Science.gov

Sample records for scintillating guides screen

  1. Composite scintillator screen

    DOEpatents

    Zeman, Herbert D. (1687 Peach St., Memphis, TN 38112)

    1994-01-01

    A scintillator screen for an X-ray system includes a substrate of low-Z material and bodies of a high-Z material embedded within the substrate. By preselecting the size of the bodies embedded within the substrate, the spacial separation of the bodies and the thickness of the screen, the sensitivity of the screen to X-rays within a predetermined energy range can be predicted.

  2. Response from inorganic scintillation screens induced by high energetic ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieberwirth, A.; Ensinger, W.; Forck, P.; Lederer, S.

    2015-12-01

    Inorganic scintillation screens were irradiated with swift heavy ion beams at GSI accelator facility, using protons up to Uranium ions as projectiles. Beams were extracted from the synchrotron SIS18 with high energy (?300 MeV/u) in slow and fast extraction mode. During irradiation the scintillation response of the screens was recorded by two different optical setups simultaneously to investigate the light output, profile characteristics and emission spectra. In principle fast extracted beams induce lower light output than slow extracted beams. The output per deposited energy shows a decreasing dependency with respect of the atomic number. Emission spectra showed no significant defects of the materials, neither at irradiation with increasing beam intensity nor during long time irradiation.

  3. Scintillating screens sensitivity and resolution studies for low energy, low intensity beam diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Harasimowicz, Janusz; Welsch, Carsten P.; Cosentino, Luigi; Finocchiaro, Paolo; Pappalardo, Alfio

    2010-10-15

    In order to investigate the limits of scintillating screens for beam profile monitoring in the ultra-low energy, ultra-low intensity regime, CsI:Tl, YAG:Ce, and a Tb glass-based scintillating fiber optic plate (SFOP) were tested. The screens response to 200 and 50 keV proton beams with intensities ranging from a few picoampere down to the subfemtoampere region was examined. In the following paper, the sensitivity and resolution studies are presented in detail for CsI:Tl and the SFOP, the two most sensitive screens. In addition, a possible use of scintillators for ultra-low energy antiproton beam monitoring is discussed.

  4. High quantum efficiency megavoltage imaging with thick scintillator detectors for image guided radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopal, Arun

    In image guided radiation therapy (IGRT), imaging devices serve as guidance systems to aid patient set-up and tumor volume localization. Traditionally, 2-D megavoltage x-ray imagers, referred to as electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs), have been used for planar target localization, and have recently been extended to perform 3-D volumetric reconstruction via cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). However, current EPIDs utilize thin and inefficient phosphor screen detectors and are subsequently limited by poor soft tissue visualization, which limits their use for CBCT. Therefore, the use of thick scintillation media as megavoltage x-ray detectors for greater x-ray sensitivity and enhanced image quality has recently been of significant interest. In this research, two candidates for thick scintillators: CsI(Tl) and terbium doped scintillation glass were investigated in separate imaging configurations. In the first configuration, a thick scintillation crystal (TSC) consisting of a thick, monolithic slab of CsI(Tl) was coupled to a mirror-lens-camera system. The second configuration is based on a fiber-optic scintillation glass array (FOSGA), wherein the scintillation glass is drawn into long fiber-optic conduits, inserted into a grid-type housing constructed out of polymer-tungsten alloy, and coupled to an array of photodiodes for digital read-out. The imaging prototypes were characterized using theoretical studies and imaging measurements to obtain fundamental metrics of imaging performance. Spatial resolution was measured based on a modulation transfer function (MTF), noise was evaluated in terms of a noise power spectrum (NPS), and overall contrast was characterized in the form of detective quantum efficiency (DQE). The imaging studies were used to optimize the TSC and FOSGA imagers and propose prototype configurations for order-of-magnitude improvements in overall image quality. In addition, a fast and simple technique was developed to measure the MTF, NPS, and DQE metrics for clinical EPID and CBCT systems based on a novel adaptation of a traditional line-pair resolution bar-pattern. This research provides two significant benefits to radiotherapy: the characterization of a new generation of thick scintillator based megavoltage x-ray imagers for CBCT based IGRT, and the novel adaptation of fundamental imaging metrics from imaging research to routine clinical performance monitoring.

  5. Isotopically-enriched gadolinium-157 oxysulfide scintillator screens for the high-resolution neutron imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trtik, Pavel; Lehmann, Eberhard H.

    2015-07-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of the production of isotopically-enriched gadolinium oxysulfide scintillator screens for the high spatial-resolution neutron imaging. Approximately 10 g of 157Gd2O2S:Tb was produced in the form of fine powder (particle size approximately 2 ?m). The level of 157Gd enrichment was above 88%. Approximately 2.5 ?m thick 157Gd2O2S:Tb scintillator screens were produced and tested for the absorption power and the light output. The results are compared to the reference screens based on natGd2O2S:Tb. The isotopically enriched screens provided increase by a factor of 3.8 and 3.6 for the absorption power and the light output, respectively. The potential of the scintillator screens based on 157Gd2O2S phosphor for the purpose of the (high-resolution) neutron imaging is discussed.

  6. Combinatorial Screening of Advanced Scintillators for High Resolution X-ray Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Shifan; Tao, Dejie; Lynch, Michael; Yuan, Xianglong; Li, Yiqun

    2008-05-12

    The lack of efficient scintillators is a major problem for developing powerful x-ray detectors that are widely used in homeland security, industrial and scientific research. Intematix has developed and applied a high throughput screening process and corresponding crystal growth technology to significantly speed up the discovery process for new efficient scintillators. As a result, Intematix has invented and fabricated three new scintillators both in powder and bulk forms, which possess promising properties such as better radiation hardness and better matching for silicon diode.

  7. Screening and Evaluation Tool (SET) Users Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Layne Pincock

    2014-10-01

    This document is the users guide to using the Screening and Evaluation Tool (SET). SET is a tool for comparing multiple fuel cycle options against a common set of criteria and metrics. It does this using standard multi-attribute utility decision analysis methods.

  8. Scintillating screens sensitivity and resolution studies for low energy, low intensity beam diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Harasimowicz, Janusz; Cosentino, Luigi; Finocchiaro, Paolo; Pappalardo, Alfio; Welsch, Carsten P

    2010-10-01

    In order to investigate the limits of scintillating screens for beam profile monitoring in the ultra-low energy, ultra-low intensity regime, CsI:Tl, YAG:Ce, and a Tb glass-based scintillating fiber optic plate (SFOP) were tested. The screens response to 200 and 50 keV proton beams with intensities ranging from a few picoampere down to the subfemtoampere region was examined. In the following paper, the sensitivity and resolution studies are presented in detail for CsI:Tl and the SFOP, the two most sensitive screens. In addition, a possible use of scintillators for ultra-low energy antiproton beam monitoring is discussed. PMID:21034082

  9. [Preparation and Performance of Ultrafast ?-CuI Scintillation Conversion Screen].

    PubMed

    Xia, Ming; Gu, Mu; Liu, Xiao-lin; Liu, Bo; Huang, Shi-ming; Ni, Chen

    2015-04-01

    Micro-columnar structured ?-CuI scintillation conversion screen with columnar diameter in the micrometer and thickness about 17 µm were prepared by thermal evaporation method on quartz substrates with different temperatures. X-ray excited luminescence spectra of the screens show two peaks located at 430 nm and near 700 nm, which correspond to the fast and slow emission components, respectively. The fast one dominated. The intensity of 430 nm peak decreased as the substrate temperature rose from 170 °C to 210 °C. At the same time the intensity of 700 nm band increased. The changes may be attributed to the iodine loss from screen caused by the substrate temperature. The phenomenon of iodine loss was observed by the Rutherford backscattering experiment. The crystal structure of the screens presents (111) preferred orientation, which is independent of the substrate temperature. As the temperature rose to 210 °C, two weak additional peaks of (220) and (420) ?-CuI crystal planes in X-ray diffraction patterns appeared due to the increase in kinetic energy of CuI molecules. The scanning electron microscopy images of the screens showed that the columnar structure was improved when the substrate temperature increased from 170 °C to 190 °C, but it would be degenerated when the temperature continued to rise to 210 °C because of the surface and bulk diffusion effects of the depositing molecules. Finally, the spatial resolution of the ?-CuI scintillation screens was measured by knife-edge method, and they are 4.5, 7.2 and 5.6lp · mm(-1) for the screens prepared at the substrates temperatures of 170, 190 and 210 °C, respectively. The result shows that micro-column structure could improve the spatial resolution of ?-CuI scintillation screen. PMID:26197605

  10. Polycrystalline para-terphenyl scintillator adopted in a $\\beta^-$ detecting probe for radio-guided surgery

    E-print Network

    Camillocci, Elena Solfaroli; Bocci, Valerio; Collamati, Francesco; De Lucia, Erika; Faccini, Riccardo; Marafini, Michela; Mattei, Ilaria; Morganti, Silvio; Paramatti, Riccardo; Patera, Vincenzo; Pinci, Davide; Recchia, Luigi; Russomando, Andrea; Sarti, Alessio; Sciubba, Adalberto; Senzacqua, Martina; Voena, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    A radio-guided surgery technique exploiting $\\beta^-$ emitters is under development. It aims at a higher target-to-background activity ratio implying both a smaller radiopharmaceutical activity and the possibility of extending the technique to cases with a large uptake of surrounding healthy organs. Such technique requires a dedicated intraoperative probe detecting $\\beta^-$ radiation. A first prototype has been developed relying on the low density and high light yield of the diphenylbutadiene doped para-therphenyl organic scintillator. The scintillation light produced in a cylindrical crystal, 5 mm in diameter and 3 mm in height, is guided to a photo-multiplier tube by optical fibres. The custom readout electronics is designed to optimize its usage in terms of feedback to the surgeon, portability and remote monitoring of the signal. Tests show that with a radiotracer activity comparable to those administered for diagnostic purposes the developed probe can detect a 0.1 ml cancerous residual of meningioma in a...

  11. Polycrystalline para-terphenyl scintillator adopted in a ?- detecting probe for radio-guided surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Bellini, F.; Bocci, V.; Collamati, F.; De Lucia, E.; Faccini, R.; Marafini, M.; Mattei, I.; Morganti, S.; Paramatti, R.; Patera, V.; Pinci, D.; Recchia, L.; Russomando, A.; Sarti, A.; Sciubba, A.; Senzacqua, M.; Voena, C.

    2015-06-01

    A radio-guided surgery technique exploiting ?- emitters is under development. It aims at a higher target-to-background activity ratio implying both a smaller radiopharmaceutical activity and the possibility of extending the technique to cases with a large uptake of surrounding healthy organs. Such technique requires a dedicated intraoperative probe detecting ?- radiation. A first prototype has been developed relying on the low density and high light yield of the diphenylbutadiene doped para-therphenyl organic scintillator. The scintillation light produced in a cylindrical crystal, 5 mm in diameter and 3 mm in height, is guided to a photo-multiplier tube by optical fibres. The custom readout electronics is designed to optimize its usage in terms of feedback to the surgeon, portability and remote monitoring of the signal. Tests show that with a radiotracer activity comparable to those administered for diagnostic purposes the developed probe can detect a 0.1 ml cancerous residual of meningioma in a few seconds.

  12. Arrays of Segmented, Tapered Light Guides for Use with Large, Planar Scintillation Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Raylman, Raymond R.; Vaigneur, Keith; Stolin, Alexander V.; Jaliparthi, Gangadhar

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic imaging techniques can potentially improve detection and diagnosis of cancer in women with radiodense and/or fibrocystic breasts. Our group has previously developed a high-resolution positron emission tomography imaging and biopsy device (PEM-PET) to detect and guide the biopsy of suspicious breast lesions. Initial testing revealed that the imaging field-of-view (FOV) of the scanner was smaller than the physical size of the detector’s active area, which could hinder sampling of breast areas close to the chest wall. The purpose of this work was to utilize segmented, tapered light guides for optically coupling the scintillator arrays to arrays of position-sensitive photomultipliers to increase both the active FOV and identification of individual scintillator elements. Testing of the new system revealed that the optics of these structures made it possible to discern detector elements from the complete active area of the detector face. In the previous system the top and bottom rows and left and right columns were not identifiable. Additionally, use of the new light guides increased the contrast of individual detector elements by up to 129%. Improved element identification led to a spatial resolution increase by approximately 12%. Due to attenuation of light in the light guides the detector energy resolution decreased from 18.5% to 19.1%. Overall, these improvements should increase the field-of-view and spatial resolution of the dedicated breast-PET system. PMID:26538685

  13. Energy saving window screen guide device

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, S.L.

    1983-02-22

    The screen or shade for the window is of flexible material so that when in open position it can be pleated. Opposite sides of the screen have tapes sewed on near the edges and male snap fasteners are spaced from each other on the tapes. These fasteners snap into holes in plastic glides which travel along plastic tracks. Either converted by screws or integral with the tracks are angle sealing strips, one flange being on the outside and arranged to prevent air movement from the inside of the screen to the outside, or vice versa, when the screen is closed. Either attached by screws to the track and sealing strip assembly or integral therewith is a mounting rail which is attached by screws to the building or support. A slanting roof is shown having several windows equipped with independently glided screens.

  14. FIELD SCREENING METHODS CATALOG: USER'S GUIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Field Screening Methods Catalog contains a compilation of methods that were identified as being used in EPA Regions. Several methods contain no method performance information, because this information was not available. The Catalog was developed to assist the user in identify...

  15. HYDROCARBON SPILL SCREENING MODEL (HSSM) VOLUME 1: USER'S GUIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This users guide describes the Hydrocarbon Spill Screening Model (HSSM). The model is intended for simulation of subsurface releases of light nonaqueous phase liquids (LNAPLs). The model consists of separate modules for LNAPL flow through the vadose zone, spreading in the capil...

  16. Urine drug screening: practical guide for clinicians.

    PubMed

    Moeller, Karen E; Lee, Kelly C; Kissack, Julie C

    2008-01-01

    Drug testing, commonly used in health care, workplace, and criminal settings, has become widespread during the past decade. Urine drug screens have been the most common method for analysis because of ease of sampling. The simplicity of use and access to rapid results have increased demand for and use of immunoassays; however, these assays are not perfect. False-positive results of immunoassays can lead to serious medical or social consequences if results are not confirmed by secondary analysis, such as gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The Department of Health and Human Services' guidelines for the workplace require testing for the following 5 substances: amphetamines, cannabinoids, cocaine, opiates, and phencyclidine. This article discusses potential false-positive results and false-negative results that occur with immunoassays of these substances and with alcohol, benzodiazepines, and tricyclic antidepressants. Other pitfalls, such as adulteration, substitution, and dilution of urine samples, are discussed. Pragmatic concepts summarized in this article should minimize the potential risks of misinterpreting urine drug screens. PMID:18174009

  17. The design of an active pixel sensor test structure optimised for the read out of scintillator screens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greig, Tom; Castelli, Chris; Holland, Andrew; Burt, David

    2007-04-01

    Indirect detection of X-rays using a scintillator coupled to a Solid-state sensor is an application where the CMOS Active Pixel Sensor (APS) can offer improved performance compared with conventional charge coupled device (CCD) based systems. The main advantages that CMOS sensors offer are reduced susceptibility to radiation damage, lower power consumption and increased on chip functionality. We describe the operation of a basic photodiode type pixel and explain how the read-out and sensing arrangement can be optimised for indirect X-ray detection in digital radiography applications. The optimised pixel is designed to have a narrow-band response to visible light generated by a scintillator screen, while at the same time suppressing signal from direct X-ray interaction. We outline a programme that has recently begun at Brunel University and e2v technologies to design, fabricate, and characterise variants of these pixel structures to perform a parametric study of CMOS imager performance.

  18. Short Interfering RNA Guide Strand Modifiers from Computational Screening

    PubMed Central

    Onizuka, Kazumitsu; Harrison, Jason G.; Ball-Jones, Alexi A.; Ibarra-Soza, José M.; Zheng, Yuxuan; Ly, Diana; Lam, Walter; Mac, Stephanie; Tantillo, Dean J.; Beal, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    Short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are promising drug candidates for a wide range of targets including those previously considered “undruggable”. However, properties associated with the native RNA structure limit drug development and chemical modifications are necessary. Here we describe the structure-guided discovery of functional modifications for the guide strand 5’ end using computational screening with the high resolution structure of human Ago2, the key nuclease on the RNA interference pathway. Our results indicate the guide strand 5’-end nucleotide need not engage in Watson-Crick (W/C) H-bonding but must fit the general shape of the 5’-end binding site in MID/PIWI domains of hAgo2 for efficient knockdown. 1,2,3-Triazol-4-yl bases formed from the CuAAC reaction of azides and 1-ethynylribose, which is readily incorporated into RNA via the phosphoramidite, perform well at the guide strand 5’-end. In contrast, purine derivatives with modified Hoogsteen faces or N2 substituents are poor choices for 5’-end modifications. Finally, we identified a 1,2,3-triazol-4-yl base incapable of W/C H-bonding that performs well at guide strand position 12, where base pairing to target was expected to be important. This work expands the repertoire of functional nucleotide analogs for siRNAs. PMID:24152142

  19. Experimental validation of Monte Carlo (MANTIS) simulated x-ray response of columnar CsI scintillator screens

    SciTech Connect

    Freed, Melanie; Miller, Stuart; Tang, Katherine; Badano, Aldo

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: MANTIS is a Monte Carlo code developed for the detailed simulation of columnar CsI scintillator screens in x-ray imaging systems. Validation of this code is needed to provide a reliable and valuable tool for system optimization and accurate reconstructions for a variety of x-ray applications. Whereas previous validation efforts have focused on matching of summary statistics, in this work the authors examine the complete point response function (PRF) of the detector system in addition to relative light output values. Methods: Relative light output values and high-resolution PRFs have been experimentally measured with a custom setup. A corresponding set of simulated light output values and PRFs have also been produced, where detailed knowledge of the experimental setup and CsI:Tl screen structures are accounted for in the simulations. Four different screens were investigated with different thicknesses, column tilt angles, and substrate types. A quantitative comparison between the experimental and simulated PRFs was performed for four different incidence angles (0 deg., 15 deg., 30 deg., and 45 deg.) and two different x-ray spectra (40 and 70 kVp). The figure of merit (FOM) used measures the normalized differences between the simulated and experimental data averaged over a region of interest. Results: Experimental relative light output values ranged from 1.456 to 1.650 and were in approximate agreement for aluminum substrates, but poor agreement for graphite substrates. The FOMs for all screen types, incidence angles, and energies ranged from 0.1929 to 0.4775. To put these FOMs in context, the same FOM was computed for 2D symmetric Gaussians fit to the same experimental data. These FOMs ranged from 0.2068 to 0.8029. Our analysis demonstrates that MANTIS reproduces experimental PRFs with higher accuracy than a symmetric 2D Gaussian fit to the experimental data in the majority of cases. Examination of the spatial distribution of differences between the PRFs shows that the main reason for errors between MANTIS and the experimental data is that MANTIS-generated PRFs are sharper than the experimental PRFs. Conclusions: The experimental validation of MANTIS performed in this study demonstrates that MANTIS is able to reliably predict experimental PRFs, especially for thinner screens, and can reproduce the highly asymmetric shape seen in the experimental data. As a result, optimizations and reconstructions carried out using MANTIS should yield results indicative of actual detector performance. Better characterization of screen properties is necessary to reconcile the simulated light output values with experimental data.

  20. Developmental Screening in Early Childhood: A Guide (5th Edition)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkins-Burnett, Sally; Meisels, Samuel

    2005-01-01

    This edition covers the basics of screening used to identify which children may have learning problems or disabilities. It offers advice for selecting an appropriate screening instrument and for setting up a screening program. The book contains reviews of current developmental screens, plus an entirely new annotated bibliography. For the first…

  1. Evaluation of powder/granular Gd2O2S:Pr scintillator screens in single photon counting mode under 140 keV excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, S.; Georgiou, M.; Loudos, G.; Michail, C.; Fountos, G.; Kandarakis, I.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is the evaluation of an alternative, low cost solution for the gamma detector in planar imaging. It is based on a powder scintillator, well established in X-ray imaging, and could be further exploited in simultaneous bimodal imaging systems. For this purpose, we have examined the performance of Gd2O2S:Pr powder scintillator, in the form of thick granular screens easily produced in the laboratory by commercially available Gd2O2S:Pr powder. The screen was coupled to a round position sensitive photomultiplier tube (R3292 PSPMT). The system's evaluation was performed in photon counting mode under 99mTc excitation. In all measurements, a general purpose hexagonal parallel collimator was used. Different samples of screens with coating thickness varying from 0.1 g/cm2 to 1.2 g/cm2 were tested. The 0.6 g/cm2 screen, corresponding to ~ 2 mm actual thickness, was found most efficient under 140 keV irradiation. The system`s performance with the proposed screen is reported with the modulation transfer function. Moreover sensitivity, spatial and energy resolution as well as the uniformity response using phantoms were measured. The performance of the proposed screen was compared with two CsI:Tl pixellated crystal arrays with 2 × 2 × 3 mm3 and 3 × 3 × 5 mm3pixel size. A spatial resolution, of 3 mm FWHM, for a 99mTc line source, was achieved at zero source to collimator distance. In addition, the Gd2O2S:Pr screen showed a slower degradation of the spatial resolution with increasing source to collimator distance e.g at 20 cm, the Gd2O2S:Pr screen showed aq spatial resolution of 8.4 mm while the spatial resolution of the pixellated crystals was 15 mm. Taking into account its easy production, its flexibility due to powder form, the very low cost and the good spatial resolution properties of the proposed alternative detector, powder scintillators could potentially be used for the construction of flexible detector geometries, such as ring type or gamma probes or as a low cost detector solution in educational photon counting imaging applications, complementary to standard X-ray imaging.

  2. Hazard screening application guide. Safety Analysis Report Update Program

    SciTech Connect

    1992-06-01

    The basic purpose of hazard screening is to group precesses, facilities, and proposed modifications according to the magnitude of their hazards so as to determine the need for and extent of follow on safety analysis. A hazard is defined as a material, energy source, or operation that has the potential to cause injury or illness in human beings. The purpose of this document is to give guidance and provide standard methods for performing hazard screening. Hazard screening is applied to new and existing facilities and processes as well as to proposed modifications to existing facilities and processes. The hazard screening process evaluates an identified hazards in terms of the effects on people, both on-site and off-site. The process uses bounding analyses with no credit given for mitigation of an accident with the exception of certain containers meeting DOT specifications. The process is restricted to human safety issues only. Environmental effects are addressed by the environmental program. Interfaces with environmental organizations will be established in order to share information.

  3. A Guide for Developing Standard Operating Job Procedures for the Screening & Grinding Process Wastewater Treatment Facility. SOJP No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deal, Gerald A.; Montgomery, James A.

    This guide describes standard operating job procedures for the screening and grinding process of wastewater treatment facilities. The objective of this process is the removal of coarse materials from the raw waste stream for the protection of subsequent equipment and processes. The guide gives step-by-step instructions for safety inspection,…

  4. Imaging performance of a thin Lu2O3:Eu nanophosphor scintillating screen coupled to a high resolution CMOS sensor under X-ray radiographic conditions: comparison with Gd2O2S:Eu conventional phosphor screen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seferis, I.; Michail, C.; Valais, I.; Zeler, J.; Liaparinos, P.; Kalyvas, N.; Fountos, G.; Zych, E.; Kandarakis, I.; Panayiotakis, G.

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to experimentally evaluate the imaging characteristics of the Lu2O3:Eu nanophosphor thin screen coupled to a high resolution CMOS sensor under radiographic conditions. Parameters such as the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), the Normalized Noise Power Spectrum (NNPS) and the Detective Quantum Efficiency (DQE) were investigated at 70 kVp under three exposure levels (20 mAs, 63 mAs and 90 mAs). Since Lu2O3:Eu emits light in the red wavelength range, the imaging characteristics of a 33.3 mg/cm2 Gd2O2S:Eu conventional phosphor screen were also evaluated for comparison purposes. The Lu2O3:Eu nanophosphor powder was produced by the combustion synthesis, using urea as fuel. A scintillating screen of 30.2 mg/cm2 was prepared by sedimentation of the nanophosphor powder on a fused silica substrate. The CMOS/Lu2O3:Eu detector`s imaging characteristics were evaluated using an experimental method proposed by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) guidelines. It was found that the CMOS/Lu2O3:Eu nanophosphor system has higher MTF values compared to the CMOS/Gd2O2S:Eu sensor/screen combination in the whole frequency range examined. For low frequencies (0 to 2 cycles/mm) NNPS values of the CMOS/Gd2O2S:Eu system were found 90% higher compared to the NNPS values of the CMOS/Lu2O3:Eu nanophosphor system, whereas from medium to high frequencies (2 to 13 cycles/mm) were found 40% higher. In contrast with the CMOS/ Gd2O2S:Eu system, CMOS/Lu2O3:Eu nanophosphor system appears to retain high DQE values in the whole frequency range examined. Our results indicate that Lu2O3:Eu nanophosphor is a promising scintillator for further research in digital X-ray radiography.

  5. Biomarker-guided screening of Juzen-taiho-to, an oriental herbal formulation for immunostimulation.

    PubMed

    Takaoka, Anna; Iacovidou, Maria; Hasson, Tal H; Montenegro, Diego; Li, Xiangming; Tsuji, Moriya; Kawamura, Akira

    2014-03-01

    Juzen-taiho-to is an immunostimulatory herbal formulation that is clinically used in East Asia for cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy and radiation. The formulation stimulates various leukocytes, including T, B, and NK cells and macrophages. Although Juzen-taiho-to is known to contain numerous compounds with various pharmacological activities, it is not clear which compounds are responsible for the stimulation of individual cell types. Here, we conducted what we call "biomarker-guided screening" to purify compounds responsible for the macrophages stimulatory activity. To this end, gene expression was analyzed by a DNA array for macrophages treated with Juzen-taiho-to and DMSO (vehicle control), which identified intercellular adhesion molecule 1 as a biomarker of macrophage stimulation by Juzen-taiho-to. A quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assay of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 was then used to guide the purification of active compounds. The screening resulted in the purification of a glycolipid mixture, containing ?-glucosylceramides. The glycolipid mixture potently stimulated intercellular adhesion molecule 1 expression in primary dendritic cells as well as in primary CD14+ (macrophages) cells. The identification of this glycolipid mixture opens up an opportunity for further studies to understand how plant-derived glycolipids stimulate macrophages and dendritic cells in a safe and effective manner as demonstrated by Juzen-taiho-to. PMID:24549928

  6. Biomarker-guided screening of Juzen-taiho-to, an Oriental herbal formulation for immmunostimulation

    PubMed Central

    Takaoka, Anna; Iacovidou, Maria; Hasson, Tal H.; Montenegro, Diego; Li, Xiangming; Tsuji, Moriya; Kawamura, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Juzen-taiho-to (JTT) is an immunostimulatory herbal formulation that is clinically used in East Asia for cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy and radiation. The formulation stimulates various leukocytes, including T, B, and NK cells and macrophages (M?). Although JTT is known to contain numerous compounds with various pharmacological activities, it is not clear which compounds are responsible for the stimulation of individual cell types. Here, we conducted what we call, “biomarker-guided screening,” to purify compounds responsible for the M? stimulatory activity. To this end, gene expression was analyzed by a DNA array for M? treated with JTT and DMSO (vehicle control), which identified intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) as a biomarker of M?-stimulation by JTT. A qRT-PCR assay of ICAM-1 was then used to guide the purification of active compounds. The screening resulted in the purification of a glycolipid mixture, containing ?-glucosylceramides. The glycolipid mixture potently stimulated ICAM-1 expression in primary dendritic cells (DC) as well as in primary CD14+ (M?) cells. Identification of this glycolipid mixture opens an opportunity for further studies to understand how plant-derived glycolipids stimulate M? and DC in a safe and effective manner as demonstrated by JTT. PMID:24549928

  7. Scintillator material

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F. (Batavia, IL); Kross, Brian J. (Aurora, IL)

    1994-01-01

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography.

  8. Scintillator material

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F. (Batavia, IL); Kross, Brian J. (Aurora, IL)

    1992-01-01

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography.

  9. Scintillator material

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, D.F.; Kross, B.J.

    1994-06-07

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography. 4 figs.

  10. Scintillator material

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, D.F.; Kross, B.J.

    1992-07-28

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography. 4 figs.

  11. Incremental Validity Analyses of the Violence Risk Appraisal Guide and the Psychopathy Checklist: Screening Version in a Civil Psychiatric Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edens, John F.; Skeem, Jennifer L.; Douglas, Kevin S.

    2006-01-01

    This study compares two instruments frequently used to assess risk for violence, the Violence Risk Appraisal Guide (VRAG) and the Psychopathy Checklist: Screening Version (PCL:SV), in a large sample of civil psychiatric patients. Despite a strong bivariate relationship with community violence, the VRAG could not improve on the predictive validity…

  12. T & I--Graphic Arts, Silk Screen Printing. Kit No. 60. Instructor's Manual [and] Student Learning Activity Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cope, George

    An instructor's manual and student activity guide on silk screen printing are provided in this set of prevocational education materials which focuses on the vocational area of trade and industry (graphic arts). (This set of materials is one of ninety-two prevocational sets arranged around a cluster of seven vocational offerings: agriculture, home…

  13. Using adverse outcome pathway analysis to guide development of high-throughput screening assays for thyroid-disruptors

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using Adverse Outcome Pathway Analysis to Guide Development of High-Throughput Screening Assays for Thyroid-Disruptors Katie B. Paul1,2, Joan M. Hedge2, Daniel M. Rotroff4, Kevin M. Crofton4, Michael W. Hornung3, Steven O. Simmons2 1Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education Post...

  14. Taking It to the Pews: A CBPR-Guided HIV Awareness and Screening Project with Black Churches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berkley-Patton, Jannette; Bowe-Thompson, Carole; Bradley-Ewing, Andrea; Hawes, Starlyn; Moore, Erin; Williams, Eric; Martinez, David; Goggin, Kathy

    2010-01-01

    Utilizing a community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach is a potentially effective strategy for exploring the development, implementation, and evaluation of HIV interventions in African American churches. This CBPR-guided study describes a church-based HIV awareness and screening intervention (Taking It to the Pews [TIPS]) that fully…

  15. Shackleton's Antarctic Adventure: The Greatest Survival Story of All Time. Teacher's Guide To Accompany the Giant-Screen Film.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibb, Reen

    This teacher's guide was developed to accompany the giant-screen film, "Shackleton's Antarctic Adventure". The activities featured use a multidisciplinary approach and target students ages 7 through 14. Teacher pages include background information and student pages include instructions and additional information for understanding the activity.…

  16. A Guide to Screening for the Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnosis and Treatment Program (EPSDT) Under Medicaid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frankenburg, William K.; North, A. Frederick, Jr.

    The manual was designed to help public officials, physicians, nurses, and others to plan and implement an Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnosis and Treatment (EPSDT) program under Medicaid. Procedures for carrying out components of an EPSDT program are recommended. Part 1 discusses organization and administration of screening, diagnosis, and…

  17. Screening for Usher Syndrome: A Hands-On Guide for School Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houghton, Joan; Coonts, Teresa; Jordan, Beth; Schafer, Jacqueline, Ed.

    This manual was written specifically to help school nurses conduct screenings for Usher syndrome, a genetic condition that involves deafness or hearing loss and the progressive loss of vision. It provides information on the step-by-step process of how to conduct a screening, the actual forms needed for a screening, and resources for referring…

  18. Scintillation Mathematics

    E-print Network

    Baxter, Paul D.

    and a rain gauge. COST 280 MCM4 4 #12; ' & $ % Example Italsat Trace #15; Time series of severe rain of tropospheric scintillation. #15; The data has been divided into rain and non­rain periods by using a radiometer rain effects for an observed attenuation trace. #15; In the wavelet transform, W , effects due to rain

  19. Obtaining and screening compound collections: a user's guide and a call to chemists

    E-print Network

    Hergenrother, Paul J.

    online 3rd May 2006 1367-5931/$ ­ see front matter # 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. DOI 10 as drugs or drug leads is perhaps most obvious, theuseofsmallmoleculestointerrogatebiologicalsystems collections to screen. Everything old is new again: screens of FDA-approved drugs A major bottleneck

  20. Plastic scintillation dosimetry: Optimal selection of scintillating fibers and scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Archambault, Louis; Arsenault, Jean; Gingras, Luc; Sam Beddar, A.; Roy, Rene; Beaulieu, Luc

    2005-07-15

    Scintillation dosimetry is a promising avenue for evaluating dose patterns delivered by intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans or for the small fields involved in stereotactic radiosurgery. However, the increase in signal has been the goal for many authors. In this paper, a comparison is made between plastic scintillating fibers and plastic scintillator. The collection of scintillation light was measured experimentally for four commercial models of scintillating fibers (BCF-12, BCF-60, SCSF-78, SCSF-3HF) and two models of plastic scintillators (BC-400, BC-408). The emission spectra of all six scintillators were obtained by using an optical spectrum analyzer and they were compared with theoretical behavior. For scintillation in the blue region, the signal intensity of a singly clad scintillating fiber (BCF-12) was 120% of that of the plastic scintillator (BC-400). For the multiclad fiber (SCSF-78), the signal reached 144% of that of the plastic scintillator. The intensity of the green scintillating fibers was lower than that of the plastic scintillator: 47% for the singly clad fiber (BCF-60) and 77% for the multiclad fiber (SCSF-3HF). The collected light was studied as a function of the scintillator length and radius for a cylindrical probe. We found that symmetric detectors with nearly the same spatial resolution in each direction (2 mm in diameter by 3 mm in length) could be made with a signal equivalent to those of the more commonly used asymmetric scintillators. With augmentation of the signal-to-noise ratio in consideration, this paper presents a series of comparisons that should provide insight into selection of a scintillator type and volume for development of a medical dosimeter.

  1. Plastic scintillation dosimetry: optimal selection of scintillating fibers and scintillators.

    PubMed

    Archambault, Louis; Arsenault, Jean; Gingras, Luc; Beddar, A Sam; Roy, René; Beaulieu, Luc

    2005-07-01

    Scintillation dosimetry is a promising avenue for evaluating dose patterns delivered by intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans or for the small fields involved in stereotactic radiosurgery. However, the increase in signal has been the goal for many authors. In this paper, a comparison is made between plastic scintillating fibers and plastic scintillator. The collection of scintillation light was measured experimentally for four commercial models of scintillating fibers (BCF-12, BCF-60, SCSF-78, SCSF-3HF) and two models of plastic scintillators (BC-400, BC-408). The emission spectra of all six scintillators were obtained by using an optical spectrum analyzer and they were compared with theoretical behavior. For scintillation in the blue region, the signal intensity of a singly clad scintillating fiber (BCF-12) was 120% of that of the plastic scintillator (BC-400). For the multiclad fiber (SCSF-78), the signal reached 144% of that of the plastic scintillator. The intensity of the green scintillating fibers was lower than that of the plastic scintillator: 47% for the singly clad fiber (BCF-60) and 77% for the multiclad fiber (SCSF-3HF). The collected light was studied as a function of the scintillator length and radius for a cylindrical probe. We found that symmetric detectors with nearly the same spatial resolution in each direction (2 mm in diameter by 3 mm in length) could be made with a signal equivalent to those of the more commonly used asymmetric scintillators. With augmentation of the signal-to-noise ratio in consideration, this paper presents a series of comparisons that should provide insight into selection of a scintillator type and volume for development of a medical dosimeter. PMID:16121582

  2. Large volume flow-through scintillating detector

    DOEpatents

    Gritzo, Russ E. (Los Alamos, NM); Fowler, Malcolm M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1995-01-01

    A large volume flow through radiation detector for use in large air flow situations such as incinerator stacks or building air systems comprises a plurality of flat plates made of a scintillating material arranged parallel to the air flow. Each scintillating plate has a light guide attached which transfers light generated inside the scintillating plate to an associated photomultiplier tube. The output of the photomultiplier tubes are connected to electronics which can record any radiation and provide an alarm if appropriate for the application.

  3. The Study of Zinc Sulphide Scintillator for Fast Neutron Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wu; Bin, Tang; Heyong, Huo; Bin, Liu; Ke, Tang; Yong, Sun; Wei, Yin; Chao, Cao

    Fast neutron radiography is a promising application for accelerators. The potential effectiveness of this technique depends on the development of suitable imaging detectors for fast neutrons. Zinc sulphide based scintillators have the largest light output per event in the family of imaging scintillators used so far in fast neutron radiography. This paper investigated different aspects of this scintillator in order to determine the factors which might affect the light output. A mathematical model was established to estimate effectiveness of this scintillator. Zinc sulphide screens were prepared with ZnS particles of different concentration in polypropylene matrix. A 14MeV fast neutron source was used in the experiments. The light output was detected using a CCD camera or a film coupled to the scintillator screen. The results showed that the optimum scintillators is 3-mm in thickness with the weight ratio of 1:1 to 2:1 for ZnS and polypropylene.

  4. Tubulin Inhibitor Identification by Bioactive Conformation Alignment Pharmacophore-Guided Virtual Screening.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Shanthi; Choi, Min Jeong; Cho, Yong Seo; Min, Sun-Joon; Keum, Gyochang; Kim, Soo Jin; Lee, Chang Sik; Pae, Ae Nim

    2015-11-01

    Microtubules are important cellular component that are critical for proper cellular function. Microtubules are synthesized by polymerization of ?? tubulin heterodimers called protofilaments. Microtubule dynamics facilitate proper cell division during mitosis. Disruption of microtubule dynamics by small-molecule agents inhibits mitosis, resulting in apoptotic cell death and preventing cell cycle progression. To identify a novel small molecule that binds the ?? tubulin interface to affect microtubule dynamics, we developed a bioactive conformation alignment pharmacophore (BCAP) model to screen tubulin inhibitors from a huge database. The application of BCAP model generated based on the known ??-tubulin interface binders enabled us to identify several small-molecules that cause apoptosis in human promyelocytic leukemia (HL-60) cells. Virtual screening combined with an in vitro assay yielded 15 cytotoxic molecules. In particular, ethyl 2-(4-(5-methyl-3-nitro-1H-pyrazol-1-yl)butanamido)-4-phenylthiophene-3-carboxylate (H05) inhibited tubulin polymerization with an IC50 of 17.6 ?m concentration. The virtual screening results suggest that the application of an unbiased BCAP pharmacophore greatly eliminates unlikely compounds from a huge database and maximizes screening success. From the limited compounds tested in the tubulin polymerization inhibitor (TPI) assay, compound H05 was discovered as a tubulin inhibitor. This compound requires further structure activity optimization to identify additional potent inhibitors from the same class of molecules. PMID:25845798

  5. Research into the usage of integrated jamming of IR weakening and smoke-screen resisting the IR imaging guided missiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Long-tao; Jiang, Ning; Lv, Ming-shan

    2015-10-01

    With the emergence of the anti-ship missle with the capability of infrared imaging guidance, the traditional single jamming measures, because of the jamming mechanism and technical flaws or unsuitable use, greatly reduced the survival probability of the war-ship in the future naval battle. Intergrated jamming of IR weakening + smoke-screen Can not only make jamming to the search and tracking of IR imaging guidance system , but also has feasibility in conjunction, besides , which also make the best jamming effect. The research conclusion has important realistic meaning for raising the antimissile ability of surface ships. With the development of guidance technology, infrared guidance system has expanded by ir point-source homing guidance to infrared imaging guidance, Infrared imaging guidance has made breakthrough progress, Infrared imaging guidance system can use two-dimensional infrared image information of the target, achieve the precise tracking. Which has Higher guidance precision, better concealment, stronger anti-interference ability and could Target the key parts. The traditional single infrared smoke screen jamming or infrared decoy flare interference cannot be imposed effective interference. So, Research how to effectively fight against infrared imaging guided weapons threat measures and means, improving the surface ship antimissile ability is an urgent need to solve.

  6. Scintillator efficiency study with MeV x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Stuart; Brown, Kristina; Curtis, Alden; Lutz, Stephen S.; Howe, Russell; Malone, Robert; Mitchell, Stephen; Danielson, Jeremy; Haines, Todd; Kwiatkowski, Kris

    2014-09-01

    We have investigated scintillator efficiency for MeV radiographic imaging. This paper discusses the modeled detection efficiency and measured brightness of a number of scintillator materials. An optical imaging camera records images of scintillator emission excited by a pulsed x-ray machine. The efficiency of various thicknesses of monolithic LYSO:Ce (cerium-doped lutetium yttrium orthosilicate) are being studied to understand brightness and resolution trade-offs compared with a range of micro-columnar CsI:Tl (thallium-doped cesium iodide) scintillator screens. The micro-columnar scintillator structure apparently provides an optical gain mechanism that results in brighter signals from thinner samples. The trade-offs for brightness versus resolution in monolithic scintillators is straightforward. For higher-energy x-rays, thicker materials generally produce brighter signal due to x-ray absorption and the optical emission properties of the material. However, as scintillator thickness is increased, detector blur begins to dominate imaging system resolution due to the volume image generated in the scintillator thickness and the depth of field of the imaging system. We employ a telecentric optical relay lens to image the scintillator onto a recording CCD camera. The telecentric lens helps provide sharp focus through thicker-volume emitting scintillators. Stray light from scintillator emission can also affect the image scene contrast. We have applied an optical light scatter model to the imaging system to minimize scatter sources and maximize scene contrasts.

  7. Mass spectrometry guided venom profiling and bioactivity screening of the Anatolian Meadow Viper, Vipera anatolica.

    PubMed

    Göçmen, Bayram; Heiss, Paul; Petras, Daniel; Nalbantsoy, Ayse; Süssmuth, Roderich D

    2015-12-01

    This contribution reports on the first characterization of the venom proteome and the bioactivity screening of Vipera anatolica, the Anatolian Meadow Viper. The crude venom as well as an isolated dimeric disintegrin showed remarkable cytotoxic activity against glioblastoma cells. Due to the rare occurrence and the small size of this species only little amount of venom was available, which was profiled by means of a combination of bottom-up and top-down mass spectrometry. From this analysis we identified snake venom metalloproteases, cysteine-rich secretory protein isoforms, a metalloprotease inhibitor, several type A2 phospholipases, disintegrins, a snake venom serine protease, a C-type lectin and a Kunitz-type protease inhibitor. Furthermore, we detected several isoforms of above mentioned proteins as well as previously unknown proteins, indicating an extensive complexity of the venom which would have remained undetected with conventional venomic approaches. PMID:26385313

  8. Scintillators and applications thereof

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Richard T.

    2015-09-01

    Scintillators of various constructions and methods of making and using the same are provided. In some embodiments, a scintillator comprises at least one radiation absorption region and at least one spatially discrete radiative exciton recombination region.

  9. Scintillators and applications thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Richard T.

    2014-07-15

    Scintillators of various constructions and methods of making and using the same are provided. In some embodiments, a scintillator comprises at least one radiation absorption region and at least one spatially discrete radiative exciton recombination region.

  10. Lead carbonate scintillator materials

    DOEpatents

    Derenzo, Stephen E. (Pinole, CA); Moses, William W. (Berkeley, CA)

    1991-01-01

    Improved radiation detectors containing lead carbonate or basic lead carbonate as the scintillator element are disclosed. Both of these scintillators have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to other known scintillator materials. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in medical uses.

  11. Scintillator materials for calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, M.J.

    1994-09-01

    Requirements for fast, dense scintillator materials for calorimetry in high energy physics and approaches to satisfying these requirements are reviewed with respect to possible hosts and luminescent species. Special attention is given to cerium-activated crystals, core-valence luminescence, and glass scintillators. The present state of the art, limitations, and suggestions for possible new scintillator materials are presented.

  12. Scintillator manufacture at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Mellott, K.; Bross, A.; Pla-Dalmau, A.

    1998-08-01

    A decade of research into plastic scintillation materials at Fermilab is reviewed. Early work with plastic optical fiber fabrication is revisited and recent experiments with large-scale commercial methods for production of bulk scintillator are discussed. Costs for various forms of scintillator are examined and new development goals including cost reduction methods and quality improvement techniques are suggested.

  13. Expression of Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein (TCTP) Gene of Dirofilaria immitis Guided by Transcriptomic Screening

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yan; Lan, Jingchao; Wu, Xuhang; Yang, Deying; Zhang, Zhihe; Nie, Huaming; Hou, Rong; Zhang, Runhui; Zheng, Wanpeng; Xie, Yue; Yan, Ning; Yang, Zhi; Wang, Chengdong; Luo, Li; Liu, Li; Gu, Xiaobin; Wang, Shuxian; Peng, Xuerong

    2014-01-01

    Dirofilaria immitis (heartworm) infections affect domestic dogs, cats, and various wild mammals with increasing incidence in temperate and tropical areas. More sensitive antibody detection methodologies are required to diagnose asymptomatic dirofilariasis with low worm burdens. Applying current transcriptomic technologies would be useful to discover potential diagnostic markers for D. immitis infection. A filarial homologue of the mammalian translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP) was initially identified by screening the assembled transcriptome of D. immitis (DiTCTP). A BLAST analysis suggested that the DiTCTP gene shared the highest similarity with TCTP from Loa loa at protein level (97%). A histidine-tagged recombinant DiTCTP protein (rDiTCTP) of 40 kDa expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) showed immunoreactivity with serum from a dog experimentally infected with heartworms. Localization studies illustrated the ubiquitous presence of rDiTCTP protein in the lateral hypodermal chords, dorsal hypodermal chord, muscle, intestine, and uterus in female adult worms. Further studies on D. immitis-derived TCTP are warranted to assess whether this filarial protein could be used for a diagnostic purpose. PMID:24623877

  14. FEDS user`s guide: Facility energy screening. Release 2.10

    SciTech Connect

    Dirks, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    The Facility Energy Decision Screening (FEDS) Model is under development at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US DOE Federal Energy Management Program (DOE-FEMP) and the US Army Construction Engineering REsearch Laboratory (USA-CERL). FEDS is a multi-level energy analysis software system designed to provide a comprehensive approach to fuel-neutral, technology-independent, integrated (energy) resource planning and acquisition. The FEDS system includes Level-1, which is a top-down, first-pass energy systems analysis and energy resource acquisition decision software model for buildings and facilities, and the Level-2 software model, which allows specific engineering inputs and provides detailed output. The basic intent of the model is to provide an installation with the information necessary to determine the minimum life-cycle cost (LCC) configuration of the installation`s energy generation and consumption infrastructure. The model has no fuel or technology bias; it simply selects the technologies that will provide an equivalent or superior level of service (e.g., heating, cooling, illumination) at the minimum LCC.

  15. Human Genetics in Rheumatoid Arthritis Guides a High-Throughput Drug Screen of the CD40 Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Diogo, Dorothée; Wu, Di; Spoonamore, Jim; Dancik, Vlado; Franke, Lude; Kurreeman, Fina; Rossin, Elizabeth J.; Duclos, Grant; Hartland, Cathy; Zhou, Xuezhong; Li, Kejie; Liu, Jun; De Jager, Philip L.; Siminovitch, Katherine A.; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Bowes, John; Eyre, Steve; Padyukov, Leonid; Gregersen, Peter K.; Worthington, Jane; Gupta, Namrata; Clemons, Paul A.; Stahl, Eli; Tolliday, Nicola; Plenge, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    Although genetic and non-genetic studies in mouse and human implicate the CD40 pathway in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), there are no approved drugs that inhibit CD40 signaling for clinical care in RA or any other disease. Here, we sought to understand the biological consequences of a CD40 risk variant in RA discovered by a previous genome-wide association study (GWAS) and to perform a high-throughput drug screen for modulators of CD40 signaling based on human genetic findings. First, we fine-map the CD40 risk locus in 7,222 seropositive RA patients and 15,870 controls, together with deep sequencing of CD40 coding exons in 500 RA cases and 650 controls, to identify a single SNP that explains the entire signal of association (rs4810485, P?=?1.4×10?9). Second, we demonstrate that subjects homozygous for the RA risk allele have ?33% more CD40 on the surface of primary human CD19+ B lymphocytes than subjects homozygous for the non-risk allele (P?=?10?9), a finding corroborated by expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analysis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 1,469 healthy control individuals. Third, we use retroviral shRNA infection to perturb the amount of CD40 on the surface of a human B lymphocyte cell line (BL2) and observe a direct correlation between amount of CD40 protein and phosphorylation of RelA (p65), a subunit of the NF-?B transcription factor. Finally, we develop a high-throughput NF-?B luciferase reporter assay in BL2 cells activated with trimerized CD40 ligand (tCD40L) and conduct an HTS of 1,982 chemical compounds and FDA–approved drugs. After a series of counter-screens and testing in primary human CD19+ B cells, we identify 2 novel chemical inhibitors not previously implicated in inflammation or CD40-mediated NF-?B signaling. Our study demonstrates proof-of-concept that human genetics can be used to guide the development of phenotype-based, high-throughput small-molecule screens to identify potential novel therapies in complex traits such as RA. PMID:23696745

  16. Scintillator reflective layer coextrusion

    DOEpatents

    Yun, Jae-Chul (Naperville, IL); Para, Adam (St. Charles, IL)

    2001-01-01

    A polymeric scintillator has a reflective layer adhered to the exterior surface thereof. The reflective layer comprises a reflective pigment and an adhesive binder. The adhesive binder includes polymeric material from which the scintillator is formed. A method of forming the polymeric scintillator having a reflective layer adhered to the exterior surface thereof is also provided. The method includes the steps of (a) extruding an inner core member from a first amount of polymeric scintillator material, and (b) coextruding an outer reflective layer on the exterior surface of the inner core member. The outer reflective layer comprises a reflective pigment and a second amount of the polymeric scintillator material.

  17. Screening and Risk Factors

    Cancer.gov

    Close Window State Cancer Profiles Quick Reference Guides ? Quick Reference Guides Index Screening and Risk Factors Send to Printer Text description of this image. Site Home Policies Accessibility Viewing Files FOIA Contact Us U.S. Department of Health

  18. In search of allosteric modulators of a7-nAChR by solvent density guided virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Dey, Raja; Chen, Lin

    2011-04-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) are pentameric ligand gated ion channels whose activity can be modulated by endogenous neurotransmitters as well as by synthetic ligands that bind the same or distinct sites from the natural ligand. The subtype of ?7 nAChR has been considered as a potenial therapeutic target for Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia and other neurological and psychiatric disorders. Here we have developed a homology model of ?7 nAChR based on two high resolution crystal structures with Brookhaven Protein Data Bank (PDB) codes 2QC1 and 2WN9 for threading on one monomer and then for building a pentamer, respectively. A number of small molecule binding sites are identified using Pocket Finder (J. An, M. Tortov, and R. Abagyan, Molecular & Cellular Proteomics, 4.6, 752-761 (2005)) of Internal Coordinate Mechanics (ICM). Remarkably, these computer-identified sites match perfectly with ordered solvent densities found in the high-resolution crystal structure of ?1 nAChR, suggesting that the surface cavities in the ?7 nAChR model are likely binding sites of small molecules. A high throughput virtual screening by flexible ligand docking of 5008 small molecule compounds was performed at three potential allosteric modulator (AM) binding sites of ?7 nAChR using Molsoft ICM software (R. Abagyan, M. Tortov and D. Kuznetsov, J Comput Chem 15, 488-506, (1994)). Some experimentally verified allosteric modulators of ?7 like CCMI comp-6, LY 7082101, 5-HI, TQS, PNU-120596, genistein, and NS-1738 ranked among top 100 compounds, while the rest of the compounds in the list could guide further search for new allosteric modulators. PMID:21294583

  19. Shifting scintillator neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Clonts, Lloyd G; Cooper, Ronald G; Crow, Jr., Morris Lowell; Hannah, Bruce W; Hodges, Jason P; Richards, John D; Riedel, Richard A

    2014-03-04

    Provided are sensors and methods for detecting thermal neutrons. Provided is an apparatus having a scintillator for absorbing a neutron, the scintillator having a back side for discharging a scintillation light of a first wavelength in response to the absorbed neutron, an array of wavelength-shifting fibers proximate to the back side of the scintillator for shifting the scintillation light of the first wavelength to light of a second wavelength, the wavelength-shifting fibers being disposed in a two-dimensional pattern and defining a plurality of scattering plane pixels where the wavelength-shifting fibers overlap, a plurality of photomultiplier tubes, in coded optical communication with the wavelength-shifting fibers, for converting the light of the second wavelength to an electronic signal, and a processor for processing the electronic signal to identify one of the plurality of scattering plane pixels as indicative of a position within the scintillator where the neutron was absorbed.

  20. A Perspective on the Future of High-Throughput RNAi Screening: Will CRISPR Cut Out the Competition or Can RNAi Help Guide the Way?

    PubMed

    Taylor, Jessica; Woodcock, Simon

    2015-09-01

    For more than a decade, RNA interference (RNAi) has brought about an entirely new approach to functional genomics screening. Enabling high-throughput loss-of-function (LOF) screens against the human genome, identifying new drug targets, and significantly advancing experimental biology, RNAi is a fast, flexible technology that is compatible with existing high-throughput systems and processes; however, the recent advent of clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas, a powerful new precise genome-editing (PGE) technology, has opened up vast possibilities for functional genomics. CRISPR-Cas is novel in its simplicity: one piece of easily engineered guide RNA (gRNA) is used to target a gene sequence, and Cas9 expression is required in the cells. The targeted double-strand break introduced by the gRNA-Cas9 complex is highly effective at removing gene expression compared to RNAi. Together with the reduced cost and complexity of CRISPR-Cas, there is the realistic opportunity to use PGE to screen for phenotypic effects in a total gene knockout background. This review summarizes the exciting development of CRISPR-Cas as a high-throughput screening tool, comparing its future potential to that of well-established RNAi screening techniques, and highlighting future challenges and opportunities within these disciplines. We conclude that the two technologies actually complement rather than compete with each other, enabling greater understanding of the genome in relation to drug discovery. PMID:26048892

  1. Lead carbonate scintillator materials

    DOEpatents

    Derenzo, S.E.; Moses, W.W.

    1991-05-14

    Improved radiation detectors containing lead carbonate or basic lead carbonate as the scintillator element are disclosed. Both of these scintillators have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to other known scintillator materials. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in medical uses. 3 figures.

  2. The Use of Energy Information in Plastic Scintillator Material

    SciTech Connect

    Ely, James H.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Bates, Derrick J.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Lopresti, Charles A.; Runkle, Robert C.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Weier, Dennis R.

    2008-06-15

    Plastic scintillator material is often used for gamma-ray detection in many applications due to its relatively good sensitivity and cost-effectiveness compared to other detection materials. However, due to the dominant Compton scattering interaction mechanism, full energy peaks are not observed in plastic scintillator spectra and isotopic identification is impossible. Typically plastic scintillator detectors are solely gross count detectors. In some safeguards and security applications, such as radiation portal monitors for vehicle screening, naturally-occurring radioactive material (NORM) often triggers radiation alarms and results in innocent or nuisance alarms. The limited energy information from plastic scintillator material can be used to discriminate the NORM from targeted materials and reduce the nuisance alarm rate. An overview of the utilization of the energy information from plastic scintillator material will be presented, with emphasis on the detection capabilities and potential limitations for safeguards and security applications. (PIET-43741-TM-490)

  3. Cervical Cancer Screening for Patients on the Female-to-Male Spectrum: a Narrative Review and Guide for Clinicians.

    PubMed

    Potter, Jennifer; Peitzmeier, Sarah M; Bernstein, Ida; Reisner, Sari L; Alizaga, Natalie M; Agénor, Madina; Pardee, Dana J

    2015-12-01

    Guidelines for cervical cancer screening have evolved rapidly over the last several years, with a trend toward longer intervals between screenings and an increasing number of screening options, such as Pap/HPV co-testing and HPV testing as a primary screening. However, gynecological recommendations often do not include clinical considerations specific to patients on the female-to-male (FTM) spectrum. Both patients and providers may not accurately assess risk for HPV and other sexually transmitted infections, understand barriers to care, or be aware of recommendations for cervical cancer screening and other appropriate sexual and reproductive health services for this patient population. We review the evidence and provide guidance on minimizing emotional discomfort before, during, and after a pelvic exam, minimizing physical discomfort during the exam, and making adaptations to account for testosterone-induced anatomical changes common among FTM patients. PMID:26160483

  4. The physics analysis and experiment study of zinc sulphide scintillator for fast neutron radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Bin; Wu, Yang; Li, Hang; Sun, Yong; Huo, Heyong; Liu, Bin; Tang, Ke; Yin, Wei; Chao, Chao

    2013-11-01

    Fast neutron radiography is a promising application for accelerator based neutron sources. The potential effectiveness of this technique depends on the development of suitable imaging detectors for fast neutrons. Zinc sulphide based scintillators have the largest light output per event in the family of imaging scintillators used so far in fast neutron radiography. This paper investigated different aspects of this scintillator in order to determine the factors which might affect the light output. A mathematical model was established to estimate effectiveness of this scintillator. Zinc sulphide screens were prepared with ZnS particles of different concentrations in polypropylene matrix. A 14 MeV fast neutron source was used in the experiments. The light output was detected using a CCD camera or a film coupled to the scintillator screen. The results showed that the optimum scintillators is around 3 mm in thickness with the weight ratio of 2:1 for ZnS and polypropylene.

