Sample records for scintillating guides screen

  1. Composite scintillator screen

    DOEpatents

    Zeman, Herbert D. (1687 Peach St., Memphis, TN 38112)

    1994-01-01

    A scintillator screen for an X-ray system includes a substrate of low-Z material and bodies of a high-Z material embedded within the substrate. By preselecting the size of the bodies embedded within the substrate, the spacial separation of the bodies and the thickness of the screen, the sensitivity of the screen to X-rays within a predetermined energy range can be predicted.

  2. Screen Study Guides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Barry

    1969-01-01

    This study guide for Arthur Lipsett's film "Very Nice, Very Nice" is in four parts. First, it describes and evaluates the film, discusses Lipsett's unusual juxtapositions, fast cutting, and fragmented speeches as indications of his satirical intent, and suggests that the only meaningful summation of the film's content is through pattern…

  3. Theory of thin screen scintillations for a spherical wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, L. C.

    1976-01-01

    A thin screen scintillation theory for a spherical wave is presented under the 'quasi-optical' approximation. We calculate the 'scattering angle', the 'observed angle', the intensity correlation function and the temporal pulse broadening for the random wave. It is found that as the wave propagates outward away from the phase screen, the correlation scale of the intensity fluctuation increases linearly while the 'observed angle' decreases linearly. The calculations are carried out for both Gaussian and power-law spectra of the turbulent medium.

  4. High quantum efficiency megavoltage imaging with thick scintillator detectors for image guided radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopal, Arun

    In image guided radiation therapy (IGRT), imaging devices serve as guidance systems to aid patient set-up and tumor volume localization. Traditionally, 2-D megavoltage x-ray imagers, referred to as electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs), have been used for planar target localization, and have recently been extended to perform 3-D volumetric reconstruction via cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). However, current EPIDs utilize thin and inefficient phosphor screen detectors and are subsequently limited by poor soft tissue visualization, which limits their use for CBCT. Therefore, the use of thick scintillation media as megavoltage x-ray detectors for greater x-ray sensitivity and enhanced image quality has recently been of significant interest. In this research, two candidates for thick scintillators: CsI(Tl) and terbium doped scintillation glass were investigated in separate imaging configurations. In the first configuration, a thick scintillation crystal (TSC) consisting of a thick, monolithic slab of CsI(Tl) was coupled to a mirror-lens-camera system. The second configuration is based on a fiber-optic scintillation glass array (FOSGA), wherein the scintillation glass is drawn into long fiber-optic conduits, inserted into a grid-type housing constructed out of polymer-tungsten alloy, and coupled to an array of photodiodes for digital read-out. The imaging prototypes were characterized using theoretical studies and imaging measurements to obtain fundamental metrics of imaging performance. Spatial resolution was measured based on a modulation transfer function (MTF), noise was evaluated in terms of a noise power spectrum (NPS), and overall contrast was characterized in the form of detective quantum efficiency (DQE). The imaging studies were used to optimize the TSC and FOSGA imagers and propose prototype configurations for order-of-magnitude improvements in overall image quality. In addition, a fast and simple technique was developed to measure the MTF, NPS, and DQE metrics for clinical EPID and CBCT systems based on a novel adaptation of a traditional line-pair resolution bar-pattern. This research provides two significant benefits to radiotherapy: the characterization of a new generation of thick scintillator based megavoltage x-ray imagers for CBCT based IGRT, and the novel adaptation of fundamental imaging metrics from imaging research to routine clinical performance monitoring.

  5. Isotopically-enriched gadolinium-157 oxysulfide scintillator screens for the high-resolution neutron imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trtik, Pavel; Lehmann, Eberhard H.

    2015-07-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of the production of isotopically-enriched gadolinium oxysulfide scintillator screens for the high spatial-resolution neutron imaging. Approximately 10 g of 157Gd2O2S:Tb was produced in the form of fine powder (particle size approximately 2 ?m). The level of 157Gd enrichment was above 88%. Approximately 2.5 ?m thick 157Gd2O2S:Tb scintillator screens were produced and tested for the absorption power and the light output. The results are compared to the reference screens based on natGd2O2S:Tb. The isotopically enriched screens provided increase by a factor of 3.8 and 3.6 for the absorption power and the light output, respectively. The potential of the scintillator screens based on 157Gd2O2S phosphor for the purpose of the (high-resolution) neutron imaging is discussed.

  6. Combinatorial Screening of Advanced Scintillators for High Resolution X-ray Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Shifan; Tao, Dejie; Lynch, Michael; Yuan, Xianglong; Li, Yiqun

    2008-05-12

    The lack of efficient scintillators is a major problem for developing powerful x-ray detectors that are widely used in homeland security, industrial and scientific research. Intematix has developed and applied a high throughput screening process and corresponding crystal growth technology to significantly speed up the discovery process for new efficient scintillators. As a result, Intematix has invented and fabricated three new scintillators both in powder and bulk forms, which possess promising properties such as better radiation hardness and better matching for silicon diode.

  7. Multiple phase screen modeling of ionospheric scintillation along radio occultation raypaths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrano, Charles S.; Groves, Keith M.; Caton, Ronald G.; Rino, Charles L.; Straus, Paul R.

    2011-12-01

    We present the Radio Occultation Scintillation Simulator (ROSS), which uses the multiple phase screen method (MPS) to simulate the forward scatter of radio waves by irregularities in the equatorial ionosphere during radio occultation experiments. ROSS simulates propagation through equatorial plasma bubbles which are modeled as homogeneous electron density fluctuations modulated by a Chapman profile in altitude and a Gaussian window in the magnetic east-west direction. We adjust the parameters of the density model using electron density profiles derived from the ALTAIR incoherent scatter radar (9.4°N, 167.5°E, 4.3° north dip), and space-to-ground observations of scintillation using VHF and GPS receivers that are colocated with the radar. We compare the simulated occultation scintillation to observations of scintillation from the CORISS instrument onboard the C/NOFS satellite during a radio occultation occurring near ALTAIR on 21 April 2009. The ratio of MPS predicted S4 to CORISS observed S4 throughout the F region altitudes of 240-350 km ranged between 0.86 and 1.14.

  8. The effect of phase scintillations on the accuracy of phase screen simulation using deterministic screens derived from GPS and ALTAIR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrano, Charles S.; Groves, Keith M.; Caton, Ronald G.

    2012-08-01

    Radio receivers capable of high-rate sampling such as GPS scintillation monitors and the ALTAIR VHF/UHF tracking radar can measure ionospheric phase fluctuations suitable for scintillation modeling using phase screen techniques. For modeling purposes, the phase variations caused by the refractive effects of electron density irregularities encountered along the propagation path are desired. The phase fluctuations measured by ground-based receivers, however, also include the unwanted effects of diffraction (phase scintillations). In this paper, we investigate the effect of phase scintillations on the accuracy of phase screen simulation when using the phase measured on the ground as a proxy for the ionospheric screen. Using stochastic and deterministic (measured) phase screens, we quantitatively assess the accuracy of this approach by cross-correlating the predicted and measured intensity fluctuations. We find that the intensity cross-correlation is less than unity even in the weak scatter limit, due to the presence of weak phase scintillations. This correlation decreases rapidly with increasing irregularity strength once rapid transitions in the phase (strong phase scintillations) develop. We demonstrate that, when using the measured phase on the ground as a proxy for the ionospheric screen, both the temporal structure of simulated fluctuations and their statistics deviate increasingly from those of the measurements as the turbulence strength increases, especially when strong phase scintillations are present. We also demonstrate that back-propagating the complex signal up to ionospheric altitudes prior to the forward propagation calculation yields improved results, but some errors still remain as a consequence of neglecting amplitude fluctuations which develop inside the random medium.

  9. Cholesterol Screening: A Practical Guide to Implementation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingery, Paul M.

    1995-01-01

    Dry-chemistry cholesterol analysis has made screening feasible in a variety of settings. The article provides practical tips for the implementation of mass cholesterol screening using a portable dry-chemistry analyzer and discusses issues involved in conducting effective cholesterol screening programs from start to finish. (SM)

  10. Polycrystalline para-terphenyl scintillator adopted in a ?? detecting probe for radio-guided surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Bellini, F.; Bocci, V.; Collamati, F.; De Lucia, E.; Faccini, R.; Marafini, M.; Mattei, I.; Morganti, S.; Paramatti, R.; Patera, V.; Pinci, D.; Recchia, L.; Russomando, A.; Sarti, A.; Sciubba, A.; Senzacqua, M.; Voena, C.

    2015-06-01

    A radio-guided surgery technique exploiting ?? emitters is under development. It aims at a higher target-to-background activity ratio implying both a smaller radiopharmaceutical activity and the possibility of extending the technique to cases with a large uptake of surrounding healthy organs. Such technique requires a dedicated intraoperative probe detecting ?- radiation. A first prototype has been developed relying on the low density and high light yield of the diphenylbutadiene doped para-therphenyl organic scintillator. The scintillation light produced in a cylindrical crystal, 5 mm in diameter and 3 mm in height, is guided to a photo-multiplier tube by optical fibres. The custom readout electronics is designed to optimize its usage in terms of feedback to the surgeon, portability and remote monitoring of the signal. Tests show that with a radiotracer activity comparable to those administered for diagnostic purposes the developed probe can detect a 0.1 ml cancerous residual of meningioma in a few seconds.

  11. Single electron response of the scintillator-light guide-photomultiplier detector.

    PubMed

    Novák, L; Müllerová, I

    2009-01-01

    The time response of a scintillator-light guide-photomultiplier combination was measured with a time-constant of 3 ns. Single detected electrons were recognizable at the output of the photomultiplier. The distribution of the number of photoelectrons produced by one detected electron and the pulse-height distribution of the photomultiplier output pulses were analysed. Statistical noise computed from these distributions was compared with the noise produced by the dark current of the photomultiplier. PMID:19196414

  12. Inverted-conical light guide for crosstalk reduction in tightly-packed scintillator matrix and MAPMT assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Y.-Y.; Chen, C. R.; Chen, P.; Huang, J.-J.; Huang, M. A.; Liu, T.-C.; Nam, J. W.; Wang, M.-Z.; Bogomolov, V.; Brandt, S.; Budtz-Jørgensen, C.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Choi, H. S.; Connell, P. H.; Eyles, C.; Jeong, S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. B.; Kim, S.-W.; Lee, J.; Lim, H.; Min, K. W.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Park, I. H.; Petrov, V.; Reglero, V.; ?ípa, J.; Rodrigo, J. M.; Svertilov, S.; Yashin, I.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present the Inverted-Conical light guide designed for optical crosstalk reduction in the scintillator-MAPMT assemblies. The research was motivated by the 30% crosstalk observed in UFFO X-ray telescope, UBAT, during the preliminary calibration with MAPMTs of 64 2.88 × 2.88 mm2 pixels and identically gridded YSO crystal matrices. We began the study with the energy and crosstalk calibrations of the detector, then we constructed a GEANT4 simulation with the customized metallic film model as the MAPMT photocathode. The simulation reproduced more than 70% of the crosstalk and explained it as a consequence of the total reflection produced by the photocathode. The result indicated that the crosstalk mechanism could be a common case in most of the contact-assembled scintillation detectors. The concept of the Inverted-Conical light guide was to suppress the total reflection by contracting the incident angle of the scintillation. We optimized the design in the simulation and fabricated a test sample. The test sample reduced 52% crosstalk with a loss of 6% signal yield. The idea of the Inverted-Conical light guide can be adapted by scintillation detectors multi-pixel, imaging-purpose scintillation detectors such as the ultra-fast GRB observatory UFFO-UBAT, whose performances are sensitive to responding time, image resolution, and geometrical modifications.

  13. Screening of alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides using liquid scintillation counting and monitoring procedures in radiation emergencies.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Seokwon; Ha, Wi-Ho; Yoo, Jaeryong; Lee, Seung-Sook

    2014-11-01

    Urine gross alpha and beta activity analysis was conducted, and an internal contamination screening method was adopted to monitor visitors to Japan after the Fukushima accident. In particular, spot urine samples were used to evaluate internal contamination for 16 mo, and a total of 90 people participated in gross alpha and beta emitter screening. An ultra-low-background liquid scintillation counter was used for measurement, and optimal pulse shape analysis values were determined by measuring alpha- and beta-emitting certified reference materials. Moreover, linearity and reproducibility were assessed to validate the adopted methods, and international intercomparison was conducted using synthetic urine samples by measuring alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides in multi-contaminated samples. Here, the measurement results of visitors to Japan are discussed, and a screening procedure is established for gross alpha and beta activity analysis during radiation emergencies. PMID:25271927

  14. Low noise scintillation detectors with a P-47 thin layer screen for electrons of several keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajcsos, Zs.; Meisel, W.; Griesbach, P.; Gütlich, P.; Sauer, Ch.; Kurz, R.; Hildebrand, K.; Albrecht, R.; Ligtenberg, M. A. C.

    1994-09-01

    The applicability of a low-noise scintillation detector (ScD) for the registration of electrons of several keV energy has been studied employing photomultipliers (PM) of different types and sizes. With the application of a sedimented P-47 scintillation screen, the values of the low-energy sensitivity limit and those of the light conversion coefficient were determined as about 2.7-4.7 keV and 2.8-6.6 photoelectrons/keV, respectively, for the set of PM's (Philips-Valvo XP 2020, Philips-Valvo XP 2052, Philips-Valvo XP 2972, EMI 9124a) studied. It is concluded that such scintillation detectors might be used advantageously as electron counters in the range of E > 5 keV. Applications below this kinetic energy value are also feasible when applying a floating acceleration of several kV to the ScD — a voltage much lower than the values required for Everhart-Thornley detectors.

  15. Experimental validation of Monte Carlo (MANTIS) simulated x-ray response of columnar CsI scintillator screens

    PubMed Central

    Freed, Melanie; Miller, Stuart; Tang, Katherine; Badano, Aldo

    2009-01-01

    Purpose:MANTIS is a Monte Carlo code developed for the detailed simulation of columnar CsI scintillator screens in x-ray imaging systems. Validation of this code is needed to provide a reliable and valuable tool for system optimization and accurate reconstructions for a variety of x-ray applications. Whereas previous validation efforts have focused on matching of summary statistics, in this work the authors examine the complete point response function (PRF) of the detector system in addition to relative light output values. Methods: Relative light output values and high-resolution PRFs have been experimentally measured with a custom setup. A corresponding set of simulated light output values and PRFs have also been produced, where detailed knowledge of the experimental setup and CsI:Tl screen structures are accounted for in the simulations. Four different screens were investigated with different thicknesses, column tilt angles, and substrate types. A quantitative comparison between the experimental and simulated PRFs was performed for four different incidence angles (0°, 15°, 30°, and 45°) and two different x-ray spectra (40 and 70 kVp). The figure of merit (FOM) used measures the normalized differences between the simulated and experimental data averaged over a region of interest. Results: Experimental relative light output values ranged from 1.456 to 1.650 and were in approximate agreement for aluminum substrates, but poor agreement for graphite substrates. The FOMs for all screen types, incidence angles, and energies ranged from 0.1929 to 0.4775. To put these FOMs in context, the same FOM was computed for 2D symmetric Gaussians fit to the same experimental data. These FOMs ranged from 0.2068 to 0.8029. Our analysis demonstrates that MANTIS reproduces experimental PRFs with higher accuracy than a symmetric 2D Gaussian fit to the experimental data in the majority of cases. Examination of the spatial distribution of differences between the PRFs shows that the main reason for errors between MANTIS and the experimental data is that MANTIS-generated PRFs are sharper than the experimental PRFs. Conclusions: The experimental validation of MANTIS performed in this study demonstrates that MANTIS is able to reliably predict experimental PRFs, especially for thinner screens, and can reproduce the highly asymmetric shape seen in the experimental data. As a result, optimizations and reconstructions carried out using MANTIS should yield results indicative of actual detector performance. Better characterization of screen properties is necessary to reconcile the simulated light output values with experimental data. PMID:19994503

  16. Hazard screening application guide. Safety Analysis Report Update Program

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1992-06-01

    The basic purpose of hazard screening is to group precesses, facilities, and proposed modifications according to the magnitude of their hazards so as to determine the need for and extent of follow on safety analysis. A hazard is defined as a material, energy source, or operation that has the potential to cause injury or illness in human beings. The purpose of this document is to give guidance and provide standard methods for performing hazard screening. Hazard screening is applied to new and existing facilities and processes as well as to proposed modifications to existing facilities and processes. The hazard screening process evaluates an identified hazards in terms of the effects on people, both on-site and off-site. The process uses bounding analyses with no credit given for mitigation of an accident with the exception of certain containers meeting DOT specifications. The process is restricted to human safety issues only. Environmental effects are addressed by the environmental program. Interfaces with environmental organizations will be established in order to share information.

  17. High-throughput RNAi screening in cultured cells: a user's guide

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christophe J. Echeverri; Norbert Perrimon

    2006-01-01

    RNA interference has re-energized the field of functional genomics by enabling genome-scale loss-of-function screens in cultured cells. Looking back on the lessons that have been learned from the first wave of technology developments and applications in this exciting field, we provide both a user's guide for newcomers to the field and a detailed examination of some more complex issues, particularly

  18. A Guide for Developing Standard Operating Job Procedures for the Screening & Grinding Process Wastewater Treatment Facility. SOJP No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deal, Gerald A.; Montgomery, James A.

    This guide describes standard operating job procedures for the screening and grinding process of wastewater treatment facilities. The objective of this process is the removal of coarse materials from the raw waste stream for the protection of subsequent equipment and processes. The guide gives step-by-step instructions for safety inspection,…

  19. Scintillation Mathematics

    E-print Network

    Baxter, Paul D.

    ' & $ % The Extraction of Scintillation Statistics from Italsat 50 GHz Beacon Data using Wavelets P wavelet method of wet scintillation extraction, assessing the impact on scintillation statistics to the index i as the dilation level and the index j as the translation index. COST 280 MCM4 10 #12

  20. T & I--Graphic Arts, Silk Screen Printing. Kit No. 60. Instructor's Manual [and] Student Learning Activity Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cope, George

    An instructor's manual and student activity guide on silk screen printing are provided in this set of prevocational education materials which focuses on the vocational area of trade and industry (graphic arts). (This set of materials is one of ninety-two prevocational sets arranged around a cluster of seven vocational offerings: agriculture, home…

  1. Using adverse outcome pathway analysis to guide development of high-throughput screening assays for thyroid-disruptors

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using Adverse Outcome Pathway Analysis to Guide Development of High-Throughput Screening Assays for Thyroid-Disruptors Katie B. Paul1,2, Joan M. Hedge2, Daniel M. Rotroff4, Kevin M. Crofton4, Michael W. Hornung3, Steven O. Simmons2 1Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education Post...

  2. Shackleton's Antarctic Adventure: The Greatest Survival Story of All Time. Teacher's Guide To Accompany the Giant-Screen Film.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibb, Reen

    This teacher's guide was developed to accompany the giant-screen film, "Shackleton's Antarctic Adventure". The activities featured use a multidisciplinary approach and target students ages 7 through 14. Teacher pages include background information and student pages include instructions and additional information for understanding the activity.…

  3. Incremental Validity Analyses of the Violence Risk Appraisal Guide and the Psychopathy Checklist: Screening Version in a Civil Psychiatric Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edens, John F.; Skeem, Jennifer L.; Douglas, Kevin S.

    2006-01-01

    This study compares two instruments frequently used to assess risk for violence, the Violence Risk Appraisal Guide (VRAG) and the Psychopathy Checklist: Screening Version (PCL:SV), in a large sample of civil psychiatric patients. Despite a strong bivariate relationship with community violence, the VRAG could not improve on the predictive validity…

  4. Taking It to the Pews: A CBPR-Guided HIV Awareness and Screening Project with Black Churches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berkley-Patton, Jannette; Bowe-Thompson, Carole; Bradley-Ewing, Andrea; Hawes, Starlyn; Moore, Erin; Williams, Eric; Martinez, David; Goggin, Kathy

    2010-01-01

    Utilizing a community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach is a potentially effective strategy for exploring the development, implementation, and evaluation of HIV interventions in African American churches. This CBPR-guided study describes a church-based HIV awareness and screening intervention (Taking It to the Pews [TIPS]) that fully…

  5. Scintillator material

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, D.F.; Kross, B.J.

    1992-07-28

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography. 4 figs.

  6. Scintillator material

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, D.F.; Kross, B.J.

    1994-06-07

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography. 4 figs.

  7. Scintillator material

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F. (Batavia, IL); Kross, Brian J. (Aurora, IL)

    1994-01-01

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography.

  8. Scintillator material

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F. (Batavia, IL); Kross, Brian J. (Aurora, IL)

    1992-01-01

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography.

  9. A protein network-guided screen for cell cycle regulators in Drosophila

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephen T Guest; Jingkai Yu; Dongmei Liu; Julie A Hines; Maria A Kashat; Russell L Finley Jr

    2011-01-01

    Background  Large-scale RNAi-based screens are playing a critical role in defining sets of genes that regulate specific cellular processes.\\u000a Numerous screens have been completed and in some cases more than one screen has examined the same cellular process, enabling\\u000a a direct comparison of the genes identified in separate screens. Surprisingly, the overlap observed between the results of\\u000a similar screens is low,

  10. Screening for Usher Syndrome: A Hands-On Guide for School Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houghton, Joan; Coonts, Teresa; Jordan, Beth; Schafer, Jacqueline, Ed.

    This manual was written specifically to help school nurses conduct screenings for Usher syndrome, a genetic condition that involves deafness or hearing loss and the progressive loss of vision. It provides information on the step-by-step process of how to conduct a screening, the actual forms needed for a screening, and resources for referring…

  11. Scintillating Stars

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Bob Riddle

    2003-02-01

    Often, a bright planet that is visible over the horizon will be mistaken for a star. Some believe they can tell the difference between a star and a planet because stars twinkle, or scintillate , and planets do not. In actuality however, both will twinkle because any light that passes through our atmosphere, whether it be reflected from a planet or generated by a star, will be interfered with by the atmospheric elements. This month's column sheds light on this "scintillating" subject and engages students in a research activity that revolves around the question: Is Pluto a planet?

  12. Rapid bioassay-guided screening of toxic substances in vegetable oils that shorten the life of SHRSP rats

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    It has been consistently reported that vegetable oils including canola oil have a life shortening effect in Stroke-Prone Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats (SHRSP) and this toxic effect is not due to the fatty acid composition of the oil. Although it is possible that the phytosterol content or type of phytosterol present in vegetable oils may play some role in the life shortening effect observed in SHRSP rats this is still not completely resolved. Furthermore supercritical CO2 fractionation of canola oil with subsequent testing in SHRSP rats identified safe and toxic fractions however, the compounds responsible for life shortening effect were not characterised. The conventional approach to screen toxic substances in oils using rats takes more than six months and involves large number of animals. In this article we describe how rapid bioassay-guided screening could be used to identify toxic substances derived from vegetable oils and/or processed foods fortified with vegetable oils. The technique incorporates sequential fractionation of oils/processed foods and subsequent treatment of human cell lines that can be used in place of animal studies to determine cytotoxicity of the fractions with structural elucidation of compounds of interest determined via HPLC-MS and GC-MS. The rapid bioassay-guided screening proposed would require two weeks to test multiple fractions from oils, compared with six months if animal experiments were used to screen toxic effects. Fractionation of oil before bio-assay enhances the effectiveness of the detection of active compounds as fractionation increases the relative concentration of minor components. PMID:20122175

  13. Obtaining and screening compound collections: a user's guide and a call to chemists

    E-print Network

    Hergenrother, Paul J.

    online 3rd May 2006 1367-5931/$ ­ see front matter # 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. DOI 10 as drugs or drug leads is perhaps most obvious, theuseofsmallmoleculestointerrogatebiologicalsystems collections to screen. Everything old is new again: screens of FDA-approved drugs A major bottleneck

  14. A computational screen for mammalian pseudouridylation guide H\\/ACA RNAs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    PETER SCHATTNER; SERGIO BARBERAN-SOLER; TODD M. LOWE

    2006-01-01

    The box H\\/ACA RNA gene family is one of the largest non-protein-coding gene families in eukaryotes and archaea. Recently, we developed snoGPS, a computational screening program for H\\/ACA snoRNAs, and applied it to Saccharomyces cerevisiae .W e report here results of extending our method to screen for H\\/ACA RNAs in multiple large genomes of related species, and apply it to

  15. A GUIDE TO THE ORNL ECOTOXICOLOGICAL SCREENING BENCHMARKS: BACKGROUND, DEVELOPMENT, AND APPLICATION

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bradley E. Sample; Glenn W. Suter II; Rebecca A. Efroymson; Daniel S. Jones

    ACKNOWLEDGMENTS Funding for development of this guide was provided by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of EnvironmentalPolicy and Assistance, Air, Water, and Radiation Division (EH-412; Stephen Domotor, Technical Project Manager). We are grateful for the multiple respondents to our request for information concerning,field examples,of use and acceptance,of the ORNL benchmarks. This guide benefitted from reviews by Stephen Domotor (EH-412),

  16. Cation exchange displacement batch chromatography of proteins guided by screening of protein purification parameters.

    PubMed

    Kotasi?ska, Marta; Richter, Verena; Thiemann, Joachim; Schlüter, Hartmut

    2012-11-01

    Displacement chromatography has been shown to be an effective alternative for protein purification. We investigated in this study sample displacement chromatography, which does not require a displacer molecule. Furthermore, we performed a screening for determination of parameters for an optimal sample displacement chromatography. We screened the affinities of cytochrome C, lysozyme, myoglobin, and ribonuclease A toward a cation exchange material as a function of different pH values and to presence of different concentrations of sodium chloride in the sample application buffer. Sample displacement chromatography in batch chromatography mode for the separation of the protein mixture was studied with a sample application buffer with a pH of 5 and 7. As predicted by the screening experiments, sample displacement chromatography was most effective at pH 7 since this pH guaranteed the largest differences of the affinities of the four proteins toward the stationary phase. In summary, we describe here sample displacement chromatography in the batch chromatography mode for the separation of proteins, which is a simple and fast alternative to conventional displacement chromatography. Systematic screening of chromatographic parameters prior to sample displacement chromatography promises a successful separation of a target protein. PMID:22707445

  17. METAL FINISHING FACILITY RISK SCREENING TOOL (MFFRST): TECHNICAL DOCUMENTATION AND USER'S GUIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The model MFFRST, short for Metal Finishing Facility Risk Screening Tool, is a user-friendly pc-based computer tool which allows an individual to evaluate the potential exposures and health risks to workers and nearby residents from emissions from individual metal finishing facil...

  18. Walkthrough screening evaluation field guide. Natural phenomena hazards at Department of Energy facilities: Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Eder, S.J. [EQE Engineering Consultants, San Francisco, CA (United States); Eli, M.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Salmon, M.W. [EQE Engineering Consultants, Irvine, CA (United States)

    1993-11-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has a large inventory of existing facilities. Many of these facilities were not designed and constructed to current natural phenomena hazard (NPH) criteria. The NPH events include earthquakes, extreme winds and tornadoes, and floods. DOE Order 5480.28 establishes policy and requirements for NPH mitigation for DOE facilities. DOE is conducting a multiyear project to develop evaluation guidelines for assessing the condition and determining the need for upgrades at DOE facilities. One element of the NPH evaluation guidelines` development involves the existing systems and components at DOE facilities. This effort is described in detail in a cited reference. In the interim period prior to availability of the final guidelines, DOE facilities are encouraged to implement an NPH walk through screening evaluation process by which systems and components that need attention can be rapidly identified. Guidelines for conducting the walk through screening evaluations are contained herein. The result of the NPH walk through screening evaluation should be a prioritized list of systems and components that need further action. Simple and inexpensive fixes for items identified in the walk through as marginal or inadequate should be implemented without further study. By implementing an NPH walk through screening evaluation, DOE facilities may realize significant reduction in risk from NPH in the short term.

  19. Large volume flow-through scintillating detector

    DOEpatents

    Gritzo, Russ E. (Los Alamos, NM); Fowler, Malcolm M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1995-01-01

    A large volume flow through radiation detector for use in large air flow situations such as incinerator stacks or building air systems comprises a plurality of flat plates made of a scintillating material arranged parallel to the air flow. Each scintillating plate has a light guide attached which transfers light generated inside the scintillating plate to an associated photomultiplier tube. The output of the photomultiplier tubes are connected to electronics which can record any radiation and provide an alarm if appropriate for the application.

  20. Conformation guides molecular efficacy in docking screens of activated ?-2 adrenergic G protein coupled receptor.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Dahlia R; Ahn, SeungKirl; Sassano, Maria F; Kleist, Andrew; Zhu, Xiao; Strachan, Ryan; Roth, Bryan L; Lefkowitz, Robert J; Shoichet, Brian K

    2013-05-17

    A prospective, large library virtual screen against an activated ?2-adrenergic receptor (?2AR) structure returned potent agonists to the exclusion of inverse-agonists, providing the first complement to the previous virtual screening campaigns against inverse-agonist-bound G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) structures, which predicted only inverse-agonists. In addition, two hits recapitulated the signaling profile of the co-crystal ligand with respect to the G protein and arrestin mediated signaling. This functional fidelity has important implications in drug design, as the ability to predict ligands with predefined signaling properties is highly desirable. However, the agonist-bound state provides an uncertain template for modeling the activated conformation of other GPCRs, as a dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) activated model templated on the activated ?2AR structure returned few hits of only marginal potency. PMID:23485065

  1. Conformation Guides Molecular Efficacy in Docking Screens of Activated ?-2 Adrenergic G Protein Coupled Receptor

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A prospective, large library virtual screen against an activated ?2-adrenergic receptor (?2AR) structure returned potent agonists to the exclusion of inverse-agonists, providing the first complement to the previous virtual screening campaigns against inverse-agonist-bound G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) structures, which predicted only inverse-agonists. In addition, two hits recapitulated the signaling profile of the co-crystal ligand with respect to the G protein and arrestin mediated signaling. This functional fidelity has important implications in drug design, as the ability to predict ligands with predefined signaling properties is highly desirable. However, the agonist-bound state provides an uncertain template for modeling the activated conformation of other GPCRs, as a dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) activated model templated on the activated ?2AR structure returned few hits of only marginal potency. PMID:23485065

  2. GPS and ionospheric scintillations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. M. Kintner; B. M. Ledvina; E. R. de Paula

    2007-01-01

    Ionospheric scintillations are one of the earliest known effects of space weather. Caused by ionization density irregularities, scintillating signals change phase unexpectedly and vary rapidly in amplitude. GPS signals are vulnerable to ionospheric irregularities and scintillate with amplitude variations exceeding 20 dB. GPS is a weak signal system and scintillations can interrupt or degrade GPS receiver operation. For individual signals,

  3. Human Genetics in Rheumatoid Arthritis Guides a High-Throughput Drug Screen of the CD40 Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Diogo, Dorothée; Wu, Di; Spoonamore, Jim; Dancik, Vlado; Franke, Lude; Kurreeman, Fina; Rossin, Elizabeth J.; Duclos, Grant; Hartland, Cathy; Zhou, Xuezhong; Li, Kejie; Liu, Jun; De Jager, Philip L.; Siminovitch, Katherine A.; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Bowes, John; Eyre, Steve; Padyukov, Leonid; Gregersen, Peter K.; Worthington, Jane; Gupta, Namrata; Clemons, Paul A.; Stahl, Eli; Tolliday, Nicola; Plenge, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    Although genetic and non-genetic studies in mouse and human implicate the CD40 pathway in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), there are no approved drugs that inhibit CD40 signaling for clinical care in RA or any other disease. Here, we sought to understand the biological consequences of a CD40 risk variant in RA discovered by a previous genome-wide association study (GWAS) and to perform a high-throughput drug screen for modulators of CD40 signaling based on human genetic findings. First, we fine-map the CD40 risk locus in 7,222 seropositive RA patients and 15,870 controls, together with deep sequencing of CD40 coding exons in 500 RA cases and 650 controls, to identify a single SNP that explains the entire signal of association (rs4810485, P?=?1.4×10?9). Second, we demonstrate that subjects homozygous for the RA risk allele have ?33% more CD40 on the surface of primary human CD19+ B lymphocytes than subjects homozygous for the non-risk allele (P?=?10?9), a finding corroborated by expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analysis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 1,469 healthy control individuals. Third, we use retroviral shRNA infection to perturb the amount of CD40 on the surface of a human B lymphocyte cell line (BL2) and observe a direct correlation between amount of CD40 protein and phosphorylation of RelA (p65), a subunit of the NF-?B transcription factor. Finally, we develop a high-throughput NF-?B luciferase reporter assay in BL2 cells activated with trimerized CD40 ligand (tCD40L) and conduct an HTS of 1,982 chemical compounds and FDA–approved drugs. After a series of counter-screens and testing in primary human CD19+ B cells, we identify 2 novel chemical inhibitors not previously implicated in inflammation or CD40-mediated NF-?B signaling. Our study demonstrates proof-of-concept that human genetics can be used to guide the development of phenotype-based, high-throughput small-molecule screens to identify potential novel therapies in complex traits such as RA. PMID:23696745

  4. Human genetics in rheumatoid arthritis guides a high-throughput drug screen of the CD40 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Diogo, Dorothée; Wu, Di; Spoonamore, Jim; Dancik, Vlado; Franke, Lude; Kurreeman, Fina; Rossin, Elizabeth J; Duclos, Grant; Hartland, Cathy; Zhou, Xuezhong; Li, Kejie; Liu, Jun; De Jager, Philip L; Siminovitch, Katherine A; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Bowes, John; Eyre, Steve; Padyukov, Leonid; Gregersen, Peter K; Worthington, Jane; Gupta, Namrata; Clemons, Paul A; Stahl, Eli; Tolliday, Nicola; Plenge, Robert M

    2013-05-01

    Although genetic and non-genetic studies in mouse and human implicate the CD40 pathway in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), there are no approved drugs that inhibit CD40 signaling for clinical care in RA or any other disease. Here, we sought to understand the biological consequences of a CD40 risk variant in RA discovered by a previous genome-wide association study (GWAS) and to perform a high-throughput drug screen for modulators of CD40 signaling based on human genetic findings. First, we fine-map the CD40 risk locus in 7,222 seropositive RA patients and 15,870 controls, together with deep sequencing of CD40 coding exons in 500 RA cases and 650 controls, to identify a single SNP that explains the entire signal of association (rs4810485, P?=?1.4×10(-9)). Second, we demonstrate that subjects homozygous for the RA risk allele have ?33% more CD40 on the surface of primary human CD19+ B lymphocytes than subjects homozygous for the non-risk allele (P?=?10(-9)), a finding corroborated by expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analysis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 1,469 healthy control individuals. Third, we use retroviral shRNA infection to perturb the amount of CD40 on the surface of a human B lymphocyte cell line (BL2) and observe a direct correlation between amount of CD40 protein and phosphorylation of RelA (p65), a subunit of the NF-?B transcription factor. Finally, we develop a high-throughput NF-?B luciferase reporter assay in BL2 cells activated with trimerized CD40 ligand (tCD40L) and conduct an HTS of 1,982 chemical compounds and FDA-approved drugs. After a series of counter-screens and testing in primary human CD19+ B cells, we identify 2 novel chemical inhibitors not previously implicated in inflammation or CD40-mediated NF-?B signaling. Our study demonstrates proof-of-concept that human genetics can be used to guide the development of phenotype-based, high-throughput small-molecule screens to identify potential novel therapies in complex traits such as RA. PMID:23696745

  5. FEDS user`s guide: Facility energy screening. Release 2.10

    SciTech Connect

    Dirks, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    The Facility Energy Decision Screening (FEDS) Model is under development at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US DOE Federal Energy Management Program (DOE-FEMP) and the US Army Construction Engineering REsearch Laboratory (USA-CERL). FEDS is a multi-level energy analysis software system designed to provide a comprehensive approach to fuel-neutral, technology-independent, integrated (energy) resource planning and acquisition. The FEDS system includes Level-1, which is a top-down, first-pass energy systems analysis and energy resource acquisition decision software model for buildings and facilities, and the Level-2 software model, which allows specific engineering inputs and provides detailed output. The basic intent of the model is to provide an installation with the information necessary to determine the minimum life-cycle cost (LCC) configuration of the installation`s energy generation and consumption infrastructure. The model has no fuel or technology bias; it simply selects the technologies that will provide an equivalent or superior level of service (e.g., heating, cooling, illumination) at the minimum LCC.

  6. Relaxation and guided imagery used with 12-year-olds during venipuncture in a school-based screening study.

    PubMed

    Forsner, Maria; Norström, Fredrik; Nordyke, Katrina; Ivarsson, Anneli; Lindh, Viveca

    2014-09-01

    Needle-related procedures are reported to be problematic for children. In a school-based celiac disease screening, 12-year-olds' experiences with relaxation and guided imagery (R-GI) during venipuncture were investigated. One group tried nurse-led R-GI (n = 60) and another group received standard care (SC; n = 49). A mixed method design was applied using short written narratives, facial affective scale (FAS), and visual analog scale (VAS) for pain intensity. Qualitative content analysis highlighted that diversity and contradictions when facing blood tests. FAS scores were significantly lower in the SC group before (p = 0.01), during (p = 0.01), and after (p = 0.01) venipuncture. VAS scores did not differ between the groups. The blood test was mostly experienced as unproblematic, and GI during venipuncture did not decrease pain or affect. However, the fact that a number of children scored high FAS indicates a need for effective methods to help children cope with needle-related school-based procedures. PMID:23818144

  7. Modelling plastic scintillator response to gamma rays using light transport incorporated FLUKA code.

    PubMed

    Ranjbar Kohan, M; Etaati, G R; Ghal-Eh, N; Safari, M J; Afarideh, H; Asadi, E

    2012-05-01

    The response function of NE102 plastic scintillator to gamma rays has been simulated using a joint FLUKA+PHOTRACK Monte Carlo code. The multi-purpose particle transport code, FLUKA, has been responsible for gamma transport whilst the light transport code, PHOTRACK, has simulated the transport of scintillation photons through scintillator and lightguide. The simulation results of plastic scintillator with/without light guides of different surface coverings have been successfully verified with experiments. PMID:22341953

  8. Scintillators and applications thereof

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Richard T.

    2014-07-15

    Scintillators of various constructions and methods of making and using the same are provided. In some embodiments, a scintillator comprises at least one radiation absorption region and at least one spatially discrete radiative exciton recombination region.

  9. The scintillating grid illusion is enhanced by binocular viewing.

    PubMed

    Read, Jenny C A; Robson, Joseph H; Smith, Christopher L; Lucas, Andrew D

    2012-01-01

    The scintillating grid illusion is an intriguing stimulus consisting of a grey grid on a black background, with white discs at the grid intersections. Most viewers perceive illusory "scintillating" black discs within the physical white discs, especially at non-fixated locations. Here, we report for the first time that this scintillation percept is stronger when the stimulus is viewed binocularly than when it is presented to only one eye. Further experiments indicate that this is not simply because two monocular percepts combine linearly, but involves a specifically cyclopean contribution (Schrauf & Spillmann, 2000). However, the scintillation percept does not depend on the absolute disparity of the stimulus relative to the screen. In an intriguing twist, although the basic illusion shows more scintillation when viewed binocularly, when the illusion is weakened by shifting the discs away from the grid intersections, scintillation becomes stronger with monocular viewing. PMID:23482297

  10. The scintillating grid illusion is enhanced by binocular viewing

    PubMed Central

    Read, Jenny C. A.; Robson, Joseph H.; Smith, Christopher L.; Lucas, Andrew D.

    2012-01-01

    The scintillating grid illusion is an intriguing stimulus consisting of a grey grid on a black background, with white discs at the grid intersections. Most viewers perceive illusory “scintillating” black discs within the physical white discs, especially at non-fixated locations. Here, we report for the first time that this scintillation percept is stronger when the stimulus is viewed binocularly than when it is presented to only one eye. Further experiments indicate that this is not simply because two monocular percepts combine linearly, but involves a specifically cyclopean contribution (Schrauf & Spillmann, 2000). However, the scintillation percept does not depend on the absolute disparity of the stimulus relative to the screen. In an intriguing twist, although the basic illusion shows more scintillation when viewed binocularly, when the illusion is weakened by shifting the discs away from the grid intersections, scintillation becomes stronger with monocular viewing. PMID:23482297

  11. Scintillation light emission studies of LSO scintillators

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Saoudi; C. Pepin; D. Houde; R. Lecomte

    1999-01-01

    UV and ?-ray excited luminescence and nuclear spectroscopy were used to study the relationship between the scintillation mechanisms of LSO and the spectroscopic characteristics obtained with PMT and APD readouts at room temperature. No correlation was found between scintillation decay time and light output. Like other investigators, we observed the existence of two distinct luminescence centers, Ce1 and Ce2, that

  12. Best Practice in Preschool Screening.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenkoetter, Sharon E.; Wanska, Susan K.

    This brief guide outlines best practices in preschool screening for the presence of possible disabilities. It covers: a definition of screening, its history, the rationale for screening, requirements for effective screening measures (reliability, validity, fairness, utility), models for preschool screening, evaluation of screening procedures, and…

  13. Scintillator materials for calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, M.J. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Life Sciences Div.

    1994-09-01

    Requirements for fast, dense scintillator materials for calorimetry in high energy physics and approaches to satisfying these requirements are reviewed with respect to possible hosts and luminescent species. Special attention is given to cerium-activated crystals, core-valence luminescence, and glass scintillators. The present state of the art, limitations, and suggestions for possible new scintillator materials are presented.

  14. Scintillator manufacture at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Mellott, K.; Bross, A.; Pla-Dalmau, A. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States)

    1998-11-09

    A decade of research into plastic scintillation materials at Fermilab is reviewed. Early work with plastic optical fiber fabrication is revisited and recent experiments with large-scale commercial methods for production of bulk scintillator are discussed. Costs for various forms of scintillator are examined and new development goals including cost reduction methods and quality improvement techniques are suggested.

  15. Scintillator manufacture at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Mellott, K.; Bross, A.; Pla-Dalmau, A.

    1998-08-01

    A decade of research into plastic scintillation materials at Fermilab is reviewed. Early work with plastic optical fiber fabrication is revisited and recent experiments with large-scale commercial methods for production of bulk scintillator are discussed. Costs for various forms of scintillator are examined and new development goals including cost reduction methods and quality improvement techniques are suggested.

  16. Screening and Risk Factors

    Cancer.gov

    Close Window State Cancer Profiles Quick Reference Guides ? Quick Reference Guides Index Screening and Risk Factors Send to Printer Text description of this image. Site Home Policies Accessibility Viewing Files FOIA Contact Us U.S. Department of Health

  17. Scintillator reflective layer coextrusion

    DOEpatents

    Yun, Jae-Chul (Naperville, IL); Para, Adam (St. Charles, IL)

    2001-01-01

    A polymeric scintillator has a reflective layer adhered to the exterior surface thereof. The reflective layer comprises a reflective pigment and an adhesive binder. The adhesive binder includes polymeric material from which the scintillator is formed. A method of forming the polymeric scintillator having a reflective layer adhered to the exterior surface thereof is also provided. The method includes the steps of (a) extruding an inner core member from a first amount of polymeric scintillator material, and (b) coextruding an outer reflective layer on the exterior surface of the inner core member. The outer reflective layer comprises a reflective pigment and a second amount of the polymeric scintillator material.

  18. In search of allosteric modulators of a7-nAChR by solvent density guided virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Dey, Raja; Chen, Lin

    2011-04-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) are pentameric ligand gated ion channels whose activity can be modulated by endogenous neurotransmitters as well as by synthetic ligands that bind the same or distinct sites from the natural ligand. The subtype of ?7 nAChR has been considered as a potenial therapeutic target for Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia and other neurological and psychiatric disorders. Here we have developed a homology model of ?7 nAChR based on two high resolution crystal structures with Brookhaven Protein Data Bank (PDB) codes 2QC1 and 2WN9 for threading on one monomer and then for building a pentamer, respectively. A number of small molecule binding sites are identified using Pocket Finder (J. An, M. Tortov, and R. Abagyan, Molecular & Cellular Proteomics, 4.6, 752-761 (2005)) of Internal Coordinate Mechanics (ICM). Remarkably, these computer-identified sites match perfectly with ordered solvent densities found in the high-resolution crystal structure of ?1 nAChR, suggesting that the surface cavities in the ?7 nAChR model are likely binding sites of small molecules. A high throughput virtual screening by flexible ligand docking of 5008 small molecule compounds was performed at three potential allosteric modulator (AM) binding sites of ?7 nAChR using Molsoft ICM software (R. Abagyan, M. Tortov and D. Kuznetsov, J Comput Chem 15, 488-506, (1994)). Some experimentally verified allosteric modulators of ?7 like CCMI comp-6, LY 7082101, 5-HI, TQS, PNU-120596, genistein, and NS-1738 ranked among top 100 compounds, while the rest of the compounds in the list could guide further search for new allosteric modulators. PMID:21294583

  19. Screening of scFv-displaying phages recognizing distinct extracellular domains of EGF receptor by target-guided proximity labeling method.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chialun; Takayanagi, Atsushi; Yoshida, Tetsuhiko; Shimizu, Nobuyoshi

    2011-09-30

    We recently constructed the scFv-displaying phage library with extremely high repertoire and have successfully utilized for screening scFv antibodies against various proteins, polysaccharides and glyco-lipids. Here, we developed a new screening strategy to isolate scFv antibodies against cell surface EGF receptor (EGFR). For this, we applied two slightly different methods of "target-guided proximity labeling," such as Proximity selection (ProxiMol) method and a new sulfo-SBED labeling method with the aide of monoclonal anti-human EGFR antibody B4G7 as a guide molecule. ProxiMol method relies on the Biotin-labeling of scFv-displaying phages that bound to the target in a vicinity of 100? from the guide molecule, whereas sulfo-SBED method transfers Biotin to scFv-displaying phages, which bound to the target in a distance of 20 ?. After two rounds of panning on the EGFR-overexpressing A431 cells starting from approx. 1 × 10¹² pfu, 47 each of Biotin-labeled scFv-displaying phages were recovered using Streptoavidin-coated magnetic beads, and among them total 11 scFv-phages were found to be definitely positive for binding to A431 cell surface by ELISA assay. Restriction mapping and sequencing analysis of these scFv-phage DNAs revealed that they encode 4 different scFv-nucleotide sequences in total. Immuno-fluorescent microscopy provided evidence that these 4 scFv antibodies bind specifically to EGFR on the A431 cells, showing slightly different staining patterns. Thus, "target-guided proximity labeling" methods were powerful for isolating scFv-displaying phages that recognize distinct extracellular domains of the target receptor. This novel screening strategy could be applicable to many other cell surface antigens and receptors. PMID:21782821

  20. Multi-PSPMT scintillation camera

    SciTech Connect

    Pani, R.; Pellegrini, R.; Trotta, G.; Scopinaro, F. [Univ. of Rome (Italy). Dept. of Experimental Medicine] [Univ. of Rome (Italy). Dept. of Experimental Medicine; Soluri, A.; Vincentis, G. de [CNR (Italy). Inst. of Biomedical Technologies] [CNR (Italy). Inst. of Biomedical Technologies; Scafe, R. [ENEA-INN, Rome (Italy)] [ENEA-INN, Rome (Italy); Pergola, A. [PSDD, Rome (Italy)] [PSDD, Rome (Italy)

    1999-06-01

    Gamma ray imaging is usually accomplished by the use of a relatively large scintillating crystal coupled to either a number of photomultipliers (PMTs) (Anger Camera) or to a single large Position Sensitive PMT (PSPMT). Recently the development of new diagnostic techniques, such as scintimammography and radio-guided surgery, have highlighted a number of significant limitations of the Anger camera in such imaging procedures. In this paper a dedicated gamma camera is proposed for clinical applications with the aim of improving image quality by utilizing detectors with an appropriate size and shape for the part of the body under examination. This novel scintillation camera is based upon an array of PSPMTs (Hamamatsu R5900-C8). The basic concept of this camera is identical to the Anger Camera with the exception of the substitution of PSPMTs for the PMTs. In this configuration it is possible to use the high resolution of the PSPMTs and still correctly position events lying between PSPMTs. In this work the test configuration is a 2 by 2 array of PSPMTs. Some advantages of this camera are: spatial resolution less than 2 mm FWHM, good linearity, thickness less than 3 cm, light weight, lower cost than equivalent area PSPMT, large detection area when coupled to scintillating arrays, small dead boundary zone (< 3 mm) and flexibility in the shape of the camera.

  1. Extruded plastic scintillation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Anna Pla-Dalmau, Alan D. Bross and Kerry L. Mellott

    1999-04-16

    As a way to lower the cost of plastic scintillation detectors, commercially available polystyrene pellets have been used in the production of scintillating materials that can be extruded into different profiles. The selection of the raw materials is discussed. Two techniques to add wavelength shifting dopants to polystyrene pellets and to extrude plastic scintillating strips are described. Data on light yield and transmittance measurements are presented.

  2. Scintillator and CMOS APS Imager for Radiography Conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kwang Hyun Kim; Young Soo Kim

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated X-ray image performance for several scintillators and a CMOS APS imager by both diagnostic radiography and mammography conditions. Commercially available scintillators such as Lanex screen, needle structured CsI (Tl), and fiber optic structured CsI (Tl) were coupled with a CMOS APS imager. The X-ray machines used in this study were fixed tube voltage of 80 kVp and variable

  3. Tracking with scintillating fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruchti, R.

    1995-11-01

    The parametric performance of scintillating fiber tracking elements is reviewed and compared with recent measurements. Topics include performance of scintillation materials, single-clad and multiclad fiber waveguide structures, optical splicing, and photosensors. A brief description of fiber trackers utilized in several experiments is provided, and an extended bibliography is included for detailed reference.

  4. Toxic chemical release inventory risk screening guide (Version 1. 0). Volume 1. The process. Volume 2. Appendices. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Klauder, D.; Saunders, L.

    1989-07-01

    The guide describes some of the challenges raised by the Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) data and to suggest ways of approaching them. The guide suggests steps that can be taken to answer two key issues of concern: setting risk-based priorities for followup investigation of the TRI facilities and chemicals within geographic area of interest, and identifying data needs and approaches for collecting information necessary to respond to health and ecological questions from the public. The guide is directed at those individuals who are involved in interpreting and explaining environmental pollution, exposures, and health risks to the general public, especially at the local or sub-State level. Many users of the guide will already be well versed in evaluating risk and/or in helping members of the public understand and deal with toxic chemicals, but Title 111 - particularly, the Section 313 release data - presents new challenges for everyone.

