rubber (EPDM), fluorocarbon (Viton or Kel-F), polytetrafluoroethylene, high-density polyethylene (HDPE), isobutylene-isoprene copolymer rubber (butyl), polypropylene, and styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR). The selected simulant mixed wastes were (1) an aqueous alkaline mixture of sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite; (2) a chlorinated hydrocarbon mixture; (3) a simulant liquid scintillation fluid; and (4) a mixture of ketones. The testing protocol involved exposing the respective materials to 286,000 rads of gamma radiation followed by 14-day exposures to the waste types at 60{degrees}C. The seal materials were tested using vapor transport rate (VTR) measurements while the liner materials were tested using specific gravity as a metric. For these tests, a screening criterion of 0.9 g/hr/m{sup 2} for VTR and a specific gravity change of 10% was used. Based on this work, it was concluded that while all seal materials passed exposure to the aqueous simulant mixed waste, EPDM and SBR had the lowest VTRs. In the chlorinated hydrocarbon simulant mixed waste, only Viton passed the screening tests. In both the simulant scintillation fluid mixed waste and the ketone mixture simulant mixed waste, none of the seal materials met the screening criteria. For specific gravity testing of liner materials, the data showed that while all materials with the exception of polypropylene passed the screening criteria, Kel-F, HDPE, and XLPE offered the greatest resistance to the combination of radiation and chemicals.

  19. Development of Novel Polycrystalline Ceramic Scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Wisniewska, Monika; Boatner, Lynn A; Neal, John S; Jellison Jr, Gerald Earle; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine; North, Andrea L; Wisniewski, Monica; Payzant, E Andrew; Howe, Jane Y; Lempicki, Aleksander; Brecher, Charlie; Glodo, J.

    2008-01-01

    For several decades most of the efforts to develop new scintillator materials have concentrated on high-light-yield inorganic single-crystals while polycrystalline ceramic scintillators, since their inception in the early 1980 s, have received relatively little attention. Nevertheless, transparent ceramics offer a promising approach to the fabrication of relatively inexpensive scintillators via a simple mechanical compaction and annealing process that eliminates single-crystal growth. Until recently, commonly accepted concepts restricted the polycrystalline ceramic approach to materials exhibiting a cubic crystal structure. Here, we report our results on the development of two novel ceramic scintillators based on the non-cubic crystalline materials: Lu SiO:Ce (LSO:Ce) and LaBr:Ce. While no evidence for texturing has been found in their ceramic microstructures, our LSO:Ce ceramics exhibit a surprisingly high level of transparency/ translucency and very good scintillation characteristics. The LSO:Ce ceramic scintillation reaches a light yield level of about 86% of that of a good LSO:Ce single crystal, and its decay time is even faster than in single crystals. Research on LaBr:Ce shows that translucent ceramics of the high-light-yield rare-earth halides can also be synthesized. Our LaBr:Ce ceramics have light yields above 42 000 photons/MeV (i.e., 70%of the single-crystal light yield).

  20. GPS phase scintillation correlated with auroral forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampton, D. L.; Azeem, S. I.; Crowley, G.; Santana, J.; Reynolds, A.

    2013-12-01

    The disruption of radio wave propagation due to rapid changes in electron density caused by auroral precipitation has been observed for several decades. In a few cases the disruption of GPS signals has been attributed to distinct auroral arcs [Kintner, 2007; Garner, 2011], but surprisingly there has been no systematic study of the characteristics of the auroral forms that cause GPS scintillation. In the Fall of 2012 ASTRA deployed four CASES GPS receivers at UAF observatories in Alaska (Kaktovik, Fort Yukon, Poker Flat and Gakona) specifically to address the effects of auroral activity on the high latitude ionosphere. We have initiated an analysis that compares the phase scintillation, recorded at high cadence, with filtered digital all-sky camera data to determine the auroral morphology and electron precipitation parameters that cause scintillation. From correlation studies from a single site (Poker Flat), we find that scintillation is well correlated with discrete arcs that have high particle energy flux (power per unit area), and not as well correlated with pulsating forms which typically have high characteristic energy, but lower energy flux . This indicates that the scintillation is correlated with the magnitude of the change in total electron density as expected. We will also report on ongoing work where we correlate the scintillation from the Fort Yukon receiver with the all-sky images at Poker Flat to determine the altitude that produces the greatest disturbance. These studies are aimed at a model that can predict the expected local disturbance to navigation due to auroral activity.

  1. A scintillating gas detector for 2D dose measurements in clinical carbon beams.

    PubMed

    Seravalli, E; de Boer, M; Geurink, F; Huizenga, J; Kreuger, R; Schippers, J M; van Eijk, C W E; Voss, B

    2008-09-01

    A two-dimensional position sensitive dosimetry system based on a scintillating gas detector has been developed for pre-treatment verification of dose distributions in hadron therapy. The dosimetry system consists of a chamber filled with an Ar/CF4 scintillating gas mixture, inside which two cascaded gas electron multipliers (GEMs) are mounted. A GEM is a thin kapton foil with copper cladding structured with a regular pattern of sub-mm holes. The primary electrons, created in the detector's sensitive volume by the incoming beam, drift in an electric field towards the GEMs and undergo gas multiplication in the GEM holes. During this process, photons are emitted by the excited Ar/CF4 gas molecules and detected by a mirror-lens-CCD camera system. Since the amount of emitted light is proportional to the dose deposited in the sensitive volume of the detector by the incoming beam, the intensity distribution of the measured light spot is proportional to the 2D hadron dose distribution. For a measurement of a 3D dose distribution, the scintillating gas detector is mounted at the beam exit side of a water-bellows phantom, whose thickness can be varied in steps. In this work, the energy dependence of the output signal of the scintillating gas detector has been verified in a 250 MeV/u clinical 12C ion beam by means of a depth-dose curve measurement. The underestimation of the measured signal at the Bragg peak depth is only 9% with respect to an air-filled ionization chamber. This is much smaller than the underestimation found for a scintillating Gd2O2S:Tb ('Lanex') screen under the same measurement conditions (43%). Consequently, the scintillating gas detector is a promising device for verifying dose distributions in high LET beams, for example to check hadron therapy treatment plans which comprise beams with different energies. PMID:18695295

  2. Validating the use of scintillation proxies to study ionospheric scintillation over the Ugandan region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amabayo, Emirant B.; Jurua, Edward; Cilliers, Pierre J.

    2015-06-01

    In this study, we compare the standard scintillation indices (S4 and σΦ) from a SCINDA receiver with scintillation proxies (S4p and | sDPR |) derived from two IGS GPS receivers. Amplitude (S4) and phase (σΦ) scintillation data were obtained from the SCINDA installed at Makerere University (0.34°N, 32.57°E). The corresponding amplitude (S4p) and phase (| sDPR |) scintillation proxies were derived from data archived by IGS GPS receivers installed at Entebbe (0.04°N, 32.44°E) and Mbarara (0.60°S, 30.74°E). The results show that for most of the cases analysed in this study, σΦ and | sDPR | are in agreement. Amplitude scintillation occurrence estimated using the S4p are fairly consistent with the standard S4, mainly between 17:00 UT and 21:00 UT, despite a few cases of over and under estimation of scintillation levels by S4p. Correlation coefficients between σΦ and the | sDPR | proxy revealed positive correlation. Generally, S4p and S4 exhibits both moderate and strong positive correlation. TEC depletions associated with equatorial plasma bubbles are proposed as the cause of the observed scintillation over the region. These equatorial plasma bubbles were evident along the ray paths to satellites with PRN 2, 15, 27 and 11 as observed from MBAR and EBBE. In addition to equatorial plasma bubbles, atmospheric gravity waves with periods similar to those of large scale traveling ionospheric disturbances were also observed as one of the mechanisms for scintillation occurrence. The outcome of this study implies that GPS derived scintillation proxies can be used to quantify scintillation levels in the absence of standard scintillation data in the equatorial regions.

  3. Scintillation gamma spectrometer for analysis of hydraulic fracturing waste products.

    PubMed

    Ying, Leong; O'Connor, Frank; Stolz, John F

    2015-01-01

    Flowback and produced wastewaters from unconventional hydraulic fracturing during oil and gas explorations typically brings to the surface Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM), predominantly radioisotopes from the U238 and Th232 decay chains. Traditionally, radiological sampling are performed by sending collected small samples for laboratory tests either by radiochemical analysis or measurements by a high-resolution High-Purity Germanium (HPGe) gamma spectrometer. One of the main isotopes of concern is Ra226 which requires an extended 21-days quantification period to allow for full secular equilibrium to be established for the alpha counting of its progeny daughter Rn222. Field trials of a sodium iodide (NaI) scintillation detector offers a more economic solution for rapid screenings of radiological samples. To achieve the quantification accuracy, this gamma spectrometer must be efficiency calibrated with known standard sources prior to field deployments to analyze the radioactivity concentrations in hydraulic fracturing waste products. PMID:25734826

  4. Scintillating quantum dots for imaging x-rays (SQDIX) for aircraft inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, E. R.; DeHaven, S. L.; Williams, P. A.

    2016-02-01

    Scintillation is the process currently employed by conventional X-ray detectors to create X-ray images. Scintillating quantum dots (StQDs) or nano-crystals are novel, nanometer-scale materials that upon excitation by X-rays, re-emit the absorbed energy as visible light. StQDs theoretically have higher output efficiency than conventional scintillating materials and are more environmentally friendly. This paper will present the characterization of several critical elements in the use of StQDs that have been performed along a path to the use of this technology in wide spread X-ray imaging. Initial work on the scintillating quantum dots for imaging X-rays (SQDIX) system has shown great promise to create state-of-the-art sensors using StQDs as a sensor material. In addition, this work also demonstrates a high degree of promise using StQDs in microstructured fiber optics. Using the microstructured fiber as a light guide could greatly increase the capture efficiency of a StQDs based imaging sensor.

  5. Efficiency and timing resolution of scintillator tiles read out with silicon photomultipliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pooth, O.; Weingarten, S.; Weinstock, L.

    2016-01-01

    Silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) are semiconductor photo sensors that have the potential to replace photomultiplier tubes (PMT) in various fields of application. We present detectors consisting of 30 × 30 × 0.5 cm3 fast plastic scintillator tiles read out with SiPMs. The detectors offer great electronic and mechanical advantages over the classical PMT-scintillator combination. SiPMs are very compact devices that run independent of magnetic fields at low voltages and no light guides between the scintillator and the SiPM are necessary in the presented layouts. Three prototypes, two of which with integrated wavelength shifting fibres, have been tested in a proton beam at the COSY accelerator at Forschungszentrum Jülich. The different layouts are compared in terms of most probable pulse height, detection efficiency and noise behaviour as well as timing resolution. The spatial distributions of these properties across the scintillator surface are presented. The best layout can be operated at a mean efficiency of bar epsilon=99.9 % while sustaining low noise rates in the order of 10 Hz with a timing resolution of less than 3 ns. Both efficiency and timing resolution show good spatial homogeneity.

  6. Equatorial scintillation model. Technical report, 1 February 1983-30 April 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Fremouw, E.J.; Robins, R.E.

    1985-09-30

    Radiowave scintillation in the presence of natural and/or high-altitude nuclear disturbances has the potential to disrupt numerous transionospheric radio and radar systems. This report develops a model characterizing the plasma-density irregularities that produce scintillation in the naturally disturbed equatorial F layer. The model is incorporated into Program WBMOD along with subroutines for computing both link geometry and scintillation indices, the latter by means of phase screen diffraction theory. The model is based on similarly extensive analysis of wideband data from two equatorial stations. It describes irregularities at an effective height of 350 km that are isotropic across the geomagnetic field and elongated by a factor of 50 along the field and whose one-dimensional spatial power spectrum obeys a single-regime power law with a (negative) spectral index of 1.5. The height-integrated spectral strength of the irregularities is modeled as a function of solar epoch (sunspot number), the angle between the sunset terminator and the geomagnetic field line through the equatorial F layer point in question (a measure of seasonal and longitudinal variation), time after E-layer sunset on that field line, and the F-layer magnetic apex latitude of the point. The report also highlights a factor missing from complete characterization of the joint seasonal/longitudinal variation of scintillation, thought to depend upon thermospheric neutral winds.

  7. Quantum noise in digital x-ray image detectors with optically coupled scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, M.J.; Hames, S.M.; Wilderman, S.J.; Ciarelli, J.J.

    1996-08-01

    Digital x-ray imaging detectors designed to soft x-ray (1 to 50 keV) are significant for medical mammography, dental radiography, microradiography, and microtomography. Detector designs involve either direct absorption of x-rays in solid state devices or thin scintillator screens optically coupled to solid state sensors. Well designed scintillator systems produce 10 or more electrons per detected x-ray and, used with charge coupled devices (CCD), detect 100,000 x-rays per pixel before saturation. However, if the scintillator is directly coupled to the detector, radiation can penetrate to the semiconductor detector with a small number of events producing large charge and noise. The authors have investigated the degradation of image noise by these direct absorption events using numerical models for a laboratory detector system consisting of a 60 {micro}m CsI scintillator optically coupled to a scientific CCD. Monte Carlo methods were used to estimate the charge deposition signal and noise for both the CsI and the semiconductor. Without a fiber optic coupler, direct absorptions dominate the signal and increase the signal variance by a factor of about 30 at energies above 10 keV. With a 3 mm fiber optic coupler, no significant degradation is observed for input energies below 45 keV.

  8. Genetic Screening

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Wylie; Tarini, Beth; Press, Nancy A.; Evans, James P.

    2011-01-01

    Current approaches to genetic screening include newborn screening to identify infants who would benefit from early treatment, reproductive genetic screening to assist reproductive decision making, and family history assessment to identify individuals who would benefit from additional prevention measures. Although the traditional goal of screening is to identify early disease or risk in order to implement preventive therapy, genetic screening has always included an atypical element—information relevant to reproductive decisions. New technologies offer increasingly comprehensive identification of genetic conditions and susceptibilities. Tests based on these technologies are generating a different approach to screening that seeks to inform individuals about all of their genetic traits and susceptibilities for purposes that incorporate rapid diagnosis, family planning, and expediting of research, as well as the traditional screening goal of improving prevention. Use of these tests in population screening will increase the challenges already encountered in genetic screening programs, including false-positive and ambiguous test results, overdiagnosis, and incidental findings. Whether this approach is desirable requires further empiric research, but it also requires careful deliberation on the part of all concerned, including genomic researchers, clinicians, public health officials, health care payers, and especially those who will be the recipients of this novel screening approach. PMID:21709145

  9. Review on photonic crystal coatings for scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapitsch, Arno; Lecoq, Paul

    2014-11-01

    The amount of light and its time distribution are key factors determining the performance of scintillators when used as radiation detectors. However most inorganic scintillators are made of heavy materials and suffer from a high index of refraction which limits light extraction efficiency. This increases the path length of the photons in the material with the consequence of higher absorption and tails in the time distribution of the extracted light. Photonic crystals are a relatively new way of conquering this light extraction problem. Basically they are a way to produce a smooth and controllable index matching between the scintillator and the output medium through the nanostructuration of a thin layer of optically transparent high index material deposited at the coupling face of the scintillator. Our review paper discusses the theory behind this approach as well as the simulation details. Furthermore the different lithography steps of the production of an actual photonic crystal sample will be explained. Measurement results of LSO scintillator pixels covered with a nanolithography machined photonic crystal surface are presented together with practical tips for the further development and improvement of this technique.

  10. New Efficient Organic Scintillators Derived from Pyrazoline.

    PubMed

    Bliznyuk, Valery N; Seliman, Ayman F; Ishchenko, Alexander A; Derevyanko, Nadezhda A; DeVol, Timothy A

    2016-05-25

    We report on the synthesis, spectroscopic and scintillation properties of three new pyrazoline core based fluorophores. Fluorescence properties of the fluorophores have been studied both in a solution state and in a solid polyvinyltoluene (PVT) resin matrix of different porosity. The synthesized fluorophores were found to be promising candidates for application in plastic scintillators for detection of ionizing radiation (alpha, beta particles, γ rays and neutrons) and demonstrated superior efficiency in comparison to the existing commercially used fluorophores (2-(1-naphthyl)-5-phenyloxazole (αNPO), 9,10-diphenylanthracene, etc.). Moreover, the suggested synthetic route allows functionalization of the fluorophores with a vinyl group for further covalent bound to the PVT or other vinyl polymer matrices, which dramatically improves chemical stability of the system simultaneously improving the photoluminescence quantum yield. Possible mechanisms of the enhanced scintillation properties are discussed based on preliminary quantum mechanical calculations and spectroscopic characteristics of the fluorophores under study. PMID:27163887

  11. Bispectral analysis of meter wavelength interplanetary scintillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    The bispectrum of interplanetary scintillation is investigated. Rice-squared and lognormal point-source intensity probability density functions are used to derive model bispectra as functionals of the intensity autocovariance. Simultaneous observations of the source CTA 21 at 270, 340, and 470 MHz are analyzed to produce scintillation indices, skewness parameters, and bispectra, which are compared with the models for the cases of weak, intermediate, and strong scattering. The results obtained for CTA 21 are shown to rule out lognormal statistics for interplanetary scintillation over the frequency range from 340 to 470 MHz. It is found that the observed bispectra correspond well with the predictions of the Rice-squared model for weak and intermediate scattering, but are systematically different from model bispectra computed by assuming a point source in the case of strong scattering.

  12. Current trends in scintillator detectors and materials

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, William W.

    2001-10-23

    The last decade has seen a renaissance in inorganic scintillator development for gamma ray detection. Lead tungstate (PbWO4) has been developed for high energy physics experiments, and possesses exceptionally high density and radiation hardness, albeit with low luminous efficiency. Lutetium orthosilicate or LSO (Lu2SiO5:Ce) possesses a unique combination of high luminous efficiency, high density, and reasonably short decay time, and is now incorporated in commercial positron emission tomography (PET) cameras. There have been advances in understanding the fundamental mechanisms that limit energy resolution, and several recently discovered materials (such as LaBr3:Ce) possess energy resolution that approaches that of direct solid state detectors. Finally, there are indications that a neglected class of scintillator materials that exhibit near band-edge fluorescence could provide scintillators with sub-nanosecond decay times and high luminescent efficiency.

  13. Isotopic response with small scintillator based gamma-ray spectrometers

    DOEpatents

    Madden, Norman W.; Goulding, Frederick S.; Asztalos, Stephen J.

    2012-01-24

    The intrinsic background of a gamma ray spectrometer is significantly reduced by surrounding the scintillator with a second scintillator. This second (external) scintillator surrounds the first scintillator and has an opening of approximately the same diameter as the smaller central scintillator in the forward direction. The second scintillator is selected to have a higher atomic number, and thus has a larger probability for a Compton scattering interaction than within the inner region. Scattering events that are essentially simultaneous in coincidence to the first and second scintillators, from an electronics perspective, are precluded electronically from the data stream. Thus, only gamma-rays that are wholly contained in the smaller central scintillator are used for analytic purposes.

  14. Characterization of ionospheric scintillation at a geomagnetic equatorial region station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seba, Ephrem Beshir; Gogie, Tsegaye Kassa

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we analyzed ionospheric scintillation at Bahir Dar station, Ethiopia (11.6°N, 37.38°E) using GPS-SCINDA data between August 2010 and July 2011. We found that small scale variation in TEC caused high ionospheric scintillation, rather than large scale variation. We studied the daily and monthly variations in the scintillation index S4 during this year, which showed that scintillation was a post-sunset phenomenon on equinoctial days, with high activity during the March equinox. The scintillation activity observed on solstice days was relatively low and almost constant throughout the day with low post-sunset activity levels. Our analysis of the seasonal and annual scintillation characteristics showed that intense activity occurred in March and April. We also studied the dependence of the scintillation index on the satellite elevation angle and found that scintillation was high for low angles but low for high elevation angles.

  15. On the scintillation efficiency of carborane-loaded liquid scintillators for thermal neutron detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Zheng; Okoye, Nkemakonam C.; Urffer, Matthew J.; Green, Alexander D.; Childs, Kyle E.; Miller, Laurence F.

    2015-01-01

    The scintillation efficiency in response to thermal neutrons was studied by loading different concentrations of carborane (0-8.5 wt%) and naphthalene (0 and 100 g/L) in five liquid organic scintillators. The sample was characterized in Pb and Cd shields under the irradiation of the thermal neutrons from a 252Cf source. A method was developed to extract the net neutron response from the pulse-height spectra. It was found that the order of scintillation efficiencies for both γ-rays and thermal neutrons is as follows: diisopropylnaphthalene>toluene (concentrated solutes)>toluene~pseudocumene~m-xylene. The quench constants, obtained by fitting the Stern-Volmer model to the plots of light output versus carborane concentration, are in the range of 0.35-1.4 M-1 for all the scintillators. The Birks factors, estimated using the specific energy loss profiles of the incident particles, are in the range of 9.3-14 mg cm-2 MeV-1 for all the samples. The light outputs are in the range of 63-86 keV electron equivalents (keVee) in response to thermal neutrons. Loading naphthalene generally promotes the scintillation efficiency of the scintillator with a benzene derivative solvent. Among all the scintillators tested, the diisopropylnaphthalene-based scintillator shows the highest scintillation efficiency, lowest Birks factor, and smallest quench constants. These properties are primarily attributed to the double fused benzene-ring structure of the solvent, which is more efficient to populate to the excited singlet state under ionizing radiation and to transfer the excitation energy to the fluorescent solutes.

  16. High-throughput scintillation proximity assay for stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1.

    PubMed

    Tawa, Paul; Falgueyret, Jean-Pierre; Guiral, Sebastien; Isabel, Elise; Powell, David A; Zuck, Paul; Skorey, Kathryn

    2011-06-01

    Stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) catalyzes the synthesis of monounsaturated fatty acids and has been implicated in a number of disease states, including obesity and diabetes. To find small-molecule inhibitor leads, a high-throughput scintillation proximity assay (SPA) was developed using the hydrophobic binding characteristics of a glass microsphere scintillant bead to capture SCD1 from a crude lysate of recombinant SCD1 in Sf9 lysate coupled with the strong binding characteristics of an azetidine compound ([(3)H]AZE). The SPA assay was stable over 24 h and could detect compounds with micromolar to nanomolar potencies. A robust 1536-well high-throughput screening assay was developed with good signal-to-noise ratio (10:1) and excellent Z' factor (0.8). A screening collection of 1.6 million compounds was screened at 11 µM, and approximately 7700 compounds were identified as initial hits, exhibiting at least 35% inhibition of [(3)H]AZE binding. Further screening and confirmation with an SCD enzyme activity assay led to a number of new structural leads for inhibition of the enzyme. The SPA assay complements the enzyme activity assay for SCD1 as a tool for the discovery of novel leads in drug discovery. PMID:21406617

  17. The design of the TASD (totally active scintillator detector) prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mefodiev, A. V.; Kudenko, Yu. G.

    2015-12-01

    Totally active and magnetic segmented scintillation neutrino detectors are developed for the nextgeneration accelerator neutrino experiments. Such detectors will incorporate scintillation modules with scintillation counters that form X and Y planes. A single counter is a 7 × 10 × 90 mm3 scintillation bar with gluedin wavelength-shifting fibers and micropixel avalanche photodiodes. The results of measurements of the parameters of these detectors are presented.

  18. The design of the TASD (totally active scintillator detector) prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Mefodiev, A. V. Kudenko, Yu. G.

    2015-12-15

    Totally active and magnetic segmented scintillation neutrino detectors are developed for the nextgeneration accelerator neutrino experiments. Such detectors will incorporate scintillation modules with scintillation counters that form X and Y planes. A single counter is a 7 × 10 × 90 mm{sup 3} scintillation bar with gluedin wavelength-shifting fibers and micropixel avalanche photodiodes. The results of measurements of the parameters of these detectors are presented.

  19. New Structured Scintillators for Neutron Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarkar, V. V.; Ovechkina, E. E.; Bhandari, H. B.; Soundara-Pandian, L.; More, M. J.; Riedel, R. A.; Miller, S. R.

    We report on the development of novel neutron scintillators fabricated in microcolumnar formats using the physical vapour deposition (PVD) method. Such structures mitigate the conventional trade-off between spatial resolution and detection efficiency by channelling the scintillation light towards the detector while minimizing lateral spread in the film. Consequently, high resolution and high contrast neutron images can be acquired in a time efficient manner. In this paper, we discuss methods and characterization for scintillator films made from three distinct compositions, Thallium (Tl) or Europium (Eu) doped Lithium CesiumIodide (Li3Cs2I5:Tl,Eu, referred to as LCI), Tl or Eudoped Lithium Sodium Iodide (LixNa1-xI:Tl,Eu, referred to as LNI), and Cerium (Ce)-doped Gadolinium Iodide (GdI3:Ce, referred to as GDI). LCI and LNI scintillators are derived from the well-known CsI and NaI scintillators by the incorporation of 6Li into their lattice. Based on our measurements reported here, LCI/LNI scintillators have shown to exhibit bright emissions, fast, sub-microsecond decay, and an ability to effectively discriminate between neutron and gamma interactions using pulse shape (PSD) and/or pulse height (PHD) discrimination. LCI has a density of 4.5 g/cm3, a measured peak emission wavelength of 460 nm (doped with Eu), and a light yield of ∼50,000 photons/thermal neutron. LNI has a density of 3.6 g/cm3, an emission peak measured at 420 nm, and a light yield of ∼100,000 photons/thermal neutron. The recently discovered GDI exhibits excellent scintillation properties including a bright emission of up to 5,000 photons/thermal neutron interaction, 550 nm green emission, a rise time of ∼0.5 ns and a primary decay time of ∼38 ns (Glodo et al., 2006). Its high thermal neutron cross-section of ∼255 kb makes it an attractive candidate for neutron detection and imaging. Although it has high density of 5.2 gm/cm3 and effective atomic number of 57, its gamma sensitivity can be minimized by lowering the film thickness and its neutron sensitivity can be maximized through the use of enriched Gd. The fabrication of micro-structured films of these materials using an evaporation technique permits the cost-effective volume synthesis of high-quality neutron scintillators over large areas (20 cm x 20 cm) in short time. In addition, the vapour deposition permits stoichiometry and dopant control not possible using conventional crystal growth.

  20. The homestake surface-underground scintillations: Description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cherry, M. L.; Corbato, S.; Daily, T.; Fenyves, E. J.; Kieda, D.; Lande, K.; Lee, C. K.

    1985-01-01

    Two new detectors are currently under construction at the Homestake Gold Mine a 140-ton Large Area Scintillation Detector (LASD) with an upper surface area of 130 square meters, a geometry factor (for an isotropic flux) of 1200 square meters, sr, and a depth of 4200 m.w.e.; and a surface air shower array consisting of 100 scintillator elements, each 3 square meters, spanning an area of approximately square kilometers. Underground, half of the LASD is currently running and collecting muon data; on the surface, the first section of the air shower array will begin operation in the spring of 1985. The detectors and their capabilities are described.

  1. Near-infrared scintillation of liquid argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, T.; Escobar, C. O.; Lippincott, W. H.; Rubinov, P.

    2016-03-01

    Since the 1970s it has been known that noble gases scintillate in the near infrared (NIR) region of the spectrum (0.7 μm < λ < 1.5 μm). More controversial has been the question of the NIR light yield for condensed noble gases. We first present the motivation for using the NIR scintillation in liquid argon detectors, then briefly review early as well as more recent efforts and finally show encouraging preliminary results of a test performed at Fermilab.

  2. Statistics of time averaged atmospheric scintillation

    SciTech Connect

    Stroud, P.

    1994-02-01

    A formulation has been constructed to recover the statistics of the moving average of the scintillation Strehl from a discrete set of measurements. A program of airborne atmospheric propagation measurements was analyzed to find the correlation function of the relative intensity over displaced propagation paths. The variance in continuous moving averages of the relative intensity was then found in terms of the correlation functions. An empirical formulation of the variance of the continuous moving average of the scintillation Strehl has been constructed. The resulting characterization of the variance of the finite time averaged Strehl ratios is being used to assess the performance of an airborne laser system.

  3. Industrial growth of LuYAP scintillation crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annenkov, Alexander; Fedorov, Andrei; Korzhik, Mikhail; Ligoun, Vladimir; Missevitch, Oleg; Tkachev, Alexander; Lecoq, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Status of the (Lux-Y1-x)AlO3: Ce (LuYAP) scintillation crystal production is described. This scintillation crystal with 70% Lu content in (Lu-Y) system is a good choice for positron emission tomography and extreme applications such as well logging due to the good combination of scintillation, mechanical and chemical properties.

  4. 21 CFR 892.1100 - Scintillation (gamma) camera.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Scintillation (gamma) camera. 892.1100 Section 892...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1100 Scintillation (gamma) camera. (a) Identification. A scintillation (gamma) camera is a device intended to image the distribution of radionuclides...

  5. Upconverting nanoparticles for optimizing scintillator based detection systems

    DOEpatents

    Kross, Brian; McKisson, John E; McKisson, John; Weisenberger, Andrew; Xi, Wenze; Zom, Carl

    2013-09-17

    An upconverting device for a scintillation detection system is provided. The detection system comprises a scintillator material, a sensor, a light transmission path between the scintillator material and the sensor, and a plurality of upconverting nanoparticles particles positioned in the light transmission path.

  6. Optimization of the design of thick, segmented scintillators for megavoltage cone-beam CT using a novel, hybrid modeling technique

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Langechuan; Antonuk, Larry E.; El-Mohri, Youcef; Zhao, Qihua; Jiang, Hao

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Active matrix flat-panel imagers (AMFPIs) incorporating thick, segmented scintillators have demonstrated order-of-magnitude improvements in detective quantum efficiency (DQE) at radiotherapy energies compared to systems based on conventional phosphor screens. Such improved DQE values facilitate megavoltage cone-beam CT (MV CBCT) imaging at clinically practical doses. However, the MV CBCT performance of such AMFPIs is highly dependent on the design parameters of the scintillators. In this paper, optimization of the design of segmented scintillators was explored using a hybrid modeling technique which encompasses both radiation and optical effects. Methods: Imaging performance in terms of the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and spatial resolution of various hypothetical scintillator designs was examined through a hybrid technique involving Monte Carlo simulation of radiation transport in combination with simulation of optical gain distributions and optical point spread functions. The optical simulations employed optical parameters extracted from a best fit to measurement results reported in a previous investigation of a 1.13 cm thick, 1016 μm pitch prototype BGO segmented scintillator. All hypothetical designs employed BGO material with a thickness and element-to-element pitch ranging from 0.5 to 6 cm and from 0.508 to 1.524 mm, respectively. In the CNR study, for each design, full tomographic scans of a contrast phantom incorporating various soft-tissue inserts were simulated at a total dose of 4 cGy. Results: Theoretical values for contrast, noise, and CNR were found to be in close agreement with empirical results from the BGO prototype, strongly supporting the validity of the modeling technique. CNR and spatial resolution for the various scintillator designs demonstrate complex behavior as scintillator thickness and element pitch are varied—with a clear trade-off between these two imaging metrics up to a thickness of ∼3 cm. Based on these results, an optimization map indicating the regions of design that provide a balance between these metrics was obtained. The map shows that, for a given set of optical parameters, scintillator thickness and pixel pitch can be judiciously chosen to maximize performance without resorting to thicker, more costly scintillators. Conclusions: Modeling radiation and optical effects in thick, segmented scintillators through use of a hybrid technique can provide a practical way to gain insight as to how to optimize the performance of such devices in radiotherapy imaging. Assisted by such modeling, the development of practical designs should greatly facilitate low-dose, soft tissue visualization employing MV CBCT imaging in external beam radiotherapy. PMID:24877827

  7. Optimization of the design of thick, segmented scintillators for megavoltage cone-beam CT using a novel, hybrid modeling technique

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Langechuan; Antonuk, Larry E. El-Mohri, Youcef; Zhao, Qihua; Jiang, Hao

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Active matrix flat-panel imagers (AMFPIs) incorporating thick, segmented scintillators have demonstrated order-of-magnitude improvements in detective quantum efficiency (DQE) at radiotherapy energies compared to systems based on conventional phosphor screens. Such improved DQE values facilitate megavoltage cone-beam CT (MV CBCT) imaging at clinically practical doses. However, the MV CBCT performance of such AMFPIs is highly dependent on the design parameters of the scintillators. In this paper, optimization of the design of segmented scintillators was explored using a hybrid modeling technique which encompasses both radiation and optical effects. Methods: Imaging performance in terms of the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and spatial resolution of various hypothetical scintillator designs was examined through a hybrid technique involving Monte Carlo simulation of radiation transport in combination with simulation of optical gain distributions and optical point spread functions. The optical simulations employed optical parameters extracted from a best fit to measurement results reported in a previous investigation of a 1.13 cm thick, 1016μm pitch prototype BGO segmented scintillator. All hypothetical designs employed BGO material with a thickness and element-to-element pitch ranging from 0.5 to 6 cm and from 0.508 to 1.524 mm, respectively. In the CNR study, for each design, full tomographic scans of a contrast phantom incorporating various soft-tissue inserts were simulated at a total dose of 4 cGy. Results: Theoretical values for contrast, noise, and CNR were found to be in close agreement with empirical results from the BGO prototype, strongly supporting the validity of the modeling technique. CNR and spatial resolution for the various scintillator designs demonstrate complex behavior as scintillator thickness and element pitch are varied—with a clear trade-off between these two imaging metrics up to a thickness of ∼3 cm. Based on these results, an optimization map indicating the regions of design that provide a balance between these metrics was obtained. The map shows that, for a given set of optical parameters, scintillator thickness and pixel pitch can be judiciously chosen to maximize performance without resorting to thicker, more costly scintillators. Conclusions: Modeling radiation and optical effects in thick, segmented scintillators through use of a hybrid technique can provide a practical way to gain insight as to how to optimize the performance of such devices in radiotherapy imaging. Assisted by such modeling, the development of practical designs should greatly facilitate low-dose, soft tissue visualization employing MV CBCT imaging in external beam radiotherapy.

  8. Robust GPS carrier tracking under ionospheric scintillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susi, M.; Andreotti, M.; Aquino, M. H.; Dodson, A.

    2013-12-01

    Small scale irregularities present in the ionosphere can induce fast and unpredictable fluctuations of Radio Frequency (RF) signal phase and amplitude. This phenomenon, known as scintillation, can degrade the performance of a GPS receiver leading to cycle slips, increasing the tracking error and also producing a complete loss of lock. In the most severe scenarios, if the tracking of multiple satellites links is prevented, outages in the GPS service can also occur. In order to render a GPS receiver more robust under scintillation, particular attention should be dedicated to the design of the carrier tracking stage, that is the receiver's part most sensitive to these types of phenomenon. This paper exploits the reconfigurability and flexibility of a GPS software receiver to develop a tracking algorithm that is more robust under ionospheric scintillation. For this purpose, first of all, the scintillation level is monitored in real time. Indeed the carrier phase and the post correlation terms obtained by the PLL (Phase Locked Loop) are used to estimate phi60 and S4 [1], the scintillation indices traditionally used to quantify the level of phase and amplitude scintillations, as well as p and T, the spectral parameters of the fluctuations PSD. The effectiveness of the scintillation parameter computation is confirmed by comparing the values obtained by the software receiver and the ones provided by a commercial scintillation monitoring, i.e. the Septentrio PolarxS receiver [2]. Then the above scintillation parameters and the signal carrier to noise density are exploited to tune the carrier tracking algorithm. In case of very weak signals the FLL (Frequency Locked Loop) scheme is selected in order to maintain the signal lock. Otherwise an adaptive bandwidth Phase Locked Loop (PLL) scheme is adopted. The optimum bandwidth for the specific scintillation scenario is evaluated in real time by exploiting the Conker formula [1] for the tracking jitter estimation. The performance of the proposed tracking scheme is assessed by using both simulated and real data. Real data have been collected in Vietnam by using a USRP (Universal Software Radio Peripheral) N210 front end connected to a rubidium oscillator. Selected events are exploited in order to challenge the algorithm with strong phase and amplitude variations. Moreover, simulated data have been collected by using the prototype of a digital front end developed by Novatel, namely the 'Firehose'. Since the latter includes a TCXO oscillator, the proposed tracking scheme is also opportunely modified to take in account the clock error contribution. References 1. R.S., Conker, M. B. El-Arini, C. J. Hegarty, and T. Hsiao, Modelling the effects of ionospheric scintillation on GPS/satellite-based augmentation system availability. Radio Sci., 38, 1, 1001, doi: 10.1029/2000RS002604, 2003. 2. B. Bougard et al, 'CIGALA: Challenging the Solar Maximum in Brazil with PolaRxS,' ION GNSS, Portland, Sept. 2011.