  5. Thin film scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Warren; McKinney, George; Tzolov, Marian

    2015-03-01

    Scintillating materials convert energy flux (particles or electromagnetic waves) into light with spectral characteristic matching a subsequent light detector. Commercial scintillators such as yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) and yttrium aluminum perovskite (YAP) are commonly used. These are inefficient at lower energies due to the conductive coating present on their top surface, which is needed to avoid charging. We hypothesize that nano-structured thin film scintillators will outperform the commercial scintillators at low electron energies. We have developed alternative thin film scintillators, zinc tungstate and zinc oxide, which show promise for higher sensitivity to lower energy electrons since they are inherently conductive. Zinc tungstate films exhibit photoluminescence quantum efficiency of 74%. Cathodoluminescence spectroscopy was applied in transmission and reflection geometries. The comparison between the thin films and the YAG and YAP commercial scintillators shows much higher light output from the zinc tungstate and zinc oxide at electron energies less than 5 keV. Our films were integrated in a backscattered electron detector. This detector delivers better images than an identical detector with commercial YAG scintillator at low electron energies. Dr. Nicholas Barbi from PulseTor LLC, Dr. Anura Goonewardene, NSF Grants: #0806660, #1058829, #0923047.

  6. Gravitational Interstellar Scintillation

    E-print Network

    Redouane Al Fakir

    2008-05-23

    Gravitation could modulate the interstellar scintillation of pulsars in a way that is analogous to refractive interstellar scintillation (RISS). While RISS occurs when a large ionized cloud crosses the pulsar line-of-sight, gravitational interstellar scintillation (GISS) occurs when a compact gravitational deflector lies very near to that line-of-sight. However, GISS differs from RISS in at least two important respects: It has a very distinctive and highly predictible time signature, and it is non-dispersive. We find two very different astronomical contexts where GISS could cause observable diffraction-pattern distortions: Highly inclined binary pulsars, and the kind of compact interstellar clouds suspected of causing extreme scattering events.

  7. Radio Sources and Scintillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rickett, Barney

    2001-10-01

    A review is given of the interplay between studies of compact radio sources and the scattering and scintillations that occur as the signals travel through the irregular refractive index of the interstellar and interplanetary plasmas.

  8. Correlation of GPS signal fades due to ionospheric scintillation for aviation applications

    E-print Network

    Stanford University

    Correlation of GPS signal fades due to ionospheric scintillation for aviation applications Jiwon (GPS) signal fading due to strong ionospheric scintillation is a major concern for GPS- guided aviation in equatorial areas during high solar activity. A GPS aviation receiver may lose carrier tracking lock under

  9. Monte Carlo simulation of a novel water-equivalent electronic portal imaging device using plastic scintillating fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Teymurazyan, A.; Pang, G.

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: Most electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) developed so far use a thin Cu plate/phosphor screen to convert x-ray energies into light photons, while maintaining a high spatial resolution. This results in a low x-ray absorption and thus a low quantum efficiency (QE) of approximately 2-4% for megavoltage (MV) x-rays. A significant increase of QE is desirable for applications such as MV cone-beam computed tomography (MV-CBCT). Furthermore, the Cu plate/phosphor screen contains high atomic number (high-Z) materials, resulting in an undesirable over-response to low energy x-rays (due to photoelectric effect) as well as high energy x-rays (due to pair production) when used for dosimetric verification. Our goal is to develop a new MV x-ray detector that has a high QE and uses low-Z materials to overcome the obstacles faced by current MV x-ray imaging technologies. Methods: A new high QE and low-Z EPID is proposed. It consists of a matrix of plastic scintillating fibers embedded in a water-equivalent medium and coupled to an optically sensitive 2D active matrix flat panel imager (AMFPI) for image readout. It differs from the previous approach that uses segmented crystalline scintillators made of higher density and higher atomic number materials to detect MV x-rays. The plastic scintillating fibers are focused toward the x-ray source to avoid image blurring due to oblique incidence of off-axis x-rays. When MV x-rays interact with the scintillating fibers in the detector, scintillation light will be produced. The light photons produced in a fiber core and emitted within the acceptance angle of the fiber will be guided toward the AMFPI by total internal reflection. A Monte Carlo simulation has been used to investigate imaging and dosimetric characteristics of the proposed detector under irradiation of MV x-rays. Results: Properties, such as detection efficiency, modulation transfer function, detective quantum efficiency (DQE), energy dependence of detector response, and water-equivalence of dose response have been investigated. It has been found that the zero frequency DQE of the proposed detector can be up to 37% at 6 MV. The detector, also, is water-equivalent with a relatively uniform response to different energy x-rays as compared to current EPIDs. Conclusions: The results of our simulations show that, using plastic scintillating fibers, it is possible to construct a water-equivalent EPID that has a better energy response and a higher detection efficiency than current flat panel based EPIDs.

  10. Atmospheric scintillation in astronomical photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborn, J.; Föhring, D.; Dhillon, V. S.; Wilson, R. W.

    2015-09-01

    Scintillation noise due to the Earth's turbulent atmosphere can be a dominant noise source in high-precision astronomical photometry when observing bright targets from the ground. Here we describe the phenomenon of scintillation from its physical origins to its effect on photometry. We show that Young's scintillation-noise approximation used by many astronomers tends to underestimate the median scintillation noise at several major observatories around the world. We show that using median atmospheric optical turbulence profiles, which are now available for most sites, provides a better estimate of the expected scintillation noise and that real-time turbulence profiles can be used to precisely characterize the scintillation-noise component of contemporaneous photometric measurements. This will enable a better understanding and calibration of photometric noise sources and the effectiveness of scintillation correction techniques. We also provide new equations for calculating scintillation noise, including for extremely large telescopes where the scintillation noise will actually be lower than previously thought. These equations highlight the fact that scintillation noise and shot noise have the same dependence on exposure time and so if an observation is scintillation limited, it will be scintillation limited for all exposure times. The ratio of scintillation noise to shot noise is also only weakly dependent on telescope diameter and so a bigger telescope may not yield a reduction in fractional scintillation noise.

  11. Discrimination of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material in Plastic Scintillator Material

    SciTech Connect

    Ely, James H.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Geelhood, Bruce D.; Schweppe, John E.; Warner, Ray A.

    2003-08-19

    Plastic scintillator material is used in many applications for the detection of gamma-rays from radioactive material, primarily due to the sensitivity per unit cost compared to other detection materials. However, the resolution and lack of full-energy peaks in the plastic scintillator material prohibits detailed spectroscopy. Therefore, other materials such as doped sodium iodide are used for spectroscopic applications. The limited spectroscopic information can however be exploited in plastic scintillator materials to provide some discrimination. The discrimination between man-made and naturally occurring sources would be useful in reducing alarm screening for radiation detection applications which target man-made sources. The results of applying the limited energy information from plastic scintillator material for radiation portal monitors are discussed.

  12. Study of scintillation in natural and synthetic quartz and methacrylate

    E-print Network

    J. Amare; S. Borjabad; S. Cebrian; C. Cuesta; D. Fortuno; E. Garcia; C. Ginestra; H. Gomez; D. C. Herrera; M. Martinez; M. A. Olivan; Y. Ortigoza; A. Ortiz de Solorzano; C. Pobes; J. Puimedon; M. L. Sarsa; J. A. Villar; P. Villar

    2014-03-27

    Samples from different materials typically used as optical windows or light guides in scintillation detectors were studied in a very low background environment, at the Canfranc Underground Laboratory, searching for scintillation. A positive result can be confirmed for natural quartz: two distinct scintillation components have been identified, not being excited by an external gamma source. Although similar effect has not been observed neither for synthetic quartz nor for methacrylate, a fast light emission excited by intense gamma flux is evidenced for all the samples in our measurements. These results could affect the use of these materials in low energy applications of scintillation detectors requiring low radioactive background conditions, as they entail a source of background.

  13. OPTIMAL WELL LOCATOR (OWL): A SCREENING TOOL FOR EVALUATING LOCATIONS OF MONITORING WELLS: USER'S GUIDE VERSION 1.2

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Optimal Well Locator ( OWL) program was designed and developed by USEPA to be a screening tool to evaluate and optimize the placement of wells in long term monitoring networks at small sites. The first objective of the OWL program is to allow the user to visualize the change ...

  14. Laser beam scintillation beyond the turbulent atmosphere A numerical computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bufton, J. L.; Taylor, L. S.

    1976-01-01

    The extended Huygens-Fresnel formulation for propagation through turbulence is used to examine scintillation of a finite laser beam. The method is demonstrated analytically for propagation beyond a weak Gaussian phase screen. A numerical integration technique is used to extend the results to a more realistic turbulence model. Results are compared with existing Gaussian beam propagation theory.

  15. Surface preparation and coupling in plastic scintillator dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Ayotte, Guylaine; Archambault, Louis; Gingras, Luc; Lacroix, Frederic; Beddar, A. Sam; Beaulieu, Luc

    2006-09-15

    One way to improve the performance of scintillation dosimeters is to increase the light-collection efficiency at the coupling interfaces of the detector system. We performed a detailed study of surface preparation of scintillating fibers and their coupling with clear optical fibers to minimize light loss and increase the amount of light collected. We analyzed fiber-surface polishing with aluminum oxide sheets, coating fibers with magnesium oxide, and the use of eight different coupling agents (air, three optical gels, an optical curing agent, ultraviolet light, cyanoacrylate glue, and acetone). We prepared 10 scintillating fiber and clear optical fiber light guide samples to test different coupling methods. To test the coupling, we first cut both the scintillating fiber and the clear optical fiber. Then, we cleaned and polished both ends of both fibers. Finally, we coupled the scintillating fiber with the clear optical fiber in either a polyethylene jacket or a V-grooved support depending on the coupling agent used. To produce more light, we used an ultraviolet lamp to stimulate scintillation. A typical series of similar couplings showed a standard deviation in light-collection efficiency of 10%. This can be explained by differences in the surface preparation quality and alignment of the scintillating fiber with the clear optical fiber. Absence of surface polishing reduced the light collection by approximately 40%, and application of magnesium oxide on the proximal end of the scintillating fiber increased the amount of light collected from the optical fiber by approximately 39%. Of the coupling agents, we obtained the best results using one of the optical gels. Because a large amount of the light produced inside a scintillator is usually lost, better light-collection efficiency will result in improved sensitivity.

  16. In vivo quantification of fluorescent molecular markers in real-time by ratio imaging for diagnostic screening and image-guided surgery.

    PubMed

    Bogaards, A; Sterenborg, H J C M; Trachtenberg, J; Wilson, B C; Lilge, L

    2007-08-01

    Future applications of "molecular diagnostic screening" and "molecular image-guided surgery" will demand images of molecular markers with high resolution and high throughput (~ > or =30 frames/second). MRI, SPECT, PET, optical fluorescence tomography, hyper-spectral fluorescence imaging, and bioluminescence imaging do not offer such high frame rates. 2D optical fluorescence imaging can provide surface images with high resolution and high throughput. The ability to accurately quantify the fluorescence in vivo is critical to extract functional information of the disease state, however few methods are available. Here, a ratiometric 2D quantification method is introduced. Through mathematical modeling the performance was evaluated using optical properties that resembled biological tissues with the fluorescent marker Protoporhyrin IX. Experimentally the performance was evaluated in optical phantoms with different optical properties employing a novel prototype clinical imaging system. The clinical feasibility of real-time, image-guided surgery was demonstrated in patients undergoing prostatectomy. Discussed are the reasons why the introduced method leads to an increased quantification performance followed by modifications so it can be applied to novel fluorescent molecular markers as phthalocyanine 4 and dual-fluorescent markers. These offer additional advantages as these can provide a linear response to marker concentration and further minimize the dependence on autofluorescence and optical properties, as demonstrated through modeling. PMID:17868102

  17. Polysiloxane scintillator composition

    DOEpatents

    Walker, James K. (Gainesville, FL)

    1992-01-01

    A plastic scintillator useful for detecting ionizing radiation comprising a matrix which comprises an optically transparent polysiloxane having incorporated therein at least one ionizing radiation-hard fluor capable of converting electromagnetic energy produced in the polysiloxane upon absorption of ionizing radiation to detectable light.

  18. Polysiloxane scintillator composition

    DOEpatents

    Walker, J.K.

    1992-05-05

    A plastic scintillator useful for detecting ionizing radiation comprising a matrix which comprises an optically transparent polysiloxane having incorporated therein at least one ionizing radiation-hard fluor capable of converting electromagnetic energy produced in the polysiloxane upon absorption of ionizing radiation to detectable light.

  19. Boron loaded scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Zane William; Brown, Gilbert Morris; Maya, Leon; Sloop, Jr., Frederick Victor; Sloop, Jr., Frederick Victor

    2009-10-20

    A scintillating composition for detecting neutrons and other radiation comprises a phenyl containing silicone rubber with carborane units and at least one phosphor molecule. The carbonate units can either be a carborane molecule dispersed in the rubber with the aid of a compatibilization agent or can be covalently bound to the silicone.

  20. Scintillator Waveguide For Sensing Radiation

    DOEpatents

    Bliss, Mary (West Richland, WA); Craig, Richard A. (West Richland, WA); Reeder; Paul L. (Richland, WA)

    2003-04-22

    The present invention is an apparatus for detecting ionizing radiation, having: a waveguide having a first end and a second end, the waveguide formed of a scintillator material wherein the therapeutic ionizing radiation isotropically generates scintillation light signals within the waveguide. This apparatus provides a measure of radiation dose. The apparatus may be modified to permit making a measure of location of radiation dose. Specifically, the scintillation material is segmented into a plurality of segments; and a connecting cable for each of the plurality of segments is used for conducting scintillation signals to a scintillation detector.

  1. Scintillator requirements for medical imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, William W.

    1999-09-01

    Scintillating materials are used in a variety of medical imaging devices. This paper presents a description of four medical imaging modalities that make extensive use of scintillators: planar x-ray imaging, x-ray computed tomography (x-ray CT), SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) and PET (positron emission tomography). The discussion concentrates on a description of the underlying physical principles by which the four modalities operate. The scintillator requirements for these systems are enumerated and the compromises that are made in order to maximize imaging performance utilizing existing scintillating materials are discussed, as is the potential for improving imaging performance by improving scintillator properties.

  2. CRISPR-Cas9-Mediated Genetic Screening in Mice with Haploid Embryonic Stem Cells Carrying a Guide RNA Library.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Cuiqing; Yin, Qi; Xie, Zhenfei; Bai, Meizhu; Dong, Rui; Tang, Wei; Xing, Yu-Hang; Zhang, Hongling; Yang, Suming; Chen, Ling-Ling; Bartolomei, Marisa S; Ferguson-Smith, Anne; Li, Dangsheng; Yang, Li; Wu, Yuxuan; Li, Jinsong

    2015-08-01

    Mouse androgenetic haploid embryonic stem cells (AG-haESCs) can support full-term development of semi-cloned (SC) embryos upon injection into MII oocytes and thus have potential applications in genetic modifications. However, the very low birth rate of SC pups limits practical use of this approach. Here, we show that AG-haESCs carrying deletions in the DMRs (differentially DNA methylated regions) controlling two paternally repressed imprinted genes, H19 and Gtl2, can efficiently support the generation of SC pups. Genetic manipulation of these DKO-AG-haESCs in vitro using CRISPR-Cas9 can produce SC mice carrying multiple modifications with high efficiency. Moreover, transfection of DKO-AG-haESCs with a constitutively expressed sgRNA library and Cas9 allows functional mutagenic screening. DKO-AG-haESCs are therefore an effective tool for the introduction of organism-wide mutations in mice in a single generation. PMID:26165924

  3. Usefulness of Succinate dehydrogenase B (SDHB) immunohistochemistry in guiding mutational screening among patients with pheochromocytoma-paraganglioma syndromes.

    PubMed

    Pai, Rekha; Manipadam, Marie Therese; Singh, Pradyumn; Ebenazer, Andrew; Samuel, Prasanna; Rajaratnam, Simon

    2014-11-01

    Genetic testing of pheochromocytomas (PCC) and paragangliomas (PGL), although expensive, is gradually becoming a part of the routine laboratory investigation for patients with PCC-PGL syndrome. Recently, Succinate dehydrogenase B (SDHB) immunochemistry has been shown to be an excellent indicator of germline mutations in the SDH genes and could help significantly reduce cost. This study assesses the utility of SDHB immunohistochemical analysis when used to guide genetic analysis, with emphasis on cost benefits it could provide in a resource-limited setting. Forty-four cases of PCC/PGL characterized by genetic analysis were included to determine their SDHB expression pattern by immunohistochemistry. SDHB antibody expression was negative among three cases each, with SDHB and SDHD mutations. Immunohistochemistry results were positive for all three cases of RET, a single case of neurofibromatosis and for two cases with Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) mutations while the remaining two cases with VHL mutations showed a diffuse 'cytoplasmic blush'. Thirty of the remaining 31 samples demonstrated positive staining and were negative for mutations, while a lone sample that was negative for staining and mutation was not included in the final analysis as the internal control for the sample was not adequately stained. Cost analysis in our settings showed that triaging with SDHB immunohistochemistry could potentially reduce costs by USD 320-500 per patient. SDHB immunohistochemistry, when used as a guide to genetic testing, can significantly reduce the effort, time and costs of testing among patients with PCC-PGL, a huge benefit in resource limited settings. PMID:24735130

  4. Scintillation detectors based on silicon microfluidic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maoddi, P.; Mapelli, A.; Bagiacchi, P.; Gorini, B.; Haguenauer, M.; Lehmann Miotto, G.; Murillo Garcia, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Veneziano, S.; Renaud, P.

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic channels obtained by SU-8 photolithography and filled with liquid scintillators were recently demonstrated to be an interesting technology for the implementation of novel particle detectors. The main advantages of this approach are the intrinsic radiation resistance resulting from the simple microfluidic circulation of the active medium and the possibility to manufacture devices with high spatial resolution and low material budget using microfabrication techniques. Here we explore a different technological implementation of this concept, reporting on scintillating detectors based on silicon microfluidic channels. A process for manufacturing microfluidic devices on silicon substrates, featuring microchannel arrays suitable for light guiding, was developed. Such process can be in principle combined with standard CMOS processing and lead to a tight integration with the readout photodetectors and electronics in the future. Several devices were manufactured, featuring microchannel geometries differing in depth, width and pitch. A preliminary characterization of the prototypes was performed by means of a photomultiplier tube coupled to the microchannel ends, in order to detect the scintillation light produced upon irradiation with beta particles from a 90Sr source. The photoelectron spectra thus obtained were fitted with the expected output function in order to extract the light yield.

  5. MASIV: The Microarcsecond Scintillation-Induced Variability Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovell, J. E. J.; Jauncey, D. L.; Senkbeil, C.; Shabala, S.; Bignall, H. E.; Pursimo, T.; Ojha, R.; Macquart, J.-P.; Rickett, B. J.; Dutka, M.; Kedziora-Chudczer, L.

    2007-07-01

    We are undertaking a large-scale 5 GHz VLA survey of the northern sky to search for rapid intra-day variability (IDV). Over four observing epochs we found that 56% of the sources showed variability on timescales of hours to several days. Fewer variables were detected at high galactic latitudes, supporting interstellar-scintillation as the principal mechanism responsible for IDV. We find evidence that many of the scattering screens are not moving with the local standard of rest. There are few scintillating sources observed at high redshift which may be an indication of scattering in the turbulent intergalactic medium.

  6. Simulating Moving Features in Pulsar Scintillation Arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, J. A.; Rudolph, M. L.; Stinebring, D. R.; Coles, W. A.; Rickett, B. J.

    2005-12-01

    Pulsar scintillation often shows organized and simple structure in a power spectrum analysis. In particular, the power in the secondary spectrum is frequently organized along parabolas that can be identified with thin scattering screens in the interstellar medium. Hill et al. (2005) showed an example in which substructure moved along a parabolic path in accord with the known motion of the pulsar across the sky and the derived distance to the scattering screen. We report results of a simulation in which coherent electromagnetic waves are propagated through a turbulent phase-changing screen causing interference effects at the observer. The inhomogeneities in the screen are assumed to have a Kolmogorov spectrum and are localized in distinct clouds embedded in the screen. We find movement in the secondary spectrum substructure that is consistent with the observations reported by Hill et al. (2005). We comment on the physical implications of the isolated substructure and its persistence in both the simulation and the observations. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation.

  7. Lunar components in Lunping scintillations

    SciTech Connect

    Koster, J.R.; Lue, H.Y.; Wu, Hsi-Shu; Huang, Yinn-Nien

    1993-08-01

    The authors report on an anlysis of a 14 year data set of ionospheric scintillation data for 136 MHz signals transmitted from a Japanese satellite. They use a lunar age superposition method to analyze this data, breaking the data into blocks by seasons of the year. They observe a number of different scintillation types in the record, as well as impacts of lunar tides on the time record. They attempt to provide an origin for the different scintillation types.

  8. The Origin of Radio Scintillation in the Local Interstellar Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Rickett, Barney J.; Redfield, Seth

    2008-03-01

    We study three quasar radio sources (B1257-326, B1519-273, and J1819+385) that show large-amplitude intraday and annual scintillation variability produced by the Earth's motion relative to turbulent-scattering screens located within a few parsecs of the Sun. We find that the lines of sight to these sources pass through the edges of partially ionized warm interstellar clouds where two or more clouds may interact. From the gas flow vectors of these clouds, we find that the relative radial and transverse velocities of these clouds are large and could generate the turbulence that is responsible for the observed scintillation. For all three sight lines the flow velocities of nearby warm local interstellar clouds are consistent with the fits to the transverse flows of the radio scintillation signals.

  9. Neutron crosstalk between liquid scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbeke, J. M.; Prasad, M. K.; Snyderman, N. J.

    2015-09-01

    A method is proposed to quantify the fractions of neutrons scattering between liquid scintillators. Using a spontaneous fission source, this method can be utilized to quickly characterize an array of liquid scintillators in terms of crosstalk. The point model theory due to Feynman is corrected to account for these multiple scatterings. Using spectral information measured by the liquid scintillators, fractions of multiple scattering can be estimated, and mass reconstruction of fissile materials under investigation can be improved. Monte Carlo simulations of mono-energetic neutron sources were performed to estimate neutron crosstalk. A californium source in an array of liquid scintillators was modeled to illustrate the improvement of the mass reconstruction.

  10. Rare earth phosphors and phosphor screens

    DOEpatents

    Buchanan, Robert A. (Palo Alto, CA); Maple, T. Grant (Sunnyvale, CA); Sklensky, Alden F. (Sunnyvale, CA)

    1981-01-01

    This invention relates to rare earth phosphor screens for converting image carrying incident radiation to image carrying visible or near-visible radiation and to the rare earth phosphor materials utilized in such screens. The invention further relates to methods for converting image carrying charged particles to image carrying radiation principally in the blue and near-ultraviolet region of the spectrum and to stabilized rare earth phosphors characterized by having a continuous surface layer of the phosphors of the invention. More particularly, the phosphors of the invention are oxychlorides and oxybromides of yttrium, lanthanum and gadolinium activated with trivalent cerium and the conversion screens are of the type illustratively including x-ray conversion screens, image amplifier tube screens, neutron imaging screens, cathode ray tube screens, high energy gamma ray screens, scintillation detector screens and screens for real-time translation of image carrying high energy radiation to image carrying visible or near-visible radiation.

  11. A fast microchannel plate-scintillator detector for velocity map imaging and imaging mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, B.; King, S. J.; Vallance, C.; Brouard, M.

    2014-02-15

    The time resolution achievable using standard position-sensitive ion detectors, consisting of a chevron pair of microchannel plates coupled to a phosphor screen, is primarily limited by the emission lifetime of the phosphor, around 70 ns for the most commonly used P47 phosphor. We demonstrate that poly-para-phenylene laser dyes may be employed extremely effectively as scintillators, exhibiting higher brightness and much shorter decay lifetimes than P47. We provide an extensive characterisation of the properties of such scintillators, with a particular emphasis on applications in velocity-map imaging and microscope-mode imaging mass spectrometry. The most promising of the new scintillators exhibits an electron-to-photon conversion efficiency double that of P47, with an emission lifetime an order of magnitude shorter. The new scintillator screens are vacuum stable and show no signs of signal degradation even over longer periods of operation.

  12. Extruding plastic scintillator at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Anna Pla-Dalmau; Alan D. Bross; Victor V. Rykalin

    2003-10-31

    An understanding of the costs involved in the production of plastic scintillators and the development of a less expensive material have become necessary with the prospects of building very large plastic scintillation detectors. Several factors contribute to the high cost of plastic scintillating sheets, but the principal reason is the labor-intensive nature of the manufacturing process. In order to significantly lower the costs, the current casting procedures had to be abandoned. Since polystyrene is widely used in the consumer industry, the logical path was to investigate the extrusion of commercial-grade polystyrene pellets with dopants to yield high quality plastic scintillator. This concept was tested and high quality extruded plastic scintillator was produced. The D0 and MINOS experiments are already using extruded scintillator strips in their detectors. An extrusion line has recently been installed at Fermilab in collaboration with NICADD (Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator and Detector Development). This new facility will serve to further develop and improve extruded plastic scintillator. This paper will discuss the characteristics of extruded plastic scintillator and its raw materials, the different manufacturing techniques and the current R&D program at Fermilab.

  13. Scintillation light transport and detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriel, T. A.; Lillie, R. A.

    1987-08-01

    The MORSE neutron gamma-ray transport code has been modified to allow for the transport of scintillation light. This modified code is used to analyze the light collection characteristics of a large liquid scintillator module (18 × 18 × 350 cm 3).

  14. Lithium-loaded liquid scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Dai, Sheng (Knoxville, TN); Kesanli, Banu (Mersin, TR); Neal, John S. (Knoxville, TN)

    2012-05-15

    The invention is directed to a liquid scintillating composition containing (i) one or more non-polar organic solvents; (ii) (lithium-6)-containing nanoparticles having a size of up to 10 nm and surface-capped by hydrophobic molecules; and (iii) one or more fluorophores. The invention is also directed to a liquid scintillator containing the above composition.

  15. Hybrid scintillators for neutron discrimination

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Patrick L; Cordaro, Joseph G; Anstey, Mitchell R; Morales, Alfredo M

    2015-05-12

    A composition capable of producing a unique scintillation response to neutrons and gamma rays, comprising (i) at least one surfactant; (ii) a polar hydrogen-bonding solvent; and (iii) at least one luminophore. A method including combining at least one surfactant, a polar hydrogen-bonding solvent and at least one luminophore in a scintillation cell under vacuum or an inert atmosphere.

  16. Scintillator based beta batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rensing, Noa M.; Tiernan, Timothy C.; Shirwadkar, Urmila; O'Dougherty, Patrick; Freed, Sara; Hawrami, Rastgo; Squillante, Michael R.

    2013-05-01

    Some long-term, remote applications do not have access to conventional harvestable energy in the form of solar radiation (or other ambient light), wind, environmental vibration, or wave motion. Radiation Monitoring Devices, Inc. (RMD) is carrying out research to address the most challenging applications that need power for many months or years and which have undependable or no access to environmental energy. Radioisotopes are an attractive candidate for this energy source, as they can offer a very high energy density combined with a long lifetime. Both large scale nuclear power plants and radiothermal generators are based on converting nuclear energy to heat, but do not scale well to small sizes. Furthermore, thermo-mechanical power plants depend on moving parts, and RTG's suffer from low efficiency. To address the need for compact nuclear power devices, RMD is developing a novel beta battery, in which the beta emissions from a radioisotope are converted to visible light in a scintillator and then the visible light is converted to electrical power in a photodiode. By incorporating 90Sr into the scintillator SrI2 and coupling the material to a wavelength-matched solar cell, we will create a scalable, compact power source capable of supplying milliwatts to several watts of power over a period of up to 30 years. We will present the latest results of radiation damage studies and materials processing development efforts, and discuss how these factors interact to set the operating life and energy density of the device.

  17. [Chemical databases and virtual screening].

    PubMed

    Rognan, Didier; Bonnet, Pascal

    2014-12-01

    A prerequisite to any virtual screening is the definition of compound libraries to be screened. As we describe here, various sources are available. The selection of the proper library is usually project-dependent but at least as important as the screening method itself. This review details the main compound libraries that are available for virtual screening and guide the reader to the best possible selection according to its needs. PMID:25537046

  18. Thermal neutron scintillators using unenriched boron nitride and zinc sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, J. E.; Cole, A. J.; Kirby, A.; Marsden, E.

    2015-06-01

    Thermal neutron detectors based on powdered zinc sulfide intimately mixed with a neutron capture compound have a history as long as scintillation technique itself. We show that using unenriched boron nitride powder, rather than the more commonly used enriched lithium fluoride, results in detection screens which produce less light but which are very considerably cheaper. Methods of fabricating large areas of this material are presented. The screens are intended for the production of large area low cost neutron detectors as a replacement for helium-3 proportional tubes.

  19. Proton recoil scintillator neutron rem meter

    DOEpatents

    Olsher, Richard H. (Los Alamos, NM); Seagraves, David T. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2003-01-01

    A neutron rem meter utilizing proton recoil and thermal neutron scintillators to provide neutron detection and dose measurement. In using both fast scintillators and a thermal neutron scintillator the meter provides a wide range of sensitivity, uniform directional response, and uniform dose response. The scintillators output light to a photomultiplier tube that produces an electrical signal to an external neutron counter.

  20. Drift scintillation meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1984-03-01

    This is the final report for the subject contract under which The University of Texas at Dallas (UTD) built, tested and delivered an engineering model and three flight versions of the Drift Scintillation Meter (DSM) to the Air Force Geophysics Laboratory for flight on the Air Force DMSP satellites. The report is divided into three sections. Section 1 contains the instrument description and theory of operation. Section 2 contains a description of planned spacecraft-level instrument testing, stimulation requirements and instrument handling and safety. Section 3 contains an instrument interconnection diagram and a list of the schematics, drawings, parts lists and wiring lists that describe the as-built configuration of the instrument. This documentation is available in the R&D Equipment Information Reports that were submitted to AFGL after each instrument delivery.

  1. Ionospheric scintillation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rino, C. L.; Freemouw, E. J.

    1973-01-01

    The diffracted field of a monochromatic plane wave was characterized by two complex correlation functions. For a Gaussian complex field, these quantities suffice to completely define the statistics of the field. Thus, one can in principle calculate the statistics of any measurable quantity in terms of the model parameters. The best data fits were achieved for intensity statistics derived under the Gaussian statistics hypothesis. The signal structure that achieved the best fit was nearly invariant with scintillation level and irregularity source (ionosphere or solar wind). It was characterized by the fact that more than 80% of the scattered signal power is in phase quadrature with the undeviated or coherent signal component. Thus, the Gaussian-statistics hypothesis is both convenient and accurate for channel modeling work.

  2. Scintillator materials containing lanthanum fluorides

    DOEpatents

    Moses, W.W.

    1991-05-14

    An improved radiation detector containing a crystalline mixture of LaF[sub 3] and CeF[sub 3] as the scintillator element is disclosed. Scintillators made with from 25% to 99.5% LaF[sub 3] and the remainder CeF[sub 3] have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is equal to or superior to other known scintillator materials, and which may be processed from natural starting materials containing both rare earth elements. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in positron emission tomography. 2 figures.

  3. Scintillator materials containing lanthanum fluorides

    DOEpatents

    Moses, William W. (Berkeley, CA)

    1991-01-01

    An improved radiation detector containing a crystalline mixture of LaF.sub.3 and CeF.sub.3 as the scintillator element is disclosed. Scintillators made with from 25% to 99.5% LaF.sub.3 and the remainder CeF.sub.3 have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is equal to or superior to other known scintillator materials, and which may be processed from natural starting materials containing both rare earth elements. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in positron emission tomography.

  4. Properties of scintillator solutes

    SciTech Connect

    Fluornoy, J.M.

    1998-06-01

    This special report summarizes measurements of the spectroscopic and other properties of the solutes that were used in the preparation of several new liquid scintillators developed at EG and G/Energy Measurements/Santa Barbara Operations (the precursor to Bechtel Nevada/Special Technologies Laboratory) on the radiation-to-light converter program. The data on the individual compounds are presented in a form similar to that used by Prof. Isadore Berlman in his classic handbook of fluorescence spectra. The temporal properties and relative efficiencies of the new scintillators are presented in Table 1, and the efficiencies as a function of wavelength are presented graphically in Figure 1. In addition, there is a descriptive glossary of the abbreviations used herein. Figure 2 illustrates the basic structures of some of the compounds and of the four solvents reported in this summary. The emission spectra generally exhibit more structure than the absorption spectra, with the result that the peak emission wavelength for a given compound may lie several nm away from the wavelength, {lambda}{sub avg}, at the geometric center of the emission spectrum. Therefore, the author has chosen to list absorption peaks, {lambda}{sub max}, and emission {lambda}{sub avg} values in Figures 3--30, as being most illustrative of the differences between the compounds. The compounds, BHTP, BTPB, ADBT, and DPTPB were all developed on this program. P-terphenyl, PBD, and TPB are commercially available blue emitters. C-480 and the other longer-wavelength emitters are laser dyes available commercially from Exciton Corporation. 1 ref., 30 figs.

  5. Scintillator fiber optic long counter

    DOEpatents

    McCollum, T.; Spector, G.B.

    1994-03-29

    A flat response position sensitive neutron detector capable of providing neutron spectroscopic data utilizing scintillator fiber optic filaments embedded in a neutron moderating housing having an open end through which neutrons enter to be detected is described. 11 figures.

  6. Scintillator fiber optic long counter

    DOEpatents

    McCollum, Tom (Sterling, VA); Spector, Garry B. (Fairfax, VA)

    1994-01-01

    A flat response position sensitive neutron detector capable of providing neutron spectroscopic data utilizing scintillator fiber optic filaments embedded in a neutron moderating housing having an open end through which neutrons enter to be detected.

  7. Weak Interstellar Scintillation of Pulsar B0809+74

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coles, Wm. A.; Rickett, Barney J.; Markkanen, Jussi

    1998-05-01

    The nearby pulsar B0809+74 should be in the regime of weak interstellar scintillation at all frequencies above about 1 GHz, based on extrapolating 400 MHz observations using a Kolmogorov spectral model. The predicted time scale at 933 MHz is about 1 hr. The source is circumpolar at the EISCAT-Sodankyla site in Finland, and we were able to take advantage of a receiver test to observe it continuously at 933 MHz for 80 hours. The observations showed that the source was on the edge of weak scintillation with a scintillation index S_rms/ = 0.90, and a time scale of 1.9 hr. The 80 hr observation was long enough to provide a reliable estimate of the intensity structure function, which we have compared with a weak scintillation theoretical model. The model includes the distribution of interstellar plasma turbulence along the line-of-sight; its spectral exponent; and the velocities of the pulsar, the observer and the turbulent plasma. The observations are consistent with a Kolmogorov spectrum and various distributions of turbulence along the line-of-sight, including a thin screen. In this paper we will show the range of models which provide an adequate match to the observations, including the model proposed by Bhat et al. (submitted to MNRAS 1998) in which there is enhanced scattering at the edge of the local super-bubble.

  8. Extruded plastic scintillator including inorganic powders

    DOEpatents

    Bross, Alan D.; Mellott, Kerry L.; Pla-Dalmau, Anna

    2006-06-27

    A method for producing a plastic scintillator is disclosed. A plurality of nano-sized particles and one or more dopants can be combined with a plastic material for the formation of a plastic scintillator thereof. The nano-sized particles, the dopant and the plastic material can be combined within the dry inert atmosphere of an extruder to produce a reaction that results in the formation of a plastic scintillator thereof and the deposition of energy within the plastic scintillator, such that the plastic scintillator produces light signifying the detection of a radiative element. The nano-sized particles can be treated with an inert gas prior to processing the nano-sized particles, the dopant and the plastic material utilizing the extruder. The plastic scintillator can be a neutron-sensitive scintillator, x-ray sensitive scintillator and/or a scintillator for the detection of minimum ionizing particles.

  9. AMIGA at the Auger Observatory: the scintillator module testing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platino, M.; Hampel, M. R.; Almela, A.; Krieger, A.; Gorbeña, D.; Ferrero, A.; De La Vega, G.; Lucero, A.; Suarez, F.; Videla, M.; Wainberg, O.; Etchegoyen, A.

    2011-06-01

    AMIGA is an extension of the Pierre Auger Observatory that will consist of 85 detector pairs each one composed of a surface water-Cherenkov detector and a buried muon counter. Each muon counter has an area of 30 m2 and is made of scintillator strips with doped optical fibers glued to them, which guide the light to 64 pixels photomultiplier tubes. The detector pairs are arranged at 433 m and 750 m array spacings. In this paper we present the testing and initial calibration system for the scintillator modules that constitute each muon counter of AMIGA. The scintillator modules are tested with a "scanner" that consists of an x-y positioning system that moves a 5 mCi 137Cs radioactive source over the module taking data at fixed locations. The scanner both tests the module for possible fabrication defects and stores the light-attenuation curve parameters. A complete scanning process of a 64 strip scintillator module has been performed and results are presented. Also, attenuation curves obtained with scanner and with background muons are compared with satisfactory results.

  10. An imaging technique for detection and absolute calibration of scintillation light

    SciTech Connect

    Pappalardo, Alfio; Cosentino, Luigi; Finocchiaro, Paolo

    2010-03-15

    Triggered by the need of a detection system to be used in experiments of nuclear fusion in laser-generated plasmas, we developed an imaging technique for the measurement and calibration of the scintillation light yield of scintillating materials. As in such experiments, all the reaction products are generated in an ultrashort time frame, the event-by-event data acquisition scheme is not feasible. As an alternative to the emulsion technique (or the equivalent CR39 sheets) we propose a scintillating screen readout by means of a high performance charge coupled device camera. Even though it is not strictly required in the particular application, this technique allows the absolute calibration of the scintillation light yield.

  11. Low-dose megavoltage cone-beam CT imaging using thick, segmented scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Mohri, Youcef; Antonuk, Larry E.; Zhao, Qihua; Choroszucha, Richard B.; Jiang, Hao; Liu, Langechuan

    2011-03-01

    Megavoltage, cone-beam computed tomography (MV CBCT) employing an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) is a highly promising technique for providing soft-tissue visualization in image-guided radiotherapy. However, current EPIDs based on active matrix flat-panel imagers (AMFPIs), which are regarded as the gold standard for portal imaging and referred to as conventional MV AMFPIs, require high radiation doses to achieve this goal due to poor x-ray detection efficiency (~2% at 6 MV). To overcome this limitation, the incorporation of thick, segmented, crystalline scintillators, as a replacement for the phosphor screens used in these AMFPIs, has been shown to significantly improve the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) performance, leading to improved image quality for projection imaging at low dose. Toward the realization of practical AMFPIs capable of low dose, soft-tissue visualization using MV CBCT imaging, two prototype AMFPIs incorporating segmented scintillators with ~11 mm thick CsI:Tl and Bi4Ge3O12 (BGO) crystals were evaluated. Each scintillator consists of 120 × 60 crystalline elements separated by reflective septal walls, with an element-to-element pitch of 1.016 mm. The prototypes were evaluated using a bench-top CBCT system, allowing the acquisition of 180 projection, 360° tomographic scans with a 6 MV radiotherapy photon beam. Reconstructed images of a spatial resolution phantom, as well as of a water-equivalent phantom, embedded with tissue equivalent objects having electron densities (relative to water) varying from ~0.28 to ~1.70, were obtained down to one beam pulse per projection image, corresponding to a scan dose of ~4 cGy--a dose similar to that required for a single portal image obtained from a conventional MV AMFPI. By virtue of their significantly improved DQE, the prototypes provided low contrast visualization, allowing clear delineation of an object with an electron density difference of ~2.76%. Results of contrast, noise and contrast-to-noise ratio are presented as a function of dose and compared to those from a conventional MV AMFPI.

  12. Low-dose megavoltage cone-beam CT imaging using thick, segmented scintillators.

    PubMed

    El-Mohri, Youcef; Antonuk, Larry E; Zhao, Qihua; Choroszucha, Richard B; Jiang, Hao; Liu, Langechuan

    2011-03-21

    Megavoltage, cone-beam computed tomography (MV CBCT) employing an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) is a highly promising technique for providing soft-tissue visualization in image-guided radiotherapy. However, current EPIDs based on active matrix flat-panel imagers (AMFPIs), which are regarded as the gold standard for portal imaging and referred to as conventional MV AMFPIs, require high radiation doses to achieve this goal due to poor x-ray detection efficiency (?2% at 6 MV). To overcome this limitation, the incorporation of thick, segmented, crystalline scintillators, as a replacement for the phosphor screens used in these AMFPIs, has been shown to significantly improve the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) performance, leading to improved image quality for projection imaging at low dose. Toward the realization of practical AMFPIs capable of low dose, soft-tissue visualization using MV CBCT imaging, two prototype AMFPIs incorporating segmented scintillators with ?11 mm thick CsI:Tl and Bi(4)Ge(3)O(12) (BGO) crystals were evaluated. Each scintillator consists of 120 × 60 crystalline elements separated by reflective septal walls, with an element-to-element pitch of 1.016 mm. The prototypes were evaluated using a bench-top CBCT system, allowing the acquisition of 180 projection, 360° tomographic scans with a 6 MV radiotherapy photon beam. Reconstructed images of a spatial resolution phantom, as well as of a water-equivalent phantom, embedded with tissue equivalent objects having electron densities (relative to water) varying from ?0.28 to ?1.70, were obtained down to one beam pulse per projection image, corresponding to a scan dose of ?4 cGy--a dose similar to that required for a single portal image obtained from a conventional MV AMFPI. By virtue of their significantly improved DQE, the prototypes provided low contrast visualization, allowing clear delineation of an object with an electron density difference of ?2.76%. Results of contrast, noise and contrast-to-noise ratio are presented as a function of dose and compared to those from a conventional MV AMFPI. PMID:21325709

  13. Newborn Hearing Screening: Present Scenario

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vishwambhar

    2015-01-01

    In 2009 many countries of the world met to discuss newborn and infant hearing screening current issues and guiding principles for action under World Health Organization (WHO) banner, though most of the countries who had begun this work as universal program or high risk screen do not have exact data and protocol. The developing countries also decided to become part of it and common guideline was proposed. India being part of it included hearing screening as one of the 30 diseases to be screened under Rashtriya Bal Swasthya Karyakram (RBSK). This article discusses all these issues of newborn hearing screening in the world and India. PMID:25657515

  14. Structural design of a high energy particle detector using liquid scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, Timothy John; /Minnesota U.

    1997-02-01

    This thesis presents a design for a 10,000 ton liquid scintillator neutrino detector being considered for the MINOS project at Fermilab. Details of designing, manufacturing, and assembling the active detector components are presented. The detector consists of 1080 magnetized steel absorber planes alternating with 1080 active detector planes. Each active plane is made up of plastic extrusions divided into nearly 400 cells for positional resolution. Life tests on the plastic extrusions determine their feasibility for containing the scintillator. The extrusions are sealed at the bottom, filled with liquid scintillator, and have an optical fiber running the entire length of each cell. The fibers terminate at the top of each extrusion in a manifold. An optical-fiber-light-guide connects the fibers in each manifold to a photo-detector. The photo-detector converts the light signals from the scintillator and optical fibers into electrical impulses for computer analysis.

  15. Plastic scintillation dosimetry: comparison of three solutions for the Cerenkov challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, P. Z. Y.; Suchowerska, N.; Lambert, J.; Abolfathi, P.; McKenzie, D. R.

    2011-09-01

    In scintillation dosimetry, a Cerenkov background signal is generated when a conventional fibre optic is exposed to radiation produced by a megavoltage linear accelerator. Three methods of measuring dose in the presence of Cerenkov background are compared. In the first method, a second background fibre is used to estimate the Cerenkov signal in the signal fibre. In the second method, a colour camera is used to measure the combined scintillation and Cerenkov light in two wavelength ranges and a mathematical process is used to extract the scintillation signal. In the third method, a hollow air core light guide is used to carry the scintillation signal through the primary radiation field. In this paper, the strengths and weaknesses of each dosimetry system are identified and recommendations for the optimum method for common clinical dosimetry situations are made.

  16. Two dimensional and linear scintillation detectors for fast neutron imaging — comparative analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikerov, V. I.; Koshelev, A. P.; Ozerov, O. V.; Sviridov, A. S.; Yurkov, D. I.

    2014-05-01

    The paper was aimed to compare performance capabilities of two types of scintillation detectors commonly used for fast neutron imaging: two dimensional and linear ones. Best-case values of quantum efficiency, spatial resolution and capacity were estimated for detectors with plastic converter-screen in case of 14 MeV neutrons. For that there were examined nuclear reactions produced in converter-screen by fast neutrons, spatial distributions of energy release of emerged charged particles and amplitude distributions of scintillations generated by these particles. The paper shows that the efficiency of the linear detector is essentially higher and this detector provides potentially better spatial resolution in comparison with the two dimensional detector. But, the two dimensional detector surpasses the linear one in capacity. The presented results can be used for designing radiographic fast neutron detectors with organic scintillators.

  17. Transmission environmental scanning electron microscope with scintillation gaseous detection device.

    PubMed

    Danilatos, Gerasimos; Kollia, Mary; Dracopoulos, Vassileios

    2015-03-01

    A transmission environmental scanning electron microscope with use of a scintillation gaseous detection device has been implemented. This corresponds to a transmission scanning electron microscope but with addition of a gaseous environment acting both as environmental and detection medium. A commercial type of low vacuum machine has been employed together with appropriate modifications to the detection configuration. This involves controlled screening of various emitted signals in conjunction with a scintillation gaseous detection device already provided with the machine for regular surface imaging. Dark field and bright field imaging has been obtained along with other detection conditions. With a progressive series of modifications and tests, the theory and practice of a novel type of microscopy is briefly shown now ushering further significant improvements and developments in electron microscopy as a whole. PMID:25497719

  18. Radiopure Metal-Loaded Liquid Scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Rosero, Richard; Yeh, Minfang

    2015-03-18

    Metal-loaded liquid scintillator plays a key role in particle and nuclear physics experiments. The applications of metal ions in various neutrino experiments and the purification methods for different scintillator components are discussed in this paper.

  19. Unitary scintillation detector and system

    DOEpatents

    McElhaney, S.A.; Chiles, M.M.

    1994-05-31

    The invention is a unitary alpha, beta, and gamma scintillation detector and system for sensing the presence of alpha, beta, and gamma radiations selectively or simultaneously. The scintillators are mounted in a light-tight housing provided with an entrance window for admitting alpha, beta, and gamma radiation and excluding ambient light from the housing. Light pulses from each scintillator have different decay constants that are converted by a photosensitive device into corresponding differently shaped electrical pulses. A pulse discrimination system identifies the electrical pulses by their respective pulse shapes which are determined by decay time. The identified electrical pulses are counted in separate channel analyzers to indicate the respective levels of sensed alpha, beta, and gamma radiations. 10 figs.

  20. Scintillation at two optical frequencies.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, W B; Reitsema, H J

    1981-09-15

    Stellar scintillation data were obtained on a single night at a variety of zenith distances and azimuths, using a photon-counting photometer recording at 100 Hz simultaneously at wavelengths of 0.475 microm and 0.870 microm. Orientable apertures of 42-cm diam separated by 1 m were used to establish the average upper atmosphere wind direction and velocity. Dispersion in the earth's atmosphere separate the average optical paths at the two wavelengths, permitting a reconstruction of the spatial cross-correlation function for scintillations, independent of assumptions about differential fluid motions. Although there is clear evidence of a complicated velocity field, scintillation power was predominantly produced by levels at pressures of 130 +/- 30 mbar. The data are not grossly inconsistent with layers of isotropic Kolmogorov turbulence, but there is some evidence for deviation from the Kolmogorov spectral index and/or anisotropy. PMID:20333125

  1. Unitary scintillation detector and system

    DOEpatents

    McElhaney, Stephanie A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Chiles, Marion M. (Knoxville, TN)

    1994-01-01

    The invention is a unitary alpha, beta, and gamma scintillation detector and system for sensing the presence of alpha, beta, and gamma radiations selectively or simultaneously. The scintillators are mounted in a light-tight housing provided with an entrance window for admitting alpha, beta, and gamma radiation and excluding ambient light from the housing. Light pulses from each scintillator have different decay constants that are converted by a photosensitive device into corresponding differently shaped electrical pulses. A pulse discrimination system identifies the electrical pulses by their respective pulse shapes which are determined by decay time. The identified electrical pulses are counted in separate channel analyzers to indicate the respective levels of sensed alpha, beta, and gamma radiations.

  2. Fracture-resistant lanthanide scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Doty, F. Patrick (Livermore, CA)

    2011-01-04

    Lanthanide halide alloys have recently enabled scintillating gamma ray spectrometers comparable to room temperature semiconductors (<3% FWHM energy resolutions at 662 keV). However brittle fracture of these materials upon cooling hinders the growth of large volume crystals. Efforts to improve the strength through non-lanthanide alloy substitution, while preserving scintillation, have been demonstrated. Isovalent alloys having nominal compositions of comprising Al, Ga, Sc, Y, and In dopants as well as aliovalent alloys comprising Ca, Sr, Zr, Hf, Zn, and Pb dopants were prepared. All of these alloys exhibit bright fluorescence under UV excitation, with varying shifts in the spectral peaks and intensities relative to pure CeBr.sub.3. Further, these alloys scintillate when coupled to a photomultiplier tube (PMT) and exposed to .sup.137Cs gamma rays.

  3. 3D Printing of Scintillating Materials

    E-print Network

    Mishnayot, Y; Cooperstein, I; Magdassi, S; Ron, G

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate, for the first time, the applicability of 3D printing technique to the manufacture of scintillation detectors. We report of a formulation, usable in stereolithographic printing, that exhibits scintillation efficiency on the order of 30\\% of that of commercial polystyrene based scintillators. We discuss the applicability of these techniques and propose future enhancements that will allow tailoring the printed scintillation detectors to various application.

  4. Nanophosphor composite scintillator with a liquid matrix

    DOEpatents

    McKigney, Edward Allen (Los Alamos, NM); Burrell, Anthony Keiran (Los Alamos, NM); Bennett, Bryan L. (Los Alamos, NM); Cooke, David Wayne (Santa Fe, NM); Ott, Kevin Curtis (Los Alamos, NM); Bacrania, Minesh Kantilal (Los Alamos, NM); Del Sesto, Rico Emilio (Los Alamos, NM); Gilbertson, Robert David (Los Alamos, NM); Muenchausen, Ross Edward (Los Alamos, NM); McCleskey, Thomas Mark (Los Alamos, NM)

    2010-03-16

    An improved nanophosphor scintillator liquid comprises nanophosphor particles in a liquid matrix. The nanophosphor particles are optionally surface modified with an organic ligand. The surface modified nanophosphor particle is essentially surface charge neutral, thereby preventing agglomeration of the nanophosphor particles during dispersion in a liquid scintillator matrix. The improved nanophosphor scintillator liquid may be used in any conventional liquid scintillator application, including in a radiation detector.

  5. 3D Printing of Scintillating Materials

    E-print Network

    Y. Mishnayot; M. Layani; I. Cooperstein; S. Magdassi; G. Ron

    2014-06-15

    We demonstrate, for the first time, the applicability of 3D printing technique to the manufacture of scintillation detectors. We report of a formulation, usable in stereolithographic printing, that exhibits scintillation efficiency on the order of 30\\% of that of commercial polystyrene based scintillators. We discuss the applicability of these techniques and propose future enhancements that will allow tailoring the printed scintillation detectors to various application.

  6. Hygroscopicity Evaluation of Halide Scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuravleva, M; Stand, L; Wei, H; Hobbs, C. L.; Boatner, Lynn A; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine; Burger, Arnold; Rowe, E; Bhattacharya, P.; Tupitsyn, E; Melcher, Charles L

    2014-01-01

    A collaborative study of relative hygroscopicity of anhydrous halide scintillators grown at various laboratories is presented. We have developed a technique to evaluate moisture sensitivity of both raw materials and grown crystals, in which the moisture absorption rate is measured using a gravimetric analysis. Degradation of the scintillation performance was investigated by recording gamma-ray spectra and monitoring the photopeak position, count rate and energy resolution. The accompanying physical degradation of the samples exposed to ambient atmosphere was photographically recorded as well. The results were compared with ben

  7. Scintillator Cosmic Ray Super Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, L. X.; Valdés-Galicia, J. F.; Matsubara, Y.; Nagai, Y.; Itow, Y.; Sako, T.; López, D.; Mitsuka, G.; Munakata, K.; Kato, C.; Yasue, S.; Kosai, M.; Tsurusashi, M.; Nakamo, Y.; Shibata, S.; Takamaru, H.; Kojima, H.; Tsuchiya, H.; Watanabe, K.; Koi, T.; Fragoso, E.; Hurtado, A.; Musalem, O.

    2013-04-01

    The Scintillator Cosmic Ray Super Telescope (SciCRST) is a new experiment to detect solar neutrons, and also it is expected to work as a muon and cosmic ray detector. The SciCRST consist of 14,848 plastic scintillator bars, and it will be installed at the top of Sierra Negra volcano, Mexico, 4580 m.a.s.l. We use a prototype, called as miniSciBar, to test the hardware and software of the final experiment. In this paper, we present the status and details of the experiment, and results of the prototype.

  8. Composite scintillators for detection of ionizing radiation

    DOEpatents

    Dai, Sheng (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Stephan, Andrew Curtis (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Brown, Suree S. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Wallace, Steven A. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Rondinone, Adam J [Knoxville, TN

    2010-12-28

    Applicant's present invention is a composite scintillator having enhanced transparency for detecting ionizing radiation comprising a material having optical transparency wherein said material comprises nano-sized objects having a size in at least one dimension that is less than the wavelength of light emitted by the composite scintillator wherein the composite scintillator is designed to have selected properties suitable for a particular application.

  9. Photonic crystal scintillators and methods of manufacture

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, Ricardo D.; Sexton, Lindsay T.; Fuentes, Roderick E.; Cortes-Concepcion, Jose

    2015-08-11

    Photonic crystal scintillators and their methods of manufacture are provided. Exemplary methods of manufacture include using a highly-ordered porous anodic alumina membrane as a pattern transfer mask for either the etching of underlying material or for the deposition of additional material onto the surface of a scintillator. Exemplary detectors utilizing such photonic crystal scintillators are also provided.

  10. Characteristics of High Latitude Ionosphere Scintillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Y.

    2012-12-01

    As we enter a new solar maximum period, global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) receivers, especially the ones operating in high latitude and equatorial regions, are facing an increasing threat from ionosphere scintillations. The increased solar activities, however, also offer a great opportunity to collect scintillation data to characterize scintillation signal parameters and ionosphere irregularities. While there are numerous GPS receivers deployed around the globe to monitor ionosphere scintillations, most of them are commercial receivers whose signal processing mechanisms are not designed to operate under ionosphere scintillation. As a result, they may distort scintillation signal parameters or lose lock of satellite signals under strong scintillations. Since 2008, we have established and continuously improved a unique GNSS receiver array at HAARP, Alaska. The array contains high ends commercial receivers and custom RF front ends which can be automatically triggered to collect high quality GPS and GLONASS satellite signals during controlled heating experiments and natural scintillation events. Custom designed receiver signal tracking algorithms aim to preserve true scintillation signatures are used to process the raw RF samples. Signal strength, carrier phase, and relative TEC measurements generated by the receiver array since its inception have been analyzed to characterize high latitude scintillation phenomena. Daily, seasonal, and solar events dependency of scintillation occurrence, spectral contents of scintillation activities, and plasma drifts derived from these measurements will be presented. These interesting results demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of our experimental data collection system in providing insightful details of ionosphere responses to active perturbations and natural disturbances.

  11. Synthesis of plastic scintillation microspheres: Evaluation of scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiago, L. M.; Bagán, H.; Tarancón, A.; Garcia, J. F.

    2013-01-01

    The use of plastic scintillation microspheres (PSm) appear to be an alternative to liquid scintillation for the quantification of alpha and beta emitters because it does not generate mixed wastes after the measurement (organic and radioactive). In addition to routine radionuclide determinations, PSm can be used for further applications, e.g. for usage in a continuous monitoring equipment, for measurements of samples with a high salt concentration and for an extractive scintillation support which permits the separation, pre-concentration and measurement of the radionuclides without additional steps of elution and sample preparation. However, only a few manufacturers provide PSm, and the low number of regular suppliers reduces its availability and restricts the compositions and sizes available. In this article, a synthesis method based on the extraction/evaporation methodology has been developed and successfully used for the synthesis of plastic scintillation microspheres. Seven different compositions of plastic scintillation microspheres have been synthesised; PSm1 with polystyrene, PSm2 with 2,5-Diphenyloxazol(PPO), PSm3 with p-terphenyl (pT), PSm4 with PPO and 1,4-bis(5-phenyloxazol-2-yl) (POPOP), PSm5 pT and (1,4-bis [2-methylstyryl] benzene) (Bis-MSB), PSm6 with PPO, POPOP and naphthalene and PSm7 with pT, Bis-MSB and naphthalene. The synthesised plastic scintillation microspheres have been characterised in terms of their morphology, detection capabilities and alpha/beta separation capacity. The microspheres had a median diameter of approximately 130 ?m. Maximum detection efficiency values were obtained for the PSm4 composition as follows 1.18% for 3H, 51.2% for 14C, 180.6% for 90Sr/90Y and 76.7% for 241Am. Values of the SQP(E) parameter were approximately 790 for PSm4 and PSm5. These values show that the synthesised PSm exhibit good scintillation properties and that the spectra are at channel numbers higher than in commercial PSm. Finally, the addition of naphthalene modifies the shape of the pulses produced by alpha and beta particles leading to better alpha/beta separation.