  5. Augmenting on-screen instructions with micro-projected guides: when it works, and when it fails

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephanie Rosenthal; Shaun K. Kane; Jacob O. Wobbrock; Daniel Avrahami

    2010-01-01

    We present a study that evaluates the effectiveness of augmenting on-screen instructions with micro-projection for manual task guidance unlike prior work, which replaced screen instructions with alternative modalities (e.g., head-mounted displays). In our study, 30 participants completed 10 trials each of 11 manual tasks chosen to represent a set of common task-components (e.g., cutting, folding) found in many everyday activities

  6. The scintillating grid illusion.

    PubMed

    Schrauf, M; Lingelbach, B; Wist, E R

    1997-04-01

    Disk-shaped luminance increments were added to the intersections of a Hermann grid consisting of medium grey bars on a black background. Illusory spots, darker than the background, were perceived as flashing within the white disks with each flick of the eye. This striking phenomenon may be referred to as the scintillating grid illusion. We determined the conditions necessary for cancelling the Hermann grid illusion, as well as the luminance requirements and the size ratio between disks and bars that elicits the scintillation effect. The fact that scanning eye movements are necessary to produce the scintillation effect sets it apart from the Hermann grid illusion. PMID:9196721

  7. LIGHT YIELD, IMAGING PROPERTIES AND SPECTRAL RESPONSE OF INORGANIC SCINTILLATORS UNDER INTENSE ION IRRADIATION

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Gütlich; W. Ensinger; P. Forck; B. Walasek-Höhne; Saint Gobain

    Scintillating screens are widely used for transverse beam profile monitoring and pepper-pot emittance measurements at accelerator facilities. For high current beam operations at the GSI heavy ion UNILAC, several inorganic scintillators were investigated under different ion beam conditions. The imaging properties of various materials were studied with respect to light yield and imaged beam width. The measured properties show a

  8. Monte Carlo simulation of a novel water-equivalent electronic portal imaging device using plastic scintillating fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Teymurazyan, A.; Pang, G. [Imaging Research, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto M4N 3M5 (Canada); Imaging Research, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto M4N 3M5 (Canada); Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto M4N 3M5 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto M5S 3E2 (Canada) and Department of Physics, Ryerson University,Toronto M5B 2K3 (Canada)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: Most electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) developed so far use a thin Cu plate/phosphor screen to convert x-ray energies into light photons, while maintaining a high spatial resolution. This results in a low x-ray absorption and thus a low quantum efficiency (QE) of approximately 2-4% for megavoltage (MV) x-rays. A significant increase of QE is desirable for applications such as MV cone-beam computed tomography (MV-CBCT). Furthermore, the Cu plate/phosphor screen contains high atomic number (high-Z) materials, resulting in an undesirable over-response to low energy x-rays (due to photoelectric effect) as well as high energy x-rays (due to pair production) when used for dosimetric verification. Our goal is to develop a new MV x-ray detector that has a high QE and uses low-Z materials to overcome the obstacles faced by current MV x-ray imaging technologies. Methods: A new high QE and low-Z EPID is proposed. It consists of a matrix of plastic scintillating fibers embedded in a water-equivalent medium and coupled to an optically sensitive 2D active matrix flat panel imager (AMFPI) for image readout. It differs from the previous approach that uses segmented crystalline scintillators made of higher density and higher atomic number materials to detect MV x-rays. The plastic scintillating fibers are focused toward the x-ray source to avoid image blurring due to oblique incidence of off-axis x-rays. When MV x-rays interact with the scintillating fibers in the detector, scintillation light will be produced. The light photons produced in a fiber core and emitted within the acceptance angle of the fiber will be guided toward the AMFPI by total internal reflection. A Monte Carlo simulation has been used to investigate imaging and dosimetric characteristics of the proposed detector under irradiation of MV x-rays. Results: Properties, such as detection efficiency, modulation transfer function, detective quantum efficiency (DQE), energy dependence of detector response, and water-equivalence of dose response have been investigated. It has been found that the zero frequency DQE of the proposed detector can be up to 37% at 6 MV. The detector, also, is water-equivalent with a relatively uniform response to different energy x-rays as compared to current EPIDs. Conclusions: The results of our simulations show that, using plastic scintillating fibers, it is possible to construct a water-equivalent EPID that has a better energy response and a higher detection efficiency than current flat panel based EPIDs.

  9. Rare earth ceramic scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    DiBianca, F. A.; Cusano, D. A.; Georges, J.-P. J.; Greskovich, C. D.

    1985-06-25

    An improved scintillator for a solid state radiation detector useful in CT (computed tomography), DR (digital radiography), and related technologies. The scintillator, rather than being grown as a single crystal, is formed by means of hot pressing or sintering, as a polycrystalline ceramic. Rare earth oxides doped with rare earth activators are selected to yield a cubic crystal structure of high density and transmittance, which satisfies radiation detector requirements better than crystals utilized heretofore.

  10. Scintillation light emission studies of LSO scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Saoudi, A.; Pepin, C.; Houde, D.; Lecomte, R.

    1999-12-01

    UV and {gamma}-ray excited luminescence and nuclear spectroscopy were used to study the relationship between the scintillation mechanisms of LSO and the spectroscopic characteristics obtained with PMT and APD readouts at room temperature. No correlation was found between scintillation decay time and light output. Like other investigators, the authors observed the existence of two distinct luminescence centers, Ce1 and Ce2, that mainly give rise to short (420 nm) and long (440 nm) emission wavelengths. The measurements showed that different LSO crystals excited by {gamma}-rays have emission spectra with largely different shapes and maxima depending on the relative population and luminescence efficiency of these centers. It was also found that the poor energy resolution of LSO and YSO scintillators is well correlated with the coexistence of the two competing luminescence mechanisms. The prevalence of either Ce1 or Ce2 luminescence tends to reduce the variance of light emission and, thus, to improve energy resolution. Inversely, the coexistence of the two centers increases variance and degrades energy resolution.

  11. Neutron scintillators using wavelength shifting fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, D.P.; Miller, V.C.; Ramsey, J.A.

    1995-06-01

    A proposed design for an optically-based, one-dimension scintillation detector to replace the gas-filled position-sensitive proportional counter currently used for a wide-angle neutron detector (WAND) at the high-Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is presented. The scintillator, consisting of a mixture of {sup 6}LiF and ZnS(Ag) powders in an epoxy binder, is coupled to an array of wavelength shifting optical fibers which provide position resolution. The wide-angle neutron detector is designed to cover a 120 degree arc with a 75 cm radius of curvature. The final detector design provides for 600 optical fibers coupled to the scintillator screen with an angular resolution of 0.2 degrees. Each individual pixel of the detector will be capable of operating at count rates exceeding 1 MHz. Results are presented from the measurement of neutron conversion efficiencies for several screen compositions, gamma-ray sensitivity, and spatial resolution of a 16 element one-dimensional array prototype.

  12. Laser beam scintillation beyond the turbulent atmosphere A numerical computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bufton, J. L.; Taylor, L. S.

    1976-01-01

    The extended Huygens-Fresnel formulation for propagation through turbulence is used to examine scintillation of a finite laser beam. The method is demonstrated analytically for propagation beyond a weak Gaussian phase screen. A numerical integration technique is used to extend the results to a more realistic turbulence model. Results are compared with existing Gaussian beam propagation theory.

  13. Surface preparation and coupling in plastic scintillator dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Ayotte, Guylaine; Archambault, Louis; Gingras, Luc; Lacroix, Frederic; Beddar, A. Sam; Beaulieu, Luc [Departement de physique, de genie physique et d'optique, Universite Laval, Quebec City, Quebec, G1K7P4 (Canada) and Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Hotel Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec City, Quebec, G1R2J6 (Canada); Departement de physique, de genie physique et d'optique, Universite Laval, Quebec City, Quebec, G1K7P4 (Canada) and Department de Radio-Oncologie, Hotel Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec City, Quebec, G1R2J6 (Canada) and Department of Radiation Physics, Division of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Department de physique, de genie physique et d'optique, Universite Laval, Quebec City, Quebec, G1K7P4 (Canada) and Department de Radio-Oncologie, Hotel Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec City, Quebec, G1R2J6 (Canada); Department of Radiation Physics, Division of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Department de physique, de genie physique et d'optique, Universite Laval, Quebec City, Quebec, G1K7P4 (Canada) and Department de Radio-Oncologie, Hotel Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec City, Quebec, G1R2J6 (Canada)

    2006-09-15

    One way to improve the performance of scintillation dosimeters is to increase the light-collection efficiency at the coupling interfaces of the detector system. We performed a detailed study of surface preparation of scintillating fibers and their coupling with clear optical fibers to minimize light loss and increase the amount of light collected. We analyzed fiber-surface polishing with aluminum oxide sheets, coating fibers with magnesium oxide, and the use of eight different coupling agents (air, three optical gels, an optical curing agent, ultraviolet light, cyanoacrylate glue, and acetone). We prepared 10 scintillating fiber and clear optical fiber light guide samples to test different coupling methods. To test the coupling, we first cut both the scintillating fiber and the clear optical fiber. Then, we cleaned and polished both ends of both fibers. Finally, we coupled the scintillating fiber with the clear optical fiber in either a polyethylene jacket or a V-grooved support depending on the coupling agent used. To produce more light, we used an ultraviolet lamp to stimulate scintillation. A typical series of similar couplings showed a standard deviation in light-collection efficiency of 10%. This can be explained by differences in the surface preparation quality and alignment of the scintillating fiber with the clear optical fiber. Absence of surface polishing reduced the light collection by approximately 40%, and application of magnesium oxide on the proximal end of the scintillating fiber increased the amount of light collected from the optical fiber by approximately 39%. Of the coupling agents, we obtained the best results using one of the optical gels. Because a large amount of the light produced inside a scintillator is usually lost, better light-collection efficiency will result in improved sensitivity.

  14. Atmospheric Scintillation in Astronomical Photometry

    E-print Network

    Osborn, J; Dhillon, V S; Wilson, R W

    2015-01-01

    Scintillation noise due to the Earth's turbulent atmosphere can be a dominant noise source in high-precision astronomical photometry when observing bright targets from the ground. Here we describe the phenomenon of scintillation from its physical origins to its effect on photometry. We show that Young's (1967) scintillation-noise approximation used by many astronomers tends to underestimate the median scintillation noise at several major observatories around the world. We show that using median atmospheric optical turbulence profiles, which are now available for most sites, provides a better estimate of the expected scintillation noise and that real-time turbulence profiles can be used to precisely characterise the scintillation noise component of contemporaneous photometric measurements. This will enable a better understanding and calibration of photometric noise sources and the effectiveness of scintillation correction techniques. We also provide new equations for calculating scintillation noise, including ...

  15. Screening for Skin Cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark Helfand; Susan M. Mahon; Karen B. Eden; Paul S. Frame; C. Tracy Orleans

    We searched the MEDLINE database for papers published between 1994 and June 1999, using search terms for screening, physical examination, morbidity, and skin neoplasms. For information on accuracy of screening tests, we used the search terms sensitivity and specificity. We identified the most important studies from before 1994 from the Guide to Clinical Preventive Services, second edition, and from high-quality

  16. Adrenal suppression: A practical guide to the screening and management of this under-recognized complication of inhaled corticosteroid therapy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) are the most effective anti-inflammatory agents available for the treatment of asthma and represent the mainstay of therapy for most patients with the disease. Although these medications are considered safe at low-to-moderate doses, safety concerns with prolonged use of high ICS doses remain; among these concerns is the risk of adrenal suppression (AS). AS is a condition characterized by the inability to produce adequate amounts of the glucocorticoid, cortisol, which is critical during periods of physiological stress. It is a proven, yet under-recognized, complication of most forms of glucocorticoid therapy that can persist for up to 1 year after cessation of corticosteroid treatment. If left unnoticed, AS can lead to significant morbidity and even mortality. More than 60 recent cases of AS have been described in the literature and almost all cases have involved children being treated with ?500 ?g/day of fluticasone. The risk for AS can be minimized through increased awareness and early recognition of at-risk patients, regular patient follow-up to ensure that the lowest effective ICS doses are being utilized to control asthma symptoms, and by choosing an ICS medication with minimal adrenal effects. Screening for AS should be considered in any child with symptoms of AS, children using high ICS doses, or those with a history of prolonged oral corticosteroid use. Cases of AS should be managed in consultation with a pediatric endocrinologist whenever possible. In patients with proven AS, stress steroid dosing during times of illness or surgery is needed to simulate the protective endogenous elevations in cortisol levels that occur with physiological stress. This article provides an overview of current literature on AS as well as practical recommendations for the prevention, screening and management of this serious complication of ICS therapy. PMID:21867553

  17. Scintillator requirements for medical imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, William W.

    1999-09-01

    Scintillating materials are used in a variety of medical imaging devices. This paper presents a description of four medical imaging modalities that make extensive use of scintillators: planar x-ray imaging, x-ray computed tomography (x-ray CT), SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) and PET (positron emission tomography). The discussion concentrates on a description of the underlying physical principles by which the four modalities operate. The scintillator requirements for these systems are enumerated and the compromises that are made in order to maximize imaging performance utilizing existing scintillating materials are discussed, as is the potential for improving imaging performance by improving scintillator properties.

  18. Scintillator Waveguide For Sensing Radiation

    DOEpatents

    Bliss, Mary (West Richland, WA); Craig, Richard A. (West Richland, WA); Reeder; Paul L. (Richland, WA)

    2003-04-22

    The present invention is an apparatus for detecting ionizing radiation, having: a waveguide having a first end and a second end, the waveguide formed of a scintillator material wherein the therapeutic ionizing radiation isotropically generates scintillation light signals within the waveguide. This apparatus provides a measure of radiation dose. The apparatus may be modified to permit making a measure of location of radiation dose. Specifically, the scintillation material is segmented into a plurality of segments; and a connecting cable for each of the plurality of segments is used for conducting scintillation signals to a scintillation detector.

  19. Boron loaded scintillator

    DOEpatents

    Bell, Zane William (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Brown, Gilbert Morris (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Maya, Leon (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Sloop, Jr., Frederick Victor (Oak Ridge, TN); Sloop, Jr., Frederick Victor [Oak Ridge, TN

    2009-10-20

    A scintillating composition for detecting neutrons and other radiation comprises a phenyl containing silicone rubber with carborane units and at least one phosphor molecule. The carbonate units can either be a carborane molecule dispersed in the rubber with the aid of a compatibilization agent or can be covalently bound to the silicone.

  20. Polysiloxane scintillator composition

    DOEpatents

    Walker, J.K.

    1992-05-05

    A plastic scintillator useful for detecting ionizing radiation comprising a matrix which comprises an optically transparent polysiloxane having incorporated therein at least one ionizing radiation-hard fluor capable of converting electromagnetic energy produced in the polysiloxane upon absorption of ionizing radiation to detectable light.

  1. The Scintillating Grid Illusion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MICHAEL SCHRAUF; BERND LINGELBACH; EUGENE R WIST

    1997-01-01

    Disk-shaped luminance increments were added to the intersections of a Hermann grid consisting of medium grey bars on a black background. Illusory spots, darker than the background, were perceived as flashing within the white disks with each flick of the eye. This striking phenomenon may be referred to as the scintillating grid illusion. We determined the conditions necessary for cancelling

  2. The effect of scintillator response on signal difference to noise ratio in X-ray medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ninos, K.; Cavouras, D.; Fountos, G.; Kandarakis, I.

    2010-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of scintillator material properties on the signal difference to noise ratio (SdNR) under X-ray imaging conditions. To this aim, SdNR was modelled in terms of scintillator material properties such as the quantum detection efficiency (QDE), the intrinsic energy conversion efficiency (ICE) and the light transmission efficiency (LTE). Scintillators were assumed to be in the form of scintillator layers (phosphor screens) with various thicknesses ranging from 70 to 110 mg/cm2. Data on the X-ray absorption and optical properties of the scintillators were either calculated from tabulated data, i.e. X-ray attenuation coefficients for QDE estimation, or were obtained from previous experimental studies. It was found that in a wide range of X-ray tube voltages the Gd2O2S:Tb scintillator produced higher SdNR values, while the CsI:Tl scintillator was better at lower voltages (below 65 kVp). It was additionally verified that, in the range of X-ray diagnostic energies, SdNR increases with the thickness of the scintillator layer screen. In conclusion, SdNR may be critically affected by scintillator properties and, hence, it may be significantly improved by appropriately selecting the type and thickness of the phosphor screen to be integrated into an imaging system.

  3. Scintillator spent fuel monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, C.E.; Nixon, K.V.; Bernard, W.

    1980-01-01

    A monitor for rapidly measuring the gross gamma-ray flux immediately above spent fuel assemblies in underwater storage racks has been developed. It consists of a plastic scintillator, photomultiplier, collimator, and a small battery-powered electronics package. The crosstalk from an isolated fuel assembly to an adjacent void is only about 2%. The mean difference between the measured gamma-ray flux and the flux estimated from the declared burnup and cooling time with a simple formula is 22%.

  4. [Chemical databases and virtual screening].

    PubMed

    Rognan, Didier; Bonnet, Pascal

    2014-12-01

    A prerequisite to any virtual screening is the definition of compound libraries to be screened. As we describe here, various sources are available. The selection of the proper library is usually project-dependent but at least as important as the screening method itself. This review details the main compound libraries that are available for virtual screening and guide the reader to the best possible selection according to its needs. PMID:25537046

  5. A fast microchannel plate-scintillator detector for velocity map imaging and imaging mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Winter, B; King, S J; Brouard, M; Vallance, C

    2014-02-01

    The time resolution achievable using standard position-sensitive ion detectors, consisting of a chevron pair of microchannel plates coupled to a phosphor screen, is primarily limited by the emission lifetime of the phosphor, around 70 ns for the most commonly used P47 phosphor. We demonstrate that poly-para-phenylene laser dyes may be employed extremely effectively as scintillators, exhibiting higher brightness and much shorter decay lifetimes than P47. We provide an extensive characterisation of the properties of such scintillators, with a particular emphasis on applications in velocity-map imaging and microscope-mode imaging mass spectrometry. The most promising of the new scintillators exhibits an electron-to-photon conversion efficiency double that of P47, with an emission lifetime an order of magnitude shorter. The new scintillator screens are vacuum stable and show no signs of signal degradation even over longer periods of operation. PMID:24593353

  6. Scintillating fiber-based photon beam profiler for the Jefferson Lab tagged photon beam line

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Zornl; F. J. Barbosa; A. Freyberger; B. Kross

    2000-01-01

    A scintillating fiber hodoscope has been built for use as a photon beam profiler in the bremsstrahlung tagged photon beam in Hall B of the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab). The device consists of a linear array of 64 2×2 mm2 scintillating fibers glued to a corresponding set of light guide fibers. Both fiber types use double-clad technology

  7. Lithium-loaded liquid scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Dai, Sheng (Knoxville, TN); Kesanli, Banu (Mersin, TR); Neal, John S. (Knoxville, TN)

    2012-05-15

    The invention is directed to a liquid scintillating composition containing (i) one or more non-polar organic solvents; (ii) (lithium-6)-containing nanoparticles having a size of up to 10 nm and surface-capped by hydrophobic molecules; and (iii) one or more fluorophores. The invention is also directed to a liquid scintillator containing the above composition.

  8. Scintillation light transport and detection

    SciTech Connect

    Gabriel, T.A.; Lillie, R.A.

    1986-08-01

    The MORSE neutron gamma-ray transport code has been modified to allow for the transport of scintillation light. This modified code is used to analyze the light collection characteristics of a large liquid scintillator module (18 x 18 x 350 cm/sup 3/).

  9. Scintillation light transport and detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriel, T. A.; Lillie, R. A.

    1987-08-01

    The MORSE neutron gamma-ray transport code has been modified to allow for the transport of scintillation light. This modified code is used to analyze the light collection characteristics of a large liquid scintillator module (18 × 18 × 350 cm 3).

  10. Thermal neutron scintillators using unenriched boron nitride and zinc sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, J. E.; Cole, A. J.; Kirby, A.; Marsden, E.

    2015-06-01

    Thermal neutron detectors based on powdered zinc sulfide intimately mixed with a neutron capture compound have a history as long as scintillation technique itself. We show that using unenriched boron nitride powder, rather than the more commonly used enriched lithium fluoride, results in detection screens which produce less light but which are very considerably cheaper. Methods of fabricating large areas of this material are presented. The screens are intended for the production of large area low cost neutron detectors as a replacement for helium-3 proportional tubes.

  11. Scintillating double beta decay bolometers

    E-print Network

    S. Pirro; J. W. Beeman; S. Capelli; M. Pavan; E. Previtali; P. Gorla

    2005-10-27

    We present the results obtained in the development of scintillating Double Beta Decay bolometers. Several Mo and Cd based crystals were tested with the bolometric technique. The scintillation light was measured through a second independent bolometer. A 140 g CdWO_4 crystal was run in a 417 h live time measurement. Thanks to the scintillation light, the alpha background is easily discriminated resulting in zero counts above the 2615 keV gamma line of Thallium 208. These results, combined with an extremely easy light detector operation, represent the first tangible proof demonstrating the feasibility of this kind of technique.

  12. Scintillator materials containing lanthanum fluorides

    DOEpatents

    Moses, W.W.

    1991-05-14

    An improved radiation detector containing a crystalline mixture of LaF[sub 3] and CeF[sub 3] as the scintillator element is disclosed. Scintillators made with from 25% to 99.5% LaF[sub 3] and the remainder CeF[sub 3] have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is equal to or superior to other known scintillator materials, and which may be processed from natural starting materials containing both rare earth elements. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in positron emission tomography. 2 figures.

  13. Scintillator materials containing lanthanum fluorides

    DOEpatents

    Moses, William W. (Berkeley, CA)

    1991-01-01

    An improved radiation detector containing a crystalline mixture of LaF.sub.3 and CeF.sub.3 as the scintillator element is disclosed. Scintillators made with from 25% to 99.5% LaF.sub.3 and the remainder CeF.sub.3 have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is equal to or superior to other known scintillator materials, and which may be processed from natural starting materials containing both rare earth elements. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in positron emission tomography.

  14. Timing characteristics of scintillator bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisov, S.; Dzierba, A.; Heinz, R.; Klimenko, A.; Samoylenko, V.; Scott, E.; Shchukin, A.; Smith, P.; Steffen, C.; Teige, S.

    2002-02-01

    The proposed Hall D detector at Jefferson Lab will have a time-of-flight detector composed of long and narrow scintillator bars. We have evaluated the time resolution of two bar prototypes in particle beams at the Institute for High Energy Physics in Protvino, Russia. The bars are 2.0 m long and have square cross-sections of size 2.5 and 5.0 cm2. In this paper, we present results on how the time resolution of each of these bars depends on the entry position of the beam into the scintillator, on the material used for scintillator wrapping and on the phototube used for the readout.

  15. Ionospheric scintillation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rino, C. L.; Freemouw, E. J.

    1973-01-01

    The diffracted field of a monochromatic plane wave was characterized by two complex correlation functions. For a Gaussian complex field, these quantities suffice to completely define the statistics of the field. Thus, one can in principle calculate the statistics of any measurable quantity in terms of the model parameters. The best data fits were achieved for intensity statistics derived under the Gaussian statistics hypothesis. The signal structure that achieved the best fit was nearly invariant with scintillation level and irregularity source (ionosphere or solar wind). It was characterized by the fact that more than 80% of the scattered signal power is in phase quadrature with the undeviated or coherent signal component. Thus, the Gaussian-statistics hypothesis is both convenient and accurate for channel modeling work.

  16. Newborn Hearing Screening: Present Scenario

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vishwambhar

    2015-01-01

    In 2009 many countries of the world met to discuss newborn and infant hearing screening current issues and guiding principles for action under World Health Organization (WHO) banner, though most of the countries who had begun this work as universal program or high risk screen do not have exact data and protocol. The developing countries also decided to become part of it and common guideline was proposed. India being part of it included hearing screening as one of the 30 diseases to be screened under Rashtriya Bal Swasthya Karyakram (RBSK). This article discusses all these issues of newborn hearing screening in the world and India. PMID:25657515

  17. Scintillator fiber optic long counter

    DOEpatents

    McCollum, T.; Spector, G.B.

    1994-03-29

    A flat response position sensitive neutron detector capable of providing neutron spectroscopic data utilizing scintillator fiber optic filaments embedded in a neutron moderating housing having an open end through which neutrons enter to be detected is described. 11 figures.

  18. Scintillator fiber optic long counter

    DOEpatents

    McCollum, Tom (Sterling, VA); Spector, Garry B. (Fairfax, VA)

    1994-01-01

    A flat response position sensitive neutron detector capable of providing neutron spectroscopic data utilizing scintillator fiber optic filaments embedded in a neutron moderating housing having an open end through which neutrons enter to be detected.

  19. Scintillating fiber ribbon - tungsten calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bross, A.; Crisler, M.; Kross, B.; Wrbanek, J.

    1989-07-01

    An ultra-high density scintillating fiber and tungsten calorimeter used as an active beam-dump for electrons are described. Data showing the calorimeter response to electrons with momenta between 50 and 350 GeV/c are presented.

  20. About NICADD extruded scintillating strips

    SciTech Connect

    Dyshkant, A.; Beznosko, D.; Blazey, G.; Chakraborty, D.; Francis, K.; Kubik, D.; Lima, J.G.; Rykalin, V.; Zutshi, v.; /Northern Illinois U.; Baldina, E.; Bross, A.; Deering, P.; Nebel, T.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Schellpfeffer, J.; Serritella, C.; Zimmerman, J.; /Fermilab

    2005-04-01

    The results of control measurements of extruded scintillating strip responses to a radioactive source Sr-90 are provided, and details of strip choice, preparation, and method of measurement are included. About four hundred one meter long extruded scintillating strips were measured at four different points. These results were essential for prototyping a tail catcher and muon tracker for a future international electron positron linear collider detector.

  1. Transmission environmental scanning electron microscope with scintillation gaseous detection device.

    PubMed

    Danilatos, Gerasimos; Kollia, Mary; Dracopoulos, Vassileios

    2015-03-01

    A transmission environmental scanning electron microscope with use of a scintillation gaseous detection device has been implemented. This corresponds to a transmission scanning electron microscope but with addition of a gaseous environment acting both as environmental and detection medium. A commercial type of low vacuum machine has been employed together with appropriate modifications to the detection configuration. This involves controlled screening of various emitted signals in conjunction with a scintillation gaseous detection device already provided with the machine for regular surface imaging. Dark field and bright field imaging has been obtained along with other detection conditions. With a progressive series of modifications and tests, the theory and practice of a novel type of microscopy is briefly shown now ushering further significant improvements and developments in electron microscopy as a whole. PMID:25497719

  2. Advances in scintillators for medical imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Loef, Edgar V.; Shah, Kanai S.

    2014-09-01

    A review is presented of some recent work in the field of inorganic scintillator research for medical imaging applications, in particular scintillation detectors for Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET).

  3. Unitary scintillation detector and system

    DOEpatents

    McElhaney, Stephanie A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Chiles, Marion M. (Knoxville, TN)

    1994-01-01

    The invention is a unitary alpha, beta, and gamma scintillation detector and system for sensing the presence of alpha, beta, and gamma radiations selectively or simultaneously. The scintillators are mounted in a light-tight housing provided with an entrance window for admitting alpha, beta, and gamma radiation and excluding ambient light from the housing. Light pulses from each scintillator have different decay constants that are converted by a photosensitive device into corresponding differently shaped electrical pulses. A pulse discrimination system identifies the electrical pulses by their respective pulse shapes which are determined by decay time. The identified electrical pulses are counted in separate channel analyzers to indicate the respective levels of sensed alpha, beta, and gamma radiations.

  4. Unitary scintillation detector and system

    DOEpatents

    McElhaney, S.A.; Chiles, M.M.

    1994-05-31

    The invention is a unitary alpha, beta, and gamma scintillation detector and system for sensing the presence of alpha, beta, and gamma radiations selectively or simultaneously. The scintillators are mounted in a light-tight housing provided with an entrance window for admitting alpha, beta, and gamma radiation and excluding ambient light from the housing. Light pulses from each scintillator have different decay constants that are converted by a photosensitive device into corresponding differently shaped electrical pulses. A pulse discrimination system identifies the electrical pulses by their respective pulse shapes which are determined by decay time. The identified electrical pulses are counted in separate channel analyzers to indicate the respective levels of sensed alpha, beta, and gamma radiations. 10 figs.

  5. Development of radiation hard scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Markley, F.; Woods, D.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Foster, G. (Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States)); Blackburn, R. (Michigan Univ., Nuclear Reactor Lab., Ann Arbor, MI (United States))

    1992-05-01

    Substantial improvements have been made in the radiation hardness of plastic scintillators. Cylinders of scintillating materials 2.2 cm in diameter and 1 cm thick have been exposed to 10 Mrads of gamma rays at a dose rate of 1 Mrad/h in a nitrogen atmosphere. One of the formulations tested showed an immediate decrease in pulse height of only 4% and has remained stable for 12 days while annealing in air. By comparison a commercial PVT scintillator showed an immediate decrease of 58% and after 43 days of annealing in air it improved to a 14% loss. The formulated sample consisted of 70 parts by weight of Dow polystyrene, 30 pbw of pentaphenyltrimethyltrisiloxane (Dow Corning DC 705 oil), 2 pbw of p-terphenyl, 0.2 pbw of tetraphenylbutadiene, and 0.5 pbw of UVASIL299LM from Ferro.

  6. 3D Printing of Scintillating Materials

    E-print Network

    Mishnayot, Y; Cooperstein, I; Magdassi, S; Ron, G

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate, for the first time, the applicability of 3D printing technique to the manufacture of scintillation detectors. We report of a formulation, usable in stereolithographic printing, that exhibits scintillation efficiency on the order of 30\\% of that of commercial polystyrene based scintillators. We discuss the applicability of these techniques and propose future enhancements that will allow tailoring the printed scintillation detectors to various application.

  7. 3D Printing of Scintillating Materials

    E-print Network

    Y. Mishnayot; M. Layani; I. Cooperstein; S. Magdassi; G. Ron

    2014-06-15

    We demonstrate, for the first time, the applicability of 3D printing technique to the manufacture of scintillation detectors. We report of a formulation, usable in stereolithographic printing, that exhibits scintillation efficiency on the order of 30\\% of that of commercial polystyrene based scintillators. We discuss the applicability of these techniques and propose future enhancements that will allow tailoring the printed scintillation detectors to various application.

  8. Characteristics of High Latitude Ionosphere Scintillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Y.

    2012-12-01

    As we enter a new solar maximum period, global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) receivers, especially the ones operating in high latitude and equatorial regions, are facing an increasing threat from ionosphere scintillations. The increased solar activities, however, also offer a great opportunity to collect scintillation data to characterize scintillation signal parameters and ionosphere irregularities. While there are numerous GPS receivers deployed around the globe to monitor ionosphere scintillations, most of them are commercial receivers whose signal processing mechanisms are not designed to operate under ionosphere scintillation. As a result, they may distort scintillation signal parameters or lose lock of satellite signals under strong scintillations. Since 2008, we have established and continuously improved a unique GNSS receiver array at HAARP, Alaska. The array contains high ends commercial receivers and custom RF front ends which can be automatically triggered to collect high quality GPS and GLONASS satellite signals during controlled heating experiments and natural scintillation events. Custom designed receiver signal tracking algorithms aim to preserve true scintillation signatures are used to process the raw RF samples. Signal strength, carrier phase, and relative TEC measurements generated by the receiver array since its inception have been analyzed to characterize high latitude scintillation phenomena. Daily, seasonal, and solar events dependency of scintillation occurrence, spectral contents of scintillation activities, and plasma drifts derived from these measurements will be presented. These interesting results demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of our experimental data collection system in providing insightful details of ionosphere responses to active perturbations and natural disturbances.

  9. Composite scintillators for detection of ionizing radiation

    DOEpatents

    Dai, Sheng (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Stephan, Andrew Curtis (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Brown, Suree S. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Wallace, Steven A. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Rondinone, Adam J [Knoxville, TN

    2010-12-28

    Applicant's present invention is a composite scintillator having enhanced transparency for detecting ionizing radiation comprising a material having optical transparency wherein said material comprises nano-sized objects having a size in at least one dimension that is less than the wavelength of light emitted by the composite scintillator wherein the composite scintillator is designed to have selected properties suitable for a particular application.

  10. Advantages and Problems of Nanocrystalline Scintillators

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. V. Klassen; V. V. Kedrov; V. N. Kurlov; Yu. A. Ossipyan; S. Z. Shmurak; I. M. Shmyt'ko; G. K. Strukova; N. P. Kobelev; E. A. Kudrenko; O. A. Krivko; A. P. Kiselev; A. V. Bazhenov; T. N. Fursova

    2008-01-01

    Our experiments with nanocrystalline scintillating rare earth oxides and rare earth fluorides have shown that in some cases nanoscopic dimensions provide essential improvement of the most important scintillation parameters: light yield, kinetics of scintillations, radiation hardness, etc. We found that in the range from 20 to 100-nm of the oxide and fluoride particles there are 3 types of layered structures:

  11. Imaging-Based Screening: Understanding the Controversies

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Diana L.; Pandharipande, Pari V.; Lee, Janie M.; Lehman, Constance D.; Lee, Christoph I.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The goals of this article are to provide an overview of controversial aspects of imaging-based screening and to elucidate potential risks that may offset anticipated benefits. Conclusion Current controversial topics associated with imaging-based screening include false-positive results, incidental findings, overdiagnosis, radiation risks, and costs. Alongside the benefits of screening, radiologists should be prepared to discuss these additional diagnostic consequences with providers and patients to better guide shared decision making regarding imaging-based screening. PMID:25341132

  12. Impact of equatorial ionospheric irregularities on GNSS receivers using real and synthetic scintillation signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghafoori, F.; Skone, S.

    2015-04-01

    The impact of L-band equatorial ionospheric scintillation on Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) receivers is investigated in this paper using both real and synthetic scintillation data. To this end, various low-latitude data sets, recorded during the most recent solar maximum, are exploited in post-processing to develop and verify realistic simulation tools and evaluate GNSS receiver performance. A scintillation simulation model is implemented based on the phase screen formulation of Dr. Charles Rino (1979, 1982, and 2011) which allows oblique signal propagation in an anisotropic propagation medium with multiple irregularity layers (or phase screens) for multiple GNSS frequencies. The observed real scintillation parameters are used to drive GNSS signal simulations. The subsequent simulated GNSS signal time series are verified through comparison with real data for different signal tracking states including the most severe and challenging tracking scenarios. Using both real and synthetic data sets, the impact of scintillation on observation quality and receiver performance is evaluated in terms of probability of loss of phase and frequency lock, as well as the correlation of disturbed L-band signals transmitted by GNSS satellites on the same transionsopheric path.

  13. Scintillating lustre induced by radial fins

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Kohske; Fukuda, Haruaki; Watanabe, Katsumi; Ueda, Kazuhiro

    2012-01-01

    Radial lines of Ehrenstein patterns induce illusory scintillating lustre in gray disks inserted into the central gaps (scintillating-lustre effect). We report a novel variant of this illusion by replacing the radial lines with white and black radial fins. Both white and gray disks inserted into the central gaps were perceived as scintillating, if the ratio of the black/white fin width were balanced (ie, close to 1.0). Thus, the grayness of the central disk is not a prerequisite for the scintillation. However, the scintillation was drastically reduced when the ratio was imbalanced. Furthermore, the optimal ratio depended on the color of the center disks. PMID:23145270

  14. Method of making a scintillator waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Bliss, Mary (West Richland, WA); Craig, Richard A. (West Richland, WA); Reeder, Paul L. (Richland, WA)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is an apparatus for detecting ionizing radiation, having: a waveguide having a first end and a second end, the waveguide formed of a scintillator material wherein the therapeutic ionizing radiation isotropically generates scintillation light signals within the waveguide. This apparatus provides a measure of radiation dose. The apparatus may be modified to permit making a measure of location of radiation dose. Specifically, the scintillation material is segmented into a plurality of segments; and a connecting cable for each of the plurality of segments is used for conducting scintillation signals to a scintillation detector.

  15. Extruded plastic scintillator for MINERvA

    SciTech Connect

    Pla-Dalmau, Anna; Bross, Alan D.; /Fermilab; Rykalin, Victor V.; Wood, Brian M.; /NICADD, DeKalb

    2005-11-01

    An extrusion line has recently been installed at Fermilab in collaboration with NICADD (Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator and Detector Development). This new facility will serve to further develop and improve extruded plastic scintillator. Since polystyrene is widely used in the consumer industry, the logical path was to investigate the extrusion of commercial-grade polystyrene pellets with dopants to yield high quality plastic scintillator. The D0 and MINOS experiments are already using extruded scintillator strips in their detectors. A new experiment at Fermilab is pursuing the use of extruded plastic scintillator. A new plastic scintillator strip is being tested and its properties characterized. The initial results are presented here.

  16. Advances in Yield Calibration of Scintillators

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Johan T. M. de Haas; Pieter Dorenbos

    2008-01-01

    By means of a photomultiplier tube, a Si-photodiode, and a Si-avalanche photodiode, the absolute scintillation yield of recently developed LaBr3:Ce, LaCl3:Ce, and (Lu,Y)2SiO5:Ce scintillators and traditional Lu2SiO5:Ce, Bi4Ge3O12, NaI:Tl, CsI:Tl, and CsI:Na scintillators were determined. These are all well known scintillators that cover emission wavelengths from 250 nm to 750 nm. By comparing the scintillation yield independently measured with the

  17. Cerium doped elpasolite halide scintillators.

    SciTech Connect

    Doty, F. Patrick (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Shah, Kanai Subodhbhai (Radiation Monitoring Devices, Watertown, MA); Noda, Frank T.; Yang, Pin; Zhou, Xiao Wang (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA)

    2010-05-01

    Low-cost, high-performance gamma-ray spectrometers are urgently needed for proliferation detection and homeland security. The cost and availability of large scintillators used in the spectrometer generally hinge on their mechanical property and crystal symmetry. Low symmetry, intrinsically brittle crystals, such as these emerging lanthanide halide scintillators, are particularly difficult to grow in large sizes due to the development of large anisotropic thermomechanical stresses during solidification process. Isotropic cubic scintillators, such as alkali halides, while affordable and can be produced in large sizes, are poor spectrometers due to severe nonproportional response and modest light yield. This work investigates and compares four new elpasolite based lanthanide halides, including Cs2LiLaBr6, Cs2NaLaBr6, Cs2LiLaI6, and Cs2NaLaI6, in terms of their crystal symmetry, characteristics of photoluminescence and optical quantum efficiency. The mechanical property and thermal expansion behavior of the cubic Cs2LiLaBr6 will be reported. The isotropic nature of this material has potential for scaled-up crystal growth, as well as the possibility of low-cost polycrystalline ceramic processing. In addition, the proportional response with gamma-ray energy of directionally solidified Cs2LiLaBr6 will be compared with workhorse alkali halide scintillators. The processing challenges associated with hot forged polycrystalline elpasolite based lanthanide halides will also be discussed.

  18. Scintillation materials for medical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lempicki, A.; Wojtowicz, A.J.

    1992-01-01

    Scintillators are beginning to attract renewed attention because modern High Energy Physics accelerators are placing unprecedented demands of quantity and quality of detector materials and Positron Emission Tomography (PET), used by the medical field. Both applications required materials for scintillator detectors with properties beyond those delivered by traditional scintillators. Thallium doped halides are very efficient, but slow and chemically unstable. Two modern developments, namely the very fast BaF[sub 2], which owed its success to the newly discovered crossover transitions, and CeF[sub 3], which carried a promise of fast components, more practical wavelengths and attractive efficiency. Since traditional scintillators (Tl doped halides) are very efficient, and could be even more efficient at larger concentrations of Tl, if it were not for concentration quenching. However Tl transitions are spin forbidden and slow. Both ills could be remedied by replacing Tl with Ce, whose transitions are allowed and which is known to form fully concentrated compounds of high photoluminescent efficiency and no quenching. These materials, plus new Ce-doped materials, exhibiting highly promising properties for medical applications, became the target of our studies.

  19. High Efficiency, Low Cost Scintillators for PET

    SciTech Connect

    Kanai Shah

    2007-03-06

    Inorganic scintillation detectors coupled to PMTs are an important element of medical imaging applications such as positron emission tomography (PET). Performance as well as cost of these systems is limited by the properties of the scintillation detectors available at present. The Phase I project was aimed at demonstrating the feasibility of producing high performance scintillators using a low cost fabrication approach. Samples of these scintillators were produced and their performance was evaluated. Overall, the Phase I effort was very successful. The Phase II project will be aimed at advancing the new scintillation technology for PET. Large samples of the new scintillators will be produced and their performance will be evaluated. PET modules based on the new scintillators will also be built and characterized.

  20. Speeding up directed evolution: Combining the advantages of solid-phase combinatorial gene synthesis with statistically guided reduction of screening effort.

    PubMed

    Hoebenreich, Sabrina; Zilly, Felipe E; Acevedo-Rocha, Carlos G; Zilly, Matías; Reetz, Manfred T

    2015-03-20

    Efficient and economic methods in directed evolution at the protein, metabolic, and genome level are needed for biocatalyst development and the success of synthetic biology. In contrast to random strategies, semirational approaches such as saturation mutagenesis explore the sequence space in a focused manner. Although several combinatorial libraries based on saturation mutagenesis have been reported using solid-phase gene synthesis, direct comparison with traditional PCR-based methods is currently lacking. In this work, we compare combinatorial protein libraries created in-house via PCR versus those generated by commercial solid-phase gene synthesis. Using descriptive statistics and probabilistic distributions on amino acid occurrence frequencies, the quality of the libraries was assessed and compared, revealing that the outsourced libraries are characterized by less bias and outliers than the PCR-based ones. Afterward, we screened all libraries following a traditional algorithm for almost complete library coverage and compared this approach with an emergent statistical concept suggesting screening a lower portion of the protein sequence space. Upon analyzing the biocatalytic landscapes and best hits of all combinatorial libraries, we show that the screening effort could have been reduced in all cases by more than 50%, while still finding at least one of the best mutants. PMID:24921161

  1. Scintillators for positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, W.W.; Derenzo, S.E.

    1995-09-01

    Like most applications that utilize scintillators for gamma detection, Positron Emission Tomography (PET) desires materials with high light output, short decay time, and excellent stopping power that are also inexpensive, mechanically rugged, and chemically inert. Realizing that this ``ultimate`` scintillator may not exist, this paper evaluates the relative importance of these qualities and describes their impact on the imaging performance of PET. The most important PET scintillator quality is the ability to absorb 511 keV photons in a small volume, which affects the spatial resolution of the camera. The dominant factor is a short attenuation length ({le} 1.5 cm is required), although a high photoelectric fraction is also important (> 30% is desired). The next most important quality is a short decay time, which affects both the dead time and the coincidence timing resolution. Detection rates for single 511 keV photons can be extremely high, so decay times {le} 500 ns are essential to avoid dead time losses. In addition, positron annihilations are identified by time coincidence so {le}5 ns fwhm coincidence pair timing resolution is required to identify events with narrow coincidence windows, reducing contamination due to accidental coincidences. Current trends in PET cameras are toward septaless, ``fully-3D`` cameras, which have significantly higher count rates than conventional 2-D cameras and so place higher demands on scintillator decay time. Light output affects energy resolution, and thus the ability of the camera to identify and reject events where the initial 511 keV photon has undergone Compton scatter in the patient. The scatter to true event fraction is much higher in fully-3D cameras than in 2-D cameras, so future PET cameras would benefit from scintillators with a 511 keV energy resolution < 10--12% fwhm.

  2. Health Screening

    MedlinePLUS

    Screenings are tests that look for diseases before you have symptoms. Screening tests can find diseases early, when they're easier ... Overweight and obesity Prostate cancer in men Which tests you need depends on your age, your sex, ...

  3. Silicon photomultipliers for scintillating trackers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabaioli, S.; Berra, A.; Bolognini, D.; Bonvicini, V.; Bosisio, L.; Ciano, S.; Iugovaz, D.; Lietti, D.; Penzo, A.; Prest, M.; Rashevskaya, I.; Reia, S.; Stoppani, L.; Vallazza, E.

    2012-12-01

    In recent years, silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) have been proposed as a new kind of readout device for scintillating detectors in many experiments. A SiPM consists of a matrix of parallel-connected pixels, which are independent photon counters working in Geiger mode with very high gain (?106). This contribution presents the use of an array of eight SiPMs (manufactured by FBK-irst) for the readout of a scintillating bar tracker (a small size prototype of the Electron Muon Ranger detector for the MICE experiment). The performances of the SiPMs in terms of signal to noise ratio, efficiency and time resolution will be compared to the ones of a multi-anode photomultiplier tube (MAPMT) connected to the same bars. Both the SiPMs and the MAPMT are interfaced to a VME system through a 64 channel MAROC ASIC.

  4. Nanodosemeters based on gel scintillators.

    PubMed

    Grau Carles, A

    2006-01-01

    The feasibility of a nanodosemeter based on a liquid scintillator cocktail of four components (ethoxylated nonylphenol, pseudocumene, water and a lipophilic mixture) is studied. The dosemeter can work in distinct gel phases, for which the radioactive substance can be confined inside aqueous nanoscale structures of different size. For water volumes ranging 0-15%, it results in a gel with micelles of 4 nm radius. For water volumes ranging 30-50%, the resulting liquid-crystal gel contains nanostructures of approximately 20 nm radius. The low-energy electron emission arising from the decay of (3)H and (55)Fe is counted in a commercial liquid-scintillation counting spectrometer for both homogeneous and gel samples. The counting efficiency gap between the two phases is used to compute the average energy deposited inside the micelle. PMID:17213221

  5. Statistical properties of finite-bandwidth radiation scattered by random amplitude screens and random phase screens.

    PubMed

    Ridley, Kevin D; Jakeman, Eric

    2010-11-10

    We investigate the effect of finite bandwidth of the incident radiation on scattering by thin layers that introduce random phase or amplitude variations. In particular, we calculate the scintillation index of the propagating radiation for smoothly varying and fractal phase screens and for random telegraph wave and checkerboard amplitude screens. Increasing the bandwidth of the incident radiation reduces the fluctuations of the scattered intensity over the whole propagation path, except in the case of the smoothly varying phase screen, where geometrical optics features in the pattern persist in the focusing region. PMID:21068869

  6. Chemical compatibility screening test results

    SciTech Connect

    Nigrey, P.J.; Dickens, T.G.

    1997-12-01

    A program for evaluating packaging components that may be used in transporting mixed-waste forms has been developed and the first phase has been completed. This effort involved the screening of ten plastic materials in four simulant mixed-waste types. These plastics were butadiene-acrylonitrile copolymer rubber, cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE), epichlorohydrin rubber, ethylene-propylene rubber (EPDM), fluorocarbon (Viton or Kel-F), polytetrafluoroethylene, high-density polyethylene (HDPE), isobutylene-isoprene copolymer rubber (butyl), polypropylene, and styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR). The selected simulant mixed wastes were (1) an aqueous alkaline mixture of sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite; (2) a chlorinated hydrocarbon mixture; (3) a simulant liquid scintillation fluid; and (4) a mixture of ketones. The testing protocol involved exposing the respective materials to 286,000 rads of gamma radiation followed by 14-day exposures to the waste types at 60{degrees}C. The seal materials were tested using vapor transport rate (VTR) measurements while the liner materials were tested using specific gravity as a metric. For these tests, a screening criterion of 0.9 g/hr/m{sup 2} for VTR and a specific gravity change of 10% was used. Based on this work, it was concluded that while all seal materials passed exposure to the aqueous simulant mixed waste, EPDM and SBR had the lowest VTRs. In the chlorinated hydrocarbon simulant mixed waste, only Viton passed the screening tests. In both the simulant scintillation fluid mixed waste and the ketone mixture simulant mixed waste, none of the seal materials met the screening criteria. For specific gravity testing of liner materials, the data showed that while all materials with the exception of polypropylene passed the screening criteria, Kel-F, HDPE, and XLPE offered the greatest resistance to the combination of radiation and chemicals.

  7. Buried plastic scintillator muon telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, F.; Medina-Tanco, G. A.; D'Olivo, J. C.; et al.

    Muon telescopes can have several applications, ranging from astrophysical to solar-terrestrial interaction studies, and fundamental particle physics. We show the design parameters, characterization and end-to-end simulations of a detector composed by a set of three parallel dual-layer scintillator planes, buried at fix depths ranging from 0.30 m to 3 m. Each layer is 4 m2 and is composed by 50 rectangular pixels of 4cm x 2 m, oriented at a 90 deg angle with respect to its companion layer. The scintillators are MINOS extruded polystyrene strips with two Bicron wavelength shifting fibers mounted on machined grooves. Scintillation light is collected by multi-anode PMTs of 64 pixels, accommodating two fibers per pixel. The front-end electronics has a time resolution of 7.5 nsec. Any strip signal above threshold opens a GPS-tagged 2 micro-seconds data collection window. All data, including signal and background, are saved to hard disk. Separation of extensive air shower signals from secondary cosmic-ray background muons and electrons is done offline using the GPS-tagged threefold coincidence signal from surface water cerenkov detectors located nearby in a triangular array. Cosmic-ray showers above 6 PeV are selected. The data acquisition system is designed to keep both, background and signals from extensive air showers for a detailed offline data.

  8. Secondary scintillation yield in pure xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro, C. M. B.; Fernandes, L. M. P.; Lopes, J. A. M.; Coelho, L. C. C.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.; dos Santos, J. M. F.; Giboni, K.; Aprile, E.

    2007-05-01

    The xenon secondary scintillation yield was studied as a function of the electric field in the scintillation region, in a gas proportional scintillation counter operated at room temperature. A large area avalanche photodiode was used for the readout of the VUV secondary scintillation produced in the gas, together with the 5.9 keV x-rays directly absorbed in the photodiode. The latter was used as a reference for the determination of the number of charge carriers produced by the scintillation pulse and, thus, the number of VUV photons impinging the photodiode. A value of 140 photons/kV was obtained for the scintillation amplification parameter. The attained results are in good agreement with those predicted, for room temperature, by Monte Carlo simulation and Boltzmann calculations, as well as with those obtained for saturated xenon vapour, at cryogenic temperatures, and are about a factor of two higher than former results measured at room temperature.

  9. Scintillation Reduction Method for Photometric Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, P.; Sandler, D.

    1998-10-01

    We explore the reduction of scintillation via differencing signals from binary stars. Theory has been extended to include temporal and angular separation effects simultaneously. For meter-class telescopes, scintillation for a 2" binary is reduced by greater than a factor of 3. Aperture averaging for differential scintillation had a D^-1.4+/-0.1 dependence for exposure times <=0.25 s versus D^-1.1+/-0.1 for absolute scintillation. For 1.5 m diameter telescopes, the influence of binary separation on differential scintillation for theta<5^'' went as theta^0.6 for instantaneous scintillation and rose slightly with exposure time. If the deconvolution problem can be solved, differencing signals from binary stars offers the potential for increased photometric accuracy.

  10. 4/6-GHz ionospheric scintillation measurements during the peak of sunspot cycle 21

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, D.J. (COMSAT Laboratories, Clarksburg, MD); Pontes, M.S. (Rio de Janeiro, Pontificia Universidade Catolica, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil)

    1981-01-01

    Analyses of power spectral density confirm an f to the -3 dependence for weak scintillations, which, it is noted, can be explained by the conventional weak scattering theory for a thick screen with a power law electron density fluctuation spectrum of p equals 4. Data gathered from 1977 to 1980 at the Hong Kong Earth Station provide further insight into 4- and 6-GHz scintillations during maximum solar activity. Such characteristics as occurrence frequencies, durations, global scales, and spectral roll-off slopes are unique in that they had not been observed in previous years. Peak-to-peak fluctuations of up to 14-dB magnitude are observed for which the f to the -3 power spectrum dependence is no longer valid. In terms of cumulative statistics, a model of scintillation increase as a function of solar activities is developed for engineering applications.