  9. Study of 138La radioactive decays using LaBr3 scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quarati, F. G. A.; Khodyuk, I. V.; van Eijk, C. W. E.; Quarati, P.; Dorenbos, P.

    2012-08-01

    We present a detailed investigation of the intrinsic activity of LaBr3 scintillators from the natural abundance of radioactive isotope 138La. Compared to earlier studies of lanthanum halides intrinsic activity, we gained a sharper insight by using samples of different sizes, ranging from 0.16 cm3 to 347 cm3, and by applying in our recent analysis results on the non-proportionality of scintillation response. In addition, we took advantage of the fact that LaBr3 spectrometers offer a unique opportunity, never available before, to study the characteristics of the 138La electron capture and β radioactive decays that are 2nd order unique forbidden transitions. The observed shape of the β continuum, measured down to the energy of 2 keV, is found to be different than expected from standard nuclear theory, indicating a possible underestimation of the screening effect for β energies below 75 keV.

  10. Equatorial scintillation calculations based on coherent scatter radar and C/NOFS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Emanoel; de Paula, Eurico R.; Rezende, L. F. C.; Groves, Keith M.; Roddy, Patrick A.; Dao, Eugene V.; Kelley, Michael C.

    2011-04-01

    During its transit through a region of equatorial ionospheric irregularities, sensors on board the Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite provide a one-dimensional description of the medium, which can be extended to two dimensions if the structures are assumed to be elongated in the direction of the magnetic field lines. The C/NOFS scintillation calculation approach assumes that the medium is equivalent to a diffracting screen with random phase fluctuations that are proportional to the irregularities in the total electron content, specified through the product of the directly measured electron density by an estimated extent of the irregularity layer along the raypaths. Within the international collaborative effort anticipated by the C/NOFS Science Definition Team, the present work takes the vertical structure of the irregularities into more detailed consideration, which could lead to improved predictions of scintillation. Initially, it describes a flexible model for the power spectral density of the equatorial ionospheric irregularities, estimates its shape parameters from C/NOFS in situ data and uses the signal-to-noise ratio S/N measurements by the São Luís coherent scatter radar to estimate the mean square electron density fluctuation <ΔN2> within the corresponding sampled volume. Next, it presents an algorithm for the wave propagation through a three-dimensional irregularity layer which considers the variations of <ΔN2> along the propagation paths according to observations by the radar. Data corresponding to several range-time-intensity maps from the radar is used to predict time variations of the scintillation index S4 at the L1 Global Positioning System (GPS) frequency (1575.42 MHz). The results from the scintillation calculations are compared with corresponding measurements by the colocated São Luís GPS scintillation monitor for an assessment of the prediction capability of the present formulation.

  11. Calculations and measurements of the scintillator-to-water stopping power ratio of liquid scintillators for use in proton radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott Ingram, W.; Robertson, Daniel; Beddar, Sam

    2015-03-01

    Liquid scintillators are a promising detector for high-resolution three-dimensional proton therapy dosimetry. Because the scintillator comprises both the active volume of the detector and the phantom material, an ideal scintillator will exhibit water equivalence in its radiological properties. One of the most fundamental of these is the scintillator's stopping power. The objective of this study was to compare calculations and measurements of scintillator-to-water stopping power ratios to evaluate the suitability of the liquid scintillators BC-531 and OptiPhase HiSafe 3 for proton dosimetry. We also measured the relative scintillation output of the two scintillators. Both calculations and measurements show that the linear stopping power of OptiPhase is significantly closer to water than that of BC-531. BC-531 has a somewhat higher scintillation output. OptiPhase can be mixed with water at high concentrations, which further improves its scintillator-to-water stopping power ratio. However, this causes the solution to become cloudy, which has a negative impact on the scintillation output and spatial resolution of the detector. OptiPhase is preferred over BC-531 for proton dosimetry because its density and scintillator-to-water stopping power ratio are more water equivalent.

  12. Progress in studying scintillator proportionality: Phenomenological model

    SciTech Connect

    Bizarri, Gregory; Cherepy, Nerine; Choong, Woon-Seng; Hull, Giulia; Moses, William; Payne, Sephen; Singh, Jai; Valentine, John; Vasilev, Andrey; Williams, Richard

    2009-04-30

    We present a model to describe the origin of non-proportional dependence of scintillator light yield on the energy of an ionizing particle. The non-proportionality is discussed in terms of energy relaxation channels and their linear and non-linear dependences on the deposited energy. In this approach, the scintillation response is described as a function of the deposited energy deposition and the kinetic rates of each relaxation channel. This mathematical framework allows both a qualitative interpretation and a quantitative fitting representation of scintillation non-proportionality response as function of kinetic rates. This method was successfully applied to thallium doped sodium iodide measured with SLYNCI, a new facility using the Compton coincidence technique. Finally, attention is given to the physical meaning of the dominant relaxation channels, and to the potential causes responsible for the scintillation non-proportionality. We find that thallium doped sodium iodide behaves as if non-proportionality is due to competition between radiative recombinations and non-radiative Auger processes.

  13. Magnetic fields and SDC endcap scintillator performance

    SciTech Connect

    Green, D.

    1993-01-01

    Many detectors designed to operate in colliders contain both magnetic fields, usually solenoids, and scintillators. The former is known to influence the operation of the latter. A first look is taken in this note at the implications of that influence for the SDC detector.

  14. Waveshifting fiber readout of lanthanum halide scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Case, G. L.; Cherry, M. L.; Stacy, J. G.

    2006-07-01

    Newly developed high-light-yield inorganic scintillators coupled to waveshifting optical fibers provide the capability of efficient X-ray detection and millimeter scale position resolution suitable for high-energy cosmic ray instruments, hard X-ray/gamma ray astronomy telescopes and applications to national security. The CASTER design for NASA's proposed Black Hole Finder Probe mission, in particular, calls for a 6 8 m2 hard X-ray coded aperture imaging telescope operating in the 20 600 keV energy band, putting significant constraints on cost and readout complexity. The development of new inorganic scintillator materials (e.g., cerium-doped LaBr3 and LaCl3) provides improved energy resolution and timing performance that is well suited to the requirements for national security and astrophysics applications. LaBr3 or LaCl3 detector arrays coupled with waveshifting fiber optic readout represent a significant advance in the performance capabilities of scintillator-based gamma cameras and provide the potential for a feasible approach to affordable, large area, extremely sensitive detectors. We describe some of the applications and present laboratory test results demonstrating the expected scintillator performance.

  15. High resolution scintillation detector with semiconductor readout

    DOEpatents

    Levin, Craig S.; Hoffman, Edward J.

    2000-01-01

    A novel high resolution scintillation detector array for use in radiation imaging such as high resolution Positron Emission Tomography (PET) which comprises one or more parallelepiped crystals with at least one long surface of each crystal being in intimate contact with a semiconductor photodetector such that photons generated within each crystal by gamma radiation passing therethrough is detected by the photodetector paired therewith.

  16. An improved model of equatorial scintillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Secan, J. A.; Bussey, R. M.; Fremouw, E. J.; Basu, Sa.

    1995-05-01

    One of the main limitations of the modeling work that went into the equatorial section of the Wideband ionospheric scintillation model (WBMOD) was that the data set used in the modeling was limited to two stations near the dip equator (Ancon, Peru, and Kwajalein Island, in the North Pacific Ocean) at two fixed local times (nominally 1000 and 2200). Over the past year this section of the WBMOD model has been replaced by a model developed using data from three additional stations (Ascension Island, in the South Atlantic Ocean, Huancayo, Peru, and Manila, Phillipines; data collected under the auspices of the USAF Phillips Laboratory Geophysics Directorate) which provide a greater diversity in both latitude and longitude, as well as cover the entire day. The new model includes variations with latitude, local time, longitude, season, solar epoch, and geomagnetic activity levels. The way in which the irregularity strength parameter CkL is modeled has also been changed. The new model provides the variation of the full probability distribution function (PDF) of log (CkL) rather than simply the average of log (CkL). This permits the user to specify a threshold on scintillation level, and the model will calculate the percent of the time that scintillation will exceed that level in the user-specified scenario. It will also permit calculation of scintillation levels at a user-specified percentile. A final improvement to the WBMOD model is the implementation of a new theory for calculating S4 on a two-way channel.

  17. Fluorescent compounds for plastic scintillation applications

    SciTech Connect

    Pla-Dalmau, A.; Bross, A.D.

    1994-04-01

    Several 2-(2{prime}-hydroxyphenyl)benzothiazole, -benzoxazole, and -benzimidazole derivatives have been prepared. Transmittance, fluorescence, light yield, and decay time characteristics of these compounds have been studied in a polystyrene matrix and evaluated for use in plastic scintillation detectors. Radiation damage studies utilizing a {sup 60}C source have also been performed.

  18. Wide velocity measurements by optical scintillations methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsadka, S.; Shaft, S.; Azar, Z.; Tur, Moshe

    1989-07-01

    Scintillations-based optical techniques for the measurement of the atmospheric transverse average wind velocity are reexamined. Three different methods for the processing of the resultant time-lagged covariance function are compared to in situ anemometer measurements. A correlation index of 0.89-0.95 is obtained between the optical and anemometer results. It tends to increase with the measurement time constant.

  19. Testing of the scintillation sandwich prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Vashkevich, V.

    1995-06-01

    The 3 m{sup 2} prototype of the surface detector using optical fiber readout was completely prepared for testing measurements in February 1995 at Fermilab. Two 25 mm thick, 3 m{sup 2} acrylic scintillation plates (1.2 {times} 2.5 m{sup 2}) are used for light collection in the upper (above the 25 mm steel plate) and lower (below the steel) counters of the sandwich. The light is collected with the help of 1 mm diameter wavelength shifter fiber loops 3 m long inserted in the grooves on the top surface of the scintillator, 3 fibers per groove. We used Kurary Y11, 200 ppm of shifter dye, and double clad fibers. 1.5 m of clear fibers spliced to each end of the shifter fiber transport the light to the phototube. Spacing between the grooves is 5 cm. The counter`s edges were painted with BICRON (BC620) white reflective paint. The scintillation plates were wrapped with Dupont Tyvek. The glued bundle of fibers is connected to an EMI-9902KB 38 mm phototube through the simple light mixer bar. Used PM has a ``green extended`` rubidium bialkali photocathode. The report contains information on the testing of the scintillation sandwich.

  20. Scintillator Development for the PROSPECT Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Minfang

    2014-03-01

    Doped scintillator is the target material of choice for antineutrino detection as it utilizes the time-delayed coincidence signature of the positron annihilation and neutron capture resulting from the Inverse Beta Decay (IBD) interaction. Additionally, the multiple gamma rays or heavy ions emitted after neutron capture on either Gd or 6Li respectively provide a distinct signal for the identification of antineutrino events and therefore significantly enhance accidental background reduction. The choice of scintillator and dopant depends on the detector requirements and scintillator performance criteria. Both Gd and 6Li doped scintillators have been used in past reactor antineutrino experiments such as Double Chooz, Daya Bay, RENO, and Bugey3 and are currently under investigation by the PROSPECT collaboration. Their properties in terms of light yield, optical transparency, chemical stability and background rejection efficiency using Pulse Shape Discrimination (PSD) will be reported. Research sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Physics and Office of High Energy Physics, under contract with Brookhaven National Laboratory-Brookhaven Science Associates.

  1. A focusing gas scintillation proportional counter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. F.; Bodine, O. H.; Novick, R.; Wolff, R. S.

    1977-01-01

    An improved large-area gas scintillation proportional counter has been built, suitable for use in X-ray astronomy. This counter employs electron focusing in a drift region to achieve uniform response. It is shown that a window area of 60 sq cm and a spectral resolution of 10% fwhm or better at 5.9 keV can be obtained.

  2. Measurement of imaging properties of scintillating fiber optic plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zentai, George; Ganguly, Arundhuti; Star-Lack, Josh; Virshup, Gary; Hirsh, Hayley; Shedlock, Daniel; Humber, David

    2014-03-01

    Scintillating Fiber Optic Plates (SFOP) or Fiber Optic Scintillator (FOS) made with scintillating fiber-glass, were investigated for x-ray imaging. Two different samples (T x W x L = 2cm x 5cm x 5cm) were used; Sample A: 10μm fibers, Sample B: 50μm fibers both with statistically randomized light absorbing fibers placed in the matrix. A customized holder was used to place the samples in close contact with photodiodes in an amorphous silicon flat panel detector (AS1000, Varian), typically used for portal imaging. The detector has a 392μm pixel pitch and in the standard configuration uses a gadolinium oxy-sulphide (GOS) screen behind a copper plate. X-ray measurements were performed at 120kV (RQA 9 spectrum), 1MeV (5mm Al filtration) and 6MeV (Flattening Filter Free) for Sample A and the latter 2 spectra for Sample B. A machined edge was used for MTF measurements. The measurements showed the MTF degraded with increased X-ray energies because of the increase in Compton scattering. However, at the Nyquist frequency of 1.3lp/mm, the MTF is still high (FOS value vs. Cu+GOS): (a) 37% and 21% at 120kVp for the 10μm FOS and the Cu+GOS arrays, (b) 31%, 20% and 20% at 1MeV and (c) 17%, 11% and 14% at 6MeV for the 10μm FOS, 50μm FOS and the Cu+GOS arrays. The DQE(0) value comparison were (a) at 120kV ~24% and ~13 % for the 10μm FOS and the Cu+GOS arrays (b) at 1MV 10%, 10% and 7% and (c) at 6MV 12%, ~19% and 1.6% for the 10μm FOS , 50μm FOS and Cu+GOS arrays.

  3. Outward atmospheric scintillation effects and inward atmospheric scintillation effects comparisons for direct detection ladar applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youmans, Douglas G.

    2014-06-01

    Atmospheric turbulence produces intensity modulation or "scintillation" effects on both on the outward laser-mode path and on the return backscattered radiation path. These both degrade laser radar (ladar) target acquisition, ranging, imaging, and feature estimation. However, the finite sized objects create scintillation averaging on the outgoing path and the finite sized telescope apertures produce scintillation averaging on the return path. We expand on previous papers going to moderate to strong turbulence cases by starting from a 20kft altitude platform and propagating at 0° elevation (with respect to the local vertical) for 100km range to a 1 m diameter diffuse sphere. The outward scintillation and inward scintillation effects, as measured at the focal plane detector array of the receiving aperture, will be compared. To eliminate hard-body surface speckle effects in order to study scintillation, Goodman's M-parameter is set to 106 in the analytical equations and the non-coherent imaging algorithm is employed in Monte Carlo realizations. The analytical equations of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNRp), or mean squared signal over a variance, for a given focal plane array pixel window of interest will be summarized and compared to Monte Carlo realizations of a 1m diffuse sphere.

  4. Liquid Scintillator Production for the NOvA Experiment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mufson, S.; Baugh, B.; Bower, C.; Coan, T.; Cooper, J.; Corwin, L.; Karty, J.; Mason, P.; Messier, M. D.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; et al

    2015-04-15

    The NOvA collaboration blended and delivered 8.8 kt (2.72M gal) of liquid scintillator as the active detector medium to its near and far detectors. The composition of this scintillator was specifically developed to satisfy NOvA's performance requirements. A rigorous set of quality control procedures was put in place to verify that the incoming components and the blended scintillator met these requirements. The scintillator was blended commercially in Hammond, IN. The scintillator was shipped to the NOvA detectors using dedicated stainless steel tanker trailers cleaned to food grade.

  5. Liquid scintillator production for the NOvA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mufson, S.; Baugh, B.; Bower, C.; Coan, T. E.; Cooper, J.; Corwin, L.; Karty, J. A.; Mason, P.; Messier, M. D.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Proudfoot, M.

    2015-11-01

    The NOvA collaboration blended and delivered 8.8 kt (2.72M gal) of liquid scintillator as the active detector medium to its near and far detectors. The composition of this scintillator was specifically developed to satisfy NOvA's performance requirements. A rigorous set of quality control procedures was put in place to verify that the incoming components and the blended scintillator met these requirements. The scintillator was blended commercially in Hammond, IN. The scintillator was shipped to the NOvA detectors using dedicated stainless steel tanker trailers cleaned to food grade.

  6. A High Throughput Scintillation Proximity Imaging Assay for Protein Methyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Ibáñez, Glorymar; Shum, David; Blum, Gil; Bhinder, Bhavneet; Radu, Constantin; Antczak, Christophe; Luo, Minkui; Djaballah, Hakim

    2013-01-01

    Protein methyltransferases (PMTs) orchestrate epigenetic modifications through post-translational methylation of various protein substrates including histones. Since dysregulation of this process is widely implicated in many cancers, it is of pertinent interest to screen inhibitors of PMTs, as they offer novel target-based opportunities to discover small molecules with potential chemotherapeutic use. We have thus developed an enzymatic screening strategy, which can be adapted to scintillation proximity imaging assay (SPIA) format, to identify these inhibitors. We took advantage of S-adenosyl-L-[3H-methyl]-methionine availability and monitored the enzymatically catalyzed [3H]-methyl addition on lysine residues of biotinylated peptide substrates. The radiolabeled peptides were subsequently captured by streptavidin coated SPA imaging PS beads. We applied this strategy to four PMTs: SET7/9, SET8, SETD2, and EuHMTase1, and optimized assay conditions to achieve Z′ values ranging from 0.48 to 0.91. The robust performance of this SPIA for the four PMTs was validated in a pilot screen of approximately 7,000 compounds. We identified 80 cumulative hits across the four targets. NF279, a suramin analogue found to specifically inhibit SET7/9 and SETD2 with IC50 values of 1.9 and 1.1 μM, respectively. Another identified compound, Merbromin, a topical antiseptic, was classified as a pan-active inhibitor of the four PMTs. These findings demonstrate that our proposed SPIA strategy is generic for multiple PMTs and can be successfully implemented to identify novel and specific inhibitors of PMTs. The specific PMT inhibitors may constitute a new class of anti-proliferative agents for potential therapeutic use. PMID:22256970

  7. Imaging performance and light emission efficiency of Lu2 SiO5:Ce (LSO:Ce) powder scintillator under X-ray mammographic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michail, C.; Toutountzis, A.; David, S.; Kalyvas, N.; Valais, I.; Kandarakis, I.; Panayiotakis, G. S.

    2009-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to measure the imaging transfer characteristics and the luminescence efficiency (XLE) of a Lu2SiO5:Ce (LSO:Ce) powder scintillator for use in X-ray mammography detectors. An LSO:Ce powder scintillating screen, with a coating thickness of 25 mg/cm2, was prepared in our laboratory. The imaging performance of the screen was assessed by experimental determination of the modulation transfer function (MTF) and the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) as well as single index image quality parameters such as noise equivalent pass band (Ne) and informational efficiency ( n I). A theoretical model, describing radiation and light transfer, was fitted to experimental MTF values in order to estimate optical properties of the scintillator. Screen irradiation was performed under exposure conditions employed in mammographic applications (27 kVp, 63 mAs). MTF was determined by the square wave response function (SWRF) method. Results showed that LSO:Ce exhibits high MTF and DQE values, which are comparable to those of the commercially used Gd2O2S:Tb. Considering our image quality parameters and luminescence efficiency results as well as the fast response of the LSO:Ce scintillator screen (40 ns), this material can be considered for use in X-ray mammographic detectors.

  8. Non-Carbon Dyes For Platic Scintillators- Report

    SciTech Connect

    Teprovich, J.; Colon-Mercado, H.; Gaillard, J.; Sexton, L.; Washington, A.; Ward, P.; Velten, J.

    2015-10-19

    Scintillation based detectors are desirable for many radiation detection applications (portal and border monitoring, safeguards verification, contamination detection and monitoring). The development of next generation scintillators will require improved detection sensitivity for weak gamma ray sources, and fast and thermal neutron quantification. Radiation detection of gamma and neutron sources can be accomplished with organic scintillators, however, the single crystals are difficult to grow for large area detectors and subject to cracking. Alternatives to single crystal organic scintillators are plastic scintillators (PS) which offer the ability to be shaped and scaled up to produce large sized detectors. PS is also more robust than the typical organic scintillator and are ideally suited for deployment in harsh real-world environments. PS contain a mixture of dyes to down-convert incident radiation into visible light that can be detected by a PMT. This project will evaluate the potential use of nano-carbon dyes in plastic scintillators.

  9. TORCH screen

    MedlinePlus

    ... different infections in a newborn. TORCH stands for toxoplasmosis , rubella , cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex, and HIV, but it ... used to screen infants for infections such as toxoplasmosis, cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex, syphilis and others. These infections ...

  10. Developmental Screening

    MedlinePlus

    Learn More about Your Child’s Development: Developmental Monitoring and Screening Taking a first step, waving “bye-bye,” and pointing to something interesting are all developmental milestones, ...

  11. Hypertension screening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foulke, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    An attempt was made to measure the response to an announcement of hypertension screening at the Goddard Space Center, to compare the results to those of previous statistics. Education and patient awareness of the problem were stressed.

  12. Vision Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... office. Some community screenings use this method. Corneal light reflex testing This simple test can be performed ... focuses on a penlight, the position of the light reflection from the front surface (cornea) of the ...

  13. A new type of thermal-neutron detector based on ZnS(Ag)/LiF scintillator and avalanche photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin, V. N.; Sadykov, R. A.; Trunov, D. N.; Litvin, V. S.; Aksenov, S. N.; Stolyarov, A. A.

    2015-09-01

    A high-efficiency thermal-neutron detector based on ZnS(Ag)/LiF scintillator is described, which employs a new technique of signal pick-up with the aid of a light guide and avalanche photodiodes instead of optical fibers and photomultipliers. Results of tests on the RADEX pulsed neutron source are presented, in which neutron diffraction patterns of test objects have been obtained.

  14. Application of the Strong Scatter Theory to the Interpretation of Ionospheric Scintillation Measurements along Geostationary Satellite Links at VHF and L-band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrano, C. S.; Groves, K. M.; Basu, S.; Mackenzie, E.; Sheehan, R. E.

    2013-12-01

    In a previous work, we demonstrated that ionospheric turbulence parameters may be inferred from amplitude scintillations well into in the strong scatter regime [Carrano et al., International Journal of Geophysics, 2012]. This technique, called Iterative Parameter Estimation (IPE), uses the strong scatter theory and numerical inversion to estimate the parameters of an ionospheric phase screen (turbulent intensity, phase spectral index, and irregularity zonal drift) consistent with the observed scintillations. The optimal screen parameters are determined such that the theoretical intensity spectrum on the ground best matches the measured intensity spectrum in a least squares sense. We use this technique to interpret scintillation measurements collected during a campaign at Ascension Island (7.96°S, 14.41°W) in March 2000, led by Santimay Basu and his collaborators from Air Force Research Laboratory. Geostationary satellites broadcasting radio signals at VHF and L-band were monitored along nearly co-linear links, enabling a multi-frequency analysis of scintillations with the same propagation geometry. The VHF data were acquired using antennas spaced in the magnetic east-west direction, which enabled direct measurement of the zonal irregularity drift. We show that IPE analysis of the VHF and L-Band scintillations, which exhibited very different statistics due to the wide frequency separation, yields similar estimates of the phase screen parameters that specify the disturbed ionospheric medium. This agreement provides confidence in our phase screen parameter estimates. It also suggests a technique for extrapolating scintillation measurements to frequencies other than those observed that is valid in the case of strong scatter. We find that IPE estimates of the zonal irregularity drift, made using scintillation observations along single space-to-ground link, are consistent with those measured independently using the spaced antenna technique. This encouraging result suggests one may measure the zonal irregularity drift at scintillation monitoring stations equipped with only a single channel receiver, so that the spaced-antenna technique cannot be employed. We noted that the scintillation index (S4) at L-band commonly exceeded that at VHF early in the evening when the irregularities were most intense, followed by one or more reversals of this trend at later local times as aging irregularities decayed and newly formed bubbles drifted over the station. We use the strong scatter theory to explain this perhaps counter-intuitive situation (one would normally expect a higher S4 at the lower frequency) in terms of strong refractive focusing.

  15. Neutron guide

    DOEpatents

    Greene, Geoffrey L.

    1999-01-01

    A neutron guide in which lengths of cylindrical glass tubing have rectangular glass plates properly dimensioned to allow insertion into the cylindrical glass tubing so that a sealed geometrically precise polygonal cross-section is formed in the cylindrical glass tubing. The neutron guide provides easier alignment between adjacent sections than do the neutron guides of the prior art.

  16. Characterizing energy dependence and count rate performance of a dual scintillator fiber-optic detector for computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Hoerner, Matthew R. Stepusin, Elliott J.; Hyer, Daniel E.; Hintenlang, David E.

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Kilovoltage (kV) x-rays pose a significant challenge for radiation dosimetry. In the kV energy range, even small differences in material composition can result in significant variations in the absorbed energy between soft tissue and the detector. In addition, the use of electronic systems in light detection has demonstrated measurement losses at high photon fluence rates incident to the detector. This study investigated the feasibility of using a novel dual scintillator detector and whether its response to changes in beam energy from scatter and hardening is readily quantified. The detector incorporates a tissue-equivalent plastic scintillator and a gadolinium oxysulfide scintillator, which has a higher sensitivity to scatter x-rays. Methods: The detector was constructed by coupling two scintillators: (1) small cylindrical plastic scintillator, 500 μm in diameter and 2 mm in length, and (2) 100 micron sheet of gadolinium oxysulfide 500 μm in diameter, each to a 2 m long optical fiber, which acts as a light guide to transmit scintillation photons from the sensitive element to a photomultiplier tube. Count rate linearity data were obtained from a wide range of exposure rates delivered from a radiological x-ray tube by adjusting the tube current. The data were fitted to a nonparalyzable dead time model to characterize the time response. The true counting rate was related to the reference free air dose air rate measured with a 0.6 cm{sup 3} Radcal{sup ®} thimble chamber as described in AAPM Report No. 111. Secondary electron and photon spectra were evaluated using Monte Carlo techniques to analyze ionization quenching and photon energy-absorption characteristics from free-in-air and in phantom measurements. The depth/energy dependence of the detector was characterized using a computed tomography dose index QA phantom consisting of nested adult head and body segments. The phantom provided up to 32 cm of acrylic with a compatible 0.6 cm{sup 3} calibrated ionization chamber to measure the reference air kerma. Results: Each detector exhibited counting losses of 5% when irradiated at a dose rate of 26.3 mGy/s (Gadolinium) and 324.3 mGy/s (plastic). The dead time of the gadolinium oxysulfide detector was determined to be 48 ns, while the dead time of the plastic scintillating detector was unable to accurately be calculated due to poor counting statistics from low detected count rates. Noticeable depth/energy dependence was observed for the plastic scintillator for depths greater than 16 cm of acrylic that was not present for measurements using the gadolinium oxysulfide scintillator, leading us to believe that quenching may play a larger role in the depth dependence of the plastic scintillator than the incident x-ray energy spectrum. When properly corrected for dead time effects, the energy response of the gadolinium oxysulfide scintillator is consistent with the plastic scintillator. Using the integrated dual detector method was superior to each detector individually as the depth-dependent measure of dose was correctable to less than 8% between 100 and 135 kV. Conclusions: The dual scintillator fiber-optic detector accommodates a methodology for energy dependent corrections of the plastic scintillator, improving the overall accuracy of the dosimeter across the range of diagnostic energies.

  17. Calculations and measurements of the scintillator-to-water stopping power ratio of liquid scintillators for use in proton radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ingram, W. Scott; Robertson, Daniel; Beddar, Sam

    2015-01-01

    Liquid scintillators are a promising detector for high-resolution three-dimensional proton therapy dosimetry. Because the scintillator comprises both the active volume of the detector and the phantom material, an ideal scintillator will exhibit water equivalence in its radiological properties. One of the most fundamental of these is the scintillator’s stopping power. The objective of this study was to compare calculations and measurements of scintillator-to-water stopping power ratios to evaluate the suitability of the liquid scintillators BC-531 and OptiPhase HiSafe 3 for proton dosimetry. We also measured the relative scintillation output of the two scintillators. Both calculations and measurements show that the linear stopping power of OptiPhase is significantly closer to water than that of BC-531. BC-531 has a somewhat higher scintillation output. OptiPhase can be mixed with water at high concentrations, which further improves its scintillator-to-water stopping power ratio. However, this causes the solution to become cloudy, which has a negative impact on the scintillation output and spatial resolution of the detector. OptiPhase is preferred over BC-531 for proton dosimetry because its density and scintillator-to-water stopping power ratio are more water equivalent. PMID:25705066

  18. A Monte Carlo study of an energy-weighted algorithm for radionuclide analysis with a plastic scintillation detector.

    PubMed

    Shin, Wook-Geun; Lee, Hyun-Cheol; Choi, Chang-Il; Park, Chang Soo; Kim, Hong-Suk; Min, Chul Hee

    2015-07-01

    Nuisance and false alarms due to naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) are major problems facing radiation portal monitors (RPMs) for the screening of illicit radioactive materials in airports and ports. Based on energy-weighted counts, we suggest an algorithm that distinguishes radioactive nuclides with a plastic scintillation detector that has poor energy resolution. Our simulation study, using a Monte Carlo method, demonstrated that man-made radionuclides can be separated from NORM by using a conventional RPM. PMID:25836977

  19. Neutron spectroscopy with scintillation detectors using wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, Jessica

    The purpose of this research was to study neutron spectroscopy using the EJ-299-33A plastic scintillator. This scintillator material provided a novel means of detection for fast neutrons, without the disadvantages of traditional liquid scintillation materials. EJ-299-33A provided a more durable option to these materials, making it less likely to be damaged during handling. Unlike liquid scintillators, this plastic scintillator was manufactured from a non-toxic material, making it safer to use, as well as easier to design detectors. The material was also manufactured with inherent pulse shape discrimination abilities, making it suitable for use in neutron detection. The neutron spectral unfolding technique was developed in two stages. Initial detector response function modeling was carried out through the use of the MCNPX Monte Carlo code. The response functions were developed for a monoenergetic neutron flux. Wavelets were then applied to smooth the response function. The spectral unfolding technique was applied through polynomial fitting and optimization techniques in MATLAB. Verification of the unfolding technique was carried out through the use of experimentally determined response functions. These were measured on the neutron source based on the Van de Graff accelerator at the University of Kentucky. This machine provided a range of monoenergetic neutron beams between 0.1 MeV and 24 MeV, making it possible to measure the set of response functions of the EJ-299-33A plastic scintillator detector to neutrons of specific energies. The response of a plutonium-beryllium (PuBe) source was measured using the source available at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. The neutron spectrum reconstruction was carried out using the experimentally measured response functions. Experimental data was collected in the list mode of the waveform digitizer. Post processing of this data focused on the pulse shape discrimination analysis of the recorded response functions to remove the effects of photons and allow for source characterization based solely on the neutron response. The unfolding technique was performed through polynomial fitting and optimization techniques in MATLAB, and provided an energy spectrum for the PuBe source.

  20. Nonproportionality of Scintillator Detectors: Theory and Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, Stephen; Cherepy, Nerine; Hull, Giulia; Valentine, John; Moses, William; Choong, Woon-Seng

    2009-08-17

    On the basis of nonproportionality data obtained for several scintillators, we have developed a theory to describe the carrier dynamics to fit the light yield versus electron energy. The theory of Onsager was adapted to explain how the carriers form excitons or sequentially arrive at the activators to promote the ion to an excited state, and the theory of Birks was employed to allow for exciton-exciton annihilation. We then developed a second theory to deduce the degradation in resolution that results from nonproportionality by evoking Landau fluctuations, which are essentially variations in the deposited energy density that occur as the high energy electron travels along its trajectory. In general there is good agreement with the data, in terms of fitting the nonproportionality curves and reproducing the literature values of nonproportionality's contribution to the scintillator resolution. With the resurgence of interest in developing scintillator detectors that have good energy resolution, an improved understanding of nonproportionality has become a crucial matter since it presents the fundamental limit to the achievable resolution. In order to hasten an improved understanding of scintillator nonproportionality, we have constructed an instrument referred to as SLYNCI (Scintillator Light Yield Nonproportionality Compton Instrument). This is a second-generation instrument to the original device developed by Valentine and coworkers, wherein several new principles of operation have served to increase the data rate by an order of magnitude as discussed in detail in References. In the present article, the focus is on a theory to describe the measured electron response, which is the light yield as a function of the electron energy. To do this, we account for transport of carriers and excitons, in terms of how they transfer their energy to the activators with competition from nonradiative decay pathways. This work builds on the original work of Murray and coworkers, and on the understanding of excitons. We then provide a new theoretical framework from which the nonproportionality data is reduced to a measure of the degradation in resolution. We have utilized data obtained from SLYNCI to obtain accurate nonproportionality data on several scintillators, and have developed a theory to describe the carrier dynamics to fit the data for the light yield versus electron energy.

  1. Real-time Scintillation Monitoring in Alaska from a Longitudinal Chain of ASTRA's SM-211 GPS TEC and Scintillation Receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowley, G.; Azeem, S. I.; Reynolds, A.; Santana, J.; Hampton, D. L.

    2013-12-01

    Amplitude and phase scintillation can cause serious difficulties for GPS receivers. Intense scintillation can cause loss of lock. High latitude studies generally show that phase scintillation can be severe, but the amplitude scintillation tends to be small. The reason for this is not yet understood. Furthermore, the actual causes of the ionospheric irregularities that produce high latitude scintillation are not well understood. While the gradient drift instability is thought to be important in the F-region, there may be other structures present in either the E- or F-regions. The role of particle precipitation is also not well understood. Four of ASTRA's CASES GPS receivers were deployed in Alaska to demonstrate our ability to map scintillation in realtime, to provide space weather services to GPS users, and to initiate a detailed investigation of these effects. These dual-frequency GPS receivers measure total electron content (TEC) and scintillation. The scintillation monitors were deployed in a longitudinal chain at sites in Kaktovic, Fort Yukon, Poker Flat, and Gakona. Scintillation statistics show phase scintillations to be largest at Kaktovic and smallest at Gakona. We present GPS phase scintillation and auroral emission results from the Alaska chain to characterize the correspondence between scintillation and auroral features, and to investigate the role of high latitude auroral features in driving the phase scintillations. We will also present data showing how phase scintillation can cause other GPS receivers to lose lock. The data and results are particularly valuable because they illustrate some of the challenges of using GPS systems for positioning and navigation in an auroral region like Alaska. These challenges for snowplough drivers were recently highlighted, along with the CASES SM-211 space weather monitor, in a special video in which ASTRA and three other small businesses were presented with an entrepreneurial award from William Shatner (http://youtu.be/bIVKEQH_YPk).

  2. Rod guide

    SciTech Connect

    Sable, D.E.

    1988-11-29

    This patent describes a rod guide assembly for a sucker rod longitudinally reciprocably movable in a well flow conductor comprising: a pair of longitudinally spaced upper and lower stops rigidly secured to a sucker rod; and a guide body movably mounted on the rod between the stops. The stops being spaced from each other a distance slightly greater than the length of the guide body, the upper stop engaging the guide body to move the guide body downwardly with the rod after an initial short downward movement of the rod after initiation of each downward movement of the rod and the lower stop engaging the guide body to move the second guide body upwardly with the rod after initial short upward movement of the rod after initiation of each upward movement of the rod during the longitudinal reciprocatory movement of the rod in a well flow conductor.

  3. EPSDT: A Guide for Educational Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Care Financing Administration (DHHS), Washington, DC.