  12. Detection of six rapidly scintillating active galactic nuclei and the diminished variability of J1819+3845

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koay, J. Y.; Bignall, H. E.; Macquart, J.-P.; Jauncey, D. L.; Rickett, B. J.; Lovell, J. E. J.

    2011-10-01

    The extreme, intra-hour and >10% rms flux density scintillation observed in AGNs such as PKS 0405-385, J1819+3845 and PKS 1257-326 at cm wavelengths has been attributed to scattering in highly turbulent, nearby regions in the interstellar medium. Such behavior has been found to be rare. We searched for rapid scintillators among 128 flat spectrum AGNs and analyzed their properties to determine the origin of such rapid and large amplitude radio scintillation. The sources were observed at the VLA at 4.9 and 8.4 GHz simultaneously at two hour intervals over 11 days. We detected six rapid scintillators with characteristic time-scales of <2 h, none of which have rms variations >10%. We found strong lines of evidence linking rapid scintillation to the presence of nearby scattering regions, estimated to be <12 pc away for ~200 ?as sources and <250 pc away for ~10 ?as sources. We attribute the scarcity of rapid and large amplitude scintillators to the requirement of additional constraints, including large source compact fractions. J1819+3845 was found to display ~2% rms variations at ~6 h time-scales superposed on longer >11 day variations, suggesting that the highly turbulent cloud responsible for its extreme scintillation has moved away, with its scintillation now caused by a more distant screen ?50 to 150 pc away.

  13. Scintillating fiber ribbon --- tungsten calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Bross, A.; Crisler, M.; Kross, B.; Wrbanek, J.

    1989-07-14

    We describe an ultra-high density scintillating fiber and tungsten calorimeter used as an active beam-dump for electrons. Data showing the calorimeter response to electrons with momenta between 50 and 350 GeV/c are presented. 9 figs.

  14. SNO+ Scintillator Purification and Assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, R.; Chen, M.; Chkvorets, O.; Hallman, D.; Vázquez-Jáuregui, E.

    2011-04-01

    We describe the R&D on the scintillator purification and assay methods and technology for the SNO+ neutrino and double-beta decay experiment. The SNO+ experiment is a replacement of the SNO heavy water with liquid scintillator comprised of 2 g/L PPO in linear alkylbenzene (LAB). During filling the LAB will be transported underground by rail car and purified by multi-stage distillation and steam stripping at a flow rate of 19 LPM. While the detector is operational the scintillator can be recirculated at 150 LPM (full detector volume in 4 days) to provide repurification as necessary by either water extraction (for Ra, K, Bi) or by functional metal scavenger columns (for Pb, Ra, Bi, Ac, Th) followed by steam stripping to remove noble gases and oxygen (Rn, O2, Kr, Ar). The metal scavenger columns also provide a method for scintillator assay for ex-situ measurement of the U and Th chain radioactivity. We have developed "natural" radioactive spikes of Pb and Ra in LAB and use these for purification testing. Lastly, we present the planned operating modes and purification strategies and the plant specifications and design.

  15. Interstellar Scintillation and Intraday Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rickett, B. J.

    Sources that are compact enough to show intrinsic variability on times of a day or less (IDV) at cm wavelengths must also show interstellar scintillation (ISS) on similar timescales. However for many IDV sources, the variations could be entirely due to ISS, reducing the implied brightness temperatures to $\\sim 1013$~K or less.

  16. SNO+ Scintillator Purification and Assay

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, R.; Vazquez-Jauregui, E.; Chen, M.; Chkvorets, O.; Hallman, D.

    2011-04-27

    We describe the R and D on the scintillator purification and assay methods and technology for the SNO+ neutrino and double-beta decay experiment. The SNO+ experiment is a replacement of the SNO heavy water with liquid scintillator comprised of 2 g/L PPO in linear alkylbenzene (LAB). During filling the LAB will be transported underground by rail car and purified by multi-stage distillation and steam stripping at a flow rate of 19 LPM. While the detector is operational the scintillator can be recirculated at 150 LPM (full detector volume in 4 days) to provide repurification as necessary by either water extraction (for Ra, K, Bi) or by functional metal scavenger columns (for Pb, Ra, Bi, Ac, Th) followed by steam stripping to remove noble gases and oxygen (Rn, O{sub 2}, Kr, Ar). The metal scavenger columns also provide a method for scintillator assay for ex-situ measurement of the U and Th chain radioactivity. We have developed ''natural'' radioactive spikes of Pb and Ra in LAB and use these for purification testing. Lastly, we present the planned operating modes and purification strategies and the plant specifications and design.

  17. EFFECT OF WATER VELOCITY ON THE FISH-GUIDING EFFICIENCY OF AN 'ELECTRICAL GUIDING SYSTEM

    E-print Network

    electrical field, and collecting the guided fish were installed. Evaluation facllities consisted of rotaryEFFECT OF WATER VELOCITY ON THE FISH-GUIDING EFFICIENCY OF AN 'ELECTRICAL GUIDING SYSTEM BY JOHN R drum screens to divert all fish that escaped past the electrical field to an inclined-screen trap

  18. Method of making a scintillator waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Bliss, Mary (West Richland, WA); Craig, Richard A. (West Richland, WA); Reeder, Paul L. (Richland, WA)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is an apparatus for detecting ionizing radiation, having: a waveguide having a first end and a second end, the waveguide formed of a scintillator material wherein the therapeutic ionizing radiation isotropically generates scintillation light signals within the waveguide. This apparatus provides a measure of radiation dose. The apparatus may be modified to permit making a measure of location of radiation dose. Specifically, the scintillation material is segmented into a plurality of segments; and a connecting cable for each of the plurality of segments is used for conducting scintillation signals to a scintillation detector.

  19. Extruded plastic scintillator for MINERvA

    SciTech Connect

    Pla-Dalmau, Anna; Bross, Alan D.; Rykalin, Victor V.; Wood, Brian M.; /NICADD, DeKalb

    2005-11-01

    An extrusion line has recently been installed at Fermilab in collaboration with NICADD (Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator and Detector Development). This new facility will serve to further develop and improve extruded plastic scintillator. Since polystyrene is widely used in the consumer industry, the logical path was to investigate the extrusion of commercial-grade polystyrene pellets with dopants to yield high quality plastic scintillator. The D0 and MINOS experiments are already using extruded scintillator strips in their detectors. A new experiment at Fermilab is pursuing the use of extruded plastic scintillator. A new plastic scintillator strip is being tested and its properties characterized. The initial results are presented here.

  20. Impact of equatorial ionospheric irregularities on GNSS receivers using real and synthetic scintillation signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghafoori, F.; Skone, S.

    2015-04-01

    The impact of L-band equatorial ionospheric scintillation on Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) receivers is investigated in this paper using both real and synthetic scintillation data. To this end, various low-latitude data sets, recorded during the most recent solar maximum, are exploited in post-processing to develop and verify realistic simulation tools and evaluate GNSS receiver performance. A scintillation simulation model is implemented based on the phase screen formulation of Dr. Charles Rino (1979, 1982, and 2011) which allows oblique signal propagation in an anisotropic propagation medium with multiple irregularity layers (or phase screens) for multiple GNSS frequencies. The observed real scintillation parameters are used to drive GNSS signal simulations. The subsequent simulated GNSS signal time series are verified through comparison with real data for different signal tracking states including the most severe and challenging tracking scenarios. Using both real and synthetic data sets, the impact of scintillation on observation quality and receiver performance is evaluated in terms of probability of loss of phase and frequency lock, as well as the correlation of disturbed L-band signals transmitted by GNSS satellites on the same transionsopheric path.

  1. Scintillators for positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, W.W.; Derenzo, S.E.

    1995-09-01

    Like most applications that utilize scintillators for gamma detection, Positron Emission Tomography (PET) desires materials with high light output, short decay time, and excellent stopping power that are also inexpensive, mechanically rugged, and chemically inert. Realizing that this ``ultimate`` scintillator may not exist, this paper evaluates the relative importance of these qualities and describes their impact on the imaging performance of PET. The most important PET scintillator quality is the ability to absorb 511 keV photons in a small volume, which affects the spatial resolution of the camera. The dominant factor is a short attenuation length ({le} 1.5 cm is required), although a high photoelectric fraction is also important (> 30% is desired). The next most important quality is a short decay time, which affects both the dead time and the coincidence timing resolution. Detection rates for single 511 keV photons can be extremely high, so decay times {le} 500 ns are essential to avoid dead time losses. In addition, positron annihilations are identified by time coincidence so {le}5 ns fwhm coincidence pair timing resolution is required to identify events with narrow coincidence windows, reducing contamination due to accidental coincidences. Current trends in PET cameras are toward septaless, ``fully-3D`` cameras, which have significantly higher count rates than conventional 2-D cameras and so place higher demands on scintillator decay time. Light output affects energy resolution, and thus the ability of the camera to identify and reject events where the initial 511 keV photon has undergone Compton scatter in the patient. The scatter to true event fraction is much higher in fully-3D cameras than in 2-D cameras, so future PET cameras would benefit from scintillators with a 511 keV energy resolution < 10--12% fwhm.

  2. Energy resolution of scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moszy?ski, M.; Syntfeld-Ka?uch, A.; Swiderski, L.; Grodzicka, M.; Iwanowska, J.; Sibczy?ski, P.; Szcz??niak, T.

    2016-01-01

    According to current knowledge, the non-proportionality of the light yield of scintillators appears to be a fundamental limitation of energy resolution. A good energy resolution is of great importance for most applications of scintillation detectors. Thus, its limitations are discussed below; which arise from the non-proportional response of scintillators to gamma rays and electrons, being of crucial importance to the intrinsic energy resolution of crystals. The important influence of Landau fluctuations and the scattering of secondary electrons (?-rays) on intrinsic resolution is pointed out here. The study on undoped NaI and CsI at liquid nitrogen temperature with a light readout by avalanche photodiodes strongly suggests that the non-proportionality of many crystals is not their intrinsic property and may be improved by selective co-doping. Finally, several observations that have been collected in the last 15 years on the influence of the slow components of light pulses on energy resolution suggest that more complex processes are taking place in the scintillators. This was observed with CsI(Tl), CsI(Na), ZnSe(Te), and undoped NaI at liquid nitrogen temperature and, finally, for NaI(Tl) at temperatures reduced below 0 °C. A common conclusion of these observations is that the highest energy resolution, and particularly intrinsic resolution measured with the scintillators, characterized by two or more components of the light pulse decay, is obtainable when the spectrometry equipment integrates the whole light of the components. In contrast, the slow components observed in many other crystals degrade the intrinsic resolution. In the limiting case, afterglow could also be considered as a very slow component that spoils the energy resolution. The aim of this work is to summarize all of the above observations by looking for their origin.

  3. ZOOMTEXT USER GUIDE ZoomText is a screen-magnification software program. The levels of magnification are adjustable from 2X to

    E-print Network

    Saldin, Dilano

    screen reader as well. ACTIVATE 1) Click on the start window icon in the toolbar at the bottom. HELP: Click on Help in the ZoomText toolbar. SPEECH: Turn Speech on or off, press (ALT) + (SHIFT) + (S) CONTROLS: Turn ZoomText off, press (ALT) + (DEL). Turn ZoomText on, press (ALT) + (INSERT). Bring up

  4. Graduate School of Science and Technology/GSST, Aarhus University, 09/01-2014 Quick guide to GSST screening grants and

    E-print Network

    screening grants and visiting grants General information Based on funding from Aarhus University Research University. The purpose of both types of grants is to strengthen the internationalisation of the PhD study and Technology, Aarhus University, can apply for these two types of grants. Both types of grants can only

  5. Thermal annealing behavior of ?-Al2O3 scintillation screens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lederer, S.; Akhmadaliev, S.; Forck, P.; Gütlich, E.; Lieberwirth, A.; Ensinger, W.

    2015-12-01

    Polycrystalline alumina samples (?-Al2O3, purity: 99.8%) were irradiated by 63Cu heavy ions (E = 0.5 MeV/u) at various fluences. After irradiation, absorption measurements were performed within the wavelength range from 200 to 1000 nm to evaluate color center evolution. Thermal annealing behavior of the created defects was investigated with respect to annealing temperature and duration. Complex color center formation processes depending on particle fluence and temperature could be observed. Calculated activation energies necessary for F- and F+-center migration are ?0.3 eV for temperatures ranging from RT to ?673 K.

  6. Imaging-Based Screening: Understanding the Controversies

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Diana L.; Pandharipande, Pari V.; Lee, Janie M.; Lehman, Constance D.; Lee, Christoph I.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The goals of this article are to provide an overview of controversial aspects of imaging-based screening and to elucidate potential risks that may offset anticipated benefits. Conclusion Current controversial topics associated with imaging-based screening include false-positive results, incidental findings, overdiagnosis, radiation risks, and costs. Alongside the benefits of screening, radiologists should be prepared to discuss these additional diagnostic consequences with providers and patients to better guide shared decision making regarding imaging-based screening. PMID:25341132

  7. Pixel-structured scintillators for digital x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Seung Man; Lim, Chang Hwy; Kim, Tae Woo; Kim, Ho Kyung

    2009-02-01

    We exploit the development of a pixel-structured scintillator that would match the readout pixel array, such as a photodiode array. This combination may become an indirect-conversion detector having high x-ray sensitivity without sacrificing the inherent resolving power defined by the pixel geometry of the photodiodes, because the scintillation material has a relatively high atomic number and density compared with the photoconductors, and the pixel-structured design may provide a band-limited modulation-transfer function (MTF) characteristic even with a thicker scintillator. For the realization of pixel-structured scintillators, two-dimensional (2D) array of pixel-structured wells with a depth of 100?m was prepared by using a deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) process on a silicon wafer. Then, Gd2O2S:Tb phosphor powders with organic binders were filled within the well array by using a sedimentation method. Three different pixel designs of 50, 100 and 200 ?m with a wall (or septum) thickness of 10 ?m were considered. Each sample size was 20 × 30 mm2 considering intra-oral imaging. The samples were coupled to the CMOS photodiode array with a pixel pitch of 48 ?m and the imaging performances were evaluated in terms of MTF, NPS (noise-power spectrum) and DQE (detective quantum efficiency) at intra-oral imaging conditions. From the measurement results, the sensitivities of the samples with 50, 100 and 200 ?m pitch designs were about 12, 25 and 41% of that of the reference commercial phosphor screen (MinR-2000). Hence the DQE performances at 0.2 lp/mm were about 3.7, 9.6, 22.7% of the reference screen. According to the Monte Carlo simulations, the lower sensitivity was due to the loss of optical photons in silicon walls. However, the MTF performance was mainly determined by the designed pixel apertures. If we make pixel-structured scintillators with a deeper depth and provide reflectance on walls, much enhanced DQE performance is expected.

  8. Evaluation of different scintillators for 1MV NDE x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zentai, George; Ganguly, Arundhuti; Visrshup, Gary

    2014-03-01

    X-ray radiography is an important and frequently used NDE method of testing metal structures, such as tube welding quality, cracks and voids in cast iron or other metals. It gives fast and visible answer for structural defects. The Varian high energy portal imagers on Clinacs used in cancer treatment were tested for this purpose. We compared the traditional Gadox (LANEX) screen with and without a 1mm Cu buildup plate as used clinically. We also tested different hybrid scintillators, which consisted of different phosphor layers deposited onto fiberoptic plates. The last screen tested was a 2cm thick fiberoptic plate which contained scintillating fibers. The sensitivity (ADU = number of digital counts per a given X-ray dose), the resolution (MTF - modulation transfer function) and the DQE (detective quantum efficiency) were compared, with a 1 MV source, for these X-ray conversion screens. We found that the additional 1mm Cu plate, which improves the absorption and the contrast at 6 or higher energy MeV imaging, does not improve the image quality at 1MV. Rather it attenuates the X-rays, resulting in lower sensitivity and a lower DQE(0) of 2.2% with the additional Cu plate compared to DQE(0) of ~4% without the Cu plate. The hybrid scintillators with evaporated phosphors on fiberoptic plates tested were too thin resulting in low sensitivity. The best results were obtained from the thick scintillating fiberoptic screens, which provided the best DQE and high resolution with the 1MV X-ray beam. Further optimization is planned by changing the thickness of the scintillating fiber optic plate.

  9. Adaptive triggering for scintillation signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesic, J.; Vencelj, M.; Strnisa, K.; Savran, D.

    2015-04-01

    Due to the stochastic nature of the pulse creation in a scintillation detector the output pulses are not all of the same shape but rather 'noised' with statistical fluctuations on the pulse tails, which may induce false triggers. The current state of the art in solving this kind of problems is either introducing a deadtime after each pulse which makes the detector inefficient at higher count rates or raising the trigger threshold above the fluctuactions level, which on the other side, lowers the dynamic range of the detector from the low energy side. In order to meet the ever growing demand for high precision/efficient experiments the solutions to these limitations are highly desirable. We propose a new method, the adaptive triggering for scintillation signals.

  10. Silicon photomultipliers for scintillating trackers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabaioli, S.; Berra, A.; Bolognini, D.; Bonvicini, V.; Bosisio, L.; Ciano, S.; Iugovaz, D.; Lietti, D.; Penzo, A.; Prest, M.; Rashevskaya, I.; Reia, S.; Stoppani, L.; Vallazza, E.

    2012-12-01

    In recent years, silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) have been proposed as a new kind of readout device for scintillating detectors in many experiments. A SiPM consists of a matrix of parallel-connected pixels, which are independent photon counters working in Geiger mode with very high gain (?106). This contribution presents the use of an array of eight SiPMs (manufactured by FBK-irst) for the readout of a scintillating bar tracker (a small size prototype of the Electron Muon Ranger detector for the MICE experiment). The performances of the SiPMs in terms of signal to noise ratio, efficiency and time resolution will be compared to the ones of a multi-anode photomultiplier tube (MAPMT) connected to the same bars. Both the SiPMs and the MAPMT are interfaced to a VME system through a 64 channel MAROC ASIC.

  11. Scintillation Monitoring Using Asymmetry Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaikh, Muhammad Mubasshir; Mahrous, Ayman; Abdallah, Amr; Notarpietro, Riccardo

    Variation in electron density can have significant effect on GNSS signals in terms of propagation delay. Ionospheric scintillation can be caused by rapid change of such delay, specifically, when they last for a longer period of time. Ionospheric irregularities that account for scintillation may vary significantly in spatial range and drift with the background plasma at speeds of 45 to 130 m/sec. These patchy irregularities may occur several times during night, e.g. in equatorial region, with the patches move through the ray paths of the GNSS satellite signals. These irregularities are often characterized as either ‘large scale’ (which can be as large as several hundred km in East-West direction and many times that in the North-South direction) or ‘small scale’ (which can be as small as 1m). These small scale irregularities are regarded as the main cause of scintillation [1,2]. In normal solar activity conditions, the mid-latitude ionosphere is not much disturbed. However, during severe magnetic storms, the aurora oval extends towards the equator and the equator anomaly region may stretched towards poles extending the scintillation phenomena more typically associated with those regions into mid-latitudes. In such stormy conditions, the predicted TEC may deviate largely from the true value of the TEC both at low and mid-latitudes due to which GNSS applications may be strongly degraded. This work is an attempt to analyze ionospheric scintillation (S4 index) using ionospheric asymmetry index [3]. The asymmetry index is based on trans-ionospheric propagation between GPS and LEO satellites in a radio occultation (RO) scenario, using background ionospheric data provided by MIDAS [4]. We attempted to simulate one of the recent geomagnetic storms (NOAA scale G4) occurred over low/mid-latitudes. The storm started on 26 September 2011 at UT 18:00 and lasted until early hours of 27 September 2011. The scintillation data for the storm was taken from an ionospheric station in Cairo, Egypt (lat= 29.8641 °, long= 31.3172 °). It was observed that the level of asymmetry was significantly increased during the main phase of the geomagnetic storm. This was due to the changes in ionization, which in turn produced large gradients along occulted ray path in the ionosphere. A very good correlation was found between the evaluated ionospheric asymmetry index and the S4 scintillation index. Additionally, the correlation between evaluated ionospheric asymmetry and errors related to the RO inversion products such as peak electron density (delta NmF2) and Vertical TEC (delta VTEC) estimates also showed promising results. This work is carried out under the framework of the TRANSMIT project (Training Research and Applications Network to Support the Mitigation of Ionospheric Threats - www.transmit-ionosphere.net). [1]Basu Sa. and Basu Su., (1981), ‘Equatorial Scintillation - A Review’, Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics, 43, p. 473. [2]Davies K., (1990), ‘Ionospheric Radio’, IEEE Electromagnetic Waves Series 31, Peter Peregrinus Ltd. [3]Spencer, P., Mitchell, C.N., (2007) ‘Imaging of fast moving electron-density structures in the polar cap’, Annals of Geophysics, vol. 50, no. 3, pp. 427-434. [4]Shaikh, M.M., Notarpietro, R., Nava, B., (2013) ‘The Impact of Spherical Symmetry Assumption on Radio Occultation Data Inversion in the Ionosphere: An Assessment Study’, Advances in Space Research, doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.asr.2013.10.025.

  12. Laue Diffraction Using Scintillator Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iles, Gail N.; Peetermans, Steven; Schorr, Susan; Lehmann, Eberhard

    The Fast Acquisition Laue Camera for Neutrons (FALCON) is a thermal neutron Laue diffractometer at HZB in Berlin. The instrument comprises two scintillator plate detectors coupled to four iCCD cameras each. One detector is placed in the backscattering position, enabling neutrons to pass through the centre of the detector box. The second detector is free to be placed either in the direct transmission position, or rotated to positions around the sample. The image-intensified CCDs, supplied by Photonic Science Ltd as components of the detector units, are capable of obtaining 20-bit digitization Laue images in under ten seconds. Whilst our instrument will be used as a diffractometer primarily for crystal structure determination, the configuration of the detectors is similar to ICON at PSI in Switzerland, especially in their 'double detector set-up'. In 2015 FALCON enters the commissioning phase whereby one of our activities will be to calibrate the detector units using CONRAD, the cold neutron imaging instrument of HZB. CONRAD will be used to characterise those factors which affect the total efficiency of the detectors i.e. cameras, lenses, CCD chips and the scintillators themselves e.g. homogeneity of the scintillator plate thickness.

  13. Scintillation Forecasting Using NPOESS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, B.; Retterer, J.; Demajistre, R.; de La Beaujardiere, O.; Scro, K.

    2005-12-01

    We have conducted a theoretical study of the use of NPOESS data for the forecasting of equatorial radio scintillation using knowledge of the equatorial Appleton anomaly, e.g., the peak-to-valley ratio of TEC (Total Electron Content) between the anomaly crests and the magnetic equator. The peak-to-valley ratio can be obtained from the UV (ultraviolet) imagery of the anomaly region that will be provided by the NPOESS sensors. The post-sunset enhancement of the upward drift velocity of the equatorial plasma has been shown, both theoretically and observationally, to be an important determinant of both the onset of scintillation and the strength of the anomaly. The technical approach is to run PBMOD, the AFRL low-latitude ionosphere model, with a range of post-sunset vertical drift velocities to determine the quantitative relationship between the peak-to-valley ratio and the maximum value of the pot-sunset upward drift velocity of equatorial plasma. Once the relationship is validated, it will be used to estimate the maximum value of the drift velocity from the peak-to-valley ratio, which is derived from the UV imagery data provided by NPOESS-like sensor, such as GUVI on TIMED satellite. The drift velocity will then be used in PBMOD to simulate the formation and evolution of equatorial plasma `bubbles' and calculate the distribution of the amplitude scintillation index S4. Results of the study will be discussed.

  14. The gas scintillation proportional counter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sims, M. R.; Peacock, A.; Taylor, B. G.

    1984-03-01

    The gas scintillation proportional counter has seen rapid development in recent years as a broad-band spectrometer for X-ray astronomy. It may be used in the conjunction with grazing incidence optics or coded aperture masks to produce spectral images of the X-ray sky. Its performance characteristics such as spatial resolution, energy resolution and background rejection efficiency will be described. Reference will be made in large part to work conducted over the last few years at SSD/ESTEC and to work undertaken by the Columbia and Los Alamos groups and at MSSL. The gas scintillator may be coupled to a variety of readout systems including an array of photomultipliers, a microchannel plate or a photoionisation detector. Their relative merits will be reviewed. At high pressures (˜ 3-5 atm) the imaging gas scintillator can be used in nuclear medicine, where its spatial resolution and energy resolution can provide higher resolution images with better contrast than the standard gamma camera.

  15. Secondary scintillation yield in pure xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro, C. M. B.; Fernandes, L. M. P.; Lopes, J. A. M.; Coelho, L. C. C.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.; dos Santos, J. M. F.; Giboni, K.; Aprile, E.

    2007-05-01

    The xenon secondary scintillation yield was studied as a function of the electric field in the scintillation region, in a gas proportional scintillation counter operated at room temperature. A large area avalanche photodiode was used for the readout of the VUV secondary scintillation produced in the gas, together with the 5.9 keV x-rays directly absorbed in the photodiode. The latter was used as a reference for the determination of the number of charge carriers produced by the scintillation pulse and, thus, the number of VUV photons impinging the photodiode. A value of 140 photons/kV was obtained for the scintillation amplification parameter. The attained results are in good agreement with those predicted, for room temperature, by Monte Carlo simulation and Boltzmann calculations, as well as with those obtained for saturated xenon vapour, at cryogenic temperatures, and are about a factor of two higher than former results measured at room temperature.

  16. Recording of relativistic particles in thin scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Tolstukhin, I A.; Somov, Alexander S.; Somov, S. V.; Bolozdynya, A. I.

    2014-11-01

    Results of investigating an assembly of thin scintillators and silicon photomultipliers for registering relativistic particles with the minimum ionization are presented. A high efficiency of registering relativistic particles using an Ej-212 plastic scintillator, BSF-91A wavelength-shifting fiber (Saint-Gobain), and a silicon photomultiplier (Hamamtsu) is shown. The measurement results are used for creating a scintillation hodoscope of the magnetic spectrometer for registering ? quanta in the GlueX experiment.

  17. 4/6-GHz ionospheric scintillation measurements during the peak of sunspot cycle 21

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, D. J.; Pontes, M. S.

    1981-11-01

    Analyses of power spectral density confirm an f to the -3 dependence for weak scintillations, which, it is noted, can be explained by the conventional weak scattering theory for a thick screen with a power law electron density fluctuation spectrum of p equals 4. Data gathered from 1977 to 1980 at the Hong Kong Earth Station provide further insight into 4- and 6-GHz scintillations during maximum solar activity. Such characteristics as occurrence frequencies, durations, global scales, and spectral roll-off slopes are unique in that they had not been observed in previous years. Peak-to-peak fluctuations of up to 14-dB magnitude are observed for which the f to the -3 power spectrum dependence is no longer valid. In terms of cumulative statistics, a model of scintillation increase as a function of solar activities is developed for engineering applications.

  18. Waveshifters and Scintillators for Ionizing Radiation Detection

    SciTech Connect

    B.Baumgaugh; J.Bishop; D.Karmgard; J.Marchant; M.McKenna; R.Ruchti; M.Vigneault; L.Hernandez; C.Hurlbut

    2007-12-11

    Scintillation and waveshifter materials have been developed for the detection of ionizing radiation in an STTR program between Ludlum Measurements, Inc. and the University of Notre Dame. Several new waveshifter materials have been developed which are comparable in efficiency and faster in fluorescence decay than the standard material Y11 (K27) used in particle physics for several decades. Additionally, new scintillation materials useful for fiber tracking have been developed which have been compared to 3HF. Lastly, work was done on developing liquid scintillators and paint-on scintillators and waveshifters for high radiation environments.

  19. Divalent fluoride doped cerium fluoride scintillator

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F. (630 Sylvan Pl., Batavia, IL 60510); Sparrow, Robert W. (28 Woodlawn Dr., Sturbridge, MA 01566)

    1991-01-01

    The use of divalent fluoride dopants in scintillator materials comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. The preferred divalent fluoride dopants are calcium fluoride, strontium fluoride, and barium fluoride. The preferred amount of divalent fluoride dopant is less than about two percent by weight of the total scintillator. Cerium fluoride scintillator crystals grown with the addition of a divalent fluoride have exhibited better transmissions and higher light outputs than crystals grown without the addition of such dopants. These scintillators are useful in radiation detection and monitoring applications, and are particularly well suited for high-rate applications such as positron emission tomography (PET).

  20. Radio wave scintillations at equatorial regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poularikas, A. D.

    1972-01-01

    Radio waves, passing through the atmosphere, experience amplitude and phase fluctuations know as scintillations. A characterization of equatorial scintillation, which has resulted from studies of data recorded primarily in South America and equatorial Africa, is presented. Equatorial scintillation phenomena are complex because they appear to vary with time of day (pre-and postmidnight), season (equinoxes), and magnetic activity. A wider and more systematic geographical coverage is needed for both scientific and engineering purposes; therefore, it is recommended that more observations should be made at earth stations (at low-geomagnetic latitudes) to record equatorial scintillation phenomena.

  1. Timing resolution of the FINUDA scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalena, B.; D'Erasmo, G.; Di Santo, D.; Fiore, E. M.; Palomba, M.; Simonetti, G.; Andronenkov, A.; Pantaleo, A.; Paticchio, V.; Faso, D.

    2009-05-01

    Experimental characterizations of scintillation detectors timing performance of the internal (TOFINO) and external (TOFONE) scintillator barrels used in FINUDA experiment are presented. The measurements take advantage of detecting synchronous particle pairs produced in the reactions, namely e+e- pairs from Bhabha collisions between the primary beams and K+K- pairs from ?(1020) decay. The method used for synchronizing the multiple detectors constituting the scintillator barrels is also described as being carried out in two steps: a rough one online by the injection of laser light pulses flashing the scintillators all together, and a fine one offline exploiting the timing features of e+e- and K+K- pairs.

  2. Airport Screening

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 2011 Photo courtesy of Dan Paluska/Flickr Denver Airport Security Screening Introduction With air travel regaining popularity and increased secu- rity measures, airport security screening has become an area of interest for ...

  3. Neuroblastoma Screening

    MedlinePLUS

    ... called diagnostic tests . General Information About Neuroblastoma Cancer Key Points Neuroblastoma is a disease in which malignant ( ... factors for neuroblastoma are not known. Neuroblastoma Screening Key Points Tests are used to screen for different ...

  4. MRSA Screening

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Was this page helpful? Formal name: Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus Screening Related tests: Wound Culture At a ... know? How is it used? A methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) screen is a test that looks ...

  5. Health Screening

    MedlinePLUS

    Screenings are tests that look for diseases before you have symptoms. Screening tests can find diseases early, when they're easier ... Overweight and obesity Prostate cancer in men Which tests you need depends on your age, your sex, ...

  6. Formula optimization of the Jiashitang scar removal ointment and antiinflammatory compounds screening by NF-?B bioactivity-guided dual-luciferase reporter assay system.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jie; Tao, Jin; Zhang, Nannan; Liu, Yanjie; Jiang, Min; Hou, Yuanyuan; Wang, Qian; Bai, Gang

    2015-02-01

    Inflammation plays a role in scar formation; therefore, decreasing inflammation benefits scar removal. Jiashitang scar removal ointment (JST) is a commercially available traditional Chinese medicinal formulation. It is composed of extracts from Carthamus tinctorius L. (Car), Rheum officinale Baill. (Rhe), Salvia miltiorrhiza Beg. (Sal), and Panax notoginseng (Burk.) F.?H. Chen (Pan), which are all herbs with potent antiinflammatory activities. Our aims are to optimize the formula of JST and to elucidate its antiinflammatory active components. Response surface methodology was applied to optimize proportions of the four herb extracts. The antiinflammatory effects were evaluated using in vitro and in vivo models. To screen for active components in this formula, a bioactivity-based ultra-performance liquid chromatography/quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis was performed. After optimization, the antiinflammatory effects of the new formula were significantly superior to the original one. Screening identified 13 active ingredients: a series of saffiomin, emodin, salvianolic acid, tanshinone, and triterpenoid saponin derivatives. These active ingredients were predicted to exert nuclear factor-?B inhibiting effects through MAPK, PI3K/AKT, and NIK-IKK pathways. In conclusion, the original formula was successfully optimized with more potent antiinflammatory activity. These methods can be applied to researches of other formulas. PMID:25363818

  7. Chemical compatibility screening test results

    SciTech Connect

    Nigrey, P.J.; Dickens, T.G.

    1997-12-01

    A program for evaluating packaging components that may be used in transporting mixed-waste forms has been developed and the first phase has been completed. This effort involved the screening of ten plastic materials in four simulant mixed-waste types. These plastics were butadiene-acrylonitrile copolymer rubber, cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE), epichlorohydrin rubber, ethylene-propylene rubber (EPDM), fluorocarbon (Viton or Kel-F), polytetrafluoroethylene, high-density polyethylene (HDPE), isobutylene-isoprene copolymer rubber (butyl), polypropylene, and styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR). The selected simulant mixed wastes were (1) an aqueous alkaline mixture of sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite; (2) a chlorinated hydrocarbon mixture; (3) a simulant liquid scintillation fluid; and (4) a mixture of ketones. The testing protocol involved exposing the respective materials to 286,000 rads of gamma radiation followed by 14-day exposures to the waste types at 60{degrees}C. The seal materials were tested using vapor transport rate (VTR) measurements while the liner materials were tested using specific gravity as a metric. For these tests, a screening criterion of 0.9 g/hr/m{sup 2} for VTR and a specific gravity change of 10% was used. Based on this work, it was concluded that while all seal materials passed exposure to the aqueous simulant mixed waste, EPDM and SBR had the lowest VTRs. In the chlorinated hydrocarbon simulant mixed waste, only Viton passed the screening tests. In both the simulant scintillation fluid mixed waste and the ketone mixture simulant mixed waste, none of the seal materials met the screening criteria. For specific gravity testing of liner materials, the data showed that while all materials with the exception of polypropylene passed the screening criteria, Kel-F, HDPE, and XLPE offered the greatest resistance to the combination of radiation and chemicals.

  8. Scintillation properties of lead sulfate

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, W.W.; Derenzo, S.E. ); Shlichta, P.J. )

    1991-11-01

    We report on the scintillation properties of lead sulfate (PbSO{sub 4}), a scintillator that show promise as a high energy photon detector. It physical properties are well suited for gamma detection, as its has a density of 6.4 gm/cm{sup 3}, a 1/e attenuation length for 511 keV photons of 1.2 cm, is not affected by air or moisture, and is cut and polished easily. In 99.998% pure PbSO{sub 4} crystals at room temperature excited by 511 keV annihilation photons, the fluorescence decay lifetime contains significant fast components having 1.8 ns (5%) and 19 ns (36%) decay times, but with longer components having 95 ns (36%) and 425 ns (23%) decays times. The peak emission wavelength is 335 nm, which is transmitted by borosilicate glass windowed photomultiplier tubes. The total scintillation light output increases with decreasing temperature fro 3,200 photons/MeV at +45{degrees}C to 4, 900 photons/MeV at room temperature (+25{degrees}C) and 68,500 photons/MeV at {minus}145{degrees}C. In an imperfect, 3 mm cube of a naturally occurring mineral form of PbSO{sub 4} (anglesite) at room temperature, a 511 keV photopeak is seen with a total light output of 60% that BGO. There are significant sample to sample variations of the light output among anglesite samples, so the light output of lead sulfate may improve when large synthetic crystals become available. 10 refs.

  9. Optimizing light collection from thin scintillators used in a beta-ray camera for surgical use

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, C.S.; MacDonald, L.R.; Tornai, M.P.; Hoffman, E.J.; Park, J.

    1996-06-01

    The authors are developing a 1--2 cm{sup 2} area camera for imaging the distribution of beta-emitting radiopharmaceuticals at the surface of tissue exposed during surgery. The front end consists of a very thin continuous or segmented scintillator sensitive to betas (positrons or electrons) of a few hundred keV, yet insensitive to gamma rays. The light from the scintillator is piped through clear fibers to the photon detector (PD). This approach requires that a sufficient number of scintillation photons be transported from the scintillator, through the fibers to the PD. The scintillator, reflector, surface treatments, geometry, fiber light guides, and optical couplings must be optimized. The authors report here on efforts made to optimize the light collection from <3 mm thick plastic and CaF{sub 2}(Eu) disk coupled to a 5 cm long bundle of clear optical fibers, on average, {approximately}250 photoelectrons are produced at a PMT photocathode for a {sup 204}Tl beta flood source (E{sub max} = 763 keV). This corresponds to a sufficient number of photoelectrons for <1 mm resolution imaging capabilities for the proposed camera.

  10. Photodetectors for Scintillator Proportionality Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, William W.; Choong, Woon-Seng; Hull, Giulia; Payne, Steve; Cherepy, Nerine; Valentine, J.D.

    2010-10-18

    We evaluate photodetectors for use in a Compton Coincidence apparatus designed for measuring scintillator proportionality. There are many requirements placed on the photodetector in these systems, including active area, linearity, and the ability to accurately measure low light levels (which implies high quantum efficiency and high signal-to-noise ratio). Through a combination of measurement and Monte Carlo simulation, we evaluate a number of potential photodetectors, especially photomultiplier tubes and hybrid photodetectors. Of these, we find that the most promising devices available are photomultiplier tubes with high ({approx}50%) quantum efficiency, although hybrid photodetectors with high quantum efficiency would be preferable.

  11. OVERCOMING IONOSPHERIC SCINTILLATION FOR WORLDWIDE GPS AVIATION

    E-print Network

    Stanford University

    OVERCOMING IONOSPHERIC SCINTILLATION FOR WORLDWIDE GPS AVIATION A DISSERTATION SUBMITTED decades, its impact on GPS aviation has not been well understood. As a result, the current GPS aviation to mitigate the impact of scintillation. Although current aviation receivers do not protect against

  12. Epoxy resins produce improved plastic scintillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markley, F. W.

    1967-01-01

    Plastic scintillator produced by the substitution of epoxy resins for the commonly used polystyrene is easy to cast, stable at room temperature, and has the desirable properties of a thermoset or cross-linked system. Such scintillators can be immersed directly in strong solvents, an advantage in many chemical and biological experiments.

  13. Gravitational wave scintillation by a stellar cluster

    E-print Network

    G. Congedo; F. De Paolis; P. Longo; A. A. Nucita; D. Vetrugno

    2006-10-27

    The diffraction effects on gravitational waves propagating through a stellar cluster are analyzed in the relevant approximation of Fresnel diffraction limit. We find that a gravitational wave scintillation effect - similar to the radio source scintillation effect - comes out naturally, implying that the gravitational wave intensity changes in a characteristic way as the observer moves.

  14. Binderless composite scintillator for neutron detection

    DOEpatents

    Hodges, Jason P [Knoxville, TN; Crow, Jr; Lowell, M [Oak Ridge, TN; Cooper, Ronald G [Oak Ridge, TN

    2009-03-10

    Composite scintillator material consisting of a binderless sintered mixture of a Lithium (Li) compound containing .sup.6Li as the neutron converter and Y.sub.2SiO.sub.5:Ce as the scintillation phosphor, and the use of this material as a method for neutron detection. Other embodiments of the invention include various other Li compounds.

  15. Scintillator handbook with emphasis on cesium iodide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tidd, J. L.; Dabbs, J. R.; Levine, N.

    1973-01-01

    This report provides a background of reasonable depth and reference material on scintillators in general. Particular attention is paid to the cesium iodide scintillators as used in the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO) experiments. It is intended especially for use by persons such as laboratory test personnel who need to obtain a working knowledge of these materials and their characteristics in a short time.

  16. Performance of scintillation materials at cryogenic temperatures

    E-print Network

    V. B. Mikhailik; H. Kraus

    2010-01-29

    An increasing number of applications of scintillators at low temperatures, particularly in cryogenic experiments searching for rare events, has motivated the investigation of scintillation properties of materials over a wide temperature range. This paper provides an overview of the latest results on the study of luminescence, absorption and scintillation properties of materials selected for rare event searches so far. These include CaWO4, ZnWO4, CdWO4, MgWO4, CaMoO4, CdMoO4, Bi4Ge3O12, CaF2, MgF2, ZnSe and AL2O3-Ti. We discuss the progress achieved in research and development of these scintillators, both in material preparation and in the understanding of scintillation mechanisms, as well as the underlying physics. To understand the origin of the performance limitation of self-activated scintillators we employed a semi-empirical model of conversion of high energy radiation into light and made appropriate provision for effects of temperature and energy transfer. We conclude that the low-temperature value of the light yield of some modern scintillators, namely CaWO4, CdWO4 and Bi4Ge3O12, is close to the theoretical limit. Finally, we discuss the advantages and limitations of different materials with emphasis on their application as cryogenic phonon-scintillation detectors (CPSD) in rare event search experiments.

  17. Extruded scintillator for the calorimetry applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dyshkant, A.; Rykalin, V.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Beznosko, D.; /SUNY, Stony Brook

    2006-08-01

    An extrusion line has been installed and successfully operated at FNAL (Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory) in collaboration with NICADD (Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator and Detector Development). This new Facility will serve to further develop and improve extruded plastic scintillator. Recently progress has been made in producing co-extruded plastic scintillator, thus increasing the potential HEP applications of this Facility. The current R&D work with extruded and co-extruded plastic scintillator for a potential ALICE upgrade, the ILC calorimetry program and the MINERvA experiment show the attractiveness of the chosen strategy for future experiments and calorimetry. We extensively discuss extruded and co-extruded plastic scintillator in calorimetry in synergy with new Solid State Photomultipliers. The characteristics of extruded and co-extruded plastic scintillator will be presented here as well as results with non-traditional photo read-out.

  18. Genetic Screening

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Wylie; Tarini, Beth; Press, Nancy A.; Evans, James P.

    2011-01-01

    Current approaches to genetic screening include newborn screening to identify infants who would benefit from early treatment, reproductive genetic screening to assist reproductive decision making, and family history assessment to identify individuals who would benefit from additional prevention measures. Although the traditional goal of screening is to identify early disease or risk in order to implement preventive therapy, genetic screening has always included an atypical element—information relevant to reproductive decisions. New technologies offer increasingly comprehensive identification of genetic conditions and susceptibilities. Tests based on these technologies are generating a different approach to screening that seeks to inform individuals about all of their genetic traits and susceptibilities for purposes that incorporate rapid diagnosis, family planning, and expediting of research, as well as the traditional screening goal of improving prevention. Use of these tests in population screening will increase the challenges already encountered in genetic screening programs, including false-positive and ambiguous test results, overdiagnosis, and incidental findings. Whether this approach is desirable requires further empiric research, but it also requires careful deliberation on the part of all concerned, including genomic researchers, clinicians, public health officials, health care payers, and especially those who will be the recipients of this novel screening approach. PMID:21709145

  19. Separation and purification of ?-glucosidase inhibitors from Polygonatum odoratum by stepwise high-speed counter-current chromatography combined with Sephadex LH-20 chromatography target-guided by ultrafiltration-HPLC screening.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoling; Liang, Junsheng; Zhang, Yi; Zhao, Huading; Guo, Ying; Shi, Shuyun

    2015-03-15

    Although Polygonatum odoratum has been widely used as medicinal plant and food supplement for treating diabetes, little is known regarding its bioactive components. In this study, ultrafiltration-HPLC based ligand screening was developed to screen ?-glucosidase inhibitors from P. odoratum for the first time. Then bioactive components were target-guided separated by combining stepwise high-speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC) using petroleum ether-ethyl acetate-methanol-water (1:4:0.8:4.2, v/v/v/v), (1:4:1.8:3.2, v/v/v/v) and (1:4:2.3:2.7, v/v/v/v) as solvent systems with Sephadex LH-20 chromatography eluted by MeCN-MeOH (1:1, v/v). Five phenethyl cinnamides, N-cis-feruloyloctopamine (1); N-trans-p-coumaroyloctopamine (2), N-trans-feruloyloctopamine (3), N-trans-p-coumaroyltyramine (4) and N-trans-feruloyltyramine (5), and four homoisoflavanones, (3R)-5,7-dihydroxyl-3-(2',4'-dihydroxylbenzyl)-chroman-4-one (6), (3R)-5,7-dihydroxyl-6-methyl-3-(4'-hydroxylbenzyl)-chroman-4-one (7), (3R)-5,7-dihydroxyl-6-methyl-8-methoxyl-3-(4'-hydroxylbenzyl)-chroman-4-one (8); and (3R)-5,7-dihydroxyl-6,8-dimethyl-3-(4'-hydroxylbenzyl)-chroman-4-one) (9), with purity over 98.5% were purified, and their structures were identified by UV, MS, and (1)H NMR. Notably, compounds 2 and 4 were first reported in genus Polygonatum, while compound 1 was first obtained from family Liliaceae. In addition, ?-glucosidase inhibitory activities of compounds 1-9 were evaluated, and compounds 2 and 4 exhibited stronger ?-glucosidase inhibitory activity with IC50 values of 2.3 and 2.7?M. The results suggested the potential medicinal use of P. odoratum, and the technology could be widely applied for rapid screening and preparative separation of a group of bioactive compounds from complex matrix. PMID:25682336

  20. Measurement of radiation damage of water-based liquid scintillator and liquid scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Bignell, L. J.; Diwan, M. V.; Hans, S.; Jaffe, D. E.; Rosero, R.; Vigdor, S.; Viren, B.; Worcester, E.; Yeh, M.; Zhang, C.

    2015-10-19

    Liquid scintillating phantoms have been proposed as a means to perform real-time 3D dosimetry for proton therapy treatment plan verification. We have studied what effect radiation damage to the scintillator will have upon this application. We have performed measurements of the degradation of the light yield and optical attenuation length of liquid scintillator and water-based liquid scintillator after irradiation by 201 MeV proton beams that deposited doses of approximately 52 Gy, 300 Gy, and 800 Gy in the scintillator. Liquid scintillator and water-based liquid scintillator (composed of 5% scintillating phase) exhibit light yield reductions of 1.74 ± 0.55 % and 1.31 ± 0.59 % after ? 800 Gy of proton dose, respectively. Some increased optical attenuation was observed in the irradiated samples, the measured reduction to the light yield is also due to damage to the scintillation light production. Based on our results and conservative estimates of the expected dose in a clinical context, a scintillating phantom used for proton therapy treatment plan verification would exhibit a systematic light yield reduction of approximately 0.1% after a year of operation.

  1. Measurement of radiation damage of water-based liquid scintillator and liquid scintillator

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bignell, L. J.; Diwan, M. V.; Hans, S.; Jaffe, D. E.; Rosero, R.; Vigdor, S.; Viren, B.; Worcester, E.; Yeh, M.; Zhang, C.

    2015-10-19

    Liquid scintillating phantoms have been proposed as a means to perform real-time 3D dosimetry for proton therapy treatment plan verification. We have studied what effect radiation damage to the scintillator will have upon this application. We have performed measurements of the degradation of the light yield and optical attenuation length of liquid scintillator and water-based liquid scintillator after irradiation by 201 MeV proton beams that deposited doses of approximately 52 Gy, 300 Gy, and 800 Gy in the scintillator. Liquid scintillator and water-based liquid scintillator (composed of 5% scintillating phase) exhibit light yield reductions of 1.74 ± 0.55 % andmore »1.31 ± 0.59 % after ? 800 Gy of proton dose, respectively. Some increased optical attenuation was observed in the irradiated samples, the measured reduction to the light yield is also due to damage to the scintillation light production. Based on our results and conservative estimates of the expected dose in a clinical context, a scintillating phantom used for proton therapy treatment plan verification would exhibit a systematic light yield reduction of approximately 0.1% after a year of operation.« less

  2. Measurement of radiation damage of water-based liquid scintillator and liquid scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bignell, L. J.; Diwan, M. V.; Hans, S.; Jaffe, D. E.; Rosero, R.; Vigdor, S.; Viren, B.; Worcester, E.; Yeh, M.; Zhang, C.

    2015-10-01

    Liquid scintillating phantoms have been proposed as a means to perform real-time 3D dosimetry for proton therapy treatment plan verification. We have studied what effect radiation damage to the scintillator will have upon this application. We have performed measurements of the degradation of the light yield and optical attenuation length of liquid scintillator and water-based liquid scintillator after irradiation by 201 MeV proton beams that deposited doses of approximately 52 Gy, 300 Gy, and 800 Gy in the scintillator. Liquid scintillator and water-based liquid scintillator (composed of 5% scintillating phase) exhibit light yield reductions of 1.74 ± 0.55 % and 1.31 ± 0.59 % after 0? 80 Gy of proton dose, respectively. Whilst some increased optical attenuation was observed in the irradiated samples, the measured reduction to the light yield is also due to damage to the scintillation light production. Based on our results and conservative estimates of the expected dose in a clinical context, a scintillating phantom used for proton therapy treatment plan verification would exhibit a systematic light yield reduction of approximately 0.1% after a year of operation.

  3. Using handheld plastic scintillator detectors to triage individuals exposed to a radiological dispersal device

    SciTech Connect

    Manger, Ryan P; Hertel, Nolan; Burgett, E.; Ansari, A.

    2011-01-01

    After a radiological dispersal device (RDD) event, people could become internally contaminated by inhaling dispersed radioactive particles. A rapid method to screen individuals who are internally contaminated is desirable. Such initial screening can help in prompt identification of those who are highly contaminated and in prioritizing individuals for further and more definitive evaluation such as laboratory testing. The use of handheld plastic scintillators to rapidly screen those exposed to an RDD with gamma-emitting radionuclides was investigated in this study. The Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code was used to model two commercially available plastic scintillation detectors in conjunction with anthropomorphic phantom models to determine the detector response to inhaled radionuclides. Biokinetic models were used to simulate an inhaled radionuclide and its progression through the anthropomorphic phantoms up to 30 d after intake. The objective of the study was to see if internal contamination levels equivalent to 250 mSv committed effective dose equivalent could be detected using these instruments. Five radionuclides were examined: {sup 60}Co, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 192}Ir, {sup 131}I and {sup 241}Am. The results demonstrate that all of the radionuclides except {sup 241}Am could be detected when placing either one of the two plastic scintillator detector systems on the posterior right torso of the contaminated individuals.

  4. Bone Density Screening and Re-screening in Postmenopausal Women and Older Men.

    PubMed

    Gourlay, Margaret L; Overman, Robert A; Ensrud, Kristine E

    2015-12-01

    Clinical practice guidelines universally recommend bone mineral density (BMD) screening to identify osteoporosis in women aged 65 years and older. Risk assessment is recommended to guide BMD screening in postmenopausal women under age 65. Insufficient data are available to inform standard ages to start and stop BMD screening in postmenopausal women. Based on longitudinal studies of incident osteoporosis and fracture in postmenopausal women, an initial BMD test should be ordered for all women aged 65, and the frequency of re-screening should be based on age and BMD T score (more frequent testing for older age and lower T score). Although clinical practice guidelines recommend BMD screening according to risk factors for fracture in postmenopausal women under age 65, no standard approach to risk assessment exists. Minimal evidence is available to guide osteoporosis screening in men, but some experts recommend initiation of BMD screening in men at age 70. PMID:26408154

  5. A compact, in vivo screen of all 6-mers reveals drivers of tissue-specific expression and guides synthetic regulatory element design

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Large-scale annotation efforts have improved our ability to coarsely predict regulatory elements throughout vertebrate genomes. However, it is unclear how complex spatiotemporal patterns of gene expression driven by these elements emerge from the activity of short, transcription factor binding sequences. Results We describe a comprehensive promoter extension assay in which the regulatory potential of all 6 base-pair (bp) sequences was tested in the context of a minimal promoter. To enable this large-scale screen, we developed algorithms that use a reverse-complement aware decomposition of the de Bruijn graph to design a library of DNA oligomers incorporating every 6-bp sequence exactly once. Our library multiplexes all 4,096 unique 6-mers into 184 double-stranded 15-bp oligomers, which is sufficiently compact for in vivo testing. We injected each multiplexed construct into zebrafish embryos and scored GFP expression in 15 tissues at two developmental time points. Twenty-seven constructs produced consistent expression patterns, with the majority doing so in only one tissue. Functional sequences are enriched near biologically relevant genes, match motifs for developmental transcription factors, and are required for enhancer activity. By concatenating tissue-specific functional sequences, we generated completely synthetic enhancers for the notochord, epidermis, spinal cord, forebrain and otic lateral line, and show that short regulatory sequences do not always function modularly. Conclusions This work introduces a unique in vivo catalog of short, functional regulatory sequences and demonstrates several important principles of regulatory element organization. Furthermore, we provide resources for designing compact, reverse-complement aware k-mer libraries. PMID:23867016

  6. Characterization of indirect X-ray imaging detector based on nanocrystalline gadolinium oxide scintillators for high-resolution imaging application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Chang-Woo; Kyung Cha, Bo; Jeon, Sungchae; Kyung Kim, Ryun; Huh, Young

    2013-01-01

    Nanocrystalline Gd2O3:Eu scintillating powders were successfully synthesized through a co-precipitation process for X-ray imaging detector applications. In this work, as-synthesized sample was further calcinated at different temperature, time with 1-10 h and doped-Eu3+ concentration with 1-10 mol% in the electrical furnace. The characterization such as the crystal structures and microstructure of Gd2O3:Eu scintillator were measured by XRD and SEM experiment. The phase transition from cubic to monoclinic structure was observed at 1300 °C calcination temperature. Dominant emission peak of sample with cubic structure was appeared at 611 nm under 266 nm UV light excitation. After scintillation properties of synthesized Gd2O3:Eu scintillator were investigated, Gd2O3:Eu scintillating films with different thickness was fabricated onto glass substrate by a screen printing method. And then X-ray imaging performance in terms of the light response to X-ray exposure dose, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spatial resolution were measured by combining the fabricated Gd2O3:Eu screen films with a lens-coupled CCD imaging detector under radiographic system conditions.

  7. Measurement of imaging properties of scintillating fiber optic plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zentai, George; Ganguly, Arundhuti; Star-Lack, Josh; Virshup, Gary; Hirsh, Hayley; Shedlock, Daniel; Humber, David

    2014-03-01

    Scintillating Fiber Optic Plates (SFOP) or Fiber Optic Scintillator (FOS) made with scintillating fiber-glass, were investigated for x-ray imaging. Two different samples (T x W x L = 2cm x 5cm x 5cm) were used; Sample A: 10?m fibers, Sample B: 50?m fibers both with statistically randomized light absorbing fibers placed in the matrix. A customized holder was used to place the samples in close contact with photodiodes in an amorphous silicon flat panel detector (AS1000, Varian), typically used for portal imaging. The detector has a 392?m pixel pitch and in the standard configuration uses a gadolinium oxy-sulphide (GOS) screen behind a copper plate. X-ray measurements were performed at 120kV (RQA 9 spectrum), 1MeV (5mm Al filtration) and 6MeV (Flattening Filter Free) for Sample A and the latter 2 spectra for Sample B. A machined edge was used for MTF measurements. The measurements showed the MTF degraded with increased X-ray energies because of the increase in Compton scattering. However, at the Nyquist frequency of 1.3lp/mm, the MTF is still high (FOS value vs. Cu+GOS): (a) 37% and 21% at 120kVp for the 10?m FOS and the Cu+GOS arrays, (b) 31%, 20% and 20% at 1MeV and (c) 17%, 11% and 14% at 6MeV for the 10?m FOS, 50?m FOS and the Cu+GOS arrays. The DQE(0) value comparison were (a) at 120kV ~24% and ~13 % for the 10?m FOS and the Cu+GOS arrays (b) at 1MV 10%, 10% and 7% and (c) at 6MV 12%, ~19% and 1.6% for the 10?m FOS , 50?m FOS and Cu+GOS arrays.

  8. Secondary scintillation yield in pure argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro, C. M. B.; Lopes, J. A. M.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.; dos Santos, J. M. F.

    2008-10-01

    The secondary scintillation yield is of great importance for simulating double phase detectors, which are used in several of the ongoing Dark Matter search experiments, as well as in the future large-scale particle detectors proposed in Europe as the next generation underground observatories. The argon secondary scintillation yield is studied, at room temperature, as a function of electric field in the gas scintillation gap. A Large Area Avalanche Photodiode (LAAPD) collects the VUV secondary scintillation produced in the gas, as well as the 5.9 keV x-rays directly absorbed in the photodiode. The direct x-rays were used as a reference for the determination of the number of charge carriers produced by the scintillation pulse and, so, the number of photons impinging the LAAPD. A value of 81 photons/kV was obtained for the scintillation amplification parameter, defined as the number of photons produced per drifting electron and per kilovolt. The scintillation yields obtained in this work are in agreement with those obtained by Monte Carlo calculations and a factor of ?10 higher than those determined by the WARP experiment.

  9. Scintillation Breakdowns in Chip Tantalum Capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teverovsky, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    Scintillations in solid tantalum capacitors are momentarily local breakdowns terminated by a self-healing or conversion to a high-resistive state of the manganese oxide cathode. This conversion effectively caps the defective area of the tantalum pentoxide dielectric and prevents short-circuit failures. Typically, this type of breakdown has no immediate catastrophic consequences and is often considered as nuisance rather than a failure. Scintillation breakdowns likely do not affect failures of parts under surge current conditions, and so-called "proofing" of tantalum chip capacitors, which is a controllable exposure of the part after soldering to voltages slightly higher than the operating voltage to verify that possible scintillations are self-healed, has been shown to improve the quality of the parts. However, no in-depth studies of the effect of scintillations on reliability of tantalum capacitors have been performed so far. KEMET is using scintillation breakdown testing as a tool for assessing process improvements and to compare quality of different manufacturing lots. Nevertheless, the relationship between failures and scintillation breakdowns is not clear, and this test is not considered as suitable for lot acceptance testing. In this work, scintillation breakdowns in different military-graded and commercial tantalum capacitors were characterized and related to the rated voltages and to life test failures. A model for assessment of times to failure, based on distributions of breakdown voltages, and accelerating factors of life testing are discussed.