  11. Recording of relativistic particles in thin scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Tolstukhin, I A.; Somov, Alexander S. [JLAB; Somov, S. V.; Bolozdynya, A. I.

    2014-11-01

    Results of investigating an assembly of thin scintillators and silicon photomultipliers for registering relativistic particles with the minimum ionization are presented. A high efficiency of registering relativistic particles using an Ej-212 plastic scintillator, BSF-91A wavelength-shifting fiber (Saint-Gobain), and a silicon photomultiplier (Hamamtsu) is shown. The measurement results are used for creating a scintillation hodoscope of the magnetic spectrometer for registering ? quanta in the GlueX experiment.

  12. Spacecraft Radio Scintillation and Solar System Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, Richard

    1993-01-01

    When a wave propagates through a turbulent medium, scattering by the random refractive index inhomogeneities can lead to a wide variety of phenomena that have been the subject of extensive study. The observed scattering effects include amplitude or intensity scintillation, phase scintillation, angular broadening, and spectral broadening, among others. In this paper, I will refer to these scattering effects collectively as scintillation. Although the most familiar example is probably the twinkling of stars (light wave intensity scintillation by turbulence in the Earth's atmosphere), scintillation has been encountered and investigated in such diverse fields as ionospheric physics, oceanography, radio astronomy, and radio and optical communications. Ever since planetary spacecraft began exploring the solar system, scintillation has appeared during the propagation of spacecraft radio signals through planetary atmospheres, planetary ionospheres, and the solar wind. Early studies of these phenomena were motivated by the potential adverse effects on communications and navigation, and on experiments that use the radio link to conduct scientific investigations. Examples of the latter are radio occultation measurements (described below) of planetary atmospheres to deduce temperature profiles, and the search for gravitational waves. However,these concerns soon gave way to the emergence of spacecraft radio scintillation as a new scientific tool for exploring small-scale dynamics in planetary atmospheres and structure in the solar wind, complementing in situ and other remote sensing spacecraft measurements, as well as scintillation measurements using natural (celestial) radio sources. The purpose of this paper is to briefly describe and review the solar system spacecraft radio scintillation observations, to summarize the salient features of wave propagation analyses employed in interpreting them, to underscore the unique remote sensing capabilities and scientific relevance of the scintillation measurements, and to highlight some of the scientific results obtained to date. Special emphasis is placed on comparing the remote sensing features of planetary and terrestrial scintillation measurements, and on contrasting spacecraft and natural radio source scintillation measurements. I will first discuss planetary atmospheres and ionospheres, and then the solar wind.

  13. Longitudinal correlation of equatorial ionospheric scintillation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ron Caton; Keith Groves

    2006-01-01

    Studies at the Air Force Research Laboratory are investigating methods for the incorporation of expected data sets from the Communication\\/Navigation Outage Forecast System (C\\/NOFS) satellite into existing scintillation specification models for an improved knowledge of the regional scintillation environment. Results from this research will form the basis for ground-based empirical scintillation forecast algorithms. One such study involves a determination of

  14. Structure-guided design of fluorescent S-adenosylmethionine analogs for a high-throughput screen to target SAM-I riboswitch RNAs.

    PubMed

    Hickey, Scott F; Hammond, Ming C

    2014-03-20

    Many classes of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM)-binding RNAs and proteins are of interest as potential drug targets in diverse therapeutic areas, from infectious diseases to cancer. In the former case, the SAM-I riboswitch is an attractive target because this structured RNA element is found only in bacterial mRNAs and regulates multiple genes in several human pathogens. Here, we describe the synthesis of stable and fluorescent analogs of SAM in which the fluorophore is introduced through a functionalizable linker to the ribose. A Cy5-labeled SAM analog was shown to bind several SAM-I riboswitches via in-line probing and fluorescence polarization assays, including one from Staphylococcus aureus that controls the expression of SAM synthetase in this organism. A fluorescent ligand displacement assay was developed and validated for high-throughput screening of compounds to target the SAM-I riboswitch class. PMID:24560607

  15. Targeted isolation and structure elucidation of stilbene glycosides from the bark of Lysidice brevicalyx Wei guided by biological and chemical screening.

    PubMed

    Hu, Youcai; Ma, Shuanggang; Li, Jianbei; Yu, Shishan; Qu, Jing; Liu, Jing; Du, Dan

    2008-11-01

    An efficient procedure based on biological and chemical screening has been performed to investigate the antioxidant constituents of the bark of Lysidice brevicalyx Wei. The procedure allowed the rapid identification of known compounds and tentative characterization of unknown compounds by online LC/UV/ESIMS(n) analyses of the antioxidant fraction. Targeted isolation of the unknown compounds has led to the discovery of seven new stilbene glycosides, named lysidisides L-R (1-7), together with a known stilbene glycoside, (E)-resveratrol 3-O-rutinoside (8). The structures of these compounds were further determined on the basis of spectroscopic and chemical evidence. The antioxidant activities of compounds 1-8 and two related compounds, (E)-polydatin (9) and lysidiside E (11), were evaluated. The known compound (E)-polydatin (9) showed antioxidant activity at concentrations of 10(-4) and 10(-5) mol/L. PMID:18847246

  16. Waveshifters and Scintillators for Ionizing Radiation Detection

    SciTech Connect

    B.Baumgaugh; J.Bishop; D.Karmgard; J.Marchant; M.McKenna; R.Ruchti; M.Vigneault; L.Hernandez; C.Hurlbut

    2007-12-11

    Scintillation and waveshifter materials have been developed for the detection of ionizing radiation in an STTR program between Ludlum Measurements, Inc. and the University of Notre Dame. Several new waveshifter materials have been developed which are comparable in efficiency and faster in fluorescence decay than the standard material Y11 (K27) used in particle physics for several decades. Additionally, new scintillation materials useful for fiber tracking have been developed which have been compared to 3HF. Lastly, work was done on developing liquid scintillators and paint-on scintillators and waveshifters for high radiation environments.

  17. Divalent fluoride doped cerium fluoride scintillator

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F. (630 Sylvan Pl., Batavia, IL 60510); Sparrow, Robert W. (28 Woodlawn Dr., Sturbridge, MA 01566)

    1991-01-01

    The use of divalent fluoride dopants in scintillator materials comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. The preferred divalent fluoride dopants are calcium fluoride, strontium fluoride, and barium fluoride. The preferred amount of divalent fluoride dopant is less than about two percent by weight of the total scintillator. Cerium fluoride scintillator crystals grown with the addition of a divalent fluoride have exhibited better transmissions and higher light outputs than crystals grown without the addition of such dopants. These scintillators are useful in radiation detection and monitoring applications, and are particularly well suited for high-rate applications such as positron emission tomography (PET).

  18. Design Rules for Ce-activated scintillating radiation detection materials: Compromises between Luminosity and stopping power

    SciTech Connect

    Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Ferris, Kim F.; Jones, Dumont M.

    2008-06-01

    In recent years, the scintillation properties of many specific cerium-doped scintillators (such as LSO and BaBr3) have been extensively studied. This paper presents new development methods for property-screening design rules ,using structure-property relationships for two fundamental target detector properties--luminosity and stopping power. The first and most evident goal in developing screening models of luminosity and stopping power is to obtain new candidate cerium scintillating materials. However, a second and more strategic goal is to extract design rules, which define the structural limitations on materials consistent with desirable detector properties. The design rules are based on our capability to predict the luminescence and stopping power of a material from a set of structural descriptors. These models are generated using statistical multiple linear regression techniques over a large set of 24 descriptors. We find that within a set of ten cerium-doped scintillator materials that we can quantitatively predict luminosity and stopping power with a correlation coefficient of ~0.99 based on 6 of the 24 descriptors. Furthermore, we show that in this circumstance the luminosity and stopping power are nominally related and only share one common descriptor in the developed models. In particular luminosity depends largely on matrix valence electron properties and their coupling to activator sites—properties that do not require high atomic masses per se, a requirement for high stopping power.

  19. Touch Screens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael McRoberts

    \\u000a You are now going to take a look at a cool gadget that you can use easily with an Arduino—a touch screen. Since the advent\\u000a of smart phones and handheld game consoles, touch screens are now inexpensive and readily available. A touch screen allows\\u000a you to make an easy touch interface for a device or it can be overlaid onto

  20. Investigation of Luminescence Properties of Lu SiO :Ce (LSO) Powder Scintillator in the X-Ray Radiography Energy Range

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stratos L. David; Christos M. Michail; Ioannis G. Valais; Adrianos E. Toutountzis; Panagiotis F. Liaparinos; Dionisis A. Cavouras; Ioannis S. Kandarakis; George S. Panayiotakis

    2008-01-01

    This paper investigates the light emission efficiency of Lu2SiO5:Ce (LSO) powder scintillator under conditions employed in projection X-ray imaging. Although single-crystal LSO has been thoroughly studied in medical imaging energies, the efficiency of powder LSO has not been previously investigated experimentally under X-ray medical radiography conditions. For this purpose, three scintillating screens with a coating thickness of 63.4, 108.4, and

  1. Photodetectors for Scintillator Proportionality Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, William W.; Choong, Woon-Seng; Hull, Giulia; Payne, Steve; Cherepy, Nerine; Valentine, J.D.

    2010-10-18

    We evaluate photodetectors for use in a Compton Coincidence apparatus designed for measuring scintillator proportionality. There are many requirements placed on the photodetector in these systems, including active area, linearity, and the ability to accurately measure low light levels (which implies high quantum efficiency and high signal-to-noise ratio). Through a combination of measurement and Monte Carlo simulation, we evaluate a number of potential photodetectors, especially photomultiplier tubes and hybrid photodetectors. Of these, we find that the most promising devices available are photomultiplier tubes with high ({approx}50%) quantum efficiency, although hybrid photodetectors with high quantum efficiency would be preferable.

  2. Comparison of LSO, LGSO and MLS scintillators

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Catherine M. Pepin; P. Berard; R. Lecomte

    2001-01-01

    The luminescence and nuclear spectroscopic properties of recent LSO, LGSO and MLS scintillators were investigated and compared to those of older LSO and LGSO crystals. UV-excited luminescent spectra outline important similarities between these scintillators. The two distinct luminescence mechanisms previously identified in LSO appear to be present in all crystals. The relative light yield and energy resolution were assessed using

  3. Binderless composite scintillator for neutron detection

    DOEpatents

    Hodges, Jason P [Knoxville, TN; Crow, Jr; Lowell, M [Oak Ridge, TN; Cooper, Ronald G [Oak Ridge, TN

    2009-03-10

    Composite scintillator material consisting of a binderless sintered mixture of a Lithium (Li) compound containing .sup.6Li as the neutron converter and Y.sub.2SiO.sub.5:Ce as the scintillation phosphor, and the use of this material as a method for neutron detection. Other embodiments of the invention include various other Li compounds.

  4. Luminescence and Scintillation Properties at the Nanoscale

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christophe Dujardin; David Amans; Andrei Belsky; Frederic Chaput; Gilles Ledoux; Anne Pillonnet

    2010-01-01

    This contribution is a review of the luminescence and scintillation properties of nanoparticles (NP), particularly doped insulators. Luminescence spectroscopy is an appropriate tool to probe matter at the nanoscale. Luminescence is also the last stage of the scintillation process. Specific surface and structural effects occurring in NP are reported. Their consequences on the NP luminescence properties are discussed. Parts of

  5. Scintillation Counters for the CDF Muon Upgrade

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Pauletta

    2001-01-01

    The possibility of triggering on muons at higher luminosities and smaller bounch spacings has been preserved in the central region and ectended to the forward (eta < 1.5) by constructing new scintillation counters and refurbishing existing ones. The new counters are made of polystyrene - based scintillator produced by Monokristall under JINR supervision and employ a readout technique which is

  6. OVERCOMING IONOSPHERIC SCINTILLATION FOR WORLDWIDE GPS AVIATION

    E-print Network

    Stanford University

    OVERCOMING IONOSPHERIC SCINTILLATION FOR WORLDWIDE GPS AVIATION A DISSERTATION SUBMITTED decades, its impact on GPS aviation has not been well understood. As a result, the current GPS aviation to mitigate the impact of scintillation. Although current aviation receivers do not protect against

  7. Epoxy resins produce improved plastic scintillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markley, F. W.

    1967-01-01

    Plastic scintillator produced by the substitution of epoxy resins for the commonly used polystyrene is easy to cast, stable at room temperature, and has the desirable properties of a thermoset or cross-linked system. Such scintillators can be immersed directly in strong solvents, an advantage in many chemical and biological experiments.

  8. Clinical Neuropathology practice guide 6-2013: morphology and an appropriate immunohistochemical screening panel aid in the identification of synovial sarcoma by neuropathologists

    PubMed Central

    Keith, Julia Lee; Bilbao, Juan; Croul, Sidney; Ang, Lee Cyn; Guiot, Marie-Christine; Rossiter, John; Ghorab, Zeina; Hawkins, Cynthia; Karamchandani, Jason

    2013-01-01

    Aims: Pathologists are under increasing pressure to accurately subclassify sarcomas, yet neuropathologists have limited collective experience with rare sarcoma types such as synovial sarcoma. We reviewed 9 synovial sarcomas affecting peripheral nerve diagnosed by neuropathologists and explored the morphologic and immunohistochemical differences between these and MPNST. Our goal was to make practical recommendations for neuropathologists regarding which spindle cell tumors affecting nerve should be sent for SYT-SSX testing. Methods: Clinical records and genetics were reviewed retrospectively and central pathology review of 9 synovial sarcomas and 6 MPNST included immunohistochemistry for SOX10, S100, BAF47, CK (lmw, pan, CK7, CK19), EMA, CD34, bcl2, CD99, and neurofilament. Results: Common synovial sarcoma sites were brachial plexus, spinal and femoral nerve, none were “intra-neural”, all had the SYT-SSX1 translocation, and 6/9 were monophasic with myxoid stroma and distinct collagen. Half of the monophasic synovial sarcomas expressed CK7, CK19 or panCK in a “rare positive cells pattern”, 8/9 (89%) expressed EMA, and all were SOX10 immunonegative with reduced but variable BAF47 expression. Conclusions: We recommend that upon encountering a cellular spindle cell tumor affecting nerve neuropathologists consider the following: 1) SYT-SSX testing should be performed on any case with morphology suspicious for monophasic synovial sarcoma including wiry or thick bands of collagen and relatively monomorphous nuclei; 2) neuropathologists should employ a screening immunohistochemical panel including one of CK7, panCK or CK19, plus EMA, S100 and SOX10, and 3) SYT-SSX testing should be performed on any spindle cell tumor with CK and/or EMA immunopositivity if SOX10 immunostaining is negative or only labels entrapped nerve elements. PMID:24131748

  9. Screen optics effects on detective quantum efficiency in digital radiography: Zero-frequency effects

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. R. Lubinsky; Zhao Wei; Goran Ristic; J. A. Rowlands

    2006-01-01

    Indirect flat panel imagers have been developed for digital radiography, fluoroscopy and mammography, and are now in clinical use. Screens made from columnar structured cesium iodide (CsI) scintillators doped with thallium have been used extensively in these detectors. The purpose of this article is to investigate the effect of screen optics, e.g., light escape efficiency versus depth, on gain fluctuation

  10. Carotid Artery Screening

    MedlinePLUS

    Carotid Artery Screening What is carotid artery screening? Who should consider heart screening – and why? How are the procedures ... more information about heart screening? What is carotid artery screening? Screening examinations are tests performed to find ...

  11. Scintillation Effects on Space Shuttle GPS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, John L.; Kramer, Leonard

    2001-01-01

    Irregularities in ionospheric electron density result in variation in amplitude and phase of Global Positioning System (GPS) signals, or scintillation. GPS receivers tracking scintillated signals may lose carrier phase or frequency lock in the case of phase sc intillation. Amplitude scintillation can cause "enhancement" or "fading" of GPS signals and result in loss of lock. Scintillation can occur over the equatorial and polar regions and is a function of location, time of day, season, and solar and geomagnetic activity. Mid latitude regions are affected only very rarely, resulting from highly disturbed auroral events. In the spring of 1998, due to increasing concern about scintillation of GPS signals during the upcoming solar maximum, the Space Shuttle Program began to assess the impact of scintillation on Collins Miniaturized Airborne GPS Receiver (MAGR) units that are to replace Tactical Air Control and Navigation (TACAN) units on the Space Shuttle orbiters. The Shuttle Program must determine if scintillation effects pose a threat to safety of flight and mission success or require procedural and flight rule changes. Flight controllers in Mission Control must understand scintillation effects on GPS to properly diagnose "off nominal" GPS receiver performance. GPS data from recent Space Shuttle missions indicate that the signals tracked by the Shuttle MAGR manifest scintillation. Scintillation is observed as anomalous noise in velocity measurements lasting for up to 20 minutes on Shuttle orbit passes and are not accounted for in the error budget of the MAGR accuracy parameters. These events are typically coincident with latitude and local time occurrence of previously identified equatorial spread F within about 20 degrees of the magnetic equator. The geographic and seasonal history of these events from ground-based observations and a simple theoretical model, which have potential for predicting events for operational purposes, are reviewed.

  12. Screen Time

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    OMSI

    2007-01-01

    This game asks you a series of questions about how much time you spend in front of a screen, not being active. It begins by pointing out that since we spend a lot of time in front of computer screens at work or school, additional time at home can really affect how healthy we are. It asks how much time you spend watching TV, playing computer games, and using the computer each day. It then adds up the total amount of screen time you spend every day, and calculates how many hours you spend a year in front of a screen. It also tells you if that's a healthy amount, and suggests ways to stay active while in front of screens.

  13. Comparison of Scintillating Fiber and Diamond Detector Data

    E-print Network

    McDonald, Kirk

    .77 Avalanche photodiode plastic scintillating fiber Saint-Gobain BCF-20 1/e length >3.5 meter fluorescenceComparison of Scintillating Fiber and Diamond Detector Data T. Tsang BNL (Nov 9 2009)(Nov. 9, 2009) #12;Scintillating fiber channel #0 Feb. 6, 2008 scintillating fiber 2 meter long, BCF-20, 1-mm

  14. Cerium oxidation state in LSO:Ce scintillators

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Charles L. Melcher; Stephan Friedrich; Stephen P. Cramer; Merry A. Spurrier; Piotr Szupryczynski; Ron Nutt

    2005-01-01

    Trivalent cerium ions form the luminescence centers in several important families of scintillation materials including the rare earth oxyorthosilicates, pyrosilicates, and aluminates. When comparing the experimentally determined scintillation properties of cerium-doped scintillators to theoretical models of scintillation mechanisms, there is often speculation regarding the fraction of the total cerium that exists in the radiative trivalent charge state (Ce3+) rather than

  15. Secondary scintillation yield in pure argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro, C. M. B.; Lopes, J. A. M.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.; dos Santos, J. M. F.

    2008-10-01

    The secondary scintillation yield is of great importance for simulating double phase detectors, which are used in several of the ongoing Dark Matter search experiments, as well as in the future large-scale particle detectors proposed in Europe as the next generation underground observatories. The argon secondary scintillation yield is studied, at room temperature, as a function of electric field in the gas scintillation gap. A Large Area Avalanche Photodiode (LAAPD) collects the VUV secondary scintillation produced in the gas, as well as the 5.9 keV x-rays directly absorbed in the photodiode. The direct x-rays were used as a reference for the determination of the number of charge carriers produced by the scintillation pulse and, so, the number of photons impinging the LAAPD. A value of 81 photons/kV was obtained for the scintillation amplification parameter, defined as the number of photons produced per drifting electron and per kilovolt. The scintillation yields obtained in this work are in agreement with those obtained by Monte Carlo calculations and a factor of ?10 higher than those determined by the WARP experiment.

  16. Scintillating double-beta-decay bolometers

    SciTech Connect

    Pirro, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell'Universita di Milano-Bicocca and INFN (Italy)], E-mail: Stefano.Pirro@mib.infn.it; Beeman, J. W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (United States); Capelli, S.; Pavan, M.; Previtali, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell'Universita di Milano-Bicocca and INFN (Italy); Gorla, P. [Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (Italy)

    2006-12-15

    We present the results obtained in the development of scintillating double-beta-decay bolometers. Several Mo and Cd based crystals were tested with the bolometric technique. The scintillation light was measured through a second independent bolometer. A 140-g CdWO{sub 4} crystal was run in a 417-h live time measurement. Thanks to the scintillation light, the {alpha} background is easily discriminated, resulting in zero counts above the 2615-keV {gamma} line of {sup 208}Tl. These results, combined with an extreme easy light detector operation, represent the first tangible proof demonstrating the feasibility of this kind of technique.

  17. Cosmic-ray cascades photographed in scintillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrowes, S. C.; Huggett, R. W.; Levit, L. B.; Porter, L. G.

    1974-01-01

    Light produced by nuclear-electromagnetic cascades in a plastic scintillator can be photographed, and the resulting images on film used to measure both the energy content of the cascades and also the positions at which the cascades passed through the scintillator. The energy content of a cascade can be measured to 20% and its position determined to plus or minus 0.8 cm in each scintillator. Techniques for photographing the cascades and analyzing the film are described. Sample data are presented and discussed.

  18. Scintillation of rare earth doped fluoride nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobsohn, L. G.; McPherson, C. L.; Sprinkle, K. B.; Ballato, J. [Center for Optical Materials Science and Engineering Technologies (COMSET), and School of Materials Science and Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634 (United States); Yukihara, E. G. [Physics Department, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078-3072 (United States); DeVol, T. A. [Department of Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634-0905 (United States)

    2011-09-12

    The scintillation response of rare earth (RE) doped core/undoped (multi-)shell fluoride nanoparticles was investigated under x-ray and alpha particle irradiation. A significant enhancement of the scintillation response was observed with increasing shells due: (i) to the passivation of surface quenching defects together with the activation of the REs on the surface of the core nanoparticle after the growth of a shell, and (ii) to the increase of the volume of the nanoparticles. These results are expected to reflect a general aspect of the scintillation process in nanoparticles, and to impact radiation sensing technologies that make use of nanoparticles.

  19. Vision Screening

    MedlinePLUS

    ... office. Some community screenings use this method. Corneal light reflex testing This simple test can be performed ... focuses on a penlight, the position of the light reflection from the front surface (cornea) of the ...

  20. A Monte Carlo investigation of Swank noise for thick, segmented, crystalline scintillators for radiotherapy imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Antonuk, Larry E.; El-Mohri, Youcef; Zhao, Qihua

    2009-01-01

    Thick, segmented scintillating detectors, consisting of 2D matrices of scintillator crystals separated by optically opaque septal walls, hold considerable potential for significantly improving the performance of megavoltage (MV) active matrix, flat-panel imagers (AMFPIs). Initial simulation studies of the radiation transport properties of segmented detectors have indicated the possibility of significant improvement in DQE compared to conventional MV AMFPIs based on phosphor screen detectors. It is therefore interesting to investigate how the generation and transport of secondary optical photons affect the DQE performance of such segmented detectors. One effect that can degrade DQE performance is optical Swank noise (quantified by the optical Swank factor Iopt), which is induced by depth-dependent variations in optical gain. In this study, Monte Carlo simulations of radiation and optical transport have been used to examine Iopt and zero-frequency DQE for segmented CsI:Tl and BGO detectors at different thicknesses and element-to-element pitches. For these detectors, Iopt and DQE were studied as a function of various optical parameters, including absorption and scattering in the scintillator, absorption at the top reflector and septal walls, as well as scattering at the side surfaces of the scintillator crystals. The results indicate that Iopt and DQE are only weakly affected by absorption and scattering in the scintillator, as well as by absorption at the top reflector. However, in some cases, these metrics were found to be significantly degraded by absorption at the septal walls and scattering at the scintillator side surfaces. Moreover, such degradations are more significant for detectors with greater thickness or smaller element pitch. At 1.016 mm pitch and with optimized optical properties, 40 mm thick segmented CsI:Tl and BGO detectors are predicted to provide DQE values of ?29% and 42%, corresponding to improvement by factors of ?29 and 42, respectively, compared to that of conventional MV AMFPIs. PMID:19673222

  1. Investigation of the properties of new scintillator LYSO and recent LSO scintillators for phoswich PET detectors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Catherine Michelle Pepin; Anne-Laure Perrot; Philippe Bérard; Claude Pépin; Daniel Houde; Roger Lecomte; Charles L. Melcher; Henri Dautet

    2002-01-01

    The luminescence and nuclear spectroscopic properties of the new cerium-doped rare-earth scintillator lutetium-yttrium oxyorthosilicate (Lu0.6Y1.4SiO5:Ce, LYSO) were investigated and compared to those of both recent and older LSO crystals. UV-excited luminescent spectra outline important similarities between LYSO and LSO scintillators. The two distinct Ce1 and Ce2 luminescence mechanisms previously identified in LSO are also present in LYSO scintillators. The energy

  2. New observations of scintillation climatology from the Scintillation Network Decision Aid (SCINDA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Y.; Caton, R. G.; Wiens, K.; Groves, K. M.

    2012-12-01

    The Scintillation Network Decision Aid (SCINDA) was established with three ground sites in the mid-1990's by the Air Force Research Laboratory and has continued to grow into a global scintillation observation network. This system consists of an array of VHF and GPS receivers which continually measure scintillation in the equatorial region. In the past few years, the extended network of ground stations has expanded into the African sector. Initial results from yearly scintillation data obtained from two VHF receivers in Narobi, Kenya and Bahir Dar, Ethiopia in 2011 indicate the presence of scintillation activity throughout the June-July -August (northern summer) season which is inconsistent with current state-of-the-art ionospheric climatology models. It is well known that seasonal equatorial scintillation patterns vary with longitude based on geographical location. For example, the scintillation activity at VHF frequencies are absent in the Pacific sector during the months of November to February while observations from South America show nearly continuous scintillation during this same time period. With little to no ground-based observations, the scintillation climatology over the African region has not been well understood. In the paper, we will present S4 measurements various longitudinal sectors, including the first look at solar maximum type conditions over the African sector, and provide comparisons with output from a global climatology model.

  3. The Scintillating Optical Fiber Isotope Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binns, W. Robert

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the Scintillating Optical Fiber Isotope Experiment (SOFIE) which is being developed by Washington University and the University of New Hampshire to study the abundances of cosmic ray isotopes in the iron charge region. This detector system is a Cerenkov-Range-dE/dx experiment and utilizes range and trajectory detectors made of scintillating optical fibers, a fused silica Cerenkov counter, and plastic scintillator dE/dx counters to determine the charge and mass of cosmic ray nuclei. A brief description of the balloon flight instrument presently being developed will be given followed by initial results of an engineering model calibration at the LBL Bevalac heavy ion accelerator. In addition a brief discussion of the potential of scintillating fiber trajectory detectors for use in experiments requiring precise trajectory determination such as those being planned for the NASA Particle Astrophysics Magnet Facility (Astromag) program is presented.

  4. GEM scintillation readout with avalanche photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conceição, A. S.; Requicha Ferreira, L. F.; Fernandes, L. M. P.; Monteiro, C. M. B.; Coelho, L. C. C.; Azevedo, C. D. R.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.; Lopes, J. A. M.; dos Santos, J. M. F.

    2007-09-01

    The use of the scintillation produced in the charge avalanches in GEM holes as signal amplification and readout is investigated for xenon. A VUV-sensitive avalanche photodiode has been used as photosensor. Detector gains of about 4 × 104 are achieved in scintillation readout mode, for GEM voltages of 490 V and for a photosensor gain of 150. Those gains are more than one order of magnitude larger than what is obtained using charge readout. In addition, the energy resolutions achieved with the scintillation readout are lower than those achieved with charge readout. The GEM scintillation yield in xenon was measured as a function of GEM voltage, presenting values that are about a half of those achieved for the charge yield, and reach about 730 photons per primary electron at GEM voltages of 490 V.

  5. Scintillating fiber ribbon-tungsten calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bross, A.; Crisler, M.; Kross, B.; Wrbanek, J.

    1990-01-01

    We describe an ultra-high density scintillating fiber and tungsten calorimeter used as an active beam-dump for electrons. Data showing the calorimeter response to electrons with momenta between 50 and 350 GeV/ c are presented.

  6. Cerium fluoride, a new fast, heavy scintillator

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. W. Moses; S. E. Derenzo

    1989-01-01

    The authors describe the scintillation properties of Cerium Fluoride (CeFâ), a newly discovered, heavy (6.16 g\\/cm³), inorganic scintillator. Its fluorescence decay lifetime, measured with the delayed coincidence method, is described by a single exponential with a 27 +- 1 ns time constant. The emission spectrum peaks at a wavelength of 340 nm, and drops to less than 10% of its

  7. Current status on plastic scintillators modifications.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Guillaume H V; Hamel, Matthieu; Sguerra, Fabien

    2014-11-24

    Recent developments of plastic scintillators are reviewed, from 2000 to March 2014, distributed in two different chapters. First chapter deals with the chemical modifications of the polymer backbone, whereas modifications of the fluorescent probe are presented in the second chapter. All examples are provided with the scope of detection of various radiation particles. The main characteristics of these newly created scintillators and their detection properties are given. PMID:25335882

  8. Fast digitizing techniques applied to scintillation detectors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. Bertalot; B. Esposito; Y. Kaschuck; D. Marocco; M. Riva; A. Rizzo; D. Skopintsev

    2006-01-01

    A 200 MHz 12-bit fast transient recorder card has been used for the digitization of pulses from photomultipliers coupled to organic scintillation detectors. Two modes of operation have been developed at ENEA-Frascati: a) continuous acquisition up to a maximum duration of ˜ 1.3 s corresponding to the full on-board memory (256 MSamples) of the card: in this mode, all scintillation

  9. Ternary liquid scintillator for optical fiber applications

    DOEpatents

    Franks, Larry A. (Santa Barbara, CA); Lutz, Stephen S. (Santa Barbara, CA)

    1982-01-01

    A multicomponent liquid scintillator solution for use as a radiation-to-light converter in conjunction with a fiber optic transmission system. The scintillator includes a quantity of 5-amino-9-diethylaminobenz (a) phenoxazonium nitrate (Nile Blue Nitrate) as a solute in a fluor solvent such as benzyl alcohol. The use of PPD as an additional solute is also disclosed. The system is controllable by addition of a suitable quenching agent, such as phenol.

  10. Liquid scintillators for optical fiber applications

    DOEpatents

    Franks, Larry A. (Santa Barbara, CA); Lutz, Stephen S. (Santa Barbara, CA)

    1982-01-01

    A multicomponent liquid scintillator solution for use as a radiation-to-light converter in conjunction with a fiber optic transmission system. The scintillator includes a quantity of 1, 2, 4, 5, 3H, 6H, 1 OH, tetrahydro-8-trifluoromethyl (1) benzopyrano (9, 9a, 1-gh) quinolizin-10-one (Coumarin) as a solute in a fluor solvent such as benzyl alcohol or pseudo-cumene. The use of BIBUQ as an additional or primary solute is also disclosed.

  11. Validating the use of scintillation proxies to study ionospheric scintillation over the Ugandan region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amabayo, Emirant B.; Jurua, Edward; Cilliers, Pierre J.

    2015-06-01

    In this study, we compare the standard scintillation indices (S4 and ??) from a SCINDA receiver with scintillation proxies (S4p and | sDPR |) derived from two IGS GPS receivers. Amplitude (S4) and phase (??) scintillation data were obtained from the SCINDA installed at Makerere University (0.34°N, 32.57°E). The corresponding amplitude (S4p) and phase (| sDPR |) scintillation proxies were derived from data archived by IGS GPS receivers installed at Entebbe (0.04°N, 32.44°E) and Mbarara (0.60°S, 30.74°E). The results show that for most of the cases analysed in this study, ?? and | sDPR | are in agreement. Amplitude scintillation occurrence estimated using the S4p are fairly consistent with the standard S4, mainly between 17:00 UT and 21:00 UT, despite a few cases of over and under estimation of scintillation levels by S4p. Correlation coefficients between ?? and the | sDPR | proxy revealed positive correlation. Generally, S4p and S4 exhibits both moderate and strong positive correlation. TEC depletions associated with equatorial plasma bubbles are proposed as the cause of the observed scintillation over the region. These equatorial plasma bubbles were evident along the ray paths to satellites with PRN 2, 15, 27 and 11 as observed from MBAR and EBBE. In addition to equatorial plasma bubbles, atmospheric gravity waves with periods similar to those of large scale traveling ionospheric disturbances were also observed as one of the mechanisms for scintillation occurrence. The outcome of this study implies that GPS derived scintillation proxies can be used to quantify scintillation levels in the absence of standard scintillation data in the equatorial regions.

  12. Preparation of paper scintillator for detecting 3H contaminant.

    PubMed

    Miyoshi, Hirokazu; Ikeda, Toshiji

    2013-09-01

    Liquid scintillator (LS)-encapsulated silica was prepared by the sol-gel method and then was added dropwise onto a wipe paper to form a paper scintillator. First, the efficiencies of wipe were determined for both the paper scintillator and the wipe paper using a liquid scintillation counter (LSC). The efficiencies of wipe using the paper scintillator and the wipe paper were 88 and 36 %, respectively. The detection efficiencies were 5.5 % for the paper scintillator, 46 % for the wipe paper using an LS and 0.08 % for the (3)H/(14)C survey meter, respectively, compared with that of a melt-on scintillator of 47 %. Second, an (3)H contaminant on the paper scintillator was successfully detected using a photomultiplier without an LSC or an (3)H/(14)C survey meter. Finally, the paper scintillator was able to detect beta rays of the (3)H contaminant easily without an LS. PMID:23554426

  13. Simulation of optical configurations and signal processing methods in Anger-type neutron-position scintillation detector

    SciTech Connect

    Roche, C.T.; Strauss, M.G.; Brenner, R.

    1984-01-01

    The spatial linearity and resolution of Anger-type neutron-position scintillation detectors are studied using a semi-empirical model. Detector optics with either an air gap or optical grease between the scintillator and the dispersive light guide are considered. Three signal processing methods which truncate signals from PMT's distant from the scintillation are compared with the linear resistive weighting method. Air gap optics yields a 15% improvement in spatial resolution and 50% reduction in differential and integral nonlinearity relative to grease coupled optics, using linear processing. Using signal truncation instead of linear processing improves the resolution 15-20% for the air gap and 20-30% for the grease coupling case. Thus, the initial discrepancy in the resolution between the two optics nearly vanished, however the linearity of the grease coupled system is still significantly poorer.

  14. Scintillations in the imaging through turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charnotskii, Mikhail

    2014-10-01

    Fluctuations in the images of scenes viewed over large distances are the most obvious manifestation of the turbulence effects on the imaging of the incoherent objects. While the average or long-exposure imaging is arguably the most well studied topic of the optical propagation in turbulence, and substantial progress was also made in understanding the average short-exposure imaging, the image scintillations for complex extended scenes are not well understood. We discuss some available results of the image scintillation theory and report on some recent progress. We introduce the concept of the scintillation imaging, when unlike the conventional turbulence imaging techniques the variance of the series of images of the scene is calculated and used to gain information either about the object or about the turbulence on the propagation path. The third constraint in the turbulent PSF [1] plays a critical role in the scintillation imaging making scintillation images insensitive to the constant background and emphasizing the areas with higher local contrast. The bilinear structure of the Object-to-Variance (O2V) maps makes it impossible to use the analogues of the PSF or MTF for scintillation images and precludes development of the general theory of scintillation imaging. We discuss the fundamental properties of the O2V kernel and discuss four examples of scintillation images of simple objects. We present the measurement data where colored scintillation images of the edge were obtained. The variance distributions are normalized using the traditional long-exposure images to remove dependence on the object brightness. In this case scintillations are concentrated near the edge and carry information about the turbulence on the imaging path. The amplitude and width of these variance distributions are sensitive to the turbulence level and can be used as passive scintillometer without the need to deploy the laser source and receiver at both ends of the propagation path. Variance images of the object with sinusoidal brightness distribution consists of the uniform background and doublefrequency sinusoidal oscillations. It has the features consistent with turbulent super-resolution originally described in [2]. Namely, for unresolved object oscillating components disappears while the background persevere.

  15. 15-March 2007 1 A Scintillating Fibre TrackerA Scintillating Fibre Tracker

    E-print Network

    SFT 1SFT 1 SFT 2SFT 2 Weilin Yu, DPG Frühjahrstagung,Gießen #12;15-March 2007 11 Scintillating Fibre Tracker(SFT) Built by JLU Giessen 2 cylinders of 2 X 2 layers, 100 stereo angle 1 mm Kuraray fibres Scintillating Fibre Tracker(SFT) Momentum measured in full azimuthal angle and reconstructed by bending 1 Tesla

  16. Hearing Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson-Curiskis, Nanette

    2012-01-01

    Hearing levels are threatened by modern life--headsets for music, rock concerts, traffic noises, etc. It is crucial we know our hearing levels so that we can draw attention to potential problems. This exercise requires that students receive a hearing screening for their benefit as well as for making the connection of hearing to listening.

  17. SCREENING TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Field screening methods are used to determine whether a characteristic of interest is present or absent, above and below a predetermined threshold at a given site, or in a concentration within a predetermined range of interest. or the U.S. EPA and the regulated community much emp...

  18. Rapid variability of BL Lac 0925+504: interstellar scintillation induced?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jun; Liu, Xiang

    2015-06-01

    Analysis of rapid variability at 4.85 GHz for the BL Lac object 0925+504 is presented and discussed. The structure functions (SF) are investigated with both refractive and weak interstellar scintillation (RISS/WISS) models analytically. Parameters obtained with these models are quantitatively compared, suggesting that the emission region of IDV is remarkably compact and the responsible interstellar scintillation medium (ISM) lies very close to the observer. Furthermore possible evidence of annual modulation of the variability timescales is detected in this source. Our findings indicate that the observed rapid variability in 0925+504 is predominantly caused by a scattering screen located along the line of sight to the source, at a distance of ˜110 pc to the observer.

  19. Simulation tool for optical design of PET detector modules including scintillator material and sensor array

    SciTech Connect

    Jatekos, B.; Erdei, G.; Lorincz, E. [Budapest Univ. of Technology and Economics, Dept. of Atomic Physics, Budafoki ut 8, H-1111 Budapest (Hungary)

    2011-07-01

    The appearance of single photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) in the field of PET detector modules made it necessary to apply more complex optical design methods to refine the performance of such assemblies. We developed a combined simulation tool that is capable to model complex detector structures including scintillation material, light guide, light collection optics and sensor, correctly taking into account the statistical behavior of emission of scintillation light and its absorbance in SPADs. As a validation we compared simulation results obtained by our software and another optical design program. Calculations were performed for a simple PET detector arrangement used for testing purposes. According to the results, deviation of center of gravity coordinates between the two simulations is 0.0195 mm, the average ratio of total counts 1.0052. We investigated the error resulting from finite sampling in wavelength space and we found that 20 nm pitch is sufficient for the simulation in case of the given spectral dependencies. (authors)

  20. Clinical prototype of a plastic water-equivalent scintillating fiber dosimeter array for QA applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lacroix, Frederic; Archambault, Louis; Gingras, Luc; Guillot, Mathieu; Beddar, A. Sam; Beaulieu, Luc [Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d'Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec, G1K 7P4 (Canada) and Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec, Quebec G1R2J6 (Canada); Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d'Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada) and Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec, Quebec G1R2J6 (Canada); Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d'Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec, G1K 7P4 (Canada) and Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec, Quebec G1R2J6 (Canada)

    2008-08-15

    A clinical prototype of a scintillating fiber dosimeter array for quality assurance applications is presented. The array consists of a linear array of 29 plastic scintillation detectors embedded in a water-equivalent plastic sheet coupled to optical fibers used to guide optical photons to a charge coupled device (CCD) camera. The CCD is packaged in a light-tight, radiation-shielded housing designed for convenient transport. A custom designed connector is used to ensure reproducible mechanical positioning of the optical fibers relative to the CCD. Profile and depth dose characterization measurements are presented and show that the prototype provides excellent dose measurement reproducibility ({+-}0.8%) in-field and good accuracy ({+-}1.6% maximum deviation) relative to the dose measured with an IC10 ionization chamber.

  1. Dark matter search with CaF2 scintillator at Osaka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, I.; Hazama, R.; Mukaida, K.; Kishimoto, K.; Sakai, H.; Katsuki, A.; Itamura, T.; Umehara, S.; Yoshida, S.; Kishimoto, T.

    2008-07-01

    A CaF2 scintillator complex system (ELEGANT VI) is developed to search for the axial-vector coupled dark matter (WIMPs) and study the neutrino-less double beta decay of 48 Ca. Active light guides of pure CaF2 crystals which are on both sides of the central CaF2(Eu) crystal act as a 4? active shield, combined with surrounding CsI(T1) scintillators. The whole system is at the underground laboratory (Oto Cosmo Observatory) located in Nara. In this article our current status of the investigation are described, especially putting emphasis on the development of flash scaler to do a single photon counting.

  2. Detection of charged particles and X-rays by scintillator layers coupled to amorphous silicon photodiode arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, T.; Drewery, J.; Hong, W.S.; Lee, H.; Kaplan, S.N.; Perez-Mendez, V. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Goodman, C.A.; Wildermuth, D. [Air Techniques, Inc. Hicksville, NY (United States)

    1995-04-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) p-i-n diodes with transparent metallic contacts are shown to be suitable for detecting charged particles, electrons, and X-rays. When coupled to a suitable scintillator using CsI(Tl) as the scintillator we show a capability to detect minimum ionizing particles with S/N {approximately}20. We demonstrate such an arrangement by operating a p-i-n diode in photovoltaic mode (reverse bias). Moreover, we show that a p-i-n diode can also work as a photoconductor under forward bias and produces a gain yield of 3-8 higher light sensitivity for shaping times of 1 {mu}s. n-i-n devices have similar optical gain as the p-i-n photoconductor for short integrating times ( < 10{mu}s). However, n-i-n devices exhibit much higher gain for a long term integration (10ms) than the p-i-n ones. High sensitivity photosensors are very desirable for X-ray medical imaging because radiation exposure dose can be reduced significantly. The scintillator CsI layers we made have higher spatial resolution than the Kodak commercial scintillator screens due to their internal columnar structure which can collimate the scintillation light. Evaporated CsI layers are shown to be more resistant to radiation damage than the crystalline bulk CsI(Tl).

  3. Review on photonic crystal coatings for scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapitsch, Arno; Lecoq, Paul

    2014-11-01

    The amount of light and its time distribution are key factors determining the performance of scintillators when used as radiation detectors. However most inorganic scintillators are made of heavy materials and suffer from a high index of refraction which limits light extraction efficiency. This increases the path length of the photons in the material with the consequence of higher absorption and tails in the time distribution of the extracted light. Photonic crystals are a relatively new way of conquering this light extraction problem. Basically they are a way to produce a smooth and controllable index matching between the scintillator and the output medium through the nanostructuration of a thin layer of optically transparent high index material deposited at the coupling face of the scintillator. Our review paper discusses the theory behind this approach as well as the simulation details. Furthermore the different lithography steps of the production of an actual photonic crystal sample will be explained. Measurement results of LSO scintillator pixels covered with a nanolithography machined photonic crystal surface are presented together with practical tips for the further development and improvement of this technique.

  4. Monte Carlo investigations of the effect of beam divergence on thick, segmented crystalline scintillators for radiotherapy imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi; El-Mohri, Youcef; Antonuk, Larry E.; Zhao, Qihua

    2010-07-01

    The use of thick, segmented scintillators in electronic portal imagers offers the potential for significant improvement in x-ray detection efficiency compared to conventional phosphor screens. Such improvement substantially increases the detective quantum efficiency (DQE), leading to the possibility of achieving soft-tissue visualization at clinically practical (i.e. low) doses using megavoltage (MV) cone-beam computed tomography. While these DQE increases are greatest at zero spatial frequency, they are diminished at higher frequencies as a result of degradation of spatial resolution due to lateral spreading of secondary radiation within the scintillator—an effect that is more pronounced for thicker scintillators. The extent of this spreading is even more accentuated for radiation impinging the scintillator at oblique angles of incidence due to beam divergence. In this paper, Monte Carlo simulations of radiation transport, performed to investigate and quantify the effects of beam divergence on the imaging performance of MV imagers based on two promising scintillators (BGO and CsI:Tl), are reported. In these studies, 10-40 mm thick scintillators, incorporating low-density polymer, or high-density tungsten septal walls, were examined for incident angles corresponding to that encountered at locations up to ~15 cm from the central beam axis (for an imager located 130 cm from a radiotherapy x-ray source). The simulations demonstrate progressively more severe spatial resolution degradation (quantified in terms of the effect on the modulation transfer function) as a function of increasing angle of incidence (as well as of the scintillator thickness). Since the noise power behavior was found to be largely independent of the incident angle, the dependence of the DQE on the incident angle is therefore primarily determined by the spatial resolution. The observed DQE degradation suggests that 10 mm thick scintillators are not strongly affected by beam divergence for detector areas up to ~30 × 30 cm2. For thicker scintillators, the area that is relatively unaffected is significantly reduced, requiring a focused scintillator geometry in order to preserve spatial resolution, and thus DQE.

  5. Optimization of the design of thick, segmented scintillators for megavoltage cone-beam CT using a novel, hybrid modeling technique

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Langechuan; Antonuk, Larry E.; El-Mohri, Youcef; Zhao, Qihua; Jiang, Hao

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Active matrix flat-panel imagers (AMFPIs) incorporating thick, segmented scintillators have demonstrated order-of-magnitude improvements in detective quantum efficiency (DQE) at radiotherapy energies compared to systems based on conventional phosphor screens. Such improved DQE values facilitate megavoltage cone-beam CT (MV CBCT) imaging at clinically practical doses. However, the MV CBCT performance of such AMFPIs is highly dependent on the design parameters of the scintillators. In this paper, optimization of the design of segmented scintillators was explored using a hybrid modeling technique which encompasses both radiation and optical effects. Methods: Imaging performance in terms of the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and spatial resolution of various hypothetical scintillator designs was examined through a hybrid technique involving Monte Carlo simulation of radiation transport in combination with simulation of optical gain distributions and optical point spread functions. The optical simulations employed optical parameters extracted from a best fit to measurement results reported in a previous investigation of a 1.13 cm thick, 1016 ?m pitch prototype BGO segmented scintillator. All hypothetical designs employed BGO material with a thickness and element-to-element pitch ranging from 0.5 to 6 cm and from 0.508 to 1.524 mm, respectively. In the CNR study, for each design, full tomographic scans of a contrast phantom incorporating various soft-tissue inserts were simulated at a total dose of 4 cGy. Results: Theoretical values for contrast, noise, and CNR were found to be in close agreement with empirical results from the BGO prototype, strongly supporting the validity of the modeling technique. CNR and spatial resolution for the various scintillator designs demonstrate complex behavior as scintillator thickness and element pitch are varied—with a clear trade-off between these two imaging metrics up to a thickness of ?3 cm. Based on these results, an optimization map indicating the regions of design that provide a balance between these metrics was obtained. The map shows that, for a given set of optical parameters, scintillator thickness and pixel pitch can be judiciously chosen to maximize performance without resorting to thicker, more costly scintillators. Conclusions: Modeling radiation and optical effects in thick, segmented scintillators through use of a hybrid technique can provide a practical way to gain insight as to how to optimize the performance of such devices in radiotherapy imaging. Assisted by such modeling, the development of practical designs should greatly facilitate low-dose, soft tissue visualization employing MV CBCT imaging in external beam radiotherapy. PMID:24877827

  6. Career Guide to Industries

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    A companion to the Occupational Outlook Handbook 2000-2001 (See the April 14, 2000 Scout Report), the Career Guide to Industries "provides information on available careers by industry, including the nature of the industry, working conditions, employment, occupations in the industry, training and advancement, earnings and benefits, employment outlook, and lists of organizations that can provide additional information." While the Occupational Outlook Handbook focuses on specific careers, this guide considers industries in a broader scope, examining 47 industries. The industries are broken into seven sectors, each containing several overviews. Each career guide includes the same sections: Significant Points, Nature of the Industry, Working Conditions, Employment Occupations in the Industry, Training and Advancement, Earnings Outlook, and Sources of Additional Information. Users may search for a specific industry using the key word search feature on the top right of the screen.

  7. Isotopic response with small scintillator based gamma-ray spectrometers

    DOEpatents

    Madden, Norman W. (Sparks, NV); Goulding, Frederick S. (Lafayette, CA); Asztalos, Stephen J. (Oakland, CA)

    2012-01-24

    The intrinsic background of a gamma ray spectrometer is significantly reduced by surrounding the scintillator with a second scintillator. This second (external) scintillator surrounds the first scintillator and has an opening of approximately the same diameter as the smaller central scintillator in the forward direction. The second scintillator is selected to have a higher atomic number, and thus has a larger probability for a Compton scattering interaction than within the inner region. Scattering events that are essentially simultaneous in coincidence to the first and second scintillators, from an electronics perspective, are precluded electronically from the data stream. Thus, only gamma-rays that are wholly contained in the smaller central scintillator are used for analytic purposes.

  8. Newborn Screening

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    American Association for the Advancement of Science (; )

    2005-03-07

    There's been a lot of talk recently about national testing standards for students. But now, some doctors are calling for national testing standards for newborns. In some states, every newborn baby gets a blood test that can detect more than thirty serious diseases. But in other states, it's a very different story. According to geneticist Piero Rinaldo of the Mayo Clinic, just having a state senator with an affected child could make the difference. Now, he and dozens of other experts have developed uniform standards for newborn screening. And they're calling on the federal government to adopt them. This Science update details many of the obstacles by which individual states and the U.S. government face when challenged with newborn screening practices. Additional links for further inquiry are provided.

  9. Vision Screening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Visi Screen OSS-C, marketed by Vision Research Corporation, incorporates image processing technology originally developed by Marshall Space Flight Center. Its advantage in eye screening is speed. Because it requires no response from a subject, it can be used to detect eye problems in very young children. An electronic flash from a 35 millimeter camera sends light into a child's eyes, which is reflected back to the camera lens. The photorefractor then analyzes the retinal reflexes generated and produces an image of the child's eyes, which enables a trained observer to identify any defects. The device is used by pediatricians, day care centers and civic organizations that concentrate on children with special needs.

  10. Microfluidic Scintillation Detectors for High Energy Physics

    E-print Network

    Maoddi, Pietro; Mapelli, Alessandro

    This thesis deals with the development and study of microfluidic scintillation detectors, a technology of recent introduction for the detection of high energy particles. Most of the interest for such devices comes from the use of a liquid scintillator, which entails the possibility of changing the active material in the detector, leading to increased radiation resistance. A first part of the thesis focuses on the work performed in terms of design and modelling studies of novel prototype devices, hinting to new possibilities and applications. In this framework, the simulations performed to validate selected designs and the main technological choices made in view of their fabrication are addressed. The second part of this thesis deals with the microfabrication of several prototype devices. Two different materials were studied for the manufacturing of microfluidic scintillation detectors, namely the SU-8 photosensitive epoxy and monocrystalline silicon. For what concerns the former, an original fabrication appro...