    This guide is intended to help schools develop linkages with the federal Medicaid program, particularly the Early and Periodic, Screening, Diagnostic, and Treatment (EPSDT) program, a comprehensive and preventive health care system for Medicaid-eligible individuals up to age 21. The guide aims to: (1) acquaint schools with State Medicaid agencies…

  4. Divalent europium doped and un-doped calcium iodide scintillators: Scintillator characterization and single crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boatner, L. A.; Ramey, J. O.; Kolopus, J. A.; Neal, John S.

    2015-06-01

    The alkaline-earth scintillator, CaI2:Eu2+, was initially discovered around 1964 by Hofstadter, Odell, and Schmidt. Serious practical problems quickly arose, however, that were associated with the growth of large monolithic single crystals of this material due to its lamellar, mica-like structure. As a result of its theoretically higher light yield, CaI2:Eu2+ has the potential to exceed the excellent scintillation performance of SrI2:Eu2+. In fact, theoretical predictions for the light yield of CaI2:Eu2+ scintillators suggested that an energy resolution approaching 2% at 662 keV could be achievable. As in the case of the early SrI2:Eu2+ scintillator, the performance of CaI2:Eu2+ scintillators has traditionally suffered due, at least in part, to outdated materials synthesis, component stoichiometry/purity, and single-crystal-growth techniques. Based on our recent work on SrI2:Eu2+ scintillators in single-crystal form, we have developed new techniques that are applied here to CaI2:Eu2+ and pure CaI2 with the goal of growing large un-cracked crystals and, potentially, realizing the theoretically predicted performance of the CaI2:Eu2+ form of this material. Calcium iodide does not adhere to modern glassy carbon Bridgman crucibles-so there should be no differential thermal-contraction-induced crystal/crucible stresses on cooling that would result in crystal cracking of the lamellar structure of CaI2. Here we apply glassy carbon crucible Bridgman growth, high-purity growth-charge compounds, our molten salt processing/filtration technique, and extended vacuum-melt-pumping methods to the growth of both CaI2:Eu2+ and un-doped CaI2. Large scintillating single crystals were obtained, and detailed characterization studies of the scintillation properties of CaI2:Eu2+ and pure CaI2 single crystals are presented that include studies of the effects of plastic deformation of the crystals on the scintillator performance.

  5. Divalent Europium Doped and Un-doped Calcium Iodide Scintillators: Scintillator Characterization and Single Crystal Growth

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Boatner, Lynn A; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine; Kolopus, James A; Neal, John S

    2015-01-01

    The alkaline-earth scintillator, CaI2:Eu2+, was initially discovered around 1964 by Hofstadter, Odell, and Schmidt. Serious practical problems quickly arose, however, that were associated with the growth of large monolithic single crystals of this material due to its lamellar, mica-like structure. As a result of its theoretically higher light yield, CaI2:Eu2+ has the potential to exceed the excellent scintillation performance of SrI2:Eu2+. In fact, theoretical predictions for the light yield of CaI2:Eu2+ scintillators suggested that an energy resolution approaching 2% at 662 keV could be achievable. As in the case of the early SrI2:Eu2+ scintillator, the performance of CaI2:Eu2+ scintillators hasmore » traditionally suffered due, at least in part, to outdated materials synthesis, component stoichiometry/purity, and single-crystal-growth techniques. Based on our recent work on SrI2:Eu2+ scintillators in single-crystal form, we have developed new techniques that are applied here to CaI2:Eu2+ and pure CaI2 with the goal of growing large un-cracked crystals and, potentially, realizing the theoretically predicted performance of the CaI2:Eu2+ form of this material. Calcium iodide does not adhere to modern glassy carbon Bridgman crucibles - so there should be no differential thermal-contraction-induced crystal/crucible stresses on cooling that would result in crystal cracking of the lamellar structure of CaI2. Here we apply glassy carbon crucible Bridgman growth, high-purity growth-charge compounds, our molten salt processing/filtration technique, and extended vacuum-melt-pumping methods to the growth of both CaI2:Eu2+ and un-doped CaI2. Large scintillating single crystals were obtained, and detailed characterization studies of the scintillation properties of CaI2:Eu2+ and pure CaI2 single crystals are presented that include studies of the effects of plastic deformation of the crystals on the scintillator performance.« less

  6. Divalent Europium Doped and Un-doped Calcium Iodide Scintillators: Scintillator Characterization and Single Crystal Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Boatner, Lynn A; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine; Kolopus, James A; Neal, John S

    2015-01-01

    The alkaline-earth scintillator, CaI2:Eu2+, was initially discovered around 1964 by Hofstadter, Odell, and Schmidt. Serious practical problems quickly arose, however, that were associated with the growth of large monolithic single crystals of this material due to its lamellar, mica-like structure. As a result of its theoretically higher light yield, CaI2:Eu2+ has the potential to exceed the excellent scintillation performance of SrI2:Eu2+. In fact, theoretical predictions for the light yield of CaI2:Eu2+ scintillators suggested that an energy resolution approaching 2% at 662 keV could be achievable. As in the case of the early SrI2:Eu2+ scintillator, the performance of CaI2:Eu2+ scintillators has traditionally suffered due, at least in part, to outdated materials synthesis, component stoichiometry/purity, and single-crystal-growth techniques. Based on our recent work on SrI2:Eu2+ scintillators in single-crystal form, we have developed new techniques that are applied here to CaI2:Eu2+ and pure CaI2 with the goal of growing large un-cracked crystals and, potentially, realizing the theoretically predicted performance of the CaI2:Eu2+ form of this material. Calcium iodide does not adhere to modern glassy carbon Bridgman crucibles - so there should be no differential thermal-contraction-induced crystal/crucible stresses on cooling that would result in crystal cracking of the lamellar structure of CaI2. Here we apply glassy carbon crucible Bridgman growth, high-purity growth-charge compounds, our molten salt processing/filtration technique, and extended vacuum-melt-pumping methods to the growth of both CaI2:Eu2+ and un-doped CaI2. Large scintillating single crystals were obtained, and detailed characterization studies of the scintillation properties of CaI2:Eu2+ and pure CaI2 single crystals are presented that include studies of the effects of plastic deformation of the crystals on the scintillator performance.

  7. Monitoring and Forecasting Ionospheric Scintillation at High Latitudes (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prikryl, P.; Jayachandran, P. T.; Chadwick, R.; Kelly, T.

    2013-12-01

    Ionospheric scintillation (rapid signal amplitude fading and phase fluctuation) poses a threat to reliable and safe operation of modern technology that relies on Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS). Ionospheric scintillation of GNSS signal severely degrades positional accuracy, causes cycle slips leading to loss of lock that affects performance of radio communication and navigation systems. At high latitudes, the scintillation is caused by ionospheric irregularities produced through coupling between solar wind plasma and the magnetosphere. Climatology of GPS scintillation at high latitudes in both hemispheres shows that phase scintillation occurs predominantly on the dayside in the cusp and in the nightside auroral oval. Solar wind disturbances, in particular the co-rotating interaction regions (CIR) on the leading edge of high-speed streams (HSS) and interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICME), have been closely correlated with the occurrence of scintillation at high latitudes. These results demonstrated a technique of probabilistic forecast of high-latitude phase scintillation occurrence relative to arrival times of HSS and ICME. The Canadian High Arctic Ionospheric Network (CHAIN) has been monitoring GPS ionospheric scintillation and total electron content (TEC) since November 2007. One-minute amplitude and phase scintillation indices from L1 GPS signals and TEC from L1 and L2 GPS signals are computed from amplitude and phase data sampled at 50 Hz. Since 2012, significant expansion of CHAIN has begun with installation of new receivers, each capable of tracking up to 30 satellites including GLONASS and Galileo. The receivers log the raw phase and amplitude of the signal up to a 100-Hz rate for scintillation measurements. We briefly review observations of ionospheric scintillation and highlight new results from CHAIN, including the climatology of scintillation occurrence, collocation with aurora and HF radar backscatter, correlation with CIRs and ICMEs, and the method of probabilistic forecasting of phase scintillation at high latitudes.

  8. Development of an Ultra-Low Background Liquid Scintillation Counter for Trace Level Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Erchinger, Jennifer L.; Orrell, John L.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Douglas, Matthew; Finn, Erin C.; Fuller, Erin S.; Keillor, Martin E.; Morley, Shannon M.; Mullen, Crystal A.; Panisko, Mark E.; Shaff, Sarah M.; Warren, Glen A.; Wright, Michael E.

    2015-09-01

    Low-level liquid scintillation counting (LSC) has been established as one of the radiation detection techniques useful in elucidating environmental processes and environmental monitoring around nuclear facilities. The Ultra-Low Background Liquid Scintillation Counter (ULB-LSC) under construction in the Shallow Underground Laboratory at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory aims to further reduce the MDAs and/or required sample processing. Through layers of passive shielding in conjunction with an active veto and 30 meters water equivalent overburden, the background reduction is expected to be 10 to 100 times below typical analytic low-background liquid scintillation systems. Simulations have shown an expected background of around 14 counts per day. A novel approach to the light collection will use a coated hollow light guide cut into the inner copper shielding. Demonstration LSC measurements will show low-energy detection, spectral deconvolution, and alpha/beta discrimination capabilities, from trials with standards of tritium, strontium-90, and actinium-227, respectively. An overview of the system design and expected demonstration measurements will emphasize the potential applications of the ULB-LSC in environmental monitoring for treaty verification, reach-back sample analysis, and facility inspections.

  9. Scintillating Quantum Dots for Imaging X-rays (SQDIX) for Aircraft Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Eric (Principal Investigator); Williams, Phillip (Principal Investigator); Dehaven, Stan

    2015-01-01

    Scintillation is the process currently employed by conventional x-ray detectors to create x-ray images. Scintillating quantum dots or nano-crystals (StQDs) are a novel, nanometer-scale material that upon excitation by x-rays, re-emit the absorbed energy as visible light. StQDs theoretically have higher output efficiency than conventional scintillating materials and are more environmental friendly. This paper will present the characterization of several critical elements in the use of StQDs that have been performed along a path to the use of this technology in wide spread x-ray imaging. Initial work on the SQDIX system has shown great promise to create state-of-the-art sensors using StQDs as a sensor material. In addition, this work also demonstrates a high degree of promise using StQDs in microstructured fiber optics. Using the microstructured fiber as a light guide could greatly increase the capture efficiency a StQDs based imaging sensor.

  10. Development of a fast radiation detector based on barium fluoride scintillation crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Hetong; School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi'an Jiaotong University, XJTU, Xi'an 710049, Shaanxi ; Zhang, Zichuan; Weng, Xiufeng; Liu, Junhong; Zhang, Kan; Li, Gang; Guan, Xingyin

    2013-07-15

    Barium fluoride (BaF{sub 2}) is an inorganic scintillation material used for the detection of X/gamma radiation due to its relatively high density, equivalent atomic number, radiation hardness, and high luminescence. BaF{sub 2} has a potential capacity to be used in gamma ray timing experiments due to the prompt decay emission components. It is known that the light output from BaF{sub 2} has three decay components: two prompt of those at approximately 195 nm and 220 nm with a decay constant around 600-800 ps and a more intense, slow component at approximately 310 nm with a decay constant around 630 ns which hinders fast timing experiments. We report here the development of a fast radiation detector based on a BaF{sub 2} scintillation crystal employing a special optical filter device, a multiple reflection multi-path ultraviolet region short-wavelength pass light guides (MRMP-short pass filter) by using selective reflection technique, for which the intensity of the slow component is reduced to less than 1%. The methods used for this study provide a novel way to design radiation detector by utilizing scintillation crystal with several emission bands.

  11. Codoped direct-gap semiconductor scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Derenzo, Stephen E.; Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Weber, Marvin J.; Klintenberg, Mattias K.

    2006-05-23

    Fast, bright inorganic scintillators at room temperature are based on radiative electron-hole recombination in direct-gap semiconductors, e.g. CdS and ZnO. The direct-gap semiconductor is codoped with two different impurity atoms to convert the semiconductor to a fast, high luminosity scintillator. The codopant scheme is based on dopant band to dopant trap recombination. One dopant provides a significant concentration of carriers of one type (electrons or holes) and the other dopant traps carriers of the other type. Examples include CdS:In,Te; CdS:In,Ag; CdS:In,Na; ZnO:Ga,P; ZnO:Ga,N; ZnO:Ga,S; and GaN:Ge,Mg.

  12. Codoped direct-gap semiconductor scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Derenzo, Stephen Edward; Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Weber, Marvin J.; Klintenberg, Mattias K.

    2008-07-29

    Fast, bright inorganic scintillators at room temperature are based on radiative electron-hole recombination in direct-gap semiconductors, e.g. CdS and ZnO. The direct-gap semiconductor is codoped with two different impurity atoms to convert the semiconductor to a fast, high luminosity scintillator. The codopant scheme is based on dopant band to dopant trap recombination. One dopant provides a significant concentration of carriers of one type (electrons or holes) and the other dopant traps carriers of the other type. Examples include CdS:In,Te; CdS:In,Ag; CdS:In,Na; ZnO:Ga,P; ZnO:Ga,N; ZnO:Ga,S; and GaN:Ge,Mg.

  13. Scintillating 99Tc Selective Ion Exchange Resins

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell Greenhalgh; Richard D. Tillotson

    2012-07-01

    Scintillating technetium (99Tc) selective ion exchange resins have been developed and evaluated for equilibrium capacities and detection efficiencies. These resins can be utilized for the in-situ concentration and detection of low levels of pertechnetate anions (99TcO4-) in natural waters. Three different polystyrene type resin support materials were impregnated with varying amounts of tricaprylmethylammonium chloride (Aliquat 336) extractant, several different scintillating fluors and wavelength shifters. The prepared resins were contacted batch-wise to equilibrium over a wide range of 99TcO4- concentrations in natural water. The measured capacities were used to develop Langmuir adsorption isotherms for each resin. 99Tc detection efficiencies were determined and up to 71.4 ± 2.6% was achieved with some resins. The results demonstrate that a low level detection limit for 99TcO4- in natural waters can be realized.

  14. Plastic fiber scintillator response to fast neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Danly, C. R.; Sjue, S.; Wilde, C. H.; Merrill, F. E.; Haight, R. C.

    2014-11-15

    The Neutron Imaging System at NIF uses an array of plastic scintillator fibers in conjunction with a time-gated imaging system to form an image of the neutron emission from the imploded capsule. By gating on neutrons that have scattered from the 14.1 MeV DT energy to lower energy ranges, an image of the dense, cold fuel around the hotspot is also obtained. An unmoderated spallation neutron beamline at the Weapons Neutron Research facility at Los Alamos was used in conjunction with a time-gated imaging system to measure the yield of a scintillating fiber array over several energy bands ranging from 1 to 15 MeV. The results and comparison to simulation are presented.

  15. Development of High-Resolution Scintillator Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Larry A. Franks; Warnick J. Kernan

    2007-09-01

    Mercuric iodide (HgI2) is a well known material for the direct detection of gamma-rays; however, the largest volume achievable is limited by the thickness of the detector which needs to be a small fraction of the average trapping length for electrons. We report results of using HgI2 crystals to fabricate photocells used in the readout of scintillators. The optical spectral response and efficiency of these photocells were measured and will be reported. Nuclear response from an HgI2 photocell that was optically matched to a cerium-activated scintillator is presented and discussed. Further improvements can be expected by optimizing the transparent contact technology.

  16. Plastic fiber scintillator response to fast neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danly, C. R.; Sjue, S.; Wilde, C. H.; Merrill, F. E.; Haight, R. C.

    2014-11-01

    The Neutron Imaging System at NIF uses an array of plastic scintillator fibers in conjunction with a time-gated imaging system to form an image of the neutron emission from the imploded capsule. By gating on neutrons that have scattered from the 14.1 MeV DT energy to lower energy ranges, an image of the dense, cold fuel around the hotspot is also obtained. An unmoderated spallation neutron beamline at the Weapons Neutron Research facility at Los Alamos was used in conjunction with a time-gated imaging system to measure the yield of a scintillating fiber array over several energy bands ranging from 1 to 15 MeV. The results and comparison to simulation are presented.

  17. Plastic fiber scintillator response to fast neutrons.

    PubMed

    Danly, C R; Sjue, S; Wilde, C H; Merrill, F E; Haight, R C

    2014-11-01

    The Neutron Imaging System at NIF uses an array of plastic scintillator fibers in conjunction with a time-gated imaging system to form an image of the neutron emission from the imploded capsule. By gating on neutrons that have scattered from the 14.1 MeV DT energy to lower energy ranges, an image of the dense, cold fuel around the hotspot is also obtained. An unmoderated spallation neutron beamline at the Weapons Neutron Research facility at Los Alamos was used in conjunction with a time-gated imaging system to measure the yield of a scintillating fiber array over several energy bands ranging from 1 to 15 MeV. The results and comparison to simulation are presented. PMID:25430353

  18. Neutron detection with single crystal organic scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Zaitseva, N; Newby, J; Hamel, S; Carman, L; Faust, M; Lordi, V; Cherepy, N; Stoeffl, W; Payne, S

    2009-07-15

    Detection of high-energy neutrons in the presence of gamma radiation background utilizes pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) phenomena in organics studied previously only with limited number of materials, mostly liquid scintillators and single crystal stilbene. The current paper presents the results obtained with broader varieties of luminescent organic single crystals. The studies involve experimental tools of crystal growth and material characterization in combination with the advanced computer modeling, with the final goal of better understanding the relevance between the nature of the organic materials and their PSD properties. Special consideration is given to the factors that may diminish or even completely obscure the PSD properties in scintillating crystals. Among such factors are molecular and crystallographic structures that determine exchange coupling and exciton mobility in organic materials and the impurity effect discussed on the examples of trans-stilbene, bibenzyl, 9,10-diphenylanthracene and diphenylacetylene.

  19. Transparent Ceramic Scintillator Fabrication, Properties and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cherepy, N J; Kuntz, J D; Roberts, J J; Hurst, T A; Drury, O B; Sanner, R D; Tillotson, T M; Payne, S A

    2008-08-24

    Transparent ceramics offer an alternative to single crystals for scintillator applications such as gamma ray spectroscopy and radiography. We have developed a versatile, scaleable fabrication method, using Flame Spray Pyrolysis (FSP) to produce feedstock which is readily converted into phase-pure transparent ceramics. We measure integral light yields in excess of 80,000 Ph/MeV with Cerium-doped Garnets, and excellent optical quality. Avalanche photodiode readout of Garnets provides resolution near 6%. For radiography applications, Lutetium Oxide offers a high performance metric and is formable by ceramics processing. Scatter in transparent ceramics due to secondary phases is the principal limitation to optical quality, and afterglow issues that affect the scintillation performance are presently being addressed.

  20. Fast scintillation counter system and performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sasaki, H.; Nishioka, A.; Ohmori, N.; Kusumose, M.; Nakatsuka, T.; Horiki, T.; Hatano, Y.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental study of the fast scintillation counter (FS) system to observe a shower disk structure at Mt. Norikura is described, especially the system performance and a pulse wave-form by a single charge particles. The photomultiplier tube (PT) pulse appears at the leading edge of the main pulse. To remove this PT-pulse from the main pulse, the frame of the scintillator vessel was changed. The fast triggering system was made to decrease the dead time which came from the use of the function of the self triggering of the storage oscilloscope (OSC). To provide a new field on the multi-parameter study of the cosmic ray showers, the system response of the FS system also improved as a result of many considerations.

  1. Scintillator phase of the SNO+ experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozza, V.; SNO+ Collaboration

    2012-07-01

    The SNO+ experiment is the follow up of the SNO experiment, replacing the heavy water volume with about 780 tons of liquid scintillator (LAB) in order to shift the sensitive threshold to lower energy range. The 6000 m.w.e. natural rock shielding, and the use of ultra-clean materials makes the detector suitable for the detection of pep and CNO solar neutrinos, geo-neutrinos, reactor neutrinos and the possible observation of neutrinos from supernovae. Complementing this program, SNO+ will also search for 150Nd (5.6% abundance) neutrinoless double beta decay, loading the liquid scintillator with 0.1% of natural Neodymium. After a review of the general SNO+ setup, the physics of the solar neutrino phase will be presented.

  2. Scintillation noise in widefield radio interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedantham, H. K.; Koopmans, L. V. E.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we consider random phase fluctuations imposed during wave propagation through a turbulent plasma (e.g. ionosphere) as a source of additional noise in interferometric visibilities. We derive expressions for visibility variance for the wide field of view case (FOV ˜10°) by computing the statistics of Fresnel diffraction from a stochastic plasma, and provide an intuitive understanding. For typical ionospheric conditions (diffractive scale ˜5-20 km at 150 MHz), we show that the resulting ionospheric `scintillation noise' can be a dominant source of uncertainty at low frequencies (ν ≲ 200 MHz). Consequently, low-frequency widefield radio interferometers must take this source of uncertainty into account in their sensitivity analysis. We also discuss the spatial, temporal, and spectral coherence properties of scintillation noise that determine its magnitude in deep integrations, and influence prospects for its mitigation via calibration or filtering.

  3. Internet access to data for scintillation compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, W.W.; West, A.C.; Derenzo, S.E.

    1995-09-01

    The LBL Pulsed X-Ray Facility has scintillation data on a large variety of inorganic scintillators. We offer this information on all compounds that we have tested. The only restrictions/favors that we ask users of this data are: (1) The data is intended for research use and may not be sold; (2) If any portion of the data is used in a publication, that the following text appear somewhere in the publication: {open_quotes}This work was supported in part by the Director, Office of Energy Research, Office of Health and Environmental Research, Medical Applications and Biophysical Research Division of the U.S. Department of Energy under contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098, and in part by Public Health Service Grant No. R01 CA48002 awarded by the National Cancer Institutes, Department of Health and Human Services.{close_quotes}.

  4. A Guide to Desktop Videoconferencing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maring, Gerald H.; Levy, Erik W.

    This document presents a step-by-step guide to using three desktop videoconferencing applications: CU-SeeMe, iVisit, and NetMeeting. First, hardware and software recommendations for PC-based and Macintosh systems are provided. Illustrations of sample screens accompany the text for each application. The following additional considerations for…

  5. Improved Neutron Scintillators Based on Nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis Friesel, PhD

    2008-06-30

    The development work conducted in this SBIR has so far not supported the premise that using nano-particles in LiFZnS:Ag foils improves their transparency to 420 (or other frequency) light. This conclusion is based solely on the light absorption properties of LiFZnS foils fabricated from nano- and from micro-particles. Furthermore, even for the case of the Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} foils, the transmission of 420 nm light gained by using nano-particles all but disappears as the foil thickness is increased beyond about 0.2 mm, a practical scintillator thickness. This was not immediately apparent from the preliminary study since no foils thicker than about 0.04 mm were produced. Initially it was believed that the failure to see an improvement by using nano-particles for the LiFZnS foils was caused by the clumping of the particles in Toluene due to the polarity of the ZnS particles. However, we found, much to our surprise, that nano-particle ZnS alone in polystyrene, and in Epoxy, had worse light transmission properties than the micro-particle foils for equivalent thickness and density foils. The neutron detection measurements, while disappointing, are attributable to our inability to procure or fabricate Bulk Doped ZnS nanoparticles. The cause for the failure of nano-particles to improve the scintillation light, and hence improved neutron detection efficiency, is a fundamental one of light scattering within the scintillator. A consequence of PartTec's documentation of this is that several concepts for the fabrication of improved {sup 6}LiFZnS scintillators were formulated that will be the subject of a future SBIR submission.

  6. Characteristics of Yerevan High Transparency Scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Zorn, Carl; Asryan, Gegham; Egiyan, Kim; Tarverdyan, M.; Amaryan, Moscov; Amaryan, Moskov; Demirchyan, Raphael; Stepanyan, Stepan; Burkert, Volker; Sharabian, Youri

    1992-08-01

    Optical transmission, light output and time characteristics are given for long scintillator strips fabricated at the Yerevan Physics Institute using the extrusion method. It is shown that at 45% relative (to anthracene) light output, good transmission (2.5/2.9 m attenuation length with photomultiplier direct readout and 3/3.5 m attenuation length fiber readout) and time characteristics (average decay time 2.8 nsec) were obtained.

  7. Nanophosphor composite scintillators comprising a polymer matrix

    DOEpatents

    Muenchausen, Ross Edward; Mckigney, Edward Allen; Gilbertson, Robert David

    2010-11-16

    An improved nanophosphor composite comprises surface modified nanophosphor particles in a solid matrix. The nanophosphor particle surface is modified with an organic ligand, or by covalently bonding a polymeric or polymeric precursor material. The surface modified nanophosphor particle is essentially charge neutral, thereby preventing agglomeration of the nanophosphor particles during formation of the composite material. The improved nanophosphor composite may be used in any conventional scintillator application, including in a radiation detector.

  8. Observations of interplanetary scintillation in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Li-Jia; Peng, Bo

    2013-07-01

    The Sun affects the Earth in multiple ways. In particular, the material in interplanetary space comes from coronal expansion in the form of solar wind, which is the primary source of the interplanetary medium. Ground-based Interplanetary Scintillation (IPS) observations are an important and effective method for measuring solar wind speed and the structures of small diameter radio sources. In this paper we will discuss the IPS observations in China.

  9. Studies of NICADD Extruded Scintillator Strips

    SciTech Connect

    Dychkant, Alexandre; et al.

    2005-03-01

    About four hundred one meter long, 10 cm wide and 5 mm thick extruded scintillating strips were measured at four different points. The results of measurements strip responses to a radioactive source {sup 90}Sr are provided, and details of strip choice, preparation, and method of measurement are included. This work was essential for prototyping a tail catcher and muon tracker for a future international electron positron linear collider detector.

  10. Simulating Silicon Photomultiplier Response to Scintillation Light

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Abhinav K.; van Dam, Herman T.; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Clarkson, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The response of a Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM) to optical signals is affected by many factors including photon-detection efficiency, recovery time, gain, optical crosstalk, afterpulsing, dark count, and detector dead time. Many of these parameters vary with overvoltage and temperature. When used to detect scintillation light, there is a complicated non-linear relationship between the incident light and the response of the SiPM. In this paper, we propose a combined discrete-time discrete-event Monte Carlo (MC) model to simulate SiPM response to scintillation light pulses. Our MC model accounts for all relevant aspects of the SiPM response, some of which were not accounted for in the previous models. We also derive and validate analytic expressions for the single-photoelectron response of the SiPM and the voltage drop across the quenching resistance in the SiPM microcell. These analytic expressions consider the effect of all the circuit elements in the SiPM and accurately simulate the time-variation in overvoltage across the microcells of the SiPM. Consequently, our MC model is able to incorporate the variation of the different SiPM parameters with varying overvoltage. The MC model is compared with measurements on SiPM-based scintillation detectors and with some cases for which the response is known a priori. The model is also used to study the variation in SiPM behavior with SiPM-circuit parameter variations and to predict the response of a SiPM-based detector to various scintillators. PMID:26236040

  11. Data-driven exploration of the ionization-phonon partitioning in scintillating radiation detector materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ferris, Kim F.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Jordan, David V.; Jones, Dumont M.

    2008-06-01

    An information-based approach to scintillating materials development has been applied to ranking the alkali halide and alkali earth halide series in terms of their energy conversion efficiency. The efficiency of scintillating radiation detection materials can be viewed as the product of a consecutive series of electronic processes (energy conversion, transfer, and luminescence) as outlined by Lempicki and others. Relevant data are relatively sparse, but sufficient for the development of forward mapping of materials properties through materials signatures. These mappings have been used to explore the limits of the K ratio in the Lempicki model with chemical composition, and examine its relationship with another common design objective, density. The alkali halides and alkali earth halide compounds separate themselves into distinct behavior classes favoring heavier cations and anions for improved K ratio. While the coupling of ionization is strongly related to the optical phonon modes, both dielectric and band gap contributions cannot be ignored. When applied within a candidate screen, the resulting model for K imposes design rules—simple structural restrictions—on scintillating radiation detector materials.

  12. Broadband Ionospheric Scintillation Measurements from Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suszcynsky, D. M.; Light, M. E.; Pigue, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Radio Frequency Propagation (RFProp) experiment consists of a satellite-based radio receiver suite to study various aspects of trans-ionospheric signal propagation and detection in four frequency bands, 2 - 55 MHz, 125 - 175 MHz, 365 - 415 MHz and 825 - 1100 MHz. In this paper, we present an overview of the RFProp on-orbit research and analysis effort with particular focus on an equatorial scintillation experiment called ESCINT. The 3-year ESCINT project is designed to characterize equatorial ionospheric scintillation in the upper HF and lower VHF portions of the radio spectrum (20 - 150 MHz). Both a 40 MHz continuous wave (CW) signal and 30 - 42 MHz swept frequency signal are transmitted to the satellite receiver suite from the Reagan Test Site at Kwajalein Atoll in the Marshall Islands (8.7° N, 167.7° E) in four separate campaigns centered on the 2014 and 2015 equinoxes. Results from the first campaign conducted from April 22 - May 15, 2014 will be presented including (a) coherence bandwidth measurements over a full range of transmission frequencies and scintillation activity levels, (b) spread-Doppler clutter effects arising from preferential ray paths to the satellite due to refraction off of isolated density irregularities, and (c) supporting ray-trace simulations. The broadband nature of the measurements is found to offer unique insight into both the structure of ionospheric irregularities and their impact on HF/VHF trans-ionospheric radio wave propagation.

  13. Boron-Loaded Silicone Rubber Scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Z.W.; Maya, L.; Brown, G.M.; Sloop, F.V.Jr

    2003-05-12

    Silicone rubber received attention as an alternative to polyvinyltoluene in applications in which the scintillator is exposed to high doses because of the increased resistance of the rubber to the formation of blue-absorbing color centers. Work by Bowen, et al., and Harmon, et al., demonstrated their properties under gamma/x-ray irradiation, and Bell, et al. have shown their response to thermal neutrons. This last work, however, provided an example of a silicone in which both the boron and the scintillator were contained in the rubber as solutes, a formulation which led to the precipitation of solids and sublimation of the boron component. In the present work we describe a scintillator in which the boron is chemically bonded to the siloxane and so avoids the problem of precipitation and loss of boron to sublimation. Material containing up to 18% boron, by weight, was prepared, mounted on photomultipliers, and exposed to both neutron and gamma fluxes. Pulse height spectra showing the neutron and photon response were obtained, and although the light output was found to be much poorer than from samples in which boron was dissolved, the higher boron concentrations enabled essentially 100% neutron absorption in only a few millimeters' thickness of rubber.

  14. Pulse height model for deuterated scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haitang; Enqvist, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    An analytical model of light pulse height distribution for finite deuterated scintillation detectors is created using the impulse approximation. Particularly, the energy distribution of a scattered neutron is calculated based on an existing collision probability scheme for general cylindrical shaped detectors considering double differential cross-sections. The light pulse height distribution is analytically and numerically calculated by convoluting collision sequences with the light output function for an EJ-315 detector from our measurements completed at Ohio University. The model provides a good description of collision histories capturing transferred neutron energy in deuterium-based scintillation materials. The resulting light pulse height distribution details pulse compositions and their corresponding contributions. It shows that probabilities of neutron collision with carbon and deuterium nuclei are comparable, however the light pulse amplitude due to collisions with carbon nuclei is small and mainly located at the lower region of the light pulse distribution axis. The model can explore those neutron interaction events that generate pulses near or below a threshold that would be imposed in measurements. A comparison is made between the light pulse height distributions given by the analytical model and measurements. It reveals a significant probability of a neutron generating a small light pulse due to collisions with carbon nuclei when compared to larger light pulse generated by collisions involving deuterium nuclei. This model is beneficial to understand responses of scintillation materials and pulse compositions, as well as nuclei information extraction from recorded pulses.

  15. Screening for cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, A.B.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains three sections: Fundamentals of Screening, Screening Tests, and Screening for Specific Cancer Sites. Each section consists of several chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Principles of Screening and of the Evaluation of Screening Programs; Economic Aspects of Screening; Cervical Cytology; Screening Tests for Bladder Cancer; Fecal Occult Blood Testing; Screening for Cancer of the Cervix; Screening for Gastric Cancer; and Screening for Oral Cancer.

  16. Temperature Dependence of Scintillation Properties of Bright Oxide Scintillators for Well-Logging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagida, Takayuki; Fujimoto, Yutaka; Kurosawa, Shunsuke; Kamada, Kei; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Nikl, Martin; Chani, Valery

    2013-07-01

    Scintillation characteristics such as the pulse height, energy resolution, and decay time of single crystals of Tl-doped NaI (Tl:NaI), Ce-doped Lu2SiO5 (Ce:LSO), Ce-doped YAlO3 (Ce:YAP), Ce-doped Gd3(Al,Ga)5O12 (Ce:GAGG), Pr-doped Lu3Al5O12 (Pr:LuAG), undoped LuAG, and Ce-doped Y3Al5O12 (Ce:YAG) transparent ceramics were compared at 25-150 °C to simulate well logging conditions. For increasing temperature, the light output of the scintillators decreased, mostly because of thermal quenching. Among these samples, Pr:LuAG demonstrated the highest scintillation performance at 150 °C.

  17. Methods for the continuous production of plastic scintillator materials

    DOEpatents

    Bross, Alan; Pla-Dalmau, Anna; Mellott, Kerry

    1999-10-19

    Methods for producing plastic scintillating material employing either two major steps (tumble-mix) or a single major step (inline-coloring or inline-doping). Using the two step method, the polymer pellets are mixed with silicone oil, and the mixture is then tumble mixed with the dopants necessary to yield the proper response from the scintillator material. The mixture is then placed in a compounder and compounded in an inert gas atmosphere. The resultant scintillator material is then extruded and pelletized or formed. When only a single step is employed, the polymer pellets and dopants are metered into an inline-coloring extruding system. The mixture is then processed under a inert gas atmosphere, usually argon or nitrogen, to form plastic scintillator material in the form of either scintillator pellets, for subsequent processing, or as material in the direct formation of the final scintillator shape or form.

  18. Scintillation properties of cerium-doped germanate glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chun; Zeng, QingJi; Gan, Fuxi

    2000-11-01

    The properties of high rare-earth-containing germanate glass have been investigated to assess the potential for using this material to construct electromagnetic calorimeters for particle physics. We report here on measurements of scintillation yield, transmission and decay time, on large blocks of Ce3+-doped Gd2O3-based glasses, the samples were excited by a high energy X-ray beam and the associated scintillation yield and decay time was measured. The optical transmission of the samples was measured. It was observed that scintillation yield of present scintillation glass is 20 - 30% of BGO scintillation yield, decay time is in range of 60 - 90 ns, glass density is 5.75 g/cm3. It was concluded that higher density and availability and low cost make this glass become promising candidate for cerium doped dense scintillator.

  19. Phase and coherence analysis of VHF scintillation over Christmas Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shume, E. B.; Mannucci, A. J.; Caton, R.

    2014-03-01

    This short paper presents phase and coherence data from the cross-wavelet transform applied on longitudinally separated very high frequency (VHF) equatorial ionospheric scintillation observations over Christmas Island. The phase and coherence analyses were employed on a pair of scintillation observations, namely, the east-looking and west-looking VHF scintillation monitors at Christmas Island. Our analysis includes 3 years of peak season scintillation data from 2008, 2009 (low solar activity), and 2011 (moderate solar activity). In statistically significant and high spectral coherence regions of the cross-wavelet transform, scintillation observations from the east-looking monitor lead those from the west-looking monitor by about 20 to 60 (40 ± 20) min (most frequent lead times). Using several years (seasons and solar cycle) of lead (or lag) and coherence information of the cross-wavelet transform, we envisage construction of a probability model for forecasting scintillation in the nighttime equatorial ionosphere.