  10. Estimation of Fano factor in inorganic scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bora, Vaibhav; Barrett, Harrison H.; Fastje, David; Clarkson, Eric; Furenlid, Lars; Bousselham, Abdelkader; Shah, Kanai S.; Glodo, Jarek

    2016-01-01

    The Fano factor of an integer-valued random variable is defined as the ratio of its variance to its mean. Correlation between the outputs of two photomultiplier tubes on opposite faces of a scintillation crystal was used to estimate the Fano factor of photoelectrons and scintillation photons. Correlations between the integrals of the detector outputs were used to estimate the photoelectron and photon Fano factor for YAP:Ce, SrI2:Eu and CsI:Na scintillator crystals. At 662 keV, SrI2:Eu was found to be sub-Poisson, while CsI:Na and YAP:Ce were found to be super-Poisson. An experiment setup inspired from the Hanbury Brown and Twiss experiment was used to measure the correlations as a function of time between the outputs of two photomultiplier tubes looking at the same scintillation event. A model of the scintillation and the detection processes was used to generate simulated detector outputs as a function of time for different values of Fano factor. The simulated outputs from the model for different Fano factors was compared to the experimentally measured detector outputs to estimate the Fano factor of the scintillation photons for YAP:Ce, LaBr3:Ce scintillator crystals. At 662 keV, LaBr3:Ce was found to be sub-Poisson, while YAP:Ce was found to be close to Poisson.

  11. Scintillation Light from Cosmic-Ray Muons in Liquid Argon

    E-print Network

    Denver Whittington; Stuart Mufson; Bruce Howard

    2015-11-13

    This paper reports the results of an experiment to directly measure the time-resolved scintillation signal from the passage of cosmic-ray muons through liquid argon. Scintillation light from these muons is of value to studies of weakly-interacting particles in neutrino experiments and dark matter searches. The experiment was carried out at the TallBo dewar facility at Fermilab using prototype light guide detectors and electronics developed for the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment. Two models are presented for the time structure of the scintillation light, a phenomenological model and a physically-motivated model. Both models find $\\tau_{\\text{T}} = 1.52$ $\\mu$s for the decay time constant of the Ar$_2^*$ triplet state. These models also show that the identification of the "early" light fraction in the phenomenological model, $F_{\\text{E}}\\approx 25\\%$ of the signal, with the total light from singlet decays is an underestimate. The total fraction of singlet light is $F_{\\text{S}} \\approx 36\\%$, where the increase over $F_{\\text{E}}$ is from singlet light emitted by the wavelength shifter through processes with long decay constants. The models were further used to compute the experimental particle identification parameter $F_{\\text{prompt}}$, the fraction of light coming in a short time window after the trigger compared with the light in the total recorded waveform. The models reproduce quite well the typical experimental value $\\sim0.3$ found by dark matter and double $\\beta$-decay experiments, which suggests this parameter provides a robust metric for discriminating electrons and muons from more heavily ionizing particles.

  12. Scintillation observations near the sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coles, W. A.; Rickett, B. J.; Scott, S. L.

    1978-01-01

    Results on the electron density spectrum, the random velocity and the mean velocity of the solar wind in the region from 5 to 100 solar radii are presented. Results are based on intensity scintillations of incoherent radio sources at different locations and different radio frequencies. The shape of the electron density irregularity spectrum is shown to be well modeled by a power law in wavenumber with a slope that abruptly steepens at higher wavenumbers. This two slope power law model is shown to have a break (defined as the wavenumber of the change of slope) that increases with decreasing distance from the Sun. The fractional random velocity is shown to be insignificant at distances of greater than 40 solar radii, but shows a steady increase with decreasing solar distance inside of 40 solar radii.

  13. Colon cancer screening

    MedlinePLUS

    Screening for colon cancer; Colonoscopy - screening; Sigmoidoscopy - screening; Virtual colonoscopy - screening ... Colon cancer screening can detect polyps and early cancers in the intestines. This type of screening can find problems ...

  14. Genetic screening

    PubMed Central

    Andermann, Anne; Blancquaert, Ingeborg

    2010-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE To provide a primer for primary care professionals who are increasingly called upon to discuss the growing number of genetic screening services available and to help patients make informed decisions about whether to participate in genetic screening, how to interpret results, and which interventions are most appropriate. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE As part of a larger research program, a wide literature relating to genetic screening was reviewed. PubMed and Internet searches were conducted using broad search terms. Effort was also made to identify the gray literature. MAIN MESSAGE Genetic screening is a type of public health program that is systematically offered to a specified population of asymptomatic individuals with the aim of providing those identified as high risk with prevention, early treatment, or reproductive options. Ensuring an added benefit from screening, as compared with standard clinical care, and preventing unintended harms, such as undue anxiety or stigmatization, depends on the design and implementation of screening programs, including the recruitment methods, education and counseling provided, timing of screening, predictive value of tests, interventions available, and presence of oversight mechanisms and safeguards. There is therefore growing apprehension that economic interests might lead to a market-driven approach to introducing and expanding screening before program effectiveness, acceptability, and feasibility have been demonstrated. As with any medical intervention, there is a moral imperative for genetic screening to do more good than harm, not only from the perspective of individuals and families, but also for the target population and society as a whole. CONCLUSION Primary care professionals have an important role to play in helping their patients navigate the rapidly changing terrain of genetic screening services by informing them about the benefits and risks of new genetic and genomic technologies and empowering them to make more informed choices. PMID:20393090

  15. Scintillation of Radio Sources: The Signature of a Caustic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, P. G.; Melrose, D. B.

    2006-08-01

    The role of caustics in the scintillation of radio sources due to thin-screen scattering is explored. The classical stationary phase treatment of this type of scattering implies singular behavior at the caustics. Physically, this singularity is resolved by diffractive effects, and a smooth but highly peaked intensity distribution is expected, analogous to what we observe in geometrical optics. However, in a companion paper we showed that the intensity amplification near a caustic can be very mild and is typically swamped by a rapidly oscillating diffractive interference pattern. In this paper we introduce a modified stationary phase method that employs an Airy function approximation near caustics. This modified method provides an accurate estimate of the intensity near the caustic and allows us to show that significant intensity enhancement is only expected to develop for extremely strong scattering screens. In this limit the behavior of the intensity near the caustic depends on only a small number of bulk properties of the scattering screen. As such, not only does it provide a clear signature for when a caustic has been crossed, it also may be used to yield important properties of the scattering medium.

  16. New observations of scintillation climatology from the Scintillation Network Decision Aid (SCINDA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Y.; Caton, R. G.; Wiens, K.; Groves, K. M.

    2012-12-01

    The Scintillation Network Decision Aid (SCINDA) was established with three ground sites in the mid-1990's by the Air Force Research Laboratory and has continued to grow into a global scintillation observation network. This system consists of an array of VHF and GPS receivers which continually measure scintillation in the equatorial region. In the past few years, the extended network of ground stations has expanded into the African sector. Initial results from yearly scintillation data obtained from two VHF receivers in Narobi, Kenya and Bahir Dar, Ethiopia in 2011 indicate the presence of scintillation activity throughout the June-July -August (northern summer) season which is inconsistent with current state-of-the-art ionospheric climatology models. It is well known that seasonal equatorial scintillation patterns vary with longitude based on geographical location. For example, the scintillation activity at VHF frequencies are absent in the Pacific sector during the months of November to February while observations from South America show nearly continuous scintillation during this same time period. With little to no ground-based observations, the scintillation climatology over the African region has not been well understood. In the paper, we will present S4 measurements various longitudinal sectors, including the first look at solar maximum type conditions over the African sector, and provide comparisons with output from a global climatology model.

  17. GEM scintillation readout with avalanche photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conceição, A. S.; Requicha Ferreira, L. F.; Fernandes, L. M. P.; Monteiro, C. M. B.; Coelho, L. C. C.; Azevedo, C. D. R.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.; Lopes, J. A. M.; dos Santos, J. M. F.

    2007-09-01

    The use of the scintillation produced in the charge avalanches in GEM holes as signal amplification and readout is investigated for xenon. A VUV-sensitive avalanche photodiode has been used as photosensor. Detector gains of about 4 × 104 are achieved in scintillation readout mode, for GEM voltages of 490 V and for a photosensor gain of 150. Those gains are more than one order of magnitude larger than what is obtained using charge readout. In addition, the energy resolutions achieved with the scintillation readout are lower than those achieved with charge readout. The GEM scintillation yield in xenon was measured as a function of GEM voltage, presenting values that are about a half of those achieved for the charge yield, and reach about 730 photons per primary electron at GEM voltages of 490 V.

  18. Diffractive Interstellar Scintillation Timescales and Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordes, J. M.; Rickett, B. J.

    1998-11-01

    We derive general relationships between the observed timescale of diffractive interstellar scintillations and the physical velocities of the observer, the source, and the scattering medium. Our treatment applies exclusively to saturated scintillations of point sources in the strong scattering regime. We show how scintillation observations may be combined with other observables (proper motion and dispersion measure) to yield (1) improvements in galactic models for the free-electron density and (2) estimates of the distance and transverse velocity of individual pulsars. We explicitly consider cases of current astrophysical interest, including hypervelocity pulsars too far above the Galactic plane to allow distance estimates from dispersion measures alone. We also briefly consider scintillations of extragalactic sources, including gamma-ray burst sources at great distances from the Galaxy.

  19. Liquid scintillators for optical-fiber applications

    SciTech Connect

    Franks, L.A.; Lutz, S.S.

    1981-06-01

    A multicomponent liquid scintillator solution for use as a radiation-to-light converter in conjunction with a fiber optic transmission system. The scintillator includes a quantity of 1, 2, 4, 5, 3H, 6H, 1 OH, tetrahydro-8-trifluoromethyl (1) benzopyrano (9, 9a, 1-gh) quinolizin-10-one (Coumarin) as a solute in a fluor solvent such as benzyl alcohol or pseudo-cumene. The use of BIBUQ as an additional or primary solute is also disclosed.

  20. Liquid scintillators for optical fiber applications

    SciTech Connect

    Franks, Larry A.; Lutz, Stephen S.

    1982-01-01

    A multicomponent liquid scintillator solution for use as a radiation-to-light converter in conjunction with a fiber optic transmission system. The scintillator includes a quantity of 1, 2, 4, 5, 3H, 6H, 1 OH, tetrahydro-8-trifluoromethyl (1) benzopyrano (9, 9a, 1-gh) quinolizin-10-one (Coumarin) as a solute in a fluor solvent such as benzyl alcohol or pseudo-cumene. The use of BIBUQ as an additional or primary solute is also disclosed.

  1. Ternary liquid scintillator for optical fiber applications

    DOEpatents

    Franks, Larry A. (Santa Barbara, CA); Lutz, Stephen S. (Santa Barbara, CA)

    1982-01-01

    A multicomponent liquid scintillator solution for use as a radiation-to-light converter in conjunction with a fiber optic transmission system. The scintillator includes a quantity of 5-amino-9-diethylaminobenz (a) phenoxazonium nitrate (Nile Blue Nitrate) as a solute in a fluor solvent such as benzyl alcohol. The use of PPD as an additional solute is also disclosed. The system is controllable by addition of a suitable quenching agent, such as phenol.

  2. GPS phase scintillation correlated with auroral forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampton, D. L.; Azeem, S. I.; Crowley, G.; Santana, J.; Reynolds, A.

    2013-12-01

    The disruption of radio wave propagation due to rapid changes in electron density caused by auroral precipitation has been observed for several decades. In a few cases the disruption of GPS signals has been attributed to distinct auroral arcs [Kintner, 2007; Garner, 2011], but surprisingly there has been no systematic study of the characteristics of the auroral forms that cause GPS scintillation. In the Fall of 2012 ASTRA deployed four CASES GPS receivers at UAF observatories in Alaska (Kaktovik, Fort Yukon, Poker Flat and Gakona) specifically to address the effects of auroral activity on the high latitude ionosphere. We have initiated an analysis that compares the phase scintillation, recorded at high cadence, with filtered digital all-sky camera data to determine the auroral morphology and electron precipitation parameters that cause scintillation. From correlation studies from a single site (Poker Flat), we find that scintillation is well correlated with discrete arcs that have high particle energy flux (power per unit area), and not as well correlated with pulsating forms which typically have high characteristic energy, but lower energy flux . This indicates that the scintillation is correlated with the magnitude of the change in total electron density as expected. We will also report on ongoing work where we correlate the scintillation from the Fort Yukon receiver with the all-sky images at Poker Flat to determine the altitude that produces the greatest disturbance. These studies are aimed at a model that can predict the expected local disturbance to navigation due to auroral activity.

  3. Development of Novel Polycrystalline Ceramic Scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Wisniewska, Monika; Boatner, Lynn A; Neal, John S; Jellison Jr, Gerald Earle; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine; North, Andrea L; Wisniewski, Monica; Payzant, E Andrew; Howe, Jane Y; Lempicki, Aleksander; Brecher, Charlie; Glodo, J.

    2008-01-01

    For several decades most of the efforts to develop new scintillator materials have concentrated on high-light-yield inorganic single-crystals while polycrystalline ceramic scintillators, since their inception in the early 1980 s, have received relatively little attention. Nevertheless, transparent ceramics offer a promising approach to the fabrication of relatively inexpensive scintillators via a simple mechanical compaction and annealing process that eliminates single-crystal growth. Until recently, commonly accepted concepts restricted the polycrystalline ceramic approach to materials exhibiting a cubic crystal structure. Here, we report our results on the development of two novel ceramic scintillators based on the non-cubic crystalline materials: Lu SiO:Ce (LSO:Ce) and LaBr:Ce. While no evidence for texturing has been found in their ceramic microstructures, our LSO:Ce ceramics exhibit a surprisingly high level of transparency/ translucency and very good scintillation characteristics. The LSO:Ce ceramic scintillation reaches a light yield level of about 86% of that of a good LSO:Ce single crystal, and its decay time is even faster than in single crystals. Research on LaBr:Ce shows that translucent ceramics of the high-light-yield rare-earth halides can also be synthesized. Our LaBr:Ce ceramics have light yields above 42 000 photons/MeV (i.e., 70%of the single-crystal light yield).

  4. Validating the use of scintillation proxies to study ionospheric scintillation over the Ugandan region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amabayo, Emirant B.; Jurua, Edward; Cilliers, Pierre J.

    2015-06-01

    In this study, we compare the standard scintillation indices (S4 and ??) from a SCINDA receiver with scintillation proxies (S4p and | sDPR |) derived from two IGS GPS receivers. Amplitude (S4) and phase (??) scintillation data were obtained from the SCINDA installed at Makerere University (0.34°N, 32.57°E). The corresponding amplitude (S4p) and phase (| sDPR |) scintillation proxies were derived from data archived by IGS GPS receivers installed at Entebbe (0.04°N, 32.44°E) and Mbarara (0.60°S, 30.74°E). The results show that for most of the cases analysed in this study, ?? and | sDPR | are in agreement. Amplitude scintillation occurrence estimated using the S4p are fairly consistent with the standard S4, mainly between 17:00 UT and 21:00 UT, despite a few cases of over and under estimation of scintillation levels by S4p. Correlation coefficients between ?? and the | sDPR | proxy revealed positive correlation. Generally, S4p and S4 exhibits both moderate and strong positive correlation. TEC depletions associated with equatorial plasma bubbles are proposed as the cause of the observed scintillation over the region. These equatorial plasma bubbles were evident along the ray paths to satellites with PRN 2, 15, 27 and 11 as observed from MBAR and EBBE. In addition to equatorial plasma bubbles, atmospheric gravity waves with periods similar to those of large scale traveling ionospheric disturbances were also observed as one of the mechanisms for scintillation occurrence. The outcome of this study implies that GPS derived scintillation proxies can be used to quantify scintillation levels in the absence of standard scintillation data in the equatorial regions.

  5. TORCH screen

    MedlinePLUS

    ... different infections in a newborn. TORCH stands for toxoplasmosis , rubella , cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex, and HIV, but it ... used to screen infants for infections such as toxoplasmosis, cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex, syphilis and others. These infections ...

  6. Vision Screening

    MedlinePLUS

    ... office. Some community screenings use this method. Corneal light reflex testing This simple test can be performed ... focuses on a penlight, the position of the light reflection from the front surface (cornea) of the ...

  7. Hypertension screening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foulke, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    An attempt was made to measure the response to an announcement of hypertension screening at the Goddard Space Center, to compare the results to those of previous statistics. Education and patient awareness of the problem were stressed.

  8. Quantum noise in digital x-ray image detectors with optically coupled scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, M.J.; Hames, S.M.; Wilderman, S.J.; Ciarelli, J.J.

    1996-08-01

    Digital x-ray imaging detectors designed to soft x-ray (1 to 50 keV) are significant for medical mammography, dental radiography, microradiography, and microtomography. Detector designs involve either direct absorption of x-rays in solid state devices or thin scintillator screens optically coupled to solid state sensors. Well designed scintillator systems produce 10 or more electrons per detected x-ray and, used with charge coupled devices (CCD), detect 100,000 x-rays per pixel before saturation. However, if the scintillator is directly coupled to the detector, radiation can penetrate to the semiconductor detector with a small number of events producing large charge and noise. The authors have investigated the degradation of image noise by these direct absorption events using numerical models for a laboratory detector system consisting of a 60 {micro}m CsI scintillator optically coupled to a scientific CCD. Monte Carlo methods were used to estimate the charge deposition signal and noise for both the CsI and the semiconductor. Without a fiber optic coupler, direct absorptions dominate the signal and increase the signal variance by a factor of about 30 at energies above 10 keV. With a 3 mm fiber optic coupler, no significant degradation is observed for input energies below 45 keV.

  9. Screening for cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, A.B.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains three sections: Fundamentals of Screening, Screening Tests, and Screening for Specific Cancer Sites. Each section consists of several chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Principles of Screening and of the Evaluation of Screening Programs; Economic Aspects of Screening; Cervical Cytology; Screening Tests for Bladder Cancer; Fecal Occult Blood Testing; Screening for Cancer of the Cervix; Screening for Gastric Cancer; and Screening for Oral Cancer.

  10. Simulation tool for optical design of PET detector modules including scintillator material and sensor array

    SciTech Connect

    Jatekos, B.; Erdei, G.; Lorincz, E.

    2011-07-01

    The appearance of single photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) in the field of PET detector modules made it necessary to apply more complex optical design methods to refine the performance of such assemblies. We developed a combined simulation tool that is capable to model complex detector structures including scintillation material, light guide, light collection optics and sensor, correctly taking into account the statistical behavior of emission of scintillation light and its absorbance in SPADs. As a validation we compared simulation results obtained by our software and another optical design program. Calculations were performed for a simple PET detector arrangement used for testing purposes. According to the results, deviation of center of gravity coordinates between the two simulations is 0.0195 mm, the average ratio of total counts 1.0052. We investigated the error resulting from finite sampling in wavelength space and we found that 20 nm pitch is sufficient for the simulation in case of the given spectral dependencies. (authors)

  11. Detection of charged particles and X-rays by scintillator layers coupled to amorphous silicon photodiode arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, T.; Drewery, J.; Hong, W.S.; Lee, H.; Kaplan, S.N.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Goodman, C.A.; Wildermuth, D.

    1995-04-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) p-i-n diodes with transparent metallic contacts are shown to be suitable for detecting charged particles, electrons, and X-rays. When coupled to a suitable scintillator using CsI(Tl) as the scintillator we show a capability to detect minimum ionizing particles with S/N {approximately}20. We demonstrate such an arrangement by operating a p-i-n diode in photovoltaic mode (reverse bias). Moreover, we show that a p-i-n diode can also work as a photoconductor under forward bias and produces a gain yield of 3-8 higher light sensitivity for shaping times of 1 {mu}s. n-i-n devices have similar optical gain as the p-i-n photoconductor for short integrating times ( < 10{mu}s). However, n-i-n devices exhibit much higher gain for a long term integration (10ms) than the p-i-n ones. High sensitivity photosensors are very desirable for X-ray medical imaging because radiation exposure dose can be reduced significantly. The scintillator CsI layers we made have higher spatial resolution than the Kodak commercial scintillator screens due to their internal columnar structure which can collimate the scintillation light. Evaporated CsI layers are shown to be more resistant to radiation damage than the crystalline bulk CsI(Tl).

  12. Monte Carlo investigations of the effect of beam divergence on thick, segmented crystalline scintillators for radiotherapy imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; El-Mohri, Youcef; Antonuk, Larry E.; Zhao, Qihua

    2010-01-01

    The use of thick segmented scintillators in electronic portal imagers offers the potential for significant improvement in x-ray detection efficiency compared to conventional phosphor screens. Such improvement substantially increases the detective quantum efficiency (DQE), leading to the possibility of achieving soft-tissue visualization at clinically-practical (i.e. low) doses using megavoltage (MV) cone-beam computed tomography. While these DQE increases are greatest at zero spatial frequency, they are diminished at higher frequencies as a result of degradation of spatial resolution due to lateral spreading of secondary radiation within the scintillator – an effect that is more pronounced for thicker scintillators. The extent of this spreading is even more accentuated for radiation impinging the scintillator at oblique angles of incidence due to beam divergence. In this paper, Monte Carlo simulations of radiation transport, performed to investigate and quantify the effects of beam divergence on the imaging performance of MV imagers based on two promising scintillators (BGO and CsI:T1), are reported. In these studies, 10 – 40 mm thick scintillators, incorporating low-density polymer, or high-density tungsten septal walls were examined for incident angles corresponding to that encountered at locations up to ~15 cm from the central beam axis (for an imager located 130 cm from a radiotherapy x-ray source). The simulations demonstrate progressively more severe spatial resolution degradation (quantified in terms of the effect on modulation transfer function) as a function of increasing angle of incidence (as well as of scintillator thickness). Since the noise power behavior was found to be largely independent of incident angle, the dependence of the DQE on incident angle is therefore primarily determined by the spatial resolution. The observed DQE degradation suggests that 10 mm thick scintillators are not strongly affected by beam divergence for detector areas up to ~30 × 30 cm2. For thicker scintillators, the area that is relatively unaffected is significantly reduced, requiring a focused scintillator geometry in order to preserve spatial resolution, and thus DQE. PMID:20526032

  13. Optimization of the design of thick, segmented scintillators for megavoltage cone-beam CT using a novel, hybrid modeling technique

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Langechuan; Antonuk, Larry E.; El-Mohri, Youcef; Zhao, Qihua; Jiang, Hao

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Active matrix flat-panel imagers (AMFPIs) incorporating thick, segmented scintillators have demonstrated order-of-magnitude improvements in detective quantum efficiency (DQE) at radiotherapy energies compared to systems based on conventional phosphor screens. Such improved DQE values facilitate megavoltage cone-beam CT (MV CBCT) imaging at clinically practical doses. However, the MV CBCT performance of such AMFPIs is highly dependent on the design parameters of the scintillators. In this paper, optimization of the design of segmented scintillators was explored using a hybrid modeling technique which encompasses both radiation and optical effects. Methods: Imaging performance in terms of the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and spatial resolution of various hypothetical scintillator designs was examined through a hybrid technique involving Monte Carlo simulation of radiation transport in combination with simulation of optical gain distributions and optical point spread functions. The optical simulations employed optical parameters extracted from a best fit to measurement results reported in a previous investigation of a 1.13 cm thick, 1016 ?m pitch prototype BGO segmented scintillator. All hypothetical designs employed BGO material with a thickness and element-to-element pitch ranging from 0.5 to 6 cm and from 0.508 to 1.524 mm, respectively. In the CNR study, for each design, full tomographic scans of a contrast phantom incorporating various soft-tissue inserts were simulated at a total dose of 4 cGy. Results: Theoretical values for contrast, noise, and CNR were found to be in close agreement with empirical results from the BGO prototype, strongly supporting the validity of the modeling technique. CNR and spatial resolution for the various scintillator designs demonstrate complex behavior as scintillator thickness and element pitch are varied—with a clear trade-off between these two imaging metrics up to a thickness of ?3 cm. Based on these results, an optimization map indicating the regions of design that provide a balance between these metrics was obtained. The map shows that, for a given set of optical parameters, scintillator thickness and pixel pitch can be judiciously chosen to maximize performance without resorting to thicker, more costly scintillators. Conclusions: Modeling radiation and optical effects in thick, segmented scintillators through use of a hybrid technique can provide a practical way to gain insight as to how to optimize the performance of such devices in radiotherapy imaging. Assisted by such modeling, the development of practical designs should greatly facilitate low-dose, soft tissue visualization employing MV CBCT imaging in external beam radiotherapy. PMID:24877827

  14. Characterization of ionospheric scintillation at a geomagnetic equatorial region station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seba, Ephrem Beshir; Gogie, Tsegaye Kassa

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we analyzed ionospheric scintillation at Bahir Dar station, Ethiopia (11.6°N, 37.38°E) using GPS-SCINDA data between August 2010 and July 2011. We found that small scale variation in TEC caused high ionospheric scintillation, rather than large scale variation. We studied the daily and monthly variations in the scintillation index S4 during this year, which showed that scintillation was a post-sunset phenomenon on equinoctial days, with high activity during the March equinox. The scintillation activity observed on solstice days was relatively low and almost constant throughout the day with low post-sunset activity levels. Our analysis of the seasonal and annual scintillation characteristics showed that intense activity occurred in March and April. We also studied the dependence of the scintillation index on the satellite elevation angle and found that scintillation was high for low angles but low for high elevation angles.

  15. Isotopic response with small scintillator based gamma-ray spectrometers

    DOEpatents

    Madden, Norman W. (Sparks, NV); Goulding, Frederick S. (Lafayette, CA); Asztalos, Stephen J. (Oakland, CA)

    2012-01-24

    The intrinsic background of a gamma ray spectrometer is significantly reduced by surrounding the scintillator with a second scintillator. This second (external) scintillator surrounds the first scintillator and has an opening of approximately the same diameter as the smaller central scintillator in the forward direction. The second scintillator is selected to have a higher atomic number, and thus has a larger probability for a Compton scattering interaction than within the inner region. Scattering events that are essentially simultaneous in coincidence to the first and second scintillators, from an electronics perspective, are precluded electronically from the data stream. Thus, only gamma-rays that are wholly contained in the smaller central scintillator are used for analytic purposes.

  16. Current trends in scintillator detectors and materials

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, William W.

    2001-10-23

    The last decade has seen a renaissance in inorganic scintillator development for gamma ray detection. Lead tungstate (PbWO4) has been developed for high energy physics experiments, and possesses exceptionally high density and radiation hardness, albeit with low luminous efficiency. Lutetium orthosilicate or LSO (Lu2SiO5:Ce) possesses a unique combination of high luminous efficiency, high density, and reasonably short decay time, and is now incorporated in commercial positron emission tomography (PET) cameras. There have been advances in understanding the fundamental mechanisms that limit energy resolution, and several recently discovered materials (such as LaBr3:Ce) possess energy resolution that approaches that of direct solid state detectors. Finally, there are indications that a neglected class of scintillator materials that exhibit near band-edge fluorescence could provide scintillators with sub-nanosecond decay times and high luminescent efficiency.

  17. Hearing Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson-Curiskis, Nanette

    2012-01-01

    Hearing levels are threatened by modern life--headsets for music, rock concerts, traffic noises, etc. It is crucial we know our hearing levels so that we can draw attention to potential problems. This exercise requires that students receive a hearing screening for their benefit as well as for making the connection of hearing to listening.

  18. Trends and patterns of scintillator nonproportionality

    E-print Network

    Ivan V. Khodyuk; Pieter Dorenbos

    2012-04-19

    Data on the photon nonproportional response of 33 inorganic scintillation materials are systemized and analyzed. The main trends of nonproportionality for different groups of inorganic scintillators, especially for oxides and halides, are highlighted. The dependence of the shape and degree of photon nonproportional response versus chemical composition, dopant type, refractive index and other fundamental properties of the materials is studied. Better proportionality appears to be correlated with higher refractive index of the compound. Another related factor is the width of the valence band in halide compounds. With larger valence band width from fluorides, to chlorides, to bromides, and to iodides, a better proportionality is observed.

  19. Trends and patterns of scintillator nonproportionality

    E-print Network

    Khodyuk, Ivan V

    2012-01-01

    Data on the photon nonproportional response of 33 inorganic scintillation materials are systemized and analyzed. The main trends of nonproportionality for different groups of inorganic scintillators, especially for oxides and halides, are highlighted. The dependence of the shape and degree of photon nonproportional response versus chemical composition, dopant type, refractive index and other fundamental properties of the materials is studied. Better proportionality appears to be correlated with higher refractive index of the compound. Another related factor is the width of the valence band in halide compounds. With larger valence band width from fluorides, to chlorides, to bromides, and to iodides, a better proportionality is observed.

  20. New Structured Scintillators for Neutron Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarkar, V. V.; Ovechkina, E. E.; Bhandari, H. B.; Soundara-Pandian, L.; More, M. J.; Riedel, R. A.; Miller, S. R.

    We report on the development of novel neutron scintillators fabricated in microcolumnar formats using the physical vapour deposition (PVD) method. Such structures mitigate the conventional trade-off between spatial resolution and detection efficiency by channelling the scintillation light towards the detector while minimizing lateral spread in the film. Consequently, high resolution and high contrast neutron images can be acquired in a time efficient manner. In this paper, we discuss methods and characterization for scintillator films made from three distinct compositions, Thallium (Tl) or Europium (Eu) doped Lithium CesiumIodide (Li3Cs2I5:Tl,Eu, referred to as LCI), Tl or Eudoped Lithium Sodium Iodide (LixNa1-xI:Tl,Eu, referred to as LNI), and Cerium (Ce)-doped Gadolinium Iodide (GdI3:Ce, referred to as GDI). LCI and LNI scintillators are derived from the well-known CsI and NaI scintillators by the incorporation of 6Li into their lattice. Based on our measurements reported here, LCI/LNI scintillators have shown to exhibit bright emissions, fast, sub-microsecond decay, and an ability to effectively discriminate between neutron and gamma interactions using pulse shape (PSD) and/or pulse height (PHD) discrimination. LCI has a density of 4.5 g/cm3, a measured peak emission wavelength of 460 nm (doped with Eu), and a light yield of ?50,000 photons/thermal neutron. LNI has a density of 3.6 g/cm3, an emission peak measured at 420 nm, and a light yield of ?100,000 photons/thermal neutron. The recently discovered GDI exhibits excellent scintillation properties including a bright emission of up to 5,000 photons/thermal neutron interaction, 550 nm green emission, a rise time of ?0.5 ns and a primary decay time of ?38 ns (Glodo et al., 2006). Its high thermal neutron cross-section of ?255 kb makes it an attractive candidate for neutron detection and imaging. Although it has high density of 5.2 gm/cm3 and effective atomic number of 57, its gamma sensitivity can be minimized by lowering the film thickness and its neutron sensitivity can be maximized through the use of enriched Gd. The fabrication of micro-structured films of these materials using an evaporation technique permits the cost-effective volume synthesis of high-quality neutron scintillators over large areas (20 cm x 20 cm) in short time. In addition, the vapour deposition permits stoichiometry and dopant control not possible using conventional crystal growth.

  1. Pulsed cathodoluminescence and ?-luminescence of scintillation crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, V. A.; Ochkin, V. N.; Pestovskii, N. V.; Petrov, A. A.; Savinov, S. Yu; Zagumennyi, A. I.; Zavertyaev, M. V.

    2015-11-01

    The spectra and decay time of pulsed cathodoluminescence (PCL) of a scintillating crystals excited by the electron beam is compared to the spectra and decay time of the luminescence of the same crystals initiated by ?-rays (GL). It is shown that spectra and decay time of PCL and GL are identical within the experimental errors. The explanation of these results is based on taking into account the physical processes within the crystal media under the irradiation by high-energy particles. The results of this study confirm that the PCL method may be used for the rapid analysis of the luminescent properties of scintillators.

  2. The homestake surface-underground scintillations: Description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cherry, M. L.; Corbato, S.; Daily, T.; Fenyves, E. J.; Kieda, D.; Lande, K.; Lee, C. K.

    1985-01-01

    Two new detectors are currently under construction at the Homestake Gold Mine a 140-ton Large Area Scintillation Detector (LASD) with an upper surface area of 130 square meters, a geometry factor (for an isotropic flux) of 1200 square meters, sr, and a depth of 4200 m.w.e.; and a surface air shower array consisting of 100 scintillator elements, each 3 square meters, spanning an area of approximately square kilometers. Underground, half of the LASD is currently running and collecting muon data; on the surface, the first section of the air shower array will begin operation in the spring of 1985. The detectors and their capabilities are described.

  3. 21 CFR 892.1100 - Scintillation (gamma) camera.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Scintillation (gamma) camera. 892.1100 Section 892.1100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1100 Scintillation (gamma) camera. (a) Identification. A scintillation (gamma) camera...

  4. Upconverting nanoparticles for optimizing scintillator based detection systems

    DOEpatents

    Kross, Brian; McKisson, John E; McKisson, John; Weisenberger, Andrew; Xi, Wenze; Zom, Carl

    2013-09-17

    An upconverting device for a scintillation detection system is provided. The detection system comprises a scintillator material, a sensor, a light transmission path between the scintillator material and the sensor, and a plurality of upconverting nanoparticles particles positioned in the light transmission path.

  5. Application of the Strong Scatter Theory to the Interpretation of Ionospheric Scintillation Measurements along Geostationary Satellite Links at VHF and L-band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrano, C. S.; Groves, K. M.; Basu, S.; Mackenzie, E.; Sheehan, R. E.

    2013-12-01

    In a previous work, we demonstrated that ionospheric turbulence parameters may be inferred from amplitude scintillations well into in the strong scatter regime [Carrano et al., International Journal of Geophysics, 2012]. This technique, called Iterative Parameter Estimation (IPE), uses the strong scatter theory and numerical inversion to estimate the parameters of an ionospheric phase screen (turbulent intensity, phase spectral index, and irregularity zonal drift) consistent with the observed scintillations. The optimal screen parameters are determined such that the theoretical intensity spectrum on the ground best matches the measured intensity spectrum in a least squares sense. We use this technique to interpret scintillation measurements collected during a campaign at Ascension Island (7.96°S, 14.41°W) in March 2000, led by Santimay Basu and his collaborators from Air Force Research Laboratory. Geostationary satellites broadcasting radio signals at VHF and L-band were monitored along nearly co-linear links, enabling a multi-frequency analysis of scintillations with the same propagation geometry. The VHF data were acquired using antennas spaced in the magnetic east-west direction, which enabled direct measurement of the zonal irregularity drift. We show that IPE analysis of the VHF and L-Band scintillations, which exhibited very different statistics due to the wide frequency separation, yields similar estimates of the phase screen parameters that specify the disturbed ionospheric medium. This agreement provides confidence in our phase screen parameter estimates. It also suggests a technique for extrapolating scintillation measurements to frequencies other than those observed that is valid in the case of strong scatter. We find that IPE estimates of the zonal irregularity drift, made using scintillation observations along single space-to-ground link, are consistent with those measured independently using the spaced antenna technique. This encouraging result suggests one may measure the zonal irregularity drift at scintillation monitoring stations equipped with only a single channel receiver, so that the spaced-antenna technique cannot be employed. We noted that the scintillation index (S4) at L-band commonly exceeded that at VHF early in the evening when the irregularities were most intense, followed by one or more reversals of this trend at later local times as aging irregularities decayed and newly formed bubbles drifted over the station. We use the strong scatter theory to explain this perhaps counter-intuitive situation (one would normally expect a higher S4 at the lower frequency) in terms of strong refractive focusing.

  6. A Monte Carlo study of an energy-weighted algorithm for radionuclide analysis with a plastic scintillation detector.

    PubMed

    Shin, Wook-Geun; Lee, Hyun-Cheol; Choi, Chang-Il; Park, Chang Soo; Kim, Hong-Suk; Min, Chul Hee

    2015-07-01

    Nuisance and false alarms due to naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) are major problems facing radiation portal monitors (RPMs) for the screening of illicit radioactive materials in airports and ports. Based on energy-weighted counts, we suggest an algorithm that distinguishes radioactive nuclides with a plastic scintillation detector that has poor energy resolution. Our simulation study, using a Monte Carlo method, demonstrated that man-made radionuclides can be separated from NORM by using a conventional RPM. PMID:25836977

  7. A new type of thermal-neutron detector based on ZnS(Ag)/LiF scintillator and avalanche photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin, V. N.; Sadykov, R. A.; Trunov, D. N.; Litvin, V. S.; Aksenov, S. N.; Stolyarov, A. A.

    2015-09-01

    A high-efficiency thermal-neutron detector based on ZnS(Ag)/LiF scintillator is described, which employs a new technique of signal pick-up with the aid of a light guide and avalanche photodiodes instead of optical fibers and photomultipliers. Results of tests on the RADEX pulsed neutron source are presented, in which neutron diffraction patterns of test objects have been obtained.

  8. Development of scintillator plates with high energy resolution for alpha particles made of GPS scintillator grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimaoka, Takehiro; Kaneko, Junichi H.; Izaki, Kenji; Tsubota, Youichi; Higuchi, Mikio; Nishiyama, Shusuke

    2014-01-01

    A scintillator plate with high energy resolution was developed to produce an alpha particle monitor used in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants and mixed plutonium-uranium oxide (MOX) fuel plants. Grains of a Gd2Si2O7 (GPS) scintillator of several 10 to 550 ?m were fixed on a glass substrate and were then mechanically polished. By increasing the size of scintillator grains and removing fine powders, the collected light yield and energy resolution for alpha particles were drastically improved. Energy resolution of 9.3% was achieved using average grain size of 91 ?m. Furthermore, the ratios between counts in a peak and total counts were improved by more than 60% by the further increase of grain size and adoption of mechanically polished surfaces on both sides. Beta and gamma ray influences were suppressed sufficiently by the thin 100 ?m scintillator plates.

  9. Scintillating fiber detector performance, detector geometries, trigger, and electronics issues for scintillating fiber tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Baumbaugh, A.E.

    1994-06-01

    Scintillating Fiber tracking technology has made great advances and has demonstrated great potential for high speed charged particle tracking and triggering. The small detector sizes and fast scintillation fluors available make them very promising for use at high luminosity experiments at today`s and tomorrow`s colliding and fixed target experiments where high rate capability is essential. This talk will discuss the current state of Scintillating fiber performance and current Visual Light Photon Counter (VLPC) characteristics. The primary topic will be some of the system design and integration issues which should be considered by anyone attempting to design a scintillating fiber tracking system which includes a high speed tracking trigger. Design. constraints placed upon the detector system by the electronics and mechanical sub-systems will be discussed. Seemingly simple and unrelated decisions can have far reaching effects on overall system performance. SDC and DO example system designs will be discussed.

  10. Vision Screening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Visi Screen OSS-C, marketed by Vision Research Corporation, incorporates image processing technology originally developed by Marshall Space Flight Center. Its advantage in eye screening is speed. Because it requires no response from a subject, it can be used to detect eye problems in very young children. An electronic flash from a 35 millimeter camera sends light into a child's eyes, which is reflected back to the camera lens. The photorefractor then analyzes the retinal reflexes generated and produces an image of the child's eyes, which enables a trained observer to identify any defects. The device is used by pediatricians, day care centers and civic organizations that concentrate on children with special needs.

  11. Fluorescent compounds for plastic scintillation applications

    SciTech Connect

    Pla-Dalmau, A.; Bross, A.D.

    1994-04-01

    Several 2-(2{prime}-hydroxyphenyl)benzothiazole, -benzoxazole, and -benzimidazole derivatives have been prepared. Transmittance, fluorescence, light yield, and decay time characteristics of these compounds have been studied in a polystyrene matrix and evaluated for use in plastic scintillation detectors. Radiation damage studies utilizing a {sup 60}C source have also been performed.

  12. Optimization of Shielded Scintillator for Neutron Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belancourt, Patrick; Morrison, John; Akli, Kramer; Freeman, Richard; High Energy Density Physics Team

    2011-10-01

    The High Energy Density Physics group is interested in the basic science of creating a neutron and gamma ray source. The neutrons and gamma rays are produced by accelerating ions via a laser into a target and creating fusion neutrons and gamma rays. A scintillator and photomultiplier tube will be used to detect these neutrons. Neutrons and photons produce ionizing radiation in the scintillator which then activates metastable states. These metastable states have both short and long decay rates. The initial photon count is orders of magnitude higher than the neutron count and poses problems for accurately detecting the neutrons due to the long decay state that is activated by the photons. The effects of adding lead shielding on the temporal response and signal level of the neutron detector will be studied in an effort to minimize the photon count without significant reduction to the temporal resolution of the detector. MCNP5 will be used to find the temporal response and energy deposition into the scintillator by adding lead shielding. Results from the simulations will be shown. Optimization of our scintillator neutron detection system is needed to resolve the neutron energies and neutron count of a novel neutron and gamma ray source.

  13. Waveshifting fiber readout of lanthanum halide scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Case, G. L.; Cherry, M. L.; Stacy, J. G.

    2006-07-01

    Newly developed high-light-yield inorganic scintillators coupled to waveshifting optical fibers provide the capability of efficient X-ray detection and millimeter scale position resolution suitable for high-energy cosmic ray instruments, hard X-ray/gamma ray astronomy telescopes and applications to national security. The CASTER design for NASA's proposed Black Hole Finder Probe mission, in particular, calls for a 6 8 m2 hard X-ray coded aperture imaging telescope operating in the 20 600 keV energy band, putting significant constraints on cost and readout complexity. The development of new inorganic scintillator materials (e.g., cerium-doped LaBr3 and LaCl3) provides improved energy resolution and timing performance that is well suited to the requirements for national security and astrophysics applications. LaBr3 or LaCl3 detector arrays coupled with waveshifting fiber optic readout represent a significant advance in the performance capabilities of scintillator-based gamma cameras and provide the potential for a feasible approach to affordable, large area, extremely sensitive detectors. We describe some of the applications and present laboratory test results demonstrating the expected scintillator performance.

  14. Comparisons of Scintillating Fiber, Diamond Particle Detector

    E-print Network

    McDonald, Kirk

    Comparisons of Scintillating Fiber, Diamond Particle Detector and Beam Current Transformer T. Tsang TP #12;Diamond particle detector Shot # 17017 Shot # 17006 typical diamond detector signal trace from Marcus Palm #12;Nov. 11, 2007, 17000 series data Red: x, diamond particle detector signal @ left 20o

  15. Progress in studying scintillator proportionality: Phenomenological model

    SciTech Connect

    Bizarri, Gregory; Cherepy, Nerine; Choong, Woon-Seng; Hull, Giulia; Moses, William; Payne, Sephen; Singh, Jai; Valentine, John; Vasilev, Andrey; Williams, Richard

    2009-04-30

    We present a model to describe the origin of non-proportional dependence of scintillator light yield on the energy of an ionizing particle. The non-proportionality is discussed in terms of energy relaxation channels and their linear and non-linear dependences on the deposited energy. In this approach, the scintillation response is described as a function of the deposited energy deposition and the kinetic rates of each relaxation channel. This mathematical framework allows both a qualitative interpretation and a quantitative fitting representation of scintillation non-proportionality response as function of kinetic rates. This method was successfully applied to thallium doped sodium iodide measured with SLYNCI, a new facility using the Compton coincidence technique. Finally, attention is given to the physical meaning of the dominant relaxation channels, and to the potential causes responsible for the scintillation non-proportionality. We find that thallium doped sodium iodide behaves as if non-proportionality is due to competition between radiative recombinations and non-radiative Auger processes.

  16. A mobile antineutrino detector with plastic scintillators

    E-print Network

    Yasuhiro Kuroda; Shugo Oguri; Yo Kato; Ryoko Nakata; Yoshizumi Inoue; Chikara Ito; Makoto Minowa

    2012-06-28

    We propose a new type segmented antineutrino detector made of plastic scintillators for the nuclear safeguard application. A small prototype was built and tested to measure background events. A satisfactory unmanned field operation of the detector system was demonstrated. Besides, a detailed Monte Carlo simulation code was developed to estimate the antineutrino detection efficiency of the detector.

  17. High resolution scintillation detector with semiconductor readout

    DOEpatents

    Levin, Craig S. (Santa Monica, CA); Hoffman, Edward J. (Los Angeles, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A novel high resolution scintillation detector array for use in radiation imaging such as high resolution Positron Emission Tomography (PET) which comprises one or more parallelepiped crystals with at least one long surface of each crystal being in intimate contact with a semiconductor photodetector such that photons generated within each crystal by gamma radiation passing therethrough is detected by the photodetector paired therewith.

  18. Liquid scintillator production for the NOvA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mufson, S.; Baugh, B.; Bower, C.; Coan, T. E.; Cooper, J.; Corwin, L.; Karty, J. A.; Mason, P.; Messier, M. D.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Proudfoot, M.

    2015-11-01

    The NOvA collaboration blended and delivered 8.8 kt (2.72M gal) of liquid scintillator as the active detector medium to its near and far detectors. The composition of this scintillator was specifically developed to satisfy NOvA's performance requirements. A rigorous set of quality control procedures was put in place to verify that the incoming components and the blended scintillator met these requirements. The scintillator was blended commercially in Hammond, IN. The scintillator was shipped to the NOvA detectors using dedicated stainless steel tanker trailers cleaned to food grade.

  19. Light propagation and fluorescence quantum yields in liquid scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, C.; Gramlich, B.; Wagner, S.

    2015-09-01

    For the simulation of the scintillation and Cherenkov light propagation in large liquid scintillator detectors a detailed knowledge about the absorption and emission spectra of the scintillator molecules is mandatory. Furthermore reemission probabilities and quantum yields of the scintillator components influence the light propagation inside the liquid. Absorption and emission properties are presented for liquid scintillators using 2,5-Diphenyloxazole (PPO) and 4-bis-(2-Methylstyryl)benzene (bis-MSB) as primary and secondary wavelength shifter. New measurements of the quantum yields for various aromatic molecules are shown.

  20. Liquid scintillator production for the NOvA experiment

    E-print Network

    S. Mufson; B. Baugh; C. Bower; T. E. Coan; J. Cooper; L. Corwin; J. A. Karty; P. Mason; M. D. Messier; A. Pla-Dalmau; M. Proudfoot

    2015-06-30

    The NOvA collaboration blended and delivered 8.8 kt (2.72M gal) of liquid scintillator as the active detector medium to its near and far detectors. The composition of this scintillator was specifically developed to satisfy NOvA's performance requirements. A rigorous set of quality control procedures was put in place to verify that the incoming components and the blended scintillator met these requirements. The scintillator was blended commercially in Hammond, IN. The scintillator was shipped to the NOvA detectors using dedicated stainless steel tanker trailers cleaned to food grade.

  1. Outward atmospheric scintillation effects and inward atmospheric scintillation effects comparisons for direct detection ladar applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youmans, Douglas G.

    2014-06-01

    Atmospheric turbulence produces intensity modulation or "scintillation" effects on both on the outward laser-mode path and on the return backscattered radiation path. These both degrade laser radar (ladar) target acquisition, ranging, imaging, and feature estimation. However, the finite sized objects create scintillation averaging on the outgoing path and the finite sized telescope apertures produce scintillation averaging on the return path. We expand on previous papers going to moderate to strong turbulence cases by starting from a 20kft altitude platform and propagating at 0° elevation (with respect to the local vertical) for 100km range to a 1 m diameter diffuse sphere. The outward scintillation and inward scintillation effects, as measured at the focal plane detector array of the receiving aperture, will be compared. To eliminate hard-body surface speckle effects in order to study scintillation, Goodman's M-parameter is set to 106 in the analytical equations and the non-coherent imaging algorithm is employed in Monte Carlo realizations. The analytical equations of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNRp), or mean squared signal over a variance, for a given focal plane array pixel window of interest will be summarized and compared to Monte Carlo realizations of a 1m diffuse sphere.

  2. Quadruple screen test

    MedlinePLUS

    ... screen; Multiple marker screening; AFP plus; Triple screen test; AFP maternal; MSAFP; 4-marker screen ... This test is most often done between the 15th and 22nd weeks of the pregnancy. It is most accurate ...

  3. Cervical Cancer Screening

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Treatment Cervical Cancer Prevention Cervical Cancer Screening Research Cervical Cancer Screening (PDQ®) What is screening? Screening is looking ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Cervical Cancer Key Points Cervical cancer is a disease in ...

  4. Fast digitizing techniques applied to scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertalot, L.; Esposito, B.; Kaschuck, Y.; Marocco, D.; Riva, M.; Rizzo, A.; Skopintsev, D.

    2006-01-01

    A 200 MHz 12-bit fast transient recorder card has been used for the digitization of pulses from photomultipliers coupled to organic scintillation detectors. Two modes of operation have been developed at ENEA-Frascati: a) continuous acquisition up to a maximum duration of ˜ 1.3 s corresponding to the full on-board memory (256 MSamples) of the card: in this mode, all scintillation events are recorded; b) non-continuous acquisition in which digitization is triggered by those scintillaton events whose amplitude is above a threshold value: the digitizing interval after each trigger can be set according to the typical decay time of the scintillation events; longer acquisition durations (>1.3 s) can be reached, although with dead time (needed for data storage) which depends on the incoming event rate. Several important features are provided by this novel digital approach: high count rate operation, pulse shape analysis, post-experiment data re-processing, pile-up identification and treatment. In particular, NE213 scintillators have been successfully used with this system for measurements in mixed neutron (n) and gamma ( ?) radiation fields from fusion plasmas: separation between ? and neutron events is made by means of a dedicated software comparing the pulse charge integrated in two different time intervals and simultaneous neutron and ? pulse height spectra can be recorded at total count rates in the MHz range. It has been demonstrated that, for scintillation detection applications, 12-bit fast transient recorder cards offer improved performance with respect to analogue hardware; other radiation detectors where pulse identification or high count rate is required might also benefit from such digitizing techniques.

  5. Non-Carbon Dyes For Platic Scintillators- Report

    SciTech Connect

    Teprovich, J.; Colon-Mercado, H.; Gaillard, J.; Sexton, L.; Washington, A.; Ward, P.; Velten, J.

    2015-10-19

    Scintillation based detectors are desirable for many radiation detection applications (portal and border monitoring, safeguards verification, contamination detection and monitoring). The development of next generation scintillators will require improved detection sensitivity for weak gamma ray sources, and fast and thermal neutron quantification. Radiation detection of gamma and neutron sources can be accomplished with organic scintillators, however, the single crystals are difficult to grow for large area detectors and subject to cracking. Alternatives to single crystal organic scintillators are plastic scintillators (PS) which offer the ability to be shaped and scaled up to produce large sized detectors. PS is also more robust than the typical organic scintillator and are ideally suited for deployment in harsh real-world environments. PS contain a mixture of dyes to down-convert incident radiation into visible light that can be detected by a PMT. This project will evaluate the potential use of nano-carbon dyes in plastic scintillators.

  6. Liquid scintillator production for the NOvA experiment

    E-print Network

    Mufson, S; Bower, C; Coan, T; Cooper, J; Corwin, L; Karty, J; Mason, P; Pla-Dalmau, A; Proudfoot, M

    2015-01-01

    The NOvA collaboration blended and delivered 8.8 kt (2.72M gal) of liquid scintillator to its detectors as its active detector medium. The composition of the scintillator was developed to meet the requirements of the experiment. The scintillator was shipped to the NOvA near and far detectors using dedicated stainless steel tanker trailers. A rigorous set of quality control procedures were put in place to assure that the liquid scintillator was blended to satisfy the transparency, light yield, and conductivity requirements. The incoming components, the blended scintillator, and the scintillator in the transport tanker trailers were all qualified with these procedures, which ensured that the NOvA scintillator was high quality and met its performance requirements.

  7. Precise scintillation correction for an Earth-to-space optical communication link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Shengbo; Meng, Xin

    2008-12-01

    Optical telecommunications will be the next technological step in Earth-to-space communication. However, propagation of an optical beam through the irregular atmosphere results in significant distortion of the signal, necessitating correction schemes for Earth-to-space communications. Conventional approaches to correct distortions that are based on natural or artificial guide stars are useful in astronomical imaging, but have practical difficulties or are not adequate to correct the distortions important for Earth-to-space optical links. Then we proposed a system, which employs an orbiting spacecraft with a bright laser reference source and a relay mirror, can provide essentially perfect scintillation correction.

  8. Attention Guiding in Multimedia Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jamet, Eric; Gavota, Monica; Quaireau, Christophe

    2008-01-01

    Comprehension of an illustrated document can involve complex visual scanning in order to locate the relevant information on the screen when this is evoked in spoken explanations. The present study examined the effects of two types of attention-guiding means (color change or step-by-step presentation of diagram elements synchronized with a spoken…

  9. Development of a fast radiation detector based on barium fluoride scintillation crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Hetong; School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi'an Jiaotong University, XJTU, Xi'an 710049, Shaanxi ; Zhang, Zichuan; Weng, Xiufeng; Liu, Junhong; Zhang, Kan; Li, Gang; Guan, Xingyin

    2013-07-15

    Barium fluoride (BaF{sub 2}) is an inorganic scintillation material used for the detection of X/gamma radiation due to its relatively high density, equivalent atomic number, radiation hardness, and high luminescence. BaF{sub 2} has a potential capacity to be used in gamma ray timing experiments due to the prompt decay emission components. It is known that the light output from BaF{sub 2} has three decay components: two prompt of those at approximately 195 nm and 220 nm with a decay constant around 600-800 ps and a more intense, slow component at approximately 310 nm with a decay constant around 630 ns which hinders fast timing experiments. We report here the development of a fast radiation detector based on a BaF{sub 2} scintillation crystal employing a special optical filter device, a multiple reflection multi-path ultraviolet region short-wavelength pass light guides (MRMP-short pass filter) by using selective reflection technique, for which the intensity of the slow component is reduced to less than 1%. The methods used for this study provide a novel way to design radiation detector by utilizing scintillation crystal with several emission bands.

  10. Screening for cardiovascular disease before kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Palepu, Sneha; Prasad, G V Ramesh

    2015-12-24

    Pre-kidney transplant cardiac screening has garnered particular attention from guideline committees as an approach to improving post-transplant success. Screening serves two major purposes: To more accurately inform transplant candidates of their risk for a cardiac event before and after the transplant, thereby informing decisions about proceeding with transplantation, and to guide pre-transplant management so that post-transplant success can be maximized. Transplant candidates on dialysis are more likely to be screened for coronary artery disease than those not being considered for transplantation. Thorough history and physical examination taking, resting electrocardiography and echocardiography, exercise stress testing, myocardial perfusion scintigraphy, dobutamine stress echocardiography, cardiac computed tomography, cardiac biomarker measurement, and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging all play contributory roles towards screening for cardiovascular disease before kidney transplantation. In this review, the importance of each of these screening procedures for both coronary artery disease and other forms of cardiac disease are discussed. PMID:26722655

  11. Screening for cardiovascular disease before kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Palepu, Sneha; Prasad, G V Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Pre-kidney transplant cardiac screening has garnered particular attention from guideline committees as an approach to improving post-transplant success. Screening serves two major purposes: To more accurately inform transplant candidates of their risk for a cardiac event before and after the transplant, thereby informing decisions about proceeding with transplantation, and to guide pre-transplant management so that post-transplant success can be maximized. Transplant candidates on dialysis are more likely to be screened for coronary artery disease than those not being considered for transplantation. Thorough history and physical examination taking, resting electrocardiography and echocardiography, exercise stress testing, myocardial perfusion scintigraphy, dobutamine stress echocardiography, cardiac computed tomography, cardiac biomarker measurement, and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging all play contributory roles towards screening for cardiovascular disease before kidney transplantation. In this review, the importance of each of these screening procedures for both coronary artery disease and other forms of cardiac disease are discussed. PMID:26722655

  12. Real-time Scintillation Monitoring in Alaska from a Longitudinal Chain of ASTRA's SM-211 GPS TEC and Scintillation Receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowley, G.; Azeem, S. I.; Reynolds, A.; Santana, J.; Hampton, D. L.

    2013-12-01

    Amplitude and phase scintillation can cause serious difficulties for GPS receivers. Intense scintillation can cause loss of lock. High latitude studies generally show that phase scintillation can be severe, but the amplitude scintillation tends to be small. The reason for this is not yet understood. Furthermore, the actual causes of the ionospheric irregularities that produce high latitude scintillation are not well understood. While the gradient drift instability is thought to be important in the F-region, there may be other structures present in either the E- or F-regions. The role of particle precipitation is also not well understood. Four of ASTRA's CASES GPS receivers were deployed in Alaska to demonstrate our ability to map scintillation in realtime, to provide space weather services to GPS users, and to initiate a detailed investigation of these effects. These dual-frequency GPS receivers measure total electron content (TEC) and scintillation. The scintillation monitors were deployed in a longitudinal chain at sites in Kaktovic, Fort Yukon, Poker Flat, and Gakona. Scintillation statistics show phase scintillations to be largest at Kaktovic and smallest at Gakona. We present GPS phase scintillation and auroral emission results from the Alaska chain to characterize the correspondence between scintillation and auroral features, and to investigate the role of high latitude auroral features in driving the phase scintillations. We will also present data showing how phase scintillation can cause other GPS receivers to lose lock. The data and results are particularly valuable because they illustrate some of the challenges of using GPS systems for positioning and navigation in an auroral region like Alaska. These challenges for snowplough drivers were recently highlighted, along with the CASES SM-211 space weather monitor, in a special video in which ASTRA and three other small businesses were presented with an entrepreneurial award from William Shatner (http://youtu.be/bIVKEQH_YPk).