  11. On the scintillation efficiency of carborane-loaded liquid scintillators for thermal neutron detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Zheng; Okoye, Nkemakonam C.; Urffer, Matthew J.; Green, Alexander D.; Childs, Kyle E.; Miller, Laurence F.

    2015-01-01

    The scintillation efficiency in response to thermal neutrons was studied by loading different concentrations of carborane (0-8.5 wt%) and naphthalene (0 and 100 g/L) in five liquid organic scintillators. The sample was characterized in Pb and Cd shields under the irradiation of the thermal neutrons from a 252Cf source. A method was developed to extract the net neutron response from the pulse-height spectra. It was found that the order of scintillation efficiencies for both ?-rays and thermal neutrons is as follows: diisopropylnaphthalene>toluene (concentrated solutes)>toluene~pseudocumene~m-xylene. The quench constants, obtained by fitting the Stern-Volmer model to the plots of light output versus carborane concentration, are in the range of 0.35-1.4 M-1 for all the scintillators. The Birks factors, estimated using the specific energy loss profiles of the incident particles, are in the range of 9.3-14 mg cm-2 MeV-1 for all the samples. The light outputs are in the range of 63-86 keV electron equivalents (keVee) in response to thermal neutrons. Loading naphthalene generally promotes the scintillation efficiency of the scintillator with a benzene derivative solvent. Among all the scintillators tested, the diisopropylnaphthalene-based scintillator shows the highest scintillation efficiency, lowest Birks factor, and smallest quench constants. These properties are primarily attributed to the double fused benzene-ring structure of the solvent, which is more efficient to populate to the excited singlet state under ionizing radiation and to transfer the excitation energy to the fluorescent solutes.

  12. Quadruple screen test

    MedlinePLUS

    ... screen; Multiple marker screening; AFP plus; Triple screen test; AFP maternal; MSAFP; 4-marker screen ... This test is most often done between the 15th and 22nd weeks of the pregnancy. It is most accurate ...

  13. Lung Cancer Screening

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Lung Cancer Research Lung Cancer Screening (PDQ®) What is screening? Screening is looking ... are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Lung Cancer Key Points Lung cancer is a disease in ...

  14. Skin Cancer Screening

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Cancer Skin Cancer Screening Skin Cancer Research Skin Cancer Screening (PDQ®) What is screening? Screening is looking ... are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Skin Cancer Key Points Skin cancer is a disease in ...

  15. A scintillating bolometer for experiments on double beta decay

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Alessandrello; V. Bashkirov; C. Brofferio; C. Bucci; D. V. Camin; O. Cremonesi; E. Fiorini; G. Gervasio; A. Giuliani; A. Nucciotti; M. Pavan; G. Pessina; E. Previtali; L. Zanotti

    1998-01-01

    The scintillation yields of CaF2 crystals with different doping concentration of Europium have been measured at low temperatures and their bolometric behavior has been investigated. After these studies we have constructed the first “scintillating bolometer” where the heat and scintillation pulses produced by charged particles are simultaneously recorded. With this method a strong suppression of the background from ?-particles in

  16. Prediction of tropospheric scintillation on satellite links from radiosonde data

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hugues Vasseur

    1999-01-01

    On the basis of radiosonde data, a new method is proposed for predicting tropospheric scintillation effects on slant paths. It stems from a rigorous statistical development and consists of two steps. First, statistical features of tropospheric turbulence responsible for scintillation are extracted from the analysis of a large amount of radiosonde ascents. Second, long-term scintillation statistics are inferred from these

  17. Statistics of time averaged atmospheric scintillation

    SciTech Connect

    Stroud, P.

    1994-02-01

    A formulation has been constructed to recover the statistics of the moving average of the scintillation Strehl from a discrete set of measurements. A program of airborne atmospheric propagation measurements was analyzed to find the correlation function of the relative intensity over displaced propagation paths. The variance in continuous moving averages of the relative intensity was then found in terms of the correlation functions. An empirical formulation of the variance of the continuous moving average of the scintillation Strehl has been constructed. The resulting characterization of the variance of the finite time averaged Strehl ratios is being used to assess the performance of an airborne laser system.

  18. A Monte Carlo study of an energy-weighted algorithm for radionuclide analysis with a plastic scintillation detector.

    PubMed

    Shin, Wook-Geun; Lee, Hyun-Cheol; Choi, Chang-Il; Park, Chang Soo; Kim, Hong-Suk; Min, Chul Hee

    2015-07-01

    Nuisance and false alarms due to naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) are major problems facing radiation portal monitors (RPMs) for the screening of illicit radioactive materials in airports and ports. Based on energy-weighted counts, we suggest an algorithm that distinguishes radioactive nuclides with a plastic scintillation detector that has poor energy resolution. Our simulation study, using a Monte Carlo method, demonstrated that man-made radionuclides can be separated from NORM by using a conventional RPM. PMID:25836977

  19. General considerations for SSC scintillator calorimeters (For the scintillator general subgroup)

    SciTech Connect

    Nodulman, L.

    1989-01-01

    The Scintillator Calorimetry group divided into three subgroups: a conventional uranium and plate design ala ZEUS, fiber design, and a group on general considerations. The considerations of the third group are reported here on geometrical and technical issues. 1 fig.

  20. Ionospheric scintillations associated with equatorial E-region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandra, H.; Vats, H. O.; Sethia, G.; Deshpande, M. R.; Rastogi, R. G.; Sastri, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    Amplitude scintillations at 40, 140, and 360 MHz recorded at an equatorial station Ootacamund (dip 4 deg N) during the ATS-6 phase II and the ionograms at a nearby station Kodaikanal (dip 3.5 deg N) are examined for the scintillation activity. Various sporadic E events, but not the Es-q, are associated with intense daytime scintillations. There are no scintillations at times of normal E-layer or cusp type of Es. Scintillations are also present at times of night Es.

  1. Liquid scintillator production for the NOvA experiment

    E-print Network

    S. Mufson; B. Baugh; C. Bower; T. E. Coan; J. Cooper; L. Corwin; J. A. Karty; P. Mason; M. D. Messier; A. Pla-Dalmau; M. Proudfoot

    2015-06-30

    The NOvA collaboration blended and delivered 8.8 kt (2.72M gal) of liquid scintillator as the active detector medium to its near and far detectors. The composition of this scintillator was specifically developed to satisfy NOvA's performance requirements. A rigorous set of quality control procedures was put in place to verify that the incoming components and the blended scintillator met these requirements. The scintillator was blended commercially in Hammond, IN. The scintillator was shipped to the NOvA detectors using dedicated stainless steel tanker trailers cleaned to food grade.

  2. Progress in studying scintillator proportionality: Phenomenological model

    SciTech Connect

    Bizarri, Gregory; Cherepy, Nerine; Choong, Woon-Seng; Hull, Giulia; Moses, William; Payne, Sephen; Singh, Jai; Valentine, John; Vasilev, Andrey; Williams, Richard

    2009-04-30

    We present a model to describe the origin of non-proportional dependence of scintillator light yield on the energy of an ionizing particle. The non-proportionality is discussed in terms of energy relaxation channels and their linear and non-linear dependences on the deposited energy. In this approach, the scintillation response is described as a function of the deposited energy deposition and the kinetic rates of each relaxation channel. This mathematical framework allows both a qualitative interpretation and a quantitative fitting representation of scintillation non-proportionality response as function of kinetic rates. This method was successfully applied to thallium doped sodium iodide measured with SLYNCI, a new facility using the Compton coincidence technique. Finally, attention is given to the physical meaning of the dominant relaxation channels, and to the potential causes responsible for the scintillation non-proportionality. We find that thallium doped sodium iodide behaves as if non-proportionality is due to competition between radiative recombinations and non-radiative Auger processes.

  3. Characterization of Large Liquid Scintillation Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Pozzi, S.A.

    2003-08-25

    This report presents the results of the characterization of 11 large liquid scintillators. The neutron energy threshold and maximum detection efficiency were determined as a function of voltage and constant fraction discriminator threshold. Fits to the response of each detector were found. The results can be used to select the experimental settings in the operation of the detectors to ensure consistent response and repeatability.

  4. An improved model of equatorial scintillation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. A. Secan; R. M. Bussey; E. J. Fremouw; Sa. Basu

    1995-01-01

    One of the main limitations of the modeling work that went into the equatorial section of the Wideband ionospheric scintillation model (WBMOD) was that the data set used in the modeling was limited to two stations near the dip equator (Ancon, Peru, and Kwajalein Island, in the North Pacific Ocean) at two fixed local times (nominally 1000 and 2200). Over

  5. Scintillation properties of LSO:Ce boules

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. L. Melcher; M. Schmand; M. Eriksson; L. Eriksson; M. Casey; R. Nutt; J. L. Lefaucheur; B. Chai

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the scintillation characteristics of 1880 LSO crystals that were cut from 76 crystal boules. We measured the light output and energy resolution of all 1880 crystals, and also measured the decay times of 1169 of the crystals. We observed trends in light output and energy resolution that were not previously evident from studies of small numbers of crystals,

  6. Center Information Scintillation Materials Research Center

    E-print Network

    Wang, Xiaorui "Ray"

    to be a critical need in medical imaging systems, homeland security inspection and monitoring systems, neutron investigation of scintillation mechanisms · Development of novel synthesis techniques · Synthesis films. Inorganic crystals typically have superior performance for the detection of high-energy gamma

  7. Scintillation Materials Research Center Annual Report

    E-print Network

    Tennessee, University of

    their experience with luminescence and thin film combinatorial techniques to build libraries of new scintillation applications, sol-gel synthesis, and a cooperation with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory for the refinement of a novel technique for measurement of activator site charge states via synchrotron measurements

  8. Applicability of GSO scintillators for well logging

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. L. Melcher; J. S. Schweitzer; R. S. Manente; C. A. Peterson

    1991-01-01

    Cerium-doped gadolinium oxyorthosilicate (GSO:Ce) was developed as a scintillating material for application in positron emission tomography. The fundamental properties of this material were studied, with particular attention given to properties relevant to nuclear well logging applications and their temperature dependence. Initial evaluations indicated that this material had a number of properties which seemed to make it a favorable candidate for

  9. Scintillator Development for the PROSPECT Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Minfang

    2014-03-01

    Doped scintillator is the target material of choice for antineutrino detection as it utilizes the time-delayed coincidence signature of the positron annihilation and neutron capture resulting from the Inverse Beta Decay (IBD) interaction. Additionally, the multiple gamma rays or heavy ions emitted after neutron capture on either Gd or 6Li respectively provide a distinct signal for the identification of antineutrino events and therefore significantly enhance accidental background reduction. The choice of scintillator and dopant depends on the detector requirements and scintillator performance criteria. Both Gd and 6Li doped scintillators have been used in past reactor antineutrino experiments such as Double Chooz, Daya Bay, RENO, and Bugey3 and are currently under investigation by the PROSPECT collaboration. Their properties in terms of light yield, optical transparency, chemical stability and background rejection efficiency using Pulse Shape Discrimination (PSD) will be reported. Research sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Physics and Office of High Energy Physics, under contract with Brookhaven National Laboratory-Brookhaven Science Associates.

  10. High resolution scintillation detector with semiconductor readout

    DOEpatents

    Levin, Craig S. (Santa Monica, CA); Hoffman, Edward J. (Los Angeles, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A novel high resolution scintillation detector array for use in radiation imaging such as high resolution Positron Emission Tomography (PET) which comprises one or more parallelepiped crystals with at least one long surface of each crystal being in intimate contact with a semiconductor photodetector such that photons generated within each crystal by gamma radiation passing therethrough is detected by the photodetector paired therewith.

  11. UKDMC Dark Matter Search with Inorganic Scintillators

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. A. Kudryavtsev; N. J. C. Spooner; P. K. Lightfoot; J. W. Roberts; M. J. Lehner; T. Gamble; T. B. Lawson; R. Lüscher; J. E. McMillan; M. Robinson; D. R. Tovey; N. J. T. Smith; P. F. Smith; G. J. Alner; S. P. Hart; J. D. Lewin; R. M. Preece; T. J. Sumner; W. G. Jones; J. J. Quenby; B. Ahmed; A. Bewick; D. Davidge; J. V. Dawson; A. S. Howard; I. Ivaniouchenkov; M. K. Joshi; V. Lebedenko; I. Liubarsky; J. C. Barton

    2001-01-01

    The status of dark matter searches with inorganic scintillator detectors at Boulby mine is reviewed. Results of a test experiment with CsI(Tl) crystal are presented. The objectives of this experiment were to study anomalous fast events and ways to remove this background. We found clear indications that these events were due to surface contami- nation of crystals by alphas, probably

  12. An experimental method to determine the effective luminescence efficiency of scintillator-photodetector combinations used in X-ray medical imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Cavouras, D; Kandarakis, I; Bakas, A; Triantis, D; Nomicos, C D; Panayiotakis, G S

    1998-07-01

    The scintillator effective luminescence efficiency, which may be defined in terms of the scintillator's X-ray luminescence efficiency and the scintillator-photodetector spectral matching and geometrical configuration, was studied for various X-ray imaging applications. Four scintillator materials Gd2O2S:Tb, Y2O2S:Tb, ZnSCdS:Ag and CsI:Na were used to prepare test screens. They were evaluated in relation to various photodetectors used in X-ray imaging, such as radiographic films, photocathodes, and photodiodes. Effective luminescence efficiency was determined for a range of X-ray tube voltages (50-140 kVp) by measuring the light flux emitted per unit of incident exposure rate and the spectra of the light emitted by the four scintillators. Scintillator-photodetector combinations resulting in higher image brightness level were determined for different X-ray imaging systems. Findings indicate that CsI:Na is very efficient with orthochromatic radiographic films, Gd2O2S:Tb could be useful in conventional or digital fluoroscopy and in CT and ZnSCdS:Ag could be employed in some medium to low voltage digital radiography applications. PMID:9771388

  13. Liquid scintillator production for the NOvA experiment

    E-print Network

    Mufson, S; Bower, C; Coan, T; Cooper, J; Corwin, L; Karty, J; Mason, P; Pla-Dalmau, A; Proudfoot, M

    2015-01-01

    The NOvA collaboration blended and delivered 8.8 kt (2.72M gal) of liquid scintillator to its detectors as its active detector medium. The composition of the scintillator was developed to meet the requirements of the experiment. The scintillator was shipped to the NOvA near and far detectors using dedicated stainless steel tanker trailers. A rigorous set of quality control procedures were put in place to assure that the liquid scintillator was blended to satisfy the transparency, light yield, and conductivity requirements. The incoming components, the blended scintillator, and the scintillator in the transport tanker trailers were all qualified with these procedures, which ensured that the NOvA scintillator was high quality and met its performance requirements.

  14. Neutron guide

    DOEpatents

    Greene, Geoffrey L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01

    A neutron guide in which lengths of cylindrical glass tubing have rectangular glass plates properly dimensioned to allow insertion into the cylindrical glass tubing so that a sealed geometrically precise polygonal cross-section is formed in the cylindrical glass tubing. The neutron guide provides easier alignment between adjacent sections than do the neutron guides of the prior art.

  15. Data-driven exploration of the ionization-phonon partitioning in scintillating radiation detector materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ferris, Kim F.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Jordan, David V.; Jones, Dumont M.

    2008-06-01

    An information-based approach to scintillating materials development has been applied to ranking the alkali halide and alkali earth halide series in terms of their energy conversion efficiency. The efficiency of scintillating radiation detection materials can be viewed as the product of a consecutive series of electronic processes (energy conversion, transfer, and luminescence) as outlined by Lempicki and others. Relevant data are relatively sparse, but sufficient for the development of forward mapping of materials properties through materials signatures. These mappings have been used to explore the limits of the K ratio in the Lempicki model with chemical composition, and examine its relationship with another common design objective, density. The alkali halides and alkali earth halide compounds separate themselves into distinct behavior classes favoring heavier cations and anions for improved K ratio. While the coupling of ionization is strongly related to the optical phonon modes, both dielectric and band gap contributions cannot be ignored. When applied within a candidate screen, the resulting model for K imposes design rules—simple structural restrictions—on scintillating radiation detector materials.

  16. Development of a fast radiation detector based on barium fluoride scintillation crystal.

    PubMed

    Han, Hetong; Zhang, Zichuan; Weng, Xiufeng; Liu, Junhong; Guan, Xingyin; Zhang, Kan; Li, Gang

    2013-07-01

    Barium fluoride (BaF2) is an inorganic scintillation material used for the detection of X?gamma radiation due to its relatively high density, equivalent atomic number, radiation hardness, and high luminescence. BaF2 has a potential capacity to be used in gamma ray timing experiments due to the prompt decay emission components. It is known that the light output from BaF2 has three decay components: two prompt of those at approximately 195 nm and 220 nm with a decay constant around 600-800 ps and a more intense, slow component at approximately 310 nm with a decay constant around 630 ns which hinders fast timing experiments. We report here the development of a fast radiation detector based on a BaF2 scintillation crystal employing a special optical filter device, a multiple reflection multi-path ultraviolet region short-wavelength pass light guides (MRMP-short pass filter) by using selective reflection technique, for which the intensity of the slow component is reduced to less than 1%. The methods used for this study provide a novel way to design radiation detector by utilizing scintillation crystal with several emission bands. PMID:23902059

  17. Development of a fast radiation detector based on barium fluoride scintillation crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Hetong [Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, NINT, Xi'an 710024, Shaanxi (China) [Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, NINT, Xi'an 710024, Shaanxi (China); School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi'an Jiaotong University, XJTU, Xi'an 710049, Shaanxi (China); Zhang, Zichuan; Weng, Xiufeng; Liu, Junhong; Zhang, Kan; Li, Gang [Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, NINT, Xi'an 710024, Shaanxi (China)] [Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, NINT, Xi'an 710024, Shaanxi (China); Guan, Xingyin [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi'an Jiaotong University, XJTU, Xi'an 710049, Shaanxi (China)] [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi'an Jiaotong University, XJTU, Xi'an 710049, Shaanxi (China)

    2013-07-15

    Barium fluoride (BaF{sub 2}) is an inorganic scintillation material used for the detection of X/gamma radiation due to its relatively high density, equivalent atomic number, radiation hardness, and high luminescence. BaF{sub 2} has a potential capacity to be used in gamma ray timing experiments due to the prompt decay emission components. It is known that the light output from BaF{sub 2} has three decay components: two prompt of those at approximately 195 nm and 220 nm with a decay constant around 600-800 ps and a more intense, slow component at approximately 310 nm with a decay constant around 630 ns which hinders fast timing experiments. We report here the development of a fast radiation detector based on a BaF{sub 2} scintillation crystal employing a special optical filter device, a multiple reflection multi-path ultraviolet region short-wavelength pass light guides (MRMP-short pass filter) by using selective reflection technique, for which the intensity of the slow component is reduced to less than 1%. The methods used for this study provide a novel way to design radiation detector by utilizing scintillation crystal with several emission bands.

  18. A slanting light-guide analog decoding high resolution detector for positron emission tomography camera

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, W.H.; Jing, M.; Bendriem, B.; Hartz, R.; Mullani, N.; Gould, K.L.; Michel, C.

    1987-02-01

    Current high resolution PET cameras require the scintillation crystals to be much narrower than the smallest available photomultipliers. In addition, the large number of photomultiplier channels constitutes the major component cost in the camera. Recent new designs use the Anger camera type of analog decoding method to obtain higher resolution and lower cost by using the relatively large photomultipliers. An alternative approach to improve the resolution and cost factors has been proposed, with a system of slanting light-guides between the scintillators and the photomultipliers. In the Anger camera schemes, the scintillation light is distributed to several neighboring photomultipliers which then determine the scintillation location. In the slanting light-guide design, the scintillation is metered and channeled to only two photomultipliers for the decision making. This paper presents the feasibility and performance achievable with the slanting light-guide detectors. With a crystal/photomultiplier ratio of 6/1, the intrinsic resolution was found to be 4.0 mm using the first non-optimized prototype light-guides on BGO crystals. The axial resolution will be about 5-6 mm.

  19. Rod guide

    SciTech Connect

    Sable, D.E.

    1988-11-29

    This patent describes a rod guide assembly for a sucker rod longitudinally reciprocably movable in a well flow conductor comprising: a pair of longitudinally spaced upper and lower stops rigidly secured to a sucker rod; and a guide body movably mounted on the rod between the stops. The stops being spaced from each other a distance slightly greater than the length of the guide body, the upper stop engaging the guide body to move the guide body downwardly with the rod after an initial short downward movement of the rod after initiation of each downward movement of the rod and the lower stop engaging the guide body to move the second guide body upwardly with the rod after initial short upward movement of the rod after initiation of each upward movement of the rod during the longitudinal reciprocatory movement of the rod in a well flow conductor.

  20. Medicare Preventive and Screening Services

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Hepatitis C screening test HIV screening Mammograms (screening) Nutrition therapy services Obesity screenings & counseling One-time “Welcome to Medicare” preventive visit Prostate cancer screenings Sexually transmitted infections screening & counseling Shots: Flu ...

  1. Risks of Breast Cancer Screening

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Screening (PDQ®) What is screening? Screening is looking ... cancer screening: Cancer Screening Overview General Information About Breast Cancer Key Points Breast cancer is a disease in ...

  2. Nonproportionality of Scintillator Detectors: Theory and Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, Stephen; Cherepy, Nerine; Hull, Giulia; Valentine, John; Moses, William; Choong, Woon-Seng

    2009-08-17

    On the basis of nonproportionality data obtained for several scintillators, we have developed a theory to describe the carrier dynamics to fit the light yield versus electron energy. The theory of Onsager was adapted to explain how the carriers form excitons or sequentially arrive at the activators to promote the ion to an excited state, and the theory of Birks was employed to allow for exciton-exciton annihilation. We then developed a second theory to deduce the degradation in resolution that results from nonproportionality by evoking Landau fluctuations, which are essentially variations in the deposited energy density that occur as the high energy electron travels along its trajectory. In general there is good agreement with the data, in terms of fitting the nonproportionality curves and reproducing the literature values of nonproportionality's contribution to the scintillator resolution. With the resurgence of interest in developing scintillator detectors that have good energy resolution, an improved understanding of nonproportionality has become a crucial matter since it presents the fundamental limit to the achievable resolution. In order to hasten an improved understanding of scintillator nonproportionality, we have constructed an instrument referred to as SLYNCI (Scintillator Light Yield Nonproportionality Compton Instrument). This is a second-generation instrument to the original device developed by Valentine and coworkers, wherein several new principles of operation have served to increase the data rate by an order of magnitude as discussed in detail in References. In the present article, the focus is on a theory to describe the measured electron response, which is the light yield as a function of the electron energy. To do this, we account for transport of carriers and excitons, in terms of how they transfer their energy to the activators with competition from nonradiative decay pathways. This work builds on the original work of Murray and coworkers, and on the understanding of excitons. We then provide a new theoretical framework from which the nonproportionality data is reduced to a measure of the degradation in resolution. We have utilized data obtained from SLYNCI to obtain accurate nonproportionality data on several scintillators, and have developed a theory to describe the carrier dynamics to fit the data for the light yield versus electron energy.

  3. Predicting the timing properties of phosphor-coated scintillators using Monte Carlo light transport simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roncali, Emilie; Schmall, Jeffrey P.; Viswanath, Varsha; Berg, Eric; Cherry, Simon R.

    2014-04-01

    Current developments in positron emission tomography focus on improving timing performance for scanners with time-of-flight (TOF) capability, and incorporating depth-of-interaction (DOI) information. Recent studies have shown that incorporating DOI correction in TOF detectors can improve timing resolution, and that DOI also becomes more important in long axial field-of-view scanners. We have previously reported the development of DOI-encoding detectors using phosphor-coated scintillation crystals; here we study the timing properties of those crystals to assess the feasibility of providing some level of DOI information without significantly degrading the timing performance. We used Monte Carlo simulations to provide a detailed understanding of light transport in phosphor-coated crystals which cannot be fully characterized experimentally. Our simulations used a custom reflectance model based on 3D crystal surface measurements. Lutetium oxyorthosilicate crystals were simulated with a phosphor coating in contact with the scintillator surfaces and an external diffuse reflector (teflon). Light output, energy resolution, and pulse shape showed excellent agreement with experimental data obtained on 3 × 3 × 10 mm3 crystals coupled to a photomultiplier tube. Scintillator intrinsic timing resolution was simulated with head-on and side-on configurations, confirming the trends observed experimentally. These results indicate that the model may be used to predict timing properties in phosphor-coated crystals and guide the coating for optimal DOI resolution/timing performance trade-off for a given crystal geometry. Simulation data suggested that a time stamp generated from early photoelectrons minimizes degradation of the timing resolution, thus making this method potentially more useful for TOF-DOI detectors than our initial experiments suggested. Finally, this approach could easily be extended to the study of timing properties in other scintillation crystals, with a range of treatments and materials attached to the surface.

  4. Predicting the timing properties of phosphor-coated scintillators using Monte Carlo light transport simulation.

    PubMed

    Roncali, Emilie; Schmall, Jeffrey P; Viswanath, Varsha; Berg, Eric; Cherry, Simon R

    2014-04-21

    Current developments in positron emission tomography focus on improving timing performance for scanners with time-of-flight (TOF) capability, and incorporating depth-of-interaction (DOI) information. Recent studies have shown that incorporating DOI correction in TOF detectors can improve timing resolution, and that DOI also becomes more important in long axial field-of-view scanners. We have previously reported the development of DOI-encoding detectors using phosphor-coated scintillation crystals; here we study the timing properties of those crystals to assess the feasibility of providing some level of DOI information without significantly degrading the timing performance. We used Monte Carlo simulations to provide a detailed understanding of light transport in phosphor-coated crystals which cannot be fully characterized experimentally. Our simulations used a custom reflectance model based on 3D crystal surface measurements. Lutetium oxyorthosilicate crystals were simulated with a phosphor coating in contact with the scintillator surfaces and an external diffuse reflector (teflon). Light output, energy resolution, and pulse shape showed excellent agreement with experimental data obtained on 3 × 3 × 10 mm³ crystals coupled to a photomultiplier tube. Scintillator intrinsic timing resolution was simulated with head-on and side-on configurations, confirming the trends observed experimentally. These results indicate that the model may be used to predict timing properties in phosphor-coated crystals and guide the coating for optimal DOI resolution/timing performance trade-off for a given crystal geometry. Simulation data suggested that a time stamp generated from early photoelectrons minimizes degradation of the timing resolution, thus making this method potentially more useful for TOF-DOI detectors than our initial experiments suggested. Finally, this approach could easily be extended to the study of timing properties in other scintillation crystals, with a range of treatments and materials attached to the surface. PMID:24694727

  5. Divalent Europium Doped and Un-doped Calcium Iodide Scintillators: Scintillator Characterization and Single Crystal Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Boatner, Lynn A [ORNL; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine [ORNL; Kolopus, James A [ORNL; Neal, John S [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    The alkaline-earth scintillator, CaI2:Eu2+, was initially discovered around 1964 by Hofstadter, Odell, and Schmidt. Serious practical problems quickly arose, however, that were associated with the growth of large monolithic single crystals of this material due to its lamellar, mica-like structure. As a result of its theoretically higher light yield, CaI2:Eu2+ has the potential to exceed the excellent scintillation performance of SrI2:Eu2+. In fact, theoretical predictions for the light yield of CaI2:Eu2+ scintillators suggested that an energy resolution approaching 2% at 662 keV could be achievable. As in the case of the early SrI2:Eu2+ scintillator, the performance of CaI2:Eu2+ scintillators has traditionally suffered due, at least in part, to outdated materials synthesis, component stoichiometry/purity, and single-crystal-growth techniques. Based on our recent work on SrI2:Eu2+ scintillators in single-crystal form, we have developed new techniques that are applied here to CaI2:Eu2+ and pure CaI2 with the goal of growing large un-cracked crystals and, potentially, realizing the theoretically predicted performance of the CaI2:Eu2+ form of this material. Calcium iodide does not adhere to modern glassy carbon Bridgman crucibles - so there should be no differential thermal-contraction-induced crystal/crucible stresses on cooling that would result in crystal cracking of the lamellar structure of CaI2. Here we apply glassy carbon crucible Bridgman growth, high-purity growth-charge compounds, our molten salt processing/filtration technique, and extended vacuum-melt-pumping methods to the growth of both CaI2:Eu2+ and un-doped CaI2. Large scintillating single crystals were obtained, and detailed characterization studies of the scintillation properties of CaI2:Eu2+ and pure CaI2 single crystals are presented that include studies of the effects of plastic deformation of the crystals on the scintillator performance.

  6. Simulating Ionosphere-Induced Scintillation for Testing GPS Receiver Phase Tracking Loops

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Todd E. Humphreys; Mark L. Psiaki; Joanna C. Hinks; Brady O'Hanlon

    2009-01-01

    A simple model is proposed for simulating equatorial transionospheric radio wave scintillation. The model can be used to test Global Positioning System phase tracking loops for scintillation robustness because it captures the scintillation properties that affect such loops. In the model, scintillation amplitude is assumed to follow a Rice distribution, and the spectrum of the rapidly-varying component of complex scintillation

  7. Screen time and children

    MedlinePLUS

    "Screen time" is a term used for activities done in front of a screen, such as watching TV, working on a computer, or playing video games. Screen time is sedentary activity, meaning you are being physically ...

  8. Health Screenings and Immunizations

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and Immunizations: What Are Health Screenings? In This Topic What Are Health Screenings? Recommended Screenings For Women ... for More Information National Institute on Aging Related Topics Talking with Your Doctor The information in this ...

  9. Mental Health Screening Center

    MedlinePLUS

    Mental Health Screening Center These online screening tools are not a substitute for consultation with a health professional. ... you have any concerns, see your doctor or mental health professional. Depression This screening form was developed from ...

  10. Interferometric phase scintillation in the IPM

    SciTech Connect

    Dennison, B.; Simon, R.S.; Ananthakrishnan, S.; Feidler, R.L.

    1988-11-01

    Using a global VLBI array operating at 327 MHz, we find strongly correlated scintillations in the fringe phase obtained on various baselines. The magnitude of the fringe phase scintillations is approximately proportional to the baseline length. Cross correlatin of the fringe phase on different baselines reveals maximum correlation at some small lag, with the value dependent upon baseline pair. We find that the lags of maximum correlation (for different baseline pairs) are fit very well by a model in which the phase fluctuation pattern is moving across the array with fixed velocity. Since the fit velocity is 410 km/sm almost radially outwards from the sun, we confirm that the interplanetary medium is responsible. The implied phase power spectrum is in good agreement with other observations.

  11. Plastic fiber scintillator response to fast neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danly, C. R.; Sjue, S.; Wilde, C. H.; Merrill, F. E.; Haight, R. C.

    2014-11-01

    The Neutron Imaging System at NIF uses an array of plastic scintillator fibers in conjunction with a time-gated imaging system to form an image of the neutron emission from the imploded capsule. By gating on neutrons that have scattered from the 14.1 MeV DT energy to lower energy ranges, an image of the dense, cold fuel around the hotspot is also obtained. An unmoderated spallation neutron beamline at the Weapons Neutron Research facility at Los Alamos was used in conjunction with a time-gated imaging system to measure the yield of a scintillating fiber array over several energy bands ranging from 1 to 15 MeV. The results and comparison to simulation are presented.

  12. Semiconductor High-Energy Radiation Scintillation Detector

    E-print Network

    Kastalsky, A; Spivak, B

    2006-01-01

    We propose a new scintillation-type detector in which high-energy radiation produces electron-hole pairs in a direct-gap semiconductor material that subsequently recombine producing infrared light to be registered by a photo-detector. The key issue is how to make the semiconductor essentially transparent to its own infrared light, so that photons generated deep inside the semiconductor could reach its surface without tangible attenuation. We discuss two ways to accomplish this, one based on doping the semiconductor with shallow impurities of one polarity type, preferably donors, the other by heterostructure bandgap engineering. The proposed semiconductor scintillator combines the best properties of currently existing radiation detectors and can be used for both simple radiation monitoring, like a Geiger counter, and for high-resolution spectrography of the high-energy radiation. The most important advantage of the proposed detector is its fast response time, about 1 ns, essentially limited only by the recombi...

  13. Reflectance of polytetrafluoroethylene for xenon scintillation light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, C.; Pinto da Cunha, J.; Pereira, A.; Chepel, V.; Lopes, M. I.; Solovov, V.; Neves, F.

    2010-03-01

    Gaseous and liquid xenon particle detectors are being used in a number of applications including dark matter search and neutrino-less double beta decay experiments. Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) is often used in these detectors both as electrical insulator and as a light reflector to improve the efficiency of detection of scintillation photons. However, xenon emits in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) wavelength region (? ?175 nm) where the reflecting properties of PTFE are not sufficiently known. In this work, we report on measurements of PTFE reflectance, including its angular distribution, for the xenon scintillation light. Various samples of PTFE, manufactured by different processes (extruded, expanded, skived, and pressed) have been studied. The data were interpreted with a physical model comprising both specular and diffuse reflections. The reflectance obtained for these samples ranges from about 47% to 66% for VUV light. Other fluoropolymers, namely, ethylene tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE), fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP), and perfluoro-alkoxyalkane (PFA) were also measured.

  14. Plastic fiber scintillator response to fast neutrons.

    PubMed

    Danly, C R; Sjue, S; Wilde, C H; Merrill, F E; Haight, R C

    2014-11-01

    The Neutron Imaging System at NIF uses an array of plastic scintillator fibers in conjunction with a time-gated imaging system to form an image of the neutron emission from the imploded capsule. By gating on neutrons that have scattered from the 14.1 MeV DT energy to lower energy ranges, an image of the dense, cold fuel around the hotspot is also obtained. An unmoderated spallation neutron beamline at the Weapons Neutron Research facility at Los Alamos was used in conjunction with a time-gated imaging system to measure the yield of a scintillating fiber array over several energy bands ranging from 1 to 15 MeV. The results and comparison to simulation are presented. PMID:25430353

  15. Reflectance of polytetrafluoroethylene for xenon scintillation light

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, C.; Pinto da Cunha, J.; Pereira, A.; Chepel, V.; Lopes, M. I.; Solovov, V.; Neves, F. [Department of Physics, LIP-Coimbra, University of Coimbra, P-3004 516 Coimbra (Portugal)

    2010-03-15

    Gaseous and liquid xenon particle detectors are being used in a number of applications including dark matter search and neutrino-less double beta decay experiments. Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) is often used in these detectors both as electrical insulator and as a light reflector to improve the efficiency of detection of scintillation photons. However, xenon emits in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) wavelength region ({lambda}{approx_equal}175 nm) where the reflecting properties of PTFE are not sufficiently known. In this work, we report on measurements of PTFE reflectance, including its angular distribution, for the xenon scintillation light. Various samples of PTFE, manufactured by different processes (extruded, expanded, skived, and pressed) have been studied. The data were interpreted with a physical model comprising both specular and diffuse reflections. The reflectance obtained for these samples ranges from about 47% to 66% for VUV light. Other fluoropolymers, namely, ethylene tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE), fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP), and perfluoro-alkoxyalkane (PFA) were also measured.

  16. Scintillation detectors of Alborz-I experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezeshkian, Yousef; Bahmanabadi, Mahmud; Abbasian Motlagh, Mehdi; Rezaie, Masume

    2015-02-01

    A new air shower experiment of the Alborz Observatory, Alborz-I, located at the Sharif University of Technology, Iran, will be constructed in near future. An area of about 30×40 m2 will be covered by 20 plastic scintillation detectors (each with an area of 50×50 cm2). A series of experiments have been performed to optimize the height of light enclosures of the detectors for this array and the results have been compared to an extended code simulation of these detectors. Operational parameters of the detector obtained by this code are cross checked by the Geant4 simulation. There is a good agreement between the extended-code and Geant4 simulations. We also present further discussions on the detector characteristics, which can be applicable for all scintillation detectors with a similar configuration.

  17. Characteristics of Yerevan High Transparency Scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Zorn, Carl; Asryan, Gegham; Egiyan, Kim; Tarverdyan, M.; Amaryan, Moscov; Amaryan, Moskov; Demirchyan, Raphael; Stepanyan, Stepan; Burkert, Volker; Sharabian, Youri

    1992-08-01

    Optical transmission, light output and time characteristics are given for long scintillator strips fabricated at the Yerevan Physics Institute using the extrusion method. It is shown that at 45% relative (to anthracene) light output, good transmission (2.5/2.9 m attenuation length with photomultiplier direct readout and 3/3.5 m attenuation length fiber readout) and time characteristics (average decay time 2.8 nsec) were obtained.

  18. A Portable Scintillation Alpha Survey Instrument

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. G. Spear

    1957-01-01

    A scintillation alpha counter utilizing a zinc sulfide fluor, a multiplier phototube, and a two-stage vacuum tube amplifier has been developed. A neon-bulb oscillator high-voltage supply is used to supply 900 volts to the multiplier phototube, and headphones are used to obtain an aural indication of counting. The average geometry or counting efficiency over the 7.43-inch2 probe area is approximately

  19. Boron-loaded silicone rubber scintillators

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Z. W. Bell; M. A. Miller; L. Maya; G. M. Brown

    2004-01-01

    Silicone rubber has received attention as an alternative to polyvinyltoluene in applications in which the scintillator is exposed to high doses of radiation because of the increased resistance of the rubber to the formation of blue-absorbing color centers. Work by Bowen, et al., and Harmon, et al., has demonstrated their properties under gamma\\/X-ray irradiation, and Bell, et al. have shown

  20. Boron-loaded silicone rubber scintillators

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Z. W. Bell; M. A. Miller; L. Maya; G. M. Brown; F. V. Sloop Jr

    2003-01-01

    Silicone rubber received attention as an alternative to polyvinyltoluene in applications in which the scintillator is exposed to high doses of radiation because of the increased resistance of the rubber to the formation of blue-absorbing color centers. Work by Bowen, et al, and Harmon, et al, demonstrated their properties under gamma\\/x-ray irradiation, and Bell, et al have shown their response

  1. Lutetium aluminate: spectroscopic and scintillation properties

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Lempicki; C. Brecher; D. Wisniewski; E. Zych; A. J. Wojtowicz

    1996-01-01

    The present status of the LuAlO3:Ce (LuAP) scintillator is reviewed and its performance compared to that of YAlO3:Ce (YAP). The light output of LuAP, at this stage of development, appears to be limited by two factors: insufficient Ce concentration and the presence of a parasitic absorption, Both LuAP and YAP show a dependence of light output on thickness, indicating that

  2. The homestake scintillation detectors: A status report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. L. Cherry; S. Corbato; T. Daily; D. Kieda; K. Lande; C. K. Lee

    1986-01-01

    Summary  We describe the 140 ton, 1200 m2sr Large-Area Scintillation Detector located underground at a depth of 4850 ft and the 0.8 km2 surface air shower array at the Homestake Mine. Half of the underground detector is currently operating. We discuss its performance\\u000a and describe the monopole sensitivity of the LASD and the ability of the surface-underground telescope to detect cosmic

  3. Properties of the YAG:Ce scintillator

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Moszynski; T. Ludziejewski; D. Wolski; W. Klamra; L. O. Norlin

    1994-01-01

    Light yield, light pulse shape due to gamma-rays and alpha-particles, energy resolution and time resolution of the new YAG:Ce scintillator were studied using a light readout by means of the XP2020Q photomultiplier and the S3590-03 photodiode. The light yield of 20 300 +\\/- 2000 photons\\/MeV was determined using three independent methods. The light pulse produced by gamma-rays consists of two

  4. Semiconductor high-energy radiation scintillation detector

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Kastalsky; S. Luryi; B. Spivak

    2006-01-01

    We propose a new scintillation-type detector in which high-energy radiation generates electron–hole pairs in a direct-gap semiconductor material that subsequently recombine producing infrared light to be registered by a photo-detector. The key issue is how to make the semiconductor essentially transparent to its own infrared light, so that photons generated deep inside the semiconductor could reach its surface without tangible

  5. Nanophosphor composite scintillators comprising a polymer matrix

    DOEpatents

    Muenchausen, Ross Edward (Los Alamos, NM); Mckigney, Edward Allen (Los Alamos, NM); Gilbertson, Robert David (Los Alamos, NM)

    2010-11-16

    An improved nanophosphor composite comprises surface modified nanophosphor particles in a solid matrix. The nanophosphor particle surface is modified with an organic ligand, or by covalently bonding a polymeric or polymeric precursor material. The surface modified nanophosphor particle is essentially charge neutral, thereby preventing agglomeration of the nanophosphor particles during formation of the composite material. The improved nanophosphor composite may be used in any conventional scintillator application, including in a radiation detector.

  6. The Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment - Instrument description

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. N. Johnson; R. L. Kinzer; J. D. Kurfess; M. S. Strickman; W. R. Purcell; D. A. Grabelsky; M. P. Ulmer; D. A. Hillis; G. V. Jung; R. A. Cameron

    1993-01-01

    The Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment on the Arthur Holly Compton Gamma Ray Observatory satellite uses four actively shielded NaI (Tl)-CsI(Na) phoswich detectors to provide gamma-ray line and continuum detection capability in the 0.05-10 MeV energy range. The instrument includes secondary capabilities for gamma-ray and neutron detection between 10 and 250 MeV. The detectors have 3.8 deg x 11.04 deg (FWHM)

  7. LIQUID SCINTILLATION COUNTING OF NICKEL63

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. E. Gleit; J. Dumot

    1961-01-01

    Liquid scintillation systems based on gels, ether, and toluene are ; investigated for counting nickel-63. A nickel complex of n-caproic acid ; dissolved in a solution of toluene containing 1,4-bis(2-(5-phenloxazolyl)-; benzene(POPOP) and 2,5-diphenyloxazole (PPO) is found to be prefterable with ; respect to reproducibility, ease of preparation, and interpretation. The ; addition of a small quantity of ethyl alcohol produces

  8. Cerium fluoride, a new fast, heavy scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, W.W.; Derenzo, S.E.

    1988-11-01

    We describe the scintillation properties of Cerium Fluoride (CeF/sub 3/), a newly discovered, heavy (6.16 g/cm/sup 3/), inorganic scintillator. Its fluorescence decay lifetime, measured with the delayed coincidence method, is described by a single exponential with a 27 /+-/ ns time constant. The emission spectrum peaks at a wavelength of 340 nm, and drops to less than 10% of its peak value at 315 nm and 460 nm. When a 1 cm optical quality cube of CeF/sub 3/ is excited with 511 keV photons, a photopeak with a 20% full width at half maximum is observed at approximately half the light output of a Bismuth Germanate (BGO) crystal with similar geometry. We also present measurements of the decay time and light output of CeF/sub 3/ doped with three rare-earth elements (Dy, Er, and Pr). The short fluorescence lifetime, high density, and reasonable light output of this new scintillator suggest that it would be useful for applications where high counting rates, good stopping power, and nanosecond timing are important, such as medical imaging and nuclear science. 5 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Liquid Scintillator Response at Low-Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passmore, Daniel

    2005-04-01

    The brightest source of neutrinos in our solar system is the sun. Neutrinos from the sun are especially hard to detect because they arrive to the Earth with energies less than 15MeV. KamLAND, a sensitive one-kiloton liquid scintillator detector allocated in a deep underground mine in central Japan, is preparing to detect solar neutrinos. To do this we must better understand the detectors response at the low energy region. Low energy particles have a different response because when traveling inside liquid scintillator at low energies they have a lower probability of emitting Cherenkov light. It is important to understand the amount of energy produced from these Cherenkov emissions and how this will affect neutrino energy reconstruction. This group has built a high precision Compton Spectrometer designed to study the response of the KamLAND liquid scintillator to the Cherenkov light. The spectrometer has high precision amplitude and time measurements by a data acquisition system based on the VME standard of electronics. The analysis of this data will be important for the future use of the KamLAND detector in detecting solar neutrinos.

  10. Boron-Loaded Silicone Rubber Scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Z.W.; Maya, L.; Brown, G.M.; Sloop, F.V.Jr

    2003-05-12

    Silicone rubber received attention as an alternative to polyvinyltoluene in applications in which the scintillator is exposed to high doses because of the increased resistance of the rubber to the formation of blue-absorbing color centers. Work by Bowen, et al., and Harmon, et al., demonstrated their properties under gamma/x-ray irradiation, and Bell, et al. have shown their response to thermal neutrons. This last work, however, provided an example of a silicone in which both the boron and the scintillator were contained in the rubber as solutes, a formulation which led to the precipitation of solids and sublimation of the boron component. In the present work we describe a scintillator in which the boron is chemically bonded to the siloxane and so avoids the problem of precipitation and loss of boron to sublimation. Material containing up to 18% boron, by weight, was prepared, mounted on photomultipliers, and exposed to both neutron and gamma fluxes. Pulse height spectra showing the neutron and photon response were obtained, and although the light output was found to be much poorer than from samples in which boron was dissolved, the higher boron concentrations enabled essentially 100% neutron absorption in only a few millimeters' thickness of rubber.

  11. Methods for the continuous production of plastic scintillator materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bross, A.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Mellott, K.

    1999-10-19

    Methods are disclosed for producing plastic scintillating material employing either two major steps (tumble-mix) or a single major step (inline-coloring or inline-doping). Using the two step method, the polymer pellets are mixed with silicone oil, and the mixture is then tumble mixed with the dopants necessary to yield the proper response from the scintillator material. The mixture is then placed in a compounder and compounded in an inert gas atmosphere. The resultant scintillator material is then extruded and pelletized or formed. When only a single step is employed, the polymer pellets and dopants are metered into an inline-coloring extruding system. The mixture is then processed under a inert gas atmosphere, usually argon or nitrogen, to form plastic scintillator material in the form of either scintillator pellets, for subsequent processing, or as material in the direct formation of the final scintillator shape or form.

  12. Luminescence and scintillation properties of CsI: A potential cryogenic scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailik, V. B.; Kapustyanyk, V.; Tsybulskyi, V.; Rudyk, V.; Kraus, H.

    2015-04-01

    Caesium iodide is one of the more extensively studied scintillators. Here we present X-ray luminescence spectra, scintillation light output and decay curves as function of temperature, from room temperature down to below 10 K. Features of the observed intrinsic luminescence are explained in terms of radiative recombination of on- and off-centre STE. A model permitting interpretation of the dynamics of luminescence changes in CsI with temperature is suggested. This model includes adiabatic potential energy surfaces (APES) associated with singlet and triplet states of self-trapped excitons (STE) and explains the variation of the luminescence spectra with temperature as a result of re-distribution in the population between on- and off-centre STE. The temperature dependence of the scintillation light yield is discussed in the framework of the Onsager mechanism.

  13. Cytomegalovirus in pregnancy: to screen or not to screen

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is now the commonest congenital form of infective neurological handicap, recognized by the Institute of Medicine as the leading priority for the developed world in congenital infection. In the absence of an effective vaccine, universal screening for CMV in pregnancy has been proposed, in order that primary infection could be diagnosed and- potentially- the burden of disability due to congenital CMV prevented. Discussion Universal screening for CMV to identify seronegative women at the beginning of pregnancy could potentially reduce the burden of congenital CMV in one of three ways. The risk of acquiring the infection during pregnancy has been shown to be reduced by institution of simple hygiene measures (primary prevention). Among women who seroconvert during pregnancy, CMV hyperimmune globulin (CMV HIG) shows promise in reducing the risk of perinatal transmission (secondary prevention), and CMV HIG and/ or antivirals may be effective in reducing the risk of clinical sequelae among those known to be infected (tertiary prevention). The reports from these studies have re-ignited interest in universal screening for CMV, but against the potential benefit of these exciting therapies needs to be weighed the challenges associated with the implementation of any universal screening in pregnancy. These include; the optimal test, and timing of screening, to maximize detection; an approach to the management of equivocal results, and the cost effectiveness of the proposed screening program. In this article, we provide an overview of current knowledge and ongoing trials in the prevention, diagnosis and management of congenital CMV. Recognising that CMV screening is already being offered to many patients on an ad hoc basis, we also provide a management algorithm to guide clinicians and assist in counseling patients. Summary We suggest that- on the basis of current data- the criteria necessary to recommend universal screening for CMV are not yet met, but this position is likely to change if trials currently underway confirm that CMV HIG and/ or antivirals are effective in reducing the burden of congenital CMV disease. PMID:23594714

  14. Properties of the high-density scintillator cerium fluoride

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. F. Anderson

    1989-01-01

    A new radiation-hard scintillator, CeFâ, has been found. It has a density of 6.16 g\\/cm³ and a radiation length of 1.7 cm. Two scintillation decay constants have been detected with time constants of approx. 2 ns and 31 ns peaking at 310 nm and 340 nm, respectively. The amount of scintillation light from our present samples is about 50% that

  15. Position-sensitive scintillation detectors of nuclear radiation (Review)

    SciTech Connect

    Akimov, Yu.K. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation)

    1995-05-01

    The techniques for detecting nuclear radiation using nontraditional light detectors, such as image converters, multichannel vacuum and solid-state photomultiplers, avalanche photodiodes, and photosensitive chambers with gas amplification are reviewed. Most of the paper is dedicated to tracking detectors with organic scintillating fibers. Devices with capillaries filled with a liquid scintillator are also considered. Position-sensitive detectors built around scintillating inorganic single crystals and glasses are described.

  16. Measurement of tritium with high efficiency by using liquid scintillation counter with plastic scintillator.

    PubMed

    Furuta, Etsuko; Ohyama, Ryu-ichiro; Yokota, Shigeaki; Nakajo, Toshiya; Yamada, Yuka; Kawano, Takao; Uda, Tatsuhiko; Watanabe, Yasuo

    2014-11-01

    The detection efficiencies of tritium samples by using liquid scintillation counter with hydrophilic plastic scintillator (PS) was approximately 48% when the sample of 20 ?L was held between 2 PS sheets treated by plasma. The activity and count rates showed a good relationship between 400 Bq to 410 KBq mL(-1). The calculated detection limit of 2 min measurement by the PS was 13 Bq mL(-1) when a confidence was 95%. The plasma method for PS produces no radioactive waste. PMID:24815096

  17. Properties of Quantum-Dot-Doped Liquid Scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coy, Christopher

    2014-03-01

    Novel scintillators based on semiconducting nanocrystals called quantum dots have unique optical and chemical properties that make them interesting for future neutrino experiments especially those searching for neutrino-less double beta decay. In this talk, we report the results of laboratory-scale measurements for three candidate quantum-dot-doped scintillators. We focus on the key properties required for large-scale neutrino experiments, which are the emission spectrum, the attenuation length and the stability. I would like to follow the talk by Andrey Elagin on directionality in scintillators and precede Athena Ierokomos' talk on light yield in scintillators.

  18. Plasmonic light yield enhancement of a liquid scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Bignell, Lindsey J.; Jackson, Timothy W. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, New South Wales 2234 (Australia)] [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, New South Wales 2234 (Australia); Mume, Eskender [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, New South Wales 2234 (Australia) [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, New South Wales 2234 (Australia); Center of Excellence in Anti-matter Matter Studies, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra (Australia); Lee, George P. [Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Melbourne (Australia)] [Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Melbourne (Australia)

    2013-05-27

    We demonstrate modifications to the light yield properties of an organic liquid scintillator due to the localization of the tertiary fluorophore component to the surface of Ag-core silica-shell nanoparticles. We attribute this enhancement to the near-field interaction of Ag nanoparticle plasmons with these fluor molecules. The scintillation light yield enhancement is shown to be equal to the fluorescence enhancement within measurement uncertainties. With a suitable choice of plasmon energy and scintillation fluor, this effect may be used to engineer scintillators with enhanced light yields for radiation detection applications.