  20. Measurement accuracy and Cerenkov removal for high performance, high spatial resolution scintillation dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Archambault, Louis; Beddar, A. Sam; Gingras, Luc

    2006-01-15

    With highly conformal radiation therapy techniques such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy, radiosurgery, and tomotherapy becoming more common in clinical practice, the use of these narrow beams requires a higher level of precision in quality assurance and dosimetry. Plastic scintillators with their water equivalence, energy independence, and dose rate linearity have been shown to possess excellent qualities that suit the most complex and demanding radiation therapy treatment plans. The primary disadvantage of plastic scintillators is the presence of Cerenkov radiation generated in the light guide, which results in an undesired stem effect. Several techniques have been proposed to minimize this effect. In this study, we compared three such techniques--background subtraction, simple filtering, and chromatic removal--in terms of reproducibility and dose accuracy as gauges of their ability to remove the Cerenkov stem effect from the dose signal. The dosimeter used in this study comprised a 6-mm{sup 3} plastic scintillating fiber probe, an optical fiber, and a color charge-coupled device camera. The whole system was shown to be linear and the total light collected by the camera was reproducible to within 0.31% for 5-s integration time. Background subtraction and chromatic removal were both found to be suitable for precise dose evaluation, with average absolute dose discrepancies of 0.52% and 0.67%, respectively, from ion chamber values. Background subtraction required two optical fibers, but chromatic removal used only one, thereby preventing possible measurement artifacts when a strong dose gradient was perpendicular to the optical fiber. Our findings showed that a plastic scintillation dosimeter could be made free of the effect of Cerenkov radiation.

  1. Predicting the timing properties of phosphor-coated scintillators using Monte Carlo light transport simulation.

    PubMed

    Roncali, Emilie; Schmall, Jeffrey P; Viswanath, Varsha; Berg, Eric; Cherry, Simon R

    2014-04-21

    Current developments in positron emission tomography focus on improving timing performance for scanners with time-of-flight (TOF) capability, and incorporating depth-of-interaction (DOI) information. Recent studies have shown that incorporating DOI correction in TOF detectors can improve timing resolution, and that DOI also becomes more important in long axial field-of-view scanners. We have previously reported the development of DOI-encoding detectors using phosphor-coated scintillation crystals; here we study the timing properties of those crystals to assess the feasibility of providing some level of DOI information without significantly degrading the timing performance. We used Monte Carlo simulations to provide a detailed understanding of light transport in phosphor-coated crystals which cannot be fully characterized experimentally. Our simulations used a custom reflectance model based on 3D crystal surface measurements. Lutetium oxyorthosilicate crystals were simulated with a phosphor coating in contact with the scintillator surfaces and an external diffuse reflector (teflon). Light output, energy resolution, and pulse shape showed excellent agreement with experimental data obtained on 3 × 3 × 10 mm³ crystals coupled to a photomultiplier tube. Scintillator intrinsic timing resolution was simulated with head-on and side-on configurations, confirming the trends observed experimentally. These results indicate that the model may be used to predict timing properties in phosphor-coated crystals and guide the coating for optimal DOI resolution/timing performance trade-off for a given crystal geometry. Simulation data suggested that a time stamp generated from early photoelectrons minimizes degradation of the timing resolution, thus making this method potentially more useful for TOF-DOI detectors than our initial experiments suggested. Finally, this approach could easily be extended to the study of timing properties in other scintillation crystals, with a range of treatments and materials attached to the surface. PMID:24694727

  2. Measurement accuracy and cerenkov removal for high performance, high spatial resolution scintillation dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Archambault, Louis; Beddar, A Sam; Gingras, Luc; Roy, René; Beaulieu, Luc

    2006-01-01

    With highly conformal radiation therapy techniques such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy, radiosurgery, and tomotherapy becoming more common in clinical practice, the use of these narrow beams requires a higher level of precision in quality assurance and dosimetry. Plastic scintillators with their water equivalence, energy independence, and dose rate linearity have been shown to possess excellent qualities that suit the most complex and demanding radiation therapy treatment plans. The primary disadvantage of plastic scintillators is the presence of Cerenkov radiation generated in the light guide, which results in an undesired stem effect. Several techniques have been proposed to minimize this effect. In this study, we compared three such techniques-background subtraction, simple filtering, and chromatic removal-in terms of reproducibility and dose accuracy as gauges of their ability to remove the Cerenkov stem effect from the dose signal. The dosimeter used in this study comprised a 6-mm(3) plastic scintillating fiber probe, an optical fiber, and a color charge-coupled device camera. The whole system was shown to be linear and the total light collected by the camera was reproducible to within 0.31% for 5-s integration time. Background subtraction and chromatic removal were both found to be suitable for precise dose evaluation, with average absolute dose discrepancies of 0.52% and 0.67%, respectively, from ion chamber values. Background subtraction required two optical fibers, but chromatic removal used only one, thereby preventing possible measurement artifacts when a strong dose gradient was perpendicular to the optical fiber. Our findings showed that a plastic scintillation dosimeter could be made free of the effect of Cerenkov radiation. PMID:16485419

  3. Hearing Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson-Curiskis, Nanette

    2012-01-01

    Hearing levels are threatened by modern life--headsets for music, rock concerts, traffic noises, etc. It is crucial we know our hearing levels so that we can draw attention to potential problems. This exercise requires that students receive a hearing screening for their benefit as well as for making the connection of hearing to listening.

  4. Classroom Screening.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alpha Plus Corp., Piedmont, CA.

    This classroom screening device was developed by the Circle Preschool First Chance Project, a government-funded program to integrate handicapped children into regular classroom activities, for use in preschools, nursery schools, Head Start centers and other agencies working with young children. It is designed to give a gross measure of a child's…

  5. Streptococcal screen

    MedlinePlus

    ... The swab is tested to identify group A streptococcus, the cause of strep throat. It takes about 7 minutes to get the ... positive strep screen most often means Group A streptococcus is ... have strep throat. Sometimes, the test may be positive, even if ...

  6. Satellite guide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The University of Rhode Island's Sea Grant Program has published what it calls the first user's guide to environmental satellite data. Written by Peter Cornillon, an oceanographer at Rhode Island, the guide spells out which agencies distribute information from 14 environmental satellites. For those unfamiliar with remote-sensing techniques, the guide also delineates the various sensors the satellites carry and the types of information they produce. The heart of the looseleaf-formatted guide is an overview of the characteristics and objectives of each satellite and the characteristics of the data available.

  7. Systematic studies of small scintillators for new sampling calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacosalem, E. P.; Iba, S.; Nakajima, N.; Ono, H.; Sanchez, A. L. C.; Bacala, A. M.; Miyata, H.

    2007-12-01

    A new sampling calorimeter using very thin scintillators and the multi-pixel photon counter (MPPC) has been proposed to produce better position resolution for the international linear collider (ILC) experiment. As part of this R&D study, small plastic scintillators of different sizes, thickness and wrapping reflectors are systematically studied. The scintillation light due to beta rays from a collimated ^{90}Sr source are collected from the scintillator by wavelength-shifting (WLS) fiber and converted into electrical signals at the PMT. The wrapped scintillator that gives the best light yield is determined by comparing the measured pulse height of each 10 × 40 × 2 mm strip scintillator covered with 3M reflective mirror film, teflon, white paint, black tape, gold, aluminum and white paint+teflon. The pulse height dependence on position, length and thickness of the 3M reflective mirror film and teflon wrapped scintillators are measured. Results show that the 3M radiant mirror film-wrapped scintillator has the greatest light yield with an average of 9.2 photoelectrons. It is observed that light yield slightly increases with scintillator length, but increases to about 100% when WLS fiber diameter is increased from 1.0 mm to 1.6 mm. The position dependence measurement along the strip scintillator showed the uniformity of light transmission from the sensor to the PMT. A dip across the strip is observed which is 40% of the maximum pulse height. The block type scintillator pulse height, on the other hand, is found to be almost proportional to scintillator thickness.

  8. Transition effect of air shower particles in plastic scintillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asakimori, K.; Maeda, T.; Kameda, T.; Mizushima, K.; Misaki, Y.

    1985-01-01

    The transition effect of air shower particles in the plastic scintillators near the core was measured by scintillators of various thickness. The air showers selected for the measurement were of 10,000. Results obtained are as follows: (1) the multiplication of shower particles in the scintillators is less than 20% for that of 50 mm thickness; (2) dependence of the transition effect on age parameter is not recognized within the experimental errors.

  9. Application of accelerators for the research and development of scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibuya, Kengo; Koshimizu, Masanori; Asai, Keisuke; Muroya, Yusa; Katsumura, Yosuke; Inadama, Naoko; Yoshida, Eiji; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Yamaya, Taiga; Murayama, Hideo

    2007-08-01

    We introduce experimental systems which use accelerators to evaluate scintillation properties such as scintillation intensity, wavelength, and lifetime. A single crystal of good optical quality is often unavailable during early stages in the research and development (R&D) of new scintillator materials. Because of their beams' high excitation power and/or low penetration depth, accelerators facilitate estimation of the properties of early samples which may only be available as powders, thin films, and very small crystals. We constructed a scintillation spectrum measurement system that uses a Van de Graaff accelerator and an optical multichannel analyzer to estimate the relative scintillation intensity. In addition, we constructed a scintillation time profile measurement system that uses an electron linear accelerator and a femtosecond streak camera or a microchannel plate photomultiplier tube followed by a digital oscilloscope to determine the scintillation lifetimes. The time resolution is approximately 10ps. The scintillation spectra or time profiles can be obtained in a significantly shorter acquisition time in comparison with that required by conventional measuring systems. The advantages of the systems described in this study can significantly promote the R&D of novel scintillator materials.

  10. Application of accelerators for the research and development of scintillators.

    PubMed

    Shibuya, Kengo; Koshimizu, Masanori; Asai, Keisuke; Muroya, Yusa; Katsumura, Yosuke; Inadama, Naoko; Yoshida, Eiji; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Yamaya, Taiga; Murayama, Hideo

    2007-08-01

    We introduce experimental systems which use accelerators to evaluate scintillation properties such as scintillation intensity, wavelength, and lifetime. A single crystal of good optical quality is often unavailable during early stages in the research and development (R&D) of new scintillator materials. Because of their beams' high excitation power and/or low penetration depth, accelerators facilitate estimation of the properties of early samples which may only be available as powders, thin films, and very small crystals. We constructed a scintillation spectrum measurement system that uses a Van de Graaff accelerator and an optical multichannel analyzer to estimate the relative scintillation intensity. In addition, we constructed a scintillation time profile measurement system that uses an electron linear accelerator and a femtosecond streak camera or a microchannel plate photomultiplier tube followed by a digital oscilloscope to determine the scintillation lifetimes. The time resolution is approximately 10 ps. The scintillation spectra or time profiles can be obtained in a significantly shorter acquisition time in comparison with that required by conventional measuring systems. The advantages of the systems described in this study can significantly promote the R&D of novel scintillator materials. PMID:17764319

  11. Large-scale liquid scintillation detectors for solar neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benziger, Jay B.; Calaprice, Frank P.

    2016-04-01

    Large-scale liquid scintillation detectors are capable of providing spectral yields of the low energy solar neutrinos. These detectors require > 100 tons of liquid scintillator with high optical and radiopurity. In this paper requirements for low-energy neutrino detection by liquid scintillation are specified and the procedures to achieve low backgrounds in large-scale liquid scintillation detectors for solar neutrinos are reviewed. The designs, operations and achievements of Borexino, KamLAND and SNO+ in measuring the low-energy solar neutrino fluxes are reviewed.

  12. Phase and coherence of longitudinally separated equatorial ionospheric scintillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shume, E. B.; Mannucci, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents the first calculation of phase and coherence of cross-wavelet transform applied on longitudinally separated VHF and L-band equatorial ionospheric scintillation. The cross-wavelet analysis has utilized scintillation observations made over equatorial South America and Christmas Island. Part of the results of this study has been reported recently in the Geophysical Research Letters by Shume and Mannucci (2013). The phase and coherence analysis were employed on pairs of scintillation observations separated by longitudes thereby to develop VHF and L-band scintillation (and equatorial spread F) forecast tools west of observation sites.

  13. Composite solid-state scintillators for neutron detection

    DOEpatents

    Dai, Sheng; Im, Hee-Jung; Pawel, Michelle D.

    2006-09-12

    Applicant's present invention is a composite scintillator for neutron detection comprising a matrix material fabricated from an inorganic sol-gel precursor solution homogeneously doped with a liquid scintillating material and a neutron absorbing material. The neutron absorbing material yields at least one of an electron, a proton, a triton, an alpha particle or a fission fragment when the neutron absorbing material absorbs a neutron. The composite scintillator further comprises a liquid scintillating material in a self-assembled micelle formation homogeneously doped in the matrix material through the formation of surfactant-silica composites. The scintillating material is provided to scintillate when traversed by at least one of an electron, a proton, a triton, an alpha particle or a fission fragment. The scintillating material is configured such that the matrix material surrounds the micelle formation of the scintillating material. The composite scintillator is fabricated and applied as a thin film on substrate surfaces, a coating on optical fibers or as a glass material.

  14. 21 CFR 892.1100 - Scintillation (gamma) camera.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) Identification. A scintillation (gamma) camera is a device intended to image the distribution of radionuclides in... analysis and display equipment, patient and equipment supports, radionuclide anatomical markers,...

  15. 21 CFR 892.1100 - Scintillation (gamma) camera.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) Identification. A scintillation (gamma) camera is a device intended to image the distribution of radionuclides in... analysis and display equipment, patient and equipment supports, radionuclide anatomical markers,...

  16. 21 CFR 892.1100 - Scintillation (gamma) camera.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Identification. A scintillation (gamma) camera is a device intended to image the distribution of radionuclides in... analysis and display equipment, patient and equipment supports, radionuclide anatomical markers,...

  17. Development of polystyrene-based scintillation materials and its mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Hidehito; Kitamura, Hisashi; Shinji, Osamu; Saito, Katashi; Shirakawa, Yoshiyuki; Takahashi, Sentaro

    2012-12-01

    Scintillation materials based on polystyrene (PS) have been investigated. Para-terphenyl was employed as a fluorescent molecule (fluor) that functions as a wavelength shifter. A clear increase in photon yield of the scintillation materials relative to the pure PS was observed, which cannot be explained by the conventional theory of scintillation mechanism. Furthermore, the photon yield increased with flour concentration in accordance with a power-law. Here we reveal the emergence of a luminescence of PS-based scintillation materials and demonstrate that their photon yields can be controlled by the fluor concentration.

  18. Plasmonic light yield enhancement of a liquid scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bignell, Lindsey J.; Mume, Eskender; Jackson, Timothy W.; Lee, George P.

    2013-05-01

    We demonstrate modifications to the light yield properties of an organic liquid scintillator due to the localization of the tertiary fluorophore component to the surface of Ag-core silica-shell nanoparticles. We attribute this enhancement to the near-field interaction of Ag nanoparticle plasmons with these fluor molecules. The scintillation light yield enhancement is shown to be equal to the fluorescence enhancement within measurement uncertainties. With a suitable choice of plasmon energy and scintillation fluor, this effect may be used to engineer scintillators with enhanced light yields for radiation detection applications.

  19. Lanthanide doped strontium-barium cesium halide scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Bizarri, Gregory; Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Derenzo, Stephen E.; Borade, Ramesh B.; Gundiah, Gautam; Yan, Zewu; Hanrahan, Stephen M.; Chaudhry, Anurag; Canning, Andrew

    2015-06-09

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising an inorganic scintillator comprising an optionally lanthanide-doped strontium-barium, optionally cesium, halide, useful for detecting nuclear material.

  20. Energy Transfer Based Nanocomposite Scintillator for Radiation Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslam, Soha; Sahi, Sunil; Chen, Wei; Ma, Lun; Kenarangui, Rasool

    2014-09-01

    Scintillators are the materials that emit light upon irradiation with high energy radiation like X-ray or gamma-ray. Inorganic single crystal and organic (plastic and liquid) are the two most used scintillator types. Both of these scintillator kinds have advantages and disadvantages. Inorganic single crystals are expensive and difficult to grow in desire shape and size. Also, single crystal scintillator such as NaI and CsI are very hygroscopic. On the other hand, organic scintillators have low density which limits their applications in gamma spectroscopy. Due to high quantum yield and size dependent emission, nanoparticles have attracted interested in various field of research. Here, we have studies the nanoparticles for radiation detection. We have synthesized nanoparticles of Cerium fluoride (CeF3), Zinc Oxide (ZnO), Cadmium Telluride (CdTe), Copper complex and Zinc sulfide (ZnS). We have used Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) principle to enhance the luminescence properties of nanocomposite scintillator. Nanocomposites scintillators are structurally characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Optical properties are studied using Photoluminescence, UV-Visible and X-ray. Enhancements in the luminescence are observed under UV and X-ray excitation. Preliminary studies shows nanocomposite scintillators are promising for radiation detection. Scintillators are the materials that emit light upon irradiation with high energy radiation like X-ray or gamma-ray. Inorganic single crystal and organic (plastic and liquid) are the two most used scintillator types. Both of these scintillator kinds have advantages and disadvantages. Inorganic single crystals are expensive and difficult to grow in desire shape and size. Also, single crystal scintillator such as NaI and CsI are very hygroscopic. On the other hand, organic scintillators have low density which limits their applications in gamma spectroscopy. Due to high quantum yield and size dependent emission, nanoparticles have attracted interested in various field of research. Here, we have studies the nanoparticles for radiation detection. We have synthesized nanoparticles of Cerium fluoride (CeF3), Zinc Oxide (ZnO), Cadmium Telluride (CdTe), Copper complex and Zinc sulfide (ZnS). We have used Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) principle to enhance the luminescence properties of nanocomposite scintillator. Nanocomposites scintillators are structurally characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Optical properties are studied using Photoluminescence, UV-Visible and X-ray. Enhancements in the luminescence are observed under UV and X-ray excitation. Preliminary studies shows nanocomposite scintillators are promising for radiation detection. US Department of Homeland Security.

  1. Slavery Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minneapolis Public Schools, Minn.

    This teachers guide outlines two major objectives for this eighth grade social studies unit: 1) student discovery, practice, and refinement of historical inquiry skills based on primary source work; and, 2) understanding of the concepts and content about slavery as a social institution. The guide also specifies behavioral objectives, teaching

  2. Vision Screening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Visi Screen OSS-C, marketed by Vision Research Corporation, incorporates image processing technology originally developed by Marshall Space Flight Center. Its advantage in eye screening is speed. Because it requires no response from a subject, it can be used to detect eye problems in very young children. An electronic flash from a 35 millimeter camera sends light into a child's eyes, which is reflected back to the camera lens. The photorefractor then analyzes the retinal reflexes generated and produces an image of the child's eyes, which enables a trained observer to identify any defects. The device is used by pediatricians, day care centers and civic organizations that concentrate on children with special needs.

  3. RADTRAN 5 user guide.

    SciTech Connect

    Kanipe, Frances L.; Neuhauser, Karen Sieglinde

    2003-07-01

    This User Guide for the RADTRAN 5 computer code for transportation risk analysis describes basic risk concepts and provides the user with step-by-step directions for creating input files by means of either the RADDOG input file generator software or a text editor. It also contains information on how to interpret RADTRAN 5 output, how to obtain and use several types of important input data, and how to select appropriate analysis methods. Appendices include a glossary of terms, a listing of error messages, data-plotting information, images of RADDOG screens, and a table of all data in the internal radionuclide library.

  4. A model for the secondary scintillation pulse shape from a gas proportional scintillation counter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazkaz, K.; Joshi, T. H.

    2016-03-01

    Proportional scintillation counters (PSCs), both single- and dual-phase, can measure the scintillation (S1) and ionization (S2) channels from particle interactions within the detector volume. The signal obtained from these detectors depends first on the physics of the medium (the initial scintillation and ionization), and second how the physics of the detector manipulates the resulting photons and liberated electrons. In this paper we develop a model of the detector physics that incorporates event topology, detector geometry, electric field configuration, purity, optical properties of components, and wavelength shifters. We present an analytic form of the model, which allows for general study of detector design and operation, and a Monte Carlo model which enables a more detailed exploration of S2 events. This model may be used to study systematic effects in current detectors such as energy and position reconstruction, pulse shape discrimination, event topology, dead time calculations, purity, and electric field uniformity. We present a comparison of this model with experimental data collected with an argon gas proportional scintillation counter (GPSC), operated at 20 C and 1 bar, and irradiated with an internal, collimated 55Fe source. Additionally we discuss how the model may be incorporated in Monte Carlo simulations of both GPSCs and dual-phase detectors, increasing the reliability of the simulation results and allowing for tests of the experimental data analysis algorithms.

  5. Direct reading measurement of absorbed dose with plastic scintillators--the general concept and applications to ophthalmic plaque dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Flühs, D; Heintz, M; Indenkämpen, F; Wieczorek, C

    1996-03-01

    We have developed dosemeters based on plastic scintillators for a variety of applications in radiation therapy. The dosemeters consist basically of a tissue-substituting scintillator probe, an optical fiber light guide, and a photomultiplier tube. The background light generated in the light guide can be compensated by a simultaneous measurement of the light from a blind fiber. Plastic scintillator dosemeters combine several advantageous properties which render them superior to other dosemeter types for many applications: minimal disturbance of the radiation field because of the homogeneous detector volume and the approximate water equivalence; no dependence on temperature and pressure (under standard clinical conditions) and angle of radiation incidence; no high voltage in the probe; high spatial resolution due to small detector volumes; direct reading of absorbed doses; and a large dynamical range. The high spatial resolution together with direct reading make these detectors suitable for real-time 3-D dosimetry using multi-channel detector systems. Such a system has been developed for eye plaque dosimetry and successfully employed for dosimetric treatment optimization. The plaque optimization can be performed by dosimetric measurements for the individual patient ("dosimetric treatment planning"). The time consumption for this procedure is less than for a physically correct computer-based therapy planning, e.g., by means of a Monte Carlo simulation. PMID:8815386

  6. Comparing the response of PSD-capable plastic scintillator to standard liquid scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolf, Richard S.; Hutcheson, Anthony L.; Gwon, Chul; Phlips, Bernard F.; Wulf, Eric A.

    2015-06-01

    This work discusses a test campaign to characterize the response of the recently developed plastic scintillator with pulse shape discrimination (PSD) capabilities (EJ-299-33). PSD is a property exhibited by certain types of scintillating material in which incident stimuli (fast neutrons or γ rays) can be separated by exploiting differences in the scintillation light pulse tail. Detector geometries used were: a 10 cm×10 cm×10 cm cube and a 10-cm diameter×10-cm long cylinder. EJ-301 and EJ-309 liquid scintillators with well-known responses were also tested. The work was conducted at the University of Massachusetts Lowell Van De Graaff accelerator. The facility accelerated protons on a thin Li target to yield quasi-monoenergetic neutrons from the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction (Q-value: -1.644 MeV). Collimated fast neutrons were obtained by placing detectors behind a neutron spectrometer. Rotating the spectrometer, and thus changing the neutron energy, allowed us to achieve 0.5-3.2 MeV neutrons in 200-300 keV steps. Data were acquired through a flash analog-to-digital converter (ADC) capable of performing digital PSD measurements. By using the PSD technique to separate the neutron events from unwanted γ background, we constructed a pulse height spectrum at each energy. Obtaining a relationship of the relative light output versus energy allowed us to construct the response function for the EJ-299-33 and liquid scintillator. The EJ-299-33 response in terms of electron equivalent energy (Ee.e.) vs. proton equivalent energy (Ep.e.), how it compared with the standard xylene-based EJ-301 (or, NE-213/BC-501 A equivalent) and EJ-309 liquid scintillator response, and how the EJ-301 and EJ-309 compared, are presented. We find that the EJ-299-33 demonstrated a lower light output by up to 40% for <1.0 MeV neutrons; and ranging between a 5-35% reduction for 2.5-3.0 MeV neutrons compared to the EJ-301/309, depending on the scintillator and geometry. Monte Carlo modeling techniques were used to investigate how the neutron beam and accelerator background environment affected the detector response. We find relatively good agreement between our results and the modeling; however, the observed response could not be fully accounted for due to events with pulse pile up, thus leading to contamination of the neutron PSD selected events.

  7. Fundamental Limits of Scintillation Detector Timing Precision

    PubMed Central

    Derenzo, Stephen E.; Choong, Woon-Seng; Moses, William W.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we review the primary factors that affect the timing precision of a scintillation detector. Monte Carlo calculations were performed to explore the dependence of the timing precision on the number of photoelectrons, the scintillator decay and rise times, the depth of interaction uncertainty, the time dispersion of the optical photons (modeled as an exponential decay), the photodetector rise time and transit time jitter, the leading-edge trigger level, and electronic noise. The Monte Carlo code was used to estimate the practical limits on the timing precision for an energy deposition of 511 keV in 3 mm × 3 mm × 30 mm Lu2SiO5:Ce and LaBr3:Ce crystals. The calculated timing precisions are consistent with the best experimental literature values. We then calculated the timing precision for 820 cases that sampled scintillator rise times from 0 to 1.0 ns, photon dispersion times from 0 to 0.2 ns, photodetector time jitters from 0 to 0.5 ns fwhm, and A from 10 to 10,000 photoelectrons per ns decay time. Since the timing precision R was found to depend on A−1/2 more than any other factor, we tabulated the parameter B, where R = BA−1/2. An empirical analytical formula was found that fit the tabulated values of B with an rms deviation of 2.2% of the value of B. The theoretical lower bound of the timing precision was calculated for the example of 0.5 ns rise time, 0.1 ns photon dispersion, and 0.2 ns fwhm photodetector time jitter. The lower bound was at most 15% lower than leading-edge timing discrimination for A from 10 to 10,000 photoelectrons/ns. A timing precision of 8 ps fwhm should be possible for an energy deposition of 511 keV using currently available photodetectors if a theoretically possible scintillator were developed that could produce 10,000 photoelectrons/ns. PMID:24874216

  8. Wind Velocity Measurements By Optical Scintillations Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsadka, S.; Shaft, S.; Azar, Z.; Tur, Moshe

    1990-01-01

    Scintillations-based optical techniques for the measurement of the atmospheric transverse average wind velocity are re-examined. Three different methods for the processing of the resultant time-lagged covariance function are compared to in-situ anemometer measurements. A correlation index of 0.89-0.95 is obtained between the optical and anemometer results and it tends to increasing with the measurement time constant. Some degradation in the accuracy of the optical methods is observed when the spacing between the detectors is either much smaller or much larger than the Fresnel zone [AL]1/2.

  9. Li2Se as a Neutron Scintillator

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Du, Mao-Hua; Shi, Hongliang; Singh, David J.

    2015-06-23

    We show that Li2Se:Te is a potential neutron scintillator material based on density functional calculations. Li2Se exhibits a number of properties favorable for efficient neutron detection, such as a high Li concentration for neutron absorption, a small effective atomic mass and a low density for reduced sensitivity to background gamma rays, and a small band gap for a high light yield. Our calculations show that Te doping should lead to the formation of deep acceptor complex VLi-TeSe, which can facilitate efficient light emission, similar to the emission activation in Te doped ZnSe.

  10. Application of refractive scintillation theory to radio transmission through the ionosphere and the solar wind, and to reflection from a rough ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booker, H. G.

    1981-11-01

    The theory of diffractive scattering by small-scale irregularities is combined with the results of Booker and MajidiAhi (1981) concerning refractive scattering by large-scale irregularities in a phase-changing screen, in a study of three intensity scintillation phenomena: (1) the reflection of radio and optical waves from an ocean surface disturbed by a spectrum of water waves; (2) the scintillation of VHF, UHF and SHF radio waves traversing the ionospheric F-region; and (3) the scintillation of the radio waves mentioned while traversing the solar wind. Spectral diagrams are drawn to show how the outer, inner, Fresnel, focal, lens and peak scales vary with such relevant parameters as electromagnetic wave-frequency for the ocean, RMS fractional fluctuation of ionization density for the ionosphere, and distance of closest approach to the sun for the solar wind.

  11. Measurement of Scintillation and Ionization Yield and Scintillation Pulse Shape from Nuclear Recoils in Liquid Argon

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cao, H.

    2015-05-26

    We have measured the scintillation and ionization yield of recoiling nuclei in liquid argon as a function of applied electric field by exposing a dual-phase liquid argon time projection chamber (LAr-TPC) to a low energy pulsed narrow band neutron beam produced at the Notre Dame Institute for Structure and Nuclear Astrophysics. Liquid scintillation counters were arranged to detect and identify neutrons scattered in the TPC and to select the energy of the recoiling nuclei. We also report measurements of the scintillation yields for nuclear recoils with energies from 10.3 to 57.3 keV and for median applied electric fields from 0more » to 970 V/cm. For the ionization yields, we report measurements from 16.9 to 57.3 keV and for electric fields from 96.4 to 486 V/cm. Furthermore, we report the observation of an anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from nuclear recoils, which is similar to the anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from electron recoils. Assuming that the energy loss partitions into excitons and ion pairs from 83mKr internal conversion electrons is comparable to that from 207Bi conversion electrons, we obtained the numbers of excitons (Nex) and ion pairs (Ni) and their ratio (Nex/Ni) produced by nuclear recoils from 16.9 to 57.3 keV. Motivated by arguments suggesting direction sensitivity in LAr-TPC signals due to columnar recombination, a comparison of the light and charge yield of recoils parallel and perpendicular to the applied electric field is presented for the first time.« less

  12. Measurement of Scintillation and Ionization Yield and Scintillation Pulse Shape from Nuclear Recoils in Liquid Argon

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, H.

    2015-05-26

    We have measured the scintillation and ionization yield of recoiling nuclei in liquid argon as a function of applied electric field by exposing a dual-phase liquid argon time projection chamber (LAr-TPC) to a low energy pulsed narrow band neutron beam produced at the Notre Dame Institute for Structure and Nuclear Astrophysics. Liquid scintillation counters were arranged to detect and identify neutrons scattered in the TPC and to select the energy of the recoiling nuclei. We also report measurements of the scintillation yields for nuclear recoils with energies from 10.3 to 57.3 keV and for median applied electric fields from 0 to 970 V/cm. For the ionization yields, we report measurements from 16.9 to 57.3 keV and for electric fields from 96.4 to 486 V/cm. Furthermore, we report the observation of an anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from nuclear recoils, which is similar to the anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from electron recoils. Assuming that the energy loss partitions into excitons and ion pairs from 83mKr internal conversion electrons is comparable to that from 207Bi conversion electrons, we obtained the numbers of excitons (Nex) and ion pairs (Ni) and their ratio (Nex/Ni) produced by nuclear recoils from 16.9 to 57.3 keV. Motivated by arguments suggesting direction sensitivity in LAr-TPC signals due to columnar recombination, a comparison of the light and charge yield of recoils parallel and perpendicular to the applied electric field is presented for the first time.

  13. Problems in data treatment for ionospheric scintillation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forte, B.; Radicella, S. M.

    2002-12-01

    Ionospheric scintillation data detrending is reviewed in this paper. The attention is focused on satellite to ground links (mainly GPS) data. The problem of a fixed ("frozen") cutoff frequency is pointed out. A possible explanation of the presence of "phase without amplitude" scintillations is given as a result of erroneous data detrending.

  14. Plastic scintillator produced by the injection-molding technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, Y.; Inagaki, T.; Morimoto, T.; Sugai, I.; Kuriki, M.; Shirai, R.; Goto, M.; Yamashina, T.

    1998-02-01

    Plastic scintillators based on polystrene and a polystyrene derivative (MS resin) have been produced by the injection-molding technique, and the light yield, transmission, fluorescence, sunshine hardness and radiation hardness were compared with those of casting scintillators. It was also investigated whether or not a fluorescent lamp affected the transparency.

  15. Some studies of avalanche photodiode readout of fast scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Holl, I.; Lorenz, E.; Natkaniez, S.; Renker, D.; Schmelz, C.; Schwartz, B.

    1995-08-01

    Photomultipliers (PMs) are the classical readout element for scintillation detectors in high energy particle physics, nuclear physics, medical physics, industrial radiation monitors etc. Here, large area avalanche photodiodes with high performance, narrow operation tolerances and high reliability have recently become available. The authors report on some tests of their performance in the readout of fast scintillators.

  16. Wavelet-based analogous phase scintillation index for high latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, A.; Tiwari, R.; Strangeways, H. J.; Dlay, S.; Johnsen, M. G.

    2015-08-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) performance at high latitudes can be severely affected by the ionospheric scintillation due to the presence of small-scale time-varying electron density irregularities. In this paper, an improved analogous phase scintillation index derived using the wavelet-transform-based filtering technique is presented to represent the effects of scintillation regionally at European high latitudes. The improved analogous phase index is then compared with the original analogous phase index and the phase scintillation index for performance comparison using 1 year of data from Trondheim, Norway (63.41°N, 10.4°E). This index provides samples at a 1 min rate using raw total electron content (TEC) data at 1 Hz for the prediction of phase scintillation compared to the scintillation monitoring receivers (such as NovAtel Global Navigation Satellite Systems Ionospheric Scintillation and TEC Monitor receivers) which operate at 50 Hz rate and are thus rather computationally intensive. The estimation of phase scintillation effects using high sample rate data makes the improved analogous phase index a suitable candidate which can be used in regional geodetic dual-frequency-based GPS receivers to efficiently update the tracking loop parameters based on tracking jitter variance.

  17. Characterizing Properties and Performance of 3D Printed Plastic Scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormick, Jacob

    2015-10-01

    We are determining various characteristics of the performance of 3D printed scintillators. A scintillator luminesces when an energetic particle raises electrons to an excited state by depositing some of its energy in the atom. When these excited electrons fall back down to their stable states, they emit the excess energy as light. We have characterized the transmission spectrum, emission spectrum, and relative intensity of light produced by 3D printed scintillators. We are also determining mechanical properties such as tensile strength and compressibility, and the refractive index. The emission and transmission spectra were measured using a monochromator. By observing the transmission spectrum, we can see which optical wavelengths are absorbed by the scintillator. This is then used to correct the emission spectrum, since this absorption is present in the emission spectrum. Using photomultiplier tubes in conjunction with integration hardware (QDC) to measure the intensity of light emitted by 3D printed scintillators, we compare with commercial plastic scintillators. We are using the characterizations to determine if 3D printed scintillators are a viable alternative to commercial scintillators for use at Jefferson Lab in nuclear and accelerated physics detectors. I would like to thank Wouter Deconinck, as well as the Parity group at the College of William and Mary for all advice and assistance with my research.

  18. 21 CFR 892.1100 - Scintillation (gamma) camera.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Scintillation (gamma) camera. 892.1100 Section 892.1100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1100 Scintillation (gamma) camera....

  19. Purification of KamLAND-Zen liquid scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Haruo

    2013-08-08

    KamLAND-Zen is neutrino-less double-beta decay search experiment using enriched 300 kg of {sup 136}Xe dissolved in pure liquid scintillator. This report is purification work of liquid scintillator for KamLAND-Zen experiment before installation in the inner-balloon and background rejection processes after installation.

  20. Performance comparison of scintillators for alpha particle detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morishita, Yuki; Yamamoto, Seiichi; Izaki, Kenji; Kaneko, Junichi H.; Toui, Kohei; Tsubota, Youichi; Higuchi, Mikio

    2014-11-01

    Scintillation detectors for alpha particles are often used in nuclear fuel facilities. Alpha particle detectors have also become important in the research field of radionuclide therapy using alpha emitters. ZnS(Ag) is the most often used scintillator for alpha particle detectors because its light output is high. However, the energy resolution of ZnS(Ag)-based scintillation detectors is poor because they are not transparent. A new ceramic sample, namely the cerium doped Gd2Si2O7 (GPS) scintillator, has been tested as alpha particle detector and its performances have been compared to that one of three different scintillating materials: ZnS(Ag), GAGG and a standard plastic scintillator. The different scintillating materials have been coupled to two different photodetectors, namely a photomultiplier tube (PMT) and a Silicon Photo-multiplier (Si-PM): the performances of each detection system have been compared. Promising results as far as the energy resolution performances (10% with PMT and 14% with Si-PM) have been obtained in the case of GPS and GAGG samples. Considering the quantum efficiencies of the photodetectors under test and their relation to the emission wavelength of the different scintillators, the best results were achieved coupling the GPS with the PMT and the GAGG with the Si-PM

  1. Microprocessor-based single particle calibration of scintillation counter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazumdar, G. K. D.; Pathak, K. M.

    1985-01-01

    A microprocessor-base set-up is fabricated and tested for the single particle calibration of the plastic scintillator. The single particle response of the scintillator is digitized by an A/D converter, and a 8085 A based microprocessor stores the pulse heights. The digitized information is printed. Facilities for CRT display and cassette storing and recalling are also made available.