  13. Nonproportionality of Scintillator Detectors: Theory and Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, Stephen; Cherepy, Nerine; Hull, Giulia; Valentine, John; Moses, William; Choong, Woon-Seng

    2009-08-17

    On the basis of nonproportionality data obtained for several scintillators, we have developed a theory to describe the carrier dynamics to fit the light yield versus electron energy. The theory of Onsager was adapted to explain how the carriers form excitons or sequentially arrive at the activators to promote the ion to an excited state, and the theory of Birks was employed to allow for exciton-exciton annihilation. We then developed a second theory to deduce the degradation in resolution that results from nonproportionality by evoking Landau fluctuations, which are essentially variations in the deposited energy density that occur as the high energy electron travels along its trajectory. In general there is good agreement with the data, in terms of fitting the nonproportionality curves and reproducing the literature values of nonproportionality's contribution to the scintillator resolution. With the resurgence of interest in developing scintillator detectors that have good energy resolution, an improved understanding of nonproportionality has become a crucial matter since it presents the fundamental limit to the achievable resolution. In order to hasten an improved understanding of scintillator nonproportionality, we have constructed an instrument referred to as SLYNCI (Scintillator Light Yield Nonproportionality Compton Instrument). This is a second-generation instrument to the original device developed by Valentine and coworkers, wherein several new principles of operation have served to increase the data rate by an order of magnitude as discussed in detail in References. In the present article, the focus is on a theory to describe the measured electron response, which is the light yield as a function of the electron energy. To do this, we account for transport of carriers and excitons, in terms of how they transfer their energy to the activators with competition from nonradiative decay pathways. This work builds on the original work of Murray and coworkers, and on the understanding of excitons. We then provide a new theoretical framework from which the nonproportionality data is reduced to a measure of the degradation in resolution. We have utilized data obtained from SLYNCI to obtain accurate nonproportionality data on several scintillators, and have developed a theory to describe the carrier dynamics to fit the data for the light yield versus electron energy.

  14. Facilitating Factors and Barriers to BMI Screening in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stalter, Ann M.; Chaudry, Rosemary V.; Polivka, Barbara J.

    2010-01-01

    The National Association of School Nurses advocates for body mass index (BMI) screening. Little research describes school nurse practice of BMI screening. In this descriptive study, 25 Ohio school nurses participated in three focus groups. An adapted "Healthy People 2010" Determinants of Health Model guided the research questions. School nurses…

  15. Divalent Europium Doped and Un-doped Calcium Iodide Scintillators: Scintillator Characterization and Single Crystal Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Boatner, Lynn A; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine; Kolopus, James A; Neal, John S

    2015-01-01

    The alkaline-earth scintillator, CaI2:Eu2+, was initially discovered around 1964 by Hofstadter, Odell, and Schmidt. Serious practical problems quickly arose, however, that were associated with the growth of large monolithic single crystals of this material due to its lamellar, mica-like structure. As a result of its theoretically higher light yield, CaI2:Eu2+ has the potential to exceed the excellent scintillation performance of SrI2:Eu2+. In fact, theoretical predictions for the light yield of CaI2:Eu2+ scintillators suggested that an energy resolution approaching 2% at 662 keV could be achievable. As in the case of the early SrI2:Eu2+ scintillator, the performance of CaI2:Eu2+ scintillators has traditionally suffered due, at least in part, to outdated materials synthesis, component stoichiometry/purity, and single-crystal-growth techniques. Based on our recent work on SrI2:Eu2+ scintillators in single-crystal form, we have developed new techniques that are applied here to CaI2:Eu2+ and pure CaI2 with the goal of growing large un-cracked crystals and, potentially, realizing the theoretically predicted performance of the CaI2:Eu2+ form of this material. Calcium iodide does not adhere to modern glassy carbon Bridgman crucibles - so there should be no differential thermal-contraction-induced crystal/crucible stresses on cooling that would result in crystal cracking of the lamellar structure of CaI2. Here we apply glassy carbon crucible Bridgman growth, high-purity growth-charge compounds, our molten salt processing/filtration technique, and extended vacuum-melt-pumping methods to the growth of both CaI2:Eu2+ and un-doped CaI2. Large scintillating single crystals were obtained, and detailed characterization studies of the scintillation properties of CaI2:Eu2+ and pure CaI2 single crystals are presented that include studies of the effects of plastic deformation of the crystals on the scintillator performance.

  16. Divalent europium doped and un-doped calcium iodide scintillators: Scintillator characterization and single crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boatner, L. A.; Ramey, J. O.; Kolopus, J. A.; Neal, John S.

    2015-06-01

    The alkaline-earth scintillator, CaI2:Eu2+, was initially discovered around 1964 by Hofstadter, Odell, and Schmidt. Serious practical problems quickly arose, however, that were associated with the growth of large monolithic single crystals of this material due to its lamellar, mica-like structure. As a result of its theoretically higher light yield, CaI2:Eu2+ has the potential to exceed the excellent scintillation performance of SrI2:Eu2+. In fact, theoretical predictions for the light yield of CaI2:Eu2+ scintillators suggested that an energy resolution approaching 2% at 662 keV could be achievable. As in the case of the early SrI2:Eu2+ scintillator, the performance of CaI2:Eu2+ scintillators has traditionally suffered due, at least in part, to outdated materials synthesis, component stoichiometry/purity, and single-crystal-growth techniques. Based on our recent work on SrI2:Eu2+ scintillators in single-crystal form, we have developed new techniques that are applied here to CaI2:Eu2+ and pure CaI2 with the goal of growing large un-cracked crystals and, potentially, realizing the theoretically predicted performance of the CaI2:Eu2+ form of this material. Calcium iodide does not adhere to modern glassy carbon Bridgman crucibles-so there should be no differential thermal-contraction-induced crystal/crucible stresses on cooling that would result in crystal cracking of the lamellar structure of CaI2. Here we apply glassy carbon crucible Bridgman growth, high-purity growth-charge compounds, our molten salt processing/filtration technique, and extended vacuum-melt-pumping methods to the growth of both CaI2:Eu2+ and un-doped CaI2. Large scintillating single crystals were obtained, and detailed characterization studies of the scintillation properties of CaI2:Eu2+ and pure CaI2 single crystals are presented that include studies of the effects of plastic deformation of the crystals on the scintillator performance.

  17. Neutron guide

    DOEpatents

    Greene, Geoffrey L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01

    A neutron guide in which lengths of cylindrical glass tubing have rectangular glass plates properly dimensioned to allow insertion into the cylindrical glass tubing so that a sealed geometrically precise polygonal cross-section is formed in the cylindrical glass tubing. The neutron guide provides easier alignment between adjacent sections than do the neutron guides of the prior art.

  18. Plastic fiber scintillator response to fast neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Danly, C. R.; Sjue, S.; Wilde, C. H.; Merrill, F. E.; Haight, R. C.

    2014-11-15

    The Neutron Imaging System at NIF uses an array of plastic scintillator fibers in conjunction with a time-gated imaging system to form an image of the neutron emission from the imploded capsule. By gating on neutrons that have scattered from the 14.1 MeV DT energy to lower energy ranges, an image of the dense, cold fuel around the hotspot is also obtained. An unmoderated spallation neutron beamline at the Weapons Neutron Research facility at Los Alamos was used in conjunction with a time-gated imaging system to measure the yield of a scintillating fiber array over several energy bands ranging from 1 to 15 MeV. The results and comparison to simulation are presented.

  19. Scintillation noise in widefield radio interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedantham, H. K.; Koopmans, L. V. E.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we consider random phase fluctuations imposed during wave propagation through a turbulent plasma (e.g. ionosphere) as a source of additional noise in interferometric visibilities. We derive expressions for visibility variance for the wide field of view case (FOV ˜10°) by computing the statistics of Fresnel diffraction from a stochastic plasma, and provide an intuitive understanding. For typical ionospheric conditions (diffractive scale ˜5-20 km at 150 MHz), we show that the resulting ionospheric `scintillation noise' can be a dominant source of uncertainty at low frequencies (? ? 200 MHz). Consequently, low-frequency widefield radio interferometers must take this source of uncertainty into account in their sensitivity analysis. We also discuss the spatial, temporal, and spectral coherence properties of scintillation noise that determine its magnitude in deep integrations, and influence prospects for its mitigation via calibration or filtering.

  20. Small inorganic scintillators as neutron detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bartle, C.M.; Haight, R.C.

    1998-12-01

    Small organic scintillators that exhibit pulse shape differences (PSD) in response to charged particles have been investigated as possible neutron detectors in the energy range from 1 to 200 MeV. Neutrons in this energy range can induce reactions such as (n,p) and (n,alpha) in these scintillators, and the cross sections for these reactions vary with energy. Pulse-height and PSD distributions were measured as a function of neutron energy for small crystals of NaI(Tl) and CsI(Tl) at the LANSCE-WNR pulsed spallation neutron source. PSD information indicating the relative numbers of protons and alphas produced can give information about the neutron spectrum in fast-neutron radiation fields such as those encountered in space exploration.

  1. Scintillating 99Tc Selective Ion Exchange Resins

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell Greenhalgh; Richard D. Tillotson

    2012-07-01

    Scintillating technetium (99Tc) selective ion exchange resins have been developed and evaluated for equilibrium capacities and detection efficiencies. These resins can be utilized for the in-situ concentration and detection of low levels of pertechnetate anions (99TcO4-) in natural waters. Three different polystyrene type resin support materials were impregnated with varying amounts of tricaprylmethylammonium chloride (Aliquat 336) extractant, several different scintillating fluors and wavelength shifters. The prepared resins were contacted batch-wise to equilibrium over a wide range of 99TcO4- concentrations in natural water. The measured capacities were used to develop Langmuir adsorption isotherms for each resin. 99Tc detection efficiencies were determined and up to 71.4 ± 2.6% was achieved with some resins. The results demonstrate that a low level detection limit for 99TcO4- in natural waters can be realized.

  2. Transparent Ceramic Scintillator Fabrication, Properties and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cherepy, N J; Kuntz, J D; Roberts, J J; Hurst, T A; Drury, O B; Sanner, R D; Tillotson, T M; Payne, S A

    2008-08-24

    Transparent ceramics offer an alternative to single crystals for scintillator applications such as gamma ray spectroscopy and radiography. We have developed a versatile, scaleable fabrication method, using Flame Spray Pyrolysis (FSP) to produce feedstock which is readily converted into phase-pure transparent ceramics. We measure integral light yields in excess of 80,000 Ph/MeV with Cerium-doped Garnets, and excellent optical quality. Avalanche photodiode readout of Garnets provides resolution near 6%. For radiography applications, Lutetium Oxide offers a high performance metric and is formable by ceramics processing. Scatter in transparent ceramics due to secondary phases is the principal limitation to optical quality, and afterglow issues that affect the scintillation performance are presently being addressed.

  3. Internet access to data for scintillation compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, W.W.; West, A.C.; Derenzo, S.E.

    1995-09-01

    The LBL Pulsed X-Ray Facility has scintillation data on a large variety of inorganic scintillators. We offer this information on all compounds that we have tested. The only restrictions/favors that we ask users of this data are: (1) The data is intended for research use and may not be sold; (2) If any portion of the data is used in a publication, that the following text appear somewhere in the publication: {open_quotes}This work was supported in part by the Director, Office of Energy Research, Office of Health and Environmental Research, Medical Applications and Biophysical Research Division of the U.S. Department of Energy under contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098, and in part by Public Health Service Grant No. R01 CA48002 awarded by the National Cancer Institutes, Department of Health and Human Services.{close_quotes}.

  4. Reflectance of polytetrafluoroethylene for xenon scintillation light

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, C.; Pinto da Cunha, J.; Pereira, A.; Chepel, V.; Lopes, M. I.; Solovov, V.; Neves, F.

    2010-03-15

    Gaseous and liquid xenon particle detectors are being used in a number of applications including dark matter search and neutrino-less double beta decay experiments. Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) is often used in these detectors both as electrical insulator and as a light reflector to improve the efficiency of detection of scintillation photons. However, xenon emits in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) wavelength region ({lambda}{approx_equal}175 nm) where the reflecting properties of PTFE are not sufficiently known. In this work, we report on measurements of PTFE reflectance, including its angular distribution, for the xenon scintillation light. Various samples of PTFE, manufactured by different processes (extruded, expanded, skived, and pressed) have been studied. The data were interpreted with a physical model comprising both specular and diffuse reflections. The reflectance obtained for these samples ranges from about 47% to 66% for VUV light. Other fluoropolymers, namely, ethylene tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE), fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP), and perfluoro-alkoxyalkane (PFA) were also measured.

  5. Neutron detection with single crystal organic scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Zaitseva, N; Newby, J; Hamel, S; Carman, L; Faust, M; Lordi, V; Cherepy, N; Stoeffl, W; Payne, S

    2009-07-15

    Detection of high-energy neutrons in the presence of gamma radiation background utilizes pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) phenomena in organics studied previously only with limited number of materials, mostly liquid scintillators and single crystal stilbene. The current paper presents the results obtained with broader varieties of luminescent organic single crystals. The studies involve experimental tools of crystal growth and material characterization in combination with the advanced computer modeling, with the final goal of better understanding the relevance between the nature of the organic materials and their PSD properties. Special consideration is given to the factors that may diminish or even completely obscure the PSD properties in scintillating crystals. Among such factors are molecular and crystallographic structures that determine exchange coupling and exciton mobility in organic materials and the impurity effect discussed on the examples of trans-stilbene, bibenzyl, 9,10-diphenylanthracene and diphenylacetylene.

  6. Codoped direct-gap semiconductor scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Derenzo, Stephen Edward (Pinole, CA); Bourret-Courchesne, Edith (Berkeley, CA); Weber, Marvin J. (Danville, CA); Klintenberg, Mattias K. (Berkeley, CA)

    2008-07-29

    Fast, bright inorganic scintillators at room temperature are based on radiative electron-hole recombination in direct-gap semiconductors, e.g. CdS and ZnO. The direct-gap semiconductor is codoped with two different impurity atoms to convert the semiconductor to a fast, high luminosity scintillator. The codopant scheme is based on dopant band to dopant trap recombination. One dopant provides a significant concentration of carriers of one type (electrons or holes) and the other dopant traps carriers of the other type. Examples include CdS:In,Te; CdS:In,Ag; CdS:In,Na; ZnO:Ga,P; ZnO:Ga,N; ZnO:Ga,S; and GaN:Ge,Mg.

  7. Codoped direct-gap semiconductor scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Derenzo, Stephen E.; Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Weber, Marvin J.; Klintenberg, Mattias K.

    2006-05-23

    Fast, bright inorganic scintillators at room temperature are based on radiative electron-hole recombination in direct-gap semiconductors, e.g. CdS and ZnO. The direct-gap semiconductor is codoped with two different impurity atoms to convert the semiconductor to a fast, high luminosity scintillator. The codopant scheme is based on dopant band to dopant trap recombination. One dopant provides a significant concentration of carriers of one type (electrons or holes) and the other dopant traps carriers of the other type. Examples include CdS:In,Te; CdS:In,Ag; CdS:In,Na; ZnO:Ga,P; ZnO:Ga,N; ZnO:Ga,S; and GaN:Ge,Mg.

  8. Long-term scintillation observations of five pulsars at 1540 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, N.; Manchester, R. N.; Johnston, S.; Rickett, B.; Zhang, J.; Yusup, A.; Chen, M.

    2005-03-01

    From 2001 January to 2002 June, we monitored PSRs B0329+54, B0823+26, B1929+10, B2020+28 and B2021+51 using the Nanshan 25-m radio telescope of the Urumqi Observatory to study their diffractive interstellar scintillation (DISS). The average interval between observations was about 9d and the observation duration ranged between 2 and 6h depending on the pulsar. Wide variations in the DISS parameters were observed over the 18-month data span. Despite this, the average scintillation velocities are in excellent agreement with the proper motion velocities. The average two-dimensional autocorrelation function for PSR B0329+54 is well described by a thin-screen Kolmogorov model, at least along the time and frequency axes. Observed modulation indices for the DISS time-scale and bandwidth and the pulsar flux density are greater than values predicted for a Kolmogorov spectrum of electron density fluctuations. Correlated variations over times that are long compared to the nominal refractive scintillation time are observed, suggesting that larger scale density fluctuations are important. For these pulsars, the scintillation bandwidth as a function of frequency has a power-law index (~3.6) much less than that expected for Kolmogorov turbulence (~4.4). Sloping fringes are commonly observed in the dynamic spectra, especially for PSR B0329+54. The detected range of fringe slopes are limited by our observing resolution. Our observations are sensitive to larger-scale fringes and hence smaller refractive angles, corresponding to the central part of the scattering disc.

  9. Scintillations and Lévy Flights through the Interstellar Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldyrev, Stanislav; Gwinn, Carl

    2003-02-01

    Temporal broadening of pulsar signals results from electron density fluctuations in the interstellar medium that cause the radiation to travel along paths of different lengths. The theory of Gaussian fluctuations predicts that the pulse temporal broadening should scale with the wavelength as ?4 and with the dispersion measure (DM; proportional to the distance to the pulsar) as DM2. However, for large dispersion measures, DM>20pccm-3, the observed scaling is ?4DM4, contradicting the conventional theory. Although the problem has existed for 30 years, there has been no resolution to this paradox. We suggest that scintillations for distant pulsars are caused by non-Gaussian, spatially intermittent density fluctuations with a power-law-like probability distribution. Such a probability distribution does not have a second moment, and therefore the previously applied conventional Fokker-Planck theory does not hold. Instead, we propose to apply the theory of Lévy distributions (so-called Lévy flights). We show that the observed scaling is recovered for large DM if the density differences, ?N, have Lévy distribution decaying as |?N|-5/3. In the thin-screen approximation, the corresponding tail of the time-profile of the arriving signal is estimated to be I(?)~?-4/3.

  10. Scintillating bar detector for antiproton annihilations measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corradini, M.; Leali, M.; Rizzini, E. Lodi; Mascagna, V.; Prest, M.; Vallazza, E.; Venturelli, L.

    2015-08-01

    A detector used in two different experiments of the ASACUSA Collaboration at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator is presented. It consists of several modules, each one made of ~1 m long scintillating bars, which allows the detection of the charged particles produced in the antiproton-nuclei annihilations. The modularity of the detector, its electronics readout and the data acquisition system have been designed to be adapted to different experimental conditions.

  11. Improved Neutron Scintillators Based on Nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis Friesel, PhD

    2008-06-30

    The development work conducted in this SBIR has so far not supported the premise that using nano-particles in LiFZnS:Ag foils improves their transparency to 420 (or other frequency) light. This conclusion is based solely on the light absorption properties of LiFZnS foils fabricated from nano- and from micro-particles. Furthermore, even for the case of the Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} foils, the transmission of 420 nm light gained by using nano-particles all but disappears as the foil thickness is increased beyond about 0.2 mm, a practical scintillator thickness. This was not immediately apparent from the preliminary study since no foils thicker than about 0.04 mm were produced. Initially it was believed that the failure to see an improvement by using nano-particles for the LiFZnS foils was caused by the clumping of the particles in Toluene due to the polarity of the ZnS particles. However, we found, much to our surprise, that nano-particle ZnS alone in polystyrene, and in Epoxy, had worse light transmission properties than the micro-particle foils for equivalent thickness and density foils. The neutron detection measurements, while disappointing, are attributable to our inability to procure or fabricate Bulk Doped ZnS nanoparticles. The cause for the failure of nano-particles to improve the scintillation light, and hence improved neutron detection efficiency, is a fundamental one of light scattering within the scintillator. A consequence of PartTec's documentation of this is that several concepts for the fabrication of improved {sup 6}LiFZnS scintillators were formulated that will be the subject of a future SBIR submission.

  12. Nanophosphor composite scintillators comprising a polymer matrix

    DOEpatents

    Muenchausen, Ross Edward (Los Alamos, NM); Mckigney, Edward Allen (Los Alamos, NM); Gilbertson, Robert David (Los Alamos, NM)

    2010-11-16

    An improved nanophosphor composite comprises surface modified nanophosphor particles in a solid matrix. The nanophosphor particle surface is modified with an organic ligand, or by covalently bonding a polymeric or polymeric precursor material. The surface modified nanophosphor particle is essentially charge neutral, thereby preventing agglomeration of the nanophosphor particles during formation of the composite material. The improved nanophosphor composite may be used in any conventional scintillator application, including in a radiation detector.

  13. Characteristics of Yerevan High Transparency Scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Zorn, Carl; Asryan, Gegham; Egiyan, Kim; Tarverdyan, M.; Amaryan, Moscov; Amaryan, Moskov; Demirchyan, Raphael; Stepanyan, Stepan; Burkert, Volker; Sharabian, Youri

    1992-08-01

    Optical transmission, light output and time characteristics are given for long scintillator strips fabricated at the Yerevan Physics Institute using the extrusion method. It is shown that at 45% relative (to anthracene) light output, good transmission (2.5/2.9 m attenuation length with photomultiplier direct readout and 3/3.5 m attenuation length fiber readout) and time characteristics (average decay time 2.8 nsec) were obtained.

  14. Measurement accuracy and Cerenkov removal for high performance, high spatial resolution scintillation dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Archambault, Louis; Beddar, A. Sam; Gingras, Luc

    2006-01-15

    With highly conformal radiation therapy techniques such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy, radiosurgery, and tomotherapy becoming more common in clinical practice, the use of these narrow beams requires a higher level of precision in quality assurance and dosimetry. Plastic scintillators with their water equivalence, energy independence, and dose rate linearity have been shown to possess excellent qualities that suit the most complex and demanding radiation therapy treatment plans. The primary disadvantage of plastic scintillators is the presence of Cerenkov radiation generated in the light guide, which results in an undesired stem effect. Several techniques have been proposed to minimize this effect. In this study, we compared three such techniques--background subtraction, simple filtering, and chromatic removal--in terms of reproducibility and dose accuracy as gauges of their ability to remove the Cerenkov stem effect from the dose signal. The dosimeter used in this study comprised a 6-mm{sup 3} plastic scintillating fiber probe, an optical fiber, and a color charge-coupled device camera. The whole system was shown to be linear and the total light collected by the camera was reproducible to within 0.31% for 5-s integration time. Background subtraction and chromatic removal were both found to be suitable for precise dose evaluation, with average absolute dose discrepancies of 0.52% and 0.67%, respectively, from ion chamber values. Background subtraction required two optical fibers, but chromatic removal used only one, thereby preventing possible measurement artifacts when a strong dose gradient was perpendicular to the optical fiber. Our findings showed that a plastic scintillation dosimeter could be made free of the effect of Cerenkov radiation.

  15. A slanting light-guide analog decoding high resolution detector for positron emission tomography camera

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, W.H.; Jing, M.; Bendriem, B.; Hartz, R.; Mullani, N.; Gould, K.L.; Michel, C.

    1987-02-01

    Current high resolution PET cameras require the scintillation crystals to be much narrower than the smallest available photomultipliers. In addition, the large number of photomultiplier channels constitutes the major component cost in the camera. Recent new designs use the Anger camera type of analog decoding method to obtain higher resolution and lower cost by using the relatively large photomultipliers. An alternative approach to improve the resolution and cost factors has been proposed, with a system of slanting light-guides between the scintillators and the photomultipliers. In the Anger camera schemes, the scintillation light is distributed to several neighboring photomultipliers which then determine the scintillation location. In the slanting light-guide design, the scintillation is metered and channeled to only two photomultipliers for the decision making. This paper presents the feasibility and performance achievable with the slanting light-guide detectors. With a crystal/photomultiplier ratio of 6/1, the intrinsic resolution was found to be 4.0 mm using the first non-optimized prototype light-guides on BGO crystals. The axial resolution will be about 5-6 mm.

  16. Pulse height model for deuterated scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haitang; Enqvist, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    An analytical model of light pulse height distribution for finite deuterated scintillation detectors is created using the impulse approximation. Particularly, the energy distribution of a scattered neutron is calculated based on an existing collision probability scheme for general cylindrical shaped detectors considering double differential cross-sections. The light pulse height distribution is analytically and numerically calculated by convoluting collision sequences with the light output function for an EJ-315 detector from our measurements completed at Ohio University. The model provides a good description of collision histories capturing transferred neutron energy in deuterium-based scintillation materials. The resulting light pulse height distribution details pulse compositions and their corresponding contributions. It shows that probabilities of neutron collision with carbon and deuterium nuclei are comparable, however the light pulse amplitude due to collisions with carbon nuclei is small and mainly located at the lower region of the light pulse distribution axis. The model can explore those neutron interaction events that generate pulses near or below a threshold that would be imposed in measurements. A comparison is made between the light pulse height distributions given by the analytical model and measurements. It reveals a significant probability of a neutron generating a small light pulse due to collisions with carbon nuclei when compared to larger light pulse generated by collisions involving deuterium nuclei. This model is beneficial to understand responses of scintillation materials and pulse compositions, as well as nuclei information extraction from recorded pulses.

  17. Boron-Loaded Silicone Rubber Scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Z.W.; Maya, L.; Brown, G.M.; Sloop, F.V.Jr

    2003-05-12

    Silicone rubber received attention as an alternative to polyvinyltoluene in applications in which the scintillator is exposed to high doses because of the increased resistance of the rubber to the formation of blue-absorbing color centers. Work by Bowen, et al., and Harmon, et al., demonstrated their properties under gamma/x-ray irradiation, and Bell, et al. have shown their response to thermal neutrons. This last work, however, provided an example of a silicone in which both the boron and the scintillator were contained in the rubber as solutes, a formulation which led to the precipitation of solids and sublimation of the boron component. In the present work we describe a scintillator in which the boron is chemically bonded to the siloxane and so avoids the problem of precipitation and loss of boron to sublimation. Material containing up to 18% boron, by weight, was prepared, mounted on photomultipliers, and exposed to both neutron and gamma fluxes. Pulse height spectra showing the neutron and photon response were obtained, and although the light output was found to be much poorer than from samples in which boron was dissolved, the higher boron concentrations enabled essentially 100% neutron absorption in only a few millimeters' thickness of rubber.

  18. Scintillation mechanisms in rare earth orthophosphates

    SciTech Connect

    Wojtowicz, A.J.; Wisniewski, D. |; Lempicki, A.

    1994-12-31

    In this Communication we present results of our studies on scintillation properties of rare earth orthophosphates. Despite of the PO{sub 4} group high frequency vibrations, which limit the conversion efficiency in orthophosphate lattices, some of them are very promising, as evidenced by the exceptionally good scintillation properties of LuPO{sub 4}:Ce. We have studied the following orthophosphate crystals: YbPO{sub 4}:Ce, YbPO{sub 4}, and Lu{sub x}Yb{sup 1-x}PO{sub 4}:Ce. Both Ce and Yb ions scintillate (through d-f transition and charge transfer state decay, respectively) but, unfortunately, they also show strong tendency toward mutual quenching. We propose that nonradiative Yb-Ce energy transfer and the nonradiative decay of the (Yb{sup 2+} + Ce{sup 4+}) charge transfer state are responsible for the observed effect. Therefore ytterbium does not provide cheaper substitute for the optically inactive RE ion (lutetium) in the orthophosphate lattice, on the contrary, it has to be carefully avoided whenever a Ce-activation is used.

  19. Scintillation theory of eclipse shadow bands

    SciTech Connect

    Codona, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    The results of a theoretical investigation of solar eclipse shadow bands are presented. The study provides both quantitative and qualitative insight into the factors governing the visibility of shadow bands. Using only standard, weak-scattering scintillation theory and standard models for atmospheric turbulence, all of the salient features of the shadow bands are explained. The contrast is found to be greater for shorter wavelengths and the band spacing to scale like the square-root of the wavelength very near totality. For times greater than about 20 seconds before (or after) totality the band spacing becomes frequency-independent and the scintillations are dominated by turbulence near the ground. The turbulence mainly responsible for shadow bands is found to be below two kilometers in altitude. Turbulence at the tropopause is found to have no impact on shadow bands until 2-3 seconds from totality. Longer eclipes are expected to show bands with greater contrast and linearity. Intensity correlation scales are typically less than 10cm within 30 seconds of totality. The scintillation theory predictions for shadow band structure motion, and evolution are found to be in agreement with both visual and photoelectric observations.

  20. Scintillators with potential to supersede lanthanum bromide

    SciTech Connect

    Cherepy, Nerine; Payne, Steven; Aszatlos, Steve; Hull, Giulia; Kuntz, J.; Niedermayr, Tom; Pimputkar, S.; Roberts, J.; Sanner, R.; Tillotson, T.; van Loef, Edger; Wilson, Cody; Shah, Kanai; Roy, U.; Hawrami, R.; Burger, Arnold; Boatner, Lynn; Choong, Woon-Seng; Moses, William

    2009-06-01

    New scintillators for high-resolution gamma ray spectroscopy have been identified, grown and characterized. Our development efforts have focused on two classes of high light yield materials: Europium-doped alkaline earth halides and Cerium-doped garnets. Of the halide single crystals we have grown by the Bridgman method - SrI{sub 2}, CaI{sub 2}, SrBr{sub 2}, BaI{sub 2} and BaBr{sub 2} - SrI{sub 2} is the most promising. SrI{sub 2}(Eu) emits into the Eu{sup 2+} band, centered at 435 nm, with a decay time of 1.2 {micro}s and a light yield of up to 115,000 photons/MeV. It offers energy resolution better than 3% FWHM at 662 keV, and exhibits excellent light yield proportionality. Transparent ceramics fabrication allows production of Gadolinium- and Terbium-based garnets which are not growable by melt techniques due to phase instabilities. While scintillation light yields of Cerium-doped ceramic garnets are high, light yield non-proportionality and slow decay components appear to limit their prospects for high energy resolution. We are developing an understanding of the mechanisms underlying energy dependent scintillation light yield non-proportionality and how it affects energy resolution. We have also identified aspects of optical design that can be optimized to enhance energy resolution.

  1. Broadband Ionospheric Scintillation Measurements from Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suszcynsky, D. M.; Light, M. E.; Pigue, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Radio Frequency Propagation (RFProp) experiment consists of a satellite-based radio receiver suite to study various aspects of trans-ionospheric signal propagation and detection in four frequency bands, 2 - 55 MHz, 125 - 175 MHz, 365 - 415 MHz and 825 - 1100 MHz. In this paper, we present an overview of the RFProp on-orbit research and analysis effort with particular focus on an equatorial scintillation experiment called ESCINT. The 3-year ESCINT project is designed to characterize equatorial ionospheric scintillation in the upper HF and lower VHF portions of the radio spectrum (20 - 150 MHz). Both a 40 MHz continuous wave (CW) signal and 30 - 42 MHz swept frequency signal are transmitted to the satellite receiver suite from the Reagan Test Site at Kwajalein Atoll in the Marshall Islands (8.7° N, 167.7° E) in four separate campaigns centered on the 2014 and 2015 equinoxes. Results from the first campaign conducted from April 22 - May 15, 2014 will be presented including (a) coherence bandwidth measurements over a full range of transmission frequencies and scintillation activity levels, (b) spread-Doppler clutter effects arising from preferential ray paths to the satellite due to refraction off of isolated density irregularities, and (c) supporting ray-trace simulations. The broadband nature of the measurements is found to offer unique insight into both the structure of ionospheric irregularities and their impact on HF/VHF trans-ionospheric radio wave propagation.

  2. Interstellar Scintillation of Extragalactic Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rickett, Barney

    1998-05-01

    Interstellar scintillation (ISS) causes a Galactic seeing problem for radio astronomy. Thus the flux density from a very compact radio source appears to scintillate on a time scale that ranges from days to minutes depending on the wavelength and Galactic path length. I will review the observed variations from various sources, which are among the most compact cores of active galactic nuclei (AGN). An ISS interpretation of the observed variations yields estimates of the source sizes in the range 0.01 to 10 milliarcsec, often much smaller than the resolution from earth-based VLBI. The recognition of such variations as apparent reduces the implied brightness temperature by a factor as large as one million, compared to the extreme values deduced by interpreting the variations as intrinsic. Some such intraday variable sources also exhibit partially correlated variations in their polarized flux and angle. The changes in interstellar Faradya rotation are too slow to cause such variations by many orders of magnitude. I will report on attempts to model the polarized flux variations as due to independent ISS from polarized components with intrinsic polarization structure in the source at a level of tens of microarcseconds. I will also discuss how Frail et al. (Nature, 389, 261, 1997) used interstellar scintillation to estimate the size of the expanding fireball in the radio afterglow of gamma-ray burst 970508.

  3. Newborn Screening

    PubMed Central

    Pitt, James J

    2010-01-01

    Early detection of many disorders, mainly inherited, is feasible with population-wide analysis of newborn dried blood spot samples. Phenylketonuria was the prototype disorder for newborn screening (NBS) and early dietary treatment has resulted in vastly improved outcomes for this disorder. Testing for primary hypothyroidism and cystic fibrosis (CF) was later added to NBS programs following the development of robust immunoassays and molecular testing. Current CF testing usually relies on a combined immunoreactive trypsin/mutation detection strategy. Multiplex testing for approximately 25 inborn errors of metabolism using tandem mass spectrometry is a relatively recent addition to NBS. The simultaneous introduction of many disorders has caused some re-evaluation of the traditional guidelines for NBS, because very rare disorders or disorders without good treatments can be included with minimal effort. NBS tests for many other disorders have been developed, but these are less uniformly applied or are currently considered developmental. This review focuses on Australasian NBS practices. PMID:20498829

  4. Methods for the continuous production of plastic scintillator materials

    DOEpatents

    Bross, Alan (Downers Grove, IL); Pla-Dalmau, Anna (Naperville, IL); Mellott, Kerry (Malta, IL)

    1999-10-19

    Methods for producing plastic scintillating material employing either two major steps (tumble-mix) or a single major step (inline-coloring or inline-doping). Using the two step method, the polymer pellets are mixed with silicone oil, and the mixture is then tumble mixed with the dopants necessary to yield the proper response from the scintillator material. The mixture is then placed in a compounder and compounded in an inert gas atmosphere. The resultant scintillator material is then extruded and pelletized or formed. When only a single step is employed, the polymer pellets and dopants are metered into an inline-coloring extruding system. The mixture is then processed under a inert gas atmosphere, usually argon or nitrogen, to form plastic scintillator material in the form of either scintillator pellets, for subsequent processing, or as material in the direct formation of the final scintillator shape or form.

  5. Separation of Scintillation and Cherenkov Lights in Linear Alkyl Benzene

    E-print Network

    Li, Mohan; Yeh, Minfang; Wang, Zhe; Chen, Shaomin

    2015-01-01

    To separate scintillation and Cherenkov lights in water-based liquid scintillator detectors is a desired feature for future neutrino and proton decay researches. Linear alkyl benzene (LAB) is one important ingredient of a water-based liquid scintillator being developed. In this paper we observed a good separation of scintillation and Cherenkov lights in an LAB sample. The rising and decay times of the scintillation light of the LAB were measured to be $(7.7\\pm3.0)\\ \\rm{ns}$ and $(36.6\\pm2.4)\\ \\rm{ns}$, respectively, while the full width [-3$\\sigma$, 3$\\sigma$] of the Cherenkov light was 12 ns dominated by the time resolution of our photomultiplier tubes. The light yield of the scintillation was measured to be $(1.01\\pm0.12)\\times10^3\\ \\rm{photons}/\\rm{MeV}$.

  6. Temperature Dependence of Scintillation Properties of Bright Oxide Scintillators for Well-Logging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagida, Takayuki; Fujimoto, Yutaka; Kurosawa, Shunsuke; Kamada, Kei; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Nikl, Martin; Chani, Valery

    2013-07-01

    Scintillation characteristics such as the pulse height, energy resolution, and decay time of single crystals of Tl-doped NaI (Tl:NaI), Ce-doped Lu2SiO5 (Ce:LSO), Ce-doped YAlO3 (Ce:YAP), Ce-doped Gd3(Al,Ga)5O12 (Ce:GAGG), Pr-doped Lu3Al5O12 (Pr:LuAG), undoped LuAG, and Ce-doped Y3Al5O12 (Ce:YAG) transparent ceramics were compared at 25-150 °C to simulate well logging conditions. For increasing temperature, the light output of the scintillators decreased, mostly because of thermal quenching. Among these samples, Pr:LuAG demonstrated the highest scintillation performance at 150 °C.

  7. A Model for the Secondary Scintillation Pulse Shape from a Gas Proportional Scintillation Counter

    E-print Network

    Kazkaz, Kareem

    2015-01-01

    Proportional scintillation counters (PSCs), both single- and dual-phase, can measure the scintillation (S1) and ionization (S2) channels from particle interactions within the detector volume. The signal obtained from these detectors depends first on the physics of the medium (the initial scintillation and ionization), and second how the physics of the detector manipulates the resulting photons and liberated electrons. In this paper we develop a model of the detector physics that incorporates event topology, detector geometry, electric field configuration, purity, optical properties of components, and wavelength shifters. We present an analytic form of the model, which allows for general study of detector design and operation, and a Monte Carlo model which enables a more detailed exploration of S2 events. This model may be used to study systematic effects in currents detectors such as energy and position reconstruction, pulse shape discrimination, event topology, dead time calculations, purity, and electric fi...

  8. Measurement of scintillation efficiency for nuclear recoils in liquid argon

    E-print Network

    D. Gastler; E. Kearns; A. Hime; L. C. Stonehill; S. Seibert; J. Klein; W. H. Lippincott; D. N. McKinsey; J. A. Nikkel

    2012-05-08

    The scintillation light yield of liquid argon from nuclear recoils relative to electronic recoils has been measured as a function of recoil energy from 10 keVr up to 250 keVr. The scintillation efficiency, defined as the ratio of the nuclear recoil scintillation response to the electronic recoil response, is 0.25 \\pm 0.01 + 0.01(correlated) above 20 keVr.

  9. Apparatus for positioning an external radioactive standard in a liquid scintillation counter

    SciTech Connect

    Horrocks, D.L.; Kampf, R.S.

    1987-07-07

    This patent describes a liquid scintillation counter having a counting chamber for receiving a sample containing a scintillator substance and a sample of a radioactive substance to be counted. The improved apparatus positions a radioactive source in an operating location to irradiate the sample in the counting chamber comprising, in combination: (1) a continuous bidirectionally flexible conveyor forming a closed loop for conveying the radioactive source through on operating location and a storage location; (2) means supporting the radioactive source at a position along the flexible conveyor for conveyance; (3) guide means for supporting the conveyor and for guiding conveyor movement along a selected path, the path transversing at spaced positions the storage location for the radioactive source remote from the counting chamber and the operating location for the radioactive source near to the counting chamber; and (4) drive means coupled to the continuous flexible conveyor to draw the conveyor around the path for conveying the radioactive source through the spaced storage and operating locations.

  10. Scintillation-induced Intermittency in SETI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordes, James M.; Lazio, Joseph W.; Sagan, Carl

    1997-10-01

    We use scattering theory, simulations, and empirical constraints on interstellar scintillations to discuss the intermittency of radio signals from extraterrestrial intelligence (ETI). The number of ETI sources in the Galaxy has a direct influence on the expected dynamic range of fluxes in a survey, through inverse square-law effects and, equally importantly, by the number of independent statistical trials made on modulations caused by interstellar scintillations. We demonstrate that scintillations are very likely to allow initial detections of narrowband signals, while making redetections extremely improbable, a result that follows from the skewed, exponential distribution of the modulation. This conclusion holds for relatively distant sources but does not apply to radio SETI toward nearby stars (<~100 pc). Recent SETI has found nonrepeating, narrowband events that are largely unexplained. We consider three models in order to assess these events and to analyze large surveys in general: (model I) radiometer noise fluctuations; (model II) a population of constant Galactic sources that undergo deep fading and amplification due to interstellar scintillation, consistent with ETI transmissions; and (model III) real, transient signals (or hardware errors) of either terrestrial or extraterrestrial origin. We derive likelihood and Bayesian tests of the models for individual events and globally on entire surveys. Applying them to The Planetary Society/Harvard META data, we find that models II and III are both highly preferred to model I, but that models II and III are about equally likely. In the context of model II, the likelihood analysis indicates that candidate events above threshold (~32 ?) are combinations of large amplitude noise fluctuations and scintillation gains, making it highly probable that events seen once will only very rarely be seen again. Ruling out model II in favor of model III is difficult--to do so, many more reobservations (e.g., thousands) are needed than were conducted in META (hundreds) or the reobservation threshold must be much lower than was used in META. We cannot, therefore, rule out the possibility that META events are real, intrinsically steady ETI signals. Our formalism can be used to analyze any SETI program. We estimate the number of reobservations required to rule out model II in favor of model III, taking into account that reobservations made promptly sample the same scintillation gain as in the original detection, while delayed reobservations sample a decorrelated scintillation modulation. The required number is a strong function of the thresholds used in the original survey and in reobservations. We assess optimal methods for applying statistical tests in future SETI programs that use multiple site and multiple beam observations as well as single site observations. We recommend that results be recorded on many more events than have been made to date. In particular, we suggest that surveys use thresholds that are far below the false-alarm threshold that is usually set to yield a small number of noise-induced ``detections'' in a massive survey. Instead, large numbers of events should be recorded in order to (1) demonstrate that background noise conforms to the distribution expected for it; and (2) investigate departures from the expected noise distribution as due to interference or to celestial signals. In this way, celestial signals can be investigated at levels much smaller than the false-alarm threshold. The threshold level for archiving candidate intensities and their corresponding sky positions is best defined in terms of the recording and computational technology that is available at a cost commensurate with other survey costs.

  11. Lanthanide doped strontium-barium cesium halide scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Bizarri, Gregory; Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Derenzo, Stephen E.; Borade, Ramesh B.; Gundiah, Gautam; Yan, Zewu; Hanrahan, Stephen M.; Chaudhry, Anurag; Canning, Andrew

    2015-06-09

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising an inorganic scintillator comprising an optionally lanthanide-doped strontium-barium, optionally cesium, halide, useful for detecting nuclear material.

  12. Multifrequency equatorial ionospheric scintillations in American and Indian zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rastogi, R. G.; Aarons, J.; Whitney, H. E.; Mullen, J. P.; Pantoja, J.; Deshpande, M. R.; Vats, H. O.; Chandra, H.; Davies, K.

    1980-01-01

    Amplitude scintillations of 40/41, 140 and 360 MHz transmissions recorded at Huancayo (phase I) and at Ootacamund (phase II) of the ATS-6 program are compared. The scintillations were found to be strongest between 20 and 24 hr LT with another peak around midday. The daytime scintillations do not show a significant seasonal variation at either of these stations. The nighttime scintillations were maximum during December solstices at Huancayo and during equinoxes at Ootacamund and suggested to be due to non-q type of sporadic E following the occurrence of counter-electrojet.

  13. Energy Transfer Based Nanocomposite Scintillator for Radiation Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslam, Soha; Sahi, Sunil; Chen, Wei; Ma, Lun; Kenarangui, Rasool

    2014-09-01

    Scintillators are the materials that emit light upon irradiation with high energy radiation like X-ray or gamma-ray. Inorganic single crystal and organic (plastic and liquid) are the two most used scintillator types. Both of these scintillator kinds have advantages and disadvantages. Inorganic single crystals are expensive and difficult to grow in desire shape and size. Also, single crystal scintillator such as NaI and CsI are very hygroscopic. On the other hand, organic scintillators have low density which limits their applications in gamma spectroscopy. Due to high quantum yield and size dependent emission, nanoparticles have attracted interested in various field of research. Here, we have studies the nanoparticles for radiation detection. We have synthesized nanoparticles of Cerium fluoride (CeF3), Zinc Oxide (ZnO), Cadmium Telluride (CdTe), Copper complex and Zinc sulfide (ZnS). We have used Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) principle to enhance the luminescence properties of nanocomposite scintillator. Nanocomposites scintillators are structurally characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Optical properties are studied using Photoluminescence, UV-Visible and X-ray. Enhancements in the luminescence are observed under UV and X-ray excitation. Preliminary studies shows nanocomposite scintillators are promising for radiation detection. Scintillators are the materials that emit light upon irradiation with high energy radiation like X-ray or gamma-ray. Inorganic single crystal and organic (plastic and liquid) are the two most used scintillator types. Both of these scintillator kinds have advantages and disadvantages. Inorganic single crystals are expensive and difficult to grow in desire shape and size. Also, single crystal scintillator such as NaI and CsI are very hygroscopic. On the other hand, organic scintillators have low density which limits their applications in gamma spectroscopy. Due to high quantum yield and size dependent emission, nanoparticles have attracted interested in various field of research. Here, we have studies the nanoparticles for radiation detection. We have synthesized nanoparticles of Cerium fluoride (CeF3), Zinc Oxide (ZnO), Cadmium Telluride (CdTe), Copper complex and Zinc sulfide (ZnS). We have used Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) principle to enhance the luminescence properties of nanocomposite scintillator. Nanocomposites scintillators are structurally characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Optical properties are studied using Photoluminescence, UV-Visible and X-ray. Enhancements in the luminescence are observed under UV and X-ray excitation. Preliminary studies shows nanocomposite scintillators are promising for radiation detection. US Department of Homeland Security.

  14. Composite solid-state scintillators for neutron detection

    DOEpatents

    Dai, Sheng; Im, Hee-Jung; Pawel, Michelle D.

    2006-09-12

    Applicant's present invention is a composite scintillator for neutron detection comprising a matrix material fabricated from an inorganic sol-gel precursor solution homogeneously doped with a liquid scintillating material and a neutron absorbing material. The neutron absorbing material yields at least one of an electron, a proton, a triton, an alpha particle or a fission fragment when the neutron absorbing material absorbs a neutron. The composite scintillator further comprises a liquid scintillating material in a self-assembled micelle formation homogeneously doped in the matrix material through the formation of surfactant-silica composites. The scintillating material is provided to scintillate when traversed by at least one of an electron, a proton, a triton, an alpha particle or a fission fragment. The scintillating material is configured such that the matrix material surrounds the micelle formation of the scintillating material. The composite scintillator is fabricated and applied as a thin film on substrate surfaces, a coating on optical fibers or as a glass material.

  15. GPS phase scintillation and proxy index at high latitudes during a moderate geomagnetic storm

    E-print Network

    Prikryl, P.

    The amplitude and phase scintillation indices are customarily obtained by specialised GPS Ionospheric Scintillation and TEC Monitors (GISTMs) from L1 signal recorded at the rate of 50 Hz. The scintillation indices S[subscript ...

  16. Oral Cancer Screening

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Screening Research Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Screening (PDQ®) What is screening? ... are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Key Points Oral cancer is ...

  17. Health Screenings and Immunizations

    MedlinePLUS

    ... your primary doctor. Blood Tests – A Common Screening Method (Source: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute) Click ... tests, see What Are Blood Tests? Other Screening Methods Doctors can't screen for all diseases and ...

  18. RBC Antibody Screen

    MedlinePLUS

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? RBC Antibody Screen Share this page: Was this page helpful? ... Indirect Coombs Test; Indirect Anti-human Globulin Test; Antibody Screen Formal name: Red Blood Cell Antibody Screen ...

  19. Screen time and children

    MedlinePLUS

    "Screen time" is a term used for activities done in front of a screen, such as watching TV, working on a computer, or playing video games. Screen time is sedentary activity, meaning you are being physically ...

  20. Breast Cancer Screening Methods

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... medlineplus/videos/news/Screening_Methods_123015.html Breast Cancer Screening Methods HealthDay News Video - December 31, 2015 ... this page, please enable JavaScript. Play video: Breast Cancer Screening Methods For closed captioning, click the CC ...

  1. Groundwater Screen

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1993-11-09

    GWSCREEN was developed for assessment of the groundwater pathway from leaching of radioactive and non radioactive substances from surface or buried sources and release to percolation ponds. The code calculates the limiting soil concentration or effluent release concentration such that, after leaching and transport to the aquifer, regulatory contaminant levels in groundwater are not exceeded. The code uses a mass conservation approach to model three processes: Contaminant release from a source volume, contaminant transport inmore »the unsaturated zone, and contaminant transport in the saturated zone. The source model considers the sorptive properties and solubility of the contaminant. Transport in the unsaturated zone is described by a plug flow model. Transport in the saturated zone is calculated with a semi-analytical solution to the advection dispersion equation in groundwater. Concentration as a function of time at a user specified receptor point and maximum concentration averaged over the exposure interval are also calculated. In addition, the code calculates transport and impacts of radioactive progeny. Input to GWSCREEN is through one, free format ASCII file. This code was designed for assessment and screening of the groundwater pathway when field data is limited. It was not intended to be a predictive tool.« less

  2. Monte Carlo calculation of the spatial response (Modulated Transfer Function) of a scintillation flat panel and comparison with experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juste, Belén; Miró, Rafael; Monasor, Paula; Verdú, Gumersindo

    2015-11-01

    Phosphor screens are commonly used in many X-ray imaging applications. The design and optimization of these detectors can be achieved using Monte Carlo codes to simulate radiation transport in scintillation materials and to improve the spatial response. This work presents an exhaustive procedure to measure the spatial resolution of a scintillation flat panel image and to evaluate the agreement with data obtained by simulation. To evaluate the spatial response we have used the Modulated Transfer Function (MTF) parameter. According to this, we have obtained the Line Spread Function (LSF) of the system since the Fourier Transform (FT) of the LSF gives the MTF. The experimental images were carried out using a medical X-ray tube (Toshiba E7299X) and a flat panel (Hammamatsu C9312SK). Measurements were based on the slit methodology experimental implementation, which measures the response of the system to a line. LSF measurements have been performed using a 0.2 mm wide lead slit superimposed over the flat panel. The detector screen was modelled with MCNP (version 6) Monte Carlo simulation code in order to analyze the effect of the acquisition setup configuration and to compare the response of scintillator screens with the experimental results. MCNP6 offers the possibility of studying the optical physics parameters (optical scattering and absorption coefficients) that occur in the phosphor screen. The study has been tested for different X-ray tube voltages, from 100 to 140 kV. An acceptable convergence between the MTF results obtained with MCNP6 and the experimental measurements have been obtained.

  3. Fundamental study of inorganic-organic hybrid scintillator using Pr:Lu3Al5O12 and plastic scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamada, Kei; Kurosawa, Shunsuke; Yokota, Yuui; Yanagida, Takayuki; Nikl, Martin; Yoshikawa, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Read out test of inorganic-organic hybrid scintillator; Pr:LuAG single crystal covered with plastic scintillator BC-499 is demonstrated. Emission peaks of the hybrid scintillator was observed around 430 nm, which suit to the sensitive wavelength of photomultiplier tube (PMT). The Pr:LuAG sample coated with BC-499 showed the better light output than the that of Pr:LuAG itself. Light output was increased up to 30% sing PMT (Hamamatsu R9800). Decay curve of the hybrid scintillator was also measured and successfully modeled. Corporation.

  4. A Model for the Secondary Scintillation Pulse Shape from a Gas Proportional Scintillation Counter

    E-print Network

    Kareem Kazkaz; Tenzing Henry Yatish Joshi

    2015-12-16

    Proportional scintillation counters (PSCs), both single- and dual-phase, can measure the scintillation (S1) and ionization (S2) channels from particle interactions within the detector volume. The signal obtained from these detectors depends first on the physics of the medium (the initial scintillation and ionization), and second how the physics of the detector manipulates the resulting photons and liberated electrons. In this paper we develop a model of the detector physics that incorporates event topology, detector geometry, electric field configuration, purity, optical properties of components, and wavelength shifters. We present an analytic form of the model, which allows for general study of detector design and operation, and a Monte Carlo model which enables a more detailed exploration of S2 events. This model may be used to study systematic effects in currents detectors such as energy and position reconstruction, pulse shape discrimination, event topology, dead time calculations, purity, and electric field uniformity. We present a comparison of this model with experimental data collected with an argon gas proportional scintillation counter (GPSC), operated at 20 C and 1 bar, and irradiated with an internal, collimated 55Fe source. Additionally we discuss how the model may be incorporated in Monte Carlo simulations of both GPSCs and dual-phase detectors, increasing the reliability of the simulation results and allowing for tests of the experimental data analysis algorithms.

  5. Cytomegalovirus in pregnancy: to screen or not to screen

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is now the commonest congenital form of infective neurological handicap, recognized by the Institute of Medicine as the leading priority for the developed world in congenital infection. In the absence of an effective vaccine, universal screening for CMV in pregnancy has been proposed, in order that primary infection could be diagnosed and- potentially- the burden of disability due to congenital CMV prevented. Discussion Universal screening for CMV to identify seronegative women at the beginning of pregnancy could potentially reduce the burden of congenital CMV in one of three ways. The risk of acquiring the infection during pregnancy has been shown to be reduced by institution of simple hygiene measures (primary prevention). Among women who seroconvert during pregnancy, CMV hyperimmune globulin (CMV HIG) shows promise in reducing the risk of perinatal transmission (secondary prevention), and CMV HIG and/ or antivirals may be effective in reducing the risk of clinical sequelae among those known to be infected (tertiary prevention). The reports from these studies have re-ignited interest in universal screening for CMV, but against the potential benefit of these exciting therapies needs to be weighed the challenges associated with the implementation of any universal screening in pregnancy. These include; the optimal test, and timing of screening, to maximize detection; an approach to the management of equivocal results, and the cost effectiveness of the proposed screening program. In this article, we provide an overview of current knowledge and ongoing trials in the prevention, diagnosis and management of congenital CMV. Recognising that CMV screening is already being offered to many patients on an ad hoc basis, we also provide a management algorithm to guide clinicians and assist in counseling patients. Summary We suggest that- on the basis of current data- the criteria necessary to recommend universal screening for CMV are not yet met, but this position is likely to change if trials currently underway confirm that CMV HIG and/ or antivirals are effective in reducing the burden of congenital CMV disease. PMID:23594714

  6. Comparing the response of PSD-capable plastic scintillator to standard liquid scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolf, Richard S.; Hutcheson, Anthony L.; Gwon, Chul; Phlips, Bernard F.; Wulf, Eric A.

    2015-06-01

    This work discusses a test campaign to characterize the response of the recently developed plastic scintillator with pulse shape discrimination (PSD) capabilities (EJ-299-33). PSD is a property exhibited by certain types of scintillating material in which incident stimuli (fast neutrons or ? rays) can be separated by exploiting differences in the scintillation light pulse tail. Detector geometries used were: a 10 cm×10 cm×10 cm cube and a 10-cm diameter×10-cm long cylinder. EJ-301 and EJ-309 liquid scintillators with well-known responses were also tested. The work was conducted at the University of Massachusetts Lowell Van De Graaff accelerator. The facility accelerated protons on a thin Li target to yield quasi-monoenergetic neutrons from the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction (Q-value: -1.644 MeV). Collimated fast neutrons were obtained by placing detectors behind a neutron spectrometer. Rotating the spectrometer, and thus changing the neutron energy, allowed us to achieve 0.5-3.2 MeV neutrons in 200-300 keV steps. Data were acquired through a flash analog-to-digital converter (ADC) capable of performing digital PSD measurements. By using the PSD technique to separate the neutron events from unwanted ? background, we constructed a pulse height spectrum at each energy. Obtaining a relationship of the relative light output versus energy allowed us to construct the response function for the EJ-299-33 and liquid scintillator. The EJ-299-33 response in terms of electron equivalent energy (Ee.e.) vs. proton equivalent energy (Ep.e.), how it compared with the standard xylene-based EJ-301 (or, NE-213/BC-501 A equivalent) and EJ-309 liquid scintillator response, and how the EJ-301 and EJ-309 compared, are presented. We find that the EJ-299-33 demonstrated a lower light output by up to 40% for <1.0 MeV neutrons; and ranging between a 5-35% reduction for 2.5-3.0 MeV neutrons compared to the EJ-301/309, depending on the scintillator and geometry. Monte Carlo modeling techniques were used to investigate how the neutron beam and accelerator background environment affected the detector response. We find relatively good agreement between our results and the modeling; however, the observed response could not be fully accounted for due to events with pulse pile up, thus leading to contamination of the neutron PSD selected events.

  7. Scintillating bolometers for Double Beta Decay search

    E-print Network

    Gironi, Luca

    2009-01-01

    In the field of Double Beta Decay (DBD) searches, the use of high resolution detectors in which background can be actively discriminated is very appealing. Scintillating bolometers containing a Double Beta Decay emitter can largely fulfill this very interesting possibility. In this paper we present the latest results obtained with CdWO4 and CaMoO4 crystals. Moreover we report, for the first time, a very interesting feature of CaMoO4 bolometers: the possibility to discriminate beta-gamma events from those induced by alpha particles thanks to different thermal pulse shape.

  8. Neutron Detection using Lithium Glass Scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Adam; Rees, Lawrence; Czirr, Bart

    2011-10-01

    We have developed a neutron detector using a thin sheet of lithium-6 glass scintillator. Lithium-6 has a high capture cross-section for neutrons, giving high neutron detection efficiency. One of the difficulties of neutron detection is discriminating between neutron and gamma radiation. We have measured the gamma sensitivity of our detector to be one in 10,000. For nuclear non-proliferation applications, radioactive sources may be shielded. Unlike most neutron detectors, lithium glass detectors are more efficient at detecting neutrons if the source is shielded. We are testing different configurations to optimize the detector's neutron capture efficiency.