  19. Plasmonic light yield enhancement of a liquid scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bignell, Lindsey J.; Mume, Eskender; Jackson, Timothy W.; Lee, George P.

    2013-05-01

    We demonstrate modifications to the light yield properties of an organic liquid scintillator due to the localization of the tertiary fluorophore component to the surface of Ag-core silica-shell nanoparticles. We attribute this enhancement to the near-field interaction of Ag nanoparticle plasmons with these fluor molecules. The scintillation light yield enhancement is shown to be equal to the fluorescence enhancement within measurement uncertainties. With a suitable choice of plasmon energy and scintillation fluor, this effect may be used to engineer scintillators with enhanced light yields for radiation detection applications.

  20. Energy Transfer Based Nanocomposite Scintillator for Radiation Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslam, Soha; Sahi, Sunil; Chen, Wei; Ma, Lun; Kenarangui, Rasool

    2014-09-01

    Scintillators are the materials that emit light upon irradiation with high energy radiation like X-ray or gamma-ray. Inorganic single crystal and organic (plastic and liquid) are the two most used scintillator types. Both of these scintillator kinds have advantages and disadvantages. Inorganic single crystals are expensive and difficult to grow in desire shape and size. Also, single crystal scintillator such as NaI and CsI are very hygroscopic. On the other hand, organic scintillators have low density which limits their applications in gamma spectroscopy. Due to high quantum yield and size dependent emission, nanoparticles have attracted interested in various field of research. Here, we have studies the nanoparticles for radiation detection. We have synthesized nanoparticles of Cerium fluoride (CeF3), Zinc Oxide (ZnO), Cadmium Telluride (CdTe), Copper complex and Zinc sulfide (ZnS). We have used Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) principle to enhance the luminescence properties of nanocomposite scintillator. Nanocomposites scintillators are structurally characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Optical properties are studied using Photoluminescence, UV-Visible and X-ray. Enhancements in the luminescence are observed under UV and X-ray excitation. Preliminary studies shows nanocomposite scintillators are promising for radiation detection. Scintillators are the materials that emit light upon irradiation with high energy radiation like X-ray or gamma-ray. Inorganic single crystal and organic (plastic and liquid) are the two most used scintillator types. Both of these scintillator kinds have advantages and disadvantages. Inorganic single crystals are expensive and difficult to grow in desire shape and size. Also, single crystal scintillator such as NaI and CsI are very hygroscopic. On the other hand, organic scintillators have low density which limits their applications in gamma spectroscopy. Due to high quantum yield and size dependent emission, nanoparticles have attracted interested in various field of research. Here, we have studies the nanoparticles for radiation detection. We have synthesized nanoparticles of Cerium fluoride (CeF3), Zinc Oxide (ZnO), Cadmium Telluride (CdTe), Copper complex and Zinc sulfide (ZnS). We have used Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) principle to enhance the luminescence properties of nanocomposite scintillator. Nanocomposites scintillators are structurally characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Optical properties are studied using Photoluminescence, UV-Visible and X-ray. Enhancements in the luminescence are observed under UV and X-ray excitation. Preliminary studies shows nanocomposite scintillators are promising for radiation detection. US Department of Homeland Security.

  1. Putting the Screen in Screening

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Sion Kim; Knight, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol is strongly linked to the leading causes of adolescent and adult mortality and health problems, making medical settings such as primary care and emergency departments important venues for addressing alcohol use. Extensive research evidence supports the effectiveness of alcohol screening and brief interventions (SBIs) in medical settings, but this valuable strategy remains underused, with medical staff citing lack of time and training as major implementation barriers. Technology-based tools may offer a way to improve efficiency and quality of SBI delivery in such settings. This review describes the latest research examining the feasibility and efficacy of computer- or other technology-based alcohol SBI tools in medical settings, as they relate to the following three patient populations: adults (18 years or older); pregnant women; and adolescents (17 years or younger). The small but growing evidence base generally shows strong feasibility and acceptability of technology-based SBI in medical settings. However, evidence for effectiveness in changing alcohol use is limited in this young field.

  2. GPS phase scintillation and proxy index at high latitudes during a moderate geomagnetic storm

    E-print Network

    Prikryl, P.

    The amplitude and phase scintillation indices are customarily obtained by specialised GPS Ionospheric Scintillation and TEC Monitors (GISTMs) from L1 signal recorded at the rate of 50 Hz. The scintillation indices S[subscript ...

  3. GOOGLE EARTH QUICK GUIDE (1)Google Earth Features

    E-print Network

    Smith-Konter, Bridget

    GOOGLE EARTH QUICK GUIDE (1)Google Earth Features The Google Earth of the Google Earth window. Often when opening up the Google Earth program, the view screen will be a view of the entire Earth from space. Navigation bar

  4. Plasma Screen Floating Mount

    DOEpatents

    Eakle, Robert F. (New Ellenton, SC); Pak, Donald J. (Martine, GA)

    2004-10-26

    A mounting system for a flat display screen, particularly a plasma display screen, suspends the screen separately in each of the x-, y- and z-directions. A series of frames located by linear bearings and isolated by springs and dampers allows separate controlled movement in each axis. The system enables the use of relatively larger display screens in vehicles in which plasma screen are subject to damage from vibration.

  5. Small-screen interface design: Where are we? Where do we go?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Don Zimmerman; Teresa Yohon

    2009-01-01

    Cell phones, handheld computers, iPods, and other small-screen technologies have become ubiquitous with more and more physical features added annually. Researchers have used diverse variables to explore usability on small-screen design for cell phones and PDAs, but few researchers have explored presenting Websites on small screens nor have theories been proposed to guide future research on small-screen interfaces. Our article,

  6. Optimization of the Performance of Segmented Scintillators for Radiotherapy Imaging through Novel Binning Techniques

    PubMed Central

    El-Mohri, Youcef; Antonuk, Larry E.; Choroszucha, Richard B.; Zhao, Qihua; Jiang, Hao; Liu, Langechuan

    2014-01-01

    Thick, segmented crystalline scintillators have shown increasing promise as replacement x-ray converters for the phosphor screens currently used in active matrix flat-panel imagers (AMFPIs) in radiotherapy, by virtue of providing over an order of magnitude improvement in the DQE. However, element-to-element misalignment in current segmented scintillator prototypes creates a challenge for optimal registration with underlying AMFPI arrays, resulting in degradation of spatial resolution. To overcome this challenge, a methodology involving the use of a relatively high resolution AMFPI array in combination with novel binning techniques is presented. The array, which has a pixel pitch of 0.127 mm, was coupled to prototype segmented scintillators based on BGO, LYSO and CsI:Tl materials, each having a nominal element-to-element pitch of 1.016 mm and thickness of ~1 cm. The AMFPI systems incorporating these prototypes were characterized at a radiotherapy energy of 6 MV in terms of MTF, NPS, DQE, and reconstructed images of a resolution phantom acquired using a cone-beam CT geometry. For each prototype, the application of 8×8 pixel binning to achieve a sampling pitch of 1.016 mm was optimized through use of an alignment metric which minimized misregistration and thereby improved spatial resolution. In addition, the application of alternative binning techniques that exclude the collection of signal near septal walls resulted in further significant improvement in spatial resolution for the BGO and LYSO prototypes, though not for the CsI:Tl prototype due to the large amount of optical cross-talk resulting from significant light spread between scintillator elements in that device. The efficacy of these techniques for improving spatial resolution appears to be enhanced for scintillator materials that exhibit mechanical hardness, high density and high refractive index, such as BGO. Moreover, materials that exhibit these properties as well as offer significantly higher light output than BGO, such as CdWO4, should provide the additional benefit of preserving DQE performance. PMID:24487347

  7. Optimization of the performance of segmented scintillators for radiotherapy imaging through novel binning techniques.

    PubMed

    El-Mohri, Youcef; Antonuk, Larry E; Choroszucha, Richard B; Zhao, Qihua; Jiang, Hao; Liu, Langechuan

    2014-02-21

    Thick, segmented crystalline scintillators have shown increasing promise as replacement x-ray converters for the phosphor screens currently used in active matrix flat-panel imagers (AMFPIs) in radiotherapy, by virtue of providing over an order of magnitude improvement in the detective quantum efficiency (DQE). However, element-to-element misalignment in current segmented scintillator prototypes creates a challenge for optimal registration with underlying AMFPI arrays, resulting in degradation of spatial resolution. To overcome this challenge, a methodology involving the use of a relatively high resolution AMFPI array in combination with novel binning techniques is presented. The array, which has a pixel pitch of 0.127 mm, was coupled to prototype segmented scintillators based on BGO, LYSO and CsI:Tl materials, each having a nominal element-to-element pitch of 1.016 mm and thickness of ? 1 cm. The AMFPI systems incorporating these prototypes were characterized at a radiotherapy energy of 6 MV in terms of modulation transfer function, noise power spectrum, DQE, and reconstructed images of a resolution phantom acquired using a cone-beam CT geometry. For each prototype, the application of 8 × 8 pixel binning to achieve a sampling pitch of 1.016 mm was optimized through use of an alignment metric which minimized misregistration and thereby improved spatial resolution. In addition, the application of alternative binning techniques that exclude the collection of signal near septal walls resulted in further significant improvement in spatial resolution for the BGO and LYSO prototypes, though not for the CsI:Tl prototype due to the large amount of optical cross-talk resulting from significant light spread between scintillator elements in that device. The efficacy of these techniques for improving spatial resolution appears to be enhanced for scintillator materials that exhibit mechanical hardness, high density and high refractive index, such as BGO. Moreover, materials that exhibit these properties as well as offer significantly higher light output than BGO, such as CdWO4, should provide the additional benefit of preserving DQE performance. PMID:24487347

  8. Scintillating bolometers for Double Beta Decay search

    E-print Network

    Luca Gironi

    2009-11-05

    In the field of Double Beta Decay (DBD) searches, the use of high resolution detectors in which background can be actively discriminated is very appealing. Scintillating bolometers containing a Double Beta Decay emitter can largely fulfill this very interesting possibility. In this paper we present the latest results obtained with CdWO4 and CaMoO4 crystals. Moreover we report, for the first time, a very interesting feature of CaMoO4 bolometers: the possibility to discriminate beta-gamma events from those induced by alpha particles thanks to different thermal pulse shape.

  9. Scintillating ribbon x-ray detector

    SciTech Connect

    Kinchen, B.E. [BK Science and Engineering, Fremont, CA (United States); Rogers, A. [Synergistic Detector Designs, Sunnyvale, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    A patent in the early 1970`s by Aerojet Corporation in Sacramento, CA put forth the idea of using an array of scintillating fibers for x-ray detection and imaging. In about 1975, Pratt and Whitney Aircraft in East Hartford, CT designed and manufactured an imaging system based on the patent. The device was 1.75 in thick in the direction of the x-ray beam and about 4 in. by 4 in. square. The device was used with a 8 MeV x-ray source to image and measure internal clearances within operating aircraft, gas turbines engines. There are significant advantages of fiber optic detectors in x-ray detection. However, the advantages are often outweighed by the disadvantages. Two of the advantages of scintillating fiber optic x-ray detectors are: (1) high limiting spatial frequency -- between 20 and 25 lp/mm; and (2) excellent x-ray stopping power -- they can be made thick and retain spatial resolution. In traditional fiber optic detectors the x-rays are oriented parallel to the long axis of the fiber. For the scintillating ribbon x-ray sensor, the x-rays are oriented normal to the fiber long axis. This ribbon sensor technique has a number of advantages over the two current radiographic techniques digital x-radiography and x-ray film: The main advantage the ribbon has is size and shape. It can be as thin as 0.05 in., virtually any width or length, and flexible. Once positioned in a given location, 20 to 100 square inches of the object being inspected can be imaged with a single x-ray beam sweep. It is clear that conventional digital cameras do not lend themselves to placement between walls of aircraft structures or similar items requiring x-ray inspections. A prototype scintillating ribbon x-ray sensor has been fabricated and tested by Synergistic Detector Designs. Images were acquired on corrosion test panels of aluminum fabricated by Iowa State University.

  10. Measurement of scintillation and ionization yield and scintillation pulse shape from nuclear recoils in liquid argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, H.; Alexander, T.; Aprahamian, A.; Avetisyan, R.; Back, H. O.; Cocco, A. G.; Dejongh, F.; Fiorillo, G.; Galbiati, C.; Grandi, L.; Guardincerri, Y.; Kendziora, C.; Lippincott, W. H.; Love, C.; Lyons, S.; Manenti, L.; Martoff, C. J.; Meng, Y.; Montanari, D.; Mosteiro, P.; Olvitt, D.; Pordes, S.; Qian, H.; Rossi, B.; Saldanha, R.; Sangiorgio, S.; Siegl, K.; Strauss, S. Y.; Tan, W.; Tatarowicz, J.; Walker, S.; Wang, H.; Watson, A. W.; Westerdale, S.; Yoo, J.; Scene Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    We have measured the scintillation and ionization yield of recoiling nuclei in liquid argon as a function of applied electric field by exposing a dual-phase liquid argon time projection chamber (LAr-TPC) to a low energy pulsed narrow band neutron beam produced at the Notre Dame Institute for Structure and Nuclear Astrophysics. Liquid scintillation counters were arranged to detect and identify neutrons scattered in the TPC and to select the energy of the recoiling nuclei. We report measurements of the scintillation yields for nuclear recoils with energies from 10.3 to 57.3 keV and for median applied electric fields from 0 to 970 V /cm . For the ionization yields, we report measurements from 16.9 to 57.3 keV and for electric fields from 96.4 to 486 V /cm . We also report the observation of an anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from nuclear recoils, which is similar to the anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from electron recoils. Assuming that the energy loss partitions into excitons and ion pairs from Krm83 internal conversion electrons is comparable to that from 207Bi conversion electrons, we obtained the numbers of excitons (Nex) and ion pairs (Ni) and their ratio (Nex/Ni ) produced by nuclear recoils from 16.9 to 57.3 keV. Motivated by arguments suggesting direction sensitivity in LAr-TPC signals due to columnar recombination, a comparison of the light and charge yield of recoils parallel and perpendicular to the applied electric field is presented for the first time.

  11. Measurement of Scintillation and Ionization Yield and Scintillation Pulse Shape from Nuclear Recoils in Liquid Argon

    E-print Network

    H. Cao; T. Alexander; A. Aprahamian; R. Avetisyan; H. O. Back; A. G. Cocco; F. DeJongh; G. Fiorillo; C. Galbiati; L. Grandi; Y. Guardincerri; C. Kendziora; W. H. Lippincott; C. Love; S. Lyons; L. Manenti; C. J. Martoff; Y. Meng; D. Montanari; P. Mosteiro; D. Olvitt; S. Pordes; H. Qian; B. Rossi; R. Saldanha; S. Sangiorgio; K. Siegl; S. Y. Strauss; W. Tan; J. Tatarowicz; S. Walker; H. Wang; A. W. Watson; S. Westerdale; J. Yoo

    2015-05-27

    We have measured the scintillation and ionization yield of recoiling nuclei in liquid argon as a function of applied electric field by exposing a dual-phase liquid argon time projection chamber (LAr-TPC) to a low energy pulsed narrow band neutron beam produced at the Notre Dame Institute for Structure and Nuclear Astrophysics. Liquid scintillation counters were arranged to detect and identify neutrons scattered in the TPC and to select the energy of the recoiling nuclei. We report measurements of the scintillation yields for nuclear recoils with energies from 10.3 to 57.3 keV and for median applied electric fields from 0 to 970 V/cm. For the ionization yields, we report measurements from 16.9 to 57.3 keV and for electric fields from 96.4 to 486 V/cm. We also report the observation of an anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from nuclear recoils, which is similar to the anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from electron recoils. Assuming that the energy loss partitions into excitons and ion pairs from $^{83m}$Kr internal conversion electrons is comparable to that from $^{207}$Bi conversion electrons, we obtained the numbers of excitons ($N_{ex}$) and ion pairs ($N_i$) and their ratio ($N_{ex}/N_i$) produced by nuclear recoils from 16.9 to 57.3 keV. Motivated by arguments suggesting direction sensitivity in LAr-TPC signals due to columnar recombination, a comparison of the light and charge yield of recoils parallel and perpendicular to the applied electric field is presented for the first time.

  12. Study of electron content depletions associated with amplitude scintillations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. V. S. Rama Rao; B. V. Ramana Rao; D. S. V. V. D. Prasad

    1988-01-01

    Faraday rotation data on scintillations obtained using VHF radio beacon signals at 136 MHz from the ERS-II and Sirio satellites for 1980 and 1983-1984 are used to study TEC depletions associated with scintillations. Consideration is given to the diurnal, seasonal, and solar cycle variations in the parameters of these TEC depletions. Variations in the occurrence, durations, and amplitudes of depeletions

  13. Low-power Charge Sensitive Amplifier for Semiconductor Scintillator

    E-print Network

    Stanacevic, Milutin

    was implemented in 0.5µm CMOS process with a 5 V power supply. I. INTRODUCTION There is a great needLow-power Charge Sensitive Amplifier for Semiconductor Scintillator Xiao Yun, Milutin Stana) for measurement of optical response of photo-detector reg- istering light produced by semiconductor scintillator

  14. NEST: A Comprehensive Model for Scintillation Yield in Liquid Xenon

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Szydagis; N. Barry; K. Kazkaz; J. Mock; D. Stolp; M. Sweany; M. Tripathi; S. Uvarov; N. Walsh; M. Woods

    2011-01-01

    A comprehensive model for explaining scintillation yield in liquid xenon is introduced. We unify various definitions of work function which abound in the literature and incorporate all available data on electron recoil scintillation yield. This results in a better understanding of electron recoil, and facilitates an improved description of nuclear recoil. An incident gamma energy range of O(1 keV) to

  15. Statistical characteristics of low-latitude ionospheric scintillation over China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kangkang; Li, Guozhu; Ning, Baiqi; Hu, Lianhuan; Li, Hongke

    2015-03-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) L-band ionospheric scintillation produced by electron density irregularities in the ionospheric E- and F-regions, is mainly a low- and high-latitude phenomenon. In this study, the statistical behavior of GPS ionospheric scintillation over a Chinese low-latitude station Sanya (18.3°N, 109.6°E; dip lat: 12.8°N) has been investigated. A detailed study on the seasonal and solar activity dependence of scintillation occurrence during July 2004-December 2012 show that the amplitude scintillation pattern, with a maximum occurrence during equinox of solar maximum, agrees with plasma bubble observations by in situ satellites in this longitude. A few daytime periodic scintillation events are found during June solstice months of solar minimum. Interestingly, a significant equinoctial asymmetry of scintillation onset time is found in 2011-2012. The initiation of scintillation during September-October is on average earlier than that of March-April about 25 min. Meanwhile, the zonal drifts of irregularities estimated using two spatially separated GPS receivers over Sanya show a similar behavior during the two equinoxes, slowly decreasing from 150 m/s at post-sunset to 50 m/s near midnight. The possible mechanisms responsible for the occurrence characteristics of GPS scintillation over Sanya, and relevant aspects of the zonal drifts of the irregularities are discussed.

  16. GPS receiver performance characterization under realistic ionospheric phase scintillation environments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas N. Morrissey; Karl W. Shallberg; A. J. Van Dierendonck; Matthew J. Nicholson

    2004-01-01

    It is well known that ionospheric scintillation has the potential to affect all types of GPS receivers, even dual-frequency military precise-positioning service versions. In a previous effort the degree of degradation to Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS) operation caused by scintillation, on the basis of simulated data input to an actual WAAS reference receiver under carefully controlled laboratory conditions at

  17. Scintillator hodoscope system for a high intensity beam

    SciTech Connect

    De Palma, M.; Macchia, G.; Maggi, G.; Nappi, E.; Ranieri, A.; Sacchetti, A.; Selvaggi, G.; Spinelli, P.

    1985-07-01

    In this paper the authors describe the construction and the operation of a scintillator hodoscope used in an intense beam. By using a fast scintillator (Pilot U), an XP1910 photomultiplier, and an appropriate electronic chain, a two-pulse separation of 6 ns per channel and a time resolution (sigma) of 210 ps were obtained.

  18. Purification of KamLAND-Zen liquid scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Haruo [Research Center for Neutrino Science, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan)] [Research Center for Neutrino Science, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan)

    2013-08-08

    KamLAND-Zen is neutrino-less double-beta decay search experiment using enriched 300 kg of {sup 136}Xe dissolved in pure liquid scintillator. This report is purification work of liquid scintillator for KamLAND-Zen experiment before installation in the inner-balloon and background rejection processes after installation.

  19. Mechanical deformation effect on CsI(Tl) scintillators efficiency

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. Gayshan; A. Boyarintsev; A. Gektin; D. Zosim

    2003-01-01

    Due to the technological limitations in scintillation crystal growth and machining afterwards, crystals always contain certain internal defects and nonuniform distribution of intrinsic stresses. This work is directed to study the effect of CsI(Tl) mechanical deformation on their scintillation efficiency. It is shown that light output changes depend on the type of deformation (shock, steady deformation) and crystallographic orientation of

  20. Low-Power Amplifier for Readout Interface of Semiconductor Scintillator

    E-print Network

    Stanacevic, Milutin

    by scintillating semiconductor wafer in event of ionizing radiation event. Presented optimization procedure of the amplifier implemented in 0.5 µm CMOS technology, verify gain of 71 mV/fC, with the linearity measured at 1- /pF. Index Terms--Radiation detection, scintillator, readout IC, charged sensitive amplifier, pulse

  1. A scintillating fission detector for neutron flux measurements

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sy Stange; Ernst I Esch; Eric A Burgett; Iain May; Ross E Muenchausen; Felicia Taw; Fredrik K Tovesson

    2010-01-01

    Neutron flux monitors are commonly used for a variety of nuclear physics applications. A scintillating neutron detector, consisting of a liquid scintillator loaded with fissionable material, has been developed, characterized, and tested in the beam line at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, and shows a significant improvement in neutron sensitivity compared with a conventional fission chamber. Recent research on

  2. Restoration of continuous turbulence profile from lunar scintillation A. Tokovinin

    E-print Network

    Tokovinin, Andrei A.

    Restoration of continuous turbulence profile from lunar scintillation A. Tokovinin Version 1.1. June 11, 2008 [prj/atm/moon/doc/restor3.tex] 1 Introduction Optical turbulence near the ground can be measured by a suitable analysis of lunar or solar scintillation. However, the problem of restoring

  3. Interface for routine spectral display from several liquid scintillation counters

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. E. Gordon; W. Erwin; R. M. Lemmon

    1976-01-01

    An interfacing circuit for coupling several Tri-Carb liquid scintillation counters to a multichannel analyzer is described. The display of the analyzer is completely controlled from the liquid scintillation counters and information from any of the three channels in each counter can be displayed. The system is being used for both instructional and diagnostic purposes. For the former it will be

  4. TOF-PET detector concept based on organic scintillators

    E-print Network

    Moskal, P; Bia?as, P; Ciszewska, M; Czerwi?ski, E; Heczko, A; Kajetanowicz, M; Kap?on, ?; Kochanowski, A; Konopka-Cupia?, G; Korcyl, G; Krzemie?, W; ?ojek, K; Majewski, J; Migda?, W; Molenda, M; Nied?wiecki, Sz; Pa?ka, M; Rudy, Z; Salabura, P; Silarski, M; S?omski, A; Smyrski, J; Zdebik, J; Zieli?ski, M

    2013-01-01

    In this contribution we present a new concept of the large acceptance detector systems based on organic scintillators which may allow for simultaneous diagnostic of large fraction of the human body. Novelty of the concept lies in employing large blocks of polymer scintillators instead of crystals as detectors of annihilation quanta, and in using predominantly the timing of signals instead of their amplitudes.

  5. Purification of KamLAND-Zen liquid scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Haruo

    2013-08-01

    KamLAND-Zen is neutrino-less double-beta decay search experiment using enriched 300 kg of 136Xe dissolved in pure liquid scintillator. This report is purification work of liquid scintillator for KamLAND-Zen experiment before installation in the inner-balloon and background rejection processes after installation.

  6. Investigating the energy resolution of arrays of small scintillation crystals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. J. Herbert; L. J. Meng; D. Ramsden

    2002-01-01

    Arrays of small scintillation crystals are being used increasingly for high-resolution imaging applications in nuclear medicine. Although the degree of pixellation now available is high for some scintillation materials, this spatial resolution is often achieved at the expense of degraded energy resolution due to the lower, and more variable, light-collection efficiency. The energy resolution of a detector is, however, especially

  7. Authoring Guide

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Comprehensively describes NJCATE's instructional materials development and authoring process. The Guide covers traditional style manual topics as well as issues particular to instructional materials development and publishing, such as readability, assessment, copyrights and contracts. Although originally developed for use by NJCATE's Mecomtronics Engineering Technology Program, the Guide's principles easily apply to any modular-based instructional materials development. Target Audience 2-4 year College Faculty/AdministratorsSelf Evaluation DataAn excellent resource to guide the development of integrated technical curricula, primarily at the post-secondary level, but also applicable to high school curriculum development.

  8. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of scintillation processes in NaI(Tl)

    SciTech Connect

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Wang, Zhiguo; Williams, Richard; Grim, Joel; Gao, Fei

    2014-04-26

    Developing a comprehensive understanding of the processes that govern the scintillation behavior of inorganic scintillators provides a pathway to optimize current scintillators and allows for the science-driven search for new scintillator materials. Recent experimental data on the excitation density dependence of the light yield of inorganic scintillators presents an opportunity to incorporate parameterized interactions between excitations in scintillation models and thus enable more realistic simulations of the nonproportionality of inorganic scintillators. Therefore, a kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) model of elementary scintillation processes in NaI(Tl) is developed in this work to simulate the kinetics of scintillation for a range of temperatures and Tl concentrations as well as the scintillation efficiency as a function of excitation density. The ability of the KMC model to reproduce available experimental data allows for elucidating the elementary processes that give rise to the kinetics and efficiency of scintillation observed experimentally for a range of conditions.

  9. Comparison of tropospheric scintillation prediction models of the Indonesian climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Cheng Yee; Singh, Mandeep Jit

    2014-12-01

    Tropospheric scintillation is a phenomenon that will cause signal degradation in satellite communication with low fade margin. Few studies of scintillation have been conducted in tropical regions. To analyze tropospheric scintillation, we obtain data from a satellite link installed at Bandung, Indonesia, at an elevation angle of 64.7° and a frequency of 12.247 GHz from 1999 to 2000. The data are processed and compared with the predictions of several well-known scintillation prediction models. From the analysis, we found that the ITU-R model gives the lowest error rate when predicting the scintillation intensity for fade at 4.68%. However, the model should be further tested using data from higher-frequency bands, such as the K and Ka bands, to verify the accuracy of the model.

  10. Energy partition in sapphire and BGO scintillating bolometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortigoza, Y.; Coron, N.; Cuesta, C.; García, E.; Ginestra, C.; Gironnet, J.; de Marcillac, P.; Martínez, M.; Pobes, C.; Puimedón, J.; Redon, T.; Sarsa, M. L.; Torres, L.; Villar, J. A.

    2011-03-01

    Scintillating bolometers are particle detectors with a high particle discrimination power with many applications in nuclear and particle physics. This discrimination power is based on the different scintillation yield for different particles, and is strongly dependent on the target used. At the very low temperatures required for the operation of the bolometers, very few data about the scintillation yields are available. In this paper we present estimates of absolute light yields and energy partition among heat, light and trapping channels in Sapphire (Al 2O 3) and BGO (Bi 4Ge 3O 12) scintillating bolometers operated at 20 mK. The estimate relies on the observed negative correlation between the light and heat signals produced by ?-ray absorption in scintillating bolometers and on the study of the X-ray stimulated luminescence properties of BGO at temperatures down to 77 K.

  11. Measurement of ortho-positronium properties in liquid scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perasso, S.; Consolati, G.; Franco, D.; Hans, S.; Jollet, C.; Meregaglia, A.; Tonazzo, A.; Yeh, M.

    2013-08-01

    Pulse shape discrimination in liquid scintillator detectors is a well-established technique for the discrimination of heavy particles from light particles. Nonetheless, it is not efficient in the separation of electrons and positrons, as they give rise to indistinguishable scintillator responses. This inefficiency can be overtaken through the exploitation of the formation of ortho-Positronium (o-Ps), which alters the time profile of light pulses induced by positrons. We characterized the o-Ps properties in the most commonly used liquid scintillators, i.e. PC, PXE, LAB, OIL and PC + PPO. In addition, we studied the effects of scintillator doping on the o-Ps properties for dopants currently used in neutrino experiments, Gd and Nd. Further measurements for Li-loaded and Tl-loaded liquid scintillators are foreseen. We found that the o-Ps properties are suitable for enhancing the electron-positron discrimination.

  12. [Lung cancer screening].

    PubMed

    Sánchez González, M

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is a very important disease, curable in early stages. There have been trials trying to show the utility of chest x-ray or computed tomography in Lung Cancer Screening for decades. In 2011, National Lung Screening Trial results were published, showing a 20% reduction in lung cancer mortality in patients with low dose computed tomography screened for three years. These results are very promising and several scientific societies have included lung cancer screening in their guidelines. Nevertheless we have to be aware of lung cancer screening risks, such as: overdiagnosis, radiation and false positive results. Moreover, there are many issues to be solved, including choosing the appropriate group to be screened, the duration of the screening program, intervals between screening and its cost-effectiveness. Ongoing trials will probably answer some of these questions. This article reviews the current evidence on lung cancer screening. PMID:23830728

  13. Cytotoxicity screening of some South American Solanaceae.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Murillo, B; Fajardo, V M; Suárez, M

    2001-08-01

    Alcoholic extracts of seven plants belonging to the Solanaceae family were phytochemically screened and evaluated for their cytotoxic activity by Brine Shrimp Test (BST) with Artemia salina larvae, Inhibition of Cell Division Test (ICDT) on sea urchin Loxechinus albus fertilized eggs and inhibition of crown gall tumors on Potato Disk Bioassay (PDB). From Salpichroa diffusa, bioassay-guided chromatographic separation afforded some active fractions from which epi-katonic acid was identified. PMID:11543969

  14. Characterization of cerium fluoride nanocomposite scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Stange, Sy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Esch, Ernst I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brown, Leif O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Couture, Aaron J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mckigney, Edward A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Muenchausen, Ross E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Del Sesto, Rico E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gilbertson, Robert D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mccleskey, T Mark [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reifarth, Rene [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Measurement of the neutron capture cross-sections of a number of short-lived isotopes would advance both pure and applied scientific research. These cross-sections are needed for calculation of criticality and waste production estimates for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative, for analysis of data from nuclear weapons tests, and to improve understanding of nucleosynthesis. However, measurement of these cross-sections would require a detector with a faster signal decay time than those used in existing neutron capture experiments. Crystals of faster detector materials are not available in sufficient sizes and quantities to supply these large-scale experiments. Instead, we propose to use nanocomposite detectors, consisting of nanoscale particles of a scintillating material dispersed in a matrix material. We have successfully fabricated cerium fluoride (CeF{sub 3}) nanoparticles and dispersed them in a liquid matrix. We have characterized this scintillator and have measured its response to neutron capture. Results of the optical, structural, and radiation characterization will be presented.

  15. Diagnostic imaging and biopsy pathways following abnormal screen-film and digital screening mammography

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Rebecca A.; Zhu, Weiwei; Horblyuk, Ruslan; Karliner, Leah; Sprague, Brian L.; Henderson, Louise; Lee, David; Onega, Tracy; Buist, Diana SM.; Sweet, Alison

    2013-01-01

    Objective The transition from screen-film to digital mammography may have altered diagnostic evaluation of women following a positive screening examination. This study compared use and timeliness of diagnostic imaging and biopsy for women screened with screen-film or digital mammography. Materials and Methods Data were from 35,321 positive screening mammograms on 32,087 women aged 40–89 years, from 22 Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium facilities in 2005–2008. Diagnostic pathways were classified by their inclusion of diagnostic mammography, ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and biopsy. We compared time to resolution and frequency of diagnostic pathways by patient characteristics, screening exam modality, and radiology facility. Between-facility differences were evaluated by computing the proportion of mammograms receiving follow-up with a particular pathway for each facility and examining variation in these proportions across facilities. Multinomial logistic regression adjusting for age, calendar year, and facility compared odds of follow-up with each pathway. Results The median time to resolution of a positive screening mammogram was 10 days. Compared to screen-film mammograms, digital mammograms were more frequently followed by only a single diagnostic mammogram (46% vs. 36%). Pathways following digital screening mammography were also less likely to include biopsy (16% vs. 20%). However, in adjusted analyses most differences were not statistically significant (p = 0.857 for mammography only; p = 0.03 for biopsy). Substantial variability in diagnostic pathway frequency was seen across facilities. For instance, the frequency of evaluation with diagnostic mammography alone ranged from 23% to 55% across facilities. Conclusion Differences in evaluation of positive digital and screen-film screening mammograms were minor, and appeared to be largely attributable to substantial variation between radiology facilities. To guide health systems in their efforts to eliminate practices that do not contribute to effective care, we need further research to identify the causes of this variation and the best evidence-based approach for follow-up. PMID:23471650

  16. Fiscal Officer Training, 1999-2000. Participant's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Education, Washington, DC.

    This guide is intended for use by participants (college fiscal officers, business officers, bursars, loan managers, etc.) in a two-day workshop on Title IV of the reauthorized Higher Education Act. The guide includes copies of the visual displays used in the workshop, space for individual notes, sample forms, sample computer screens, quizzes, and…

  17. Stretching Screens and Imaginations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douthwaite, Shelaugh

    1983-01-01

    Secondary students utilize a simplified technique to make silk screen prints, which can be printed onto T-shirts. The only materials needed from art suppliers are a few squeegees and a few yards of polyester screen mesh. (RM)

  18. Breast Cancer Screening

    MedlinePLUS

    ... is available from the NCI Web site . Three tests are used by health care providers to screen for breast cancer: Mammogram Mammography is the most common screening test for breast cancer . A mammogram is an x- ...

  19. Screening for Birth Defects

    MedlinePLUS

    ... extra chromosome. A common trisomy is trisomy 21 (Down syndrome) . Other trisomies include trisomy 13 (Patau syndrome) and ... Test Test Type What Does It Screen for? Down Syndrome Detection Rate Combined firsttrimester screening Blood test for ...

  20. Cervical Cancer Screening

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Cancer found early may be easier to treat. Cervical cancer screening is usually part of a woman's ... may do more tests, such as a biopsy. Cervical cancer screening has risks. The results can sometimes ...

  1. International Cancer Screening Network

    Cancer.gov

    Skip to Main Content Search International Cancer Screening Network Sponsored by the National Cancer Institute Working Together to Evaluate Cancer Screening and Improve Outcomes Internationally About the ICSN Overview Participating Countries Contact

  2. Comparison of gamma-ray detectors: Scintillators, scintillating fibers, and semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, C.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    New scintillators that have advantages relative to NaI(Tl) and BGO include GSO, LSO, YAP, and BaF{sub 2}. GSO, for example, is very radiation hard, and BaF{sub 2} is very fast. Scintillating fibers, which allow good spatial resolution and complex geometries, have been used extensively in high energy physics, but they can also be used at lower energies. Semiconductors such as germanium, silicon, CdTe, CdZnTe, and HgI{sub 2} can provide good resolution. The proliferation of types has made selection of a gamma-ray detector for a particular application difficult. The authors compare the different types and give examples of choices that have been made for laboratory experiments, portable instruments, and space applications.

  3. Colorectal cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Burt, Randall W; Cannon, Jamie A; David, Donald S; Early, Dayna S; Ford, James M; Giardiello, Francis M; Halverson, Amy L; Hamilton, Stanley R; Hampel, Heather; Ismail, Mohammad K; Jasperson, Kory; Klapman, Jason B; Lazenby, Audrey J; Lynch, Patrick M; Mayer, Robert J; Ness, Reid M; Provenzale, Dawn; Rao, M Sambasiva; Shike, Moshe; Steinbach, Gideon; Terdiman, Jonathan P; Weinberg, David; Dwyer, Mary; Freedman-Cass, Deborah

    2013-12-01

    Mortality from colorectal cancer can be reduced by early diagnosis and by cancer prevention through polypectomy. These NCCN Guidelines for Colorectal Cancer Screening describe various colorectal screening modalities and recommended screening schedules for patients at average or increased risk of developing colorectal cancer. In addition, the guidelines provide recommendations for the management of patients with high-risk colorectal cancer syndromes, including Lynch syndrome. Screening approaches for Lynch syndrome are also described. PMID:24335688

  4. Statistical study of UHF scintillations conducted between 1994 and 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valladares, C. E.; Sheehan, R. E.

    2013-12-01

    A spaced-antenna scintillation system was installed at Ancon, Peru in May 1994 to measure amplitude fluctuations of 250-MHz signals from a geostationary satellite located 100° W using three antennas spaced in the magnetic east-west direction. The system also included a receiver of L-band signals from the GOES satellite and a second baseline was added in November 1996 consisting of 2 spaced-antennas receiving UHF signals from a satellite at 25° W. This system also called the MISETA scintillation system was designed and built under supervision of Dr. Santimay Basu. The MISETA measurements have provided the climatology of amplitude scintillation and zonal irregularity drifts during almost 2 solar cycles. In addition to these statistical results, The MISETA system has been used to study in detail scintillation onset, duration, recurrence, and S4 intensity during special atmospheric processes such as stratospheric sudden warming (SSW) events. It was found that during SSW events scintillations occurred less frequently and appeared at later local times. Our conclusions are also compared with measurements from other scintillation/equatorial spread F sensors that exist in the Peruvian region. Digisonde and VIPIR ionosondes, coherent radars, imagers, and GPS receivers from the LISN network in South America, provide additional information on the characteristics of the disturbed environment and endorse the UHF scintillation results.

  5. Cathodoluminescence studies of commercial and nano-structured scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDoanld, Warren; McKinney, George; Tzolov, Marian

    2014-03-01

    Scintillators have applications in fundamental research and in consumer products, e.g. detectors, scanners, and televisions. This research focused on analyzing the cathodoluminescence of different single-crystal scintillators with an originally developed method for evaluation of their performance, which allows for a direct comparison of different scintillators. We have studied yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG), yttrium aluminum perovskite (YAP) scintillators, zinc oxide single crystal, zinc tungstate single crystal, zinc oxide nanowires, and zinc tungstate film. The commercial scintillators are covered with conductive film which prevents low energy electrons from effectively interacting with the scintillator. We have varied the voltage accelerating the electrons with the intention of finding the threshold below which this effect will impact the performance of the scintillators. The same procedure was followed for the nanowires and zinc tungstate film which have enough conductivity and don't require a top conducting film. The threshold was established to be around 3 kV for the YAG and there is no threshold for the films, which perform much better at these low voltages. This property of the films has the potential for application in desktop scanning electron microscopes, where the accelerating voltage is low. The voltage dependence of the cathodoluminescence intensity follows an exponential trend and we present a model explaining it.

  6. Comparative photoluminescence study of crystalline and nanostructured scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinney, George; McDonald, Warren; Tzolov, Marian

    2014-03-01

    Scintillators are widely used for conversion of high energy radiation/particles to visible light which can be either directly observed or further converted to electrical signal in photomultipliers or solid state detectors. We compare the light emission properties of traditional crystalline scintillators with nanostructured films created in our laboratory with the potential for use as scintillators. We have studied zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires, zinc tungstate (ZnWO4) thin films, commercially available crystals of ZnO, ZnWO4 and commercial scintillators of yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) and yttrium aluminum perovskite (YAP). We will present the photoluminescence emission spectra, the intensity dependence of the emission, and the photoluminescence excitation spectra. We have found that the emission spectrum of zinc oxide nanowires becomes very intense at high excitation intensities and becomes comparable with the emission from the commercial scintillators. The excitation spectra indicate the presence of subgap electronic states in the nanostructured samples and in the commercial scintillators. This study contributes to our effort of creating electron detectors for scanning electron microscopy using nanostructured scintillators.

  7. Extended ionospheric amplitude scintillation model for GPS receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira Moraes, Alison; Costa, Emanoel; Paula, Eurico Rodrigues; Perrella, Waldecir João.; Monico, João. Francisco Galera

    2014-05-01

    Ionospheric scintillation is a phenomenon that occurs after sunset, especially in the low-latitude region, affecting radio signals that propagate through the ionosphere. Depending on geophysical conditions, ionospheric scintillation may cause availability and precision problems to Global Navigation Satellite System users. The present work is concerned with the development of an extended model for describing the effects of the amplitude ionospheric scintillation on GPS receivers. Using the ?-? probabilistic model, introduced by previous authors in different contexts, the variance of GPS receiver tracking loop error may be estimated more realistically. The proposed model is developed with basis on the ?-? parameters and also considering correlation between amplitude and phase scintillation. Its results are interpreted to explain how a receiver may experience different error values under the influence of ionospheric conditions leading to a fixed scintillation level S4. The model is applied to a large experimental data set obtained at São José dos Campos, Brazil, near the peak of the equatorial anomaly during high solar flux conditions, between December 2001 and January 2002. The results from the proposed model show that depending on the ?-? pair, moderate scintillation (0.5 ? S4 ? 0.7) may be an issue for the receiver performance. When S4 > 0.7, the results indicate that the effects of scintillation are serious, leading to a reduction in the receiver availability for providing positioning solutions in approximately 50% of the cases.

  8. Low/Mid-latitude Ionospheric irregularities and scintillation climatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, Amr; Groves, K. M.; Mahrous, Ayman; Hussein, Fayrouz

    Ionospheric scintillation occur when radio signals propagate through an irregular ionosphere (e.g., plasma bubbles). Since plasma bubbles are regions of depleted ion and electron densities, a plasma bubble located on the satellite-to-ground signal path will cause radio signals to fluctuate in phase and amplitude. Ionospheric scintillation data were analyzed in the magnetic latitudinal field-of-view 29° N -13.4° N, observed by a stand-alone SCINDA (Scintillation Network Decision Aid) - GPS receiver at Helwan, Egypt (29.86° N, 31.32° E). A minimum 20° elevation cut off angle has been set in order to minimize the multipath effect. During the enhancing phase of the current solar cycle 24 (years 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013), the behaviour of the scintillation occurrence were characterized. The seasonal, annual and solar cycle variation of scintillation occurrence is investigated together with the Total Electron Content (TEC), to put in evidence the relation between the electron density gradients and the ionospheric irregularities causing scintillation. This study considers a first step to develop a scintillation climatology over Northern Africa.

  9. Gmail user guide Your guide to

    E-print Network

    Bristol, University of

    you must first reset your password. #12;Gmail user guide Settings and personalisation All of yourGmail user guide Your guide to Gmail #12;Gmail user guide Welcome to Gmail! This guide outlines some of the key settings and features of Gmail. Getting started How to access your Gmail account page 3

  10. Fiber optic thermal/fast neutron and gamma ray scintillation detector

    DOEpatents

    Neal, John S. (Knoxville, TN); Mihalczo, John T (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2007-10-30

    A system for detecting fissile and fissionable material originating external to the system includes: a .sup.6Li loaded glass fiber scintillator for detecting thermal neutrons, x-rays and gamma rays; a fast scintillator for detecting fast neutrons, x-rays and gamma rays, the fast scintillator conjoined with the glass fiber scintillator such that the fast scintillator moderates fast neutrons prior to their detection as thermal neutrons by the glass fiber scintillator; and a coincidence detection system for processing the time distributions of arriving signals from the scintillators.

  11. Triple Screening in Pregnancy

    MedlinePLUS

    MENU Return to Web version Triple Screening in Pregnancy What is a triple screen? A triple screen is a blood test that measures three things called alpha-fetoprotein, human chorionic gonadotropin and unconjugated estriol. The results of the blood test ...

  12. VLHC Beam Screen Cooling

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Darve; P. Bauer; P. Limon; T. Peterson

    In the framework of the Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) R&D studies, vacuum and beam screen issues are being investigated at Fermilab. This report focuses on the cooling system for the VLHC beam screen and its integration into the VLHC cryo-system. Beam screen cooling is a key issue in the VLHC, due to the large synchrotron radiation (SR) power generated

  13. Regional Arctic observations of TEC gradients and scintillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durgonics, Tibor; Høeg, Per; Benzon, Hans-Henrik

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, there has been growing scientific interest in Arctic ionospheric properties and variations. However our understanding of the fundamental ionospheric processes present in this area is still incomplete. GNSS networks present in Greenland today make it possible to acquire near-real time observations of the state and variations of the high-latitude ionosphere. This data can be employed to obtain relevant geophysical variables and statistics. In our study GPS-derived total electron content (TEC) measurements have been complemented with amplitude scintillation indices (S4), and phase scintillation indices (??). The investigation of the relationship between these geophysical variables will likely lead to new ways to study the underlying physical processes and to build tools for monitoring and predicting large-scale patterns in Arctic TEC and scintillations. A number of specific ionosphere events will be presented and the underlying geophysical process will be identified and described. In particular, results will be presented where large-scale gradients in the regional TEC are compared with the growth of scintillations. The statistics of the scintillations will be investigated, with emphasis on how well the scintillations follow the Nakagami-m distribution. The spectra of both the intensities and phase will be calculated, and the corner frequency of these spectra will also be determined. These corner frequencies will be used to compute a number of important geophysical and ionospheric parameters. Furthermore, we will discuss how the spectral characteristics of the scintillations during large TEC gradients vary, and how values of the power spectra slopes change during increasing scintillations. These values will be validated against values found in prior studies. TEC and scintillation time-series and maps will also be presented over the Greenlandic region. We will show how the expansion of the auroral oval during geomagnetic storms can be detected from GNSS-derived data. We will then investigate the correlation between TEC and ionospheric indices.

  14. Luminescence and scintillation properties of rare-earth-doped LuF3 scintillation crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pejchal, Jan; Fukuda, Kentaro; Kurosawa, Shunsuke; Yokota, Yuui; Yoshikawa, Akira

    2015-03-01

    The Nd-doped and Er-doped LuF3 single crystals were grown by the micro-pulling-down method to study their scintillation properties in the vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) region. The doubly Nd-Er codoped single crystal was grown to study possibility of scintillation performance improvement by energy transfer from Er3+ to Nd3+ ions. The LiF flux was to avoid phase transition below melting temperature. The 1%Nd-doped sample showed the highest overall scintillation efficiency under X-ray excitation which was 7 times as high as that of the LaF3:Nd 8% standard. The leading Nd3+ 5d-4f emission was situated at 176 nm, while the Er3+ 5d-4f emission for Er-doped samples was observed at 163 nm, which better matches the sensitivity of some VUV-sensitive photodetectors. The optimum Er concentration was determined to be around 1-3 mol%. No Er3+ 5d-4f emission was observed for the doubly Er,Nd-codoped sample due to energy transfer from the Er3+ to Nd3+ ions. Slight improvement of the light yield was observed in the doubly-doped sample with respect to the Nd-only doped one.

  15. Development of scintillating fiber detector technology for high rate particle tracking

    E-print Network

    E. C. Aschenauer; J. Baehr; V. Gapienko; B. Hoffmann; A. Kharchilava; H. Luedecke; R. Nahnhauer; R. Shanidze

    1997-10-02

    The performance of a scintillating fiber detector prototype for tracking under high rate conditions is investigated. A spatial resolution of about100 micron is aimed for the detector. Further demands are low occupancy and radiation hardness up to 1 Mrad/year. Fibers with different radii and different wavelengths of the scintillation light from different producers have been extensively tested concerning light output, attenuation length and radiation hardness, with and without coupling them to light guides of different length and diameter. In a testrun at a 3 GeV electron beam the space dependent efficiency and spatial resolution of fiber bundels were measured by means of two external reference detectors with a precision of 50 micron. The light output profile across fiber roads has been determined with the same accuracy. Different technologies were adopted for the construction of tracker modules consisting of 14 layers of 0.5 mm fibers and 0.7 mm pitch. A winding technology provides reliable results to produce later fiber modules of about 25 cm x 25 cm area. We conclude that on the basis of these results a fiber tracker for high rate conditions can be built.

  16. Radio scintillation of gamma-ray-burst afterglows

    E-print Network

    Jeremy Goodman

    1997-06-09

    Stars twinkle to the eye through atmospheric turbulence, but planets, because of their larger angular size, do not. Similarly, scintillation due to the local interstellar medium will modulate the radio flux of gamma-ray-burst afterglows and may permit indirect measurements of their angular sizes. The amplitude of refractive scintillation is of order ten percent at ten gigahertz unless the source size is much larger than the expected size, of order ten microarcseconds. Diffractive scintillation is marginally possible, depending sensitively on the source size, observing frequency, and scattering measure of the interstellar medium.

  17. Reduction of scintillation in optical modulating retro-reflector links.

    PubMed

    Rabinovich, W S; Mahon, R; Ferraro, M; Goetz, P G; Murphy, J L

    2014-11-17

    Optical modulating retro-reflectors enable free-space optical links that have greatly reduced pointing requirements and do not require a laser at one end of the link. However, these types of links can exhibit very high optical scintillation due to the double passage of the beam through the atmosphere. This high scintillation causes fades and surges that can lead to packet errors in the link. It is shown that scintillation can be greatly reduced through a combination of techniques including retro-reflector diversity, aperture averaging and bistatic optical interrogation. Improvements of 20 dB in link performance are demonstrated. PMID:25402097

  18. Scintillation of Liquid Helium for Low-Energy Nuclear Recoils

    E-print Network

    Ito, T M

    2013-01-01

    The scintillation properties of liquid helium upon the recoil of a low energy helium atom are discussed in the context of the possible use of this medium as a detector of dark matter. It is found that the prompt scintillation yield in the range of recoil energies from a few keV to 100 keV is somewhat higher than that obtained by a linear extrapolation from the measured yield for an 5 MeV alpha particle. A comparison is made of both the scintillation yield and the charge separation by an electric field for nuclear recoils and for electrons stopped in helium.

  19. A 2-phase liquid scintillation assay for glycolipid synthetases

    SciTech Connect

    Hospattankar, A.V.; Radin, N.S.

    1981-10-01

    Glycolipid synthetases can be assayed conveniently by incubating the lipid substrate with the radiosugar-labeled nucleotide in a small plastic scintillation vial. At the end of the incubation period, water and perchloric acid are added, then n-butanol, then a toluene-based scintillation cocktail. The radioactive lipid partitions into the scintillation fluid, leaving excess sugar nucleotide in the aqueous phase. Only a small fraction of the total radioactivity in the aqueous layer is detectable. This method is illustrated for ceramide:UDP-glucose glucosyltransferase. The approach should be applicable to other lipid synthetases that can be assayed with radioactive hydrophilic substrate.

  20. Liquid Scintillator based experiments in Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, K.; KamLAND-Zen Collaboration

    2012-08-01

    Recent experiments have confirmed neutrino oscillations. The mass structure of neutrinos is one of the next interesting subjects in neutrino physics. Neutrinoless double beta decay has the potential to investigate the mass structure of neutrinos. Many neutrinoless double beta decay experiments are being proposed and some were introduced at this conference. Here we present neutrinoless double beta decay experiments based on liquid scintillator techniques. SNO+ plans to use 150Nd as the neutrinoless double beta decay isotope dissolved in liquid scintillator, similarly KamLAND-Zen will use 136Xe loaded liquid scintillator. The physics goals, schedule and current status of both experiments were discussed.