  2. Screening for Panic Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... GAD) Panic Disorder & Agoraphobia Social Anxiety Disorder Specific Phobias Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) ... Screening for Social Anxiety Disorder Screening for Specific Phobias Screening for an Anxiety Disorder: Children Screening for ...

  3. Quadruple screen test

    MedlinePlus

    ... screen; Multiple marker screening; AFP plus; Triple screen test; AFP maternal; MSAFP; 4-marker screen ... This test is most often done between the 15th and 22nd weeks of the pregnancy. It is most accurate ...

  4. Measurement of ortho-positronium properties in liquid scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Perasso, S.; Franco, D.; Tonazzo, A.; Consolati, G.; Hans, S.; Yeh, M.; Jollet, C.; Meregaglia, A.

    2013-08-08

    Pulse shape discrimination in liquid scintillator detectors is a well-established technique for the discrimination of heavy particles from light particles. Nonetheless, it is not efficient in the separation of electrons and positrons, as they give rise to indistinguishable scintillator responses. This inefficiency can be overtaken through the exploitation of the formation of ortho-Positronium (o-Ps), which alters the time profile of light pulses induced by positrons. We characterized the o-Ps properties in the most commonly used liquid scintillators, i.e. PC, PXE, LAB, OIL and PC + PPO. In addition, we studied the effects of scintillator doping on the o-Ps properties for dopants currently used in neutrino experiments, Gd and Nd. Further measurements for Li-loaded and Tl-loaded liquid scintillators are foreseen. We found that the o-Ps properties are suitable for enhancing the electron-positron discrimination.

  5. Bismuth germanate scintillators: Applications in nuclear safeguards and health physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, C. E.; Dowdy, E. J.; Lucas, M. C.

    1986-01-01

    Bismuth germanate (BGO) scintillators are preferable to NaI(Tl) scintillators or germanium detectors for some applications. We describe two systems based on BGO scintillators for applications in nuclear safeguards and health physics. The first system, which consists of eight scintillators and a computer-based data acquisition system, is very efficient. The second, which consists of one scintillator and a small analyzer, is less efficient but portable. A computer code that uses measured response functions and photopeak efficiencies, unfolds the BGO distributions measured with these systems to determine gamma-ray flux spectra and dose rates. One application of these systems is the accurate determination of flux spectra and dose rates from containers of uranium or plutonium. A second application determined these quantities from a replica of Little Boy, the device exploded over Hiroshima.

  6. Buried plastic scintillator muon telescope (BATATA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfaro, R.; de Donato, C.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Guzmán, A.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Moreno Barbosa, E.; Paic, G.; Patiño Salazar, E.; Salazar Ibarguen, H.; Sánchez, F. A.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Valdés-Galicia, J. F.; Vargas Treviño, A. D.; Vergara Limón, S.; Villaseñor, L. M.; Auger Collaboration

    2010-05-01

    Muon telescopes have multiple applications in the area of cosmic ray research. We are currently building such a detector with the objective of comparing the ground penetration of muon vs. electron-gamma signals originated in cosmic ray showers. The detector is composed by a set of three parallel dual-layer scintillator planes, buried at fixed depths ranging from 120 to 600g/cm2. Each layer is 4m2 and is composed by 49 rectangular strips of 4cm×2m, oriented at a 90∘ angle with respect to its companion layer, which gives an xy-coincidence pixel of 4×4cm2. The scintillators are MINOS extruded polystyrene strips, with an embedded Bicron BC92 wavelength shifting (WLS) fibers, of 1.5 mm in diameter. Light is collected by Hamamatsu H7546B multi-anode PMTs of 64 pixels. The front-end (FE) electronics works in counting mode and signals are transmitted to the surface DAQ stage using low-voltage differential signaling (LVDS). Any strip signal above threshold opens a GPS-tagged 2μs data collection window. Data, including signal and background, are acquired by a system of FPGA (Spartan 2E) boards and a single-board computer (TS7800).

  7. Reflective Membrane Scintillation For Laser Receiver Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Jack H.; DeLong, Mark L.

    Laboratory simulation of atmospheric laser scintillation has been accomplished through a Reflective Membrane Optical Scintillator (RMOS). RMOS incorporates a novel vibrating membrane design that is virtually wavelength independent and statistically programmable in real time. The device has application in the context of wavefront simulation as it exists in turbulent medium. Wavefront disturbances are created by reflecting collimated light off of the membrane surface. The reflected light undergoes spatial modulation and angular redistributions which mimic the effects observed over long path propagation through the atmosphere. Acoustic energy, coupled into the membrane through an electro-mechanical transducer, sets-up nodal vibrational modes in the bounded membrane, creating angular distortion areas that redistribute energy in the reflected beam. The statistics of the energy redistribution is a function of the applied acoustical spectrum, rms transducer voltage, and distance from the membrane surface, as well as the shape and acoustic impedance of the membrane boundary. Laboratory testing of a prototype device indicate spatial irradiance variations in the reflected beam exhibit probability distributions having log-normal symmetry with angle-of-arrival deviations up to 25 milliradians and variances from .01 to 1.0.

  8. Liquid scintillation detectors for high energy neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Stefanie N.; Learned, John G.

    2010-04-01

    Large liquid scintillation detectors have been generally used for low energy neutrino measurements, in the MeV energy region. We describe the potential employment of large detectors (>1 kiloton) for studies of higher energy neutrino interactions, such as cosmic rays and long baseline experiments. When considering the physics potential of new large instruments the possibility of doing useful measurements with higher energy neutrino interactions has been overlooked. Here we take into account Fermat’s principle, which states that the first light to reach each PMT will follow the shortest path between that PMT and the point of origin. We describe the geometry of this process, and the resulting wavefront, which we call the “Fermat surface”, and discuss methods of using this surface to extract directional track information and particle identification. This capability may be demonstrated in the new long baseline neutrino beam from Jaeri accelerator to the KamLAND detector in Japan. Other exciting applications include the use of Hanohano as a movable long baseline detector in this same beam, and LENA in Europe for future long baseline neutrino beams from CERN. Also, this methodology opens up the question as to whether a large liquid scintillator detector should be given consideration for use in a future long baseline experiment from Fermilab to the DUSEL underground laboratory at Homestake.

  9. Liquid Scintillation Detectors for High Energy Neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Stefanie N.; Learned, John G.

    2010-03-30

    Large open volume (not segmented) liquid scintillation detectors have been generally dedicated to low energy neutrino measurements, in the MeV energy region. We describe the potential employment of large detectors (>1 kiloton) for studies of higher energy neutrino interactions, such as cosmic rays and long-baseline experiments. When considering the physics potential of new large instruments the possibility of doing useful measurements with higher energy neutrino interactions has been overlooked. Here we take into account Fermat's principle, which states that the first light to reach each PMT will follow the shortest path between that PMT and the point of origin. We describe the geometry of this process, and the resulting wavefront, which we are calling the 'Fermat surface', and discuss methods of using this surface to extract directional track information and particle identification. This capability may be demonstrated in the new long-baseline neutrino beam from Jaeri accelerator to the KamLAND detector in Japan. Other exciting applications include the use of Hanohano as a movable long-baseline detector in this same beam, and LENA in Europe for future long-baseline neutrino beams from CERN. Also, this methodology opens up the question as to whether a large liquid scintillator detector should be given consideration for use in a future long-baseline experiment from Fermilab to the DUSEL underground laboratory at Homestake.

  10. Characterization of cerium fluoride nanocomposite scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Stange, Sy; Esch, Ernst I; Brown, Leif O; Couture, Aaron J; Mckigney, Edward A; Muenchausen, Ross E; Del Sesto, Rico E; Gilbertson, Robert D; Mccleskey, T Mark; Reifarth, Rene

    2009-01-01

    Measurement of the neutron capture cross-sections of a number of short-lived isotopes would advance both pure and applied scientific research. These cross-sections are needed for calculation of criticality and waste production estimates for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative, for analysis of data from nuclear weapons tests, and to improve understanding of nucleosynthesis. However, measurement of these cross-sections would require a detector with a faster signal decay time than those used in existing neutron capture experiments. Crystals of faster detector materials are not available in sufficient sizes and quantities to supply these large-scale experiments. Instead, we propose to use nanocomposite detectors, consisting of nanoscale particles of a scintillating material dispersed in a matrix material. We have successfully fabricated cerium fluoride (CeF{sub 3}) nanoparticles and dispersed them in a liquid matrix. We have characterized this scintillator and have measured its response to neutron capture. Results of the optical, structural, and radiation characterization will be presented.

  11. Imaging of gamma emitters using scintillation cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricard, Marcel

    2004-07-01

    Since their introduction by Hal Anger in the late 1950s, the gamma cameras have been widely used in the field of nuclear medicine. The original concept is based on the association of a large field of view scintillator optically coupled with an array of photomultiplier tubes (PMTs), in order to locate the position of interactions inside the crystal. Using a dedicated accessory, like a parallel hole collimator, to focus the field of view toward a predefined direction, it is possible to built up an image of the radioactive distribution. In terms of imaging performances, three main characteristics are commonly considered: uniformity, spatial resolution and energy resolution. Major improvements were mainly due to progress in terms of industrial process regarding analogical electronic, crystal growing or PMTs manufacturing. Today's gamma camera is highly digital, from the PMTs to the display. All the corrections are applied "on the fly" using up to date signal processing techniques. At the same time some significant progresses have been achieved in the field of collimators. Finally, two new technologies have been implemented, solid detectors like CdTe or CdZnTe, and pixellized scintillators plus photodiodes or position sensitive photomultiplier tubes. These solutions are particularly well adapted to build dedicated gamma camera for breast or intraoperative imaging.

  12. Scintillating Bolometers for Double Beta Decay Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorla, P.; Arnaboldi, C.; Beeman, J.; Capelli, S.; Giachero, A.; Gironi, L.; Pavan, M.; Pessina, G.; Pirro, S.; Previtali, E.

    2008-05-01

    In the field of Double Beta Decay searches the possibility to have high resolution detectors in which a very large part of the natural background can be discriminated with respect to the tiny expected signal, results very appealing. This very interesting possibility can be fulfilled in the case of a scintillating crystal bolometer containing a DBD emitter whose transition energy exceeds the one of the natural 2615 keV gamma line of 208Tl. We present the results achieved in the development of bolometric light detectors for double beta searches. The detectors are 1 mm thick germanium disk coated with a layer of SiO2 in order to increase the light collection. The adopted temperature sensors are NTD Ge thermistors optimized to work at temperatures between 9 and 13 mK. A light detector with a considerable large area (35 cm2) was constructed and run in a test measurement. A 140 g CdWO4 crystal (116Cd has a DBD transition energy of 2802 keV) was operated as bolometer and the scintillation light was read by the light detector. The excellent results combined with extreme easy light detector assembly represent the first tangible proof demonstrating the feasibility of this kind of technique.

  13. Triple-Label β Liquid Scintillation Counting

    PubMed Central

    Bukowski, Thomas R.; Moffett, Tyler C.; Revkin, James H.; Ploger, James D.; Bassingthwaighte, James B.

    2010-01-01

    The detection of radioactive compounds by liquid scintillation has revolutionized modern biology, yet few investigators make full use of the power of this technique. Even though multiple isotope counting is considerably more difficult than single isotope counting, many experimental designs would benefit from using more than one isotope. The development of accurate isotope counting techniques enabling the simultaneous use of three β-emitting tracers has facilitated studies in our laboratory using the multiple tracer indicator dilution technique for assessing rates of transmembrane transport and cellular metabolism. The details of sample preparation, and of stabilizing the liquid scintillation spectra of the tracers, are critical to obtaining good accuracy. Reproducibility is enhanced by obtaining detailed efficiency/quench curves for each particular set of tracers and solvent media. The numerical methods for multiple-isotope quantitation depend on avoiding error propagation (inherent to successive subtraction techniques) by using matrix inversion. Experimental data obtained from triple-label β counting illustrate reproducibility and good accuracy even when the relative amounts of different tracers in samples of protein/electrolyte solutions, plasma, and blood are changed. PMID:1514684

  14. Synthesis and characterization of a BaGdF5:Tb glass ceramic as a nanocomposite scintillator for x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gyuhyon; Struebing, Christian; Wagner, Brent; Summers, Christopher; Ding, Yong; Bryant, Alex; Thadhani, Naresh; Shedlock, Daniel; Star-Lack, Josh; Kang, Zhitao

    2016-05-01

    Transparent glass ceramics with embedded light-emitting nanocrystals show great potential as low-cost nanocomposite scintillators in comparison to single crystal and transparent ceramic scintillators. In this study, cubic structure BaGdF5:Tb nanocrystals embedded in an aluminosilicate glass matrix are reported for potential high performance MeV imaging applications. Scintillator samples with systematically varied compositions were prepared by a simple conventional melt-quenching method followed by annealing. Optical, structural and scintillation properties were characterized to guide the design and optimization of selected material systems, aiming at the development of a system with higher crystal volume and larger crystal size for improved luminosity. It is observed that enhanced scintillation performance was achieved by tuning the glass matrix composition and using GdF3 in the raw materials, which served as a nucleation agent. A 26% improvement in light output was observed from a BaGdF5:Tb glass ceramic with addition of GdF3.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of a BaGdF5:Tb glass ceramic as a nanocomposite scintillator for x-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gyuhyon; Struebing, Christian; Wagner, Brent; Summers, Christopher; Ding, Yong; Bryant, Alex; Thadhani, Naresh; Shedlock, Daniel; Star-Lack, Josh; Kang, Zhitao

    2016-05-20

    Transparent glass ceramics with embedded light-emitting nanocrystals show great potential as low-cost nanocomposite scintillators in comparison to single crystal and transparent ceramic scintillators. In this study, cubic structure BaGdF5:Tb nanocrystals embedded in an aluminosilicate glass matrix are reported for potential high performance MeV imaging applications. Scintillator samples with systematically varied compositions were prepared by a simple conventional melt-quenching method followed by annealing. Optical, structural and scintillation properties were characterized to guide the design and optimization of selected material systems, aiming at the development of a system with higher crystal volume and larger crystal size for improved luminosity. It is observed that enhanced scintillation performance was achieved by tuning the glass matrix composition and using GdF3 in the raw materials, which served as a nucleation agent. A 26% improvement in light output was observed from a BaGdF5:Tb glass ceramic with addition of GdF3. PMID:27044066

  16. Monte Carlo calculation of the spatial response (Modulated Transfer Function) of a scintillation flat panel and comparison with experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juste, Belén; Miró, Rafael; Monasor, Paula; Verdú, Gumersindo

    2015-11-01

    Phosphor screens are commonly used in many X-ray imaging applications. The design and optimization of these detectors can be achieved using Monte Carlo codes to simulate radiation transport in scintillation materials and to improve the spatial response. This work presents an exhaustive procedure to measure the spatial resolution of a scintillation flat panel image and to evaluate the agreement with data obtained by simulation. To evaluate the spatial response we have used the Modulated Transfer Function (MTF) parameter. According to this, we have obtained the Line Spread Function (LSF) of the system since the Fourier Transform (FT) of the LSF gives the MTF. The experimental images were carried out using a medical X-ray tube (Toshiba E7299X) and a flat panel (Hammamatsu C9312SK). Measurements were based on the slit methodology experimental implementation, which measures the response of the system to a line. LSF measurements have been performed using a 0.2 mm wide lead slit superimposed over the flat panel. The detector screen was modelled with MCNP (version 6) Monte Carlo simulation code in order to analyze the effect of the acquisition setup configuration and to compare the response of scintillator screens with the experimental results. MCNP6 offers the possibility of studying the optical physics parameters (optical scattering and absorption coefficients) that occur in the phosphor screen. The study has been tested for different X-ray tube voltages, from 100 to 140 kV. An acceptable convergence between the MTF results obtained with MCNP6 and the experimental measurements have been obtained.

  17. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of scintillation processes in NaI(Tl)

    SciTech Connect

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Wang, Zhiguo; Williams, Richard; Grim, Joel; Gao, Fei

    2014-04-26

    Developing a comprehensive understanding of the processes that govern the scintillation behavior of inorganic scintillators provides a pathway to optimize current scintillators and allows for the science-driven search for new scintillator materials. Recent experimental data on the excitation density dependence of the light yield of inorganic scintillators presents an opportunity to incorporate parameterized interactions between excitations in scintillation models and thus enable more realistic simulations of the nonproportionality of inorganic scintillators. Therefore, a kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) model of elementary scintillation processes in NaI(Tl) is developed in this work to simulate the kinetics of scintillation for a range of temperatures and Tl concentrations as well as the scintillation efficiency as a function of excitation density. The ability of the KMC model to reproduce available experimental data allows for elucidating the elementary processes that give rise to the kinetics and efficiency of scintillation observed experimentally for a range of conditions.

  18. Comparison of Luminescence ADP Production Assay and Radiometric Scintillation Proximity Assay for Cdc7 Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Takagi, Toshimitsu; Shum, David; Parisi, Monika; Santos, Ruth E.; Radu, Constantin; Calder, Paul; Rizvi, Zahra; Frattini, Mark G.; Djaballah, Hakim

    2013-01-01

    Several assay technologies have been successfully adapted and used in HTS to screen for protein kinase inhibitors; however, emerging comparative analysis studies report very low hit overlap between the different technologies, which challenges the working assumption that hit identification is not dependent on the assay method of choice. To help address this issue, we performed two screens on the cancer target, Cdc7-Dbf4 heterodimeric protein kinase, using a direct assay detection method measuring [33P]-phosphate incorporation into the substrate and an indirect method measuring residual ADP production using luminescence. We conducted the two screens under similar conditions, where in one, we measured [33P]-phosphate incorporation using scintillation proximity assay (SPA), and in the other, we detected luminescence signal of the ATP-dependent luciferase after regenerating ATP from residual ADP (LUM). Surprisingly, little or no correlation were observed between the positives identified by the two methods; at a threshold of 30% inhibition, 25 positives were identified in the LUM screen whereas the SPA screen only identified two positives, Tannic acid and Gentian violet, with Tannic acid being common to both. We tested 20 out of the 25 positive compounds in secondary confirmatory study and confirmed 12 compounds including Tannic acid as Cdc7-Dbf4 kinase inhibitors. Gentian violet, which was only positive in the SPA screen, inhibited luminescence detection and categorized as a false positive. This report demonstrates the strong impact in detection format on the success of a screening campaign and the importance of carefully designed confirmatory assays to eliminate those compounds that target the detection part of the assay. PMID:21564015

  19. Optimization of the performance of segmented scintillators for radiotherapy imaging through novel binning techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Mohri, Youcef; Antonuk, Larry E.; Choroszucha, Richard B.; Zhao, Qihua; Jiang, Hao; Liu, Langechuan

    2014-02-01

    Thick, segmented crystalline scintillators have shown increasing promise as replacement x-ray converters for the phosphor screens currently used in active matrix flat-panel imagers (AMFPIs) in radiotherapy, by virtue of providing over an order of magnitude improvement in the detective quantum efficiency (DQE). However, element-to-element misalignment in current segmented scintillator prototypes creates a challenge for optimal registration with underlying AMFPI arrays, resulting in degradation of spatial resolution. To overcome this challenge, a methodology involving the use of a relatively high resolution AMFPI array in combination with novel binning techniques is presented. The array, which has a pixel pitch of 0.127 mm, was coupled to prototype segmented scintillators based on BGO, LYSO and CsI:Tl materials, each having a nominal element-to-element pitch of 1.016 mm and thickness of ∼1 cm. The AMFPI systems incorporating these prototypes were characterized at a radiotherapy energy of 6 MV in terms of modulation transfer function, noise power spectrum, DQE, and reconstructed images of a resolution phantom acquired using a cone-beam CT geometry. For each prototype, the application of 8 × 8 pixel binning to achieve a sampling pitch of 1.016 mm was optimized through use of an alignment metric which minimized misregistration and thereby improved spatial resolution. In addition, the application of alternative binning techniques that exclude the collection of signal near septal walls resulted in further significant improvement in spatial resolution for the BGO and LYSO prototypes, though not for the CsI:Tl prototype due to the large amount of optical cross-talk resulting from significant light spread between scintillator elements in that device. The efficacy of these techniques for improving spatial resolution appears to be enhanced for scintillator materials that exhibit mechanical hardness, high density and high refractive index, such as BGO. Moreover, materials that exhibit these properties as well as offer significantly higher light output than BGO, such as CdWO4, should provide the additional benefit of preserving DQE performance.

  20. Optimization of the scintillation detector in a combined 3D megavoltage CT scanner and portal imager.

    PubMed

    Mosleh-Shirazi, M A; Swindell, W; Evans, P M

    1998-10-01

    A parametric study is described leading to the optimization of a custom-made scintillation detector with a relatively high quantum efficiency (QE) for megavoltage photons and light output toward a remote lens. This detector allows low-dose portal imaging and continuous cone-beam megavoltage CT acquisition. The EGS4 Monte Carlo code was used to simulate the x-ray and electron transport in the detector. A Monte Carlo model of optical photon transport in a detector element was devised and used as well as various irradiation experiments on scintillators. Different detector materials and configurations were compared in terms of the optical photon irradiance on the lens from on- and off-axis detector elements and the practical constraints regarding detector construction and weight. Effects of scintillator material, detector element size, crystal coating type, and reflectivity, combinations of different coatings on detector faces, scintillator doping level, and crystal transparency were studied. With scintillator thickness adjusted to give an 18% x-ray QE at 6 MV, the light output of CsI(Tl) was at least eight times higher than ZnWO4, BGO and NE118 plastic. Further, CsI(Tl) showed the smallest decrease in QE going from 6 to 24 MV. The off-axis reduction in emittance from the periphery of the detector was relatively small with a slight dependence on the type and reflectivity of the coating and the crystal thickness for a fixed detector element cross section. Light output was more strongly dependent on the reflectivity of lambertian coatings than specular ones. For a fixed detector element cross section, optimum coating type depended on crystal thickness. Typical CsI(Tl) crystals showed a relatively small variation in light output with changes in optical attenuation length. The optimum detector element was found to be CsI(Tl) coated on five faces with TiO2-loaded epoxy resin offering about a ten-fold improvement in light output per incident photon compared to typical metal/phosphor screens. PMID:9800695

  1. Digital breast tomosynthesis (3D-mammography) screening: A pictorial review of screen-detected cancers and false recalls attributed to tomosynthesis in prospective screening trials.

    PubMed

    Houssami, Nehmat; Lång, Kristina; Bernardi, Daniela; Tagliafico, Alberto; Zackrisson, Sophia; Skaane, Per

    2016-04-01

    This pictorial review highlights cancers detected only at tomosynthesis screening and screens falsely recalled in the course of breast tomosynthesis screening, illustrating both true-positive (TP) and false-positive (FP) detection attributed to tomosynthesis. Images and descriptive data were used to characterise cases of screen-detection with tomosynthesis, sourced from prospective screening trials that performed standard (2D) digital mammography (DM) and tomosynthesis (3D-mammography) in the same screening participants. Exemplar cases from four trials highlight common themes of relevance to screening practice including: the type of lesions frequently made more conspicuous or perceptible by tomosynthesis (spiculated masses, and architectural distortions); the histologic findings (both TP and FP) of tomosynthesis-only detection; and the need to extend breast work-up protocols (additional imaging including ultrasound and MRI, and tomosynthesis-guided biopsy) if tomosynthesis is adopted for primary screening. PMID:27017251

  2. Screening for cardiovascular disease before kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Palepu, Sneha; Prasad, G V Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Pre-kidney transplant cardiac screening has garnered particular attention from guideline committees as an approach to improving post-transplant success. Screening serves two major purposes: To more accurately inform transplant candidates of their risk for a cardiac event before and after the transplant, thereby informing decisions about proceeding with transplantation, and to guide pre-transplant management so that post-transplant success can be maximized. Transplant candidates on dialysis are more likely to be screened for coronary artery disease than those not being considered for transplantation. Thorough history and physical examination taking, resting electrocardiography and echocardiography, exercise stress testing, myocardial perfusion scintigraphy, dobutamine stress echocardiography, cardiac computed tomography, cardiac biomarker measurement, and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging all play contributory roles towards screening for cardiovascular disease before kidney transplantation. In this review, the importance of each of these screening procedures for both coronary artery disease and other forms of cardiac disease are discussed. PMID:26722655

  3. Screening for cardiovascular disease before kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Palepu, Sneha; Prasad, G V Ramesh

    2015-12-24

    Pre-kidney transplant cardiac screening has garnered particular attention from guideline committees as an approach to improving post-transplant success. Screening serves two major purposes: To more accurately inform transplant candidates of their risk for a cardiac event before and after the transplant, thereby informing decisions about proceeding with transplantation, and to guide pre-transplant management so that post-transplant success can be maximized. Transplant candidates on dialysis are more likely to be screened for coronary artery disease than those not being considered for transplantation. Thorough history and physical examination taking, resting electrocardiography and echocardiography, exercise stress testing, myocardial perfusion scintigraphy, dobutamine stress echocardiography, cardiac computed tomography, cardiac biomarker measurement, and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging all play contributory roles towards screening for cardiovascular disease before kidney transplantation. In this review, the importance of each of these screening procedures for both coronary artery disease and other forms of cardiac disease are discussed. PMID:26722655

  4. Newborn Screening

    PubMed Central

    Pitt, James J

    2010-01-01

    Early detection of many disorders, mainly inherited, is feasible with population-wide analysis of newborn dried blood spot samples. Phenylketonuria was the prototype disorder for newborn screening (NBS) and early dietary treatment has resulted in vastly improved outcomes for this disorder. Testing for primary hypothyroidism and cystic fibrosis (CF) was later added to NBS programs following the development of robust immunoassays and molecular testing. Current CF testing usually relies on a combined immunoreactive trypsin/mutation detection strategy. Multiplex testing for approximately 25 inborn errors of metabolism using tandem mass spectrometry is a relatively recent addition to NBS. The simultaneous introduction of many disorders has caused some re-evaluation of the traditional guidelines for NBS, because very rare disorders or disorders without good treatments can be included with minimal effort. NBS tests for many other disorders have been developed, but these are less uniformly applied or are currently considered developmental. This review focuses on Australasian NBS practices. PMID:20498829

  5. Characterization of scintillator materials for fast-ion loss detectors in nuclear fusion reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Ramos, M. C.; García López, J.; García-Muñoz, M.; Rodríguez-Ramos, M.; Carmona Gázquez, M.; Zurro, B.

    2014-08-01

    In fusion plasma reactors, fast ion generated by heating systems and fusion born particles must be well confined. The presence of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities can lead to a significant loss of these ions, which may reduce drastically the heating efficiency and may cause damage to plasma facing components in the vacuum vessel. In order to understand the physics underlying the fast ion loss mechanism, scintillator based detectors have been installed in several fusion devices. In this work we present the absolute photon yield and its degradation with ion fluence in terms of the number of photons emitted per incident ion of several scintillators thin coatings: SrGa2S4:Eu2+ (TG-Green), Y3Al5O12:Ce3+ (P46) and Y2O3:Eu3+ (P56) when irradiated with light ions of different masses (deuterium ions, protons and α-particles) at energies between approximately 575 keV and 3 MeV. The photon yield will be discussed in terms of the energy deposited by the particles into the scintillator. For that, the actual composition and thickness of the thin layers were determined by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS). A collimator with 1 mm of diameter, which defines the beam size for the experiments, placed at the entrance of the chamber. An electrically isolated sample holder biased to +300 V to collect the secondary electrons, connected to a digital current integrator (model 439 by Ortec) to measure the incident beam current. A home made device has been used to store the real-time evolution of the beam current in a computer file allowing the correction of the IL yields due to the current fluctuations. The target holder is a rectangle of 150 × 112 mm2 and can be tilted. The X and Y movements are controlled through stepping motors, which permits a fine control of the beam spot positioning as well as the study of several samples without venting the chamber. A silica optical fiber of 1 mm diameter fixed to the vacuum chamber, which collects the light from the scintillators. The solid angle subtended by the fiber is ∼2.2 × 10-5 sr. The final element is a compact and high sensitive spectrometer, QE6500 (Ocean Optics Inc.) with a 2D area detector which allow us to measure simultaneously in the range of 200-1100 nm with a spectral resolution ∼1-2 nm. The measured signals were analyzed and stored with the SpectraSuite software [6]. The absolute calibration of the optical system described above was carried out with a HL-2000-CAL Tungsten Halogen Calibration Standard light source which provides absolute intensity values (in μW/cm2/nm) at the fiber port at wavelengths from 360-1050 nm.The beam fluxes used to irradiate the phosphors were ∼ 1012 p/cm2s- for the IL yields determination, and up to ten times higher for the degradation analyses.The Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) measurements of the screens were accomplished in the same vacuum chamber using protons at 3 MeV and 5 MeV. Two different energies were employed due to the large difference between the thicknesses of the samples. The proton beam intensity was 10 nA and the beam size 1 mm of diameter. The analysis were performed with a Passivated Implanted Planar Silicon (PIPS) detector of 300 mm2, positioned at 150° and with a 10 μm thick aluminized mylar foil placed at the detector surface to avoid the light emitted by the scintillators. The RBS spectra were analyzed using the SIMNRA code [7].The scintillators investigated in this work were selected according to their availability, radiation hardness, fast response, and/or prior use in plasma diagnostics. In this paper, three different kinds of materials have been analyzed. The TG-Green (so called by the manufacturer, Sarnoff Corporation, USA) is a Eu doped SrGa2S4 powder substrate with density of 3.65 g/cm3, and presents an emission at 540 nm with a very short decay time.≈490 ns [8]. A TG-Green scintillator coating has been applied, for the first time, to a fusion plasma diagnostics for the detection of fast-particle losses on the AUG tokamak [9,10]. The same material supplied by other manufacturer (CIEMAT) has been used to compare the yields for both samples. We will refer to these screens as TGa and TGb for the corresponding to Sarnoff Co. and CIEMAT, respectively. The P46 is a rare earth oxide Y3Al5O12 (YAG) doped with Ce by 0.15% CeO2, manufactured by Proxitronic GmbH, Germany. The luminescence emission consists in a broad peak, centered at 550 nm with a stated decay time constant of 70 ns. [11]. The P46 has been widely applied to fusion plasma diagnostic and in particular to fast-ion loss detection on several devices such as TFTR and NSTX [12,13]. Finally, the P56 scintillator is a Eu doped Y2O3 powder substrate, Y2O3:Eu3+, manufactured by AST Corporation, England. Although this material has a high efficiency, its light emission has a long decay time of 2 ms [14], making the P56 unsuitable to follow the frequency of the MHD fluctuations.The samples were deposited using different processes directly by the manufacturers on 2 mm thick stainless steel plates. It is important to remind that reflections on the substrate may contribute to a luminescence enhancement of the thin scintillator screens. Therefore, the screens under study here as well as the experimental set-up were designed to mimic the real operation of a fast-ion loss detector.

  6. Making Movies: From Script to Screen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bobker, Lee R.

    This book is a guide to the making of films. It covers preparation (scripting, storyboarding, budgeting, casting, and crew selection), filming (directing, camera operating, and sound recording), and postproduction (editing, sound dubbing, laboratory processing, and trial screening). Distribution of films is discussed in detail. Possible careers in…

  7. Cathodoluminescence studies of commercial and nano-structured scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDoanld, Warren; McKinney, George; Tzolov, Marian

    2014-03-01

    Scintillators have applications in fundamental research and in consumer products, e.g. detectors, scanners, and televisions. This research focused on analyzing the cathodoluminescence of different single-crystal scintillators with an originally developed method for evaluation of their performance, which allows for a direct comparison of different scintillators. We have studied yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG), yttrium aluminum perovskite (YAP) scintillators, zinc oxide single crystal, zinc tungstate single crystal, zinc oxide nanowires, and zinc tungstate film. The commercial scintillators are covered with conductive film which prevents low energy electrons from effectively interacting with the scintillator. We have varied the voltage accelerating the electrons with the intention of finding the threshold below which this effect will impact the performance of the scintillators. The same procedure was followed for the nanowires and zinc tungstate film which have enough conductivity and don't require a top conducting film. The threshold was established to be around 3 kV for the YAG and there is no threshold for the films, which perform much better at these low voltages. This property of the films has the potential for application in desktop scanning electron microscopes, where the accelerating voltage is low. The voltage dependence of the cathodoluminescence intensity follows an exponential trend and we present a model explaining it.

  8. Cost-effective segmented scintillating converters for hard x rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasile, Stefan A.; Gordon, Jeffrey S.; Klugerman, Mikhail; Nagarkar, Vivek V.; Squillante, Michael R.; Entine, Gerald; Watson, Scott; Kauppila, Todd J.

    1996-07-01

    Thick segmented scintillating converters coupled to optical imaging detectors offer the advantage of large area, high stopping power sensors for high energy x-ray digital imaging. The recent advent of high resolution and solid state optical sensors such as amorphous silicon arrays and CCD optical imaging detectors makes it feasible to build large, cost effective imaging arrays. This technology, however, shifts the sensor cost burden to the segmented scintillators needed for imaging. The required labor intensive fabrication of high resolution, large area hard x- ray converters results in high cost and questionable manufacturability on a large scale. We report on recent research of a new segmented x-ray imaging converter. This converter is fabricated using vacuum injection and crystal growth methods to induce defect free, high density scintillating fibers into a collimator matrix. This method has the potential to fabricate large area, thick segmented scintillators. Spatial resolution calculations of these scintillator injected collimators show that the optical light spreading is significantly reduced compared to single crystalline scintillators and sub-millimeter resolution x- ray images acquired with the segmented converter coupled to a cooled CCD camera provided the resolution to characterize the converter efficiency and noise. The proposed concept overcomes the above mentioned limitations by producing a cost-effective technique of fabricating large area x-ray scintillator converters with high stopping power and high spatial resolution. This technology will readily benefit diverse fields such as particle physics, astronomy, medicine, as well as industrial nuclear and non-destructive testing.

  9. A method for analyzing a survey of scintillating radio sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artyukh, V. S.; Tyul'bashev, S. A.

    1996-09-01

    A method for an automated analysis of data from a survey of scintillating radio sources to be obtained using the Large Phased Array of the Lebedev Institute of Physics has been developed. Difference and median filters are used to remove effects interfering with the detection of scintillating sources. The parameters for these filters are chosen so as to maximize the signal-to-noise ratio, which is very important when searching for extremely weak scintillating sources. Model calculations are used to give the probability of missing a signal as a function of the signal-to-noise ratio for a given acceptable probability of false detection of 0.001. The analysis method presented will make it possible to obtain a scintillating source survey complete in radio sources having scintillation dispersions equal to the noise dispersion, with the expected number of false detections being one in 1000. Estimates of the errors of the measured coordinates of the scintillating radio sources and of the scintillation dispersions as functions of the signal-to-noise ratio are obtained.

  10. Applicability of GSO scintillators for well logging

    SciTech Connect

    Melcher, C.L.; Schweitzer, J.S.; Manete, R.A.; Peterson, C.A. )

    1991-04-01

    Cerium-doped gadolinium oxyorthosilicate (GSO:Ce) was developed as a scintillating material for application in positron emission tomography. In this paper, the authors analyze the fundamental properties of this material, with particular attention to properties relevant to nuclear well logging applications and their temperature dependence. Initial evaluations indicated that this material had a number of properties which seemed to make it a favorable candidate for well logging applications, such as the reported decay time constant of 60 ns. Subsequent studies showed the presence of a longer, 600 ns, decay constant, which coupled with its extremely high thermal neutron absorption cross section and relatively low light output, raised questions about its suitability. The authors study the temperature dependence of GSO:Ce to better evaluate its applicability as a gamma-ray detector for nuclear well logging applications.

  11. Scintillating glass fiber-optic neutron sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Abel, K.H.; Arthur, R.J.; Bliss, M.

    1994-04-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has fabricated cerium-activated lithium silicate scintillating fibers via a hot-downdraw process. These fibers, which, as produced, typically have a transmission length (e{sup {minus}1} length) of greater than 2 meters, are found to undergo aging when subjected to room air. The aging, which is complete in a few weeks, reduces the transmission length to the order of 0.5 meter. Because of the high alkali content of the glass (on the order of 20--30 mole % lithia), we have attributed this aging to aqueous corrosion oat the polymer cladding/glass interface. changes in transmission with chemical treatment of the surface support the corrosion model. Fiber transmission performance has been preserved by modifying the hot-downdraw to a double crucible to produce glass-on-glass waveguides.