  9. Cherenkov and Scintillation Properties of Cubic Zirconium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christl, M.J.; Adams, J.H.; Parnell, T.A.; Kuznetsov, E.N.

    2008-01-01

    Cubic zirconium (CZ) is a high index of refraction (n =2.17) material that we have investigated for Cherenkov counter applications. Laboratory and proton accelerator tests of an 18cc sample of CZ show that the expected fast Cherenkov response is accompanied by a longer scintillation component that can be separated by pulse shaping. This presents the possibility of novel particle spectrometers which exploits both properties of CZ. Other high index materials being examined for Cherenkov applications will be discussed. Results from laboratory tests and an accelerator exposure will be presented and a potential application in solar energetic particle instruments will be discussed

  10. Fundamental limits of scintillation detector timing precision.

    PubMed

    Derenzo, Stephen E; Choong, Woon-Seng; Moses, William W

    2014-07-01

    In this paper we review the primary factors that affect the timing precision of a scintillation detector. Monte Carlo calculations were performed to explore the dependence of the timing precision on the number of photoelectrons, the scintillator decay and rise times, the depth of interaction uncertainty, the time dispersion of the optical photons (modeled as an exponential decay), the photodetector rise time and transit time jitter, the leading-edge trigger level, and electronic noise. The Monte Carlo code was used to estimate the practical limits on the timing precision for an energy deposition of 511 keV in 3 mm × 3 mm × 30 mm Lu2SiO5:Ce and LaBr3:Ce crystals. The calculated timing precisions are consistent with the best experimental literature values. We then calculated the timing precision for 820 cases that sampled scintillator rise times from 0 to 1.0 ns, photon dispersion times from 0 to 0.2 ns, photodetector time jitters from 0 to 0.5 ns fwhm, and A from 10 to 10,000 photoelectrons per ns decay time. Since the timing precision R was found to depend on A(-1/2) more than any other factor, we tabulated the parameter B, where R = BA(-1/2). An empirical analytical formula was found that fit the tabulated values of B with an rms deviation of 2.2% of the value of B. The theoretical lower bound of the timing precision was calculated for the example of 0.5 ns rise time, 0.1 ns photon dispersion, and 0.2 ns fwhm photodetector time jitter. The lower bound was at most 15% lower than leading-edge timing discrimination for A from 10 to 10,000 photoelectrons ns(-1). A timing precision of 8 ps fwhm should be possible for an energy deposition of 511 keV using currently available photodetectors if a theoretically possible scintillator were developed that could produce 10,000 photoelectrons ns(-1). PMID:24874216

  11. Fundamental Limits of Scintillation Detector Timing Precision

    PubMed Central

    Derenzo, Stephen E.; Choong, Woon-Seng; Moses, William W.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we review the primary factors that affect the timing precision of a scintillation detector. Monte Carlo calculations were performed to explore the dependence of the timing precision on the number of photoelectrons, the scintillator decay and rise times, the depth of interaction uncertainty, the time dispersion of the optical photons (modeled as an exponential decay), the photodetector rise time and transit time jitter, the leading-edge trigger level, and electronic noise. The Monte Carlo code was used to estimate the practical limits on the timing precision for an energy deposition of 511 keV in 3 mm × 3 mm × 30 mm Lu2SiO5:Ce and LaBr3:Ce crystals. The calculated timing precisions are consistent with the best experimental literature values. We then calculated the timing precision for 820 cases that sampled scintillator rise times from 0 to 1.0 ns, photon dispersion times from 0 to 0.2 ns, photodetector time jitters from 0 to 0.5 ns fwhm, and A from 10 to 10,000 photoelectrons per ns decay time. Since the timing precision R was found to depend on A?1/2 more than any other factor, we tabulated the parameter B, where R = BA?1/2. An empirical analytical formula was found that fit the tabulated values of B with an rms deviation of 2.2% of the value of B. The theoretical lower bound of the timing precision was calculated for the example of 0.5 ns rise time, 0.1 ns photon dispersion, and 0.2 ns fwhm photodetector time jitter. The lower bound was at most 15% lower than leading-edge timing discrimination for A from 10 to 10,000 photoelectrons/ns. A timing precision of 8 ps fwhm should be possible for an energy deposition of 511 keV using currently available photodetectors if a theoretically possible scintillator were developed that could produce 10,000 photoelectrons/ns. PMID:24874216

  12. Measurement of Scintillation and Ionization Yield and Scintillation Pulse Shape from Nuclear Recoils in Liquid Argon

    E-print Network

    H. Cao; T. Alexander; A. Aprahamian; R. Avetisyan; H. O. Back; A. G. Cocco; F. DeJongh; G. Fiorillo; C. Galbiati; L. Grandi; Y. Guardincerri; C. Kendziora; W. H. Lippincott; C. Love; S. Lyons; L. Manenti; C. J. Martoff; Y. Meng; D. Montanari; P. Mosteiro; D. Olvitt; S. Pordes; H. Qian; B. Rossi; R. Saldanha; S. Sangiorgio; K. Siegl; S. Y. Strauss; W. Tan; J. Tatarowicz; S. Walker; H. Wang; A. W. Watson; S. Westerdale; J. Yoo

    2015-05-27

    We have measured the scintillation and ionization yield of recoiling nuclei in liquid argon as a function of applied electric field by exposing a dual-phase liquid argon time projection chamber (LAr-TPC) to a low energy pulsed narrow band neutron beam produced at the Notre Dame Institute for Structure and Nuclear Astrophysics. Liquid scintillation counters were arranged to detect and identify neutrons scattered in the TPC and to select the energy of the recoiling nuclei. We report measurements of the scintillation yields for nuclear recoils with energies from 10.3 to 57.3 keV and for median applied electric fields from 0 to 970 V/cm. For the ionization yields, we report measurements from 16.9 to 57.3 keV and for electric fields from 96.4 to 486 V/cm. We also report the observation of an anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from nuclear recoils, which is similar to the anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from electron recoils. Assuming that the energy loss partitions into excitons and ion pairs from $^{83m}$Kr internal conversion electrons is comparable to that from $^{207}$Bi conversion electrons, we obtained the numbers of excitons ($N_{ex}$) and ion pairs ($N_i$) and their ratio ($N_{ex}/N_i$) produced by nuclear recoils from 16.9 to 57.3 keV. Motivated by arguments suggesting direction sensitivity in LAr-TPC signals due to columnar recombination, a comparison of the light and charge yield of recoils parallel and perpendicular to the applied electric field is presented for the first time.

  13. Measurement of Scintillation and Ionization Yield and Scintillation Pulse Shape from Nuclear Recoils in Liquid Argon

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, H.

    2015-05-26

    We have measured the scintillation and ionization yield of recoiling nuclei in liquid argon as a function of applied electric field by exposing a dual-phase liquid argon time projection chamber (LAr-TPC) to a low energy pulsed narrow band neutron beam produced at the Notre Dame Institute for Structure and Nuclear Astrophysics. Liquid scintillation counters were arranged to detect and identify neutrons scattered in the TPC and to select the energy of the recoiling nuclei. We also report measurements of the scintillation yields for nuclear recoils with energies from 10.3 to 57.3 keV and for median applied electric fields from 0 to 970 V/cm. For the ionization yields, we report measurements from 16.9 to 57.3 keV and for electric fields from 96.4 to 486 V/cm. Furthermore, we report the observation of an anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from nuclear recoils, which is similar to the anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from electron recoils. Assuming that the energy loss partitions into excitons and ion pairs from 83mKr internal conversion electrons is comparable to that from 207Bi conversion electrons, we obtained the numbers of excitons (Nex) and ion pairs (Ni) and their ratio (Nex/Ni) produced by nuclear recoils from 16.9 to 57.3 keV. Motivated by arguments suggesting direction sensitivity in LAr-TPC signals due to columnar recombination, a comparison of the light and charge yield of recoils parallel and perpendicular to the applied electric field is presented for the first time.

  14. Measurement of Scintillation and Ionization Yield and Scintillation Pulse Shape from Nuclear Recoils in Liquid Argon

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cao, H.

    2015-05-26

    We have measured the scintillation and ionization yield of recoiling nuclei in liquid argon as a function of applied electric field by exposing a dual-phase liquid argon time projection chamber (LAr-TPC) to a low energy pulsed narrow band neutron beam produced at the Notre Dame Institute for Structure and Nuclear Astrophysics. Liquid scintillation counters were arranged to detect and identify neutrons scattered in the TPC and to select the energy of the recoiling nuclei. We also report measurements of the scintillation yields for nuclear recoils with energies from 10.3 to 57.3 keV and for median applied electric fields from 0more »to 970 V/cm. For the ionization yields, we report measurements from 16.9 to 57.3 keV and for electric fields from 96.4 to 486 V/cm. Furthermore, we report the observation of an anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from nuclear recoils, which is similar to the anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from electron recoils. Assuming that the energy loss partitions into excitons and ion pairs from 83mKr internal conversion electrons is comparable to that from 207Bi conversion electrons, we obtained the numbers of excitons (Nex) and ion pairs (Ni) and their ratio (Nex/Ni) produced by nuclear recoils from 16.9 to 57.3 keV. Motivated by arguments suggesting direction sensitivity in LAr-TPC signals due to columnar recombination, a comparison of the light and charge yield of recoils parallel and perpendicular to the applied electric field is presented for the first time.« less

  15. Optimization of the Performance of Segmented Scintillators for Radiotherapy Imaging through Novel Binning Techniques

    PubMed Central

    El-Mohri, Youcef; Antonuk, Larry E.; Choroszucha, Richard B.; Zhao, Qihua; Jiang, Hao; Liu, Langechuan

    2014-01-01

    Thick, segmented crystalline scintillators have shown increasing promise as replacement x-ray converters for the phosphor screens currently used in active matrix flat-panel imagers (AMFPIs) in radiotherapy, by virtue of providing over an order of magnitude improvement in the DQE. However, element-to-element misalignment in current segmented scintillator prototypes creates a challenge for optimal registration with underlying AMFPI arrays, resulting in degradation of spatial resolution. To overcome this challenge, a methodology involving the use of a relatively high resolution AMFPI array in combination with novel binning techniques is presented. The array, which has a pixel pitch of 0.127 mm, was coupled to prototype segmented scintillators based on BGO, LYSO and CsI:Tl materials, each having a nominal element-to-element pitch of 1.016 mm and thickness of ~1 cm. The AMFPI systems incorporating these prototypes were characterized at a radiotherapy energy of 6 MV in terms of MTF, NPS, DQE, and reconstructed images of a resolution phantom acquired using a cone-beam CT geometry. For each prototype, the application of 8×8 pixel binning to achieve a sampling pitch of 1.016 mm was optimized through use of an alignment metric which minimized misregistration and thereby improved spatial resolution. In addition, the application of alternative binning techniques that exclude the collection of signal near septal walls resulted in further significant improvement in spatial resolution for the BGO and LYSO prototypes, though not for the CsI:Tl prototype due to the large amount of optical cross-talk resulting from significant light spread between scintillator elements in that device. The efficacy of these techniques for improving spatial resolution appears to be enhanced for scintillator materials that exhibit mechanical hardness, high density and high refractive index, such as BGO. Moreover, materials that exhibit these properties as well as offer significantly higher light output than BGO, such as CdWO4, should provide the additional benefit of preserving DQE performance. PMID:24487347

  16. Wavelet-based analogous phase scintillation index for high latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, A.; Tiwari, R.; Strangeways, H. J.; Dlay, S.; Johnsen, M. G.

    2015-08-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) performance at high latitudes can be severely affected by the ionospheric scintillation due to the presence of small-scale time-varying electron density irregularities. In this paper, an improved analogous phase scintillation index derived using the wavelet-transform-based filtering technique is presented to represent the effects of scintillation regionally at European high latitudes. The improved analogous phase index is then compared with the original analogous phase index and the phase scintillation index for performance comparison using 1 year of data from Trondheim, Norway (63.41°N, 10.4°E). This index provides samples at a 1 min rate using raw total electron content (TEC) data at 1 Hz for the prediction of phase scintillation compared to the scintillation monitoring receivers (such as NovAtel Global Navigation Satellite Systems Ionospheric Scintillation and TEC Monitor receivers) which operate at 50 Hz rate and are thus rather computationally intensive. The estimation of phase scintillation effects using high sample rate data makes the improved analogous phase index a suitable candidate which can be used in regional geodetic dual-frequency-based GPS receivers to efficiently update the tracking loop parameters based on tracking jitter variance.

  17. Microprocessor-based single particle calibration of scintillation counter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazumdar, G. K. D.; Pathak, K. M.

    1985-01-01

    A microprocessor-base set-up is fabricated and tested for the single particle calibration of the plastic scintillator. The single particle response of the scintillator is digitized by an A/D converter, and a 8085 A based microprocessor stores the pulse heights. The digitized information is printed. Facilities for CRT display and cassette storing and recalling are also made available.

  18. Purification of KamLAND-Zen liquid scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Haruo

    2013-08-08

    KamLAND-Zen is neutrino-less double-beta decay search experiment using enriched 300 kg of {sup 136}Xe dissolved in pure liquid scintillator. This report is purification work of liquid scintillator for KamLAND-Zen experiment before installation in the inner-balloon and background rejection processes after installation.

  19. Performance comparison of scintillators for alpha particle detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morishita, Yuki; Yamamoto, Seiichi; Izaki, Kenji; Kaneko, Junichi H.; Toui, Kohei; Tsubota, Youichi; Higuchi, Mikio

    2014-11-01

    Scintillation detectors for alpha particles are often used in nuclear fuel facilities. Alpha particle detectors have also become important in the research field of radionuclide therapy using alpha emitters. ZnS(Ag) is the most often used scintillator for alpha particle detectors because its light output is high. However, the energy resolution of ZnS(Ag)-based scintillation detectors is poor because they are not transparent. A new ceramic sample, namely the cerium doped Gd2Si2O7 (GPS) scintillator, has been tested as alpha particle detector and its performances have been compared to that one of three different scintillating materials: ZnS(Ag), GAGG and a standard plastic scintillator. The different scintillating materials have been coupled to two different photodetectors, namely a photomultiplier tube (PMT) and a Silicon Photo-multiplier (Si-PM): the performances of each detection system have been compared. Promising results as far as the energy resolution performances (10% with PMT and 14% with Si-PM) have been obtained in the case of GPS and GAGG samples. Considering the quantum efficiencies of the photodetectors under test and their relation to the emission wavelength of the different scintillators, the best results were achieved coupling the GPS with the PMT and the GAGG with the Si-PM

  20. Semiconductor scintillator based on photon recycling Serge Luryi n

    E-print Network

    Luryi, Serge

    Semiconductor scintillator based on photon recycling Serge Luryi n , Arsen V. Subashiev University efficiency a b s t r a c t Direct-bandgap semiconductor with high quantum radiative efficiency can operate of photoreceivers on both sides of the semiconductor scintillator wafer is desirable. & 2011 Elsevier B.V. All

  1. Light Output Response of BC-505 Liquid Scintillator

    E-print Network

    Saskatchewan, University of

    compounds emit light in response to the ionization produced by the incident radiation. This ioniza- tion investigated the light output response of various scintil- lator materials using several models to parameterizeLight Output Response of BC-505 Liquid Scintillator R.E. Pywell, B.D. Sawatzky, 1 J. Ives, 2 N

  2. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of scintillation processes in NaI(Tl)

    SciTech Connect

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Wang, Zhiguo; Williams, Richard; Grim, Joel; Gao, Fei

    2014-04-26

    Developing a comprehensive understanding of the processes that govern the scintillation behavior of inorganic scintillators provides a pathway to optimize current scintillators and allows for the science-driven search for new scintillator materials. Recent experimental data on the excitation density dependence of the light yield of inorganic scintillators presents an opportunity to incorporate parameterized interactions between excitations in scintillation models and thus enable more realistic simulations of the nonproportionality of inorganic scintillators. Therefore, a kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) model of elementary scintillation processes in NaI(Tl) is developed in this work to simulate the kinetics of scintillation for a range of temperatures and Tl concentrations as well as the scintillation efficiency as a function of excitation density. The ability of the KMC model to reproduce available experimental data allows for elucidating the elementary processes that give rise to the kinetics and efficiency of scintillation observed experimentally for a range of conditions.

  3. Orthogonal Arrays Plans Screening

    E-print Network

    MASCOT NUM Jean-Marc Azaïs Orthogonal Arrays Plans Screening Orthogonal Arrays Plans Screening Surface de réponse : Plans pour l'approximation de codes numériques Jean-Marc AZAÏS Modélisation Aléatoire NUM #12;MASCOT NUM Jean-Marc Azaïs Orthogonal Arrays Plans Screening Orthogonal Arrays Plans Screening

  4. Touch screen have become

    E-print Network

    Wobbrock, Jacob O.

    Typing { l ABSTRACT Touch screen have become screens pales examine typing physical keybo o inform future (Figure 1). O screen keyb rting touch-typ yed a techniqu 33]): we asked 1. Finger (blue ricted typing c te-bas of typing on fla t just in the ph in the ability t ust visually atte ouches occur touch screen ecially from

  5. Suppressor Screens in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Zhang, Yuelin

    2016-01-01

    Genetic screens have proven to be a useful tool in the dissection of biological processes in plants. Specifically, suppressor screens have been widely used to study signal transduction pathways. Here we provide a detailed protocol for ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) mutagenesis used in our suppressor screens in Arabidopsis and discuss the basic principles behind suppressor screen design and downstream analyses. PMID:26577776

  6. Characterization of cerium fluoride nanocomposite scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Stange, Sy; Esch, Ernst I; Brown, Leif O; Couture, Aaron J; Mckigney, Edward A; Muenchausen, Ross E; Del Sesto, Rico E; Gilbertson, Robert D; Mccleskey, T Mark; Reifarth, Rene

    2009-01-01

    Measurement of the neutron capture cross-sections of a number of short-lived isotopes would advance both pure and applied scientific research. These cross-sections are needed for calculation of criticality and waste production estimates for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative, for analysis of data from nuclear weapons tests, and to improve understanding of nucleosynthesis. However, measurement of these cross-sections would require a detector with a faster signal decay time than those used in existing neutron capture experiments. Crystals of faster detector materials are not available in sufficient sizes and quantities to supply these large-scale experiments. Instead, we propose to use nanocomposite detectors, consisting of nanoscale particles of a scintillating material dispersed in a matrix material. We have successfully fabricated cerium fluoride (CeF{sub 3}) nanoparticles and dispersed them in a liquid matrix. We have characterized this scintillator and have measured its response to neutron capture. Results of the optical, structural, and radiation characterization will be presented.

  7. Triple-label beta liquid scintillation counting.

    PubMed

    Bukowski, T R; Moffett, T C; Revkin, J H; Ploger, J D; Bassingthwaighte, J B

    1992-07-01

    The detection of radioactive compounds by liquid scintillation has revolutionized modern biology, yet few investigators make full use of the power of this technique. Even though multiple isotope counting is considerably more difficult than single isotope counting, many experimental designs would benefit from using more than one isotope. The development of accurate isotope counting techniques enabling the simultaneous use of three beta-emitting tracers has facilitated studies in our laboratory using the multiple tracer indicator dilution technique for assessing rates of transmembrane transport and cellular metabolism. The details of sample preparation, and of stabilizing the liquid scintillation spectra of the tracers, are critical to obtaining good accuracy. Reproducibility is enhanced by obtaining detailed efficiency/quench curves for each particular set of tracers and solvent media. The numerical methods for multiple-isotope quantitation depend on avoiding error propagation (inherent to successive subtraction techniques) by using matrix inversion. Experimental data obtained from triple-label beta counting illustrate reproducibility and good accuracy even when the relative amounts of different tracers in samples of protein/electrolyte solutions, plasma, and blood are changed. PMID:1514684

  8. Data Quality Screening Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strub, Richard; Lynnes, Christopher; Hearty, Thomas; Won, Young-In; Fox, Peter; Zednik, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    A report describes the Data Quality Screening Service (DQSS), which is designed to help automate the filtering of remote sensing data on behalf of science users. Whereas this process often involves much research through quality documents followed by laborious coding, the DQSS is a Web Service that provides data users with data pre-filtered to their particular criteria, while at the same time guiding the user with filtering recommendations of the cognizant data experts. The DQSS design is based on a formal semantic Web ontology that describes data fields and the quality fields for applying quality control within a data product. The accompanying code base handles several remote sensing datasets and quality control schemes for data products stored in Hierarchical Data Format (HDF), a common format for NASA remote sensing data. Together, the ontology and code support a variety of quality control schemes through the implementation of the Boolean expression with simple, reusable conditional expressions as operands. Additional datasets are added to the DQSS simply by registering instances in the ontology if they follow a quality scheme that is already modeled in the ontology. New quality schemes are added by extending the ontology and adding code for each new scheme.

  9. Scintillation fluctuations of optical communication lasers in atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panich, Michael G.; Coffaro, Joseph T.; Belichki, Sara B.; Splitter, Landon J.; Phillips, Ronald L.; Andrews, Larry C.; Fountain, Wayne; Tucker, Frank M.

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this research is to evaluate scintillation fluctuations on optical communication lasers and evaluate potential system improvements to reduce scintillation effects. This research attempts to experimentally verify mathematical models developed by Andrews and Phillips [1] for scintillation fluctuations in atmospheric turbulence using two different transmitting wavelengths. Propagation range lengths and detector quantities were varied to confirm the theoretical scintillation curve. In order to confirm the range and wavelength dependent scintillation curve, intensity measurements were taken from a 904nm and 1550nm laser source for an assortment of path distances along the 1km laser range at the Townes Laser Institute. The refractive index structure parameter (Cn2) data was also taken at various ranges using two commercial scintillometers. This parameter is used to characterize the strength of atmospheric turbulence, which induces scintillation effects on the laser beam, and is a vital input parameter to the mathematical model. Data was taken and analyzed using a 4-detector board array. The material presented in this paper outlines the verification and validation of the theoretical scintillation model, and steps to improve the scintillation fluctuation effects on the laser beam through additional detectors and a longer transmitting wavelength. Experimental data was post processed and analyzed for scintillation fluctuations of the two transmitting wavelengths. The results demonstrate the benefit of additional detectors and validate a mathematical model that can be scaled for use in a variety of communications or defense applications. Scintillation is a problem faced by every free space laser communication system and the verification of an accurate mathematical model to simulate these effects has strong application across the industry.

  10. Plasma Screen Floating Mount

    DOEpatents

    Eakle, Robert F. (New Ellenton, SC); Pak, Donald J. (Martine, GA)

    2004-10-26

    A mounting system for a flat display screen, particularly a plasma display screen, suspends the screen separately in each of the x-, y- and z-directions. A series of frames located by linear bearings and isolated by springs and dampers allows separate controlled movement in each axis. The system enables the use of relatively larger display screens in vehicles in which plasma screen are subject to damage from vibration.

  11. Effect of scintillator crystal geometry and surface finishing on depth of interaction resolution in PET detectors: Monte Carlo simulation and experimental results using silicon photomultipliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuddy, Sarah; Reznik, Alla; Rowlands, John A.; Taghibakhsh, Farhad

    2010-04-01

    Resolution of positron emission tomography (PET) systems benefits from information about depth of interaction (DOI) within scintillation crystals, particularly in small bore scanners or parallel plate detectors. In this investigation, the ability of the dual-ended readout detector module configuration to resolve DOI and crystal index was evaluated for a variety of detector pitches and light guide thicknesses to validate the dual-ended readout method. Experimental results with oneto- one coupling between saw-cut 2mm pitch LYSO scintillation crystals and silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) achieved 2.1 mm DOI resolution. Monte Carlo simulations were used to investigate the effect of larger detector pitches and varied light guide thickness on the crystal index identification accuracy and DOI resolution for a pixilated crystal array in dual-ended readout configuration. It is reported that the accuracy in identifying a 2 mm scintillation crystal was >80% for detector pitches < 6 mm and that DOI resolution was < 2 mm for all detector pitches and light guide thicknesses.

  12. Comparative photoluminescence study of crystalline and nanostructured scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinney, George; McDonald, Warren; Tzolov, Marian

    2014-03-01

    Scintillators are widely used for conversion of high energy radiation/particles to visible light which can be either directly observed or further converted to electrical signal in photomultipliers or solid state detectors. We compare the light emission properties of traditional crystalline scintillators with nanostructured films created in our laboratory with the potential for use as scintillators. We have studied zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires, zinc tungstate (ZnWO4) thin films, commercially available crystals of ZnO, ZnWO4 and commercial scintillators of yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) and yttrium aluminum perovskite (YAP). We will present the photoluminescence emission spectra, the intensity dependence of the emission, and the photoluminescence excitation spectra. We have found that the emission spectrum of zinc oxide nanowires becomes very intense at high excitation intensities and becomes comparable with the emission from the commercial scintillators. The excitation spectra indicate the presence of subgap electronic states in the nanostructured samples and in the commercial scintillators. This study contributes to our effort of creating electron detectors for scanning electron microscopy using nanostructured scintillators.

  13. Cathodoluminescence studies of commercial and nano-structured scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDoanld, Warren; McKinney, George; Tzolov, Marian

    2014-03-01

    Scintillators have applications in fundamental research and in consumer products, e.g. detectors, scanners, and televisions. This research focused on analyzing the cathodoluminescence of different single-crystal scintillators with an originally developed method for evaluation of their performance, which allows for a direct comparison of different scintillators. We have studied yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG), yttrium aluminum perovskite (YAP) scintillators, zinc oxide single crystal, zinc tungstate single crystal, zinc oxide nanowires, and zinc tungstate film. The commercial scintillators are covered with conductive film which prevents low energy electrons from effectively interacting with the scintillator. We have varied the voltage accelerating the electrons with the intention of finding the threshold below which this effect will impact the performance of the scintillators. The same procedure was followed for the nanowires and zinc tungstate film which have enough conductivity and don't require a top conducting film. The threshold was established to be around 3 kV for the YAG and there is no threshold for the films, which perform much better at these low voltages. This property of the films has the potential for application in desktop scanning electron microscopes, where the accelerating voltage is low. The voltage dependence of the cathodoluminescence intensity follows an exponential trend and we present a model explaining it.

  14. Development of scintillation materials for medical imaging and other applications

    SciTech Connect

    Melcher, C. L.

    2013-02-05

    Scintillation materials that produce pulses of visible light in response to the absorption of energetic photons, neutrons, and charged particles, are widely used in various applications that require the detection of radiation. The discovery and development of new scintillators has accelerated in recent years, due in large part to their importance in medical imaging as well as in security and high energy physics applications. Better understanding of fundamental scintillation mechanisms as well as the roles played by defects and impurities have aided the development of new high performance scintillators for both gamma-ray and neutron detection. Although single crystals continue to dominate gamma-ray based imaging techniques, composite materials and transparent optical ceramics potentially offer advantages in terms of both synthesis processes and scintillation performance. A number of promising scintillator candidates have been identified during the last few years, and several are currently being actively developed for commercial production. Purification and control of raw materials and cost effective crystal growth processes can present significant challenges to the development of practical new scintillation materials.

  15. Luminescence and scintillation properties of rare-earth-doped LuF3 scintillation crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pejchal, Jan; Fukuda, Kentaro; Kurosawa, Shunsuke; Yokota, Yuui; Yoshikawa, Akira

    2015-03-01

    The Nd-doped and Er-doped LuF3 single crystals were grown by the micro-pulling-down method to study their scintillation properties in the vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) region. The doubly Nd-Er codoped single crystal was grown to study possibility of scintillation performance improvement by energy transfer from Er3+ to Nd3+ ions. The LiF flux was to avoid phase transition below melting temperature. The 1%Nd-doped sample showed the highest overall scintillation efficiency under X-ray excitation which was 7 times as high as that of the LaF3:Nd 8% standard. The leading Nd3+ 5d-4f emission was situated at 176 nm, while the Er3+ 5d-4f emission for Er-doped samples was observed at 163 nm, which better matches the sensitivity of some VUV-sensitive photodetectors. The optimum Er concentration was determined to be around 1-3 mol%. No Er3+ 5d-4f emission was observed for the doubly Er,Nd-codoped sample due to energy transfer from the Er3+ to Nd3+ ions. Slight improvement of the light yield was observed in the doubly-doped sample with respect to the Nd-only doped one.

  16. Fiber optic thermal/fast neutron and gamma ray scintillation detector

    DOEpatents

    Neal, John S. (Knoxville, TN); Mihalczo, John T (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2007-10-30

    A system for detecting fissile and fissionable material originating external to the system includes: a .sup.6Li loaded glass fiber scintillator for detecting thermal neutrons, x-rays and gamma rays; a fast scintillator for detecting fast neutrons, x-rays and gamma rays, the fast scintillator conjoined with the glass fiber scintillator such that the fast scintillator moderates fast neutrons prior to their detection as thermal neutrons by the glass fiber scintillator; and a coincidence detection system for processing the time distributions of arriving signals from the scintillators.

  17. Sound and Light from Fractures in Scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tantot, A.; Santucci, S.; Ramos, O.; Deschanel, S.; Verdier, M.-A.; Mony, E.; Wei, Y.; Ciliberto, S.; Vanel, L.; Di Stefano, P. C. F.

    2013-10-01

    Prompted by intriguing events observed in certain particle-physics searches for rare events, we study light and acoustic emission simultaneously in some inorganic scintillators subject to mechanical stress. We observe mechanoluminescence in Bi4Ge3O12, CdWO4, and ZnWO4, in various mechanical configurations at room temperature and ambient pressure. We analyze the temporal and amplitude correlations between the light emission and the acoustic emission during fracture. A novel application of the precise energy calibration of Bi4Ge3O12 provided by radioactive sources allows us to deduce that the fraction of elastic energy converted to light is at least 3×10-5.

  18. SSPM Scintillator Readout for Gamma Radiation Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, S A; Wendelberger, B; Young, J A; Green, J A; Guise, R E; Franks, L

    2011-09-01

    Silicon-based photodetectors offer several benefits relative to photomultiplier tube–based scintillator systems. Solid-state photomultipliers (SSPM) can realize the gain of a photomultiplier tube (PMT) with the quantum efficiency of silicon. The advantages of the solid-state approach must be balanced with adverse trade-offs, for example from increased dark current, to optimize radiation detection sensitivity. We are designing a custom SSPM that will be optimized for green emission of thallium-doped cesium iodide (CsI(Tl)). A typical field gamma radiation detector incorporates thallium doped sodium iodide (NaI(Tl)) and a radiation converter with a PMT. A PMT’s sensitivity peaks in the blue wavelengths and is well matched to NaI(Tl). This paper presents results of photomultiplier sensitivity relative to conventional SSPMs and discusses model design improvements. Prototype fabrications are in progress.

  19. Intensity Scintillation and Astronomical Quantum Observation

    E-print Network

    Jiang Dong

    2009-11-02

    Holography is 3D imaging which can record intensity and phase at the same time. The importance of construct hologram is holographic recording and wavefront reconstruction. It is surprised that holography be discovered in study interstellar scintillation for pulsar provide a coherent light source recently. I think that is speckle hologram and speckle interference(i.e. intensity interference), and use modern technique which include phased array,CCD, digital signal processing and supercomputer can achieve that digital and computer holography from radio to X-ray astronomy. This means we can use it to image the universe and beyond the limited of telescope for cosmos provide much coherent light from pulsar,maser, black hole to 21cm recombination line. It gives a probe to the medium of near the black hole et al. From those coherent light sources in the sky, we can uncover one different universe that through astronomical quantum observation which use intensity interference.

  20. Measurement of rain parameters by optical scintillation.

    PubMed

    Wang, T I; Lerfald, G; Lawrence, R S; Clifford, S F

    1977-08-01

    We describe a technique for measuring path-averaged rain parameters by analyzing the rainfall-induced scintillations of a laser beam. From the time-lagged covariance function of two vertically spaced line detectors, we determine the average rainfall rate and drop-size distribution along the optical path. This technique requires no prior assumption of the form of the drop-size distribution. Sample measurements on a 140-m path confirm that the path-averaged drop-size distribution of a steady rain follows a Marshall-Palmer distribution. The optically measured path-averaged rain rate also shows good agreement with conventional tipping-bucket rain-gauge data. PMID:20168902

  1. Structure of scintillations in Neptune's occultation shadow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, W. B.; Lellouch, Emmanuel; Sicardy, Bruno; Brahic, Andre; Vilas, Faith

    1988-01-01

    An exceptionally high-quality data set from a Neptune occultation is used here to derive a number of new results about the statistical properties of the fluctuations of the intensity distribution in various parts of Neptune's occultation shadow. An approximate numerical ray-tracing model which successfully accounts for many of the qualitative aspects of the observed intensity fluctuation distribution is introduced. Strong refractive scintillation is simulated by including the effects of 'turbulence' with projected atmospheric properties allowed to vary in both the direction perpendicular and parallel to the limb, and an explicit two-dimensional picture of a typical intensity distribution throughout an occulting planet's shadow is presented. The results confirm the existence of highly anisotropic turbulence.

  2. Medication Guide

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Quit Smoking Quit Smoking Benefits of Quitting Health Effects of Smoking Secondhand Smoke Withdrawal Ways to Quit QuitGuide Pregnancy & ... that eases nicotine withdrawal symptoms and blocks the effects of nicotine from cigarettes if the user starts smoking again. ...

  3. A 2-phase liquid scintillation assay for glycolipid synthetases

    SciTech Connect

    Hospattankar, A.V.; Radin, N.S.

    1981-10-01

    Glycolipid synthetases can be assayed conveniently by incubating the lipid substrate with the radiosugar-labeled nucleotide in a small plastic scintillation vial. At the end of the incubation period, water and perchloric acid are added, then n-butanol, then a toluene-based scintillation cocktail. The radioactive lipid partitions into the scintillation fluid, leaving excess sugar nucleotide in the aqueous phase. Only a small fraction of the total radioactivity in the aqueous layer is detectable. This method is illustrated for ceramide:UDP-glucose glucosyltransferase. The approach should be applicable to other lipid synthetases that can be assayed with radioactive hydrophilic substrate.

  4. Trigger and electronics issues for scintillating fiber tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Baumbaugh, A.E.

    1994-01-01

    Scintillating Fiber technology has made great advances and has demonstrated great promise for high speed charged particle tracking and triggering. The small detector sizes and fast scintillation floors available, make them very promising for use at high luminosity experiments at today`s and tomorrow`s colliding and fixed target experiments where high rate capability is essential. This paper will discuss some of the system aspects which should be considered by anyone attempting to design a scintillating fiber tracking system and high speed tracking trigger. As the reader will see, seemingly simple decisions can have far reaching effects on overall system performance.

  5. Thin scintillators for ultrafast hard X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhehui; Barnes, Cris W.; Kapustinsky, Jon S.; Morris, Chris L.; Nelson, Ron O.; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Liyuan; Zhu, Ren-Yuan

    2015-05-01

    A multilayer thin-scintillator concept is described for ultrafast imaging. The individual layer thickness is determined by the spatial resolution and light attenuation length, the number of layers is determined by the overall efficiency. By coating the scintillators with a high quantum-efficiency photocathode, single X-ray photon detection can be achieved using fast scintillators with low light yield. The fast, efficient sensors, when combined with MCP and novel nanostructed electron amplification schemes, is a possible way towards GHz hard X-ray cameras for a few frames of images.

  6. Quenching the scintillation in CF4 Cherenkov gas radiator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, T.; D`Ambrosio, C.; Easo, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Forty, R.; Frei, C.; Gibson, V.; Gys, T.; Harnew, N.; Hunt, P.; Jones, C. R.; Lambert, R. W.; Matteuzzi, C.; Muheim, F.; Papanestis, A.; Perego, D. L.; Piedigrossi, D.; Plackett, R.; Powell, A.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Ullaland, O.; Websdale, D.; Wotton, S. A.; Wyllie, K.

    2015-08-01

    CF4 is used as a Cherenkov gas radiator in one of the Ring Imaging Cherenkov detectors at the LHCb experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. CF4 is well known to have a high scintillation photon yield in the near and far VUV, UV and in the visible wavelength range. A large flux of scintillation photons in our photon detection acceptance between 200 and 800 nm could compromise the particle identification efficiency. We will show that this scintillation photon emission system can be effectively quenched, consistent with radiationless transitions, with no significant impact on the photons resulting from Cherenkov radiation.

  7. Ionization and scintillation of nuclear recoils in gaseous xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renner, J.; Gehman, V. M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Matis, H. S.; Miller, T.; Nakajima, Y.; Nygren, D.; Oliveira, C. A. B.; Shuman, D.; Álvarez, V.; Borges, F. I. G.; Cárcel, S.; Castel, J.; Cebrián, S.; Cervera, A.; Conde, C. A. N.; Dafni, T.; Dias, T. H. V. T.; Díaz, J.; Esteve, R.; Evtoukhovitch, P.; Fernandes, L. M. P.; Ferrario, P.; Ferreira, A. L.; Freitas, E. D. C.; Gil, A.; Gómez, H.; Gómez-Cadenas, J. J.; González-Díaz, D.; Gutiérrez, R. M.; Hauptman, J.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; Herrera, D. C.; Iguaz, F. J.; Irastorza, I. G.; Jinete, M. A.; Labarga, L.; Laing, A.; Liubarsky, I.; Lopes, J. A. M.; Lorca, D.; Losada, M.; Luzón, G.; Marí, A.; Martín-Albo, J.; Martínez, A.; Moiseenko, A.; Monrabal, F.; Monserrate, M.; Monteiro, C. M. B.; Mora, F. J.; Moutinho, L. M.; Muñoz Vidal, J.; Natal da Luz, H.; Navarro, G.; Nebot-Guinot, M.; Palma, R.; Pérez, J.; Pérez Aparicio, J. L.; Ripoll, L.; Rodríguez, A.; Rodríguez, J.; Santos, F. P.; dos Santos, J. M. F.; Seguí, L.; Serra, L.; Simón, A.; Sofka, C.; Sorel, M.; Toledo, J. F.; Tomás, A.; Torrent, J.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.; Villar, J. A.; Webb, R. C.; White, J.; Yahlali, N.

    2015-09-01

    Ionization and scintillation produced by nuclear recoils in gaseous xenon at approximately 14 bar have been simultaneously observed in an electroluminescent time projection chamber. Neutrons from radioisotope ?-Be neutron sources were used to induce xenon nuclear recoils, and the observed recoil spectra were compared to a detailed Monte Carlo employing estimated ionization and scintillation yields for nuclear recoils. The ability to discriminate between electronic and nuclear recoils using the ratio of ionization to primary scintillation is demonstrated. These results encourage further investigation on the use of xenon in the gas phase as a detector medium in dark matter direct detection experiments.

  8. Radio scintillation of gamma-ray-burst afterglows

    E-print Network

    Jeremy Goodman

    1997-06-09

    Stars twinkle to the eye through atmospheric turbulence, but planets, because of their larger angular size, do not. Similarly, scintillation due to the local interstellar medium will modulate the radio flux of gamma-ray-burst afterglows and may permit indirect measurements of their angular sizes. The amplitude of refractive scintillation is of order ten percent at ten gigahertz unless the source size is much larger than the expected size, of order ten microarcseconds. Diffractive scintillation is marginally possible, depending sensitively on the source size, observing frequency, and scattering measure of the interstellar medium.

  9. Neutron detector using lithiated glass-scintillating particle composite

    DOEpatents

    Wallace, Steven (Knoxville, TN); Stephan, Andrew C. (Knoxville, TX); Dai, Sheng (Knoxville, TN); Im, Hee-Jung (Knoxville, TN)

    2009-09-01

    A neutron detector composed of a matrix of scintillating particles imbedded in a lithiated glass is disclosed. The neutron detector detects the neutrons by absorbing the neutron in the lithium-6 isotope which has been enriched from the natural isotopic ratio to a commercial ninety five percent. The utility of the detector is optimized by suitably selecting scintillating particle sizes in the range of the alpha and the triton. Nominal particle sizes are in the range of five to twenty five microns depending upon the specific scintillating particle selected.

  10. Border Screening for SARS

    PubMed Central

    King, Arlene; de Jong, Dick; Bodie-Collins, Margaret; Squires, Susan G.; Tam, Theresa WS

    2005-01-01

    With the rapid international spread of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) from March through May 2003, Canada introduced various measures to screen airplane passengers at selected airports for symptoms and signs of SARS. The World Health Organization requested that all affected areas screen departing passengers for SARS symptoms. In spite of intensive screening, no SARS cases were detected. SARS has an extremely low prevalence, and the positive predictive value of screening is essentially zero. Canadian screening results raise questions about the effectiveness of available screening measures for SARS at international borders. PMID:15705315

  11. Development of scintillating fiber detector technology for high rate particle tracking

    E-print Network

    E. C. Aschenauer; J. Baehr; V. Gapienko; B. Hoffmann; A. Kharchilava; H. Luedecke; R. Nahnhauer; R. Shanidze

    1997-10-02

    The performance of a scintillating fiber detector prototype for tracking under high rate conditions is investigated. A spatial resolution of about100 micron is aimed for the detector. Further demands are low occupancy and radiation hardness up to 1 Mrad/year. Fibers with different radii and different wavelengths of the scintillation light from different producers have been extensively tested concerning light output, attenuation length and radiation hardness, with and without coupling them to light guides of different length and diameter. In a testrun at a 3 GeV electron beam the space dependent efficiency and spatial resolution of fiber bundels were measured by means of two external reference detectors with a precision of 50 micron. The light output profile across fiber roads has been determined with the same accuracy. Different technologies were adopted for the construction of tracker modules consisting of 14 layers of 0.5 mm fibers and 0.7 mm pitch. A winding technology provides reliable results to produce later fiber modules of about 25 cm x 25 cm area. We conclude that on the basis of these results a fiber tracker for high rate conditions can be built.

  12. Lanthanum halide scintillators for time-of-flight 3-D pet

    DOEpatents

    Karp, Joel S. (Glenside, PA); Surti, Suleman (Philadelphia, PA)

    2008-06-03

    A Lanthanum Halide scintillator (for example LaCl.sub.3 and LaBr.sub.3) with fast decay time and good timing resolution, as well as high light output and good energy resolution, is used in the design of a PET scanner. The PET scanner includes a cavity for accepting a patient and a plurality of PET detector modules arranged in an approximately cylindrical configuration about the cavity. Each PET detector includes a Lanthanum Halide scintillator having a plurality of Lanthanum Halide crystals, a light guide, and a plurality of photomultiplier tubes arranged respectively peripherally around the cavity. The good timing resolution enables a time-of-flight (TOF) PET scanner to be developed that exhibits a reduction in noise propagation during image reconstruction and a gain in the signal-to-noise ratio. Such a PET scanner includes a time stamp circuit that records the time of receipt of gamma rays by respective PET detectors and provides timing data outputs that are provided to a processor that, in turn, calculates time-of-flight (TOF) of gamma rays through a patient in the cavity and uses the TOF of gamma rays in the reconstruction of images of the patient.

  13. Quick Guide to ERIC Tools for the Graduate Student.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Higher Education, Washington, DC.

    This collection serves as a quick guide to Educational Resources Information Center (ERIC) tools graduate students may find useful. The guide contains example screens and information on each of these: (1) ACCESS ERIC Home Page, the hub of the ERIC system, which links to all Clearinghouses and support components; (2) the ERIC system slide show home…

  14. Comparison of Plastic and NaI(Tl) Scintillators for Vehicle Portal Monitor Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Stromswold, David C.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Schweppe, John E.; Ely, James H.; Milbrath, Brian D.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Geelhood, Bruce D.

    2003-10-31

    Experimental data and computer simulations are presented for gamma-ray detection by vehicle portal monitors for homeland security applications at international borders. The experiments and simulations use spectral processing of gamma rays from various sources (241Am, 57Co, 133Ba, 137Cs, 60Co) and background to provide data for comparing plastic and NaI(Tl) detectors. The effects of gamma-ray scattering in cargo are also examined. Plastic scintillators are well suited for primary screening of gamma-ray sources because of their large size and low cost. Sodium iodide is preferable to plastic for applications of isotope identification based on gamma-ray spectrometry. Some applications may benefit from integrating features from both types of detectors.

  15. Time and position sensitive single photon detector for scintillator read-out

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schössler, S.; Bromberger, B.; Brandis, M.; Schmidt, L. Ph H.; Tittelmeier, K.; Czasch, A.; Dangendorf, V.; Jagutzki, O.

    2012-02-01

    We have developed a photon counting detector system for combined neutron and ? radiography which can determine position, time and intensity of a secondary photon flash created by a high-energy particle or photon within a scintillator screen. The system is based on a micro-channel plate photomultiplier concept utilizing image charge coupling to a position- and time-sensitive read-out anode placed outside the vacuum tube in air, aided by a standard photomultiplier and very fast pulse-height analyzing electronics. Due to the low dead time of all system components it can cope with the high throughput demands of a proposed combined fast neutron and dual discrete energy ? radiography method (FNDDER). We show tests with different types of delay-line read-out anodes and present a novel pulse-height-to-time converter circuit with its potential to discriminate ? energies for the projected FNDDER devices for an automated cargo container inspection system (ACCIS).

  16. Development of a fast scintillator based beam phase measurement system for compact superconducting cyclotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharjee, Tanushyam; Kanti Dey, Malay; Dhara, Partha; Roy, Suvodeep; Debnath, Jayanta; Balakrishna Bhole, Rajendra; Dutta, Atanu; Pradhan, Jedidiah; Pal, Sarbajit; Pal, Gautam; Roy, Amitava; Chakrabarti, Alok

    2013-05-15

    In an isochronous cyclotron, measurements of central phase of the ion beam with respect to rf and the phase width provide a way to tune the cyclotron for maximum energy gain per turn and efficient extraction. We report here the development of a phase measurement system and the measurements carried out at the Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre's (VECC's) K= 500 superconducting cyclotron. The technique comprises detecting prompt {gamma}-rays resulting from the interaction of cyclotron ion beam with an aluminium target mounted on a radial probe in coincidence with cyclotron rf. An assembly comprising a fast scintillator and a liquid light-guide inserted inside the cyclotron was used to detect the {gamma}-rays and to transfer the light signal outside the cyclotron where a matching photo-multiplier tube was used for light to electrical signal conversion. The typical beam intensity for this measurement was a few times 10{sup 11} pps.

  17. Video Screen Capture Basics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunbar, Laura

    2014-01-01

    This article is an introduction to video screen capture. Basic information of two software programs, QuickTime for Mac and BlueBerry Flashback Express for PC, are also discussed. Practical applications for video screen capture are given.

  18. Stretching Screens and Imaginations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douthwaite, Shelaugh

    1983-01-01

    Secondary students utilize a simplified technique to make silk screen prints, which can be printed onto T-shirts. The only materials needed from art suppliers are a few squeegees and a few yards of polyester screen mesh. (RM)

  19. Preconception Carrier Screening

    MedlinePLUS

    ... fibrosis , fragile X syndrome , sickle cell disease , and Tay–Sachs disease . Who should consider preconception carrier screening? A ... descent (Ashkenazi Jews) should be offered screening for Tay–Sachs disease, Canavan disease, familial dysautonomia, and cystic fibrosis. ...

  20. Screening for Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for Primary Care Practice Published Recommendations Draft Summary Prostate Cancer: Screening Release Date: May 2012 This topic is ... against prostate-specific antigen (PSA)-based screening for prostate cancer. The USPSTF recommends against the service. There is ...

  1. Screening for Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of Internal Medicine Summaries for Patients Screening for Prostate Cancer: A Guidance Statement From the Clinical Guidelines Committee ... Physicians The full report is titled “Screening for Prostate Cancer: A Guidance Statement From the Clinical Guidelines Committee ...

  2. Breast Cancer Screening

    MedlinePLUS

    ... trials is available from the NCI website . Three tests are used by health care providers to screen for breast cancer: Mammogram Mammography is the most common screening test for breast cancer . A mammogram is an x- ...

  3. International Cancer Screening Network

    Cancer.gov

    Skip to Main Content Search International Cancer Screening Network Sponsored by the National Cancer Institute Working Together to Evaluate Cancer Screening and Improve Outcomes Internationally About the ICSN Overview Participating Countries Contact

  4. Cervical Cancer Screening

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Cancer found early may be easier to treat. Cervical cancer screening is usually part of a woman's health ... may do more tests, such as a biopsy. Cervical cancer screening has risks. The results can sometimes be ...

  5. The effects of dissolved methane upon liquid argon scintillation light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, B. J. P.; Alexander, T.; Back, H. O.; Collin, G.; Conrad, J. M.; Greene, A.; Katori, T.; Pordes, S.; Toups, M.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper we report on measurements of the effects of dissolved methane upon argon scintillation light. We monitor the light yield from an alpha source held 20 cm from a cryogenic photomultiplier tube (PMT) assembly as methane is injected into a high-purity liquid argon volume. We observe significant suppression of the scintillation light yield by dissolved methane at the 10 part per billion (ppb) level. By examining the late scintillation light time constant, we determine that this loss is caused by an absorption process and also see some evidence of methane-induced scintillation quenching at higher concentrations (50-100 ppb). Using a second PMT assembly we look for visible re-emission features from the dissolved methane which have been reported in gas-phase argon methane mixtures, and we find no evidence of visible re-emission from liquid-phase argon methane mixtures at concentrations between 10 ppb and 0.1%.

  6. 21 CFR 892.1100 - Scintillation (gamma) camera.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1100 Scintillation (gamma) camera. (a) Identification. A...

  7. A Scintillator Purification Plant and Fluid Handling System for SNO+

    E-print Network

    Richard J. Ford; for the SNO+ Collaboration

    2015-06-29

    A large capacity purification plant and fluid handling system has been constructed for the SNO+ neutrino and double-beta decay experiment, located 6800 feet underground at SNOLAB, Canada. SNO+ is a refurbishment of the SNO detector to fill the acrylic vessel with liquid scintillator based on Linear Alkylbenzene (LAB) and 2 g/L PPO, and also has a phase to load natural tellurium into the scintillator for a double-beta decay experiment with 130Te. The plant includes processes multi-stage dual-stream distillation, column water extraction, steam stripping, and functionalized silica gel adsorption columns. The plant also includes systems for preparing the scintillator with PPO and metal-loading the scintillator for double-beta decay exposure. We review the basis of design, the purification principles, specifications for the plant, and the construction and installations. The construction and commissioning status is updated.

  8. Robust detection of ionospheric scintillations using MF-DFA technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miriyala, Sridhar; Koppireddi, Padma Raju; Chanamallu, Srinivasa Rao

    2015-12-01

    The performance of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) receivers is limited by the ionospheric scintillation effects that cause signal degradation due to refraction, reflection and scattering of the signals. Hence, there is a need to develop an ionospheric scintillation detection technique for robust GNSS receivers. In this paper, a new algorithm based on multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA) is proposed for detecting the ionospheric irregularities. The ionospheric and scintillation GNSS data recorded at Koneru Lakshmaiah (KL) University, Guntur, India, was considered for the analysis. The carrier to noise ratio ( C/ N 0) time series data of GNSS satellite vehicles that are affected due to scintillations was decomposed using adaptive time-frequency methods like empirical mode decomposition (EMD), ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) and complementary ensemble empirical mode decomposition (CEEMD). It was observed that the CEEMD method combined with MF-DFA provides better results as compared to the EMD and EEMD techniques.

  9. Time profile of the scintillation from liquid and gaseous xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murayama, Ikuko; Nakamura, Shogo

    2014-11-01

    The decay time profile of vacuum ultraviolet scintillation induced by electronic recoils has been studied for liquid and gaseous xenon. The scintillation light from xenon excited by a gamma source was measured by using two vacuum ultraviolet sensitive photomultipliers, one for detecting scintillation and the other for counting photons of weak monochromatic light. The analysis results based on the time-correlated single photon counting method show that the time profile in the 176 nm scintillation decay curve for liquid xenon is consistent with a single exponential component and the decay time constant is 31.5±1.3 ns. This constant does not change significantly for pressure ranges between 90 kPa and 130 kPa. There is no emission wavelength dependence of the decay constant. The result corresponds to an average on electronic recoil energies up to 1.3 MeV.

  10. Final LDRD report : advanced plastic scintillators for neutron detection.

    SciTech Connect

    Vance, Andrew L.; Mascarenhas, Nicholas; O'Bryan, Greg; Mrowka, Stanley

    2010-09-01

    This report summarizes the results of a one-year, feasibility-scale LDRD project that was conducted with the goal of developing new plastic scintillators capable of pulse shape discrimination (PSD) for neutron detection. Copolymers composed of matrix materials such as poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and blocks containing trans-stilbene (tSB) as the scintillator component were prepared and tested for gamma/neutron response. Block copolymer synthesis utilizing tSBMA proved unsuccessful so random copolymers containing up to 30% tSB were prepared. These copolymers were found to function as scintillators upon exposure to gamma radiation; however, they did not exhibit PSD when exposed to a neutron source. This project, while falling short of its ultimate goal, demonstrated the possible utility of single-component, undoped plastics as scintillators for applications that do not require PSD.

  11. 21 CFR 892.1100 - Scintillation (gamma) camera.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...gamma) camera. (a) Identification. A scintillation (gamma) camera is a device intended to image the distribution of radionuclides in the body by means of a photon radiation detector. This generic type of device may include signal...

  12. 21 CFR 892.1100 - Scintillation (gamma) camera.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...gamma) camera. (a) Identification. A scintillation (gamma) camera is a device intended to image the distribution of radionuclides in the body by means of a photon radiation detector. This generic type of device may include signal...

  13. 21 CFR 892.1100 - Scintillation (gamma) camera.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...gamma) camera. (a) Identification. A scintillation (gamma) camera is a device intended to image the distribution of radionuclides in the body by means of a photon radiation detector. This generic type of device may include signal...

  14. Broadband Meter-Wavelength Observations of Ionospheric Scintillation

    E-print Network

    Fallows, R A; McKay, D; Vierinen, J; Virtanen, I I; Postila, M; Ulich, Th; Enell, C-F; Kero, A; Iinatti, T; Lehtinen, M; Orispää, M; Raita, T; Roininen, L; Turunen, E; Brentjens, M; Ebbendorf, N; Gerbers, M; Grit, T; Gruppen, P; Meulman, H; Norden, M; de Reijer, J-P; Schoenmakers, A; Stuurwold, K

    2015-01-01

    Intensity scintillations of cosmic radio sources are used to study astrophysical plasmas like the ionosphere, the solar wind, and the interstellar medium. Normally these observations are relatively narrow band. With Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) technology at the Kilpisj\\"arvi Atmospheric Imaging Receiver Array (KAIRA) station in northern Finland we have observed scintillations over a 3 octave bandwidth. ``Parabolic arcs'', which were discovered in interstellar scintillations of pulsars, can provide precise estimates of the distance and velocity of the scattering plasma. Here we report the first observations of such arcs in the ionosphere and the first broad-band observations of arcs anywhere, raising hopes that study of the phenomenon may similarly improve the analysis of ionospheric scintillations. These observations were made of the strong natural radio source Cygnus-A and covered the entire 30-250\\,MHz band of KAIRA. Well-defined parabolic arcs were seen early in the observations, before transit, and disapp...

  15. Scintillation effects on radio wave propagation through solar corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, C. M.; Sue, M. K.; Bedrossian, A.; Sniffin, R. W.

    2002-01-01

    When RF waves pass through the solar corona and solar wind regions close to the Sun, strong scintillation effects appear at their amplitude, frequency and phase, especially in the regions very close to the Sun (less than 4 solar radius).

  16. Multilayer Scintillation Detector for Nuclear Physics Monitoring of Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batischev, A. G.; Aleksandrin, S. Yu.; Gurov, Yu. B.; Koldashov, S. V.; Lapushkin, S. V.; Mayorov, A. G.

    The physical characteristics of the multilayer scintillation spectrometer (MSS) for identification and energy measurement of cosmic electrons, positrons and nuclei are considered in this paper. This spectrometer is made on the basis of several plastic scintillator plates with various thick viewed by photomultipliers. Two upper layers are strips of orthogonal scintillators. The nuclei energy measurement range is 3 - 100 MeV/nucleon. Spectrometer is planning for space weather monitoring and investigation of solar-magnetospheric and geophysics effects on satellite. MSS time resolution is about 1 microsecond and it can measure the time profiles of fast processes in the Earth's magnetosphere. Spectrometer experimental characteristics were estimated by means of computer simulation. The ionization loss fluctuations, ion charge exchange during pass through detector and, especially, scintillation quenching effect (Bircs effect) were taken into account in calculations.

  17. A Scintillator Purification Plant and Fluid Handling System for SNO+

    E-print Network

    Ford, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    A large capacity purification plant and fluid handling system has been constructed for the SNO+ neutrino and double-beta decay experiment, located 6800 feet underground at SNOLAB, Canada. SNO+ is a refurbishment of the SNO detector to fill the acrylic vessel with liquid scintillator based on Linear Alkylbenzene (LAB) and 2 g/L PPO, and also has a phase to load natural tellurium into the scintillator for a double-beta decay experiment with 130Te. The plant includes processes multi-stage dual-stream distillation, column water extraction, steam stripping, and functionalized silica gel adsorption columns. The plant also includes systems for preparing the scintillator with PPO and metal-loading the scintillator for double-beta decay exposure. We review the basis of design, the purification principles, specifications for the plant, and the construction and installations. The construction and commissioning status is updated.