  1. Gene Expression Changes in Developing Zebrafish as Potential Markers for Rapid Developmental Neurotoxicity Screening

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sparse information exists on many chemicals to guide developmental neurotoxicity (DNT) risk assessments. As DNT testing using rodents is laborious and expensive, alternative species such as zebrafish are being adapted for toxicity screening. Assessing the DNT potential of chem...

  2. Intensity Scintillation and Astronomical Quantum Observation

    E-print Network

    Jiang Dong

    2009-11-02

    Holography is 3D imaging which can record intensity and phase at the same time. The importance of construct hologram is holographic recording and wavefront reconstruction. It is surprised that holography be discovered in study interstellar scintillation for pulsar provide a coherent light source recently. I think that is speckle hologram and speckle interference(i.e. intensity interference), and use modern technique which include phased array,CCD, digital signal processing and supercomputer can achieve that digital and computer holography from radio to X-ray astronomy. This means we can use it to image the universe and beyond the limited of telescope for cosmos provide much coherent light from pulsar,maser, black hole to 21cm recombination line. It gives a probe to the medium of near the black hole et al. From those coherent light sources in the sky, we can uncover one different universe that through astronomical quantum observation which use intensity interference.

  3. Scintillating glass fiber-optic neutron sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Abel, K.H.; Arthur, R.J.; Bliss, M. [and others

    1994-04-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has fabricated cerium-activated lithium silicate scintillating fibers via a hot-downdraw process. These fibers, which, as produced, typically have a transmission length (e{sup {minus}1} length) of greater than 2 meters, are found to undergo aging when subjected to room air. The aging, which is complete in a few weeks, reduces the transmission length to the order of 0.5 meter. Because of the high alkali content of the glass (on the order of 20--30 mole % lithia), we have attributed this aging to aqueous corrosion oat the polymer cladding/glass interface. changes in transmission with chemical treatment of the surface support the corrosion model. Fiber transmission performance has been preserved by modifying the hot-downdraw to a double crucible to produce glass-on-glass waveguides.

  4. SSPM Scintillator Readout for Gamma Radiation Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, S A; Wendelberger, B; Young, J A; Green, J A; Guise, R E; Franks, L

    2011-09-01

    Silicon-based photodetectors offer several benefits relative to photomultiplier tube–based scintillator systems. Solid-state photomultipliers (SSPM) can realize the gain of a photomultiplier tube (PMT) with the quantum efficiency of silicon. The advantages of the solid-state approach must be balanced with adverse trade-offs, for example from increased dark current, to optimize radiation detection sensitivity. We are designing a custom SSPM that will be optimized for green emission of thallium-doped cesium iodide (CsI(Tl)). A typical field gamma radiation detector incorporates thallium doped sodium iodide (NaI(Tl)) and a radiation converter with a PMT. A PMT’s sensitivity peaks in the blue wavelengths and is well matched to NaI(Tl). This paper presents results of photomultiplier sensitivity relative to conventional SSPMs and discusses model design improvements. Prototype fabrications are in progress.

  5. The Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment - Instrument description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, W. N.; Kinzer, R. L.; Kurfess, J. D.; Strickman, M. S.; Purcell, W. R.; Grabelsky, D. A.; Ulmer, M. P.; Hillis, D. A.; Jung, G. V.; Cameron, R. A.

    1993-06-01

    The Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment on the Arthur Holly Compton Gamma Ray Observatory satellite uses four actively shielded NaI (Tl)-CsI(Na) phoswich detectors to provide gamma-ray line and continuum detection capability in the 0.05-10 MeV energy range. The instrument includes secondary capabilities for gamma-ray and neutron detection between 10 and 250 MeV. The detectors have 3.8 deg x 11.04 deg (FWHM) fields of view defined by tungsten collimators. Each detector has an independent, single-axis orientation system which permits offset pointing from the spacecraft Z-axis for background measurements and multitarget observations. The instrument, and its calibration and performance, are described.

  6. The Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment - Instrument description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. N.; Kinzer, R. L.; Kurfess, J. D.; Strickman, M. S.; Purcell, W. R.; Grabelsky, D. A.; Ulmer, M. P.; Hillis, D. A.; Jung, G. V.; Cameron, R. A.

    1993-01-01

    The Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment on the Arthur Holly Compton Gamma Ray Observatory satellite uses four actively shielded NaI (Tl)-CsI(Na) phoswich detectors to provide gamma-ray line and continuum detection capability in the 0.05-10 MeV energy range. The instrument includes secondary capabilities for gamma-ray and neutron detection between 10 and 250 MeV. The detectors have 3.8 deg x 11.04 deg (FWHM) fields of view defined by tungsten collimators. Each detector has an independent, single-axis orientation system which permits offset pointing from the spacecraft Z-axis for background measurements and multitarget observations. The instrument, and its calibration and performance, are described.

  7. High-Z organic-scintillation solution

    SciTech Connect

    Berlman, I.B.; Fluornoy, J.M.; Ashford, C.B.; Lyons, P.B.

    1983-01-01

    In the present experiment, an attempt is made to raise the average Z of a scintillation solution with as little attendant quenching as possible. Since high-Z atoms quench by means of a close encounter, such encounters are minimized by the use of alkyl groups substituted on the solvent, solute, and heavy atoms. The aromatic compound 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene (pseudocumene) is used as the solvent; 4,4''-di(5-tridecyl)-p-terphenyl (SC-180) as the solute; and tetrabutyltin as the high-Z material. To establish the validity of our ideas, various experiments have been performed with less protected solvents, and heavy atoms. These include benzene, toluene, p-terphenyl, bromobutane, and bromobenzene.

  8. Liquid environmental stress screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, J. L.

    1992-05-01

    This report describes a method of performing Environmental Stress Screening in an inert fluid. Because the liquid has a high dielectric strength, the items being screened can be energized and operational while submerged. Transmitting vibrations through the liquid to the item being screened permits screening without the use of fixtures, and the liquid's high heat capacity allows very rapid temperature changes, either by pumping hot or cold liquid from remote reservoirs or by moving the device from a hot tank to a cold tank. A prototype screening system has been built at NRaD, and faults induced in a small (47 pieces) lot of printed wiring boards have been detected.

  9. Development of a fast scintillator based beam phase measurement system for compact superconducting cyclotrons.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Tanushyam; Kanti Dey, Malay; Dhara, Partha; Roy, Suvodeep; Debnath, Jayanta; Balakrishna Bhole, Rajendra; Dutta, Atanu; Pradhan, Jedidiah; Pal, Sarbajit; Pal, Gautam; Roy, Amitava; Chakrabarti, Alok

    2013-05-01

    In an isochronous cyclotron, measurements of central phase of the ion beam with respect to rf and the phase width provide a way to tune the cyclotron for maximum energy gain per turn and efficient extraction. We report here the development of a phase measurement system and the measurements carried out at the Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre's (VECC's) K = 500 superconducting cyclotron. The technique comprises detecting prompt ?-rays resulting from the interaction of cyclotron ion beam with an aluminium target mounted on a radial probe in coincidence with cyclotron rf. An assembly comprising a fast scintillator and a liquid light-guide inserted inside the cyclotron was used to detect the ?-rays and to transfer the light signal outside the cyclotron where a matching photo-multiplier tube was used for light to electrical signal conversion. The typical beam intensity for this measurement was a few times 10(11) pps. PMID:23742541

  10. CaF2(Eu): an ``old'' scintillator revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plettner, C.; Pausch, G.; Scherwinski, F.; Herbach, C. M.; Lentering, R.; Kong, Y.; Römer, K.; Grodzicka, M.; Szcze?niak, T.; Iwanowska, J.; Moszy?ski, M.

    2013-06-01

    Homeland security applications demand performant two-plane Compton-camera systems, with high detector efficiency, good nuclide identification and able to perform in-field conditions. A low-Z scintillator has been proposed and studied as a promising candidate for use in the scattering plane of a scintillator-based Compton camera: CaF2(Eu) [1]. All the relevant properties for the application of this scintillator in a mobile Compton camera system, have been addressed: the energy resolution and the non-proportionality at room temperature and in the temperature range of -20°C to +55°C, the photoelectron yield and the relative light yield in the relevant temperature range. A new method of inferring the relative light output of scintillators has been proposed.

  11. A Scintillator Purification Plant and Fluid Handling System for SNO+

    E-print Network

    Ford, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    A large capacity purification plant and fluid handling system has been constructed for the SNO+ neutrino and double-beta decay experiment, located 6800 feet underground at SNOLAB, Canada. SNO+ is a refurbishment of the SNO detector to fill the acrylic vessel with liquid scintillator based on Linear Alkylbenzene (LAB) and 2 g/L PPO, and also has a phase to load natural tellurium into the scintillator for a double-beta decay experiment with 130Te. The plant includes processes multi-stage dual-stream distillation, column water extraction, steam stripping, and functionalized silica gel adsorption columns. The plant also includes systems for preparing the scintillator with PPO and metal-loading the scintillator for double-beta decay exposure. We review the basis of design, the purification principles, specifications for the plant, and the construction and installations. The construction and commissioning status is updated.

  12. The response of scintillators to heavy ions: 1, Plastics

    SciTech Connect

    McMahan, M.A.

    1987-10-01

    The response of various scintillator detectors to ions of A = 1-84 and energies E/A = 5 to 30 MeV have been measured, and are found to be linear above an energy of 100 MeV. Results are presented for a typical organic plastic scintillator including parametrizations of the data as a function of Z, A, and energy. These results can be used by anyone using scintillators as heavy ion detectors, with one calibration point giving a normalization that allows use of the whole set of curves. The response functions are compared to previous parametrizations at lower energies and discussed in terms of the theory of delta-ray formation in the scintillator.

  13. Experimental efforts and results in finding new heavy scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Derenzo, S.E.; Moses, W.W.

    1992-09-01

    New heavy scintillators are being discovered with increasing frequency. In recent years NaI(Tl) (with its high light output and energy resolution) has been joined by BGO (with its high stopping power), BaF{sub 2} (with its excellent timing resolution), and CeF{sub 3} (with its speed and short Moliere radius). More than 10 potentially useful scintillators have been under development in the past five years, such as PbSO{sub 4} and Lu{sub 2}SiO{sub 5}(Ce). We tabulate the characteristics of these and other scintillators, including wavelength, luminous efficiency, decay time, and initial intensity. We describe a search strategy and the prospects for finding the ``ideal`` heavy scintillator, which would combine the light output of NaI(Tl) and CsI(Tl), the stopping power of BGO, and the speed of BaF{sub 2} and ZnO(Ga).

  14. A Scintillator Purification Plant and Fluid Handling System for SNO+

    E-print Network

    Richard J. Ford; for the SNO+ Collaboration

    2015-06-29

    A large capacity purification plant and fluid handling system has been constructed for the SNO+ neutrino and double-beta decay experiment, located 6800 feet underground at SNOLAB, Canada. SNO+ is a refurbishment of the SNO detector to fill the acrylic vessel with liquid scintillator based on Linear Alkylbenzene (LAB) and 2 g/L PPO, and also has a phase to load natural tellurium into the scintillator for a double-beta decay experiment with 130Te. The plant includes processes multi-stage dual-stream distillation, column water extraction, steam stripping, and functionalized silica gel adsorption columns. The plant also includes systems for preparing the scintillator with PPO and metal-loading the scintillator for double-beta decay exposure. We review the basis of design, the purification principles, specifications for the plant, and the construction and installations. The construction and commissioning status is updated.

  15. A new scintillating glass for high energy physics applications

    SciTech Connect

    Puseljic, D.; Baumbaugh, B.; Bishop, J.; Busenitz, J.; Cason, N.; Cunningham, J.; Gardner, R.; Kennedy, C.; Mannel, E.; Mountain, R.J.

    1987-10-01

    A new scintillating glass has been developed containing Cerium (3+) oxide in an aluminate host glass. In this material the scintillation emission spectrum is red-shifted relative to that observed for Ce/sup 3 +/ in silicate glasses. Additionally emission and absorption spectra are more widely separated in the aluminate composition, suggesting that such glasses might have improved light transmission properties. The refractive index is high, making it a potentially interesting material for use in fiber-optic tracking detectors.

  16. A new scintillating glass for high energy physics applications

    SciTech Connect

    Puseljic, D.; Baumbaugh, B.; Bishop, J.; Busenitz, J.; Cason, N.; Cunningham, J.; Gardner, R.; Kennedy, C.; Mannel, E.; Mountain, R.J.

    1988-02-01

    A new scintillating glass has been developed containing Cerium (3+) oxide in an aluminate host glass. In this material the scintillation emission spectrum is red-shifted relative to that observed for Ce/sup 3+/ in silicate glasses. Additionally, emission and absorption spectra are more widely separated in the aluminate composition, suggesting that such glasses might have improved light transmission properties. The refractive index is high, making it a potentially interesting material for use in fiber-optic tracking detectors.

  17. Hadronic shower development in Iron-Scintillator Tile Calorimetry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Amaral; A. Amorim; K. Anderson; G. Barreira; R. Benetta; S. Berglund; C. Biscarat; G. Blanchot; E. Blucher; A A Bogush; C. Bohm; V. Boldea; O. Borisov; M. Bosman; C. Bromberg; J. Budagov; S. Burdin; L. Caloba; J. Carvalho; P. Casado; M. V. Castillo; M. Cavalli-Sforza; V. Cavasinni; R. Chadelas; I E Chirikov-Zorin; G. Chlachidze; M. Cobal; F. Cogswell; F. Colaço; S. Cologna; S. Constantinescu; D. Costanzo; M. Crouau; F. Daudon; J. David; M. David; T. Davidek; J. Dawson; K. De; T. Del Prete; A. De Santo; B. Di Girolamo; S. Dita; J. Dolejsi; Z. Dolezal; R. Downing; I. Efthymiopoulos; M. Engström; D. Errede; S. Errede; H. Evans; A. Fenyuk; A. Ferrer; V. Flaminio; E. Gallas; M. Gaspar; I. Gil; O. Gildemeister; V. Glagolev; A. Gomes; V. Gonzalez; S. González De La Hoz; V Grabskii; E Graugès-Pous; P. Grenier; H H Hakopian; M. Haney; M. Hansen; S. Hellman; A. Henriques; C. Hebrard; E. Higon; S O Holmgren; J. Huston; Yu M Ivanyushenkov; A. Juste; S. Kakurin; G V Karapetian; A N Karyukhin; S. Kopikov; V. Kukhtin; Y. Kulchitsky; W. Kurzbauer; M. Kuzmin; S. Lami; V. Lapin; C. Lazzeroni; A. Lebedev; R. Leitner; J. Li; Yu F Lomakin; O V Lomakina; M. Lokajicek; J. M. Lopez Amengual; A. Maio; S. Malyukov; F. Marroquin; J. P. Martins; E. Mazzoni; F S Merritt; R. Miller; I A Minashvili; Ll. Miralles; G. Montarou; A. Munar; S. Nemecek; Marzio Nessi; A. Onofre; S. Orteu; I. C. Park; D. Pallin; D. Pantea; R. Paoletti; J. Patriarca; A. Pereira; J. A. Perlas; P. Petit; J E Pilcher; L. Poggioli; L. Price; J. Proudfoot; O. Pukhov; G. Reinmuth; G. Renzoni; R. Richards; C. Roda; J. B. Romance; V. Romanov; B. Ronceux; P. Rosnet; V. Rumyantsev; N. Russakovich; E. Sanchis; H. Sanders; C. Santoni; J. Santos; L. Sawyer; L.-P. Says; J. M. Seixas; B. Selldèn; A. Semenov; A S Shchelchkov; M. Shochet; V. Simaitis; A N Sissakian; A. Solodkov; O. Solovianov; P. Sonderegger; M. Sosebee; K. Soustruznik; F. Spanó; R. Stanek; E A Starchenko; R. Stephens; M. Suk; F. Tang; P. Tas; J. Thaler; S. Tokar; N. Topilin; Z. Trka; A S Turcot; M. Turcotte; S. Valkar; M. J. Varandas; A H Vartapetian; F. Vazeille; I. Vichou; V. Vinogradov; S B Vorozhtsov; D. Wagner; A. White; H. Wolters; N. Yamdagni; G. Yarygin; C. Yosef; A. Zaitsev; M. Zdrazil

    2000-01-01

    The lateral and longitudinal profiles of hadronic showers detected by a prototype of the ATLAS Iron-Scintillator Tile Hadron Calorimeter have been investigated. This calorimeter presents a unique longitudinal configuration of scintillator tiles. Using a fine-grained pion beam scan at 100GeV, a detailed picture of transverse shower behaviour is obtained. The underlying radial energy densities for the four depth segments and

  18. Investigating the energy resolution of arrays of small scintillation crystals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. J. Herbert; L. J. Meng; D. Ramsden

    2001-01-01

    Arrays of small scintillation crystals are being used increasingly for high-resolution imaging applications in nuclear medicine. Although the degree of pixellation now available is high for some scintillation materials, this spatial-resolution is often achieved at the expense of degraded energy-resolution due to the lower, and more variable, light-collection efficiency. The energy-resolution of a detector is, however, especially important in nuclear

  19. The scintillating grid illusion in stereo-depth

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Schrauf; Lothar Spillmann

    2000-01-01

    The dark scintillating dots occurring on a gray-on-black, modified Hermann grid [Schrauf, M., Lingelbach, B., & Wist, E. R. (1997). The scintillating grid illusion. Vision Research, 37, 1033–1038] were studied in stereo-depth by assigning various degrees of disparity to the white inducing disks. Dependent on the sign of disparity, the disks and the dark illusory spots within them appeared to

  20. Light collection in scintillation detector composites for neutron detection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. F. Knoll; T. F. Knoll; T. M. Henderson

    1988-01-01

    With the goal of developing neutron detectors of high detection efficiency and fast response, the authors have been investigating the heterogeneous combination of neutron-conversion materials in a plastic or liquid scintillation matrix. One such combination consists of thin-wall glass microspheres filled with high pressure ³He gas dispersed in plastic scintillator. The authors have now developed glass formulations that are capable

  1. Solution based synthesis of cadmium tungstate scintillation films

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Huamei Shang

    2006-01-01

    In this dissertation, I will summarize my experimental study on the fabrication of oxide scintillation films for X-rays, gamma-rays, and neutrons detection through microstructure engineering by low cost solution methods. The research work has been focused mainly on the fabrication of oxide scintillation films with sol-gel processing, hydrothermal method, taking CdWO4 (CWO) as a model system because of its high

  2. Lanthanum Halide Nanoparticle Scintillators for Nuclear Radiation Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Guss, P. P., Guise, R., Yuan, D., Mukhopadhyay, S., O'Brien, R., Lowe, D.

    2013-02-01

    Nanoparticles with sizes <10 nm were fabricated and characterized for their nanocomposite radiation detector properties. This work investigated the properties of several nanostructured radiation scintillators, in order to determine the viability of using scintillators employing nanostructured lanthanum tribromide, lanthanum trifluoride, or cerium tribromide. Preliminary results of this investigation are consistent with the idea that these materials have an intrinsic response to nuclear radiation that may be correlated to the energy of the incident radiation.

  3. Lanthanum halide nanoparticle scintillators for nuclear radiation detection

    SciTech Connect

    Guss, Paul; Guise, Ronald [Remote Sensing Laboratory, P.O. Box 98521, M/S RSL-48, Las Vegas, Nevada 89193 (United States); Yuan Ding [National Security Technologies, LLC, Los Alamos Operations, P.O. Box 809, M/S LAO/C320, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States); Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy [Remote Sensing Laboratory-Andrews, Building 1783, Arnold Avenue Andrews AFB, Maryland 20762 (United States); O'Brien, Robert; Lowe, Daniel [University of Nevada, Las Vegas, 4505 S. Maryland Parkway, Las Vegas, Nevada 89154 (United States); Kang Zhitao; Menkara, Hisham [Georgia Tech Research Institute, 925 Dalney St., Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Nagarkar, Vivek V. [RMD, Inc., 44 Hunt Street, Watertown, Massachusetts 02472 (United States)

    2013-02-14

    Nanoparticles with sizes <10 nm were fabricated and characterized for their nanocomposite radiation detector properties. This work investigated the properties of several nanostructured radiation scintillators, in order to determine the viability of using scintillators employing nanostructured lanthanum trifluoride. Preliminary results of this investigation are consistent with the idea that these materials have an intrinsic response to nuclear radiation that may be correlated to the energy of the incident radiation.

  4. Radiation characteristics of scintillator coupled CMOS APS for radiography conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kwang Hyun Kim; Soongpyung Kim; Dong-Won Kang; Dong-Kie Kim

    2006-01-01

    Under industrial radiography conditions, we analyzed short-term radiation characteristics of scintillator coupled CMOS APS (hereinafter SC CMOS APS). By means of experimentation, the contribution of the transmitted X-ray through the scintillator to the properties of the CMOS APS and the afterimage, generated in the acquired image even at low dose condition, were investigated. To see the transmitted X-ray effects on

  5. Development of Novel UV Emitting Single Crystalline Film Scintillators

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yu. Zorenko; V. Gorbenko; M. Nikl; J. A. Mares; T. Martin; P.-A. Douissard

    2010-01-01

    The work is dedicated to the development of new types of UV-emitting scintillators based on single crystalline films (SCF) of aluminum perovskites and garnets grown by the liquid phase epitaxy method. The peculiarities of growth and properties of the following three types of UV SCF scintillators are considered in this work: i) Ce-doped SCF of Y-Lu-Al-perovskites with the Ce3+ emission

  6. Lubrication guide

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. O. Bolt; J. G. Carroll

    1991-01-01

    This guide is written for people who may have operating problems with lubricants to resolve. It concentrates on practical items. For example, information about specific types of lubricates from various suppliers -- oils, greases, and special products -- is provided in table format. These tables, the heart of the presentation, include profiles of lubricants for each use category, recommended specific

  7. Polymers Guide

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This 21 page document contains an instructor guide for the polymers module from Nano-Link. The activity requires a background in eight grade science. The document includes background information on polymers, a hands-on learning activity, questions to check understanding, links to multimedia resources, and further readings. Visitors must complete a quick and free registration to access the materials.

  8. style guide

    E-print Network

    MIT EECS style guide :: subbiah + clapp :: January 2012 #12;Subbiah + Clapp 617.576.0593 | ilavenil.subbiah@gmail 5405 PANTONE 5395 PANTONE 165 PANTONE 168 #12;Subbiah + Clapp 617.576.0593 | ilavenil.subbiah@gmail 5405 PANTONE 5395 PANTONE 165 PANTONE 168 #12;Subbiah + Clapp 617.576.0593 | ilavenil.subbiah@gmail

  9. Freestyle Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Research Associates, Inc., Chicago, IL.

    This booklet serves as an introduction to the concept of Freestyle, a career awareness project designed to encourage nine- to twelve-year-olds to freely explore their interests, develop their skills, and choose their career paths. The booklet includes an explanation of the Freestyle project, goals, and components (t.v. programs, project guide,…

  10. Coatings Guide

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Coatings Guide is a free online information resource that focuses on alternative, low-emission coatings for metal, plastic, and architectural substrates. Developed cooperatively by the U.S. EPA's Office of Research and Development and Research Triangle Institute (RTI) Interna...

  11. Automated Groundwater Screening

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Glenn A.; Collard, Leonard, B.

    2005-10-31

    The Automated Intruder Analysis has been extended to include an Automated Ground Water Screening option. This option screens 825 radionuclides while rigorously applying the National Council on Radiation Protection (NCRP) methodology. An extension to that methodology is presented to give a more realistic screening factor for those radionuclides which have significant daughters. The extension has the promise of reducing the number of radionuclides which must be tracked by the customer. By combining the Automated Intruder Analysis with the Automated Groundwater Screening a consistent set of assumptions and databases is used. A method is proposed to eliminate trigger values by performing rigorous calculation of the screening factor thereby reducing the number of radionuclides sent to further analysis. Using the same problem definitions as in previous groundwater screenings, the automated groundwater screening found one additional nuclide, Ge-68, which failed the screening. It also found that 18 of the 57 radionuclides contained in NCRP Table 3.1 failed the screening. This report describes the automated groundwater screening computer application.

  12. Broadband meter-wavelength observations of ionospheric scintillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallows, R. A.; Coles, W. A.; McKay-Bukowski, D.; Vierinen, J.; Virtanen, I. I.; Postila, M.; Ulich, Th.; Enell, C.-F.; Kero, A.; Iinatti, T.; Lehtinen, M.; Orispää, M.; Raita, T.; Roininen, L.; Turunen, E.; Brentjens, M.; Ebbendorf, N.; Gerbers, M.; Grit, T.; Gruppen, P.; Meulman, H.; Norden, M. J.; de Reijer, J.-P.; Schoenmakers, A.; Stuurwold, K.

    2014-12-01

    Intensity scintillations of cosmic radio sources are used to study astrophysical plasmas like the ionosphere, the solar wind, and the interstellar medium. Normally, these observations are relatively narrow band. With Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR) technology at the Kilpisjärvi Atmospheric Imaging Receiver Array (KAIRA) station in northern Finland we have observed scintillations over a three-octave bandwidth. "Parabolic arcs," which were discovered in interstellar scintillations of pulsars, can provide precise estimates of the distance and velocity of the scattering plasma. Here we report the first observations of such arcs in the ionosphere and the first broadband observations of arcs anywhere, raising hopes that study of the phenomenon may similarly improve the analysis of ionospheric scintillations. These observations were made of the strong natural radio source Cygnus-A and covered the entire 30-250 MHz band of KAIRA. Well-defined parabolic arcs were seen early in the observations, before transit, and disappeared after transit although scintillations continued to be obvious during the entire observation. We show that this can be attributed to the structure of Cygnus-A. Initial results from modeling these scintillation arcs are consistent with simultaneous ionospheric soundings taken with other instruments and indicate that scattering is most likely to be associated more with the topside ionosphere than the F region peak altitude. Further modeling and possible extension to interferometric observations, using international LOFAR stations, are discussed.

  13. Observations of GPS scintillation during an isolated auroral substorm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosokawa, Keisuke; Otsuka, Yuichi; Ogawa, Yasunobu; Tsugawa, Takuya

    2014-12-01

    This paper reports simultaneous observations of ionospheric scintillation during an auroral substorm that were made using an all-sky full-color digital single-lens reflex (DSLR) camera (ASC) and a Global Positioning System (GPS) ionospheric scintillation and total electron content monitor (GISTM) in Tromsø (69.60 N, 19.20 E), Norway. On the night of November 19, 2009, a small substorm occurred in northern Scandinavia. The ASC captured its temporal evolution from the beginning of the growth phase to the end of the recovery phase. The amplitude scintillation, as monitored by the S4 index from the GISTM, did not increase in any substorm phase. By contrast, phase scintillation, as measured by the ? ? index, occurred when discrete auroral arcs appeared on the GPS signal path. In particular, the phase scintillation was significantly enhanced for a few minutes immediately after the onset of the expansion phase. During this period, bright and discrete auroral forms covered the entire sky, which implies that structured precipitation on the scale of a few kilometers to a few tens of kilometers dominated the electron density distribution in the E region. Such inhomogeneous ionization structures probably produced significant changes in the refractive index and eventually resulted in the enhancement of the phase scintillation.

  14. An auroral scintillation observation using precise, collocated GPS receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garner, T. W.; Harris, R. B.; York, J. A.; Herbster, C. S.; Minter, C. F., III; Hampton, D. L.

    2011-02-01

    On 10 January 2009, an unusual ionospheric scintillation event was observed by a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver station in Fairbanks, Alaska. The receiver station is part of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency's (NGA) Monitoring Station Network (MSN). Each MSN station runs two identical geodetic-grade, dual-frequency, full-code tracking GPS receivers that share a common antenna. At the Fairbanks station, a third separate receiver with a separate antenna is located nearby. During the 10 January event, ionospheric conditions caused two of the receivers to loose lock on a single satellite. The third receiver tracked through the scintillation. The region of scintillation was collocated with an auroral arc and a slant total electron content (TEC) increase of 5.71 TECu (TECu = 1016/m2). The response of the full-code tracking receivers to the scintillation is intriguing. One of these receivers lost lock, but the other receiver did not. This fact argues that a receiver's internal state dictates its reaction to scintillation. Additionally, the scintillation only affected the L2 signal. While this causes the L1 signal to be lost on the semicodelessly receiver, the full-code tracking receiver only lost the L1 signal when the receiver attempted to reacquire the satellite link.

  15. The lower bound on the timing resolution of scintillation detectors.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Stefan; van Dam, Herman T; Schaart, Dennis R

    2012-04-01

    The timing performance of scintillation detectors is ultimately limited by photon counting statistics. In fact, photon counting statistics form a dominant contribution to the overall timing resolution of many state-of-the-art detectors. A common approach to investigate this contribution is to calculate the variance in the registration times of individual scintillation photons within the photosensor. However, in general the single-photon variance is not equal to the intrinsic limit on the timing resolution, since in principle one can make use of the timing information carried by all photons detected. In this work, the Cramér-Rao lower bound on the timing resolution of a scintillation detector, based on the information contained in the full set of registered photons, is calculated. The results appear to be in good agreement with trends observed in the literature. Furthermore, it is shown that the timestamp obtained from any single scintillation photon never yields the optimum timing resolution for realistic scintillation detectors. Yet, it appears that the intrinsic timing resolution limit can be approached closely by making use of the timestamps from a relatively small number of photons emitted during the initial part of the scintillation pulse. PMID:22410975

  16. Development of High Resolution Scintillator Systems Based on Photocell Technology

    SciTech Connect

    W.J. Kernan; L.A. Franks; M. Groza; A. Burger

    2006-01-01

    Inorganic scintillator/photomultiplier-based spectrometers are the systems of choice for a multitude of X-ray and gamma radiation measurement applications. Despite widespread use, they have numerous shortcomings. The most serious shortcoming is the relatively poor energy resolution that makes isotope identification problematic, particularly in the case of trace quantities. Energy resolution in scintillator/photomultiplier tube (PMT) spectrometers is governed by a combination of the crystal intrinsic resolution that includes non-linearity effects, photomultiplier statistics, and the variability in the probability of a scintillation photon generating a photoelectron at the photocathode. It is evident that energy resolution in these systems is linked to both the physics of light generation in the scintillator and the characteristics of the PMT. PMTs also present design problems, especially in the case of handheld and portable instruments, due to their considerable weight and volume. Additionally, PMTs require well-regulated high voltage, and are vulnerable to magnetic fields. The objective of this work is to provide instrument designers of scintillation-based gamma-ray spectrometers with superior energy resolution and greatly reduced weight and volume. It is planned to achieve this advancement by optimizing the performance of a new class of inorganic scintillators by matching their emission spectra with the enhanced quantum efficiency of certain photocells.

  17. High energy resolution with transparent ceramic garnet scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherepy, N. J.; Seeley, Z. M.; Payne, S. A.; Beck, P. R.; Swanberg, E. L.; Hunter, S.; Ahle, L.; Fisher, S. E.; Melcher, C.; Wei, H.; Stefanik, T.; Chung, Y.-S.; Kindem, J.

    2014-09-01

    Breakthrough energy resolution, R(662keV) < 4%, has been achieved with an oxide scintillator, Cerium-doped Gadolinium Yttrium Gallium Aluminum Garnet, or GYGAG(Ce). Transparent ceramic GYGAG(Ce), has a peak emission wavelength of 550 nm that is better matched to Silicon photodetectors than to standard PMTs. We are therefore developing a spectrometer based on pixelated GYGAG(Ce) on a Silicon photodiode array that can provide R(662 keV) = 3.6%. In comparison, with large 1-2 in3 size GYGAG(Ce) ceramics we obtain R(662 keV) = 4.6% with PMT readout. We find that ceramic GYGAG(Ce) of a given stoichiometric chemical composition can exhibit very different scintillation properties, depending on sintering conditions and post-anneal treatments. Among the characteristics of transparent ceramic garnet scintillators that can be controlled by fabrication conditions are: scintillation decay components and their amplitudes, intensity and duration of afterglow, thermoluminescence glow curve peak positions and amplitudes, integrated light yield, light yield non-proportionality - as measured in the Scintillator Light Yield Non-Proportionality Characterization Instrument (SLYNCI), and energy resolution for gamma spectroscopy. Garnet samples exhibiting a significant fraction of Cerium dopant in the tetravalent valence also exhibit: faster overall scintillation decay, very low afterglow, high light yield, but poor light yield proportionality and degraded energy resolution.

  18. A rapid method for the simultaneous determination of gross alpha and beta activities in water samples using a low background liquid scintillation counter.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Cabeza, J A; Pujol, L

    1995-05-01

    The radiological examination of water requires a rapid screening technique that permits the determination of the gross alpha and beta activities of each sample in order to decide if further radiological analyses are necessary. In this work, the use of a low background liquid scintillation system (Quantulus 1220) is proposed to simultaneously determine the gross activities in water samples. Liquid scintillation is compared to more conventional techniques used in most monitoring laboratories. In order to determine the best counting configuration of the system, pulse shape discrimination was optimized for 6 scintillant/vial combinations. It was concluded that the best counting configuration was obtained with the scintillation cocktail Optiphase Hisafe 3 in Zinsser low diffusion vials. The detection limits achieved were 0.012 Bq L-1 and 0.14 Bq L-1 for gross alpha and beta activity respectively, after a 1:10 concentration process by simple evaporation and for a counting time of only 360 min. The proposed technique is rapid, gives spectral information, and is adequate to determine gross activities according to the World Health Organization (WHO) guideline values. PMID:7730064

  19. Characterization of water-based liquid scintillator response to gammas and neutrons at varying scintillator-surfactant concentrations

    E-print Network

    Chilton, Lauren (Lauren M.)

    2012-01-01

    Large scale solar neutron and neutrino flux experiments require many tons of bulk liquid organic scintillator to take spectroscopic data of these energetic particles. However, material and chemical concerns make such ...

  20. Optical Design Considerations for Efficient Light Collection from Liquid Scintillation Counters

    SciTech Connect

    Bernacki, Bruce E.; Douglas, Matthew; Erchinger, Jennifer L.; Fuller, Erin S.; Keillor, Martin E.; Morley, Shannon M.; Mullen, Crystal A.; Orrell, John L.; Panisko, Mark E.; Warren, Glen A.; Wright, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Liquid scintillation counters measure charged particle-emitting radioactive isotopes and are used for environmental studies, nuclear chemistry, and life science. Alpha and beta emissions arising from the material under study interact with the scintillation cocktail to produce light. The prototypical liquid scintillation counter employs low-level photon-counting detectors to measure the arrival of the scintillation light produced as a result of the dissolved material under study interacting with the scintillation cocktail. For reliable operation the counting instrument must convey the scintillation light to the detectors efficiently and predictably. Current best practices employ the use of two or more detectors for coincidence processing to discriminate true scintillation events from background events due to instrumental effects such as photomultiplier tube dark rates, tube flashing, or other light emission not generated in the scintillation cocktail vial. In low background liquid scintillation counters additional attention is paid to shielding the scintillation cocktail from naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) present in the laboratory and within the instruments construction materials. Low background design is generally at odds with optimal light collection. This study presents the evolution of a light collection design for liquid scintillation counting in a low background shield. The basic approach to achieve both good light collection and a low background measurement is described. The baseline signals arising from the scintillation vial are modeled and methods to efficiently collect scintillation light are presented as part of the development of a customized low-background, high sensitivity liquid scintillation counting system.

  1. Cell-based screening: extracting meaning from complex data.

    PubMed

    Finkbeiner, Steven; Frumkin, Michael; Kassner, Paul D

    2015-04-01

    Unbiased discovery approaches have the potential to uncover neurobiological insights into CNS disease and lead to the development of therapies. Here, we review lessons learned from imaging-based screening approaches and recent advances in these areas, including powerful new computational tools to synthesize complex data into more useful knowledge that can reliably guide future research and development. PMID:25856492

  2. ScreenFlow

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2008-01-01

    Capturing images and screen shots can be tricky, and it's nice to hear about new applications that can help out with such tasks. ScreenFlow allows users to create screen recordings and it also includes an array of editing options. Visitors should note that this is a trial version, and that the full-featured version costs $99. This version is compatible with computers running Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard.

  3. Breast screening revisited.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Alka; Tripathi, Prem; Sahu, Abhinav; Daftary, Jalpa

    2014-01-01

    Breast screening is the medical screening of asymptomatic, apparently healthy women for breast lump in an attempt to achieve an earlier diagnosis. The assumption is that the early detection will improve outcomes. In western countries, breast screening programs have led to a significant reduction in mortality and improved prognosis of patients with breast cancer. However in India, although the number of breast cancer are on the rise there is no such organized program. This article emphasizes on the importance of breast screening and protocol to be followed in our country where it can have significant impact on the prognosis. PMID:25657940

  4. The LHCb Upgrade Scintillating Fibre Tracker

    E-print Network

    Leverington, Blake D

    2014-01-01

    The Scintillating Fibre (SciFi) Tracker is designed to replace the current downstream tracking detectors in the LHCb Upgrade during 2018 (CERN/LHCC 2014-001; LHCb TDR 15). The operation and the results obtained from the data collected 2011 and 2012 demonstrate that the current detector is robust and functioning very well. However, the limit of O ( 1 fb-1) of data per year cannot be overcome without improving the detector. This will be achieved using 25 ns bunch spacing with the average number of proton-proton interactions per bunch crossing n = 7 : 6. Collecting data at this luminosity will only be possible if the detector is improved by increasing the readout of the front-end electronics to 40MHz and implementing a more flexible software-based triggering system that will increase the data rate as well as the efficiency. The increase in interactions per bunch crossing will result in an increased occupancy in the tracking detectors and will exceed the operational occupancy for the Outer Tracker. Here we presen...

  5. Is admission screening for Pseudomonas aeruginosa useful in haematologic patients? A prospective study with 1310 patients.

    PubMed

    Sidler, J A; Frei, R; Tschudin-Sutter, S; Dangel, M; Battegay, M; Weisser, M; Passweg, J; Widmer, A F

    2015-06-01

    Screening for Pseudomonas aeruginosa is recommended to guide empirical antimicrobial therapy in patients on high-risk units. However, evidence for this approach is scarce. We therefore screened 1310 patients with severe haematologic diseases for P. aeruginosa colonization at admission: 108 (8.2%) were positive, but only nine (0.7%; six with the same clone as in the screening isolate) subsequently developed a P. aeruginosa bloodstream infection (positive predictive value of screening, 8.6%; negative predictive value of screening, 99.5%). Routine screening for P. aeruginosa at admission did not sufficiently predict subsequent bloodstream infections caused by P. aeruginosa. PMID:25680312

  6. Characterization of 4 × 4ch MPPC array in scintillation spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grodzicka, M.; Moszy?ski, M.; Szcz??niak, T.; Szaw?owski, M.; Baszak, J.

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this work is an evaluation of MPPC array characteristics in application for scintillation light readout in gamma-ray spectrometry. Hamamatsu MPPC array of 4 × 4 channels format and total area of 12 × 12 mm2 was used as a light readout device with CsI:Tl, BGO, LSO, LaBr3, NaI:Tl, CsI:Na, LaCl3, CaF2:Eu, and CdWO4 scintillators. The measurements presented in this work covered: measurements of the breakdown voltage for each channel of the MPPC array, selection of the optimum operating voltage, evaluation of the linearity range of MPPC response for each of the used crystals, measurements of the number of photoelectrons per MeV and measurements of the energy resolution for 661.6 keV ?-rays from 137Cs. The results of the energy resolution and number of photoelectrons obtained with the tested MPPC and nine scintillators were compared to those obtained for the same scintillators with XP2020Q and XP5212 PMTs. The energy resolution data for 661.6 keV ?-rays, obtained with 12 × 12 × 12 mm3 CsI:Tl, LSO and BGO scintillators coupled to the tested MPPC are equal to: 6.4%, 9.4% and 9.5%, respectively, and are close to the results obtained for the same scintillators coupled to the XP2020Q PMT (6.6%, 9.4% and 10.5%, respectively). The study showed that light readout by means of an MPPC array produces comparable or even slightly better (in the case of a proper match of the MPPC and the scintillator optical surface) results than the XP2020Q PMT readout.

  7. Towards an understanding of nonlinearity in scintillator detector materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizarri, G.; Moses, W. W.; Payne, S. A.; Williams, R. T.

    2011-09-01

    It has been known for more than 50 years that the light emitted by a scintillator under high-energy excitation (gamma, alpha, proton) is not always proportional to the amount of absorbed energy. The deviation from the linearity of luminosity versus absorbed energy is known as nonproportionality. In addition to its academic interest, this phenomenon has been considered central for scintillator development due to its implication in the limitation of achievable detector performance. Although non-proportional response was studied intensively during the second part of the 20th century, the understanding of its origin and implications on scintillator performance are mainly qualitative. Research in the 1960s uncovered a correlation between proportional response and ionization density, while in the 1980s nonproportionality was proposed as the main reason of energy resolution deviation from the counting statistics limit. It is only recently that the bridge between qualitative and quantitative understanding has been crossed, mainly driven by the large effort undertaken to discover new high-resolution scintillators. Developing such detector materials prompted efforts to gain a deeper understanding of the microscopic processes involved in scintillation mechanisms and so in nonproportionality. In this manuscript, the phenomenology of past and present understanding of non-proportional response will be reviewed. Based on recent experimental, computational and theoretical works, the relation between nonlinear response and energy resolution degradation will be addressed. Finally, the relation between material parameters and proportionality will be evaluated. These recent works are leading towards a deeper understanding of nonlinearity in scintillator detector materials and should result in the development of new high performance scintillator materials.

  8. Newborn screening in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Rustama, Diet S; Fadil, M Ryadi; Harahap, Elly R; Primadi, Aris

    2003-01-01

    In Indonesia, newborn screening is not yet a policy, and the incidence of preventable causes of mental retardation detected by newborn screening is not known. Congenital hypothyroidism (CH) is not infrequent. Without a screening program, unrecognized CH patients were neglected for years. Since May 1999, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has assisted in starting a CH Newborn Screening Project to estimate the local incidence of CH and to evaluate the problems associated with the screening. In June 2000, a pilot study was conducted using primary TSH measurement, supplemented by T4 in infants with elevated TSH. The target was to screen 12,000 newborn infants, using cord blood serum taken at birth, or a heel prick between 2 to 6 days of age. Between June 2000 and February 2001, 3,534 neonates born in 4 hospitals were screened using cord blood serum taken at birth (recall rate 3.3%). From March 2001 onwards, the heel prick method was used and participating hospitals increased from 4 to 7. Using this approach, until August 2001, 3,309 samples were analysed and the recall rate was much lower (0.64%). The number of unsatisfactory samples was relatively high due to an unstable process of blood collection. Parental refusal and low acceptance of screening among policy makers resulted from lack of awareness of the dangers of CH, and the screening program was not considered a health priority. Recall of patients after screening was a major barrier, with problems in tracking patients arising from urbanization and a high rate of relocation. To advance the CH screening program nationwide, infrastructure must be improved along with the recall system, and education as well as information campaigns for parents and medical professionals must be intensified. The Department of Health must be persuaded to give a national mandate. PMID:15906701

  9. COVARIANCE ASSISTED SCREENING AND ESTIMATION

    PubMed Central

    Ke, By Tracy; Jin, Jiashun; Fan, Jianqing

    2014-01-01

    Consider a linear model Y = X ? + z, where X = Xn,p and z ~ N(0, In). The vector ? is unknown and it is of interest to separate its nonzero coordinates from the zero ones (i.e., variable selection). Motivated by examples in long-memory time series (Fan and Yao, 2003) and the change-point problem (Bhattacharya, 1994), we are primarily interested in the case where the Gram matrix G = X?X is non-sparse but sparsifiable by a finite order linear filter. We focus on the regime where signals are both rare and weak so that successful variable selection is very challenging but is still possible. We approach this problem by a new procedure called the Covariance Assisted Screening and Estimation (CASE). CASE first uses a linear filtering to reduce the original setting to a new regression model where the corresponding Gram (covariance) matrix is sparse. The new covariance matrix induces a sparse graph, which guides us to conduct multivariate screening without visiting all the submodels. By interacting with the signal sparsity, the graph enables us to decompose the original problem into many separated small-size subproblems (if only we know where they are!). Linear filtering also induces a so-called problem of information leakage, which can be overcome by the newly introduced patching technique. Together, these give rise to CASE, which is a two-stage Screen and Clean (Fan and Song, 2010; Wasserman and Roeder, 2009) procedure, where we first identify candidates of these submodels by patching and screening, and then re-examine each candidate to remove false positives. For any procedure ?? for variable selection, we measure the performance by the minimax Hamming distance between the sign vectors of ?? and ?. We show that in a broad class of situations where the Gram matrix is non-sparse but sparsifiable, CASE achieves the optimal rate of convergence. The results are successfully applied to long-memory time series and the change-point model. PMID:25541567

  10. Film Screening and Conversation

    E-print Network

    Mathis, Wayne N.

    Film Screening and Conversation 2011 6-9pm Smithsonian Asian Paci c American Program Rasmuson Director John Sayles Film Run Time: 124 minutes Closest Metro: L'Enfant Plaza Related Traveling Exhibition, the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Program presents a screening of the film Amigo and a conversation

  11. DCCPS: BRP: PCRB: Screening

    Cancer.gov

    PCRB is interested in research that promotes optimal use of breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer screenings in populations. Optimal use balances the benefit of screening for people who will get cancer in their lifetime against the harms to those who will not get cancer.

  12. Newborn screening fact sheets.

    PubMed

    Kaye, Celia I; Accurso, Frank; La Franchi, Stephen; Lane, Peter A; Hope, Northrup; Sonya, Pang; G Bradley, Schaefer; Michele A, Lloyd-Puryear

    2006-09-01

    Newborn screening fact sheets were last revised in 1996 by the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Genetics. This revision was prompted by advances in the field since 1996, including technologic innovations, as well as greater appreciation of ethical issues such as those surrounding informed consent. The following disorders are discussed in this revision of the newborn screening fact sheets: biotinidase deficiency, congenital adrenal hyperplasia, congenital hearing loss, congenital hypothyroidism, cystic fibrosis, galactosemia, homocystinuria, maple syrup urine disease, medium-chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency, phenylketonuria, sickle cell disease and other hemoglobinopathies, and tyrosinemia. A series of topics related to newborn screening is discussed in a companion publication to this electronic publication of the fact sheets (available at: www.pediatrics.org/cgi/content/full/118/3/1304). These topics are newborn screening as a public health system; factors contributing to the need for review of the newborn screening system; informed consent; tandem mass spectrometry; DNA analysis in newborn screening; status of newborn screening in the United States; and the effect of sample timing, preterm birth, diet, transfusion, and total parenteral nutrition on newborn screening results. PMID:16950973

  13. Geant4 simulation of zinc oxide nanowires in anodized aluminum oxide template as a low energy X-ray scintillator detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taheri, Ali; Saramad, Shahyar; Setayeshi, Saeed

    2013-02-01

    In this work, ZnO nanowires in anodized aluminum oxide nanoporous template are proposed as an architecture for development of new generation of scintillator based X-ray imagers. The optical response of crystalline ordered ZnO nanowire arrays in porous anodized aluminum oxide template under 20 keV X-ray illumination is simulated using the Geant4 Monte Carlo code. The results show that anodized aluminum oxide template has a special impact as a light guide to conduct the optical photons induced by X-ray toward the detector thickness and to decrease the light scattering in detector volume. This inexpensive and effective method can significantly improve the spatial resolution in scintillator based X-ray imagers, especially in medical applications.

  14. Screening for melanoma.

    PubMed

    Collins, Mary-Katharine M; Secrest, Aaron M; Ferris, Laura K

    2014-10-01

    Although melanoma is a deadly cancer that is rising in incidence, the USA does not have uniform guidelines for melanoma screening. Screening for melanoma requires no specialized equipment and has little associated morbidity. However, screening has the greatest impact when performed among patients with the highest risk for melanoma incidence and mortality. Screening lower-risk patients may result in prohibitively high costs, unnecessary biopsies of benign lesions, and decreased access to a dermatologic specialist for patients who are actually at a higher risk. We advocate targeting melanoma screening efforts toward those patients at high risk of developing and dying from melanoma, as well as toward those at-risk patients who are least likely to detect their own melanoma. PMID:24999755

  15. Forecasting Equatorial Scintillation Activity in Real-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redmon, R.; Anderson, D.; Caton, R. G.; Bullett, T. W.

    2008-12-01

    It is well-known that the generation of equatorial, F-region plasma density irregularities, via the Generalized Rayleigh-Taylor instability mechanism is critically dependent on the magnitude of the pre-reversal enhancement (PRE) in upward ExB drift velocity after sunset. These plasma density "bubbles" that are generated after sunset lead to the "scintillation" of trans-ionospheric radio wave signals that pass through these bubbles and is commonly referred to as "scintillation activity". Communication and Navigation systems can be severely disrupted by these plasma density irregularities. A measure of scintillation activity is given by the "S4 Index" and a network of Air Force, ground-based UHF and L-band receivers measuring the S4 Index is called the SCIntillation Network Decision Aid (SCINDA) network. This paper describes a technique for automatically forecasting, in real-time, the occurrence or non-occurrence of scintillation activity that relies on real-time data from a ground-based ionospheric sounder at or near the geomagnetic equator. After sunset, the height-rise with time of the bottom-side of the F-layer reflects the magnitude of the upward ExB drift velocity. The value of the ionospheric parameter, h'f (the virtual height of the bottom-side F-layer) at 1930 LT reflects the integrated ExB drift effect on lifting the F-layer to an altitude where the Rayleigh-Taylor instability mechanism becomes important. Incorporating observed h'f values from the Jicamarca, Peru digital sounder at 1930 LT and relating these values to the Total Hourly S4 Index (THS4) observed by the UHF receiver at the Ancon, Peru SCINDA site, it is found that a "threshold" in h'f exists below which, THS4 < 1 (no scintillation activity) and above which THS4 > 1 (scintillation activity). Examples of Jicamarca sounder observations and h'f values prior to the onset of scintillation activity are given. We present results that describe how the threshold value of h'f changes with solar cycle activity and how these results have been incorporated into a real-time capability for automatically forecasting scintillation activity that is available on Google Earth to all interested parties.