  12. OFFSET: Optical Fiber Folded Scintillating Extended Tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Presti, D.; Aiello, S.; Bonanno, D. L.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Leonora, E.; Longhitano, F.; Pugliatti, C.; Randazzo, N.; Romano, F.; Russo, G. V.; Russo, M.; Stancampiano, C.; Sipala, V.

    2014-02-01

    The OFFSET collaboration aims at the development of a novel system for tracking charged particles, designed to achieve real-time imaging, large detection areas, and a high spatial resolution especially suitable for use in medical diagnostics. This paper presents the first prototype of this tracker, having a 2020 cm2 sensitive area made by two crossed ribbons of 500 ?m square scintillating fibers. The track position information is extracted in real time using a reduced number of read-out channels to obtain very large detection area at moderate cost and complexity. The performance of the tracker was investigated using ? sources, cosmic rays and a 62 MeV proton beam.

  13. High-Density, Scintillating, Fluoride Glass Calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akgun, Ugur; Xie, Qiuchen

    2014-03-01

    The unprecedented radiation levels in current Large Hadron Collider runs, and plans to even increase the luminosity creates a need for new detector technologies to be investigated. Here, we propose to use high density, scintillating, fluoride glasses as active media in calorimeters. CHG3 is a special example of this glass family, which has been developed specifically for hadron collider experiments, and is known for fast response time, in addition to high light yield. In this presentation, the results from a computational study on the performances of the two different designs of CHG3 glass calorimeters are reported. First design reads the signal directly from the edge of the glass plate; the second design utilizes wavelength-shifting fibers to carry the signal out of the glass plate. Each simulation model is a sampling calorimeter with 20 alternating layers of glass and iron absorber. By changing the absorber thickness we tested hadronic as well as electromagnetic capabilities of the calorimeter models.

  14. Structure of scintillations in Neptune's occultation shadow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, W. B.; Lellouch, Emmanuel; Sicardy, Bruno; Brahic, Andre; Vilas, Faith

    1988-01-01

    An exceptionally high-quality data set from a Neptune occultation is used here to derive a number of new results about the statistical properties of the fluctuations of the intensity distribution in various parts of Neptune's occultation shadow. An approximate numerical ray-tracing model which successfully accounts for many of the qualitative aspects of the observed intensity fluctuation distribution is introduced. Strong refractive scintillation is simulated by including the effects of 'turbulence' with projected atmospheric properties allowed to vary in both the direction perpendicular and parallel to the limb, and an explicit two-dimensional picture of a typical intensity distribution throughout an occulting planet's shadow is presented. The results confirm the existence of highly anisotropic turbulence.

  15. The Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment - Instrument description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. N.; Kinzer, R. L.; Kurfess, J. D.; Strickman, M. S.; Purcell, W. R.; Grabelsky, D. A.; Ulmer, M. P.; Hillis, D. A.; Jung, G. V.; Cameron, R. A.

    1993-01-01

    The Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment on the Arthur Holly Compton Gamma Ray Observatory satellite uses four actively shielded NaI (Tl)-CsI(Na) phoswich detectors to provide gamma-ray line and continuum detection capability in the 0.05-10 MeV energy range. The instrument includes secondary capabilities for gamma-ray and neutron detection between 10 and 250 MeV. The detectors have 3.8 deg x 11.04 deg (FWHM) fields of view defined by tungsten collimators. Each detector has an independent, single-axis orientation system which permits offset pointing from the spacecraft Z-axis for background measurements and multitarget observations. The instrument, and its calibration and performance, are described.

  16. Facilitating Factors and Barriers to BMI Screening in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stalter, Ann M.; Chaudry, Rosemary V.; Polivka, Barbara J.

    2010-01-01

    The National Association of School Nurses advocates for body mass index (BMI) screening. Little research describes school nurse practice of BMI screening. In this descriptive study, 25 Ohio school nurses participated in three focus groups. An adapted "Healthy People 2010" Determinants of Health Model guided the research questions. School nurses…

  17. Statistical distribution of GPS amplitude scintillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akala, A. O.; Doherty, P. H.

    2012-01-01

    This study presents complementary cumulative distribution function (CCDF) as a statistical distribution apparatus for fitting GPS scintillations data. Three years of data at three levels of solar activity, 2002 (high), 2004 (moderate) and 2008 (low) from an equatorial anomaly crest station; Bogota (4.4°N, 74.1°W, dip 16.0°N) [Colombia] in the West Coast of South America were used for the investigation. These data were grouped into daily, monthly and seasonal sets at three levels of solar activity, and tests were introduced on them to reject data from non-ionospheric sources of scintillation, such as multipath. Before fitting each set of data on a CCDF, the data were first visualized with the aid of scatter plots whereby the distributions exhibit non-Gaussian behavior. As a case study, at S4=0.3 threshold, during the year 2002 and 2004, the months of May-July showed probability of occurrence of the order of 0.01 (1% of the observed samples of a given set) for each month, while in 2008, this trend persisted to August (May-August, probability of occurrence of 0.01 or less (1%)). The tails of January and March's distributions were observed to be the heaviest at S4=0.3, although, a relatively heavy tail at this threshold was also observed during the month of November in the year 2004, and during March Equinox and December Solstice in terms of seasons. The heaviness of the tail at this threshold relaxes as solar activity decreases. The calculated probability of occurrences and those derived from the statistical distribution scheme show good consistency. The results presented in this study may be of assistance for future modeling and simulation studies.

  18. Method for measuring multiple scattering corrections between liquid scintillators

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Verbeke, J. M.; Glenn, A. M.; Keefer, G. J.; Wurtz, R. E.

    2016-04-11

    In this study, a time-of-flight method is proposed to experimentally quantify the fractions of neutrons scattering between scintillators. An array of scintillators is characterized in terms of crosstalk with this method by measuring a californium source, for different neutron energy thresholds. The spectral information recorded by the scintillators can be used to estimate the fractions of neutrons multiple scattering. With the help of a correction to Feynman's point model theory to account for multiple scattering, these fractions can in turn improve the mass reconstruction of fissile materials under investigation.

  19. Thin scintillators for ultrafast hard X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhehui; Barnes, Cris W.; Kapustinsky, Jon S.; Morris, Chris L.; Nelson, Ron O.; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Liyuan; Zhu, Ren-Yuan

    2015-05-01

    A multilayer thin-scintillator concept is described for ultrafast imaging. The individual layer thickness is determined by the spatial resolution and light attenuation length, the number of layers is determined by the overall efficiency. By coating the scintillators with a high quantum-efficiency photocathode, single X-ray photon detection can be achieved using fast scintillators with low light yield. The fast, efficient sensors, when combined with MCP and novel nanostructed electron amplification schemes, is a possible way towards GHz hard X-ray cameras for a few frames of images.

  20. Quenching the scintillation in CF4 Cherenkov gas radiator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, T.; D`Ambrosio, C.; Easo, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Forty, R.; Frei, C.; Gibson, V.; Gys, T.; Harnew, N.; Hunt, P.; Jones, C. R.; Lambert, R. W.; Matteuzzi, C.; Muheim, F.; Papanestis, A.; Perego, D. L.; Piedigrossi, D.; Plackett, R.; Powell, A.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Ullaland, O.; Websdale, D.; Wotton, S. A.; Wyllie, K.

    2015-08-01

    CF4 is used as a Cherenkov gas radiator in one of the Ring Imaging Cherenkov detectors at the LHCb experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. CF4 is well known to have a high scintillation photon yield in the near and far VUV, UV and in the visible wavelength range. A large flux of scintillation photons in our photon detection acceptance between 200 and 800 nm could compromise the particle identification efficiency. We will show that this scintillation photon emission system can be effectively quenched, consistent with radiationless transitions, with no significant impact on the photons resulting from Cherenkov radiation.

  1. A 2-phase liquid scintillation assay for glycolipid synthetases

    SciTech Connect

    Hospattankar, A.V.; Radin, N.S.

    1981-10-01

    Glycolipid synthetases can be assayed conveniently by incubating the lipid substrate with the radiosugar-labeled nucleotide in a small plastic scintillation vial. At the end of the incubation period, water and perchloric acid are added, then n-butanol, then a toluene-based scintillation cocktail. The radioactive lipid partitions into the scintillation fluid, leaving excess sugar nucleotide in the aqueous phase. Only a small fraction of the total radioactivity in the aqueous layer is detectable. This method is illustrated for ceramide:UDP-glucose glucosyltransferase. The approach should be applicable to other lipid synthetases that can be assayed with radioactive hydrophilic substrate.

  2. Reduction of scintillation in optical modulating retro-reflector links.

    PubMed

    Rabinovich, W S; Mahon, R; Ferraro, M; Goetz, P G; Murphy, J L

    2014-11-17

    Optical modulating retro-reflectors enable free-space optical links that have greatly reduced pointing requirements and do not require a laser at one end of the link. However, these types of links can exhibit very high optical scintillation due to the double passage of the beam through the atmosphere. This high scintillation causes fades and surges that can lead to packet errors in the link. It is shown that scintillation can be greatly reduced through a combination of techniques including retro-reflector diversity, aperture averaging and bistatic optical interrogation. Improvements of 20 dB in link performance are demonstrated. PMID:25402097

  3. Neutron detector using lithiated glass-scintillating particle composite

    DOEpatents

    Wallace, Steven; Stephan, Andrew C.; Dai, Sheng; Im, Hee-Jung

    2009-09-01

    A neutron detector composed of a matrix of scintillating particles imbedded in a lithiated glass is disclosed. The neutron detector detects the neutrons by absorbing the neutron in the lithium-6 isotope which has been enriched from the natural isotopic ratio to a commercial ninety five percent. The utility of the detector is optimized by suitably selecting scintillating particle sizes in the range of the alpha and the triton. Nominal particle sizes are in the range of five to twenty five microns depending upon the specific scintillating particle selected.

  4. Ionization and scintillation of nuclear recoils in gaseous xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renner, J.; Gehman, V. M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Matis, H. S.; Miller, T.; Nakajima, Y.; Nygren, D.; Oliveira, C. A. B.; Shuman, D.; Álvarez, V.; Borges, F. I. G.; Cárcel, S.; Castel, J.; Cebrián, S.; Cervera, A.; Conde, C. A. N.; Dafni, T.; Dias, T. H. V. T.; Díaz, J.; Esteve, R.; Evtoukhovitch, P.; Fernandes, L. M. P.; Ferrario, P.; Ferreira, A. L.; Freitas, E. D. C.; Gil, A.; Gómez, H.; Gómez-Cadenas, J. J.; González-Díaz, D.; Gutiérrez, R. M.; Hauptman, J.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; Herrera, D. C.; Iguaz, F. J.; Irastorza, I. G.; Jinete, M. A.; Labarga, L.; Laing, A.; Liubarsky, I.; Lopes, J. A. M.; Lorca, D.; Losada, M.; Luzón, G.; Marí, A.; Martín-Albo, J.; Martínez, A.; Moiseenko, A.; Monrabal, F.; Monserrate, M.; Monteiro, C. M. B.; Mora, F. J.; Moutinho, L. M.; Muñoz Vidal, J.; Natal da Luz, H.; Navarro, G.; Nebot-Guinot, M.; Palma, R.; Pérez, J.; Pérez Aparicio, J. L.; Ripoll, L.; Rodríguez, A.; Rodríguez, J.; Santos, F. P.; dos Santos, J. M. F.; Seguí, L.; Serra, L.; Simón, A.; Sofka, C.; Sorel, M.; Toledo, J. F.; Tomás, A.; Torrent, J.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.; Villar, J. A.; Webb, R. C.; White, J.; Yahlali, N.

    2015-09-01

    Ionization and scintillation produced by nuclear recoils in gaseous xenon at approximately 14 bar have been simultaneously observed in an electroluminescent time projection chamber. Neutrons from radioisotope α-Be neutron sources were used to induce xenon nuclear recoils, and the observed recoil spectra were compared to a detailed Monte Carlo employing estimated ionization and scintillation yields for nuclear recoils. The ability to discriminate between electronic and nuclear recoils using the ratio of ionization to primary scintillation is demonstrated. These results encourage further investigation on the use of xenon in the gas phase as a detector medium in dark matter direct detection experiments.

  5. Novel radiation hard microfabricated scintillation detectors with high spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mapelli, A.; Gorini, B.; Haguenauer, M.; Jiguet, S.; Vico Triviño, N.; Renaud, P.

    2010-05-01

    A novel liquid scintillation detector with high spatial resolution is being developed with standard microfabrication techniques. It consists of a dense array of scintillating waveguides obtained by filling microfluidic channels with an organic liquid scintillator and optically coupled to a pixellated photodetector. Such a microfluidic device can be designed and processed to meet the requirements of a wide range of applications like medical imaging, homeland security and high-energy physics. High-spatial resolution miniaturized detectors as well as large-area detectors can easily be fabricated. The fabrication process of a prototype detector and experimental results are presented in this paper.

  6. Rayleigh scattering of linear alkylbenzene in large liquid scintillator detectors.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiang; Liu, Qian; Wurm, Michael; Zhang, Qingmin; Ding, Yayun; Zhang, Zhenyu; Zheng, Yangheng; Zhou, Li; Cao, Jun; Wang, Yifang

    2015-07-01

    Rayleigh scattering poses an intrinsic limit for the transparency of organic liquid scintillators. This work focuses on the Rayleigh scattering length of linear alkylbenzene (LAB), which will be used as the solvent of the liquid scintillator in the central detector of the Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory. We investigate the anisotropy of the Rayleigh scattering in LAB, showing that the resulting Rayleigh scattering length will be significantly shorter than reported before. Given the same overall light attenuation, this will result in a more efficient transmission of photons through the scintillator, increasing the amount of light collected by the photosensors and thereby the energy resolution of the detector. PMID:26233375

  7. Rayleigh scattering of linear alkylbenzene in large liquid scintillator detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Xiang Zhang, Zhenyu; Liu, Qian; Zheng, Yangheng; Wurm, Michael; Zhang, Qingmin; Ding, Yayun; Zhou, Li; Cao, Jun; Wang, Yifang

    2015-07-15

    Rayleigh scattering poses an intrinsic limit for the transparency of organic liquid scintillators. This work focuses on the Rayleigh scattering length of linear alkylbenzene (LAB), which will be used as the solvent of the liquid scintillator in the central detector of the Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory. We investigate the anisotropy of the Rayleigh scattering in LAB, showing that the resulting Rayleigh scattering length will be significantly shorter than reported before. Given the same overall light attenuation, this will result in a more efficient transmission of photons through the scintillator, increasing the amount of light collected by the photosensors and thereby the energy resolution of the detector.

  8. Fiber optic thermal/fast neutron and gamma ray scintillation detector

    DOEpatents

    Neal, John S.; Mihalczo, John T

    2007-10-30

    A system for detecting fissile and fissionable material originating external to the system includes: a .sup.6Li loaded glass fiber scintillator for detecting thermal neutrons, x-rays and gamma rays; a fast scintillator for detecting fast neutrons, x-rays and gamma rays, the fast scintillator conjoined with the glass fiber scintillator such that the fast scintillator moderates fast neutrons prior to their detection as thermal neutrons by the glass fiber scintillator; and a coincidence detection system for processing the time distributions of arriving signals from the scintillators.

  9. Effect of scintillator crystal geometry and surface finishing on depth of interaction resolution in PET detectors: Monte Carlo simulation and experimental results using silicon photomultipliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuddy, Sarah; Reznik, Alla; Rowlands, John A.; Taghibakhsh, Farhad

    2010-04-01

    Resolution of positron emission tomography (PET) systems benefits from information about depth of interaction (DOI) within scintillation crystals, particularly in small bore scanners or parallel plate detectors. In this investigation, the ability of the dual-ended readout detector module configuration to resolve DOI and crystal index was evaluated for a variety of detector pitches and light guide thicknesses to validate the dual-ended readout method. Experimental results with oneto- one coupling between saw-cut 2mm pitch LYSO scintillation crystals and silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) achieved 2.1 mm DOI resolution. Monte Carlo simulations were used to investigate the effect of larger detector pitches and varied light guide thickness on the crystal index identification accuracy and DOI resolution for a pixilated crystal array in dual-ended readout configuration. It is reported that the accuracy in identifying a 2 mm scintillation crystal was >80% for detector pitches < 6 mm and that DOI resolution was < 2 mm for all detector pitches and light guide thicknesses.

  10. Improvement of medical imaging with enhanced light extraction of scintillators by integrated nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Mao; Yi, Ya Sha

    2015-08-01

    Scintillators are important functional parts in x-ray and Υ-radiation medical imaging instruments, while the high refractive index of scintillation materials significantly reduced the light yield from the scintillators to the detectors, which limited acquired image quality. In this paper, we reviewed two ways to improve the light yield of scintillators via nano photonic devices based on different scintillation materials and integrated nano structures.

  11. Groundwater Screen

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1993-11-09

    GWSCREEN was developed for assessment of the groundwater pathway from leaching of radioactive and non radioactive substances from surface or buried sources and release to percolation ponds. The code calculates the limiting soil concentration or effluent release concentration such that, after leaching and transport to the aquifer, regulatory contaminant levels in groundwater are not exceeded. The code uses a mass conservation approach to model three processes: Contaminant release from a source volume, contaminant transport inmore » the unsaturated zone, and contaminant transport in the saturated zone. The source model considers the sorptive properties and solubility of the contaminant. Transport in the unsaturated zone is described by a plug flow model. Transport in the saturated zone is calculated with a semi-analytical solution to the advection dispersion equation in groundwater. Concentration as a function of time at a user specified receptor point and maximum concentration averaged over the exposure interval are also calculated. In addition, the code calculates transport and impacts of radioactive progeny. Input to GWSCREEN is through one, free format ASCII file. This code was designed for assessment and screening of the groundwater pathway when field data is limited. It was not intended to be a predictive tool.« less

  12. Neonatal screening.

    PubMed

    Pàmpols, Teresa

    2003-01-01

    Neonatal screening (NS) is a medical act in the context of preventive medicine aimed at the early identification of infants affected by certain conditions that threaten their life and long-term health, for which a timely intervention can lead to a significant reduction of morbidity, mortality and associated disabilities. It emerged three decades ago in the context of prevention of mental retardation. Since then, around 600 inborn metabolic disorders have been described and technological progress has been impressive; nevertheless only around 5% of the disorders have been the object of NS. The most frequently cited reasons for the limitation are low prevalence and the lack of treatment. The tandem mass spectrometry has come in place in recent years across the globe, expanding NS to include several disorders of intermediary metabolism. This has shown, in addition to a prevalence much higher than previously thought, the benefits of early detection. The present work is a review of NS, not only from the point of view of technological/medical achievements, but also considering other factors which will affect specific disease selection, according to the social and organizational infrastructure that may expand the borders of NS. PMID:12921292

  13. Lanthanum halide scintillators for time-of-flight 3-D pet

    DOEpatents

    Karp, Joel S.; Surti, Suleman

    2008-06-03

    A Lanthanum Halide scintillator (for example LaCl.sub.3 and LaBr.sub.3) with fast decay time and good timing resolution, as well as high light output and good energy resolution, is used in the design of a PET scanner. The PET scanner includes a cavity for accepting a patient and a plurality of PET detector modules arranged in an approximately cylindrical configuration about the cavity. Each PET detector includes a Lanthanum Halide scintillator having a plurality of Lanthanum Halide crystals, a light guide, and a plurality of photomultiplier tubes arranged respectively peripherally around the cavity. The good timing resolution enables a time-of-flight (TOF) PET scanner to be developed that exhibits a reduction in noise propagation during image reconstruction and a gain in the signal-to-noise ratio. Such a PET scanner includes a time stamp circuit that records the time of receipt of gamma rays by respective PET detectors and provides timing data outputs that are provided to a processor that, in turn, calculates time-of-flight (TOF) of gamma rays through a patient in the cavity and uses the TOF of gamma rays in the reconstruction of images of the patient.

  14. Persuasion Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1971

    In this teacher's guide to the textbook called "Persuasion" the emphasis is on assisting the teacher to develop in his students the skills of critical and creative thinking. Each instructional unit moves from the experience of persuasive techniques, through critical analysis, to the creative practice of the technique in question. Essays on…

  15. Homebuyer's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sindt, Roger P.; Harris, Jack

    Designed to assist prospective buyers in making such important decisions as whether to buy a new or older home and within what price range, the guide provides information on the purchase process. Discussion of the purchase process covers the life-cycle costs (recurring homeownership costs that must be met every month); selection of a home;…

  16. Freestyle Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Research Associates, Inc., Chicago, IL.

    This booklet serves as an introduction to the concept of Freestyle, a career awareness project designed to encourage nine- to twelve-year-olds to freely explore their interests, develop their skills, and choose their career paths. The booklet includes an explanation of the Freestyle project, goals, and components (t.v. programs, project guide,

  17. Teachers Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linsky, Ronald B.; Schnitger, Ronald L.

    This guide provides teachers with copies of the materials given to students participating in the oceanography program of the Orange County Floating Laboratory Program and provides information concerning colleges and universities offering courses in oceanography and marine science, source of films, and sources of publications concerning the Navy's…

  18. Coatings Guide

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Coatings Guide is a free online information resource that focuses on alternative, low-emission coatings for metal, plastic, and architectural substrates. Developed cooperatively by the U.S. EPA's Office of Research and Development and Research Triangle Institute (RTI) Interna...

  19. Teachers Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linsky, Ronald B.; Schnitger, Ronald L.

    This guide provides teachers with copies of the materials given to students participating in the oceanography program of the Orange County Floating Laboratory Program and provides information concerning colleges and universities offering courses in oceanography and marine science, source of films, and sources of publications concerning the Navy's

  20. The response of a BGO scintillator to relativistic heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsufuji, Naruhiro; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Komami, Hideaki; Kohno, Toshiyuki

    1999-06-01

    The response of a BGO scintillator to He, C, Ne, Si and Ar ions has been studied at incident energies from 120 MeV up to 18 GeV for the first time. The energy of incident beam was changed by inserting an absorber of various thicknesses made of PMMA plates. The primary particles were identified and separated from projectile fragments by using the Δ E- E counter telescope method. A thin NE102A plastic scintillator and a BGO scintillator were used as a Δ E counter and a residual E detector, respectively. The energy of the primary particles was deduced by comparing the depth-dose distribution measured by an ionization chamber to those by a theoretical calculation. The light output of the BGO scintillator was found to be linear in this energy region. The dependency of the light output on the particle species was well indexed as a function of log (AZ 2).

  1. Scintillation effects on radio wave propagation through solar corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, C. M.; Sue, M. K.; Bedrossian, A.; Sniffin, R. W.

    2002-01-01

    When RF waves pass through the solar corona and solar wind regions close to the Sun, strong scintillation effects appear at their amplitude, frequency and phase, especially in the regions very close to the Sun (less than 4 solar radius).

  2. A scintillator purification plant and fluid handling system for SNO+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Richard J.

    2015-08-01

    A large capacity purification plant and fluid handling system has been constructed for the SNO+ neutrino and double-beta decay experiment, located 6800 feet underground at SNOLAB, Canada. SNO+ is a refurbishment of the SNO detector to fill the acrylic vessel with liquid scintillator based on Linear Alkylbenzene (LAB) and 2 g/L PPO, and also has a phase to load natural tellurium into the scintillator for a double-beta decay experiment with 130Te. The plant includes processes multi-stage dual-stream distillation, column water extraction, steam stripping, and functionalized silica gel adsorption columns. The plant also includes systems for preparing the scintillator with PPO and metal-loading the scintillator for double-beta decay exposure. We review the basis of design, the purification principles, specifications for the plant, and the construction and installations. The construction and commissioning status is updated.

  3. Scintillation advantages of lowest order Bessel-Gaussian beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyyuboğlu, H. T.; Baykal, Y.; Sermutlu, E.; Cai, Y.

    2008-08-01

    For a weak turbulence propagation environment, the scintillation index of the lowest order Bessel-Gaussian beams is formulated. Its triple and single integral versions are presented. Numerical evaluations show that at large source sizes and large width parameters, when compared at the same source size, Bessel-Gaussian beams tend to exhibit lower scintillations than the Gaussian beam scintillations. This advantage is lost however for excessively large width parameters and beyond certain propagation lengths. Large width parameters also cause rises and falls in the scintillation index of off-axis positions toward the edges of the received beam. Comparisons against the fundamental Gaussian beam are made on equal source size and equal power basis.

  4. Robust detection of ionospheric scintillations using MF-DFA technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miriyala, Sridhar; Koppireddi, Padma Raju; Chanamallu, Srinivasa Rao

    2015-12-01

    The performance of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) receivers is limited by the ionospheric scintillation effects that cause signal degradation due to refraction, reflection and scattering of the signals. Hence, there is a need to develop an ionospheric scintillation detection technique for robust GNSS receivers. In this paper, a new algorithm based on multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA) is proposed for detecting the ionospheric irregularities. The ionospheric and scintillation GNSS data recorded at Koneru Lakshmaiah (KL) University, Guntur, India, was considered for the analysis. The carrier to noise ratio ( C/ N 0) time series data of GNSS satellite vehicles that are affected due to scintillations was decomposed using adaptive time-frequency methods like empirical mode decomposition (EMD), ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) and complementary ensemble empirical mode decomposition (CEEMD). It was observed that the CEEMD method combined with MF-DFA provides better results as compared to the EMD and EEMD techniques.

  5. Encapsulated scintillators monitor /sup 3/H-solute concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, G.; Gruner, S.

    1982-02-01

    The short range of the /sup 3/H beta allows shielding of microbeds of scintillator by a several um thick coating of a water based gel. Gels may be used which are permeable to a wide variety of tritiated molecules. Thus, the light output of a mixture of the coated beads and a solution of the tritiated compound is proportional to the solution concentration of the tritiated substance. The mixture may also contain particles to which the gel is impermeable, such as cells, vesicles, large proteins, etc., but which can alter the concentration of the tritiated compound by uptake or release. In this case, the light output monitors the fractional uptake of the tritiated material. The design criteria for encapsulating the scintillators and dynamically monitoring the scintillation output are discussed. A simple method for encapsulating plastic scintillator microbeads, suitable for monitoring slow concentration changes, is described and tested.

  6. Experimental efforts and results in finding new heavy scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Derenzo, S.E.; Moses, W.W.

    1992-09-01

    New heavy scintillators are being discovered with increasing frequency. In recent years NaI(Tl) (with its high light output and energy resolution) has been joined by BGO (with its high stopping power), BaF{sub 2} (with its excellent timing resolution), and CeF{sub 3} (with its speed and short Moliere radius). More than 10 potentially useful scintillators have been under development in the past five years, such as PbSO{sub 4} and Lu{sub 2}SiO{sub 5}(Ce). We tabulate the characteristics of these and other scintillators, including wavelength, luminous efficiency, decay time, and initial intensity. We describe a search strategy and the prospects for finding the ``ideal`` heavy scintillator, which would combine the light output of NaI(Tl) and CsI(Tl), the stopping power of BGO, and the speed of BaF{sub 2} and ZnO(Ga).

  7. The response of scintillators to heavy ions: 1, Plastics

    SciTech Connect

    McMahan, M.A.

    1987-10-01

    The response of various scintillator detectors to ions of A = 1-84 and energies E/A = 5 to 30 MeV have been measured, and are found to be linear above an energy of 100 MeV. Results are presented for a typical organic plastic scintillator including parametrizations of the data as a function of Z, A, and energy. These results can be used by anyone using scintillators as heavy ion detectors, with one calibration point giving a normalization that allows use of the whole set of curves. The response functions are compared to previous parametrizations at lower energies and discussed in terms of the theory of delta-ray formation in the scintillator.

  8. Final LDRD report : advanced plastic scintillators for neutron detection.

    SciTech Connect

    Vance, Andrew L.; Mascarenhas, Nicholas; O'Bryan, Greg; Mrowka, Stanley

    2010-09-01

    This report summarizes the results of a one-year, feasibility-scale LDRD project that was conducted with the goal of developing new plastic scintillators capable of pulse shape discrimination (PSD) for neutron detection. Copolymers composed of matrix materials such as poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and blocks containing trans-stilbene (tSB) as the scintillator component were prepared and tested for gamma/neutron response. Block copolymer synthesis utilizing tSBMA proved unsuccessful so random copolymers containing up to 30% tSB were prepared. These copolymers were found to function as scintillators upon exposure to gamma radiation; however, they did not exhibit PSD when exposed to a neutron source. This project, while falling short of its ultimate goal, demonstrated the possible utility of single-component, undoped plastics as scintillators for applications that do not require PSD.

  9. Liquid Scintillator Light Yield Measurements for the SNO+ Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grullon, Sean

    2013-04-01

    The SNO+ experiment is the follow-up to the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). The heavy water that was in SNO will be replaced with a liquid scintillator of linear alkylbenzene. SNO+ will have a broad physics program which will include measuring the pep and CNO solar neutrino flux, detecting geo-neutrinos, studying reactor neutrino oscillations, serving as a supernova neutrino detector, and carrying out a search for neutrinoless double beta decay by loading an isotope such as neodymium into the liquid scintillator. Since energy resolution is of profound importance for the experiment, it is extremely important to accurately measure the light yield of the liquid scintillator for different loading percentages of Neodymium. A series of measurements made comparing the relative light yields of different liquid scintillator configurations to a Cherenkov spectrum will be described.

  10. Bismuth germanate scintillators: Applications in nuclear safeguards and health physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, C. E.; Dowdy, E. J.; Lucas, M. C.

    Bismuth germanate (BGO) scintillators are preferable to NaI(Tl) scintillators or germanium detectors for some applications in nuclear safeguards and health physics. The first system, which consists of eight scintillators and a computer-based data acquisition system, is very efficient. The second, which consists of one scintillator and a small analyzer, is less efficient but portable. A computer code that uses measured response functions and photopeak efficiencies, unfolds the BGO distributions measured with these systems to determine gamma-ray flux spectra and dose rates. One application of these systems is the accurate determination of flux spectra and dose rates from containers of uranium or plutonium. A second application determined these quantities from a replica of Little Boy, the device exploded over Hiroshima.

  11. Bismuth germanate scintillators: applications in nuclear safeguards and health physics

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, C.E.; Dowdy, E.J.; Lucas, M.C.

    1985-05-01

    Bismuth germanate (BGO) scintillators are preferable to NaI(Tl) scintillators or germanium detectors for some applications in nuclear safeguards and health physics. The first system, which consists of eight scintillators and a computer-based data acquisition system, is very efficient. The second, which consists of one scintillator and a small analyzer, is less efficient but portable. A computer code that uses measured response functions and photopeak efficiencies, unfolds the BGO distributions measured with these systems to determine gamma-ray flux spectra and dose rates. One application of these systems is the accurate determination of flux spectra and dose rates from containers of uranium or plutonium. A second application determined these quantities from a replica of Little Boy, the device exploded over Hiroshima. 7 refs., 6 figs.

  12. Comparison of scintillators for single shot imaging of laser accelerated proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Nathan

    2012-03-01

    The application of intense laser pulses incident on specialized targets provides exciting new means for generating energetic beams of protons and ions. Recent work has demonstrated the utility of these beams of particles in a variety of applications, from inertial confinement fusion to radiation therapy. These applications require precise control, and subsequently precise feedback from the beam. Imaging techniques can provide the necessary shot-to-shot characterization to be effective as diagnostics. However, the utility of imaging methods scales with the capability of scintillating materials to emit well characterized and consistent radiation upon irradiance by a charged particle beam. We will discuss three candidates for an ideal diagnostic for MeV range protons and light ions. CsI:Tl^+ and Al2O3:Cr^3+ are two inorganic scintillators which exhibit excellent response to hadrons in this energy range. They are compared with the combination diagnostic micro-channel plate with a P43 phosphor screen, which offers advantages in refresh rate and resolution over direct exposure methods. Ultimately we will determine which candidate performs optimally as part of a robust, inexpensive diagnostic for laser accelerated protons and light ions.

  13. Research to Operations of Ionospheric Scintillation Detection and Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, J.; Scro, K.; Payne, D.; Ruhge, R.; Erickson, B.; Andorka, S.; Ludwig, C.; Karmann, J.; Ebelhar, D.

    Ionospheric Scintillation refers to random fluctuations in phase and amplitude of electromagnetic waves caused by a rapidly varying refractive index due to turbulent features in the ionosphere. Scintillation of transionospheric UHF and L-Band radio frequency signals is particularly troublesome since this phenomenon can lead to degradation of signal strength and integrity that can negatively impact satellite communications and navigation, radar, or radio signals from other systems that traverse or interact with the ionosphere. Although ionospheric scintillation occurs in both the equatorial and polar regions of the Earth, the focus of this modeling effort is on equatorial scintillation. The ionospheric scintillation model is data-driven in a sense that scintillation observations are used to perform detection and characterization of scintillation structures. These structures are then propagated to future times using drift and decay models to represent the natural evolution of ionospheric scintillation. The impact on radio signals is also determined by the model and represented in graphical format to the user. A frequency scaling algorithm allows for impact analysis on frequencies other than the observation frequencies. The project began with lab-grade software and through a tailored Agile development process, deployed operational-grade code to a DoD operational center. The Agile development process promotes adaptive promote adaptive planning, evolutionary development, early delivery, continuous improvement, regular collaboration with the customer, and encourage rapid and flexible response to customer-driven changes. The Agile philosophy values individuals and interactions over processes and tools, working software over comprehensive documentation, customer collaboration over contract negotiation, and responding to change over following a rigid plan. The end result was an operational capability that met customer expectations. Details of the model and the process of operational integration are discussed as well as lessons learned to improve performance on future projects.

  14. Lanthanum halide nanoparticle scintillators for nuclear radiation detection

    SciTech Connect

    Guss, Paul; Guise, Ronald; O'Brien, Robert; Lowe, Daniel; Kang Zhitao; Menkara, Hisham; Nagarkar, Vivek V.

    2013-02-14

    Nanoparticles with sizes <10 nm were fabricated and characterized for their nanocomposite radiation detector properties. This work investigated the properties of several nanostructured radiation scintillators, in order to determine the viability of using scintillators employing nanostructured lanthanum trifluoride. Preliminary results of this investigation are consistent with the idea that these materials have an intrinsic response to nuclear radiation that may be correlated to the energy of the incident radiation.

  15. Scintillation of thin tetraphenyl butadiene films under alpha particle excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollmann, Tina; Boulay, Mark; Kuźniak, Marcin

    2011-04-01

    The alpha induced scintillation of the wavelength shifter 1,1,4,4-tetraphenyl-1,3-butadiene (TPB) was studied to improve the understanding of possible surface alpha backgrounds in the DEAP dark matter search experiment. We found that vacuum deposited thin TPB films emit 882±210 photons per MeV under alpha particle excitation. The scintillation pulse shape consists of a double exponential decay with lifetimes of 11±5 and 275±10 ns.

  16. Lanthanum Halide Nanoparticle Scintillators for Nuclear Radiation Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Guss, P. P., Guise, R., Yuan, D., Mukhopadhyay, S., O'Brien, R., Lowe, D.

    2013-02-01

    Nanoparticles with sizes <10 nm were fabricated and characterized for their nanocomposite radiation detector properties. This work investigated the properties of several nanostructured radiation scintillators, in order to determine the viability of using scintillators employing nanostructured lanthanum tribromide, lanthanum trifluoride, or cerium tribromide. Preliminary results of this investigation are consistent with the idea that these materials have an intrinsic response to nuclear radiation that may be correlated to the energy of the incident radiation.

  17. High effective atomic number polymer scintillators for gamma ray spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Cherepy, Nerine Jane; Sanner, Robert Dean; Payne, Stephen Anthony; Rupert, Benjamin Lee; Sturm, Benjamin Walter

    2014-04-15

    A scintillator material according to one embodiment includes a bismuth-loaded aromatic polymer having an energy resolution at 662 keV of less than about 10%. A scintillator material according to another embodiment includes a bismuth-loaded aromatic polymer having a fluor incorporated therewith and an energy resolution at 662 keV of less than about 10%. Additional systems and methods are also presented.