  18. Scintillation properties of ceramics based on zinc oxide

    E-print Network

    Demidenko, V A; Khodyuk, I V; Khristich, O A; Mikhrin, S B; Rodnyi, P A

    2010-01-01

    Ceramics ZnO:Zn of 20mm diameter and 1.6mm thickness with an optical transparency up to 0.33 in the visible region have been prepared by hot pressing technique. Scintillating and luminescent characteristics such as emission spectra, decay time, yield, and TSL glow curve have been measured under X-ray excitation. Two emission bands peaking at 500 and 380 nm were detected, the light output was about 80% of that for standard BGO scintillator, main decay constant was 10.4 ± 0.1 ns. The obtained data allow us to consider the ZnO:Zn ceramics as a perspective scintillator. Finally, the investigation shows that other ZnO-based fast scintillators can be fabricated in the form of optical ceramics.

  19. Scintillation properties of ceramics based on zinc oxide

    E-print Network

    V. A. Demidenko; E. I. Gorokhova; I. V. Khodyuk; O. A. Khristich; S. B. Mikhrin; P. A. Rodnyi

    2010-09-07

    Ceramics ZnO:Zn of 20mm diameter and 1.6mm thickness with an optical transparency up to 0.33 in the visible region have been prepared by hot pressing technique. Scintillating and luminescent characteristics such as emission spectra, decay time, yield, and TSL glow curve have been measured under X-ray excitation. Two emission bands peaking at 500 and 380 nm were detected, the light output was about 80% of that for standard BGO scintillator, main decay constant was 10.4 +/- 0.1 ns. The obtained data allow us to consider the ZnO:Zn ceramics as a perspective scintillator. Finally, the investigation shows that other ZnO-based fast scintillators can be fabricated in the form of optical ceramics.

  20. A scintillator purification plant and fluid handling system for SNO+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Richard J.

    2015-08-01

    A large capacity purification plant and fluid handling system has been constructed for the SNO+ neutrino and double-beta decay experiment, located 6800 feet underground at SNOLAB, Canada. SNO+ is a refurbishment of the SNO detector to fill the acrylic vessel with liquid scintillator based on Linear Alkylbenzene (LAB) and 2 g/L PPO, and also has a phase to load natural tellurium into the scintillator for a double-beta decay experiment with 130Te. The plant includes processes multi-stage dual-stream distillation, column water extraction, steam stripping, and functionalized silica gel adsorption columns. The plant also includes systems for preparing the scintillator with PPO and metal-loading the scintillator for double-beta decay exposure. We review the basis of design, the purification principles, specifications for the plant, and the construction and installations. The construction and commissioning status is updated.

  1. 21 CFR 892.1100 - Scintillation (gamma) camera.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... A scintillation (gamma) camera is a device intended to image the distribution of radionuclides in the body by means of a photon radiation detector. This generic type of device may include signal analysis and display equipment, patient and...

  2. Cancer Screening: How Do Screening Tests Become Standard Tests?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... cancer symptoms. There are different kinds of screening tests. Screening tests include the following: Physical exam and ... are linked to some types of cancer. Screening tests have risks. Not all screening tests are helpful ...

  3. Principles of Cancer Screening.

    PubMed

    Pinsky, Paul F

    2015-10-01

    Cancer screening has long been an important component of the struggle to reduce the burden of morbidity and mortality from cancer. Notwithstanding this history, many aspects of cancer screening remain poorly understood. This article presents a summary of basic principles of cancer screening that are relevant for researchers, clinicians, and public health officials alike. PMID:26315516

  4. Enzymatically Generated CRISPR Libraries for Genome Labeling and Screening.

    PubMed

    Lane, Andrew B; Strzelecka, Magdalena; Ettinger, Andreas; Grenfell, Andrew W; Wittmann, Torsten; Heald, Rebecca

    2015-08-10

    CRISPR-based technologies have emerged as powerful tools to alter genomes and mark chromosomal loci, but an inexpensive method for generating large numbers of RNA guides for whole genome screening and labeling is lacking. Using a method that permits library construction from any source of DNA, we generated guide libraries that label repetitive loci or a single chromosomal locus in Xenopus egg extracts and show that a complex library can target the E. coli genome at high frequency. PMID:26212133

  5. A Job Seeker's Guide About this Guide

    E-print Network

    Butler, Laurie J.

    A Job Seeker's Guide About this Guide This guide is designed to assist you in your job search. Included in this guide are many helpful tips that you can use throughout your job search process. In this guide, you will learn how to: Apply job search strategies Write and format a resume Conduct yourself

  6. Performance studies of scintillating ceramic samples exposed to ionizing radiation

    E-print Network

    G. Dissertori; D. Luckey; F. Nessi-Tedaldi; F. Pauss; R. Wallny

    2012-11-16

    Scintillating ceramics are a promising, new development for various applications in science and industry. Their application in calorimetry for particle physics experiments is expected to involve an exposure to high levels of ionizing radiation. In this paper, changes in performance have been measured for scintillating ceramic samples of different composition after exposure to penetrating ionizing radiation up to a dose of 38 kGy.

  7. Scintillation of liquid neon from electronic and nuclear recoils

    E-print Network

    J. A. Nikkel; R. Hasty; W. H. Lippincott; D. N. McKinsey

    2006-12-04

    We have measured the time dependence of scintillation light from electronic and nuclear recoils in liquid neon, finding a slow time constant of 15.4+-0.2 us. Pulse shape discrimination is investigated as a means of identifying event type in liquid neon. Finally, the nuclear recoil scintillation efficiency is measured to be 0.26+-0.03 for 387 keV nuclear recoils.

  8. Research to Operations of Ionospheric Scintillation Detection and Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, J.; Scro, K.; Payne, D.; Ruhge, R.; Erickson, B.; Andorka, S.; Ludwig, C.; Karmann, J.; Ebelhar, D.

    Ionospheric Scintillation refers to random fluctuations in phase and amplitude of electromagnetic waves caused by a rapidly varying refractive index due to turbulent features in the ionosphere. Scintillation of transionospheric UHF and L-Band radio frequency signals is particularly troublesome since this phenomenon can lead to degradation of signal strength and integrity that can negatively impact satellite communications and navigation, radar, or radio signals from other systems that traverse or interact with the ionosphere. Although ionospheric scintillation occurs in both the equatorial and polar regions of the Earth, the focus of this modeling effort is on equatorial scintillation. The ionospheric scintillation model is data-driven in a sense that scintillation observations are used to perform detection and characterization of scintillation structures. These structures are then propagated to future times using drift and decay models to represent the natural evolution of ionospheric scintillation. The impact on radio signals is also determined by the model and represented in graphical format to the user. A frequency scaling algorithm allows for impact analysis on frequencies other than the observation frequencies. The project began with lab-grade software and through a tailored Agile development process, deployed operational-grade code to a DoD operational center. The Agile development process promotes adaptive promote adaptive planning, evolutionary development, early delivery, continuous improvement, regular collaboration with the customer, and encourage rapid and flexible response to customer-driven changes. The Agile philosophy values individuals and interactions over processes and tools, working software over comprehensive documentation, customer collaboration over contract negotiation, and responding to change over following a rigid plan. The end result was an operational capability that met customer expectations. Details of the model and the process of operational integration are discussed as well as lessons learned to improve performance on future projects.

  9. Lanthanum halide nanoparticle scintillators for nuclear radiation detection

    SciTech Connect

    Guss, Paul; Guise, Ronald; O'Brien, Robert; Lowe, Daniel; Kang Zhitao; Menkara, Hisham; Nagarkar, Vivek V.

    2013-02-14

    Nanoparticles with sizes <10 nm were fabricated and characterized for their nanocomposite radiation detector properties. This work investigated the properties of several nanostructured radiation scintillators, in order to determine the viability of using scintillators employing nanostructured lanthanum trifluoride. Preliminary results of this investigation are consistent with the idea that these materials have an intrinsic response to nuclear radiation that may be correlated to the energy of the incident radiation.

  10. High effective atomic number polymer scintillators for gamma ray spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Cherepy, Nerine Jane; Sanner, Robert Dean; Payne, Stephen Anthony; Rupert, Benjamin Lee; Sturm, Benjamin Walter

    2014-04-15

    A scintillator material according to one embodiment includes a bismuth-loaded aromatic polymer having an energy resolution at 662 keV of less than about 10%. A scintillator material according to another embodiment includes a bismuth-loaded aromatic polymer having a fluor incorporated therewith and an energy resolution at 662 keV of less than about 10%. Additional systems and methods are also presented.

  11. Ternary liquid scintillator for optical-fiber applications

    SciTech Connect

    Franks, L.A.; Lutz, S.S.

    1981-06-01

    A multicomponent liquid scintillator solution for use as a radiation-to-light converter in conjunction with a fiber optic transmission system. The scintillator includes a quantity of 5-amino-9-diethylaminobenz (a) phenoxazonium nitrate (Nile Blue Nitrate) as a solute in a fluor solvent such as benzyl alcohol. The use of PPD as an additional solute is also disclosed. The system is controllable by addition of a suitable quenching agent, such as phenol.

  12. What Do Scintillations Tell Us about the Ionized ISM?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rickett, B. J.

    2007-07-01

    I review what has been learned about the fine structure in the ionized interstellar medium from radio scintillation and scattering -- first, as it constrains the wavenumber spectrum of the electron density and second in terms of evidence from parabolic scintillation arcs for discrete structures on scales less than about 1 AU, which must be very widely distributed to account for the incidence of discrete parabolic arcs and Extreme Scattering Events.

  13. Status report on dark matter search with low activity scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacci, C.; Belli, P.; Bernabei, R.; Dai, C.; Di Nicolantonio, W.; Ding, L. K.; Gaillard-Lecanu, E.; Giraud-Heraud, Y.; Kuang, H. H.; Incicchitti, A.; Mallet, J.; Mosca, L.; Prosperi, D.; Tao, C.; Chambon, B.; Chazal, V.; De Jésus, M.; Drain, D.; Messous, Y.; Pastor, C.; BPRS (Beijing, Paris, Roma, Saclay) Collaboration

    1994-05-01

    The BPRS experiment is dedicated to particle Dark Matter search with low activity scintillators. Preliminary results on Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) have been already obtained with NaI(Tl) and CaF 2(Eu) target-detectors. New detector developments are in progress. A new search for Strongly Interacting Massive Particles (SIMPs) with NaI(Tl) scintillators have been also performed.

  14. FERPA Training Guide FERPA Training Steps

    E-print Network

    FERPA Training Guide 1 FERPA Training Steps Graduate committee chairs and co-chairs are encouraged-time FERPA training via TrainTraq (if not previously completed). When trying to access the Graduate Committee Degree Evaluation too, the following screen will display if you have not completed FERPA training

  15. An auroral scintillation observation using precise, collocated GPS receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garner, T. W.; Harris, R. B.; York, J. A.; Herbster, C. S.; Minter, C. F., III; Hampton, D. L.

    2011-02-01

    On 10 January 2009, an unusual ionospheric scintillation event was observed by a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver station in Fairbanks, Alaska. The receiver station is part of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency's (NGA) Monitoring Station Network (MSN). Each MSN station runs two identical geodetic-grade, dual-frequency, full-code tracking GPS receivers that share a common antenna. At the Fairbanks station, a third separate receiver with a separate antenna is located nearby. During the 10 January event, ionospheric conditions caused two of the receivers to loose lock on a single satellite. The third receiver tracked through the scintillation. The region of scintillation was collocated with an auroral arc and a slant total electron content (TEC) increase of 5.71 TECu (TECu = 1016/m2). The response of the full-code tracking receivers to the scintillation is intriguing. One of these receivers lost lock, but the other receiver did not. This fact argues that a receiver's internal state dictates its reaction to scintillation. Additionally, the scintillation only affected the L2 signal. While this causes the L1 signal to be lost on the semicodelessly receiver, the full-code tracking receiver only lost the L1 signal when the receiver attempted to reacquire the satellite link.

  16. Observations of GPS scintillation during an isolated auroral substorm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosokawa, Keisuke; Otsuka, Yuichi; Ogawa, Yasunobu; Tsugawa, Takuya

    2014-12-01

    This paper reports simultaneous observations of ionospheric scintillation during an auroral substorm that were made using an all-sky full-color digital single-lens reflex (DSLR) camera (ASC) and a Global Positioning System (GPS) ionospheric scintillation and total electron content monitor (GISTM) in Tromsø (69.60 N, 19.20 E), Norway. On the night of November 19, 2009, a small substorm occurred in northern Scandinavia. The ASC captured its temporal evolution from the beginning of the growth phase to the end of the recovery phase. The amplitude scintillation, as monitored by the S4 index from the GISTM, did not increase in any substorm phase. By contrast, phase scintillation, as measured by the ? ? index, occurred when discrete auroral arcs appeared on the GPS signal path. In particular, the phase scintillation was significantly enhanced for a few minutes immediately after the onset of the expansion phase. During this period, bright and discrete auroral forms covered the entire sky, which implies that structured precipitation on the scale of a few kilometers to a few tens of kilometers dominated the electron density distribution in the E region. Such inhomogeneous ionization structures probably produced significant changes in the refractive index and eventually resulted in the enhancement of the phase scintillation.

  17. A compound crystal with film scintillator for electron detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinney, George; McDonnald, Warren; Tzolov, Marian

    2015-03-01

    Yttrium Aluminum Garnets (YAG) and Yttrium Aluminum Perovskite (YAP) are widely used as electron detectors. This application requires a top conducting layer which hinders their application at low electron energies. We have developed a layer of zinc tungstate which delivers conductivity large enough to prevent charging while still being an efficient scintillator. For better coupling between the two systems we have studied their optical properties. Ce doping is an essential element in YAP and YAG in order for them to be efficient scintillators. We have studied the Ce content and we show that higher Ce content leads to reabsorption in the YAP scintillators. These details were revealed by using photoluminescence emission and excitation spectroscopy. The absorption spectrum for the YAG scintillators coincides with the excitation for the main emission lines. The optical studies of the zinc tungstate films and a single crystal have shown that the films are more efficient light emitters. We have integrated the zinc tungstate films with YAG scintillators and we will report on the performance of this compound scintillator. It is expected that it will perform well at low and high electron energies, which makes it a very cost effective platform for electron detectors.

  18. High energy resolution with transparent ceramic garnet scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherepy, N. J.; Seeley, Z. M.; Payne, S. A.; Beck, P. R.; Swanberg, E. L.; Hunter, S.; Ahle, L.; Fisher, S. E.; Melcher, C.; Wei, H.; Stefanik, T.; Chung, Y.-S.; Kindem, J.

    2014-09-01

    Breakthrough energy resolution, R(662keV) < 4%, has been achieved with an oxide scintillator, Cerium-doped Gadolinium Yttrium Gallium Aluminum Garnet, or GYGAG(Ce). Transparent ceramic GYGAG(Ce), has a peak emission wavelength of 550 nm that is better matched to Silicon photodetectors than to standard PMTs. We are therefore developing a spectrometer based on pixelated GYGAG(Ce) on a Silicon photodiode array that can provide R(662 keV) = 3.6%. In comparison, with large 1-2 in3 size GYGAG(Ce) ceramics we obtain R(662 keV) = 4.6% with PMT readout. We find that ceramic GYGAG(Ce) of a given stoichiometric chemical composition can exhibit very different scintillation properties, depending on sintering conditions and post-anneal treatments. Among the characteristics of transparent ceramic garnet scintillators that can be controlled by fabrication conditions are: scintillation decay components and their amplitudes, intensity and duration of afterglow, thermoluminescence glow curve peak positions and amplitudes, integrated light yield, light yield non-proportionality - as measured in the Scintillator Light Yield Non-Proportionality Characterization Instrument (SLYNCI), and energy resolution for gamma spectroscopy. Garnet samples exhibiting a significant fraction of Cerium dopant in the tetravalent valence also exhibit: faster overall scintillation decay, very low afterglow, high light yield, but poor light yield proportionality and degraded energy resolution.

  19. Computer Simulation of the Light Yield Nonlinearity of Inorganic Scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Cannon, Bret D.; Gao, Fei; Xie, YuLong

    2009-06-01

    To probe the nature of the physical processes responsible for the nonlinear photon response of inorganic scintillators, we have combined a Monte Carlo (MC) code for calculating the microscopic spatial distributions of electron-hole pairs with a kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) model of energy-transfer processes. In this publication, we focus on evaluating the contribution of an annihilation mechanism between self-trapped excitons (STE) to the photon response of pure CsI and Ce-doped LaBr3. A KMC model of scintillation mechanisms in pure CsI was developed previously and we introduce in this publication a similar model for Ce-doped LaBr3. We show that the KMC scintillation model is able to reproduce both the kinetics and efficiency of the scintillation process in Ce-doped LaBr3. Relative light output curves were generated at several temperatures for both scintillators from simulations carried out at 2, 5, 10, 20, 100, and 400 keV. These simulations suggest that STE-STE annihilation can account for the initial rise in relative light yield with increasing incident energy. This is due to the fact that the proportion of high-density regions decreases as the incident energy increases thus reducing the likelihood for STE-STE encounter. In addition, the simulations clearly show a lack of temperature dependence of the relative light output, in agreement with a majority of experimental work on the temperature dependence of nonlinearity in inorganic scintillators.

  20. Infrared scintillation yield in gaseous and liquid argon

    E-print Network

    A. Buzulutskov; A. Bondar; A. Grebenuk

    2011-04-19

    The study of primary and secondary scintillations in noble gases and liquids is of paramount importance to rare-event experiments using noble gas media. In the present work, the scintillation yield in gaseous and liquid Ar has for the first time been measured in the near infrared (NIR) and visible region, both for primary and secondary (proportional) scintillations, using Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes (G-APDs) and pulsed X-ray irradiation. The primary scintillation yield of the fast component was measured to be 17000 photon/MeV in gaseous Ar in the NIR, in the range of 690-1000 nm, and 510 photon/MeV in liquid Ar, in the range of 400-1000 nm. Proportional NIR scintillations (electroluminescence) in gaseous Ar have been also observed; their amplification parameter at 163 K was measured to be 13 photons per drifting electron per kV. Possible applications of NIR scintillations in high energy physics experiments are discussed.

  1. Gene Expression Changes in Developing Zebrafish as Potential Markers for Rapid Developmental Neurotoxicity Screening

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sparse information exists on many chemicals to guide developmental neurotoxicity (DNT) risk assessments. As DNT testing using rodents is laborious and expensive, alternative species such as zebrafish are being adapted for toxicity screening. Assessing the DNT potential of chem...

  2. Screening and preventable illness.

    PubMed

    Byrne, M M; Thompson, P

    2001-11-01

    If an agent does not discount the future at a constant rate, as in some forms of myopia, her optimal strategy is unattainable without some commitment device. We apply this familiar idea to a model of screening and disease prevention, and explore how financial incentives can correct suboptimal health choices. In general, myopia need not imply under-screening. While the optimal intervention for prevention effort is a state-invariant subsidy, the optimal intervention for screening may involve a tax or a subsidy. When screening and prevention are coincident, a simple and practical subsidy equal to one minus the discount factor to both screening and intervention is indicated. PMID:11758049

  3. Risks of Cervical Cancer Screening

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Treatment Cervical Cancer Prevention Cervical Cancer Screening Research Cervical Cancer Screening (PDQ®) What is screening? Screening is looking ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Cervical Cancer Key Points Cervical cancer is a disease in ...

  4. Neutron detector based on Particles of 6Li glass scintillator dispersed in organic lightguide matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ianakiev, K. D.; Hehlen, M. P.; Swinhoe, M. T.; Favalli, A.; Iliev, M. L.; Lin, T. C.; Bennett, B. L.; Barker, M. T.

    2015-06-01

    Most 3He replacement neutron detector technologies today have overlapping neutron-gamma pulse-height distributions, which limits their usefulness and performance. Different techniques are used to mitigate this shortcoming, including Pulse Shape Discrimination (PSD) or threshold settings that suppress all gammas as well as much of the neutrons. As a result, count rates are limited and dead times are high when PSD is used, and the detection efficiency for neutron events is reduced due to the high threshold. This is a problem in most applications where the neutron-gamma separation of 3He detectors had been essential. This challenge is especially severe for neutron coincidence and multiplicity measurements that have numerous conflicting requirements such as high detection efficiency, short die-away time, short dead time, and high stability. 6Li-glass scintillators have excellent light output and a single peak distribution, but they are difficult to implement because of their gamma sensitivity. The idea of reducing the gamma sensitivity of 6Li-glass scintillators by embedding small glass particles in an organic light-guide medium was first presented by L.M. Bollinger in the early 60s but, to the best of our knowledge, has never been reduced to practice. We present a proof of principle detector design and experimental data that develop this concept to a large-area neutron detector. This is achieved by using a multi-component optical medium (6Li glass particles attached to a glass supporting structure and a mineral oil light guide) which matches the indices of refraction and minimizes the absorption of the 395 nm scintillator light. The detector design comprises a 10 in. long tube with dual end readout with about 3% volume density of 6Li glass particles installed. The presented experimental data with various neutron and gamma sources show the desired wide gap between the neutron and gamma pulse height distributions, resulting in a true plateau in the counting characteristics similar to that of 3He detectors.

  5. Alpha/beta pulse shape discrimination in plastic scintillation using commercial scintillation detectors.

    PubMed

    Bagán, H; Tarancón, A; Rauret, G; García, J F

    2010-06-18

    Activity determination in different types of samples is a current need in many different fields. Simultaneously analysing alpha and beta emitters is now a routine option when using liquid scintillation (LS) and pulse shape discrimination. However, LS has an important drawback, the generation of mixed waste. Recently, several studies have shown the capability of plastic scintillation (PS) as an alternative to LS, but no research has been carried out to determine its capability for alpha/beta discrimination. The objective of this study was to evaluate the capability of PS to discriminate alpha/beta emitters on the basis of pulse shape analysis (PSA). The results obtained show that PS pulses had lower energy than LS pulses. As a consequence, a lower detection efficiency, a shift to lower energies and a better discrimination of beta and a worst discrimination of alpha disintegrations was observed for PS. Colour quenching also produced a decrease in the energy of the particles, as well as the effects described above. It is clear that in PS, the discrimination capability was correlated with the energy of the particles detected. Taking into account the discrimination capabilities of PS, a protocol for the measurement and the calculation of alpha and beta activities in mixtures using PS and commercial scintillation detectors has been proposed. The new protocol was applied to the quantification of spiked river water samples containing a pair of radionuclides ((3)H-(241)Am or (90)Sr/(90)Y-(241)Am) in different activity proportions. The relative errors in all determinations were lower than 7%. These results demonstrate the capability of PS to discriminate alpha/beta emitters on the basis of pulse shape and to quantify mixtures without generating mixed waste. PMID:20685410

  6. Scintillating glass fiber neutron sensors: 2, Light transmission in scintillating fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Abel, K.H.; Arthur, R.J.; Bliss, M.

    1993-10-01

    The capture and transmission of light from an event through a scintillating fiber is somewhat different than in conventional optical waveguide applications. A theoretical all-ray model that depends on surface and bulk loss factors is developed for this transmission. The capture fraction can be significantly greater than that predicted on the basis of meridional rays alone and the gross loss is nonexponential for short distances (less than or of the order of one 1/e distance). The latter phenomenon occurs because high-angle and skew rays are more rapidly attenuated than meridional rays.

  7. Optical Design Considerations for Efficient Light Collection from Liquid Scintillation Counters

    SciTech Connect

    Bernacki, Bruce E.; Douglas, Matthew; Erchinger, Jennifer L.; Fuller, Erin S.; Keillor, Martin E.; Morley, Shannon M.; Mullen, Crystal A.; Orrell, John L.; Panisko, Mark E.; Warren, Glen A.; Wright, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Liquid scintillation counters measure charged particle-emitting radioactive isotopes and are used for environmental studies, nuclear chemistry, and life science. Alpha and beta emissions arising from the material under study interact with the scintillation cocktail to produce light. The prototypical liquid scintillation counter employs low-level photon-counting detectors to measure the arrival of the scintillation light produced as a result of the dissolved material under study interacting with the scintillation cocktail. For reliable operation the counting instrument must convey the scintillation light to the detectors efficiently and predictably. Current best practices employ the use of two or more detectors for coincidence processing to discriminate true scintillation events from background events due to instrumental effects such as photomultiplier tube dark rates, tube flashing, or other light emission not generated in the scintillation cocktail vial. In low background liquid scintillation counters additional attention is paid to shielding the scintillation cocktail from naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) present in the laboratory and within the instruments construction materials. Low background design is generally at odds with optimal light collection. This study presents the evolution of a light collection design for liquid scintillation counting in a low background shield. The basic approach to achieve both good light collection and a low background measurement is described. The baseline signals arising from the scintillation vial are modeled and methods to efficiently collect scintillation light are presented as part of the development of a customized low-background, high sensitivity liquid scintillation counting system.

  8. Interstellar Scintillation Velocities of a Relativistic Binary PSR B1534+12 and Three Other Millisecond Pulsars

    E-print Network

    Slavko Bogdanov; Malgorzata Pruszynska; Wojciech Lewandowski; Alex Wolszczan

    2002-04-16

    We present interstellar scintillation velocity measurements for four millisecond pulsars obtained from long-term monitoring observations with the Arecibo radio telescope at 430 MHz. We also derive explicit expressions that relate the measured scintillation velocity to the effective transverse velocity responsible for the motion of the diffraction pattern for both binary and solitary pulsars. For B1257+12, B1534+12, J1640+2224, and J1713+0747 we derive velocity estimates of 197, 192, 38, and 82 km/s, respectively. These values are in good agreement with proper motion measurements for the four pulsars. For PSR B1534+12, we use the ISS velocity dependence on orbital phase to determine the longitude of the ascending node (Omega) of the pulsar's orbit and to derive an estimate of the effective scattering screen location. The two possible values of Omega are 70+/-20 and 290+/-20 degrees and the approximate screen location is 630+/-200 pc with the assumed pulsar distance of 1.1 kpc.

  9. Excitonic effects in oxyhalide scintillating host compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Shwetha, G.; Kanchana, V.; Valsakumar, M. C.

    2014-10-07

    Ab-initio calculations based on density functional theory have been performed to study the electronic, optical, mechanical, and vibrational properties of scintillator host compounds YOX (X = F, Cl, Br, and I). Semiempirical dispersion correction schemes are used to find the effect of van der Waals forces on these layered compounds and we found this effect to be negligible except for YOBr. Calculations of phonons and elastic constants showed that all the compounds studied here are both dynamically and mechanically stable. YOF and YOI are found to be indirect band gap insulators while YOCl and YOBr are direct band gap insulators. The band gap is found to decrease as we move from fluorine to iodine, while the calculated refractive index shows the opposite trend. As the band gap decreases on going down the periodic table from YOF to YOI, the luminescence increases. The excitonic binding energy calculated, within the effective mass approximation, is found to be more for YOF than the remaining compounds, suggesting that the excitonic effect to be more in YOF than the other compounds. The optical properties are calculated within the Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TDDFT) and compared with results obtained within the random phase approximation. The TDDFT calculations, using the newly developed bootstrap exchange-correlation kernel, showed significant excitonic effects in all the compounds studied here.

  10. Teachers Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linsky, Ronald B.; Schnitger, Ronald L.

    This guide provides teachers with copies of the materials given to students participating in the oceanography program of the Orange County Floating Laboratory Program and provides information concerning colleges and universities offering courses in oceanography and marine science, source of films, and sources of publications concerning the Navy's…

  11. Coatings Guide

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Coatings Guide is a free online information resource that focuses on alternative, low-emission coatings for metal, plastic, and architectural substrates. Developed cooperatively by the U.S. EPA's Office of Research and Development and Research Triangle Institute (RTI) Interna...

  12. Homebuyer's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sindt, Roger P.; Harris, Jack

    Designed to assist prospective buyers in making such important decisions as whether to buy a new or older home and within what price range, the guide provides information on the purchase process. Discussion of the purchase process covers the life-cycle costs (recurring homeownership costs that must be met every month); selection of a home;…

  13. Characterization of 4 × 4ch MPPC array in scintillation spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grodzicka, M.; Moszy?ski, M.; Szcz??niak, T.; Szaw?owski, M.; Baszak, J.

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this work is an evaluation of MPPC array characteristics in application for scintillation light readout in gamma-ray spectrometry. Hamamatsu MPPC array of 4 × 4 channels format and total area of 12 × 12 mm2 was used as a light readout device with CsI:Tl, BGO, LSO, LaBr3, NaI:Tl, CsI:Na, LaCl3, CaF2:Eu, and CdWO4 scintillators. The measurements presented in this work covered: measurements of the breakdown voltage for each channel of the MPPC array, selection of the optimum operating voltage, evaluation of the linearity range of MPPC response for each of the used crystals, measurements of the number of photoelectrons per MeV and measurements of the energy resolution for 661.6 keV ?-rays from 137Cs. The results of the energy resolution and number of photoelectrons obtained with the tested MPPC and nine scintillators were compared to those obtained for the same scintillators with XP2020Q and XP5212 PMTs. The energy resolution data for 661.6 keV ?-rays, obtained with 12 × 12 × 12 mm3 CsI:Tl, LSO and BGO scintillators coupled to the tested MPPC are equal to: 6.4%, 9.4% and 9.5%, respectively, and are close to the results obtained for the same scintillators coupled to the XP2020Q PMT (6.6%, 9.4% and 10.5%, respectively). The study showed that light readout by means of an MPPC array produces comparable or even slightly better (in the case of a proper match of the MPPC and the scintillator optical surface) results than the XP2020Q PMT readout.

  14. Automated Groundwater Screening

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Glenn A.; Collard, Leonard, B.

    2005-10-31

    The Automated Intruder Analysis has been extended to include an Automated Ground Water Screening option. This option screens 825 radionuclides while rigorously applying the National Council on Radiation Protection (NCRP) methodology. An extension to that methodology is presented to give a more realistic screening factor for those radionuclides which have significant daughters. The extension has the promise of reducing the number of radionuclides which must be tracked by the customer. By combining the Automated Intruder Analysis with the Automated Groundwater Screening a consistent set of assumptions and databases is used. A method is proposed to eliminate trigger values by performing rigorous calculation of the screening factor thereby reducing the number of radionuclides sent to further analysis. Using the same problem definitions as in previous groundwater screenings, the automated groundwater screening found one additional nuclide, Ge-68, which failed the screening. It also found that 18 of the 57 radionuclides contained in NCRP Table 3.1 failed the screening. This report describes the automated groundwater screening computer application.

  15. Radar measurement of ionospheric scintillation in the polar region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knepp, Dennis L.

    2015-10-01

    This paper considers several estimators that use radar data to measure the S4 scintillation index that characterizes the severity of amplitude scintillation that may occur during RF propagation through ionospheric irregularities. S4 is defined to be the standard deviation of the fluctuations in received power normalized by division by the mean power. Estimates of S4 are based on radar returns obtained during track of targets which may themselves have intrinsic radar cross-section fluctuations. Key to this work is the consideration of thresholding, which is used in many radars to remove (from further processing) signals whose SNR is considered too low. We consider several estimators here. The "direct" estimator attempts to estimate S4 through the direct calculation of the mean and standard deviation of the SNR from a number of radar returns. The maximum likelihood (ML) estimator uses multiple hypothesis testing and the assumption of Nakagami-m statistics to estimate the scintillation index that best fits the radar returns from some number of pulses. The ML estimator has perfect knowledge of the number of radar returns that are below the threshold. The direct estimator is accurate for the case where there is no threshold and there are many returns or samples from which to estimate S4. However, the direct estimator is flawed (especially for strong scintillation) if deep fades that fall below the radar threshold are ignored. The modified ML estimator here is based on the ML technique but is useful if the count of missed returns is unavailable. We apply the modified ML estimator to several years of radar tracks of large calibration satellites to obtain the statistics of UHF scintillation as viewed from the early warning radar at Thule, Greenland. One-way S4 was measured from 5000 low Earth orbit tracks during the 3 year period after solar maximum in May 2000. The data are analyzed to quantify the exceedance or the level of scintillation experienced at various probabilities. For example, from Thule during the period from December 2001 to February 2002, the probability exceeds 5% that the one-way scintillation index at UHF is greater than 0.7. On a daily basis this translates into 1.2 h a day of strong scintillation. Unfortunately, there are insufficient data to obtain equivalent information for the winter of solar maximum when the scintillation is likely to be most severe.

  16. Scintillation properties of polycrystalline LaxY1-xO3 ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahi, Sunil; Chen, Wei; Kenarangui, Rasool

    2015-03-01

    Scintillators are the material that absorbs the high-energy photons and emits visible photons. Scintillators are commonly used in radiation detector for security, medical imaging, industrial applications and high energy physics research. Two main types of scintillators are inorganic single crystals and organic (plastic or liquid) scintillators. Inorganic single crystals are expensive and difficult to grow in desire shape and size. Also, some efficient inorganic scintillator such as NaI and CsI are not environmental friendly. But on the other hand, organic scintillators have low density and hence poor energy resolution which limits their use in gamma spectroscopy. Polycrystalline ceramic can be a cost effective alternative to expensive inorganic single crystal scintillators. Here we have fabricated La0.2Y1.8O3 ceramic scintillator and studied their luminescence and scintillation properties. Ceramic scintillators were fabricated by vacuum sintering of La0.2Y1.8O3 nanoparticles at temperature below the melting point. La0.2Y1.8O3 ceramic were characterized structurally using XRD and TEM. Photoluminescence and radioluminescence studies were done using UV and X-ray as an excitation source. We have used gamma isotopes with different energy to studies the scintillation properties of La0.2Y1.8O3 scintillator. Preliminary studies of La0.2Y1.8O3 scintillator shows promising result with energy resolution comparable to that of NaI and CsI.

  17. Behavioral Economics: “Nudging” Underserved Populations to Be Screened for Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Tess; Kreuter, Matthew W.; McBride, Timothy D.

    2015-01-01

    Persistent disparities in cancer screening by race/ethnicity and socioeconomic status require innovative prevention tools and techniques. Behavioral economics provides tools to potentially reduce disparities by informing strategies and systems to increase prevention of breast, cervical, and colorectal cancers. With an emphasis on the predictable, but sometimes flawed, mental shortcuts (heuristics) people use to make decisions, behavioral economics offers insights that practitioners can use to enhance evidence-based cancer screening interventions that rely on judgments about the probability of developing and detecting cancer, decisions about competing screening options, and the optimal presentation of complex choices (choice architecture). In the area of judgment, we describe ways practitioners can use the availability and representativeness of heuristics and the tendency toward unrealistic optimism to increase perceptions of risk and highlight benefits of screening. We describe how several behavioral economic principles involved in decision-making can influence screening attitudes, including how framing and context effects can be manipulated to highlight personally salient features of cancer screening tests. Finally, we offer suggestions about ways practitioners can apply principles related to choice architecture to health care systems in which cancer screening takes place. These recommendations include the use of incentives to increase screening, introduction of default options, appropriate feedback throughout the decision-making and behavior completion process, and clear presentation of complex choices, particularly in the context of colorectal cancer screening. We conclude by noting gaps in knowledge and propose future research questions to guide this promising area of research and practice. PMID:25590600

  18. Behavioral economics: "nudging" underserved populations to be screened for cancer.

    PubMed

    Purnell, Jason Q; Thompson, Tess; Kreuter, Matthew W; McBride, Timothy D

    2015-01-01

    Persistent disparities in cancer screening by race/ethnicity and socioeconomic status require innovative prevention tools and techniques. Behavioral economics provides tools to potentially reduce disparities by informing strategies and systems to increase prevention of breast, cervical, and colorectal cancers. With an emphasis on the predictable, but sometimes flawed, mental shortcuts (heuristics) people use to make decisions, behavioral economics offers insights that practitioners can use to enhance evidence-based cancer screening interventions that rely on judgments about the probability of developing and detecting cancer, decisions about competing screening options, and the optimal presentation of complex choices (choice architecture). In the area of judgment, we describe ways practitioners can use the availability and representativeness of heuristics and the tendency toward unrealistic optimism to increase perceptions of risk and highlight benefits of screening. We describe how several behavioral economic principles involved in decision-making can influence screening attitudes, including how framing and context effects can be manipulated to highlight personally salient features of cancer screening tests. Finally, we offer suggestions about ways practitioners can apply principles related to choice architecture to health care systems in which cancer screening takes place. These recommendations include the use of incentives to increase screening, introduction of default options, appropriate feedback throughout the decision-making and behavior completion process, and clear presentation of complex choices, particularly in the context of colorectal cancer screening. We conclude by noting gaps in knowledge and propose future research questions to guide this promising area of research and practice. PMID:25590600

  19. Counterintuitive MCNPX Results for Scintillator Surface Roughness Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Ding; Guss, Paul

    2012-10-01

    We performed a number of comparative MCNPX simulations of gamma energy depositions of scintillation crystals with smooth and rough surfaces. In the study, nine surface patterns (8 micro-roughness + 1 smooth) were coupled with eight common scintillation crystals for a total of 72 possible combinations. Although this was a preliminary study, the outcome was counterintuitive; results generally favored surfaces with micro-roughness over a conventional smooth surface as measured in terms of average energy depositions. The advantage gained through surface roughness is less significant for CdSe and LaCl3, but is most significant for the common NaI and the glass-like SiO2 scintillators. Based on the results of the 64 rough-surface coupled MCNPX simulations, 57 of the 64 (~89%) simulations showed some improvement in energy deposition. The mean improvement in energy deposition was 2.52%. The maximum improvement was about 8.75%, which was achieved when roughening the surface of a SiO2 scintillator using a micro cutting pattern. Further, for a conventional NaI scintillator, MCNPX results suggest that any roughness pattern would improve the energy deposition, with an average improvement of 3.83%. Although the likely causes remain unclear, we intend to focus on presenting simulation results instead of offering a sound explanation of the underlying physics.

  20. Tests of Multibeam Scintillation Mitigation on Laser Uplinks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Keith

    2004-01-01

    A report presents additional details about parts of the program of research and development that is the topic of the immediately preceding article. The report emphasizes those aspects of the program that pertain to the use of multiple uplink laser beams in a ground-to-spacecraft optical communication system to reduce (relative to the case of a single uplink laser beam) the depth and frequency of occurrence of fades in the uplink signal received at the spacecraft. The underlying multibeam scintillation-mitigation concept was described in "Multiple-Beam Transmission for Optical Communication" (NPO-20384), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 22, No. 11 (November 1998), page 56. The report discusses the need for mitigating uplink scintillation; briefly describes the Optical Communications Telescope Laboratory and its role as the ground station in the research; summarizes prior experiments in uplink scintillation and multibeam mitigation of scintillation in ground-to-spacecraft laser communications; and describes key experiments planned to be performed in the next five years. The report then elaborates somewhat on the initial experiments, which are to be dedicated to understanding and perfecting the multibeam scintillation-mitigation strategy.

  1. Angular correlation of the stellar scintillation on large telescopes

    E-print Network

    Kornilov, V

    2012-01-01

    The stellar scintillation is one of the fundamental limitation to the precision of ground-based photometry. The paper examines the problem of correlation of the scintillation of two close stars at the focus of a large telescope. The derived correlation functions were applied to data of the long-term study of the optical turbulence (OT) in the Northern Caucasus with MASS (Multi-Aperture Scintillation Sensor) instrument to predict the angular correlation of the scintillation at the Sternberg institute 2.5 m telescope currently in construction. A median angular radius of the correlation as large as 20 arcsec was found for the case of Kolmogorov OT. On the basis of the obtained relations we also analyze the correlation impact in ensemble photometry and conjugate plane photometry. It is shown that a reduction of the scintillation noise up to 8 times can be achieved when using a crowded ensemble of comparison stars. The calculation of the angular correlation can be repeated for any large telescope at the site where...

  2. Pulsar scintillations from corrugated reconnection sheets in the interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pen, Ue-Li; Levin, Yuri

    2014-08-01

    We show that surface waves along interstellar current sheets closely aligned with the line of sight lead to pulsar scintillation properties consistent with those observed. This mechanism naturally produces the length-scales and density scales of the interstellar medium (ISM) scattering lenses that are required to explain the magnitude and dynamical spectrum of the scintillations. In this scenario, the parts of warm ionized ISM that are responsible for the scintillations are relatively quiescent, with scintillation and scattering resulting from weak waves propagating along magnetic domain boundary current sheets. These are expected from helicity conservation and have also been observed in numerical simulations. The model statistically predicts the spacing and amplitudes of inverted parabolic arcs seen in Fourier-transformed dynamical spectra of strongly scintillating pulsars with only three parameters. Multifrequency, multi-epoch low-frequency very long baseline interferometry observations can quantitatively test this. If successful, in addition to mapping the ISM, this might allow precise nanoarcsecond pulsar astrometry, distance measurements and emission studies using these 10-au interferometers in the sky.

  3. Plastic scintillators: a powerful tool to reduce mixed waste

    SciTech Connect

    Tarancon, A.; Bagan, H.; Garcia, J.F.; Rauret, G.

    2008-07-01

    Wastes containing radioactive and organic compounds (mixed wastes) are difficult to dispose because of the regulations established for nuclear and hazardous wastes. Mixed wastes originate mainly in the emulsions generated in beta emitter determinations by Liquid Scintillation techniques. The use of plastic scintillators instead of liquid cocktails may facilitate the segregation, after measurement, of sample and scintillator without introducing additional wastes in the measurement step. In this study, we compare the capability of Plastic Scintillation (PS) versus Liquid Scintillation (LS) and Cerenkov (C) techniques to determine beta emitters in routine measurements. Results obtained show that high and medium energy beta emitters (Sr-90/Y-90 and C-14) can be quantified in aqueous samples by using PS with similar relative errors (< 5%) as those obtained by LS or C, for any activity level considered. For low energy emitters (H-3), best results using PS are achieved for medium activity levels. Additionally, measurements performed in solutions including alpha (Pu-238) and beta-gamma (Cs-134) emitters confirm the capability of PS to extent the application of this technique to the determination of these types of isotopes. (authors)

  4. Scintillating Fiber Technology for a High Energy Neutron Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, Evgeny; Adams, James; Watts, John, Jr.; Christl, Mark

    Secondary neutrons within a crewed spacecraft make a significant contribution to the radiation exposure of the crew. In order to determine the dose equivalent the absolute neutron energy spectrum must be measured. Making this measurement in the crew quarters requires an instrument that distinguishes neutrons from the background of gamma ray and charged particle radiation with high reliability. A design for a high energy neutron spectrometer will be presented that achieves excellent background rejection while measuring the absolute neutron differential energy spectrum. This spectrometer consists of 6Li-loaded scintillating glass optical fiber waveguides which are imbedded in plastic scintillator. The plastic scintillator measures the neutron energy while thermalizing the neutrons. Once thermalized, the neutrons can be absorbed by 6Li, which gives a signal in the glass fibers. Optically separating the signals from the glass fibers and in the plastic scintillator is critical for strong background rejection. It permits the thermal neutron absorption signal in the glass fibers to be detected while signals from gamma rays and charges particles are rejected with high efficiency. This talk will discuss the methods for creating optical fiber waveguides from 6Li glass loaded scintillating fibers.

  5. Low-latitude scintillation weakening during sudden stratospheric warming events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paula, E. R.; Jonah, O. F.; Moraes, A. O.; Kherani, E. A.; Fejer, B. G.; Abdu, M. A.; Muella, M. T. A. H.; Batista, I. S.; Dutra, S. L. G.; Paes, R. R.

    2015-03-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) L1-frequency (1.575 GHz) amplitude scintillations at São José dos Campos (23.1°S, 45.8°W, dip latitude 17.3°S), located under the southern crest of the equatorial ionization anomaly, are analyzed during the Northern Hemisphere winter sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) events of 2001/2002, 2002/2003, and 2012/2013. The events occurred during a period when moderate to strong scintillations are normally observed in the Brazilian longitude sector. The selected SSW events were of moderate and major categories and under low Kp conditions. The most important result of the current study is the long-lasting (many weeks) weakening of scintillation amplitudes at this low-latitude station, compared to their pre-SSW periods. Ionosonde-derived evening vertical plasma drifts and meridional neutral wind effects inferred from total electron content measurements are consistent with the observed weakening of GPS scintillations during these SSW events. This work provides strong evidence of SSW effects on ionospheric scintillations and the potential consequences of such SSW events on Global Navigation Satellite System-based applications.

  6. Developing a Culturally Responsive Breast Cancer Screening Promotion with Native Hawaiian Women in Churches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaopua, Lana Sue

    2008-01-01

    This article presents findings from research to develop the promotional component of a breast cancer screening program for Native Hawaiian women associated with historically Hawaiian churches in medically underserved communities. The literature on adherence to health recommendations and health promotions marketing guided inquiry on screening

  7. Screening for Heart Murmurs. What's Normal and What's Not.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pflieger, Kurt L.; Strong, William B.

    1992-01-01

    A step-by-step guide to auscultating young athletes helps physicians identify normal heart murmurs as well as sounds that might signify underlying cardiac pathology. Rapid, thorough preparticipation screening can help differentiate athletes who may require treatment or activity restriction from those with normal murmurs who can remain active. (SM)

  8. Cell-based screening: extracting meaning from complex data.

    PubMed

    Finkbeiner, Steven; Frumkin, Michael; Kassner, Paul D

    2015-04-01

    Unbiased discovery approaches have the potential to uncover neurobiological insights into CNS disease and lead to the development of therapies. Here, we review lessons learned from imaging-based screening approaches and recent advances in these areas, including powerful new computational tools to synthesize complex data into more useful knowledge that can reliably guide future research and development. PMID:25856492

  9. Use of internal scintillator radioactivity to calibrate DOI function of a PET detector with a dual-ended-scintillator readout

    SciTech Connect

    Bircher, Chad; Shao Yiping

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: Positron emission tomography (PET) detectors that use a dual-ended-scintillator readout to measure depth-of-interaction (DOI) must have an accurate DOI function to provide the relationship between DOI and signal ratios to be used for detector calibration and recalibration. In a previous study, the authors used a novel and simple method to accurately and quickly measure DOI function by irradiating the detector with an external uniform flood source; however, as a practical concern, implementing external uniform flood sources in an assembled PET system is technically challenging and expensive. In the current study, therefore, the authors investigated whether the same method could be used to acquire DOI function from scintillator-generated (i.e., internal) radiation. The authors also developed a method for calibrating the energy scale necessary to select the events within the desired energy window. Methods: The authors measured the DOI function of a PET detector with lutetium yttrium orthosilicate (LYSO) scintillators. Radiation events originating from the scintillators' internal Lu-176 beta decay were used to measure DOI functions which were then compared with those measured from both an external uniform flood source and an electronically collimated external point source. The authors conducted these studies with several scintillators of differing geometries (1.5 x 1.5 and 2.0 x 2.0 mm{sup 2} cross-section area and 20, 30, and 40 mm length) and various surface finishes (mirror-finishing, saw-cut rough, and other finishes in between), and in a prototype array. Results: All measured results using internal and external radiation sources showed excellent agreement in DOI function measurement. The mean difference among DOI values for all scintillators measured from internal and external radiation sources was less than 1.0 mm for different scintillator geometries and various surface finishes. Conclusions: The internal radioactivity of LYSO scintillators can be used to accurately measure DOI function in PET detectors, regardless of scintillator geometry or surface finish. Because an external radiation source is not needed, this method of DOI function measurement can be practically applied to individual PET detectors as well as assembled systems.

  10. Scintillation counters in modern high-energy physics experiments (Review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharzheev, Yu. N.

    2015-07-01

    Scintillation counters (SCs) based on organic plastic scintillators (OPSs) are widely used in modern high-energy physics (HEP) experiments. A comprehensive review is given to technologies for production of OPS strips and tiles (extrusion, injection molding, etc.), optical and physical characteristics of OPSs, and methods of light collection based on the use of wavelength-shifting (WLS) fibers coupled to multipixel vacuum and silicon PMs. Examples are given of the use of SCs in modern experiments involved in the search for quarks and new particles, including the Higgs boson (D0, CDF, ATLAS, CMS), new states of matter (ALICE), CP violation (LHCb, KLOE), neutrino oscillations (MINOS, OPERA), and cosmic particles in a wide mass and energy interval (AMS-02). Scintillation counters hold great promise for future HEP experiments (at the ILC, NICA, FAIR) due to properties of a high segmentation, WLS fiber light collection, and multipixel silicon PMT readout.

  11. Gasolines as primary solvents in liquid scintillation counting

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, A.; Ma Pinto, R.; Sillero, A.

    1986-11-01

    Gasolines from several commercial sources have been used as primary solvents in liquid scintillation counting of dry and aqueous samples of either /sup 3/H- or /sup 14/C-labeled compounds. Dry samples can be counted only by the addition of fluors to the gasolines, and compared to a standard liquid scintillator, efficiencies of around 75% were attained. For the counting of aqueous samples, gasolines must also be supplemented with secondary solvents (i.e., 10% naphthalene, 5% Triton X-100, or 10% methanol). Simply with Triton X-100, efficiencies similar to those obtained with a dioxane-based liquid scintillator were observed in the case of some gasolines. Drawbacks to gasoline are the higher toxicity and the variation of efficiency, probably depending on the presence of color markers. On the positive side is the low price of the gasolines, compared with either toluene or dioxane, and the facility of purchasing.

  12. Scintillator-fiber charged particle track-imaging detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binns, W. R.; Israel, M. H.; Klarmann, J.

    1983-01-01

    A scintillator-fiber charged-particle track-imaging detector was developed using a bundle of square cross section plastic scintillator fiber optics, proximity focused onto an image intensified charge injection device (CID) camera. The tracks of charged particle penetrating into the scintillator fiber bundle are projected onto the CID camera and the imaging information is read out in video format. The detector was exposed to beams of 15 MeV protons and relativistic Neon, Manganese, and Gold nuclei and images of their tracks were obtained. Details of the detector technique, properties of the tracks obtained, and preliminary range measurements of 15 MeV protons stopping in the fiber bundle are presented.

  13. Scintillation Response of Liquid Xenon to Low Energy Nuclear Recoils

    E-print Network

    E. Aprile; K. L. Giboni; P. Majewski; K. Ni; M. Yamashita; R. Hasty; A. Manzur; D. N. McKinsey

    2005-03-29

    Liquid Xenon (LXe) is expected to be an excellent target and detector medium to search for dark matter in the form of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). Knowledge of LXe ionization and scintillation response to low energy nuclear recoils expected from the scattering of WIMPs by Xe nuclei is important for determining the sensitivity of LXe direct detection experiments. Here we report on new measurements of the scintillation yield of Xe recoils with kinetic energy as low as 10 keV. The dependence of the scintillation yield on applied electric field was also measured in the range of 0 to 4 kV/cm. Results are in good agreement with recent theoretical predictions that take into account the effect of biexcitonic collisions in addition to the nuclear quenching effect.

  14. Hadronic Shower Development in Iron-Scintillator Tile Calorimetry

    E-print Network

    Tilecal Atlas Collaboration

    1999-04-29

    The lateral and longitudinal profiles of hadronic showers detected by a prototype of the ATLAS Iron-Scintillator Tile Hadron Calorimeter have been investigated. This calorimeter uses a unique longitudinal configuration of scintillator tiles. Using a fine-grained pion beam scan at 100 GeV, a detailed picture of transverse shower behavior is obtained. The underlying radial energy densities for four depth segments and for the entire calorimeter have been reconstructed. A three-dimensional hadronic shower parametrization has been developed. The results presented here are useful for understanding the performance of iron-scintillator calorimeters, for developing fast simulations of hadronic showers, for many calorimetry problems requiring the integration of a shower energy deposition in a volume and for future calorimeter design.

  15. Hadronic Shower Development in Tile Iron-Scintillator Calorimetry

    E-print Network

    Yuri A. Kulchitsky

    1999-10-07

    The lateral and longitudinal profiles of hadronic showers detected by a prototype of the ATLAS Iron-Scintillator Tile Hadron Calorimeter have been investigated. This calorimeter uses a unique longitudinal configuration of scintillator tiles. Using a fine-grained pion beam scan at 100 GeV, a detailed picture of transverse shower behavior is obtained. The underlying radial energy densities for four depth segments and for the entire calorimeter have been reconstructed. A three-dimensional hadronic shower parametrization has been developed. The results presented here are useful for understanding the performance of iron-scintillator calorimeters, for developing fast simulations of hadronic showers, for many calorimetry problems requiring the integration of a shower energy deposition in a volume and for future calorimeter design.

  16. Neutron imaging using the anisotropic response of crystalline organic scintillators.

    SciTech Connect

    Brubaker, Erik; Steele, John T.

    2010-11-01

    An anisotropy in a scintillator's response to neutron elastic scattering interactions can in principle be used to gather directional information about a neutron source using interactions in a single detector. In crystalline organic scintillators, such as anthracene, both the amplitude and the time structure of the scintillation light pulse vary with the direction of the proton recoil with respect to the crystalline axes. Therefore, we have investigated the exploitation of this effect to enable compact, high-efficiency fast neutron detectors that have directional sensitivity via a precise measurement of the pulse shape. We report measurements of the pulse height and shape dependence on proton recoil angle in anthracene, stilbene, p-terphenyl, diphenyl anthracene (DPA), and tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB). Image reconstruction for simulated neutron sources is demonstrated using maximum likelihood methods for optimal directional sensitivity.

  17. Gadolinium loaded plastic scintillators for high efficiency neutron detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovechkina, Lena; Riley, Kent; Miller, Stuart; Bell, Zane; Nagarkar, Vivek

    2009-08-01

    Gadolinium has the highest thermal neutron absorption cross section of any naturally occurring element, and emits conversion electrons as well as atomic X-rays in over 50% of its neutron captures, which makes it a useful dopant in scintillators for detecting thermal neutrons. Gadolinium isopropoxide was studied as a possible dopant for styrene-based plastic scintillators as a convenient and inexpensive method to produce high-efficiency thermal neutron detectors. Plastic scintillators with gadolinium weight concentrations of up to 3% were transparent, uniform and defect-free and were characterized with spectral measurements performed under x-ray and neutron irradiation. The new material has the same characteristic emission of styrene with a maximum at approximately 425 nm, and a light output of 76% relative to the undoped plastic. A 13 mm thick sample containing 0.5% gadolinium by weight detected 46% of incident thermal neutrons, which makes this an attractive material for a variety of applications.

  18. Radiation characteristics of scintillator coupled CMOS APS for radiography conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kwang Hyun; Kim, Soongpyung; Kang, Dong-Won; Kim, Dong-Kie

    2006-11-01

    Under industrial radiography conditions, we analyzed short-term radiation characteristics of scintillator coupled CMOS APS (hereinafter SC CMOS APS). By means of experimentation, the contribution of the transmitted X-ray through the scintillator to the properties of the CMOS APS and the afterimage, generated in the acquired image even at low dose condition, were investigated. To see the transmitted X-ray effects on the CMOS APS, Fein focus™ X-ray machine, two scintillators of Lanex™ Fine and Regular, and two CMOS APS array of RadEye™ were used under the conditions of 50 kV p/1 mAs and 100 kV p/1 mAs. By measuring the transmitted X-ray on signal and Noise Power Spectrum, we analytically examined the generation mechanism of the afterimage, based on dark signal or dark current increase in the sensor, and explained the afterimage in the SC CMOS APS.

  19. BaBrI:Eu2 + , a new bright scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Bourret-Courchesne, E.D.; Bizarri, G.; Hanrahan, S.M.; Gundiah, G.; Yan, Z.; Derenzo, S.E.

    2009-11-07

    The scintillation properties of BaBrI:Eu2+ are reported. Crystals were produced by the vertical Bridgman technique in a sealed quartz ampoule. Excellent scintillation properties were measured. A light yield of 81,0007 +- 3000 photons per MeV (ph/MeV) of absorbed gamma-ray energy was measured. An energy resolution (FWHM over peak position) of 4.870.5percent was observed for the 662keV full absorption peak. Pulsed X-ray luminescence measurements show two exponential decay components of 297 and 482 ns with a contribution to the total light output of 23percent and 77percent, respectively. Under X-ray and UV excitation, the emission corresponds to a broadband center at 413 nm. These initial values make BaBrI:Eu2+ one of the brightest and the fastest known Eu2+ doped scintillators.

  20. Scintillation as the cause of Intraday Variability at cm Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rickett, B. J.

    2003-05-01

    Rapid (intraday) flux density variations observed at cm wavelengths are more readily explained as scintillation in the ionized interstellar medium than by intrinsic models. Whereas the latter yield brightness temperatures many orders of magnitude above those found from VLBI, temperatures found from scintillation models are consistent with the canonical jet models with Doppler factors similar to those found from VLBI. I will review the many lines of evidence in support of scintillation, concentrating on results from the most rapid variables, which are scattered in unusually nearby regions of the interstellar medium. I will also show preliminary results from a recent survey of 700 flat spectrum sources in which more than 12% vary on times shorter than two days, suggesting brightness temperatures no more than about 1012 K.

  1. New approaches in medical imaging using plastic scintillating detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, P. V.; Anderson, J. A.; Antich, P. P.; Prior, J. O.; Zhang, Y.; Fernando, J.; Constantinescu, A.; Goomer, N. C.; Parkey, R. W.; Fenyves, E.; Chaney, R. C.; Srivastava, S. C.; Mausner, L. F.