  16. A scintillating fission detector for neutron flux measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Stange, Sy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Esch, Ernst I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Burgett, Eric A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; May, Iain [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Muenchausen, Ross E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Taw, Felicia [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tovesson, Fredrik K [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Neutron flux monitors are commonly used for a variety of nuclear physics applications. A scintillating neutron detector, consisting of a liquid scintillator loaded with fissionable material, has been developed, characterized, and tested in the beam line at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, and shows a significant improvement in neutron sensitivity compared with a conventional fission chamber. Recent research on nanocomposite-based scintillators for gamma-ray detection indicates that this approach can be extended to load nanoparticles of fissionable material into a scintillating matrix, with up to three orders of magnitude higher loading than typical fission chambers. This will result in a rugged, cost-efficient detector with high efficiency, a short signal rise time, and the ability to be used in low neutron-flux environments. Initial efforts to utilize the luminescence of uranyl oxide to eliminate the need for wavelength-shifting dyes were unsuccessful. Excitation of uranyl compounds has been reported at wavelengths ranging from 266 nm to 532 nm. However, neither the 300 nm emission of toluene, nor the 350 nm emission of PPO, nor the 410 nm emission of POPOP resulted in significant excitation of and emission by uranyl oxide. As indicated by UV/visible spectroscopy, light emitted at these wavelengths was absorbed by the colored solution. {sup 235}U remains the most attractive candidate for a fissionable scintillator, due to its high fission cross-section and lack of a threshold fission energy, but all solutions containing molecular uranium compounds will be colored, most more highly than the U{sup 6+} compounds used here. Research is therefore continuing toward the fabrication of uranium nanoparticles, in which, due to Rayleigh scattering, the coloration should be less pronounced. The characterization of the thorium-loaded liquid scintillator and the fabrication of the 100 mL detectors for use at LANSCE demonstrated the feasibility of loading fissionable material into a liquid scintillator. Analysis of beam line experiments using the thorium-loaded scintillator is underway to determine the fission event rate in the detector, for comparison with a conventional fission chamber as well as with an unloaded liquid scintillator.

  17. Greenhouse Raspberry Production Guide

    E-print Network

    Walter, M.Todd

    Greenhouse Raspberry Production Guide For winter or year-round production Department.fruit.cornell.edu/berry.html Production Guide Greenhouse Raspberry For winter or year-round production #12;#12;Greenhouse Raspberry Production Guide About this Guide The Greenhouse Raspberry Production Guide was origi- nally written

  18. Low-latitude scintillation weakening during sudden stratospheric warming events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paula, E. R.; Jonah, O. F.; Moraes, A. O.; Kherani, E. A.; Fejer, B. G.; Abdu, M. A.; Muella, M. T. A. H.; Batista, I. S.; Dutra, S. L. G.; Paes, R. R.

    2015-03-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) L1-frequency (1.575 GHz) amplitude scintillations at São José dos Campos (23.1°S, 45.8°W, dip latitude 17.3°S), located under the southern crest of the equatorial ionization anomaly, are analyzed during the Northern Hemisphere winter sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) events of 2001/2002, 2002/2003, and 2012/2013. The events occurred during a period when moderate to strong scintillations are normally observed in the Brazilian longitude sector. The selected SSW events were of moderate and major categories and under low Kp conditions. The most important result of the current study is the long-lasting (many weeks) weakening of scintillation amplitudes at this low-latitude station, compared to their pre-SSW periods. Ionosonde-derived evening vertical plasma drifts and meridional neutral wind effects inferred from total electron content measurements are consistent with the observed weakening of GPS scintillations during these SSW events. This work provides strong evidence of SSW effects on ionospheric scintillations and the potential consequences of such SSW events on Global Navigation Satellite System-based applications.

  19. Tests of Multibeam Scintillation Mitigation on Laser Uplinks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Keith

    2004-01-01

    A report presents additional details about parts of the program of research and development that is the topic of the immediately preceding article. The report emphasizes those aspects of the program that pertain to the use of multiple uplink laser beams in a ground-to-spacecraft optical communication system to reduce (relative to the case of a single uplink laser beam) the depth and frequency of occurrence of fades in the uplink signal received at the spacecraft. The underlying multibeam scintillation-mitigation concept was described in "Multiple-Beam Transmission for Optical Communication" (NPO-20384), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 22, No. 11 (November 1998), page 56. The report discusses the need for mitigating uplink scintillation; briefly describes the Optical Communications Telescope Laboratory and its role as the ground station in the research; summarizes prior experiments in uplink scintillation and multibeam mitigation of scintillation in ground-to-spacecraft laser communications; and describes key experiments planned to be performed in the next five years. The report then elaborates somewhat on the initial experiments, which are to be dedicated to understanding and perfecting the multibeam scintillation-mitigation strategy.

  20. Scintillating Fiber Technology for a High Energy Neutron Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, Evgeny; Adams, James; Watts, John, Jr.; Christl, Mark

    Secondary neutrons within a crewed spacecraft make a significant contribution to the radiation exposure of the crew. In order to determine the dose equivalent the absolute neutron energy spectrum must be measured. Making this measurement in the crew quarters requires an instrument that distinguishes neutrons from the background of gamma ray and charged particle radiation with high reliability. A design for a high energy neutron spectrometer will be presented that achieves excellent background rejection while measuring the absolute neutron differential energy spectrum. This spectrometer consists of 6Li-loaded scintillating glass optical fiber waveguides which are imbedded in plastic scintillator. The plastic scintillator measures the neutron energy while thermalizing the neutrons. Once thermalized, the neutrons can be absorbed by 6Li, which gives a signal in the glass fibers. Optically separating the signals from the glass fibers and in the plastic scintillator is critical for strong background rejection. It permits the thermal neutron absorption signal in the glass fibers to be detected while signals from gamma rays and charges particles are rejected with high efficiency. This talk will discuss the methods for creating optical fiber waveguides from 6Li glass loaded scintillating fibers.

  1. Measurement of ortho-positronium properties in liquid scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perasso, S.; Consolati, G.; Franco, D.; Jollet, C.; Meregaglia, A.; Tonazzo, A.; Yeh, M.

    2014-03-01

    Pulse shape discrimination is a well-established technique for background rejection in liquid scintillator detectors. It is particularly effective in separating heavy particles from light particles, but not in distinguishing electrons from positrons. This inefficiency can be overtaken by exploiting the formation of ortho-positronium (o-Ps), which alters the time profile of light pulses induced by positrons. We characterized the o-Ps properties in the most commonly used liquid scintillators, i.e. PC, PXE, LAB, OIL and PC + PPO. In addition, we studied the effects of scintillator doping on the o-Ps properties for dopants used in neutrino-less double beta decay experiments (Nd and Te) and in anti-neutrino and neutron detection (Gd and Li respectively). We found that the o-Ps properties are similar in all the tested scintillators, with a lifetime around 3 ns and a formation probability of about 50%. This result indicates that an o-Ps-enhanced pulse shape discrimination can be applied in liquid scintillator detectors for neutrino and anti-neutrino detection and for neutrino-less double beta decay search.

  2. Bright Semiconductor Scintillator for High Resolution X-Ray Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Nagarkar, Vivek V.; Gaysinskiy, Valeriy; Ovechkina, Olena E.; Miller, Stuart; Singh, Bipin; Guo, Liang; Irving, Thomas (IIT); (Rad. Monitoring)

    2011-08-16

    We report on a novel approach to produce oxygen-doped zinc telluride (ZnTe:O), a remarkable group II-VI semiconductor scintillator, fabricated in the columnar-structured or polycrystalline forms needed to fulfill the needs of many demanding X-ray and {gamma}-ray imaging applications. ZnTe:O has one of the highest conversion efficiencies among known scintillators, emission around 680 nm (which is ideally suited for CCD sensors), high density of 6.4 g/cm{sup 3}, fast decay time of {approx}1 {micro}s with negligible afterglow, and orders of magnitude higher radiation resistance compared to commonly used scintillators. These properties allow the use of ZnTe:O in numerous applications, including X-ray imaging, nuclear medicine (particularly SPECT), room temperature radioisotope identification, and homeland security. Additionally, ZnTe:O offers distinct advantages for synchrotron-based high resolution imaging due to the absence of atomic absorption edges in the low energy range, which otherwise reduce resolution due to secondary X-ray formations. We have fabricated films of ZnTe:O using a vapor deposition technique that allows large-area structured scintillator fabrication in a time- and cost-efficient manner, and evaluated its performance for small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) at an Argonne National Laboratory synchrotron beamline. Details of the fabrication and characterization of the optical, scintillation and imaging properties of the ZnTe:O films are presented in this paper.

  3. Colorectal cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Leggett, B A; Hewett, D G

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common malignancies in Australia, and screening to detect it an earlier stage is cost-effective. Furthermore, detection and removal of precursor polyps can reduce incidence. Currently, there are limited data to determine the screening rate in Australia, but it is certainly lower than the 80% screening rate considered desirable. Whether colonoscopy is used as the screening test or to follow up positive results of an initial non-invasive test, it plays a fundamental role. Despite high sensitivity and specificity, it is expensive and invasive with measurable risk and is not acceptable as an initial test to many participants. It does not provide complete protection, and interval cancers between planned colonoscopies are associated with proximal location, origin in sessile serrated adenomas and operator-dependent factors. An essential component of colorectal screening is the measurement of colonoscopy quality indicators, such as caecal intubation and adenoma detection rates, which are known to be associated with the rate of interval cancer. The non-invasive screening test currently recommended in Australia is biennial testing for faecal occult blood between the ages of 50 and 75 using a faecal immunochemical test, with positives evaluated by colonoscopy. This is provided through the National Bowel Cancer Screening Programme, currently for those at the ages of 50, 55, 60 and 65 years, with full implementation of biennial screening by 2020. To improve screening in Australia, the most fruitful approach may be to acknowledge that there is a choice of screening tests and to focus on the goal of improving overall participation rate and being able to measure this. PMID:25582937

  4. Indium-111-Photofrin-II scintillation scan

    SciTech Connect

    Origitano, T.C.; Karesh, S.M.; Reichman, O.H.; Henkin, R.E.; Caron, M.J.

    1989-04-01

    Photodynamic therapy is under intense investigation as an adjuvant treatment for malignant glial tumors of the central nervous system. Photofrin-II (HpD-II) is currently the most actively investigated photosensitizing agent. A crucial issue regarding the safe and efficacious usage of HpD-II-based photodynamic therapy is the individual in vivo kinetics of tumor uptake and retention, compared with normal brain clearance. The optimal time for photoactivation of sensitized tumor must be known to ensure a high target-to-nontarget ratio, resulting in the maximal tumor destruction while preserving normal brain. Our laboratory developed a radionuclide scan based on 111indium (111In)-labeled HpD-II to evaluate HpD-II localization and clearance noninvasively within a canine model of intracerebral gliosarcoma. Synthesis of the 111In-HpD-II complex in greater than 90% yield is achieved by a simple, rapid labeling method. Radiochemical purity and stability were verified by high-performance liquid chromatography. Using the canine model of intracerebral gliosarcoma, we followed the uptake of 111In-HpD-II in tumors with serial scintillation scanning. Localization of the tumor by 111In-HpD-II has been verified by contrast-enhanced computed tomographic scan followed by gross and histological examination of the enhancing brain region. Total body biodistribution of 111In-HpD-II at various times after injection has been evaluated. The ratio of uptake in tumor compared with surrounding brain peaked at 72 hours after injection. The knowledge of regional distribution and concentration of a photosensitizing agent within a tumor mass and surrounding brain allows for the most efficacious timing and localization of a photoactivating source.

  5. New scintillators for fiber optics: system sensitivity and bandwidth as a function of fiber length

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, S.; Franks, L.A.; Flournoy, J.M.; Lyons, P.B.

    1981-01-01

    Long-wavelength liquid scintillators have been developed for fiber-optic plasma-diagnostic experiments. Relative system sensitivity and bandwidth data as a function of fiber length for several scintillator systems will be presented.

  6. A History of Vision Screening.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appelboom, Tina M.

    1985-01-01

    The vision screening program has a long and interesting history involving educators, pediatricians, optometrists, and ophthamologists. This historical review of vision screening in the schools includes a discussion of amblyopia and screening of preschool students. (Author/CB)

  7. Use of internal scintillator radioactivity to calibrate DOI function of a PET detector with a dual-ended-scintillator readout

    PubMed Central

    Bircher, Chad; Shao, Yiping

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Positron emission tomography (PET) detectors that use a dual-ended-scintillator readout to measure depth-of-interaction (DOI) must have an accurate DOI function to provide the relationship between DOI and signal ratios to be used for detector calibration and recalibration. In a previous study, the authors used a novel and simple method to accurately and quickly measure DOI function by irradiating the detector with an external uniform flood source; however, as a practical concern, implementing external uniform flood sources in an assembled PET system is technically challenging and expensive. In the current study, therefore, the authors investigated whether the same method could be used to acquire DOI function from scintillator-generated (i.e., internal) radiation. The authors also developed a method for calibrating the energy scale necessary to select the events within the desired energy window. Methods: The authors measured the DOI function of a PET detector with lutetium yttrium orthosilicate (LYSO) scintillators. Radiation events originating from the scintillators’ internal Lu-176 beta decay were used to measure DOI functions which were then compared with those measured from both an external uniform flood source and an electronically collimated external point source. The authors conducted these studies with several scintillators of differing geometries (1.5?×?1.5 and 2.0?×?2.0 mm2 cross-section area and 20, 30, and 40 mm length) and various surface finishes (mirror-finishing, saw-cut rough, and other finishes in between), and in a prototype array. Results: All measured results using internal and external radiation sources showed excellent agreement in DOI function measurement. The mean difference among DOI values for all scintillators measured from internal and external radiation sources was less than 1.0 mm for different scintillator geometries and various surface finishes. Conclusions: The internal radioactivity of LYSO scintillators can be used to accurately measure DOI function in PET detectors, regardless of scintillator geometry or surface finish. Because an external radiation source is not needed, this method of DOI function measurement can be practically applied to individual PET detectors as well as assembled systems. PMID:22320787

  8. Tilt Estimation in Moderate-to-Strong Scintillation.

    PubMed

    Burl, J B; Roggemann, M C; Welsh, B

    2001-06-20

    Adaptive optics systems are being applied in ever more challenging environments, for example, the projection of lasers over long horizontal paths through the atmosphere. These long atmospheric paths corrupt the signal received from the beacon and typically yield highly scintillated received wave fronts. Tilt estimation for controlling the fast steering mirror in these systems is complicated by the presence of branch points in the scintillated received wave fronts. In particular, correlation between the tilt and the projected beam's centroid error at the target has been observed in horizontal laser beam projection experiments. The presence of this correlation indicates that better tracking performance should be achievable. We compare the performance of four estimation schemes applied to tilt estimation in a horizontal laser projection system. It is demonstrated that all four schemes underestimate the tilt required to return the laser beam to a target in highly scintillated environments. A method of correcting this tilt is presented, and the expected performance improvement is quantified. PMID:18357314

  9. Scintillator-fiber charged particle track-imaging detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binns, W. R.; Israel, M. H.; Klarmann, J.

    1983-01-01

    A scintillator-fiber charged-particle track-imaging detector was developed using a bundle of square cross section plastic scintillator fiber optics, proximity focused onto an image intensified charge injection device (CID) camera. The tracks of charged particle penetrating into the scintillator fiber bundle are projected onto the CID camera and the imaging information is read out in video format. The detector was exposed to beams of 15 MeV protons and relativistic Neon, Manganese, and Gold nuclei and images of their tracks were obtained. Details of the detector technique, properties of the tracks obtained, and preliminary range measurements of 15 MeV protons stopping in the fiber bundle are presented.

  10. Cerium-doped lutetium oxyorthosilicate; A fast, efficient new scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Melcher, C.L.; Schweitzer, J.S. (Schlumberger-Doll Research Center, Ridgefield, CT (United States))

    1992-08-01

    In this paper, the authors have discovered a new single crystal inorganic scintillator, cerium-doped lutetium oxyorthosilicate (Lu[sub 2]) (1 [minus] x)Ce[sub 2x](SiO[sub 4])O or (LSO), which has a number of advantages over existing scintillators. It has a scintillation emission intensity which is [approximately] 75% of NaI(T1) with a decay time of [approximately] 40 ns. The peak emission wavelength is 420 nm. It has a very high gamma-ray detection efficiency due to its density of 7.4 g/cm[sup 3] and its effective atomic number of 66. Its radiation length of 1.14 cm is only slightly longer than BGO (1.12 cm). Due to its unique combination of high emission intensity, speed, and high density and atomic number, LSO appears to be an attractive candidate for diverse applications including medical imaging, high energy physics experiments, and geophysical exploration.

  11. The scintillating grid illusion in stereo-depth.

    PubMed

    Schrauf, M; Spillmann, L

    2000-01-01

    The dark scintillating dots occurring on a gray-on-black, modified Hermann grid [Schrauf, M., Lingelbach, B., & Wist, E. R. (1997). The scintillating grid illusion. Vision Research, 37, 1033-1038] were studied in stereo-depth by assigning various degrees of disparity to the white inducing disks. Dependent on the sign of disparity, the disks and the dark illusory spots within them appeared to lie either in the same plane, in front of, or behind the grid. At zero disparity, illusory strength was maximum and was the same for stereo, binocular and monocular viewing. With increasing disparity, the illusion became progressively weaker; however, the decrease for stereo-patterns was significantly less than for control patterns presented binocularly or monocularly. These results suggest a central contribution to the scintillation effect. PMID:10683450

  12. Hadronic Shower Development in Tile Iron-Scintillator Calorimetry

    E-print Network

    Yuri A. Kulchitsky

    1999-10-07

    The lateral and longitudinal profiles of hadronic showers detected by a prototype of the ATLAS Iron-Scintillator Tile Hadron Calorimeter have been investigated. This calorimeter uses a unique longitudinal configuration of scintillator tiles. Using a fine-grained pion beam scan at 100 GeV, a detailed picture of transverse shower behavior is obtained. The underlying radial energy densities for four depth segments and for the entire calorimeter have been reconstructed. A three-dimensional hadronic shower parametrization has been developed. The results presented here are useful for understanding the performance of iron-scintillator calorimeters, for developing fast simulations of hadronic showers, for many calorimetry problems requiring the integration of a shower energy deposition in a volume and for future calorimeter design.

  13. Hadronic Shower Development in Iron-Scintillator Tile Calorimetry

    E-print Network

    Tilecal Atlas Collaboration

    1999-04-29

    The lateral and longitudinal profiles of hadronic showers detected by a prototype of the ATLAS Iron-Scintillator Tile Hadron Calorimeter have been investigated. This calorimeter uses a unique longitudinal configuration of scintillator tiles. Using a fine-grained pion beam scan at 100 GeV, a detailed picture of transverse shower behavior is obtained. The underlying radial energy densities for four depth segments and for the entire calorimeter have been reconstructed. A three-dimensional hadronic shower parametrization has been developed. The results presented here are useful for understanding the performance of iron-scintillator calorimeters, for developing fast simulations of hadronic showers, for many calorimetry problems requiring the integration of a shower energy deposition in a volume and for future calorimeter design.

  14. Photoelectron anticorrelations and sub-Poisson statistics in scintillation detectors

    PubMed Central

    Bousselham, Abdelkader; Barrett, Harrison H.; Bora, Vaibhav; Shah, Kanai

    2010-01-01

    The performance of scintillation detectors for x rays and gamma rays is limited fundamentally by the statistics of the scintillation light and the resulting photoelectrons. This paper presents a new experimental approach to studying these statistics by observing correlations in the signals from two photodetectors. It is shown that the Fano factors (ratios of variance to mean), both for the number the photoelectrons produced on the photocathode of the photomultiplier and for the underlying number of scintillation photons, can be deduced from these correlations. For LaBr3(Ce) and 662 keV gamma rays, the photopeak signals obtained by photomultipliers on opposite faces of a thin sample are negatively correlated, and the Fano factor for the photoelectrons is significantly less than one. The inferred Fano factor for the optical photons is very small, indistinguishable from zero within experimental error. PMID:20725609

  15. Scintillating bolometers for fast neutron spectroscopy in rare events searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, M.; Coron, N.; Ginestra, C.; Gironnet, J.; Gressier, V.; Leblanc, J.; de Marcillac, P.; Redon, T.; Di Stefano, P.; Torres, L.; Veber, P.; Velazquez, M.; Viraphong, O.

    2012-07-01

    Neutrons are a relevant background in rare events physics. Detectors based on fast neutron-induced nuclear reactions are commonly used for fast neutron spectroscopy. In this subject, scintillating bolometers provide an excellent energy resolution and particle discrimination by the simultaneous measurement of the heat and emitted light. Our group has constructed several 6Li and 10B based massive scintillating bolometers (LiF, Li6Eu(BO3)3, Li6Gd(BO3)3), with energy resolutions ranging from 16 to 200 keV. First results of a 32 gr 6LiF scintillating bolometer enriched at 95% in 6Li operated at 20 mK are presented. The use of this material in a multi-target cryogenic dark matter experiment, like EURECA, would allow monitoring the incident neutron flux in the detector during the data-taking.

  16. Minimum Bias Trigger Scintillators in ATLAS Run II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidoti, A.

    2014-10-01

    The Minimum Bias Trigger Scintillators (MBTS) delivered the primary triggers for selecting events from real LHC collisions with the smallest bias for the low luminosity LHC RunI fills from 2009-2013 (proton-proton, lead-lead and lead-proton collisions). Similarly, for the next RunII of LHC (2015-2018) MBTS will provide key ingredients for the first physics measurements at larger LHC collisions energy (charge multiplicity, proton-proton cross section, rapidity gap measurements, ... ) and in general for low luminosity LHC fills. After more than 25 fb-1 of proton-proton collisions delivered during RunI, MBTS detectors have been substantially upgraded in preparation of RunII. The upgrade strategy is presented including the scintillator replacement, the modified read out scheme, the optical measurements on RunI scintillators assessing the degradation due to the dose received.

  17. Scintillation Response of Liquid Xenon to Low Energy Nuclear Recoils

    E-print Network

    E. Aprile; K. L. Giboni; P. Majewski; K. Ni; M. Yamashita; R. Hasty; A. Manzur; D. N. McKinsey

    2005-03-29

    Liquid Xenon (LXe) is expected to be an excellent target and detector medium to search for dark matter in the form of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). Knowledge of LXe ionization and scintillation response to low energy nuclear recoils expected from the scattering of WIMPs by Xe nuclei is important for determining the sensitivity of LXe direct detection experiments. Here we report on new measurements of the scintillation yield of Xe recoils with kinetic energy as low as 10 keV. The dependence of the scintillation yield on applied electric field was also measured in the range of 0 to 4 kV/cm. Results are in good agreement with recent theoretical predictions that take into account the effect of biexcitonic collisions in addition to the nuclear quenching effect.

  18. Screen optics effects on detective quantum efficiency in digital radiography: Zero-frequency effects

    SciTech Connect

    Lubinsky, A.R.; Zhao Wei; Ristic, Goran; Rowlands, J.A. [Department of Radiology, State University of New York at Stony Brook Stony Brook, New York 11794-8460 (United States); Imaging Research, Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Center Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada)

    2006-05-15

    Indirect flat panel imagers have been developed for digital radiography, fluoroscopy and mammography, and are now in clinical use. Screens made from columnar structured cesium iodide (CsI) scintillators doped with thallium have been used extensively in these detectors. The purpose of this article is to investigate the effect of screen optics, e.g., light escape efficiency versus depth, on gain fluctuation noise, expressed as the Swank factor. Our goal is to obtain results useful in optimizing screens for digital radiography systems. Experimental measurements from structured CsI samples were used to derive their screen optics properties, and the same methods can also be applied to powder screens. CsI screens, all of the same thickness but with different optical designs and manufacturing techniques, were obtained from Hamamatsu Photonics Corporation. The pulse height spectra (PHS) of the screens were measured at different x-ray energies. A theoretical model was developed for the light escape efficiency and a method for deriving light escape efficiency versus depth from experimental PHS measurements was implemented and applied to the CsI screens. The results showed that the light escape efficiency varies essentially linearly as a function of depth in the CsI samples, and that the magnitude of variation is relatively small, leading to a high Swank factor.

  19. Comparison of LuYAP, LSO, and BGO as scintillators for high resolution PET detectors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Simone Weber; Daniela Christ; Marcel Kurzeja; Ralf Engels; Guenter Kemmerling; Horst Halling

    2003-01-01

    For high resolution positron emission tomographs based on scintillation detectors a fast, dense, and bright scintillator is required. A sample of a new scintillator, Lu0.8Y0.2AlO3:Ce (LuYAP) with a density of 7.7 g\\/cm3 and a scintillation decay time of 20 and 160 ns is compared with LSO and BGO crystals of the same size to estimate the potential of the crystal

  20. Angular sensitivities of scintillator slab configurations for location of gamma ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, J. C.

    1976-01-01

    Thin flat scintillator slabs are a useful means of measuring the angular location of gamma ray fluxes of astronomical interest. A statistical estimate of position error was made of two scintillator systems suitable for gamma ray burst location from a balloon or satellite platform. A single rotating scintillator with associated flux monitor is compared with a pair of stationary orthogonal scintillators. Position error for a strong burst is of the order of a few arcmin if systematic errors are ignored.

  1. Comparative investigation of the performance of ZnO-based scintillators for use as ?-particle detectors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John S Neal; Lynn A Boatner; N. C. Giles; L. E. Halliburton; S. E. Derenzo; E. D. Bourret-Courchesne

    2006-01-01

    As part of a comprehensive investigation of the scintillation properties of zinc-oxide-based scintillators, four samples of gallium-doped zinc oxide (ZnO) powders have been characterized by means of X-ray excitation, ?-particle excitation, and temperature-dependent photoluminescence (PL). The ultimate goals of these studies are, first, to understand the scintillation mechanisms that are operative in various members of the ZnO family of scintillators,

  2. Breast cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Sirovich, B E; Sox, H C

    1999-10-01

    Randomized controlled trials involving nearly 500,000 women on two continents have confirmed the early promise that screening mammography can reduce breast cancer mortality. The observed benefits of mammographic screening, however, are not the same in all women. The mortality reduction in women over age 70 is unknown, and women aged 40 to 49 do not appear to benefit from mammographic screening to the same extent as those over age 50. The reasons for this disparity are incompletely understood, but it depends in part upon differing tumor biology and mammographic test characteristics in younger women. Even if relative survival benefits were equal for women under and over age 50, absolute reduction in risk would remain considerably lower for younger women, a disparity that would not be corrected by improved screening technology or adjustment of interscreening intervals. The authors' review of the evidence leads them to strongly support mammographic screening of women aged 50 to 69 at an interval not longer than 2 years. The authors also feel it is reasonable to screen women over age 70 who have a favorable life expectancy. They conclude, however, that the evidence does not support a blanket recommendation in favor of screening women aged 40 to 49. Instead, they advocate a well-informed conversation between physician and patient regarding the present knowledge and the risks and benefits of screening for each individual woman. Definitive answers await the results of ongoing RCTs designed to study the survival benefit conferred by screening women aged 40 to 49. Disagreement will undoubtedly persist regarding which recommendations should determine private practice and public policy. PMID:10572546

  3. Final Report on Actinide Glass Scintillators for Fast Neutron Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Bliss, Mary; Stave, Jean A.

    2012-10-01

    This is the final report of an experimental investigation of actinide glass scintillators for fast-neutron detection. It covers work performed during FY2012. This supplements a previous report, PNNL-20854 “Initial Characterization of Thorium-loaded Glasses for Fast Neutron Detection” (October 2011). The work in FY2012 was done with funding remaining from FY2011. As noted in PNNL-20854, the glasses tested prior to July 2011 were erroneously identified as scintillators. The decision was then made to start from “scratch” with a literature survey and some test melts with a non-radioactive glass composition that could later be fabricated with select actinides, most likely thorium. The normal stand-in for thorium in radioactive waste glasses is cerium in the same oxidation state. Since cerium in the 3+ state is used as the light emitter in many scintillating glasses, the next most common substitute was used: hafnium. Three hafnium glasses were melted. Two melts were colored amber and a third was clear. It barely scintillated when exposed to alpha particles. The uses and applications for a scintillating fast neutron detector are important enough that the search for such a material should not be totally abandoned. This current effort focused on actinides that have very high neutron capture energy releases but low neutron capture cross sections. This results in very long counting times and poor signal to noise when working with sealed sources. These materials are best for high flux applications and access to neutron generators or reactors would enable better test scenarios. The total energy of the neutron capture reaction is not the only factor to focus on in isotope selection. Many neutron capture reactions result in energetic gamma rays that require large volumes or high densities to detect. If the scintillator is to separate neutrons from gamma rays, the capture reactions should produce heavy particles and few gamma rays. This would improve the detection of a signal for fast neutron capture.

  4. Smaller, Lower-Power Fast-Neutron Scintillation Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Jagdish; Blaes, Brent

    2008-01-01

    Scintillation-based fast-neutron detectors that are smaller and less power-hungry than mainstream scintillation-based fast-neutron detectors are undergoing development. There are numerous applications for such detectors in monitoring fast-neutron fluxes from nuclear reactors, nuclear materials, and natural sources, both on Earth and in outer space. A particularly important terrestrial application for small, low-power, portable fast-neutron detectors lies in the requirement to scan for nuclear materials in cargo and baggage arriving at international transportation facilities. The present development of miniature, low-power scintillation-based fast-neutron detectors exploits recent advances in the fabrication of avalanche photodiodes (APDs). Basically, such a detector includes a plastic scintillator, typically between 300 and 400 m thick with very thin silver mirror coating on all its faces except the one bonded to an APD. All photons generated from scintillation are thus internally reflected and eventually directed to the APD. This design affords not only compactness but also tight optical coupling for utilization of a relatively large proportion of the scintillation light. The combination of this tight coupling and the avalanche-multiplication gain (typically between 750 and 1,000) of the APD is expected to have enough sensitivity to enable monitoring of a fast-neutron flux as small as 1,000 cm(exp -2)s(exp -1). Moreover, pulse-height analysis can be expected to provide information on the kinetic energies of incident neutrons. It has been estimated that a complete, fully developed fast-neutron detector of this type, would be characterized by linear dimensions of the order of 10 cm or less, a mass of no more than about 0.5 kg, and a power demand of no more than a few watts.

  5. Characterizing the response of miniature scintillation detectors when irradiated with proton beams

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Louis Archambault; Jerimy C Polf; Luc Beaulieu; Sam Beddar

    2008-01-01

    Designing a plastic scintillation detector for proton radiation therapy requires careful consideration. Most of the plastic scintillators should not perturb a proton beam if they are sufficiently small but may exhibit some energy dependence due to the quenching effect. In this work, we studied the factors that would affect the performance of such scintillation detectors. We performed Monte Carlo simulations

  6. On the nature of the electrojet irregularities responsible for daytime VHF scintillations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Santimay Basu; Jules Aarons; Ben B. Balsley

    1977-01-01

    The nature of electrojet irregularities responsible for daytime VHF scintillations at 41 and 140 MHz observed at Huancayo, Peru, has been examined by conducting a study of simultaneous scintillation measurements, ionograms, and 50-MHz oblique radar backscatter. It is found that the times of onset and decay of VHF scintillations correspond closely with the times of onset and decay of type

  7. New Technique for the Measurement of the Scintillation Efficiency of Nuclear Recoils

    E-print Network

    Jelena Ninkovic; Peter Christ; Godehard Angloher; Dieter Hauff; Partick Huff; Emilija Pantic; Federica Petricca; Franz Proebst; Wolfgang Seidel

    2006-04-05

    We present a new technique developed for the measurement of the scintillation efficiency of nuclear recoils in solid scintillators. Using this technique we measured the quenching of the scintillation efficiency for the various recoiling nuclei in CaWO4 crystals which are used in direct Dark Matter searches.

  8. Solar flux dependence of coherence scales in scintillation patterns produced by ESF irregularities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Engavale; K. Jeeva; K. U. Nair; A. Bhattacharyya

    2005-01-01

    The coherence scale length, defined as the 50% decorrelation scale length along the magnetic east-west direction, in the ground scintillation pattern obtained at a dip equatorial location, due to scattering of VHF radio waves by equatorial spread F (ESF) irregularities, is calculated, using amplitude scintillation data recorded by two spaced receivers. The average east-west drift of the ground scintillation pattern,

  9. The Extraction of Scintillation Statistics from Italsat 50 GHz Beacon Data using Wavelets

    E-print Network

    Baxter, Paul D.

    The Extraction of Scintillation Statistics from Italsat 50 GHz Beacon Data using Wavelets P. D a revised wavelet method of wet scintillation extraction, assessing the impact on scintillation statistics ¡ ¢ . It is usual to refer to the index § as the dilation level and the index as the translation index. COST 280

  10. Location of the position of a particle trajectory in a scintillator

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Charpak; L. Dick; L. Feuvrais

    1962-01-01

    Light pulses traveling in opposite directions in a flat scintillator are ; collected by two photomultipliers. The delay between the arrival of the two ; pulses, measured with a time-converter, gives the position of the traversal of ; the scintillator by an ionizing particle. It is found that the average ; propagation speed of the light in the scintillator is

  11. Plastic scintillators for positron emission tomography obtained by the bulk polymerization method

    E-print Network

    Kap?on, ?ukasz; Molenda, Marcin; Moskal, Pawe?; Wieczorek, Anna; Bednarski, Tomasz; Bia?as, Piotr; Czerwi?ski, Eryk; Korcyl, Grzegorz; Kowal, Jakub; Kowalski, Pawe?; Kozik, Tomasz; Krzemie?, Wojciech; Nied?wiecki, Szymon; Pa?ka, Marek; Pawlik, Monika; Raczy?ski, Lech; Rudy, Zbigniew; Salabura, Piotr; Gupta-Sharma, Neha; Silarski, Micha?; S?omski, Artur; Smyrski, Jerzy; Strzelecki, Adam; Wi?licki, Wojciech; Zieli?ski, Marcin; Zo?, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes three methods regarding the production of plastic scintillators. One method appears to be suitable for the manufacturing of plastic scintillator, revealing properties which fulfill the requirements of novel positron emission tomography scanners based on plastic scintillators. The key parameters of the manufacturing process are determined and discussed.

  12. Data-Driven Testbed for Evaluating GPS Carrier Tracking Loops in Ionospheric Scintillation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    TODD E. HUMPHREYS; MARK L. PSIAKI; BRENT M. LEDVINA; A. P. Cerruti; P. M. Kintner

    2010-01-01

    A large set of equatorial ionospheric scintillation data has been compiled, used to characterize features of severe scintillation that impact Global Positioning System phase tracking, and used to develop a scintillation testbed for evaluating tracking loops. The data-driven testbed provides researchers a tool for studying, and the receiver developers a tool for testing, the behavior of carrier tracking loops under

  13. Combined composite scintillation detector for separate measurements of fast and thermal neutrons

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nikolai Z. Galunov; Boris V. Grinyov; Natalya L. Karavaeva; Eugenia V. Martynenko; Oleg A. Tarasenko; Yaroslav V. Gerasymov; Oleg Ts. Sidletskiy

    2010-01-01

    We propose and study a new composite scintillation detector. It is the combined detector for separate detection of fast neutrons and thermal neutrons in the presence of gamma background radiation. The combined detector consists of two scintillation parts. It is the organic composite scintillator that is made from stilbene crystalline grains (grains with sizes from 2.5 to 3.0 mm) those

  14. Design of an Instrument to Measure Optical Reflectance of Scintillating Crystal Surfaces

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Martin Janecek; William W. Moses

    2008-01-01

    In order for a Monte Carlo simulation to be accurate in predicting and optimizing the light collection in scintillation detectors, the light reflectance off an internal surface within the scintillating crystal must be understood well. We present design studies for an instrument that will accurately measure the reflectance distribution within a scintillating crystal. A laser is aimed towards the center

  15. A decametric wavelength radio telescope for interplanetary scintillation observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronyn, W. M.; Shawhan, S. D.

    1975-01-01

    A phased array, electrically steerable radio telescope (with a total collecting area of 18 acres), constructed for the purpose of remotely sensing electron density irregularity structure in the solar wind, is presented. The radio telescope is able to locate, map, and track large scale features of the solar wind, such as streams and blast waves, by monitoring a large grid of natural radio sources subject to rapid intensity fluctuation (interplanetary scintillation) caused by the irregularity structure. Observations verify the performance of the array, the receiver, and the scintillation signal processing circuitry of the telescope.

  16. The weighting function for scintillation on a folded path

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, B. G.

    1984-12-01

    In the case of a spherical beam wave propagating in a weakly inhomogeneous medium which has a Kolmogorov spectrum, Dr. Ze'evi derived a weighting function for scintillation for a direct and for a folded path with respect to the position of the turbulent medium. Experiments were performed to verify Ze'evi's weighting function for a folded path for three different types of reflectors. The experimental results did not support Dr. Ze'evi's theory. We found that the scintillation weighting functions are less weighted near the detector and have an unexpected increase near the reflector. These results are discussed by using a geometric optical model of the turbulence.

  17. Development of lithium-loaded liquid scintillator for PROSPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norcini, Danielle; Prospect Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The PROSPECT experiment will use a segmented detector positioned 7-20m from the High Flux Isotope Reactor core to measure the antineutrino spectrum of uranium-235 and perform a sterile neutrino search. Such measurements require the use of liquid scintillator with the capability to distinguish prompt and delayed signals from inverse beta decay events. The characterization of light yield, pulse shape discrimination performance, and neutron capture properties of the lithium-loaded scintillator have been studied with a test detector at Yale. These results will be discussed in the context of their application to antineutrino detection with the PROSPECT experiment. on behalf of the PROSPECT collaboration.

  18. Influence of turbulence strength on temporal correlation of scintillation.

    PubMed

    Anguita, Jaime A; Cisternas, Jaime E

    2011-05-01

    Through extensive laboratory experimentation we demonstrate that the temporal frequency content of turbulence-induced scintillation strongly depends on the temperature gradient exerted at the propagation path of a collimated laser beam. We find a power law relating the turbulence strength induced by convection with the vertical temperature gradient and we show that the cutoff frequency of scintillation shows an approximately linear growth with turbulence strength, measured by angle-of-arrival fluctuations. The impact of these findings are discussed in the context of free-space optical communications. PMID:21540982

  19. Radioluminescent characteristics of the EJ 299-33 plastic scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyibule, S.; Henry, E.; Schröder, W. U.; Tõke, J.; Acosta, L.; Auditore, L.; Cardella, G.; De Filippo, E.; Francalanza, L.; Gìani, S.; Minniti, T.; Morgana, E.; Pagano, E. V.; Pirrone, S.; Politi, G.; Quattrocchi, L.; Rizzo, F.; Russotto, P.; Trifirò, A.; Trimarchi, M.

    2013-11-01

    The response of the EJ 299-33 plastic scintillator to energetic charged nuclear particles ranging from isotopes of hydrogen to isotopes of carbon has been determined over a wide energy range using a complex experimental setup and nuclear reactions induced by a 20 AMeV carbon beam on an aluminum target. A strong pulse-shape dependence of the generated light bursts on the impinging particle specie is observed, which makes this scintillator suitable, among other things, for neutron vs.?-ray identification. Fit formulas are proposed for the normalized light output as a function of particle energy for eleven isotopes of elements ranging from hydrogen to carbon.

  20. The Scintillating Optical Fiber Calorimeter Instrument Performance (SOFCAL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christl, M. J.; Benson, C. M.; Berry, F. A.; Fountain, W. F.; Gregory, J. C.; Johnson, J. S.; Munroe, R. B.; Parnell, T. A.; Takahashi, Y.; Watts, J. W.

    1999-01-01

    SOFCAL is a balloon-borne instrument designed to measure the P-He cosmic ray spectra from about 200 GeV/amu - 20 TeV/amu. SOFCAL uses a thin lead and scintillating-fiber ionization calorimeter to measure the cascades produced by cosmic rays interacting in the hybrid detector system. Above the fiber calorimeter is an emulsion chamber that provides the interaction target, primary particle identification and in-flight energy calibration for the scintillating fiber data. The energy measurement technique and its calibration are described, and the present results from the analysis of a 1 day balloon flight will be presented.

  1. Cerium-doped lutetium oxyorthosilicate: a fast, efficient new scintillator

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. L. Melcher; J. S. Schweitzer

    1992-01-01

    The authors discuss a single-crystal inorganic scintillator, cerium-doped lutetium oxyorthosilicate (Lu2(1-x)Ce2x (SiO4) or LSO). It has a scintillation emission intensity which is ~75% of NaI(Tl) with a decay time of ~40 ns. The peak emission wavelength is 420 nm. It has a very high gamma-ray detection efficiency due to its density of 7.4 g\\/cm3 and its effective atomic number of

  2. Liquid Xenon Scintillation:. Light Propagation and Detection with Avalanche Photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chepel, V.; Solovov, V. N.; Neves, F.; Lopes, M. I.; Lindote, A.; da Cunha, J. Pinto; Marques, R. Ferreira; Policarpo, A. J. P. L.

    2003-03-01

    In this paper we describe our recent results on the study of avalanche photodiodes for detection of scintillation of liquid xenon, namely measurements of very low intensity light pulses and the photodiode excess noise as a function of temperature. Some other aspects relevant to the use of liquid xenon scintillation for particle detection are also addressed. In particular, we refer our measurements of the refraction index and attenuation length of the liquid for the VUV light emitted by xenon, which were found to be 1.69±0.02 and 36.4±1.8 cm, respectively.

  3. Polystyrene-based scintillator with pulse-shape discrimination capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhmurin, P. N.; Lebedev, V. N.; Titskaya, V. D.; Adadurov, A. F.; Elyseev, D. A.; Pereymak, V. N.

    2014-10-01

    Polystyrene-based scintillators with 2-phenyl-5-(4-tert-butylephenyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazole (tert-BuPPD) or 2,5-di-(3-methylphenyl)-1,3,4 oxadiazole (m-DMePPD) are proposed for pulse-shape n/?-discrimination. These scintillators have improved mechanical properties, long operational time and high n/? discrimination parameter - figure of merit (1.49 and 1.81 in a wide energy region), so they can be used as detectors of fast neutrons in the presence of gamma radiation background.

  4. Scintillator-fiber charged-particle track-imaging detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binns, W. R.; Israel, M. H.; Klarmann, J.

    1983-01-01

    A scintillator-fiber charged-particle track-imaging detector has been developed using a bundle of square cross-section plastic scintillator fiber optics, proximity focused onto an image intensified Charge Injection Device (CID) camera. Detector to beams of 15 MeV protons and relativistic Neon, Manganese, and Gold nuclei have been exposed and images of their tracks are obtained. This paper presents details of the detector technique, properties of the tracks obtained, and range measurements of 15 MeV protons stopping in the fiber bundle.

  5. Enhancing citizen engagement in cancer screening through deliberative democracy.

    PubMed

    Rychetnik, Lucie; Carter, Stacy M; Abelson, Julia; Thornton, Hazel; Barratt, Alexandra; Entwistle, Vikki A; Mackenzie, Geraldine; Salkeld, Glenn; Glasziou, Paul

    2013-03-20

    Cancer screening is widely practiced and participation is promoted by various social, technical, and commercial drivers, but there are growing concerns about the emerging harms, risks, and costs of cancer screening. Deliberative democracy methods engage citizens in dialogue on substantial and complex problems: especially when evidence and values are important and people need time to understand and consider the relevant issues. Information derived from such deliberations can provide important guidance to cancer screening policies: citizens' values are made explicit, revealing what really matters to people and why. Policy makers can see what informed, rather than uninformed, citizens would decide on the provision of services and information on cancer screening. Caveats can be elicited to guide changes to existing policies and practices. Policies that take account of citizens' opinions through a deliberative democracy process can be considered more legitimate, justifiable, and feasible than those that don't. PMID:23378639

  6. A prototype scintillation dosimeter customized for small and dynamic megavoltage radiation fields.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Jamil; Yin, Yongbai; McKenzie, David R; Law, Susan H; Ralston, Anna; Suchowerska, Natalka

    2010-02-21

    A prototype plastic scintillation dosimeter has been developed with a small sensitive volume, rapid response and good dosimetric performance. The novelty of this design is the use of an air core light guide to transport the scintillation signal out of the primary radiation field. The significance of this innovation is that it eliminates the Cerenkov background signal that is generated in conventional optical fibres. The dosimeter performance was compared to existing commercial dosimeters in 6 MV and 18 MV photon beams and 6 MeV and 20 MeV electron beams, in both static and dynamic fields. The dosimeter was tested in small static fields and in dynamically delivered fields where the detector volume is shielded, while the stem is irradiated. The depth dose measurements for the photon beams agreed with ionization chamber measurements to within 1.6%, except in the build-up region due to positional uncertainty. For the 6 MeV and 20 MeV electron beams, the percentage depth dose measurements agreed with the ionization chamber measurements to within 3.6% and 4.5%, respectively. For field sizes of 1 cm x 1 cm and greater, the air core dosimeter readings agreed with diamond detector readings to within 1.2%. The air core dosimeter was accurate in dynamically delivered fields and had no measurable stem effect. The air core dosimeter was accurate over a range of field sizes, energies and dose rates, confirming that it is a sensitive and accurate dosimeter with high spatial resolution suitable for use in megavoltage photon and electron beams. PMID:20107251

  7. Simulation of light transport in scintillators based on 3D characterization of crystal surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Cherry, Simon R.

    2013-01-01

    In the development of positron emission tomography (PET) detectors, understanding and optimizing scintillator light collection is critical for achieving high performance, particularly when the design incorporates depth-of-interaction (DOI) encoding or time-of-flight information. Monte-Carlo simulations play an important role in guiding research in detector designs and popular software such as GATE now include models of light transport in scintillators. Although current simulation toolkits are able to provide accurate models of perfectly polished surfaces, they do not successfully predict light output for other surface finishes, for example those often used in DOI-encoding detectors. The lack of accuracy of those models mainly originates from a simplified description of rough surfaces as an ensemble of micro-facets determined by the distribution of their normal, typically a Gaussian distribution. The user can specify the standard deviation of this distribution, but this parameter does not provide a full description of the surface reflectance properties. We propose a different approach based on 3D measurements of the surface using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Polished and rough (unpolished) crystals were scanned to compute the surface reflectance properties. The angular distributions of reflectance and reflected rays were computed and stored in look-up tables (LUTs). The LUTs account for the effect of incidence angle and were integrated in a light transport model. Crystals of different sizes were simulated with and without reflector. The simulated maximum light output and the light output as a function of DOI showed very good agreement with experimental characterization of the crystals, indicating that our approach provides an accurate model of polished and rough surfaces and could be used to predict light collection in scintillators. This model is based on a true 3D representation of the surface, makes no assumption about the surface and provides insight on the optical behaviour of rough crystals that can play a critical role in optimizing the design of PET detectors. This approach is also compatible with existing simulation toolkits and next steps include the implementation in GATE. PMID:23475145

  8. Colorectal Cancer Screening

    MedlinePLUS

    ... rectum small intestine colon (large intestine) What Is Colorectal Cancer? Colorectal cancer is cancer that occurs in the ... or older, start getting screened now. Who Gets Colorectal Cancer? • Both men and women can get it. • It ...

  9. Health Screenings at School

    MedlinePLUS

    ... ability to learn. In some states these screening tests are mandated by law and may also include dental checks, scoliosis evaluations, blood pressure readings, and height and weight measurements. In school districts in which ...

  10. Screening for Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the patient’s preferences, prostate cancer risk, health, and life expectancy. Doctors should not screen for prostate cancer using ... than 69 years, or any man with a life expectancy less than 10 to 15 years. What are ...

  11. Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Screening

    MedlinePLUS

    ... available from the NCI Web site . There is no standard or routine screening test for stomach cancer. ... cancers would help you live longer than if no treatment were given, and treatments for cancer may ...

  12. Newborn screening tests

    MedlinePLUS

    ... about 40 disorders. All 50 states screen for congenital hypothyroidism , galactosemia , and phenylketonuria (PKU). In addition to the ... acid metabolism disorders Biotinidase deficiency Congenital adrenal ... fibrosis Fatty acid metabolism disorders Galactosemia Glucose- ...

  13. Endometrial Cancer Screening

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Follow-up tests may detect endometrial cancer. Transvaginal ultrasound No studies have shown that screening by transvaginal ... of the latest published information on cancer prevention, detection, genetics, treatment, supportive care, and complementary and alternative ...

  14. Screening for Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 17 PM You are here: Home Recommendations for Primary Care Practice Published Recommendations Recommendation Summary Cervical Cancer: Screening ... are one-page documents that provide guidance to primary care clinicians for using recommendations in practice. This summary ...

  15. Methods of Fabricating Scintillators with Radioisotopes for Beta Battery Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rensing, Noa M.; Squillante, Michael R.; Tieman, Timothy C.; Higgins, William; Shiriwadkar, Urmila

    2013-01-01

    Technology has been developed for a class of self-contained, long-duration power sources called beta batteries, which harvest the energy contained in the radioactive emissions from beta decay isotopes. The new battery is a significant improvement over the conventional phosphor/solar cell concept for converting this energy in three ways. First, the thin phosphor is replaced with a thick scintillator that is transparent to its own emissions. By using a scintillator sufficiently thick to completely stop all the beta particles, efficiency is greatly improved. Second, since the energy of the beta particles is absorbed in the scintillator, the semiconductor photodetector is shielded from radiation damage that presently limits the performance and lifetime of traditional phosphor converters. Finally, instead of a thin film of beta-emitting material, the isotopes are incorporated into the entire volume of the thick scintillator crystal allowing more activity to be included in the converter without self-absorption. There is no chemical difference between radioactive and stable strontium beta emitters such as Sr-90, so the beta emitter can be uniformly distributed throughout a strontium based scintillator crystal. When beta emitter material is applied as a foil or thin film to the surface of a solar cell or even to the surface of a scintillator, much of the radiation escapes due to the geometry, and some is absorbed within the layer itself, leading to inefficient harvesting of the energy. In contrast, if the emitting atoms are incorporated within the scintillator, the geometry allows for the capture and efficient conversion of the energy of particles emitted in any direction. Any gamma rays associated with secondary decays or Bremsstrahlung photons may also be absorbed within the scintillator, and converted to lower energy photons, which will in turn be captured by the photocell or photodiode. Some energy will be lost in this two-stage conversion process (high-energy particle to low-energy photons to electric current). The geometric advantage partially offsets this as well, since the absorption depth of high-energy beta radiation is much larger than the depth of a p-n junction. Thus, in a p-n junction device, much of the radiation is absorbed far away from the junction, and the electron- hole pairs are not all effectively collected. In contrast, with a transparent scintillator the radiation can be converted to light in a larger volume, and all of the light can be collected in the active region of the photodiode. Finally, the new device is more practical because it can be used at much higher power levels without unduly shortening its lifetime. While the crystal structure of scintillators is also subject to radiation damage, their performance is far more tolerant of defects than that of semiconductor junctions. This allows the scintillator- based approach to use both higher energy isotopes and larger quantities of the isotopes. It is projected that this technology has the potential to produce a radioisotope battery with up to twice the efficiency of presently used systems.

  16. COATING ALTERNATIVES GUIDE (CAGE) USER'S GUIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The guide provides instructions for using the Coating Alternatives GuidE (CAGE) software program, version 1.0. It assumes that the user is familiar with the fundamentals of operating an IBM-compatible personal computer (PC) under the Microsoft disk operating system (MS-DOS). CAGE...