  18. Screening for Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... risk, health, and life expectancy. Doctors should not screen for prostate cancer using PSA unless patients express a clear preference for screening after discussion. Doctors should not screen using PSA in average-risk men younger than ...

  19. Testicular Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professional Testicular Cancer Treatment Testicular Cancer Screening Testicular Cancer Screening–Patient Version (PDQ®) What is screening? Screening ... are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Testicular Cancer Key Points Testicular cancer is a disease in ...

  20. Iterative reconstruction for pet scanners with continuous scintillators.

    PubMed

    Iriarte, Ana; Caffarena, Gabriel; Lopez-Fernandez, Mariano; Garcia-Carmona, Rodrigo; Otero, Abraham; Sorzano, Carlos O S; Marabini, Roberto

    2015-08-01

    Several technical developments have led to a comeback of the continuous scintillators in positron emission tomography (PET). Important differences exist between the resurgent continuous scintillators and the prevailing pixelated devices, which can translate into certain advantages of the former over the latter. However, if the peculiarities of the continuous scintillators are not considered in the iterative reconstruction in which the measured data is converted to images, these advantages will not be fully exploited. In this paper, we review which those peculiarities are and how they have been considered in the literature of PET reconstruction. In light of this review, we propose a new method to compute one of the key elements of the iterative schemes, the system matrix. Specifically, we substitute the traditional Gaussian approach to the so-called uncertainty term by a more general Monte Carlo estimation, and account for the effect of the optical photons, which cannot be neglected in continuous-scintillators devices. Finally, we gather in a single scheme all the elements of the iterative reconstruction that have been individually reformulated, in this or previous works, for continuous scintillators, providing the first reconstruction framework fully adapted to this type of detectors. The preliminary images obtained for a commercially available PET scanner show the benefits of adjusting the reconstruction to the nature of the scintillators. PMID:26736742

  1. Response of plastic scintillators to low-energy photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peralta, Luis; Rêgo, Florbela

    2014-08-01

    Diagnostic radiology typically uses x-ray beams between 25 and 150 kVp. Plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs) are potentially successful candidates as field dosimeters but careful selection of the scintillator is crucial. It has been demonstrated that they can suffer from energy dependence in the low-energy region, an undesirable dosimeter characteristic. This dependence is partially due to the nonlinear light yield of the scintillator to the low-energy electrons set in motion by the photon beam. In this work, PSDs made of PMMA, PVT or polystyrene were studied for the x-ray beam range 25 to 100 kVp. For each kVp data has been acquired for additional aluminium filtrations of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0 mm. Absolute dose in the point of measurement was obtained with an ionization chamber calibrated to dose in water. From the collected data, detector sensitivities were obtained as function of the beam kVp and additional filtration. Using Monte Carlo simulations relative scintillator sensitivities were computed. For some of the scintillators these sensitivities show strong energy-dependence for beam average energy below 35 keV for each additional filtration but fair constancy above. One of the scintillators (BC-404) has smaller energy-dependence at low photon average energy and could be considered a candidate for applications (like mammography) where beam energy has small span.

  2. A compound crystal with film scintillator for electron detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinney, George; McDonnald, Warren; Tzolov, Marian

    2015-03-01

    Yttrium Aluminum Garnets (YAG) and Yttrium Aluminum Perovskite (YAP) are widely used as electron detectors. This application requires a top conducting layer which hinders their application at low electron energies. We have developed a layer of zinc tungstate which delivers conductivity large enough to prevent charging while still being an efficient scintillator. For better coupling between the two systems we have studied their optical properties. Ce doping is an essential element in YAP and YAG in order for them to be efficient scintillators. We have studied the Ce content and we show that higher Ce content leads to reabsorption in the YAP scintillators. These details were revealed by using photoluminescence emission and excitation spectroscopy. The absorption spectrum for the YAG scintillators coincides with the excitation for the main emission lines. The optical studies of the zinc tungstate films and a single crystal have shown that the films are more efficient light emitters. We have integrated the zinc tungstate films with YAG scintillators and we will report on the performance of this compound scintillator. It is expected that it will perform well at low and high electron energies, which makes it a very cost effective platform for electron detectors.

  3. Observations of GPS scintillation during an isolated auroral substorm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosokawa, Keisuke; Otsuka, Yuichi; Ogawa, Yasunobu; Tsugawa, Takuya

    2014-12-01

    This paper reports simultaneous observations of ionospheric scintillation during an auroral substorm that were made using an all-sky full-color digital single-lens reflex (DSLR) camera (ASC) and a Global Positioning System (GPS) ionospheric scintillation and total electron content monitor (GISTM) in Tromsø (69.60 N, 19.20 E), Norway. On the night of November 19, 2009, a small substorm occurred in northern Scandinavia. The ASC captured its temporal evolution from the beginning of the growth phase to the end of the recovery phase. The amplitude scintillation, as monitored by the S4 index from the GISTM, did not increase in any substorm phase. By contrast, phase scintillation, as measured by the σ φ index, occurred when discrete auroral arcs appeared on the GPS signal path. In particular, the phase scintillation was significantly enhanced for a few minutes immediately after the onset of the expansion phase. During this period, bright and discrete auroral forms covered the entire sky, which implies that structured precipitation on the scale of a few kilometers to a few tens of kilometers dominated the electron density distribution in the E region. Such inhomogeneous ionization structures probably produced significant changes in the refractive index and eventually resulted in the enhancement of the phase scintillation.

  4. Response of plastic scintillators to low-energy photons.

    PubMed

    Peralta, Luis; Rgo, Florbela

    2014-08-21

    Diagnostic radiology typically uses x-ray beams between 25 and 150?kVp. Plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs) are potentially successful candidates as field dosimeters but careful selection of the scintillator is crucial. It has been demonstrated that they can suffer from energy dependence in the low-energy region, an undesirable dosimeter characteristic. This dependence is partially due to the nonlinear light yield of the scintillator to the low-energy electrons set in motion by the photon beam. In this work, PSDs made of PMMA, PVT or polystyrene were studied for the x-ray beam range 25 to 100?kVp. For each kVp data has been acquired for additional aluminium filtrations of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0?mm. Absolute dose in the point of measurement was obtained with an ionization chamber calibrated to dose in water. From the collected data, detector sensitivities were obtained as function of the beam kVp and additional filtration. Using Monte Carlo simulations relative scintillator sensitivities were computed. For some of the scintillators these sensitivities show strong energy-dependence for beam average energy below 35?keV for each additional filtration but fair constancy above. One of the scintillators (BC-404) has smaller energy-dependence at low photon average energy and could be considered a candidate for applications (like mammography) where beam energy has small span. PMID:25079252

  5. Computer Simulation of the Light Yield Nonlinearity of Inorganic Scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Cannon, Bret D.; Gao, Fei; Xie, YuLong

    2009-06-01

    To probe the nature of the physical processes responsible for the nonlinear photon response of inorganic scintillators, we have combined a Monte Carlo (MC) code for calculating the microscopic spatial distributions of electron-hole pairs with a kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) model of energy-transfer processes. In this publication, we focus on evaluating the contribution of an annihilation mechanism between self-trapped excitons (STE) to the photon response of pure CsI and Ce-doped LaBr3. A KMC model of scintillation mechanisms in pure CsI was developed previously and we introduce in this publication a similar model for Ce-doped LaBr3. We show that the KMC scintillation model is able to reproduce both the kinetics and efficiency of the scintillation process in Ce-doped LaBr3. Relative light output curves were generated at several temperatures for both scintillators from simulations carried out at 2, 5, 10, 20, 100, and 400 keV. These simulations suggest that STE-STE annihilation can account for the initial rise in relative light yield with increasing incident energy. This is due to the fact that the proportion of high-density regions decreases as the incident energy increases thus reducing the likelihood for STE-STE encounter. In addition, the simulations clearly show a lack of temperature dependence of the relative light output, in agreement with a majority of experimental work on the temperature dependence of nonlinearity in inorganic scintillators.

  6. Putting the Screen in Screening

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Sion Kim; Knight, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol is strongly linked to the leading causes of adolescent and adult mortality and health problems, making medical settings such as primary care and emergency departments important venues for addressing alcohol use. Extensive research evidence supports the effectiveness of alcohol screening and brief interventions (SBIs) in medical settings, but this valuable strategy remains underused, with medical staff citing lack of time and training as major implementation barriers. Technology-based tools may offer a way to improve efficiency and quality of SBI delivery in such settings. This review describes the latest research examining the feasibility and efficacy of computer- or other technology-based alcohol SBI tools in medical settings, as they relate to the following three patient populations: adults (18 years or older); pregnant women; and adolescents (17 years or younger). The small but growing evidence base generally shows strong feasibility and acceptability of technology-based SBI in medical settings. However, evidence for effectiveness in changing alcohol use is limited in this young field. PMID:26259001

  7. VHF and L-band scintillation characteristics over an Indian low latitude station, Waltair (17.7° N, 83.3° E)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rama Rao, P. V. S.; Tulasi Ram, S.; Niranjan, K.; Prasad, D. S. V. V. D.; Gopi Krishna, S.; Lakshmi, N. K. M.

    2005-10-01

    Characteristics of simultaneous VHF (244 MHz) and L-band (1.5 GHz) scintillations recorded at a low-latitude station, Waltair (17.7° N, 83.3° E), during the low sunspot activity year of March 2004 to March 2005, suggest that the occurrence of scintillations is mainly due to two types, namely the Plasma Bubble Induced (PBI), which maximizes during the post sunset hours of winter and equinoctial months, and the Bottom Side Sinusoidal (BSS) type, which maximizes during the post-midnight hours of the summer solstice months. A detailed study on the spectral characteristics of the scintillations at both the frequencies show that the post-sunset scintillations are strong with fast fading (≈40 fad/min) and are multiple in nature in scattering, giving rise to steep spectral slopes, whereas the post-midnight scintillations, which occur mostly on the VHF signal with low fading rate (≈4 fad/min), are of the BSS type, often showing typical Fresnel oscillations with reduced roll off spectral slopes, indicating that the type of irregularity resembles a thin screen structure giving rise to weak scattering. Using the onset times of several similar scintillation patches across the two satellite (FLEETSAT 73° E, INMARSAT 65° E) ray paths (sub-ionospheric points are separated by 82 km), the East ward movement of the irregularity patches is found to vary from 150 to 250 m/s during the post sunset hours and decrease slowly during the post midnight hours. Further, the east-west extent of the PBI type of irregularities is found to vary from 100 to 500 km, while that of the BSS type extend up to a few thousand kilometers. Keywords. Ionosphere (Ionospheric irregularities; Auroral ionosphere; Electric fields and currents)

  8. New scintillation detectors based on oxide single crystal films for biological microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorenko, Yu; Konstankevych, I.; Globus, M.; Grinyov, B.; Lyubinskiy, V.

    2003-06-01

    Scintillation characteristics of the Lu 3Al 5O 12-based single crystal films, grown on the Y 3Al 5O 12 (YAG) substrate by liquid phase epitaxy, were explored and improved for the application in biological microtomography as X-ray image screens. To achieve a high spatial resolution, the film must be of about 1 μm thickness, a large effective atomic number Zeff being necessary for a sufficient absorption in the X-ray range. The Lu 3Al 5O 12:Ce 3+ garnet ( Zeff≈60) is a proper heavy material for such films. However, a stable growth of this film on the YAG substrate is hampered by the lattice mismatch between the film and substrate. This mismatch was duly reduced with the use of specially chosen isoelectronic impurities which simultaneously enhance the light yield of the film, and the overlap of its luminescence spectrum with the spectral sensitivity of the photoreceiver (CCD camera).

  9. Scintillating glass fiber neutron sensors: 2, Light transmission in scintillating fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Abel, K.H.; Arthur, R.J.; Bliss, M.

    1993-10-01

    The capture and transmission of light from an event through a scintillating fiber is somewhat different than in conventional optical waveguide applications. A theoretical all-ray model that depends on surface and bulk loss factors is developed for this transmission. The capture fraction can be significantly greater than that predicted on the basis of meridional rays alone and the gross loss is nonexponential for short distances (less than or of the order of one 1/e distance). The latter phenomenon occurs because high-angle and skew rays are more rapidly attenuated than meridional rays.

  10. sPHENIX Hadronic Calorimeter Scintillator Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrd, Reuben; Sphenix Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    A new form of matter called the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP) was discovered with the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). PHENIX is an experiment at RHIC that helped with this discovery, but plans are being made to replace it with a new spectrometer with different capabilities. The sPHENIX detector will consist of a superconducting solenoid magnet, hadronic and electromagnetic calorimetry and charged particle tracking. sPHENIX will enable a rich jet physics program that will address fundamental questions about of the nature of the QGP. The new detector will provide full azimuthal coverage and +/- 1.1 in pseudorapidity. The Hadronic Calorimeter is a major subsystem in this detector. It is made of alternating layers of scintillating tiles and steel plates. In the current prototype the tiles are covered with a reflective coating and contain wavelength shifting fibers. As the second round of prototypes are developed for an upcoming beam test, special care is being taken to provide uniform light collection efficiency across the detector. Studies are being conducted to ensure this by careful alignment of the silicon photomultipliers to the fibers and varying coatings on the tiles. The effects of the coating will be presented along with the current status and ongoing plans.

  11. Progress with the MICE scintillating fiber trackers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overton, Edward

    2013-12-01

    The International Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is a proof of principle demonstration of ionization cooling, for application in a future neutrino factory or muon collider. MICE is under construction at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (UK), where a dedicated beam line has been commissioned to transport particles produced inside the ISIS accelerator facility. The beam emittance will be measured using two scintillating fiber trackers on each side of the cooling channel, which will be mounted inside a 4 T solenoid. As particles pass through the tracker, their position will be measured at 5 stations, each of which provides a position resolution of less than 0.5 mm. The fiber trackers have been validated using cosmic ray tests, which have allowed the light yield to be found. In addition, a spare tracking station was exposed to the MICE beam, which has enabled the tracker readout to be integrated with the MICE DAQ for the first time. This test required the integration gate on the D0 AFE-IIt readout boards to be synchronized with particle arrival by using diagnostic signals from the ISIS accelerator.

  12. Scintillating LXe/LKr electromagnetic calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Akimov, D.Yu.; Bolozdynya, A.J.; Churakov, D.L.

    1995-12-01

    A scintillating LXe/LKr electromagnetic calorimeter has been built at the ITEP and tested at the BATES (MIT) accelerator. The detector consists of a PMT matrix and 45 light collecting cells made of aluminized Mylar partially covered with p-terphenyl as a wavelength-shifter (WLS). Each pyramidal cell has (2.1 x 2.1) x 40 x (4.15 x 4.15) cm dimensions and is viewed by an FEU-85 glass-window photomultiplier. The detector has been exposed to the 106--348 MeV electron beam. The energy resolution is {sigma}{sub E}/E {approx_equal} 5%/{radical}E at 100--350 MeV range in LXe; the coordinate resolution is {sigma}{sub X} {approx_equal} 0.7 cm; the time resolution is {sigma}{sub {tau}} {approx_equal} 0.6 ns for a single cell. Possible ways to improve energy resolution are discussed.

  13. Excitonic effects in oxyhalide scintillating host compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Shwetha, G.; Kanchana, V.; Valsakumar, M. C.

    2014-10-07

    Ab-initio calculations based on density functional theory have been performed to study the electronic, optical, mechanical, and vibrational properties of scintillator host compounds YOX (X = F, Cl, Br, and I). Semiempirical dispersion correction schemes are used to find the effect of van der Waals forces on these layered compounds and we found this effect to be negligible except for YOBr. Calculations of phonons and elastic constants showed that all the compounds studied here are both dynamically and mechanically stable. YOF and YOI are found to be indirect band gap insulators while YOCl and YOBr are direct band gap insulators. The band gap is found to decrease as we move from fluorine to iodine, while the calculated refractive index shows the opposite trend. As the band gap decreases on going down the periodic table from YOF to YOI, the luminescence increases. The excitonic binding energy calculated, within the effective mass approximation, is found to be more for YOF than the remaining compounds, suggesting that the excitonic effect to be more in YOF than the other compounds. The optical properties are calculated within the Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TDDFT) and compared with results obtained within the random phase approximation. The TDDFT calculations, using the newly developed bootstrap exchange-correlation kernel, showed significant excitonic effects in all the compounds studied here.

  14. Optical Design Considerations for Efficient Light Collection from Liquid Scintillation Counters

    SciTech Connect

    Bernacki, Bruce E.; Douglas, Matthew; Erchinger, Jennifer L.; Fuller, Erin S.; Keillor, Martin E.; Morley, Shannon M.; Mullen, Crystal A.; Orrell, John L.; Panisko, Mark E.; Warren, Glen A.; Wright, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Liquid scintillation counters measure charged particle-emitting radioactive isotopes and are used for environmental studies, nuclear chemistry, and life science. Alpha and beta emissions arising from the material under study interact with the scintillation cocktail to produce light. The prototypical liquid scintillation counter employs low-level photon-counting detectors to measure the arrival of the scintillation light produced as a result of the dissolved material under study interacting with the scintillation cocktail. For reliable operation the counting instrument must convey the scintillation light to the detectors efficiently and predictably. Current best practices employ the use of two or more detectors for coincidence processing to discriminate true scintillation events from background events due to instrumental effects such as photomultiplier tube dark rates, tube flashing, or other light emission not generated in the scintillation cocktail vial. In low background liquid scintillation counters additional attention is paid to shielding the scintillation cocktail from naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) present in the laboratory and within the instruments construction materials. Low background design is generally at odds with optimal light collection. This study presents the evolution of a light collection design for liquid scintillation counting in a low background shield. The basic approach to achieve both good light collection and a low background measurement is described. The baseline signals arising from the scintillation vial are modeled and methods to efficiently collect scintillation light are presented as part of the development of a customized low-background, high sensitivity liquid scintillation counting system.

  15. Quick Guide to ERIC Tools for the Graduate Student.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Higher Education, Washington, DC.

    This collection serves as a quick guide to Educational Resources Information Center (ERIC) tools graduate students may find useful. The guide contains example screens and information on each of these: (1) ACCESS ERIC Home Page, the hub of the ERIC system, which links to all Clearinghouses and support components; (2) the ERIC system slide show home

  16. Fiscal Officer Training, 1999-2000. Participant's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Education, Washington, DC.

    This guide is intended for use by participants (college fiscal officers, business officers, bursars, loan managers, etc.) in a two-day workshop on Title IV of the reauthorized Higher Education Act. The guide includes copies of the visual displays used in the workshop, space for individual notes, sample forms, sample computer screens, quizzes, and…

  17. Neutron detector based on Particles of 6Li glass scintillator dispersed in organic lightguide matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ianakiev, K. D.; Hehlen, M. P.; Swinhoe, M. T.; Favalli, A.; Iliev, M. L.; Lin, T. C.; Bennett, B. L.; Barker, M. T.

    2015-06-01

    Most 3He replacement neutron detector technologies today have overlapping neutron-gamma pulse-height distributions, which limits their usefulness and performance. Different techniques are used to mitigate this shortcoming, including Pulse Shape Discrimination (PSD) or threshold settings that suppress all gammas as well as much of the neutrons. As a result, count rates are limited and dead times are high when PSD is used, and the detection efficiency for neutron events is reduced due to the high threshold. This is a problem in most applications where the neutron-gamma separation of 3He detectors had been essential. This challenge is especially severe for neutron coincidence and multiplicity measurements that have numerous conflicting requirements such as high detection efficiency, short die-away time, short dead time, and high stability. 6Li-glass scintillators have excellent light output and a single peak distribution, but they are difficult to implement because of their gamma sensitivity. The idea of reducing the gamma sensitivity of 6Li-glass scintillators by embedding small glass particles in an organic light-guide medium was first presented by L.M. Bollinger in the early 60s but, to the best of our knowledge, has never been reduced to practice. We present a proof of principle detector design and experimental data that develop this concept to a large-area neutron detector. This is achieved by using a multi-component optical medium (6Li glass particles attached to a glass supporting structure and a mineral oil light guide) which matches the indices of refraction and minimizes the absorption of the 395 nm scintillator light. The detector design comprises a 10 in. long tube with dual end readout with about 3% volume density of 6Li glass particles installed. The presented experimental data with various neutron and gamma sources show the desired wide gap between the neutron and gamma pulse height distributions, resulting in a true plateau in the counting characteristics similar to that of 3He detectors.

  18. Efficient high-resolution hard x-ray imaging with transparent Lu2O3:Eu scintillator thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marton, Zsolt; Miller, Stuart R.; Brecher, Charles; Kenesei, Peter; Moore, Matthew D.; Woods, Russell; Almer, Jonathan D.; Miceli, Antonino; Nagarkar, Vivek V.

    2015-09-01

    We have developed microstructured Lu2O3:Eu scintillator films that provide spatial resolution on the order of micrometers for hard X-ray imaging. In addition to their outstanding resolution, Lu2O3:Eu films also exhibits both high absorption efficiency for 20 to 100 keV X-rays, and bright 610 nm emission whose intensity rivals that of the brightest known scintillators. At present, high spatial resolution of such a magnitude is achieved using ultra-thin scintillators measuring only about 1 to 5 μm in thickness, which limits absorption efficiency to ~3% for 12 keV X-rays and less than 0.1% for 20 to 100 keV X-rays; this results in excessive measurement time and exposure to the specimen. But the absorption efficiency of Lu2O3:Eu (99.9% @12 keV and 30% @ 70 keV) is much greater, significantly decreasing measurement time and radiation exposure. Our Lu2O3:Eu scintillator material, fabricated by our electron-beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) process, combines superior density of 9.5 g/cm3, a microcolumnar structure for higher spatial resolution, and a bright emission (48000 photons/MeV) whose wavelength is an ideal match for the underlying CCD detector array. We grew thin films of this material on a variety of matching substrates, measuring some 5-10μm in thickness and covering areas up to 1 x 1 cm2, which can be a suitable basis for microtomography, digital radiography as well as CT and hard X-ray Micro-Tomography (XMT). The microstructure and optical transparency of such screens was optimized, and their imaging performance was evaluated in the Argonne National Laboratory's Advanced Photon Source. Spatial resolution and efficiency were also characterized.

  19. Data Quality Screening Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strub, Richard; Lynnes, Christopher; Hearty, Thomas; Won, Young-In; Fox, Peter; Zednik, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    A report describes the Data Quality Screening Service (DQSS), which is designed to help automate the filtering of remote sensing data on behalf of science users. Whereas this process often involves much research through quality documents followed by laborious coding, the DQSS is a Web Service that provides data users with data pre-filtered to their particular criteria, while at the same time guiding the user with filtering recommendations of the cognizant data experts. The DQSS design is based on a formal semantic Web ontology that describes data fields and the quality fields for applying quality control within a data product. The accompanying code base handles several remote sensing datasets and quality control schemes for data products stored in Hierarchical Data Format (HDF), a common format for NASA remote sensing data. Together, the ontology and code support a variety of quality control schemes through the implementation of the Boolean expression with simple, reusable conditional expressions as operands. Additional datasets are added to the DQSS simply by registering instances in the ontology if they follow a quality scheme that is already modeled in the ontology. New quality schemes are added by extending the ontology and adding code for each new scheme.

  20. A Guide to Audiovisual Resources about ERIC.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ely, Donald P.

    The currently available audiovisual products about ERIC reviewed in this guide have been developed to meet the needs of a variety of users with varying familiarity with the system. Materials to be included were screened on the basis of availability, currency, and technical quality. The remaining products were then reviewed using five criteria: (1)…

  1. Plasma Screen Floating Mount

    DOEpatents

    Eakle, Robert F.; Pak, Donald J.

    2004-10-26

    A mounting system for a flat display screen, particularly a plasma display screen, suspends the screen separately in each of the x-, y- and z-directions. A series of frames located by linear bearings and isolated by springs and dampers allows separate controlled movement in each axis. The system enables the use of relatively larger display screens in vehicles in which plasma screen are subject to damage from vibration.

  2. Effect of beam types on the scintillations: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baykal, Yahya; Eyyuboglu, Halil T.; Cai, Yangjian

    2009-02-01

    When different incidences are launched in atmospheric turbulence, it is known that the intensity fluctuations exhibit different characteristics. In this paper we review our work done in the evaluations of the scintillation index of general beam types when such optical beams propagate in horizontal atmospheric links in the weak fluctuations regime. Variation of scintillation indices versus the source and medium parameters are examined for flat-topped-Gaussian, cosh- Gaussian, cos-Gaussian, annular, elliptical Gaussian, circular (i.e., stigmatic) and elliptical (i.e., astigmatic) dark hollow, lowest order Bessel-Gaussian and laser array beams. For flat-topped-Gaussian beam, scintillation is larger than the single Gaussian beam scintillation, when the source sizes are much less than the Fresnel zone but becomes smaller for source sizes much larger than the Fresnel zone. Cosh-Gaussian beam has lower on-axis scintillations at smaller source sizes and longer propagation distances as compared to Gaussian beams where focusing imposes more reduction on the cosh- Gaussian beam scintillations than that of the Gaussian beam. Intensity fluctuations of a cos-Gaussian beam show favorable behaviour against a Gaussian beam at lower propagation lengths. At longer propagation lengths, annular beam becomes advantageous. In focused cases, the scintillation index of annular beam is lower than the scintillation index of Gaussian and cos-Gaussian beams starting at earlier propagation distances. Cos-Gaussian beams are advantages at relatively large source sizes while the reverse is valid for annular beams. Scintillations of a stigmatic or astigmatic dark hollow beam can be smaller when compared to stigmatic or astigmatic Gaussian, annular and flat-topped beams under conditions that are closely related to the beam parameters. Intensity fluctuation of an elliptical Gaussian beam can also be smaller than a circular Gaussian beam depending on the propagation length and the ratio of the beam waist size along the long axis to that along the short axis (i.e., astigmatism). Comparing against the fundamental Gaussian beam on equal source size and equal power basis, it is observed that the scintillation index of the lowest order Bessel-Gaussian beam is lower at large source sizes and large width parameters. However, for excessively large width parameters and beyond certain propagation lengths, the advantage of the lowest order Bessel-Gaussian beam seems to be lost. Compared to Gaussian beam, laser array beam exhibits less scintillations at long propagation ranges and at some midrange radial displacement parameters. When compared among themselves, laser array beams tend to have reduced scintillations for larger number of beamlets, longer wavelengths, midrange radial displacement parameters, intermediate Gaussian source sizes, larger inner scales and smaller outer scales of turbulence. The number of beamlets used does not seem to be so effective in this improvement of the scintillations.

  3. Radar measurement of ionospheric scintillation in the polar region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knepp, Dennis L.

    2015-10-01

    This paper considers several estimators that use radar data to measure the S4 scintillation index that characterizes the severity of amplitude scintillation that may occur during RF propagation through ionospheric irregularities. S4 is defined to be the standard deviation of the fluctuations in received power normalized by division by the mean power. Estimates of S4 are based on radar returns obtained during track of targets which may themselves have intrinsic radar cross-section fluctuations. Key to this work is the consideration of thresholding, which is used in many radars to remove (from further processing) signals whose SNR is considered too low. We consider several estimators here. The "direct" estimator attempts to estimate S4 through the direct calculation of the mean and standard deviation of the SNR from a number of radar returns. The maximum likelihood (ML) estimator uses multiple hypothesis testing and the assumption of Nakagami-m statistics to estimate the scintillation index that best fits the radar returns from some number of pulses. The ML estimator has perfect knowledge of the number of radar returns that are below the threshold. The direct estimator is accurate for the case where there is no threshold and there are many returns or samples from which to estimate S4. However, the direct estimator is flawed (especially for strong scintillation) if deep fades that fall below the radar threshold are ignored. The modified ML estimator here is based on the ML technique but is useful if the count of missed returns is unavailable. We apply the modified ML estimator to several years of radar tracks of large calibration satellites to obtain the statistics of UHF scintillation as viewed from the early warning radar at Thule, Greenland. One-way S4 was measured from 5000 low Earth orbit tracks during the 3 year period after solar maximum in May 2000. The data are analyzed to quantify the exceedance or the level of scintillation experienced at various probabilities. For example, from Thule during the period from December 2001 to February 2002, the probability exceeds 5% that the one-way scintillation index at UHF is greater than 0.7. On a daily basis this translates into 1.2 h a day of strong scintillation. Unfortunately, there are insufficient data to obtain equivalent information for the winter of solar maximum when the scintillation is likely to be most severe.

  4. A scintillating fission detector for neutron flux measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Stange, Sy; Esch, Ernst I; Burgett, Eric A; May, Iain; Muenchausen, Ross E; Taw, Felicia; Tovesson, Fredrik K

    2010-01-01

    Neutron flux monitors are commonly used for a variety of nuclear physics applications. A scintillating neutron detector, consisting of a liquid scintillator loaded with fissionable material, has been developed, characterized, and tested in the beam line at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, and shows a significant improvement in neutron sensitivity compared with a conventional fission chamber. Recent research on nanocomposite-based scintillators for gamma-ray detection indicates that this approach can be extended to load nanoparticles of fissionable material into a scintillating matrix, with up to three orders of magnitude higher loading than typical fission chambers. This will result in a rugged, cost-efficient detector with high efficiency, a short signal rise time, and the ability to be used in low neutron-flux environments. Initial efforts to utilize the luminescence of uranyl oxide to eliminate the need for wavelength-shifting dyes were unsuccessful. Excitation of uranyl compounds has been reported at wavelengths ranging from 266 nm to 532 nm. However, neither the 300 nm emission of toluene, nor the 350 nm emission of PPO, nor the 410 nm emission of POPOP resulted in significant excitation of and emission by uranyl oxide. As indicated by UV/visible spectroscopy, light emitted at these wavelengths was absorbed by the colored solution. {sup 235}U remains the most attractive candidate for a fissionable scintillator, due to its high fission cross-section and lack of a threshold fission energy, but all solutions containing molecular uranium compounds will be colored, most more highly than the U{sup 6+} compounds used here. Research is therefore continuing toward the fabrication of uranium nanoparticles, in which, due to Rayleigh scattering, the coloration should be less pronounced. The characterization of the thorium-loaded liquid scintillator and the fabrication of the 100 mL detectors for use at LANSCE demonstrated the feasibility of loading fissionable material into a liquid scintillator. Analysis of beam line experiments using the thorium-loaded scintillator is underway to determine the fission event rate in the detector, for comparison with a conventional fission chamber as well as with an unloaded liquid scintillator.

  5. Counterintuitive MCNPX Results for Scintillator Surface Roughness Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Ding; Guss, Paul

    2012-10-01

    We performed a number of comparative MCNPX simulations of gamma energy depositions of scintillation crystals with smooth and rough surfaces. In the study, nine surface patterns (8 micro-roughness + 1 smooth) were coupled with eight common scintillation crystals for a total of 72 possible combinations. Although this was a preliminary study, the outcome was counterintuitive; results generally favored surfaces with micro-roughness over a conventional smooth surface as measured in terms of average energy depositions. The advantage gained through surface roughness is less significant for CdSe and LaCl3, but is most significant for the common NaI and the glass-like SiO2 scintillators. Based on the results of the 64 rough-surface coupled MCNPX simulations, 57 of the 64 (~89%) simulations showed some improvement in energy deposition. The mean improvement in energy deposition was 2.52%. The maximum improvement was about 8.75%, which was achieved when roughening the surface of a SiO2 scintillator using a micro cutting pattern. Further, for a conventional NaI scintillator, MCNPX results suggest that any roughness pattern would improve the energy deposition, with an average improvement of 3.83%. Although the likely causes remain unclear, we intend to focus on presenting simulation results instead of offering a sound explanation of the underlying physics.

  6. Low-latitude scintillation weakening during sudden stratospheric warming events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paula, E. R.; Jonah, O. F.; Moraes, A. O.; Kherani, E. A.; Fejer, B. G.; Abdu, M. A.; Muella, M. T. A. H.; Batista, I. S.; Dutra, S. L. G.; Paes, R. R.

    2015-03-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) L1-frequency (1.575 GHz) amplitude scintillations at São José dos Campos (23.1°S, 45.8°W, dip latitude 17.3°S), located under the southern crest of the equatorial ionization anomaly, are analyzed during the Northern Hemisphere winter sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) events of 2001/2002, 2002/2003, and 2012/2013. The events occurred during a period when moderate to strong scintillations are normally observed in the Brazilian longitude sector. The selected SSW events were of moderate and major categories and under low Kp conditions. The most important result of the current study is the long-lasting (many weeks) weakening of scintillation amplitudes at this low-latitude station, compared to their pre-SSW periods. Ionosonde-derived evening vertical plasma drifts and meridional neutral wind effects inferred from total electron content measurements are consistent with the observed weakening of GPS scintillations during these SSW events. This work provides strong evidence of SSW effects on ionospheric scintillations and the potential consequences of such SSW events on Global Navigation Satellite System-based applications.

  7. Tests of Multibeam Scintillation Mitigation on Laser Uplinks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Keith

    2004-01-01

    A report presents additional details about parts of the program of research and development that is the topic of the immediately preceding article. The report emphasizes those aspects of the program that pertain to the use of multiple uplink laser beams in a ground-to-spacecraft optical communication system to reduce (relative to the case of a single uplink laser beam) the depth and frequency of occurrence of fades in the uplink signal received at the spacecraft. The underlying multibeam scintillation-mitigation concept was described in "Multiple-Beam Transmission for Optical Communication" (NPO-20384), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 22, No. 11 (November 1998), page 56. The report discusses the need for mitigating uplink scintillation; briefly describes the Optical Communications Telescope Laboratory and its role as the ground station in the research; summarizes prior experiments in uplink scintillation and multibeam mitigation of scintillation in ground-to-spacecraft laser communications; and describes key experiments planned to be performed in the next five years. The report then elaborates somewhat on the initial experiments, which are to be dedicated to understanding and perfecting the multibeam scintillation-mitigation strategy.

  8. Scintillating Fiber Technology for a High Energy Neutron Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, Evgeny; Adams, James; Watts, John, Jr.; Christl, Mark

    Secondary neutrons within a crewed spacecraft make a significant contribution to the radiation exposure of the crew. In order to determine the dose equivalent the absolute neutron energy spectrum must be measured. Making this measurement in the crew quarters requires an instrument that distinguishes neutrons from the background of gamma ray and charged particle radiation with high reliability. A design for a high energy neutron spectrometer will be presented that achieves excellent background rejection while measuring the absolute neutron differential energy spectrum. This spectrometer consists of 6Li-loaded scintillating glass optical fiber waveguides which are imbedded in plastic scintillator. The plastic scintillator measures the neutron energy while thermalizing the neutrons. Once thermalized, the neutrons can be absorbed by 6Li, which gives a signal in the glass fibers. Optically separating the signals from the glass fibers and in the plastic scintillator is critical for strong background rejection. It permits the thermal neutron absorption signal in the glass fibers to be detected while signals from gamma rays and charges particles are rejected with high efficiency. This talk will discuss the methods for creating optical fiber waveguides from 6Li glass loaded scintillating fibers.

  9. Stellar scintillation on large and extremely large telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornilov, V.

    2012-10-01

    The accuracy of ground-based astronomical photometry is limited by two factors: photon statistics and stellar scintillation arising when starlight passes through the Earth's atmosphere. This paper examines the theoretical role of the outer scale LO of the optical turbulence (OT), which suppresses the low-frequency component of the scintillation. It is shown that for typical values of LO ˜ 25-50 m, this effect becomes noticeable for telescopes of diameter about 4 m. On extremely large, 30-40 m, telescopes with exposures longer than a few seconds, the inclusion of the outer scale in the calculation reduces the scintillation power by more than a factor of 10 relative to conventional estimates. The details of this phenomenon are discussed for various models of non-Kolmogorov turbulence. In addition, a quantitative description of the influence of the telescope central obscuration on the measured scintillation noise is introduced and combined with the effect of the outer scale. Evaluation of the scintillation noise on future TMT and E-ELT telescopes predicts an amplitude of approximately 10 μmag for a 60-s exposure.