    1993-06-01

    A small animal imaging camera was built in our laboratory, using-fast plastic scintillating detectors ( ? = 2-4 ns) and position sensitive photomultipliers (Hamamatsu) digitized using flash ADCs. Pinhole collimators were used for 125I imaging to achieve submillimeter resolution with scintillating plates of 28 mm radius and 1.5 mm thickness. A high resolution PET module was constructed with arrays of 1.0 mm diameter plastic scintillating fibers. The feasibility of high resolution imaging was demonstrated by the study of brain blood flow in a rat using 125I IMP in single photon detection mode and with 64Cu PTSM by using PET mode. Construction of single photon and positron emission tomographic imaging systems for small animals and subsequently for human imaging is in progress.

  2. Final Report on Actinide Glass Scintillators for Fast Neutron Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Bliss, Mary; Stave, Jean A.

    2012-10-01

    This is the final report of an experimental investigation of actinide glass scintillators for fast-neutron detection. It covers work performed during FY2012. This supplements a previous report, PNNL-20854 “Initial Characterization of Thorium-loaded Glasses for Fast Neutron Detection” (October 2011). The work in FY2012 was done with funding remaining from FY2011. As noted in PNNL-20854, the glasses tested prior to July 2011 were erroneously identified as scintillators. The decision was then made to start from “scratch” with a literature survey and some test melts with a non-radioactive glass composition that could later be fabricated with select actinides, most likely thorium. The normal stand-in for thorium in radioactive waste glasses is cerium in the same oxidation state. Since cerium in the 3+ state is used as the light emitter in many scintillating glasses, the next most common substitute was used: hafnium. Three hafnium glasses were melted. Two melts were colored amber and a third was clear. It barely scintillated when exposed to alpha particles. The uses and applications for a scintillating fast neutron detector are important enough that the search for such a material should not be totally abandoned. This current effort focused on actinides that have very high neutron capture energy releases but low neutron capture cross sections. This results in very long counting times and poor signal to noise when working with sealed sources. These materials are best for high flux applications and access to neutron generators or reactors would enable better test scenarios. The total energy of the neutron capture reaction is not the only factor to focus on in isotope selection. Many neutron capture reactions result in energetic gamma rays that require large volumes or high densities to detect. If the scintillator is to separate neutrons from gamma rays, the capture reactions should produce heavy particles and few gamma rays. This would improve the detection of a signal for fast neutron capture.

  3. DSB:Ce3+ scintillation glass for future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auffray, E.; Akchurin, N.; Benaglia, A.; Borisevich, A.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dormenev, V.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P.; Korjik, M.; Kozlov, D.; Kunori, S.; Lecoq, P.; Lee, S. W.; Lucchini, M.; Mechinsky, V.; Pauwels, K.

    2015-02-01

    One of the main challenges for detectors at future high-energy collider experiments is the high precision measurement of hadron and jet energy and momentum. One possibility to achieve this is the dual-readout technique, which allows recording simultaneously scintillation and Cherenkov light in an active medium in order to extract the electromagnetic fraction of the total shower energy on an event- by-event basis. Making use of this approach in the high luminosity LHC, however, puts stringent requirements on the active materials in terms of radiation hardness. Consequently, the R&D carried out on suitable scintillating materials focuses on the detector performance as well as on radiation tolerance. Among the different scintillating materials under study, scintillating glasses can be a suitable solution due to their relatively simple and cost effective production. Recently a new type of inorganic scintillating glass: Cerium doped DSB has been developed by Radiation Instruments and New Components LLC in Minsk for oil logging industry. This material can be produced either in form of bulk or fiber shape with diameter 0.3-2mm and length up to 2000 mm. It is obtained by standard glass production technology at temperature 1400°C with successive thermal annealing treatment at relatively low temperature. The production of large quantities is relatively easy and the production costs are significantly lower compared to crystal fibers. Therefore, this material is considered as an alternative and complementary solution to crystal fibers in view of a production at industrial scale, as required for a large dual readout calorimeter. In this paper, the first results on optical, scintillation properties as well as the radiation damage behaviour obtained on different samples made with different raw materials and various cerium concentrations will be presented.

  4. Smaller, Lower-Power Fast-Neutron Scintillation Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Jagdish; Blaes, Brent

    2008-01-01

    Scintillation-based fast-neutron detectors that are smaller and less power-hungry than mainstream scintillation-based fast-neutron detectors are undergoing development. There are numerous applications for such detectors in monitoring fast-neutron fluxes from nuclear reactors, nuclear materials, and natural sources, both on Earth and in outer space. A particularly important terrestrial application for small, low-power, portable fast-neutron detectors lies in the requirement to scan for nuclear materials in cargo and baggage arriving at international transportation facilities. The present development of miniature, low-power scintillation-based fast-neutron detectors exploits recent advances in the fabrication of avalanche photodiodes (APDs). Basically, such a detector includes a plastic scintillator, typically between 300 and 400 m thick with very thin silver mirror coating on all its faces except the one bonded to an APD. All photons generated from scintillation are thus internally reflected and eventually directed to the APD. This design affords not only compactness but also tight optical coupling for utilization of a relatively large proportion of the scintillation light. The combination of this tight coupling and the avalanche-multiplication gain (typically between 750 and 1,000) of the APD is expected to have enough sensitivity to enable monitoring of a fast-neutron flux as small as 1,000 cm(exp -2)s(exp -1). Moreover, pulse-height analysis can be expected to provide information on the kinetic energies of incident neutrons. It has been estimated that a complete, fully developed fast-neutron detector of this type, would be characterized by linear dimensions of the order of 10 cm or less, a mass of no more than about 0.5 kg, and a power demand of no more than a few watts.

  5. Scintillation properties of Gd3Al2Ga3O12:Ce3+ single crystal scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakthong, Ongsa; Chewpraditkul, Weerapong; Wanarak, Chalerm; Kamada, Kei; Yoshikawa, Akira; Prusa, Petr; Nikl, Martin

    2014-07-01

    The scintillation properties of Gd3Al2Ga3O12:Ce3+ (GAGG:Ce) single crystals grown by the Czochralski method with 1 at% cerium in the melt were investigated and results were compared with so far published results in the literature. The light yield (LY) and energy resolution were measured using a XP5200B photomultiplier. Despite about twice higher LY for GAGG:Ce, the energy resolution is only slightly better than that of LuAG:Ce due to its worse intrinsic resolution and non-proportionality of LY. The LY dependences on the sample thickness and amplifier shaping time were measured. The estimated photofraction in pulse height spectra of 320 and 662 keV ?-rays and the total mass attenuation coefficient at 662 keV ?-rays were also determined and compared with the theoretical ones calculated using the WinXCom program.

  6. Characteristics of scintillation detectors based on inorganic scintillators and SiPM light readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szcze&?acute; niak, T.; Grodzicka, M.; Moszy?ski, M.; Szaw?owski, M.; Wolski, D.; Baszak, J.

    2013-02-01

    Recently, a silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) became one of the strongest candidates for application in PET-MR or SPECT-MR dual-modality scanners. However, optimization of the scintillation detectors with SiPM light readout requires different approach than in the case of classic photomultipliers. The finite number of micro-cells in a SiPM creates nonlinear response for high number of incident photons. Moreover, the size and total number of micro-cells defines fill factor, which in turn affects the photon detection efficiency (PDE). Response of SiPMs is also highly sensitive to bias voltage causing changes in PDE and excess noise factor (ENF). Finally, each cell posses an effective dead time needed to fully recharge that cell after the photon detection. In this work the listed above unique features of SiPMs are overviewed. The reported data also contain measurements of energy resolution and 22Na time resolution.

  7. COVARIANCE ASSISTED SCREENING AND ESTIMATION

    PubMed Central

    Ke, By Tracy; Jin, Jiashun; Fan, Jianqing

    2014-01-01

    Consider a linear model Y = X ? + z, where X = Xn,p and z ~ N(0, In). The vector ? is unknown and it is of interest to separate its nonzero coordinates from the zero ones (i.e., variable selection). Motivated by examples in long-memory time series (Fan and Yao, 2003) and the change-point problem (Bhattacharya, 1994), we are primarily interested in the case where the Gram matrix G = X?X is non-sparse but sparsifiable by a finite order linear filter. We focus on the regime where signals are both rare and weak so that successful variable selection is very challenging but is still possible. We approach this problem by a new procedure called the Covariance Assisted Screening and Estimation (CASE). CASE first uses a linear filtering to reduce the original setting to a new regression model where the corresponding Gram (covariance) matrix is sparse. The new covariance matrix induces a sparse graph, which guides us to conduct multivariate screening without visiting all the submodels. By interacting with the signal sparsity, the graph enables us to decompose the original problem into many separated small-size subproblems (if only we know where they are!). Linear filtering also induces a so-called problem of information leakage, which can be overcome by the newly introduced patching technique. Together, these give rise to CASE, which is a two-stage Screen and Clean (Fan and Song, 2010; Wasserman and Roeder, 2009) procedure, where we first identify candidates of these submodels by patching and screening, and then re-examine each candidate to remove false positives. For any procedure ?? for variable selection, we measure the performance by the minimax Hamming distance between the sign vectors of ?? and ?. We show that in a broad class of situations where the Gram matrix is non-sparse but sparsifiable, CASE achieves the optimal rate of convergence. The results are successfully applied to long-memory time series and the change-point model. PMID:25541567

  8. DCCPS: BRP: PCRB: Screening

    Cancer.gov

    PCRB is interested in research that promotes optimal use of breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer screenings in populations. Optimal use balances the benefit of screening for people who will get cancer in their lifetime against the harms to those who will not get cancer.

  9. Lung cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Tanoue, Lynn T; Tanner, Nichole T; Gould, Michael K; Silvestri, Gerard A

    2015-01-01

    The United States Preventive Services Task Force recommends lung cancer screening with low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) in adults of age 55 to 80 years who have a 30 pack-year smoking history and are currently smoking or have quit within the past 15 years. This recommendation is largely based on the findings of the National Lung Screening Trial. Both policy-level and clinical decision-making about LDCT screening must consider the potential benefits of screening (reduced mortality from lung cancer) and possible harms. Effective screening requires an appreciation that screening should be limited to individuals at high risk of death from lung cancer, and that the risk of harm related to false positive findings, overdiagnosis, and unnecessary invasive testing is real. A comprehensive understanding of these aspects of screening will inform appropriate implementation, with the objective that an evidence-based and systematic approach to screening will help to reduce the enormous mortality burden of lung cancer. PMID:25369325

  10. Scoliosis Screening in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Div. of Pupil Personnel Services.

    The booklet outlines New York state school policy and procedures for screening students for scoliosis, lateral curvature of the spine. It is explained that screening is designed to discover spinal deformities early enough to prevent surgery. Planning aspects, including organizing a planning team for the school district, are discussed. Among…

  11. Scintillator-fiber charged-particle track-imaging detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binns, W. R.; Israel, M. H.; Klarmann, J.

    1983-01-01

    A scintillator-fiber charged-particle track-imaging detector has been developed using a bundle of square cross-section plastic scintillator fiber optics, proximity focused onto an image intensified Charge Injection Device (CID) camera. Detector to beams of 15 MeV protons and relativistic Neon, Manganese, and Gold nuclei have been exposed and images of their tracks are obtained. This paper presents details of the detector technique, properties of the tracks obtained, and range measurements of 15 MeV protons stopping in the fiber bundle.

  12. Applying direct liquid scintillation counting to low level tritium measurement.

    PubMed

    Varlam, C; Stefanescu, I; Duliu, O G; Faurescu, I; Popescu, I

    2009-05-01

    Different types of procedures could be applied to measure environmental tritium level, but usually all are based on measuring tritium concentration in extracted samples water by liquid scintillation counting techniques. There are two standard methods published for tritium measurement in aqueous samples. The recommended tritium activities for tritium standard solutions can be found in these reference procedures. This paper reports the results from a comparative study carried out for different tritium standard solutions, in order to measure the counting efficiency using liquid scintillation method. PMID:19230692

  13. Evaluating Small Scintillating Cells for Digital Hadron Calorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, Kurt

    2004-01-01

    This thesis discusses the use of scintillator cells with digital electronics as a basis for a digital hadron calorimeter. The detection of a minimum ionizing particle (MIP), analysis of crosstalk, and determination of light yield for the array of scintillating cells are described. The cells were found to have a light yield (in terms of single photoelectrons per MIP) of 7 to 13. Crosstalk due to transfer of light between adjacent cells or photomultiplier tube channels can reach 45%. Rejection versus efficiency studies show that single-channel thresholds can be set that reject noise while accepting MIP signals.

  14. Study of rare alpha decays with scintillating bolometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardani, L.

    2013-08-01

    Rare ? decays can be studied with an unprecedented sensitivity by means of scintillating bolometers, as these detectors can provide a large source mass as well as an excellent resolution and can disentangle the nature of the interacting particle thanks to the different light yield. As an example of the results that can be obtained with this technique, I report the conclusive test on the identification of 209Bi decay and the measurement of the half-life of this isotope. In addition, I present a measurement with a PbWO4 scintillating bolometer, in which the lead isotopes decays were studied.

  15. Scintillation characterization of thallium-doped lithium iodide crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Sajid; Kim, H. J.; Kim, Y. D.

    2015-09-01

    The paper discusses scintillation and luminescence properties of thallium-doped LiI crystals, grown by the Bridgman technique. X-ray induced emission spectrum is obtained between 380 nm and 600 nm, and is attributed to the Tl+ ion. The photoluminescence measurement with the excitation wavelength of 305 nm revealed a similar emission spectrum. Light yield, energy resolution and scintillation decay time profiles were studied under 662 keV (137Cs) ?-ray excitation. A maximum light yield of 14,000±1400 ph/MeV and two exponential decay time components were obtained.

  16. Relationship between microstructure and efficiency of scintillating glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Bliss, M.; Craig, R.A.; Reeder, P.L.; Sunberg, D.S.; Weber, M.J.

    1994-04-01

    Prior work has shown that there is a correlation between trap densities and scintillation efficiency of cerium-activated, lithium-aluminosilicate glasses. Raman spectroscopy has strongly suggested that phase separation may be playing an important role in governing the scintillation efficiency. This study, relates the thermoluminescence glow-curve data and microstructural analysis for a compositional series. The thermoluminescence data provide information about the traps in the neighborhood of the activator (Ce{sup 3+}). The microscopy and crystallization of the glasses provide direct evidence of activator partitioning.

  17. A decametric wavelength radio telescope for interplanetary scintillation observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronyn, W. M.; Shawhan, S. D.

    1975-01-01

    A phased array, electrically steerable radio telescope (with a total collecting area of 18 acres), constructed for the purpose of remotely sensing electron density irregularity structure in the solar wind, is presented. The radio telescope is able to locate, map, and track large scale features of the solar wind, such as streams and blast waves, by monitoring a large grid of natural radio sources subject to rapid intensity fluctuation (interplanetary scintillation) caused by the irregularity structure. Observations verify the performance of the array, the receiver, and the scintillation signal processing circuitry of the telescope.

  18. MUTANT SCREEN REPORT A Genetic Screen for High Copy Number

    E-print Network

    Sharan, Roded

    MUTANT SCREEN REPORT A Genetic Screen for High Copy Number Suppressors of the Synthetic Lethality a high copy number suppressor screen to search for genes that, when overexpressed, suppress the synthetic

  19. Psychological screening program overview.

    PubMed

    Wright, Kathleen M; Huffman, Ann H; Adler, Amy B; Castro, Carl A

    2002-10-01

    This article reviews the literature on health surveillance conducted during military deployments, focusing on models for assessing the impact of operational deployments on peacekeepers. A discussion of the stressors and potential mental health consequences of peacekeeping operations follows with relevant examples of findings from U.S. and international military forces. Psychological screening in different peacekeeping operations conducted in U.S. Army-Europe is reviewed. The review begins with the redeployment screening of military personnel deployed to Bosnia mandated under the Joint Medical Surveillance Program, and continues through the present screening of units deployed to Kosovo. The detailed description of the screening program includes a discussion of procedures and measures and demonstrates the evolution of the program. A summary of key findings from the screening program and a discussion of future research directions are provided. PMID:12392255

  20. Scintillating plastic optical fiber radiation detectors in high energy particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Bross, A.D.

    1991-10-26

    We describe the application of scintillating optical fiber in instrumentation for high energy particle physics. The basic physics of the scintillation process in polymers is discussed first and then we outline the fundamentals of scintillating fiber technology. Fiber performance, optimization, and characterization measurements are given. Detector applications in the areas of particle tracking and particle energy determination are then described. 13 refs., 12 figs.

  1. Band-Gap and Band-Edge Engineering of Multicomponent Garnet Scintillators from First Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Satyesh K.; Uberuaga, Blas P.; Nikl, Martin; Jiang, Chao; Stanek, Christopher R.

    2015-11-01

    Complex doping schemes in R3 Al5 O12 (where R is the rare-earth element) garnet compounds have recently led to pronounced improvements in scintillator performance. Specifically, by admixing lutetium and yttrium aluminate garnets with gallium and gadolinium, the band gap is altered in a manner that facilitates the removal of deleterious electron trapping associated with cation antisite defects. Here, we expand upon this initial work to systematically investigate the effect of substitutional admixing on the energy levels of band edges. Density-functional theory and hybrid density-functional theory (HDFT) are used to survey potential admixing candidates that modify either the conduction-band minimum (CBM) or valence-band maximum (VBM). We consider two sets of compositions based on Lu3 B5O12 where B is Al, Ga, In, As, and Sb, and R3Al5 O12 , where R is Lu, Gd, Dy, and Er. We find that admixing with various R cations does not appreciably affect the band gap or band edges. In contrast, substituting Al with cations of dissimilar ionic radii has a profound impact on the band structure. We further show that certain dopants can be used to selectively modify only the CBM or the VBM. Specifically, Ga and In decrease the band gap by lowering the CBM, while As and Sb decrease the band gap by raising the VBM, the relative change in band gap is quantitatively validated by HDFT. These results demonstrate a powerful approach to quickly screen the impact of dopants on the electronic structure of scintillator compounds, identifying those dopants which alter the band edges in very specific ways to eliminate both electron and hole traps responsible for performance limitations. This approach should be broadly applicable for the optimization of electronic and optical performance for a wide range of compounds by tuning the VBM and CBM.

  2. Methods of Fabricating Scintillators with Radioisotopes for Beta Battery Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rensing, Noa M.; Squillante, Michael R.; Tieman, Timothy C.; Higgins, William; Shiriwadkar, Urmila

    2013-01-01

    Technology has been developed for a class of self-contained, long-duration power sources called beta batteries, which harvest the energy contained in the radioactive emissions from beta decay isotopes. The new battery is a significant improvement over the conventional phosphor/solar cell concept for converting this energy in three ways. First, the thin phosphor is replaced with a thick scintillator that is transparent to its own emissions. By using a scintillator sufficiently thick to completely stop all the beta particles, efficiency is greatly improved. Second, since the energy of the beta particles is absorbed in the scintillator, the semiconductor photodetector is shielded from radiation damage that presently limits the performance and lifetime of traditional phosphor converters. Finally, instead of a thin film of beta-emitting material, the isotopes are incorporated into the entire volume of the thick scintillator crystal allowing more activity to be included in the converter without self-absorption. There is no chemical difference between radioactive and stable strontium beta emitters such as Sr-90, so the beta emitter can be uniformly distributed throughout a strontium based scintillator crystal. When beta emitter material is applied as a foil or thin film to the surface of a solar cell or even to the surface of a scintillator, much of the radiation escapes due to the geometry, and some is absorbed within the layer itself, leading to inefficient harvesting of the energy. In contrast, if the emitting atoms are incorporated within the scintillator, the geometry allows for the capture and efficient conversion of the energy of particles emitted in any direction. Any gamma rays associated with secondary decays or Bremsstrahlung photons may also be absorbed within the scintillator, and converted to lower energy photons, which will in turn be captured by the photocell or photodiode. Some energy will be lost in this two-stage conversion process (high-energy particle to low-energy photons to electric current). The geometric advantage partially offsets this as well, since the absorption depth of high-energy beta radiation is much larger than the depth of a p-n junction. Thus, in a p-n junction device, much of the radiation is absorbed far away from the junction, and the electron- hole pairs are not all effectively collected. In contrast, with a transparent scintillator the radiation can be converted to light in a larger volume, and all of the light can be collected in the active region of the photodiode. Finally, the new device is more practical because it can be used at much higher power levels without unduly shortening its lifetime. While the crystal structure of scintillators is also subject to radiation damage, their performance is far more tolerant of defects than that of semiconductor junctions. This allows the scintillator- based approach to use both higher energy isotopes and larger quantities of the isotopes. It is projected that this technology has the potential to produce a radioisotope battery with up to twice the efficiency of presently used systems.

  3. A History of Vision Screening.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appelboom, Tina M.

    1985-01-01

    The vision screening program has a long and interesting history involving educators, pediatricians, optometrists, and ophthamologists. This historical review of vision screening in the schools includes a discussion of amblyopia and screening of preschool students. (Author/CB)

  4. On the collocation of the cusp aurora and the GPS phase scintillation: A statistical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yaqi; Moen, Jøran I.; Miloch, Wojciech J.

    2015-10-01

    The climatology map of the GPS phase scintillation identifies two regions of high scintillation occurrences: around magnetic noon and around magnetic midnight. The scintillation occurrence rate is higher around noon, while the scintillation level is stronger around magnetic midnight. This paper focuses on the dayside scintillation region. In order to resolve the role of the cusp auroral processes in the production of irregularities, we put the GPS phase scintillation in the context of the observed auroral morphology. Results show that the occurrence rate of the GPS phase scintillation is highest inside the auroral cusp, regardless of the scintillation strength and the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). On average, the scintillation occurrence rate in the cusp region is about 5 times as high as in the region immediately poleward of it. The scintillation occurrence rate is higher when the IMF Bz is negative. When partitioning the scintillation data by the IMF By, the distribution of the scintillation occurrence rate around magnetic noon is similar to that of the poleward moving auroral form (PMAF): there is a higher occurrence rate at earlier (later) magnetic local time when the IMF By is positive (negative). This indicates that the irregularities which give rise to scintillations follow the IMF By-controlled east-west motion of the aurora and plasma. Furthermore, the scintillation occurrence rate is higher when IMF By is positive when the cusp is shifted toward the post noon sector where it may get easier access to the higher density plasma. This suggests that the combined auroral activities (e.g., PMAF) and the density of the intake solar EUV ionized plasma are crucial for the production of scintillations.

  5. Prostate Cancer Screening.

    PubMed

    Mulhem, Elie; Fulbright, Nikolaus; Duncan, Norah

    2015-10-15

    Among American men, prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related death. Although prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing has been used to screen for prostate cancer for more than 25 years, the test has low sensitivity and specificity, and there is no clear evidence for determining what threshold warrants prostate biopsy. Only one of five randomized controlled trials of PSA screening showed an effect on prostate cancer-specific mortality, and the absolute reduction in deaths from prostate cancer was one per 781 men screened after 13 years of follow-up. None of the trials showed benefit in all-cause mortality, and screening increased prostate cancer diagnoses by about 60%. Harms of screening include adverse effects from prostate biopsy, overdiagnosis and overtreatment, and anxiety. One-half of screen-detected prostate cancers will not cause symptoms in the patient's lifetime, and 80% to 85% of men who choose observation will not die from prostate cancer within 15 years. Adverse effects of radical prostatectomy include perioperative complications, erectile dysfunction, and urinary incontinence. Radiation therapy can cause acute toxicity leading to urinary urgency, dysuria, diarrhea, and rectal pain; late toxicity includes erectile dysfunction, rectal bleeding, and urethral stricture. Despite variations across guidelines, no organization recommends routine PSA testing, and all endorse some form of shared decision-making before testing. If screening is performed, it should generally be discontinued at 70 years of age. PMID:26554408

  6. Positronium signature in organic liquid scintillators for neutrino experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Franco, D.; Consolati, G.; Trezzi, D.

    2011-01-15

    Electron antineutrinos are commonly detected in liquid scintillator experiments via inverse {beta} decay by looking at the coincidence between the reaction products: neutrons and positrons. Prior to positron annihilation, an electron-positron pair may form an orthopositronium (o-Ps) state, with a mean lifetime of a few nanoseconds. Even if the o-Ps decay is speeded up by spin-flip or pick-off effects, it may introduce distortions in the photon emission time distribution, crucial for position reconstruction and pulse shape discrimination algorithms in antineutrino experiments. Reversing the problem, the o-Ps-induced time distortion represents a new signature for tagging antineutrinos in liquid scintillator. In this article, we report the results of measurements of the o-Ps formation probability and lifetime for the most used solvents for organic liquid scintillators in neutrino physics (pseudocumene, linear alkyl benzene, phenylxylylethane, and dodecane). We characterize also a mixture of pseudocumene +1.5 g/l of 2,5-diphenyloxazole, a fluor acting as wavelength shifter. In the second part of the article, we demonstrate that the o-Ps-induced distortion of the scintillation photon emission time distributions represent an optimal signature for tagging positrons on an event by event basis, potentially enhancing the antineutrino detection.

  7. Proton damage measurements of rare earth oxide scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Hollerman, W.A.; Fisher, J.H.; Shelby, G.A. ); Holland, L.R.; Jenkins, G.M. . Dept. of Physics)

    1991-04-01

    This paper reports on the development of a measurement technique to determine the degradation in light output under exposure to 3 MeV protons. The rare earth oxide scintillators included Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S doped with Pr. Tb, and Eu; Y{sub 2}O{sub 2}S doped with Tb and Eu; Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} (YAG) doped with Ce; and ZnS doped with Ag. Four scintillator samples were painted on a rotatable water cooled turret used to measure the proton beam current with thermocouples for temperature monitoring. The data acquisition and storage system consists of an ACRO module interfaced to a Macintosh SE/30 computer running LabVIEW software. Results indicate that the YAG doped with Ce scintillator coating withstood a proton dose an order of magnitude large than that tolerated by the other phosphor compounds. This fact has significant implication for the use of this material for experimental scintillator applications.

  8. A Helium Gas-Scintillator Active Target for Photoreaction Measurements

    E-print Network

    R. Al Jebali; J. R. M. Annand; J. -O. Adler; I. Akkurt; E. Buchanan; J. Brudvik; K. Fissum; S. Gardner; D. J. Hamilton; K. Hansen; L. Isaksson; K. Livingston; M. Lundin; J. C. McGeorge; I. J. D. MacGregor; R. MacRae; D. G. Middleton; A. J. H. Reiter; G. Rosner; B. Schröder; J. Sjögren; D. Sokhan; B. Strandberg

    2015-03-18

    A multi-cell He gas-scintillator active target, designed for the measurement of photoreaction cross sections, is described. The target has four main chambers, giving an overall thickness of 0.103 $\\mathrm{g/cm^{2}}$ at an operating pressure of 2 MPa. Scintillations are read out by photomultiplier tubes and the addition of small amounts of $\\mathrm{N}_{2}$ to the He, to shift the scintillation emission from UV to visible, is discussed. First results of measurements at the MAX IV Laboratory tagged-photon facility show that the target has good timing resolution and can cope well with a high-flux photon beam. The determination of reaction cross sections from target yields relies on a Monte Carlo simulation, which considers scintillation light transport, photodisintegration processes in $^{4}\\mathrm{He}$, background photon interactions in target windows and interactions of the reaction-product particles in the gas and target container. The predictions of this simulation are compared to the measured target response.

  9. Direct determination of lead-210 by liquid-scintillation counting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairman, W. D.; Sedlet, J.

    1969-01-01

    Soft betas, the internal conversion electrons, and unconverted gamma rays from lead-210 are efficiently detected in a liquid scintillation counting system with efficiency of 97 percent. The counter is interfaced with a multichannel pulse height analyzer. The spectra obtained is stored on paper tape and plotted on an x-y plotter.

  10. Counterintuitive MCNPX Results for Scintillator Surface Roughness Effect

    SciTech Connect

    2012-08-12

    We have reported on our recent MCNPX simulation results of energy deposition for a group of 8 scintillation detectors, coupled with various rough surface patterns. The MCNPX results generally favored the detectors with various rough surface patterns. The observed MCNPX results are not fully explained by this work.

  11. Current-mode Preamplifier for Response Measurement of Semiconductor Scintillator

    E-print Network

    Stanacevic, Milutin

    , the equivalent noise charge (ENC) is 8000. I. INTRODUCTION The detection of nuclear radiation is important part of "false alarms" becomes critical. The proposed three-dimensional (3D) integration of scintillation circuitry and requires development of novel circuit techniques to relax the effect of input parasitic

  12. Conditioning Matrices of Liquid Scintillation Cocktails Contaminated with Tritium

    SciTech Connect

    Dianu, Magdalena

    2005-07-15

    This paper describes a viable solidification technology to convert the liquid scintillation cocktail into a stable form which minimizes the probability to release tritium in the environment.This radioactive waste type is generated by the radio-chemical analysis lab of a CANDU nuclear power plant.

  13. Strontium iodide scintillators for high energy resolution gamma ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Cody M.; van Loef, Edgar V.; Glodo, Jarek; Cherepy, Nerine; Hull, Giulia; Payne, Stephen; Choong, Woon-Seng; Moses, William; Shah, Kanai S.

    2008-08-01

    Recently SrI2, a scintillator patented by Hofstadter in 1968, has been rediscovered and shown to possess remarkable scintillation properties. The light output of SrI2:Eu2+ has been measured to be even higher than previously observed and exceeds 120,000 photons/MeV, making it one of the brightest scintillators in existence. The crystal also has excellent energy resolution of less than 3% at 662 keV. The response is highly linear over a wide range of gamma ray energies. The emission of SrI2:Eu2+ and SrI2:Ce3+/Na+ is well-matched to both photomultiplier tubes and blue-enhanced silicon photodiodes. While SrI2:Eu2+ is relatively slow, SrI2:Ce3+/Na+ has a fast response. SrI2 crystals with many different dopant concentrations have been grown and characterized. In this presentation, crystal growth techniques as well as the effects of dopant concentration on the scintillation properties of SrI2, over the range 0.5% to 8% Eu2+ and 0.5% to 2% Ce3+/Na+, will be discussed in detail.

  14. Ca2+-Doped CeBr3 Scintillating Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Guss, Paul; Foster, Michael E.; Wong, Bryan M.; Doty, F. Patrick; Shah, Kanai; Squillante, Michael R.; Shirwadkar, Urmila; Hawrami, Rastgo; Tower, Josh; Yuan, Ding

    2014-01-21

    Despite the outstanding scintillation performance characteristics of cerium tribromide (CeBr3) and cerium-activated lanthanum tribromide, their commercial availability and application are limited due to the difficulties of growing large, crack-free single crystals from these fragile materials. This investigation employed aliovalent doping to increase crystal strength while maintaining the optical properties of the crystal. One divalent dopant (Ca2+) was used as a dopant to strengthen CeBr3 without negatively impacting scintillation performance. Ingots containing nominal concentrations of 1.9% of the Ca2+ dopant were grown. Preliminary scintillation measurements are presented for this aliovalently doped scintillator. Ca2+-doped CeBr3 exhibited little or no change in the peak fluorescence emission for 371 nm optical excitation for CeBr3. The structural, electronic, and optical properties of CeBr3 crystals were studied using the density functional theory within the generalized gradient approximation. The calculated lattice parameters are in good agreement with the experimental data. The energy band structures and density of states were obtained. The optical properties of CeBr3, including the dielectric function, were calculated.

  15. O the Optimization of a Lead Scintillator Compensating Calorimeter.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsirou, Andromachi Leo

    A lead scintillator calorimeter was designed and tested by members of the ZEUS calorimeter group. The design of the TEST-36 calorimeter incorporated new ideas for the optimization of the performance of a hadron calorimeter. The development, testing, and the results are presented here.

  16. Advanced Large Area Plastic Scintillator Project (ALPS): Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, David V.; Reeder, Paul L.; Todd, Lindsay C.; Warren, Glen A.; McCormick, Kathleen R.; Stephens, Daniel L.; Geelhood, Bruce D.; Alzheimer, James M.; Crowell, Shannon L.; Sliger, William A.

    2008-02-05

    The advanced Large-Area Plastic Scintillator (ALPS) Project at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory investigated possible technological avenues for substantially advancing the state-of-the-art in gamma-ray detection via large-area plastic scintillators. The three predominant themes of these investigations comprised the following: * Maximizing light collection efficiency from a single large-area sheet of plastic scintillator, and optimizing hardware event trigger definition to retain detection efficiency while exploiting the power of coincidence to suppress single-PMT "dark current" background; * Utilizing anti-Compton vetoing and supplementary spectral information from a co-located secondary, or "Back" detector, to both (1) minimize Compton background in the low-energy portion of the "Front" scintillator's pulse-height spectrum, and (2) sharpen the statistical accuracy of the front detector's low-energy response prediction as impelmented in suitable energy-windowing algorithms; and * Investigating alternative materials to enhance the intrinsic gamma-ray detection efficiency of plastic-based sensors.

  17. Using Radio Transmitter to Simulate Amplitude Scintillation on Radio Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eccles, V.; Ilayian, R.

    2014-12-01

    Rapid fluctuation of radio-frequency signal phase and/or amplitude that is generated as a signal passing through the ionosphere is commonly referred to as ionospheric scintillation. Scintillation occurs as radio frequency signals pass through a field of plasma bubbles or irregularities that can lead to signal power fading, phase cycle slips, poor GPS signals and unusable information. The goal of this research is to use radio wave transmission to simulate scintillation under controlled conditions in order examine the performance of different GPS receivers and their ability to suppress the scintillation. The information gained from the VHF (Very High Frequency) transmitter would serve as a diagnostic tool to better understand the environmental conditions that are causing these irregularities. This system could then be used as a baseline design to be upgraded by NASA engineers to 1.2 GHz - 1.5 GHz for testing out the performance of different GPS receivers. The methodology of VHF testing could be translated to higher frequencies, such as CW (Continuous Wave), which could enhance our understanding of this phenomenon.

  18. The design of the totally active scintillator detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mefodiev, A. V.; Kudenko, Y. G.

    2015-11-01

    In the project of Advanced European Infrastructures for Detectors at Accelerators (AIDA), the Institute of Nuclear Research designed and tested the Totally Active Scintillator Detector (TASD). This paper reports the results of design of TASD prototype and outlines requirements for a test beam at CERN to test these, tentatively planned on the H8 beamline in the North Area, which is equipped with a large aperture magnet. TASD consists of 50 modules of plastic scintillators. Each module is instrumented with one X and one Y plane, with 90 scintillator bars per plane. The bar width, height and length are 1.0 cm, 0.7 cm and 90 cm respectively. The distance between modules can be varied from 0 to 2.5 cm. Other components such as active detectors or passive sheets of material can be inserted in these 2.5 cm gaps if required. The full detector depth can therefore be varied from 75 cm to 200 cm and in its compact form, it is 1 m3 in volume. The paper presents measurement results for the TASD elements that included in the prototype elements (measurement of crosscurrents, the light yield of scintillators, and the characteristics of photodiodes).

  19. Photovoltaic nanocrystal scintillators hybridized on Si solar cells

    E-print Network

    Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    for the first time, we show that the solar conversion efficiency is enhanced 2 folds under white light illumination similar to the solar spectrum. Such nanocrystal scintillators provide the ability to extend.7190) Ultraviolet; (160.2540) Fluorescent and luminescent materials; (040.6040) Silicon; (040.5350) Photovoltaics

  20. Novel scintillators and silicon photomultipliers for nuclear physics and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, David

    2015-06-01

    Until comparatively recently, scintillator detectors were seen as an old-fashioned tool of nuclear physics with more attention being given to areas such as gamma-ray tracking using high-purity germanium detectors. Next-generation scintillator detectors, such as lanthanum bromide, which were developed for the demands of space science and gamma- ray telescopes, are found to have strong applicability to low energy nuclear physics. Their excellent timing resolution makes them very suitable for fast timing measurements and their much improved energy resolution compared to conventional scintillators promises to open up new avenues in nuclear physics research which were presently hard to access. Such "medium-resolution" spectroscopy has broad interest across several areas of contemporary interest such as the study of nuclear giant resonances. In addition to the connections to space science, it is striking that the demands of contemporary medical imaging have strong overlap with those of experimental nuclear physics. An example is the interest in PET-MRI combined imaging which requires putting scintillator detectors in a high magnetic field environment. This has led to strong advances in the area of silicon photomultipliers, a solid-state replacement for photomultiplier tubes, which are insensitive to magnetic fields. Broad application to nuclear physics of this technology may be foreseen.

  1. Effect of Ionospheric Scintillations on GNSS A White Paper

    E-print Network

    Boneh, Dan

    1 Effect of Ionospheric Scintillations on GNSS ­ A White Paper SBAS Ionospheric Working Group................................................................................... 19 #12;2 1 Introduction The ionosphere is a highly variable and complex physical system-region of the ionosphere, contains the greatest concentration of free electrons. At times, the F-region of the ionosphere

  2. Ionospheric Scintillation Effects on Single and Dual Frequency GPS Positioning

    E-print Network

    Stanford University

    Ionospheric Scintillation Effects on Single and Dual Frequency GPS Positioning S. Datta-Barua, P. H studying low latitude ionospheric phenomena at the Boston College Institute for Scientific Research (ISR include studies of ionospheric effects on GPS signals and worldwide systems and in analytical

  3. Development of novel UV emitting single crystalline film scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorenko, Yu; Gorbenko, V.; Savchyn, V.; Voznyak, T.; Nikl, M.; Mares, J. A.; Martin, T.; Douissard, P.-A.

    2011-04-01

    The work is dedicated to development of new types of UV -emitting scintillators based on single crystalline films (SCF) of aluminimum perovskites and garnets grown by the liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) method. The development of the following three types of UV SCF scintillators is considered in this work: i) Ce-doped SCF of Y-Lu-Al-perovskites with Ce3+ emission in the 360-370 nm range with a decay time of 16-17 ns; ii) Pr-doped SCF of Y-Lu-Al garnets with Pr3+ emission in the 300-400 nm range with a decay time of 13-17 ns; iii) La3+ and Sc3+ doped SCF of Y-Lu-Al-garnets, emitting in the 290-400 nm range due to formation of the LaY,Lu, ScY,Lu and ScAl centers with decay time of 250-575 ns. The results of testing the several novel UV-emitting SCFs scintillators for visualization of X-ray images at ESFR are presented. It is shown that the UV emission of the LuAG:Sc, LuAG:La and LuAG:Pr SCFs is efficient enough for conversion of X-ray to the UV light and that these scintillators can be used for improvement of the resolution of imaging detectors in synchrotron radiation applications.

  4. A helium gas scintillator active target for photoreaction measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Jebali, Ramsey; Annand, John R. M.; Adler, Jan-Olof; Akkurt, Iskender; Buchanan, Emma; Brudvik, Jason; Fissum, Kevin; Gardner, Simon; Hamilton, David J.; Hansen, Kurt; Isaksson, Lennart; Livingston, Kenneth; Lundin, Magnus; McGeorge, John C.; MacGregor, Ian J. D.; MacRae, Roderick; Middleton, Duncan G.; Reiter, Andreas J. H.; Rosner, Günther; Schröder, Bent; Sjögren, Johan; Sokhan, Daria; Strandberg, Bruno

    2015-10-01

    A multi-cell He gas scintillator active target, designed for the measurement of photoreaction cross sections, is described. The target has four main chambers, giving an overall thickness of 0.103 g/cm3 at an operating pressure of 2 MPa. Scintillations are read out by photomultiplier tubes and the addition of small amounts of N2 to the He, to shift the scintillation emission from UV to visible, is discussed. First results of measurements at the MAX IV Laboratory tagged-photon facility show that the target has a timing resolution of around 1 ns and can cope well with a high-flux photon beam. The determination of reaction cross sections from target yields relies on a Monte Carlo simulation, which considers scintillation light transport, photodisintegration processes in 4He, background photon interactions in target windows and interactions of the reaction-product particles in the gas and target container. The predictions of this simulation are compared to the measured target response.

  5. Scintillation, Afterglow and Thermoluminescence of L A Kappers1

    E-print Network

    Hamilton, Douglas S.

    Scintillation, Afterglow and Thermoluminescence of CsI:Tl,Sm L A Kappers1 , R H Bartram1 , D and thermoluminescence on single-crystal samples of CsI:Tl and CsI:Tl,Sm, recorded sequentially at adjusted gain settings, and combined radioluminescence, afterglow and thermoluminescence experiments on single-crystal samples of Cs

  6. Fast liquid scintillators: recent developments at EG and G

    SciTech Connect

    Flournoy, J.M.; Lutz, S.S.; Franks, L.A.; Berlman, I.B.; Ashford, C.B.; Lyons, P.B.

    1985-11-01

    Several liquid scintillator for formulations are described that were developed over the last several years on the Radiation-to-Light Converter program at EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc. The general aim of this program is to develop new scintillators that are needed for monitoring fast pulses of ionizing radiation. A large part of this effort has been directed toward new red scintillators for remote sensing applications, in which the scintillation pulses are to be transmitted to the detectors through long optical fibers. The main absorption band for red dyes is often at too long a wavelength for good overlap with the emission band of excited solvent molecules. In such cases, an intermediate wavelength shifter is used, whose absorption band overlaps well with the solvent emission, and whose emission overlaps the absorption band of the final emitter. With a good intermediate dye, energy transfer to the final emitter will be so fast that little energy is lost by radiation from excited singlets of the intermediate, and the overall time response is usually improved. Pseudo-cumene has been found to be the most efficient solvent for most nonpolar aromatic solutes, which usually emit a fairly short wavelengths, from near-ultraviolet to green light. Benzyl alcohol has been found to be an efficient solvent for most of the polar red-emitting laser dyes.

  7. Radio Scintillation Due to Discontinuities in the Interstellar Plasma Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, H.; Rickett, B.

    1996-12-01

    We develop the theory of interstellar scintillation as caused by an irregular plasma having a power-law spatial density spectrum with a spectral index of beta = 4 corresponding to a medium with abrupt changes in its density. An ``outer scale'' is included in the model representing the range over which the density of the medium remains uniform. Such a spectrum could be used to model plasma shock fronts in supernova remnants. We investigate and develop equations for pulse broadening, decorrelation bandwidth of diffractive scintillations, and the refractive scintillation index and compare our results with pulsar measurements. We consider both a medium concentrated in a thin layer and an extended irregular medium. We conclude that the beta = 4 model gives satisfactory agreement for many diffractive measurements, but that for the refractive scintillation index, it gives less satisfactory agreement than does the Kolmogorov turbulence spectrum. We propose to investigate a composite spectrum, featuring a uniform background turbulence with randomly distributed discrete objects, as modelled by the beta = 4 spectrum.

  8. Interstellar Scintillation as a Cosmological Probe: Prospects and Challenges†

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koay, J. Y.; Macquart, J.-P.; Rickett, B. J.; Bignall, H. E.; Jauncey, D. L.; Lovell, J. E. J.; Reynolds, C.; Pursimo, T.; Kedziora-Chudczer, L.; Ojha, R.

    2012-04-01

    The discovery that interstellar scintillation (ISS) is suppressed for compact radio sources at z >~ 2 has enabled ISS surveys to be used as cosmological probes. We discuss briefly the potential and challenges involved in such an undertaking, based on a dual-frequency survey of ISS carried out to determine the origin of this redshift dependence.

  9. Radioactive contamination of SrI2(Eu) crystal scintillator

    E-print Network

    Belli, P; Cerulli, R; Danevich, F A; Galenin, E; Gektin, A; Incicchitti, A; Isaienko, V; Kobychev, V V; Laubenstein, M; Nagorny, S S; Podviyanuk, R B; Tkachenko, S; Tretyak, V I

    2011-01-01

    A strontium iodide crystal doped by europium (SrI2(Eu)) was produced by using the Stockbarger growth technique. The crystal was subjected to characterisation that included relative photoelectron output and energy resolution for gamma quanta. The intrinsic radioactivity of SrI2(Eu) crystal scintillator was tested both in scintillation mode and by using ultra-low background HPGe gamma spectrometry deep underground. The response of the SrI2(Eu) detector to alpha particles (alpha/beta ratio and pulse shape) was estimated by analysing the 226Ra trace contamination internal to the crystal. We have found alpha/beta=0.55 and no difference in scintillation decay for alpha particles and gamma quanta. The application of the obtained results in the search for the double electron capture and electron capture with positron emission in 84Sr has been investigated at a level of sensitivity T_1/2 \\sim 10^15-10^16 yr. The results of these studies demonstrate the potentiality of this material for a variety of scintillation appli...

  10. Radioactive contamination of SrI2(Eu) crystal scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belli, P.; Bernabei, R.; Cerulli, R.; Danevich, F. A.; Galenin, E.; Gektin, A.; Incicchitti, A.; Isaienko, V.; Kobychev, V. V.; Laubenstein, M.; Nagorny, S. S.; Podviyanuk, R. B.; Tkachenko, S.; Tretyak, V. I.

    2012-04-01

    A strontium iodide crystal doped by europium (SrI2(Eu)) was produced by using the Stockbarger growth technique. The crystal was subjected to a characterization that includes relative photoelectron output and energy resolution for ? quanta. The intrinsic radioactivity of the SrI2(Eu) crystal scintillator was tested both by using it as scintillator at sea level and by ultra-low background HPGe ? spectrometry deep underground. The response of the SrI2(Eu) detector to ? particles (?/? ratio and pulse shape) was estimated by analysing the 226Ra internal trace contamination of the crystal. We have measured: ?/?=0.55 at E?=7.7 MeV, and no difference in the time decay of the scintillation pulses induced by ? particles and ? quanta. The application of the obtained results in the search for the double electron capture and electron capture with positron emission in 84Sr has been investigated at a level of sensitivity: T˜1015-1016 yr. The results of these studies demonstrate the potentiality of this material for a variety of scintillation applications, including low-level counting experiments.

  11. Bright and ultra-fast scintillation from a semiconductor?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derenzo, Stephen E.; Bourret-Courshesne, Edith; Bizarri, Gregory; Canning, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Semiconductor scintillators are worth studying because they include both the highest luminosities and shortest decay times of all known scintillators. Moreover, many semiconductors have the heaviest stable elements (Tl, Hg, Pb, and Bi) as a major constituent and a high ion pair yield that is proportional to the energy deposited. We review the scintillation properties of semiconductors activated by native defects, isoelectronic impurities, donors and acceptors with special emphasis on those that have exceptionally high luminosities (e.g. ZnO:Zn; ZnS:Ag, Cl; CdS:Ag, Cl) and those that have ultra-fast decay times (e.g. ZnO:Ga; CdS:In). We discuss underlying mechanisms that are consistent with these properties and the possibilities for achieving (1) 200,000 photons/MeV and 1% fwhm energy resolution for 662 keV gamma rays, (2) ultra-fast (ns) decay times and coincident resolving times of 30 ps fwhm for time-of-flight positron emission tomography, and (3) both a high luminosity and an ultra-fast decay time from the same scintillator at cryogenic temperatures.

  12. Lung Cancer Screening.

    PubMed

    Deffebach, Mark E; Humphrey, Linda

    2015-10-01

    Screening for lung cancer in high-risk individuals with annual low-dose computed tomography has been shown to reduce lung cancer mortality by 20% and is recommended by multiple health care organizations. Lung cancer screening is not a specific test; it is a process that involves appropriate selection of high-risk individuals, careful interpretation and follow-up of imaging, and annual testing. Screening should be performed in the context of a multidisciplinary program experienced in the diagnosis and management of lung nodules and early-stage lung cancer. PMID:26315517

  13. A study of liquid scintillator and fiber materials for use in a fiber calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Altice, P.P. Jr.

    1990-04-01

    This reports an investigation into the performance of selected scintillation oils and fiber materials to test their applicability in high energy, liquid scintillator calorimetry. Two scintillating oils, Bicron BC-517 and an oil mixed for the MACRO experiment, and two fiber materials, Teflon and GlassClad PS-252, were tested for the following properties: light yield, attenuation length and internal reflection angle. The results of these tests indicated that the scintillation oils and the fiber materials had an overall good performance with lower energies and would meet the requirements of liquid scintillator detection at SSC energies. 6 refs.

  14. Technical manual: a survey of scintillating medium for high-energy particle detection

    E-print Network

    Baitenov, Adil; Beznosko, Dmitriy

    2016-01-01

    There are various particle detection methods used nowadays and the most common is using scintillators. Among scintillating materials, solid plastic and water-based liquid scintillators (WbLS) are the latest development. In particular, WbLS allows researchers to apply different particle detection methods for increased experiment efficiency. This survey attempts to make an overview on detection methods and detectors in high-energy physics using scintillators. It is meant as a summary for those new to scintillator detectors and looking for general material on the topic.

  15. X-ray detection capability of bismuth-loaded plastic scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshimizu, Masanori; Bertrand, Guillaume H. V.; Hamel, Matthieu; Kishimoto, Shunji; Haruki, Rie; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Yanagida, Takayuki; Fujimoto, Yutaka; Asai, Keisuke

    2015-10-01

    We evaluated the high-energy X-ray detection capabilities of Bi-loaded plastic scintillators. The detection efficiency for 67.4 keV X-rays was successfully increased by increasing the Bi concentration. The detection efficiency of a plastic scintillator loaded with 10 wt % Bi was comparable to that of a commercially available plastic scintillator loaded with 5 wt % Pb, NE-142. A subnanosecond time resolution was achieved, and no long scintillation component appeared with Bi loading. These results indicate that Bi loading is an effective method of enhancing the detection efficiency for high-energy X-rays while preserving the timing properties of plastic scintillators.

  16. First Results from Masiv: the Microarcsecond Scintillation-Induced Variability Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bignall, H. E.; Lovell, J. E. J.; Jauncey, D. L.; Kedziora-Chudczer, L.; Macquart, J.-P.; Rickett, B. J.; Tzioumis, A. K.

    We report on the first results of the recent large-scale Micro-Arcsecond Scintillation Induced Variability (MASIV) 5 GHz VLA Survey of the northern sky. Our objective is to assemble a sample of 100--150 scintillating flat-spectrum extragalactic sources, which will be used to examine both the microarcsecond structure and parent populations of these sources, and to probe the turbulent interstellar medium responsible for the scintillation. One of the first findings of the MASIV Survey is that both the fraction of sources that scintillate, and their fractional scintillation amplitudes, are larger among the weaker, ˜100 mJy, sources.

  17. Fiber optic thermal/fast neutron and gamma ray scintillation detector

    DOEpatents

    Neal, John S.; Mihalczo, John T.

    2006-11-28

    A detector system that combines a .sup.6Li loaded glass fiber scintillation thermal neutron detector with a fast scintillation detector in a single layered structure. Detection of thermal and fast neutrons and ionizing electromagnetic radiation is achieved in the unified detector structure. The fast scintillator replaces the polyethelene moderator layer adjacent the .sup.6Li loaded glass fiber panel of the neutron detector and acts as the moderator for the glass fibers. Fast neutrons, x-rays and gamma rays are detected in the fast scintillator. Thermal neutrons, x-rays and gamma rays are detected in the glass fiber scintillator.

  18. The field of view of a scintillator pair for cosmic rays

    E-print Network

    Schultheiss, N G

    2016-01-01

    Particles in an extended air shower (EAS), initiated by a cosmic ray primary, lead to two nearly simultaneous detections in a scintillator pair. The angle of the EAS and the axis through both scintillators can be reconstructed using the time difference of the detections and the distance between the scintillators. The acceptances of a scintillator along the axis through the scintillators and perpendicularly on this axis follow the same distribution in theory. Using a data set with two perpendicular detector pairs this theory is verified. The distribution of possible origins of cosmic ray primaries, and the resulting EAS, can thus be described using the perpendicular distribution for a given time difference.

  19. Study of a prototype high quantum efficiency thick scintillation crystal video-electronic portal imaging device

    SciTech Connect

    Samant, Sanjiv S.; Gopal, Arun

    2006-08-15

    Image quality in portal imaging suffers significantly from the loss in contrast and spatial resolution that results from the excessive Compton scatter associated with megavoltage x rays. In addition, portal image quality is further reduced due to the poor quantum efficiency (QE) of current electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs). Commercial video-camera-based EPIDs or VEPIDs that utilize a thin phosphor screen in conjunction with a metal buildup plate to convert the incident x rays to light suffer from reduced light production due to low QE (<2% for Eastman Kodak Lanex Fast-B). Flat-panel EPIDs that utilize the same luminescent screen along with an a-Si:H photodiode array provide improved image quality compared to VEPIDs, but they are expensive and can be susceptible to radiation damage to the peripheral electronics. In this article, we present a prototype VEPID system for high quality portal imaging at sub-monitor-unit (subMU) exposures based on a thick scintillation crystal (TSC) that acts as a high QE luminescent screen. The prototype TSC system utilizes a 12 mm thick transparent CsI(Tl) (thallium-activated cesium iodide) scintillator for QE=0.24, resulting in significantly higher light production compared to commercial phosphor screens. The 25x25 cm{sup 2} CsI(Tl) screen is coupled to a high spatial and contrast resolution Video-Optics plumbicon-tube camera system (1240x1024 pixels, 250 {mu}m pixel width at isocenter, 12-bit ADC). As a proof-of-principle prototype, the TSC system with user-controlled camera target integration was adapted for use in an existing clinical gantry (Siemens BEAMVIEW{sup PLUS}) with the capability for online intratreatment fluoroscopy. Measurements of modulation transfer function (MTF) were conducted to characterize the TSC spatial resolution. The measured MTF along with measurements of the TSC noise power spectrum (NPS) were used to determine the system detective quantum efficiency (DQE). A theoretical expression of DQE(0) was developed to be used as a predictive model to propose improvements in the optics associated with the light detection. The prototype TSC provides DQE(0)=0.02 with its current imaging geometry, which is an order of magnitude greater than that for commercial VEPID systems and comparable to flat-panel imaging systems. Following optimization in the imaging geometry and the use of a high-end, cooled charge-coupled-device (CCD) camera system, the performance of the TSC is expected to improve even further. Based on our theoretical model, the expected DQE(0)=0.12 for the TSC system with the proposed improvements, which exceeds the performance of current flat-panel EPIDs. The prototype TSC provides high quality imaging even at subMU exposures (typical imaging dose is 0.2 MU per image), which offers the potential for daily patient localization imaging without increasing the weekly dose to the patient. Currently, the TSC is capable of limited frame-rate fluoroscopy for intratreatment visualization of patient motion at {approx}3 frames/second, since the achievable frame rate is significantly reduced by the limitations of the camera-control processor. With optimized processor control, the TSC is expected to be capable of intratreatment imaging exceeding 10 frames/second to monitor patient motion.

  20. Study of a prototype high quantum efficiency thick scintillation crystal video-electronic portal imaging device.

    PubMed

    Samant, Sanjiv S; Gopal, Arun

    2006-08-01

    Image quality in portal imaging suffers significantly from the loss in contrast and spatial resolution that results from the excessive Compton scatter associated with megavoltage x rays. In addition, portal image quality is further reduced due to the poor quantum efficiency (QE) of current electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs). Commercial video-camera-based EPIDs or VEPIDs that utilize a thin phosphor screen in conjunction with a metal buildup plate to convert the incident x rays to light suffer from reduced light production due to low QE (<2% for Eastman Kodak Lanex Fast-B). Flat-panel EPIDs that utilize the same luminescent screen along with an a-Si:H photodiode array provide improved image quality compared to VEPIDs, but they are expensive and can be susceptible to radiation damage to the peripheral electronics. In this article, we present a prototype VEPID system for high quality portal imaging at sub-monitor-unit (subMU) exposures based on a thick scintillation crystal (TSC) that acts as a high QE luminescent screen. The prototype TSC system utilizes a 12 mm thick transparent CsI(Tl) (thallium-activated cesium iodide) scintillator for QE=0.24, resulting in significantly higher light production compared to commercial phosphor screens. The 25 X 25 cm2 CsI(Tl) screen is coupled to a high spatial and contrast resolution Video-Optics plumbicon-tube camera system (1240 X 1024 pixels, 250 microm pixel width at isocenter, 12-bit ADC). As a proof-of-principle prototype, the TSC system with user-controlled camera target integration was adapted for use in an existing clinical gantry (Siemens BEAMVIEW(PLUS)) with the capability for online intratreatment fluoroscopy. Measurements of modulation transfer function (MTF) were conducted to characterize the TSC spatial resolution. The measured MTF along with measurements of the TSC noise power spectrum (NPS) were used to determine the system detective quantum efficiency (DQE). A theoretical expression of DQE(0) was developed to be used as a predictive model to propose improvements in the optics associated with the light detection. The prototype TSC provides DQE(0)=0.02 with its current imaging geometry, which is an order of magnitude greater than that for commercial VEPID systems and comparable to flat-panel imaging systems. Following optimization in the imaging geometry and the use of a high-end, cooled charge-coupled-device (CCD) camera system, the performance of the TSC is expected to improve even further. Based on our theoretical model, the expected DQE(0)=0.12 for the TSC system with the proposed improvements, which exceeds the performance of current flat-panel EPIDs. The prototype TSC provides high quality imaging even at subMU exposures (typical imaging dose is 0.2 MU per image), which offers the potential for daily patient localization imaging without increasing the weekly dose to the patient. Currently, the TSC is capable of limited frame-rate fluoroscopy for intratreatment visualization of patient motion at approximately 3 frames/second, since the achievable frame rate is significantly reduced by the limitations of the camera-control processor. With optimized processor control, the TSC is expected to be capable of intratreatment imaging exceeding 10 frames/second to monitor patient motion. PMID:16964854