  17. Ultraviolet radiation screening compounds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    CHARLES S. COCKELL; JOHN KNOWLAND

    1988-01-01

    Amongst the diversity of methods used by organisms to reduce damage caused by ultraviolet (UV) radiation, the synthesis of UV-screening compounds is almost ubiquitous. UV-screening compounds provide a passive method for the reduction of UV-induced damage and they are widely distributed across the microbial, plant and animal kingdoms. They share some common chemical features. It is likely that on early

  18. 8. DETAIL OF COMPUTER SCREEN AND CONTROL BOARDS: LEFT SCREEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. DETAIL OF COMPUTER SCREEN AND CONTROL BOARDS: LEFT SCREEN TRACKS RESIDUAL CHLORINE; INDICATES AMOUNT OF SUNLIGHT WHICH ENABLES OPERATOR TO ESTIMATE NEEDED CHLORINE; CENTER SCREEN SHOWS TURNOUT STRUCTURES; RIGHT SCREEN SHOWS INDICATORS OF ALUMINUM SULFATE TANK FARM. - F. E. Weymouth Filtration Plant, 700 North Moreno Avenue, La Verne, Los Angeles County, CA

  19. Students' Compulsion To Screen: Research on Kenneth Burke's Terministic Screens.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strasma, Kip

    Kenneth Burke suggests that language operates from ultimate motives centered around "god-terms" through terministic screens. God-terms represent the strongest terministic screens in any culture: they screen attention to selected realities while screening or deflecting away others. A model of composition can be constructed from these theoretical…

  20. Screening of solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appelbaum, J.; Chait, A.; Thompson, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    Because solar cells in a production batch are not identical, screening is performed to obtain similar cells for aggregation into arrays. A common technique for screening is based on a single operating point of the I-V characteristic of the cell, usually the maximum power point. As a result, inferior cell matching may occur at the actual operating points. Screening solar cells based on the entire I-V characteristic will inherently result in more similar cells in the array. An array consisting of more similar cells is likely to have better overall characteristics and more predictable performance. Solar cell screening methods and cell ranking are discussed. The concept of a mean cell is defined as a cell 'best' representing all the cells in the production batch. The screening and ranking of all cells are performed with respect to the mean cell. The comparative results of different screening methods are illustrated on a batch of 50 silicon cells of the Space Station Freedom.

  1. Survivorship: screening for cancer and treatment effects, version 2.2014.

    PubMed

    Denlinger, Crystal S; Ligibel, Jennifer A; Are, Madhuri; Baker, K Scott; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Dizon, Don; Friedman, Debra L; Goldman, Mindy; Jones, Lee; King, Allison; Ku, Grace H; Kvale, Elizabeth; Langbaum, Terry S; Leonardi-Warren, Kristin; McCabe, Mary S; Melisko, Michelle; Montoya, Jose G; Mooney, Kathi; Morgan, Mary Ann; Moslehi, Javid J; O'Connor, Tracey; Overholser, Linda; Paskett, Electra D; Peppercorn, Jeffrey; Raza, Muhammad; Rodriguez, M Alma; Syrjala, Karen L; Urba, Susan G; Wakabayashi, Mark T; Zee, Phyllis; McMillian, Nicole R; Freedman-Cass, Deborah A

    2014-11-01

    The NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship provide screening, evaluation, and treatment recommendations for common physical and psychosocial consequences of cancer and cancer treatment. This portion of the guidelines describes recommendations regarding screening for the effects of cancer and its treatment. The panel created a sample screening tool, specifically for use in combination with the NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship, to guide providers to topics that require more in-depth assessment. Effective screening and assessment can help providers deliver necessary and comprehensive survivorship care. PMID:25361799

  2. Fiber optic thermal/fast neutron and gamma ray scintillation detector

    DOEpatents

    Neal, John S.; Mihalczo, John T.

    2006-11-28

    A detector system that combines a .sup.6Li loaded glass fiber scintillation thermal neutron detector with a fast scintillation detector in a single layered structure. Detection of thermal and fast neutrons and ionizing electromagnetic radiation is achieved in the unified detector structure. The fast scintillator replaces the polyethelene moderator layer adjacent the .sup.6Li loaded glass fiber panel of the neutron detector and acts as the moderator for the glass fibers. Fast neutrons, x-rays and gamma rays are detected in the fast scintillator. Thermal neutrons, x-rays and gamma rays are detected in the glass fiber scintillator.

  3. Development of glass-ceramic scintillators for gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Faoite, D.; Hanlon, L.; Roberts, O.; Ulyanov, A.; McBreen, S.; Tobin, I.; Stanton, K. T.

    2015-06-01

    Scintillators synthesised as glass-ceramics have several potential benefits compared to the currently-used halide scintillators, including non-hygroscopicity, mechanical ruggedness, ease of producing customisable shapes, and the potential for low-cost synthesis. The use of these scintillators is considered for a gamma-ray telescope operating in the 0.2MeV-50MeV photon range. Inorganic scintillator compounds suitable for incorporation into glass-ceramics are assessed. In addition, several families of glass suitable for use as hosts for scintillating compounds are also reviewed.

  4. A novel epitaxially grown LSO-based thin-film scintillator for micro-imaging using hard synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Douissard, Paul Antoine; Cecilia, Angelica; Martin, Thierry; Chevalier, Valentin; Couchaud, Maurice; Baumbach, Tilo; Dupré, Klaus; Kühbacher, Markus; Rack, Alexander

    2010-09-01

    The efficiency of high-resolution pixel detectors for hard X-rays is nowadays one of the major criteria which drives the feasibility of imaging experiments and in general the performance of an experimental station for synchrotron-based microtomography and radiography. Here the luminescent screen used for the indirect detection is focused on in order to increase the detective quantum efficiency: a novel scintillator based on doped Lu(2)SiO(5) (LSO), epitaxially grown as thin film via the liquid phase epitaxy technique. It is shown that, by using adapted growth and doping parameters as well as a dedicated substrate, the scintillation behaviour of a LSO-based thin crystal together with the high stopping power of the material allows for high-performance indirect X-ray detection. In detail, the conversion efficiency, the radioluminescence spectra, the optical absorption spectra under UV/visible-light and the afterglow are investigated. A set-up to study the effect of the thin-film scintillator's temperature on its conversion efficiency is described as well. It delivers knowledge which is important when working with higher photon flux densities and the corresponding high heat load on the material. Additionally, X-ray imaging systems based on different diffraction-limited visible-light optics and CCD cameras using among others LSO-based thin film are compared. Finally, the performance of the LSO thin film is illustrated by imaging a honey bee leg, demonstrating the value of efficient high-resolution computed tomography for life sciences. PMID:20724778

  5. New rare-earth-activated phosphate glass scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, John S [ORNL] [ORNL; Boatner, Lynn A [ORNL] [ORNL; Wisniewski, Dariusz J [ORNL] [ORNL; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine [ORNL] [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    We have investigated the applicability of phosphate glasses as host systems for the formation of rare-earth-activated gamma-and x-ray scintillators. Glass scintillators have generally suffered from low light yields, usually attributed to inefficient energy transfer from the glass matrix to the luminescent center. Our research on these phosphate glasses has shown that their structural properties can be readily varied and controlled by compositional alterations. The melting and pouring temperature of ~1050oC for these phosphate glasses is significantly lower than the processing temperatures generally associated with the formation of silicate glass scintillators. The calcium-sodium phosphate glasses will tolerate relatively high cerium concentrations based on the initial melt compositions, and the light yield for gamma-ray excitation at 662 keV was determined as a function of cerium concentration up to the saturation level. The rare-earthactivated Ca-Na phosphate glass primary-component decay time was in the range of 32 to 42 nsec for various Ce concentrations with the contribution of the light output of the primary component ranging from 80 to 90%. Studies of the effects of co-doing with both Ce and Gd were also carried out in the case of the Ca-Na phosphate glass hosts. The effects of post-synthesis thermochemical treatments in a variety of atmospheres and at various processing temperatures were also investigated for the Ce-activated Ca-Na phosphate scintillators.

  6. LC-DET-2006-009 CALICE scintillator HCAL commissioning

    E-print Network

    ; to develop a calibration procedure applicable to the 8000 SiPM used to read out the AHCAL; and to testLC-DET-2006-009 CALICE scintillator HCAL commissioning experience and test beam program Nicola D suited detector component to measure their four-momentum. The goal is to reach a jet energy resolution

  7. Measurement of electron backscattering from plastic scintillator for neutron decay

    E-print Network

    Martin, Jeff

    Measurement of electron backscattering from plastic scintillator for neutron decay Michael J in the decay to obtain a measure of the asymmetry. These electrons, however, may backscatter off of the backscattered electrons with careful attention to s systematic uncertainties. The accurate measurement

  8. Gas scintillation drift chambers with wave shifter fiber readout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadoulet, Bernard; Weiss, Steven; Parsons, Ann; Lin, Robert P.; Smith, Garth

    1988-01-01

    Results for a prototype xenon gas scintillation drift chamber are presented. Its operation is discussed using two types of light detection schemes: one based on an Anger camera geometry and one based on an array of wave-shifting light fibers. The results are judged to demonstrate the instrument's potential.

  9. Gas scintillation drift chambers with wave shifter fiber readout

    SciTech Connect

    Sadoulet, B.; Weiss, S.; Parsons, A.; Lin, R.P.; Smith, G.

    1988-02-01

    The authors present results from their prototype xenon gas scintillation drift chamber. They discuss its operation with two types of light detection schemes: one based on a Anger camera geometry and one based on an array of wave shifting light fibers. The results demonstrate some of the instruments's tremendous potential.

  10. Development of nanocomposite scintillators R. E. Del Sesto

    E-print Network

    to more efficient and precise radiographical imaging methods. Modern- day x-ray or radiation detectors- tion of nuclear materials. In order to create a new class of scintillator materials that combines good nano- composites exhibit a photopeak when exposed to 137 Cs source -radiation. Background Radiation

  11. Conditioning Matrices of Liquid Scintillation Cocktails Contaminated with Tritium

    SciTech Connect

    Dianu, Magdalena [Institute for Nuclear Research (Romania)

    2005-07-15

    This paper describes a viable solidification technology to convert the liquid scintillation cocktail into a stable form which minimizes the probability to release tritium in the environment.This radioactive waste type is generated by the radio-chemical analysis lab of a CANDU nuclear power plant.

  12. Light output of Double Chooz scintillators for low energy electrons

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C Aberle; C Buck; F X Hartmann; S Schönert; S Wagner

    2011-01-01

    The energy dependent light output of liquid scintillators used in the Double Chooz experiment was measured for electrons up to 140 keV energy. A new Compton scattering coincidence apparatus was built for this purpose. A detailed study on possible systematic errors was made. We report the experimental results of our investigations and tested them for concordance with the predictions of

  13. Compensation of scintillator sensitivity loss due to irradiation damage

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Compensation of scintillator sensitivity loss due to irradiation damage François GUILLET, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette, France Irradiation damage can decrease sensitivity of imaging devices during variation is irradiation damage which indeed occurs on the camera considered in this study. This paper

  14. Bulk crystal growth of scintillator materials for gamma ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Mohan

    2008-10-01

    Within the past few years, it has been demonstrated that several new rare earth halide scintillation detector crystals such as cerium doped lanthanum bromide (LaBr3:Ce) have high output and improved energy deposit to light linearity and thus they can substantially enhance the performance of the next generation of gamma ray detectors. These detectors have a variety of applications in NASA hard x-ray and gamma ray missions, high energy physics, home land security and medical imaging applications. This cerium doped lanthanum bromide crystal has ˜1100% the light output of BGO, resulting in better energy resolution than conventional scintillators. This is equivalent to 60000 photons per MeV of deposited energy. This new series of scintillator materials promise to usher a breakthrough in the field, if sufficiently large and clear crystals of this material can be grown. These halides however are highly hygroscopic and hence pose some difficulty in growing crystals. Efforts are being made to grow this and other materials in this family of crystals and successful results have been achieved. An overview of the challenges encountered during the synthesis and melt crystal growth of these rare earth halide scintillators shall be presented.

  15. Bulk crystal growth of scintillator materials for gamma ray detectors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mohan Aggarwal

    2008-01-01

    Within the past few years, it has been demonstrated that several new rare earth halide scintillation detector crystals such as cerium doped lanthanum bromide (LaBr3:Ce) have high output and improved energy deposit to light linearity and thus they can substantially enhance the performance of the next generation of gamma ray detectors. These detectors have a variety of applications in NASA

  16. Deployment Methods for The Acoustic Scintillation Flow Meter

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rick Emmert; Jon Lomeland; Brent Belleau; Jan Buermans; Josef Lampa

    The acoustic scintillation flow meter (ASFM), also sometimes called the cross-correlation flow measurement technique, has been used to make turbine discharge measurements in over 30 different low-head intakes in the past 10 years. Design considerations relevant to field deployment include placement of transducers on installation frames, minimization of flow interference and particularly vibration, as vibration can interfere with acoustic signals

  17. On the Relationship Between Scintillation Index and Rician Fading

    Microsoft Academic Search

    PAUL D. SHAFT

    1974-01-01

    The literature dealing with communication theory contains numerous analyses of the effect of fading on communications signals, while the literature dealing with ionospheric physics contains numerous models and measurements of ionosphericinduced scintillation. This correspondence relates the two; thus, the literature of each field can be applied to the other.

  18. A Helium Gas-Scintillator Active Target for Photoreaction Measurements

    E-print Network

    Jebali, R Al; Adler, J -O; Akkurt, I; Buchanan, E; Brudvik, J; Fissum, K; Gardner, S; Hamilton, D J; Hansen, K; Isaksson, L; Livingston, K; Lundin, M; McGeorge, J C; MacGregor, I J D; MacRae, R; Middleton, D G; Reiter, A J H; Rosner, G; Schröder, B; Sjögren, J; Sokhan, D; Strandberg, B

    2015-01-01

    A multi-cell He gas-scintillator active target, designed for the measurement of photoreaction cross sections, is described. The target has four main chambers, giving an overall thickness of 0.103 $\\mathrm{g/cm^{2}}$ at an operating pressure of 2 MPa. Scintillations are read out by photomultiplier tubes and the addition of small amounts of $\\mathrm{N}_{2}$ to the He, to shift the scintillation emission from UV to visible, is discussed. First results of measurements at the MAX IV Laboratory tagged-photon facility show that the target has good timing resolution and can cope well with a high-flux photon beam. The determination of reaction cross sections from target yields relies on a Monte Carlo simulation, which considers scintillation light transport, photodisintegration processes in $^{4}\\mathrm{He}$, background photon interactions in target windows and interactions of the reaction-product particles in the gas and target container. The predictions of this simulation are compared to the measured target response...

  19. A Helium Gas-Scintillator Active Target for Photoreaction Measurements

    E-print Network

    R. Al Jebali; J. R. M. Annand; J. -O. Adler; I. Akkurt; E. Buchanan; J. Brudvik; K. Fissum; S. Gardner; D. J. Hamilton; K. Hansen; L. Isaksson; K. Livingston; M. Lundin; J. C. McGeorge; I. J. D. MacGregor; R. MacRae; D. G. Middleton; A. J. H. Reiter; G. Rosner; B. Schröder; J. Sjögren; D. Sokhan; B. Strandberg

    2015-03-18

    A multi-cell He gas-scintillator active target, designed for the measurement of photoreaction cross sections, is described. The target has four main chambers, giving an overall thickness of 0.103 $\\mathrm{g/cm^{2}}$ at an operating pressure of 2 MPa. Scintillations are read out by photomultiplier tubes and the addition of small amounts of $\\mathrm{N}_{2}$ to the He, to shift the scintillation emission from UV to visible, is discussed. First results of measurements at the MAX IV Laboratory tagged-photon facility show that the target has good timing resolution and can cope well with a high-flux photon beam. The determination of reaction cross sections from target yields relies on a Monte Carlo simulation, which considers scintillation light transport, photodisintegration processes in $^{4}\\mathrm{He}$, background photon interactions in target windows and interactions of the reaction-product particles in the gas and target container. The predictions of this simulation are compared to the measured target response.

  20. Optical fibers and avalanche photodiodes for scintillator counters

    SciTech Connect

    Borenstein, S R; Palmer, R B; Strand, R C

    1980-01-01

    Fine hodoscopes can be made of new scintillating optical fibers and one half inch end-on PMT's. An avalanche photodiode with small size and immunity to magnetic fields remains as a tempting new device to be proven as a photodetector for the fibers.

  1. Measurement of energies using a glass-scintillator ionization spectrometer.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillespie, C. R.; Huggett, R. W.

    1971-01-01

    A method is proposed for obtaining the energies of high-energy hadrons incident upon a glass-scintillator ionization spectrometer. The description of the apparatus and of its calibration with cosmic ray muons is followed by a demonstration of the processing of the data obtained.

  2. Semiconductor scintillator based on photon recycling Serge Luryi n

    E-print Network

    Luryi, Serge

    on direct-gap semiconductors, like InP or GaAs. For the exemplary case of InP the luminescence spectrumSemiconductor scintillator based on photon recycling Serge Luryi n , Arsen V. Subashiev University efficiency a b s t r a c t Direct-bandgap semiconductor with high quantum radiative efficiency can operate

  3. Restoration of turbulence profile from lunar scintillation A. Tokovinin

    E-print Network

    Tokovinin, Andrei A.

    Restoration of turbulence profile from lunar scintillation A. Tokovinin Version 2.1 January 23, 2007 [restoration.tex] 1 Introduction A robust method to evaluate quantitatively ground solar SHABAR ­ in [4]. Profile restoration is also discussed by Kaiser [2]. 2 Weighting functions 36 9

  4. Novel scintillators and silicon photomultipliers for nuclear physics and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, David

    2015-06-01

    Until comparatively recently, scintillator detectors were seen as an old-fashioned tool of nuclear physics with more attention being given to areas such as gamma-ray tracking using high-purity germanium detectors. Next-generation scintillator detectors, such as lanthanum bromide, which were developed for the demands of space science and gamma- ray telescopes, are found to have strong applicability to low energy nuclear physics. Their excellent timing resolution makes them very suitable for fast timing measurements and their much improved energy resolution compared to conventional scintillators promises to open up new avenues in nuclear physics research which were presently hard to access. Such "medium-resolution" spectroscopy has broad interest across several areas of contemporary interest such as the study of nuclear giant resonances. In addition to the connections to space science, it is striking that the demands of contemporary medical imaging have strong overlap with those of experimental nuclear physics. An example is the interest in PET-MRI combined imaging which requires putting scintillator detectors in a high magnetic field environment. This has led to strong advances in the area of silicon photomultipliers, a solid-state replacement for photomultiplier tubes, which are insensitive to magnetic fields. Broad application to nuclear physics of this technology may be foreseen.

  5. The balloon-borne electron telescope with scintillating fibers (BETS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torii, S.; Tamura, T.; Tateyama, N.; Yoshida, K.; Ouchi, Y.; Yamagami, T.; Saito, Y.; Murakami, H.; Kobayashi, T.; Komori, Y.; Kasahara, K.; Yuda, T.; Nishimura, J.

    2000-09-01

    We describe a new detector system developed for high-altitude balloon flights to observe the cosmic-ray electrons above 10 GeV. The Balloon borne Electron Telescope with Scintillating (BETS) fibers instrument is an imaging calorimeter which is capable of selecting electrons against the large background of protons. The calorimeter is composed of a sandwich of scintillating optical-fiber belts and lead plates with a combination of three plastic scintillators for shower trigger. The total thickness of lead is 40mm (~7.1r.l.) and the number of fiber belts is nine. In each belt, alternating layers are oriented in orthogonal (/x and /y) directions. Two sets of an intensified CCD camera are adopted for read-out of the scintillating fibers in the /x and /y direction, respectively. The accelerator beam tests were carried out to study the performance of detector for electrons in 1996 and for protons in 1997 at CERN-SPS. The instrument was successfully flown aboard high-altitude balloon in 1997 and 1998. It is demonstrated by the flight data that a reliable identification of the electron component has been achieved in 10-100GeV and the energy spectrum has been obtained.

  6. Advanced Large Area Plastic Scintillator Project (ALPS): Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, David V.; Reeder, Paul L.; Todd, Lindsay C.; Warren, Glen A.; McCormick, Kathleen R.; Stephens, Daniel L.; Geelhood, Bruce D.; Alzheimer, James M.; Crowell, Shannon L.; Sliger, William A.

    2008-02-05

    The advanced Large-Area Plastic Scintillator (ALPS) Project at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory investigated possible technological avenues for substantially advancing the state-of-the-art in gamma-ray detection via large-area plastic scintillators. The three predominant themes of these investigations comprised the following: * Maximizing light collection efficiency from a single large-area sheet of plastic scintillator, and optimizing hardware event trigger definition to retain detection efficiency while exploiting the power of coincidence to suppress single-PMT "dark current" background; * Utilizing anti-Compton vetoing and supplementary spectral information from a co-located secondary, or "Back" detector, to both (1) minimize Compton background in the low-energy portion of the "Front" scintillator's pulse-height spectrum, and (2) sharpen the statistical accuracy of the front detector's low-energy response prediction as impelmented in suitable energy-windowing algorithms; and * Investigating alternative materials to enhance the intrinsic gamma-ray detection efficiency of plastic-based sensors.

  7. Using Radio Transmitter to Simulate Amplitude Scintillation on Radio Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eccles, V.; Ilayian, R.

    2014-12-01

    Rapid fluctuation of radio-frequency signal phase and/or amplitude that is generated as a signal passing through the ionosphere is commonly referred to as ionospheric scintillation. Scintillation occurs as radio frequency signals pass through a field of plasma bubbles or irregularities that can lead to signal power fading, phase cycle slips, poor GPS signals and unusable information. The goal of this research is to use radio wave transmission to simulate scintillation under controlled conditions in order examine the performance of different GPS receivers and their ability to suppress the scintillation. The information gained from the VHF (Very High Frequency) transmitter would serve as a diagnostic tool to better understand the environmental conditions that are causing these irregularities. This system could then be used as a baseline design to be upgraded by NASA engineers to 1.2 GHz - 1.5 GHz for testing out the performance of different GPS receivers. The methodology of VHF testing could be translated to higher frequencies, such as CW (Continuous Wave), which could enhance our understanding of this phenomenon.

  8. Optical artefact characterization and correction in volumetric scintillation dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Daniel; Hui, Cheukkai; Archambault, Louis; Mohan, Radhe; Beddar, Sam

    2014-01-01

    The goals of this study were (1) to characterize the optical artefacts affecting measurement accuracy in a volumetric liquid scintillator detector, and (2) to develop methods to correct for these artefacts. The optical artefacts addressed were photon scattering, refraction, camera perspective, vignetting, lens distortion, the lens point spread function, stray radiation, and noise in the camera. These artefacts were evaluated by theoretical and experimental means, and specific correction strategies were developed for each artefact. The effectiveness of the correction methods was evaluated by comparing raw and corrected images of the scintillation light from proton pencil beams against validated Monte Carlo calculations. Blurring due to the lens and refraction at the scintillator tank-air interface were found to have the largest effect on the measured light distribution, and lens aberrations and vignetting were important primarily at the image edges. Photon scatter in the scintillator was not found to be a significant source of artefacts. The correction methods effectively mitigated the artefacts, increasing the average gamma analysis pass rate from 66% to 98% for gamma criteria of 2% dose difference and 2 mm distance to agreement. We conclude that optical artefacts cause clinically meaningful errors in the measured light distribution, and we have demonstrated effective strategies for correcting these optical artefacts. PMID:24321820

  9. A SCINTILLATION CHAMBER-IMAGE INTENSIFIER BEAM PROFILE DETECTOR

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. R. Waters; G. T. Reynolds; D. B. Searl; R. A. Zdanis

    1961-01-01

    A scintillation chamber was mounted on a single stage image intensifier ; which was lens coupled to an intensifier orthicon in a closed circuit television ; system. Charged particles entered the ends and travelled down the length of the ; filaments causing fiashes of light which were amplified and displayed on the ; monitor kinescope. This system was used as

  10. Operation characteristics of ionizing radiation detectors based on inorganic and plastic scintillators for nuclear physics and medical instrumentation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Globus; B. Grinyov

    1996-01-01

    Main operation characteristics of radiation detectors, using various scintillation substances, are calculated on the base of a realistic optical model of a scintillator. The calculation method takes account of a mirror-type maximum of the diffuse reflection indicatrix which is important for light collection in a scintillator. The comparison is carried out between various cases. Differing in the scintillator geometry, the

  11. Operation characteristics of ionizing radiation detectors based on inorganic and plastic scintillators for nuclear physics and medical instrumentation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Globus; B. Grinyov

    1995-01-01

    Main operation characteristics of radiation detectors, using various scintillation substances, are calculated on the base of a realistic optical model of a scintillator. The calculation method takes account of a mirror-type maximum of the diffuse reflection indicatrix which is important for light collection in a scintillator. The comparison is carried out between various cases differing in the scintillator geometry, the

  12. A comparison of TEC fluctuations and scintillations at Ascension Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, S.; Groves, K. M.; Quinn, J. M.; Doherty, P.

    1999-11-01

    With increasing reliance on space-based platforms for global navigation and communication, concerns about the impact of ionospheric scintillation on these systems have become a high priority. Recently, the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) performed amplitude scintillation measurements of L1 (1.575 MHz) signals from GPS satellites at Ascension Island (14.45° W, 7.95° S; magnetic latitude 16° S) during February-April, 1998, to compare amplitude scintillations with fluctuations of the total electron content (TEC). Ascension Island is located in the South Atlantic under the southern crest of the equatorial anomaly of F2 ionization where scintillations will be much enhanced during the upcoming solar maximum period. Ascension Island is included in the global network of the International GPS Service (IGS) and the GPS receivers in this network report the carrier to noise (C/N) ratio, the dual frequency carrier phase and pseudorange data at 30-s intervals. Such data with a sampling interval of 30 s were analyzed to determine TEC, the rate of change of TEC (ROT) and also ROTI, defined as the standard deviation of ROT. The spatial scale of ROTI, sampled at 30 s interval, will correspond to 6 km when the vector sum of the ionospheric projection of the satellite velocity and the irregularity drift orthogonal to the propagation path is of the order of 100 m/s. On the other hand, the scale-length of the amplitude scintillation index corresponds to the Fresnel dimension which is about 400 m for the GPS L1 frequency and an ionospheric height of 400 km. It is shown that, in view of the co-existence of large and small scale irregularities in equatorial irregularity structures, during the early evening hours, and small magnitude of irregularity drifts, ROTI measurements can be used to predict the presence of scintillation causing irregularities. The quantitative relationship between ROTI and S4, however, varies considerably due to variations of the ionospheric projection of the satellite velocity and the ionospheric irregularity drift. During the post-midnight period, due to the decay of small scale irregularities leading to a steepening of irregularity power spectrum, ROTI, on occasions, may not be associated with detectable levels of scintillation. In view of the power law type of irregularity power spectrum, ROTI will, in general, be larger than S4 and the ratio, ROTI/S4, in the present dataset is found to vary between 2 and 10. At high latitudes, where the ionospheric motion, driven by large electric fields of magnetospheric origin, is much enhanced during magnetically active periods, ROTI/S4 may be considerably larger than that in the equatorial region.

  13. Forecasting Ionospheric Real-time Scintillation Tool (FIRST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, D. N.; Redmon, R.; Bullett, T.; Caton, R. G.; Retterer, J. M.

    2009-05-01

    It is well-known that the generation of equatorial, F-region plasma density irregularities, via the Generalized Rayleigh-Taylor instability mechanism is critically dependent on the magnitude of the pre-reversal enhancement (PRE) in upward ExB drift velocity after sunset. These plasma density bubbles that are generated after sunset lead to the scintillation of trans-ionospheric radio wave signals that pass through these bubbles and is commonly referred to as scintillation activity. Communication and Navigation systems can be severely disrupted by these plasma density irregularities. A measure of scintillation activity is given by the S4 Index and a network of Air Force, ground-based UHF and L-band receivers measuring the S4 Index is called the SCIntillation Network Decision Aid (SCINDA) network. After sunset, the height-rise with time of the bottom- side of the F-layer reflects the magnitude of the upward ExB drift velocity. The value of the ionospheric parameter, h'F (the virtual height of the bottom-side F-layer) at 1930 LT reflects the integrated ExB drift effect on lifting the F-layer to an altitude where the Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instability mechanism becomes important. It is found that there exists a threshold in the h'F value at 1930 LT and the onset of scintillation activity as measured by the S4 Index value in the Peruvian longitude sector. This h'F threshold value is found to decrease with decreasing F10.7 cm fluxes in a linear manner (R = 0.99). T o examine this relationship, theoretically, we incorporate a suite of first-principle models of the ambient ionosphere (PBMOD) developed at the Air Force Research Lab (AFRL) to investigate R-T growth rates and threshold h'F (1930 LT) values as a function of solar cycle activity. In addition, this paper describes a technique for automatically forecasting, in real-time, the occurrence or non-occurrence of scintillation activity that relies on real-time data from a ground-based ionospheric sounder at or near the geomagnetic equator. We describe how FIRST has been developed into a real-time capability for automatically forecasting scintillation activity that is available on Google Earth to all interested parties.

  14. AMG All Music Guide

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The AMG All Music Guide website is designed to complement a line of books that provide extensive reviews of thousands of music recordings, organized by genre, such as blues, jazz, rock, and so on. This website is particularly helpful as it provides all of this material at no cost, and is relatively easy to navigate as well. Using the search box at the top of the screen visitors can look for various artists, albums, songs, styles, or labels. After returning results, visitors can browse through the material, and click on any number of available hyperlinks in order to make their way to related material, such as genre, related artists and the like. For example, if one were to search for Duke Ellington, the search would return a brief essay about his work, a complete list of his recordings (with reviews), as well as additional information, such as Billboard chart information, Grammy nominations, and artists who he influenced. The site is rounded out by a series of short essays on a plethora of musical styles, including garage rock, acoustic blues, and zydeco.

  15. Physics in Screening Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Certik, Ondrej

    In the current study, we investigated atoms in screening environments like plasmas. It is common practice to extract physical data, such as temperature and electron densities, from plasma experiments. We present results that address inherent computational difficulties that arise when the screening approach is extended to include the interaction between the atomic electrons. We show that there may arise an ambiguity in the interpretation of physical properties, such as temperature and charge density, from experimental data due to the opposing effects of electron-nucleus screening and electron-electron screening. The focus of the work, however, is on the resolution of inherent computational challenges that appear in the computation of two-particle matrix elements. Those enter already at the Hartree-Fock level. Furthermore, as examples of post Hartree-Fock calculations, we show second-order Green's function results and many body perturbation theory results of second order. A self-contained derivation of all necessary equations has been included. The accuracy of the implementation of the method is established by comparing standard unscreened results for various atoms and molecules against literature for Hartree-Fock as well as Green's function and many body perturbation theory. The main results of the thesis are presented in the chapter called Screened Results, where the behavior of several atomic systems depending on electron-electron and electron-nucleus Debye screening was studied. The computer code that we have developed has been made available for anybody to use. Finally, we present and discuss results obtained for screened interactions. We also examine thoroughly the computational details of the calculations and particular implementations of the method.

  16. H Produced Ionospheric Electron Density Irregularities Diagnosed by UHF Radio Star Scintillations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, Alfred

    HF-waves incident on an overdense (HF-frequency < penetration frequency) ionosphere are known to produce large scale electron density irregularities. It is predicted that similar irregularities are formed during underdense HF-modification. The propagation of UHF radio waves originating from radio stars will be affected by such irregularities in the ionosphere. The interest in a scintillation experiment is twofold. One may obtain information on the electron density irregularies and one may learn about the propagation of radio waves through such a perturbed medium. A thin screen (diffractive) theory is derived which allows to draw conclusions on the electron density irregularities from the intensity fluctuations measured on the ground if the phase perturbations are much less than one radian. Since radio stars suitable for scintillation measurements at UHF are very faint an antenna with a large collection area is required. The observations reported in this dissertation were performed with the 300m diameter spherical reflector of the Arecibo Observatory. Successful observations were performed at 430 MHz and at 1400 MHz. Intensity fluctuations at such high frequencies measured with a large antenna suffer severe filtering in the thin phase screen regime. The theory presented in this dissertation includes these filtering effects. Many observations agree with the predictions of that theory. Some observations indicate that refraction effects have to be included to explain the data. HF-induced electron density irregularities were only observed during overdense heating. Several attempts to detect irregularities at an observing frequency of 430 MHz during underdense heating (HF-frequencies 1.1 to 2 times penetration frequency) failed. All the measurements reported in this dissertation are therefore during overdense heating except for the measurement on the 22 September 1980 whichs shows a transition from underdense to overdense HF-modification. Attempts were made to measure electron density irregularities at an observing frequency of 2380 MHz due to overdense heating but the fluctuations were too weak to be discriminated against instrumental uncertainties. The formation time for the irregularities after the HF-power was turned on was (TURN)25 seconds. Their lifetime after the HF-power was turned off was on the order of hours. The electron density perturbations appear to exceed 1% at times. One observation on 11/12 September 1980 reveals that the density perturbation actually corresponds to a depletion.

  17. Guide to treatment technology for contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, H.; Aylward, R.

    1992-08-04

    This document is a guide for the screening of alternative treatment technologies for contaminated soils. The contents of this guide are organized into: 1. Introduction, II. Utilizing the table, III. Tables: Contamination Versus Technology, TV. Contaminant Waste Groups, and V. References. The four Contaminations Versus Technology tables are designed to identify the effectiveness and/or potential applicability of technologies to some or all compounds within specific waste groups. The tables also present limitations and special use considerations for the particular treatment technology. The phase of development of the technology is also included in the table. The phases are: Available, Innovative, and Emerging technologies. The technologies presented in this guide are organized according to the method of treatment. The four (4) treatment methods are Biological, Solidification/Stabilization, Thermal, and Chemical/Physical Treatment. There are several processing methods; some are well developed and proven, and others are in the development stage.

  18. Sensors Based on Spectroscopy of Guided Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homola, Ji?í

    The last two decades have witnessed remarkable progress in the develpment of affinity biosensors and their applications in areas such as environmental protection, biotechnology, medical diagnostics, drug screening, food safety, and security. An affinity biosensor consists of a transducer and a biological recognition element which is able to interact with a selected analyte. Various optical methods have been exploited in biosensors including fluorescence spectroscopy, interferometry (reflectometric white light interferometry, modal interferometry in optical waveguide structures), and spectroscopy of guided modes of optical waveguides. Optical biosensors based on spectroscopy of guided modes of optical waveguides - grating coupler, resonant mirror, and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) - rely on the measurement of binding-induced refractive index changes and thus are label-free technologies. This paper reviews fundamentals of optical sensors based on spectroscopy of guided modes of optical waveguides and their applications.

  19. Student Information System Screen and Website Guide Lite Version

    E-print Network

    ....................................................................................viii SSH Hints/Tips .................................................................................................ix SIS Main Menu........................................................................ 1 Name

  20. TEACHER'S GUIDE to accompany the giant-screen film

    E-print Network

    Mathis, Wayne N.

    ? 6 A Journey Unexpected Activity 1: Track the Expedition Students use latitude and longitude coordinates to track Shackleton's epic journey. 10 Ice-Cold Continent Activity 2: All About Antarctica Students learn basic information about Antarctica and compare the continent to the places where they live

  1. Assessment of drinking water radioactivity content by liquid scintillation counting: set up of high sensitivity and emergency procedures.

    PubMed

    Rusconi, R; Azzellino, A; Bellinzona, S; Forte, M; Gallini, R; Sgorbati, G

    2004-05-01

    In our institute, different procedures have been developed to measure the radioactivity content of drinking water both in normal and in emergency situations, such as those arising from accidental and terrorist events. A single radiometric technique, namely low level liquid scintillation counting (LSC), has been used. In emergency situations a gross activity screening is carried out without any sample treatment by a single and quick liquid scintillation counting. Alpha and beta activities can be measured in more than one hundred samples per day with sensitivities of a few Bq/L. Higher sensitivity gross alpha and beta, uranium and radium measurements can be performed on water samples after specific sample treatments. The sequential method proposed is designed in such a way that the same water sample can be used in all the stages, with slight modifications. This sequential procedure was applied in a survey of the Lombardia district. At first tap waters of the 13 largest towns were examined, then a more detailed monitoring was carried out in the surroundings of Milano and Lodi towns. The high sensitivity method for the determination of uranium isotopes was used to check the presence of depleted uranium in Lake Garda. Reduced equipment requirements and relative readiness of radiochemical procedures make LSC an attractive technique which can also be applied by laboratories lacking specific radiochemistry facilities and experience. PMID:15042271

  2. Comparison of Hydroacoustic and Net Estimates of Fish Guidance Efficiency of an Extended Submersible Bar Screen at John Day Dam

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gene R. Ploskey; Thomas J. Carlson

    1999-01-01

    We compared results of the hydroacoustic and netting methods of estimating guided and unguided fish passage and evaluated fish-guidance efficiency (FGE) of an extended submersible bar screen at John Day Dam on the Columbia River. Hydroacoustic counts of guided fish were significantly correlated with concurrent gatewell catches (r = 0.73; N = 39), as were hydroacoustic counts of unguided fish

  3. Score test variable screening

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Sihai Dave; Li, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Variable screening has emerged as a crucial first step in the analysis of high-throughput data, but existing procedures can be computationally cumbersome, difficult to justify theoretically, or inapplicable to certain types of analyses. Motivated by a high-dimensional censored quantile regression problem in multiple myeloma genomics, this paper makes three contributions. First, we establish a score test-based screening framework, which is widely applicable, extremely computationally efficient, and relatively simple to justify. Secondly, we propose a resampling-based procedure for selecting the number of variables to retain after screening according to the principle of reproducibility. Finally, we propose a new iterative score test screening method which is closely related to sparse regression. In simulations we apply our methods to four different regression models and show that they can outperform existing procedures. We also apply score test screening to an analysis of gene expression data from multiple myeloma patients using a censored quantile regression model to identify high-risk genes. PMID:25124197

  4. Newborn hearing screening.

    PubMed

    Stewart, D L; Pearlman, A

    1994-11-01

    Congenital deafness is a relatively common problem with an incidence of 1/300 to 1/1000. Most states have no mass screening program for hearing loss, but the state of Kentucky compiles a High Risk Registry which is a historical survey of parents relating to risk factors for hearing loss. Unfortunately this survey can miss 50% of those who have a hearing deficit. If not detected prior to discharge, there is often a delay in diagnosis of deafness which prevents early intervention. We report 2 years' experience at Kosair Children's Hospital where 1,987 infants admitted to well baby, intermediate, or intensive care nurseries were screened using the ALGO-1 screener (Natus Medical Inc, Foster City, CA) which is a modified auditory brain stem evoked response (ABR). Our screening of this population led to an 11% incidence of referral for complete audiological evaluation. There were no significant complications. Forty-eight infants were found to have nonspecified, sensorineural, or conductive hearing loss. The positive predictive value of the test was 96%. Therefore, we feel that the use of the modified ABR in the newborn is a timely, cost efficient method of screening for hearing loss and should be used for mass screening of all newborns. PMID:7806952

  5. Screening for depression.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Douglas M

    2012-01-15

    In the United States, depression affects up to 9 percent of patients and accounts for more than $43 billion in medical care costs. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends screening in adolescents and adults in clinical practices that have systems in place to ensure accurate diagnosis, effective treatment, and follow-up. It does not recommend for or against screening for depression in children seven to 11 years of age or screening for suicide risk in the general population. The Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ)-2 and PHQ-9 are commonly used and validated screening tools. The PHQ-2 has a 97 percent sensitivity and 67 percent specificity in adults, whereas the PHQ-9 has a 61 percent sensitivity and 94 percent specificity in adults. If the PHQ-2 is positive for depression, the PHQ-9 should be administered; in older adults, the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale is also an appropriate follow-up test. If these screening tests are positive for depression, further evaluation is needed to confirm that the patient's symptoms meet the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders' criteria for diagnosis. PMID:22335214

  6. Small field diode correction factors derived using an air core fibre optic scintillation dosimeter and EBT2 film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ralston, Anna; Liu, Paul; Warrener, Kirbie; McKenzie, David; Suchowerska, Natalka

    2012-05-01

    There is no commercially available real-time dosimeter that can accurately measure output factors for field sizes down to 4 mm without the use of correction factors. Silicon diode detectors are commonly used but are not dosimetrically water equivalent, resulting in energy dependence and fluence perturbation. In contrast, plastic scintillators are nearly dosimetrically water equivalent. A fibre optic dosimeter (FOD) with a 0.8 mm3 plastic scintillator coupled to an air core light guide was used to measure the output factors for Novalis/BrainLab stereotactic cones of diameter 4-30 mm and Novalis MLC fields of width 5-100 mm. The FOD data matched the output factors measured by a 0.125 cm3 Semiflex ion chamber for the MLC fields above 30 mm and those measured with the EBT2 radiochromic film for the cones and MLC fields below 30 mm. Relative detector readings were obtained with four diode types (IBA SFD, EFD, PFD, PTW 60012) for the same fields. Empirical diode correction factors were determined by taking the ratio of FOD output factors to diode relative detector readings. The diodes were found to over-respond by 3%-16% for the smallest field. There was good agreement between different diodes of the same model number.

  7. Characteristics of High-latitude and Equatorial Ionospheric Scintillation of GNSS Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Y.; Jiao, Y.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, several years of multi-constellation global navigation satellite scintillation data collected at Alaska, Peru, and Ascension Island are analyzed to characterize scintillation features observed at high latitude and equatorial locations during the current solar maximum. Recognizing that strong scintillation data are often lost due to the lack of robustness in conventional GPS receivers used for ionosphere scintillation monitoring (ISM), an autonomous event driven scintillation data collection system using software-defined raw RF sampling devices have been developed deployed at a number of strategically selected high latitude and equatorial locations since 2009. This unique scintillation data recording system is triggered by indicators computed from a continuously operating ISM receiver and the raw RF data is post processed using advanced receiver signal processing algorithms designed to minimize carrier phase cycle slips and loss of lock of signals during strong scintillations. Based on scintillation events extracted from the raw data, several statistical distributions are established to characterize the intensity, duration and occurrence frequency of scintillation. Results confirm that scintillation at low latitudes is generally more intense and longer lasting, while high-latitude scintillation is milder and usually dominated by phase fluctuations. Results also reveal the impacts of solar activity, geomagnetic activity and seasons on scintillation in different areas. Combining measurements from a co-located geo-magnetometer and corresponding global geomagnetic activities, qualitative and quantitative correlations between scintillation and both local and global geomagnetic activities have been obtained. Results show that in Alaska, the occurrence frequency and intensity of scintillation, especially phase fluctuations, have strong correlations with geomagnetic field intensity disturbances, while in equatorial stations, the correlation is not obvious.

  8. Internal anisotropy of the turbulent scintillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charnotskii, Mikhail

    2014-06-01

    We introduce a new concept of the Internal Anisotropy (IA) for the homogeneous and isotropic random fields. IA reflects the hidden structures that can exist in the samples of the random field, and are not revealed by the simplest, single and two-point statistical moments. There is presently no established theory of the IA, and no quantitative metrics of IA are available. It is understood, however, that IA cannot be present in any stationary isotropic Gaussian random field, or any single-point transformations of it. We illustrate the IA concept on a simple toy model of two-dimensional random field, and show that IA can affect the third and higher-order multipoint statistical moments. We generate samples of the random irradiance distributions for the plane wave passed through a phase screen with the quasi- Kolmogorov statistics. Visual evaluation suggests the presence of the IA in the irradiance samples. The statistical analysis reveals that the three-point third moment of irradiance exhibit the features consistent with the IA, especially in the focusing conditions. Conditional probabilities of the irradiance gradient components also proved to be sensitive to the IA. We discuss the role of the IA for optimal placement of the multiple receivers of the FSO system using the spatial diversity for fade mitigation.

  9. ScintSim1: A new Monte Carlo simulation code for transport of optical photons in 2D arrays of scintillation detectors

    PubMed Central

    Mosleh-Shirazi, Mohammad Amin; Zarrini-Monfared, Zinat; Karbasi, Sareh; Zamani, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) arrays of thick segmented scintillators are of interest as X-ray detectors for both 2D and 3D image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Their detection process involves ionizing radiation energy deposition followed by production and transport of optical photons. Only a very limited number of optical Monte Carlo simulation models exist, which has limited the number of modeling studies that have considered both stages of the detection process. We present ScintSim1, an in-house optical Monte Carlo simulation code for 2D arrays of scintillation crystals, developed in the MATLAB programming environment. The code was rewritten and revised based on an existing program for single-element detectors, with the additional capability to model 2D arrays of elements with configurable dimensions, material, etc., The code generates and follows each optical photon history through the detector element (and, in case of cross-talk, the surrounding ones) until it reaches a configurable receptor, or is attenuated. The new model was verified by testing against relevant theoretically known behaviors or quantities and the results of a validated single-element model. For both sets of comparisons, the discrepancies in the calculated quantities were all <1%. The results validate the accuracy of the new code, which is a useful tool in scintillation detector optimization. PMID:24600168

  10. Technical Note: Removing the stem effect when performing Ir-192 HDR brachytherapy in vivo dosimetry using plastic scintillation detectors: A relevant and necessary step

    SciTech Connect

    Therriault-Proulx, Francois; Beddar, Sam; Briere, Tina M.; Archambault, Louis; Beaulieu, Luc [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Unit 94, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States) and Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d'Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada); Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Unit 94, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d'Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada) and Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Ho circumflex tel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada)

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate whether or not a stem effect removal technique is necessary when performing Ir-192 HDR brachytherapy in vivo dosimetry using a scintillation detector. Methods: A red-green-blue photodiode connected to a multichannel electrometer was used to detect the light emitted from a plastic scintillation detector (PSD) during irradiation with an Ir-192 HDR brachytherapy source. Accuracy in dose measurement was compared with and without the use of stem effect removal techniques. Monochromatic and polychromatic filtration techniques were studied. An in-house template was built for accurate positioning of catheters in which the source and the PSD were inserted. Dose distribution was measured up to 5 cm from source to detector in the radial and longitudinal directions. Results: The authors found the stem effect to be particularly important when the source was close to the optical fiber guide and far from the scintillation component of the detector. It can account for up to (72{+-}3)% of the signal under clinically relevant conditions. The polychromatic filtration outperformed the monochromatic filtration as well as the absence of filtration in regard to dose measurement accuracy. Conclusions: It is necessary to implement a stem effect removal technique when building a PSD for in vivo dosimetry during Ir-192 HDR brachytherapy. The PSD that the authors have developed for this study would be suitable for such an application.

  11. Rapid, optimized interactomic screening.

    PubMed

    Hakhverdyan, Zhanna; Domanski, Michal; Hough, Loren E; Oroskar, Asha A; Oroskar, Anil R; Keegan, Sarah; Dilworth, David J; Molloy, Kelly R; Sherman, Vadim; Aitchison, John D; Fenyö, David; Chait, Brian T; Jensen, Torben Heick; Rout, Michael P; LaCava, John

    2015-06-01

    We must reliably map the interactomes of cellular macromolecular complexes in order to fully explore and understand biological systems. However, there are no methods to accurately predict how to capture a given macromolecular complex with its physiological binding partners. Here, we present a screening method that comprehensively explores the parameters affecting the stability of interactions in affinity-captured complexes, enabling the discovery of physiological binding partners in unparalleled detail. We have implemented this screen on several macromolecular complexes from a variety of organisms, revealing novel profiles for even well-studied proteins. Our approach is robust, economical and automatable, providing inroads to the rigorous, systematic dissection of cellular interactomes. PMID:25938370

  12. Herbicide Discovery and Screening

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Historically, herbicides have been discovered by randomly screening collections of chemicals for activity on target weeds. While totally empirical, this approach has been surprisingly successful and has produced essentially all commercial herbicides currently in use. More recently, agrichemical companies have adopted directed strategies using in vitro assays, compound structure/activity relationships, and profiling assays of mRNAs, proteins, and metabolites. These latter approaches, in combination with high-throughput screens, are designed to exploit recent advances in technology and take advantage of our increased understanding of biological systems.

  13. Installation Guide Table of Contents

    E-print Network

    Virginia Tech

    Installation Guide VISDA #12;Table of Contents Introduction............................................................................4 Installing the VISDA...........................................................................................................8 #12;VISDA Installation Guide Introduction This installation guide outlines the supported

  14. Integrating Men’s Health and Masculinity Theories to Explain Colorectal Cancer Screening Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Christy, Shannon M.; Mosher, Catherine E.; Rawl, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cause of cancer deaths among men in the United States. Although CRC screening has been found to reduce CRC incidence and mortality, current screening rates among men are suboptimal due to various practical and psychosocial barriers. One potential barrier to CRC screening identified in qualitative studies with men is the threat to masculinity that endoscopic screening methods pose. Indeed, beliefs about masculinity have been predictive of other preventive health behaviors among men. In this review paper, we propose a novel conceptual framework to explain men’s CRC screening behavior that integrates masculinity norms, gender role conflict, men’s health care experiences, behaviors, and beliefs, and social and background variables. This framework has the potential to guide future research on men’s CRC screening behaviors and other health behaviors and may inform gender-sensitive interventions which target masculinity beliefs to increase preventive health behaviors. PMID:23813927

  15. Dynamic Analysis and Design of Separation Screen Mechanism in a Plant of Moisturized Wastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Byung Young; Kim, Kwang Hoon; Kwak, Kwang Hoon; Kang, Gyung Ju; Hong, Chul Hyun

    In this study, theoretical super screen vibration analysis has been carried out to predict the dynamic characteristics of interactive waste particles. The vibrating screen is modeled of three assemblies such as screen, wastes guide, and supported screen. Then materials (or particles) of different size is to be separated by using the eccentric vibrator and classifying tilt plates. In processing separation mechanism, much lighter construction wastes (wood, Styrofoam, etc) and heavier materials are separated by staying time delay in a super screen. The design results, separation screen were able to know that small and larger particles are conspicuous difference each motion character according to trajectory particles, and small particles raise the probability in classifying tilt plates.

  16. PERFORMANCE DEMONSTRATIONS OF ALTERNATIVE SCREEN RECLAMATION PRODUCTS FOR SCREEN PRINTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project evaluated environmentally-preferable products for the screen reclamation process In screen printing during month-long demonstrations at 23 printing facilities nationwide. hrough the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Design for the Environment Printing Project, pr...

  17. ChemTracker 4.0 Inventory Management User Guide

    E-print Network

    ChemTracker 4.0 Inventory Management User Guide Part 2: Add Inventory, Add Templates 10 & Household Items · Barcodes · Add Inventory Templates #12;Add Inventory Required Fields © 2013 Stanford University 2 Press Add at the top of the screen to start. 10/11/2013 You will only be able to add inventory

  18. ChemTracker V1 Quick Start Guide

    E-print Network

    to the Chemical Inventory Management page: ehs.stanford.edu/chemicalinventory and click on the "Submit a Chem management of multiple inventory items at the same time. #12;Process Inventory Screen: You can move, copyChemTracker V1 Quick Start Guide Hazardous Materials Management Program 2011 #12;Get Access: Go

  19. Screens and Displays.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edstrom, Malin

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the characteristics of different computer screen technologies including the possible harmful effects on health of cathode ray tube (CRT) terminals. CRT's are compared to other technologies including liquid crystal displays, plasma displays, electroluminiscence displays, and light emitting diodes. A chart comparing the different…

  20. Instructions: Making the screen

    E-print Network

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    of the Styrofoam cup as shown below: 2) Using a straight edge, draw a ling perpendicular to the slit as shown below of a Styrofoam cup using masking tape as in the figure below: Flashlight Tape #12 the zero centimeter line with the front of the screen and the edge of the meter stick against the Styrofoam