  10. Scintillation properties of polycrystalline LaxY1-xO3 ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahi, Sunil; Chen, Wei; Kenarangui, Rasool

    2015-03-01

    Scintillators are the material that absorbs the high-energy photons and emits visible photons. Scintillators are commonly used in radiation detector for security, medical imaging, industrial applications and high energy physics research. Two main types of scintillators are inorganic single crystals and organic (plastic or liquid) scintillators. Inorganic single crystals are expensive and difficult to grow in desire shape and size. Also, some efficient inorganic scintillator such as NaI and CsI are not environmental friendly. But on the other hand, organic scintillators have low density and hence poor energy resolution which limits their use in gamma spectroscopy. Polycrystalline ceramic can be a cost effective alternative to expensive inorganic single crystal scintillators. Here we have fabricated La0.2Y1.8O3 ceramic scintillator and studied their luminescence and scintillation properties. Ceramic scintillators were fabricated by vacuum sintering of La0.2Y1.8O3 nanoparticles at temperature below the melting point. La0.2Y1.8O3 ceramic were characterized structurally using XRD and TEM. Photoluminescence and radioluminescence studies were done using UV and X-ray as an excitation source. We have used gamma isotopes with different energy to studies the scintillation properties of La0.2Y1.8O3 scintillator. Preliminary studies of La0.2Y1.8O3 scintillator shows promising result with energy resolution comparable to that of NaI and CsI.

  11. Functional Stability of the Human Kappa Opioid Receptor Reconstituted in Nanodiscs Revealed by a Time-Resolved Scintillation Proximity Assay

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Randi Westh; Wang, Xiaole; Golab, Agnieszka; Bornert, Olivier; Oswald, Christine; Wagner, Renaud; Martinez, Karen Laurence

    2016-01-01

    Long-term functional stability of isolated membrane proteins is crucial for many in vitro applications used to elucidate molecular mechanisms, and used for drug screening platforms in modern pharmaceutical industry. Compared to soluble proteins, the understanding at the molecular level of membrane proteins remains a challenge. This is partly due to the difficulty to isolate and simultaneously maintain their structural and functional stability, because of their hydrophobic nature. Here we show, how scintillation proximity assay can be used to analyze time-resolved high-affinity ligand binding to membrane proteins solubilized in various environments. The assay was used to establish conditions that preserved the biological function of isolated human kappa opioid receptor. In detergent solution the receptor lost high-affinity ligand binding to a radiolabelled ligand within minutes at room temperature. After reconstitution in Nanodiscs made of phospholipid bilayer the half-life of high-affinity ligand binding to the majority of receptors increased 70-fold compared to detergent solubilized receptors—a level of stability that is appropriate for further downstream applications. Time-resolved scintillation proximity assay has the potential to screen numerous conditions in parallel to obtain high levels of stable and active membrane proteins, which are intrinsically unstable in detergent solution, and with minimum material consumption. PMID:27035823

  12. Thermal annealing behavior of α-Al2O3 scintillation screens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lederer, S.; Akhmadaliev, S.; Forck, P.; Gütlich, E.; Lieberwirth, A.; Ensinger, W.

    2015-12-01

    Polycrystalline alumina samples (α-Al2O3, purity: 99.8%) were irradiated by 63Cu heavy ions (E = 0.5 MeV/u) at various fluences. After irradiation, absorption measurements were performed within the wavelength range from 200 to 1000 nm to evaluate color center evolution. Thermal annealing behavior of the created defects was investigated with respect to annealing temperature and duration. Complex color center formation processes depending on particle fluence and temperature could be observed. Calculated activation energies necessary for F- and F+-center migration are ∼0.3 eV for temperatures ranging from RT to ∼673 K.

  13. Use of internal scintillator radioactivity to calibrate DOI function of a PET detector with a dual-ended-scintillator readout

    SciTech Connect

    Bircher, Chad; Shao Yiping

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: Positron emission tomography (PET) detectors that use a dual-ended-scintillator readout to measure depth-of-interaction (DOI) must have an accurate DOI function to provide the relationship between DOI and signal ratios to be used for detector calibration and recalibration. In a previous study, the authors used a novel and simple method to accurately and quickly measure DOI function by irradiating the detector with an external uniform flood source; however, as a practical concern, implementing external uniform flood sources in an assembled PET system is technically challenging and expensive. In the current study, therefore, the authors investigated whether the same method could be used to acquire DOI function from scintillator-generated (i.e., internal) radiation. The authors also developed a method for calibrating the energy scale necessary to select the events within the desired energy window. Methods: The authors measured the DOI function of a PET detector with lutetium yttrium orthosilicate (LYSO) scintillators. Radiation events originating from the scintillators' internal Lu-176 beta decay were used to measure DOI functions which were then compared with those measured from both an external uniform flood source and an electronically collimated external point source. The authors conducted these studies with several scintillators of differing geometries (1.5 x 1.5 and 2.0 x 2.0 mm{sup 2} cross-section area and 20, 30, and 40 mm length) and various surface finishes (mirror-finishing, saw-cut rough, and other finishes in between), and in a prototype array. Results: All measured results using internal and external radiation sources showed excellent agreement in DOI function measurement. The mean difference among DOI values for all scintillators measured from internal and external radiation sources was less than 1.0 mm for different scintillator geometries and various surface finishes. Conclusions: The internal radioactivity of LYSO scintillators can be used to accurately measure DOI function in PET detectors, regardless of scintillator geometry or surface finish. Because an external radiation source is not needed, this method of DOI function measurement can be practically applied to individual PET detectors as well as assembled systems.

  14. [Lung cancer screening].

    PubMed

    Sánchez González, M

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is a very important disease, curable in early stages. There have been trials trying to show the utility of chest x-ray or computed tomography in Lung Cancer Screening for decades. In 2011, National Lung Screening Trial results were published, showing a 20% reduction in lung cancer mortality in patients with low dose computed tomography screened for three years. These results are very promising and several scientific societies have included lung cancer screening in their guidelines. Nevertheless we have to be aware of lung cancer screening risks, such as: overdiagnosis, radiation and false positive results. Moreover, there are many issues to be solved, including choosing the appropriate group to be screened, the duration of the screening program, intervals between screening and its cost-effectiveness. Ongoing trials will probably answer some of these questions. This article reviews the current evidence on lung cancer screening. PMID:23830728

  15. BaBrI:Eu2 + , a new bright scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Bourret-Courchesne, E.D.; Bizarri, G.; Hanrahan, S.M.; Gundiah, G.; Yan, Z.; Derenzo, S.E.

    2009-11-07

    The scintillation properties of BaBrI:Eu2+ are reported. Crystals were produced by the vertical Bridgman technique in a sealed quartz ampoule. Excellent scintillation properties were measured. A light yield of 81,0007 +- 3000 photons per MeV (ph/MeV) of absorbed gamma-ray energy was measured. An energy resolution (FWHM over peak position) of 4.870.5percent was observed for the 662keV full absorption peak. Pulsed X-ray luminescence measurements show two exponential decay components of 297 and 482 ns with a contribution to the total light output of 23percent and 77percent, respectively. Under X-ray and UV excitation, the emission corresponds to a broadband center at 413 nm. These initial values make BaBrI:Eu2+ one of the brightest and the fastest known Eu2+ doped scintillators.

  16. Development of Scintillating Bolometers for Dark Matter Searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, M.; Cuesta, C.; García, E.; Ginestra, C.; de Solórzano, A. Ortiz; Ortigoza, Y.; Pobes, C.; Puimedón, J.; Rolón, T.; Sarsa, M. L.; Villar, J. A.; Coron, N.; Gironnet, J.; Leblanc, J.; de Marcillac, P.; Redon, T.; Torres, L.; Veber, P.; Velázquez, M.

    Scintillating bolometers, in which the simultaneous detection of light and heat allows to discriminate the nature of the interacting particle, are one of the most promising detectors for Dark Matter (DM) searches. One main advantage is the wide range of materials that can be used as target, that could provide a key for WIMP identification. The EURECA (European Underground Rare Event Calorimeter Array) project aims to install 1 ton of cryogenic detectors (Ge and solid state scintillators) to explore the spin independent (SI) scalar cross sections down to the 10-46 cm2 region. In this frame, the ROSEBUD collaboration is developing low temperature scintillating materials to be installed at the Canfranc Underground Laboratory. Work on 6Li and 10B based targets, that could allow to monitor the thermal and fast neutron flux within the experiments, is also presented.

  17. A plastic scintillation dosimeter for high dose rate brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Lambert, J; McKenzie, D R; Law, S; Elsey, J; Suchowerska, N

    2006-11-01

    In vivo dose verification in brachytherapy requires a small insertable dosimeter with a real-time readout capability. Fibre optic scintillation dosimeters, consisting of a plastic scintillator coupled to an optical fibre, are one of the most promising dosimeters for this application. We have developed two sizes of the BrachyFOD scintillation dosimeter which have external diameters of 2.2 mm and 1 mm and have determined their important dosimetric characteristics (depth dose relation, angular dependence, temperature dependence, energy dependence). We have shown that the background signal created by Cerenkov and fibre fluorescence does not significantly affect the performance in most clinical geometries using an (192)Ir source from an HDR brachytherapy unit. The dosimeter design enables readout at less than 0.5 s intervals. The BrachyFOD satisfies the need for a real-time in vivo brachytherapy dosimeter. PMID:17047266

  18. Pulse shape discrimination with lithium-containing organic scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaitseva, Natalia; Glenn, Andrew; Paul Martinez, H.; Carman, Leslie; Pawełczak, Iwona; Faust, Michelle; Payne, Stephen

    2013-11-01

    6Li-containing organic scintillators have been prepared and characterized as a new type of transparent, single-phase materials with pulse shape discrimination (PSD) properties for simultaneous detection of thermal and fast neutrons discriminated from gamma radiation. Tests conducted with recently developed PSD-capable plastic scintillators showed that incorporation of 6Li into the aromatic matrix with fast-neutron/gamma discrimination properties offers the additional sensitivity to thermal neutrons, substantially increasing efficiency and the energy range of neutron detection. Comparative analyses of 6Li-loaded plastic, liquid and single crystal organic scintillators provide evidence that, in addition to neutron/gamma discrimination, these novel materials have the ability for discrimination between the signatures of fast and thermal neutrons.

  19. Scintillation counters in modern high-energy physics experiments (Review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharzheev, Yu. N.

    2015-07-01

    Scintillation counters (SCs) based on organic plastic scintillators (OPSs) are widely used in modern high-energy physics (HEP) experiments. A comprehensive review is given to technologies for production of OPS strips and tiles (extrusion, injection molding, etc.), optical and physical characteristics of OPSs, and methods of light collection based on the use of wavelength-shifting (WLS) fibers coupled to multipixel vacuum and silicon PMs. Examples are given of the use of SCs in modern experiments involved in the search for quarks and new particles, including the Higgs boson (D0, CDF, ATLAS, CMS), new states of matter (ALICE), CP violation (LHCb, KLOE), neutrino oscillations (MINOS, OPERA), and cosmic particles in a wide mass and energy interval (AMS-02). Scintillation counters hold great promise for future HEP experiments (at the ILC, NICA, FAIR) due to properties of a high segmentation, WLS fiber light collection, and multipixel silicon PMT readout.

  20. Prototype of a scintillation detector involving APD photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzubenko, G. B.; Zhigareva, N. M.; Mikhaylov, K. R.; Romanov, D. V.; Stavinsky, A. V.; Stolin, V. L.; Polozov, P. A.; Prokudin, M. S.; Sharkov, G. B.

    2015-11-01

    A prototype of a new scintillation detector involving APD photodetectors is discussed. The prototype in question consists of a plastic scintillator 96 × 96 × 128 mm in size. Grooves into which a wavelength-shifting fiber is laid are made on lateral faces of the scintillator. A photodiode equipped with a special amplifier is arranged at the end of this fiber. The results of testing the detector prototype in a proton beam are presented. It is shown that the amplitude of the signal in the prototype changes substantially (by a factor of three to five) with the coordinate of a particle as it traverses the prototype. Thus, the proposed design is position-sensitive. Also, the neutron-detection efficiency was calculated with the aid of the GEANT3 code package.

  1. Scintillation Efficiency of Liquid Xenon for Low Energy Nuclear Recoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wongjirad, Taritree; Ni, Kaixuan; Manzur, Angel; Kastens, Louis; McKinsey, Daniel

    2008-04-01

    In early 2006, the XENON and ZEPLIN collaborations announced highly stringent upper limits on the WIMP-nucleon cross-section. However, the dominant systematic uncertainty in these limits is due to the uncertainty in the nuclear recoil scintillation efficiency (NRSE) for liquid xenon. The NRSE is defined as the amount of scintillation produced by nuclear recoils, divided by the amount of scintillation produced by electron recoils, per unit energy. Though the NRSE has been measured by several groups, its value at the low energies most important for the liquid xenon WIMP searches has a large uncertainty. Furthermore, the NRSE may vary with the strength of the electric field in the liquid xenon. In an attempt to reduce these uncertainties, we have measured the NRSE down to 5 keV nuclear recoil energy for various electric fields.

  2. Hadronic shower development in Iron-Scintillator Tile Calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaral, P.; Amorim, A.; Anderson, K.; Barreira, G.; Benetta, R.; Berglund, S.; Biscarat, C.; Blanchot, G.; Blucher, E.; Bogush, A.; Bohm, C.; Boldea, V.; Borisov, O.; Bosman, M.; Bromberg, C.; Budagov, J.; Burdin, S.; Caloba, L.; Carvalho, J.; Casado, P.; Castillo, M. V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Chadelas, R.; Chirikov-Zorin, I.; Chlachidze, G.; Cobal, M.; Cogswell, F.; Colaço, F.; Cologna, S.; Constantinescu, S.; Costanzo, D.; Crouau, M.; Daudon, F.; David, J.; David, M.; Davidek, T.; Dawson, J.; De, K.; Del Prete, T.; De Santo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Dita, S.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Downing, R.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Engström, M.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Evans, H.; Fenyuk, A.; Ferrer, A.; Flaminio, V.; Gallas, E.; Gaspar, M.; Gil, I.; Gildemeister, O.; Glagolev, V.; Gomes, A.; Gonzalez, V.; González De La Hoz, S.; Grabski, V.; Grauges, E.; Grenier, P.; Hakopian, H.; Haney, M.; Hansen, M.; Hellman, S.; Henriques, A.; Hebrard, C.; Higon, E.; Holmgren, S.; Huston, J.; Ivanyushenkov, Yu.; Jon-And, K.; Juste, A.; Kakurin, S.; Karapetian, G.; Karyukhin, A.; Kopikov, S.; Kukhtin, V.; Kulchitsky, Y.; Kurzbauer, W.; Kuzmin, M.; Lami, S.; Lapin, V.; Lazzeroni, C.; Lebedev, A.; Leitner, R.; Li, J.; Lomakin, Yu.; Lomakina, O.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopez Amengual, J. M.; Maio, A.; Malyukov, S.; Marroquin, F.; Martins, J. P.; Mazzoni, E.; Merritt, F.; Miller, R.; Minashvili, I.; Miralles, Ll.; Montarou, G.; Munar, A.; Nemecek, S.; Nessi, M.; Onofre, A.; Orteu, S.; Park, I. C.; Pallin, D.; Pantea, D.; Paoletti, R.; Patriarca, J.; Pereira, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Petit, P.; Pilcher, J.; Pinhão, J.; Poggioli, L.; Price, L.; Proudfoot, J.; Pukhov, O.; Reinmuth, G.; Renzoni, G.; Richards, R.; Roda, C.; Romance, J. B.; Romanov, V.; Ronceux, B.; Rosnet, P.; Rumyantsev, V.; Russakovich, N.; Sanchis, E.; Sanders, H.; Santoni, C.; Santos, J.; Sawyer, L.; Says, L.-P.; Seixas, J. M.; Selldèn, B.; Semenov, A.; Shchelchkov, A.; Shochet, M.; Simaitis, V.; Sissakian, A.; Solodkov, A.; Solovianov, O.; Sonderegger, P.; Sosebee, M.; Soustruznik, K.; Spanó, F.; Stanek, R.; Starchenko, E.; Stephens, R.; Suk, M.; Tang, F.; Tas, P.; Thaler, J.; Tokar, S.; Topilin, N.; Trka, Z.; Turcot, A.; Turcotte, M.; Valkar, S.; Varandas, M. J.; Vartapetian, A.; Vazeille, F.; Vichou, I.; Vinogradov, V.; Vorozhtsov, S.; Wagner, D.; White, A.; Wolters, H.; Yamdagni, N.; Yarygin, G.; Yosef, C.; Zaitsev, A.; Zdrazil, M.; Zuñiga, J.

    2000-03-01

    The lateral and longitudinal profiles of hadronic showers detected by a prototype of the ATLAS Iron-Scintillator Tile Hadron Calorimeter have been investigated. This calorimeter presents a unique longitudinal configuration of scintillator tiles. Using a fine-grained pion beam scan at 100 GeV, a detailed picture of transverse shower behaviour is obtained. The underlying radial energy densities for the four depth segments and for the entire calorimeter have been reconstructed. A three-dimensional hadronic shower parametrisation has been developed. The results presented here are useful for understanding the performance of iron-scintillator calorimeters, for developing fast simulations of hadronic showers, for many calorimetry problems requiring the integration of a shower energy deposition in a volume and for future calorimeters design.

  3. Scintillator-fiber charged particle track-imaging detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binns, W. R.; Israel, M. H.; Klarmann, J.

    1983-01-01

    A scintillator-fiber charged-particle track-imaging detector was developed using a bundle of square cross section plastic scintillator fiber optics, proximity focused onto an image intensified charge injection device (CID) camera. The tracks of charged particle penetrating into the scintillator fiber bundle are projected onto the CID camera and the imaging information is read out in video format. The detector was exposed to beams of 15 MeV protons and relativistic Neon, Manganese, and Gold nuclei and images of their tracks were obtained. Details of the detector technique, properties of the tracks obtained, and preliminary range measurements of 15 MeV protons stopping in the fiber bundle are presented.

  4. Neutron imaging using the anisotropic response of crystalline organic scintillators.

    SciTech Connect

    Brubaker, Erik; Steele, John T.

    2010-11-01

    An anisotropy in a scintillator's response to neutron elastic scattering interactions can in principle be used to gather directional information about a neutron source using interactions in a single detector. In crystalline organic scintillators, such as anthracene, both the amplitude and the time structure of the scintillation light pulse vary with the direction of the proton recoil with respect to the crystalline axes. Therefore, we have investigated the exploitation of this effect to enable compact, high-efficiency fast neutron detectors that have directional sensitivity via a precise measurement of the pulse shape. We report measurements of the pulse height and shape dependence on proton recoil angle in anthracene, stilbene, p-terphenyl, diphenyl anthracene (DPA), and tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB). Image reconstruction for simulated neutron sources is demonstrated using maximum likelihood methods for optimal directional sensitivity.

  5. Gasolines as primary solvents in liquid scintillation counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernndez, Ascensin; Ma Pinto, Rosa; Sillero, Antonio

    1986-11-01

    Gasolines from several commercial sources have been used as primary solvents in liquid scintillation counting of dry and aqueous samples of either 3H- or 14C-labeled compounds. Dry samples can be counted only by the addition of fluors to the gasolines, and compared to a standard liquid scintillator, efficiencies of around 75% were attained. For the counting of aqueous samples, gasolines must also be supplemented with secondary solvents (i.e., 10% naphthalene, 5% Triton X-100, or 10% methanol). Simply with Triton X-100, efficiencies similar to those obtained with a dioxane-based liquid scintillator were observed in the case of some gasolines. Drawbacks to gasoline are the higher toxicity and the variation of efficiency, probably depending on the presence of color markers. On the positive side is the low price of the gasolines, compared with either toluene or dioxane, and the facility of purchasing.

  6. Gasolines as primary solvents in liquid scintillation counting

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, A.; Ma Pinto, R.; Sillero, A.

    1986-11-01

    Gasolines from several commercial sources have been used as primary solvents in liquid scintillation counting of dry and aqueous samples of either /sup 3/H- or /sup 14/C-labeled compounds. Dry samples can be counted only by the addition of fluors to the gasolines, and compared to a standard liquid scintillator, efficiencies of around 75% were attained. For the counting of aqueous samples, gasolines must also be supplemented with secondary solvents (i.e., 10% naphthalene, 5% Triton X-100, or 10% methanol). Simply with Triton X-100, efficiencies similar to those obtained with a dioxane-based liquid scintillator were observed in the case of some gasolines. Drawbacks to gasoline are the higher toxicity and the variation of efficiency, probably depending on the presence of color markers. On the positive side is the low price of the gasolines, compared with either toluene or dioxane, and the facility of purchasing.

  7. Characterization of positronium properties in doped liquid scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consolati, G.; Franco, D.; Hans, S.; Jollet, C.; Meregaglia, A.; Perasso, S.; Tonazzo, A.; Yeh, M.

    2013-12-01

    Orthopositronium (o-Ps) formation and decay can replace the annihilation process, when a positron interacts in liquid scintillator media. The delay induced by the positronium decay represents either a potential signature for antineutrino detection, via inverse β decay, or to identify and suppress positron background, as recently demonstrated by the Borexino experiment. The formation probability and decay time of o-Ps depend strongly on the surrounding material. In this paper, we characterize the o-Ps properties in liquid scintillators as function of concentrations of gadolinium, lithium, neodymium, and tellurium dopers used by present and future neutrino experiments. In particular, gadolinium and lithium are high neutron cross section isotopes, widely used in reactor antineutrino experiments, while neodymium and tellurium are double β decay emitters, employed to investigates the Majorana neutrino nature. Future neutrino experiments may profit from the performed measurements to tune the preparation of the scintillator in order to maximize the o-Ps signature, and therefore the discrimination power.

  8. A potential base substrate for deformable scintillation materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Hidehito; Sato, Nobuhiro; Kitamura, Hisashi; Shirakawa, Yoshiyuki; Takahashi, Sentaro

    2016-05-01

    Deformable scintillation materials for radiation detection are an original concept that will impact many applications. Here we reveal the optical characteristics of readily available, transparent grease that consists of adhesive aromatic ring polymers. The aromatic ring polymer is methyl phenyl polysiloxane, commonly used in cosmetics, lubrication, heat conduction, and mechanical damping. It has a 285-nm excitation maximum and emits short wavelength light that peaks at 315 nm. The stopping power for 1 MeV electrons is 1.78 MeV cm2/g. The light-yield distribution has distinct peaks at 976 keV from internal conversion electrons and at 5486 keV from alpha particles. In addition, this particular methyl phenyl polysiloxane is safe for use and disposal, which is an excellent advantage. These aromatic ring polymers are potential base substrates for deformable scintillation materials and make an important addition to the categories of scintillation materials.

  9. Scintillation Properties of Eu2+-Activated Barium Fluoroiodide

    SciTech Connect

    Gundiah, Gautam; Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Bizarri, Gregory; Hanrahan, Stephen M.; Chaudhry, Anurag; Canning, Andrew; Moses, William W.; Derenzo, Stephen E.

    2009-11-18

    The scintillation properties of powders and single-crystals of BaFI doped with Eu2+ are presented. Single crystals were grown by the vertical Bridgman technique. Under optical and X-ray excitation, the samples exhibit a narrow E2+ 5d-4f transition emission centered at 405 nm. The scintillation light output is estimated to be 55,000+-5,000 photons/MeV at 662 keV with 85percent of the light decaying within 600 ns. An energyresolution of 8.5percent full width at half maximum (FWHM) has been achieved using this scintillator for 662 keV excitation (137Cs source) at room temperature.

  10. Preparation and characterization of a novel UV-curable plastic scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jun; Ding, Yunyu; Zhu, Jiayi; Qi, Di; Su, Ming; Xu, Yewei; Bi, Yutie; Lin, Runxiong; Zhang, Lin

    2016-05-01

    A novel UV-curable plastic scintillator was first prepared by using the technology of photosensitivity rapid prototyping. It used the copolymer of 621A-80, TPGDA and styrene as the matrix doped with PPO and POPOP. Its fluorescence spectra displayed a maximum emission wavelength at 428 nm. The light yield of the plastic scintillator was approximately 7.1% of anthracene on the basis of a comparison with the commercially available scintillator (ST-401). The as-prepared plastic scintillator also displayed a fast scintillation decay. Its decay time is 2.6 ns approximately. Importantly, through the technology of photosensitivity rapid prototyping, the plastic scintillator could be prepared in a short period of time at low temperature. What's more, this preparation method provides the possibility of combining the plastic scintillator with 3D printing technology, and then the applications of the plastic scintillator may be expanded greatly.

  11. DSB:Ce3+ scintillation glass for future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auffray, E.; Akchurin, N.; Benaglia, A.; Borisevich, A.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dormenev, V.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P.; Korjik, M.; Kozlov, D.; Kunori, S.; Lecoq, P.; Lee, S. W.; Lucchini, M.; Mechinsky, V.; Pauwels, K.

    2015-02-01

    One of the main challenges for detectors at future high-energy collider experiments is the high precision measurement of hadron and jet energy and momentum. One possibility to achieve this is the dual-readout technique, which allows recording simultaneously scintillation and Cherenkov light in an active medium in order to extract the electromagnetic fraction of the total shower energy on an event- by-event basis. Making use of this approach in the high luminosity LHC, however, puts stringent requirements on the active materials in terms of radiation hardness. Consequently, the R&D carried out on suitable scintillating materials focuses on the detector performance as well as on radiation tolerance. Among the different scintillating materials under study, scintillating glasses can be a suitable solution due to their relatively simple and cost effective production. Recently a new type of inorganic scintillating glass: Cerium doped DSB has been developed by Radiation Instruments and New Components LLC in Minsk for oil logging industry. This material can be produced either in form of bulk or fiber shape with diameter 0.3-2mm and length up to 2000 mm. It is obtained by standard glass production technology at temperature 1400°C with successive thermal annealing treatment at relatively low temperature. The production of large quantities is relatively easy and the production costs are significantly lower compared to crystal fibers. Therefore, this material is considered as an alternative and complementary solution to crystal fibers in view of a production at industrial scale, as required for a large dual readout calorimeter. In this paper, the first results on optical, scintillation properties as well as the radiation damage behaviour obtained on different samples made with different raw materials and various cerium concentrations will be presented.

  12. Smaller, Lower-Power Fast-Neutron Scintillation Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Jagdish; Blaes, Brent

    2008-01-01

    Scintillation-based fast-neutron detectors that are smaller and less power-hungry than mainstream scintillation-based fast-neutron detectors are undergoing development. There are numerous applications for such detectors in monitoring fast-neutron fluxes from nuclear reactors, nuclear materials, and natural sources, both on Earth and in outer space. A particularly important terrestrial application for small, low-power, portable fast-neutron detectors lies in the requirement to scan for nuclear materials in cargo and baggage arriving at international transportation facilities. The present development of miniature, low-power scintillation-based fast-neutron detectors exploits recent advances in the fabrication of avalanche photodiodes (APDs). Basically, such a detector includes a plastic scintillator, typically between 300 and 400 m thick with very thin silver mirror coating on all its faces except the one bonded to an APD. All photons generated from scintillation are thus internally reflected and eventually directed to the APD. This design affords not only compactness but also tight optical coupling for utilization of a relatively large proportion of the scintillation light. The combination of this tight coupling and the avalanche-multiplication gain (typically between 750 and 1,000) of the APD is expected to have enough sensitivity to enable monitoring of a fast-neutron flux as small as 1,000 cm(exp -2)s(exp -1). Moreover, pulse-height analysis can be expected to provide information on the kinetic energies of incident neutrons. It has been estimated that a complete, fully developed fast-neutron detector of this type, would be characterized by linear dimensions of the order of 10 cm or less, a mass of no more than about 0.5 kg, and a power demand of no more than a few watts.

  13. Quenching correction for volumetric scintillation dosimetry of proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Daniel; Mirkovic, Dragan; Sahoo, Narayan; Beddar, Sam

    2013-01-01

    Volumetric scintillation dosimetry has the potential to provide fast, high-resolution, three-dimensional radiation dosimetry. However, scintillators exhibit a nonlinear response at the high linear energy transfer (LET) values characteristic of proton Bragg peaks. The purpose of this study was to develop a quenching correction method for volumetric scintillation dosimetry of proton beams. Scintillation light from a miniature liquid scintillator detector was measured along the central axis of a 161.6 MeV proton pencil beam. Three-dimensional dose and LET distributions were calculated for 85.6, 100.9, 144.9 and 161.6 MeV beams using a validated Monte Carlo model. LET values were also calculated using an analytical formula. A least-squares fit to the data established the empirical parameters of a quenching correction model. The light distribution in a tank of liquid scintillator was measured with a CCD camera at all four beam energies. The quenching model and LET data were used to correct the measured light distribution. The calculated and measured Bragg peak heights agreed within ±3% for all energies except 85.6 MeV, where the agreement was within ±10%. The quality of the quenching correction was poorer for sharp low-energy Bragg peaks because of blurring and detector size effects. The corrections performed using analytical LET values resulted in doses within 1% of those obtained using Monte Carlo LET values. The proposed method can correct for quenching with sufficient accuracy for dosimetric purposes. The required LET values may be computed effectively using Monte Carlo or analytical methods. Future detectors should improve blurring correction methods and optimize the pixel size to improve accuracy for low-energy Bragg peaks.

  14. Final Report on Actinide Glass Scintillators for Fast Neutron Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Bliss, Mary; Stave, Jean A.

    2012-10-01

    This is the final report of an experimental investigation of actinide glass scintillators for fast-neutron detection. It covers work performed during FY2012. This supplements a previous report, PNNL-20854 “Initial Characterization of Thorium-loaded Glasses for Fast Neutron Detection” (October 2011). The work in FY2012 was done with funding remaining from FY2011. As noted in PNNL-20854, the glasses tested prior to July 2011 were erroneously identified as scintillators. The decision was then made to start from “scratch” with a literature survey and some test melts with a non-radioactive glass composition that could later be fabricated with select actinides, most likely thorium. The normal stand-in for thorium in radioactive waste glasses is cerium in the same oxidation state. Since cerium in the 3+ state is used as the light emitter in many scintillating glasses, the next most common substitute was used: hafnium. Three hafnium glasses were melted. Two melts were colored amber and a third was clear. It barely scintillated when exposed to alpha particles. The uses and applications for a scintillating fast neutron detector are important enough that the search for such a material should not be totally abandoned. This current effort focused on actinides that have very high neutron capture energy releases but low neutron capture cross sections. This results in very long counting times and poor signal to noise when working with sealed sources. These materials are best for high flux applications and access to neutron generators or reactors would enable better test scenarios. The total energy of the neutron capture reaction is not the only factor to focus on in isotope selection. Many neutron capture reactions result in energetic gamma rays that require large volumes or high densities to detect. If the scintillator is to separate neutrons from gamma rays, the capture reactions should produce heavy particles and few gamma rays. This would improve the detection of a signal for fast neutron capture.

  15. Ionospheric scintillation over Antarctica during the storms of 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, C.; Kinrade, J.; Yin, P.; Smith, N.; Bust, G. S.; Weatherwax, A. T.; Rose, M.; Maxfield, D.; Jarvis, M. J.

    2011-12-01

    At the present time our knowledge of the Earth's ionosphere is dominated by measurements from the Northern Hemisphere. In spite of recent evidence indicating unexplained differences in the ionospheres from the two hemispheres, there is still very little information from the ionosphere over the Southern oceans and the Antarctic. Although the Antarctic is rather sparsely instrumented for ionospheric study, over the past decade increasing numbers of geodetic GPS receivers have been deployed there and more recently several groups have installed specialist GPS equipment for monitoring scintillation. In January 2010 a project commenced that involved the remote deployment of equipment at 81 degrees and 89 degrees South geographic. The objective of the fieldwork was to deploy GPS receiving equipment that would for the first time take simultaneous measurements of total electron content (TEC), plasma velocity and ionospheric scintillation at remote locations across the Antarctic. The paper reports on the results from the first year of data collection throughout three ionospheric storms. The first storm shows a multitude of small-scale ionospheric irregularities over the auroral and polar regions while the high-latitude ionosphere is in partial darkness. TEC is observed entering the polar cap and being broken up into a patch in a region of strong phase scintillation. The second and third storms occur in the deep Antarctic winter and show far less in the way of TEC in the polar cap; nevertheless they show strong evidence of phase scintillation and irregularities observed from multiple instruments across the polar region. The results provide new evidence for the importance of particle precipitation in causing phase scintillation in the polar regions on low-elevation GPS signals. It is anticipated that this will be useful input in forming a realistic statistical model of the irregularities in the high-latitude ionosphere that are responsible for phase and amplitude scintillation on a variety of radio signals.

  16. The Scintillating Optical Fiber Calorimeter Instrument Performance (SOFCAL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christl, M. J.; Benson, C. M.; Berry, F. A.; Fountain, W. F.; Gregory, J. C.; Johnson, J. S.; Munroe, R. B.; Parnell, T. A.; Takahashi, Y.; Watts, J. W.

    1999-01-01

    SOFCAL is a balloon-borne instrument designed to measure the P-He cosmic ray spectra from about 200 GeV/amu - 20 TeV/amu. SOFCAL uses a thin lead and scintillating-fiber ionization calorimeter to measure the cascades produced by cosmic rays interacting in the hybrid detector system. Above the fiber calorimeter is an emulsion chamber that provides the interaction target, primary particle identification and in-flight energy calibration for the scintillating fiber data. The energy measurement technique and its calibration are described, and the present results from the analysis of a 1 day balloon flight will be presented.

  17. Scintillating optical fibers for fine-grained hodoscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Borenstein, S.R.; Strand, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    Fast detectors with fine spatial resolution will be needed to exploit high event rates at ISABELLE. Scintillating optical fibers for fine grained hodoscopes have been developed by the authors. A commercial manufacturer of optical fibers has drawn and clad PVT scintillator. Detection efficiencies greater than 99% have been achieved for a 1 mm fiber with a PMT over lengths up to 60 cm. Small diameter PMT's and avalanche photodiodes have been tested with the fibers. Further improvements are sought for the fiber and for the APD's sensitivity and coupling efficiency with the fiber.

  18. Single-photoelectron noise reduction in scintillation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Marvin, T.P.; The SLAC mQ Collaboration

    1995-10-01

    The 1994--95 search at SLAC for mulicharged particles used four 21 {times} 21 {times} 130-cm{sup 3} Bicron 408 scintillation counters to detect a signal at the single-photoelectron level. The competing noise requiring minimization was due to a combination of PM tube (8-inch Thorne EMI 9353KA) afterpulsing and ambient radiation-induced scintillator luminescence. A very slow decay (> 30 {mu}s) component was observed and received particular attention. Efforts to reduce the SPE noise included photomultiplier tube base modifications, detector shielding and cooling, signal amplification, and veto procedures.

  19. Relationship between microstructure and efficiency of scintillating glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Bliss, M.; Craig, R.A.; Reeder, P.L.; Sunberg, D.S.; Weber, M.J.

    1994-04-01

    Prior work has shown that there is a correlation between trap densities and scintillation efficiency of cerium-activated, lithium-aluminosilicate glasses. Raman spectroscopy has strongly suggested that phase separation may be playing an important role in governing the scintillation efficiency. This study, relates the thermoluminescence glow-curve data and microstructural analysis for a compositional series. The thermoluminescence data provide information about the traps in the neighborhood of the activator (Ce{sup 3+}). The microscopy and crystallization of the glasses provide direct evidence of activator partitioning.

  20. Scintillation characterization of thallium-doped lithium iodide crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Sajid; Kim, H. J.; Kim, Y. D.

    2015-09-01

    The paper discusses scintillation and luminescence properties of thallium-doped LiI crystals, grown by the Bridgman technique. X-ray induced emission spectrum is obtained between 380 nm and 600 nm, and is attributed to the Tl+ ion. The photoluminescence measurement with the excitation wavelength of 305 nm revealed a similar emission spectrum. Light yield, energy resolution and scintillation decay time profiles were studied under 662 keV (137Cs) γ-ray excitation. A maximum light yield of 14,000±1400 ph/MeV and two exponential decay time components were obtained.